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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02875
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-31-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02875

Full Text





I FRIDAY4


CITRUS COUNT Y






www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community -Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 118 ISSUE 24


Power outage
hits Chronicle
Due to a severe
and prolonged power
outage at the Chroni-
cle's Meadowcrest
offices, coverage will
be limited. The
Chronicle apologizes.
Flags fly at
half-staff for
astronaut
Gov. Rick Scott
has ordered flags be
flown at half-staff at
all local, state and
federal buildings
today as a mark of
respect for the mem-
ory of astronaut Neil
Armstrong. This is
pursuant to the presi-
dent's proclamation.
Martin slaying
case gets
new judge
ORLANDO -A
13-year judicial vet-
eran has been as-
signed to take over
the second-degree
murder case of a for-
mer neighborhood
watch leader ac-
cused of fatally
shooting a Florida
teenager.
Judge Debra S.
Nelson was assigned
George Zimmerman's
case Thursday, a day
after an appeals court
granted his attorney's
request for Judge
Kenneth Lester to
disqualify himself.
Attorney Mark
O'Mara had asked
the court earlier this
month to overturn
Lester's decision not
to leave the case.
O'Mara contended
that the judge made
disparaging remarks
about Zimmerman's
character and advo-
cated for additional
charges against him
in setting his $1 mil-
lion bond in July.
Unions dealt
setback in
prisons fight
TALLAHASSEE -
Public employee
unions are mulling
their options after a
judge refused to re-
open a lawsuit chal-
lenging Florida's plan
to privatize prison
health care.
Officials with the
Florida Nurses Asso-
ciation and American
Federation of State,
County and Munici-
pal Employees, said
on Thursday they
had not yet decided
what to do.
The groups chal-
lenged a budget pro-
vision calling for the
privatization.
Circuit Judge Kevin
Carroll refused to rule
last month because
the budget provision
expired July 1.
Options for the
unions include ap-
pealing or filing a
new lawsuit.
-From staff and wire reports


Com ics ........ C7
Community . . . .C5
Crossword ........ C6
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment . B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C7
Obituaries . . . .A6
Classifieds . . . .C8
TV Listings . . . .C6


6Il IlIII 8478 2002


Romney rallies


Associated Press
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney waves to delegates Thursday after speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

Presidential nominee asks Americans to 'turn the page' on President Obama


Associated Press
TAMPA
Lifted by a show of Republican unity
that once seemed so distant, Mitt
Romney plunged into the presi-
dential campaign's final 67 days focused
more than ever on jobs and the economy,
and depicting President Barack Obama as
a well-meaning but inept man who must
be replaced.
"America has been patient," he told the
nation. "Americans have supported this
president in good faith. But today, the
time has come to turn the page."
Obama, who will hold his own conven-
tion next week, served notice that he will
use his powers of incumbency to make
Romney's mission hard. Obama planned
to visit a Texas military base exactly two
years after declaring the end of the U.S.


combat mission in Iraq, the war that
haunts the last Republican president.
This, as Democrats prepare to gather in
Charlotte, N.C., for Obama's convention.
Romney capped a high-energy night
closing the Republican National Conven-
tion with a spirited and unusually per-
sonal speech infused with his family life,
touching on his Mormon faith and re-
counting his youth. The cheers were loud
and frequent, surely music to the ears of a
candidate who struggled throughout the
bruising primary season and beyond to
bury doubts among many in his party that
he was the authentic conservative in the
field.
"Now is the time to restore the promise
ofAmerica," Romney declared to a nation
struggling with unemployment and the


Page A2


Isaac continues soaking La.


Water released

from storm-

stressed dam

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Isaac
soaked Louisiana for yet another
day and pushed more water into
neighborhoods all around the
city, flooding homes and forcing
last-minute evacuations and res-
cues. New Orleans itself was
spared, thanks in large part to a
levee system built after Katrina.
As the storm slogged its way
across the state and windy con-
ditions calmed, the extent of
some of the damage became
clear. Hundreds of homes, per-
haps more, were underwater,
thousands of people were stay-
ing at shelters and half of the
state was without power. About
500 people had to be rescued by
boat or high-water vehicles, and
at least two people were killed.
And the damage may not be
done. Officials were releasing
water from an Isaac-stressed
dam at a lake near the
Louisiana-Mississippi border,
hoping to ease the pressure.
They had also started work on a
levee breach in hard-hit Plaque-
mines Parish. In Arkansas,
power lines were downed and
trees knocked over as Isaac


Associated Press
Residents evacuate a flooded neighborhood Thursday in LaPlace, La.


moved into the state.
Farther south, where evacua-
tions were ordered ahead of the
storm, Isaac's unpredictable,
meandering path and the
amount of rain as much as 16
inches in some places caught
many off guard.
"I was blindsided, nobody ex-
pected this," said Richard
Musatchia, who left his home in
LaPlace, northwest of the city.
Musatchia said 5 feet of water
filled his home before a neigh-
bor passed by with a boat and
evacuated him and his 6-year-
old boxer, Renny
He piled two suitcases, a back-
pack and a few smaller bags onto
the boat and said that's all he has


left. He left a brand-new Cadil-
lac and a Harley-Davidson be-
hind.
"People have their generators,
because they thought the power
would go out, but no one ex-
pected the water," he said.
Others trickled into a parking
lot of the New Wine Christian
Fellowship church, delivered by
National Guard vehicles, school
buses and pickup trucks.
Daphine and David Newman
fled their newly decorate home
with two trash bags of clothing.
They have lived in their subdivi-
sion since 1992, and they never
had water in their home from
See Page A2


Speakers hit chord with

state committeeman


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
If Ann Romney's goal in mak-
ing her speech Tuesday on the
first full day of the Republican
National Convention in Tampa
was to enhance her husband's
image, she hit her mark with a
county resident.
"She gave a different impres-
sion than I ever had about Mitt
Romney," said Homosassa resi-


Bob
Hagaman
attended RNC
on Tuesday.


See Page A2






Landfill


to recycle


concrete

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Citrus County Solid Waste Management
plans to start a concrete recycling pro-
gram at the Citrus County Landfill.
This new program was discussed Tues-
day at a meeting of the Citrus County
Board of Citrus County Commissioners
during a public hearing to adopt fees, as-
sessment rates and an emergency fee
schedule for Solid Waste for the upcom-
ing financial year.
Casey Stephens, director of Solid Waste
Management, said this program would
help not only residents, but save the
county money
"We are trying to offer another service
to customers of the landfill and at the
same time produce a product we can use
internally at the landfill."
The pilot program would work by ac-
cepting clean concrete from local con-
tractors and builders with no tipping fee
for clean material. A $90 relocation fee
would apply for any waste in the load
other than concrete.
The landfill would stockpile the con-
crete until a sufficient amount accumu-
lates to crush it into aggregate, a building
material to be used at the landfill or for


PageA2





A2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012


ROMNEY
Continued from Page Al

slowest economic recovery
in decades.
Polls suggest a to-the-
wire campaign finish. The
two men will spend the
next 10 weeks in a handful
of competitive states, none
more important than
Florida and Ohio, and meet
in one-on-one debates
where the stakes could
hardly be any higher.
The campaign themes
are mostly set. Romney de-
picts the president as a
once-inspiring but disap-
pointing figure who doesn't
understand job-creation or
ordinary Americans' frus-
trations. Democrats por-
tray Romney as a man
shifting ever rightward in
the absence of core convic-
tions, and a wealthy pluto-
crat who can't relate to the
middle class.
Hanging over the cam-
paign is a big number: the
nation's 8.3 percent unem-
ployment rate. It is
Obama's biggest impedi-
ment to a second term. Re-
publicans seem to be
banking on the notion that
it will bring Obama down if
Romney simply presents


RNC
Continued from Page Al

dent Bob Hagaman. "Her
speech made him more real
to me. I had found him to be
standoffish, but now I know
him to be a really warm per-
son."
Hagaman attended the
convention on Tuesday and
Wednesday as a state com-
mitteeman and alternate
delegate.
Listening to Ann Romney,
Hagaman said, gave him a
lot more confidence and en-
thusiasm.



CONCRETE
Continued from Page Al

other county projects.
Stephens said the land-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


himself as a competent al-
ternative.
Strikingly absent from
Romney's campaign, in-
cluding the three-day con-
vention in Tampa, were
detailed explanations of
how he would tame deficit
spending while also cutting
taxes and expanding the
armed forces. He seems to
be asking voters to trust his
ability to create jobs and to
make tough, unpopular de-
cisions later.
Romney used his biggest
moment yet in the spot-
light, Thursday's televised
acceptance speech, to put a
softer glow on his business
record and to make short
work of a conservative
checklist that is now less
important as he pursues
swing voters.
He briefly hailed "the
sanctity of life," but did not
mention "abortion," illegal
immigration, or even
Ronald Reagan by his first
name.
Romney's speech also
omitted many of the sharp
barbs that he and his allies
often throw at Obama.
"I wish President Obama
had succeeded, because I
want America to succeed,"
Romney said. "But his
promises gave way to dis-
appointment and division.

"I wanted Romney for
president before her
speech, but now I'm much
more excited about the
prospect," Hagaman said.
Other speakers impressed
convention-goers, too.
New Jersey Gov Chris
Christie's keynote address
on Tuesday resonated with
Hagaman.
"He speaks forcefully,"
Hagaman said. "He talked
about how New Jersey was
a hopeless case when he be-
came governor, but they got
things moving in a positive
direction now."
Christie cited many of his
obstacles that were consid-

fill would contract with a
company to bring a con-
crete crusher into the land-
fill once or twice a year to
crush the concrete down to
aggregate. The concrete re-
cycling program will begin


... We deserve better."
He repeated his claim
that Obama can't lead
America out its economic
doldrums because he has
no business background.
"Jobs to him are about
government," Romney said.
The relatively toned-
down rhetoric was a shift
from Romney's taunt, only
two weeks ago, of "Mr.
President, take your cam-
paign of division and anger
and hate back to Chicago."
Thursday's gentler tone
by Romney might simply be
a nod to reality. Polls re-
peatedly find that voters
find Obama more likable
than Romney. Romney's
convention message was:
It's OK to like Obama even
as you fire him.
Of course other top Re-
publicans, and Romney
himself, might revert to rip-
ping into Obama, espe-
cially if they don't see polls
moving in Romney's direc-
tion soon in the 10 or so
states up for grabs.
Democrats hope their
convention in Charlotte
will, at a minimum, neu-
tralize any GOP bounce out
of Tampa.
Obama seemed equally
willing to avoid bombastic
rhetoric for a while. He
told Time magazine he

ered insoluble problems.
But with each solution he
remarked, "We did it." As
New Jersey governor, he
faced the challenge of bal-
ancing a budget with an $11-
billion deficit, which he said
he accomplished for three
years in a row with lower
taxes.
Wisconsin Congressman
Paul Ryan, the Republican
Party nominee for vice pres-
ident, also gave an impres-
sive presentation.
"Ryan covered all the
things we need to do to get
the country back on track,"
Hagaman said. "When
you're at the convention,

Oct. 1.
The BOCC unanimously
passed both the assessment
rates for Solid Waste Man-
agement and for the Solid
Waste residential assess-
ment roll for the new finan-


hoped his re-election
would help end the politi-
cal stalemate in Washing-
ton, much like "popping a
blister."
The president also said
he wants to do a better job
of explaining how his poli-
cies will help boost the
economy
Obama planned to cam-
paign this weekend in
Ohio, Colorado and Iowa.
Romney planned to cam-
paign Friday in Virginia,
Saturday in Ohio and both
days in Florida before tak-
ing a couple of days to rest
while Democrats start their
quadrennial show in Char-
lotte.
Like any presidential
challenger, Romney must
do two things: Make voters
willing to oust the incum-
bent, and make himself an
acceptable replacement.
In Thursday's address,
Romney seemed to assume
Americans have already
cleared the first hurdle, weary
of high unemployment.
"What America needs is
jobs, lots of jobs," Romney
said. "To the majority of
Americans who now be-
lieve that the future will
not be better than the past,
I can guarantee you this: if
Barack Obama is re-
elected, you will be right."

people are wandering back
and forth all the time. But
when Ryan spoke, every-
body sat down and paid at-
tention."
No convention for Haga-
man would be complete
without a mishap. Another
newspaper published a
photograph of a bus full of
Republicans that got stuck
down a narrow street in St
Petersburg while trying to
find the convention. Haga-
man was a passenger on
that bus.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.

cial year.
For more information
about the new concrete re-
cycling program, call the Di-
vision of Solid Waste
Management at 352-527-
7670.


ISAAC
Continued from Page Al

wind directions, we was
ground zero."
As officials called for im-
promptu evacuations, a de-
bate started about whether
anyone was to blame.
Jefferson Parish Council
president Chris Roberts
said forecasters at the Na-
tional Hurricane Center
needed a new way of meas-
uring the danger Many sec-
ond-guessed evacuation
orders, he said.
"The risk that a public of-
ficial has is, people say, Aw,
it's a Category 1 storm and
you guys are out there call-
ing for mandatory evacua-
tions,"' Roberts said.
Hundreds of people in
lower Jefferson chose to
ride out the storm and
many of them had to be res-
cued, he said.
Eric Blake, a hurricane
specialist at the National
Hurricane Center in Miami,
said although Isaac's cone
shifted west as it zigzagged
toward the Gulf Coast, fore-
casters accurately pre-
dicted its path, intensity and
rainfall. He did say the
storm crept ashore some-
what slower than antici-
pated.
Blake also said local offi-
cials and residents should-
n't use Katrina as a guide for
what areas were at the
greatest risk of flooding dur-
ing Isaac.
"Every hurricane is dif-
ferent," Blake said. "If you're
tryingtousethelasthurricane
to gauge your storm surge
risk, it's very dangerous."
Along the shores of Lake
Pontchartrain near New Or-
leans, officials sent scores of
buses and dozens of high-
water vehicles to help evac-
uate about 3,000 people as
rising waters lapped against
houses and left cars
stranded. Floodwaters rose
waist-high in some neigh-
borhoods.
A Coast Guard helicopter
hoisted a couple and their
dogs early Thursday from a
home in LaPlace, between
the Mississippi River and
Lake Pontchartrain, after
storm surge poured into
their neighborhood and


local authorities called for
help. The couple was taken
to New Orleans and re-
ported in good
condition.
To the east, evacuations
were ordered in a sparsely-
populated area as the lake
dam threatened to break.
Officials in Tangipahoa
Parish, La., feared the water
would pour into the already
swollen river and flood
places downstream.
Louisiana Gov Bobby Jin-
dal said the controlled re-
lease should prevent a
significant flooding event
A tow truck driver was
killed Thursday morning
when a tree fell on his truck
in Picayune, Miss., just
across the state line from
Louisiana. In Vermilion
Parish, a 36-year-old man
died after falling 18 feet
from a tree while helping
friends move a vehicle
ahead of the storm.
Deputies did not know why
he climbed the tree.
President Barack Obama
declared federal emergen-
cies in Louisiana and Mis-
sissippi late Wednesday,
allowing federal aid to be
freed up for affected areas.
In southeast Arkansas,
winds gusted to more than
40 mph and heavy rainfall
fell, knocking down trees
and power lines in Chicot
County The small farming
town of Eudora lost power.
In neighboring Ashley
County, a handful of dead
trees were scattered across
roadways, according to
County Judge Emory
Austin, who said he was
worried about flooding.
"We need the rain, I just
don't need a lot,"Austin said.
Isaac arrived seven years
after Hurricane Katrina and
passed slightly to the west of
New Orleans, where the
city's fortified levee system
easily handled the assault
"Unfortunately, that's not
been the case for low-lying
areas outside the federal
system, in particular lower
Jefferson and Plaquemines
parishes," said Louisiana
Democratic U.S. Sen. Mary
Landrieu. "Hurricane Isaac
has reinforced for us once
again just how vulnerable
these critical areas are. We
must re-engage the Corps of
Engineers on this."


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Page A3 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


TH roTATE Astronauts stymied by bolts


Citrus County
BOCC honors injured
service member
Citrus County commission-
ers presented a proclamation
at their regular meeting on
Aug. 28, proclaiming the day
as "Lance Corporal Joshua
Langston
White Day"
in Citrus
County.
James
Langston,
grandfather
of Cpl.
White, ac-
Joshua cepted the
White proclama-
tion on behalf of his grandson.
Cpl. White, a Crystal River
native, was the victim of an
improvised explosive device
(lED) earlier this month while
on patrol in the Kajaki District
in the Helmand Province,
Afghanistan, and suffered se-
rious injuries from the blast
resulting in the amputation of
both legs, and serious
wounds to his abdominal
area, lungs and arms.
While recovering in the
Walter Reed Medical Hospi-
tal, Cpl. White was presented
with the Purple Heart.
Authorities looking for
dog that bit woman
A woman was bitten by a
stray dog on Friday, Aug. 24,
while she was in the area of
Vince Drive in Citrus Springs.
The dog was described as
small to medium in size and
solid brown in color with
white on its chest and neck. If
the dog is not found, the
woman faces undergoing a
series of rabies shots.
Anyone who has any infor-
mation or knows the where-
abouts of this dog is asked to
call Citrus County Animal
Services at 352-746-8400
immediately.

Ocala
Man gets 180 days in
jail for stealing candy
Ajudge has sentenced a
21-year-old homeless man to
180 days in jail for stealing $2
worth of candy.
Delvis Rodriguez-Ramos
- already on probation for
theft pleaded guilty
Wednesday to taking Twix
and Snickers bars from an
Ocala store.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported an employee noticed
the candy missing Saturday.
Rodriguez-Ramos denied
taking the candy, but returned
to the store Monday and con-
fessed. The employee asked
him to come back Tuesday to
talk about it. When Ro-
driguez-Ramos showed up,
the employee called police.
Rodriguez-Ramos told the
Star-Banner he had not eaten
in a few days and was hungry.
But the Marion County
judge asked why Rodriguez-
Ramos didn't try to find a job
or seek help from a homeless
shelter. The judge also fined
Rodriguez-Ramos $500.

Miramar
School closes without
paying teachers
A South Florida charter
school has closed its doors
leaving teachers without their
last paycheck.
The Miami Herald reported
teachers knew the end was
near for Miramar's Parkway
Academy, but didn't expect to
be stiffed of their final month's
pay.
The Broward school district
voted in March to close the
517-student school. Officials
cited the school for eight
years of subpar performance
and accused it of using un-
certified teachers in some
classrooms.
School officials sought a
ruling from an administrative
judge that allowed them to re-
main open. Earlier this
month, the judge sided with
the school district.


A statement from Parkway
said they're in the process of
liquidating assets.
-From staff and wire reports


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL -
Sticky bolts proved too
much for spacewalking as-
tronauts Thursday, forcing
them to leave a new power-
switching box dangling from
the International Space Sta-
tion instead of bolted down.
It was a major disap-
pointment for NASA's
Sunita Williams and
Japan's Akihiko Hoshide,
who spent hours struggling
with the bolts. They used all
sorts of tools and tactics as
the spacewalk went into
overtime, but nothing
worked.
With time running out,
Mission Control finally told
them to tie down the box
and head back inside. The


work will be left for a future
spacewalk, presumably
sometime soon.
"We'll figure this out an-
other day," Mission Control
radioed.
Thursday's spacewalk
was supposed to last 6 1/2
hours but stretched past
eight hours. It ended up in
NASAs top 10 list for longest
spacewalks at the No. 3
spot.
The power router is one
of four, and NASA stressed
that the other three all of
them redundant are
working fine. Nonetheless,
the electrical system will
need to be reconfigured at
the 260-mile-high lab given
Thursday's failed effort
The old box started acting
up last fall, and NASA de-


ON THE NET
NASA: http://www.
nasa.gov/mission_
pages/station/main/
index.html

cided to replace it before it
failed altogether This was
the first spacewalk by Amer-
icans since the final shuttle
flight a year ago.
Williams and Hoshide had
trouble getting the old unit
out because of two sticky
bolts, and they found metal
shavings in the area. They
squirted in compressed ni-
trogen gas to clear the holes,
and some debris came out.
But still, the bolts wouldn't
go back in to secure the new
box. None of the tools


seemed to do the trick.
The frustration level
mounted as the minutes and
hours ticked by At one
point, Mission Control ra-
dioed, "We've tried almost
every backup we have on
this stupid bolt"
Putting in a new switch-
ing box was the No. 1 prior-
ity of the spacewalk. In
separate work, the astro-
nauts managed to hook up
one power cable and get an-
other cable halfway con-
nected. They never got
around to replacing a bad
camera on the space sta-
tion's big robotic arm.
Mission Control did its
best to cheer up the space-
walkers as they re-entered
the space station. "You guys
are rock stars, just so you


know," Mission Control said.
It was the second space-
walk in less than two weeks.
On Aug. 20, two Russians
worked outside the orbiting
complex, installing shields
to protect against microme-
teorite strikes.
It's no longer common for
astronauts to step into the
vacuum of space. That's be-
cause after almost 14 years,
the space station is virtually
complete. Plus NASAs shut-
tles are retired and now mu-
seum pieces.
Williams is the lone
woman among the space
station's current six-person
crew. She and Hoshide ar-
rived at the space station a
month ago, launching from
Kazakhstan aboard a Russ-
ian rocket.


.ore rooms for rehab


^! ^
*^ L ,
'I
.f/


j #K-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Diamond Ridge Health & Rehabilitation Center admission coordinator Jo Lea Shadley speaks with Withlacoochee Technical Institute Certified
Nursing Assistant student Kyle Grossi on Wednesday evening at an open house. The Beverly Hills facility has opened 22 private rooms that will
be used for short-term patient care for individuals recovering from surgeries such as knee or hip replacement or open-heart surgery, Shadley said.

Lecanto facility shows addition, services to local officials


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The demand for more privacy
in rehabilitative care has caused
a local care center to add more
rooms at its facility.
Diamond Ridge Health and
Rehabilitation Center is adding
44 private rooms to its therapy
section, bringing the total num-
ber of rooms to 52, according to
administrator Sue Korman.
"We're now waiting on a piece
of paper a letter from the
state before we can have people
use them. We expect this to hap-


The 120-room facility at 2730 W. Marc
Knighton Court in Lecanto assisted living,
physical therapy and skilled nursing services.


pen in September," Korman
said.
The 120-room facility at 2730 W
Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto
offers among other things as-
sisted living, physical therapy
and skilled nursing services, ac-
cording to Korman.
The sprawling facility also
caters to dementia patients.
Wednesday evening, officials at


the facility opened their doors to
the public and county officials to
showcase the addition and the
services available.
"Over the years, a lot of the
doctors and others who use our
therapy services have been say-
ing more private rooms were
needed. There was growing de-
mand and people love privacy,
you know, having their own space


even if their stay with us is brief,"
Korman said.
She said the length of stay for a
rehab patient at the facility can
range from seven to 100 days.
Korman said when the facility
first opened in 1989 at the site
that is tucked away behind the
hubbub of County Road 491, it
had 60 rooms. In 1994, another 60
were added.
"Now we have added 44. We
have been growing since we
opened," Korman added.
Chronicle reporterA.B. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


'Littles' get a little back-to-school help


Big Brothers Big Sisters hosts

event for children and mentors


Special to the Chronicle
Big Brothers Big Sisters
hosted the annual back-to-
school match event for "Lit-
tles" (children) and their
"Bigs" (mentors) in Her-
nando and Citrus counties.
The event took place on
Aug. 9, at Ernie Weaver Park
in Brooksville.
Nearly 30 "Bigs," "Littles"
and family members from
both counties attended the
event along with several Big
staff members and a family
whose child is waiting to be
matched with a "Big."
This was an opportunity
for children in the Big
Brothers Big Sisters pro-
gram to meet and interact
with other matches, while
celebrating the start of a
new school year
"Bigs" and "Littles" par-
ticipated in arts and crafts
activities, played on the


playground and with sports
equipment, and had dinner
together
Pepsi donated drinks for
the event, and Big Brothers
Big Sisters provided pizza.
Each child in attendance
was also given a backpack,
provided by Pepsi in
Brooksville, filled with
school supplies.
For as little as a couple of
hours a couple of times per
month, volunteers can add
joy to the life of a child, and
ultimately, contribute
greatly to his or her poten-
tial. Together, "Bigs" and
"Littles" do simple, every-
day activities, such as going
to a sporting event, playing
a game, going to a park, or
watching movies.
Volunteers don't have to
change their lives to change
the life of a child.
The main office, Big
Brothers Big Sisters of


Special to Chronicle
Citrus County Big Brother Mike Cunneen and his "Little" David, age 12, recently attended
a back-to-school event in Brooksville with other area Bigs and Littles.
Pinellas County, serves chil- Learn how to can make a or by calling 727-518-8860. To
dren in Pinellas, Hernando difference by going to talk to a Big Sister, call Sheri
and Citrus counties. www.bbbspc.org/volunteer Chancey at 352-422-1329.





A4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012



Robbery


suspect


nabbed

Chronicle

A Crystal River man
was arrested Tuesday on a
charge of robbery without
a weapon, a day after he
jumped into another
man's car and took off
with his belongings, ac-
cording to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office re-
port.
On Monday, Teneric
LeCorn, 32, of NE 5th
Street, reportedly jumped
into the passenger seat of
a man's car as the motorist
halted at a stop sign at the
intersection of NE 5th
Terrace and 8th Avenue.
According to LeCorn's
arrest affidavit, he then
told the driver to proceed
to the RaceTrac gas sta-
tion on State Road 44. The
driver told investigators,
LeCorn demanded money
and CDs. He said LeCorn
went through his belong-
ings and took his loose
change and two CDs. The
man said LeCorn kept a
hand in his pocket
throughout, but never
brandished a weapon.
At RaceTrac, LeCorn
reportedly exited the car
and went inside the store
and soon left the area.
The driver's descrip-
tions and those of other
witnesses at the store of
the suspect matched
video footage of LeCorn.
LeCorn returned to the
store Tuesday where in-
vestigators arrested him.
His bond is $10,000.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Anthony W. Wilson, 57,
E. David Street, Inverness, at
10:46 p.m. Wednesday was ar-
rested on a charge of driving
under the influence (DUI). Wil-
son was reportedly stopped for
a traffic infraction and deputies
smelled alcohol on him. He al-
legedly failed field sobriety
tasks. Bond $500.
Arrests
Gabrielle Renee
Berenger, 19, E. Amity Street,
Inverness, at 11:40 a.m.
Wednesday was arrested on a
charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
Katey Renee Fincham,
19, of Crystal River, at 11:45
a.m. Wednesday was arrested
on a charge of domestic bat-
tery. No bond.
Marc Adam Smith, 40, of
Inverness, at 9:55 p.m.
Wednesday was arrested on a
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Michael Anthony
Valenza, 28, of Beverly Hills, at
8:21 a.m. Thursday was ar-
rested on a charge of domestic
battery. No bond.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:31 p.m. Aug. 19
in the 30 block of Beverly Hills
Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 9:50 a.m. Aug. 20 in
the 300 block of N. Dunfries
Point, Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 5:20 p.m. Aug. 20 in
the 2300 block of W. Gardenia
Drive, Dunnellon.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 6:27 a.m. Aug. 21 in
the 3700 block of S. Red Eagle
Terrace, Homosassa.
A vehicle burglary was
reported at 7:57 a.m. Aug. 21 in
the 700 block of N. Charles


Avenue, Inverness.
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 12:06 p.m. Aug. 21 in
the 100 block of N. Apopka
Avenue, Inverness.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 1:04 p.m. Aug. 21 in
the 50 block of Roosevelt
Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 5:43 p.m. Aug. 21 in
the 500 block of W. Main
Street, Inverness.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 9:30 p.m. Aug. 21 in
the 5700 block of S. Power
Terrace, Homosassa.
Vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:29 a.m. Aug. 28 in
the 1800 block of W. Tacoma
Street, Hernando.
Vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:33 a.m. Aug. 28 in
the 4100 block of E. Parsons
Point Road, Hernando.
Vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 9:09 a.m. Aug. 28 in
the 8800 block of N. Delene
Terrace, Crystal River.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 10:49 a.m.
Aug. 28 in the 5300 block of S.
Cherokee Way, Homosassa.
Vehicle burglary was re-


For the RECORD
ported at 9:29 p.m. Aug. 28 in
the 3500 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
Thefts
M A felony retail theft was re-
ported at 8:51 a.m. Aug. 17 in
the 6700 block of W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 2:05 p.m. Aug. 17 in the 900
block of Hawk Crest Lane, In-
verness.
A grand theft was reported
at 3 p.m. Aug. 17 in the 80
block of S. Adams Street,
Beverly Hills.
A grand theft was reported
at 5:34 p.m. Aug. 18 in the
9200 block of N. Elliot Way,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft was reported
at 5:39 p.m. Aug. 18 in the
4400 block of W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported
at 10:11 a.m. Aug. 20 in the
3400 block of E. Hartley Court,
Hernando.
A grand theft was reported
at 10:22 a.m. Aug. 20 in the 10
block of Meadowdale Street,
Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:51 p.m. Aug. 20 in the


4100 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 4:16 p.m. Aug. 20 in the
1000 block of E. Withlacoochee
Trail, Dunnellon.
A grand theft was reported
at 6:21 p.m. Aug. 20 in the
5600 block of S. Woodside Ter-
race, Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 6:41 p.m. Aug. 20 in the
10000 block of W. Main Street,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 11:53 a.m. Aug. 21 in
the 6800 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:11 p.m. Aug. 21 in the
5400 block of S. Mildred
Terrace, Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 1 p.m. Aug. 21 in the 7800
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was reported
at 1:48 p.m. Aug. 21 in the
5000 block of W. Southern
Street, Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:51 p.m. Aug. 28 in the
6600 block of S. Florida Av-
enue, Floral City.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


-= 7 Fictitious Name Notices...................................C12

M meeting Notices............................... ................. C12

Lien Notices.................................... .................. C12

Miscellaneous Notices.....................................C12

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices................C....C11

Notice to Creditors/Administration...................C11

SSelf Storage Notices............................................C11


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


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favorite lamp from wasn't


advertised in the Chronicle...





You might still be in the dark.


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Call 352-563-5655


A larceny petit theft was
reported at 2:28 p.m. Aug. 28 in
the 5500 block of S. Glenn
Acres Terrace, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:40 p.m. Aug. 28 in the
4000 block of E. Dawson Drive,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:30 p.m. Aug. 28 in the
6200 block of W. Pine Ridge
Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
Vandalisms
MA vandalism was reported
at 12:17 a.m. Aug. 19 in the
2300 block of N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
MA vandalism was reported
at 10:14 p.m. Aug. 19 in the
4000 block of E. Parsons Point
Road, Hernando.
SA vandalism was reported
at 2:24 a.m. Aug. 20 in the
2100 block of S. Adams Street,
Beverly Hills.
SA vandalism was reported
at 11:05 a.m. Aug. 20 in the
12000 block of W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River.
SA vandalism was reported
at 2:08 p.m. Aug. 21 in the 700
block of S.E. 5th Terrace, Crys-
tal River.


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Republican rising stars out in force at RNC


Associated Press

TAMPA It's Mitt Rom-
ney's show. But New Jersey
Gov. Chris Christie rocked
the house. Florida Sen.
Marco Rubio was the talk of
the town. And Wisconsin
Rep. Paul Ryan's rising-star
status was blinding as he ac-
cepted the party's vice pres-
idential nomination.
"We can get this country
working again. We can get
this economy growing again.
We can make the safety net
safe again. We can do this,"
Ryan told cheering dele-
gates at the GOP convention
Wednesday night. "What-
ever your political party,
let's come together for the
sake of our country. Join
Mitt Romney and me."
Amid the applause for
Ryan was the sound of the
future. The Republican
Party's next-generation lead-
ers were in ample supply at
the GOP's convention as they
positioned for national roles
and, perhaps, even their own
shot at the White House in
four or eight years.
After victories at all levels
of government in the past
few years, the GOP has a
deep bench of up-and-
coming governors, senators
and, it seems, even House
candidates. It's diverse, too,
for a party that faces serious


Associated Press
New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, left, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie were among the GOP's rising stars to address
the Republican National Convention this week in Tampa.


demographic challenges -
particularly among Hispan-
ics in a country that's be-
coming more multicultural
by the day
"Growing up, I never imag-
ined a girl from a border
town could one day become
a governor But this is Amer-
ica," said New Mexico Gov
Susana Martinez, the na-
tion's first Latina governor
Condoleezza Rice, the
first black female secretary
of state, reminded delegates
that she had grown up in the
segregated South. "My par-
ents taught me to never give
up," she said, "and to always
believe that my future could


be whatever I dreamt it to
be."
It's little wonder, then,
that next-generation Repub-
licans got plum slots behind
the convention podium.
"In 2020, someone that
you see speaking in a promi-
nent role today is probably
going to be on the ballot,"
said Lew Oliver, a Florida
delegate from Orlando.
The Republican marquee
represents "the emerging
faces of the conservative
cause," said former Florida
Gov Jeb Bush, a potential fu-
ture presidential candidate
- like many others in atten-
dance. He made the com-


ment this week as he sat be-
tween Martinez and another
first-term governor, Brian
Sandoval of Nevada. Both
are Hispanic, and talked
about often in GOP circles
as the future of the party.
Should Romney win in
November, Ryan automati-
cally would be considered
the next leading prospect for
the GOP nomination. Other
Republicans on the rise
could find themselves in the
new administration. Some
could end up being key po-
litical allies in presidential
battleground states. And oth-
ers could emerge as intellec-
tual leaders within the party.


A Romney loss this fall to
President Barack Obama
would -perhaps as soon as
the day after the election -
set off a mad scramble
among countless Republi-
cans to emerge as the next
presidential nominee.
Among those considered
likely to weigh a run:
Ryan, the Wisconsin
congressman and federal
budget specialist who will
have had one national polit-
ical campaign under his
belt. His relative youth may
serve as a bridge between
generations, as he noted in
his speech when he wryly
compared his iPod playlist


to Romney's: "I hope it's not
a deal-breaker, Mitt, but my
playlist starts with AC/DC
and ends with Zeppelin."
Christie, the New Jer-
sey governor, who delivered
a rousing keynote address
Tuesday night and last year
decided against a 2012 run.
Bush, the oldest son of
President George H.W Bush
and brother of President
George W Bush, who has long
rejected overtures to run.
Rubio, the Florida sen-
ator and Cuban-American
who has spent the past year
working to boost his na-
tional political profile.
There are countless oth-
ers talked about- and they,
too, were on hand.
New Hampshire Sen.
Kelly Ayotte, South Dakota
Sen. John Thune and Vir-
ginia Gov Bob McDonnell
all received polite recep-
tions. Rice, a party favorite,
was buzzed about as she sat
in the Romney family's pri-
vate box and later ad-
dressed the delegates.
Wisconsin Gov Scott
Walker, who gained national
attention for his fight against
his state's public employee
unions and for defeating a re-
call effort, delivered a robust
speech in which he said that
Romney, like himself, under-
stands that "people, not the
government, create jobs."


Isaac kept Gov. Scott away


from Republican convention


Associated Press

PENSACOLA On the
final morning of the Republi-
can National Convention,
Gov Rick Scott was as far
away from Tampa as he could
get without leaving the state.
Scott showed up in Pen-
sacola, reassuring tourists
that they shouldn't let Hur-
ricane Isaac wash out their
Labor Day weekend plans.
It was windy and rainy, but
Scott was telling visitors to
come on down to the coast.
"We look forward to hav-
ing full hotels again," Scott
said. "We want to make sure
everyone knows how nice it
is here in Florida."
This wasn't supposed to
be how Scott spent his week.
Instead the Republican Na-
tional Convention was going
to give Scott a chance to
bask in the political lime-
light as the GOP governor of
the home state which just
happens to be the biggest
swing state. Scott didn't
have a primetime speaking
slot, but he was still sched-
uled to address delegates.
It would have been the
crowning moment for Scott
who bucked the Republican
establishment, spent mil-
lions of his own fortune and
defeated their candidate en
route to the governor's man-
sion two years ago. Scott
made one of his first forays
into politics by spending
money on ads criticizing the
federal health care over-
haul pushed by President
Barack Obama.
But the intrusion of Isaac
spoiled those plans and
forced Republicans to scut-
tle the first day of the con-
vention when Scott was
scheduled to appear. And
even though the storm
caused only isolated dam-


Associated Press
Gov. Rick Scott missed a chance to bask in the political
limelight of the Republican National Convention because of
Hurricane Isaac.


age in Florida, Scott stayed
away from many of the ac-
tivities taking place at the
convention site and around
Tampa.
Instead he visited other
parts of the state impacted
by Isaac like Palm Beach
County. He spent time tout-
ing tourism in Key West and
then Pensacola.
So it was Lt. Gov Jennifer
Carroll not Scott who was
given the spotlight when
Florida delivered its 50 del-
egates to Mitt Romney. It
was U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio -
and former Gov Jeb Bush -
getting interviewed time
and again by national media
about Mitt Romney and Re-
publican politics.
Scott did spend time with
Florida Republicans on
Monday but instead of firing
up the delegates about the
convention he was telling to
them about the bands of
Isaac skirting by the Tampa
Bay area.
Tampa's Democratic
Mayor Bob Buckhorn, who
kept trumpeting the conven-
tion as a way to spur future
growth and business for the


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region, praised Scott's deci-
sion to sidestep much of the
convention. Scott and Buck-
horn talked in the days lead-
ing up to the convention
when it appeared that Isaac
was going to pass closer to
the Tampa Bay area.
"I think he did exactly
what he should have been
doing," Buckhorn said.
"Both he and I have said
from Day One that public
safety trumps politics."
But while Scott may not
have gotten as much na-
tional exposure for his poli-
tics, his decision to avoid
much of the convention
hoopla may help with
Florida voters. Polls have
shown that Scott has strug-
gled to win over a majority
of voters since becoming
governor.
Rep. Will Weatherford,
the incoming Florida House
speaker, said focusing on
the storm was a better way
for Scott to spend his time
than "yucking it up" with
other Republicans.
"I think it's his finest week
as governor," said Weather-
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GOP calls for broader gun


rights, unlimited clips


Associated Press

TAMPA Republicans
have strengthened the pro-
gun-rights portion of their
party platform, including a
new call for unlimited bul-
let capacities in guns, in a
defiant response to criti-
cism that followed recent
mass shootings at a Col-
orado cinema and an Ari-
zona congresswoman's
gathering.
The 2012 platform, ap-
proved this week by GOP
convention-goers who nom-
inated Mitt Romney for
president, also endorses
"stand your ground" rights
for gun owners. That legal
concept, which says gun
bearers don't have to re-
treat if they feel threatened
in a public place, drew na-
tional attention after Feb-
ruary's fatal shooting of an
unarmed Florida teenager
by a neighborhood watch
volunteer
Republicans tradition-
ally embrace gun rights in
their quadrennial party
platforms. The one ap-
proved this week went far-
ther than those of 2004 and
2008.
Gun control advocates
see it as an audacious an-
swer to calls for firearms
restrictions after a gunman


killed 12 people in Col-
orado last month, and an-
other gunman killed six
people in Tucson, Ariz.,
early last year. Gabrielle
Giffords, then a Democratic
congresswoman holding an
outdoor meeting, was
gravely wounded in the
Tucson assault.
"Gun control only affects
and penalizes law-abiding
citizens," the 2008 Republi-
can platform said. This
year's platform adds: "We
oppose legislation that is
intended to restrict our
Second Amendment rights
by limiting the capacity of
clips or magazines."
The shooters in Colorado
and Arizona used large-ca-
pacity weapons capable of
firing many rounds quickly
The 2004 GOP platform
said "law-abiding citizens"
should have the right "to
own firearms in their
homes for self-defense."
This year's platform sup-
ports "the fundamental
right to self-defense wher-
ever a law-abiding citizen
has a legal right to be."
It calls for federal laws
"that would expand the ex-
ercise of that right by al-
lowing those with
state-issued carry permits
to carry firearms in any
state that issues such per-


mits to its own residents."
Dan Gross, president of
the Brady Campaign to Pre-
vent Gun Violence, said
that, by making these
changes, Republican lead-
ers have "put themselves
farther out of touch with
their constituents."
His group supports bans
on large-capacity weapons,
which it says are "designed
to shoot a lot of people
quickly and efficiently."
David Keene, president
of the National Rifle Asso-
ciation, told the NRA News
that the 2008 GOP platform
"was perhaps the most gun-
friendly platform that any
party had ever adopted,"
and "this year's Republican
platform is even stronger in
terms of dedicating a major
party to the protection of
the Second Amendment."
Presidential nominees,
not to mention the general
public, often ignore party
platforms. Top Republicans
in Tampa, however, im-
plored the public to study
the 50-page platform
document.
"We invite Americans to
consider this platform a
call for dramatic change
in government," Virginia
Gov Bob McDonnell said in
his convention speech
Tuesday


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NETWORKS


STATE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 A5





A6 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012


Enough sleep key


for college students


Some schools

have nap class
JUSTIN POPE
AP Education Writer

As college students return
to campus in the coming
weeks, they'll be showered
in the usual handouts of
coupons, condoms and
credit cards. But some
schools are also giving stu-
dents what a growing body
of research reveals could
make a huge difference in
their college careers: ear
plugs, sleep shades and
napping lessons.
College health officials
are finally realizing healthy
sleep habits are a potential
miracle drug for much of
what ails the famously fraz-
zled modern American col-
lege student: anxiety,
depression, physical health
problems and more than
most students realize ac-
ademic troubles. Some stud-
ies have found students
getting adequate sleep aver-
age a full letter grade higher
than those who don't.
But adolescent bio-
rhythms make it hard
enough for college students
to get the sleep they need, a
recommended nine hours.
On top of that, campus life
turns out to resemble a giant
laboratory experiment de-
signed for maximum sleep
deprivation: irregular
schedules, newfound free-
dom, endless social interac-
tion, loud and crowded
housing, late-night exercise
and food washed down by
booze, coffee and energy
drinks. Campuses pulsing
with energy at midnight by
mid-afternoon resemble
Zombie U., with students
dozing off in library chairs,
on yoga mats and even in
coffee shops.
Technology isn't helping,
with wireless Internet
adding to the 24/7 distrac-
tions and students sleeping
with their smart phones on.
That likely helps explain
data showing college stu-
dents got about eight hours
of sleep in the 1960s and '70s,
seven by the '80s, and, ac-
cording to more recent sur-
veys, closer to six these days.
Campaigning last week,
even President Barack
Obama told some students
at an Ohio State University
diner he assumed "you guys
have arranged it so you
don't have really early
morning classes." No such
luck. 'Actually, I failed that,"
one student replied, telling
the president he had one at
8 a.m. the next day
Now, some counselors
and health officials are try-
ing to get the message out in
creative ways. At tiny Hast-
ings College in Nebraska,
student peer educators plop
down a bed in the middle of
the student union, dress
themselves in pajamas, and
talk to passers-by about
sleep. Macalester College in
Minnesota publishes a "nap
map" listing the pros and
cons of various campus
snooze sites. And many
schools are offering semi-
nars on napping (basic les-
son: short naps work better).
The University of
Louisville is even planning
a campus-wide "flash nap"
- think of a flash mob but
with sleeping, not dancing
- later in the school year
("We have to arrange in it
advance so our public safety
folks know it's not an epi-
demic of something," said
director of health promo-
tion Karen Newton).
Still, given the scope of
sleeping problems, what's
surprising is such efforts
are exceptional. Major,
campus-wide campaigns ap-
pear rare or non-existent
Experts said professors
(and doctors) aren't always
good sleep role models. As
for deans and administra-
tors, many seem hesitant to
tell parents who've just
dropped $50,000 on tuition


Sleep tips for
college students
Exercise regularly, but
not after the early
evening. Avoid caffeine
after 2 p.m. Try to avoid
late-night eating and al-
cohol, but don't go to
bed hungry, either.
Don't use electronics -
laptops, tablets, smart
phones, etc. late at
night. Not only will the
content stimulate your
brain, the brightness of
the screen is compara-
ble to a morning walk
in the sun when it
comes to waking you
up.
Make your bed a place
just for sleep. Don't
study, watch TV or do
anything else there (or
not much else. Some
colleges advise limiting
your bed to the "three
S's" sleep, sex and
sickness).
E If you have early
classes on some days,
try not to sleep in on
the others. Experts say
a regular schedule is
the most essential ele-
ment of a healthy sleep
routine.
Try to avoid naps, and
if you do nap, nap be-
fore 3 p.m. and for no
more than 20 minutes.
Otherwise you'll keep
yourself up at night.
Set your alarm clock -
but for the evening, at a
reasonable bedtime.
That way, you're less
likely need it in the
morning (if you need
an alarm clock to wake
up feeling rested, you're
not sleeping enough).
-Associated Press

the big push on campus this
year will be for everyone to
sleep more.
While awareness is grow-
ing, at most schools sleep ef-
forts amount to a few posters
on campus or perhaps a few
lines in a quickly forgotten
talk during orientation week
While about three-quarters
of college students have indi-
cated occasional sleep prob-
lems, the latest National
College Health Assessment
found about the same pro-
portion reported receiving
no information from their
school about sleep (though
it's possible, in their sleepi-
ness, some forgot).
"The average student is
functioning with a clinical
sleep disorder," said LeeAnn
Hamilton, assistant director
of health promotion and pre-
ventive services at the Uni-
versity of Arizona,
describing research con-
ducted on students there.
They average about 6.5
hours per night (though stu-
dents tend to over-report in
such surveys). But sleep time
and quality measurements
declined over the course of
the academic year, while
anxiety, depression and con-
flict with family, friends and
roommates all rose. Hamil-
ton's office has been sending
students a "Snoozeletter"
with sleep tips.
As described by junior
Sara Campbell, residence
hall life at UA makes it hard
even for students trying to
sleep constant late-night
chattering, visitors coming
and going, early morning
cleaning crews running their
vacuums. She aims to be
asleep by 12:30 or so but was
dumbfounded to find girls on
her hall regularly pulling all-
nighters for papers and
exams -basically academic
suicide, the research shows.
"Not to speak bad of them,
but a lot of them are fresh-
men and just decided to
wait 'till the last minute,"
she said.
Her big challenge was
managing with a roommate
who tries to keep earlier
hours; this year the pair are
moving off-campus together
where they'll have separate
bedrooms.


