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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02882
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 09-08-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02882

Full Text


Pirate power: CR hosts Williston on gridiron /B1


I I I I


Partly cloudy with a
40 percent chance of
thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


CITRUS COUNTY





wRONICLE.
R Owww.chronicleonline.com ,


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 118 ISSUE 32


DNC


EDC ANNUAL AWARDS


Ranay
Bratton
is accused
of burning
4-year-old boy
with a lighted
cigarette.

Local

faces

child

abuse

charges

Man accused
of burning
4-year-old boy
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
A 28-year-old Bev-
erly Hills man was ar-
rested Friday on four
counts of aggravated
child abuse, accord-
ing to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Of-
fice. The alleged vic-
tim is a 4-year-old boy
Randy James Brat-
ton is accused of re-
straining the boy's left
arm and burning him
with a lighted ciga-
rette causing a crater
wound. Bratton also
is accused of burning
the child on three
separate occasions on
both feet and his
elbow.
The boy claimed
Bratton hit him and
investigators saw
bruises under the
child's right eye and
on his hips and
thighs.
Bratton reportedly
admitted to restrain-
ing the child's arm
and burning it with
the cigarette. He
claimed he did it be-
cause the child would
not stop running near
his lighted cigarette.
But he denied burn-
ing the child on other
occasions.
Bratton said the
bruising could have
been caused by him
forcefully grabbing
the child and placing
him in his bedroom.
He also said it was
possible he struck the
child in the eye, but
he doesn't recall.
The child's mother
was reportedly con-
frontational with in-
vestigators and
denied any abuse.
Bratton was ar-
rested and trans-
ported to the Citrus
County Detention fa-
cility Bond was set at
$40,000.

RELIGION:
New minister
The Rev. Ray Kelley is
the man at the pulpit
at First Christian
Church of Inverness./


Com ics .........C7
Community . . .C5
Crossword . . . .C6
Editorial . . . .A8
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope . . .B6
Lottery Numbers ..B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . .C7
Obituaries . . . .A5
Classifieds . . .C8
TV Listings . . .C6


III6 ll| l III 4 2002


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Daniel Williamson works on removing the engine from a pick-up truck Thursday morning at the LKQ
facility in Crystal River. On Friday, the business was named as Employer of the Year by the Citrus County
Economic Development Council.




BE_ TIN TIHE


EDC honors

industries
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO Chad Damron
pushed back tears as he ac-
cepted the Outstanding Em-
ployer Award on behalf of LKQ
Corp.
"I'll keep it short before I
start getting chocked up," he
said as his voice trembled.
"Thank you."
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce president and CEO
Josh Wooten, who presented
the award, said LKQ is near and
dear to many in the community,
and presenting the award held
even greater significance since
the passing of local business-
man Lenny Damron in August.
In 1979, Lenny Damron
opened Damron's Auto Parts
Inc. on County Road 486 near
Crystal River. In time, he ex-
panded the company to other
locations, such as Gainesville,
Melbourne and Atlanta, Ga.
In 1998, Lenny Damron,


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
ABOVE: The Citrus County Economic Development Council held its
annual Industry Appreciation Luncheon on Friday at College of
Central Florida. The Outstanding Small Business Award was
presented to Ferris Farms. Pictured, from left, are: EDC president
and county commissioner Joe Meek, Ferris Groves manager Dudley
Calfee, EDC executive director John Siefert and Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce chief executive officer Josh Wooten.
BELOW: Citrus County Chronicle Publisher Gerry Mulligan was
named Person of the Year during the Industry Appreciation event
Friday. Pictured, from left, are: Meek, Mulligan, Siefert and Wooten.


along with sons Chad and
Casey, sold the auto salvage
business to Illinois-based LKQ
Corp. Lenny Damron served as
senior vice president, manag-


ing LKQ's self-service and
heavy-duty truck divisions until
his recent death.
See Page A2

AWARD RECIPIENTS
* Outstanding Employer Award
LKQ Inc.
* Outstanding Small Business
Award Ferris Farms
* Person of the Yearo- Gerry
Mulligan, Citrus County
Chronicle publisher
* EDC Appreciation Awards -
Diane Toto with We Care
Food Pantry, Curtis Peters
with Holcim Inc. and Ardath
Prendergast with the EDC.


amazes


Citrus


pair

Convention

'electrifying'for

Gudis, Davis
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
Mike Gudis and Samuel
Davis had just a dandy time
in Charlotte, N.C., this
week. And they hope the
party carries on through the
Nov 6 election.
Gudis, the Citrus County
Democratic
state com-
mitteeman,
and Davisng the attended the
Woods resi-c DNC as the
dent, were at
among 300
Florida del-
egates at- Mike Gudis
tending the attended the
Democratic DNC as the
National Citrus County
Convention. Democratic
state
T h e y committeeman.
nominated
Barack Obama to a second
term as president and
cheered with thousands of
others to hear Michelle
Obama, former President
Bill Clinton and the presi-
dent himself.
"It was electrifying,"
Gudis, a Crystal River city
councilman, said Friday
during a phone interview as
the pair traveled home.
Davis, attending his first
national convention at age
82, agreed.
"The excitement was
magnificent," he said. "I
rate it an A-plus. I'd like to
go back again."
The Florida delegation
was situated a few rows
above the main floor. Each
day convention activities
began in the early evening
and continued with final
speakers wrapping up well
past 11 p.m.
'"As somebody who doesn't
like to sit still for six hours, I
was pinned to my chair,"
Gudis said. "The speeches
were outstanding."
Both were floored by
Clinton's speech Wednes-
day night, one many TV
commentators said up-
staged the president's ac-
ceptance speech.
Gudis attended the 1996
convention in Chicago
when Clinton was nomi-
nated for a second term.
"I don't think I ever saw
Bill Clinton any better than
he was at this convention,"
he said. "Clinton was more
dynamic than the president"
Davis said Clinton identi-
fied with Americans.
"He laid the foundation
for the common person to
understand," he said.
Both also were impressed
by Obama, saying the presi-
dent mixed details of first-
term successes with plans
for a second term.
See Page A2


Dentist delivers free services


Dental Day makes dent

in Citrus County need
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Sam, a young man
from Dunnellon, arrived at the dentist's of-
fice prepared.
At 3:30 a.m., he set up his lawn chair out-
side the office door and opened his cooler
filled with bottled water, sandwiches and
sunflower seeds, ready for a long wait -


and he wasn't even the first person to arrive
at the annual free dental care day, given by
Crystal River dentist Dr. John Hosner.
"I am extremely thankful for this," Sam
said at 7:30 a.m. still an hour and a half be-
fore the office opened for the day "I don't re-
member the last time I saw a dentist, maybe
when I was 13. I've got a lot of cavities."
See .Page A4
Dr. John Hosner, right, and dental assistant
Lisa Lofley work on a patient Friday during
dental care day, in which he provides free
services to patients in need.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
75


Ap11





A2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


BEST
Continued from Page Al

In a phone interview
Wednesday, Chad Damron,
the southeast region vice
president of LKQ, credited
the business' humble begin-
nings and continuous com-
munity support for the
company's success.
"We wouldn't be where we
are without that start," he
said. "It's an important part
of our history"
LKQ was one of a number
of award recipients Friday
during the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council's annual Industry
Appreciation Awards
Luncheon at the College of
Central Florida.
Instead of the traditional
plaque, each recipient re-
ceived a print of a Don Mayo
painting and a bottle of wine
from Copp Winery
EDC president and
county commissioner Joe
Meek kicked off the event by
welcoming everyone. He
said the luncheon was an
occasion to offer thanks to
the businesspeople in Cit-
rus County and recognize
their hard work.
Despite economic diffi-
culties, Meek said tomorrow
will be a better day With
companies such as Sibex,
TCG and the recent expan-
sion of Crystal Chevrolet in
Homosassa, Meek noted
things are slowly but surely
improving.
"So the future is bright in
Citrus County," he said.
Looking forward, Meek



DNC
Continued from Page Al

"We still have a long way
to go for this economy to
come back and he was very
well aware of this fact,"
Gudis said. "He was very
truthful."
The challenge of any con-
vention is to continue that
enthusiasm through Elec-
tion Day
"If we can do that," Gudis
said, "Obama is over the
top."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Jerry Ross was the guest speaker at the Industry Appreciation Luncheon. Ross talked about
strategies small businesses should take to bolster success.


said the county, EDC and
chamber of commerce will
continue to be dedicated to
success and that success lies
within the small business
community.
"Thank you for the hard
work and dedication you
give to Citrus County," he
said.
Guest speaker Jerry Ross,
executive director of the
National Entrepreneur
Center in Orlando, spoke
about what people can do
today to refresh their busi-
ness in spite of the poor
economy.
Ross said many people
want to know what hap-
pened to the economy With
all the talk of recession,
bailouts and wars, Ross ex-
plained many businesses
felt fear and uncertainty. He


said companies started to
slow down and decided to
pause. However, since small
businesses make up a ma-
jority of the new net jobs,
the circumstance has con-
tributed to the economic
stagnation.
Therefore, Ross encour-
aged business owners to do
things, starting today, such
as cutting expenses, reduc-
ing overhead, adding value
to their company, recon-
necting with clients and
spending their dollars lo-
cally
"It's just the little things,"
he said.
Ross also said owners
should re-light the fire they
once had for their business.
"We need to get it back,
because that's what made us
entrepreneurs," he said.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and
be prepared to give your name, phone number, and
the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-
5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be prepared
to leave a detailed message.


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Above all, Ross said, busi-
ness owners have to keep
their focus, embrace new
technology and continue to
move forward without look-
ing back.
"We've had tough times
before. We've had recession
before. Everything's OK," he
said. "We're the answer.
You're the answer."
Other award recipients


av.zm nnmTra-


included:
Wooten pre-
sented Ferris Farms
in Floral City with
the Outstanding
Small Business
Award. Dudley
Calfee, manager of
Ferris Farms, ac- Joe
cepted the award.
"There's no way to as thp
recover from a sur- welcoi
prise like this... I ac- those a
cept this award on the a,
behalf of Floral City lunch
and the employees
at Ferris Farms," Dudley
said.
Gerry Mulligan, pub-
lisher of the Citrus County
Chronicle, was named
Person of the Year.
"Gerry is synonymous
with Citrus County," Wooten
stated.
Besides being known for
his job at the Chronicle,
Wooten noted Mulligan's in-
volvement in local eco-
nomic development and
several county nonprofits,
including the United Way
and YMCA.
"He's a man who has been
there for the county since
the 1970s," he said. "I can't
think of a county without
him."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Meek said Mulli-
gan is someone who
is always quick to
praise others and
works hard every
day to make Citrus
County a better
place.
WMeek "He loves this
EDC county," he said.
dent Mulligan, after
ned all cracking a few
tending jokes, thanked the
wards chamber and EDC
ieon. for the honor and
recognized his
workforce for the newspa-
per's success.
"In all seriousness, I ap-
preciate it. I have a very
good newspaper staff that
works with me," he said.
Acknowledging the power
of the press, Mulligan said
he feels recognizing positive
things in the community is
essential. He also expressed
appreciation for seeing so
many supporters of the
paper, and him personally,
in the room.
In addition, Diane Toto
with We Care Food Pantry,
Curtis Peters with Holcim
Inc. and Ardath Prender-
gast with the EDC were
given EDC Appreciation
Awards.


I


e

t
h


1







Page A3 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Response team
meeting on Sept. 12
The regular monthly meet-
ing of the Community Emer-
gency Response Team
(C.E.R.T.) for the Northeast
Quadrant will be at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 12, at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.
There will be a practice
ham radio network at the end
of the meeting to demon-
strate C.E.R.T. communica-
tion capabilities in case of
mobilization. The following
evening, Thursday, Sept. 13,
will be the first "Radio Net" for
the northeast quadrant.
For information, call Gerry
Brummer at 352-382-4446,
or on the web at www.citrus
countycert.org.
Citrus County Council
schedules gathering
The Citrus County Council
will meet at 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, Sept. 12, at the Beverly
Hills Lions Club Building, 72
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
For information, call
Theresa Waldron at 352-746-
5984, or email freedomwayl
@gmail.com.
Citrus 20/20 board
to convene Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at
5:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10,
in Room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are asked to
attend. All interested persons
are welcome.
For information, go to
www.citrus2020.org, or call
352-201-0149.
CF foundation
committee to meet
The College of Central
Florida Foundation Executive
Committee will meet at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
12, at the Enterprise Center
on the Ocala campus.
The Foundation Board of
Directors meeting will be at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
19, at the Founders Hall
boardroom at the Ocala
campus.
The meetings are open to
the public. Copies of the
agenda will be available at
each meeting.

Tallahassee
Search continues for
education commish
The Florida Board of Edu-
cation is moving forward in its
search for the state's next ed-
ucation commissioner.
The board approved a list
of qualifications it is looking
for in potential candidates at
its meeting Friday. Those in-
cluded strong executive lead-
ership skills, experience
leading a large organization
and ability to implement a
plan to provide all students a
world-class education.
So far the state has re-
ceived only a handful of ap-
plications, but a search
agency has identified more
than 20 candidates.
Commissioner Gerard
Robinson resigned in July
after just a year on the job.
State seeking aid due
to oyster decline
Gov. Rick Scott is seeking
federal disaster assistance
due to the failure of Florida's
oyster fishery.
Scott sent a letter Thurs-
day to the U.S. Department
of Commerce requesting the
declaration of a fishery re-
source disaster for Gulf of
Mexico harvesting areas.
Most of Florida's oysters
are taken from Apalachicola
Bay in the Panhandle. The
fishery failure could affect
2,500 jobs in Franklin


County.
Officials suspect drought is
a contributing factor. It's re-
duced freshwater flowing into
the bay from Georgia and Al-
abama through the
Apalachicola River.
-From staff and wire reports


Unions want pension change struck down


State Supreme

Court tackles issue

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A high-stakes
billion-dollar battle over public em-
ployee pensions was waged before
the Florida Supreme Court on
Friday
A group of unions led by the
state's teachers union want the


high court to strike down a new law
that is forcing employees to pay 3
percent of their salaries for part of
their retirement costs.
But during the hourlong hearing,
justices appeared to be skeptical to
arguments that the 2011 requirement
violated collective bargaining and
contract rights for the roughly 600,000
state workers, teachers, firefighters
and sheriff's deputies who are now
contributing to their pension.
A decision by the Supreme
Court could still be months away,
but the end result either will be a


vindication for Gov. Rick Scott
and the GOP-controlled Legisla-
ture, or it will create a nearly $2
billion budget gap for state and
local governments.
Lawmakers made the change to
plug a previous budget shortfall.
While that fact is not central to the
lawsuit, it appeared to weigh
on justices.
"Why would the Legislature bind
itself forever no matter what the
budget crisis is?" Justice Barbara
Pariente said at one point
Ron Meyer, the lawyer represent-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Fire Rescue Chief Larry Morabito is served breakfast Friday morning by a Life Care Center staff
member during the First Responder Breakfast.




Saying thanks


Breakfast honors

first responders
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
LECANTO Deputy Brian
Coleman sauntered into the Life
Care Center of Citrus County to say
hello to residents of the facility and
eat a quick tribute and apprecia-
tion breakfast.
Also seated in the nursing cen-
ter's Courtyard Cafe dining area
were SheriffJeff Dawsy, Fire Chief
Larry Morabito and several first re-
sponders. They were chowing
down on a breakfast of bacon, eggs
and fruit.
Center Activities Director


Melissa Dickinson said it is a me-
morial tribute to the first respon-
ders who perished in the terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and a
"thank you" to local responders.
"We just want to show them that
we appreciate them and that they
are our heroes," Dickinson said.
This is the third annual 9/11
breakfast at the facility, located at
3325 W Jerwayne Lane, Dickinson
said
Coleman, who is in the Coast
Guard reserves, said he vividly re-
calls the aftermath of the events of
that fateful day in 2001.
"I was with the Coast Guard in
the area the day after, heading up
to Boston and you could still see
the smoke rising from the fires. It
is definitely a day we better never
forget," Coleman said.


He said it is really nice and ap-
preciated that the facility was feed-
ing first responders to
commemorate the loss of their
brethren.
It was Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Capt. Doug Dodd's first time at
the breakfast.
"It's a nice breakfast and the
food is very good. It is also nice that
they are showing us they appreci-
ate what we do," Dodd said.
Dickinson said it is a labor of
love for the facility's staff, and
plans are to continue the tradition
on an annual basis.
"They are the real heroes," she
said, "and they sacrifice so much to
protect us."
Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Deputies honored for RNC work


Sherts office

sent 48 people

to convention
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
LECANTO Citrus
County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
on Friday congratulated a
packed room of officers who
were part of the security
gauntlet at last week's Re-
publican National Conven-
tion in Tampa.
"You did us proud," he
said.
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office sent a 48-person
contingent to the event, in-
cluding a marine protection
unit.
Dawsy quipped about
everything from the some-
what spartan lodging situa-
tion and the daily intake of
sandwiches, but said in the
end he hoped every partic-
ipant relished his or her
experiences.
He thanked his officers
for their professionalism in
the face of sometimes
rowdy protesters.
Dawsy also presented the
officers with badges embla-
zoned with the seal of the
state and Tampa 2012.


At first it
was the
unknown that
kept you kind of
anxious ...
Thomas Beagan
sheriff's office deputy.

In scattered moments of
levity and flashbacks, offi-
cers were shown a montage
of photos and videos of the
sights and sounds of their
nine-day stay at the conven-
tion, which saw Mitt Rom-
ney and Paul Ryan
officially selected as the
GOP ticket for November's
presidential election.
In some of the video
footage, protesters were
seen taunting the officers,
but the reaction was muted
and non-confrontational.
Detective Bobby Lambert
and Deputy Thomas Bea-
gan were part of the team to
Tampa.
"At first it was the un-
known that kept you kind of
anxious, because you didn't
know what was going to hap-
pen, but we're a team and it
all worked out in the end. I
would say it was a good ex-
perience," Beagan said.
He was quick to add he


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's deputies who helped keep the peace
at the Republican National Convention gathered Friday with
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy for a reception.


would definitely reprise his
role at any future mega
event
Lambert said he was
awed by the sheer number
of law enforcement officers
at the event.
"There were like 4,000. I
don't know the exact num-
ber, but there were a lot,"
he said.
Lambert, too, was im-
pressed by the patient
professionalism. He heaped
praise on the team's ground
force commander, Sgt.


Brad Smith, for keeping
things tight.
Smith said this was per-
haps the largest event the
agency had ever partici-
pated in.
He said his team was a
frontline group, but were
"extremely professional."
Smith said it was a testa-
ment to the great plans the
agency formulated and the
team executed while in
Tampa.
"Overall, it was a positive
experience," he said.


the Florida Education Associa-
and other unions, contended
Legislature can force newly-
ed public employees to pay for
r pension, but it has no right to
s the mandate to those already
[he job.
You can't change the game in the
dle of the game," Meyer said.
lorida was once one of only a
dful of states that did not re-
re public employees to pay part
heir pension costs. During his
apaign for governor, Scott vowed
nd the practice.



Botched


burglary


leads to


arrests

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
A self-described pain pill
addict was arrested Thurs-
day and charged with break-
ing into a home and biting
the homeowner in a bid to
escape, according to the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office.
Cassandra Laudicina, 25,
S. Fillmore Street, Beverly
Hills, was charged with
criminal mischief and bur-
glary with battery Her bond
is $25,250.
Esmel Joel Maldonado
Fournier, 22, also of Beverly
Hills, who was a passenger in
Laudicina's car, is accused of
jumping out of the vehicle
and slashing a tire of the al-
leged victim's car
According to the arrest
report, deputies were re-
sponding to an address in
Hernando for a burglary
in progress. While
deputies were en route,
Laudicina called authori-
ties to say she was bat-
tered and a Taser was
used on her at the same
Hernando address of the
alleged burglary.
Investigators went to see
Laudicina, who had re-
turned to her home. She re-
portedly told investigators
the alleged victim lured her
to his address with a prom-
ise of returning medication
he had stolen from her.
She said as soon as she ar-
rived, the man grabbed her
by the neck and used the
Taser on her Other people in
the home also jumped her,
she said.
She said she thought the
man stole some detoxifica-
tion patches from her and
she needed them back.
The female deputy looked
over Laudicina's torso and
could not find any marks con-
sistent with a Taser or physi-
cal attack of any kind. Instead
the deputy noticed the skinny
build of Laudicina and nee-
dle marks on her arms. She
reportedly admitted to the
deputy she was a pain pill ad-
dict and would shoot up
methamphetamine and
roxycodone.
However, when investiga-
tors spoke to the alleged vic-
tim, he told them Laudicina
came crawling through the
back window of his resi-
dence after cutting the
screen with a knife.
He said Laudicina was
grabbed and held down
while awaiting the deputies.
Laudicina reportedly bit the
victim on the forearm and
took off.
The victim chased her, but
as she came outside,
Fournier jumped out of
Laudicina's vehicle and
stuck a knife into one of the
man's vehicle tires.
Laudicina reportedly ad-
mitted to biting the alleged
victim. Though Fournier de-
nied slashing a tire, a knife
was found in his pocket.
Both Laudicina and
Fournier were arrested and
transported to the Citrus
County Detention facility
Laudicina also was charged
with trying to smuggle a
controlled substance into


the jail. The bond on that
charge was $2,000.
Fournier's charge is crim-
inal mischief. His bond was
$250.






A4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


State BRIEFS


Prison health
privatization could
take effect Jan. 1
After months of legal battles,
a state budget panel next week
could clear the way for the De-
partment of Corrections to con-
tract with two companies to
provide health services in
Florida's prisons. The Legisla-
tive Budget Commission on
Wednesday will consider a de-
partment request to transfer
money within the budget so the
privatization can occur.
The department plans to
contract with Wexford Health
Sources to provide health serv-
ices at prisons in South Florida,
and with Corizon to do the work
in the rest of the state. Informa-
tion included in the LBC's
agenda indicates the privatiza-
tion would take effect Jan. 1.
Lawmakers directed the de-
partment last year to privatize
inmate health care. But a legal
challenge by the Florida Nurses
Association and the American
Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees tied
up the issue.
The challenge centered on a
legislative decision to include
the change in budget fine print,
known as "proviso" language,
instead of approving it in a reg-
ular bill. A Leon County circuit
judge did not rule on the chal-
lenge because the proviso lan-
guage expired with the June 30
end of the 2011-12 fiscal year.
Fiscal outlook for
next year shows no
shortfall
The Legislative Budget Com-
mission will get a dose of good
news when it meets Wednes-
day: A draft financial outlook
shows the state likely will not
face a budget shortfall for the
2013-14 fiscal year.


Analysts each year provide a
long-term outlook to the LBC,
showing estimated revenues
and anticipated levels of spend-
ing. Lawmakers have repeat-
edly grappled with shortfalls
during the past few years, but
the new outlook shows no
budget gap for the fiscal year
that starts July 1,2013.
"Fiscal strategies will not be
required; the budget is in bal-
ance as constitutionally re-
quired and is growing more
slowly than available rev-
enues," the draft said.
Feds: State
warehousing dis.
abled kids in homes
The state is violating the fed-
eral Americans with Disabilities
Act by parking children with dis-
abilities in nursing homes for
years, according to a letter the
U.S. Department of Justice sent
to Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi this week.
DOJ investigated the cases
of 200 medically fragile children
in facilities in Miami, Fort Laud-
erdale, Orlando, Tampa and St.
Petersburg, concluding the chil-
dren are kept in the homes un-
necessarily, often far from their
loved ones while the state pays
more than $500 a day per child.
That's more than double the
rate the state pays for seniors.
DOJ alleged the state is iso-
lating the children in facilities
where the average length of
stay is three years, and educa-
tional opportunities are limited
to as little as 45 minutes a day.
Perez wrote the children have
few interactions with their fami-
lies, friends and peers, and are
frequently deprived of activities
"critical to child development."
Investigators found many of the
children would benefit from liv-
ing with their families or in other
community settings.


Citizens insurance
approves loan
program
Citizens Property Insurance
Corp. will provide $350 million in
low-interest loans to companies
willing to take policies out of the
state-backed insurer that now
covers more than 1.4 million poli-
cies, the insurer's board agreed
Friday after lengthy debate.
The plan would reduce the
ranks of Citizens by up to
350,000 policies by offering insur-
ers 20-year loans if they agree to
hold the Citizens policies for 10
years. Citizens President and
CEO Barry Gilway said the move
would save the company billions
of dollars in potential losses and
more than $240 million a year in
reinsurance costs.
Most of the loans, about $300
million, will go to insurers willing to
take policies from the non-coastal
residential accounts, the fastest
growing sector of Citizens busi-
ness. The remaining $50 million
could be tapped by companies
willing to take coastal properties
out of the state-backed pool.
The News Service of Florida


DENTIST
Continued from Page Al

As the line of people snaked around the
building about 40 people who had been
there since before dawn Robert, the first
to arrive just before Sam, sat on a planter
"It's been a while since I've gone to the
dentist," he said. "I've got a shattered wis-
dom tooth there's a hole all the way to
the root. I hope they can do something, but
I know it's too far gone to fill."
Robert, an unemployed machine opera-
tor/forklift driver, said even for those who
are employed, often the health insurance
plans offered don't cover dental care, or if
they do it's limited and dental care is
expensive. For many, it becomes a luxury
"I don't know what needs to happen to
change things," he said.
This is the fourth year Hosner has of-
fered this day of free service, limited to
fillings and extractions and emergency
services.
Beginning around 8 a.m., volunteers
from the Crystal River Lions Club signed
each person in and gave them a number.
In all, 56 people registered.
"There were more here than last year,"
Hosner said as he worked on a patient "I
think the economy has something to do
with that. Also, I'm doing a lot more oral
surgery this year."
At 11 a.m., Hosner said he had worked
on only one person who needed cavities


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



-" Fictitious Name Notices.........................C16


M meeting Notices .......................................016




Lien Notices..............................................C16



Notice to Creditors/Administration.......C16


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
i..I j ill-
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc

ts
PC
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch,


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
PC


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
90 77 0.90 87 73 0.20

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excsive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING


thunderstorms.
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
?-w High: 88 Low: 74
II, cloudy; 80% chance of showers and
,\ m thunderstorms.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 70
Partly cloudy; 30% chance of a ing.riri
-N*ow'li . thunderstorms.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 86/70
Record 96/64
Normal 91/70
Mean temp. 78
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.60 in.
Total for the month 1.50 in.
Total for the year 51.17 in.
Normal for the year 40.40 in.
'As of 7 p.n at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 68%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grass
Today's count: 5.1/12
Sunday's count: 6.7
Monday's count: 6.9
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
Ur1Pirillir, (AFTERNOON)
9/8 SATURDAY 6:09 12:21 6:33
9/9 SUNDAY 12:44 6:56 1:09 7:21
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 7:43 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW......... .7:12 AM.
4 0 CO O MOONRISE TODAY............... 12:13 AM.
SEPT.8 SfPt1 SEPT.22 SIfT.20f MOONSET TODAY ............ .... .2:18 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division F.. -, -) 754-6777. For more
information on drought cord'ti-nf p''e ,,: '. : Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.f-dof.com/fire-,. ,.r ,i.,
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Tiriur:.a.. ard .:.r Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wed. sdi and/or Saturday.
- ar ,3- n r :rr a shut-off nozzle or -r,, : ir:.qa'.:.r ,of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 10:36 a/6:19a -- /7:55 p
Crystal River" 8:57 a/3:41 a 11:11 p/5:17 p
Withlacoochee* 6:44 a/1:29 a 8:58 p/3:05 p
Homosassa* 9:46 a/5:18 a /6:54 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
12:50 a/7:21 a 11:46 a/9:17 p
10:07 a/4:43 a /6:39 p
7:54 a/2:31 a 10:27 p/4:27 p
12:00 a/6:20 a 10:56 a/8:16 p


Southwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters ,'.ill have a moderate chop
becoming choppy in exposed areas in
the afternoon. Partly clouijd, with scat-
tered thunderstorms today.


Gulf water
temperature


84
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.15 33.20 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.67 38.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.56 39.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.39 41.41 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
anniua flood which has a 43-precen chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District oF the United Slates Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION



W o *
/{a 6.s0s .* MW
0s ,

S90a I ,
-e ~ lou 1E 3 PBaiw If 1A4


30s
. Anhsosr gc


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston. SC
Charleston. WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


86 65
93 70
85 63
85 72
85 65
10271
88 68
78 46
91 71
88 55
82 68
83 64
83 60
91 73
91 67
89 70
78 64
89 64
83 64
93 74
89 69
86 60
10479
71 55
74 64
81 60
95 73
91 67
89 68
86 67
96 76
83 69
93 75
99 83
97 73
77 68
90 71
96 73
77 57
72 59
90 72
92 73
92 68


ts
pc
ts
01 ts
ts
PC
ts
s
ts
s
43 pc
sh
ts
94 ts
ts
ts
06 pc
pc
03 sh
ts
sh
pc
pc
s
pc
w
pc
ts
ts
ts
.02 pc
ts
pc
s
pc
PC
s
.19 pc
ts
ts
Is


83 57
80 60
77 56
82 61
84 67
89 64
86 58
85 54
81 60
86 56
80 65
72 53
81 58
89 70
75 56
87 61
71 58
73 51
69 59
91 65
72 52
83 60
85 61
78 53
75 51
69 57
80 63
75 52
82 56
83 61
91 64
71 52
84 58
102 81
82 56
82 68
75 55
79 56
69 56
76 49
89 64
85 61
78 57


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


aL
^ "^


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 91 79 ts 89 69
New York City 87 71 ts 88 64
Norfolk 83 69 ts 88 67
Oklahoma City 10573 s 82 52
Omaha 78 62 s 78 52
Palm Springs 10581 ts 106 84
Philadelphia 88 71 ts 86 62
Phoenix 85 72 51 ts 102 83
Pittsburgh 84 65 sh 69 52
Portland. ME 82 60 pc 78 64
Portland. Ore 95 57 s 87 57
Providence, R.I 84 68 pc 82 65
Raleigh 85 72 ts 90 65
Rapid City 75 49 s 80 57
Reno 89 59 pc 94 60
Rochester. NY 83 60 ts 75 53
Sacramento 88 57 pe 92 56
St. Louis 93 67 25 pc 73 56
St. Ste. Marie 64 57 06 sh 62 50
Salt Lake City 83 59 s 87 62
San Antonio 99 73 pc 91 66
San Diego 81 72 pc 79 70
San Francisco 68 54 s 67 55
Savannah 91 74 ts 89 72
Seattle 90 56 s 81 55
Spokane 81 51 s 87 56
Syracuse 86 62 ts 79 55
Topeka 84 64 .16 s 78 53
Washington 89 72 ts 87 59
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Wichita Falls. Texas
LOW 23 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 72/53/pcf
Athens 87/69/s
Beijing 81/61/pc
Berlin 69/54/c
Bermuda 85/79/ts
Cairo 91/73/s
Calgary 80/57/s
Havana 90/71/ts
Hong Kong 85/81/ts
Jerusalem 88/66/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


80/66/pc
79/50/s
92/65/s
77/56/ts
81/56/ts
57/48/sh
83/54/s
88/68/pc
85/65/s
67/49/s
87/75/ts
71/51/r
63/47/pc


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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filled. The rest had abscessed teeth that
needed extracting.
"Last year, we did very few extractions,
mostly fillings, and the year before, too,"
he said.
He said last year they had to turn away
several people who required pre-medica-
tion and did not take the needed medica-
tion. This year they had to turn away
someone with a fully impacted wisdom
tooth that would've taken an hour or two
of oral surgery
That's the hard part of what he does
each year, but he goes into it knowing
whatever help he can offer is only a "drop
in the bucket."
Still, the mood was upbeat as Hosner,
his dental assistant of 18 years, Lisa Lofley,
and former assistant Sheila Copen did
what they could. They were averaging be-
tween 20 and 30 minutes per patient.
The value of their time and supplies is
an estimated $20,000 each year.
"We'll see our last patient at4 (p.m.) today,"
Hosner said. "We'll see as many as we can."
Copen drives all the way from Clermont
each year to volunteer her time.
"There are so many people in need," she
said.
Lions Club volunteer Vera Frederick
said it would be great if more dentists
would offer free care.
"We need more 'Good Samaritans' like
this," she said.
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can
be reached at nkennedy@chronicleon-
line. corn or 352-564-2927.


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Voter drives adopting new methods


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Some
organizations are turning to
sophisticated data mining,
direct mail, the Internet
and other strategies to reg-
ister voters typically under-
represented on the rolls,
including young people and
ethnic minorities. Others
are simply targeting those
who favor their political
goals, such as conservative
Christians.
The shift away from more
traditional voter registra-
tion drives such as vol-
unteers with clipboards in
front of a supermarket is
driven as much by restric-
tive state laws as it is better
technology Several states
including Florida have re-
cently passed legislation
setting tight deadlines for
groups to turn in voter ap-
plications, so groups like
the NAACP were looking
for ways to get the applica-
tions directly into the hands
of voters. And they have to
rely on voters to turn in the
applications themselves.
"This is a new effort since
the 2000 election," said Uni-
versity of Florida political
scientist Daniel Smith.
"Technology has made it
more cost-effective.... When
you have upwards of 40 per-
cent of eligible populations
not registered, there is a
market for this kind of
work."
Florida is a particularly
important area for the
groups, as it is the largest
swing state in the presiden-
tial election. Other battle-
ground states on the
center's list include Col-
orado, North Carolina, Ohio
and Virginia.
The increased focus on
direct mail and data mining
comes as the campaigns
themselves increasingly
use online data to raise
money and persuade vot-
ers. The campaigns of both
Mitt Romney and Barack
Obama have spent hun-
dreds of thousands on digi-
tal strategies. And
Romney's campaign began
a secretive data-mining
project this summer to sift
through Americans' per-
sonal information in-
cluding their purchasing
history and church atten-
dance to identify new
and likely wealthy donors.
The new Florida law set
a 48-hour deadline for turn-
ing in applications once
they are completed and var-
ious registration and re-
porting requirements.
Organizations or individu-
als could be fined $50 for
every late form up to a max-
imum of $1,000 in a given
year. A judge has since
blocked that part of the law
from taking effect, though
Smith said until then it did
have a chilling effect on
new voter registrations.
Florida is just one of 23
states that have laws re-
stricting traditional regis-
tration drives, according to
Project Vote, a Washington-
based nonpartisan group
that promotes voting in his-
torically underrepresented
communities.
Requirements in various
states run the gamut from
tight deadlines like
Florida's to limits on how
many registration forms a
group can obtain. Some re-
quire groups and volun-
teers to register with the
state and undergo state-
approved training. Several
states prohibit paying indi-
viduals based on the num-
ber of applications they
turn in, and Maryland re-
quires participants to be at
least 18 years old.
"We have seen a system-
atic coordinated attack on
voting rights across the na-
tion," said Marvin Randolph
of the National Association
for the Advancement of Col-
ored People.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Saralynne
Miller


at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Check voter registration
Special to the Chronicle

Florida's next statewide election is the presidential
general election Nov 6, only two months away
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill en-
courages voters to do some housekeeping on their voter
registration record or get registered not already -
without the rush of an election just around the corner.
Has your address change? Have you moved here
from another county or state? Has your name changed?
Has your signature change? Want a party affiliation
change?
Most registered voters know to make changes when
they change their name or address. However, updating
their signature may not be top of mind. It is especially
important for those who intend to vote absentee. The
signature on your ballot envelope must match the sig-
nature on your voter record.
Those who think their signature has changed, for
whatever reason, should check it out with the elections
office. That may be done by mail or in person. The voter
registration application can be used for changes in sig-
nature, address, name or party affiliation, or to register
to vote.
Call 352-341-6740 to request a mail ballot or visit the
elections office website at www.votecitrus.com.


"We've had to work
harder to make sure that
people have access to the
ability to register and vote
and we've had to be more
aggressive and innovative."
As a result, the NAACP is
partnering with the non-
partisan Voter Participa-
tion Center, which helped
pioneer direct mail voter
registration in 2004, said
Randolph, vice president
for campaigns at the orga-
nization's national head-
quarters in Baltimore.
The Washington, D.C.-
based Voter Participation
Center is mailing nearly 4
million registration appli-
cations targeted to minori-
ties, unmarried women and
young people in 28 states,
including nearly 353,000
being sent to Florida. That's
in addition to 6.6 million
applications sent out in
three prior mailings since
September 2011.
Other organizations part-
nering with the center for
the first time this election
cycle are the National
Council of La Raza and the
League of Conservation
Voters Education fund. A
group called United in Pur-
pose also is using data min-
ing as it strives to register
up to 5 million conservative
Christians across the nation
this year. Companies that
do data mining for busi-
nesses to influence con-
sumers and political
campaigns and interest
groups to sway voters now
are tailoring their services
for voter registration drives
as well.
The Florida Family Pol-
icy Council intentionally
avoided traditional regis-
tration drives because of
the state's restrictions, said


John Stemberger, the
group's president. The
group's website includes a
registration form that peo-
ple can fill out, and allows
volunteers to find unregis-
tered citizens who have
been identified as likely to
favor the council's views.
Those volunteers can then
call, email or personally
visit those people. Among
other things, the council op-
poses abortion and same-
sex marriage.
"We are going both old
school and new school,"
Stemberger said. "The kind
of not-your-father's-
Oldsmobile version of voter
registration, things that
we're doing, are direct mail
and we also have an auto-
mated program."
That doesn't mean tradi-
tional drives have been
abandoned. Data-driven
techniques are viewed as a
supplement for some
groups, while others, such
as the League of Women
Voters, still are conducting
only traditional face-to-face
registration drives.
And avoiding new restric-
tions isn't the only reason
for alternatives to tradi-
tional registration drives.
Page Gardner, president
of the Voter Participation
Center, said she chose the
list-based approach when
the group, then known as
Women's Voices, began its
efforts in 2004 because that
provides near-universal
reach and targets people by
demographics instead of
geography
"The advantage of this
program with mail is that
we can reach out to broad
universe of people very
quickly and to those people
that we may not be able to


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Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Linda Azwell, OD


Please RSVP
352.7953317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


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In association with:


meet in front of a grocery
store or canvassing and
talking to people at a door
or at an event," said
NAACP's Randolph.
Commercially available
data such as magazine sub-
scription and mail order
purchasing lists are used to
identify people in various
targeted groups and match
them against voter registra-
tion rolls to identify which
ones are not registered. The
lists also are cross-checked
with Social Security data to
exclude people who have
died.
So far, nearly 8 percent,
or about 470,000, of the ap-
plications the Voter Partici-
pation Center sent out
before the current mailing
have been turned in. It may
seem like a small number,
but "that's huge in terms of
direct mail," Gardner said.
One or 2 percent is the
norm, although a key differ-
ence is the only expense for
turning in a registration
form is the price of a
postage stamp.
Regardless of what ap-
proach is taken, there are
still millions of eligible peo-
ple not registered to vote.
The Pew Center on the
States issued a report in
February saying 25 percent
of those eligible to vote are
not registered. The study
found one of every eight
registrations is out of date,
mostly because of people
moving.
Pew Director of Election
Initiatives David Becker
said the organization has
been working with eight
states to modernize their
registration activities and
plans to expand that effort
after this year's election.
"We are still using paper,
pen and postal mail to drive
our voter registrations in
the 21st Century," Becker
said.
"You don't do it with
taxes. You don't do it with
parking tickets. You don't
do it to renew your driver's
license."

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726-8323 000CHX5


Henry 'Hank'
Butler Jr., 81
LECANTO
Henry R. "Hank" Butler
Jr, 81, of Lecanto, Fla., died
Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, at
Citrus Memorial hospital.
Henry was born April 9,
1931, in Madison, Wis., the
son of Henry and Elizabeth
Butler. He served as a
medic in the U.S. Army dur-
ing the Korean War. Henry
retired as an office manager
from National Cash Regis-
ter Company. He was a
board member of the Crys-
tal Oaks Civic Association
for many years. He enjoyed
playing golf. Hank will be
greatly missed by his friends
and family and his golfing
buddies.
Henry was preceded in
death by Janet, his wife of 54
years. Survivors include
son, Daniel Butler (Pat) of
Wauwatosa; daughter, Car-
rie Ritchey of Lutz, Fla.;
sons, Cameron (Pat) Butler
of Madison, Andrew Butler
(Tammy) of Cottage Grove
and Edward Butler of Madi-
son; sisters, Betty Millar of
Bloomfield, Conn., and Mar-
ilou Angevine of Madison;
eight grandchildren; and a
great-grandchild.
A gathering for Mr Butler
was from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 7, 2012, at Cress Fu-
neral Home, 3610 Speedway
Road, Madison, Wis.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Barbara
Yajian, 71
Mrs. Barbara Joan Yajian,
71, died Monday, Sept. 3,
2012, in Winter Park, Fla.
Service will be conducted
in St. Mary Armenian
Church in Hollywood, Fla.


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Funeral Home for 50 Years



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Monnie
Cates, 61
CRYSTAL RIVER
Monnie L. Cates, 61, of
Crystal River, passed away
Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012, at
her home under the loving
care of her family and Hos-
pice of Citrus County.
She was born June 13,
1951, in Brooksville, Fla.,
and was a lifelong resident
of Crystal River. Monnie
was a member of the Crystal
River High School Class of
1969, a professional hair
stylist and a member of the
First Baptist Church of
Crystal River. She was an
avid football fan and was to-
tally involved with her sons'
school and sports activities.
She was preceded in
death by her father, the late
Johnnie V Lewis. She is sur-
vived by her husband, Terry
R. Cates; mother, Peggy Gas-
pard (Paul); sons, Marty Wil-
son (Nicole), Will Wilson
(Gina), and Jason and Je-
remy Cates; brother, Gary
Lewis (Jamie); aunts, Bob-
bie Parker, Reba Veal
(Raleigh) and Mae Lewis;
grandchildren, Austin,
Johnnie and Blake Wilson;
and many other loving fam-
ily and friends both here
and in Tennessee.
Visitation is from 6 to 8
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
chapel in Crystal River The
funeral service will be con-
ducted at 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 9, from the First Bap-
tist Church of Crystal River
with the Rev Tim Lantzy
and the Rev Lloyd Bertine
presiding. Interment will
follow at Red Level Ceme-
tery Arrangements are
under the care of Strickland
Funeral Home, Crystal
River.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


-Ir'niif?9T inc^^^o



37YAS. WITH
DIGNITYS&RESPE5






www ogit o iao m


SObituaries


SO YOU KNOW
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits free and
paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicleonline.com.


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Honoring Survivors and



Remembering Loves Ones

Include your loved ones and those touched
by cancer in our Chronicle Keepsake
Edition on October 2. This special edition
will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT.

