<%BANNER%>
Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02870
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-26-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02870

Full Text



Neil Armstrong: Astronaut, statesman dead at 8&


TODAY
& next
morning


C I T R U- S


COUNTY


Mostly cloudy and
windy, 50 percent
chance of showers.
PAGE A4


AUGUST 26, 2012


NATIONAL NEWS:








Sw TUNE




One year ago
Vermont residents
remember Tropical
Storm Irene./Page A14
ENTERTAINMENT:


Storm menaces state


Gov. Scott

cancels speech

Associated Press
TAMPA The site of the
National Republican Con-
vention showed no signs of
a coming deluge Saturday,
even as the approaching
Tropical Storm Isaac sent
officials across the state
into full-scale preparation
mode.
Streets were already shut

See Page A5


Associated Press
A steady stream of cars moves north Saturday in the middle
Keys as the Florida Keys prepare for Tropical Storm Isaac.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency, and
a hurricane warning was issued for the Florida Keys, as
officials warned tourists to leave.


Citrus keeps eyes on TS Isaac


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
As Tropical Storm Isaac
continues to chum its way
through the Caribbean,
local residents are waiting
to see where the storm will
actually hit before ramping
up preparation efforts.
Standing in the parking
lot of Home Depot in Crys-
tal River, Gary Turkaly and
Karen Damm had just fin-
ished loading their SUV


El Nino affects area


Pedal power
Bike messenger tries to
outrun a bad cop who
wants to steal the
package he is paid to
deliver in a new
film./Page B6
HOMEFRONT:


Wild things
Decorate a child's room
with animal themes.
/HomeFront
OPINION:
King's
Bay is a jewel
of Citrus
County and the
state of
Florida.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
As lake levels have steadily risen over the past several months, many anglers have taken advantage of the influx of
water. David Knowlton pauses near the Withlacoochee State Trail in Inverness on Friday morning to try his hand at catch-
ing a largemouth bass.


with a few cases of bottled
water Saturday afternoon.
"We always keep water
around and a tarp to cover
any holes in the roof,"
Turkaly said.
Plus, Damm said they
cleared a bit of debris out
of the yard to make sure
none of it goes flying if
strong winds blow through.
But even with a bit of
preparation, the Crystal
See EYES/Page A5




SO YOU KNOW
Current lake levels:
Tsala Apopka
Chain Floral
City: 41.75 feet.
Tsala Apopka
Chain -
Hernando:
37.78 feet.
Tsala Apopka
Chain -
Inverness: 39.21
feet.
Lake Consuela -
37.36 feet.
Highest levels
ever recorded:
Tsala Apopka
Chain Floral
City: 44.22 feet,
March 1960.
Tsala Apopka
Chain -
Hernando: 41.74
feet, April 1960.
Tsala Apopka
Chain -
Inverness: 42.94
feet, April 1960.
Lake Consuela -
42.84 feet,
September 2004.
Source: Southwest
Florida Water
Management District


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
At the Moonrise Resort in Flo-
ral City, which sits on the edge of
a warren of lakes, canals and is-
lands called the Tsala Apopka
chain, the owners have an organic
method of gauging lake levels.
Resort owners Mike and Sue
Ellen Friddle would look for a
trusted cypress tree, situated in
the tide field of the lake.
"Right now, it's under water,"
Mrs. Friddle said.
"We have not seen the water
this high since the hurricanes of
2004. We have a beach area and a
sea wall that is normally 10 feet
away, and the water is at the sea
wall. We don't have a beach any-
more," she said.
Incredibly, Mrs. Friddle said, as


We have had a seven-year extended
dry period, and you know lake levels
are related to groundwater levels.

Granville Kinsman
hydrologic data manager at Southwest Florida Water Management District.


recent as May and early June, the
resort's water level was so low,
the boat launch was closed.
While the lakes are not brim-
ming, Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
officials also said this has been
the highest lake water and
groundwater levels since 2006.
"We have had a seven-year ex-
tended dry period, and you know
lake levels are related to ground-
water levels," said Granville
Kinsman, manager of the water


district's Hydrologic Data section.
The water district has been col-
lecting daily data for Tsala
Apopka in Floral City, Hernando
and Inverness for more than 50
years. It has collected daily data
for Lake Consuela for 27 years.
Current lake levels range from
41.17 feet in the Floral City pool
to 37.36 feet in Lake Consuela.
According to Kinsman, data in-
dicates these lakes have been
suffering from low water levels in
recent years, but the extreme


rainfall associated with Tropical
Storm Debby started the rapid re-
covery to more normal levels be-
ginning in June.
Kinsman alluded to something
called leaky-lakes: Lakes leak
into low groundwater
"When you combine that with
evaporation and lack of rain, lake
levels can get low very quickly,"
he said.
However, Kinsman said, when
groundwater levels recover as
they have done recently, lake lev-
els will bounce back.
According to SWFWMD data,
current groundwater levels com-
pare to historical groundwater
levels, by rating them 1 to 100 -
100 being the highest water levels
ever recorded and 1 would be the
lowest water levels ever
See Page A4


This won't fly
Airlines crack down on
inappropriate dress.
/Page Dl


TOMORROW:
Amendments
November's ballot
includes 11 proposed
constitutional amend-
ments. Read pros and
cons of each./Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ............ D4
Crossword .............A16
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ... .......... A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A18


Alzheimer's INFORMATION


Plan ahead: Make finance, health wishes early


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Making medical and financial plans be-
fore a life-changing event can be one of the
greatest gifts a person can give to their
family
No matter the age, Anne Black, market-
ing communications coordinator with HPH
Hospice, said people should start having
the conversation about living wills and
picking a healthcare surrogate, because no
one knows when a serious illness or acci-
dent can leave a person incapacitated and
unable to make decisions.
Oftentimes, Black said, she uses the ex-
ample of how people love to plan for spe-
cial occasions like weddings and birthday
parties, but when it comes to discussing
end-of-life issues, no one wants to think
about it.
Nevertheless, it is an important conver-
sation to have.


See Page A7


FIVE QUICK TIPS
* Those named in the power of attorney
document should have a copy of and
access to the original document.
* The person with dementia should
name a successor (back-up) agent for
power of attorney in the event the
agent may one day be unable to act.
* The person should consider a neutral
third person to have power of attorney
if those chosen may not agree.
* Once a power of attorney for health
care document and/or a signed living
will is in place, give a copy to the
person's physicians and other health
care providers.
* Consider choosing an attorney or a
bank to manage the individual's estate
if the person lacks a trusted individual
with the time or expertise.
Source: Alzheimer's Association.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

As Alzheimer's disease
research progresses, scien-
tists continue to desper-
ately search for a way to
prevent the onset of the
fatal disease.
Though there is cur-
rently no known, scientific
means to thwart
Alzheimer's, Jerry Fisher,
a program specialist with
the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, suggests some
ideas to help people re-


duce the risk of dementia
and increase the chances
of healthy, successful
aging.
At the top of the list is
diet. Fisher said it's no se-
cret what a person eats af-
fects his or her body
However, those eating a
heart-healthy diet, which
is low in fat and choles-
terol, can truly benefit,
Fisher explained, because
researchers have found ev-
idence linking brain health
to heart health.
See CHOICES/Page A7


HIGH
87
LOW
79


/A9


Summer rains bring life to Citrus waters; global climate cycle turns wet again


Lifestyle choices may help

reduce risk ofAlzheimer's




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


jw A


..... .. ... ....
.YFARS


I~I

ii


NEW
LOCATION
, NOW
L OPEN!


i


Hearing Aids


From


FREE


HEARING AIDS
Miracle Ear Hearing Aid Center
is NOW Offering HEARING AIDS AT NO COST
TO FEDERAL WORKERS AND RETIREES!


That's Right...
No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee!


Blue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear digital hearing aids.
If you have Federal Government Insurance with enrollment code #104, #105, #111, or #112, you
are covered for hearing aids with no out of pocket expenses. 3 yr. warranty.
If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers.
JRRY! MONDAY-FRIDAY 10AM-5PM


35 2- 795-1484 Provider for most insurance companies


3iNIl


YEARS IN CITRUS COUNTY!


OWNER, RICKEY
RICHARDSON
Licensed Hearing
. Aid Specialist


OPEN: Mon.-Fri. IOAM-5PM
352-795-1484


BRIAN
LAZIO
Licensed Hearing
Aid Specialist


-HL


v T w


22


A2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


.. ... ..


41AM


llllm:Lmhl1',l:


-UJ ^ Mj- ^-,


'= ,


Il'1







Page A3 -SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Program targets
first-time voters
Citrus County's Supervisor
of Elections Susan Gill has
announced a voter registra-
tion drive at area high schools
to register students and pre-
pare first-time voters for the
Nov. 6 general election.
The schedule is as follows:
Citrus High Tuesday,
Aug. 28.
Crystal River High -
Wednesday, Aug. 29.
Lecanto High Thurs-
day, Aug. 30.
During lunch period stu-
dents who are 18 years old
may register to vote and stu-
dents who are 17 and 16 may
pre-register. The deadline to
register to vote in the Novem-
ber election is Oct. 9.
Citrus 95 FM Radio has
partnered with the elections
office since 2006 to conduct
the voter registration drive
and help get the message out
to students on the importance
of voting.
For information, call the
elections office at 352-
341-6740.
School district
opens Twitter account
The Citrus County School
District has created a Twitter
account to keep the commu-
nity informed of emergency no-
tifications and breaking news
involving weather-related or
law enforcement situations.
To follow the school dis-
trict, visit http://twitter.com/
CitrusSchools. You must
have or create a Twitter ac-
count to be able to connect.
The school district will use
Twitter as a strategic and
carefully monitored way of
communicating during the re-
mainder of the school year.

Miami

Suspect shot
following chase
MIAMI -Authorities say a
South Florida police chase
ended with one man shot and
several people in custody.
According to reports, the
chase began Friday morning
and involved several police
departments. The Miami Her-
ald reported the pursuit
ended when the driver made
a sharp U-turn by Palmetto
Expressway and crashed into
a fence. The driver ran from
the car and jumped over the
fence, leaving other suspects
behind. Police eventually
caught the driver and ar-
rested the suspects at the
site of the crash. Officials
said no officers were injured.
-From staff and wire reports

Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forum 7
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at the
College of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for su-
perintendent of schools, will
have a barbecue fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 8, at Rock Crusher
Pavilion, 275 S. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. Informa-
tion: 352-726-3181, 352-726-
3966 or 352-637-5191.
Winn Webb, Republican
for sheriff, will have a fund-
raiser at 6 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 17, at Neon Leon's Zy-
deco Steakhouse, 10350 W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa. In-
formation: email winn.
webb@gmail.com.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.


Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.com.


Old war, new enemy


"' 4 .


. '
,'\ ,ll ^ll .: _[ ^

" ,4 .,, .
k 7 ,| L-


- -. ...


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office School Resource Officer Deputy Mitch Cook places an anti-synthetic drugs sign in the window of Express Lane
Food Stores in Floral City. Volunteers with Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus and local law enforcement officers took to the streets
Saturday morning to urge local businesses to stop selling synthetic drugs.

Program asks convenience stores to just say 'no' to selling synthetic drugs


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Nationwide, the synthetic drug industry is
booming.
Often marketed as "incense" or "bath salts,"
synthetic drugs are laced with chemicals,
which mimic the effects of marijuana, cocaine
and methamphetamine. The drugs are typi-
cally sold over the counter at convenience
stores, gas stations and tobacco shops through-
out the country and have become increasingly
popular with teens and young adults.
However, with the lucrative profits comes
the ever-growing number of injuries and
deaths being reported at the hands of the
deadly substances.
Though several states have issued bans on
synthetic drugs, manufactures stay one step
ahead, continually altering the drugs' chem-
ical make-up to skirt laws.
As a concerted effort to rid synthetic drug
sales in Citrus County, Partners for a Sub-
stance-Free Citrus and the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office took to the streets Saturday
morning to urge local businesses to stop sell-
ing synthetic drugs.
Lt. Kevin Purinton said the focus would be
on the places where children have direct ac-


cess to the drugs. Earlier in the week, he said
he and Sgt. Ron Frink visited 32 stores, hand-
ing out contracts for business owners to sign
voluntarily agreeing not to sell synthetic
drugs. Of the 32, eight were signed.
Saturday's initiative, called phase one of
the campaign, involved revisiting stores in In-
verness, Homosassa and Crystal River to see
if the contracts were signed, putting up signs
stating synthetic drugs aren't sold here in
stores that agreed to ban sales and issuing
contracts to not previously visited stores.
Linda Rochette, manager of the Shell gas
station on the corner of State Road 44 and
Croft Road, enthusiastically agreed to have
the sign in her store. She had already signed
the contract.
It was an easy decision to make, she said,
because her store never sold them.
Rochette has worked at the store for nearly
20 years and said Saturday she would quit
working there if management ever decided
to start selling the drugs. She said she has
seen people come stumbling into her store so
high from them, they didn't know what was
going on around them.
"I hate to see that," she said. "We can't
stand it."
Many of the stores, which were given con-


tracts earlier in the week, still hadn't signed
them. Several promised to have them signed
by the next visit. Others said they weren't
sure if they would be signed at all. A number
of stores denied selling synthetic drugs and
agreed to have a sign placed in their busi-
ness' window stating such.
Martin Osuji, the manager of the Chevron
gas station on U.S. 41, said he doesn't sell the
drugs for "moral reasons."
"Many come looking for them and people
keep pressuring me to sell them, telling me I
can make a lot of money," he said. "But
money's not everything."
Phase two of the campaign will involve a
sticker-shock contest. Local middle- and
high-school students will have the opportu-
nity to develop a sign discouraging the sale
and consumption of synthetic drugs.
The winning design will be unveiled dur-
ing the annual Red-Ribbon Week celebration
in October and posted on billboards and busi-
nesses throughout the county for all to see.
In addition, businesses that voluntarily
agree not to sell synthetic drugs will be rec-
ognized at the close of the campaign.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 orswiles@chronicle
online, com.


Romney to help women, dodge Isaac


Associated Press
TAMPA Republican of-
ficials abruptly announced
plans Saturday evening to
scrap the first day of their
national convention, bowing
to a threat posed by Tropi-
cal Storm Isaac, churning
toward Florida.
The announcement said
while the convention would
officially be gaveled into
session Monday as sched-
uled, the day's events would
be canceled until Tuesday
That meant Romney's for-
mal nomination would be
postponed by a day, from
Monday to Tuesday, but the
balance of the four days of
political pageantry and
speechmaking would go on
as scheduled.


The former Massachusetts
governor campaigned in bat-
tleground Ohio during the
day, pledging to help women
entrepreneurs and innova-
tors who are eager to create
small businesses and the jobs
that go with them. It was an
economy-themed countdown
to the Republican National
Convention taking shape in a
city already bristling with se-
curity and bracing for a
possible hurricane.
"Women in this country
are more likely to start busi-
nesses than men. Women
need our help," said the Re-
publican presidential chal-
lenger, eager to relegate
recent controversy over
abortion to the sidelines
and make the nation's slow
economic recovery the dom-


inant issue of his conven-
tion week.
Romney campaigned with
running mate Paul Ryan in
Ohio as delegates arrived in
Florida by the planeload.
Across town, technicians
completed the conversion of
a hockey arena along Tampa
Bay into a red, white and
blue-themed convention hall.
The announcement made
the GOP convention the
party's second in a row to be
disrupted by weather. Four
years ago, the delegates
gathered in St. Paul, Minn.,
but Hurricane Gustav, slam-
ming the Gulf Coast, led to a
one-day postponement.
In that case, party offi-
cials rewrote their script to
make President George W
Bush's speech into a video


E. -1 U. a A
Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate and former Massachu-
setts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks as vice presidential running
mate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., listens during a campaign rally
Saturday in Powell, Ohio.
appearance and to cancel Dick Cheney to appear be-
plans for Vice President fore the delegates.


State BRIEFS


Tropical storm
stalls NASA launch
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -
NASA's effort to launch a pair of
satellites to Earth's radiation
belts has been delayed until
late next week because of
Tropical Storm Isaac.
The countdown was halted at
the four-minute mark in the wee
hours of Saturday for the
second time in as many days.
Thunderstorms prevented
the unmanned rocket from


blasting off with NASA's Radia-
tion Belt Storm Probes. On Fri-
day, a tracking beacon on the
rocket held up the flight.
NASA initially said it would
try again Sunday.
But with Isaac bearing to-
ward Florida, launch managers
decided to move the Atlas V
rocket back into its hangar and
sit tight until the storm passed.
They're now aiming for a Thurs-
day launch.
The twin satellites are de-
signed to study Earth's harsh


radiation belts.
Scientists say the two-year,
$686 million mission will im-
prove space forecasting; the
goal is to better guard against
solar storms.
Spacecraft can be damaged,
and astronauts hurt, from severe
solar outbursts. Life here on the
planet also can be disrupted.
Biden cancels
Florida trip
WASHINGTON Vice
President Joe Biden is postpon-


ing his planned trip to Florida
because of Tropical Storm
Isaac.
Biden was planning to go to
Orlando and St. Augustine on
Tuesday, but a campaign offi-
cial said the trip has been
postponed to ensure all local
law enforcement and emer-
gency management resources
can stay focused on Tropical
Storm Isaac, which could im-
pact Florida during the Repub-
lican National
Convention.


Biden had previously can-
celed a planned trip Monday to
Tampa site of the GOP con-
vention because of the se-
vere weather forecast.
Biden had planned a two-day
swing through Florida during
the Republican meetings to
counter their message.
Republican officials an-
nounced Saturday they are
postponing major convention
events until Tuesday because
of the storm.
-From wire reports






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Energy security assured in shelters at 83 schools


Business Wire

HILLSBORO, Ore. -As Florida
braces for hurricane season, an am-
bitious program to install Solar-
Worldsolar panels on 100 Florida
schools by the end of 2012 has better
equipped state residents to weather
powerful storms. Tapping a $10 mil-
lion federal stimulus grant, the
Florida Solar Energy Center
(FSEC) has enabled installation of
a 10-kilowatt solar array at each of
the schools to provide emergency
power for school-based shelters in
the event of storms such as the im-
pending Hurricane Isaac.
The ground-mounted solar sys-
tems supplement the schools' elec-
tricity during normal operations
while charging a bank of back-up
batteries. If schools are put into
service as emergency shelters, the
solar systems will power their light-
ing and critical equipment, drawing
on the batteries during dark hours.
"These installations represent
multi-purpose applications of solar
technology," said Kevin Kilkelly,
president of SolarWorld Americas,
the largest U.S. solar manufacturer
for more than 35 years. "Solar is of-
fering efficient and effective back-
up power while reducing energy
costs for schools and augmenting
their science curriculum."
SolarWorld Authorized Installer
Vergona-Bowersox Electric Inc.,
based in Boca Raton, has completed


I


~- ,


-.- ,,- -... -I
' : |^ r~


Photo courtesy of University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center
A 10-kilowatt solar array supplies power to DeSoto Middle School in Arcadia.


installations at 83 schools to date.
"These solar systems increase the
value of the state's emergency shel-
ters, making them more useful to
citizens facing natural disasters,"
said Michael Vergona Jr., project
manager for Vergona-Bowersox.
"Evacuees during a hurricane now
have a place to charge their cell
phones, keep their medications and
baby formula refrigerated, or heat
up a meal."
According to FSEC, a research in-
stitute of the University of Central


Florida, participating schools were
selected based on their status as
emergency shelters, their demo-
graphics and their renewable-
energy curriculum.
"This forward-thinking program,
using solar energy to enhance dis-
aster response capabilities, is an in-
novative example of applying green
technology to meet community
needs," said Susan Schleith, FSEC
project manager for the SunSmart
program. "This program also pro-
vides a dynamic learning resource


ON THE NET
For a complete list of schools,
visit the FSEC website at
http://blog.floridaenergy
center.org/echronicle/2011
/07/sunsmart-e-shelter-
installations/.

for the classroom, allowing students
and teachers to study the relation-
ship between energy and the envi-
ronment, while gaining valuable
science and math skills."
For a complete list of participat-
ing schools, visit the FSEC website
at http://blog.floridaenergycenter.
org/echronicle/2011/07/sunsmart-
e-shelter-installations/.

About FSEC
The Florida Solar Energy Center,
a research institute of the Univer-
sity of Central Florida, is the largest
and most active state-supported en-
ergy research institute in the na-
tion. Current divisions and their
research activities include ad-
vanced energy research: alternative
transportation systems, hydrogen
fuel and fuel cells; buildings re-
search: energy-efficient buildings;
and solar energy: solar water and
pool heating and solar electric and
distributed generation systems. For
more information about the center,
visit www.floridaenergycenter.org
or call the FSEC Public Affairs Of-
fice at 321-638-1015.


Forthe RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrest
Samuel Sonnon, 38, of
1255 N.E. Second St., Crystal
River, at 11:45 a.m. Wednes-
day, arrested on felony
charges of uttering forged bills,
checks, drafts or notes, and
forging bank bills, checks,
drafts or notes. Bond $6,000.

ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping
for a view of where
each type of crime
occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record
reports are also
archived online at
www.chronicle
online.com.


RAINS
Continued from Page Al

recorded.
Kinsman said current
groundwater levels at 65 are
the healthiest since 2006.
Normal levels are defined
as those that fall between 25
and 75.
At the end of May, which
is the end of the dry season,
Kinsman said the number
for the Citrus County area


was 21.
Kinsman expects current
lake levels to remain high
for the next couple of years
because of the climatic phe-
nomenon called El Nifio.
"With El Nifio, there is
more rainfall in the winter
and spring months," he
added.
El Nifio is defined as
warming of the ocean sur-
face in equatorial areas off
the western coast of South
America that occurs every
four to 12 years. It alters


storm tracks and creates un-
usual weather patterns in
other parts of the world.
Resort owner Sue Ellen
Friddle said she is looking
forward to as much rain as
possible, including the pos-
sible deluge expected from
Tropical Storm Isaac, which
is expected in the area early
next week.
She said business has
picked up at her resort.
"In 26 years," she said,
"this is the best August we
ever had."


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Citrus County School Board..................A18

City of Crystal River...........................A17

,H : Bid Notices...........................................D6

Meeting Notices...................................D6

Miscellaneous Notices.......................D6

.. 3Self Storage Notices............................D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts

ts
pc


ts
ts
ts
t8


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
pc


ts
ts
ts
t8


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds at 20 knots, with
higher gusts. Seas 2-4 feet. Bay and
inland waters will be choppy. Chance
of thunderstorms late today.


93 74 000 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 79
Mostly cloudy and windy; 50%
~ ~ chance of showers/storms
P1 111111MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 80
Tropical storm winds possible; heavy rain
possible depending on track of Isaac
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 89 Low: 80
Still windy with lingering scattered showers and
V storms
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 90/71
Record 98/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.20 in.
Total for the month 10.70 in.
Total for the year 47.77 in.
Normal for the year 37.40 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 55%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, nettle, chenopods
Today's count: 5.3/12
Monday's count: 3.9
Tuesday's count: 6.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/26 SUNDAY 1:39 7:54 2:09 8:23
8/27 MONDAY 2:32 8:46 3:00 9:15
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


SEP 8 SEP 15 SEPT. 22
SEPT.8 SEPT.15 SEPT.22


SUNSET TONIGHT 7:58 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:06 A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY ...........................4:13 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY ............................2:00 A M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 2:38 a/8:54 a 1:12 p/10:54 p
Crystal River* 12:59 a/6:16 a 11:33 a/8:16 p
Withlacoochee* 9:20 a/4:04 a /6:04 p
Homosassa*** 1:48 a/7:53 a 12:22 p/9:53 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
3:59 a/10:25 a 2:36 p/--
2:20 a/7:47 a 12:57 p/9:22 p
12:07 a/5:35 a 10:44 a/7:10 p
3:09 a/9:24 a 1:46 p/10:59 p


Gulf water
temperature


87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.01 33.00 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.78 37.83 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.21 39.23 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.17 41.16 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION




City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


"- -







FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
87 61 pc 87 63
93 62 ts 88 67
83 57 pc 81 60
86 67 pc 87 69
80 65 ts 80 71
96 77 pc 94 72
80 70 .01 ts 82 69
79 47 pc 88 57
85 73 s 91 69
92 51 s 90 55
77 67 pc 81 65
91 66 pc 85 65
89 61 pc 87 65
85 64 pc 87 73
90 60 pc 86 63
86 58 pc 85 64
93 66 ts 85 70
93 61 pc 93 66
91 67 pc 84 68
87 63 pc 88 69
93 65 pc 92 68
80 59 pc 85 56
94 78 .01 ts 93 77
80 59 pc 91 60
76 68 .40 ts 80 62
90 66 pc 86 69
94 73 ts 93 73
93 65 pc 92 71
79 69 ts 80 66
84 66 pc 85 62
91 75 .01 pc 93 76
92 67 pc 90 70
88 72 pc 91 69
99 80 s 99 79
90 73 .11 ts 89 72
73 66 pc 72 61
93 68 pc 95 73
80 73 .12 pc 91 74
89 66 ts 79 64
77 66 .05 pc 83 61
90 71 pc 91 71
91 72 s 92 69
89 68 .07 s 92 69


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 90 73 pc 92 75
New York City 86 72 pc 82 70
Norfolk 85 73 .54 ts 82 72
Oklahoma City 94 75 ts 87 69
Omaha 73 68 .21 pc 86 63
Palm Springs 10382 s 106 78
Philadelphia 83 72 ts 83 70
Phoenix 10381 s 103 84
Pittsburgh 86 62 pc 81 64
Portland, ME 78 63 pc 77 60
Portland, Ore 84 53 pc 76 57
Providence, R.I. 81 65 pc 81 63
Raleigh 72 63 .42 pc 85 66
Rapid City 79 56 pc 87 64
Reno 94 61 s 90 55
Rochester, NY 88 61 pc 87 65
Sacramento 84 55 s 87 57
St. Louis 91 74 .06 ts 84 71
St. Ste. Marie 90 64 ts 84 64
Salt Lake City 91 61 pc 95 70
San Antonio 95 75 pc 95 75
San Diego 73 67 pc 74 67
San Francisco 67 53 pc 65 53
Savannah 87 65 trace pc 87 73
Seattle 77 53 pc 73 55
Spokane 78 47 s 88 55
Syracuse 90 61 pc 86 64
Topeka 79 68 .89 ts 83 64
Washington 82 73 .05 ts 83 70
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 107 Needles, Calif. LOW 22 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/79/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 66/56/sh Mexico City
Athens 101/77/s Montreal
Beijing 88/72/pc Moscow
Berlin 69/53/sh Paris
Bermuda 85/81/ts Rio
Cairo 97/74/s Rome
Calgary 74/47/s Sydney
Havana 88/75/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 92/81/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 90/65/s Warsaw


82/63/s
67/49/c
90/65/s
71/56/ts
90/67/s
72/61/pc
70/54/sh
80/63/pc
88/66/pc
65/54/c
88/75/ts
87/65/s
70/57/r


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
44s office
c k. .illBrunt Hvv, 1624 N.
Dunkerlield Meadowcrest
Dunker edr- .Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A ve Crystal River,
AM1 \ Madowrei FL 34429
N 1:1 :

I IInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. square
S8' E 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
-j^ "34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ...................................................................... Publisher, 563-3 2 22
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ................................. .................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4FS Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


0
AUG. 31


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


STATE/LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EYES
Continued from Page Al

River couple didn't seem
too concerned about Isaac.
"This is not going to be
that bad," Turkaly said.
"We'll probably just get a lit-
tle bit of wind, a little bit of
rain."
Steve Saperstein, who
was loading planks of wood
into his truck Saturday for a
non-storm-related project,
said he wasn't too worried
- yet.
"I'm just watching it right
now," he said. "Maybe to-
morrow (Sunday) I'll panic,
but today, I'm OK."
Already equipped with a
generator, water and basic
food supplies, the 20-year
Crystal River resident said
all he anticipates from the
storm is rain and wind, but
he'll keep an eye on it.
At MacRae's of Ho-
mosassa bait shop, store em-
ployee Thomas Bentley said
the storm would have to get
closer before making any
decision on what to do to
prepare for Isaac.
"Nobody will start worry-
ing until tomorrow (Sunday)
night, Monday morning," he
said.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Capt. Joe Eckstein,
who heads the emergency
operations center, said Sat-
urday evening forecasters
believe Isaac could reach
hurricane status right be-
fore it hits the Florida Keys.
Though the storm had
picked up speed, Eckstein
said forecasters warned it's
not very organized, meaning
it could possibly fall apart
once it hits land. Neverthe-
less, he said they also stated
Isaac could potentially
strengthen into a Category 2
or stronger, making it hard
to form a game plan locally
Eckstein anticipated
today would be decision-
making day After seeing the
storm's track around 7 a.m.,
he said he would then call a
briefing to figure out how to
proceed.
If the storm jogs 50 miles
east, he said Citrus County
could be affected "big time."
If it moves 50 miles west, the
effects could be less.
If Isaac stays on its cur-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Kipper Blanton, left, and Leonard Church, center, made a trip to The Home Depot on
Saturday to get an 8,000-watt generator in preparation of the approach of Tropical Storm
Isaac. Plywood and other items such as batteries and flashlights were also hot-selling items.


CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP
* To register for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office's
CodeRED weather program, visit
www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/ and click on "CodeRED
Registration" near the center top of the page.
* Those without computer access may call 352-746-6555.


rent track, Eckstein said the
county might see some mod-
erate flooding. Worst-case
scenario, he said forecast-
ers late Saturday stated the
county could receive four to
eight inches of rain and pos-
sibly up to 12 inches from
isolated storms. The county
could also begin experienc-
ing tropical storm-force
winds as early as Sunday
night. And the main con-
cerns with flooding might
occur when high tide rolls
in Monday afternoon and


--a -4


early Tuesday morning.
But it could be far less
worse than predicted, Eck-
stein stated.
Currently, the county is
under a tropical storm
watch. Eckstein urges resi-
dents to stay tuned into
their favorite weather chan-
nel today to see how Isaac is
progressing.
For current information
from the Citrus County
Emergency Operation Cen-
ter, visit wwwsheriffcitrus.
org/EM/.


Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@chron
icleonline. com.


STORM
Continued from Page Al

down around the Tampa
Bay Times Forum, where
former Massachusetts Gov.
Mitt Romney will accept
his party's presidential
nomination Thursday
night. Law enforcement
milled about downtown,
and some protests already
were under way One group
protesting homelessness
and the housing crisis
"took over" a foreclosed
home by cleaning the yard
and planned to help a
homeless couple move in.
Convention officials an-
nounced Saturday evening
they planned to convene
the meeting briefly Mon-
day, then immediately re-
cess until Tuesday
afternoon, when the storm
is expected to have passed.
Florida Gov Rick Scott, a
Republican, declared a
state of emergency and
canceled his plans to at-
tend convention events
Sunday and Monday
A hurricane warning had


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 A5

been issued for the Florida
Keys, and officials warned
tourists to leave. Forecast
models show Isaac likely
won't hit Tampa head-on,
but it could lash the city
with rain and strong winds
just as the convention
ramps up.
"I told some of my Demo-
cratic friends, 'We are the
storm, baby, we are the
thunder,"' said Steve Linder,
whose business is planning
all events for the Michigan
delegation. Linder added,
smiling, "and it ain't gonna
stop until November"
Dianne Joachim of New
Richmond, Wis., was in
town for her first conven-
tion and vowed not to let
Isaac ruin it.
"I just figure God's got
this," she said as she ar-
rived at her downtown
hotel.
Scott said during a
media briefing that dele-
gates were being told how
to stay safe during a storm,
and officials were ready
for storm surge, bridge clo-
sures and other problems
that could arise during the
convention.


Thank You!
I would like to thank my family, friends, and all those who
supported my campaign. It has been a privilege to serve our citizens
for the past eight years and I look forward to continuing my service
in this wonderful community.


Sincerely,
Dennis Damato
County Comm ijsioiier
District 1


1~




I


'I


*, .


Political advertisement
paid for and approved
by Dennis Damato,
Republican for County
Commissioner, District 1
OOCG6T


S -W A- ...



FREE VACATION VOUCHER TO
THE FIRST 150 PEOPLE!
SATURDAY, AUG. 25 & SUNDAY, AUG. 26 ONLY
HURRY IN! WHEN THEY'RE GONE... THEY'RE GONE!


~1

'1


OF A LIFETIME
3 DAYS, 2 NIGHTS PAID VACATION


AT ANY
* Anaheim, CA
* Atlantic Beach, NC
* Atlantic City, NJ
* Branson, MD
* Charlotte, NC
* Cumberland Mtns, TN
* Dallas, TX
* Daytona Beach, FL
* Falmouth, MA
* I I .:i I AZ


OF THESE
Freeport, Bahamas
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Glade, TN
Hancock, MA
Hilton Head, SC
Kitty Hawk, NC
Lake Tahoe, CA
Las Vegas, NV
Lincoln, NH
Miami, FL


EXCITING DESTINATIONS!


* Murrells Inlet, SC
* Myrtle Beach, SC
* Nashville, TN
* Nassau, Bahamas
* New Orleans, LA
* Orlando, FL
* Palm Springs, CA
* Portland, ME
* Reno, NV
* San Antonio, TX


* San Diego, CA
* San Francisco, CA
* Santa Fe, NM
* Sedona, AZ
* Smoky Mtns., TN
* Tucson, AZ
* Virginia Beach, VA
* ,1...... I,:.,,.:i VA
* Wisconsin Dells, WI


ABSOLUTELY NO COMMITMENT!


, I A -"


*nkrus(C


I
U

I


AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST
CLOSE CAR DEALS. WE 0


Il a--"
-"TO n^:^ ^ | 'i "p7.f '"- --" ......!,.
= TI 4'-_b-.. .I~ ,, I -.,- I,,;
t_-u
.:i;.:.:...... ...7
... ^^ ^ .^^ ^-j~e '.'""-^ -/-"-"^ ^B






I-A .
-R^^T/ P -.-.. -- -.ctl-co
... -. - ,



ill s KiAHor m
, L, L L


rDON'T Tne Power toSurprise'
)PEN RELATIONSHIPS" Shop from Home @ www.citrusia.com


-'I.
-y JIM"
.- _ a
S-' F-&.


00


,..r *-


vmmm


m.. -^ --,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


James
Bentley, 78
ARLINGTON,
TEXAS
James R. Bentley, age 78,
passed peacefully into His
eternal rest Tuesday, Aug.
21, 2012, in
|Arlington
Texas. With
his only
child at his
side, James
passed from
secondary
complica-
James tions fol-
Bentley lowing an
extended
battle with Parkinson's
disease.
James was born May 4,
1934, in Wellsville, N.Y, to
Ralph Bentley and Dorothy
Bell. He was the youngest of
three siblings and grew up
in nearby Bolivar, N.Y, with
a brother and sister, Robert
and July In his early years,
he developed interests in
individual and team sports.
Football was his favorite.
He later grew up to be class
athlete in his senior year of
high school. He went on to
be a graduate of Penn State
University, while also en-
rolled in the Air Force
ROTC program. Upon grad-
uation from school, he went
on active duty as a captain
with the Air Force and
began his flight training in
Lakeland, Fla., where he
met his "wife to be," Geor-
gia. James was married Aug.
25, 1956, to Georgia Jones in
Bolivar, N.Y, and enjoyed
being both a loving and de-
voted husband to Georgia
and a proud father of his
only child, his son Russell.
He had varied interests in
the outdoors, from fishing,
to hunting, to family camp-
ing and boating. He was
strong-willed and ambi-
tious, but tender-hearted
and compassionate.
James is survived by his
only child, Russell E. Bent-
ley (51) of Dallas, Texas; by
many nieces/nephews in the
New England area; and
many dear longtime friends
and co-workers.
A memorial service to cel-
ebrate the life and times of
James Bentley will be at 11
a.m. May 25, 2013, tenta-
tively at the Maple Lawn
Cemetery in Bolivar, N.Y,
through Schaffner Funeral
Home. A reception follow-


ing the service will be held
at the L'Italia Restaurant in
Wellsville, N.Y James' final
resting place will be Maple
Lawn Cemetery, Bolivar,
N.Y Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
Moore-Funeralhome.com.
James was loved and re-
spected during his lifetime
and will be deeply missed
by all those who where for-
tunate enough to know him
and shared a part of his life.

Rosemary
Harden, 84
INVERNESS
Rosemary Harden, 84, of
Inverness, Fla., died Aug.
23, 2012, at the Hospice of
Citrus
Co. County
House in
Lecanto.
Rosemary
was born
Aug. 14,
1928, in Bal-
timore, Md.,
Rosemary the daugh-
Harden ter of
William and
Fern Sweeney She moved
to Inverness in 1984 from
Millersville, Md. Rosemary
attended Calvary Chapel in
Inverness.
Survivors include her
husband, William Harden
Sr. of Inverness, Fla.; daugh-
ters, Carol Brown and
husband Ray of Port St.
John, Fla., and Janet
"Dolly" Risteyn of Newland,
N.C.; son, William Harden
Jr. of Inverness, Fla.; sister,
Leilanie Baer of Bel
Air, Md.; five grand-
children; and five
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Harden will be at 1
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012,
at the Heinz Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends from noon until the
hour of service. Inurnment
will be at Florida National
Cemetery at a later date.
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

C E. 6 ai
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

G LDEN SoI-
raLE Oref

For Information and costs,
OOOBxP call 726-8323


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Brown


Dominick
Littzi, 66
INVERNESS
Dominick T Littzi, 66, of
Inverness, Fla., passed away
in the Lord on Aug. 21, 2012,
at Citrus Memorial
hospital.
Dominick was born Dec.
13, 1945, in Pittston, Pa., the
son of Dominick and Agnes
Littzi. He retired after 32
years in the security depart-
ment of a local Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., hospital, where
he also extended his great
compassion to help anyone
in need at any time. He was
liked and respected by all
who knew him everywhere.
Dominick is survived by
his wife, Debbie Littzi. As
eternal soul mates, Do-
minick and Debbie were
married Sept. 25, 1987, at
the CoCo Palms Resort on
Kauai, Hawaii. They shared
almost 25 years of the most
loving marriage, and would
have been celebrating their
special love on their 25th
wedding anniversary this
September.
Dominick, Debbie, and
their eight cats moved to In-
verness in September 2010.
Dominick was totally dedi-
cated to loving and caring
for his special family He
lived his faith in the teach-
ings of Jesus Christ, as he
was a man of honor, pa-
tience, kindness, under-
standing, forgiveness and
comfort, and respected
everyone. Dominick had a
fondness for animals and,
with his wife, had joined
Humanitarian of Florida
Inc. He thoroughly enjoyed
his property, living in Citrus
County, and meeting so
many wonderful, caring
people.
Donations in Dominick's
memory can be made to the
Humanitarian of Florida
Inc., The Manchester
S0 0C7DTI

ujoo pr
FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills
(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
.www.HooperFuneralHome.comj


House, 1149 Conant Ave.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or
any animal shelter.
A funeral Mass for Mr.
Littzi will be at 10:30 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 31, 2012, at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. Father Erwin Beli-
gicia will preside. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Carmella
Gruber, 94
LECANTO
Carmella Gruber, 94, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Aug. 20, 2012.
A native of Melrose Park,
Ill., she was born July 9,
1918, to Antonio and Malilda
(Winters) Christofaro and
moved here from Melrose
Park in 1997. Carmella
loved birds and music and
enjoyed making birthday
cards.
She is survived by her
children, Carlene Lawrence
(Raymond), Judy Hemer
(John) and John Guber (Nel-
lie); 11 grandchildren; 16
great-grandchildren; and 14
great-great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Gruber was preceded
in death by two sons,
Richard and Robert Gruber
A memorial service will
be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28,
in the Florida Room of the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park. In lieu of flow-
ers, please make memorial
contributions to the Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park Flamingo
Exhibit.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.




"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Clifford
Schoenenberger,
62
HERNANDO
Clifford Arthur Schoe-
nenberger, age 62, Her-
nando, died Aug. 23,2012, at
Hospice of Citrus County
House in Lecanto.
Cliff was born March 23,
1950, in Chicago, Ill., to the
late Arthur and Eileen
(Drueen) Schoenenberger.
He was employed as an ac-
countant for DuPage County
(Illinois.) Cliff was an avid
golfer, member of the Citrus
Hills Men's Club and BGA
(Bad Golfer's Association.)
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 39 years,
Lynn Schoenenberger, Her-
nando; his sons, Daniel
(Gina) Schoenenberger,
Hoffman Estates, Ill., and
Timothy (Donna) Schoenen-
berger, West Chicago, Ill.;
brothers, Edward (Melinda)
Schoenenberger, Wheaton,
Ill., and Arthur Schoenen-
berger, West Chicago, Ill.;
sisters, Arleen Lindstrom,
Winfield, Ill., and Georgene
Werle, West Chicago, Ill.;
five grandchildren; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at 11
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 30,2012,
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory The family requests
donations in Cliff's memory
to Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.



To Place Your
("In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @ chronicleonline.com
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@chronicleonline.com
F'Cosngtireorlaing a
is 4 dys p iotorndte. A


Funeral Directors ,
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Adrienne
Cubine, 68
HOMOSASSA
Adrienne Sharon Cubine,
68, of Homosassa, died
Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012.
National Cremation Soci-
ety in Hudson is handling
arrangements.

Louis
Santiago, 67
LECANTO
Louis A. Santiago, 67, of
Lecanto, died Thursday,
Aug. 23, 2012, at his home.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.
Mass will be offered at 10
a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012,
at St. Benedict Catholic
Church in Crystal River.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.






O0FHOMOSASSAInc.
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com

More
SThan Just
Lorrie Verticals

,eS' 2" Faux Wood
V, Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments ,
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19,next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)

F_ CALL-NOW! -I


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy .
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694 |
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


PETER Y'UNG KIAM, M.D.
Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery


HERE

WHEN YOU

NEED

CITR

When il comes to outstanding cardiovascular care, trust
your heart to Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center.
With nearly a decade of experience, our expert team of
surgeons, physicians and nurses offer the most advanced
expertise when you need it most, right here at home.

From advanced heart surgery such as coronary artery
bypass (CABG) and heart valve repairs to the implantation
of pacemakers and automatic defibrillators, Citrus
Memorial is at the heart of it. Our minimally invasive
abdominal aneurysm surgery, carotid artery procedures
and lung surgery techniques help in reducing the risks and
complications associated with more traditional methods
and promote improved healing that helps speed you back to
normal daily living.

So when it comes to matters of the heart, coupled with
our proven record for compassionate care and excellent
outcomes, you can depend on Citrus County's most
comprehensive heart and vascular center.

Learn more about us by visiting heartofciLrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


S,, CITRUS MEMORIAL




S& VASCULAR CENTER
502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


/^CITR U Sf^ C0 U N T YT

CHRONICLE
www.c~~hronicleonline.com


Like us on Facebook
Discuss daily news topics with our journalists and
photographers. Get breaking news updates. See
and comment on pictures from around our
county. Enter contests. Get invites to events.
We also...
Socialize, Laugh
and Have Fun!






iL.E _
www.facebook.com/citruscountychronicle


A6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


m Ih





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLAN
Continued from Page Al

"Everyone should make
their wishes known," Black
said.
When speaking to people
in the community about the
value of early financial and
health care planning, Black
said she always asks people
if they remember the Terry
Schiavo case, in which a
young, brain-dead St. Pe-
tersburg woman became the
center of the national right-
to-die fight.
She also uses the story
about her sister-in-law.
Black said her sister-in-
law only had 35 percent use
of her heart after heart sur-


AGING WELL
Visit a doctor regularly.
Participate in activities
that stimulate your
brain, such as reading,
crossword puzzles,
playing bridge, and
other mental exercises.
Manage stress through
techniques such as re-
laxation, meditation
and yoga.
Treat depression. De-
pressed elders have
higher rates of demen-
tia, lower quality of life
and higher rates of
death.
Be social. Maintaining a
network of friends will
lessen the likelihood of
isolation and depres-
sion while increasing
the overall level of brain
stimulation.
Exercise daily, such as
walking 30 minutes per
day.
Control hypertension,
diabetes and heart dis-
ease risk factors for
dementia through
physical exercise, quit-
ting smoking, control-
ling blood pressure,
lowering cholesterol
and avoiding obesity.
Follow a healthy diet
and take vitamins, in-
cluding vitamins C and
E, and folic acid.
Limit alcohol intake.
Source: Alzheimer's
Foundation of America.


gery and had damage to her
lungs from years of asthma
and bronchitis, as well as
emphysema from second-
hand smoke. She never
shared her symptoms with
her physician and avoided
tests, Black said, by switch-
ing doctors because "she just
didn't want to deal with it."
When she eventually was
referred for hospice care in
Pinellas County, Black said
she talked with her about
short-term fixes such as
dialysis, feeding tubes and
breathing machines but
nothing that would fix the
underlying medical
problems.
"It opened the door to talk
about how all of those things
might prolong her life, and
gave us the opportunity to


CHOICES
Continued from Page Al

The Alzheimer's Associa-
tion encourages people to
manage their body weight
and consume more antioxi-
dant-rich foods such as
dark-skinned fruits and veg-
etables and some nuts such
as almonds, walnuts and
pecans.
Exercise, both physical
and mental, is also vital for
maintaining strong brain ac-
tivity. Fisher said 25 percent
of the blood in people's bod-
ies goes to the brain, which
feeds oxygen and nutrients
to encourage brain cell re-
juvenation and helps brain
function.
According to the
Alzheimer's Foundation of
America, physical exercise
lessens the chance of car-
diovascular complications,
which could cause
Alzheimer's and other
dementias.
Research shows mental
exercises that stimulate the


discuss what quality of life
was important to her so she
could make health care de-
cisions about what she
wanted and share them with
her family," Black said.
She died Aug. 11, and her
family knew she gave them
the biggest gift possible by
making those wishes known.
Her husband and children
didn't have to deal with the
guilt so many families face
when the conversation has
never taken place.
In cases involving
Alzheimer's disease, Sue Pi-
atek, social work supervisor
with HPH, said the best sce-
nario would be to have
everything in place already
"Ideally, it should be done
before a person receives a
diagnosis," she said.


But if plans haven't been
made, Piatek said it is cru-
cial for the patient and their
loved ones to examine and
update any financial and
health care arrangements
as soon as possible while a
person still has the legal ca-
pacity to execute them.
Jerry Fisher, a program
specialist with the
Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter,
said the best idea is to have
an attorney determine
whether the individual is
still legally competent.
To aid in the process, var-
ious documents are avail-
able to guarantee late-stage
or end-of-life health care
and financial wishes are
carried out.
Advanced directives for


READING LIST
* Find a list of suggested books for caregivers of
Alzheimer's and dementia patients with this story on-
line at www.chronicleonline.com.


brain helps preserve its
vigor and strengthen the
connections, such as the
neurons and synapses, and
cells.
Fisher said people should
challenge themselves and
stay curious. Reading books,
working on crossword and
jigsaw puzzles and playing
games are just some of the
ways people can exercise
their mind.
Lastly, Fisher said, people
should stay social. Even
when a person is diagnosed
with Alzheimer's, he said
the patient sometimes feels
the need to pull away from
public activities and end so-
cial interaction with friends
and family
However, the Alzheimer's
Association states one study
showed leisure activities,
which combined physical,
mental and social activity,


are the most likely to pre-
vent dementia.
In the study of 800 men


health care are typically
documents such as a living
will, which describes a per-
son's wishes for end-of-life
care; a durable power of at-
torney for health care,
which appoints a health
care surrogate; and a Do Not
Resuscitate (DNR) order,
which tells health care pro-
fessionals not to perform
cardiopulmonary resuscita-
tion (CPR) if a person stops
breathing or heart stops.
For financial and estate
management, legal docu-
ments include a will, which
specifies how a person's as-
sets and estate will be dis-
tributed after death; a
durable power of attorney
for finances, which appoints
someone else to make fi-
nancial decisions; and a liv-

and women age 75 and
older, those who were more
physically active, more
mentally active or more so-
cially engaged had a lower
risk for developing demen-
tia, and those who com-
bined these activities did
even better.
For information about the


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 A7
ing trust, which provides in-
structions about a person's
estate and appoints a
trustee.
While people can com-
plete certain documents
without an attorney, Piatek
said getting advice and
using services from an elder
law attorney could be useful.
In addition, Black said, it
is important if a person lives
in another state to know
what laws apply in that state.
For more information
about planning ahead and
needed documents, call
Project GRACE toll-free at
877-994-7223 or visit
www.projectgrace.org/.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.

latest discoveries in
Alzheimer's prevention and
research, visit www.alz.org/
research/science/alzheimers
_prevention_andrisk.asp.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


e Welcome


You To


'alue


ental


Care


Dentists Dr. Michael Welch, DMD; Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD; Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD and associates offer high quality dentistry in a friendly
atmosphere. From the moment you enter our office our caring staff welcomes you with a smile. Dr. Welch and associates take time in reviewing the
recommended treatment that is within your financial means and will answer any questions or concerns that you may have. Our friendly staff will
assure that your visit is as pleasant as possible. Dr. Welch and associates strive to provide quality dentistry at affordable prices. Our monthly
specials are geared to help people afford dental services, whether you have insurance or not.


Dentures
These days it is a bit overwhelming with all of the advertising for
dentures. What is the difference, basically the quality of the material used,
as well as the processing methods! We would like to share our experience
and background with our community. First of all, our technicians are
extremely experienced with over 90 years combined experience. We use
only high quality acrylic well known in the dental industry for many
years. All of our dentures are thermostatically cured for eight hours. We
offer three levels of dentures so everyone can afford to have new teeth.
* Our Economy denture consists of our stock teeth with lucitone 199 plain
pink acrylic with a smooth finish; this denture has a six month warranty.
* Our Midgrade denture consists of economy teeth, midgrade hygienic
acrylic and the finish is slightly characterized. This denture has a one year
warranty.
* Our Elite denture includes Bioform plastic teeth or portrait teeth, which
is a high grade tooth used by many of the well known doctors in our area.
The finish on the Elite denture is highly characterized and this denture
has a two year warranty.


We also can reline and repair your dentures the same day if you come
in early enough.

Crown And Bridge
Value Dental Care offers several types of crowns to suit your personal
needs. Our metal free Zirconia crowns are an especially popular choice
for a great cosmetic result; this is an all porcelain crown that looks very
natural with no worry of metal exposure. We offer several types of high
quality porcelain fused to metal crowns as well.


Our crown and bridge lab has over 30 years experience.


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD


Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


I ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICANMADE! We*do not shiptoChin


590 Cleaning Special 579
9 00 New Patients Only $ l 0
FREE Exam & E-Rays
w/Cleaning $
D0210 D0150 D1110
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with a
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/01/12 D27


Porcelain Dentures 65 FREE
Fused to starting at $ n 00
(For first one) 16IFREE
ny other offers. Expires 10/01/12 Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/01/12 If not chargeable by in
751 D5510 D5120 Not valid with any oth,


Second
Opinion
X-ray & Exam
(New Patients Only)
D0210 D0150
surance. Coupon required.
er offers. Expires 10/01/12


LOSE:30 Pounds
in 30 DAYS!* I
More Choices! More Freedom! Amazing Results!

Visit Our Convenient

NEW LOCATION!
/ in Beverly Hills
.Next to Beverly Hills Cleaners
Near intersection Hwy. 491 and 486 or call 352-237-8787
top with the fadiets, pills, strenuous exercise and other temporary solutions!
FOUR WEEK PROGRAMS

r or mediclly super;ised prgram-*


v, FREE CONSULTATION-
Call TODAY, start LOSING tonight!