Associated Press
This 1877 Steinway grand piano used by Motown artists was restored recently. Former
Beatle Paul McCartney, who orchestrated the piano's refurbishment, and Berry Gordy,
the architect of the Motown music label, will be the first to play it.



Restoring history


McCartney,

Gordy to play

Motownpiano

Associated Press

DETROIT In town for
a concert last summer,
Paul McCartney made his
first-ever visit to Detroit's
Motown Museum, the leg-
endary two-story "Hitsville
USA"' building where a
generation's worth of mu-
sical gems were created.
McCartney, a contempo-
rary of Motown stars such as
Stevie Wonder and Marvin
Gaye, "was just thrilled to
be in the space," said Lina
Stephens, the museum's cu-
rator, who gave McCartney
and his bandmates a guided
tour that day
McCartney was also ex-
cited to come across a pair
of pianos.
"He came to the first
piano even though
there's a sign on it that
says, 'Please do not touch'
- he went up and played
the piano," Stephens said.
"He said, 'I'm sorry I have


to,' and he played."
When the group arrived
at Studio A the famed
Motown recording studio
McCartney found piano
No. 3. This one, though,
had a cover over the keys.
He was told it couldn't
be played due to deterio-
ration, and McCartney
moved on.
The next day, he called
with an offer to have the
damaged 1877 Steinway
grand fully restored.
More than a year later,
that process has been
completed.
The restored 9-foot Victo-
rian rosewood will have its
coming-out party at a Sept
18 charity event in New
York City before returning
to its home on West Grand
Boulevard in Detroit
McCartney and Motown
founder Berry Gordy will
play the piano at the New
York event, dubbed "Pro-
ject: Harmony," said Mo-
town Museum Board of
Trustees Chairwoman
Robin Terry, Gordy's grand-
niece. The event will bene-
fit the Motown Museum.
"We'll unveil the piano
and then the two of them
will play the piano, and


we'll have some fun and
leave it to them to make of
that what they will," Terry
said in an interview with
The Associated Press on
Thursday
The piano will eventu-
ally go back on display at
Studio A, where it has
been housed since the mu-
seum's opening in 1985.
Terry said the piano
made its way to Motown
when the studio acquired
Golden World Records in
1967, a facility that was re-
dubbed Motown Studio B
and used by musicians and
songwriters to create
music by Wonder, Gaye
and other Motown greats.
The piano was restored
by Steinway & Sons to pro-
fessional recording quality,
Terry said, with all of its
internal components -
soundboard, keys, ham-
mers, pins and strings -
restored. The piano's case
was left as is to preserve
its authenticity, while the
legs, which were not origi-
nal, were replaced.
While the original strings
and hammers were worn
beyond repair, they were re-
tained and will be returned
to the museum for exhibit


40-year-old cheese on auction block

Associated Press

MILWAUKEE A re-
cently discovered block of
eastern Wisconsin ched-
dar cheese that dates back
to the Nixon presidency
will be sold for $10 per -
ounce.
Edward Zahn, 73, was in ". -.
Z's Cheese Shoppe's walk-..
in cooler last month,
preparing to shut down... -
his Oconto store. Hek
pushed aside stacks of m a
cheese to reveal several Associated Press
wooden boxes that had A 28-year-old block of cheddar was one of three recently
been overlooked for years. discovered in a Milwaukee cheese market. The three
Inside were blocks of boxes 28, 34 and 40 years old will be auctioned to
unintentionally aged the public.
cheddar 28, 34 and 40
years old that, some ex-
perts say, might comprise
the oldest collection of
cheese ever assembled
and sold to the public.
"It just got overlooked,"
Zahn told the Wisconsin
State Journal of the 40-
year-old cheese. "It looks
just like the others except
it's just a lot sharper It's
got character"

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries

Edward 'Big Ed'
Scott, 50
CRYSTAL RIVER
Edward "Big Ed" Scott,
50, of Crystal River, passed
away on Wednesday, Aug. 22,
2012, at HPH Hospice Care
Center in Inverness. A na-
tive of Fort Myers, Fla., he
was born Nov. 17, 1961, to
Thomas Jefferson and
Stella Irene (Rodman) Scott,
one of three sons. He moved
here in 2004 from Fort
Myers. Edward was a chef
by profession and was em-
ployed in various restau-
rants in the Fort Myers area
for many years. Five years
ago, he changed careers to
wastewater and fresh water
operator. Mr Scott was Epis-
copalian by faith.
He is survived by a daugh-
ter, Scarlet E. "Carly" Scott
of Clermont, Fla.; brother,
Thomas Scott of New York
State; and his mother, Stella
I. Scott of Crystal River. He
was preceded in death by
his father, Thomas J. Scott
in 1989, and a brother,
Daniel Scott, in 1994. Wilder
Funeral Home in Ho-
mosassa is handling the
arrangements. www.wilder
funeral.com.

Charles Singley
Jr., 77
HOMOSASSA
Charles A. Singley Jr, 77,
of Homosassa, passed away
Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, at
his home. A native of
Philadelphia, Pa., he was
born Jan. 6,1935, and moved
to Homosassa from Kem-
blesville, Pa., 15 years ago.
Mr. Singley was a retired
salesman for Coca-Cola with
30 years of service, oversee-
ing the Pennsylvania, New
Jersey and Delaware areas.
Charles was a member of
the 1954 LaSalle NCAA Na-
tional Champion basketball
team, playing as a forward.
He is survived by his wife
of 44 years, Joy M. Singley of
Homosassa; daughter-in-
law, Karen Singley of New
Castle, Del.; sister, Veronica
Pacewic and husband An-
drew of Greenville, S.C.;
and granddaughter, Jen-
nifer Singley of New Castle,
Del. Mr. Singley was pre-
ceded in death by a son, the
late Robert Singley, on April
27, 2009.
A memorial service of re-
membrance will be at
Wilder Funeral Home in
Homosassa on Friday, Aug.
31, at 11 a.m. with Chaplain
Larry Strickland officiating.
Interment will be private.
www.wilderfuneral.com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free
and paid obituaries.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.


Citrus Publishing employees and there families are not elige to enter. Email




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 A7


OIF IrIP!










Wildfires burn homes, cause injuries


Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. Rap-
idly expanding wildfires
across a broad swath of
southern Montana have
caused injuries and burned
homes, buildings and vehi-
cles, authorities said Thurs-
day, as firefighters struggled
to contain the flames amid
hazardous conditions.
The precise toll of the lat-
est spate of fires to hit the
state remained uncertain.
But at least three evacua-
tion orders were in place
and well over 150 homes
were threatened by blazes
that in some cases burned
unchecked.
High temperatures and
erratic winds made the fight
more difficult. And with at
least nine large fires burn-
ing in Montana, officials
said there was increasing
competition for adequate
equipment and personnel.
"We hope for everything
but take what we can get,"
said Karen Tuscano of the
U.S. Forest Service.
Tuscano was responding to
a new wildfire in the Para-
dise Valley near Yellowstone
National Park. The blaze
known as the Pine Creek
Fire ignited Wednesday and
resulted in minor injuries to
firefighters and members of
the public, the Park County
sheriff's office said.
Residents caught un-
aware were forced to flee
the village of Pine Creek
without packing any bags,
said Park County Commis-
sioner Marty Malone.
He said about 200 people
live in the area and that
some tried to fight the fire
themselves, including a man
who ran a hose on the
flames until the power to an
electric water pump was cut
off by the blaze and the
water stopped running.


The Park County attorney
said five homes and eight
other structures were dam-
aged, according to the Liv-
ingston Enterprise.
And the flames advanced
to threaten houses in the
Deep Creek area, Tuscano __
said.
The fire had grown to an
estimated 8 square miles
less than a day after it was
reported Wednesday after-
noon on private land near-
the Yellowstone River The
cause was under investiga-
tion.
A resident who failed to
heed an evacuation on a fire
south of Butte suffered sec-
ond degree burns to his
hands and arms, said Forest
Service spokeswoman
Mariah Leuschen. That
blaze, the 19 Mile Fire, has
burned more than 4 square
miles and at least nine
structures, including two
houses.
An estimated 100 houses
remained threatened by the
fire. Residents briefly were ........ .. .,..
allowed back in with escorts :.. ... ...... ...
Thursday to check on the
condition of their property.
To the east, an estimated
20 residences and summer
houses remained evacuated
from a fire burning on the
northeast front of the
Beartooth Mountains near
Roscoe. Crews had a crude
line around the fire by late
Thursday and a federal fire- r
fighting team brought in to"
handle the blaze was re-as-
signed to the Pine Creek
Fire, said spokesman Jeff
Gildehaus.
South of Bozeman, offi-
cials said six houses and 20.\0
commercial buildings and ,
outbuildings were threat-
ened by the Millie Fire,
which exploded from less
than 1 square mile to more Associated Press
than 15 square miles from A home burns just north of East River Road during the Pine Creek Fire in Paradise Valley near Pine Creek Wednesday in
Wednesday to Thursday Livingston, Mont.


Shell can start drill prep in Alaska's Chukchi Sea


Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
Royal Dutch Shell PLC has
been given a permit to begin
preparation work at ex-
ploratory drilling sites in the
Chukchi Sea off Alaska's
northwest coast while it
awaits certification for its oil
spill response barge, Inte-
rior Secretary Ken Salazar
announced Thursday
"We are allowing certain
limited preparatory activi-
ties that we know can be
done in a safe manner," he
said in a teleconference
with reporters.
The company was granted
permission to starting dig-
ging with its drill ship, but
only into the layer of ocean
bottom that's above oil re-
serves. Shell can dig 20-by-
40-foot mud-line cellars,
which will eventually hold
and protect a well's blowout
preventer 40 feet below the
seabed. The company also is
authorized to drill narrow
pilot holes, which reveal ob-
structions or gas pockets,
down another 1,500 feet.
That's about 4,000 feet
above were petroleum is ex-
pected.


"These activities are es-
sential safety steps that will
allow for the installation and
protection of the blowout
preventer," Salazar said.
The limited work will be
conducted with Bureau of
Safety and Environmental
Enforcement safety experts
present 24 hours a day,
Salazar said. The decision
followed exhaustive review
of Shell drilling rigs and
safety equipment including
a capping stack that could
be lowered onto a leaking
well, Salazar said.
Shell remains prohibited
from drilling deeper into
petroleum-bearing forma-
tions until it meets other re-
quirements, including Coast
Guard certification of an oil
spill response barge that re-
mains in port in Belling-
ham, Wash.
"That's period, end of
story," Salazar said.
Federal regulators are re-
quiring Shell to suspend
drilling in the Chukchi 38
days before ice moves in, to
make sure the company has
time cope with a spill or a
wellhead blowout. That
means drilling would have
to stop around Sept 24.


*I, CARllJ .ILE ..WOD],VINYLLAMINATE'l


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527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CCC2837


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning September 3, 2012.
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


Waterbodv Plant
Hernando Pool Torpedograss / Coontail /Nuphar /
Tussocks / Floating / Duckweed /
Pickerelweed
Inverness Pool Torpedograss / Pickerelweed /
Hydrilla / Nuphar /Tussocks /
Floating / Paspalum / Duckweed
Floral City Pool Duckweed / Floating Heart /
Floating
Chassahowizka Hydrilla
River


Herbicide Used
Glyphosate / 2,4D / Super K /
Aquathol / Diquat / Clipper / Quest
Super K /Aquathol / Diquat /
Glyphosate / 2,4D / Clipper / Quest
Glyphosate / Diquat / Clipper /
Quest
Aquathol


MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks / Torpedograss /
Pickerelweed


Harvesting


Floral City Pool Smartweed / Tussocks / Water Harvesting
Paspalum / Torpedograss
Inverness Pool Smartweed /Tussocks/ Harvesting
Pickerelweed
All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated areas will be
identified with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use
restrictions. For further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at htto://
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/oubworks/aauatics/aauaticservices.htm. Citrus County Division of
Aquatic Services


Shell this month asked to
extend that deadline for two
weeks, saying new data in-
dicates ice will not be a fac-
tor until mid-November.
Salazar said a decision on
an extension is unnecessary
until Shell completes work
on its response barge.
Shell hopes to drill ex-
ploratory wells in both the
Chukchi and Beaufort seas
during this year's open
water season, which is rap-
idly drawing to a close.
"We don't know what's
going to happen with Shell
and whether they're going
to be able to complete a well
this year," Salazar said.
"The situation remains dy-


namic."
At a news conference
Thursday afternoon, Shell
Alaska Vice President Pete
Slaiby said employees
cheered Salazar's an-
nouncement, even as he ac-
knowledged that completing
a well in the Chukchi with-
out the extension would be
"very, very difficult."
The spill response barge
could be certified next
week, but towing it to the
drilling area would take up-
ward of two weeks.
Drilling a mud-line cellar
and a pilot hole, he said,
could start next week and
take about two weeks. Con-
tinuing to the hydrocarbon-


bearing zone at about 4,500
feet would take another two
weeks.
Completing preliminary
work, he said, would make
2012 a success even without
drilling into the hydrocar-
bon zone.
'All this work on top holes
is clearly going to help us as
well, put wind in our sails
for 2013," he said.
Environment groups con-
demned the decision. Mar-


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a spill in the extreme Arctic
Ocean environment.
"This is one of the most
productive marine areas in
the world, supporting hun-
dreds of species and thou-
sands of people who depend
on the sea's bounty," she
said by email. "To drill in
our Arctic Ocean is to gam-
ble with its future."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ohio transplant



error under review

Donated kidney placed with medical waste


Associated Press


COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Health officials and a con-
sulting surgeon are review-
ing a living-donor kidney
transplant program that's
been temporarily sus-
pended by a northwest
Ohio hospital, where a do-
nated kidney apparently
was put with medical waste
instead of going to the in-
tended recipient in what
medical experts describe
as a rare accident
The University of Toledo
Medical Center apologized
and put two nurses and an
administrator of surgical
services on paid leave with-
out public explanation fol-
lowing the Aug. 10 error It
also sent letters notifying 975
patients and potential organ
donors and recipients that
they may need to make other
arrangements for services
typically provided through
the program under review.
UTMC is "committed to
ensuring safeguards are put
in place to prevent such an
incident from ever happen-
ing again," Dr Jeffrey Gold,
the vice president for health
affairs, said in a statement
The review is expected to
take several weeks.
State health officials say
they're looking into the error


on behalf of the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid
Services, and UTMC hired a
Texas surgeon to evaluate its
transplant procedures. Dr
Marlon Levy, surgical direc-
tor for transplantation at
Baylor All Saints Medical
Center at Fbrt Worth, was ex-
pected to visit Toledo on
Thursday and Friday
The hospital has refused
to publicly share much de-
tail about how the kidney
was rendered unusable
during the transplant,
which typically is an hours-
long surgery involving a
five-person medical team
removing the organ from a
donor, transferring it to a
steel container and trans-
planting it to a patient in
close proximity.
"Somehow, some way, an
inexplicable human error
made someone think that
the kidney apparently was
already in the recipient
body when it was not," the
UTMC president, Dr. Lloyd
Jacobs, told The Blade in
Toledo.
The local health commis-
sioner, Dr David Grossman,
told the newspaper that a
doctor who was involved
said a nurse accidentally
disposed of the kidney
Grossman did not respond
to phone messages from


The Associated Press.
The man who donated
the kidney and the in-
tended recipient, his sister,
have been released from
the medical center. The
hospital hasn't identified
the family, and it can't say
whether the sister has re-
ceived a different kidney,
UTMC spokesman Tobin
Klinger said. There was a
"good chance" of finding
another compatible donor,
the facility has said.
Kidneys are the most
commonly transplanted
organ. More than 5,700 kid-
ney transplants involving
living donors and 11,000
with deceased donors were
performed last year in the
United States, according to
the Organ Procurement
and Transplantation Net-
work, which maintains the
national patient waiting list
and is administered by the
United Network for Organ
Sharing. UTMC performed
16 of those living-donor kid-
ney transplants and 37
deceased-donor transplants
in 2011.
The types of problems
that lead to unsuccessful
transplants are uncommon
but can include an unex-
pected donor disease trans-
mission or the death of a
living donor.


Man gets 99 years in prison


Associated Press
LIBERTY, Texas Ju-
rors on Thursday convicted
a man of taking part in the
repeated sexual assaulting
a Texas middle school stu-
dent and sentenced him to
99 years in prison.
Eric McGowen wasn't in
court when jurors found
him guilty of aggravated


sexual assault of a child or
later when they returned
with the sentence, which
also included a $10,000
fine. The 20-year-old had
been free on bail and he
skipped out during a
break in proceedings
Wednesday, the first day of
testimony.
The judge issued an ar-
rest warrant for McGowen


Wednesday and allowed tes-
timony to resume Thursday
Jurors returned with the
guilty verdict after deliber-
ating for about 20 minutes.
Then, after brief court pro-
ceedings on his punish-
ment, they decided his
sentence in less than 30
minutes.
Prosecutors say the girl,
who was 11 years old at the


Puppy rescued from Dumpster


Associated Press
Dennis Preslan pets Scrappy on Wednesday afternoon, after the 3-month-old pit
bull/Labrador mix was reunited with his owner, Lyndsey Moeller, and littermates in North
Pole, Alaska. Preslan found Scrappy gagged with a bandanna in a suitcase in a Dumpster
after the puppy had being stolen from it's home.



for sex assault of Texas girl
time, was sexually assaulted saulted in an abandoned following the testimony of
on at least five occasions trailer, nearly a dozen witnesses
from mid-September All six of the juveniles over a day and a half, de-
through early December of and two of the 14 adults fense attorney Matthew Pos-
2010 by 20 men and boys charged in the case pleaded ton rested his case without
from her town, Cleveland, guilty. McGowen was the presenting any witnesses or
which is about 45 miles first defendant to stand evidence.
northeast of Houston. Police trial. He faced a minimum McGowen was in court
began investigating after sentence of 25 years prison Wednesday when the girl,
one of the girl's classmates and a maximum of life. now 13, spoke about her or-
told a teacher he saw video After prosecutors con- deal. The girl was not in
of her being sexually as- cluded their case Thursday court Thursday


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 A1







Page A12 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012



PINION


"Believe that you can and you're
halfway there."
Theodore Roosevelt, 1858-1919


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SEEK CONCESSIONS





Suit should




be resolved




out of court


here are many facets to
attorney Bill Grant's law-
suit against the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office seeking


documents re-
lated to the slay-
ing of woman he
contends was a
confidential in-
formant.
Grant is work-
ing on behalf of
the victim's family
members in an ef-
fort to provide
them with closure.


fully be exempt if they could
jeopardize public safety or
hamper the investigation.
Compounding this issue is


THE ISSUE:
Suit against
sheriff's office.

OUR OPINION:
Be reasonable so
case does not end
up in litigation.


Sheriff's officials are denying
access to documents at this
time because they say they do
not want to jeopardize an ac-
tive investigation.
We favor open access to pub-
lic documents and cast a wary
eye when the public is denied
access to information. How-
ever, it is understandable that
certain documents may right-


Slow learners
These politicians who chose
Florida for their convention in Au-
gust sure weren't thinking very
much. Everybody knows that this
is hurricane season for the South
and yet they still chose it.
All's I can say is, they 0
might be a brain with
some things, but when it
comes to common sense,
they haven't got any.
Check your head f.
Regarding "Double
standards:" Your call re-
garded, your call men- CAL
tions Colorado lowering 563-
their tuition fees for ille- J
gal immigrants. Unless
you live in Colorado, it doesn't af-
fect you. It appears that you may
be a legal immigrant. So if you're
a legal immigrant and you don't
live in Colorado, it doesn't affect
you. I mean, have you ever read
the bumper sticker that says,
"Think locally, act globally," or
vice versa? Same thing, all right?
Same difference.
Priorities
As I read Friday morning's
paper (Aug. 24), I thought to my-
self, we need to quit worrying
about a port and the EDC and fix
our county for our people so their
homes and businesses don't
flood. That seems like a priority to
me.
Good people
This morning is a beautiful,
sunny day. Yesterday was a mess.
We were at Wal-Mart yesterday
and I was waiting for my husband
to come with the vehicle to pick
me up and it was pouring buckets
and dogs and cats and whatever.
This nice gentleman beside me
helped me and my husband with
our groceries and I just want to
tell him, "Thank you very much,"
since he got wet, too. Thank you
very much. There are good people
in this world yet. Thank you.
Thank you!
We had a late lunch this past
Monday (Aug. 20) at Applebee's,
ordered our lunch, and, much to
our surprise, the waitress in-
formed us that our bill was paid
for from (an) unknown lady after


0

(


what appears to
be personal dis-
like between Mr.
Grant and Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy. That's
not surprising
given the years of
being at cross-pur-
poses in their re-
s p e c t iv e
professions and
the differences in


their political ideologies.
In this case, we ask the two
to look past their differences
and try to reach a compromise
in order to prevent a costly
lawsuit. It is not fair for tax-
payers to foot the bill for a
costly legal defense.
We feel both sides can make
concessions before it comes to
that.


she left. Thank you for your
kindness.
Help with crafts
I bought a new plastic canvas
craft kit that came with yarn,
plastic canvas and graph
N patterns. There are in-
JND structions for certain
aw stitches, but no instruc-
yrr tions on how to cut the
canvas to fit the patterns.
I can't seem to line up
the canvas with the graph
pattern in order to cut
P the canvas correctly. If I
604 place one side exactly on
)579 the line, the other side
)579i ends up in the middle of
the hole, not on the line
where it should be cut. It
ends up uneven at the sides
and/or top and bottom. I know I
must be doing something wrong
since I've never done this type of
craft before. Is there a trick to lin-
ing up the canvas to the graph? Is
there an easy way to do this? If
anybody can help me, please
reply in Sound Off.
Tax question
I have just received my 2012
notice of proposed property tax.
Can someone explain to me why
if the market value of my prop-
erty has gone down, the assessed
value has gone up? I would appre-
ciate an explanation.
Poker is gambling
Playing chess may be a game
of skill as a few other sports are,
but when it comes to card playing
and gambling, poker is a gam-
bling game. Very few people win
and until they make better odds
for the people to win, it's no differ-
ent than any other gambling
game.
And this is wrong what the
judge did to give the poker people
a break, because you're going to
have people who can't afford to
play (who) are going to spend
their house money on gambling.
We need to put a stop to that.
That's ridiculous. He's way off
base, this judge.
Hot air
Congratulations to Hurricane
Isaac for being the second-largest
collection of hot air headed to
Tampa.


Calvin Coolidge redux


W hen Chris
Christie gave
his keynote
address at the Repub-
lican National Conven- I
tion, I couldn't help but 'L
notice that he bears a L-
curious resemblance
to all three major can-
didates from the 1912
presidential election. William
In girth, Christie FLOI
looks like a William V0I
Howard Taft Republi- -VO
can. In style, he uses
the bully pulpit like that pugna-
cious Bull Moose, Theodore Roo-
sevelt And in position, he serves
as governor of New Jersey, just as
Woodrow Wilson did.
When I think of which presi-
dent GOP nominee Mitt Romney
most resembles, there's little
question that it is Calvin
Coolidge, a former Massachusetts
governor often described as stiff,
reticent and socially awkward. In
fact, Alice Roosevelt Longworth
once said that Coolidge looked
"as though he had been weaned
on a pickle." And Dorothy Parker,
upon learning that "Silent Cal"
had died, reportedly asked, "How
can they tell?"
Interestingly, Coolidge often
played along with his critics.
When Parker announced at a din-
ner party that she had bet some-
one she could get more than two
words out of Coolidge, Silent Cal
responded, "You lose." Similarly,
Coolidge once observed, "I think
the American people want a
solemn ass as a President and
I think I will go along with them."
Romney would probably bene-


F
-n
I(


fit from displaying a
similar self-deprecat-
ing wit. He might also
help himself by mim-
icking Coolidge's fa-
mous line, "Don't
expect to build up the
weak by pulling down
the strong." Romney
almost surely would
Mattox benefit from pledging
RIDA to govern like
CES Coolidge.
During his time as
mayor of Northamp-
ton, Mass., Coolidge somehow
managed to cut taxes, increase
teachers' salaries and retire
some of the city's debts. He pro-
duced a similar record as gover-
nor of Massachusetts. And as
president, Coolidge reduced fed-
eral spending, cut income taxes
and helped generate enough eco-
nomic growth to enable the U.S.
Treasury to retire one-quarter of
its debt.
Coolidge is often derided for
saying, "The chief business of the
American people is business."
Yet, interestingly, the context for
this Romney-like "gaffe" was a
1925 speech before the American
Society of Newspaper Editors in
which Coolidge exhorted the
"mainstream media" of his day to
do a better job covering the con-
cerns of ordinary Americans
striving to climb the economic
ladder and make a better life for
themselves.
Similarly, historian Robert
Sobel believes that those who
criticize Coolidge for being too
"laissez-faire" fail to understand
his fidelity to the constitutional


principle that Romney has in-
voked in health policy: federal-
ism. Sobel notes that when
Coolidge was governor of Massa-
chusetts, he supported measures
(like reducing the work week
from 54 hours to 48 hours) that he
refused to nationalize as presi-
dent because "such matters were
considered the responsibilities of
state and local governments."
Whatever one makes of Rom-
ney's policy prescriptions, I sus-
pect many Americans would
welcome a Coolidge-like commit-
ment from the GOP nominee (and
from President Obama) to avoid
the politics of personal destruc-
tion in favor of substantive cam-
paign speeches focused on one's
philosophy of governing. That
sort of strategy is not only high-
minded, but it also increases the
likelihood that Americans will
elect the candidate who best re-
flects their beliefs about govern-
ment.
In the 1920s, Coolidge's view of
limited government fit the times.
As Walter Lippmann once noted,
Silent Cal's political genius lay in
his talent for embodying the
growing belief that "government
in this country has become dan-
gerously complicated and top-
heavy."
Nearly 100 years later, many
Republicans are no doubt hoping
that Mitt Romney will somehow
manage to do the same.
--*--A
William Mattox is a columnist
with Florida Voices and a resi-
dent fellow at the James Madi-
son Institute in Tallahassee.


LETTERS X\to the Editor


Adaptation
We, the populace, are again
being subjected to water-use re-
strictions, and this time it will be
because of poor representation.
It is not all in the hands of na-
ture and the lack of rainfall, but
it also is in the hands of those
whose responsibility requires
them to exercise knowledgeable
planning regarding water avail-
ability for their constituents.
Forgive my use of the cliche;
however, "Get a plan, Stan."
Here is the suggested plan:
There are currently at least 180
desalination plants in Florida.
However, there are but a mere
few in the north-central region
of the state not enough to
make up for the lessening avail-
ability of groundwater. That said,
there is less salt in brackish
water than regular saltwater
With abundant brackish
groundwater (ask any well dig-
ger) along with the brackish
areas of many streams that enter
the Gulf of Mexico, any qualified
engineer should be able to con-
nect the dots and provide a sus-
tainable supply of brackish
water to a new desalination
plant in this area. The construc-
tion and operation of such a
plant would provide a large eco-
nomic boost to this area, as well
as stem the tide of a water war.
Beyond the initial cost of
building the desalination plant,
according to a Southwest Florida
Water Management District-re-
lated website, the cost of produc-
ing a gallon of tap/drinking water
is nearly the same as a gallon of
desalinated water: half a penny


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

per gallon. So build a plant or
two, and we are back being able
to survive without losing our in-
vestments as well as our lives.
Oversimplified? Perhaps! But
I'm Joe Citizen, not a planner of
major projects. That's the re-
sponsibility of those at county,
state and federal levels. Instead
of leaning on a list of rules for
water consumption, it's time to
figure out a way to meet the
water needs of the populace that
you took an oath to serve.
Doug Jordan
Homosassa


Airline prices
I'm 66 years old and have a
few serious health problems.
Earlier this week, my son called
from New Jersey and was telling
me to go to the Deborah Heart
and Lung Center near Fort Dix
in New Jersey To get into Debo-
rah, you have to be sponsored.
My son sponsored me. He is a
fireman in New Jersey
I looked on a map to see which
airport was closest, which
turned out to be Atlantic City. I
then checked the Internet to see
which airlines flew into Atlantic
City. There was only one.
I called them to see how much
it would cost for my wife and I.
When I told them their prices
were too high, the person I was
talking to told me to either pay it
or stay home. The airfare was
$550 from Tampa. The cost of
our luggage was $270 and a car
rental for the time we were up
there was $330. This was way out
our range.
I had an appointment with my
heart doctor and was told he
could do the same thing Debo-
rah could do. When I told the
airlines their prices were too
high, I was told to either pay
them or stay home because they
didn't care.
Well, we did not go to New Jer-
sey and my heart doctor set me
up with an appointments for the
23rd and the 24th of August
Oh, one more thing. I checked
the website of the airlines and
found well over 638 complaints
registered in the past year
Jake Little
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CAPE/FOO


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Senica Air Joes Carpet
Conditioning 352-726-4465
352-795-9685


Honorable Mention
Powers
Protection
352-746-3500

ALUI0U


Honorable Mention
Michael's Floor
Covering, Inc.
352-341-0813

CHIRORACTI


Winner Winner
Blackshears II Citrus Chiropractic
Aluminum 352-795-5350
352-795-9722


Honorable Mention
Frick's Painting
352-287-2144


PANROE


Honorable Mention
The Health Center at
Brentwood
352-746-6600


T PP T


VV VV V V V Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
n Pat's Pawn Robert J. Eldredge
7 352-794-6040 352-344-8300

Wrnner' S ___


Circle


Winner Honorable Mention
Citrus Pest Crystal River
Management Firestone
352-563-6698 crystalriverfirestone.com


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Winner Winner
Welch Appliance Abitare of Paris
352-726-1911 aparisdayspa.com


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Welch Appliance
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ARS& RF


Honorable Mention
Dr. Swanson/
Complete Family
Dentistry
352-795-1223

FINS


F)


Honorable Mention Winner
Bush Pest Control Southern Sun Title
877-345-BUSH Company
352-382-3339



R Winner Winner- Tie
Bow Wow Boutique Becky's
352-795-1684 Travel Store
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H R L IN


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Scrap & Stamp Art Fancy's Pets Walk Don't Run
Studio Anytime Fitness FDS Disposal Flynn Builders, Inc Kids Trading Post 352-563-5100 Travel
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Winner
Brentwood
Retirement
Community
352-746-6611


Honorable Mention
Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living
Community
352-621-8017


Honorable Mention
Cedar Creek
at Kings Bay
cedarcreeklife.com



Winner
Crystal Automotive
352-564-1971



Honorable Mention
Eagle Buick GMC
352-7956800



Winner
Fred's Barber Shop
864 Hwy. 44,
Crystal River

BOA


Winner
Howards Flea
Market
www.howardsfleamarket.com


Honorable Mention
Waste Pro
352-726-7440


GOLF COURSE


Winner
Holiday Inn
Express
352-563-1111

INUAC


Winner
Deem's Kitchen &
Bath Showrooms
www.godeem.com

^^^^^^


Winner
Suncoast Plumbing
and Electric
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POBUILDER


Winner
Griffin's
Tree Care LLC
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USED BOOKS


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Waverley Plantation The Hagar Group Clover Lawn Sod Diamond Luxury Poe House Books
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Flower Basket
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All Prestige
Automotive, Inc.
352-795-7000


Winner
Hooper Funeral
Home & Crematory
352-726-2271


Honorable Mention
Strickland
Funeral Home
352-795-2678

FURNITRETO


Winner
Ace Hardware
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Winner
Professional
Hearing Center
726-4327


Honorable Mention
Bell Family
Insurance
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Sheldon-Palmes
Insurance
www.sheldonpalmesinsurance.com



Winner
Smart Interiors
www.smartinteriorsfurn.com

INVESTMENT
F-jHIRM


Winner
Porter's
Locksmithing
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Winner
Comfort Mattress
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Honorable Mention
Wholesale
Sleep Center
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MEDICAL CENTE


Winner
Citrus 95.3
www.citrus953.com



Honorable Mention
The Fox 96.3
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Rebekah Paradiso
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REAL ESTATE
OFFICE^^


Honorable Mention Winner Winner Winner
Audibel Raymond James Citrus Memorial Exit Realty Leaders
Hearing Centers www.raymondiames.com/crl Health System www.exitrealtyleaders.com
855-321-4327 www.citrusmh.org


Winner
Lecanto Veterinary
Hospital
352-270-8819



Honorable Mention
Best Buy Water
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Winner
Tropical Window
352-795-4226



Winner
72 Hour
Blind Factory
352-527-0012

^ WINDOW
TREATMENTS


MIL


Winner Winner Winner Winner Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Homosassa Badcock Furniture Comfort Keepers Jim Green Jewelers Taylor Made Homes River Safaris Vertical Blinds
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Honorable Mention
Crystal River Marine
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Winner
Tri-County
Overhead Door
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Winner
Will Construction
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HonorableMention
Whalen Jewelers
352-726-4709


Winner
Citrus County
Chronicle
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Winner
AAA Roofing
352-563-0411


Winner
Cotton Club
352-563-2582


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 A13


I ACCUNTAN


BOD


I HPIGCNE


I CAR WASH


^ PAINT
STORE^^^


SKILLEDNRING
FACILITY I


I PAINTER I


SKILLED NURSING
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KID


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HAIRn^^
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^ JEWELRY
I STORE I


^ RIVER
CRUISES^^












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBRIES U. of Iowa rejected shooting suspect

Sentenced


Associated Press
Former Virginia lacrosse
player and convicted mur-
derer George Huguely V is
led to court Thursday for
his sentencing in Char-
lottesville, Va. Huguely was
sentenced to 23 years in
prison for the alcohol-fueled
beating death of his ex-girl-
friend in 2010.

Man gets 23 years
for slaying ex
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
- A former University of Vir-
ginia lacrosse player who
killed his ex-girlfriend in a
drunken rage was sentenced
Thursday to 23 years in
prison after the defendant
tearfully apologized to his vic-
tim's family.
George W. Huguely V had
three years trimmed from a
jury's recommended sen-
tence of 26 years for the May
2010 slaying of Yeardley
Love.
"Unlike Ms. Love, Mr.
Huguely still has the majority
of his life ahead of him,"
Charlottesville Circuit Judge
Edward Hogshire told the
court.
Huguely, who is 24, could
be released in less than 20
years.

World BRIEFS

Mourning


Associated Press
A woman weeps Thursday
at the start of a public me-
morial for late Prime Minis-
ter Meles Zenawi at
Meskel Square in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia. Thou-
sands turned out for the
first of three days of
planned commemorative
ceremonies.

Syrians say rebels
shot down plane
BEIRUT Syrian activists
said rebels shot down a gov-
ernment warplane over the
northern province of Idlib on
Thursday, the second time in
a week that opposition fight-
ers claimed to have brought
down an aircraft in the esca-
lating civil war.
Two activist groups, The
Local Coordination Commit-
tees and the Britain-based
Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights, said the plane
was seen crashing near the
Abu Zuhour air base. Idlib-
based activist Alaa al-Din
said rebels shot it down with
heavy machine guns.
A video broadcast on the
pan-Arab satellite station Al-
Arabiya shows what appears
to be a person parachuting
and rebels cheering and
claiming he was the pilot. The
video's authenticity could not
be verified.
The government had no
immediate comment, and the
report couldn't be independ-
ently confirmed.
But a brief video clip
posted by an Idlib-based
rebel group showed the body
of a man in an olive-green
pilot overall with an apparent
head wound.
The authenticity of the
video, dated Aug. 30, could
not be independently verified.
From wire reports


Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Iowa The Univer-
sity of Iowa rejected the suspect in
the Colorado movie theater shoot-
ing rampage from a graduate neu-
roscience program last year after
he visited campus for an interview
and left the program director
bluntly warning colleagues: "Do
NOT offer admission under any cir-
cumstances."
James Holmes applied to the
Iowa program in late 2010 and was
given an interview on Jan. 28, 2011,
according to records released by
the university. Holmes wrote in his
application that he was passionate
about neuroscience and would


bring "my strong moral upbringing"
to the program. He painted himself
as a bright student interested in im-
proving himself and helping the
world with a career in scientific re-
search.
But two days after Holmes' inter-
view, neuroscience program direc-
tor Daniel Tranel wrote a strongly
worded email urging the admis-
sions committee not to accept him
to the school.
"James Holmes: Do NOT offer ad-
mission under any circumstances,"
wrote Tranel, a professor of neurol-
ogy
Psychology professor Mark Blum-
berg followed up with a separate
email two days later to say he


agreed with Tranel about Holmes,
one of three students Blumberg in-
terviewed. "Don't admit," he wrote
about Holmes. He recommended
admission for the other two.
Neither official elaborated on
their reasoning in the emails, which
are among 12 pages of records the
university released about Holmes
in response to public records re-
quests filed by The Associated
Press and other news outlets.
None of the documents further
explain why Holmes' application
was denied. University spokesman
Tom Moore said Thursday that
Holmes was academically qualified
but officials did not see him as "a
good personal fit for our program."


Waiting for Isaac


.,


Associated Press
Storm clouds leading remnants of Hurricane Isaac gather in the skies Thursday over a grain elevator in England,
Ark., as a man carries tools into a gust of wind. With the storms approaching many farm states, some farmers
wonder whether too much relief is on the horizon.

Farmers hit by drought are uneasy about looming storm


Associated Press
ST LOUIS Indiana farmer
John Kolb normally would welcome
storms that could provide his crops
with badly needed water in this
summer of drought. Instead, he and
other Corn Belt farmers are nerv-
ously watching the forecast as Hur-
ricane Isaac's remnants slog their
way, concerned they could end up
getting too much of a good thing.
The reason for their worry:
Strong winds could topple corn
stalks already severely weakened
by the nation's worst drought in two
generations, and a possible deluge
could muddy the fields and slow
bringing in whatever crop is still
salvageable.
"We could really use the mois-
ture, but I don't want wind," Kolb,
41, said from the 2,000 acres of corn
and soybeans he farms with his
dad and uncle in southeastern In-
diana's Franklin County and the
adjacent Butler County in Ohio.
"The corn is just so weak. It's been
so dry that it kind of cannibalized
itself. It fed off itself to try to stay


alive and it wouldn't take a whole
lot to blow it down.
"That would make it a tangled
mess, and that's pretty hard to har-
vest."
Isaac has lost strength since
coming ashore late Tuesday as a
Category 1 hurricane, with 80 mph
winds near the mouth of the Mis-
sissippi River But it's still ex-
pected to provide a dousing for
much of the nation's midsection -
from Arkansas north to Missouri
and into a corner of Iowa, then east
through Illinois and Indiana to
Ohio in coming days. Rainfall to-
tals could reach up to 7 inches, ac-
cording to a U.S. Drought Monitor
weekly update Thursday
In Arkansas, farmers scrambled
to bring in as much of their corn
and rice as they could before
Isaac's wind and rain reached the
state. With the storm blowing
Thursday into southeast Arkansas,
growers had to leave their fields
and begin the wait to see what the
storm will do to their crops.
Isaac's encroachment came as
the latest weekly update by a


drought-tracking effort credited re-
cent rains in the central U.S. with
easing the dryness, even if it was
far too late for some corn crops.
The newest U.S. Drought Moni-
tor map from the University of Ne-
braska's National Drought
Mitigation Center showed that the
section of the continental U.S. in
the worst two categories of drought
- extreme and exceptional re-
mained relatively unchanged at
23.2 percent as of Tuesday
The U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture reported Monday that 52 per-
cent of that crop was listed as being
in poor or very poor shape, more
than double the status of 19 per-
cent in those two categories at this
time last year Soybeans, which
could benefit from more rains be-
cause it's earlier in the growing
season than corn, were faring only
slightly better, with 17 percent of
that crop described as being very
poor while an additional 21 per-
cent was poor, the USDA said. A
year ago, just 15 percent of the na-
tion's soybeans were in those
categories.


Consumer spending rose in July


Associated Press


WASHINGTON -Ameri-
cans spent at the fastest
pace in five months in July
after earning a little more.
The increase in income and
consumer spending could
help boost an economy
mired in subpar growth.
Consumer spending rose
0.4 percent in July from
June, the Commerce Depart-
ment said Thursday. That
followed no change in June
and a slight decline in May
Income grew 0.3 percent,
matching the gains from
May and June. Americans
also earned 0.3 percent
more after paying taxes.
The savings rate after
taxes dipped to 4.2 percent
in July That's down slightly
from 4.3 percent in June,
the highest in a year
Consumer spending is
closely watched because it


accounts for 70 percent of
economic activity.
Paul Dales, senior U.S.
economist at Capital Eco-
nomics, said that the rise in
spending showed "there is
still life in American con-
sumers." But he cautioned
that higher gasoline prices
and a decline in consumer
confidence in August could
dampen spending in com-
ing months.
Hiring picked up in July
and could see further mod-
est gains in August. The
number of Americans seek-
ing unemployment benefits
was unchanged last week at
a seasonally adjusted
374,000, the Labor Depart-
ment said in a separate re-
port Thursday
Applications are a meas-
ure of the pace of layoffs.
They have risen slightly
over the past three weeks
but remain lower than they


Consumer spending
U.S. consumer spending,
which accounts for 70 per-
cent of all economic activity,
rose 0.4 percent in July over
the previous month.
0.9 percent ...............................
0.8 ........................ .. ........... .......
0.7 ................... ........ July
0.6. .................. ........ 0 .4%
0.5 ........... .............
0.4 ...... ....... .......
0.3

-01.
-0.2 ............................... ..
-0.2 .................. ...
-0.3 r-.i... i...r--...r.. .i...ri ...-r-T
J ASONDJFMAM J J
2011 2012
SOURCE. Commerce Dept. AP
were in the spring, when
hiring nearly stalled. When
applications fall consis-
tently below 375,000, it gen-
erally suggests that hiring is
strong enough to lower the
unemployment rate.