*All photos & information must be submitted
by Wednesday, September 26th






30

Per Tribute
SWill include a photo and
short bio, approximately
20 words or less.
Call Saralynne
.."564-2917
'or Yvonne
563-3273
.

j4 ...HON!CLE
www.dltronicleo~illie.COM


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 A5


KIF







A6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


IHowTKs *I 'IEA H T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2240272 8.80 +.45 CheniereEn 63481 15.73 +.69 Intel 767816 24.19 -.91 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
NokiaCp 906589 2.64 +.18 Rentech 44717 2.32 +.03 MicronT 636230 6.42 -.26 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
S&P500ETF860988 144.33 +.56 Vringo 42515 3.53 +.24 SiriusXM 536992 2.53 -.01 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SprintNex 614062 5.03 +.07 NovaGld g 34910 5.07 +.32 Kraft 458985 39.99 -2.33 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
FordM 596949 10.14 +.23 NwGoldg 27478 11.35 -.03 Cisco 442992 19.56 -.17 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd-Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
MSEngy12 21.67 +3.47 +19.1 Ellomay 5.02 +.77 +18.1 BioFuelrs 4.71 +1.71 +57.0 ingqualification. n-Stockwasa new issue in the lastyear.The 52-week high andlowfig-
AlphaNRs 6.90 +.99 +16.8 Taseko 3.34 +.31 +10.2 PeregrinP 4.50 +1.43 +46.6 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
Quiksilvr 3.57 +.51 +16.7 NDynMn g 3.89 +.31 +8.7 CellTher rs 2.32 +.53 +29.6 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Mechel 6.99 +.93 +15.3 ASpecRity 4.50 +.35 +8.4 CoffeeH 7.60 +1.44 +23.5 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
CliffsNRs 39.91 +5.05 +14.5 Metalico 2.46 +.17 +7.4 GeoMet pf 5.50 +.95 +20.8 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Pandora 10.47 -2.10 -16.7 NovaCppn 2.20 -.15 -6.4 Audiencen 6.90 -11.96 -63.4
PrUSRMCV34.68 -6.64 -16.1 HKN 2.11 -.13 -5.8 Envivion 2.22 -.46 -17.2 IT '
iPSXR1K 10.17 -1.74 -14.6 AvalonHId 3.63 -.20 -5.2 Cyclacelpf 2.22 -.28 -11.2
BarcShtC 15.20 -2.05 -11.9 Arrhythm 2.27 -.12 -5.0 PointrTel 2.40 -.29 -10.8 52-Week Net % YT[
PrUVxST rs 34.72 -4.48 -11.4 WisPpf 102.00 -5.00 -4.7 Accuray 5.84 -.70 -10.7 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


2,017 Advanced
943 Declined
144 Unchanged
3,104 Total issues
309 New Highs
12 New Lows
3,642,448,066 Volume


DIARY


DIARY


275 Advanced
151 Declined
35 Unchanged
461 Total issues
14 New Highs
2 New Lows
97,649,236 Volume


1,426
1,010
141
2,577
159
28
1,695,709,171


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 411.54Dow Jones Utilities
8,327.67 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,135.81 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,432.12 1,074.77S&P 500
14,975.51 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71 Russell 2000


13,306.64
5,072.20
471.86
8,234.51
2,426.17
3,136.42
1,437.92
15,040.10
842.27


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


+14.64 +.11 +8.91 +21.06
+27.57 +.55 +1.05+16.10
-.67 -.14 +1.55+12.38
+73.95 +.91 +10.13+16.88
-2.36 -.10 +6.49 +9.96
+.61 +.02 +20.39 +27.08
+5.80 +.41 +14.34 +24.58
+64.59 +.43 +14.03 +23.69
+4.32 +.52 +13.68 +24.97


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BoSBrasil 7.88 +.14
BkofAm 8.80 +.45
BkMontg 59.08 +.40
BkNYMel 22.92 -.11
ABBLtd 18.65 +.74 Barday 13.17 +.86
AESCorp 11.39 +.02 BariPVix 9.41 -.57
AFLAC 48.29 +.88 BarrickG 40.16 +1.16
AGL Res 40.87 -.13 Baxter 59.18 +.14
AK Steel 5.78 +.41 Beam Inc 60.78 -.56
AOL 33.38 -.39 BeazerHm 3.11 +.01
ASA Gold 23.63 +.45 BectDck 77.88 +.68
AT&T Inc 37.30 -.14 BerkHaA129942.00+345.00
AbtLab 66.69 -.23 BerkH B 86.64 +.17
AberFitc 36.48 +.35 BestBuy 18.23 +.16
Accenture 64.44 +.57 BBarrett 24.23 +.43
AccoBrds 6.92 +.35 BioMedR 18.99 +.08
AdamsEx 11.23 +.04 BIkHillsCp 34.57 -.18
AdvAuto 70.39 -.93 BlkDebtStr 4.35 -.03
AMD 3.45 -.21 BlkEnhC&l 13.33 +.09
AdvSemi 3.84 +.01 BIkGbOp 13.59 +.09
Aeroposfi 14.66 +.05 Blackstone 14.19 +.49
Aetna 39.00 +.63 BlockHR 16.33 +.08
Agilent 38.42 +.94 Boeing 72.89 +.07
Agniomg 49.42 +1.09 BorgWarn 72.38 +2.71
AlcatelLuc 1.15 +.04 BostBeer 103.46 +.77
Alcoa 9.10 +.34 BostProp 114.37 +1.42
AllegTch 32.22 +1.38 BostonSci 5.63 +.08
Allergan 88.95 -.03 BoydGm 6.11 +.07
Allete 41.61 -.13 BrMySq 33.30 -.20
AlliBGIbHi 15.59 -.06 Brookdale 23.19 +.40
AlliBInco 8.46 -.03 BrkfidOfPr 17.26 +.15
AlliBern 14.34 -.05 Brunswick 24.72 +.90
Allstate 38.48 +.02 Buckeye 48.76 -.11
AlphaNRs 6.90 +99 BurgerKn 13.68 -.04
AlpTotDiv 4.49 +01 C&J Engy 20.45 +.66
AIpAlerMLP 16.35 ... CBREGrp 17.70 +.22
Altria 34.27 -.32 CBSB 37.02 +.31
AmBev 38.25 +.32 CH Engy 65.25 +.03
Ameren 33.12 -.06 CITGrp 40.03 +.77
AMovilL 25.83 +.07 CMS Eng 23.34 -.06
AmAdxle 12.15 +.22 CNO Find 9.71 +.04
AEagleOut 22.95 +01 CSS Inds 20.20 +.04
AEP 43.46 -.06 CSX 22.31 +.25
AmExp 57.73 +.32 CVS Care 46.06 -.44
AmlnDGrp 33.99 -.23 CYS Invest 14.52 +.09
AmSIP3 7.35 ... CblvsnNY 15.65 +.21
AmTower 71.92 +.28 CabotOGs 42.17 +.59
Amerigas 41.96 -.13 Calix 5.64 +.54
AmeriBrgn 38.18 -.46 CallGolf 5.85 +.04
Ameteks 35.48 +.25 Calpine 17.55 -.98
Anadarko 72.29 +1.22 Cameron 56.02 +1.24
AnglogldA 34.18 +.89 CampSp 35.04 -.14
ABInBev 86.95 -.59 CdnNRsgs 32.20 +1.58
Annaly 17.54 -.09 CapOne 57.41 +.25
Aon plc 51.96 -.21 CapifSrce 7.17 +.07
Apachde 89.90 +3.35 CapM pfB 15.66 -.04
AquaAm 25.23 -.29 CardnlHIth 38.31 -.88
ArcelorMit 16.01 +1.04 CareFusion 27.75 +.97
ArchCoal 6.60 +.50 CarMax 32.24 -.52
ArchDan 27.29 -.07 Carnival 37.05 +1.12
ArmourRsd 7.56 ... CarpTech 50.55 +2.25
Ashland 74.89 -.61 Caterpillar 88.10 +3.31
AsdEstat 15.25 -.11 Celanese 39.56 +1.25
AssuredG 14.76 +.23 Cemex 8.09 +.17
AstraZen 46.79 -.20 Cemigpfs 17.35 -.22
ATMOS 35.31 -.39 CenovusE 34.96 +1.11
AuRico g 5.97 +.26 CenterPnt 20.95 -.04
Avon 15.99 +.26 CenEIBras 6.42 -.07
BB&TCp 32.86 +.57 CntryLink 41.93 -.29
BHPBilILt 67.70 +2.45 Checkpnt 8.61 +.14
BP PLC 41.93 +.75 ChesEng 20.34 +.64
BPZ Res 2.69 +.11 ChesUfi 46.78 -.22
BRFBrasil 16.13 -.06 Chevron 114.00 +.97
BRT 6.26 ... ChicB&l 39.71 +1.15
BakrHu 46.74 +1.45 Chioms 19.34 +.05
BallCorp 42.78 +.09 Chimera 2.65 +.04
BcBilVArg 8.27 +.23 ChinaMble 53.19 +.26
BooBradpf 17.15 +.55 Chipofe 326.35 +24.02
BomSantSA 7.71 +.21 Chubb 74.91 -.18


Cigna 46.13 +.14 EMCCp 27.70 +.19 FBHmScn 26.64 -.26 HarmonyG 9.02 +.36 iShiBxB 119.93 +.25
CindBell 5.26 +.05 EOG Res 112.88 +.47 FranceTel 13.66 +.26 HartfdFn 19.47 +.85 iShB20T 124.03 -.58
Cifgroup 32.07 +.95 EastChm s 57.37 +.69 FMCG 39.43 +3.09 HawaiiEl 27.60 +.20 iShB7-10T 107.95 +.14
CleanHarb 53.40 +.06 Eaton 47.43 +1.33 Fusion-io 28.49 +.20 HItCrREIT 58.66 -.54 iShBl-3T 84.46 +.02
CliffsNRs 39.91 +5.05 EV EnEq 10.99 +.01 HItMgmt 7.86 -.01 iS Eafe 53.26 +.79
Clorox 72.78 -.66 EdwLfSci 108.82 +2.00 HIthcrRlty 24.74 -.19 iShiBxHYB 92.53 +.16
Coach 61.70 +1.75 Ban 11.29 -.24 GATX 43.45 +.96 Heckmann 4.07 -.04 iSR1KG 67.08 +.16
CobaltlEn 23.76 +.63 BdorGld g 14.68 +.90 GabelliET 5.74 +.01 HeclaM 5.82 +.29 iSR2KV 74.53 +.67
CCFemsa 124.47 +.43 EmersonEl 49.80 -.18 GabHIthW 8.98 .06 Heinz 55.76 -.52 iShR2K 84.26 +.62
CocaColas 37.90 -.25 EmpDist 21.40 -.10 GabUil 8.12 +.03 HeimPayne 48.00 +2.21 iShUSPfd 39.84 +.13
CocaCE 30.72 +.07 EnbrdgEPt 28.68 +.04 GafisaSA 4.12 +.22 Hersha 5.20 ... iShREst 66.56 +.12
Coeur 25.00 +.76 EnCanag 22.67 +.54 GameStop 21.66 +.60 Hertz 14.90 +.08 iShDJHm 18.82 +.07
CohStlnfra 18.20 Gannett 16.06
ColgPal 106.30 -1.19
CollctvBrd 21.66 -.03
ColonyFnd 19.09 -.26 C i ... T
Comerica 32.23 +.55
CmwREIT 14.94 +.23
CmtyHIt 27.69 -.48 I
CompSci 3304 +29 w.iron le33.04 +.29 nllne.com
Con-Way 29.60 -.33
ConAgra 25.58 -.28
ConocPhil s 56.64 +.85
ConsolEngy 31.21 +2.04
ConEd 60.63 -.43
ConstellA 33.65 -.41
ContlRes 78.51 +3.47
Cnvrgys 15.98 +.14
CooperCo 93.33 +7.30
Cooper Ind 75.23 +.99
Coring 12.55 +.25
CosanLtd 14.79 +.07
CottCp 8.28 -.08
CovenbyH 41.68 +.26
Covidien 57.14 +.41RS
Crane 39.71 +.77
CSVS2xVxS 1.75 -.26
CSVeIIVSt 16.79 +.89 r
CredSuiss 21.16 +.82 6
CrwnCsfie 6450 -.42
Cummins 100.57 +2.14
CurEuro 12729 +1.69 -


DCTIndl 651 *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.
n... ... ';


uuDDRCorp 15.53 +.06
DNP Selct 9.99 +.09
DNP Sel rt .02 -.01
DR Horton 20.03 -.01
DSW Inc 64.79 -.38
DTE 59.49 -.20
DanaHIdg 14.49 +.29
Danaher 55.06 +.59
Darden 53.49 -.03
DeanFds 16.41 -.19
Deere 78.22 +1.18
DelphiAun 31.15 +.29
DeltaAir 9.28 +.08
DenburyR 16.24 +.44
DeutschBk 40.18 +2.57
DevonE 59.34 +.94
DiaOffs 67.19 +.01
DicksSptg 51.70 -.02
DigDMdan .60 -.38
DxFnBullrs 106.12 +2.82
DirSCBear 14.73 -.33
DirFnBear 18.29 -.51
DirDGIdBII 14.93 +1.15
DrxEnBear 7.82 -.45
DirEMBear 12.50 -.93
DirxSCBull 62.73 +1.16
Discover 38.47 +.24
Disney 51.74 -.12
DollarGen 49.85 -.79
DomRescs 53.16 -.61
DowChm 30.33 +.80
DuPont 50.56 +.71
DukeEnrs 64.72 -.28
DukeRlty 15.03 +.08


EndvSilvg 9.72 +.22
EngyTsfr 43.83 +.23
EnergySol 2.59 +.10
EnPro 38.77 +.36
ENSCO 57.05 -.40
Entergy 68.21 -1.04
EntPrPt 53.40 +.10
EqtyRsd 60.56 -.16
EsteeLdrs 61.00 +.05
ExcoRes 7.39 +.16
Exelon 36.15 -.05
Express 15.92 +.10
ExxonMbl 89.92 +.93
FMCTech 48.54 +1.17
FairchldS 15.00 +.08
FedExCp 87.38 -.16
FedSignl 6.37 +.12
Ferrellgs 18.97 -.15
Ferro 3.71 +.31
FidlNFin 19.55 -.08
FidNatlnfo 32.68 +.04
FstHorizon 9.37 +.05
FTActDiv 8.15 -.13
FtTrEnEq 12.19 +.04
FirstEngy 43.12 -.23
Ruor 54.75 +1.47
FootLockr 36.45 +.12
FbrdM 10.14 +.23
FbrdMwt 1.29 +.19
ForestCA 15.23 +.14
ForestLab 35.37 -.30
ForestOil s 8.13 +.20


Gap 35.93 -.16
GenDynam 67.20 +.48
GenElec 21.59 +.28
GenGrPrp 20.99 +.13
GenMills 39.24 -.08
GenMotors 23.37 +.92
GenOn En 2.60 -.06
Genworth 5.65 +.21
Gerdau 9.75 +.31
GlaxoSKIn 45.14 -.72
GolLinhas 4.95 +.33
GoldFLtd 13.31 +.20
Goldcrpg 43.00 +.86
GoldmanS 116.33 +2.79
Goodyear 13.16 +.18
GtPlainEn 21.78 -.23
Griffon 9.93 -.08
GuangRy 15.19 +.96
Guess 27.03 +.56
GugSP400ew32.06 +.18
Guidewren 31.30 -.68
HCA Hldg 29.31 -.03
HCP Inc 46.64 -.39
HSBC 45.10 +.84
HSBCCap 26.38 +.03
HalconRrs 8.25 +.19
Hallibrtn 34.24 +1.28
HanJS 16.47
HanPrmDv 14.64 +.15
Hanesbrds 33.32
Hanoverlns 36.13 +.13
HarleyD 43.97 +.43


Hess 52.90 +2.08
HewlettP 17.42 -.17
HighwdPrp 33.21 -.07
HollyFront 39.53 +.11
HomeDp 57.26 -.39
HonwIllnfi 59.90 +.88
HospPT 24.18 -.26
HostHofis 16.30 +.46
HovnanE 3.15 +.07
Humana 72.23 +.56
Huntsmn 14.63 +.36
IAMGIdg 14.06 +.55
ICICI Bk 34.39 +.99
ING 8.49 +.44
iShGold 16.91 +.35
iSAsfia 23.73 +.18
iShBraz 55.28 +1.50
iShEMU 30.76 +.59
iShGer 22.48 +.49
iSh HK 17.39 +.42
iShJapn 9.07 +.12
iSh Kor 57.69 +1.33
iSMalas 14.45 +.09
iShMex 63.35 +.52
iShSing 13.26 +.11
iSTaiwn 12.84 +.18
iShUK 17.42 +18
iShSilver 32.64 +.97
iShChina25 33.66 +.93
iSSP500 145.00 +.65
iShBAgB 111.89 +.02
iShEMkts 40.64 +.92


iStar 7.38 +.10
Idacorp 42.89 +.06
ITW 60.60 +.89
Imafon 5.90 -.02
IngerRd 46.13 -.13
IntegrysE 54.29 -.45
IntcnfiEx 137.13 +.21
IBM 199.50 +.40
InfiGame 12.51 -.01
IntPap 36.30 +.75
Interpublic 10.98 -.03
InvenSenn 12.76 +.54
Invesco 25.01 +.24
IronMtn 32.99 -.01
ItauUnibH 16.57 +.51

JPMorgCh 39.30 +.61
Jabil 21.90 -.03
Jaguar g 1.14 +.05
JanusCap 8.87 +.01
Jefferies 15.63 +.47
JohnJn 67.88 +.04
JohnsnCfi 27.77 +.28
JoyGIbl 56.63 +3.54
JnprNtwk 18.71 +.48
KB Home 12.07 +.21
KBR Inc 29.30 +.84
KKR Fn 9.97 +.20
KCSouthn 79.82 +.13
Kaydons 22.64 +.27
KA EngTR 26.70 -.01


Kellogg 50.39 -.01 MobileTele 20.07 +.65 PepcoHold 19.24 -.08 ResrceCap 5.85 -.25
KeyEngy 8.50 +.65 Molyomrp 11.94 +.56 PepsiCo 72.10 -.05 RetailPrpn 11.46 +.23
Keycorp 8.61 +.10 MoneyG rs 16.08 -.12 Prmian 14.95 +.09 Revlon 12.81 -.18
KimbClk 82.93 -.69 Monsanto 89.39 -.05 PetrbrsA 21.41 +.66 ReynAmer 44.46 -.77
Kimco 20.48 -.08 MonstrWw 7.40 -.50 Petrobras 22.13 +.69 Riointo 48.64 +3.08
KindME 81.73 -.52 Moodys 41.27 +.02 Pfizer 24.24 -.10 RiteAid 1.27 +.01
KindMorg 35.84 +.10 MorgStan 17.08 +.83 PhilipMor 88.83 -.65 RockTen 70.34 +2.08
KindrMwt 3.42 +.08 MSEmMkt 14.33 +.23 Phillips66n 44.26 +.84 RockwlAut 73.21 +1.60
Kinrossg 9.66 +.53 Mosaic 61.01 -.04 PiedNG 32.11 +.11 RockColl 51.15 +1.37
KnghtCap 2.73 -.01 MotrlaSolu 49.30 +.18 PimoStrat 12.52 -.04 Rowan 36.14 +.49
KodiakOg 9.44 +.15 NCR Corp 23.18 -.08 PinWst 52.41 -.15 RylCarb 29.57 +.85
Kohls 52.53 -.28 NRG Egy 21.78 -.55 PioNtrl 103.17 +3.86 RoyDShllA 71.59 +.63
KrispKrm 7.47 +.01 NVEnergy 18.17 +.10 PitnyBw 13.97 +.21 Royce 12.91 +.08
Kroger 22.73 -.37 NYSE Eur 26.35 +.39 PlainsEx 40.33 +.57 Roce IB 25.67 +.02
LSICorp 7.87 -.19 Nabors 15.53 +.39 PlumCrk 41.23 +.01
LTC Prp 33.77 -.64 NamTai 9.70 -.51 Polaris s 78.57 +.30
LaZBoy 14.95 +.19 NatFuGas 51.44 -.03 PostPrp 51.01 -.28 SAIC 12.24
Ladede 42.21 -.11 NatGrid 55.47 -.22 Potash 43.18 +1.13 SCANA 48.32 -.11
LVSands 44.30 +1.01 NOilVarco 81.92 +2.26 PwshDB 28.97 +.32 SKTIcm 14.83 -.04
LeapFrog 9.15 -.89 Navistar 2476 +79 PSUSDBull 22.01 -.24 SpdrDJIA 132.94 +12
LennarA 33.93 -.15 NewAmHi 11.31 -.13 PSSPLwV 28.04 -.14 SpdrGold 168.44 +3.55
Lexmark 21.64 -.06 NJRscs 45.20 ... PwShPfd 14.84 +.02 SPMid 183.16 +.95
LbtyASG 4.13 +.01 NewOriEd 14.79 +.80 PSIndia 17.38 +.25 S&P500ETF144.33 +.56
LillyEli 46.65 -.16 NYCmtyB 13.61 +.04 Praxair 107.02 +.46 SpdrHome 24.39 +.04
Limited 48.51 -.30 Newcastle 7.79 -.07 PrecDrill 8.32 +.50 SpdrLehHY 40.18 +.10
LincNat 24.38 +.22 NewellRub 18.76 +.17 PrinFnd 28.31 +.28 SpdrS&P RB 28.89 +.27
Lindsay 70.55 +.83 NewfidExp 33.34 +.30 ProLogis 35.73 +.37 SpdrRetl 63.52 +.15
Linkedln 119.04 -.06 NewmtM 51.69 +.79 ProShtS&P 34.21 -.17 SpdrOGEx 55.69 +1.45
LionsGtg 15.81 +.20 NewpkRes 7.74 +.25 PrUShS&P 13.74 -.13 SpdrMetM 43.92 +2.14
LloydBkg 2.34 +.06 Nexeng 25.65 +.15 PrUltQQQs 62.01 -.17 STMicro 5.82 +.11
LockhdM 92.18 -.65 NextEraEn 67.65 +.24 PrUShQQQ 27.21 +.07 Safeway 16.32 -.17
LaPac 14.27 +.24 NiSource 25.30 -.14 ProUltSP 61.07 +.53 StJoe 19.96 +.56
Lowes 28.32 -.06 NikeB 99.29 -.17 ProUShL20 15.71 +.17 Stude 39.50 +.39
46 +100 NobleCorp 37.02 .01 ProShtR2K 24.93 -.14 Saks 11.50 -.11
NokiaCp 2.64 +18 PrUVxSTrs 34.72 -4.48 Salesforce 149.57 +.68
Nordstrm 57.51 -.45 PrUltCrude 34.55 +1.16 SaelyBty 27.29 -.70
M&TBk 90.74 +.89 NorflkSo 71.92 -.10 PrUShCrde 37.25 -1.30 SJuanB 13.80 -.30
MBIA 11.39 +21 NoestUt 38.24 +08 ProUltSIvs 55.98 +3.13 SandRdge 6.99 +12
MDU Res 22.43 +.05 NorthropG 67.37 -.32 ProUShEuro 20.28 -.57 Sanofi 42.40 +.12
MEMC 3.19 -.04 Novars 59.85 -.02 ProctGam 68.52 +.28 Schlmbrg 73.17 +71
MFAFnd 8.28 +06 Nucor 39.40 +1.31 ProgsvCp 19.39 -.08 Sdichwab 14.03 +.07
MCR 9.98 +.03 NustarEn 48.95 +.23 ProUSR2K 26.70 -.42 SeadrillLtd 40.87 +.98
MGIC 1.42 +.15 NuvMuOpp 15.22 +10 PUSSP500 rs38.91 .53 SealAir 15.06 +07
MGM Rsts 10.70 +.37 NvPdlnco 9.86 +.06 Prudent 57.19 +93 SenHous 22.38 -.05
Macquarie 42.60 -.30 NuvQPf2 9.22 -.08 PSEG 31.66 -.06 Sensient 37.55 -.03
Macys 40.46 +.11 OGEEngy 54.50 -.28 PubStrg 146.82 -.66 ShawGrp 42.94 +.10
MageMPr 8470 -.03 OasisPet 30.78 +.27 PulteGrp 14.75 +14 SiderurNac 5.59 +.41
Magnalntg 45.78 +.96 OcciPet 87.15 +2.85 PPrIT 5.66 -.03 SilvWhg 36.35 +.64
MagHRes 4.53 +.17 OfficeDpt 1.88 +02 QEPRes 29.62 +1.11 SilvrcpMg 6.38 +.12
Manitowoc 1430 +.55 OfficeMax 6.57 +.32 Qihoo360 23.39 -.49 SimonProp 159.05 +.20
Manulifeg 11.99 +.27 OiSAs 3.88 +.05 QuanexBld 17.82 +.62 Skechers 21.03 -.50
MarathnO 28.61 +.2733 OSAldRub 9.21 +.05 Questar 20.15 +.05 SmithAO 55.54 -.03
MarathPet 5189 +.97 OlindRepub 922.42 +.025 QksilvRes 3.92 +.18 SmithfF 20.38 +.04
MarathPeGold 50.46 +.97 Oln 22.42 +.25 Quiksilvr 3.57 +.51 Smudcker 86.10 -.52
MVGold 50.4628 +1.83 OmegaHIt 24.50 -.17 RPM 28.23 -.10 SonyCp 11.64 +.42
MV Semi n 32.94 .3 i +2 Rackspace 64.45 +.60 Sothebys 35.56 +2.13
MV emin 32.94 -.32 OnAssign 16.96 +.20 RadianGrp 4.33 +.29 SoJerInd 51.45 -.12
MltVRus 28.94 +.84 ONEOKs 45.75 +.17 RadioShk 2.90 +.06 SouthnCo 45.91 -.16
MktVJrGId 23.47 +.69 OneokPtrs 56.99 +.75 Racorp 72.16 -1.03 SthnCopper 34.33 +1.74
MarlntA 39.36 +.61 OshkoshCp 26.69 +.49 RLauren 161.08 +2.23 SwstAirl 9.19 -.02
MarshM 34.32 -.03 OwensCorn 33.75 +.57 RangeRs 67.41 +1.57 SwstnEngy 32.63 +.28
MStwrt 300 Owenslll 19.66 +.88 RJamesFn 37.01 +.32 SpectraEn 28.96 +.34
M cmln 14t15 + Rayonier 50.50 +.49 SprintNex 5.03 +.07
McDnlds 91.02 +.35 PG&E Cp 4347 +.28 Rltylno 42.78 +57 SprottSilv 13.78 +.40
McrrwH 5291 +05 PNC 6380 +79 RedHat 59.15 +.05 SprottGold 14.89 -.17
MdcKesson 88.50 .94 PNM Res 21.20 22 ReionsFn 7.37 +.15 SP Mas 36.95 +.72
McMoRn 13.33 +.36 PPG 113.14 +14 RennpubSvc 28.38 +.36 SPCnSt 35.76 -.29
McEwenM 4.35 +.25 PPLCorp 29.24 +03 Repubvc 28.38 +36 SPCnSt 3576 -29
MeadJohn 75.98 +.28 PVRPtrs 24.12 +.04
Mechel 6.99 +.93 PacDrill n 9.70 -.09
Medis 43.51 .04 PackAmer 33.27 +.37
Medtrnic 41.61 +.03 PallCorp 57.18 +.49
MensW 37.59 -.02 Pandora 10.47 -2.10 The remainder of the
Merck 44.05 -.19 ParkerHan 83.69 +1.40 The remain er of the
MetLife 35.28 +.32 PeabdyE 23.71 +2.31 NYSE listings can be
MetroPCS 9.97 -.09 Pengrthg 6.92 +.21
MetroHIth 8.51 +.03 PennWstg 15.01 +.56 found on the next page
MKorsn 56.03 +.53 Penney 28.50 +.53 n the next page.
MidAApt 68.05 +.16 PepBoy 9.89 -.01


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.75 -.02
AbdnEMTel 20.14 +.34
AdmRsc 36.07 -.27
Advenbx .73 +.04
AlexcoRg 3.95 +.09
AlldNevG 35.00 +1.50
AlmadnM g 2.68 +.03
AmAppared 1.14 -.04
Aurizong 4.64 +.21
AvalnRare 1.86 +.08
Banrog 4.95 +.23
BarcUBS36 43.83 +.43


BarcGSOil 23.54 +.44
BrigusGg .95 +.03
BritATob 101.42 -1.76 DeourEg .19 +.00
CardiumTh .23 -.01 DenisnM g 1.45 +.04
CelSd .32 -.00 DocuSec 4.07 +.07
CFCdag 23.16 +.76 EVLtdDur 16.60
CheniereEn 15.73 +.69 EVMuniBd 13.90 +.05
ChinaShen .45 +.06 EVMuni2 13.69
ClaudeRg .83 +.08 EllswthFd 7.18
ClghGlbOp 11.46 me. i 1 0
ComstkMn 2.99 +.01 EmeradOil 1.22 -.02
CornstProg 5.65 +.05 EnovaSys .10 +.00
CornerstSt 7.51 +.03 EnteeGold .65 +.02
CrSuiHiY 3.23 -.03 ExeterRgs 1.88 -.01
Crosshrg .19 +.00 FrkStPrp 11.35 -.01


GamGldNR 14.29 +.09
GascoEngy .14 -.01
Gastar grs 1.77 +.05
GenMoly 2.74 +.01
GeoGloblR .11 +.01
Geoldnefcs .14 -.02
GigOpDcs 2.44 +.11
GoldResrc 21.32 +1.01
GoldStdVg 1.71 -.08
GoldenMin 6.55 +.44
GoldStrg 1.60 +.07
GranTrrag 5.03 +.32
GrtBasGg .25 +.01


GtPanSilvg 2.24 +.15
Hemisphrx .87 +.10
ImmunoCII 3.17 -.06
ImpOilgs 47.95 +.75
IndiaGC .24 +.02
InovioPhm .57 +.02
IntellgSys 1.77 +.09
IntTowerg 2.98 -.06


KeeganRg 4.15 +.12
LadThalFn 1.42 +.03
LkShrGld g 1.07 +.02
LongweiPI 1.42 -.03


NthnO&G 18.43 +1.23 Richmntg 4.61 +.31
NovaBayP 1.39 +.14 Rubi 3.72 -.03
MagHRpfD 43.90 -.20 NovaCppn 2.20 -.15
Metaliom 2.46 +.17 NovaGld 5.07 +.32
MdwGoldg 1.42 +.06 SamsO&G 1.04 +01
MinsMgt 1.46i .03 Sandstg rs 10.16 +.30
MinesMgt 1.46 .03 ParaG&S 2.77 +.02 SilverBull .54 +.05
N u 1i 6 .7 -' PhrmAth 1.24 ... SilvrCrstg 2.94 +.09
NavideaBio 3.57 -.10 PlatGpMet .98 +.09 SynergyRs 2.81 -.01
NeoStem .71 PolyMetg 1.12 +.01 TanzRyg 4.80 +.22
NBRESec 4.82 +.03 PyramidOil 4.31 .04 Taseko 3.34 +.31
Neuralstem .67 +.01 Quaterrag .39 +.05 Timminsg 2.74 +.04
Nevsung 4.64 +.10 QuestRM g 1.27 +.06 TrnsafiPet 1.04
NwGoldg 11.35 -.03 RareEleg 4.26 +.28 TriangPet 7.33 +.42
NAPallg 1.98 +.05 Rentech 2.32 +.03 Tuomwsg 1.37 +.04
NDynMng 3.89 +.31 RexahnPh .47 ... TwoHrbwt .75


US Geoth .33 -.00
Univ Insur 3.71 +.15
Ur-Energy .99 -.00
Uranerz 1.52 -.01
UraniumEn 2.72 -.06

VangTotWV 48.56 +.46
VantageDrl 1.65 -.05
VirnetX 27.75 -.73
VistaGold 3.30 +.03
Vringo 3.53 +.24
Walterlnv 33.88 +.36
WFAdvlnco 10.55
YMBiog 1.91 +.03
ZBBEngy .35


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 40.50 -.12
ASMLHId 56.82 -1.05
Abiomed 21.00 -2.29
Abraxas 2.07 +.07
AcadaTc 27.61 +.61
AcadiaPh 1.92 +.17
Accuray 5.84 -.70
Achillion 7.32 +.12
AcmePkt 19.69 +.52
AcordaTh 25.19 +.28
AcfvsBliz 12.02 -.21
Actuate 7.15 +.05
Acxiom 18.24 +.06
AdobeSy 32.46 -.33
Adtran 20.03 -.57
AdvEnld 13.56 +.09
AeroViron 23.37 +.69
AEternagh .53 +.04
Affymax 19.03 +.02
Afymetrix 3.78 -.01
AkamaiT 38.73 -.48
Akorn 14.56 -.27
AlaskCom 2.14 +.01
Alexion 110.61 +1.58
Alexzars 4.90 +.21
AlignTech 37.92 +.55
Alkermes 18.99
AllotComm 27.49 +.43
AllscriptH 10.90 +.11
AlnylamP 18.93 +.56
AlteraCp If 37.97 -.06
AmTrstFin 27.02 +.37
Amarin 14.78 +.16
Amazon 259.14 +7.76
ACapAgy 35.02 +.12
AmCapLtd 11.38 +.14
ACapMtg 25.24 +.18
ARItyCTn 12.37 +.17
AmSupr 3.78 +.06
Amgen 83.96 -.85
AmkorTch 4.65 +.10
Amyris 3.26 +.03
Anadigc 1.27 +.05
AnalogDev 40.45 +.11
Anlogic 70.34 +.39
Analystlnt 3.87 +.12
Ancestry 30.80 -.05
Ansys 71.89 -.57
AntaresP 3.88 -.09
AntheraPh .93 +.01
A123Sysh .20 -.01
ApolloGrp 30.29 -.10
Apollolnv 8.19 -.01
Apple Inc 680.44 +4.17
ApldMafi 11.86 -.05
Approach 31.81 +1.14
ArQule 5.46 -.04
ArchCap 40.36 +.26
ArenaPhm 8.60 -.10
AresCap h 17.42 +.06
AriadP 22.01 -.08
Ariba Inc 44.70 -.05
ArkBest 8.26 -.54
ArmHId 26.23 -.04
ArrayBio 5.55 -.13
Arris 13.94 +.08
ArubaNet 20.16 +.16
AscenaRts 20.90 +.33
AscentSolr 1.80
AspenTech 24.73 +.14
AsscdBanc 13.15 +.07
AstexPhm 3.15 +.05
AfiasAir 54.55 +.96
Atmel 6.29 -.01
Audience n 6.90 -11.96
AuthenTec 8.03
Autodesk 32.22 -.55
AutoData 59.25 -.11
Auxilium 24.17 -.23
AvagoTch 36.20 -.41
AvanirPhm 3.40 +.01
AviatNetw 2.24 -.05
AvisBudg 16.70 +.05
Aware 6.40 -.03


Axcelis 1.00 +.01 CogentC 20.81 +.80
B/EAero 40.64 +.14 Cognex 38.79 +1.65
BGCPtrs 4.78 +.13 CognizTech 67.20 +1.26
BJsRest 42.52 +1.02 CogoGrp 1.86 -.01
BMCSft 43.33 -.16 Coinstar 52.21
Baidu 109.59 -3.15 ColdwCrkh .53 +.03
Bazaarvcn 15.30 +.19 ColumLab .99 -.06
BeacnRfg 28.35 +.16 Comcast 34.46 -.19
BeasleyB 5.29 +.01 Comcspd 33.60 -.13
BedBath 69.17 -.50 CmcBMO 41.04 +.24
BioDIvrylf 5.61 ... CommSys 11.65 +.13
BioFuelrs 4.71 +1.71 CommVIt 52.81 +.30
Biogenldc 152.50 +.31 CmplGnom 3.15 +.11
Biolase 1.68 +.02 Compuwre 10.14 -.01
BioMarin 38.36 -.53 ComScore 14.70 +.05
BioSanters 1.40 +.04 Comverse 6.38 +.38
BioScrip 8.42 -.06 Concepts 20.58
BIkRKelso 10.10 +.08 ConcurTch 74.26 -.36
BobEvans 40.30 +.19 Conmed 27.51 +.03
BodyCentrl 9.13 +.24 Conns 25.39 -.70
BonTon 12.76 +.01 ConstantC 20.62 +.76
BostPrv 9.84 +.04 Coparts 27.25 -.44
BreitBurn 18.65 +.14 CorinthC 2.38 +.04
Brightcvn 12.34 -.24 CorOnDem 27.26 -.77
Brightpnt 8.95 -.02 Costom 99.72 -.26
Broadcom 36.11 -.01 CowenGp 2.74 -.06
BrcdeCm 6.25 +.09 Cree Inc 27.99 -.07
BrooksAuto 8.11 +.04 Crocs 18.24 -.03
BrukerCp 13.05 +.52 Ctrip.omm 17.54 +.69
BuffabWW 82.00 +.06 CubistPh 47.18 -.70
CA Inc 26.83 +.09 CumMed 2.80 +.04
CBOE 28.85 +.14 Curis 4.21 -.08
CH Robins 57.45 +.39 CypSemi 12.45 -.14
CMEGrps 58.40 +2.01 C( i 3.61 +.30
CNinsure 6.11 +.35
CSG Sys 21.02 -.78
CTC Media 8.98 +.37 DFCGIbl 18.92 +.21
CVBFnd 12.39 +.18 Daktronics 9.83 +.12
CadencePh 3.87 ... DealrTrk 27.82 +.32
Cadence 13.54 +.06 DeclkrsOut 46.12 -1.12
CalaCvOp 12.23 -.09 Delcath 1.75 +.03
CalaGDyln 8.36 +.07 Dell Inc 10.64 +.12
CalaStrTR 10.09 +.10 Deltek 13.04 +.11
Callidus 4.65 +.26 Dndreon 4.87 -.06
CalumetSp 30.02 +1.17 Dennys 4.98 +.02
CdnSolar 2.81 +.13 Dentsply 37.34 +.49
CapCtyBk 10.10 +.20 DexCom 13.90 -.26
CapFedFn 11.96 -.01 DiamndFhlf 19.09 +.26
CpstnTrbh 1.02 +.01 DianaCont 5.69 +.20
Carbonite 7.47 -.28 DigitalGen 11.76 +.40
CareerEd 3.64 +.03 DirecTV 53.29 +.03
CarlyleGn 26.47 +.27 DiscCmAh 56.42 +.23
Carrizo 27.36 +.17 DiscCmCh 52.47 +.21
CarverB rs 3.65 -.28 DiscovLab 3.22 -.11
CatalystPh 1.37 +.04 DishNetwk 32.35 -.24
Catamaran 92.27 +1.00 DollarTrs 47.71 -.29
CathayGen 17.43 +.26 DonlleyRR 11.62 +.10
Cavium 33.92 +.25 DrmWksA 17.55 +.03
Celgene 75.44 +.95 DryShips 2.35 +.08
CellTherrs 2.32 +.53 Dunkin 29.57 +.30
CelldexTh 5.81 -.16 Dynavax 4.19 +.04
Celsion 4.78 +.38 E-Trade 9.06 +.21
CentEurolf 3.16 +.11 eBay 49.24 +.33
CEurMed 6.62 +.39 ENGlobal .69 -.03
CenGrdAlf 12.99 +.17 EaglRkEn 9.57 +.04
CentAI 6.99 +.47 ErthLink 7.12 +.12
Cepheid 40.03 +.79 EstWstBcp 22.38 +.23
Cerner 75.35 +.07 EducMgmt 3.50 +.02
Changyou 25.48 +.92 EducDevh 3.99 +.03
Chartlnds 73.14 +.67 8x8 Inc 6.07 +.09
CharterCm 78.15 -1.13 ElectSd 12.82 +.33
ChkPoint 48.26 -.25 ElectArts 14.04 +.41
Cheesecake 34.82 +.29 EFII 16.68 +.11
ChelseaTh 1.31 -.13 EndoPhrm 33.15 +.44
ChildPlace 57.88 -.42 Endobgix 12.62 +.72
ChAdvCnsh .45 +.08 EngyXXI 34.99 +.88
ChrchllD 57.45 +.29 Enphasen 4.53 -.45
CienaCorp 14.66 +.29 Entegris 9.00 -.18
CinnFin 38.71 -.43 EntropCom 5.97 +.26
Cintas 41.41 -.08 Envivion 2.22 -.46
Cirrus 44.35 -.54 Equinix 197.47 -4.30
Cisco 19.56 -.17 Ericsson 9.23 +.14
CitzRepBc 20.30 -.15 ExactScih 10.31 -.13
CitrixSys 80.59 -1.16 Exelids 5.08 +.14
CleanEngy 13.59 +.14 E)ddeTc 3.23 +.06
Clearwire 1.66 +.01 Expedias 54.11 +.73
Codexis 2.66 +.22 Expdlni 37.78 +.67
CoffeeH 7.60 +1.44 ExpScripts 63.30 -.45


Ezomrp 23.44 +.61 iShsSOX 54.71 -.15
F5Netwks 100.27 +1.22 iShNsdqBio 140.86 -.07
FLIRSys 20.61 +.16 Ion PLC 24.04 +.09
FSI Inf 6.17 -.01 IdenixPh 5.84 -.25
FX Ener 7.77 +.29 Idenfive h .69 +.03
Facebookn 18.98 +.02 Illumina 45.37 +2.42
Fastenal 42.13 -.05 Immersion 5.51
Fiduslnvst 16.10 -.30 ImunoGn 14.77 -.15
FifthStRn 10.77 +.04 ImpaxLabs 24.39 -.54
FifthThird 15.31 +.26 Incyte 18.33 -1.28
Fndlnst 17.61 -.27 Infinera 6.03 +.18
Finisar 14.86 +.85 Informat 36.48 +.81
FinLine 23.62 -.16 Infosys 45.66 +1.01
FstCashFn 45.22 +.21 In gDv 5.70 -.13
FFnclOH 17.17 +.29 Intel 24.19 -.91
FstMerch 14.64 +.19 InterDig 35.91 +.24
FMidBc 12.69 +.57 Intrface 14.01 +.07
FstNiagara 8.17 -.04 InterMune 7.94 +.20
FstSolar 20.44 +.41 InterNAP 7.19 -.04
FTNDXTc 26.43 -.09 InfiBcsh 19.42 +.15
FstMerit 17.02 +.37 InfiSpdw 28.31 +.27
Fiserv 72.81 +.05 Intersil 9.20 -.03
FiveBelw n 35.38 -.50 Intuit 59.46 -.28
Flextrn 6.73 -.08 InvRIEst 8.49 +.03
FocusMda 24.29 -.12 IronwdPh 12.21 -.19
ForcePro 5.55 Isis 14.85 -.42
FormFac 5.29 -.10 IvanhoeE h .64 +.01
Forinet 27.38 -.02
Fossil Inc 86.65 +1.22
FosterWhl 22.58 +.25 JA Solar .80 -.03
Francesca 27.87 -2.07 JDS Uniph 12.29 +.50
FredsInc 13.86 ... JacklnBox 27.46 +.34
FreshMkt 56.98 +.96 Jamba 2.50 +.07
FronterCm 4.55 -.10 JamesRiv 2.76 +.14
FuelCell .91 +.02 JazzPhrm 44.56 -.56
FultonFncl 10.06 +.07 JetBlue 5.10 +.11
FushiCop 904 ... JiveSoftn 14.54 -.81
JosABank 49.16 -.74
KCAPRFin 8.65 -.03
GTAdvTc 6.03 +.33 KIT Digift 3.15 +.01
GalenaBio 1.94 -.02 KLATnc 51.85 -.57
Garmin 41.52 +.78 KeryxBio 2.14 +.02
Gentex 18.39 +.09 Kforce 12.35 +.43
GeronCp 2.90 +.06 Kimballlnt 11.75 +.08
Gevo 3.30 +.11 KnightT 7.19 +.38
GileadSd 59.26 -.23 Kraft 39.99 -2.33
GladerBc 15.81 -.05 KratosDef 4.83 +.06
Gleacher h .78 +.01 Kulicke 11.40 -.28
Globalstrh .30 LKQCorp 39.76 +.79
GIbSpcMet 15.49 +19 LSI IndIf 6.33 -.13
GluMobile 4.85 -.06 LTX-Cred 5.69 -.15
GolLNGLtd 39.21 -.19 LamResrch 34.72 +.43
Google 706.15 +6.75 LamarAdv 32.86 -.19
GrCanyEd 22.77 +.30 Landstar 48.47 +.13
GrLkDrge 7.36 +.04 Lattce 3.89 -.01
GreenMtC 27.83 +3.25 Layne 18.50 +.41
GreenPlns 5.11 +.35 LeapWirlss 5.89 +.08
Groupon n 4.27 +.05 LexPhrm 2.42 +.03
GulfportE 27.86 +.53 LibGlobA 57.20 +.23
H&EEq 19.28 +.06 LibCapA 105.79 +.27
HMN Fn 2.74 ... LibtylntA 19.29 +.03
HMS Hdgs 34.22 -.44 LibVentAn 49.21 +.09
HSN Inc 46.68 +.13 LifeTech 48.80 -.36
HainCel 71.47 -1.67 LimelghtN 2.26 -.06
Halozyme 5.93 -.12 LinearTch 33.55 -.12
HancHId 30.98 +.26 Linktone 2.80 -.08
Harmonic 4.78 +.09 LinnEngy 39.54 -.16
Hasbro 37.64 -.31 Lionbrdg 3.34 -.27
HawHold 5.65 -.08 Liquidity 53.95 -.07
HIthCSvc 22.46 +.20 LivePrsn 17.29 +.24
HSchein 78.35 +.42 LodgeNet .41 +.02
HercOffsh 4.49 +.22 Logitech 9.59 +.17
HiTchPhm 31.38 -.15 LogMeln 23.44 +.83
Hollysys 10.03 +.02 LookSmth .90 +.03
Hologic 20.18 +.06 Lulkin 54.86 +2.90
HmLnSvcn 15.70 +.09 lululemngs 77.14 +8.54
HomeownC 21.92 +1.03 Luminex 19.75 -.02
HorizPhm 4.06 -.09
HorsehdH 9.72 +.64
HotTopic 9.51 -.25 MBFncl 20.65 +.25
HudsCity 7.55 +.09 MCG Cap 4.92 +.04
HuntJB 51.65 -.40 MGE 51.29 +.03
HuntBncsh 6.70 +.10 MIPSTech 7.31 +.01
IAC Inter 51.40 -.66 MTRGam 3.45 -.08
ICG Grp 8.85 -.23 MTS 52.53 -.16
IPG Photon 63.45 +1.07 MagicJcks 26.38 -.16
iShAsiaexJ 54.31 +1.04 Majesoi 1.74 +.05
iShACWI 46.75 +.49 MAKOSrg 16.78 -.17


MannKd 2.64 -.05 PSSWrld 21.75 -.11
MktAxess 28.89 -1.51 Paccar 41.71 +.70
MarvelT 10.48 +.06 PacEthan h .40 +.05
MatrixSv 10.50 +.10 PacSunwr 2.35 -.04
Mattel 35.50 -.14 PaciraPhm 18.06 -.08
MattrssFn 31.65 -.80 PanASlv 19.04 +.46
Mattson .87 -.01 PaneraBrd 157.39 +2.03
Maximlntg 27.97 -.13 ParamTch 22.37 -.28
MaxwlT 8.71 +.71 Parexel 29.96 -.12
Maxygen 2.71 +.06 ParkerVsn 2.55 +.31
MedAssets 17.80 +.22 PrtnrCm 4.63 +.17
MedicAcIn 3.55 +.04 Patterson 34.24 -.17
Medivafon 105.65 -2.97 PattUTI 16.10 +.37
MeloiCrwn 12.36 +.47 Paychex 34.22
Mellanox 110.85 -9.08 PeetsCfeT 73.52 +.01
MentorGr 17.07 +.04 Pendrell 1.18 +.02
MercadoL 82.87 +.73 PnnNGm 39.50 +.48
Mercerlnfi 6.47 +.26 PennantPk 10.96 +.07
MergeHIth 3.42 -.12 PensonWh .07 -.02
Methanx 29.91 +.43 PeopUtdF 12.19 +.03
Micrel 10.43 +.01 PeregrinP 4.50 +1.43
Microchp 34.67 -.26 PerfectWd 11.13 +.15
MicronT 6.42 -.26 Perrigo 111.84 -.13
MicrosSys 52.11 -.04 PetSmart 71.44 +.10
MicroSemi 20.50 +.08 Pharmacyc 65.01 -.89
Microsoft 30.95 -.40 PluristemT 4.39 -.22
Mindspeed 2.42 +.01 Polyoim 10.87 +.10
Misonix 2.95 -.23 Pool Corp 40.18 -.39
MobileMini 17.23 +.08 Popular rs 17.11 +.45
Molex 27.36 +.39 Power-One 5.80 -.23
Momenta 14.60 -.06 PwShs QQQ 69.43 -.10
MonPwSys 21.15 +.12 Presstekh .49
MonstrBvs 58.22 +.15 PriceTR 63.40 +.11
Movers 8.67 +.26 priceline 621.55 +17.55
Mylan 24.06 -.01 PrivateB 17.02 +.32
MyriadG 26.83 +.14 PrUPQQQs 62.47 -.27
NETgear 38.88 +.27 PrognicsPh 3.44 -.08
NIl HIdg 6.84 +.33 PUShQQQrs36.02 +.12
NPS Phm 8.17 +.48 ProspctCap 11.67 -.01
NXP Semi 24.82 +.35 PureCycle 2.00
Nanosphere 3.34 ... QIAGEN 18.60 +.24
NasdOMX 23.73 ... QlikTech 23.95 +.16
Natlnstrm 25.98 +.25 Qlogic 12.56 -.05
NatPenn 9.33 -.01 Qualoim 61.93 -.69
NektarTh 8.50 +.01 QualityS s 19.41 +.44
Neonode 3.57 +.09 QuestSft 27.96 +.01
NeptuneTg 4.44 +.15 Questoir 51.97 +1.68
NetApp 35.80 +.24 QuickLog 2.84 -.13
NetEase 50.11 +.42 RFMicD 3.84 -.04
Netfiix 56.66 +.01 Rambus 4.67 +.08
NYMtgTr 6.97 +.03 Randgold 111.47 +2.77
NewsCpA 24.47 -.03 RaptorPhm 5.27 +.23
NewsCpB 24.66 ... Regenrn 152.55 +.10
NobltyH If 5.36 -.54 RentACt 35.67 -.24
NorTrst 47.99 +.08 ReprosTh 14.62 -.40
NwstBcsh 12.18 -.21 RschMotn 7.19 +.48
Novadaqg 8.54 +.54 Responsys 9.39
Novavax 1.99 ... RexEnergy 13.10 +.70
NuVasive 21.47 +.16 RiverbedT 21.73 +.54
NuanceCm 24.45 +.15 RosttaGrs 5.68 +.20
Nvidia 13.40 -.33 RosettaR 46.24 +1.40
NxStageMd 13.36 -.09 RossStrss 68.13 -1.12
OCZTech 4.59 +.24 Rovi Corp 15.97 +.49
OReillyAu 83.25 -.41 RoyGId 90.42 +.26
ObagiMed 13.30 -.05 RubioinTc 8.83 -.12
Oclaro 2.70 +.02 Rudolph 10.00 +.15
OdysMar 3.67 +.03 rue21 31.01 +.86
OffclPaym 4.20 +.17 Ranair 31.67 +.30
OldDomFrt 45.79 +.19 Ifi n
OmniVisn 16.77 +.28
OnSmcnd 6.57 +.12 SBACom 60.04 -.64
Onoothyr 5.33 +.05 SEI Inv 22.38 +.06
OnyxPh 78.71 +.84 SLM Cp 15.94 +.16
OpenTxt 56.16 +.19 SS&CTech 22.70 +.19
OpenTbleh 46.22 -.24 STEC 7.79 -.11
OpbmerPh 15.97 -.46 SagentPhm 16.61 +1.09
Oracle 32.60 -.03 SalixPhm 41.92 -.54
OraSure 9.75 +01 SanDisk 44.26 +.25
Orexigen 5.50 -.23 SangBio 5.84 +.04
Orthfx 43.43 Sanmina 9.02 +.04
OtterTail 23.19 +.30 Sanofi rt 1.73 +.01
Overstk 9.23 +.10 Santarus 7.48 +.08
Oxi neh 56 01 Sapient 10.57 +.09
Sareptars 14.94 +.39
SavientPh 1.34 +.08
PDC Engy 32.21 +1.85 Schnitzer 31.22 +2.63
PDL Bio 7.37 -.07 SdClone 4.84 +.01
PMCSra 6.16 +.13 SdGames 8.06 +.30