0 BEVERLY HILLS
mEEABOLIC 352-237-8787
RESEARCH CENTER
IGlAH ,_ fi- ''LI o a OTHER CONVENIENT
emetabolic.com LOCATIONS IN OCALA&
THE VILLAGES


Homosassa 621-7700
rystalRiver 79so FREE INSPECTIONS
Inverness 860-1037oT
TERMITE SPECIALISTS INGED ANT WINGED TERMITE
SINCE 1967 \_^ t

(HOME SERVICES)
Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH
www.bushhomeservices.com .. si.i.


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.

Crystal River
352-794-6139


I


is


I


I We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. I


- - - - - - - -


P1
L B-121/LIPO Injection
and Prescription HCG
available!


I


. . . . . . .M E


6.00


** --^..^l **








NYPD: Empire State victims hit by police gunfire


Associated Press
NEW YORK All nine
people wounded during a
dramatic confrontation be-
tween police and a gunman
outside the Empire State
Building were struck by bul-
lets fired by the two officers,
police said Saturday, citing
ballistics evidence.
The veteran patrolmen
who opened fire on the suit-
wearing gunman, Jeffrey
Johnson, had only an instant
to react when he whirled
and pointed a .45-caliber
pistol as they approached
him from behind on a busy
sidewalk.
Officer Craig Matthews
shot seven times. Officer
Robert Sinishtaj fired nine
times, police said. Neither
had ever fired their
weapons before on a patrol.
The volley of gunfire
felled Johnson in just a few
seconds and left nine other
people bleeding on the
sidewalk.
In the initial chaos Friday,


it wasn't clear whether
Johnson or the officers were
responsible for the trail of
wounded, but based on bal-
listic and other evidence, "it
appears that all nine of the
victims were struck either
by fragments or by bullets
fired by police," Police
Commissioner Raymond
Kelly told reporters on Sat-
urday at a community event
in Harlem.
He reiterated that the of-
ficers appeared to have no
choice but to shoot Johnson,
whose body had 10 bullet
wounds in the chest, arms
and legs.
"I believe it was handled
well," Kelly said.
The officers confronted
Johnson as he walked, casu-
ally, down the street after
gunning down a former co-
worker on the sidewalk out-
side the office they once
shared. The shooting hap-
pened at 9 a.m., as the
neighborhood bustled with
people arriving for work.
The gunman and his vic-


tim, Steve Ercolino, had a
history of workplace squab-
bles before Johnson was
laid off from their company,
Hazan Import Corp., a year
ago. At one point, the two
men had grappled physi-
cally in an elevator.
John Koch, the property
manager at the office build-
ing where the men worked,
said security camera
footage showed the two
pushing and shoving. The
tussle ended when Ercolino,
a much larger man, pinned
Johnson against the wall of
the elevator by the throat,
Koch said. Ercolino let him
go after a few moments, and
the two men went their sep-
arate ways.
"They didn't like each
other," Koch said.
After shooting Ercolino,
Johnson, an eccentric T-
shirt designer and avid bird-
watcher who wore a suit
every day, even when photo-
graphing hawks in Central
Park, walked away as if
nothing had happened.


Associated Press
This photo posted to an Instagram account belonging to a person identified as mr mookie,
an eyewitness at the scene, shows shooting victim Robert Asika being tended to by pedes-
trians Friday outside the Empire State Building in New York.


NYC shootings strike a city that prizes tourism dollars, safety


Associated Press
NEW YORK New York
officials proudly tout the Big
Apple as the safest big city
in America. But blasts of
gunfire in front of crowds
near some of the city's best-
known destinations this
month painted a picture at
odds with its tame, tourist
friendly image.
Police confronted a knife-
wielding man in Times
Square and then shot him to
death a few blocks away
Aug. 11 as onlookers fol-
lowed along and snapped
photos.
And on Friday, a gunman
with a workplace grudge
shot a former co-worker
dead outside the Empire
State Building and then
was killed himself by police
in a burst of bullets that left
at least nine bystanders
wounded, some apparently
by police rounds.
"I thought it's impossible
for something like this to


happen here," Julien
Berthoud said after his par-
ents, visiting from Switzer-
land, ran from the gunshots
and then returned a few
minutes later to see victims
lying on the ground, some of
them bleeding, as onlookers
wept and frantically called
911.
The recent shootings
might not leave a lasting
mark on the public's view of
New York, which has seen
its appeal to tourists endure
terrorism.
Only one of the injured
bystanders was from out of
town. Still, Friday's violence
spurred officials to assure
visitors they were safe, even
as it spotlighted the difficult
task police face in con-
fronting threats at thronged
landmarks where some on-
lookers are more inclined to
record the danger than to
run from it.
Tourist Linda Signorini,
for one, isn't fazed. The cus-
tomer service worker from


Associated Press
Bystanders and a police officer stand on Fifth Avenue to view
the scene after a multiple shooting Friday outside the Empire
State Building in New York. Suspect Jeffrey Johnson killed a
former co-worker in cold blood and then himself was shot
dead by police.


Melbourne, Australia,
headed to the Empire State
Building on Friday evening
with her husband, Con, and
their 27-year-old daughter,
Erica.
They'd been startled by
the news of the shooting


that morning, but it didn't
change their outlook on
the city, Linda Signorini
said.
Noting the number of po-
lice officers they had seen
on the streets, "we felt
pretty safe," she said.


That's exactly the mes-
sage city officials have
strived to send for the past
two decades, making ag-
gressive efforts to combat
crime, to turn once-seedy
Times Square into a G-rated
entertainment district -
and to cast tourism as an
economic-development
priority.
More than 50 million visi-
tors came to the city last
year, a record. Mayor
Michael Bloomberg's office
says tourism will contribute
$45 billion in direct spend-
ing to the city and add 30,000
new jobs to its workforce by
2015.
Asked what he would
say to tourists who might
be concerned about Fri-
day's shooting near the
iconic skyscraper, Police
Commissioner Raymond
Kelly reiterated that New
York is America's safest
big city.
The oft-invoked descrip-
tion is based on FBI crime


statistics for the nation's 25
most populous cities. The
data comprise a total of
seven major crimes, includ-
ing murder, rape and rob-
bery; New York has the
lowest rate per 100,000
residents.
"Over the last few
decades, the strides that the
city has made have been sig-
nificant in increasing its ap-
peal" to tourists, and the
recent shootings aren't
likely to change that, said
Anna Maria Bounds, a
Queens College sociologist
who researches urban
tourism.
As for city residents, "in
general, New Yorkers are
resilient," said Dr. Charles
Marmar, the chairman of
NYU Langone Medical Cen-
ter's Psychiatry Depart-
ment, which conducts
research on post-traumatic
stress and dispatched clini-
cians to meet with people
wounded in Friday's
gunfire.


EXPANDING AGAIN!

As of August 13, 2012 Dr. Tawfik has officially acquired

the practice of Dr. Geoffrey Roberts.

We value both you and your healthcare and look forward

to a long, healthy relationship with you. I


We are at the same location and have the same phone number.

Please contact us for your next appointment.

756 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 1

352-795-5544

Dr. Eihab r
Tawfik
& wife
Zoila Cruz




i* .



I 1 .


'S


4i~







1~


Dr. Tawfik and his staff would also like to


Congratulate Dr. Roberts


on his retirement

and thank him for his service and

dedication to the citizens of Citrus County!


A8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Neil Armstrong dies at 82


Former NASA astronaut was

first man to walk on the moon


Associated Press
CINCINNATI Neil
Armstrong was a soft-
spoken engineer who be-
came a global hero when as
a steely-nerved pilot he
made "one giant leap for
mankind" with a small step
onto the moon. The modest
man, who had people on
Earth entranced and awed
from almost a quarter-
million miles away, but
credited others for the feat,
died Saturday He was 82.
Armstrong died following
complications resulting
from cardiovascular proce-
dures, his family said in a
statement. It didn't say
where he died; he had lived
in suburban Cincinnati.
Armstrong commanded
the Apollo 11 spacecraft that
landed on the moon July 20,
1969, capping the most dar-
ing of the 20th century's sci-
entific expeditions. His first
words after becoming the
first person to set foot on the
surface are etched in history
books and the memories of
those who heard them in a
live broadcast.
"That's one small step for
man, one giant leap for
mankind," Armstrong said.
(Armstrong insisted later
he had said "a" before man,
but said he too couldn't hear
it in the version that went to
the world.)
In those first few mo-
ments on the moon, during
the climax of a heated space
race with the then-Soviet
Union, Armstrong stopped
in what he called "a tender
moment" and left a patch to
commemorate NASA astro-
nauts and Soviet cosmo-
nauts who had died in
action.
"It was special and mem-
orable, but it was only in-
stantaneous because there
was work to do," Armstrong
told an Australian television


interviewer this year.
Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin spent nearly three
hours walking on the lunar
surface, collecting samples,
conducting experiments
and taking photographs.
"The sights were simply
magnificent, beyond any vi-
sual experience that I had
ever been exposed to," Arm-
strong once said.
The moonwalk marked
America's victory in the
Cold War space race that
began Oct. 4, 1957, with the
launch of the Soviet Union's
Sputnik 1, a 184-pound
satellite that sent shock
waves around the world.
Although he had been a
Navy fighter pilot, a test
pilot for NASAs forerunner
and an astronaut, Arm-
strong never allowed him-
self to be caught up in the
celebrity and glamour of the
space program.
"I am, and ever will be, a
white socks, pocket protec-
tor, nerdy engineer," he said
in February 2000 in one of
his rare public appear-
ances. "And I take a sub-
stantial amount of pride in
the accomplishments of my
profession."
A man who kept away
from cameras, Armstrong
went public in 2010 with his
concerns about President
Barack Obama's space pol-
icy that shifted attention
away from a return to the
moon and emphasized pri-
vate companies developing
spaceships. He testified be-
fore Congress and in an
email to The Associated
Press, Armstrong said he
had "substantial reserva-
tions," and along with more
than two dozen Apollo-era
veterans, he signed a letter
calling the plan a "mis-
guided proposal that forces
NASA out of human space
operations for the foresee-
able future."


Associated Press/NASA
Apollo 11 astronauts Nell Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, the first men to land on the moon, plant the U.S.
flag July 20, 1969, on the lunar surface. Armstrong's family reported he died Saturday at age 82.
Neil Armstrong is shown July 20, 1969.


ates are subJec to avallabIlty To understand how funds are
insumdd and guaranteed, depositors are info ed coverage mlts on all accounts
fferedMITED OFFER APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED
LIMITED OFFER APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


Month Smiles


Six Month Smiles is an alternative to comprehensive orthodontic treatment. The goal is to


Complimentary
hand treatment
with your teeth
cleaning!


straighten your teeth in about six months using tooth colored braces.
This process is completely safe and does not harm your teeth. It is
also known as short term orthodontics. Six Month Smiles is quicker
and less expensive than traditional orthodontics. As an added
bonus to you, we will also make you bleaching trays for free! This
way you will have straight and white teeth in as little as six months.


Read what our
clients have to say:
Pleasant, caring & understanding staff,
Dr. Ledger is a great guy and
understanding. I hate to go
to the dentist but you all made it
bearable for me. Thanks.
I am a very nervous patient.
Dr. Ledger and his staff made me feel
so relaxed and thank you so much
for the great care. I actually
look forward to my next visit.
This was actually a pleasant trip to the
dentist. Very friendly and helpful staff.
I will be back!
We are very pleased with your office.
Very professional, friendly atmosphere.
We have referred several family and
friends to you already. Thank you.
Love my hygienist and Dr. Ledger.
Would and will recommend to friends.
No pressure, common sense
explanations with you
making the final choice.


"r, BEFORE AFTER

YOU CAN WIN A NEW SMILE!

COMING SOON OUR SIX MONTH SMILES CONTEST.
Look For Updates On Last Year's Winner: Chase Owens.


jeremy A. Ledger
D.M.D., P.A.
Se Habla Espahol
License #DN 17606


FREE SECOND OPINION

Ledger Dentistry

LedgerDentistry.com


3640 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa

(352) 628-3443


Six


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


III. police chief: Teen


knew captor socially


Associated Press
WASHINGTON PARK, Ill.
-A teenager held captive in
a house for more than three
years before escaping with a
relative's help initially went
there voluntarily but wasn't
allowed to leave when she
wanted to go home, an Illi-
nois police chief said Friday
Washington Park Police
Chief David Clark said the
19-year-old St. Louis woman
bolted from the home Mon-
day and told investigators
her time in captivity in-
cluded almost daily beat-
ings and sexual assaults.
One of those attacks re-
sulted in a now-2-year-old
boy rescued when a police
SWAT team raided the
home Thursday and ar-
rested a 25-year-old man
and his mother, Clark said.
The police chief said the
three-day lag between the
teen's report and the raid on
the home was largely spent
trying to substantiate her
story. Clark also said inves-
tigators were working a sep-
arate sexual-assault case
and lacked the manpower to
go any faster.
No charges have been
filed in the case. State law
gave prosecutors until about
5 p.m. Saturday 48 hours
after the arrests to either
charge the suspects or re-
lease them.
Clark wouldn't publicly
identify the suspect, his
mother or the teenager,
citing the ongoing
investigation.
He said investigators
planned to have the child's
DNA tested to determine
whether the man is his
father.
St Clair County State's At-
torney Brendan Kelly, the
county's top prosecutor, told
The Associated Press on
Friday conditions in the
home were "definitely
deplorable."
Initial evidence suggests
"some of the details are con-
sistent with what the young


Associated Press
A man passes by a Washington Park, III., home Friday where
a 19-year-old St. Louis woman claims she was held captive
for more than three years before managing to escape
Monday, Aug. 20, and notify police. Authorities who raided
the southwestern Illinois house Thursday arrested a 25-year-
old man and his mother while retrieving a 2-year-old boy the
teenager said was the result of nearly daily sexual attacks
she endured at the home.


lady is saying, and I think
there's something to it." he
said. "We're still trying to fig-
ure out what the heck is
going on."
Clark said the teenager
met the man socially
"through someone else
when they were partying,
and a relationship built,"
eventually leading to her
visit at his home about the
time she was reported
missing.
"When she (soon) decided
to go back to her parents, he
wouldn't allow it," Clark
said.
He said the man's mother
helped detain the young
woman and helped falsify
medical records when she
bore her son in the first year
of her captivity The teen told
investigators the man and
his mother coerced her into
using a false name when giv-
ing birth to conceal she was
under-aged, Clark said.
The young woman has told
police she repeatedly tried
to escape the house, which is
on Washington Park's busiest
street and next door to a con-
venience store, just a half-
mile from a freeway. But her
captor chased her down
each time and forced her
back to the home at gun-
point, Clark said.


Washington Park is a vil-
lage of 4,200 people tucked
on the edge of East St Louis
in one of Illinois' poorest re-
gions. Known for its strip
clubs and poverty, the com-
munity has grappled for
years with corruption and vi-
olent crime punctuated by
the 2010 shooting death of
the village's mayor, John
Thornton.
The village twice has filed
for bankruptcy since 2004,
the last time in 2009.
Neighbors told The Asso-
ciated Press they had little
reason to suspect anything
amiss at the one-story bun-
galow on a parcel cluttered
with trash, including a stack
of six mildewing mattresses
on a concrete slab sur-
rounded by tall weeds. A
child's car seat, baby stroller
and car tires were nearby
A neighbor, Lakeitha
Smith, opened her front
door a crack and told the AP
during the few times she saw
the young woman outside,
the teenager didn't appear
bruised or traumatized.
Smith said the man would
step away from the home at
times with the toddler, who
"looked like a healthy baby,"
and often came to Smith's
house, where he played with
her 3-year-old son.


Woman gives birth to her grandson


Associated Press
MADAWSKA, Maine A 49-year-old
Maine woman has given birth to her
grandson after her daughter was pre-
cluded from becoming pregnant because
of a heart condition.
The Portland Press Herald reported
Linda Sirois of Madawska gave birth to 7-
pound, 14-ounce Madden Hebert on Aug.
13 for her daughter, Angel. Twenty-five-
year-old Angel Hebert said her baby is
"eating like a champ and he doesn't fuss
too much."
Sirois said she's offered for years to be-
come a gestational surrogate for Angel if a
doctor said she shouldn't become preg-
nant. Hebert, of Presque Isle, said she and


her husband, Brian Hebert, got that word
last summer
Sirois has four children, including
twins, and her youngest kids are in col-
lege. She said she thinks the pregnancy
with Madden might have been her easiest.

CLICK & SAVE
Check out local deals offered at
www.chron icleonline.com.
Each deal will be available for purchase
online for 48 hours, but a minimum
number of customers must participate
in order for the deal to be available.
A new Click & Save deal will be offered
every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.


Be included in this year's



Women in Business
Featuring The 10 Most Admired Women

Reserve your space today, call your
advertising representative.

IM ~563-5592


isi


Whiplash injuries can sometimes go unnoticed for days
following an accident. The pain and damage to your
body may not start for weeks or months after an
accident injury.

Early detection and starting chiropractic
treatment immediately is very important and can
make all the difference in the quality of your life.

Stop the pain... call us today!


Dr. Anthony B. Oliverio
Chiropractic Physician


Dr. Sean A. Barber
Chiropractic Physician


Dr. Anthony Oliverio and
the Neck and Back Care Center staff
would like to welcome Dr. Sean Barber.

You are welcome to come in and meet
Dr. Barber at our Crystal River office!


CareCredit 1. 2
VJSASI^E.


Neck & Back Care Center

Short Term Care for Your Neck and Back Pain
New Family's Welcome!
Call today for your appointment!


563-5055

Office Hours
Mon -Wed -Fri 9am-6pm
Tues 2pmr- 6pm
Thurs 9am-12pm

912 Highway 44, in Crystal River
www.yourinjurydoc.com


Most Insurance accepted Auto Insurance
Medicare and Medicaid Workman's Comp


m


A10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


NATION


L^a^k-ns Weome!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III, right, and Apple's iPhone
4S are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea.
After a year of litigation, a jury decided Friday that Samsung
ripped off the innovative technology used by Apple to create its
revolutionary iPhone and iPad. An appeal is expected.


Apple's victory may


mean fewer options


Samsung vows

to fight back
Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Calif. -Apple
Inc.'s $1 billion legal victory
could mean fewer smart-
phone options for con-
sumers to choose from,
analysts said.
A federal jury's verdict
Friday that Samsung Elec-
tronic Co. stole Apple's tech-
nology to make and market
smartphones using Google's
Android software sends a
warning to other companies
manufacturing similar de-
vices, the biggest market-
place threat to Apple.
"Some of these device
makers might end up say-
ing, 'We love Android, but
we really don't want to fight
with Apple anymore,'"' said
Christopher Marlett, CEO of
MDB Capital Group, an in-
vestment bank specializing
in intellectual property. "I
think it may ultimately
come down to Google having
to indemnify these guys, if it
wants them to continue
using Android."
That's if the verdict
stands. Samsung, the Seoul-
based global leader among


smartphone makers, vowed
to fight. Its lawyers told the
judge it intended to ask her
to toss out the verdict.
"This decision should not
be allowed to stand because
it would discourage innova-
tion and limit the rights of
consumers to make choices
for themselves," Samsung
lead lawyer John Quinn said.
He argued the judge or an
appeals court should over-
turn the verdict.
Apple lawyers plan to for-
mally demand Samsung pull
its most popular cellphones
and computer tablets from
the U.S. market. They also
can ask the judge to triple
the damages from $1.05 bil-
lion to $3 billion.
U.S. District Judge Lucy
Koh will decide the issues,
along with Samsung's de-
mand she overturn the jury's
verdict, in several weeks.
Quinn said Samsung would
appeal if the judge refuses to
toss out the decision.
Apple Inc. filed its patent
infringement lawsuit in
April 2011 and engaged the
country's highest-paid
patent lawyers to demand
$2.5 billion from its top
smartphone competitor.
Samsung Electronics Co.
fired back with its own law-
suit seeking $399 million.


Smart meters start debate


Texans fight against

utility upgrade

Associated Press
DALLAS Thelma Taormina
keeps a pistol at her Houston-area
home to protect against intruders.
But one of the last times she used it,
she said, was to run off a persistent
utility company worker who was try-
ing to replace her old electricity
meter with a new digital unit.
"This is Texas." she declared at a
recent public hearing on the new me-
ters. "We have rights to choose what
appliances we want in our home."
A nationwide effort to upgrade local
power systems with modern equip-
ment has run into growing resistance
in Texas, where suspicion of govern-
ment and fear of electronic snooping
have made a humble household de-
vice the center of a politically charged
showdown over personal liberty.
Some angry residents are building
steel cages around their electric me-
ters, threatening installers who show
up with new ones and brandishing
Texas flags at boisterous hearings
about the utility conversion.
"It's Gestapo. You can't do this,"
said Shar Wall of Houston, who at-
tended the Public Utility Commission
meeting wearing a large red "Texas
Conservative" pin. "I'm a redneck


Texas girl and I won't put up with it."
Utilities began replacing old-style
electricity meters across the country
about seven years ago as part of an ef-
fort to better manage demand on an
increasingly strained power grid.
New "smart meters" transmit and re-
ceive data remotely as electricity is
used. Utility officials say they can use
the real-time information to help pre-
vent grid overloads during extreme
temperatures. The devices would also
promote conservation, such as cycling
air conditioners on and off during
peak demand periods.
In 2009, President Barack Obama
devoted $3.5 billion in federal stimu-
lus funds to help utility companies
make the upgrade.
The conversion has triggered op-


NO
TRESPASSING
NO
SMART METE


Thelma
Taormina
fought back
to keep her
old electric
meter at her
home in
Houston.
Associated Press


position in a number of states. Some
residents have questioned the health
impact of the radio waves the de-
vices emit or the possibility hackers
could get confidential data from the
transmissions.
Officials have downplayed the haz-
ards, but several states, including Cal-
ifornia, Vermont, Maine and Nevada,
have allowed residents to opt out of
the new system. In most cases, resi-
dents would have to pay extra to have
a utility employee come to their
house to read their old meter.
Texas utilities have installed nearly
6 million smart meters, or 87 percent
of their goal, since the state passed au-
thorizing legislation in 2005. But as the
project moves toward completion by
2016, the opposition is getting louder.


Diamond Ridge Health and Rehabilitation Center
cordially invites you to our


Nhh IFn ,--dZ-
2730 W. Marc Knighton Ct, B0kicl
S Lecanto, FL 34461 .
352-746-9500 "
W. N-l IBryCan igh way


S"""""--

Of STH
I ST
INNt


Extreme Testing For Rugged Reliability. Special Financing For An Easygoing Price.

0% APR FOR 36 MONTHS!*

with equal monthly payments

Getting consistent year-round home comfort you can count on doesn't happen
by accident. Trane systems endure rigorous testing to ensure reliability and long
: lasting performance for you and your family. Combine that with 0% APR
Financing with equal payments for 36 months* on qualifying purchases from
,1., .: ,., August 15 through October 31, 2012, and owning the best heating and cooling
-' ,-..;'. .' system you'll ever need is an offer that's too good to let pass. Steady.
*'"' ,il '.' ; Dependable. Durable. It's hard to stop a Trane isn't just a tagline. It's a proven
reality.

Or ... Choose 5.9% APR Financing or up to a $1,250 Instant Rebate.*
Include Trane's innovative ComfortLinkTM II control with your system purchase
and you'll also receive a complimentary subscription to NexiaTM Home
Intelligence web-based remote home automation service.
SEnergy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage.
Trane's XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options
.r. available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-that's
the Trane difference.

CALL NOW FOR 36 MONTHS 0% APR FINANCING ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY TRANE SYSTEMS!*


352-746-0098


H.E. Smith Co. Inc

1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461
www.trane.com
RA0035171 ER0005952


TRAWE'

It's Hard7b StopA'lTane:
IT'S HARD TO STOP A TRANE. REALLY HARD.


See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers OR instant rebate from $100 up to $1,250 valid on qualifying systems only. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void
where prohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special terms APR will continue to apply until all
qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: Monthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in
full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with the market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/10/2012. If you are charged interest in any billing
cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash
advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly payment if shown based on $xx purchase.


ECOMFOp-r
_Cj
S Sj
opr
PECIAALIsr


I


NATION


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crying 'foul' over ballpark proposals


Almost every day you see a news
story about a guy who painted a
marriage proposal on a billboard
next to a busy highway, or proposed to his
girlfriend on the Diamond Vi-
sion at a packed ballgame. It
happens so often a love-struck
man really has to do something
unusual now to make the
evening news paint his pro-
posal on the side of a cow, carve
his message of never-ending
love in the middle of a cornfield,
or declare his love for his
brother's bride-to-be at the re- J
hearsal dinner.
But here's the question: Do MUL
any of these people stay mar-
ried? Has anyone looked into whether
these marriages work out?
I cringe every time one of these propos-
als pops up on a ballpark video screen, be-
cause I wonder what the guy is thinking.
It's a good bet his girlfriend is not going to
humiliate herself on camera by saying
"no" in front of a big crowd, and he knows
it. He is not asking her to say "yes"; he is
asking a crowd of complete strangers to
say "yes" for her. Can you imagine the boo-
ing if she said "no"? Proposing in public
doesn't say "I love you" as much as it says,
"I'm a manipulative creep who will be-
come your stalker if you don't marry me."
Asking a father's permission for his
daughter's hand in marriage has unfortu-
nately fallen out of favor. Now the suitor
asks a stadium full of people for permis-
sion. Who would know more about mar-
riage than 20,000 people, many of whom
have painted their beer bellies with the
team's colors? Certainly not the bride's
parents or her pastor. What do those old
fuddies know?
Are ballparks, stadiums and cornfields
considered romantic now? "Gee, honey,
those $7 hot dogs really bring out the color
of your eyes. Your hair matches the color
of the gum I'm kneeling on, and your face
is brighter than the advertising on the out-
field fence. Now that the 'kissing camera'
is on us, it's like we're starring in our own
reality show. Who needs to work? We'll be-


II


come reality celebrities, and they make
tons of money Will you marry me?"
Then again, the guy may get what he de-
serves, a bride who says, "I will, if you
promise not to get upset when I
get, like, a gazillion Facebook
'likes' from everyone seeing me
on TV and you get only a few.
That's the way it is, so don't get
jealous. Of course, if I get a few
Proposals, I might have to take
I a look at them and see if any
are better than yours. Now that
we're celebrities, no one ex-
M pects us to stay married very
long, so we'll have to sign a
-LEN prenup to split the money from
all the endorsement deals we'll
get. If that's all OK with you, I will."
Readers of history know marrying for
love is a new idea in world history In
many countries India and China, for ex-
ample arranged marriages and dowries
are still common. Parents decide who will
marry whom. Sounds pretty horrid and
old-fashioned, doesn't it? The odd thing is,
the divorce rate is much lower in coun-
tries with arranged marriage than it is in
ours. How is that possible?
Well, sure, getting divorced is harder in
those countries, but why does it work at
all? Is it because they expect different
things from a marriage than we do? What
do a couple of teenage lovebirds know
about building a home, making a partner-
ship work and dealing with needy chil-
dren? How has deciding whom to marry
based on "he's cute" and "she's hot"
worked out?
How many times a day do you need to
hear the words "struggling single parent"
in news stories to figure out our system of
romantic love is not working any better for
most people and their emotionally bat-
tered children than the one it replaced?
But here's the most important thing. I
didn't come to the ballgame to watch you
propose or kiss. Stop it!

Follow Jim Mullen on Pinterest at
interest. com/jimmullen.


Enrollment open at Academy of Arts


Special to the Chronicle

The Academy of Arts at
the Art Center of Citrus
County has open enroll-
ment for classes in drama,
visual arts and dance.
Each class registration is
$35, and registration allows
participants to be placed
on a "space-available wait-


ing list" to take additional
classes for that single fee.
Call 352-746-7606 or stop
by the Art Center Box Office
from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday to register.
Most classes start the week
of Sept. 10 and conclude the
week of Dec. 16.
Starting the week of Sept.
10 are:


Monday, Youth Art
(limit 12 persons), 4 to 5:30
p.m.; Dance Movement, 5 to
6p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday,
Youth Drama (limit 40 per-
sons), 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Youth Mu-
sical Chorus, 6 to 7 p.m.
Acting for Adults (limit
12 persons), 6 to 7:30 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, sweet peas, chilled
pears, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with
ripstick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, baked beans, chilled mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni and
cheese, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
chilled peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, turkey wrap, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, dried fruit mix, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.


Aug. 27 to 31 MENUS


Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, cheesy
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, macaroni and cheese,
ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
pears, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Barbecued
chicken sandwich, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
dried fruit mix, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, sausage pizza, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, chilled peaches, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato roasters, broc-
coli, dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken,


maxstix, turkey with gravy over
noodles and ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas,
celery, peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cheesy
chicken and rice burrito,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
chilled baked beans, potato tri-
angles, mixed fruit, baked
beans, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
ham salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, potato tri-
angles, applesauce, cucum-
bers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, spaghetti with rip-
stick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, potato triangles,
corn, peaches, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Macaroni and
cheese, green peas, parslied
carrots, pears, white bread,
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sloppy Joe on
seeded hamburger bun, mixed
vegetables, potatoes O'Brien,
peaches, margarine, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Blended juice,
chicken thigh, tomato pepper
sauce, hot German potato
salad, Tuscan vegetables,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with
sweet and sour sauce, coconut
rice, green beans, fruit salad,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad,
pea/cheese salad, marinated
broccoli salad, graham crackers,
two slices whole-grain bread
with mayonnaise, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


-- FALL 2012 SCHEDULE -

MONDAY 12:30pm LIVELY BUNCH Meets Tues. 914 Starts Mon. 9110 THURSDAY 10:00am POWDER PUFFS Meets Thurs. 8130 Starts Thurs. 916
Mixed Senior Handicap Teams of 4* $11.00 Per Week Ladies Handicap Teams of 4 $11.00 Per Week


MONDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL
Money Shots


/Prizes


Drop In Fun for Everyone Continuous THURSDAY 12:30pm SR. MEN'S HDCP Continuous
s $8.25 Week Sanctioned Drop-In Weekly Payouts $12.00 Per Week Only Pay Weeks You Bowl


MONDAY 6:30pm TURNOVERS Meets Mon. 8113 Starts Mon. 8120 THURSDAY 3:00pm MEADOWCREST Meets Thurs. 1014 Starts Thurs. 10/11
Mixed Handicap Teams of 5 15.00 Per Week Mixed Handicap Residents of Meadowcrest Teams of 4 $7.75 Per Week

MONDAY 7:00pm PBA EXPERIENCE Meet & Bowl Starts Mon. 9110 THURSDAY 7:00pm MANATEE MATCH-PLAY Meets Thurs. 8116 Starts Thurs. 8124
A Weekly Pay-Out Shot Changes Every 3 Weeks Mixed Handicap Match-Play Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week


TUESDAY 9:15am MORNING BIRDS Meets Tues. 8114 Starts Tues. 8121 THURSDAY 7:15pm
Ladies Handicap Teams of 4* $11.00 Per Week


FLORIDA POWER Meet & Bowl Starts Thurs. 916
Mixed Teams of 5* $13.00 Per Week


TUESDAY 12:30pm SR. NO TAP Meets Tues. 9118 Starts Tues. 9125 THURSDAY 9:30pm.CL DOLLAR NIGHT continuous
SMixed Handicap* 8 & 9 Pins= Strike $12.00 Per Week $1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling. $1 Shoe Rental $1 Hot Dogs $1 Draft* $1 Small Soda

TUESDAY 1:00pm SUGAR BABES Meets Tues. 9111 Starts Tues. 9118 FRIDAY 9:30am-Noon DOLLAR DAY continuous
Ladies Handicap From Sugarmill Woods $11.00 Per Week $1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling- $1 Shoe Rental $1 Hot Dogs. $1 Draft* $1 Small Soda

TUESDAY 4:30pm YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Tues. 8114 Starts Tues. 8121 FRIDAY 12:30pm MANATEE MIXERS Meets Fri. 8117 Starts Fri. 8124
Teams of 3 $17.00 Sanction Fee Includes Team Shirt* Bantams $6 Per Week* Prep/Junior $7 Per Week Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $12.00 Per Week


TUESDAY 7:00pm TUES. MEN'S HDCP Meets Tues.8121 Starts Tues. 8128 FRIDAY 2:00pm
Handicap Teams of 5* $16.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Budget Truck Rental


CITRUS HILLS Meets Fri. 9121 Starts Fri. 9128
Mixed Handicap Residents of Citrus Hills


TUESDAY 6:30pm TUES. GALS Meets Tues. 8121
Handicap Teams of 5* $15.00 Per Week


Starts Tues. 8128 FRIDAY


6:30pm FUN BUNCH Meets Fri. 8124 Starts Fri. 8131
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week


WEDNESDAY 12:30pm SR. STARS Meets Wed. 8122 Starts Wed. 8129 FRIDAY 6pm-9pm RENT-A-LANE continuous Starts Fri. 8124
Mixed Pins OverAverage Teams of 3* $11.00 Per Week* $500 Added Prize Money by Pepsi Any Two Hours in this Period $35/Lane With FREE Shoe Rentals


WEDNESDAY 12:30pm EL DORADO Continuous
Mixed Teams of 4 from El Dorado Subdivision


FRIDAY 9:30pm-12:30pm VERTIGLOW Continuous
Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music $35 Per Lane with FREE Shoe Rentals


WEDNESDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL Drop In Fun for Everyone continuous SATURDAY 9:30am YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Sat. 8118 Starts Sat. 8125
Money Shots/Prizes $8.25 Week Youth League Teams of 4, Pee-Wee (5 & Under) $4, Bantam (8 & Under) $6 Prep/Junior (9 & Older) $7


WEDNESDAY 7:00pm CCML MENS Meets Wed. 8115 Starts Wed. 8122 SATURDAY 3-5:30pm KIDS KAMP continuous
Mens Teams of 4* $15.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Manatee Lanes Family Bowling with Vertiglow Bowling- Music, Prizes, FREE Shoe Rentals, Sm. Soda, $8.50 Per Person

WEDNESDAY 7:00pm WEDNESDAY MIXERS Meets Wed. 8115 Starts Wed. 8122 SATURDAY 7:30pm.10pm & 10:30pm.lam VERTIGLOW BOWLING continuous
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4, $15.00 Per Week Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music $35 Per Lane with FREE Rental Shoes* Call for Reserations No Deposit Required!


l1


mas n aliaiam I m niaM -.co lmM


A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fatal refinery blast


Associated Press
Fire rises over the Amuay oil refinery Saturday near Punto Fijo, Venezuela.
Firefighters and rescue teams work at the refinery after an explosion rocked
Venezuela's biggest oil refinery.


Explosion kills 26 and injures 80 in Venezuela


Associated Press

CARACAS, Venezuela -
A huge explosion rocked
Venezuela's biggest oil re-
finery and unleashed a fero-
cious fire Saturday, killing
at least 26 people and injur-
ing more than 80 others in
one of the deadliest disas-
ters in memory for the coun-
try's key oil industry
Balls of fire rose over the
Amuay refinery, one of the
largest in the world, in video
posted on the Internet by
people who were nearby at
the time. Government offi-
cials pledged to restart the
refinery within two days
and said the country has
plenty of fuel supplies on
hand to meet its domestic
needs as well as its export
commitments.
At least 86 people were
injured, nine of them seri-
ously, Health Minister Eu-
F; i7 "" ,.


genia Sader said at a hospi-
tal where the wounded
were taken. She said 77 peo-
ple suffered light injuries
and were released.
Officials said those killed
included a 10-year-old boy,
and 17 of the 26 victims
were National Guard troops
stationed at a post next to
the refinery
President Hugo Chavez
declared three days of
mourning in the country
"This affects all of us,"
Chavez said by phone on
state television. "It's very
sad, very painful."
Chavez said he ordered a
"deep investigation" to de-
termine what caused the
explosion.
Vice President Elias Jaua,
who traveled to the area in
western Venezuela, said the
authorities tried "to save the
greatest number of lives."
Officials said firefighters


had controlled the flames at
the refinery on the
Paraguana Peninsula,
where clouds of dark smoke
were still billowing in the
afternoon.
The blast occurred about
1:15 a.m. when a gas leak
created a cloud that ignited,
Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez
said. He said an adjacent
National Guard post was se-
verely damaged by the blast,
along with nearby homes.
"That gas generated a
cloud that later exploded and
has caused fires in at least
two tanks of the refinery and
surrounding areas," Ramirez
said. "The blast wave was of
a significant magnitude."
Images in the early hours
after the explosion showed
the flames casting an orange
glow against the night sky
One photograph showed an
injured man being wheeled
away on a stretcher.


Obama speaks on Romney's views


BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama said Mitt Romney has locked him-
self into "extreme positions" on economic
and social issues and would surely impose
them if elected, trying to discredit his Re-
publican rival at the biggest political mo-
ment of his life.
In an interview with The Associated
Press, Obama said Romney lacks serious
ideas, refuses to "own up" to the responsi-
bilities of what it takes to be president, and
deals in factually dishonest arguments
that could soon haunt him in face-to-face
debates.
Obama also offered a glimpse of how he
would govern in a second term of divided
government, insisting rosily the forces of
the election would help break Washing-
ton's stalemate. He said he would be will-
ing to make a range of compromises with
Republicans, confident some would rather
make deals than remain part of "one of the
least productive Congresses in American
history"
Mainly, Obama appeared intent on
countering Romney ahead of the conven-
tion. In doing so, the president depicted
his opponent as having accumulated ideas
far outside the mainstream with no room
to turn back.
"I can't speak to Governor Romney's mo-
tivations," Obama said. "What I can say is
that he has signed up for positions, ex-
treme positions, that are very consistent
with positions that a number of House Re-
publicans have taken. And whether he ac-
tually believes in those or not, I have no
doubt that he would carry forward some of
the things that he's talked about."
Obama spoke to the AP on Thursday be-


Associated Press
President Barak Obama talked about the pres-
idential race and Republican challenger Mitt
Romney in the exclusive AP interview, ahead
of the GOP convention opening Monday.

fore heading off to a long weekend with his
family at Camp David, the secluded presi-
dential retreat in the Maryland mountains.
The president was at ease but doggedly
on script, steering even personal-themed
questions about Romney and running mate
Paul Ryan into answers about starkly dif-
ferent visions for helping the middle class.
Romney, a successful former executive
of a private equity firm and one-time Mas-
sachusetts governor, will introduce him-
self to a TV audience of millions next
Thursday as he takes the convention stage
to accept his party's presidential nomina-
tion. He has offered himself as a business-
minded alternative to Obama and has
seized on voter concerns about joblessness


ICE chief of staff accused of
sexual misconduct
WASHINGTON -At least three employees at
Immigration and Customs Enforcement have al-
leged inappropriate sexual behavior by a senior
Obama administration appointee and longtime
aide to Homeland Security Janet Napolitano.
The complaints are part of a sexual discrimi-
nation and retaliation lawsuit filed in May by a
senior ICE agent. They accuse ICE chief of
staff Suzanne Barr of sexually inappropriate be-
havior toward employees.
Barr is accused of telling a male subordinate
he was "sexy" and asking a personal question
about his anatomy. She is also accused of offer-
ing to perform a sex act with a male subordinate
while on business travel in Bogota, Colombia.
Employee names were censored in affidavits
reviewed by The Associated Press.
Barr is on leave while the allegations are in-
vestigated and has no comment.


Grizzly bear kills hiker in
Denali National Park
ANCHORAGE, Alaska Officials said a
grizzly bear has killed a hiker at Denali National
Park the first fatal attack in the park's history.
Denali Park officials said the hiker was back-
packing alone along the Toklat River on Friday
afternoon when he was attacked. A wallet was
found near the site of the attack with probable
identification.
Next of kin have yet to be notified.
Officials said Friday afternoon three day hik-
ers stumble upon an abandoned backpack
along the river. They also saw torn clothing and
blood, and immediately alerted park staff.
Park rangers then located the site via a heli-
copter Friday night.
Park rangers are due back at the site Satur-
day to recover the remains and attempt to lo-
cate the predatory bear.
From wire reports


Extra fast. Extra easy. Extra great. -


Our emergency room is specifically designed to
get you the medical care you need and back in
action at racecar speed. ER Extra. Extra fast care
from a high-performance team.


ER EXTRA"


=SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


00-CAUP yscanR frrlLie 3 2.9 .13 r 0 3683


Nation BRIEFS


NATION/WORLD


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 A13











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Mexico investigates attack on US officials


Associated Press
A soldier stands guard over an armored U.S. Embassy
vehicle attacked by unknown assailants Friday on the
highway leading to the city of Cuernavaca, near Tres Marias,
Mexico. Two U.S. government employees were shot and
wounded in the attack, a law enforcement official said.


Associated Press
MEXICO CITY Mexi-
can authorities are trying to
sort out why a U.S. Embassy
vehicle was ambushed by
federal police on a rural
back road in mountains
south of the capital, leaving
two U.S. government work-
ers wounded.
Officials from both nations
said federal officers were
chasing criminals Friday
morning when a hail of bul-
lets was fired at the embassy
sport utility vehicle carrying


two employees and a Mexi-
can Navy captain.
Federal police earlier
said men in four vehicles
had fired at the embassy
SUV and a Mexican Attor-
ney General's Office
spokesman confirmed Sat-
urday all were federal po-
lice units. He could not be
named because he was not
authorized to speak on the
record.
The official said Mexico's
top police official, Public Se-
curity Secretary Genaro
Garcia Luna, went to the site


of the shooting, indicating
the sensitivity and tension
over a situation that in-
volved an attack not only on
U.S. officials, but on Mexi-
can Navy personnel as well.
The U.S. Embassy took
nearly 12 hours to issue a
statement Friday, but de-
scribed the incident as an
"ambush."
U.S. officials did not iden-
tify the wounded employees
or their assignments or
agencies, saying only they
were heading to a military
training base south of Mex-
ico City and traveling with a
Mexican naval captain, who
was not seriously injured.
The Mexican official said
12 police officers were still


being questioned Saturday,
though they had not been
charged.
The two American work-
ers were taken to a hospital
in the nearby resort city of
Cuernavaca. One had a gun-
shot wound in his leg and
the other was wounded in
the stomach and one hand,
said a Mexican government
official who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity. Hospital
officials in Cuernavaca said
the wounded were later
transferred to a Mexico City
hospital in stable condition.
Federal police said Fri-
day the officers were in the
area looking for criminals,
but it did not explain what
happened.


World BRIEFS

Reunited


REMEMBERING TROPICAL STORM IRENE


One


year


later


Associated Press
Hussein Ali Omar, 60, one
of 11 Lebanese Shiite
pilgrims who Syrian rebels
have been holding for three
months in Syria, hugs his
mother upon arrival at his
home in a southern suburb
of Beirut, Lebanon.
Syrian rebels
release a hostage
BEIRUT Turkey on Sat-
urday secured the release of
one of 11 Shiite Lebanese
hostages held for three
months by Syrian rebels, a
move that underlined
Ankara's growing influence in
the Arab world.
Hussein Ali Omar, 60,
crossed into Turkey after his
release and later arrived in
Beirut, the Lebanese capital,
aboard a private Turkish jet.
"Our treatment (by the Syr-
ian captors) was excellent
and the Lebanese (hostages)
are well," Omar said.
Key Pakistani
Taliban figure killed
KABUL, Afghanistan -A
NATO airstrike in eastern
Afghanistan killed a senior
commander of the Pakistani
Taliban who had close ties
with al-Qaida, dealing a blow
to the militants who operate
on both sides of the countries'
porous border.
Mullah Dadullah was killed
Friday in Afghanistan's east-
ern Kunar province, which
lies just across the border
from the Pakistani tribal area
of Bajur, the military alliance
said. He was the Pakistani
Taliban leader in Bajur, and
NATO said Saturday that
Dadullah also was responsi-
ble for the movement of fight-
ers and weapons across the
frontier as well as attacks
against Afghan and coalition
forces in Afghanistan.
Attacked


Associated Press
Siberian tiger "Altai"
escaped the enclosure
Saturday at Cologne Zoo in
western Germany and
killed a female keeper
before being shot dead by
the zoo's director, police
said. The tiger managed to
get from the enclosure to
an adjacent storage build-
ing, where it attacked the
43-year-old keeper, said
police spokesman Stefan
Kirchner. "It appears the
gate wasn't properly shut,"
Kirchner said.
-From wire reports


-5* -
-~ -
_____ --


Ei~ m

-- ____
Wi:--
F. ___-


Associated Press
Workers install a foundation at a house Thursday, Aug. 23, that was damaged after flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene last year in
Prattsville, N.Y. I A sign, seen Aug. 17, remembers Tropical storm Irene in East Granville, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated
by the storm. I Sandy Gaffney wipes away a tear in her new trailer home Aug. 14, in Berlin, Vt. Gaffney lost the first home she
owned when Tropical Storm Irene hit her mobile home park less than a year after she moved in.


After the rain:

Irene's lessons to

the East Coast
Associated Press
Antonia Schreiber is taking no
chances on the next big storm.
The remnants of Hurricane
Irene turned the 200-year-old
housed her
Catskill Moun-
tains spa bou-
tique into a
muddy mess a
year ago in Wind-
ham, N.Y She
managed to re-
Antonia open in the same
Schreiber town within
relocated her months but
spa to higher this time on
ground after higher ground.
Tropical Storm "If it happens
Irene turned
the boutique once, history has
into a muddy a tendency to re-
mess. peat itself, and I
hope it's a long,
long time from now," Schreiber
said, "but that's not a chance I
want to take again."
Lessons learned
Hard lessons have been learned
in the year since Irene sent sedans
bobbing down rivers, swept away
historic covered bridges, put mil-
lions in the dark and killed dozens
of people along the Eastern
Seaboard. Responses range from
personal gestures, such as buying
a home generator, to statewide
policy changes, like the tightening
of utility regulations.
Many of the reactions are based
on the belief that while Irene sur-
prised areas more used to bliz-
zards than tropical weather,
future storms are inevitable.


Vt. N.H.
S


Hurricane Irene: One year later


Mass. (1 Hurricane Irene left the eastern U.S. coast drenched from torential rainfall
(3 one year ago. Here are some highlights of her destructive path:


Conn. R.


Pa N.J.
0


s. c


STATE DEATHS COST DAMAGE DETAILS
1. South Carolina None $5 million+ Irene brushed the coast damaging trees,
caused flooding and beach erosion
2. North Carolina 7 1.2 billion Made first landfall as a category 1
hurricane near Cape Lookout
3. Virginia 5 182 million Flooding and wind damage caused the
state's second-largest power outage
4. Maryland 3 33.2 million Caused evacuation of Ocean City.
Nuclear reactor knocked offline
5. Washington D.C. None Minimal Tree damage, flooding in capital
6. New Jersey 11 1 billion+ Made second landfall near Atlantic City.
Record flooding with 10 inches of rain
7. Pennsylvania 6 58 million Flooding and 1.3 million power outages
8. New York 10 1.3 billion Third landfall hit Brooklyn, coastal
evacuations,1.1 million power outages
9. Connecticut 2 235 million Final landfall, flooding and power outages
10. Massachusetts 1 63.2 million Power lines and trees down, flooding


11. Vermont


"Our question for Vermont is:
What did we learn from Irene
that we would do again and would
put us in a better position with fu-
ture storms in a climate-change
future?" said Gov Peter Shumlin,
who scrambled after the storm hit
his state Aug. 28 to help hill towns
cut off from the world.
Irene hits cities
As Irene made landfall in
North Carolina and roared up
the East Coast, a densely popu-
lated corridor loaded with high-
rises, suburban sprawl and
pricey beach homes, officials in
New York City and Long Island
braced for storm surges and
heavy winds by evacuating low-
lying coastal areas and shutting


Worst disaster since 1927 flood. Towns
6 733 million cut off for days after extreme flooding,
raging rivers toreout roads and bridges


down one of the world's largest
subway systems.
The storm made a direct hit on
New York City as a tropical
storm, but damage there and in
other big cities such as Philadel-
phia and Boston was minimal.
That gave many Easterners the
impression the much-feared
storm was a dud.
But in the days to follow, it be-
came clear the lashing rains had
saved their most dramatic dam-
age for 100 miles or more inland.
Damage to suburbs
Tree-lined suburban neighbor-
hoods in Connecticut lost power
for days as branches crashed
down. Surging streams in Ver-
mont and in New York's Adiron-


dack and Catskill mountains
ripped up roads, bridges and
homes. New York utilities re-
placed more than 300 miles of
wire after the double whammy of
Irene and, shortly afterward, the
remnants of Tropical Storm Lee.
In some cases, utility crews could
not restore power for a week or
more because the roads were
gone.
Irene became the costliest Cat-
egory 1 U.S. hurricane on record
since at least 1980, with esti-
mated total damage of $15.8 bil-
lion. The storm resulted in $4.3
billion in personal, commercial
and auto insurance claims, ac-
cording to Verisk Analytics, a
publicly traded company that as-
sesses risk.


Mexican police ambushed

American embassy vehicle


N-.







* /


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






Historic hotels

Representatives report pleasing uptick in business


Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A17 of
today's Chronicle.


tGET THIS /


BRUCE SMITH
Associated Press
CHARLESTON, S.C. -Business is recov-
ering nicely for historic hotels in the Caroli-
nas, Georgia and Tennessee as the economy
improves following the Great Recession, in-
dustry representatives said Thursday
"We're having a banner year The best
year ever," said Lynn Lesene, one of the op-
erators of The Wentworth Mansion that
hosted representatives of eight members of
Historic Hotels of America.
"In leisure business we had some drop-off
but we got that back pretty quickly," said Bud
St Pierre, the marketing director of The
King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort on
St Simons Island, Ga. He said, however,
group business continues to lag because
Georgia state government is not spending as
much on training sessions and other coastal
meetings.
Chris Welch, the operator of The Smith
House in Dahlonega, Ga., said his inn never
really felt the recession.
"Our lodging numbers are up 30 percent
since 2008," he said, adding that the average
daily rate has increased every year and, un-
like some other hotels, it did not have to be
reduced during the downturn.
Welch noted much of the inn's business in-
volves weddings and people are always
going to get married.
The hotel association was formed by the
National Trust for Historic Preservation
more than 20 years ago. To become mem-
bers, hotels must be at least 50 years old, be


recognized as having historical significance
and listed on or be eligible for the National
Register of Historic Places.
The group started in 1989 with 32 mem-
bers. It now has more than 240.
Lesene said dealing with the downturn
made her operation more directed.
"We found competition we didn't have be-
fore. We had to find a way to be leaner in-
ternally and externally," she said. One of the
things her company, Charming Inns, did was
to combine two of its Charleston inns that
were in the same building. It now operates
four inns and a restaurant.
Also helping is that, last month, The Went-
worth Mansion was named the top small city
hotel and the 12th best hotel in the world by
Travel + Leisure Magazine.
St. Pierre said his resort improved its
marketing operations as a result of the re-
cession.
Association members agreed there is a lot
of interest in historic inns at a time when the
same hotels and motels are seen in towns
across the nation.
"We have people every single day when
you do the guest satisfaction survey, they
specifically found us because they wanted a
unique property," said Janet Kurtz, the mar-
keting director for The Hermitage Hotel in
Nashville. "They wanted a very historic set-
ting that really told the story of the city they
were in."
"The most common comment we get is
that people travel through the week on busi-
ness and on the weekend they want to come
for something unique," Welch added.