The government releases
the August jobs report on
Sept 7. Analysts expect it to
say the economy added
118,000 jobs in August and
that the unemployment rate
held at 8.3 percent, accord-
ing to FactSet. Economists
say stronger growth is
needed to create more jobs
and lower unemployment.
Reports released Thurs-
day from a range of retail-
ers show Americans kept
spending in August despite
the increase in gas prices.
Costco Wholesale Corp.'s
revenue from stores open at
least a year climbed 6 per-
cent. And Target Corp. re-
ported a 4.2 percent increase
in revenue at stores opened
at least a year The strong
sales reports come two days
after a private research firm
said consumer confidence in
August fell to its lowest level
since November 2011.


declined to elaborate.
lumberg said in an email Thurs-
that he has no specific recollec-
of Holmes or his opinion,
ng officials interview many ap-
ants each year Tranel was not
citing interview requests Thurs-
a spokesman said.
olmes later enrolled as a first-
r Ph.D. student in a neuro-
nce program at the University
"olorado Denver He withdrew
ut six weeks before the attack in
ora, where prosecutors say the
rear-old opened fire during a
night showing of the latest Bat-
n movie, "The Dark Knight
es," killing 12 people and injur-
58 others.




Court


rejects


Texas


voter


ID law

Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas -A tough
Texas law requiring voters
to show photo identification
at the polls discriminates
against low-income blacks
and Hispanics, a federal
court ruled Thursday, wip-
ing out for the November
election a measure champi-
oned by conservatives and
setting up a potential U.S.
Supreme Court showdown.
In Washington, a three-
judge panel unanimously
ruled that the 2011 law im-
poses "strict, unforgiving
burdens on the poor" and
noted that Texas' racial mi-
norities are more likely to
live in poverty.
It was the state's second
major loss in court in three
days, coming after a sepa-
rate federal panel ruled
Tuesday that Texas' Repub-
lican-dominated Legisla-
ture failed to avoid
"discriminatory purposes"
when drawing new maps for
congressional districts and
both houses of the state Leg-
islature to reflect the Texas'
booming population.
The voter ID decision
could set a precedent for up-
coming legal challenges to
similar laws in other states.
South Carolina's strict photo
ID law is on trial this week
in front of another three-
judge panel in the same fed-
eral courthouse. A ruling in
that case is expected before
the November election.
It also underscores a
widespread push, largely by
Republican-controlled leg-
islatures and governors' of-
fices, to impose strict
identification requirements
on voters. But Democrats
say fraud at the polls is
largely nonexistent and that
Republicans are trying to
disenfranchise minorities,
poor people and college stu-
dents all groups that tend
to vote Democratic.
State Attorney General
Greg Abbott said he will ap-
peal to the U.S. Supreme
Court, "where we are confi-
dent we will prevail." He
pointed to past decisions
upholding similar "ballot in-
tegrity safeguards" in Geor-
gia and Indiana.
Republican Gov. Rick
Perry said, "Chalk up an-
other victory for fraud."
"Today federal judges sub-
verted the will of the people
of Texas," he said, "and un-
dermined our effort to ensure
fair and accurate elections."
During the Texas voter ID
case, the Justice Depart-
ment called several lawmak-
ers, all of them Democrats,
who said they detected a
clear racial motive in the
push for the law. Lawyers for
Texas argued that the state
was simply tightening its
laws. Texas called experts
who demonstrated that


voter ID laws had a minimal
effect on turnout.












SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Andy Roddick speaks
Thursday during a news
conference during the
second round of play at
the 2012 US Open tennis
tournament. Roddick
says the U.S. Open will
be the last tournament of
his career.


Roddick says he'll
retire after US Open
NEW YORK Whether
it turns out to be a tearful
farewell or simply another
fun-filled evening of tennis,
Friday night figures to be
electric in Arthur Ashe
Stadium.
Pretty much like any
night Andy Roddick is play-
ing at the U.S. Open.
The man who has defined
American tennis, for better
and worse, over the last
decade or so, announced on
Thursday, his 30th birthday,
that this year's U.S. Open
will be his last tournament.
He's calling it quits at the
scene of his biggest tri-
umph, the 2003 U.S.
Open, and at the place
where his name was virtu-
ally always on the mar-
quee, even as his days as
the world's top-ranked
player faded further into
the rearview mirror.
Wearing a black T-shirt
with a black cap pulled low
over his eyes, Roddick
came into his hastily called
news conference, held
shortly before a night ses-
sion that featured No. 1
Roger Federer's straight-
set victory and Venus
Williams' three-set loss to
No. 6 Angelique Kerber.
"I'll make this short and
sweet," Roddick said. "I've
decided that this is going to
be my last tournament."
But there will be some
time to linger, to reflect on
a career that produced only
the one major title but al-
ways kept people filing
through the turnstiles at
Flushing Meadows. They
came because they knew
they'd get their money's
worth from a gritty, no-non-
sense guy who helped the
U.S. to the 2007 Davis Cup
title and remains the last
American man to hoist a
trophy at a Grand Slam.
"Do we love to have a
guy like that out there?
Sure," said Gordon Smith,
the CEO of the U.S. Tennis
Association. "Was it great
that he's an American?
Sure. But the greatest part
was that he battled. He
was a warrior. And he
loved to play for his coun-
try. We could use another
dozen Andy Roddicks."
Certainly, Smith isn't the
only one who feels that
way, and Roddick said he
was announcing his retire-
ment a little early because
he wanted a proper chance
to say goodbye not only
to the hundreds of players
he battled but the dozens
he mentored, as well.
And while his fans and
critics may have questioned
his tactics and some of his
brutish antics over his col-
orful career, nobody ever
doubted that Roddick was
always in it, 100 percent.
For now, he lives in the
present, knowing every
match this week (and
next?) could be his last at a
tennis park that has long
felt like his second home.
Is Roddick ready to let it
all hang out one last time
and create some magic of
his own?
"We'll see," he said. "I
wish it was a choice."
-From wire reports


Friday-night football PREVIEWS


Citrus out for vengeance against Harmony


SEAN ARNOLD
Chronicle Correspondent

Harmony Longhorns
at Citrus Hurricanes,
7:30 p.m.
The Citrus football
team's dominating 62-7 vic-
tory in last week's presea-
son game versus Poinciana
wasn't completely without
a hitch.


Hurricane senior Darius
Chapes, who put up a
game-high 208 rushing yards
and three touchdowns on
just a dozen carries, dislo-
cated his elbow, leaving
him out of tonight's game
against visiting Harmony
In the absence of
Chapes, the Chronicle's co-
Player of the Year in 2011,
Citrus (6-5 in 2011) will still
be potent at running back


with juniors Tyric Wash-
ington and James Pouncey
as well as sophomore
Breon Whaley, who totaled
75 yards and two TDs on
three carries last week.
The 'Canes will also be
compensated by a strong
offensive line and this year's
upgraded passing game.
"Those other three tail-
backs are pretty dang
good," Citrus coach Ray


Greene said this week. "It
all happens up front any-
way, and our backs know
that. If the offensive line
can be physical, then our
backs will have a good
night"
Greene and his squad
are grateful they won't be
making the long trip to
Harmony, which is south of
Orlando near St. Cloud.
The team bus got lost on its


way there for last season's
opener, causing Citrus to
arrive two hours late.
Things only got worse from
there as the 'Canes lost six
fumbles in a 15-7 loss.
Tonight, however, marks
the beginning of an eight-
game regular season
stretch that will include six
home contests for Citrus.


Page B4


Lecanto takes

early lead in

county rivalry

JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

INVERNESS It was a
hot, muggy day at the Cit-
rus Hills golf course yes-
terday. But most
importantly: it was sunny
and clear. After a week
full of rain and setbacks,
the Lecanto and Crystal
River High School girls'
golf teams took to the
course to usher in the new
season on Thursday. And
despite the rust and
nerves, the Lecanto girls
team took away their first
victory of the season, de-
feating Crystal River 196 -
240.
Leading the way for the
Lady Panthers were jun-
ior Chynna Liu, who shot a
43, and freshman Maddi-
son Polazzo, who was just
two strokes behind at a 45.
But what helped propel
Lecanto to the win was the
three way tie between sen-
ior Jennifer Hafner, soph-
omore Keirah Tettenburn,
and junior Jessica Fee
who all shot a 54, keeping
Lecanto's top four under-
neath 60 strokes.
For Lecanto coach Doug
Warren, he couldn't have
been happier after the
match.
"Overall, we had a good
time today And lucky for
us we came out with a
win," he said. "We had
some girls who were a lit-
tle nervous today, and I
don't think their scores
are indicative of how
they're going to play for
the rest of the season. But
we also had a couple of


(
!,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Crystal River High School's Maycee Mullarkey, a junior, tees off Thursday afternoon in a girls golf match between
the Pirates and the Lecanto High School Panthers.


good scores. So, I'm
happy with how things
went."
For Crystal River, jun-
iors Maycee Mullarkey's
47 and Marissa Wilder's
59 helped them out as


best they could, but in
the end Lecanto just
shot too well.
But for Crystal River
coach Claudia Sebold,
the match gives way to
nothing but positive


feedback.
"Considering that we
have all new girls, and
that this is their first
match together, I'm
thinking we played mar-
velous," she said. "From


here, the only place to
go is up. We know that
we have to bring the
scores down and from
there hopefully get
wins. I'm really proud of
them."


Venus Williams upset in three-hour match


Associated Press


NEW YORK -At a U.S.
Open that will be remem-
bered for goodbyes by
Andy Roddick and Kim Cli-
jsters, another former No.
1 and Grand Slam cham-
pion, Venus Williams, left
with a spirited second-
round loss that felt nothing
like a farewell.
Hours after Roddick
chose the occasion of his
30th birthday to let the ten-
nis world in on a little se-
cret he'd been keeping -
he'll retire after his run at
Flushing Meadows ends -
Williams served poorly and
stumbled badly for a set
and a half before recover-
ing to make things quite
competitive.
Williams came within
two points of winning, but
dropped five of the last six
games and ended up exit-
ing early at a tournament
she's won twice, beaten 6-2,
5-7, 7-5 by sixth-seeded An-
gelique Kerber of Germany
in a nearly 3-hour match
that ended at 12:19 a.m. as
Thursday turned to Friday
Asked afterward if she's
ready to join Roddick in re-
tirement, Williams replied:
"No, because if I could


have made two more shots,
I probably could have won
that match. I think there's a
big difference for me be-
cause I'm beating myself.
I'm not getting destroyed
out there. ... If I was out
there and people were
killing me, maybe it's time
to hang it up."
A year ago at the U.S.
Open, Williams didn't get
the chance to play at all in
the second round, with-
drawing hours before the
match and announcing she
had Sjogren's syndrome, an
autoimmune disease that
can cause fatigue.
This time, buoyed by
chants of "Let's go, Venus!"
in a mostly empty Arthur
Ashe Stadium perhaps
spectators figured in the
second set that Kerber was
on her way to a swift vic-
tory Williams found the
resolve and energy to put
aside her 16 double-faults
and 60 total unforced er-
rors and help produce as
entertaining a contest as
the arena has hosted this
week.
"I know this is not proper
tennis etiquette, but this is
the first time I've ever
played here that the crowd
has been behind me like


Associated Press
Angelique Kerber, of Germany, reacts Thursday after defeating
Venus Williams in a match at the U.S. Open in New York.


that. Today I felt American,
you know, for the first time
at the U.S. Open," Williams
said. "So I've waited my
whole career to have this
moment and here it is."
At changeovers in the
third set, trying to concen-
trate on her coach's game
plan, Kerber draped a
white towel over her head,
looking a bit like a little kid
dressing as a ghost for Hal-
loween. She would lift the
towel's edge every so often
so she could tuck a water


bottle underneath and take
a sip.
"Venus is such a great
player. ... Everybody was
against me," Kerber said,
referring to the crowd, "but
it doesn't matter"
It all came a day after
four-time major champion
Clijsters, who is 29, played
the final singles match of
her career, and while the
32-year-old Williams never
has uttered a word indicat-
ing she's thinking about
leaving the sport, she is no


longer the player she once
was.
"Obviously, being on the
losing end of a match like
this isn't a lot of fun,"
Williams said. "Today all I
had was fight, because I
didn't play well."
In addition to her 2000
and 2001 trophies from the
U.S. Open, and five titles
from Wimbledon, Williams
was the runner-up at major
tournaments seven times.
In 16 years of Grand Slam
action, since her debut in
1997, Williams had never
gone through an entire sea-
son without making at least
one fourth-round appear-
ance at a major.
Until 2012, when she
never even made the third
round once. She missed
the Australian Open while
still working her way back
onto the tour, then lost in
the second round at the
French Open and the first
round at Wimbledon.
For so long the owner of
one of the most feared
serves on the women's tour
- surpassed only, perhaps,
by her younger sister Ser-
ena's Williams took
quite a while to get going

See Page B4


Panthers stri


SPORTS
BRIEF







Page B2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012






UTO


RACING


Race
SCHEDULES


Sprint Cup
x-non-points race
Feb. 18 x-Budweiser Shootout, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 23 x-Gatorade Duel 1, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Tony Stewart)
Feb. 23 x-Gatorade Duel 2, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Matt Kenseth)
Feb. 26 Daytona 500, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Matt Kenseth)
March 4 Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avon-
dale, Ariz. (Denny Hamlin)
March 11 Kobalt Tools 400, Las Vegas
(Tony Stewart)
March 18 Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn.
(Brad Keselowski)
March 25 -Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif.
(Tony Stewart)
April 1 Goody's Fast Relief 500, Ridge-
way, Va. (Ryan Newman)
April 14 Samsung Mobile 500, Fort
Worth, Texas (Greg Biffle)
April 22 STP 400, Kansas City, Kan.
(Denny Hamlin)
April 28 Richmond 400, Richmond, Va.
(Kyle Busch)
May 6 -Aaron's 499, Talladega, Ala. (Brad
Keselowski)
May 12 Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
(Jimmie Johnson)
May 19 x-Sprint Showdown, Concord,
N.C. (Jimmie Johnson)
May 19- x-Sprint All-Star, Concord, N.C.
(Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
May 27 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
(Kasey Kahne)
June 3 Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 10 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa.
(Joey Logano)
June 17 Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn,
Mich. (Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
June 24 -Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif. (Clint Bowyer)
June 30 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
(Brad Keselowski)
July 7 Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Tony Stewart)
July 15 Lenox Industrial Tools 301,
Loudon, N.H. (Kasey Kahne)
July 29 Crown Royal Presents The Cur-
tiss Shaver 400 at The Brickyard, Indi-
anapolis (Jimmie Johnson)
Aug. 5 Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa.
(Jeff Gordon)
Aug. 12 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at
The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y (Marcos Am-
brose)
Aug. 19 Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn,
Mich. (Greg Biffle)
Aug. 25 Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol,
Tenn. (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 2 AdvoCare 500, Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 8 Federated Auto Parts 400, Rich-
mond, Va.
Sept. 16- GEICO 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 23 Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H.
Sept. 30 AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 7 Good Sam Roadside Assistance
500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 13 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 21 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas
City, Kan.
Oct. 28 -TUMS Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway,
Va.
Nationwide Series
Feb. 25 DRIVE4COPD 300, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (James Buescher)
March 3 Bashas' Supermarkets 200,
Avondale, Ariz. (Elliott Sadler)
March 10 Sam's Town 300, Las Vegas
(Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
March 17 St. Patrick's Day 300, Bristol,
Tenn. (Elliott Sadler)
March 24 Royal Purple 300, Fontana,
Calif. (Joey Logano)
April 13 O'Reilly Auto Parts 300, Fort
Worth, Texas (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
April 27- Richmond 250, Richmond, Va.
(Kurt Busch)
May 5 Aaron's 312, Talladega, Ala. (Joey
Logano)
May 11 Darlington 200, Darlington, S.C.
(Joey Logano)
May 20 Iowa Spring 250, Newton, Iowa
(Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 26 History 300, Concord, N.C. (Brad
Keselowski)
June 2 5-hour Energy 200, Dover, Del.
(Joey Logano)
June 16 Alliance Auto Parts 250, Brook-
lyn, Mich. (Joey Logano)
June 23 Road America 200, Elkhart
Lake, Wis. (Nelson Piquet Jr.)
June 29 Feed the Children 300, Sparta,
Ky (Austin Dillon)
July 6 Subway Jalapeno 250, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Kurt Busch)
July 14 FW. Webb 200, Loudon, N.H.
(Brad Keselowski)
July 22 STP 300, Joliet, III. (Elliott Sadler)
July 28 Indiana 250, Indianapolis (Brad
Keselowski)
Aug. 4 U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa
(Elliott Sadler)
Aug. 11 Zippo 200 at The Glen, Watkins
Glen, N.Y (Carl Edwards)
Aug. 18 NAPA Auto Parts 200, Montreal
(Justin Allgaier)
Aug. 24 Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn.
(Joey Logano)
Sept. 1 NRA American Warrior 300,
Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 7-Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
Richmond, Va.
Sept. 15 Dollar General 300 powered by
Coca-Cola, Joliet, III.
Sept. 22 Kentucky 300, Sparta, Ky
Sept.29- OneMain Financial 200, Dover, Del.
Oct. 12- Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City,
Kan.
Camping World

Feb. 24 NextEra Energy Resources 250,
Daytona Beach, Fla. (John King)
March 31 Kroger 250, Ridgeway, Va.
(Kevin Harvick)
April 15 Good Sam Roadside Assistance
Carolina 200, Rockingham, N.C. (Kasey
Kahne)
April 21 SFP 250, Kansas City, Kan.
(James Buescher)
May18- N.C. Education Lottery 200, Con-
cord, N.C. (Justin Lofton)
June 1 Lucas Oil 200, Dover, Del. (Todd
Bodine)
June 8 -WinStarWorld Casino 400k, Fort
Worth, Texas (Johnny Sauter)
June 28 UNOH 225, Sparta, Ky (James
Buescher)
July 14- American Ethanol 200, Newton,
Iowa (Timothy Peters)
July 21 -American Ethanol 225, Joliet, III.
(James Buescher)
Aug. 4 Pocono Mountains 125, Long


Pond, Pa. (Joey Coulter)
Aug. 18 -VFW 200, Brooklyn, Mich. (Nel-
son Piquet Jr.)
Aug. 22 NCWTS 200, Bristol, Tenn. (Tim-
othy Peters)
Aug. 31 -Jeff Foxworthy's Grit Chips 200,
Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 15 --American Ethanol 200 (Fall),
Newton, Iowa
Sept. 21 Kentucky 201, Sparta, Ky.
Sept. 29 Smith's 350, Las Vegas


Associated Press

--WATKINS GLEN, N.Y.
n quiet moments and there
aren't many in the world of
auto racing-Michael Printup
often marvels at this juncture of
his professional life: a Seneca In-
dian overseeing a historic race
track by the shores of Seneca Lake.
"When you're Native American,
you're talking about 1 percent of
the population to begin with. I rec-
ognize it I'm proud. It's pretty cool,"
said Printup, who at 47 is complet-
ing his third year as president of
Watkins Glen International, the
famed road course in the Finger
Lakes region of upstate New York
that NASCAR visits each August.
"There's 22 NASCAR facilities,
there's 22 track presidents across
the country, there's one female in
California (Auto Club Speedway
president Gillian Zucker), and me,"
he said. "Everybody else, I'll call
Joe Citizen."
NASCAR created its Drive for
Diversity program to develop mi-
nority drivers and crew members,
and help them advance through
the ranks with the goal of reaching
the sport's top series, Sprint Cup.
Since 2004, the program has in-
cluded more than 40 drivers, with
most being selected more than once.
"The drive for diversity across
the industry is a good thing," said
John Saunders, president of Inter-
national Speedway Corp., which
owns the Watkins Glen track.
"We're starting to see some trac-
tion, particularly at the race track
where young drivers, men and
women of many different cultures,
are coming to the lower divisions of
NASCAR."


SPRINT CUP
ADVOCARE 500
* Site: Hampton, Ga.
* Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 2:30-4
p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday
practice (Speed, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 5:30-6:30
p.m.); Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
* Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-oval, 1.54
miles).
* Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
* Last year: Jeff Gordon won the rain-delayed
race, holding off Hendrick teammate Jimmie
Johnson in a Tuesday finish.
* Last week: Denny Hamlin won at Bristol to
tie Johnson, Tony Stewart and Brad Keselowski
for the series victory lead with three. Johnson
finished second.
* Fast facts: Kasey Kahne, with two victories,
holds the first of the two wild-card spots that will
go to the drivers with the most victories in the
11th-20th spots. The points will be reset to
2,000 for each Chase qualifier, and the top 10
will receive three points for each regular-season
victory ... The track had two Cup races a year
from its opening in 1960 to 2010. Speedway
Motorsports Inc. shifted one of the races to Ken-
tucky Speedway
* Next race: Federated Auto Parts 400, Sept. 8,
Richmond International Raceway Richmond, Va.
* Online: http://www.nascar.com

NATIONWIDE
NRA AMERICAN WARRIOR 300
* Site: Hampton, Ga.
* Schedule: Saturday, practice (Speed, 11:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.),
race, 7 p.m. (ESPN, 6:30-10 p.m.).
* Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-oval, 1.54
miles).
* Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
* Last year: Carl Edwards held off Kyle Busch
after overcoming a pit-stop penalty.
* Last week: Joey Logano raced to his sixth
series victory of the year, chasing down Kevin
Harvick at Bristol and holding on over a series
of late cautions. Defending series champion


Ricky Stenhouse Jr. was second.
* Fast facts: Busch, the series career victory
leader with 51, is winless in 14 starts this sea-
son.
* Next race: Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
Sept. 7, Richmond International Raceway, Rich-
mond, Va.
* Online: http://www.nascar.com

CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
JEFF FOXWORTHY'S GRIT CHIPS 200
* Site: Hampton, Ga.
* Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 1-2:30
p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-6 p.m.), race, 8
p.m. (Speed, 7:30-10:30 p.m.).
* Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-oval, 1.54
miles).
* Race distance: 202.2 miles, 130 laps.
* Last year: Ron Hornaday Jr. raced to the
second of his four 2011 victories, winning on pit
strategy. He has a series-record 51 victories.
* Last race: Timothy Peters won at Bristol on
Aug. 22, leading all 204 laps for his second vic-
tory of the season and fifth overall. Peters eas-
ily pulled away from Red Horse Racing
teammate Parker Kligerman on a green-white-
checkered restart.
* Last week: Brothers Kyle and Kurt Busch are
racing against each other for the first time in the
series. Kyle Busch has fourTruck victories at the
track.
* Next race: American Ethanol 200, Sept. 15,
Iowa Speedway Newton, Iowa.
* Online: http://www.nascarcom

INDYCAR
GRAND PRIX OF BALTIMORE
* Site: Baltimore.
* Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday, prac-
tice, qualifying (NBC Sports Channel, 6-7 p.m.);
Sunday race, 2:45 p.m. (NBC Sports Channel,
2-5 p.m.).
* Track: Streets of Baltimore (street course,
2.0 miles).
* Race distance: 150 miles, 75 laps.
* Last year: Team Penske's Will Power won
the inaugural race for the last of his six 2011


He also served as senior director
for facility development at Michi-
gan International Speedway (MIS)
and unsuccessfully lobbied on be-
half of the company to get a NASCAR
track built on Staten Island.
Printup worked on projects that
resulted in recycling at all of ISC's
race tracks, and while he was at
Michigan was involved with wind
studies, implemented a small solar
project and oversaw wetland reha-
bilitation. He also began to work
with Wayne State University on an
interactive class on solar energy
that was designed to have students
conduct and review wind speeds at
different elevations and observe
and record meteorological condi-
tions, including terrain buffering.
Printup does free coffee and
doughnuts on race weekends for all
campers and has a camp site in the
infield where he interacts with the
clientele. Thousands attend both
events and Printup smiled, nodding
in affirmation, when asked if atten-
dance for the Sprint Cup road race
three weeks ago was up over 2011,
bucking a recent trend in a sport
that's seen on-track attendance suffer
mightily in the troubled economy
"We're very proud of his track
record, no pun intended," Saun-
ders said of Printup. "In terms of
running a racetrack, I've been very
pleased with the progress in ad-
vancing men and women of differ-
ent cultures throughout our
company- Homestead-Miami has
a largely Hispanic staff.
"It's an ongoing journey This is
not something you just say, 'Well,
we crossed the finish line. We're
done with that.' The face of Amer-
ica will always evolve, and you
have to evolve with it."


victories. Oriol Servia was second.
* Last week: Ryan Briscoe won at Sonoma,
holding off Penske teammate Power for his first
victory of the year and eighth overall.
* Fast facts: Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay
each have won three straight races this year.
Powerwon road races at Alabama, Long Beach
and Sao Paulo, and Hunter-Reay won on ovals
at Milwaukee and Iowa and the street course in
Toronto.... The downtown course runs along the
Inner Harbor and goes around Oriole Park at
Camden Yards. ... Josef Newgarden will miss
the race after injuring his left index finger at
Sonoma. Bruno Junqueira will replace Newgar-
den in the Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing entry
... The Indy Lights race also is Sunday (NBC
Sports Channel, 12:30-2 p.m.)
* Next race: MAVTV 500, Sept. 15, Auto Club
Speedway Fontana, Calif.
* Online: http://www.indycar.com

NHRA FULL THROTTLE
U.S. NATIONALS
* Site: Clermont, Ind.
* Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday, qual-
ifying; Sunday qualifying (ESPN2, 11 a.m.-2
p.m., 5-7 p.m.); Monday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
* Track: Lucas Oil Raceway.
* Last year: Antron Brown became the first
U.S. Nationals winner in both Top Fuel and Pro
Stock Motorcycle, beating Del Worsham in the
Top Fuel final. Mike Neff raced to the Funny Car
victory, Greg Anderson won in Pro Stock, and
Hector Arana Jr. topped the Pro Stock Motor-
cycle field.
* Last race: Ron Capps topped the Funny Car
field in Brainerd, Minn., on Aug. 22 to take the
points lead. Erica Enders raced to her third Pro
Stock victory of the season and second in a
row, Morgan Lucas won the Top Fuel division,
and Eddie Krawiec raced to the Pro Stock Mo-
torcycle victory.
* Fast facts: The event ends the 17-race reg-
ular season. The top 10 in each division will
qualify forthe six-race Countdown to the Cham-
pionship.


* Next race: O'Reilly Auto Parts Nationals,
Sept. 14-16, zMAX Dragway Concord, N.C.
* Online: http://www.nhra.com

FORMULA ONE
BELGIAN GRAND PRIX
* Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
* Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.),
Saturday practice, qualifying (Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.);
Sunday race, 8 a.m. (Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.).
* Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road course,
4.35 miles).
* Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.
* Last year: Sebastian Vettel raced to the sev-
enth of his 11 victories en route to his second
straight season title. Red Bull teammate Mark
Webber was second.
* Last race: McLaren's Lewis Hamilton won
the Hungarian Grand Prix on July 29 for his sec-
ond victory of the year, holding off Lotus' Kimi
Raikkonen.
* Fast facts: The course is the longest in Fl.
* Next race: Italian Grand Prix, Sept. 9, Auto-
dromo di Monza, Monza, Italy.
* Online: http://www.formulal cornn

OTHER RACES
m ARCA RACING SERIES: Southern Illinois
100, Monday, DuQuoin State Fairgrounds,
DuQuoin, II. Online: http://www.arcaracing.com
* AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Baltimore
Sports Car Challenge, Saturday (ABC, Satur-
day noon-2 p.m.), Streets of Baltimore, Balti-
more. Online: http://www.americanlemans.com
* WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car: Friday-
Saturday Skagit Speedway Alger, Wash.; Mon-
day, Willamette Speedway Lebanon, Ore. Late
Model: Saturday, Tyler County Speedway, Mid-
dlebourne, W.Va. Super DirtCar: Sunday,
Rolling Wheels Raceway Elbridge, N.Y Online:
http://www.worldofoutlaws.com
* U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Silver Crown:
Ted Horn 100, Sunday, DuQuoin State Fair-
grounds, DuQuoin, II. Sprint Car: Friday, Tri-City
Speedway, Pontoon Beach, Ill.; Saturday, Terre
Haute Action Track, Terre Haute, IIl. Online:
http://www.usacracing.com


1. Klaus Graf, 140
(tie) Lucas Luhr, 140
3. Chris Dyson, 128
(tie) Guy Smith, 128
5. Eric Lux, 67
6. Michael Marsal, 54
7. Tony Burgess, 28
8. Steve Kane, 24
9. Simon Pagenaud, 20
10. Johnny Mowlem, 18


Associated Press
Michael Printup, president of Watkins Glen International, poses Aug. 10 during practice for the NASCAR Nationwide
Series race in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Printup often marvels at this juncture of his professional life: a Seneca Indian
overseeing a historic race track by the shores of Seneca Lake.






The good new days



Watkins Glen president a testament to diversity


Printup, whose father is 100 per-
cent Seneca, grew up in Hamburg
in western New York and became
enamored with motor sports as a
youngster, often traveling to see
Formula One's U.S. Grand Prix,
which was at Watkins Glen from
1961-80.
"I grew up as a race fan but
never had the desire to get into it,
which is kind of weird," Printup
said. "I was coming here when I
was a kid because it was only 2 1/2
hours away. My last U.S. Grand
Prix was 1975 and my brother still
has the program. It was (Niki) Lauda,
Emo (Emerson Fittipaldi) 1-2. They
started 1-2 and they finished 1-2."
Printup landed at ISC by chance.
He was working for Delaware North
in sports facility management at
the 1996 Summer Olympics in At-
lanta and the company was about
to take over management of Cali-
fornia Speedway
"I remember the owner of the
company, Jerry Jacobs Jr, said, 'A
guy, Roger Penske, ever hear of
him? Roger Penske's building a
racetrack,"' Printup recalled with
a laugh. "They said, 'Would you
mind moving to California?' I had
just got married, and I said, 'Sure."'
ISC, which was formed by
NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. in
1953, merged with Penske Motor-
sports in 1999 to become one of the
largest motorsports companies in
North America. Printup made the
transition when ISC took over Cal-
ifornia Speedway (renamed Auto
Club Speedway) and has held vari-
ous positions in the company dur-
ing the past 12 years, including vice
president of Americrown Services
Corp. and 380 Development LLC,
wholly owned subsidiaries of ISC.


Around the TRACKS


Point
LEADERS


Sprint Cup
1. Greg Biffle, 849.
2. Jimmie Johnson, 838.
3. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 834.
4. Matt Kenseth, 823.
5. Martin Truex Jr., 797.
6. Clint Bowyer, 794.
7. Brad Keselowski, 790.
8. Denny Hamlin, 774.
9. Kevin Harvick, 767.
10. Tony Stewart, 746.
11. Kasey Kahne, 730.
12. Carl Edwards, 712.
13. Kyle Busch, 707.
14. Jeff Gordon, 691.
15. Ryan Newman, 688.
16. Marcos Ambrose, 679.
17. Paul Menard, 674.
18. Joey Logano, 638.
19. Jamie McMurray 598.
20. Jeff Burton, 577.
Nationwide Series
1. Elliott Sadler, 864.
2. Ricky Stenhouse Jr, 845.
3. Sam Hornish Jr., 836.
4. Austin Dillon, 829.
5. Justin Allgaier, 770.
6. Michael Annett, 726.
7. Cole Whitt, 671.
8. Mike Bliss, 640.
9. Brian Scott, 550.
10. Danica Patrick, 539.
11. Joe Nemechek, 539.
12. Mike Wallace, 519.
13. Tayler Malsam, 511.
14. Jason Bowles, 505.
15. Jeremy Clements, 497.
16. Erik Darnell, 368.
17. Eric McClure, 344.
18. Timmy Hill, 343.
19. Johanna Long, 330.
20. Brad Sweet, 274.
Camping World
1. Timothy Peters, 497.
2. James Buescher, 480.
3. Ty Dillon, 472.
4. Justin Lofton, 466.
5. Parker Kligerman, 466.
6. Matt Crafton, 448.
7. Joey Coulter, 446.
8. Ron Hornaday Jr., 422.
9. Nelson Piquet Jr., 418.
10. Jason White, 401.
11. Miguel Paludo, 383.
12. Johnny Sauter, 365.
13. Cale Gale, 346.
14.Todd Bodine, 338.
15. Dakoda Armstrong, 336.
16. Ross Chastain, 320.
17. David Starr, 296.
18. John WesTownley 287.
19. Ryan Sieg, 280.
20. Bryan Silas, 274.
NHRA
Top Fuel
1. Antron Brown, 1,335.
2. Spencer Massey 1,277.
3. Tony Schumacher, 1,196.
4. Steve Torrence, 1,139.
5. Doug Kalitta, 971.
Funny Car
1. Ron Capps, 1,228.
2. Robert Hight, 1,175.
3. Jack Beckman, 1,068.
4. Johnny Gray, 999.
5. Mike Neff, 988.
Pro Stock
1. Allen Johnson, 1,432.
2. Jason Line, 1,298.
3. Greg Anderson, 1,270.
4. Mike Edwards, 1,090.
5. Erica Enders, 1,065.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Eddie Krawiec, 962.
2. Andrew Hines, 856.
3. Hector Arana Jr, 760.
4. Hector Arana, 630.
5. Karen Stoffer, 504.
IndyCar
1. Will Power, 422.
2. Ryan Hunter-Reay 386.
3. Helio Castroneves, 381.
4. Scott Dixon, 368.
5. Simon Pagenaud, 337.
6. Tony Kanaan, 327.
7. James Hinchcliffe, 326.
8. Ryan Briscoe, 317.
9. Dario Franchitti, 306.
10. Graham Rahal, 286.
11.J.R. Hildebrand, 257.
12. Justin Wilson, 253.
13. Oriol Servia, 249.
14. Rubens Barrichello, 247.
15.Takuma Sato, 243.
16. Marco Andretti, 237.
17. Alex Tagliani, 236.
18. Charlie Kimball, 228.
19. Mike Conway, 219.
20. E.J. Viso, 212.
Formula One
1. Fernando Alonso, 164.
2. Mark Webber, 124.
3. Sebastian Vettel, 122.
4. Lewis Hamilton, 117.
5. Kimi Raikkonen, 116.
6. Nico Rosberg, 77.
7. Jenson Button, 76.
8. Romain Grosjean, 76.
9. Sergio Perez, 47.
10.Kamui Kobayashi, 33.
11. Pastor Maldonado, 29.
12. Michael Schumacher, 29.
13. Paul di Resta, 27.
14. Felipe Massa, 25.
15. Bruno Senna, 24.
16. Nico Hulkenberg, 19.
17. Jean-Eric Vergne, 4.
18. Daniel Ricciardo, 2.
Grand-Am Rolex
1. Memo Rojas, 330
(tie) Scott Pruett, 330
3. Ryan Dalziel, 312
4. Darren Law, 303
5. Alex Popow, 298
(tie) David Donohue, 298
7. Joao Barbosa, 290
8. John Pew, 285
(tie) Oswaldo Negri Jr., 285
9. Max Angelelli, 284
(tie) Ricky Taylor, 284
American Le Mans





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 9 S. Carolina rallies


Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Ninth-ranked South Car-
olina and coach Steve
Spurrier got a big scare to
open the season. Marcus
Lattimore and Connor
Shaw helped the Game-
cocks grind their way
through past scrappy Van-
derbilt.
Lattimore ran for two
touchdowns and 110 yards
in his first game back after
tearing his left ACL, and
Shaw ran for 92 yards while
playing the second half with
an injured shoulder as No.
9 South Carolina rallied for
a 17-13 victory against Van-
derbilt on Thursday night.
"Maybe it's good for us
...," Spurrier said. "You look
at the preseason press we
thought we were hot stuff.


Associated Press
South Carolina's D. J. Swearinger (36) breaks up a pass in-
tended for Vanderbilt's Jonathan Krause (17) in the second
half of an NCAA college football game Thursdayin Nashville,
Tenn. South Carolina won 17-13.


Then we almost got that
stuff beat out of us."
This is the highest rank-
ing South Carolina has ever


started a season, and the
Gamecocks are expected to
challenge for an SEC East
title after going 11-2 last


season.
But Shaw bruised his
right, throwing shoulder
late in the first half and
missed the first two series
of the third quarter before
returning. The junior drove
the Gamecocks for the go-
ahead touchdown and ran
12 yards to the Vandy 1 be-
fore rolling in pain in the
end zone.
Lattimore scored the go-
ahead TD on a 1-yard run
with 11:25 to go.
"They gave me some
medicine," Shaw said. "I got
a ball and just started work-
ing out, I didn't want it to get
stiff on me. It was painful,
but I got through it."
Spurrier called Shaw's
performance gutsy after
taking a helmet to the
shoulder blade that left his
throwing shoulder bruised


but not dislocated. Spurrier
said Shaw even assured
him he could pick up a first
down inside the final
minute to make sure the
Gamecocks ran out the
clock to seal the win.
"He'll be sore for a while.
I think he should be OK.
Had some nice runs there.
He was hurting a little bit.
That's what it took,"
Spurrier said.
Vanderbilt had plenty of
time to attempt a come-
back, the last with 5:08 left.
But the Commodores
turned it over on downs
with 1:47 to go when Jordan
Matthews couldn't handle a
fourth-down pass from Jor-
dan Rodgers. Gamecocks
defensive back D.J.
Swearinger appeared to
grab Matthews' arm before
the ball arrived.


"You did know the SEC
just came out with very
clear rules about talking
about the officials and what
happens after games," Van-
derbilt coach James
Franklin. "Trying to get me
fined?"
Matthews refused to com-
ment on the no-call, though
he waved his arms looking
for a flag.
Vanderbilt didn't have the
sellout crowd Franklin
wanted, but most of the
38,393 who did turn out
were wearing black as part
of a "blackout." The Com-
modores came up with
three sacks and forced two
turnovers, and they out-
gained South Carolina 276-
272 in total offense. But
South Carolina had a 115-17
advantage in the fourth
quarter.


Detroit Lions beat the Buffalo Bills 38-32


Associated Press

DETROIT Matthew
Stafford threw a 24-yard
touchdown pass to Calvin
Johnson and the Detroit
Lions went on to beat the
Buffalo Bills 38-32 Thursday
night.
Stafford and Johnson
went to the sideline healthy
after their only drive to
make the Lions happy that
their dynamic duo avoided
injuries in the fourth and
final preseason game.
Detroit's offense, defense
and special teams con-
tributed toward the Lions
(2-2) taking a 28-7 lead in the
first quarter over the Bills
(0-4).
Buffalo quarterback Ryan
Fitzpatrick completed all
five of his passes, including
a 4-yard TD pass to Stevie
Johnson, on his first and last
possession.
The Bills gave Tyler Thig-
pen an extended opportu-
nity to keep his job as their
No. 2 QB and he didn't take
advantage of it. Thigpen had
an interception returned for
a touchdown in his second
straight game.
Steelers 17, Panthers 16
PITTSBURGH Charlie
Batch completed 11 of 14
passes for 102 yards and a
touchdown to bolster his hopes
of playing a 15th NFL season
and Pittsburgh beat Carolina in
its preseason finale.
Batch hit Emmanuel Sanders
for a 37-yard play on Pitts-
burgh's first drive and later
found Will Johnson for a 27-
yard gain to set up a field goal
as the Steelers (3-1) won a bat-
tle of the backups against the
Panthers (2-2).
Carolina quarterback Jimmy
Clausen passed for 173 yards
and two touchdowns, including
a 79-yard score to rookie Lam-
ont Bryant with 2:31 to play to
bring the Panthers within a
point. The 2-point conversion
failed, however, and kicker
Justin Medlock missed a 50-
yard field goal with 32 seconds
left.
Bears 28, Browns 20
CLEVELAND Quarter-
back Colt McCoy did little to so-
lidify winning Cleveland's
backup job or impress any
other NFL team and
Chicago's Josh McCown threw
two touchdown passes in the
first half, leading the Bears over
the Browns in the exhibition fi-
nale.
McCoy, who lost his starting
job in training camp to rookie
Brandon Weeden, is battling
Seneca Wallace to be Cleve-
land's No. 2 QB. McCoy went 2
of 5 for 16 yards and an inter-
ception.
The Bears (3-1) returned an
interception and blocked punt
for TDs in a 90-second span of
the third quarter to pull away
from the Browns (2-2).
McCown played the entire
game, finishing 20 of 29 for 157
yards and the two TDs. He will
sit behind starter Jay Cutler and
Jason Campbell.
Colts 20, Bengals 16
INDIANAPOLIS Chandler
Harnish threw a 42-yard touch-
down pass to tight end Do-
minique Jones, leading the
Colts over Cincinnati in the pre-
season finale.
Neither starting quarterback
stuck around long. No. 1 draft
pick Andrew Luck left after
Indy's first series.


Bengals quarterback Andy
Dalton left with a bruised right
arm after just six plays. Coach
Marvin Lewis later said Dalton
would have returned had it
been a regular season game.
That left the heavy-lifting to
the backups and the offi-
cials, who called 24 penalties.
Behind Harnish, the last se-
lection in this year's draft, Indy
(2-2) rallied from a 10-0 deficit
to take a 14-13 halftime lead.
Eagles 28, Jets 10
PHILADELPHIA- Greg
McElroy became the first quar-
terback to lead the Jets into the
end zone this preseason in a
loss to Philadelphia.
Mark Sanchez, Tim Tebow
and most of the Jets starters
didn't play in this battle between
backups and guys fighting for
roster spots.
Michael Vick and all of
Philadelphia's starters watched
from the sideline.
Trent Edwards threw for 197
yards and two TDs to help the
Eagles (4-0) finish unbeaten in
the preseason for the first time
since 1995.
Texans 28, Vikings 24
HOUSTON Trindon Holli-
day had his third kick return for
a touchdown of the preseason
and Justin Forsett rushed for
114 yards and two more scores
in Houston's win over Min-
nesota in the preseason finale.
Holliday brought back a punt
76 yards for a touchdown in the
third quarter, bolstering his case
to make the Texans (3-1) solely
as a special teams threat.
Forsett broke a 52-yard run on
Houston's second play from
scrimmage and set a Texans'
rushing record for a preseason
game.
Jaguars 24, Falcons 14
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Kevin Elliott had a 77-yard
touchdown reception, likely so-
lidifying his spot on the regular-
season roster, and Jacksonville
beat Atlanta.
The teams took vastly differ-
ent approaches to the game.
The Jaguars (3-1) played their
offensive starters into the sec-
ond quarter; the Falcons (1-3)
played just two regulars: line-
backer Akeem Dent and defen-
sive tackle Peria Jerry.
The results hardly showed
that.
Jaguars quarterback Blaine
Gabbert fumbled on the open-
ing play. Trying to pitch to
Rashad Jennings, Gabbert's
toss hit fullback Greg Jones in
the backside. The Falcons re-
covered, and Jacquizz Rodgers
scored on the next play. Gab-
bert and his fellow starters
stayed in for 25 plays, but failed
to score.
Rams 31, Ravens 17
ST. LOUIS Sam Bradford
threw three touchdown passes
in 1/2 quarters, giving St. Louis
a win over Baltimore to end the
preseason.
Rams coach Jeff Fisher, tak-
ing over a franchise that has to-
taled 15 wins in the past five
seasons, used virtually all of his
starters until the score was 21-
0 on a 9-yard catch by Mike
Hoomanawanui with 6:59 to go
in the half. Bradford threw five
touchdown passes in the pre-
season, all of them at home for
the Rams (2-2).
Ravens coach John Har-
baugh, gearing up for a Super
Bowl run after losing in the AFC
title game last season, started
just a handful of his regulars.


-.mulo 4 J


Associated Press
Detroit Lions quarterback Shaun Hill (14) dives into the end zone for a touchdown over guard Dylan Gandy (65) Thursday
during the first half of an NFL preseason football game against the Buffalo Bills in Detroit.


