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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02883
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-09-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02883

Full Text


Rude reception: UF deals


Windy, with showers
and thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


C I T R U- S





11R


SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


SSEC newbie Texas A& s /Bl

OUNTY -






www.chronicleonline.com -
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 33


One dead in
Beverly Hills
shooting
Two were injured and
one person died following
a shooting Saturday
afternoon.
According to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
shots were fired around
4 p.m. at a residence in
Beverly Hills. Heather
Yates, spokeswoman for
the sheriffs office, stated
the incident was domestic-
related. As a result of
gunfire in the home,
Yates stated in a news re-
lease, one person, a
white male in his sixties,
was found dead. Two oth-
ers, a white female, also
in her sixties, and a white
male in his twenties, were
injured and subsequently
airlifted to Shand's Hospi-
tal in Gainesville.
At this time, Yates
stated, detectives are in-
vestigating to determine
exactly what happened.
However, they know the
incident was isolated to
those found inside the
residence. Names are
being withheld pending
notification of next of kin.
Further information
about the shooting was
not available by press
time Saturday night.


HOMEFRONT:


Garden class
Some schools use
gardens as teaching
tools. /HomeFront
OPINION:
So as far
as we can see,
this isn't
working for
anyone other
than the
attorneys.


COMMENTARY:


Program to stay put


Federal plan excels at health dept.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO Behind-the-
scenes efforts to potentially
move a federally funded pro-
gram from the Citrus County


Health Department to private
interests have run into a major
barrier.
Simply, according to health
department officials, it can't be
done.
The health department is


guaranteed the program until
2016, and even then a
switchover is unlikely unless
the health department finds it-
self in disfavor with state and
federal agencies that oversee
the program.
"So I guess we're stuck with
the health department," Assis-
tant County Administrator


Cathy Pearson said.
Pearson, who uttered that re-
mark last week in a room full of
health advocates, said she was
not suggesting local health offi-
cials are doing a poor job with
the Federally Qualified Health
Center (FQHC) program.
Rather, she said, the county
See Page A4


When Jrandma



is a/so Miom


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Ronnie Badolato, 62, isn't looking forward to an easy retirement, but she knows her house will be full of six grate-
ful grandchildren whom she fought for 27 months to keep together and out of foster care. The dining room table
is used as a classroom for homework with grandma leading the studies. From left, Ronnie Badolato hugs Thomas
Badolato, 9, while Will Badolato, 7 1/2; Richard Royle, 14; Alan Badolato, 10; Star Royle, 11; and Samatha Royle,
13, work on their own. National Grandparents Day is celebrated every year on the first Sunday after Labor Day.

Beverly Hills family of eight share three bedrooms, lots oflove


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
e -- BEVERLY HILLS
o her six grandchildren,
Ronnie Badolato is nothing
short of amazing.
She's tough and demanding in
all the best ways. She's generous
with hugs and kisses, innovative
in her ways to find low-cost spe-
cial treats like dollar movies and
dollar bowling for her brood.
At 62, what Ronnie Badolato
lacks in energy and financial re-
sources, she makes up for in devo-
tion and tenacity
To her grandchildren, she's not
just Grandma, but mom and dad,
guardian, protector, provider and
advocate.
"In 2005, these children were all
placed in foster care in New York
for 27 months, and that whole time
I fought to get custody of all six of
them," she said from her home in
Beverly Hills.
They all arrived in Beverly Hills
in time for Christmas 2007.
They've been together as a family


Ronnie Badolato says she always gets comments about her rear-window
stickers.


ever since.
The oldest three children -
Samatha, 13; Star, 11 and Richard,
14 have the last name Royle.
The youngest -Alan, 10; Thomas,
9 and Will, 7 1/2 are named
Badolato. They all have the same


mother, who is married to Mrs.
Badolato's son, the youngest chil-
dren's father.
Badolato's brother, Ricky,
rounds out the family


Page A5


sxJ
Cathy
Pearson


Numbed


by the


numbers

Troop deaths

no longer stir

war-weary US
ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security
Writer
WASHINGTON It was
another week at war in
Afghanistan, another string
of American casualties, and
another collective shrug by a
nation weary of a faraway
conflict whose hallmark is its
grinding inconclusiveness.
After nearly 11 years,
many by now have grown
numb to the sting of losing
soldiers like Pfc. Shane W
Cantu of Corunna, Mich. He
died of shrapnel wounds in
the remoteness of eastern
Afghanistan, not far from
the getaway route that
Osama bin Laden took
when U.S. forces invaded
after Sept. 11, 2001, and
began America's longest
war.
Cantu was 10 back then.
Nearly every day the Pen-
tagon posts another formu-
laic death notice, each one
brief and unadorned, re-
vealing the barest of facts -
name, age and military unit
- but no words that might
capture the meaning of the
loss.
Cantu, who joined the
Italy-based 173rd Airborne
Brigade on Sept. 11 last
year and went to
Afghanistan last month, was
among five U.S. deaths an-
nounced this past week, as
the Democrats and Repub-
licans wrapped up back-to-
back presidential
nominating conventions.
31 a month
American troops are still
dying in Afghanistan at a
pace that doesn't often reg-
ister beyond their home-
towns. So far this year, it's
31 a month on average, or
one per day National atten-
tion is drawn, briefly, to
grim and arbitrary mile-
stones such as the 1,000th
and 2,000th war deaths. But
days, weeks and months
See Page A2


Waters week
See the winner of the
Save Our Waters Week
photo contest, and read
local thoughts about
water conservation.
/Page Cl


Annie's Mailbox ......A10
Classifieds ............ D3
Crossword ..............A10
Editorial ............. C2
Entertainment ..........B8
Horoscope ................B8
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B8
Movies ...............A10
O bituaries ................A6
Together.................A14


S I ILL|l 20 0,!I o


Environmentalist criticizes wetland mitigation for U.S. 19


Area likely to get funds

from 1-75 roadproject
JIM HUNTER
Chronicle Correspondent
The state taketh, but it can giveth, too.
Still, even in the giveth part, longtime Cit-
rus County environmental activist Ron
Miller thinks the state's system for mitigat-
ing destruction of wetlands needs to be
changed.
Miller, vice president of the Homosassa
River Alliance (HRA), is incensed the
money the state will have to put up for tak-
ing wetlands in Citrus County when it
widens U.S. 19 later this decade will go to a
project in Pasco County.
That project is the Conner Preserve, a
3,000-acre, wetland-rich preserve the
Southwest Florida Water Management Dis-


trict is restoring about 7 miles north of
Land 0' Lakes. The water district bought
the land in 2003 and has been working to re-
store the wetland functionality of the pre-
serve as both core habitat and as a link
between Starkey Wilderness Park to the
west and Cypress Creek Wellfield to the
east.
Restoring and preserving wetlands in one
place to make up for the loss in another is
called mitigation in projects that are allowed
by permit to "take" or destroy some wetlands
in their development projects. Both govern-
ment and private projects must mitigate.
The good news for Citrus County is the
state is pushing ahead an Interstate 75 ex-
pansion project in Pasco County, and the
mitigation for that project will be applied
in Citrus County, according to state highway
officials, allowing 148 acres of environmen-
tally sensitive land in Homosassa to be pre-
served and protected forever
See Page A4


Florida heads for private

wetland mitigation banking


JIM HUNTER
Chronicle Correspondent
In Florida, a state long
notorious for its annual
wetlands loss to develop-
ment, the law says if you
take wetlands in a permit-
ted development, you have
to give wetlands back in
one way or another.
Private mitigation bank-
ing is the trend of the fu-
ture in wetland mitigation,
according to officials in-
volved in environmental


mitigation, and anyone
concerned about wetland
loss in Florida should un-
derstand how it works,
they say
Mitigation banking can
be complicated, but at its
basic level, a private miti-
gation banker doing busi-
ness in this region said, "In
essence, you are trading
land."
Wade Waltimyer is in
charge of mitigation
See BANKING/Page A7


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
87
LOW
74


I --tS UI NI D :





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This undated image provided by the Department of the Army
shows Pfc. Shane W. Cantu of Corunna, Mich.


NUMBED
Continued from Page Al

pass with little focus by the
general public or its politi-
cal leaders on the individu-
als behind the statistics.
Each week at war has a
certain sameness for those
not fighting it, yet every
week brings distinct pain
and sorrow to the families
who learn their son or
daughter, brother or sister,
father or mother was killed
or wounded.
Cantu died Aug. 28, but the
Pentagon did not publicly re-
lease his name until Wednes-
day He was memorialized by
his paratrooper "sky soldier"
comrades in Italy on Thurs-
day and honored in his
hometown of Corunna,
where the high school foot-
ball coach, Mike Sullivan,
was quoted in local news re-
ports as saying the energetic
and athletic Cantu had been
"the toughest kid I've ever
coached ever known."
He would have turned 21
next month.
Larger than life
His roommate in
Afghanistan, Pfc. Cameron
Richards, 23, remembers
Cantu as a larger-than-life
figure, a guy with an infec-
tious smile who took pride
in whipping up spaghetti,
tacos and other dinners on
his portable skillet. It was a
knack he attributed to hav-
ing grown up with five sis-
ters with whom he shared
family meal duties.
"He was the type of per-
son you wanted to be around
every day," Richards said in
a telephone interview Fri-
day from the brigade's head-


quarters in Italy, where he
returned after being
wounded by shrapnel from a
hand grenade two weeks be-
fore Cantu was killed.
"When he was in the
room, you knew he was in
the room. He'd be the loud-
est one laughing," he added.
"He impacted everybody"
'Who Cares?' war
As the war drags on, it re-
mains a faraway puzzle for
many Americans. Max Boot,
a military historian and de-
fense analyst at the Council
on Foreign Relations, has
called Afghanistan the
"Who Cares?" war
"Few, it seems, do, except
for service personnel and
their families," he wrote re-
cently "It is almost as if the
war isn't happening at all."
One measure of how far
the war has receded into the
background in America is
the fact that it was not even
mentioned by Mitt Romney
in his speech last week ac-
cepting the Republican
presidential nomination.
President Barack Obama
has pledged to end the main
U.S. combat role in
Afghanistan by the end of
2014, but current plans call
for some thousands of U.S.
troops to remain long after
that to train Afghans and
hunt terrorists.
The war remains at the
forefront, naturally, for
members of the military
such as Marine Lt. Gen.
John Kelly, whose son, 2nd
Lt. Robert M. Kelly, was
killed by a roadside bomb in
southern Afghanistan in
November 2010.
"America as a whole today
is certainly not at war, not as
a country, not as a people,"
Kelly said in a speech Aug.


Associated Press
An Army carry team moves a transfer case Aug. 30 containing the remains of Pfc. Shane W. Cantu of Corunna, Mich., at
Dover Air Force Base, Del. Cantu, who, coincidentally, joined his Italy-based Army unit on Sept. 11 last year and deployed
to Afghanistan this summer, was among five U.S. deaths announced this past week. He was just 10 when al-Qaida ter-
rorists attacked on Sept. 11, 2001. American troops are still dying in Afghanistan with a regularity that does not always


register beyond their hometown
28 at the American Legion's
national convention. Kelly
is Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta's senior military
assistant.
"Only a tiny fraction of
American families fear all
day and every day a knock
at the door that will shatter
their lives," Kelly said.
More casualties
That knock came this past
week for more families, in-
cluding that of Jeremie S.
Border, a 28-year-old Army
Special Forces staff sergeant
from Mesquite, Texas. His
alma mater, McMurry Uni-
versity, said he graduated in
2006 with degrees in sociol-
ogy and communications. He
played four seasons for the
school's football team, whose
players will wear a helmet
decal bearing his uniform
number, 28, for the remain-
der of this season.
The Pentagon said Tues-
day he was killed by small
arms fire last Saturday,
along with Army Staff Sgt.
Jonathan P Schmidt, 28, of
Petersburg, Va., a graduate
of Thomas Dale High


School outside Richmond.
Schmidt was an explosive
ordnance disposal expert
assigned to a unit based at
Fort Bragg, N.C. The Fayet-
teville (N.C.) Observer re-
ported he joined the Army
in 2003 and is survived by
his wife and one son.
Marine Lance Cpl. Alec R.
Terwiske, 21, of Dubois, Ind.,
was killed in combat last
Monday in Helmand


province. He was a reservist
with a tank battalion based
at Fort Knox, Ky., but in
Afghanistan he was assigned
to a combat engineer battal-
ion. The Pentagon provided
no details about the circum-
stances of his death.
Army Spc. Kyle R. Rookey,
23, of Oswego, N.Y, died last
Sunday in Jalalabad in east-
ern Afghanistan in a non-
combat incident. As is


standard with noncombat
deaths the Pentagon offered
no other details pending an
investigation. Rookey is sur-
vived by his wife, Victoria,
and a daughter, Flora, ac-
cording to a report by CNY
Central.com in Syracuse,
which said Gov. Andrew
Cuomo ordered flags at all
state buildings fly at half-
staff Friday in Rookey's
honor.


S a(a0


t~ms
A oa


A2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012







Page A3 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Obama, Romey campaign down homestretch

SRomney stumps in Virginia, president in Florida .4fl U


Evangelist Pat Robertson, left, is seen
on stage as Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney campaigns
Saturday at the Military Aviation
Museum in Virginia Beach, Va.


Associated Press
SEMINOLE President
Barack Obama on Saturday
pronounced Republicans
"dead wrong" for calling
America a country in de-
cline, offering a rebuttal to
the "naysayers" who drew
attention to the nation's
staggering debt and anemic
job growth. Republican rival
Mitt Romney said there's
nothing wrong that a new
president can't fix.
Both clawed for advan-
tage in a post-convention
push through some of the
most closely contested
states, Obama on a Florida
bus tour, Romney rallying in


Virginia, opening the home-
stretch to the election in less
than two months.
Obama told a spirited rally
America's "basic bargain" is
at stake in the election, the
promise "if you work hard it
will pay off."
He pledged to make edu-
cation more affordable, re-
duce dependence on foreign
oil and slash deficits "with-
out sticking it to the middle
class" if his re-elected.
He reached for some
Ronald Reagan-like opti-
mism in hard times, telling
his audience much about
America is essentially right
"When our opponents say
this nation is in decline they


are dead wrong," he said.
"This is America. We still
have the best workers in the
world and the best entrepre-
neurs in the world. We've got
the best scientists and the
best researchers. We've got
the best colleges and the
best universities."
Days earlier, GOP vice
presidential candidate Paul
Ryan noted the national
debt was reported to have
passed $16 trillion on the
first day of the Democratic
convention.
"That's a country in de-
cline," Ryan said.
Unemployment remains
stubbornly high, clocking in
at 8.1 percent on Friday


Associated Press
President Barack Obama, center, places his food
order with Pedro Barrionuevo, left, and his wife
Nidia Barrionuevo, owners of West Tampa
Sandwich Shop and Restaurant, during an
unannounced stop Saturday in Tampa.


Citrus Co.

Sheriffs

Office on

Facebook

Agency finally

launched its

page recently

Special to the Chronicle
With more than 955 mil-
lion monthly users, Face-
book is
most pop-
ular social
Snetwork-
ing tools
in the
world.
Founded
Jeff Dawsy in 2004, its
sheriff of mission is
Citrus County. to "make
the world
more open and
connected."
Although Facebook ini-
tially was used primarily
as a personal social media
venue, throughout the
years government entities,
schools, businesses and
more began using the plat-
form to market their
brands and communicate
with customers. Then
public safety and law en-
forcement organizations
saw the value in providing
information online and
encouraging two-way
communication with
residents.
Now, the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office has
launched its own agency
Facebook page, which res-
idents can view at
www.facebook.com/sheriff
citrus. The page engages
residents by asking for as-
sistance, such as identify-
ing persons of interest or
finding missing persons. It
keeps users in the loop
about upcoming events,
road closures, high-profile
cases and educates users
on different aspects of the
sheriff's office.
Although the sheriff's
office has not publicized
the page until now, it has
more than 8,000 viewers
per week.
"It's really important for
us to communicate with
the citizens we serve and
Facebook is just one more
way we can do that," Sher-
iff Jeff Dawsy said. "Two-
way communication is
very valuable to us and
Facebook offers that op-
portunity in a unique
format"
Internet users can con-
nect with the sheriff's of-
fice by signing up for a
Facebook account for free
at www.facebook.com,
then visit wwwfacebook.
com/sheriffcitrus. Current
Facebook users can click
on the Facebook link from
the sheriff's office website
at www. sheriffcitrus. org.

INTERNET LINKS
www.facebook.com/
sheriffcitrus
www.sheriffcitrus.org


Bowling basics


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Key Training Center clients bowl Saturday at Manatee Lanes in Crystal River during the first day of their bowling league season.

Key Training Center clients roll into new bowling season at Manatee Lanes


VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
U To volunteer, call John and Mary Kondracki at 352-382-9202 or
Mike and Marsha Stokley at 352-621-3185.


Michael Stokley, a member of
the Kiwanis Club of Homosassa
Springs who coordinates the
league, said the league consists of
24 teams and the season lasts for
16 weeks, ending with an awards
banquet in April.
Kiwanis also is very involved in
sponsoring a Bingo league for the
Key as well as coordinating the
annual Field Day at Crystal River
High School. Members and mem-
bers' spouses volunteer as
coaches for the bowling teams.
"The Key Training Center is re-
ally big for us," Stokley said.
Rounding up her high school
volunteers, Joanne Jacobson, ad-
visor for the Key Club at Lecanto


High School, said many students
start out volunteering with the
Key's bowling league.
It eventually helps build their
passion for community service,
she said, especially when her stu-
dents see how much bowling
means to the clients.
"These clients get so excited,"
she said. "They form like a men-
toring connection. It's very
rewarding."
Sandy Maylor, administrative
assistant to the director of hous-
ing and residential services at
the Key, said 94 clients were reg-
istered to bowl Saturday It's a big
event for them.
"They love it. They absolutely


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Bob
Wilkinson gently eased back his
bowling ball before letting it rip
down the lane, sending it roaring
toward the pins.
His mom, Ruth, cheered em-
phatically from the back of the
bowling alley
"That's a good one, Bob," she
shouted.
And with another spare under
his belt, Bob Wilkinson turned to
his mom with a grin on his face
and blew softly on his thumb as if
to say his hands were hot.
Cheers, high-fives and smiles
lit up Manatee Lanes as several
clients from the Key Training
Center showed off their bowling
skills Saturday to kick off the new
season of the Kiwanis/Key Train-
ing Center bowling league.


love it," she said. "We're all about
them being out in the community"
It's her hope by the end of the
season they will be able to secure
a sponsor to create new shirts for
the clients this year
Still keeping a close eye on her
son, Ruth Wilkinson said she just
moved to Citrus County from
North Carolina, and made sure to
be close to the Key
Even though her son isn't a
client yet, she was grateful the Key
allowed her son to bowl anyway.
"And he's happy about it," she
said. "He was polishing his ball
for three days."
Stokley said there is always a
need for more volunteers. Games
are from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday
at Manatee Lanes.
To volunteer, call John and
Mary Kondracki at 352-382-9202
or Mike and Marsha Stokley at
352-621-3185.


AroundTHE COUNTY


Crystal River
Remembrance walk Sept. 11
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River, will have a 9/11 remembrance
walk from the post home, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway (State Road 44) at
11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11.
Participants will walk east from the
post to Meadowcrest, and then return to
the post.

Crystal River
Vets' week group to meet
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will meet
to plan the Citrus County's 20th annual
Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the con-
ference room of the Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
All veterans' service organizations are
welcome to send representatives to par-
ticipate. Individual veterans also welcome.


For information, call Chris Gregoriou
at 352-795-7000.

Inverness
BOCC public hearing Thursday
The Citrus County Commission will
have a public hearing at 5:01 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 13, in the commission meeting
room, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
This meeting is for the purpose of re-
viewing the tentative budget for the fis-
cal year beginning Oct. 1 and ending
Sept. 30, 2013.
Request ballot to vote by mail
Any citizen wanting to vote by mail for
the Nov. 6 general election may request a
ballot from the Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections Office by calling 352-341-
6740 or visiting at www.votecitrus.com.
Any qualified registered Citrus County
voter is entitled to a vote-by-mail ballot.
The Supervisor of Elections Office
suggests voting by mail to avoid waiting
in line at the polls on Election Day. Plus,
11 constitutional amendments are on


the ballot. Voting by mail gives residents
time to review and research the items
on the ballot.
Call the elections office for information.
CAMPAIGN TRAIL
The Citrus County Chronicle's politi-
cal forum 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at
the College of Central Florida in Lecanto.
Information: Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
Sandy Balfour, Republican for su-
perintendent of schools, and Angela
Vick, Republican for clerk of courts, will
speak at the 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
18, meeting of the Women's Political
Network of Citrus County at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804 Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto, off County
Road 491 near Beverly Hills. Informa-
tion: Jeanne McIntosh, 352-484-9975.
Winn Webb, Republican for sheriff,
has two fundraisers planned: 6 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 17, at Neon Leon's Zydeco
Steakhouse, 10350 W. Yulee Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Information: email
winn.webb@gmail.com. Also, noon to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Inverness


Women's Club, 1715 Forest Drive, Inver-
ness. Information: Rosella Hale, 746-2545.
Sandy Balfour, Republican for su-
perintendent of schools, will have a
fundraiser from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept.
21, at Skeet's Family Barbecue, 3871 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. Infor-
mation: Debbie, 352-613-6507.
Citrus County's Democratic clubs are
having a golf tournament fundraiser for
the campaign headquarters at 8 a.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 8, at El Diablo golf course. In-
formation: Lew Chandler, 352-601-7339.
The Beverly Hills Civic Association
candidates' forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Information: Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Association is
hosting a candidates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a listing of po-
litical happenings for the 2012 election
season. Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.com.
-From staff reports






A4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


PROGRAM
Continued from Page Al

should expand its services
to help even more low-
income adults and children
of poor families.
The health department
in 2009 received a two-year
FQHC grant. A five-year ex-
tension followed.
The federal program pro-
vides primary care services
for medical, mental health,
substance abuse and -
mainly for children den-
tal care.
FQHC centers receive a
higher proportion of
Medicare and Medicaid re-
imbursements to offset the
costs of treating the unin-
sured. They are not al-
lowed to turn away patients
because of inability to pay
Pearson and County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe
had visited a private, non-
profit FQHC in Hillsbor-
ough County at the request
of Mike Bays, a Lecanto in-
surance agent who is the
husband of Commissioner
Rebecca Bays.
Mike Bays, who had
sought an FQHC grant in
2006 but later withdrew the
application at the health
department's request, said
in a recent interview that
private FQHCs can more
efficiently serve patients
than public health
departments.
Thorpe and Pearson said
they are researching the
issue and are not acting on
the Bays' behalf.
Officials associated with
the FQHC program, how-
ever, said it excels with the
health department.
Inspectors with the U.S.
Department of Health and
Human Services visited
Citrus County Health De-
partment clinics twice in
the program's first two


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


years. The 2010 inspection
noted Citrus County had an
"excellent understanding
of FQHC requirements"
and found no areas of fault.
Andrew Behrman, presi-
dent and chief executive of-
ficer of the Florida
Association of Community
Health Centers Inc., said
regulators are unlikely to
consider other applications
for an FQHC program in
Citrus County.
"You have a working
FQHC right here,"
Behrman told members of
the George Dame Commu-
nity Health Center Board of
Directors last week.
"They're going to look at
this, look at a new applica-
tion and ask, 'why is there a
need for a new FQHC in
this area?"'
The Citrus County
FQHC's annual budget is
about $6.8 million. About
half the revenue comes
from Medicaid, Medicare
and other insurance. Most
of the rest is from the fed-
eral grant, and state and
county funding.
Jerri Regan, who over-
sees the health depart-
ment's FQHC program,
said 16,000 patients took
advantage of Citrus County
FQHC services last year.
About 22 percent are unin-
sured and generally pay
nothing for their medical
care.
State funding is expected
to drop by $430,000 and the
county is planning to cut its
$950,000 subsidy to
$650,000. Still, Regan said
the health department is
expanding services to rural
areas of Floral City, Her-
nando and Homosassa with
the grant-purchase of a mo-
bile medical van that
should be operational by
late December or early
January
Behrman said the Citrus
County FQHC spends $435


per patient, which he
termed "outstanding." He
said the state average
among 51 public and not-
for-profit FQHCs is $510
per patient.
While public and private,
not-for-profit FQHCs oper-
ate essentially the same,
their oversight is different.
With a private FQHC, the
board of directors contracts
with health-care providers.
The board receives grants
and pays an executive
director
Public FQHCs, such as
the health department, are
partners with the board of
directors. Both the board
and health department
would need to agree to re-
move the FQHC from the
agency, Behrman said.
Board member Theresa
Foster said there was no
reason to consider separat-
ing FQHC from the health
department
"I'm kind of curious why
we're thinking of moving
away from that," she said.
"We're in the infancy
stage."
Still, Pearson said in an
interview Citrus County
residents are being re-
ferred away from the
health department and to
the Thomas E. Langley
Medical Center, an FQHC
in Sumter County She said
that's because Citrus
County doesn't have the
necessary services to meet
their needs.
"I hope the health de-
partment can come up with
a marketing plan," she said.
"We have to market the
George Dame Center bet-
ter. We should be more ac-
tive and help expand
services. That's where I
think we need to go."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


WETLAND The state's U.S. 19 road project in
Continued from PageAl Citrus will widen the highway from
Homosassa to Crystal River.


Miller is happy about that,
but said the mitigation sys-
tem is still disconnected and
should address the damage
projects do to specific sys-
tems, not somewhere else.
The state's U.S. 19 road
project in Citrus will widen
the highway from Homosassa
to Crystal River, which will
destroy some existing wet-
lands along the highway
Construction of the widen-
ing and resurfacing project
will be in two phases. The
first, from West Green Acres
Street to Jump Court is
funded for construction and
is slated to begin in the fall of
2016, though it could start a
bit earlier, depending on cir-
cumstances. The second
stage, from Jump Court to
Fort Island Trail, is not yet
funded for construction and
is in right-of-way acquisition,
which is expected to be com-
pleted in 2015.
State law allows wetlands
to be destroyed for such
projects if they are miti-
gated, or made up for, by
restoration or even cre-
ation of other wetlands
elsewhere, usually at a bet-
ter than one-for-one gain
ratio. The idea of wetland
mitigation is to create wet-
lands that in the big picture
will replace the lost ones
and function naturally that
way forever
Miller said he under-
stands the rules of mitiga-
tion, which in the case of the
U.S. 19 project allow for the
money to be used in Pasco,
because the project is in the
same Upper Coastal Water
Basin. But he thinks it's il-
logical, environmentally un-
wise and finally unfair to
destroy wetlands for the
Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa River area and


not mitigate the effects in
that same local system. He
said both systems are in
need of restoration and will
be affected by wetland loss,
yet the mitigation money is
going somewhere else.
"I think that highly inap-
propriate," he said.
Miller complained to the
water district, which tradi-
tionally has done the mitiga-
tion projects for the Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion (DOT), that the Citrus
mitigation money was not
staying local but was going to
the Conner Preserve. He
asked water managers how
that mitigates damage to the
Homosassa and Crystal
River systems, already need-
ing help.
The answer from water
district and DOT officials
was no current mitigation/
restoration project is set up
for environmental mitiga-
tion credit in Citrus County
Miller explained the irony
of the whole thing is the Ho-
mosassa River Alliance
(HRA) in 2004 pitched to the
state the purchase of the
same undeveloped land that
will be used to satisfy the I-
75 mitigation. The Florida
Acquisition and Review
Council approved the land
for purchase, but the state
never bought it
That land near the head-


waters of the Homosassa
was called the "Homosassa
Wildlife Corridor" because it
connected other state lands
and wildlife corridors to the
north and south. Because it
has wetlands and uplands,
some parts could have been
developed, which inevitably
has an affect on the sur-
rounding wetlands, environ-
mental scientists say
Today, the property is
owned by an environmental
restoration company called
EarthBalance and is part of
what's called a "private mit-
igation bank" owned by that
company Private mitigation
banks are entities that have
acquired properties and cre-
ated or restored wetlands on
them and created conditions
for their preservation (see
accompanying story). In this
case, DOT will buy wetland
mitigation credits from
EarthBalance for the perma-
nent preservation of the Ho-
mosassa property.
DOT officials said the
EarthBalance property
credits appear to be a good
match for the 1-75 project
needs and can be used there
(environmental agencies
determine the amount of
credits). A senior represen-
tative for EarthBalance said
he had no official

See WETLAND/Page A6


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Me eBid Notices...................... D5

i Meeting Notices....................D5


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Expect show-
ers and thunderstorms at times today.


4 78 0.05 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 74
Windy with showers and
thunderstorms likely.
-- MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 70
thunderstorms.

High: 88 Low: 67
Mostly sunny and less humid

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/72
Record 96/64
Normal 91/70
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday trace
Total for the month 1.50 in.
Total for the year 51.17 in.
Normal for the year 40.61 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.91 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 54%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 5.0/12
Monday's count: 6.6
Tuesday's count: 7.5
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
9/9 SUNDAY 12:44 6:56 1:09 7:21
9/10 MONDAY 1:30 7:43 1:55 8:07
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


o*
SEPT.15 SEPT.22


0
SEPT. 29


OCT. 8


SUNSET TONIGHT 7:42 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:13A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY ...........................1:02 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ...................... 3:06 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:50 a/7:21 a 11:46 a/9:17 p
Crystal River** 10:07 a/4:43 a /6:39 p
Withlacoochee* 7:54 a/2:31 a 10:27 p/4:27 p
Homosassa*** 12:00 a/6:20 a 10:56 a/8:16 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:19 a/8:49 a 1:13 p/10:36 p
12:40 a/6:11 a 11:34 a/7:58 p
9:21 a/3:59 a 11:36 p/5:46 p
1:29 a/7:48 a 12:23 p/9:35 p


Gulf water
temperature


85
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.20 33.20 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.77 38.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.66 39.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.41 41.41 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


j- j a.... ** 0\ 90.s 99*

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L
83 61 .50 pc 72 49
74 61 pc 83 63
83 62 .05 pc 74 53
92 72 s 80 61
83 66 .04 pc 79 60
89 73 s 91 60
88 66 .43 pc 79 56
82 50 s 92 58
83 72 .11 s 82 58
95 59 ts 89 48
82 70 ts 74 57
74 60 1.17 sh 69 50
85 65 .44 pc 69 48
88 75 ts 85 67
77 62 .33 pc 74 52
90 68 1.01 pc 81 58
73 54 s 70 58
75 62 .53 s 76 52
70 60 1.78 sh 71 58
92 74 .15 pc 83 60
78 60 .64 sh 74 53
84 66 .02 pc 76 46
87 66 .03 s 88 61
79 47 .01 s 86 58
82 50 s 75 52
73 57 .45 sh 71 56
72 63 .05 pc 85 65
76 61 .40 s 77 54
83 69 .22 pc 75 54
83 71 .40 pc 78 53
87 78 s 91 64
73 59 .24 s 74 53
79 73 s 83 59
10280 ts 95 77
82 66 .10 s 83 58
77 68 pc 75 67
76 63 .43 s 78 57
78 68 .15 s 82 58
70 52 s 69 55
79 50 s 72 52
92 74 s 87 61
91 72 s 86 59
80 66 1.53 s 79 56


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 94 76 .05 s 84 67
New York City 81 70 .31 pc 77 61
Norfolk 89 75 pc 80 64
Oklahoma City 83 60 s 89 56
Omaha 86 47 s 77 52
Palm Springs 10982 ts 95 79
Philadelphia 89 68 .22 pc 78 59
Phoenix 94 78 ts 99 79
Pittsburgh 76 61 .45 pc 70 48
Portland, ME 76 66 ts 76 52
Portland, Ore 81 61 pc 69 56
Providence, R.I. 79 70 ts 76 57
Raleigh 90 69 .03 pc 81 58
Rapid City 84 47 s 87 65
Reno 96 58 pc 91 54
Rochester, NY 72 61 .20 sh 69 52
Sacramento 88 59 s 85 56
St. Louis 74 59 s 75 54
St. Ste. Marie 63 53 s 64 47
Salt Lake City 87 55 pc 93 68
San Antonio 92 77 s 92 63
San Diego 78 71 pc 79 71
San Francisco 64 56 pc 68 55
Savannah 91 75 trace ts 86 67
Seattle 77 56 c 65 56
Spokane 86 53 ts 82 51
Syracuse 78 62 .06 sh 69 49
Topeka 81 51 s 78 53
Washington 91 66 .49 pc 79 59
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Palm Springs, Calif.
LOW 25 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 81/59/s Mexico City
Athens 90/70/s Montreal
Beijing 84/64/pc Moscow
Berlin 75/60/pc Paris
Bermuda 81/79/ts Rio
Cairo 89/74/s Rome
Calgary 75/48/s Sydney
Havana 90/73/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 86/79/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 81/65/s Warsaw


72/63/c
80/60/pc
89/61/s
77/57/ts
66/52/pc
53/41/sh
83/58/s
92/65/s
84/65/s
66/48/s
87/74/sh
68/48/pc
63/48/c


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY -


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


. . .. ... .. . .J .... .. ~ ..





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRANDMA
Continued from Page Al

"I bought this house as a
summer place in 1988," Mrs.
Badolato said.
She never intended to
make Florida her perma-
nent home, but things hap-
pen. After a divorce in 1996,
she had to leave her home
in New Jersey, so she and
her two sons, both whom
she had adopted, moved to
Beverly Hills.
Her son James died in
2010 at age 34 from a heart
attack.
While in Florida, Mrs.
Badolato worked for a num-
ber of social service agen-
cies- she opened the Early
Head Start program in Cit-
rus County, worked with
Childhood Development
Services and Healthy
Families.
Meanwhile, her son had
moved to New York, where
he and his wife lost custody
of the children because of
neglect.
"What broke my heart,
they were put in separate
homes because they have
different names," she said.
"They saw each other at the
visitation center run by
Catholic Charities."
Because of her experi-
ence with and knowledge of
the services in Citrus
County and her fierce
love for her grandchildren
- Mrs. Badolato set out to
gain custody
"I wasn't about to let them
grow up separated," she
said. "Someone said to me,
'When they're 18 just tell
them you did your best,' but
that's not acceptable."
It took her more than two
years and nearly 20 trips to
New York until she was able


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 A5


She always says, 'I hate kids.
I want to eat them. If you put
them on a sandwich, you'll know
I want to bite them.' That's her
favorite saying.

Star Royle
age 13, granddaughter of Ronnie Badolato.


to convince a judge the chil-
dren would be better off all
together in Florida.
MmE
Here are some of the
"grandfacts":
According to the U.S. Cen-
sus Bureau's most recent in-
formation, in 2007,2.5 million
grandparents were sole care-
givers for their grandchil-
dren. Of those, 1.6 million
were grandmothers and
932,000 were grandfathers.
Nearly 1.5 million were
employed; almost a half-
million lived below the pov-
erty level and more than
732,000 lived with disabilities.
The median income for
"grandfamilies" in 2007 was
$33,453.
In 2010, more than 7 mil-
lion children in the U.S.
lived with a grandparent.
In 2011, of the 1,424 grand-
parents age 60 and over who
live in a household with
their grandchildren in Cit-
rus County, 500 are respon-
sible for their care more
than 35 percent.
MmE
In a small, three-bedroom
house designed for an older
retired couple, a family of
six busy, growing children,
their grandmother and a
great-uncle need to be close.
The kids sleep in three
sets of bunk beds. There's
not a lot of privacy Every-
one shares daily chores.
Weekdays start at 6 a.m.


with breakfast and getting
everyone off to school. After
school everyone does home-
work, then dinner, then
more homework. TV and
Xbox are only if homework
is done.
Everyone goes to church
Sunday The older children
sometimes go on outings
with their "Bigs" from Big
Brothers Big Sisters.
Rules are strict
"Don't lie and don't sneak,
like if you have a bad grade
you can't hide it," said 10-
year-old Alan. "You can't
blame things on other peo-
ple or make excuses."
"Be always honest," said
9-year-old Thomas.
If you tell a lie or misbe-
have at school, you have to
write an apology letter.
"If we're bad, sometimes
we have to face the wall,"
said Will, 7 1/2.
You work for what you
want. You take responsibil-
ity for your actions.
Mrs. Badolato called her-
self "old school." She read-
ily admits to mistakes she
made with her own sons.
"My boys were adopted
and I wanted them to have
every opportunity and ad-
vantage and we had the
money for things and vaca-
tions," she said. "The word
'no' was not as readily said
as it is now, and there was
an entitlement attitude. I
don't want these children to


grow up with that. I want
them to know you have to
earn, to work for things."
She said she feels like she
has a second chance, to do
things differently
"I have more experience,
more knowledge," she said.
She's less permissive,
more consistent.
"If you don't have param-
eters, you do what you want
and end up in places you
don't want to be," she said.
Still, she wishes she could
afford to do more for the
kids. Due to budget cuts, last
year she lost her job with
Healthy Families. They of-
fered her a job that would
mean being out of the area
at times, but she turned it
down. It's more important to
be there for her family, she
told them.
Thanks to local programs
such as the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Harmony in
the Streets summer camp,
Camp Caruth, the Elks club,
the kids aren't deprived.
"Things are available if
you investigate and look for
them," Mrs. Badolato said.
"Things are tight, but we're
OK. Sometimes it upsets me,
and I wish I had the energy
I had 20 years ago."
She said she worries all
the time about her health
and whether she'll be
around as she and they-
grow older.
"She puts in hard work
for us, and she wants to
know everything about us
and she takes us every-
where, that's how we know
she loves us," Thomas said.
"She plays fun games with
us," Star said.
No one goes to bed with-
out hugs and kisses.
Ronnie Badolato is not bi-
ologically related to any of
these children, but there's
no doubt they are hers.


GRANDPARENT RESOURCES
Resources available for grandparents raising
grandchildren:
* Kinship Care Educational Support Group Kids
Central sponsored group meets from 6 to 8 p.m.
Thursday at First Presbyterian Church of Crystal
River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. Visit
www.kidscentralinc.org/kinship-care-corner.
* Administration on Aging www.aoa.gov/prof/notes/
Docs/Grandpa rents_Raising_Grandchildren.pdf.
* AARP Grandparent Information Center -
www.aarp.org/families/grandparents.
* The Grandparent Rights Organization -
grandparenting rights advocacy group: www.
grandparentsrights.org.
* Grandparents Who Care for help with visitation
problems: www.grandparentswhocare.com.
* National Center for Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren improving the quality of life for
intergenerational kinship care families via education,
advocacy, and the promotion of sound legislation:
http://chhs.gsu.edu/nationalcenter.
* Social Security Benefits for Grandchildren -
providing advice on Social Security benefits:
www.ssa.gov/kids/parent5.htm.


Star smiled and said,
"She always says, 'I hate
kids. I want to eat them. If
you put them on a sandwich,
you'll know I want to bite
them.' That's her favorite
saying."


"I know she loves us,"
Alan said, "because she al-
ways makes us laugh."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Addle 'Mema'
Hackney, 98
HOMOSASSA
Addie "Mema" Hackney
of Homosassa, FL died Aug.
29, 2012 under the loving
care of her family, extended
family at Cy-
press Cove
Care Center
and HPH
Hospice.
Mrs.
Hackney
was born m.
December
21, 1913 in Addie
Greenwood, Hackney
SC, daugh-
ter of the late Henry and
Mamie (Rikard) Baker. She
was a resident of Largo, FL
for 84 years before moving
to Homosassa in 2003. She
was a member of Church of
Christ, Largo.
Mrs. Hackney was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Ray Hackney in 1958,
a son, Ray D. "Dick" Hack-
ney in 1973 and granddaugh-
ter, Kelly Allison in 2011.
Survivors include son, Tom
Hackney of Homosassa,
daughter, Gail Youngblood
of Homosassa, sister, Mar-
garet Nell McDermott of
Carrollton, TX, grandchil-
dren, Ronald Youngblood of
Williston, Jill LaFleur of
Homosassa, Pam Sanford of
New Port Richey, and John
Hackney of Logan, Utah, 10
great-grandchildren, 6
nieces and 2 nephews.
The Service of Remem-
brance for Addie will be
held 3:00 PM, Friday, Sept.
14, 2012 at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home with Pastor Carl
Hemphill officiating.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Frances
Wilson, 83
LECANTO
Frances Flagg Wilson, 83,
of Lecanto, Fla., born in
Martinsburg, WVa., was
married to James Wilson Jr.
for 64 years.
She is predeceased by a
brother, Robert Flagg, and is
survived by four brothers,
James Flagg, Raymond
Flagg, Claude Flagg and
Richard Flagg; and one sis-
ter, Julia Rockwell. Frances
had three children, Tyler
Wilson, Mary Jane Messick
and Dorothy Gregg; eight
grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren. She
loved her family, church,
gardening, sewing and golf.
A service will be at the
First Presbyterian Church
in Lecanto, Fla., at 4 p.m.
Sept 20.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Julia Kaufmann
Julia A. Kaufmann died
Friday, Sept. 7, 2012, at her
residence. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.


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Roy
Holden III, 74
CRYSTAL RIVER
Roy J. Holden III, 74, of
Crystal River, died Thurs-
day, Sept. 6, 2012, in Ocala,
Fla. He was born in Rowe,
Mass., was a
retired tool
and die
maker and
moved to
Cr ystal
River in
2009 from
St. Peters-
burg, Fla. Roy
He en- Holden III
joyed re-
storing old cars, tinkering,
fishing, working on the farm
and listening to country
music. He was a humanitar-
ian and community minded
by being a 5-gallon blood
donor to the local blood
banks. He enjoyed socializ-
ing with family and friends
over a cold beer and spend-
ing quality time with his
family, especially his grand-
children.
Funeral services are
scheduled for 3 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 10, 2012, at the
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon. Visitation is
scheduled for 1 to 3 p.m.
Monday at the funeral
home.
Survivors include his wife
of 54 years, Joyce, Crystal
River; son, Roy J. Holden IV
and wife, Robin, Crystal
River; daughter, Teresa
Holden, Topeka, Kan.; sis-
ters, Dora Thompson, Semi-
nole, Fla., and Faith (Wayne)
Holbrook, Brattleboro, Vt.;
grandsons, Henry and
Christopher Green and
Roger Radford; grand-
daughters, Elizabeth (Josh)
Hughes, Crystal (Jason)
O'Hara and Tabetha and
Tina Holden; great-grand-
daughters, Audrey Hughes,
Kimberly and Ali Holden;
and great-grandson, Joshua
Hughes.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations in the
memory of Mr. Holden to
The St. Jude Children's Hos-
pital, 262 Danny Thomas
Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Online condolences may
be offered at robertsof
dunnellon.com.
SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
free and paid obituar-
ies. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.



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CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
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Alicia Ogles, 35
CRYSTAL RIVER
Alicia Ranee Ogles, 35, of
Crystal River, Fla., lost her
battle with
cancer Aug.
24,2012. Ali-
cia was
born on
Aug. 1, 1977,
at Citrus
Memorial
hospital in
Inverness, Alicia
Fla. She Ogles
was a
mother of four MacKen-
zie, 15; MaKaylee, 14; Kaleb,
11; and Kaci, 8. Alicia lived
a hard and difficult life as a
single mother, providing for
her four babies. Her chil-
dren were her source of
love and comfort that money
couldn't buy When Alicia
found out she would not sur-
vive this final battle with
cancer, she donated her
long red hair to Locks of
Love. Alicia stated, "This
will be the only time that I
will get a chance to help
someone else with
cancer"
Alicia is survived by her
mother, Patricia Ogles Mar-
tin, of Crystal River, Fla.;
stepfather, Rodney Martin
and his wife, Dawn of Citrus
Springs, Fla.; maternal
grandfather, Leroy Ogles
and his wife Carolyn of Live
Oak, Fla.; two aunts; six un-
cles; numerous cousins; and
friends. She was preceded
in death by her grand-
mother, Gloria L. Ogles.
A memorial service for
Alicia will be at 2 p.m. Fri-
day, Sept. 14, 2012, at Heinz
Funeral Home & Cremation
in Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




Edwin
Jurewicz, 79
LECANTO
Edwin J. Jurewicz, 79, of
Lecanto, died Sunday, June
24,2012, at Hospice of Citrus
County unit of Citrus Memo-
rial hospital in Inverness.
Graveside military honors
will be at 10 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 14, 2012, at Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Strickland Funeral
Home in Crystal River as-
sisted the family with
arrangements.

m Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Buffalo Bill performer


reburied at reservation


Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -
The remains of a man who
died young while touring
the world with Buffalo Bill
were hidden for more than
a century in an unmarked
grave some 1,700 miles
from his South Dakota In-
dian reservation.
Now Albert Afraid of
Hawk is returning home.
He'll be reburied Sunday
in accordance with Lakota
tradition, thanks largely to
a curious and persistent
Connecticut history buff.
Bob Young uncovered
records of the Oglala Sioux
member's death at a Con-
necticut hospital after a
bout with food poisoning
from eating bad corn. A few
years ago, Young pieced the
details together and
reached out to Afraid of
Hawk's family members.
"It's something that
should have happened a
long time ago, but it didn't,"
said Marlis Afraid of Hawk,
54, whose father, Daniel
Afraid of Hawk, is Albert's
last living nephew. "... No-
body even questioned where
he is buried or where this
person is. It was left at that"
Afraid of Hawk began



WETLAND
Continued from PageA4

notification yet, but he had
heard rumors.
Wade Waltimyer, presi-
dent of the board for Earth-
Balance, said his company
has done some restoration
work on the property it ac-
quired, and manages it as
preserved land. Waltimyer,
who overseas mitigation
banking for the company,
said when the state buys its
credits, the land will be as-
sured of being preserved
forever He said no matter
who may own it in the fu-
ture, the deed restrictions
will forever require it to
remain as it is, and trust
funds will support its man-
agement to that end.
Waltimyer said a water
district survey has re-
vealed a spring on the
property that was not on
the map or known to water
managers, which gives the
property even more value
for wetland preservation.
EarthBalance describes


traveling with Buffalo Bill's
world-famous troupe known
as the Congress of Rough
Riders of the World two
years before he died at age
20. He was among a rotating
cast that helped educate
and entertain thousands of
spectators eager to hear
firsthand accounts of life on
the unruly terrain.
Last month, Marlis Afraid
of Hawk, Daniel Afraid of
Hawk and other relatives
traveled to Connecticut
from their homes on the
Cheyenne River Reserva-
tion in South Dakota to wit-
ness the disinterment of
Albert's remains.
Young, president of a mu-
seum in Danbury, Conn.,
had identified the location
of Afraid of Hawk's grave at
a cemetery there.
'At the start it was just an-
other research project, but
each piece I came up with
got me more interested,"
said Young, who was work-
ing at the cemetery at the
time of the discovery
Nicholas Bellantoni, the
state archeologist for Con-
necticut, knew the coffin
would have long disinte-
grated, and he prepared
the family for the possibil-
ity the acidic Connecticut


itself as an ecosystem
restoration and Southeast-
ern environmental consult-
ing company based in
Florida with teams of envi-
ronmental scientists and
technicians expert in de-
signing, constructing,
restoring and managing
upland and wetland
habitats.
Waltimyer said getting
into the mitigation banking
business was a natural step
for such a company, though
the Homosassa property is
one of its first forays into
private mitigation banking.

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soil had left little behind.
Bellantoni and a team of
excavators gently dug a
couple of feet into the
ground with a backhoe. At
about 4 1/2 feet, they began
getting hits on a metal de-
tector, signaling they were
getting closer to nails that
had been in the coffin.
He was born in 1879, the
third of seven children be-
longing to Emil Afraid of
Hawk and his wife, White
Mountain. His brother
Richard was among the
survivors of the Wounded
Knee Massacre in 1890.
Afraid of Hawk joined Buf-
falo Bill's Wild West show
in 1898 with a childhood
friend from the Oglala
Sioux Tribe, and he appar-
ently sent money back to
family members living on
the Pine Ridge reservation.