Operators of
the Wentworth
Mansion in
Charleston,
S.C., and other
historic hotels
in the region
say business
has bounced
back sharply.
Associated Press


Associated Press
Peter Bird, from the Miraval Resort and Spa, in Tucson, Ariz., demonstrates Naga Thai
massage at the Aug. 16 International Spa Association event in New York. Parties at
the spa, treatments for stressed and time-pressed consumers, cross-cultural traditions,
and a whole lot of purple from lavender-scented treatments to mauve nail polish -
are some of the trends and services that were shown off at the annual meeting re-
cently in New York. A woman receives a hand massage at the meeting.


Fast facials, more trends highlighted at meeting


Stein am Rhein


Special to the Chronicle
Ely and Fe Romero, joined by sister Suki Brzoska, pose for a photo in Stein am Rhein,
Switzerland. They spent 17 days touring Germany, Switzerland and Austria. It was
the vacation of a lifetime.


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor


NEW YORK
p parties at the spa,
treatments for
stressed and
time-pressed
consumers, cross-cultural
traditions, and a whole
lot of purple from
lavender-scented
treatments to mauve nail
polish are some of the
trends and services that
were shown off at the
annual International Spa
Association meeting
Aug. 16 in New York.
Here are some details:
SPA-RTY: Rejuvenation at the spa
need not be a solitary pursuit. "A trend
we've been seeing is private
events called 'spa-rtys' getting
booked in the spa space for
weddings, corporate events,
etc." said Lauren Clifford, a
spokeswoman for the Regent
Palms Turks and Caicos, which
has a 26,000-square-foot in-
door-outdoor facility at the
Caribbean island resort.
Aspira Spa, based at The Os-
thoff Resort in Elkhart Lake,
Wis., is also seeing gatherings
of friends, colleagues, sorority
sisters and even multi-genera-
tional families for group
events at the spa, says general manager
Lola Roeh. Roeh's recently married
daughter Shannan "didn't do a tradi-
tional shower, but had a spa shower in-
stead. Guests had a spa service, then
gathered back for lunch, then had an-
other service and got together in the
whirlpool to relax."
CROSS-CULTURAL: Massage afi-
cionados may be familiar with Thai
massage techniques in which practition-
ers walk on their clients' backs. Miraval,
a spa in Tucson, Ariz., turned heads at
the spa meeting with a demonstration of
a form of Thai massage called Naga
($215, 50 minutes) in which therapist
Peter Bird was suspended above his


client, holding on to white silk ropes
wrapped around his arms. He varied
the pressure of his feet and legs on the
client's muscles by using the ropes for
balance and to move up and down.
"A lot of people think they're going to
be sore afterwards, but they're not, be-
cause the pressure is deep but soft, not
sharp," said Bird, who studied the tech-
nique in Thailand and says holding the
ropes makes it easy for him to balance
his weight.
Kohler Waters Spa, based in Kohler,
Wis., is introducing a ritual inspired by
Middle Eastern hammams in which
guests are robed in traditional Turkish
towels called pestemals, bathed in
warm water poured from a copper bowl,
then scrubbed with an exfoliating mitt
"Kohler is known for water and bathing
products, so this is a service that's ritu-
alistic and water-based, offering quiet
and relaxation," said Linda Machtig,
Kohler's group marketing manager
At Gwinganna, a retreat in Queens-
land, Australia, about an hour from
Brisbane, Aboriginal influences are in-
corporated into a stress-reduction treat-
ment that includes listening to
didgeridoo music while the therapist
shakes a rainstick and applies smooth,


hot black basalt stones to the body
"We're looking to switch off the stress
responses," said Gwinganna marketing
manager Tracy Willis.
STRESSED AND TIME-PRESSED:
In a hurry? A new facial treatment
called HydraFacial available in 2,000
spas nationwide offers five procedures
in 15 minutes: exfoliation of dead skin, a
gentle acid peel, pore-cleaning, hydra-
tion with antioxidants and application
of moisturizers and sunscreen. The
treatment runs $135-$175 depending on
location.


See Page A17






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wife miffed, wants


in-laws to apologize


SUNDAY EVENING AU G U ST 26, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
OWESH NBC 19 19 News News Pigskin Pro-Am NFL Preseason Football Carolina Panthers at New York Jets. (N) News Access
Victor Borge: Comedy in Music! (In Oscar Hammerstein II -- Out of My Big Band Vocalists Vocalists from the 1940s. (In Dr. Fuhrman's Immunity
0 WEDUPBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo) 'G' Dreams (In Stereo) 'G' c Stereo) 'G' c Solution! 'G'
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Best of Pledge 'G' MI-5 "The Extremist"
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Madden NFL 13 NFL Preseason Football Carolina Panthers at New York Jets. From News Paid
0 NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Pigskin Pro-Am (N) MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. (N) cN Program
S]WFTV)ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (In Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A 45- News Sports
S ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo)'PG' year-old mom tries to get healthy 'PG' Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Big Brother (N) (In The Good Wife (In The Mentalist (In 10 News, 11pm (N)
0 [WT] CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) N Stereo) B Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14'B
WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 NFL Football American Cleveland The The Family Guy Family Guy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News The Closer
0 FOX13 13Dad'14' Show Simpsons Simpsons '14 '14' (In Stereo)
D [WCJB 1 ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Extreme Makeover:Weight Loss Edition News Brothers
WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
WFTSABC 11 11 11 News World ABC Action News Once Upon a Time (In Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A 45- News Grey's
F ABC 11 11 11News Special Stereo) 'PG' B year-old mom tries to get healthy 'PG' Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Law & Order "House *** "Cadillac Records"(2008, Drama) Adrien
S[W IND 12 12 16 14' '14' Theory Theory "Scoundrels"PG Counsel"PG Brody Beyonce Knowles. R'
S[WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 **~ "X-Men: The Last Stand" (2006) Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born Ride Paid
D [WACX TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Paid Paid Journey Creflo D. Connec Jim Raley Dayna Kingdom
King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Cults. Without a Trace "Hard NUMB3RS"High The Unit Hijacked
S W CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men (In Stereo) 'PG' Landing"'PG' Exposure"'PG'N plane.'PG'u
Casita Big Rotary Sunflower Inverness Your Citrus County Court Music Mix MusicMix TheCisco Black
Mi CWM FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight USA USA Kid 'G' Beauty
ED CWO )X FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football American Cleveland Simpsons |Simpsons |Fam. Guy Fam. Guy FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
C WWVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. |Noticiero Jenni Rivera PequenosGigantes"Semifinal" (SS)Sal y Pimienta'14 Comned. Noticiero
I X PX ION 17 Flashpoint'PG' Flashpoint'PG' Flashpoint '14' Flashpoint'PG' Leverage'PG' Leverage 'P3'
Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AE)J 54 48 54 25 27 WarsPG' WarsPG' arsPG' Wars WarsarsPG'GWars'War Wars WarsPPG WarsPPG WarsPG WarsPG'
*** "High Plains *** "Joe Kidd" (1972, Western) Clint Hell on Wheels (N) '14' Breakin Bad "Say My Small Town Breaking
55 64 55 Drifter" 1973) 'R' Eastwood, Robert Duvall. 'PG' BName" ) NBad
1 Tanked: Unfiltered (In Call- Off the Off the Off the Call of Call- Call of Call of Off the Off the
(HO 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'PG' Wildman Hook Hook Hook Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Hook Hook
*** "Coming to America"(1988, Comedy) Sunday Best (N) Sunday Best 'PG' Sunday Best 'PG' Let's Stay Let's Stay
W ) 196 19 96 Eddie Murphy Arsenio Hall. 'R'B 'PG' Bc Together Together
[BRAVO] 254 51 254 Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Below Jersey
Futurama ** "Without a Paddle" (2004, Comedy) Seth Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Tosh.0 Futurama The Burn- South Park
27 61 27 33 '14' Green, Matthew Lillard. PG-13 'm '14'm c'14'm '14' Jeff 'MA'
i n 98 45 98 28 37 "Smokey- Redneck Island (In Redneck Island "All Redneck Island "Beer Redneck Island "The Redneck Island (In Redneck
98 45 98 28 37 Bndt. 2' Stereo)'PG' Mixed Up"'PG' Bliss"'PG' Pinky Swear"'PG' Stereo)'PG' B Island
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Insanity! Diabetes Wall St. BMW: A Driving Obs. ISelling Cars Amer. Greed Crime Inc.
IMW J 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Countdown to Republican Convention CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Austin & Shake It Jessie Jessie Good- Gravity A.N.T Jessie Phineas Phineas Shake It Shake It
WISHJ 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up! G' 'G' 'G' Charlie FallsY7 FarmG' G' and Ferb and Ferb Up!G' Up! G'
LSPIHj 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants. (Live) SportsCenter (N)
ESPW2) 34 28 34 43 49 Skate Football Softball MLS Soccer: Red Bulls at Sporting NHRA Drag Racing
(EWTl 95 70 95 48 Ben. Crossing Sunday Night Prime Catholic. |Savoring G.K. |Rosary Catholic Compass God |Bookmark
Ei) 29 52 29 20 28 **s "The Notebook" (2004 Romance) Ryan *** "Aladdir" F1i' F isy) Voices of ***nt "Aladdin" (1992, Fantasy) Voices of
( m 29 52 29 20 28 Gosling, Rachel McAdams.'PG-13' Scott Weinger, ..i.. ,,,11, 'G' Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. '
"Walking- * "Scar Movie 2" (2001) Shawn ** "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of *2 "Playing God" (1997) David "Thomas
118 170 Talk." Wayans. R BNLife" (2003) Angelina Jolie. 'PG-13' m Duchovny R' Crown"
[FNCi 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOO) 26 56 26 Chopped Food Truck Race Cupcake Wars (N) Food Truck Race Iron Chef America Chopped
FSNFL 35 39 35 MLB Baseball Marlins |Boysin NFL Preseason Football Atlanta Falcons at Miami Dolphins. (Taped) |Dolphins
51 *** "Wanted" (2008, Action) James McAvoy *** "Taken" (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, *** "Taken" (2008, Action) Liam Neeson,
(LX) 30 60 30 51 Morgan Freeman. R' Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. PG-13' Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGATour Golf |PGA Tour Golf The Barclays, Final Round.
*** "Straight From *** "Back to You and Me" (2005, Drama) *** "Backyard Wedding" (2010, Romance) Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
ALL 39 68 39 45 54 the Heart" m Lisa Hartman Black. N Alicia Witt, Frances Fisher. Nc
"The Art of Getting By" (2011) ** "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D True Blood Eric tries to The Newsroom Nina True Blood Eric tries to
(i) 302 201 302 2 2 Freddie Highmore. N Christmas'" (2011) 'R' save Bill. 'MA' surprises Mac. MA' save Bill. 'MA'
** "Sucker Punch" Real Time With Bill ** "J. Edgar" (2011) Leonardo DiCaprio. J. Edgar Hoover **+ "Knight and Day" (2010) Tom
B 303 202 303 (2011) B Maher 'MA' N becomes the first director of the FBI. 'R Cruise. 'P-13' mc
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers'G' Holmes Inspection Handyman Holmes Inspection
Counting Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars American Pickers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers (N) SharkWranglers
51 25 51 32 42 Cars'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' "Battle Lines"'14' '14' "Redemption"'14'
"Perfect Husband: "Fatal Honeymoon" (212, Docudrama) Drop Dead Diva "Picks Army Wives "Domestic "Fatal Honeymoon"
24 38 24 31 Laci Peterson Story" Harvey Keitel, Amber Clayton. N & Pakes"'PG' Maneuvers"'PG' (2012) Harvey Keitel.
"Lost in the Dark" (2007, Suspense) Mae *** "Seventeen and Missing" (2007, Drama) ** "The Babysitters Seduction" (1996,
50 119 Whitman, Matthew Smalley N R' Deedee Pfeiffer.'NR Suspense) Stephen Collins. N
320 221 320 3 **** "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: *** "The Birdcage" (1996, Comedy) Robin **+ "Tower Heist" (2011) Ben Life on Top
P320221320 3 3 Part2"(2011) Daniel Radcliffe. Williams. (In Stereo) R B Stiller. 'PG-13' cc
(MSNBCJ 42 41 42 __ Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera Caught on Camera |Predator Raw Predator Raw |Lockup: Raw
Amish: Out of Order Amish: Out of Order -.... i, Out of Order -.... i, Out of Order Taboo Hybrid --neither Taboo Hybrid --neither
(P' B 109 65 109 44 53 PGPG'PG' 1-.1ii, Affairs"'PG' .,... Fast" 'PG' male norfemale. male norfemale.
tNiliJ 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious Victorious Victorious Victorious My Wife My Wife Nick |George Yes, Dear |Yes, Dear Friends Friends
(DWi) 103 62 103 Oprah Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah Oprah's Next Lovetown, USA 'PG' Oprah Oprah
(DXY) 44 123 Snapped PG c Snapped PG' Snapped PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
ni 340 241 340 Wem dKevin Nealon: Weeds Episodes Dexter "Sin of Homeland "Achilles Weeds (N) Episodes Weeds Episodes
S W 340 241 340 4 Whelmed, Not Overly *MA' *MA' Omission" MA' Heel" 14' B *MA *MA' *MA' MA'
Dumbest Dumbest SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Wind Tunnel With Dave Two Guys Car Crazy Auto Racing
[SPEED 732 112 732 Stuff Stuff (Live) Lane (N) Despain (N) Garage 'G'
S 37 43 37 27 36 Bar Rescue "Downey's Bar Rescue "Fallen Bar Rescue Bar Rescue "Broke Flip Men Flip Men Bar Rescue "Beach
37 43 37 27 36 and Out"'PG' Angels"'PG' "Bottomless Pit"'PG' Black Sheep"'PG' (N)'PG' 'P Bummer"'PG'
"Jack and Jill" Boss"Louder Than Boss"Through and *** "Secretariat" (2010) Diane Lane.The Boss Through and
) 370 271 370 (2011) Adam Sandler. Words"'MA' Through"'MA' story of the 1973 Triple Crown winner. Through"'MA'B
Into the Rays Live! Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Blue'G' Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue G'
"Blade **** "Raiders of the LostArk" (1981, Adventure) **t "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008,
SYFY 31 59 31 26 29 Runner" Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman. PG Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate BFanchett. 'PG-1 3'
(1BS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "The Wedding Date" (2005) 'PG-13' ** "Valentine's Day" (2010) Jessica Alba.'PG-13' 1** "Valentine's Day" (2010)
(MRtt) 169 53 169 30 35 **** "The Pride of the Yankees" (1942, *** "Ball of Fire" (1941, Comedy) Gary *** "Man of the West"(1958, Western) Gary
(1 J 169 53 169 30 35 Biography) Gary Cooper. 'NR' Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck. 'NR' B Cooper, Julie London.'NR BN
One CarToo Far Survivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days One CarToo Far Bering Sea Gold: One Car Too Far
53 34 53 24 26 "Rainforest"'PG' 'PG' Bc (N) PG' "Volcano" (N) 'PG' Under the Ice '14' "Volcano" PG' B
(E ) 50 46 50 29 30 Extreme |Extreme Extreme |Extreme Hoard-Buried Hoard-Buried High School Moms Hoard-Buried
** "Timeline" (2003) Paul Walker. Adventurers *** "Fright Night" (2011, Horror) Anton "Freddy's Dead: The Final "Windtalkers"
ITiij 350 261 350 travel back to 1300s wartime France. Yelchin, Colin Farrell. (In Stereo) 'R'B Nightmare" (1991) (In Stereo) R'
"National **u "Sherlock Holmes"(2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Leverage 'The D.B. The Great Escape Leverage 'The D.B.
(NW 48 33 48 31 34 Treasure" Jude Law. 'PG-13' (DVS) CooperJob" (N)'PG' '14'm cCooper Job"'PG'
tITN] 38 58 38 33 *' "Catch That Kid"(2004)'PG' Annoying Regular Venture King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Bizarre Foods Man v Fd Man v Fd Meat Meat Big Beef Paradise Steak Paradise
QjiiTV) 25 55 25 98 55 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Combat Forensic Forensic
(1YI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H'PG' c M*A*S*H King King King jKing King King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Burn Notice "Desperate
47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14' Victims Unit '14 Times"'PG'
Bridezillas "Brittany & Bridezillas "Michelle & Bridezillas "Tasha & Bridezillas "Tasha & Bridezillas (N) '14' Bridezillas"Tasha &
117 69 117 Michelle"'14' Tasha"'14'B Tracy"'14'B Remy"N cTracy"'14'B
(WGN3AjJ 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30 Rock Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News |Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: My prob-
lem is my husband's
much younger 18-
year-old sister. Because
there's such an age gap,
"Lauren" has always been
given whatever she wanted
and told that everything she
does is wonderful.
My husband's parents are
only in their mid-50s, but say
they're "too old" to be rais-
ing a teenager and never
discipline her. Lauren
steals and lies to her teach-
ers. She told them she had
leukemia and needed an
operation while she hid out
at a friend's house until the
school nurse called to in-
quire about her health.
Unsurprisingly, Lauren
didn't get ac-
cepted into any
of her preferred
colleges. I have e
a teaching posi-
tion at the local
university, and
my mother-in-
law asked
whether I could
pull some .
strings and get
Lauren into my '
school. I hon-
estly don't feel ANNI
that Lauren MAILI
reaches the cal-
iber of student
my department requires. I
told my mother-in-law as
gently as I could that Lau-
ren needs to stand on her
own two feet and learn how
to do things for herself.
I offered to help her sub-
mit a college application
and said I would take her to
meet with the registrar, but
that's as far as I would go.
My mother-in-law got very
upset and asked me to
leave. She then called my
husband at work and told
him what a mistake he
made when he married me


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Campaign" (R) ID required.
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Premium Rush" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Hit and Run"(R) ID required.
2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Sparkle" (PG-13) 4:45 p.m.


"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Paranorman" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Paranorman" (PG) In real 3D.
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7p.m.
"The Campaign" (R) ID required.
1:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-
13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Outlets for smoke
6 Pippin or winesap
11 Chew
16 Scarecrow stuffing
21 Greeting on Oahu
22 Sky hunter
23 Hearsay
24 Of sheep
25 Granted
26 Stylishly dated
27 Pointed arch
28 "Divine Comedy" author
29 American Indian
30 "Kiss Me -"
32 Beige
34 Inventor Nikola -
36 Turf
37 Like a moray
39 Dalai -
41 Detest
43 Depot (abbr.)
44 Gainsay
45 Do away with
48 Shed
50 Bone (prefix)
52 Undisclosed
55 City in Alaska
57 Brad
59 Comfort
63 Kind of war
64 Made taut
66 Ice cream variety
68 Betsy or Diana
69 Country road
70 Massage
72 Held sway
73 Simple dwelling
74 Application
75 Go after game
76 Penalized
78 Pole
79 San -, Calif.
80 An examination
82 Old cry of
disapproval
83 Brought to bay
85 Riddle
86 Kind of timer
87 Org. cousin
88 Pointed tool
89 Cooking utensil
90 Cache
93 Connected series
95 Cravat
96 Priest's hat
100 Goes wrong
101 ---de-lance
102 Lustrous fabric


104 Kick
105 Steal from
106 Farm denizen
107 Poison ivy
109 Peruke
110 Remove,
in printing
111 Tyson or Wallace
112 Punctuation mark
115 Of vocal groups
117 Mutiny
118 Deadly
119 Flavoring plant
121 Norse god
122 Calm
123 Prince in an opera
125 Young horse
127 Appease
129 Sanatorium (abbr.)
132 Give assent
134 Eastern European
136 Lake
137 Final
141 Rink surface
142 Place of assembly, once
144 Colorful gem
146 and void
148 Fib
149 Speed-trap device
151 One of the
Carpenters
153 Sensational
155 - -coming
157 Escape
158 French writer
Zola
159 Praise
160 Played for stakes
161 Noblewomen
162 Be slow
163 Wee
164 Like ski slopes



DOWN
1 Fuzzy
2 Cream of the crop
3 Work of fiction
4 By way
5 Went down
6 Of a blood vessel
7 Leading
8 Fruit stone
9 Learning
10 Son of Cain
11 Toasted bread cube
12 Embrace
13 Leave unmentioned


14 Relocates
15 Magician's
exclamation
16 Carbonated
beverage
17 New Deal org.
18 Wash cycle
19 Russian writer
Chekhov
20 Like neglected lawns
31 Thanks--!
33 Hit
35 Roped
38 Linear measures
40 In unison (2 wds.)
42 Ardor
44 Lunchtime destination,
for short
46 Insect
47 "-Pinafore"
49 Rank
51 Related
52 Walk proudly
53 Notched, as a leaf
54 Instances
56 Strange
58 Evergreen tree
60 One of the Three Mus-
keteers
61 Reason
62 Stage direction
64 Chinese dynasty
65 Horse's color
67 Trudge
69 Breathing organ
71 Wager
75 Lofty
76 Tropical tree
77 Waste pipe
79 Make fun
81 Hardy character
82 Cunning one
84 Sheep
85 Harbor town
87 Angel
89 and dine
90 Flower part
91 Utter nonsense
92 Jargon
93 Verne's captain
94 Witnessed
95 Snug
96 Wall Street animal
97 Social group
98 Symbol
99 White poplar
101 Racing distance
103 A twitching
104 Pungent bulb


(2 wds.)
17 Deer
18 Kitchen VIP
0 Hang
1 Actress Streep
3 Vessel
4 Love personified
6 Electrical unit
7 Ump cousin
?0 Sheer nonsense
?2 Threshold
Puzzle answer


124 Swindled
126 Drink
128 At high volume
129 Chartered
130 Town in Florida
131 Creeping plant
133 Play
135 Manservant
138 Texas landmark
139 Tendon
140 Roosevelt or
is on Page A18.


Pendergrass
War god
Seed appendage
Sumptuous
Hauls
Lemon or lime ending
Annex
Itinerary (abbr.)
Skillet


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


and how I'm ruining the
family
This phone call was fol-
lowed by one from his
brother, who said if I don't
help Lauren, I'm no longer a
member of their family.
Then his wife phoned and
called me names. A few
weeks later, we were invited
to a family cookout, and they
acted like nothing
happened.
I know I did the right
thing, and I'm not giving in.
My husband says to let it go,
but I want an apology. Am I
wrong in asking for one? -
N.Y Wife
Dear N.Y: You are not
wrong, but asking for an
apology from these people
is not going to im-
prove family rela-
tions. Let it go. It
r ^ does not benefit
Lauren to have so
little discipline
and direction, and
her parents are
both lazy and neg-
ligent in their par-
enting.
Suggest to Lau-
ren that she apply
to community col-
E'S lege. It will give
BOX her time to get her
act together while
providing a decent
education and college expe-
rience that she can parlay
into a four-year university
program if she does well.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A16 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera- Riders an'
tions, the Veterans Notes The poc
sometimes contain only basic Day barber
information regarding each day, Sept.
post. For more information The poc
about scheduled activities, trip to Trol
meals and more for a specific Wednesde
post, call or email that post at baseball g
the contact listed. Tampa Ba
West Central Florida York Yank
Coasties, Coast Guard veter- will leave
ans living in West Central an approx
Florida, meet the third Saturday night. The
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and fare, gam<
coffee at the Country Kitchen ments. Th
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 the public,
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, accompar
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet- Tickets
erans are welcome. For more be purcha
information, call Charlie Jensen 6585 Gulf
at 352-503-6019. Crystal Ri'
Red Tail Memorial Chap- 352-795-6
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ- and inform
action meets at Ocala Regional For moi
Airport Administration Building, the post a
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All Cmdr. Mic
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at 302-6096,
352-854-8328. mklyap@(
Citrus County Veterans post at 35
Coalition provides food to vet- 0 Ame
erans in need. Food donations iary Unit'
and volunteers are always wel- p.m. the fo
corned and needed. The CCVC every mor
is on the DAV property in Inver- ability in the
ness at the corner of Paul and mothers,
Independence, off U.S. 41 ters, grant
north. Hours of operation are granddauc
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and grandmotl
Thursday. Appointments made the Ameri
by calling 352-400-8952. ceased ve
CCVC general meetings are during wa
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday dren); steel
monthly at the DAV building in veterans
Inverness. All active duty and wartime. (
honorably discharged veterans, Sandy WI
their spouses, widows and wid- or membe
owers, along with other veter- Barbara L
ans' organizations and current H.F.
coalition members are wel- 10087, Be
come. The CCVC is a nonprofit tivities suc
corporation; donations are tax golf, darts
deductible. Members can more for n
renew with Gary Williamson at Review th
352-527-4537, or at the meet- for activity
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. call the pc
AMVETS William Crow The VFW
Post 447, Inglis, is on State County R(
Road 40 East. For more infor- hind Cade
nation about the post and its The VF
activities, call 352-447-1816; plays Thur
email Amvet447@comcast.net. tween Twi
Blanton-Thompson and Citrus
American Legion Post 155 is Club. Tee
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High- players, b(
way, Crystal River. Doors open are welcoi
at 4 p.m. with dinner available; to be a me
entertainment at 7 p.m. join. Lunc
All are welcome at 5 p.m. Jayne Sta
dinners on Wednesdays and The pos
Friday, offered by the Legion, Day with a
Auxiliary, Sons of the American Labor Day
Legion, American Legion day, Sept.




SPA-RTY
Continued from Page A15

"There's no downtime, and you get
instant results," said Alex Ignon, di-
rector of HydraFacial marketing.
Brides-to-be can have the treatment a
day before the wedding without wor-
rying about a side effect of reddened
skin.
Deborah Lippmann is a manicurist
to the stars, but says her quick-dry and
waterproof nail polishes and treat-
ments work for real women with busy
schedules, whether they're walking
the red carpet or doing dishes. Lipp-
mann is known for doing nails for
celebs, designers, magazine covers
and runways, and her high-end prod-
ucts ($18 to $20 for polishes) have long


d 40/8 families.
st will have a Labor
ecue at 1 p.m. Mon-
3. All are welcome.
st is sponsoring a bus
picana Field on
ay, Sept. 5, for a
lame featuring the
iy Rays vs. the New
ees. A chartered bus
the post at 4 p.m. with
imate return at mid-
cost includes bus
e ticket and refresh-
is event is open to
,including children
iied by an adult.
are limited and can
sed at the Legion,
-to-Lake Highway, in
ver. Call the post at
6526 for ticket price
nation.
re information about
nd its activities, call
;hael Klyap Jr. at 352-
, or email him at
gmail.com. Call the
2-795-6526.
rican Legion Auxil-
155 meets at 7:30
fourth Tuesday of
ith at the post. Eligi-
e Auxiliary is open to
wives, sisters, daugh-
ddaughters, great-
ghters or
hers of members of
can Legion and of de-
eterans who served
r time (also stepchil-
pchildren; and female
who served during
Call Unit President
Iite at 352-249-7663,
ership chairman
ogan, 352-795-4233.
Nesbitt VFW Post
overly Hills, offers ac-
ch as meals, bingo,
, karaoke, pool and
members and guests.
e monthly newsletter
es and updates, and
ost at 352-746-0440.
Post 10087 is off
oad 491, directly be-
ence Bank.
W Mixed Golf League
rsdays alternating be-
sted Oaks Golf Club
Springs Country
time is 8 a.m. New
oth men and women,
me. You do not have
ember of the VFW to
h follows. Call Rich or
sik at 352-464-3740.
st will celebrate Labor
an old-fashioned
y Picnic at noon Mon-
3, at the post. On the


menu are half a grilled chicken,
including all the fixings, plus
dessert and coffee for a dona-
tion of $7 per plate. The public
is welcome.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.
The public is also welcome
to participate in the post's sixth
annual golf scramble Saturday,
Sept. 15, with a shotgun start at
8 a.m. at Twisted Oaks Golf
Club. Registration forms are
available at the post. Entry fee
is $55 per player, which in-
cludes green fees, cart fees,
food and a goodie bag. Pro-
ceeds from the event will go to
Hospice of Citrus County. A
banquet will immediately follow
the tourney at the post; it will in-
clude awards and presenta-
tions, and is also open to the
public.
For more information, call
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
The Friday night dinner Aug.
31 will be roast pork from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Cost is $8. Children
younger than 6 eat for $4. All
are welcome.
The post is planning a bus
trip to the Hard Rock Casino in
Tampa on Wednesday, Aug. 29.
We will leave the post at 8 a.m.
Call the post for information.
The post is a nonsmoking fa-
cility; smoking is allowed on the
porch. WiFi available.
All are welcome to join the
post for its Labor Day Picnic at
11:30 a.m. Monday, Sept. 3.
Hamburgers, hot dogs, potato
salad and baked beans will be
served for $5. Karaoke with
Mike.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.


been available at retailers like Bar-
neys and Neiman Marcus, but now
she's bringing her lacquers and treat-
ments to spas at hotels like the
Fontainebleau Miami and Trump,
Ritz-Carlton and Four Seasons
properties.
For the insomniac, Mohonk Moun-
tain House's "Solutions for Modern
Living" services now include a treat-
ment called "Attainable Sleep" that
helps guests at the New Paltz, N.Y,
spa re-learn how to fall asleep through
relaxation, aromatherapy, a soak and
massage ($185, 90 minutes). Mohonk
also sells aromatic oils and bath salts
to help clients recreate the feeling at
home.
PURPLE POWER: Purple is pop-
ular in spa services, as a color and as
a concept.
Aspira is offering an "Indigo Jour-


This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at
352-560-3867 or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month. Dun-
nellon Young Marines meet


ney" that includes a violet clay mask,
massage with violet-infused oil, re-
flexology, lavender aromatherapy and
"chromatherapy" (color therapy with
purple tones), and an elderberry fa-
cial. Clients handle sparkling
amethyst stones as part of the three-
hour, $435 treatment, which also in-
corporates Hindu beliefs in opening
the center of intuition, or "third eye."
Kohler Waters Spa is promoting a
"lavender parfait" pedicure and man-
icure, while Massage Envy, a member-
ship-based day spa in 800 locations, is
offering a lavender foot scrub as a $10
add-on service to a massage, with hot
towels to open pores and shea butter
to moisturize.
Massage Envy clinics will also do-
nate $10 from every massage and fa-
cial on Sept. 19 to the Arthritis
Foundation.


SINCE 1972 -
L'Ament travel
M
209 N. PineAve., Inverness, FL
kathy@accenttravelgroup.com
L (352) 726-6623 -A


Casino Tours | Cruises I Vacations
Call for dates & details. 352-597-4822*Toll Free: 1-877-604-4822


IP CASINO RESORT 149 pp/dbi
SPECIAL FOR SEPT/OCT
Beau Rivage $179 pp/db l109 pp/dbl
4 Days, 3 Nights $90 Free Play,
S$20 Food Coupons
Sunday Departures Booking now for
Visit 2 Casinos, $55 Free Play, 2 Meal Coupons 9/20 & 10/25


