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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02869
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-25-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02869

Full Text



Just in time: Pull and save this guide /Inside


I i I I


Sunny to partly cloudy
with 20 percent chance
of afternoon storms.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Y






SN www.chronicleonline.com


Hurricane


TIM.-


AUGUST 25, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 18


Officials mull scenarios of Isaac's arrival


Tropical storm'spath still uncertain, but outer ring ofstorm could hit Monday yf


Joe
Eckstein
heads the local
emergency
operations
center.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -A second
straight sunny day is forecast for
today, but don't get used to it.
Citrus County officials met Fri-
day to discuss the scenarios of
Tropical Storm Isaac threatening
Florida's Gulf Coast as it moves
northward this weekend.


Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Capt. Joe Eckstein, who heads the
emergency operations center,
said Isaac's projected path is still
unreliable, and its potential won't
be known until it passes over
Cuba today or early Sunday
"It's going to bounce all
around," Eckstein said. "That still
gives us plenty of time before it
affects us."


Eckstein said national forecast-
ers said there is a 20 percent to 30
percent probability of Isaac
bringing tropical storm-force
winds to Citrus County's coast. He
said the area could see rainfall
between 4 and 6 inches Monday
and Tuesday more or less de-
pending on Isaac's path.
He said the storm's path is
wide. Effects from the storm


might be felt 200 miles from its
eye, Eckstein said.
"We could start getting rain and
some wind on Monday, and the
eye might not even be near us,"
he said. "It's a very large storm.
It's hard to predict right now how
it's going to affect us."
Eckstein has participated in
See Page A9


Horses,


carriages


top CR


agenda

Two businesses

seek permission

to start service
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER It
may be horse and buggy
time in the city.
According to City Man-
ager Andy Houston, two re-
quests have been made to
the city
council
for the
operation
S*V 'A~ of horse/
Carriage
businesses
on city
streets.
Andy "There
Houston are a num-
explained the ber of
city must look things we
at several have to look
things before at before
deciding on the
horse and anything is
carriage permit. done. We
don't want
them on U.S. 19 and maybe
not on Cutler Spur Boule-
vard," Houston said in a
phone interview Friday
Houston said he needs
more information about the
businesses' intentions be-
fore he can elaborate on the
issue.
He said the Port Hotel is
one of the applicants.
"They already have a
horse and carriage that
walks around their parking
lot, but I think they want to
extend that from the port
area," Houston said. "The
other person wants it for
the downtown area."
The council meets at 7
p.m. Monday at city hall on
U.S. 19. The agenda
includes:
Approval of resolution
to purchase material to in-
stall 180 high-intensity stop
sign assemblies for $10,292.
Approval of rate struc-
ture for residential and
commercial trash collec-
tion for 2013.
A resolution regarding
See Page A4


TOMORROW:
High water
Lots of summer rain has lake
levels on the rise./Sunday


Com ics .......................... C8
Community ....................C6
Crossword ................ C7
Editorial ............ ....... A8
Entertainm ent ................B6
Horoscope ......................B6
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts ..............B6
Movies ............. ........ C8
Obituaries ................ A5
Classifieds ................... C9
TV Listings ......................C 7


II6 ll8478 2002! U


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Salvation Army Lt. Vanessa Miller sits in the sanctuary of the Salvation Army Center for Worship and Service on Thursday morning
discussing how the new center will offer improved benefits to those seeking services. One of the new services provided will be a teen
center. When finished the teen center will offer youngsters a place to socialize, study and play under a safe, supervised setting, Miller said.




Mission: Expansion


Salvation Army

moves into new

Lecanto facility

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO The Salvation
Army has a mission. And now it
has a place big enough to de-
liver it.
The Army is leaving its
cramped double-wide trailer
and small sanctuary on Grover
Cleveland Boulevard for a new,
spacious 16,000-square-foot
Center for Worship and Service
off State Road 44.
The public is invited to an
open house Sunday. Though
services have taken place in the
new sanctuary the past three
weeks, the center officially
opens the day after Labor Day
And Lt. Vanessa Miller can't
wait.
"We're very, very excited,"
said Miller, who heads up the
Citrus County unit.
When Miller arrived in Citrus
County more than three years


ago, the Salvation Army's board
of directors knew it wanted to
expand to a central location
that could provide more out-
reach services, rather than only
serve as a reactionary group
during disasters.
"We wanted a central location
to support what was already
happening," she said.


After a search, the board
found the spot in a vacant strip
center and warehouse off State
Road 44 in Lecanto. Organizers
began a capital campaign to
raise funds for the $1.2 million
project; that capital campaign
continues to pay the monthly
mortgage.
The new building has space


CRHS raises funds for injured Marine


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern
CRYSTAL RIVER The blue
and gold of Crystal River High
School shone brightly Thursday
evening for a local Marine.
The Josh White fundraiser and
barbecue at CRHS appeared to
be a great success as donations
poured in to provide a recovery
fund for wounded Marine Lance
Cpl. Joshua White and his family


"I knew that they were in it for
the long haul," organizer and
White's former teacher, Lanna
Wentworth, said about the White
family "I just wanted to help, and
this is the way that I could help. I
love Josh. He was fantastic, just
a nice, good kid and just fun to be
around."
A 2009 CRHS graduate, White
suffered many injuries and the
loss of both legs as a result of an
IED explosion Aug. 10 while pa-


trolling in the Kajaki District in
the Helmand province of
Afghanistan. The 22-year-old is
recovering at Walter Reed Na-
tional Military Medical Center in
Maryland, surrounded by family
and friends.
During Thursday's fundraiser,
countless volunteers joined to
help manage the vending sta-
tions of pulled pork and cake
See Page A2


for 12 mostly part-time employ-
ees, including seven probation
case workers, who previously
were crammed into a rented of-
fice in Inverness. The Salvation
Army provides probation serv-
ices through a contract with the
county
See Page A4



JOSH WHITE FUND
To donate to the fund, mail cash
or check to the "Josh White
Fund" at Crystal River High
School, at 1205
N.E.8th Ave.,
Crystal River, FL
34428. White, a
2009 Crystal
High School
graduate, lost
both of his legs
in an lED explo-
sion Aug. 10
while on patrol in Afghanistan.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
92
LOW
74


For more
T.S. Isaac
coverage,
see page
A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Medicaid



expansion



costs climb


i.-m..r-
.. .......
. -' .. ..- - -_ "....A t:- -- :
... .... .. . .. .._ .. I-- .bil


Price tag of

program starts

at $79.2M
JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service of
Florida
TALLAHASSEE -
Looking for the price tag of
the federal Affordable
Care Act, analysts have re-
leased a report estimating
an expansion of the Medi-
caid program would cost
the state $79.2 million dur-
ing the 2016-17 fiscal year
and the costs would grow to
$337.6 million by 2022-23.
The report, however, is
loaded with assumptions
about issues such as how
many people would sign up
for Medicaid if eligibility
expanded and when they
would sign up. The federal
health law calls for broad-
ening Medicaid eligibility,
but the issue has become
controversial in Florida be-
cause Gov Rick Scott said
the state will not go along
with such an expansion.
Analysts, who released
the report Thursday, also
said they could not deter-
mine the Affordable Care
Act's spin-off costs for an-
other large group of peo-
ple: those who already
meet eligibility require-
ments but have not en-
rolled in Medicaid.
It has been expected that
already-eligible people
would start signing up, at
least in part because the
federal law requires most
Americans to have insur-
ance coverage in 2014 or
pay financial penalties. But
low-income people are ex-
empted from the penalties,
making it difficult for ana-


lysts to pinpoint how many
would enroll.
"The likelihood and pace
of the population's presen-
tation for services cannot
be reasonably forecast at
this time," the report said.
The analysts, represent-
ing the House, Senate, gov-
ernor's office and the Office
of Economic & Demo-
graphic Research, metAug.
14 to discuss the projections
and then compiled the re-
port. The Affordable Care
Act, which Congress and
President Obama approved
in 2010, has been a
lightning-rod political issue
in Florida, with Republicans
vehemently opposing it
In June, the U.S.
Supreme Court upheld the
constitutionality of most of
the law. But the court said
states can choose whether
to comply with a provision
expanding Medicaid cover-
age by increasing a key in-
come threshold used in
determining eligibility.
Scott immediately said
Florida would not go along
with the expansion.
Under the law, the fed-
eral government would pay
all of the costs of expanded
eligibility during the first
few years and eventually
would pay 90 percent of the
costs. If Florida rejects the
expansion, it would forgo
as much as $3 billion a year
in federal funding, accord-
ing to estimates.
The report shows Florida
would have to start picking
up part of the Medicaid ex-
pansion tab in 2016-17, pay-
ing about $79.2 million out of
an overall cost of nearly $3.2
billion. State costs would
gradually increase during
the next several years and
are estimated at $337.6 mil-
lion in 2022-23 out of a total
cost of almost $3.4 billion.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Friends and family of wounded U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Joshua White gather for his barbecue fundraiser Thursday on "Josh
White Night," at Crystal River High School.


MARINE
Continued from Page Al

pops, and the sale of T-shirts
and wristbands, honoring
White's service to his country
"Everybody wanted to
help," Wentworth said. "It
wasn't like I had to drag
people out here, and every-
one here is volunteering.
Everybody is like, 'I want to
help. I want to help."'
Matthew Brown stood be-
side fellow volunteers at the
concession stand. His
daughter, Brittni Brown, is
among those close friends
with White in Maryland.
"It all blossomed through
Lanna Wentworth," Brown
said about the fundraiser,
"and we sort of jumped on


board with them because of
our relationship with Josh."
The fundraiser coincided
with the Pirates' first pre-
season game, which was
called "The Josh White
Night." All ticket sales went
toward the Josh White
Fund.
White played football at
CRHS for four years var-
sity for three and was al-
ways thought of by his
teammates as an athlete
who didn't have to do much
to gain a presence on and
off the field.
"He was giving, I would
say," teammate Joey Fruh
said. "No matter what you
needed, he wouldn't ques-
tion you. He'd have your
back and make sure you did
the right thing."
Teammate Wes Lanier


knew Josh's character as a
player would help him as a
Marine.
"His words spoke louder
than his actions," he said.
"He was a quiet humble
leader He didn't speak out a
lot, but he led by example.
I'm sure he carried that over
in Afghanistan and the
Marines. That's what we re-
member of him and how
proud we are of him as Pi-
rates."
Wentworth and other vol-
unteers have raised more
than $1,000 for the Josh
White Fund since Aug. 15,


not including the 100-plus
people who donated to the
event on Thursday, and that
number will keep growing.
"I don't know about
tonight," Wentworth said.
"Somebody gave me a $100
donation, somebody made a
$200 donation and an older
gentleman stopped by and
dropped off an envelope
that I haven't opened yet"
To donate toward the
fund, mail cash or check to
the "Josh White Fund" at
Crystal River High School,
at 1205 N.E. 8th Ave., Crystal
River, FL 34428.


~24
~
*Ih~ .'t


FREE VACATION VOUCHER TO
THE FIRST 150 PEOPLE!
RR SATURDAY, AUG. 25 & SUNDAY, AUG. 26 ONLY
HURRY IN! WHEN THEY'RE GONE... THEY'RE GONE!


IF A LIFETIME
3 DAYS, 2 NIGHTS PAID VACATION


AT ANY OF THESE
Anaheim, CA Freeport, Bahamas
Atlantic Beach, NC Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Atlantic City, NJ Glade, TN
Branson, MD Hancock, MA
Charlotte, NC Hilton Head, SC
Cumberland Mtns, TN Kitty Hawk, NC
Dallas, TX Lake Tahoe, CA
Daytona Beach, FL Las Vegas, NV
Falmouth, MA Lincoln, NH
II. :1 AZ Miami, FL

ABSOLUTE
~- -J r A,


EXCITING DESTINATIONS!


* Murrells Inlet, SC
* Myrtle Beach, SC
* Nashville, TN
* Nassau, Bahamas
* New Orleans, LA
* Orlando, FL
* Palm Springs, CA
* Portland, ME
* Reno, NV
* San Antonio, TX


* San Diego, CA
* San Francisco, CA
* Santa Fe, NM
* Sedona, AZ
* Smoky Mtns., TN
* Tucson, AZ
* Virginia Beach, VA
* ,1...... I,:.,,.:i VA
* Wisconsin Dells, WI


LY NO COMMITMENT!


S- --

"^^ *^^ "-&9 ' "" SS8S,,4-
i _.l -r-,-S-, -.-

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AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUS
CLOSE CAR DEALS WE i


.. .' I -
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TDONT TIne Poer to Surprise S' m Home @ w.truslda.com
OiPEN RELATIONSHIPS" Shop from Home @ www.citrsia.com


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A2 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


LOCAI/STATE


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Page A3 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around Concert to benefit CREST playground
THE STATE


Citrus County
School district has
new Twitter account
The Citrus County School
District has created a Twitter
account to keep the commu-
nity informed of emergency no-
tifications and breaking news
involving weather-related or
law enforcement situations.
To follow the school dis-
trict, go to twitter.com/Citrus
Schools. You must have or
create a Twitter account to be
able to connect.
The school district will use
Twitter as a strategic and
carefully monitored way of
communication during the re-
mainder of the school year.


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern
Slides, swings and see-
saws galore.
The Citrus Resources for
Exceptional Student Transi-
tion (CREST) School in
Lecanto, as an ongoing proj-
ect, plans to improve its cur-
rent playground with an
adaptable, accessible and
adequate area of entertain-
ment and education for
their students.
"The goal for the play-
ground is to enhance it, and
get a bunch of new equip-
ment that meets everybody's
needs because we have such
a unique population here at
CREST," teacher Kelly
Daugherty said.
CREST has raised ap-


proximately $35,000 for al-
most two years in order to
purchase and build up to
$398,000 worth of new
equipment in the upcoming
school years.
Community organizations
such as the Crystal River
Rotary Club, the Black Dia-
mond Foundation and the
Citrus County Education
Foundation have pur-
chased specific equipment
that will be placed later in
the year
The project itself will be
done gradually and won't be
finished until the goal is
reached, but awareness for
the playground's impor-
tance is the main concern
for Daugherty and the
CREST staff.
"We know it's not realistic


* WHAT: Eagles cover
band 7 Bridges
concert.
WHEN: 7 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 13.
WHERE: Curtis
Peterson Auditorium in
Lecanto.
WHY: To raise money
for CREST playground
equipment.
CONTACT: Call the
school at 352-
527-0303.

to have it all in one year, and
it's going to happen in
phases," Daugherty said.
"But it's getting the commu-
nity involved and everybody
a little bit more aware of
everything."


Every child at CREST will
have access to specialized
equipment, designed to
deeply involve the interact-
ing student.
"It's all going to be
wheelchair accessible. It's
all going to have sensory
development for our chil-
dren that have sensory de-
velopment problems,"
Daugherty said. "Children
who have emotional behav-
ioral disabilities that don't
have the physical chal-
lenges can still go out there
and exercise, so it's going
to help out with the obesity
rate."
In order to raise addi-
tional funds, CREST has or-
ganized a "Playground
Benefit" concert with Eagles
cover band 7 Bridges at 7


Orlando


Man tried to take
27 snakes on plane
Authorities said a Brazilian
man tried to take 27 snakes
he bought at a breeder's
expo onto his flight to Sao
Paulo.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported Mateus Dal Maso was
stopped Wednesday as he
tried to board the plane at Or-
lando International Airport.
Authorities said Dal Maso
wrapped the snakes in nylon
stockings and hid them inside
stereo speakers in his lug-
gage. The reptiles were spot-
ted by screeners.
Officials said he bought the
snakes in Daytona Beach.
The Sentinel reported Dal
Maso at first denied having
anything other than electron-
ics inside his bag. But he
later admitted to federal au-
thorities the snakes were in
the bag.
The newspaper said he
was found guilty of exporting
illegal merchandise. He was
fined $6,000.

Tallahassee
FAMU student clubs
to resume recruiting
Florida A&M University is
lifting a ban on student clubs
and organizations from re-
cruiting new members.
Former FAMU President
James Ammons imposed the
ban back in January, follow-
ing the hazing death of drum
major Robert Champion and
the arrests of several FAMU
students on charges of haz-
ing other students.
FAMU's vice president for
student affairs announced
Thursday the ban would be
lifted next month.
But the university is putting
in new academic requirements
for members of fraternities,
sororities and student clubs.
Students must have com-
pleted their freshman year
with at least 24 credit hours
and a 2.0 grade point average.
Clubs and organizations
will also be required to submit
monthly reports on commu-
nity service activities.
The university is also impos-
ing mandatory orientation ses-
sions for student organizations,
including sessions on hazing.
Workers comp. rate
increase sought
Insurance companies are
seeking a 6.1 percent in-
crease in workers compensa-
tion rates in Florida.
The state Office of Insur-
ance Regulation announced
Thursday it had received pro-
posals from the National
Council on Compensation In-
surance. The council is a rat-
ing and data collection
agency owned by insurance
companies. It submits rate fil-
ings on their behalf.
Employers purchase work-
ers compensation insurance
to cover on-the-job injuries.
The increase would go into
effect Jan. 1. Premiums last
January increased 8.9 per-
cent. If the new proposal is
approved, Florida's rates
would still be 56 percent
lower than in 2003. That's
when the Legislature passed
a law aimed at reducing rates
through provisions that in-
clude a limit on fees paid to
lawyers for injured workers.
-From staff and wire reports


Guaranteed goodness


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ann Sanders, left, with Levi, and Susan Schrader and Libby display K-9 Good Citizen behavior Friday morning in
Inverness.

Test certifies canine is obedient and helps gain respect


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Every good dog deserves a
certificate.
By passing the Canine Good Cit-
izen test of the American Kennel
Club (AKC), a dog is awarded a cer-
tificate when it demonstrates it has
reached a standard of acceptable
behavior to make it an asset to its
owner
In fact, one insurance company,
The Hartford, may offer coverage
for breeds that have been ineligi-
ble in the past if the dog meets the
specific criteria demonstrating
obedience and responsible owner-
ship, according to Citrus County
Animal Services Officer Susan
Schrader
Along with Ann Sanders,
Schrader is organizing an event
Saturday, Sept 8, to mark Septem-
ber as Responsible Dog Owner
Month.
"September is celebrated by
AKC as Responsible Dog Owner
Month," Schrader said. "By hold-
ing Canine Good Citizen tests, we
show the public how to make their
dogs good citizens for Citrus
County and their insurance com-
pany The Hartford insurance com-
pany sponsors the events for AKC.
The requirements are on AKC.org.
It includes the basics: sit, stay,


By holding
Canine Good Citizen
tests, we show the
public how to make
their dogs good
citizens for Citrus
County...

Susan Schrader
animal services officer

down, come and more."
According to the AKC, Canine
Good Citizen testing is for all dogs:
purebred and mixed breed. A dog
that achieves a passing score on
the test will be awarded special
certification as a Canine Good Cit-
izen to help it and its owner gain
respect in the community
Testing costs $20. An owner can
observe the test before signing up
to gauge whether the dog will pass.
If the dog does not pass, the owner
will get training tips to help it pass
next time.
Last year, more than 630 dog
clubs and other organizations
throughout the United States
hosted events reaching millions of


m WHAT: Canine Good Citizen
testing.
WHEN: 8:30 a.m. to noon,
Saturday, Sept. 8.
WHERE: Citrus County Fair-
grounds, 3600 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness.
COST: $20; 25-percent
discount for rescued dogs with
proof.
CONTACT: Susan Schrader at
352-422-2722 or Ann Sanders
at 352-302-5626.

dog lovers and potential pet own-
ers, according to the AKC. Dog
lovers also posted thousands of
"Acts of Responsible Dog Owner-
ship" on the AKC's Facebook and
Twitter pages.
In addition to the testing,
Schrader and Sanders will seek
more support for the Canine As-
sisted Testimony group at 8 a.m.
This program offers therapy dogs
to comfort children while they give
testimony in court cases. The dogs
help children relax while they con-
vey information that may be diffi-
cult and frightening for them.
Schrader would like to expand
the services of the program to help
any victim of a violent crime, as
well as children, by adding more
dog handlers.


p.m. on Oct. 13 at Curtis Pe-
terson Auditorium in
Lecanto.
"They are, according to
Rolling Stone magazine, one
of the best Eagles tribute
bands you can see," Daugh-
erty said.
Tickets for the concert
are $20 and can be pur-
chased at Eagle Buick,
Progress Energy, the Citrus
County School Board and
CREST School.
"It's not just a playground
for our children here; it' s
learning how to socialize
and learning how to play,"
Daugherty said. "We want
our children, just like any
other child, to have the
most normal experience of
being able to go out and
play"




GOP


critics


won't be


deterred

RNCprotests

will go on

despite rain

Associated Press
TAMPA Just as Repub-
licans are preparing for
their convention next week,
so are the protesters.
And just like the Republi-
cans are making contin-
gency plans in case Tropical
Storm Isaac brings heavy
rain and wind to Tampa, the
protesters are making plans
of their own.
On Friday, a small group
of demonstrators at an en-
campment west of down-
town said the rain might
curtail their numbers and
the ability to carry giant,
papier-mache political
puppets, large signs and
other props. All are virtu-
ally guaranteed to fall apart
in the rain and wind ex-
pected to hit Tampa on
Monday, the first day of the
convention.
However, that doesn't
mean Mitt Romney and run-
ning mate Paul Ryan won't
have crowds of demonstra-
tors outside. Groups includ-
ing Code Pink, People for
the Ethical Treatment of
Animals, the AFL-CIO
union and Planned Parent-
hood have already started
arriving, regardless of the
forecast. And die-hards
have vowed to move ahead
with their plans, rain or
shine.
"We're no longer really
considering indoor options.
Some regular rain and wind
won't stop us. They would
have to be unsafe conditions
to make us consider chang-
ing the plans," said Michael
Long, of the Florida Con-
sumer Action Network,
which is organizing a
protest for Sunday evening
as the RNC holds its kickoff
party at Tropicana Field in
St. Petersburg.
By mid-day Friday, it ap-
peared that Isaac was track-
ing away from Florida's west
coast and the Republican
National Convention. It was
forecast to pass the lower
Florida Keys late Sunday
night, then head northwest
into the Gulf of Mexico. Me-
teorologists say that it could
make landfall on Tuesday
evening somewhere be-
tween the Florida Panhan-
dle and southeastern
Louisiana although offi-
cials stress that the forecast
is still unpredictable and
that everyone from political
delegates to full-time Gulf
Coast residents should be
prepared.
Florida officials have ac-
tivated the state's Emer-


agency Operations Center in
response to Isaac. Still,
Gov. Rick Scott said the
event should proceed as
planned.


* '1"0. l






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WHAT: Open house for
new Salvation Army
Center for Worship and
Service.
WHEN: 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
WHERE: 712 S. School
Avenue, off S.R. 44,
Lecanto.


MISSION
Continued from Page Al

The building also pro-
vides much needed extra
space for a host of Salvation --
Army programs, from its
food bank to life-enrich- The Sa
ment classes and a place for Leader
teens to gather.
Social service director >
Angelique Howland said the *
county bus service will have
a stop at the new center, of-
fering the public opportuni-
ties to receive services and
attend programs.
"We're looking forward to
expanding even more," she
said.
Volunteers the Salva- G
tion Army counts about 300
in its ranks are being
tasked to participate in a ter wh
host of new programs, in- tures
eluding: degre(
A free teen center avail- Bec
able every weekday after inginc
school until 6 p.m. The cen- tern
ter includes six computers, shelter
Wi-Fi, 55-inch flat screen TV overn
and Wii games. volunt
Character-building with t
classrooms for elementary Clevel
and middle school boys and Als(
girls. wome
Free classes taught by shelter
qualified volunteers for the Sa
household budgeting, par- held ji
enting, building a resume and c
and other subjects designed in a H
to help people better their TI
lives, and is
A multi-use facility and the ol
sparkling new commercial "We
kitchen can double as a that
homeless shelter in the win- said.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
salvation Army Center for Worship and Service is at 712 S. School Avenue in Lecanto.
rs believe its central location will benefit more of those in need of assistance.


Technology
conservation up
Group


Citrus Cyde
Center


hen evening tempera-
drop below 40
es.
ause the entire build-
cludes a sprinkler sys-
in the ceiling, the
*r will not require
ight "fire watcher"
teers as was the case
he shelter on Grover
land Boulevard.
o, space allows men,
n and children in the
r. In the old system,
salvation Army shelter
just men, while women
children were housed
[omosassa hotel.
he sanctuary seats 125
nearly twice as big as
d sanctuary
wanted something
was inviting," Miller
"It's a nice, bright


@ W Gulf to Lake wi"



space."
Services are 11 a.m. Sun-
days.
Miller said she hopes the
community will take advan-
tage of the new center and
will continue to support the
Salvation Army in its cam-
paign to pay the mortgage.
"We're really taking a leap
of faith here. We trust it will
work out," she said. "This
community has been very
supportive of us."
Miller said she is excited
to see the Salvation Army
blossom in Citrus County.
"The mission never
changes," she said. "The
way we get to express that
mission is expanding and
growing."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at


I-Stop Prints of
Citrus County


Google map
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


HORSES
Continued from Page Al

the Department of Trans-
portation's maintenance of
the medians at the inter-
section of U.S. 19 and S.R.
44.
Authorizing adminis-
tration to execute a memo-
randum of understanding
with Citrus County to allow
utilization of county con-
tracts for storm debris re-
moval.
The council in its capac-
ity as the Community Re-
development Agency (CRA)
will discuss the following at
a 6 p.m. meeting.
An update on funding
projections for CRA;


* WHAT: Crystal River
City Council meeting.
WHEN: 7 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 27;
6 p.m. CRA meeting.
WHERE: City Hall on
U.S. 19.
CONTACT: www.
crystalriverfl.org.

Potential purchase of
the Waddington property at
the corner of Citrus Avenue
and U.S. 19;
The timeline for the
Riverwalk decision and
Proposed improve-
ments for U.S. 19.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
NA NA NA NA NA NA 86 68 0.00D

s ". -v -- r^ >1 -


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers

Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
ts
pc

ts
pc
sh
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
80 ts
71 pc
74 pc
74 pc
77 pc
69 pc
77 pc
81 pc
80 ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 10-15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
moderate chop. Partly cloudy today.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
93 71 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 92 Low: 74
Sunny to partly cloudy; 20% chance
of an afternoon thunderstorm
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 77
... Increasing clouds; 40% chance of afternoon
thunderstorms
k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 80
Rainy and windy conditions...watching Isaac
'.,>;;i^


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 90/68
Record 97/62
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 10.50 in.
Total for the year 47.57 in.
Normal for the year 37.15 in.
'As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 68
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 49%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, nettle, chenopods
Today's count: 5.2/12
Sunday's count: 6.2
Monday's count: 4.5
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/25 SATURDAY 12:44 6:59 1:14 7:28
8/26 SUNDAY 1:39 7:54 2:09 8:23
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 7:59 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW............... 7:05 AM.
0 () 0 C MOONRISE TODAY.........................3:16 PM.
AV .31 SEFF.8 SEPT.15 1 EPT.22 MOONSET TODAY ...... ............. 1:02A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division ,- F i ...i,. ? -) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please ,!,i ii_- .,, :.. f Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or Tir:. a:. ,rn, .,:.ri of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka" 12:51 a/7:29 a 11:47 a/9:27 p
Crystal River" 10:08 a/4:51 a /6:49 p
Withlacoochee* 7:55 a/2:39 a 10:46 p/4:37 p
Homosassa*** 12:01 a/6:28 a 10:57 a/8:26 p


**At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
2:38 a/8:54 a 1:12 p/10:54 p
12:59 a/6:16 a 11:33 a/8:16 p
9:20 a/4:04 a /6:04 p
1:48 a/7:53 a 12:22 p/9:53 p


Gulf water
temperature



880
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.86 33.01 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.70 37.78 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.17 39.21 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.17 41.17 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of beingeua equaed or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United Slates Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


S"80s



8 S
Loa
Anqlnge6gg



60s
SOs .-. -_' '
j.n a


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston. SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Br~nq~



Dsn~..
U-",,


ElP-
' E, IPas
' 4.71
S- -


80s


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
87 56 pc 87 62
83 63 ts 87 66
78 61 70 ts 79 60
88 69 trace pc 87 67
82 62 c 84 69
95 70 ts 94 73
87 66 sh 83 68
91 61 s 80 51
89 64 pc 90 68
81 56 s 86 50
78 70 pc 79 64
88 60 s 88 64
85 61 ts 87 62
83 71 08 pc 85 70
92 59 .04 s 86 62
85 63 s 86 63
94 64 pc 95 75
91 57 s 93 65
89 58 pc 85 66
87 71 pc 88 66
92 62 pc 92 65
85 55 pc 83 54
93 73 ts 91 76
91 57 pc 83 57
90 68 ts 79 67
88 63 pc 84 69
93 68 ts 94 71
93 62 pc 93 66
85 65 sh 81 65
87 63 pc 84 60
88 75 .20 ts 89 77
90 64 pc 92 68
90 64 .07 ts 90 70
98 76 s 98 80
91 65 ts 88 70
76 66 pc 72 64
95 64 s 93 71
94 71 pc 91 73
88 70 pc 88 70
89 66 ts 79 66
89 69 pc 90 71
92 67 pc 91 65
92 64 s 92 67


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


70 A 70S


0s -,90 -,-. B -..



rw 'Aflanta



^1.OOs ", 9-S


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H L Pep. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 73 30 ts 89 75
New York City 87 69 c 84 68
Norfolk 78 73 ts 81 67
Oklahoma City 89 72 ts 87 72
Omaha 81 71 ts 77 67
Palm Springs 10680 s 101 78
Philadelphia 90 70 c 83 68
Phoenix 97 81 s 102 82
Pittsburgh 87 58 s 83 62
Portland, ME 81 61 pc 77 58
Portland, Ore 77 50 s 82 55
Providence, R.I 85 66 pc 82 60
Raleigh 77 68 pc 83 62
Rapid City 99 62 s 79 58
Reno 95 60 s 93 57
Rochester, NY 87 58 s 88 63
Sacramento 93 56 s 91 58
St. Louis 95 75 pc 95 72
St. Ste. Marie 81 65 12 pc 88 66
Salt Lake City 92 67 s 92 66
San Antonio 95 75 ts 95 76
San Diego 73 68 trace pc 74 67
San Francisco 71 53 pc 66 53
Savannah 84 69 .32 pc 86 70
Seattle 72 50 s 77 55
Spokane 73 47 s 81 52
Syracuse 89 59 pc 88 64
Topeka 82 66 25 ts 80 69
Washington 88 72 sh 84 68
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 Palm Sprngs, Calif. LOW 31
Meacham, Ore.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/77/ts
Amsterdam 73/61/sh
Athens 101/77/s
Beijing 85/63/pc
Berlin 73/58/pc
Bermuda 85/78/pc
Cairo 97/75/s
Calgary 71/44/s
Havana 89/75/ts
Hong Kong 87/79/ts
Jerusalem 91/70/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


81/60/pc
73/53/r
88/60/pc
72/57/ts
85/63/s
65/54/sh
68/53/sh
82/63/s
90/70/pc
64/46/pc
88/76/ts
87/64/s
77/62/pc


C I T R U S.


C U N TY -


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







Miscellaneous




Notices...............,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,C12


CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
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For home delivery by mail:
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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-ll Brani Hvi, 1624 N.
Dunkerield. H Meadowcrest
Dunker eid --Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A ve Crystal River,
A "1 \ ,Madowrei FL 34429
N ill

I IInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
S' 106 W. Main
S 41 44' Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ...................................................................... Publisher, 563 -3 2 22
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ................................. .................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy.............. ...............................Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 564-2930
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I-


A4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012





CimRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ralph 'Abe'
Abel, 77
HERNANDO
Ralph Lee "Abe" Abel, 77,
of Hernando, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Aug. 23,
2012, at his residence.
He was born March 21,
1935, in Lawrence County,
Ind., to Preston and Luella
(Collins) Abel. He came
here 47 years ago from
Cocoa, Fla. He lived most of
his life in Citrus County. He
was a Protestant and a
USMC veteran of the
Korean War.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 55 years, Alice
Abel of Hernando, Fla.; four
sons, Glenn, Ken and Eric
(Claudia) Abel, all of Her-
nando, Fla., and Jeff
(Leann) Abel of Williston,
Fla.; four brothers and four
sisters; four grandchildren,
Jessica, Emma, Erin and
Elise Abel.
A celebration of life will
be at 11 a.m. Monday, Aug.
27, 2012, at the Strickland
Funeral Home Chapel in
Crystal River, Fla., with mil-
itary honors provided by the
American Legion Post 155
Honor Guard, Crystal River,
Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

William 'Bill'
Gary Jr., 69
INVERNESS
William "Bill" Gary Jr. 69,
of Inverness, Fla., died
Tuesday Aug. 14, 2012 at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital.
He was born Aug. 8,1943,
in Her-
nando, Fla.,
to the late

and Carrie
W itherr-
spoon Gary
After gradu-
ating high
William school, Bill
Gary Jr. worked as a
block mason for 10 years for
Frank Croft, then for 36
years at Esperdico in
Inverness, Fla.
Preceding him in death
were his mother, Carrie
Gary; father, William Gary
Sr; and sister, Mary Ann
Johnson. He leaves to cher-
ish his memories one
brother, Lemont Gary (Pat),
of Raleigh, N.C.; one
nephew, Artrey Gary, of Lau-
rel, Md.; four nieces, Alto-
vise Gary, of Houston, Texas,
Debbie Lane, of Upper
Marlboro, Md., Donna Blue
(Preston), of Bowie, Md. and
Greta Banks (Stacey), of Hy-
attsville, Md.; and a special
companion of 44 years,
Pearlie Leaks and family
Funeral services for
William "Bill" Gary Jr. will
be Saturday, Aug., 25, 2012,
at 11 a.m. at the Mount
Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church of Hernando, 3451
E. Lemon Dr., Hernando,
FL. Pastor Demetrius
Franklin Sr. will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
Hernando Community
Cemetery, Hernando, Fla.
Friends may call 9 a.m. until
funeral time Saturday at
the Mount Carmel Mission-
ary Baptist Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Cason Funeral and Cre-
mation Services, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. cornm.

Richard
Araya, 60
HOMOSASSA
Richard Araya, 60, of Ho-
mosassa, died Thursday,
Aug. 23, 2012, at his home.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.


SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.


I g I i
37.EAS WIT


Shirley
Guadagnoli, 91
CRYSTAL RIVER
Shirley Guadagnoli, 91, of
Crystal River, died Thurs-
day, Aug. 23, 2012, at Cypress
Cove Care Center in Crystal
River.
Services and burial will
be in Milford, Mass. Local
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home Crystal River

Michael
Martin, 58
DUNNELLON
Michael G. Martin, 58, of
Dunnellon, went peacefully
with the Lord Aug. 23, 2012,
at his family's home in Her-
nando, Fla.
He is sur-
vived by his
s o n ,
s Michael C


Tom Martin,
of Califor-
Michael nia; his
Martin uncle, Osel
Martin, of Kentucky; his
nephew, Robert Martin, of
Calif.; his mother and fa-
ther-in-law, Beverly Senter
Goclon and Don Goclon, of
Hernando; his brother and
sister-in-law, Andrew and
Stacey Barnes, of Her-
nando; his niece and
nephew, Brandon and Sab-
rina Barnes; lifelong friend,
Keith Mullins, of Crystal
River; and most impor-
tantly, his dearest friends of
Marion County Fire Rescue.
He was a member of the
Moose International LOOM
2112 of Inverness. Mike
served with Marion County
Fleet Management moving
into the title of Marion
County Fire Rescue Fleet
Manager. Mike was respon-
sible for more than 100
emergency vehicles that
provided protection to the
citizens of Marion County
Mike loved his son, family,
fishing, his motorcycles and
his Cadi. He loved helping
others anytime, anyplace
anywhere and he had no
enemies.
The family received
friends from 5 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, Aug 24, at the Roberts
Bruce Chapel, West 6241
S.W State Road 200, Ocala,
FL 352-854-2266. All were
welcome to attend and
share with the family There
will be a celebration of
Mike's life at 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 25, at the Country-
side Presbyterian Church,
7768 S.W Highway 200. All
are welcome to attend. In
lieu of flowers, please send
donations to the American
Cancer Society Arrange-
ments by Roberts Funeral
Homes, Ocala, Fla. Visit our
guest book at roberts
funeralhomes.com.

David
Windham, 50
CITRUS SPRINGS
David Windham, 50, of
Citrus Springs, died Sunday,
Aug. 19, 2012, at his home.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


"YourrTrusted Family-Owned




Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Obituaries


Associated Press

TAMPA- Mitt Romney is
about to get personal.
The GOP's presidential
nominee-to-be wants to use
his four-day party next
week in Florida to play up
his life story following a
summer filled with a bar-
rage of TV ads courtesy
of President Barack Obama
and his allies that cast
him as a ruthless and out-
of-touch businessman.
He'll surround himself
with his five sons, five
daughters-in-law and 15 of
his 18 grandchildren. Rom-
ney's wife, Ann, will play
her biggest role yet. A pa-
rade of athletes Romney
met as an Olympic organ-
izer, such as hockey legend
Mike Eruzione, will be on
hand. So will doting parish-
ioners he helped as a lay
pastor in the Mormon
Church in Boston.
From the stagecraft to the
speakers' roster, the agenda
for the convention that starts
Monday is carefully crafted
toward one goal: introduc-
ing Romney to the country
on his own terms while pro-
jecting him as the leader the
country needs in tough eco-
nomic times and Obama
as a failure on that front
"We go to a convention
and for the first time define


1.: - .
Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks Fri-
day during a campaign rally in Commerce, Mich.


Mitt a little bit better," said
Ron Kaufman, a top Rom-
ney adviser.
Aides dismiss the notion
that the former Massachu-
setts governor needs to re-
pair a damaged image after
a summer of negative ads
and a recent string of mis-
steps, including Friday
when he waded into a de-
bunked conspiracy theory
by raising the issue of
Obama's citizenship.
"No one's ever asked to
see my birth certificate,"
Romney joked at a rally in
the suburbs of Detroit
while visiting his native
state. "They know that this
is the place that we were
born and raised."
Just a day earlier, Rom-


ney caused himself another
potential headache when
he said big business was
"doing fine" due to off-
shore tax havens. It was a
comment that echoed a
claim similar to one he had
criticized Obama for mak-
ing, and it also reminded
voters of Romney's own
overseas accounts.
In the coming days, Rom-
ney's team will put the fin-
ishing touches on a program
that whether acknowl-
edged by the campaign or
not is intended to turn the
page from a difficult sum-
mer. Among his hiccups: a
foreign trip marred by self-
inflicted troubles.
The convention will be
Romney's most consequen-


tial shot yet to send a pre-
cise message to Americans:
that he has the experience
and resolve to strengthen
the economy and the nation.
But Romney's challenge
is that most people have an
opinion about him. Just 8
percent of people in a new
Associated Press-GfK poll
say they don't know how
they feel about him.
Romney's team appears
undaunted.
"We look to tell all parts
of the governor's story,"
said Russ Schriefer, a top
Romney adviser who has
overseen the details of the
convention. "We can show
that Gov Romney is
uniquely qualified to take
on the problems that this
country's facing."
The first three nights of
the convention will be
aimed at building the case
against Obama specifi-
cally on his stewardship on
the economy with
speeches and videos featur-
ing everyday Americans.
Expect tough critiques
from New Jersey Gov Chris
Christie on Tuesday and
vice presidential candidate
Paul Ryan on Wednesday
As Schriefer put it, the
plan is to "lay down the
predicate and make the
case why President Obama
has failed."


Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush can


build national appeal in Tampa


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE When
former Florida Gov Jeb
Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio
speak at next week's Re-
publican National Conven-
tion in their home state,
they might be auditioning
to be GOP presiden-
tial candidates
themselves.
If President
Barack Obama de-
feats presumptive
Republican nomi-
nee Mitt Romney in
November, support-
ers will be pushing Sen. I
Bush and Rubio to Ru
run in four years. will int
They are popular co
with conservatives,


have strong national pro-
files, could easily raise the
requisite millions and hire
the right staff to wage seri-
ous campaigns, and their
speeches in Tampa could
give those bids a lift, just as
Obama's appearance at the
2004 Democratic National
Convention helped position
him to win in 2008.
Bush and Rubio might
not have the same cache at
the moment as some of the
other big-name speakers on
the convention schedule,
some of whom might also
seek the White House in
four years or eight: New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie,
who turned down broad
calls to run this year, is giv-
ing the keynote address.
Romney's running mate,
Wisconsin Congressman
Paul Ryan, and Wisconsin
Gov Scott Walker, a con-
servative hero for defeat-
ing labor unions in a
showdown earlier this
year, also will get turns at
the podium.
Rubio, though, is being
given a prime spot he
will introduce Romney, a
point when viewership
will be at a peak. Even if
the convention were being
held elsewhere, it's likely
he would have been given
a prominent role as a tea
party favorite who hap-
pens to be Hispanic, a de-
mographic the GOP is
trying to woo.
Bush likely drew his slot
because the convention is


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r
nt
An
in
re


in Florida. He hadn't been
expecting an invitation and
wasn't a speaker during the
two Republican conven-
tions when he was governor
- and that's when his
brother, George W Bush,
was the nominee.
No matter what happens,
Bush and Rubio
won't be running
against each other
Rubio, 41, considers
Bush to be a mentor
he consulted the
former governor be-
fore running for
Senate in 2010 -
Marco and his supporters
bio say he would defer
produce if Bush ran. Neither
eyion is willing to discuss
their specific plans.
"It's flattering. I think
people mean it as a compli-
ment," Rubio said of specu-
lation that he could run for
president. "What I have to
remind myself right now is
that I have a job as a United
States senator. Everyone
I've ever known that tries to
use their position as a step-
ping stone for something
else has ended up destroy-
ing themselves."
Bush, 59, said he isn't
thinking about his political
future and is content in pri-
vate life. He has done sev-
eral fundraising events for
Romney and his focus is on
getting him elected. Since
leaving the governor's of-
fice in 2007, he's been a
business consultant and is
on several corporate
boards, including the hos-


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Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@chronicleonline.com

i4dayspir orn ae


pital chain, Tenet Health-
care Corp., and the lumber
company Rayonier.
"It's a huge opportunity
that Gov Romney will take
advantage of to lay out a
clear, bold alternative to
Obama economics," Bush
said of the convention. "His
convention speech,
particularly... is the
place that I'm ex-
pecting and have "
the confidence that
he will begin that -.
effort." "
Florida Congress- -
man Connie Mack
IV is also speaking Jeb E
at the convention. spear
He'll be the first convey
speaker leading up to Rom-
ney's closing speech a
prime spot that could be a
reward for Mack's early en-
dorsement and campaign-
ing for Romney It also
serves to give Mack atten-
tion as he seeks to unseat
Democratic Sen. Bill Nel-
son, a seat that Republicans
are targeting as they try to
retake control of the
Senate.
Republican National
Committee Chairman
Reince Priebus said the
right person making the
right speech at a conven-
tion can catapult the per-
son to the top of the
national conversation.
"Speaking at prime time
at a national convention
can be a magical moment
for people that want to
change the course and di-

H'U h ble L^h9


reaction of our country.
We've seen it over and over
again over the years. And
there's no question that
Marco Rubio is an extraor-
dinarily special person in
our party," Priebus said.
"This is going to be an im-
portant convention for a


lot of folks and my
suspicion is it's
going to be impor-
tant for Marco as
well."
Both Bush and
Rubio, when they
give their speeches,
will be starting
from much stronger
positions than
Obama was eight


years ago.
Bush, whose brother and
father were presidents, is
a Republican icon in
Florida who still travels
the country helping GOP
candidates and is a na-
tional voice on education
policy, particularly in sup-
port of charter schools and
school choice. He began
fielding questions about
running for president
shortly after becoming
governor in 1999.
Because of his age and
time out of office, he would
probably have to run in
2016, if Romney loses, or in
2020, if Romney wins, to be
viable. In a general elec-
tion, he would have to dif-
ferentiate himself from his
brother, who left the White
House unpopular with in-
dependent voters.