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A6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BANKING
Continued from Page Al

banking for EarthBalance,
an environmental restora-
tion company from North
Port. EarthBalance has a
mitigation bank in Ho-
mosassa, resulting from the
148 acres the company owns
near the Homosassa River
headwaters.
Here's how mitigation
works: a permitted develop-
ment destroys some wet-
land. The state and federal
environmental agencies
allow this, while requiring
the development to replace
the wetlands at least at the
same ratio, if not higher.
The developer could be the
state conducting a road
project or a company in a
commercial enterprise such
as a big store or residential
subdivision.
When this mitigation was
first required by the state,
environmental restoration
agents for the developers
tried to create new wetlands
adjacent or near the site of
the lost wetlands. If it wasn't
already a natural system
supporting wetlands, how-
ever, the results were poor
or even disastrous.
Off-site creation was
found to have better success
when the environment used
naturally supported wet-
lands. Even better was
restoring what had once
been wetlands or what was
damaged wetlands.
Pure stretches of wet-
lands are unlikely to be per-
mitted for development in
this state, but Florida is full
of wetland systems that nat-
urally have a lot of uplands
adjacent and around them
that can be developed. Wet-
lands within and next to de-
veloped land often fare
badly, even losing their
functionality as wetlands.
So regulatory officials
also began to buy property
in danger of being devel-
oped property that had
wetlands and uplands -
and then deed restricting
the land to keep it from
being developed. Then the
land had a value as ex-
change for lost wetlands
and was a valuable way to
get "credit" for wetlands lost
to development.


Depending on the project,
created/restored/preserved
acres can be worth up to
$100,000. Waltimyer said it
generally takes 3 to 5 acres
of a project to make a credit,
but the ration of wetland is
critical.
"You can't just preserve
anything," he said.
But whether mitigation is
done by creation, restora-
tion or preservation, devel-
opers have chronically
complained the planning,
design, engineering, permit-
ting, construction and mon-
itoring required in
mitigation was overly bur-
densome and expensive.
Until now, while the de-
velopers hired private com-
panies like EarthBalance to
take care of mitigation re-
quirements, the water dis-
tricts also put together
restoration projects with
the resultant credits that the
developer paid for and got
credit for. DOT, for example,
routinely went to the state's
water districts for off-setting
wetland credits in road
construction.
Today, the process has
evolved to where private en-
tities are allowed to "bank"
projects up front before any
development needs them.
In a wetland mitigation
bank today, a private com-
pany or consortium can cre-
ate though in recent
times it's more often restore
and preserve wetlands
and thereby produce miti-
gation credits in its bank.
It must do so under the
permit approval of environ-
mental agencies that also
score projects and then de-
termine the amount of cred-
its created. The banks have
to put up a bond that after
a number of years, when the
agencies determine the
project a success can be
converted into a trust to pro-
vide funds for restoration
and management in perpe-
tuity. Deed restrictions are
required to prohibit the de-
velopment of the land for-
ever, no matter who owns it.
This has resulted in a
growing number of privately
owned mitigation banks,
and a proliferation of them
is expected in the coming
years.
Waltimyer and spokesper-
sons for the Southwest
Florida Water Management


District and the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion said private mitigation
banking works well for a
number of reasons.
They said it saves devel-
opers time and money due
to costly delays in permit-
ting. It settles the replace-
ment of the lost wetlands up
front with environmental
work and preservation that
has already been accom-
plished successfully and
guaranteed to state and fed-
eral standards.
An obvious question is
whether private mitigation
bank can make a profit Yes,
depending on their costs for
projects and the value of
credits they are awarded.
But in the long run, every-
one wins under the system
because regulated restora-
tion and preservation works
and is encouraged and even
rewarded, said Veronica
Craw, an environmental
manager for the water
district.
Developers don't get
snarled in environmental
permitting problems and
can plan and conduct a proj-
ect better and more effi-
ciently Wetlands are
replaced, often at a better
ratio than lost and the risk
of them failing as a wetland
environment is less likely
Finally, the net loss of wet-
lands in the state is man-
aged better, officials said.
Craw said private mitiga-
tion banking will be the
wave of the future in wet-
land mitigation not only be-
cause the system works
better, but because the state
Legislature perceives it that
way and has in fact man-
dated the mitigation go to
private banking.
So the water district will
back out of the wetland mit-
igation as a creator of cred-
its, for example for DOT, she
said, and private entities
will begin fulfilling that
need. The U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers also has said
its first preference will be
private mitigation banking.
One weakness is the miti-
gation probably won't be in
the specific water system
losing wetlands. Citrus envi-
ronmentalists Ron Miller,
for example, said mitigation
ought to be done in the same
system. He doesn't buy the
big picture argument. If Ho-


mosassa wetlands are lost,
he said, some kind of
restoration work should be
done in relation to that river
system.
Another weakness could
be political interference or
manipulation with the agen-
cies setting the standards
for the private mitigation
projects and scoring the


amount of credit the banks
get for projects. In one con-
troversial case, a North
Florida bank disagreed
with the credits it was being
allowed by DEP and hired a
top state lobbyist to inter-
cede with the agency after
unsuccessfully challenging
the law.
One DEP official who op-


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 A7

posed the bank's demands
was suspended in the con-
troversy, though later
reinstated.
At stake can be millions,
and if too many credits are
allowed by regulators, then
there is in essence, a net
loss of wetlands, which mit-
igation laws were supposed
to stop.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ria" Teenage suicide bomber kills six


Associated Press
Indian Hindu Kanwarias,
worshippers of Hindu God
Shiva, carry metal
canisters filled with holy
water from the Ganges
River on Saturday as they
walk toward Padilla
Mahadev temple, on the
outskirts of Allahabad,
India. Kanwarias are
devotees performing a
ritual pilgrimage in which
they walk the roads of
India, clad in saffron and
carrying ornately decorated
canisters of the sacred
water of the Ganges River
over their shoulders to take
it back to Hindu temples in
their hometowns.


Storm Leslie nears
Bermuda
HAMILTON, Bermuda -
Tropical Storm Leslie moved
slowly northward Saturday
after pausing to spin in place
over the Atlantic, and fore-
casters expected it would re-
gain strength and become a
hurricane before passing to
the east of Bermuda.
The latest forecasts pointed
to the storm going by about
200 miles east-southeast of
the British territory Sunday af-
ternoon or evening as a Cate-
gory 1 hurricane, the Bermuda
Weather Service said.
"It appears that Bermuda
will be spared a direct im-
pact," Wayne Perinchief, the
national security minister,
said Friday. "However, I urge
the public to remain cautious
as there is the potential for
the storm to re-intensify and
change track, and we could
experience heavy rain and
winds in shower bands."

Truce


Taliban claim

responsibility for

Afghan attack

Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan A
teenage suicide bomber
blew himself up outside
NATO headquarters in the
Afghan capital Saturday,
killing at least six civilians
in a strike that targeted the
heart of the U.S.-led mili-
tary operation in the coun-
try, officials said.
The Taliban claimed re-
sponsibility for the blast,
which was the latest in a se-
ries of insurgent attacks in
the heavily fortified Afghan


capital aimed at undercut-
ting a months-long campaign
by the U.S.-led coalition to
shore up security in Kabul
before a significant with-
drawal of combat troops lim-
its American options.
While bombings and
shootings elsewhere in
Afghanistan often receive
relatively little attention, at-
tacks in the capital score
propaganda points for the
insurgents by throwing
doubt on the government's
ability to provide security
even the seat of its power.
Attacks also aim to under-
mine coalition claims of im-
proving security ahead of
the planned withdrawal of
foreign troops by the end of
2014.
The bomber struck just
before noon Saturday out-


side the headquarters of the
U.S.-led NATO coalition, on
a street that connects the al-
liance headquarters to the
nearby U.S. and Italian em-
bassies, a large U.S. military
base and the Afghan De-
fense Ministry
The alliance and police
said all of the dead were
Afghans, and the Ministry of
Interior said some were
street children. Kabul po-
lice said in a statement the
bomber was 14 years old.
The Taliban claimed re-
sponsibility for the attack,
saying the target was a U.S.
intelligence facility nearby
German Brig. Gen. Gunter
Katz, the spokesman for the
U.S.-led international mili-
tary alliance, said there
were no coalition
casualties.


Associated Press
French soldiers, who are part of the NATO forces, investigate
the scene of a suicide attack Saturday in Kabul, Afghanistan.
A suicide bomber blew himself up near NATO headquarters in
the Afghan capital Saturday, killing at least six people, police
said.


No room for refugees


Associated Press
Fatimah Abdullah, 29, who fled her home in Marea, Syria, 15 days ago due to Syrian government shelling, sits
Sept. 7 next to her 4-day-old twins Ahmad and Bayan, who were born in a Turkish hospital and brought back with
her to the border where they take refuge at the Bab AI-Salameh border crossing, in hopes of entering one of the
refugee camps in Turkey, near the Syrian town of Azaz.

Twins born in Turkey but returned to Syrian border


Associated Press
An inmate belonging to the
M-18 gang stands inside
the prison July 22 in Quezal-
tepeque, El Salvador. Six
months after El Salvador
brokered an historic truce
between two rival gangs to
curb the nation's daunting
homicide rate, officials are
split over whether the truce
actually works.


China steps up
rescue efforts
BEIJING Rescue work-
ers cleared roads Saturday
so they could search for sur-
vivors and rush aid to a re-
mote mountainous area of
southwestern China after twin
earthquakes killed at least 80
people.
More than 200,000 vil-
lagers were evacuated after
Friday's quakes toppled thou-
sands of homes and sent
boulders cascading across
roads in a region of small
farms and mines near the
border between Guizhou and
Yunnan provinces, where
some of China's poorest peo-
ple live.
The official Xinhua News
Agency quoted local officials
as saying the death toll could
climb further because the
quakes seriously damaged
roads and communications,
making it difficult to collect
information.
The damage also slowed
rescue efforts.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
BAB AL-SALAMEH, Syria -
Pregnant with twins, Fatima Ab-
dallah survived shelling, hid under
relatives' beds and went without
food during a treacherous weeks-
long trip across the Syrian border.
Safely in a Turkish hospital, she
gave birth to a healthy boy and girl.
But after two nights, she was sent
right back, the victim of the over-
whelmed country's ban of new
refugee arrivals until more camps
can be built.
Abdallah, 29, brushed away the
flies in a cramped, 10-foot concrete
shed near the border crossing,
where at least 5,000 other refugees
waited to cross into a safer haven
from Syria's 18 months of violence.
She held her 4-day-old son, Ahmed,
as he furiously sucked away on his
pacifier, while her daughter Bayan


slept, eyes tightly closed, in pink
and blue fuzzy blankets.
"I want a clean house," she said
softly, gesturing at the mud-tracked
concrete floor "Just a safe home for
them, it's just not clean here."
Her plight is part of the poignant
ordeal of at least 5,000 refugees
stranded with little food and un-
sanitary conditions at the Bab Al-
Salameh crossing, camped in
immense sheds where trucks car-
rying cargo were once inspected.
Ailing refugees wait outside, some
stretched out on cots, to be treated
by doctors for diabetes and food
poisoning. A baby whose family
fled the city of Aleppo weeks ago
sleeps in a car seat, surrounded by
mosquito netting.
Refugees are stranded here on
the border because of Turkey's de-
cision two weeks ago to ban new ar-
rivals into the country until it can


construct new refugee camps. The
country has already taken in some
80,000 Syrians and will let women in
like Abdallah, but only to give birth.
"We send delivery cases to
Turkey, but the problem is that
after they give birth, they are sent
back on the same day or the next,"
said Dr Necmi, a Turkish doctor
working at a small clinic on the
border run by a Turkish aid organ-
ization also provides cooked meals
to the refugees.
"There is no healthy place here
for these women to be comfort-
able," he said.
The United Nations estimates
1.2 million people aredisplaced in-
side of Syria half of them chil-
dren and nowhere is it more
apparent than in Bab al-Salameh
which seems overrun by children
of all ages, some even as young as
the 4-day-old twins.


Tornado strikes N.Y beachfront neighborhood


Associated Press


NEW YORK A tornado
swept out of the sea and hit
a beachfront neighborhood
in New York City on Satur-
day, hurling debris in the
air, knocking out power and
startling residents who
once thought of twisters as
a Midwestern phenomenon.
Videos taken by by-
standers showed a funnel
cloud sucking up water,
sand and then small pieces
of buildings, as it moved
through the Breezy Point
section of the Rockaway
peninsula in Queens.
Residents had advance
notice. The National
Weather Service issued a


tornado warning for Queens
and Brooklyn at 10:40 a.m.
The storm took people by
surprise anyway when it
struck about 30 minutes
later.
In the storm's wake, the
community of seaside bun-
galows was littered with
broken flower pots,
knocked-down fences and
smashed windows.
At the Breezy Point Surf
Club, the tornado ripped
the roofs off rows of ca-
banas, scattered deck
chairs and left a heavy
metal barbecue and
propane tank sitting in the
middle of a softball field, at
least 100 yards from any
nearby home.


Infant, 3 others killed in northeast
Oklahoma storms
Associated Press
NOWATA, Okla. -Authorities say a couple and their
grandchild had no time to reach a shelter before winds from
a severe thunderstorm flung their mobile home into a creek
in northeast Oklahoma, killing them.
The three were among four people who died in severe
storms that blasted through Oklahoma on Friday. A Missouri
truck driver also was killed when winds flipped his semi.
Nowata County sheriff's deputy Rick Harper said Saturday
the winds picked up the mobile home and carried it about
100 yards before it landed. Harper said the home basically
"disintegrated" and officials found the bodies in the water
after a two-hour search.
National Weather Service meteorologist Pete Snyder said
radar didn't show a tornado in the area, but a team was dis-
patched to determine what happened.


Missing


S.C. boy


falls by


wayside


Mediapaying

little attention

despitepleas
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. De-
spite detectives' pleas to na-
tional media, the
disappear-
ance of an .
18-month-
old black
boy with the
wide smile
has yet to
grab the
widespread
attention Amir
given to Jennings
other miss- has been
ing chil- missing since
dren's cases. Nov. 28, 2011.
Some advo-
cates say the reason why
may be as simple as the tod-
dler's gender- and his race.
From the still-unsolved
slaying of 6-year-old Jon-
Benet Ramsey more than 15
years ago to the disappear-
ance and killing of 2-year-old
Caylee Anthony, the public
has watched with rapt atten-
tion as many cases involving
young children unfolded,
often over many months. Yet
Amir Jennings, the little boy
who hasn't been seen since
he was captured on surveil-
lance video with his mother
in South Carolina nearly a
year ago, has registered as
scarcely a blip on the na-
tion's consciousness.
"Media has always leaned
toward the cute little kids,"
said Monica Caison of the
Wilmington, N.C.-based
CUE Center for Missing Per-
sons. "And unfortunately, a
lot of times they think cute
little kids are white."
Amir's mother, Zinah Jen-
nings, was convicted Friday
on a charge related to his
disappearance and sen-
tenced to 10 years in prison.
The 23-year-old woman has
been jailed since December,
and police arrested her
after she told them false,
misleading stories about the
boy's whereabouts. Jen-
nings has maintained she
left the boy somewhere safe,
but prosecution witnesses
said the young mother
claimed she was stressed
and pondered selling or giv-
ing away the boy
Jennings' mother says she
last saw her wide-eyed, giggly
grandson early on the morn-
ing of Nov 28,2011. He went
to a bank with his mother the
next day but has not been
seen since. A store owner has
testified she saw the boy and
his mother a month later, but
prosecutors challenged that
assertion, and there was no
surveillance video to back up
the claim.











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Veterans Notes can be found .
on Page All of
today's l
Chronicle. "


-i^


:.1WD


Cruising the Black Sea, Danube for beautiful views around 'twin cities'


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle

t may come as a
surprise to some that
Budapest is not one,
but two, great European
cities.

Cruising upstream from Constanta,
Bulgaria, on the Black Sea, toward Ger-
many and the headwaters of the
Danube River, passengers get a bird's-
eye view of five countries, grouped to-
gether as Eastern Europe.
The mighty Danube divides Croatia
and Serbia (remnants of the old Yu-
goslavia) prior to
our entry into
Hungary. Most of
the area through
agricultural with
an occasional vil-
lage popping into
view, marked by a
church steeple,
Neil Sawyer visible from miles
seig SOA erO away. It seems as
SPONTANEOUS if we're on a slow
TRAVELER boat to China be-
cause of the
length of time to
arrive at these seemingly distant
villages.
Finally, off in the distance we began
seeing commercial buildings and de-
velopments larger than the rural farms,
forests, and the ever-present church
steeple. As we rounded a bend in the
river, some of the first structures to
come into full view were bridges the
five bridges of Budapest.
Our excitement over the famous
bridges of Budapest soon gave way to
the thrills of visual perspective of the
two cities of Buda, on the left (west),
and Pest, on the right (east). Buda and
Pest were significant cities in their own
right up until 1873, when the two cities


were unified into one, with the famous
Chain Bridge connecting the two. Thus,
Budapest was born and became a
major banking and cultural center for
Eastern Europe.
French writer Jules Romain said,
when he visited Budapest, "Budapest,
along with the Danube, comprise one
of the most beautiful riverside city
landscapes of all, equaling London on
the Thames and Paris on the Seine."
A great way to get one's bearings is to
first visit the Buda side by climbing
Castle Hill, which was the home of a
medieval castle that has now been re-
placed by the Budapest Royal Palace
that houses the Historical Museum of
the City of Budapest, as well as the Na-
tional Library and the Hungarian Na-
tional Gallery
Nearby, on Castle Hill,
is Fisherman's Bastion, a
fort-like bastion built so
fishermen could protect Beautifl
that stretch of the city 2. Parlik
wall above the river
There's a viewing prome-
nade that allows the best possible view
of the Danube and the Pest side of the
city. Plan to spend some time on Castle
Hill, as there is a lot to see and the
view is unbeatable. Then head over to
the Pest side via the historic and beau-
tiful Chain Bridge.
The locals, of course, call Pest the
best, but as a first-time visitor we'll
leave that for them to work out The
best of Pest, for the sake of brevity, is
the magnificent neo-Gothic Parliament
Building dominating the skyline, the
Church of St. Stephen and the Castle
Palace, to name a few.
A serene night cruise on the river is
another way to get the full impact of
this impressive city and its stately
buildings.
These timeless structures are trans-
formed into a virtual sea of lights at
night, dazzling to its audience, with re-
flections of the city's waterfront on the
Danube.


Photos by Neil Sawyer
ul bridges and buildings around Budapest: 1. The Freedom Bridge;
ament Building; 3. View of a village with a church, on the Danube.


Page All


Summer trip to Chicago

Carla Nicklas of Meadowcrest went to Chicago to visit family and friends. She
went to Wrigley Reld to see her beloved Cubs win 11-10. She went to Brookfield
Zoo, the Art Institute and the Navy Pier. Here she poses at the Art Institute next
to her favorite painting, "Sunday Afternoon on the Island of la Grande Jatte,"
by Georges Seurat.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Go see new baby


and be nice


SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 C:Comcast,Citrus B:Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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(JffNJ 38 58 38 33 "Big Top Scooby-Doo!" (2012) 'NR' Dragons |NinjaGo Venture |King/Hill King/Hill Fam.Guy Fam. Guy |Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Pizza Paradise 'PG' Toy Hntr Toy Hntr David Blaine David Blaine The Smithsonian Mysteries-Museum
QiiTV) 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn |Pawn Storage Storage Storage Combat Forensic Forensic
(fYI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Memories of M*A*S*H 'PG' c Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special White Collar "Ancient
(US) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit 14 Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit 14 Victims Unit'14 History" 'PG'
Bridezillas 'Tasha & Bridezillas 'Tasha & Bridezillas "Remy & Bridezillas "Jennifer & Bridezillas (N) '14' My- Wedding- David
117 69 117 Tracy"'14' c Remy"'14 c' Blanca"'14' Blanca" '14' cc Tutera: Unveiled
rWGN A 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: ClI 30Rock |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay TheUnit'14'


Dear Annie: My hus-
band and I have
been married for 30
years. We each have adult
children from previous mar-
riages.
One, "Luella," only wants
a relationship when it suits
her We don't hear from her
on Father's Day, but if you
miss something for her,
she's "hurt." She's a taker,
not a giver.
A year ago, Luella had a
baby We asked about visit-
ing, but Luella simply didn't
respond. We offered to help
when the baby came home
from the hospital, but were
told they wanted to "bond as
a family," and we respected
that
Finally, in
desperation, I
put the ball in
her court. She
didn't like it one
bit, but after a
particularly vit-
riolic email, she
finally gave us a
date to come
visit.
Luella lives
across the coun-
try, and it's not
easy to get ANNI
there, finan- MAILI
cially and physi-
cally We would
be willing to go if we felt we
were welcome.
So should we go or wait
until she is more eager to
see us?
We don't want to be la-
beled as disinterested
grandparents, nor do we
want to be resented.
The joy of meeting our
new granddaughter has
been diminished by Luella's
attitude. What would you
do? The Undoubtedly
Wicked Stepmother
Dear Stepmother: Go.
Luella will never be "more
eager." Yes, her hand was


Today'sMOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required.
1 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R)
ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13)


1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required.
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Command for
a pooch
6 Clip
11 Propeller part
16 Keen
21 Dress in finery
22 Monte -
23 Actress Sophia -
24 Candle
25 Mark with a
hot iron
26 Ubiquitous
28 Century plant
29 Dispirited
30 Newt
32 River in England
33 Gruff
35 Billiards stick
36 Stanley
Gardner
38 River in France
41 Repose
43 Henna is one
44 there, done that
45 Scrape
48 Part of AWOL
50 NNE, e.g.
52 Memorial tablet
55 Atmosphere
57 Pass away
58 Cod and Hatteras
62 Annex
63 Urban air problem
65 Foxy
67 Once around
a track
69 Rue
70 Krazy of old comics
71 Cushion
72 Lummox
74 Enticing thing
76 Beget
77 Old Hebrew
measure
79 At once
81 Lukewarm
83 Necklace part
85 Spy org.
86 Kind of seal
88 Picture puzzle
90 Turner or Danson
92 Failed
94 Starchy food,
for short
96 Tit for-
97 Insect
99 Ground grain
100 Ancient racing


vehicle
103 Bauble
105 Hidden supply
107 Mode
110 Term in tennis
111 Something for
a milkmaid
113 Extend
115 Butter serving
117 Tater
118 Inter-
120 Do a farm job
122 Mineral spring
123 Navy ship prefix
125 Part of the U.K.
126 Decelerated
128 Performed
130 Work unit
132 Conduit for smoke
133 Mature
134 Treat respectfully
135 Distress call
137 Cheese variety
139 Approached
141 Parrot
143 Spoon of a kind
145 Hold spellbound
147 Summit
150 Sports org.
152 Lubricates
154 Group of players
155 A gem
159 Female animal
160 Anklebone
162 Happy
164 Nothing
166 Have being
167 Command
169 Not lived in
173 Heart chambers
175 Exalt
176 Brilliance
177 Rub
178 Noblemen
179 Fill with joy
180 Boutiques
181 Repulse
182 Baking need

DOWN
1 Story with a moral
2 Misprint
3 Large fish net
4 Tin
5 Jekyll's alter ego
6 Nova -
7 Showy performer
8 Eagle
9 Settled after flight


Lasso expert
Sanctified
- Alamos
War god
Lay bare
Item in a database
Remain
Crone
Swiftly
Song-and-dance show
Primp
Film spool
Job-site VIP
Conducted
Masculine title (abbr.)
For men only
Old French coin
Scut
Boasts
Verge
Measures of time (abbr.)
- parmigiana
Frost
Tea variety
Andes animal
Noisy argument
Bitter -
Cactus fruit (2 wds.)
Weird
Place
Smell
Cry from a canine
Barroom,
English style
Domain
- as a fiddle
Ump relative
Raise
Rainy
Private teacher
"-of a Salesman"
Club charge
Faucet problem
Cudgel
Letters in genetics
Turner and
Hentoff
Plank
Recipe meas.
Disagree
Word of greeting
Stalemate
You bet!
Ascot
Transport
Sudden movement
Went slowly
Child
Zoo denizen


116 Huge destructive wave
119 Stopped snoozing
121 Tower town
124 Witnessed
127 Before
129 Extinct bird
131 Turn right,
on horseback
132 Visage
136 Cold-shoulders
138 Explosive stuff


From - Z
Literary collection
Cape Canaveral event
Miss Fitzgerald
Famous composer
Love
Reef material
Radio, TV, etc.
Melancholic state
Sword
Hooded jacket


Sign of the Zodiac
Slightest
Genealogy diagram
Storage structure
Terrible
Woman
Rough calculation (abbr.)
Sleep
Spigot
Native of (suffix)
Calendar abbr.


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


9-9


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


forced, but you arranged
that, so take advantage.
Don't make this about
Luella. It's about seeing
your grandchild. Stay in a
hotel if you can manage it.
Bring a house gift for the
parents, as well as a gift for
the baby
Be sweet and pleasant.
Some children are simply
difficult, and you must deal
with them as they are in
order to stay in their lives.
Dear Annie: I disagree
with your suggestion to "Old
in Indiana" that the division
of her estate "should be rel-
atively equal."
She has every right to di-
vide her estate as she feels
proper and deserving. The
ones who give the
least always ex-
pect the most. -
Reward the De-
serving
Dear Reward:
Yes, some children
deserve more, and
parents can do
what they like.
Our concern is
what happens to
the sibling rela-
tionships when the
E'S parents die and
BOX one child inherits
more than the oth-
ers.
It's a recipe for lifelong
estrangement, and parents
should take this into consid-
eration when making out
their wills.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A10 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
The Nature Coast All
Veterans Reunion for 2012 is
looking for diversified vendors
for Oct. 15 through Oct. 21 for
the reunion, to be at the Holcim
Corp. Red Level location on
U.S. 19, just north of County
Road 488. The event is to
honor the Vietnam Traveling
Wall, the Purple Heart Memo-
rial, Korean War Memorial, the
Moving Tribute and veterans
from all conflicts from World
War II on.
There will be no duplicate
vendors. A 10-foot by 10-foot
space is $175. A 15-foot by
15-foot space is $250. Larger
lots are $1.25 per square foot.
Power is $35 additional and
those spaces are limited. All
prices subject to a 6 percent
sales tax. Vendor generators
permitted with prior approval.
Extension cords are not fur-
nished. Applications must be


received by Sept. 31. Call
Richard Mass at 352-726-8877,
or email at richardmass@
tampabay.rr.com for approval.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort). Reservations should
be made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-5131,
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Lunch-


eon for Military Women will
take place at noon Monday,
Nov. 12, at the Crystal River
Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River. Those
who have never received an in-
vitation in the past may call
Leslie Martineau at 352-746-
2396 to be added to the
mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-


quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets. Free
classes to combat veterans are
offered by her at several loca-
tions and times. Call her at
352-382-7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and


coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more infor-
mation. The next meeting will
be Thursday, Sept. 20. Mem-
bers will be briefed on the AFA
National Convention and
upcoming events.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty


and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m. All are
welcome at 5 p.m. dinners on
Wednesday and Fridays, of-
fered by the Legion, Auxiliary,
Sons of the American Legion,
American Legion Riders and
40/8 families. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call Cmdr. Michael
Klyap Jr. at 352-302-6096,


See VETERANS/Page A12


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle


The Rsherman's Bastion.


BUDAPEST
Continued from PageA9

Aside from the historical struc-
tures and beauty of these twin cities,
our favorite time was spent at Hotel
Helia, a thermal and spa hotel, which


is home to a rejuvenating hot mineral
spring so convenient!
A few minutes in these soothing
waters can erase all trauma of a full
day of walking, standing, and climb-
ing in and around one of the most
picturesque cities in Europe, the
twin cities of Buda and Pest, which
are now one.


----

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for 27
years. They travel frequently, having
been to 48 states, 64 countries
and seven continents.
Contact Neil via email to
gobuddy@tampabay.rr com.


In SERVICE


Jessica E. Espada

Air Force Airman Jessica E.
Espada graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare princi-
ples and skills.


Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Espada is the daughter of
Maria and Willie Espada of
Inverness. She is a 2007
graduate of Citrus High
School and earned a bache-
lor's degree in 2011 from the
University of South Florida,
Tampa.


SO YOU KNOW

* News briefs submitted by travel clubs
associated with for-profit travel agencies must
be run as paid advertisements in the Chronicle.
This information includes trips, travel shows
and meetings to plan trips and events by those
groups. Civic and social group trips being
coordinated through travel agencies are also
included in this policy. Nonprofit groups or
churches that plan excursions as social trips
and fundraisers (where all generated funds
benefit that group and its works) are still
invited to submit their items as free news
briefs for the travel section. For more
information about paid advertisements, call
Saralynne Miller, 352-563-6363, ext. 1367.


IT NIT YU VIP TI ,Iy, i
Casino Tours I Cruises I Vacations / i
al fordates & details. 352-597-4822 *Toll Free: 1-877-604-4822
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Day Port of Call Arrive Dekart
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3 Night Paris and 3 Night
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$349 'dbl I
JAN. 28-31, 2013
Motorcoach from
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SPECIALS


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527-8002 476-4242
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H1OLE2^WOOD TOU4 S
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9; T
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ONLY
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I
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tour of the Port Columbus Nat'l' Civil
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Tour Dates October 2nd & 15th
$239 p. pdbloccupan $299 single
2 DAY 1 NIGHT GETAWAY TO SOUTH
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Includes 3 meals. World famous Polynesian
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Tour Date September 26
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much more! Limited tickets
Call For Tour Dates & Pricing
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Wednesdayy pick-up Homosassa:
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i


I


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 All


"IrBOOK NO
0(FOR THE
OLIDAYIJ





A12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page All

or email him at mklyap@
gmail.com. Call the post at
352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or membership
chairman Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank. The VFW
Mixed Golf League plays
Thursday alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Citrus Springs Country Club.
Tee time is 8 a.m. New play-
ers, both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call
Rich or Jayne Stasik at
352-464-3740.
The public is welcome to
participate in the post's sixth
annual golf scramble Saturday,
Sept. 15, with a shotgun start
at 8 a.m. at Twisted Oaks Golf
Club. Registration forms are
available at the post. Entry fee
is $55 per player, which in-
cludes green fees, cart fees,
food and a goodie bag. Pro-
ceeds from the event will go to
Hospice of Citrus County. A
banquet will immediately follow
the tourney at the post; it will
include awards and presenta-
tions, and is also open to the
public.
For more information, call
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. WiFi available
at the post for free. The Friday
night dinner Sept. 14 will be
baked chicken from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Cost is $8. Children
younger than 6 eat for $4. All
are welcome. All are welcome
at the Patriot Day Ceremony at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, fol-
lowed by cake and coffee. The
post is a nonsmoking facility;
smoking is allowed on the
porch. Information regarding
any post events is available at
the post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41.
The chapter hall is on the cor-
ner of Independence Highway
and Paul Drive. We thank vet-


at the Plantation
on Crystal River


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


erans for their service and wel-
come any disabled veteran to
join us from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
any Tuesday or Thursday at
the chapter hall. This is also
the time that we accept do-
nated nonperishable foods for
our continuing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and their
families when we are able.
Anyone who knows a disabled
veteran or their family who re-
quires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish to
help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries are
at 906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw
4337.org forinformation about
all weekly post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday. The public is wel-
come at bingo at 6 p.m.
Thursday.
A 9/11 Remembrance Cere-
mony will be held at the post at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11. The
public is welcome. Light re-
freshments to follow. The out-
door flea market and pancake
breakfast will Sept. 15. All are
welcome at the all-you-can-eat
breakfast from 7:30 to 10:30
a.m. Cost is $5.


w


, $1595
Limited time offer
Call for reservations
352-795-4211


931W .tdri rl,(ytlRvrFL349*w wPatto nrytivecm


HEALTH


SCREENING


Friday, September 21

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Anne Marie Newcomer, OD
Please RSVP 352.628.3029
Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446
In association with:
.L CATARACT &
,0 -/ LASER INSTITUTE
U, -' "Excellence...with love"
StLukesEye.comrn
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida
Chapter 7 welcomes new
members to help promote pub-
lic awareness of the POW/MIA
issue and help veterans in
need of help. Full membership
is open to all individuals 18
years or older who wish to
dedicate time to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event.
Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or by email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
First meeting of the year will be
Sept. 18. Any female relative
age 16 or older who is a wife,
widow, mother, mother-in-law,
stepmother, sister, daughter,
stepdaughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of an honorably dis-
charged Marine and FMF
Corpsman eligible to join the
Marine Corps League, and fe-
male Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular and special
events, as well as meetings.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $6.
The public is welcome at the
Oct. 21 flea market beginning
at 7 a.m. Outside space is $5
(bring a table) and inside
space is $10. Call the post at
726-3339 to reserve space.
Proceeds benefit the Cancer
Aid & Research Foundation.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19
between Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa.
See VETERANS/Page A13


6M
EBB
MEMBER


Retraining program



brings new benefits


Honorably discharged
veterans from the
age of 35 years to no
more than 60 years can now
apply for up to 12 months of
retraining assistance valued
at $1,473 per month. A press
release issued by the Veter-
ans Administration on Aug.
27 addresses the details of
the Veterans Retraining As-
sistance program (VRAP).
In addition to the age re-
quirements, those eligible
will be currently
unemployed,
have an other
than dishonor-
able discharge,
are not eligible
for any other VA
education benefit
programs, are not
in receipt of VA
compensation
due to Individual Barbara
Unemployability VETEI
(UI), and must not VIE
be enrolled in a
federal or state
job training program. Ap-
proved 2013 phase VRAP
recipients are encouraged
to start training full-time by
April 2013 in order to re-
ceive the fullest benefit be-
fore assistance under this
benefit program ends on
March 31, 2014. The VA is
currently accepting applica-
tions via the website,
www.benefits.va.gov/VOW
Training must be in a VA-
approved program of study
offered by a community col-
lege or technical school, and
your program of study must
lead to an associate degree,
non-college degree, or cer-
tificate for a high-demand
occupation as defined by
the Department of Labor
(DOL). High-demand occu-
pations are defined by the
DOL via a link from the US
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs' website, www.va.gov/
or call the VA toll free at 1-
800-827-1000. Information
may also be obtained by vis-
iting the One-Stop Career
Center/Workforce Connec-
tion at 1103 East Inverness
Blvd., Inverness, or by call-
ing that location at 352-
637-2223.
The VA expects to fill all
45,000 available slots for the
fiscal program's year 2012
before the Sept. 30, 2012
deadline, and will continue
processing new applica-
tions for the 54,000 slots
available in the 2013 fiscal
year's program.
According to VA Deputy
Undersecretary for Eco-
nomic Opportunity Curtis
Coy, this program applies to


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Rates are subject to availablity To undemtand how funds am -
nsured and guamnteed, depositors arminformed covemge mts .on all accounts
offeredMITED OFFER APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED
LIMITED OFFER APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED oooc ,


AKEL
DENTftL



CHILDREN

F WELCOME!


INCLUDING CHILDREN'S
CLEANING, FILLINGS
AND SEALANTS

5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill

* 352-596-99001
www.akeldental.com
MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED
*\ Accepting-Chase Health Advance and CareCredit
AMIR AKEL, DMD


a small segment of the Vet-
eran population that may
not have regular interaction
with the VA or stay informed
about veterans' benefits and
opportunities.
Veterans are not the only
ones who benefit from this
program. Businesses who
employ veterans that are
participating or have com-
pleted this program may
apply for Work Opportunity
Tax Credits (WOTC) and
Special Em-
- ployer Incentives
(SEI).
Employers
S' who hire veter-
ans receive reim-
bursement of up
to 50 percent of
the veteran's
salary during the
SEI program,
Corcoran which typically
RANS' lasts up to 6
WS months, to cover
expenses in-
curred for cost of
instruction, necessary loss
of production due to train-
ing status, VA support dur-
ing training and placement
follow-up phase to assist
with work- or training-re-
lated needs, and more.
Veterans hired under the
SEI program receive,
among other benefits, im-
mediate income and bene-
fits as an employee,
increased chance of being
hired as a result of em-
ployer incentives, and one-
on-one support from a VA
vocational rehabilitation
counselor or employment
coordinator to assist with
training- or work-related
needs.
Last month, I mentioned
some changes to the transi-
tion program, geared to-
ward those who are close to,
or currently experiencing,
separation from the mili-


tary The programs I'm dis-
cussing today are not re-
stricted to those who are
transitioning from military
life to civilian life. That's
why I'm excited to share this
information, because there
are so many veterans who
are beyond that transitional
phase and are anxious to
find work.
The occupations on the
DOEs list aren't out of reach,
either. They're widely var-
ied, and what I call "real"
occupation titles; not the
kind we find in a small clas-
sified listing "high pay for
stuffing envelopes" by call-
ing a 1-800 number.
The high-demand occupa-
tion categories include, but
are not limited to: architec-
ture and engineering, busi-
ness and financial, legal,
food preparation and serv-
ing, sales, office and admin-
istrative support,
construction, computer and
mathematical, arts, design,
entertainment, sports,
media and much more.
The Citrus County Vet-
eran's Coalition website
(www.ccvcfl.org) has this list
and other pertinent links for
you to click, follow and print
for your own reference.
By all means, if you're be-
tween the ages of 35 and 60,
an honorably discharged
veteran, and meet the crite-
ria listed, then jump on this
opportunity It could change
your life!


Barbara L. Corcoran is the
public information officer
of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She
maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this
group may be found at
www.ccvcfl.org


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and
be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-
5660 and ask for editor Mike Arnold.


Emile Pandolfi
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
Sunday, Oct. 28, 3 p.m.


Golden Dragon Acrobats
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 N. Educational Path, Lecanto
Sunday, Dec. 2, 3 p.m.

Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala
Monday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m.


Cherish the Ladies:
Traditional Irish Music
Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
Sunday, Feb. 24, 3 p.m.

Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala
Monday, Feb. 25, 7:30 p.m.


? The Diamonds
Citrus Learning and Conference Center,
Lecanto
Sunday, March 3, 3 p.m.




Henson's Miscreant Puppets
In "Stuffed and Unstrung"
Dassance Fine Arts Center Ocala
Tuesday, April 16, 7:30 p.m.
For mature audiences nty
CH1W ^I^^^^^^^^


Su0na. y Bunc

11:30 am 2:30 pm

Golden Anniversary

Special


VETERANS


l


5 A*. I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A12

Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
in the Beverly Plaza, invites all
eligible veterans to join or
transfer to our Post 237 family.
There are many activities (call
the post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion
Auxiliary (ALA) are active help-
ing veterans and the commu-
nity. Stop by the post or visit
the website at
www.Post237.org to view the
calendar of upcoming events.
Call the post at
352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills,
at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly. Any veteran who has
seen honorable service in any
of the Armed Forces of the U.S.
is eligible for membership if
said service was within Korea,
including territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from
Sept. 3, 1945, to the present or
if said service was outside of
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson
at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 A13


(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Voiture & Cabane 1219 will
present a Chikin' BBQ begin-
ning at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at American Legion Post
155. The public is welcome.
For $7, the dinner includes half
a chicken, beans and coleslaw.
Hot dogs and sodas will be
available for children at a
nominal price. Fun for the day
will include a washer tourna-
ment, horseshoe tournament,
dart games, basketball shoot,
bean bag toss, ring toss
and more.
Also available will be a free
child identification program.
Proceeds will benefit youth
sports in Citrus County.
For more information, call
Larry Pink at 352-563-5451.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited.
The next meeting will be at 1
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, at the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto.
The location is approximately 1
mile south of State Road 44 on
the west side of C.R. 491. This
is a new start time for the


bimonthly meeting.
To learn more about Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the chapter's web-
site at www.citruspurple
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social
hour follows. All Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are welcome.
Call Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW meets
at 5 p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and
its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City.
All eligible veterans wel-
come. Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629
for information and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly.
Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Oct. 13, Nov.
10 and Dec. 8.


Are You


Registered

TO Vote?

Last Day

To Register

Is Tuesday7

October 9th
This means you must be
Registered to vote in Citrus
sCounty in order to be eligible
Stto vote in the upcoming
Ask prmoioFrev io, caGeneral Election.7


Sept. 10 to 14MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog, un-
crusted PBJ, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baked
beans, pears, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with
ripstick, hot ham and cheese
on bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, peas, mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni
and cheese, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Chicken sandwich,
cheese pizza, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, corn, dried
fruit mix, fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
cereal and toast, tater tots and
grits, milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast


round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken and
rice burrito, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, broccoli, mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets,
macaroni and cheese, ham
super salad with ripstick, yo-
gurt parfait plate, garden
salad, corn, dried fruit mix, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Barbecue
sandwich, turkey wrap, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, baked
beans, potato triangles, pears,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, cheese pizza, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, peas,
peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
cereal and toast, tater tots and
grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Roasted chicken
with roll, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato
roasters, broccoli, dried fruit,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken,
maxstix, turkey and gravy over


noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas,
celery, peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cheesy
chicken and rice burrito,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, chilled baked beans, po-
tato triangles, mixed fruit,
baked beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato triangles, apple-
sauce, cucumbers, celery,
juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, spaghetti
with ripstick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
partait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, potato triangles,
corn, peaches, juice, milk.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbe-
cued chicken, Lyonnaise pota-
toes, California-blend
vegetables, sugar cookie,
whole-grain wheat bun with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean beef
chili, parslied rice, carrot coins,
peaches, wheat crackers with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sausage and
bean casserole, buttered
spinach, yellow corn, citrus
fruit, whole-grain bread, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Sliced meatloaf
with tomato gravy, mashed po-
tatoes, green peas, graham
crackers, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef salad with
ham, cheese and whole boiled
egg, French dressing, carrot-
raisin salad, mixed fruit, whole-
grain bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


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Beverly Hills

Community Church

'a Invites you to their


82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
746-3620


National
"Back to Church Sunday"
Service
September 16, 10 a.m.


"How would you like to go to church with me this Sunday?" Chances are
you ve never heard this question before. 'Back to Church SLunday is part of
a national movement of churches across America to encourage people to
rediscover Church. The Beverly Hills Community Church WOuIld like to invite
you. your family, and your friends back to church for a special service.
Sunday. September 16. at 10 a.m. Our doors are always open and we
invite everyone to rediscover church. "You can find hope here."


Sunday


Our regular schedule is as follows:
ay 8:30 a.m. Coffee and Fellowship
10:00 a.m. Traditional Worship Service


Tuesday
Wednesday


5:00 p.m. Youth Fellowship
10:30 a.m. Tuesday Morning Bible Study
6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study


3rd Friday of every month, Spaghetti Supper
(except Dec.. June. July. Aug.). from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Please come and get back to the roots of your forefathers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn where to



volunteer at forum


Special to the Chronicle
Opportunity Links is a
monthly forum that pro-
vides groups the opportu-
nity to link up with citizens
who are interested in vol-
unteering in the commu-
nity, and a chance to talk
about sites and what organ-
izations' volunteer needs
are.
The next Opportunity
Links will be at 3 p.m.


Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the
Citrus County Resource
Center in the Caf6, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto.
One good overall reason
for volunteering is to pro-
mote a healthy community.
It gives others a chance to
give back, a chance to help
others in need and a
chance to make a differ-
ence. The Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and


RSVP are the engine
through which organiza-
tions can connect hundreds
volunteers to meaningful
service opportunities.
Through building rela-
tionships with nonprofits,
schools, faith-based groups
and others, NCVC/RSVP
plays a critical role in en-
couraging volunteer power
to the fullest.
For more information,
call 352-527-5950.


Give blood, save lives


AnnualMatt Curley drive slated for Sept. 15


Special to the Chronicle

Our Lady of Grace Church/Knights of
Columbus Abbot Francis Sadlier Council
6168 will co-host the third annual Matt
Curley Memorial Blood drive on Satur-
day, Sept. 15, in the Our Lady of Grace
Parish Life Center on Roosevelt Boule-
vard from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The drive honors the memory of Matt
Curley, who died in 2010 after many years
of service to the council, parish and Cit-
rus County. He was a 10-year member of


Knights of Columbus Council 6168. Loyal
to his heritage, he also was a member of
the Ancient Order of Hibernians.
All are welcome to honor the memory
of this giving person by giving the gift of
life on Saturday, Sept. 15.
Those who have conflicts on this date
can participate in this drive by donating
blood around the date at a Life South
Community Blood center, such as that at
1241 S. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto,
near Lecanto High school.
Call 352-527-3061.


Run/walk will benefit CASA


Event will begin at high school


Special to the Chronicle
The inaugural Colors for
CASA 5K Race will be Sun-
day, Sept. 16, beginning at 8
a.m. at Lecanto High
School.
Registration for the
run/walk will begin at


6:45 a.m.
Proceeds from the event
will benefit the Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association,
a domestic violence victim
advocacy center that pro-
vides outreach and shelter
services in Citrus County.
Pre-registration fee is


$15, which includes a T-
shirt. Registration the day
of the race will be $20 (T-
shirt not guaranteed).
Register at
www.active.com, or email
Amanda Pitre at pitre.
amanda.lhs2013.gmail.com,
or Hannah Huntington at
Huntington. hannah.lhs
2013@gmail.com for a mail-
in registration form.


Get to know Citrus County's 'aquatic treasures'


Special to the Chronicle

All are welcome to join
Dr. Joan Bradshaw and
Elaine Lewis from Citrus
County Extension at 3 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 17, for "Save


Our Waters Week: Getting
to know Citrus County's
Aquatic Treasures," an in-
formative workshop about
preserving and protecting
water resources in Citrus
County.

For the RECORD


The workshop is free, but
pre-registration is required
by calling 352-527-5700.
The workshop will be at
Citrus County Extension,
3650 W Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.


The wedding planner


J just got back from a May-December wed-
ding the bride looked like she was
born last May; the groom, last December
If they were any younger, they'd have been
wearing formal onesies.
As soon as I got off the plane, I was handed
a three-page, single-spaced wedding
agenda.
How on earth would they stick to such a
strict schedule? Every waking moment was
planned with military precision. But as
someone who's been to a lot of weddings, I
know they never go exactly as
planned.
Here is what the wedding
agenda looked like in hindsight:
FRIDAY
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.: Church re-
hearsal. Bride breaks into tears;
bride's father takes a swing at the
groom.
7 to 8:30 p.m.: Rehearsal din-
ner Maid of honor stalks out
after catching her boyfriend flirt- JII
ing with a bridesmaid. MUL
9 to 11 p.m.: Teenage nieces
and nephews caught drinking
from half-filled glasses while grown-ups
dance.
SATURDAY
8 to 10:30 a.m.: Hair and makeup at the
Hair House. Mother of the groom mistakes
the name for another kind of establishment
and says, "I thought so."
9 to 10:30 a.m.: Groomsmen's breakfast.
Groom gets several phone calls from his
mother, asking what kind of woman he is
marrying. Groom starts drinking doubles.
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Bridal party pho-
tos. Many usable photos are taken before
groom "urps" on bridesmaid.
Other photos show groom
begging forgiveness. S
2:30 to 2:55 p.m.: Wedding
guests are escorted to their
seats. The ushers look openly PUZZle is
embarrassed to be seen with
women they wouldn't hit on F E T C H
in a bar. A R R A
2:55 to 3 p.m.: Seating of B R A N D
the parents, who look as if L7O w E F
their shoes are much too E R LaE
tight and something smells SNC ;S F
funny in the church. P L A Q u
3:01 p.m.: Ceremony be- E L L S
gins. The bride and groom KnAT A T P
will never again look so OM ER N
young and in love, or so beau- E A R E D
tiful and handsome, as they CNACc R
do at this moment C H A R I
4:30 p.m.: Reception be- L E T Pi
gins. Open bar is mobbed by A L I A F
friends and relatives who S- L OW [E
haven't had a drink for al- 0 N 0 R
most an hour and a half. They HNOI K E-
toss them back two at a time. ACME N
6:30 to 8 p.m.: Dinner D E TA
served. 0 R DER
6:31 p.m.: First complaint R A I SE
about where a guest is L
6:31 pt k A T S E
seated. 9- 9 T
6:31 p.m.: First complaint 9-9


about how long it takes to get a Long Island
iced tea that was ordered.
7:30 p.m.: Cake cutting. Make that plural:
cakes. And cupcakes. And cake-sicles.
7:30 to 8 p.m.: Maid of honor tells embar-
rassing story but thankfully can't finish be-
cause she gets the hiccups and starts crying.
Best man is illiterate and drunk His speech
consists mainly of "I love you, man," over
and over
8 to 8:05 p.m.: Bride and groom's first
dance to "their song."
8:05 to 8:10 p.m.: Bride and her
father dance.
8:10 to 8:15 p.m.: Groom and his
mother dance awkwardly, as
groom does not know how to do
the Latin hustle.
9 p.m.: Deafening music starts,
the universal signal for old people
to leave, as simply walking up and
asking them to go home is still
considered impolite.
M 9 p.m.: Wedding cake served.
.LEN 9:05 p.m.: Bouquet toss.
Drunken guest gets smacked in
the face.
10:35 to 11 p.m.: Two couples get into a fist-
fight over who is better friends with the new-
lyweds. The words "Do you want to take this
outside?" are heard.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.: Arraignment
10:37 a.m.: Bail set.

Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to Lose
Money in Your Spare Time -At Home,"
is available at amazon.com. You can follow
him at pinterest.com/jimmullen.


Sunday's PUZZLER


on Page A10.


SHEAR BLADE SHARP
MCIARLO LOR EN TAPER
1MIN PRESENT AGAVE
IFT = T EES S U RLY CU E
0 1 SE REST D YE BEEN
R ATC H L AE D IR
E AIURIA DIECA PE S
MO S L A LAP REG RET
A AF UR E S I R E
IN W TEP D BEA C I A
R Sy E D F LUN K E D
B T T ANT MEAL
OT TOY TATY L E
A R C R H PAT SPUD
REAP S AUSIS ENG
D DID R G F U E A GEE

A LA LSD E FEINAH INEARE
IN B A O I L S T EAM PA L
A L US GL AD INI L A RE
UIN I IN HA B I T ED A TR I A
ECLAT ERASE DUKIA ES
SHOP 2SR is. yUv e ALS
2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Divorces 8/27/12 to 9/2/12
Alfons L. Bemmel, Inverness vs. Heather
R. Lemay, Lecanto
Gail Ekker, Inverness vs. Ray J. Ekker,
Floral City
Katie E. Simmons, Florence, Ala. vs. Stuart
C. Simmons, Hernando
Ronald A. Tanner III, Hernando vs. Carmen
D. Tanner, Inverness
Marriages 8/27/12 to 9/02/12
Wallace Edwin Anderson, Inglis/Bonnie Jean
Drake, Inglis
Timothy John Cavill, Lincoln Park, Mich./
Ashley Nicole Sowards, River Rouge, Mich.
Michael Ray Hardesty, Citrus Springs/
Adalis Ayala, Citrus Springs


Michael Edward James, Inverness/
Denise Jones Bowen, Inverness
Howard James Mulnix, Beverly Hills/
Prayat Enos, Homosassa
Eugene Charles Putney, Inverness/
Anne Marie McDaniel, Inverness
Mark Wayne Willett, Crystal River/
Paula Renee Lucas, Crystal River

Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-
6400 or visit www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For pro-
ceedings filed in another county, contact the
clerk in that area.


A14 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


11











SPORTS


The Bucs get set to
take on the Carolina
Panthers on Sunday
afternoon./B7



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Local recreation/B2
0 MLB/B3
. '* L Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 College football/B5, B6
0 Golf/B6
0 NFL/B7
0 Entertainment/B8


US Open women's
final now Sunday
NEW YORK -The U.S.
Open women's singles final
has been postponed until
Sunday because of rain in
the forecast.
The match between Ser-
ena Williams and Victoria
Azarenka was originally
scheduled for Saturday
night, when the National
Weather Service is predict-
ing an 80 percent chance of
rain. Tournament officials will
announce the rescheduled
match time later Saturday.
Weather permitting, this
will mark the fourth time in
the last five years the
women's final has been
played on Sunday, with
2010 the only year in that
stretch the championship
was decided on its origi-
nally scheduled day.
US Open men's final
moved to Monday
NEWYORK-The U.S.
Open will finish on a Monday
for the fifth consecutive year.
With a potentially danger-
ous storm expected Satur-
day night in Flushing
Meadows, the tournament
suspended play for the day
while David Ferrer was
leading Novak Djokovic 5-2
in the first set of their semifi-
nal. Spectators were told to
leave Arthur Ashe Stadium.
That match was sched-
uled to resume Sunday, with
the men's final shifted from
its originally scheduled Sun-
day slot to Monday. Andy
Murray reached the final by
beating Tomas Berdych.
Jaguars donating
money for lack of
TD celebrations
JACKSONVILLE -
Maurice Jones-Drew has
been briefed. He has heard
all about Mike Mularkey's
touchdown policy, the one
in which the Jacksonville
Jaguars coach donates
money to charity every time
a player scores and hands
the ball to an official without
any kind of celebration.
Jones-Drew chuckled
when asked whether he's
going to comply with Mula-
rkey's request.
"We're entertainers, but
at the same time I'm
coachable," Jones-Drew
said this week.
Of everyone in Jack-
sonville's locker room,
Jones-Drew could have the
toughest time playing it
straight. After all, the three-
time Pro Bowl running
back has celebrated nearly
all his 74 career touch-
downs in unique fashion.
He mimicked NBA star
LeBron James' "chalk toss"
after scoring in Cleveland
last year, an animated cel-
ebration that drew a chorus
of boos. He was fined
$7,500 in 2007 for using
the goal post to simulate
an ATM withdrawal.
He has danced in the
end zone from Day 1, offer-
ing up versions of the "Cat
Daddy," the "Macarena,"
and the "Ickey Shuffle."
From wire reports


Welcome to the SEC


No. 23 UF edges

conference newbie

Texas A M 20-17

Associated Press
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
No. 24 Florida had never won a
game under coach Will
Muschamp after trailing at half-
time entering Saturday's game
against Texas A&M.
Looks as if things are going to be
different this year
Mike Gillislee ran for 83 yards
and two touchdowns and the


Gators shut down Texas A&M's of-
fense in the second half in a 20-17
win in the Aggies' first Southeast-
ern Conference game after moving
from the Big 12.
The Gators entered the game 0-5
when trailing at halftime with
Muschamp in charge. Muschamp
talked to his team about this being
a statement win for Florida.
"I told our team I'm not big on
See Page B4
Florida running back Mike Gillislee
(23) rushes for a touchdown as
Texas A&M's Steven Jenkins (45)
and Deshazor Everett, right, defend
during the fourth quarter Saturday
in College Station, Texas.
Associated Press


Off and running


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River's Brandon Harris runs at the Lecanto Invitational on Saturday morning at Lecanto High
School. Harris led all male Citrus County runners with a 27th place finish in a time of 18:12. Citrus
sophomore Alyssa Weber came in seventh overall in the girls race, completing the course in 21:05.


at Lecanto Invitational


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
LECANTO Lecanto
High's girls cross coun-
try team found some
leadership from a fresh-
man who was running


her first race
Saturday
Claire
Farnsworth was
the top finisher
for the Panthers
as Lecanto fin-
ished seventh in
the Lecanto In-
vitational cross
country meet at
Lecanto High
School.


"At the beginning of
the season, I can do bet-
ter," Farnsworth said.
"It's a bit harder than
some courses. I am used
to this. This is my home
course."
Benoist was not


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


Farnsworth was 11th
in the race with a time
of 21:44. Senior Chloe
Benoist, the dean of Cit-
rus County girls cross
country, felt disap-
pointed with an 18th fin-
ish. Her time was 22:00.


happy with her
performance.
And yes, it's pos-
sible to feel old
as a high school
senior.
"It was a de-
cent start," she
said. "I have
some improving
to do. I had bet-
ter times when I


was younger. I remem-
ber when I was little and
beating seniors and now
I am a senior getting
beaten by younger kids.
"We have so much
talent this year,"
See Page B4


Hot


shots at


BMW

Mickelson

shares lead

with Singh

Associated Press
CARMEL, Ind. -The best
in golf returned to Indiana
for the first time in more
than 20 years, and based on
the All-Star performance
that broke out Saturday in
the BMW Championship,
this show might leave these
golf-hungry
fans even
more mes-
merized.
The last
big event at
Crooked
Stick was
the 1991
PGA Cham- Phil
pionship Mickelson
featuring an tied for lead at
unknown 16-under par.
rookie named John Daly
who turned it into a one-
man show of
power golf.
There are
no mystery
guests this
time.
Not with
Phil Mickel-
son making
10 birdies, Vijay Singh
including a shares BMW
6-iron on lead with Phil
the par-3 Mickelson.
17th that he described as a
"salty little cut, back into the
wind." He had a 64 and
wound up tied for the lead
with Vijay Singh, who has
taken only 74 putts through
three rounds, but had a
three-putt on the 18th hole
that gave him a 69 and cost
him the outright lead.
Mickelson and Singh, both
in the World Golf Hall of
Fame, were at 16-under 200.
Right behind them were
two-time major Rory McIl-
roy and former world No. 1
Lee Westwood, followed by
the likes of Adam Scott and


See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS








EEDWAY HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


iET


IN


THE


jAME


Coed softball league returns Oct. 9


Special to the Chronicle
Coed softball is back and
hosted by Citrus County
Parks and Recreation. The
league is scheduled to start
Oct 9.
This league is designed
for levels of all. The league
plays on Tuesday and
Thursday nights at Bicen-
tennial Park with games at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Each
team is required to have a
minimum of four girls each
game. Each team may roster
up to 25 participants.
Last chance to register
will be Wednesday, Oct. 3, at
the Citrus County Resource
Center There is a $50 regis-
tration fee that is required
to sign a team up. Team fees
are based on the number of
entries per league and are
divided up equally among
the teams.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540. If
you are a single player want-
ing to play, call and they will
aid you in finding a team.
Run/walk will
benefit CASA
The inaugural Colors for
CASA5K Race will be Sunday,
Sept. 16, beginning at 8 a.m. at
Lecanto High School. Registra-
tion for the run/walk will begin
at 6:45 a.m.
Proceeds from the event will
benefit the Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association, a domestic vio-
lence victim advocacy center
that provides outreach and shel-
ter services in Citrus County.


Pre-registration fee is $15,
which includes a T-shirt. Registra-
tion the day of the race will be
$20 (T-shirt not guaranteed).
Register at www.active.com, or
email Amanda Pitre at
pitre.amanda.lhs2013@gmail.
corn, or Hannah Huntington at
Huntington.hannah.lhs2013@
gmail.com for a mail-in registra-
tion form.
Back to the
hardwood on Sept. 24
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's men's basketball league
will start Sept. 24. The league
plays games at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m. and 8:30 p.m. on Mondays
and Wednesdays at local
school gymnasiums. This is a 5-
on-5 full court league.
The last chance to register a
team will be Sept. 12. There is a
$50 registration fee required
from each team. League fees
are based on the number of reg-
istered teams and are divided
up equally among the teams.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540.
Men's softball
winding down season
Men's Softball is winding
down, with only four games re-
maining before the playoffs. Ad-
vanced Fitness is leading the
pack undefeated, with eight
wins and no losses. Reflections
Church 2 is right behind them
with five wins and three losses.
The rest of the standings are
as follows: Reflections Church
- (5-4); R.C. Lawn Care (4-
3); 01' guys with help (4-4);


& .- ..
Special to the Chronicle
Coed softball starts back up at Bicentennial Park on Oct. 9.


The Pistols (1-6); and The
Machine (0-7).
Games are played at Bicen-
tennial Park on Monday and
Wednesday nights with games
at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and
8:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome
to come out and be a part of
the action.
Beach volleyball to
begin in September
Beach volleyball is coming
to Citrus County. This will be a
4 on 4 league, with any combi-
nation of men and women. All
participants must be at least
18 years old.
This is a semi-competitive
league. Games will be played
at Bicentennial Park on Tues-
day nights. Get your team to-
gether and get some great
exercise. League play will begin
in September. The team fee
is $50.
For more information or to
register, call Citrus County Parks
& Recreation at 352-527-7540.


Coed kickball
held at park
If you ever thought of joining
the thrilling world of kickball,
well here's your chance. The
next season of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's coed kick-
ball league is coming up.
Kickball is an exciting game
that can be played by people of
all ages. It's a great way to
meet new people and get a little
exercise while having fun. You
must be 18 years old to partici-
pate. Game times will be at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. on
Wednesday. Games will last
one hour or nine innings,
whichever occurs first. All
games are at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River.
If you have a business, group
of friends, or maybe a close
neighborhood this is a great way
to build some teamwork and
have some fun bonding time.
For more information, call Andy
Smith, Parks & Recreation su-
pervisor, at 352-400-0960.


Pine Ridge Fishing
Club gathers
The Pine Ridge Fishing Club
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at 5690
W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
All fishermen and boaters
are welcome.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for four
hours, or $30 per hour. Times are
arranged with the instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whisper-
ing Pines also offers racquetball
lessons. Call for information.
Registration, open gym
for youth b-ball league
Citrus County YMCA will host
a registration day for its 2012
Fall Youth Basketball League on
Monday, Sept. 10, for kids ages
3 through 12. The event will
begin at 6 p.m. at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center on the
campus of the Key Training Cen-
ter, State Road 44, Crystal River.
Parents may bring children
to register them and those
who are already registered
may attend to meet the
coaches while enjoying shoot-
ing some hoops.
Due to the popularity of last
season, the Citrus YMCA de-
cided to offer a fall league with
a 10-week session. There will
be an age division for 3- to 5-
year-olds for the Junior Basket-
ball League with the Youth


League made up of 6- to 12-
year-olds with several age
brackets. Practices will be held
once a week Monday through
Friday, with games being
played on Saturdays. All prac-
tices and games will be held at
the Key Training Center Chet
Cole Life Enrichment Center
gymnasium.
The league cost is $85 for
ages 6 to 12, and $65 for 3 to
5. Scholarships are available
through the YMCA's Financial
Assistance program.
Volunteer coaches are
needed, and a background
screening is required and pro-
vided by the Citrus County
YMCA. Sponsors are also
needed, and sponsor names
will be printed on team jerseys.
To register for the league,
visit the website at www.ymca-
suncoast.org and download the
form on the Citrus County
page. Visit the office at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway or call 352-
637-0132 for more details.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.


Recreation BRIEFS


Soccer registration
ends Sept. 15
Registration for Nature Coast
Soccer Club's 2012-13 recre-
ational season will end Sept.
15. To register a child, visit
www.naturecoastsoccer.com/.
The fee is $80.
The season-opening Jam-
boree will be Oct. 27 with the
first games being played Nov.
3. Ages 4 to 15 are welcome,
with Under-6 and Under-8 age
groups using an academy pro-
gram, which focuses on skills
development.
NCSC is still looking for local
businesses to sponsor recre-
ational teams, with different levels
of sponsorships available. Email
naturecoastsoccerl @yahoo.com
to become a sponsor.
Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County
Parks & Recreation and Ten-
nis Pro Mehdi Tahiri for youth
tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condi-
tioning, drills, footwork, match
play, doubles and single strat-
egy. The five-week sessions will
be at the Lecanto Community
Park Tennis Courts on Sun-
days. Each session will run
from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8
to 14 and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540, or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers
afterschool programs
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
will be offered at Central Ridge
Elementary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary.
Ages for the Y Afterschool
Program range from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. After-
school programs are a great way
to end the school day, and the
first fall session will offer kids the
opportunity to participate in flag
football, cheerleading and art.
The Citrus County YMCA


has received a grant for the Af-
terschool Programs from Sun-
coast Federal Schools Credit
Union. This grant will enable
the Y to provide scholarships
for 200 children this school year
to participate in the enrichment
clubs. Both financial assistance
and registration forms will be
available at the school offices,
the YMCA office in Beverly
Hills, and online at www.
ymcasuncoast.org. For more
information, call the Citrus Y at
352-637-0132.
Still spots
available for PLAY
The next season of PLAY will
begin Sept. 10. The PLAY pro-
gram (Preparing Little Athletes
Youth) is a comprehensive motor
skills development program that
will prepare you and your child
for the world of organized sports.
The PLAY program is de-
signed for children ages 3 to 5,
each child will receive a team T-
shirt and age-appropriate
sports equipment. Each pro-
gram runs for six weeks, one
night a week for one hour.
Soccer and T-ball will be the
next sports offered. The cost is
$45 per child; sign your child up
for more than one sport in the
same session and save $10.
There are still a few spots
available. For more information,
call Crysta Henry, recreation
program specialist for youth pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Get in shape
at boot camp
The YMCA offers an outdoor
boot camp at King's Bay Park.
Boot camp classes are from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday
and Thursday. The program fee
is $35 per month.
This energetic workout will
get you in shape by combining
cardio, strength and core con-
ditioning with lots of fun. It is
everything you need to burn fat
and calories, plus it is de-
signed for all levels of fitness
because everyone works out
at their own pace.
Here is what you will need to
get started: water, a towel and
dumbbells that weigh 5 to 8
pounds. Just show up at the
park to get started.
For more information, call


352-637-0132 or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
YMCA is
SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an of-
ficial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little or
no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet
at the First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa on Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fri-
days. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates and stability
and strength. To find out if you
are eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider.
For information, call the YMCA
office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for a
community Divine Yoga class at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA
now offers its Group Exercise
program at First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, the Y's westside
venue for health and wellness
classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered.
For more information about
the YMCA Group Exercise pro-
gram, call the office at 352-
637-0132. Financial assistance
is available to all those who
qualify. The YMCA office is in
Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and is open
noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.


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0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rangers 4, Rays 2,
10 innings
Texas Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler2b 4 00 0 Fuld If 40 1 1
Andrusdh 4 1 2 0 BUptoncf 4 01 0
Hamltn cf-lf 3 1 1 3 Zobrist ss 4 0 0 0
Beltre 3b 5 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 00 0
N.Cruz rf 4 00 0 Joycerf 4 0 0 0
MiYonglb 4 00 0 Scott dh 4 0 0 0
Morlndlb 0 0 0 0 Kppngrlb 2 11 01
DvMrp If 3 00 0 Thmps pr 0 1 0 0
Gentry cf 0 00 0 Loaton c 0 0 0 0
Soto c 4 02 0 BFrncs ph 1 0 0 0
LMartn pr 0 1 0 0 RRorts 2b 2 00 0
LMrtnz c 0 0 0 0 JMolin c 2 0 0 0
Profarss 4 1 1 1 C.Penaph-1b2 0 0 0
Totals 35 47 4 Totals 33 2 3 1
Texas 000 200 000 2 4
Tampa Bay000 001 010 0 2
E-Kinsler (16). DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-
Texas 6, Tampa Bay 4.2B-Soto (5), Profar (2).
HR-Hamilton (40). SB-B.Upton (29), Thomp-
son (3). CS-Andrus (9), Fuld (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Darvish 8 2 2 1 2 8
Mi.AdamsW,5-3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Nathan S,31-32 1 0 0 0 1 2
Tampa Bay
Archer 7 4 2 2 2 11
Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2
FarnsworthL,1-4 1 3 2 2 1 1
HBP-by Farnsworth (Hamilton), by Archer
(Hamilton). WP-Darvish.
T-3:05. A-18,702 (34,078).

White Sox 5, Royals 4
Kansas City Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
L.Cain cf 5 1 2 0 Wise cf 4 0 1 0
AEscor ss 3 02 1 AIRmrz ss 4 0 1 1
AGordn If 4 0 0 0 Viciedo If 4 1 2 1
Butler b 4 0 1 1 JrDnksIf 0 0 0 0
S.Perezdh 4 0 1 0 Konerklb 3 1 1 1
Francr rf 4 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0
Mostks3b 4 1 2 0 Przynsdh 4 1 1 0
B.Penac 4 0 1 1 Flowrsc 2 1 1 2
TAreu pr 0 1 0 0 Olmedo 3b 4 0 0 0
Giavtll2b 4 1 2 1 Bckhm2b 3 1 1 0
JDyson pr 0 00 0
Totals 36 4114 Totals 32 5 8 5
Kansas City 001 000 012 4
Chicago 101 201 00x 5
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Kansas City 6, Chicago
7. 2B-A.Escobar (27), Moustakas (31), Gi-
avotella (5), AI.Ramirez (23), Beckham (22).
HR-Viciedo (20), Konerko (22), Flowers (7).
SB-A.Escobar (28), J.Dyson (26).
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
B.Chen L,10-12
Mazzaro
Jeffress
Chicago
Sale W,16-6
Crain
Myers
Thornton H,23
A.Reed S,26-30


6 6 5 5 2 6
1 2 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 2


Orioles 5, Yankees 4


New York

Jeter ss
Swisher rf
Teixeir lb
AIRdrg dh
Cano 2b
RMartn c
ENunez pr
CStwrt c
AnJons If
Grndrs cf
ISuzuki cf-
J.Nix 3b
ErChvz 3b
Dickrsn pr
Totals
New York
Baltimore


Baltimore
ab r h bi
5 1 3 0 Markks rf
5 00 1 McLoth pr-lf
4 0 1 0 Andino2b
3 1 1 2 Hardy ss
3 0 1 0 AdJons cf
3 1 1 0 MrRynllb
r 0 0 0 0 Ford If-rf
0 00 0 Machd 3b
2 0 0 0 StTllsn dh
2 00 0 Tegrdnc
If 4 1 2 1
2 000
2 0 1 0
0000
35 4104 Totals
110 000 011
021 002 00x


ab rh
2 1 1

400
4 1 2
4 1 1
3 1 1
4 1 2
4 00
300
300


325 8 5
4
5


DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-NewYork 8, Baltimore
5.2B-Teixeira (27), I.Suzuki (22), McLouth (9),
Hardy (27), AdJones (32). HR-AI.Rodriguez
(17), Hardy (19), Mar.Reynolds (21), Ford (3).
SB-Ford (1). SF-AI.Rodriguez.


New York
Sabathia L,13-5
Eppley
Baltimore
J.Saunders W,2-1
O'Day H,10
Strop H,24
Matusz H,2
Ji.Johnson S,42-45


IP H RERBBSO

61-38 5 5 0 5
12-30 0 0 1 1


2 2
0 0
1 1
0 0
1 0


Twins 3, Indians 0
Cleveland Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r
Choo rf 4 0 2 0 Revere cf 3 2
Kipnis dh 3 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 3 1
AsCarrss 4 0 0 0 Mauerc 4 0
CSantn c 3 00 0 Wlngh dh 1 0
Brantly cf 3 0 0 0 Mornea lb 2 0
Canzlerib 3 0 1 0 Doumitlf 4 0
CPhlps 2b 3 00 0 Mstrnn pr-lf 0 0
Hannhn 3b 3 0 1 0 Parmelrf 4 0
Carrer If 3 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 3 0
Flormn ss 4 0
Totals 29 04 0 Totals 28 3
Cleveland 000 000 000 -
Minnesota 002 010 00x -


2
3
1
0
0




h bi
2 0
1 0
0 1
01
1 1
1 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
73
- 0
- 3


DP-Cleveland 2, Minnesota 2. LOB-Cleve-
land 3, Minnesota 9. SB-Revere 2 (34), J.Car-
roll (8). SF-Willingham.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
McAllister L,5-7 3 2 2 2 3 1
Seddon 11-33 1 1 1 1
Maine 2-3 0 0 0 1
Herrmann 1 0 0 0 0 1
Sipp 1 0 0 0 0 1
S.Barnes 1 2 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
DeVriesW,5-5 6 4 0 0 1 2
DuensingH,7 1 0 0 0 0 0
BurtonH,16 1 0 0 0 0 1
PerkinsS,11-14 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by McAllister (J.Carroll), by S.Barnes
(Plouffe).


Tampa Bay Rays
upcoming schedule
Sept. 9 Texas, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Sept. 14 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Sept. 16 at N.Y Yankees, TBA
Sept. 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 18 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 19 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 20 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 23 Toronto, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 26 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 28 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 29 at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 30 at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oct. 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 2 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 3 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 78
New York 78
Tampa Bay 76
Boston 63
Toronto 62


Wash.
Atlanta
Phila.
New York
Miami


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
61 .561 - 7-3
61 .561 - 3-7
63 .547 2 2 6-4
76 .453 15 15 1-9
75 .453 15 15 5-5


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
53 .619 - 8-2
60 .571 612 6-4
71 .486 1812612 6-4
74 .468 21 9 5-5
78 .443 2412 1212 3-7


Str Home Away
W-1 39-31 39-30 Chicago
L-1 41-28 37-33 Detroit
L-1 38-32 38-31 Kan. City
L-2 32-39 31-37 Cleveland
W-2 34-34 28-41 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
63 .543 - 4-6
64 .533 1Y2 4 4-6
77 .446 131216 4-6
80 .424 161/219 4-6
82 .410 181221 5-5


Home Away
41-28 34-35
43-28 30-36
31-38 31-39
32-37 27-43
26-41 31-41


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-1 44-26 42-27
W-4 40-32 40-28
W-2 33-37 34-34
L-2 30-37 35-37
L-1 32-37 30-41


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .600 - 6-4
65 .532 91/2 3-7
66 .522 11 1 /2 4-6
70 .496 141/25 7-3
86 .381 301/221 4-6
96 .309 401/231 3-7


Str Home Away
W-1 44-27 40-29
L-3 42-29 32-36
L-2 42-29 30-37
W-2 41-28 28-42
W-2 34-34 19-52
L-1 28-40 15-56


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .597 - 6-4
60 .562 5 7-3
63 .543 7/2 2/2 9-1
72 .482 16 11 5-5



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
61 .561 - 6-4
66 .529 412 12 5-5
71 .489 10 6 4-6
74 .468 13 9 6-4
81 .409 21 17 4-6


Home Away
43-25 40-31
42-30 35-30
37-29 38-34
36-34 31-38


Str Home Away
L-1 39-31 39-30
W-1 38-33 36-33
L-1 33-34 35-37
W-3 34-33 31-41
L-3 30-41 26-40


Associated Press
Texas Rangers second baseman lan Kinsler tags out Tampa Bay Rays base runner Sam Fuld ati second base to end
the first inning Saturday in St. Petersburg.




Extra frames yet again for Rays


This time, TB


beaten by Rangers


4-2 in 10 innings

Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Rookie Ju-
rickson Profar hit a tiebreaking RBI
double in the 10th inning, helping the
Texas Rangers beat the Tampa Bay
Rays 4-2 on Saturday night.
Geovany Soto had a two-out double
to deep center off Kyle Farnsworth (1-
4). Profar then made it 3-2 when he
drove in pinch-runner Leonys Martin
on his hit past a diving Carlos Pena
down the first-base line.
Texas took a 4-2 lead when Josh
Hamilton, who earlier hit his 40th
homer this season, was hit by a pitch
with the bases loaded.
Mike Adams (5-3) threw a scoreless
inning for the win before Joe Nathan
pitched the 10th for his 31st save.
Pena was called out looking to end
the game with a runner on second
and was ejected for arguing the call
by plate umpire Mike Estabrook.
Orioles 5, Yankees 4
BALTIMORE The Orioles continued
their long-ball onslaught against the Yan-
kees, hitting three home runs off CC
Sabathia in a 5-4 victory that moved Balti-
more back into a tie atop the AL East with
New York.
Mark Reynolds, Lew Ford and J.J.
Hardy homered for the Orioles, who have
won 11 of 15 overall and nine of the last
13 against the Yankees. With a victory
Sunday, Baltimore will win the season se-
ries (10-8) for the first time since 1997.
Trying to secure a victory for Joe Saun-
ders (2-1), Baltimore closer Jim Johnson
entered with a 5-3 lead in the ninth. He
promptly gave up three straight singles,
the last a bunt by Derek Jeter, to load the
bases with no outs.
White Sox 5, Royals 4
CHICAGO Dayan Viciedo, Tyler
Flowers and Paul Konerko each homered
to back Chris Sale's six solid innings and
lead the Chicago White Sox to a 5-4 win
over the Kansas City Royals.
Sale (16-6) scattered five hits and
struck out six over six innings. He allowed
six baserunners in the first three innings
before settling down to retire the last 10
batters he faced.
Addison Reed finished up, extending his
White Sox rookie record with his 26th save.
Viciedo hit a solo homer in the first for
the game's first run. Flowers connected
with a two-run shot in the fourth and Kon-
erko had a solo blast in the sixth. All three
homers came off Bruce Chen (10-12), who
had won his last four starts in Chicago.

Twins 3, Indians 0
MINNEAPOLIS Cole DeVries
pitched six scoreless innings to win his
third straight start and the Minnesota
Twins beat the Cleveland Indians 3-0.
Joe Mauer had an RBI single and Josh
Willingham added a sacrifice fly in a two-
run third inning for Minnesota, which had
lost four of its past five games.
DeVries(5-5) gave up four hits and
walked one. A trio of relievers combined
for three hitless innings, with Glen
Perkins working the ninth for his 11th
save in 14 chances.
Indians starter Zach McAllister (5-7)
made it through only three innings in los-
ing his third straight decision. He allowed


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 4
Baltimore 5, N.Y. Yankees 4
Minnesota 3, Cleveland 0
Texas 4, Tampa Bay 2, 10 innings
Toronto at Boston, late
Detroit at L.A. Angels, late
Oakland at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees (FGarcia 7-6) at Baltimore (Britton 5-1), 1:35
p.m.
Toronto (Villanueva 7-5) at Boston (Buchholz 11-5), 1:35
p.m.
Texas (Oswalt 4-2) at Tampa Bay (Shields 13-8), 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 1-3) at Minnesota (Vasquez 0-1), 2:10
p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 4-3) at Chicago White Sox (H.Santi-
ago 3-1), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (A.Sanchez 2-4) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 4-2), 3:35
p.m.
Oakland (Milone 11-10) at Seattle (Vargas 14-9), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Washington 7, Miami 6, 10 innings
Atlanta 11, N.Y. Mets 3
L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 2
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado at Philadelphia, ppd., rain
Cincinnati 5, Houston 1
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 3
Arizona at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-8) at Philadelphia (Cloyd 1-1), 1
p.m., 1st game
Atlanta (Hanson 12-8) at N.Y. Mets (C.Young 4-7), 1:10
p.m.
Houston (E.Gonzalez 1 -0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 17-7), 1:10
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Rusin 0-2) at Pittsburgh (Locke 0-1), 1:35
p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 11-12) at Washington (E.Jackson 9-9),
1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 5-4) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 5-6), 2:15
p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 5-6) at San Diego (Werner 1-1), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Undecided) at Philadelphia (Undecided), 6:35
p.m., 2nd game
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 12-8) at San Francisco (Zito 10-8),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.


two runs on two hits and three walks.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 11, Mets 3
NEW YORK Kris Medlen extended
Atlanta's scoreless streak to 31 innings
for its best string in more than 20 years,
slumping Brian McCann drove in four
runs with four hits and the Braves beat
the New York Mets 11-3.
A tornado touched down in Queens
about 15 miles away several hours before
the game. Dark, ominous clouds swept in
later, causing a 75-minute rain delay after
the sixth inning.
The NL wild card leaders won their
fourth straight. McCann homered, dou-
bled and tied a career high for hits and
Dan Uggla kept up his recent resurgence
at the plate with three hits and two walks,
scoring three times.
Medlen (8-1) allowed four hits and left
with an 8-2 lead after the rain and con-
tributed a long RBI double.
Atlanta has won the last 19 games
Medlen has started, dating to 2010.
Nationals 7, Marlins 6, 10 inns.
WASHINGTON Pinch hitter Corey
Brown's single drove in lan Desmond with
the winning run in the bottom of the 10th
inning, lifting the Washington Nationals to


a 7-6 victory over the Florida Marlins.
After Adam LaRoche singled off Chad
Guadin (3-2) to open the inning,
Desmond singled him to third and Danny
Espinosa was intentionally walked to load
the bases. Suzuki grounded into a
fielder's choice with LaRoche thrown out
at home, but Brown followed with a bloop
single to right.
The Nationals, a major league-best 86-
53, began the day with a 61-game lead
over the Atlanta Braves in the NL East.
Dodgers 3, Giants 2
SAN FRANCISCO Hanley Ramirez
hit a go-ahead RBI double in the top of
the ninth inning and the Los Angeles
Dodgers trimmed a game off their division
deficit with a 3-2 win against the NL
West-leading San Francisco Giants.
Adrian Gonzalez led off the ninth with a
triple against Jeremy Affeldt (1-2), then
Ramirez came through with a double to
the gap in right-center. That was the
Dodgers' first hit in 15 tries so far this se-
ries with runners in scoring position.
Ronald Belisario (5-1) pitched out of
trouble in the eighth for the victory, help-
ing Los Angeles snap a four-game losing
streak to rival San Francisco in a key
September weekend.
Cubs 4, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH Jeff Samardzija
pitched the Cubs' first complete game in
his final start of the season and Chicago
beat the fading Pittsburgh Pirates 4-3.
David DeJesus singled in Welington
Castillo with two outs in the eighth for the
go-ahead run after Pittsburgh had tied the
game at 3 in the bottom of the seventh.
Samardzija (9-13) overcame a rocky
first inning to allow two hits over his final
8 2-3 innings. With the 27-year-old in his
first full season as a major league starter,
the Cubs announced Friday their inten-
tion to shut him down for the season.
Alfonso Soriano hit his 27th home run
for the Cubs, who arrived in Pittsburgh
having lost 17 of their previous 18 road
games but won for the second consecu-
tive night.
Reds 5, Astros 1
CINCINNATI Bronson Arroyo ex-
tended his personal winning streak to five
games, Jay Bruce and Brandon Phillips
hit solo home runs and the first-place
Cincinnati Reds bounced back from a
frustrating loss with a 5-1 win over the
last-place Houston Astros.
Phillips and Joey Votto both had two
hits to help Arroyo improve to 8-1 over his
last nine starts and 9-2 since July 6.
Arroyo (12-7) had at least one
baserunner in every inning except the
seventh his last but allowed just a
first-inning run.
Brewers 6, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS --Aramis Ramirez had
three hits, including his 22nd home run,
to lead the Milwaukee Brewers to a 6-3
win over the St. Louis Cardinals.
Ricky Weeks added a solo home run
and Ryan Braun went 3 for 5 with a run
scored for Milwaukee. Carlos Gomez went
2 for 4 and drove in two runs. Ramirez,
who also walked twice, reached base all
five times he batted and scored twice.
Mike Fiers (9-7) allowed one run and
five hits in five innings and also got his
first career RBI with a single in the sec-
ond inning. John Axford pitched a score-
less ninth for his 27th save.
Adron Chambers had an RBI triple for
St. Louis. Jake Westbrook (13-11) went
five innings and allowed three runs on
seven hits to take the loss.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 B3



NL

Nationals 7, Marlins 6,
10 innings
Miami Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GHrndzcf 4 1 1 1 Werthrf 5 1 1 1
DSolan2b 4 2 2 1 Harper cf 4 21 1
Reyes ss 5 0 1 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 22 2
Stanton rf 5 1 1 1 Morse If 4 0 1 0
Ca.Leelb 3 11 0 EPerezpr-lf 0 0 0 0
Ruggin If 5 0 1 0 TMoore ph-lf 1 0 0 0
J.Buckc 5 0 1 1 LaRochib 5 0 2 0
DMrph3b 4 1 1 0 Dsmndss 5 1 2 0
Buehrle p 3 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 4 0 1 1
Petersn ph 1 0 0 0 Flores c 2 1 1 1
ARamsp 0 00 0 Tracy ph 0 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 KSuzukc 1 00 0
Webbp 0 0 0 0 Detwilrp 2 00 0
H.Bellp 0 0 0 0 Stmmnp 0 00 0
Gaudinp 0 0 0 0 Lmrdzzph 1 00 0
CGarci p 0 00 0
Berndn ph 1 00 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Storen p 0 00 0
CBrwnph 1 0 1 1
Totals 39 69 4 Totals 40712 7
Miami 210 020 100 0 6
Wash. 001 110 021 1 7
One out when winning run scored.
E-LaRoche (7), Zimmerman (14). LOB-
Miami 7, Washington 10. 2B-D.Solano (8),
Ruggiano (19), Do.Murphy (5). HR-G.Her-
nandez (2), Stanton (32), Werth (5), Harper
(18), Zimmerman (20), Flores (6). SB-Reyes
(35), Desmond (17). CS-Ruggiano (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Buehrle 7 5 3 3 2 5
A.Ramos 0 2 2 2 0 0
M.Dunn 0 1 0 0 0 0
WebbH,10 1 0 0 0 1 2
H.Bell BS,7-26 1 1 1 1 0 3
GaudinL,3-2 1-3 3 1 1 1 0
Washington
Detwiler 5 7 5 3 3 3
Stammen 2 1 1 0 1 2
C.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 2
Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 3
Storen W,2-1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Dodgers 3, Giants 2
Los Angeles San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi


M.Ellis 2b 4 0 2 0
Victorn cf 3 0 1 1
AdGnzllb 4 1 1 0
HRmrzss 4 0 2 1
Ethierrf 2 00 00
L.Cruz3b 4 00 0
JRiverl If 3 0 1 0
Cstllns pr-lf 0 1 0 0
A.Ellisc 2 0 0 0
Capuanp 2 1 1 0
BAreuph 0 00 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0
League 0 00 0
Totals 28 38 2


Pagan cf
Scutaro 2b
Sandovl 3b
Posey c
Pence rf
Arias ss
Belt lb
GBlanc If
M.Cain p
SCasill p
Affeldt p
Mota p
HSnchz ph
Totals


Los Angeles 000 001 011 3
San Francisco 100 000 100 2
DP-Los Angeles 2, San Francisco 2. LOB-
Los Angeles 3, San Francisco 7. 2B-Victorino
(24), H.Ramirez (27), J.Rivera (14), Scutaro
(27), Posey (33), G.Blanco (12). 3B-Ad.Gon-
zalez (1). CS-H.Ramirez 2 (7), Ethier (2). S-
A.Ellis, Pence, M.Cain. SF-Victorino.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Capuano
Belisario W,5-1
League S,2-2
San Francisco
M.Cain
S.Casilla
Affeldt L,1-2
Mota


71-36 2
2-3 0 0
1-3 2 1
2-3 0 0


Braves 11, Mets 3


Atlanta
ab r h bi
Bourn cf 6 0 1 0
RJhnsn cf 0 0 0 0
Prado ss-3b6 1 3 2
Heywrdrf 5 1 1 0
C.Jones 3b 3 0 0 1


3 33 0
5 34 4
5 1 2 1


0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0


Janish ss
FFrmn lb
Uggla 2b
McCnn c
Constnz If
Medlen p
JFrncs ph
Avilan p
Hinske ph
Gearrin p


Totals 43111711
Atlanta 014
NewYork 000


New York

Baxter rf
Hairstn ph-rf
DnMrp 2b
Acosta p
Famili p


ab rh bi
3 00 0
1 0 0 0
3 00 0
0 00 0
0 0 0 0


RRmrzp 0 00 0
Lutzph 1 0 0 0
EIRmrp 0 0 0 0
DWrght 3b 4 2 2 0
I.Davis lb 3 0 1 0
Duda If 4 0 2 2
Tejada ss 4 00 0
Vldspn cf 3 0 1 0
Thole c 2 0 0 0
Nickesph-c 2 0 1 0
Hefnerp 0 00 0
Hmpsnp 0 0 0 0
FLewis ph 1 00 0
RCarsn p 0 00 0
RCeden ph-2b3 1 1 1
Totals 34 3 8 3
021 201 11
110 010 3


E-Dan.Murphy (15). DP-Atlanta 1, NewYork
1. LOB-Atlanta 10, New York 6. 2B-Bourn
(23), Heyward (27), McCann (13), Medlen (1),
Duda (12). HR-McCann (19), Hinske (2),
R.Cedeno (4). S-Medlen.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
MedlenW,8-1 6 4 2 2 2 3
Avilan 2 4 1 1 0 1
Gearrin 1 0 0 0 0 3
NewYork
HefnerL,2-6 22-38 5 5 2 1
Hampson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Carson 2 2 2 2 1 1
Acosta 1 1 1 1 0 0
Familia 1 4 2 2 0 1
R.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 1 0
El.Ramirez 1 2 1 1 0 3


Cubs 4, Pirates 3


Chicago


Pittsburgh
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


DeJessrf 4 0 2 1 Holt 2b 4 1 1 0
Valuen 3b 3 0 0 1 SMarte If 3 0 0 0
Rizzolb 4 0 1 0 AMcCtcf 3 1 0 0
ASorinlf 5 1 1 1 GJoneslb 3 0 0 0
Matherl If 0 0 0 0 PAIvrz3b 4 0 2 2
SCastro ss 3 0 1 0 Presleyrf 4 00 0
WCastll c 4 1 2 0 Barmes ss 3 00 0
Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 GSnchz ph 1 00 0
Smrdzj p 3 0 0 0 Barajs c 3 0 0 0
Campn cf 3 2 2 0 JHrrsn pr 0 1 0 0
McKnrc 0 00 0
JMcDnIp 2 00 0
Watson p 0 00 0
JHughsp 0 0 0 0
Clemnt ph 1 0 1 1
Grillip 0 0 0 0
Resop p 0 00 0
Totals 33 4103 Totals 31 3 4 3
Chicago 011 010 010 4
Pittsburgh 200 000 100 3
E-S.Castro (23). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-
Chicago 10, Pittsburgh 4. 2B-W.Castillo (9),
Campana (6), PAlvarez (23). HR-A.Soriano
(27). SB-DeJesus (7), Rizzo (3), S.Castro
(23), Campana (27). CS-S.Castro (13). S-
Samardzija, S.Marte. SF-Valbuena.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Samardzija W,9-13
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald
Watson
J.Hughes
Grilli L,1-5
Resop


9 4 3 2 1 9






B4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012



Friday's late box

Lecanto 24,
Weeki Wachee 7
Lecanto 7 7 0 10 24
WW 700 0 7
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
L: Barber 55 pass to Marcic (Leiva kick)
WW: Tinch 4 pass to King (kick good)
Second Quarter
L: Waters 16 rush (Leiva kick)
Fourth Quarter
L: Waters 9 rush (Leiva kick)
L: Leiva 24 FG
Rushing leaders
L: Waters 10-57-2, Poe 7-76-0.
WW: Vreeland 6-12-0.
Passing leaders
Lec: Barber 10-14-159-1-1.
WW: Tinch 4-13-24-1-1.
Receiving Leaders
Lec: Lucas 7-81-0, Marcic 1-55-1.
WW: Cimino3-15-0.
Defensive leaders
Sacks: Lec J. Nightengale 2, Anderson 2,
Riemer.
Int: Lec- Horton.
Saturday box score


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
2-5-9
CASH 3 (late)
2-5-8

PLAY 4 (early)
9-4-9-6
PLAY 4 (late)
3-4-8-9

FANTASY 5
Or Unavailable

POWERBALL LOTTERY
6-20-34-44-48 14-21-27-31-45-52
POWER BALL XTRA
29 2


No. 6 Florida St. 55, On theAIRWAVES
Savannah St. 0


Savannah St. 0 0 0 0-- 0
Florida St. 35 13 7 0 55
First Quarter
FSU-R.Smith 61 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 14:21.
FSU-Thompson 6 run (Hopkins kick), 11:51.
FSU-Dent 8 pass from Manuel (Hopkins kick),
8:53.
FSU-Benjamin 9 pass from Manuel (Hopkins
kick), 7:57.
FSU-Freeman 5 run (Hopkins kick), :49.
Second Quarter
FSU-Wilder 19 run (Hopkins kick), 10:06.
FSU-Wilder 1 run (kick failed), 8:02.
Third Quarter
FSU-Benjamin 19 pass from Coker (Hopkins


kick), 11:24.
A-71,126.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


FSU
20
23-167
246
17-21-0
64
1-46.0
0-0
2-15
20:18


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Savannah St., Barnes 11-34, Veals
3-5, Bostick 4-(minus 20). Florida St., Freeman
7-69, Smiley 7-28, Thompson 3-25, Wilder 4-
20, Benjamin 1-16, Pryor 1-9.
PASSING-Savannah St., Bostick 2-15-0-9.
Florida St., Manuel 11-13-0-161, Trickett 5-6-0-
66, Coker 1-2-0-19.
RECEIVING-Savannah St., Lackey 1-12,
Veals 1-(minus 3). Florida St., R.Smith 3-77,
Benjamin 3-46, Shaw 3-30, Dent 2-19, Thomp-
son 1-19, Haulstead 1-15, Haggins 1-13,
Kourtzidis 1-13, Freeman 1-7, Greene 1-7.