SeagateT 30.60 -1.10 TransGIb 11.96 +.46
SearsHIdgs 58.18 +.81 TrimbleN 51.24 +.52
SeattGen 28.89 -.79 TripAdvn 35.61 +.16
SelCmfrt 31.31 +.04 TriQuint 6.08 +.21
Selectlns 18.40 -.03 TrstNY 5.73 +.03
Semtech 25.50 +.15
Sequenom 3.86 +.06 Trusmk 24.65 +.06
SvcSource 9.63 +.01 TuesMrn 6.36 -.03
SevArtsrs .92 -.06 UTiWrldwd 13.99 -.56
ShandaG s 3.86 +.04 Ubiquitf n 12.03 +.04
ShoreTel 4.06 ... UltaSalon 101.54 +6.28
ShuffiMstr 15.23 -.05 Ultratech 32.09 -1.90
Shutterfly 32.07 +1.09 Umpqua 13.00 +.08
SigmaAld 73.43 +2.03 Unilife 3.19 -.05
SilicGrln 9.28 +.08
Silinmlmg 5.00 +.07 UtdOnln 5.35 +.03
SilcnLab 38.34 -.23 USEnr 2.20 -.04
Slcnware 5.70 +.04 UtdTherap 55.19 -.50
SilvStdg 15.17 +.07 UnivDisp 41.48 +.13
Sina 63.61 +1.68 UnivFor 40.01 +1.39
Sindair 12.41 +.41 UnwiredP 1.79 -.11
SiriusXM 2.53 -.01 UranmRs h .51 +.06
SironaDent 54.84 +.58 UrbanOut 38.73 -.30
Skullcandy 15.60 -.20
SkyWest 9.19 +.14
SkywksSol 31.16 -.02 VCAAnt 20.10 +.14
SmartBal 11.65 -.28 VCAAnt 20.10 +.14
SmithWes 10.07 +1.07 VOXX In 7.74 +.16
SnydLance 25.51 +.40 ValueClick 16.35 -.19
SodaStrm 37.63 -.01 VanSTCpB 80.09 +.13
Sohu.cm 42.36 +1.27 VanlntCpB 86.94 +.18
SolarCap 23.47 +.10 Veeomlnst 36.00 +1.02
SonicCorp 10.03 +.12 Veli 7.30 +.05
Sons 1.94 -.03 VBradley 21.37 -.16
SouMoBc 24.50
Sourcefire 56.20 -1.08 erintSys 28.5 +.25
SpectPh 12.01 -.59 Verisign 48.93 -.08
SpiritAir 19.73 +.13 Verisk 48.90 -.23
Splunkn 38.29 +1.06 VertxPh 57.10 -.34
Spreadtrm 21.78 +1.19 ViaSat 39.36 +.36
Staples 11.64 +.17 ViacomB 50.86 +1.03
StarBulkh .52 +.01 ical 3.80 +.10
StarSdent 3.79 +.01 VirgnMdah 29.32 +.64
Starbucks 51.17 +.33 ViroPhrm 27.47 -.33
SfDynam 12.32 +.38 MstaPrt 36.82 +1.24
StemCells 2.07 -.06
Stericyde 93.60 +.20 Vitang 3.80 -.05
SMadden 45.05 +.27 Vivus 22.63 -.25
StewEnt 8.24 +.26 Vodafone 28.29 -.22
Stratasys 62.93 -1.06 Volcano 28.16 -.58
SunHIth 8.45 +.01 WarnerCh 12.86 +.06
SunesisPh 3.40 +.08 WarrenRs 2.98 +.04
SunOpta 6.24 +.03 Web.com 17.21 -.20
SunPower 4.46 +.08 WebMD 15.03 +.40
support.cm 3.25 -.09
SusqBnc 10.98 +.19 WendysCo 4.45 -.01
Susser 35.49 -.02 WestellT 1.99 -.13
SwisherH If 1.73 +.01 WDigital 41.86 -1.25
Symantec 18.92 -.03 WLibtyBcp 3.95 +.03
Symetricm 6.28 -.01 Westmrld 9.35 +.25
Synaorn 8.26 ... Wstptlnng 33.42 -.57
Synchron 23.49 -.09 WetSeal 3.12 +.13
Synopsys 33.73 -.37 WholeFd 97.70 -.52
SyntaPhm 8.09 -.03 WillsL pfA 11.00 -.11
Syntrolmh .73 +.01 WspA 11.00 .11
TFS Fncl 8.93 +.09 WlshB 6.50 +.01
THLCredit 13.90 -.05 Windstrm 10.21 +.07
TICCCap 10.85 +.06 Wintrust 37.73 +.14
tw teleom 25.67 +.09 Woodward 36.99 +.73
TakeTwo 10.54 +.20 Wowjointh .36 +.04
Tangoe 14.29 -1.68 WrightM 20.77 -.50
TASER 5.50 +.08 Wynn 102.74 +1.19
TechData 49.45 +.10 XOMA 3.58 -.04
TICmSys 2.03 -.16
Tellabs 3.67 +.01 Xlinx 34.87 +.16
TescoCp 10.17 +.15 YRCrs 6.20 +.22
TeslaMot 29.35 +.80 Yahoo 15.22 +.11
TxCapBsh 47.01 -.13 Yandex 22.95 +.44
Texlnst 29.18 -.38 Zagg 8.39 +.08
TexRdhse 17.72 -.20 Zalicus 1.39 -.04
Theravnce 23.91 -.28 Zllow 42.63 -.86
Thoratec 34.95 -.63 ZonBcp 20.30 +.57
ThrshdPhm 8.67 +.23
TibcoSft 32.60 +.47 Zopharm 5.60 +.21
TitanMach 25.36 +1.62 Zpcar 7.94 +.10
TiVo Inc 9.74 -.01 ZOgenix 2.30 -.02
Towerstm 4.14 -.16 Zumiez 29.15 +.28
TractSupp 100.61 -.27 Zyngan 2.88 -.06


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.6610 4.6530
Australia .9622 .9717
Bahrain .3770 .3775
Brazil 2.0295 2.0310
Britain 1.6004 1.5936
Canada .9782 .9822
Chile 475.75 480.55
China 6.3437 6.3440
Colombia 1795.50 1807.50
Czech Rep 19.19 19.45
Denmark 5.8229 5.8932
Dominican Rep 39.11 39.19
Egypt 6.0929 6.0944
Euro .7815 .7910
Hong Kong 7.7557 7.7568
Hungary 222.76 226.99
India 55.395 55.650
Indnsia 9565.00 9565.00
Israel 3.9777 4.0160
Japan 78.29 78.88
Jordan .7085 .7085
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1115 3.1165
Mexico 12.9896 13.0582
N. Zealand 1.2320 1.2467
Norway 5.7440 5.8451
Peru 2.612 2.613
Poland 3.20 3.27
Russia 31.6526 31.9726
Singapore 1.2358 1.2423
So. Africa 8.1909 8.3056
So. Korea 1130.50 1133.95
Sweden 6.6103 6.7389
Switzerlnd .9457 .9532
Taiwan 29.68 29.86
Thailand 31.04 31.17
Turkey 1.7971 1.8077
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 21.3499 21.3999
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



li- Yesterday PvsDay

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.11 0.09
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 0.65 0.59
10-year 1.67 1.55
30-year 2.83 2.67



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Oct 12 96.42 +.89
Corn CBOT Dec 12 7991/2 +1
Wheat CBOT Dec 12 905 +131/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 17361/2 -101/2
Cattle CME Oct 12 126.47 +.42
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 19.38 +.51
Orange Juice ICE Nov 12 127.45 +2.40


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1737.50 $1684.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.633 $31.3/O
Copper (pound) $3.6660 $3.4b40
Platinum (troy oz., spot)

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 5.78 +.41 -30.0 Lowes .64 2.3 19 28.32 -.06 +11.6
AT&T Inc 1.76 4.7 50 37.30 -.14 +23.3 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 91.02 +.35 -9.3
Ameteks .24 .7 20 35.48 +.25 +26.4 Microsoft .80 2.6 15 30.95 -.40 +19.2
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 86.95 -.59 +42.6 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.1 24 49.30 +.18 +6.5
BkofAm .04 .5 9 8.80 +.45 +58.3 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 67.65 +.24+11.1
CapCtyBk ...... 10.10 +.20 +5.8 Penney 28.50 +.53 -18.9
CntryLink 2.90 6.9 46 41.93 -.29 +12.7 PiedmOfc .80 4.6 13 17.30 +.13 +1.5
Citigroup .04 .1 9 32.07 +.95 +21.9 RegionsFn .04 .5 18 7.37 +.15 +71.4
CmwREIT 2.00 13.4 0 14.94 +.23 10 SearsHdgs .33 58.18 +.81 +83.1
mwREIT 2.0013.4Smucker 2.08 2.4 21 86.10 -.52 +10.1
Disney .60 1.2 17 51.74 -.12+38.0 SprintNex ......5.03 +.07+115.0
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 17 64.72 -.28 Texlnst .68 2.3 20 29.18 -.38 +.2
EnterPT 3.00 6.4 21 46.97 -.25 +7.5 TimeWarn 1.04 2.4 16 43.64 +.42 +20.8
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.5 11 89.92 +.93 +6.1 UniFirst .15 .2 15 66.12 +.27 +16.5
FordM .20 2.0 8 10.14 +.23 -5.8 VerizonCm 2.06 4.7 44 43.72 -.43 +9.0
GenElec .68 3.1 18 21.59 +.28 +20.5 Vodafone 1.99 7.0 ... 28.29 -.22 +.9
HomeDp 1.16 2.0 20 57.26 -.39 +36.2 WalMart 1.59 2.2 16 73.82 -.99 +23.5
Intel .90 3.7 10 24.19 -.91 -.2 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 12 34.94 -.26 +5.7
IBM 3.40 1.7 14199.50 +.40 +8.5 YRC rs ...... 6.20 +.22 -37.8







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I MUTUALFUDSS I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: MuItCGrA 8.93 +.04
Balancp 17.12 +.05 InBosA 5.91 +.02
Retlnc 8.96 ... LgCpVal 19.55 +.11
Alger Funds B: NatlMunInc 10.12 +.01
SmCapGr 7.18 +.02 SpEqtA 16.64 +.08
AllianceBern A: TradGvA 7.40
BalanAp 17.30 +.06 Eaton Vance B:
GIbThGrAp63.98 +1.25 HlthSBt 10.63
SmCpGrA 40.32 +.17 NatlMulnc 10.12 +.01
AllianceBern Adv: Eaton Vance C:
LgCpGrAd 30.98 +.19 GovtC p 7.39
AllianceBern B: NatMunInc 10.12 +.01
GlbThGrBt 54.86 +1.07 Eaton Vance I:
GrowthBt 28.00 +.14 FltgRt 9.06 +.01
SCpGrBt 32.14 +.13 GblMacAbR 9.84 -.01
AllianceBern C: LgCapVal 19.60 +.10
SCpGrCt 32.32 +.14 FBR Funds:
Allianz Fds Insti: Focuslnv t n 50.14 +.03
NFJDvVI 12.92 +.07 FMI Funds:
SmCpVI 31.52 +.26 LgCappn 17.35 +.02
Allianz Funds C: FPA Funds:
AGICGrthC 27.21 +.01 Newlnco 10.68 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: FPACres 28.80 +.06
LgCaplnst 21.62 +.12 Fairholme 30.95 +.29
Amer Beacon Inv: Federated A:
LgCaplnv 20.48 +.11 MidGrStA 35.88 +.20
Ameri Century 1st: MuSecA 10.71 +.01
Growth 28.87 +.08 Federated Insti:
Amer Century Adv: KaufmnR 5.38 +.02
EqGroAp 24.66 +.06 TotRetBd 11.57
EqincAp 7.99 +.01 StrValDvlS 5.14 -.01
Amer Century Inv: Fidelity Adv Foc T:
AIICapGr 31.67 +.16 EnergyT 36.70 +.70
Balanced 17.62 +.03 HItCarTe 22.95 -1.96
DivBnd 11.26 +.01 Fidelity Advisor A:
Eqlnc 8.00 +.02 Nwlnsghp 23.08 +.10
Growthl 28.60 +08 StrlnA 12.70 +.05
Heritagel 23.22 +.17 Fidelity Advisor C:
IncGro 27.80 +.08 Nwlnsghtn 21.77 +.09
InfAdjBd 13.32 +.04 Fidelity Advisor I:
IntDisc 9.77 +.08 EqGrl n 68.00 +.22
InitGrol 10.78 +.09 Eqlnin 26.42 +.14
NewOpp 8.31 +.04 IntBdln 11.70 +.01
OneChAg 13.21 +.06 NwlnsgtIn 23.40 +.10
OneChMd 12.68 +.06 Strlnin 12.85 +.05
RealEstl 24.00 +.06 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 26.73 +.17 BalancT 16.68 +.04
Valuelnv 6.36 +.04 DivGrTp 13.34 +.09
American Funds A: EqGrTp 63.46 +.20
AmcpAp 21.34 +.11 EqInT 25.99 +.13
AMutAp 28.46 ... GrOppT 43.08 +.26
BalAp 20.28 +.08 HilnAdTp 10.24 +.03
BondAp 12.92 +.01 IntBdT 11.68 +.01
CaplBAp 53.17 +.02 MulncTp 13.71 +.01
CapWGAp 36.02 +.25 OvrseaT 17.17 +.19
CapWAp 21.48 +.15 STFiT 9.34
EupacA p 39.27 +.43 StSelAIICp 20.45 +.09
FdlnvA p 40.23 +.28 Fidelity Freedom:
GIbiBaIA 26.44 +.16 FF2010n 14.29 +.06
GovtAp 14.60 +01 FF2010K 13.09 +.05
GwthAp 33.66 +.28 FF2015n 11.95 +.05
HITrAp 11.16 +.03 FF2015K 13.16 +.05
IncoAp 18.06 +.06 FF2020n 14.48 +.07
IntBdAp 13.78 +.01 FF2020K 13.59 +.06
InfitlGrlncAp 29.75 +.26 FF2025 n 12.07 +.06
ICAAp 30.78 +.12 FF2025K 13.76 +.07
LtTEBAp 16.33 ... FF2030n 14.38 +.08
NEcoAp 28.06 +.21 FF2030K 13.91 +.07
N PerAp 30.37 +.24 FF2035n 11.92 +.07
NwWrldA 51.50 +.40 FF2035K 14.01 +.08
STBFAp 10.10 +.01 FF2040n 8.32 +.05
SmCpAp 38.86 +.35 FF2040K 14.05 +.08
TxExAp 13.07 ... FF2045K 14.21 +.09
WshAp 31.47 +.08 Fidelity Invest:
Ariel Investments: AIISectEq 13.07 +.05
Apprec 44.57 +.42 AMgr50On 16.35 +.06
Ariel 48.85 +.35 AMgr70rn 17.32 +.09
Artisan Funds: AMgr20rxn 13.34
Intl 23.25 +.09 Balanc n 20.26 +.06
Intllnstl 23.40 +.09 BalancedK 20.26 +.06
InftlValir 28.81 +.16 BlueChGrxn50.62 +.26
MidCap 39.60 +.37 BluChpGrKx 50.66 +.22
MidCapVal 21.32 +.07 CAMunn 12.87 +.01
Baron Funds: Canada n 54.33 +.59
Asset 51.86 +.19 CapApn 29.92 +.15
Growth 58.27 +.12 CapDevOn 11.98 +.07
SmallCap 26.32 +.10 Cplncrn 9.35 +.04
Bernstein Fds: ChinaRgr 26.57 +.41
IntDur 14.18 +.01 CngS 465.09
DivMu 14.87 ... CTMunrn 12.07
TxMgdlnt 13.34 +.22 Contran 79.20 +.31
BlackRock A: ContraK 79.21 +.32
EqtyDiv 19.93 +.05 CnvScn 24.91 +.22
GIAIAr 19.47 +.13 DisEqn 24.77 +.04
HiYlnvA 7.93 +.02 DiscEqF 24.77 +.04
InflOpAp 31.04 +.31 Divlntin 28.69 +.21
BlackRock B&C: DivrslntKr 28.68 +.22
GIAICt 18.11 +.12 DivSkOn 17.43 +.16
BlackRockInstl: DivGthxn 30.18 +.02
EquityDv 19.98 +05 EmergAsrn27.15 +.36
GIbAllocr 19.57 +14 EmrMkn 21.68 +.30
HiYldBd 7.93 +.02 Eq Incn 47.04 +.25
Brinson FundsY: EQIIn 19.67 +.01
HiYldlYn 6.30 +.02 ECapAp 17.95 +.18
BruceFund 400.98 -.01 Europe 29.75 +.35
Buffalo Funds: Exch 323.88 .
SmCapn 29.43 Exportn 24.09 +.10
CGM Funds: Fideln 36.07 +.11
Focusn 27.19 +.27 Fiftyrn 19.97 +.09
Muti n 27.20 +.29 FItRateHi r n 9.91
Realtyn 30.28 +.16 FrnOnen 29.26 +.18
Calamos Funds: GNMAen 11.87 -.12
GrwthAp 52.67 +.39 Govtnc 10.92

Incop 16.42 +.03 Grolncen 21.19 +11
InfEqAp 13.45 +13 GrowCoF 99.09 +.52
SocialAp 30.94 +.13 GrowthCoK 99.07 +51
SocBdp 16.45 +.03 GrStratrn 20.56 +.07
SocEqAp 38.34 +19 Highlncr n 9.25 +.03
SocEqAp 38.34 +.19
TxF Lgp 16.42 +.01 lndepnn 25.65 +.23
Cohen & Steers: InProBd n 13.42 +.05
RltyShrs 70.44 +.19 IntGovn 11.08 +.01
ColumbiaClass A: IntGonMun 108 +.063
Acornt 30.43 +.25 IntDiscn 31.50 +30
DivEqInc 10.56 +.05 nDSCprn 19.548 +.2830
DivOpptyA 8.83 +.03 InSvGrdn 14802 +01
LgCapGrAt 27.32 +.07 InvGBn 7.97 +.01
LgCorQAp 6.66 +.01 Japanr 9.39 +.12
MdCpGrOp 10.40 +.08 JpnS +.1295
MidCVIOpp 8.21 +.06 LgCapVal 118.35 +06
PBModAp 11.26 +.05 LatAm 49.73 +94
TxEA p 14.24 LevCoStkll n 3040 +.30
SelCommA46.06 -.07 LowPrxn 39.2640 +1.630
FrontierA 11.32 +03 LowPriKrx 39.24 -1.72
GlobTech 21.72 -.01 Magellnn 74.37 +.32
Columbia Cl lT&G:
Cmbpin 8. 17 +10 MagellanK 74.32 +.32
EmMktOpln8.17 +.10 MDMurn 11.65
Columbia Class Z: MAMunn 12.71
AcornZ 31.56 +.25 MegaCpStknl1.87 +.08
AcornlntZ 39.16 +.47 MIMunn 12.51
DivlncoZ 15.07 -.01 MidCapn 30.29 +.11
IntBdZ 9.55 +.01 MNaMunnn 12.01
IntTEBd 10.99 MtgSecn 11.39 +.01
LgCapGr 13.88 +.17 Munilncn 13.50 +.01
ValRestr 49.69 +.29 NJMunrn 12.30
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 17.60 +.06
ComRett 8.48 +.07 NwMilln 33.12 +.13
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.66
InflCorEqn 10.00 +.17 OTCn 63.35 +.43
USCorEql n12.33 +.07 OhMunn 12.35
USCorEq2nl2.14 +.07 1001ndex 10.35 +.03
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 30.90 +.25
CommAp 19.57 +.02 PcBasn 23.63 +.17
DWS InvestS: PAMunrn 11.44
CoreEqtyS 18.04 +.03 Puritnn 19.80 +.05
CorPIsnc 11.15 +.02 PuritanK 19.80 +.05
EmMkGrr 15.59 +.29 RealExn 32.75 -.04
EnhEmMk 11.08 +.06 SAIISecEqF 13.09 +.05
EnhGlbBdr 10.30 +.08 SCmdtyStrtn9.34 +.10
GIbSmCGr 38.58 +.43 SCmdtyStrFn9.37 +.10
GIblThem 22.45 +.30 SrEmrgMkt 15.89 +.29
Gold&Prc 14.86 +.40 SrslntGrw 11.54 +.08
HiYldTx 12.99 ... SerlniGrF 11.57 +.08
IntTxAMT 12.16 +.01 SrslntVal 9.04 +.09
Intl FdS 41.67 +.59 SerlntiValF 9.06 +.09
LgCpFoGr 34.26 +.01 SrlnvGrdF 12.02
LatAmrEq 40.35 +.66 StlntMun 10.87
MgdMuniS 9.50 ... STBFn 8.59 +.01
MATFS 15.23 +01 SmCapDiscn22.98 +20
SP500S 19.21 +.08 SmllCpSrn 18.26 +.11
WorldDiv 23.67 +.08 SCpValu rx 15.45 -.31
Davis Funds A: SllSelLCVrnll.76 +.07
NYVenA 36.23 +.15 SlSlcACapn28.41 +13
Davis Funds B: StkSelSmCp20.31 +.12
NYVenB 34.46 +.14 Skatlncn 11.37 +05
Davis Funds C: SfrReRtr 9.80 +.04
NYVenC 34.79 +.13 TaxFrBrn 11.65
Davis FundsVY: TotalBdn 11.27 +.01
NYVenY 36.66 +.15 Trendn 79.61 +.31
Delaware Invest A: USBI n 12.00
Diverlncp 9.42 ... Utilityn 18.79 -.05
SMIDCapG 25.26 +.17 ValStratn 30.40 +.16
TxUSAp 12.25 +.01 Valuen 74.41 +58
Delaware Invest B: Wrldwn 19.79 +.13
SelGrBt 35.67 +.22 Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: Airn 37.61 +.31
EmMCrEqnl8.65 +.24 Bankingn 19.83 +15
EmMktV 27.77 +.42 Biotchn 111.91 .15
IntSmVan 14.83 +.25 Brokrn 47.64 +.57
LargeCo 11.39 +.05 Chemn 115.48 +90
TAUSCorE2n9.88 +06 ComEquipn22.50 +10
USLgVan 22.28 +.20 Compn 65.67 +.06
USMicron 15.06 +.07 ConDisn 27.69 +05
USTgdVal 17.50 +13 ConsuFnn 14.18 +.11
USSmalln 23.54 +.13 ConStapn 81.17 -.46
USSmVa 26.97 +.21 CstHon 44.84 +.18
IntlSmCon 15.01 +.24 DfAern 84.11 +.51
EmMktSCnl9.73 +.14 Electrn 47.87 -.16
EmgMktn 25.59 +.35 Enrgyn 52.44 +.99
Fixdn 10.35 ... EngSvn 69.47 +1.28
IntGFxlnn 13.18 +.02 EnvAltEnrnl6.24 +.15
IntVan 15.65 +.34 FinSvn 59.67 +.47
Glb5Fxlncnll1.31 +.02 Goldrn 40.53 +.99
2YGIFxdn 10.14 +.01 Healthn 142.89 -.10
DFARIEn 27.23 +.03 Insurn 51.22 +.20


Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 104.92 +1.47
Balanced 76.89 +.36 Materialn 70.66 +1.18
Income 13.86 +.01 MedDIn 61.03 -.04
IntStk 32.57 +.53 MdEqSysn 28.58 +.23
Stock 119.44 +71 Mulfdn 55.27 +.11
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 32.07 +.46
TRBd I 11.33 ... Pharm n 15.44 -.05
TRBd Np 11.33 ... Retail 63.77 +.15
Dreyfus: Softwrn 89.10 +.24
Aprec 45.26 +.15 Techn 105.75 +.29
CTA 12.38 Telcmn 51.32 -.08
CorVA Transn 51.09 +.31
Dreyf 9.88 +.03 UtilGrn 56.79 -.26
DryMidr 29.78 +.15 Wirelessn 8.06 +.03
GNMA 16.17 +.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 30.34 +.57 5001dxlnvn 51.15 +.21
HiYldAp 6.54 +.02 5001dx I 51.16 +.21
StratValA 30.12 +.18 Intlnxlnvn 32.81 +.44
TechGroA 35.64 +.16 TotMktlnvn41.78 +.18
DreihsAclnc 10.42 ... USBondl 12.00 +.01
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktGr 27.68 +.25 ExMktAd r n40.61 +.23
EVPTxMEmI45.72 +.49 5001dxAdvn51.15 +.21
Eaton Vance A: IntAd r n 32.83 +.44
ChinaAp 16.13 +21 TotMktAdrn41.79 +.19
AMTFMuInc 10.40 ... USBondl 12.00 +.01


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.18 +.37
OverseasA 22.05 +.27
First Investors A
BlChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.68 +.02
GloblAp 6.76 +.06
GovtAp 11.54
GrolnAp 16.72 +.08
IncoAp 2.60 +.01
MATFAp 12.48
MITFAp 12.86
NJTFAp 13.78
NYTFA p 15.25
OppAp 29.74 +.23
PATFAp 13.74 +.01
SpSitAp 24.96 +.14
TxExlncop 10.26
TotRtAp 16.85 +.06
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.21 -.05
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.91 +.01
ALTFAp 11.89
AZTFAp 11.47 +.01
CallnsAp 12.92
CAIntAp 12.13
CaITFAp 7.48
COTFAp 12.44
CTTFAp 11.48
CvtScAp 15.12 +.07
DblTFA 12.28
DynTchA 34.02 +.13
EqlncAp 18.17 +.10
Fedlntp 12.52
FedTFAp 12.68
FLTFAp 11.99
FoundAlp 11.00 +.09
GATFA p 12.74
GoIdPrMA 33.65 +1.13
GrwthAp 50.32 +.33
HYTFA p 10.88
HilncA 2.05 +.01
IncomAp 2.22 +.01
InsTFAp 12.58 +.01
NYITFp 11.86
LATFAp 12.04 +.01
LMGvScA 10.34 +.01
MDTFAp 12.01
MATFAp 12.16
MITFAp 12.34
MNInsA 12.95 +.01
MOTFA p 12.73
NJTFAp 12.63
NYTFAp 12.12
NCTFA p 12.94
OhiolAp 13.09
ORTFA p 12.58
PATFAp 10.93
ReEScAp 17.25 +.02
RisDvAp 37.59 +.11
SMCpGrA 37.48 +.36
Stratlncp 10.60 +.03
TtlRinAp 10.45 +.02
USGovAp 6.90 +.01
UtIsAp 13.98 -.03
VATFAp 12.24
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.20 +.07
IncmeAd 2.21 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.24 +.01
USGvC t 6.86 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesAx 22.25 -.11
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktApx 22.37 +.44
ForgnAp 6.56 +.15
GIBdAp 13.24 +.07
GrwthAp 18.73 +.28
WorldAp 15.60 +.22
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktCx 21.75 +.43
ForgnCp 6.40 +.14
GIBdCp 13.26 +.07
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestAe 17.55 -.21
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 12.06 +.01
US Eqty 45.13 +.17
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 22.58 +.07
Quality 23.81 -.07
GMOTrust IV:
IntllntrV 20.07 +.31
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.11 +.15
Quality 23.82 -.07
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.35 +.30
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 38.39 +.22
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 26.29 +.12
HiYield 7.31 +.02
HYMuni n 9.28
MidCapV 38.75 +.22
ShtDrTF n 10.66
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.94 +.04
CapAplnst 43.42 +.33
Intllnv t 58.27 +.74
Intl r 58.93 +.75
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.67 +.26
DivGthAp 21.01 +.07
IntOpAp 14.33 +.17
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 32.72 +.25
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.40 +.34
Div&Gr 21.76 +.08
Balanced 21.36 +.05
MidCap 27.99 +.10
TotRetBd 11.81 +.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.46 +.02
StrGrowth 10.91 -.09
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.29 +.29
HlthcareS 17.48 -.01
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 8.00 +.01
IVA Funds:
WAdwideIr 16.13 +.09
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.44 +.02
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.38 +.84
Ubliies 17.73 -.09
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 13.04 +.10
Chartp 17.91 +.07
CmstkA 17.34 +.10
Constp 24.29 +.14
DivrsDivp 13.44 +.01
EqlncA 9.18 +.02
GrIncAp 20.91 +.07
HilncMu p
HiYld p 4.33 +.02
HYMuA 10.04
InfiGrow 27.89 +.21
MunilnA 13.89 +.01
PA TFA 17.03
US MortgA 13.11
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.86
US Mortg 13.04
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 13.13 +.10
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.18 +.28
AssetStA p 25.02 +.30
AssetSkl r 25.26 +.30
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.10 +.01
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.15 +.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 27.89 +.11
JPMorgan R Cl:
CoreBondn 12.10 +01
ShtDurBd 11.02 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.51 +.08
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.09 +.01
HighYld n 8.08 +.03
lnfrTFBd n 11.37
LgCpGr 24.73 +.12
ShtDurBd n 11.02 +.01
USLCCrPIsn23.25 +.19
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 27.14 +.13
ContrarnT 14.04 +.12
EnterprT 65.59 +.19
FIxBndT 10.97 +.01
GlLUfeSciTr 30.47 -.06
GIbSelT 9.36 +.11
GITechTr 18.78 +.04
Grw&lncT 34.43 +.21
JanusT 32.18 +.03
OvrseasTr 31.10 +.69
PrkMCVal T22.16 +.14
ResearchT 32.38 +.11
ShTmBdT 3.10
Twenty T 63.47 +.38
VentureT 60.48 +.28
WrldWTr 44.43 +.53
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.24 +.03
IncomeAp 6.67 +01


RgBkA 14.86 +.12
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.67 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.73 +.09
LSBalanc 13.50 +.07
LSConsrv 13.48 +.04
LSGrwth 13.41 +.07
LSModer 13.34 +.06
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.12 +.22
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.53 +.22


Name NAV Chg
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 130.97 +.38
CBApprp 16.01 +.02
CBLCGrp 24.39 +.10
GCIAIICOp 8.60 +.16
WAHilncAt 6.13 +.02
WAMgMup 17.10
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.15 +.09
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.60 +.26
CMValTrp 41.95 +.30
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.30 +.40
SmCap 29.62 +.22
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.92 +.07
StrlncC 15.34 +.07
LSBondR 14.85 +.06
StrlncA 15.26 +.08
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.62 +.06
InvGrBdY 12.63 +.06
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.93 +.10
FundlEq 13.24 +.06
BdDebAp 8.04 +.03
ShDurlncAp 4.63 +.01
MidCpAp 17.41 +.09
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.66 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.62
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.84 +.10
MIGA 17.83 +.09
EmGA 48.70 +.22
HilnA 3.55 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 15.14 +.04
UtilA 18.36 +.09
ValueA 25.43 +.06
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.97 +.08
GvScBn 10.54 +.01
HilnBn 3.55 +.01
MulnBn 8.97
TotRB n 15.15 +.04
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.55 +.06
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqn 18.01 +.23
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.06 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.26 +.04
GovtBt 9.02
HYIdBBt 6.03 +.01
IncmBldr 17.66 +.04
IntlEqB 10.71 +.11
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.95 +.25
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 82.69 +.09
Managers Funds:
Yackbanpnl9.18 +.02
YacktFocn 20.64 +.01
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.52 +.09
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.31 +.07
Indialnvr 15.85 +.21
PacTgrlnv 22.27 +.16
MergerFdn 16.00 +.01
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.95 +.03
TotRtBdl 10.95 +.04
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.78 +.08
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.92 +.12
MontagGr I 26.29
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.01 +.10
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 13.78 +.09
MCapGrl 35.55 +.27
Muhlenkn 57.02 +.26
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.65 +.12
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 32.64 +.28
Mutual Series:
BeacnZx 13.19 -.04
GblDiscAe 29.66 -.32
GIbDiscZ e 30.08 -.32
QuestZ e 17.73 -.20
SharesZx 22.46 -.11
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.20 +.04
Geneslnst 50.17 +.16
Intl r 16.97 +.26
LgCapV Inv 27.38 +.37
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.99 +.17
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.90 +.03
Nicholasn 48.14 +.16
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.08
HiYFxlnc 7.40
SmCpldx 9.30
Stkldx 17.83
Technly 16.44
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.87
LtMBAp 11.24
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.35
HYMunBd 16.87 +.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 22.29 +.03
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.66 +.18
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.11 +.16
Globall 21.91 +.31
Intl I r 19.08 +.45
Oakmark 49.18 +.23
Select 32.75 +.15
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.43 +.03
GIbSMdCap 14.76 +.15
LgCapStrat 9.72 +.09
RealRet 9.73 +.08
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.20
AMTFrNY 12.21
CAMuniAp 8.77
CapApAp 49.48 +.25
CaplncAp 9.24 +.02
ChmplncAp 1.84
DvMktAp 33.09 +.37
Discp 65.78
EquityA 9.66 +.05
GlobAp 60.81 +.56
GIbOppA 29.61 +.22
GblStfrlncA 4.29 +.01
Goldp 34.68 +.88
IntBdA p 6.52 +.03
LtdTmMu 15.08
MnStFdA 37.58 +.24
PAMuniAp 11.47
SenFltRtA 8.25 +.01
USGv p 9.84
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.17 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.22
CplncB t 9.04 +.02
ChmplncBt 1.85 +.01
EquityB 8.87 +.05
GblStrlncB 4.30 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40
RoMuAp 16.96
RcNtMuA 7.50
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 32.77 +.36
IntlBdY 6.52 +.03
IntGrowY 29.16 +.29
Osterweis Funds:
Sklncon 11.71 +.02
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.87 +01
TotRtAd 11.50 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.15 +.09
AIIAsset 12.62 +.10
ComodRR 7.08 +07
Divlnc 12.14 +.03
EmgMkCur 10.40 +.06
EmMkBd 12.27 +04
Fltlnc r 8.80 +.02
ForBdUnr 11.47 +.16
FrgnBd 11.19 +.04
HiYId 9.51 +.04
InvGrCp 11.16 +.03
LowDu 10.61 +.02
ModDur 11.11 +.03
RealRtnIl 12.47 +.04
ShortT 9.87 +.01
TotRt 11.50 +.02
TRII 11.07 +.02
TRIll 10.12 +.02
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.07 +.09
LwDurA 10.61 +.02
RealRtAp 12.47 +.04
TotRtA 11.50 +02
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.94 +.09
RealRtCp 12.47 +.04
TotRtCt 11.50 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.47 +.04
TRtnp 11.50 +.02


PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 11.14 +.10
TotRtnP 11.50 +.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.88 +.04
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.32 +.55
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.88 +.01
IntiValA 18.13 +.31
PionFdAp 42.35 +.16
ValueAp 12.08 +.05


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.31 +.05
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.41 +.05
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.16 +.02
Price Funds:
Balance 20.93 +.12
BIChip 46.14 +.32
CABond 11.47
CapApp 23.19 +.08
DivGro 26.30 +.07
EmMktB 14.01 +.06
EmEurop 18.83 +.44
EmMktS 31.20 +.42
Eqlnc 26.15 +.16
Eqlndex 38.88 +.16
Europe 15.36 +.17
GNMA 10.14
Growth 38.24 +.20
Gr&ln 22.56 +.10
HIthSci 43.34 -.04
HiYield 6.86 +.03
InsDCpG 19.13 +.15
InstHiYld 9.66 +.03
MCEqGr 30.59 +.16
IntlBond 10.10 +.11
IntDis 43.83 +.51
Intl G& 12.50 +.17
IntlStk 13.77 +.18
Japan 7.70 +.10
LatAm 40.50 +.78
MDShrt 5.24
MDBond 11.08 +.01
MidCap 59.73 +.31
MCapVal 24.97 +.11
NAmer 35.86 +.15
NAsia 15.63 +.16
New Era 43.69 +.80
N Horiz 36.63 +.06
N Incn 9.90
NYBond 11.88
OverSSF 8.16 +.10
PSInc 17.17 +.09
RealAssetr 11.16 +.19
RealEst 21.61 +.06
R2010n 16.58 +.08
R2015n 12.91 +.07
R2020n 17.90 +.11
R2025n 13.12 +.09
R2030n 18.86 +.14
R2035n 13.34 +.10
R2040 n 18.98 +.14
R2045n 12.64 +.10
SciTecn 27.49 +.07
ShtBd n 4.86
SmCpStk 36.55 +.16
SmCapVal 39.02 +.20
SpecGr 19.40 +.16
SpecIn 12.95 +.05
TFInc 10.54 +.01
TxFrH 11.76
TxFrSI 5.71
USTIntn 6.32 +.01
USTLgn 14.03 -.05
VABond 12.29
Valuen 26.10 +.17
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 9.75 +.11
LgCGIIn 10.47 +.06
LT20201n 12.64 +.07
LT20301n 12.50 +.08
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.37 +.15
HiYIdAp 5.63 +.02
MuHilncA 10.29 -.01
UtlityA 11.88 -.01
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.65 +.14
HiYIdBt 5.62 +.02
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 33.75 +.15
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.28 +.01
AZTE 9.53
ConvSec 20.13 +.08
DvrlnAp 7.67 +.01
EqlnAp 16.95 +.09
EuEq 19.28 +.26
GeoBalA 13.18 +.04
GIbEqtyp 9.23 +.06
GrlnAp 14.47 +.12
GIblHIthA 46.17 +.07
HiYdA p 7.82 +.03
HiYld In 6.08 +.02
IncmAp 7.19
IntGrln p 9.20 +.15
InvAp 14.62 +.07
NJTxAp 9.85
MultCpGr 55.72 +.32
PATE 9.53
TxExA p 9.05
TFInAp 15.70
TFHYA 12.66
USGvAp 13.72 +.01
GIblUtilA 10.54 +.03
VoyAp 22.51 +.28
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.71
DvrlnBt 7.60 +.01
EqInct 16.79 +.09
EuEq 18.44 +.25
GeoBalB 13.06 +.05
GIbEqt 8.31 +.06
GINtRs t 17.76 +.37
GrlnBt 14.20 +.12
GIbIHIthB 36.77 +.06
HiYIdBt 7.81 +.03
HYAdBt 5.96 +.02
IncmBt 7.13 +.01
IntGrlnt 9.10 +.15
IntlGrth t 13.75 +.19
InvBt 13.12 +.06
NJTxBt 9.84
MultCpGr 47.59 +.28
TxExBt 9.05
TFHYBt 12.68
USGvBt 13.65 +.02
GlblUtilB 10.49 +.02
VoyBt 18.89 +.24
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.89 +.21
LgCAIphaA 43.71 +.25
Value 25.14 +.15
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.89 +.09
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.29 +.19
PennMulr 11.94 +.10
Premierlr 19.99 +.15
TotRetl r 13.93 +.08
ValSvct 11.72 +.18
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.39 +.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 17.12 -.03
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.20 +.28
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 20.51 +.03
l0001nvr 40.93 +.18
S&P Sel 22.71 +.09
SmCpSI 21.82 +.11
TSMSelr 26.23 +.11
Scout Funds:
Intl 31.27 +.33
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.94 +.15
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.08 +.16
Sequoia 163.65 -.03
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 48.23 +.19
SoSunSCInv tn21.91+.27
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 56.41 +.34
Stratton Funds:
Mulf-Cap 37.59 +.40
RealEstate 31.62 +02
SmCap 55.93 +.25
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.25 -.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn 9.19 +.04
TotRetBdl 10.15 +.04
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.01
Eqldxlnst 11.01 +.04
IntlEqllnst 15.57 +.21
Templeton Instit:
ForEqSx 18.81 +.33
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 15.83 +.23
REVallnstr 25.67 +.15
Valuelnst 47.51 +.70
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.92 +.31
IncBuildAt 18.88 +.10
IncBuildCp 18.88 +.10
IntValue I 26.51 +.31
LtTMul 14.65
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 4.99 +.02
Incom 9.24 +.02
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.52 +.04
Flexlncp 9.27 +.03
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.84 +.23
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.73 +.07
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.50 +.06
ChinaReg 6.96 +08
GIbRs 9.93 +.21
Gld&Mtls 12.54 +.36
WdPrcMn 12.39 +.35


USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.20 +.17
CABd 11.03 +.01
CrnstStr 22.91 +.14
GovSec 10.41 +.01
GrTxStr 14.70 +.03
Grwth 16.64 +.04
Gr&lnc 16.43 +.11
IncStk 13.78 +.03
Inco 13.43 +.02
Inf 24.38 +.28
NYBd 12.49 +.01
PrecMM 29.52 +.93


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 15.09 +.01
ShtTBnd 9.25 +.01
SmCpStk 15.07 +.12
TxElt 13.66
TxELT 13.85
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.61
WIdGr 20.68 +.11
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.50 +.10
Stkldx 27.02 +.11
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.71 +.08
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.94 +.07
CAITAdmn 11.68
CALTAdm n11.92 +.01
CpOpAdl n 77.85 +.05
EMAdmr r n 34.23 +.49
Energyn 115.05 +2.28
EqlnAdm n n50.95 +.01
EuroAdml n 58.42 +.83
ExplAdml n 75.50 +.52
ExtdAdm n 45.61 +.27
500Admln 133.11 +.55
GNMAAdn 11.09 +.01
GrwAdmn 37.45 +.14
HlthCrn 61.41 +.04
HiYldCp n 6.01 +.01
InfProAdn 29.11 +.09
ITBdAdmln 12.12 +.02
ITsryAdmln 11.80 +.01
IntGrAdm n 57.92 +.75
ITAdmI n 14.35 +.01
ITGrAdmn 10.38 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmI n 10.85 -.02
LTAdmln 11.75 +.01
MCpAdmlnlOl.36 +.65
MorgAdm n 63.41 +.25
MuHYAdmnll1.21
NYLTAdn 11.77
PrmCap r n 72.46 +.05
PALTAdm n 11.69
ReitAdm r n 95.97 +.09
STsyAdmln 10.79
STBdAdmlnlO.66
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.89 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.84 +.01
SmCAdm n 38.72 +.22
TxMCapr n 72.31 +.32
TtBAdmln 11.17
TStkAdm n 35.99 +.16
ValAdmln 22.95 +.12
WellslAdm n59.35 +.02
WelltnAdm n59.13 +.17
Windsor n 49.64 +.36
WdsrllAdn 51.95 +.20
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.92 +.01
CapOppn 33.69 +.02
Convrtn 13.02 +.05
DivApplnn 23.91 +.03
DivdGron 16.86 +.02
Energy 61.26 +1.21
Eqlnc n 24.30
Explr n 81.07 +.55
FLLTn 12.18 +.01
GNMAn 11.09 +.01
GlobEqn 18.09 +.14
Grolnc n 30.62 +.09
GrthEqn 12.63 +.07
HYCorpn 6.01 +.01
HlthCren 145.51 +.10
InflaPron 14.82 +.05
IntlExplrn 14.18 +.22
IntlGrn 18.20 +.24
InfitlVal n 29.52 +.48
ITIGraden 10.38 +.02
ITTsryn 11.80 +.01
LifeConn 17.31 +.05
LifeGron 23.47 +.14
Lifelncn 14.77 +.02
LifeMod n 20.88 +.09
LTIGraden 10.85 -.02
LTTsryn 13.50 -.05
Morg n 20.44 +.08
MuHYn 11.21
Mulntn 14.35 +.01
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.75 +.01
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.33
NYLTn 11.77
OHLTTEn 12.67 +.01
PALTn 11.69
PrecMtlsrn 16.21 +.40
PrmcpCorn 15.14 +.02
Prmcp r n 69.80 +.04
SelValu rn 20.83 +.10
STARn 20.60 +.09
STIGraden 10.84 +.01
STFedn 10.89 +.01
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 21.29 +.09
TgtRetlncn 12.24 +.04
TgRe2010n24.35 +.09
TgtRe2015Onl3.48 +.06
TgRe2020On23.95 +.11
TgtRe2025 nl3.65 +.08
TgRe2030n23.43 +.14
TgtRe2035nl4.11 +.09
TgtRe2040 n23.18 +.15
TgtRe2050 n23.08 +.15
TgtRe2045 nl4.56 +.10
USGron 21.34 +.10
USValuen 11.87 +.06
Wellsly n 24.49
Welltn n 34.23 +.09
Wndsrn 14.71 +.10
Wndslln 29.27 +.11
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl rn97.10 +1.30
ExtMktIn 112.57 +.66
MidCplstPl nl 10.44 +71
TotlntAdm r r24.00 +.33
Totlntllnstr n96.01 +1.32
TotlntllP r n 96.03 +1.31
TotlntSig r n 28.79 +.39
500 n 133.08 +.54
Balancedn 23.93 +.07
EMktn 26.04 +.38
Europe n 25.06 +.36
Extend n 45.56 +.27
Growth n 37.44 +.13
LgCaplxn 26.61 +.12
LTBndn 14.49 -.04
MidCapn 22.32 +.14
Pacific n 9.61 +.11
REITrn 22.48 +.01
SmCap n 38.66 +.21
SmlCpGthn25.04 +.12
STBndn 10.66
TotBndn 11.17
TotllntlIn 14.35 +.20
TotStkn 35.97 +.16
Value n 22.95 +.12
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.94 +.07
DevMklnstn 9.32 +.13
Extln n 45.61 +.27
FTAIIWIdl r n85.51 +1.17
Grwthlstn 37.45 +.14
InfProlnstn 11.86 +.04
Instldxn 132.26 +.55
InsPIn 132.27 +.55
InstTStldxn 32.57 +.15
lnsTStPlus n32.58 +.15
MidCplstn 22.39 +.14
REITInstrn 14.85 +.01
STBondldxnlO.66
STIGrlnstn 10.84 +.01
SCInstn 38.72 +.22
TBIstn 11.17
TSInstn 35.99 +.16
Valuelstn 22.95 +.12
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 109.95 +.45
GroSign 34.68 +.13
ITBdSign 12.12 +02
MidCpldxn 31.98 +.20
STBdldx n 10.66
SmCpSig n 34.88 +.19
TotBdSgIn 11.17
TotStkSgln 34.73 +.15
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.91 +.01
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.65 +.03
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.46 +.11
CorelnvA 6.72 +.02
DivOppAp 15.69 +.08
DivOppC t 15.51 +.08
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 44.05 +.15
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.32
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 21.65 +.13
Opptylnv 40.20 +.34
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
Growth 44.50 +.40
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 43.29 +.39
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.60 +.01
CorePlusli 11.60 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.52 +03


Stocks on the rise


Market retains


gains despite


jobs report


Associated Press


NEW YORK- The stock
market followed one of its
most exciting days of the
year with a rather dull one
Friday Indexes barely rose
following a weak jobs re-
port, which increased hopes
the Federal Reserve would
act next week to support the
economy
The gains, while meager,
kept major market indexes
at their highest levels in
more than four years follow-
ing a massive surge the day
before.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 14.64 points to
close at 13,306.64. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 was up 5.80 n
points to 1,437.92. The Nas- l1
daq composite barely moved, U
up 0.61 points at 3,136.42. h
The government reported C
96,000 jobs were created in P
the U.S. last month, fewer a
than economists had fore- e
cast. The unemployment g
rate fell to 8.1 percent from s
8.3 percent, but only be- h
cause more people gave up o
looking for work. n
Tech bellwether Intel n
dealt a blow to the market
early in the day by cutting e
its revenue outlook because r
of weak demand for its jo
semiconductors. Intel fell 90 e
cents, or nearly 4 percent, to to
$24.19. n
The flat trading for the in


Campbell's looks to revamp soup


Associated Press
A bowl of Campbell's new Chicken & Quinoa soup is part of
the company's new plan to attain younger consumers.


percent a decade earlier
Campbell's changes also
illustrate how difficult it is
for brands that appeal to
older customers to become
relevant to Millennials. This
group, defined as those ages
18 to through early 30s, is
heavily sought after by com-
panies and marketers. But
Millennials have little in
common with their parents,
whether it's their tastes, eat-
ing habits or cooking meth-
ods.
"I grew up with salt, pep-
per and ketchup," said
Chuck Vila, who heads
Campbell's customer in-
sights division, which sur-
veys the marketplace for
trends. "These guys are
playing around with really
interesting spices from
around the world."