The Ravens committed four
turnovers and Tyrod Taylor
started at quarterback for Joe
Flacco, and they also rested
running back Ray Rice and
linebacker Ray Lewis.
Broncos 16, Cardinals 13
GLENDALE, Ariz. While
Peyton Manning watched, Den-
ver's reserves pulled out a wild
one in the desert.
Manning and the rest of the
Broncos' starters took the fourth
game of the preseason off, and
Denver got a 44-yard field goal
from Matt Prater as the game
ended to beat Arizona.
Omar Bolden, a fourth-round
draft pick from nearby Arizona
State, returned a kickoff 103
yards for a touchdown to ignite
a second-half comeback for
Denver (2-2).
In contrast to the Broncos,
Arizona used 10 starters on of-
fense and 10 on defense in the
game's first few series. The
Cardinals' two candidates for
starting quarterback, John Skel-
ton and Kevin Kolb, did not
play.
Packers 24, Chiefs 3
GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Backup quarterback Graham
Harrell finally came through
with the strong preseason per-


formance Green Bay were
looking for, driving the offense
for touchdowns on all three of
his possessions in a victory
over Kansas City.
Harrell completed 13 of 15
passes for 223 yards with two
touchdowns in both teams' final
tuneup
Second-year running back
Alex Green had touchdowns
rushing and receiving, and Jar-
rett Boykin caught a touchdown
for the Packers (2-2).
Peyton Hillis had 46 yards on
six carries early on and the
Chiefs (1-3) rushed for 247
yards.
Defensive tackle B.J. Raji ap-
peared to hurt his left ankle on
the Packers' first defensive
play, but was able to walk off
the field without assistance.
49ers 35, Chargers 3
SAN FRANCISCO De-
lanie Walker caught a 32-yard
touchdown pass from backup
quarterback Colin Kaepernick,
Alex Smith handed off five
times before calling it a night
and San Francisco wrapped up
the preseason with a win over
San Diego.
Walker returned to action for
the first time since the exhibi-
tion opener after he injured his
right knee during practice on


Aug. 12. He missed time late
last season with a broken left
jaw before returning for the
NFC championship, so the TD
catch will only serve as a boost
heading into the regular season
next weekend for the 49ers (3-
1).
Philip Rivers went 8 for 10 for
89 yards and an interception in
one quarter for San Diego (3-
1), which will be back in the
Bay Area to open the season
on Monday Night Football Sept.
10 at Oakland.
Seahawks 21, Raiders 3
SEATTLE Rookie quarter-
back Russell Wilson played just
one quarter in his final tuneup
before the regular season, so
high-priced backup Matt Flynn
led Seattle on three scoring
drives.
The Seahawks (4-0) closed
out the second perfect presea-
son in franchise history with a
win over Oakland (1-3).
Wilson saw limited action just
days after winning the quarter-
back competition and being
chosen the regular-season
starter. Flynn played most of
the second and third quarters
and led Seattle to a pair of
touchdowns.
Oakland starting quarterback
Carson Palmer saw six snaps


and handed off on all of them,
including a pair of third-down
running plays. Darren McFad-
den never saw the field.
With Palmer getting a short
stint, Matt Leinart played the re-
mainder of the first half and
was unimpressive. Leinart was
3 of 11 for 14 yards with an in-
terception and a passer rating
of 1.7.
Titans 10, Saints 6
NASHVILLE, Tenn. New
Orleans took no chances in its
final preseason game, resting
all starters in a loss to Ten-
nessee.
The Saints prepare to return
home to storm-ravaged
Louisiana and put a scandal-
ridden offseason behind them.
Saints interim coach Joe Vitt
scratched 26 players, including
starting quarterback Drew
Brees and their top three run-
ning backs and wide receivers,
ensuring the team will be on
solid footing as he begins a
suspension for the pay-for-in-
jury scheme by New Orleans
(2-3).
Offensive line coach Aaron
Kromer will lead the team into
its Sept. 9 regular-season
opener against the Washington
Redskins.


FOOTBALL


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 B3





B4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012


SCOREBOARD


AMERICAN LEAGUE For the record


Wednesday's games
Toronto 8, N.Y Yankees 5
Chicago White Sox 8, Baltimore 1
Oakland 8, Cleveland 4
Tampa Bay 8, Texas 4
Kansas City 1, Detroit 0
Minnesota 10, Seattle 0
L.A. Angels 10, Boston 3
Thursday's games
Oakland 12, Cleveland 7
Baltimore 5, Chicago White Sox 3
Seattle 5, Minnesota 4
Toronto 2, Tampa Bay 0
Kansas City 2, Detroit 1
L.A. Angels 5, Boston 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday's games
L.A. Dodgers 10, Colorado 8
Cincinnati 6, Arizona 2
San Diego 8, Atlanta 2
N.Y Mets 3, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 0
Washington 8, Miami 4
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 6, Houston 4
Thursday's games
Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago Cubs 12, Milwaukee 11
Washington 8, St. Louis 1
San Francisco 8, Houston 4
Arizona 2, L.A. Dodgers 0


Odds to Win AdvoCare 500
DRIVER 0
Jimmie Johnson
Greg Biffle
Kyle Busch
Matt Kenseth
Carl Edwards
Kasey Kahne
Tony Stewart
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Jeff Gordon
Denny Hamlin
Brad Keselowski
Kevin Harvick
Mark Martin
Clint Bowyer
Martin Truex Jr.
Joey Logano
Ryan Newman
Marcos Ambrose
Jeff Burton
Kurt Busch
Juan Pablo Montoya
Aric Almirola 1
Jamie McMurray 1
Paul Menard 1
Field (All Others) E


== Florida LOTTERY

Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
... CASH 3 (early)
2 -2-2-9
CASH 3 (late)
2-7-2

PLAY 4 (early)
5-9-7-5
PLAY 4 (late)
4-4-0-0

Florida te FANTASY5
S 1-5-16-19-34


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Mets at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boise State at Michigan State
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Washington State at BYU (same-day tape)
CFL FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) BC Lions at Montreal Alouettes
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.) vs. Columbus (Fla.)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega European
Masters, second round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Deutsche Bank Championship, first
round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGAWeb.com Tour: Mylan Classic, second
round (same-day tape)
SOCCER
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado Rapids at Portland Timbers
TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) U.S. Open: Men's second round and
women's third round
7 p.m. (ESPN2) U.S. Open: Men's second round and
women's third round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. Seven Rivers at Branford
7:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Chiefland at Lecanto
7:30 p.m. Harmony at Citrus
7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Nature Coast
7:30 p.m. West Port at Dunnellon


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Rays' Ben Zobrist can't catch a ground ball Thursday in the sixth inning
against the Toronto Blue Jays.


Villanueva leads Blue Jays


past slumping Rays 2-0


Associated Press

TORONTO Shutout losses are becoming
a troubling trend for the Tampa Bay Rays.
Carlos Villanueva pitched six sharp in-
nings and the Toronto Blue Jays beat
slumping Tampa Bay 2-0 on Thursday
night, snapping a five-game losing streak
against the Rays.
Tampa Bay lost for the fifth time in six
games and dropped 112 games behind Bal-
timore for the second AL wild-card berth.
The Rays have been blanked twice in the
past three games, and six of their nine
shutout losses this season have come in the
past 25 games.
"We've played that story way too often
and we've got to get by it somehow," man-
ager Joe Maddon said.
Tampa Bay, beaten 1-0 at Texas on Tues-
day, has lost a major league-worst 10 times
when allowing two runs or less.
"There's not a whole lot to say about it,"
outfielder Sam Fuld said. "You just try to
bounce back."
Kelly Johnson hit a two-run double in the
first inning and Toronto won consecutive
games for the first time since Aug. 12-13, im-
proving to 3-9 against the Rays this season.
Pitching despite an illness, Villanueva (7-
4) allowed five hits all singles to win
for the first time since July 27 against De-
troit. The right-hander had gone 0-4 in five
starts since, despite never allowing more
than four earned runs. He walked one and
struck out seven, including six straight dur-
ing one stretch to tie a club record.
"Carlos was fighting a low-grade fever all
afternoon and through the six innings he
pitched tonight," Blue Jays manager John
Farrell said. "But he was outstanding
again."


It was the first win in five career appear-
ances against Tampa Bay for Villanueva,
who entered 0-1 with a 9.00 ERA against the
Rays. He said the illness forced him to work
slowly and conserve as much energy as
possible.
"It's just satisfying to beat Tampa," Vil-
lanueva said. "They've given me a lot of
trouble since I came to the East last year"
Fuld praised Villanueva's command and
his assortment of off-speed pitches.
"His changeup is really good and the
slider I saw from him came out of his hand
like a fastball," Fuld said. "That's the defi-
nition of good off-speed stuff, the stuff that
looks like a fastball out of the hand, and
that was certainly the case tonight."
Darren Oliver and Brad Lincoln each
worked one inning and Casey Janssen fin-
ished for his 18th save in 21 chances.
The hard-luck loser was Rays rookie left-
hander Matt Moore, who allowed two runs
and six hits in six innings. Moore walked
three, two in the decisive first inning, and
struck out seven. The loss was his first since
July 22 against Seattle.
Moore (10-8) got two quick outs in the first
but couldn't wrap things up. Edwin Encar-
nacion walked, Adam Lind singled and
Yunel Escobar walked to load the bases for
Johnson, who doubled into the right-field
corner.
"Moore has got a good fastball and I was
just looking for the first one I could han-
dle," Johnson said.
One strike from retiring Encarnacion,
Moore said he regretted not going after the
Toronto slugger.
"I quit what I was doing the first two hit-
ters," Moore said. "I don't know what it was,
it just felt like I was getting a little giddy,
kind of jumping at the glove a little bit"


OPEN
Continued from Page B1

against Kerber, who was a
semifinalist in New York
last year. Williams was bro-
ken each of the first five
times she served and nine
times overall.
"It's been a long time; I
usually don't have that
many breaks," Williams
said.
She only hit one ace,
more than 1 1/2 hours into
the match, in her 10th serv-
ice game of the evening.
Kerber reeled off six con-
secutive games in one
stretch from the first set to
the second, while Williams'
mother, Oracene Price,
rested her chin on her right
hand in the stands.
Williams made things in-
teresting, though.
"I was nervous at the end
of the second set. I mean, I
was a little bit nervous and
playing also not so aggres-
sive. I was too defensive,"
Kerber said.
Then, after Williams led
4-2 in the third set, and was
two points away from vic-
tory while leading 5-4 as
Kerber served, it all came
apart again down the
stretch for the American.
Usually stoic during
matches, whether winning
or losing, Williams was as
animated as she gets, rais-
ing a clenched fist or
yelling "Come on!" after
those rare instances when
she did control the action
- and dropping her head
or rolling her eyes or even
swiping her racket on the
court after missed shots.
It was the left-handed
Kerber's tour-leading 55th
match win of the year, and
she even showed off a little
ingenuity, twice shifting the
racket to her right hand to
extend exchanges. She
even won one, somehow
connecting with enough
oomph righty to get the ball
over to the other side.
Williams, perhaps stunned
the point wasn't over,
pushed a swinging back-
hand volley into the net
while staggering forward.
That kind of night for
Williams, who even had is-
sues with an earring that
came out of her right lobe
and the wrapping on her
racket handle, which she
replaced during a
changeover.
Her U.S. Open is over,
and Roddick's career will
be whenever his last match
of this tournament ends.
He made his surprising
announcement at a hastily
arranged news conference
at the site of his biggest tri-
umph the 2003 champi-
onship, the last time an
American man won a



FOOTBALL
Continued from Page B1

"It's definitely nice to
open in front of our fans and
the band," Greene said.
"Last year it seemed like we
were on the road every
week.
"That whole night was
just a fiasco," he added, dis-
cussing last year's opener.
"We got out there and we
didn't play well. It was a ter-
rible way to start the season.
I think the kids are looking
forward to playing them. It
left a pretty bad taste in our
mouth."
The 7A Longhorns (3-8 in
2011), meanwhile, have
more than extended travel
time to worry about. They
lost 49-6 to FirstAcademy of
Orlando in a preseason
matchup last Friday and
now face an improved Cit-
rus club with redemption on
its mind.
Chronicle pick: Citrus by
at least three touchdowns.

Crystal River Pirates
at Nature Coast Tech
Sharks, 7:30 p.m.
Crystal River makes its


way down to the Shark Tank
near Brooksville for what
will be second-year Crystal
River coach Greg Fowler's
first game against Nature
Coast. It will be a substan-
tial step up in competition
for the Pirates a week after
they upended Weeki
Wachee 59-12 in preseason
play
Crystal River senior quar-
terback Joe LaFleur threw
for 299 yards and five touch-
downs, while connecting on
10 of 13 passes despite a
pair of drops by his re-
ceivers against the first-year


No. 23-seeded
Fish came back
to beat two-time
semifinalist Nikolay
Davydenko 4-6,
6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-1,
6-2, the tourna-
ment-record
10th match in
which a man
erased a two-set
deficit and came
all the way back
to win.

Grand Slam singles trophy.
"I just feel like it's time,"
said Roddick, who is
seeded 20th.
He is scheduled to play
19-year-old Bernard Tomic
of Australia in the second
round Friday night.
Roddick's impending de-
parture overshadowed
some otherwise notewor-
thy on-court developments
Thursday afternoon.
There was the loss by
fifth-seeded Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, the 2008 Australian
Open runner-up, against a
man ranked 52nd.
And there was a spate of
victories by American men,
two who are Roddick's con-
temporaries and good pals
(32-year-old James Blake
and 30-year-old Mardy
Fish), and two who have
been viewed as possible
successors as the best the
country has to offer in the
sport (19-year-old Jack
Sock and 24-year-old Sam
Querrey).
"I saw the press confer-
ence just before I came out
here. I had a feeling,
thought it might be, be-
cause he's someone who
puts heart and soul into
every match. It gets
tougher as you get older,
and I don't think he could
keep doing it the same
way," said the 115th-ranked
Blake, whose 6-1, 6-4, 6-2
upset of No. 24 Marcel Gra-
nollers of Spain was stun-
ning for its ease.
No. 23-seeded Fish came
back to beat two-time U.S.
Open semifinalist Nikolay
Davydenko 4-6, 6-7 (4), 6-2,
6-1, 6-2, the tournament-
record 10th match in which
a man erased a two-set
deficit and came all the
way back to win.
Davydenko's takeaway?
Men should be playing
best-of-three-set matches
at Grand Slam tourna-
ments, the way women do.
"Why (do) girls play best
of three sets and we should
play best of five sets and


Hornets squad. The Pirates
(5-5 in 2011) are also led of-
fensively by returning
Chronicle co-Player of the
Year Dallas Baldner, who
ran for a game-high 128
yards last week.
The Sharks narrowly
missed the playoffs with a 6-
4 overall record last year
under then first-year coach
Charles Liggett. They are
led by senior running back
Matt Breida, a Division I re-
cruit who led Hernando
County with 208 rushes for
1,613 yards and 20 touch-
downs a season ago.
Chronicle pick: Crystal
River by 10.

West Port Wolf Pack
at Dunnellon Tigers,
7:30 p.m.
Dunnellon overcame a
strong comeback effort by
Lecanto in a flag-filled pre-
season contest to beat the
Panthers 33-23 (27-17 be-
tween varsity squads) last
week. Buoyed by senior
quarterback Jordon Boley's
4 of 6 passing for 117 yards
and two TDs in the Tigers'
new pistol offense, Dunnel-
lon (6-4 in 2011) jumped out
to a 20-3 lead in the second
quarter.
The 7A Wolf Pack (4-6 in


2011) are expected to be a
formidable test for area
teams this season, but they
stumbled offensively
against Belleview for much
of Friday's Preseason Clas-
sic, which West Port won 13-
3.
Chronicle pick: Dunnel-
lon by two touchdowns.

Seven Rivers Christian
Warriors at Branford
Buccaneers, 7:30 p.m.
Seven Rivers Christian
goes north to Suwannee


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

have the same prize
money?" Davydenko said,
reviving a familiar debate.
"Why are we playing five-
set matches? We need to
play best of three in Grand
Slams. Everybody will sup-
port (that idea, even Roger)
Federer. For Federer, it's
easy to win in one hour, two
sets. No need to run (for) a
third set," Davydenko said.
Of course, for Federer,
winning three sets before
his opponent does never
has been much of a prob-
lem, and the 17-time major
champion moved into the
third round with a routine
6-2, 6-3, 6-2 victory over
83rd-ranked Bjorn Phau of
Germany on Thursday
night.
Naturally, he was asked
about Roddick, a guy Fed-
erer beat in all four Grand
Slam finals they played
against each other, includ-
ing one at the U.S. Open
and three at Wimbledon.
"Oh, man. He's a great
man," Federer said. "I've
had some great battles with
him for a long, long time.
Obviously, the Wimbledon
finals come to mind, the
ones we played together.
He's a great, great competi-
tor and a great champion,
really"
Looking ahead to Friday,
Federer also mentioned
that he thinks Roddick
"truly deserves a great ova-
tion, a great atmosphere, a
great crowd. ... I'm defi-
nitely going to watch it. It's
not one to miss, and I hope
it's not his last."
Querrey also echoed the
sentiments of plenty of oth-
ers about Roddick's decision.
"He's been my biggest
role model the last 10
years, playing tennis,
watching tennis. He's been
a really great guy, a great
leader to us all. Nice and
kind. Really generous to
the up-and-comers," Quer-
rey said after beating
Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo of
Spain 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 to reach
the third round. "For me,
for ... the 18-year-olds now,
he's just been an unbeliev-
able champion, a Hall of
Famer."
While few seemed to
have an inkling that Rod-
dick would say farewell
during these two weeks, 14-
time major champion Ser-
ena Williams, for one, was
not taken aback.
Indeed, after beating
Maria Jose Martinez
Sanchez of Spain 6-2, 6-4,
the younger Williams said
she knew this was coming.
"I mean, he told me a
while ago last year -
that this would be it," she
said. "We were talking
about it. I was just thinking,
'Change your mind, Andy.
Change your mind.' But I
guess he didn't."


County to battle with Bran-
ford (2-8 in 2011) without
the luxury of a proper
spring and fall preseason
game. The Warriors de-
feated the Buccaneers 20-
14 to open last season, but
are trying to overcome key
losses to that team as they
rely on the exceptional tal-
ents of senior John
Iwaniec, who led the
county with 1,800 rushing
yards in 2011.
Seven Rivers won its
Northern Division in the
Sunshine State Conference
last year, finishing 7-3 over-
all, and is led by first-year
head coach Dave Iwaniec -
an assistant within the pro-
gram since its inception
three seasons ago this
fall.
Chronicle pick: Branford
by a touchdown.
Chiefland Indians at
Lecanto Panthers,
7:30 p.m.
Lecanto coach McKinley
Rolle wanted his team to
focus on fundamentals this
week in the runup to its sea-
son opener against 1A
Chiefland after his squad
and Dunnellon combined


for 28 penalties in three
quarters in last Friday's pre-
season action. Lecanto (3-7
in 2011) fell to the Tigers 33-
23, but narrowed a 20-3 sec-
ond-quarter deficit with a
pair of passing TDs by jun-
ior quarterback Christian
Barber (7 of 14 passing, 161
yards) to make it 20-17 late
in the third.
Chiefland is trying to end
a 23-game losing streak, but
has to hit the road to take on
a Panther team that blanked
the Indians 17-0 in Rolle's
first game as coach in last
year's opener.
Chronicle pick: Lecanto
by three touchdowns.











SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hopeless diamond curses Encore's cast


Special to the Chronicle
Cast members of "The Curse of the Hopeless Diamond" are
from left Michael Shier II as Harry Dinker, Fran Scott as Fe-
licity Crump, Sean Crosley as Dandy, Ashley Kisner as Kelly
Boggs and Ted Taylor as Basil Benchley. On the floor are Pam
Schrek as Daphnee Lee and Mike Shier Sr. as Reggie Potter.


Murder-mystery

show opens next

weekend

Special to the Chronicle
For its show of the 2012
season, Encore Ensemble
Theater is undertaking an-
other murder-mystery writ-
ten by Eileen Moushey and
adding its trademark blend
of comedy, music and a deli-
cious catered meal.
"The Curse of the Hope-
less Diamond" will be per-
formed Friday, Sept. 7,
Saturday, Sept. 8, and Sun-


day, Sept. 9, in the Encore
Ensemble Ballroom at Cen-
tral Ridge Community Cen-
ter in Beverly Hills. Tickets
for the dinner and show are
$25 for the public and $20
for CRCC members. Seating
is by reservation only, so call
ahead.
For show times, informa-
tion, or to reserve tickets,
call the Encore Ensemble
Box Office at 352-212-5417.
The play focuses on Regi-
nald Potter and his young
(and some say gold-digging)
wife, Daphne, who wants to
revive her Vegas career by
performing with her latest
"arm-candy" Dandy and
using Reggie's money to
bankroll it. Unfortunately,


he doesn't have money -
just the famous, fabulous
and very cursed Potter Dia-
mond. Reggie has enlisted
famous detectives to guard
the jewel and protect him
from the curse.
Cast members are Ashley
Kisner, Mike Shier Sr,
Shirley Kisner, Mike Shier
II, Pam Schrek, Fran (Barg)
Scott and Sean Crosley Brit-
tany Shier will handle
sounds and lights.
"We are very happy to
also have Ted Taylor in his
acting debut," said Ashley
Kisner, the director "It ap-
pears he was bitten by the
acting 'bug' and came out to
audition on a whim and re-
ally impressed us. He will


hopefully be a great addi-
tion to Encore Ensemble
and the audiences should
love him."
As usual, the show
has voluntary audience
participation
"The feedback we get con-
stantly from our patrons is
that they love the music and
would like more," Encore
President Mike Shier Sr
said. "We always try to
choose songs that the audi-
ence will be familiar with
and hope that it just adds to
their whole experience."
The Wounded Warrior
Project, which helps return-
ing wounded soldiers and
their families, will benefit
from the performances.


BEING


Associated Press
Jason Clarke, from left, Tom Hardy and Shia LaBeouf portray the Bondurant brothers in "Lawless."

Moonshine movie a visceral fitful fever dream


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
If you can accept the notion
that Tom Hardy, Shia
LaBeouf and Jason Clarke
could be brothers during this
century or any other, you might
be able to immerse yourself in
the artfully pulpy allure of
"Lawless," based on the true
story of the bootlegging
Bondurants.
Director John Hillcoat's
ultra-violent drama plays like a


AP MOVIE REVIEW


hot, sweaty, delusional fever
dream and is similarly fitful. It
can be visceral and operatic,
beautiful and brutal but also
slow and overlong.
The look and the sound of it
are the most effective parts,
and the most intrinsically tied:
Singer-songwriter Nick Cave, a
longtime friend and collabora-
tor of fellow Australian Hill-
coat (on "The Proposition" and


"The Road"), wrote the script
and co-wrote the score, so
there's a peculiar kind of dark
flavor, humor and musicality to
the cadence of the dialogue. No
one bursts into song, but you
suspect they might and some-
times hope they would.
"Lawless" is based on "The
Wettest County in the World,"
See Page C8


Crafters display wares at annual armory show


ROCHELLE KAISER
Homosassa Beacon editor
This weekend, pack up the
family and head to the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River
for the annual Harvest Moon
Craft Show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1.
This popular craft show
brings an abundance of
crafters, who will offer unusual
and unique items along with
past favorites and useful every-
day items.
"The show is full inside, but
there are still spaces available
outside," coordinator Mimi


Saulton said.
Any crafter or artist who is in-
terested in setting up a display
outside can call show chairper-
son Michaeleen "Mike" Hurley
at 352-249-7012. She can pro-
vide additional information.
The Harvest Moon Craft
Show, hosted each year by the
Citrus County Craft Council,
will offer a variety of new items
as well as everyone's favorites.
Guests will see artistic wood-
working, floral designs, an
array of jewelry pieces, textiles,
soap and even a few holiday
ornaments.
"Julie (Rosko) will have her


large, colorful, crepe flower
arrangements. She may even
have her holiday poinsettias
ready," Saulton said.
Each crafter has donated an
item to be used for a raffle that
is drawn every 30 minutes
throughout the day As each
guest enters the show, he or she
should pick up a ticket. Num-
bers will be announced over the
loudspeaker and will be written
down in the front lobby
Food and refreshments will
be available for purchase from
the kitchen during the show.
Each year, members of the
craft council choose a nonprofit


to receive the proceeds from
the show. For this show, mem-
bers have selected Big Brothers
Big Sisters as the beneficiary
Each craft show supports a dif-
ferent beneficiary except the
show in November
"During our November
shows, we always select the
Shop With A Cop program,"
Saulton said. "The program
benefit's a lot of children in the
area."
The one-day show will be at
the Crystal River Armory
across from Home Depot on
West Venable Drive next to the
airport


www.screened.com
Nicholas Cage and Cher star in the
movie "Moonstruck."

Inverness
Celebrate Blue Moon
on Courthouse Square
As the sun goes down on Court-
house Square in Inverness on Friday,
come and watch the PG-rated adult ro-
mantic comedy "Moonstruck," starring
Cher.
The open-air free showing for Night
at the Museum celebrates the second
full moon in August the Blue Moon
- and is the museum's first event of
the season. Bring a chair or spread
your blanket for casual seating.
Movie-time refreshments such as
soda, water and popcorn will be offered
for sale. As soon as it turns dark, the
movie will begin on the east side of the
courthouse adjacent to North Apopka
Avenue.
No rain date is set for the event. For
information, call 352-341-6436.

Beverly Hills
Author to speak at Sept. 1
meeting of novel society
Clarissa Thomasson is the featured
speaker at the Saturday, Sept. 1, meet-
ing of the Florida Chapter of the Histori-
cal Novel Society. She has written six
historical novels, two from the Civil War
and Reconstruction Era and a three-
generation family tragedy based on a
1910 trial.
Her last three nov-
els are set in south-
west Florida from
1918 to 1927 and the
collapse of the land
boom. The stories fol-
low a young woman
who comes to Acadia
for a new start in life,
takes a job in Boca Clarissa
Grande and finally Thomasson
comes to live in the
town of Venice. The stories include
Seminole lore, the coming of the rail-
road to Florida, the growth of tourism
and ranching, and the building of
Venice.
The Florida Chapter of the Historical
Novel Society meets in the Community
Room of the Central Ridge Library, 425
W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. For
information, call Marian Fox at 352-
726-0162 or visit www.fchns.org.

Citrus County
Farmers' markets crop up
across the county
Three farmers' markets will cropup
throughout the county Saturday, Sept. 1.
The markets are:
Inverness Farmers' Market, about
30 vendors, fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and more, 8 a.m.
to noon, first and third Saturdays
monthly, Inverness Government Center
parking lot. 352-726-2611.
Dunnellon's First Saturday Village
Market, includes a variety of street ven-
dors, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. first Saturday
monthly, Dunnellon's Historic District on
West Pennsylvania Avenue, Cedar and
Walnut streets. 352-465-2225.
Saturday at the Market, farmers'
market, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
weekly, in front of the historic Court-
house, Brooksville. 352-428-4275.
From staff reports


In Saturday Classifieds \- .
Shop in our
Garage and Yard Sales Category
SAVE BIG!
7 94 6 0 5_____________________________________________________________


LBEST BETS I





C2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012

MUSEUMS
"Cruisin' the Fossil
Freeway," features 30 fossils,
including a complete skeleton
cast of Triceratops horridus,
the famous three-homed di-
nosaur, in addition toAlber-
tosaurus, a ferocious carnivore
that lived about 70 million
years ago, Florida Museum of
Natural History in Gainesville.
Fossils complement 19 color
prints and five large-scale mu-
rals of creative artwork. Exhibit
ends Sept. 3. Admission $5 for
adults, $4.50 for Florida resi-
dents, seniors and college stu-
dents and $4 for ages 3 to 17.
352-273-2062.
Outdoor presentation
featuring Spanish Conquis-
tador and Native American
camps. 10 a.m. to noon Sat-
urday, Sept. 29, on lawn of
Silver River Museum, Ocala.
Event admission is free; how-
ever, State Park admission
fees do apply.
Re-enactors will portray
Spanish conquistadors and a
local Native American (Timu-
cuan Indian) for a step back
to the year 1539. Presenta-
tion will include talks, displays
of authentic armor, weaponry,
Native American life ways
and a riding demonstration of


SCENE


early Spanish military ma-
neuvers on horseback. The
Silver River Museum and pio-
neer homestead buildings will
be open to the public. Guests
welcome to bring lunch and
picnic on the museum lawn.
352-236-5401 or www.Silver
RiverMuseum.com.
"Phosphate Discovery:
Florida's Gold Rush" runs
through November 2012 at
Floral City Heritage Museum.
Exhibit features the history of
the phosphate industry in Cit-
rus County and includes new
photos and artifacts. Free.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
every Friday and Saturday in
new Town Center, 8394 E.
Orange Ave./County Road
48. www.floralcityhc.org. 352-
860-0101, the-fchc@hotmail.
com. Special viewing can be
arranged.
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
"Pure Photography:
Pictorial and Modern Photo-
graphs from the Syracuse


Fossil examination










--.

Special to the Chronicle
A University of Florida student examines a fossil at the
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville. The
exhibit "Cruisin' the Fossil Freeway" will end Monday.


University Art Collection,"
opens Saturday, Sept. 8, at Ap-
pleton Museum of Art, College
of Central Florida, in Ocala. Ex-
hibit features 30 works by the
best photographers starting in
the early 20th century, such as
Berenice Abbott, Imogen Cun-
ningham, Edward Weston and


Alfred Steiglitz.
0 "FLORAda and Flow-
ing Waters: The Art of Mark
Messersmith, Margaret
Ross Tolbert and Anna
Tomczak," opens Sunday,
Sept. 16, at Appleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of Cen-
tral Florida, in Ocala. Exhibit


presents lush and beautiful
portrait of natural Florida as
interpreted by three of the
state's most prominent artists.
"Appleton's Animals:
Real and Legendary,"
opens Thursday, Sept. 27, at
Appleton Museum of Art, Col-
lege of Central Florida, in
Ocala. Docent tours begin in
the lobby at 2 p.m.
FESTIVALS
31st annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show, Satur-
day, Oct. 13, and Sunday,
Oct. 14, in historic downtown
Gainesville. 352-393-8536.
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.
THEATER
Encore Ensemble's
"The Curse of The Hope-
less Diamond," Friday,
Sept. 7, Saturday, Sept. 8,
and Sunday, Sept. 9, Central
Ridge Community Center.
Doors open at 6 p.m. with
dinner at 7 p.m. Friday and
Saturday. Doors open at 3
p.m. with dinner at 4 p.m.
Sunday. Performance follows
meal. $25. Portion of pro-
ceeds benefit Wounded War-
rior Project. 352-212-5417.
"Move Over Mrs.
Markham," Sept. 14 to 30,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Art Center Theater.
"The Best Little
Whorehouse in Texas,"
Sept. 6 to 30, Ocala Civic
Theater. 352-236-2274 or
www.ocalacivictheatre.com.
"Play It Again Sam"
Friday, Nov. 2, through Sun-
day, Nov. 18, Art Center,
2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Cit-
rus Hills. 352-746-0924.
"Madea Gets a Job,"
3 p.m. Nov. 11, USF Sun
Dome. $27.50 to $87.50.
ticketmaster.com, 800-745-
3000.
Ruth Eckerd Hall
performances:
"Rock of Ages", 5 and 9
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.
"Agatha Christie's BBC
Murders", 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 13; 2 and 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 15; 8 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 16; 2 and 8 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov. 17; 2 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 18; Capitol Theatre in
downtown Clearwater. $55
and $40. 727-791-7400 or
www.atthecap.com.
"Dan Goggin's Nunset
Boulevard: The Nunsense
Hollywood Bowl Show", 2
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2.
"Catch Me If You Can," a
new musical, 2 and 8 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8.


Stood,


Chefs of


Napoli II

Originating in Spring Hill, Florida,
Chefs of Napoli II in Inverness makes you
feel as if you have stepped right into Italy.
If the aromas don't convince you, the tastes sg
certainly will. Even first generation Italians are
exclaiming, "Squisito!".
This welcome new addition to local dining is open
seven days a week and offers a classy ristorante atmosphere
with a Neapolitan cuisine. The foods of Naples range from recipes that were influenced
by the local aristocracy with very elaborate preparations that included meat; to the more
common offerings made from modest but nutritionally healthy ingredients such as pasta
and beans with local vegetables.
Based on the style of cooking famous in Naples, Chefs of Napoli II presents a complete
menu of exquisite specialties ranging from pasta dishes to seafood and veal. Pizza was
thought to have originated in Naples, and Chefs of Napoli II makes pizza that rivals the
homeland. There are lots of new entree dishes to tempt your palate, and prices range
from $12.00 to $16.00. A good selection of beer and wine is also available to complement
your meal. To top off your experience, try to save room for authentic cannoli or tiramisu.
No reservations are required as yet, but you can call ahead to be sure: 352/419-6554.
Chefs of Napoli II is located at 1546 U.S. Highway 41 in Inverness, Florida.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ARTS & CRAFTS
DownStairs Art Gallery
and Studio, at 611 N. Citrus
Ave., is open. Hours are 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Sunday. Pottery les-
sons available. 352-249-6170
or adellisster@gmail.com.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meeting, 9 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 1, at Weeki Wachee
Senior Center off U.S. 19 and
Toucan Trail, Spring Hill.
Short meeting, show-and-tell
and birthday raffle. Pat Otto
will show the group how to
assemble a scarecrow in
acrylics on a surface of your
choice. On Sept. 20 and 30,
Oregon teacher Karen Hub-
bard will teach Tiger and Cub
on Saturday and chickadees
on Sunday. 352-688-0839 or
352-666-9091. www.nature
coastdecorativeartists.com.
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library, 310
S. Palmer Drive, Wildwood.
352-748-1158. els34785@
yahoo.com.
Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. Sept. 1,
over a half-mile up and down
scenic Beach Boulevard.
Third Saturday Art Walk is 6
to 10 p.m. Sept. 15. Gulfport
Art Walk is the First Friday and
Third Saturday of every
month, year-round. Parking
free. Free trolley rides from off-
site parking areas. Pet- and
family-friendly. www.Gulfport
MA.com. 866-ART-WALK.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
Fair Ave., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at 10
a.m. first Wednesday. All quil-
ters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at 8089 W.
Pine Bluff St., Crystal River.
352-563-6349, 352-861-
8567. www.mhdartists.com.


SCENE


Citrus Watercolor Club
meeting, 1 p.m. second Fri-
day monthly, United Methodist
Church on County Road 581,
Inverness. $5. 352-382-8973
or 352-622-9352.
Photographer Gary
Kuhl's photographic tour, 6
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, at
historic Knight House, 8219
Orange Ave., Floral City.
Photos include beautiful
mountain landscapes, gla-
ciers, seascapes and native
wildlife from Mt. McKinley,
North America's highest
mountain, to the shores of
Resurrection Bay on the
Kenai Peninsula. Refresh-
ments. Sign up in advance at
gallery or by calling 352-344-
9300. $3 donation.
Florida Artists Gallery
summer hours, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Wednesday through
Saturday and noon to 4 p.m.
Tuesday and Sundays
through Sept. 30. The gallery
is in the historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City. 352-344-9300.
www.floridaartistsgallery.com.
Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. The Art
Center of Citrus County is at
2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Her-
nando. 352-746-4089.
ART CLASSES
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. www.Florida
artistsgallery.com.
September classes
include:
Fearless Painting with
Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 10. Lunch break
noon to 1 p.m. Instructor Susi
LaForsch. In one-day work-
shop, participants will create
an 18-inch-by-24-inch abstract
painting. Four-student limit.
$75 per workshop, materials
included. $20 deposit re-
quired. Contact LaForsch at
laforsch@tampabay.rr.com or
352-726-8710.
Drawing with Ann, 10
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Sept. 1, 8,
15, and 29. Instructor Ann
Covington. Charcoal, pencils
and color pencils available to
try. Class size limited. $20
per class or $60 for four
classes if paid in advance.
Call Covington at 352-726-
2979 or 352-344-9300.


The art of green


Special to the Chronicle
"Trading Places" is a collaboration exhibition of 20 ce-
ramic artists affiliated with the University of Florida who
exchanged undecorated greenware pieces. The exhibit
ends Friday at the Webber Center Gallery, CF Ocala
Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. Hours are 11 a.m. to
5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.


Introduction to Papermak-
ing, 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday,
Sept. 1. Instructor Keith Gum.
$50. Learn basic methods of
handmade paper production,
using cotton rag and abaca
fibers as well as various inclu-
sions for texture and decorative
effect. Materials and equipment
provided. Dress for wet, messy
activity. Call Gum at 352-344-
9300 or e-mail ifugaopaper
craft@gmail.com.
Japanese Bookbinding,
1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15.
Instructor Keith Gum. $35 plus
$5 material fee. Workshop de-
signed to create a stab-bound
book with sheets made in Intro-
duction to Papermaking class.


Need a minimum of 20
sheets and two decorative
papers. All other materials
and equipment provided. Call
Gum at 352-344-9300 or e-
mail ifugaopapercraft@
gmail.com.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand,
9 a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10. www.citruscountyfl.org,
click on Parks & Recreation
to register. 352-465-7007.
Floral City Needle
Artists instructs in quilting,
embroidery, knitting and cro-
chet for beginners to ad-
vanced levels, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday at Floral City


Community House between
the library and the museum
on Orange Avenue. Free.
352-344-5896.
Acrylics and/or Oils on
Canvas, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Homosassa Civic
Center, 5530 S. Mason
Creek Drive, behind the fire
station. $15 per class. Bring
supplies. Instructor Keith
Mitchell. 352-503-3498.
Calligraphy classes, 1
p.m. Thursday, at Hobby
Haven & Gifts, 1239 Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
352-794-6032.
Lorna Jean Gallery
classes:
Learn to draw class,
1-hour lesson at noon,
1, 3 and 4 p.m. for groups or
private lessons, Tuesday
through Saturday. Materials
included. Summer special
$15 per class. Pay for four
classes, get one free.
Sterling silver jewelry
class, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Friday. Four-week course
starts Friday, Sept. 14. Materi-
als and use of tools included.
$140. Limit of four students.
Watercolor beginner's
class, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
days, Lorna Jean Gallery.
Limit of six students. $15 per
class. Materials list at gallery.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way in Crystal River. Call
352-564-2781.
The Garden Shed
classes:


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 C3

Origami, 6 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 4 and Sept.
18. Materials and supplies in-
cluded. $25.
Calligraphy, 6 to 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13. $30
for five-week session. Bring
calligraphy pen set or buy
one here.
The Garden Shed is at
2423 S. Rock Crusher Road
in Homosassa. Call 352-503-
7063 to register. Pre-registra-
tion required. All major credit
cards accepted.
FARMERS' MARKETS
Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Market,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Sept.
7, at Lake Beverly Park. Ven-
dor spaces $10. Market days
are the first and third Fridays
of each month, www.bhcivic
association.com. 352-746-
2657.
Market Day with Art &
Treasures, an outdoor event
with plants, produce, arts,
crafts, collectibles and more,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Sat-
urdays on the grounds of
Heritage Village, 657 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. 352-
564-1400.
Herry's Market Day,
8 a.m. to noon, last Saturday
of the month at Hospice Thrift
Shoppe, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa (behind
Wendy's, east of U.S. 19).
Herry's Market Day is offering
free vendor space. Space is
limited. 352-527-2020.


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C4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012

SPECIAL INTEREST
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Soci-
ety meeting, 1 p.m. first Sat-
urday monthly, Central
Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
Author Clarissa Thomasson
will be fea-
tured
speaker.
Thomas-
son has
written six
historical
novels, two
Clarissa from the
Thomasson Civil War
and Recon-
struction Era and a three-
generation family tragedy
based on a 1910 trial. Her
last three novels are set in
southwest Florida from 1918
to 1927 and the collapse of
the land boom. 352-726-
0162. 352-726-0162.
http://FCHNS.org. 352-726-
0162 or www.fchns.org.
Comedian and political
commentator Bill Maher, 8
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall. $89, $65,
and $50. 727-791-7400.
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
The Capitol Theatre
film series:
8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7 -
"Pulp Fiction."
3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9
- "Aurora Borealis."
8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21
- 'Vertigo."
3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30
- "The Goonies."
Tickets $5. 727-791-7400
or www.atthecap.com.
Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian Fel-
lowship, conversation and
music from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Village Cafe, 789 N.E.
Fifth St., on State Road 44.
352-817-6879.
Crystal River Preserve
State Park boat tour, 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays,
Crystal River Preserve State
Park Visitor Center. $10 adults;
$8 children ages 7 to 12; free,
children 6 and younger. Tickets
on sale in Preserve Visitor
Center one hour prior to depar-
ture; arrive no less than 15
minutes prior to departure.
352-563-0450. www.crystal
riverstateparks.org.
Ultimate Abbott and
Costello Tribute Show, star-
ring Bill Riley and Joe Ziegler,
at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15,
Circle Square Cultural Cen-
ter, 8395 S.W. 80th Street,
Ocala. www.CSCultural
Center.com or 352-854-3670.
DANCE
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom music,
twice monthly at community
centers, hosted by deejay
Sapphire. On the second
Wednesday monthly, the tea


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TheWalking tall
Walking tall


**


Special to the Chronicle
An Italian Festival will be from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 8, at Circle Square Commons Town Square, 8405
S.W. 80th Street, in Ocala. Italian dishes and dancing to
live Italian music will be available along with
performances by jugglers, mimes and stilt walkers. Call
352-854-3670 or visit www.CircleSquareCommons.com
for information.


dance is 1:30 to 4 p.m. at Cen-
tral Citrus Community Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. 352-527-5993. On the
last Friday monthly, tea dance is
from 2 to 4 p.m. at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa.
$5, with a portion of the pro-
ceeds going to in-home senior
services. 352-527-5993 or 352-
795-3831.
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance, 7:30 to
10:30 p.m. the first and third
Friday monthly at Lake Pana-
soffkee Recreation Park in the
blue building at 1582 County
Road 459 off County Road 470.
Dances open to married, cou-
ples, singles and groups from
churches and RV parks. All
ages welcome. No alcohol. Fin-
ger foods or soda welcome.
352-424-1688.
Hernando Jazz Society's
"Big Band Bash at the
Wellington," 1:30 p.m. Sunday
Sept. 9, Wellington Club
House, 400 Wexford Blvd.,
Spring Hill. HJS members free,
nonmembers $10. Sioux City
Grill will offer cash bar and buf-
fet from 1 to 3 p.m. Nonmem-
bers call 352-835-7183 to
reserve space and ensure ad-
mittance into Wellington Com-
munity. 352-799-9690.
Spirit of Citrus Dancers'
Birthday Bash, Saturday, Sept. 1.
Cakes and great music will be
featured. Music by Butch Phillips.


Saturday, Sept. 15 -
"National Ballroom Dance
Week" with complimentary
desserts and appetizers.
Wearing favorite fall colors.
Music by Butch Phillips.
Saturday, Oct. 6 -
Monthly Birthday Dance
Party. Birthday cakes will be
served. Bill Dimmitt deejay.
Saturday, Oct. 20 -first
Galaxy Ball. Come as a
being from outer space or an
Earthling. Music by Butch
Phillips.
Dances are at the Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center in
Beverly Hills. Doors open at
6:45 p.m. A complimentary
dance lesson at 7 p.m.; gen-
eral dancing from 7:30 to 10
p.m. Admission $6 for mem-
bers; $9 for nonmembers. Ice
and coffee provided; sodas
and bottled water are avail-
able for purchase. 352-344-
1383 or 352-726-1495.
www.socdancer.org.
Sunday Dance Social,
7 to 10 p.m. is every other
week, at Recreation Planta-
tion RV Park, 609 County
Road 466 and Rolling Acres
Road, Lady Lake. Next
dances is Sept. 9. Singles
and Couples welcomed. Re-
freshments provided.
B.Y.O.B. $10. 352-304-8672.
Allan O'Neal sings and
deejays first Saturday of the
month at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.