Reds 5, Astros 1


Houston Cincinnati
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Pareds 2b 5 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 3 1 2 1
FMrtnzrf 2 1 2 0 Heiseycf 5 0 0 0
BBarns ph-rfl 00 0 Votto 1 b 3 1 2 0
Wallacib 4 0 0 0 Cairopr-1b 0 0 0 0
Maxwll cf 3 0 1 1 Ludwck If 4 0 0 0
JCastro c 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 2 1 1
JDMrtn If 4 0 2 0 Frazier 3b 2 1 0 0
Dmngz3b 4 0 2 0 Hanignc 3 0 1 1
Greene ss 3 0 1 0 WValdzss 4 0 1
Bogsvc ph 1 0 0 0 Arroyo p 3 0 0 0
BNorrs p 2 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
FRdrgzp 0 00 0 HRdrgzph 1 01 0
JSchafrph 1 00 0 Broxtnp 0 00 0
XCedenp 0 00 0
JValdz p 0 00 0
MDwnsph 1 01 0
Totals 34 19 1 Totals 31 5 8 4
Houston 100 000 000 1
Cincinnati 011 003 00x 5
E-Fe.Rodriguez (1), B.Phillips (5). DP-
Cincinnati 2. LOB-Houston 9, Cincinnati 9.
2B-FMartinez (5), Votto (37). HR-B.Phillips
(16), Bruce (33). SB-B.Phillips (12), Cairo (4).
CS-J.D.Martinez (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Houston
B.Norris L,5-12
Fe.Rodriguez
X.Cedeno
J.Valdez
Cincinnati
ArroyoW,12-7
Marshall
Broxton


51-36 5
2-3 1 0
2-3 0 0
11-31 0


5 2 4
0 1 2
0 0 1
0 2 0


7 7 1 1 2 5
1 0 0 0 1 1
1 2 0 0 0 1


HBP-by X.Cedeno (Votto), by B.Norris (Fra-
zier).
Brewers 6, Cardinals 3
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 4 00 0 Jay cf 5 0 1 0
RWeks 2b 5 1 1 1 MCrpnt rf 2 0 1 0
Braun If 5 1 3 0 Chamrs pr-rf 2 0 1 1
ArRmr 3b 3 2 3 1 Hollidy If 3 0 0 0
Hartib 4 1 2 1 Craigib 4 0 1 0
Lucroyc 5 1 3 0 YMolinc 3 1 0 0
CGomz cf 4 0 2 2 Freese 3b 3 1 2 0
Bianchi ss 3 0 0 0 Kozma ss 1 0 1 0
Fiersp 2 0 1 1 Schmkr2b 3 0 0 1
TGreen ph 1 0 0 0 Descals ss-3b4 0 1 1
LHrndzp 0 0 0 0 Westrkp 1 0 0 0
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 RJcksn ph 1 0 0 0
Farrisph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthlp 0 0 0 0
Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0 BryAnd ph 1 1 1 0
Ishikaw ph 0 0 0 0 SFrmn p 0 0 0 0
Mldnd ph 1 0 0 0 Beltran ph 1 0 0 0
Axfordp 0 00 0 Salasp 0 00 0


VMarte p
Rzpczy p
Totals 38 6156 Totals
Milwaukee 021 000 102
St. Louis 010 000 110


0 00 0
0 00 0
343 9 3
6
3


E-Schumaker (3), Freese (13). DP-Milwau-
kee 1, St. Louis 1. LOB-Milwaukee 12, St.
Louis 10. 2B-Ar.Ramirez (44), Craig (29),
Freese (24), Kozma (1). 3B-Chambers (2).
HR-R.Weeks (17), Ar.Ramirez (22). SB-
C.Gomez (32), Bry.Anderson (1). CS-Braun
(7). S-C.Gomez, Bianchi. SF-Schumaker.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
FiersW,9-7 5 5 1 1 3 5
Li.HernandezH,2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Fr.Rodriguez H,27 1 2 1 1 0 2
HendersonH,8 1 1 1 1 1 1
Axford S,27-35 1 0 0 0 1 1
St. Louis
WestbrookL,13-11 5 7 3 3 4 2
Rosenthal 2 4 1 1 1 3
S.Freeman 1 0 0 0 0 0
Salas 1-3 2 2 2 0 1
V.Marte 1-32 0 0 0 0
Rzepczynski 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .330; Trout,
Los Angeles, .329;Jeter, NewYork, .323; Beltre,
Texas, .318; Fielder, Detroit, .315; Mauer, Min-
nesota, .314; DavMurphy Texas, .314.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 109; Hamilton,
Texas, 93; Kinsler, Texas, 93; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 89; AJackson, Detroit, 87; Jeter, New York,
87; AdJones, Baltimore, 86.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 119; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 116; Willingham, Minnesota, 102; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 97; Fielder, Detroit, 95; Pujols,
Los Angeles, 93; Beltre, Texas, 89.
HITS-Jeter, NewYork, 189; MiCabrera, De-


troit, 174; Beltre, Texas, 168; AGordon, Kansas
City, 166; Butler, Kansas City, 162; Andrus,
Texas, 160; Cano, New York, 160.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 46; Pu-
jols, Los Angeles, 40; Cano, New York, 38;
Kinsler, Texas, 38; Choo, Cleveland, 37; Ad-
Gonzalez, Boston, 37; Brantley, Cleveland, 36.
TRIPLES-AJackson, Detroit, 10; JWeeks,
Oakland, 8; Rios, Chicago, 7; Zobrist, Tampa
Bay, 7; Andrus, Texas, 6; AEscobar, Kansas City,
6; ISuzuki, New York, 6;Trout, Los Angeles, 6.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 40; ADunn,
Chicago, 38; Encarnacion, Toronto, 38; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 35; Granderson, New York, 34;
Willingham, Minnesota, 33; Beltre, Texas, 30;
Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30.
STOLEN BASES-Trout, Los Angeles, 44;
RDavis, Toronto, 40; Revere, Minnesota, 34;
Crisp, Oakland, 32; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 29;
AEscobar, Kansas City, 28; Kipnis, Cleveland, 27.
PITCHING-Price, Tampa Bay, 17-5; Weaver,
Los Angeles, 16-4; Sale, Chicago, 16-6;
Scherzer, Detroit, 15-6; MHarrison, Texas, 15-
9; Darvish, Texas, 14-9; Vargas, Seattle, 14-9;
PHughes, New York, 14-12.
STRIKEOUTS-Scherzer, Detroit, 213; Ver-
lander, Detroit, 209; Darvish, Texas, 196; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 195; Shields, Tampa Bay, 181;
Price, Tampa Bay, 175; Sale, Chicago, 168.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 42; JiJohnson,
Baltimore, 42; RSoriano, NewYork, 36; CPerez,
Cleveland, 35; Nathan, Texas, 31;Valverde, De-
troit, 28; Reed, Chicago, 26.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346;
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .341; Posey, San
Francisco, .325;YMolina, St. Louis, .321; Braun,
Milwaukee, .314; DWright, New York, .314;
CGonzalez, Colorado, .309.
RUNS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 94; Braun,
Milwaukee, 92; Bourn, Atlanta, 88; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 86; JUpton, Arizona, 86; Holliday, St.
Louis, 85; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 84; Hart,
Milwaukee, 84.
RBI-Braun, Milwaukee, 100; Headley, San
Diego, 98; Bruce, Cincinnati, 95; Holliday, St.
Louis, 92; LaRoche, Washington, 92; ASoriano,
Chicago, 92; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 90.
HITS-AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 172; Prado,
Atlanta, 162; Braun, Milwaukee, 161; Bourn, At-
lanta, 160; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 159;
Reyes, Miami, 158; Holliday, St. Louis, 157.
DOUBLES-ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 44;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 39; Prado, Atlanta, 37;
Votto, Cincinnati, 37; DWright, New York, 37;
AHill, Arizona, 35; Bruce, Cincinnati, 34; Hart,
Milwaukee, 34.
TRIPLES-SCastro, Chicago, 11; Fowler,
Colorado, 11; Reyes, Miami, 11; Bourn, Atlanta,
10; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 10; Pagan, San
Francisco, 10; Colvin, Colorado, 9.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 38; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 33; Stanton, Miami, 32; LaRoche,
Washington, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 28; PAIvarez,
Pittsburgh, 27; Hart, Milwaukee, 27; Kubel, Ari-
zona, 27; ASoriano, Chicago, 27.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Atlanta, 38; Reyes,
Miami, 35; Pierre, Philadelphia, 34; Victorino,
Los Angeles, 33; CGomez, Milwaukee, 32; Boni-
facio, Miami, 30; DGordon, Los Angeles, 30.
PITCHING-Dickey New York, 18-4; GGon-
zalez, Washington, 18-7; Cueto, Cincinnati, 17-
7; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 15-6; Strasburg,
Washington, 15-6; 6 tied at 14.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 201;
Strasburg, Washington, 197; Dickey, New York,
195; GGonzalez, Washington, 185; Gallardo,
Milwaukee, 182; Samardzija, Chicago, 180;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 178.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 35; AChapman,
Cincinnati, 35; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 34; Motte,
St. Louis, 33; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 31; Clip-
pard, Washington, 30; Putz, Arizona, 28.


PGA Tour

BMW Championship
Saturday
At Crooked Stick Golf Club Course,
Carmel, Ind.
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,497, Par: 72
Third Round


69-67-64 -
65-66-69 -
68-65-68 -
64-68-69-
68-68-66 -
67-69-66 -
68-67-67-
65-67-71 -
67-69-68 -
68-67-69-
64-69-71 -
68-69-68 -
68-68-69-
68-68-69 -
70-65-70 -
66-66-73 -
69-70-67-
70-69-68 -
68-70-69 -
67-70-70 -
70-66-71 -
71-64-72-
68-66-73-
68-71-69-
71-66-71 -
64-70-74-
69-69-71 -
69-69-71 -
69-68-72-
69-68-72 -
68-73-68 -
70-66-73-
69-67-73 -
66-72-72 -
68-71-71 -
67-70-73-
70-69-72 -
69-71-71 -
71-69-71 -
72-71-68-
70-74-67-
72-72-67-
72-67-73-
64-75-73-
66-73-73 -
67-71-74-
73-69-70 -
74-70-68 -
68-71-74-
70-71-72-
74-71-68 -
74-72-67-
69-73-72-
70-72-72-
70-69-76-
69-72-74 -
69-73-73-
71-71-73-
67-76-72 -
72-71-72-
69-70-77-
71-70-75-
75-72-69-
75-72-70 -
76-71-71 -
72-76-70-
75-73-71 -
77-72-70-
77-72-72-
70-73-80 -


Phil Mickelson
Vijay Singh
Lee Westwood
Rory Mcllroy
Adam Scott
Robert Garrigus
Dustin Johnson
TigerWoods
Zach Johnson
Graeme McDowell
Bo Van Pelt
Louis Oosthuizen
Chris Kirk
lan Poulter
Padraig Harrington
Ryan Moore
Jim Furyk
Ben Curtis
Kyle Stanley
Justin Rose
Troy Matteson
Bill Haas
Seung-Yul Noh
Ernie Els
Brendon de Jonge
Graham DeLaet
Sergio Garcia
Brandt Snedeker
Martin Laird
Charl Schwartzel
Steve Stricker
John Huh
Tom Gillis
Luke Donald
Matt Every
Rickie Fowler
Nick Watney
Bubba Watson
Bob Estes
Kevin Na
J.B. Holmes
Pat Perez
Jason Dufner
Webb Simpson
Ryan Palmer
Ben Crane
Brian Harman
Greg Chalmers
Geoff Ogilvy
Johnson Wagner
D.A. Points
Jeff Overton
Matt Kuchar
Charlie Wi
John Senden
Bud Cauley
Kevin Stadler
Tim Clark
Jimmy Walker
Scott Piercy
David Hearn
Keegan Bradley
Charley Hoffman
Carl Pettersson
Dicky Pride
MarkWilson
Marc Leishman
Bryce Molder
William McGirt
Hunter Mahan


FSU stomps Savannah



St. in shortened game


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Federated Auto Parts 400
race (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series: MAC Tools U.S.
Nationals (Taped)
BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco
Giants (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Texas A&M (Taped)
7 p.m. (SUN) Savannah State at Florida State (Taped)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Auburn at Mississippi State (Taped)
NFL
Note: The Tampa Bay Buccaneers game is blacked out
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Houston Texans
4 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco 49ers at Green Bay Packers
8:15 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Steelers at Denver Broncos
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: KLM Open Final
Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: BMW Championship Final
Round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour Golf BMW Championship Final
Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kingsmill Championship -
Final Round
BULL RIDING
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR Texas Redneck Bull Bash (Taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) PBR The Jack Daniel's Invitational
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 2012 U.S. Open Women's Doubles
Final
4 p.m. (CBS) 2012 U.S. Open Men's Final
VOLLEYBALL
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Beach Volleyball (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


a time of 23:01 for the Pi-
rates while Delaney Caleau
was 34th with a clocking of
23:07.
"This was her first race
ever," said coach Lisa
Carter of Lane. "I am ex-
cited. They did well."
The Citrus High girls
were 15th with a score of


No. 6'Noles

win around

weather delays

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE EJ
Manuel passed for three
touchdowns in the opening
seven minutes and sixth-
ranked Florida State's de-
fense held lower-division
Savannah State to 28 yards
Saturday on its way to a 55-
0 victory in a game called in
the third quarter because
of lightning.
The Seminoles bolted to a
35-0 lead in the first quarter
as Manuel completed 11 of
13 passes for 161 yards and
five different Seminoles
scored touchdowns. Manuel
didn't play after the opening
quarter.
Florida State (2-0) led 48-0
at halftime and finished with
413 yards. James Wilder Jr
and Kelvin Benjamin each
scored two touchdowns be-
fore the game was called with
8:59 left in the third period.
Savannah State, a Foot-
ball Championship Subdivi-
sion school, has been
outscored by a combined
139-0 in its first two games
this season. It was beaten
84-0 at Oklahoma State last
week. The Mid-Eastern Ath-
letic Conference member is
collecting paychecks total-
ing $860,000 for the two



BMW
Continued from Page B1

Dustin Johnson. And only
three shots behind was Tiger
Woods, who keeps getting
the most out of a scrappy
game and is very much in
the mix going into Sunday
'The cream has risen to the
top, hasn't it?" Westwood said.
This follows the Deutsche
Bank Championship in


SEC
Continued from Page B1

those sort of things, but with
all of our hospitality in the
SEC, we're trying to make
everybody happy and every-
body wanted the glory story
here with A&M, and they did-
n't get it," Muschamp said.
Florida trailed 17-10 at
halftime after a first half in
which Texas A&M's offense
under new coach Kevin
Sumlin pretty much did what
it wanted. Things changed in
the second half as the Gators
clamped down and forced
punts each of A&M's six pos-
sessions after the break.
"In the second half we just



RUNNING
Continued from Page B1

Benoist continued. "I think
we have a real chance this
year to go to state."
Benoist wowed the local
cross country scene when
she was a fast fifth grader at
Seven Rivers Christian.
Today, she has been to state
six times and seems like a
good bet to run again in
Tallahassee.
"I think some of the girls
ran very well and some of
the girls didn't run as well as
they would like," said
Lecanto High assistant
coach Steve Farnsworth.
"Katie Mattingly (47th, 23:57)
ran her first race of her life.
My daughter (Claire) ran her
first race. She ran well.
Chloe didn't have a good
race. That happens."
Citrus High's Alyssa
Weber had the top local fin-
ish with seventh but she did-
n't seem satisfied. She ran a
21:06.
"I thought I could do bet-
ter," she said.
The Crystal River High
girls team did not have a
team score as several key
members were missing due
to other commitments.
Chloe Lane was 32nd with


games, which will help the
athletic program meet its
total budget of $5.1 million.
The school came into the
game as unprecedented 70
1/2-point underdogs and
covered, thanks to the
weather.
How lopsided was it?
Florida State racked up 255
yards in the first quarter
while Savannah State's of-
fense went backward to the
tune of 20 yards.
Savannah State trailed 35-
0 by the time it picked up its
first of three first downs in
the game on a 12-yard pass
from Antonio Bostick to Ed-
ward Lackey, Jr.
Florida State scored four
touchdowns on its first 13
plays and led 28-0 just seven
minutes into the game as
things went wrong from the

which McIlroy held off
Louis Oosthuizen, Woods,
Mickelson and Johnson.
The opening week at The
Barclays featured Nick Wat-
ney beating Ryder Cup pick
Brandt Snedeker, Johnson
and Sergio Garcia.
And now this perhaps
the strongest leaderboard in
golf all year going into the
final round.
The 16 players separated
by five shots have won 29
majors and 21 World Golf

played more disciplined
football," Muschamp said.
Sumlin, the former Hous-
ton coach, was disappointed
the Aggies continued a
trend from last year of en-
tering the second half with a
lead, only to lose.
"It's something we ad-
dressed," he said. "It's the
elephant in the room."
Caleb Sturgis helped
Florida cut A&M's lead to 17-
13 with a 25-yard field goal
early in the third quarter.
Florida quarterback Jeff
Driskel looked indecisive
most of the day and was
sacked eight times. But he
made a play when he had to,
finding Omarius Hines on a
39-yard completion to pro-
pel a drive early in the


420 points.
Crystal River male run-
ner Brandon Harris was
27th with a time of 18:12.
"I'm happy with my whole
team," said Crystal River
High boys coach Tim Byrne.
"Everybody on the team ran
well for the first race of the
season. Brandon ran well. I
am hoping to get some com-
petition out of them."
Lecanto's Sam Alford was
38th with a time of 18:36.
The Crystal River High
boys were 10th with a score
of 326. Citrus High was 13th
with a score of 406.
Lecanto's boys were 15th
with a score of 409.
Citrus's Corbin Clarke
was 65th with a time of
19:34.
"We are not in good
shape," said Citrus High
boys coach James Martone.
"We missed a lot of days
with the rain. If they are not
on their own, we are fight-
ing the early part of the sea-
son. I am very proud of
Corbin Clarke. Cameron
Grant was second. We can
only get better"
Lecanto Invitational Cross
Country Meet at Lecanto
High Results
Girls team scores
1. Nature Coast 94; 2.
George Jenkins 104; 3. Sickles
105; 4. Sarasota 117; 5. Van-
guard 164; 6. Belleview 196; 7.
Lecanto 210; 8. Buchholz 213;
9. Mitchell 231; 10. Steinbren-
ner 266; 11. Springstead 297;
12. Forest 327; 13. Land O'
Lakes 375; 14. Ridgewood 391;
15. Citrus 420; 16. South Lake
434; 17. Trinity Catholic 442;
18. Hernando 456; 19. Pasco


outset for the visitors.
Savannah State (0-2) won
the opening coin toss and
elected to defer and then
booted the game's opening
kickoff out of bounds, giving
Florida State the ball at its
own 35. Just 39 seconds later,
Manuel hit Rodney Smith on
a 61-yard scoring bomb on
the Seminoles third play
and the rout was on.
Chris Thompson's 6-yard
run 2 1/2 minutes later made
it 14-0, followed by Manuel's
8-yard TD pass to Greg Dent
made it 21-0 with 8:53 re-
maining in the first quarter
After a Rashad Greene
punt return of 39 yards,
Manuel connected with Ben-
jamin on a 9-yard touchdown
pass and the Seminoles were
up 28-0 with 7:57 remaining
in the opening period.

Championships, and four of
them have been No. 1 in the
world over the last decade.
"The crowd is pretty
rowdy, and it's an incredible
leaderboard," Scott said.
"It's going to be fun. "
Singh was the dominant
figure throughout the day.
The 49-year-old Fijian has-
n't won on the PGA Tour in
four years, and he was des-
perate to show that he could
put four good rounds to-
gether and end that drought.

fourth quarter.
Gillislee finished it off,
evading a couple of defend-
ers and then tight-roping
the sideline on a 12-yard
touchdown run to put
Florida up 20-17. Gillislee
had a 4 yard score in the
first quarter.
Driskel also came up big
late in the game with a 21-
yard run to give the Gators a
first down and allow them to
run out the clock.
"We were really com-
posed in here," Driskel said
of the mood at halftime. "No
one was pointing fingers at
each other We just came in
and got the things we
needed corrected cor-
rected. We knew there was a
whole other half to play"


458; 20. P.K. Yonge 463; 21.
Santa Fe 583.
Girls Top 10 Individuals
1. Elizabeth Mulford, Ocala
Vanguard 19:34; 2. Audrey Car-
penter, Vanguard 19:45; 3.
Claudia Cancello, Trinity
Mitchell 20:07; 4. Catherine
Blaney, Belleview 20:18; 5. An-
gelina Grebe, Sarasota 20:44;
6. Abby Grant, Sickles 21:04; 7.
Alyssa Weber, Citrus 21:06; 8.
Theresa Trentham, George
Jenkins 21:09; 9. Tiana New-
ton, Springstead 21:25; 10.
Emily Kerns, Mitchell 21:42.
Boys team scores
Sarasota 69; 2. Steinbrenner
69; 3. Vanguard 85; 4. Nature
Coast 114; 5. Sickles 145; 6.
Buchholtz 178; 7. George Jenk-
ins 193; 8. P.K. Yonge 222; 9.
Springstead 260; 10. Crystal
River 326; 11. Mitchell 355; 12.
Lake Weir 400; 13. Citrus 406;
14. Forest 407; 15. Lecanto
409; 16. Belleview 433; 17.
Ridgewood 435; 18. Anclote
507; 19. Trinity Catholic 509;
20. Pasco 517; 21. Hernando
582; 22. South Lake 582; 23.
Meadowbrook Academy 630;
24. Land O' Lakes 639.
Boys Top 10 Individuals
1. Garrett Westlake, P.K.
Yonge 16:05; 2. Matt Magee,
Steinbrenner 16:25; 3. Court-
land Bernard, Sarasota 16:28;
4. Fator Zainelabdin, Sickles
16:32; 5. Tyler Bess-Lima,
Steinbrenner 16:53; 6. Zackey
Summerall, Sarasota 16:58; 7.
David Rood, Ocala Vanguard
17:07; 8. Joseph Janson, P.K.
Yonge 17:07; 9. Patrick Ledz-
ian, Ocala Vanguard 17:10;
10. Zach Bess-Lima, Stein-
brenner 17:26.


Associated Press
Florida State's Kenny Shaw gets around Savannah State's
Cicerio Printup to gain extra yards on a reception in the first
quarter Saturday in Tallahassee.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

No. 24 Florida 20,
Texas A&M 17
Florida 7 3 3 7- 20
Texas A&M 3 14 0 0-- 17
First Quarter
TAM-FG Bertolet 27,10:34.
Fla-Gillislee 4 run (Sturgis kick), 3:51.
Second Quarter
TAM-Manziel 11 run (Bertolet kick), 13:39.
TAM-Michael 1 run (Bertolet kick), 7:01.
Fla-FG Sturgis 51,1:49.
Third Quarter
Fla-FG Sturgis 25, 11:02.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Gillislee 12 run (Sturgis kick), 13:05.
A-87,114.
Fla TAM
First downs 21 21
Rushes-yards 48-142 38-134
Passing 165 200
Comp-Att-Int 14-17-0 24-31-0
Return Yards 1 (-5)
Punts-Avg. 5-47.2 6-49.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 3-21 9-78
Time of Possession 35:07 24:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Gillislee 14-83, Patton 3-
31, M.Brown 6-16, Jones 5-10, Driskel 14-8,
Hines 1-2, T.Burton 2-1, Joyer 1-0,
Team 2-(minus 9). Texas A&M, Manziel 17-60,
Michael 13-33, Malena 3-23, TWilliams 5-18.
PASSING-Florida, Driskel 13-16-0-162, J.Cro-
foot 1-1-0-3.Texas A&M, Manziel 23-30-0-173,
McNeal 1-1-0-27.
RECEIVING-Florida, Reed 5-59, Hines 2-46,
Hammond 2-27, T.Burton 2-16, Dunbar 1-11,
Gillislee 1-3, Jones 1-3. Texas A&M, Evans 7-
60, R.Swope 5-16, T.Johnson 3-26, Michael 3-
15, McNeal 2-11, TWilliams 1-28, Lamascus
1-24, Malena 1-12, Hicks 1-8.
No. 21 Kansas St. 52,
Miami 13
Miami 3 3 0 7- 13
Kansas St. 14 10 7 21 52
First Quarter
KSt-C.Klein 1 run (A.Cantele kick), 8:13.
KSt-C.Klein 6 run (A.Cantele kick), 2:52.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 32, :11.
Second Quarter
KSt-FG A.Cantele 21,10:20.
KSt-Cu.Sexton 27 pass from C.Klein (A.Can-
tele kick), 6:10.
Mia-FG Wieclaw 27,:00.
Third Quarter
KSt-C.Klein 1 run (A.Cantele kick), 9:16.
Fourth Quarter
KSt-Hubert 4 run (A.Cantele kick), 11:12.
KSt-Sams 15 run (A.Cantele kick), 10:51.
KSt-Sams 11 run (A.Cantele kick), 5:30.
Mia-Walford 2 pass from RyWilliams (Wieclaw
kick), 3:51.
A-48,843.
Mia KSt
First downs 13 27
Rushes-yards 29-40 60-288
Passing 222 210
Comp-Att-Int 21-28-0 9-11-1
Return Yards 0 12
Punts-Avg. 4-40.0 1-52.0
Fumbles-Lost 3-3 2-0
Penalties-Yards 4-30 2-12
Time of Possession 22:44 37:16
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, James 9-27, Du.Johnson 6-
19, Clements 4-1, Dorsett 1-(minus 1), Morris
9-(minus 6). Kansas St., Hubert 19-106, C.Klein
22-71, Sams 3-47, Robinson 3-20, Pease 5-18,
Lockett 2-14, Rose 3-7, Thompson 1-6,
Sa.Johnson 2-6, Harper 0-(minus 7).
PASSING-Miami, Morris 19-26-0-215,
Ry.Williams 2-2-0-7. Kansas St., C.Klein 9-11 -
1-210.
RECEIVING-Miami, Scott 4-39, Du.Johnson 4-
37, Walford 3-61, Dorsett 3-31, Hurns 2-32,
Thompkins 2-3, M.Lewis 1-10, Waters 1-5,
James 1-4. Kansas St., Lockett 3-59, Thompson
3-57, Trujillo 1-58, Cu.Sexton 1-27, Harper 1-9.
No. 14 Ohio St. 31,
Central Florida 16
UCF 3 7 6 0 16
OhioSt. 7 1014 0- 31
First Quarter
OSU-B.Miller 37 run (Basil kick), 9:35.
UCF-FG Moffitt 28, :12.
Second Quarter
OSU-FG Basil 24, 9:58.
UCF-Tukes 1 pass from Bortles (Moffitt kick),
6:54.
OSU-B.Miller 6 run (Basil kick), :15.
Third Quarter
OSU-Stoneburner 12 pass from B.Miller (Basil
kick), 10:25.
OSU-B.Miller 8 run (Basil kick), 8:08.
UCF-Giovanetti 2 pass from Bortles (kick


blocked), 1:37.
A-104,745.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


UCF
16
23-103
249
25-41-3
10
2-39.0
0-0
6-45
26:44


osu
25
51-256
155
18-24-1
14
2-36.5
2-2
10-79
33:16


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCF, S.Johnson 12-75, B.Harvey
7-36, Calabrese 1-2, McDuffie 1-1, Team 1-
(minus 1), Bortles 1-(minus 10). Ohio St.,
B.Miller 27-141, C.Brown 2-33, Dunn 5-29,
Hyde 7-27, Z.Boren 7-16, R.Smith 3-10.
PASSING-UCF, Bortles 25-41-3-249. Ohio St.,
B.Miller 18-24-1-155.
RECEIVING-UCF Worton 7-96, Hall 5-40, Mc-
Duffie 3-44, S.Johnson 3-22, Godfrey 2-17, Floyd
2-16, Reese 1-11, Giovanetti 1-2, Tukes 1-1. Ohio
St., D.Smith 6-57, C.Brown 6-48, Stoneburner 2-
20, Z.Boren 1-13, Heuerman 1-9, Spencer 1-6,
Hyde 1-2.
USF 32, Nevada 31
South Florida 6 7 7 12 32
Nevada 21 0 7 3-- 31
First Quarter
Nev-Sudfeld recovered fumble in end zone
(Hardison kick), 10:40.
Nev-Fajardo 1 run (Hardison kick), 6:29.
USF-A.Davis 51 pass from Daniels (kick
failed), 5:19.
Nev-Huber 29 pass from Fajardo (Hardison
kick), 2:58.
Second Quarter
USF-Murray 1 run (Bonani kick), 9:12.
Third Quarter
USF-Lamar 35 run (Bonani kick), 12:56.
Nev-Fajardo 14 run (Hardison kick), :00.
Fourth Quarter
Nev-FG Hardison 35, 8:16.
USF-Dunkley 52 pass from Daniels (pass
failed), 2:37.
USF-A.Davis 56 pass from Daniels (pass
failed), :38.
A-22,804.
USF Nev
First downs 26 30
Rushes-yards 35-209 53-278
Passing 363 271
Comp-Att-Int 22-40-0 27-38-0
Return Yards 1 3
Punts-Avg. 8-41.6 7-41.9
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 4-3
Penalties-Yards 13-107 9-84
Time of Possession 26:20 33:40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Florida, Lamar 8-85, Murray
13-60, Daniels 11-53, Hopkins 2-12, Team 1-
(minus 1). Nevada, Jefferson 30-135, Fajardo
18-134, Hale 5-9.
PASSING-South Florida, Daniels 22-40-0-363.
Nevada, Fajardo 27-38-0-271.
RECEIVING-South Florida, A.Davis 12-191,
Dunkley 2-67, Mitchell 2-29, Murray 2-16, Landi
1-28, Welch 1-23, Hopkins 1-5, Marc 1-4. Ne-
vada, Sudfeld 5-67, Wimberly 5-55, Arendse 5-
39, Turner 4-37, Huber 2-31, Bradley 2-10,
Jefferson 2-8, Brock 1-19, Jeffers1-5.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 B5


No. 14 Ohio State handles UCF 31-16


Turnovers, OSU's

Miller are undoing

ofKnights

Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio Central
Florida coach George O'Leary
certainly doesn't believe in moral
victories.
After Braxton Miller rushed for
three touchdowns and threw for
another to lead No. 14 Ohio State to
a 31-16 win over the Knights on Sat-
urday, it was suggested to O'Leary
that his team did well to throw a
scare into the Buckeyes.
"I'm not into 'we played this' or
'we played that,"' he said. "You ei-
ther win or lose. We lost."
But, he added, he believes the
old maxim that teams learn more
from defeat than victory
"I don't know whoever said (it)
the other way, but they're nuts," he
said. "That coach is no longer
working."
The Knights learned a lot. They
hung tough with the Buckeyes,
trailing 17-10 at the half, but made
too many mistakes to win on the
road against a ranked opponent.


Associated Press
Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller breaks away from Central Florida
players on his way to a touchdown during the first quarter Saturday in
Columbus, Ohio.


"Nobody in that locker room
thought, 'We hope we have a shot
(at winning),"' quarterback Blake
Bortles said. "We all knew coming
in that we were going to be in this
game and we could win. It wasn't, 'I
hope it's a close game.' We ex-
pected to win this game."
Bortles learned as much as any-
one from the loss. He completed 25
of 41 passes for 249 yards and two


touchdowns, a 1-yarder to Justin
Tukes and a 2-yarder to Billy Gio-
vanetti. But he also had three in-
terceptions two of which led to
Ohio State touchdowns.
"If I play better, we have a good
chance of winning," Bortles said.
Miller's scoring runs covered 37,
6 and 8 yards to prop up an Ohio
State ground game that was miss-
ing its top two backs. He also found


Doors blown ofi


Associated F
Miami defensive back Deon Bush catches up with Kansas State running back John Hubert during the first I
Saturday in Manhattan, Kan. The Hurricanes suffered a 52-13 loss to the Wildcats.


No. 21 Kansas State defends home with 52-13 rout ofMiam


Associated Press

MANHATTAN, Kan. Miami
pushed Kansas State to the limit last
season, forcing the Wildcats to make
a dramatic goal-line stand in the clos-
ing minutes to preserve the victory
This one wasn't even close.
Collin Klein threw for 210 yards
and ran for 71 more Saturday, ac-
counting for four touchdowns and
leading the 21st-ranked Wildcats to a
52-13 rout
"They were excellent," Miami
coach Al Golden said. "They beat us
in all three phases. They outplayed
us, outcoached us, starting with me,
and that's it. No excuses. They de-
served to win."
The blowout stood in stark con-
trast to their previous meeting in
Coral Gables, Fla., when Kansas
State eked out a 28-24 win.
Miami only managed 40 yards
rushing on 29 carries this time a
paltry 1.4-yard average. Stephen
Morris threw for 215 yards but was
sacked five times.


"We made a million adjustments,"
Golden said. "We just didn't stop
them. We didn't tackle well enough.
We didn't get the ball stopped."
Kansas State had plenty to do with
that.
John Hubert had 106 yards rushing
and a touchdown, and Daniel Sams
added two scores on the ground as
the Wildcats (2-0) rolled up 498 yards
of total offense while holding Miami
to 262.
The Hurricanes also hurt them-
selves by fumbling three times, once
on their opening drive.
"We can't do that," Golden said.
"We have a chance to answer right
there and settle in a little bit. We
never really settled in."
The Canes, opening with consecu-
tive road games for the first time
since 2005, looked like an inexperi-
enced bunch against the senior-
laden Wildcats. They had 14 players
appear in their first game a week
ago, including 12 freshmen from a
roster that has 42 first-year guys.
Talented freshman Duke Johnson


managed only 19 yards on the groin
after gaining 135 in last Saturde
win at Boston College, when Mi;
rallied from an early 14-0 deficit.
"I just wasn't making the mos
my opportunities," Johnson se
"That's all."
Same could be said for the res
the Hurricanes, whose perform:
was summed up by a 5-second s]
in the fourth quarter: Morris fi
bled while getting sacked, and Sa
sprinted 15 yards on the next pla3
give Kansas State a 45-6 lead v
10:51 remaining in the game.
Miami (1-1) scored its only tou
down in the closing minutes, wl
backup quarterback Ryan Willia
completed a short scoring pass
lowing a long kickoff return.
"When we went down 14-0, it
like, 'OK, this is just like last we
We're going to just stick together
Miami center Shane McDern
said. "Even when we went dc
even further than that, we were j
saying, 'OK let's stick together, 1
keep going, keep our head down.


Bulldogs take care of Tigers 28-1l


Associated Press

STARKVILLE, Miss. -
Tyler Russell threw for 222
yards and three touch-
downs, Marcus Green
caught two touchdown
passes and Mississippi
State easily beat Auburn
28-10 on Saturday at Davis
Wade Stadium.
Auburn briefly took a 10-
7 lead when Onterio Mc-
Calebb returned a kickoff
100 yards for a touchdown
to open the second half, but
Mississippi State (2-0, 1-0
Southeastern Conference)
responded with 21 unan-
swered points.
Auburn (0-2, 0-1) strug-
gled through an awful of-
fensive performance.
Kiehl Frazier completed 13
of 22 passes for 125 yards
and three interceptions.
The victory broke a
string of unsavory trends
for the Bulldogs. They had
lost 10 out of the last 11
against Auburn includ-


ing four straight and
hadn't won an SEC opener
since 1999.
Tennessee 51,
Georgia State 13
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Justin Hunter tied a school
single-game record Saturday
by catching three of Tyler
Bray's four touchdown passes,
as Tennessee trounced Foot-
ball Championship Subdivi-
sion program Georgia State
51-13 in its home opener.
Hunter caught eight passes
for 146 yards in his second
game back for Tennessee (2-
0) after tearing the anterior
cruciate ligament in his left
knee last September. A Ten-
nessee player had caught
three touchdown passes in a
game eight previous times,
most recently by Chris Han-
non in a 59-21 victory over
Mississippi State in 2003.
Bray went 18 of 20 for 310
yards and completed his last
13 passes, the third-longest


streak in school history. His
other touchdown pass was a
19-yarder to Mychal Rivera.
Virginia 17,
Penn St. 16
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
- Virginia's Michael Rocco hit
Jake McGee on a 6-yard
touchdown pass with 1:28 to
play Saturday, and Sam
Ficken's fourth missed field
goal of the game from 42
yards at the gun preserved
the Cavaliers' 17-16 victory
over Penn State.
The loss in new coach Bill
O'Brien's first road game hurt
the Nittany Lions just as much,
if not moreso, than their defeat
last weekend at home against
Ohio. Penn State (0-2) forced
four turnovers in Virginia terri-
tory, continually taking it away
to give its offense another op-
portunity, but then couldn't
close the deal.
Virginia's winning drive cov-
ered 86 yards in 12 plays, the
biggest blow a 44-yard pass


from Rocco to Jake McGee
on third-and-16 from the C
aliers' 22 yard-line. Seven
plays later, on third-and-go
from the 6, Rocco found
McGee open again in the e
zone, and Drew Jarrett's e:
point was the difference.
Maryland 36,
Temple 27
PHILADELPHIA- Perr
Hills threw two touchdowns
and ran for one to help Mar
land beat Temple 36-27.
Embarrassed by the Owls
a 31-point loss last season,
Terrapins (2-0) nearly blew
23-point lead at halftime. Hil
had all three of his scores in
half to help Maryland race tc
26-3 lead. The Owls store
back in the second half but r
out of time and big plays.
Maryland played nothing
like the team that squeaked
out a 7-6 win last week
against Football Champi-
onship Subdivision team
William & Mary.


Jake Stoneburner on a 12-yard
touchdown pass.
Miller hit on 18 of 24 passes for
155 yards no completion going
for more than 15 yards with one
interception.
"Everything they talk about
Braxton Miller is accurate,"
O'Leary said. "He can make you
look very foolish. At times he did
with our team."
The last Ohio State quarterback
to rush for three touchdowns in a
game was Art Schlichter against
Illinois in 1978.
Ahead by a tenuous seven points
at the start of the second half, the
Buckeyes put the game out of reach
with big contributions from Miller
and the defense.
Miller was at the controls as the
Buckeyes took the kickoff and
rolled 76 yards in 12 plays. At the
UCF 12, he looked right, then
rolled left before lobbing a pass
barely over the outstretched arm of
cornerback Jordan Ozerities to
Stoneburner in the end zone.
After the extra-point and kickoff,
Bortles threw a ball up for grabs
that was picked off by linebacker
Etienne Sabino at the Knights' 32.
"That's a horrible decision," Bor-
tles said. "I've got to throw that ball
out of bounds. I put our defense in
a tough situation."




F USF nips


Nevada


Bulls take

32-31 win

over Wolf Pack

Associated Press

RENO, Nev. B.J.
Daniels passed for 363 yards
and three touchdowns, in-
cluding a 56-yard scoring
toss to Andre Davis with 38
seconds left in the game Sat-
urday, to help South Florida
come from behind to beat
Nevada 32-31.
Daniels also threw a 51-
yard TD to Davis, who fin-
ished with 12 catches for 191
yards, and a 52-yard score to
Chris Dunkley with 2:37 re-
maining. Lindsey Lamar
added 85 yards rushing on
just 8 carries for the Bulls
Press (2-0), who trailed 21-6 in the
half opening quarter
Cody Fajardo passed for
271 yards and a touchdown
i and ran for 134 yards and two
S more scores, and Stefphon
Jefferson ran for 135 yards
und for the Wolf Pack (1-1), who
ay's won their opener last week
ami at Cal and had lost only once
in their last 18 home games.
t of Nevada, which moved
aid. this season from the West-
ern Athletic Conference to
t of the Mountain West, domi-
nce nated early and led 21-13 at
the half but Lamar ran 35
pan yards for a touchdown on
um- South Florida's opening
ams drive of the second half to
y to cut the lead to 21-20.
vith Fajardo answered with
passes of 23 yards to Bran-
ch- don Wimberly and 19 yards
hen to Kendall Brock before fak-
ams ing a hand off and rolling
fol- around the right side 14
yards for a touchdown on
was the final play of the third
ek. quarter to make it 28-20.
'r,"' Allen Hardison's 35-yard
nott field goal put Nevada ahead
>wn 31-20 with 8:16 left in the
just game before the Bulls of the
et's Big East Conference
"' mounted their comeback.
S Daniels, who also ran for
53 yards on 11 carries, com-
S pleted 22 of 40 passes on the
game but was 10 of 17 for 227
yards in the fourth quarter
alone. Demitri Murray added
e 60 yards rushing for the Bulls.
ay- Fajardo, a sophomore,
completed 27 of 38 passes
al on the game. He was practi-
cally flawless early, leading
end] Nevada to touchdowns on
xtra its first three possessions,
rushing for 88 yards in the
first quarter.


y

ry-

s in
the
a
Is
the
o a
d
ran


d


Associated Press
South Florida's Lindsey Lamar
(5) runs up the middle during
the second half Saturday
against Nevada in Reno, Nev.






B6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


SPORTS


Beavers bite No. 13 Badgers





stunned by a


La.-Monroe in OT

Associated Press

CORVALLIS, Ore. Sean Man-
nion threw for 276 yards and a
touchdown, Oregon State's defense
smothered Wisconsin's Montee
Ball and the Beavers upset the No.
13 Badgers 10-7 on Saturday
Mannion connected with
Brandin Cooks on a 20-yard touch-
down on the opening drive of the
second half to give the Beavers a
10-0 lead then turned it over to the
Oregon State (1-0) defense that
forced two turnovers and held Ball
to 61 yards rushing.
The win snapped Wisconsin's 33-
game non-conference winning
streak, the second-longest in the
country behind LSU.
Wisconsin finished with 207
yards and only 35 on the ground. It
was the lowest total yardage for
Wisconsin in five years. The previ-
ous non-conference loss for Wis-
consin (1-1) came early in the 2003
season when the Badgers lost to
UNLV
Louisiana-Monroe 34,
No. 8 Arkansas 31, OT
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Kolton Brown-
ing's 16-yard touchdown run on fourth-
and-one lifted Louisiana-Monroe to a
34-31 overtime win over No. 8 Arkansas.
Browning accounted for 481 yards of
total offense and four touchdowns to
lead the Warhawks (1-0) to their first
win over a Southeastern Conference
team since defeating Alabama in 2007.
The Razorbacks (1-1) played the
second half without quarterback Tyler
Wilson, who suffered a head injury after
taking several big hits in the first half.
Wilson, who also missed the second
half against New Mexico last season
with concussion-like symptoms, was
11-of-20 passing for 196 yards and a
pair of touchdowns before leaving the
game at halftime.
Louisiana-Monroe outgained
Arkansas 550-377 in total yards.
No. 2 USC 42, Syracuse 29
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. Matt
Barkley threw a career-best six touch-
down passes, and Robert Woods was
spectacular with 200 all-purpose yards
and two scores, to help No. 2 Southern
California shake free of Syracuse 42-29.
The rare trip to the northeast for the
Trojans was choppy at times, and
Syracuse's hurry-up offense kept USC
working hard for four quarters at
MetLife Stadium.
Ryan Nassib and Syracuse's hurry-
up offense kept things close with con-
secutive touchdowns in the third quarter
to make it 21-16 heading into the fourth.
Nassib finished with 327 yards passing,
two touchdown passes and a touch-
down run.
But the Orange simply had no answer
for Woods.
The All-American reached over a
defender for a 29-yard score in the
second quarter and boxed out a defen-
sive back on a 4-yard touchdown in
the third. He finished with 10 catches
for 93 yards.
No. 1 Alabama 35,
Western Kentucky 0
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. --AJ McCar-
ron passed for 219 yards and matched
his career high with four touchdown
passes to lead No. 1 Alabama to a 35-0
win over Western Kentucky.
McCarron had two scoring tosses
apiece to Christion Jones and Kevin
Norwood in a performance that was
more about big plays than consistent,
muscle-flexing dominance for the top-
ranked Crimson Tide (2-0). The Hilltop-
pers (1-1) were 40-point underdogs
and the sandwich opponent between
top 10 opponents Michigan and No. 8
Arkansas.
A running game that produced 232
yards against the Wolverines took a
back seat to McCarron and the capital-
istic defense. McCarron completed 14
of 19 passes and played all but the
final series.
Norwood caught three passes for 92
yards.
No. 3 LSU 41, Washington 3
BATON ROUGE, La. -Alfred Blue
rushed for 101 yards, including a 21-
yard score, and No. 3 LSU racked up
242 yards on the ground in a 41-3 vic-
tory over Washington.


Associated Press
Oregon State's Brandin Cooks runs against Wisconsin's Mike Taylor (53) and Pat Muldoon (92) during the
second half Saturday in Corvallis, Ore. The unranked Beavers knocked off the No. 13 Badgers 10-7.


Power runner Kenny Hilliard added a
pair of short touchdowns and fullback
J.C. Copeland powered through for an-
other score for LSU (2-0), which basi-
cally ran at will while averaging nearly 5
yards per carry.
Tigers quarterback Zach Metten-
berger was an efficient 12-of-18 for 195
yards, including a 32-yard scoring strike
to Kadron Boone. James Wright caught
five passes for 75 yards.
Keith Price was 17 of 36 for 157 yards
for the Huskies (1-1). Normally a good
scrambler, Price had trouble with LSU's
speedy defenders, who sacked him four
times and intercepted him once.
No. 4 Oregon 42,
Fresno State 25
EUGENE, Ore. Kenjon Barner ran
for 201 yards and three touchdowns to
lead No. 4 Oregon to a 42-25 victory
over Fresno State.
De'Anthony Thomas ran for 102
yards and two additional scores for the
Ducks (2-0), who sprinted to a 35-6
lead in the first half before the Bulldogs
were able to slow them a bit in the sec-
ond. Redshirt freshman quarterback
Marcus Mariota completed 19 of 27
passes for 166 yards and a touchdown.
Derek Carr, the younger brother of
former Bulldogs QB David Carr, com-
pleted 29 of 47 passes for 234 yards
and a touchdown for Fresno State (1-1).
No. 5 Oklahoma 69,
Florida A&M 13
NORMAN, Okla. Damien Williams
ran for 156 yards and four touchdowns
in a record-setting Owen Field debut,
Kenny Stills added 120 yards receiving
and a score, and No. 5 Oklahoma beat
Florida A&M 69-13.
Williams' rushing total was the most
for a player in his first game at the
Sooners' home field, and he became
only the fourth player at the school to
eclipse 100 yards rushing in each of his
first two games. Adrian Peterson was
the last to do it, in 2004.
Landry Jones threw for 252 yards
and two touchdowns with one intercep-
tion for the Sooners (2-0), who had
dropped a spot in the rankings after an
unimpressive 24-7 victory in their
opener at UTEP.
No. 9 South Carolina 48,
East Carolina 10
COLUMBIA, S.C. Dylan Thomp-
son completed 21 of 37 passes for 330
yards and three touchdowns to help
No. 9 South Carolina (2-0) beat East
Carolina 48-10.
Thompson started the game in place
of the injured Connor Shaw, and left lit-
tle doubt coach Steve Spurrier made
the right choice to let Shaw rest.
Thompson's first completion was a
53-yard pass to Damiere Byrd. He fin-
ished the game averaging almost 16
yards a completion and did not throw
an interception.
The rejuvenated passing game al-
lowed Spurrier to use star running back
Marcus Lattimore sparingly. He gained


40 yards on 13 carries.
No. 11 Michigan State 41,
Central Michigan 7
MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. -An-
drew Maxwell threw for 275 yards and
two touchdowns, and No. 11 Michigan
State cruised to a 41-7 win over Cen-
tral Michigan.
The Spartans (2-0) scored 10 points
in the final minute of the first half to take
a 24-0 lead. Michigan State was play-
ing at Central Michigan (1-1) for the first
time, part of a decade-long series of
games against the Chippewas, Eastern
Michigan and Western Michigan.
Le'Veon Bell had 70 yards on 18 car-
ries with two touchdowns, shouldering
a lighter load after carrying 44 times for
210 yards in Michigan State's opener
against Boise State.
No. 12 Clemson 52,
Ball State 27
CLEMSON, S.C. DeAndre Hop-
kins caught three touchdown passes,
Andre Ellington rushed for two scores
and Spencer Benton kicked a 61-yard
field goal to set an Atlantic Coast Con-
ference record in No. 12 Clemson's 52-
27 victory over Ball State.
Ellington's two short TD runs helped
the Tigers (2-0) get off to a fast start,
and Tajh Boyd found Hopkins for touch-
down passes of 13, 34 and 15 yards in
the second period to help increase the
lead to 35-10. Benton finished the
Tigers'45-point half with his record-set-
ting kick as time ran out.
Ball State (1-1) had hoped to use its
fast-paced attack to keep up. But Keith
Wenning threw two interceptions, both
which led to Clemson scores.
No. 15 Virginia Tech 42,
Austin Peay 7
BLACKSBURG, Va. Virginia Tech
used two big plays in the punt return
game to overcome a lethargic offensive
start and the No. 15 Hokies beat Austin
Peay 42-7.
Kyshoen Jarrett's 46-yard punt re-
turn set up a 2-yard touchdown run by
Michael Holmes to give the Hokies a
7-0 lead.
Still not clicking on offense, especially
in the running game, Virginia Tech (2-0)
got a momentum-building punt block by
Tony Gregory midway through the sec-
ond period. Five plays later, Logan
Thomas scored on a 1-yard sneak.
No. 19 Michigan 31,
Air Force 25
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Denard
Robinson ran for 218 yards, threw for
208 and scored four times to help No.
19 Michigan hold off Air Force for a 31-
25 win.
Robinson became the first player in
major college football since at least
1996 to have at least 200 yards rushing
and 200 passing in three games, ac-
cording to STATS LLC.
The Wolverines (1-1) bounced back
after a 41-14 loss to Alabama, though
they had a tough time beating the Fal-


cons (1-1) in a game they were favored
to win easily.
Cody Getz ran for 130 yards, with his
third rushing TD and a 2-point conver-
sion pulling Air Force within three early
in the fourth.
No. 20 TCU 56,
Grambling St. 0
FORT WORTH, Texas Casey
Pachall threw three touchdowns passes
after No. 20 TCU had already scored
touchdowns on special teams and de-
fense in the first 7 minutes of a 56-0
victory over Grambling State.
Pachall threw TD passes of 12 and
66 yards to Josh Boyce in the Horned
Frogs' first game as a Big 12 Confer-
ence member, and the debut of their
$164 million completely re-done sta-
dium. Pachall played only the first half
and was 9-of-9 passing for 201 yards.
Trevone Boykin was 8 of 8 for 75
yards and a TD in the second half.
The combined 17-of-17 passing was
the most in FBS history without an in-
completion.
No. 22 Notre Dame 20,
Purdue 17
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -Tommy Rees
came off the bench to lead Notre Dame
on a last-minute, winning drive as the
No. 22 Irish got a 27-yard field goal
from Kyle Brindza with seven seconds
to go and beat Purdue 20-17.
Rees, who was suspended for the
opener after he was involved in a skir-
mish with police at a party in May, re-
lieved starter Everett Golson late in the
fourth quarter.
Purdue (1-1) had tied the game at
17-17 when Caleb TerBush threw a 15-
yard TD pass to Antavian Edison with
2:12 left, the score set up by Josh
Johnson's recovery of a Golson fumble.
Golson was shaken up on the play and
the Irish turned to Rees, who started 12
games last season.
Rees connected on key third down
passes of 10 yards to John Goodman
and 21 yards to Robby Toma to get
Brindza in position for the game-win-
ning kick. Notre Dame is 2-0 for the first
time since 2008.
No. 23 Louisville 35,
Missouri State 7
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Teddy Bridge-
water kept No. 23 Louisville's offense
clicking by passing for a career-high
344 yards and two touchdowns, while
the defense stifled Missouri State in a
35-7 rout.
Despite a statistical falloff from last
week's 19-of-21 effort against Ken-
tucky, Bridgewater still completed 30 of
39 passing attempts. He once again in-
volved others and often, with seven of
his 10 targets catching at least three
passes.
Eli Rogers led the way with six re-
ceptions, while Charles Gaines had a
game-high 73 yards. Tight ends Nate
Nord and Ryan Hubbell caught TDs as
the Cardinals totaled 475 yards, eight
more than last week.