George Veszpremy, a 32-
year-old music director at a
radio station in Boston, has
fond memories of his
mother sending him to
school in the morning with a
thermos of Campbell's
chicken noodle.
"As a kid, you eat it and
it's great. It served the pur-
pose at the time," said
Veszpremy, noting the soups
were a cheap way for his
single mother to give him a
quick, comforting meal.
But looking back, he said
he realizes the soup wasn't
the best quality the noo-
dles were soggy and thin, the
chicken pieces were minus-
cule and there were no veg-
etables. Veszrpremy said his
tastes have evolved: He
sticks to homemade or the
soup bar at the supermarket.


I0NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Name Last Chg
SP Consum 46.78 +.26
SP Engy 73.45 +1.25
SPDRFncl 15.68 +.16
SP Inds 37.00 +.32
SPTech 31.09 -.05
SPUI 36.62 -.12
StdPac 6.86 -.06
Standex 45.42 +.03
StanBlkDk 71.88 +.50
StarwdHfl 57.86 +1.07
StateSr 43.00 +.14
Steris 35.04 -.04
SbllwrM 11.60 +.65
StratHotels 6.24 -.02
Styker 54.15 -.04
SturmRug 46.84 +.12
SubPpne 38.09 +.04
SunCmts 45.95 -.05
Suncorgs 33.32 +.94
Sunoco 47.79 +.12
SunriseSen 14.29 -.06
Suntech .72 -.06
SunTrst 27.50 +.82
SupEnrgy 21.87 +.68
Supvalu 2.39 +.03
SwiftTrans 8.24 -.07
Synovus 2.40 +.03
Sysco 30.58 -.04
TCF Fncl 11.42 -.07
TDAmeritr 17.50 +.05
TECO 17.54 -.06


TIM Part 20.16
TJXs 45.85
ThawSemi 14.51
TalismEg 14.17
Target 64.00
TataMotors 22.44
TeckResg 30.18
TelefBrasil 22.84
TelefEsp 14.22
TempurP 31.71
Tenaris 42.47
TenetHlth 5.41
Teradata 80.20
Teradyn 16.28
Terex 23.36
TerraNitro 213.76
Tesoro 40.14
TetraTech 6.50
TevaPhrm 40.42
Textron 27.59
Theragen 1.67
ThermoFis 58.93
ThomCrkg 3.29
3DSys 40.69
3MCo 92.82
Tiffany 62.64
TWCable 90.82
TimeWarn 43.64
Timken 41.45
Titan Intl 21.17
TitanMet 12.71
TollBros 33.36


TorchEngy 1.65
Torchmark 52.27
TorDBkg 83.70
Total SA 51.84
TotalSys 23.67
Transom 47.60
Travelers 65.21
Tredgar 17.42
TriConfi 16.32
TrinaSolar 4.02
Trinity 30.97
TurqHillRs 9.31
TwoHrblnv 11.75
Tycolnt 56.63
Tyson 15.70
UBSAG 12.35
UDR 25.87
UIL Hold 36.13
UNS Engy 41.06
USAirwy 12.14
USEC .50
USG 22.45
UltraPtg 21.05
UndArmrs 59.64
UniFirst 66.12
UnilevNV 35.52
Unilever 36.38
UnionPac 122.25
UtdContl 19.70
UPS B 72.60
UtdRentals 37.83
US Bancrp 33.98


USNGsrs 18.12 -.51 WPXEnn 16.45
US OilFd 35.88 +.65 Wabash 7.10
USSteel 20.89 +1.68 WaiMart 73.82
UtdTech 79.41 +.01 Walgrn 34.94
UtdhlthGp 54.88 -.01 WalterEn 34.59
UnumGr 2012 +.19 WsteMInc 34.50
Weathflnfi 12.73
WeinRIt 28.32
ValeSA 18.03 +1.14 WellPoint 60.29
ValeSApf 17.77 +1.08 WellsFargo 35.00
ValeantPh 59.47 -.72 WestarEn 29.40
ValeroE 32.18 +.76 WAstEMkt 16.10
VangTSM 73.96 +.36 WstAMgdHi 6.48
VangREIT 67.74 +.06 WAstlnfOpp 13.22
VangEmg 41.51 +.96 WstnRefin 27.48
VangEur 46.89 +.65 WstnUnion 18.15
VangEAFE 33.71 +.49 Weyerhsr 25.45
VarianMed 59.90 +.40 Whrlpl 78.02
Vectren 28.46 -.18 WhitngPet 49.18
Venoco 11.73 +.34 WmsCos 33.89
Ventas 65.04 -.88 WmsPtrs 51.66
VeoliaEnv 11.80 +.84 Winnbgo 11.54
VeriFone 32.48 +1.93 WiscEngy 38.15
VerizonCm 43.72 -.43 WT India 17.11
VimpelCm 11.68 +.36 Worthgtn 23.17
Visa 129.71 +.21 XLGrp 23.76
Vishaylnt 10.50 +.23 XcelEngy 28.10
VMware 94.29 +.27 Xerox 7.68
VoceraCn 30.42 +1.53 Yamanag 17.83
Vonage 2.28 +.03 YoukuTud 17.84
Vornado 81.88 +.26 YumBrnds 65.75
WGL Hold 40.14 -.10 Zimmer 65.22


courage lending. He thinks
Market watch the Fed will announce it
Sept. 7, 2012 will hold benchmark rates

Dow Jones +14.64 near zero through 2015 and,
industrials possibly, launch a third
13,306.64 round of bond purchases.

Nasdaq +0.61 "The economy is still
composite 3,136.42 struggling, and so it's sub-
ject to shocks from over-
Standard & +5.80 seas," Ricchiuto said.
Poor's 500 1,437.92 "We're going to get more
stimulus from the Fed."
Russell +4.32 Shortly after jobs num-
2000 842.27 bers were released, analysts

from RBS told investors in a
NYSE diary note they see the likelihood
Advanced: 2,017 of the Fed announcing new

Declined: 943 bond purchases next week

Unchanged: 144 at 90 percent.
"We expect the Fed to act
Volume: 3.6 b in September," they wrote.

Nasdaq diary Most major markets in
Advanced: 1,426 Europe rose, too. Bench-
mark indexes rose 0.7 per-
Declined: 1,010 cent in Germany and 0.3

Unchanged: 141 percent in France. Italy's

Volume: 1.7 b main index rose 2 percent.
AP In U.S. trading, materials
companies rose 2 percent,
najor indexes Friday fol- the biggest gain among the
owed big gains Thursday. S&P 500's ten industry sec-
J.S. stocks hit four-year tors. The biggest losers were
lighs after the European consumer staples, down 0.8
centrall Bank announced percent.
Alans to buy an unlimited Intel followed several
mount of short-term gov- other major companies in
rnment bonds from strug- reducing its profit forecast,
ling countries in the region including FedEx. The
uch as Italy and Spain. The world's second-largest pack-
.ope is the borrowing costs age delivery company low-
f those countries will fall, ered its forecast for earnings
making a breakup of the 17- earlier this week, citing the
nation euro zone less likely slowing global economy
Steven Ricchiuto, chief Overall, for every three
economist at Mizuho Secu- companies in the S&P 500
ities, said the weak U.S. telling investors to lower
obs report means the Fed- their expectations for future
ral Reserve is more likely earnings, only one is saying
o announce steps at its to raise them, according to
meeting next week to keep S&P Capital IQ, a research
interest rates low and en- firm.


Company began


quest to attain


younger eaters

CANDICE CHOI
AP Food Industry Writer


If your lunch still consists
of a bowl of Campbell's
tomato soup and a grilled
cheese sandwich, chances
are you grew up using a
typewriter
Generations of Americans
have moved on from Camp-
bell's condensed chicken
noodle and tomato soups in
search of heartier varieties
with more exotic flavors.
Now, the world's largest
soup company is racing to
do the same.
Campbell Soup Co. last
year began a quest that led
executives to a diverse
group of cities from Port-
land, Ore., to London to fig-
ure out how to make soups
that appeal to younger,
finicky customers. In the
year ahead, the 143-year-old
company plans to roll out 50
products such as Moroccan-
style chicken and spicy
chorizo. The ingredients
may surprise those used to a
plain bowl of chicken soup:
tomatillos, coconut milk and
shitake mushrooms.
The new soups also won't
look like the big, gelatinous
chunks that came in the
steel cans that built Camp-
bell into an iconic brand.
These soups come in plastic
pouches that are easy to
open and heat up in a mi-
crowave in less than three
minutes.
The remake could be a
do-or-die task for Campbell.
Overall canned soup con-
sumption is down 13 per-
cent over the past decade,
according to the research
firm Euromonitor Interna-
tional, as fresh soups have
become more widely avail-
able at supermarkets and
restaurants. And Campbell
now has about 53 percent of
the market, down from 67


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012



PINION


"People exercise an unconscious
selection in being influenced."
T.S. Eliot
"Religion and Literature," 1935


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz......... .................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BIG BALLOT




Amendments



are reason to



be prepared


ou already know we
have a presidential
election coming up in
less than 60 days. In addition,
we'll choose among candidates
facing off in other offices at the
national, state and local levels.


What you may
not be aware of,
though, is the full
slate of state con-
stitutional amend-
ments also on
your ballot: 11 of
them, covering
topics ranging
from health care
to property taxes
to state courts to
religious freedom
and more.


THE IS
The genera
ball

OUR OP
It will be I
complex, s
ahead if yo
person, o
vote-by-mr


All of these important
choices need your attention.
Unfortunately, their presenta-
tion will result in an extraordi-
narily long ballot two
legal-size sheets, back and
front. The amendment lan-
guage, particularly, is heavy
reading.
It's going to be a busy elec-
tion period, too. Typically,
more voters turn out for presi-
dential elections than any
other. If the past is a guide,
nearly three times as many vot-
ers as we saw for the primary
will participate. Remember
also the early-voting period
was cut by the Legislature to
eight days, plus Citrus County
reduced the number of Elec-
tion Day precincts from
41 to 31.
What does this mean to you?
Two key words: preparation
and patience.
In Citrus County, our elec-
tions workers do their best to
make your visit to the polls a
positive experience. But voters
are responsible for being pre-
pared when they arrive at the
voting site. Research the can-
didates so you know who best
represents your philosophy


Just as important, study the
proposed state constitutional
amendments, so you under-
stand what's being put forth
and what it would mean. Sev-
eral nonpartisan organizations
will offer explanations and
commentaries on-
;SUE: line and in print.
Take advantage of
al election them.
ot. Be sure to get a
copy of the Chron-
INION: icle on Sunday,
ong and Sept. 16. Pull out
ong and and save the spe-
o prepare cial pages featur-
ou vote in
r order a ing a full-size
ail ballot, sample ballot, in-
formation on reg-
istering to vote or
changing your information, re-
questing a vote-by-mail ballot,
locations and hours of early-
vote polling sites and details on
Election Day precinct sites,
among other information from
the Supervisor of Elections
Office.
Increasingly, voters are tak-
ing advantage of conveniently
voting by mail. Vote-by-mail
ballots may be obtained until
the Wednesday before Election
Day and must be received by
the Supervisor of Elections Of-
fice by 7 p.m. on Election Day.
Those who already requested
vote-by-mail ballots should re-
ceive them in early October.
Those who did not order
vote-by-mail ballots will re-
ceive sample ballots in the
mail in mid-October. Prepare
for your visit to the polling
place by marking your choices,
as a guide for when you enter
the voting booth.
If everyone prepares well,
things should go quickly in the
polling places.
Remember, though, we said
you must have patience: even if
you're prepared, your neighbor
the one in line in front of you
may not be.


Fingerprinting
I see the Justice Department is
rejecting states' rights for ID rules
for the next election to prevent
voter fraud. They say it's discrimi-
natory for blacks and Hispanics. I
ask, do these people drive, buy
liquor or get federal aid? Then
they already have ID. What are the
states to do to prevent fraud? An
idea is to fingerprint each voter,
then run the fingerprints through
a database. Problem solved.
There is more than one way to
prevent voter fraud, and the Jus-
tice Department shouldn't be
where they are at this time. I think


we need to reassess this adminis-
tration's efforts.
No ID, no vote
I'm calling the Chronicle in ref-
erence to the courts in Texas re-
jecting (the) voter ID law, because
they say it discriminates against
low-income blacks and Hispanics.
Are those the only low-income
people there? You mean to tell me
there's no whites, no Chinese, no
other low-income families? Why
do they only have to specify
blacks and Hispanics? You have a
photo ID. College students have
ID. You don't have a photo ID, you
don't vote. That's the bottom line.


Bad timing
I read with interest this morning about the much-
awaited and needed left-turn road project in Floral City,
a town struggling to survive building its local busi-
nesses. And I was interested to note that at the height
of this season, the height of the time that they're
busiest, that's when the road project is going to start.
Who was thinking? Was anybody thinking up in Tallahas-
see when they decided to start this road project in Feb-
ruary just before at the height of the snowbird season?
It will probably be going on during the Floral City Straw-
berry Festival. Come on, guys. Wake up. Take a break.


CAL
563-0579


Media will paint


W ho will win
the presiden-
tial election? I
have no clue.
Pundits predict
election outcomes. I'm
not a pundit.
But I think I know
what will be the issue
that decides the
outcome. Lloyd
It is the economy OTI
Bill Clinton's pit VOlI
bull, James Carville,
famously said, "It's the
economy, stupid."
Focusing on that issue won the
election for Clinton, even though
the economy was in great shape
then, compared to now.
I'm also pretty sure the people
who will decide the election
haven't made up their minds and
won't until October
Let's face it: conservatives will
vote for Mitt Romney and liberals
will vote for Barack Obama. It is the
others called swing voters, mod-


I


L
h.

I
I
(


rates, undeci
whatever-wh
For most
how they fee
W their own finan
ation will be th
ing factor If the
o job, aren't dro
debt, can make
each month a
Brown think $16 trilli
IER tional debt is a
DES they will vote t(
doing what
doing. In othe
the state of the economy i
ter part of October will de
the election.
Admittedly, that is a p
to select someone to hea
ecutive branch of the fed
ernment, but politics an
policy are too complex
ugly for many people. Tt
to rely on the media
media is tilted to the left
the protestations.
Here's what will happe


PjfE4- EUV i
R p;AtDT p C.


rosy picture

ideds or ning immediately, with the end of
1o matter the Democrats' convention. The
of them, media will discover signs blos-
el about soming all over that the economy
Lcial situ- is recovering. Jobs are appearing
he decid- and various indicators will show
ey have a the Obama tax-and-spend ap-
wning in proach is working. By Nov 6, if you
the bills read the paper or watch TV we
nd don't will be in boom times.
on in na- The national debt will continue
problem, to rise. Unemployment may be as
o keep on bad or worse. Social Security and
we are Medicare will be as likely to go
*r words, bankrupt. But from the liberal
n the lat- media's perspective, happy days
determine will be here again. All that will be
missing is Ginger Rogers singing,
poor way "We're in the Money"
d the ex- Watch for it.
eral gov-
id public
and too Lloyd Brown was in the newspa-
hey tend per business nearly 50 years, be-
and the ginning as a copy boy and
;, despite retiring as editorial page editor
of the Florida Times-Union in
n, begin- Jacksonville.




I ryo012-t
I f@F

_ LETTERS to the Editor


Fighters can vote
In response to the person post-
ing in Thursday's (Aug. 30)
Sound Off "Raise Voting Age"
who wants the voting age raised
because 18-year-olds are chil-
dren and shouldn't vote on our
taxes: I would ask this person to
write to an 18-year-old combat
infantry soldier serving in
Afghanistan and pose your ques-
tion to him or her
Richard Davis
Hernando

Where is my bailout?
I would like to know where the
bailout is for us honest, hard-
working Americans. I bought my
home at what I was told was
"fair market value".
I bought my home to live in.
Others, those more than $100,000
to $750,000 paycheck people
bought homes on "speculation."
They never had plans on living
in the homes, just bought them
before they were built knowing
they could sell them for a 50 per-
cent to 75 percent gain when the
house was completely built.
Thus, driving up the "fair mar-
ket value." These people are the
ones mostly guilty of what has
happened to our economy They
leveraged their credit, glutted
our economy Then, when the
"bubble" burst, they are the ones
(who) get bailed out. They walk
away from houses, leaving banks
and mortgage companies in se-
vere distress. (I do not feel bad
for the banks and mortgage com-
panies, they loaned money too
freely, never considering the
consequences.) Not only do they
walk away from these "specula-
tions," they get to write them off
as a loss on an investment!
In the meantime, after living
in my home, making repairs, im-
provements and investing money
into it, I have lost every single
dime I have put into my home.
And wait, then they tell me I
can't write off the loss, because it
wasn't an "investment," it was
my primary residence.
I would like to know which
one of these presidential candi-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


dates is going to put the honest,
hardworking in the front of the
line. My credit card is paid off. It
is not used unless it is absolutely
necessary And no, I do not have
two, three or four credit cards. If
you can't afford it, don't buy it!
Congress and the White House
keep bailing out the people (who)
put us in the situation. When are
they going to reward those of us
that have been responsible? I
would love for President Obama
and Gov Mitt Romney to answer
this question for me.
Linda Bond
Beverly Hills

Only here
Only in Citrus County do we
have college graduates waiting
tables and a high school dropout
representing us in Tallahassee.
Only in Citrus County do we
have pastors preaching a Repub-
lican agenda to lower taxes on
millionaires while their parish-
ioners can barely afford food.
Only in Citrus County do we
have people who cannot afford a


decent standard of living but
support huge tax breaks for mil-
lionaires.
Only in Citrus County do we
have contempt for those who lost
their jobs but honor and enrich
those who sent their jobs
overseas.
Only in Citrus County do we
have millionaires planting pine
trees on valuable commercial
property and avoiding millions
in property taxes.
Shame on us.
Gail Stearns
Lecanto

Thou shalt not
The article, "When I'm dying,
early exit OK," by Tom O'Hara -
sorry that you put this article in
the paper, as it's a command-
ment of God: "Thou shalt not
kill."
What possessed this man to
write these thoughts? We must
wait for God's time, not ours. His
will be done, amen, not ours.
Suffering expiates our sins.
Shirley Saitta
Crystal River

Hit movie theaters
In this Sunday's (Aug. 26) guest
column, Bob Hagaman encour-
ages us to become better in-
formed voters. Regardless of
political or philosophical differ-
ences, we are, after all, most in-
terested in seeing the success of
our form of government and way
of life succeed.
In this regard, I suggest spend-
ing some quality time at your
local theater to see 2016
Obama's America. The film is a
documentary and answers many
of the questions that continue to
linger about our president's ori-
gins and core beliefs. Most im-
portant, it provides a glimpse
into how our country has re-
acted to his leadership and how
another four-year term might in-
fluence our country So, get your
date, buy some popcorn and get
informed.
Jerry Alvarez
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: VOTER ID





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grandmother's life-giving gin


Chicago woman

gives birth to her

granddaughter
MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer

CHICAGO Setting foot
in a hospital again, Emily
and Mike Jordan couldn't
help but feel anxious.
More than two years be-
fore, at age 29, Emily had
been diagnosed with cervi-
cal cancer. But just before
she was to undergo a radi-
cal hysterectomy, she was
told she was pregnant.
Faced with saving her own
life or their unborn child's,
the young couple made the
excruciating decision to go
forward with her surgery It
meant losing the baby, and
forfeiting any chance at
having their own children.
Or so they thought.
"I can't describe what
that was like after finding
out you have cancer, after
finding out your chance of
ever carrying a baby is
gone," Emily said, still
stammering at times as she
recounts that painful day in
2010.
Simply put, her body no
longer had a place where a
baby could grow.
But now, more than two
years later, she and Mike
had come from their subur-
ban Chicago home to the
labor and delivery depart-
ment of a downtown hospi-
tal to realize the dream
they thought was lost to
become parents, though
not the way they, or most
people, would have
imagined.
Alongside them that day
was Emily's mother, Cindy
Reutzel a fit, silver-
haired 53-year-old grand-
mother whose profile
revealed a round belly, a
pregnant belly
Reutzel was about to give
birth to her own
grandchild.
In vitro fertilization
Just 34 years ago, Louise
Brown, the first "test tube"
baby, was born in Great
Britain. The result? A veri-
table in-vitro baby boom.
It started with would-be
mothers in their 20s and
30s. "Then people started
pushing the envelope,"
said Dr. Helen Kim, direc-
tor of the in vitro fertiliza-
tion program at the
University of Chicago. "If
you could help a
menopausal woman in her
30s, could you help a
menopausal woman in her
40s? And then it became,
'Can you help a
menopausal woman in her
50s?'
"And the answer is yes."
Some older women were
having their own babies.
But more often, they were
using egg donors to have
their own children, or serv-
ing as surrogates or "gesta-
tional carriers."
There was the 51-year-
old grandmother in Brazil
who gave birth to her twin
grandchildren in 2007.
There've been others,
grandmothers in their 40s
or 50s and even 60s.
Unreal offer
Cindy Reutzel, Emily's
mom, had a vague recollec-
tion of those stories. So
when doctors shared the
good news they had been
able to keep Emily's
ovaries intact, Reutzel im-
mediately made the offer.
"What if I carried your


Associated Press
Emily Jordan, left, and her pregnant mother Cindy
Reutzel relax at Jordan's home Aug. 19 in Naperville, III.
After Jordan underwent a radical hysterectomy, she and her
husband accepted an offer from Reutzel to act as their
surrogate. : Six-day-old Elle Cynthia Jordan is held by
her mother and grandmother Sept. 5. Mike Jordan,
left, and Emily Jordan hold their daughter.


baby for you?" she asked. As her belly grew, people
Emily and Mike didn't started asking about "her
take it too seriously at first, baby" But she was quick to
"We didn't really think tell them the story. This
that was a realistic option," was not her baby; she was
said Emily, who works in Grandma.
hospital administration. Admittedly, she said, she
It turned out, though, it worried about the physical
wasn't really that far- toll pregnancy might take,
fetched after all, particu- though her body handled it
larly for a young better than she expected.
grandmother who's in good She also wondered how
health, like Reutzel. well she'd bounce back
After a process that in- from a Caesarean section.
cluded psychological eval- That's how she had deliv-
uation and hormonal ered Emily and her older
manipulation to prepare brother, but that had been
their bodies, Kim eventu- three decades ago.
ally implanted Reutzel's Still, she reassured
uterus with an embryo cre- Emily and Mike throughout
ated with Emily's egg and the pregnancy the baby was
Mike's sperm. fine, she was fine, every-
M s m . thing would be fine.


carrying a DaDy
It was no easy process,
with a regimen of hor-
monal shots. Work sched-
ules were interrupted and
vacations postponed. But
Reutzel was committed.
"The thought of Emily
and Mike ... not being able
to have children and ...
share that piece of their
lives with someone just
broke my heart," said
Reutzel, who lives in
Chicago and is executive
director at a medical foun-
dation. "I want Emily to
have that connection with
another human being like I
had with her."



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Repaying the gift
Humor helped. Mike
often teased his mother-in-
law each time they'd take
her to dinner or do some-
thing nice for her.
'Are we even yet?" he'd
ask.
"Not yet," she'd reply,
laughing.
In truth, Mike and Emily
knew there'd really be no
way to repay this kind of
gesture.
"This is a continuation of
everything that she has
done her entire life for me,
which is to make sure that I
have the best life possible,"
Emily said.
All they could do, they
said, was to promise to


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raise their baby as best
they could. And that was
enough for Reutzel.
"I know I gave a gift," she
said. "But I'm also getting
so much in return."
Final delivery
Last week, a few days
after Emily's 32nd birthday,
daughter sat next to
mother, holding hands in
the delivery room.
And Elle Cynthia Jordan
was born.
"She looks just like you!
She looks just like you!"


Emily shouted, running
from the delivery room to
introduce their newborn to
Mike.
Reutzel is recovering
well. She even said she'd
consider doing it again.
"When I watch both of
them hold that baby and
look into her face, it's like
everything I could have
imagined wanting for them
- better than I could have
imagined," she said, her
eyes filling with tears.
"This is what it was all
about for me."


S












Wednesday, Sept. 19th

6pm 7pm
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an entrepreneur
- from the business idea to the reality of
owning your own business. Following the
seminar, interested participants will have the
opportunity to meet with seasoned SCORE
counselors to further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed for
individuals who are not business owners, but
who are interested in learning what is
involved in becoming one. If you have ever
asked yourself "Do I have what it takes to be
an entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for
you!

A one hour counseling session will follow
for those interested in meeting with a
SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact
Dale Maim at SCORE

352-249-1236
s www.scorecitrus.org
Seating is limited.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 A9











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation 'QBRIEFSueen of torts' takes on tough task
Big buffet


K~~~ .e^
Associated Press
A bear eats large vegeta-
bles from a tractor Friday in
Portage, Alaska. The
bears, moose, elk and
bison at the Alaska Wildlife
Conservation Center are
being served giant vegeta-
bles from the Alaska State
Fair. The super-sized veg-
etables are too big and
tough for human consump-
tion, but the animals don't
seem to mind.


Ed Koch released
from hospital
NEW YORK How's he
doing? Better.
Former New York City
Mayor Ed Koch has been re-
leased from a hospital after
being treated for anemia.
WNBC-TV reported the 87-
year-old Koch was in good
spirits at a press conference
Friday afternoon at the hospi-
tal. He said he was going
straight back to work at a law
firm.
He later told the Daily
News doctors checked his
heart and arteries and found
he's "in good shape."
The Democrat felt weak
over the weekend while stay-
ing with friends in North Car-
olina. He was admitted to
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospi-
tal on Tuesday.
A spokesman said Koch
kept tabs on developments at
the Democratic National Con-
vention in Charlotte, N.C.
Koch served three terms,
from 1978 to 1989. He's fa-
mous for asking constituents,
"How'm I doing?"

World BRIEFS

Music prep


Associated Press
Workers build a concert
stage for an upcoming fes-
tival Friday on Copacabana
Beach, in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil.


UK man ji
impersonal
LONDON -/
who tweeted ab
a senior police c
last summer's L
and posed as a
officer has been
five years in jail
Ellis Ward, 29
Twitter about life
politan Police inE
the streets of Lo
rioters and loote
duped one Britis
into printing a co
his duties.
He also preter
army major wou
swindling three
more than $64,1
Prosecutor M
Williams told Wi
Crown Court tha
"professional an
polished fraudste
ception lasted fo
Ward admitted
charges of fraud
sentenced Frida


Attorney works

to compensate

911 responders

Associated Press

NEW YORK Sheila
Birnbaum is known in legal
circles across New York as
the "queen of torts" for her
prowess in sorting out com-
plicated cases. But she may
be up against her most
daunting task to date.
Since Attorney General


Eric Holder ap-
pointed her special
master of a Sept. 11
victims' compensa-
tion fund in May
2011, Birnbaum has
been responsible for
evenhandedly dis-
tributing $2.7 billion Sh
to ground zero re- Birni
sponders and others handle
who became ill after for grot
being exposed to respc
dust and ash from
the smoldering ruins of the
World Trade Center
The problem is, she
doesn't quite know how
many people will be eligible


e
b
in
ur
ni


for compensation.
"We haven't yet re-
ceived the ava-
lanche of claims that
might have been ex-
pected," she said,
noting only about
300 people have
ila filed eligibility
)aum forms so far The
ig fund fund will ultimately
nd zero receive thousands of
riders. applications, she
predicts.
Nearly two years after
President Barack Obama
signed the James Zadroga
9/11 Health and Compensa-
tion Act into law, about


40,000 responders and sur-
vivors receive monitoring
and 20,000 get treatment for
illnesses as part of the
World Trade Center Health
Program one of the law's
two components. But the
other, Birnbaum's fund
compensating the same
kind of people for economic
losses, hasn't been as quick
to get off the ground.
It's not a matter of bu-
reaucratic foot-dragging,
but rather an illustration of
the complexities of key leg-
islation born of the attacks
that took place 11 years ago
next week.


Civil war intensifies


percent. It hasn't been
below 8 percent since.


Associated Press
BEIRUT Two booby-trapped
vehicles exploded within hours of
each other Friday in Syria's once-
impregnable capital of Damascus,
killing at least five police officers
as rebels increasingly target Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's seat of power
With the civil war intensifying,
the head of the Red Cross warned
after meeting with Assad that the
situation in the country was
"rapidly deteriorating." Elsewhere
in Damascus, shells struck a Pales-
tinian refugee camp, killing 10 peo-
ple, state media said.
The uprising began in March
2011, when protests calling for po-
litical change were met by a violent
crackdown by government troops.
Many in the opposition took up
arms, and activists said more than
23,000 people have been killed.


The government said more than
4,000 security officers are among
the dead.
Damascus was relatively quiet
until July, when rebels launched a
bold attack, capturing several neigh-
borhoods and setting off a bomb that
killed four high-ranking security of-
ficials, including the defense minis-
ter and Assad's brother-in-law.
Since then, the regime has suc-
ceeded in largely quelling a rebel
offensive in the capital, but has
struggled to contain an opposition
push into the northern city of
Aleppo, the country's commercial
hub.
Friday's first blast in Damascus
killed five officers when a motor-
cycle packed with explosives blew
up across the street from a mosque
in the Rukneddine neighborhood,
state TV said. An Associated Press
reporter at the scene said the bomb


damaged a nearby medical clinic,
staining its walls and the pavement
with blood.
There were no casualties in the
second blast, a car bomb that went
off about two hours later in the up-
scale Mazze neighborhood near the
Ministry of Information and the
Ministry of Justice, which are
about 330 feet apart. Friday is the
weekend in Syria and institutions
are usually closed.
Fruit peddler Walid Mahmoud
said he was 165 feet away from the
first explosion.
"It was thunderous, and if I was
closer, I would have been killed,"
he told the AP "I saw many bodies
on the ground."
State TV blamed terrorists, the
term the regime uses to describe
the rebels. There was no immedi-
ate claim of responsibility for the
attacks.


Twin quakes kill at least 67 in China

Associated Press r -F77


ailed for BEIJING Twin earthquakes and
Eating cop a spate of aftershocks struck south-
western China on Friday, toppling
A conman thousands of houses and sending
out serving as boulders cascading across roads. At
officer during least 67 people were killed and hun-
ondon riots dreds injured in the remote moun-
British army tainous area, and more than 100,000
sentenced to residents were evacuated.
for fraud. Damage was preventing rescuers
, posted on from reaching outlying towns, and
as a Metro- communications were disrupted
spector on after the midday quakes hit along the
ndon tackling borders of Guizhou and Yunnan
rs, and provinces, a region of small farms and
3h newspaper mines where some of China's poorest
>lumn about people live.
The first 5.6-magnitude quake
ended to be an struck before 11:30 a.m. and was fol-
nded in Iraq, lowed by an equally strong quake
women out of shortly after noon, joined by dozens
n00. o of aftershocks. Though of moderate
00. strength, the quakes were shallow,
ichael which often causes more damage.
nchester Hardest hit was Yiliang County,
it Ward was a where all but one of the deaths oc-
d accom- curred, according to the Yunnan
r" whose de- provincial government's official web-
r years. site. Another 730 people in the area
d to 18 were injured, the state-run Xinhua
I and was News Agency said. Yiliang's high pop-
y. ulation density, flimsy building con-
-From wire reports struction and landslide-prone


Associated Press
A series of earthquakes collapsed houses and triggered landslides in a remote
mountainous part of southwestern China on Friday, killing dozens of people,
with the death toll expected to rise.


hillsides were blamed for the rela-
tively high death toll.
China Central Television showed
roads littered with rocks and boul-
ders and pillars of dust rising over
hilltops from the landslides. One
image taken just as one quake struck
showed people running out of a su-
permarket as the ground shook.
Other footage showed several hun-


dred people crowding into a school
athletic field in Yiliang's county seat,
a sizable city spread along a river in a
valley, as well as soldiers carrying in-
jured people and rescue materials.
Though quakes occur in the area
frequently, buildings in rural areas
and China's fast-growing smaller
cities and towns are often con-
structed poorly


"This is a lot more compli-
cated than meets the eye,"
said Birnbaum, an attorney
With time still left to sub-
mit claims, some people are
holding out in the event they
become sick in the near fu-
ture. Others are waiting
until the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and
Health officially adds 14
broad categories of cancer
to the list of conditions cov-
ered by the fund.
The national institute's
director, Dr John Howard,
said in June it planned to
expand coverage to include
scores of cancer types.




Jobs


report


obstacle


for


Obama
Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The dis-
appointing August jobs re-
port raises yet another
campaign obstacle for Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
makes his hopes of holding
onto his own job even more
challenging especially in
closely contested battle-
ground states with painfully
high levels of unemployment
Coming less than 12 hours
after the president accepted
his party's nomination for a
second term, the lackluster
report could wipe out or di-
minish any traditional
bounce in the polls he might
have gotten from the festive,
well-choreographed three-
day Democratic National
Convention.
"The broad message here
is flat flat, flat" said econo-
mist Heidi Shierholz with
the labor-affiliated Eco-
nomic Policy Center
A disappointing report for
one month might be dis-
missed in normal times as
an aberration, she said, "but
a stagnant report when the
unemployment rate is over
8 percent represents a con-
tinuation of the crisis,"
meaning getting back to pre-
recession employment lev-
els will take many more
months, even years.
The bleak news played
right into the hands of Re-
publicans, who claim that
Obama's policies inhibit job
production and have made
the economic picture worse.
"Did you see the jobs re-
port this morning by the
way?" Republican rival Mitt
Romney asked reporters in
Sioux City, Iowa. "Almost
400,000 people dropped out
of the work force altogether
It's simply unimaginable."
The overall unemployment
rate declined from 8.3 per-
cent to 8.1 percent last month,
which should be good news,
but the "improvement" came
only because more people
gave up looking for work
Only 96,000 new jobs were
created in August, sharply
down from the revised July
number of 141,000 and
below the threshold of
100,000 to 150,000 new jobs
needed each month to keep
pace with working-age pop-
ulation growth.
That's not good news for
an incumbent president up
for re-election in just 60
days. It was another sharp
reminder the economy isn't
Obama's friend.
Even though the presi-
dent likes to talk about re-
cent private-sector job
growth- for 30 consecutive
months now, as he noted
Friday in a campaign stop in
New Hampshire there
are still 261,000 fewer peo-
ple employed today than
when he was sworn in. The
jobless rate then was 7.9


Associated Press
A firefighter extinguishes a burned car close to where an explosion went off Friday between the buildings of the
Ministry of Information and the Ministry of Justice in Damascus, Syria.

Five dead as bombs strike Syrian capital ofDamascus











SPORTS


The Rays go to extra
innings Friday night at
home against the
Texas Rangers./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College football/B2
0 Golf, tennis/B3
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 High school football/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Hurricanes' rally just short vs. WP


Bans overturned in
NFL bounty case
NEW ORLEANS -
Jonathan Vilma, Scott Fu-
jita and Will Smith are back
in the NFL. For now.
The suspensions of
players,
plus un-
signed
free
agent
Anthony
Har-
Jonathan grove, for
Vilma their
roles in
New Orleans' pay-for-pain
bounty scandal were lifted
Friday by a three-member
appeals panel.
them all a few minutes
later.
The Saints' Smith and
Fujita, now with the Cleve-
land
Browns,
probably
will play
in Sun-
day's
season
openers.
Scott Fujita Vilma
can at
least rejoin his teammates
and coaches in New Or-
leans and get paid -
even if the linebacker is not
yet ready to play because
of knee problems.
And Hargrove can start
talking to NFL teams about
giving him another shot,
after he was cut by the
Green Bay Packers.
Still, there's no telling
how long the reprieve will
last.
Coming just two days
before the first full slate of
NFL games this season,
the ruling is a setback for
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and the league.
But while the decision al-
lows the players to rejoin
their teams, it does not
permanently void their
suspensions.
NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello said Goodell would
"make an expedited deter-
mination of the discipline
imposed" for violating the
league's bounty rule.
The ruling does not af-
fect New Orleans coach
Sean Payton, suspended
for the season, interim
coach Joe Vitt (six games)
or general manager Mickey
Loomis (eight games).
Panthers drop
match at West Port
The Lecanto volleyball
team fell in four games
(25-15, 23-25, 25-10, 26-24)
to District 6A-6 opponent
West Port late Thursday
night in Ocala.
Courtney Rymer and
Marie Buckley each had 5
kills to lead the Panthers
while Savannah Weller led
the team in digs, with
teammate Shannon Fer-
nandez also contributing
in that area.
Lecanto (1-1 overall, 0-1
district) plays 7 p.m. Mon-
day at home against
Nature Coast.
From staff, wire reports


Citrus loses 28-26

to visiting Wolfpack
DAVE PIEKLIK
Correspondent
INVERNESS A late game
surge by the Citrus football team
fell yards short of a dramatic
come-from-behind victory Friday
night in a 28-26 football loss to vis-
iting West Port of Ocala.
Trailing 28-7 late in the third


quarter, Citrus (1-1 overall)
blocked a punt and recovered a
fumble during a furious rally
that narrowed
the deficit to just West I
two points with a Citri
minute to go on
the West Port 40- -
yard line. Down
to its last posses-
sion, 'Canes
quarterback Belleview.
Cody Bogart --
forced to scramble from the
pocket heaved a pass that just


Po
us

n
a
F


fell short of the end zone and
was picked off by West Port to
end the game.
Citrus coach
ort 28 Rayburn Greene
s 26 told his team after
the game he was
I The'Canes' proud of them and
ext game is they played "a
t 7:30 p.m. gutsy, gutsy football
riday at game."
Citrus was deal-
ing with a lineup
that had several starters injured,
including running back Darius


Ba ldners ball


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River senior running back Dallas Baldner scored five total touchdowns Friday night as the
Pirates downed Williston 41-14 at Earl Bramlett Stadium in Crystal River.

CR running back's 5 TDs power team past Williston 48-21


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER What a
difference a year can
make. Buoyed by senior 0.....
Dallas Baldner's five TDs, .
Crystal River avenged its I.
21-point road loss to
Williston from a year ago For mo
with a 48-21 home-opener photos
victory Friday night. on this
Baldner electrified www.d
fans at Earl Bramlett Sta- online.
dium right out of the gate,
taking the opening kickoff 82
yards for a score. Before the end
of the first quarter, the senior


-

)re
5, C
Sst
hrO
C


running back added a 55-yard
scoring rush and caught a 27-yard
TD pass from senior Joe LaFleur
to put the Pirates ahead 21-0.
Crystal River ran into
trouble in the second
quarter, however. The
Red Devils blocked a
punt, recovered a Pirate
fumble, forced a
click turnover-on-downs, drew
tory at two pass interference
onicle penalties, chewed up all
OMe but 3 minutes of clock
and got a pair of TD
passes from junior Stephen
Cochlin to narrow the score to
20-14 heading into the half.


Crystal River 48
Williston 21
0 The Pirates'
next game is
Sept. 21 at
home against
Santa Fe.


The Pirates' woes continued
early in the third as they
coughed up another fumble to
Williston. But the Crystal River
defense rose to the occasion with
the help of a pass block by soph-
omore Jacob LaFleur as well as
See Page B4


Chapes. Backups Breon Whaley
and Tyric Washington handled the
task of stepping up remarkably;
Whaley ended the game with 97
yards rushing and three touch-
downs on 16 carries.
Defensive tackle Steven
Knowles came up with several
huge sacks and the blocked punt to
keep his team in the game.
West Port quarterback Kalen
Woodyard lead a solid attack for
his team, completing 9 of 12
passes for 224 yards and two
touchdowns.




Panthers


outlast


Hornets


Lecanto scores

last 17points of

game for win
JOSEPH KORNECKI III
Correspondent
WEEK WACHEE The
Lecanto Panthers spoiled the
Weeki Wachee Hornets' first
home game in their inaugural
season as they scored on
their first drive three plays
into the game.
Lecanto junior quarterback
Christian Barber connected on
a 55-yard touchdown pass to
Ricky Marcic, who sprinted
past the Weeki Wachee defense
for a 6-0 lead. Luis Leiva added
the point after for a 7-0 lead.
The Hornets got some good
fortune as they recovered a
muffed Lecanto punt at the 19
yard line. They converted off
the turnover as Hornet quar-
terback David Tinch threw a
4-yard touchdown pass to Jon
King for their first touchdown
at home. Tinch added the
extra point to knot the score at
7 apiece with 3:15 left in the
first quarter.
However, that was the only
score for Weeki Wachee (1-1)
the entire night as they only
mustered 58 yards in the con-
test as Lecanto dominated on
the defensive side of the ball.
Lecanto (1-1) never looked
back as Nile Waters sprinted
to the end zone for a 16-yard
touchdown rush for a 14-7
Panther lead with 9:05 left in
the first half.
With 11:40 left, Waters added
a 9-yard touchdown rush in the
fourth quarter after he con-
verted a gutsy 4th-and-3 con-
version. Luis Leiva then
connected on the extra point
for a 21-7 Lecanto advantage.
On the drive, sophomore
running back Brian Poe be-
hind solid blocking had 56
yards rushing on the drive
that set up Waters' fourth-
down conversion and touch-


Page B4


Lecanto 24
Weeki Wachee 7


Ai&


* The
team's next
game is 7:30
p.m. Friday
at Central.


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B2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012

College Football
Schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Saturday, Sept. 8
EAST
Lehigh (1-0) at CCSU (0-1), Noon
Albany (NY) (1-0) at Robert Morris (0-1),
Noon
Bryant (0-1) at St. Francis (Pa.) (0-1), Noon
Maryland (1-0) at Temple (1-0), Noon
NC State (0-1) at UConn (1-0), Noon
Dayton (0-1) at Duquesne (0-1), 12:10 p.m.
Maine (0-0) at Boston College (0-1), 1 p.m.
Wagner (0-1) at Georgetown (1-0), 1 p.m.
Rhode Island (0-0) at Monmouth (NJ) (0-1),
1p.m.
Delaware St. (1-0) at Delaware (1-0), 3:30 p.m.
Howard (1-0) at Rutgers (1-0), 3:30 p.m.
Southern Cal (1-0) vs. Syracuse (0-1) at East
Rutherford, N.J., 3:30 p.m.
Indiana (1-0) at UMass (0-1), 3:30 p.m.
Morgan St. (1-0) at Buffalo (0-1), 6 p.m.
Bucknell (0-0) at Marist (1-0), 6 p.m.
Pace (0-1) at Stony Brook (1-0), 6 p.m.
Fordham (1-0) at Villanova (0-1), 6 p.m.
SOUTH
Auburn (0-1) at Mississippi St. (1-0), Noon
Penn St. (0-1) at Virginia (1-0), Noon
East Carolina (1-0) at South Carolina (1-0),
12:21 p.m.
Ball St. (1-0) at Clemson (1-0), 12:30 p.m.
Jacksonville (0-1) at Charleston Southern
(0-1), 1:30 p.m.
Chowan (0-0) atVMI (0-1), 1:30 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-1) at VirginiaTech (1-0), 1:30p.m.
North Carolina (1-0) atWake Forest (1 -0), 3p.m.
Missouri St. (0-1) at Louisville (1-0), 3:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky (1-0) at Alabama (1-0), 3:39 p.m.
Georgia St. (0-1) at Tennessee (1-0), 4 p.m.
Coastal Carolina (1-0) at Furman (0-1), 5 p.m.
NichollsSt. (0-0) at South Alabama (0-1), 5p.m.
Virginia-Wise (1-1) at Campbell (0-1), 6 p.m.
Morehead St. (1-0) at E. Kentucky (0-1), 6 p.m.
Akron (0-1) at FlU (0-1), 6 p.m.
Savannah St. (0-1) at Florida St. (1-0), 6 p.m.
Old Dominion (1-0) at Hampton (0-1), 6 p.m.
Alcorn St. (1-0) at James Madison (1-0), 6 p.m.
W.Virginia St. (1-1) at NC A&T (0-1), 6 p.m.
Gardner-Webb (0-1) at Richmond (0-1), 6 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman (1-0) at SC State (1-0),
6p.m.
Georgia Southern (1-0) at The Citadel (1-0),
6p.m.
Montana (1-0) atAppalachian St. (0-1), 6:30 p.m.
MVSU (0-1) at Alabama St. (0-1), 7p.m.
NC Central (1-0) at Elon (0-1), 7 p.m.
Presbyterian (1-0) at Georgia Tech (0-1), 7p.m.
Chattanooga (0-1) at Jacksonville St. (0-1),
7p.m.
Washington (1-0) at LSU (1-0), 7 p.m.
Davidson (0-1) at Lenoir-Rhyne (0-1), 7 p.m.
Norfolk St. (1-0) at Liberty (0-1), 7 p.m.
W. Carolina (1-0) at Marshall (0-1), 7 p.m.
FAU (1 -0) at Middle Tennessee (0-1), 7 p.m.
UTEP (0-1) at Mississippi (1-0), 7 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (0-1) at Murray St. (0-1), 7 p.m.
Ark.-Monticello (1-0) at Northwestern St.
(0-1), 7 p.m.
Jackson St. (0-1) vs. Tennessee St. (1-0 at
Memphis, Tenn., 7 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette (1-0) at Troy (1-0), 7 p.m.
Lafayette (0-0) at William & Mary (0-1), 7 p.m.
Lincoln (Mo.) (0-1) at Wofford (1-0), 7p.m.
Kent St. (1-0) at Kentucky (0-1), 7:30 p.m.
McMurry (0-1) at McNeese St. (1-0), 8 p.m.
S. Dakota St. (0-1) at SE Louisiana (0-1), 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Miami (1 -0) at Kansas St. (1 -0), Noon
New Hampshire (1-0) at Minnesota (1-0),
Noon
UCF (1-0) at Ohio St. (1-0), Noon
Illinois St. (1-0) at E. Michigan (0-1), 1 p.m.
S. Illinois (0-1) at Miami (Ohio) (0-1), 1 p.m.
Quincy (0-1) at Indiana St. (0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Colgate (0-1) at South Dakota (0-1), 3 p.m.
Michigan St. (1-0) at Cent. Michigan (1-0),
3:30 p.m.
Rice (0-1) at Kansas (1-0), 3:30 p.m.
Air Force (1-0) at Michigan (0-1), 3:30 p.m.
Purdue (1-0) at Notre Dame (1-0), 3:30 p.m.
Iowa St. (1-0) at Iowa (1-0), 3:42 p.m.
Indianapolis (0-1) atW. Illinois (1-0), 4 p.m.
Valparaiso (0-1) atYoungstown St. (1-0), 4 p.m.
Franklin (0-1) at Butler (0-1), 6 p.m.
Idaho (0-1) at Bowling Green (0-1), 7 p.m.
Montana St. (1-0) at Drake (1-0), 7 p.m.
UT-Martin (1-0) at N. Illinois (0-1), 7p.m.
Central St. (Ohio) (0-1) at N. Iowa (0-1), 7 p.m.
New Mexico St. (1-0) at Ohio (1-0), 7 p.m.
Mars Hill (0-1) at SE Missouri (0-1), 7 p.m.
E. Illinois (1-0) at W. Michigan (0-1), 7 p.m.
Portland St. (1-0) at North Dakota (1-0),
7:05 p.m.
Georgia (1-0) at Missouri (1-0), 7:45 p.m.
Vanderbilt (0-1) at Northwestern (1-0), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Tulane (0-1) at Tulsa (0-1), Noon
Texas A&M Commerce (0-1) at UTSA (1-0),
2p.m.
Florida (1-0) at Texas A&M (0-0), 3:30 p.m.
Alabama A&M (1-0) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-0),
6p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe (0-0) vs. Arkansas (1-0) at
Little Rock, Ark., 7 p.m.
Memphis (0-1) at Arkansas St. (0-1), 7 p.m.
Texas Southern (1-0) at North Texas (0-1),
7p.m.
Florida A&M (0-1) at Oklahoma (1-0), 7 p.m.
Incarnate Word (1-0) at Sam Houston St.
(0-0), 7 p.m.
Grambling St. (0-1) atTCU (0-0), 7p.m.
Texas Tech (1-0) at Texas St. (1-0), 7 p.m.
LouisianaTech (0-0) at Houston (0-1), 8 p.m.
Prairie View (0-1) at Lamar (0-1), 8 p.m.
Stephen F Austin (1-0) at SMU (0-1), 8 p.m.
New Mexico (1-0) at Texas (1-0), 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Weber St. (0-1) at BYU (1-0), 3 p.m.
S. Utah (0-1) at California (0-1), 3 p.m.
Sacramento St. (0-1) at Colorado (0-1), 3 p.m.
E.Washington (1-0) at Washington St. (0-1),
3p.m.
Mesa St. (0-1) at N. Colorado (0-1), 3:35 p.m.
South Florida (1-0) at Nevada (1-0), 3:35 p.m.
Wisconsin (1-0) at Oregon St. (0-0), 4 p.m.
Toledo (0-1) at Wyoming (0-1), 4 p.m.
Black Hills St. (00) at Idaho St. (0-1), 6:05 p.m.
Fresno St. (1-0) at Oregon (1-0), 6:30 p.m.
N. Dakota St. (1-0) at Colorado St. (1-0), 7p.m.
Army (0-0) at San Diego St. (0-1), 7:30 p.m.
Nebraska (1-0) at UCLA (1-0), 7:30 p.m.
UC Davis (1-0) atSan Jose St. (0-1), 8p.m.
W. New Mexico (1-0) at San Diego (0-1),
9p.m.
N. Arizona (0-1) at UNLV (0-1), 10p.m.
Oklahoma St. (1-0) at Arizona (1-0), 10:30p.m.
Illinois (1-0) at Arizona St. (1-0), 10:30 p.m.
Duke (1-0) at Stanford (1-0), 10:30 p.m.