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Romney to feature




personal side at RNC


Bush
king at
mntion.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 A5











AS~TH SAUDYMAAsR2,202SOKSEiusCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowToS E'THEMRTINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF886232 141.51 +.85 CheniereEn 30905 14.83 +.18 SiriusXM 462111 2.54 +.04 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 864721 8.16 +.01 Vringo 23887 3.57 -.09 Intel 444006 24.91 -.13 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
NokiaCp 570228 3.08 -.12 NwGoldg 17078 10.95 -.20 PwShs QQQ347111 68.29 +.42 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SprintNex 433186 4.89 +.11 NAPallg 16902 1.94 +.07 Autodesk 323917 30.13 -5.58 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
BariPVix 348049 11.33 -.48 Rentech 14989 2.20 -.03 Cisco 315656 19.20 +.08 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch- %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
CSVInvNG 31.22 +3.67 +13.3 Medgenwt 6.85 +1.86 +37.2 DigitAllyrs 7.00 +1.80 +34.6 ing qualification. n -Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Edenor 2.35 +.27 +13.0 Medgenics 12.95 +2.11 +19.5 AmpioPhm 3.38 +.58 +20.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
Supvalu 2.35 +.23 +10.8 MeetMe 2.49 +.19 +8.3 DragonWg 2.68 +.44 +19.6 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt-Right to buy security ata specifiedprice. s-
Frontline 3.93 +.32 +8.9 WizrdSftrs 4.65 +.31 +7.1 Ubiquiti n 10.57 +1.58 +17.6 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
BIkHillsCp 33.42 +2.41 +7.8 BiPTin 47.65 +2.84 +6.3 Cleantch rs 3.12 +.42 +15.6 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj- Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVLgNGs22.65 -3.35 -12.9 Arrhythm 2.25 -.20 -8.2 Autodesk 30.13 -5.58 -15.6
Acornlntl 3.12 -.37 -10.6 AvalonHId 3.88 -.33 -7.9 Stewrdshp 4.65 -.60 -11.4
PrUVxSTrs 5.15 -.47 -8.3 SbdCp 1997.80-129.05 -6.1 PeregrinP 2.20 -.26 -10.8
DolanCo 3.72 -.29 -7.2 CTPtrs 3.68 -.15 -3.9 SpanishBrd 3.10 -.32 -9.4 52-Week Net % YT[
PrSUItNG rs40.40 -3.02 -7.0 DocuSec 3.66 -.14 -3.7 PorterBcp 2.01 -.20 -8.9 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,912 Advanced
1,038 Declined
164 Unchanged
3,114 Total issues
73 New Highs
12 New Lows
2,519,812,214 Volume


DIARY


235 Advanced
182 Declined
34 Unchanged
451 Total issues
4 New Highs
8 New Lows
61,815,839 Volume


1,502
910
141
2,553
53
33
1,318,838,170


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 411.54Dow Jones Utilities
8,327.67 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,426.68 1,074.77S&P 500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71 Russell 2000


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


13,157.97 +100.51 +.77 +7.70 +16.60
5,118.58 +3.14 +.06 +1.97+14.76
472.50 +2.33 +.50 +1.68+11.52
8,047.87 +36.43 +.45 +7.63+11.07
2,414.54 -1.08 -.04 +5.98 +8.14
3,069.79 +16.39 +.54 +17.84 +23.79
1,411.13 +9.05 +.65+12.21 +19.91
14,708.32 +84.28 +.58+11.51 +18.85
809.19 +3.19 +.40 +9.21 +16.97


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

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the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BomSBrasil 7.90 -.12
BkofAm 8.16 +.01
BkMontg 58.18 +.35
BkNYMel 22.43 -.01
ABBLtd 17.54 -.09 Barday 11.86 -.19
ACELtd 74.25 +.13 BariPVix 11.33 -.48
AESCorp 11.51 +.13 BarnesNob 11.69 -.02
AFLAC 46.18 +.47 BarrickG 37.78 -.26
AGLRes 39.43 +.23 BasicEnSv 11.64 -.15
AK Steel 5.62 -.05 Baxter 58.75 +.48
ASA Gold 23.02 BeamInc 58.20 +30
AT&T Inc 36.95 +.39 BeazerHm 3.03 +.09
AUOptron 3.05 -.10 BectDck 75.93 +.66
AbtLab 65.84 +.51 BerkHaA128225.00 +425.00
AberFitc 36.19 +.64 BerkH B 85.39 +.24
Accenture 61.53 +.70 BestBuy 17.31 -.70
AccoBrds 6.80 -.08 BigLots 30.28 -.48
AdamsEx 10.99 +.03 BBarrett 22.60 +.71
AMD 3.94 +.04 BioMedR 18.39
AdvSemi 3.63 -.02 BIkHillsCp 33.42 +2.41
AecomTch 19.17 +.08 BlkDebtStr 4.24
Aeropostf 13.40 +.10 BlkEnhC&l 13.36 +.01
Aetna 38.72 -.58 BIkGlbOp 13.39
Agilent 37.85 +.38 BlockHR 16.35 -.02
Agniomg 47.39 +.10 Boeing 71.09 +.73
Agrium g 97.83 -.25 BorgWarn 68.43 -.61
AlcatelLuc 1.17 -.02 BostBeer 101.12 -.01
Alcoa 8.63 BostProp 111.84 +.26
AllegTch 30.77 -.64 BostonSci 5.50 +.10
Allergan 85.25 +.41 BoydGm 6.23 +.14
Allete 40.78 -.07 BrMySq 32.57 +.42
AlliBGIbHi 15.93 +.15 Brookdale 21.71 -.02
AlliBInco 8.50 +.03 BrkfldOfPr 17.19 +.18
AlliBern 13.59 +.28 Brunswick 23.82 +.60
Allstate 37.76 +.05 Buckeye 48.36 -1.28
AlphaNRs 6.40 -.19 BurgerKn 13.98 -.10
AIpAlerMLP 16.20 -.03 CBLAs 21.29 +.16
Altria 34.08 +.63 CBREGrp 17.58 -.07
AmBev 37.50 +.16 CBSB 36.55 +.59
Ameren 33.20 +.04 OH Engy 65.16 +.05
Amerigrp 90.82 +.57 CIT Grp 38.35 +.05
AMovilL 25.49 +.43 CMS Eng 22.86 +.16
AEagleOut 21.96 +.08 CNO Find 8.88 -.11
AEP 42.80 +.20 SS Inds 19.24 +.90
AmExp 57.49 +1.07 CSX 22.99 +.15
AmlntGrp 34.47 +.71 CVS Care 45.56 +21
AmSIP3 7.32 +01 CYS Invest 14.16 +.16
AmTower 69.44 +.23 CblvsnNY 15.17 +.12
Amerigas 40.80 +.10 CabotOGs 41.86 +1.22
AmeriBrgn 38.10 +.12 CallGolf 5.80 -.41
Anadarko 69.57 +.65 Calpine 17.80 +.05
AnglogldA 33.58 -.10 Camecog 22.69 -.24
ABInBev 82.24 +1.30 Cameron 53.71 -.25
Ann Inc 34.99 +.15 CampSp 34.99 +.29
Annaly 17.16 +.07 CdnNRsgs 31.34 +.30
Anworth 6.73 +.03 CapOne 56.87 +1.24
Aon plc 52.37 +.23 CapiiSrce 6.89 +.02
Apache 87.50 -.05 CapMplB 15.31 -.02
AquaAm 25.05 +.16 CardnlHIth 39.72 +.17
ArcelorMit 15.26 -.29 CareFusion 26.43 +.08
ArchCoal 6.58 -.18 CarMax 29.81 +.26
ArchDan 26.38 +.17 Carnival 33.27 -.04
ArcosDor 13.36 -.09 Caterpillar 87.47 -.16
ArmourRsd 7.32 +.03 Celanese 40.32 -.45
Ashland 73.49 ... Cemex 8.09 +.12
AsdEstat 15.42 +.06 Cemigpfs 18.68 +.13
AssuredG 13.62 +.03 CenterPnt 20.32 +.08
ATMOS 35.23 +.08 CntryLink 42.26 +.59
AuRicog 7.14 ... Checkpnt 7.94 +.03
Avon 15.56 +.06 ChesEng 19.39 +.09
BB&TQCp 31.11 +.10 ChesUf 46.68 +.17
BHPBillLt 68.80 -.25 Chevron 112.01 +.72
BP PLC 42.19 -.06 ChicB&l 37.50 +.08
BRFBrasil 16.51 -.02 Chicos 18.52 +.47
BRT 6.29 +.01 Chimera 2.45 +.03
BakrHu 47.51 +.16 ChinaMble 53.53 +.19
BallCorp 42.13 -.04 Cigna 44.50 +.34
Bo"Bradpf 16.83 -.04 CindBell 4.50 +.02
BomSantSA 6.91 +.07 Citfgroup 29.83 +.25


CleanHarb 54.83 -.48 EQTCorp 53.99 -.45 FMCG 36.13 -.64 HartfdFn 18.15 +.14 iShEMBd 119.17 +.09
CliffsNRs 38.89 -.43 EastChm s 55.27 -.31 Freescale 10.61 +.06 HawaiiEl 27.21 +.27 iShB20T 124.81 -.12
Clorox 72.31 +.34 Eaton 46.44 +.67 Frontline 3.93 +.32 HItCrREIT 58.14 +.92 iS Eafe 52.10 -.08
Coach 55.89 +.58 EatnVan 26.34 +.10 Fusion-io 29.12 +.13 HItMgmt 7.02 -.02 iShiBxHYB 92.15 +.41
CCFemsa 120.49 +2.44 EVEnEq 10.87 +.03 HIthcrRlty 23.98 +.07 iSR1KV 70.56 +.31
CocaColas 38.47 +.36 Edisonlnt 43.87 +.27 HealthNet 22.59 +.07 iSR1KG 65.87 +.45
CocaCE 29.58 +.31 EducRlty 11.47 +.18 GATX 42.24 +.17 Heckmann 2.79 ... iSR2KV 71.51 +.12
Coeur 22.23 +.26 Ban 11.71 -.03 GNC 36.80 +.60 HeclaM 5.37 -.01 iSR2KG 92.60 +.27
CohStlnfra 17.86 -.03 BdorGldg 13.01 -.01 GabelliET 5.61 +.03 Heinz 56.27 +.76 iShR2K 80.74 +.22
ColgPal 105.77 +1.06 EmersonEl 51.72 +.25 GabHIthW 8.70 +.05 Hersha 4.96 +.04 iShBShtT 110.22
CollctvBrd 21.61 ... EmpDist 21.24 +.08 GabUfil 8.21 +.11 Hertz 13.15 +.15 iShUSPfd 39.57 +.02
Comerica 30.75 +.21 EnbrdgEPt 29.21 -.26 GafisaSA 3.98 +.23 Hess 50.19 +.41 iShREst 65.02 +.25
CmclMfs 13.15 -.02 EnCanag 21.70 -.05 GameStop 18.42 -.23 HewlettP 17.58 -.06 iShDJHm 18.04 +.24
CmwREIT 15.00
CompSci 32.99 +.17
ComstkRs 16.55 +.30 -
Con-Way 30.32 -.36
ConAgra 24.85 +.16
ConocPhils 56.36 +.20 C XA.) N C jL
ConsolEngy 32.88 -.11 1 www.chronicleonline.com
ConEd 61.42 +.43
ConstellA 32.72 +.44
Cnvrgys 15.33 -.06
Cooper Ind 74.57 +.59
Corning 11.52 -.03
CosanLtd 14.31 +.13
CottCp 8.50 +.18
CovenbyH 41.74 -.13
Covidien 55.62 +55
Crane 39.37 -.56
CS VS3xSlyv 29.42 +.42
CSVS2xVxS 2.54 -.17
CSVellVSt 14.19 +59
CredSuiss 19.21 -.02
CrwnCsfie 61.89 +.25 0 RS
CubeSmart 12.69 +.10
Cummins 100.09 -.31
'"0 563-5655
DCTIndl 6.15 +.03 536
DDR Corp 15.00 +.13
DNPSelct 10.61 +.06
DR Horton 19.01 +.23t s
DSW Inc 64.42 +.22
DTE 58.74 +21 Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start


uanadicg d.5 -.08
Danaher 53.30 +.14
Darden 52.35 +.90
DeVry 19.02 -.41
DeanFds 16.38 +.11
Deere 76.67 +.55
DelphiAun 29.18 +.05
DeltaAir 9.11 -.04
DenburyR 15.56 +.19
DeutschBk 34.05 -.29
DevonE 61.04 +.52
DicksSptg 49.14 +.26
DxFnBullrs 96.06 +1.32
DirSCBear 16.85 -.13
DirFnBear 20.35 -.28
DirSPBear 18.54 -.35
DirDGIdBII 12.65 +.09
DrxEnBear 8.36 -.17
DirEMBear 13.16 -.02
DirxSCBull 55.51 +.38
Discover 38.60 +.50
Disney 49.56 +.39
DoleFood 12.96 +.30
DollarGen 49.66 -.05
DollarTh 81.00 +1.32
DomRescs 53.49 +.35
Dover 57.83 +.06
DowChm 29.89 +.10
DrPepSnap 45.19 +.52
DuPont 50.35 +.11
DukeEn rs 65.47 +.23
DukeRlty 14.25 +.08
EMC Cp 26.68 +.70
EOGRes 108.91 +1.90


Enerplsg 15.68
EnPro 37.18
ENSCO 56.75
Entergy 68.73
EntPrPt 52.79
EqtyRsd 60.82
EsteeLdrs 60.10
ExomRes 7.21
Exelon 36.83
Express 15.15
ExxonMbl 88.05
FMC Tech 47.21
FairchldS 14.99
FamilyDIr 62.35
FedExCp 89.07
FedSignl 5.97
Fedlnvst 21.57
Ferrellgs 19.45
Ferro 3.35
FibriaCelu 8.04
FidlNFin 19.05
RdNatlnfo 31.96
Rfth&Pac 12.82
FstHorizon 8.42
FTActDiv 8.11
FtTrEnEq 12.05
RFirstEngy 44.74
FootLockr 34.02
FordM 9.49
ForestLab 34.68
ForestOil s 7.47
FBHmScn 24.65


Gannett 15.41
Gap 35.12
GenDynam 66.09
GenElec 20.80
GenGrPrp 19.76
GenMills 39.04
GenMotors 21.18
GenOn En 2.53
Genworth 5.41
Gerdau 9.33
GlaxoSKIn 46.44
GolLinhas 5.06
GoldFLtd 13.15
Goldcrpg 40.41
GoldmanS 104.96
GoodrPet 13.78
Goodyear 11.88
GtPlainEn 21.44
Griffon 9.64
GuangRy 14.57
Guess 26.48
HCAHldg 28.12
HSBC 44.05
HSBCCap 26.36
HalconRrs 7.97
Hallibrtn 34.27
HanJS 16.10
HanPrmDv 14.47
Hanesbrds 32.23
Hanoverlns 35.49
HarleyD 42.55
HarmonyG 9.70


Hexced 22.77
HighwdPrp 32.86
HollyFrts 38.99
HomeDp 56.96
HonwIllnt 58.36
HospPT 23.78
HostHofis 15.35
HovnanE 2.66
Humana 69.95
Huntsmn 14.47
IAMGIdg 13.10
ICICI Bk 34.54
ING 7.15
ION Geoph 6.62
iShGold 16.26
iSAsfia 23.76
iShBraz 54.25
iSCan 27.63
iShGer 21.15
iSh HK 17.09
iShJapn 9.30
iShKor 57.17
iSMalas 14.72
iShMex 62.30
iShSing 13.17
iSTaiwn 12.69
iShSilver 29.74
iShBTips 120.38
iShChina25 34.01
iSSP500 142.17
iShEMkts 40.05
iShiBxB 119.89


iStar 7.07 +.15
Idacorp 41.84 +.11
ITW 59.68 +.80
Imafon 5.83 +.11
IngerRd 46.92 +.52
IntegrysE 55.32 +.14
IntcnfEx 137.10 +1.37
IBM 197.77 +2.07
InfiGame 12.02 +.04
IntPap 34.55 +.38
Interpublic 10.81 -.05
Invesco 23.80 +.14
InvMtgCap 19.95 +.14
IronMtn 32.55 +.03
ItauUnibH 16.86 +.03



JPMorgCh 37.17 -.06
Jabil 23.27 -.03
JanusCap 8.62 -.04
Jefferies 14.31 +.19
JohnJn 67.60 +.47
JohnsnCI 26.98 +.07
JoyGIbl 55.59 -1.25
JnprNtwk 17.74 -.49
KBHome 11.01 +.31
KBR Inc 27.05 -.23
KTCorp 15.23
KC South 77.70 +.93
Kaydon s 22.40 +.04
KAEngTR 26.55 +.10


Kellogg 51.48 +.32
KeyEngy 8.55 -.11
Keycorp 8.35 +.06
KimbClk 83.66 +.24
Kimco 20.32 +.15
KindME 81.84 +.04
KindMorg 35.29 +.44
Kinross g 9.03 +.19
KnghtCap 2.80 -.06
KodiakOg 9.17 +.33
Kohls 52.50 +1.05
KrispKrm 7.49 +.18
Kroger 21.81 +.12
KronosWw 17.27 -.53
LAN Air 24.07 -.12
LSI Corp 7.59 +.01
LTC Prp 32.56 -.08
LaZBoy 13.51 +.09
Ladede 42.03 +.16
LVSands 42.63 -.49
LearCorp 39.78 -.47
LeggMason 25.53 +.29
LeggPlat 23.89 +.33
LennarA 32.63 +.60
Level3rs 22.22 +.11
Lexmark 19.45 +.01
LbtyASG 4.08 +.03
LillyEli 43.86 +1.46
Limited 48.83 +1.06
LincNat 23.78 +.25
Lindsay 66.89 -.78
Linkedln 105.11 -.31
LockhdM 92.45 +.25
LonePineg 1.18 +.01
LaPac 13.55 +.39
Lowes 27.73 +.37


M&TBk 85.87 +.37
MBIA 10.55 +.03
MDU Res 22.07 +.31
MEMC 2.88 +.01
MCR 9.90 -.01
MGIC 1.19 +.03
MGMRsts 10.31 +.02
Macerich 59.65 +.85
Macquarie 42.03 -.08
Macys 39.75 +.83
MageMPtr 82.05 +.09
Magnalntg 45.06 -.38
MagHRes 4.23 +.06
Manitowoc 12.54 -.17
Manulifeg 11.07 +.14
MarathnO 27.84 +.14
MarathPet 48.75 -.29
MktVGold 47.57 +.15
MVOilSvs 40.94 +.09
MVSemi n 33.06 +.10
MktVRus 28.00 +.28
MktVJrGld 22.02
MarlntA 36.97 -.15
MarshM 34.05 +.31
MStewrt 2.99
Masco 14.13 +.20
McDrmlnt 11.70 +.08
McDnlds 88.92 +.67
McGrwH 49.57 +.32
McKesson 87.19 +.68
McMoRn 12.98 +.02
McEwenM 3.98 +.04
MeadJohn 72.81 +.65
Mechel 6.16 -.07
Medids 32.50 +.35
Medtrnic 40.58 +.21
Merck 43.12 +.32
Meribr 4.50 -.20
MetLife 34.65 +.20
MetroPCS 9.82 +.10


MetroHIth 7.93 -.10 PepsiCo 73.06 +.40 ReneSola 1.51 -.28
MKorsn 53.92 +2.25 Prmian 17.75 -.15 RepubSvc 27.84
MidAApt 67.93 +.34 PetrbrsA 21.01 ... Revlon 12.96 -.05
MobileTele 18.29 +.01 Petrobras 21.73 ... ReynAmer 45.53 +.49
MolinaHIth 23.77 -.54 Pfizer 24.01 +.27 Riontnb 46.06 -.49
MolsCoorB 44.27 +.14 PhilipMor 89.76 +1.07 RiteAid 1.23 +.02
Molyomrp 9.61 -.07 PhilipsEl 22.80 -.30 RockwlAut 72.29 +.23
MoneyGrs 16.15 +.31 Phillips66n 41.36 +.03 RockColl 49.41 +.03
Monsanto 85.34 -.49 PiedNG 31.31 +.03 RockwdH 48.49 +1.60
MonstrWw 7.00 -.06 PimoStrat 12.03 +.08 RylCarb 25.57 -.06
MorgStan 14.56 +.06 PinWst 51.72 +.23 RoyDShllA 70.35 +.09
MSEmMkt 14.05 +.03 PioNtrl 98.65 +2.52 Royce 12.75 -.01
Mosaic 57.35 -.25 PitnyBw 13.61 ... Royce pfB 25.70 -.05
MotrlaSolu 47.63 +.05 PlainsEx 41.09 +1.60 R and 26.23 +.30
MurphO 52.72 +.08 PlumCrk 40.53 +.19
NCR Corp 22.20 +.26 Polaris s 74.30 -.23
NRG Egy 21.18 -.03 PostPrp 50.87 -.05 SAIC 11.76 +.04
NVEnergy 17.97 +.18 Potash 41.56 +.21 SCANA 47.93 +.34
NYSEEur 25.24 -.16 PwshDB 28.52 -.13 SKTIcm 14.58 -.06
Nabors 15.50 -.11 PSUSDBull 22.42 +.07 SpdrDJIA 131.38 +1.00
NatFuGas 49.95 +75 PSKBWBk 24.17 +.19 SpdrGold 161.97 +.08
NatGrid 54.42 -.03 PSHYCpBd 19.02 +.05 S&P500ETF141.51 +.85
NOilVarco 77.03 -.29 PShEMSov 30.10 -.01 SpdrHome 23.42 +.26
Navistar 22.98 -.15 Praxair 107.12 -.49 SpdrLehHY 39.99 +.14
NewAmHi 11.41 +.15 PrecDrill 8.25 -.14 SpdrNuBMu 24.36 -.05
NJRscs 45.37 +.03 PrinFnd 27.27 +.22 SPLelntTB 60.13 -.06
NewOriEd 14.08 -.41 ProLogis 33.43 +.52 SpdrRetl 60.69 +.21
NYCmlyB 13.16 +.05 ProShtS&P 34.92 -.23 SpdrOGEx 52.71 +.33
NYnmes 9.22 +.15 PrUShS&P 14.33 -.18 SpdrMetM 41.95 -.22
NewellRub 17.65 +.10 PrUltQQQs 60.04 +.68 Safeway 15.48 +.17
NewfidExp 31.71 +.36 PrUShQQQ 28.22 -.34 StJoe 18.68 +.02
NewmtM 49.23 +.19 ProUltSP 58.73 +.70 Stude 37.56 -.13
NewpkRes 7.13 -.05 ProUShL20 15.59 +.03 Saks 11.78 +.12
Nexeng 25.74 +.06 ProShtR2K 26.02 -.07 Salesforce 148.54 +1.77
NextEraEn 67.84 +.43 PrUltSP500 84.88 +1.53 SJuanB 14.97 -.07
NiSource 24.14 +.14 PrUVxSTrs 5.15 -.47 SandRdge 6.51 -.01
NikeB 96.86 +1.41 PrUltCrude 34.23 -.20 Sanofi 40.89 +.25
NobleCorp 38.45 +.08 PrUShCrde 37.79 +.21 Sichlmbrg 74.59 +.40
Nokiap 3.08 -.12 ProUltSv s 46.83 +.43 Schwab 13.27 +.27
Nordsrm 57.95 +.88 ProUShEuro 21.28 +.17 SeadrillLtd 41.13 +.13
NorfkSo 73.60 +.02 ProctGam 67.02 +.34 SealAir 13.26 +.15
NoestUt 37.97 +.23 ProgsvCp 19.76 +.19 Sealy 1.62 +.04
NorthropG 67.40 +.48 ProUSR2K 29.16 -.11 SenHous 21.99 +.22
Novarts 60.03 +.09 PUSSP500rs41.45 -.77 Sensient 36.15 -.11
NuSIdn 42.55 +.87 Pruden s 54.62 +.82 ShawGrp 41.96 -.03
Nucor 38.70 -.44 PSEG 32.13 +.19 Sherwin 142.63 +2.82
NustarEn 51.46 .35 PubSrg 142.68 +1.38 SiderurNac 5.40 -.29
NuvMuOpp 14.97 +.02 PulteGrp 13.51 +.19 SilvWhtg 34.08 +.13
NvPfdlnco 9.51 -.09 PPrIT 5.69 -.02 SilvrcpMog 5.87 +.02
NuvQP2 9.34 +.02 QEPRes 28.80 +1.62 SimonProp 157.12 +.66
OGE Engy 54.34 +.3402 Qihoo360 23.08 -.61 Skedichers 22.25 +.32
OGnePty 54293 +.34 QuanexBId 17.78 -.03 SmithAO 53.65 +.19
OasisPet 29.41 +.6453 QuantaSvc 24.20 -.11 SmithfF 19.24 +.51
OcffiPet 87.90 +.64 Quester 19.80 +.05 Smucker 84.40 +.50
OfficeDpt 1.53 + .01 QksilvRes 3.62 -.08 Solera 41.24 -1.45
Olindepub 8.92 -.05 RPM 27.16 +.03 SonyCp 11.71 +.10
On Ht 23.59 i .09 RadianGrp 3.36 +.02 SoJerInd 50.69 +.07
ONegaH 2359 +.09 RadioShk 2.56 -.09 SouthnCo 45.88 +.30
ONEOKs 44.59 +.26 Ralcorp 70.00 +.18 SthnCopper 32.50 -.19
OneokPtrs 55.29 -.31 RLauren 159.58 +3.10 SwstAirl 9.21 -.09
OshkoshCp 24.72 -.58 RangeRs 66.27 +.61 SwstnEngy 31.55 +.60
OwensCorn 33.18 +1.18 RJamesFn 34.92 +.13 SpectraEn 28.86 +.02
Owenslll 18.14 -.22 Rayonier 48.39 +.29 SpiritAero 25.35 +.45
Raytheon 55.80 +.12 SprintNex 4.89 +11
PG&E Cp 44.07 +.28 Rltylnco 42.35 +.51 SprottSilv 12.55 +.16
PNC 62.05 +. 22 RedHat 57.77 +.04 SP Mats 35.84 -.07
PNM Res 20.53 +.24 RedwdTr 14.00 -.01 SP HIthC 38.74 +.33
PPGC 1.5 1 RegionsFn 7.18 +.17 SPCnSt 35.60 +.31


PPL Corp 29.28
PallCorp 55.09
Pandora 9.97
ParkerHan 81.58
PeabdyE 23.37
Pengrth g 7.08
PennVaRs 24.47
PennWstg 14.78
Penney 24.75
PepBoy 9.05
PepcoHold 19.28


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.94 +.07
AbdnEMTel 19.58 +.12
AdmRsc 35.62 +.36
Advenlx .72 -.02
AlexoRg 3.54 -.09
AlldNevG 31.86 +.83
AlmadnMg 2.38 -.01
AmAppared 1.02 -.01
Augustag 2.78 +.01
Aurizon g 4.20 +.03
AvalnRare 2.00 +.03
Banrog 4.53 -.04


BarcUBS36 43.23 -.19 CubicEn .33 ...
BarcGSOil 23.39 -.06
BrigusGg .91 +.03
BritATob 103.97 -.55 DeourEg .17 -.00
Carderog .85 -.02 DenisnM g 1.43
CardiumTh .23 +.04 DocuSec 3.66 -.14
CelSd .32 -.01 EVLtdDur 16.79 +.02
Celag 21 .07 EVMuniBd 13.43 -.04
CFCdheniag 2ereEn 14.83 +.1807 EVMuni2 13.82 +.12
CheniereEn 1483 +.18 EllswthFd 7.14 +.01
ChinaShen .49 +.09 EvolPetol 8.06 -.03
ClaudeRg .71 +.03 ExeterRgs 1.83 +.01
ClghGlbOp 11.16 ... FkStP 085 11
CornstProg 5.45 +.03
CrSuiHiY 3.23 +.01
Crosshrg .22 +.01 GamGIdNR 14.08 -.02


GascoEngy .15
Gastargrs 1.66
GenMoly 2.69
GeoGloblR .19
GoldResrc 18.47
GoldStdVg 1.60
GoldenMin 5.19
GoldStrg 1.37
GldFId 2.09
GranTrrag 4.65
GrtBasGg .23
GtPanSilvg 1.99
Hemisphrx .66
HstnAEn 1.03
iBio 1.05


ImmunoCII 2.44
ImpOilgs 46.86 +.49
Innovaro .49
InovioPhm .59 +.03
IntellgSys 1.68
IntTowerg 3.15 -.05


KeeganRg 3.64 +.08
LadThalFn 1.38 +.01
LkShrGldg 1.03 -.01


Medgenics 12.95 +2.11


MeetMe 2.49
Metalico 2.22
MdwGoldg 1.34
MinoiG g .53
NavideaBio 3.81
NeoStem .62
NBRESec 4.72
Neuralstem .45
Nevsung 3.98
NwGoldg 10.95
NAPallg 1.94
NDynMng 2.39
NthnO&G 16.63
NovaCpp n 2.63
NovaGld g 4.65


NvDivAdv 15.31 +.06 I

SamsO&G 1.07 +.03
ParaG&S 2.43 -.03 Sandstgrs 9.77 +.20
PhrmAth 1.28 +.02 SinoHub .16 -.03
PolyMetg 1.14 -.05 TanzRyg 4.59 +.05
PyramidOil 4.48 -.02 Taseko 2.87 +.02
Quaterrag .35 -.03 Tengsco .68 -.02
RadiantLog 1.67 ... TrnsafiPet 1.08 +.01
RareEleg 4.10 +.01 TravelCts 5.19 -.16
ReavesUtl 24.45 -.07 TriangPet 6.82 +.27
Rentedh 2.20 -.03 Tuoiwsg 1.30 +.08
RexahnPh .46 -.03 Univlnsur 3.47 +.10
Richmntg 4.26 -.04 Ur-Energy 1.07 +.02
Rubion g 3.49 +.02 UraniumEn 2.57 +.07


VangTotW 47.37 +.08
VantageDrl 1.51 +.03
VirnetX 23.88 -.16
VistaGold 3.20 -.01
VoyagerOG 1.29 +.12
Vringo 3.57 -.09
Walterlnv 28.00
WFAdvlnco 10.60 -.07
WFAdMSec 15.99 -.01
WizrdSftrs 4.65 +.31
YMBiog 1.96 -.01
ZBB Engy .31 -.03


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 39.05 +.04
ARCAbih .36 +.01
ASML HId 57.77 +.15
\jATP O&G .35 -.06
Aastrom 1.60 -.03
Abraxas 2.09 +.09
AcadaTc 25.10 +.63
AcadiaPh 1.80 +.01
Accuray 6.05 -.12
Achillion 6.86 +.25
AcmePkt 16.94 -.45
AoirdaTh 23.00 -.13
AcfvePw h .84 +.04
AcfvsBliz 11.75 +.03
Acxiom 16.78 +.26
AdobeSy 32.26 -1.24
Adtran 20.98 -.26
AdvEnId 13.04 -.07
AdventSoft 23.24 +.24
AdvisBds 43.15 +.15
AEternagh .51 +.05
Affymax 17.12 +.09
Affymetrix 3.68 +.08
AkamaiT 37.10 -.03
Akorn 13.30 +.46
Alexion 106.74 +3.04
Alexzars 4.19 +.07
AlignTech 32.89 +.49
Alkermes 17.94 +.23
AllosThera 1.78
AllotComm 27.11 +.07
AllscriptH 10.50 -.28
AlteraCp If 36.35 +.63
AlterraCap 23.24 -.06
AmTrstFin 28.60 -.19
Amarin 12.99 +.77
Amazon 245.74 +4.54
AFTxE 5.85 +.08
ACapAgy 34.17 +.29
AmCapLd 11.16 -.03
ACapMtg 24.23 +.10
ARItyCTn 11.39 +.02
Amgen 84.59 +.93
AmkorTch 4.71 -.09
AmpioPhm 3.38 +.58
Amyris 3.45 -.11
AnalogDev 39.74 +.17
Anlogic 69.30 +.83
Analystlnt 3.94 +.02
Ancestry 30.63 -.47
Andrsons 39.50 +.12
AngiesLn 9.69 +.13
Ansys 67.51 -.53
AntaresP 4.00 +.09
AntheraPh .98 +.13
A123Sys .34 -.02
ApolloGrp 27.09 -.30
Apollolnv 7.91 +.02
Apple Inc 663.22 +.59
ApldMati 11.77 -.03
AMCC 5.32 +.05
Approach 27.61 -.12
ArchCap 40.29 +.55
ArcfcCat 42.97 -.17
ArenaPhm 8.64 +.15
AresCaph 17.14 +.10
AriadP 20.36 +.19
Ariba Inc 44.54 +.01
ArkBest 9.75 -.20
ArmHId 27.80 +.35
ArrayBio 5.68 +.08
Arris 13.48 -.04
ArubaNet 19.36 +2.44
AscenaRts 19.29 -.01
AscentSolr 1.80 -.04
AsialnfoL 11.96 -.43
AspenTech 23.61 +.05
AsscdBanc 12.86 +.06
AstexPhm 2.67 -.01
athenahlth 87.91 +.90
Atmel 6.06 +.12
AuthenTec 8.10 +.02
Autodesk 30.13 -5.58
AutoData 58.42 +.45


Autxlium 23.29 +.17 CogoGrp 1.85 -.03
AvagoTch 36.05 +.03 Coinstar 51.09 -.37
AvanirPhm 2.91 +.06 ColdwCrkh .53 -.00
AvisBudg 15.98 +.25 ColumLbh 1.01 -.04
Aware 6.00 +.33 Comcast 33.95 +.01
Axcelis .99 +.02 Comcspd 33.04 +.06
B/EAero 39.03 +.03 CmcBMO 39.50 +.25
BGCPtrs 4.62 +.01 CommSys 11.74 +.31
BMCSft 42.14 +.10 CommVIt 51.50 +.82
Baidu 115.72 +.63 CmplGnom 2.63 -.03
Bazaarvcn 14.85 +.90 CompCred 5.93 -.03
BeacnRfg 27.87 +.49 CmptrPr 50.59 +3.80
BeasleyB 5.25 +.01 Compuwre 10.01 +.02
BebeStrs 5.37 -.09 Comverse 6.06 -.05
BedBath 66.40 +.22 ConcurTch 72.20 -.46
BioRelLab 26.56 -.53 Conmed 26.79 +.21
Biogenldc 147.03 +1.88 Conns 22.12 +.28
BioMarin 38.70 +.76 ConsolCom 16.22 +.38
BioSanters 1.48 -.02 ConstantC 17.95 -.33
BioScrip 7.99 +.37 CopanoEn 30.18 -.34
BIkRKelso 9.68 +.04 Coparts 26.03 -.15
Blckbaud 24.48 -.38 CorinthC 2.19 -.07
BloominBn 12.89 -.11 CorOnDem 25.10 -.18
BobEvans 39.56 -.24 CornerTher 6.98 -.12
BodyCentrl 8.66 +.29 Costoo 96.25 +1.51
BonTon 8.44 +.39 CreeInc 28.09 +.30
BreitBurn 18.96 +.09 Crocs 17.65 +1.34
Brightcvn 12.43 -.03 Ctrip.oim 17.11 -.25
Broadcom 35.35 +.14 CubistPh 45.65 +1.21
BroadSoft 36.30 -.14 Curis 4.14 +.13
BrcdeCm 5.89 +.01 Cyberonics 44.39 +.34
BrukerCp 12.23 -.06 Cyclacelh .51 -.04
BuffabWW 74.65 -.12 Cymer 56.60 +.10
BldrFstSrc 4.20 ... CypSemi 11.85 -.03
CAl Inc 25.80 +.01 CVtoneth .79 +.03
CH Robins 57.16 +.35
CMEGrps 53.67 +.34
CSG Sys 20.70 +.43 DFCGIbl 18.50 -.03
CTC Media 8.50 -.06 Daktronics 9.51
CadencePh 4.32 DeclkrsOut 49.54 +.49
Cadence 12.73 -.17 Delcath 2.01 +.01
Caesars n 8.04 -.21 Dell Inc 11.26 +.02
CalaStrTR 9.94 +.03 Dndreon 5.07 -.06
Callidus 4.30 +.14 Dentsply 36.70 -.15
CalumetSp 27.60 +.58 DexCom 12.52 +.15
CdnSolar 2.93 -.03 DiamndFhlf 20.33 -.13
CapCtyBk 7.91 +.14 DianaCont 5.22 -.05
CapFedFn 11.82 +.03 DigitalGen 10.12 +.12
CpstnTrbh 1.02 -.03 Diodes 18.50 -.05
Cardtronic 29.45 -.16 DirecTVA 52.63 +.91
CareerEd 3.47 -.01 DiscCmAh 53.33 +.80
CaribouC 12.34 +.18 DiscCmCh 50.10 +1.24
Carrizo 25.20 ... DiscovLab 2.63 +.12
CarverB rs 3.80 -.06 DishNetwk 32.27 +.28
CatalystPh 1.86 +.14 DollarTrs 49.29 +.79
Catamaran 92.07 +1.37 DonlleyRR 11.58 +.14
Cavium 32.33 +.19 DragonWg 2.68 +.44
Celgene 72.04 +.57 DrmWksA 17.01 -.07
CellTherah .40 -.01 DryShips 2.31 +.01
CelldexTh 5.11 +.33 Dunkin 28.24 +.08
Celsion 4.68 +.23 Dynavax 3.54 -.03
CentEurolf 2.81 +.04 E-Trade 8.50 +.10
CentAI 6.50 -.24 eBay 47.10 +.29
Cepheid 36.42 +.64 EVEngy 60.11 +.33
CeragonN 6.85 -.23 EaglRkEn 9.48 +.36
Cereplasth .20 -.00 ErthLink 6.69 +.01
Cerner 71.27 +.24 EstWstBcp 21.75 +.06
Changyou 23.10 +.14 EducDevh 3.85 -.06
CharterCm 77.73 +1.35 8x8 Inc 6.00 +.04
ChkPoint 49.32 -.26 ElectSd 12.57 +.03
Cheesecake 33.14 +.06 ElectArts 13.33 +.08
ChemoCtxn 10.43 -.26 EndoPhrm 32.17 +.29
ChinBAKh .48 -.07 Endobgix 12.61 -.23
ChrchllD 56.31 +.95 EnerNOC 10.13 -.22
CienaCorp 16.88 -.34 EngyXXI 34.12 +.37
CinnFin 39.10 +.24 Entegris 8.44 -.17
Cintas 40.86 +.27 EntropCom 5.41 -.03
Cirrus 42.00 +.02 Equinix 193.51 +.61
Cisco 19.20 +.08 Ericsson 9.65 -.15
CitzRepBc 19.97 +.09 ExactScih 9.99 +.02
CitrixSys 77.00 -.05 Exelids 4.30 +.01
CleanEngy 13.25 +.03 E)ddeTc 3.10 +.01
Cleantchrs 3.12 +.42 Expedias 53.06 +.77
Clearwire 1.74 -.01 Expdlni 37.71 +.19
CoStar 80.32 -2.23 ExpScripts 61.76 +.18
Codexis 2.11 +.01 ExtrmNet 3.35 -.01
CogentC 20.67 +.50 EZchip 33.66 +.01
CognizTech 64.86 -.13 F5Netwks 98.65 -.37


FLIRSys 19.86 -.03 IdenixPh 6.01 -.08
FSI Int 6.18 +.01 Illumina 41.64 -.03
FXEner 7.95 +.20 ImunoGn 13.84 +.09
Facebookn 19.41 -.03 ImpaxLabs 23.88 +.05
Fastenal 44.71 +.95 inContact 5.67 -.05
FedMogul 9.49 +.16 Incyte 20.04 +.14
FiestaRn 15.89 -.27 Infinera 5.72 +.07
FifthStRn 10.43 +.05 InfinityPh 17.48 -.30
FifthThird 14.81 +.18 Informat 31.04 +.06
FindEngin 20.68 +.15 Infosys 43.64 +.03
Fndlnst 17.36 -.01 InnerWkgs 13.03 +.20
Finisar 15.53 -.04 Insulet 21.18 +.67
FinLine 22.66 +.28 In1gDv 5.31 +.10
FstCashFn 44.47 +1.12 Intel 24.91 -.13
FMidBc 11.85 +.17 InterDig 33.49 +1.21
FstNiagara 7.99 -.03 Intrface 13.90 +.35
FstSolar 24.77 +.16 InterMune 7.95
FstMerit 15.73 -.05 InfiSpdw 25.40 -.34
Fiserv 70.87 +.40 Intersil 9.20 +.01
FiveBelw n 30.90 +.68 Intuit 58.43 +.24
Flextrn 6.67 -.01 InvRIEst 8.29
FocusMda 24.88 -.10 IridiumCm 7.44 -.18
ForcePro 5.55 ... IronwdPh 12.50 +.35
Forfnet 25.61 -.08 Isis 13.62 -.06
Fossil Inc 87.84 +1.06
FosterWhl 21.00 -.10
Francesca 34.69 -.09 j2Global 28.13 -.10
FredsInc 13.42 -.22 JA Solar 1.01 -.04
FreshMkt 61.56 +1.05 JDS Uniph 11.68 +.06
FronterCm 4.63 +.08 JackHenry 37.03 +.04
FuelCell 1.00 +.00 JacklnBox 25.48 -.27
FultonFncl 9.55 +.02 Jamba 2.31 -.01
e; JamesRiv 2.83 -.13
JazzPhrm 46.50 +.36
GSVCap 8.77 +.30 JetBlue 5.07 -.01
GTAdvTc 6.34 -.02 JiveSoftn 15.40 -.04
GalenaBio 1.62 +.01 JosABank 40.73 -.54
Garmin 40.50 -.22 KLATnc 53.36 +.30
Gentex 18.01 -.11 Kayakn 28.79 -1.15
Genfivah 10.65 +.12 KeryxBio 2.03 -.07
GeoEye 26.60 +.16 KeyTrn 10.45 +.40
GeronCp 2.30 +.23 KirMlands 8.71 +.11
Gevo 3.65 KnightT 6.64 -.18
GileadSd 57.29 +1.24 Kraft 41.87 +.60
Globalstrh .30 -.01 Kulicke 11.43 +.21
GIbSpcMet 14.94 -.20 LKQCorp 38.31 -.66
GluMobile 5.21 -.09 LPL Find 28.52 +.42
GolLNGLtd 41.14 +2.37 LSI Indlf 6.41 +.02
Google 678.63 +1.83 LTX-Cred 5.92 +.01
GrCanyEd 20.74 -.28 LamResrch 34.62 +.07
GrayM rsh .35 LamarAdv 32.78 +.06
GreenMtC 25.63 +.41 Lattce 3.81 -.04
Greenlight 23.94 -.38 LeapWirlss 5.75 +.11
Grifols rs 20.27 +.03 LibGlobA 54.88 +.28
Grouponn 4.44 -.08 LibCapA 103.81 +.46
GulfportE 25.10 +.21 LibtylntA 18.18 +.18
H&EEq 18.15 +.12 LibVentAn 47.21 +2.21
HMN Fn 2.98 +.02 LifeTech 46.84 +.38
HMS Hdgs 33.92 -1.34 LimelghtN 2.49 -.04
HainCel 69.75 +1.98 LincElec 42.93 -.03
Halozyme 5.73 -.01 LinearTch 32.91 +.22
HancHId 30.43 +.17 LinnEngy 39.31 +.31
HansenMed 1.53 -.01 Lionbrdg 3.23 +.15
Harmonic 4.37 +.06 Liquidity 48.66 -1.15
Hasbro 37.49 +.20 LiveDeal 5.30 +.22
HawHold 6.23 +.05 LivePrsn 15.93 +.32
HIthCSvc 21.44 +.16 LodgeNet .37 -.01
Healthwys 10.40 +.22 Logitech 9.59 +.28
HelenTroy 30.97 +.24 LogMeln 21.13 +.18
HSchein 76.25 +.20 LookSmth .99 -.00
HercOffsh 4.26 +.01 Lulkin 52.34 +.30
Hibbett 55.46 -.40 lululemngs 63.87 -.49
Hologic 19.46 -.31 Luminex 19.22 -.20
HmLnSvcn 15.65 +.14
HomeownC 19.50 +.40
HorizPhm 4.04 +.01 MCGCap 4.48 +.11
HorsehdH 9.04 -.21 MERTele 3.12 -.18
HotTopic 9.42 -.20 MGE 50.13 -.10
HubGroup 30.39 -.22 MIPSTech 6.32 +.05
HudsCity 6.44 +.01 MKS Inst 26.78 +.07
HuntJB 54.38 -.16 MTS 49.42 -.38
HuntBncsh 6.55 +.01 MSG 41.41 +1.16
IAC Inter 51.50 +.20 MAKOSrg 14.61 -.25
IPG Photon 61.90 +.35 MannKd 2.39 -.06
iPass 1.86 -.01 MarvellT 10.45 +.03
iShACWI 45.80 +.17 Masimo 21.94 -.27
iShNsdqBio 136.00 +1.84 Mattel 35.65 +.28
IconixBr 18.38 -.07 Madmlnig 28.16 +.17