Creamer in position for LPGA Tour win


Associated Press

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. Paula
Creamer moved into position to
end a two-year victory drought,
shooting a 6-under 65 to take a two-
stroke lead into the final round of
the Kingsmill Championship.
The nine-time LPGA Tour win-
ner chipped in for birdie on the


par-4 13th in her bogey-free round
on Kingsmill's River Course. She
had a 16-under 197 total, the lowest
54-hole score in the history of the
event.


Schreefel had a 69, and Kang shot 70.
Second-ranked Staci Lewis was
11 under along with Ai Miyazato
and Azahara Munoz. Lewis shot a
68, Miyazato had a 67, and Munoz a
69Q Lewis and Mivnazato eacph have


land's Graeme Storm blew a five-stroke
lead midway through the third round
and dropped into a four-way tie for the
KLM Open lead.
Storm finished with a 1-under 69 to
c_ ;"' l 1 -


Second-round leader Jiyai Shin matcn Spain s Pablo Larrazabal
was econrond er a9 SJiyailSin two victories this year, and Munoz Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano an
was second after a 69. She also is also has won. l and'a S t m son a n
winless since 2010. also has won. land's and Scott Jamieson at 12
Dewi Claire Schreefel and European Tour Larrazabal had a 64, and Fernar
Danielle Kang were 12 under HILVERSUM, Netherlands Eng- Castano and Jamieson shot 66.


and
d Scot-
under.
indez-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

College Football Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 35, Robert Morris 10
Baldwin-Wallace 45, Bluffton 13
Bloomsburg 30, Edinboro 14
Boston College 34, Maine 3
Bucknell19, Marist 17
Buffalo 56, Morgan St. 34
Delaware 38, Delaware St. 14
Dickinson 24, Juniata 17
Duquesne 17, Dayton 7
East Stroudsburg 31, Lock Haven 0
Endicott 66, Castleton St. 14
Georgetown 13, Wagner 10
Gettysburg 48, Ursinus 7
Hobart 28, Geneva 7
Indiana 45, UMass 6
Johns Hopkins 34, Susquehanna 7
Lehigh 35, CCSU 14
Lycoming 24, Delaware Valley 14
Maryland 36, Temple 27
Mercyhurst 45, Millersville 7
Monmouth (NJ) 41, Rhode Island 6
Muhlenberg 21, Franklin & Marshall 0
NC State 10, UConn 7
Rochester 17, Thiel 7
Rutgers 26, Howard 0
Shepherd 34, American International 7
Southern Cal 42, Syracuse 29
St. Francis (Pa.) 39, Bryant 28
St. John Fisher 28, Washington & Jefferson 24
Stony Brook 77, Pace 7
W. New England 35, Westfield St. 10
Widener 41, King's (Pa.) 6
SOUTH
Alabama 35, W. Kentucky 0
Alabama St. 29, MVSU 7
Appalachian St. 35, Montana 27
Bethune-Cookman 27, SC State 14
Campbell 10, Virginia-Wise 0
Cent. Arkansas 42, Murray St. 20
Centre 49, Rose-Hulman 21
Clark Atlanta 20, Lane 17
Clemson 52, Ball St. 27
Coastal Carolina 47, Furman 45, 30T
Cumberlands 55, Cumberland (Tenn.) 13
E. Kentucky 24, Morehead St. 17
Elon 34, NC Central 14
Emory & Henry 45, Maryville (Tenn.) 36
FlU 41, Akron 38, OT
Florida St. 55, Savannah St. 0
Georgia Tech 59, Presbyterian 3
Hampden-Sydney 42, Christopher Newport 20
Jacksonville 31, Charleston Southern 10
Jacksonville St. 27, Chattanooga 24
James Madison 42, Alcorn St. 3
Kentucky Christian 33, Bluefield South 14
Kentucky Wesleyan 13, Kentucky St. 6
LSU 41, Washington 3
Lenoir-Rhyne 20, Davidson 2
Lindsey Wilson 53, Pikeville 36
Louisville 35, Missouri St. 7
Marshall 52, W. Carolina 24
McNeese St. 69, McMurry 7
Middle Tennessee 31, FAU 17
Mississippi 28, UTEP 10
Mississippi St. 28, Auburn 10
Morehouse 39, Edward Waters 18
NC A&T 77, W. Virginia St. 0
Newberry 17, Shorter 14
Norfolk St. 31, Liberty 24
Northwestern St. 31, Ark.-Monticello 24
Old Dominion 45, Hampton 7
Rhodes 20, Washington (Mo.) 17, OT
Richmond 41, Gardner-Webb 8
South Alabama 9, Nicholls St. 3
South Carolina 48, East Carolina 10
Tennessee 51, Georgia St. 13
Tennessee St. 38, Jackson St. 12
The Citadel 23, Georgia Southern 21
Union (Ky.) 14, Campbellsville 13
VMI 24, Chowan 17
Virginia 17, Penn St. 16
Virginia Tech 42, Austin Peay 7
Wake Forest 28, North Carolina 27
Washington & Lee 28, Sewanee 6
Wingate 37, Albany St. (Ga.) 9
Winston-Salem 30, Concord 22
Wofford 82, Lincoln (Pa.) 0
MIDWEST
Adrian 23, Defiance 13
Albion 22, Wheaton (III.) 21
Ashland 7, Wayne (Mich.) 0
Bethel (Minn.) 21, Wartburg 0
Bowling Green 21, Idaho 13
Butler 42, Franklin 13
Carroll (Wis.) 30, Ripon 24
Cent. Missouri 31, NW Missouri St. 21
Central 17, Augustana (III.) 10
Coe 34, Cornell (Iowa) 14
Concordia (Moor.) 38, Buena Vista 14
Concordia (St.P) 34, Minn.-Crookston 24
Crown (Minn.) 35, Mac Murray 28
Elmhurst31,Trine 13
Ferris St. 49, Lake Erie 21
Grand Valley St. 83, Notre Dame Coll. 46
Gustavus 35, Simpson (Iowa) 26
Hillsdale 38, Ohio Dominican 20
Illinois College 53, Grinnell 20
Illinois St. 31, E. Michigan 14
Illinois Wesleyan 53, Alma 7
Indiana St. 44, Quincy 0
Iowa St. 9, Iowa 6
Kalamazoo 29, Manchester 28
Kansas St. 52, Miami 13
Kenyon 31, Earlham 14
Lake Forest 20, Lawrence 16
Lindenwood 35, SW Baptist 14
Loras 28, Rockford 14
Macalester 17, Concordia (Wis.) 13
Marian (Ind.) 31, Siena Heights 3
Mary 31, Augustana (SD) 25
Miami (Ohio) 30, S. Illinois 14
Michigan 31, Air Force 25
Michigan St. 41, Cent. Michigan 7
Michigan Tech 51, Tiffin 15
Millikin 49, Hope 20
Minn. Duluth 38, Winona St. 16
Minn. St.-Mankato 38, Bemidji St. 10
Minn.-Morris 10, Martin Luther 0
Minnesota 44, New Hampshire 7
Monmouth (III.) 31, Beloit 14
Montana St. 34, Drake 24
N. Illinois 35, UT-Martin 7
N. Iowa 59, Central St. (Ohio) 0
North Dakota 45, Portland St. 37
Northwestern (Minn.) 49, Westminster (Mo.) 7
Northwood (Mich.) 28, Walsh 16
Notre Dame 20, Purdue 17
Ohio 51, New Mexico St.24
Ohio St.31, UCF 16
Peru St. 48, Culver-Stockton 21
Rice 25, Kansas 24
SE Missouri 30, Mars Hill 18
SW Minnesota St. 32, Northern St. (SD) 30
Saginaw Valley St. 37, Malone 14
Sioux Falls 45, Minn. St.-Moorhead 10
South Dakota 31, Colgate 21
St. Cloud St. 45, Upper Iowa 20
St. John's (Minn.) 31, Wis.-Eau Claire 28
St. Norbert 31, Knox 20
St. Olaf 31, DePauw 10
St. Scholastica 35, Eureka 10
St. Thomas (Minn.) 43, Wis.-River Falls 9
Trinity (III.) 42, Concordia (Mich.) 0
Urbana 34, Seton Hill 31
W. Illinois 27, Indianapolis 17
W. Michigan 52, E. Illinois 21
Wayne (Neb.) 20, Minot St. 6
William Penn 31, Luther 9
Wis. Lutheran 38, Olivet 14
Wis.-Platteville 52, Dubuque 35
Wis.-Stout 31, Jamestown 0
Youngstown St. 59, Valparaiso 0
SOUTHWEST


Alabama A&M 14, Ark.-Pine Bluff 10
Arkansas St. 33, Memphis 28
Florida 20, Texas A&M 17
Henderson St. 47, McKendree 24
North Texas 34, Texas Southern 7
Oklahoma 69, Florida A&M 13
S. Arkansas 56, Texas College 0
Sam Houston St. 54, Incarnate Word 7
TCU 56, Grambling St. 0
Texas Tech 58, Texas St. 10
Tulsa 45, Tulane 10
UTSA 27, Texas A&M Commerce 16
FAR WEST
BYU 45, Weber St. 13
California 50, S. Utah 31
Idaho St. 38, Black Hills St. 5
Montana Tech 37, Carroll (Mont.) 20
N. Colorado 40, Mesa St. 3
N. Dakota St. 22, Colorado St. 7
Oregon 42, Fresno St. 25
Oregon St. 10, Wisconsin 7
Sacramento St. 30, Colorado 28
San Diego St. 42, Army 7
South Florida 32, Nevada 31
Toledo 34, Wyoming 31
Washington St. 24, E. Washington 20






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Top running backs returning for Jaguars, Vikings

Associated Press in this pass-driven league. son's participation in the days ahead of the first game.
"Seeing him run those opener Frazier has stressed Mularkey has said Jones-
MINNEAPOLIS Mau- hills, he kind of inspired me his use will be limited be- Drew will play, but in a
rice Jones-Drew saw the to get back at it again," hind Toby Gerhart. third-down role behind
video clips of Adrian Peter- Jones-Drew said, "We're going to Rashad Jennings. ,


son sprinting up the slope at
the edge of Minnesota's
practice field, another dis-
play of the Vikings star's
fierce determination to
have his surgically repaired
left knee ready in time for
the regular season.
The sight was so stirring
for Jones-Drew it catalyzed
the end of his holdout from
the Jacksonville Jaguars.
After all, heavy-load run-
ning backs like the two of
them can use some com-
pany in today's NFL.
They've fast become a relic


adding: "It shows he prepare like he's
has the right mind- the guy," Jaguars
set and he's ready to coach Mike Mula-
go to work. I'm wish- rkey said, refusing
ing him all the best." to embrace Fra-
Except, of course, zier's stated plan.
on Sunday when the Jones-Drew has
Jaguars visit the found himself in a
Vikings. Adrian similar situation.
Though Vikings Peterson During training
coach Leslie Frazier Minnesota camp, while the
has squeezed every Vikings RB. Vikings were trying
last cautionary comment to hold Peterson back from
out of his lexicon over the overdoing his rehabilita-
past few months, declining tion, Jones-Drew was hold-
to grant final clearance, all ing out. He reported to the
signs have pointed to Peter- Jaguars last weekend, seven


"We're preparing as if he
is going to play a lot He's a
guy you definitely don't want
to ignore on the football
field," Frazier said, express-
ing the same skepticism.
Try to find two running
backs in the league right
now more valuable to their
teams.
Over the last five seasons,
Peterson and Jones-Drew
rank first and second in the
NFL in each of these cate-
gories: yards rushing, total
touchdowns and total yards
from scrimmage.


Associated Press
It remains to be seen how much the Jacksonville Jaguars
will play star running back Maurice Jones-Drew in the team's
season opener against the Minnesota Vikings after Jones-
Drew missed the entire offseason during a holdout.


New regime begins Tannehill, Miami
NewB reb gisIvfVY TIVV!XEn"


Bucs start

Schiano era

against Panthers

Associated Press

TAMPA As usual,
Ronde Barber tried to de-
flect attention from himself.
Tampa Bay's five-time Pro
Bowl selection insists he's
approaching his 200th con-
secutive NFL start as if it's
just another game. Yet he
concedes Sunday's season
opener against Cam Newton
and the Carolina Panthers is
anything but that for the
Buccaneers, who'll be mak-
ing their debut under coach
Greg Schiano.
Newton threw for a
rookie-record 4,051 yards,
while also setting a league
single-season mark for
touchdowns rushing by a
quarterback in 2011, when
the 2010 Heisman Trophy
winner raised the standard
by which defenses measure
themselves. He torched the
Bucs with four TDs passing
and four more on the
ground in two games be-
tween the NFC South rivals.
The Bucs have an up-and-
coming young quarterback
of their own in Josh Free-
man and have given him
some nice new tools to work
with in his fourth season.


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers open the season at home today
against the Carolina Panthers. The game is blacked out on


local television.
But in Barber's mind,
Tampa Bay will always be a
defensive team, and it's im-
portant to set the tone for
what he expects to be a suc-
cessful season. The 37-year-
old is making the transition
from cornerback to safety in
his 16th season, and says
Newton presents a unique
challenge for an overhauled
defense that wants to re-
deem itself after yielding a
league-high and franchise-
record 494 points in 2011.
Newton beat Tampa Bay
38-19 at Raymond James
Stadium and 48-16 in the
second meeting in Charlotte.
"Last year was last year.
I've forgotten about it. ... It
has no and when I say no,
I mean absolutely no -
bearing on this football
team," Barber said, adding


that the Bucs have bought
into a new defensive system
similar to the one Schiano
used to transform Rutgers
into a Big East contender
over the past 11 seasons.
"It's a completely differ-
ent scheme. ... We have dif-
ferent ways we're going to
play Cam, different ways
we're going to play every sit-
uation that they beat us with
last year," Barber added.
"We're looking forward to it
... It's a good start for us. We
can judge ourselves on how
we play against him."
Newton enters his second
season determined to build
on his record-breaking suc-
cess and help Carolina, 6-10
a year ago, get over the hump
and back to the playoffs.
"I'm about doing whatever
is needed to win football


games," said the 6-foot-5,245-
pounder whom the Bucs say
possesses such a unique skill
set as a runner and passer
that it's virtually impossible
to shut him down completely
"Literally, when he has the
ball, you're playing against
another running back. He's
that athletic and that good,
which really screws up your
math. And defense is all
math. It's getting your troops
deployed where the fight is
going on," Schiano said.
"It really messes up all
your rules, and assumptions
have to be tweaked. You
tweak your rules and as-
sumptions to stop the run,
and then you have a guy
who's a very potent passer,
that's what makes him as
dangerous as he is."
Tampa Bay was 4-12 last
season, finishing on a 10-
game losing streak that in-
cluded the pair of lopsided
losses to the Panthers.
A year after throwing for 25
touchdowns and just six inter-
ceptions and helping the Bucs
win 10 games in his first year
as a full-time starter, Freeman
took a step back while tossing
16 TD and. 22 interceptions.
The Bucs have sur-
rounded the 24-year-old
Freeman with more talent,
signing All-Pro guard Carl
Nicks, three-time 1,000-yard
receiver Vincent Jackson
and former Indianapolis
Colts tight end Dallas Clark
in free agency


Associated Press

HOUSTON The real
hard knocks start in Hous-
ton for Miami quarterback
Ryan Tannehill.
Picked eighth overall in
the NFL draft, he may
have the toughest test of
any of the five rookie quar-
terbacks starting on the
NFEs opening weekend.
He goes against a Texans
defense that ranked sec-
ond in yards allowed and
set a club record with 44
sacks in Wade Phillips'
first season as coordinator.
"They don't have as
many exotic pressures and
zone blitzes as you will see
from other teams, but
they're really good at what
they do," Tannehill said.
"They believe at what they
do and they're crisp at it."
Tannehill will make his
NFL debut at Reliant Sta-
dium, where he led Texas
A&M to a bowl victory over
Northwestern in his final
college game last Decem-
ber. Mike Sherman, Tan-
nehill's college coach, was
fired a few weeks before the
bowl game and hired as the
new Dolphins' offensive co-
ordinator before the draft
It's eased Tannehill's
transition to the pros by
having much of the same


playbook from A&M, and he
won the starting job in
training camp over Matt
Moore, who started 12
games last season. Veteran
David Garrard was also in
the mix until he hurt his left
knee and needed surgery in
early August. The Dolphins
waived Garrard this week.
Tannehill is the first
rookie quarterback to start
for Miami in a season
opener, something not
even Dan Marino got to do.
John Beck, currently No. 3
on Houston's depth chart,
was the last rookie to start
any games for the Dolphins
and he went 0-4 in 2007.
Miami has question marks
on the right side of the line,
where rookie Jonathan Mar-
tin will start at tackle and
backup John Jerry will start
at guard. Left tackle Jake
Long was limited at practice
this week with a right knee
injury That isn't dimming
Tannehill's eagerness head-
ing into his first game.
"It's been a whirlwind,
kind of nonstop," Tannehill
said, "but I'm really excited
in the position and the op-
portunity that I have. Now
it's just about taking advan-
tage of it. This is not the
end of the road. It's just
starting as I see it, and it's
about going out every day,
getting better"


NFL CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 (
Miami 0 0 0 .000 (
New England 0 0 0 .000 (
N.Y Jets 0 0 0 .000 (
South
W L T Pct PF
Houston 0 0 0 .000 (
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 (
Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 (
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 (
North
W L T Pct PF
Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 (
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 (
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 (
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 (
West
W L T Pct PF
Denver 0 0 0 .000 (
Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 (
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 (
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 (
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 2'
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 (
Washington 0 0 0 .000 (
N.Y Giants 0 1 0 .000 17
South
W L T Pct PF
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 (
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 (
New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 (
Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 (
North
W L T Pct PF
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 (
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 (
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 (
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 (
West
W L T Pct PF
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 (
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 (
Seattle 0 0 0 .000 (
St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 (
Wednesday's Game
Dallas 24, N.Y Giants 17
Sunday's Games
Indianapolis at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 1 p.m.
New England at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Washington at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 10:15 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 13
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 16
Tampa Bay at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.


Washington at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 17
Denver at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
NFL Injury Report
NEW YORK -The updated National Foot-
ball League injury report, as provided by the
league:
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at CHICAGO
BEARS COLTS: OUT: LB Pat Angerer (foot),
G Joe Reitz (knee). QUESTIONABLE: RB De-
lone Carter (chest), WR Austin Collie (head),
WR T.Y. Hilton (shoulder). PROBABLE: RB
Mewelde Moore (chest), CB Jerraud Powers
(knee), DE Cory Redding (knee). BEARS:
QUESTIONABLE: RB Lorenzo Booker (head).
PROBABLE: WR Earl Bennett (hand), S Chris
Conte (shoulder), P Adam Podlesh (hip), LB
Brian Urlacher (knee).
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS at MINNESOTA
VIKINGS JAGUARS: OUT: DE Austen Lane
(foot), DE George Selvie (knee), LB Daryl Smith
(groin). DOUBTFUL: CB Derek Cox (hamstring).
QUESTIONABLE: CB Mike Harris (hamstring).
PROBABLE: WR Justin Blackmon (ankle), C
Brad Meester (not injury related), DE Aaron
Morgan (not injury related), G Uche Nwaneri
(ankle). VIKINGS: OUT: LB Marvin Mitchell
(ankle), S Andrew Sendejo (ankle), WR Jarius
Wright (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: RB Adrian
Peterson (knee). PROBABLE: S Robert Blan-
ton (hamstring), TE John Carlson (knee), DT
Letroy Guion (knee), T Geoff Schwartz (ab-
domen), CB Marcus Sherels (ankle).
BUFFALO BILLS at NEW YORK JETS -
BILLS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Stevie Johnson
(groin). PROBABLE: WR Brad Smith (groin), G
Kraig Urbik (low back). JETS: OUT: T Dennis
Landolt (knee), S Eric Smith (hip, knee). QUES-
TIONABLE: DE Mike DeVito (calf), TE Dustin
Keller (hamstring), DT Sione Po'uha (low back).
PROBABLE: LB Nick Bellore (shoulder), S Josh
Bush (concussion), LB David Harris (ankle),
WR Stephen Hill (calf), WR Santonio Holmes
(ribs), S LaRon Landry (heel), CB Ellis Lankster
(quadriceps), RB Joe McKnight (hamstring), G
Brandon Moore (hip), WR Chaz Schilens
(ankle), LB Bryan Thomas (ankle).
MIAMI DOLPHINS at HOUSTON TEXANS
-DOLPHINS: QUESTIONABLE: DTTony Mc-
Daniel (knees, toes). PROBABLE: WR Brian
Hartline (calf), G John Jerry (ankle), T Jake
Long (knee), LB Koa Misi (back), DE Derrick
Shelby (shoulder), LB Jason Trusnik (ankle).
TEXANS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Bryan Braman
(hamstring), RB Arian Foster (knee), LB Brooks
Reed (hip). PROBABLE: NT Shaun Cody (back,
ankle), LB Brian Cushing (ribs), TE Owen
Daniels (illness), WR Andre Johnson (chest), S
Shiloh Keo (neck), C Chris Myers (knee), RB
Ben Tate (head), DE J.J. Watt (elbow).
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS atTENNESSEE
TITANS PATRIOTS: OUT: RB ShaneVereen
(foot). QUESTIONABLE: CB Alfonzo Dennard
(hamstring), TE Daniel Fells (shin), G Nick Mc-
Donald (shoulder), S Sterling Moore (knee), T
Sebastian Vollmer (back). PROBABLE: S
Patrick Chung (shoulder).TITANS: OUT: T Mike
Otto (finger, knee). DOUBTFUL: DT Sen'Der-
rick Marks (knee). QUESTIONABLE: DT Jurrell
Casey (elbow), LB Zac Diles (hamstring), DE
Scott Solomon (knee).
ST. LOUIS RAMS at DETROIT LIONS -
RAMS: OUT: DT Michael Brockers (ankle), DT
Matthew Conrath (knee), DT Darell Scott
(knee). LIONS: DOUBTFUL: S Louis Delmas
(knee), CB Chris Houston (ankle).
WASHINGTON REDSKINS at NEW OR-
LEANS SAINTS- REDSKINS: OUT: S Brandon
Meriweather (knee). PROBABLE: NT Chris Baker


(ankle), G Kory Lichtensteiger (knee), LB Brian
Orakpo (chest), CB Josh Wilson (abdomen).
SAINTS: OUT: T Marcel Jones (knee). QUES-
TIONABLE:WR Adrian Arrington (knee),WR Mar-
ques Colston (foot), CB Jabari Greer (groin), LB
David Hawthorne (knee), LB Curtis Lofton (ankle).
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at CLEVELAND
BROWNS EAGLES: OUT: S Colt Anderson
(knee), WR Riley Cooper (collarbone). QUES-
TIONABLE: RB Dion Lewis (hamstring). PROB-
ABLE: S Nate Allen (hamstring), DE Jason
Babin (calf), LB Jamar Chaney (hamstring), DT
Fletcher Cox (knee), LB Casey Matthews
(ankle), T Nathan Menkin (shoulder). BROWNS:
OUT: LB James-Michael Johnson (ribs,
oblique). DOUBTFUL: T Oniel Cousins (ankle).
QUESTIONABLE: TE Jordan Cameron (groin),
G John Greco (calf), QBThaddeus Lewis (right
thumb), RB Chris Ogbonnaya (ankle), RB Trent
Richardson (knee), TE Benjamin Watson
(thigh). PROBABLE: S Eric Hagg (illness), CB
Dimitri Patterson (knee), S Ray Ventrone (ham-
string), S Usama Young (thigh).
ATLANTA FALCONS at KANSAS CITY
CHIEFS- FALCONS: PROBABLE: CB Christo-
pher Owens (hamstring), RB Jason Snelling
(calf). CHIEFS: DOUBTFUL: DE Allen Bailey
(ankle), S Kendrick Lewis (shoulder), DT Anthony
Toribio (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Jovan
Belcher (groin), CB Jalil Brown (groin), CB Bran-
don Flowers (foot), LB Derrick Johnson (ankle).
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at GREEN BAY
PACKERS 49ERS: QUESTIONABLE: WR
Ted Ginn Jr. (ankle), RB Brandon Jacobs
(knee). PACKERS: OUT: CB Davon House
(shoulder), LB Jamari Lattimore (ankle), RB
James Starks (toe). PROBABLE:TE Tom Crab-
tree (shoulder), LB Robert Francois (ham-
string), RB Alex Green (knee), DT B.J. Raji
(ankle), S Sean Richardson (hamstring).
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at ARIZONA CARDI-
NALS- SEAHAWKS: OUT: G James Carpen-
ter (knee), DE Greg Scruggs (hamstring), WR
Golden Tate (knee). DOUBTFUL: CB Byron
Maxwell (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: RB Mar-
shawn Lynch (back). PROBABLE: QB Matt
Flynn (right elbow). CARDINALS: QUESTION-
ABLE: G Adam Snyder (elbow), CB Greg Toler
(hip), RB Beanie Wells (hamstring). PROBA-
BLE: TE Rob Housler (hamstring), S Rashad
Johnson (abdomen), WR Andre Roberts
(ankle), LB O'Brien Schofield (knee), RB LaRod
Stephens-Howling (groin).
CAROLINA PANTHERS at TAMPA BAY
BUCCANEERS PANTHERS: OUT: G Jeff
Byers (knee). QUESTIONABLE: RB Jonathan
Stewart (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Jon Beason
(thigh), WR Steve Smith (foot). BUCCANEERS:
DOUBTFUL: CB E.J. Biggers (foot), CB An-
thony Gaitor (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE:
WR Arrelious Benn (knee).
PITTSBURGH STEELERS at DENVER
BRONCOS STEELERS: OUT: S Ryan Clark
(not injury related), LB Stevenson Sylvester (knee).
DOUBTFUL: RB Rashard Mendenhall (knee).
QUESTIONABLE: RB Baron Batch (groin), LB
James Harrison (knee). PROBABLE: LB Larry
Foote (ankle), DE Brett Keisel (ankle), RB Isaac
Redman (ankle), LB Jason Worilds (wrist). BRON-
COS: OUT: G Chris Kuper (forearm).
CINCINNATI BENGALS at BALTIMORE
RAVENS BENGALS: OUT: CB Dre Kirk-
patrick (knee). DNP: DE Carlos Dunlap (knee),
RB Bernard Scott (hand). LIMITED: CB Jason
Allen (quadriceps), TE Donald Lee (thigh).
FULL: QB Andy Dalton (right biceps), DE
Robert Geathers (knee), TE Jermaine Gresham
(knee), LB Dan Skuta (head). RAVENS: DNP:
CB Asa Jackson (illness), T Jah Reid (leg).
FULL: S Sean Considine (head), LB Courtney
Upshaw (shoulder).
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at OAKLAND
RAIDERS CHARGERS: DNP: T Jared
Gaither (back). LIMITED: DT Antonio Garay


(ankle), RB Ryan Mathews (clavicle). RAIDERS:
DNP: WR Jacoby Ford (foot). LIMITED: G
Cooper Carlisle (back), WR Juron Criner
(ankle), WR Denarius Moore (hamstring), DT
Richard Seymour (knee). FULL:TE David Aus-
berry (shoulder), K Sebastian Janikowski (left
groin), TE Brandon Myers (shoulder), G Stefen
Wisniewski (calf).
2011 NFL leaders
AFC
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE 611 401 5235 39 12
Schaub, HOU 292 178 2479 15 6
Roethlis., PIT 513 324 4077 21 14
Rivers, SND 582 366 4624 27 20
Mat. Moore, MIA 347 210 2497 16 9
Hasselbeck, TEN 518 319 3571 18 14
Flacco, BAL 542 312 3610 20 12
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Jones-Drew, JAC 343 1606 4.68 56 8
R. Rice, BAL 291 1364 4.69 70t 12
A. Foster, HOU 278 1224 4.40 43 10
McGahee, DEN 249 1199 4.82 60t 4
Ry. Mathews, SND 222 1091 4.91 39 6
Re. Bush, MIA 216 1086 5.03 76t 6
Benson, CIN 273 1067 3.91 42 6
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Welker, NWE 122 1569 12.9 99t 9
Gronkowski, NWE 90 1327 14.7 52t 17
B. Marshall, MIA 81 1214 15.0 65t 6
Bowe,KAN 81 1159 14.3 52t 5
Hernandez, NWE 79 910 11.5 46 7
St. Johnson, BUF 76 1004 13.2 55 7
R. Rice, BAL 76 704 9.3 52 3
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret Pts
Gronkowski, NWE 18 1 17 0 108
R. Rice, BAL 15 12 3 0 90
A. Foster, HOU 12 10 2 0 72
Green-Ellis, NWE 11 11 0 0 66
Jones-Drew, JAC 11 8 3 0 66
Tolbert, SND 10 8 2 0 60
NFC
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 502 343 4643 45 6
Brees, NOR 657 468 5476 46 14
Romo, DAL 522 346 4184 31 10
Stafford, DET 663 421 5038 41 16
E. Manning, NYG 589 359 4933 29 16
M. Ryan, ATL 566 347 4177 29 12
Ale. Smith, SNF 446 274 3150 17 5
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
M.Turner, ATL 301 1340 4.45 81t 11
L. McCoy, PHL 273 1309 4.79 60 17
Gore, SNF 282 1211 4.29 55 8
M. Lynch, SEA 285 1204 4.22 47 12
S. Jackson, STL 260 1145 4.40 47t 5
B. Wells, ARI 245 1047 4.27 71 10
Forte, CHI 203 997 4.91 46 3
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
R.White, ATL 100 00 1296 13.0 43 8
J.Graham, NOR 99 1310 13.2 59 11


Ca. Johnson, DET 96 1681 17.5
Harvin, MIN 87 967 11.1
Sproles, NOR 86 710 8.3
Pettigrew, DET 83 777 9.4
Cruz, NYG 82 1536 18.7
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec
L. McCoy, PHL 20 17 3
Ca. Johnson, DET 16 0 16
Jor. Nelson, GBY 15 0 15
C. Newton, CAR 14 14 0
M. Lynch, SEA 13 12 1
A. Peterson, MIN 13 12 1


Ret
0
0
0
0
0
0


Wednesday, Sept. 19th

6pm 7pm

(Followed by an hour

of individual counseling)


The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an entrepreneur
- from the business idea to the reality of
owning your own business. Following the
seminar, interested participants will have the
opportunity to meet with seasoned SCORE
counselors to further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed for
individuals who are not business owners, but
who are interested in learning what is
involved in becoming one. If you have ever
asked yourself "Do I have what it takes to be
an entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for
you!

A one hour counseling session will follow
for those interested in meeting with a
SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact
Dale Malm at SCORE

352-249-1236
Swww.scorecitrus.org
Seating is limited.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 B7


pO en vs. exans












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

McCartney gets
French honor
PARIS France's Ely-
see Palace said former
Beatle Paul McCartney

decorated
with the
legion of
honor for
services
to music.
On Sat-
urday the
Paul presiden-
bMcCartney tial office
said 70-
year-old McCartney -
who sang and co-wrote
hits like "Hey Jude" and
"Yesterday" was deco-
rated at the rank of offi-
cer by French President
FMancois Hollande at the
Elysee Palace, with mem-
bers of McCartney's fam-
ily attending.
McCartney joins the
ranks of other singers to
have received the honor
Barbra Streisand and
Liza Minnelli were simi-
larly honored by former
President Nicolas
Sarkozy.

Man arrested at
Cyrus' house
LOS ANGELES -A-
man allegedly clutching a
pair of scissors was ar-
rested
after po-
lice say
he tried
Sto force
himself
inside the
Los Ange-
les home
Miley of Miley
Cyrus Cyrus.
Los An-
geles police Lt. Brian
Wendling said employees
inside the house in the
Studio City area called
police around 4 a.m. Sat-
urday after the man came
to the door and claimed
to be a friend of the 19-
year-old singer-actress.
Wendling said the sus-
pect then repeatedly threw
himself against an outside
wall as if he was trying to
break into the house. Cyrus
was not home.
The man, who was not
identified, was arrested
after officers saw him
jump behind some
bushes. He was carrying
a pair of scissors.

Stewart braves
crowds for film
TORONTO It's been
tough for Kristen Stewart
to be back out in public
after revelations of an af-
fair that led to her
breakup with "Twilight"
co-star
Robert
Pattinson.
Yet
there's no
place she
would
rather be
than at
Kristen the
Stewart Toronto
Interna-




thought about skipping
the festival.
She said it was impor-
tant to be there with di-
rector Walter Salles and
co-star Garrett Hedlund,
who like Stewart had
worked for years to get
the film made.
-From wire reports


New Kindle on fire


Associated Press
The Kindle Fire's new HD model has a screen that measures 7 inches diagonally and costs $199.

Review: HD screen is a big improvement for Amazon's tablet


RYAN NAKASHIMA
Associated Press

SANTA MONICA, Calif. Buying
movies and TV shows to watch on
the Kindle Fire will be a lot more
appealing now Amazon's tablet
computer sports a more vibrant
screen.
The screen in the Fire's new HD
models is such a major improve-
ment, I can't see why you would
purchase a regular model, even if it
means saving $40.
The HD models were among the
new devices Amazon unveiled
Thursday They start at $199 for the
smaller one, with a screen that
measures 7 inches diagonally That
will start shipping next Friday Two
models with larger screens will go
on sale in November
Amazon is also refreshing the
regular model. It promises to be 40
percent faster than the original one,
which came out last November It
also comes with a price cut to $159,
instead of the original $199. The
regular Kindle Fire will also start
shipping next Friday
The new offerings bring the Fire
into closer competition with
Apple's market-leading iPad. The
HD screens will have a higher reso-
lution, just as Apple introduced a
higher-resolution screen earlier
this year The larger models will
have 8.9-inch screens, slightly
smaller than the iPad's 9.7 inches.
By the numbers, the difference
between the HD and the regular
screens doesn't seem that big.
The smaller Kindle Fire HD has
a screen resolution of 1280 by 800.
Last year's 7-inch model and the
upgraded version with better in-
nards both have screens with 1024
by 600 pixels.
That doesn't come close to the lat-
est iPad, which has a resolution of
2048 by 1536. Nonetheless, this up-
grade feels like a big leap for Ama-
zon. It means a sharp picture
instead of one that seems made up
of lots of pixels, a welcome relief


that feels even better when you con-
sider the price. At $199, compared
with $499 for the latest iPad, I can
see this being a popular stocking
stuffer this Christmas.
Amazon has also made a couple
of important design changes in its
new HD models. For one, the speak-
ers are now on both sides of the de-
vice when held in landscape mode
like a movie screen, meaning you
can watch movies in Dolby Digital
Plus stereo sound without head-
phones. The old Kindle Fire had
stereo speakers off to one side
when held this way, and that hasn't
changed with the upgraded non-HD
model.
Both the upgraded Kindle Fire
and new HD 7-inch models also
come with a full suite of new fea-
tures that are nifty, but not game-
changing.
Both devices will feature the "X-
Ray" series of features that provide
insights into the book or movie
you're enjoying.
An on-screen tap during a movie
will list actors in the scene. With
more clicks, you can learn more
about them from Amazon's movie
information service IMDb. In books,
X-Ray has been a popular feature
on the Kindle Touch e-reader That
now works on Kindle Fire and gives
you a bird's eye view of where char-
acters or ideas appear later on in a
book.
Amazon.com Inc. has also up-
graded its audio book offerings.
"Immersion Reading" allows you to
read a book while hearing narra-
tion from a famous actor I find this
feature to be a distraction, but some
book lovers will appreciate it.
For parents, Amazon has added a
system that can control how much
time a child can spend on various
media. So, you could limit how
much your kids can watch video
and play games, but let them read
as much as they want.
I was only able to test the 7-inch
models this week. The larger ones,
which cost at least $299, won't ship


until Nov 20. Their screens will be
1920 by 1200 just short of the
iPad's.
Some aspects about the Kindle
Fire HD sounded great, but could-
n't be tested in the short time that
Amazon gave reporters to try out
the devices Thursday
For instance, it was impossible to
tell whether Kindle Fire HD's two
antennas made its performance in
Wi-Fi noticeably faster than the lat-
est iPad or Google's Nexus 7. Also
unknown was whether its promised
11-hour battery life held up for real.
In handling the device, though, I
found video played well and images
looked sharp. But it was not as re-
sponsive as I would have liked. It
seemed to lag when swiping
through pictures or through the
news feed on the custom-built Face-
book app.
There was no app that independ-
ently controlled the front-facing
camera, which is new to the Kindle
Fire HD. The Facebook picture I
took with the device turned out up-
side down, even though the camera
was clearly meant to be at the top of
the device when held in landscape
mode. Amazon's representatives
said the camera was mainly for use
with a Skype app made for the
device.
People looking to buy a new
tablet might be able to overlook
these minor annoyances because of
the sharper screen.
Ultimately, the decision to buy a
Kindle Fire HD could be deter-
mined by the array of content that
comes with the device if you join
the $79 annual free-shipping pro-
gram known as Amazon Prime.
Amazon has made plenty of big
investments lately that make Prime
a more compelling offer On Tues-
day, it announced a deal with the
Epix pay TV channel that allows
Prime members to watch 2,000
movies like "The Avengers" and
"The Hunger Games" for free, on
top of some 23,000 movies and TV
shows it had already


Showers fall at N.Y Fashion Week


Associated Press


NEW YORK A flurry
of fashion assistants
rushed to protect racks of
clothes backstage at New
York Fashion Week from
Saturday's sudden down-
pours perhaps as potent
a reminder as any during
these spring previews that
seasons can be
temperamental.


Birthday: There are indications that the year ahead will
turn into a period of accelerated activity and travel for
you. This doesn't mean that you will necessarily be
trekking great distances, but you will be visiting multiple
places.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Even though you may keep
a low profile in a partnership arrangement, to your co-
hort's credit, whatever benefits are derived will be shared
equally. Make sure you are appreciative.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your best asset is likely to be
your ability to improve upon most anything, even things
that are already pretty darn good. It'll be those ingenious
touches that add new dimensions.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Many pleasant experi-
ences could be in store for you, mostly because you're
operating in a mode where others will feel compelled to
do nice things for you in return for your kindness.


Maybe that's why leather
is as common in these pre-
views for spring and sum-
mer 2013 as the pops of
color and chiffon you might
expect.
"You can wear those
leather jackets all year
long," said stylist June Am-
brose. "They're sleek
enough to go under a parka
or a vest and buttery enough
for spring."


Designers have been mov-
ing away from seasonal
dressing, meaning models at
Rag & Bone endured layers
of leather in a roasting, un-
air conditioned preview
Friday
"I'm not designing specifi-
cally for 'the show' or even
for spring," said Tom Mora of
J. Crew, which has a preview
Tuesday "We have deliver-
ies once a month and we al-


Today's HOROSCOPE
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Try to put an arrange-
ment together where you can function as the host or
hostess. You'd be superb in this role, so give your talent
a chance to shine.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you desire to give a
gift to someone who is very special in your eyes, remem-
ber that it's the thought behind the present that makes
the most impact. Select accordingly.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Material aspects look to
be favoring you at this point in time, with savory perks
coming your way via business contacts.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't fret if someone in
your group tries to usurp the role you've been accus-
tomed to playing. This person won't get very far, but he or
she may inadvertently make you look better.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Lucky you, because quite a
few good friends might each do a special favor for you. Yet


ways want it to look new."
The crowd traded tank
tops and open-toed shoes
Friday for long sleeves and
boots Saturday as rain
leaked through the tents at
Lincoln Center Mercedes-
Benz Fashion Week pre-
views for retailers, editors
and stylists continue for
eight days, before the fash-
ion crowd heads for Lon-
don, Milan and Paris.


none of them will want what they do broadcast to others.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Someone you recently met
has been waiting for a signal regarding your intentions. If
you really care, let it be known. If not, don't string him or
her along any longer.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You stand your best
chances for success in an area where you are unselfishly
motivated to invest your time. Try to rise above your own
petty perspective.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If there is anyone who can
infuse a spirit of warmth into a social situation, it's you.
I'm sure all of your friends would agree that you're the
primary candidate for such a job.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You'll work hard to make sure
that your partners in a group endeavor come out as well
as you. Your efforts won't be in vain, nor will they go un-
rewarded.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
Mega Money: 5 34 35 38
Mega Ball: 11
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $917.50
3-of-4 MB 25 $563
3-of-4 661 $63.50
2-of-4 MB 1,056 $27.50
1-of-4 MB 10,139 $2.50
2-of-4 21,002 $2
Fantasy 5:14 22 28 32 34
5-of-5 2 $114,984.42
4-of-5 297 $124.50
3-of-5 9,254 $11
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
Fantasy 5:12 13- 14 23- 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 242 $555
3-of-5 8,165 $23

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 9,
the 253rd day of 2012. There
are 113 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 9,1543, Mary
Stuart was crowned Queen of
Scots at Stirling Castle, nine
months after she was born.
On this date:
In 1776, the second Conti-
nental Congress made the
term "United States" official,
replacing "United Colonies."
In 1830, Charles Durant
flew a balloon from New York
City across the Hudson River
to Perth Amboy, N.J.
In 1850, California became
the 31 st state of the union.
In 1919, some 1,100 mem-
bers of Boston's 1,500-man
police force went on strike.
(The strike was broken by
Massachusetts Gov. Calvin
Coolidge with replacement
officers.)
In 1926, the National
Broadcasting Co. (NBC) was
incorporated by the Radio
Corp. of America.
In 1957, President Dwight
D. Eisenhower signed the first
civil rights bill to pass Con-
gress since Reconstruction.
In 1971, prisoners seized
control of the maximum-se-
curity Attica Correctional Fa-
cility near Buffalo, N.Y,
beginning a siege that ended
up claiming 43 lives.
In 1997, Sinn Fein, the
IRA's political ally, formally re-
nounced violence as it took
its place in talks on Northern
Ireland's future.
Ten years ago: Former
Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin
"Buzz" Aldrin was con-
fronted outside the Luxe
Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif.,
by conspiracy theorist Bart
Sibrel, who demanded
Aldrin swear on a Bible he'd



Five years ago: Britney
Spears performed her new
single "Gimme More" in a
much-criticized comeback at-
tempt at the MTV Video
Music Awards in Las Vegas.
One year ago: New York-
ers and Washingtonians
shrugged off talk of a new
terror threat as intelligence
officials scrambled to nail
down information on a possi-
ble al-Qaida strike timed to
coincide with the 10th an-
niversary of 9/11.
Today's Birthdays:
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Luther Simmons is 70. Col-
lege Football Hall of Famer
and former NFL player Joe
Theismann is 63. Actor Hugh
Grant is 52. Model Rachel
Hunter is 43. Pop-jazz singer
Michael Buble' is 37.


Thought for Today:
"There are two great days in
a person's life the day we
are born and the day we dis-
cover why." William Bar-
clay, Scottish theologian
(1907-1978).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Save Our Waters


Has Florida

no shame?
"Always do right this
will gratify some and as-
tonish the rest."
Mark Twain
(1835-1910)
MEi
DAN HILLIARD
Special to the Chronicle
I t was only yesterday,
it seems. I perched
on the bow of a small
plywood skiff peer-
ing down into the clear
water of Lake Okee-
chobee, commonly called
the "Big O," as we scur-
ried to the fish camp
ahead of an approaching
thunderstorm. I pointed
out the fleeing bass and
bluegill to my father as
we sped along, and even
offered commentary, but
he probably couldn't hear
me over the 10 horse-
power Martin outboard.
It might have been only
a few days later that the
family was wade fishing
in the shoreline grass of
Lake Clinch in Frost-
proof, Fla. We dunked
earthworms on bass beds
and caught only those
small enough that they
did not break our cane
poles. It was a family out-
ing that day, the memory
as clear as the lake's
water and as clean as the
sandy bottom.
It was not today's gen-
eration that coined the
phrase "O-M-G!" for a lot
of poles were broken.
The bass were plentiful
and big. Really big. There
were no restrictions or
guidelines about con-
sumption of fish those
days, so the bass became
guests of honor at the
evening meal.
It wasn't all that long
ago, really it wasn't Less
than a single lifetime,
only 50 or so years ago,
and these lakes had ex-
isted for centuries or per-
haps millennia in that
form. These things are
the stuff of roots, the
things that keep our
youth at home for the
long haul. Such experi-
ences aree the bonds that
See Page C4


Special to the Chronicle
Rrst-place Save Our Waters Week photo contest winner, Jessica Hoag of Bushnell, captured the serenity and
beauty of Ozello's waters as her husband, accompanied by his father and brother visiting from upstate New York,
enjoyed fishing and family time together. See other winners next week in Commentary and HomeFront.


Help give Florida some CPR


K.C. NAYFIELD
Special to the Chronicle
I turned 60 years old this year. As
a native, it means I have spent
six decades in Florida. I have
seen a lot of change.
I grew up on a lake in a small
town in Central Florida. My mother
said that I learned to swim before I
learned to walk. I have since spent
the better portions of my life swim-
ming, water skiing, surfing, fishing,
scuba diving, boating and, most re-
cently, canoeing. Florida's water re-
sources have been a huge part of
my life. Perhaps this is why I am so
saddened to see them disappearing
at an alarming rate.
If you haven't noticed the decline
in water quantity and quality in the
state, then you probably just haven't
lived here long enough. The recent
drought could not state it any clearer
- Florida is running out of water.
Our lakes are dwindling away
and our rivers and springs are dra-
matically reduced in flow Saltwa-
ter intrusion is evident in many
coastal communities. Our estuary
systems have suffered as well, re-


sulting in huge declines in fish and
shellfish populations.
We have filled in hundreds of
thousands of wetlands and built
causeways over estuaries. We have
paved thousands of miles of roads
and built thousands upon thou-
sands of houses and buildings. All
of this has led to an increase in
water consumption and a decrease
in aquifer recharge, resulting in a
low aquifer level. More evidence of
this lies in the large numbers of
sinkholes that have been forming in
the recent past.
The reality is that there is not just
one single major factor that has cre-
ated the problem. It has been a
number of minimal-effect occur-
rences that have combined to have
a maximal effect.
Although Florida will never be
the paradise of my youth, I feel that
we can reverse many of these
changes and help save our dying
natural water resources. It is time
to give Florida some CPR. That is
conservation, preservation and
restoration.
Conservation of water is the eas-
iest and quickest beneficial prac-


tice. We all can help by adopting a
new water ethic by realizing that
water is the most precious com-
modity that we possess.
We can do simple things like fix-
ing leaking plumbing and limiting
shower time. We can plant Florida
Friendly landscaping and use rain
barrels to collect water to water our
plants. We can encourage water
reuse projects for golf courses. We
can urge commercial and agricul-
tural entities to use best manage-
ment practices with regard to water
usage. Some of us may even give up
our lush green lawns or at least fol-
low watering restrictions.
Conservation of energy also re-
sults in conservation of water. It
takes a lot of water to generate
power. We can cut back on our use
even by just turning off lights when
not in use.
Preservation of water recharge
areas is vital. Unfortunately, the
funds for Florida Forever were
taken from the state budget. There
is, however, a move to pass a consti-
tutional amendment to provide
See Page C4


Guest COLUMN


Citrus County's FQHC license best kept public


JEFFERY KINNARD
Special to the Chronicle
I read, with interest, Mike
Wright's article in last
Sunday's paper, regard-
ing the Federally Qualified
Health Center (FQHC) li-
cense held by the Citrus
County Health Department.
Being the owner of a pri-
vate chiropractic clinic, and
also provider of chiropractic
services at the Citrus County
Health Department, pro-
vides me with a unique per-
spective in this discussion.