Fisher wants Seminoles focused


FSU hosts FCS foe

Savannah State

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida
State's Jimbo Fisher wants the
sixth-ranked Seminoles to be fo-
cused and play disciplined football
when they host Savannah State on
Saturday in what shapes up to be a
colossal mismatch.
The struggling Wildcats are sub-
stituting for West Virginia, which
pulled out of Saturday's date with
the Seminoles earlier this year.
Savannah State comes to town on
the heels of an 84-0 pummeling at
the hands of another Top 25 team,
18th-ranked Oklahoma State. The
Seminoles (1-0) were installed as 70
1/2-point favorites by Las Vegas
odds makers.
One bright note, Savannah State
is collecting paychecks totaling
$860,000 for the two games, which
will go a long way toward helping
the financially strapped athletic
program meet its total budget of
$5.1 million.
Fisher has been criticized for


. .4 .. ..: - .. -: . .. *-. .
-w


Associated Press
Florida State running back Chris Thompson (4) and the Seminoles are
taking on FCS opponent Savannah State today.


stacking the top end of his schedule
with seemingly winnable games in
his first three seasons, but he says
it's a matter of paying the bills -
which requires seven home games,
regardless of the opponent.
"It ain't about you don't want to
play," Fisher said. "We'll play who-
ever you got on the schedule."
Savannah State is one of the
weakest teams in the Football
Championship Subdivision, going


4-72 against opponents in its own
division. The Wildcats have scored
only one touchdown in their last
five games and been outscored by
an average of 40 points in their last
six as they prepare to face one of
the nation's best defenses.
And Savannah State coach Steve
Davenport has already wondered
aloud whether the money is worth
lining up against bigger, stronger
and faster athletes across the


board. He's got four freshmen start-
ing in the Wildcats' offensive line.
"Our kids played until the clock
struck zero," Davenport told the
Tallahassee Democrat "That's what
I think we'll do again this week."
Fisher said he's counting on his
team to concentrate on its assign-
ments and play mistake-free football.
"That's one of the challenges,"
conceded Fisher, who doesn't want
to lose another key player to injury
either Star defensive end Brandon
Jenkins suffered a season-ending
broken left foot in last week's win.
Getting his starters out early
would almost seem to be a cer-
tainty Saturday Oklahoma State
had walk-ons playing by halftime
during its romp last weekend.
"I hope we're that sharp," Fisher
said. "I hope we don't take that for
granted."
The Seminoles haven't seemed
to take things too casually against
weaker opponents in recent times,
having outscored three previous
FCS teams by a combined 190-19 in
the Fisher era.
Florida State demolished Mur-
ray State 69-3 in its opener last
week and now seeks its fourth win
over a FCS team in Fisher's third
year.


No more patsies Buls'


No. 24 Florida first

SEC test for Aggies

Associated Press

COLLEGE STATION, Texas No
easy opener No chance to work out the
kinks against some lower-division team.
Thanks to Hurricane Isaac, Texas
A&M and Louisiana Tech postponed
last week's game in Shreveport until
Oct. 13. That means Texas A&M will
open its season and life in the
Southeastern Conference against
No. 24 Florida on Saturday
Whether it will be an advantage
to the Gators or the Aggies, no one's
really sure.
"This is our first game," new Texas
A&M coach Kevin Sumlin said. "You
can't worry about that. We can't
change what happened last week. It's
how you approach it. There are posi-
tives and negatives to both. I think
any coach would tell you that"
Sure, Florida had a chance to fig-
ure out its quarterback situation and
work out some kinks. But last week's
27-14 win over Bowling Green also
gave the Aggies some tape to look at,
something the Gators didn't have this
week. Last year's tape isn't much help
since Sumlin is in his first year at
Texas A&M after being hired from
Houston in December.
"We are in a little bit of a guessing
game from the standpoint of them not
playing, but that's always with the
first game," Florida coach Will
Muschamp said. "You go through that
as a coach. You kind of go through it
when you go into a bowl game and
you have that much time off with
some different wrinkles that they may
give you. We just need to adjust to
what we're doing."
Florida cornerback Jaylen Watkins
said the Gators have
been watching tape from No. 24 UI
Sumlin's high-flying of- Texas AJ
fenses at Houston to
prepare. U Time: 3:3
"They have a quick Saturday.
tempo," Watkins said. U TV: ESPN
"They try to get you out
of rhythm when you're
looking back. Some-
times they look back and they hike the
ball when you're trying to get your call
from your coaches. They try to catch
you off-balance when you're not pay-
ing attention."
These teams are similar in that
they both have quarterbacks who are
in their first season as starters.
Muschamp named Jeff Driskel his
starter Monday after alternating be-
tween him and Jacoby Brissett


a w a ~- -


Associated Press
No. 24 Florida is expected to rely heavily on running back Mike Gillislee against
SEC newcomer Texas A&M today at College Station, Tx. Gillislee had a career-
high 148 yards rushing and two touchdowns last week against Bowling Green.


against Bowling Green.
"He just wants me to go out there
and play and not worry about looking
over my shoulder," Driskel said of
Muschamp. "He wants me to play
loose and calm and that's what I'm
going to do."
Driskel will be helped by having
running back Mike Gillislee in the
backfield with him.
F (1-0) at Gillislee got off to a great
&M (0M4) start last week, running
24 times for 148 yards
0 p.m. and two touchdowns.
Sumlin decided red-
shirt freshman Johnny
Manziel would take over
the job left vacant by
current Miami Dolphins quarterback
Ryan Tannehill a couple of weeks into
camp.
"He's an inexperienced player and
because of that, our surrounding cast
of our offensive line or our running
backs or our skill people on the
perimeter who have experience,
have to play well and create a quar-
terback-friendly atmosphere for
him," Sumlin said. "Fortunately
we've got experienced players in


those positions."
Indeed. Texas A&M's biggest
strength going into the season is a vet-
eran offensive line led by the two tack-
les, Luke Joeckel and Jake Matthews.
The Aggies also hope to get a boost by
the return of running back Christine
Michael, a senior who has seen his last
two seasons end prematurely after
breaking his leg in 2010 and tearing an
anterior cruciate ligament last season.
He ran for 899 yards and eight touch-
downs last season before the injury
The Gators know they'll be facing a
rowdy crowd on Saturday after the
Aggies have been waiting months to
officially begin the SEC era in College
Station. First-year Florida offensive
coordinator Brent Pease, a former as-
sistant at Baylor, has tried to convey
just how crazy it can get to his play-
ers, Swamp experience or not.
"The thing I do remember is in the
third quarter and you look up there
and they're all swaying, you can't look
or you're going to get like vertigo. Those
stands start moving," Pease said. "It can
get loud. They're into it and they get
their little yell people going and ... it's a
great atmosphere to play in."


USF heading

out west to

face Nevada

Associated Press

TAMPA Traveling to
the West Coast is a fairly
new experience for South
Florida, but coach Skip
Holtz stresses it'll be
strictly business when the
Bulls visit Nevada.
"Everybody talks about,
'We're so excited to go to
Nevada... I've never been
to Nevada,"' Holtz said,
looking ahead to Satur-
day's game in Reno. "I
said, 'You're going to see
the inside of a hotel room,
the inside of a stadium
and what you see outside
the bus window' It's not
we're going on a tourist
trip with cameras hanging
around their necks. This
is a business trip."
The Bulls (1-0) opened
with a 34-13 win against
Tennessee-Chattanooga, a
Football Championship
Subdivision opponent, in a
game that prompted more
questions than answers.
USF's defense allowed
just 151 yards, but its of-
fense only rushed for 85
yards in 31 carries. Senior
quarterback B.J. Daniels
passed for 225 yards, al-
though he committed two
turnovers that led to 10 of
Chattanooga's points.
Nevada (1-0), which won
31-24 on the road against
Pac-12 Conference mem-
ber California, figures to
provide a formidable
challenge. The Wolf Pack,
a first-year Mountain Con-
ference school, are facing
a Big East Conference foe
for the first time. Nevada
is 39-10 at home since
coach Chris Ault's return
to the sidelines in 2004.
USF, in its 16th season
of football, playing west of
the Rocky Mountains for
the third time in program
history The Bulls, aware
that Nevada's home field
is 4,610 feet above sea
level, have undergone
extra conditioning work
this week.


Miami travels to Kansas State


Associated Press

MANHATTAN, Kan. The pass
interference penalty in the closing
minutes is what gave Miami hope.
It was called on Kansas State de-
fensive back Nigel Malone, and
gave the Hurricanes the ball with
first-and-goal at the
2-yard line. They Miami
were trailing 28-24 Kansas S
before a home
crowd in Coral I Time: 12 p.
Gables and, so it 0 TV: FX
seemed, poised to
punch in the go-
ahead touchdown early last season.
A first-down pass fell incomplete,
and two straight runs went
nowhere.
Now facing fourth down with 57
seconds left, Jacory Harris took the
snap and rolled to his left, looking
for a place to throw. With everyone
covered, the Miami quarterback


(
it


sprinted for the pylon, stretching
the ball out just as he was swarmed
under by the pursuing Wildcats.
The officials ruled it a touchdown.
Replays proved otherwise and the
Hurricanes lost a heartbreaker
"It stuck with us all year, what
can you say?" recalled Hurricanes
coach Al Golden,
1-0) at whose team gets its
ate (1-0) chance at retribu-
tion when it visits
n. Saturday. No. 21 Kansas State
on Saturday
"I think we fin-
ished the year con-
verting 14 of 15 goal-to-go
situations," Golden said. "That was
the one. Give them a lot of credit-
they fought until the end. Their
guys stepped up and made plays on
the 2-yard line there in succession,
and they earned the right to win
that game by the way they played.
We didn't execute and they did -


bottom line."
There are new faces on both sides
of the ball Harris was a senior on
last year's team but enough still
around who remember the way last
season's meeting played out
One of them is Arthur Brown, the
Wildcats' senior linebacker
He was one of the nation's most
highly prized recruits coming out
of high school in Wichita, Kan. The
Wildcats wanted him at the time,
but Brown felt a hankering to get
out of Kansas, so he committed to
the Hurricanes and former coach
Randy Shannon.
Brown played in 11 games as a
freshman and all 12 as a sopho-
more, including the Hurricanes'
appearance in the Champs Sports
Bowl. But he wound up transfer-
ring after the season, deciding that
he ultimately wanted to play closer
to home, and finally enrolled at
Kansas State.


No. 14 Ohio State preps
for big push from UCF
COLUMBUS, Ohio Quarter-
back Blake Bortles believes that
his Central Florida team has ath-
letes to play on even terms with
No. 14 Ohio State on Saturday.
Another fa-
mous, or infa- UCF (
mous, former No. 14 Oh
Floridian agrees.
"They're a Big 0 Time: 12
Ten talent," m TV: ESPN2
Buckeyes coach
Urban Meyer
said of UCF. "There's no question
there's people on that team at
certain positions that are as good
or better than our (guys). They
have five or six NFL players on
their roster. That tells you what
we're getting ready to face. We'd
better be ready. This is going to
be a brawl."
In the first meeting between the


schools, both enter with 1-0
records. Each scored 56 points
last week in battering Mid-Ameri-
can Conference opponents from
Ohio, the Knights whipping Akron
56-14 and the Buckeyes rolling
over Miami University 56-10 in
Meyer's first game on the side-
lines after coach-
L-0) at ing Florida to two
io St. (1-0) national titles in
six seasons,
.m. Saturday. 2005-10.
The Knights of
coach George
O'Leary, coming
off a 5-7 season in 2011, are brim-
ming with confidence.
"I think we can run with them, I
think we can run with anybody,"
said Bortles, who threw for three
touchdowns last week in his first
collegiate start. "We're a team
full of athletes. Everybody's
going to go out there and give it
their all."


1
hi


2


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I* t;*.-.*'-


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



PGA Tour
BMW Championship
Friday
At Crooked Stick Golf Club Course,
Carmel, Ind.
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,497, Par: 72
Second Round
Vijay Singh 65-66-131 -13
Ryan Moore 66-66 -132 -12
Rory Mcllroy 64-68-132 -12
Tiger Woods 65-67-132 -12
Lee Westwood 68-65 -133 -11
Bo Van Pelt 64-69-133 -11
Seung-Yul Noh 68-66-134 -10
Graham DeLaet 64-70 -134 -10
Graeme McDowell 68-67-135 -9
Dustin Johnson 68-67-135 -9
Bill Haas 71-64-135 -9
Padraig Harrington 70-65-135 -9
Tom Gillis 69-67-136 -8
Robert Garrigus 67-69- 136 -8
lan Poulter 68-68-136 -8
Adam Scott 68-68 -136 -8
John Huh 70-66-136 -8
Zach Johnson 67-69-136 -8
Phil Mickelson 69-67-136 -8
Troy Matteson 70-66 -136 -8
Chris Kirk 68-68-136 -8
Justin Rose 67-70-137 -7
Rickie Fowler 67-70 -137 -7
Louis Oosthuizen 68-69-137 -7
Martin Laird 69-68-137 -7
Charl Schwartzel 69-68-137 -7
Brendon de Jonge 71-66-137 -7
Luke Donald 66-72-138 -6
Brandt Snedeker 69-69 138 -6
Ben Crane 67-71 -138 -6
Kyle Stanley 68-70-138 -6
Sergio Garcia 69-69-138 -6
Ernie Els 68-71 -139 -5
Geoff Ogilvy 68-71 -139 -5
Ben Curtis 70-69-139 -5
John Senden 70-69-139 -5
Jason Dufner 72-67-139 -5
Webb Simpson 64-75-139 -5
Jim Furyk 69-70-139 -5
NickWatney 70-69-139 -5
David Hearn 69-70-139 -5
Ryan Palmer 66-73-139 -5
Matt Every 68-71 -139 -5
Bubba Watson 69-71 -140 -4
Bob Estes 71-69-140 -4
Johnson Wagner 70-71-141 -3
Bud Cauley 69-72-141 -3
Keegan Bradley 71-70-141 -3
Steve Stricker 68-73 -141 -3
Kevin Stadler 69-73-142 -2
Brian Harman 73-69-142 -2
Tim Clark 71-71 -142 -2
Matt Kuchar 69-73-142 -2
Charlie Wi 70-72-142 -2
JimmyWalker 67-76-143 -1
Scott Piercy 72-71 -143 -1
Hunter Mahan 70-73-143 -1
Kevin Na 72-71 -143 -1
Greg Chalmers 74-70-144 E
J.B. Holmes 70-74-144 E
PatPerez 72-72-144 E
D.A. Points 74-71 -145 +1
Jeff Overton 74-72- 146 +2
Carl Pettersson 75-72-147 +3
Charley Hoffman 75-72-147 +3
Dicky Pride 76-71 -147 +3
Marc Leishman 75-73- 148 +4
MarkWilson 72-76-148 +4
William McGirt 77-72-149 +5
BryceMolder 77-72-149 +5



Sprint Cup
Federated Auto Parts
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond,Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 127.023 mph.
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 126.981.
3. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 126.91.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 126.808.
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 126.79.
6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 126.784.
7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 126.671.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 126.6.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 126.553.
10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 126.547.
11. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 126.41.
12. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 126.139.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 126.08.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 126.074.
15. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 126.033.
16. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 126.033.
17. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 125.974.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 125.939.
19. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 125.88.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 125.845.
21. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 125.722.
22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 125.692.
23. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 125.599.
24. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 125.546.
25. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 125.511.
26. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 125.389.
27. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 125.389.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 125.371.
29. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 125.342.
30. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 125.226.
31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 125.052.
32. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 124.988.
33. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 124.89.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 124.879.
35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 124.746.
36. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 124.723.
37. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 124.706.
38. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 124.539.
39. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 124.407.
40. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 124.315.
41. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 124.161.
42. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 124.087.
43. (91) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 123.779.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 123.468.
45. (0) Mark Green, Toyota, 120.962.


U.S. Open Results
Friday
At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center, NewYork
Purse: $25.5 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Semifinals
Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Maria
Sharapova (3), Russia, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.


Serena Williams (4), United States, def. Sara
Errani (10), Italy 6-1, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Bob and Mike Bryan (2), United States, def.
Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5),
Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-4.
U.S. Open Show
Court Schedules
Saturday
At The USTA Billie Jean King National Ten-
nis Center
New York
Arthur Ashe Stadium
Play begins at 11 a.m. EDT
Men's Singles Semifinals: Tomas Berdych
(6), Czech Republic, vs. Andy Murray (3), Britain
Men's Singles Semifinals: David Ferrer (4),
Spain, vs. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia
Night Session (7 p.m.)
Women's Singles Final: Victoria Azarenka (1),
Belarus, vs. Serena Williams (4), United States


SPORTS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 B3


Serena moves to Open final


Azarenka surprises

Sharapova, will be

Williams'opponent

Associated Press

NEW YORK Thanks to her lat-
est easy victory, Serena Williams is
one match from her fourth U.S.
Open title and 15th Grand Slam tro-
phy overall.
Williams wasted little time or en-
ergy while overwhelming 10th-
seeded Sara Errani of Italy 6-1, 6-2
on Friday night to reach the final at
Flushing Meadows.
Building a 38-6 edge in winners
and smacking nine aces to raise
her tournament-leading total to 50,
Williams needed only 64 minutes to
dismiss Errani, the runner-up at
the French Open.
Not only has Williams won every
set she's played over the last two
weeks, she's dropped a total of only
19 games across six matches. It's
part of a stretch of dominance that
has carried her to a 25-1 record
since a shocking first-round exit at
the French Open in late May, the
only time in 49 Grand Slam ap-
pearances that Williams lost her
opening match.
Her recent surge includes titles
at Wimbledon and the London
Olympics.
"It's really awesome," Williams


Associated Press
Serena Williams returns a shot to Italy's Sara Errani during a semifinal
match Friday at the 2012 US Open tennis tournament in New York.


said in an on-court interview. "That
is what I wanted, and what I
dreamed of, all year."
It was 12 months ago that the Amer-
ican was stunned in straight sets at
the U.S. Open final by Sam Stosur.
Williams' championships in New
York came in 1999,2002 and 2008.
In Saturday night's final, she
will face top-ranked Victoria
Azarenka of Belarus, who beat
Maria Sharapova in three sets ear-
lier Friday Williams is 9-1 against
Azarenka.
"Obviously, Victoria wants to win,
too," Williams told the crowd in
Arthur Ashe Stadium. "But I'm


American, guys. Last one standing.
Go USA!"
In many ways, her semifinal was
a complete mismatch.
Errani had never been past the
third round at the U.S. Open -and
never past the fourth round at any
major tournament until this
year. She reached the quarterfi-
nals at the Australian Open in Jan-
uary, then made it all the way to
the final at the French Open, losing
there to Sharapova.
In her first 17 Grand Slam appear-
ances, Errani was 15-17. She entered
Friday 17-3 in 2012 at the sport's four
most important tournaments.


Singh assumes BMW's top spot


Golfer has single-shot

lead as Mcllroy,

Woods a stroke back

Associated Press

CARMEL, Ind. -Vijay Singh keeps
giving himself chances to end four
years without a PGA Tour victory He
made four birdies around the turn
Friday for a 6-under 66 in the BMW
Championship, putting his name atop
the leaderboard for the second time
in his last four tournaments.
It won't get any easier the rest of
the way
Tiger Woods was one shot behind.
So was Rory McIlroy Going into a
storm-filled weekend at Crooked
Stick, four players who have reached
No. 1 in the world were among the
top six.
Woods started slowly and finished
strong, with birdies on his last two
holes for a 67. McIlroy, coming off
what he called one of the best ball-
striking rounds of his life, had to
overcome four bogeys for a hard-
earned 68. Joining them one shot out
of the lead was Ryan Moore, who had
a 66 and seems to play well in the
BMW Championship no matter
which state it is held.
Lee Westwood (65) and Indiana na-
tive Bo Van Pelt (69) were two shots
off the lead.
The 49-year-old Singh was at 13-
under 131 on Crooked Stick, a Pete
Dye course vulnerable to low scoring
because of rain over the last several
days. The second round was played
early Friday to beat approaching
thunderstorms, and the times were
pushed back slightly Saturday to re-
cover from whatever rain falls
overnight
LPGA Tour
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. Jiyai Shin fol-
lowed her opening 9-under 62 with a 68
to take a one-stroke lead in the LPGA
Tour's Kingsmill Championship.
The South Korean player had four
birdies and a bogey to finish two rounds
at 12 under on Kingsmill's River Course.
She won the last of her eight LPGA Tour

Sports BRIEF

NJ: Leagues can't
stop sports betting
TRENTON, N.J. -A
court filing claims sports
gambling is so widespread
already that New Jersey's
plans to implement it won't
cause any harm to college
and pro sports leagues.
The argument is contained
in a court filing that seeks to
dismiss a lawsuit filed by the
four major pro leagues and
the NCAA.
New Jersey's Legislature
approved sports gambling
earlier this year.
The leagues' lawsuit seeks
to stop the state from grant-
ing sports gambling licenses.
In its brief released late
Friday, the state claims the
leagues have no standing to
bring the lawsuit because
they can't show they'd suffer
direct harm from sports ,
gambling in New Jersey I
when more than $350 billion
is already bet on sports,
both legally and illegally.
From wire reports


6,
LA

0S


d


Associated Pres
Vijay Singh watches his approach shot on the seventh fairway Friday during th
second round of the BMW Championship golf tournament at Crooked Stic


Golf Club in Carmel, Ind.
titles in November 2010.
American Danielle Kang was second
after a 64.
Paula Creamer and Dewi Claire
Schreefel were 10 under. Schreefel had a
66, and Creamer shot 67.
Michelle Wie missed the cut with
rounds of 75 and 71.
European Tour
HILVERSUM, Netherlands- Eng-


land's Graeme Storm shot a 4-under 66
to take a three-stroke lead after the sec-
ond round of the KLM Open.
Storm had an 11-under total 129 total
at Hilversumsche. He opened with a
course-record 63.
Scotland's Scott Jamieson (64),
Spain's Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano
(65) and Sweden's Peter Hanson (66)
were tied for second.


Friday's match was only her sec-
nd major semifinal, Williams'
2nd, and that disparity showed
ght from the outset.
Errani did not even come within
point of winning a game until she
Ready trailed 5-0. When Williams
etted a backhand, Errani got on
le board at 5-1.
By then, the outcome was clear.
When Errani finally won a sec-
nd game, getting to 2-1 in the sec-
nd set with an inside-out forehand
D hold serve, she let out a yelp and
skipped toward the sideline.
Errani won the first point of the
ext game, too, with a well-angled
roundstroke winner that made it
've-15.
At that moment, it was as if
filliams said to herself, "OK,
enough is enough."
She won four points in a row to
old for a 3-1 lead like this: 102
aph service winner, 117 mph ace,
14 mph ace, 119 mph ace.
In the next game, Williams
umped a swinging backhand vol-
*y into the net and hopped in
lace, angry with herself, but then
stored order to break yet again
nd make it 4-1.
Williams, who turns 31 on Sept.
6, is trying to become the first 30-
ear-old woman to win the U.S.
pen since Martina Navratilova in
987. She's also hoping to become
ie first woman with champi-
nships at Wimbledon and the U.S.
pen since -yes, you guessed it -
Filliams did it in 2002.




Pole set


for Sprint


Cup race


Earnhardt,

Gordon take

front row at

Richmond

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. It's a
Hendrick Motorsports front
row at Richmond Interna-
tional Raceway
Dale Earnhardt Jr. won
the pole for Saturday night's
"regular-season" finale,
turning a lap of 127.023 mph
in his Chevrolet to bump
teammate Jeff Gordon from
the top starting spot.
"I was as surprised as
anybody," said Earnhardt,
who won the 11th pole of his
career
It's the first pole for
NASCAR's most popular
driver since the 2011 Day-
tona 500.
It came at the expense of
Gordon, who is trying to
race his way into the Chase
for the Sprint Cup champi-
onship. Gordon wound up
second, and was pleased
ss with the effort.
e "Mission accomplished,"
k he said.
Gordon needs a strong
race Saturday night and a
little bit of help to earn one
of the two wild-card berths
in the 12-driver Chase field.
Although eight drivers go
into the race mathemati-
cally eligible for the final
two spots in the Chase field,
the talk has focused on a
battle between Gordon and
Kyle Busch for the last slot.


2012


Eagle BuickOj SI C T rucks


Citrus County Speedway

Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012

Legends Cars of Southwest Florida 'SW


liva,,
VENDS,
IA W

A AS






B4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012



NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New England 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.YJJets 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.YGiants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Wednesday's Game
Dallas 24, N.Y Giants 17
Sunday's Games
Indianapolis at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 1 p.m.
New England at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Washington at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 10:15 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 13
Chicago at Green Bay 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 16
Tampa Bay at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at New England, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Miami, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 17
Denver at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Friday's high school
football box scores

Forest 37, Dunnellon 20
Dunnellon 14 0 6 0 20
Forest 10 10 10 7 37
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
FHS- Roddenberry 1-run (Krysalka kick)
DHS Boley 3-run (Boley kick)
FHS -Krysalka 42-FG
DHS Brown 27-pass from Boley (Boley kick)
Second Quarter
FHS -Krysalka 28-FG
FHS-Austin 78-punt return (Krysalka kick)
Third Quarter
FHS -Krysalka 47-FG
DHS Boley 5-run (2-pt. conversion failed)
FHS Gordan 82-pass from Roddenberry
(Krysalka kick)
Fourth Quarter
FHS- Austin 75-nt return (Krysalka kick)
Individual Leaders
RUSHING-DHS, Swoll 15-49, Boley 18-49,
Parks 2-6; FHS, King 11-42, Austin 5-18,
Rodenberry 9-16, Miller 4-7.
PASSING-DHS, Boley 8-18-2-217; FHS,
Rodenberry 7-14-0-157.
RECEIVING-DHS, Jackson 6-166, Brown
1-27, Parks 1-24; FHS, Gordan 2-91, Molinari
2-37, Wasiewicz 1-13, Linder 1 -9, Williams 1 -8.
Cornerstone Charter 31,
Seven Rivers 22
CC 7 14 0 10- 31
SR 6 0 8 8- 22
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
SR --Iwaniec 60-yd run (kick failed)
C Nelson 81 -yd run (Moeller kick)
Second Quarter
C -Nelson 1 -yd run (Moeller kick)
C Nelson 10-yd run (Moeller kick)
Third Quarter
SR M- assullo 2-yd run (Iwaniec run)
Fourth Quarter
C Nelson 31 -yd run (Moeller kick)
SR Iwaniec 5-yd run (Iwaniec run)
C -Moeller 26-yd FG
Individual Leaders
Passing C: D. Nelson 5-6-38-0-0; SR: Iwaniec
1-3-0-0-0.
Rushing C: D. Nelson 20-181 -4, B. Perez: 11 -
86-0; SR: J. Iwaniec : 28-327-2, J. Mazza : 7-16-
0, K. Massullo :6-14-1.
Receiving C: M. Moeller: 4-30-0; SR: none
West Port 28, Citrus 26
WP13 8 7 0- 28
Cit 0 7 12 7- 26
SCORING SUMMARY
First Quarter


West Port QB Woodyard 11-yd TD pass to
WR Ricky McDuffie; EP good.
West Port Woodyard 13-yd TD pass to WR
Jonnu Smith; EP no good.
Second Quarter
West Port RB Will Sims 2-yd TD run; 2-pt-
conv. good.
Citrus RB Whaley 13-yd TD run; EP good,
21-7
Third Quarter
9:55 West Post, RB Alfonso Randolf 1-yd TD
run; EP good, 28-7
6:45 Citrus, RB Whaley 1-yd TD run; EP no
good, 28-13
4:35 Citrus, RB Whaley 7-yd TD run; EP no
good, 28-19
First Quarter
2:02 Citrus, RB AI-LamarWhite 7-yd TD run; EP
good, 28-26
KEY PLAYERS
Citrus: Breon Whaley, RB; 16 carries, 97 yards,
3TDs
Steven Knowles, DT, 2 sacks, 1 blocked punt
West Port: Kalen Woodyard, QB; 9-of-12 pass-
ing, 224 yards, 2TDs


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOTr the record

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Friday in the Florida Lottery:
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11


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Virginia 529 College
Savings 250 race (Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (ABC) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Federated
Auto Parts 400 race
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FOX) Atlanta Braves at New York Mets
7 p.m. (SUN) Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays
BOXING
9:45 p.m. (HBO) Chad Dawson vs. Andre Ward: Super
Middleweights
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Luis Ramos Jr. vs. Noe Bolanos
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Penn State at Virginia
12 p.m. (MNT) East Carolina at South Carolina
12 p.m. (ESPN) Auburn at Mississippi State
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Central Florida at Ohio State
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Tulane at Tulsa
12 p.m. (FX) Miami at Kansas State
12:30 p.m. (CW) Ball State at Clemson
3 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina at Wake Forest
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Purdue at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (ABC) USC at Syracuse
3:30 p.m. (MNT) Western Kentucky at Alabama
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Florida at Texas A&M
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Air Force at Michigan
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Rice at Kansas
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Delaware State at Delaware
4 p.m. (FX) Wisconsin at Oregon State
7 p.m. (ESPN) Washington at LSU
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas-El Paso at Mississippi
7:30 p.m. (FOX) Nebraska at UCLA
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Army at San Diego State
7:45 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at Missouri
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Arizona State
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: KLM Open Third
Round
12 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: BMW Championship- Third
Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kingsmill Championship -
Third Round
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: BMW Championship- Third
Round
TENNIS
12 p.m. (CBS) 2012 U.S. Open Men's Semifinals
8 p.m. (CBS) 2012 U.S. Open Women's Final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
7:30 a.m. Lecanto, Citrus, Crystal River, Seven Rivers at
Lecanto Invitational


PIRATES
Continued from Page B1

quarterback pressure by
Baldner and LaFleur to
force a three-and-out.
Baldner ran it five times
for 62 yards on his team's
ensuing drive, capping it
with an 18-yard TD scamper
to the outside and Joe
LaFleur's two-point conver-
sion pass to junior Destin
Dawsy, making it 28-14.
Aided by a pair of Willis-
ton turnovers, including an
interception by senior line-
backer A.J. Bostic, Crystal
River added three more
touchdowns in the next 6
minutes of play to blow the
score wide open with a com-
manding 48-14 lead a
minute into the fourth quar-
ter. Dawsy had a 7-yard TD
rush, Baldner caught a pass
in the flats from LaFleur
and ran it for a 55-yard scor-
ing reception. Sophomore
receiver Sam Franklin
grabbed a LaFleur pass and
took it in for a 44-yard TD
during the stretch.
Cochlin culminated a 57-
yard drive with a 6-yard
rush midway into the final
quarter for his club's final
score. Cochlin completed 14
of his 27 passes for 135
yards. His counterpart
LaFleur was 5-for-12 for 149
yards.
Baldner paced all players
in the game with 183 yards


on 14 carries to go along
with his TD return and re-
ception, as well as a 40-yard
second-quarter kickoff re-
turn. He had 110 yards and
eight carries at the half.
"This shows that we've all
improved as a team, not just
as individuals," Baldner
said of his performance and
the team's victory
Junior kicker Jorge De-
ciderio made all three of
Williston's PAT attempts,
while Pirates senior John
McAteer was 3-for-5 on
extra points thanks to two
blocked kicks by the Red
Devil special teams.
Despite the convincing
win, Crystal River commit-
ted 17 penalties for more
than 200 yards, and turned
over four fumbles in a game
that lasted longer than three
hours.
Pirates coach Greg
Fowler was proud of his of-
fensive line and defense,
but saw plenty of areas
needing improvement as his
team enters its bye week.
"I think our front line is
doing as good as any line in
high school football,"
Fowler said. "We can't turn
it over like that and do that
to our defense. We're defi-
nitely not happy with where
were at. We've got work to
do. This was step No. 2 in a
10-step plan."
The Pirates will play host
to district foe Santa Fe for
their homecoming at 7 p.m.
Sept. 21.


Warriors' comeback



comes up just short


SRCSj otball

drops 31-22

decision at home

STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent

BROOKSVILLE The
home team on the field at
Ernie Wever Park in
Brooksville on Friday night
certainly did not look like a
football team coming off a
60-0 opening week loss.
Seven Rivers Christian
showed resiliency, guts and
effort in its first division
game of the year, falling just
short in a 31-22 loss to visit-
ing Cornerstone Charter
Academy
The young, inexperienced
and smaller Warriors scored
first, and managed to trim a
21-6 deficit to 28-22 late in
the game, before succumb-
ing to the Ducks' ground at-
tack, which ran down the
clock and booted a late field
goal to seal it.
Down 21-6 in the third
quarter, Seven Rivers (0-2, 0-1
in Sunshine State Confer-
ence North Division) with-
stood Cornerstone's opening
drive of the second half, with
Joshua Jackson sacking


Ducks quarterback Demonte
Nelson for a loss of 20 yards
on a fourth-down snap.
The Warriors took over
from there, leaning on the
steady legs of running back
John Iwaniec to go 39 yards,
capped off by a two-yard
Kelin Massullo touchdown
dash. Iwaniec's two-point
rushing attempt found the
end zone as well, making it
21-14.
Iwaniec was stellar all
evening, carrying multiple
defenders on his back seem-
ingly the entire game, fin-
ishing with 327 yards
rushing and two touch-
downs on 28 carries.
After Cornerstone quarter-
back Nelson ran for a 31-yard
score on the opening drive of
the fourth quarter, Iwaniec
countered with a 5-yard
touchdown with 5:40 remain-
ing, then converted another
two-point dash to bring the
Warriors to within six.
But Nelson and company
ran vital time off the clock,
then sealed the deal with a
26-yard field goal from
standout kicker Marcus
Moeller, icing the win for
the Ducks (1-2, 1-1). How-
ever, Seven Rivers head
coach David Iwaniec could
display nothing but pride
following the loss.


"It was a sight to see," said
Iwaniec, noting that his
team had just 14 players
dressed. "We play four quar-
ters of football. We were a
little bit short in the fuel
tank there at the end, but
we'll get better next week.
We'll be ready to go."
Seven Rivers' spirited
play was there from the get-
go, as Iwaniec highlighted
the first possession of the
night with a 60-yard mad
dash for the end zone, giving
the Warriors the early 6-0
lead.
But Nelson was too much
for the undersized and less
athletic Warrior defense,
rushing for three consecutive
touchdowns (81, 1 and 10
yards) over the rest of the first
half to give Cornerstone con-
trol early on. Nelson would
finish with 171 yards on 20
carries, en route to finding
the end zone four times total.
Brandon Preez also gained
86 yards on 11 rushes, several
times at key moments of
Ducks possessions.
"We've got to be better
tackling," Iwaniec said. "We
had that guy (Nelson)
wrapped up several times in
the backfield, and just
couldn't hang on."
Seven Rivers will host
Bronson next Friday night.


Fourth quarter unkind to



Dunnellon in 37-20 loss


Tigers take it

on the chin

against Forest

Special to the Chronicle

OCALA If there's one
thing Dunnellon didn't want
to see Friday night, it was
Forest's Jordon Austin in
the open field with the foot-
ball in his hands.
Unfortunately for the
Tigers, it happened twice.
Austin broke free for two
long touchdowns one on
an interception and one on
a punt return and proved
to be the difference in the
Wildcats' 37-20 victory at
Forest Field.
"He's just a special player
that sees things that other
people don't see," Forest
coach David Hodges said.
"He's just a big-time play-
maker, whether it's on of-
fense or defense or
especially on special teams.
People want to line up and
kick it to him? Well, you're
taking your chances with
that one. He's our big-time,
big-play guy"
Forest (2-0) put on an im-
pressive show against a
Dunnellon team known for
its big and physical lines.
The Wildcats held their own
in the trenches, while
breaking off three huge
plays Austin's pair of
TD's totaling 153 return
yards and an 82-yard third-
quarter bomb from Jake
Roddenberry to Quadari-
ous Gordan to keep the
Tigers at bay on the score-


board.
"The difference tonight
was three plays: Jordon
Austin returning that punt
right before halftime,
(Austin) picking the ball off,
and then we blew a cover-
age (against Gordan)," Dun-
nellon coach Frank Beasley
said. "Three plays were a
big difference, and then
some other little things that
our kids have to learn from
that you can't do in big
games and expect to come
out on top.
"I'm really disappointed
that we lost. We expect to
come out on top every
game, but we learned a lot
about ourselves and we're
going to learn even more on
film. I expect we'll come
back even better next
week."
Dunnellon (1-1) outgained
Forest on the ground (104-
82) and in the air (217-157),
but Forest dominated the
ever-important special
teams battle thanks to
Danny Krysalka. The Wild-
cats' senior kicker was 3-
for-3 on field goals,
including from 42 and 47
yards, and 4-for-4 on extra
points. Seven of his eight
total kickoffs resulted in
touchbacks. leaving Dun-
nellon with poor field posi-
tion for much of the game.
"With Danny, you've just
got to get him within his
range and he'll make the
field goal," Forest quarter-
back Jake Roddenberry
said. "Whenever we need
him, he comes through."
Roddenberry came out
on the winning end of a
crowd-pleasing quarter-
back battle with Dunnellon


signal-caller Jordon Boley.
While Boley finished with
more yards passing (217-
157) and rushing (49-16), the
Tiger senior suffered a pair
of picks while Roddenberry
had none.
Roddenberry also pro-
duced one of the true high-
lights of a game packed with
big plays. With Forest cling-
ing to a 23-20 lead late in the
third quarter, Roddenberry
dropped back while Forest
receivers Gordan and Josue
Molinari broke down the
sideline to his left. Molinari
squared off his route and
pulled both Tiger defenders
with him, leaving Gordan by
himself beyond the cover-
age. The rest was up to Rod-
denberry, who hit his target
on the numbers to open a
double-digit lead that held
up for the remainder of the
game.
"Quadarious (Gordan) is
one of the fastest kids on the
team," said Roddenberry,
who had a rushing TD for
Forest. "(Molinari) ran an
out, the defender came
down on Josue, and
Quadarious was wide
open."
With Boley leading the
way, Dunnellon put on some
offensive fireworks, too. He
rushed for a pair of touch-
downs and passed for an-
other a 27-yard strike to
L.J. Brown while putting
on a pitch-and-catch clinic
with 6-foot-2 receiver Andre
Jackson (six catches, 166
yards).
"Jordon Boley did a nice
job of making things hap-
pen when things broke
down," Beasley said. "He's
a tough kid."


Harvick wins Richmond
Nationwide race
RICHMOND, Va. Kevin
Harvick took the lead by dodg-
ing a caution caused by leader
Kurt Busch, then pulled away
on a restart with 17 laps to go
and won the Nationwide Series
race Friday night at Richmond
International Raceway.
The victory snapped a 30-
race winless streak in the se-
ries for Harvick, whose last
victory came in this race two
years ago. It was his 38th vic-
tory in the series, and fifth at
Richmond.
As he had done for much of
the race, Harvick pulled away



PANTHERS
Continued from Page B1

down rush. The Panthers
capped the scoring for the
night at 24-7 when Leiva
hit a 24-yard field goal
Weeki Wachee's bright


as if he had an extra gear when
the race went back to green on
lap 234, leaving championship
contender Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
and Busch to battle for second.
Stenhouse won that easily.
Busch was third, followed by
local favorite Denny Hamlin and
Michael Annett.
Jamaica beats US 2-1
in World Cup qualifier
KINGSTON, Jamaica -
Rodolph Austin and Luton Shel-
ton scored on free kicks as Ja-
maica rallied to beat the United
States 2-1 Friday night in a
World Cup qualifier, giving the
Reggae Boyz their first win over


spot was its sound disci-
pline the team only com-
mitted two penalties for 10
yards the entire night com-
pared to Lecanto's 16
penalties for 90 yards.
Junior quarterback
Christian Barber had 159
yards passing with a touch-
down pass and intercep-


the Americans.
Clint Dempsey, playing his
first competitive match in three
months, put the U.S. ahead 35
seconds in with the fastest
American goal in a World Cup
qualifier. But the 60th-ranked
Reggae Boyz, who had been 0-
10-8 against the U.S., rallied
with goals in the 23rd and 62nd
minutes on free kicks caused
by fouls from Kyle Beckerman
and Maurice Edu.
Jamaica (2-0-1) leads Group
A with seven points at the
halfway point, followed by the
U.S. (1-1-1). Guatemala (0-0-1)
hosted Antigua and Barbuda
(0-1-1) later Friday.


tion. Lecanto had five
sacks on the night.
"I thought we played
well and hard," Lecanto
second-year head coach
McKinley Rolle said. "We
didn't take advantage of
some opportunities, and
we still have to strive to get
better."


Sports BRIEFS


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 3, Rangers 1,
11 innings
Texas Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 DJnngs If 5 0 0 0
Andrus ss 4 00 0 BUpton cf 3 1 1 0
Hamltn cf 4 0 0 0 Zobrist ss 4 1 1 2
Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 1
N.Cruzrf 4 00 0 Kppngrlb 3 0 0 0
MiYongdh 4 1 1 1 C.Penalb 1 0 0 0
DvMrp If 3 0 1 0 BFrncs dh-rf 4 0 1 0
Morlndlb 4 0 1 0 RRorts2b 4 0 0 0
LMrtnz c 3 00 0 CGmnz c 2 00 0
Profar ph 1 00 0 Thmps pr 0 0 0 0
Soto c 0 00 0 JMolin c 1 0 1 0
Fuld rf 3 0 0 0
EJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0
WDavisp 0 00 0
Totals 35 15 1 Totals 353 5 3
Texas 000 010 000 00 1
TampaBay 000 100 000 02 3
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Texas 2, Tampa
Bay 6. HR-Mi.Young (7), Zobrist (16), Longo-
ria (11). SB-B.Upton (28). CS-Dav.Murphy
(4).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
D.Holland 8 2 1 1 2 11
Uehara 2-3 0 0 0 1 2
Kirkman 1 2 0 0 0 3
Scheppers 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
M.LoweL,0-1 0 1 2 2 1 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson 6 4 1 1 1 5
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 2
Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 1
W.DavisW,3-0 2 1 0 0 0 5
M.Lowe pitched to 2 batters in the 11 th.
T-3:32. A-19,545 (34,078).

Yankees 8, Orioles 5
New York Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeterss 5 1 3 1 Markksrf 4 0 0 0
Swisher rf-1b4 1 0 0 Hardy ss 4 1 1 0
Cano2b 3 1 0 0 McLoth If 4 1 3 0
AIRdrgdh 4 1 2 2 AdJonscf 4 1 1 3
RMartn c 4 1 1 3 Wieters c 4 00 0
Grndrscf 4 00 0 MrRynllb 4 00 0
AnJonsIf 2 1 1 0 C.Davisdh 4 0 0 0
Ibanez ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 1
Dickrsn If 0 0 0 0 Andino 2b 4 1 1 1
Pearcelb 2 1 1 2
ISuzuki ph-rf2 1 1 0
McGeh3b 2 00 0
ErChvz ph-3b 1 0 0 0
J.Nixph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 89 8 Totals 365 8 5
NewYork 000 520 001 8
Baltimore 000 003 101 5
E- Swisher (4). LOB-NewYork 3, Baltimore 4.
2B-McLouth 2 (8). HR-AI.Rodriguez (16),
R.Martin (16), Pearce (4), Ad.Jones (29),
Machado (4), Andino (7).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
PHughesW,14-12 6 6 3 2 0 5
Eppley 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
LoganH,18 1 0 0 0 0 0
D.Robertson H,24 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
R.Soriano 1 1 1 1 0 2
Baltimore
W.ChenL,12-9 42-36 7 7 1 4
S.Johnson 3 1 0 0 0 3
Matusz 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
Ayala 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-byW.Chen (Swisher).

Royals 7, White Sox 5


Kansas City Chicago
ab r h bi
L.Cain cf 5 2 2 3 De Aza cf
AEscor ss 4 0 2 0 JoLopz 3b
AGordn If 5 0 2 0 Wise If
Butlerdh 5 1 1 0 Konerklb
S.Perezc 3 22 2 Olmedopr
Mostks3b 3 1 0 0 Rios rf
Francr rf 4 0 1 1 Przyns c
Hosmerlb 2 0 0 1 JrDnkspr
Giavtll 2b 4 1 1 0 Flowrsc
DJhnsn ph
Viciedo dh
AIRmrz ss
Bckhm 2b


ab r h bi
3 1 2 0
5 00 0
4 1 2 1



1000
5 0 1 0
4 1 2 1
0 0 0 0


3 1 1 0
3 1 2 2
4 00 0


Totals 35 7117 Totals 37512 5
Kansas City 020 012 002 7
Chicago 100 112 000 5
DP-Kansas City 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Kansas
City 6, Chicago 10. 2B-A.Gordon (46), Fran-
coeur (20), De Aza (26), AI.Ramirez (22). 3B-
Wise (2). HR-L.Cain 2 (7), S.Perez (9), Wise
(7), Pierzynski (25), AI.Ramirez (9). S-
AI.Ramirez. SF-Hosmer.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Mendoza 51-310 5 5 1 3
Collins 1 0 0 0 0 2
Crow 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
K.HerreraW,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1
G.Holland S,12-14 1 1 0 0 0 3
Chicago
Liriano 5 6 5 5 4 4
N.Jones 1 2 0 0 0 0
Veal 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Crain 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornton 1 0 0 0 0 2
A.ReedL,3-2 1 3 2 2 0 1
Liriano pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
N.Jones pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Crow pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Mendoza (DeAza), by Crow (Viciedo).