Lecanto Hwy. (County Road
491 across from Havana
House Cafe) Lecanto. No
dance in September. Next
Dance is Saturday, Oct. 6,
with a Roaring '20s and
Gangster Theme. Special
spotlight entertainment will
be at 6:30 p.m. Arnold and
Mary-Ann Virgilio will co-host
the dance Saturday, Nov. 24,
with a patriotic theme. Veter-
ans will be honored for their
service. Attire will be semifor-
mal or patriotic. All veterans
in attendance will receive a
gift and certificate of appreci-
ation signed by Citrus County
Commissioner.
Dances are from 6 to 10
p.m. with a free dance lesson
at 5:30 p.m. $10. 352-464-
0004. www.eventsolutions
bylinda.com.
Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Music starts at
7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda
available.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East Cit-
rus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. $3 per class. 352-
344-9666.
Inverness Square
Dance Club's beginner
square dance lessons, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, East
Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, east of Inverness on
State Road 44. 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700. Next
enrollment for square dance
classes is in April.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
days, Beverly Hills Recreation
Center. $3 nonmembers. 352-
746-4882 or 352-527-3738.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, fellowship hall of
First United Methodist Church
of Dunnellon, 21501 W. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. 352-
489-1785 or 352-465-2142.
African dance classes
at Central Ridge Library.
Free. For a schedule and to
donate African instruments
(djembes, dun-duns, foot and
ankle bells), new or used, call
352-249-7283.
MUSIC
Free Fridays concert
series, 8 to 10 p.m. Friday
nights, through Oct. 12, at Bo
Diddley Community Plaza on
corner of Southeast First
Street and East University
Avenue. gvlculturalaffairs.org.
352-393-8746.
The Country Sunshine
Band, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Friday, East Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Hwy. (State Road 44
East), Inverness. Call Annie
at 352-465-4860.


'Gruffalo's


Child' as good


as the original


f you love "The
Gruffalo" as much as
me, you may love "The
Gruffalo's Child" a wee bit
more.
Like the original, "The
Gru ffalo's
Child" rollicks V
with rhyme and
features clay-
like CGI charac-
ters in
live-action envi- 7
ronments. I only
missed the bub-
bles of tradi-
tional animation
that recall chil- Heather
dren's book il- FOS
lustrations. Still, ON I
the charming
hand-drawn
bouts are a minute detail.
What is even neater
about "The Gruffalo's
Child" is it takes on a kid's
perspective.
Once more, we find
Mother Squirrel (voiced by
Helena Bonham Carter)
and her kids in a snowy for-
est. She continues her
Gruffalo story, telling her
children the monstrous
Gruffalo (voiced by Robbie
Coltrane) is still terrified of
clever Mouse (voiced by
James Corden), who
tricked him long ago. The
Gruffalo is so afraid of the
"Big Bad Mouse" he forbids
his daughter (voiced by
Shirley Henderson) to ven-
ture out in the woods alone.
But the little Gruffalo
girl will not heed her fa-
ther's warnings. Terrified
as she is of the Mouse's
scaly tail, fiery eyes and
whiskers tougher than
wire, she must see him. So
on a cold, blustery night,
she sneaks out to find him.
On her naughty little ex-
cursion, the Gruffalo's
child encounters Snake
(voiced by Rob Brydon),


John Thomas Tradi-
tional Country Music Show
and Jam, 6 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days weekly, Oxford Commu-
nity Center, 4027 Main St.,
Oxford. $5. 352-560-7496.
Crystal River Music in
The Park is looking for any
talented individuals or groups
who would be willing to per-
form for two hours on the
third Saturday of any month.
All are invited to audition.
352-601-3506.
Rock the Universe
2012, Florida's biggest Chris-


Owl (voiced by John Hurt)
and Fox (voiced by Tom
Wilkinson).
My favorite thing about
"The Gruffalo's Child" is it
wraps the Gruffalo's
charming, wood-
carved world
and narrative
child. My inner
child appreci-
ated the inclu-
p sion of a
character I
would have fan-
tasized about
r Foster years and years
TER ago.
-ILM Now, I know
children who
pretend to be
"monsters" and chase their
friends. It's great to make a
big, loveable beast. It's
even better to drape awe-
some creatureness over
the audience's shoulders.
If you're mature or too
plain old to identify with
the monstrous lead, you
will still eat up the little
Gruffalo's plucky nature,
beloved stick doll and
adorable pink back bumps.
Another plus is the
humor. It is a good mix of
quirky, black comedy. One
giggly moment happens
when the Gruffalo child
finds a frog frozen in a lake.
The poor creature blinks
pitifully Thankfully, car-
toonish logic brightens the
morbid scene.
All in all, "The Gruffalo's
Child" is gem. I give it an
A+.
With a running time of 27
minutes, "The Gruffalo's
Child" is rated G and can
be rented via Redbox.

Heather Foster is a senior
at the University of
Florida.


tian music festival, Sept. 7
and 8, Universal Orlando Re-
sort. Friday, Sept. 7, lineup in-
cludes Skillet, Newsboys,
Jeremy Camp, for King &
Country, Family Force 5,
Robert Pierre, Group 1 Crew,
We As Human and Ever-
found. Saturday, Sept. 8, line-
up includes tobyMac,
Switchfoot, Relient K, Britt
Nicole, tenth avenue north,
Rhett Walker Band, Group 1
Crew, We As Human and
Everfound. www.Rockthe
Universe.com. 866-788-4636.


r
;1


oNTE



Pood.


You're invited to try us. Serving a good
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Page C5 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Pancakes hit
plates on Sept. 9
Beverly Hills Lions Club
will serve its pancake break-
fast from 8 to 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 9. Cost for
breakfast is $4 for adults and
$2 for children younger
than 12.
On the menu are all the
pancakes you can eat, and
choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice,
coffee or tea.
Funds from the project go
back to the community in
helping others receive eye
exams and glasses.
For additional information,
call Lion Addie at 352-
746-3187.
Post to have
picnic Monday
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary will
host a Labor Day picnic from
3 to 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 3.
Cost is $5 per plate. On
the menu are a choice of hot
dogs, burgers, salads, sides
and more. Music by Mark B
from 3 to 6 p.m. The event is
open to the public.
Call 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org, for infor-
mation about this and other
post activities.
Friends of Blues
help other groups
In an effort to help other
nonprofit groups, the Nature
Coast Friends of Blues has
Blues'n Bar-B-Que gift certifi-
cates good for four people to
attend the 2012 Blues'n Bar-
B-Que free of charge.
The gift certificates are
great for silent auction
fundraisers an organization
may have between now and
the Nov. 3 event. Email
Susan Mitchell at sukelo@
tampabay.rr.com, or call 352-
503-3498 for information.
Home Again
gets new items
In business since 2010, at
Beverly Plaza, Cathi's Attic
closed its doors in August
and allowed Home Again Re-
sale Store to offer its quality
furniture items for sale.
Home Again, a 50/50 furni-
ture and furnishings consign-
ment store, donates all
proceeds to children's pro-
grams at the Central Ridge
Boys & Girls Club.
Home Again is on County
Road 486 and is open from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. For infor-
mation, call 352-270-8861.
Spot Family jam
to be Saturday
The Spot Family Center's
Family Jam will begin at 5:30
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1. Reg-
istration closes at 7 p.m.
All are invited to the fun, to
include free dinner, drinks,
groceries and beauty items. If
weather permits, water activi-
ties will be available.
The center is at 405 S.E.
Seventh Ave., Crystal River.
Call Evelyn Vissicchio, pro-
gram director, at 352-
794-3870.


Come be a leader


Leadership Citrus applications available for 5-month program


Special to the Chronicle

Applications are now being ac-
cepted for the Leadership Citrus Class
of 2013. Leadership Citrus has been
active in our community for 21 years,
and participants have gained a higher
level of awareness and understanding
of Citrus County and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-month


program that meets every other week.
A limited number of applicants will be
selected to participate in the program
by a committee made up from the
Leadership Citrus Board.
The process involves filling out an
application and going through an in-
terview process. Selected members
will be notified through the mail in
December and classes will start in


January
Class membership is open to Citrus
County residents, and members of the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
will receive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber members
and $595 for nonmembers.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; applica-
tions are due by Oct. 25.


Leadership Citrus alumni to gather to celebrate 21 years of program


Leadership Citrus will celebrate 21
years with other community leaders and
alumni who have maximized their reach
into the community and expanded their
knowledge of Citrus County.


The reunion party will be hosted by the
Leadership Citrus Class of 2012 and
Kevin and Karen Cunningham from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, at the
Cunningham home, 2729 Reston Place


in Hernando.
Leadership Citrus Alumni are encour-
aged to bring a potential candidate for the
Leadership Citrus 2013 Class. Call Gwen
Klaiber at 352-341-6610.


'FAN'tastic quilting


JOAN NOVAK/Special to the Chronicle
The Creative Quilters had the distinct honor of having six new members sign up at one meeting, and have one of the new
members agree to teach a workshop in October on turning a man's sweatshirt into a lovely jacket. The jackets will be just
right for the cooler days coming soon. Wearing the "FAN"tastic Sweatshirt jackets, from left, are: Donna Moore-Lavoie,
Leda Hall and Victoria Perito.



Learn new technological skills with CRUG


Crystal River Users Group Inc. slates fall class schedule


Special to the Chronicle

Crystal River Users Group Inc. has
announced its 2012 fall class schedule.
All classes except Digital Scrapbook-
ing will be conducted at Crystal Oaks
Community Clubhouse, 4958 Crystal
Oaks Blvd., Lecanto.
Classes are:
CSS Basic, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
Sept. 17 and 24; $15 for members, $23
for nonmembers. CSS defines how
HTML elements are to be displayed.
Styles are normally saved in external
.css files. External style sheets enable
you to change the appearance and lay-
out of all the pages in a website, just


by editing one single file. Each CSS
class will also involve teaching basic
HTML technology.
Digital Scrapbooking, 1 to 4 p.m.,
Sept. 20, 27 and Oct. 4; $20 for mem-
bers, $30 for nonmembers. Using
photo editing programs on your com-
puter, you can create beautiful scrap-
book pages with your photos and
realistic digital elements and papers.
The class will include gathering digi-
tal files, downloading them from the
Internet, resizing and altering your
own photographs, adding text, drop
shadows and other effects to create
your own unique pages. Photoshop El-
ements 10 will be used in class for the


lessons. This class will be taught at
1578 W Meadowcrest Blvd.
Windows 7 Basic, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Oct. 1 and 8; $15 for members,
$23 for nonmembers.
Word 2010 Basic, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Oct. 15, 22 and 29; $20 for mem-
bers, $30 for nonmembers.
i Adobe Elements PSE, 9:30 to 11:30
p.m., Nov 12, 19, 26 and Dec. 3; $20 for
members, $30 for nonmembers.
WordPress, noon to 1:30 p.m. Nov.
12, 19, 26 and Dec. 3; $15 for members,
$23 for nonmembers.
Visit the website at crug.com to reg-
ister, find out about payment and get
directions to classes.


News NOTES

Cadet
honored


Special to the Chronicle
At the recent Withla-
coochee Technical Insti-
tute graduation ceremony
of the criminal justice
class, Connary Reynolds
was presented a certifi-
cate and a $500 check do-
nated by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Citizen's Acad-
emy Alumni Association.
Any cadet who attends the
justice academy course is
eligible for the ward. Se-
lection of the award is
made by the CAAA Board
of Directors based on need
and current income and
the recipient's future goals
in law enforcement.


Plant society
to meet Sept. 4
The Citrus Native Plant
Society will resume its meet-
ings at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
4, at at the Beverly Hills
Lion's Club, 72 Civic Circle in
Beverly Hills.
Members will be welcom-
ing new president Steve
Farnsworth. The meeting will
offer members the opportu-
nity to share their native gar-
dening experiences over the
summer with photos and
slideshow presentations.
Everyone is welcome to at-
tend. For more information,
email citrusnps@gmail.com.
American-Italians
plan activities
Citrus American Italian
Club of Inverness will begin
September with a dinner
dance Saturday, Sept. 8.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; din-
ner will be served at 5 p.m.
On the menu are baked
chicken, potato, vegetable,
salad, dessert and coffee.
Call Angie for tickets at 352-
637-5203. Cost is $14.50;
BYOB.
The trustees meeting will
be at 9:30 a.m. Monday,
Sept. 10, and the executive
meeting will be at 9:30 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 17. The Sept.
19 dinner and meeting will
begin at 4 p.m, with the
meeting at 5:30 pm.
On Saturday, Sept. 22,
there will be an indoor/out-
door flea market from 7 a.m.
to 2 p.m.; vendors welcome.
An inside table is $10 and
outside space is $7. Call
Martha at 352-476-8727, or
Dolores at 352-746-5019 to
reserve space. Profits will go
for Thanksgiving turkeys for
needy families of Citrus
County. Food will be avail-
able. Setup will be Friday,
Sept. 21, from noon to 4 p.m.


Religion NOTES


Homosassa SDA
Pastor Dale Wolfe will give the sermon at the 11
a.m. divine worship Saturday.
The 9:30 a.m. Sabbath school will be led by Su-
sanne Adams. John Adams will talk about "Final
Events" at the 10 a.m. Sabbath school. The 10
a.m. adult Sabbath school will be led by Pastor
Dale Wolfe.
Bible study will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The food
pantry will be open 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4.
Adult stuy group meets at 10 a.m. Thursday
and men's study group meets at 6:30 p.m. Thurs-
day.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at 352-
382-7753. The church is at 5863 Cardinal St.
Glad Tidings
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday with
song, then study at Glad Tidings Church. Divine
hour follows at 11 a.m. Elder Marks brings the
bread of life this Sabbath. A vegan lunch follows.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday. All are invited.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Program)
alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly.


For information, call Bob at 352-628-1743. The
church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River.
Inverness SDA
Saturday Sabbath school starts at 9:10 a.m.;
Saturday children's classes begin at 9:30;
toddler class is at 9:45; adult Bible study is at
9:50 a.m.
Clyde Thomas preaches at the 11 a.m.
worship hour Saturday.
Prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. Wednesday.
Thrift store is open 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday.
The Health Food Store is open 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, after prayer meeting on Wednes-
day night and after vespers on Saturday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens, 4.5
miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
The church phone number is 352-726-9311.
See www.sda-inverness.org.
Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all ages.
The worship service begins at 11:30 a.m. After the
service, there is a weekly potluck.


Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to noon
each Wednesday.
The church is at 428 N.E. Third Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or visit online at
www.adventhopechurch.com.
Congregation Beth Sholom
The Genesis Project, beginning Sept. 24, is
an intensive, in-depth analysis and discussion of
the entire text of the Book of Genesis conducted
in English.
We will employ the classical ancient, medieval
and modern commentators of the biblical text;
we will utilize archaeology, anthropology, history,
linguistics, comparative literature; we will consult
traditional texts of Jewish mysticism and the sto-
ries and legends of other near-eastern civiliza-
tions; and we will use drama and literary
analysis to study both the prose and poetry of
the biblical narrative.
It is expected that this course will continue
over several semesters. Fee for 14 sessions is
$5 per session, plus textbook. To order the
textbook at a special discount price, call


Hazzan Mordecai Kamlot, 352-643-0995.
Come home for the holidays. High Holiday
Services are open to the entire community. Call for
the schedule of services.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is at
102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, and offers spirited
and participatory-style Friday (7:30 p.m.) and
Saturday (9:30 a.m.) Shabbat services, as well as
social and cultural activities.
For more information, call 352-643-0995 or 352-
746-5303.
Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist services start
at 11 a.m. Saturday. Afellowship luncheon will
follow the worship service; all are welcome.
The adult Sabbath school program begins at
9:15 a.m. Saturday, followed at 10 a.m. by a Bible
study. Classes for children are available at 9:30
a.m. There is a mid-week meeting at 6 p.m. each
Wednesday.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRI DAY EVENING AUGU ST 31 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
a WE H NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access America's Got Talent Grimm'14'x cDateline NBC 'PG' News Jay Leno
World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Washington Florida Great Performances Vienna Great Performances Standards,
N W i PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) cc Week Philharmonic's summer concert.'G' show tunes and jazz.'G' s
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) Wash. Need Great Performances (N)'G' Ribbon World T Smiley
WA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment America's Got Talent Grimm "Bad Moon Dateline NBC (N) (In News Jay Leno
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. (In Stereo)'PG'Ec Rising" '14' c Stereo)'PG'mc
SNews World Jeopardy! Wheel of Shark Tank A dance fit- 20/20 (In Stereo) 'PG' s Eyewit. Football
S(WFV) ABC 20 20 20 News 'G' s Fortune ness program.'PG' News Friday
10 News, Evening Inside Be a Undercover Boss (In CSI: NY "Clean Sweep" Blue Bloods "Some 10 News Letterman
SSPCBS10 10 10 10 106pm (N) News Edition Millionaire Stereo) 'PG' c '14'c Kind of Hero"'14' 11pm (N)
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) The Insider Bones The team investigates roadside remains. FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
SVFOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a 'PG' (N) (In Stereo) (PA)'14'c (In Stereo) ca Hollyw'd
D WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Shark Tank'PG' 20/20 (In Stereo)'PG's cNews Nightline
ND 2 2 2 22 22 Christian Bay Focus TheWord Great Awakening Jesse The Good Life JackVan Life Today Fruit of the Great
(WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Duplantis Impe Spirit Awaken
News World Wheel of Jeopardy! Shark Tank A dance fit- 20/20 (In Stereo)'PG' s News Nightline
S(WFTS ABC 11 11 11 News Fortune 'G'ec ness program.'PG' (Na c
WMO ND 12 12 16 .Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
E (W I)ND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Intent'14' c Intent'14' 'PG' 'PG'
D (WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld FamFeud FamFeud Monk'PG'x cMonk'PG'x cScrubs Seinfeld Excused Excused
MD (WAC TBN 21 21 Paid The 700 Club (N)'G' Paid Connect |Jump Keith Moore Studio Direct Healing
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QI W cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Half Men Model (N)'14' s Stereo)'14' a 'PG' 'PG' Simpsons to Jim
W E FAM 16 16 16 15 Crosswords Citrus County Florida Zorro a Bill Cosby Outdoorsman Treasure Friday Friday Friday Friday
FAM 16 16 16 15 Today Court Naturally Show'G' Hunters Night Night Drive-In Drive-In
S(WOGX) FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang Bones (In Stereo) (PA) '14' FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ'PG' Access
r WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Un Refugio Por Ella Soy Eva'14' Abismo de Pasi6n Amor Bravlo (N)'14' Noticias Noticiero
m WXPX ION 17 Cold Case'PG' Cold Case'PG' Cold Case'PG' Cold Case'PG' Cold Case'PG' Flashpoint'PG'
American American American American American American American American American American American American
A&E 54 48 54 25 27 Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers
***Y, "October Sky" (1999, Docudrama) Jake *** "The Princess Bride" (1987, Adventure) *** "The Princess Bride" (1987, Adventure)
EANIJ 55 64 55 Gyllenhaal.'PG' c Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. 'PG' c Cary Elwes, Robin Wright.'PG'x '
Gator Boys "Gators North Woods Law: On North Woods Law: On Law on the Border (In Law on the Border (N) Law on the Border (In
52 35 52 19 21 Gone Rogue"'PG' the Hunt'PG' the Hunt (N)'PG' Stereo)'PG' (In Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'PG'
96 19 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live'PG'x c***Y "Ray"(2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Regina King. Ray Chris
96 19 96 Charles overcomes hardships to become a legend.'PG-13 Brown
[iBAVO] 254 51 254 Million Dollar Listing Million Dollar Listing ***Y2 "The Aviator" (2004, Biography) Leonardo DiCaprio.'PG-13' Aviator
27 61 27 33 Tosh.0 'MA' Colbert Daily Show Tosh.0 '14' s Tosh.0 Futurama (In Stereo) Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daily Show Colbert
C 27 61 27 33 Report 14' E '14' c '14' c '14' s Report
98 Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Reba 'PG' Reba 'PG' Reba 'PG' Reba 'PG' Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys
CMTa' 98 45 98 28 37 PG 'PG c a a a Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Cheerleaders
ICNlBC1 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report Costco Craze Ultimate Factories American Greed Mad Money
ENl 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
Gravity Gravity Gravity Gravity Gravity Gravity Gravity Gravity A.N.T Good- Jessie Jessie
46 40 46 6 5 Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Falls'Y7' Farm'G' Charlie 'G'Xa 'G' c
fESPNI 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) College Football Live College Football Boise State at Michigan State. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)
[ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 '12 U.S. Open 2012 U.S. Open Tennis Men's Second Round and Women's Third Round. (N) (Live) World/Poker
EWINJ 95 70 95 48 Church IGallery Daily Mass |Life on the Rock'G' Campus |Rosary Showcase The |Women
n 29 52 29 20 28 n *** "Freaky Friday" *** "Mean Girls" (2004, Comedy) Lindsay *** "Mean Girls" (2004, Comedy) Lindsay The 700 Club'PG'xs
29 52 29 20 28 (2003) 'PG' Lohan, Rachel McAdams.'PG-13' Lohan, Rachel McAdams.'PG-13'
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ll) 118 170 "Smoke" Drama) Harvey Keitel.'R c Comedy) Ice Cube.'PG-13'cc Cedric the Enfertainer. 'r'S Shield"
EENC) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
[FIIDJ 26 56 26 Diners Diners Best |Best Diners |Diners Diners |Diners Diners Diners Diners |Diners
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E**Yn "Date Night"'(2010, Romance-Comedy) *Y "Push"(2009) Chris Evans. Premiere. Rogue psychics *Y "Push"(2009, Suspense) Chris
TFX) 30 60 30 51 Steve Carell, Tina Fey 'PG-13' battle a covert government agency 'PG-13' Evans.'PG-13'
tLl 727 67 727 Central |PGA Tour Golf |PGA Tour Golf Deutsche Bank Championship, First Round.
Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
WALLJ 39 68 39 45 54 Prairie 'G' c Prairie 'G' c Prairie 'G' c Prairie 'G' cc
j*i* 302 201 302 2 2 "Titanic"(1997) Leonardo Ward/ The Newsroom Nina Hard Knocks: Training Real Time With Bill Real Time With Bill
D302 201 302 2 2 iCaprio.'PG-13' c Dawson surprises Mac. 'MA' Camp Maher (N) 'MA' c Maher'MA'Bc
S**Y2 "Major League" 1989, Comedy) Tom REAL Sports With ** "What's Your Number?" (2011) Anna Faris, True Blood Eric tries to
303 202 303 Berenger. (In Stereo) 'R' Bryant Gumbel'PG' Chris Evans. (In Stereo) 'R' s save Bill.'MA'
WI.Th 23 57 23 42 52 Hunt Intl |Hunt Intl Hunt IntlI |Hunt Intl Cool Pools'G' c Extreme Homes'G' Hunters |Hunt Intl HuntntI |Hunt Intl
Modern Marvels 'PG' c American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers
HIST 51 25 51 32 42 "Pinball Mania"'PG' 'PG'c 'PG'c 'PG'c 'PG' c
My Ghost Story: My Ghost Story: America's Most Wanted America's Most Wanted America's Most Wanted America's Most Wanted
FE 24 38 24 31 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera PG' s (N)'14' 14' a 'PG' s
"A Long Way Home" (2001, Drama) Meredith "The Preacher's Daughter" (2012, Drama) "Lies My Mother Told Me" (2005, Docudrama)
(Jsili) 50 119 Baxter, obert Urich. 'NR' c Andrea Bowen. Premiere. 'NR E Joely Richardson, Colm Feore. cc
S**Y2 "Tower Heist" (2011) Ben *** "X-Men: First Class" (2011) James McAvoy The early Strike Back (N) (In Skin to the Strike Back
WMA 320 221 320 3 3 Stiller. 'PG-13' m years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. Stereo)'MA'c Max
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) |Hardball Matthews |The Ed Show(N) |Rachel Maddow Documentary Documentary
(urini) 109 65 109 44 53 a Abandoned Abandoned Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron Dark Secrets of the Lusitania A new expedition Abandoned Abandoned
109 65 109 44 53 'PG, Lintothe wreck. (N)'PG, L
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[WWJ 103 62 103 Police Women Police Women Police Women Police Women Police Women Police Women
WfXYJ 44 123 Roseanne ** "Enough"(2002) Jennifer Lopez. 'PG-13' cc ** "Enough" (2002) Jennifer Lopez. 'PG-13' cc Family
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340 241 340 4 Mind" (2004, Romance) Jim Carrey 'R' c brings many casualties and few victories. 'R' Kattpacalypse 'MA, L "Blitz"
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732 112 732 AdvoCare 500, Qualifying. (N) (Live) Setup (N) From Atlanta Motor Speedway (N) (Live) Center (N) Debrief
iiKE 37 43 37 27 36 Gangland "Wild Boyz" ***Y "Casino" (1995, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci. A mob employ- *** "A Bronx Tale"
37 43 37 27 36 '14'[c ee makes a play for power in 1970s Las Vegas. (In Stereo)'R' (1993)'R'
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370 271 370 Timberlake. (In Stereo) 'R' c 'MA' a 'MA' cc Stereo) 'MA' a (2011) Zoe Saldana.
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36 31 36 Tourn. Centre in Toronto. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Football Show Animals'G'
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31 59 31 26 29 Christopher Shand. 'NR' X Gambit" (N) cc Skylar's help.
(TB~) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King |Seinfeld |Seinfeld Payne |Payne |Worse |Worse ** "Valentine's Day" (2010)'PG-13'
hi** "Chapter Two" (1979, Comedy-Drama) *** "Rollerball" (1975, Science Fiction) *** "Hide in Plain Sight" (1980, Crime
OS^S 169 53 169 30 35 James Caan.'PG' s James Caan, John Houseman. 'R' sc Drama) James Caan, TII Eikenberry'PG
53 34 53 24 26 Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Bering Sea Gold: Yukon Men (N) (In Bering Sea Gold:
53 34 53 24 26 a a Under the Ice a Stereo) ca Under the Ice cc
(iiC) 50 46 50 29 30 SayYes ISayYes Gown |Gown SayYes ISaYes SayYes |SayYes Gown IGown SayYes SayYes
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TOON 38 58 38 33 Level Up |Gumball Adven |NinjaGo Cartoon Planet'G' King/Hill |King/Hill American |American Fam.Guy |Fam.Guy
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truTY 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'14' Cops'PG' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Forensic Forensic
[LVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H |Home Improvement |Home Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond King King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special CSI: Crime Scene
(USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Investigation 'PG'
Charmed (In Stereo) Charmed "Just Harried" *** "Dirty Dancing"(1987) Jennifer Grey A sheltered *** "Dirty Dancing" (1987,
WJ 117 69 117 'PG'] 'PG'X] teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor. Romance) Jennifer Grey 'PG-13'
1Wi 18 18 18 18 20 30 Rock |30 Rock Funny Home Videos Mother |Mother |Mother |Mother |WGN News at Nine |Funny Home Videos


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BEAAT 'E

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
GAME



GENNIB



CIYPAR
7" T"
^^ _! _


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


t l ' i
I ,
i P I' I I l




'*1 1



AFTER HIS CULIMIN&
COMPANION 5TARTEP TO
.PANIC, H TOLP HER TO ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your I
answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: HYPER PARCH WANTED TAMPER
I Answer: After he pitched a perfect game, he -
THREW A PARTY


ACROSS
1 Palm off
6 Obscenity
substitute,
perhaps
11 Respond to
the doorbell
13 Crusty roll
14 Pianist
Fats -
15 Mean and
nasty
16 Schmooze
17 Female rabbit
18 Bossy's chew
21 Cigar type
23 "Mad Max"
Gibson
26 Stopped for
lunch
27 Writer
Dinesen
28 Markdown
29 Hieroglyphics
stone
31 Baja fast food
32 Like a punk
hairdo


33 Large glaciers
(2 words)
35 Belgian river
36 Tot's perch
37 Itty-bitty
38 "King"
Cole
39 Got going
40 W-2 info
41 Coral
formation
42 Paulo
44 Glib
47 Departure
51 Like some
debts
52 Trickery
53 Synthetic
fabric
54 Dawdle

DOWN
1 Cabbage
Patch Kids or
Furbys
2 Lennon's wife
3 Suffix for hero


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PCS EMIIL JUTS
ALl GONE AMAH

ADULTS ALGAE
IPIOITIBOUINIDI NIIKIE


ARES EL KS
RABBI UR GE S
IRA PORE SEPT
PILL EGGS BEA
EIPRE KIEI BABB
TSAR DAUB
RINSE SLOGAN
HERE PENIKINIRFE
LIVES ID EE RAW
MINT CORD DRS


4 Hearty
swallow
5 Determination
6 Nobleman
7 Queue
8 Compass dir.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Always, to
Byron
10 Use a crowbar
12 Hale and
hearty
13 Early camera
18 Western
explorers'
guide Kit
19 Perfect world
20 Knock it off!
22 Bleating
23 Colorful
parrots
24 Weds in haste
25 Diminish
28 Kangaroo
pouch
30 Just
scrape by
31 Like most
new drivers
34 Came to a
halt
36 Entered data
39 Actress Ina -
41 Breezy
greeting
43 Killer whale
44 Merriment
45 "Have you
wool?"
46 Mil. rank
48 Underwater
shocker
49 Word in RSVP
50 Dirty place


Dear Annie: We are three
daughters who need help.
Our parents' home seems
unhappy and full of
bitterness. Mom and
Dad have been mar-
ried for 59 years, but
Mom doesn't seem to
enjoy life. Dad is not
perfect, but we really
don't know their past
personal stories and
relationship. They
seem to have led sepa-
rate lives: Mom at
home with six kids to
raise, and Dad work- ANIN
ing long hours at his MAIL
business. Since Dad's
retirement, they have
settled into a routine of doctor
appointments and staying home.
Dad no longer wants to do any-
thing, because Mom is constantly
telling him that he doesn't do
things correctly He embarrasses
her. Dad has no interest in going
places due to his health issues,
and Mom doesn't want him driv-
ing much or staying home alone.
The constant nagging has cre-
ated an unhealthy environment.
It is difficult to visit, because we
don't like to see and hear them
like this. We have sat down with
them to discuss the situation and
offered suggestions, but there has
been neither change nor resolu-
tion. Counseling is not an option,
as Mom seems overly concerned
with what others know about her
or will think of her. Dad doesn't
seem to be concerned about any-
thing. We don't want to become
the kind of kids who stop seeing
their parents. Any suggestions?
- The Girls
Dear Girls: When couples re-


tire, they can fall into the trap of
doing nothing and getting on
each other's nerves. Mom resents
Dad invading her do-
mestic domain, and
Dad is depressed be-
cause his identity was
tied up in his job. And
if they have health is-
sues, it can exacerbate
the problem because
getting out of the
house can be problem-
atic or exhausting. It's
a shame your parents
won't address their
IE'S problems, particularly
BOX if they are depressed.
We recommend you
find ways to get them
out of the house, together or sep-
arately Take them out for dinner.
Invite Mom to a play Encourage
Dad to attend a ballgame with
you. Look into senior programs in
their area, and perhaps offer to
go with them until they become
interested enough to go on their
own and, hopefully, make friends.
Please don't give up on them.
They need you.
Dear Annie: I'm 13 and live
with my mom. She always over-
reacts when my room is not ab-
solutely spotless, which leaves
me wondering whether she has
OCD. She doesn't seem to care
the rest of the house is a mess.
She seems to magnify the messi-
ness of my room only
When I confront her about this,
she gets mad and sends me to my
room. I think she wants me to be
holed up in there so I'll see how
messy it is. But I don't. Does she
have OCD? How would I know?
Help me. My Room Is Clean
Dear Room: If your mom is


only concerned with the mess in
your room, it's probably not OCD.
It's more likely your room is a lit-
tle messy
Mom sounds stressed. If you
find yourself arguing with her a
lot, please consider the two of
you may be pushing each other's
buttons more than you intend.
Try talking to her when you are
both calm. Explain you don't
want to fight. Ask how to make
things better. If it doesn't help,
please discuss it with your school
counselor.
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to "Single Too Long," the
45-year-old gentleman who is
having problems meeting women
who have never been married
and don't have children.
I would like to mention No
Kidding (nokidding.net), an in-
ternational "social club" for
adults, single or married, who
never have parented and don't
wish to. Not everyone wants kids,
and many of us are surrounded
by others constantly trying to
change our minds. No Kidding is
not a dating site. It's just a place
for people without kids to meet
like-minded others. California
U

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Bridge


North 08-31-12
4 K 7 6 2
SK762
V J 10 8
10 9 7 4
54
West East
S J 9 4 10 5
V97642 VA 3
AJ K Q 8 6 5 2
10 863 *QJ9
South
4 A Q 8 4 3
V KQ5
S3
AK 7 2

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 4 Pass Pass 24
Dbl. Pass ??


Opening lead: + A


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Author Ray Bradbury, who died in June and was
particularly well-known for "Fahrenheit 451" and
"The Illustrated Man," said, "I know you've heard
it a thousand times before. But it's true hard
work pays off. If you want to be good, you have to
practice, practice, practice. If you don't love some-
thing, then don't do it."
I know you've heard it a thousand times before,
but it's true work hard to describe your hand ac-
curately to partner.
In today's deal, North has the decision to make.
South opens one spade, West passes, North passes
(do you agree?), East balances with two diamonds,
South doubles, and West passes. What should
North do now?
First, should North pass over one spade? In the
past, that would have been a common choice, but
nowadays almost everyone would bid at least two
spades, for tactical reasons if no other
Next, let's analyze South's double. That is for
takeout, showing short diamonds, and promising
extra values because North could have nothing.
What does South know about North's hand?
That it has fewer than six points. Given that,
North's hand is a maximum. North should jump to
three spades. He must show some enthusiasm.
Here, South will raise to four spades and make
five, losing one heart and one diamond.
If North bids two spades, he might have a 3-3-4-
3 or 3-3-3-4 zero-count.
Base your bids on what partner already knows
about your hand.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C6 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


WANT TO KNOW 15 HOW YOUtRE --
BARK AT A OUR6LAR bOITP A I "
'15H IN YOUR MOUTIH-..IF I KNOLL A
BUR6LAP.
I L- T
S Is. 15COMIN6,
.LL.EAT r
EARLY.,







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A^TOME?J {( 3 NSO CE A.




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-^ \18f-6!L i^ \


UNBELuVBLE, S1S! -
WHEN ARE-yoo GOING
TO FORGErIHE1DUM6
THINGS THATf
HFIPPNED LFOd,
WE WJRE 4
KIDS?^ ^


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


ALICE, THIS IS MY
DAUGHTER. HER CAREER
PLAN IS TO BECOME A
TROPHY WIFE FOR A
BLIND GUY.







The Born Loser


IARS CALLED IN


IUt YOU ON'T TWNK PERHAPS
R1 .>FlbA BOUT )NOT.,,
-/ ._ I h T_ W, DmoOU? /--,--/I


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


6OVRO IAGREE (55
WfH YOUR WIFE
THAT YOUV VE61YN
L5AL XE6 RALLY
,, A. EP TO KNOW...








Big Nate

HEY, IF YOU TWO WANT
TO GET YOURSELVES
IN SHAPE FOR SCHOOL,
GO60 AHEAD' UT LEAVE
ME OUT OF IT







Arlo and Janis -


BUT VEAN YOUR FFRWPNDS AT
FOX ANP /U ARPE L610ON -
/ONPPR WHY YOU PONT JUST
RE6LCASE THE RETURN ANP
PUT THE 5 ISSUE BHINP YOU!




'. i


I'M HAVING A REAL
HARD TIME CHOOSING
SIDES ON THIS ONE.


S6UT RVE- YOU E.VE.R kOT1C6F-
ROW OFTEr RE. CKLL5SiCK
l-"_._ ON FRICAYS? _-,


* I ~DON'T
ANYTHING'


* ^


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Possession" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Possession" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.


"Lawless" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Premium Rush" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Hit and Run"(R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25
p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X slenba jAV


"ZLHWCBCD ... BR HC BZZYRPWHPLT


LMXYWRBJC BCPJ PFL EBCTR JO PFL


CJVZL HCT PFL ZLHWCLT." PHGZJW


XHZTNLZZ

Previous Solution: "An optimist may see a light where there is none, but why must
the pessimist always run to blow it out?" Rene Descartes
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 8-31


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


YOU STILLTFLK BOUT
TH-E TIM 11 ROKE YOUR
WORLKING DOU.- RND ITH
GUYS R NICKEL-TO
WRTcOH yOU DRESS.


'!,< -..


Dilbert


AND BY THAT HE MEANS
HE'S NOT HAPPY THAT
I'M MAJORING IN VISUAL
AND PERFORMING ARTS.


AH, NATE! GOO D'
HELP ME
CARRY THESE
SUPPLIES
INTO MY
CLASS-
ROOM.


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 C7






C8S FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012



MOVIE
Continued from Page Cl


Matt Bondurant's fictional
tale of his grandfather, Jack,
and his brothers, moon-
shine masters who kept the
Virginia hills good n'
liquored up during Prohibi-
tion. The eldest, Howard
(Clarke), is a volatile and
frequently inebriated vet-
eran of World War I. The
middle brother, Forrest
(Hardy), is the quietly com-
manding leader of the busi-
ness and the family. And
then there's Jack (LaBeouf),
the youngest who's eager to
prove himself. He's the most
ambitious, which makes
him the most dangerous.
The Bondurant boys find
their tidy little operation
threatened when a corrupt
Chicago lawman named
Charlie Rakes (Guy Pearce)
swoops in to shut them
down. He's as nasty as he is
nattily dressed, and Pearce


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


once again seems to relish
playing this type of precise
villain. Also entering the
brothers' lives, seemingly
because the story needed
some sort of female figure,
are two very different
women. Maggie (Jessica
Chastain) arrives out of
nowhere one day from The
Big City with a secret past
and immediately starts
functioning as the waitress
at the brothers' restau-
rant/headquarters and For-
rest's obligatory love
interest. Bertha (Mia
Wasikowska) is the modest
and pious daughter of the
town's preacher who
catches Jack's eye which
makes no sense, given that
he's a wannabe gangster
with flashy tastes.
"Lawless" allows neither
of these fine, versatile ac-
tresses to display what they
can do fully It is mainly
about the men, and the pri-
mal ways in which they sur-
vive and seek revenge. Yet it
also squanders the formida-


ble presence of Gary Old-
man in just a few scenes as
the big-city mobster who
Jack aspires to be like one
day He is gone for large, in-
explicable chunks of time,
and is sorely missed.
Still, there is Hardy, who
is always hulking and in-
tense and impossible to stop
watching. Sure, his accent is
a little thick and folksy but
he seems to get the melody
that exists within the script
- and at least you can un-
derstand him better here
than you could when he had
that contraption strapped to
his face to play Bane in
"The Dark Knight Rises." As
LaBeouf continues his ef-
fort to show he's a grown-up
and can do serious charac-
ter work, Hardy shows up
and simply dominates.
"Lawless," a Weinstein
Co. release, is rated R for
strong bloody violence, lan-
guage and some sexual-
ity/nudity. Running time:
110 minutes. Two and a half
stars out of four.


Associated Press
Shia LaBeouf, right, portrays the youngest Bondurant brother a scene from "Lawless." The
movie opens Friday in local theaters.





To place an ad, call 563=5966


.a: **)53-65 Tl Fe: 88)82-34 E al:*asi 'es 9 onceol*eco wbi0:ww *rnilonie0o


Older gentleman looking
for single lady 50-60 short
& thin, NS, SD, no pets.
For dinner and dancing,
motorcycle rides, LTR.
Send Picture and some-
thing about you to:
Blind Box 1799
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

Pinochle Players
Seeking couple to
play weekly
N/S, N/D
(352) 628-3570





4 x 8 Utility Trailer
Good Tires Needs a
little work$325.
75 Paver Bricks $25.
(352) 503-6149

BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Sept 9, 9-4, Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
toys, Fruit/Nut
Treat, Cage Wire 8260
Adrian Dr.
Brooksville 727-517-5337








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
4 44* * *


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
*GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
CONSTRUCTION
ESTIMATOR
Part time to start. You will
need experience in
Commercial Concrete
and Masonry Estimating.
Must be computer literate
and have a working
knowledge of Excel.
Email resume to:
wavecrestmasonry@
embarqmail.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 1 & Sun. 2, 8am-4p
* Multi Family Sale*
Hsehld, tools, clothes,
Beseler Enlarger &
other dark rm. equip.
Vintage magazines
7300 W Shetland Lane

FLORAL CITY
*STREET WIDE SALE*
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8a-Ip
Household, Tools,
Furniture and MORE!
S. COVE POINT
No Early Birds

FOR SALE
1964 Silver Kennedy
Half Dollar $10 ea
(352) 556-1724
HOLDER
Friday & Sat., 8am ?
7138 N. Smith Terrace
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8a- 4o
MOVING SALE
RAIN OR SHINE
Inv. Golf & CC Area,
8912 E. Cashiers Ct.
off S. Black Mt. Drive

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825


2 chairs and 2 hassocks
30.00 352 382 1436
after 10am
PATIO FURNITURE PVC
beige 7pc set-table, 4
chairs, rocker, lamp &
cushions $175 Call
352-344-3112
RECLINER recliner rarely
used excellent
95.00 cream color 352
382 1436 after 10am
Traditional Couch and
2 chairs, brown & gold
paisley print 2 yrs. old
excellent condition
Asking $1,250
(352) 637-2281
WASHER/DRYER
washer/dryer, white,
working condition, can
deliver in Inverness,
$200.00 352-212-5286



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



3 Adorable
Free Kittens, litter
trained, good w/kids
(352) 344-2211
3 Netherlands Dwarf
Rabbits
Mostly Black w/
some white
(352) 341-0351
4 Banthan
Roosters
Bucktail Mix
(352) 302-6420
Black Lab Mix
Male, neutered, 8 yrs,
Free to good home
Needs lots of room.
Loving, needs love in
return (352) 344-4763


FREE' 'BEST .
Permit And ,
I Engineering Fees I s_ _
4 Up to $200 value I

*Siding Soffit *Fascia* Skirting* Roofovers *Carports Screen Rooms *Decks -Windows* Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


FREE HORSE MANURE
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
Just Weaned
People Friendly
2 Tigers & Gray
352-257-1794
FREE PUPPIES
Heinz 57
to Loving Home
3 months old
(352) 476-6811
Free To Good Home,
Pong the 4 month old
Kitty.Back and white.
Fixed and Shots. Indoor
kitty acts like dog. Comes
with food and toys.
Needs home
ASAP.Please call
352-419-7327
LeBRA for 2003 Toyota
Camry Solara. Excellent
condition.
352-287-3119
MOBILE HOME
1979 14X60 SW 2BR/2BA
352-621-0437


Bull Dog Terrier, Male
Pure bred, 65 lb black
& white, brown & blue
eye Lecanto Area
REWARD
(352) 601-1766


Lost Boxer
Male, Citrus Springs
If found please Call
(352) 249-8744
LOST JACK Russell
Male, 8 months old
blue collar
Name "Ozzie"
Dawson St. Inverness
(352) 419-4749
Lost
Part Persian Light
Orange Cat. Lost in Blue
Cove area of Dunellon.
Family new to Blue Cove.
Cat declawed all the way
around
(352) 445-5495
Lost Pitbull/Terrier
white/black, 801bs, goes
by "Diesel", lost 7/13/12
in the vicinity of Cardinal
and 491, needs meds.
Last seen Noble and
Rovan (352) 270-5114

Lost Sapphire & Gold
Bracelet
Citrus Hills Publix
8/29
(352) 270-3554
YORKIE
Missing from Buckskin
Dr. Pine Ridge.
Black and Tan.
Family Devastated
Reward $200
No questions
(352) 527-7980


with White markings,
microchipped
answers to "Galaxy"
Bravo and Haciendo
Pine Ridge
(352) 476-1878



2 COWS
Mom & Cat with ID
tags. Call to identify
Crystal River Area
(352) 563-1724
Found -
Mini Pincher 8/29 on 488.
Please call 352-302-4324
Found Orange Male
Tabby Cat, with white
marking on stomach
Very friendly In
Sugarmill Woods near
Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303
Found Young Male
Husky blue collar
Off Homosassa Trl.
(352) 503-6355
Jackie
Quaker Parrot
Found near Forest
& Stage Coach
Citrus County Animal
Services (352) 746-8400
Tri colored, tan, black
and white, Male
Walker. found in the
area of Page and
Keepsake in Hernando.
(352) 201-5124


ROUTES




AVAILABLE


N01


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager or
email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
C C I T R U 0 U N T Y


CHItjoNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful
flower of
Mt. Caramel,
fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother
of the Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me
and show me here
you are my mother.
0 Holy Mary,
Mother of God,
Queen of Heaven
and Earth, I humbly
beseech you from
the bottom of my
heart to secure me
in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. 0 Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this
causein your hands
(3 times).
Say this prayer for
3 consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
KJ




Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
preciouspawsflorida.c
om
726-4700




"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS AT A
TIME"



O t?


ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
THurs. Fri. Sat & Sun
Noon-4pm


PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy.
Inverness
(cats only)
Regular store hours



Adopt a
rescued Pet ,






t

View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adoptarescuedpet
.com or call
352-795-9550

ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday 10am-12pm
PetSupermarket
Inverness
We are in NEED of
FOSTERS to help
save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at Pet
Supermarket
Inverness


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825

CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A. till 4:00 P.
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and
Conant.
Look for the big white
building with the
bright paw prints.





OFFICE ASSIST.

Part time Homosassa
Area, Office & quick
books exp. required
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-2600





HAIR STYLIST
Wanted. To Join Our
Team In Citrus Springs
(352) 464-2196











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^**i** * *


ARNP WANTED
Friendly Pediatric
office in Crystal River.
20 hours per week.
Send resume to:
medofficehrdept
@tampabay.rr.com



CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@




DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
Barrington Place, part
of Emeritus Sr. Living,
a dynamic, rapidly
expanding company
committed to provid-
ing quality care for
seniors, is seeking a
motivated,
self-directed
individual to
coordinate resident
care activity
including resident
assessments,
medication
management &
overall resident
satisfaction & staffing.
Must a team player.
Requires strong
leadership &
technical ability, a
documented history
of working with the
elderly, the ability to
problem solve &
implement resident
focused systems,
experience in an
assisted living, nursing
home and a thor-
ough understanding
of state requirements.
LPN a must.

We provide
comprehensive
benefits, including
competitive pay,
medical, dental,
vision & 401(k) plans
and paid vacation,
holiday & sick
time. Interested
candidates please
forward a resume to:
Barrington Place
Fax: (352) 746-4166
EOE
The Start of
Something Wonderful



F/T Medical
Insurance Biller

Experience required,
Benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1795M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429


248613975
63 72954 18
5 1 94 8 76 3 2
926574381
78 4132569
1538 6 9E 724
8 7 19462 5 3
3 9 57 2 8 1 46
4 6 2351897


SCENE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Full Time
Lab Technologist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429

NEEDEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RESEARCH
COORDINATOR/RN

Seeking Detail Orien-
ted, computer literate
RN for Busy Clinical
Research Office
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1800P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429




Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SALES
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace

Telemarketing Mgr

AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375




A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic

Must have valid
driver's license.
Min. 3 yrs. Exp.
Pay based upon exp.
$11- $15perhr
Appoolv in Person ONLY
H.E. Smith Co.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

CONSTRUCTION
ESTIMATOR
Part time to start. You will
need experience in
Commercial Concrete
and Masonry Estimating.
Must be computer literate
and have a working
knowledge of Excel.
Email resume to:
wavecrestmasonry@
embarqmail.com

DRIVER

Over The Road
Flatbed, 2 Yrs Exp, 3-5
wks gone. Class A CDL
(334) 864-7456

Foundation repair

Trainable working
Foreman Needed
Must Have insurable DL,
Able to work 10+ Hr.
Days M.-Fri. Call for
Phone Interview.
Dunnellon352-843-1717




FREE TUITION TAX
SCHOOL

Learn to prepare income
tax returns. Potential
employment after taking
course. Limited spaces
left! Register to attend
open house to learn more
Call (352) 563-2777
Liberty Tax Service
Small fee for books

Grounds &
Building Maint

"Seeking exp'd
individual for grounds
& building mainte-
nance for large
Beverly Hills Assoc.
Non-smoker.
Please fax resume to
352-746-0875 "Please
do not call office"


HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Crystal River,
Homosassa Area

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




Telemarketing Mgr

AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375





CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time Customer
Service/Food Prep posi-
tion. 15 Hours a week.
Must be available even-
ing hours 4-7pm and
weekends.Customer
Service and typing skills
required.Fax resume to
352-527-9605

Laundry Attendant

Apply 118 S Apopka,
Inverness










Massage Therapy
Weekend Class

SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-5
HAVE A NEW CAREER
IN 37 WEEKS
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey
Campus
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com

TUTOR NEEDED

For
conversational
Spanish
Contact: Chandra@
champsinc.com





Established Pizza
Shop in Floral City.
Good Money Maker
$16,000 586-9932





AC BUSINESS
For Sale
For More Info. Call
Jack 352-697-1143





Antique 1950 One
Armed Bandit 10 cent
slot machine. Exc Con-
dition From Harrahs@
Lake Tahoe. $1200
(352) 726-7596




Elvis, 3 stooges,
McDonalds org. 15th
Anniversay B-Day Cake
display, complete,
Lundby Doll House w/
furn., Lucy Plates. ETC.
MOVING MUST SELL
(352) 726-5584


Elvis Collection
$100
I Love Lucy Plates
$100
(352) 726-5584
McDonalds org. 15th
Anniversay B-Day Cake
Display, complete $100
Lundby Doll House
w/ furnishing, $100
(352) 726-5584


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHAR-BROIL GRILL
Two burner
No Tank $50.00
Older Model
352-601-7816
DRYER
$100 works great.
90 day warranty.
delivery extra
call/text352-364-6504
DRYER Whirlpool Dryer,
excellent condition.
$135.00
352-270-3772 or
352-464-1591
ELECTRIC FRYER
Masterbuilt Butterball
Electric Turkey Fryer -
Never used $95.00
(352) 527-8993
Kenmore Freezer,
Upright less than
1 yr. old
$250.
(352) 341-4313
Maytag Dryer
for RV or Apartment
Like knew $325
(352) 489-2099
Refrigerator/Freezer,
Maytag Side by Side
Microwave, Maytag
Both White
$150. for both
(352) 419-5527
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can
Deliver. 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great.90 day warranty.
Delivery extra call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER/DRYER
washer/dryer, white,
working condition, can
deliver in Inverness,
$200.00 352-212-5286




Computer Desk
w/ Hutch and chair
$65.
(352) 628-5428
COMPUTER DESK
With Hutch Dark Oak
$70. Call 352-586-7346




SUNDAY @
Auction Hall 1pm
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
ANTIQUE &
COLLECTIBLE
Great selection
Early American
Antique Furniture ,
Onental & Middle
Eastern, Art, Sterling,
Jewelry, 100+ Fostona
Americana 50+
Humells, Lenox,
Mounted Fish, Swords,
Dolls and more HUGE
group First day &
framed stamps series
Must have the 10%bp,
Dudleys auction num-
bers ad the Mainely
Real Estate numbers,
the webistie and the
phone number
www.dudlevs
auction.com
10%bp cash/chk
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246


SUNDAY @
Auction Hall 1pm
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
ANTIQUE &
COLLECTIBLE
Great selection
Early American
Antique Furniture,
Oriental & Middle
Eastern, Art, Sterling,
Jewelry, 100+ Fostorna
Americana, 50+
Humells, Lenox,
Mounted Fish, Swords,
Dolls and more HUGE
group First day &
framed stamps series
Must have the 10%bp,
Dudleys auction num-
bers ad the Mainely
Real Estate numbers,
the webiste and the
phone number
www.dudlevs
auction.com
10%bp cash/chk
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246





SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529

SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $85
352-613-0529

TELEVISION
40 INCH LCD HDTV
Gorgeous Samsung TV
like new w/remote and
manual. Inverness asking
$400. 352-341-0316

TELEVISION
54" PROJECTION TV
Works great $200 firm.
Located in Beverly Hills.
352-464-3934

Television. Panasonic 34
in. HD, 16x9, Surround
Sound, Picture-in-picture.
Remote control. Manu-
als. Excellent condition.
$60 527-6709





INTERIOR DOOR -
8'H X 2'W
$30.00 (352) 527-8993

MIRROR BEVELED
PLATE GLASS MIRROR
39"H X 62"W $30.00
(352) 527-8993

WINDOWS (5) New,
Never installed, Single
hung w/ screens 31x53
aluminum $185
(352) 527-2292





COMPUTER MONITOR
15" HP Computer
Monitor $60.00
Call 352-586-7346

DELL P4 Desktop
w/ monitor XP office
$75
COMPAQ P4, XP
w/ monitor $90
228-0568, 628-6806

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





TRACTOR
2005 AG King
Model AK22-40, 4X4
Diesel engine, bucket
and box blade. $8000
(727) 215-4938





PATIO FURNITURE PVC
beige 7pc set-table, 4
chairs, rocker, lamp &
cushions $175 Call
352-344-3112





2 COMPUTER DESKS
Light Oak Corner Desks
$50. Each Call
352-586-7346

2 Queen Anne Chairs
$150
Fl. Shell Collection $50.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274

4 Drawer Chest,
solid oak $40. obo
Dinette Set,
Table with 4 chairs,
$30 obo
(352) 503-2550


CLASSIFIED




5PE E BEDRM
SET Queen Size
$800 OBO
4 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET SECTIONAL $300
OBO (352)201-4725
6 pc Oak Entertainment
Center; expandable
Selling w/ 51 in. Hitachi
TV. $950. Will sell
separately if interested.
(352) 527-7980
21" TV and Stand $30,
42" TV stand $20
Riverhaven
(352) 621-3270
Beige Leather Recliner,
like new, no smoke
no pets $150.
2 Drawer Wood
Night Stand $20.
(740) 610-8076 Cell
Card Table
With Chairs
$15.obo
(352) 503-2550
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Entertainment Center
Lighted white washed
oak holds stereo, spkrs,
TV., w/storage $250
Fisher Stereo unit w/
speakers $125
(352) 726-5584
ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Real wood, ch stain,
glass door, holds
27"non-hd tv + more.
Beautiful $95 746-7232
Four drawer chest
$40.00
Wood Table-5'x 3.5'
$25.00
352-860-1578
Futton
with extra cover
& pillows Excel. cond.
$250. obo
(352) 746-1316
HEADBOARD QUEEN
OAK WOOD $30
352-777-1256
Hide A Bed,
Lazy BoyExcellent
Pastel Colors
$250
(352) 341-4313
High End Used Furniture
SECOND TIME AROUND
RESALES 270-8803
2165 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Large Oak Dresser,
great cond. $175.
New Twin Bed,
never slept in $250.
(352) 249-9275
Leave message
Large sq glass/ marble
coffee table, metal tnm.
Matching end tables w/ 2
Irg gold leaf lamps. $400
726-5584
Lazy Boy Loveseat
$125.
2 Custom Valances
$75.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274
Love Seat & 2 Swivel
Rockers $100
Queen Bed, 2 night
stands. $125
Riverhaven
(352) 621-3270
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER
Dk brown vinylvery little
use $100.00
352-860-1578
Roll Top Desk
$1,000.
Large Strato Lounger
Rocker Recliner
$199.
(352) 344-1541
Section Sofa,
2 end recliners
Italian Tan Leather
Excel. Cond.
$300 352-419-5363
Silk Flowers,
vases, supplies $75.
Misc. Decor. Items
$125.
Changing Decor -SMW
(352) 382-7274
SOFAAND CHAIR
Matching Sofa & Chair.
Excellent Condition.
$350. or best offer.
352-795-0841
Solid Oak table drop
leaves w/ 4 bentwood
chrs. Excellent Cond
$375. Large Grn leather
sectional w/ Qbed
Exc. $375 726-5584
Traditional Couch and
2 chairs, brown & gold
paisley print 2 yrs. old
excellent condition
Asking $1,250
(352) 637-2281
Tropical print sofa &
chair, excellent cond
$300. DR set
Glass/marble table, metal
trim, 6 chrs, side table
$500 726-5584


FRIDAY,AUGUST 31,2012 C9


Recliner, cream color
excel. cond.
$95,
(352) 382-1436
WING BACK CHAIR
$15.00
Bar Stool-wood $15.00
352-860-1578 Iv mes-
sage




Electric Dethatcher
Excel. cond. $125 obo
Gas Wood chipper/
vacuum, self propel
$350. obo
(352) 249-7221
LAWN MOWER
John Deere 42" riding
mower. 60 hours, like
new. First $1000 takes
it! (352) 726-8311
LAWN MOWER
TORO 6.5 HP
SELF-PROPELLED -
$100 (352) 527-8993
STAGHORN FERN with
rigging to hang in a tree
$60. 352-563-2288




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 1 & Sun. 2, 8am-4p
* Multi Family Sale*
Hsehld, tools, clothes,
Beseler Enlarger &
other dark rm. equip.
Vintage magazines
7300 W Shetland Lane
FLORAL CITY
*STREET WIDE SALE*
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8a-1 p
Household, Tools,
Furniture and MORE!
S. COVE POINT
No Early Birds

HOLDER
Friday & Sat., 8am ?
7138 N. Smith Terrace
INVERNESS
Estate sale 8am 1pm
Friday and Saturday
off Highlands Blvd.
421 S. Seminole Ave.
Rain or Shine
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8a- 4p
MOVING SALE
RAIN OR SHINE
Inv. Golf & CC Area,
8912 E. Cashiers Ct.
off S. Black Mt. Drive
INVERNESS
Sept. 1 & 2,
NOON to 5pm
Sept. 3 8am 1pm
Boating/fishing,
bikes,motorcycle,some
antiques & other house-
hold items.
6475 Mockingbird Ln.
INVERNESS
Yard Sale
Saturday, Sept. 1,
756 S Tern Pt:
Furniture, sewing ma-
chine, crafts, books, art
work, toys,and household
items
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 9-3 & Sat. 9-1
MOVING Tools, Lawn
items, Liv. Rm., Bush
desk set, & MORE!
2778 W. Axelwood Dr.
WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




MEN'S JEANS 2 pair Lee
Jeans 30X30 new $25.for
both 352-637-1102




2 WOOD CABINETS
Stores 100+ vhs w/3
movies/tape $50
good shape 746-5984
1979 TRANS-AM Ready
for restoration. Extra
body parts included. En-
gine ran 18 months ago,
$1200.00 or best offer.
352-200-1459
1997 Schwinn
Women's Bike
Excellent Cond.
Owner manual
$200 OBO
(352) 465-6830
2010, 14x30' Aluminum
Shed Insullated, Dry
Wall, elec.& air, $5,000
obo (352) 382-3928
B&D BATTERY WEED
EATER Works real good
for small yard
$25 746-5984
CAMERA, OLYMPUS
35MM, LIKE NEW, CASE
& MANUAL. $25
352-746-4160
CHAR-BROIL GAS
GRILL with full tank
gas-papers in excl.
cond.$80.00
352-746-0167


COMPACT FRIDGE.
3.2 cu.ft. NEW
with papers $99.00
352-746-0167
COOLER LARGE WHITE
COOLER $75.00
(352) 527-8993
Flat Screen TV
Sharp 26"
$100.
Computer, older,
works good $65.
(352) 563-2896
FLOOR MATS WEATH-
ERTECH LEXUS RX
CUSTOM MATS-GRAY
$65.00 (352) 527-8993
FREE Oak Wood
You Haul Call
352-586-7346
GAS CANS (3) PLASTIC
5 GAL. CANS $11
EACH (352) 527-8993
GRILL CHARBROIL
MSTER FLAME GAS
GRILL W/COVER -
$35.00 (352) 527-8993
HP1000C PRINTER
Works good will need ink
$15 746-5984
Krause Ladder
Hinged, multi purpose
five position Meets
OSHA & ANSI Specs.
$150. (352) 382-5300
Lincoln Welder
AC, 225 Amp
$150
Chop Saw
for wood, $80
(352) 563-2896
LP Gas Fork Lift Tank
Good Shape, No leaks

80 Shipping Pallets all in
good shape, no boards
missing $75. obo for all
(352) 563-2385
MENS CLOTHING
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
MOVING SALE
Inverness Highlands
Microwave $20, Triple
Dresser w/mirror $100
TV Stand $10, 2 Display
Cab. w/ glass shelves
-$150/both, 2 Wicker
end tables $30./both,
China Cabinet w/glass
shelves $125. Table
w/leaf & 6 chairs $75.
47" Projection TV $100,
Recliner $50. Blowflex
Mach. $150. 697-3151
PAPER SHREDDERS [2]
paper shredders @ $5.00
each 352-746-0167
Portable Generator
Gegenarec 5000 Watt,
Briggs & Straton 10 HP.
$450 OBO
(352) 489-7930
Rolland Electric Organ
with Bench $8,000 obo
Electric Accordion w/
module & 1 speaker
$3,000 obo, 344-1541


SMOKER CHARBROIL
SMOKER-USED
TWICE-EXCELL.COND.
53"L X 40"H $100
(352) 527-8993
TODDLER HEADBOARD
brand new, rod iron, can
e-mail picture, price re-
duced, $15
(352)465-1616
Utility Trailer Like New
5ft x 10 Oft. treated wood
floor, steel mesh ramp
tailgate, new spare
$800. General Electric
110V, 12,000 BTU,
remote control
Air Conditioner, $175.
Cell (740) 610-8076
WHEELS TSW MAG
4 WHEELS 17"
DIAMETER
$100 (352) 527-8993




3 Wheel Scooter
Excellent Condition
$475
(352) 341-4008
DEPENDS FOR MEN
Large quantity Size s/m
Unopened packages
Over 150 pair $60. for all.
Dunnellon 465-8495
ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Used to transport mo-
tonrized wheelchair on
rear of vehicle. Asking
$800.00. 352-746-5672

WALKER HAND
BRAKES, BASKET &
SEAT,HD,NEW,NEVER
USED. COST$130, SELL
FOR $85 352-746-4160




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
FOR SALE
1964 Silver Kennedy
Half Dollar $10 ea
(352) 556-1724
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" GREG BEN-
NETT CORSAIR BASS
P-J STYLE W/JAZZ
NECK, MET RED, $95
352-601-6625
CORNET AND CASE
(New wonder model)
made by Conn
serial #141209
1920 era. Good
condition $450
(352) 726-8311


AMPHLIFER
Behringer Bx-108
Thunderbird bass amp.
$50. 352-419-4464
GUITAR
AXL left-handed electnc
guitar with stand and gig
bag.$85. 352-419-4464
PIANO
Walitzer,
good beginners piano,
with light and bench
$400. (352) 382-0009




2 TWIN COMFORTERS
w/shams & skirts.
Brown/beige & blue floral
pattern. $20
352-513-4614




GAZELLE EDGE Exer-
cise glider 4 function car-
dio workout computer
tracks spd, dist, tm,+cal
$75 746-7232 LMSG




Brand New
Odyssey
2 Ball SRT Putter
$100.
(352) 794-6203
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
Elliptical Exercise
Machine. Like New
$300
352-422-0273
GOLF CLUB
PING G5 DRIVER used
ping g5 driver 10.5
graphite shaft with cover.
$75.00 call at 382-5275

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238




4 x 8 Utility Trailer
Good Tires Needs a
little work$325.
75 Paver Bricks $25.
(352) 503-6149




2 BOUNCE $10,
1 BOUNCE DELUXE
MUSICAL $20, gym $15,
stroller green and brown
$20 352-777-1256


~Is


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451

Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748

Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292
TOP NOTCH Carpentry
and Remodeling
Kitchen/Bath Specialist
All Handyman Needs
Lic. (352) 220-8801




BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820


Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201


PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300





JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269





Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!









CIO FRIDAY,AUGUST 31,2012


FISHER PRICE RAIN-
FOREST JUMPEROO
Like New $35.
Call 352-637-4916
JEEP BRAND 2 IN 1
SPORT BABY CARRIER
Used Once, $15.00
call 352-637-4916
STROLLER EXCELLENT
CONDITION AND PLAY-
PEN BROWN AND pinks
$40 each 352-777-1256
SWING SMALL DELUXE
$20,2 CAR SEAT FOR
INFANT $20 each,high
chair for dinning room
$10 352-777-1256


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944
WANTED
PARK BENCH
willing to paint & elec.
glas top stove in Al-
mond (352) 503-6149
Wanted to Buy
Gas Chain Saw
(352) 249-7221




3 Chihuahua
Puppies
8 weeks old
(352) 419-4084
3 Male Yorkies, $650.
1 Male Morkie $500.
1 Male Shorkie $500.
ckc, fl. health certs.,
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC GREAT DANE
PUPPIES AKC Great
Danes Puppies! Born
Aug 1st Call
352-502-3607
BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Sept 9, 9-4, Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
toys, Fruit/Nut
Treat, Cage Wire 8260
Adrian Dr.
Brooksville 727-517-5337


CAT 4YR OLD MALE
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207










RAYA

is a 4-year-old white
retriever mix who
weighs 56 pounds.
She is a very pretty
girl. Walks well on a
leash, just a little bit
shy. Very affection-
ate and wants to be
with her humans as
much as possible.
Does not care about
cats. In desperate
need of a home.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288.















Roxy
Small, spayed, yellow
Retriever mix approxi-
mately 1 1/2 years old.
She has a medium en-
ergy level and would do
well even in a smaller
home. She is quiet, re-
served and very well
mannered. She gets
along with dogs and
cats. 352-201-8664


** *





Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
I** i **




Bring your fishing
pole!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
Hernando/Citrus Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre fenced,
paved road $625/mo
(352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182




BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
'/2 acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


I Pets


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS,
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


. EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 312 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
MANUFACTURED
HOME ON 100+ ft. of
Water Frontage, BOAT
RAMP IN OZELLO
KEYS New Plumbing,
Washer/ Dryer hkup
$78,900.
CALL FOR SHOWING
352-212-0460




HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
6270 W Liberty Lane
3BD/2BA Doublewide
1 acre lot. Deck on front
and rear. Will consider
owner financing with 5K
down. Asking $39,900
(603) 860-6660





Leek
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





ACTION-
SRENTALMANAGEMENT
REALLY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(itrusCounlyHomeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
14 S.Jefferso (H)................625
2/2 Lving room, family room,
FL room & inside utility room
45 W. Kentwood (CS) ............S1200
3/2/2 Includes pool/oiwn service,
newer home available Sept 1st
CRYSTAL RIVER
11435 N. Dixie Shores ((R).........$900
3/1 Corport, stilt home with dock
& Gulf access, lominte floors
HOMOSASSA
2306 Sdig Pt. (H) ..............500
2/1 Duplex, close to Homosasso &
Crystal River, W/D Hook4Jp
5865 W. Vike Path (H)................ $725
3/2/1 Cozy home, Ig yord
close to Rock Crasher Elementary
1416 W. Kendde ................... S750
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 acre, fenced
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
3441 L Ch l (HER) .............. $600
2/1 Adorable, close to lake and ounctes to Ocala
1274 Cypress Cove Ct. NV)....... 625
2/25lTownhousedoseto town
and the interstate, community pool

HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 Villa at
SUGARMILL WOODS
No Pets $700
352 489-0937




FLORAL CITY
1/1, $400/Mo. $400/Sec.
Incls, septic water, trash
No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity


BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/Carport, $600
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
Remodeled, Cute 2/1,
W/D, CHA, shed, fenc'd
$560. mo 352-228-3454
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850 mo. F/L/S
(352) 249-7033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 /2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2/loft BR, den $650.
$500 sec. no pets
(352) 519-6051
HOMOSASSA
Meadows 3/2/2
from $650 up
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Upgrades $775
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INVERNESS
3/2/2, $800, 1st, last &
sec. Ref.'s. No Pets, No
smoke (352) 726-1875
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community no
smoking, $750 mo.
Cell 352-220-3939,
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $750. mo
+ util (330) 337-9637




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$110wkly/120wkly. No
hidden cost. 563-6428
LECANTO
Large Furnished
Room w/ Bath
Use of pool, laundry,
kitchen, tv. 500 a month.
Smoke outside, single
person, no pets.
352.860.3259


Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000



Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$56,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1V2 Completely Furn.,
Pool, boat dock, Wash/
Dry (352) 302-5972
CRYSTAL RIVER
Furnished 1/1 w/pool.
$775/mo. Very clean,
flex terms, new couch,
flat scrn, ent cntr, bed
& more.Off 19 N of air-
port. Call 813-240-0408.




INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $125/wk.
$475 sec $600 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
Labor Day Sale 1 wk
only $250 off 3bd2ba FL
RM CHA 1650sq ft car-
pets c/fans w DW @
WashDry H/ups rent
$650 dep $750 23 N.
Wadsworth
813-340-1352 or
352-794-0211




FLORAL CITY
2/1 Fully Furn., Elec. &
water included, $650.
No. Pets (352) 223-8840
(352) 464-3964


Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990

HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660


ESTATE SALE: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
ra tegated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tlon call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


12
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





FRIDAY
On-Site 9am
3055 S Audubon Ter
Homosassa 34448
REAL ESTATE
& CONTENTS
MH on 5 Lots w/
28x32 garage-sheds
& carports.
COURT ORDERED
SALE
'06 Grand Marquis
19k mi, '81 C20 PU,
Trailer, Workshop of
Construction Tools,
Furniture & Household
www.dudlevs
auction.com
10%bp cash/chk
(352)637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
Maine-ly RE
BK 381384












For Sale By
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
1,800 SF, 4BR/2BA
home on .44 acres
Zoning:
COMMERCIAL (CG)
Prime location in
historical downtown
Crystal River 2 blocks
from US HWY 19
Permitted uses in-
clude office, medi-
cal, restaurant, retail,
day care center,
school, bed & break-
fast, vet office, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
839 N Citrus Ave,

THUR. SEPT 6 2D
OPEN from 1 PM

Call 3130
for more info
For Details
Visit our Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com









FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


CLASSIFIED


_1


2/2/2, Located on
Culdesac, min. from
golf club. All rms open
to enclosed pool & la-
nai New AC, $144,000
owner fin. 15% down
terms negotiable
(352) 465-2372
HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srpnngs $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900
2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884




3 Bedroom, 21/2 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master,
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239,900
(352) 860-0444




OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418
Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192




HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

YOU'LL THIS!
Inver/Highlands
LARGE 1 Fam, 2.8
acres, residential area,
fully fenced, 4 BR, 3 BA,
pool, own deep well,
costly updates 2011.
Offered AS IS. $189,900.
Call Owner 419-7017.



Crystal River

Spacious DW Moduler
on corner lot with 4
bedrooms. 5th room
could be an office or
sitting room. 3 full
baths. Screened in
solar heated in ground
pool & Jacuzzi. 2 car
garage, sprinkler sys-
tem fireplace in FR,
alarm system, central
vac system, lots of
kitchen cabinets, dou-
ble oven, ceramic tile &
carpet throughout. All
on a landscaped yard-a
must see! $185,000.
352-220-6187 or
609-290-4335




HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, Nice, Clean
Rent to Own
$675. mo.
813-335-5277




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118, 000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
"Gold Medal"
REALTOR,
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.









Quade
Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qfeeser@yahoo.com
CENTURY 21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450














Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *-

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty


CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529




YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOT,VERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$75,000.CALL
(352)513-5001




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745




2.5 ACRES,
Crystal Hills Mini Farms
486 to N. Anthony Ave.
Left on E. Jinnita St.
3rd Lot on Rt $25,500.
(727) 439-9106
/2 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact
fee credit, high and
dry, trees, $11,500 obo
(352) 795-3710
FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
clear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
$25k.have title asking
$14,500 o.b.o.
813-792-1355




Ten Pontoon Boat Seat
End Arm Rests,
w/ storage & cup
holder $15ea
all for $100
(352) 628-5222




Jet Ski
Seadoo, 1999, Bombar-
dier GS, 720 CC, w/
trailer, new wheels Sr
Mechanic owned, runs
great real nice cond.
$1,250. (352) 422-1026




BASS TRACKER
15 ft, Jon Boat 25HP
Merc. Mtr., elect. start
mtr. guide trolling mtr.
new tires on trlr. new
spare tire, life jacket &
cooler incl.'d $1,500
(352) 344-4670
CONCEPT
1997, 22ft, 6 In. CC
225HP, EFI Merc., SS
Prop. Alum. Tan. Ax. trlr.
cust. Interior, & cover
new gauges, dual bat-
teries, all safety equip.
life jackets & anker,
$11,900 .(352) 795-4674
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
SWEETWATER
20ft. 50HP evinrude,
galvanized trailer,
$3500
(352) 613-2333




Car Tow Dolly
with surge brakes, LED
lights, tongue jack &
wheel covers, extras
$1,775, 352-249-7896
JAMBOREE

'05 Jamboree 30 ft class
C Motor home. Excellent
Cond. Ford V10 20K mi-
les, NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
746-9002


Citrus County
Homes I


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICY KANE
1. Actress Barrymore was aware of (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Mailed the monthly fee for a flat (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
Definition tells you how many
3. Baseball home base destiny (1) syllables in each word.
1 2012UFS, Dist by Univ Uclckior UFS
4. Slippery-wet candle cord (1)


5. Fair-haired woman's little lakes (1)


6. U.K./France passageway tornado shape (2)


7. Luminance or intelligence appropriateness (2)


SS-1 IHDII SS3aMIH9II *L I3NNfM 'lNNiHJ '9 SUNOd S3AINOIf
1OM1 1 SlflTI' Rd lIVId *e INHMR S'ZM AUNH AXNaX Jt
8-31-12 SRRMSKV


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
KZ Sportsman
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 6, air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892





111 IIIi
CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548

FORD
'04, Thunderbird, conv.
w/ hardtop 35K mi.
excel, cond. $17,500
(352) 564-6833
HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS
352-628-4600
JAGUAR
2004 X-Type excellent
cond 95K miles
garage kept 1 owner
$ 6900.
97 MERCEDES diesel
$2500.
352-341-4586
LEXUS
'05, ES 330, 131k miles
1 owner $11,900
(352) 212-6179
luckylorra@aol.com

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! A
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
'02, Miata Conv. GL,
dark green, tan,
leather, 100K miles,
boise radio, PW, PL,
showroom cond. $8,500
Must See 352-527-7867

SUNDAY @
Auction Hall 1pm
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
ANTIQUE &
COLLECTIBLE
Great selection
Early American
Antique Furniture,
Oriental & Middle
Eastern, Art, Sterling,
Jewelry, 100+ Fostona
Americana 50+
Humells, Lenox,
Mounted Fish, Swords,
Dolls and more HUGE
group First day &
framed stamps series
Must have the 10%bp,
Dudleys auction num-
bers ad the Mainely
Real Estate numbers,
the webistie and the
phone number
www.dudlevs
auction.com
10%bp cash/chk
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Livesto


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
IneedLIST-

INGS!









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



mau0-g


'96, SC300, 150K miles,
1 owner, $5,400
(352) 212-6179
luckylorra@aol.com
MERCURY
Mountaineer Auto, V8,
4 door SUV, 2000, Fac-
tory Mags, tinted windows
Electric everything!
$3500 727-207-1619 CR
PONTIAC
'06, G6, V6 Engine
70,000 miles
very good cond.
$8,400. (352) 601-0276
SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600
SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. SEPT 2. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble H4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555


SelStrg-


CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018

DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600

FORD '00
'00, Ranger, XLT, 4 WD,
step side, ext. cab.
4 DR 125K $5,600
(352) 422-7863

FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8,
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018

FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4, 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *.
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
1983, 4X4, 5 spd. new
radial swampers, great
woods truck, alum. tool
box, new brakes lots of
new parts $1,450.
(352) 344-4670




Jeep
1998 Sahara 67K, 6 cyl, 5
speed, options, garaged,
exc cond, $8850/neg
352-322-5679

HONDA '00
CRV, 117K, great gas
savor, full pwr, extraclean
$5,200 o (352) 257-4251
c (352) 794-6069

HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600

JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8, 4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600

PONTIAC
'01, Aztek, 159 K, Black,
cold A/C, sunroof, up-
graded rims & tires, V6
$2,800 obo 464-2643


SefSol


VIRAGO
'95, 700CC, showroom
cond. driven monthly
1,128 miles, $2,800


NISSAN SUPER
CHARGER
FRONTIER 2002
$7,200.00 OBO; Auto.
352-270-0168




DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 7! $5,450.
352-341-0018
FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907
PLYMOUTH
'97, Voyager, Van,
needs module
$1,800 obo
325-220-0133
Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
+io .o0Q9 nn


'89, 4 X 4, 300, Runs
good, 2 new rear tires,
cammo seat, gun racks,
Lots of new parts $725
(352) 344-4670




Harley Davidson
2000 Fat Boy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
Harley Davidson
2003 Anniv edition Fat
Boy 12k mi, Vance &
Hines exhaust, wind-
shield & bags. Beautiful
$10,500 (352) 586-0510
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
VW TRIKE
VW Tnke New only 900
miles Garage Kept Looks
& runs great. $8000.00
352-344-9340 Phone


Sel Soae


803-0831 FCRN
9/11, Units 237,17039,1738, 748, 770, 2055- Kings Bay Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF LIEN

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property de-
scribed below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Florida Self Stor-
age Facility Act Statutes (Section 83.80183.809). The undersigned will sell at Public
Auction by competitive bidding on Tuesday, September 11 at 2:30pm on the prem-
ises where said property has been stored.
Kingsbay Self Storage, 7957 W. W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River, FL 34429, Citrus
County, State of Florida:

Brandi Barber Unit # 237 Household
Michael Sisk Unit # 1039 Entire Household
Gary Boesch Unit # 138 Misc. Household
Michelle Lowther Unit # 148 Household Items
Clinton Robinson Unit # 170 Household
Kim Lauer Unit # 2055 Household

Purchase must be paid at the time of purchase in cash. All items purchased are sold
as is and must be removed at the time of the sale. Sale subject to cancellation or in
the event of settlement between owner and obligated party.
Dated this day of August 14, 2012
Kings Bay Self Storage


491-0910 MCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Paula G. Ross File No: 2012 CP 369 Notice to Creditors
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2012 CP 369
IN RE: ESTATE OF

PAULA G. ROSS a/k/a PAULA GLORIA ROSS,


Division Probate
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Paula G. Ross a/k/a Paula Gloria Ross,
deceased, whose date of death was March 25, 2012, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is August 31,2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/Linda Suzzanne Griffin, Esquire Stirling D. Ross
Attorney for Stirling D. Ross 409 Hilltop Ave.
Florida Bar Number: 0371971 Clearwater, FL 33755
Linda Suzzanne Griffin PA
1455 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756
Tele: (727) 449 9800; Fax: (727) 446 2748
E-Mail: linda@lawyergriffin.com
August31, September 7, 2012.


812-0831 FCRN
Reeves, Charles A. File No: 2077-CP-534 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-534

IN RE: ESTATE OF

CHARLES A. REEVES

Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of CHARLES A. REEVES, deceased, whose date of
death was April 15, 2011, and whose Social Security Number is xxx-xx-3151, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and that of personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 24, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Representative

/s/Michael T. Kovach, Jr., Esquire /s/Michael T. Kovach Jr
KOVACH & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 303 Tompkins Street
Florida Bar No. 0308020 Post Office Box 635
Post Office Box 635
Inverness, Florida 34451
Inverness, FL 34451-0635
Telephone No.: (352) 341-5557
August 24 & 31, 2012.


CLASSIFIED




815-0831 FCRN
Estate of Margaret F Lynar File No: 2072-CP-489 (Summ, Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-489 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGARET F. LYNAR
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the estate of MARGARET F. LYNAR, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-489,
by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the
decedent's date of death was December 25,2011; that the total value of the
estate is $24932.00and that the names and addresses of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
VICKI HAGERTY 123 N. Andre St.
Saginaw, Ml 48602
MICHAEL LYNAR 4134 Bond Ave.

Rockledge, GL 32955
KEVIN LYNAR 512 Isle of Capri

FT. Lauderdale, FL 33301
JEFFREY K. LYNAR P 0 Box 1852
Cross City, FL 32628
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the order of Summary Administration
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 24, 2012.

Attorney for Persons Giving Notice: Person Giving Notice: /s/ Marie T. Blume
/s/ Patricia Lake
Attorney 123 N.
Andre St Florida Bar Number: 0493181
Saginaw, Ml 48602 P.O. Box 2763
Inverness, Florida 34451
Telephone: (352) 726-7778
August 24 & 31, 2012.


816-00831 FHCRN
Thomas R. Cowles File No: 2012-CP-432 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-432
IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS R. COWLES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Thomas R. Cowles deceased, whose date of
death was May 20, 2012,is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is August 24, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/ Megan T. Fitzpatrick /s/ Ruth W. Cowles
FITZPATRICK & FITZPATRICK, P.A. 8442 East Gospel Island Road
213 N. Apopka Avenue Inverness, Florida
34450
Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
352-726-1821
Florida Bar No. 84987
August 24 & 31, 2012.


897-0831 FCRN
vs. PABLO OLIVER NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP-472

IN RE: ESTATE OF
PABLO OLIVER A/K/A PABLO A. OLIVER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Pablo Oliver a/k/a Pablo A. Oliver, deceased,
whose date of death was December 3, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is August 24, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
John A. Nelson
John A. Nelson
Attorney for John A. Nelson 2218 Highway 44 West
Florida Bar Number: 0727032 Inverness, Florida
34453
Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726 6129 Fax: (352) 726 0223
E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com
John A. Nelson
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Florida 34453

Published Twice August 24 and 31,2012


898-0831 FCRN
vs. PATRICIA CRAGG NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 496
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PATRICIA CRAGG A/K/A PATRICIA M. CRAGG A/K/A PATRICIA MARIE CRAGG
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Patricia Cragg a/k/a Patricia M. Cragg a/k/a
Patricia Marie Cragg, deceased, whose date of death was July 31, 2012, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is August 24, 2012.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
John A. Nelson
John A. Nelson
Florida Bar Number: 0727032 2218 Highway 44 West
Slaymaker and Nelson, PA. Inverness, Florida
34453
2218 Highway 44 Westlnverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726 6129Fax: (352) 726 0223
E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com

Published twice August 24 and 31,2012


800-0831 FCRN
vs. Richard W Suter 2072 CA 000906 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000906

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD W. SUTER, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RICHARD W. SUTER
Last Known Address: 6090 N MCKREE TERRACE, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
Also Attempted At: 6100 SABAL BROOK WAY, PORT ORANGE, FL 32128
Current Residence Unknown

PAMELA J. SUTER
Last Known Address: 6090 MCKREE TER, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
Also Attempted At: 6100 SABAL BROOK WAY, PORT ORANGE, FL 32128
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CITRUS AND THE
STATE OF FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK 1694 AT PAGE 2225 AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

LOT 66, OF SHAMROCK ACRES, PHASE 2, BEING FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;
COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
THENCE S 88 DEGREES 33'24" W ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1336.80 FEET TO THE SW CORNER OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33,
THENCE N 0 DEG. 09' 35 E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 A DISTANCE
OF 278.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE N 0 DEG. 09'35" E
ALONG SAID WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF 288.66 FEET, THENCE EAST 719.46 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A 50 FOOT WIDE ROAD, THENCE S 13
DEGREE 30'00" E ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT -OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 296.86
FEET, THENCE WEST 789.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is


FRIDAY,AUGUST 31,2012 CLL


1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before September 24,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court this 15 day of August, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By Kathy Stalbaum
As Deputy Clerk
(Seal)

Publish August 24 and 31, 2012 11-05352


801-0831 FCRN
vs. Carol Perna 09-2012-CA-000840 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-000840
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
CAROL PERNA. AS KNOWN BENEFICIARY OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA
AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED, MICHAEL J. COLLINS, AS BENEFICIARY HEIR
OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED,
PETER A. COLLINS, AS BENEFICIARY HEIR OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA
AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED, JEFFREY L COLLINS, AS BENEFICIARY HEIR
OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED,
et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
MICHAEL J. COLLINS, AS BENEFICIARY HEIR OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA
AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED
CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 6 BEAVERBROOK RD BURLINGTON, MA 01803 and

30 HEWLETT ST 1 ROSLINDALE, MA 02131 and

24 KENWOOD ST DORHCESTER CENTER, MA 02124-2212

JEFFREY L. COLLINS, AS BENEFICIARY HEIR OF PATRICIA A. COLLINS A/K/A PATRICIA
AMANDA COLLINS A/K/A PAT, DECEASED
CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
LAST KNOW ADDRESS 7259 S WITHLAPOPKA DR FLORAL CITY, FL 34436 and

31 ADDISON AVE BROCKTON, MA 02302

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida:
LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK 24, WITH-LA-POPKA ISLANDS, UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 139 AND 140, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 1989 PEACHTREE MOTOR
HOME/PEACE

commonly known as 5191 S WITHLAPOPKA DR, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436 has been filed
against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Ashley L. Simon of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box
800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 24, 2012, (or 30
days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, phone (352) 637-9853 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
Dated: August 13, 2012


(Court Seal)

Publish: August 24 and 31,2012


CLERK OF THE COURT
Honorable Betty Strifler
110 N. Apopka Avenue Room 101
Inverness, Florida 34450

By: Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk


802-0831 FCRN
vs. James Riegler 2072-CA-7056 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2012-CA-1056

AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES RIEGLER, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AMAZONINA DACOSTA
Last Known Address Unknown
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 8, BLOCK D, AZALEA ISLAND, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 162, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before September 24,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court this 15 day of August, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By Kathy Stalbaum
As Deputy Clerk
(Seal)

Publish August 24 and 31,2012 11-11401


804-0831 FCRN
vs. Gary F White 2072-CA-000638 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2012-CA-000638
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY F. WHITE, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN TENANT
CURRENT RESIDENCE: 4435 N AZTEC POINT, HERNANDO, FL 34442

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 89 IN BLOCK A OF FAIRVIEW ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGES 49 THROUGH 60 INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before September 24,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court this 13 day of August, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By Kathy Stalbaum
As Deputy Clerk
(Seal)

Publish August 24 and 31,2012 11-24674


813-0831 FCRN
Vs. Martin V. Monzo Case No: 2012-CA-746 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No:2012-CA-746

Cadence Bank, National Association,

Plaintiff;

V.

Martin V. Monzo; Unknown Spouse of Martin V. Monzo; Pine Ridge Property Owners
Association, Inc., a Florida non profit corporation; Citrus Hills Property Owners Associ-
ation, Inc., a Florida non profit corporation; John Doe as unknown tenant of 3119 West
Daffodil Drive; Jane Doe as unknown tenant of 3119 West Daffodil Drive; John Doe as
unknown party in possession of 3119 West Daffodil Drive; John Doe as unknown ten-
ant of 672 East Boston Street; Jane Doe as unknown tenant of 672 East Boston Street;
John Doe as unknown party in possession of 672 East Boston Street; Any and All
Others claiming by, through or under said defendants as to 3119 West Daffodil Drive;
and Any and All Others claiming by, through or under said defendants as to 672 East
Boston Street; Citrus County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida,

Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARTIN V. MONZO
(Addresses Unknown)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed by Plaintiff, CADENCE BANK,
National Association, seeking foreclosure of the following real property:
Lot 17, Block 16, CITRUS HILLS FIRST ADDITION, according to map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 9, Pages 73-83, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of a written de-
fense, if any, to J. Marshall Moorhead, Esquire or L. Geoffrey Young, Esq., Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is 150 Second Avenue North, 17th Floor, St. Petersburg, Florida
33701, within 30 days from the date of this Notice, and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;


Foelsr


Foel sue l


Foel s reS l


Noie toCeios


Noie oCeios


EEE


Foreclosure Sale/
Action Notic


Foecoue S


Foreclosure S
Action Notic2e,









C12 FRIDAY,AUGUST 31, 2012


otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in Plaintiff's
Complaint.

Dated this 14th day of August, 2012.

CLERK OF COURT, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL) B y : / s /
Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

Attorneys for Plaintiff:
J. Marshall Moorhead, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 36274
L. Geoffrey Young, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 188763
ADAMS AND REESE LLP
150 Second Avenue North, 17th Floor
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Telephone: 727-502-8221 / Facsimile: 727-502-8250

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at: John Sullivan, 352-341-6700.
August 24 & 31, 2012.