MaxwIlT 7.87 +.04 PacEthan h .36 +.03
MedAssets 17.00 +.71 PacSunwr 2.27 +.08
MedicAcIn 3.68 +.04 PaciraPhm 17.45 -.18
MediCo 24.34 -.14 PanASIv 17.27
Medivafon 95.85 +.66 PaneraBrd 154.06 +1.64
MelcoCrwn 11.90 -.06 ParamTch 21.17 -.40
Mellanox 114.25 +.85 Parexel 26.98 -.04
MEMSIC 1.65 +.10 ParkerVsn 2.07 -.09
MentorGr 16.34 +.10 PrtnrCm 4.15 +.12
MercadoL 80.50 ... Patterson 34.06 -.09
MergeHIth 3.28 -.02 PattUTI 15.66 +.09
Methanx 29.24 -.06 Paychex 33.19 +.21
Microchp 34.73 +.21 PnnNGm 38.54 +.26
MicronT 6.30 +.05 PennantPk 10.70 +.03
MicrosSys 51.59 +3.38 PensonWh .10 +.02
MicroSemi 19.64 -.08 PeopUtdF 12.07 +.07
Microsoft 30.56 +.31 PeregrinP 2.20 -.26
Misonix 3.23 +.19 PerfectWd 11.01 -.18
MitekSys 4.89 +.05 Perrigo 110.49 +1.87
Molex 27.14 +.22 PetSmart 70.99 +.44
Momenta 13.93 +.35 Pharmacyc 67.06 +2.15
MonPwSys 22.50 +.42 PhotoMdx 12.38 +.16
MonroMuf 34.85 -.32 PhotrIn 5.91 -.01
MonstrBvs 59.75 +.10 Plexus 30.58 -.06
Movers 7.90 +.16 PluristemT 4.08 -.08
MulimGm 15.40 -.13 Polyoim 9.98 -.03
Mylan 23.79 +.23 Pool Corp 38.14 +.12
MyriadG 24.84 -.12 Popularrs 15.59 +.12
NETgear 37.49 -.07 Power-One 6.10 -.01
NGPCap 6.79 +.19 PwShsQQQ 68.29 +.42
NIl HIdg 6.20 -.03 Pwrwvrsh .34 -.02
NPS Phm 7.91 +.29 Presstekh .49
NXP Semi 23.74 +.02 PriceTR 62.73 +1.08
Nanosphere 3.39 -.02 priceline 593.18 -.35
NasdOMX 22.77 -.10 PrimoWtr 1.17 +.06
NatCineM 13.89 +.19 PrivateB 15.75 -.01
NatPenn 8.87 +.06 PrUPQQQs 59.66 +1.04
Navarre 1.27 +.09 PrognicsPh 4.29 +.11
NektarTh 8.64 +.22 PUShQQQrs38.08 -.64
NeptuneTg 4.61 +.01 ProspctCap 11.58 +.12
NetlUEPS 9.88 +1.24 PureCycle 2.15 +.15
NetApp 34.78 +1.38 QIAGEN 17.63 +.08
NetEase 51.82 +1.03 QlikTech 21.79 -.20
Netflix 63.16 -.89 Qlogic 12.21 +.07
Neflist 1.58 -.12 Qualoim 62.43 +.39
NetSpend 9.05 +.06 QualityS s 17.59 +.20
NYMigTr 6.75 +.06 QuestSft 27.96 +.01
NewsCpA 23.31 ... Questoir 43.37 +.61
NewsCpB 23.48 +.01 QuickLog 2.30 +.21
NobltyHIf 4.79 +.37 RFMicD 3.76 -.04
Nordson 59.37 +.28 RITTech 3.66 +.36
NorTrst 46.47 +.29 Rambus 4.85
NwstBcsh 11.96 +.03 Randgold 100.71 +.18
Novavax 2.00 +.04 RealPage 26.06 +.52
NuVasive 21.04 +.13 Regenrn 145.09 +2.31
NuanceCm 23.89 -.04 RentACt 36.31 -.14
Nvidia 14.60 +.29 RschMotn 6.94 -.13
NxStageMd 12.51 -.11 Responsys 9.28 -.01
02Micro 3.56 +.01 RexEnergy 12.83 +.08
OCZTech 5.67 -.22 RiverbedT 20.52 +.29
OReillyAu 86.87 +.41 RofinSinar 21.91 -.07
ObagiMed 13.14 +.05 RosttaGrs 6.12 -.24
OceanRign 16.28 +.24 RosettaR 42.33 +.45
Oclaro 2.61 -.01 RossStrss 69.89 +.71
OdysMar 3.66 -.06 RoviCorp 14.80 -.10
OldDomFrt 45.68 -.15 RoyGId 84.52 +.08
OmniVisn 15.63 +.17 RubioinTc 8.99 -.05
OnAssign 16.29 +.32 rue21 26.88 -1.99
OnSmcnd 6.39 +.03
Onoothyr 4.82 +.45
OnyxPh 73.34 +1.67 SBACom 59.68 +.37
OpenTxt 53.55 -.50 SEI Inv 22.01 -.05
OpenTbleh 43.52 -.24 SLMCp 15.82 +.11
OpbmerPh 14.88 +.16 SS&CTech 22.87 +.03
Oracle 31.95 +.37 STEC 7.41 +.03
OraSure 10.94 +.22 SVB FnGp 56.63 -.22
Orexigen 4.37 +.40 SalixPhm 44.90 -.12
Orthfx 41.19 +.41 SanderFm 41.00 +.73
Otelco un 1.96 SanDisk 43.04 +.77
OtterTail 22.86 +.24 Sanmina 8.78 -.03
Overstk 8.52 +.08 Sanofirt 1.46 -.01
Santarus 6.25 -.03
Sapient 9.78 +.06
PDCEngy 26.28 +.20 Sareptars 10.78 +.70
PDLBio 7.30 -.03 SavientPh 1.22 +.13
PMC Sra 5.84 +.03 Schnitzer 29.83 +.21
PSSWrld 21.93 ... SdClone 5.02 +.25
Paccar 40.27 +.24 SdGames 6.72 -.11


SeagateT 34.06 +.37
SearsHIdgs 56.51 +2.09
SeattGen 26.88 +.11
SelCmfrt 28.23 -.30
Selectvlns 17.91 +.17
Semtech 25.01 +.25
Senomyx 1.83 +.09
Sequenom 3.69 +.08
SvcSource 8.64 +.04
SvArtsrsh .02
ShandaG s 3.33 -.05
ShoeCarns 22.57 -1.81
Shutterfly 30.65 -.85
SigmaAld 70.67 +.27
SilicGrln 8.55 -.19
Silicnlmg 5.02 +.07
SilcnLab 38.10 -.06
Slcnware 5.62 -.04
SilvStdg 14.86 -.13
Sina 56.21 +.12
Sindair 11.69 +.08
SiriusXM 2.54 +.04
SironaDent 53.46 -.13
Skullcandy 14.65 -.23
SkyWest 8.47 -.09
SkywksSol 29.64 -.15
SmartBal 12.15 +.21
SmithWes 8.05 +.39
SodaStrm 37.33 -.02
Sohu.cm 43.15 +1.31
SolarCap 23.01 +.28
SonicCorp 9.24 +.03
Sonus 1.86 +.06
SouMoBc 23.02 -.03
Sourcefire 52.11 +1.35
Spectranet 12.23 +.20
SpectPh 11.86 +.17
SpiritAir 19.20 -.16
Splunkn 30.86 -.07
Spreadtrm 19.61 -.05
Stamps.cm 21.50 +.34
Staples 10.85 -.13
StarSdent 4.11
Starbucks 48.70 +.80
SiDynam 12.41 +.08
StemCells 1.68 +.03
Stericyde 91.26 +1.02
SMadden 42.80 +.88
Stratasys 62.58 -4.94
SunHIth 8.49 +.02
SunesisPh 3.37 +.15
SunOpta 5.90 +.17
SunPower 4.93 -.09
SusqBnc 10.55 +.09
Susser 35.16 +.11
SwisherH If 1.58 -.01
Symantec 17.73 -.03
Symetricm 6.28 +.05
Synaorn 8.61 +.16
Synapfcs 30.35 -.16
SynrgyP rs 4.64 +.24
Synopsys 33.28 +.03
TICCCap 10.24 +.22
TPCGrp 39.59 -.08
TTMTCh 10.64 +.14
tw teleom 25.50 +.26
TakeTwo 10.14 -.14
Tangoe 19.85 -.02
TASER 5.29 -.10
TechData 49.10 +.07
TICmSys 1.60 -.01
Tellabs 3.30
TescoCp 10.10 -.12
TeslaMot 29.50 -1.23
TesseraTch 14.48 +.26
TetraTc 25.95 +.23
TxCapBsh 43.76 +.19
Texlnst 29.56 +.24
TexRdhse 17.11 -.05
Theravnce 27.91 +.50
Thoratec 32.16 -.04
ThrshdPhm 7.98 +.55
TibcoSft 29.43 -.05
TileShop 12.25 -.70
TitanMach 23.77 -.44
TiVo Inc 9.18 -.04
Tornier 17.93 +.30
Towerstm 3.98 +.11


TractSupp 96.15 +.16
TrimbleN 46.61 -.50
TripAdvn 34.05 +.51
TriQuint 5.62 -.08
TrueRelig 22.68 +.15
TrstNY 5.59 +.02
Trustmk 23.80 +.06
21Vianet 9.57 +.52
Ubiquii n 10.57 +1.58
UltaSalon 92.96 +.75
Ultrapetrol .83 +.07
Umpqua 12.54 +.06
Unilife 2.87 -.08
UtdCmBks 7.62 +.25
UtdNtrIF 54.95 -.32
UtdOnln 4.98
US Enr 2.20 +.06
UtdTherap 55.33 +.11
UnivDisp 42.73 +.86
UnivFor 36.77 -.16
UranmRs h .50
UrbanOut 36.94 +.11


VCAAnt 18.84 +.11
VOXXInD 7.27 -.11
ValueClick 16.40 +.61
VanSTCpB 79.99 +.02
VanlntCpB 86.81 -.07
Veeomlnst 33.02 -.18
Veli 6.99 +.28
VBradley 24.51 -.34
Verisign 47.50 -.04
Verisk 48.58 +.23
VertxPh 53.56 -.31
ViaSat 38.66 +.14
ViacomB 50.61 +.44
Vical 3.55 +.02
VirgnMdah 27.01 -.12
ViroPhrm 26.85 +.35
VisChinah .24 +.01
VistaPrt 38.02 -.33
Vivus 21.67 +.45
Vodafbne 29.27 +.09
WarnerCh 17.45 +.30
WashFed 16.15 +.10
WaveSysh 1.01 -.03
Web.com 15.95 +.06
WebMD 15.05 +.09
WendysCo 4.37 +.11
WernerEnt 22.63 -.15
WDigital 43.63 +.15
WestgS rsh .21 -.01
Westmrld 7.88 +.04
Wstptlnn g 34.60 -1.30
WetSeal 2.81 -.06
WholeFd 97.03 +1.95
WillsLpfA 11.10 -.06
WilshBcp 6.26 +.09
Windstrm 9.73 +.20
WisdomTr 6.54 -.12
WrightM 20.18 +.42
Wynn 105.33 +.18
XOMA 3.19 +.11
Xilinx 33.90 +.36
Xyratex 12.18 +.02
YRCrs 5.63 -.12
Yahoo 14.92 +.06
Yandex 20.94 -.05
Yongye 4.37 +.18
Zagg 7.00 -.14
Zalicus 1.26 +.03
ZebraT 36.99 -.14
Zllow 37.89 -.10
ZonBcp 19.14 +.14
Zopharm 5.01 +.02
Zpcar 7.63 -.17
Zumiez 31.51 -1.93
Zyngan 3.27 +.02


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.






Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.6270 4.6160
Australia .9606 .9574
Bahrain .3770 .3758
Brazil 2.0244 2.0244
Britain 1.5810 1.5864
Canada .9912 .9935
Chile 481.95 481.25
China 6.3557 6.3569
Colombia 1810.50 1812.50
Czech Rep 19.88 19.81
Denmark 5.9500 5.9280
Dominican Rep 39.09 39.13
Egypt 6.0887 6.0889
Euro .7988 .7958
Hong Kong 7.7567 7.7560
Hungary 222.03 220.85
India 55.495 55.260
Indnsia 9505.00 9495.00
Israel 4.0232 4.0145
Japan 78.70 78.47
Jordan .7085 .7085
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1000 3.0945
Mexico 13.1886 13.1618
N. Zealand 1.2325 1.2292
Norway 5.8264 5.8286
Peru 2.616 2.615
Poland 3.27 3.26
Russia 31.8155 31.7046
Singapore 1.2501 1.2472
So. Africa 8.3896 8.3088
So. Korea 1134.98 1130.70
Sweden 6.5994 6.6041
Switzerlnd .9592 .9559
Taiwan 29.96 29.94
Thailand 31.18 31.16
Turkey 1.7978 1.7935
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6726
Uruguay 21.3999 21.3999
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.10 0.09
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 0.71 0.80
10-year 1.69 1.81
30-year 2.80 2.93



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Oct 12 96.15 -.12
Corn CBOT Dec 12 8081/2 -614
Wheat CBOT Dec 12 8881/2 -614
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 173112 +161/2
Cattle CME Oct 12 124.45 -.47
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 19.58 -.01
Orange Juice ICE Nov12 117.95 -1.10



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1669.80 $1616.30
Silver (troy oz., spot) $30.60b6 2/.995
Copper (pound) $3.4880 $3.422O
Platinum (troy oz., spot)t$1bb4.40 $14/3.10

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... ... ... 5.62 -.05 -32.0 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 88.92 +.67 -11.4
AT&T Inc 1.76 4.8 49 36.95 +.39 +22.2 Microsoft .80 2.6 15 30.56 +.31 +17.7
Ametek s .24 .7 20 34.46 +.20 +22.8 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.2 23 47.63 +.05 +2.9
ABInBev 1.57 1.9 ... 82.24 +1.30 +34.8 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 67.84 +.43 +11.4
BkofAm .04 .5 9 8.16 +.01 +46.8 Penney ... ... 24.75 +.25 -29.6
CapCtyBk ...... 7.91 +.14 -17.2 PiedmOfc .80 4.7 12 16.95 +.07 -.5
CntryLink 2.90 6.9 46 42.26 +.59 +13.6 RegionsFn .04 .6 17 7.18 +.17 +67.0
Citigroup .04 .1 8 29.83 +.25 +13.4 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 56.51 +2.09 +77.8
CmwREIT 2.00 13.3 20 15.00 ... -9.9 Smucker 2.08 2.5 21 84.40 +.50 +8.0
Disney .60 1.2 16 49.56 +.39 +32.2 SprintNex ... ....... 4.89 +.11+109.0
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 17 65.47 +.23 ... Texlnst .68 2.3 21 29.56 +.24 +1.5
EnterPT 3.00 6.7 20 44.83 -.18 +2.6 TimeWarn 1.04 2.5 16 42.09 +.29 +16.5
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.6 11 88.05 +.74 +3.9 UniFirst .15 .2 14 65.20 +.21 +14.9
FordM .20 2.1 8 9.49 +.04-11.8 VerizonCm 2.00 4.6 43 43.17 +.92 +7.6
GenElec .68 3.3 17 20.80 +.16 +16.1 Vodafone 1.99 6.8 ... 29.27 +.09 +4.4
HomeDp 1.16 2.0 20 56.96 +.41 +35.5 WalMart 1.59 2.2 15 72.11 +.55 +20.7
Intel .90 3.6 11 24.91 -.13 +2.7 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 12 35.65 -.01 +7.8
IBM 3.40 1.7 14197.77 +2.07 +7.6 YRC rs ... ... 5.63 -.12 -43.5
Lowes .64 2.3 18 27.73 +.37 +9.3


A6 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 A7


I MUTUiijAL DS I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.91 +.04
Retlnc 8.95
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 6.89 +.01
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 16.98 +.06
GlbThGrA p61.47 +.04
SmCpGrA 38.81 +.05
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 30.10 +.11
AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 52.72 +.03
GrowthBt 27.37 +.16
SCpGrBt 30.95 +.05
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 31.12 +.05
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 12.60 +.04
SmCpVi 30.48 +.05
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 26.77 +.21
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 21.19 +.11
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 20.08 +.11
Ameri Century 1 st:
Growth 28.28 +.21
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 24.21 +.14
EqlncAp 7.88 +.03
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 30.92 +.23
Balanced 17.41 +.06
DivBnd 11.24 -.01
Eqlnc 7.89 +.04
Growthl 28.01 +.20
Heritagel 22.55 +.16
IncGro 27.27 +.15
InfAdjBd 13.25 -.01
IntDisc 9.42
InfiGrol 10.53
New Opp 7.95 +.03
OneChAg 12.96 +.04
OneChMd 12.47 +.03
RealEstl 23.42 +.11
Ultra 26.13 +.17
Valuelnv 6.21 +.03
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 20.98 +.08
AMuiAp 28.27 +.14
BalAp 19.97 +.09
BondAp 12.88 -.01
CaplBAp 52.71 +.19
CapWGAp 35.40 +.14
CapWAp 21.29 -.03
EupacA p 38.59 +.03
FdlnvAp 39.38 +.21
GIblBalA 26.10 +.05
GovtAp 14.57 -.01
GwthAp 32.92 +.17
HITrAp 11.08
IncoAp 17.83 +.07
IntBdAp 13.75 -.01
InfiGrlncAp 29.17 +.03
ICAAp 30.43 +.18
LtTEBAp 16.33 +.01
NEcoAp 27.58 +.07
N PerAp 29.69 +.11
NwWrldA 50.72 +.02
STBFAp 10.09
SmCpAp 37.71 +.04
TxExAp 13.06 +.01
WshAp 31.05 +.21
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 42.93 +.15
Ariel 46.98 +.09
Artisan Funds:
Infl 22.91 +.01
Inblnsfi 23.07 +.02
InfiVal r 28.01 +.05
MidCap 38.30 +.22
MidCapVal 20.87 +.09
SCapVal 15.17 +.01
Baron Funds:
Asset 50.50 +.26
Growth 56.34
SmallCap 25.51 +.11
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 14.15 -.01
DivMu 14.86 +.01
TxMgdlni 13.11 -.02
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.69 +.11
GIAIAr 19.23 +.03
HiYlnvA 7.86
InfiOpAp 30.35 +.06
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 17.90 +.04
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 19.74 +.12
GIbAllocr 19.32 +.03
HiYldBd 7.86
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlYn 6.23
BruceFund 398.71 +.48
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 28.48 +.01
CGM Funds:
Focus n 26.33 +.23
Mutin 26.36 +.14
Realty n 29.63 +.09
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 51.25 +.30
Calvert Invest:
Incop 16.38 -.01
InfiEqAp 13.22 +.02
SocialAp 30.57 +.11
SocBdp 16.41 -.01
SocEqAp 37.50 +.29
TxFLgp 16.44 +.03
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 68.96 +.26
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 29.30 +.08
DivEqlnc 10.38 +.06
DivOpptyA 8.70 +.05
LgCapGrA t26.63 +.19
LgCorQAp 6.54 +.05
MdCpGrOp 10.12 +.06
MidCVOp p 7.99 +.05
PBModAp 11.12 +.02
TxEAp 14.23 +.01
SelComm A 45.29 +.21
FrontierA 10.80 +.04
GlobTech 21.39 +.09
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOp I n 8.08 +.01
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 30.39 +.08
AcornlntZ 38.37 +.02
DivlncoZ 14.90 +.12
IntBdZ 9.53 -.01
IntTEBd 10.99 +.01
LgCapGr 13.40 +.10
ValRestr 48.75 +.28
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.38 -.03
DFA Funds:
InfiCorEqn 9.77 -.01
USCorEql n12.01 +.07
USCorEq2nll.80 +.07
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 19.21 +.11
DWS Invest S:
CoreEqtyS 17.65 +.10
CorPlslncx 11.10 -.03
EmMkGrr 15.52 -.03
EnhEmMk 10.94
EnhGlbBdrx10.19 -.03
GIbSmCGr 37.02 -.01
GlblThem 21.91 -.01
Gold&Prc 14.16 +.02
HiYldTx 12.98 +.02
IntTxAMT 12.14 +.01
Inf FdS 40.57 +.05
LgCpFoGr 33.53 +.27
LatAmrEq 39.41 -.08
MgdMuniS 9.49 +.01
MATFS 15.21 +.02
SP500S 18.84 +.12
WorldDiv 23.54 +.06
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 35.60 +.16
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 33.87 +.14
Davis Funds C:
NYVenC 34.20 +.15
Davis Funds Y:
NYVenY 36.02 +.16
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Incp 9.41 ...
SMIDCapG 24.63 +.06
TxUSAp 12.24 +.02
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 34.44 +.12
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqnl8.55 +.02
EmMktV 27.60 -.01
IntSmVan 14.52 -.03
LargeCo 11.17 +.08
TAUSCorE21 9.60 +.06
USLgVan 21.63 +.13
US Micron 14.50 +.05
USTgdVal 16.84 +.07
US Small n 22.61 +.07
USSmVa 25.87 +.05
IntlSmCon 14.70 -.01
EmMktSC n 19.59 +.06
EmgMktn 25.46
Fixdn 10.35
IntGFxlnn 13.13 -.01
IntVan 15.22 -.01
Glb5Fxlncnll.28 ...
2YGIFxdn 10.13
DFARIEn 26.66 +.12


Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 75.53 +.32
Income 13.81 -.01
IntStk 31.74 -.11
Stock 116.75 +.67
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdIn 11.37
TRBdNpn 11.36 -.01
Dreyfus:
Aprec 44.68 +.22
CTA 12.38 +.01
CorVA
Dreyf 9.69 +.07
DryMid r 28.74 +.09
GNMA 16.17 -.01
GrChinaA r 30.25 -.35
HiYIdAp 6.49 -.01
StratValA 29.28 +.20
TechGroA 34.64 +.14
DreihsAclnc 10.42
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 27.42 -.16
EVPTxMEmI 45.24 +.01
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 16.10 +.06


Name NAV Chg
AMTFMuInc 10.39 +.02
MuIlCGrA 8.66 +.04
InBosA 5.88
LgCpVal 19.16 +.12
NatlMunInc 10.11 +.02
SpEqtA 16.07 +.06
TradGvA 7.41
Eaton Vance B:
HIthSBt 10.44 +.09
NatlMulnc 10.10 +.01
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.40
NatMunlnc 10.11 +.02
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 9.03
GblMacAbR 9.86 +.01
LgCapVal 19.22 +.13
FBR Funds:
Focuslnvtn49.16 +.20
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 17.17 +.12
FPA Funds:
Newlnco 10.66
FPACres 28.38 +.06
Fairholme 30.42 +.38
Federated A:
MidGrStA 34.83 +.17
MuSecA 10.69 +.01
Federated InstI:
KaufmnR 5.27 +.03
TotRetBd 11.54 -.01
StrValDvIS 5.12 +.04
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 35.73 +.22
HItCarT 24.15 +.26
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 22.51 +.12
StrInA 12.59 -.01
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 21.24 +.11
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrl n 66.28 +.29
EqlnI n 25.88 +.11
IntBdln 11.67
Nwlnsgtln 22.82 +.12
StrInI n 12.74 -.01
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 16.43 +.05
DivGrTp 13.00 +.05
EqGrTp 61.87 +.26
EqInT 25.47 +.11
GrOppT 41.82 +.28
HilnAdTp 10.15
IntBdT 11.64 -.01
MulncTp 13.70 +.01
OvrseaT 16.76 -.04
STFiT 9.33
StkSelAIICp 19.99 +.10
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 14.11 +.02
FF2010K 12.93 +.02
FF2015n 11.80 +.02
FF2015K 12.99 +.01
FF2020n 14.27 +.02
FF2020K 13.40 +.02
FF2025n 11.87 +.02
FF2025K 13.53 +.02
FF2030n 14.14 +.03
FF2030K 13.67 +.02
FF2035n 11.70 +.03
FF2035K 13.75 +.03
FF2040n 8.16 +.02
FF2040K 13.79 +.04
FF2045K 13.93 +.03
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.80 +.07
AMgr50n 16.15 +.02
AMgr70rn 17.04 +.04
AMgr20rn 13.27
Balancn 19.94 +.07
BalancedK 19.94 +.07
BlueChGr n 49.43 +.31
BluChpGrK 49.52 +.32
CAMunn 12.86 +.01
Canada n 52.77 +.23
CapApn 29.19 +.14
CapDevOn 11.72 +.07
Cplncrn 9.26
ChinaRg r 26.62 -.03
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 12.08 +.01
Contra n 77.28 +.43
ContraK 77.28 +.42
CnvSc n 24.30 +.08
DisEqn 24.25 +.15
DiscEqF 24.24 +.14
DivlntIn 28.17 -.01
DivrslntKr 28.15 -.01
DivStkOn 16.94 +.06
DivGthn 29.59 +.12
EmergAs r n27.26 -.10
EmrMkn 21.39 -.05
Eqlncn 46.08 +.20
EQIIn 19.36 +.12
ECapAp 17.25 -.04
Europe 28.66 -.07
Exch 323.88
Exportn 23.49 +.16
Fidel n 35.37 +.22
Fifty rn 19.48 +.16
FItRateHi r n 9.88
FrlnOnen 28.71 +.09
GNMAn 11.96 -.01
Govtlnc 10.90 -.01
GroCo n 96.61 +.68
Grolncn 20.72 +.10
GrowCoF 96.62 +.69
GrowthCoK 96.60 +.68
GrStratrn 20.08 +.08
Highlncr n 9.18
Indepnn 24.74 +.15
InProBdn 13.35 -.01
IntBdsn 11.08 -.01
IntGovn 11.05 -.01
InPMu n 10.63 +.01
InfiDiscn 30.64 -.09
InfiSCprn 18.94 -.08
InvGrBdn 11.99
InvGBn 7.94 -.01
Japan r 9.61 +.01
JpnSm n 9.02 +.07
LgCapVal 11.09 +.06
LatAm 48.83 +.01
LevCoStkn 29.35 +.12
LowP r n 40.26 +.07
LowPriKr 40.26 +.07
Magelln n 72.44 +.44
MagellanK 72.39 +.44
MDMurn 11.65 +.01
MAMunn 12.71 +.02
MegaCpStk n11.61 +.06
MIMunn 12.51 +.01
MidCapn 29.31 +.14
MNMunn 12.01 +.01
MtgSecn 11.35
Munilncn 13.49 +.01
NJMunrn 12.29
NwMktr n 17.37
NwMilln 32.21 +.19
NYMunn 13.66 +.02
OTCn 61.21 +.41
OhMunn 12.34 +.01
1l00ndex 10.17 +.07
Ovrsean 30.13 -.05
PcBasn 23.47 -.10
PAMunrn 11.43 +.01
Puritnn 19.50 +.08
PuritanK 19.49 +.07
RealEn 32.07 +.15
SAIISecEqF 12.81 +.07
SCmdtyStrt n 9.22 -.04
SCmdtyStrF n9.25 -.04
SrEmrgMkt 15.64 -.05
SrslntGrw 11.32 +.02
SerlnfiGrF 11.35 +.01
SrslntVal 8.83 -.01
SerlnfiValF 8.85 -.01
SrlnvGrdF 11.99 -.01
StIntMu n 10.87
STBFn 8.57 -.01
SmCapDiscn22.11 +.13
SmllCpSrn 17.54 +.03
SCpValu r 15.36 +.09
SllSelLCVrnll.48 +.06
SllSlcACap n27.76 +.14
SllSelSmCp 19.51 +.03
Sfratlncn 11.27 -.01
SfrReRtr 9.70 -.01
TaxFrBrn 11.64 +.01
TotalBdn 11.24
Trend n 77.76 +.47
USBIn 11.98
Utilityn 18.67 +.14
ValStratn 29.50 +.22
Value n 72.09 +.30
Wrldwn 19.28 +.05
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 37.28 +.04
Bankingn 19.16 +.10
Biotchn 107.96 +1.47
Brokrn 46.00 +.13
Chemn 113.03 +.07
CoinEquip n22.16 +.03
Comp n 64.75 +.37
ConDisn 26.95 +.16
ConsuFnn 13.78 +.10
ConStapn 80.53 +.43
CstHo n 44.08 +.30
DfAer n 82.30 +.43
Eleck n 47.52 +.21
Enrgyn 51.06 +.31
EngSv n 68.30 +.09
EnvAltEnrnl6.01 +.04
FinSv n 57.97 +.22
Goldrn 38.62 +.01
Healilin 138.60 +1.50
Insurn 50.14 +.27
Leisrn 100.49 +.44


Material n 68.50 +.03
MedDI n 59.64 +.22
MdEqSysn 27.51 +.19
MulTdn 53.67 +.35
NtGasn 31.31 +.17
Pharmn 15.10 +.13
Retail n 62.19 +51
Softwr n 86.30 +.36
Techn 103.28 +.26
Telcm n 50.52 +.51
Transn 51.45 -.03
UtilGr n 56.60 +.25
Wireless n 7.98 +.04
Fidelity Spartan:
5001dxlnvn 50.15 +.33
5001dxl 50.16 +.33
IntlnxInvn 32.17 -.07
TotMktlnv n 40.84 +.24
USBond I 11.97 -.01
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn39.18 +.14
5001dxAdvn50.15 +.32
IntAdrn 32.19 -.06
TotMktAd r n40.85 +.25


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 11.97 -.01
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.83 -.02
OverseasA 21.91 -.08
First Investors A
BlChpAp
GloblAp 6.61 +.01
GovtAp 11.52 -.01
GrolnAp 16.36 +.10
IncoAp 2.58
MATFAp 12.48 +.01
MITFAp 12.84 +.01
NJTFAp 13.78 +.02
NYTFAp 15.24 +.01
OppAp 28.90 +.12
PATFAp 13.73 +.01
SpSitAp 24.20 +.10
TxExAp 10.26 +.01
TotRtAp 16.61 +.05
ValueBp 7.57 +.04
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.26 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.89
ALTFAp 11.91 +.01
AZTFAp 11.46 +.01
CallnsAp 12.91 +.01
CAIntAp 12.14 +.01
CalTFAp 7.50 +.01
COTFAp 12.44 +.01
CTTFAp 11.49 +.01
CvtScAp 14.86 +.06
Dbl TFA 12.34 +.01
DynTchA 33.04 +.17
EqlncAp 17.93 +.09
Fedlntp 12.51
FedTFAp 12.70 +.02
FLTFAp 11.99 +.01
FoundAlp 10.76 +.02
GATFAp 12.73 +.01
GoldPrMA 31.79 -.03
GrwthAp 49.35 +.19
HYTFA p 10.87
HilncA 2.04
IncomAp 2.20
InsTFAp 12.57 +.01
NYITF p 11.86 +.02
LATFAp 12.03 +.01
LMGvScA 10.33 -.01
MDTFAp 12.03 +.01
MATFAp 12.16 +.01
MITFAp 12.34 +.01
MNInsA 12.94 +.01
MOTFAp 12.75 +.01
NJTFAp 12.64 +.01
NYTFAp 12.15 +.01
NCTFAp 12.95 +.01
OhiolAp 13.10 +.02
ORTFAp 12.59 +.01
PATFAp 10.93 +.01
ReEScAp 16.91 +.10
RisDvAp 37.04 +.16
SMCpGrA 36.29 +.18
Stratlnc p 10.58
TtlRtnAp 10.43
USGovA p 6.90
USIsAp 14.01 +.07
VATFAp 12.25 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdvn 13.15
IncmeAd 2.19 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.22
USGvCt 6.85 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.07 +.08
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 22.04 -.11
ForgnAp 6.27 -.04
GIBdAp 13.19
GrwthAp 18.07 -.02
WorldAp 15.13 -.02
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.43 -.11
ForgnCp 6.12 -.04
GIBdCp 13.21 -.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.61 +.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 12.04
US Eqty 44.22 +.29
GMOTrust IIll:
CHIE 22.34 +.07
Quality 23.56 +.13
GMOTrust IV:
IntflntrV 19.54 -.01
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.94 +.01
Quality 23.57 +.13
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 52.06 +.24
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.43 +.19
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.51 +.14
HiYield 7.25
HYMuni n 9.27
MidCapV 37.77 +.19
ShtDrTF n 10.66
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.85 -.01
CapAplnst 42.04 +.30
Infllnvt 57.12 +.02
Infl r 57.76 +.02
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 31.75 +.13
DivGltAp 20.63 +.13
IntOpAp 14.05 +.04
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 31.80 +.13
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 41.22 +.18
Div&Gr 21.36 +.14
Balanced 21.07 +.09
MidCap 27.31 +.14
TotRetBd 11.76 -.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SrTotRetr 12.43 -.01
StrGrowhi 11.04 -.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.93 +.06
HItcareS 17.10 +.17
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.98
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.90
Wldwide I r 15.92
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.18 +.09
Invesco Funds:
Energy 37.63 +.15
Ufliies 17.63 +.08
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.89 +.02
Chart p 17.66 +.08
CmstkA 16.98 +.09
Constcp 23.79 +.13
DivrsDivp 13.19 +.09
EqlncA 9.05 +.04
GrIncAp 20.51 +.12
HilncMu p
HiYldep 4.30
HYMuA 10.04 +.01
InfiGrow 27.57 +.02
MunilnA 13.88 +.01
PATFA 17.03 +.01
USMortgA 13.08 -.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.86 +.02
USMortg 13.01 -.01
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 12.97 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 23.96 -.09
AssetStA p 24.78 -.08
AssetSbi r 25.02 -.09
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.09
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.14 -.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 27.21 +.16
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond n 12.09 -.01
ShtDurBd 11.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.25 +.07
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.08 -.01
HighYld n 8.04
lntmTFBd n 11.38 +.01
LgCpGr 24.22 +.16
ShtDurBdn 11.01
USLCCrPIsn22.69 +.13
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.73 +.09
ContrarnT 13.75 +.03
EnterprT 64.40 +.17
FIxBndT 10.94
GlLifeSciTr 29.62 +.23
GIbSel T 9.13 -.01
GITechTr 18.33 +.02
Grw&lncT 33.77 +.16
JanusT 31.51 +.18
OvrseasTr 30.55 -.16
PrkMCVal T21.61 +.10
ResearchT 31.60 +.16
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 61.73 +.22
VentureT 59.25 -.09
WrldWTr 43.29 -.03
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.16
RgBkA 14.30 +.06


StilnAp 6.64
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.64
John Hancock Cl1:
LSAggr 12.45 +.05
LSBalanc 13.29 +.04
LSConsrv 13.36 +.01
LSGrwth 13.16 +.05
LSModer 13.17 +.02
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.77 -.14
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.18 -.14


Name NAV Chg
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 128.00 +.60
CBApprp 15.75 +.09
CBLCGrp 23.76 +.14
GCIAIICOp 8.31 -.01
WAHilncAt 6.07
WAMgMup 17.09 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.59 +.13
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 28.63 +.16
CMValTrp 41.01 +.24
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.95 +.19
SmCap 29.18 +.19
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.72 -.01
StrlncC 15.06
LSBondR 14.66 -.01
StrlncA 14.98 +.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.52 -.01
InvGrBdY 12.53 -.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.61 +.07
FundlEq 12.97 +.10
BdDebAp 7.97 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.62
MidCpAp 17.00 +.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.65
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.61 -.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.39 +.14
MIGA 17.47 +.08
EmGA 47.52 +.25
HilnA 3.52
MFLA
TotRA 14.99 +.05
UtilA 18.01 +.07
ValueA 24.99 +.16
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.65 +.06
GvScBn 10.52 -.01
HilnBn 3.53
MulnBn 8.96 +.01
TotRBn 14.99 +.05
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.11 +.16
MFS Funds InstI:
InfiEqn 17.62 -.01
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.05
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.02 +.06
GovtBt 9.01
HYIdBBt 6.02 +.01
IncmBldr 17.47 +.06
InfiEqB 10.41 -.01
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.13 +.20
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 80.97 +.30
Managers Funds:
Yackan p nl8.86 +.08
YacktFocn 20.31 +.09
Bond n 27.33 -.01
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.34 +.01
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.17 +.01
Indialnvr 15.89 -.03
PacTgrlnv 22.12 -.01
MergerFdn 15.94 +.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.01 -.03
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.88
TotRtBdl 10.87 -.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.60
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.42 +.09
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.72 +.03
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 13.63
MCapGrl 34.47 +.07
Muhlenkn 55.84 +.25
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.88 +.20
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 31.69 +.14
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.07 +.02
GblDiscA 29.72 +.06
GIbDiscZ 30.13 +.05
QuestZ 17.78 +.03
SharesZ 22.27 +.08
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.75 +.14
Geneslnst 48.74 +.13
Int r 16.58 -.07
LgCapV Inv 26.60 +.13
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.51 +.13
Nicholas Group:
HilncIn 9.81 +.01
Nicholasn 46.67 +.16
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.07 -.01
HiYFxlnc 7.36
SmCpldx 8.98 +.04
StkIdx 17.55 +.11
Technly 15.98 +.10
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.83 +.03
LtMBAp 11.24 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.34
HYMunBd 16.82 +.02
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.82 +.10
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 42.75 +.28
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.71 +.11
Global 21.65 +.01
Inftl r 18.36 -.13
Oakmark 48.17 +.31
Select 31.87 +.20
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.35
GlbSMdCap 14.44 -.01
LgCapStrat 9.61 -.01
RealRet 9.60
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.20
AMTFrNY 12.20 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.74
CapApAp 48.42 +.23
CaplncAp 9.16 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.83
DvMktAp 32.49 -.05
Discp 63.38 +.20
EquityA 9.45 +.04
GlobAp 59.16 +.04
GIbOppA 28.93 +.09
GblStrlncAx 4.26 -.01
Goldp 32.82 +.08
IntBdA p 6.46
LtdTmMu 15.08 +.01
MnStFdA 36.72 +.23
PAMuniAp 11.46
SenFltRtA 8.22 +.01
USGv p 9.82 -.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.17 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.21 +.01
CplncB t 8.97 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.83
EquityB 8.68 +.04
GblStrlncBx 4.28
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40 +.01
RoMuAp 16.96 +02
RcNtMuA 7.50 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 32.17 -.05
InfiBdY 6.45 -.01
IntGrowY 28.25 -.08
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.64 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.86
TotRtAd 11.44 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.99 .03
AIIAsset 12.45 -.02
ComodRR 6.95 -.04
Divlnc 12.06
EmgMkCur 10.30 -.02
EmMkBd 12.15
Fltlnc r 8.74
ForBdUnr 11.24 -.02
FrgnBd 11.11 +.01
HiYId 9.43
InvGrCp 11.10
LowDu 10.56 -.01
ModDur 11.05 -.01
RealRtnIl 12.40 -.01
ShortT 9.86
TotRt 11.44 -.01
TRII 11.03
TRIll 10.08 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.91 -.03
LwDurA 10.56 -.01
RealRtAp 12.40 -.01
TotRtA 11.44 -.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.78 -.03
RealRtCp 12.40 -.01
TotRtCt 11.44 -.01
PIMCO Funds D:


RealRtnp 12.40 -.01
TRtnp 11.44 -.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.97 -.03
TotRtnP 11.44 -.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 29.24 +.16
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.24 +.01
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.85
InfiValA 17.68 -.01
PionFdAp 41.56 +.25


Name NAV Chg
ValueAp 11.90 +.08
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.17
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.28 +.01
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.10
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.60 +.06
BIChipn 45.01 +.28
CABondn 11.46 +.01
CapApp n 22.82 +.08
DivGron 25.88 +.15
EmMktBn 13.85
EmEurop 17.95 -.03
EmMktS n 30.90 -.02
Eqlncn 25.68 +.15
Eqlndexn 38.13 +.25
Europen 14.81 +.02
GNMAn 10.13 -.01
Growth n 37.30 +.20
Gr&lnn 22.14 +.10
HIthSci n 41.87 +.38
HiYield n 6.79
InsfiCpG 18.57 +.10
InstHiYId n 9.57
MCEqGrn 29.75 +.16
InfiBond n 9.95 -.03
IntDis n 42.63 -.07
Intl G&l 12.31 -.02
InfiStkn 13.48 +.01
Japan n 7.83 +.01
LatAm n 39.58 +.09
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.07 +.01
MidCapn 58.15 +.29
MCapValn 24.34 +.12
NAmern 35.03 +.15
NAsian 15.54
New Era n 42.55 +.09
NHorizn 35.61 +.13
N Incn 9.88 -.01
NYBondn 11.87 +.02
OverS SFn 8.03 +.01
PSIncn 16.94 +.03
RealAssetr nlO.88 +.01
RealEstn 21.20 +.08
R2010n 16.36 +.03
R2015n 12.71 +.03
R2020n 17.59 +.04
R2025n 12.87 +.03
R2030n 18.48 +.06
R2035n 13.06 +.04
R2040n 18.58 +.06
R2045n 12.37 +.04
SciTecn 27.38 +.07
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 35.44 +.11
SmCapVal n37.69 +.08
SpecGrn 18.98 +.07
Speclnn 12.84
TFIncn 10.53 +.01
TxFrHn 11.75 +.01
TxFrSIn 5.71
USTIntn 6.30 -.01
USTLgn 14.08 -.01
VABondn 12.28 +.01
Valuen 25.42 +.15
Principal Inv:
Divlnfillnst 9.61
LgCGI In 10.20 +.06
LT20201n 12.44 +.03
LT20301n 12.27 +.04
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.76 +.08
HiYldAp 5.58
MuHilncA 10.28 +.01
UtlityA 11.69 +.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.07 +.13
HiYIdBt 5.58
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 32.88 +.14
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.24
AZ TE 9.53 +.01
ConvSec 19.78 +.05
DvrlnAp 7.63
EqlnAp 16.54 +.09
EuEq 18.48
GeoBalA 13.05 +.04
GIbEqtyp 9.03 +.04
GrlnAp 14.10 +.08
GIbIHItA 45.18 +.24
HiYdAp 7.73
HiYId In 6.02
IncmAp 7.14
IntGrln p 9.00 -.01
InvAp 14.29 +.08
NJTxA p 9.85 +.01
MultCpGr 54.54 +.27
PATE 9.53 +.01
TxExA p 9.05 +.01
TFInAp 15.69 +.01
TFHYA 12.64
USGvAp 13.65 -.02
GIblUtilA 10.36 +.04
VoyAp 21.88 +.07
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.70
DvrlnBt 7.57 +.01
Eqlnct 16.38 +.08
EuEq 17.68
GeoBalB 12.90 +.04
GIbEqt 8.13 +.03
GINtRst 17.24 +.04
GrlnBt 13.84 +.08
GIbHIthB 35.99 +.19
HiYldBt 7.72
HYAdBt 5.90
IncmBt 7.08
IntGrln t 8.90 -.01
InfiGrth t 13.53
InvBt 12.83 +.07
NJTxB t 9.84 +.01
MultiCpGr 46.59 +.23
TxExB t 9.05 +.01
TFHYBt 12.66
USGvBt 13.58-.03
GlblUtilB 10.32 +.04
VoyBt 18.37 +.06
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.67 +.01
LgCAIphaA 42.82 +.29
Value 24.41 +.14
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.66 +.07
Royce Funds:

MicroCapl 14.80
PennMulr 11.50 +.01
Premierl r 19.37 +.02
TotRetl r 13.48 +.02
ValSvc t 11.23 +.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.37
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.84 +.09
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.00 -.14
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 19.87
1OOInvr 40.08 +.25
S&P Sel 22.27 +.15
SmCpSI 20.95 +.08
TSMSelr 25.65 +.15
Scout Funds:
Infl 30.63 -.01
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.21 +.19
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.40 +.21
Sequoia 159.85 +.93
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.44 +.30
SoSunSCInv tn21.06+.04
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 55.50 +.33
Stratton Funds:
MulI-Cap 36.20 +.21
RealEstate 30.87 +.14
SmCap 53.48 +.10
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.25 -.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn 9.13 ...
TotRetBdl 10.13 ...
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.99 -.01
Eqldxlnst 10.76 +.06
InflEqllnst 15.26
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.17 -.08
Third Avenue Fds:
InfiValnstr 15.51 -.06
REVallnstr 25.18 +.06
Valuelnst 47.24 +.01
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.74 -.06
IncBuildAt 18.65 +.01
IncBuildCp 18.65 +.01
IntValue I 26.32 -.07
LtTMul 14.65 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 4.96
Income 9.21
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.46
Flexlncp 9.23
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.44 +.17
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.46 +.05
US Global Investors:
AIIAmR 25.11 +15
ChinaReg 6.87 -.04
GIbRs 9.61 +.02


Gld&Mtls 11.88 -.01
WdPrcMn 11.72 +.02
USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.38 +.22
CABd 11.02 +.01
CrnstStr 22.62 +.02
GovSec 10.39 -.01
GrTxStr 14.56 +.06
Grwth 16.31 +.06
Gr&lnc 16.02 +.07
IncStk 13.54 +.08
Inco 13.43
Inf 23.86 +.05


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 12.48 +.01
PrecMM 28.11 +.05
SciTech 14.74 +.08
ShtTBnd 9.23
SmCpStk 14.52 +.03
TxElt 13.66 +.01
TxELT 13.85 +.01
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.62
WIdGr 20.16 +.06
VALIC:
MdCpldx 20.75 +.06
Stkldx 26.50 +.17
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.36 +.13
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.59 +.08
CAITAdmn 11.67 +.01
CALTAdmnn11.90 +.01
CpOpAdl n 75.97 +.51
EMAdmr r n 34.08 +.03
Energyn 112.74 +.53
EqlnAdm n n50.31 +.36
ExplAdml n 72.58 +.27
ExtdAdm n 43.99 +.15
500Adml n 130.51 +.86
GNMAAdn 11.07 -.01
GrwAdm n 36.71 +.22
HlthCr n 60.31 +.41
HiYldCp n 5.97
InfProAdn 28.94 -.03
ITBdAdml n 12.08 -.01
ITsryAdml n 11.77 -.01
IntGrAdmn 57.11 +.03
ITAdmlIn 14.33 +.01
ITGrAdmn 10.34 -.01
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmln 10.89
LTAdmln 11.74 +.01
MCpAdml n 98.78 +.48
MorgAdmn 61.86 +.40
MuHYAdmn1n1.20 +.01
NYLTAdn 11.76 +.01
PrmCaprn 71.24 +.45
PALTAdm nll.69 +.01
ReitAdm r rn 93.94 +.45
STsyAdml n 10.78 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.65
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.87 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.82
SmCAdm n 37.26 +.14
TxMCap r n 70.75 +.43
TfBAdmln 11.15 -.01
TStkAdmn 35.18 +.21
ValAdmlIn 22.45 +.14
WellslAdm n59.01 +.13
WelltnAdmrn n58.38 +.24
Windsorn 48.48 +.18
WdsrllAdn 51.04 +.28
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.90 +.01
CapOppn 32.88 +.22
Convrtn 12.84 +.01
DivApplnn 23.62 +.16
DivdGronn 16.70 +.11
Energy n 60.03 +.28
Eqlncn 24.00 +.17
Explr n 77.94 +.29
FLLTn 12.17 +.01
GNMAn 11.07 -.01
GlobEqn 17.71 +.07
Grolncn 30.06 +.20
GrthEqn 12.26 +.09
HYCorpn 5.97
HlthCren 142.91 +.98
InflaPron 14.73 -.02
InfiExplrn 13.85 -.04
IntlGrn 17.94 +.01
InfiVal n 28.73 -.03
ITIGraden 10.34 -.01
ITTsryn 11.77 -.01
LifeConn 17.15 +.03
LifeGro n 23.07 +.08
Lifelncn 14.69 +.01
LifeMod n 20.60 +.05
LTIGraden 10.89
LTTsryn 13.55 -.01
Morg n 19.94 +.13
MuHYn 11.20 +.01
Mulntn 14.33 +.01
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.74 +.01
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.33 +.01
NYLTn 11.76 +.01
OHLTTEn 12.66 +.01
PALTn 11.69 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 15.56 +.05
PrmcpCorn 14.88 +.11
Prmcp r n 68.63 +.43
SelValurn 20.38 +.12
STARn 20.31 +.05
STIGraden 10.82
STFedn 10.87 -.01
STTsryn 10.78 -.01
StratEqn 20.70 +.12
TgtRetlncn 12.14 +.01
TgRe2010n24.09 +.04
TgtRe20150nl3.31 +.03
TgRe2020 n23.61 +.06
TgtRe2025 nl3.43 +.04
TgRe2030 n23.03 +.07
TgtRe2035 nl3.85 +.05
TgtRe204On22.74 +.09
TgtRe2050 n22.64 +.09
TgtRe2045 nl4.28 +.06
USGron 20.75 +.10
USValuen 11.58 +.08
Wellsly n 24.36 +.06
Well n 33.80 +.14
Wndsrn 14.37 +.05
Wndslln 28.76 +.16
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPlrn95.21 +.06
ExtMktIn 108.58 +.37
MidCplstPl n107.63 +.52
TotlntAdm r rn3.60 +.03
Totlntllnst r n94.38 +.09
TotlntllP r n 94.40 +.08
TotlntSig r n 28.30 +.02
500n 130.49 +.86
Balancedn 23.58 +.08
EMktn 25.92 +.02
Europen 24.12 +.01
Extend n 43.95 +.15
Growth n 36.71 +.22
LgCaplxn 26.06 +.16
LTBnd n 14.54 -.01
MidCapn 21.75 +.10
Pacific n 9.76
REITr n 22.01 +.10
SmCapn 37.21 +.14
SmlCpGth n24.07 +.09
STBndn 10.65
TotBndn 11.15 -.01
Totllntl n 14.10 +.01
TotStkn 35.16 +.21
Value n 22.45 +.15
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.59 +.08
DevMklnstn 9.14 +.01
Extlnn 43.99 +.15
FTAIIWIdl r n84.04 +.08
Grwthlstn 36.71 +.22
InfProlnstn 11.79 -.01
Instldxn 129.67 +.85
InsPIn 129.68 +.85
lnstTStldxn 31.84 +.20
lnsTStPlusrn31.84 +.19
MidCplstn 21.82 +.10
REITInstrn 14.54 +.07
STBondldxnlO.65
STIGrlnstn 10.82
SCInstn 37.26 +.14
TBIstn 11.15 .01
TSInstn 35.18 +.21
Valuelstn 22.45 +.14
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 107.80 +.70
GroSig n 34.00 +.21
ITBdSig n 12.08 -.01
MidCpldxn 31.17 +.15
STBdldxn 10.65
SmCpSign 33.57 +.13
TotBdSgIn 11.15 -.01
TotStkSgl n 33.95 +.20
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.89
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.61 -.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.37 -.03
CorelnvA 6.57 +.06
DivOppAp 15.39 +.10
DivOppCt 15.21 +.10
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.71 -.14
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.24 +.02
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 20.92 +.06
Opptylnv 39.02 +.15
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.79 +.24
Wells Fargo Instl:
UltSTMuA 4.83
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.57 -.01
CorePlus I 11.58
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.22 +06


Word from Bernanke





turns stocks around


Associated Press


NEW YORK The stock
market keeps getting tossed
around by the Fed.
Stocks opened lower Fri-
day but reversed course
after a letter surfaced from
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke suggesting
there was room for the cen-
tral bank to do more to help
the economy
"There is scope for fur-
ther action by the Federal
Reserve to ease financial
conditions and strengthen
the recovery," Bernanke
wrote to California Rep.
Darrell Issa, a Republican,
in a letter obtained by The
Wall Street Journal.
The Dow Jones industrial
average was down 30 points
at its low but finished 100.51
points higher, at 13,157.97,
its first gain all week. It was
still the first losing week for
the Dow since early July
The Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 9.05 to
1,411.13 but also snapped a
six-week winning streak.
The Nasdaq composite
index rose 16.39 to 3,069.79,
ending five straight weeks of
gains.
In a typically slow August,
without much else to influ-
ence trading, investors have
grasped for hints about
what the Fed might do.
On Wednesday afternoon,
investors pushed stocks
higher after the Fed re-
leased meeting minutes that
appeared to signal it was
ready to take more action to
prop up the economy
On Thursday, stocks de-
clined when a Fed regional
bank president cast doubt


Market
Aug. 24

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



on the idea, sa
terview with C
economic r
peared to
strength.
Then o:
Bernanke sh
market again.
in response
from Issa, the
House oversig
who had asked
was premature
additional step
The Fed ha
tions, inclu
bonds, as it ha
since the 2008
sis, to try to l
rates and dri
into the stock:
Still, it's de


Court rules Samsung didn't copy iPhone


including those for telecom-
munications technology
The court also denied
Apple's claim that Samsung
had illegally copied its de-
sign, ruling that big rectan-
gular screens in cases with
rounded corners had ex-
isted in products before the
iPhone and iPad.
"It is not possible to assert
that these two designs are
similar based only on the
similarity of those features,"
the court said in a ruling is-
sued in Korean that was
translated into English by
The Associated Press. It also
said individual icons in the
Samsung products do not
appear similar to the icons
Apple used in the iPhone.
But the court ruled that
Suwon, South Korea-based
Samsung had infringed on
one of Apple's patents on
the feature that causes a
screen to bounce back when
a user scrolls to an end
image. The court banned
sales of Samsung products
using the technology, in-
cluding the Galaxy S2, in
South Korea.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Most laid-off US workers Alzheimer's drug fails study

take pay cuts in new jobs but flashes potential

WASHINGTON The U.S. economic recov- INDIANAPOLIS -An Alzheimer's treatment
ery hasn't felt much like one even for people who from Eli Lilly and Co. failed to slow memory de-
managed to find new jobs after being laid off. cline in two separate patient studies, but the drug
Most have had to settle for less pay. did show some potential to help in mild cases of
Only 56 percent of Americans laid off from the mind-robbing condition that is notoriously dif-
January 2009 through December 2011 had ficult to treat.
found jobs by the start of this year, the Labor De- The Indianapolis drugmaker's announcement
apartment said Friday. More than half of them could be a step toward a long-awaited break-
took jobs with lower pay. One-third took pay cuts through in the fight against the disease. But re-
of 20 percent or more. searchers not tied to the studies and Eli Lilly
The figures would be even worse if people itself cautioned against overreacting to the ini-
who could find only part-time jobs were included tial results.
in the total. Lilly said Friday that its treatment, solanezumab,
The report provides an illustration of the job failed to slow the rate of cognitive decline, which
market's persistent weakness well after the involves a person's ability to remember things, in
Great Recession officially ended in June 2009. It two late-stage studies of about 1,000 patients
also documents that while the economy has each. But when data from the trials were com-
added nearly 3 million jobs since the recovery bined, scientists saw a statistically significant slow-
began, many pay less than those that were lost. ing of that rate in the bigger population.



NEYR TOKECANG


Name Last Chg
SP Consum 45.37 +.37
SP Engy 71.98 +.43
SPDRFncl 15.13 +.08
SP Inds 36.71 +.17
SPTech 30.57 +.19
SP UIl 36.62 +.17
StdPac 6.66 +.27
Standex 42.61 -.94
StarwdHfl 54.41 +1.11
StateStr 41.44 +.22
StatoilASA 25.16 -.06
Steris 34.33 +.11
SbIIwtrM 10.66 +.03
StratHotels 6.02 +.09
Syker 53.74 +.51
SturmRug 44.10 +1.00
SubPpne 37.77 +.37
SunCmts 45.90 +.11
Suncor gs 31.74 +.32
SunriseSen 14.30 +.06
Suntedich 1.00 -.02
SunTrst 25.10 +.19
SupEnrgy 22.14 +.18
Supvalu 2.35 +.23
Synovus 2.00 -.01
Sysco 30.36 +.33
TCFFncl 10.69 +.25
TDAmeritr 16.75 +.13
TE Connect 35.03 -.14
TECO 17.61 +.04


TIM Part 19.69
TJXs 45.87
ThawSemi 14.37
TalismEg 13.67
Target 63.69
TataMotors 22.01
TeckResg 29.21
TelefBrasil 22.48
TelefEsp 12.67
TempurP 32.26
Tenaris 41.47
TenetHIth 5.17
Teradyn 15.74
Terex 20.53
TerraNitro 214.20
Tesoro 39.45
TetraTech 6.83
TevaPhrm 40.41
Textron 26.53
Theragen 1.75
ThermoFis 56.59
3DSys 40.40
3MCo 92.83
Tiffany 58.50
TWCable 89.55
TimeWarn 42.09
Timken 41.00
TollBros 32.59
TorchEngy 1.76
Torchmark 50.94
TorDBkg 81.46
Total SA 49.11


TotalSys 23.41
Transom 48.96
Travelers 65.40
Tredgar 15.73
TriConfi 16.07
TrinaSolar 4.85
TwoHrblnv 11.46
Tyolnfi 56.47
Tyson 15.15
UBSAG 11.20
UDR 25.46
UIL Hold 35.56
UNS Engy 40.06
USAirwy 11.11
USEC .69
USG 20.61
UltraPtg 21.42
UndArmr s 55.87
UniFirst 65.20
UnilevNV 34.66
Unilever 35.82
UnionPac 123.99
UtdConfi 19.27
UPSB 75.72
UtdRentals 32.25
US Bancrp 33.03
USNGsrs 18.38
USOilFd 35.68
USSteel 20.81
UtdTech 80.08
UtdhlthGp 54.16
UnumGrp 19.21


ValeSA 17.01 -.16
ValeSApf 16.65 -.16
ValeantPh 52.10 +.85
ValeroE 29.24 +.03
VangTotBd 84.72
VangTSM 72.25 +.41
VangREIT 66.26 +.22
VangAIIW 42.64 -.08
VangEmg 40.95 +.03
VangEAFE 32.93 -.04
VarianMed 59.58 +.79
Vecren 28.47 +.11
Ventas 64.15 +.41
VeoliaEnv 10.67 +.10
VeriFone 34.00 +.40
VerizonCm 43.17 +.92
VimpelCm 10.37 +.06
Visa 126.66 -.49
Vishaylnt 9.83 -.03
VMware 92.21 +.97
Vornado 82.10 +.52
WGL Hold 39.77 +.11
WPX En n 14.82 +.48
Wabash 6.62 -.06
WalMart 72.11 +.55
Walgrn 35.65 -.01
WalterEn 35.49 -.27
WasteConn 30.38 -.02
WsteMInc 34.28 -.06


much future Fed action
watch would help the market or
2012 the economy. On Friday,
some analysts thought it
+100.51 strange that the market
13,157.97 moved so decisively on just
an inkling about what the
+ 16.39 Fed chairman might be
3,069.79 thinking.

+9.05 "What's new about what
came out?" said Ann Miletti,
1,411.13 senior portfolio manager at

+3.19 Wells Fargo Advantage

809.19 Funds in Menomonee Falls,
Wis. "I guess the markets
diary are dependent on having
1,912 some commentary about the
macro economy every single
1,038 day"

d: 164 For the most part, the

2.5 b market has been hard to
read this month. Without
diary much news, trading volume
1,502 has been low, and investors

910 haven't had much convic-
---- tion either way about the
d: 141 economy

1.3 b Of 18 trading days in Au-
AP gust, only once has the Dow

moved more than 1 percent.
saying in an in- On five days, it has been vir-
'NBC that the tually flat, moving less than
recovery ap- one-tenth of a percentage
be gaining point.
The turbulence likely lies
n Friday, ahead. The Fed's annual
ook up the meeting in Jackson Hole,
His letter was Wyo., is at the end of the
to questions month. German courts are
head of the set to decide next month
ht committee, whether the country can
d whether it keep participating in
'e to consider bailouts for weaker Euro-
ps. pean countries.
is several op- And the presidential elec-
ding buying tion in November, which
as done twice will help determine
financial cri- whether taxes go up and
power interest government spending is cut
ive investors next year, could throw the
market, markets into turmoil for
debatable how weeks beforehand.


Associated Press gle over patents and innova-
tion unfolding in nine coun-
SEOUL, South Korea tries. The biggest stakes are
South Korea's Samsung won in the U.S., where Apple is
a home court ruling in its suing Samsung for $2.5 bil-
global smartphone battle lion over allegations it has
against Apple on Friday created illegal knockoffs of
when judges in Seoul said iPhones and iPads.
the company didn't copy the The Seoul ruling was a
look and feel of the U.S. rare victory for Samsung in
company's iPhone, and that its arguments that Apple
Apple infringed on Sam- has infringed on its wireless
sung's wireless technology technology patents, which
However, in a split deci- previously have been shot
sion on patents, the panel down by courts in Europe
also said Samsung violated where judges have ruled
Apple technology behind the that they are part of indus-
bounce-back feature when try standards that must be
scrolling on touch screens, licensed under fair terms to
and ordered both sides to competitors.
pay limited damages. "This is basically Sam-
The Seoul Central Dis- sung's victory on its home ter-
trict Court ruling called for ritory," said patent attorney
a partial ban on sales of JeongWoo-sung."Outofnine
products including iPads countries, Samsung got the
and smartphones from both ruling that it wanted for the
companies, though the ver- first time in South Korea."
dict did not affect the latest- The ruling ordered Apple
generation phones to remove the iPhone 3GS,
Apple's iPhone 4S or Sam- iPhone 4, iPad 1 and iPad 2
sung's Galaxy S3. from store shelves in South
The ruling affects only the Korea, saying that the prod-
South Korean market, and ucts infringed on two of Sam-
is part of a larger, epic strug- sung's five disputed patents,


WatsnPh 83.32
Weathflnfi 12.76
WeinRIt 28.05
WellPoint 57.66
WellsFargo 34.04
WestarEn 29.24
WAstEMkt 15.65
WstAMgdHi 6.63
WAstlnfOpp 13.27
WstnRefin 26.20
WstnUnion 17.42
Weyerhsr 24.37
Whrlpl 74.35
WhifngPet 44.77
WmsCos 32.11
WmsPtrs 50.99
WmsSon 42.30
Winnbgo 11.01
WiscEngy 38.38
WTDvexF 55.67
WT India 17.16
Worthgtn 21.10
Wyndham 51.43
XL Grp 23.23
XcelEngy 27.93
Xerox 7.38
YPFSoc 12.32
Yamanag 16.81
Yelp n 19.48
Youku 18.24
YumBrnds 64.03
Zimmer 61.27







Page A8 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Curt Ebitz......... .................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ELECTION GAMEMANSHIP




Backdoor


scheming




cheats voters


Election integrity is the
linchpin of America's
representative democ-
racy. If election integrity is
compromised, so is the legiti-
macy of our representative sys-
tem of government.
Since winners
and losers are in THE IS
every election, the
temptation to en- State Hou
sure victory by 34 i
manipulating the
electoral process OUR 01
through illegal or Poli
ethically ques- manip
tionable means is subvert
always lurking in ro
the shadows.pro
In this regard,
the Florida House District 34
race regrettably has been
marred by the gamesmanship
of political manipulators at-
tempting to influence the out-
come for ostensible personal
or partisan benefit.
Democratic candidate Lynn
Dostal of Homosassa aban-
doned the Democratic primary
race after Independent Party
candidate Nancy Argenziano
announced her bid for the
House seat. Dostal openly ad-
mitted he was a placeholder on
the Democratic ticket to assure
a head-to-head contest be-
tween Argenziano and Repub-
lican incumbent Jimmie T.
Smith in the general election.
Following Dostal's departure
from the race, Robert Goocher,
an Inverness auto mechanic,
entered the Democratic pri-
mary race. Never seen or heard
on the campaign trail but
backed by a pair of Tallahas-
see-based electioneering com-
mittees that sent out
pro-Goocher and anti-Dostal
brochures, Dostal, among oth-
ers, suspected Goocher of being


S

ra

P
t

e
c


a Republican "shill" to split the
general election vote between
Goocher and Argenziano in a
three-way race with Smith.
Spurred by this apparent po-
litical manipulation, Dostal re-
entered the race. Asserting in
public forums, as
;SUE: well as his inter-
view with the
se District Chronicle edito-
ace. rial board, that he
was now the real
INION: deal, he con-
ical vinced many he
ilators was passionately
electoral committed to stay-
ess. ing in the race and
winning.
Flushed with
the smell of success following
his convincing 72 percent
Democratic primary win over
Goocher, Dostal reaffirmed he
was the real deal by confi-
dently declaring Argenziano
should consider dropping out
of the race and he would feel
like a failure if he dropped out.
Shortly thereafter, however,
Dostal officially withdrew from
the ballot after consulting with
local Democratic Party offi-
cials. Whether or not Dostal
feels like a failure for with-
drawing from the race, he has
certainly disappointed those
voters who believed he would
have been a strong voice in
Tallahassee.
Sadly, the manipulation of
the District 34 House race has
shamefully aimed at subvert-
ing its outcome for apparent
personal or partisan benefit. In
doing so, those involved have
willingly or unwillingly con-
tributed to seriously under-
mining the integrity of the
electoral process by cheating
the voters from deciding the
best candidate.


Hot Corner: WATER PERMIT


Reverse decision saltwater intrusi
dry and the aqu
I'm outraged to read in the to support future
paper the Southwest Florida mer we have wa
Water Management District has as required, tak
issued a 10-year water use permit ers, monitored c
for some investment companies installed water-s
to withdraw (more than) 76,700 watered the lawi
gallons of water a day and ship it or possibly will
out of our county just so they can have a problem
make money. This is outrageous lawn watering.
and needs to be stopped. .
Infuriating news Politi
Who does the
After reading the headline in Water Managem
Monday's Chronicle (Aug. 13) ally serve? And \
about a permit being granted to knowledgeable
this outfit in Ocala to pump and a tenth of a foot
sell water to be bottled here in guess we can al
our county, I am so angry I could until the day the
just chew nails. Have we not been enough usable v
reading last week in the paper ar- beloved home st
tiles about springs going dry, tics as usual. I'r



Exploring options
I have to pay for a mortgage, food, utilities, gas. I
can't afford $40 in lottery tickets. Maybe I should
apply for an EBT card and if I win on the lottery,
then I can pay them back. Isn't that a good deal?
Not playing fair
This is for the people ... who stole the trampoline
equipment from the house on South Fillmore Street.
I know you took it. If this is how you raise your chil-
dren, you are sorry excuses for parents. And when
the owners come back, I will tell them who has it
when they ask.


on, wells going
ifer not being able
e growth? All sum-
tered once a day
en Marine show-
our water usage,
saving toilets, not
in when it's rained
rain. I do not even
with once-a-week

al move
Southwest Florida
nent (District) re-
who are these very
people ? Less than
t drawdown? I
I rest assured
ere will not be
water in my
tate, Florida. Poli-
n disgusted.


CA
563-0579


"Vote for the man who promises least;
he'll be the least disappointing."
Bernard Baruch, 1960


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Deferring deportations right


T he photos were
heartening and
heartbreaking.
Thousands of young
people lined up on a
sweltering summer ;i
day, clutching the pa- -
pers that chart their
lives in America: *
diplomas and awards,
pay stubs and rent re- Cokih
ceipts, bank state- Steven:
ments and tax returns. OTIH
But there was one
document none of VOI
them had: proof of U.S.
citizenship, or even a valid visa.
They have lives but not legality.
They are here but not here. They
are neighbors and friends, co-
workers and classmates. And yet
they are one traffic ticket or com-
puter check away from being sent
back to countries they remember
dimly, or not at all.
An estimated 1.7 million young
people who were brought to the
United States as children are liv-
ing here illegally. They are
blameless but stateless. The fail-
ure to help them has been a na-
tional disgrace. Finally, the
Obama administration is taking
one small step in the right
direction.
Under a new plan, these young
people can apply for "deporta-
tion deferral." They'd still be ille-
gal, but they could get work
permits, driver's licenses, profes-
sional certificates. And for two
years, at least, the government
promises not to throw them out.
That's why, when the plan took ef-
fect last week, so many braved
the heat, and legal jeopardy, to
seek advice and file applications.
The plan is far from perfect,
but it's much better than nothing.
"It's like giving wings to the
people (who) want to fly," Noe
Torres, who came from Mexico at
age 4, told The New York Times.
Obama's critics accuse him of
playing politics and pandering to


,. : the Hispanic vote and,
of course, that's true.
But Republicans have
only themselves to
blame. Mitt Romney
knows about pander-
ing. During the pri-
mary season, he
eagerly lined up with
the party's nativist
and wing and opposed
Roberts even modest immigra-
IER tion reform proposals,
including the Dream
CES Act blocked by a
GOP filibuster -
which would have legalized the
young people now seeking depor-
tation deferral.
Now Mitt Romney is suffering
from his self-inflicted wound, and
Team Obama would be guilty of
malpractice if they didn't rub salt
in it. A USA Today/Gallup poll
found eight of 10 Latino voters
support deportation deferral,
most of them strongly
Republicans were already in
trouble with Hispanics. George
Bush won 44 percent of those vot-
ers in 2004; the figure dropped to
31 percent for John McCain four
years later Gallup said Romney
is down to 25 percent, giving him
"the weakest position among
Latinos of any presidential con-
tender since 1996."
This year, the Latino vote could
be critical in swing states such as
Florida, Nevada and Colorado.
But the future landscape gets
even rockier for Republicans.
The Pew Research Center re-
ports the number of Hispanics in
college now tops 2 million for the
first time, 16.5 percent of the total
enrollment. One of every four
public school students is Latino.
By choosing Rep. Paul Ryan as
his running mate, Romney
missed a chance to strengthen
ties to the Hispanic community.
Democrats were worried about
the appeal of Sen. Marco Rubio of
Florida, the Spanish-speaking


son of Cuban immigrants. Sen.
Rob Portman of Ohio, also fluent
in Spanish, might have been an
effective emissary as well.
"Ryan, who comes from a state
with only 5 percent Latino voters,
has zero connection with His-
panic voters," Andres Oppen-
heimer, an analyst of Latino
trends, wrote in The Miami Her-
ald. "It suggests that Romney has
thrown in the towel on the His-
panic vote."
Romney's opposition to depor-
tation deferral is not only politi-
cally clueless but also morally
defenseless. Those young people,
lined up so hopefully with their
records and receipts, spoke with
power and passion about their
adopted land.
"This is my country; it's where
my roots are," Nathaly Uribe,
who came from Chile as a toddler,
told the Los Angeles Times. "It
feels great to know that the coun-
try that I call home is finally ac-
cepting me."
Added Bupendra Ram, a native
of the Fiji Islands: "This offers us
an opportunity to fulfill the
dreams I've had since I was a
child."
Many of these applicants worry
about the election. If he won,
would Romney cancel the pro-
gram? Or track them down and
deport their parents? But even
those fears could not dissuade
them.
"My mom decided I should do
it," Hazar Parra, who just fin-
ished nurse's training, told The
New York Times. "Basically, for
me to do better and succeed,
she's willing to risk everything."
That brave woman, and the
others who stand with her, de-
serve our respect and support.
They've earned their wings.
--*--A
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Course correction
Second-quarter new jobs aver-
aged 75,000 per month, a de-
crease of 125,000 from the first
quarter The number of Ameri-
cans in the workforce actually
working is 63.8 percent, the low-
est in 40 years; economic growth
is the weakest since 1945.
The president promised his
trillion-dollar stimulus bill
would cut unemployment to 5.6
percent; it's been more than 8
percent more realistically 15
percent for 41 straight months.
Listening to Mr Obama at his
hundreds of fundraisers, you'd
think the horrible state of our
economy isn't his fault; he con-
tinues to blame everybody and
everything. Seventy percent of
Americans say we're on the
wrong track; 55 percent say Mr
Obama has changed America for
the worse.
Question: Has this recession
or any other been turned around
by raising taxes and spending
huge sums of borrowed money?
Can we do something else?
Absolutely!
History has shown policies of
lower taxes and reduced federal
spending as enacted by Harding-
Coolidge, Kennedy and Reagan
were extremely successful. From
1921 to 1929 GDP increased by a


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

staggering 59 percent; from 1961
to 1968 the increase was 42 per-
cent and 34 percent from 1982 to
1989.
Consider conditions in 1921
when we faced not only deep re-
cession but a devastating epi-


demic. To right the economy, a
three-part, across-the-board tax
cut was enacted; the top rate was
lowered from 60 percent to 25
percent Taxes paid by high-in-
come earners increased from
$300 billion to $700 billion per
year In the early 1920s, top earn-
ers paid one-third of the total tax
burden; by the late 1920s they
paid two-thirds. How did every-
one else fare? Incomes over
$100,000 increased by 15 percent,
while incomes from $10,000 to
$100,000 increased by 84 percent.
The policy helped everyone!
Joseph P. Ryan
Homosassa

Thanks for support
I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to thank all those who
supported me in my recent re-
election campaign.
It has been a pleasure to serve
this community, first as a teacher
and coach for 20 years and then
as a school board member for
the past eight years. To all
school board employees, a big
"thank you" for your dedicated
efforts that, on a daily basis,
make this school district highly
effective and very special.
Bill Murray
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


e

-i
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Isaac approaches Haiti


Population still

not recovered

from 2010

earthquake

Associated Press

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- Tropical Storm Isaac
strengthened as it swirled
toward vulnerable Haiti on
Friday evening, threaten-
ing to bring punishing rains
to people still without
homes after the 2010 earth-
quake, but unlikely to gain
enough steam to strike as a
hurricane.
Forecasters expected the
storm to stay below hurri-
cane force until it reached
the Gulf of Mexico on Sun-
day, and they shifted the
projected track back east-
ward where it remained a
threat to Tampa, Fla., where
the Republican National
Convention starts Monday
In Haiti, the government
and international aid
groups were prepared to
evacuate several thousand
people from settlement
camps that sprang up in the
aftermath of the earth-
quake, but there were few
takers.
Isaac was expected to
dump up to eight to 12
inches of rain on the island
of Hispaniola, which is
shared by Haiti and the Do-
minican Republic. Haiti is
heavily deforested and just a
few hours of steady rain can
trigger deadly mudslides.
"That kind of rain is going
to cause some life-threaten-
ing flash floods and mud-
slides," said Dennis Feltgen,
a spokesman for the U.S.
Hurricane Center in Miami.
Isaac was centered about
100 miles south-southeast of
Port-au-Prince, the Haitian
capital, Friday evening, and
its maximum sustained
winds had increased to 65. It
was moving west at 16 mph.
Tropical force winds ex-
tended nearly 200 miles
from the storm's center.
Cuba declared a state of
alert Friday for six eastern
provinces, according to a
Civil Defense announce-
ment read on the afternoon
news, and five central
provinces were put on pre-
liminary watch.
"Vacationers in tourist in-
stallations of those regions
have begun to be evacu-
ated," Radio Rebelde said.


Associated Press


A man runs away from a wave Friday as Tropical Storm Isaac approaches Barahona, Dominican Republic.


The Caribbean braces for Isaac
Tropical Storm Isaac's projected path over the next five days:


Trop
U.s. as of
. 29. _9 Max'
Q ,, Cour;
Tampa Atlantic Local
Aug. 28 Ocean
r.1in'mi Time
Aug. 27 \ unless
Aug.6"uba oTrop
Mex. ,,,.3 25` Hauli Dom. Rep.

Gual. Jam Aug. 24
Hon. 2 p.m.
Caribbean Sea


0 600 mi
0 600 km
SOURCE: NOAA


ical Storm Isaac
2 p.m. Aug. 24:
Wind: 60 mph
se: NWat 14 mph
tion: 16.8 N 71.4W
s 8 a.m. EDT
ss noted
p. storm *Hurricane


Colo. Ven.


"In the coming hours, peo-
ple in areas at greatest risk
of flooding will be trans-
ported to safe places."
In flood-prone Haiti,
Prime Minister Laurent
Lamothe urged people to
avoid crossing rivers and to
stay calm, saying "panic cre-
ates more problems." He
said the government had set
aside about $50,000 in emer-
gency funds and had buses
and 32 boats on standby for
evacuations.


But among many
Haitians, the notion of dis-
aster preparedness in a
country where most people
get by on $2 a day was met
with a shrug.
"We don't have houses
that can bear a hurricane,"
said Jeanette Lauredan,
who lives in a tent camp in
the crowded Delmas district
of Port-au-Prince.
About 400,000 people re-
main in settlement camps
comprised of shacks and


Associated Press
Jim Rustin, center, Miami-Dade maintenance supervisor at
Vizcaya, guides his workers on the installation of the
protective Kevlar netting being hooked into place over their
historic stained glass doors Friday in Miami. Expecting some
showers but preparing for squalls, South Florida companies
spent the week's end going over their hurricane readiness
plans -just in case.


tarps in the wake of Haiti's
devastating 2010 earthquake.
In Port-au-Prince, people
went to work as usual, but
commercial banks closed at
noon and some residents
took precautions as the sky
darkened, rain fell and the
wind picked up.
'"Just in case this gets very
bad the sky is turning
gray I'm making sure we
have enough food in the
house," said 25-year-old
Joanne Dorville as she car-
ried home rice, sardines,
black beans and cooking oil
that she had purchased in a


street market.
Haitian authorities and
aid workers from the Inter-
national Organization for
Migration and the Haitian
Red Cross had planned to
evacuate as many as 8,000
people from a tent camp at
the edge of the capital Fri-
day but few accepted. Two
school buses supposed to
shuttle people to temporary
shelters drove away empty.
"If I leave for a shelter, by
the time I come back, every-
thing I have will be gone,"
said Charles Delizaire, a 39-
year-old resident of the set-


Keys won't issue
visitor evacuation
MIAMI Officials in the
Florida Keys say they won't
issue a visitor evacuation.
Based on reports from the
National Hurricane Center
that Isaac will remain a tropi-
cal storm as it passes
through the Keys, officials
announced Friday they won't
issue an evacuation.
Monroe County emer-
gency management director
Irene Toner said, however,
the absence of a visitor
evacuation should not be in-
terpreted by visitors as an
"all-clear." During the storm,
Toner said visitors and resi-
dents must remain indoors.
They should not be outside,
on roadways, beaches and
certainly not on, or in the
water, until the storm is well
away from the Keys.
-Associated Press

tlement named Marassa.
More than a hundred peo-
ple accepted an offer to stay
a few nights in a school that
President Michel Martelly
toured along with Lamothe,
the prime minister Martelly
greeted mothers and their
children but after he left,
people began to leave.
"They dragged me from
the camp and brought me
here," 38-year-old Marlene
Charles, thirsty and hungry,
said about the aid groups.
"There's no way I'm going to
spend the night here."
She then walked out.


Evacuees from a Haitian tent city arrive Friday at the Jean Marie Vincent High School shel-
ter in Tabarre, Haiti, in anticipation of Tropical Storm Isaac.


ISAAC
Continued from Page Al

conference calls with state
emergency officials. He said
he met Friday with Citrus
County officials, including
those with the county and
school district, to update
them on the storm's potential.
"If decisions have to be
made on Sunday, I wanted
them prepared going into



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the weekend," he said.
For example, no plans
have been made to close
school Monday However,
that could change if fore-
casters on Sunday expect
high winds, making it dan-
gerous for school buses to
travel on county roads.
Eckstein said it's also too
soon to know if Isaac's
winds would result in a
storm surge. He said if the
storm moves on a northwest
track through the gulf, it


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9-1 on
T I


CARPETIIJ TIII WOD-V.II,, IIN L--LAMINIT


would push water out of the
coastal rivers. A straight
northern track, he said,
would push water in.
Even though the scenar-
ios are many, Eckstein said
the public should be ready
"People should already
be prepared," he said. "This
should not be a surprise to
anybody"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.


COLORGENR


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CCC#2837
SERVING CITRUS COUNTY SINCEM1975


pm pmflB
T1 AT

CARPET&ILE--,]


NATION/WORLD


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 A9












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationRIEFS Confessed killer welcomes prison term
Splash


Associated Press
Captain David Anderson's
Dolphin and Whale Safari in
Dana Point, Calif., specta-
tors watch whales off the
coast of southern Califor-
nia. Endangered blue
whales, the world's largest
animals, are being seen in
droves off the northern Cal-
ifornia coast, lured by an
abundance of their favorite
food shrimp-like crea-
tures known as krill.
Whale-watching tour oper-
ators are reporting a
bumper harvest of blue
whales, orcas, humpbacks
and binocular-toting
tourists eager to witness
the coastal feeding frenzy.


No graphic
cigarette warnings
RICHMOND, Va. The
federal government can't re-
quire tobacco companies to
put large graphic health warn-
ings on cigarette packages to
show smoking can disfigure
and even kill people, a di-
vided federal appeals court
panel ruled Friday.
In a 2-1 decision, the U.S.
Court of Appeals in Washing-
ton affirmed a lower court rul-
ing that the requirement ran
afoul of the First Amend-
ment's free speech protec-
tions. The appeals court
tossed out the requirement
and told the Food and Drug
Administration to go back to
the drawing board. The deci-
sion is considered a blow to
one of the Obama administra-
tion's major public health ini-
tiatives, raises the prospect of
another U.S. Supreme Court
tobacco battle and opens the
door to further challenges of
the FDA's regulatory scheme.

World BRIEF

Under fire


Associated Press
An armored U.S. Embassy
vehicle is checked by mili-
tary personnel after it was
attacked Friday by un-
known assailants on the
highway leading to the city
of Cuernavaca, near Tres
Marias, Mexico.


Associated Press

OSLO, Norway It was
during breaks between
marathon video game ses-
sions in his mother's apart-
ment in Oslo that Anders
Behring Breivik drafted his
complicated and chilling
plan. He would kill indis-
criminately with explosives
and guns, surrender to au-
thorities if he survived, then
prove himself sane in court
- all to publicize a mani-
festo accusing Muslims of
destroying European society.
By any account, it went
exactly to plan. A court
ruled Friday that Breivik
was sane when he killed 77
people, most of them
teenagers, in attacks that
shook Norway to its core.
"His goal was to be de-
clared sane, so on that point
he is satisfied," Breivik's de-
fense lawyer, Geir


Lippestad, said.
The Oslo district court
found the 33-year-old right-
wing extremist guilty of ter-
rorism and premeditated
murder for the twin attacks
on July 22 last year Breivik
first bombed government
headquarters, killing eight
people, before going on a
shooting massacre on Utoya
island that left 69 dead at a
summer camp for young
members of the governing
Labor Party
Prosecutors had asked for
an insanity ruling, which
Breivik rejected as an at-
tempt to deflate his radical
anti-Muslim views. He
smiled with apparent satis-
faction when the five-judge
panel declared him sane
and sentenced him to a 21-
year prison sentence that
can be extended for as long
as he's considered danger-
ous to society Legal experts


say that likely means he will
be locked up for life.
"He has killed 77 people,
most of them youth, who
were shot without mercy,
face to face. The cruelty is
unparalleled in Norwegian
history," Judge Arne Lyng
said. "This means that the
defendant even after serv-
ing 21 years in prison would
be a very dangerous man."
In his final words, Breivik
regretted not killing more
people, apologizing to other
"militant nationalists" for not
achieving an even higher
death toll. He said he wouldn't
appeal the ruling because
that would "legitimize" a
court he said got its mandate
from a political system that
supports multiculturalism.
Prosecutors also said they
would not appeal, bringing
the legal process for Nor-
way's worst peacetime mas-
sacre to an end and


Associated Press
Confessed mass killer Anders Behring Breivik smiles as he
arrives Friday in the courtroom in Oslo, Norway.


providing closure for vic-
tims' families and survivors,
who have had to endure
weeks of testimony from
Breivik describing the vic-
tims as traitors for embrac-
ing immigration.
"I am very relieved and


happy about the outcome,"
said Tore Sinding Bekkedal,
who survived the Utoya
shooting. "I believe he is mad,
but it is political madness and
not psychiatric madness. He
is a pathetic and sad little
person."


Fighting fire, winning


Residents relax as

threat from blaze

abates in

California

Associated Press

MINERAL, Calif. Residents
of a tiny mountain town breathed
easier Friday after air tankers
and helicopters blunted the run
of a massive wildfire in Northern
California just outside Lassen
Volcanic National Park.
"After hearing the news, I think
I feel a whole lot better today,"
said Bob Einck, a contractor
He said he didn't expect to
have to continue to remove be-
longings from his vacation home
in Mineral to protect them from
fire danger
Fire crews working by air
Thursday repeatedly doused the
spearhead of the Ponderosa Fire
with water and flame retardant
as it crept up the deep Battle
Creek Canyon threatening the
national park and the town of
about 190 homes.
CalFire spokesman Don Camp
said firefighters made significant
progress against the blaze, stop-
ping its stubborn run only miles
from Mineral.
"We didn't sustain any signifi-
cant growth for the first time in
four days," Camp said.
Residents, meanwhile, gath-
ered at the Lassen Mountain
Lodge, which serves as a gateway
to the park and has become a
makeshift fire command center,
and studied the latest fire map,
which shows the blaze more than


Associated Press
Fire crews drop water onto the Ponderosa Fire from a helicopter Thursday near Mineral, Calif. The Ponderosa
Fire was 57 percent contained, with full containment expected early next week.


two-thirds contained at nearly
30,000 acres, or 44 square miles.
"Today is going to be a critical
day," Camp said, noting winds
were expected to slow Friday
Full containment is expected
early next week.
Sixty-four homes and 20 other
buildings have been destroyed,
mostly in the Manton area, since
lightning ignited the blaze Satur-
day, Camp said. It was still threat-
ening 900 other homes scattered
through the rugged countryside


as it burned a new front to the
south.
About 2,500 firefighters were
battling the blaze scorching piney
hills about 30 miles southeast of
Redding.
Efforts to protect Mineral have
had a noticeable effect, accord-
ing to Wade Glenn, who manages
the lodge. He said when the fire
started, smoke was heavy in the
air, causing tension among area
residents. Glenn said Friday the
skies were a hazy blue and peo-


ple were feeling much better
Gale Gilbert, a retired Califor-
nia Highway Patrol traffic officer,
said the fire in the canyon looked
like a mass of little campfires
after the heavy dousing from the
air
"You get concerned, but there's
not much you can do but wait,
and make sure your insurance is
paid up," he said. "I feel pretty
comfortable coming down and
looking at the maps and hearing
people talk."