I agree with Mike Bays, in
that this FQHC license is
one of the best things in
medicine for delivering
health care services to the
uninsured, and underin-
sured, for the communities
they serve. I also agree with
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe that private clinics
can operate with greater
flexibility.
Where I'm a bit con-
cerned, and somewhat
skeptical, is that it seems
there has been a significant
effort to move in a "privati-


zation direction" before ac-
tually trying to identify any
problems that exist at the
health department, and cor-
rect them.
A day spent at any of the
health department clinics
would reveal that the doc-
tors, nurses, and support
staff are there for a purpose
greater than their pay; they
truly have a heart for the
people they serve. If there
are shortcomings in the de-
livery of health care serv-
ices to the uninsured and
underinsured in Citrus


County, it is my opinion that
the problems lie in proce-
dures rather than the per-
sonnel. If we have problems
in the procedures, let's work
at correcting those, and not
throw the proverbial baby
out with the bath water.
Because of the extraordi-
nary efforts of Teresa Good-
man, and her predecessor
Mary Beth Nayfield, our
county health department
has an FQHC license/desig-
nation that gives them ac-
cess to increased state and
federal dollars, as well as


millions of dollars in grant
monies, to provide care for
the citizens of Citrus County.
Their efforts should be sup-
ported, and current proce-
dures critiqued, including
input from informed indi-
viduals such as Mr. Bays, to
improve the way that the
county health department
delivers health care
services.
An FQHC license is worth
a tremendous amount of
money to the license holder.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Watch out

for fast-

growing

trees
Swent to lunch the
other day and ran into
a tree.
My story is that the tree
was not behind my car
when I parked it at the
Highlander Cafe on Citrus
Avenue in Crystal River.
When I got back into the
vehicle, the tree had
miraculously grown 25
feet tall and positioned it-
self so my left rear
bumper would take a di-
rect hit. When the bumper
hit the virgin tree, the con-
tents of the cup of hot cof-
fee in my right hand flew
into the sky, bounced off
the interior roof and
landed in my lap.
There is never a good
place for hot coffee to
land once it exits its as-
signed container, but
landing in the lap of a
male driver who has just
slammed his vehicle into
a tree that did not exist a
mere 60 minutes ago is
a particularly bad
conclusion.
I said many bad words
that cannot be printed in
the newspaper.
Did I mention this was
all taking place during
one of our Florida after-
noon thunderstorms?
Well, it did.
To escape the scalding
coffee that was pooling in
my seat, I jumped from
the vehicle into a blinding
rain storm.
While the cool Florida
rain was helping soothe
the coffee-induced burn-
ing on important parts of
my anatomy, a burst of
lightning quickly con-
vinced me that standing in
2 inches of water under a
large tree that had just
sprouted during the last
60 minutes was also not a
good idea.
For safety's sake, I knew
I needed to jump back
into my now-dented vehi-
cle with the coffee pooling
in the driver's seat. My
goal was to reach the pas-
senger's seat.
Did I mention that I also
purchased a sticky bun
with my coffee from the
nice folks at the High-
lander Cafe? They make
very nice desserts at the
Highlander Cafe.
Now soaking wet, hold-
ing the scalded area of my
anatomy, still saying very
bad words that cannot be
printed in a family news-
paper, I dove over the dri-
ver's seat and landed


See Page C3 See Page C4

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I







Page C2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012



PINION


"The only things that evolve by
themselves in an organization are
disorder, friction, and malperformance."
Peter Drucker, 1909-2005


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
o Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CITRUS MEMORIAL




Appointments,



compromise



badly needed


Almost every government
agency in the country is
looking at budget cuts
this coming year because our
economy remains stalled and
citizens are in no mood to pay


additional taxes.
Citrus Memorial
Health System in
Inverness, as a
public hospital, is
one of those enti-
ties that must con-
tinue to reduce its
budget to find a
balance. CMHS is
facing an even
greater crisis be-


THE IS
Budget ch
at Citrus M\

OUR OP
Gov. Scott
move with


cause its own governing board
has abandoned its fiduciary re-
sponsibility and no longer
makes tax dollars available for
the operation of the hospital.
This past week, the Chroni-
cle reported that one of the op-
tions the hospital board will
consider is closing the Sug-
armill Woods clinic. While
every option has to be on the
table for the hospital's founda-
tion board to consider, it may
be a little early to give up on
the effort to provide clinic
service to the southwest por-
tion of the county.
The county hospital is facing
a $9 million deficit, so there
can't really be any sacred cows;
but serving the southwest re-
gion of the county is an impor-
tant strategy for the public
hospital.
The more critical task at
hand is for our county hospital
to settle its governance issue
and resolve to move forward in
cooperation with local physi-
cians. Gov. Rick Scott can help
us find consensus by moving
forward and making the final
two appointments to the gov-
erning board. Once that's com-
plete, the two feuding boards
should be able to settle the
dispute.
Gov. Scott is not a fan of using


Federal iPad grant
In today's paper was a com-
plaint about the iPads. ... The edi-
tor of the Chronicle said that was
a grant. A grant from whom? The
sidewalks on (State Road) 44
were a grant a grant
from the government. I
suspect the iPads were 0
also a grant from the gov-
ernment. That's not free
money. That's from the
taxpayers.
Editor's note: The iPads I
for seventh-graders at Cit-
rus Springs Middle School
came from a $150,000 CAL
federal Race to the Top 563
grant, part of theAmerican 560
Recovery and Reinvest-
ment Act of 2009 eco-
nomic stimulus package.
Property taxes
It's tax time. I just got my state-
ment. I've lived in Sugarmill Woods
for 14 years, and last year not one
house was built in 2011 and this
year my market value went down
20 percent again. And a total of 30
percent of replacement value way
below market. I'm even underwa-
ter. No wonder we're No. 1 in fore-
closures and unemployment in the
state of Florida. What a great state.
It's going to be like Newark pretty


I


I


tax dollars to operate public
hospitals, so it is unlikely that
Citrus County will ever return
to the old days of using tax dol-
lars to balance the operating
budget. But right now, our
county tax dollars
are really only
;SUE: being used to pay
the attorneys to
challenges fight over medical
Memorial. issues and not a
single taxpayer in
INION: the county can be
needston happy about that.
needs to As the hospital
urgency, leadership strug-
gles with the hap-
less task of making budget
reductions, a broader commu-
nity strategy is needed on
health services. In most busi-
ness segments, competition
produces better quality and
pricing for consumers. That is
not what's happening with
health care in Citrus County.
The lack of a working rela-
tionship between many of the
county's physicians and the
public hospital has resulted in
unnecessary conflict and strife.
Hospital employees are not
happy. Private physicians are
not happy. The hospital is los-
ing money and making further
cutbacks.
The working conditions and
ongoing conflict inevitably
have an impact on the quality
of care given to consumers.
And we certainly have not
heard anyone say that the cost
of care to consumers has gone
down.
So as far as we can see, this
isn't working for anyone other
than the attorneys.
Gov. Scott needs to move with
a sense of urgency and com-
plete his appointments. The
foundation board, governing
board and area physicians
then must again try to find a
compromise that starts CMHS
on the road to recovery.


soon. No one cares. But I've got
good news; our taxes went up.
Well, anyway, have a good day.
It's a felony
In response to the so-called
many men who said Animal Con-
trol told him it was not il-
JND legal to kill cats if done
WD in a humane manner,
iFF should get the facts
B ~ straight and tell it like it
f is. If he is trapping and
killing cats, he is commit-
ting a third-degree felony.
Abuse an animal, go to
jail. I can't wait to see
your picture on the front
)579 page in handcuffs.
Made in USA
Us dumb Americans ought to
move to China, Bangladesh, all
these foreign countries because
we can't get anything nice here
anymore. Where is anything made
in the USA? I was made in the
USA, born in the USA, but you
know what? Underwear, everything
is disgusting. The cotton in the
underwear is terrible. Your socks
are terrible. Your underwear
shrinks. There's nothing made
nice anymore made in the USA.
Only us people who were made
here are the USA brand.


Pigskin progressivism


With two extravagant enter-
tainments under way, it is
instructive to note the
connection between the presiden-
tial election and the college foot-
ball season: Barack Obama
represents progres-
sivism, a doctrine whose
many blemishes on
American life include
universities as football
factories, which pro- ri m
gressivism helped to
create. /
Higher education em- r
braced athletics in the ,
first half of the 19th cen-
tury, when most colleges Geor
were denominational OTI
and most instruction
was considered mental VOI
and moral preparation
for a small minority clergy and
other professionals. Physical edu-
cation had nothing to do with spec-
tator sports entertaining people
from outside the campus commu-
nity Rather, it was individual fit-
ness- especially gymnastics for
the moral and pedagogic purposes
of muscular Christianity mens
sana in corpore sano, a sound
mind in a sound body
The collective activity of team
sports came after a great collective
exertion, the Civil War, and two
great social changes, urbanization
and industrialization. This story is
told well in "The Rise of Gridiron
University: Higher Education's
Uneasy Alliance with Big-Time
Football" (University Press of
Kansas) by Brian M. Ingrassia, a
Middle Tennessee State University
historian.
Intercollegiate football began
when Rutgers played Princeton in
1869, four years after Appomattox.
In 1878, one of Princeton's two un-
dergraduate student managers
was Thomas he was called
Tommy Woodrow Wilson. For
the rest of the 19th century, football
appealed as a venue for valor for
collegians whose fathers' venues
had been battlefields. Stephen
Crane, author of the Civil War
novel "The Red Badge of Courage"


g
I


(1895) the badge was a wound -
said: "Of course, I have never been
in a battle, but I believe that I got
my sense of the rage of conflict on
the football field."
Harvard philosopher William
James then spoke of so-
ciety finding new
sources of discipline
and inspiration in "the
moral equivalent of
war." Society found
football, which like war
. "required the subordi-
nation of the individ-
ual, and which would
relieve the supposed
,e Will monotony of workers
IER enmeshed in mass
production.
CES College football be-
came a national phe-
nomenon because it supposedly
served the values ofprogressivism,
in two ways. It exemplified spe-
cialization, expertise and scientific
management And it would recon-
cile the public to the transforma-
tion of universities, especially
public universities, into something
progressivism desired but the pub-
lic found alien. Replicating indus-
trialism's division of labor,
universities introduced the frag-
mentation of the old curriculum of
moral instruction into increasingly
specialized and arcane disciplines.
These included the recently
founded social sciences eco-
nomics, sociology, political science
that were supposed to supply
progressive governments with the
expertise to manage the complex-
ities of the modem economy and
the simplicities of the uninstructed
masses.
Football taught the progressive
virtue of subordinating the indi-
vidual to the collectivity Inevitably,
this led to the cult of one individ-
ual, the coach. Today, in almost
every state, at least one public uni-
versity football coach is paid more
than the governor
As universities multiplied, foot-
ball fueled the competition for
prestige and other scarce re-
sources. Shortly after it was


founded, the University of Chicago
hired as football coach the nation's
first tenured professor of physical
culture and athletics, Amos Alonzo
Stagg, who had played at Yale for
Walter Camp, an early shaper of
the rules and structure of intercol-
legiate football. Camp also was
president of the New Haven Clock
Co. Clocks were emblematic of
modernity workers punching
time clocks, time-and-motion effi-
ciency studies. Camp saw football
as basic training for the manage-
rial elites demanded by
corporations.
Progressives saw football as
training managers for the modem
regulatory state. Ingrassia says a
Yale professor, the Social Darwin-
ist William Graham Sumner (who
was Camp's brother-in-law), pro-
duced one academic acolyte who
thought the "English race" was es-
tablishing hegemony because it
played the "sturdiest" sports.
Reinforced concrete and other
advancements in construction
were put to use building huge sta-
diums to bring the public onto
campuses that, to many, seemed in-
creasingly unintelligible. Ingrassia
says "Harvard Stadium was the
prototype" for dozens of early 20th
century stadiums. In 1914, the in-
augural game in the Yale Bowl
drew 70,055 spectators. The Ala-
bama, LSU and Southern Califor-
nia football programs are the
children of Harvard's, Yale's and
Princeton's.
"It's kind of hard," said Al-
abama's Bear Bryant, "to rally
'round a math class." And today
college football is said to give vast,
fragmented universities a sense of
community through shared ritual.
In this year's first "game of the cen-
tury," Alabama's student-athletes
played those from Michigan in
Cowboys Stadium in Arlington,
Texas, which is 605 miles and 1,191
miles from Tuscaloosa and Ann
Arbor, respectively
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Wait for port study
In response to the article, "Port
Citrus hard to chart" published
Sept 4, the prospects for Port Cit-
rus will be studied in the coming
months by nationally renowned
port experts, and it is too soon to
start questioning the merits of the
port before all the data is ana-
lyzed. Although speculation is to
be expected, Port Citrus is work-
ing hard to make sure that all po-
tential business opportunities are
included in the feasibility study.
Port Citrus already has several
advantages that ports seek, such
as the availability of land sur-
rounding the port for manufac-
turing and other business
development, and proximity to
developing intermodal logistics
centers such as the Ocala/Mar-
ion Commerce Park. In addition,
the Port Study area extends be-
yond the existing port property
- encompassing the Progress
Energy/Duke area. This could be
an important factor in determin-
ing what cargoes and ships could
use Port Citrus.
Simply put, the facts about the
opportunities for Port Citrus are


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

not in yet, and this community
could see major economic bene-


fits, if the research shows real
economic potential. Even without
that information, the port has al-
ready been contacted by a signifi-
cant number of businesses
interested in utilizing Port Citrus.
In Florida, waterborne com-
merce accounts for more than
half of Florida's $149.4 billion in
international trade. In addition,
Florida seaports support more
than 550,000 direct and indirect
jobs. Especially in light of the 10.8
percent unemployment rate, to
prematurely reject the develop-
ment of Port Citrus is a disservice
to the community and the state.
During these tough economic
times, communities should ex-
pect their leaders to review all
available avenues for economic
development and job growth. Cit-
rus County has a manmade asset
that should be evaluated to see
whether it can be developed into
a revenue- and job-producing
feature. We applaud and support
Citrus County's systematic efforts
to review all avenues to grow the
economy in their county
Doug Wheeler
president,
Florida Ports Council


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two things my Cheryl and I cannot share


D during our
lifetime to-
gether, Cheryl
and I have shared.
We've shared without *
an ounce of
selfishness; we've
shared with each of us
trying to place the
other's need ahead of
our own; and, we've Fred B
always shared with A Sl
love. OF I
Back when we were
first married, we never
had any extra cash, but my
parents would sometimes give us
an accumulation of pop bottles on
which we could redeem the de-
posit of 2 cents apiece. We'd wait
until we had 50 cents, enough to go


r
L
L


to the local Freezette
and buy one ice cream
cone, just one, one of
those dipped in a
chocolate shell. Shar-
ing those ice cream
cones ranks very high
on the list of the best
times of our lives.
So far, we've shared
rannen kisses on six of the
-ICE world's seven conti-
IFE nents. I say "so far" be-
cause we've not yet
been to Antarctica;
and, as the years pass, it seems
less and less likely that we will,
but if we ever do get to this frozen
wasteland, there's no doubt that
we will share a kiss there, too.
We share three children.


We share seven grandchildren.
We look forward to the day
when we might even get to share
great-grandchildren.
But, we have never, and we have
no intention of ever, sharing a
toothbrush.
Some folks have told me they do
this and, that for them, it's no big
deal. But, that's not for us. It just
doesn't seem right. There are oc-
casions when we must be imagi-
native. When we're traveling and
either of us forget our toothbrush,
the problem is usually easy
enough to resolve by calling the
hotel's front desk, but if not, and if
we can't get to a convenience store
right away, we improvise. I've
used a facecloth, a paper towel or
a couple of pieces of toilet tissue


smeared with tooth paste, but I've
never, ever used Cheryl's tooth-
brush! Not only that, she is not
welcome to use mine. If it is ever
necessary, I'll walk two miles, one
way, to buy one for her, but she
can't use mine!
She once wore my clothes when
we arrived in Athens, Greece, and
her suitcase didn't, but thank
goodness, her toothbrush was in
her carry-on! I've not yet needed
to wear her clothes, but I could do
that. I'd probably get some strange
looks. Even so, I could do it but
I won't use her toothbrush!
I really thought the only totally
un-sharable thing for us was the
toothbrush, but a few days ago, I
came out of the shower, grabbed a
towel and while drying my face, I


fumbled around on the counter-
top for my glasses and put them
on. I couldn't see. I quickly
washed the lenses, dried them,
put the glasses back on, but still
couldn't see!
My immediate thought was, "Oh,
no! I've gone blind!"
That's when Cheryl came in,
looked at me and said, "What are
you doing wearing my glasses?"
My mistake.
There are two things I'm now
certain my Cheryl and I cannot
share our toothbrushes and our
eyeglasses!

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Citrus County Harvest


expands board of directors

As Citrus County Harvest begins our ship with the Citrus County School District,
13th year as an organization (fiscal we feel you should know what our work-
year ended June 30, 2012) load is. Our program will be op-
specializing in food recovery rating in 10 out of 11
and feeding hungry children on elementary schools. We will be
the weekends, we would like to serving up to 1,000 school-age
announce the expansion of our children for 35 weeks. At a cost
board from nine members to 15 r of $100 per student for an entire
members with two members-at- A school year and the probability
large. of serving 100 children at each
Our board members are: school, we will need to raise
Debbie Lattin-- chair. $100,000 each year to sustain
Mary Catherine Spires Debbie Lattin our program. That is a pretty
vice chair Ddaunting task and we accept the
Jill Wickliffe treasurer. GUEST challenge each year because we
Lori Watson secretary COLUMN are dedicated to feeding hungry
Elisabeth Moore board children.


member.
Inger Stuart board member.
Tara Garcia board member.
Shaunda Burdette board member
Nina Furry board member
Ann Gibbs board member
Hollynn Pospiech board member
Jenny/Lainey Poulis board member.
Clark Smith board member.
Catherine Grace Spires board
member.
Nancy Weaver board member.
Mike Fitzpatrick member-at-large.
Tobey Phillips member-at-large.
The growth of our Citrus County Bless-
ings program the backpack program -
from one school serving 50 children in 2009
to 10 schools serving up to 1,000 children
for the 2012-13 school year, precipitated the
need for change in our board makeup. Our
greatest strength continues to be the fact
that we are an all-volunteer network of in-
dividuals, civic organizations, faith com-
munities, and businesses serving and
facilitating the feeding of those in need in
our community. Our success is a result of
over 200 volunteers working with us to en-
sure the job of feeding hungry children is
paramount to anything else we do.
To that end, the largest expense we have
is food for our Blessings program. That ac-
counts for 84 percent of our budget. The re-
maining 16 percent is spent in operating
our program and outfitting our pantry sites.
Our sources of funding leave us in a very
well balanced position.
So why am I giving you all of this infor-
mation? Two reasons come to mind. As we
begin our 2012-13 school year in partner-


The second reason is to inform you of our
outcomes. We ask each participating
school, after students have been in the pro-
gram for one full school year, to give us
feedback in the areas of behavior, atten-
dance, guided reading levels and FCAT
scores. We are pleased to report that after
seeing the results, we know that our Bless-
ings program is a positive piece of the pie
when it comes to student learning.
While we recognize we are a very small
part of the child's learning process, we
know that coming to school with food in
your tummy is a good beginning for many
who would otherwise come to school on
Monday very hungry
We applaud our educators and we tip our
hats to all those who have helped make our
program successful. After all, everyone de-
serves an equal starting point.
Thank you for your support and we ask
you to continue your benevolence toward
our Blessings program in any way that you
can. Our board recognized very early that
we can only focus on the need, not the
cause. We provide food to hungry children
who during the school week are on the free
or reduced meal program. We cannot fix
the environments from which these chil-
dren start their day Our focus is simple and
unwavering: Silencing weekend hunger!


Debbie Lattin is chairwoman of Citrus
County Harvest To contact Harvest, call
352-341-7707 or write to Citrus County
Harvest, PO. Box 2253, Inverness,
FL 34451; or online, go to
www. citruscountyblessings. com.


Sound OFF


Dedicated to Biden
Yesterday while driving in
Tampa, I noticed a clever
food sign that said, "Hi, Joe,
welcome to North Car-
olina." Of course I realized
the sign was dedicated to
Obama's right-hand man
and our esteemed and bril-
liant Vice President Joe
Biden.
Poor opinions
I see Cokie and Steven
Roberts is back in the paper
telling what they want to
talk about. They are the
most prejudiced people
going. They are for the De-
mocrats and not for the Re-
publicans. Shame, shame,
shame on you. Once again
you're back in the paper and
you're doing the same thing;
defending the Democrats
and not the Republicans.
Off the sidewalk
This is a big joke and
maybe the people would
like to have a laugh this
morning. On Aug. 29 I was
traveling toward Inverness
and I saw a person, a man,
walking toward Inverness.
And I would just like to say
he was walking in the dirt.
He wasn't walking not even
on the sidewalk that you all,
you know, just put in. I think
that's a good joke.
Which Winter?
The day trip to the Albin
Polasek Museum sounds
like a lovely trip. I think,
though, that you should
clarify; is it in Winter Gar-
den or is it in Winter Park?
Please make some sort of
clarification on this. Would
be very confusing to get to


one place and not find it.
Editor's note: The mu-
seum is in Winter Park.
Filthy talk
Thank you for the person
who called in about the vul-
gar talk. It's everywhere. I
had my grandkids here for
the summer and I have to
be careful where I take them
in public, because people
just use the filthiest lan-
guage and don't even care
that they're around your
children or grandchildren.
People think that everybody
talks like that, evidently, be-
cause they sure don't mind
talking like that around any-
body and anything.
Good letters
I am an avid reader of
those intelligent and reason-
able letters by Mr. William C.
Young of Crystal River. I
wanted to call him and thank
him for those letters, but his
phone number is unlisted for
obvious reasons. I hope he
sees this Sound Off and
knows that there are lots of
people like me that agree
with him about most every
letter he has ever written.
Thank you, William C. Young.
Good doctor, staff
Thanks so much, Dr. Topa
and Nicole and the girls.
How nice they are. Kind of
people I really care about.
Love animals and are so
kind. God bless them. Peo-
ple like them, we should
have more of. Thanks.
Waste of money
Just think how many chil-
dren could have been helped
in school for the money
that's being wasted on the


Republican National Conven-
tion. It's a sad situation in
this country to throw the
money away like that. These
kids are starving for food and
lacking the tools in order to
get a better education.

Fines and permits
Well, folks, there it is (on)
Monday morning (Sept. 3),
"Watering fines." They're
going to fine us for using too
much water and somebody is
going to let some company
come in and drain our
aquifer for profit. We must do
something. Everybody needs
to call their county commis-
sioner. We need to do some-
thing about this now.

Deserve raise
In regards to the article
about hospital budget cuts:
I can't believe Ryan Beaty
has the nerve to even think
about not giving employee
raises. These are the very
people who work every day
taking care of the citizens
of our county. Most of the
time they are working un-
derstaffed, regardless of
what they say. If they
weren't doing their job,
there would be no reason
for the ridiculous raise to re-
tirement fund for Mr. Beaty.
A lower census? Really? This
has been the busiest sum-
mer I can remember. No
beds available on floors. Ad-
mitted patients in the ER
bed for hours because the
hospital is full, which adds
to ER wait times because
then beds become an issue
for them. Mr. Beaty, there
should be no doubt in your
mind the employees need
and deserve a raise.


Honoring our grandparents' wisdom


Today is Grandparents Day, sp(
cally dedicated to give wel
served honor to that stage of
when perspective is so valuable bec
of the treasury of history that most o
grandss" possess.
Who among us has not bene-
fited from the attention of an
elder in our life either a
blood relative, family friend, or
neighbor? And as we are learn-
ing, today's grandparents are
healthier, more active, involved
and energized than anytime in
human history
As part of my 4Generations
Institute work, I've been col-
lecting family remembrances
- stories passed across the (
generations -which provide a -
guiding light in my public policy advo
I love family history It's what allox
to see ourselves through the lens o:
personal past. Recalling our own hi:
evokes a sense of responsibility to thl
ture to create our own legacies. H
one of my favorite family remembrar
My Grandma Minnie always liked t
people talking. As long as she was in a;
ulating conversation, she was happy M
she was just plain nosy, but I think their
better explanation. Minnie needed to I
what was going on, and hearing news
the mouths of people she knew made
more interesting- and maybe, just m
- she would have an opportunity to s
some bits of advice!
One way Minnie gathered her "soui
was setting a tender trap. The bai
fresh-baked pan of her delicious ci
mon coffee cake. Here's the strategy
up a batch of rich, yeasty dough, slati
with butter, sprinkle it generously
sugar and cinnamon, pop it in the (
and open all of the kitchen
windows. As that sweet Who i
aroma began wafting in the Who
morning breeze, you'd be not b
astonished how many
neighbor women remem- the at
bered "Oh, I have some-
thing to tell Minnie!" elde
Following their noses to
Minnie's kitchen table, they'd conr
groups of three and four, wearing
aprons, hair tucked into old-cot
babushkas, bearing tidings of fa
friends and sharing those wonderful'
stories."
Those tales got their name because
were often told at the fish store by wc
waiting for their hand-picked catch c
day to be gutted, scaled and filleted. I:
several minutes it took the fish man
his sharp-knife duty, you'd be amazed
much neighborhood news could
shared.
But most of the talk back at Min
kitchen table was personal. "It's Moi
Yetta would begin. "First he said he
working late. I believed him. The:
started with the stories about help
friend with a problem. I still believed
But then he ran out of stories. Now 11
he's up to no good."
Between bites of coffee cake, the (
women would nod in sympathy But
nie had something to ask. "Yetta,
kind of no good? A girl or gambling?'
"How should I know?" sighed Y



GUEST Th
Continued from PageC1 tha'

Increased reimburse-
ments, and grant dollars,
can be used to build new fa-
cilities, hire additional
providers, and add addi- sai
tional services in order to
serve those who can least
afford it. This license can
enable our county health
department to own and op-
erate diagnostic facilities by limit
such as X-ray, MRI, and CT conveni
scan equipment, which any ap
would improve access to able, or
such services for all resi- those p;
dents of Citrus County from lo
While it is true that all of ment or
these same things can hap- Even
pen through a private en- license
tity, there is certainly some ble to
evidence that, under the health c
private "nonprofit" frame- resident
work, insured patients are nity, b
scheduled quickly and con- cantly
veniently, while at the same reimbu:
time minimizing the num- Medical
ber of uninsured patients tients
seen in the clinics. "Unin- "more c
sured visits" are minimized patients


shaking her head slowly, her eyes looking
down in sorrow.
"Ask him," replied Minnie. "The truth
might hurt, but not knowing is no good ei-
ther. If he lies, you will likely know it at
least he'll know you don't be-
lieve the stories, and you're
putting your foot down. Morris
should know you care enough
to learn the truth. If he won't
tell you, then cross that bridge
later."
Minnie was not a creden-
tialed counselor, of course. She
was a kitchen table connector
evine with Old Country smarts and a
keen sense of justice.
EST Her role was to gather "the
JMN girls," hear their news, and
-- give each one a special word of
wisdom. She believed in teamwork. "Try
picking up a big table by yourself- im-
possible. Everybody take hold of a corner
... up it goes."
Minnie organized people as naturally as
she baked. And with the same system. No
formal recipe -just good ingredients and
the right way of mixing. Whether it was a
special dinner celebration, taking up a
collection to help a sick friend to the hos-
pital, or taking in a family who lost their
apartment, Minnie made the plan.
For Minnie, solving a problem wasn't re-
ally too complicated. Get people together,
find out what's going on, think of ways to
work it out, and get started. If you have to
change direction ... so change direction!
Not acting was Minnie's pet peeve.
"You'll wait a long time with your mouth
open before a roasted chicken will fly in"
was one of her favorite sayings. Whether
it was attending to a private family matter
or exercising her cherished right to vote,
Minnie believed that knowing, feeling and
wishing are not enough to
ng us has solve a problem. She be-
lieved in getting the job
ited from done.
We all had our own
tion of an childhood helpmates, peo-
ple who were there when
our life? we needed them, opening
their ears to our plans, and
their hearts to our problems.
If not a close family member, maybe a
neighbor, a teacher, a cleric or another
mentor. I know that each of us had some of
those special relationships which helped
build our confidence, shape our attitudes,
inspire us to achieve, and pave our paths
to adulthood.
My Grandma Minnie was such a person
for me. I am convinced my passion for ad-
vocacy was, in part, nurtured at her
kitchen table, listening to her wise coun-
sel and seeing her act in subtle but strong
ways to get others moving forward.
Please take a moment to think of that
special older person in your childhood
whose influence moved you in the right di-
rection. Consider what that powerful pres-
ence was, and how it helped guide who
you are today


Jack Levine is the founder of the
Tallahassee-based 4Generations
Institute. He maybe reached at
Jack@4Gen.org or visited at
www4Gen.org.


ere is certainly some evidence
t, under the private "nonprofit"
framework, insured patients
are scheduled quickly and
conveniently, while at the
ne time minimizing the number
of uninsured patients seen
in the clinics.


ting follow-up care,
gently not having
appointments avail-
r even encouraging
patients to seek care
cal health depart-
emergency rooms.
though this FQHC
tries as best possi-
improve access to
care services, for all
ts in our commu-
ecause of signifi-
higher
rsement rates, the
re and Medicaid pa-
would still be the
desired" scheduled
s, which can lead to


the uninsured getting less
than we can provide as a
community
It is my opinion that, if
there are problems let's fix
them, but the residents of
Citrus County would be
best served by this license
remaining with the county
health department or some
other public entity

JefferyKinnard, D.C.,
provides chiropractic
services for the Citrus
County Health
Department in the
FQHC program.


Jack L
GUE
COL1


amoi
enef
ttent
r in


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


SHAME
Continued from Page C1

serve, years later, to hold families
together. The Xbox is no substitute.
Things are different today
All of Florida's estuaries are im-
paired by pollutants, as are more
than 80 percent of our inland wa-
ters. Mercury is a common cause,
as are nutrients such as nitrates
and phosphate.
The "Big 0" is no longer clear,
and neither is Lake Clinch. The
fish are no longer abundant and
those you may catch are likely to
cause illness if eaten in large
volume.
Current consumption guidelines
for the Withlacoochee River sug-
gest one should not eat more than
a single bass meal per month, in-
cluding children who are espe-
cially vulnerable to mercury
(www.myfloridaeh.com/medicine/
fishconsumptionadvisories/2012
Brochure.pdf)
Yes, things are different today
With rampant pollution in our


CPR tion g
Conse
own a
Continued from Page Cl consi(
conse
funding. I understand that through
this will mean a small tax serval
increase but it is money There
well spent toward our qual- from t
ity of life in the future. I means
urge you to support the to yoi
Florida Water and Land duced
Conservation Amendment. Res
I urge you also to make return
donations to land conserva- lands


COMMENTARY


Mr. Putnam, you may be right. We don't need
the Environmental Protection Agency. We
need something akin to the EPA on steroids
with a bad attitude and little patience.


waters, we do not realize the bene-
fits once so common. Beaches are
sometimes closed and common
sense often curtails other water-
dependent recreation. Swimming
in green slimy water just isn't all
that much fun. It is not the stuff of
family bonds, good memories or
reasons to stay home. The otters
are mostly gone in the Lower With-
lacoochee River these days, per-
haps because the food supply is
vanishing. The squeal of kids swim-
ming is a memory A family dinner
with local fish is not so appealing
anymore.
On June 17, 2012, state Commis-
sioner of Agriculture Adam Put-
nam had an op-ed published in the
Gainesville Sun titled, "We don't
need the EPA." He touted the qual-
ity of the state's water regulation
and the $100 billion annual contri-


groups like the Nature
*rvancy Florida. If you
a large tract of land,
der putting it into a
rvation easement
gh a group like Con-
tion Trust for Florida.
* are great tax benefits
his practice and it is a
s of leaving your land
ur children at a re-
1 tax rate.
storation will involve
ning many of our wet-
back to their original


bution of agriculture to Florida's
economy
Everyone is entitled to debate
the facts, but choosing facts is an el-
evated art form peculiar to politi-
cians. There is no debate that
agriculture is a fundamental com-
ponent of our lives. Likewise, there
is no credible argument that denies
the ag industry's use of the lion's
share of water in the state or it con-
tributing to the majority share of
nutrient pollution to our waters.
Furthermore, nutrients are not the
sole pollutant resulting from cur-
rent agriculture practices.
Mr Putnam, you may be right. We
don't need the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency We need something
akin to the EPA on steroids with a
bad attitude and little patience. We
certainly do not need to continue
the failed policies used by the state.


Irge you to support the
lorida Water and Land
nservation Amendment.


function. We do not need a
"no net loss" policy Mitiga-
tion is not an ideal practice
since not all wetlands were
created equal. Some play a
more significant role in
recharge than others. Man-
made wetlands have had
poor success rates. We need


to restore what was th
the beginning. We n
"significant incr
policy
We need to rally be
is too late for future g(
tions. We need to sto
destruction of Florida
ural water resource


In 2008, the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection re-
ported the gross contribution to
Florida's economy by coastal and
inland waters exceeded $600 bil-
lion. Pesky fact, that.
The people of this state under-
stand the deep tendrils of water's
impact on our lives and the defi-
ciencies of state regulation. We un-
derstand how political agendas
manipulate science to the benefit
of special interests.
We are here to tell Tallahassee
that we've had enough. Other pri-
orities pale in comparison.

Dan Hilliard is a Florida native,
former aviator,
retired air traffic
controller, fisherman, sport and
commercial diver He is a past and
current
director of the
Withlachoochee Area
Residents Inc. (WAR), which was
organized in 1984 in response to
quality of life threats posed by
activities that have a high
potential to degrade groundwater
and surface water quality


need to give Florida CPR.

K C Nayfield DVM, is a
native Floridian, water
enthusiast,
iere in environmentalist and
eed a preservationist. He has
tease" resided with his family in
Crystal River since 1977
fore it and served for four years
enera- on the Crystal River
p the Waterfront Advisory
i's nat- Board, which he chaired
*s. We for two years.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

directly on the sticky bun
that was occupying the pas-
senger seat.
When you drop 180-soak-
ing-wet-pounds onto a sticky
bun, it can do some really
awful things. It did all of
those awful things and then
some.
As I drove home, I was
wet, burned, had a dented
car that I could only blame
on a tree that miraculously
grew during my lunch
break, and had sticky bun
on my glasses, in my hair
and somehow down the
front inside of my shirt.
To come totally clean with
my personal hypocrisy, I
went to a Chronicle editorial
board meeting the next day
where we discussed the im-
portant public issue of when
to take the driver's license
away from senior citizens
who no longer have the abil-
ity to safely handle a vehicle.
I did not participate in
that discussion and I did not
write that editorial.
My car is in the repair
shop as I write this, and the
doctor said the burns did
not cause any permanent
damage, although he did say
I have developed a new
twitch in my right eye.

Gerry Mulligan is
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him at gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


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BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Retail thera


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


m u. i. p... :flhi "si:.. e .... " .. =.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Steve and Jewel Lamb hosted a Citrus County Chamber of Commerce mixer Thursday at the newly constructed Crystal Chevrolet dealership
on U.S. 19. The construction replaced the old structure with a new, modern building in less than a year's time.


Auto dealer

upgrades new

$2Mshowroom
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA Exactly 28
years to the date after Crystal
Chevrolet first opened its doors
in 1984, the notable local com-
pany moved into its fresh, up-
dated showroom on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa.
It wasn't planned to make the
shift June 18, insisted Steve
Lamb, owner of Crystal Motor
Car Company Inc.
"It was just one of those freaks
of nature," he said with a hearty
laugh.
In December, the old Crystal
Chevrolet showroom was demol-
ished to make room for a new
state-of-the-art facility. The re-
modeling was done as part of an
upgrade and to conform to
Chevrolet's new image standards.
After the demolition was com-
pleted and the land cleared, con-
struction on the new building
began in January
Lamb admits seeing the build-
ing where he and his wife, Jewel,
got their humble start taken apart
was bittersweet
Jewel Lamb, however, said she
understood the need for change.
Through the years with changes
in technology and as their busi-
ness continues to grow, she said


The new Crystal Chevrolet is a shining building and was built to comply with other Chevrolet dealerships
across the country.


she knew the new showroom
would allow them to be more in-
novative as a company.
In the end, Lamb said, a person
shouldn't try to stop progress.
Settled in their new surround-
ings, Lamb touted how efficient
the building is. For example, he
said, the building is "greener"
than the previous one.
"We've seen a 70 percent drop
in our electric bill," he said.
It's also more customer-
friendly and employee-friendly
One of the major changes,
Lamb said, happened in the serv-


ice area, where employees now
have quick, direct access to the
service lane and the waiting room
to serve customers better More-
over, the waiting room itself is
four times bigger. And the parts
department is larger, too.
"We are tickled to death," he
said.
With an added 1,700 square feet
of space and 47 feet of additional
width, Lamb said the building has
more of presence from U.S. 19.
There is more covered show-
room space, which is great when
it comes to Florida's unpre-


dictable weather.
In total, the project cost $2 mil-
lion, though Lamb said General
Motors paid the "lion's share" of it
Since moving into the new
building, Jewel Lamb said the re-
action from customers has been
mixed. Some like the old building
and some like the new one.
But Lamb contends it doesn't
matter whether someone has the
fanciest building or product; what
it boils down to is giving their cus-
tomers the best service possible.
"People make the place," he
said.


Take a long-term view of unemployment rate


We hear so much about the
unemployment rate nowa-
days. It's unavoidable, and
understandable. High unemploy-
ment can weigh down our economy,
so it makes sense we'd step on the
scale, so to speak, to gauge our
progress.
You may already sense
where this analogy is
going; anyone who is
watching their weight un-
derstands stepping on a
scale every day can be
discouraging down a
pound one day, up two /'
pounds the next. True,
lasting weight loss, we
know, is a slow slog. Laura
When it comes to our WORK
fluctuating employment CONNI
numbers, I'm not suggest-
ing it's the yo-yoing data
that's the problem. Rather, it's the
tendency to rely on a given number
at any given point in time as the sole
measure of our success. Every
slight bobble in the wrong direction
is cause for gloom-and-doom; when
the needle moves downward, we
hold our breath.
It may be time to exhale. At least
a little.
But first we've got to acknowledge
our unemployment rate is not
where we want or need it to be. In


I

:1


t
EI


July, the month for which the most
recent data is available, Citrus
County's unemployment rate was
10.8 percent; out of a labor force of
55,664, 5,988 people were without
jobs. Add fact that, in April, the rate
had dropped below double digits
for the first time since
November 2008.
Given all that, it seems
hard to make the case for
improvement, doesn't it?
But we know better, be-
cause we are doing bet-
ter Throughout our
workforce region, we're
averaging nearly 800 job
placements each month
Byrnes and the number of em-
FORCE players with open job or-
-CTION ders in July has
increased nearly 60 per-
cent during the year,
from 345 to 549.
In Citrus County during the past
fiscal year, Workforce Connection
provided services to 841 employers,
providing recruitment assistance,
training grants and financial incen-
tives and workforce intelligence.
Traffic at our one-stop Resource
Center in Inverness topped 16,400
and we assisted more than 11,000
jobs seekers with such services as
online job listings and referrals, r6-
sum6 writing assistance, employa-


ability workshops, career and wage
information, job search resources
and equipment, and one-on-one ca-
reer counseling. More important,
there were 1,363 job placements.
If that's true, you may well ask,
why did our unemployment rate
start climbing back up in June after
four months of steady decline and
stability? Simply put, monthly em-
ployment and unemployment rates
at state and local levels may have
sharp fluctuations due to seasonal
events that follow a fairly regular
pattern each year. Such events in-
clude tourism, agricultural har-
vests, holidays and the opening and
closings of schools.
In July, 66 counties of Florida's 67
counties had over-the-month in-
creases in unemployment rates, yet
all 67 had declines in unemploy-
ment rates over the year.
That's key, because when it comes
to gauging true, lasting economic
progress, Rebecca Rust, Florida's
chief economist, tells us we must
take the long view.
"What's most important is looking
at long-term trends versus month-
to-month changes. Long-term
trends do track- if unemployment
goes down, jobs will go up. Month-
to-month, it's not going to track
every month."
So how well do we track? In July


2011, Citrus County's unemploy-
ment rate was 12.4 percent, with
6,989 jobless. And the year before, it
was 13 percent with 7,374 out of
work. Today, the unemployment
rate has dropped 2.2 percent from
2010 and 1,386 fewer people were
out of work.
Certainly not where we want to
be, but as Workforce Connection's
Board Chair Darlene Goddard put
it, "we're already getting there."
Ms. Goddard, who is also execu-
tive director of human resources for
Winco Manufacturing in Ocala, said
recently she sees signs of "brick and
mortar" investment that indicate
the economy is gaining momentum.
"It's not just health care, it's man-
ufacturing," she said. "It's coming
back. You don't spend money unless
it is. We're doing a lot better this
year than last year and we did bet-
ter last year than the year before."
The goal, of course, is to continue
to work together to help make next
year even better.

Laura Byrnes, APR is a Florida
Certified Workforce Professional
and communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact her
at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-5627,
ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce. com.


Teen


driver


ups auto


premium

DEAR BRUCE: I am
a 60-year-old
woman, and I have
had guardianship of a
child since she was in dia-
pers. Now, 16 years later,
she is driving, and be-
cause she is, I've added
her to my insurance pol-
icy Holy cow! My rates
went to the moon.
I knew they would go
up, but not like this. I live
paycheck to paycheck, and
this is killing me finan-
cially She is an absolute
joy, and I would hate to de-
prive her of this activity.
I recently found out that
if I had waited a couple of
years until she was 18, the
rates would not have been
so outrageous, but it's too
late now. Any thoughts? -
T.R, via email
DEAR T.R: One prob-
lem is that even if you de-
cide to not let your teen
drive your vehicle, the in-
surance company now
knows she's in your
household and has a dri-
ver's license. It likely
would take the position
that she is a potential
driver and would set your
premium accordingly
You might ask the insur-
ance company if there's
anything your teen can do
to reduce the premium,
such as taking a driver's
education course or addi-
tional private driving
classes. Often the com-
pany will give you a credit.
Another thing you can
do is to have her get a job
and pay part or all of the
increase in the premium.
She's old enough to get a
job, and since she wants to
drive, she can certainly
help out This would not be
unreasonable and would
be a good lesson for her
DEAR BRUCE: My son,
who is a sophomore in col-
lege, has a good chunk of
money in savings. In fact,
he has enough money
saved to pay for the col-
lege that he's attending,
yet he has insisted on tak-
ing out student loans.
He and I argue about
this all the time. I don't
want him to have this
debt He says there's noth-
ing wrong with borrowing
the money and investing
it, and since there is no in-
terest, whatever he earns
is just gravy
I think he is doing
something illegal. Am I
wrong? Concerned
Mother, via email
DEAR CONCERNED
MOTHER: Your son is not
the first to do what you de-
scribe. Is there anything
improper here? That de-
pends on whether he an-
swered all questions
truthfully in the loan doc-
uments he signed.
You say whatever he
earns is "gravy." On the
other hand, if he loses
money on his investments,
the gravy goes and he has
to pay back this loan when
the time comes from some
other source.
The fact your son has
saved money says a good
deal about him.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns.










D2

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan 91 ,I
this: | |:
Im1 %w.


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Celebrating industry in Citrus County


We hope you were able to
join us in last week's Indus-
try Appreciation Month
events. Once again, we thank
our overall sponsor, Superior
Residences of Lecanto/Sun-
flower Springs Assisted Liv-
ing Facility, for the generous
sponsorship that allows us to
bring all these events to the
community.
Thanks to our mixer event
sponsor, Crystal Chevrolet,
we celebrated "Baseball,
hot dogs, apple pie and
Chevrolet" as the company
premiered their newest up-
graded showroom in their
auto line as Citrus County's
largest automotive dealer.
Attendees enjoyed food and
refreshments to the sounds
of Cole Taylor live. Crystal
Chevrolet, owned by Steve
and Jewel Lamb, is the Sep-
tember recipient of the New
Image Award from Citrus
County Chamber of
Commerce.
More than 150 people
came out to celebrate our
award winners at the EDC
Industry Appreciation
Luncheon. Jerry Ross, from
Disney's National Entrepre-
neur Center, treated atten-
dees to a motivational and
positive talk focused on Cit-
rus County This event,
sponsored by Progress En-
ergy and conducted at our
partner, College of Central
Florida in Lecanto, spot-
lights outstanding compa-
nies and people in the
business community of Cit-
rus County The award win-
ners this year are:
Citizen of the Year -
Gerry Mulligan.
Gerry Mulligan is synony-
mous with Citrus County
Arriving in the late 1970s, he
appears to be involved in
EVERYTHING, generously
giving of his time to dozens
of organizations includ-
ing now leading the Crystal
River Chamber of Com-
merce Area Council, where
he is working to facilitate
positive projects that en-


CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development U
Council, Inc.

hance Crystal River and en-
courage business, tourism
and consumer interaction.
As publisher of the Chroni-
cle, Gerry not only ensures
that the local news in Citrus
County is reported, he as-
sures that the newspaper is
available to numerous non-
profit and business/civic or-
ganizations so they have a
method to share their infor-
mation with residents. Ad-
ditionally, he provides the
public a voice in the com-
munity through avenues
such as the Sound Off fea-
tures and online comments.
Outstanding Small Busi-
ness -Ferris Groves, Floral
City.
Ferris Groves started 75
years ago on Duval Island.
They added a packing and
shipping plant in 1944. Now
under the management of
Dudley Calfee, Ferris Farms
grows millions of pounds of
fresh citrus, blueberries
and strawberries that are
sold both locally at their
landmark vintage-style pro-
duce store, and regionally to
retail outlets. Ferris Groves
is much more than just fruit
- it is a vital part of the Flo-
ral City community
Through Dudley's efforts, a
paved path connecting the
produce store to the Withla-
coochee State Trail offers
easy access for a cool rest
stop to bikers and walkers.
Dudley has also been an in-
tegral player in the Floral
City Merchants Association
and the annual Bikes &
BBQ Cookoff, and last year's
successful Friday evening
kickoff for the Chamber of
Commerce Strawberry Fes-


IOF
.... .r.l O V

,. ....... .... .........


tival. And as a Board mem-
ber on the Citrus County Ag
Alliance, Ferris Groves and
Dudley Calfee further pro-
mote the importance of agri-
culture to our local
economy
Outstanding Employer of
the Year LKQ, Crystal
River.
Lenny Damron grew a
small salvage yard into a
family business as Damron's
Auto Parts in 1981, later ex-
panding into other locations
such as Gainesville, Mel-
bourne and Atlanta, Ga.
When he sold the business
to Illinois-based LKQ Corp.
in 1998, he continued to
serve as a senior vice presi-
dent. During Lenny's tenure
with LKQ, the company ex-
panded to become the lead-
ing alternative parts
supplier to the collision in-
dustry in the U.S. and
Canada. Hundreds of peo-
ple are now employed in the
area as a result of LKQ, and
their recent expansion of


ING o
VA RD&
'EN Sponsor
Rsiness F




. Sponsor

September
i SUPERIOR
I a L .N aito





.v Toi gullSnsW t
352.795.3149


their business in Crystal
River shows confidence in
Citrus County. LKQ was the
recipient of the New Image
Award from the Chamber of
Commerce in August.
SCORE Award Dr. Jim
Harvey
This award is being pre-
sented by SCORE to Dr.
James Harvey who recently
retired from the College of
Central Florida, in recogni-
tion of the years of assis-
tance that he has given to
SCORE.
Special Awards of Excel-
lence were presented to:
Diane Toto, who has been
a Citrus County activist for
many years and has been
tireless in her efforts to
spearhead the creation and
construction of the We Care
Food Pantry that opened
last month on Cardinal
Street in Homosassa.
Curtis Peters, who for
many years generously
hosted the annual EDC bar-
becue on the Holcim Inc.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


property on U.S. 19 near the
barge canal. While the bar-
becue has been moved to
M&B Dairy this year, EDC is
grateful for his charity, as
well as the contribution that
Holcim makes to our local
economy through its mining
operations.
Ardath Prendergast, Ex-
ecutive Aide for both Josh
Wooten, Chamber of Com-
merce President and CEO,
and John Seifert, Executive
Director of the Economic
Development Council, con-
tinuously demonstrates
great drive and passion for
her work. A recent graduate
of the Chamber of Com-
merce Leadership Citrus
program, Ardath continu-
ally offers a high level of en-
thusiasm and pro-
fessionalism that enhances
the development of these
two organizations as well as
Citrus County
Be sure to congratulate
them the next time you see
them!
There are still two more
events scheduled for the re-
mainder of Industry Appre-
ciation Month.
The Economic Develop-
ment Council will conduct
its annual meeting Thurs-
day, Sept. 13, at the College
of Central Florida. This is a
perfect opportunity to re-
ceive a first-hand update on
the activities of the EDC
over the past year, and gain
insight into the upcoming
year. The meeting will fea-
ture an encore of a presen-
tation that the EDC made to
the Duke Energy Business
Development Team in Au-
gust about Citrus County's


major assets. The public is
invited to stay and attend
the regular meeting of the
Board of Directors following
the annual meeting. A light
continental breakfast will
be served. Networking be-
gins at 8 a.m. No registration
is required.
Then we finish up big
with our signature event,
and one of the absolute best
parties in the County the
Annual Barbeque on Thurs-
day, Sept. 20, presented by
Sibex Inc. Held at M&B
Dairy in Lecanto this year,
we also recognize Dale Mc-
Clellan, owner of M&B. Mc-
Clellan is the 2012 Swisher
Sweets/Sunbelt Ag Expo
Florida Farmer of the Year
- a tremendous achieve-
ment to be singled out
among the thousands of
farmers in our state and
we thank him for opening
his farm for this fun filled
evening.
Come out and chow down
on the best barbeque ever
prepared by the Citrus
County Agricultural Al-
liance while you enjoy liba-
tions at the open bar. Your
ticket of $25 per person gets
you in the gate, all your
food, open bar and the fa-
mous Tim McGraw-tribute
artist Adam D. Tucker with
his full band. Check out
www.bluemoontalent.com/
adam-d-tucker.html for in-
formation on this nationally
known group. We hope you
will come kick up your heels
from 6 to 10 p.m. at M & B
Dairy in Lecanto. Log onto
www.citrusedc.com to pur-
chase your tickets or call
352-795-3149.