814-0831 FCRN
Vs. V. Martin V. Monzo Case No: 2012-CA-746 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No:2012-CA-746
Cadence Bank, National Association,

Plaintiff;

V. Case No. 2012-CA-746

Martin V. Monzo; Unknown Spouse of Martin V. Monzo; Pine Ridge Property Owners
Association, Inc., a Florida non profit corporation; Citrus Hills Property Owners Associ-
ation, Inc., a Florida non profit corporation; John Doe as unknown tenant of 3119
West Daffodil Drive; Jane Doe as unknown tenant of 3119 West Daffodil Drive; John
Doe as unknown party in possession of 3119 West Daffodil Drive; John Doe as un-
known tenant of 672 East Boston Street; Jane Doe as unknown tenant of 672 East
Boston Street; John Doe as unknown party in possession of 672 East Boston Street;
Any and All Others claiming by, through or under said defendants as to 3119 West
Daffodil Drive; and Any and All Others claiming by, through or under said defendants
as to 672 East Boston Street; Citrus County, a political subdivision of the State of Flor-
ida,

Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: MARTIN V. MONZO
(Addresses Unknown)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed by Plaintiff, CADENCE BANK,
National Association, seeking foreclosure of the following real property:
Lot 17, Block 16, CITRUS HILLS FIRST ADDITION, according to map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 9, Pages 73-83, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of a written de-
fense, if any, to J. Marshall Moorhead, Esquire or L. Geoffrey Young, Esq., Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is 150 Second Avenue North, 17th Floor, St. Petersburg, Florida
33701, within 30 days from the date of this Notice, and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in Plaintiff's
Complaint.

Dated this 14th day of August, 2012.

CLERK OF COURT, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL) By; / s /
Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
Attorneys for Plaintiff:
J. Marshall Moorhead, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 36274
L. Geoffrey Young, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 188763
ADAMS AND REESE LLP
150 Second Avenue North, 17th Floor
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Telephone: 727-502-8221 / Facsimile: 727-502-8250

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ficipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at: John Sullivan, 352-341-6700.
August 24 & 31, 2012.


818-0907 FCRN
Vs. Robinson, Daniel E. 2012-CA-000024A Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2012-CA-000024A

SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY, INC. f/k/a AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DANIEL E. ROBINSON; MARLENE J. ROBINSON; ISPC; ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JAMES K. BROWN, deceased; JOHN DOE, UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; and ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST IDA BROWN, deceased,
Defendants.

TO: ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JAMES K.
BROWN, deceased, and ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST IDA BROWN, deceased.
NOTICE OF ACTION

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following
property:
See Exhibit "A"
EXHIBIT "A"

Lot 10, SMITTY'S ACRES, an unrecorded Subdivision in Sections I and 2 of Township 17
South, Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida, also known as follows:
Commence at the Intersection of the West line of Section 1, Township 17 South,
Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida and the South right-of-way line of Sunset Trail as
shown on Plat of River Bend, Unit No. 3, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 89, Public
Records of Citrus County, Florida, and thence go South 01 12'41" East along the West
line of said Section 1, as distance of 317 27 feet to a concrete monument at the most
Northerly corner of said Smitty's Acres; thence continue South 01 12'41" East a dis-
tance of 464.97 feet; thence go North 89 06'02" East, a distance of 448.59 feet to the
point of beginning; thence continue North 89 06'02" East a distance of 112.13 feet;
thence go South 01 13'26" East a distance of 390.05 feet; thence go South 89 06'33"
West a distance of 112.15 feet; thence go North 01 13'18" West a distance of 390 03
feet to the point of beginning. The North 25.00 feet being subject to a road easement.
Together with a undivided interest in the following 50.00 foot wide easement for
ingress/egress and utilities lying 25.00 feet on each side of the following described
centerline:
Commence at the intersection of the West line of Section 1, Township 17 South,
Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida and the South right-of-way line of Sunset Trail as
shown on the Plat of River Bend, Unit No. 3, as recorded in Plat book 2, page 89, pub-
lic records of Citrus County, Florida and thence go South 01 14'32" East along the
West line of said Section 1, a distance of 317 27 feet to a concrete monument at the
Northerly corner of said Smitty's Acres, thence continue South 01 14'32" East a dis-
tance of 75.00'; thence go North 89 04'50" East a distance of 915.00 feet to an Iron
rod at the point of beginning; thence go South 01 14'32" East along said centerline a
distance of 681 22 feet to the center of cul-de-sac having radius of 40 00 feet, a cen-
tral angle of 282 37'36", a chord of 50 00 feet, an arc of 197.31 feet being the point of
terminus
AND
Commence at the intersection of the West line of Section 1, Township 17 South,
Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida, and the South right-of-way line of Sunset Trail as
shown on the plat of River Bend, Unit No. 3, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 89, Pub-
lic Records of Citrus County, Florida, and thence go South 01 14'32" West line of said
Section I a distance of 317.27 feet to a concrete monument at the most Northerly
corner of said Smitty's Acres; thence continue South 01 14'32" East a distance of 75.00
feet; thence go North 89 04'50" East a distance of 915.00 feet to a Iron rod, thence go
South 01 14'32" East a distance of 390.00 feet to an Iron rod at the point of beginning;
thence go South 8904'50" West along said centerline a distance of 1064.06 feet the
P.C. of a curve having a radius of 143.72 feet, a central angle 6947'29", a chord and
bearing of South 54 11'05" West, 164.43 feet; thence go along the arc of last said
curve an arc distance of 175.06 feet; thence go South 1917'21" West a distance of
80.00 feet to the center of a cul-de-sac having a radius of 40.00 feet, a central angle
28237'36", a chord of 50.00 feet and a arc of 197.31 feet, being the point of terminus
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2005 FLEETWOOD 4603A MOBILE HOME WITH VIN#'S:
GLFL435A89388 AND GLFL435B89388 LOCATED ON THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY.
a/k/a: 6910 W. Melissa Ann Path, Dunnellon, FL 34433
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses to it, if any, on JOHN C. ENGLEHARDT, PA., 1524 E. Livingston Street, Orlando,
Florida 32803, Plaintiff's attorney, no more than 30 days from the date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice of Action and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint for Foreclo-
sure.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on August 21,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court
Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida
34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
August 31 and September 7, 2012.


820-0907 FCRN
Vs. Mitchim, Carmen R. Case No: 2012 CA 001188 A Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2012 CA 001188 A
REGIONS BANK,

Plaintiff,
v.


CARMEN R. MITCHIM, Deceased, et al.,

Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION


To: Unknown Spouse, if any, of Carmen R. Mitchim, deceased, Unknown
Spouse, if any, of Alpine L. Burke, deceased, Unknown Successor
Trustee, of the Alpine L. Burke Revocable Trust Agreement dated
July 8, 2002, Unknown Beneficiaries of the Alpine L. Carmen
R. Mitchem, deceased, Unknown Heirs and Unknown Parties
of the Unknown Spouse, if any, of Carmen R. Mitchim, deceased, Un
known Heirs and Unknown Parties of the Unknown Spouse, if any, of Al
pine L. Burke
(Names and Address Unknown)

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing property in Citrus County, Florida:

Lot 20, Block 103, BEVERLY HILLS UNIT NUMBER SIX SECTION ONE, a subdivision ac-
cording to the plat thereof recorded at Plate Book 11, Pages 89 through 91, inclusive,
in the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
The street address of which is 232 Jefferson Street, South, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465.


CLASSIFIED


FrcourSae


has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any to it, on Plaintiff's attorney, whose name is ROBERT W. PYLES, Esquire,
McCumber, Daniels, Buntz, Hartig & Puig, P.A., 4830 W. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 300,
Tampa, FL 33609-2521, and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court
by October 1,2012, or you will be defaulted and a judgment may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on August 21, 2012.

Betty Strifler, Clerk of Circuit Court
(Seal)
By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
August 31 & September 7, 2012.


821-0907 FCRN
Vs. Pursifull, Ann Case No: 2012 CA 000820A Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000820A

NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANN PURSIFULL, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:

LISA BRUNO
Last Known Address: 5033 S ROBERT BLAKE AVE INVERNESS, FL 34452
Also Attempted At: 1227 PINE KNOLLS ROAD, KERNERSVILLE, NC 27284
Current Residence Unknown

ANN PURSIFULL
Last Known Address: 5033 S ROBERT BLAKE AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34452
Also Attempted At: 1227 PINE KNOLLS ROAD, KERNERSVILLE, NC 27284
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:

THE SOUTH 130 FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK 443, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST FIRST ADDI-
TION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 44 THROUGH 58, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before October 1,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR,
TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIV-
ING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
(Seal) WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 21st day of August, 2012.

BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Court

By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
August 31 & September 7, 2012.



822-0907 FCRN
Vs. Rickard, Lawrence Case No: 09-2012-CA-000737 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-000737 SEC.:

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
LAWRENCE RICKARD AKA LAWRENCE PHIL RICKARD, et al
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROPERTY

TO:
LAWRENCE RICKARD AKA LAWRENCE PHIL RICKARD, ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 1454 ESTUARY DRIVE
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defend-
ants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trus-
tees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendantss; and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in CITRUS
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

BEGIN AT A POINT FOUND BY MEASURING FROM THE SW CORNER OF GOVERNMENT
LOT 4, IN SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, NORTH 48 23'58" EAST,
92.98 FEET TO THE CENTER LINE OF A ROAD 50.0 FEET WIDE; THENCE ALONG SAID ROAD
CENTER LINE SOUTH 47 06'32" EAST, 89.28 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 15 56'32" EAST, 283.50
FEET; THENCE NORTH 83 59' EAST 25.37 FEET TO A POINT IN THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF SAID ROAD AND THE ABOVE MENTIONED POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING ALONG THE WATERS EDGE OF A CANAL THE FOL-
LOWING COURSES AND DISTANCE THAT APPROXIMATELY FOLLOW THE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF SAID CANAL, NORTH 83 59' EAST 73.85 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8711'30"
EAST 47.76 FEET; THENCE NORTH 4822' EAST 29.8 FEET; THENCE NORTH 28 11' EAST
72.12 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 52'30" EAST, 18.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 35'30" EAST
79.42 FEET, THENCE NORTH 84 43' EAST 92.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 39 20' EAST 23.57
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 20 05' EAST 84.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 9 29' EAST 48.01 FEET,
M.O.L TO THE WATERS EDGE OF A SALT WATER BAY (TRACHEL LAKE); THENCE ALONG
SAID SALT WATER BAY, NORTH 81 46' WEST 87.99 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 37 45'30" WEST
90.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 13 45' WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 34 34' WEST 40.70
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 82 24' WEST, 51.41 FEET, M.O.L. TO THE WATERS EDGE OF A CA-
NAL; THENCE ALONG SAID CANAL, NORTH 16 13' WEST, 84.86 FEET; THENCE NORTH
27 05' WEST, 108.04 FEET THENCE NORTH 81 34' WEST, 39.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH
27 05' WEST, 108.04 FEET THENCE NORTH 81 34' WEST, 39.68 FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID CANAL, NORTH 26 32' EAST, 20.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 83 59' WEST 59.77 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 15 56'30" WEST, 26.66 FEET TO THE AFOREMENTIONED POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1555 SOUTH WALLACE POINT, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before Oc-
tober 1, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 22nd day of August, 2012.


Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Seal)

By: /s/ Dawn Nampel, Deputy Clerk

"In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not
later than 1(one) day prior to the proceeding at Community Legal Services of
Mid-Florida, Inc. (Citrus), 1300 Highway 41 North, Suite A, Inverness Office, Inverness,
FL 34450-3984 352-726-8512 (Citrus) and for the hearing and voice impaired
800-955-8770."
FL-97012642-11
August 31 and September 7, 2012.


823-0907 FCRN
Vs. Nichol, Rodney Case No: 09-2011-CA-001054 Notice of Action for Forclosure
Proceeding-Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.:09-2011-CA-001054
SEC.:
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF
AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007-5
Plaintiff,

v.
RODNEY NICHOL, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROPERTY

TO:
Rodney Nichol, ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
16 Beverly Hills Boulevard, Beverly Hills, FL 34465

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said
Defend ants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said
Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s);
and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in CITRUS
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

LOT 2, BLOCK 8 OF BEVERLY HILLS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 149 AND 150, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 16 BEVERLY HILLS BOULEVARD, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before Oc-
tober 1,2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.


WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 21 st day of August, 2012.
(Seal) Betty
Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

"In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not
later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Community Legal Services of
Mid-Florida, Inc. (Citrus), 1300 Highway 41 North, Suite A, Inverness Office, Inverness,
FL 34450-3984 352-726-8512 (Citrus) and for the hearing and voice impaired
800-955-8770."
August 31 & September 7, 2012.


899-0831 FCRN
vs. Rebecca A. Boros 2012 CA 001014 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CASE NO.: 2012 CA 001014


US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I
LLC TRUST 2005-AC7 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2005-AC7,
Plaintiff,
vs.
REBECCA A. BOROS A/K/A REBECCA BOROS, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: REBECCA A. BOROS A/K/A REBECCA BOROS
Last KNown Address: 3 CAPTALPA COURT, HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
Also Attempted At: 17327 BROOK CROSSING COURT, ORLAND PARK, IL 60467
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 14, BLOCK B-7, SUGARMILL WOODS CYPRESS VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, PLAT BOOK 10,
PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16 PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before September 24,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR,
TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIV-
ING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 15 day of August, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
(Seal)
By Kathy Stalbaum
As Deputy Clerk
Publish August 24 and 31,2012 11-18272


824-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT
NOTICE is hereby given by the City Council of the City of Inverness, Florida that pur-
suant to Chapter 166.041 of the laws of Florida a Public Notice be given by the City
Council of the City of Inverness that an ordinance entitled:
ORDINANCE 2012-690
AN ORDINANCE GRANTING TO FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
d/b/a PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA, INC. A NON-EXCLUSIVE
ELECTRIC UTILITY RIGHT OF WAY UTILIZATION FRANCHISE;
PRESCRIBING THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS RELATED TO THE
OCCUPANCY OF MUNICIPAL STREETS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY IN
THE CITY OF INVERNESS, FLORIDA, FOR THE PURPOSE OF
PROVIDING ELECTRIC SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY
OF PROVISIONS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

will be considered for final reading and adoption by the City Council. All interested
parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed Or-
dinance at 5:31 PM, September 18, 2012.

Copy of the proposed ordinance will be on file with and available for inspection by
the public in the office of the City Clerk in the City Hall, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness,
Florida, between the hours of 8:30 AM and 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday of each
week.

Be advised that if any person or persons may wish to appeal a decision of the City
Council of the City of Inverness, Florida, made at this meeting, a record of the pro-
ceedings will be needed by such person or persons and a verbatim record may be
needed.

This Notice is issued under my hand as the President of the City Council of the City of
Inverness this 21st of August, 2012.
Attest /s/ Deborah Davis /s/ Cabot McBride
City Clerk
President of City Council
August 31, 2012.


826-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT
Jimmie Welch
Vs. County: Citrus
Florida Department of Environmental Protection Case: 2010-CA-173

Notice is hereby given that the above referenced parties have entered into a settle-
ment of claimant's tort claims) (G09-07-562/A) against the insured, for the total
amount of $7 500.00 to be paid by State of Florida to the claimant.
Ray Cochan
Risk Managment Program Specialist

August 26, 2012.


817-0831

FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa,Citrus County,
Florida the following:
DOS: 9/11/12 @8AM
2009 Cargo Craft Trailer
VIN# 4D6EB16027324
DOS: 09/13/12 @ 8 AM
2008 Hyundai
VIN#
KMHCM36C38U074095
DOS: 9/17/12 @ 8 AM
1996 ZZN1 Vessel
VIN# ZZN47429J596


DOS: 9/19/12 @ 8 AM
2004 Dodge
VIN# 1D4GP25B04B537738
DOS: 09/13/12 @ 8 AM
2001 YAMA MC
VIN#JYARJ04E81A015685
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicle(s) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
August 31, 2012.

829-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that the following vehi-
cles will be sold at public
auction pursuant to F.S.
713.585 on 09/17/2012 at
the locations below at
9:00 a.m. to satisfy labor
and storage charges.
2005 Nissan
5N1AN08UX5C641591
1717 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34448-6414



825083tFCng


352-795-2244
Location: Allstate Trans-
missiones of Crystal River
Total Lien: $4303.60
Pursuant to F.S. 713.585
the cash amount per ve-
hicle would be sufficient
to redeem that vehicle
from the lienor. Any inter-
ested party has a right to
a hearing prior to the sale
by filing a demand for
the hearing with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court in Cit-
rus and mailing copies of
the same to all owners
and lienors. The
owner/lienholder has a
right to recover posses-
sion of the vehicle by
posting bond pursuant to
F.S. 559.917 and if sold
any proceeds remaining
from the sale will be de-
posited with the Clerk of
Circuit Court for disposi-
tion. Any persons inter-
ested should contact
Snickfish, LLC at:
813.422.9100
August 31,2012.


825-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF MEETING

Finance Committee meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on
Monday, October 08, 2012 at 12:00pm and on Monday, November 12, 2012 at
12:00pm and on Monday, December 10, 2012 at 12:00pm in the Citrus County Hospi-
tal Board offices located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The Citrus County Hospi-
tal Board offices are located within the building of the Law Office of Grant & Dozier,
LLC to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
Finance Report.
Other.
A regular meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, Octo-
ber 08, 2012 at 12:30pm and on Monday, November 12, 2012 at 12:30pm and on
Monday, December 10,2012 at 12:30pm in the Citrus County Hospital Board offices
located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The Citrus County Hospital Board offices
are located within the building of the Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
Citrus County Hospital Board Finance Committee Report.
Foundation Governance Issues.
Citrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
Other.

Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-419-6566. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566.
August 31, 2012.


827-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District announces the following public
meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Citrus County Task Force of the Citrus/Hernando Waterways Restoration Council

DATE/TIME: Monday, September 10, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.

PLACE: Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280,
Lecanto, Florida 34461

PURPOSE: Discussion of task force business.

This is a public meeting and an agenda is available online at
www.watermatters.ora/waterways or by contacting the Southwest Florida Water
Management District, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899;
1-352-796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 (Florida only), extension 4378.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act should contact the District's Human Resources Director, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; 1-352-796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 (Florida only),
extension 4702; TDD (Florida only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.
August 31, 2012.


830-0831 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Ficl-
tious Name Law. pursuant
to Secton 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:


SOLUTION DISTRIBUTING,
located at 2320 N. Hick-
ory Glen Pt. Hernando,
Florida 34442 in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name with
Florida Department of
State, Division of Corpo-
rations, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Dated at Cirus,
Flor-


ida this 29th day of Au-
gust, 2012.
Solution Communications,
Inc.
/s/ George Sleeman
President
Published on (1) time in
Citrus County Chronicle.
August 31, 2012.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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a. Fl


YOU PAY PER MO
$21,999* 289
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


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YOU PAY PER MO
20,999 *275
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


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CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


CRYSTAL


SWJ CHEVROLET M
CrystalAutos.com 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515
++$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER.*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSIS-
TANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE
EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65%
APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


MEN


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THE PRICE YOU SEE IS
HE PRICE YOU PAY


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012 C13


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1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosssa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksvilleep, FL 3413
1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453


*PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC ^LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39,000 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WAC +0% AVAILABLE ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS FOR A LIMITED TIME WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR
000CBUL ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


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C14 FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






















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What's inside


EComprehensive previews on the
Citrus, Crystal River, Lecanto,
Seven Rivers and Dunnellon
football teams.
mUniversity of Florida and Florida
State University season previews
written by Gator Bait Magazine
and The Osceola, respectively.
ESeason schedules for our five
high school teams, four area
college teams and three state
NFL teams.


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the grill. Gather your friends, grab your grilling tongs, and
EXPERIENCE THE ULTIMATE TAILGATE PARTY.


f Publix.
OFFICIAL SUPERMARKET O0 THE TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS


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G2 Friday, August 31, 2012


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Three fearless predictions


There's no eloquent
way to put it: I'm
happy high school
sports are back in session.
Especially football.
After a long, mostly un-
eventful summer in Citrus
County, the pigskin will be
kicked off at var-
ious stadiums
around Florida
tonight
And what bet-
ter way to begin
the Chronicle's
coverage by hav-
ing me make
predictions that
only have two
possible out- J.M. S
comes: woefully TRI
off the mark or T I
spot-on. DOL
Hopefully
everyone realizes this is in
good fun; without further
ado, here are three predic-
tions for the 2012 seasons.
1. While Sept 28's Crystal
River at Citrus game is Cit-
rus County's most com-
pelling, the Pirates' Oct 26
home against against Dun-
nellon will be the most
impactful in the area.
By the time these two teams
meet at Earl Bramlett Sta-
dium in Week 9, one or both
could conceivably be compet-
ing for the District 5A-5 title.
Both the Pirates and
Tigers should be improved
after missing the playoffs in
2011 and at least one of the
two should return.
Crystal River has not de-
feated Dunnellon since
2001, although it's come
closest in the interim in
2007 (13-12) and 2010 (28-21).
This is a pick that could
have holes shot through it


two months from now, but I
think the Pirates break
through.
2. Citrus and Lecanto will
be better, but aren't quite
playoff squads.
This isn't an indictment of
the Hurricanes' or Panthers'
talent, but just
pure numbers.
These two are
in an extremely
top-heavy Dis-
trict 6A-5 that
will have area
powerhouses
Gainesville and
Ocala Vanguard
fighting each
oracchi other for su-
PLE premacy
I think Citrus
BLE will get to seven
wins this season,
while Lecanto should push
for just its third .500 regular
season in school history
Regardless of season
record, you have to finish in
the top two in your own dis-
trict, and I can't envision the
'Canes or Panthers achiev-
ing that in 2012.
3. Two area athletes could
hit milestones, but only one
will
Crystal River quarterback
Joe Lafleur and Seven
Rivers Christian running
back John Iwaniec, both sen-
iors, are each looking to
make a mark in their respec-
tive schools' record books.
After over 1,800 yards
rushing as a junior, Iwaniec
is easily the Warriors'
single-season and career-
yardage leader I think he
puts another notch in his belt
by rushing for 2,000 yards in
2012. This is a pick based on
talent and circumstance, as


he's the only proven weapon
on Seven Rivers.
Lafleur has an outside shot
at passing former Crystal
River quarterback Shay
Newcomer as the school's all-
time leader in passing yards.
Entering his third year as
a varsity starter, Lafleur has
the talent and the support-
ing cast to do so. But I think
circumstance dictates that
he won't reach the mark,
which is about 2,700 yards
away
In Newcomer's senior
year in 2007, he passed the
ball an eye-popping 375
times in 12 games.
Lafleur threw exactly 1/3
that amount as a junior (125
attempts).
Early indications are that
Pirates head coach Greg
Fowler will put the ball in
the air more, but will Crys-
tal River all of the sudden
throw the ball even twice as
much in 2012?
Seems unlikely


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FDi DISgSA INC
F -g L -.%. 1

(352) 746-0617 4
ll~~ t'..n-,ni,-, .1 F~e,-i, ;,,l,-, h n,., L',n "-




'Sf in

P.O. BOX 906, HERNANDO, FL 34441
fdsdisposalinc@aol.com www.fdsdisposalinc.comr


Table of contents

* Crystal River..................... G4, G5


* Citrus................................ G6, G 7


* Lecanto............................. G8, G9


* Schedules..................... G10, G11


* Seven Rivers Christian.... G13, G14


* Dunnellon........................ 15, G16


* University of Florida............... G18


* Florida State University..........G19


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Friday, August 31, 2012 G3


Credits
Publisher
Gerry Mulligan
Editor
Charlie Brennan
Sports Editor
J.M. Soracchi
Layout/design
J.M. Soracchi
J.K. Devine
Copy editors
J.M. Soracchi
Brad Bautista

Photographers
Dave Sigler
Matthew Beck
Steve Johnson
Sports Writers
Sean Arnold
Steve McGunnigle
Justin Plante
Mike Maksymicz
J.M. Soracchi
Bob Ferrante
Marty Cohen


Twisted Oaks

Golf Course
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-1------------







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Name
Dallas Baldner
Al Ellison
John McAteer
Antonio Franklin
Chris Force
Zach Brown
Sam Franklin
Khris Caraballo
Ty Reynolds
Collin Ryan
Joe Lafleur
Nick Hernandez
Gabe Wilcox
Matt White
AJ Bostic
Cody D'amato
Colton Albright
Rueben Bowers
Brandon Frampton
Austin Porta
Destin Dawsy
Zack Leonard
Jamin Laforest
Brandon Terry
Jacob Lafleur
Cody Baldner
Cameron Anderson
Giovanni Vallardes
Zack Kulch
Brandon Martin
Mitch Foster
AJ Martin
Anthony Guinan
Mike Martinez
Jonathan Palumbo
Anthony Rogers
Bilail Jenkins
Manuel Henriquez
Page Nash
Christian Barber
Jeremiah Cleveland
Carlton Gadson
Trevor Allegood
Dylan Jenkins
Josh Beane
Tobias Hollis


Grade
12
9
12
9


Crystal River Pirates




Lafleur looks to flourish in final year


Senior will lead offense

to possible playoff run

STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
With an opportunity to leave his mark in the
school record books, Crystal River senior quar-
terback Joe Lafleur is more focused on simply
winning, which is why he is a second-year team
captain, progressively improving, and could be-
come the Pirates' all-time leading passer in
yardage before the upcoming
season's end.
Lafleur led the county ,
last year with 1,155
yards passing and 12
touchdowns, while
rushing for 233 yards
and a pair of scores. "
Crystal River head ,-
coach Greg Fowler .. .
knows his senior quarter-
back is important to the Pi-
rates' success, and that the team will likely go
as far as Lafleur's arm will take them.
"When you have a guy like Joe Lafleur, of-
fensively we have a lot of talent this year, and
we hope to get the ball in everybody's hands,"
Fowler said.
And as far as building on those record-break-
ing stats, Fowler believes Lafleur is capable of

See LAFLEUR/Page G12
Crystal River senior quarterback Joe Lafleur will
be surrounded by offensive weapons in 2012
and could be in a position to lead the Pirates
back to the playoffs for the first time since 2008.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH


Dallas Baldner

Position: Running back

Year: Senior

Last year: Co-Chronicle
Player of the Year excelled on
offense and special teams.

Expectations: Baldner becomes the feature
back in Crystal River's offense.


Manuel Henriquez

Position: Defensive tackle

Year: Senior

Last year: 95 tackles as one
of the best interior lineman in
the area.

Expectations: Expected to shut down the
middle of the field for CR's defense.


AJ Bostic


Position: Linebacker

Year: Senior

Last year: had 77 tackles,
2 sacks and 2 interceptions.

Expectations: Bostic is
bouncing back from a knee injury, but looks to
clean up any plays that get by the Pirates' line.


- I:CR1=


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G4 Friday, August 31, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Expectations raised in Fowler's second year


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
Entering his second year at the
helm of the Pirates' ship, Crystal
River head football coach Greg
Fowler has the expectations of
and belief in his team that a sea-
soned veteran coach would.
And he has the weapons on the
field to do so, returning several
key starters and
seniors, partic-
ularly on the of- It's
fensive side of
the ball. family thar
The other key program
factor Fowler progra
preaches is
team chemistry, second-year Crys
the atmosphere football coa
and the cama-
raderie. Or as
he likes to simply put it, family
"It's more of a family than a
football program; we're pretty
tight," Fowler said. "We've tried
hard this last year to make this a
family-oriented program."
Fowler has previous coaching
experience from several loca-
tions, including at Pine Ridge
High School in Volusia County,
leading them to the playoffs twice,
as well as New Smyrna Beach,
leading them to a district title.
But Fowler seems to have found
a home here, not just in his posi-


t


tion as head coach, but in Crystal
River in general.
"It's a small community, there's
a good atmosphere here, and good
support for the program," said
Fowler. "It's a great area to raise
children, it's on the water, it's a
nice, close-knit community."
Senior quarterback Joe Lafleur
attests to Fowler's enthusiasm,
saying, "He lives and breathes
football. I think
he's the best
more of a thing that's
come to Crystal
a football River in a long
time."
Lafleur went
on to express
GReg FOwler thanks for all
al River High School anks or a
:h on team's attitude. the time Fowler
and the rest of
the coaching
staff put in with the team, includ-
ing on weekends, when they could
be spending time with their fami-
lies. But again, Pirates football is
Fowler's family
As for the aforementioned expec-
tations, Crystal River hopes to bet-
ter its 5-5 record of last season.
Said Fowler, "We expect to make
the playoffs, and hopefully win a
couple games once we get there."
The firepower is certainly
there, with Lafleur leading the of-
fense from behind center. Lafleur
was the county's leading passer


Keyloss


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River football coach Greg Fowler, far right, enters his second season at the helm of the Pirates' program.


last season, and could likely break
Crystal River's all-time passing
yardage record this year.
Fowler points out that he has
four of his five starting offensive
linemen returning, and the pro-
tection that provides will allow


Lafleur to run the option, have
the time to find open receivers
downfield, and occasionally
scramble to the outside. This of-
fensive diversity looks to be a key
to the Pirates' success this
season.


"When you have a guy like Joe
Lafleur, offensively we have a lot
of talent this year, and we hope to
get the ball in everybody's hands a
little bit," Fowler said.
See FOWLER/Page G12


District


" Destin Dawsy, FB
" Joe Lafleur, QB
" Giovanni Vallardes, C
" Bilial Jenkins, OG
" Brandon Martin, T




" Gabe Wilcox, DB
" Christian Barber, T
" Brandon Terry, T
" Jacob Lafleur, LB
" Chris Force, LB
" Alexander Ellison, LB/RB


* Napoleon Hutcherson, RB U 5A-5 (Crystal River, Dunnellon, Gainesville Eastside,
* Josh Howell, RB North Marion, Alachua Santa Fe, Belleview).
* Tyler Burns, TE
" Jamir Lewis, DT Cahsot o
" Donnie Dewees, K


Record: 5-5 overall,
district, missed playoffs.



Greg Fowler, 2nd seas
5-5 overall.


Head coach Greg Fowler, in just his second year at his posi-
* tion, exudes confidence in his team to exceed the results of last
season's 5-5 finish, hoping to compete for the district title and
1-4 make some noise in the playoffs.
"We plan on being really good offensively," Fowler said. "We're
I going going to throw the ball around a bit, and defensively, we're
a multiple-front defense."
on, Fowler believes the versatility and potential his team
possesses should warrant high expectations for the 2012 season.


Friday, August 31, 2012 G5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. Name
1 James Pouncey
2 Kyle Tobin
3 Jordan Boykins
4 Darius Chapes
5 Javian Clark
6 Steven Knowles
7 Austin Killeen
8 Austin Bogart


RB/DB
WR/DB
WR/DB
RB/LB
QB/LB
OL/DL
K
QB/DB


Al Lamar White FB/LB
Steven Smith TE/DL/P
Desmond Franklin WR/DB
Kyle Presnick RB/DB
Cody Bogart QB, DB
Hunter Dillon K
Jaimee Juse WR/LB
Tyric Washington RB/LB
Robert Briggs OL/LB
Breon Whaley RB, LB
KodyMcDow FB/LB
Jesse Vineyard OL/DL
Nick Fernandez OL/LB
Travis Blotz OL/LB
Bryse Densmore OL
Patrisk Tarrasi OL/DL
Christian Carrera OL/DL
LeVonte White OL/DL


George Harty
James Douglas
CJ Barbee


OL/DL
OL/DL
OL/DL


- CITRUS
ROSTER^^


THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH


Darius Chapes


Position: Running back

Year: Senior

Last year: Co-Chronicle
Player of the Year had 786
yards, 7 TDs in five games
at RB. Also a standout at LB.

Expectations: Without having to spend time
at linebacker, Chapes should be more
productive as a ballcarrier.


Kyle Tobin


Position: Defensive back

Year: Senior

Last year: All over the field
.._. with 575 return yards, 5 INTs
and 5 blocked kicks.

Expectations: Tobin is Hurricanes' best cover
corner and most versatile player overall. Should
provide electricity returning kicks and punts for
Citrus' special teams.


Cody Bogart


Position: Quarterback
Year: Junior

Last year: Ended 2011 as
undisputed starter at QB
as a sophomore.

Expectations: With the 'Canes looking to pass
more in 2012, Bogart will have more chances to
distribute the ball to inexperienced, yet talented
receivers.


Citrus Hurricanes




Vineyard embodies squad's toughness


Hurricanes defensive

lineman set to lead unit
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Citrus junior Jesse Vineyard embodies the
ideal ethos of the Hurricanes' football squad. At
6 feet, 197 pounds, Vineyard is far from small. But
in the world of defensive linemen, he carries a
modest frame for a defensive tackle.
His dedication, work ethic, strength and quick-
ness more than make up for the lack of bulk, how-
ever, and set him and his'Canes up for a potentially
special year following a 6-win -
campaign that culminated AL--
in a blowout bowl vic-
tory to give Citrus its
first winning season
since 2005.
After trying his
hand on the offensive
side of the line during the off-
season, Vineyard is back where he belongs.
"We kind of moved him around in the spring, '
trying to play him both ways, which is not a good
idea for anyone playing in the box if you can help
it," said third-year 'Canes coach Rayburn Greene
during fall camp. "He's one of our three down
lineman in the 3-5 defense, and I think it's a
natural fit for him."

See VINEYARD/Page G17 '
Citrus junior defensive lineman Jesse Vineyard, 7 *.
background, is considered undersized for his ..,- ..
position but makes up for it with his strength, . ., '
quickness and work ethic. ...... ", "" .
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


I


I


G6 Friday, August 31, 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Greene hopes third year's a charm for 'Canes


Head football coach

thinks Citrus program is

poised to take next step
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Citrus coach Rayburn Greene says a
coach's third year at a school is when you
can best find out what to
expect from his leader-
ship over the long haul. With
This is the first season few weeks
Greene will be experienc-
ing a third year of his own it's what I
at a school. Despite his
relatively short coaching do with tt
record, however, he al- y ife
ready has a diverse coach- my life
ing resume.
He co-founded the ath- Ra)
letic program at Lancaster third-year Citrut
Christian Academy in
Nashville, Tenn., where
he led its football team to a 10-0 record in just
its second season. He then moved to Florida,
where he started the football program at
Lecanto's Seven Rivers Christian School be-
fore taking the job at Citrus, a century-old
school with a long history of football.
Greene, who didn't know he wanted to
coach until after college, quickly fell in love
with the opportunity to help young men
with difficult upbringings similar to his
own while getting to engage in his passion


for football.
"Within the first few weeks, I knew right
away it's what I wanted to do the rest of my
life," he said. "Lancaster was really a per-
fect place to do it because there weren't any
expectations. It was a low-key project, so it
was a nice way to figure it all out."
Greene inherited a Hurricanes program
that had won just five games in its two prior
seasons and hadn't put in a winning season
since 2005. There were growing pains, for
sure, as his 2010 squad won just two games.
The 2011 team suffered 10
lost fumbles in its first two
in the first games while the offense
struggled with an ill-fitting
I knew ... veer option attack But
after transforming the atti-
wanted to tude surrounding the pro-
ie rest of gram and converting to an
I-formation, the 'Canes
won four of their last five
games to end the season 6-
burn Greene 5. The team was still up for
s head coach said of a potential playoff spot as
passion for football, late as the first week of No-
vember before getting
eliminated by Vanguard.
"Being able to hang our hat on a winning
season reinforced in the kids' minds our ex-
pectations and put our goals a step above,"
Greene said.
See GREENE/Page G17
After a strong finish to 2011, the Citrus High
School varsity football team is looking to
take the next step in head coach Rayburn
Greene's (ballcap) third season in charge.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


* Cody Bogart, QB
* Darius Chapes, RB
* Nick Fernandez, OL/LB
* Steven Knowles, OL/DL
* Steven Smith, TE/DL/P
* Kyle Tobin, WR/DB/RET
* Jesse Vineyard, DT



* Travis Blotz, OLB
* Austin Bogart, QB/DB
* Desmond Franklin, WR/DB


* Connor Killeen, K
* Mitch Kilpatrick, TE/DE
* Brandon Roberts, FB/LB
* Ryan Travers, OT
* Paris Wilcox, WR/DB


Record: 6-5 overall,
district, missed playoffs.



Rayburn Greene,
season, 8-13 at Citrus.


* 6A-5 (Citrus, Lecanto, Vanguard, Lake Weir, Gainesville).



Rayburn Greene definitely thinks Citrus is improved from 2011


but admits it will take a superlative effort from his Hurricanes
* squad to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2005.
"There's a lot to play for, starting with the county, which is im-
2-2 portant to us. We're not under any false pretenses," Greene
said. "We know we have to slay a giant if we want to go to the
I playoffs. Making the playoffs would be a major accomplish-
ment. It was special for us just to be in it for our final district
3rd game last season. We tell the kids all the time that the games
aren't played on paper."


Friday, August 31, 2012 G7


i






8
S







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kirk Osburn
Ricky Marcic


WR/DB
RB/LB/P


Jeremiah Lucas ATH
Christian Barber QB


Nile Waters


RB/LB


Nicolai Kortendick LB


Peter Forges
Deandre Horton
Armante Young
Austin Stephens
Ben Washington
Alizah Robinson
Chris Molinelli
Frankie Bartley
Dustin Trenary
Sean Smith
Ardante Anderson
Alex Strickland
Joby Evans
Ed Zwolski
Matt Abrams
Mike Steele
Josh Hordeman
Josh Riemer
Zach Vonner
Jordan Lee
Justin Campbell
Mike Pearson
Brandon Weiss
Luis Leiva
Kody House
Jarrod Campbell


WR/LB
WR/CB
RB
WR/LB
CB
WR/DB
WR/DB
LB
LB
LB
RB/DL
OL
OL/DE
DE
OL
OL/DL
OL
OL
DL
OL
OL/DL
OL
OL/DE
K/P
WR/CB
DL


No. Name Pos.


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

LECANTO It says a lot
about a person's work ethic
when, in only their second
year playing high school foot-
ball, they're put in a leader-
ship situation. But that is
precisely where senior of-
fensive tackle and de-
fensive end Josh
Reimer finds
himself as the
2012 season
begins.
And coach
McKinley Rolle
doesn't expect any-
thing less.
"He hadn't played
much before last year," Rolle
said. "But you could tell with
how hard he worked that he
would step up. And through
that work, he's become one of
the best players on this
team."
But Reimer attribues his
hard work to just putting his
time in.
"It's like with every other
sport, you have to work
hard," he said. "I see all of
the other guys pushing them-
selves, and it makes me want
to work just as hard, if not


harder. But it's just about
putting the time in."
Reimer is going into his
second year on the Panthers'
football team. But, despite
his short time on the team,
he's familiar with the game,
having spent much of his
young life playing the sport
in both Pop Warner and
middle school.
His experience
in high school,
however, has
been under the
guidance of sec-
ond-year coach
Rolle, who came
in the same year as
Josh.
"I really like coach
Rolle," Reimer said. "I've had
some middle school coaches,
but haven't really experi-
enced other high school
coaches. But from just the ex-
perience with coach and the
practices he holds, you can
tell he's a great coach."
See Page G12
Lecanto offensive lineman
Josh Reimer is in just his
second year of varsity football,
but is one of the Panthers' top
blockers.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Kirk Osburn


Position: Safety

Year: Senior

Last year: 45 tackles

Expectations: Lecanto
looks for Osburn to be an
emotional leader on defense, while also
playing wide receiver extensively.


THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH

Nile Waters


Position: Linebacker

Year: Junior

Last year: Led county with
10 sacks in 2011.

Expectations: Waters is ex-
pected to start defensively and offensively as
the Panthers' starting running back.


Alizah Robinson


Position: Wide receiver

Year: Junior

Last year: Recorded 60
tackles as a defensive back.

Expectations: Robinson
will start at wideout and as a cornerback as he
steps into a leadership role for Lecanto.


Lecanto Panthers




Reimer 's work ethic leads squad


Senior offensive lineman

commands respect through actions ..-" .!_


GS Friday, August 31, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No surprises for Panthers' Rolle in second year


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
LECANTO For many years, the
Lecanto High School football team
has been the brunt of far too many
jokes among the student body But it's
not hard to see why Over the past fif-
teen years, Lecanto has posted one
plus-.500 season: 2002. And before
that, the Panthers reached the play-
offs the only time in school history in
1999, but fell to a
5-6 record after a
first-round defeat. Our
Needless to say,
football hasn't want to s(
been very success- It's as sim
ful for Lecanto in
recent years. that.
And for a lot of
students, a 3-7 M
campaign in 2011 second-year
doesn't give much referencing the sch
for them to be ex- hist
cited about for the
upcoming season.
For second-year head coach McKin-
ley Rolle, he expects nothing less.
"Our students want to see results.
It's as simple as that. And you really
can't blame them," he said. "They
want to see us be productive and they
want to see us win. Winning cures all."

Lecanto High School varsity football
coach McKinley Rolle runs his players
through drills at a recent practice.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Winning, Rolle explained, is some-
thing he looks to do a lot of this season.
The Panthers are returning a number
of key players from last year, one of
whom is senior captain Kirk Osbourne,
who noted that coach Rolle's system,
established as he began last season, is
one that took time to get used to.
"Last year, this was a complete new
system," he said. "So we spent most
of it trying to get used to it. But when
we came into this year's summer pro-
gram, we already
had a feel for it. We
students had the routine
,e resuIts, down, so every-
ee resultS. thing started to (be-
ple as come) second
nature. The sum-
mer practices
helped us take
cKinley Rolle those next steps,
Lecanto head coach, and really im-
iool's underwhelming proved our play"
ory in varsity football. One of the things
the players said
Rolle expects of
himself and his team is to have pride.
"It's all about having that pride,"
Rolle said. "When the boys put on that
jersey, I tell them it means something,
not only as a student, but as a football
player. Everything stems from that
pride. And I think people could tell
even last year Anybody who watched
us last year could tell we played with
a new sense of swagger and pride."
But with another new season,
Rolle is bringing in another new phi-


losophy: self-accountability. It seems
simple, but it's a problem that has
plagued many high school sports
teams. As much as football is a team
game, where games are always won
and lost as a group, it is just as im-
portant to remember that everyone
has individual responsibilities.
"Our team motto is 'No excuses,"'
Rolle said. "There were a lot of guys
making excuses for even the smallest
problems. It's all about knowing
what you're supposed to do and get-
ting it done."
Even with his stricter presence in
the locker room, coach Rolle has
made it an effort to unite his team
and make the bonds between old and
new players closer
"Our morale is higher coming into
this year, and we've tried to make it a
point to do so," he said. "Our goal was
to become more of a team, and a fam-
ily These guys all hang out inside of
school and outside of school. And
we've tried to do some things to build
team morale. It's what our summer
program was for. And it worked.
None of the guys have any squabbles,
and that'll translate in the long run.
The team getting closer will allow
them to play better when they're
playing for each other rather than
just playing for themselves."
So as the season starts, coach Rolle
and his staff continue to push this
Lecanto team to hopeful new heights,
and look to make big strides in building
a respected program within the district


* Nile Waters, RB/LB

* Mike Pearson, OL

* Alizah Robinson, WR/DB

* Kirk Osburn, WR/DB

* Ardante Anderson, RB/DL




* Christian Barber, QB

* Jeremiah Lucas, ATH

* Josh Riemer, OL

* Zach Vonner, DL


Heath Hernandez, ATH

Tra'Vaun Greenlee, RB

Brandon Dawes, CB




Record: 3-7 overall, 0-4
district, missed playoffs.




McKinley Rolle, 2rd
season, 3-7 at Lecanto.


6A-5 (Citrus, Lecanto, Vanguard, Lake Weir, Gainesville).