NL

Marlins 9, Nationals 7,
10 innings
Miami Washington


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Petersnl If 4 21 0 Werthrf 5 1 1 0
Ruggincf 5 22 0 Harpercf 5 0 1 0
Reyes ss 6 23 3 Zmrmn 3b 5 1 2 2
Stantonrf 5 1 2 2 LaRochib 4 1 1 0
Ca.Leelb 4 01 2 Morse If 5 1 2 2
Dobbs3b 6 1 3 0 Dsmndss 5 1 3 0
DSolan 2b 5 0 2 1 Espinos 2b 5 1 1 1
Gaudinp 0 00 0 KSuzukc 4 1 1 1
Cishek p 0 00 0 Strasrg p 0 0 0 0
Brantly c 3 1 1 1 CBrwn ph 1 0 0 0
JaTrnr p 3 00 0 Duke p 1 0 0 0
Zamrnp 0 00 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 0 1 0
Webb p 0 00 0 Matths p 0 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 Storenp 0 00 0
Kearns ph 1 0 1 0 Tracy ph 1 0 0 0
ARamsp 0 00 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
DMrph 2b 1 00 0 McGnzl p 0 00 0
Berndn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 43 9169 Totals 43713 6
Miami 212 100 000 3 9
Washington200 000 310 1 7
E-D.Solano (3). DP-Washington 1. LOB-
Miami 12, Washington 9. 2B-Stanton (29),
Ca.Lee (24), Dobbs (11), Kearns (5), LaRoche
(28), Desmond (28), Espinosa (33), K.Suzuki
(3). 3B-Reyes 2 (11), Zimmerman (1). HR-
Stanton (31), Brantly (2), Zimmerman (19),
Morse (13). SB-D.Solano 2 (7), Brantly (1).
SF-Ca.Lee 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Ja.Turner 6 4 2 2 1 3
Zambrano 0 3 3 3 0 0
WebbH,9 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
M.DunnH,17 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
A.RamosBS,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1
GaudinW,3-1 1 0 0 0 1 1
CishekS,13-17 1 3 1 1 1 3
Washington
Strasburg 3 6 5 5 3 2
Duke 4 3 1 1 2 3
Mattheus 1 2 0 0 0 2
Storen 1 2 0 0 0 0
Clippard L,2-4 2-3 3 3 3 1 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Zambrano pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.


BASEBALL


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 B5


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 78
Baltimore 77
Tampa Bay 76
Boston 63
Toronto 61


Wash.
Atlanta
Philly
New York
Miami


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
60 .565 - 4-6
61 .558 1 6-4
62 .551 2 1 6-4
75 .457 15 14 2-8
75 .449 16 15 5-5


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
53 .616 - 8-2
60 .568 6Y2 6-4
71 .486 18 7Y2 6-4
73 .471 20 9Y2 6-4
77 .446 23Y213 4-6


Str Home
W-1 41-28
L-1 38-31
W-1 38-31
L-1 32-38
W-1 34-34


Away
37-32 Chicago
39-30 Detroit
38-31 Kan. City
31-37 Cleveland
27-41 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
63 .540 - 3-7
63 .537 Y2 3 5-5
76 .449 12Y215 5-5
79 .423 16 182 3-7
81 .409 18 20Y2 4-6


Home Away
40-28 34-35
43-28 30-35
31-38 31-38
32-37 26-42
25-40 31-41


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-1 43-26 42-27
W-340-32 39-28
W-233-37 34-34
L-1 30-36 35-37
W-2 32-37 30-40


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .597 - 6-4
63 .540 8 4-6
65 .526 10 2 4-6
70 .489 15 7 7-3
86 .377 302 22Y2 3-7
95 .312 39Y231Y2 3-7


Home Away
43-27 40-29
42-27 32-36
42-28 30-37
41-28 26-42
34-34 18-52
28-40 15-55


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .594-- 6-4
60 .559 5 7-3
63 .540 7Y2 2Y2 8-2
71 .486 15 10 6-4



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
60 .562-- 6-4
65 .529 4Y2 1Y2 4-6
70 .493 9Y2 6Y2 4-6
74 .464 13Y210Y2 6-4
81 .409 21 18 4-6


Home Away
43-25 39-31
42-30 34-30
36-29 38-34
36-33 31-38


Str Home Away
L-2 38-30 39-30
L-2 38-33 35-32
W-2 33-34 35-36
W-2 33-33 31-41
L-3 30-41 26-40


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays second baseman Ryan Roberts, right, steps out of the way as Texas Rangers' lan Kinsler attempts
to break up a first-inning double play during Friday's game in St. Petersburg. Roberts' relay throw to first was in time
to get Elvis Andrus.




Rays win on Zobrist's homer


Yanks beat Orioles


to leadAL East

Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Ben Zo-
brist's home run in the bottom of the
11th inning lifted the Tampa Bay
Rays to a 3-1 victory over the Texas
Rangers on Friday night.
Zobrist's 16th homer came off
Mark Lowe (0-1) after a leadoff walk
to B.J. Upton.
Wade Davis (3-0) got the win after
striking out five of the six hitters he
faced in the 10th and 11th innings.
The Rays' fifth win in six games
featured a total of 29 strikeouts for
both teams.
Texas starter Derek Holland struck
out a career-high 11 while giving up
only two hits and two walks in eight
innings. Holland threw a season-high
116 pitches, retiring five Rays in a
span of seven pitches at one point.
Evan Longoria's fourth-inning
homer, his 11th, was the first hit off
Holland, who was trying to win a
fourth straight start for the first time
in his career
It was the Rangers' fourth loss in
11 extra-inning games this season.
It was the second straight extra-in-
ning game for the Rangers, who ar-
rived at their hotel at 4:40 a.m.,
Friday after a 5-4, 10-inning win at
Kansas City on Thursday night
Rays starter Jeremy Hellickson
pitched six innings, giving up four
hits including a home run to Michael
Young in the fifth inning.
It was Young's seventh home run
and his third in the last five days.
David Murphy walked after
Young's homer, and then Hellickson
and four relievers retired the next 17
Rangers in order
Royals 7, White Sox 5
CHICAGO Lorenzo Cain hit two
home runs, including a tie-breaking, two-
run shot in the ninth inning, as the
Kansas City Royals beats the Chicago
White Sox 7-5.
Salvador Perez also hit a two-run
homer for the Royals, who won their sixth
straight against the White Sox.
Chicago hit three home runs: Alexei
Ramirez hit a two-run shot and Dewayne
Wise and A.J. Pierzynski hit solo shots
homers.
Kelvin Herrera (2-2) pitched out of a
bases-loaded jam in the eighth inning for
the Royals.
Johnny Giavotella led off the ninth with
a single off Addison Reed (3-2). Cain fol-
lowed with a deep home run to left center,
giving the Royals a 7-5 lead. His seventh
home run of the season gave him his first
career two-homer game.
Greg Holland pitched the ninth for his
12th save in 14 chances.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 8, Orioles 5
BALTIMORE -Alex Rodriguez hit his
300th home run with the Yankees, Rus-
sell Martin and Steve Pearce also home-
red, and New York regained sole
possession of first place in the AL East by
defeating the Baltimore Orioles 8-5.
The Yankees built a 7-0 lead in the fifth
inning against rookie Wei-Yin Chen (12-9)
and held on for their third win in nine
games. New York had lost eight of 11 to the
Orioles, including the opener of this four-
game series that runs through Sunday.
Adam Jones, Robert Andino and
Manny Machado homered for the Orioles,
who got three hits from Nate McLouth but
missed a chance to move ahead of the
Yankees for the first time since June 7.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Baltimore 10, N.Y. Yankees 6
Texas 5, Kansas City 4, 10 innings
Friday's Games
N.Y Yankees 8, Baltimore 5
Tampa Bay 3, Texas 1
Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 5
Toronto at Boston, late
Cleveland at Minnesota, late
Detroit at L.A. Angels, late
Oakland at Seattle, late
Saturday's Games
Kansas City (B.Chen 10-11) at Chicago White Sox (Sale
15-6), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 13-4) at Baltimore (J.Saunders 1-
1), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 5-6) at Minnesota (De Vries 4-5),
7:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 14-9) atTampa Bay (Archer 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Laffey 3-5) at Boston (Matsuzaka 1-4), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 13-7) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 11-9),
9:05 p.m.
Oakland (Bre.Anderson 3-0) at Seattle (Iwakuma 6-3),
9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y Yankees at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 1, Colorado 0
Miami 6, Milwaukee 2
Washington 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 12, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia 3, Colorado 2
Miami 9, Washington 7
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Houston 5, Cincinnati 3
Milwaukee at St. Louis, late
Arizona at San Diego, late
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, late
Saturday's Games
Miami (Buehrle 12-12) at Washington (Detwiler 9-6), 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 7-1) at N.Y Mets (Hefner 2-5), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 11-10) at San Francisco (M.Cain
13-5), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 8-13) at Pittsburgh (Ja.Mc-
Donald 12-7), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Chatwood 4-4) at Philadelphia (Hamels 14-6),
7:05 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 5-11) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 11-7), 7:10
p.m.
Milwaukee (Fiers8-7) at St. Louis (Westbrook 13-10), 7:15
p.m.
Arizona (Miley 14-9) at San Diego (C.Kelly 1-0), 8:35 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Phillies 3, Rockies 2
PHILADELPHIA- Nate Schierholtz hit
an RBI single in the bottom of the ninth
inning to lift the Philadelphia Phillies to a
3-2 victory over the Colorado Rockies.
Pinch-hitter Laynce Nix hit a tying, two-
run double in the seventh, and the Phillies
won for the 10th time in 14 games.
Jimmy Rollins walked off Will Harris (1-
1) to start the bottom of the ninth. Rollins
advanced to second on Juan Pierre's sac-
rifice. After Chase Utley was intentionally
walked, both runners advanced on a wild
pitch. Schierholtz then hit a sharp grounder
to right field past a drawn-in infield.
Jonathan Papelbon (4-6) tossed a
scoreless ninth to earn the win.

Braves 3, Mets 0
NEW YORK Paul Maholm and the
Braves bullpen combined to give Atlanta
three straight shutouts for the first time in


exactly a decade, and the NL wild-card
leaders beat the New York Mets 3-0.
Coming off two 1-0 wins over Colorado,
the Braves' staff stretched its scoreless
streak to 28 innings. Atlanta last pitched
three straight shutouts on Sept. 4-7, 2002,
according to STATS LLC.
Jason Heyward hit his 25th homer in
the fourth inning and Dan Uggla also con-
nected.
This weekend marks Chipper Jones'
last trip to New York to play the Mets, an
opponent he has often wrecked in the
past. The Mets presented the retiring 40-
year-old star with a pricey piece of 3-D
artwork as part of his farewell tour, while
the crowd responded with its usual boos.
Jones went 0 for 4.

Astros 5, Reds 3
CINCINNATI Matt Dominguez hit a
three-run homer in the ninth inning that
broke Aroldis Chapman's streak of 27
consecutive saves and powered the
Houston Astros to a 5-3 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds.
Chapman (5-5) took a 3-2 lead into the
ninth, but had his club-record streak bro-
ken by a player swinging with a sore left
hand.
Tyler Green and J.D. Martinez singled
off Chapman with one out. Dominguez,
out of the starting lineup because of the
sore hand, hit Chapman's second pitch
for his second career homer and the
fourth off the hard-throwing left-hander
this season.
Chapman is 35 of 40 in save chances
overall.
Hector Ambriz (1-0) got two outs in the
eighth. Wilton Lopez pitched the ninth for
his third save in six chances.

Cubs 12, Pirates 2
PITTSBURGH Travis Wood gave
up just one hit over six innings and the
Chicago Cubs stopped a six-game losing
streak with a 12-2 win over the mistake-
prone Pittsburgh Pirates, who made
seven errors in their worst defensive night
in over a quarter-century.
Wood (5-12) ended an eight-game skid
of his own, striking out five and walking
three to win for the first time in more than
two months.
Starlin Castro had three hits, including
the 500th of his career, and drove in four
runs for the Cubs. Alfonso Soriano added
three hits and three RBI as Chicago took
full advantage of one of the worst defen-
sive nights in Pittsburgh's 130-year history.
The Pirates had not made seven errors
in a game since 1985 and finished one
shy of the club record set in 1939. It was
the first seven-error game in the majors
since Atlanta in a 2004 loss to Colorado.

Marlins 9 Nationals 7,
10 innings
WASHINGTON Stephen Strasburg
matched his career low by lasting only
three innings in his likely final home start
of the season, allowing five runs in the
Washington Nationals' 9-7, 10-inning loss
to the Miami Marlins.
Strasburg, 15-6 with a 3.16 ERA, al-
lowed two runs in the first, one in the sec-
ond and two in the third, giving up six hits
- including home runs to Giancarlo
Stanton and Rob Brantley. He threw 67
pitches and was pinch hit for in the third.
In his first full season following elbow-
ligament replacement surgery on Sept. 3,
2010, Strasburg has 197 strikeouts in 159
1/3 innings. The Nationals, wanting to
protect the arm of the 24-year-old right-
hander, have said next Wednesday's
start at the New York Mets likely will be
his final appearance of the season, even
though Washington is likely to see post-
season baseball for the first time since
the original Senators in 1933.


NL

Braves 3, Mets 0


Atlanta


New York
ab r h bi


ab rh bi


Bourn cf 3 0 1 0 RCeden ss 4 0 1 0
RJhnsn If 3 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 1 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 1 0
Overay ph 1 0 0 0 Hairstn rf 4 00 0
OFIhrtp 0 0 0 0 I.Davislb 2 0 0 0
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Shppch c 4 0 1 0
C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0 Bay If 3 00 0
FFrmnlb 4 0 0 0 AnTrrscf 0 00 0
Prado ss-lf 4 0 0 0 Vldspn cf 2 0 0 0
Heywrdrf 4 1 2 1 JuTrnrph 1 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 4 2 2 1 FLewis cf 0 00 0
D.Rossc 3 0 0 1 Niesep 2 0 1 0
Mahlm p 2 0 1 0 Duda ph 1 00 0
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 Parnellp 0 0 0 0
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0
Constnzph 1 0 0 0 Baxterph 1 00 0
Janish ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 37 3 Totals 330 5 0
Atlanta 000 100 101 3
NewYork 000 000 000 0
E-C.Jones (10), Shoppach (3). LOB-Atlanta
5, New York 11. 2B-Uggla (24). HR-Heyward
(25), Uggla (18). SF-D.Ross.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
MaholmW,12-9 51-35 0 0 3 6
DurbinH,13 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Avilan H,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Venters H,18 1 0 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty H,25 1 0 0 0 1 2
Kimbrel S,35-38 1 0 0 0 1 2
NewYork
NieseL,10-9 6 5 1 1 1 2
Parnell 1 1 1 0 0 1
Mejia 2 1 1 1 0 1
PB-D.Ross.

Phillies 3, Rockies 2


Colorado

Fowler cf
Rutledg ss
CGnzlz If
WRosr c
Pachec lb
Nelson 3b
Colvin rf
CTorrs p
MtRynl p
Roenck p
Belisle p
Giambi ph
ABrwn pr
WHarrs p
LeMahi2b
Francis p
Blckmn rf
Totals
Colorado


Philadelphia
ab rh bi a


4 1 2 0
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
4 00 0
3 0 1 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0

0 00 0
0000
2000
4 0 1 0


35 28 2
200


ab rh bi


Rollinsss 4 1 1 0
Pierre If 4 1 3 0
Utley 2b 3 0 0 0
Wggntn 1 b 3 00 0
L.Nixph 1 0 1 2
Aumontp 0 00 0
Papeln p 0 0 0 0
Schrhltph 1 0 1 1
Mayrry cf 3 0 1 0
DBrwn rf 3 00 0
Kratz c 4 00 0
Mrtnz3b 2 02 0
Orrph-3b 2 1 1 0
CI.Leep 1 0 0 0
Lindlmp 0 00 0
Diekmnp 0 00 0
Howard ph-1b2 00 0
Totals 33310 3
000 000 2


Philadelphia 000 000 201 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-M.Martinez (3). LOB-Colorado 7,
Philadelphia 12. 2B-Rutledge (14), C.Gonza-
lez (29), L.Nix (9), Mayberry (21). SB-Pierre
2 (34). CS-A.Brown (1). S-Pierre, CI.Lee.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Francis 52-36 0 0 1 7
C.TorresH,1 1 2 2 2 0 1
Mat.Reynolds 0 0 0 0 1 0
Roenicke BS,2-2 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Belisle 1 0 0 0 1 2
W.Harris L,1-1 1-3 1 1 1 2 0
Philadelphia
CI.Lee 61-38 2 2 0 7
Lindblom 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Diekman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Aumont 1 0 0 0 0 2
PapelbonW,4-6 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mat.Reynolds pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-W.Harris.

Astros 5, Reds 3


Houston Cincinnati
ab r h bi
Altuve 2b 2 1 1 0 BPhllps 2b
Dmngz3b 3 1 2 3 Heiseycf
Paredsrf-2b5 0 1 0 Vottolb
Wallac lb 4 0 1 0 Ludwcklf
Maxwllcf 5 1 1 2 Bruce rf
FMrtnz If 3 0 1 0 Frazier 3b
Bogsvcpr-rfO 0 0 0 DNavrrc
MDwns 2 00 0 WValdz ss
JCastro ph 1 0 0 0 Cairo ph
BBarns If 0 0 0 0 HBaily p
CSnydrc 4 0 0 0 Marshllp
Greene ss 4 1 1 0 Broxtn p
Harrellp 2 00 0 AChpm p
JSchafrph 1 0 0 0 Paul ph
Storey p 0 0 00
Wrght p 0 000
Ambrizp 0 000
JDMrtnph 1 1 1 0
WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 59 5 Totals
Houston 200 000 003
Cincinnati 200 010 000


ab rh bi
5 1 2 0
5 23 0

3 0 1 2
4 0 1 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0


34310 3
5
3


E-H.Bailey (3), Frazier (7). DP-Houston 3.
LOB-Houston 8, Cincinnati 8.3B-Heisey (5).
HR-Dominguez (2), Maxwell (14). SB-Altuve
(29), Bogusevic (14).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Harrell 6 7 3 3 4 5
Storey 1 1 0 0 0 1
W.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
AmbrizW,1-0 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
W.LopezS,3-6 1 2 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
H.Bailey 62-35 2 2 1 9
MarshallH,19 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
BroxtonH,8 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
A.Chapman 1 4 3 3 0 1
HBP-by Broxton (FMartinez), by H.Bailey
(M.Downs).

Cubs 12, Pirates 2
Chicago Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DeJess rf 5 1 0 0 Holt 2b 4 0 1 0
AlCarr p 0 0 0 0 SMarte If-cf 2 0 0 1
Russell p 0 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 3 00 0
Cardns ph 1 0 0 0 Presley If 1 0 0 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0 GJonesrf 4 0 0 0
Valuen3b 4 2 1 2 GSnchzlb 2 00 0
Rizzolb 3 2 1 1 PAIvrz3b 3 0 1 0
LaHairph-1b1 0 0 0 Barajs c 2 0 0 0
ASorin If 5 1 3 3 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0
Sappeltpr-lf0 1 0 0 Leroux p 0 0 0 0
SCastro ss 5 1 3 4 Takhsh p 0 0 0 0
Clevngr c 5 0 1 1 Clemnt ph 1 0 0 0
BJcksn cf 3 1 1 0 McPhrs p 0 00 0
Campnph-cf2 1 1 0 Mercer ph 1 0 0 0
Barney2b 5 1 1 0 JHrrsnss 4 1 1 0
TWood p 4 1 0 0 AJBrntp 1 00 0
Mather rf 1 0 0 0 McKnr c 1 1 1 1
Totals 44121211 Totals 29 2 4 2
Chicago 103 003 500 12
Pittsburgh 000 000 020 2
E-Barajas (4), G.Sanchez (3), J.Harrison (5),
Holt 2 (2), S.Marte 2 (2). DP-Chicago 1, Pitts-
burgh 1. LOB-Chicago 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2B-
Valbuena (17), S.Castro (22), PAIvarez (22),
McKenry (13). SB-S.Castro (22). SF-
S.Marte.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
TWoodW,5-11 6 1 0 0 3 5
AI.Cabrera 1 0 0 0 1 1
Russell 1 3 2 2 0 1
Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 2
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett L,15-6 5 8 7 3 1 4
Ju.Wilson 0 1 0 0 1 0
Leroux 12-30 2 0 0 2
Takahashi 1-3 2 3 3 2 0
McPherson 2 1 0 0 0 1
A.J.Burnett pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
Ju.Wilson pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP-A.J.Burnett, Leroux.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Actor recovering
from injuries
NEW YORK-Kristin
Chenoweth said she's
still on the mend after
suffering
injuries
in July
while
filming
the CBS
legal
drama
"The
Kristin Good
Chenoweth Wife."
Appear-
ing on "Live! with Kelly &
Michael" on Friday, the
pixyish actress offered
details of the accident,
which happened during a
New York location shoot.
An overhead lighting rig
collapsed, she said, strik-
ing her in the face, slam-
ming her to the ground
and knocking her out
When she woke up, co-
star Josh Charles was
holding her hand.
Said Chenoweth: "He's
my angel."
Chenoweth, 44, said
she continues to recover
from a skull fracture and
rib, neck and back in-
juries. But she called her-
self "blessed" the mishap
wasn't worse.
Although forced to
withdraw from her recur-
ring role on "The Good
Wife," she'll appear on its
Sept 30 season premiere.

Swift debuts song
for cancer victim
NEW YORK-- Taylor
Swift paid tribute to a
young cancer victim with
a special song on Friday's
"Stand Up to Cancer"
telethon.
"Ronan" was dedicated
to a 4-year-old boy who
died last
year of
neuro-
blastoma.
1 Swift
S wrote the
l song after
reading
the blog
Taylor Swift of
Ronan's
mother, Maya Thompson,
who is credited as a co-
writer
According to a person
familiar with the show,
but who asked not to be
identified because they
were not authorized to
speak, the song had never
been performed in public.

Eastwood talks
about convention
LOS ANGELES Clint
Eastwood said he
achieved what he sought
to do when he appeared
at the Republican Na-
tional Convention last
month and had a nearly
12-minute dialogue with
an empty chair
In an interview pub-
lished Friday in the
Carmel Pine Cone, a
small California newspa-
per, the 82-year-old said
he didn't know what he
was going to say until he
said it. He told the paper
he wanted to make three
points, one of which was
that President Barack
Obama had broken prom-
ises he made when he
took office.
Eastwood's peculiar,
sometimes rambling con-
versation with an imagi-
nary Obama in the empty
chair set the blogosphere
and social media ablaze.
From wire reports


Associated Press
Members of the British band One Direction, from left, Niall Horan, Louis Tomlinson, Liam Payne, Zayn Malik and
Harry Styles perform Thursday at the MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles.




British invasion


One Direction barge in on Rihanna's party at VMAs


Associated Press

There may have been no signature
moment at this year's MTV Video
Music Awards, but there was a signa-
ture sound: the screams of teenage
girls wild about One Direction.
It stopped just short of a British
invasion, but the hunky teens in the
boy band won three awards on
Thursday night's show and barged
in on Rihanna's party
Rihanna kicked off things with a
spicy performance to open Thurs-
day night's show, then ended it by
taking the show's top honor, video of
the year, for her steamy hit "We
Found Love."
"Doesn't my girl Rihanna look
sexy tonight?" Katy Perry asked the
crowd after the performance.
And the night's lead nominee did,
showing up in a pixie cut and a fig-
ure-hugging, elegant scoop-backed
white dress before changing into a
flowing red outfit for her medley of
the new single "Cockiness (I Love
It)" with rapper A$AP Rocky and
"We Found Love." She brushed
imaginary dust from her shoulder
as she walked to the stage to thank
fans and her creative team.
The camera returned to the pop
star often except when it was on
One Direction, which provided the
night's most screamed-over per-
formance. The band won best pop
video, best new artist and most
share-worthy video.
"We've grown up watching this
show, and to even be here is an


honor," Niall Horan said from the
stage.
The quintet, put together by
Simon Cowell after "The X Factor"
auditions and the first British act to
debut atop the Billboard 200 album
chart, seemed stunned as fans
screamed upon announcement of
their win.
The group performed later, rising
to a stairwell surrounded by
screaming, reaching female fans on
an elevated platform and bringing
most attendees to their feet. Mem-
bers of the U.S. gymnastics team
sang along to their song "One
Thing" and cameras caught Perry
and Rihanna whispering to each
other
While there was no easily identi-
fiable signature moment early on,
there were a few interesting sights.
Pink floated above the crowd on a
pair of oversized lips as she per-
formed her new song "Blow Me
(One Last Kiss)" before Frank Ocean
wowed with a somber, moonlit ver-
sion of his song "Thinking About
You." Then there was Olympic
champion Gabby Douglas flipping
on stage to new Alicia Keys song
"Girl on Fire," and Taylor Swift
dove into the crowd after a group
sing-a-long of her new hit "We Are
Never Ever Getting Back Together"
Chris Brown pulled off something
of an upset in the best male video
category Rihanna's former
boyfriend won for his self-directed
video "Turn Up The Music," beating
out several top stars, including


Drake, who tied Rihanna for most
nominations with five. Brown also
won for best cinematography M.I.A.
was the night's only other multiple
winner, taking two off-camera
awards for direction and cine-
matography
Drake won best hip-hop video for
"HYFR," which featured Lil
Wayne. He talked about his black
and Jewish roots growing up in
Toronto and his sometimes outsider
status.
"I want to dedicate this award to
any kid that's ever had a long walk
home by yourself," Drake said.
"This is for you, man, for real. We
made it."
Host Kevin Hart, who promised
no one would be spared his
comedic barbs, opened up old
wounds between Brown and Drake
in his opening monologue, spoofing
the two for the bar brawl that took
place between their entourages in
June.
Drake and friends Nicki Minaj
and Lil Wayne sat stone-faced as
Hart joked: "Nip it in the bud, guys.
I'm tired of it Fix it tonight."
Minaj, dressed in a skintight full-
body outfit, won best female video
for "Starships." Coldplay took best
rock video for "Paradise." And
Calvin Harris the show's house
DJ who's featured on "We Found
Love"- won the first best elec-
tronic dance music award for "Feel
So Close." Beyonce, Perry, Skrillex
and Demi Lovato won awards not
televised on the show


Sleeping Beauty recreated in museum


Associated Press

KIEV, Ukraine Looking
for true love? Fall asleep in
Ukraine's top museum and
wait for a kiss.
A Ukrainian-Canadian
artist is presenting an inter-
active art project called
"Sleeping Beauty," in which
five attractive young women
take turns sleeping under
dim lights in Kiev's top
gallery, each under a pledge
to marry the visitor who
wakes her with a kiss.
Any unmarried museum-
goer can kiss the woman in
the hope of making Beauty
fall in love and awaken.
Taras Polataiko, a Ukrain-
ian-born artist now based in
Canada, said the goal of his
exhibit is to recreate the fa-


Birthday: In the next solar cycle, be alert for new opportu-
nities that may come from persons whom you've worked
and experienced some success with in the past. What their
present proposals offer might be worthwhile, but don't take
anything for granted.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't bank too heavily on
Dame Fortune to achieve your objectives for you, no matter
how lucky you usually are. In fact, your best efforts might
barely get you by.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You might not be too good
about keeping secrets, so be careful and stay on your
guard. If you accidentally let something slip out, don't pro-
vide any additional information.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Failing to budget your re-
sources properly could put you in dire trouble later on. Try
to be prudent now, so that you have vital resources later,
when you will really need them.


Associated Press
Visitors look at a new art project called 'Sleeping Beauties,'
created by Canadian-Ukrainian artist Taras Polataiko,
Friday in The National Art Museum in Kiev, Ukraine.
mous fairy tale and witness undertones, symbolizing the
the birth of love. patience of the Ukrainian
But it also has political people trapped by what he


Today's HOROSCOPE
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You might spend more
time talking about your intentions than taking any kind of
action. What you say you'll do will make for good listening,
but won't produce a thing.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It wouldn't be wise to take
on tasks or assignments that you lack the expertise or
know-how to tackle. If you must try, have someone compe-
tent peering over your shoulders.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Negotiations of financial im-
portance should not be conducted with a verbal agreement
and a handshake. For the sake of everybody involved, put
things in writing.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Your analytical abilities are
usually quite sharp, yet there is a possibility you might do
things in a manner that goes against your better judgment
and does not serve your best interests.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Unless your mind is squarely


calls the oppressive govern-
ment of President Viktor
Yanukovych, and hopes that
the nation will one day
awaken to true freedom.
"I am turning the fairy
tale into reality, the Prince
fell in love with her deeply,
strongly and this love woke
her up," Polataiko told The
Associated Press. "Strong
love happens by chance."
The two-week exhibit
ends Sunday and so far only
one Sleeping Beauty has
woken up to a kiss only to
discover that her Prince
Charming is actually a
princess. It is unclear what
the two women will do now,
given that Ukraine forbids
same-sex marriage and that
Princess Charming has a
boyfriend of her own.


focused on your work, you could make a serious mistake
with something you usually do automatically. Don't take
anything for granted.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You could fall prey to impulse pur-
chases if you're just browsing through the stores. Only when
you have a definite item in mind will you make a good buy.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) The perspective from which
you view domestic developments could be slightly dis-
torted. Unless you concentrate on solving problems, you're
likely to complicate your life even further.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Generosity may be more in
your mind than in your actions. Remember that what you
offer might be very easy to promise but difficult to deliver.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -A well-intentioned person might
not have the resources or capabilities to do what she or he
would like to do for you. It's best not to think of anybody as
your ace in the hole.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
Fantasy 5:12 13- 14 23- 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 242 $555
3-of-5 8,165 $23

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Sept. 8,
the 252nd day of 2012. There
are 114 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Sept. 8, 1892, an early
version of "The Pledge of Al-
legiance," written by Francis
Bellamy, appeared in "The
Youth's Companion."
On this date:
In 1504, Michelangelo's
towering marble statue of
David was unveiled to the
public in Florence, Italy.
In 1565, a Spanish expedi-
tion established the first per-
manent European settlement
in North America at present-
day St. Augustine, Florida.
In 1761, Britain's King
George III married Princess
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-
Strelitz, just a few hours after
meeting her for the first time.
In 1900, Galveston, Texas,
was struck by a hurricane
that killed an estimated 8,000
people.
In 1921, Margaret Gor-
man, 16, of Washington,
D.C., was crowned the first
"Miss America" in Atlantic
City, N.J.
In 1935, Sen. Huey P.
Long, D-La., was shot and
mortally wounded inside the
Louisiana State Capitol; he
died two days later. (The as-
sailant was identified as Dr.
Carl Weiss, who was gunned
down by Long's bodyguards.)
In 1974, President Gerald
R. Ford granted an uncondi-
tional pardon to former Presi-
dent Richard Nixon.
In 1987, former Demo-
cratic presidential candidate
Gary Hart admitted during an
interview on ABC's "Night-
line" that he had committed
adultery, and said he had no
plans to resume his White
House bid.
In 1994, a USAir Boeing
737 crashed into a ravine as
it was approaching Pittsburgh
International Airport, killing all
132 people on board.
Ten years ago: The gov-
ernment reported that violent
crime rate had dropped by
ten percent the previous
year, reaching its lowest level
since 1973.
Five years ago: Sheriffs
deputies in Logan County,
W.Va., removed Megan
Williams, a 20-year-old black
woman, from a house in Big
Creek, where she'd endured
what authorities described as
days of torture. (Seven white
men and women pleaded
guilty in the case, but in a
strange twist, Williams re-
canted her accusations in
2009; however, one of the de-
fendants said, "It did happen.")
One year ago: Addressing
a joint session of Congress,
President Barack Obama
challenged a reluctant Con-
gress to urgently pass a
larger-than-expected $450
billion jobs plan to "jolt an
economy that has stalled."
Today's Birthdays: Co-
median Sid Caesar is 90.
Musician Will Lee ("Late
Show with David Letterman")
is 60. Singer Aimee Mann is
52. Pop musician David


Steele (Fine Young Canni-
bals) is 52. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Pink is 33.
Thought for Today: "Try
to learn something about
everything and everything
about something." T.H.
Huxley, English biologist and
author (1825-1895).











RELIGION _
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A restoration rarity


DANNY TINDELL/The Dothan Eagle
Larry and Laura Blumberg hold a quill as Rabbi Yochanan Salazar, right, fills in a letter on the Torah at Temple Emanu-EI in Dothan, Ala.
This Torah appears to be about 250 years old and likely originated in what was then known as Moravia and later became known as the Czech
Republic.

Synagogue's Torah scroll turns out to be more unique than originally known


LANCE GRIFFIN
Dothan Eagle

DOTHAN, Ala.
The celebration of the Torah
at Dothan's Temple Emanu-
El wasn't about nostalgia for
those who belong to the Temple.
Signifying a communication
from God is far from the same
feeling derived from dusting off
and fixing up an old record
album.
It was more than symbolism.
For this synagogue, the Torah
does more than stand in the
place of something. It offers a


real connection with God.
So when Rabbi Lynne Gold-
smith noticed some of the letters
separating from the parchment
and others fading beyond recog-
nition, the Temple decided to
have the document restored.
"It's the one thing we want to
protect more than any other,"
Goldsmith said. "And of course it
is more than the scroll itself. It's
what is written on it."
Goldsmith already knew the
Temple's Torah had an incredi-
ble tradition. According to Tem-
ple history, Temple Emanu-El
purchased the Torah from a


refugee in 1941. It is believed to
have been smuggled out of Bres-
lau, Germany, prior to Kristall-
nacht, a series of coordinated
attacks on Jews in Germany in
November of 1938. Many were
killed and thousands of others
rounded up and sent to concen-
tration camps.
However, when they took it to
Miami for restoration recently,
they found there was even more
to the Torah's story
The Torah was taken to an or-
ganization that specializes in
Torah restorations called Sofer
on Site. When Rabbi Yochanan


Salazar began to examine it, he
noticed some of the letters were
written in an ornate manner,
with crowns and other insignia
coming out of the top of some of
the letters.
Salazar's years of study
helped him identify this specific
Torah as coming from Kabbalis-
tic scribes. Kabbalah is a spe-
cific school of thought inside
Judaism characterized by often
mystical religious interpreta-
tion. Kabbalistic Torahs are very
rare and it is unlikely another

See Page C4


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Dance


phobia

A few weeks ago, a 4.1
earthquake hit
Yorba Linda, Calif.,
the town where I spent my
teen years growing up and
near where some of my
family still lives.
My niece, Jennifer, was
in the shower when the
quake hit and things
started shaking.
In all the years I lived in
California, that was among
my top 10 greatest fears -
to be in the shower and
have an earthquake hit
and be buried in a pile of
debris while naked or in
some stage of undress.
I even named my fear
"They'llFindMeNakeda-
phobia."
But I don't want to talk
about that particular fear,
since I live in Florida,
which so far isn't prone to
earthquakes, although I
suppose it could happen
so I'll just file this fear
away in my brain for safe
keeping.
No, today's fear du jour
is the dreaded fear of
dancing.
There's even an official
term for it: chorophobia.
Recently, I read about a
chorophobic. A man who
had it was engaged to be
See Page C2


Inverness church welcomes new pastor


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
First Christian Church of
Inverness has a long history
in this town.
More than 30 years ago,
the church built its first
building on Hillside Court,
right off the Withlacoochee
State Trail.
By 2000, the church ran
two Sunday morning serv-
ices, each with 200 or more
people.
To accommodate growth,
they built a new sanctuary
in 2003 on Colonade Street
near Whispering Pines
Park, followed by a family
life center in 2004.
Then the church split in
2008, and the remnant that
stayed has struggled ever
since to be the church God
called them to be.
On Sunday, Sept. 16, FCCI


Sale away
Crafters with a Mission will
have its "Third Annual Bazaar
and Bake Sale" from 9 a.m. to
7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, and
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 29, in the gym at Crystal
River Church of God, 2180
N.W. 12th Ave., Crystal River. A
variety of crafts will be featured.
Admission is free. Call 352-
795-3079.
Church of the Advent will
have its annual outdoor "Trash
to Treasure Sale" on Saturday,
Sept. 29. Rent 10-by-10-feet
spaces for $15 each. Shaded
spaces available on a first-
come-first-served basis.
Crafters, flea market and food
vendors are invited to partici-
pate. The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front of the
new firehouse. For registration
and information, call Al Sickle at
352-208-5664 or Maryanne
Brennan at 352-347-2428.


0 Meet the Rev. Ray Kel-
ley, new pastor at
First Christian Church
of Inverness. He will
be preaching at
10:15 a.m. Sunday,
Sept. 16. The church
is at 2018 Colonade
St., Inverness. Church
office: 352-344-1908.
Visit online at www.
fccinv.com.

welcomes the Rev Ray Kel-
ley as new minister and also
his wife Shirley as music di-
rector They come from a
church in Live Oak, where
Kelley worked in cross-cul-
tural ministry
"One of the quotes every-
body likes to use about Mar-
tin Luther King is that '11
o'clock on Sunday mornings Special to the Chronicle
The Rev. Ray Kelley recently joined as the new minister at First Christian Church of Inver-
See Page C2 ness. His wife, Shirley, is the music director.


Hernando United
Methodist Church will sponsor
its semi-annual "Sell Your
Own Treasures" event from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.
The price is $5 for a 12-by-12-
foot spot. No reservation re-
quired. Bring your own tables.
First come, first served. Set up
early and beat the crowd.
Breakfast and lunch is avail-
able. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Call 352-726-7245 or visit
www.hernandoumcfl.org.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Estate donations are
also accepted. Pick-up is avail-
able for larger donations. Items


Religion NOTES
donated are tax deductible and
a form is provided from Helping
Hands. Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
Third Saturday supper is
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Sept. 15
in the Dewain Farris Fellowship
Hall at Community Congrega-
tional Christian Church, 9220 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes
lasagna, garden salad, bread,
dessert, coffee and tea for $10
for adults and $5 for children.
Tickets can be purchased at the
door. Takeouts available. Call
the church at 352-489-1260.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers will
return beginning Sept. 21. Sup-
pers will take place from 4 to 6
p.m. the third Friday monthly in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation
of $8 per person, $15 for two
and $4 for children 12 and
younger includes all-you-can-


eat salad, spaghetti with meat
sauce, Italian bread, dessert
and coffee or tea. Come and
enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets
are available at the door.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, hosts its fish
fry the first Friday monthly in
the church pavilion. Cost is $7
for adults and $3.50 for chil-
dren. The fish fry is open to the
public.
Special events
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host a Christian
Bluegrass and traditional
Country music concert featur-
ing Shannon and Heather
Slaughter and County Clare at
7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28. Bring
family and friends for an enjoy-
able evening of music and re-
freshments. Suggested
donation is $10. For tickets or
more information, call the


church office at 352-795-5325.
The church is at 1070 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
The Council of Catholic
Women at St. Thomas
Church invites all of its mem-
bers and the women of the
parish to the first meeting of the
fall season on Tuesday. Coffee
and tea will be served at 9:30
and the meeting starts at 10
a.m. Annual dues ($10) will be
collected.
Register for AWANA
clubs at First Baptist Church of
Dunnellon from 5:45 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Cost is $10 per
child. AWANA is for children
ages 2 years through sixth
grade. The church is at 20831
Powell Road, Dunnellon. Call
352-489-2730.
Unity of Citrus County in-
vites people of all faiths to join
with thousands of people
around the world for a 24-hour

See Page C2


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Memory,


Judaism


and the


NewYear
y sister and I have
come up with a
game we both
enjoy namely, we email
trivia questions back and
forth to each other based
on events in our child-
hoods. We are really en-
joying ourselves,
stretching our memory
powers back 50 years,
which to us seems like
yesterday
Our inquiries into the
past have included the
color of my first prom
dress, our favorite restau-
rants (most no longer in
business), and experi-
ences and events that
shaped our lives. We are
comfortable in these re-
membrances because
they bring back a time
when life was simpler and
there were none of the en-
cumbrances we have to
deal with today I believe
my sister and I have found
common ground when we
were both innocent of the
trials and tribulations we
were to both face as
grown-ups. It was a safe
time for us, before we be-
came parents and adults.
In Judaism, especially
at this particular holy
time of the year, remem-
bering plays a major role
See Page C3





C2 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


PASTOR
Continued from Page C1

is the most segregated hour
in America,' and there's a
reason for that," Kelley
said. "You go to church
where you're comfortable,
and that doesn't just apply
to black or white churches,
but to denominational
styles."
He said he has preached
in more than 100 African-
American churches and
served as president of Win-
ston Salem Bible College, a
predominantly African-
American school.
He laughed as he described
the difference between black
church and white church
styles of worship.
"In a white church, the
pastor gives a 'lecture' ser-
mon," he said. "It's 'Sit
down, be quiet, I've got
something to tell you.' But
in the black church it's a
conversation, so there's a
lot of nodding, a lot of
'Amening,' a lot of audible
response."
He added that most
white churches start
promptly on time and end
before people's stomachs
start to growl. Some
churches even have count-
down clocks to start time
and the pastor keeps an
eye on a watch or a clock in
the back of the room so as
not to go overtime.
Not so with most black
churches, where the serv-
ice can last for hours.
"The reason they can do
that with ease," he said, "is
that there are two or three
times you stand up and do
something during the serv-
ice. You get up and bring
your offering up front and
a couple of other times
where you have activity in-
stead of just sitting, you're
up and clapping."
He said when he was at
Winston-Salem, before that
student chorus would go to


RELIGION


a white church to perform
they had to tell them: "Just
because the people aren't
clapping or standing up or
nodding, that doesn't mean
they don't like your
singing."
"In their churches they
were used to the audience
having visual reactions to
the presentation," he said.
"So, they'd go into a white
church and sing and the
audience would just sit
there, but as they'd leave
they'd say, 'That was won-
derful we enjoyed that
so much!"'
Kelley said one of the
things he looks forward to
here in Citrus County is
getting to know the other
churches and pastors in
the area. However, first he
wants to get to know the
people at First Christian,
and overtime discover why
God has brought him to this
place at this time.
"One of the points in my
first sermon here when
you look backward you can
see how God led you, but
when you look forward
you're not sure," he said.
"You have visions of what
you want to see happen, but
you don't know for sure just
how God's going to lead."
He said one thing he
does know for sure: The
goal and mission of every
church is to reach people
for Christ.
"We want to see the num-
bers go up, but not because
it's a feather in my cap, but
every number represents
an individual," he said.
"People are what count."
Shirley Kelley said she,
too, is excited to be here
and the people of the
church are eager for a
fresh start.
"With that enthusiasm on
both sides, the Lord's going
to bless that," she said.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

period of global unity to ob-
serve the 19th annual Unity
World Day of Prayer. The
2012 Unity World Day of Prayer
theme is "The Universe is Call-
ing." The following activities will
take place at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

married. However, when he
learned he would be re-
quired to dance with his
bride at the wedding recep-
tion, he called the wedding
off!
There may have been
other things going on, but it
may very well have been the
chorophobia. I totally get
that.
Ironically, I married a guy
who loves to dance. How-
ever, because we got mar-
ried by a justice of the
peace/real estate person
practically before our first
date, I didn't know that
about him.
And if we had had a fancy
wedding with dancing -
well, we didn't so there's no
need to speculate on what
could've been.
So far, my chorophobia
hasn't caused too many
problems in our marriage.
During the past 37 years I've
danced with my husband a
few times, usually at a wed-
ding where alcohol may or
may not have been involved.
Besides, he's my husband
and, therefore, contractu-
ally obligated to not aban-
don me when I step on his
toes or become so rhythmi-
cally impaired that I stop
mid-Electric Slide and wan-
der off the dance floor
Not that that's happened.
Except maybe once or twice.
Years ago I went to do a


Lecanto: Opening service at 6
p.m. Wednesday followed by a
"Drumming Circle" and a 24-
hour prayer vigil; a guided med-
itation service at 9 a.m.
Thursday, followed by a walk
on the labyrinth, and a closing
service at 6 p.m. to bring clo-
sure to the 24-hour prayer vigil.
All events are free and open to
the public. For more informa-
tion, go to www.unityofcitrus.
org, call the church office at

story for the paper about a
local dance studio. I re-
member being paralyzed
with fear at the front door,
afraid I would walk through
the studio door and be in-
stantly naked.
Thankfully that didn't
happen, not in a literal
sense, that is.
However, when the studio
owner asked if I liked to
dance, I felt my face redden.
I felt shame where did
that even come from?
What do you mean you
don't dance? I imagined her
saying. Everyone dances.
Everyone knows how to
dance. There must be some-
thing wrong with you.
I felt unworthy and em-
barrassed. I didn't dare tell
her that I've missed many
events because I'd been
afraid there would be a
dance floor and someone
would ask me to dance and
I'd have to make an excuse
not to.
The only thing worse
would be if she had offered
to give me a lesson.
I can't follow. I can't figure
out forward and/or back-
ward, left foot or right. I'm
clumsy and awkward and
unbalanced.
If anyone were to see me
I'd feel naked and exposed.
So, I work hard at not being
seen. No one sees me dance,
ever.
Let me tell you, choropho-
bia, as with most every pho-
bia, is quite mentally
exhausting having to re-
arrange your life around it.


352-746-1270 or visit www.
worlddayofprayer.org.
The Unity Mystery Dinner
Theater Team will present a
season of three mysteries for
the audience to solve. Dinner
will be served. Enjoy an evening
of surprises, good food and
super sleuthing. Schedule: Fri-
day and Saturday, Sept. 14 and
15 "Murder Is Par For The
Course"; Friday and Saturday,
Dec. 14 and 15- "Santa's Un-

Here's the irony: More
than anything, I want to
dance. I've always wanted to
dance. I've always wanted to
be the one who, when the
music starts, gets up and
moves with it, following
someone's lead, keeping in
step, staying in sync.
In many ways it's a pic-
ture of how I live out my
faith.
Fear often keeps me from
doing what I truly want
to do.
I hear the music, but I
hold back. I want to step out,
but I don't. I want to follow,
but I also want to lead, and
it doesn't work that way.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

timely Demise"; Friday and Sat-
urday, March 15 and 16 -
"Murder Most Green." Season
tickets on sale now. Individual
show tickets available for $20.
Season tickets available for
$60. Door prizes and "Top De-
tective Award." Call the box of-
fice at 352-746-1270 between 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday. All are welcome.

See NOTES/Page C3

There can be only one per-
son leading.
I hate this struggle, but I
don't really know how to be
any different.
And I know that I'm miss-
ing out on something that
could be kind of wonderful.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
- I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! :

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


m JST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
LI I' r, .ii ,Ill r s
U ; H , ,
i6287 00


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.- 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE
SALVATION
ARM IY TRUS COUN..w
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712IS. So llAve.


( Crv. tal iver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
| (12th Ave.)
I Provided


Attend

the worship

service off


your

choice...