Upcoming Citrus Helping local children


County Chamber/ 3-


EDC Events


Sept. 13 EDC An-
nual Meeting
Sept. 20 EDC Indus-
try Appreciation BBQ 6
to 10 p.m. at M & B Dairy,
Lecanto. $25 per person.
Sept. 22 Business
Women's Alliance Health
and Fitness Expo 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at National Guard
Armory, Crystal River.
Sept. 29 "Citrus Ave.
Lights Up the Night" Pro-
gressive Dinner (6 to 9 p.m.)
on Citrus Avenue, with
LIVE entertainment (6 to
11 p.m.).
Oct. 11 After Hours
Business Networking
Mixer NATURE COAST
EMS.
Oct. 12 October
Chamber Lunch at Citrus
Hills Golf& Country Club.
Oct. 23 After Hours
Business Networking
Mixer ALPACA MAGIC.
Dec. 1 10 a.m. Pa-
rade in the Hills, "The
Magic of Christmas" pa-
rade, crafts, car show.


Dec. 1 6 p.m. Crystal
River "A Postcard Christ-
mas" Parade.
Dec. 5 BWA Decem-
ber Luncheon.
Dec. 8 Noon Inver-
ness "A Postcard Christ-
mas" Parade.
Jan. 19 and 20 2013
Florida Manatee Festival
in Crystal River.
http ://www.floridamanatee
festival, com/external/
wcpages/manatee_festival/
index.aspx
Check out our complete
calendar for community,
entertainment and
fundraising events. Follow
us on your smartphone:


9ILE9


Arbor Trail Rehab and Skilled Nursing Facility had the
fourth annual School Supply Drive for the children at In-
verness Middle School. More than $400 in supplies was
donated. "We are part of the community," said Kari Rady,
Director of Admissions at Arbor Trail. "We all need to in-
vest in the future leaders of our community."


News You CAN USE


Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park promotes literacy. Show
your library card or donate a family-
friendly book and gain free park admission
on Literacy Day, Sept. 15, from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Contact Susan Strawbridge at 352-
628-5445, ext. 1002.
EAARP Auto Insurance: The AARP-
branded auto insurance program offered
by The Hartford is now available through
Insurance Resources and Risk Man-
agement. Contact Melissa Seney-King at
352-537-1488 or Melissa@lnsurance
ResourcesNow.com.
Registrations
Are you starting a new business? Do
you want to take your existing business to
the next level? Make plans to attend the
Business Growth Information Seminar


presented by BizCo of Citrus Thursday,
Sept. 13. The seminar is at the College of
Central Florida Room 103 from 5:30 to 7
p.m. Registration is $8 in advance, $10 at
the door. Contact Gregg at 352-628-6624.
Andrew Breese with Edward Jones
hosts a free financial workshop titled
"Your Source for Financial Education"
at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at the Coastal Regional
Library in Crystal River. Contact Anne
Davenport at 352-795-1603 or anne.
davenport@edwardjones.com. A second
session will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Sept. 20.
Register now to be a part of the
eighth annual Haunted Tram experience
Oct. 26 and 27 from 6 to 11 p.m. at the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park. Guidelines and applications
to secure a spot along the haunted tram
trail are available at the park office. No


charge to sponsor a location and cash
prizes will be awarded for first, second
and third places. Contact Susan Straw-
bridge at 352-628-5445, ext. 1002.
Make reservations now to join the
Kick-Off Breakfast for the United Way
Workplace Campaign. The breakfast is
at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club. Cost is $20 per
person or $200 for a table of eight. Call
352-795-LIVE to reserve your space.
MA Shop Local Expo will be at the
College of Central Florida from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29. For booth or
general information, call Necia Ratliff at
352-489-0099.
SA "Nail that Interview" workshop will
be in Inverness on Sept. 14 and Sept. 28 at
1:15 p.m. Registration is required, contact
Workforce Connection at 352-291-9552.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...

Kelly Kelley \\
Citrus Kia, Crystal River cm) 'e

CindiFein
Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce

... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service


The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce is proud to
promote its "You Caught My
Eye" program.
The program allows resi-
dents and visitors to recog-
nize employees who go


beyond in their attention to
Customer Service. Please
note: The business must be
located within Citrus County
For information about the
honor, call the Chamber at
352-795-3149.


W] "like"us on
facebook











Angela Vick- Chief Deputy of the Clerk of Court office
joins Melissa Benefield on this weeks edition of
Chamber Chat. Angela shares with us the role and
the duties of the Clerk of Court. We can add Chamber
Chat co-host to that list! Melissa Wood of the
Manicure Martini in Inverness presents the Nail Tech
Network & Nail Runway Fashion Show at the
Plantation on Crystal River Saturday September 15th.
See the latest in Design FX, Metallics and more! We
all want to look more youthful and Debbie Kneece
from IM&P Wellness Center in Crystal River show us
how. Watch her erase the years with her
Microdermabrasion demonstration. In our "Chamber
Cooks" segment Skeets BBQ shares a mouthwatering
recipe for Smoked Turkey Salad that you don't want
to miss! You have 3 chances to watch Chamber
Chat-- Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm--
every week! If you would like your business or local
event featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.

"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


McLeans honored Seven Rivers Regional earns award


as good drivers
Con-way Truckload, a full
truckload carrier and subsidiary
of Con-way Inc., based in
Joplin, Mo., recently announced
its July Drivers of the Month.
The "Contractor Team of the
Month" award has been given
to Jim and Dianna McLean of
Crystal River.
"Slow down and enjoy what
you do," Jim and Dianna
McLean said in a joint state-
ment. "We love the ever-chang-
ing surroundings we
experience daily out here on
the road."
The McLeans joined Con-
way Truckload in 2007. They
have eight children and 12
grandchildren. When they're
not on the road they enjoy re-
laxing and working on their
farm.
"We congratulate these driv-
ers and thank them for their
dedication and professional-
ism," said Saul Gonzalez, chief
operating officer, Con-way
Truckload.
Business growth
seminar planned
Small business owners look-
ing for guidance to take their
business to the next level, or
those who are starting new
businesses, will be interested in
the Business Growth and Infor-
mation Seminar sponsored by
BizCo of Citrus County.
BizCo is a not-for-profit
group of Citrus County busi-
ness professionals, dedicated
to assisting small business and
growing the local economy.
The Business Growth Infor-
mation Seminar will take place
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Sept. 13, in
Room 103 at the College Cen-
tral Florida campus in Lecanto.
Topics will cover such items
as "Inexpensive ways to maxi-
mize your exposure, increase
sales and save money," "Elimi-
nate duplicate entry info and
create complete backups," "Low
or no-cost ways to improve your
bottom line," "How to read your
credit card processing state-
ment and reduce your bill by 40
percent," "Easy access and af-
fordable rates for necessary


Special to the Chronicle
For seven years, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center has earned quality achievement
awards from American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines program. This year,
Kathy Fenelon, left, regional VP of quality improvement initiatives for the American Heart
Association, presented hospital representatives Carol DeFalco, center, nurse manager, and
Patricia Dourm, director of nursing, with the 2012 Heart Failure Gold Quality Achievement
award. This signifies the hospital has reached an aggressive goal of treating heart failure,
according to the guidelines of care recommended by the American Heart Association/Amer-
ican College of Cardiology. Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, a 128-bed general, med-
ical/surgical acute care facility serving Citrus, Levy and south Marion counties, opened its
doors in 1978. Visit SevenRiversRegional.com.


business legal expenses,"
"Maximize the efficiency of your
computer network," and "Proac-
tively solve ID theft risks and
problems."
Finger foods and beverages
will be served.
Reservations are $8 in ad-
vance or $10 at the door. To
make reservations, call Gregg
Mackler at 352-628-6624.
To learn more about BizCo
of Citrus County, and the Busi-
ness Growth Information Semi-
nar, visit www.BizCoTeam
Citrus.com.
Workforce sets
September events
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties is offering
nearly 50 workshops during the
month of September to assist
those interested in sharpening
their employability skills. The
workshops begin Tuesday,
Sept. 4, as Workforce Connec-


tion offices will be closed Mon-
day, Sept. 3, for the Labor Day
holiday.
Ranging from drop-in open
resume labs to two-day work-
shops, the programs are avail-
able at no charge to job
seekers throughout Workforce
Connection's three-county re-
gion. Participants must be fully
registered with Workforce Con-
nection through the Employ
Florida Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com. Addi-
tional workshop registration
may also be required.
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers are in Citrus
County at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.;
and in Marion County at 2703
N.E. 14th St., Ocala. To sign up
for any of the workshops, call
352-291-9552 or 800-434-
JOBS, ext. 1410. or register on-
line at https://www.timecenter.
com/wcworkshops.


Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.
clmworkforce.com. The follow-
ing programs take place at
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers in Chiefland, In-
verness and Ocala, as well as
at various community locations:
Beyond Barriers: Path-
ways to Employment is for
those whose background is-
sues create a barrier to finding
a job. Workshop takes place at
1:30 p.m. Sept. 21 in Ocala.
Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Sessions are
set for 3:30 p.m. Sept. 18 in
Chiefland and 1:30 p.m. Sept.
14 and Sept. 28 p.m. in Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that In-
terview and Optimal R6sum6
workshops take place Sept. 13
and Sept. 27 beginning at 8:15


a.m. in Ocala. Nail that Inter-
view workshops are also at
8:15 p.m. Sept. 12 and Sept. 26
in Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m.
Sept. 14 and Sept. 28 in
Inverness.
Navigating the New
World of Work two-day work-
shop takes place every Tues-
day and Wednesday in Ocala
beginning Sept. 11, with ses-
sions at 8:15 a.m. for new job
seekers and those with barriers
to employment and at 1:15 p.m.
for displaced professionals. It is
also offered at 8:15 a.m. Sept.
18 in Chiefland and at 1:15
p.m. Sept. 20 in Inverness.
The workshops cover how to
identify abilities and transfer-
able skills, job search strate-
gies/targeted resume
development, interviewing
skills/follow up and how to work
effectively with a Workforce
Connection placement
specialist.
Mobile Resource Unit
provides jobseeker services
and resources every Monday at
10:30 a.m. at the Bronson Li-
brary, and at 12:30 p.m. Tues-
days at the Williston Library.
The MRU is available at 9 a.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
Annie Johnson Center in Dun-
nellon, at 10 a.m. the second
Wednesday at the Town Hall in
Inglis, and at 10 a.m. the third
Wednesday at the Cedar Key
Library.
Navigating the New
World of Work (community
workshop) offers many of the
highlights of the two-day ses-
sions, but in a two-hour format.
The condensed workshops
take place in Citrus County at
4 p.m. Sept. 12 at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly Hills, at
2 p.m. Sept. 18 at the Coastal
Region Library in Crystal River
and at 10 a.m. Sept. 20 at the
Homosassa Library. They will
also be offered in Marion
County at 2 p.m. Sept. 20 at
Dunnellon Library, at 4 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Taylor College in
Belleview and at 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Forest Community
Center in Ocklawaha.
Open R6sum6 Labs are
in Ocala at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
each Monday, as well as 9 a.m.
every Friday. Labs also take


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


*M*I ** ** 9 0* .


Store Fronts


Available



Lowest Leasing Rates Ever!



Busy Hwy 19

Crystal River location


Anchored by national

retail stores


Newly refurbished


* Kiosks


also available


-m -


CRYSTAL RIVER
M.A.L.L


352-795-2585
www.thecrystalrivermall.com
1801 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL 34428 .4


Attractive Widow looking
for a man 70-80 for com-
panionship, dinner and
artistic pursuits. Send
photo and something
about you to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1802
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal Rvr, FI
34429







Advertising
Sales
Assistant
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Part Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing,
knowledge of
Excel,& Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935

CHRONIdIE
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE


CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO
OWN
This is a real
cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1'/2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493
Cleaner Wanted
Energetic & positive.
Must pass background
check. Transportation
needed. P/T position
302-6418 LV MSG
FREE GUN with
Training. Learn more
at TrainToCarrv.com

You've Got It!


Somebody


Wants


It!
a


Cii I )\IIJ

(352) 563-5966
www.chronicleonline.com


Gheenoe
1999 Gheenoe 15'4"
and 1999 Trailer
$750 (352) 302-0778
HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person
HERNANDO
2/y1%, Furnished, Lrg.
Fm & Laun. Rm, Carport,
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850
HP Pavillion 525 C
desktop Computer
w/ LCD monitor & key-
board + all cables, Win.
XP Work great
$90. (352) 465-4037
Izhmash Saiga,
7.62 + ammo
$675.
Muzzle Loader Rifle,
50 Cal. $250.
352- 220-2204
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778
Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
No Experience re-
quired, but a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 6284867
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945
Winchester 300 MAG
Mauser Action,
Red field Scope $550
Ruger Single Revolver
22LR & 22mag, $400
352- 628-7050



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087



Free CAT
To good home
German Shepherd/
Chow mixed,
shots, to good home
(352) 322-0770
(352) 212-1719
Free Entertainment
Center, Blond color
will fit 32" Inch TV
Good Condition
(352) 613-5023
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
leave message
if no answer
FREE KITTENS
15 weeks old,
very cute
Needs good homes
(352) 341-2219
FREE KITTENS,
Tiger Striped, 12 wks,
litter trained cute and
playful. 2 male, 1 female
(352) 216-6668
Free to Good Home
6 month old
Pitt Bull, Male
Housebroken, Friendly
(386) 589-2097
Free To Good Home: 2 yr
old male pure black an
white cat, fixed, all shots,
declawed. Very good lov-
ing cat, loves attention
and to just lay around,
please needs a home
asap great with kids,
doesn't mind dogs but
doesn't like cats....please
call me at 352-400-9756


Pot Belly Pig
(352) 726-9573
Twin Mattress and Box
Spring. Clean and
excellent condition.
Free for pickup.
(352) 344-1066



LOST
3yr old brussel griffon dog
Sunday 9/2 in Inverness
at Walgreens on Inde-
pendence and Hwy 44.
Has tag, named Grimm
(352) 293-1488
Lost Hearing Aid. Winn
Dixie in Inverness on
8/31. Reward. PIs call
(352) 7264194
LOST
Mini schnauzer 14 yrs
old very petite. Lost on
9/2 Mason Creek Rd &
Blvd Dr. Ans to Sparky
634-0271 or 634-1044
Lost
Part Persian Light
Orange Cat. Lost in Blue
Cove area of Dunellon.
Family new to Blue Cove.
Cat declawed all the way
around
(352) 445-5494
Lost Small
white Maltese
Lost in Vicinity of
Forest Ridge & Lincoln
352-527-0783
Lost Yellow Lab on 9/6
in River Lakes Manor
off of HWY 200. Camo
collar, very friendly.
(352) 697-0828
White Chihuahua
Puppy, Female
name Angel, 10 wks
Inverness
(352) 419-9527



Found White
Chihuahua, short hair,
found on Hwy 19
Homosassa 1 mo. ago
Citrus County Animal
Services (352) 746-8400
Quaker Parrot
Found near Forest
& Stage Coach
Citrus County Animal
Services (352) 746-8400


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594


Sr in need of dependable
older small or Midsize car
or pk-up. Text yr/make/
mi & Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.


Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741



RECEPTIONIST
Custom home builder
is seeking an ener-
getic receptionist.
Must be able to han-
dle multiple phone
lines, accurately file
as needed, operate
a fax, copier,
scanner, and assist
with everyday office
activities. Home
building experience
preferred but not
required. Must have
a high energy level
and a great get it
done attitude.
Please email resumes
to: mcorson@
citrushills.com
or fax (352) 746-9895.

1 ..11
. "Lll '. '.'11 i Ist.

CLRONiCLE
Class'ifeds


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 D3


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

place at 8:15 a.m. Sept. 11 and
Sept. 25 in Chiefland and at
1:15 p.m. Sept. 11 and Sept. 25
in Inverness. Drop-ins are wel-
come and no additional regis-
tration is required, but space is
limited.
Free financial
workshops slated
A free financial workshop,
"Your Source for Financial Ed-
ucation," will begin at 2 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Coastal Regional
Library in Crystal River, hosted
by Andrew Breese with Ed-
ward Jones.
There is a second session
from 2 to 4 p.m. Sept. 20.
All materials will be provided.
Topics will be foundations of in-
vesting, retirement by design,
protecting what's important and
preparing an estate plan.
Contact Anne Davenport at
anne.davenport@edwardjones
.com or 352-795-1603.
Leadership Citrus
applications open
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013. Cost of
the class is $495 for Chamber
members and $595 for non-
members. Applications can be
found at www.leadershipcitrus.
com; due by Oct. 25.


I---*- "3**







D4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person




m.







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966







ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com


CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoocorm


HOME HEALTH
CLINICIAN/RN
Full Time

BayCare HomeCare
provides high-quality,
compassionate care
right at home. Join
us for great career
opportunities, a
special way to work,
and the chance to be
the kind of profes-
sional you want to be.
One year home care
experience preferred.
Contact Amy Wright
at 727-519-1768 or
apply online to posi-
tion # 122053 at:
BavCareJobs.com
A-
WF BayCare
HomeCare
EOE/AAIM/F/DIV
DF/TFWP


MASSAGE
THERAPIST

P/T Massage Therapist,
apply in person to Better
Health Chiropractic,
6166 W Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT /
X-RAY TECH
Medical assistant / x-ray
tech needed for fast
paced office. Must have
3-5 yrs experience. Must
have Florida x-ray
licence. Fax resume to
352-746-4130

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Apply in Person
Have resume avail.
(352) 746-3336

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
With Venipuncture
exp. Needed for
Busy Medical Prac-
tice. Fax Resume
To: 352-270-8889 or
Call (352) 746-1515
For Information

Medical Office
RECEPTIONIST
For busy Primary
Care Office. Must
possess great cus-
tomer service skills.
Strong work ethic,
and ability to multi
task in a fast paced
office environment.
Good Benefits
FAX RESUME TO
352-382-2289

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OPTOMETRIC
TECH
NW citrus. 30-38 hrs/wk.
Medical exp. required.
Fax resume to
866-897-0245.
Registered Nurses
RN's needed to perform
basic first aid at a busi-
ness near Crystal River.
Interesting/Low Stress
Work Environment. Call
888.269.6344/Fax re-
sume to 740.266.6671
Email to: nursingcorps
@yahoo.com
RESEARCH
COORDINATOR/RN
Seeking Detail Orien-
ted, computer literate
RN for Busy Clinical
Research Office
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1800P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429


RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Looking for reliable
staff. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing expe-
rience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


RN. LPN. CNA
All Shifts, FT &PT

RN SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
Part time
ACTIVITIES COOR.
Full Time

CNA DRIVER

Health Care
Experience Preferred.
APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood CIr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility






Building Official/
Building Division
Director
Announcement
# 12-53
Supervises staff,
hiring, training, moni-
toring, counseling,
disciplining and
preparing perfor-
mance evaluations.
Prepares and admin-
isters annual budget.
Bachelor's degree or
education and
training equivalent to
four years of college
education in Con-
struction, Architec-
ture, Engineering or a
closely related field.
Requires Standard
Building Code
Administrator certifi-
cation. Must possess
a current valid Florida
Driver license. Pay
Range $2,104.60 BW -
$3,156.95 BW DOQ
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
EOE/ADA






rTri


ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in Enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722

HEALTHCARE
MARKETING REP
We need a dynamic
marketing/sales
professional to
directly market TLC
outpatient Physical
Therapy services to
both serve current
clients & recruit new
customers. Must be
experienced in
Healthcare Sales/
Marketing, willing to
travel and results
driven. Competitive
salary & benefits.
Car allowance &
Results driven bonus
structure.
Please apply online
www.therapvmamtio
bs.com or fax resume
to 352-382-1161.

Office Utilities
Specialist
The Homosassa
Special Water District
will be accepting
applications for the
position of Office
Utilities Specialist.
Duties for this position
will include but are
not limited to: Payroll,
Accounts Payable,
recording and tran-
scription of Board
Meetings, Accounts
Receivable. Interac-
tion with Customers
both on the phones
and in person
required. Applicant
must have experi-
ence with Microsoft
Word and Excel.
Applicant must
possess Excellent
Customer Service
Skills. Government
Utility Experience
preferred. Applicant
must reside within
Citrus County.
Applications will
be accepted until
September 24, 2012.
Applications may be
dropped off at
District office or email
to: hswd@
tampabav.rr.com
Applications may be
filled out at the
District website @
www.homosassa
water.com.


CLASSIFIED



INSURANCE REP
440/220 LIC. Insurance
Prior Independant
agency skills preferred.
Mail Resume to:
Box # 1797P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

P/T Administra-
tive Assistant
(Full Time Jan -April)
Must be proficient,
able to multi-task, or-
ganized and possess
communication and
computers skills with
an extensive knowl-
edge in Microsoft
Office products for a
Crystal River CPA
Firm. Qualified appli-
cants submit
resumes to
mindvy(awmwccpa
.com or send to:
PO box 895
Inverness, FL 34452






CHSalNIeHE

Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep
Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers
QUALIFICATIONS
Two years sales exp.
preferred.
Computer
proficiency
Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
Strong presentation
skills preferred.
Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.
Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.

NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
Ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
No Experience re-
quired, but a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-4867




DRIVER
OTR RGN/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

SCHOOL DISTRICT
OF CITRUS COUNTY

FOOD SERVICES
NUTRITION
SPECIALIST
QUALIFICATIONS:
(1) Bachelor's degree
in Nutrition from an
accredited university.
(2) Registered Dieti-
tian or Registry Eligible
(MUST take and pass
Registered Dietitian
examination within 1
year of
employment).
(3) Experience with
school nutrition pro-
grams is desirable.
This is a 12-month
position, 25.1 days;
Professional/ Techni-
cal Salary Schedule
Apply online at
www.cltrus.kl2.fl.us by
following the
employment link
Questions regarding
the position can be
directed to
(352) 726-1931
ext. 2429 or
frelerg@cltrus.kl2.fl.us

SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
The City of Dunnellon
dba Greenlight
Communications is
accepting applica-
tions for Service Tech-
nician. This position
requires an electrical
background with
communications
troubleshooting and
repair experience,
both forward and
reverse path. High
School diploma or
equivalent and
Cable Certification
required. Must obtain
a job description
and submit a
City of Dunnellon
Employment
Application package
to the City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500.
Electronic
applications/resumes
not accepted.
Salary range
($23,192 $34,798)
Application deadline
09/24/2012.
Positions will remain
opened until filled.
E.O.E., DFWP.


Exp. Tree Climber
Dri./Lic 352-746-5129

LABORER

Must have clean Drivers
License and pass drug
test. Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1801 P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.Crystal River, FI
34429
Technician Needed.
Our business is growing
and we are in need of
technicians who have
experience in diesel en-
gines and transmis-
sions. We have the best
working hours Mon-Fri
and paid holidays. Sign
on bonus or moving al-
lowance is available.
GM experience even
though not required is a
plus. We offer top
wages and benefits. Call
Kevin 352-493-4263 or
send email to
kbelfry@ymail.com
S c o g g i n s
Chevrolet/Buick




Cleaner Wanted
Energetic & positive.
Must pass background
check. Transportation
needed. P/T position
302-6418 LV MSG




CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE


Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel.,
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail. weekdays
& weekends?
Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!
Fax resume to:
(352) 564-2935
or apply In person at
CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant

Housekeeping
Upsale RV resort
located in Crystal River.
If Interested cl (352)
447-5820 or stop by:
10173 N Suncoast
Blvd. Ofc hrs 9a-5p


KITCHEN AND
GOLF COURSE
help needed
Apply in Person
CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf &Country Club
8690 N. Golfview Dr.
(352) 489-5045




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




TELEMARKETERS
Experienced
Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean









Massage Therapy
Weekend Class
OCT.20 2012
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




LAWN CARE
BUSINESS for Sale
$40,000 Call For Details
(352) 586-6685




OAK SHADOWBOX
COFFEE TABLE. Glass
top. Excellent condition.
40x19x18. $100.
527-1239




1938 WEBSTER DIC-
TIONARY Hardback,
School/office, self pro-
nunciation. $800.00
Passed down through
family. Cell 352-422-5659
cell 352-422-5659


Elvis Collection
$100
I Love Lucy Plates
$100
(352) 726-5584
McDonalds org. 15th
Anniversay B-Day Cake
Display, complete $100
Lundby Doll House
w/ furnishing $100
(352) 726-5584


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





5 Person Hot Tub
New pump & heater,
Excel. condition
$1,000 cash or credit
(352) 228-7666
POOL HEAT PUMP
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$500 (352) 637-0397




A CHAR-BROIL GRILL
2 Burner w/Side
Good Older Model
No Tank $60.00
352-601-7816
APPLIANCE REMOVAL
Free Appliance Removal
In Citrus County
352 209 5853
DRYER$100. works great
90 day warranty.
Delivery extra.
Free removal of old one
call/text 352-364-6504
Refrigerator
Kenmore, Elite, stainless
steel., water, icemaker,
french door, runs great
$250. 352-746-6034
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STAINLESS STEEL AP-
PLIANCES Sears Ken-
more sidebyside refriger-
ator with ice maker and
water dispenser on
door,convection electric
range, microwave,
dishwasher; 9 months
old; Dawnmarie Forte,
352-410-0220 or
Robert Melvin,
352-586-2558/
732-898- 9648


t161o


SMITTYS APPLIANCE LIC. & EXP. CNA
REPAIR. Washer & Will Care For You
Dryers, Free Pick Up Cook, Clean & Daily
352-564-8179 Needs (352) 249-7451


CAREGIVER TO ELDERLY
9 Yrs exp., Care that
makes a difference.
(352) 613-6247
Elderly Assistance
Providing all around
General Help Light
Hsekeeping., Cooking
& Dr. Visits Ref. Avail
Call Mary 352-897-5250






YOULIrw\\rld first


Need a job
or a

qualified

employee?


This area's
#1

employment

source!



S( ,..
0.9NL


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775


I PnA nI Sre s=

Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S* ALL Home
S -" Repairs
t\ Small Carpentry
Vc* Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
W Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352. 344-0905
S cell: 400-1722
S ;ured Lic.#37761


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
* "NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
* Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 ii
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Remodels, Repairs,
We Do It All! Landscape
& Tractor Work. Lic./Ins
Steve/Rob, 476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271352-465-9201

ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *




BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


*Bath


The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALLI!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244


AAA ROOFING
Call the& ".akhusn"
Free Written Estimate
.UOO OFF


|Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
ic./Ins. CCCO57537 000CHOW









BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
_________________________00QQC42R


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300



JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269


IREMODEIN


MAC'S MOBILE RV SOD,&LANDSCAPING
REPAIR & MAINT. I &MOWiNG1
RVTC Certified Tech 352-364-1180,
352-613-0113, Liec/Ins. 352-257-1831


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.

Picture Perfect Photos
of Family, Pets &
Casual Weddings


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955




Your \\ ild first.

iE Da r




( i l


BARB MALZ 212-2439 L[_


WIND



We Clean Windows nd oWhole tot MoreI
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers

t Grout Painting
I -, Residential &
--. j Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
EROO15377

352-621N12


, ,, :, -. i


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERWOCKIIG BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


Loamm" 1% fv







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TWO 17 C.F.
REFRIGERATORS not
fancy but work well.
$50 each. Walter@
352-364-2583
WASHER AND DRYER
white washer and dryer
works perfectly selling be-
cause Im moving $75
each call 352-4644280
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. I'll take
your old one. Call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER/DRYER
washer/dryer, white,
working condition, can
deliver in Inverness,
$200.00 352-212-5286




CRAFTSMAN 10" BAND
SAW. Spare Blades &
Manual $75.00
628-3585
LADDER
WERNER 20FT ALUMIN-
IUM EXT D-1120-2,
200LBS DUTY RATED
$90, 352-726-9983




48" HD Compatable TV,
excellent condition
$250
(352) 726-7952
FREE TV 33 IN
RCA/PICTURE WENT
OUT LINDA 4194788
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
SONY 42 Rear Projection
TV Sony Stand $50.00
Great Condition
3525270324
SONY TV 33in, sound
went out. Screen Works
Good. FREE
Linda 419-4788




79 Solid Mable Cabinet
Doors & Draw fronts
stained red mahogany
great for garage or
workshop project $450.
obo (352) 726-5832
TILE, GROUT, AND
MORTAR Glazed porce-
lain tile. 50% off retail.
20x20 $18 per 16 sf case
13x13 $15 per 15 sf
case. Grout mortar to
match. 352-344-4811




AC MOBILE POWER
CONVERTER FOR
AUTO, 12VDC TO 120
VAC. $25 352-726-9983
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Pavillion 525 C
desktop Computer
w/ LCD monitor & key-
board + all cables, Win.
XP Work great
$90. (352) 465-4037
WILSON ELECTRONICS
301135 DUAL BAND
FLAT PANEL ANTENNA
FOR CELL PHONES $45
352-726-9983




Excellent 10 piece PVC
patio Furniture Set, $80.
Excellent Condition
(352) 726-1891
PATIO FURNITURE PVC
beige 7pc set-table,
4 chairs, lamp &
cushions $140
Call 352-344-3112
PATIO SET Rectangular
glass top table and 2
chairs. $50 Call
352-344-3112




1 Rattan Glass top
Coffee Table. &
2 square matching end
tables Ecel cond.
$200 352-419-5363
Adjustable Bed
Craftmatic Full Size w/
massage & side rail.
Used 10 mo. Exc Cond.
Orig $3000, sell $1500
OBO. Black Spinet
Piano Exc Cond. $450
OBO (352) 422-3707
ANTIQUE DESK
Kidney shaped mahog-
any solid wood $300.
CHERRY WOOD
day bed w/ trundle
no mattress $200
(352) 613-5009
Blond dining room
table w/ 2 leaves, 'h"
protective glass top &6
chairs, excel, cond. Pd.
$1,900. asking. $600.
Bedroom Suit, off white
wicker, bed, night
stand, chest of drawers,
dresser w/ mirror, like
new Pd. $2,100. asking
$800. (352) 302-6934
COFFEE AND END
TABLES new, dark
mahogany $60 for all
Walter@ 352-364-2583
COFFEE TABLES two
end tables, glass insert
coffee and sofa table.
$200 obo Call
352-344-3112
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover and large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070
Desk Lamp $35.
and Various Art Work
(352) 270-8249
DESK Simple 3 drawer
desk, grey and blue.
Metal framed, light wood
colored surface. Good


condition $30
352-257-5156
DINING TABLE
ITALIAN MARBLE
Sacrifice at $500.00, 3
pieces of solid marble.
Can e-mail pic's.
352-513-4027
ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Real wood, ch stain glass
door, holds 27" non
HDTV + more. Beautiful
$95 746-7232 LMSG
ETHAN ALLEN COFFEE
TABLE Vintage Antiqued
Pine $75.00
(352) 3824911
ETHAN ALLENEN END
TABLES Vintage Heir-
loom Collection $95.00
(352) 3824911
FULL MATTRESS Full
size mattress in good
condition. Does not in-
clude box spring or
frame. $30 352-257-5156


ur ure
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Curved Desk
$150.
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
LOVE SEAT COUCH
Flower design.Great
condition/call for picture
$100 Linda 4194788
LOVE SEAT Reclining
love seat earth tone col-
ors, good condition. $75
352-257-5156
Lt Oak Tone Table 42"
sq. w/ 18" leaf, 4 micro-
fibr. ulpol light oak
swivel arm chairs $600.
57" Oak Bar w/ built in
cab. & drawer for bev-
erages & glasses $350.
(352) 726-7952
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
Bush Office desk, Ig.
steel cab., computer,
sm. file cab., Liv. rm.
sofa, 1 coffee, 1 end
tbl., vanity set, lamp,
mattress & boxspring
(352) 527-0347
Pair of Sofa's/ Will sepa-
rate quality like new,
England/Lazy Boy
golden neutral w/ floral
box pleated skirts,
pillows, 93"L, Must See!
Bargain $375. both
$199 ea (352) 503-3914
Picard, Queen Anne
Dining Room Table 2
leaves, 6 chairs, buffet
paid $4,000 Sell $950.
Secretary Desk, old,
$300. (352) 270-8249
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS.
Queen mattress, box spr-
ing and frame in good
condition. $60
352-257-5156
Single size white
Platform Bed
with storage, almost
new mattress $150
(352) 344-1441
SOFA/LOVESEAT Italian
leather beige. Excellent
condition.$500 Call
352-344-3112
SOLID PINE GUN
CABINET needs small
repair $20 Walter@
352-364-2583
STAND/CART ON CAST-
ERS. For TV, micro, etc.
27W, 18D, 30H Open
shelf & closed cabinet un-
derneath. $20 341-3607
Traditional Couch and
2 chairs, brown & gold
paisley print 2 yrs. old
excellent condition
Asking $1,250
(352) 637-2281




21" Self Prop. Snapper
Lawn Mower
Excel. cond. $200
McLane Commercial
Grade, Gas Edger, trim-
mer excel. cond. $200
(352) 726-7952
HIGH WHEEL TRIMMER
SEARS 6.75 torque
Like New $150
(352) 560-0307
LAWN EDGER 4cyc gas
powered Craftsman.
needs minor work. $15
obo. 352-637-2647
LAWN MOWER
Briggs & Straton
Like New
$750.
(352) 628-3329
POWER HEDGE TRIM-
MER, WARDS 13 INCH,
$20 352-726-9983
TELESCOPING TREE
PRUNER AND SAW
CUTTER, "ACE" 7FT TO
14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $75 352-726-9983
Weed eater, electric
trimmer $20. 230HP
Electric Blower/
Vaccum wall attach.
$40 (352) 726-7952




FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale. Sat. & Sun
Everything goes cheap
8980 S. Meredith Ave.
INVERNESS
Indoor Estate/ Moving
Sale of Lake Home,
Fri. Sat. & Sun 9a-2D
1431 S. WATER VIEW DR.
To end, through gates
(352) 726-5584
MEADOWCREST
Fri, Sat & Sun 8-4
Dining Room and Bed-
room sets, household
items, tools, lots more.
6517W Cannondale Dr
WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




MENS CLOTHING
PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529




!!!!!!!235/75 R15!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
......225/75 R15.....
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
::::::::::::::R19.5::::::::::::
Good tread!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
2 CAR GARAGE DOOR
SCREEN, White $80
(352) 465-4037


10 x 14 Repo Shed
w/ Garage Door (352)
860-0111,941-623-3742
1979 TRANS-AM Ready
for restoration. Extra
body parts included. En-
gine ran 18 months ago,
$1200.00 or best offer.
352-200-1459
27" TV old tube style not
wide screen remote
doesn't work $25
563-1073
ANIMAL CLIPPER
ANDIS model AG2 2
speed/uses A5 blades
seldom used works exc
$80. 352-270-3909
BAKERY
EQUIPMENT
20 qt Hobart mixing
mach. w/stainless steel
bowl & accessories,
1 tabletop sabrett hotdog
cart, pizza tray, screens
and much more.
(954) 647-0472


25 gal tall, glass,
perfect house for a little
critter. $25
746-7232 LMSG
BIKE mans 26 inch. mon-
goose MGS GCH 6.5 8
speed. $72.00
352-637 2499 Inverness
Children's Play House
24x16 wood, w/ electric.
Attached swing set.
Great Condition $500
OBO. 2 per hot tube, like
new $375 OBO
352-794-3410
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK like new File
drawer printer shelf $75
563-1073
DOUBLE CEMETERY
CRYPT Located in Veter-
ans Wall in Fountains
Memorial Gardens. 2
openings/closings incld.
Bargain price of $5000.00
for whole pkg. Call Maria
at 352-212-7533
DRYWALL STILTS 15"
to 30" Never Used.
Call Ray@464-0573
Fridge 18.2 Kenmore
2yr. old mint cond., $300
Hunting Dog Hauler
alum. 48x48x24 dbl door
$250
(352) 419-6669
GLASS PATIO SLIDING
GLASS DOOR no hard-
ware five panel measures
6 1/2 by 27 ft $99
352-249-4460
LANTERN/NEW IN BOX
Was $44, selling for $15
Linda 419-4788
QUICK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fits 10' by 10'
Popup canopy
$40.00 Call
Ray@464-0573
RIDING MOWER Old Not
running $50.Craftsman
563-1073
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
Submersible pump
2 wire & 3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411
VERTICAL BLIND light
beige with hardware
61/2 by 45 ft $75
352-249-4460
VINTAGE WICKER TEA
CART, excellent condi-
tion, place for pitcher and
glasses, also has hand-
les, $95, (352) 465-1813



EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH. LIKE
NEW $75 352-726-9983
Harmar Mobility
Model AL500
$900. obo
(352) 228-9058
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn
Never Used
$100.
352-341-1714
Motorized
Wheelchair/Scooter Lift
Transport for rear of car
$250. firm
Call Rita 5-8pmn
(352) 795-9756
Walker- folding to 5"
brand new, light
weight alum. cost $76.
asking $40., 527-0004
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" MITCHELL
ACOUSTIC GUITAR,
GIGBAQTUNERSTRAP&MO
RE! $85(msrp$399)
352-601-6625


12 SPEAKER
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
COMBO AMP LIGHT-
WEIGHT & POWERFUL
$75 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR wow
solid spruce
6 string $100
352-586-4226
AMPEG BA-108 BASS
AMP 25WATT W/ 8"
SPEAKER SMALL BUT
POWERFUL $65
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
sg copy black $100
free bag/amp
352 586 4226
ELECTRIC GUITAR
strat copy $100
free amp/bag
352 586 4226
GREG BENNETT COR-
SAIR BASS P/J STYLE
PICKUPS METALLIC
RED "NEW" $80
352-601-6625
PIANO
ROLAND DIGITAL F90
Sacrifice at$450.00 OBO,
Excellent for student. Can
e-mail pic. 352-513-4027



KING COMFORTER Re-
versible navy, red. Ex-
cellent condition. Used
only few times. High loft.
$25 341 3607
SOARING EAGLE New
in box.Was 59.95/selling
for 20.00 Linda 419-4788
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 red pillow
shams. $12 for all
341 3607
TWIN BEDDING Whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$40 341 3607



ELLIPTICAL
Horizon RE 7.6 $650
new, asking $250
TANNING BED
American Wolff $200
(352) 5134399
ELLIPTICAL
Horizon RE 7.6 $650
new, asking $250
TANNING BED
American Wolff $200
(352) 5134399
GAZELLE EDGE exer-
cise glider 4 function
cardio workout computer
track spd, dist, mi+cal
$75 746-7232



Beacon Cruiser
Red upland 26" girls
bicycle. $60
(352) 419-5669
BOW
Hoyt "Trykon" XL
Viper Sight, Stabilizer,
Loop, Peep, Quiver,
Rest, 6 ACC arrows,
$300 352-527-2792
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
COMPOUND BOW -
PSE Compound Bow, left
handed, with upgrades,
$125. Firm.
(352)4194108
S FREE GUN with
Training. Learn more
at TrainToCarrvy.com
Gravity Esprit,
58 CM, 21 speed,
Mens Hybrid bicycle,
computer, etc.
excel cond. $185.
(352) 344-5933
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352447-5595
lzhmash Saiga,
7.62 + ammo
$675.
Muzzle Loader Rifle,
50 Cal. $250.
352- 220-2204
Reebok Inversion
System, asking
$125
Call for Details
(352) 344-1413
Stevens 12 gauge, dbl
barrel shot gun. model
311A excel. cond. $350
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel
shot gun good cond.
made 1927 $425.
(352) 344-5283


Musical
Instruments]


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted
2 Horse Trailer
rough condition okay
Small 1Oft boat trailer
Honda Generator
2 or 3K, 2 x 6 Lumber
and 1 x 6-5/4
Call Jim (352) 445-0788
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944




3 Male Yorkies, $650.
1 Male Morkie $500.
1 Male Shorkie $500.
ckc, fl. health certs.,
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BENGAL CUB CATS
10 weeks old, TICA
registered, FI Health
Cert, shots up to date.
1 Spotted Snow Sepia,
1 Horizontal Flowing
Marble. $200 each
352-601-5362
BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Sept 9, 9-4, Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
toys, Fruit/Nut
Treat, Cage Wire 8260
Adrian Dr.
Brooksville 727-517-5337
BLUE CRESTED
AMAZON
Breeding pair of 6 yr old
parrots. Talkative, cute
and very tame. They
have been together
since birth. 3 Cages: 1
large indoor, 1 med out-
door and 1 travel
Illness forces sale
Total $3000
212-2814 or746-8631


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 D5


CLASSIFIED




WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Winchester 300 MAG
Mauser Action,
Red field Scope $550
Ruger Single 6 Revolver
22LR & 22mag, $400
352-220-2204




4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell
UTILITY TRAILER
10 ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800
(352) 207-5946

UTILITY TRAILER
5' x 8' triple crown lawn
trailer. Mesh sides, rear
gate, good condition, new
spare $675 obo
(352) 860-1106




WOODEN PORTACRIB
Collapsible, casters, 4"
mattress, fitted sheet.
$40 341 3607


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 Wave Runners
2 seat & 3 seater
w/Trailers.
Large Child's ATV
$950 for All Three
All need a little work
727-207-1619 Crys. Riv.

AQUA SPORT
20 FT., 140 Suzuki, 4 strk,
tan, axel alum trlr. hy-
draulic starring. ready
to go $3,750. 621-0392


null, lU WKb DIK. X&
Cream, Choc. &
Cream Males &
Females, Health Certs,
Champ. bloodline,
perfect markings $200
& up (352) 795-6870
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Thurs. Sept. 20th, 7 p.m.
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039


Gheenoe
1999 Gheenoe 15'4"
and 1999 Trailer
$750 (352) 302-0778
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 344-4537
SEARS
12 FT. JON BOAT,
6hp Johnson Motor.
$550
621-0392
SPORT FISH
28ft, twin Volvo turbo die-
sel, tower, piilot, GPS,
turn key $19,500.
(352) 978-0658
TRITON
Fish & Ski 2000, 18ft,
w/200 HP Yam. Eng., &
Troll mtr., Pwr. Ster., tilt &
trim, new trlr. tires,
includes water skis,
tubes & life vest $3,900.
352-726-4943. 201-4512




JAMBOREE

'05, 30 ft class C Motor
home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
352-746-9002

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ftf
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
Travel Trailer
2000 21 ft Sunline,
Solaris light,
series M2053.
Exc Cond $4425
(352) 344-2927 or
447-1244
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892






CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great
Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
GMC
1988 Suburban
3/4 Ton 4 x 4
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
LEXUS
'05, ES 330, 131k miles
1 owner $10,500
(352) 212-6179
luckylorra@aol.com

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
'02, Miata Cony. GL,
dark green, tan,
leather, 100K miles,
boise radio, PW, PL,
showroom cond. $8,500
Must See 352-527-7867
NISSAN
2009 Rogue 38k mi.
Clean car, not dealer
owned. $17,900
(352) 302-0778
SCION TC
2005, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
AC, Power winds, locks,
mirrors, cruise cont. New
brakes & tires. Exc Cond.
$7900. (352) 527-2792
SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988








-# r"- #


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^********A^Ir


SCARLET
is a curly-coated re-
triever mix, we think.
She is about 4 years
old and weighs 46
pounds. She is
Heartworm-negative
and also housebro-
ken. Lively and ener-
getic, can jump a
4-foot fence, so
would need a yard
to run with a high
fence. Very affec-
tionate and
well-mannered, as
well as beautiful, with
a curly, shiny black
coat.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Shorkies 4 females
1 male, 8 wks on
9/23/12
$400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803








SIMON

"Simon is a 1-year-old
neutered male
Border Collie/Bulldog
mix. He is Heartworm
negative and house-
broken. Very friendly
and loving,
energetic and very
playful, also beautiful.
Would be great with
kids. Would also like
to be your lapdog
even though he
weighs about 48
pounds. Walks well
on a leash and gets
along with other
dogs. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."


Livestock


317-0909 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 13, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
September 9, 2012.

318-0909 SUCRN
September 14, meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
A meeting of the Nominating Committee of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation, Inc.,will be held on Friday, September 14, 2012, at 12:00
Noon, in the Board room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health
System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of
the meeting is the selection of candidates for two (2) Board of Director positions
and one (1) candidate for an Advisory Board (non-voting) director.
Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing
to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered
at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
September 9, 2012.


319-0909 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB # 037-12
Contract Mowing County Water/Wastewater Facilities and Lift Stations
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide routine finish mowing, trimming, weeding, edging and litter pickup at
various County Utility Water/Wastewater Facilities and lift Station locations through-
out Citrus County.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on September
26, 2012 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a
Mandatory Bus Tour of each location.
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Bid
To submit a Bid, Bidders must have been in the mowing business for at least one (1)
year.
1. Bidders must attend the Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting and bus tour of loca-
tions.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before October 9, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for October 9, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle on September 9, 2012


NEED EXTRA CASH?










Great Opportunity For


V Individuals


V Couples



V Friends






S* Must be 18 years of age

Must have valid driver's license and insurance
Able to work or share 7 days a week, early
morning hours


For more information email:
homedelivery@chronicleonline.com
or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River to apply.

Both home delivery and
single copy routes available!

CITRUS COUNTY


CHoQNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel, cond.
$13,300(352)465-0812
352-322-5555
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVY
'00, Blazer LT,
Power Window, AC,
Nice, $2,300 obo
(352) 860-0420
DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$1,100 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River
JEEP
2003 Grand Cherokee
Limited Ed. Black, Sun
Roof. Exc Cond in/out.
Great A/C $7500 obo
746-8631 or 212-2814




FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving Ice cold air


YAMAHA
2001 Grizzly 600 4x4, like
new, 395 miles, $3200
352-746-9618




Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
Harley Davidson
2003 Anniv edition Fat
Boy 12k mi, Vance &
Hines exhaust, wind-
shield & bags. Beautiful
$10,500 (352) 586-0510
HONDA
2008 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5700.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
MOTOR SCOOTER
2007, 250CC,
very low miles,
$1,000. obo
(352) 220-8454
VIRAGO
'95, 700CC, showroom
cond. driven monthly
1,128 miles, $2,800
(352)465-9015
VW TRIKE
VW Trike New Runs
Great Great Price
$6000.00 352-344-9340
Phone


Metn


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D6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






INSIDE
m| Sikorski's
Attic
V M PAGE E6


' IOME RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


/0-N


1H,; Il/Il


" Kindergartners at Moss Haven Ele-
i mentary school work in a student
garden in Dallas. Texas. Gardens
planted in schoolyards nationally are
intended to encourage healthier eat-
ing. and also teach young students
about the environment, science.
teamwork. math and leadership.