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

U 352-795-5797

Everything Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
S Spectacular
ummer Specials
~~~4 4 " '0 ,' I


Holland America Line
A Sgnature of Exc&llence
SMOOTH JAZZ
CRUISE
Jan. 13-20, 2013
or Jan. 20-27, 2013
Rates from
Over 25 artists on board including
Toni Braxton, George Benson,
David Sanborn and morei


O COLLETTE


COLLETTE
VACATIONS
COSTA
RI CA
with air from Tampa
Oct. 26 Nov. 3, 2013
From
$2249/pp/dbi
Fully escorted, tours,
meals and morel


TALLY-HO I 352-860-2805
www.tallyhovacations.com
S-tl dwmuir@tallyhovacations.com
ADISIONOFEDUCATIONALTOURS FL Seller of Travel 10131 |

ST135415

Becky's wavel Store
1. 'I
LAST MINUTE DEALS
Save up to40% atthe DATE NTS CITY PAIRS SHIP COST
Save up to 40% at the 9/27......15......LAXtoMiamiNCL-Jewel....................$649
LVH Las Vegas Resort & Casino 9/28......14......LAX to Miami NCL-Pearl......................$699
Air& Hotei Package Save up to $150 9/3 14 A to Miami NCLun .. $99
Book NOW till Aug. 30,202 /30......14......Copenhagen to MiamiNCL Sun..........$399
Call for your special price mention 10/6......13......Montreal to Ft. Laud HAL Maasdam....$799
promo code: LVHAUG12 10/26....16......Quebec City toTampaNCLDawn........$749
Travel now till March 2013 10/27....13......London to Ft. Laud Celebrity Eclipse...$699
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Located Next toWinn Dixie (552) 527-8855
wwwA'' .beckystr,] i ,,Lave l~AIserice.com' ",,


at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will Sept. 15.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or
email him at ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.


Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families

See VETERANS/Page A18


0826 SUCRN
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC HEARING
FOR FFY 2012 CDBG APPLICATION
The City of Crystal River intends to apply to the Florida
Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) for a grant under
the Neighborhood Revitalization (NR) category in the amount of
$650,000 from the Small Cities Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) Program. For each activity that is proposed,
Statewide 70% of the funds must benefit low to moderate
income (LMI) persons. The proposed grant funded project will
provide drinking water facility improvements in the Copeland
Park area of the City and in the vicinity of Crystal River High
School. Depending on the amount of grant funds available and
the cost of the improvements, water line replacement is being
proposed on portions of NE 1st Street, NE 1st Terrace, NE 2nd
Street, NE 3rd Street, NE 4th Street, NE 7th Avenue, NE 8th
Avenue, NE 9th Avenue, NE 12th Street, NE 12th Terrace, NE
13th Street and NE 13th Terrace. The activities, dollar amount
and estimated percentage benefit to low and moderate income
persons for which the City is applying are:


Activity
Water Line Rehabilitation
Engineering
Administration
TOTAL BUDGET


Budget (Approximately)
$565,742
$ 32,258
$ 52,000
$650,000


LMI %
>56.4%
N/A
N/A


The City will adopt an anti-displacement and relocation plan
as part of the grant requirements. The City will assist
displaced persons with grant funds, as indicated in the
budget and policy.
A Public Hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to
comment on the application will be held at the Crystal River
City Hall located at 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL on
Monday, September 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 p.m. or as
soon thereafter as possible. A draft copy of the application
will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the
application will be made available upon request at City Hall,
Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m., no more than five days after October 1, 2012. The
application will be submitted to DEO on or before October 1.
To obtain additional information concerning the application
and the Public Hearing contact Louis Kneip, Capital Projects
Manager at (352) 795-4216, ex. 305 (TDD# (800) 955-8771).
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped
accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an
interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired
should contact Theresa Krim at (352) 795-4216, ex. 314 at
least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an
interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking
person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact
Ms. Krim at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and
a language interpreter will be provided. Any handicapped
person requiring special accommodation at this meeting
should contact Ms. Krim at least five calendar days prior to
the meeting.
Pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989, the
following disclosures will be submitted to DEO with the
application. The disclosures will be made available by the
City of Crystal River and DEO for public inspection upon
request. These disclosures will be available on and after the
date of submission of the application and shall continue to be
available for a minimum period of five years.
1. Other a Government (federal, state, and local) assistance to
the project in the form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee,
insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax benefit, or any
other form of direct or indirect benefit by source and amount;
2. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers,
contractors, or consultants involved in the application for
assistance or in the planning or development of the project or
activity;
3. The identities and pecuniary interests of any other persons
with a pecuniary interest in the project that can reasonably be
expected to exceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant request
(whichever is lower);
4. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property
owners, or others listed in two (2) or three (3) above which
are corporations, or other entities, the identification and
pecuniary interests by corporation or entity of each officer,
director, principal stockholders, or other official of the entity;
5. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the
project by each of the providers of those funds and the
amount provided; and
6.The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount.

The Citizen Advisory Task Force (CATF) Meeting for this
application was held on July 24, 2012. Any comments or
recommendations from the CATF will be discussed during
the Public Hearing.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP
ACCESS JURISDICTION


2013 ALASKA
SEMINAR &
PRESENTATION
Oct. 25, 2012
5:00 pm 7:00 pm
Inverness Womens Club
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Refreshments and door prizes
RSVP


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 A17






A18 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit www.post237.org. Call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-637-
5915 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
are welcome. Call Base Cmdr.
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. All interested veter-
ans are welcome. For
information about the post, call
352-697-1749.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Voiture & Cabane 1219 will
present a Chikin' BBQ begin-
ning at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at American Legion Post
155. The public is welcome. For
$7, the dinner includes half a
chicken, beans and coleslaw.
Hot dogs and sodas will be
available for children at a nomi-
nal price. Fun for the day will in-
clude a washer tournament,
horseshoe tournament, dart
games, basketball shoot, bean
bag toss, ring toss and more.
Also available will be a free
child identification program.
Proceeds will benefit youth
sports in Citrus County. For
more information, call Larry
Pink at 352-563-5451.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership


meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-
0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 352-
860-1629 for information.


Robert and Marion Healy
will celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary on
Aug. 31, 2012.
Robert Healy and Marion
Steen were married at the
Willis Ave. Church in the
Bronx, N.Y, on Aug. 31,
1952. They met at the Ford-
ham Skating Rink in the
Bronx and fell in love; after
only two months, they were


Manny and Joyce Smigel
of Crystal River are cele-
brating their 50th wedding
anniversary Aug. 26, 2012.
The couple were wed in
Pennsylvania Aug. 26, 1962.
Manny is a retired educator
and Joyce is the owner of
Slender Ella's Fitness Cen-
ter for Women in Crystal
River. They have lived in
Citrus County for almost 40
years.
They have four children:
Sarah Savell, Heather
Allen, Ruth Weatherford, all
of Citrus County, and Robert
Smigel of Tallahassee. They
have four grandchildren:
David, Seth, Jordan and
Myah.


N. 1EA I
Leonard and Jenny Bush
will celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary Aug.
30, 2012.
The couple, originally of
Wood River, Ill., were wed
Aug. 30, 1952, in East St.
Louis, Ill.
They have been entrepre-
neurs for several years,
starting with Bush Pest Con-
trol in East St. Louis, Bush
Furniture and Sea World
Pet Store, both in Wood
River, and Cottonwood Pet
Store in Glen Carbon, Ill.
Leonard retired from the
Norfork/Southern Railroad
with 32 years with the com-


Crystal Strange and
Michael Mortag of Sayner,
Wis., announce the birth of a
son, Denali Aiden Mortag, at
8:43 p.m. Aug. 14, 2012.
The baby weighed 5
pounds, 14 ounces and was
19 inches long.


married.
The couple have four chil-
dren. Bruce of Florida;
Kathleen Koeppen of Wood-
stock, N.Y; Cynthia Healy of
Kingston, N.Y; and Robert
Jr. of Homosassa. They have
five grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Both are retired and have
lived in Homosassa for 16
years.


They renewed their vows
at sunrise 6:59 a.m. on
Daytona Beach Sunday,
Aug. 26,2012, with their chil-
dren in attendance. George
Bacon officiated the re-
newal and Nancy Ham-
mond did the photography


pany They have lived in Cit-
rus County since 1993.
The couple have five chil-
dren: Leonard (Butch) and
Rebecca (Becki),
Homosassa; Darrell (Odie)
and Pam, Edwardsville, Ill.;
Deborah (Debbie) and
Robert Koch, Medora, Ill.;
Chloe (Deannie) and Mike
Lake, Brighton, Ill.; and
Lisa Menietti of Inglis.
They have 15 grandchil-
dren, 31 great-grandchil-
dren and one great-
great-grandchild.
Their family will join the
couple on a celebratory
cruise to the Caribbean.


He was welcomed by sib-
lings Gabriellan and Alanna
Mortag.
Grandparents are An-
drew Smith of Crystal River,
and Michael Mortag and
Suzy Mortag of Star Lake,
Wis.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


V E NIT S AIPIP L E CIH OIMIP SlTIRIA W
A L OIHIA OIR I1OINBRlUlM OIRo0 V I N E
G I VIEINIRIEITIR Oo0 G I VIE DIAINITIE
UTE KATE ECRU TESLA SOD0
E E L Y L A M HAHA TE S TA E N Y
M ABO L ISH MOL T 0S TME N
SECRET NIOIMIE NAIILO SOLACE_
TRADE TENSED NEAPOL I TAN
RAOSS LRNE CRHURAULREBHUT
U SE H UNT F I NED RO0D JO0S E
T EST I N G0FI E RE ED PU S ER
220EGFD b G SyOrC A WsL a UclcK
STASlH NEXlUSIT IIE BIIIRETTA
ERR S F R S T IN IP NT ROB
P I G SU MAC W I G D E LIE M I K E
APOSTROPHE CHORAL R.EBEL.
L E TIHRLR HFER B THOPR SEIREON E
M I GOREFOAL OL L FY
HO0S P NO0D S L AV POO 0L L AS T
I gCEE A GO0RA OAL0 N UL LI L I E
R D AR KA RE N LU I D U PA N D
E U UDE EMI L EE X O.L GAMED1


8-26 0 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


60th ANNIVERSARY:


The Healys


Page 2

Page 12
Page 21
Page 24
Page 30

Page 34



Page 1
Page 2

Page 8
Page 11

Page 11
Page 11


Page 12
Page 13
Page 19


Addition: Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children
(see Appendix E)
Addition: Accelerated Placement Language
Change to: 100-900 words and "three" examples
Change "District School Boards" to "District personnel"
Eliminate CBAT from the chart on Appendix B and replace with Citrus County Formative
Assessment (Clickers)
Add Appendix E


Changes for Middle School Student Progression Plan 2012-2013


Change in date 2012-2013
Addition of the reference to S. 1000 36 and appendix A (INTERSTATECOMPACT ON
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR MILITARY CHILDREN) required for Student
Progression Plans by the Florida Department of Education.
Addition In the case of other acceleration (i.e., individual subject acceleration),
documentation outlining this acceleration will be placed in the student's cumulative folder.
New requirements for high school courses (Algebra I, Geometry, Biology) taken by middle
school students and the administration of the End-of-Course (EOC) Exams for those
courses.
The change of the 7th grade Civics course requirement and EOC.
The addition of "the school principal of a middle school shall determine, in accordance
with State Board of Education rule, whether a student who transfers to the middle school
and who has successfully completed a civics education course at the student's previous
school must take an end-of-course assessment in civics education".
Change in Career and Educational Planning Course (item 6)
Changed the intensive reading requirement to align with the change in 1011.62(9),F .S.
Addition of "Mid-Term" to better describe Interim Progress Reports.


Changes Made to High School Student Progression Plan 2012-2013

Page 1 Add F Board Policy regarding notification of expulsion at time of enrollment
Page 2 Add G-Educational Opportunities for Military Children ( Full Policy in Appendix B) Add
H-Initial Placement of Homeless Students
Page 3 Add Note Regarding EOC courses will only issue credit at the end of t course
Add Next Generation Sunshine State Standards,
Deleted reference to the Curriculum Alignment Tool
Page 5 & 6 Updated the State Uniform Transfer of High School credits as passed by State Board of
Education.
Added language regarding transfers students and the requirement to take EOC assessments.
Page 6 Added Placement of Student age 18 or older returning to school
Page 7 & 8 Updated Foreign exchange Program to include:
Added: No foreign exchange student shall receive a Citrus County High School diploma
nor participate in the graduation ceremony.
Reworded to limit number of foreign exchange based on class size and total student
enrollment
Reworded students who have graduated from high school to students who have received a
diploma or equivalent will not be accepted
Added Citrus County Students Leaving the Country to be Foreign Exchange
Added Home Education
Page 9 Expanded ESOL information
Page 10-12 Expanded Hospital Homebound Information
Page 12 Added Graduation Recovery Labs
Page 13-16 Reformatted Graduation Requirements and added changes to graduation requirements by
years in one list.
Added references to required EOC exams to this list. Added AP Human Geography as an
alternative to World Cultural
Page 21 Early Graduation Provisions-Aligned to HB7059.
Page 21-25 Reformatted the 3 year Graduation Programs to include changes by cohort year.
Page 30 Added End of Course Assessment
Page 32 Added PERT information
Page 37 Added Diploma for CREST and Ren Ctr.
Page 39 Added 1 year Reading Exemption Language
Page 39 Termination of School Placement at Age 16
Page 40 Removed references to non-vocational options at WTI (adult ed high school coursework)
Page 40-42 Aligned Dual Enrollment Agreement with SPP. Added that Grades with a +/-do not effect
high school GPA
Page 42-45 Updated IB courses listed to complete IB Diploma Program and Updated Eligibility
requirements for FCAT 2.0 scores.
Page 47 Added explanation of Online Graduation Requirement and Integrity of Online courses
Page 48 Removed reference to Non-Job Preparatory Course Substitutions-No longer exist at State
Level.
Page 49-51 Reworked FL Virtual School Fulltime and Classic and Citrus Virtual School to include
Seminole
Page 53 Added Statutory requirement that students not be exempt from Final Exams due to
attendance
Page 55 Added Interscholastic Extracurricular Eligibility and Home Ed Activities-Added per
Requirements of the SPP.
Page 56 Removed Adult High School Education
Page 58 Reworded Underage GED requirements
Page 59-60 Reworded Career and Technical Education --Shared Program and Dual enrollment
Program
Added to Appendix A-Cohort of 2012-2013 Requirements
Added Appendix B Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children
Added per Requirements of SPP.
DOOCEB6


0826-SUCRN

Report on Student Progression

School Year 2011-2012

School Board of Citrus County

Section 1008.25(7)(b) of the Florida Statutes requires that each district school board annually
publish in the local newspaper and report in writing to the State Board of Education the following
information:

1. Provisions of the law (section 100825, Florida Statutes) that relate to student progression and
the district's school board policies and procedures on student promotion and retention.
Student promotion in Citrus County Schools is based upon an evaluation of each student's achievement in
terms of appropriate instructional goals. In addition, student progression from one grade to another is
based, in part, upon proficiency in reading, writing, mathematics, and science.

2. By grade, the number and percentage of all students in grades three through ten performing at
levels 1 and 2 on the reading portion of the FCAT.

Grade Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
Number Students Students Students Students Students Students
Students Scoring Scoring Scoring Scoring Scoring Scoring
Tested Level 1 Level 1 Level 2 Level 2 Levels Levels
1&2 1&2
3 1066 120 11% 242 23% 362 34%
4 1039 86 8% 225 22% 311 30%
5 1122 94 8% 253 23% 347 31%
6 1114 161 14% 253 23% 414 37%
7 1139 161 14% 256 22% 417 37%
8 1187 173 15% 321 27% 494 42%
9 1222 209 17% 334 27% 543 44%
10 1181 243 21% 369 31% 612 52%

3. By grade, the number and percentage of all students retained in grades three through ten.

Grade Number Students End-of-Year Percent Students
Retained Membership Retained
3 49 956 5.0%
4 11 921 1.0%
5 5 1036 0.5%
6 14 922 2.0%
7 9 1016 0.9%
8 11 1036 1.0%
9 217 1075 20.0%
10 82 920 9.0%
4. Information on the total number of students promoted for good cause in grade three, by each
category of good cause as specified by law.
Good Cause Category Description Total Number Students
Promoted for Good Cause
Students having limited English proficiency and who have
less than 2 years of instruction in English for Speakers of
Other Languages 0
Students with disabilities whose Individual Education Plan
indicated that participation in the statewide assessment
program would not be appropriate. 1
Students who demonstrate an acceptable level of
performance on an alternative assessment 13
Students who demonstrate proficiency through a portfolio
that they are reading equal to a level 2 performance level on
FCAT. 19
Students with disabilities who participate in FCAT with an
Individual Education Plan or Section 504 Plan that reflects
2 years of intensive remediation in reading and have been
previously retained in grades kindergarten, grade 1, and
grade 2. 43
Students who have received intensive reading for the last
two or more years, but still demonstrate a deficiency in
reading and have been retained in kindergarten, grade 1, or
grade 2 for a total of two years. 1
5. Any revisions to the district's school board policy on student promotion and retention from the
prior year.
CHANGES FOR THE 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR

Changes to the Elementary Student Progression Plan 2012-2013


50th ANNIVERSARY


The Smigels


60th ANNIVERSARY


The Bushes


New ARRIVAL


DenaliAiden Mortag


TOGETHER











SPORTS


The Atlanta
Braves tried to end
the San Francisco
Giants' five-game
winning streak
Saturday./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Adult recreation/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Auto racing/B4
0 NFL preseason/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Little League baseball/B5
0 Cycling/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Bucs guard Joseph lost to injury


Pro Bowler will miss entire

NFL season with torn patella


Associated Press
TAMPA The challenge of re-
bounding from a disappointing sea-
son has gotten a little tougher for the
youthful Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
Two-time Pro Bowl guard Davin
Joseph tore the patellar tendon in
Tampa Bay Buccaneers offensive
lineman Davin Joseph suffered a torn
patella tendon in his right knee and
will miss the entire 2012 NFL sea-
son, the team announced Saturday.
It is a big blow to a revamped Bucs
team that hopes to contend in the
NFC South division.
Associated Press


his right knee du
victory over New
miss the regular s
surgery on Monde
"It's big. But it'W
do," coach Greg S
urday "You mour
on. That's what
Davin wants us
going to have surge
road to recovery,
fix our sights on 1
to move forward.'
Joseph was inj
second quarter o
when tackle Dona


Finishing up wea


Rays drop series

to A's before rare

Sunday off

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG The
first leg of the Oakland Athlet-
ics' seven-game road trip went
just fine.
Brandon McCarthy pitched
seven solid innings and Oakland
beat the Tampa Bay Rays 4-2 on
Saturday
Chris Carter and Seth Smith
homered for the Athletics, who
took two of three from Tampa Bay
and moved within a half-game of
the AL wild card-leading Rays.
Oakland has won eight of 10 to go
a season-high 12 games over .500.
"I think we just keep proving
that we're not a fluke," McCarthy
said.
The Athletics lost 5-0 in the se-
ries opener on Thursday, then re-
bounded for a 5-4 win on Friday
They open a four-game series at
Cleveland on Monday night.
"This isn't the easiest place to
play, and it ended up being a real
good series for us," Oakland
manager Bob Melvin said.
McCarthy (7-5) allowed two
runs and four hits while improv-
ing to 9-0, including three wins
this season, against AL East
teams over 14 starts since 2009.
The right-hander was coming off
a rough start last Monday when
he gave up six runs and 10 hits
over 3 1-3 innings in a loss to
Minnesota.
"I thought it was quite the re-
covery for him," Melvin said.
After Sean Doolittle struck out
two during a perfect eighth,
Grant Balfour got the final three
outs for his 14th save.
"It's obviously a big series for
us momentum-wise," Athletics
right fielder Josh Reddick said.
The Rays dropped to 16-7 in
August.
"I give Oakland a lot of credit,"
Tampa Bay manager Joe Mad-
don said. "You can't take any-
thing away from what they're
doing. They're playing good
baseball. They're playing with a
lot of energy so I give them
credit. But we have to be better"
Carter hit a two-run shot off
Jeremy Hellickson (8-9), helping
Oakland take a 3-0 lead in the


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays second
baseman Ryan Roberts forces
Oakland Athletics base runner
Josh Reddick at second base dur-
ing the sixth inning Saturday in
St. Petersburg. Oakland won 4-2.
Tampa Bay Rays relief
pitcher J.P. Howell delivers in the
seventh inning.
first. Coco Crisp scored the first
run of the game from third when
catcher Jose Lobaton made an
errant throw to second on
Stephen Drew's stolen base.
"I could have got out of it... it's
pretty frustrating," Hellickson
said.
See Page B4


BoSox send three
2012 stars to Dodgers
BOSTON -The Los
tenA n Angeles Dodgers acquired
first baseman Adrian Gon-
ring a preseason zalez, pitcher Josh Beckett
England and will and out-
season after knee fielder
ay. Carl
s part of what we Crawford
Schiano said Sat- from
rn and you move Boston on
we have to do. Saturday,
to do that. He's hoping to
gery and start his boost
and we've got to their play- Adrian
how we are going off hopes Gonzalez
Sby taking
jured during the by taking
ured during the on the underperforming
ald Penn blocked and high-priced stars who
failed to thrive in a fractious
See Page B4 Red Sox clubhouse.
Boston also sent in-
fielder Nick Punto and
about $11
million in
cash to
the

k in the
nine-
player
trade that
was the Carl
biggest in Crawford
Los Ange-
les' history. The Red Sox
acquired first baseman
James Loney, pitcher Allen
Webster, infielder Ivan De-
Jesus Jr. and two players
to be named.
"They're in a pennant
race and have an opportu-
nity to
add talent
and were
focused
on that,"
Red Sox
general
manager
Ben Cher- Josh
ington Beckett
said. "It'll
be our job to take advan-
tage of this opportunity
and build the next big Red
Sox team."
Under a rich new owner-
ship group that includes
NBA star Magic Johnson,
the Dodgers entered the
day three games behind
San Francisco for the NL
West lead and in the midst
of the wild-card race. They
have dramatically re-
vamped their roster in the
last month with trades, ac-
quiring shortstop Hanley
Ramirez, outfielder Shane
Victorino, starter Joe Blan-
ton and reliever Brandon
League and now the three
Red Sox players.


I


LHS sports passes
on sale now
Lecanto High School is
selling the All-Sports Season
Passes. These passes grant
admission to all regularly
scheduled home games for
any LHS sport. They do not
include pre-Season, clas-
sics, tournaments, district or
above events.
Family of 4--$125.
Additional family
member $25.
Adult $25.
Student $25.
Senior (60 years of
age-drivers' license re-
quired)- $15.
From staff, wire reports


r ----------------------- *


I 11




Check & Top-Off AM Fluids I
Check Tre Pressure on All 4 Tires
27-Point Inspection -
0 Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!N
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere! I

2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
L 352.341.0018
a .A aloveohevysales.com
CLTE T iRwET HOURS OF OPERATION:
^CHL L Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Morn-FrL.; 8AM-Noon Sat.


l =Bi : I[: IlIi, i


LOV SEVIC COPO


I A iFREEi
SSAVE 13% ...
SAE 3 : Alignment
& w je'll 1 o ou iCheckun IReg. 19.
S Vald at Low oda or Loe h P s p t coupon dudn w up Honda Plus arices Hond vary odel.
oito indda nothPeasrescoupot n duirt u. I I lus te s and ees where applb Pa- pr tcoun t during wr up
Not to ombined wtha otherdounts. Exi 312 Not to be combined with any other dlSOunts Exprns 8/31/12.
I --------- .11 I........... ..11


Buy 3 Tires
S Get 1

FREE
Vaid at Lov Chevy or Love Honda. Pces may vary by model.
Plustaxesand feeswheappIcable. Plese present copon durng wte up. I
Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 8/3112.
i ----------- .


LNE
HO.L JiA


FREE
Air Condi-ioning Check I
Escape the heat! Make sure your air conditioning
system is working at its optimal level.
I We check header vave, air outlet temperature, I
condenser fan & com ressor clutch operation,
belts, hoses, connectors for leaks, & radiator surf
VMid at Love Chevy or Love Honda. Prces may vaby model.
Plustao dfes where applicable o leasepresentcoupon during write up I
Not to be combined wr any oter dscunt. Expires 8/31/12.
__I __rd ___J-


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehonc.da.com
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrL; 8AM-2PM Sat.


SPORTS















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


aa
0 0

ui U
E A H


'EEDWAY HiTTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


IN


THE


jAME


Adult recreation leagues near starts


Signups now for

multiple sports

Special to the Chronicle
Beach volleyball is coming to
Citrus County. This will be a 4-on-
4 league, with any combination of
men and women. All participants
must be at least 18 years old.
This is a semi-competitive
league. Games will be played at
Bicentennial Park on Tuesday
nights. Get your team together
and get some great exercise.
League play will begin in Sep-
tember. The team fee is $50.
For more information or to reg-
ister, call Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540.
Men's flag football
starts Sept. 13
Men's fall flag football is sched-
uled to start Sept. 13. This is a 7-on-
7 league for players who are 18
years of age and older. Games are
played at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and
8:30 p.m. Thursday at Homosassa
Area Recreational Park. The regis-
tration fee is $50 and is due by Sept.
3.
Team fees are based on the num-
ber of teams registered and are di-
vided up equally among each team. To
register or for more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540.
Coed kickball held at park
If you ever thought of joining the
thrilling world of kickball, here's your
chance. The next season of Citrus
County Parks & Recreation's coed
kickball league is coming up.
Kickball is an exciting game that
can be played by people of all ages.


It's a great way to meet new people
and get a little exercise while having
fun. You must be 18 years old to par-
ticipate. Game times will be at 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Games will last one hour or nine in-
nings, whichever occurs first. All
games are at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River.
If you have a business, group of
friends, or maybe a close neighbor-
hood, this is a great way to build some
teamwork and have some fun bonding
time. For more information, call Andy
Smith, Parks & Recreation supervisor,
at 352-400-0960.
Back to the hardwood
on Sept. 24
Citrus County Parks & Recreation's
men's basketball league will start
Sept. 24. The league plays games at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays at local
school gymnasiums. This is a 5-on-5
full court league.
The last chance to register a team
will be Sept. 12. There is a $50 regis-
tration fee required from each team.
League fees are based on the number
of registered teams and are divided up
equally among the teams.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at 352-
527-7540.
Pine Ridge bowlers to meet
The Pine Ridge Mixed Bowling
league will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 30, at the Beverly Hills Bowl to
organize the fall season.
The first week of bowling begins
Sept. 6.
Call Barb Birkholz at 352-746-6657
if interested in joining a league or
being a sub.
Beach volleyball is set to begin on
Sept. 13 at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River.
Special to the Chronicle


Recreation BRIEFS


Kiwanis/Key bowlers
hit lanes Sept. 8
The Kiwanis/Key Training
Center Bowling League for
2012/13 will begin Sept. 8 at
the Manatee Bowling Lanes in
Crystal River. It is a 16-week
league ending with a June
Awards Banquet.
The successful 2011/12 sea-
son concluded with an average
of 98 bowlers each week. What
is needed to make this season
another success are volunteer
coaches. Coaches come from
the Homosassa Springs Kiwa-
nis Club, Key Clubs of Lecanto
High School and Crystal River
High School; additional high
school volunteers who receive
credit for community service
from the school district and
community are welcome also.
Bowling dates are: Sept. 8
and 22, Oct. 6 and 20, Nov. 3
and 17, Dec. 1 and 15, Jan. 5
and 19, Feb. 9 and 23, March 9
and 23, April 13 and 27. Bowl-
ing is from noon to 2 p.m.
To volunteer or for more in-
formation, call John and Mary
Kondracki at 352-382-9202, or
Mike and Marsha Stokley and
352-621-3185.
Golf club to do
'Patriot Golf Day'
Inverness Golf and Country
Club will participate in the fifth
annual Patriot Golf Day week-
end Aug. 31 to Sept 3. Golfers
across the country and at IGCC
have the opportunity to donate
an additional $1 or more for
greens fees to benefit Folds of
Honor Foundation (Foldsof
Honor.org), which provides
post-secondary educational
scholarships for children and
spouses of military service men
and women killed or disabled
while serving.
Patriot Golf Day is jointly
supported by The PGA of
America and the U.S. Golf As-
sociation. President George W.
Bush, 43rd president, serves as
the 2012 honorary chairman of
Patriot Golf Day weekend.
In the past four years, PGA
professionals have been instru-
mental in raising more than
$8.6 million by hosting Patriot


Golf Day events at their facili-
ties, allowing the organization
to distribute more than 2,000
scholarships internationally, in
all 50 states and 41 PGA Sec-
tions. The total number of post-
secondary educational
scholarship recipients will sur-
pass the 2,600 mark in 2012.
Individuals interested in con-
tributing to Folds of Honor
Foundation and those applying
for scholarships may visit
FoldsofHonor.org.
Register now for
annual veterans tourney
The eighth annual Citrus
County Veterans Golf Tourna-
ment will be Sept. 8 at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country Club
Course for the benefit of the
Citrus County Veterans Foun-
dation Inc.
The foundation is a non profit
entity that has provided more
than $100,000 in emergency fi-
nancial assistance to local
needy, honorably discharged
veterans and their surviving
spouses since its inception in
2004.
Check-in for the four-person
scramble will be at 7:30 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. Individuals and groups
short of four persons will be
combined to make four-person
teams. You do not need to be a
veteran to participate.
Registration form and dona-
tion of $55 per person must
be received no later than Aug.
28. Each participant's dona-
tion includes golf and cart,
beverages on the course and
lunch at the country club.
Prizes will be given for first,
second and last places, clos-
est to the pin, hole in one (to
include a car), plus door
prizes. Charitable tax-de-
ductible contributions for door
prizes and hole sponsorships
for $380, $300, $200 or $100
are available.
Participating golfers should
make a check or money order
payable to Citrus County Veter-
ans Foundation and send it with
their registration form to: Citrus
County Veterans Foundation,
Attn: Dan Birstler, 2804 W.


Marc Knighton Court, Key #13,
Lecanto, FL 34461-7718.
For more information or a
registration form, visit the Citrus
County Veterans Foundation
website at www.citrusvf.org or
call Dan Birstler at 352-601-
8051.
Golf tourney needs
committee members
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization will have its 12th An-
nual Charity Golf Tournament
on Nov. 10 at Seven Springs
Golf and Country Club, New
Port Richey. Committee mem-
bers are needed to assist in the
coordination of the fundraising
event.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization serves the central
Florida area, including Citrus,
Hernando, northern Hillsbor-
ough, Lake, Pasco, northern
Pinellas and Sumter counties.
The Florida Department of
Elder Affairs has determined
this region has more than
100,000 Alzheimer's disease
sufferers. By assisting the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, participants network with
local and regional profession-
als, golfers and concerned
members of the community
helping those afflicted with
Alzheimer's disease and their
families.
For more information, call
727-848-8888, or toll free at
888-496-8004.
Learn boating skills
with flotilla
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 15-01 Crystal River
will be offering a Boating Skills
and Seamanship class from 7
to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days, beginning Aug. 28 and
running through Sept. 27.
Cost is $40. The class ac-
ceptable for citations and pa-
perwork will be completed for
participants. For more informa-
tion, call Linda Jones at 352-
503-6199.
Flotilla to do
GPS training
Interested in learning how to
use that GPS you have for your


boat? U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 15-01 Crystal River
will be offering a two-day com-
prehensive class from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, and
Saturday, Nov. 10.
Class size is limited to 10
people for more one-on-one in-
struction. Call Linda Jones for
more information at 352-503-
6199.
Get in shape
at boot camp
The YMCA offers an outdoor
boot camp at King's Bay Park.
Boot camp classes are from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday
and Thursday. The program fee
is $35 per month.
This energetic workout will
get you in shape by combining
cardio, strength and core condi-
tioning with lots of fun. It is
everything you need to burn fat
and calories, plus it is designed
for all levels of fitness because
everyone works out at their own
pace.
Here is what you will need to
get started: water, a towel and
dumbbells that weigh 5 to 8
pounds Just show up at the
park to get started.
For more information, call
352-637-0132 or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
YMCA is
SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an of-
ficial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little or
no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes
meet at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
Classes include cardio interval,
Pilates, and stability and
strength. To find out if you are
eligible for SilverSneakers, call
your health plan provider. For
more information, call the


YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for a
community Divine Yoga class at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of the
benefits of yoga are improved
balance, coordination, strength
and flexibility. Yoga is also
helpful in counteracting stress
and anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at 352-270-
8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA
now offers its Group Exercise
program at First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, the Y's westside
venue for health and wellness
classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered.
For more information about
the YMCA Group Exercise pro-
gram, call the office at 352-637-
0132. Financial assistance is
available to all those who qual-
ify. The YMCA office is in Bev-
erly Hills at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway, and is open noon to
5:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.


Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests that moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired
dance-fitness class, is offered
at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.


E Z AG
-ET






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL


Athletics 4, Rays 2
Oakland Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Crisp cf 4 1 3 0 DJnngsIf 4 1 1 1
Drew ss 4 1 1 0 Fuld cf-rf 3 0 0 0
Cespds If 4 00 0 Joyce rf 3 0 0 0
S.Smith dh 4 1 1 1 BUpton ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Carter 1b 4 1 1 2 Longori3b 3 0 0 0
Reddckrf 4 0 3 0 Zobrist ss 4 0 1 0
Dnldsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Scott dh 4 1 1 0
Kottars c 3 0 0 0 C.Pena lb 3 0 0 0
DNorrs ph-c1 0 0 0 RRorts 2b 3 0 1 0
Pnngtn 2b 4 00 0 Loaton c 2 0 0 1
Totals 35 49 3 Totals 30 2 4 2
Oakland 301 000 000 4
Tampa Bay 010 010 000 2
E-Lobaton (4), Longoria (7). DP-Tampa Bay
1. LOB-Oakland 5, Tampa Bay 5.2B-Crisp 2
(17), Reddick (23), Zobrist (32). HR-S.Smith
(12), Carter (11), De.Jennings (10). SB-Drew
(1), Fuld (5). CS-Crisp (4). SF-Lobaton.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
McCarthyW,7-5 7 4 2 2 2 7
Doolittle H,9 1 0 0 0 0 2
BalfourS,14-16 1 0 0 0 0 1
Tampa Bay
Hellickson L,8-9 5 6 4 4 0 5
Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 0
Howell 1 1 0 0 0 1
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 1
McGee 1 1 0 0 0 3
HBP-by McCarthy (C.Pena), by Hellickson
(Donaldson).
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, Jeff Kel-
logg; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Eric
Cooper.
T-2:53. A-18,187 (34,078).

Rangers 9, Twins 3
Minnesota Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 5 0 1 0 Kinsler 2b 5 1 3 4
Revererf 4 1 1 0 Andrusss 5 0 1 0
Mauerdh 4 0 1 1 Hamltnl If 4 1 2 0
Wlngh If 4 0 0 0 Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0
Mornealb 4 1 4 1 N.Cruzdh 4 1 2 1
Doumit c 4 0 1 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 2 0
Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 Soto c 4 2 2 1
JCarrll 2b 4 1 2 0 Gentry cf 3 2 1 0
Flormnss 3 0 2 1 Morlndlb 4 1 1 3
Totals 35 3123 Totals 37914 9
Minnesota 000 110 100 3
Texas 234 000 00x 9
E-J.Carroll (12), Florimon (4). DP-Minnesota
1, Texas 3. LOB-Minnesota 8, Texas 5. 2B-
Revere (13), Mauer (26), J.Carroll (15), Hamil-
ton (24), N.Cruz 2 (34). 3B-Kinsler (4).
HR-Morneau (17), Kinsler (15), Moreland (14).
SB-Revere (30). CS-Andrus (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Duensing L,3-9 21-310 9 9 1 3
AI.Burnett 22-32 0 0 0 1
Fien 1 1 0 0 0 0
TRobertson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 1
Texas
DempsterW,3-1 6 8 2 2 2 7
R.Ross 1 3 1 1 0 0
M.Lowe 1 1 0 0 1 0
Scheppers 1 0 0 0 0 2

Indians 3, Yankees 1
New York Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jeterss 5 1 2 0 Kipnis2b 3 1 0 0
Swisher rf 3 0 1 0 AsCarr ss 4 0 0 0
Cano 2b 3 02 0 Choo rf 3 1 0 0
Teixeirib 3 0 0 1 CSantndh 3 0 0 0
Grndrs cf 3 0 0 0 Brantly cf 3 1 1 3
ErChvz3b 4 0 1 0 Ktchmlb 3 0 0 0
RMartn c 4 0 1 0 Carrer If 3 0 1 0
Ibanezdh 4 00 0 Hannhn3b 2 0 1 0
ISuzuki If 4 0 0 0 Marson c 2 01 0
Totals 33 17 1 Totals 263 4 3
NewYork 000 001 000 1
Cleveland 300 000 OOx 3
E-Hannahan (10). DP-New York 1, Cleveland
1. LOB-New York 9, Cleveland 3. 2B-Cano
(35), Marson (8). HR-Brantley (6). SF-Teixeira.
IP H RERBBSO


New York
Kuroda L,12-9
Cleveland
Masterson W,10-11
Pestano H,33
C.Perez S,33-37


8 4 3 3 2 6

62-37 1 1 2 6
11-30 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


Orioles 8, Blue Jays 2
Toronto Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
RDavis If 4 0 1 0 Markks rf 5 2 2 0
McCoy cf-rf 4 0 1 0 Hardyss 5 3 3 2
Bautistrf 0 1 0 0 McLothlIf 4 1 0 0
Rasms cf 3 00 0 AdJons cf 5 0 1 2
Encrnc lb 3 1 1 2 Wietersc 4 0 1 2
KJhnsn2b 4 00 0 C.Davisdh 3 01 0
YEscorss 3 0 1 0 MrRynllb 3 1 2 0
Sierra dh 3 0 0 0 Flahrty 2b 3 0 1 0
Vizquel 3b 3 02 0 Andino 2b 0 0 0 0
Mathisc 3 0 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 1
Totals 30 26 2 Totals 36813 7
Toronto 200 000 000 2
Baltimore 002 023 10x 8
E-Mathis (2), Y.Escobar (10). LOB-Toronto 3,
Baltimore 9. 2B-Y.Escobar (14), Vizquel (2),
Hardy (23). HR-Encarnacion (34), Hardy (17).
SB-McLouth (5). CS-R.Davis (10), McCoy
(1), Vizquel (2). SF-Wieters.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Morrow L,7-5 42-36 4 2 1 7
Loup 0 1 0 0 0 0
Jenkins 31-36 4 4 2 1
Baltimore
S.JohnsonW,2-0 6 4 2 2 2 7
Ayala 2 2 0 0 0 1
Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 3

Tigers 5, Angels 3
Los Angeles Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Trout cf 4 00 0 AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0
TrHntr rf 3 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 1 1 0
HKndrc2b 4 0 2 1 MiCarrdh 4 0 0 0
Trumolb 4 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 4 1 3 0
Callasp3b 3 0 1 0 DYongl If 4 1 3 1
KMorls dh 4 1 0 0 Berry If 0 0 0 0
Aybarss 4 0 1 1 Dirks rf 4 1 2 1
V.Wells If 4 1 2 1 JhPerlt ss 4 1 2 2
BoWlsn c 3 1 0 0 Avila c 4 0 1 1
Mlzturs ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr3b 4 0 2 0
RSantg 3b 0 00 0
Totals 34 36 3 Totals 37514 5
Los Angeles 002 100 000 3
Detroit 000 002 03x 5
E-Haren (2), Infante (6), Je.Baker (1), A.Jack-
son (1). DP-Los Angeles 1, Detroit 2. LOB-
Los Angeles 6, Detroit 8. 2B-Aybar (22),
Infante (3), Fielder (25), D.Young 2 (21), Jh.Per-
alta (29). HR-V.Wells (9). CS-Aybar (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Haren 52-38 2 2 0 7
WaldenH,7 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Richards L,3-3 11-33 3 3 0 0
Hawkins 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Smyly 6 4 3 1 2 6
DotelW,4-2 2 2 0 0 0 1
Valverde S,26-30 1 0 0 0 0 0

Tampa Bay Rays
upcoming schedule
Aug. 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 30 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 31 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Sept. 1 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 2 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 3 N.Y.Yankees, 1:10 p.m.
Sept. 4 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 5 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 7Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 8 Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 9 Texas, 1:40 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 73
Tampa Bay 70
Baltimore 69
Boston 60
Toronto 56


Wash.
Atlanta
Phila.
New York
Miami


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str
53 .579 - 4-6 L-1
57 .551 32 7-3 L-2
57 .548 4 6-4 W-2
66 .476 13 9 3-7 W-1
70 .444 17 13 1-9 L-7


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str
49 .611 - 5-5 L-3
55 .567 5Y2 4-6 W-1
67 .472 17Y29Y2 6-4 W-3
69 .457 19Y211Y2 3-7 W-1
70 .449 20Y212Y2 5-5 L-3


Home Away
39-24 34-29 Chicago
35-30 35-27 Detroit
34-29 35-28 Kan. City
30-37 30-29 Cleveland
31-30 25-40 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
55 .560 - 7-3
58 .540 2Y2 1 7-3
69 .444 14Y213 6-4
71 .437 15Y214 1-9
75 .405 19Y218 1-9


Home Away
37-26 33-29
38-26 30-32
26-33 29-36
31-30 24-41
24-37 27-38


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Home Away
36-24 41-25
36-29 36-26
30-35 30-32
29-35 29-34
29-31 28-39


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
51 .602 - 6-4
57 .548 7 6-4
58 .540 8 1 4-6
67 .464 17Y210Y2 6-4
77 .384 272 20Y2 3-7
87 .315 3612 2912 2-8


Home Away
42-23 35-28
40-26 29-31
38-24 30-34
38-28 20-39
31-29 17-48
27-35 13-52


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
51 .595 - 8-2
57 .548 6 8-2
61 .520 9Y2 3Y2 5-5
66 .480 14Y28Y2 8-2



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
56 .559 - 7-3
58 .540 2Y2 1 5-5
63 .504 7 5Y2 6-4
70 .453 13Y212 6-4
74 .408 19 17Y2 7-3


Home Away
41-23 34-28
39-27 30-30
33-29 33-32
33-30 28-36


Str Home Away
L-1 37-27 34-29
W-1 34-28 34-30
L-2 33-30 31-33
W-6 31-32 27-38
W-1 26-39 25-35


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves slugger Jason Heyward, center, is greeted by teammates Martin Prado, left, and Mike Minor, right, after
hitting a three-run homer off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner during the third inning Satur-
day in San Francisco. Atlanta took a 7-3 triumph from San Francisco.




Braves end Giants' win streak


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO Jason Hey-
ward hit a three-run homer and Mike
Minor won for the first time in six
starts as the Atlanta Braves beat the
Giants 7-3 on Saturday, ending San
Francisco's five-game winning streak
Michael Bourn had two hits and
drove in two runs for the Braves, who
had lost six of seven. Reed Johnson
and Martin Prado also knocked in
runs.
Minor (7-10) gave up three runs
and four hits in 6 2-3 innings, striking
out five and walking none. He also
doubled, walked and scored twice.
Pinch-hitter Gregor Blanco had a
two-run double for the Giants.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Reds 8, Cardinals 2
CINCINNATI Brandon Phillips hit his
first home run in August, Mike Leake
pitched effectively into the seventh inning
and the Cincinnati Reds beat the St.
Louis Cardinals 8-2 to strengthen their
hold on the top spot in the NL Central.
Phillips and Ryan Ludwick had three
hits apiece and Jay Bruce added a two-
run homer as Cincinnati regained a
seven-game lead over second-place St.
Louis, which rallied to win the series
opener 8-5 on Friday night.
Leake (6-8) allowed at least one hit in
every inning except one, but kept the Car-
dinals mostly at bay.
Phillies 4, Nationals 2
PHILADELPHIA- Roy Halladay out-
pitched Gio Gonzalez with seven solid in-
nings and John Mayberry Jr. homered to
lead the Philadelphia Phillies to a 4-2 vic-
tory over the Washington Nationals.
Halladay (8-7) allowed two runs and
seven hits, struck out six and walked one.
The right-hander, who missed 42 games
with a strained muscle, is 4-1 with a 2.75
ERA in his last five starts.
The two-time Cy Young Award winner
improved to 12-2 in 17 career starts
against the Nationals franchise while
Philadelphia won for the sixth time in the
last eight games.
Rockies 4, Cubs 3
CHICAGO Carlos Gonzalez used
his speed to beat out a potential double-
play ball in the seventh inning and drive in
the go-ahead run in the Colorado Rock-
ies' 4-3 victory over the Chicago Cubs.
Andrew Brown hit his first career
homer and pinch-hitter Josh Rutledge
had a two-run shot for Colorado, which
has won six of seven. Carlos Torres (3-1)
threw 2 1-3 scoreless innings as four
Rockies relievers combined for five in-
nings of one-hit ball.
Brett Jackson hit a two-run homer for
Chicago. Manuel Corpas (0-1) got the loss.
Mets 3, Astros 1
NEW YORK- R.A. Dickey helped his
own cause in winning his 16th game, driv-
ing in a run with an infield single and
pitching seven solid innings as the New
York Mets ended a six-game skid by
beating the Houston Astros 3-1.
Justin Turner hit his first homer of the
season and Jason Bay snapped an 0-for-
14 slump with an RBI single in the eighth
to end a stretch of offensive futility for the
Mets. New York went seven straight
games without scoring more than two runs
for the first time since September 1982.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Oakland 4, Tampa Bay 2
Texas 9, Minnesota 3
Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 3
Cleveland 3, N.Y. Yankees 1
Baltimore 8, Toronto 2
Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 4
Kansas City at Boston, late
Sunday's Games
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 7-10) at Detroit (Scherzer 13-6),
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (FGarcia 7-5) at Cleveland (Jimenez 9-12),
1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (WSmith 4-5) at Boston (Doubront 10-6), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (H.Alvarez 7-11) at Baltimore (Tillman 6-2), 1:35 p.m.
Seattle (Millwood 4-10) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 9-9),
2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (DeVries 2-5) at Texas (Feldman 6-9), 3:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Kansas City at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Colorado 4, Chicago Cubs 3
N.Y. Mets 3, Houston 1
Atlanta 7, San Francisco 3
Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 2
Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 0
Philadelphia 4, Washington 2
San Diego 9, Arizona 3
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
Houston (Harrell 10-9) at N.Y Mets (Hefner 2-5), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 12-10) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 10-8),
1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (M.Rogers 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 7-13),
1:35 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 9-7) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 2-
7), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 1-3) at Chicago Cubs (Volstad 0-9), 2:20 p.m.
Miami (Buehrle 11-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 9-7), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 8-9) at Arizona (J.Saunders 6-10),
4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (THudson 12-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 7-13),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.


Dickey (16-4) again showed why he
has been one of the best pitchers in
baseball this season, tying the NL's Gio
Gonzalez and Johnny Cueto and the AL's
Jered Weaver and David Price for the
major league lead.
Pirates 4, Brewers 0
PITTSBURGH Jeff Karstens pitched
seven-plus innings before leaving with an
injury and the Pirates snapped a four-
game losing streak.
Karstens (5-3) gave up seven hits, did
not walk a batter and struck out four for
his first win in nine career starts against
Milwaukee.
Karstens also had an RBI single and
scored during Pittsburgh's four-run fifth in-
ning, but left with an injured right groin after
the first two Brewers singled in the eighth.
Padres 9, Diamondbacks 3
PHOENIX Yonder Alonso hit the last
of San Diego's three solo homers and
added a two-run single to lead the streaking
Padres past the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Chase Headley and Carlos Quentin
also homered for the Padres, who have
won six in a row.
Clayton Richard (11-12) allowed three
runs and seven hits over eight innings,
improving to 5-0 in seven career starts
against Arizona. He struck out four and
walked two.


Justin Upton celebrated his 25th birth-
day with his first career inside-the-park
home run.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rangers 9, Twins 3
ARLINGTON, Texas lan Kinsler hit a
leadoff home run and Mitch Moreland
launched a 463-foot shot, sending Ryan
Dempster and the Texas Rangers past
the Minnesota Twins 9-3 for their fourth
straight win.
Kinsler homered in the first, hit a
bases-loaded triple in the third inning that
made it 9-0 and also singled.
Dempster allowed two runs in six in-
nings and improved to 3-1 since he was
acquired from the Cubs on July 31.
Justin Morneau went 4 for 4 with a
home run for Minnesota, which has
dropped 14 of 16 overall.
Orioles 8, Blue Jays 2
BALTIMORE J.J. Hardy homered
and scored three runs, rookie Steve
Johnson allowed four hits over six innings
and the Baltimore Orioles beat the
Toronto Blue Jays 8-2 to equal their win
total of last season.
Hardy, Adam Jones and Matt Wieters
each had two RBIs for the Orioles, who
have won 14 of 20 since Aug. 3. Balti-
more (69-57) is in the thick of the AL
wild-card chase and only four games out
of first place in the AL East after going
69-93 in 2011.
Johnson (2-0) gave up two runs,
struck out seven and walked two in his
second big-league start.
Tigers 5, Angels 3
DETROIT Jhonny Peralta hit a two-
run double during a three-run eighth in-
ning that sent the Detroit Tigers to a 5-3
victory over the Los Angeles Angels.
The Tigers trailed 3-0 before scoring
twice in the sixth and taking the lead in
their last at-bat. With men on first and
third, Peralta hit a line drive just fair down
the left-field line off Garrett Richards (3-3).
Alex Avila then added an RBI single.
Octavio Dotel (4-2) threw two scoreless
innings for the win. Jose Valverde pitched
a perfect ninth for his 26th save in 30
chances.
White Sox 5, Mariners 4
CHICAGO Tyler Flowers hit a tying
homer and Dewayne Wise delivered a
go-ahead RBI single in Chicago's two-run
sixth inning, lifting the White Sox to a 5-4
victory over the Seattle Mariners on Sat-
urday night for their fifth straight win.
Seattle took a quick first-inning lead on
Kyle Seager's three-run homer before the
White Sox rallied to preserve their 2 1/2-
game lead over second-place Detroit in
the AL Central. Seager also connected in
the ninth against closer Addison Reed to
get the Mariners to within a run.
Flowers led off the sixth with his fifth
homer of the season.
Indians 3, Yankees 1
CLEVELAND Justin Masterson han-
dled New York's power-packed lineup for
6 2-3 innings and Michael Brantley hit a
three-run homer as the Cleveland Indians
snapped a nine-game skid with a 3-1 win
over the Yankees.
It's the second time this month that
Masterson (10-11) has busted a long los-
ing streak for the Indians. On Aug. 8, he
beat Minnesota and stopped Cleveland's
11-game slide, one loss shy of the club
record.


NL


Mets 3, Astros 1
Houston New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0
FMrtnz If 4 0 1 0
Wallac lb 4 0 0 0
SMoore3b 3 1 0 0
Greene ss 4 0 1 0
JCastroc 3 0 1 0
BBarnscf 2 0 1 0
Bogsvcrf 3 0 1 0
Ambriz p 0 0 0 0
FRdrgz p 0 00 0
XCeden p 0 0 0 0
Abad p 1 0 0 0
Pearce ph 1 0 0 0
Storey p 0 0 0 0
BFrncs rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 15 0
Houston 000
NewYork 000


AnTrrs cf 4 0 2
Tejada ss 3 0 0
DWrght 3b 3 0 0
Hairstn rf 3 1 1
JuTrnr1b-2b 3 1 1
RCeden2b 3 1 1
I.Davis ph-lb 1 0 1
Bay If 3 0 1
Thole c 4 0 0
Dickey p 2 0 1
Vldspn ph 0 0 0
Rauch p 0 0 0
Edgin p 0 0 0
DnMrp ph 1 0 0
Frncsc p 0 0 0
Totals 30 3 8
000 100 -
101 01x -


DP-Houston 1, NewYork 2. LOB-Houston 4,
NewYork 9. HR-Ju.Turner (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
AbadL,0-1 4 4 1 1 4 2
Storey 2 1 1 1 0 1
Ambriz 1 0 0 0 1 2
Fe.Rodriguez 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
X.Cedeno 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
NewYork
DickeyW,16-4 7 5 1 1 1 2
Rauch H,14 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Edgin H,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
FFrancisco S,21-24 1 0 0 0 0 1

Reds 8, Cardinals 2
St. Louis Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jaycf 4 0 2 0 Cozartss 5 00 0
MCrpnt 3b 3 0 1 1 Stubbs cf 5 0 1 0
Hollidy If 4 0 2 0 BPhllps 2b 5 2 3 2
Craigib 4 0 0 0 Ludwcklf 4 1 3 0
Beltranrf 4 00 0 Frazierib 3 20 1
Schmkr2b 4 0 1 0 Brucerf 3 2 1 2
T.Cruz c 4 2 2 0 Rolen 3b 2 0 1 2
Furcalss 4 0 2 0 DNavrrc 4 0 1 1
JGarcip 2 0 1 0 Leakep 3 1 2 0
SRonsn ph 1 0 0 0 Marshllp 0 0 0 0
Dicksn p 0 0 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0
Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 00 0
Descalsph 1 0 0 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 2111 Totals 35812 8
St. Louis 000 010 100 2
Cincinnati 001 003 40x 8
DP-St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 2. LOB-St. Louis 7,
Cincinnati 7. 2B-Holliday (31), B.Phillips (26),
Leake (2). HR-B.Phillips (14), Bruce (27).
SF-M.Carpenter.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
J.Garcia L,3-5 6 7 4 4 2 5
Dickson 1 4 4 4 2 1
Rzepczynski 1 1 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
LeakeW,6-8 62-310 2 2 0 3
Marshall H,17 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 2
Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 3

Braves 7, Giants 3
Atlanta San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourn cf 4 0 2 2 Pagan cf 4 0 0 0
Prado3b 3 1 2 1 Scutaro2b 4 0 1 0
Heywrdrf 4 1 1 3 Sandovl3b 4 00 0
FFrmnib 5 1 1 0 Poseyc 4 1 1 0
D.Rossc 5 0 1 0 Pence rf 3 1 0 0
RJhnsn If 4 0 2 1 Arias ss 4 0 1 0
Uggla2b 4 1 0 0 Beltib 3 1 1 1
Janish ss 5 1 1 0 FPegur If 2 0 0 0
Minor p 2 2 1 0 GBlancph-lf 1 0 1 2
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 Bmgrnp 2 0 0 0
Hinskeph 0 0 0 0 Kontosp 0 00 0
Pstrnck ph 1 0 0 0 Mijares p 0 0 0 0
OFIhrtp 0 0 0 0 Theriotph 1 0 0 0
Kimrelp 0 0 0 0 Henslyp 0 0 0 0
Affeldtp 0 0 0 0
Hacker p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 7117 Totals 323 5 3
Atlanta 003 000 121 7
San Francisco 000 010 200 3
E-Kontos (1), Posey (9). DP-San Francisco 1.
LOB-Atlanta 10, San Francisco 3.2B-D.Ross
(5), Re.Johnson (12), Minor (1), Arias (11), Belt
(21), G.Blanco (11). HR-Heyward (23). SB-
Prado (15), FFreeman (2). CS-Heyward (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
MinorW,7-10 62-34 3 3 0 5
DurbinH,12 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
O'FlahertyH,21 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,14-8 61-37 4 4 4 5
Kontos 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mijares 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Hensley 1-3 2 2 2 1 1
Affeldt 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Hacker 1 2 1 1 0 1

Phillies 4, Nationals 2
Washington Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Lmrdzz2b 4 0 1 2 Rollins ss 2 1 1 0
Harper cf 4 0 1 0 Frndsn 3b 3 1 1 0
Zmrmn3b 4 00 0 Utley2b 3 1 1 1
LaRochlb 4 00 0 Howard 1b 4 00 0
Werth rf 40 1 0 Mayrrycf 3 1 2 3
Berndnl If 3 0 1 0 Kratzc 4 0 1 0
Espinosss 4 1 2 0 Pierre If 3 0 0 0
KSuzukc 2 1 1 0 Wggntnph 1 00 0
GGnzlzp 2 00 0 Papelnp 0 00 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Mrtnz rf 3 0 0 0
Matthsp 0 0 0 0 Halladyp 2 00 0
SBurnttp 0 0 0 0 DBrwnph 1 00 0
Bastrd p 0 00 0
L.Nixlf 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 72 Totals 29 4 6 4
Washington 000 020 000 2
Philadelphia 200 001 01x 4
DP-Philadelphia 1. LOB-Washington 5,
Philadelphia 6. HR-Mayberry (12). SB-
Bernadina (14), Rollins (23), Utley 2 (6). S-
K.Suzuki. SF-Mayberry.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
G.Gonzalez L,16-7 6 5 3 3 2 7
Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 2
S.Burnett 1 1 1 1 0 2
Philadelphia
HalladayW,8-7 7 7 2 2 1 6
BastardoH,20 1 0 0 0 0 3
Papelbon S,29-32 1 0 0 0 0 2

Pirates 4, Brewers 0
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 4 0 1 0 Tabata If 3 1 1 1
RWeks2b 4 00 0 GSnchzlb 1 00 0
Braun If 4 00 0 Sniderrf-lf 4 0 1 1
ArRmr3b 4 03 0 AMcCtcf 4 00 0
Hartilb 4 0 0 0 GJoneslb-rf 4 0 1 0
Mldndc 4 0 1 0 Walker2b 4 1 0 0
CGomzcf 3 00 0 PAIvrz3b 3 02 0
LHrndzp 0 00 0 McKnrc 2 1 1 1
Lucroyph 0 0 0 0 Barmesss 3 00 0
Bianchiss 4 02 0 Karstnsp 3 1 1 1
Marcmp 1 00 0 Watsonp 0 00 0
Ishikawph 1 0 1 0 Grillip 0 00 0
Verasp 0 0 0 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
Morgancf 2 0 1 0
Totals 35 09 0 Totals 31 4 7 4