Mexican police
fire on US vehicle 2 killed outside NYC landmark


MEXICO CIT
Mexican Navy s
federal police op
a U.S. Embassy
trying two U.S. g
employees, afte
entered an area
Mexican officers
ducting anti-crim
The two U.S.
employees were
one with a woun
and the other hit
ach and hand, a
government office
spoke on conditi
anonymity. The
bassy said it cou
lease details of t
or the names of
The Navy saic
vehicles opened
Americans' spor
cle on a road so
City, but did not
any of the four c
police officers.
The shootings
have been the rE
fused running gi
broke out on a rL
mountainous arE
been used by co
nals, drug gangs
rebels in the pas


Y-The
aid Friday
)ened fire on


Associated Press


' vehicle car- NEW YORK A laid-off
government clothing designer fatally
r the vehicle shot an executive at his for-
where the mer company outside the
were con- Empire State Building on
ne operations. Friday, setting off a chaotic
Embassy showdown with police in
Hospitalized front of one of the world's
d to tspitalized, best-known landmarks. Offi-
in to the stolegm- cers killed the gunman and
tin the stom- at least nine others were
according to a wounded, some by stray po-
cial who lice gunfire, authorities said.
ion of Gunshots rang out on the
U.S. Em- Fifth Avenue side of the
uld not re- building at 9 a.m., when
he shooting pedestrians on their way to
the victims, work packed sidewalks and
d at least four merchants were opening
I fire on the their shops.
t utility vehi- "People were yelling 'Get
uth of Mexico down! Get down!"' said
make clear if Marc Engel, an accountant
arrived federal who was on a bus in the area
when he heard the shots. "It
s appeared to took about 15 seconds, a lot
result of a con- of pop, pop, pop, pop, one
un battle that shot after the other."
ural road in a Afterward, he saw the
ea that has sidewalks littered with the
mmon crimi- wounded, including one
mmonmi- person "dripping enough
s and leftist blood to leave a stream."
st. Wearing an olive suit and
-From wire reports tie and carrying a briefcase,


Jeffrey Johnson walked up
to the import company vice
president, Steven Ercolino,
put a gun to his head and
fired without saying a word,
authorities said. A witness
told investigators Johnson
shot Ercolino once in the
head and, after he fell to the
sidewalk, stood over him and
shot him four more times.
"Jeffrey just came from
behind two cars, pulled out
his gun, put it up to Steve's
head and shot him," said
Carol Timan, whose daugh-
ter, Irene, was walking to
Hazan Imports at the time
with Ercolino.
The gunman walked away
and calmly turned up 5th Av-
enue, where he blended in
with the crowd, police said.
A construction worker
who saw the shooting fol-
lowed Johnson and alerted
two police officers, a detail
regularly assigned to patrol
city landmarks like the 1,454-
foot skyscraper since the 9/11
terror attacks, officials said.
There were conflicting
accounts about whether
Johnson fired at the police
officers or just pointed the
gun at them.
Police Commissioner


Associated Press
An unidentified woman is
treated by emergency med-
ical technicians inside an
ambulance following a multi-
ple shooting Friday outside
the Empire State Building in
New York. At least four peo-
ple were shot and the gun-
man was dead, New York
City officials said.
Raymond Kelly initially
said the officers were fired
upon, but later said police
were investigating. Johnson
can be seen on video reach-
ing into a bag, pulling out a
.45-caliber pistol and point-
ing it at officers, Kelly said.


Hippo Solly dies in pool


Associated Press
MODIMOLLE, South
Africa What started out
as a day of hope for Solly
the hippo turned to tragedy
when rescuers were un-
able to save the 3-ton beast
from the swimming pool he
plunged into after being
chased from his herd.
Solly's plight captivated
animal lovers and his
death Friday left many in
tears, with some blaming a
vet who arrived too late.
"It started out as a happy
story and now it's a tragic
story It's devastating," said
Ruby Ferreira, manager of
the game preserve lodge
where the hippopotamus
had been stuck in the swim-
ming pool since Tuesday
The 4-year-old hippo had
been chased from his herd
by dominant males when he
wandered into the Monate
Conservation Lodge and
plopped into its 8-foot-deep
pool. Although he was able
to swim freely, he couldn't
get out because the pool has
no steps. Lodge workers
dubbed him Solly, and the
hippo's plight captivated
South Africans, with live TV


broadcasts from the pool and
newspaper headlines like
"It's all systems go for the
rescue of Solly the hippo."
On Friday morning, the
TV news carried a scrolling
headline announcing the
animal's death.
Solly's demise left sev-
eral of those involved
pointing fingers of blame.
Ferreira said a game
capture team had been
waiting since Thursday for
a veterinarian to show up
to tranquilize Solly and
oversee the operation to
hoist him out with a crane.
By early Friday, the
hippo was showing signs of
stress and was no longer
able to stand in the pool,
which had been drained of
most of its water in prepa-
ration for the rescue.
Lying in the murky,
feces-strewn water, he
emerged occasionally for
air, sighing anxiously
As veterinarian Dr Alex
Lewis arrived, the hippo
tried one last time to get to
his feet. He couldn't make
it. Exhausted, he dropped
his head into the knee-
deep water, making a
splash, then lay still.










SPORTS


The Rays try to
stay hot against the
Oakland Athletics
on Friday night./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Youth recreation/B2
0 Golf, auto racing/B3
0 UF football/B3
0 NFL preseason/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


US doping agency erases Armstrong's titles


Former cyclist

drops fight against

doping charges

Associated Press
The champagne toasts on the
Champs-Elysees and the two-fin-
gered "V" for victory signs he
flashed while pedaling to the
finish line.
The excruciating mountain
climbs and the explosions ofpower
that pushed him past other heaving
cyclists on narrow Alpine roads.
The legions of fans wearing
yellow Livestrong bracelets


cheering on the cancer survivor
whose grit and determination
gave them hope.
Faded images are all that re-
main of the unprecedented cy-
cling career of Lance Armstrong.
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency
erased the rest of it Friday
It wiped out 14 years of Arm-
strong's career including his
record seven Tour de France ti-
tles and barred him for life
from the sport after concluding
he used banned substances.


USADA said it expected cy-
cling's governing body to take
similar action, but the Interna-
tional Cycling Union was meas-
ured in its response, saying it first
wanted a full explanation of why
Armstrong should relinquish
Tour titles he won from 1999
through 2005.
The Amaury Sport Organiza-
tion, which runs the world's most
prestigious cycling race, said it
See Page B4


Lance Armstrong, whose stirring victories after his comeback from
cancer helped him transcend sports, chose not to pursue arbitration
in the drug case brought against him by the U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency. That was his last option in his bitter fight with USADA and
his decision set the stage for the titles to be stripped and his name
to be all but wiped from the record books of the sport he once ruled.
Associated Press


Knocking off the rust


Dunnellon

football downs

Lecanto at home
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
DUNNELLON Presea-
son football games are an op-
portunity to work the kinks
out of a new offensive or de-
fensive schemes and bring
players new to the varsity
level up to speed on the dif-
ferent level of competition.
In the case between Lecanto
High School and Dunnellon
High School
on Friday
night at Ned
Love Field, it
was a chance
For more for each team
photos, click to realize dis-
on this story at cipline is an-
www.chronicle other area
online.com. each squad
will need to
focus on when they resume
practice Monday in prepara-
tion for their respective season
openers next Friday
The Panthers and Tigers
combined for 28 penalties in
three quarters of varsity action
as Dunnellon knocked off
Lecanto 33-23, in which each
team's junior varsity squads
closed out the game by playing
the fourth quarter
"It's so hard to get in a rhythm
when that's happening," said
Dunnellon coach Frank
Beasley, whose team was fine
tuning its new Pistol offensive
system against the Panthers be-
fore the Tigers open the regular
season Friday at home against
Class 7A West Port
"It was tough, for each team.
We had some penalties, they
had some as well. It's just hard
to get in a rhythm when there
are so many penalties."
Despite his team's victory,
Beasley said he couldn't pin-
point too many positives.
"There's not a lot," said
Beasley, entering his ninth sea-
son at the helm of the Tigers'
football program. "We've got a
lot of work this next week.
We've got a big-time opponent


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dunnellon tight end Connor Wentz makes a catch in the flat and runs over Lecanto cornerback Alizah
Robinson to stay on his feet and dive into the end zone for a score Friday at Dunnellon High School.
coming in here."
Dunnellon staked itself to an
early 7-0 lead with 10 minutes re-
maining in the opening quarter
when Connor Wentz scored on a f
13-yard pass play from quarter-
back Jordon Boley, capitalizing
on a Panthers' fumble, which
Dunnellon junior defensive line-
man Keiwan Jones recovered.
Lecanto trimmed the Tigers'
lead to 7-3 on a 27-yard field
goal with 6:38 left in the
See Page B4
Lecanto quarterback
Christian Barber (7) is
tackled by Dunnellon
defender Dana Washington on
Friday night in Dunnellon.


Citrus


pummels


Poinciana

'Canes football

enjoys 62-7 romp

in fall classic
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Citrus senior
running back Darius Chapes
amassed 208 yards and three
touchdowns on just 12 first-half
carries to help the Hurricanes
blast Poinciana 62-7 in Friday's
Preseason Classic at the Citrus
Bowl.
The 'Canes pushed around the
Eagles all
night, con-
trolling
the line
on both
sides of the
ball to outgain the visitors from
Kissimmee 446 to 28.
Third-year Citrus coach Ray-
burn Greene was happy with his
team's performance, but didn't
want to overstate the significance
of the preseason contest.
"I was really proud of the way
our line blocked
those guys
around," Greene
said. "Our
coaches do a "
good job of .
preaching being
physical, and I
feel like us being
more physical Darius
made it an easier Chapes
job for our run- Citrus RB
ning backs. had 208 yards
"We have a lot rushing, 3 TDs.
more weapons than we've had in
the past, and we were able to just
run the ball, mostly, so we didn't
have to do a whole lot."
While Chapes had 164 yards and
two scores in the first quarter
alone, it was a 30-yard sideline
pass from junior quarterback
Cody Bogart (2-for-3, 56 yards) to
junior receiver Desmond Franklin
that first put Citrus on the board.
Franklin intercepted junior
quarterback Jonathan Lindstrom
on the Eagles' ensuing drive, lead-
ing to a 37-yard run and a 20-yard
rushing score, both by Chapes, on
Citrus' second possession.
A 1-yard scoring rush by senior


See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


t SATURDAY, AIT25,H2012




GET IN THE


GAME


Parks and Rec announce baton classes


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation announces baton classes at
the Citrus Springs Community
Center. Come learn the sport of
baton, march in parades, compete
in competitions and more.
Classes are open to all girls and
boys ages 4 to college age. No ex-
perience is necessary Call Diane
Sorvillo at 352-527-6540 for more
information. All classes are taught
by Sorvillo, a former Majorette
Queen of America and two-time
national champion.
Classes and times are:
4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New Be-
ginners (ages 4 to 7).
5:30 to 6:15 p.m. Competi-
tive team class.
6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo compet-
itive class.
7 to 7:45 p.m. New Begin-
ners (ages 8 and older).
Class fees are $32 per month, or
two different classes for $45.
Register for PLAY this fall
The next season of PLAY will begin
Sept. 10. The PLAY program (Prepar-
ing Little Athletes Youth) is a compre-
hensive motor skills development
program that will prepare you and your
child for the world of organized sports.
The PLAY program is designed for
children ages 3 to 5, each child will re-
ceive a team T-shirt and age-appropri-
ate sports equipment. Each program
runs for six weeks, one night a week
for one hour.
Soccer and T-ball will be the next
sports offered. The cost is $45 per
child; sign your child up for more than
one sport in the same session and
save $10.
Registration is now open. For more
information, call Crysta Henry, recre-
ation program specialist for youth pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Youth golf lessons
at Pine Ridge
Citrus County Parks & Recreation in
partnership with Pine Ridge Golf
Course will offer youth golf lessons
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday evenings for five weeks
beginning Sept. 5.
Children ages 6 to 16 are eligible
and the cost is $50 per child. Instruc-
tion will be given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several of his volunteers.
During the lessons, participants will
learn putting, driving, chipping, on-
course play and on-course etiquette.
Golf clubs will be provided, but if a
child has his or her own set, they are
encouraged to bring them.
Visit www.citruscountyparks.com, or
call 352-527-7540.


0-1

--


Special to the Chronicle


A young Citrus County resident prepares to hit the ball during Citrus County Parks and Recreation's PLAY program.


Parks & Rec offers
youth tennis lessons
Come join Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Tennis Pro Mehdi
Tahiri for youth tennis lessons.
Instruction will include condition-
ing, drills, footwork, match play, dou-
bles and single strategy. The
five-week sessions will be at the
Lecanto Community Park Tennis
Courts on Sundays. Each session
will run from 3 to 4 p.m. The clinic is
open to boys and girls ages 8 to 14
and costs $60 per child.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Afterschool programs
officially kick off Aug. 27
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs will be offered
at Central Ridge Elementary, Citrus
Springs Elementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa Ele-
mentary, Inverness Primary, Lecanto
Primary, Pleasant Grove Elementary
and Rock Crusher Elementary.


Ages for the Y Afterschool Program
range from kindergarten through fifth
grade. Afterschool programs are a
great way to end the school day, and
the first fall session will offer kids the
opportunity to participate in flag foot-
ball, cheerleading and art.
The Citrus County YMCA has re-
ceived a grant for the Afterschool Pro-
grams from Suncoast Federal Schools
Credit Union. This grant will enable the
Y to provide scholarships for 200 chil-
dren this school year to participate in
the enrichment clubs. Both financial
assistance and registration forms will
be available at the school offices, the
YMCA office in Beverly Hills, and on-
line at www.ymcasuncoast.org. For
more information, call the Citrus Y at
352-637-0132.
Play ball, cheer this fall
Upward Sports will offer flag football
and cheerleading for ages K-5 through
eighth grade.
Signup and practices have begun.
The season runs Saturdays, Sept. 8
through Nov. 10.
For information, call Chris Hope at
352-586-4685 or email

Recreation BRIEFS


chris.hope@gulftolake.com.
Registration is $45.
Register for ball,
maybe win tickets
The Citrus County YMCA is now
taking registrations for its 2012 Fall
Youth Basketball League which begins
Monday, Sept. 10. Those who pre-reg-
ister by Sept. 5 will be able to have
their child's name entered into a draw-
ing for a family-four pack of tickets to a
Tampa Bay Rays game.
Because of the popularity of last
year's winter league, the Citrus YMCA
decided to offer a fall league with a 10-
week session. There will be an age divi-
sion for 3- to 5-year-olds for the Junior
Basketball League with the Youth
League consisting of 6- to 12-year-olds
with several age brackets. Practices will
be once a week on a weekday, with
games being played on Saturdays. All
practices and games will be at the Key
Training Center Chet Cole Life Enrich-
ment Center gymnasium.
Registration is now open through
Sept. 10 The league cost is $85 for ages
6 to 12, and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholarships
are available through the YMCA's Finan-


cial Assistance program. To apply, call
the office at 352-637-0132.
Volunteer coaches are needed, and
a background screening is required
and provided by the Citrus County
YMCA. Sponsors are also needed,
and sponsor names will be printed on
team jerseys.
To register for the league, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org and download
the form on the Citrus County page.
Visit the office at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway or call 352-637-0132 for
more details.
Movie in the Park
Bring the whole family out for a fun
and free night under the stars. We will
provide the popcorn, you make the
memories.
Citrus County Parks and Recreation
has upgraded its Movie in the Park
equipment with a two-story-tall movie
screen and an upgraded sound sys-
tem. The new system made its debut
at the July Movie in the Park Event.
The next movie shown on this new
and approved system will be The
Lorax (PG) on Saturday, Sept. 8 at
Lecanto Community Park.


Men's flag football
starts Sept. 13
Men's fall flag football is
scheduled to start Sept. 13.
This is a 7-on-7 league for
players who are 18 years of
age and older. Games are
played at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays
at Homosassa Area Recre-
ational Park. The registration
fee is $50 and is due by
Sept. 3.
Team fees are based on the
number of teams registered
and are divided up equally
among each team. To register
or for more information, call Cit-
rus County Parks & Recreation
at 352-527-7540.
Beach volleyball to
begin in September
Beach volleyball is coming to
Citrus County. This will be a 4
on 4 league, with any combina-
tion of men and women.
All participants must be at least
18 years old.
This is a semi-competitive
league. Games will be played
at Bicentennial Park on Tues-
day nights. Get your team to-
gether and get some great
exercise. League play will
begin in September. The team
fee is $50.
For more information or to
register, call Citrus County
Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540.


Coed kickball
held at park
If you ever thought of joining
the thrilling world of kickball,
well here's your chance. The
next season of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's coed kick-
ball league is coming up.
Kickball is an exciting game
that can be played by people of
all ages. It's a great way to
meet new people and get a little
exercise while having fun. You
must be 18 years old to partici-
pate. Game times will be at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. on
Wednesday. Games will last
one hour or nine innings,
whichever occurs first. All
games are held at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River.
If you have a business,
group of friends, or maybe a
close neighborhood, this is a
great way to build some team-
work and have some fun bond-
ing time. For more information,
call Andy Smith, Parks &
Recreation supervisor, at
352-400-0960.
Get in shape
at boot camp
The YMCA offers an outdoor
boot camp at King's Bay Park.
Boot camp classes are from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday
and Thursday. The program fee
is $35 per month.
This energetic workout will get
you in shape by combining car-
dio, strength and core condition-


ing with lots of fun. It is every-
thing you need to burn fat and
calories, plus it is designed for all
levels of fitness because every-
one works out at their own pace.
Here is what you will need to
get started: water, a towel and
dumbbells that weigh 5 to 8
pounds Just show up at the
park to get started.
For more information, call
352-637-0132 or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
YMCA is
SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an of-
ficial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little or
no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet
at the First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa on Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fri-
days. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates, and stability
and strength. To find out if you
are eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider.
For more information, call the
YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus


County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for a
community Divine Yoga class at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of the
benefits of yoga are improved
balance, coordination,
strength and flexibility. Yoga is
also helpful in counteracting
stress and anxiety.
For more information,
call Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA
now offers its Group Exercise
program at First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, the Y's westside
venue for health and wellness
classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered.
For more information about
the YMCA Group Exercise pro-
gram, call the office at 352-637-
0132. Financial assistance is
available to all those who qualify.
The YMCA office is in Beverly
Hills at 3909 N. Lecanto High-
way, and is open noon to 5:30
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-


driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests that moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit


www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired
dance-fitness class, is offered
at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's
Club is offering Zumba classes
in air-conditioned comfort from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Everyone is welcome. For
information, call 352-447-2057.


HITTING THE LINKS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garcia, Whatley share lead at Barclays


Ailing Woods in

close range

Associated Press

FARMINGDALE, N.Y -A com-
mon phrase this year "Tiger's
back" took on a new meaning
Friday at The Barclays.
Woods felt a twinge in his lower
back when he awoke and felt pain
throughout the second round at
Bethpage Black. He overcame a
bogey-bogey start, struggled in the
simple task of retrieving the ball
from the cup and stayed well within
range of Nick Watney and the resur-
gent Sergio Garcia, who shared the
lead going into the weekend.
As many injuries as Woods has
gone through the past two years,
the way he grimaced and walked
gingerly made it look as if this
could be another.
But that wasn't the case.
"Must have slept funny on it,"
Woods said. "Soft beds at the
hotel, and woke up this morning
with it stiff. As I warmed up, it got
progressively worse, and then you
saw what happened on the golf
course. It hurt all day"
He managed a 2-under 69, a
good effort in the afternoon on
greens that tend to get crusty.
More impressive were Garcia
and Watney, also playing in the af-
ternoon as they worked their way
up the leaderboard. Garcia, who
ended a four-year drought on the
PGA Tour last week by winning
the Wyndham Championship,
made bogey on the third hole with
what he called his worst swing of
the week and atoned for that with
a tee shot on the par-5 fourth that
restored his momentum and sent
him to a 68.
Watney, whose season has been
so dismal he isn't even in the
Ryder Cup conversation as a po-
tential pick, went eagle-birdie on
the par 5s on the front nine and
then survived a roller coaster of
birdies and bogeys on the back


Associated Press
Sergio Garcia of Spain hits his drive Friday on the second hole during the second round of The Barclays golf
tournament at Bethpage State Park in Farmingdale, N.Y. Garcia shares the lead with Nick Watney going into
the weekend.


nine that gave him a 69.
They were at 8-under 134.
Vijay Singh, who last won a PGA
Tour event in 2008 when he cap-
tured the opening two playoff
events and sailed to the FedEx
Cup title, played bogey-free for a
67 and was one shot out of the
lead, along with Bob Estes, who
had a 66. John Senden (68) and Pat
Perez (70) were another stroke
back at 6-under 136.
Rory Mcllroy noticed Woods


wincing on the opening tee shot.
About an hour later, Mcllroy felt
his own pain with sloppy mistakes
during a four-hole stretch, three of
them bogeys, that left him outside
the cut line. But not for long. The
PGA champion bounced back with
an 18-foot birdie putt on the ninth,
added two more birdies and had
a 73.
The cut was at 1-over 143, end-
ing the FedEx Cup playoffs for the
likes of Robert Allenby, Ryder Cup


captain Davis Love III and Heath
Slocum, who narrowly got into the
125-man field at the start of the
playoffs.
Garcia didn't look as though he
would be around the PGA Tour's
version of a postseason until win-
ning last week in North Carolina
by using a local club caddie, and
then showing no signs of a letdown
at Bethpage Black while using a
CBS Sports spotter on the bag.
The Spaniard is getting his own


yardages, compiling his own
thoughts, going off his own in-
stincts. And he's hitting a lot of
very good shots.
"Golf is a funny game," Garcia
said. "When you think that you
have it under control, it kicks you
down. And then all of a sudden, it
gives you something to live it again,
I guess. Obviously, if I'm not hitting
the shots, then it doesn't help."
Mark Calcavecchia
leads Boeing Classic
SNOQUALMIE, Wash. Defend-
ing champion Mark Calcavecchia ea-
gled the par-5 eighth hole and finished
with a 7-under 65 to take the first-
round lead in the Boeing Classic.
Calcavecchia, a playoff winner over
Russ Cochran last year at TPC Sno-
qualmie Ridge for his first Champions
Tour title, made a 20-foot putt on No. 8
after his 4-iron approach sailed over
the flag.
Steve Pate, Jeff Sluman, Joe Don
Blake, Eduardo Romero and Kirk
Triplett were tied for second at 68.
Fred Couples withdrew because of
back problems on the first hole. The
Seattle player won the Mississippi Gulf
Resort Classic in March and Senior
British Open last month.
15-year-old Lydia Ko
shares lead in Canada
COQUITLAM, British Columbia -
Teen star Lydia Ko shot her second
straight 4-under 68 for a share of the
lead with Chella Choi in the Canadian
Women's Open.
Ko, the 15-year-old South Korean-
born New Zealander who won the U.S.
Women's Amateur two weeks ago,
birdied four of the last seven holes in a
bogey-free round to match Choi at 8
under. In January, Ko won the New
South Wales Open in Australia at 14 to
become the youngest player to win a
professional tour event.
The 22-year-old Choi, from South
Korea, followed her opening 72 with a
64 on The Vancouver Golf Club
course.


Gators to play Driskel,

Brissett in opener


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE After
countless scrimmages,
practices, meetings and
evaluations, Florida's quar-
terback competition re-
mains a dead heat.
So coach Will Muschamp
has decided to play two.
Muschamp said Friday
both Jacoby Brissett and
Jeff Driskel will play in next
week's season opener
against Bowling Green.
"They both deserve the
right to play," Muschamp
said. "Both guys are very
even, and our football
team's got great confidence
in both of them. I told both
of them today: The last po-
sition I'm worried about is
quarterback. I feel very
comfortable about both
guys."
Muschamp said he hasn't
decided on a starter and
hasn't determined how
game repetitions will be
split. It probably won't be
play by play like former
Florida coach Steve
Spurrier successfully did
against Florida State in
1997. It more likely will be
series by series or quarter
by quarter.
"We can win with both
guys," Muschamp said. "We
function as an offense


Associated Press
Gator quarterback Jacoby
Brissett will share the
season opener with team-
mate Jeff Driskel.

regardless of who that guy
is very well. It's a compli-
ment to both guys because
they both have a similar
skill set and they both are
accomplished in what
they're doing."
The sophomores essen-
tially will continue to com-
pete in games to "see if
there is some separation,"
Muschamp said.
"I think that's the next
step," he added.
Florida's QB competition
has been open since John
Brantley played his final
game against Ohio State in
the Gator Bowl. Neither
Brissett nor Driskel made a
move during spring prac-
tice, summer workouts or
fall camp.
Both got a chance to play
in big games last year, but
neither did much.


Mears gets pole after

washout at Bristol


Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. Kyle
Busch has three races re-
maining to claim a spot in
the 12-driver Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship.
Under normal circum-
stances, his chances would
be good headed into Satur-
day night's race at Bristol
Motor Speedway Busch,
after all, has five Cup victo-
ries at Bristol.
But that was before track
owner Bruton Smith de-
cided grinding the race
track would potentially lure
fans back to the track after
several years of declining
attendance. Asked Friday
what he thought of the
changes, Busch offered a
succinct assessment:
"Terrible," he said.
He was one of the few
drivers with a strong opin-
ion after two Friday prac-
tice sessions. Qualifying
was washed out by rain,
and Casey Mears and Brad
Keselowski will start on
the front row because the
field was set by practice
times. Keselowski has won
the last two Cup races at
the track.
Few drivers ventured
into the top groove during
practice, and insisted it's
too early to tell how the
race will develop.


Smith is hoping the race
proves Bristol is once
again one of the most ex-
citing tracks in NASCAR.
After yet another ho-hum
Bristol race in March,
Smith had the top lane
ground down in an effort
to eliminate the two-wide
racing that fans believed
ruined the product. Pro-
gressive banking was
added to the track in 2007,
and the bumping and
banging that was a Bristol
trademark disappeared.
The track had a streak of
55 consecutive sellouts from
1982 until 2010, and Smith
believed tightening the track
might bring the fans back
Busch was one of the
drivers who didn't bother to
run at the top of the track
on Friday Why didn't he
check it out?
"I don't have to," he
replied, "I watched the
Truck race."
Timothy Peters led all
204 laps and the first 82
were under green in
Wednesday night's truck se-
ries race. Drivers kept an
eye on that race, and voiced
their frustrations with
Smith's track on Twitter
'"Just as expected. Killing
the top groove doesn't make
the bottom groove any bet-
ter," tweeted Martin Truex
Jr


The Citrus County Gator Club
invites you to join us for the
% Day at the Swamp
Celebration
42 Citrus County
100% PURE Fairground Auditorium
GXTOR "Inverness, FL
Sat., August 25th
6pm 9pm
Guest Speaker: Former Florida Great
Travis McGriff

Come Join Your Fellow Gator Fans for an Evening of
Food, Fun, Entertainment, Silent Auctions,
Raffles and Give-A-Ways!
Tickets are available at: Fancy's Pets on Hwy 19, Crystal
River and Center State Bank, Inverness or by mail:
6570 N Tamarind Ave, Hernando, FL 34442
Additional information call: 352-503-4263
Alumni Club Members: $10 in Advance
Non-Alumni Club Members: $15 per ticket or 2 for $25
$15 at the door Children 5 and under FREE.
Sponsored by: C O )
O00COB3


GATES OPEN: 3:30 PM RACES START: 7:30 PM
Admission Prices: Students/Seniors $8.00 *Adults $12.00 Children (6-11) $5.00 Children Under 5 FREE

DIVISIONS RACING: Southwest Florida Legends Touring Series
(Sponsored by Eagle Buick, GMC Trucks, Inc. 352-795-6800)

PRO-CHALLENGE TRIPLE CROWN FINAL RACE OF SERIES

OPEN-WHEEL MODIFIED SPORTSMAN

PURE STOCKS STRICTLY STOCKS HORNETS SPECTATOR

SATURDAY NIGHT IS VETERANS' APPRECIATION NIGHT
All veterans, retired veterans and their families will be admitted
Sfor $5.00 each. Proper ID required)


THE GAINESVILLE ROLLE S


will demonstrate their skills during intermission.


N


142


!a.4l


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SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012



NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 1 2 0 .333 52 63
Buffalo 0 2 0 .000 20 43
N.YJets 0 2 0 .000 9 43
Miami 0 3 0 .000 30 66
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 46 22
Jacksonville 2 1 0 .667 76 103
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 79 61
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 62 29
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 64 54
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 91 61
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 54 52
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 49 48
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 2 0 0 1.000 49 33
Denver 1 1 0 .500 41 33
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 58 92
Oakland 0 2 0 .000 27 34
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 0 0 1.000 78 50
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 23 28
N.Y Giants 1 1 0 .500 57 35
Washington 1 1 0 .500 38 39
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 57 65
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 36 43
New Orleans 1 2 0 .333 47 44
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 59 61
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 36 62
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 44 31
Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 42 31
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 50 69
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 101 41
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 26 26
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 34 55
Arizona 1 3 0 .250 85 103
Thursday's Games
Green Bay 27, Cincinnati 13
Baltimore 48, Jacksonville 17
Tennessee 32, Arizona 27
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay 30, New England 28
Philadelphia 27, Cleveland 10
Atlanta 23, Miami 6
Seattle 44, Kansas City 14
San Diego at Minnesota, late
Chicago at N.Y Giants, late
Saturday's Games
Indianapolis at Washington, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Francisco at Denver, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y Jets, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug.29
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
New England at N.Y Giants, 7p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 30
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Philadelphia, 6:35 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:05 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 11 p.m.



Johnnie Walker
Championship
Leading Scores
Friday, At Gleneagles Hotel (PGA Cente-
nary Course), Gleneagles, Scotland,
Purse: $2.2 million, Yardage: 7,060, Par: 72,
Second Round:
Mark Foster, England 68-68 136
Richard Finch, England 69-67 136
Brett Rumford, Australia 67-70-137
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 68-69 -137
Gregory Bourdy, France 72-66 138
Paul Waring, England 71-67 138
David Howell, England 70-69 139
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 69-70 139
Knut Borsheim, Norway 67-73-140
Chris Wood, England 70-70-140
Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 72-68 140
Francesco Molinari, Italy 68-72 140
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 72-68 -140
Matthew Nixon, England 71-69-140
Matthew Southgate, England 73-67- 140
Rhys Davies, Wales 72-68 -140
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 68-72 140
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 69-71 140
Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 71-69 140
Also
Scott Pinckney, United States 72-70 142
Missed cut
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 78-69 147
Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 75-72-147
Shaun Micheel, United States 73-74-147
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 76-72 148
Paul McGinley, Ireland 73-76 -149
Rich Beem, United States 78-73-151
Michael Campbell, New Zealand 82-70-152
The Barclays
par scores
Friday, At Bethpage State Park, Black
Course, Farmingdale, N.Y., Purse: $8 mil-
lion, Yardage: 7,468, Par 71, Second Round:
Nick Watney 65-69-134 -8
Sergio Garcia 66-68 -134 -8
Vijay Singh 68-67-135 -7
Bob Estes 69-66 -135 -7
JohnSenden 6868-136 6
PatPerez 66-70 -136 -6
Rickie Fowler 67-70 -137 -5
John Huh 70-67-137 -5
Tiger Woods 68-69- 137 -5
Gary Christian 66-71 137 5
Martin Laird 70-68-138 -4
Henrik Stenson 73-65- 138 -4
K.J. Choi 67-71 -138 -4
Ryan Moore 69-69 -138 -4
Dustin Johnson 67-71-138 4
Chris Kirk 68-71-139 -3
Michael Thompson 71-68 -139 -3
lanPoulter 68-71 139 3


Brandt Snedeker 70-69-139 -3
Justin Rose 67-72-139 -3
Bo Van Pelt 70-69 -139 -3
Carl Pettersson 73-66-139 -3
FredrikJacobson 71-68-139 -3
Padraig Harrington 64-75-139 -3
Adam Scott 70-69 -139 -3
Harris English 70-69-139 -3
J.B. Holmes 71-69-140 -2
Greg Chalmers 70-70-140 -2
Charles Howell III 71-69-140 -2
Jimmy Walker 66-74-140 -2
Ernie Els 68-72-140 -2
Bubba Watson 70-70-140 -2
Charl Schwartzel 71-69- 140 -2
Tommy Gainey 70-70-140 -2
Troy Kelly 74-66 -140 -2
Blake Adams 71-69-140 -2
Matt Kuchar 72-68-140 -2
Steve Stricker 69-71 -140 -2
Brian Harman 65-75-140 -2
Jonas Blixt 67-73-140 -2
Jason Day 70-70 -140 -2
Kevin Stadler 72-69 -141 -1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.^ CASH 3 (early)
< ; 1-3-7
CASH 3 (late)
9-4-4
,. PLAY 4 (early)
S 6-2-5-7
PLAY 4 (late)
8-4-6-6
MEGA MONEY
2-36-43-44
MEGA BALL
2
Florida Lo y FANTASY 5
1-10-17 -19-22


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma,
Qualifying
7:30 p.m. (ABC) NASCAR Sprint Cup: IRWIN Tools
Night Race
BICYCLING
2 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Pro Challenge: Stage 6 from Golden to
Boulder
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) USA Pro Challenge, Stage 6 from
Golden to Boulder
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (NBC) Horse Racing Travers Stakes. From
Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Live) (CC)
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) American Heritage (Fla.) at Cocoa (Fla.)
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Staley (Mo.) at Lee's Summit West (Mo.)
7 p.m. (ESPN) Byrnes (S.C.) at Oscar Smith (Va.)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Santa Margarita (Calif.) at Brophy Prep
(Ariz.)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Johnnie Walker
Championship, Third Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: The Barclays, Third Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: The Barclays, Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: CN Canadian Women's Open,
Third Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Boeing Classic,
Second Round (Same-day Tape)
LACROSSE
1 p.m. (ESPN2) MLL Playoff: Denver Outlaws vs. Long
Island Lizards
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (ABC) Little League Baseball World Series,
International Championship: Japan vs. Panama
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Little League Baseball World Series,
U.S. Championship: Goodlettsville (Tenn.) vs. Petaluma
(Calif.)
MLB
1 p.m. (SUN) Oakland Athletics at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (FOX) Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Seattle Mariners at Chicago White Sox
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Los Angeles Dodgers
NFL
8 p.m. (CBS) Preseason: Houston Texans at New
Orleans Saints
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Swansea City
AFC vs. West Ham United FC
1 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League: SC Braga vs.
Udinese Calcio (Same-day Tape)
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League:
Helsingborgs IF vs. Celtic FC (Same-day Tape)
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (CBS) ATP U.S. Open Series: Winston-Salem
Open, Men's Final
3 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA Tennis: New Haven Open at Yale,
Final
WNBA
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Minnesota Lynx atAtlanta Dream

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


us 73-68
69-72-
man 75-66
68-73-
d 69-72-
68-73-
72-69
zen 70-71 -
an 69-72-
70-72
70-72-
h 71-71 -
71-71 -
aet 75-67-
S72-70-
1t 68-74-
68-74
68-74-
69-73-
72-71 -
69-74-
ll 73-70-
70-73
71-72
gill 67-76
71-72
75-68
68-75-
70-73-
71-72-
ro 76-67-
70-73
71-72-
Failed to qualify
73-71 -
72-72
72-72-
71-73
73-71 -
Dn 71-73
ell 77-67-
71-73
71-73-
ey 71-73-
71-73
70-74
)y 73-71 -
72-73
onge 74-71 -
S74-71 -
73-72
r 72-73-
72-74
71-75
74-72-
owell 75-71 -
71-75-
73-74
erhays 74-73-
gale 75-72-
75-72-
73-74
in 77-70-


Chris Stroud
Andres Romero
Davis Love III
Brian Davis
Colt Knost
Kevin Chappell
Rory Sabbatini
Harrison Frazar
Dicky Pride
Aaron Baddeley
Johnson Wagner
Charley Hoffman
Charlie Wi
Ted Potter, Jr.
Jerry Kelly
Boo Weekley
Sang-Moon Bae
Matt Every
Jason Bohn


-147 +5
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-149 +7
-149 +7
-149 +7
-150 +8
-150 +8
-150 +8
-151 +9
-151 +9
-151 +9
-152 +10
-154 +12
-155 +13
75-WD
78-WD


BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE Suspended
Detroit OF Darren Driggers, Chicago White Sox
SS Carlos Gonzalez and Seattle RHP David
Pauley 50 games each for violations of the
Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment
Program.
MLB-Suspended Minnesota Twins RHP
Scott Diamond six-games and an undisclosed
fine for throwing a pitch in the head area of Josh
Hamilton of the Texas Rangers on Thursday
night.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Recalled LHP
Brian Matusz from Norfolk (IL). Reinstated INF
Ryan Flaherty from the 15-day DL. Optioned
RHPTommy Hunter to Bowie (EL). Designated
LHP J.C. Romero for assignment.
BOSTON RED SOX-Activated DH David
Ortiz from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Ju-
nichi Tazawa to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Optioned RHP
Frank Herrmann to Columbus (IL). Recalled 1 B
Matt LaPorta from Columbus.
MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned OF Matt
Carson to Rochester (IL). Recalled RHP Kyle
Waldrop from Rochester.
NEW YORK YANKEES Reinstated LHP
CC Sabathia from the 15-day DL.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned RHP
Tyson Ross to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled
RHP Jim Miller from Sacramento.
TEXAS RANGERS Placed INF Michael
Young on the paternity list. Selected the con-
tract of INF Luis Hernandez from Round Rock
(PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Traded RHP
Jesse Chavez to Oakland for cash considera-
tions. Optioned RHP Chad Beck to Las Vegas
(PCL). Reinstated OF Jose Bautista from the
15-day DL.


Robert Garrig
Tom Gillis
Trevor Immelr
Greg Owen
Lee Westwood
Troy Matteson
John Rollins
Louis Oosthui
Kevin Streelm
Geoff Ogilvy
Tim Clark
Seung-Yul No
Bud Cauley
Graham DeLa
Scott Stallings
William McGir
Phil Mickelson
Luke Donald
Rory Mcllroy
Josh Teater
Jeff Maggert
James Drisco
Rod Pampling
Billy Mayfair
George McNe
Sean O'Hair
Ryan Palmer
Zach Johnson
Bryce Molder
Ricky Barnes
Roberto Casti
David Hearn
Brian Gay

Kevin Na
Ben Crane
Ken Duke
Jim Furyk
Ben Curtis
Webb Simpso
Chad Campbe
Martin Flores
J.J. Henry
Keegan BradlE
Kyle Stanley
Will Claxton
Robert Allenb
Jeff Overton
Brendon de Jo
Heath Slocum
D.A. Points
John Mallinge
David Toms
Jonathan Byr
Scott Piercy
Graeme McDo
Bill Haas
John Merrick
Daniel SummE
Cameron Trin
MarkWilson
Hunter Mahan
Marc Leishma


Bucs hold on to down



Pats in preseason action


Falcons beat

Tannehill,

Dolphins 23-6

Associated Press

TAMPA First-round
draft picks Mark Barron
and Doug Martin scored
touchdowns, helping the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
beat Tom Brady and the
New England Patriots 30-28
on Friday night.
Barron intercepted a pass
tipped by Ronde Barber
and returned it 22 yards for
a first-quarter TD. Martin
scored on a 1-yard run that
finished a game-opening
drive led by Bucs quarter-




RUST
Continued from Page B1

opening quarter, but Dun-
nellon responded with an-
other touchdown, a 36-yard
run by Boley, in which the
Panthers' defense bit on a
fake, allowing the senior
signal-caller to break down
the left sideline for the
score and a 14-3 lead.
However, the second
quarter of action was any-
thing but pleasing. Coaches,
players and fans grew rest-
less when officials called 10
penalties, slowing the pace
of the game to a crawl.
Dunnellon overcame the
slow pace, extending its
lead to 20-3 when receiver
Andrew Jackson hauled in a
40-yard touchdown pass
from Boley with 6:52 re-



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

fullback Al Lamar White
(23 yards, six carries) late
in the first quarter and a
31-yard TD run by Chapes
two minutes into the sec-
ond quarter gave the
'Canes a 34-0 advantage
before senior cornerback
Kyle Tobin scooped an
incomplete backward pass
by Lindstrom and ran it 15
yards to the end-zone to
make it 41-0 with 8:38 still
to play in the first half.
Poinciana scored on the
ensuing possession when
sophomore Devarius Turner
ran it in from the Citrus 17.
Eagles senior kicker



TITLES
Continued from Page B1

would not comment until
hearing from the UCI and
USADA The U.S. agency con-
tends the cycling body is
bound by the World Anti-Dop-
ing Code to strip Armstrong of
one of the most incredible
achievements in sports.
Armstrong, who retired a
year ago and turns 41 next
month, said Thursday he
would no longer challenge
USADA and declined to ex-
ercise his last option by en-
tering arbitration. He
denied again that he ever
took banned substances in
his career, calling USADAs
investigation a "witch
hunt" without any physical
evidence.
He is now officially a drug
cheat in the eyes of his na-
tion's doping agency
USADA chief executive
Travis Tygart described the
investigation as a battle
against a "win-at-all-cost cul-
ture," adding that the UCI
was "bound to recognize our
decision and impose it"
"They have no choice but
to strip the titles under the
code," he said.
That would leave Greg
LeMond as the only Ameri-
can to win the Tour de
France, having done so in
1986, 1989 and 1990.
Armstrong on Friday sent a
tweet that he's still planning
to ride in a mountain bike
race in Aspen, Colo., on Sat-


urday and follow it up with
running a marathon on Sun-
day, but he did not comment
directly on the sanctions.
The UCI and USADA
have engaged in a turf war
over who should prosecute
allegations against Arm-
strong. The UCI event
backed Armstrong's failed
legal challenge to USADAs


back Josh Freeman.
Brady played three quar-
ters in his most extensive ac-
tion of the preseason, but
didn't really get the Patriots
offense on track until after
Tampa Bay built a 23-7 lead.
He finished on a high note,
though, throwing a 16-yard
touchdown pass to Rob
Gronkowski on his final play.
Falcons 23, Dolphins 6
MIAMI Miami Dolphins
rookie Ryan Tannehill had a so-
so showing Friday night, which
was more than some of his of-
fensive teammates could say.
In his first game as the Dol-
phins' starting quarterback,
Tannehill went 11 for 27 for 112
yards and one interception, and
Miami lost to Atlanta.
Four of Tannehill's passes
were dropped, including a po-


maining in the first half.
Lecanto responded with
an 18-play drive, covering
76 yards. The Panthers'
Ricky Marcic capped the
drive with a 22-yard touch-
down reception from quar-
terback Christian Barber to
trim the Tigers' lead in half,
20-10.
After trading possessions
to open the second half,
Lecanto forced the Tigers to
punt on their second pos-
session of the third quarter.
That's when the Panthers
struck again, cutting their
deficit to 20-17 on a 19-yard
touchdown reception by
Austin Stephens from Bar-
ber with 1:33 left in the third
period.
But it appeared too little,
too late for a Panthers'
comeback, as Dunnellon re-
sponded with a quick drive,
covering 51 yards in a little

Christian Ramos' PAT
capped the scoring for the
half, leaving the 'Canes
ahead 41-7 going into the
break.
With a running clock in
the second half, Citrus
sophomore running back
Breon Whaley (75 yards,
three carries) added a pair
of TD rushes before fresh-
man quarterback Austin
Bogart ran a bootleg in for
an 8-yard score with a
minute to play.
Citrus senior kicker
Austin Killeen converted
five of his six extra point at-
tempts on the night, and
'Canes junior kicker Dillon
Hunter was perfect on his
pair of PATs in the fourth
quarter.
The 'Canes got strong

authority, and it cited the
same World Anti-Doping
Code in saying that it
wanted to hear more from
the U.S. agency
'As USADA has claimed
jurisdiction in the case, the
UCI expects that it will issue
a reasoned decision" ex-
plaining the action taken, the
Switzerland-based organiza-
tion said in a statement. It
said legal procedures
obliged USADA to fulfill this
demand in cases "where no
hearing occurs."
If Tour de France officials
follow USADAs lead and an-
nounces that Armstrong has
been stripped of his titles,
Jan Ullrich could be pro-
moted to champion in three
of those years. Ullrich was
stripped of his third-place
finish in the 2005 Tour and
retired from racing two years
later after being implicated
in another doping scandal.
The retired German racer
expressed no desire to
rewrite the record book of
cycling's greatest event,
even though he would be
the biggest beneficiary
"I know how the order
was on the finishing line at
the time," Ullrich said.
"I've finished with my pro-
fessional career and have
always said that I was
proud of my second-place
finishes."
The International Olympic
Committee said Friday it will
await decisions by USADA
and UCI before taking any
steps against Armstrong, who
won a bronze medal at the
2000 Sydney Games. Besides


the disqualifications, Arm-
strong will forfeit any
medals, winnings, points and
prizes, USADA said, but it is
the lost titles that now domi-
nate his legacy
Every one of Armstrong's
competitive races from Aug.
1, 1998, has been vacated by
USADA, established in 2000


tential 4-yard touchdown throw
that Anthony Fasano bobbled in
the end zone. Shaky pass pro-
tection was also a problem for
Tannehill, who was sacked
once, forced to run twice and
hit several other times.
Eagles 27, Browns 10
CLEVELAND Rookie
quarterback Nick Foles, filling in
for injured starter Michael Vick,
threw two touchdown passes in
the first quarter to lead the
Philadelphia Eagles to a 27-10
victory over the mistake-prone
Cleveland Browns.
With Vick sidelined with
bruised ribs, Foles stepped in
and played impressively for the
Eagles (3-0), who open the
regular season in Cleveland on
Sept. 9. Foles finished
12 of 19 for 146 yards with
one interception.


more than a minute to ex-
tend their lead back to 10,
27-17. Boley capped the
drive with a 2-yard run, set
up by Wentz's 24-yard recep-
tion on a third-and-14 from
the Tigers' 26-yard line.
"I thought we did a good
job of fighting back from
that early deficit," Lecanto
coach McKinley Rolle said.
"I thought we played with
them in the second and
third quarters. Dunnellon is
a good team, they played
fairly well."
Rolle explained his team
will need to work on its fun-
damentals in the next week
as they prepare for their
season opener Friday at
home against Chiefland.
"We've got to work on
tackling and execution," he
said. "We're a fairly young
team, but they've got a lot of
fight in them."

second-half running from
junior Tyric Washington (46
yards, five carries) and jun-
ior varsity running back
John Shears (24 yards, five
carries).
Sophomore running back
Joel Morejon led the Eagles
with 19 yards on three
touches.
The Citrus defense didn't
allow a completion on Poin-
ciana's eight pass attempts.
"Our defense played with
great intensity," said
Greene of his 'Canes. "I was
proud of how we competed.
"We'll have to get better,
though, because the sched-
ule starts getting a lot
harder next week."
Citrus begins its regular
season at home Friday
against Harmony at 7:30 p.m.

as the official anti-doping
agency for Olympic sports in
the United States. Since
Armstrong raced in UCI-
sanctioned events, he was
subject to international drug
rules enforced in the U.S. by
USADA. Its staff joined a
federal criminal investiga-
tion of Armstrong that ended
earlier this year with no
charges being filed.
USADA, which an-
nounced its investigation in
June, said its evidence came
from more than a dozen wit-
nesses "who agreed to tes-
tify and provide evidence
about their firsthand expe-
rience and/or knowledge of
the doping activity of those
involved in the USPS con-
spiracy," a reference to
Armstrong's former U.S.
Postal Service cycling team.
The unidentified wit-
nesses said they knew or had
been told byArmstrong him-
self that he had "used EPO,
blood transfusions, testos-
terone and cortisone" from
before 1998 through 2005,
and that he had previously
used EPO, testosterone and
Human Growth Hormone
through 1996, USADA said.
Armstrong also allegedly
handed out doping products
and encouraged banned
methods and even used
"blood manipulation includ-
ing EPO or blood transfu-
sions" during his 2009
comeback race on the Tour
In all, USADA said up to
10 former Armstrong team-
mates were set to testify
against him. Included in the
case were emails sent by


Floyd Landis, who was
stripped of the 2006 Tour de
France title for doping, de-
scribing an elaborate dop-
ing program on Armstrong's
Postal Service teams, and
Tyler Hamilton's interview
with "60 Minutes" claiming
had personal knowledge of
Armstrong doping.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Athletics 5, Rays 4


Oakland

Crisp cf
Drew ss
Cespds If
Carter lb
JGomsdh
Dnldsn 3b
DNorrs c
Moss rf
Rosales 2b


Tampa Bay


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 DJnngs If
4 0 1 0 BUpton cf
4 1 1 0 Joyce rf
3 2 1 0 Longori dh
4 1 1 2 Zobrist ss
4 1 2 1 Kppngr3b
3 0 1 1 C.Penalb
4 0 1 1 RRorts 2b
b 4 0 1 0 JMolinc
Scott ph
Fuld pr


ab r h bi
4 00 0
5 0 2 1
5 00 0
4 0 1 0
3 2 2 1
3 0 0 1
3 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
3 1 1 0
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0


Totals 34 59 5 Totals 34 4 8 4
Oakland 000 200 120 5
TampaBay 010 110 001 4
DP-Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Oakland 4, Tampa
Bay 8. 2B-Donaldson (11), D.Norris (6),
B.Upton (22), J.Molina (7), Scott (16). 3B-Ce-
spedes (3), Zobrist (6). HR-J.Gomes (15), Zo-
brist (15). CS-Donaldson (1). SF-Keppinger.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
J.Parker 6 7 3 3 2 7
R.CookW,6-2 12-30 0 0 1 4
Doolittle H,8 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
BalfourS,13-15 1 1 1 1 1 0
Tampa Bay
M.Moore 61-37 3 3 1 7
McGee 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Jo.Peralta L,1-6 1 2 2 2 0 0
W.Davis 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by M.Moore (D.Norris). WP-M.Moore.
T-3:00. A-18,913 (34,078).