?-7-v1
ef


17M;"'I,
i kI









E2 SUNDA'I~ SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


SOPHISTICATED CUSTOM HOME
* Upgrades Galore!! Over An Acre
* Kitchen w/Cherry Cab. Pecan Hardwood Fhs
* Stunning Master Bath Heated PoolHot Tub
* Very Peaceful/Serene Beautiful Property!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.el liesullon.i emnaux.nel









LIVE THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE
* Large Scrn. Lanai Nice Eat-In Kitchen
*2/2/2 Car ar. Great Master/Bath
* Lovely Mas./Bath Nice Decor
* Great Rec Hall Comm. Pool!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997u
www.FlomidaLislinglnlo.com o


GORGEOUS COUNTRY LOT!
* Large Kitchen Lots of Cabinets
* Cozy Fireplace Over 2 Acres!
* Huge Great Room New Water Pump
*20x25 Workshop OVER 2 ACRE LOT
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloiidoLislinglnlo.coinl


.,.52124 7 0 LINE
NF
6 828
5989
PT7j,',j' 337-2828
rEnter h0use #5989


PInt : lUUt:
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL |
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


$80 Million

Closed

Sales Volume




#1 ln

Cilrus Counly






--as




REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


POOL HOME ON 3.3 ACRES
This 3/2 home is located in the equestrian
area of Pine Ridge and offers a solar-heated
pool, huge lanai for entertaining, formal living
and dining, office, family room, and split
bedroom plan. Luxurious master suite and
large kitchen. Entertain and relax with a tiki hut,
a gazebo, and privacy galore. tO
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


Offered at attractive price. If you are
looking for a 3 bedroom home at a very
attractive price, look no further. New roof!
DIRECTIONS Hwy 19 to Cypress Blvd W, to right
on Sycamore Circle, to 104 Sycamore Circle
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


Ivllnutes Trom shopping. Z /2izat/w -car
garage. 1,250 sq. ft. of living area,
community pool, and clubhouse. Located
in Forest Ridge.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@oarthink.net


2003 beauty in Sugarmill.
4BR/3 bath/3-car pool home.
Eng. hardwood floors, Corian
and so much more.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buvcitruscounty.com


* 199b Year Built 3/2/2 on ./b Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System *Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
8375 S. Iucos Bld. Honssa6870 w.*ueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Great Room w/Gas Fireplace
* Lg. Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Screened Lanai & Pool
* Nice Landscaping & Private Backyard
* Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpnlmer@remax.net


LAKE ROUSSEAU
Feast your eyes on this 157 feet of waterfront
on unspoiled Lake Rousseau! This solidly-built
home has gorgeous hardwood floors, skylights
and a massive 1 6x22 screened porch
overlooking old oaks and a stunning open
water view. Huge potential for expansion. This
is not a drive by.
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sheryIpotLs@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


E2 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Val
Mahoney
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Nancy
Bowdish
RE/MAX
Realty One.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


John
Holloway
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Realty One.


RE/MAX
salutes
top agents
Linda Meahl, Lou Nal-
ley and Val Mahoney are
being recognized for hav-
ing qualified for the 2012
Million Dollar club. All
three of these agents join
a unique group of agents
who have closed in ex-
cess of $1 million in sales
volume this year. Linda is
an agent in the Inverness
RE/MAX Realty One of-
fice. Lou and Val work out
of the Homosassa
RE/MAX office on U.S.
19. All three agents are
veteran Realtors.
The associates and
staff of RE/MAX Realty
One are also very
pleased to announce that


B


Both Homes Sold Regardless of Price

8 DAHOON CT. N, HOMOSASSA
SUGARMILL WOODS
Preview 9AM Auction 10AM
2 BR, 2 1/2 bath 2,763 total sq. ft. home, large lot. Wood-burning fireplace, enclosed lanai. Eat-in
kitchen, bedroom is sizable with full bath and closets. Laundry room, 2-car garage, new A/C 2008, hot
water tank, block home, new roof 2004.
63 JACKSON ST.
BEVERLY HILLS HOME I R
Preview 1PM Auction 2PM ..._I
2/1, 1,482 total sq. ft., built in 1972. Great for investors, starter's or snowbirds. Minimum TLC
needed. Lot size is 75x120.

SEPTEMBER 21 3646 N. LUCILLE DRIVE S S
AIIPTII1II THE GLEN BEVERLY HILLS VILLA '
Preview 9AM -Auction 1OAM
2/2 villa. High ceiling. COURT ORDERED SALE.
I 1AUCTION Needs some TLC but great investment!! URI

DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
(1/2 mileS. of the Fairgrounds) BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley'sAuctionAb1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. All dimensionsare approx.mol +-)10 Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


Nancy Bowdish, John Holloway, Tony
Viggiano and Barbara Mills have all quali-
fied for the Multi-Million Dollar Club this
year. With more than $2 million in closed
sales volume each, they join a select group
of agents who have earned this title this
year. Nancy and Tony work in the Ho-
mosassa RE/MAX office on U.S. 19. John
and Barbara are agents in the Inverness
RE/MAX office on Main Street.
Garrett Joins EXIT Realty
in Beverly Hills
Phyllis Garrett, one of the area's top
real estate professionals, joined EXIT Re-
alty Leaders in Beverly Hills.
EXIT Realty Leaders is at 5018 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Call 352-527-1112 or visit the website at
www.exitrealtyleaders.com.


Barbara
Mills
RE/MAX
Realty One.


CALLING ALL
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYERS
INVESTORS AND
i.W B SNOWBIRDS
rHER YOU ARE STARTING UP OR SLOWING I I .... .. I, ,l,lll i l. I .. ... l . I SPECTACULAR SUGARMILL WOODS BUY, i 1 1
N THIS HOM E W ILL FIT YOUR NEEDS' ... ... ..., ,,, ,,,, I ,,, ..l.... i,, ,l , .. I I
.3.47 7. h., PRICED RIGHT AT $69,000 water. Make this a must see and make your ou er today. 15 Gerbrer A NG Ca Tomika piresanssen
356A474. 73 hi TWhnnnon e., nverness Call MLS 35445$72800 Jean Cassese 352-201 7034. 3R or Ki Fuller 35 1575
19 77n I)Ahip T-nPr q;'2A1q-q9Aq MLS #357445. $72,800. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. 352-586-659'8 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


BIG P BEAUTIFUL . ....... . ,,,,, ,,, ,,I,, FABULOUS INVERNESS HIGHLANDS ..1 FANTASTIC FLORAL CITY FINDI i i ll,

. H I.... I ONLY 1799001 I i.,,, ,, .....69900 ". 9081 Waterview.' MLS #355918. REDUCED $89,500.
Spires-Hanssen 5866598or Kim Fuller212-5752. i"" .. "' ..I Spireianssen 352586-659801 or Kim Fuller352212-5752.

RIGHT AND THE
HOUSE IS PERFEC1l
i W oods

SAY HELLO TO A GREAT BUY . CHARMING AND SPACIOUS n.,I l, i. i , i ... .. .. .. .. I .. .. i ....... ,,,, or,
O Nl. ,,, .. A 1,,, 1, ,,,,, I,, , ,,,. .1 II,,,,1, ,y9 0 I"1,,,,, h, h,, ,,,,, ,,,,, ,,, 7,,,,,,, ,1, ,,,,, , I I, m o
...... ' ONLY S89,9001 r .., ..I I 11 I I E.... I r, ; , 129 900 . .. : ,,i. 8 S263700 ',11 iomika
T-. I. --.. U -..- II...----'- i / n -. i;. r..ll-. i rn l n r"rrn T -1 i- r 1 -r r i f r r 11 rn -nr L _14 n On QC;-iW- ,Q C Q Z rCOQ im ,Cllr> 9_ 1 0_f"7C


Linda
Meahl
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Lou
Nalley
RE/MAX
Realty One.


P . www.dudleysauction.com


SEPTEMBER 14: TWO AUCTIONS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 E3












Frugal tricks to freshen the air in your home


A ir freshen-
ers smell
reat, but
they only mask
odors. To really
rid the air of
smells in your
home, open the
windows and let
the fresh air in.
Bring in house-
plants, keep Sara
things clean, re- FRU
move smelly LIV
shoes and empty
trash daily. If you enjoy
scents, you can combine a
few drops of essential oil
and water in a spray bottle
and use as a room mist. Sim-
mer natural items such as
apple and citrus peels, cin-
namon or fresh mint leaves
and water in a slow cooker


0001BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com
I I... i


or on the stove-
top, or soak a cot-
ton ball with
vanilla or essen-
tial oil.
The following
suggestions can
-- help freshen the
air, too:
Clean and de-
odorize the mi-
Noel c r o w a v e :
GAL Microwaves get
ING dirty and smelly.
They can be a
pain to keep clean if you
don't clean them immedi-
ately after splatters or spills.
To clean your microwave
with ease, simply combine a
couple of tablespoons of
lemon juice and 1 cup water
(or 1/2 cup white distilled
vinegar and 1/2 cup water)


in a microwave-safe bowl.
Add a wooden spoon to the
bowl to prevent super-heat-
ing. Cook on high for three
to five minutes or until
steam condenses. Wipe
down the interior of the mi-
crowave with a cloth. If any
smell remains, repeat the
lemon and water procedure,
but add a couple of cloves to
the mixture.
Castile soap: Dilute and
spray on counters or floors.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


a _- -- -- NATURE'S CUTE 2/1 COTTAGE
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET OVERLOOKING THE CANAL
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River and nestled in an area that preserved
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community most of its 1960's charm!
i ..... Take the on the Withlacoochee River Well maintained, fenced yard, sunroom.
..... ... ,, ... .... $218,000 The perfect home away from home.
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #357468 $39,900







CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, medical ... I. ,,;... .., your fenced
true masterpiece in a i .... 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard i .... .... o... or private
Lake Tsala Apopka, ... ... room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
family to move right in! imaginable! .i:... .. :..
O00CKMS $425,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 1i -' $69,900


Peppermint scent makes
the kitchen smell fresh.
Fireplace scent: Use
dried citrus peels or dried
herb bundles for added
scent. Make the bundles
using dry herbs and natural
materials, such as rosemary,
lavender, bay leaves, cinna-
mon sticks and eucalyptus.
You can add raspberry
canes and pine cones to var-
ious dried herbs, too. Cut


th


bundle them together (with
the stems facing the center
of the bundle) using raffia.
Place them in the fireplace
as fire starter, or add them
to a smoldering fire for fra-
grance.
Garbage disposal: Pour
baking soda and vinegar
into your garbage disposal.
Cover the drain and let it sit


for five minutes. Flush it
with boiling water After-
ward, grind ice cubes, salt
and citrus peels to give it a
fresh scent.
Try coffee grounds: Set
coffee grounds (either un-
used or used and dried) in a
bowl or Dixie cup in an in-

See FRUGAL/Page E9


J-es-e -IIJ o.I- .U I .I.!.tsh .. .


em to about 10 inches and Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor' A OSE Realtor''
EVELYN CURRENCY RAOl 302-3179 SOLD Nae' 287-9022
EL RREALO 1 RTh r WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
Cell: 352-634-1861 The Golden Girl 746.6700
evelyn.surrency@century21.com
n 2 BEVERLY HILLS
--i
a -P-e,,aI' I,, r l, -,I I h -, i I ,
$.h12s.' ,
condomnlom nestled in "The 62 S. DAVIS
Islands" 2 bedroom/2 bathroom BEVERLY HILLS

tall in love maintenance ree v .


$4316 N. BACALL
1OAKWOOD VILLAGE
Ver Nic Conoinu wet A wc
Very NieCondominium withdock plan DW manufactured home Front ,- ,- Irdh,-,, ,,1 l, 11llal
2/2 with picturesque view of screened porch and an the back a
In d ia n C o v e F a b u lo u s r d e s c re e n e d p rc h 2 c a r c a rp o rt a ll '. nl,- 4 ,- Ih,- ,..-
dow n the Indian Riverto the situated n a landscaped level acre ..,I, Ir, -, .- ,,.- ,,, ,11
I .v dn d 1111-,
Crystal Rive r and Gulf of Mexico i ~ ,I,,:,, '
CETR 1 ..M RTNRA ETT ETUY2 .W OTNRELETT


WITHLACOOCHEE STATE FOREST IN YOUR BACKYARD!
Ride out your back gate into the forest 3 Bedroom, 2
bath COUNTRY HOME Open floor plan with formal
dining GREAT ROOM fireplace and an ISLAND
KITCHEN the finest chef would love. 5 acres with BARN
* round pen* paddocks and your own gate into the
forest. RV storage building. MLS tt356440
PRICED RIGHT AT $288,900



im'


KAREN E. MORTON
Hall of Fame Centurion Memb-,
E-mail: kemorton@tampabay rrcc
Website: karenemorton cc
(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595
TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163
SJ.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE
1.I'< .. : c": .'. :
,wwu_,wrh -,r ,-;v ,J: ; --. tL.


WITHLACOOCHEE FOREST IN YOUR FRONTYARD!
18 ACRES (2 parcels), some woods and pasture. Watch
deer leap across your back yard. This 3 bedroom 2 bath
DW MH is hidden in the woods but right off the trails.
Located 10 minutes from the north end of the Sunshine
Parkway. MLS 356359 $229,900.


STATE FOREST JUST AROUND THE CORNER ... c "" LAKE TSALA APOPKA PRIME LAKEFRONT LOCATION!!!
Rocking chair front and rear porches bring the living area WEST HIGHLANDS SETTLE THIS ESTATE WOODWORKERS- CAR ENTHUSIASTS OR HOBBYISTS SPECTACULAR OPEN VIEW!! Waterski Off Your Backyard
outdoors Enjoy quiet country living in this 2BR, 2 that LOOKING FOR OFFERS! This SPARKLING AND SPOTLESS Ouality built 32x48 Newly Updated and Remodeled Wood Floors New
custom home Open great room, allupgraded appils. included, First time offered! 2BR, BAwithlargefamilyroom DestiyDWmabilehme isMOVE INREADY BR Kithen and Baths *New Roof New Heat/ Air *Great
inside laundry PLUS det. pole barn and oversized gar. All and 2 car garage. Huge screen porch with beautiful 2 BA le hae e n t PLVS? REtDh 3 ethl Room NBR 2B A ic Fria
fenced w/road access in front and rear. Lots of room to backyard ready for your summer garden. 125x87 Lot. A large covered carport, PLUS 2 detached metal Room w/Fireplace 2BR, 2BA, Den/Office Florida
build add home. MLS t 354158 buildings for all your real loves!!! 3 lots Estate Room* INCREDIBLE, 892 Sq. Ft. Garage and Workshop
PRICED TO SELL AT $158,900 NOW $49,900 price reduced to $84,900 KM/CB Area Room for RV Parking and Storage! MLS 354777
WAS $189,900. NEW PRICE $174,900




AFFORDABLE INVERNESS WATERFRONT INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST WEST HIGHLANDS POOL HOME
Codyand clean **2 bedroom bath i car garage Metal O CI bedrooms 3 full baths (one whe. .. 1 1B
C y LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION volume ceilings split bedrooms ,'1 ul.", I.. rli
roof, NEW KITCHEN, NEW FLOORING (wood vinyl and carpet) One acre! Peace and quiet surround this 2 BR, 2 BA, French doors opening to den/4th bedroom area. Caged
NEW BATHROOM, NEW PAINT, all On fenced canal lot only 2Car gar CBS home. Great rm with Den and in-ground pool with waterfall Inside laundry 2 car HANDYMAN SPECIAL ONLY $27,900
minutes from Inverness Great neighborhood Great fireplace. Only minutes from all in town conveniences, garage UPDATED BATHS NICE KITCHEN !! Fenced 2 BR 2 BA DW (1996) mobile home on 1/3 acre large
homne for grandma and grandpa to spend the winter. MLS 356555 $79,900 yard 3/4 acre lot on Arthur Street. SHORT SALE IN THE covered front porch. Central water nestled under the
$62,900. MS 354285 WORKS...NOW ONLY $134,900 MLSt 348967 trees. LOOKING FOR OFFERS! MLS t 355745.


E4 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the better chance of
notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of
the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednes-
day.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Sat-
urday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication
Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is avail-
able. The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on
color pages.


000CKNX F

REAL E
5569 W. GuE
MIS |CRYSTAL]
OFFICE: (35i
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E
_= i i I Jl [




CRYSTAL RIVER Riverfront horn
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage, docl
seawall, spectacular view of Crystal Rive
Huge family rm w/gas fireplace, scree
porch A must see,. #356647 PRIC


STATE, INC.
LF TO LAKE HwY.
RIVER, FL 34429
2) 795-6633
-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


1Realtor

Reaftor


VN DAYS. A WEEK!


HOMOSASSA nice older mobile HERNANDO 1985 S/W M/H with enclosed
w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear screen porch. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, w/3rd
screened porches. Newer roofover in 2010, bedroom having it's owi. ... .. .
newer appliances approximately 2 years old. workshop w/electric & 3 1. 1 i i -, ...i.,
Fullly fenced backyard with shed. #357391 rear yard, covered front porch. #357415
$26,900 $48,000
ENDN'%___ ~ ~ 4 fi I


CRYSTAL RIVER waterfront 3 bedroom,
2 bath; 84 ft on deep water canal, covered HOMOSASSA on corner of Fitchen and
boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall. Tile Cardinal is this D/W M/H w/3bedrooms 15
floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new roof, baths, carport and shed. Covered rear porch.
double paned windows, updated kitchen & Gas for cooking. Being sold "as is".
baths. #354933 $249,000 #355143 $28,990


BANK OWNED-LEESBURG, FL -O WN E S I Hl
Waterfront 2BR/2BA double wide on canal to BANK OWNED-SPRING HILL, FL
Lake Eustis & chain of lakes. $45,900 3BR/2BA pool home. Large family room with
1MLS#351395 tile floors & fireplace. $69,900 MLS#356883


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
I Large 2BR/2BA pool home on acre Original garage
converted to living area Detached 2 car garage.
I S84.900 MLS#356908


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL
5 acres in the mini farms. Ok for mobile or
homes. $20,900 MLS356452


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352)302-6714 "'


KL1 CITUS RIDGIE1 RE -I


Amanda & irk Jolnson Tom Balfour UlAenusa& Hi Sterner Art Paty
BROER/ASSOC.EALDO REACTOR ALTOR-BROER REALTOR


746-9000


I~ 0 Sirub sbu~a


1945 W. OLIVER 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 420 WASHINGTON 400 5. WASHINGTON 101 5. BARBOUR ST. 3 CLIFFORD
12/2/2 355628 $74,900 56581 $69,900 2/2/2 $65,000 2/2/2 356626 $62,500 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 2/2/2 355613 $57,900





10013 E. BASS 521 N HARRISO 78 S. LEE 27 S. FILLMORE 15 S. FILLMORE 4506 N. TUMBLEWEED 975 W. CATBRIER LN.
2 357224 $59,900 -*: $54,900 2 356827 $59,000 3/1/1 356531 $53,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 3/2 356299 $44,900 2/1/1 357440 $56,900




AL M' & ji W1 ff, I
6715 S FRANKFURTER 29N. WASHINGTON 16 S. ADAMS 3755 N. ROSCOE 1 EW NORTH CT. 45 S. MELBOURNE P-669 N IPEPERMNT DR
3/15/1 356952 $44,9000 2/1 356448 $39,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 356615 $37,500 1/2 356609 $29,900 354341 $84,900 3/2/2 354938 $149,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


j Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




Of Citrus
I Inc. i.on
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 Facebook
Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


G---
---I--I

WLAk


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 E5







E6 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012




HOMEFRONT
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reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plant spotlight: Beautyberry


utumn in Florida may not have
the vibrant reds, oranges and yel-
lows of "up North," but that does-
n't mean that we have to miss out on fall
color altogether Red maple, sweetgum,
crape myrtle, dogwood, winged sumac
and oakleaf hydrangea all
exhibit fall color, but the
most remarkable fall color y
for this area is the brilliant
purple of beautyberries. B
American beautyberry '"
(Callicarpa americana) is a -
native deciduous shrub that -
produces small lavender
flowers, followed by deep
purple berries that can last Audre
through winter There is also
a cultivated variety ofAmer- F1
ican beautyberry that pro-
duces white berries. The tiny berries
grow in densely packed groups around
the stems and are eaten by more than 40
bird species, including cardinals, wood-
peckers and mockingbirds.
Beautyberry has an open, "sprawl-
ing" growth habit and large leaves. It
grows 4 to 8 feet tall.
Beautyberry grows best in full sun to
partial shade areas, with an acidic to
slightly alkaline soil pH. While beau-
tyberry prefers rich soils, it also grows


I


in poor, sandy soils and can be seen
growing naturally along roadsides and
in other natural areas. Once this plant
is established, it is very drought-toler-
ant and low-maintenance. It has no
pests of major concern, although cater-
pillars may occasionally
Eschew the leaves.
Beautyberry's best feature
is that the leaves can be
crushed and rubbed on the
skin to repel mosquitoes and
some species of ticks. This
common Southern folk rem-
edy dating to the early 1900s
has been given scientific
Durr credence by the USDAAgri-
cultural Research Service.
N Beautyberry contains a com-
pound called callicarpenal,
which rivals chemicals such as DEET
in effectiveness. While the USDA re-
ports no human toxicity associated with
the leaves or berries, it is highly recom-
mended that a small patch of skin be
tested first for an allergic reaction.
Visit the Florida-friendly Learning
Landscape to see our beautyberry, as
well as many other Florida-friendly
plants. You can visit the garden any
day of the week from sunrise to sun-
set; it's behind the Citrus County


UF/IFAS Extension office at 3650 W
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
To learn more about American
beautyberry and more than 370 other
Florida-friendly plants, visit
www.FloridaYards.org. By answering
a few simple questions about your
yard (sun exposure, soil moisture,
etc.), the interactive plant database se-
lects plants that will thrive in your
yard with minimal maintenance.
For more information, call 352-527-
5707 or send an email to Gina.Hamilton
@bocc.citrus.fl.us. For more information
online, visit Citrus County's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District's
website at wwwWaterMatters.org and the
University of Florida's website at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida-friendly
landscaping program is a free public
education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District.Florida-friendly land-
scaping principles can help you create
an attractive yard that saves water,
keeps our water clean and provides
habitat for birds, butterflies and other
wildlife.


'Victorian' can refer to furniture's style, as well as era


Dear John: Enclosed are the
pictures of a Victorian sofa I
would like to sell. It is roughly
81 inches long by 30 inches deep and
29 inches at the top of the back. I pur-
chased it about
10 to 12 years
ago for $1,200
then had it re-
covered in the '
white damask
fabric you see
now. It has been
used sparingly
and the wood
and fabric both John Sikorski
are in excellent SIKORSKI'S
condition. It has
compacted cot- ATTIC
ton as stuffing in
the cushions, and the springs and
frame are in excellent condition. I
would appreciate any information on
the value you can provide. PH.,
Internet
Dear PH.: Technically, the Victo-
rian era ended in 1901 when Queen
Victoria died. Some furniture manu-


facturers in the United States contin-
ued making the styles that were pop-
ular during the last quarter of the
19th century well into the 20th cen-
tury I think your sofa was manufac-
tured after World War I. Currently,
the style is out of fashion and it would
not sell for what you paid for it 10
years ago. It would be better kept
rather than sold.
Dear John: You have helped me a
couple of times in the last couple of
years regarding antiques I bought at
garage and estate sales. I read your
column every week and listen to your
radio program when I can catch it.
Still doing a good job!
My daughter's ex-husband worked
See Page E8
This "Victorian" sofa likely was
manufactured after World War I,
long after the Victorian era techni-
cally ended, although the style re-
mained popular for some
time. Currently, interest in the style
is very soft.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dotted Horse Mint


M onardpunctata is
commonly called
Dotted Horse Mint
or Spotted Bee Balm. Na-
tive to Florida, it
is one of 15
species in the
North American
genus. Monard
species, also
called Berg-
amots, are non-
toxic to people,
fragrant and fla-
vorful. The dried
or fresh leaves Jane
can be brewed JAP
into a pleasant,
refreshing tea. GAR
Red, white or
pink-flowered Oswego Tea,
M. didyma, is popular in
New York and Ontario gar-
dens.
Dried leaves can be in-
cluded in potpourris and sa-
chets. Bunches of stems and
dry leaves tied with ribbon
can be hung in the kitchen
or bathroom as a natural
aromatic herb. Fresh young
leaves can be used in salads


I

I


and as a culinary herb for
dressings in meats, similar
to parsley and sage.
Wild Bergamot, M. fistu-
losa, a 4-foot-tall
perennial in
Zones 4 to 10, has
hybridized natu-
rally with M
didyma, which
grows 3 feet tall,
to produce sev-
eral hybrids. Sev-
eral named
hybrids are avail-
Veber able in more
E'S northern nurs-
eries and should
DEN do well here if
imported. 'Aquar-
ius' has deep purple flowers
with purple-green bracts.
'Cambridge Scarlet' is a vig-
orous perennial up to 3 feet
tall with a citrus smell when
leaves are brushed or
crushed. 'Croftway Pink,' up
to 30 inches tall, has rose-
pink flowers from mid-sum-
mer to fall. Nursery-grown

See Page Ell


Jackie & Bob Davis
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
NLll (352) 634-2371 cell
ERA V bob@bjdavis.com "
Fo a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bdaom
.T a '111 A


HERNANDO CITY HEIGHTS
is a small community conveniently close to our 46-nile Rails-To-Trails and Inverness shopping. Sitting on
two fenced lots, 2 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide has a recently built laundry room(on a slab), leaving the
original laundry as a "bonus" room as an office/ storage. The 23' x 14' Florida room has glass
windows. Reroofed in '01, water filter/softener '06.
I $48,000 MLS 356868


NEED A WINTER RETREAT OR WEEKENDER?
Or if you're a year-rounder, here's an adorable 2 bedroom mobile home with a 19' front porch with glass
windows and a 29' carport that continues around to the rear. A shed, a workshop, a swing in the yard
and all furnished and outfitted. You'll find a small fish pond in the front, one in the backyard and across
the street is a canal and your own unobstructed view of nature at play. Good access to 1-75 and to
downtown, quaint, historic Inverness.
,,,$38,000 MLS 356840


I ?I


I E1 "Always There For You"
RTY GAIL COOPER
mf.i, multimillion Dollar Realtor
E, Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


PERFECT IN-LAW SUITE!
* 4+office/2/3 on .59 acres
* 2880 sq ft of living well for yard
* Newer remodeled kitchen
* Master suite has large sitting room
* Possible in-law suite has living room
* New roof 2011 new AC/heat 2006
#354992 S159.000


3+OFFICE POOL HOME!
* Built in 2008 never occupied
* Corian w/raised panel cabinetry
* Separate office and family room
* Outdoor shower and lighting
* Garden tub separate shower in Master
* Double tray ceiling in living room
#351175 S229.950


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 E7


', gO i


See Virtua Tour @ :w_ ---]e-kI ci e 22 35k252 11


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


kw Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING
i. -. -. ^-


,sjaf 1180 E. TripleCrown Lp. Aake 4 2793 N.FolkstoneLp. 2918W. Beamwood Dr. d 394 N. Indianhead Rd.
MLS #356404 $224,900 MLS #356196 $119,500 S M9 LS #357431 $249d900 D. MJ LSj #357441 $229,900
Spacious 3/3/2.5 homewith heated caged-in pool. Elegant2/2/2+den pool home in immaculate condition. in u p ool lga
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis, tolefton Directions: Rte. 486to Canterbury Lakes Dr., Beautiful 3/2.5/2w/inground pool Elegantly 3/3/2 Sweetwater custom
Hartford, toleftonTripleCrown, to#1180onright to right on Folkstone, to home on corner, and pavers home on 1.30 acres.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238






"ial 5544 N. Crockett Terr. il 580 E. Keller Cl. 1770 W. Shanelle Path
S MLS #356913 $231,000 -4ilu 321 E. Keller Ct. MLS #354108 $199,900 MLS #354810 $164,900
Mitch Underwood expanded Capri model. 3/2.5/2 MLS #353847 $214,900 Elegant pool home on the Charming 2/2/2 on the
pool home on one beautifully landscaped acre. 3/2/2 +den Oaks Golf Course Home. Oaks Golf Course. Brentwood Farms Golf Course
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 John Lombard 352-422-6887





1284 N. Lombardo Ave 4719 N. Saddle Dr. I* M Wa 0it
^5' MLS #354074 $159,000 MLS #356856 $139,900 1510 N. Tor Dr. 9850 E. Pebble Creek Cl.
Value excels in this spacious 3/2/2 3/2/2 pool home w/country feel cana MLS #353649 $58,000 0 ,0 MLS #354468 $71,900
on 1 acre w/nice landscaping. perfect for your horses! 3/2 2000 Skyline home w/split floor plan. Bright 2/2/1 furnished villa.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Tami Mayer352-476-1507 Sandra Olear352-212-4058 Matt Robinson 937-219-6949
(P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
" Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


For a Virtual S STr So Mle hots
Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

for Disney in the 1980s and she
has a lot of Disney cels, litho-
graphs, prints, and a lot of other
stuff. I see you can go online and
consign in states like California
and other states. I was wondering
if you knew of a local place in
Florida where my daughter can
take her stash to sell or consign.
They were bought for her daugh-
ter, who is in college now and
could use the money. Just won-
dering if you could put us in
touch with someone in Florida.
- S.B., Sugarmill Woods
Dear S.B.: Disney items from
the 1980s are low on the totem
pole of collector interest. I am not
aware of any Disney memora-
bilia specialists in central
Florida. I suggest you contact
Just Kid's Nostalgia Auctions.
The website is www.justkidsnos-
talgia.com. Good luck.
Dear John: I was given your
email by a local gallery I have a
painting called "Tornado Trees"
by an artist named Mark Weber. I
am trying to find out its value. If
you could give me any informa-
tion on it, it would be greatly ap-
preciated. -L.H., Internet
Dear LH.: Mark Weber contin-
ues producing beautiful paintings
and prints of his original oil-on-
canvas paintings. His website is
www.markweberartist.com.
Dear John: I have quite a few
newspaper clippings of the as-
sassination of John F Kennedy I
was wondering if they are worth
something and, if so, whom
would I contact. VU., Beverly
Hills
Dear VU.: Newspaper articles
were produced in massive quan-
tities about the assassination of
President John F Kennedy Most
sell for very small amounts of
money If you want to check on
the specific newspapers you own,
contact the N.C.S.A., Newspaper
Collectors Society of America.
The website is www.history
buff.com.

John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala 34478
or asksikorski @aol com.


Lessons in bloom

School use gardens

as teaching toos

k-1 Associated Press

-DALLAS
i gathered d in the large garden
S.* -behind an elementary
school here, a group of
t kindergartners watched as their
4,,1 teacher snipped some basil, let
them smell the leaves, and then
'. did the same with oregano.
"We do a lot of smelling out
.-. there. Looking. Digging," the
teacher, LeaAnne Pillers, said.
She took her class to the garden
two or three times a week after it
opened last spring at Moss Haven
Elementary, and she's excited to
i get her new group out among the
-plants when school starts next
week.
One of their first lessons:
learning the five senses. "We'll be
able to do a lot with'What does it
look like? What does it feel like?'
Some of it we'll even be able to
taste," Pillers said.
Moss Haven's garden is among
S a growing number being planted
in schoolyards across the coun-
try It is part of an American
Heart Association initiative to get
kids to eat healthier. Along with
nutrition, school gardens also
can teach lessons about the envi-
ronment and science, teamwork,
math skills and leadership, pro-
ponents say
Pillers' kindergartners taste-
tested vegetables, measured gar-
den plots and investigated what
foods caterpillars like.
"The main thing that I really
like is citizenship that every-
body is taking responsibility,"
said Ashley Rich, who works with
teachers to develop curriculum
at the school. Over the summer,
she added, families from the
school have been taking turns
,each week caring for the garden.
She welcomes the chance for
hands-on learning, and thinks
students are getting the nutri-
tional message.
"If the children are involved in
growing the vegetables, then they


Associated Press
Elementary students plant vegetables in a garden at Moss Haven Elementary school in Dallas, Texas.


See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



GARDEN
Continued from Page E8

are interested in eating them,"
said Judith Collier-Reid, na-
tional consultant for the Dallas-
based American Heart
Association's Teaching Gardens
program, which has handed
grants to about 160 gardens
since kicking off last year. Its
mission is to help curb the na-
tion's childhood obesity
epidemic.
Cynthia Domenghini of the
Vermont-based National Gar-
dening Association said the
concept for school gardens has
been around a long time her
organization has been helping
to fund them for around 30
years but picked up speed
when first lady Michelle Obama
broke ground on an herb and
vegetable garden at the White


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 E9


House in 2009.
"There's been an increase in
the number of organizations
promoting school gardening,"
said Domenghini. She said her
group doesn't keep a count of
gardens in schools, but that
about 1,300 youth programs in
schools, churches, libraries and
other places have registered
with it.
"Fruit and vegetable gardens
are probably most popular, but
some grow flowers," she said.
"We see all different types of
garden programs."
Todd LoFrese, assistant su-
perintendent for support serv-
ices for Chapel Hill-Carrboro
City Schools in North Carolina,
said there's a gardening com-
ponent at nearly all of their 18
schools, ranging from a small
herb garden to support a culi-
nary program to a high school
with a student-run program
that donates produce to needy


families. A new elementary
school set to open next year has
been designed to include gar-
den plots, he said, and will have
a rainwater collection system
and a green roof with
vegetation.
"It's a good way to get fami-
lies involved and also the com-
munity involved," LoFrese said.
The gardens in his district
are funded in a variety of ways,
including donations, grants and
fundraising from parent
groups.
In the Houston area, the non-
profit Urban Harvest has
helped start more than 100
school gardens, training and
advising those who want to start
them and in some cases provid-
ing a garden educator to give
lessons. The organization aims
to promote nutrition and re-
spect for the environment, said
Carol Burton, its director of
youth gardening education.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

conspicuous area to add scent and
absorb bad smells. Putting them in a
sachet works best, but you can use a
section of nylon pantyhose, too. If you
don't want to use coffee grounds, you
can use baking soda and a few drops
of essential oil instead. Place in a
mason jar and cover the mouth of the
jar with tulle, using the jar ring to
hold it on.
Closets: Hang a cedar block. Use
crumpled newspaper or baking soda
inside shoes, or pour kitty litter into a
spare sock and place it in the shoes.
Put the shoes outside periodically to
air out
Use soap bars: Open up a few cakes
of bath soap and put them in your
drawers to add scent Dryer sheets or
free perfume samples from maga-
zines will work, as well. Both can
help your bathroom smell nice, too.


In your vacuum: If you have a cen-
tral vacuum system, put several
drops of essential oil on a cotton ball
and put it in the vacuum receptacle
to fill a room with essential oil scent.
Trash cans: Sprinkle borax into
your trash can to prevent it from
smelling, or toss a dryer sheet into
the bottom. Speaking of dryer sheets,
put a sheet in a linen closet, a suit-
case when traveling, sneakers, the
trunk of your car, at the bottom of
your clothes hamper, in your vacuum
bag, tucked inside a toilet paper roll
or around the holder, etc., to keep
odors at bay


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com), a
website that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday living.
To send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


Real Estate

Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


S- -Cla ssifieds

".In Print

and

-.; .Online



"The Tine
Al 9W -IZ


Fax .32 0-.566 1 Tol Free -88 45-24 *4 Emil Iafes-hondoln~o II Uest:w w hoilo


Bring your fishing
pole!





INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!


HOMOSASSA
1/1, Adult Park $135.wk
electric included
(352) 621-0601
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
HOMOSASSA
2/1%2, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
New Remodel, 2/1, /2
Acre, Rent to Own Opt.
$525.mo 352-503-7020

II 1w l .11
Lti, i v' I1 I lIst.



CL i N i ,


HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696

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Fo Sae


14x60 Fully Furnished
2BR/2BA MH. Close to
Bike Path. Roof over, car-
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and remodelled kitchen &
baths. Parking for trailer
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$10,000.Oasis MH Park,
Inverness. Lot rent
$205 Call
815 986 4510 or cell
779-221-4781


-oileHoe


2/3 MFG HOME
Remodeled,
on 2.9 AC, paved road, 3
sheds, CHA $63,500
Lease/option,
352-302-4057
DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
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$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


#1 Employment sources

www.chronicleonline.com


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
26X60; 2BR/2BA,
Screened rm, utility rm,
Dbl pane win, 3+ acres,
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carports, 30X84 Pole
Barn, well &septic
(352) 628-0812
Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
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Doublewides from
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Singwides from
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YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
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INVERNESS
3/2, CHA, 3 shedsdock
boat access. Section 8
Welcome. Water serv.
incl'd. 813-244-0627



HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


LoQQkt
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926


Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1 BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090









E10 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-ACION-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www CitrusCountyHomeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S. Tyler (BH) ........................ $550
2/1 Nice house n Beverly Hills wih
goodsized rooms and cozy Florid room
45 W. Kentwood PI. (CS) ............. $1200
3/2/2 Includes pool/lawn service,
newer home available now
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N. Seneca Pt. (CR) ............. S1200
2/2 Waterfront DW mobile in Crystal River
furnished wth great screenedin porch
11640 W. Bayshe (CR) ............ S1300
Island 0ondo, great watervoew, furnished
HOMOSASSA
2306 Smndbrg Pt. (H) .......... $500
2/1 Duplex, close to Homosaess &
Crystal River, W/D HookJp
5865 W. Vike Path (H)............... $725
3/2/1 Cozy home, Ig yard
close to Rock Crusher Elementary
24 E. Cypress Blvd. (H) .................SI 100
3/2/2 RBeauful home wih ae vews
sn Sugarmill Woods COMING OCT0 31 ST
CITRUS HILLS/LECANTO
3441 E. yappel Cr. (HER)............... $600
2/1 Adorable, close to lake and onutesrto Ocala
1274 Cypress Cove C. (INV).......... $S625
2/2 5 Townhouse close to town
and the interstate, community pool

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT, LLC
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/2/2 ..............$650
2/2/1 Townhouse.$700
2/1.5/1..............$650
3/2/1 ...............$700

2/1.5/1..............$750
Lakeview
3/2 .................$650
3/2/1...............$800
Many Extras

2/2mobile Home. $600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
2 Realtor-Associate
3 352-726-9010
















FLORAL CITY

Incds, septic water, trash
1 1n$40 Mo $400 Ses

No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


-I
Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
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MOBILES AVAILABLE


BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644

Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice, clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


QA HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





HERNANDO
Over 2,200 sf, multi-rm
office or Home & office
on Hwy 200, for More
Info Call (352) 344-3444
Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, Car Port FURN.
(352) 613-5655
CRYSTAL RIVER
Furnished 1/1 w/pool.
$775/mo. Very clean,
flex terms, new couch,
flat scrn, ent cntr, bed
& more.Off 19 N of air-
port. Call 813-240-0408.


CITRUS SPRINGS
Like new 2 BR/2 BA,
All Appl, W/D,Tile. $625.
Call: 954-557-6211
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & garbage
incl. No pets, $550mo.
(352) 2204818
INVERNESS
2/1/CP $550 mo. $250
sec. 707 Emory Street
(352) 895-0744 Cell




HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, Clean
$125/wk. $475 sec $600
Moves In.352-206-4913

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
cottages 1 /1, All until.
incl $650. 386-208-2495


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team help
you with your short or
long term rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentalscom
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 & FL. RM.
10 N. Barbour
$550. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 +1/1 Many Extras
$450, (352) 382-3525
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Very cleanquiet
neighborhood, F/lS
(352) 249-7033

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, W/D $750. + sec.
2/1 W/D $600. + sec.
Both Super Clean
352-489-2266, 322-5073

CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO
OWN
This is a real
cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1l/2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493


3/1A2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1, Close to shops
garb & Pest control
incl'd $700. 1st &sec.
(352) 201-7676
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on % Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River &
Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 Villa at
SUGARMILL WOODS
No Pets $700
352 489-0937
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 3/2/2, st & Sec.
$850/mo. Avail. Oct. 1,
352-302-6633
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. CHA,
W/D hk up, front. & back
screen porch, corner
lot w/ privacy fence
$750. 1st., last $250 dep
(352) 419-6957
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$700. (304) 444-9944
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $750. mo
+ util (330) 337-9637




HERNANDO
-II


Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450. (352) 603-0611

-elUstt


ESTATE SALE: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660


HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprings $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497




6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900
2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239
2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884




Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192






HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
2BR/1BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
REDUCED!
2/1/1, with den, Fire-
place, block home,
near Croft, $44,900.
(352) 344-4192




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFMC

REALTY ONE


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE






Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118,000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified I


Hme


06261 W OAKLAWN
HOMOSASSA, FL
2.5 ACRES VACANT
$35,000/BEST OFFER
WILLING TO TRADE.
CALL TODAY!
786-298-7825
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
A2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710


Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529



YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOT,VERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$65,000.CALL
(352)513-5001


---I
C .1trus County
I Homes







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E7

plants are inspected and
should be pest- and dis-
ease-free. Ask for a cer-
tificate if bringing plants
into Florida, or stop at the
agricultural inspection
station just inside the
state line.
Monard species may be
perennial or annual. Lo-
callym M. punctatais a
long-lived perennial that
grows 3 feet tall. It dies
down in winter and
sprouts up to form a
larger colony the next
spring. The fall flowers
are predominantly white-
flecked with purple. As
flowers age, they fade to
pink. Some can appear
creamy-yellowish colored.
Flowers have two lips and
are tubular. Flower sea-


son starts in August in full
sun but a bit later in part
shade. Some parts of a
colony will continue to
flower through to late
September.
The blossoms are a
nectar magnet for bees
and butterflies. Migrating
fall songbirds depend on
the seed for part of their
diet.
This Florida native
ranges from Zone 6 to 10.
Citrus County is in Zone 9.
Other species range north
to Zones 4 and 5. Most will
tolerate Zone 9 cold win-
ters and summers in hot
Zones 10. But combined
with the torrid humidity
in Central Florida, few
northern species can sur-
vive here, so they are not
readily available locally
Plants can be started
from seed sown in the fall.
Once the top growth has
dried, gardeners may dig


and a few times there-
after. It needs no irriga-
tion in winter or after
re-sprouting in spring.
Drought-tolerant Dot-
ted Horse Mint requires
no irrigation, pesticides
or fungicides to prosper in
the garden. It has few
problems with pests or in-
sects. Well-adapted to
local climate and soil con-
ditions, Dotted Horse
Mint is a welcome addi-
tion to the wildflower


Monardpunctata is common
or Spotted Bee Balm. Nativ
are a nectar magnet for bee

up a clump of roots and
relocate them to a desir-
able place in the peren-
nial or wildflower garden.
It will spread into a wide


garden. I've MOO-ved!
0] New Location!
t Jane Weber is a Profes- e I'm Committed to
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle sional Gardener and Con- Serving YOU with a
ly called Dotted Horse Mint sultant. Semi-retired, she HOMETOWN Touch!
'e to Florida, the blossoms grows thousands of na- ---_
s and butterflies. tive plants. Visitors are ___O_
welcome to her Dunnel- Hometown
clump in time, so it does lon, Marion Countygar- Realtv
well as an untended road- den. For an appointment Debra Cleary ReIoAssodote
side or meadow flower, call 352-249-6899 or con- 60s0 w illf to [ai- Hwy. Crystal River, FL
Water the transplant im- tactJWeberl2385 GIL t,1 r, 664 Office: 564-0333
mediately after planting @gmail.com. A 1I.site: debbiecleary.com


REALTY GROUP






DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED 2.5 BATH 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Terra Vista Maintenance Free Villa 3/2 5/2 plus a den Looks like new and is loaded with
MLS 357451 $314,900 MLS 357390 $229,900


4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
2 Office: 352-746-3600

PINE RIDGE
POOL
In-law suite,
A on golf course, 4 bed,
3 bath, 3 car gar.
Loaded!
.. MLS #355285
$324,900

PINE RIDGE
POOL HOME
2.75 private park-like
acres, 3 bed, 2.5 bath,
2 car & detached 2 car
garage w/carport.
MLS 357513


Ter Vit & Brnwo3Rnas
Term*s -3 otso oeSca ebrsi nlddwt l etl


U -


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$7 million already closed by August 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
3 To Learn More 746-924
.U.. (352) 746-9924


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


niunilLMMi.uo DEmU I v vvlrcnrnuivI rtuui numIVc
" .1.1 11 ..., II ...:. 1, .. I ,6l I.j 1. I ~ '. f. 1.ih l. h I.1 ,.. I. I j" ,.:I
[I .Z, jz,,nI 1, .,nIh.I ,ijI,,in I I ffz L,',l1. 1 1h 11;1,r h .]an'f.- ; ,.1 i.
i...] .1 ;.11;.', .... .:..... I..I Ml 5 = 'Q l-l: $220,000
Mi_ 5 = `,./1:. $77,600 Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
Call Ruth Friederick 13525636866 i'wwwi CiitusCountirSold. com


TWO BEDROOM. 2 BATH. 1 CG
IN DESIRABLE ROYAL OAKS
Il .l h l. H.lh l -..) 1 j 1. I i. I. I....) .. ... ... ...

.. I h I .] I I I j.... ....... i n. I
hi: ='.: :44 ASKING $63.900
Pat Di s ,352' 212 7280
-iid.I wiIll ny. .1.1.1 g2/ufl.d?,4 ijom


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

Hl .,j l ,I r 1 i ll. I l ,:l.( h:.l % I .lhl I .: [.I II


Mi= ?.h:?. Al ,,, $165,000
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173 lot a louw.


111 rel l l. e I r I. i mlinlllll
A .:l. :.; .; I Il : H .ill I l ll,| l VV.i1 I ,i.lli
,n.jii]. M .Il I)11
Offered at $1,133,000
Call Ehas G. Knallah at 352 400 2635
lot an Etecutive Summairt


HIGH VISIBILITY FROM
THESE 2 SIDE-BY-SIDE LOTS
ON GULF TO LAKE HWY.
Z.:.i l f 1) i d. i ll, h .,': : ll
..I .. li ]P III: Pai a I .:I l.l .,l, ,,.

Mi =i 345:i. ASKING $100,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173


THIS MAKES HOUSE SENSE
i " w i. li ` I ", FlI l..i ..i ,..il ,,, l
1I.1; .1 1,I I&n , ( N .. HI)A I1', I.) p.ill

Mi_ =-., .' ASKING $113,900
Pat Davis t3521 212 7280
View hsliting: iwi'i:r. c21ptaldais. corn


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!
* ,J .l h .ll ll l l ih. .ll



Mli .= '.561 ONLY $59,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


ESTATE SAYS SELL!



OFFERED AT $47,000
Easy to see call today
Mati Paisons 634 1273
.I . ...I ... I. A I, .. l .. ... ... ... ....


4 1..1 . i .,,:I 4 ,:. l .1 jl,:l .h :
p lh]; j p.I i .ai 1,1 ,1 l t Al FI i

PRICED TO SELL .' $269,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


* FHAhK klVlhhkF IJNl U111IFI
* I a . I I,",I I I n..
* Ii. ill ,: l li- 1 i i j I
* *I,* i* I L'l' h h l,
Mi = ,57 ) $395,000
Jeanne 8 Willaid Pickiel 2123410
iww'. CiltusCounti Sold. corn


HERNANDO
Sb........-.. ]: b,] ,r m fiq ..s . fi' 1 h...-...
VV(iVV Il..ubl. ..1. .J...... I II ..v .1...f l Ha.I

W..... .. Ir. '.i l ....J. I. ,..1 i I I U]11 .

Ml -, = ...(.' $249,000
Davrd Kiulz Cell 954 383 8786
Olice 352 726 6668


Mti = ;, ',., $59,000
Call Teiti R. Blanco 352 419 9252


LAKE FRONT HOME
ON TSALSA APOPKA
t l.,, I,1,.i h. .co ..l.i .I ..- h....- ,..ql .i i
I..l. ; I l,:... lA i l I ..h,, ..).i H6.6...I

..'. ;(lI; H I.. C. I' .: j. .II.,: I.).. .. if

Ml. = '.14'. $159,900
NIancj Jenks i3521400 8072


E12 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2012