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0
Pittsburgh 000 040 OOx 4
E-C.Gomez (5), Bianchi (1). DP-Pittsburgh
1. LOB-Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 4. 2B-
Ar.Ramirez (42), Tabata (16), RAIvarez (19),
McKenry (11). CS-A.McCutchen (10).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
MarcumL,5-4 5 5 4 0 1 5
Veras 1 2 0 0 0 2
Li.Hernandez 2 0 0 0 0 3
Pittsburgh
KarstensW,5-3 7 7 0 0 0 4
WatsonH,14 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
GrilliH,28 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Hanrahan 1 2 0 0 1 1


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Colo


Rockies 4, Cubs 3
rado Chicago


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


LeMahi2b 4 1 0 0 DeJessrf 4 0 0 0
Pacheclb 4 0 2 0 Vitters3b 4 0 0 0
CGnzlzlf 3 00 1 Rizzolb 4 01 0
WRosrc 4 01 0 ASorin If 4 1 1 0
ABrwnrf 4 11 1 SCastro ss 4 01 0
Blckmnrf 0 00 0 WOastll c 3 1 0 0
Nelson3b 4 0 1 0 BJcksncf 3 1 2 2
Colvin cf 3 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 0 0 0
JHerrr ss 4 1 1 0 Raley p 2 0 0 0
Whitep 1 00 0 Corpasp 0 00 0
Rutledg ph 1 1 1 2 Hinshw p 0 0 0 0
CTorrsp 1 0 1 0 AlCarrp 0 0 0 0
Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Mather ph 1 0 1 0
WHarrs p 0 00 0 Camp p 0 00 0
Fowler ph 1 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 00 0
Totals 34 48 4 Totals 323 6 2
Colorado 000 021 100 4
Chicago 000 300 000 3
E-Nelson (9). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Col-
orado 6, Chicago 4. 2B-B.Jackson (3). HR-
A.Brown (1), Rutledge (7), B.Jackson (3).
CS-S.Castro (11), Mather (2).


Colorado
White
C.Torres W,3-1
Brothers H,13
W.Harris H,3
Betan. S,26-31
Chicago
Raley
Corpas L,0-1
Hinshaw
Al.Cabrera
Camp
Russell
WP-Al.Cabrera.


IP H

4 5
21-3 1
11-3 0
1-3 0
1 0


R ER BB SO

3 2 1 4
0 0 1 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1


2 3 4
2 0 2
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 1


White Sox 5, Mariners 4
Seattle Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Ackley 2b 5 1 2 0 Wise cf 5 1 2 1
TRonsn If 3 1 0 0 Youkils3b 2 1 2 0
JMontrdh 5 0 1 0 A.Dunndh 4 0 0 0
Seager3b 4 2 2 4 Konerklb 3 0 2 1
Smoaklb 3 0 2 0 Riosrf 4 1 2 1
Kawskpr 0 0 0 0 Przyns c 1 0 0 0
Olivo c 3 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 1 2 1
Jasoph-c 2 0 0 0 AIRmrzss 3 1 1 1
C.Wellsrf 2 0 0 0 JrDnksl If 3 0 0 0
Thamsph-rf 1 0 1 0 Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0
Figginscf 3 0 1 0
Ryan ss 4 0 1 0
Totals 35 4104 Totals 31 511 5
Seattle 300 000 001 4
Chicago 101 002 01x 5
DP-Seattle 2, Chicago 1. LOB-Seattle 11,
Chicago 8. 2B-Rios (30), AI.Ramirez (19).
HR-Seager 2 (15), Flowers (5). SB-Wise
(10). CS-Wise (1). S-T.Robinson. SF-
Al.Ramirez.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
BeavanhL,8-8 5 7 4 4 3 2
Furbush 12-32 0 0 0 0
Kinney 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Luetge 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Chicago
Quintana 52-35 3 3 4 4
N.JonesW,6-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornton H,21 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
MyersH,6 11-32 0 0 0 0
A.ReedS,24-28 1 2 1 1 0 1
Beavan pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Beavan (Youkilis), by Thornton (Sea-
ger). WP-Luetge. PB-Jaso.
Padres 9, D-backs 3


San Diego Arizona
ab r h bi
EvCarr ss 3 1 0 0 CYoung cf
Venalerf 4 1 1 0 A.Hill2b
Headly 3b 3 2 1 2 Kubel If
Quentin If 3 3 2 1 Gldsch lb
Denorfi If 0 0 0 0 J.Upton rf
Grandlc 3 1 1 1 MMntrc
Alonsolb 3 1 2 3 CJhnsn3b
Maybin cf 3 0 0 1 JMcDnI ss
Amarst 2b 3 0 0 1 Ziegler p
Richrd p 4 0 0 0 Shaw p
Burns p 0 0 0 0 lKnndy p
Albers p
GParra ph
Zagrsk p
Elmore ss
Totals 29 97 9 Totals
San Diego 100 113 030
Arizona 020 000 010


ab r h bi
4 00 0

4 3100
3 1 0 0
4 1 2 2
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 00 0
0 00 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 0

31 3 7 3
9
3


DP-San Diego 3. LOB-San Diego 3, Arizona
3. 2B-M.Montero (18), G.Parra (18). 3B-Ven-
able (7). HR-Headley (22), Quentin (14),
Alonso (7), A.Hill (19), J.Upton (10). CS-
Ev.Cabrera (1). S-Venable. SF-Headley,
Amarista.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Richard W,11-12 8 7 3 3 2 4
Burns 1 0 0 0 0 0
Arizona
I.KennedyL,11-11 51-34 6 6 4 6
Albers 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Zagurski 11-31 1 1 0 0
Ziegler 2-3 2 2 2 2 0
Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by I.Kennedy (Quentin).
AL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
Trout LAA 104 423 99 143 .338
JeterNYY 124 531 81 173 .326
MiCabreraDet 126 490 83 159 .324
KonerkoCWS 109 408 53 130 .319
MauerMin 117 434 67 136 .313
BeltreTex 122 476 73 149 .313
Fielder Det 126 456 67 141 .309
Revere Min 89 374 50 115 .307
CanoNYY 125 483 76 148 .306
AJacksonDet 104 413 79 126 .305
Home Runs
ADunn, Chicago, 38; Encarnacion, Toronto,
34; Hamilton, Texas, 34; MiCabrera, Detroit, 32;
Granderson, New York, 32; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 31; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30.
Runs Batted In
Hamilton, Texas, 107; MiCabrera, Detroit,
106; Willingham, Minnesota, 91; Fielder, Detroit,
89; Encarnacion, Toronto, 88; ADunn, Chicago,
87; AdGonzalez, Boston, 86; Pujols, Los Ange-
les, 86.
Pitching
Weaver, Los Angeles, 16-3; Price, Tampa
Bay, 16-4; Sale, Chicago, 15-4; MHarrison,
Texas, 15-7; Sabathia, New York, 13-3;
Scherzer, Detroit, 13-6; Vargas, Seattle, 13-8.
NL leaders
G AB R H Pct.
MeCabrera SF 113 459 84 159 .346
AMcCutchen Pit 122 462 88 160 .346
YMolina StL 107 400 50 131 .328
PoseySF 114 405 57 132 .326
DWright NYM 123 454 75 144 .317
CGonzalez Col 112 441 79 138 .313
Fowler Col 115 376 67 115 .306
Holliday StL 123 477 80 145 .304
BraunMil 117 451 82 137 .304
AltuveHou 118 471 68 141 .299
Home Runs
Braun, Milwaukee, 34; Beltran, St. Louis, 28;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 27; Stanton, Miami, 27;
Kubel, Arizona, 26; Ludwick, Cincinnati, 25; AM-
cCutchen, Pittsburgh, 24.
Runs Batted In
Beltran, St. Louis, 85; Braun, Milwaukee, 85;
Holliday, St. Louis, 85; Bruce, Cincinnati, 81;
FFreeman, Atlanta, 81; CGonzalez, Colorado,
81; Headley San Diego, 80; Posey, San Fran-
cisco, 80.
Pitching
Dickey, New York, 16-4; Cueto, Cincinnati,
16-6; GGonzalez, Washington, 16-7; AJBur-
nett, Pittsburgh, 15-4; Strasburg, Washington,
15-5; Hamels, Philadelphia, 14-6; Miley, Ari-
zona, 14-8.


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.... CASH 3 (early)
9-8-1
CASH 3 (late)
t P ,4-7-2

2-2-9-2
PLAY 4 (late)
4-7-0-5
LOTTERY
1 18 -23-27-33-36
XTRA
Florida Lotry 4

POWERBALL Fantasy 5 numbers were
1 6 7 20 49 unavailable at press time.
POWER BALL Please see Monday's
23 paper for the results.


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: IRWIN Tools Night Race
(Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma
11 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
11 a.m. (ESPN) Consolation Game: Panama vs. California
3 p.m. (ABC) Championship Game: Tennessee vs. Japan
MLB
1 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Detroit
Tigers
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Colorado Rockies at Chicago Cubs
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Los Angeles Dodgers
8 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants
BICYCLING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) USA Pro Challenge Stage 7
4 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Pro Challenge: Stage 7
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Mosconi Cup (Taped)
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Alcoa (Tenn.) at Maryville (Tenn.)
3 p.m. (ESPN) University (Fla.) at Trotwood-Madison (Ohio)
NFL
4 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco 49ers at Denver Broncos
8 p.m. (NBC) Carolina Panthers at New York Jets
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Atlanta Falcons at Miami Dolphins (Taped)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Johnnie Walker
Championship Final Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: The Barclays Final Round
2 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: The Barclays Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: CN Canadian Women's Open
Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Boeing Classic Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
LACROSSE
3 p.m. (ESPN2) MLL Championship: Teams TBA
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Pumas U.N.A.M. vs Cruz Azul
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) FC Dallas at Los Angeles Galaxy
9 p.m. (ESPN2) New York Red Bulls at Sporting Kansas
City
2:50 a.m. (ESPN2) FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup: United
States vs. Germany
SOFTBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NPF Championship Series Game 3:
Teams TBA (If necessary)
TENNIS
12 p.m. (CBS) Arthur Ashe Kids' Day (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


NFL preseason
standings


New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo
Miami

Houston
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Indianapolis

Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

San Diego
Denver
Kansas City
Oakland


Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants

Tampa Bay
Carolina
Atlanta
New Orleans

Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota

Seattle
San Francisco
St. Louis
Arizona


AFC
East
W L T
1 2 0
0 2 0
0 3 0
0 3 0
South
W L T
2 0 0
2 1 0
2 1 0
1 2 0
North
W L T
2 1 0
2 1 0
2 1 0
2 1 0
West
W L T
3 0 0
1 1 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
NFC
East
W L T
3 0 0
2 1 0
1 1 0
1 2 0
South
W L T
2 1 0
1 1 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
North
W L T
2 1 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
West
W L T
3 0 0
1 1 0
S 11 0
1 3 0


Thursday's Games
Green Bay 27, Cincinnati 13
Baltimore 48, Jacksonville 17
Tennessee 32, Arizona 27
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay 30, New England 28
Philadelphia 27, Cleveland 10
Atlanta 23, Miami 6
San Diego 12, Minnesota 10
Seattle 44, Kansas City 14
Chicago 20, N.Y. Giants 17
Saturday's Games
Washington 30, Indianapolis 17
Oakland 31, Detroit 20
Pittsburgh 38, Buffalo 7
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8 p.m.


Sunday's Games
San Francisco at Denver, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Jets, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 29
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
New England at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 30
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 6:35 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 7p.m.
New Orleans at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Detroit, 7p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:05 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 11 p.m.



Champions Tour

Boeing Classic
Saturday
AtTPC Snoqualmie Ridge, Snoqualmie,
Wash.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 7,183, Par 72
Second Round
Note: Partial list of scores
Tom Jenkins 70-65-135 -9
Willie Wood 69-68-137 -7
David Eger 70-68-138 -6
Mike Reid 70-68-138 -6
Mark O'Meara 74-64 -138 -6
Mark Calcavecchia 65-73-138 -6
Jay Don Blake 68-70- 138 -6
John Huston 71-68- 139 -5
Mark Brooks 71-68-139 -5
John Cook 70-69-139 -5
Rod Spittle 69-70-139 -5
Joel Edwards 69-70-139 -5
Scott Simpson 72-68- 140 -4
Fred Funk 71-69-140 -4
Tom Kite 69-71 -140 -4
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 69-71 -140 -4
Tom Byrum 71-70 -141 -3
Michael Allen 73-68-141 -3
Joey Sindelar 71-70-141 -3
Brad Faxon 69-72-141 -3
Jeff Sluman 68-73-141 -3
Steve Pate 68-73 -141 -3
Steve Lowery 72-70 -142 -2
Hale Irwin 72-70-142 -2
Gene Sauers 71-71 -142 -2
David Frost 72-70 -142 -2
Corey Pavin 71-71 -142 -2
Olin Browne 71-71 -142 -2
Bernhard Langer 73-69 -142 -2
Jeff Freeman 73-69-142 -2
Kenny Perry 70-72 -142 -2
Morris Hatalsky 74-68-142 -2
KirkTriplett 68-74 -142 -2
Bill Glasson 72-71 -143 -1
Dan Forsman 72-71 -143 -1
Jeff Hart 71-72-143 -1
Dick Mast 72-71 -143 -1


Luck, RGIII impress


Redskins kick

Colts during

preseason game

Associated Press

LANDOVER, Md. An-
drew Luck and Robert Grif-
fin III were both impressive
Saturday as the Washington
Redskins beat the Indi-
anapolis Colts 30-17 in a
matchup of the top two
picks in the NFL draft
No. 1 selection Luck com-
pleted 14 of 23 passes for
151 yards and a 31-yard
touchdown to fellow rookie
T.Y Hilton.
No. 2 pick Griffin went 11
for 17 for 74 yards and a 4-
yard scoring throw to San-
tana Moss.
Both played one series
into the third quarter in the
teams' dress rehearsal for
the regular season, with the
Redskins ahead 14-7 when
the subs took over.
Rex Grossman threw two
second-half touchdown
passes for the Redskins.
Raiders 31, Lions 20
OAKLAND, Calif. Matthew
Stafford threw for 68 yards until
leaving with an injury to his
non-throwing hand in the De-
troit Lions' 31-20 loss to the
Oakland Raiders on Saturday.
Defensive end Dave Tollef-
son drove Stafford to the
ground after an incomplete




Denny Hamlin picks up
first Bristol victory
BRISTOL, Tenn. Denny
Hamlin won for the first time at
Bristol Motor Speedway with a
calculated late pass.
Hamlin flirted with Carl Ed-
wards for the lead late in the race,
and set up his move with 39 laps
remaining Saturday night. Hamlin
used a slide move to get past Ed-
wards, then held on as Edwards
tried to use a cross-over move to
get back in front.
It didn't work for Edwards,
and Hamlin drove away for his
third victory of the season.
Jimmie Johnson finished sec-
ond and clinched a berth in the
Chase for the Sprint Cup cham-
pionship. Greg Biffle and Dale
Earnhardt Jr. also locked down
spots in the 12-driver field.
Jeff Gordon was third, fol-
lowed by Brian Vickers and
Marcos Ambrose.
Chapman honored
as Angler of the Year
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Brent
Chapman was honored Satur-
day as the Bassmaster Angler
of the Year.
Chapman, from Lake
Quivira, Kan., received a
$100,000 prize.
"This is what we all strive for,"
Chapman said as he accepted
award at The Great New York



RAYS
Continued from Page BI

Smith put the Athletics
up 4-1 with his 12th homer
in the third.
The Rays loaded the
bases with no outs during
the second, but only man-
aged one run on Lobaton's
sacrifice fly. They also got
a solo homer from
Desmond Jennings in the
fifth.
Hellickson yielded six
hits, struck out five and
walked none in five in-
nings.
Tampa Bay reliever J.P
Howell extended his team-



BUCS
Continued from Page B1

a Patriots lineman into the
back of Joseph's leg. The sev-
enth-year pro remained on
the ground for several min-
utes, clutching his knee be-
fore leaving the field on a
cart
"The guy did an inside
move. (Penn) recovered and


his man went down and fell
on the back of Davin," Schi-
ano said. "It's one of those
wrong place, wrong time
things."
Reserve Ted Larsen re-
placed Joseph at right guard
against the Patriots, however
Schiano is not ready to say
the third-year pro will be the
Bucs' opening day starter
Larsen started 14 games
for the Bucs (No. 26 in the AP


Associated Press
Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III throws a
pass during an NFL preseason game Saturday against the
Indianapolis Colts in Landover, Md.


pass in the second quarter.
Team trainers wrapped
Stafford's left hand in heavy
bandages and a brace on the
sideline. Shaun Hill took over
on Detroit's next possession.
Oakland sidelined several
more Detroit players.
Cornerback Bill Bentley de-
parted with a shoulder injury
and Chris Houston with a left
ankle injury for the Lions (tied
for No. 11 in the AP Pro32).
Running back Kevin Smith also
left with a right ankle injury and
trainers wrapped bandages
around Mikel Leshoure's mid-
section after his final run.
Steelers 38, Bills 7
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -
Receiver Antonio Brown scored
two touchdowns in leading the


Sports BRIEFS


Pittsburgh Steelers to a 38-7
preseason rout over the Buffalo
Bills on Saturday night.
Ben Roethlisberger shook off
a slow start by engineering an
11-play, 98-yard touchdown
drive for the go-ahead score
with a 6-yard pass to Brown at
the end of the first half. Brown
then opened the second half
with a 39-yard touchdown catch
from backup Byron Leftwich in
helping the Steelers (No. 7 in
the AP Pro32) improve to 2-1.
Fred Jackson scored on a 1-
yard plunge, and high-priced
defensive end Mario Williams
had two sacks for the Bills
(No.9), who dropped to 0-3.
The Bills' starting offense sput-
tered in producing just one
score despite five of seven
drives into Steelers territory.


Associated Press
Denny Hamlin smiles in victory lane after winning the Sprint
Cup race Saturday in Bristol, Tenn.


State Fair. "I feel like a huge
weight has been taken off my
back. To achieve a lifetime goal
- well, I've never done that be-
fore. It's probably going to take
several days before it sinks in.
It's truly unbelievable."
Kevin VanDam of Kalamazoo,
Mich., won the title the last four
years and seven times overall.
"It's been a good run," Van-
Dam said. "I was trying to make it
five. A lot of these guys have
stepped up their game, and that's
what great about this sport."
Brandon Card of Caryville,
Tenn., was the Bassmaster
Elite Series Rookie of the Year.
Clemens back on
the mound at 50
SUGAR LAND, Texas -


record shutout streak to 26
2-3 consecutive innings
after pitching a scoreless
seventh.
Both teams will have a
rare Sunday off because
Tropicana Field is one of
the venues being used for
the Republican National
Convention.
According to the Rays,
Oakland and Seattle did
not play the first Sunday
this season (April 8) due in
part to opening the regular
season in Japan. Before
that, the last time there
wasn't a game scheduled
on a Sunday was Sept. 10,
1995, when San Diego and
St. Louis were off because
of a scheduling conflict

Pro32) over the past two sea-
sons, primarily at left guard.
Another third-year pro,
Derek Hardman, is listed as
Joseph's backup on the depth
chart, and Schiano said there
are options to consider
"We're going to try to work
a couple of things ... and then
quickly come to a pecking
order," Schiano said.
"I think we have the an-
swer internally That's why
we've been trying to build
depth at all the positions,"
Schiano added. "But we al-
ways look outside. That's a
constant If there's somebody
we think fits our mold, we'll
try to do what we can to get
them."
Joseph, 28, is the leader of
an offensive line that's con-
sidered one of the strongest
assets of a team that went 4-
12 and ended last season on a
10-game losing streak.


Roger Clemens was back on
the mound at age 50, striking
out hitters again.
Pitching for the first time in
five years, Clemens tossed
3 1-3 scoreless innings Satur-
day night for the Sugar Land
Skeeters of the independent
Atlantic League.
Clemens faced the Bridge-
port Bluefish and struck out
two, including former major
leaguer Joey Gathright to start
the game. He allowed one hit
without a walk and threw 37
pitches.
Scouts from the Houston
Astros and Kansas City Royals
were on hand to watch
Clemens' comeback for
however long it lasts and
wherever it leads.


with the NFL's St. Louis
Rams at Busch Stadium.
NOTES: Reddick, who
began the day mired in 14-
for-94 slide, was dropped
from third to sixth in the
lineup. "Anytime a guy
goes through some strug-
gles, you want to change it
up a little bit," Melvin said.
"We expect him back in the
three-spot before long."
Reddick went 3 for 4, in-
cluding a double. ... Hel-
lickson threw 41 pitches in
the first. ... Carter has hit
eight of 11 homers this sea-
son on the road. ... The
Rays allowed four or more
runs in consecutive games
for the first time since July
7-8 against Cleveland.

The offseason acquisition
of free agent All-Pro left
guard Carl Nicks gave the
Bucs what many believed
would be one of the best
guard tandems in the NFL
this season.
"It's unfortunate. Davin's
one of our leaders," quarter-
back Josh Freeman said after
Friday's game. "He's a tough
guy; a hard-working guy"
While Schiano will con-
sider several options to fill
Joseph's spot, the coach reit-
erated that with only one pre-
season game remaining it's
important to settle on a
course of action quickly to
give the replacement as
much time as possible to pre-
pare with the other starters
for the Sept 9 season opener
against Carolina.
"It's part of the deal," the
coach said. "Everything
moves on."


B4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garcia's lead builds


Associated Press
Sergio Garcia hits his tee shot on the fifth hole of the third round of The Barclays golf tournament Saturday at Bethpage
State Park in Farmingdale, N.Y.


Golfer has

2-shot lead at

The Barclays

Associated Press

FARMINGDALE, N.Y. -
The greens were so fast that
Sergio Garcia didn't know
when the ball was going to
stop. He was happy to see
the day end with a 2-under
69, giving him a two-shot
lead over Nick Watney
going into the final round of
The Barclays.
Garcia fell out of the lead
with a three-putt bogey on
the third hole, but he didn't
have another one the rest of
the round on a Bethpage
Black course that lived up to
is tough reputation Saturday
because of greens that re-
minded players of another
course on Long Island.
Shinnecock Hills came
up more than once. That's
when the USGA lost control
of the greens in the final
round of the U.S. Open, and
even had to water one
green in the middle of the
round. Bethpage wasn't
that bad, but it was close.
Watney, who made five
putts over 15 feet, three-
putted the final hole when
his putt went racing 10 feet
by the cup. He had to settle
for a 71, giving him another


round in the final group
with Garcia.
"Hopefully, the pins will
be in spots where there's
some grass on the greens
and the ball will stop
rolling," Watney said.
Tiger Woods, who started
the third round three shots
out of the lead, three-
putted for bogey three
times on the front nine
alone. He had another
three-putt on the 14th hole,
this one from 15 feet, and
had a 72 that put him six
shots behind.
"I don't remember blow-
ing putts by 8 to 10 feet,"
Woods said. "So that was a
bit of a shocker"
Garcia went four years
without winning on the PGA
Tour and now has a chance
to make it two in a row. He
was at 10-under 203, and
only four players were
within four shots of the lead.
Kevin Stadler played
early, when the greens still
had some moisture, and had
a remarkable round of 65
without any bogeys. He
moved up from a tie for
42nd to alone in third place,
three shots behind. Brandt
Snedeker started strong and
closed with nine pars, which
was equally impressive, for
a 68 that put him four back
Phil Mickelson might still
be in the game. Twice a run-
ner-up at Bethpage Black-
both times in the U.S. Open


- Mickelson played early
Saturday and had a 67. That
eventually put him in the
large group at 4-under 209
that included Woods, Louis
Oosthuizen, Lee Westwood
and Charl Schwartzel, an
impressive collection of
players who have either
won a major or been No. 1
in the world.
15-year-old Lydia Ko
leads in Canada
COQUITLAM, British Colum-
bia Lydia Ko took a one-
stroke lead Saturday in the
Canadian Women's Open in
her bid to become the youngest
winner in LPGA Tour history,
shooting an even-par 72.
The 15-year-old South Ko-
rean-born New Zealander had
an 8-under 208 total at The
Vancouver Golf Club.
Also trying to become the
fifth amateur winner and first
since JoAnne Carner in the
1969 Burdine's Invitational, Ko
won the U.S. Women's Ama-
teur two weeks ago. In January,
she won the New South Wales
Open in Australia at 14 to be-
come the youngest player to
win a professional tour event.
Lexi Thompson is the
youngest LPGA Tour winner,
taking the Navistar LPGA Clas-
sic last September at 16.
Ko bogeyed the par-4 18th,
making a 5-foot putt after her
4-foot par try lipped out.


Lawrie shoots 67,
takes 1-shot lead
GLENEAGLES, Scotland -
Paul Lawrie of Scotland shot a
5-under 67 in the third round of
the Johnnie Walker Champi-
onship at Gleneagles on Satur-
day to take a one-stroke lead.
Lawrie's 12-under 204 puts
him one ahead of Frenchman
Romain Wattel, who had 10
birdies for a 63. Stephen Gal-
lacher (65) of Scotland is an-
other two shots back.
Lawrie, who will be making
his Ryder Cup return next month
after a 13-year absence, had
seven birdies in his round with
just two bogeys in pursuit of his
second Tour title of the year.
Earlier this year, Lawrie won
his second Qatar Masters title,
a win that sent him to second
on the European Ryder Cup
points table.
Tom Jenkins leads
Boeing Classic
SNOQUALMIE, Wash. -
Tom Jenkins holed out for
eagle on the par-4 third hole
and finished with a bogey-free
7-under 65 to take a three-shot
lead in the Boeing Classic.
The 64-year-old Jenkins is
trying to become the oldest
winner in Champions Tour his-
tory. Mike Fetchick was 63
when he won the 1985 Hilton
Head Seniors Invitational.
Jenkins had a 9-under 135
total at TPC Snoqualmie
Ridge.


PGA Tour

The Barclays
Saturday
At Bethpage State Park, Black Course,
Farmingdale, N.Y.
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,468, Par 71
Third Round


Sergio Garcia
Nick Watney
Kevin Stadler
Brandt Snedeker
Bob Estes
Brian Harman
Greg Chalmers
Ryan Moore
John Senden
Phil Mickelson
William McGirt
Tim Clark
Louis Oosthuizen
Lee Westwood
Tom Gillis
Charl Schwartzel
Tiger Woods
David Hearn
Bubba Watson
Harris English
Dustin Johnson
Ryan Palmer
Rory Mcllroy
Luke Donald
Geoff Ogilvy
Vijay Singh
Roberto Castro
JoshTeater
Ernie Els
Carl Pettersson
Rickie Fowler
Ricky Barnes
Scott Stallings
Greg Owen
Jonas Blixt
Matt Kuchar
Steve Stricker
Tommy Gainey
J.B. Holmes
Adam Scott
Bo Van Pelt
Pat Perez
Bryce Molder
George McNeill
Billy Mayfair
Bud Cauley
Graham DeLaet
Troy Kelly
Jimmy Walker
Padraig Harrington
Gary Christian
John Huh
Brian Gay
Zach Johnson
John Rollins
lan Poulter
Chris Kirk
Martin Laird
Sean O'Hair
Trevor Immelman
Michael Thompson
Henrik Stenson
Rod Pampling
Jeff Maggert
Kevin Streelman
Troy Matteson
Jason Day
Charles Howell III
James Driscoll
Robert Garrigus
Blake Adams
Fredrik Jacobson
Justin Rose
K.J. Choi
Seung-Yul Noh


66-68-69
65-69-71 -
72-69-65
70-69-68
69-66-72
65-75-68
70-70-68
69-69-70
68-68-72
68-74-67-
68-74-67-
70-72-67-
70-71-68-
69-72-68
69-72-68
71-69-69-
68-69-72
70-73-67-
70-70-70
70-69-71 -
67-71-72-
75-68-68
69-73-69-
68-74-69
70-72-69-
68-67-76
76-67-69
72-71-69-
68-72-72
73-66-73
67-70-75
71-72-70-
72-70-71 -
68-73-72
67-73-73
72-68-73-
69-71-73-
70-70-73
71-69-73-
70-69-74
70-69-74
66-70-77-
70-73-71 -
67-76-71 -
71-72-71 -
71-71-72-
75-67-72
74-66-74
66-74-74
64-75-75-
66-71-77-
70-67-77-
71-72-72-
68-75-72
72-69-74
68-71-76-
68-71-76-
70-68-77-
71-72-73-
75-66-75
71-68-77-
73-65-78-
70-73-74-
69-74-74-
69-72-76
68-73-76
70-70-77-
71-69-77-
73-70-75-
73-68-77-
71-69-78-
71-68-79-
67-72-79-
67-71-80-
71-71-78-


LPGA Tour

Canadian Open
Saturday
At The Vancouver Golf Club, Coquitlam,
British Columbia
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,681, Par 72
Third Round
a-amateur
a-Lydia Ko 68-68-72 208 -8
Stacy Lewis 72-71-66 209 -7
Jiyai Shin 70-70-69 209 -7
Inbee Park 68-71-70- 209 -7
Chella Choi 72-64-73 209 -7
Sydnee Michaels 70-72-69-211 -5


Moira Dunn
Anna Nordqvist
Mina Harigae
Taylor Coutu
Vicky Hurst
NaYeon Choi
Catriona Matthew
Jenny Shin
Suzann Pettersen
Angela Stanford
Cristie Kerr
Julieta Granada
Jessica Korda
Jane Rah
Hee-Won Han
Brittany Lincicome
Azahara Munoz
Karrie Webb
Haeji Kang
Dewi Claire Schreefel
Mika Miyazato
YaniTseng
Amy Yang
Jane Park
Katherine Hull
Eun-Hee Ji
Gerina Piller
Jessica Shepley
Sophie Gustafson
Paige Mackenzie
Sun Young Yoo
Cindy LaCrosse
SoYeon Park
Stacy Prammanasudh
Nicole Castrale
Hee Young Park
Brittany Lang
Jodi Ewart
llhee Lee
Meena Lee
Hee Kyung Seo
Marcy Hart
Mo Martin
Laura Diaz
Alison Walshe
Natalie Gulbis
Jee Young Lee
Belen Mozo
Mariajo Uribe
Sandra Gal


69-70-72
74-70-68
73-70-69
71-70-71
70-70-72
67-72-73
74-72-67
71-70-72
71-69-73
69-70-74
71-75-68
72-73-69
72-71-71
71-71-72
73-73-69
72-73-70
73-71-71
71-73-71
72-71-72
72-71-72
71-71-73
66-75-74
70-76-70
72-73-71
73-71-72
70-77-70
73-74-70
73-74-70
72-74-71
70-76-71
72-74-71
72-73-72
74-71-72
72-73-72
72-72-73
73-69-75
71-70-76
73-73-72
73-73-72
72-74-72
75-71-72
75-70-73
74-71-73
71-71-76
72-75-72
74-72-73
69-76-74
71-72-76
72-71-76
75-72-73


Numa Gulyanamitta 76-71-73-- 220 +4
Jennie Lee 73-74-73 220 +4
Janice Moodie 71-76-73 220 +4
Jennifer Rosales 77-70-73 220 +4
Amanda Blumenherst 74-73-74 221 +5
Kristy McPherson 77-70-74 221 +5
Lizette Salas 73-74-74 221 +5
Paula Creamer 74-72-75 221 +5
Katie Futcher 73-73-75 221 +5
Becky Morgan 71-73-77-221 +5
Shanshan Feng 75-72-75 -222 +6
Cydney Clanton 72-72-78 222 +6
Christine Song 70-73-79 222 +6
Irene Cho 74-73-76 -223 +7
Hannah Yun 71-76-76-- 223 +7
Maria Hernandez 73-73-77-223 +7
Lisa Ferrero 73-72-79 224 +8
Christel Boeljon 73-74-78 225 +9
Beatriz Recari 74-73-78 225 +9
Sarah Jane Smith 74-73-78 225 +9
European PGA

Johnnie Walker Champ.
Saturday
At Gleneagles Hotel (PGA Centenary
Course), Gleneagles, Scotland
Purse: $2.2 million
Yardage: 7,060, Par: 72
Third Round
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 68-69-67 204
Romain Wattel, France 74-68-69 -205
Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 75-67-65-207
Gary Boyd, England 74-70-64 -208
M. Lafeber, Netherlands 68-73-67-208
Brett Rumford, Australia 67-70-71 208
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-71-68 209
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 68-72-69 209
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 72-68-69- 209
Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 72-68-69 209
Knut Borsheim, Norway 67-73-69 209
Gregory Bourdy, France 72-66-71 -209
Richie Ramsay Scotland 69-71-70 210
NicolasColsaerts, Belgium 69-70-71 -210
David Howell, England 70-69-71 -210
Paul Waring, England 71-67-72 -210
Chris Doak, Scotland 76-66-69 211
Scott Pinckney United States 72-70-69-211
Alexander Noren, Sweden 72-69-70-211
Jorge Campillo, Spain 73-68-70 -211
Francesco Molinari, Italy 68-72-71 -211
Mark Foster, England 68-68-75-211


Tennessee wins historic game Armstrong at peace


Southeast with decision


champs will

meet apan

Associated Press

SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT,
Pa. Brock Myers' hit a tie-
breaking double, and
Goodlettsville, Tenn., gave
up a 10-run lead in the bot-
tom of the sixth before scor-
ing nine in the seventh in a
24-16 victory Saturday over
Petaluma, Calif., for a berth
in the Little League World
Series title game.
Only California's 10-run
comeback to send the game
into extra innings tied at 15
could overshadow Ten-
nessee slugger Lorenzo But-
ler's extraordinary day at
the plate. Butler set a single-
game record with nine RBIs,
and tied a record with three
homers to lead Tennessee.
Cole Tomei had a two-run
double in the sixth, and
Hance Smith's solo shot
with two outs gave Califor-
nia an improbable 15-15 tie.
Tennessee finally held on
in the bottom of the seventh to
win the U.S. championship.
Tennessee will face Tokyo
on Sunday after Japan beat
Aguadulce, Panama, 10-2 in
the international final.
Luke Brown's strikeout to
end the game set off a wild
celebration on the field, be-
fore the two teams ex-
changed customary
postgame handshakes.
California and Tennessee
played a Little League classic.
The teams combined for 40
runs another World Series
record in a game that
lasted more than three hours.
But only Tennessee gets


Associated Press
Goodlettsville, Tenn.'s Lorenzo Butler, center, celebrates with teammates after hitting a
three-run home run against Petaluma, Calif., in the fourth inning Saturday of the U.S. cham-
pionship baseball game at the Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pa. Butler
hit three home runs and had nine RBIs in his team's 24-16 victory.


to move on to Sunday's
World Series title game
against Japan.
The U.S. title game looked
as though it might also be a
blowout with Tennessee
leading 15-5 in the sixth.
That's when Petaluma
powered up at the plate.
Every run that drew Cali-
fornia closer turned up the
intensity in the Lamade Sta-
dium stands. "Petaluma!
Petaluma!" California's fans
pleaded throughout the sixth.
Smith's homer finally
completed the comeback.
And soon enough, Ten-
nessee surged ahead again
with nine runs in the seventh.
Logan Douglas scored on
an error for California in
the bottom of the seventh
with two outs to make it 24-
16, and anxious fans won-
dered again if Petaluma
could pull off another


miraculous rally
It wasn't to be after
Brown's game-ending
strikeout
Tennessee players con-
verged near third base,
throwing their gloves in the
air before collapsing to the
ground in delight.
Butler had such a big day
at the plate his name at one
point was a trending topic
on Twitter. He hit a trio of
three-run homers, including
the final one the opposite
way to right in the sixth to
make it 15-5.
After each blast, he
looked calm in the dugout,
seeming as collected as a
big-league hitter in a tense
playoff game.
Japan relied on the bats
in the early game, too, get-
ting five homers, including
two from 13-year-old slugger
Kotaro Kiyomiya, for the in-


international championship.
The 6-foot Kiyomiya is im-
posing at the plate, and he
set the tone early with a
first-inning blast that sailed
deep down the right-field
line.
Edisson Gonzalez had an
RBI single in the first while
Daniel Castro added a run-
scoring double in the sec-
ond for Panama. Those runs
got Panama to 4-2 going into
the third.
But Japan didn't let up.
Rintaro Hirano homered
to center in the third before
Kiyomiya went deep again
in the fourth, this time the
opposite way to left-center
to make it 7-2.
Starter Yuta Ishida al-
lowed four hits and struck
out six over four innings,
while three relievers com-
bined for two shutout in-
nings to close out the game.


Associated Press

ASPEN, Colo. Lance
Armstrong was feeling just
fine even after being
beaten by a lanky teenager
in a grueling 36-mile moun-
tain bike race.
Better than fine, even.
He's more at ease now than
he has been in a decade.
In his first interview
since the U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency disciplined Arm-
strong with a lifetime ban
from professional cycling
and vacated his seven Tour
de France titles, he said,
"Nobody needs to cry for
me. I'm going to be great."
Armstrong couldn't catch
Keegan Swirbul at the
Power of Four bike race
Saturday, finishing nearly
five minutes behind the
hard-charging kid.
"It's cool to get your butt
kicked by a 16-year-old
when you know he has a
bright future," Armstrong
said, smiling.
For a few hours, Arm-
strong was back in his el-


ement on a bike and in
a race.
No controversies weigh-
ing him down, either.
The escape into the
mountains around Aspen
was almost refreshing. He
took the time to enjoy a
bright, blue day and soak in
the scenery
Before leaving, though,
he posed for pictures with
the throng of fans that gath-
ered at the base of a ski lift
to watch the racers finish.
Asked if there was any-
thing he would to say to his
fans, the ones who've sup-
ported him through the
controversy, he said: "I
think people understand
that we've got a lot of stuff
to do going forward. That's
what I'm focused on and I
think people are support-
ive of that. It's great to be
out here."
Decked out in black and
gold and sporting a Live-
strong emblem on his jer-
sey, Armstrong tinkered
with his bike and gave a kiss
to girlfriend Anna Hansen.


Associated Press
Lance Armstrong guides his bicycle down the steps after
his second-place finish in the Power of Four mountain
bicycle race Saturday at the base of Aspen Mountain in
Aspen, Colo.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Singer Rufus Wainwright,
left, and boyfriend Jorn
Weisbrodt were married in
a ceremony Thursday.

Wainwright weds
fiance Weisbrodt
NEW YORK Musi-
cian Rufus Wainwright
has tied the knot.
Publicist Bianca Bian-
coni confirmed Wainwright
and Jorn Weisbrodt were
married in a ceremony
Thursday.
People reports the 39-
year-old musician and
the artistic director of the
Luminato Festival were
married by close friend
and artist Justin Vivian
Bond in a ceremony in
Montauk on Long Island.
Wainwright and Weis-
brodt have a 1-year-old
daughter together in a
parenting partnership
with Lorca Cohen, daugh-
ter of Leonard Cohen.
Wainwright and Weisbrodt
were engaged in 2010.

Williams not sure
if she'll dance
NEW YORK-- Will
Serena Williams dance at
the U.S. Open? The
Olympic singles cham-
pion isn't sure.
Williams caused a stir
with her
celebra-
tory "crip
walk"
dance
when she
beat
Maria
Shara-
Serena pova at
Williams the
Olympics
this month, but has noth-
ing planned if she wins
next month's Open. She
said the first dance was
impromptu. She adds: "I
have to win seven
matches, so we'll see."
The Wimbledon champ
joined fellow tennis play-
ers Victoria Azarenka,
the Bryan brothers and
James Blake at Thurs-
day's annual Taste of
Tennis, where top chefs
provide culinary delights
in an event for charity.
Blake brought his infant
daughter, who was cra-
dled by Williams.

'American Idor
tour in Providence
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
The Rhode Island native
who made it to the top 10
on last season's "Ameri-
can Idol" will be in Provi-
dence for the show's
summer tour
Erika Van Pelt of South
Kingstown and the other
finalists will perform Sun-
day at the Dunkin Donuts
Center as part of the
'American Idol Live!" tour
Van Pelt was elimi-
nated from the Fox show
in March. Phillip
Phillips, who suffered
through serious kidney
problems throughout the
competition, snagged the
winning share of the
record-high 132 million
viewer votes cast
-From wire reports


Pedal


power


Associated Press
Joseph Gordon-Levitt portrays a New York City bike messenger in a scene from "Premium Rush."

Review: Shannon rides away with 'Premium Rush'


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

Let's just be glad Smell-O-Vision
never caught on.
Thankfully, the musky odor of
sweaty bike messengers doesn't em-
anate from "Premium Rush," an en-
joyable, two-wheeled action film
and flashy ode to the subculture of
urban couriers.
It's a silly movie predicated on a
simple premise, but "Premium
Rush" is satisfying B-movie enter-
tainment that moves with the swift-
ness of a Schwinn a ride made
fun particularly by Michael Shan-
non's enthrallingly comic perform-
ance as a dirty cop in mad pursuit
of a bike messenger's cargo.
Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays Wilee,
a hardened New York City messen-
ger who's forsaken a promising ca-
reer in law for the freedom of riding
the city's congested streets. His dis-
patch (AasifMandvi) sends him on a
seemingly innocuous delivery, pick-
ing up an envelope at Columbia
University to be dropped off in Chi-
natown before 7 p.m.
Like any self-respecting NYC
bike messenger, Wilee rides a fixed-
gear bike, meaning there's one
speed and no brakes the more
hardcore and aesthetically appeal-
ing way to ride. "Brakes are death"
is his mantra. He revels in the art of
traffic navigation, pinpointing
routes through red lights, sidewalks
and crosstown lanes.
Director and co-writer David
Koepp is best known as a screen-
writer of blockbusters such as "Spi-
der-Man" and "Jurassic Park," but
who has sometimes directed like
the underrated Ricky Gervais com-
edy "Ghost Town." In "Rush," he
charts Wilee's paths with a "Cash
Cab"-like map and represents his
split-second decision-making with
visualizations of disastrous alterna-
tives (like veering left and side-
swiping a stroller).
But Wilee's pedal artistry is se-
verely tested when a man (Michael
Shannon) attempts to intercept his
delivery and aggressively pursues
him down the West Side. His moti-
vation is initially unclear, but
Koepp fills the film with flashbacks
to earlier in the day for exposition.
Such time-shifting is often a
clunky technique, but Koepp as-
sembles the backstories without hit-
ting too many potholes. The man,
Wilee soon learns, is a police officer
named Bobby Monday In flash-
backs, we learn his Pai Gow habit
and his temper have gotten him in
deep with Chinatown gamblers.
He's caught wind of Wilee's ship-
ment an envelope with a ticket


Birthday New people will be entering your life in the
year ahead and could become extremely important in some
of your affairs. One or more of them might have a positive
influence in furthering your ambitions.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) When trying to promote some-
thing important, use a soft sell rather than a hard pitch.
Your audience will be able to better visualize what you say
when you paint some verbal pictures.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Because you're equally as intu-
itive as you are logical, your business instincts could be
better than usual. With this combination working on your
behalf, it should spell big profit.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You won't have to do any-
thing out of the ordinary to attract attention. You won't go
unnoticed, regardless of the size of the crowd or type of
people in attendance.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Should you get involved


good for $50,000 and hunts it
recklessly
There are other backstories, too:
Wilee is feuding with his girlfriend,
Vanessa (Dania Ramirez), a fellow
messenger, whom he fears could be
lured by his courier rival, the beefy
Manny (Wole Parks).
As Wilee whose name is meant
to evoke the coyote, albeit with the
Road Runner's knack for escape -
careens through the city, he's also
pursued by a bike cop (stuntman
Christopher Place) in a variety of
chase scenes. One takes place below
an elevated subway, evoking a
smidge of "The French Connection."
But is cycling ready for its close-
up? "Premium Rush" arrives with
some timeliness, a kind of victory
lap for the country's growing cy-
cling culture and New York's in-
creasingly bike-friendly streets.
Wilee's Wild West and his trusty
steed are in some ways behind the
curve, as Mayor Bloomberg has
largely tamed the Manhattan grid
with color-coded bike paths.
Classic movie chase scenes are
nearly all of the automotive variety.
In one of Shannon's many fine mo-
ments, he curses disgustedly at such
flimsy prey: a mere bicycle. But the
many pursuit sequences which
are a long way from Paul Newman
riding to "Rain Drops Keep Fallin'
on My Head" in "Butch Cassidy and
the Sundance Kid" are largely
riveting. Koepp filmed them with-
out the aid of visual effects and the
precarious, unarmored position of


Today's HOROSCOPE

in something of a confidential nature, make sure that you
don't mention your plans to people who are not key play-
ers. There's no reason to involve outsiders.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Sometimes, people come
to us for advice but don't really listen to anything we have
to say. This won't be true in your case your reputation
will command respect and deference.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Many of your best ideas will
involve ways to further your ambitions and add to your re-
sources. This might encourage you to aim for many differ-
ent kinds of targets.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You're likely to make an in-
delible impression on others, not because of any heroic
deed, but because of all the little acts of thoughtfulness you
display.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Although you might not be in-
vited to participate in a friend's undertaking, you can create


Dania Ramirez portrays
Gordon-Levitt's girlfriend, Vanessa,
in the action movie "Premium Rush."
: Gordon-Levitt, left, is trying to
deliver a package in "Premium
Rush" while Michael Shannon,
portraying New York Detective
Monday, tries to steal the package.
a cyclist adds to the thrill: There is
skin in the game.
Gordon-Levitt, a wonderful young
actor, carries the film easily and does
well to capture the gritty underdog
mentality of the bike messenger (For
more on New York's couriers, see the
2001 documentary "Pedal.")
But it's Shannon who doesn't just
steal the film; he towers over it One
of the finest actors around, Shan-
non's gifts are best witnessed on the
stage or in last year's excellent
"Take Shelter" He is far more than
a great heavy, but he is, neverthe-
less, a great heavy.
His Detective Monday is a combi-
nation of desperation and exasper-
ation, a wide-eyed maniac
impatient with rage but not so im-
patient to make the kind of clever,
deranged asides Christopher
Walken would appreciate. Without
him, "Premium Rush" is a passable
diversion that mostly keeps in the
defined lanes of an action film.
But its course is entirely unpre-
dictable whenever Shannon is on
screen. A New Yorker himself,
Shannon gives the film which
sometimes uses the city as merely a
race track- much of its local flavor
When he screams "This whole city
hates you" at the bikers, he's chan-
neling a real gripe.
In a two-tire film, he's an 18-
wheeler
"Premium Rush," a Columbia
Pictures release, is rated PG-13 for
some violence, intense action se-
quences and language. Running
time: 91 minutes. Three stars out of
four


your own venture and perhaps have even more fun. Do
your own thing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Do what you want to do in
concert with others, rather than going it alone. Not only will
things be easier to pull of, you'll also have a lot more
laughs and the joy of being with others.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) When your artistic and cre-
ative attributes start vying for attention, find some time to
respond to them. Chances are you'll produce something of
beauty that'll last a lifetime.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) --You'll feel more satisfied if you
select activities that require both mental and physical agility.
Better yet, engage in games that stimulate competition.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Owing to the good auspices of
others, your possibilities for gain look exceptionally promis-
ing. You'll do especially well getting involved with persons
who have generous natures.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 24
Mega Money: 2 36 43 44
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $1,631
3-of-4 MB 37 $386.50
3-of-4 732 $58
2-of-4 MB 1,072 $27.50
1-of-4 MB 9,405 $3
2-of-4 22,570 $2
Fantasy 5:1 10 17 19 22
5-of-5 4 $55,946.47
4-of-5 418 $86
3-of-5 11,238 $8.50
THURSDAY, AUGUST 23
Fantasy 5:2 8- 11 13- 29
5-of-5 2 winners $102,203.43
4-of-5 298 $110.50
3-of-5 9,935 $9
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 26,
the 239th day of 2012. There
are 127 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 26, 1920, the 19th
Amendment to the U.S. Con-
stitution, guaranteeing Ameri-
can women the right to vote,
was certified in effect by Sec-
retary of State Bainbridge
Colby.
On this date:
In 55 B.C., Roman forces
under Julius Caesar invaded
Britain, with only limited
success.
In 1883, the island volcano
Krakatoa began cataclysmic
eruptions, leading to a massive
explosion the following day.
In 1910, Thomas Edison
demonstrated for reporters
an improved version of his
Kinetophone, a device for
showing a movie with syn-
chronized sound.
In 1958, Alaskans went to
the polls to overwhelmingly
vote in favor of statehood.
In 1961, the original
Hockey Hall of Fame was
opened in Toronto.
In 1971, New Jersey Gov.
William T. Cahill announced
the New York Giants football
team had agreed to leave
Yankee Stadium for a new
sports complex to be built in
East Rutherford.
Ten years ago: Vice Pres-
ident Dick Cheney, speaking
at a Veterans of Foreign
Wars convention in Ten-
nessee, warned the United
States could face devastating
consequences from any
delay in acting to remove
Saddam Hussein as presi-
dent of Iraq.
Five years ago: The $95
million Hawaii Superferry
made its maiden run from
Oahu to Maui, the first pas-
senger ferry service between
the islands. (However, the
ferry went out of business
two years later.)
One year ago: More than
2 million people along the
Eastern Seaboard were or-
dered to move to safer
ground as Hurricane Irene
approached the coast.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Washington Post Execu-
tive Editor Benjamin C.
Bradlee is 91. Actress
Francine York is 76. Former
Homeland Security Secretary
Tom Ridge is 67. NBA coach
Stan Van Gundy is 53. Coun-
try musician Jimmy Olander
(Diamond Rio) is 51. Actress
Melissa McCarthy is 42.
Actor Macaulay Culkin is 32.
Actor Chris Pine is 32.
Thought for Today:
"When the political colum-
nists say 'Every thinking man'


they mean themselves, and
when candidates appeal to
'Every intelligent voter' they
mean everybody who is
going to vote for them." -
Franklin P. Adams, American
journalist-humorist (1881-
1960).












COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Little
Tommy Tucker
teaches about
synthetic
drugs.
/Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks Wednesday during a campaign stop in North Las Vegas, Nev. : Republican presidential candidate Mitt
Romney speaks Wednesday during a campaign stop in Bettendorf, lowa.Obama needs to remind voters why they loved him in 2008. Romney needs
voters to get to know and like him better. And both must strike a balance with their conventions to fire up core backers without alienating unde-
cided voters who may well decide a close election.

Two different nationalpolitical conventions, much different goals for candidates


PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON

why they loved him in 2008. Mitt Rom-
ney needs for voters to get to know and
like him better
With polls showing the presidential race so
close, each candidate wants badly to host a
flawless political convention in the next two
weeks to gain the upper hand for the cam-
paign's fall homestretch.
These splashy conventions are intended to
rally the thousands of core Republican support-
ers who will flock to Tampa, Fla., next week, and
the Democratic loyalists who will descend on
Charlotte, N.C., the following week. But such
gatherings also are an opportunity to send care-
fully scripted messages to the millions of Amer-
icans watching on TV or on the Internet
To that end, Republicans and Democrats
alike agree that Obama and Romney must try
to strike a balance: fire up their backers with-
out alienating the undecided voters who tend
to decide close elections. How each accom-
plishes that task or falls short will have a
major influence on the rest of the campaign.
In a sign of Obama's strategy for Charlotte, he
has been targeting key demographics, tailoring
his speeches and his ad campaign to women,
older voters and, most recently, young people
who may not have been old enough to cast bal-
lots four years ago. The hope is to pick up sup-
port at the margins in what's expected to be a
tight contest until the end.
Romney, in turn, is certain to surround himself
with his large family in Tampa five sons, five
daughters-in-law and 18 grandchildren while
emphasizing shared American values as he
works to illustrate his life beyond his buttoned-


News ANALYSIS

down businessman image. Expect lots of focus on
his private sector resume, Olympics leadership
and tenure as Massachusetts governor
Outside events could add a wrinkle to the
best-laid plans.
A potential hurricane is bearing down. If it
hits Florida in a catastrophic way, both Rom-
ney and Obama must respond, mindful to bal-
ance an opportunity to show leadership with
the risk of politicizing a natural disaster Rom-
ney would have to decide whether to cancel or
postpone his convention. And Obama would
have to weigh whether to make a presidential
visit to a damage site possibly drawing criti-
cism for raining anew on his Republican rival's
parade.
A look at Obama and Romney's likely to-do
lists as they head into their conventions.
OBAMA
Rekindle the fire. Obama swept into the
White House after building a broad coalition of
support, boosting turnout among minorities
and young voters while attracting disaffected
Republicans and many independents with
promises of a new style of politics. Four years
later, he is an incumbent president with a
record of policies that divide the nation. Polls
show his support among minorities and young
voters has waned.
Remind Democrats of his liberal accom-
plishments. Obama needs liberals to work on
his behalf this fall. But the party's left wing has
complained often, despite actions he's taken on
its core issues. He signed a measure making it
easier for women to sue for pay discrimination.
He's ending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He
repealed a ban on gays and lesbians serving
openly in the military and became the first


president to endorse same-sex marriage.
Brag with humility Even backers acknowl-
edge that Obama at times can come across as
arrogant, a certain turnoff for on-the-fence vot-
ers, especially in tough economic times.
There's also a risk in coming across as overly
confident of victory in November So the presi-
dent is likely to walk a careful line between
promoting his administration's accomplish-
ments and paying deference to others who
played a role in his successes.
Cast Romney as unacceptable. Obama is
likely to leave the dirty work of damaging Rom-
ney to speakers who will take the podium in the
days before him. The message is designed to re-
mind voters of the choice they face includ-
ing accusations that Romney flip-flops on
issues, reminders of the vast personal wealth
that sets him apart from most voters and criti-
cism of his lack of foreign policy experience.
Obama advisers don't anticipate that he'll use
his acceptance speech to linger on Romney
ROMNEY
Introduce himself to voters. Americans still
don't know a lot about him even though he's es-
sentially been running for president for almost
a decade. So expect a convention focused on
Romney's business career, his time at the helm
of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games and his
tenure as Massachusetts governor His family
will play a prominent role, as will close associ-
ates who can vouch for him as both a person
and a leader He hopes to spend the four days
making the case for why voters should give him
the job, and countering Democratic character-
izations of him as a heartless, calculating busi-
ness tycoon.
Introduce the vice presidential nominee.
Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan was unknown to
See Page C3


Book relevant to current US foreign policy


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle

James Mann, "The Obamians"
(Viking, New York 2012, 392 pages)
$26.95.
MEm
Journalist James Mann in 2004
published the best-selling book
"Rise of the Vulcans," an account of
the development and ideas and in-
fluence of the George Bush II for-
eign policy advisers. The volume
was based on interviews with mem-
bers of Bush's foreign policy team.
Now Mann has taken the same ap-
proach and produced "The Obami-
ans," which is subtitled 'The Struggle
inside the White House to redefine
American Power" It is an important
and often intimate account of those
who had the ear (or want the ear) of
President Obama on global affairs.
The author observes that during
the presidential campaign of 2008,
Obama's foreign policy statements
sometimes seemed "squeamish"
about the use of force and "hinted"
at a more modest and less unilat-
eral foreign policy For example, he
called for a complete withdrawal
from Iraq as soon as practical. His
main primary competition was
Hillary Clinton who had voted to in-
vade Iraq (Obama voted against it).
(It should be noted that the book
praises Clinton for her important
role as Secretary of State.)
Obama did call for an increased
effort in Afghanistan a position


Book REVIEW


he reversed as the counter-insur-
gency effort there seemed less and
less likely to succeed.
One of the distinctions that this
book makes in comparing policies of
Bush II and Obama is that Obama
had a far larger number and range of
foreign policy advisers as opposed
to the picture presented in "The Vul-
cans" with a relatively narrow and
ideologically similar set of advisers.
Obviously the most important for-
eign policy issue for the new ad-
ministration has been the "Arab
Spring" starting in Tunisia and
spreading to Egypt and Libya. This
presented a difficult set of issues
because the Obama administration
had consistently said it wanted to
promote democracy abroad. In the
case of Egypt, when the pro-Ameri-
can Mubarak administration began
to crumble, it created dilemmas for
Washington. Do we push Mubarak
to step aside or continue our sup-
port for the military dictatorship?
Of course, finally, the White
House pushed Mubarak to resign
and now we await the policies of the
Muslim Brotherhood. Currently we
are witnessing an outbreak of a
bloody civil war in Syria between a
dictatorship and a diverse host of
opposition movements, often based
on religious loyalties. And all of this
leaves us to ask how would we react
to a democratic uprising in a coun-


try such as Saudi Arabia? Washing-
ton favors democratic governments.
but could we tolerate $10-a-gallon
gasoline if chaos broke out in the
Saudi kingdom?
As for Obama's position on the
Congressional War Powers amend-
ment giving the Congress more con-
trol over the use of the U.S. military
abroad, the author finds the Obama
administration to be characterized
as following a "pattern of bipartisan
hypocrisy" (p 295) As a Senator he
supported checks on the White
House's use of military force
abroad, but in the White House he
has preferred to circumvent the
Congressional influence.
In the conclusion of the book, the
author makes a series of interesting
generalizations. In terms of suc-
cessful efforts, he praises his ac-
tions in the war on terrorism as
illustrated by Osama bin Laden's
death and the increasing use of
drones in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Mann recognizes as "middling suc-
cesses" the president's reorienta-
tion to shift our focus on China as
our greatest potential rival in the
future as opposed to Russia.
As "notable failures," Mann
points to the continuing tensions in
the Israeli/Palestinian situation
(not the first president to face frus-
trations on that issue.) The author
also faults the administration's fu-


tile attempts to stop the nuclear
weapon development in North
Korea and Iran.
In view of the presidential cam-
paign, it might be useful to contrast
Obama's foreign policy vision with
that of Gov. Mitt Romney The
biggest difference is, without being
too blunt about it, Obama wants to
scale back the United States' role in
global affairs and he views China as
our major future problem. Of
course Obama sometimes slips into
the rhetoric of America's continu-
ing to dominate in global politics,
given the fact that we are no longer
the completely dominating world
power we once were. He would like
to scale back our commitments -
let the Europeans do more of the
global "heavy lifting."
In the case of Romney, we get a
more standard outlook: The United
States needs to keep a high level of
military spending and global com-
mitment because we have the obli-
gation to promote our ideals
abroad. We represent the planet's
best hope for stability. He also
seems to feel that our chief global
rivalry remains Russia. The Rom-
ney people are strongly pro-Israel
and doubtful about the idea of a
Palestinian state based on the 1967
borders. They distrust global organ-
izations such as the United Nations,
trade agreements and global warm-
ing conferences.
See Page C4


Leaving a

mark on the

community

Jimmy Carter was
president.
B.R. Quinn was
sheriff.
Citrus County had less
than 40,000 people living
here.
And Pete Burrell
worked in the Chronicle's
advertising department
When I first joined the
Chronicle back in the late
1970s, Pete was one of a
handful of salespeople
who worked for the
weekly newspaper
He had migrated to In-
verness from Long Island
and was a go-getter at a
far less complicated pe-
riod in our county's his-
tory It didn't seem odd at
the time, but one of Pete's
fellow salespersons was
Erin Arthurs, the daugh-
ter of then-owner David
Arthurs.
Erin used to roller skate
along Main Street and visit
her advertising clients.
Newspapers attract odd
people, and I have always
been proud to be one of
them.
Pete came into my of-
fice this week and told me
it was time to retire. I was
surprised that time had
moved that fast.
Back in 1978, Pete was
one of the guys who in-
vited me out for a beer
during my first week on
the job. We went to a place
on 41 North known as
Sweats and I got to watch