Yankees 3, Indians 1
New York Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeter ss 4 22 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0
Swisherrf 4 1 3 3 AsCarrss 3 1 1 1
Cano 2b 3 0 1 0 Choo rf 4 0 0 0
Teixeirib 4 0 0 0 CSantnc 4 0 2 0
Grndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Brantly cf 4 0 1 0
ErChvz3b 4 00 0 LaPortIb 4 0 1 0
RMartn c 4 0 1 0 Lillirdg 3b 3 0 0 0
Ibanezdh 4 0 0 0 Carrerph 1 0 0 0
ISuzukiIf 4 0 1 0 Duncandh 3 0 1 0
Ktchm ph 0 00 0
Donald If 2 0 0 0
Hannhnph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 39 3 Totals 33 1 6 1
NewYork 100 000 200 3
Cleveland 000 100 000 1
E-As.Cabrera (17), Lillibridge (4). DP-Cleve-
land 1. LOB-New York 8, Cleveland 8. 2B-
Jeter (28), Swisher (29), Cano (34).
HR-Swisher (19), As.Cabrera (14).
IP H RERBBSO


New York
SabathiaW,13-3
D.Robertson H,18
R.Soriano S,32-34
Cleveland
Kluber
Sipp
C.Allen L,0-1
E.Rogers
C.Perez


71-34 1 1 1 9
2-30 0 0 0 1
1 2 0 0 1 1


HBP-by Sabathia (Donald), by Kluber (Jeter).
WP-R.Soriano.

Angels 2, Tigers 1


Los Angeles Detroit
ab r h bi
Trout cf 5 0 0 0 AJcksn cf
Mlzturs3b 4 1 3 0 Infante 2b
TrHntr rf 3 0 0 0 MiCarr dh
KMorls dh 4 0 0 0 Fielder lb
Trumolb 4 1 1 0 Boeschrf
HKndrc2b 4 02 2 2DYonglf
Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss
V.Wells If 4 0 1 0 Avila c
lannett c 4 0 2 0 RSantg 3b
Dirks ph
JeBakr 3b
Totals 35 29 2 Totals
Los Angeles 000 002 000
Detroit 000 000 010


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 0 1 0

3 00 0
4 0 1 0

4 00 0
4 0000
2 0 0 0
2 0 1 0


32 1 5 1
2
1


E-R.Santiago (6). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 8, Detroit 6. 2B-H.Kendrick 2 (22),
Mi.Cabrera (32). HR-Mi.Cabrera (32). SB-
M.lzturis (15), Boesch (5). CS-M.lzturis (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Greinke W,2-2
S.Downs H,19
Richards S, 1-1
Detroit
Porcello L,9-9
Villarreal
Dotel


72-35 1 1 2 5
2-3 0 0 0 0 0
2-3 0 0 0 0 2

6 7 2 2 1 6
2 2 0 0 0 4
1 0 0 0 0 0


HBP-by Porcello (Tor.Hunter).WP-Villarreal.

Rangers 8, Twins 0
Minnesota Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Revere cf 4 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 2
Mstrnn rf 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss 4 0 2 1
Mauerc 4 0 0 0 Hamltndh 5 1 1 0
Mornea 1 b 4 0 0 0 Beltre 3b 4 1 4 3
Doumit If 4 0 1 0 LHrndz 3b 0 0 0 0
Plouffe dh 4 0 1 0 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0
JCarrll 3b 2 0 1 0 DvMrp If 4 1 2 0
ACasill2b 3 00 0 Morlndlb 4 1 2 1
Flormn ss 3 0 0 0 LMrtnz c 3 1 0 0
Gentry cf 4 2 2 0
Totals 31 03 0 Totals 36815 7
Minnesota 000 000 000 0
Texas 150 010 01x 8
E-Deduno (2), M.Harrison (1). DP-Minnesota
2. LOB-Minnesota 6, Texas 7.2B-Beltre (26),
Dav.Murphy (25). 3B-Beltre (1). HR-Beltre


Minnesota
Deduno L,4-2
Waldrop
Texas
M.Harrison W,15-7
R.Ross


IP H RERBBSO

5 11 7 7 1 0


8 2 0 0 2 5
1 1 0 0 0 1


HBP-by Deduno (L.Martinez, Andrus).


Rays schedule
Aug. 25 Oakland, 1:10 p.m.
Aug. 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 30 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 31 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Sept. 1 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 2 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 3 N.Y.Yankees, 1:10 p.m.
Sept. 4 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 5 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 7Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 8 Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 9 Texas, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Sept. 14 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Sept. 16 at N.Y Yankees, TBA
Sept. 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 18 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 19 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 20 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 23 Toronto, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 26 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 28 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 29 at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 30 at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oct. 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 2 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 3 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 73
Tampa Bay 70
Baltimore 68
Boston 60
Toronto 56




W
Washington 77
Atlanta 71
Philly 59
Miami 57
New York 57


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
52 .584 - 5-5
56 .556 3Y2 7-3
57 .544 5 6-4
66 .476 13Y28Y2 3-7
69 .448 17 12 1-9



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
48 .616 - 6-4
54 .568 6 5-5
67 .468 18Y2 10Y2 5-5
69 .452 20Y2 12Y2 5-5
69 .452 20Y2 12Y2 2-8


Str Home
W-1 39-24
L-1 35-29
W-1 33-29
W-1 30-37
L-6 31-30


Away W
34-28 Chicago 68
35-27 Detroit 67
35-28 Kansas City 55
30-29 Cleveland 54
25-39 Minnesota 51


Str Home Away
L-2 36-24 41-24
L-1 36-29 35-25
W-229-35 30-32
L-2 29-31 28-38
L-6 28-35 29-34


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
55 .553 - 6-4
58 .536 2 1 6-4
69 .444 13Y212Y2 6-4
71 .432 15 14 1-9
74 .408 18 17 1-9


Home Away
40-23 34-28
39-27 29-30
33-29 33-31
33-30 28-34


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
51 .592 - 7-3
57 .544 6 7-3
60 .524 8Y2 2Y2 6-4
64 .488 13 7 9-1




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
55 .560 - 7-3
58 .536 3 2 5-5
61 .512 6 5 6-4
70 .444 14Y213Y2 5-5
74 .403 19Y218Y2 7-3


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Home Away
35-26 33-29
37-26 30-32
26-33 29-36
30-30 24-41
24-37 27-37


Str Home Away
L-2 41-23 35-28
W-4 40-26 29-30
L-4 37-24 30-34
W-4 38-28 20-38
W-1 31-28 17-48
W-1 27-35 13-51


Associated Press
The Oakland Athletics' Josh Donaldson, center, is tagged out by Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Matt Moore, left, at home
plate after being caught in a rundown while trying to steal home during the fourth inning of Friday's baseball game in
St. Petersburg.




Athletics slip past Rays 5-4


Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG Jonny
Gomes' two-run home run in the
eighth inning lifted the Oakland Ath-
letics to a 5-4 victory over the Tampa
Bay Rays on Friday night.
Gomes' homer offJoel Peralta (1-6)
broke a 3-3 tie and sent the Rays to
their second loss in eight games.
Ryan Cook (6-2) earned the win in
relief for the As, who have won seven
of nine.
Luke Scott's pinch-hit double got a
run back for the Rays in the ninth be-
fore Grant Balfour finished for his
13th save.
Gomes, who played for the Rays
from 2003-2008, has hit safely in all
eight of his games against his former
team with three homers in 26 at-bats.
It was his 15th home run of the season.


AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 3, Indians 1
CLEVELAND CC Sabathia came off
the disabled list and went into the eighth
inning and Nick Swisher hit a two-run
homer to help the New York Yankees
snap a three-game losing streak by beat-
ing the Cleveland Indians 3-1.
Cleveland lost its ninth straight as ex-
Indian Sabathia (13-3) worked 7 1/3
strong innings. The left-hander had a per-
fect game until Asdrubal Cabrera home-
red with one out in the fourth.
Derek Jeter was beaned by Indians
starter Corey Kluber, but stayed in the
game. Jeter had two hits and scored twice.

Red Sox 4, Royals 3
BOSTON Pedro Ciriaco put Boston
ahead with a two-run double in the sev-
enth inning, Jon Lester had his third
straight solid start and the Red Sox
snapped a four-game losing streak with a
4-3 win over the Kansas City Royals.
The victory capped a day in which the
Red Sox and the Dodgers discussed a
major trade that would send Adrian Gon-
zalez, Boston's best hitter, to Los Angeles.
Minutes before the game, Gonzalez
was scratched from the lineup. In Los An-
geles, first baseman James Loney was
pulled from the lineup against the Miami
Marlins. Gonzalez was leading the Red
Sox with 86 RBIs, 145 hits and 37 dou-
bles and was first in the majors with a
.398 batting average with runners in scor-
ing position.
Orioles 6, Blue Jays 4
BALTIMORE Chris Davis hit three
home runs in four at-bats and had four
RBIs to lead the Baltimore Orioles past
the skidding Toronto Blue Jays 6-4.
Davis hit solo shots off Carlos Vil-
lanueva (6-4) in the second and fourth in-
nings, then greeted Steve Delabar in the
sixth with an opposite-field, two-run drive
to left field to put Baltimore up 5-1.
Zach Britton (3-1) allowed two runs and
four hits in 6 2/3 innings for the Orioles,
who have won seven of 11 to remain in
the thick of the AL wild-card race.

Angels 2, Tigers 1
DETROIT Zack Greinke gave up
one run and Howie Kendrick broke a
scoreless tie with a two-run double in the
sixth, lifting the Los Angeles Angels to a
2-1 win over the Detroit Tigers.
Miguel Cabrera's two-out solo homer in
the eighth chased Greinke. Scott Downs
got the Angels out of the inning by getting
Prince Fielder to ground out and retired
Brennan Boesch to lead off the ninth.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Detroit 3, Toronto 2, 11 innings
L.A. Angels 14, Boston 13, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 5, Oakland 0
Texas 10, Minnesota 6
Friday's Games
L.A. Angels 2, Detroit 1
N.Y. Yankees 3, Cleveland 1
Baltimore 6, Toronto 4
Boston 4, Kansas City 3
Oakland 5, Tampa Bay 4
Texas 8, Minnesota 0
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, late
Saturday's Games
Oakland (McCarthy 6-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-8),
1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 3-8) at Texas (Dempster 2-1), 4:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 8-10) at Detroit (Smyly 4-3), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 12-8) at Cleveland (Masterson 9-11),
7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 7-4) at Baltimore (S.Johnson 1-0), 7:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3) at Boston (Beckett 5-11), 7:10
p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 8-7) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-2),
7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Colorado 1, N.Y. Mets 0
St. Louis 13, Houston 5
Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 3, 11 innings
San Francisco 5, Atlanta 2
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Colorado 3
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 5
Philadelphia 4, Washington 2
Houston 3, N.Y Mets 1
St. Louis 8, Cincinnati 5
San Diego at Arizona, late
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, late
Atlanta at San Francisco, late
Saturday's Games
Colorado (White 2-6) at Chicago Cubs (Raley 1-2), 1:05
p.m.
Houston (Abad 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 15-4), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 6-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 14-7),
4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-4) at Cincinnati (Leake 5-8), 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 5-3) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-3), 7:05
p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 16-6) at Philadelphia (Halladay
7-7), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 10-12) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 11-10),
8:10 p.m.
Miami (Jo.Johnson 7-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 11-7),
9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.


Garrett Richards struck out Delmon
Young and Jhonny Peralta for the final
two outs to earn his first career save.
Greinke (2-2) gave up five hits and two
walks while striking out five over 7 2/3 in-
nings.

Rangers 8, Twins 0
ARLINGTON, Texas Matt Harrison
took a no-hit bid into the seventh and
went eight innings for his career-high
15th victory and Adrian Beltre hit for the
cycle for the Texas Rangers in an 8-0 win
over the Minnesota Twins.
Harrison (15-7) didn't allow a hit until
Trevor Plouffe lined a solid single to left
with two outs in the seventh. That came
right after left fielder David Murphy made
a diving catch on Ryan Doumit's sinking
liner to keep the no-hit bid intact, though
Murphy had no chance to get to the next
ball hit his way.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 5, Rockies 3
CHICAGO Joe Mather took advan-
tage of a rare start with a go-ahead single
during a three-run rally in the eighth in-
ning and the Chicago Cubs ended a four-
game losing streak with a 5-3 victory over
the Colorado Rockies.
The Rockies had matched a season
best with a five-game winning streak.
Chicago trailed 3-2 going into the
eighth. Brett Jackson tied it with his sec-
ond homer of the season and Mather,
batting in the leadoff spot usually occu-
pied by David DeJesus, hit an RBI single
against reliever Matt Belisle (3-5).
The Cubs added another run on re-
liever Matt Reynolds' throwing error to
first on Anthony Rizzo's grounder.

Astros 3, Mets 1
NEW YORK Jordan Lyles won for
the first time in two months and the
Houston Astros snapped a seven-game
skid with a 3-1 victory over the sluggish
New York Mets, giving Tony De-
Francesco his first win as a major league
manager.
Tyler Greene homered and Lyles
knocked in a run with his first career dou-
ble as the Astros (40-86) improved to 4-0
against the Mets this season. Houston,
with the worst record in the majors, won
for only the eighth time in its last 51
games.
David Wright hit his 200th homer for
the Mets, who have lost six straight and
nine of 11.

Cardinals 8, Reds 5
CINCINNATI -Allen Craig and Yadier
Molina homered during a six-run sixth in-
ning, and the defending World Series
champion St. Louis Cardinals opened a
defining road trip by beating the Cincin-
nati Reds 8-5 and moving six games
back of the NL Central leaders.
The Cardinals' big comeback off Mat
Latos (10-4) started a 10-day trip against
the Reds, Pirates and Nationals.
Cincinnati knocked starter Lance Lynn
out of the game in the third inning. Joe
Kelly (4-5) fanned six in three innings of
relief. Jason Motte pitched the ninth for
his 30th save in 35 chances.
Phillies 4, Nationals 2
PHILADELPHIA- Kyle Kendrick
pitched effectively for 6 2/3 innings and
Jimmy Rollins drove in a pair of runs to
lead the Philadelphia Phillies to a 4-2 vic-
tory over the Washington Nationals.
Kendrick (7-9), one of seven pitchers
used by Philadelphia, allowed four hits
and struck out three to help the Phillies
win for the fifth time in the last seven
games.
Tyler Moore homered for Washington,
which lost its second straight.
Brewers 6, Pirates 5
PITTSBURGH Mike Fiers pitched
effectively into the seventh inning, Aramis
Ramirez had a go-ahead three-run dou-
ble in the seventh and the Milwaukee
Brewers held on to win their fourth con-
secutive game, 6-5 over the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
Fiers (7-6) tied a career high with 10
strikeouts. The rookie allowed three runs
on five hits in 6 2-3 innings.
Ramirez went 2 for 4 and scored two
runs. He cleared the bases with a two-out
double to right-center in the seventh,
breaking a 2-2 tie. Ramirez then scored
on a Corey Hart single.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 B5



NL

Cubs 5, Rockies 3


Colorado


Chicago


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Blckmn rf 4 0 0 0 Mather rf-lf 4 1 1 1
JHerrrss 3 1 0 0 Vitters3b 3 0 0 0
Pachec lb 4 0 1 0 DeJess rf 0 00 0
CGnzlzlf 4 1 1 1 Rizzolb 4 0 0 0
RHrndz c 3 0 0 0 ASorin If 4 1 1 1
Colvincf 4 0 0 0 Marmlp 0 0 0 0
Nelson 3b 4 1 2 1 SCastro ss 2 0 0 0
LeMahi2b 4 0 3 0 WCastll c 3 1 1 1
DPmrnp 1 0 0 0 BJcksn cf 3 1 1 1
Roenck p 1 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 00 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0
MtRynlp 0 00 0 Campp 0 00 0
Rutledgph 1 0 0 0 Russell p 0 00 0
Valuen ph-3b 1 1 1 0
Totals 33 37 2 Totals 29 5 5 4
Colorado 111 000 000 3
Chicago 000 020 03x 5
E-Mat.Reynolds (2), LeMahieu (2), S.Castro
(19). DP-Colorado 2. LOB-Colorado 6,
Chicago 2. 2B-Nelson (13), Valbuena (15).
HR-C.Gonzalez (21), Nelson (6), A.Soriano
(23), W.Castillo (4), B.Jackson (2). CS-
LeMahieu (2). S-D.Pomeranz.
IP H RERBBSO


Colorado
D.Pomeranz
Roenicke H,6
Belisle L,3-5 BS,6-7
Mat.Reynolds
Chicago
Samardzija
Camp
Russell W,6-1
Marmol S,16-18
WP-Samardzija.


5 2 2
2 0 0
1-3 3 3
2-3 0 0

7 6 3
1-3 0 0
2-3 0 0
1 1 0


Brewers 6, Pirates 5
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Aoki rf
RWeks 2b
Braun If
ArRmr 3b
Hart lb
Lucroy c
CGomz cf
Segura ss
Fiers p
Hndrsn p
Ishikaw ph
FrRdrg p
Axford p
Loe p


5 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
2 1 0 0
4 22 3
4 1 3 2
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
3 00 0
3 0 1 0
0 00 00
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


Totals 33 68 6
Milwaukee 020
Pittsburgh 000


Tabata If
Snider rf
AMcCt cf
GJones lb
Walker 2b
PAIvrz 3b
Barajs c
Clemnt ph
Barmes ss
McKnrph
WRdrg p
JHughs p
Quails p
JHrrsn ph
Hanrhn p
GSnchz ph
Totals
000 400
200 102


E-Barmes 2 (13). DP-Milwaukee 1, Pitts-
burgh 3. LOB-Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 4. 2B-
Aoki (22), Ar.Ramirez (41), Hart (30), Snider (4).
HR-Barajas (9). SB-Aoki (19). CS-Tabata
(12).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
FiersW,7-6 62-35 3 3 2 10
HendersonH,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Fr.RodriguezH,22 1 0 0 0 0 0
AxfordH,3 2-3 2 2 2 2 2
LoeS,2-7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
W.Rodriguez L,8-13 62-36 3 3 4 3
J.Hughes 1-3 2 3 3 1 0
Quails 1 0 0 0 0 0
Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by J.Hughes (R.Weeks).

Cardinals 8, Reds 5
St. Louis Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jay cf 5 0 1 0 Cozart ss 5 1 1 0
Beltranrf 4 1 1 0 Stubbscf 4 1 0 0
Hollidy If 5 1 1 0 BPhllps 2b 5 1 2 1
Craigib 5 2 3 3 Ludwcklf 5 0 2 0
YMolinc 5 2 3 1 Brucerf 5 1 1 0
Freese3b 2 1 1 1 Frazierib 4 1 3 1
RJcksn ph-2bl 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 5 0 2 1
Schmkr2b 4 1 3 0 Hanignc 2 00 1
Mujicap 0 0 0 0 Latosp 3 0 1 0
Boggs p 0 00 0 Simon p 0 00 0
Motte p 0 0 0 0 Paul ph 1 00 0
Furcalss 4 0 1 1 LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Lynn p 1 0 00
J.Kelly p 1 0 0 0
MCrpnt ph 0 0 0 1
Salas p 0 0 0 0
Descals 2b-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 8147 Totals 39512 4
St. Louis 010 106 000 8
Cincinnati 211 010 000 5
E-Freese (12), J.Kelly (3). DP-St. Louis 1,
Cincinnati 2. LOB-St. Louis 7, Cincinnati 11.
2B-Cozart (31), Rolen (14). HR-Craig (19),
Y.Molina (17). SB-Jay (15).SF-M.Carpenter,
Hanigan.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Lynn 2 6 4 4 2 1
J.KellyW,4-5 3 4 1 1 1 6
SalasH,5 1 0 0 0 0 3
Mujica H,21 1 0 0 0 0 2
Boggs H,25 1 0 0 0 0 1
Motte S,30-35 1 2 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Latos L,10-4 5 9 7 7 1 5
Simon 3 4 1 1 1 1
LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 0
Latos pitched to 5 batters in the 6th.
Lynn pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd.
HBP-by Simon (Freese). WP-Latos, Simon
3.

Phillies 4, Nationals 2
Washington Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Lmrdzz2b 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 4 1 2 2
Harper cf 4 0 2 0 Frndsn 3b 3 00 0
Zmrmn 3b 3 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0
Morse If 0 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0
Berndn pr-lf 2 0 1 0 Utley 2b 3 1 1 1
LaRochlb 4 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 02 1
Werth rf 4 0 0 0 DBrwn rf 4 0 0 0
Espinosss 4 0 1 0 Mayrrycf 4 1 1 0
KSuzukc 3 1 0 0 L.Nixlf 2 1 1 0
EJcksnp 2 0 1 0 Kratzc 3 00 0
TMooreph 1 1 1 2 Kndrckp 1 01 0
Matths p 0 0 0 0 Horst p 0 0 0 0
McGnzl p 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph 1 0 0 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Lindlmp 0 0 0 0
Valdesp 0 00 0
Mrtnz 3b 0 00 0
Totals 32 26 2 Totals 294 8 4
Washington 000 000 200 2
Philadelphia 100 200 01x 4
DP-Washington 2. LOB-Washington 7,
Philadelphia 5.2B-Harper 2 (18), Howard (7),
K.Kendrick (1). HR-T.Moore (7). SB-Utley (4).
CS-Espinosa (6). S-K.Kendrick.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
E.Jackson L,7-9 6 7 3 3 2 8
Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
Storen 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
K.KendrickW,7-9 62-34 2 2 2 3
HorstH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Bastardo H,19 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Lindblom 0 0 0 0 1 0
Valdes H,1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Rosenberg H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
PapelbonS,28-31 1 1 0 0 0 2
Lindblom pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by K.Kendrick (Morse).


Str Home Away
W-4 36-26 34-29
L-3 33-28 34-30
W-2 33-28 31-33
W-4 31-32 25-38
L-1 26-39 24-35


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
51 .598 - 5-5
56 .552 6 7-3
58 .536 8 2 3-7
66 .468 16Y210Y2 6-4
76 .387 262 20Y2 3-7
86 .317 35Y2 29Y2 2-8












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Alleged burglar's
record disclosed
LOS ANGELES The
man charged with break-
ing into LL Cool J's house
earlier
this week
has a
lengthy
Criminal
record
that in-
cludes a
A man-
LL Cool J slaughter
convic-
tion in
Texas, court records
show.
Authorities said the
actor-rapper subdued
Jonathan A. Kirby early
Wednesday after finding
the man in his Los Ange-
les home, breaking
Kirby's nose, jaw and ribs
in the process.
Kirby, 58, has a lengthy
arrest and criminal his-
tory in LA, but also was
convicted of voluntary
manslaughter in Dallas
in 1988.
Records show Kirby
was sentenced to six
years of imprisonment,
but was paroled the fol-
lowing year By January
1990 he had been ar-
rested on a prostitution-
related charge in West
Hollywood, and in 1995
was convicted of felony
residential burglary He
is charged with the same
offense in the LL Cool J
incident and could face
38 years to life in prison
if convicted.
No additional details
about the circumstances
of the Texas manslaugh-
ter conviction were avail-
able Friday
Prosecutors want
Kirby, a transient who
has used different names
and dates of birth over
the years, treated as a
third-strike offender
Authorities say LL Cool
J, whose real name is
James Todd Smith, and
his family were un-
harmed during the break-
in, and nothing was
apparently taken from
their home.
Kirby has yet to make a
court appearance and
had to be hospitalized be-
cause of his injuries.

US mimics soar
in air guitar
HELSINKI Shaggy
bearded "Nordic Thun-
der" has outmimed his
American
compa-
triot
"Airisto-
tle" at
playing
the air
guitar to
become
Justin this year's
Howard world
champion
in northern Finland.
Justin Howard from
Chicago narrowly beat
Matt Burns of New York
late Friday in the final of
the international contest
that has been held in the
northern Finnish city of
Oulu since 1996.
Dutchman Theun de
Jong finished third in the
field of 18 finalists that
included competitors
from Japan, Britain, Rus-
sia, Czech Republic and
neighboring Estonia.
The 17th Air Guitar
World Championship is
one of several zany an-
nual events in Finland.
-From wire reports


Lackluster 'Sparkle'


Film sputters amid

mushy melodrama

DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

"Sparkle" is like a box of July
Fourth sparklers. It sizzles briefly
whenever people open their
mouths to sing, flames out, then
flashes to life again when someone
lights another musical sparkler
In between, when people open
their mouths to talk, the characters
mostly are like burned-out
sparklers stiff, inert, disposable
metal sticks.
Not really the way we'd like to re-
member Whitney Houston or wel-
come a gifted singer such as Jordin
Sparks to the big-screen. But the
main attraction of "Sparkle" is the
glitter and glamour, and in that it
delivers, compensating somewhat
for the bad melodrama and bad act-
ing in a bad story of a Supremes-
style sister act on the late 1960s
Motown scene.
A remake of the 1976 movie,
"Sparkle" was a passion project for
Houston, also an executive pro-
ducer on the production. Her death
on the eve of the Grammys in Feb-
ruary turned the movie into a me-
morial of sorts, but her performance
as a disapproving mom is slight,
while the one solo number she sings
is blah, a sad reminder of another
glorious voice gone gruff with time
and hard living.
In the title role, "American Idol"
winner Sparks has an innocence
and earnestness, wide eyes filled
with hope and decency, a blazing
smile, that beautiful singing voice.
And then she has to go and talk, in
flat, breathless tones, infusing
Sparkle with all the conviction of a
drama club diva with her first lead
in a school play
Sparks is surrounded by veteran
actors who, while not at their best,
at least know how to mug their way
through a lurid story filled with silly
people and preposterous turns.
While constantly upstaged by her
co-stars, Sparks also gets shafted by
the action itself as director Salim
Akil ("Jumping the Broom") and his
wife, screenwriter Mara Brock Akil,
leave her on the sidelines, a big-
hearted wallflower watching every-
one else have fun and do the heavy
lifting.
So you have a movie called
"Sparkle," about an aspiring singer
and songwriter named Sparkle,
who is background noise to her own
story
Sparkle's the youngest of three
sisters raised by stern, religious De-
troit businesswoman Emma (Hous-
ton), who had a taste of musical
success in her youth, got burned
badly, and now wants nothing but
the straight-and-narrow for her
girls.
Eldest sibling Tammy (Carmen
Ejogo), who goes by the name Sister,
is the wild child drop-dead gor-
geous and desperate to break out of
the confines of Emma's world. With
a magnificent voice and spicy stage
presence, Sister's a born star as she
takes the lead in a threesome


Associated Press


Jordin Sparks is shown in a scene from "Sparkle."


Movie REVIEW


backed by Sparkle and middle sib-
ling Dolores (Tika Sumpter).
Aided by their manager, Sparkle's
new boyfriend Stix (Derek Luke),
the trio leaps to local stardom and
the prospects of a record deal, pow-
ered by Sister's voice and show-
manship and Sparkle's provocative
pop songs.
The musical numbers are slinky
and sexy, highlighted by Curtis May-
field classics and some catchy tunes
written by R. Kelly, with Ejogo,
Sparks and Sumpter dazzling in
racy outfits from costume designer
Ruth E. Carter
"Sparkle" really is Sister and
Emma's story more than anything
as Houston preaches against
worldly temptations and Ejogo
grasps for them, anyway
Luke is sturdy but boring, as is
Omari Hardwick as Stix's cousin,
Levi, a decent guy who falls madly
for Sister. Mike Epps is stuck in a
flash role as stand-up comedy star
Satin, who sweeps Sister away
swooning but devolves instantly
into the bad wolf certain to become
her downfall.
Ejogo steals the show, getting the
best songs to sing and the best lines
to shout as the melodrama turns
shrill. Even as the action becomes
tawdry and laughable, Ejogo keeps
Sister grounded, a watchable if not
altogether believable woman se-
duced by success.


Sumpter manages sass and
strength as the smart, sensible sis-
ter, leaving Sparks playing third fid-
dle in her own movie. Her romance
is uninteresting and her issues with
mom are uninvolved compared to
Sister's, while the filmmakers rein
in Sparks musically until the very
end. When she finally gets to center
stage, it's a doozy of a production
number a great music video but
an abrupt transition from quiet
church mouse to self-possessed su-
perstar that's way over the top in
context of the story
Houston sort of speed-mumbles
her way through much of her dia-
logue, and though we're told she's a
loving parent, she plays Emma
mostly as a mean, bitter, suspicious
mom.
There is a chilling moment,
though, as Emma asks, "Was my life
not enough of a cautionary tale?"
If Houston were still alive, the
line would resonate, given her drug
problems, her tumultuous personal
life, her diminished voice. With
Houston gone, the line becomes a
sad epitaph for a life gone wrong, a
talent wasted.
"Sparkle," released by Sony's
TriStar Pictures, is rated PG-13 for
mature thematic content involving
domestic abuse and drug material,
and for some violence, language
and smoking. Running time: 116
minutes. Two stars out of four


R&B singer Usher wins primary custody of sons


Associated Press


ATLANTA Grammy-
winning R&B singer Usher
on Friday was awarded pri-
mary physical custody of his
two sons, ending a long legal
fight with his ex-wife.
Fulton County Superior
Court Judge Bensonetta
Tipton Lane ruled the
singer, 33, will have primary
custody of 4-year-old Usher
Raymond V and 3-year-old
Naviyd Ely Raymond, ac-
cording to Cherrise Boone,
spokeswoman for the court


Birthday Your career could take a substantial leap for-
ward in the year ahead as a result of your new way of deal-
ing with people. This wisdom will be utilized in ways that
bring you much growth and development in your chosen
field of endeavor.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A friend who believes that you
will keep in confidence what she or he tells you is likely to en-
trust you with a secret. It's imperative that you honor this trust.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) There is a chance you can
learn more from a friend than you can from books. When
speaking to a close pal whose ideas you respect, do more
listening than talking.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You will first have to define
what you want if you hope to achieve your aims. Don't be
afraid to speak up, because once you start talking, the right
words will be there.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Friends are happy to help


clerk's office. His custody
will start Sept. 1.
Boone said Usher and his
ex-wife Tameka Foster Ray-
mond will have joint legal
custody The type of visita-
tion hasn't been determined
yet for Tameka Raymond.
Usher's lawyer, Ivory
Brown, did not immediately
return a call on Friday. Lisa
West, a lawyer for Tameka
Raymond, did not immedi-
ately return an email seek-
ing comment.
Usher, whose real name is
Usher Raymond IV, married


Tameka Raymond in
2007. They divorced
two years later He -
said the couple had
been separated since
July 2008 and
claimed there was
"no reasonable hope
of reconciliation" and Us
the marriage was "ir-
retrievably broken."
In May, Usher testified
Tameka Raymond spit at and
tried to fight with his girl-
friend during one visit and
his ex-wife hit him during
the dispute. He said he did-


Today's HOROSCOPE
you at this time, but they first must understand what you
want from them. Promote your cause the same way you'd
market a product.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your ability to research
and discover things is extremely effective. Properly applied,
you can get past the obvious and find the facts that lie be-
neath the surface.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Discussion should precede
all action you take, especially anything that would directly
affect another. Once a mutual agreement is achieved,
make your move.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Your chances for fulfilling an am-
bitious objective are excellent at this time. This is because you'll
know how to logically and effectively utilize any development.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Asincere interest in learning
more about someone you recently met will do a lot to fur-
ther the relationship. It could awaken in the other party an


n't press charges be-
cause: "I didn't want
the boys to know that
their father put their
mother in jail," he
said.
Tameka Ray-
mond's attorney
her claimed Usher pro-
voked her client and
his account is exag-
gerated. The custody deci-
sion comes after Tameka
Raymond's 11-year-old son,
Kile Glover, died last month
after he was critically in-
jured in a boating accident.


equally strong interest in you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If a family problem is dis-
cussed with all parties, it can be worked out to everybody's
satisfaction. Be the one who puts the meeting together, and
don't leave anybody out.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Tell it like it is if an old pal
comes to you for advice today. Chances are you'll have a
lot to say that could be constructive and would be ex-
tremely helpful to your friend.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your financial prospects look
extremely encouraging, provided your aspirations don't ex-
ceed your grasp. If you are content with small gains, there
could be quite a few in the making.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If your ears are ringing, chances
are you are the topic of conversation among your friends.
Not to worry, however if you could hear what they're
saying, you'd be pleased.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 23
Fantasy 5:2 8- 11 13- 29
5-of-5 2 winners $102,203.43
4-of-5 298 $110.50
3-of-5 9,935 $9
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22
Powerball: 22 29 31 47 55
Powerball: 19
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 2 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 14 29 30 41 43 49
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 20 $6,899.50
4-of-6 1,151 $91
3-of-6 23,412 $6
Fantasy 5:8 11 16 -20 -34
5-of-5 1 winner $230,545.14
4-of-5 346 $107
3-of-5 10,010 $10
TUESDAY, AUGUST 21
Mega Money: 10 22 38 41
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $2 million
4-of-4 6 winners $1,433.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Aug. 25,
the 238th day of 2012. There
are 128 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 25, 1537, King
Henry VIII granted a royal
charter incorporating the Ho-
nourable Artillery Company,
the oldest regiment in the
British Army.
On this date:
In 1718, hundreds of
French colonists arrived in
Louisiana, with some settling
in present-day New Orleans.
In 1916, the National Park
Service was established within
the Department of the Interior.
In 1921, the United States
signed a peace treaty with
Germany.
In 1944, Paris was liber-
ated by Allied forces after four
years of Nazi occupation.
In 1981, the U.S. space-
craft Voyager 2 came within
63,000 miles of Saturn's
cloud cover, sending back
pictures of and data about
the ringed planet.
Ten years ago: China set
Nov. 8, 2002, as the date for
its long-awaited Communist
Party national congress.
Five years ago: The gov-
ernment of Greece declared
a nationwide state of emer-
gency as the death toll from
wildfires rose to at least 49.
One year ago: The New
York Yankees became the
first team in major league his-
tory to hit three grand slams
in a game, with Robinson
Cano, Russell Martin and
Curtis Granderson connect-
ing in a 22-9 romp over the
Oakland Athletics.
Today's Birthdays: Game
show host Monty Hall is 91.
Actor Sean Connery is 82.
Actor Page Johnson is 82.
TV personality Regis Philbin
is 81. Actor Tom Skerritt is
79. Jazz musician Wayne
Shorter is 79. Movie director
Hugh Hudson is 76. Author
Frederick Forsyth is 74. Actor
David Canary is 74. Movie di-
rector John Badham is 73.
Filmmaker Marshall Brick-
man is 71. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Walter Williams (The
O'Jays) is 70. Georgia Gov.
Nathan Deal is 70. Actor An-
thony Heald is 68. Rock mu-
sician Danny Smythe is 64.
Rock singer-actor Gene Sim-
mons is 63. Actor John Sav-
age is 63. Country singer-
musician Henry Paul (Out-
laws; Blackhawk) is 63. Rock
singer Rob Halford is 61.


Rock singer Elvis Costello
is 58.
Thought for Today: "His-
tory is the sum total of the
things that could have been
avoided." Konrad Ade-
nauer, German statesman
(1876-1967).











RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


o0n


onk


0spel


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Associated Press
Parishioners take communion at the Flora-Bama Lounge, Package and Oyster Bar in Pensacola, Fla. The iconic bar, which sits on the Florida
and Alabama line, is famous for its annual mullet tossing contest, bar brawls and drink specials. But for one hour every Sunday, the Flora-Bama
is home to about 450 congregants of Worship at the Water, an outreach service of Perdido Key United Methodist Church.

Famous Flora-Bama Lounge serves as site ofchurch's outreach ministry


Associated Press
PERDIDO KEY
n a balmy Sunday morning
at the Flora-Bama Lounge,
Package and Oyster Bar,
barkeeps set up their sta-
tions as churchgoers fil-
tered in under a Jack
Daniels banner.
The iconic bar, which sits on
the Florida and Alabama state
line, is famous for its annual
mullet-tossing contest patrons
gather on the beach and throw
dead fish from Alabama into
Florida.
Bikini contests, bar brawls
and drink specials are the day-
to-day business of the beach bar
that calls itself 'America's last
roadhouse."
But for one hour every Sun-
day, the Flora-Bama is home to
about 450 regular congregants of
Worship at the Water, an out-
reach service of the Perdido Bay
United Methodist Church. More


than 1,100 filled the place on
Easter Sunday
Bible study is in the upstairs
bar
If Jesus returned to Earth,
he'd probably kick back at the
Flora-Bama, said Jack de Jar-
nette, a founding pastor of the
church.
"It's the sort of place he often
went and hung out with people,"
he said. "When you cannot get
people to come to church, the al-
ternative is to bring the church
to them."
A band in tie-dyed T-shirts
played Curtis Mayfield's "Peo-
ple Get Ready," as parishioners
gathered underneath an awning
adorned with rows of Land
Shark beer flags on a recent
Sunday Most wore flip-flops and
shorts, but some wore swimsuits.
"If you look closely, you might
see a few of the churchgoers
having a Bloody Mary or a bush-
whacker," longtime bar em-
ployee Blitz Poston said. "It's


really a wonderful thing that
brings together people from all
walks of life."
Offerings are collected in
neon tackle boxes placed
throughout the bar
Pastor Jeremy Mount wears
Mardi Gras beads, shorts, san-
dals and T-shirt that is fringed
around the sleeves.
"There are seven places to
drink and no place to worship
God on this key," he said. "We feel
like God has called us here to be
a ministry Where would there
ever be a better place than the
world-renowned Flora-Bama?"
His sermon is one of redemp-
tion and hope, followed by a
communion with bread and
grape juice instead of wine.
Many members of his flock
were regular churchgoers be-
fore they started attending the
Flora-Bama service. Others
have become regulars because
they like the unique setting,
Mount said.