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


West Homosassa
Citrus First United
HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
Church of Christ CKIN FMILY Methodist
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. IN cHmI Ehurch
Crystal River, FL 34465 CYSTXL Everyone
352.564.8565 RIVCK Becoming
www.westcitruscoc.com NITD o A Disciple
r-__IIIDof Christ


W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


,A (TH ODila S1
CH U -KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30


Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
. A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts


Open Minds
Open Doors


SC rystal
0 River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


# Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
OOOA93J





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEMORY
Continued from Page C1

in the High Holy Day liturgy As
Jews, we are exhorted to remember
our past deeds, a kind of soul "tak-
ing stock" situation where we look
back on all our deeds, good and
bad, and try to repent and make
amends.
We remember those who have
passed away during the year at a
special service called Yiskor, and
we remember our covenant that
God made with our ancestors, Abra-
ham, Isaac and Jacob, promising to
be our God to redeem us and to
bring us to the Promised Land.
Jews have very long memories -
not so surprising, in view of their
long history From the very dawn of
Jewish history, memory has been a
potent force for peoplehood. At
every major festival, in the prayer
for wine sanctifying the holiday, the
Exodus from Egypt is recalled. This
seminal event in the history of the
Jews was the catalyst that propelled
them from slavery to freedom, from
a ragtag group to a nation with a
purpose and destiny
It was the preparation for the Rev-
elation at Sinai and the giving of the
Torah that was to shape the former
slaves into a nation with moral laws
and a guide to living. With the laws
governing all phases of life revealed,
the eventual result of this all was the
entrance into the Promised Land,
where the Israelites where able to


live, settle and govern themselves.
Throughout the ages, the words of
the Jewish prophets echoed down to
the people to follow God's laws
(mitzvot) or bring calamity upon
themselves. We have only to look at
the signs of global warming and the
extinction of certain species to see
the wisdom in these teachings. By
ignoring those in need, by not pro-
viding for the less fortunate, we
show our lack of concern and disre-
gard for all who are made in the
image of God.
At this season we remember the
sacrifices Jews made through the
ages, sometimes with their very
lives, to remain faithful to Judaism.
It is believed that the special Kol
Nidre prayer said on the eve of the
Day of Atonement was composed
during the Inquisition, when Jews
were often coerced into baptism or
faced death. The prayer speaks of
vain vows to God not being able to
be fulfilled, a reference to forced
conversions to Catholicism in order
to save their families. Their martyr-
dom, in some cases, and the recent
memories of the Holocaust are re-
membered during this holiday sea-
son.
In the Hebrew Bible, there are
many references to memory The
ancient Israelites were exhorted to
remember the Amalekites, a war-
rior tribe that preyed on the strag-
glers of the Israelite band as they
moved through the wilderness to
the Promised Land. The Ten Com-
mandments tells us to "remember
the Sabbath Day and keep it holy"


and God remembers Noah and his
family and the animals in the Ark
and saves them from destruction.
Each time a Jew dons a prayer
shawl, a tallit, he or she is remem-
bering the commandments, mitzvot,
that God has enjoined on the Jewish
people, such a loving one's neighbor
as oneself, caring for the poor, visit-
ing the sick, observing the festivals
and the Sabbath, creating peace and
making the world a better place. As
she/he gazes at the ritual fringes,
called tzizit, they serve to remind
the worshiper of all that is expected
of one who is a member of the
Jewish people.
As we approach the Jewish New
Year of 5773, may we all remember
to treat the world gently May we re-
member to help those who suffer in
silence: the disenfranchised, the
homeless, the cast-offs of society.
May we remember what draws us
together as inhabitants of this
planet, rather than the ideologies
that draw us apart May we remem-
ber that we were all created by the
One Source, though this Source has
many names and methods of wor-
ship. May we all remember to re-
member.
L'shannah Tovah u'mitoocah a
happy and sweet New Year. (The
JewishYear of 5773 starts the
evening of September 16.)

Judi Siegal is a retired teacher and
Jewish educator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil. She can be
reached at niejudis@yahoo.com.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

A talent show will be pre-
sented at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
15, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16,
in the church hall at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church in Dun-
nellon. Songs from the "Rat
Pack," which includes Frank Sina-
tra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis,
Jr., etc., will be sung. A tribute to
veterans will also be presented.
Tickets ($10) can be purchased in
the church office. The church is on
the corner of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40 East. Call 352-489-3166.
The Rev. Israel Cohen of
Chosen People Ministries will
speak on the Arab/Israeli conflict
at the 11 a.m. service Sunday,
Sept. 16, at First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills, 4950 N Lecanto
Highway. Chosen People Min-
istries has been bringing the
Gospel of Jesus, the Messiah, to
Jewish people for more than 110
years. Call 352-746-2970 or visit
www.fbcbh.com.
A new "Coffee Talk" begins
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
19, at Cattle Dog's Roasters, 2416
N. Heritage Oaks Path, Hernando.
Join us for an informal discussion
of the book "Blue Like Jazz," by
Donald Miller. "Blue Like Jazz"
portrays Donald Miller's quest for
meaning, a depth of faith, the real-


RELIGION


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Opew
Hearts
oPe

OPe
Dow
Doors

.... ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1V miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifnim Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


\of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Holy
Communion:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00
&
10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org

la^~. :-


Homosassa Springs
SEVMH-.YAImENnsr'CHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Glory to Glory
.Ministries
y A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational JL
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL A


-*''A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.. Floral City, FL.


mmlkT ne--- alen W Lane

A Faith
Lutheran
Church (L.CM.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

&"at g oromew.


Good
Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! "

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Come as you are!
7EnEESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH







PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253
www vgenesriscomm *unui tychurch= orl


Hemendo, FL 34442
352-726-6734

2 3790 E. ParsGn's Poji
Vlsit us Gn the Web at
www.fbchormnde.com
Z


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 C3

ization that humanity is broken
and imperfect, explorations of
childhood misconceptions of faith,
and the desire to live into his true
identity. In many ways, it is about
finding a faith of one's own, and
not merely repeating what we
have experienced in our upbring-
ing or through a family tradition.
Don's faith journey is uniquely his,
and yet expresses experiences
that many of us identify as our
own as we journey through our
search for God, love, faith, and
something bigger than ourselves.
So, grab a cup of coffee and a
dessert and share your thoughts
about this intriguing book. You can
purchase your book ahead of time
from any bookstore, or we will
have a few available at the first
meeting. Call Genesis Community
Church at 352-464-0983.
"The Blessed Conference"
for women and teen girls will
take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 22, at Christ Way
Fellowship, 972 N. Christy Way,
Inverness. The event is co-hosted
by FresHope Ministries &
FresHope of Jacksonville. "The
Blessed Conference" is a special
time for women and teen girls to
have fun, worship, become in-
spired, know how loved you are,
and realize who you truly are in
the heart of Christ. You are
blessed to be a blessing. There

See NOTES/Page C4





C4 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


TORAH
Continued from Page C1

one will ever be written. Salazar
said the specific style appears to
have ended with the Holocaust.
"I was very pleased we were
able to see this and to restore it,"
Salazar said. "Because we are
not able to reproduce it, it makes
this special."
The Torah is the first five
books of the Jewish scripture,
synonymous with Genesis, Exo-
dus, Leviticus, Numbers and
Deuteronomy in the Old
Testament
A small number of people are
qualified to transcribe or restore
the Torah. They are called Sofer.
Salazar has been a Sofer for sev-
eral years. The process in tran-
scribing the document is very
detailed. It must follow Jewish
custom and practice in that it
must be written on kosher ani-
mal skin, must be written using
a quill from a kosher bird or a
reed and the ink must be made
from all natural ingredients.
Salazar said Sofers spend
about 4 to 6 hours per day tran-
scribing. Every word of the
Torah must be said aloud before
it is written and the Sofer's mind
must be centered on the words
he is writing.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Salazar said the local Tem-
ple's Torah was not completely
rewritten, but the words that
had separated from the parch-
ment or had faded beyond
recognition were inked again.
Other aesthetic work was done
as well.
Salazar said this Torah ap-
pears to be about 250 years old
and likely originated in what
was then known as Moravia and
later became known as the
Czech Republic. No one knows
how it wound up in Germany
prior to the Holocaust.
Temple members participated
in a Torah writing ceremony
Sunday Individual members
held the quill while Salazar filled
in a few remaining letters that
were purposefully left blank.
"It was amazing," said Harold
Cutler of Temple Emanu-El,
who participated in the writing
ceremony. "It brought me to-
gether with my relatives who
were not here to see this today
And it is a proud moment be-
cause traditionally it unites us
with Judaism all over the
world."
Salazar said the welcoming of
the restored Torah held spiri-
tual significance.
"You can think of it as a beau-
tiful tradition if you want, but
the reality is that it is more than
that," Salazar said.


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

will be giveaways, skits, worship arts,
and photo vignette opportunities.
Speakers include Pastor Donna
Sallee and Melissa Lieberman, and
former Disney Princess Jennifer
Beckham. For more information or to
register, visit www.blessedconference.
com or call 352-726-9768.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, Dunnellon, will host its third
annual "Old Fashioned Country
Fair and Craft Show" from 3 to 9
p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, and 11 a.m. to 9
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, on the church
grounds, 7525 S. U.S. 41, Dunnellon
(approximately 3.5 miles north of
Dunnellon). Parking and admission
are free.
The SJBCC Car Show will take
place Saturday in conjunction with the
fair; area car enthusiasts will meet
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to show their
treasures and compete for trophies.
"Field Day Events," such as three-
legged races, relay races, water bal-
loon races, and an egg toss will take
place from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Participation is free and ribbons will
be awarded to the winners. On both
days, the fair will feature a variety of
live entertainment such as the Sun
Coasters, Joyful, the James Brothers,


and Country Sunshine. Fair-goers will
find a variety of attractions including
games, a "Dunk Tank," a 17-foot slide,
a bounce house, hay wagon rides,
and a cake walk featuring home-
baked goodies. On Friday, the fair will
host a fish fry and on Saturday, a
chicken barbecue. Donation is $7 for
either meal. An ala carte menu of
hamburgers, hotdogs, peppers and
homemade sausage, drinks, and all
the trimmings will be available at any
time both days. Folks also can enjoy
fried dough, funnel cakes, SnoKones,
and a trip to Miss Beverley's Old
Fashioned Ice Cream Shop for ice
cream cones, sundaes, and root beer
floats. For those 21 and older, there's
cold beer at the "Beer Tent." Call the
church office at 352-489-3166 or
Claire at 352-465-4477.
The "Brides of Christ 3rd An-
nual Fall Retreat 2012" will take
place Oct. 5-7 at the "Historical Lake-
side Inn" in Mount Dora. The guest
speaker is author, journalist, religion
editor and feature writer Nancy
Kennedy. The cost of $235 per per-
son includes two nights lodging, two
full-course dinners, one lunch and two
breakfasts. Call Retreat Coordinator
Margi at 352-249-7315 or Registration
Coordinator Darlene at 352-249-7003
to register and receive an informa-
tional brochure. Space is limited.

See NOTES/Page C8


Recital


Special to the Chronicle
A piano recital will be presented by
Monica Daniels, Fellow, Trinity Col-
lege of Music, London, England at 2
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at First
Lutheran Church, 1900 W. State
Road 44, Inverness. The recital in-
cludes pieces by Debussy, Schu-
bert, Moeran, Rachmaninov,
Chopin, and Liszt, plus a Nocturne
by Scriabin which is played only
with the left hand, and a Rhapsody
by Dohnanyi, a Hungarian-born com-
poser who taught for 10 years at
Florida State University in Tallahas-
see. The public is invited to this
recital, which will be presented as
part of the Fine Arts Program of
First Lutheran Church. Free admis-
sion. Refreshments served following
the concert. Call 352-726-1637.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! -

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com



First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les'Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Worship
SiAl.i., Evening
Wednesday
Choir Practice


10:45 AM
6:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
,l 1. rl I, i l I, I ,, "


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship .....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon

F 46 Years of
RST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
t _& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
y Missouri Synod
www. 1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson




First United

Methodist


( of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion
9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
1',i, !I-,i -in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
g J Home of the ;
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Terry Allcorn
Interim Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 p M. Bible Study














tist



5335 E. Jasmine Lane, J
Inverness J
SMiles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
We are a it. h .......,i.i ..ri.-. d. ,i h
t the Inverness Womans ( .
171 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
\^ 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670








Hwy.44E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness
S Sunday Services
* Traditional
* 11:00 AM
S Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
U U
11:00 AM Service *
Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages
. 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group
S 5 to 7 PM
U U
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org u
Podcast: FPC inv.com *
U U
* Church Office 637-0770 U
* Pastor Craig Davies
U


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!




0 r

All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


0


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30
Sunday School........................9:30
Contemporary Service...........10:30
Evening Service.......................6:00
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes...................7:00 m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens.................................7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
*www.ourladyofgracefl
L. .catholicweb.com ..


Pastor
Tom Walker


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


RELIGION











COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Learn more about
Lincoln at meeting
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will meet
at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11,
at the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints, 3474 W.
Southern St., Lecanto.
The program will be "The
Genealogy of Abraham Lin-
coln." For a long time, many
well-known historians re-
ported that Lincoln was illegit-
imate. Now we know better.
John Thompson, one of our
members who was professor
emeritus of the University of
Wisconsin at Madison and
past president of the Lincoln
Fellowship of Wisconsin, will
present the program. He will
also talk about "How and
where did Lincoln get his
leadership skills?" Guests are
welcome to attend.
For more information, call
Mary Ann Machonkin at 352-
382-5515 or go to www.
citrusgenealogy.com.
Inverness to host
Freedom Walk
On the anniversary of the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks
against the United States,
Inverness will host a Free-
dom Walk beginning at 5:30
p.m., starting from the Inver-
ness Government Center.
The route will follow Main
Street through historic Inver-
ness, around the Courthouse
Square and return to the In-
verness Government Center.
A bus will be available to
transport walkers to Liberty
Park and the 9/11 memorial.
Participants (walkers) will
include city and county digni-
taries and employees, veter-
ans' organizations and
citizens.
In addition to the Freedom
Walk, a World Trade Center
Memorial Exhibit and Tribute
will take place in the Inver-
ness Government Center
Council Chambers beginning
at noon. Articles from the
World Trade Center, memo-
rabilia, photographs, por-
traits, stories and flags will be
on display until 6:30 p.m.
Country musicians
sought to play
Country musicians are in-
vited to volunteer their talents
on Thursday mornings to
play at the West Coast Com-
munity Center in Homosassa
near the VFW on Veterans
Drive.
Call Jersey Jim at 352-
621-3588.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Milky Way


Special to the Chronicle
Milky Way is a short-haired
orange tabby, 6 months old
and ready to go home. He
is playful and well social-
ized with people and other
cats. However, if you are
looking for a more mature
feline, we are running a
special adoption all
adult cat adoption fees are
half price. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. and 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday at
the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Please drop
by and enjoy our felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Days of peace, prayer


Rotary International requests pause for Day of Peace


Special to the Chronicle
This year, 2012, the In-
ternational Day of Peace
is Friday, Sept 21, and
special activities and cel-
ebrations will take pl. :e
across the world dir-
ing the 2012 Peace
Day Weekend. .
Since its incep- ,
tion, Peace Day
has marked per- -
sonal and plane-
tary progress
toward peace. It
has grown to in-
clude millions of
people in all parts
of the world, and e.i h
year events are org.iin-


ized to commemorate and
celebrate the day.
Rotary International's
president, Sakuji Tanaka,
chose the theme of Ro-


tary fc
Throu
rus C(
memb
World


.......


- ........
-. -_-V


Unity World Day


Special to the Chronicle
Unity of Citrus County invites
peace-minded people of all faiths
to join with them and thousands of
people around the world for a 24-
hour period of global unity to ob-
serve the 19th annual Unity World
Day of Prayer.
This year's theme is: "The Uni-
verse is Calling." United in prayer,
the affirmation will be: "My world


or 2012-13 as "Peace million Rotarians in
igh Service." In Cit- 33,000 clubs.
county, there are 250 The Rotary Club of Sug-
)ers in six clubs. armill Woods calls on
wide there are 1.2 every member of the com-
munity in schools, work-
pLices and homes to
p i "1 iNse at noon Sept.
S_ 21 for a moment of
S- silent contempla-
tion about what
_. '. the world would
be like if there
-' were peace -
-... ~' no wars, no
A killing, no un-
.---.- .-;-1 kind thoughts.
For informa-
-/"-, A "l; tion, call Shelby
. -\\eingarten at 352-
. .. --.- . 3-.)82-5591.


ofPrayer will be Sept. 13


is at peace because I am at peace."
Local activities at Unity of Cit-
rus, 2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto, will include an opening
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
12, followed by a "Drumming Cir-
cle" and a 24-hour prayer vigil. On
Thursday, Sept. 13, a guided medi-
tation will be done at 9 a.m., fol-
lowed by a walk on the labyrinth.
There will also be a service at 6
p.m. to bring closure to the 24-hour


prayer vigil. All events are free and
everyone is invited.
The purpose is to unite as many
people as possible in prayer and
other activities that promote and
help create peace in the world.
Learn more at wwwworlddayof
prayer.org.
For more information on local
activities, call Unity of
Citrus at 352-746-1270 or visit
www.unityofcitrus.org.


Final concert of series tonight


WARpresents Songcrafer's Circle


Special to the Chronicle
Withlacoochee Area Res-
idents Inc. will present its
fourth and final concert in
the second Saturday Sum-
mer Concert Series Satur-
day, Sept. 8, in the Pepper
Creek Terrace Room at the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa


Springs Wildlife State Park,
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Doors will open at 6 p.m.,
with sweet treats and bever-
ages for sale; concert
begins at 7.
Songcrafter's Circle is an
intimate evening with four
of Florida's top songwriters:
Frank Thomas, Lee Paulet,


Carly Bak and Jay Wood.
The evening focuses not
only on the songs, but also
on the anecdotes and artis-
tic musings that inspired
their work.
In the truest tradition of
storytelling, the audience
will get an intimate glimpse
of that inspiration.
All the "songcrafters" are
well-known performers lo-
cally and on Florida's Folk


Circuit. Each has been fea-
tured at previous WAR Inc.
concerts, Three Sisters
Springs, On the Point and
the 2010 Earth Day event at
Crystal River Preserve
State Park.
Tax-deductible donation
is $10. Visit the website at
www.warinconline.com for
more details about the
Songcrafters, or email war
inc.directors@gmail.com.


Pin honors


retirees

Special to the Chronicle


Disabled American Veterans Gerald A
Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces
the design and availability of this year's
Citrus County Veterans Appreciation
Commemorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme.
"Honoring our Military Retirees," the na-
tional symbol of the bald eagle will represent
the men and women who made military serv-
ice a career. The image is set in the outline of
Citrus County.
The pins are available for $3 each by call-
ing the chapter at 352-344-3464, or John
Seaman at 352-860-0123. All proceeds benefit
Chapter 70's scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.


Seeking to solve world's problems


Everyone is an expert! This is
how I opened the Sunday morn-
ing teaching that I usually have
with the shelter residents at the Her-
nando Church of the
Nazarene.
All of us have our own ..
ideas, from our perspec- .
tive on how the world
should be operated. We
all have some suggestions -
where deficiencies
should be handled and by "
whom. If I could get Pres-
ident Obama's attention
for a couple of hours, I'm DuWayn
sure I could solve several THE F
if not all of this country's H
problems. HOI
I have had the pleasure
of driving several Rotarians to an an-
nual event statewide where we in-
vest ourselves into tomorrow's
leaders who are approaching their
high school graduation. The inter-
esting part is that during the van
rides coming and going, we solve all


e
P
N


of the world's problems in discus-
sion.
From an observation point, if I am
transparent, my view of the world is
still a very small telescope.
It is only one person's view
of almost 7 billion, in which
there are no two people
alike. Do we realize how
many people have to coop-
erate and agree to build
\ one building? To build a
skyscraper? Over and over
again we see some of the
most fantastic operations
Sipper that, if people agree, are
PATH astounding.
Do we really believe that
IE homelessness is simple?
-- Do we think that providing
more houses will eliminate the prob-
lem? Do we think that jobs will be
the silver bullet that gives us the an-
swer to this growing problem and we
will never look back?
My wife said it well a couple of
days ago: How hard is it to change


one of our bad habits?
"Then, how hard do you think it is
to change a life?" We have had the
privilege of serving more than 1,000
people in our shelter alone, not to
mention thousands that we have
helped in other programs.
Each one had their life changed
just a little, some much, because
they walked through our doors. We
tried to help everyone. So, every
time I think about solving the prob-
lem, coming up with the secret elixir
or the magic bullet that will solve
homelessness because I am an ex-
pert, I come to the same conclusion
that I started with. I want to use my
life to help people in the name of
Jesus. Fear God and obey His com-
mandments. Now, that is wisdom!

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County,
a faith-based homeless shelter
Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net.


Kids


need


more


GALs

Special to the Chronicle
Become an advocate for
an abused or neglected
child become a
guardian ad litem
volunteer.
There are more than
1,800 children in the Mar-
ion, Hernando, Lake,
Sumter and Citrus coun-
ties who have been re-
moved from their homes
for alleged abuse, aban-
donment or neglect, who
are now part of a depend-
ency court proceeding.
These children need
someone who will speak
up for them.
A GAL is a volunteer
appointed by the court to
advocate for a child. The
volunteer works as part of
a team with a volunteer
supervisor and program
attorney He/she becomes
familiar with the child
and the child's case and
makes recommendations
to the court to help ensure
a safe, caring, stable and
permanent environment
for that child.
Persons 21 years and
older, who successfully
complete the pre-service
training program, have a
clean criminal back-
ground check and who
are able to be objective
are eligible. A GAL must
successfully complete 30
hours of pre-service train-
ing. On average, volun-
teers spend 5 to 10 hours
a month on a case. Most
cases last 10 months.
Call Lynn Sennett at
352-274-5231 or email her
at Lynn.Sennett@GAL.
FL.Gov
For more information
and an application, visit
www.guardianadlitem.org.
The next training begins
Thursday, Nov. 1, at
the Calvary Chapel of
Inverness.

News NOTES

Butterfly Club
to meet in B.H.
The first meeting of the
Beverly Hills Butterfly Club
will be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 9, at the Community
Building in Beverly Hills,
1 Civic Circle.
Speakers will be master
gardener Jim Bruno, who will
speak on the propagation of
plants. Speaking on hydro-
ponics will be Don Marchetti.
These meetings are free and
open to the public.
For more information, call
Chris Small at 352-527-8629,
or email cuttie22
@earthlink.net.
American-Italians
to dance tonight
Citrus American Italian
Club of Inverness has set its
calendar for September, and
will begin the month with a
dinner dance today, Sept. 8.
Doors open at 4 p.m.;
dinner will be served at
5p.m.
On the menu are baked
chicken, potato, vegetable,
salad, dessert and coffee.
Call Angie for tickets at 352-
637-5203. Cost is $14.50;
BYOB.
The Sept. 19 dinner and
meeting will begin at 4 p.m,
with the meeting at 5:30 p.m.
On Saturday, Sept. 22,
there will be an indoor/out-
door flea market from 7 a.m.
to 2 p.m.; vendors welcome.
An inside table is $10 and
outside space is $7.
Call Martha at 352-


476-8727, or Dolores at 352-
746-5019 to reserve space.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


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Ii 51 25 51 32 42 Cars'PG' Cars'PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG 'PG' PG 'PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG
"Fatal Honeymoon" (2012, Docudrama) "Killer Among Us" (2012, Suspense) Tess "Killer Among Us" (2012, Suspense) Tess
(LiFE 24 38 24 31 Harvey Keitel, Amber Clayton. ca Atkins, Tom Cavanagh. Premiere. ca Atkins, Tom Cavanagh, Boris Kodjoe. ca
"Long Lost Son" (2006, Drama) Gabrielle Drop Dead Diva 'PG' Drop Dead Diva "Lady Drop Dead Diva'PG' s Drop Dead Diva "Picks
S 50 119 Anwar, Craig Sheffer. 'NR' Parts" 'PG' & Pakes"'PG'
** "Marked for **** "Jaws"(1975, Horror) Roy Scheider, Strike Back (In Stereo) ** "The Hangover Part l/" (2011) Strike Back
S 320 221320 3 3 Death" (1990) 'R' Robert Shaw. (In Stereo) 'PG 'MA'Ec Bradley Cooper. 'R' cc
MSNBC 42 41 42 Documentary Documentary IDocumentary Documentary Documentary |Documentary
n109 65 109 44 53 side9/11: War on America Investigation of Inside 9/11: Zero Hour Terrorist attacks of Sept. 9/11: The Fireman's Inside 9/11: Zero Hour
109 65109 44 53 events.'PG' 11,2001.'PG' Story (N)'14' PG'
NICK 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious |Victorious Victorious |Victorious Big Time |iCarly'G' Victorious |Victorious Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Friends |Friends
(OW 103 62 103 Mansion Walls Mansion Walls Mansion Walls Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Mansion Walls
WXYJ 44 123 ** "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle" cc "The Sweetest Thing" (2002) 'R' **Y "Just Friends" (2005) 'PG-13'cS
i$iEW 340 24in 1 340 4 "Barbershop" *** "Our Idiot Brother" (2011) Jay Mohr: Funny for a Boxing Devon Alexander vs. Randall Bailey (N) (Live)'PG, L All Access
340241340 4Paul Rudd.'R' c Girl (N)'MA, L
NASCAR RaceDay (N) Monster Jam Monster Jam AMA Pro Racing New AMA Pro Racing New NASCAR On the
tSPEEDJ 732 112 732 (Live) Jersey Jersey Victory L. Edge
** "Without a ** "Super Troopers"(2001, Comedy) Jay **Y "MacGruber" (2010, Comedy) Will Forte, **Y "Stripes"(1981)
PiE 37 43 37 27 36 Paddle"(2004) Chandrasekhar. (In Stereo) 'R' s Kristen Wiig. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' Bill Murray 'R'
Boss"Redemption" ** "Burlesque"(2010, Drama) Cher, Christina **Y "The Vow" (2012) Rachel McAdams. **Y "30 Minutes or
370 271370 'MA' a Aguilera. (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Less"(2011)
College Rays Live! MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field Rays Live! Inside the Inside the Inside the
36 31 36 Football (N) in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) (N) Rays Rays Rays
"Shark Zone" (2003) "Sand Sharks" (2011, Comedy) Julie Marie "2 Headed Shark Attack" (2012, Action) "Super Shark" (2011)
31 59 31 26 29 Dean Cochran. R' Berman, Christina Corigliano. remiere.'R' Carmen Electra. Premiere.'NR' NR a
fS) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Seinfeld |Seinfeld Big Bang |BigBang ** "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" "How Stella Got"
*** "A Big Hand for the Little Lady" (1966, ***Y "The Goodbye Girl" (1977) Richard *** "The Bachelor and the "Andy
169 53 169 30 35 Western) Henry Fonda.'NR' Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason. 'PG'c sBobby-Soxer"(1947)'NR' Hardy"
I (Almost) Got Away Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In Outlaw Empires (In
S 53 34 53 24 26 With It'14' Stereo) '14 c' Stereo) '14 cc Stereo) '14 cc Stereo) '14 c Stereo) '14 cc
WSJ 50 46 50 29 30 Lottery Changed Flight 175: Watched Emergency 9/11: Heroes of the 88th Floor'14, V' s Emergency
"Brighton *** "The Rock"(1996, Action) Sean Connery Alcatraz "Southern Gothic" (2007, Horror) ** "Believers" (2007) Johnny
350 261 350 Rock"'R' Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco.'R' Yul Vazquez. Premiere. 'N' Messner. (In Stereo) R' ac
S 48 33 48 31 34 *** "Braveheart"(1995, Historical Drama) **** "Saving Private Ryan" (1998, War) Tom Hanks, Edward Burns. U.S. troops "Flags-
48 33 48 31 34 MelGibson.'R' look for a missing comrade during World War II. 'R'c Fathers"
f iF 38 58 38 33 Adven |Adven Movie'MA' Home |King/Hill King/Hill |Fam.Guy Dynamite Boon
(IHAi 9 54 9 44 Tastiest Places Tastiest Places Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
tiiiLYJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking '14' Most Shocking Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Forensic Forensic
f1l 32 49 32 34 24 Griffith |Griffith Griffith |Andy Griffith Show Griffith Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
NCIS "Reveille" (In NCIS A Marine's wife NCIS "Twilight" (In NCIS "Kill Ari"'14'cE NCIS "Kill Ari"'14'c 3CSI: Crime Scene
47 32 47 17 18 Stereo) 'PG' s kills an intruder.'PG' Stereo) 'P' c Investigation'14'
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With
117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
1WiLAJ 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


North 09-08-12
4K QJ
V 72
+ J 9 6 4 2
* Q 10 6
East
498542
V AQ 10
+ A
4 9 7 3 2
South
4A6
V K5 3
K Q 1085
* A KJ


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: V 6


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Nadia Comaneci said, "I have had a few turning
points, one being the first day I entered a gymnas-
tics school at age 6."
To finish the week, here is another deal in which
a defender has a chance to find the right play if he
counts the high-card points. However, this one is
harder because he must not spend ages finding the
correct play
East is defending against three no-trump. West
leads a fourth-highest heart six. What should East
do?
South can see seven top tricks: three spades, one
heart (given the lead) and three clubs. He will have
to drive out the diamond ace, so is in danger of los-
ing at least five red-suit tricks.
East would normally win with his heart ace
(third hand high) and return the heart queen (the
higher of two remaining cards). However, if he
does that here, South will duck this trick, take the
third heart, and play a diamond. East will win, but
it will be the last trick for the defense.
East must quickly count the points and realize
that his partner has perhaps a jack. South must
have the heart king. And when you are trying to es-
tablish a suit in which the opponents have one
stopper, try to make them use up that stopper as
soon as possible.
At trick one, East must smoothly put in his
queen.
Declarer cannot afford to duck, lest West have
ace-jack-fourth. But when South takes the first
trick and leads a diamond, down he goes.
That is, declarer cannot afford to duck unless
East took so long to play his queen that he has
given the game away


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PEDUD I

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reseved
SGUHOC



PAMIEL



SHLAPS
7T-Ew~
< _Z D_^


; v '
It's good to
Sbe here.
At 100, it's
.- good to be '
anywhere.

/ -.- ?
v ,_ ) ;. -.,
^ .' "I -


WHEN G ORGO BURN5
TURNFP 100,
99 WAS THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer.
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CEASE DATED POUNCE INHALE
I Answer: Record stores selling Beatles albums in 1965
were full of people who NEEDED HELP


ACROSS
1 Tall tale
5 Didn't spoil
9 UPS vehicle
12 Fencing
sword
13 Scintilla
14 Lilly of
pharmaceuticals
15 PC screens
16 Fascinating
18 Bays and
chestnuts
20 Overjoy
21 Black, in
Monte Carlo
22 Dogma
23 on (incited)
26 Movie lioness
30 Like crudites
33 Fishtail
34 Get dizzy
35 "The X-Files"
topic
37 OPEC rep,
maybe
39 Numskull
40 La Tar Pits
41 Bit parts


43 Make the
most of
45 Harness part
48 Cyclist
Armstrong
51 Binaural
53 Minimize
(2 wds.)
56 Basted
together
57 Garnet or
ruby
58 Jai -
59 Not for
60 Bunyan's tool
61 Right after
62 "Wild" place

DOWN
1 Ugh!
2 Barbecuer's
garb
3 Nostalgic look
4 Tabloids
"monster"
5 Novak and
Basinger
6 Job-ad letters
7 Qt. parts


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HATS MOO DIMM
ELOPE ERR ADE
MEMOS NOTCHED
ICCED HULAS
ATLAS COG
GNU PTAH AGHAI
EON EASE TROT
EDEN THEM ALT
SERE E YRE PLY
PBS ITCHY
LEGAL LORE
ECOLOGY OCEAN
ERA WON SIDLE
RUT SON LOBE


8 Makes gentle
9 Actress
Miles
10 Perched
11 Delightful
17 Fudd of
cartoons


19 Joule
fractions
22 Best possible
24 Stare balefully
25 Lira replacer
27 August kid,
maybe
28 Continent
divider
29 Sitcom alien
30 Polish
31 Kenya's loc.
32 Heartache
36 Pert
38 Ernie's buddy
42 Teeter-totter
44 Family car
46 Castle who
danced
47 Some
salamanders
48 Links org.
49 Mr. Trebek
50 Moniker
51 Grumpy mood
52 I'm working
54 Bullring cheer
55 Honeycomb
material


Dear Annie: I had to re-
spond to the letter from
"Seeing Red About Blue,"
whose son is in a
wheelchair. She often
finds the striped area
next to the handi-
capped parking spot
occupied, blocking
safe passage back into
her van. I have a mo-
torcycle. I used to park
in those blue-striped
areas because they
were a perfect fit for
my bike. I had a feeling
they might not be OK AN mN
to park in, but I had no MAIL
idea what they were
for and didn't see any
harm in leaving my bike there.
One day a woman approached
me and actually explained that
parking my motorcycle in the
striped spot made it difficult for
someone in a wheelchair to
safely access their car, because I
was blocking the route. Annie, I
should have known better. I did-
n't realize I was causing undue
hardship, and I immediately
apologized and moved my bike
into another spot. I will never
again park in those striped areas.
I appreciated being put in my
place. Found a New Spot To
Park
Dear Fbund: Thank you for tak-
ing responsibility for doing the
wrong thing and then correcting
it. We hope other readers will
make the same effort. Read on
for more:
From Chicago: I appreciated
all the information in that letter. I
never knew what those striped
areas in parking lots were for. I
honestly thought they were for


emergency vehicles. I never
thought they were there to help
with ramps, walkers, wheel-
chairs, etc. I am very
glad that your writer
explained the pur-
pose. Education is
power. Thank you. I
am now enlightened.
Los Angeles: I be-
lieve there is an easy
solution for drivers
who park in the
striped lane between
handicapped parking
spots, preventing a
IE'S side exit for handi-
BOX capped passengers.
These lanes should
also have a posted sign
that says, "No Parking, Handi-
capped Access Lane," complete
with corresponding fines. Usu-
ally, those signs are only placed
in front of the actual parking spot
and not the striped area next to
it.
Wisconsin: I am handicapped
and often see people parked in
handicapped spaces when they
have neither a handicapped li-
cense plate or placard. I have
begun to leave notes on those
people's cars saying, "You are not
handicapped. You should not be
in this space." It also might help
to back into the space so that the
striped area next to the ramp
cannot be blocked by another car.
Michigan: I, too, have a side-
loading wheelchair van and have
also been "parked in" by people
choosing to use the striped area.
I've also seen small cars with
handicapped placards parked in
van-designated areas. And it's ex-
ceptionally common for people to
leave their shopping carts in


those striped areas. My husband
purchased a small orange cone
and printed RAMP on it in large
black letters. He attached a 6-foot
rope to it and tied the other end
to the front passenger seat of the
van. When we park, we pull the
cone out and place it in the ad-
joining space. And do call the po-
lice next time there is a car
parked in the striped area. When
I did this, they didn't tow the car,
but they did write a ticket. If we
make this an issue, the police will
enforce the law.
Baton Rouge: How about uti-
lizing two plastic pylons (easily
purchased at an athletic equip-
ment outlet)? Affix long pieces of
bright tape to each pylon, and at-
tach the other end to a magnet.
Attach the magnets to your vehi-
cle, and leave the pylons (with
the tape attached) to the amount
of space needed for your ramp.
The entire package can be rolled
up and placed inside the car for
reuse when you're done.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


West
4 10 7 3
VJ 9 8 6 4
S 73
*8 5 4


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C6 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


So,, AR6StoO \ 9
9EAw1Qlbo \
o ThE sitt I
AMM bhME?



, ..j f .','
V . t ,

}'I L.---- *^ t


Sally Forth


LOOK AT ALL THESE YOUNG,S EYES SO FULL OF
BEWILDERED SIXTH-GRADERS, FAYE... QUESTIONS, SO FULL OF
S_ FEAR. REMEMBER, FAYE?
Sl _' HEN WE WERE JUST
h.. I : .LIKETHEM?


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Wonderful ... Looks like we have
ourselves a real bloodbath."


Doonesbury


ANOTHER CONVENTION
IN THE BAG! HOW/ PO
PO IT ELECTION AFTFR
ELECTION?









Big Nate


I PON' KNOW ABOUT
YOU GUYS, BUT I COULP
GO FOR SOME SERIOUS
POWAI-TIME!


WHO WORRIES MORE WHEN \ _IG_
YOUE OUT ON A DATE, YOUR 0 .I
MOM OR YOUR DAD? I/ R-u ----






ta~II
."am Circus
Denni.thec T -F l C


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


www lamilycircus corn w
"I think we'll skip dinner. Dolly's
mud pies were very filling."


"LET' LOAP UPON COOKIES, THEN GEE IF
WE HAVE ANY /MONEV LEFT FOR VEG-TABLES."
Betty


Arlo and Janis


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10
p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Words" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,


7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:10
p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: X slenbae


"VUOSZMAX G XPGARZSEYUP MN


JSARUPWDB. SAU ZSZUAE KSD'PU HDNE G


ZSEYUP. EYU AUFE KSD GPU GBB-JMNU GAR


CPUYMNESPMO." CGZ VPSJA

Solution: "I will not go into a story unprepared. I will do my homework, and that's
something I learned at an early age." Ed Bradley
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-8


Peanuts


r -s~~s


Pickles


NATE, AS YOU'LL
RECALL, AT THE END
OF LAST YEAR YOU
HAD TWO OUTSTANDING
DETENTIONS.


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 C7






CS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

Trinity Independent Baptist
Church will host a "Civil Ser-
vant Sunday" at 11 a.m. Oct.
7. All civil employees, past and
present, are invited. Retired
state trooper William Turley
(Ohio) is the guest speaker.
Special music will be provided
by River Jordan. All civil service
personnel are invited for dinner
following the service. The
church is on the corner of Croft
Avenue and Hayes Street. Call
the church at 352-726-0100.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a "Military
Card Party" on Monday, Oct.
15, at 114 N. Osceola Ave., In-
verness. Reservations must be
made by Thursday, Oct. 11.
Lunch will be served at 12:15
p.m. followed by card play at 1
p.m. Cost is $12 per player.
Make up your table of four or
come as a single and we will
pair you. Enjoy fun, prizes and
a raffle. For more information or
to make a reservation, call Dot-
tie at 352-382-3656 or Marilyn
at 352-746-6583.
Inverness First United
Methodist Church's "Stepping
Out Ministry" is heading to the
Eastern Caribbean to visit Half
Moon Cay in the Bahamas, St.
Thomas, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, and Grand Turk. The
price includes deluxe motor
coach, cruise, port charges, all
taxes and the bus driver's tip. It
is not necessary to be a mem-
ber of the church to attend. Call
Coordinator Carole Fletcher at
352-860-1932, or Debbie Muir
at Tally-Ho Vacations at 352-
860-2805.

Worship
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers


RELIGION


at 5 p.m. Saturday and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Come and experience the undi-
luted truth of Orthodoxy. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, off U.S. 41 North
across from Dollar General
store. The public is also invited
to attend Great Vespers at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday in The Villages at
St. George Episcopal Church.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30 am.
Sunday. Two adult Bible stud-
ies begin at 9 a.m. with
"Nooma" (by Rob Bell) and the
Letter of James. The Rev. Jack
Alwood's sermon is titled
"Crumbs!" The chancel choir re-
turns singing "Lord, I Stretch
My Hands to You." The "Forum"
meets at 6 p.m. Wednesday to
discuss issues and current
events. All are welcome to at-
tend. Call 727-795-2259 or visit
www.fpccrflorida.org.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes Judi
Siegal, a frequent columnist of
the Citrus County Chronicle's
Religion Section called, "Judi's
Journal," to the pulpit Sunday.
Siegal's topic is titled, "Palms,
Willows, Citrons and Torah
Scrolls: The Jewish Fall Festi-
vals of Thanksgiving and Joy."
She will share the wisdom and
traditions of her Jewish heritage
and explain the lesser-known
fall festivals, namely, Sukkot,
Hoshanah Rabbah, Shmini
Atzert and Simchat Torah.
Come learn about the lulav, the
etrog, and the arbah minim.
The Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship meets
at 7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. We are a nondenomi-
national church where you will
experience a friendly, loving


and casual atmosphere; a
place where you can come just
as you are. A coffee fellowship
will follow the morning service.
Weekly Bible study meets at 7
p.m. Wednesday. The book of
Ephesians is the topic of study
and discussion. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive, across from the
Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
The Mary Martha Circle of
First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs will meet at
10:30 a.m. today followed by a
salad luncheon. Monthly fellow-
ship meals resume after the
10:30 a.m. Sunday worship
service. Preacher Dan Wag-
ner's sermon is on "Confi-
dence." Sunday school for all
ages is at 9:30 a.m. The
evening service is at 6.
Wednesday's fellowship meal
at 6 p.m. is followed by prayer
and Bible study. The church is
at 7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Call the church office at
352-628-5556.
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to worship services
at 6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. This week's
theme is "He Has Done All
Things Well," from Mark 7:31-
37, by Pastor Stephen Lane.
Following the Sunday service is
a time of fellowship and Bible
study at 11 a.m. Sunday school
for children is at 11 a.m. Call
352-527-3325 or visit faith
lecanto.com.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way in Beverly Hills, has re-
turned to its regular Sunday
worship schedule at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday school for
young children and teens is at
9:15 a.m. Adult Bible class is at


9:15 a.m. and will begin a study
on the life of Moses. Plan to at-
tend a fall picnic following the
late worship service Sunday,
Sept. 16, for St. Paul's School
students, parents, members
and guests. St. Paul's Senior
Group can sign up to attend the
Nature Coast Community Band
Concert at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 22. Guests are
always welcome. Call 352-
489-3027.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 15th Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
A nursery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Godly Play
Sunday school will resume at
10 a.m. There is a healing serv-
ice and Eucharist at 10 a.m.
Wednesday. SOS is at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church
with summer hours from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. Thursday through
September. Evening Bible
study will resume Thursday.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the 15th Sunday after
Pentecost at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services. St. Anne's will
host Our Father's Table from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the parish library. The "Recov-
ering from Food Addiction"
group meets at 1 p.m. Thurs-
days in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Monday in the
parish library. All are welcome
to join St. Anne's at 6 p.m. the
fourth Sunday monthly for a
Bluegrass gospel sing-along.
Annie and Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band will
perform.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at


8:30 and 10:30 a.m. The first
Sunday monthly is designated
for children to have a special
time together in the Children's
Church room during the 10:30
a.m. worship service. The re-
maining Sundays, children will
remain in the auditorium for
worship with their parents. Sun-
day school begins at 9:30 a.m.
with classes for everyone. Adult
Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for pre-k through the
eighth grade) meets from 5:30
to 8 p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s Choir practice
from 5:30 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s din-
ner from 6:30 to 7; and Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 S., Inverness. Call the
church office at 352-726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A
nursery attendant is available
for children ages 3 and
younger. Sunday school begins
at 9:45 a.m. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Summer Sun-
day worship schedule: Contem-
porary worship at 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school from 9:30 to
10:30 a.m., and traditional wor-
ship at 11 a.m. For Christian
Education Sunday tomorrow,
the Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on "Passing the Baton,"
with readings from Deuteron-
omy 11:18-21. New Wednes-
day night Bible study begins


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

this week with participants ex-
ploring the events, characters
and teachings of the Bible in an
easy-to-understand chronologi-
cal order. Call Denise Lay at
352-637-0770.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate the DOK
Fall Assembly today. Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 will be observed
at 8 a.m. Sunday followed by
Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at 10:30
a.m. Children's church is during
the 10:30 a.m. service. Adult
Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m.
Lunch and youth Sunday
school/adult forum is at noon.
Morning prayer and the DOK
meeting is at 9 a.m. Monday.
Morning prayer is at 9 a.m.
Tuesday and Pastor Gene's
luncheon and Christian study is
at noon.
Morning prayer at 9 a.m.
Wednesday is followed by a
healing and holy Eucharist
service celebrating the Holy
Cross at 12:30 p.m. Morning
prayer at 9 a.m. Thursday will
be followed with pastoral care
starting back up at 10 a.m.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school will
begin at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service be-
gins at 6. Midweek services are
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young
Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Youth
Bible study for ages 11 and
older is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
second and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando (di-
rectly across from the Her-
nando Post Office).
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions as we are currently
seeking a new location: 1-855-
426-4542 or 352-8759614.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Fa: 32)56-66 TllFee (8). 5-240 1Em i:.lasfidsca oile*ln .m I ebi-:ww hrnclonie0o


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

8 75 6

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5 4 1 7

2 19

9

3 7 5

4 15 3
Fill in the squares so that each row. colu'ln and
3-by-3 box conral n he1 nl.irmbers 1 through 9

weee .w" All of our "
'4 tlaI4e structures
withstand
120mph
Installations by Brian CBC1253853 '.winds .
4 352-628- 7519


Permit And e
I Engineering Fees I I "
. Up to $200 value
*Siding* Soffit *Fascia -Skirting* Roofovers Carports* Screen Rooms* Decks* Windows* Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.comrn


Attractive Widow looking
for a man 70-80 for com-
panionship, dinner and
artistic pursuits. Send
photo and something
about you to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1802
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal Rvr, Fl
34429



4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell




Advertising
Sales
Assistant
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is now accepting
applications for a
Part Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow, create insertion
orders, filing,
knowledge of
Excel ,& Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent Customer
Service Skills.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service
skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935


1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE
Attractive Widow looking
for a man 70-80 for com-
panionship, dinner and
artistic pursuits. Send
photo and something
about you to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1802
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal Rvr, Fl
34429


10 x 14 Repo Shed
w/ Garage Door (352)
860-0111,941-623-3742
CITRUS HILLS
Kensington Estates
Saturday 9/8 8am- Until
Huge sale! Fishing,
Collectables, Tools,
Antiques, Jewelry.
201 N Brighton Rd.
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover. Large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070
Desk Lamp $35.
and Various Art Work
(352) 270-8249
FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale. Sat. & Sun
Everything goes cheap
8980 S. Meredith Ave.
Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741


HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352-447-5595
HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
HONDA
2008 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5700.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
Housekeeping
Upsale RV resort
located in Crystal River.
If Interested cl (352)
447-5820 or stop by:
10173 N Suncoast
Blvd. Ofc hrs 9a-5p
LABORER
Must have clean Drivers
License and pass drug
test. Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1801P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.Crystal River, FI
34429
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT /
X-RAY TECH
Medical assistant / x-ray
tech needed for fast
paced office. Must have
3-5 yrs experience. Must
have Florida x-ray
licence. Fax resume to
352-746-4130


- -m
INVERNESS Picard, Queen Anne
2/1, Clean, W/D Dining Room Table 2
Hk.-up,water & garbage leaves, 6 chairs, buffet
incl. No pets, $550mo. paid $4,000 Sell $950.
(352) 220-4818 Secretary Desk, old,
$300. (352) 270-8249
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn POOL HEAT PUMP
Never Used AQUA CAL T115
$100. 6 yrs old. Works Great
352-341-1714 $500 (352) 637-0397
MIRROR CRAFT SPORT FISH
16 ft Fishing Boat 28ft, twin Volvo turbo die-
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota sel, tower, piilot, GPS,
trolling motor, $3200 obo turn key $19,500.
(352) 344-4537 (352) 978-0658


NEED EXTRA CASH?










Great Opportunity For


V Individuals


V Couples


V Friends




Must be 18 years of age
Must have valid driver's license and insurance
Able to work or share 7 days a week, early
morning hours

For more information email:
home_delivery@chronicleonline.com
or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River to apply.
Both home delivery and
single copy routes available!
SCrITiUS U COUNTY

wIwRONICLEo
www.chronlcleonline.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE ALL NEW 2013 NISSAN

ALTIMA


We changed everything
except the name.


\11.


OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!
The All New Nissan Altima Gets 38 MPG.
Drive 684 miles on a single tank.


BLOW THE DOORS OFF... ALL FOUR OF THEM.
THE 2013 ALTIMA SV HAS BETTER OVERALL ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE
THAN THE HONDA ACCORD SE, HYUNDAI SONATA AND TOYOTA CAMRY SE


SO* STARTING
I0) MSRP

PER MONTH D
24 MONTH LEASE Model# 13013
VIN# 129758


U


I ,


CRYSTAL 352-564-1971
N I S S A N 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
CRYSTALNISSAN.COM


*Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. $2,999 down, cash or trade equity. Excludes tax, tag, title, Dealer Fee of $599.50. Lease is 24 months, 24,000 miles. $0.15 per mile over. With approved
credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior Sales may restrict stock. tBased on EPA estimate on Monroney Label. Your actual mileage may vary.