my very first fight in Cit-
rus County. For some un-
known reason, one guy
stood up and punched an-
other guy in the nose.
I knew right away I was
going to love this town.
Pete has been with the
Chronicle for much of that
time. He left for a short
period to run his own
coupon magazine, and I
brought him back 17 years
ago along with his coupon
book.
Many in the business
community know Pete be-
cause he has been work-
ing on the streets selling
advertising for decades.
He has been on the cham-
ber of commerce board
for more than 20 years
and has been deeply in-
volved in St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in
Lecanto. His wife Sue
teaches at Pope John Paul
II Catholic School.
For most readers, he's a
behind-the-scenes guy
who has seldom appeared
on our news pages. But he
has been one of the peo-
ple who have spent most
of his working life making
the newspaper better and
making Citrus County a
better place to live in.
He was always the first
to volunteer to work at a
chamber festival or help a
nonprofit agency raise
money.
No job was unimpor-
tant. If trash needed to be
picked up after the Straw-
berry Festival, Pete would
be out there working after
the crowds had gone
home and the sun set
Pete loved to serve
small businesses because
he knows they are the
backbone of our commu-
nity His level of customer
service was always at the
top of the list. There was
one legendary story about
Pete visiting a small ad-
vertiser in Inverness
every week even though
the businessperson didn't
regularly advertise.
He would stop by be-
cause the businessowner
See Page C4







Page C2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012



PINION


"In nature there are neither
rewards nor punishments; there
are only consequences."
Robert B. Ingersoll, 1833-1899


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ................. .................. HR director
Curt Ebitz................. ................ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris .......... .................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ......... ................ guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DOESN'T HOLD WATER




Bad decision on



well permit for



water bottling
W without consultation use such as agriculture, so the
with those potentially agency does not consider the
affected by the deci- final use in its determination
sion, the South- of whether to
west Florida issue a permit.
Water Manage- THE ISSUE: Regardless of
ment District Water management the rationale, this
(SWFWMD) has district permits was a bad decision.
issued permits bottled water plant It is based on a
that allow the well near state policy that
withdrawal of 28 King's Bay. allows a public re-
million gallons of source such as
water a year from OUR OPINION: water to be made
a site near the into a commodity
springs that feed A bad decision and taken for pri-
King's Bay based on bad policy. vate benefit with-
And the water is out payment. The
not being used in only fee collected
Citrus County. It is being by the state is a small permit
trucked to a water bottling fee, and there is no further
plant in Ocala. payment over the 10-year life
Michael Lusk, manager of of the permit for the water that
the Crystal River National is withdrawn, bottled and sold.
Wildlife Refuge, has expressed This is bad public policy
concern that the additional We urge our state leaders to
withdrawal could affect the amend the current policy that
flow of water into the springs, can make water a commodity
A SWFWMD spokeswoman to be transported and sold.
justified the decision based on This is a bad policy that could
the assertion that the with- ultimately be used to justify
drawal will not harm the envi- the transfer of water from one
ronment and that the region of the state to another.
drawdown will be confined to We also urge SWFWMD to
the immediate area of the well, reconsider this permit, to not
in an old lumber yard at 142 make additional decisions of
N.E. 11th St. this type until the study ofmin-
The first part of the justifica- imum flows is completed, and
tion is debatable, since the to consult with affected parties
agency has not yet completed when considering permits that
its study to determine what may affect them.
level of water withdrawal King's Bay is a jewel of Cit-
would damage the environ- rus County and the state of
ment. The second justification Florida. The flow of fresh
makes little sense, because the water into the springs is vital to
water that will be withdrawn maintain the environment of
and trucked off to Ocala is the bay Any decision that po-
water from the overall water- tentially threatens this flow is
shed that would supply the one that is neither in the inter-
springs that feed King's Bay if est of the county, nor the state.
it were not removed to supply Our state leaders should be
the bottling plant, aware of this fact, and state of-
According to the SWFWMD ficials should always opt to
spokeswoman, state law does protect this resource rather
not differentiate a permit for than to exploit it for private
bottled water from any other profit.


Missing the point
It must be nice to work for Citrus
County. Everyone has new county
vehicles. New school buses (are)
riding around mostly empty. Due to
the high crime rate, parents drive
their kids to school. The
school district has its own 0
health spa in Beverly Hills.
Our police department is
equipped to fight a small
war, travel around to com-
petitions and assist Tampa f'
for the convention. Our A
garbage dump employees
travel around for bulldozer C
rodeos. And what do we
get? Two columns daily of 563-
burglaries and theft re-
ports. Security companies
can't do a thing for businesses, due
to our high crime rate. They dis-
solved the Crystal River Police De-
partment and Inverness (Police)
Department and I haven't seen a
car patrol our neighborhood in
years. And our school district puts
out young adults who can't even
make change or get your order
right when you go shopping or to
the fast-food restaurants.
Where is the weather?
How come in the Citrus County
Chronicle, the weather map shows
so many NAs in the Beverly Hills
area? Seems like every other day,


I

-{


the weather report for that area is
NA. Why?
TV needs taming
Violence isn't the only thing they
need to change on TV. The way
they describe and discuss
!ND sex, you'd almost believe
JND they're going to show it in
OFF just a few years.
Connect the dots
I have a question for
Citrus County. I see
Hampshire from (County
Road) 491 in Lecanto,
heading west down
)579 Hampshire toward Elk-
cam; they paved both
sides of the road halfway
to the road and that's it.
They put the yellow lines down
and the white lines down, but no
reflectors down the road. Is this
just a half a job or what? They
have no more money? They're run-
ning out of money and can't even
afford reflectors?
Feed kids first
What kind of country are we liv-
ing in? There is not enough money
to meet the budget but there is
money for grants to buy iPads.
There are kids without a roof over
their head or any food and we are
giving away iPads? Is this nuts or
what?


A Big Ten strategy for GOP?


Conventions are the seventh-
inning stretches of presi-
dential politics, a pause to
consider the interminable prel-
ude and the coming climax. Re-
publicans gathering in
Tampa face an unusual
election in which they
do not have a substan-
tial advantage concern-
ing the most
presidential subject,
foreign policy. /
This is not because r-
their nominee has
weak foreign-policy
credentials, which are Georg
not weaker than OTH
Barack Obama's were
four years ago. And it is VOI
not because some of
Mitt Romney's policy expostula-
tions during the nominating
process -e.g., "We should not ne-
gotiate with the Taliban. We
should defeat the Taliban" --
promise a limitless elongation of
an 11-year exercise in mission
creep that the public is sensibly
eager to liquidate. And it is not
because there are no ominous po-
tentialities: Both Romney and
Obama seem committed to a third
regional war if, as is highly prob-
able, Iran continues to pursue nu-
clear weapons. (Israel could
make foreign policy central in the
U.S. campaign by striking Iran.)
And it is not because the world
has become tranquil although
the world, which Romney calls
"dangerous, destructive, chaotic,"
is less so than at any time since
the 1920s, measured by the likeli-
hood of people dying from organ-
ized violence.
Rather, the eclipse of foreign
policy is a result of this perverse
Obama accomplishment: He has
proved that the locution "growth
recession" is not oxymoronic. Dur-
ing this recovery, now in its fourth
year, the economy often has grown
so slowly that job creation rarely,
and then barely, matched the


H
(


growth of the workforce. Perhaps
Romney should rejoice that eco-
nomic anxieties have marginal-
ized foreign policy: The last time
a businessman was nominated in
a period of national se-
curity tensions Re-
publican Wendell
Willkie in 1940 he
lost.
There have been 11
elections since two
Democratic presidents
committed the United
States to a protracted
war of attrition in In-
e Will dochina John
|ER Kennedy by complicity
in regime-change by
CES coup; Lyndon Johnson
by incontinent escala-
tion. In those 11 elections, the
Democratic Party, wounded by its
riotous 1968 convention and its
1972 nomination of George Mc-
Govern, has elected just three
presidents. Jimmy Carter won
after Vietnam was lost. Bill Clin-
ton won after the Cold War was
won. Barack Obama won after the
nation had recoiled against for-
eign overreaching: Iraq.
The eclipse of foreign policy un-
derscores the rationality of Rom-
ney's selection of Paul Ryan. The
youngest vice presidential nomi-
nee since Dan Quayle in 1988,
Ryan guarantees that the Repub-
lican message certainly sublim-
inally, perhaps explicitly-will be
Obama's immaturity, which is writ
large in the childishness of his
characteristic rhetorical evasion:
Every difficult choice is, he says,
"a false choice." And the maturity
gap between the two tickets is un-
derscored by the serial buffoonery
of the oldest candidate for na-
tional office, the 69-year-old fel-
low currently a heartbeat away
from the presidency
One peculiarity of this political
season's first seven innings was
the selection of a fundamentally
non-ideological presidential nom-


inee by a Republican Party that,
under the beneficent influence of
the tea party, has never been more
ideological or more ideologically
homogenous. The Ryan selection
ameliorates this incongruity.
The incongruity, however, ex-
plains why Romney may be able
to win with a Big Ten strategy.
Until last year, when Nebraska
joined this athletic conference, it
extended from State College, Pa.,
to Iowa City, Iowa. Romney enters
the final innings competitive in
those two states, as well as Ohio,
Michigan and Wisconsin, which
means he is poised to correct a
Republican problem: The party
has been too dependent on the
South, understood as the 11 states
of the Confederacy, plus Okla-
homa and Kentucky
In the last five presidential
elections, Republican candidates
have received an average of 64
percent of their electoral votes
from the South. In 2000, George W
Bush became the first Republican
to win the presidency while losing
the electoral and popular votes
outside the South. The party's
Southern cast was one reason
John McCain in 2008 did not carry
any suburb contiguous to Boston,
New York, Philadelphia, Detroit
or Chicago.
Such places are habitats of per-
sons who by now may be lightly at-
tached Obama voters people
who like the idea of him but not
the results of him. As Holman W
Jenkins of The Wall StreetJournal
astutely writes, "Obama's great
political talent has been his knack
for granting his admirers permis-
sion to think highly of themselves
for thinking highly of him." Rom-
ney's great political challenge is to
wean them away by making them
faintly embarrassed about their
former infatuation.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTER > to the Editor


Questions linger
Re: "Sheriff's office admits
'human error' in hire," Page Al,
Aug. 9.
Your story and the sheriff's of-
fice's explanation leave a lot of
unanswered questions. They are
blaming a now retired HR clerk
for not completely checking the
names due to the prospective
employee's maiden name. Yet a
deputy ran her driver's license
and came up with the warrants.
This excuse does not hold up.
Isn't it the sheriff's office's pol-
icy to fingerprint applicants?
After all, they have the LiveScan
technology that scans and trans-
mits the prints electronically for
comparison. A fingerprint com-
parison would have identified
her as not only a wanted person,
but a convicted felon.
They continue to downplay
her position in the sheriff's of-
fice as "clerical," as though this
is a trivial position with low risk.
While it is true she was not a law
enforcement officer, this em-
ployee was a transcriber, who
takes dictation from deputies
preparing their incident reports.
Yes, that means this wanted
felon with a grand theft convic-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tion had full access to victims'
and witnesses' addresses, dates
of birth and Social Security
numbers, not to mention the sen-


sitive narrative section of the re-
ports where the criminal activ-
ity, victim, witness and offender
statements are documented. Fur-
ther, as an employee she had ac-
cess to areas of the building not
open to the public and was privy
to sensitive in-house conversa-
tions regarding ongoing
investigations.
While it appears Ms. Shea may
have paid her debt to society, to
some degree anyway, and was
living an honest and productive
life, this does not mean that she
meets the qualifications to be
employed in any capacity inside
the sensitive confines of a law
enforcement agency This negli-
gence goes far beyond that of a
now retire d convenient
scapegoat The HR director who
has sat in judgment of many an
employee should be investi-
gated. Further, a review of all
non-sworn employee files should
be made to ensure similar
"human errors" weren't commit-
ted. Fortunately, the FDLE rou-
tinely examines the files of all
newly hired and current
deputies, so we can be assured
there aren't any felons there.
Steven Burch
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


There's more to the Olympics than beach volleyball


here is nothing show off the greatness
quite like the of his superior race
Olympic games 7 was pretty much sin-
- country vs. country glehandedly derailed
with an unwavering by Jesse Owens, a
dedication to sports- black American.
manship. That was the Mexico City, 1968.
goal when the modern The black power salute
games were inaugu- by two American
rated in1896 and that medalists could not be
is still the way it is sup- Fred Brannen ignored anymore than
posed to be. A SLICE could the racial strife
Unfortunately, OF LIFE that was ongoing at
throughout the years, that time. Was it right
the games have been subjected to or was it wrong? Who's to say?
controversy; and, on one occasion, Munich, 1972. The murder of 11
they were struck by an unimagin- Israeli athletes by terrorists, still,
able tragedy to this day, seems surreal, but it
Berlin, 1936. Hitler's attempt to happened.


Moscow, 1980. A political deci-
sion to boycott the games, which
kept the Americans from compet-
ing, was as shameful as it was
idiotic.
Los Angeles, 1984. The same as
1980, except change "Americans"
to "Russians."
What about the most recent
London games?
As I'm sure many of you did, I
watched too many hours of televi-
sion while enjoying stellar per-
formances by the Americans as
well as men and women from
other countries.
My favorite competitor?
Gold medalist Gabby "The Fly-
ing Squirrel" Douglas, of course,


but the picture that is firmly im-
printed in my mind is not of her
gymnastic performances, but of
the smile on her face.
Was there controversy?
There always is, but nothing
earth-shattering. For many, in-
cluding myself, the participation
by a double-amputee from South
Africa was both inspiring and
troubling just how much man-
made material can be used to re-
place muscle and bone before an
advantage is created?
Now, on a final note, let's dis-
cuss beach volleyball; more pre-
cisely, let's discuss female beach
volleyball.
Since 1996, very skimpily clad


young women have participated
in what is a great sport.
I suppose some men still try to
convince people that they buy cer-
tain magazines just to read the ar-
ticles, but the game of beach
volleyball is truly an exciting
competition.
No fooling, it really is.
A word to the wise, fellows: It's
important to remember there's
much more to the Olympics than
beach volleyball but, there's
that, too!

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Voters should be informed


he Sunday, Aug. 19, Chronicle Com-
mentary section had a guest column
headlined, "Register to vote now."
The column encouraged younger citizens to
be sure to register and vote. This was fol-
lowed by an answer to the question, "Why?"
The stated reasoning was that it is neces-
sary for our nation to continue as a democ-
racy Then it states that Democratic votes


count.
First of all, our government is
not a democracy If it were, we
would never have survived as a
nation. No nation, or as a matter
of fact, no organization can sur-
vive as a democracy Only a rep-
resentative democracy can
survive.
If all the people in an organi-
zation are brought together to
make all decisions, rarely can
agreement be reached. Instead
it is necessary for members of
the organization to choose lead-


Bob Ha
GUE
COLL


ers to represent their views and lead the
organization.
Information in the second paragraph of
"Register to vote now" is certainly impor-
tant. However, based on conversations, this
is where our attention to election issues be-
gins to fall apart Many people want to vote,
but when I am asked, "Who should I vote
for?" it becomes evident that often they do
not bother to become informed. In my opin-
ion, only the informed should vote. Election
Day would be very simple then. Almost no
one would show up.
Too often, our political leaders, once they
become elected, find it desirable to be re-
elected so they concentrate on what they
feel will accomplish the desired result. Ei-
ther lobbyists, big money donors, or what
they feel will be the most popular with the
voters become their goals. As a result, es-
pecially on the national level, but often on
the state and local level, their decisions are
primarily in their own personal interest.
At this point, you can obviously see that I
do not share the same views as the writer
of the referenced column. Actually, I am a
Republican, not because Republicans are


always right, but because their stated party
principles most closely follow my under-
standing of how our country should be
governed.
This year, when you go to vote, just think
about what has happened in the past four
years. Our economy is at a standstill be-
cause business, which is the economic
driver of everything, is afraid that the next
regulation will destroy all ef-
forts. We have been told that,
"individuals did not build their
businesses." How many workers
would be willing to put in the ef-
fort to employ their fellow man?
We now have a law requiring
everyone to purchase health in-
surance. Nothing in that law
does anything to control the cost,
gaman therefore, only the insurance
EST company will benefit Some be-
lieve that the government will
UMN pay the bill. Guess what, we are
the government, thus we will
pay In addition, there will be a review
panel to decide what medical procedures
are approved. Since older people are no
longer producing in the economy, what de-
cisions will be made concerning their crit-
ical health needs?
Our economy will not improve as long as
our government continues to threaten to
destroy it Also, "Register to vote now" men-
tioned lack of bipartisanship. As best I can
discern, whenever this term is used, it is in
reference to Republicans not rolling over
to the Democrats. The Democrats have no
responsibility?
One other serious issue is our govern-
ment continues spending more than it takes
in. One philosophy says we can spend our-
selves rich. There is no evidence to support
such a belief. Find out where your candi-
date stands on this issue.
This year, consider the problems our na-
tion faces. Then become informed and on
Nov 6 vote for a change we sorely need!

Robert E Hagaman is Citrus County
Republican state committeeman.
He resides in Homosassa.


Hospital union
The recent action of the Citrus Memo-
rial Hospital Foundation board of direc-
tors to increase CEO Ryan Beaty's
retirement fund to 25 percent of his
$335,000 annual salary should be a real
morale booster for the rest of the employ-
ees at Citrus Memorial.
The Foundation board members are in
a legal dispute with the Trustees which
may never be resolved much to the de-
light, I am sure, of the attorneys repre-
senting both sides of the dispute. This
might explain why the hospital is $844,000
over budget just in legal expenses. This
year the hospital is running a $5 million-
plus deficit.
Now the Foundation wants to take care
of its CEO. The hospital has faced deficit
problems over several years, yet the Foun-
dation felt the need to increase Mr.
Beaty's pension. Changes have been made
in the past to the employees' pensions at
the hospital to save money Employees
hired after changes were made in 2004
are not even eligible for a pension. I think
instead of giving Mr. Beaty a lucrative pen-
sion increase, they may have been better
served looking for a replacement CEO.
Employees' hours are being cut and bene-
fits have been reduced or eliminated. It is
no wonder there is a morale problem at the
hospital. My hat is off to them for doing a
sometimes thankless job day in and day out
while watching their CEO get an increase
added to his pension paying him $84,000 per
year However, there is hope. Since Mr
Beaty has a contract with the hospital, I am
sure he would not mind if the rest of the em-
ployees at Citrus Memorial also had a con-
tract If there ever was a time for these
employees to organize and form a union,
the time is now. Currently, you have no voice
or seat at the table. Mr Beaty has a contract,
so he should have no problem if the rest of
the employees have a contract as well.


Only you, the employees of Citrus Me-
morial, can make this happen. Change is
good! In solidarity, there is unity!
Joe Adams
Hernando

Many happy tots
Our Citrus County Toys for Tots team, led
by the Marines of Marine Corps League
Detachment 819, has reached a pinnacle in
toy collection and distribution never wit-
nessed in the history of our county.
We have already surpassed our 2011 all-
time highs of 15,000 toys collected and dis-
tributed. We have for 2012 more then 4,000
Hess Trucks, 3,000 Zhu Zhu pets and ac-
cessories and 10,000 children's books. All
of these items have already been distrib-
uted to Citrus United Basket, the Family
Resource Center and the Salvation Army
The books were given to the Citrus County
Library System and Family Resource Cen-
ter. These books were donated by Scholas-
tic Inc. and UPS Stores, working in
partnership with our national Toys for
Tots literacy program. All these items will
be made available free to Citrus County
residents this coming Christmas. We are
anticipating many more toys coming our
way this coming fall.
The key to our successes is the unique
partnership with one of our local busi-
nesses. We give credit to Don Poss Roofing
Company, in Inverness. Owners Don and
Tammy Poss year after year have pro-
vided the docking station, forklifts, trac-
tor-trailer, pallet jacks, storage and
muscle to get the job done. They can un-
load a fully packed 18-wheeler in fewer
than 30 minutes. The shippers know this,
and they remember us and reward us
every year. We salute Don Poss Roofing
Company we couldn't achieve the level
of success without their participation.
Paul Pilny
Inverness


TqE RF(AL RIET_ 1H00 TE 1%EHMRDR30 tNIDMiTo FLORIDA.



A political storm? Or,


shelter under a big tent?


With the Republican National Con-
vention set to kick off, the party
faithful are flocking to Tampa in
the hopes of rallying the base and getting
a bounce in the polls.
The host city of Tampa has
rolled out the red carpet and
the gracious people of Hillsbor-
ough and Pinellas counties
have offered their homes and
businesses to convention-goers,
while many others have left for -
well-timed vacations to help re-
duce the traffic. While we had
hoped for Chamber of Com-Paula
merce weather, we cautiously Paula
watch Tropical Storm Isaac. FLOI
What can we expect to come VOI
of this mega-event?
Economically, the RNC is expected to
pump millions of dollars into the local
economy with the hope that it will help
many of our struggling small businesses.
Politically, it is an opportunity for the
Republican Party to deliver its message on
a national stage with thousands of cre-
dentialed media looking for any and all
angles to cover. With presidential candi-
date Mitt Romney trailing in the polls, and
the pre-convention week dominated by
stories of skinny dipping in the Sea of
Galilee and "legitimate rape," the pres-
sure is on for the party to put its best foot
forward.
The selection of Paul Ryan as the num-
ber two on the ticket has energized the
base. Gov Romney was losing favor with
the hard-core conservatives who were
somewhat mistrustful from the start. A
candidate generally appeals to the base in
the primary and starts moving to the mid-
dle for the general election.
Due to many factors a grueling pri-
mary, a candidate perceived as stiff, unre-
lenting attention on the release of tax
returns, and the massive blitz of hard-
hitting campaign ads by President Obama
and his supporters Romney was not as
solid with the base as he needed to be.
Additionally, the Republican Party base is
more complicated and fractured than in the
past. The party has moved to the right on
both economic and social issues to accom-
modate various well-organized factions.
Enter Congressman Paul Ryan, a young,
likable policy wonk with impeccable so-
cial-policy credentials to calm the fears of
the religious right. It was a bold choice
that bears some risk. Unfortunately, Rom-
ney was not in the position to go safe or
move to the middle for fear the base would
stay home.
Since Ryan joined Romney, the Repub-
lican base has indeed been energized, as
evidenced by the large crowds turning out
and the enthusiasm appearing on social
media. The base is not the only energized


I

F


force; there seems to be a major transfor-
mation of Gov Romney He seems at ease
with himself and with his running mate.
He smiles, laughs and seems more human,
more emotional. They look like
father and son on the campaign
trail and it is being well re-
ceived visually
^ Ryan also adds specifics to a
campaign that was lacking in
detail. But with that come some
r r risks with some of his policy ini-
tiatives regarding the budget,
Medicare and abortion. Con-
ockery gressman Akin, candidate for
mockery U.S. Senate from Missouri,
RIDA opened the floodgates with his
CES comments about "legitimate
rape" while discussing his posi-
tion against abortion even in the case of
rape, a position shared by Congressman
Ryan, and that is being considered as a
plank in the GOP platform. This is further
widening the gender gap.
The question to be answered by the con-
vention, through the lineup of speakers
representing the range of political ideol-
ogy, does the message delivered appeal to
a vast array of voters or will it be red meat
for the party faithful?
If this election is one of energizing the
base and securing a win based on turning
out the party faithful, we will hear very lit-
tle talk of working together with a shared
vision. Compromise will continue to be a
dirty word. Instead the speeches will be
geared toward attacking the opponent and
rallying the cheers and energy of those
present.
The speakers will be on the world stage
and will have the opportunity to present a
vision, to unite a divided nation, to wel-
come moderates, independents and con-
servative Democrats into the fold.
There are a few key speakers to watch
to see if there is an effort to expand the
shrinking tent and welcome voters who
don't pass the litmus test of the social
agenda. These individuals have spoken of
tolerance, inclusiveness and common
sense.
All eyes and ears will be on Governors
Jeb Bush and Chris Christie and Sen. John
McCain. What they say and how it is re-
ceived can make a tremendous difference
in the outcome of this election and the di-
rection of the Republican Party.
The most important speech, of course,
will be Gov Romney's and the tone will be
every bit as important as the content.

Paula Dockery is a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland who
is chronicling her final year in the
Florida Senate. She can be reached at
pdockery@florida voices., com.


TO-DO
Continued from Page C1

most Americans when Rom-
ney selected the energetic
young, GOP policy wonk as
his running mate. Over the
past two weeks, Ryan's con-
troversial budget proposals
- and conflicts with Rom-


ney on policy matters -
have dominated the politi-
cal debate. Democrats have
fueled that fire. Romney -
and Ryan now get a sec-
ond chance to make that
first impression.
Convince independent
voters he's their ally Rom-
ney heads to his convention
with 41 percent approval
among independent voters,


The convention gives him a chance
to promote the parts of his record
that appeal to cultural conservatives.


according to an Associated
Press-GfK poll. Romney, a
Republican who won the
governorship in liberal Mas-
sachusetts, will almost cer-


tainly need to boost that rat-
ing among these voters,
since they are the ones who
often decide elections, if he
is to have any chance at top-


pling Obama.
Fire up the base. Rom-
ney was never the first
choice of cultural conserva-
tives, and some still eye him
suspiciously because of his
reversals on issues they
hold dear, such as abortion
and gay rights. But the con-
vention gives him a chance
to promote the parts of his
record that appeal to this


powerful bloc of voters, who
help knock on doors and
make phone calls. His selec-
tion of Ryan, a hero to the
right, already has started to
help him further this
objective.
Prolong his "bounce" of
support into the fall if he
can manage to create one.
Deadening it will be part of
Obama's job one week later.


Letters to the EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W.


I L ITTL E TO M MY T U C K ER BY T OMRO'ER S I


WINDOW


We don't need government to tell


Continued from Page C us that we must care for each other


was getting older and
needed help. If you looked
in the front window, you
could see Pete climbing up
and changing the lightbulbs
in the overhead lights.
Pete wanted their busi-
ness, but more importantly,
he cared about his cus-
tomers as people.
It is that type of attitude
that has made our commu-
nity a special place to
spend a lifetime. People re-
ally do care about each
other and help out when-
ever they can.
Life has become more
complicated in Citrus


- we just do.


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


County. We've added
100,000 more residents
since Pete and I started
working at the weekly
Chronicle.
All the problems that
come with a larger popula-
tion have found us.
But at the core we are
still a community of people
who care about each other
and feel a responsibility to
help. We don't need govern-
ment to tell us that we must
care for each other we
just do.


And Pete Burrell is one
of the people who held true
to that core. He has done it
for the Chronicle and for
Citrus County.
He officially retires in
September.
He has left his mark on
this newspaper and this
community.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

Compared to his much-
praised book "The Vulcans"
dealing with the Bush II for-
eign policy advisers, this
volume sometimes is harder
to follow because Obama
had so many different sets
of foreign policy advisers
according to the issue. He


selected both foreign policy
hard-liners alongside multi-
lateralists in the White
House.
He mixed people with
great foreign policy experi-
ence and some newcomers
whose reputations were
made in their writings.
Bottom line: If you are in-
terested in current U.S. for-
eign policy, this book is a
"must read." It walks the
line between praise and


criticism and gives us a bet-
ter understanding of who is
advising the president on
global affairs, and his own
thinking.

Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and US. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring


ILw


r.o


I


0


Harvest Moon CrafV Show

Citrus County Craft Council
22nd Annual Craft Show
Saturday, September 1
9 am until 3 pm

Charity Supported: Big brothers
and Big Sisters of Citrus County

Sponsored by the

C LE
R www.chr onlcleo nlne.com
Food and Beverages Available




Crystal River Nat'I Guard Armory
Across from Home Depot Free Admission
8551 West Venable Street 000038z Free Parking

8th Annual
Citrus County Veterans

4 Person

Scrambled


Proceeds donated to the Citrus County Veterans Foundation.
DO NOT NEED TO BE A VETERAN TO PLAY
September 8th
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
Check in is at 7:30 am in the Hampton Room.
Shotgun Start is at 8:30 am
l. l.d. Price includes: golf cart,
by Auus3]i rste12 0 beverages on course,
-.L i. lunch at the clubhouse.
S- Prizes: Ist, 2nd & Last
t rClosest to the Pin
Hole in One Prize
S I For registration form, call 527-5915
or visit the website at www.citrusvf.org
000BYDX


2S6
SPONSORED
EVENTS SO
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chionicle is committed to suppoI ting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
sei vices, fundiaisels and enteil tainment thioughOLIt OLIi
community. The Chionicle is committed to helping make
Citi us County the best place to live and vvwoi k. Don t
hesitate to contact The Chionicle at 352-563-3226 foi all
of your sponsorship needs!


-i'mma


Sunday Monday Tuesday VV*


sommorp-


ill ~ ~ rida Sa^^^B^[*^^^^^turdayV^^


C4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


COMMENTARY


41ppr












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


No-fly






zone


Airlines can say:

You can't wear that
DAVID KOENIG
AP Airlines Writer
DALLAS
A airlines give many reasons for refus-
ing to let you board, but none stir as
much debate as this: How you're
dressed.
A woman flying from Las Vegas on South-
west this spring said she was confronted by
an airline employee for showing too much
cleavage. In another recent case, an Ameri-
can Airlines pilot lectured a passenger be-
cause her T-shirt bore a four-letter
expletive. She was allowed to keep flying
after draping a shawl over the shirt.
Both women told their stories to sympa-
thetic bloggers, and the debate over what
you can wear in the air went viral.
It's not always clear what's appropriate.
Airlines don't publish dress codes. No rules
spell out the highest hemline or the lowest
neckline allowed. That can leave passen-
gers guessing how far to push fashion
boundaries. Every once in a while the air-
line says: Not that far.
"It's like any service business. If you run a
family restaurant and somebody is swear-
ing, you kindly ask them to leave," said Ken-
neth Quinn, an aviation lawyer and former
chief counsel at the U.S. Federal Aviation
Administration.
The American Airlines passenger, who
declined to be interviewed by The Associ-
ated Press, works for an abortion provider.
Supporters suggested she was singled out
because her T-shirt had a pro-choice
slogan.
A spokesman for American said the pas-
senger was asked to cover up "because of
the F-word on the T-shirt" He said the air-
line isn't taking sides in the abortion
debate.
Last week, Arijit Guha, a graduate stu-
dent at Arizona State University, was barred
from a Delta flight in Buffalo, N.Y, because
of a T-shirt that mocked federal security
agents and included the words, "Terrists
gonna kill us all." He said the misspelled
shirt was satirical, and he wore it to protest
what he considers racial profiling.
"I thought it was a very American idea to
speak up and dissent when you think peo-
ple's rights are being violated," Guha said.
The pilot thought it scared other
passengers.
American and Delta are within their
rights to make the passengers change shirts
even if messages are political, said Joe
Larsen, a First Amendment lawyer from
Houston who has defended many media
companies.
The First Amendment prohibits govern-
ment from limiting a person's free-speech
rights, but it doesn't apply to rules set by
private companies, Larsen said. He noted
government security screeners didn't chal-


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
In this spring 2012 photo provided by a woman identified as Avital and made available to the
blog Jezebel, Avital poses for a picture at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, show-
ing what she was wearing after she said a Southwest Airlines gate agent approached her, al-
leging she was showing too much cleavage. Airlines give many reasons for refusing to let you
board, but none are stirring as much debate in 2012 than how a passenger is dressed.


lenge Guha; private Delta employees did.
In short, because airlines and their
planes are private property and not a public
space like the courthouse steps, crews can
tell you what to wear.
In the early years of jet travel, passengers
dressed up, and confrontations over cloth-
ing were unimaginable. They're still rare -
there aren't any precise numbers but
when showdowns happen, they gain more
attention as aggrieved passengers complain
on the Internet about airline clothing cops.
It's unwelcome publicity for airlines, which
already rate near the bottom of all indus-
tries when it comes to customer satisfaction.
Critics complain airlines enforce clothing
standards inconsistently The lack of clear


rules leaves decisions to the judgment of in-
dividual airline employees.
Last year, a passenger was pulled off a US
Airways jet and arrested at San Francisco
International Airport after airline employ-
ees say he refused to pull up his low-
hanging pants. The local prosecutor de-
clined to file charges against Deshon Mar-
man, a University of New Mexico football
player.
Marman's lawyer complained the same
airline repeatedly allowed a middle-age
man to travel wearing women's underwear
and not much else.
"You can't let someone repugnant like

See Page D3


Reading, writingg and resumes: Putting the hire in higher education


his past week, students re-
turned for the fall term at the
College of Central Florida in
Lecanto and, indeed, class is in ses-
sion at postsecondary
schools throughout our
region. Whether their
programs coincide with a
traditional schedule or
not, make no mistake,
students are hard at
work earning degrees
and certifications at / <
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute in Inverness, L
Community Technical Laura
and Adult Education WORK
(CTAE) in Ocala, CF Cen- CONNI
ter in Chiefland as well


as Rasmussen College, Taylor Col-
lege, Webster University and Saint
Leo University.
But when it comes to the success-
ful completion of their higher edu-
cation, one key lesson many have
yet to learn is the importance of
hire education.
As we have already discussed in
this space, employment rates for
new college graduates have fallen
sharply over the past few years, and
only about half the jobs landed by
new graduates even require a post-
secondary degree. Yet at the same
time, the national unemployment
rate is much lower for those com-
pleting postsecondary programs -
just 7.5 percent for those with asso-
ciate degrees or the equivalent and
only 4.2 percent for those with a
four-year degree or higher
So why is it so high for those fresh
out of school? And what do students


9




IF
1
E


do once they've matriculated, but
need a job to stay in school?
While postsecondary programs
understandably focus on what stu-
dents will need to know
once they're on the job,
what about the skills
they'll need to find one?
I'm talking about con-
ducting job searches,
pulling together a tar-
geted r6sum6, preparing
for an interview and
marketing themselves to
prospective employers.
Byrnes Workforce Connection
FORCE has always had a full
:CTION menu of programs and
services available to all
job seekers at our resource centers
in Inverness, Chiefland and Ocala.
But those services aren't necessar-
ily top-of-mind for students who ex-
pect to get a job once they've earned
their degree, nor are the programs
as readily accessible for those jug-
gling a full class load.
Now, for the first time, Workforce
Connection is providing employment
services tailored to meet the needs
of postsecondary students. The
three-pronged initiative includes:
The Patriot Job Connection -
a new job placement office in part-
nership with CF that provides staff-
supported resources and
one-on-one consultations with pro-
fessional placement specialists that
have already resulted in students
finding jobs. While the Patriot Job
Connection is on CF's Ocala cam-
pus, it is available at no charge to
any postsecondary student, regard-


less of what school they attend or
where they live.
Itinerant job placement serv-
ices If you can't come to the Pa-
triot Job Connection office, then the
Patriot Job Connection office will
come to you. Our staff provides
weekly job placement services on
campus at WTI and CF's Citrus
Campus, as well as bi-weekly at
CTAE. Starting in September, our
Mobile Resource Unit will provide
employment services to students at
CF's Levy County Center.
In Citrus County, placement serv-
ices are available from 8 to 11 a.m.
every Thursday at WTI. Students in-
terested in booking an appointment
with one of our placement special-
ists are asked to do so by dropping
by the Student Services office or
calling 352-726-2430, ext. 4326.
For those attending CF in
Lecanto, placement services are
available Thursdays from 2 to 4 p.m.
To schedule an appointment, call
Student Services at 352-746-6721,
ext. 6195.
"From Education to Employ-
ment: Navigating the New World of
Work" In addition to the two-day
"Navigating" seminars at our re-
source centers, and two-hour com-
munity workshops at area libraries,
we offer a three-hour workshop de-
signed specifically for postsec-
ondary students who attend as part
of their regular classroom instruc-
tion. To date, instructors from CF,
CTAE and Saint Leo University
have brought students studying a
variety of programs including allied
health care, auto body/auto tech-


nology, HVAC, horticulture and
cosmetology.
Jerry Flanders, who coordinates
our "Navigating the New World of
Work" seminars, recently told a class
of students from CF and CTAE that
"job offers don't always go to the most
experienced or most qualified."
Instead, he said, employers hire
those who stand out from the crowd
who "know their asset value and
who are able to clearly articulate
that value" often under the pres-
sure of a job interview.
Julie Needham, who teaches al-
lied healthcare at CTAE, said for
many of her registered medical as-
sistant students, this is a revolu-
tionary and much-needed way of
thinking.
"Many have never done a r6sum6
and a formal interview," Julie told
me. "They need to have skills to
represent themselves, to communi-
cate and be presentable. These
(workshops) are fantastic for them;
they're going to get a lot out of it."
Learn more about the Patriot Job
Connection, employment services
for postsecondary students and
from Education to Employment
workshops by calling 800-434-JOBS,
ext. 1683, or 352-840-5762 or by visit-
ing www.clmworkforce.com/patriot
jobconnection.

Laura Byrnes, APR is a certified
workforce professional and com-
munications manager at Workforce
Connection. Contact her at 352-
291-9559 or 800-434-5627, ext. 1234,
or lbyrnes@clm workforce., com.


Free

spender a

source of

anxiety

DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I
have been married
for some time. In our rela-
tionship, I'm the conser-
vative spender who is
always worried about
money, and my husband
just thinks it's OK to
spend, spend and spend
some more.
When I say anything, it
causes a fight. The sad
thing is after the fact, he
realizes he should have
been more careful, but
then it happens again.
I feel I need to protect
myself, but I can't afford
an attorney Is there any-
thing I can do? Reader,
via email
DEAR READER: You
didn't say how old you and
your husband are, but the
older he is, the harder it is
going to be for him to
change. And unless he
changes his ways, not
much can be done. As long
as there are people out
there who are granting
credit, guys like your hus-
band will accept that
credit.
Aside from divorcing
him, you might suggest
counseling. Other than
that, distancing yourself
from him financially is the
only option.
You could insist all ac-
counts be held separately
and try to remove your
name from any trouble-
some credit cards.
Some people just never
grow up.
DEAR BRUCE: Many
years ago, my husband
and I drew up a living
trust and assigned a fam-
ily member as the trustee.
Now we would like to
change it to make our old-
est child the trustee, as
the children are in their
20s and responsible. Do
we need to hire an attor-
ney again to accomplish
this? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: To
change the trustee in your
documents, it will be nec-
essary to use an attorney
Why try to save a few
bucks on something is this
important and that can't
be fixed once you're gone?
If you make a mistake and
then pass away, the mis-
take could be very expen-
sive to correct.
DEAR BRUCE: My ex-
husband has custody of
our 15-year-old son in an-
other state, but about 11/2
years ago, our son decided
to come and live with me.
My ex has an insurance
policy on our son. He is re-
quired by the courts to pay
85 percent of our son's
medical bills, and I pay
the rest.
A few months ago, my
son wound up in the
emergency room, and now
there are outstanding
medical bills of $10,000
that were not covered by
the insurance. I paid my
15 percent, but my ex re-
fuses to come up with the
$8,500 he owes. The
billing department from
the hospital is calling me,
and when I tell them my
son's father is responsible,
they say I was the one who
signed him into the emer-
gency room.
I called an attorney in
the state where my ex
lives, and he said he
would charge $2,500 to get
me in front of a judge to
get a court order for the ex


Page D4










D2

SUNDAY
AUGUST 26, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan Rl. E
this:


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


It's Hurricane Season: Pick up your
BUSINESS re-entry passes at either
Chamber of Commerce office: 28 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River or 401 W. Tompkins
St., Inverness. RESIDENT re-entry
passes are available at both tax collector's
offices 210 N. Apopka Ave, Suite 100, In-
verness and at 1540 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
Must provide identification and two
passes only are issued.
Remember to sign up for CodeRed noti-
fications at http://www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/.
Calling all Crafters: Looking for
crafters to participate in the craft fair in
Beverly Hills held in conjunction with "The
Magic of Christmas" Parade in the Hills
Dec. 1. Interested crafter, please email:
dina@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Only $10 to participate, you supply your
own table and chairs. Deadline is Nov. 24.
Silent Auction Item Available: to
nonprofit groups, the Nature Coast
Friends of Blues has gift certificates good
for four people to attend the 2012 Blues 'n
Bar-B-Que free of charge.
These gift certificates are great for
silent-auction fundraisers your organiza-
tion may hold between now and the Nov. 3
event. Please contact Susan Mitchell at
sukelo@tampabay.rr.com or 352-503-


We invite you to celebrate Citrus
County business and industry during
September
Citrus County Commissioners pro-
claimed September and the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce and
Economic Development Council in
cooperation with the Citrus County
Visitors & Convention Bureau have a
great month of events planned, with
generous assistance from our title
sponsor for the month, Superior Res-
idences of Lecanto, and Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living.
Our month begins with a grand
mixer event on Thursday, Sept. 6,
hosted by and presented by Crystal
Chevrolet in Homosassa. Owners
Steve and Jewel Lamb will open the
doors of their sparkly re-built Chevy
showroom, the newest upgraded
showroom in their auto line as Citrus
County's largest automobile dealer.
Come celebrate "Baseball, hot dogs,
apple pie and Chevrolet" while lis-
tening to Cole Taylor live! To help our
host prepare refreshments, please
register at no charge at http://www.cit-
ruscountychamber com/events/event-
detail.aspx?EventlD =286.
The following day, Friday, Sept. 7,
our Annual Awards Luncheon pre-
sented by Progress Energy includes
an exciting presentation from
renowned speaker Jerry Ross, with
Disney's National Entrepreneur Cen-
ter The luncheon concludes with the
revelation of the EDC's 2012 award
winners for Outstanding Small Busi-
ness, Outstanding Employer or Cor-
porate Citizen, and Person of the Year.
The EDC Annual Meeting is on
Thursday, September 13. This is the
perfect opportunity for you to see the
presentation that the EDC made to
Duke Energy's Business Develop-
ment Team.
Of course, the Annual Barbeque on
Thursday, Sept. 20, presented by
Sibex Inc., is our signature event, and
one of the absolute best parties in the
County! Held at M&B Dairy in
Lecanto this year, we also recognize


= News You CAN USE

3498 for more information.
Rental Space Available: Do you
have a special event coming up a birth-
day, a wedding, a baby shower and
don't have enough room in your home to
host the event? Consider using the GFWC
Crystal River Woman's Club clubhouse,
320 N. CitrusAve., Crystal River, as the
location.
It can be rented by hourly, daily, one
time, regular schedule, weekend or a long
term contract. The rental fees help the
club to meet community needs and spon-
sor scholarships. If you are interested,
please call 352-795-5488.
LOCAL OUTREACH
Several area organizations have dona-
tion drives going on; please consider
where you might be able to help others in
our community:
"Soap & Shampoo" Drive: Spon-
sored by Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center during the month of September
2012. Collection bins will be located in the
cafeteria of the hospital, at the Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center (1675 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River, next to Sweetbay)
and at the Seven Rivers Outpatient Labo-
ratory (at 11503 W. Emerald Oaks Drive,
Crystal River, just north of the hospital).


nutr Appreciato
Mofth Kickoff Mer




Sponsor

CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


Sponsor


September
> S TL R.ID
RILL)IL.NCES
of Lccanto

A l
*/ L


Dale McClellan, owner of M&B, the
2012 Swisher Sweets Florida Farmer
of the Year. Besides the finger-licking
barbeque prepared by the Ag Al-
liance, Tim McGraw-tribute artist
Adam D. Tucker is bringing his full
band to rock the farm with his coun-
try sounds.
We encourage you to attend ALL of
these events brought to you by the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Commerce


The Soap & Shampoo Drive will benefit
the efforts of the We Care Food Pantry.
Items requested for donation include:
body soap, shampoo, toothpaste, deodor-
ant, laundry soap and dish detergent.
Citrus United Basket (CUB): in
need of non-perishable food items includ-
ing meats, macaroni and pasta, fruit,
cheese, cereal, vegetables to restock
empty shelves.
Items may be dropped at 103 Mill Ave.,
Inverness. Monetary donations may be
mailed to P.O. Box 2094, Inverness, FL
34451.
"Two Good Soles" shoes and socks
drive: Sponsored by the RSVP of Citrus
County (a program of the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center) the program is their way
of Remembering and Responding to 9/11.
Collected NEW shoes and socks for
children in need will benefit CASA (Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association), Citrus County
District Student Services, Citrus County
Family Resource Center, Citrus United
Basket, Daystar Life Center, SPOT Family
Center and The Path of Citrus County. A
donation box is at both the Crystal River
office of the Chamber of Commerce, 28
N.W. U.S. 19, and at the Inverness Office,
401 W. Tompkins St.
For more information, call 527-5950.


.--' -


and The Citrus County Economic De-
velopment Council in cooperation
with the Citrus County Visitors & Con-
vention Bureau.
Purchase tickets today through the
EDC website at
www.citrusedc.com/events, at either
Chamber office location, or call 352-
795-3149 for more information.
We look forward to celebrating with


LKQ receives New Image Award from fellow Chamber members
Chad Damron, left, VP of
LKQ, accepts the New
Image Award for August
from Rhonda Lestinksy, Na-
ture Coast Bank Crystal .
River, and Josh Wooten, : -, ,
president/CEO of the Citrus 1
County Chamber of Com-
merce. Pictured in the back-
ground is LKQ of Crystal
River's new dismantling cen-
ter and warehouse. The fa-
cility, 125,400 square feet .
and 50 feet tall, cost just
under $8 million to com-
plete. The facility and its
streamlined system has al-
lowed LKQ to increase pro-
duction from 190 to 250
vehicles per week. By the
end of 2012, that number a
will be 300 plus. The ware-
house is operated by a wire
guided picker system allow-
ing employees to quickly put
away and remove vehicle
parts from more than 22
miles of racked deck space.
LKQ employs more than 200
people at its facility in Citrus
County.


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...

Jean Bush
(recently retired)
Georgeanne Vukmir
Theresa Dobran
Office Max, Inverness


The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce is proud to
promote its "You Caught My
Eye" program.
The program allows resi-
dents and visitors to recog-
nize employees who go
beyond in their attention to
Customer Service.
In addition to the em-
ployee's name appearing in
the newspaper, the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce sends a letter to the
employee's manager noting
the recognition. We are ex-
cited to offer such interac-
tion between businesses
and community residents.
So, go ahead, give a shout
out to someone who gave
you exceptional customer
service.
Please note: Business must


Ken Kahkola
Lowe's, Inverness


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Upcoming Citrus County

Chamber/EDC Events

Sept. 6 Industry Appreciation Mixer Crystal
Chevrolet
Sept. 7 EDC Industry Appreciation Lunch -
College of Central Florida
Sept. 20 EDC Industry Appreciation BBQ -
M & B Dairy, Lecanto
Sept. 22 Business Women's
Alliance Health and Fitness Expo
Oct. 11 After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer -F
NATURE COAST EMS
Oct. 12 October Chamber CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development
Lunch at Citrus Hills Golf & counlcc. vel'm
Country Club -
Oct. 23 After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer ALPACA MAGIC
Dec. 1 10 a.m. Parade in the Hills, "The Magic of
Christmas" parade, crafts, car show
Dec. 1 6 p.m. Crystal River "A Postcard Christmas"
Parade
Dec. 5 BWA December Luncheon
Dec. 8 Noon Inverness "A Postcard Christmas"


Parade
Jan. 19 and 20 2013 Florida
Manatee Festival in Crystal River
For details on these and ALL our
Chamber and Community events,
please visit us at www.citruscounty
chamber.com or use the QR code at
right to access our website on your
smartphone!


I~in~


WHAT TO INCLUDE
Name of person
you are nominating
Business they work for
Address of business.
Date of contact.
What stood out about
the service?
Your name and phone
number.
Date submitted.
Mail this information to
Cindi Fein, Citrus
County Chamber of
Commerce, 28 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River,
FL 34428.

be located within Citrus
County


OPEN
I : =


Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service


"like" us on











Women's Health is the topic on Chamber Chat this
week. Who is at risk for breast cancer? What are the
warning signs of breast cancer? Debbie Kneece from
IM&P Wellness Center joins Melissa Benefield as her co-
host and answers questions about breast health. Kara
Williams and Sue Fullerton tells us why this years
Women's Health & Fitness Expo at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River on September 22nd will be the
biggest and best expo yet! Donna Stevenson, DME
Director at B&W Rexall shares their Amoena line of
products designed for women who have experienced a
mastectomy or lumpectomy. From breast forms to
bra's, intimate apparel and swimwear, women will
always find that perfect fit! Karen Barton, a local Citrus
County resident who received a breast cancer
diagnosis at an early age, shares her touching story.
You will be amazed by her strength and inspired by her
courage. You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week! If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


470 e&/w


. %


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Pharmacist added
to FDA committee
Local pharmacist Richard P.
Hoffmann, PharmD, was ap-
pointed to the Peripheral and
Central Nervous System Drugs
Advisory
Committee of
the U.S. Food
and Drug Ad-
ministrationen
(FDA), effec- t
tive February
2013.
This FDA Dr. Richard
committee re- Hoffmann
views and appointed to
evaluates FDA committee.
data concern-
ing the safety and effectiveness
of marketed and investigational
human drug products for use in
the treatment of neurologic dis-
eases and makes appropriate
recommendations to the Com-
missioner of Food and Drugs.
Hoffmann will serve as the
consumer representative mem-
ber of this committee and was
supported for this appointment
by the Parkinson's Disease
Foundation (PDF).
Public relations
group to meet
The Nature Coast Chapter of
the Florida Public Relations As-
sociation will have a general
membership luncheon and offi-
cer installation from 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, at Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country Club,
505 E. Hartford St., Hernando.
Cost of the luncheon is $15 for
FPRA members and $18 for
nonmembers.
"Our goal this year is to pro-
vide quality programming and
professional development for
local public relations profes-
sionals and business owners,"
said Katie Mehl, APR, FPRA
Nature Coast Chapter presi-
dent. "With the talent of our in-
coming board, I'm confident
we'll meet that goal."
Tina Banner, APR, vice presi-
dent of resource development
for the United Way of Marion
County, will perform the installa-
tion ceremony at the Septem-
ber luncheon.
The Nature Cost FPRA
Chapter has professional devel-
opment seminars on the first
Friday of every month, serving
Citrus and Hernando counties.
Guests can access a network
of public relations professionals
and learn business techniques
to advance their organization.
To RSVP, call Mehl at 352-344-
6501. For more information,
visit www.fpranaturecoast.org.
Leadership Citrus
applications ready
Applications are now being
accepted for the Leadership
Citrus Class of 2013. Leader-
ship Citrus has been active in
our community for 21 years,
and participants have gained a
higher level of awareness and
understanding of Citrus County
and all it has to offer.
Leadership Citrus is a five-
month program that meets
every other week. A limited
number of applicants will be se-
lected to participate in the pro-
gram by a committee made up
from the Leadership Citrus
Board. The process involves fill-
ing out an application and going
through an interview process.
Selected members will be noti-
fied through the mail in Decem-
ber and classes will start in
January.
Class membership is open to
Citrus County residents, and
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will re-
ceive a discount. Cost of the
class is $495 for Chamber
members and $595 for non-
members.
Applications can be found at
www.leadershipcitrus.com; ap-
plications are due by Oct. 25.
Collections firm
adds to team
CRYSTAL RIVER Two im-
portant executive appointments
were announced recently by