"Some had never been to
church, ever, but they felt so
comfortable here in the Flora-
Bama," he said.
Church member Paul Holland
is a longtime fan of the Flora-
Bama, which he says is a five-
star honky-tonk filled with
top-shelf rednecks. He has be-
come an even bigger fan of the
church service.
"I don't want to be judged be-
cause I don't have a three-piece-
suit and I don't drive a
brand-new car and this is that
kind of church they don't
judge you. I feel like I'm more
welcome in this church than any
I've ever attended in my life," he
said.
The service is just a year old,
starting on July 4, 2011.
Church volunteer Joye
Fletcher was baptized behind
the Flora-Bama in the Gulf of
Mexico during Worship at the

See Page C5


'Pastor Jerry' takes the reins at HUMC


Special to the Chronicle
Hernando United Methodist Church wel-
comed Pastor "Jerry" Carris and his wife
Lynette to the congregation with a "down
home" fish fry and covered-dish dinner last
month. Pastor Jerry was born in
Gainesville, and following in his father's
footsteps, obtained a bachelor's degree in
Ornamental Horticulture in 1972 from the
University of Florida.
After working in the plant nursery busi-
ness for years, he got the call to ministry This
was not in his business plan. A discussion
with his pastor at the First United Methodist
Church of Winter Garden convinced him that
this was what God meant for him to do. En-
tering the Candler School of Theology at
Emory University in Atlanta in January 1984,
and studying through the summer, he was


Take a break from the daily
grind to be refreshed and chal-
lenged at the "Brides of Christ
3rd Annual Fall Retreat 2012"
scheduled for
Oct. 5-7 at
the "Historical
Lakeside
Inn," in Mt.
Dora. During
this three-day
retreat, you
will be res- Nancy
cued for a Kennedy
weekend to
rest, relax, have fun, enjoy
great food, make new friends
and most importantly, renew
your faith. This year we are
blessed to welcome as our
guest speaker a gifted author,
journalist, religion editor and


able to graduate in 1986. He was ordained a
deacon in 1985 and an elder in 1990.
He has served in churches in Orlando,
Lake Panasoffkee, Fort Myers, Starke and
Jacksonville and is no stranger to this part
of the state. As a child, he visited his aunt
and uncle and cousins (Nell and Walter
Warnock), who lived on the corner of Ella
and Zephyr streets in Inverness. Lynette
was born and raised in Wildwood, so they
are very pleased to be back.
The congregation is also very pleased,
looking forward to their journey together
doing God's mission and perhaps hearing
Pastor Jerry playing his guitar.
In Pastor Jerry's first sermon, he stressed
that "churches are primarily here for the
people who have not heard the word."
The church is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Call 352-726-7245.


feature writer, Nancy Kennedy,
who especially loves writing
and speaking about the incredi-
ble grace of God and the amaz-
ing truth that He smiles on
those He loves. The cost for the
entire getaway is $235 per per-
son, which includes two nights
lodging, two full-course dinners,
one lunch and two breakfasts,
in a beautiful lakeside setting.
Call Retreat Coordinator Margi
at 352-249-7315 or Registration
Coordinator Darlene at 352-
249-7003 to register and re-
ceive an informational
brochure. Space is limited.
Sale away
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills will host a yard
sale and bake sale from 8


Religion NOTES

a.m. to 2 p.m. today. There are
delicious baked goods and
snow cones and popcorn for
the kids. Find great deals on
clothes, toys, electronics and
house wares. The church is at
4950 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills. Call the church office
at 352-746-2970.
Church of the Advent will
have its annual outdoor "Trash
to Treasure Sale" on Saturday,
Sept. 29. Rent 10-by-10-foot
spaces for $15 each. Shaded
spaces available on a first-
come-first-served basis.
Crafters, flea market and food
vendors are invited to partici-
pate. The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front of
the new firehouse. For registra-
tion and information, call Al


Special to the Chronicle
Pastor Jerry Carris, pictured here with his wife, Lynette, re-
cently assumed duties at Hernando United Methodist
Church.


Sickle at 352-208-5664 or
Maryanne Brennan at 352-
347-2428.
Hernando United
Methodist Church will sponsor
its semi-annual "Sell Your
Own Treasures" event from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.
The price is $5 for a 12-by-12-
foot spot. No reservation re-
quired. Bring your own tables.
First come, first served. Set up
early and beat the crowd.
Breakfast and lunch is avail-
able. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Call 352-726-7245 or visit
www.hernandoumcfl.org.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is


open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Estate donations are
also accepted. Pick-up is avail-
able for larger donations. Items
donated are tax deductible and
a form is provided from Helping
Hands. Call 352-726-1707.
Special events
The youths of Red Level
Baptist Church will have a car
wash today at Brannen Banks
in Crystal River. Donations will
be accepted and the funds will
help the youths go to "Night of

See Page C2


Clinton


defends


religious


liberty


abroad
he U.S. State De-
partment wasn't
surprised last Octo-
ber when Egyptian secu-
rity forces smashed into
flocks of demonstrators
outside the state Radio
and Television Building,
killing 25 and injuring
hundreds.
After all, the rally was
called to protest the gov-
ernment's failure to stop
the burning of Coptic Or-
thodox churches or to ar-
rest and convict leaders of
the mobs. Sure enough,
waves of thugs attacked
the Copts, starting riots
that drew deadly police
vehicles.
Once again, it didn't
shock State Department
insiders that no one was
held accountable. Coptic
Christians and other reli-
gious minorities continue
to live in fear.
Similar tragedies have
been sadly predictable in
the past, but that must
change if true democracy
is going to come to Egypt
and other lands struggling
to escape centuries of
strife, said Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton, in
remarks marking the re-
cent release of the 2011
International Religious
Freedom Report.
"Egyptians are building
a brand new democracy,"
said Clinton, describing
her recent visit there. 'As
I told the Christians with
whom I met, the United
States does not take the
side of one political party
over another What we do
is stand firmly on the side
of principles. Yes, we do
support democracy- real
democracy, where every
citizen has the right to
live, work and worship
how they choose ...
"We are prepared to
work with the leaders that
the Egyptian people
choose. But our engage-
ment with those leaders
will be based on their
commitment to universal
human rights and
universal democratic
principles."
The "sobering" reality,
she stressed, is that reli-
gious freedom is "sliding
backwards" worldwide,
with more than a billion
people living under
regimes that deny them
freedom of speech, associ-
ation and liberty on mat-
ters of faith. The State
Department once again
released its familiar list of
notorious "countries of
particular concern" -
Burma, China, Eritrea,
Iran, North Korea, Saudi
Arabia, Sudan and
Uzbekistan.
This latest report is
packed with telling details
that are hard to ignore,
said Thomas Farr, direc-
tor of Georgetown Univer-
sity's Project on Religious
Freedom. He served as
the first director of the
State Department office
on international religious
freedom.
The problem is that
America's ambassador at
large for international re-
ligious freedom has "little
authority, few resources
and a bureaucracy that is
See Page C4





C2 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Joy." The church will have a
singspiration at 6 p.m. Sunday.
This is a time of praise music to
the Lord. Everyone is invited.
The church is at 11025 W. Dun-
nellon Road, Crystal River.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers will
return beginning Sept. 21. Sup-
pers will take place from 4 to 6
p.m. the third Friday monthly in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation
of $8 per person includes all-
you-can-eat salad, spaghetti
with meat sauce, Italian bread,
dessert and coffee or tea.
Come and enjoy a delicious
meal. Tickets are available at
the door.
Abundant Blessings Mes-
sianic Congregation is conduct-
ing a biblical archaeological
expedition with theme "Back
To The First Century." Members
and guests will take part in a
first-century Nasraye or
Nazarene service and hear the
Odes of Solomon of The Way;
the Messianic liturgical read-
ings of Matthew, Mark and
Luke in relation to the Torah
portion; and authentic teach-
ings of the Nazarenes of the
Way. The Messianic Biblical Ar-
chaeological Study Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday at
Homosassa Public Library in
Study Room B. Call 352-
544-5700.
Faith Haven Christian
Retreat Center, a ministry in
development since 2008, is well
on its way to becoming a valu-
able resource for Christian
counseling and event hosting in
west central Florida. As a step-
ping stone to that process, we
have opened our onsite
Cracker Horse Heritage Stable
named Soquili Stables. We had
a successful eight weeks this
summer of "Camp Soquili
2012" for the youths of our area
utilizing Soquili Stables. We are


RELIGION


scheduling a "Service Event" on
Saturday, Sept. 1, to finish the
low ropes course. The design-
ing and operations company,
www.CommonGroundsAdven-
tures.com, will assist with the
tasks at hand with experienced
and dedicated personnel. The
day will consist of "hands on"
help and conclude with a bar-
becue and pool time for all. For
more information or to attend
the "Service Event," call (352)
795-RETREAT (7387) or email
FaithHavenCRC@gmail.com or
visit www.FaithHavenCRC.org.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, will begin
hosting its fish fry the first Fri-
day monthly beginning Sept. 7
in the church pavilion. Cost is
$7 for adults and $3.50 for chil-
dren. The fish fry is open to the
public.
Unity of Citrus will join
Silent Unity an international,
trans-denominational 24/7
prayer ministry and spiritual
communities worldwide Thurs-
day, Sept. 13, for the 19th an-
nual Unity World Day of
Prayer. Unity World Day of
Prayer unites people of all
faiths in prayer for the well-
being of one another and our
world. The following activities
will take place at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto: Opening service at 6
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12, fol-
lowed by a 24-hour prayer vigil
beginning at 7 p.m.; a medita-
tion service at 9 a.m. Thursday,
Sept. 13, followed by a walk on
the labyrinth, a closing service
at 6 p.m. and the prayer vigil
ends at 7 p.m. All events are
free and open to the public. The
2012 Unity World Day of Prayer
theme is "The Universe is Call-
ing," drawn from the classic
book by the late Rev. Eric But-
terworth. For more information,
go to www.unityofcitrus.org, call
the church office at 352-746-
1270 or visit www.worlddayof-
prayer.org.
"The Blessed Confer-


Altar servers


p ~


Special to the Chronicle
Each year, the Knights of Columbus around the world recognize altar servers for their faith-
ful and devoted service. St. Scholastica Council No. 14485 recently awarded Jacob Robert-
son and Ryan Willis the altar server of the year award for their exemplary service and good
deeds. Dana Rossignol, the council's Grand Knight, said, "We congratulate all our ever-
faithful altar servers." Being an altar server is one of the oldest ministries of the church, with
roots dating back as far as the second century. At most Masses, servers are mostly in the
background, assisting the priest, but as Pope John Paul II, himself a former server, once
said, they are "much more than simple helpers." There is no minimum age for the position,
but most parishes start training young boys and girls who wish to be servers in third or
fourth grade. From left are Jacob Robertson; Jim Bobay, council church director; Ryan Willis;
and Deacon Robert Smith.


ence" for women and teen
girls will take place from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at Christ Way Fellowship,
972 N. Christy Way, Inverness.
The event is co-hosted by
FresHope Ministries &
FresHope of Jacksonville. "The
Blessed Conference" is a spe-
cial time for women and teen
girls to have fun, worship, be-
come inspired, know how loved
you are, and realize who you
truly are in the heart of Christ.
You are blessed to be a bless-
ing. There will be giveaways,
skits, worship arts, and photo
vignette opportunities. Speak-
ers include Pastor Donna


Sallee and Melissa Lieberman,
and former Disney Princess
Jennifer Beckham. For more in-
formation or to register, visit
www.blessedconference.com
or call 352-726-9768.
Inverness First United
Methodist Church's "Stepping
Out Ministry" is heading to the
Eastern Caribbean to visit Half
Moon Cay in the Bahamas, St.
Thomas, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, and Grand Turk. The
price includes deluxe motor
coach, cruise, port charges, all
taxes and the bus driver's tip. It
is not necessary to be a mem-
ber of the church to attend. Call
Coordinator Carole Fletcher at


352-860-1932, or Debbie Muir
at Tally-Ho Vacations at 352-
860-2805.
Worship
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10 a.m.
Sunday. The Rev. Dr. Jack Al-
wood's sermon is titled "Give
Thanks!" The Tuesday food
pantry is open to the commu-
nity from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
weekly. The Wednesday night
"Forum" at 6 p.m. will feature
Frank Kenny, CFP, Donor Rela-
tions officer at the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranch. Visit
www.fpccrflorida.org or call


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

352-795-2259.
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
The church is a spirit-filled,
word-of-faith family ministry that
plays traditional and contempo-
rary music. There is a gospel
sing at 7 p.m. Friday, which
gives the community and chil-
dren a safe, positive place to
come to on Friday nights. Reg-
ular church services are at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Follow us
on Facebook: @Covenant
Love Ministry or @Kinker Fam-
ily Worship. The ministry web-
site is Covenant-Love.com. Call
Pastor Brian Kinker at 352 -
601-4868.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 13th Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
There is a healing service and
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS is at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church with summer
hours from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Thursday through September.
Evening Bible study will resume
in September.
A come-as-you-are service
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services are
announced. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to Saturday and Sun-
day services. At 6 p.m. today

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pmr
795-4479


ST. ANNE'S ~ Temple
1/ CHURCH II Beth David
A Parish in theBeth David


Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


THE S] Crystal River
SALVATION CHURCH OF
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
CORPS. CHRIS
SUNDAY CHRIST
Sunday School A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
9:45 A.M. Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM. Sunday Services
TUESDAY: 10:00 A.M., 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Home League Wednesday 3
11:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller r uT,.Worshi. WithT,, rrTF


-II


Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
____ On 000A93J


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
Saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
LI I rl .t.. .r -it
-.],I ,: l .t I..I,,r .., .




Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


(oCrysal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


:" ": West Homosassa
6MslMU Citrus First United
H-KE, YOU'LL FIND
A CA ING FAMILY Church of Christ Methodist
IN CH KIST 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. church

CKYSTXL Crystal River, FL 34465 Everyone
RiVC K 352-564-8565 Becoming
,VNITgDT www.westcitruscoc.com A Disciple
of Christ
NA CTHODIST W. Deep Woods Dr. 1
r Sunday Worship
CHU KCH SnaofCrs
MUM, 8:00 am & 9:30 am
4801 N. Citrus Ave. a & 11:00 am
(2 Mi. N Of US 19) Sunday School
795-3148 9:30Sunday School
795-3148 9:30 am
I11 U...4z w 11 1 P I _


www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
- A Stephen Ministry Provider .-


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIl Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


0r Crystal
M River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


US Hwy.19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

and 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Pastor
Stephen Lane will continue his
theme of the Ninth Command-
ment, "Thou Shalt Not Covet
Thy Neighbor's House and Not
Covet Anything That Is Thy
Neighbor's," found in Exodus
20. The church is wheelchair
accessible, offers assistance for
hearing impaired, and has a cry
room for small children where
the parents can hear and see
the services in progress.
Following the Sunday service
is a time of fellowship, and at 11
a.m., Sunday school and Bible
study. Bible study has begun
the study of the Bible, with
much discussion, and its in-
spired writers with a short film
by Dr. Paul Maier. Everyone is
invited to all of services and
functions. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com. Regular
activities and meetings resume
in September.
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.

SFloral City
united Methodist
SChurch
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


RELIGION


Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-726-
0100.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the 13th Sunday after
Pentecost at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services. St. Anne's will
host Our Fathers Table today
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the parish library. The "Recov-
ering from Food Addiction"
group meets at 1 p.m. Thurs-
days in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Monday in the
parish library. Join St. Anne's at
6 p.m. Sunday for a Bluegrass
Gospel sing-along. Annie and
Tim's Bluegrass Gospel Band
will perform. An ice cream so-
cial will follow. Everyone is in-
vited to come and join in the
fun.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Children's church is
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Adult Sunday school is at 9:30
a.m. Morning prayer is at 9 a.m.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednes-


Glory to Glory
Ministries
^ A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship J
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL


day. Pastor Gene's noon lunch-
eon and Christian study is on
Tuesday. Feed My Sheep Min-
istry will host a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday for
those in need, followed by a
healing and holy Eucharist
service celebrating Aiden and
Cuthbert, Bishops of Lindis-
fame at 12:30 p.m.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
Room 102. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. The church has
many Christian education op-
portunities at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. Missionettes and Royal
Rangers clubs meet for children
from the age of 3. The adult
class meets in rooms 105 and
106 at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth Min-
istries Building. The church is at
416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
Call the church at 352-
726-4524.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. We are a nondenomi-
national church where you will
experience a friendly, loving


and casual atmosphere; a
place where you can come just
as you are. A coffee fellowship
will follow the morning service.
Weekly Bible study meets at 7
p.m. Wednesday. The book of
Ephesians is the topic of study
and discussion. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive, across from the
Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
This Sunday, Preacher
Dan Wagner, minister of First
Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs, will present
the sermon, "It's All About The
Gospel," as he encourages the
congregation to read and study
the Book of Philippians. Sunday
school begins at 9:30 a.m. Wor-
ship services are at 10:30 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Ladies Bible study is
at 11 a.m. Tuesday. Wednes-
day evening prayer and Bible
study is at 7. The church is at
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Call the church office at
352-628-5556.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church observes its
summer worship schedule with
only one service at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. All are invited to hear
an inspirational message from


Pastor Kenneth C. Blyth fol-
lowed by coffee hour in the fel-
lowship hall. The church is
barrier free and offers a free CD
ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices.
Rally Day is Sunday. All are
welcome. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Summer Sun-
day worship schedule: Contem-
porary worship at 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school from 9:30 to
10:30 a.m., and traditional wor-
ship at 11 a.m. This Sunday,
Denise Lay will bring the mes-
sage," Who Needs You," with
readings from Deuteronomy
6:4-9 and Matthew 5:13-16.
Call the church at 352-
637-0770.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school will
begin at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service be-
gins at 6. Midweek services are
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young
Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Youth
Bible study for ages 11 and
older is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C3

second and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando (di-
rectly across from the Her-
nando Post Office).
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions as we are currently
seeking a new location: 1-855-
426-4542 or 352-8759614.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship
welcomes Don Hess to the pul-
pit at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Hess'
topic is, "The Seminal Principal
of the Recovery of the Econ-
omy of the United States." This
presentation will demonstrate
that the root causes of almost
all of our economic problems
can be traced by following the
money. Hess is a frequent com-
munity newspaper columnist
with the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. The NCUU fellowship is at
7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225.
You can find not only a
church home but also a caring
church family at Abundant Life
of Crystal River, 4515 N. Talla-
hassee Road, Crystal River.
See NOTES/Page C4


1)2AccveA^ ^
Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM.................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1y2mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.00A5H7 Floral City, FL.

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Opw



OP0e



.. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices <


\of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Holy
Communion:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00
&
10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


.. _"



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Liftinu Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbefloralcity.org


Hernando

TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Come as you are!
GEIEESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
\Suna School 9:3 am
Suda Serv~icel^


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253


A Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.CM.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

&",Kt m Formhew.


OO








Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA










July and August

Worship

9:30 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


Places of worship that


offer love, peace



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! .

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Homosassa Springs
A SEVENTH-DAYADVENTIS CHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com





C4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Sunday morning service is at
10:30 a.m. and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and encouraging
Bible-based teachings that will
build your faith. Abundant Life
is a nondenominational church
that believes in the Power of
Pentecost. Come and grow
with us. Come as you are and
leave forever changed by the
presence of the Lord. Visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org or
call 352-795-LIFE.
Glory to Glory Ministries
offers a children's ministry at
10:30 a.m. Sunday led by
Jessica Gulledge. The men's
ministry meets at 6 p.m. the
first Saturday monthly. The
women's ministry, SOIL (Serv-
ing Others In Love), meets at
6:30 p.m. the fourth Saturday
monthly. The group is led by
Ginny Cieply and Muffy Morin.
The prayer ministry is led by
Melanie Cook. The music min-
istry consists of Pastor Brian
Gulledge, Joe Correas and
Tony Anglin. The church is led
by Pastor Brian Gulledge and
his wife Jessica. Glory to Glory
Ministries is in the Picard Stor-
age Building on County Road
486. Call 352-220-0550.
Rediscover church at
Gravity Church at 11 a.m.
Sunday. Come early to Grav-
ity Church Cafe for coffee, pas-
tries and fellowship. The
church is at 801 S.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River. Visit www.
gravitychurch.org.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service fea-
turing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered. A midweek worship
service for adults is offered at 6
p.m. Wednesday. For the
youths, we offer "Ignite," and
for children, "Wednesday Wor-
ship Kids." Call the office at
352-726-1252. The church is at
550 Pleasant Grove Road, In-
verness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and
10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day. All residents of the area are


welcome. Sunday morning wor-
ship service is at 10. Peace
Lutheran Church, "The Church
On The Hill," is five miles north
of Dunnellon at the junction of
U.S. 41 and State Road 40. Call
the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit www. Peace
LutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare cen-
ter is open (food and clothing)
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Mon-
days and Thursdays. The
church is in Old Homosassa at
10540 W Yulee Drive. Turn
onto Yulee Drive from U.S. 19
at Burger King, follow to stop
sign, turn left, church is about
one mile on left. Call 352-
628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for
morning worship. The church is
nondenominational and Bible
based, only preaching the
Word as it is in the Bible. All
are welcome. Call 352-
382-2557.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the
deaf. Sunday school classes at
9:45 a.m. with Sunday worship
at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's
Kids" and "Flyers" for K-5
grades from 6 to 7:15 p.m.
Sunday. Wednesday Bible
study and prayer meeting at 7
p.m. with "Warriors" for grades
6 through 12 from 6:30 to 8
p.m. Call 352-628-4793.
For new friends and fel-
lowship, come to Parsons Me-
morial Presbyterian Church
at 5850 Riverside Drive in Yan-
keetown. Enjoy coffee and
sweets at 10 a.m. Sunday in
the fellowship hall followed by
the worship service at 11 a.m.
Communion is served the first
Sunday monthly. After church,
return to the fellowship hall to
visit and eat. Call 352-
447-2506.
Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church is nondenomina-
tional. Worship services at 10
a.m. Sunday. Bible study at 6
p.m. Wednesday in chapel.
Everyone welcome. Call 352-
746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We


speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
First Church of God of
Inverness, a nondenomina-
tional church which meets at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, invites
the public to Sunday morning
worship services at 10:30 a.m.
Call 352-344-3700.
Live & learn
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
begin a 30-week study of the
books of Amos and Isaiah on
Thursday, Sept. 6, from 9:45 to
11:45 a.m. at First Baptist
Church of Beverly Hills, at the
intersection of Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491) and
Forest Ridge Boulevard. This
class is open to men and
women and includes a pro-
gram for children ages 5and
younger. CBS is part of an in-
ternational organization that
provides interdenominational
Bible study for people who de-
sire an in-depth study of God's
word along with opportunities
for fellowship. Preregistration is
necessary. To register or for
more information, call Terry at
352-382-2365, Lori or Ron at
352-746-7581, or Linda at 352-
746-1698.
First United Methodist of
Inverness will offer Dave
Ramsey's Financial Peace
University. This class will
teach you to take control of
your money, invest for the fu-
ture, and give like never be-
fore. If you truly believe all that
we have belongs to God, this
class is for you. A free preview
will take place at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 6. The first
class is Thursday, Sept. 13,
and will run from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Thursday through Nov. 8.
Cost is $89 per family. The
church is at 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road (two miles south
of Applebee's), Inverness. Call
the church at 352-726-2522 or
call Don Beaudet with ques-
tions or to register at 352-302-
5744, or register on line at
www.daveramsey.com.
Etz Hayim Institute the
adult education program of
Congregation Beth Sholom of
Citrus County will present the
Genesis Project, an in-depth
analysis and discussion of the
entire text of Genesis con-
ducted in English. The class is
open to the entire community
- persons of any faith.
Classes are from 7 to 8 p.m.


Monday beginning Sept. 24,
at the synagogue, 102 Civic
Circle in Beverly Hills. Class
will be taught by Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot, cantor/spiri-
tual leader of Congregation
Beth Sholom. It is recom-
mended that each individual
purchase their own textbook,
"Etz Hayim Torah and Com-
mentary (Five Books of
Moses)," which is available for
$25 to anyone who registers
for the class. For registration
and textbook purchase, send
your name, address, phone
number and payment to Con-
gregation Beth Sholom -
Genesis Project, P.O. Box
640024, Beverly Hills, FL
34464-0024. Make checks
payable to Congregation Beth
Sholom. Course fee of $5 per
class may made weekly at
each class.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala announces open reg-
istration of its religious school,
Congregation Beth Israel
School of Jewish Education.
The school currently meets
once a week on Sunday morn-
ings at various places in the
community. The curriculum
consists of Jewish life cycle
and history, Hebrew, Bible, hol-
idays and traditions, and
courses on Israel and pre-bar
and pre-bat mitzvah and confir-
mation classes. The school
caters to the individual needs
of the students and parent par-
ticipation is encouraged. The
staff consists of caring, experi-
enced teachers. Suzanne
Boetger is educational director.
For more information and en-
rollment, call Suzanne at the-
boetgers@yahoo.com or Judi
at 352-237-8277.
Lifelong Bible enthusiast
Jim Septer leads a Bible
study class from 1 to 3 p.m.
and at 6 p.m. Wednesday at
Unity Church of Citrus County,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto (off County Road 491,
across from Black Diamond
golf course, south of Beverly
Hills). The class features a for-
mat of open discussion and ex-
change of ideas. Call
352-746-1270.
Trusting Heart Ministries
Bible Study group meets at 6
p.m. the second and fourth
Thursday monthly at 176 N.
Rooks Ave., Inverness. This
group is open to all denomina-
tions. Call 352-860-0052 or
352-586-5174 or email trusting
heartministry@yahoo.com.
Announcements
A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Call 352-746.6200 or
visit www.sevenrivers.org.
Before- and after-school


care is available in Citrus
Springs. Children through fifth
grade can receive assistance
with breakfast, homework,
recreation, snacks, and more
with loving workers who have
been background screened
and fingerprinted. North Oak
Baptist Church offers this serv-
ice to the community at a very
low cost. From 6 a.m. to 6
p.m., NOBC Preschool and
Camp ministries are available
to work with children and give
them a safe, enjoyable envi-
ronment with trustworthy work-
ers. Bus transportation is
available from Citrus Springs
Elementary School. Call 352-
489-3359 for more information.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheart
ministry@yahoo.com.
Bereavement support
group Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. The group is com-
posed of men and women who
are experiencing grief and are
convinced that "life can be
good again." Open to all. Come
or call Anne at 352-212-0632.
Celebrate Recovery
Celebrate Recovery, a
Christ-centered 12-step fellow-
ship, meets at 6 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. Meetings
begin with dinner and fellow-
ship, followed by worship and
gender-based, small-group
meetings, concluding with Cof-
fee House fellowship at 9 p.m.
Call 352-453-5501.
Celebrate Recovery
meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday
and Fridays at Christian Re-
covery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
352-726-2800.
Celebrate Recovery
meets at 6 p.m. Friday at the
Gulf to Lake Ministry Com-
plex in Meadowcrest, left of
SunTrust Bank. A meal for a
minimum amount is served, fol-
lowed by praise, worship and a
lesson or testimony, then gen-
der-specific small groups. The
evening ends with fellowship,
coffee and dessert. The step
studies, an extremely important
extension of the program's
healing process, take place on
a different night. Call 352-586-
4709 or email celebrate.
recovery@gulftolake.com. A lo-
cator for groups throughout the
United States is found at the
website www.celebrate
recovery.com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIBERTY
Continued from Page C3

- notwithstanding the sec-
retary's fine words -
largely indifferent" to the
global state of religious
freedom, noted Farr, in re-
marks posted at National
Review Online. "It doesn't
take a rocket scientist to re-
alize that this issue is not a
priority for this administra-
tion, except perhaps for the
speechwriters (who are
doing an outstanding job)."
In her speech, Clinton
did address a few hot topics
that have previously been
out of bounds, such as blas-
phemy laws. It's time for
Americans to realize, she
said, that matters of faith
and conscience are often
life-and-death concerns -
literally.
"Certain religions are
banned completely, and a
believer can be sentenced
to death," she said. "Strict
laws ban blasphemy and
defamation of religion. And
when your words are inter-
preted as violations of
those laws, you can be sen-
tenced to death. Violence
toward religious minorities
often goes unpunished by
authorities who look the
other way
"So the message is clear:
If your beliefs don't have
government approval,
beware."
When Americans defend
religious freedom they are
not simply defending val-
ues found in this land's
laws and creeds. They are
also defending a key cen-
tral tenet of the Universal
Declaration of Human
Rights. Thus, Clinton
quoted Article 18: "Every-
one has the right to free-
dom of thought, conscience
and religion. This right in-
cludes freedom to change
his religion or belief and
freedom either alone or in
community with others and
in public or private, to man-
ifest his religion or belief in
teaching, practice, worship
and observance."
It's impossible to read
those words, she said, with-
out realizing that "religious
freedom is not just about
religion." It's about unbe-
lievers, heretics, apostates
and converts being able to
live, think and gather in
safety without the "state
looking over their shoul-
der" Without freedom of
conscience, said Clinton,
democracy is not safe.
"You can't debate some-
one who believes that any-
one who disagrees with him
by definition disagrees with
God," she said. "So let me
simply say this: People can
believe that they and only
those like them possess the
one and only truth. That's
their right, though they do
not have the right to harm
those they think harbor in-
correct views."

Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion. org
project to study religion
and the news.


(j5


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service....................8:30 AM
Sunday School.......................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service..................... 6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes..................7:00 -,
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens.................................7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH







II 'n/wn/f/ II,'/,'o//f/v
&ou Wbovwh &
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260
VAIIAWN SEI$W0I .i I I l .l. i.i. .


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School ..............9:00
Worship...................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor


First United


Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
LR -M-\


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M.& 6:00P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:00 AM

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P..


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M.to 3:30 P.M.Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .:


Hwy. 44 E@
Washington Ave., Inverness

* Sunday Services
* Traditional
* 11:00 AM
* Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD's Available *
" Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group
5to7PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org u
Podcast: FPC inv.com m

* Church Office 637-0770 U
* Pastor Craig Davies
U


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


{FfirsiCt

PresbyterianTflffmf


0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Donald Trump to
speak at Liberty
University
LYNCHBURG, Va. "The
Donald" is coming to Liberty
University.
Media outlets report that the
school announced Wednesday
that billionaire real estate mogul
and TV personality Donald
Trump would speak at Liberty's
convocation on Sept. 24.
Liberty holds convocation
three times a week, giving stu-
dents the chance to hear from
religious figures, politicians and
others while worshipping to-
gether at the Christian school
founded by the late Jerry Fal-
well. The school says the
weekly meetings are the largest
gatherings of Christian students
in North America.
Trump entertained the idea
of running for president, but in-
stead endorsed Republican
candidate Mitt Romney.
Other notable convocation
speakers this fall are actor Kirk
Cameron, Veggie Tales pro-
ducer and author Phil Vischer,
Auntie Annie's pretzels founder
Anne Beiler and Southern Bap-
tist Convention President Fred
Luter.
Guard leader
criticized for video
praising group
INDIANAPOLIS The
leader of the Indiana National
Guard asked an evangelical
Christian organization to take
down a web video he made
praising its marriage counseling
following a complaint from a
military watchdog group.
The Military Religious Free-
dom Foundation argues that
Maj. Gen. Martin Umbarger vio-
lated military rules and the First
Amendment by promoting a re-


LOUNGE
Continued from Page C1

Water's first anniversary.
"It's just an awesome
spirit-led service," she said.
The service is often a sur-
prise for the tourists who
flock to the strip of snow-
white sand and turquoise
water during the summer
months, said Bruce Barrios,
the bar's Sunday manager.
"We have so many people
in from out of town. We have
people come in and when
they see we are having
church they pick up a
Bloody Mary, a bush-

" PRIMERA IGLESIA
SHISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. *Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711











1st





5335 E. Jasmine Lane,

Y2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're inVited


to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


ligious group in the 33-second
video while in uniform, The Indi-
anapolis Star reported Tuesday.
Former Air Force attorney
Mikey Weinstein, founder of the
Albuquerque, N.M.-based
group, said Umbarger's mes-
sage promotes one religious
group over others and that such
a show of support from a two-
star general is intimidating
within the military.
"He should be removed im-
mediately and, from our per-
spective, court-martialed,"
Weinstein said.
Umbarger made the video in
September 2011 on behalf of
Centurion's Watch, a Christian
group based in Indianapolis
that offers marriage counseling
to military families. It was
posted on the nonprofit's
website.
In the video, he says in part:
"Any donation or resource that
you can give this organization
- it's faith-based, it's wanting
to keep families together with
the stresses and strains of
being apart, being in harm's
way, risking their lives for this,
for this country. I can't think of a
better organization that you can
support."
Umbarger was appointed In-
diana's adjutant general in
2004 by then-Gov. Joe Kernan,
a Democrat, and has remained
in the position under Republi-
can Gov. Mitch Daniels as
leader of more than 15,800
Guard personnel.
Daniels on Tuesday rejected
calls for Umbarger's removal.
"He's a great soldier. If, and I
don't know the military regs, if
there was a mistake, it's obvi-
ously an innocent one," Daniels
told The Associated Press. "It's
one of the best appointments
that I ever made, and I'm not
making any changes."
From wire reports

whacker or a soft drink, sit
down and listen to the ser-
mon. It's really cool, you
know, it's unique."
The appeal of the service
for church member John
Mason-Smith is that every-
one is welcome.
"This is a place I can go
and learn about God with-
out all the constraints," he
said. "It is a place that peo-
ple who aren't going to
church feel welcome and
that's what we love about
the Flora-Bama you
could be next to a guy who is
down on his luck and the
guy next to him is a million-
aire. That's the Flora-
Bama."

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor




SFirst

Assembly

of God
|
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Betye
Rusing


Romney starts to open up



- a little about religion


Associated Press
NEW YORK-Mitt Romney is start-
ing to open up a bit more about his
lifelong commitment to Mormonism
and his lay leadership in the church,
following pleas from backers who say
that talking about his faith could help
him overcome his struggles to connect
with voters.
"Who shares your values?" a recent
Romney ad asked suggesting that
the Republican presidential candi-
date was the answer. "When religious
freedom is threatened, who do you
want to stand with?"
The commercial was the start of a
broader Romney effort to emphasize
values and religion as he courts unde-
cided voters in a nation where most
people say they want a president with
strong religious beliefs to compete
with President Barack Obama in a
race that polls show is close. Romney
invited reporters to Mormon chapel
services with his family last Sunday in
New Hampshire. And he has asked a
fellow Mormon to give an invocation
before he addresses the Republican
National Convention next week.
Romney is the first Mormon presi-
dential nominee of a major political
party, and highlighting his faith carries
risks, given that many Americans view
Mormonism skeptically
Even so, a small group of supporters
and Republicans have long said the
benefits could outweigh the draw-
backs. They contend that Romney,
whose attempts to reach voters on a
personal level often fall flat, could
help people get to know him better by
highlighting this core part of his life.
Michael Gerson, who was a speech-
writer for President George W Bush,
wrote that Romney could "inject some
authenticity- or at least some per-
sonality into his campaign" by talk-
ing about his faith. A recent poll by the
Pew Research Center found that a ma-
jority of people who know that Rom-
ney is Mormon are comfortable with
his religion or don't consider it a con-
cern.
Philip Barlow, a Mormon historian
at Utah State University who worked
alongside Romney when he was
bishop in Belmont, Mass., said that try-
ing to understand Romney without
Mormonism would be like "watching a
football game with half the players in-
visible."
"It's an essential strain to know, but
it's so easily caricatured, more easily
than the influence of his schooling and
his family," Barlow said.
Religion and specifically his
decades of involvement in the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints -
has shaped every aspect of Romney's
life, from his family to his decades in
private business and his political ca-


*
Vic ory

in


Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship
Sin,..i, Evening


10:45 AM
6:00 PM


Wednesday 7:00 PM


Choir Practice


8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
- 1 .t i, belong.A place to become."


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney
gets into his car Aug. 18 to attend a fundraising event in Nantucket, Mass.


reer. The former Massachusetts gover-
nor is from a prominent Mormon fam-
ily, has donated millions to his church
and its charities, and has volunteered
countless hours to the Mormon com-
munity and others.
Yet, Romney has never been com-
fortable talking about his faith, and he
has spoken only in the broadest terms
about religion. His reticence has been
understandable even though he's
never explained it Americans gener-
ally know little about the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and
often what they do know comes from
critics. Every candidate, no matter his
or her faith, has to weigh just how
much to talk about God.
If a candidate goes overboard, "a lot
of voters who are undecided could end
up staying home," said John Green, di-
rector of the University of Akron's
Bliss Institute for Applied Politics.
Nineteen percent of respondents who
know Romney is Mormon told Pew
they're uncomfortable with his faith.
So Romney is treading carefully
In a commencement address earlier
this year at Liberty University, the
evangelical school founded by the Rev
Jerry Falwell, Romney referred to
"people of different faiths, like yours
and mine, but he never used the
word Mormon. He also never talked
about Mormonism when he quoted the
Apostle Paul and spoke of the "com-
fort of a living God" in a statement of
sympathy to the victims of the Aurora,
Colo., shooting rampage. The new ad,
Romney's most direct pitch yet to reli-
gious voters, includes images of
stained-glass windows and photos of
the late Pope John Paul II. But it does
not directly mention Romney's own
faith.


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
Non
Denominational
F Pastor
Tom Walker

Sunday
10:30 AuM.& 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALLARE WELCOME


201 :oo d St6. ,Invrns
344-190


"It seems that, by taking the nation
to church with him, Governor Romney
is letting his religion speak for itself
through its actual practices. For Mor-
monism, that has always been the bet-
ter way to respond to fears that it is a
cult or somehow not Christian," said
Kathleen Flake, a historian of Ameri-
can religion at Vanderbilt University
Divinity School. "The complications
come when we try to explain the why
of how we worship."
With less than three months until
the election, both Romney and Obama
are facing increasing questions about
their faith.
Both responded for a story pub-
lished Tuesday in the Washington Na-
tional Cathedral magazine, Cathedral
Age.
Romney wrote that he was "lay pas-
tor in my church" but didn't use the
word Mormon or name the church any-
where in his answers. Asked to address
uneasiness about his faith, Romney re-
sponded, "Every religion has its own
unique doctrines and history These
should not be bases for criticism but
rather a test of our tolerance."
Terryl Givens, a University of Rich-
mond professor and Mormon scholar,
argued that the theological specifics
are less important than the "service,
sacrifice and compassion" evident in
Romney's church experience that can
speak to his character and values. He
said Romney could "speak com-
pellingly about the real world prob-
lems of poverty, broken families,
personal struggle and loss" he has wit-
nessed as a church leader "that could
bridge the gulf between his seemingly
aloof and distant public persona and a
person of genuine empathy and
compassion."


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 PM.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
\ 9:00and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
W e are ,,,,,h .,,,i ri ,.,,,ai h.,, h
S t the Inverness Womans (
1 I j Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


Religion BRIEFS


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


F1 46 Years of
FIRST Bo Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson







All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


RELIGION


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C5












COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Heritage Council
slates meeting
The Floral City Heritage
Council will have its summer
quarterly meeting Tuesday,
Aug. 28, in the Floral City
Community House, 8370 E.
Orange Ave., between the
Heritage Museum and the
Floral City Library.
Members and guests may
bring a food item to share
and their own plate and
tableware, to partake in a
potluck supper at 7 p.m. At
7:30 p.m., the public is invited
to join members for the Snip-
pet of History presentation.
Everyone can bring a canned
food item or food staple for
the Veterans Food Pantry.
The council welcomes indi-
viduals to join with a 12-
month membership for $15,
or a household membership
for $22; both include mem-
bership and full privileges in
the Citrus County Historical
Society Inc.
For more information, visit
www.floralcityhc.org.
Right to Life
to meet Aug. 27
Citrus County Right to Life
will meet at 7 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 27, at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church.
Citrus County Right to Life
is nondenominational. All are
welcome to attend meetings
and become involved. For
more information, call 352-
563-7017.
Coin Club gathers
in Beverly Hills
The Beverly Hills Coin
Club will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 27, at the Cen-
tral Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors together
and provide numismatic edu-
cation. For details, call Joe at
352-527-2868.
Spanish-Americans
welcome members
The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County, now
entering its 25th year, is re-
cruiting new members.
The club is a multi-national
organization open to all. It
provides a venue for Citrus
County residents to experi-
ence the Latino culture. The
club has four or five dances a
year, bowling and Sunday so-
cials, a member picnic, pro-
vides scholarships for
graduating seniors, takes nu-
merous travel outings, offers
assistance to needy families
and more.
For more information, call
Benny Cruz at 352-746-3599.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Harlee


Special to the Chronicle
Harlee needs a home. This
5-month-old black and
white kitty may look seri-
ous, but she will play her
way into your heart. If you
are looking for a more ma-
ture feline, the Summer
Special Adoption runs
through August adult
cat adoption fees are half
price. Visitors are welcome
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Manches-
ter House on the corner of
State Road 44 and Conant
Avenue. Call 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of our felines on-
line at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.


Food for hope, health


Path Farm Co-op helps support mission, as well as good lifestyle


Special to the Chronicle

Keeping farms in a community can
be a positive for the community, but
why would a family want to join The
Path Farm's Co-op? Mainly, for the
freshest vegetables available and to
support the community
Many vegetables are harvested
within 24 hours of the time co-op
members receive them, which means
they have less time to lose their flavor
and nutritional value. Many people,
for health reasons, like that no co-op
foods have had pesticides or preserv-
atives sprayed on them.
The Path Farm Co-op offers the op-
portunity to enjoy a variety of healthy
greens, kale, cabbage, broccoli, cauli-
flower and other winter veggies grown
naturally, using environmentally
friendly resources like worm cast-
ings, river muck and other nutrient-
rich resources to grow tasty, nutritious
vegetables. And supporting The Path's
Farm Co-op means helping the men
and women at The Path shelter im-
prove their lifestyles.
Co-op "subscribers" make a finan-
cial commitment to the farm by buying
"shares" (aka a subscription member-
ship for six months). The shares pro-
vide the farm with the funds needed to
plant, grow and harvest the crops. In
return, the subscriber receives a bas-
ket or share of seasonal produce
throughout the fall/winter season,
every Friday or Saturday, depending
on pickup arrangements. Pickups are
at The Hernando Farmer's Market
produce stand on U.S. 41 (just south of
Chicken King).


Special to the Chronicle
The Path Farm Co-op provides members
with fresh seasonal vegetables popular
with young and old alike.

Members pay the same, whether it
turns out to be a bumper year or a
skinny one. Weather conditions have a
lot to do with the varieties that grow
during a season, the quantity and how
long a particular vegetable is avail-
able, and how much food is in each
basket. Members and the farm share
the burden and the bounty Mem-
berships are for six months, whether
weekly pickups are made or not. Many
members share the benefits of healthy


food by donating their basket to
friends, family members or other or-
ganizations when they are not able to
make their pickup.
The vegetables from The Path's
farm will vary in size and appearance
during the season, looking and tasting
similar to those grown in a home gar-
den. The varieties grown were chosen
for their flavor and their ability to pro-
duce well in our climate, and are not
expected to look perfect
Using natural environmentally
friendly methods and no pesticides,
The Path raises vegetables that grow
best in this area during the fall and
winter growing seasons, approxi-
mately six months from October to the
end of March. The Path grows, har-
vests and packs the produce all
members do is enjoy the bounty "You
Pick It" days, an opportunity for co-op
members to come out to the farm and
pick their own produce, have also
been offered.
All are welcome at the upcoming co-
op members' meeting from 6 to 7:30
p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, in room 103 of the
Conference Center at the College of
Central Florida Citrus Campus, South
Lecanto Highway The meeting will
offer a chance to ask questions, sign
up for the co-op seasons, meet the
farmer, staff and other members, and
see how vegetables are grown. Call
352-527-6500, ext. 5, to sign up, or for
more information.
To learn more about The Path, a
nonprofit organization, visit
www.pathofcitrus.org. To learn more
about The Path's farm project, visit
wwwthepathcommunity.org.


Donation for CASA


DATE 7 2 6 2012


Special to the Chronicle
The Homosassa Game Fish Club recently donated $1,500 to CASA. This year's donation was the 12th year in a row it was
able to help the organization in its cause. The donated funds represented were from proceeds from the merchandise sold
at the 28th Annual Cobia Big Fish Tournament earlier this year. Shown making the donation, from left, are: Emmett
Donnelly, secretary of the Homosassa Game Fish Club; Diana Finegan, executive director of CASA; and Jeff Garvin,
president of the Homosassa Game Fish Club.