$


$


2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE
<______________________


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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 C9


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Cl SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


nationwide
learance
event


AT


VILLAGE


TOYOTA


2012 TOYOTA
COROLLA
Auto Trans, PW, PL, CD


T113410


MSPR $17,800
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 2,805
s14,995*
or LEASE for 159


2012 TOYOTA
CAMRY
Auto, PW, PL, Cruise, CD


MSPR $22,895
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 4,400
$18,495*
or LEASE for s189


2012 TOYOTA
PRIUS
Auto, Cruise, Push Button Start, Bluetooth, CD


, oo


MSPR
CLEARANCE SAVINGS


T121453


$24,840
3,845


$20,995
or LEASE for s219


2012 TOYOTA
RAV4
Auto Trans, PW, PL, CD


* T121507


MSPR 1w $23,680
CLEARANCE SAVINGS 3,685
$19,995*
or LEASE for s189


www.villagetovota.com
ToyotaCare


VILLAGE TOI
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-628-51 00


*All leases with $2,399 Cash Cap Reduction, 36 Mos, 12k Per Year, All Offers While Supplies Last.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BMW in Ocala


0


rr.e Ultmanle
fxiDn" g M.cINrl
THE FIRST EVER BMW
CERTIRED PRE-OWNED
SALES EVENT


E Certified Pre-Owned -
ammm Wm q&;6i mm.


TWO EXCEPTIONAL OFFERS. ZEROTIMETO WASTE.
Now, during the First Ever BMW Certified Pre-Owned Sales Event,
choose from two exceptional offers through BMW Financial Services on
a Certified Pre-Owned BMW. You can walk away with a three-payment
credit of up to $1500* or you can enjoy 0.9% APR financing** on the
Certified Pre-Owned BMW you've always wanted. With offers like these,
your dream car could easily become your reality car. Remember, even
before these great offers every Certified Pre-Owned BMW is first...a
BMW. Designed to give you peace of mind. Meticulously inspected
by a BMW technician. Backed by a protection plan for up to
6 years/100,000 miles and the reassurance of Roadside Assistance.
What more could you ask for? Besides the keys. of course.
New or Certified Pre-Owned, we only make one thing.
The Ultimate Driving Machine.

BMW EfficientDynamics
Less emissions. More driving pleasure.


Certified Pre-Owned-
by BMW


2009 BMW
128i Coupe
STK#M803226A
$23,991


2010 BMW
3281 Sedan
STK#WP074556A
-_ 27,992

2011 BMW
328i Sedan
STK#MP1442
$28,994

2010 BMW
,,. 5281 Sedan
STK#MA14920A
i32,891


2009 BMW
328i Convertible
STK#MP1441
$32,994


2012 BMW
Z-4
STK#M353621A
$44,991


*BMW will make up to $1500 of the first 3 payments on Certified Pre-Owned BMWs purchased 9/4/12
through 10/31/12. "0.9% APR financing is fora limited term with approved credit for well-qualified
buyers. Must finance through BMW Financial Services. All Certified Pre-Owned BMWs advertised
exclude tax, tag, title, registration and dealer fee. Photos used for illustration purposes only. All
vehicles are subject to prior sale. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 9'9. 12.


BMW
of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
BMWinOcala.com
)00CK68


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LEASE FOR I


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-

LEASE FOR
$129 0% APR
- OFINANCING FOR
SPER MO.1 60 MONTHS*

mdddtlNZew Redesioned 2012 Volkswaaen


All lease oilers eiliude sales tax and "'Cluae tag tile reCistration and dealer fees All ea3ses are 39 months v'eirt
$47'5 due at ,gr,,rg includrg $0 secure), deposit ati-h approved crediT Ior Aell-qualieid bulern All leases are
10 000 miles per year. 20c per rrm.Ie Irereafter *0- I APR ir.ancing for 60 rmonthrsis $16 67 per monirt per $1000
borrowed wilh $0 down "0'- APR rinancinq for 72 months is S1389 per month per $1000 borrowed AlIh '-0
dcwn All offers are sj ecr to crekil approval See dealer lor complete deals Offers expire end of d3a, 9 9 2012


Volkswagen

of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
VWofOcala.com


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C14 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


Exp. Tree Climber
Dri./Lic 352-746-5129
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411
TILE, GROUT, AND
MORTAR Glazed porce-
lain tile. 50% off retail.
20x20 $18 per 16 sf case
13x13 $15 per 15sf
case. Grout mortar to
match. 352-344-4811
To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, TV ant 270-4087




Free CAT
To good home
German Shepherd/
Chow mixed,
shots, to good home
(352) 322-0770
(352) 212-1719
Free Entertainment
Center, Blond color
will fit 32" Inch TV
Good Condition
(352) 613-5023
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044


FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
leave message
if no answer
FREE KITTENS
15 weeks old,
very cute
Needs good homes
(352) 341-2219
FREE KITTENS,
Tiger Striped, 12 wks,
litter trained cute and
playful. 2 male, 1 female
(352) 216-6668
Free to Good Home
6 month old
Pitt Bull, Male
Housebroken, Friendly
(386) 589-2097
Free To Good Home: 2 yr
old male pure black an
white cat, fixed, all shots,
declawed. Very good lov-
ing cat, loves attention
and to just lay around,
please needs a home
asap great with kids,
doesn't mind dogs but
doesn't like cats....please
call me at 352-400-9756


Free
Pot Belly Pig
(352) 726-9573
Twin Mattress and Box
Spring. Clean and
excellent condition.
Free for pickup.
(352) 344-1066




LOST
3yr old brussel griffon dog
Sunday 9/2 in Inverness
at Walgreens on Inde-
pendence and Hwy 44.
Has tag, named Grimm
(352) 293-1488
LOST
Mini schnauzer 14 yrs
old very petite. Lost on
9/2 Mason Creek Rd &
Blvd Dr. Ans to Sparky
634-0271 or 634-1044
Lost
Part Persian Light
Orange Cat. Lost in Blue
Cove area of Dunellon.
Family new to Blue Cove.
Cat declawed all the way
around
(352) 445-5494


CLASSIFIED



Lost Hearing Aid. Winn
Dixie in Inverness on
8/31. Reward. PIs call
(352) 726-4194
Lost Small
white Maltese
Lost in Vicinity of
Forest Ridge & Lincoln
352-527-0783
Lost Yellow Lab on 9/6
in River Lakes Manor
off of HWY 200. Camo
collar, very friendly.
(352) 697-0828
White Chihuahua
Puppy, Female
name Angel, 10 wks
Inverness
(352) 419-9527



Found White
Chihuahua, short hair,
found on Hwy 19
Homosassa 1 mo. ago
Citrus County Animal
Services (352) 746-8400
Quaker Parrot
Found near Forest
& Stage Coach
Citrus County Animal
Services (352) 746-8400


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825

To Whoever
purchased my storage
unit #220 at Kings Bay
Mini Storage on 8/7/12.
Please call Shawn
(352) 212-8594




Sr in need of dependable
older small or Midsize car
or pk-up. Text yr/make/
mi & Price to 220-3682.
No dealers.




Forming Light Jazz
Band. All instruments
needed. Call Jay
(352) 794-3741


U-
HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
to apply in person


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"h Or# Or' '#'# -


ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com


Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT /
X-RAY TECH
Medical assistant / x-ray
tech needed for fast
paced office. Must have
3-5 yrs experience. Must
have Florida x-ray
licence. Fax resume to
352-746-4130


AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
With Venipuncture
exp. Needed for
Busy Medical Prac-
tice. Fax Resume
To: 352-270-8889 or
Call (352) 746-1515
For Information



Medical Office
RECEPTIONIST
For busy Primary
Care Office. Must
possess great cus-
tomer service skills.
Strong work ethic,
and ability to multi
task in a fast paced
office environment.
Good Benefits
FAX RESUME TO
352-382-2289


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



CAREGIVER TO ELDERLY
9 Yrs exp., Care that
makes a difference.
(352) 613-6247
Elderly Assistance
Providing all around
General Help Light
Hsekeeping., Cooking
& Dr. Visits Ref. Avail
Call Mary 352-897-5250
LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Your world first.
Every Day


x Classifieds


We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



Clean Waxed Floors
Free Estimate 344-2132



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
Remodels, Repairs,
We Do It All! Landscape
& Tractor Work. Lic./Ins
Steve/Rob, 476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
veFAST* 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748




BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
c)476-3985 (o)634-5826



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
WE HAVE MOVED
4551 W Cardinal St
Homosassa. Bring it in or
we can come to you.
352-220-4244



#1Employmentsourcecis


WWW.Chro nicleonine.coqm


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996

ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201

PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300


JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc 132549 302-9269





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.





Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Picture Perfect Photos
of Family, Pets &
Casual Weddings


& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
I'AEi~ I sl I ssssa II sssOI] I


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
ALL-IN-ONE TREE
SERVICE. Pressure
Cleaning, Painting.
We're big on small jobs.
352-406-0201
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call an time!



:n-


THE CITRUS KIA SOUL OWNERS 3


GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS


COME TO THE



CITRUS KIA


S 1itrll K IA A 1850 SE. Hwy'.19',CrYstal River',FL

It KI M JiA 352-564-8668
AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T The Power to Surprise Shop from Home @ vwww.citrusida.com
CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MASSAGE
THERAPIST

P/T Massage Therapist,
apply in person to Better
Health Chiropractic,
6166 W Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OPTOMETRIC
TECH
NW citrus. 30-38 hrs/wk.
Medical exp. required.
Fax resume to
866-897-0245.
Registered Nurses

RN's needed to perform
basic first aid at a busi-
ness near Crystal River.
Interesting/Low Stress
Work Environment. Call
888.269.6344/Fax re-
sume to 740.266.6671
Email to: nursingcorps
@yahoo.com
RESEARCH
COORDINATOR/RN

Seeking Detail Orien-
ted, computer literate
RN for Busy Clinical
Research Office
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1800P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

Looking for reliable
staff. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing expe-
rience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

RN. LPN. CNA
All Shifts, FT &PT

RN SUPERVISOR

RECEPTIONIST
Part time

ACTIVITIES COOR.
Full Time

CNA DRIVER

Health Care
Experience Preferred.

APPLY WITHIN
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility





HEALTHCARE
MARKETING REP

We need a dynamic
marketing/sales
professional to
directly market TLC
outpatient Physical
Therapy services to
both serve current
clients & recruit new
customers. Must be
experienced in
Healthcare Sales/
Marketing, willing to
travel and results
driven. Competitive
salary & benefits.
Car allowance &
Results driven bonus
structure.
Please apply online
www.therapvmamtio
bs.com or fax resume
to 352-382-1161.

INSURANCE REP

440/220 LIC. Insurance
Prior Independant
agency skills preferred.
Mail Resume to:
Box # 1797P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

P/T Administra-
tive Assistant
(Full Time Jan -April)

Must be proficient,
able to multi-task, or-
ganized and possess
communication and
computers skills with
an extensive knowl-
edge in Microsoft
Office products for a
Crystal River CPA
Firm. Qualified appli-
cants submit
resumes to
mindvlwmwccpa
.cm or send to:
P0 box 895
Inverness, FL 34452








Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Rep

Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Working a
Sales Territory within
Citrus County.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers

QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.


preferred.
* Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.

Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com

EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.


DRIVER

OTR RGN/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

Exp. Tree Climber
Dri./Lic 352-746-5129

LABORER

Must have clean Drivers
License and pass drug
test. Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1801P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.Crystal River, FI
34429






CH1KONIdE

CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE


Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel.,
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus County
Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Fax resume to:
(352) 564-2935
or apply In person at

CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant

Housekeeping

Upsale RV resort
located in Crystal River.
If Interested cl (352)
447-5820 or stop by:
10173 N Suncoast
Blvd. Ofc hrs 9a-5p

KITCHEN AND
GOLF COURSE
help needed
Apply in Person
CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf &Country Club
8690 N. Golfview Dr.
(352) 489-5045


C-i-pNIidE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHPONCLE


SOD LAYERS

Experienced Only
Apply in Person
Connolly's Sod &
Nursery
760 W. Hampshire
Blvd. Pine Springs
Plaza, Coner Hamp-
shire Blvd & 491

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced

Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean










Massage Therapy
Weekend Class
OCT 20 2012
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Rlchey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com





LAWN CARE
BUSINESS for Sale
$40,000 Call For Details
(352) 586-6685




OAK SHADOWBOX
COFFEE TABLE. Glass
top. Excellent condition.
40x19x18. $100.
527-1239




1938 WEBSTER DIC-


TIONARY Hardback,
School/office, self pro-
nunciation. $800.00
Passed down through
family. Cell 352-422-5659
cell 352-422-5659
Elvis Collection
$100
I Love Lucy Plates
$100
(352) 726-5584
Elvis, 3 stooges,
McDonalds org. 15th
Anniversay B-Day Cake
display, complete,
Lundby Doll House w/
furn., Lucy Plates. ETC.
MOVING MUST SELL
(352) 726-5584

McDonalds org. 15th
Anniversay B-Day Cake
Display, complete $100
Lundby Doll House
w/ furnishing, $100
(352) 726-5584


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





5 Person Hot Tub
New pump & heater,
Excel. condition
$1,000 cash or credit
(352) 228-7666
POOL HEAT PUMP
AQUA CAL T115
6 yrs old. Works Great
$500 (352) 637-0397




A CHAR-BROIL GRILL
2 Burner w/Side
Good Older Model
No Tank $60.00
352-601-7816
APPLIANCE REMOVAL
Free Appliance Removal
In Citrus County
352 209 5853
DRYER Whirlpool Dryer,
excellent condition.
$135.00
352-270-3772 or
352464-1591
DRYER$100. works great
90 day warranty.
Delivery extra.
Free removal of old one
call/text 352-364-6504
Refrigerator
Kenmore, Elite, stainless
steel, water, icemaker,
french door, runs great
$250. 352-746-6034
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STAINLESS STEEL AP-
PLIANCES Sears Ken-
more sidebyside refriger-
ator with ice maker and
water dispenser on
door,convection electric
range, microwave,
dishwasher; 9 months
old; Dawnmarie Forte,
352-410-0220 or
Robert Melvin,
352-586-2558/
732-898- 9648
TWO 17 C.F.
REFRIGERATORS not
fancy but work well.
$50 each. Walter@
352-364-2583
WASHER AND DRYER
white washer and dryer
works perfectly selling be-
cause Im moving $75
each call 352-4644280
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day warranty.
Delivery extra. I'll take
your old one. Call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER/DRYER
washer/dryer, white,
working condition, can
deliver in Inverness,
$200.00352-212-5286




CRAFTSMAN 10" BAND
SAW. Spare Blades &
Manual $75.00
628-3585
LADDER
WERNER 20FT ALUMIN-
IUM EXT D-1120-2,
200LBS DUTY RATED
$90, 352-726-9983




48" HD Compatable TV,
excellent condition
$250
(352) 726-7952
FREE TV 33 IN
RCA/PICTURE WENT
OUT LINDA 4194788
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
SONY 42 Rear Projection
TV Sony Stand $50.00
Great Condition
3525270324
SONY TV 33in, sound
went out. Screen Works
Good. FREE
Linda 419-4788




79 Solid Mable Cabinet
Doors & Draw fronts
stained red mahogany
great for garage or
workshop project $450.
obo (352) 726-5832
TILE, GROUT, AND
MORTAR Glazed porce-
lain tile. 50% off retail.
20x20 $18 per 16 sf case
13x13 $15 per 15sf
case. Grout mortar to
match. 352-344-4811




AC MOBILE POWER
CONVERTER FOR
AUTO, 12VDC TO 120
VAC. $25 352-726-9983
DELL P4 Desktop
w/ monitor XP office
$75
COMPAQ P4, XP
w/ monitor $90
228-0568, 628-6806
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
WILSON ELECTRONICS
301135 DUAL BAND
FLAT PANEL ANTENNA
FOR CELL PHONES $45
352-726-9983


Excellent 10 piece PVC
patio Furniture Set, $80.
Excellent Condition
(352) 726-1891
PATIO FURNITURE PVC
beige 7pc set-table,
4 chairs, lamp &
cushions $140
Call 352-344-3112
PATIO SET Rectangular
glass top table and 2
chairs. $50 Call
352-344-3112


I mletb


Traditional Couch and
2 chairs, brown & gold
paisley print 2 yrs. old
excellent condition
Asking $1,250
(352) 637-2281




21" Self Prop. Snapper
Lawn Mower
Excel. cond. $200
McLane Commercial
Grade, Gas Edger, trim-
mer excel. cond. $200
(352) 726-7952
HIGH WHEEL TRIMMER
SEARS 6.75 torque
Like New $150
(352) 560-0307
LAWN MOWER
Briggs & Straton
Like New
$750.
(352) 628-3329


I Rattan Glass top
Coffee Table. &
2 square matching end
tables Ecel cond.
$200 352-419-5363
2 Queen Anne Chairs
$150
Fl. Shell Collection $50.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274
Adjustable Bed
Craftmatic Full Size w/
massage & side rail.
Used 10 mo. Exc Cond.
Orig $3000, sell $1500
OBO. Black Spinet
Piano Exc Cond. $450
OBO (352) 422-3707
ANTIQUE DESK
Kidney shaped mahog-
any solid wood $300.
CHERRY WOOD
day bed w/ trundle
no mattress $200
(352) 613-5009
Blond dining room
table w/ 2 leaves, V2"
protective glass top &6
chairs, excel. cond. Pd.
$1,900. asking. $600.
Bedroom Suit, off white
wicker, bed, night
stand, chest of drawers,
dresser w/ mirror, like
new Pd. $2,100. asking
$800. (352) 302-6934
COFFEE AND END
TABLES new, dark
mahogany $60 for all
Walter@ 352-364-2583
COFFEE TABLES two
end tables, glass insert
coffee and sofa table.
$200 obo Call
352-344-3112
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.comn 795-0121
COUCH w/ neutral
pattern cover and large
white & green futon
$200 each OBO
352-422-8070
DESK Simple 3 drawer
desk, grey and blue.
Metal framed, light wood
colored surface. Good
condition $30
352-257-5156
DINING TABLE
ITALIAN MARBLE
Sacrifice at $500.00, 3
pieces of solid marble.
Can e-mail pic's.
352-513-4027
ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Real wood, ch stain glass
door, holds 27" non
HDTV + more. Beautiful
$95 746-7232 LMSG
ETHAN ALLEN COFFEE
TABLE Vintage Antiqued
Pine $75.00
(352) 3824911
ETHAN ALLEN END
TABLES Vintage Heir-
loom Collection $95.00
(352) 382-4911
FULL MATTRESS Full
size mattress in good
condition. Does not in-
clude box spring or
frame. $30 352-257-5156
High End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Curved Desk
$150.
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
Lazy Boy Loveseat
$125.
2 Custom Valances
$75.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274
LOVE SEAT COUCH
Flower design.Great
condition/call for picture
$100 Linda 4194788
LOVE SEAT Reclining
love seat earth tone col-
ors, good condition. $75
352-257-5156
Lt Oak Tone Table 42"
sq. w/ 18" leaf, 4 micro-
fibr. ulpol light oak
swivel arm chairs $600.
57" Oak Bar w/ built in
cab. & drawer for bev-
erages & glasses $350.
(352) 726-7952
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
Bush Office desk, Ig.
steel cab., computer,
sm. file cab., Liv. rm.
sofa, 1 coffee, 1 end
tbl., vanity set, lamp,
mattress & boxspring
(352) 527-0347
Pair of Sofa's/ Will sepa-
rate quality like new,
England/Lazy Boy
golden neutral w/ floral
box pleated skirts,
pillows, 93"L, Must See!
Bargain $375. both
$199 ea (352) 503-3914
Picard, Queen Anne
Dining Room Table 2
leaves, 6 chairs, buffet
paid $4,000 Sell $950.
Secretary Desk, old,
$300. (352) 270-8249
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS.
Queen mattress, box spr-
ing and frame in good
condition. $60
352-257-5156
Silk Flowers,
vases, supplies $75.
Misc. Decor. Items
$125.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274
Single size white
Platform Bed
with storage, almost
new mattress $150
(352) 344-1441
SOFA/LOVESEAT Italian
leather beige. Excellent
condition.$500 Call
352-344-3112
SOLID PINE GUN
CABINET needs small
repair $20 Walter@
352-364-2583
STAND/CART ON CAST-
ERS. For TV, micro, etc.
27W, 18D, 30H Open
shelf & closed cabinet un-
derneath. $20 341-3607


!!!!!!!235/75 R15!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
"*""225/75 R15"""*
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
::::::::::::::R19.5::::::::::::
Good tread!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
2 CAR GARAGE DOOR
SCREEN, White $80
(352) 465-4037
10 x 14 Repo Shed
w/ Garage Door (352)
860-0111,941-623-3742
1979 TRANS-AM Ready
for restoration. Extra
body parts included. En-
gine ran 18 months ago,
$1200.00 or best offer.
352-200-1459
27" TV old tube style not
wide screen remote
doesn't work $25
563-1073


ATUSDAY EPTfIMBER 8, 2012 C* *


CLASSIFIED




powered Craftsman.
needs minor work. $15
obo. 352-637-2647
POWER HEDGE TRIM-
MER, WARDS 13 INCH,
$20 352-726-9983
TELESCOPING TREE
PRUNER AND SAW
CUTTER, "ACE" 7FT TO
14FT REACH, LIKE
NEW $75 352-726-9983
Weed eater, electric
trimmer $20. 230HP
Electric Blower/
Vaccum wall attach.
$40 (352) 726-7952




BEVERLY HILLS
FAMILY YARD SALE!!
FRI & SAT 9-2.
CANOE, ELECTRIC
SMOKER, MINI FRIDGE,
CLOTHES, HOUSE-
HOLD ITEMS, ETC.
**95 S BARBOUR ST**
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
Moving Sale, Indoor
Din. rm. st., blond tbl 6
chairs, excel. cond. rat-
tan bd rm st., 5 pc. like
new., leather love seat
& chair. & Misc. Items
9 LAURENSHIRE STREET
BIG SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat., 8am to 2pm
Dinning Rm. Table &
chairs, collectible
glass, Hummels,
antiques, jewelry tools
& More! behind Olive
Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81
CITRUS HILLS
Kensington Estates
Saturday 9/8 8am- Until
Huge sale! Fishing,
Collectables, Tools,
Antiques, Jewelry.
201 N Brighton Rd.
CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE ESTATE SALE
Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
8a-4p
Entire woodworking
shop, tools, antiques,
guns, artwork.
A pickers paradise.
961 N Hollywood Cir
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday Only 7-12p
kids items, TV's, appli-
ances, Sewing Mach
2158 N Cedarhouse Ter
CRYSTAL RIVER
Storage Unit Liquida-
tion
Fri. Sat. Sun. 8a-4p
Furniture, antiques,
clothing, collectibles
NE 4th St Storage
Unit, corner of NE 4th
St and 3rd Ave
FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale. Sat. & Sun
Everything goes cheap
8980 S. Meredith Ave.
HOMOSASSA
4 Private Storage Units
SATURDAY SALE In
Industrial Park Accross
from Howards Flea Mkt,
Weather Permiting
HOMOSASSA
Sat. Only Sept 8, 8am
11639 W. Riverhaven Dr
INVERNESS
6701 E.Lowden Fri/Sat
8-1 Household & misc
items, Adult tricycle.
INVERNESS
Friday & Saturday,
Tools, Furn., Train sets,
exercise equip,
outbrd mtr. FINAL SALE
Everything Must Go!
4055 E. Jessie Lane
INVERNESS
Indoor Estate/ Moving
Sale of Lake Home,
Fri. Sat. & Sun 9a-2p
1431 S. WATER VIEW DR.
To end, through gates
(352) 726-5584
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help feed
veterans
MEADOWCREST
Fri, Sat & Sun 8-4
Dining Room and Bed-
room sets, household
items, tools, lots more.
6517 W Cannondale Dr
PINE RIDGE
Indoor Moving Sale
Fri. & Sat. 8a-2p
Furn. Hshold, ham
radio and MUCH MORE
3729 N. Pony Drive
WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE ESTATE SALE
Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
8a-4p
Entire woodworking
shop, tools, antiques,
guns, artwork.
A pickers paradise.
961 N Hollywood Cir

INVERNESS
Friday & Saturday 8-4
Household, furniture,
tools, collectibles,
antiques and much,
much more. Everyth-
ing must go.
10409 E Twila Court.




MENS CLOTHING
PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529


GREG BENNETT COR-
SAIR BASS P/J STYLE
PICKUPS METALLIC
RED "NEW" $80
352-601-6625
PIANO
ROLAND DIGITAL F90
Sacrifice at$450.00 OBO,
Excellent for student. Can
e-mail pic. 352-5134027




KING COMFORTER Re-
versible navy, red. Ex-
cellent condition. Used
only few times. High loft.
$25 341 3607
SOARING EAGLE New
in box.Was 59.95/selling
for 20.00 Linda 419-4788
TWIN BEDDING 2 red
box-pleated (not ruffled)
bedskirts & 2 red pillow
shams. $12 for all
341 3607


ANIMAL CLIPPER
ANDIS model AG2 2
speed/uses A5 blades
seldom used works exc
$80. 352-270-3909
AQUARIUM
25 gal tall, glass,
perfect house for a little
critter. $25
746-7232 LMSG
BAKERY
EQUIPMENT
20 qt Hobart mixing
mach. w/stainless steel
bowl & accessories,
1 tabletop sabrett hotdog
cart, pizza tray, screens
and much more.
(954) 647-0472
BIKE mans 26 inch. mon-
goose MGS GCH 6.5 8
speed. $72.00
352-637 2499 Inverness
Children's Play House
24x16 wood, w/ electric.
Attached swing set.
Great Condition $500
OBO. 2 per hot tube, like
new $375 OBO
352-794-3410
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE PANTS, JEANS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK like new File
drawer printer shelf $75
563-1073
DOUBLE CEMETERY
CRYPT Located in Veter-
ans Wall in Fountains
Memorial Gardens. 2
openings/closings incld.
Bargain price of $5000.00
for whole pkg. Call Maria
at 352-212-7533
DRYWALL STILTS 15"
to 30" Never Used.
Call Ray@464-0573
Fridge 18.2 Kenmore
2yr. old mint cond., $300
Hunting Dog Hauler
alum. 48x48x24 dbl door
$250
(352) 419-6669
GLASS PATIO SLIDING
GLASS DOOR no hard-
ware five panel measures
6 1/2 by 27 ft $99
352-249-4460
LANTERN/NEW IN BOX
Was $44, selling for $15
Linda 419-4788
QUICK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fits 10' by 10'
Popup canopy
$40.00 Call
Ray@464-0573
RIDING MOWER Old Not
running $50.Craftsman
563-1073
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529
Submersible pump
2 wire & 3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
TANNING BED
Price Is Right
No Room
$225.
(352) 503-7411
VERTICAL BLIND light
beige with hardware
61/2 by 45 ft $75
352-249-4460
VINTAGE WICKER TEA
CART, excellent condi-
tion, place for pitcher and
glasses, also has hand-
les, $95, (352) 465-1813




ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Used to transport mo-
torized wheelchair on
rear of vehicle. Asking
$800.00. 352-746-5672
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH. LIKE
NEW $75 352-726-9983
Harmar Mobility
Model AL500
$900. obo
(352) 228-9058
Ladies Bicycle
Schwinn
Never Used
$100.
352-341-1714
Motorized
Wheelchair/Scooter Lift
Transport for rear of car
$250. firm
Call Rita 5-8pmn
(352) 795-9756
Walker- folding to 5"
brand new, light
weight alum. cost $76.
asking $40., 527-0004
Walker Invacare,
3 wheel, brakes,
basket, $65.
Wheel Chair, invacare,
like new $100. both
excel cond. 341-1714




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" MITCHELL
ACOUSTIC GUITAR,
GIGBAGTUNERSTRAP&MO
RE!$85(msrp$399)
352-601-6625
12 SPEAKER
ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
COMBO AMP LIGHT-
WEIGHT & POWERFUL
$75 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR wow
solid spruce
6 string $100
352-586-4226
AMPEG BA-108 BASS
AMP 25WATT W/ 8"
SPEAKER SMALL BUT
POWERFUL $65
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
sg copy black $100
free bag/amp
352 586 4226
ELECTRIC GUITAR
strat copy $100
free amp/bag
352 586 4226


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,# ,A- ,# A-r A A- <


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted
2 Horse Trailer
rough condition okay
Small 10ft boat trailer
Honda Generator
2 or 3K, 2 x 6 Lumber
and 1 x 6-5/4
Call Jim (352) 445-0788
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944



3 Male Yorkies, $650.
1 Male Morkie $500.
1 Male Shorkie $500.
ckc, fl. health certs.,
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BENGAL CUB CATS
10 weeks old, TICA
registered, FI Health
Cert, shots up to date.
1 Spotted Snow Sepia,
1 Horizontal Flowing
Marble. $200 each
352-601-5362
BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Sept 9, 9-4, Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
toys, Fruit/Nut
Treat, Cage Wire 8260
Adrian Dr.
Brooksville 727-517-5337
BLUE CRESTED
AMAZON
Breeding pair of 6 yr old
parrots. Talkative, cute
and very tame. They
have been together
since birth. 3 Cages: 1
large indoor, 1 med out-
door and 1 travel
Illness forces sale
Total $3000
210 2-2a8 rTA4 a-6


TWIN BEDDING Whales
& dolphins. Comforter,
bedskirt, shams, sheet
set, wallpaper border.
$40 341 3607




GAZELLE EDGE exer-
cise glider 4 function
cardio workout computer
track spd, dist, mi+cal
$75 746-7232




Beacon Cruiser
Red upland 26" girls
bicycle. $60
(352) 419-5669
BOW
Hoyt "Trykon" XL
Viper Sight, Stabilizer,
Loop, Peep, Quiver,
Rest, 6 ACC arrows,
$300 352-527-2792
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
COMPOUND BOW-
PSE Compound Bow, left
handed, with upgrades,
$125. Firm.
(352)4194108
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
Saturday 8th 11 am,
$35. (352) 419-4800
Gravity Esprit,
58 CM, 21 speed,
Mens Hybrid bicycle,
computer, etc.
excel cond. $185.
(352) 344-5933
HI-POINT CARBINES
NEW IN BOX HI-POINT 9
MM CARBINES, $285.00
& HI-POINT 45 AUTO
CARBINE, $318.00,
NEW GLOCK 22 GEN 4
40 S&W $490.00 PHONE
352447-5595
Reebok Inversion
System, asking
$125
Call for Details
(352) 344-1413
Stevens 12 gauge, dbl
barrel shot gun. model
311A excel. cond. $350
Lefever Nitro Special
16 gauge, dbl barrel
shot gun good cond.
made 1927 $425.
(352) 344-5283

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238




4 x 6 Covered
Utility Trailer
5 yrs. old, like new
Paid $,1,500
Sell $1,000 obo
(423) 584-2665 Cell
4 x 8 Utility Trailer
Good Tires Needs a
little work$325.
75 Paver Bricks $25.
(352) 503-6149

UTILITY TRAILER
10ftX5ft
4 Ft loading ramp
single axle $800
(352) 207-5946

UTILITY TRAILER
5' x 8' triple crown lawn
trailer. Mesh sides, rear
gate, good condition, new
spare $675 obo
(352) 860-1106




WOODEN PORTACRIB
Collapsible, casters, 4"
mattress, fitted sheet.
$40 341 3607


Sell r Swa


SCARLET
is a curly-coated re-
triever mix, we think.
She is about 4 years
old and weighs 46
pounds. She is
Heartworm-negative
and also housebro-
ken. Lively and ener-
getic, can jump a
4-foot fence, so
would need a yard
to run with a high
fence. Very affec-
tionate and
well-mannered, as
well as beautiful, with
a curly, shiny black
coat.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




Your World










CI- iR CLE


I male, a WKS on
9/23/12
$400.
Health Cert. 1st shots,
Judy (352) 344-9803







SIMON

"Simon is a 1-year-old
neutered male
Border Collie/Bulldog
mix. He is Heartworm
negative and house-
broken. Very friendly
and loving,
energetic and very
playful, also beautiful.
Would be great with
kids. Would also like
to be your lapdog
even though he
weighs about 48
pounds. Walks well
on a leash and gets
along with other
dogs. Found as a
stray. Call Joanne at
352-795-1288."


Livestock


S- ^ A- I, "A-

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


M mAllA-*1A-


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
HOMOSASSA
2/1/1/2, No Pets $500
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/1%', Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
New Remodel, 2/1, V2
Acre, Rent to Own Opt.
$525.mo 352-503-7020
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182

-I.T .T if 1
r17E11FI


14x60 Fully Furnished
2BR/2BA MH. Close to
Bike Path. Roof over, car-
port, screen room, shed
and remodelled kitchen &
baths. Parking for trailer
or boat. Excellent Shape.
$10,000.Oasis MH Park,
Inverness. Lot rent
$205 Call
815 986 4510 or cell
779-221-4781
2/3 MFG HOME
Remodeled,
on 2.9 AC, paved road, 3
sheds, CHA $63,500
Lease/option,
352-302-4057


CAI 4YTK ULU MALl
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, lO0wks BIk. &
Cream, Choc. &
Cream Males &
Females, Health Certs,
Champ. bloodline,
perfect markings $200
& up (352) 795-6870







C16 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012




WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Yank on a bathtub drain stopper (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
SIand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Karate school magic power (2) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Promote French novelist Marcel (1) syllables in each word.
I 1 102012UFS Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS
4. "Burnt" crayon-hued sawed wood (2)


5. Your niece's brother's garbage (2)


6. State highway patrolman video folly (2)


7. Turning one's back on education (2)


9-8-


ONINHVfl ONINHfldS 'L HHdOOlaf HdOOHI "9 3SflaXH SA43HdHN "s
H iaa fl'I 38H iLSflOHd sooa 8s OPOIAT OPO(I -* 9md 91i 1
12 SIIH aSNV


S1li


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rM'.p~


FULLY INSURED

CBC1252474

WILL CONSTRUCTION BEST

352-628-2291 20 V
www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com 15isears -


BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




INVERNESS
3/2, CHA, 3 sheds,dock
boat access. Section 8
Welcome. Water serve.
incl'd. 813-244-0627




HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217





Leek
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926
Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090






RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHonmeRentals.comn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S. Tyler (BH) .........................$550
2/1 Nice housein Beverly Hill with
aoodsized rooms and coz FFloda room
45 W. Kentwod PI. (CS) .............$1200
3/2/2 Includes pool/lawn service,
newer home available now
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N. Sneca Pt. (CR)..............1200
2/2 Waterfrort DW mobile in Crystal Rver
furnished with great screened n porch
11640 Bayshoe (CR). 1..SI300
Island condo, great watervew, furrnshed
HOMOSASSA
2306 Sndburg P. (H) ..................$500
2/1 Duplex, close to Homosossa &
Crystal River, W/D HookUp
5865 W. Vikire Path (H).................. 25
3/2/1 Cozyhome, Ig yard
close to Rock Crusher Elementary
24 E. Cyess Blvd. (H) .$1100
3/2/2 Beauhful home with nice iews
in Sugarmdill Woods COMING OCT 31 ST
CITRUS HILLS/LECANTO
3441 E. Chpel (HER) ........$600
1274 Cypress Cove Ct. (INV)...........$625
2/2 5 Townhouse close to town
and the interstate, community pool


FLORAL CITY
1/1, $400/Mo. $400/Sec.
Incls, septic water, trash
No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644

Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice, clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




HERNANDO
1,000 sf Office Space
486, Cit Hills 341-3300




CITRUS HILLS
2/2V2, Car Port FURN.
(352) 613-5655
CRYSTAL RIVER
Furnished 1/1 w/pool.
$775/mo. Very clean,
flex terms, new couch,
flat scrn, ent cntr, bed
& more.Off 19 N of air-
port. Call 813-240-0408.




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like new 2 BR/2 BA,
All Appl, W/D,Tile. $625.
Call: 954-557-6211
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & garbage
incl. No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
2/1/CP $550 mo. $250
sec. 707 Emory Street
(352) 895-0744 Cell




HERNANDO
1/1 Furnished, Clean
$125/wk. $475 sec $600
Moves In.352-2064913


Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
cottages 1/1, All util.
incl $650. 386-208-2495

Rent House


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 & FL. RM.
10 N. Barbour
$550. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 +1/1 Many Extras
$450, (352) 382-3525
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Very clean,quiet
neighborhood, F/L/S
(352) 249-7033

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, W/D $750. + sec.
2/1 W/D $600. + sec.
Both Super Clean
352-489-2266, 322-5073
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 /2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1, Close to shops
garb & Pest control
incl'd $700. 1st &sec.
(352) 201-7676
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River &
Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 Villa at
SUGARMILL WOODS
No Pets $700
352 489-0937
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. CHA,
W/D hk up, frnt. & back
screen porch, corner
lot w/ privacy fence
$750. 1st., last $250 dep
(352) 419-6957

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
201-9427

INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$700. (304) 444-9944
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $750. mo
+ util (330) 337-9637




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Real Estate
For Sal


b AlE b SALE: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


CLASSIFIED


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660





HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprings $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884

MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497





6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900

2/1/CP ALL NEW:
Kitchen, bath, appli-
ances, paint in/out,
carpet. 1180 sq ft liv,
$36,900.
(352) 527-1239

2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884





3 Bedroom, 2'1 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master,
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239,900
(352) 860-0444





Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192





HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

INVERNESS
2BR/1BA/1. Cute brick
fenced home. Newer
roof & CHA, scrn porch.
$49,500 Cash or ap-
proved conventional loan
only. Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940

REDUCED!
2/1/1, with den, Fire-
place, block home,
near Croft, $44,900.
(352) 344-4192





Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118,000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169




CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need UST-

INGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOT,VERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$65,000.CALL
(352)513-5001

WaerBBBnt
Homes^^^


06261 W OAKLAWN
HOMOSASSA, FL
2.5 ACRES VACANT
$35,000/BEST OFFER
WILLING TO TRADE.
CALL TODAY!
786-298-7825


, F.


Condition, original miles
119,000 highway, main-
tained by dealership,
$9000.00 352-527-2763
GMC
1988 Suburban
3/4 Ton 4 x 4
$1,800 obo
(352) 228-9058
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! "*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
MAZDA
'02, Miata Conv. GL,
dark green, tan,
leather, 100K miles,
boise radio, PW, PL,
showroom cond. $8,500
Must See 352-527-7867


Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
V2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710




2 Wave Runners
2 seat & 3 seater
w/Trailers.
Large Child's ATV
$950 for All Three
All need a little work
727-207-1619 Crys. Riv.
AQUA SPORT
20 FT., 140 Suzuki, 4 strk,
tan, axel alum trlr. hy-
draulic starring. ready
to go $3,750. 621-0392
CONCEPT
1997, 22ft, 6 In. CC
225HP, EFI Merc., SS
Prop. Alum. Tan. Ax. trlr.
cust. Interior, & cover
new gauges, dual bat-
teries, all safety equip.
life jackets & anker,
$10,900 .(352) 795-4674
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
MIRROR CRAFT
16 ft Fishing Boat
40HP Mercury, Minn Kota
trolling motor, $3200 obo
(352) 3444537
SEARS
12 FT. JON BOAT,
6hp Johnson Motor.
$550
621-0392
SPORT FISH
28ft, twin Volvo turbo die-
sel, tower, pilot, GPS,
turn key $19,500.
(352) 978-0658
TRITON
Fish & Ski 2000, 18ft,
w/200 HP Yam. Eng., &
Troll mtr., Pwr. Ster., tilt &
trim, new trlr. tires,
includes water skis,
tubes & life vest $3,900.
352-726-4943. 201-4512




JAMBOREE

'05, 30 ft class C Motor
home. Excellent Cond.
Ford V10 20K miles,
NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
352-746-9002
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/s1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ SPORTSMAN
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 8, air & bath
$7,800
(352) 249-6098
Travel Trailer
2000 21 ft Sunline,
Solaris light,
series M2053.
Exc Cond $4425
(352) 344-2927 or
447-1244



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892






CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548
FORD
2003 Thunderbird Great


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



- a II


LEXUS
'05 ES 330, 131k miles
1 owner $10,500
(352) 212-6179
luckylorra@aol.com
SCION TC
2005, Alloy Wheels, Auto,
AC, Power winds, locks,
mirrors, cruise cont. New
brakes & tires. Exc Cond.
$7900. (352) 527-2792
SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel, cond.
$13, 300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555


FORD '00
'00, Ranger, XLT, 4 WD,
step side, ext. cab.
4 DR 125K $5,600
(352) 422-7863

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments k
Financina For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVY
'00, Blazer LT,
Power Window, AC,
Nice, $2,300 obo
(352) 860-0420
DODGE
'98, Caravan, Reliable
$1,100 obo
(419) 303-0888 cell
Crystal River
HONDA '00
CRV, 117K, great gas
savor, full pwr, extraclean
$5,200 o (352) 257-4251
c (352) 794-6069
JEEP
2003 Grand Cherokee
Limited Ed. Black, Sun
Roof. Exc Cond in/out.
Great A/C $7500 obo
746-8631 or 212-2814




FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907


248-0908 SACRN
Wolfe, Donald C. File No: 2012-CP-493 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-493

IN RE: ESTATE of DONALD C. WOLFE,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Donald C. Wolfe, deceased, whose date of
death was July 22, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is September 1, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Representative:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Myron K. Brashears /s/Michael Mountjoy,
Esquire 2745 West Elm Blossom Street 209 Courthouse
Square Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar Number: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
September 1 & 8, 2012.


249-0908 SACRN
Violet M. Phillips File No: 2012-CP-494 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CA-494
IN RE: ESTATE of VIOLET M. PHILLIPS,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of VIOLET M. PHILLIPS, deceased, whose date of
death was July 18, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is September 1, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative Co-Personal Representatives:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. Kenneth R. Mills,
5920 N. Hazelwood, Beverly Hills, FL
Michael Mountjoy, Esquire Nancy L. Alford
209 Courthouse Square 508 Palma Cela Point
Inverness, FL 34450
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar Number: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
September 1 and 8, 2012.


250-0908 SACRN
9/19 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicless,
vessels) will be sold at


Mee^tingB
Notice


public auction, Free of all
prior liens, per FL Stat.
713.78, at 10:00 AM On
September 19, 2012, at
Tropical Window Tinting,
1612 Suncoast Blvd.,


Homosassa, FL 34448,
phone 352-795-3456. No
titles, as is, cash only.
2000 PONTIAC
VIN# 1G2JB5243Y7153667
September 8,2012.


252-0908 SACRN
9/10 Attorney/Client Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in Special Meeting for the
purpose of conducting an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION on Monday, September 10,
2012, at 11:30 am, in the Board Room, Administration Annex Building, Citrus Memorial
Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of commenc-
ing an attorney/client session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The
purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss all pending Citrus County
Hospital Board litigation cases. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open
session and subsequently commence the attorney/client session which is estimated
to be approximately one and half (1.5) hours in duration. At the conclusion of the
ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION, the meeting shall be reopened per public notice.
Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows:
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board Members:
Robert Henigar
David Langer
James Sanders
Joseph Brannen
Sandra Chadwick V.
Reddy, M.D.
Robert Collins
Ralph Abadier, M.D.
Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
Court Reporter
September 8, 2012.


253-0908 SACRN
9/8 Board Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board of Directors will hold a special meeting
on Monday, September 10, 2012, at 11:30 am, in the Board Room, located on the
second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 High-
land Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the meeting will be to convene Board
for the purpose of litigation strategy session/settlement negotiations of CCHB litiga-
tion (pursuant to Fla. Stat. 286.011) and CCHB fund transfer and Budget expenditures
consistent with transfer.
This agenda item will initially be open to the public, the litigation session will be
closed to the public. The Board will reconvene after the litigation session and such
will be open to the public.
September 8, 2012.


251-0908 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Rcti-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of:
Pinelands Conference A
Elca Ministerium, located
at: 9425 North Citrus
Springs Blvd, Citrus
Springs, FL 34434, in the
County of Citrus intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State, Talla-


hassee, FL.
Dated at
Durnellodbn,
Florida, this 5th day of
September, 2012.
/s/DcrneM.
Kchler,
Owner
Published one (1) time in
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 8,2012.


YAMAHA
2001 Grizzly 600 4x4, like
new, 395 miles, $3200
352-746-9618



Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
Harley Davidson
2003 Anniv edition Fat
Boy 12k mi, Vance &
Hines exhaust, wind-
shield & bags. Beautiful
$10,500 (352) 586-0510
HONDA
2008 Full Size Shadow.
Harley looks, Chrome,
Leather bags, $5700.
C.R. (727) 207-1619
MOTOR SCOOTER
2007, 250CC,
very low miles,
$1,000. obo
(352) 220-8454
VIRAGO
'95, 700CC, showroom
cond. driven monthly
1,128 miles, $2,800
(352) 465-9015
VW TRIKE
VW Trike New Runs
Great Great Price
$6000.00 352-344-9340
Phone

'1 11 I
S Iu I I list.



Classifieds




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 EDGE SEL
$33,095 MSRP
-200 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-1,500 Ford SCRB Cash

*29.8795


2013 EXPLORER XLT


$38,705
-305
-1,500
-1,500


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Ford SCRB Cash


w G2T040 uT0 4
2012 F-150 SUPER CAB XLT
$34,640 MSRPo2013 ESCAPE SEL
-340 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount S32.845 MSRP


-1,500 XLT Chrome Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-1,500 FMCC

*29,800


-465


Special Added Discount


-1,000 Retail Customer Cash


*31.3


0


A4 1i 4 q tei d Lei Ed i A l SITi I C


'00 FORD FOCUS LX '02 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS IS '00 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Loaded Signature series, 76,000 miles
$3,950 $5,950 $6,950


'05 HONDA ACCORD LX '06 CHEVY COBALT LS
$8,950 $8,950
L.,-- ,


'07 KIA LX OPTIMA
V6
$8,950


'04 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
Signature
$10,950
IS


'07 MERCURY MILAN '06 NISSAN XTERRA
$10,950 $10,950



'09 FORD FOCUS SE '09 FORD ESCAPE XLT
1 owner
$11,950 $12,950


'12 HUYNDAI SANTA FE '12 HUYNDAI TUCSON
$18,950 $18,950


Nick
Call Toll Fre
877-795-73
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCO


Nicholas

-- Crystal River *
1 1 Nihoa


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
*Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit.
Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all
buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/1/12.


LN.com


- LINCOLN

C ti v M ai l


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 C17


oh, I -7- I




C18 SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 8, 2012


r-)


ii,


FF \


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


'2013 CHEVROLET
!MALIBU


*37 MPG
* Eco Boost
*E Assist


*Rear Backup
Camera
*8 Airbags


BRAND NEW MALIBU STARTING AT PER MO
$ 17999g$229


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


S,,, .w ,** *~
~~*0-
.-, I


2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT


YOU PAY PER MO
*21,999 $289+
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


*15999
9OT A LEASE. Y(


U


YOU PAY PER MO
$21,9999 $275
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


2012 CHEVROLET CAMARO


PER MO YOU PAY PER MO
$199 I211999 $ *289
U OWN IT!I NOT A LEASE. YOU OWN IT!


uI me


I AM I ,


'


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


CRYSTAL -
N I CHEVROLET
CrystalAutos.com 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515
++$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER.*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSIS-
TANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE
EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65%
000CLV APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


I;:


C =


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:<1