Collections Unlimited Inc., a re-
sort receivables company
based in Crystal River.


Fundraising cruise benefits CMHS


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Memorial Health System recently received a donation of $1,400 from the Tally-Ho Va-
cations 2012 Fundraiser Cruise. Tally-Ho has coordinated an annual cruise for the past 10
years, raising more than $33,000 for the hospital. From left are: Debbie Muir and Ed Lattin
from Tally Ho Vacations; Chris Pool, director of marketing and philanthropy, and Kristy Eich-
horn, marketing and philanthropy coordinator, at Citrus Memorial Health System. The 2013
cruise is scheduled for April 7 to 14 and spaces are now available. Call Tally-Ho Vacations


at 352-860-2805.


Kimberly Stibbs-Menster, for-
merly director of client services
for the company, has been pro-
moted to chief operating officer.
Stibbs-Menster, who has held
positions of increasing respon-
sibility with the firm during the
past 12 years, will now oversee
the day-to-day operations of the
entire company.
Gregg A. McMurtrie has re-
cently joined Collections Unlim-
ited as chief financial officer.
McMurtrie has held executive
positions with several national
resort and land developers dur-
ing the past 30 years. His par-
ticular areas of expertise are in
the management of timeshare
receivables and client services.
Both received the designa-
tion of Registered Resort Pro-
fessional (RRP) from the
American Resort Development
Association (ARDA), the na-
tional trade association for the
resort and land development in-
dustry. The RRP designation
recognizes the quality of the ex-
ecutive's knowledge and expe-
rience as well as his or her
commitment to the industry and
the ARDA Code of Standards &
Ethics.
"We are so happy to wel-
come Kimberly and Gregg to
their new positions with our
company," said JoAnn Smith
Heckman, RRP, president of
Collections Unlimited. "With
their impressive skill sets and
rich experience in our industry,
they will definitely help us to ex-
pand and enhance CUI's pres-
ence in the resort receivables
marketplace."
Collections Unlimited Inc. of
Crystal River (CUI) has been a
registered Florida Corporation
since 1986. CUI offers a full
range of credit and collection
services as well as credit in-
quiries. The company is affili-
ated with Trans Union and
Experian so CUI's clients have
access to the most effective
credit reporting systems avail-
able. With offices in Florida and
Colorado and a multi-lingual
collection staff, CUI handles do-
mestic and international ac-
counts. Visit www.timeshare
collections.com.
Business opening at
Crystal River Mall
Crystal River Mall is pleased
to announce Empire of Elec-
tronic Cigarettes joining the re-
tail lineup. Empire of E-Cigs
Inc. is one of Florida's premiere
electronic cigarette companies
on the market today.
"We pride ourselves on hav-
ing exceptionally high quality
products as well as our dedica-
tion to our customer service
satisfaction guarantee. Up to
60-year smokers are finding it
easy to begin their journey on a
healthier alternative to smok-
ing," states Heather Valdes of
e-cigs. Visit Empire of Elec-
tronic Cigarettes from 10 a.m.


to 9 p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday and noon to 5:30 p.m.
Sunday.
For information on leasing
opportunities or events at Crys-
tal River Mall, contact the mall
office at 352-795-2585 or visit
www.thecrystalrivermall.com.
Business growth
seminar planned
Small business owners look-
ing for guidance to take their
business to the next level, or
those who are starting new
businesses, will be interested in
the Business Growth and Infor-
mation Seminar sponsored by
BizCo of Citrus County.
BizCo is a not-for-profit
group of Citrus County busi-
ness professionals, dedicated
to assisting small business and
growing the local economy.
The Business Growth Infor-
mation Seminar will take place
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Sept. 13, in
Room 103 at the College Cen-
tral Florida campus in Lecanto.
Topics will cover such items
as "Inexpensive ways to maxi-
mize your exposure, increase
sales and save money," "Elimi-
nate duplicate entry info and
create complete backups,"
"Low or no-cost ways to im-
prove your bottom line," "How
to read your credit card pro-
cessing statement and reduce
your bill by 40 percent," "Easy
access and affordable rates for
necessary business legal ex-
penses," "Maximize the effi-
ciency of your computer
network," and "Proactively
solve ID theft risks and
problems."
Finger foods and beverages
will be served.
Reservations are $8 in ad-
vance or $10 at the door. To
make reservations, call Gregg
Mackler at 352-628-6624.
To learn about BizCo of
Citrus County, and the
seminar, visit www.BizCoTeam
Citrus.com.
Citrus Memorial
appoints new VP
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem announced the appoint-
ment of Dr. Charles Nutinsky as
vice president of medical
affairs.
Nutinsky joins Citrus Memo-
rial with more than 34 years of
experience in the medical
field. He comes most recently
from Northside Hospital in St.
Petersburg, where he served
as chief medical officer and di-
rector of medical education. In
this role, he acted as the pri-
mary liaison between the med-
ical staff and administration and
helped to identify best practices
regarding quality improvement
and patient safety.
Prior to his work with North-
side Hospital, Nutinsky prac-
ticed general and vascular
surgery, served as the assistant
professor of surgery at the Uni-


versity of
New Jersey
and served
as the chief of
medical serv-
ices for the
73rd Field
Hospital of
the U.S. Army Dr. Charles
Reserve with Nutinsky
responsibility Citrus
for physical Memorial
and medical Health System.

care as well
as lab services, radiology and
EMT services.
Nutinsky completed his med-
ical training at the College of
Osteopathic Medicine and Sur-
gery in Des Moines, Iowa, and
earned a master of medical
management from Tulane Uni-
versity. He is board-certified in
general surgery and general
vascular surgery. Nutinsky is a
Fellow of the American College
of Osteopathic Surgeons,
member of the American Col-
lege of Physician Executives,
American College of Osteo-
pathic Surgeons and American
Osteopathic Association.
"Dr. Nutinsky will bring with
him a wealth of medical and
clinical experience," said Ryan
Beaty, president and chief ex-
ecutive officer of Citrus Memo-
rial Health System. "We're
thrilled to have him join our sen-
ior management team where
he will play a key role in the
organization."
CMHS is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. More
than 150 physicians and 1,000
employees provide a wide
range of services at the Inver-
ness campus and at medical
offices and clinics in Citrus and
Sumter counties.
Workforce sets
August workshops
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties is offering
more than 40 programs during
the month of August for job
seekers interested in sharpen-
ing their employability skills.
Ranging from open resume
labs to two- and three-day
workshops, the programs are
available at no charge to job
seekers throughout Workforce
Connection's three-county re-
gion. Participants must be fully
registered with Workforce Con-
nection through the Employ
Florida Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com. Addi-
tional workshop registration
may also be required.
Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.clm-
workforce.com. The following
programs take place at Work-
force Connection Resource
Centers in Chiefland, Inverness


and Ocala, as well as at various
community locations:
Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Sessions are
set for 3:30 p.m. Aug. 31 in
Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that Inter-
view and Optimal Resum6
workshops begin at 8:15 a.m.
Aug. 30 in Ocala. "Nail that In-
terview" workshops are also at
1:15 p.m. Aug. 29 in Chiefland
and at 1:15 p.m. 31 in
Inverness.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" two-day workshop
takes place every Tuesday and
Wednesday in Ocala, with ses-
sions at 8:15 a.m. for new job
seekers and those with barriers
to employment and at 1:15 p.m.
for displaced professionals. The
workshops cover how to iden-
tify abilities and transferable
skills, job search strategies/tar-
geted resume development, in-
terviewing skills/follow up and
how to work effectively with
their own Workforce Connec-
tion placement specialist.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" (Community Work-
shop) offers many of the high-
lights of the two-day sessions
but in a two-hour format. The
condensed workshops take
place at 4 p.m. Aug. 30 at Tay-
lor College in Belleview
Open Resum6 Labs are at
9 a.m. and 2 p.m. each Monday
in Ocala, as well as at 9 a.m.
every Friday. The labs also take
place at 8:15 a.m. Aug. 28 in
Chiefland and at 1:15 p.m. Aug.
28 in Inverness. Drop-ins are
welcome and no additional reg-
istration is required, but space
is limited.
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers are in Citrus
County at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., in Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.,
in Chiefland; and in Marion
County at 2703 N.E. 14th St., in
Ocala. To sign up for any of the
workshops, call 352-291-9552
or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410 or
register online at https://www
.timecenter.com/wcworkshops.
Entrepreneur
academy at CF
OCALA- The College of
Central Florida will offer an En-
trepreneur Academy beginning
in September. The program
provides a step-by-step ap-
proach to planning a successful
business venture and is de-
signed to guide individuals who
are new to owning and operat-
ing their own business.
The program will be offered
from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tues-
days, Sept. 11 through Oct. 30,
at the CF Hampton Center,
1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd.
The fee is $160.
Participants will explore top-
ics including: managing your
personal financial condition; de-
termining the barriers to enter-
ing a market; refining the
business idea; developing the
business plan; and more. They
will have the opportunity to
meet local entrepreneurs and
representatives from SCORE,
Small Business Development
Center and the U.S. Small
Business Administration.
The program is offered in co-
operation with the University of
Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences Exten-
sion. The deadline to enroll is
Friday, Sept. 7. For information
or to register, call 352-873-5804
or visit CFItraining.cf.edu.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Registration is open to
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount.
Details on exhibit registra-


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.
Information related
to professional
development may be
considered for the
Education section.

tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities and the popular Spa
Zone are available from Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce's Crystal River office at
28 N.W. U.S. 19, 352-795-
3149, or from any Business
Women's Alliance member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.
Proceeds from last year's
expo helped to fund nine schol-
arships in health care and busi-
ness careers.
Veterans may apply
for fee waiver
TALLAHASSEE The De-
partment of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation (DBPR)
encourages military veterans
who have been honorably dis-
charged within the past 24
months to apply for a new licen-
sure fee waiver available
through the department.
As of July 1, the DBPR will
have the ability to waive initial
licensure fees for military veter-
ans under a new law passed
during the 2012 Legislative
session.
Waivers could save veterans
anywhere from a few hundred
dollars to more than a thousand
dollars, depending on the li-
cense type.
"We want to encourage vet-
erans who may be thinking
about starting a business or
getting a professional license in
Florida to apply for this waiver,"
said Secretary Ken Lawson.
"This is our way of saying
'thank you' to the veterans who
have already sacrificed so
much to protect and defend
our nation."
Through HB 517, the initial li-
cense fee, initial application fee
and initial unlicensed activity
fee will be waived for veterans
returning from service, provided
the veteran applies for licen-
sure within 24 months of being
honorably discharged. The law
will apply to new licenses
granted after July 1 for more
than 20 professions under
DBPR's jurisdiction, including
construction, real estate, certi-
fied public accountants and
cosmetologists. The waiver can
be downloaded from the de-
partment's military services
webpage at www.myflorida
license.com/dbpr/dbprmilitary.
html and should be included in
applications for professional
licensure.
The Department of Business
and Professional Regulation's
mission is to license efficiently
and regulate fairly. The depart-
ment licenses and regulates
more than 1 million businesses
and professionals ranging from
hotels and restaurants, real es-
tate agents and certified public
accountants to veterinarians,
contractors and cosmetologists.
Visit www.MyFloridaLicense
.com.


NO-FLY
Continued from Page Dl

that (the cross-dresser) on the
plane and single out this kid be-
cause he's black, wearing dread-
locks, and had two or three inches
of his underwear showing," said
the lawyer, Joseph D. O'Sullivan.
"They can't arrest him for what
someone perceives to be inappro-
priate attire."
US Airways spokesman John
McDonald said no passengers


complained about the cross-
dresser until his photo in women's
underwear circulated on the In-
ternet after the Marman incident.
He said the airline doesn't have a
dress code, but employees may
talk to a passenger if other people
might be offended by the way he's
dressed.
"It's not an issue of a dress code,
it's one of disruption," like watch-
ing pornography within sight of
other passengers, McDonald said.
An informal survey of passen-
gers at Dallas-Fort Worth Interna-
tional Airport found much support


for limits on clothing.
"Curse words on shirts always
bother me," said John Gordon, who
just graduated from film school in
Florida and was dressed in khaki
shorts and a T-shirt. "It's an unspo-
ken rule that when you go out in
public, you should be respectful."
But Leigh Ann Epperson, a cor-
porate lawyer who had just flown
in from Tokyo, said she wouldn't be
bothered if another passenger's
shirt bore the F-word.
"If people are paying the price
for their tickets, they should be
able to wear what they want," said


Epperson, who wore a black
sweater over a low-cut blouse,
black slacks and wedge-type heels.
Airlines say they refund the pas-
senger's fare if they deny boarding
for inappropriate attire.
Clashes over clothing and other
flash points seem to be increasing,
said Alexander Anolik, a travel-law
attorney in Tiburon, Calif. He
blames an unhappy mix of airline
employees who feel underpaid and
unloved, and passengers who are
stressed out and angry over extra
fees on everything from checking a
bag to scoring an aisle seat.


Anolik said passengers should
obey requests from airline employ-
ees. If passengers don't, they could
be accused of interfering with a
flight crew a federal crime. He
said passengers should wait until
they're off the plane to file com-
plaints with the airline, the U.S.
Department of Transportation or
in small-claims court
"They have this omnipotent
power," Anolik said of flight crews.
"You shouldn't argue your case
while you're on the airplane.
You're in a no-win scenario you
will be arrested."


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 D3










Most laid-off US workers take pay cuts in new jobs


Difference not big

Associated Press

WASHINGTON- The U.S. eco-
nomic recovery hasn't felt much
like one even for people who man-
aged to find new jobs after being
laid off. Most of them have had to
settle for less pay
Only 56 percent of Americans
laid off from January 2009 through
December 2011 had found jobs by
the start of this year, the Labor De-
partment said Friday More than
half of them took jobs with lower
pay One-third took pay cuts of 20
percent or more.
The figures would be even
lower if people who could find
only part-time jobs were included
in the total.
The report provides an illustra-
tion of the job market's persistent
weakness well after the Great Re-
cession officially ended in June
2009.


It also documents that while the
economy has added nearly 3 mil-
lion jobs since the recovery began,
many pay less than those that
were lost
And it points to the challenge
for President Barack Obama,
who's seeking re-election with un-
employment at 8.3 percent. No
president since World War II has
faced re-election with unemploy-
ment above 8 percent. It was 7.8
percent when Gerald Ford lost to
Jimmy Carter in 1976.
Laid-off workers always have a
harder time finding new jobs than
do people who quit. But since the
government began tracking such
data in 1984, people who lost jobs
in a recovery haven't had it as
hard as they did in the one that
began three years ago.
And the pay cuts in their new
jobs usually aren't so deep.
For example, in 2003-05, a pe-
riod that included a slow recovery,
nearly 70 percent of those who
were laid off found jobs. More


than half who found full-time
work in that time did so at equal
or higher pay
The government compiles data
on laid-off workers every two
years. The report covers only peo-
ple who had worked at least three
years in the same job before being
laid off. In doing so, it focuses on
those who had stable careers be-
fore they lost work.
They are people like Andrew
McMenemy, who used to make
$80,000 a year as a computer sys-
tems administrator at a software
firm. He was among the 80 percent
of the firm laid off in March 2010.
Now, he makes $9.15 an hour,
providing tech support for Apple.
The job offers no benefits. He
works from home in East Strouds-
burg, Pa., where he lives with his
father.
"I'm going to be 53; I have to live
at home with my father," McMen-
emy said. "I made more when I
worked in high school."
About 6.1 million people with at


least three years on the job were
laid off in the three years ending
in 2011, the government's report
said. That's down from 6.9 million
in the previous report, which cov-
ered the 2007-2009 period. But it's
still the second-highest total since
1984.
Though the proportion of laid-
off workers finding jobs has im-
proved since the 2007-2009 period,
"by no means are they back to a
normal level for a recovery," said
Henry Farber, an economics pro-
fessor at Princeton University
Compared with most other re-
coveries, "this is really bad," said
Dean Baker, an economist and co-
director of the Center for Eco-
nomic Policy Research, a liberal
think tank.
Baker noted only 15 percent of
those laid off in 2009 through 2011
have found new jobs with equal or
higher pay That compares with 25
percent in the three years before
the recession.
"You were much more likely to


be re-employed in 2007 at the
same or higher wage than now,"
he said.
An Associated Press analysis
this month documented that by
just about every measure, this
economic recovery is the feeblest
since the Great Depression.
The weakness goes well beyond
high unemployment. Economic
growth has never been weaker in
a postwar recovery Consumer
spending has never been so slack.
And even for people who have
jobs, paychecks have fallen be-
hind inflation.
The Labor Department report
Friday showed men were more
likely than women to regain jobs
after a layoff.
Male-dominated fields, such as
manufacturing and mining, have
experienced some of the strongest
job gains. By contrast, hiring has
been below average in some occu-
pations with mostly female work-
ers, such as office and
administrative support.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

to pay He says if my ex says
he can't afford to pay, it
could make the case more
expensive. The problem is
my ex is self-employed and
can manipulate finances as
he needs. Even with an
order, it may be difficult for
me to collect.
I have been working hard
on repairing my credit, and
this will destroy it. Do you
know of anything I can do to
help myself? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: We have
two separate things here.
The fact you have a court
order has little relevancy if
someone wants to walk
away from his responsibili-
ties, and that is the unhappy
truth.
The attorney gave some
solid advice that the cost
of forcing this guy to live up


to that court order may ex-
ceed any money that would
be forthcoming.
As for the medical bills,
the hospital's position is
going to be when you signed
in your son, you accepted
responsibility for the bills. I
suspect if you went to the
hospital and talked to an ex-
ecutive (not a clerk), the
hospital might reduce this
number dramatically and
work out a payment plan -
not because it wants to, but
because it recognizes that if
it doesn't, it will receive
nothing.
I know this is not what you
want to hear, but it's really
the best I can do under the
circumstances. I constantly
try to alert people, particu-
larly women, that all the di-
vorce decrees in the world
are worthless if somebody
wants to take a hike.
DEAR BRUCE: Someone
told me the family is not re-
sponsible for a deceased
person's remaining debt. Is


this correct? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: What
you heard in passing is true
sometimes. If we're talking
credit card debt, it depends
on who signed for the card,
whether other people used
the card, etc.
On balance, if only the de-
ceased's name is on these
outstanding bills, the family
may not be responsible, but
certainly the estate is. Be-
fore anything can be distrib-
uted to the heirs, the estate
must meet its obligations. If
the assets are there, retire
those debts.
DEAR BRUCE: My sister
and I inherited mineral
rights in Arizona (150 acres)
from our grandfather. We
just now found out about
this, and we're wondering
how in the heck we find out
what this is worth, if any-
thing. RT., Missouri
DEAR R.T: Mineral
rights are property rights
that allow the holder to ex-


ploit any minerals that may
be buried in the ground.
Mineral rights are separate
from the surface rights.
In my opinion, the only
proper thing to do is take a
few days' vacation and go
look at the property I say
this from personal experi-
ence. I own a piece of prop-
erty for which I do not have
the mineral rights. When I
was visiting the area, I was
amazed to see that the peo-
ple with the mineral rights
had made improvements on
the surface, where they did-
n't have rights. They had
never notified me to find out
if it was acceptable to
proceed.
You can contact oil, gas
and mineral companies in
the area and find out what
they think the probability is
that something of value is
buried underneath the sur-
face. Visiting the property
will also tell you if those
who own the above-ground
rights have taken it upon


themselves to check out
any value that may lie
underground.
DEAR BRUCE: My
mother is getting up there in
years. She informed my
brother and me she does not
have a will and that even
though she doesn't, every-
thing will still go to us. She
sees no reason to get one.
She doesn't want to have the
expense of an attorney
I think we are going to
have problems if she doesn't
have a will. Is there a way to
get a will without getting an
attorney involved? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Every-
body should have a will.
Even if it never gets pro-
bated, it should be there in
case it's necessary A will,
unlike some other docu-
ments, cannot be revised
once it comes into force, be-
cause it becomes a viable
document only upon the
person's death.
You see advertisements


on TV and in periodicals
about will kits. In my opin-
ion, it's worth the money to
get the will done right It can
save a lot of problems after
your mother passes, be-
cause once she dies, what is
done is done.
See if you can persuade
her to make a will, or, if you
and your brother have the
money, tell her you'll pay for
it. It's not only to protect
what she wants you and
your brother to have, but to
protect her, as well.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can
now be heard at
wwwbrucewilliams.com.


IIicleIi[ I


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds 6

Aw.'01w


* d


- ~

"N


- ~t.


-V..


~. :i~2~~ -


U -


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I.ax 35) .6.56 1TolFre:(88. 52230 1 mal.ca sife a nilenl. co :ww.hrnclolieco


A Single White Widow
is looking for a country
gentleman, that knows
how to treat a lady
65-85 years old
Love a country music a
plus (352) 344-0002
I am an attractive,
young at heart, young
widow, looking for that
sincere, great,
lonesome gentleman.
In his late 70's to 80's.
I know I can fix that
lonesomeness. Think
about it because Im not
dreaming. So don't hesi-
tate to write me and
lets get together
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1796 P
106 W Main St
Inverness Fl 34450
Pinochle Players
Seeking couple to
play weekly
N/S, N/D
(352) 628-3570



BASS TRACKER
15 ft, Jon Boat 25HP
Merc. Mtr., elect, start
mtr. guide trolling mtr.
new tires on trlr. new
spare tire, life jacket &
cooler incl.'d $1,500
(352) 220-1262
CONCEPT
1997, 22ft, 6 In. CC
225HP EFI Merc., SS
Prop. Alum. Tan. Ax. trlr.
cust. Interior, & cover
new gauges, dual bat-
teries, all safety equip.
life jackets & anker,
$11,900 .(352) 795-4674
CORNET AND CASE
(New wonder model)
made by Conn
serial #141209
1920 era. Good
condition $450
(352) 726-8311
GENERATOR
5550 watt Troy Built
generator. 10 HP Briggs
and Straton engine.
Never Used $400 firm
(352) 628-1029
Harley Davidson
2000 fatboy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sad bags
$9875 214-9800



#1Employmentsource is


WWW.CroniConine.CO


INSURANCE REP
440/220 LIC. Insurance
Prior Independant
agency skills preferred
mail Resume to:
Box# 1797
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
KEYSTONE
SPRINTER TT
2004, 31ft, sleeps up to
eight. Pullable w/ 1500.
New awing, $10,500
352-214-9800
LAWN MOWER
John Deere 42" riding
mower. 60 hours, like
new. First $1000 takes
it! (352) 726-8311
NISSAN
1983, 4 X4, 5 spd. new
radial swampers, great
woods truck, alum. tool
box, new brakes lots of
new parts $1,450.
(352) 220-1262
Refrigerator
Maytag Stainless steel,
25 CF, w/ top french
doors & bottom freezer
like new. $600 obo
(352) 400-9448
TRACTOR
2005 AG King
Model AK2240, 4X4
Diesel engine, bucket
and box blade. $8000
(727) 2154938
VAL'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Valerie (352) 302-9816
Residential / Offices
Once Weekly
Bi-Weekly Monthly
FREE Estimates



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Free CAT
To good home
German Shepherd/
Chow mixed,
shots, to good home
(352) 257-1737
Free Female
Black Lab
5 yrs. old, house trianed
good with kids
(352) 601-7076


to good home
call for info:
(352) 634-2781
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
CUTE
Litter trained
To good home
(352) 257-0517
Free Shitzu/Lapsa
Mixed, quiet, calm,
older dog.
Owner permanently
Hospitalized
Vet reference required
352-637-0193
Free to a Loving home
Pitt Bulls &
English Mastiff Mixed
Puppies
(352) 287-0270
HORSE MANURE
Bring Shovel & Help
yourself. Yard is open
352-697-5252
Three 13" Hub Cab
Suzuki Swift
(352) 341-1649



Free to Loving Home
Mixed Puppies
3 months old


Lost Female
Peacock
Hernando between &
200 (352) 897-4845
Lost Male Yorkie
Black coller white glitter
bones. Name Niko
Near Elcam & Deltona
(352) 476-1080
Lost
Springer Spaniel
Black & White, male
Pine Ridge area
(352) 270-3222
Lost: Black female cat,
Edith. Small tan spot
above her left eye, sev-
eral orange-tan spots on
torso. Citrus Springs near
Rutland/Deltona. Please
call 352-601-6310 if
found.
Male Black Cat
with White markings,
microchipped
answers to "Galaxy
Bravo and Haciendo
Pine Ridge
(352) 476-1878


Very Large African
Tortoise. Brown, green,
gold in color. Last seen
in the vicinity of Stoney
Ridge in Floral City.
Family Pet. Children are
devastated Reward.
(352) 476-8961. 24/7
YORKIE
Missing from Buckskin
Dr. Pine Ridge. Black
and Tan. Family Devas-
tated Reward
(352) 527-7980



Found Cockatiel
Found 8/18. Dark gray
body and chest Yellow
Head St. Anne Church
Area. Crystal River
(352) 564-9196
Found Orange Male
Tabby Cat, with white
marking on stomach
Very friendly In
Sugarmill Woods near
Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303



PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful flower
of
Mt. Caramel,
fruitful vine, splendor of
heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin, as-
sist me in my
necessity.
O Star of the Sea, help
me and show me here
you are my mother.
0 Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen
of Heaven and Earth,
I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my
heart to secure me in
my necessity. (Make
request). There are
none that can withstand
your power.
0 Mary, conceived
without sin, pray for us
who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this
cause in your hands (3
times).
Say this prayer for
3 consecutive days and
then you must publish
and it will be granted to
you.
M.S.


Sr. Woman Seeking
Sr. Companionship and
light help in exchange
for Room and board
Located in Inverness
(352) 489-2099



HAIR STYLIST
Full time IPart time
Call Sue 352-628-0630
HAIR STYLIST
Wanted. To Joln Our
Team In Cltrus Springs
(352) 464-2196








est i c
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





You01 'orld first

Need a job)
1or" a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!



i i I l ^^i -li ii


COLLEGE f I
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
Immediate
Employment
Opportunity
Available
at the College!
Faculty Associate
Degree Nursing
The College of
Central Florida
Associate Degree
Nursing program is
seeking faculty for
full-time teaching
positions beginning in
August 2012. Our
graduates are entry
level generalists and
are eligible to apply
for state licensure as
RNs. Successful
candidates will
provide classroom,
laboratory, and
clinical instruction
and complete
associated profes-
sional responsibilities.
Minimum require-
ments are a master's
degree in nursing,
at least two years
of recent clinical
experience (medical
surgical/adult health
preferred), and
licensure as a
registered nurse in
Florida. Commitment
to the college objec-
tive of providinging in-
struction for a diverse
student population.
An unofficial copy of
transcripts and cur-
rent nursing license
must be submitted
with the online
application.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application at
time of submission.
Alternatively
fax transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer


EXPERIENCED
OPHTHALMIC TECH
NEEDED P/T g
Send resume to: ,
Suncoast Eye Center
221 N.E. Hwy 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
or email:
dmsuncoast@hotmail.com
CERTIFIED CODER

Immediate Opening.
Must have at least 5.
exp in medical coding,
Fax Resume to:
352-564-4222 or e-mail
Teresa@citrusdiabetes
treament.com
CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Crystal River
Health & Rehab
Center
Now accepting
applications for

RN's
for MDS Department
Full Time & Part time
Dietary Aides
with experience
Please Apply Within
136 NE 12TH AVENUE
Crystal River
(352) 795-5044
EOE/DFWP
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience and Caring
Must Draw Blood Fax
Resume 352-746-5784
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


#1


Employment
source is...


w ie
www chronicleonhine corn


E COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
Educational
Advisor for Health
Sciences -
A Bachelor's degree
is required. This
position is open until
filled. Screening
begins after 8/27/12.
Programmer
Analyst II
Preschool Teacher I
Adjunct opportuni-
ties college-wide
Please submit a
copy of transcripts
with the online ap-
plication for posi-
tions that require a
degree.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application
at time of submis-
sion. Alternatively
fax transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer





ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722


Experienced
Legal Secretary
For small law office in
Crystal River. Only
experienced need
apply. Must have sub-
stantial experience,
preferably in one or
more of the following:
Civil Litigation,
Contract, Corporate
and/or Real Estate
Law. Potential for
part time or full time
employment.
Send Resume to
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River Fl. 34423
INSURANCE REP
440/220 LIC. Insurance
Prior Independant
agency skills preferred.
Mail Resume to:
Box# 1797
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429



Restaurant Help
ALL POSITIONS
Apply in Person, 2-4p
Angelo's Pizzeria
2492 N. Essex Ave.
Hernando
NO PHONE CALLS



Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
Experience a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-2555
Telemarketing Mgr
AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375



E I D




( ic i


D4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Available Position
of Warehouse
Clerk/Driver.
Primary role will be to
perform duties of
warehouse clerk on
daily basis and will
drive to/from cus-
tomer sites to pick up
material, and deliver
material to vendors
as needed. Must
have driving experi-
ence, clean driving
record and be able
to lift up to 751bs.
CDL/CDL with
hazardous materials
endorsement, valid
DOT medical card
preferred. DOT
background check,
drug test required.
EOE/Drug Free
Workplace. E-Verify
participant.
APPLY IN PERSON AT
Technology
Conservation Group,
Inc. 705 S Easy St,
Lecanto, Florida
Mon through Friday
8:00 am 4:00 pm or
email applications to
emoloveerelations@
tcarecvclina.com.
Please reference Job
ID #FL WHS 1018.


CHIoNIcLE


Citrus Publishing
of Florida
has an immediate
opening for Business
Office Supervisor.
Citrus Publishing
publishes the Citrus
County Chronicle,
a 23,500 weekday
and 29,000 Sunday
circulation newspa-
per in Crystal River,
Fla., and nine weekly
newspapers along
the northwestern
coast of Florida.
Candidates should
have 2 years of
experience in
general accounting
and financial
analysis; a bachelor's
degree in account-
ing; be proficient in
Microsoft Office
products; have
experience in cen-
tralized accounting
systems and demon-
strate leadership and
communication skills.

To apply,
send resumes to
Mike Arnold at
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
or fax to
(352) 564-2935.


CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 12-48
Full time position
assisting volunteers
and clients at the
Central Ridge
Community Center
in Beverly Hills. Hours
and days of work
varies weekly. Must
be able to lift at least
50 pounds. Must
possess valid Florida
Driver License.
Starting pay
$7.69 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Aug. 31, 2012
EOE/ADA
PREVIOUS
APPLICANTS NEED
NOT REAPPLY

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

FUEL TRANSPORT
DRIVER

CDL,CLASS A,
w/HAZMAT. TWIC
card preferred. Call
Jamie (352) 795-3469



Your World

a9 aw46,44k4


CHRn i 1 LE


Grounds &
Building Maint
"Seeking exp'd
individual for grounds
& building mainte-
nance for large
Beverly Hills Assoc.
Non-smoker.
Please fax resume to
352-746-0875 "Please
do not call office"

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Crystal River,
Homosassa Area
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Experience Preferred
(352)726-9481

RN UNIT
MANAGER
Full Time
Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a pro-
gressive customer
service oriented
team. Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and manage-
ment abilities, great
organizational
skills and effective
delegation and mon-
itoring of clinical
systems. Excellent
benefits
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
ATDON@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

Telemarketing Mgr

AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375




CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time Customer
Service/Food Prep posi-
tion. 15 Hours a week.
Must be available even-
ing hours 4-7pm and
weekends.Customer
Service and typing skills
required.Fax resume to
352-527-9605


Laundry Attendant

Apply 118 S Apopka,
Inverness







ENROLLING
For All Programs
*COSMETOLOGY
*rBARBER
u*MASSAGE THERAPY
u-NAIL TECH
-SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
I School of BeautyI
NPR/SPRING HILL I
Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415






Established Pizza
Shop in Floral City.
Good Money Maker
$18,000 58B-9932





Antique 1950 One
Armed Bandit 10 cent
slot machine. Exc Con-
dition From Harrahs@
Lake Tahoe. $1200
(352) 726-7596

Antique Oak Hoosier
Refinished, excel.
cond. tin flower bin
8 milk glass spice jars,
storage on top and
bottom $750. obo
(352) 795-1381



Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAA AAA ^- --


CLASSIFIED




HOT TUB THERMA-SPA
BRAND WITH COVER
5'X7' 3 PERSON, 2
SEATS AND CHAISE
LOUNGE, IN GREAT
CONDITION. $895.00 JP
352-726-4987, JOANNE
352-346-6023



DISHWASHER, WHITE
looks good,works good
under counter $100.00
352-513-4473
DRYER
$100 with broken trade in.
Works great. 30 day war-
ranty. Delivery extra.
Call/text352-364-6504
DRYER$100 works great
with 30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
FRIDGE, WHITE 2
door,top freezer, works
good. $100.00 513-4473
Kenmore Freezer,
Upright less than
1 yr. old
$250.
(352) 341-4313
Maytag Dryer
for RV or Apartment
Like knew $325
(352) 489-2099
REFRIGERATOR by
Magic Chef, Black &
Stainless, Dorm size.
Works great, priced right.
$75.00. 352-613-4279
Refrigerator
Maytag Stainless steel,
25 CF, w/ top french
doors & bottom freezer
like new. $600 obo
(352) 400-9448
Self cleaning stove.
Works great. $100
503-7992
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STOVE KENMORE white
top burners, good cond.
$100 352-513-4473
WASHER $100
with broken trade in.
Works great. 30 day war-
ranty. Delivery available
Call/text352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can


good, works good, $100
u pick up 352-513 4473
White refrigerator w/ ice
maker. Works great.
$100 503-7992



AIR COMPRESSOR
Campbell Hausfeld, 4 HP
w/ 13 gallon Tank, Oil
free, direct drive 5.8
ACFM @90 PSI $100
OBO 352-795-9849
Bandsaw 9" $40,
Drill Press 10" $50
Good Condition
(352) 341 4008
TOOL BOX
POPULAR MECHANICS
4 DRAWERS TOP,
2 BOTTOM. Large stor-
age $95. 352-220-4074



13" TELEVISION WITH
REMOTE $15
352-613-0529
TELEVISION
40 INCH LCD HDTV
Gorgeous Samsung TV
like new w/remote and
manual. Inverness asking
$400.352-341-0316
TELEVISION
54" PROJECTION TV
Works great $200 firm.
Located in Beverly Hills.
352464-3934
TELEVISION
DURABRAND 19"
COLOR TV works good.
no remote $30.00
352-220-4074
TELEVISION
MAGNAVOX 36" wl
large matching stand,
used very little, excellent
condition, $95, 465-1813
TV & RADIO COMBO
PORTABLE $15
352-613-0529



COMPUTER PRINTER
TABLE 28 HIGH 20
WIDE 16 DEEP
WALNUT COLOR.
$20.00 352-726-0686
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215 INKJET
PRINTER GOOD CON-
DITION. EXTRA INK
$30.00 352-726-0686



GENERATOR
5550 watt Troy Built
generator. 10 HP Briggs
and Straton engine.
Never Used $400 firm
(352) 628-1029
TRACTOR
2005 AG King
Model AK22-40, 4X4
Diesel engine, bucket
and box blade. $8000
(727) 215-4938


PATIO SWING, seats
three comfortable. Extra
cushions. Has canopy
too. $95 352-860-0444




5 PIECE BEDROOM
SET Queen Size
$800 OBO
4 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET SECTIONAL $300
OBO (352)201-4725
6 pc Oak Entertainment
Center; expandable
Selling w/ 51 in. Hitachi
TV. $950. Will sell
separately if interested.
(352) 527-7980
Beautiful Dining
Room Set
Wood Table, 6 chairs &
glass top plus china
cabinet. $495
(352) 726-6228
Brown suede leather
foot stool,
21 x 28, 14" High, new
$50
(352) 637-5227
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Contemporary Bar
w/ bar stools
$160.
Dining Room Table
$100
(352) 257-3802
DARK SOLID PINE
BOOKCASE W/
SHELVES and double
doors. $100 (Dunnellon)
352465-4441
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER HOLDS 32"
TELEVISION MEDIUM
OAK FINISH $30
352-613-0529
Entertainment Center
Lighted white washed
oak holds stereo, spkrs,
TV., w/ storage $250
Fisher Stereo unit w/
speakers $125
(352) 726-5584
ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Real wood, ch stain,glass
door, holds 27" non-hd
TV + more. Beautiful. $95
746-7232 after 6pm
FOUR PIECE COUCH
fair condition/call for
picture on email $20
Linda 419-4788
Fufftton
with extra cover
& pillows
Excel. cond. $250.
(352) 746-1316
Hide A Bed,
Lazy Boy,Excellent
Pastel Colors
$250
(352) 341-4313
Hitchcock Dining Room
Set Table w/ 3 leafs & 6
chairs. Custom Pads.
Excellent Condition
$650 OBO
(352) 564-3994


SUNDAY,AUGUST 26, 2012 D5


BED. natural bamboo
color, with matress,
$60.00 513-4473
Large Curved Desk
$150
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
Large Oak Dresser,
great cond. $175.
New Twin Bed,
never slept in $250.
(352) 249-9275
Leave message
Large sq glass/ marble
coffee table, metal trim.
Matching end tables w/ 2
Irg gold leaf lamps. $400
726-5584
Lift Chair
$250.
74" Sofa,
medium flowers
$80.
(352) 489-9017
Like new off white sofa
and love seat, dinette
table w/ 4 chairs, and
TV's(352) 344-2903
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE BED &
BOX SPRING. Clean,
frame included. $40.00
513-4473
Roll Top Desk
$1,000.
Large Strato Lounger
Rocker Recliner
$199.
(352) 344-1541
ROUND DINNING
TABLE plus chairs,
brown, $100.00 or best
offer 513 4473
SMALL CHINA CABINET
Antique, firm $100.00 pic-
ture upon request
513-4473
Sofa & Loveseat
with 2 high back
chairs $350.
Excellent Condition
352-637-1701
Solid Oak table drop
leaves w/ 4 bentwood
chrs. Excellent Cond
$375. Large Grn leather
sectional w/ Qbed
Exc. $375 726-5584
Triple Dresser w/ mirror,
chest, 2 night stands,
dark oak $125.
Dining Rm. Table with
butterfly leaf & 6 chairs,
med oak, like new
$275. (352) 341-5182
Tropical print sofa &
chair, excellent cond
$300. DR set
Glass/marble table, metal
trim, 6 chrs, side table
$500 726-5584
TRYING AGAIN MAUVE
WING BACK chair made
by Pioneer Very good
condition $60.00
527-1399
TWEED BLUE RE-
CLINER still available,
good cond $40 513-4473
TWIN HEADBOARD &
FOOTBOARD Cherry
Very Nice w/frame. $95
352-465-4441
(Dunnellon)


Chipper/Shredder
10HP Excellent
Condition $350
(352) 465-4234
Craftsman Riding
Mower 17%/ HP
42" Deck $450
John Deer Riding
Mower $350.
(352) 746-7357
Hesqvarna
Riding Mower,
42" Cut, Automatic,
good cond. $400.
(352) 637-4718
LAWN MOWER
John Deere 42" riding
mower. 60 hours, like
new. First $1000 takes
it! (352) 726-8311
MULCHING MOWER
BLACK & DECKER 18"
ELEC. 50 ft. cord $35.00
352-220-4074




WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




ATHLETIC Reebok ath-
letic shoes brand new
size 9.5 white and navy
trim 25.00 352 344 3485
MENS CLOTHING
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
NECKTIES Retired exec
selling collection of
20 designer ties $75 obo
352.637.2647



2 RAIN BARRELS WITH
HOSE CONNECTION
ON BOTTOM. $75 EA
464 0316
7 FISHING HINGED
SINKER MOLDS-
Palmer, H-1I,
Universal,Hilts & US
Sports, Ex., $100.
352-628-0033
1997 Schwinn
Women's Bike
Excellent Cond.
Owner manual
$200 OBO
(352) 465-6830
2010 Craftsman
Generator, 5600
very little use
$300
Tom (920) 224-2513
50" Sony TV w/ remote
$100. 36" TV w/ stand
$85. both work good
Nice girls bike 20" $15.
No cls before 10am
(352) 628-4766
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529


T~~flS Dfrnr


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451

Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzhelmer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730

1tI l li f IV L.

YoLIIl \\OIl first.





( oM I
( ' 1, 1


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
-=. ALL Home
S- Repairs
* \ ./ ,A Small Carpentry
*- Fencing

(lean Dryer
,. Vents
i Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
;ured -Lic.#37761



-, .. C


ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


IREMODEIN


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling'
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42R


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
P FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE Free Est
352-257-9508 *"
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292
TOP NOTCH Carpentry
and Remodeling
Kitchen/Bath Specialist
All Handyman Needs
Lic. (352) 220-8801




BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
VAL'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Valerie (352) 302-9816
Residential / Offices
Once Weekly *
Bi-Weekly Monthly
FREE Estimates





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALL!II
352-563-9824, 228-7320



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


AAA ROOFING
call the "A.akAustees"
Free Written Estimate


$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 oooc


ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341-3300




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536


[AWN AERIONI


JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Picture Perfect Photos
of FAMILY, PETS, or
CASUAL WEDDINGS
Barb Malz 352-212-2439




YolIrVorld first

Neecd a jo.b
or .1
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


i g g . .. . .. ..


1 -855-WE-AE RATE Leaded Glass Installed in your
Tm To Aer EXISTING DOOR!
It's Time To Aerate! ."NO ROT" I
SHlp your lawn grow O Door Units
Help your awn grow Blinds Between

fuller and greener! theGlass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
$69Aerat*Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
*p.1 .a-352-726-6125 "
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)
1-855-932-3728 J wpr sgla s


, "A GIN


When mopping
isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
"9, Cleaning & Sealing
t' Grout Painting
Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


GENERAL A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


"Repaint


Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631










COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR ITERLOCKINGBRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188





WINpDV
G.ENIE.""-
We Ocean Windows and oa Whole Ltt More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Bouleric
o00021o8 & S UPPLY INC.

In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
"' 15 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF:
One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
. FREE ESTIMATES2z
S(352) 628-5079


I Service







D6 SUNDAY,AUGUST 26, 2012


COMMERCIAL
CLOTHING racks(2).
Rollers,adjustable arms,
4 sides. $75 Dunnellon
352-465-4441
COMPUTER DESK
w/hutch pull out end to
form L shape. Like new.
Oak finish. $65. Call
352-382-1154
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER HOLDS 32" TV
MEDIUM OAK FINISH
GOOD CONDITION $30
352-613-0529
FETEC MONO MULLET
CAST NET SS1000- 9ft.
radius super spreader, 1"
sq. mesh, Ex, $40.
352-628-0033
FISH TANK
30 Gal 5 fish,
with all accessories
$100 352-201-4725
Flat Screen TV
Sharp 26"
$100.
Computer, older,
works good $65.
(352) 563-2896
H. P. PRINTER
Office-Jet-All In One
#7210.
Printer-Fax-Scanner.
$55. Call 352-382-1154
HOOVER SELF PRO-
PELLED VACUUM $30
WORKS GREAT CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO INVER-
NESS 419-5981
LAWN MOWERS
[2] MURRAY MOWERS
both 20"cut-3.5hp briggs
eng.-one @ $60.00-one
@ $30.00 [352]746-0167
Lincoln Welder
AC, 225 Amp
$150
Chop Saw
for wood, $80
(352) 563-2896
LP Gas Fork Lift Tank
Good Shape, No leaks
$60
80 Shipping Pallets all in
good shape, no boards
missing $75. obo for all
(352) 563-2385
MAKITA CHOP SAW
USED FOR VINYL
SIDING
ONLY $85 464-0316
Mickey MOUSE
FIGURINE new,in box.
Was $34.95 selling for
$15.00 Linda 419-4788
PARROT CAGE ON
STAND Playtop Green
wrought iron 66"H 32"L
23"W Xclean exc shape
$100. 352-270-3909
PAT ROBERTSON
AUTOGRAPHED
"MIRACLES CAN BE
YOURS" $10 BOOK LIKE
NEW 419-5981
Portable Generator
Gegenarec 5000 Watt,
Briggs & Straton 10 HP.
$450 OBO
(352) 489-7930
QUIK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fit's 10'X10'canopy
Never used $40.00 Call
Ray@ 464-0573
Rolland Electric Organ
with Bench $8,000 obo
Electric Accordion w/
module & 1 speaker
$3,000 obo, 344-1541
RUBBERMAID STOR-
AGE BOX 24 Gal Rub-
bermaid Action Packer
(new) $15. Call
352-382-1154
SAMSUNG GRAVITY
CELL PHONE Full sliding
kb, mint in box. tmobile
only. $50 Inverness
864-283-5797
Sewing Machine
Husqvarna (Viking)
Many decorative
stitches, plus button
holes, great cond. $150
(352) 628-9660
SEWING MACHINE
JANOME(NEW HOME)
DC 4030 Like new.
Used 6 months. Origi-
nal Cost $699. 30
Stitches, Auto Lock
Stitch, Needle Threader,
much more. Ideal for
Quilters. All metal
parts. $450 OBO
352-746-7355
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529
SPRINKLER
JOHN DEERE Large
walking sprinkler that
tracks the hose, $40.
352-628-0033
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $45 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
419-5981
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 ALL
CONNECTIONS,BOOK
AND BOX LIKE NEW
419-5981
TELEVISION 13"
WITH REMOTE $15
352-613-0529
TV & RADIO COMBO
PORTABLE $15
352-613-0529
Utility Trailer Like New
5ft x 10ft. treated wood
floor, steel mesh ramp
tailgate, new spare
$800. General Electric
110V, 12,000 BTU,
remote control
Air Conditioner, $175.
Cell (740) 610-8076
WATER SOFTENER
Ecowater
Asking $200
Call (352) 382-1424



3 Wheel Scooter
Excellent Condition
$475
(352) 341-4008
3 WHEELED WALKER
ONLY $60 464 0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ALUMINUM WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
CLEAN & STERILIZED
$30 464 0316
DEPENDS FOR MEN
Large quantity Size s/m
unopened packages over
150 pair Sell $60.00
Dunnellon 465-8495


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477





BALDWIN ELECTRIC
ORGAN Small Baldwin
Electric Organ that is in
very good shape. Very
good tone and was in-
spected just a few
years ago. Please con-
tact Ed Hill
254-564-0688. Perfer-
ably afternoon.


AMPLIFIER
Line 6 Spider III guitar
amp, 15 watts, $50.
352-419-4464
AMPLIFIER
Peavey Max 112 Bass
amp. $95. 352-419-4464
CORNET AND CASE
(New wonder model)
made by Conn
serial #141209
1920 era. Good
condition $450
(352) 726-8311
DRUM SET Drum Set
minus Toms. Zilgin and
Sabian Cymbals. $75
obo. Call 352-563-0166
Guitar gig bag.$10
352-419-4464
MUSIC STAND used but
good cond. $10.00
513-7743
PIANO
Upright Koholer Camp-
bell, Millennium series,
excellent condition.
$900 (352) 628-5752
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
soft brown tufted seat
opens for storage $40
513-4473



12 X 12 TILES 140
pieces. Light colored
$20 Linda 419-4788
LANTERN new, in box.
Was 44.00, selling for
$15 Linda 419-4788
MONGOOSE BICYCLE
21 speed men's
mountain bike. Like new.
$70.00 Phone
352-249-6509
SOARING EAGLE. New,
in box Was $59.95, sell-
ing for $20 Linda
419-4788



DP EXERCISE BIKE
UPRIGHT W/ FAN.
WORKS THE ARMS.
ONLY $85 464-0316
GAZELLE EDGE Exer-
cise glider 4-function car-
dio workout computer
tracks spd,dist,tm,+ cal
$75 746-7232 after 6pm
NICE MANUAL TREAD-
MILL TOO HOT OUT
LOSE WT INSIDE
ONLY $85. 4640316
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS $100 464-0316



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
Elliptical Exercise
Machine. Like New
$300
352-422-0273
FED HI-SHOK 357
AMMO 125g jhp, new
$65 Inverness
864-283-5797
Golf Cart
Gas,
Runs Good
$1,200 obo
352-400-0312
GOLF CLUBS -
RH Ping G2 Driver $55;
Ping G2 3 Metal $45;
graphite A shafts
(352) 860-0984
MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRES
4-knobbies 2-city tread
Kenda Specialized In-
nova All six for $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.


3 Chihuahua
Puppies
8 weeks old


CAT 4YR OLD MALE
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, 10wks, BIk. &
Cream Choc. & Cream
Males & Females,
Health Certs, Champ.
bloodline, perfect
markings $200 & up
(352) 795-6870
Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com


haired, 8 wk old male.
350$ firm Serious in-
quires only.
352-201-8004
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 28th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $350
(352) 794-3081
Pug Puppies
5 puppies 9 weeks old
$200 each
621-7507


-






RAYA

is a 4-year-old white
retriever mix who
weighs 56 pounds.
She is a very pretty
girl. Walks well on a
leash, just a little bit
shy. Very affection-
ate and wants to be
with her humans as
much as possible.
Does not care about
cats. In desperate
need of a home.
Call Joanne at
352-795-1288.














Roxy
Small, spayed, yellow
Retriever mix approxi-
mately 1 1/2 years old.
She has a medium en-
ergy level and would do
well even in a smaller
home. She is quiet, re-
served and very well
mannered. She gets
along with dogs and
cats. 352-201-8664
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 boarding ramps, 8ft x
3ft ea., heavy alum.
w/side rails $250 ea.,
$450/both
(352) 489-8637




AVON
12 ft. Avon 10 man
profsnl. river raft, infltbl,
soft bottom w/motor mt.
$600 firm (352) 489-8637
Jet Ski
Seadoo, 1999, Bombar-
dier GS, 720 CC, w/
trailer, new wheels Sr.
Mechanic owned, runs
great real nice cond.
$1,250. (352) 422-1026




2 Wave Runners
2 seat & 3 seater
w/Trailers. Large Child's
ATV $1,300 for All
All needs little work
727-207-1619 Crys. Riv.
BASS TRACKER
15 ft, Jon Boat 25HP
Merc. Mtr., elect, start
mtr. guide trolling mtr.
new tires on trlr. new
spare tire, life jacket &
cooler incl.'d $1,500
(352) 220-1262
CANOE
16 ft., American Eagle,
ready for water. Only
$175. Come see at
717 Newton Ave., Inv
CONCEPT
1997, 22ft, 6 In. CC
225HP, EFI Merc.,SS
Prop. Alum. Tan. Ax. trlr.
cust. Interior, & cover
new gauges, dual bat-
teries, all safety equip.
life jackets & anker,
$11,900 .(352) 795-4674


GHEENOO
1991 15'9" / 9.9 horse-
power Johnson, low
hours, galvanized trailer
$1500 352-424-2760
GLASS STREAM
14 ft, 20H Evinrude, troll-
ing mtr., hummingbird
dep. find. &trlr. $1,500
obo (352) 726-9708
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
LANDAU
1994 Landau 12 ft. Jon
Boat, alum., like new
$350
(352) 489-8637
SWEETWATER
20ft. 50HP evinrude,
galvanized trailer,
$3500
(352) 613-2333




2001 RV BUMPER
PULL
26 foot
$4,250 obo
(352) 400-0312
Car Tow Dolly
with surge brakes, LED
lights, tongue jack &
wheel covers, extras
$1,775, 352-249-7896
JAMBOREE

'05 Jamboree 30 ft class
C Motor home. Excellent
Cond. Ford V10 20K mi-
les, NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
746-9002
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298




GULFSTREAM
2008, 18 FT.
KINGSPORT LITE
$7,800 Negotiable
(352) 726-8005
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
KZ Sportsman
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 6, air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments k
Financina For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892






CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548


CLASSIFIED



DODGE
89 Dodge Colt
Mitsubishi engine, 5
speed, 110k mi, $1000
(352) 563-0166

FORD
'04, Thunderbird, cony.
w/ hardtop 35K mi.
excel. cond. $17,500
(352) 564-6833

FORD
2000 Taurus LX 4dr, V6
auto, air, power windows,
locks. 90,000, good con-
dition. $2500.00 OBO
352-746-3065

HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS
352-628-4600

JAGUAR
2004 X-Type excellent
cond 95K miles
garage kept 1 owner
$ 6900.
97 MERCEDES diesel
$2500.
352-341-4586

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCURY
Mountaineer Auto, V8,
4 door SUV, 2000, Fac-
tory Mags, tinted windows
Electric everything!
$3500 727-207-1619 CR

PONTIAC
'06, G6, V6 Engine
70,000 miles
very good cond.
$8,400. (352) 601-0276

SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600

SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988





CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426

MERCEDES
1981, Classic SL380
Roadster, 2 seater Lt.
Blue w/ Dark Blue Top,
Interior, New brakes &
shocks Runs great Looks
great $7,000
(352) 794-5446








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






CHEVY
'03 Silverado Pickup
2500 HD Model, loaded
50k miles, $10,500
(352) 447-1244
(352) 344-2927


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555
CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018
DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8,
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4, 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018
LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *,
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
MAZDA
'98, B2500, Extra Cab,
4 cyc. 5 speed, cold air
$2,900 obo
352-447-2366
NISSAN
1983, 4 X 4, 5 spd. new
radial swampers, great
woods truck, alum. tool
box, new brakes lots of
new parts $1,450.
(352) 220-1262




Jeep
1998 Sahara 67K, 6 cyl, 5
speed, options, garaged,
exc cond, $8850/neg
352-322-5679
CHEVY
'99, Blazer, 4 DR, 2 WD,
AC, in Good Cond.
$2,800 obo
(352) 860-0420
HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8, 4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600




DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 7! $5450.
352-341-0018
PLYMOUTH
'97, Voyager, Van,
needs module
$1,800 obo
325-220-0133
TOYOTA
2006 Sienna XLE 62K
miles, Viewpoint rear en-
try, lowered floor, wheel-
chair conversion. Wheel-
lock and Qstraint retracta-
ble tie downs. Will fit 2
Wheelchairs and has flip
down rear bench seat,
leather. $29k OBO
352-446-3110
Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018




KAWASAKI
'89, 4 X 4,300, Runs
good, 2 new rear tires,
cammo seat, gun
racks, Lots of new parts
$725 (352) 220-1262
KAWASAKI
'89, 4 X 4,300, Runs
good, 2 new rear tires,
cammo seat, gun
racks, Lots of new parts
$725 (352) 220-1262


Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank, '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333

Harley Davidson
2000 fatboy custom 88
ex cond, garage kept.
new windshld/sadbags
$9875 214-9800


HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902


VW TRIKE
VW Trike New only 900
miles Garage Kept Looks
& runs great. $8000.00
352-344-9340 Phone

YAMAHA
2012, Zuma Scooter
49 CC, 100 miles,
$2,300 obo
(352) 527-0347

Self Storagei-[^^^^


397-0826 SUCRN 09/06/12 sale Units 110, 255, 239, 309, 369, 614
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY
RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES SELF STOARGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807: WINDMILL SELF STORAGE.
UNIT # 110 AUDREY EDWARDS
UNIT # 255 JONI PAUGH
UNIT #239 ROBERT NOLAND
UNIT 309 COLLEEN MAHONEY
UNIT 369 HENRY HOWEY
UNIT #614 GLENDA AUSTIN
TENANTS STORED GOODS, IF SALABLE WILL BE SOLD ON SITE AFTER THIS PUBLIC NOTICE
HAS BEEN PUBLISHED TWO TIMES. THE SALE OF THE STORED GOODS, IF NOT REDEEMED
BY PAYMENT IN FULL OF ALL DELINQUENT RENTS AND RELATED COSTS, IN ACCORD-
ANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES. SALE WILL BE HELD ON PREMISES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER
6, 2012 @ 10 A.M. WINDMILL SELF STORAGE 2297- W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. (HWY.44)
LECANTO, FL (352)746-3633
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, AUGUST 12 & 26, 2012.


311-0826 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- David M, Johns & Kasda D, Atkins, Jr,
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Kasda D. Atkins, Jr. David M. Johns
17 Meadowdale St 5672 S Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Lecanto, FL 34461
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.


Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, August 26, 2012.


312-0826 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTYCONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY September 12, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, Florida34461
..............................F..............................................* DAVID
HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
LEONARD FRESHMAN GERRY GAUDETTE
ROBERT CABLE
******************************************************************************
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES

(5) CITATIONS:
a) Shaun Stehlik Citation #0058 Engage in the business or act in the ca
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
(6) SCHEDULED DISCUSSION