After getting his first year coaching under his belt, head coach
McKinley Rolle is confident both he and his team know what to
expect going forward into a top-heavy district slate, which
includes powers Ocala Vanguard and Gainesville.
"I think our boys have a better understanding of what we ex-
pect this year. Our expectations are higher, we've gotten
stronger overall. I feel like our line play has improved over last
year, and we've upgraded tremendously at the quarterback po-
sition. With our leadership improving too, I think we're in for a
big year."


Friday, August 31, 2012 G9


B
r


(
q
(






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTE: HOME GAMES BOLD AND IN CAPS


LEAT PNHR


HARMONY
WEST PORT
at Belleview
at Lecanto
CRYSTAL RIVER
GAINESVILLE
THE VILLAGES
BYE
LAKE WEIR (HC)
at Vanguard
at Fivay


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Aug. 31
Sept. 7
Sept. 14
Sept. 21
Sept. 28
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26
Nov. 2
Nov. 9


At Nature Coast
WILLISTON
BYE
SANTA FE (HC)
At Citrus
At North Marion
At Warner Christian
EASTSIDE
DUNNELLON
at Belleview
LECANTO


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Aug. 31
Sept. 7
Sept. 14
Sept. 21
Sept. 28
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26
Nov. 2
Nov. 9


CHIEFLAND
at Weeki Wachee
at Central
CITRUS
at The Villages
WILDWOOD (HC)
BYE
at Lake Weir
at Vanguard
GAINESVILLE
at Crystal River


IFLORIATA SE'I OLE


SO FO ID


MURRAY STATE
SAVANNAH ST.
WAKE FOREST
CLEMSON
at South Florida
at N.C. State
BOSTON COLLEGE
at Miami
DUKE
at Virginia Tech
at Maryland
FLORIDA


6 p.m.
6 p.m.
12 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
8 p.m.
TBA
TBA


Sept. 1
Sept. 8
Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Nov. 1
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24


at Boston College
at Kansas State
BETH. COOKMAN
at Georgia Tech
N.C. STATE
at Notre Dame
NORTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
VIRGINIA TECH
at Virginia
SOUTH FLORIDA
at Duke


3:30 p.m.
12 p.m.
12 p.m.
TBA
TBA
7:30 p.m.
TBA
TBA
7:30 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA


Sept. 1
Sept. 8
Sept. 13
Sept. 22
Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 17
Nov. 23
Dec. 1


CHATTANOOGA
at Nevada
RUTGERS
at Ball State
FLORIDA STATE
at Temple
at Louisville
SYRACUSE
UCONN
at Miami
at Cincinnati
PITTSBURGH


Ashley Recliner
Rocker &
Wallhugger


s2995 OVER 77 RECLINERS
b ON SALE

{S1& STL LLJJKJJW U



ATTRESS SALE
)E ,SELECTION..f: AMERICAN-MADE
ma -- .0


Aug. 31
Sept. 7
Sept. 14
Sept. 21
Sept. 28
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26
Nov. 2
Nov. 9


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Sept. 1
Sept. 8
Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 8
Nov. 17
Nov. 24


7 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA


G10 Friday August 31, 2012


I CTRUS HRICANES


CRSA RIE PIAE I


MIAMI HURRICANES -1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTE: HOME GAMES BOLD AND IN CAPS


- S N R R C A W IOS


I TIG


I ~m FOIAGATR


at Branford
CORNERSTONE
BRONSON
at Christ's Church
at First Academy
PENIEL BAPTIST
at Ocala Christian
BYE
CFCA
MASTER'S ACAD.


7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.

7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.


All home games played at Ernie Wever Park, Brooksville


Aug. 31
Sept. 7
Sept. 14
Sept. 20
Sept. 28
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26
Nov. 2
Nov. 9


WEST PORT
at Forest
NATURE COAST
at G'ville Eastside
at South Sumter
at Santa Fe
BYE
BELLEVIEW
at Crystal River
NORTH MARION
WILLISTON


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Sept. 1
Sept. 8
Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24


BOWLING GREEN
at Texas A&M
at Tennessee
KENTUCKY
LSU
at Vanderbilt
SOUTH CAROLINA
Georgia (Jax.)
MISSOURI
LOUISIANA
JACKSONVILLE ST.
at Florida State


MM DOINS


at Minnesota
HOUSTON
at Indianapolis
CINCINNATI
CHICAGO
at Oakland
at Green Bay
DETROIT
INDIANAPOLIS
at Houston
TENNESSEE
at Buffalo
NEW YORK JETS
at Miami
NEW ENGLAND
at Tennessee


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 7
Oct. 14
Oct. 28
Nov. 4
Nov. 11
Nov. 15
Nov. 25
Dec. 2
Dec. 9
Dec. 16
Dec. 23
Dec. 30


at Houston
OAKLAND
NEW YORK JETS
at Arizona
at Cincinnati
ST. LOUIS
at New York Jets
at Indianapolis
TENNESSEE
at Buffalo
SEATTLE
NEW ENGLAND
at San Francisco
JACKSONVILLE
BUFFALO
at New England


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 14
Oct. 21
Oct. 25
Nov. 4
Nov. 11
Nov. 18
Nov. 25
Dec. 2
Dec. 9
Dec. 16
Dec. 23
Dec. 30


CAROLINA
at New York Giants
at Dallas
WASHINGTON
KANSAS CITY
NEW ORLEANS
at Minnesota
at Oakland
SAN DIEGO
at Carolina
ATLANTA
at Denver
PHILADELPHIA
at New Orleans
ST. LOUIS
at Atlanta


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Aug. 31
Sept. 7
Sept. 14
Sept. 21
Sept. 28
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26
Nov. 2


3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
3:30 p.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA


Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 7
Oct. 21
Oct. 28
Nov. 4
Nov. 8
Nov. 18
Nov. 25
Dec. 2
Dec. 9
Dec. 16
Dec. 23
Dec. 30


4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


Friday August 31, 2012 G11il


I .,mP BAY BUCNER I







G12 Friday August 31, 2012


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.A-..0


FOWLER
Continued from Page G5

The defense is more of a
question mark, but Fowler
remains optimistic on that
side of the ball as well.


REIMER
Continued from Page G8

One of coach Rolle's new
mottos, "No excuses,"
pushes a sense of personal
responsibility for players
and has benefitted Reimer
throughout his days at
Lecanto.
When asked about how he
prepares for games, Reimer
simply said, "Understand my
responsibilities, understand
what I need to get done, and
know how I could try to com-
plete that to the best of my
abilities."
Even in how he conducts
himself outside of the locker
room, Reimer's quiet pres-
ence and polite attitude is
something that coach Rolle


LAFLEUR
Continued from Page G4

doubling last year's output
if he remains healthy.
"If he reaches his poten-
tial, he'll do it," said
Fowler of the school pass-
ing yardage record. "He's a
typical pocket passer; at
6-foot-4, he averaged 20
yards per completion last
year."
The coaching staff has
molded him into more of
an option quarterback and
Fowler attested to
Lafleur's intelligence on
the field, calling him a true
student of the game and
praising his work ethic.
Lafleur credits that to
the entire team and coach-
ing staff.
"We put in all the work in
the offseason, and we ex-
pect to win the district title
this year," Lafleur said.
"Hopefully we'll get into
the playoffs and see where
that goes. We've got a good
group of seniors coming


"We're young on defense,
a lot of guys are going to get
their first action on defense
this year, but alot of them
have worked hard and
stepped up," said Fowler.
And for the hard work
that Fowler insists his play-
ers have put in during the

speaks very highly of.
'"Josh isn't one of those rah-
rah types of leaders," Rolle
said. "He's a quiet leader
who leads by example. He's
a great kid, and one that I'm
extremely proud of."
But Rolle's praises didn't
end there. Reimer's growth
from last season to this sea-
son has been, as Rolle stated,
"remarkable."
"It's just a credit to his
hard work again," Rolle con-
tinued. "Like I said, he didn't
play much last season. But,
his talent and, again, his hard
work has made him one of
our best lineman this year.
His defensive play is improv-
ing as well. So, we all defi-
nitely think he's going to be a
huge contributor this year"
For Josh, that's all he
wants: to contribute. His

up, a lot of leadership on
this team, and we're look-
ing forward to this year."
Ever humble, he credits
his progression to so many
others the coaching
staff, his linemen for pro-
tecting him in the pocket,
his receivers for getting
open and making plays and
his father for motivation
and inspiration.
He also has an apprecia-
tion for the support system
around him.
Of Fowler, he said,
"We've got a good relation-
ship. I know if I need some-
thing I can call him. He's
really helped me a lot to
become who I am now. I
owe a lot to him."
And as for his team-
mates' part in it? Fowler
agrees the Pirates offense
will excel if Lafleur simply
does his job.
"Joe's leadership ability
and playmaking ability is a
big deal. He's got a lot of
weapons around him,"
Fowler said.
Lafleur echoed the senti-
ment, saying, "I know if I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

offseason, he believes he
has reason for optimism,
coupled with the chemistry
he promotes.
"If you stay family-
oriented you get a lot more
out of it. We want our kids to
succeed on and off the
field," Fowler said.

goals for the season simply
come down to wanting to bet-
ter himself so he can help the
team translate the work
they've put in into wins.
"I understand it's a team
game," Reimer said. "But, I'd
like to improve so I can be-
come a tool that the team
uses for success. We all un-
derstand that last year, and
probably the next two years
is more of a rebuilding time
for the program, so whatever
I can do to push us forward,
that's what I look to do."
As for the team goal,
Reimer was a little more
modest
"I just expect us to play as
hard as we've worked lately,"
he said. "I've worked hard,
and have seen them work
hard, so we'll just take it
from there."

get the ball where it needs
to go, the players around
me will make the plays for
me."
Further giving credit
where he feels it is due,
Lafleur mentioned his ad-
miration for current Crys-
tal River passing yardage
record-holder Shay New-
comer, stating it would be
humbling to be able to get
close to Newcomer's stats.
Beyond a season carry-
ing so much optimism for
Lafleur and the Pirates,
the senior hopes to explore
his options at the colle-
giate level, where he could
potentially continue his ca-
reer. Fowler noted he has
received interest from
South Florida and Central
Florida, as well as several
other schools in the state.
"That's definitely some-
thing I'd like to do,"
Lafleur said. "See what
kind of schools I can
maybe attend, and go from
there."
Until then, the whole
county will be watching to
see what he does now.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grade


Michael Steve
Sterling Gardner
Scott Jacobson
Will Ellis
Lance Mosher
John Iwaniec
Nathan Winstead
John Mazza
Josh Iwaniec
Kelin Massulo
Anthony LaTorraca
Joshua Jackson
Curby Bodden
Chris Powell
Lucas Jackson
James Worster


Seven Rivers Warriors



Lineman Worster like coach on field


MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ learned
Correspondent ginnint
Hea
The Seven Rivers football has pla
team has a unique player who fidenc
has been with the program his
from the Warriors' inau-
gural season in 2009.
Sophomore center
Jimmy Worster has had
a great love for the
game as long as he can
remember. Worster started ma
as a student at Seven Rivers as a game 1
fifth-grader and joined the team though
as a seventh-grader when it was
introduced at Seven Rivers as a
varsity sport in 2009. Jimmy
began his varsity career as a Sevi
line guard. He played that posi- mor
tion until now, where he will Wo
switch to the center position. upor
"I can play all positions this Warri
year if needed, as I have


d them all since the be-
g," Worster said.
d coach David Iwaniec
tced a lot of trust and con-
e in Worster because of
experience with the
team.
When asked what
strengths and weak-
nesses the team pos-
sesses, Worster said,
"Our running game is our
tin strength; the passing
has not been the best, al-
it has gotten better over


Page G17


en Rivers Christian sopho-
e offensive lineman Jimmy
rster (79) will be counted
heavily to spearhead the
iors' ground-heavy attack.
DAVE SIGLER/Chmnicle


THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH


John Iwaniec
Position: Running back
Year: Senior
) Last year: Rushed for over
1,800 yards as a junior to
lead Citrus County.


Expectations: Iwaniec's workload has grown
each season and the Warriors will likely hand
the ball to one of their longest-tenured players
early and often.



Chris Powell
Position: Fullback
Year: Senior
Last year: Powell was a
two-way player on both lines.
Expectations: Should see
lots of touches as the back lined up in front of
Iwaniec. Will also be called upon the help
pave the way for the running backs.


Joshua Jackson
SPosition: Offensive line
Year: Senior


Last year: Was a starting
offensive lineman on a
successful running team.
Expectations: Jackson will start at right
guard for the Warriors and hopes to form a
productive pairing with center Jimmy Worster.
Jackson thinks SR can win the SSAC title.



More football coverage
In the Chronicle sports section, look
for football notebooks, previews and
game coverage throughout the
season.
Online, visit our website at:
www.chronicleonline.com
Also, like us on Facebook (Citrus
County Chronicle Sports) and on
Twitter (@CitrusCoSports).


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Friday August 31, 2012 G13






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Can Iwaniec continue Warriors' ascent?


MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent
This year could be a banner year as
David Iwaniec will take the reins as head
coach of the Seven Rivers Christian
School football team, replacing Paul
Roher. Coach Iwaniec has been an assis-
tant coach since the Warriors football pro-
gram started three years ago. Coach
Iwaniec originally hails
from Seattle, Wash.,
where he played high FO
school football.
When football was in- alWays bee
produced at Seven to me,
Rivers, Iwaniec was
very interested and be-
came one of the assis- first-year Seven
tant coaches. He has first-year Seven
maintained that posi-
tion with five other as-
sistants until he


accepted the position of head coach for
the 2012 season. Since he is not a teacher
at Seven Rivers, he was hired under a
contract to serve in this position.
"Football has always been important to
me," Iwaniec said. "One of the concerns
that I have, is that if I could do it all over
again, I would start this program with the
middle school. Can you imagine what the
team would look like when they reach



John Hobbs, WR/DE
John Iwaniec, RB/DB
Joshua Jackson, OG/DL
Jacob Norman, OG/DL
Christopher Powell, T/LB
Larry Powell, HB/LB
Jeff Norman, TE/DE
Michael Steve, WR/DB
James Worster, C/DL



Sterling Gardner, QB
John Mazza, HB/DB
Joshua Iwaniec, TE/LB
Curby Bodden, OL/DL
Cason Gaskin, OL/LB
Kelin Massullo, FB/LB


high school level with that much experi-
ence under their belt?" Iwaniec said.
"I have always been involved with vari-
ous football programs and currently I
serve on the board of directors of the Jr.
Midget Sharks football team," Iwaniec
continued. "I got wind that football was
possibly coming to Seven Rivers, and that
really got my interest, so I have been
working under the three previous head
coaches until the op-


)tball has
n important


Dave Iwaniec
Rivers Christian head
of his ascention to the
Warriors' leader.


portunity came when
Coach Roher left."
Iwaniec has four chil-
dren. His son John cur-
rently plays the running
back position for the
Warriors. His younger
son, Joshua, will join
the team this year as an
eighth-grade tight end.
In 2009 there were 19


boys who comprised the
team. "This year when I take the head coach
position, we will only have 20 players. (The)
economic situation in Citrus County
See IWANIEC/Page G17
Seven Rivers Christian head football coach
David Iwaniec (sunglasses) will attempt to
keep the Warriors a rising program.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle



Tanner Commons, WR/DB
Josh Downey, QB/DE
Trey Gaskin, WR/DB
Matthew Gerhart, WR/DB
Bryce Hall, C/DL
Chandler Maidlow, T/DL
Samuel Nicks, HB/LB
Cody Bolduc, TE/DB
Josh Fischer, WR/DB



Record: 7-3 overall, 4-0 in
division, made SSAC playoffs.



David Iwaniec, first year,
0-0 record


North Division (Seven Rivers, Central Florida Christian
Academy, Cornerstone Academy, Master's Academy, First Acad-
emy of Leesburg, Ocala Christian Academy, Peniel Baptist).



"With the loss of seven seniors from last year's squad, this will
definitely make an impact this year with the remaining team. I
will have six members who were juniors last year that should
pick up some of the slack," Warriors coach David Iwaniec said.
"The team this year ... feels very strong (and could) make the
playoffs and could go all the way," Iwaniec added.
Of course, that is being pretty optimistic, though past seasons'
records have shown that the Warriors do function well as
a team.


The Warriors do not have an on-campus stadium yet, so the
team plays its "home" games at Ernie Wever Park in Brooksville.


G14 Friday August 31, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I S
-ROSTERi i


No. Name
1 J'Von Swoll
2 LD Thomas
3 Kane Parks
4 LJ Brown
5 Tyler Powell
6 Jordan Williams
7 Dana Washington
8 Connor Wentz
9 Andre Jackson
10 Dustin Molina
11 Courtney Morrison
12 Jordon Boley
14 Chris Jackson
15 Kobi Jones
16 GabeSaathoff
17 Seth Claffey
20 Bo Dewitz
21 Brandon Smith
23 Devin Taylor
24 Shane Williams
25 Josh Kendrick
26 Michael Coleman
31 Carl Hushle
50 Michael Roberson
51 William Burgess
52 Nick Weissman
53 Jacob Conkel
54 Cole Fagan
55 Cody Ingalls
56 Joey Lobsiger
57 Will Thomas
58 Deion Humbert
59 Justin Kiger
60 CJ McCormick
61 Robert Segarra
62 Houston Koch
63 Alan Perotta
65 Marshall McDowell
66 Joe Livermore
70 Ryan Mills
72 Alex Stetz
75 Keandre Brooks
76 Jason McRae
77 Keiwan Jones
80 Max Publo


Dunnellon Tigers




Versatile tight end Wentz a mismatch


Tigers senior is

all-around threat

J.M. SORACCHI
Staff Writer
About four years ago, Connor
Wentz spent all of one practice as
a freshman at the junior varsity
level before being asked a fortu-
itous question.
"(Dunnellon coach Frank
Beasley) said, 'How do you feel
about coming up to play varsity?
And I said, 'If that's where you
want me."'
When asked if that was the mo-
ment he thought Wentz would be
a special player, Beasley just
shook his head and laughed.
"We get to see our kids come
up through the system and we
knew he was going to be special
when he was in sixth grade,"
Beasley said.
Fast forward to present day
and Wentz, now a 6-foot-3, 240-
pound senior tight end, is ex-
pected to be a leader as the
Tigers football team attempts to
return to the playoffs after miss-
ing out in 2011.
In Dunnellon's offense, Wentz
is a solid blocker, able pass
catcher and athletic enough to
also line up as a fullback and run
the ball.
Marry those qualities with his


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dunnellon senior tight end Connor Wentz (8) is equally valuable to the Tigers blocking and in the
receiving game. Wentz already has an offer from Wofford but hopes to potentially play at UCF.
work ethic and mental acumen ing tight end that will play at the Wentz said UCF is looking at
and it's no wonder Dunnellon is Division I level." him as an H-back and he will
expecting a standout season Beasley said Wentz already send tape of the Tigers' presea-
from Wentz. has an offer on the table from son game against Lecanto to the
"He's a tireless worker and ... FCS school Wofford, but expects Knights.
just a great all-around athlete," his senior will get more offers
Beasley said. "He's an outstand- once the season begins. See WENTZ/Page G17


THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH


Jordan Boley

Position: Quarterback

Year: Senior
Io
Last year: Boley was a
first-year starter for
Dunnellon as a junior
during a 6-4 season.


Expectations: Expected to lead the Tigers'
offense, Noley is a dynamic player who can
pass the ball and also run it when called upon.


U Brown


Position: Strong safety

Year: Senior

Last year: At 5-foot-10, 180
pounds, Brown was a versatile
athlete in the secondary.


Expectations: His QB on defense, Beasley said
Brown is a sound tackler and a physical kid who
runs well and can also play up near the line of
scrimmage for the Tigers' defense.


Keiwan Jones


vi


Position: Defensive lineman

Year: Junior

Last year: Was instrumental
in plugging the middle for
Dunnellon's defense in 2011.


Expectations: A 6-foot-3, 270-pound lineman,
Jones is a big body in the middle of the Tigers'
defense who can move. Beasley said Jones
has the potential to lead the team in sacks.


I


Friday August 31, 2012 G15







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tigers coach Beasley ready to take next step


J.M. SORACCHI
Staff Writer
When Frank Beasley accepted
the Dunnellon High School foot-
ball job in 2005, he wasn't sure ex-
actly what to expect.
After four years as an assistant
and one year as the interim head
coach at Lake City Columbia, the
coach joined the Tigers and has
been making his
mark ever since.
"It definitely ... we
prepared me to
be a head coach into the play
somewhat," have to wi
said Beasley of
his time in Lake F
City, "but you're eighth-year DL
never really expectations f
prepared to be
a head coach."
In seven seasons at Dunnellon,
Beasley holds a 48-22 regular-
season record. In 2009 and 2010,
the Tigers won their district and
made the playoffs, but suffered a
first-round exit at the hands of
Ocala Vanguard each time.
The Tigers' head man knows the
expectations are high and believes
he has the team to fulfill them.
"There's no question we have to
get into the playoffs and we have
to win one," Beasley said. "I really
feel like this is the team to do it"


1
Y

"r
ur


Dunnellon will be revamping its
offense by moving to the Pistol for-
mation, but the Tigers' principle
of being a downhill running team
remains.
Returning 12 starters (seven of-
fense, five defense) and having
what Beasley called the best of-
fensive line from top to bottom
since he's been there, the Tigers
should be poised for a return to
postseason play
Although Dun-
have to get nellon will have
to face a gauntlet
roffs and we in the form of
one. District 5A-5
(which includes
rank Bease perennial power
rank Beasley North Marion
nnellon coach on the o Mario
r his Tigers program. and also Crystal
River), the
Tigers are ready
to meet the challenge.
"Every game on our schedule, we
feel like we stack up," Beasley said.
"Our district is tough, but we feel
like we can compete with anyone."
Besides just wins and losses or
X's and O's, coach Beasley and his
staff at Dunnellon pride them-
selves on preparing players to be
successes in other areas of life.
Twenty-eight Tigers have gone
to college to play football in seven
years, and it's the coaches who put
in a lot of time to ensure that.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dunnellon varsity head coach Frank Beasley enters his eighth season at the helm of the Tigers. Beasley thinks
this might be the best overall team he's had since coming to Dunnellon.


"It was just something in-
grained in me from when I first
started coaching," Beasley said.
"This is a way for you to let the
kids know you care about them


on a way different level than
scoring touchdowns and making
tackles."
"We like to think of it as we're a
big family and he's our dad," said


senior tight end Connor Wentz.
"He's trying to get you better not
only at football, but as a man."
See BEASLEY/Page G17


" Jordon Boley, QB
" J'Von Swoll, RB
" Connor Wentz, TE
" Andre Jackson, WR
" Alex Stetz, OL
" Cody Ingalls, OL
" Will Thomas, OL
" Keiwan Jones, DL
" Keandre Brooks, DL
" Dana Washington, DE
SLJ Brown, SS



* AJ Basso, LB


Kane Parks, ATH
Chris Jackson, WR
Joey Lobsiger, ILB
Michael Roberson, LB
Shane Williams, LB
Nick Weissman, OL



Record: 6-4 overall, 3-2
district, missed playoffs.



Frank Beasley, 8th year,
48-22 at Dunnellon.


5A-5 (Crystal River, Dunnellon, Gainesville Eastside,
North Marion, Alachua Santa Fe, Belleview).




Head coach Frank Beasley returns 12 starters and has some
experience on the offensive side of the ball led by senior and
second-year starter Jordan Boley.
Beasley made no bones about his feelings that the Tigers have
the talent to match up against any team in a tough district.
Beasley also patiently answered questions about Dunnellon's
playoff track record (appearances in 2009 and 2010, no wins in
seven seasons) but he's confident 2012 will be the year the
Tigers break through.
"I really feel like this is the team to do it," he said.


G16 Friday August 31, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



WORSTER
Continued from Page G13

the past year. Since Josh
Downey graduated this past
year, we will have a new
quarterback, Sterling Gard-
ner, who also is a sopho-
more."
Because of the low num-
ber of football players on
the Warriors' team, Worster
plays both offense and de-
fense when needed.
This year the squad will
feature about 20 players.


GREENE
Continued from Page G7

Citrus' abrupt offensive
change was made possible
by Greene's role as the of-
fensive coordinator, which
is fueled by his knowledge
of the offensive line.
"When I began to learn
and study football and be
mentored, I gravitated to-
ward the offensive line and
blocking schemes," Greene
said. "Everything else
hinges on it."
The 'Canes are working
hard at implementing more



IWANIEC
Continued from Page G14

has hindered the enroll-
ment at Seven Rivers,
thereby limiting any new
players that I may gain,"
added Iwaniec.
Since Seven Rivers is an
FHSAA independent, the
squad plays in the Sun-
shine State Athletic Confer-
ence's Northern Division.
"One of the greatest
drawbacks that I have is we
just scrimmage and train
with makeshift objects be-
cause we cannot afford to
have any players hurt with
silly accidents," Iwaniec
stated.
The Warriors have gotten
progressively better since
their inception, going 2-6, 6-
4 and then 7-3 with a 4-0 di-
vision mark in 2011.
"This upcoming season, I
will have lost nine players to


Friday August 31, 2012 G17


Even at that, Worster said,
"We are a close-knit group
and like playing together as
a team. That is why I like to
play here at Seven Rivers
and it is fun."
Iwaniec complimented
Worster's knowledge of the
offense, saying, "In the past
we used arm bands to call
plays, now we use Jimmy"
Regarding his new head
coach, Worster said, "I like
him. All the guys on the
team like him. He was the
assistant coach last year,
but now he is in charge.
"The one thing that I do

of a passing game this sea-
son, which is presenting
new opportunities for ath-
letic 280-pound junior
Steven Smith, who is mov-
ing to tight end this season
from offensive tackle.
"Coach Greene has been
the best teacher and coach
I've ever had," Smith said.
"I've learned a lot from him
and I appreciate everything
he's done for us in the
weight room and through-
out the program."
Junior quarterback Cody
Bogart was a key reason for
the switch to the I-forma-
tion, and is excited by the
prospects of adding more of


not like that Coach Iwaniec
makes us do is Monday film
reviews of past games."
Worster is very close to
John Iwaniec, the Warriors'
senior running back.
"I feel close to him be-
cause we have the same
ideas about the football
program and work well to-
gether," Worster said. "This
year should be a good sea-
son for us, and we should
reach the championship
round."
Besides football, Jimmy
participates in track and
field for the Warriors.

an aerial attack this season.
"I'm more of a passing
quarterback, I believe, and
Coach Greene saw that and
made the change, helping
fit me and our team better,"
Bogart said. '"And it worked
pretty well."
As for the signature third
season, Greene is opti-
mistic it will reflect how far
the program has come
since his arrival.
"We've had three years
with our current seniors,"
he said. "So they should be
pretty well coached and
ready to get out and do
something special, hope-
fully"


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
First-year Seven Rivers Christian head football coach Dave
Iwaniec shares a laugh with sophomore Jimmy Worster dur-
ing practice on Aug. 24


graduation and a couple of
drop-outs. The good news is
I will have seven new play-
ers join the squad, most will
be in the seventh and eighth
grades, but this will be a
good foundation to build
on," Iwaniec said. "One


great attribute Seven Rivers
possess is that the support
from the fans is tremen-
dous. We average 350-400
fans at our home games,"
Iwaniec continued. "This
makes it really worthwhile,
to me and to the players."


BEASLEY
Continued from Page G16

Although Beasley em-
braces his role as a coach,
educator and mentor, he
knows one significant way
his time on the sidelines
will be judged.
"We need to take the next
step," Beasley said. "I fully
understand that. It's been a
long time for the fans and
the community."
Dunnellon defeated
Lecanto 33-23 in Aug. 24's
preseason classic.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle



VINEYARD
Continued from Page G6

Vineyard's size is not an
aberration within that 3-5
alignment
"We have smaller guys up
front," Greene explained.
"We prefer quick-
ness over size, so
we're not trying to
plug holes with big
guys like a lot of
other teams. (Junior .
defensive lineman
Steven) Knowles
weighs about 200
pounds, (junior de- Je!
fensive lineman Vine
Kody) McDow is Citrus d
about 180 pounds, if liner
he's lucky, and Vineyard is
under 200 pounds. We want
those guys to knife through,
and Vineyard does a good
job of that. He's aggressive
and explosive, and he puts
up real good numbers in the
weight room. He's just a



WENTZ
Continued from Page G15

The last time Dunnellon
had a weapon like Wentz at
the position was D.J. Brown,
who is currently a redshirt
junior at UCE
While he is definitely
aware of his potential col-
lege future, Wentz said he
needed to be just one thing
for Dunnellon.
"Basically, a leader is all


3

e
r


real, real tough kid."
Vineyard's size, determi-
nation and weight room
prowess are factors that
make him representative of
Citrus' approach to success.
"That's where you beat
teams in the weight
room," Vineyard said. "We
go in and put in the work
every day there.
"We're more of an
inside kind of team
and we like to domi-
r4 nate teams physi-
cally and mentally,"
he added. "That's
just the way we are."
Vineyard credits
se Greene with instill-
yard ing a change in atti-
fensive tude for the 'Canes,
ian. which pays off on
and off the field for those
linked to the program.
"Under coach Greene,
we've really worked on our
discipline and getting better
with a lot of big and little
things, like watching the
ball on the line and becom-


I need to be for this group,"
he said. "We've got a bunch
of really good players every-
where.
"We're going to have a
real good year."
Wentz, who has run the
40-yard dash in the 4.6-sec-
ond range, is someone who
brings out the best in
others.
"He's a program guy,"
Beasley said. "He's a guy
who's going to make people
around him better."
Being at the varsity level


ing a better person in gen-
eral," Vineyard said. "He's
really helped our mental
toughness."
Vineyard's mental perse-
verance is partly the prod-
uct of a difficult upbringing,
which helped steer him
away from more destructive
influences.
"I saw a lot of people
dying around me when I
grew up," he said. "I figured
I'm not going to live that
kind of life and I was going
to be a better person than
what I saw."
Vineyard's in a better
place now, with even
greater prospective
achievements ahead.
"He's had a good summer
and camp and we're expect-
ing good things out of him,"
Greene said of the junior,
who played varsity as a
sophomore. "Hopefully,
he'll have a breakout year. If
he continues as he's always
done, he's set to have it.
"He deserves it."


for a fourth straight season
has its advantages. Wentz
said the mental side of the
game is second nature, and
he also knows exactly what
his coaches will be think-
ing after a play, good or
bad.
"It's all looks now," Wentz
said of communicating with
Beasley "I know exactly
what he's going to get mad
about, he doesn't even have
to say anything.
"I know what's expected
of me every snap."







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The keys to success in 2012


UFoffense will

have spotlight

on it early

MARTY COHEN
Gator Bait Magazine

Once the calendar flipped
to August, Will Muschamp
admitted he was done -
talking, that is. For the pre-
ceding seven months,
Muschamp talked plenty
about entering year two as
the head coach at Florida,
taking care of all his speak-
ing obligations to booster
clubs, media folks, whoever
he was supposed to address
concerning the direction of
his program.
But upon strolling to the
podium for Florida's own
media day on the eve of pre-
season camp, Muschamp let it
be known, several times, that
the time for talking was over
It didn't mean he planned to
erect a Cone of Silence
around the Florida program,
although if he had his
druthers, he probably would
have approved the idea.
What he meant was that it
was time to get back on the
field and produce. He reiter-
ated the theme several times,
how the Gators needed to
display signs of progress on
the field on Saturdays rather
than trying to simply con-
vince us the program was
headed in the right direction.
Muschamp firmly be-
lieves the foundation has
been laid, and he often
states he is building for the
long haul, not simply a quick
fix. But he also knows the
painful reality that the past
two seasons have been well
below the standard Florida
has established over the
past 20 years, first under
Steve Spurrier and then
Urban Meyer
He doesn't need to be re-
minded of the gory numbers
- a 15-11 mark the past two
seasons, including a 7-6


record in his initial foray in
2011. The Gators stumbled
through last fall, particularly
after starting senior quar-
terback John Brantley was
sidelined right before half-
time against eventual na-
tional champ Alabama in
the fifth game, leading to a
freefall that produced just
two wins in the final eight
regular-season contests. The
Gators fashioned an un-
seemly 3-5 mark in the SEC,
just the fourth time in the
past 40 seasons they finished
with a losing record in con-
ference play.
Both South Carolina and
Georgia have represented
the SEC East in Atlanta the
past two seasons, and are
deemed the favorites to ap-
pear again in the SEC Cham-
pionship Game. Muschamp
stated flatly that any Florida
season that doesn't include a
stop in Atlanta the first Sat-
urday in December should
be deemed a failure.
While the questions sur-
rounding this team are var-
ied, so are the answers. So
we'll stick to the basic an-
nual premise of Florida
football can the Gators
win the East and return to
Atlanta? Let's take a look at
some of the factors that need
to fall in place for the Gators
to make some noise in 2012:
1. STEADY
QUARTERBACK PLAY
This is a given for any team
with designs on contending for a
championship, but the focus on
Florida's unsettled quarterback
situation this fall will be particu-
larly acute. The quarterback spot
is in the hands of untested true
sophomores Jacoby Brissett and
Jeff Driskel, who each got
thrown in the fire a bit last sea-
son after Brantley went down.
They shared deer-in-the-
headlights looks while being
forced into action on the road
against the likes of LSU and
Auburn, but the hope is that the
experience gained, however
painful, will pay dividends a
season later. Both have been


STEVE JOHNSON/Gator Bait Magazine
Florida senior running back Mike Gillislee may need to be
productive immediately to help take the pressure off young
quarterbacks Jeff Driskel and Jacoby Brissett.


through the cauldron of SEC
play before they were ready, so
handling the environment of the
nation's toughest conference
should not be a critical factor.
But a modicum of experience
has little value when it comes to
production. If Florida's offense
is going to rebound from one of
its worst season-long perform-
ances in more than 30 years,
then either Brissett or Driskel -
or more likely both are going
to have to make some plays
and instill some confidence in
the rest of the offense, and the
entire team for that matter.
Dredging up the horrific num-
bers from last season isn't com-
pletely necessary, but two bear
repeating Florida was dead
last in the country in average
number of plays run per game
and 105th in the nation in first
downs. There were multiple ex-
planations for the dreadful
stats, but it mostly came back
to the quarterbacks, who pro-
vided no threat of a passing at-


tack in the absence of Brantley.
Simply put, the Gators are
going to need their quarterbacks
to make some plays this fall.
Brissett and/or Driskel don't nec-
essarily need to throw for 300
yards a game, but they must be
able to make defenses respect
the passing attack and not
crowd the line of scrimmage with
impunity, with no fear of getting
burned downfield in the air. New
offensive coordinator Brent
Pease has to find a way to cob-
ble together some productivity
from his young quarterbacks if
the Gator offense is going to re-
bound significantly this season.
2. IS GILLISLEE READY?
For four years, Florida was
able to camouflage the fact it
didn't have a bruising tailback
because it had the best inside
runner in college football he
just happened to wear No. 15
and play quarterback. When it
came time to get the tough
yards, to move the chains on


third down or find the endzone
to complete a drive, no one did
it better than Tim Tebow.
But Florida has lacked that
physical presence out of the
backfield the past two seasons,
and it was painfully apparent last
fall. The Gators relied on the
speed and home-run ability of
fleet tailbacks Chris Rainey and
Jeff Demps last season, but after
a fast start, the running attack
became grounded. Sure a strug-
gling offensive line and uncertain
quarterback play contributed to
the difficulties, but without any
success inside, Florida's ground
game went nowhere after the
first month of play.
Enter Mike Gillislee, a senior
who has been a bit performer
the past three seasons, but has
produced when given his rare
opportunities. Gillislee is the un-
questioned top tailback heading
into the season and at 5-11, 209
pounds, can provide the tough-
ness to lead the inside "down-
hill" running attack preferred by
both Muschamp and Pease.
Gillislee, who has averaged 6.3
yards per carry in his career,
must prove his durability he
has battled injuries his entire ca-
reer and has just 145 rushing
attempts in three seasons.
3. ALL STARTS UP FRONT
The symmetry of college foot-
ball is that often times, the inex-
perience of one season begets
the veterans of the next cam-
paign. In 2011, Florida walked
into the season with a revamped,
untested offensive line in which
tackle Xavier Nixon (13 career
starts) and guard Jon Halapio
(seven starts) supplied the only
appreciable experience up front.
To little surprise, while butting
heads with the toughest defenses
in the country (Florida faced, and
lost, to the top five teams in the
nation in total defense), the offen-
sive line struggled badly.
But the hope is that the les-
sons learned last fall will pro-
duce results a year later. New
offensive line coach Tim Davis,
who replaced Frank Verducci,
has more experience and depth


at his disposal, and the consen-
sus is that the offensive line is
apparently the most improved
unit on the team.
It needs to be, to lessen the
initial burden on the neophyte
quarterbacks. In Nixon, a sen-
ior, redshirt junior Matt
Patchan and redshirt sopho-
more Chaz Green, Florida
sports three tackles who have
appeared in 71 games with 39
starts. Patchan could be on
the cusp of a breakout season
if he finally stays healthy while
Nixon, who struggled last sea-
son while battling physical is-
sues, was voted a third-team
preseason All-SEC pick.
Halapio (20 career starts) is
deemed the rock up front, a 6-3,
321 -pound road grader who
packs a punch inside, along with
sixth-year senior James Wilson
at guard and junior Jonnotthan
Harrison at center, who started
all 13 games last season. Davis
has plenty of bodies to work with
along the line of scrimmage,
where Florida must do more than
merely hold its own this season.
4. THE PEASE CORPS
Sorry if you groaned over that
one, but Pease appears to be a
radical upgrade over last year's
offensive coordinator Charlie
Weis, a much better fit for
Muschamp's philosophy and
personality. Pease came to UF
after spending the past six years
at Boise State, where the Bron-
cos displayed a high-flying of-
fense that dominated out west.
The key is whether Pease
can translate that success to
the SEC with a group that en-
ters 2012 with question marks
across the board. We've
touched on everything but the
receivers, Pease's area for
most of his tenure at Boise, and
a spot that demands a major
upgrade this fall.
Expect to see a lot of shifting
and pre-snap motion as
Florida attempts to keep de-
fenses off-balance this season.
Pease also fancies heavy uti-
lization of screens, which
should help the Gators' young


G18 Friday August 31, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Noles embracing lofty goals


BOB FERRANTE
The Osceola

There are college football
coaches who will quickly dismiss
the preseason questions about ex-
pectations surrounding their
team. They don't like inquiries
about "pressure to win."
And then there is the confi-
dence of Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher. The Seminoles won
10 games in his first season and
then won nine games in 2011.
So when it comes to questions
about being a national title con-
tender, Fisher doesn't mind them
in the least He welcomes them.
"I think we're there," Fisher
said. "Part of being there is be-
lieving that you belong there.
That's a huge part of it. I don't
think there's any doubt The con-
fidence level of our guys, the ex-
perience of our guys."
Fisher knows the make-up of
this team. He sees plenty of lead-
ers, and many of them are juniors
and seniors.
He knows that they have made
significant accomplishments the
past two or three seasons.
But nobody has won a ring, as
Fisher said when players arrived
for preseason practice on Aug. 5.
"It has to be the year; it's my last
year," senior quarterback EJ
Manuel said. 'As far as a personal
goal, I think that will help us as
seniors leave a legacy at Florida
State. We could say that we helped
bring back a national champi-
onship. We helped put Florida
State back where it was in the '90s
and early 2000s."
FSU was a popular national
championship pick in 2011, open-
ing the season at No. 6 as the
Seminoles chased their first title
since 1999.
But early losses quickly de-
railed the Seminoles' title hopes.
And while they still finished with
wins over Miami, Florida and
Notre Dame, many players look at
last season as a disappointment
"There was too much on the
table that we left behind," defen-
sive end Brandon Jenkins said.
"We didn't play as well as we
should have."
Team on a mission
August is a good time for talk and


Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel has completed passes at a 66.1 |
years for the Seminoles.


preseason predictions.
And every year there are about 15
teams that are realistic national
championship contenders (although
the last six years you could bank on a
Southeastern Conference team win-
ning the trophy).
But for a stretch of 14 seasons from
1987-2000, you could also bank on a
top-5 finish by FSU. The lean years -
7-6 seasons in 2006, '07 and '09 -
appear to be in the rear-view mirror.
A 10-win season, including an ACC
Atlantic Division title, in 2010 re-ener-
gized the players, especially those on
defense. Players and fans clearly ex-
pected a step up in 2011 -a confer-
ence title and maybe more.
"The whole team is on a mission,"
junior offensive lineman Bryan Stork
said.
"We don't want a mediocre year like
last year. It was a rough last decade.
Florida State did some big things but
they really didn't do what they were


capable of. That's what we want to do.
We want to be that team."
FSU has a number of pieces to be
"that team."
Manuel is an experienced, accurate
passer his 66.1 percent completion
percentage is better than FSU's all-
time top four: Brad Johnson (64.7),
Charlie Ward (62.3), Danny Kanell
(62.2) and Christian Ponder (61.8).
And FSU's often-injured offense of
2011 has had an offseason to heal.
FSU returns three receivers who caught
34 or more passes a year ago as well
as top tailbacks like Devonta Freeman
(579 rushing yards, eight TDs), James
Wilder Jr. (160 rushing yards, one
touchdown) and Chris Thompson (lim-
ited to five games by injury).
The offensive line is lacking expe-
rience but is deeper and should be
able to provide more time for
Manuel (he and Clint Trickett were
sacked 41 times).


.I .I! Xavier Rhodes and safety Lamarcus
Joyner. Terrence Brooks, a former
Dunnellon High School standout who
has seen playing time at corner and
safety, is a rising star.
With eight starters back in 2012
there's a sense that the defense, now
in coordinator Mark Stoops' third year,
could be even better.
S"I think we have a great defensive
staff," Fisher said. "I think we prioritize
defense. Defense is the one constant
that I believe in. I don't think you're
ever a great team until you're great on
defense. And you're never great on
defense until you're great up front with
the defensive linemen.
"When you are great on defense,
you're always in the game."
Players feel the urgency
The schedule sets up fairly well for
FSU, which plays keyAtlantic Division
"_ j_ games at home in September against
Wake Forest and Clemson. If FSU
leaves Tampa on Sept. 29 with a 5-0
record, the national title talk will intensify.
FSU's biggest road hurdle is a Nov.
e r 8 game against Virginia Tech, but
games at N.C. State and Miami in Oc-
tober won't be easy either.
Fisher believes in the leadership of
this team. He likes that the Seminoles
are loaded with seniors and thinks that
Associated Press "pressure brings urgency."
percent rate through his first three The seniors have reinforced the
point to the rest of the team.
First-rounders abound "We do feel a sense of urgency,"
But the defense could be one of the kicker Dustin Hopkins said. "I know in
best in the nation, and it's the reason the locker room, we have a vocal
why Fisher is able to argue that FSU group especially seniors. As older
will live up to the high expectations. guys we've been here and we've seen
FSU was second in the nation last where we fell short in the past and
year in rush defense (82.6 yards per now we can kind of try to guard
game), fourth in total defense (267.69 against that."
yards) and fourth in scoring defense And while there were high expecta-
(15.08 points per game). tions of FSU a year ago, Fisher ar-
Afew players who attended the gued that the Seminoles had too many
ACC's media days noted that FSU injuries and not nearly enough depth
has about five potential first-round He feels that the depth, improved by
NFL draft picks, and most of them are three straight top-10 signing classes,
on defense. makes FSU a program that can fight
Defensive ends Brandon Jenkins for a national title.
and Bjoern Werner could feast against "I feel very good about us going into
an ACC schedule that features teams the season," Fisher said. "I think we
with inexperienced offensive tackles. have a chance to be successful
Fisher and FSU players think line- against anybody we play. I really do. I
backer Christian Jones (56 tackles, think we have the ability to do that. I
three sacks) is set for a breakout year. think we have the leadership to do
And the secondary is among the that. And I think we have the program
best in the nation with cornerback to do that."


Friday August 31, 2012 G19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BRIGHT HOUSE


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Channel 47 HD1147)
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G20 Friday August 31, 2012


J