a) Discuss Chapter 18, Building Ordinance (including trade definitions)
b) Discuss Board Member vacancies
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TIONLICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION
286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING
BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR
LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
August 26, 2012.

308-0826 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, September 5, 2012 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.


August 26, 2012.


Bid Ntice


BY: John Siefert, Executive Diirector


307-0826 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
FAIR HOUSING PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING
The City of Crystal River will conduct a fair housing workshop for the public and local
elected officials on Monday, September 10, 2012, during a regular City Council
Meeting beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Crystal River City Hall located at 123 NW High-
way 19, Crystal River, FL. This meeting is intended to provide the public and local
elected officials with information concerning fair housing requirements. Anyone in-
terested in understanding the importance of fair housing should attend.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION
August 26, 2012.

310-0826 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 035-12
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM
NSP3 B-11-UN-12-0020
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate three (3) single family homes for its
Neighborhood Stabilization Program. The three (3) homes are as follows:
35 S. Davis Street, Beverly Hills, FL
3091 N. Running Oak Terrace, Beverly Hills, FL
5261 S. Alden Ave, Inverness, FL
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for September 5, 2012 @ 10:00 am. Addi-
tional information concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below.
Addind infrmain concernhg the pre-bid conference isprovided bow.AI prices shdl include dl
labor, spervsion, materals, equipment cnd services nec-
essary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to
bid submittal. Contact Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., Phone (866)
484-1975 (Toll Free) or Fax (352) 381-8270 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on September
5, 2012 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a
Mandatory Walk through of each location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before September 20, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for September 20, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle on August 26.


ROUTES





AVAILABLE
NOW --- -


t Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

t Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager or
email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
C I T R U S .. C O U N T Y V


C CHIkRONIcLE
-www.chronicleonline.com


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Noti


I Misc. Nod


Meeting
I Notices I


MeeingH^f
I Ntiesj


Metn


LivestocB


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 D7







BEST SELECTION AND BEST PRICES


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~l m' m ''' Ifl Y aII i~IYq 1; l


2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52575


2006 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52300


2006 NISSAN SENTRA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52110


2006 FORD F150 2006 DODGE MAGNUM 2006 DODGE DURANGO
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52330 800-584-8755 EXT. 52614 800-584-8755 EXT. 52334
2006 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO 2006 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12254 800-584-8755 EXT. 12248 800-584-8755 ERT. 12203
2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2006 FORD F350 2006 FORD F250
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12151 800-584-8755 EXT. 42271 800-584-8755 EXT. 32169
2006 TOYOTA CAMRY 2005 CHRYSLER 300 2005 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62217 800-584-8755 EXT. 52440 800-584-8755 ERT. 52213
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 JEEP WRANGLER 2005 CADILLAC CTS
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52502 800-584-8755 EXT. 12234 800-584-8755 ERT. 12174
2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 2005 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42282 800-584-8755 EXT. 32373 800-584-8755 ERT. 61274
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 BUICK LACROSSE 2004 KIA SEDONA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62382 800-584-8755 EXT. 62414 800-584-8755 ERT. 52287
2004 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2004 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52508 800-584-8755 EXT. 12261 800-584-8755 ERT. 42226
2004 DODGE CARAVAN 2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER 2004 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42248 800-584-8755 EXT. 37858 800-584-8755 ERT. 32342
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 2004 NISSAN XTERRA 2004 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62400 800-584-8755 EXT. 62351 800-584-8755 ERT. 62273
2003 FORD FOCUS 2003 DODGE CARAVAN 2003 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 37726 800-584-8755 EXT. 37711 800-584-8755 ERT. 62139
2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE 2002 NISSAN FRONTIER 2002 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52254 800-584-8755 EXT. 52398 800-584-8755 ERT. 12208
2002 FORD F350 2002 CHRYSLER 300M 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12139 800-584-8755 EXT. 12373 800-584-8755 ET. 42267
2002 HONDA ODYSSEY 2002 CHEVROLET S10 2002 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42228 800-584-8755 EXT. 33005 800-584-8755 ERT. 62355
2001 FORD WINDSTAR 2001 TOYOTA TUNDRA 2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRACK
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52493 800-584-8755 EXT. 52524 800-584-8755 ERT. 12408
2001 NISSAN ALTIMA 2001 GMC JIMMY 2001 SATURN SW2
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12448 800-584-8755 EXT. 42276 800-584-8755 ET. 42582
2001 DODGE RAM 3500 2001 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 2001 TOYOTA AVALON
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 32093 800-584-8755 ERT. 62279 800-584-8755 ERT. 62314
2000 DODGE NEON 2000 FORD MUSTANG 2000 CHEVROLET TAHOE
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52448 800-584-8755 EXT. 52482 800-584-8755 ERT. 12412
2000 FORD EXPLORER 2000 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 2000 CHEVROLET S10
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ER. 47623 800-584-8755 EXT. 42259 800-584-8755 ER. 37738


CRYSTALAUTOS.CO M


D8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









SHOMEFRONT


Sikorski's
S1 Attic
PAGE E4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


A whale decal from the
Toronto-based LittleLion
Studio. Kids are often M iMri
enthralled by wild INeJ E
animals, so it's fun M IWI- N
to do their rooms with
animal-themed decor.
Associated Press P EP TREESM


i .. j miu *

IEWRJ _


STI


ltEUU0


'MSTIFS


I





ii
J


V
11
I I


r 1
ILi
I.I


SEE


a


Ir-A










E2 SUNDA~~ AUGUST 26, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


A CLASS BY ITSELF!
* Executve Beauty Magnificant MBR/Bath
* Wood Cab in Kit. Gorgeous Pool/Pavers
* 3/2/2 Split Plan Tasteful Porcelain Tile
* Close to Gulf/Rivers Shed w/Elec + Lg Gen!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaListinglnfo.com


EVERYONE IN THE POOL!!
Spacious 3/2/3 huge kit,
den, FDR and more.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buvcitruscounty.com


11985 N. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
* 2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50 Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


DUVAL ISLAND CAGED POOL
HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
2 BR/1.5 baths, Florida room,
remodeled kitchen with hickory
cabinets, garage. Move-in con-
dition. A must see home.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Mail. barbarajmils@earthfink.net












REALTY ONE









24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


S3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


Beautiful 4 BR/3 BA/3 CG Home
SFormal Living & Dining Room
* Family room w/Fireplace
* Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area
* Office w/Built-in Bookcases & Desk
SCaged Lanai & Pool w/Spa
Nicely Landscaped 1 7 Acres
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


Need a large Citrus Springs home that is priced well
and NOT a short sale?l This one is for youl Large,
possible 4 bedroom, 2 story home in peaceful Citrus
Springs ready for new owner today Interior features
large functional kitchen, family room, living room,
formal dining and huge loft area Large fenced
backyard for boat or RV parking i' E
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 4
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


JIU51 Li51:IU!
Come live the casual Florida
lifestyle. Open floorplan with tons
of natural light. Pool, spa, and
distant sunsets await!

KIM DEVANE (352) 257-5353
Email: kim@kmdevane.com I


* 3BR, 2BA w/2,075 SF Living Great Room Plan
* Formal Dining Room Eat-In Kitchen, Inside Laundry
* Split Plan, Built in 1990 Master Suite w/Jetted Tub
* Huge Glassed-In Lanai
CHRIS GRANT (352) 238-3516 [I
REAL ESTATE WISHES GRANTED
is@cthisgrantswises.com www.ChrisGrantWisres.corm


CANTERBURY LA


Gorgeous 3 BR/2 BA/2 CG Home Office/Den
Kitchen w/Conan Countertops Beautful Master Suite
Great Room w/Crown Molding. Lots of upgrades
Lanai w/Pavers Screened garden Room
Landscaped Backyard/Lake View
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


*4/3/4 on 10 Acres 3,612 Sq. Ft. of Living
* Covered Patios and 3 Sides
* Pool & Hot Tub Detached Garage w/Office
* Pole Barn Fenced and Gated
* Great Room Crown Moldings
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net



Iefr


BIG REDUCTION on this roomy, light and
bright 2004 Nobility 3/2 situated on a nicely
manicured lot in a great little neighborhood.
Open, split floor plan with living/dining, large
kitchen, separate laundry, covered attached
carport. Hurry before this is scooped up!!

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


* 199b Year Built 3/2/2 on .7b Acre
Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
Room for Pool and More
Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


242 N. Lecni Hw. eel il 2-82wwRMXcmI10W anS nens 3-2;
835S Snos Bv. oro1s 62-70 ww.our Inielsfeco 50 NE Hwy 9Ias ivr7524


5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


4390 W. FINDLAY ST., CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3 BD/2 BA/2 CG w/pool *2380 sq. ft. on 1/2 acre
* Living plus family rooms) Tile throughout
* Formal dining & eat-in kitchen Huge master suite
*42" cherry cabinets M/bath w/jeltted tub, sep. shower
* Stainess appliances Lots of privacy
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 [
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


AIMVIW t. 4U14 N. INDIAN HIVtH UH.
Very best value in Fairveiw Estates! This is a MUST
SEE home that will cost less than $100 per sq. ft!
Whether you'd like to entertain or come home to a
resort like setting, this is for you! This split, open
3 BR, 3 BTH floor plan has all your extras! Pool,
Hot Tub. Many many extras!
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyaltman@remax.net


i


E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*
*K
*
*L
*L







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Mary Nancy
Gulling Little Lewis
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.

EXIT Realty
congratulates agents
EXIT Realty Leaders would
like to say congratulations to
the following agents for earning
the following EXIT Realty
Florida July awards.
Top sponsoring agent was
Mary Gulling. Among the top
100 agents in new listings
taken were Nancy Little
Lewis, Charlene Angelo,
Peggy Price, Trish Antonetti,
Nancy Ayres, Vinny Brown,


Charlene
Angelo
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Peggy
Price
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Trish Nancy
Antonetti Ayres
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.
Mary Gulling, Sherri Oren-
dorff, Bernadette Poorman
and Debbie Branson Scott.
Karl Wolf was recognized as


&F Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
S Realtort A HOUSE Realtort I-
S302.3179 sowani-' 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 7466700

S 28 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS

...., I,,-....... 111,-,-,h, I,1 i ,I


-'' as3540 N. WOODGATE DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
i, Cute as a button, move-in ready, 2/2/1,
m easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
interior paint, furniture is negotiable with
sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.


Al Gtu Ralt, N


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Great commercial building location 2 blocks
from courthouse. 100 x 162 lot.
c19C Ann AAIC(4QL(on


I BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage
S converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage.
$84,900 MLS#356908


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Corner commercial location off Hwy 44 east &
Gospel Island Road. $61,500 MLS#354972
L


FORMER BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Prime location, multi-use building. Next to Citrus
High School. $349,989 MLS#354393


Pamela
Shemet
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Sherri
Orendorff
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


one of the top 50 agents in
pending contracts.
Among the top 50 agents in
closed sides were Nancy Little
Lewis, Mike Stokley and
Nancy Ayres. Additionally,
Nancy Little Lewis and Mike
Stokley were among the top 50
agents in closed sides buy-


Debbie Bernadette
Scott Poorman
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.
ers sides, and Nancy Ayres,
Nancy Little Lewis and Pamela
Shemet were among the top
50 agents in closed sides -
sellers side.
Among the top 100 agents in
sales volume were Nancy Little
Lewis, Barbara Stone, Mary
Gulling, Mike Stokley and


Karl
Wolf
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Barbara
Stone
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Nancy Ayres. Among the top 50
agents in sales volume sell-
ers side were Nancy Little
Lewis, Mary Gulling, Nancy
Ayres and Barbara Stone
Finally, among the top 100
agents in gross commission were
Nancy Little Lewis, Mary Gulling,
Nancy Ayres and Mike Stokley.


Lewis
joins
team at
ERA
American
ERAAmeri- Carol Lewis
can Realty ERA American
and Invest- Realty.
ments is
pleased to announce that Carol
Lewis has recently joined the
company's Inverness office.
She is very active in the com-
munity, volunteering for Relay
for Life and Junior Achievement.
Contact her at 352-726-5855 or
by email at carolf59@live.com.
See DIGEST/Page E6


I1: I[ m'l0 0'- --,J A OF CO


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


( Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


4l-ll. t 321 E. Keller CI.
MLS #353847 $214,900
3/2/2 +den Oaks Golf Course home.
Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd.,
to right on Keller,to home on right
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


, MLS #355794 $349,900
Custom built 4/3/3 pool home.
Numerous upgrades. 3+ acres.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


1935 S. Casey PL
.e r r. : ... .J S75.000
Very Clean 2/1/1 home in a quiet area
being sold w/extra lot.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


' ig)n 7W 3920 N. Stirrup Dr.
MLS #357147 $398,500
BRING YOUR HORSE! Lovely 3/3/3Tara
Lynn by Bluestone pool home on 3.3 acres.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


aC 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr.
SMLS #355561 $299,000
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres.
Bring your horses!
Teresa Boozer352-634-0213


"7Jt;a 9W. Doerr Path
MLS #357231 $275,000
Beautiful villa on a quiet cul-de-sac.
Sandra Olear352-212-4058


'JT,,, 3709 N. Buckwheal PI.
I/'"U- MLS #356804 $99,000
Furnished Pine Ridge pool home on an
acre for THIS price? 2 bdrm/2 bath.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


COistl 7 t""
Csn s ahi w *- -
9210 W. Melanie Ln.
4.We-i, MLS#357201 $49,900
Well maintained spacious 4 bed 2 1/2
bath doublewide with open floor plan.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


ltu ~~IZ t L. Brooks Ln.
MLS#353915 $79,900
Country feel 3/2 mobile on 2 acres.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


652 E. Falconry Ct. 1320 Lke hore Dr. 3 Moniana SI.
MLS #356500 $154,900 MLS #351954 $99,000 +iUS MLS# 355490 $77,900
TRUE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE Golf course Well kept home w/a great view MOVE-IN-READY2/2/2
location, solar heated 3/3/2 pool home. of Lake Spivey. Imperial Executive II.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Sandra Olear352-212-4058 Teresa Boozer352-634-0213


SP2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
LTD Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352s 302-6714 -'


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012E3







E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information............................................... 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Are you a mosquito magnet?


Thomas Jefferson's promise that
we are all created equal is com-
mendable, but when it comes to
outdoor activities, some of us get more
attention than others from those pesky
skeeterss."
As you swat madly at these annoying
pests, you may have noticed
that others seem com-
pletely unfazed. Could it be
that mosquitoes prefer to
bite some people over oth- 4H
ers? According to experts,
mosquitoes do exhibit
blood-sucking preferences.
"One in 10 people are
highly attractive to mosqui- Joan Br
toes," reports Jerry Butler, FLOR
PhD., professor emeritus at
the University of Florida. FRIEI
Female mosquitoes need LIV
human blood to develop
fertile eggs. And apparently, not just
anyone's will do.
Although researchers have yet to
pinpoint what mosquitoes consider an
ideal human target, there is research
being conducted on what compounds
and odors people exude that might be
attractive to mosquitoes. Scientists do
know that genetics account for a
whopping 85 percent of our suscepti-


I


ability to mosquito bites. They've also
identified certain elements of our
body chemistry that, when found in
excess on the skin's surface, make
mosquitoes swarm closer.
Mosquitoes are troublesome pests
that can cause itchy bites and transmit
viruses. It is the female
mosquito that feeds on
blood to enable her eggs to
develop into offspring.
ba When mosquitoes bite, they
release saliva into the bite
area. Allergic reactions to
the saliva cause the itchy
bumps and swollen hives
adshaw some people get after being
tIDA- bitten.
If a mosquito is carrying
NDLY a virus, that virus can be
ING transferred to humans
through the mosquito's
saliva. In Florida, these viruses can
cause encephalitis or dengue fever.
Mosquito-borne diseases currently of
public health concern in Florida in-
clude St. Louis encephalitis, eastern
equine encephalitis, West Nile virus
encephalitis, and dengue. The good
news is you can minimize the impact
of these insects. The best way to avoid
being bitten is to stay clear of mos-


quito-infested areas and wear protec-
tive clothing and insect repellent.
The varieties of mosquito that carry
encephalitis have their peak activity
around dusk and dawn. The insects
prefer calm, shady, and humid areas.
Dengue-carrying mosquitoes are day-
time biters and usually do not fly far
from the containers where they spend
their immature stages. If you are at
home, make sure you restrict access to
or eliminate standing water areas
where mosquitoes can breed (puddles,
fish ponds, bird baths, rain barrels,
used tires, leaf-clogged drains, and
plant saucers). Also avoid mosquitoes
by wearing protective layers; the more
skin you cover, the fewer bites you will
receive.
Repellents are used to "repel" mos-
quitoes; they do not kill them. The best
repellents provide protection for a
long period of time per application.
Current repellents are either syn-
thetic or plant-derived chemicals
available in spray, wipe-on, foam, or
lotion formulas.
DEET is a highly effective repellent.
"DEET" may not be on a product's
label its chemical names might be

See SKEETERS/Page E8


Unique pottery found by diver; a 19th-century loveseat


Dear John: I lived in
the Key Largo area
of the Florida Keys.
In 1991 while
snorkeling, I
came across this
bottle, photos at-
tached. I have no
idea if this is a
contemporary
item or some-
thing else. Is it
possible to deter-
mine the age of John S
this bottle from SIKOF
these photos? AT
Any information
would be very ap-
preciated. Thank you for
looking. -R.M., Internet
Dear R.M.: Wow, what an
interesting underwater
find. I think the stoneware
bottle was made in the early
19th century, perhaps much
earlier My guess about the
country of origin is possibly
Persia. Glass Works Auc-


I






1


tions in Pennsylvania spe-
cializes in bottles, both
glass and ceramic. To check
what it might sell
for, the website is
wwwglswrk-auc-
tion.com. Let us
know what you
discover.
Dear John: I
have a loveseat,
pictures at-
tached, from
ikorski around 1900 to
SKI'S 1910. It has a
TIC padded back,
round bolster-
looking arms,
with padded seat. There is
exquisite carving on the
round ends of the arms,
along the back edges, and
down the legs, with casters
on the front legs only Simi-
lar items I see online are in
the area of $1,500 and up.
Do you have an idea where
and how I can get fair ap-


praisal and a market for it?
- CJ., Internet
Dear C.J.: Your loveseat
was made in America after
the Civil War, sometime
during the last quarter of
the 19th century The style
is Aesthetic Revival. The
overall quality appears to
be of a high standard. The
upholstery is overdone, de-
tracting from the fine-qual-
ity woodwork and making it
See ATTIC/Page E5
This loveseat was made in
America after the Civil War,
sometime during the last
quarter of the 19th century.
The style is Aesthetic Re-
vival. The overall quality ap-
pears to be of a high
standard. The upholstery is
overdone, detracting from
the fine-quality woodwork
and making it difficult
to sell.
Special to the Chronicle


7


S


- --S .~t fr1t
A


'." .' ":'-t..

- *. ; **.^.. v.
i. -, % *r..,
A

1t
4
a.,


M.5o


. 4







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

difficult to sell. Currently
market interest in this type
of antique furniture is very
soft I think if you get $500 or
more, it will be a lucky day
Dear John: I have listened
to your show on and off for
years and I have a problem I
just know you can help with.
I recently started volunteer-
ing for a local youth orches-
tra in Hernando County and
as part of my efforts to pro-
mote and prosper the group,
I solicited donations of in-
struments for the children.
We have been given some vi-
olins, violas, mandolins,
flutes and clarinets that
strike us as too valuable to
give to 10-year-old kids. We
thought we might ascertain


their worth and perhaps sell
the more valuable ones to fi-
nance the purchase of stu-
dent instruments. Here is
the rub: We cannot find a
local appraiser. I just know
with all your contacts you
must know of someone in
the state who could offer a
charitably priced appraisal.
As I indicated, we are in
Hernando County and are
not close to either Ocala or
Tampa, but we will travel if
we need to in order to get
this info. For whatever aid
you can offer, thank you in
advance and please keep up
the good work on air. -
R.G., Internet
Dear R.G.: Thank you for
the kind words. I suggest
you contact Jan van Rooyan
in Gainesville, who is well-
qualified to handle your sit-
uation. The website is
www.gviolins.com and the


000CP .. eza "ee
REAL ESTATE, INC.
m 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
SMwiS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
S OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAML: SALES@ALEXRE .COM


BEST

Realtor


AGET,, OI D m ,Y A Wm m- ?K i m y


HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H LECANTO 2003 PALM Harbor D/W M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved road, on over 5 acres of land w/pool, 4 bedrooms,
screen porch, workshop, shed, ceiling fans, 2 baths, family rm, fenced & x-fenced.
formal dining rm & eat-in kitchen Circular drive, 4 car detached garage, 20 x 40
w/breakfast bar. Immaculate inside, near by ft. metal drive-thru barn, 40 x 20 workshop
to shopping. #355194 $60,000 also. #353359 $185,000



LECANTO 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
w/workbench area on one acre of land. SUMMERFIELD 1999 3 bdrm, 2 bath
Country kitchen w/breakfast bar overlooking D/W M/H on 1.66 acres, paved road, cent
family rm w/built-in cabinets & shelving, A/C, fully fenced. Spacious eat-in kitchen;
dining rm, large master bath w/tile fir, dbl Ig bdrms & walk-in closet, main bath has
vanity, separate tub & shower. rh,-r ,bl -nit nd dnr-n tub. Amidst
#355208 $135,000 . ., H ... i. 1 .-:2 $79,900


phone number is 352-332-
1402.
Dear John: I have a pic-
ture that is of Furth Wald,
Germany The frame is cut
from 1/4 inch thick wood
bark from a Black Forest
tree. What can you tell me of
its age, or could this have
any monetary value? It was
in my husband's family for
years.
The other picture is of a
bull moose on an ice cap. It
is in a very nice old frame


that my sister left me. I can-
not tell if it is signed. I have
never removed the back, as
it seems so fragile and could
crush easily
How old is the picture or
frame? Could it have any
monetary value? At 89 years
I am disposing of many
things; thought I should
check with you first, before
disposing of either picture.
Appreciate anything you
can tell me of both. -B.S.P,
Inverness


Dear B.S.P: The first pho-
tograph of the painting on a
wood panel is out of focus.
In order to help you I need
good clear photos.
The other framed picture
showing a moose looks to
have been produced be-
tween World War I and II.
However, that is all I can say
due to the poor
photographs.
Take the items outside in
daylight and shoot several
good, clear, in-focus photo-


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 E5

graphs, and then I will try to
finish the story


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


I51 hi L'US RIDG REA ILii


Amanda & rk Johnso TomBalfour U Avenus & HalStedn ArtPaty
BRO E/ASSOC. P oLI0A1kI REALTOR REAL0R- BROIR REACTOR


CITUSHILSKIGSBAI, CTRS SPIN S c mHLS PN IG



0-A -=II


HIE.D


746-9000







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOT A NEWS TIP?

* The Chronicle welcomes tips from
readers about breaking news. Call
the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your
name, phone number, and the ad-
dress of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature
sections, call 352-563-5660 and
ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be
prepared to leave a detailed
message.


"GET AWAY" from
the Hustle & Bustle!
2/2/2 home with additional Ranch Home in Forest Lake
detached garage One street from 3 Bedroom + office with outside
Cozythe giving space with stone entrance 1.61 acres with fenced
fireplace Park-like setting with yard. Detached garage with
fenced backyard electric & plumbing.
$84,900 MLS 356956 $85,900 MLS 357014


DIGEST
Continued from Page E3

Horth leads the pack
at Plantation
Plantation Realty Inc. would like to
congratulate Trish Horth for being our top
producing agent in July.
Trish is an avid fisher, horse lover, and is
very knowledgeable about Citrus County
real estate.
Reach her on her cell at 352-598-1570
or at the office at 352-795-0784.



WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.7 million already closed by June 29, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
m To Learn More
_a (352) 746-9924 "S


1e' GITTA BARTH
I-LS REALTOR
Investors Realty REL
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house .com


CUSTOM BUILT HOME 500K BELOW
In the equestrian section of Pine INVESTMENT
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a I -
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www.mypineridgehome.com. rn
MLS #355468.$410,000 $499.000







.3 GAZANIA CT.
NATURE'S SMW
NATURE LOVERS BEST KEPT SECRET Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River space, open floor plan, all neutral colors
and private setting perfect retreat! Oaks East, a gated waterfront community Quiet cul-de-sac street w/lots of green
... ....... Take the on the Withlacoochee River space Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
... ... .... ...$218,000 Parkway
MLS #353046 $400,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #355830 $99,000


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and LIVING ON THE WATER!
nice 1...1 in beautiful Citrus This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
Hills!! .,'. a one acre comer lot, the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well maintained 3/2/1
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
pool and patio area offers you the privacy plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. medical ... I 1. , .,. your fenced
S.. ... 1.;... ; well 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard i .... . .... ... or private
.. ... .. bring room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
... 1 ... ;.1,, ;,,' im aginable! r .. ... :..
,, $175,000 MLS#354435 $489,000 n ,.. $69,900


E6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IL


I


Kids will flip for animal-themed decor


ids are often en-
thralled with the wild
kingdom, so it's fun to
do their rooms with
animal-themed decor.
And you can think beyond the
standard, kitty-cat wall border or
dino bedding; some of today's de-
signs have a sophistication that
will please style-minded parents,
too.
So to quote Maurice Sendak,
"Let the wild rumpus begin!"
Dwell Studio: This bastion of
chic kids' decor offers deer,
triceratops, unicorn and zebra
papier-mach6 wall art that could
easily inhabit any room in the
house. Owl and unicorn
shower curtains are
rendered in Dwell's s-.L- .
nature muted-color -.
palette. Here too are
French textile de-
signer Paule Mar-
rot's high style,
textural giclee
bird paintings on
linen. (www.dwell
studio.com, papier-
mach6, $76; shower
curtains, $66; Paule
Marrot wall art,
$2,200)
Ferm Living: Folk-arty
silhouettes are the story at this
Scandinavian design house.
There are friendly tiger, owl and
octopus poly-filled cushions and
mobiles, a sweet group of bird-
shaped cushions, and a snake in
fun, stripy organic hues. An un-
likely yet whimsical Animal
Tower decal stacks a rooster on a
giraffe on a dog on a horse on an
elephant wall art sure to in-
spire some fantastical story-
telling. (www.fermlivingshop.com,
cushions, $34.25 and up; mobiles,
$45.75; Animal Tower, $110)
RoomMates: Silhouette decals
including monkeys, pelicans, tur-
tles and more come packaged to-
gether ready to affix in whatever
creative narrative strikes your
fancy There are realistic di-
nosaurs as well, packaged in mul-


DwellStudio's Papier Mache
zebra head Restoration
Hardware's African Animal Art
Camel vintage illustration, ren-
dered in warm sepia print. Kids are
often enthralled by wild animals, so
it's fun to do their rooms with ani-
mal-themed decor. Think beyond
the standard kitty-cat wall border
or dino bedding; there are decor
ideas sophisticated enough to
please style-minded parents, too.
Associated Press
tiples. (wwwroommates
decor.com, animal decals, $71.49;
dinos, $14.49)
Little Lion Studio: Based in
Montreal, Leonardo Cortes cre-
.ites" quiet, whimsical-
.' sleepscape wall decals. A
Liiilly of koalas snoozes
in eucalyptus branches; a
big yet benign whale
;. takes a little sailboat
Stior a ride. A watchful
ii ommy giraffe can be
-* positioned over the
i rib, with baby giraffe
on the other side.
Cortes' simple and
charming style is
reminiscent of that
of Babar's creator,
Laurent de Brunhoff.
(www.leolittlelion.
etsycom, whale, $45.02; koalas,
$81.54 and up; giraffes, $97.03)
Restoration Hardware: Vintage
illustrations of rhinos, camels
and lions will have children
dreaming of exploring Africa.
(www.rhbabyandchild.com, art-
work, $439)
Rug Company: London-based
designers Edward Barber and Jay
Osgerby choose to depict animals
the way they behave in the wild, so
their Fishes rug features a school
of swimmy friends, while a slither-
ing serpent makes his way across
the Snake rug. (wwwtherug
company com, $5,508 each)
Mimi Lou: In a past life,
Miriam Derville was an advertis-
ing exec for high-end fragrances.
But when she started drawing


versions of her children's stuffed
animals on their bedroom walls,
people took notice, and Mimi Lou
was born. She's created a charm-
ing collection of wall stickers fea-
turing elephants, mice, penguins,


bears and a menagerie of crea-
tures with French flair (www
mimilou-shop.fr, $52 and up)
KidsonRootf The Dutch design
studio created by Romy Boesveldt
and Ilya Yashkin link modem de-


sign with nature in a series of re-
cycled cardboard totems of birds
and other wild animals. They can
be easily assembled into table
sculptures. (www.kidsonroof.com,
starting at around $20)


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ruellia: Native,


exotic, or invasive?
Florida has an indige- will never be any Malachite
nous na- caterpillars this
t i v e far north to feed.
wildflower S e e
called Wild Petu- www.naba.org for
nia, Ruelliac- the North Ameri-
aroliniensis. In can Butterfly As-
the Acanthus sociation.
family it is eaten Locally, Wild
by caterpillars of Petunia is a
the Malachite p r e t t y,
butterfly, but only ephemeral,
along the coasts Jane Weber spring flowering
of extreme South JANE'S wildflower. It
Florida and in GARDEN self-sows seed
the Keys. Mala- GARDEN readily in rich
chite caterpillars soil and moist


also eat the leaves of the in-
vasive alien green shrimp
plant, which should never
be planted locally as there


conditions. It is common in
the areas south of Inver-

See JANE/Page E9


9690 W. GREEN LN. R TY
CRYSTAL RIVER 19 Hwy. 40 West 11451 E. Hwy. 40 -
$74,900 'I"ngi $120,000
3/2/1 car attached gar. 1,160 sq. ft. liv. nglis, FL 3/2/2 car attached carport, 2,295
Wonderful updated home in nice sq. ft. approx. liv. Centrally located
neighborhood. Squeaky clean just move G ail home n Hw 40 E in Inlis. Sits on
right in. Fenced yard and wooden ungle G3 acres and has lots of potential!
gym for the bids. Close to shopping and Broker, GRI, E-Pro Constructed with cedar studs. There
the beach. New hot water heater, new is a bonus room that could add a lot
paint, new carpet, some new furnishings, of square footage as another
it even smells new! Seller willing to help 352-400-0089 bedroom or family room. New roof
with sewer hookup. in 10/2011 and newer air unit.

www.dudleysauction.com
ON-SITE REAL ESTATE
& CONTENTS AUCTION
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31
3055 S AUDUBON TER., HOMOSASSA, FL 34448
Preview 8am ~ Auction 9am ~ Real Estate 10am
Guardian Orders Sale
tHome is a 2/1 12 X 60 MH on 5
lots with 3 lots on W Homosassa
Trail Rd, and 2 on Audubon
Property inc 28 X 32 high bay
g raget 3 utility buildings, 2 car-
ports, direct sales value is $68 ,900
Furniture, tools and vehicles inc
2006 Mercury Grand Marquis LS,
only 19,000 m ies1 1981 Chev C20
pick up w/103k miles, truck
mounted camper 16' cargo trailer,
5 pc dinette
m A Aset, file cabl-
nets, desk, e
kitchen items,
glider, MTD 12 HP lawn tractor, Troy Bilt rear tine tiller (like new), battery
charger, floor jacks, chain saws, Craftsman electnc welder, Delta shaper, Delta
joiner, Delta table saw, Torch set, air compressor, Shop Smith, nice ladders,
hand and powertools, cement mixer, composer and much more"I"I
4 DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)
BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
...Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 3524637-9588. Up"todate photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Aucton Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


SKEETERS
Continued from Page E4

listed instead: N, N-diethyl-m-
toluamide or N,N-diemethylbenzamide.
In addition to DEET, the CDC added the
following to its list of recommended re-
pellents: Picaridin, methylpropylester
and Oil of Lemon-Eucalyptus.
The EPA has determined that correct
and normal usage of DEET is not a
health concern. The AmericanAcademy
of Pediatrics recommendation states
that DEET products with a 30 percent
concentration are as safe as those with
a 10 percent concentration when used
according to directions on the label.
"Natural" repellent alternatives are not
necessarily "safe" repellent alternatives.
These products contain plant oils that
can be toxic and irritating in high con-
centrations. Always follow label direc-
tions. For safe use of repellents, always
read the complete product label and
consider the following:
U Only use repellents approved by
the EPA. (The container should have
an EPA-approved label and registra-
tion number.)



l c Wayne Cormier








|movement. New HVAC 2000 and roof in
1996. MoLS # 356828 $73,900


WOODED GETAWAY RETREAT!
3/2 stilt home built in 2003
* Garage w/1 opening will fit 2 cars
*Gorgeous hardwood flooriing
* Covered wraparound porch
* Lower ensuite for guests has kitchenette
* Plenty of room to park your boat
#352898 $237,500


Follow label directions.
Repellents differ in application
frequencies. Do not over-apply
Only apply repellents to exposed
skin, not skin covered by clothing.
Do not apply to mouth, eyes, cuts and
wounds, or sunburned or irritated skin.
Keep in mind that repellents do not
protect all users equally. The effec-
tiveness of a repellent depends on the
mosquito species that is biting, as well
as the age, sex, level of activity, and at-
tractiveness of the human using the
repellent Consider the following:
Are you in an area where you
know that mosquito-borne diseases
are present?
What is the mosquito population
like? (A lot of bites expected? Or occa-
sional bites?)
Will time spent outdoors at night
be longer than an hour?
Will you be around heavily vege-
tated, humid areas during the day?
What types of activities are going on:
exercising, running, playing sports, etc.?
Is the humidity and temperature
high?
Call Citrus County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, family,
community, and agricultural needs. All
programs and related activities spon-
sored for, or assisted by, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences are
open to all persons without discrimina-
tion with respect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations, genetic
information and veteran status as pro-
tected under the Vietnam Era Veterans'
Readjustment Assistance Act

Dr Joan Bradshawis director of
Citrus County Extension.


DARE YOU TO BEAT THIS PRICE!
* 2/+office/2/2 2000 sq ft of living
* Large extended glassed Florida room
* Newer dishwasher and microwave
* Walk-in 5'x4' pantry
* Garage has complete wall of storage cabinets
* Home warranty for the buyers
#355730 $95,000


Prep trees


for storms

H hurricane season is once
again upon us. It makes us
fully aware as Hurricane
Isaac strengthens and makes a po-
tential path toward Florida.
As we all know, the water would
be more than welcome. It is the high,
damaging winds we could do with-
out.
I know per-
sonally what
Mother Na- --
ture's fury will P'
do. In past .
years, I have ."
traveled to
help with
cleanup ef-
forts after hur-
r i c a n e Kerry Kreider
damage, in- THE
cluding ARBORIST
Florida's
worst storm,
Hurricane Andrew. It made a be-
liever out of me how devastating a
storm that size can be.
There is not a whole lot of prepa-
ration that can have been done to
protect homes or property from a
storm of that magnitude. However,
there are some precautions that can
be taken for the thunderstorms and
showers the season brings at this
time of year
One precaution we can take for
tree preservation is cleaning and
thinning out trees with full crowns.
Trees with a full crown act as sails
in the wind; resisting high winds
could cause trees to snap or uproot.
See TREES/Page E9


KEY1 "Always There For You"
REALTY GAIL COOPERS
ONE multimillion Dollar Realtor
E I Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!




Of Citrus
Inc. jaw vs"n
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 I book
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


SeeVirualTourIIsJ.AI@.UIJJ.411.rs I.e..IJs~rggof I


E8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TREES
Continued from Page E8

Trees that are pruned properly
may withstand the effect of high
winds and storms.
In my years of tree care, it still sur-
prises me how many homeowners
wait until the last minute when
storms are already brewing. It's not
until then that the calls come in with
concerns of pruning. Foresight is the
key to this situation.
It is a proven fact: Well-cared-for
trees are more likely to withstand
stressful situations.
With all the storms we have had so
far this summer, a lot of trees have
been weakened. Two weeks ago we
cut a live oak off a roof due to light-
ning. This situation could not have
been prevented. In another in-
stance, a 100-year-old live oak we cut
up and hauled off last Monday could
have been prevented with a prop-
erly pruned or thinned crown. It gets
so full and acts like a sail in the
wind.
To save headache, property dam-
age and most of all, your trees, have
them properly pruned by a profes-
sional arborist. A little preventative
maintenance will go a long way


Kerry Kreider is a practicing ar-
borist and a member of the Interna-
tional Society ofArboriculture, a
tree preservationist and president
ofAction Tree Service. You can
reach him at 352-726-9724 or by
email at actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.

REAL ESTATE
DIGEST GUIDE
News notes submitted without
photos will not be reprinted if
the photo is provided later.


SASSER OAKS, GREEN ACRES
3 bdrm, 2 1/2 bath, 1.2 acres. Garage
with sm shop, xtra work shed, covered
RV parking. Very clean, ready to move-
in, fireplace, bonus room, recently
painted as well. MLS 356314


JANE
Continued from Page E8

Inverness near Floral City, but not
readily available in nurseries. The
plant has dark green leaves. Size can
reach a foot tall and be of similar di-
ameter. Flowers are pale lavender.
For availability, ask at the Citrus
chapter of the Florida Native Plant
Society, which meets at 7 p.m. the first
Tuesday of the month at the Beverly
Hills Lions Club. Check www.afnin.org
for a list of native plant growers.
There are about 150 species of Ruellia
from tropical and subtropical America,
including a few from temperate North
America. Most are evergreen perennial
plants that can reach shrub-like size in
ideal conditions. The most prevalent is
the prolific and invasive R. brittoniana,
called Mexican Petunia and Mexican
Bluebell. It will spread into a large
colony if given room and displace native
species and the critters that depend on
the local native plants. If given one of
these 2- to 3-foot tall plants, it is better to
keep the roots contained to limit its


spread. It is often used as a rangy, free-
flowering butterfly nectar plant
A better choice is the dwarf compact
cultivar called 'Katie.' Being specially
selected for density and long flower
season, the 'Katie' Mexican Petunia
rarely sets viable seed and does not
spread rapidly by root runners. It
comes with pink, white or purple flower
colors. Long, dark green lance-shaped
leaves cluster in a ground-hugging
rosette reaching a foot in diameter
Katie's flowers are attractive to gar-
deners, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Flowering season lasts from spring to
fall. Individual flowers are funnel-
shaped, about an inch in diameter.
Clusters of flowers open at the tips of
stalks and at the leaf axils. Plant roots
are easily divided and stems will root
under mist in humus-rich soil.
One of the most spectacular Ruellias is
the Brazilian R. macarantha, which has
large clusters of dark pink flowers to 3
inches in diameter This frost-tender
perennial only grows in Zones 10 to 12 in
Southern Florida, but is a delightful pot-
ted house plant in northerly frost-prone
Zones 8 and 9. Its common name trans-
lates to Christmas Pride, as it flowers


REALTY GROUP


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 3 C


MLS `3.72,i2 ,

Tera
Terms 6 Mond-,sH


DETACHED VILLA, WOODVIEW VILLAS 2
Home in the spectacular community of Terrn
S . I n. d carpeting
# 1228
Terra Vista Re
2400 North Terra Vista Blvi
3521 746-6121


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
UR HILLSIDE VILLAS


S'l.,** = MLS 357052 $149,900





AR HILLSIDE SOUTH DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
.me view Don't miss
t Terra Vista gas and
S with the required Citrus Hlls Social Membership
$37 6,.1" MLS #355457 $109,900









BED 2 BATH 2 CAR
,, '. ,,, ...i. BRENTWOOD DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
i,, .. ...... ,. i i Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood Open floor plan with large
kitchen Lawn maintenance and Social Club Membership included
$1500. #1267 $1100
alty Group, LLC Office in the
d., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
* (800 323-7703 rAlcome Center


from fall to winter in the Southern Hemi-
sphere summer months, December to
February In its native environment it can
reach 6 feet tall with an 18 inch spread.
Delightful native, pretty exotic or in-
vasive in Florida, the Ruellia genus
has some delightful species full of nec-
tar to attract butterflies to the garden.
Conscientious gardeners do not pass
along aggressive alien plants listed by
the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council,
www.fleppc.org.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gardener
and Consultant Semi-retired, she grows
thousands ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appointment call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail.com.


CAROLE LISTER
A Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA: cell: 422-4620 KEY
Office: 382-1700


VILLA WITH FAMILY ROOM
* 3/2/3 On golf course
* Fresh int. paint Side turn garage
* Fireplace Master tub + shower
#356937 $139,900


CYPRESS RUN CONDO
* 2/2+carport First floor
* New wood floors Laundry in unit
* Dressing room Pool
#347056 $77,000


I www^lstelstins^com ^


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 E9








E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds

ha .. *., "


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



S--- Classifieds

....! In Print


and


,Online


TAll


The Time


Fo Ren If For S 1 Fn Pak. o R I U edi I Furis 1 Unis
*.I~jII. *d.i WHI.in~ Edi'ui LiiiiE7i*s ^Emi^ isin iiinj


Bring your fishing
pole!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!

C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appl's $495.mo
2/1 All Appl's $395
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815

HERNANDO
2/1%/, Furnished MH,
Lrg. Fm Rm. Laun. Rm. &
Carport Retiremnt Area,
1/2 mi. to Beach
$650 mo. 1st & Last
(352) 746-0850

HERNANDO
Newly Remodeled DW
2/2, Adult Community
(352) 270-8269

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

INVERNESS
3/1, $350. mo 1st, last
sec. No Pets
4095C Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182


BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
V acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183




W#1 Empcoment source is
www.chronicleonline.com


YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
MANUFACTURED
HOME ON 100+ ft. of
Water Frontage, BOAT
RAMP IN OZELLO
KEYS New Plumbing,
Washer/ Dryer hkup
$78,900.
CALL FOR SHOWING
352-212-0460



HOMOSASSA
6270 W Liberty Lane
3BD/2BA Doublewide
1acre lot. Deck on front
and rear. Will consider
owner financing with 5K
down. Asking $39,900
(603) 860-6660


-I.*


Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1 BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1 st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090





- A-TO
F RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHonieRentals.con
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
59 S Tyler (BH) ........................$550
2/1 nice home wtih cozy Florida room
7942 N Ob Tero (S) ........... $950
3/2/2 Newer home, lots of updates, den
CRYSTAL RIVER
548 N Gulfl Ave........................$750
3/1 /1 fenced yard, close to Rock Crusher elem
HOMOSASSA
6944 W Grant St ....................$725
2/2/1 cute newer home centally located
7843 or 7845 W Solar P1.......$685
2/2 newer duplex ind lawn & water REDUCEDI
6618 S Beagle Dr .................$1200
4/3/3waterfront stilt home, fantastic views
CITRUS HILLS/LECANTO
545 E Alaska Dr (CH)...............$800
2/2/1 new roof, handicap access
1933 W Shan elle Path (L.......$1300
3/2/2 includes full memb pools/clubhouse


CRYSTAL RIVER I
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER Get Results
VILLAGE
SUMMERSPECIAL* In The Homefront
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or Classifieds!
352-586-4882


J.W. MORTON 8
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2 ............$750
2/1/1..............$575
Includes Lawncare
2/1/1..............$625
2/1.5/1..........$650
2/2 VILLA...$700
Pritchard Island

2/1.5/1 .......... $750
Lakeview
2/1 .................$550
Jennifer Fudqe,
Property Manaqer
Cheryl Scruggqqs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
Large Studio, furnished
Pool access. $450/mo
Need ref's & Sec.
(352) 804-2953




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337

Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985


INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice I Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000
SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPFORTUNIITY




CITRUS HILLS
2/2V2, Car Port FURN.
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse 2/212,
Furnished. No pets
352-746-0008




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like New, 2/2, All appl.
$625. 954-557-6211


Crystal River
2/1, furnished, until. incl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE MOVE IN with
$600. 352-726-9570
INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
1/1 Lake view, fully
furnished All util. incld
$650.(386) 208-2495

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS 3/1
$400 mo., 1st Ist Sec.
$1,200 Move In no Pets
4308 E. McCartney Lp
(352) 212-3385


YANKEETOWN
Beautiful 2BR, 1/2 BA
Fully Furn., Stilt Home
In quiet neigh., close to
hosp., pwr. plant,
shopping, boat ramp &
Gulf of Mex. $1,000 mo.
(352) 302-5416



Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850 mo. F/L/S
(352) 249-7033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on /2 Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HIGHLANDS
Inverness 2/1/1, enclosed
lanai, all new kitchen
and bath. Lawn main in-
cluded. No Pets. F/US
$650 352-804-4007
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, No pets $550. mo.
Ist + sec (352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 bed 2 bath
1 car garage $700
352 489-0937
INVERNESS
2/1/1, FI. Rm. CHA,
W/D hk up, front. & back
screen porch, corner
lot w/ privacy fence
$750. 1st., last $250 dep
(352) 419-6957
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $795/mo,1st, last,
sec. dbl lot possible
option. 212-4053
INVERNESS
3/212 $650 mo. st & sec
lye mes (561) 313-5308
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873


INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$800. (304) 444-9944
INVERNESS
Waterfront 3/2/1
Remodeled, Dock
F/US $850/mo
(352) 270-1775
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community
no smoking, $750 mo.
352-794-3093, Lye. Mes.
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. Ia-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$110wkly/120wkly. No
hidden cost. 563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv. Rm./Ba.
share kit. $400 everything
Included 352-875-5998


Get
Results in

the

homefront

classified!








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





ESTATE SALE: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



A ,.i ,


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Notice of Real
Estate Auction
Official Public Notice
Property located at
Lot 2 Marion Oaks
Block Unit 1, Ocala,
FL, County of Marion
has been assigned
to public auction.
Bids are due by
10:30 AM on
Tuesday, Aug 28.
Bidding accepted
online only at
williamsauction.com/
332224
Sells Without Reserve.
An Auction Services
Fee of $1,500 OR a
Buyer's Premium of
5% will apply.
See complete terms
of sale at
williamsauction.com.
800.801.8003
FL Broker:
Daniel S. Nelson
Re Lic BK3223097;
Williams & Williams
Re Lic 1032049
Auctioneer:
Thomas Barnes
Auc Lic AU3383;
Williams & Williams
Auc Lic AB2784



FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990
HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660








# Employment
source is...





lwww chronicleonline con


-Umrca


For Sale By
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
1,800 SF, 4BR/2BA
home on .44 acres
Zoning:
COMMERCIAL (CG)
Prime location in
historical downtown
Crystal River 2 blocks
from US HWY 19
Permitted uses in-
clude office, medi-
cal, restaurant, retail,
day care center,
school, bed & break-
fast, vet office, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
839 N Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL
THUU SEPT 6 @ 2D
OPEN from 1 PM

Call -352-5Ie 3130
for more info
For Details
Visit our Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com












2/2/2, Located on
Culdesac, min. from
golf club. All rms open
to enclosed pool & la-
nai New AC, $144,000
owner fin. 15% down
terms negotiable
(352) 465-2372
HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprings $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497
RENT TO OWNI!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,
AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
897-4164.
$159,900


2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884



3 Bedroom, 2/2 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master,
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239,900
(352) 860-0444



OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418
Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192



GREAT INVESTMENT IN
HEATHERWOOD 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Block
Home with over 1,200 sq
ft of living area on approx
1.23 acres with 20 X 40
detached garage. Home
in need of repairs. Asking
$35,000 352-726-8559
HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

YOU'LL THIS!
Inver/Highlands
LARGE 1 Fam, 2.8
acres, residential area,
fully fenced, 4 BR, 3 BA,
pool, own deep well,
costly updates 2011.
Offered AS IS. $189,900.
Call Owner 419-7017.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



Your World

(!9444 9 ed44


CHRONICLE


Crystal River
Spacious DW Moduler
on corner lot with 4
bedrooms. 5th room
could be an office or
sitting room. 3 full
baths. Screened in
solar heated in ground
pool & Jacuzzi. 2 car
garage, sprinkler sys-
tem fireplace in FR,
alarm system, central
vac system, lots of
kitchen cabinets, dou-
ble oven, ceramic tile &
carpet throughout. All
on a landscaped yard-a
must see! $185,000.
352-220-6187 or
609-290-4335



2 STORY Farmers
Porch, 3/2 Carport
w/shed, porch off din.
room, Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $20,000
down, Asking $68,000
(603) 860-6660
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

Rr/M X
REALTY ONE
HOMOSASSA
3/1/1. Nice, Clean
Rent to Own
$675. mo.
813-335-5277




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

-IlI

3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C& New Roof
$118,000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543

I ff *Jg I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!


Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
Ineed LIST-
INGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
-Gold Medal"
REALTOR,
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.


Quade
Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qfeeser@yahoo.com
CENTURY 21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450


YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE, CABIN ON 40 ACRES
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA Hunting recreational
LOT,VERY PRIVATE, in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
0 GARAGE,"SOLD AS Area, well, pond,ATV
IS",NO REALTORS, trails Price Reduced
$75,000.CALL 352-634-4745
(352)513-5001 -


,r Mill.
il st. FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
L, L) Iclear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
-i I $25k.have title asking
) IR NICIT $14,500 o.b.o.
Classifieds 813-792-1355











-




Some pets
sell right away.


Others take a
little more time.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012 Ell


Citrus Counw
Homes


Citrus County
Homes


Waterfront
Homes









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A
GRAND HOME IN THE COUNTRY?

1 I I I6 1 l ii i ii ,



ALL THIS AND MORE FOR ONLY 5199K
,,I l" l h ', ,, ,, V' I 'll, _', V


EXCELLENT BUY ON CLOSE-IN PROPERTY
* rip h p. I.i ....... il vi -.l ii'l.. i .ui i..
I.l .. ..h: il. h ... .. l f. ltl J,
ri .lirl .Intel HI II I I.I h. h.-jlh j
:.l..i,. j buil.J '. rj.. H I II: I, 111 .. I .,.i 1 RV lj..il
Mi' = :, 4. ASKING 73,800
Pat Davis t3521 2127280
Viewi all listings i zi, c2lpaidavis com


* I)p n. II. .66 pl. 11 ;pf
* II.l:I .ll:-:- h ihll i ,]:: i i 91. I, I

Mi 5 = aii:m1h $220,000
Jeanne B Widlaid Pickiel 212 3410
It''ir. ciliuscouni 'sold coin


niv. cn IIrnuiu Ii



PRICED TO SELL QUICK! $199K
Call Ouade Feesei 352302 7699


mIes:nrn mN I ri.LUnaS. m I i
_"B I .ii I v I , l.I ii v :..ii |..I.:l .i .1 ,I I J

t, l.i I I'"' j" I' 4. 11.9ill l 6.i $ .il i .
f i II jl.jqh. p.hl.. I..:. hI i p..I.

Mi 5 = .14I PRICED AT $159,900
4 IAh / C/ler / Seuggs r Jennie Fudge 176 6668

IT..


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST
LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION

Ol .wuiqi ,ii.,


Mt 1 = "* $79,900
Call Ka/en E. Mo/Ion at 212 7595


INVERNESS 3/2
ON A CANAL LEADING TO LAKE


THIS WON'T LAST AT $62,500

Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


:, :,, ,* .iiii 1. ,i

Mi = .711I $115,000
nI'n '. ciItuscounti;sold. coin
Jeanne Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


ROSE AVE.
r, i ... ... .. I




$119.500
Cl Dot, h 9,. Or Ippt
352 422 4627o .j 352 726 6668










HERE'S THE ONE YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR
* l b. J l b.ilh .. . .i . ,

* 1111 ..II. ...I... lJ .I
i. = .:.': ASKING $65,000
Call Nancj Jenks 352 400 8072
liziir sellinocitiscounti l/homes corn


LAUNCH YOUR BOAT RIGHT ONTO
THE WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
.. .. ..... ....1. Ih i. I ,,, I,,, ,, ,I ,



I .ii.
$20.000
Cm AT -ii R B .co] 352 4/9 9252


----'mu


NICE AND NEAT 2/2/2
ON 1 ACRE
H .I.. ii: V.i.i i h .nn. I I, l ...- i


$89,900
Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


THE DECORATOR TOUCH
' 1.l II fl.nd ii Ih6 f jill. ii| i ,ll i ll' I I III...
_: _' n. h.T .: l,.il. i.01 ii, :.l.l .: 1 i.iI
hlfl'l IIi... ,1 lid l .il itliiill .il l i, lll liii
$49,900 Mi 5 = :,t..: Jv.
Maiihdn Booth 637 4904


I'I I I ... .. . ....I ..

ii,, I. II ..I.i., .. I 1 1 ..*

r1i : = *.*. $274,500
Pi Di. ,352,212 7280
..i ltong ~~. 1 .1 c2/P1idfn m


COMMERCIAL STORAGE UNITS



H i.|hv i, 4 1 Ill II .. . I ll II .. l,. I.
Mi'. = ::. PRICED RIGHT AT S990,000
Call Jim Mot ton 352 726 6668


SUPER LOCATION -
MAINTENANCE FREE LIFESTYLE
ThI b J .......' b .ilh. I .. .v ,.,i .I .II, '.


Mi'. = 3:1 ASKING $57,240
Pat Davis i3521 212 7280
View sting at i 'ir c2lpaidavrs corn


BETTER THAN NEW!
I . Il III .. ,, ,. ...I I


1. 1 1., h i

$89.000
C u Dos 4,,;wr 362 J22 J62; or 362 ;26 666S


MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING

:. v In ... I. ,I...Ii i v u.. .i.lii .i .. .iii




l.- = .:.' ASKING $59,500
Call Jim Moi ton at 422 2173


. "1


E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2012