Leadership program begins Sept. 6


Special to the Chronicle

The College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus is
accepting enrollment for its
Student Leadership Devel-
opment Series, which be-
gins in September The
leadership program is free
and open to all CF and high
school students from Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties.
"The program promotes


an increased awareness of
principle-centered leader-
ship skills and public serv-
ice opportunities among
students aspiring to be so-
cially responsible leaders,"
said Dr Vernon Lawter, Cit-
rus Campus vice president.
The workshops will be of-
fered on six Thursdays,
Sept 6 through Oct. 11, from
6 to 8 p.m. in the Citrus
Learning and Conference


Center, room 101A, at the
Citrus Campus, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway
Sessions will cover: Team
Building, Exploring Leader-
ship Styles, Solving the Per-
sonality Puzzle, Body
Language, Getting Smart
About Credit and Leading a
Focused Life. Students can
select one or two workshops
or attend them all. Although
there is no cost, registration


is required for each work-
shop. Students completing
five or more workshops will
receive a leadership award.
To learn more about the
sessions or to register, call
352-249-1207. The program
is sponsored by the CF Cit-
rus Institute for Community
Advancement, Citrus
County School District and
Citrus Campus Student
Activities Board.


News NOTES

Unwanted cell
phones collected
Unwanted cell phones can
be donated to The Center for
Victim Rights by dropping
them off at Wear To Go Con-
signment, Times Square
Plaza, 3802 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness (phone
352-344-9327).
The Inglis Police Dept. has
also assisted in this effort for
several years, and continues
to do so. Drop phones off
during operating hours.
The phones are used as a
fundraiser and so that crime
victims who need them can
have a phone to call 911 if
necessary.
The center helps victims of
crime apply for victim com-
pensation and assists with
other resources for victims.
This is a free and nation-
wide service.
Contact the center at 352-
628-6481 or crimevictimhelp
@aol.com. Visit the website
at www.advocate4victims.org.
Free tutoring
offered to kids
Free tutoring is available
from state-approved
providers to students who
scored a Level 1 or Level 2
on the Reading or Math
FCAT last spring at all Citrus
County Elementary Schools
and the Renaissance Center
(Title I schools).
Enrollment forms will be
mailed to all qualifying
families.
Tutoring is available after
school, at day care sites or
community centers, in home
or online.
Spaces are limited, so if re-
quests for free tutoring ex-
ceed the amount of funding
available, the school district
will prioritize services.
Neither the Florida Depart-
ment of Education nor the
school district promotes or
endorses any particular Sup-
plemental Educational Serv-
ices provider.
For more information, call
Maribeth Smith at 352-
726-1931, ext. 2321.
Have a meal with
Senior Friends
On Monday Aug. 27, Sen-
ior Friends for Life will dine at
the Olive Tree Restaurant,
963 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River, at 11 a.m.; order
from the menu.
On Wednesday, Sept. 5,
the group will have lunch at
Skeet's Restaurant in Beverly
Hills, 3887 N. Lecanto High-
way, at 11 a.m.; order from
the menu.
Those who need a ride can
request one when making
reservations.
Reservations must be
made for all events by calling
Myrna Hocking at 352-860-
0819, Claire Quigley at 352-
563-1998, or Teddie Holler at
352-746-6518.
Concert Choir to
rehearse Sept. 4
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir will resume re-
hearsals at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 4, in the Fellowship Hall
of Faith Lutheran Church,
935 Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto, for the 2012 holiday
season concerts.
New singers are always
welcome and should arrive at
6:30 for a brief audition.
This year's performances
will include Corelli's "Christ-
mas Cantata," a wonderful
selection of most-loved
Christmas carols, and some
familiar songs of the season.
For more information, visit
the choir's website: www.
citruschoir.com.


Kiwanis/Key Training Center Bowling League hits lanes Sept. 8


Special to the Chronicle

The Kiwanis/Key Training Center
Bowling League for 2012/13 will
begin Sept. 8 at the Manatee Bowl-


ing Lanes in Crystal River It is a 16- week. What is needed this season March 9 and 23, April 13 and 27.
week league ending with a June are more volunteer coaches. To volunteer, call John and Mary
Awards Banquet Bowling dates are: Sept. 8 and 22, Kondracki at 352-382-9202, or Mike
The 2011/12 season concluded Oct. 6 and 20, Nov 3 and 17, Dec. 1 and Marsha Stokley and 352-
with an average of 98 bowlers each and 15, Jan. 5 and 19, Feb. 9 and 23, 621-3185.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING AUGUST 25, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Entertainment 'Night America's Got Talent WrestleMania 28 Law & Order: SVU News SNL
Oscar Hammerstein Andre Rieu: Live in Tuscany Love songs in Italy. As Time Goes By Reunion Special (In Stereo) Use Your Brain to
-- O PBS 3 3 14 6 --Out (In Stereo) 'G' c 'PG' c Change YourAge
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Best of Pledge'G' *** "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot" (1974)
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Entertainment Tonight America's Got Talent WrestleMania 28 -- Law & Order: Special News Saturday
W NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N) 'PG' c (In Stereo) 'PG' s Rock vs. Cena (N) Victims Unit '14 Night Live
i ABC 20 20 20 News World Countdown NASCAR Racinq Sprint Cup: IRWIN Tools Night Race. From Bristol Motor Speedway News Hot Topics
SWFTVABC20 20 20 News in Bristol, Tenn. (N) (Live) 'PG'
SPCBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News Evening Inside Young NFL Preseason Football Houston Texans at New Orleans Saints. From 10 News, 11pm (N)
S(WISP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) News Edition Icons the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. (N) xa
MLB Baseball Regional Fox 13 News (N) (In Cops 'PG' Cops 'PG' Mobbed (In Stereo) FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Touch 'PG'
(W FOX 13 13 13 13 Coverage. Stereo) sa sa a 'PG'x (In Stereo) a
D WCJi ABC 11 11 4 News ABC NASCAR NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: IRWIN Tools Night Race. (N) (Live) News Crook
Cornerstone With John JackVan Prophecy In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale xc 7th Street AllOver CTN Pure
S (WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Hagee'G' Impe News Charles Stanley'G' Theater the World Special Passion
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If (WFT ABC 11 11 11 News News in Bristol, Tenn. N) (Live) Anatomy
(WMR) IFND 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang House A little girl has a House House treats a Movie
N 12 12 16 14' 14' Thieory Theory heart attack.'14' senator. '14' s
D IWTTAV MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Scoop Paid Ring of Honor Wrest. '70s '70s Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14' cc
MD WACX TBN 21 21 Variety Gospel Jim Raley Life Center Church Studio Direct B. Hinn Fowler IVariety Chosen [Variety
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I W G cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men "Conflicted"'14' s Stereo)'14'x Crisis"'PG' 'PG' c
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IWY FAM 16 16 16 15 Lane Zone Stereo)'14' c USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
) (WOGX FOX 13 7 7 MLB Baseball Big Bang |Big Bang Cops'PG' |Cops'PG' Mobbed 'PG' c FOX 35 News at 10 Touch 'PG' c
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E 54 48 54 25 27 Hoggers Hoggers WarsPG' WarsPG' WarsG' Wars G' Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings
S**4* "Big Jake"(1971, Western) John Wayne, *** "Tombstone"(1993, Western) Kurt Russell. Doc Holliday joins *** "Tombstone"
S 55 64 55 Richard oone.'PG-13' Wyatt Earp for the OK Corral showdown. 'R' sa (1993) Kurt Russell.
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52 35 52 19 21 Stereo)'PG'X Escape!"'PG' (In Stereo)'PG' 'PG'
S1** "All About the Benjamins" (2002, Action) Ice Cube, *** "Coming to America" (1988) Eddie Murphy An **Y "Roll Bounce"
t 96 19 96 Mike Epps, Eva Mendes.'R' c African prince and his royal sidekick come to Queens. (2005) cc
[BRAVO0 254 51 254 Top Chef'14'x |TopChef'14' a Top Chef'14'E |TopChef'14' *** "0 Brother, Where Art Thou?"
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( 27 61 27 33 Roberts, Allen Covert.'R'N Rival male skaters compete as a pair. Portia Doubleday. Premiere. R'EX
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0 ** "The Last Song" (2010, Drama) Miler **Y "The Notebook" (2004, Romance) Ryan Gosling, James Garner. A ** "The Time
29 52 29 20 28 Cyrus, Greg Kinnear, Liam Hemsworth.'PG' man tells a story to a woman about two lovers.'PG-13 Traveler's Wife"
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39 68 39 45 54 (2012) cx Roma Downey, Tim Matheson. ax Romance) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy xc (2005) Ton Spelling.
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51 25 51 32 42 of Hell'PG' Siege' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
"The Craigslist Killer" (2011, Docudrama) "Fatal Honeymoon" (2012, Docudrama) "An Officer and a Murderer" (2012,
J24 38 24 31 Jake McDorman, Billy Baldwin. a Harvey Keite, Billy Miller. Premiere. cx Docudrama) Gary Cole, Laura Harris., x
*** "Desperate Escape" (2009, Suspense) Army Wives Trevor and Army Wives Army Wives "The War Army Wives Kevin
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) 320 221 320 3 3 "Cowboys'l **** "Aliens" (1986) Sigourney Weaver. A taskforce goes Strike Back (In Stereo) **e "Tower Heist" (2011) Ben Strike Back
320 221 320 3 3 to eradicate a horrific space predator. 'R' 'MA'Bc Stiller. 'PG-13' a
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) 109 65 109 44 53 Tornado'14, U Swarm'14, L Japan'14' hurricane.'14, L Japan'14'
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O(W 103 62 103 The Will: Revealed Will: Family Secrets The Will: Revealed Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's The Will: Revealed
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S *** "Eternal Sunshine of the *** "The Rock"(1996, Action) Sean Connery. Alcatraz Katt Williams: Larry Wilmore's Race,
l 340241 340 4 Spotless Mind" (2004) 'R' c Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. 'R' Kattpacalypse'MA, L Religion & Sex
NASCAR RaceDay (N) On the Monster Jam Hard Parts Hard Parts Hard Parts Hard Parts Dumbest NASCAR World of
[SPEED 732 112 732 (Live) Edge (N) Stuff Victory L. Outlaws
*3/3 "Crank: High ** "Walking Tall" (2004, Action) The Rock, **, "The Transporter 2"(2005, Action)Jason "Crank: High
PKEJ 37 43 37 27 36 Voltage"(2009)'R' Johnny Knoxville. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Statham. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Voltage" (2009) 'R'
ri$iA"370 271 370 "Soul Boss'MA' *Y "Zookeeper"(20111 Comedy) Kevin James, ***Y "Midnight in Paris" (2011) ** "Battle: Los Angeles" (2011)
(STARJ 370 271 370 Surfer" Leslie Bibb. (In Stereo) PG'x cOwen Wilson.'PG-13' Aaron Eckhart. 'PG-13'
ji 36 31 36 SEC Football Greatest Games SEC Football Greatest Games Boxing 'PG, L
S** "The Amityville */, "Thirteen Ghosts" (2001, Horror) Tony "Haunted High" (2012, Horror) Danny Trejo, "House of Bones"
S 31 59 31 26 29 Horror"(2005)R' Shalhoub, Embeth Davidtz. 'R' a Charisma Carpenter. Premiere.'NR' (2010)'NR' a
(TB5) 49 23 49 16 19 Friends |Friends Seinfeld |Seinfeld BigBang |BigBang ** "The Wedding Date" Xa *** "Mean Girls" (2004) s
M**Y2 "The Eddy Duchin Story" (1956 *** "The Razor's Edge" (1946) Tyrone Power. An idealis- **** "Jesse James"(1939)
169 53 169 30 35 Biography) Tyrone Power, Kim Novak. 'NR' tic war veteran questions the meaning of life. Tyrone Power. Premiere.'GP'
(1nn 53 34 53 24 26 o Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo)
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"Detective Dee and *** "Source Code" (2011, Suspense) Jake "Metamorphosis" (2007, Horror) ** "Snow White: A Tale of Terror"
Ii 350 261 350 the Mystery" Gyllenhaal. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' sa Christopher Lambert. 'R' a (1997, Fantasy) 'R' s
*** "Catch Me if You Can" (2002) Leonardo **Y "Sherlock Holmes"(2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., ** "National Treasure" (2004)
(I) 48 33 48 31 34 DiCaprio.'PG-13'x JudeLaw.'PG-13' (DVS Nicolas Cage.'PG'
(ii) 38 58 38 33 Drama |Drama *t "CatchThatKid"(2004)'PG' Home |King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Dynamite |Boon
(TiAi 9 54 9 44 Extreme RV's'G' Extreme RV's'G' Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
f~ii 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking '14' Most Shocking Pawn Combat Combat Combat Combat Combat Forensic Forensic
(1T L) 32 49 32 34 24 Griffith IGriffith Griffith IGriffith Griffith Griffith King King King King King King
NCIS A friend of Gibbs' NCIS A survivalist is NCIS "Child's Play" (In NCIS A murder at a NCIS "Defiance" (In White Collar "Identity
47 32 47 17 18 daughter.'14' wanted. 'PG' s Stereo) 'PG' s college fair.'PG' Stereo) 'PG' s Crisis"'PG' s
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With
117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
W 1i8) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |White MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Chicago White Sox. (N) (Live) WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


West
I 65
V J J652
+ 74
SQ J 9 7 6


08-25-12


SA 5 4 2
East
A K J 9 8 3
SQ 10 9 7
SAK 3
4 10
South
4A Q 10
V K4


Q J 10 9 8
K 8 3

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East


1 NT


Pass 2 NT


Pass
Pass


Opening lead: 4 6


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Arthur Boyd, one of Australia's leading painters
in the last century, said, "'Art doesn't alter things. It
points things out, but it doesn't alter them. It can't,
no matter what a painter wants to do."
At the bridge table, high-card points do alter
things. A top player, though, is not blinded by them;
he is flexible in his thinking.
For example, in today's deal, do you agree with
North's raise to two no-trump (given that it was
natural, not a transfer to diamonds)? And what
should South do now?
A one-no-trump overcall should show about 15.5
to 17.5 points, a little stronger than a one-no-trump
opening. (You want some extras because if West
has a fair hand, he will make a penalty double,
which will be lucrative unless North can run into
a long suit.)
This appears to make North's raise borderline,
but aces are wonderful, worth nearer to 4.5 points
than four. And any finesses that South wishes to
take are probably winning. So North's game-try is
fine. (In fact he might even jump to three no-
trump!)
Also, the South hand seems to be a minimum
with only 15 high-card points. However, it has a lot
of pluses because East is known to have almost all
of the missing points. There are surely three spade
tricks available. And that diamond suit will be
worth three or four tricks. South should not be a
point automaton and should happily raise to three
no-trump.
Probably West will lead the spade six. South
wins and drives out East's diamond honors, ending
with 10 tricks: three spades, two hearts, three dia-
monds and two clubs.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SLUNBT /
A I
@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Rese-ed
DEILY



AGIANU E



HEELAX

7~V 7~^ ^^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Adios and
au revoir.J










HIS ABILuTY TO
5AY "API05" ANP
'AU REVOIR"
MAPE HIM THIS,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: -
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: JOIST ENACT UPHILL LAWFUL
I Answer: Levi Strauss was successful selling pants
because he was a "JEANIUS"


ACROSS
1 Crowds
5 Hall-of-Famer
Mel -
8 Carnaby
Street locale
12 Part of NBA
13 Tiger's coat
14 Burn softly
15 mater
16 Driver's
mishap
(2 wds.)
18 Recurring
theme
20 RN's group
21 Add- -
(extras)
22 Veld newbie
(2 wds.)
25 Tax shelter
28 Run for it
29 Two-masted
sailboat
33 Soothed
35 Assortment
36 Wind catchers
37 Contemporary
38 Kind of flurry


39 Culture dish
goo
41 -Margret
42 Amuses
45 Chinese
"way"
48 Coral
formation
49 Adjust the
wheels
53 Lama, e.g.
56 Farm unit
57 Dry as dust
58 Zodiac sign
59 Milk option
60 Talk wildly
61 Marquee
notice of yore
62 Injection

DOWN
1 Lady's
honorific
2 Nobel Prize
city
3 Cellar, briefly
4 Gourmet
delicacy
5 Not on duty


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HAH IGOR PSI
DALI NANO OAS
IRANFLOT LLA

U SRI
CHASM RO YALS
AU FYA FA R LDSE N
UAFAR DENS
ERI RITA FIT
SODDEN KITTY

BOILS SENSING
AD EOUT EVEN
UK E ROME RASP
SA THOR TNT


6 New Orleans
campus
7 Hypnotic
state
8 Noncom
9 Hodgepodge


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10 Trumpet or
bugle
11 Gets bills
17 Frat letter
19 Drums'
companions
23 Prehistoric
24 Polar explorer
25 Genres
26 Harm
irretrievably
27 Low voice
30 Type of rug
31 Raise a red
flag
32 Vanessa's
sister
34 Raunchy
35 Main artery
37 Nick or
scratch
39 Is of benefit
40 Hot spring
43 I, to Fritz
44 Cut drastically
45 Ski lift (hyph.)
46 Mystique
47 Valhalla host
50 Stomach-
turning
51 Handlebar
feature
52 Verne's
captain
54 Banned bug
spray
55 Also


Dear Annie: My toxic
mother has put a strain on
my family Two years ago,
she got into a fight with
my husband, and I
sided with him. Life
has been a living hell
ever since. She con-
stantly calls and leaves
horrible messages on
our voicemail. She has
turned family and
friends against us. Our
kids are scared to
death of her, but she
has told everyone that
I turned the children AN IN
against her for no rea- MAIL
son. Of course, she
would never admit
doing anything wrong. She's been
like this since I can remember.
She tormented me during my
childhood. My psychiatrist says
she has mental health issues, and
our lawyer says she probably
won't follow a restraining order.
My husband says to ignore her,
but that's impossible. My chil-
dren and I want to move. I have
panic attacks every time I see her
phone number show up on our
Caller ID. When she doesn't call,
I'm on pins and needles waiting
for the inevitable. I dread leaving
the house, because I worry about
running into her somewhere.
How do I convince my husband
that it's in our best interests to
move? If he won't, how do I get
my mother to leave us alone? -
On the Edge
Dear Edge: You cannot change
your mentally ill mother's behav-
ior unless she is cooperative. And
asking your husband to move is a
big step, especially if it means
leaving his job. While running


away might be helpful in the
short term, unless you plan to go
into the witness protection pro-
gram, Mom eventually
will find you.
I Instead, take control
of your life. Issue that
restraining order, and
if Mom violates it, call
the police. Get an un-
listed phone number.
Refuse to let her bully
you. Then, if you still
wish to move, you and
your husband will
have time to find jobs
IE'S and a home in a new
-BOX location rather than
letting Mom chase you
out of town. We also
suggest you discuss this with your
therapist and work on ways to
feel safe.
Dear Annie: In our small social
group, the wives insist on attend-
ing a local event in which the
husbands have zero interest.
When I have suggested politely
that the wives go without us, they
become irritated and veto this
plan. I know a husband who
drags his wife to sporting events
where she puts in earplugs and
reads a novel. Why do people in-
sist that their spouses attend
events whether they want to or
not? Is it power and control? A
test of one's loyalty?
Please urge your readers to at-
tend these things with those who
enjoy them and allow the rest of
us to bow out. Going but Re-
senting It
Dear Going: There are myriad
reasons people do this, although
some simply want their spouses
to enjoy what they do and keep
them company And there are in-


stances where going to something
that doesn't interest you can lead
to actual enjoyment and expand
your social repertoire. But we
agree that if it's the same event
repeatedly, you shouldn't have to
keep going provided your
spouse has someone else with
whom to attend.
Dear Annie: Please tell "Dis-
traught Wife" and any other per-
son struggling with opioid
addiction to talk to a doctor and
ask about Suboxone. This is a
drug for addicts that will help
them get off the stronger, addic-
tive drugs in a matter of days. It
does involve a couple of days of
discomfort, but after that, the de-
sire is gone. -Anonymous
DearAnonymous: Suboxone is
a medication approved for the
treatment of opiate dependence,
and it has a lower potential for
abuse than methadone. Common
side effects include flu-like symp-
toms, headaches, sweating, nau-
sea, sleeping difficulties and
mood swings, and Suboxone has
been associated with difficulty
breathing, especially when com-
bined with other depressants.
But under a doctor's supervision,
it can help an addict get sober


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit
www creators. com.


North
# 742
VA8 3
+ 6 5 2


8-25


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C7


y






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles

al lKARES EOA7t -
p)V POES FATcATs,,,





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Sally Forth


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The Born Loser
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FROR bEE-ZER .lG3' i 5ENT E.TEONE.R TMLON TRE DONKE-,

5O 0ON! P1NETITMLON


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Say, pal, it's a bit drafty in here. Would
you mind rolling up the back window?"


Doonesbury


SMINY, ANY //ORP ON
WHE.N EIZABETH //WIL L.
HAVE HER FIRST
.PRAFTR.AY '








Big Nate
so DAD WA5
FLIRTING YEAH,
WITH A HE
SALESLADY? GOT
SHOT
DOWN.






Arlo and Janis -


i.'~~~ ~~ --- I- '^ r"
1 ,'











BUT AT LEAST HE
TRIE>! THAT'S
GOOD AT HIS AGE!


AOTACCOR- WHAT
WI6 TO/WHAT ARE YOU
I REAP ON TALKING
T//TI7, p ABOUT?
71I








I HOPE 4E 10F
DOESN'T GET 0)
DISCOURAGED.
NAH,
HE BOUNCES
BACK QUICKLY
S EE

)M) !l

Ts L-^


COME HERE
OFTEN?
I WORK
~~ RE kE


The Grizzwells


Blondie


THAT SURE F.THERE'S NO LAW THAT
DOESN'TT SAYS EVERYTHING YOL
SSOUNO DO ON YOUR DAY OFF
LIKE FUN! HAS TO BE FUN, iS



-- ^ - ,-'--


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I think this one's got a
stuck zipper!"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Hit and Run" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Campaign" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Premium Rush" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:15 p.m.


"Hit and Run"(R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Sparkle" (PG-13) 4:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.,
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Paranorman" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Paranorman" (PG) In real 3D. 4:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Campaign" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 7:45
p.m.,
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"2016 Obama's America" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 Sflnbe aV


"K ZGTKOKSGAD ZKZ AHHF JN SH


VHPO ...


PG UWY SPG MJKEFGYS UKS


WOZ SPG YBWXSGYS."


- NWJA


BEEWXSOGD

Previous Solution: "I've read a lot of things about myself and think, 'Wow! That girl
sounds really saucy.' Scarlett Johansson
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 8-25


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


I CAN'T THINK OF ANYTHING THAT
SOJNoS LIKE IT WOULO BE FUN FOR
ME TO DO ON MY DAY OFF: TODAY
--^~ YOU COULD --- -,
WAS4 MY-'-
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.AN, DEAR, i' ,


I CAN'T BELIEVE THEY HAVEN'T
PASSED A LAW LIKE THAT YT'

7 ;- r' o i ^ _




I i


Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


COMICS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Classifieds


A Single White Widow
is looking for a country
gentleman, that knows
how to treat a lady
65-85 years old
Love a country music a
plus (352) 344-0002
I am an attractive,
young at heart, young
widow, looking for that
sincere, great,
lonesome gentleman.
In his late 70's to 80's.
I know I can fix that
lonesomeness. Think
about it because Im not
dreaming. So don't hesi-
tate to write me and
lets get together
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1796 P
106 W Main St
Inverness FI 34450
Pinochle Players
Seeking couple to
play weekly
NIS, N/D
(352) 628-3570
WWM Sr seeking female
for friendship. Age not im-
portant. Semi-retired, NS,
ND. Like fishing, music,
country living. Call RBY
Call R.B.Y. 352-563-1033



5 PIECE BEDROOM
SET Queen Size
$800 OBO
4 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET SECTIONAL $300
OBO (352)201-4725
Chipper/Shredder
10HP Excellent
Condition $350
(352) 465-4234













Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,# ,#, # ,


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850 mo. F/L/S
(352) 249-7033
Crystal River
2/1, furnished, util. incl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
Elliptical Exercise
Machine. Like New
$300
352-422-0273
Established Pizza
Shop in Floral City.
Good Money Maker
$18,000 58B-9932
HIGHLANDS
Inverness 2/1/1, enclosed
lanai, all new kitchen
and bath. Lawn main in-
cluded. No Pets. F/L/S
$650 352-804-4007
Inverness
Large Garage Sale
Today Only 8/25
304 Red Rose Lane
JAGUAR
2004 X-Type excellent
cond 95K miles
garage kept 1 owner
$ 6900.
97 MERCEDES diesel
$2500.
352-341-4586
JAGUAR
2004 X-Type excellent
cond 95K miles
garage kept 1 owner
$ 6900.
97 MERCEDES diesel
$2500.
352-341-4586
LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Experience Preferred
(352)726-9481

LECANTO
Furniture for Sale
Saturday only Aug 25
Household furniture.
5628 W Hunters Ridge
Circle(352) 746-0084
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $350
(352) 794-3081
PATIO SWING, seats
three comfortable. Extra
cushions. Has canopy
too. $95 352-860-0444
Portable Generator
Gegenarec 5000 Watt,
Briggs & Straton 10 HP
$450 OBO
(352) 489-7930
Roll Top Desk
$1,000.
Large Strato Lounger
Rocker Recliner
$199.
(352) 344-1541
Rolland Electric Organ
with Bench $8,000 obo
Electric Accordion w/
module & 1 speaker
$3,000 obo, 344-1541
TELEVISION
40 INCH LCD HDTV
Gorgeous Samsung TV
like new w/remote and
manual. Inverness asking
$400. 352-341-0316



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Free Birds
to good home
call for info:
(352) 634-2781


Free CAT
To good home
German Shepherd/
Chow mixed,
shots, to good home
(352) 257-1737
Free Female
Black Lab
5 yrs. old, house trianed
good with kids
(352) 601-7076
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTEN,
Cute
Free to good home
(352) 216-6668
FREE KITTENS
CUTE
Litter trained
To good home
(352) 257-0517
Free Shitzu/Lapsa
Mixed, quiet, calm,
older dog.
Owner permanently
Hospitalized
Vet reference required
352-637-0193
Free to a Loving home
Pitt Bulls &
English Mastiff Mixed
Puppies
(352) 287-0270
HORSE MANURE
Bring Shovel & Help
yourself. Yard is open
352-697-5252
Three 13" Hub Cab
Suzuki Swift
(352) 341-1649



Free to Loving Home
Mixed Puppies


Siug IVIibllsing
Thursday Chihuahua
mix Chico brown 19 lbs,
Tippy 81b Brown with
white on tip of tail and
paws 3rd one Buster
brown 61bs lost off 41 at
pine lake lane and
Floral city park Reward
422-3670 or 726-5062
Lost Female
Peacock
Hernando between &
200 (352) 897-4845
Lost Male Yorkie
Black caller white glitter
bones. Name Niko
Near Elcam & Deltona
(352) 476-1080
Lost
Springer Spaniel
Black & White, male
Pine Ridge area
(352) 270-3222
Lost: Black female cat,
Edith. Small tan spot
above her left eye, sev-
eral orange-tan spots on
torso. Citrus Springs near
Rutland/Deltona. Please
call 352-601-6310 if
found.
Male Black Cat
with White markings,
microchipped
answers to "Galaxy"
Bravo and Haciendo
Pine Ridge
(352) 476-1878
Very Large African
Tortoise. Brown, green,
gold in color. Last seen
in the vicinity of Stoney
Ridge in Floral City.
Family Pet. Children are
devastated Reward.
(352) 476-8961. 24/7
YORKIE
Missing from Buckskin
Dr. Pine Ridge. Black
and Tan. Family Devas-
tated Reward
(352) 527-7980


000C3TR

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


1 7


67 3 25


8 5 1


3


5 8 3 _6


4


2 _3 7


7_2 5 9_8


_6 9

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

..All of our .
/4dl aalced lCas .structures
withstand
120mph A
Installations by Brian CBC 1253853 win


S- - - * i^t.S^*
352-628-7519


SFREE S.T-
Permit And EL
I Engineering Fees I
Up to $200 value I

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia Skirting *Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows* Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Found Cockatiel
Found 8/18. Dark gray
body and chest Yellow
Head St. Anne Church
Area. Crystal River
(352) 564-9196
Found Orange Male
Tabby Cat, with white
marking on stomach
Very friendly In
Sugarmill Woods near
Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303




PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful flower
of
Mt. Caramel,
fruitful vine, splendor of
heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin, as-
sist me in my
necessity.
O Star of the Sea, help
me and show me here
you are my mother.
O Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen
of Heaven and Earth,
I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my
heart to secure me in
my necessity. (Make
request). There are
none that can withstand
your power.
0 Mary, conceived
without sin, pray for us
who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this
cause in your hands (3
times).
Say this prayer for
3 consecutive days and
then you must publish
and it will be granted to
you.
M.S.




Sr. Woman Seeking
Sr. Companionship and
light help in exchange
for Room and board
Located in Inverness
(352) 489-2099




HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630

HAIR STYLIST
Wanted. To Join Our
Team In Citrus Springs
(352) 464-2196










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





EXPERIENCED
OPHTHALMIC TECH
NEEDED P/T |
Send resume to:
Suncoast Eye Center
221 N.E. Hwy 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
or e-mail:
dmsuncoast@hotmail.com

CERTIFIED CODER

Immediate Opening.
Must have at least 5.
exp in medical coding,
Fax Resume to:
352-564-4222 or e-mail
Teresa@citrusdiabetes
treament.com
CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Crystal River
Health & Rehab
Center
Now accepting
applications for

RN 's

RN's
Full Time & Part time
Dietary Aides
with experience
Please Apply Within
136 NE 12TH AVENUE
Crystal River
(352) 795-5044
EOE/DFWP
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience and Caring
Must Draw Blood Fax
Resume 352-746-5784
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


CLASSIFIED SATURDAY,AUGUST 25, 2012 C9




To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


43 7 13 5 s
61711392584J


736451829
54892 73 16
12 9 83674 5
982613457
3 1 7 2- 4 5 7GIS
317245698
465789231


Experienced
Legal Secretary
For small law office in
Crystal River. Only
experienced need
apply. Must have sub-
stantial experience,
preferably in one or
more of the following:
Civil Litigation,
Contract, Corporate
and/or Real Estate
Law. Potential for
part time or full time
employment.
Send Resume to
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River Fl. 34423




Restaurant Help
ALL POSITIONS

Apply in Person, 2-4p
Angelao's Pizzeria
2492 N. Essex Ave.
Hernando
NO PHONE CALLS




Outside Sales
Associate
Fountains Memorial
Park
Experience a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-2555
Telemarketing Mgr
AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375




Available Position
of Warehouse
Clerk/Driver.
Primary role will be to
perform duties of
warehouse clerk on
daily basis and will
drive to/from cus-
tomer sites to pick up
material, and deliver
material to vendors
as needed. Must
have driving experi-
ence, clean driving
record and be able
to lift up to 751bs.
CDL/CDLwith
hazardous materials
endorsement, valid
DOT medical card
preferred. DOT
background check,
drug test required.
EOE/Drug Free
Workplace. E-Verify
participant.
APPLY IN PERSON AT
Technology
Conservation Group,
Inc. 705 S Easy St,
Lecantoy Ch Florid
Moan through Friday
8:00 am 4:00 pm or
email applications to
emirculoveerelations
tcarecvclina.com.
Please reference Job
ID #FL WHS 1018.


CH.and ninc E


Citrus Publishing
of Florida
hands an immediate
opening for Business
Office e rvisor.
Citrus Publishing
publishes the Citrus
County Chronicle,
a 23,500 weekday
and 29,000 Sunday
circulation newspa-
per in Crystal River,
Fla., and nine weekly
newspapers along
the northwestern
coast of Florida.
Candidates should
have 2 years of
experience in
general accounting
and financial
degree in account-
ing; be proficient in
Microsoft Office
products; have
experience in cen-
tralized accounting
systems and demon-
strate leadership and
communication skills.
To apply,
send resumes to
Mike Arnold at
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
or fax to
(352) 564-2935.




CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
li./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

FUEL TRANSPORT
DRIVER
CDLCLASS A,
w/HAZMAT. TWIC
card preferred. Call
Jamie (352) 795-3469

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Experience Preferred
(352)726-9481

Telemarketing Mgr
AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375
Telemarketing Mgr
AC Company. Must be
exp. Please respond
ASAP if you have what it
takes. Base pay + bonus
Call John 727-858-0375




CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time Customer
Service/Food Prep posi-
tion. 15 Hours a week.
Must be available even-
ing hours 4-7pm and
weekends.Customer
Service and typing skills
required.Fax resume to
352-527-9605




SNOW
ENROLLING
For All Programs
1 COSMETOLOGY
MASSAGE THERAPY
NAIL TECH
0SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415
I ---- J



Established Pizza
Shop in Floral City.
Good Money Maker
$18,000 585-9932



Antique 1950 One
Armed Bandit 10 cent
slot machine. Exc Con-
dition From Harrahs@
Lake Tahoe. $1200
(352) 726-7596
Antique Oak Hoosier
Refinished, excel.
cond. tin flower bin
8 milk glass spice jars,
storage on top and
bottom $750. obo
(352) 795-1381


Disney 40th
Anniversary Collection
16 Plates, signed &
numbered, Cert. of
Auth. $250. obo
(352) 746-3327



HOT TUB
4 person, with lounger
bought with house do
not want $350. obo
in crystal river, you haul
(386) 882-8867
HOT TUB THERMA-SPA
BRAND WITH COVER
5'X7' 3 PERSON, 2
SEATS AND CHAISE
LOUNGE, IN GREAT
CONDITION. $895.00 JP
352-726-4987, JOANNE
352-346-6023



DISHWASHER, WHITE
looks good,works good
under counter $100.00
352-513-4473
DRYER
$100 with broken trade in.
Works great. 30 day war-
ranty. Delivery extra.
Call/text352-364-6504
DRYER$100 works great
with 30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
FRIDGE, WHITE 2
door,top freezer, works
good. $100.00 5134473
Kenmore Freezer,
Upright less than
1 yr. old
$250.
(352) 341-4313
Maytag Dryer
for RV or Apartment
Like knew $325
(352) 489-2099
REFRIGERATOR by
Magic Chef, Black &
Stainless, Dorm size.
Works great, priced right.
$75.00. 352-613-4279
Self cleaning stove.
Works great. $100
503-7992
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STOVE KENMORE white
top burners, good cond.
$100 352-513-4473
WASHER $100
with broken trade in.
Works great. 30 day war-
ranty. Delivery available
Call/text352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can De-
liver. 352 263-7398
WASHER/WHITE looks
good, works good, $100
u pick up 352-513 4473
White refrigerator w/ ice
maker. Works great.
$100 503-7992


AIR COMPRESSOR
Campbell Hausfeld, 4 HP
w/ 13 gallon Tank, Oil
free, direct drive 5.8
ACFM @90 PSI $100
OBO 352-795-9849
Bandsaw 9" $40,
Drill Press 10" $50
Good Condition
(352) 341-4008
TOOL BOX
POPULAR MECHANICS
4 DRAWERS TOP,
2 BOTTOM. Large stor-
age $95. 352-220-4074



13" TELEVISION WITH
REMOTE $15
352-613-0529
BOOKSHELF SPEAK-
ERS BY INFINITY
$50(pair) Great Sound
Call 352-726-0040
TELEVISION
40 INCH LCD HDTV
Gorgeous Samsung TV
like new w/remote and
manual. Inverness asking
$400. 352-341-0316
TELEVISION
54" PROJECTION TV
Works great $200 firm.
Located in Beverly Hills.
352-464-3934
TELEVISION
DURABRAND 19"
COLOR TV works good.
no remote $30.00
352-220-4074
TELEVISION
MAGNAVOX 36" wl
large matching stand,
used very little, excellent
condition, $95, 465-1813
TV & RADIO COMBO
PORTABLE $15
352-613-0529



COMPUTER PRINTER
TABLE 28 HIGH 20
WIDE 16 DEEP
WALNUT COLOR.
$20.00 352-726-0686
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215 INKJET
PRINTER GOOD CON-
DITION. EXTRA INK
$30.00 352-726-0686


HP INK CARTRIDGE #23
New (unopened box) $10
Call 352-726-0040



LAWN EDGER Sears
gas powered like new
$100 352.637.2647



PATIO SWING, seats
three comfortable. Extra
cushions. Has canopy
too. $95 352-860-0444



5 PIECE BEDROOM
SET Queen Size
$800 OBO
4 PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET SECTIONAL $300
OBO (352)201-4725
6 pc Oak Entertainment
Center; expandable
Selling w/ 51 in. Hitachi
TV. $950. Will sell
separately if interested.
(352) 527-7980
Beautiful Dining
Room Set
Wood Table, 6 chairs &
glass top plus china
cabinet. $495
(352) 726-6228
Brown suede leather
foot stool,
21 x28, 14" High, new
$50
(352) 637-5227
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com 795-0121
Contemporary Bar
w/ bar stools
$160.
Dining Room Table
$100
(352) 257-3802
DARK SOLID PINE
BOOKCASE W/
SHELVES and double
doors. $100 (Dunnellon)
352-465-4441
Entertainment Center
Lighted white washed
oak holds stereo, spkrs,
TV., w/ storage $250
Fisher Stereo unit w/
speakers $125
(352) 726-5584


Fa:(32 53565 1TolFre (8) 5-34 E al:ca sif edscr. *.nieco ebie


RO UT EwS





AVAILABLE

N nOW j--

NO10


v Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

v Must be 18 years old

v Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest

Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to

the back and ask for a district manager or
email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com



1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
C Hr cou. E



SC wHpNICLE
L www.chronicleonline.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE ALL NEW 2013 NISSAN

ALTIMA


We changed everything
S except the name.


9.


I4


N


OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!
The All New Nissan Altima Gets 38 MPG.
Drive 684 miles on a single tank.


BLOW THE DOORS OFF... ALL FOUR OF THEM.
THE 2013 ALTIMA SV HAS BETTER OVERALL ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE
THAN THE HONDA ACCORD SE, HYUNDAI SONATA AND TOYOTA CAMRY SE


*-Jf2'


/


STARTING
MSRP


PER MONTH
24 MONTH LEASE


With $2,999
Due At Signing.
Model# 13013


CRYSTAL 352-564-1971
N I S S A N 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL


CRYSTAL NISSAN.COM


*Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. $2,999 down, cash or trade equity. Excludes tax, tag, title, Dealer Fee of $599.50. Lease is 24 months, 24,000 miles. $0.15 per mile over. With approved
credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior Sales may restrict stock. tBased on EPA estimate on Monroney Label. Your actual mileage may vary.


$


$


2 1


mod


C o SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


o3a









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER HOLDS 32"
TELEVISION MEDIUM
OAK FINISH $30
352-613-0529
ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Real wood, ch stain,glass
door, holds 27" non-hd
TV + more. Beautiful. $95
746-7232 after 6pm
FOUR PIECE COUCH
fair condition/call for
picture on email $20
Linda 419-4788
Futton
with extra cover
& pillows
Excel. cond. $250.
(352) 746-1316
Hide A Bed,
Lazy Boy,Excellent
Pastel Colors
$250
(352) 341-4313
Hitchcock Dining Room
Set Table w/ 3 leafs & 6
chairs. Custom Pads.
Excellent Condition
$650 OBO
(352) 564-3994
HU SUNG BAMBOO
BED. natural bamboo
color, with matress,
$60.00 513-4473
Large Curved Desk
$150
352-513-4759
Cell 352-201-7475
Large Oak Dresser,
great cond. $175.
New Twin Bed,
never slept in $250.
(352) 249-9275
Leave message
Large sq glass/ marble
coffee table, metal trim.
Matching end tables w/ 2
Irg gold leaf lamps. $400
726-5584
Lift Chair
$250.
74" Sofa,
medium flowers
$80.
(352) 489-9017
Like new off white sofa
and love seat, dinette
table w/ 4 chairs, and
TV's(352) 344-2903
LOVE SEAT Excellent
condton.Silk.Tan,brown,etc.
100.00 IINDA
419-4788
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE BED &
BOX SPRING. Clean,
frame included. $40.00
513-4473
Roll Top Desk
$1,000.
Large Strato Lounger
Rocker Recliner
$199.
(352) 344-1541
ROUND DINNING
TABLE plus chairs,
brown, $100.00 or best
offer 513 4473
SMALL CHINA CABINET
Antique, firm $100.00 pic-
ture upon request
513-4473
Sofa & Loveseat
with 2 high back
chairs $350.
Excellent Condition
352-637-1701
SOFAAND LOVESEAT
Beige colour Sofa and
Loveseat in excellent
condition. Price $ 300.
Local pickup only. Call
804 212 3170
Solid Oak table drop
leaves w/ 4 bentwood
chrs. Excellent Cond
$375. Large Grn leather
sectional w/ Qbed
Exc. $375 726-5584
Triple Dresser w/ mirror,
chest, 2 night stands,
dark oak $125.
Dining Rm. Table with
butterfly leaf & 6 chairs,
med oak, like new
$275. (352) 341-5182
Tropical print sofa &
chair, excellent cond
$300. DR set
Glass/marble table, metal
trim, 6 chrs, side table
$500 726-5584
TRYING AGAIN MAUVE
WING BACK chair made
by Pioneer Very good
condition $60.00
527-1399
TWEED BLUE RE-
CLINER still available,
good cond $40 513-4473
TWIN HEADBOARD &
FOOTBOARD Cherry
Very Nice w/frame. $95
352-465-4441
(Dunnellon)




Craftsman Riding
Mower 17/2 HP
42" Deck $450
John Deer Riding
Mower $350.
(352) 746-7357


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451

Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic. Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


ierh redder
P10p Excellent
Condition $350
(352) 465-4234
Hesqvarna
Riding Mower,
42" Cut, Automatic,
good cond. $400.
(352) 637-4718
MULCHING MOWER
BLACK & DECKER 18"
ELEC. 50 ft. cord $35.00
352-220-4074





YARDSALE
BEVERLY HILLS
YARD SALE
3050 W Mustang Blvd
Huge yard sale F,S&S
8-3. *Multifamily* furni-
ture, tools, toys, clothes.
Lots of everything!

BIG SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat., 8am to 2pm
Din. Rm., table &
chairs, collectible
glass, Hummels,
antiques, jewelry tools
& More! behind Olive
Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81



CITRUS SPRINGS
556 E. Elgrove Dr.
Saturday, 8/25, 8a 2 p,
household/kitchen items,
books, yard equipment.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fn and Sat 7:30-4 pm
Huge Multifamily Sale
9105 N Abbott Dr
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday & Sunday 8-2
Moving sale. Tools,
household & kitchen
wares, much more.
7969 W Glendale Court
off of 495
(352) 564-3994
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday, 25th 8a- p
Many household items,
furniture, Call for info
9450 N. Hatcher Point
Corner of 488 & Hatcher
Pt. (352) 436-4148
HOMOSASSA
Saturday and Sunday 9-5
Quality Bedroom & Liv-
ingroom furniture, framed
pictures and more.
17 Morning Glory Ct
Sugarmill Woods
INVERNESS
31 N. Braemar Drive
Friday and Saturday
August 24 and 25th.
Moving sale: Items used
to stage a home while
being sold. Everything
must go. Hrs 8:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m.
Inverness
Large Garage Sale
Today Only 8/25
304 Red Rose Lane

LECANTO
Furniture for Sale
Saturday only Aug25
Household furniture.
5628 W Hunters Ridge
Circle(352) 746-0084

LECANTO
Saturday 25, 8a-2p
2350 N. Pinecone Ave.
PINE RIDGE
1845 W. LaBonte Circle
Fri & Sat 8-2
Pine Ridge
Fri & Sat 9-2
Full size sleeper sofa, en-
tertainment center, 26 "
TV, misc items and more.
4770 W Mustang Blvd
WANTED
New & Used Items
in garage,
rods, reels, tackle,
tools,collectibles,
hunting equip.
352-613-2944




ATHLETIC Reebok ath-
letic shoes brand new
size 9.5 white and navy
trim 25.00 352 344 3485
MEANS CLOTHING
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
NECKTIES Retired exec
selling collection of
20 designer ties $75 obo
352.637.2647




7 FISHING HINGED
SINKER MOLDS-
Palmer, H-1,
Universal,Hilts & US
Sports, Ex., $100.
352-628-0033


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


2 RAIN BARREL WI
HOSE CONNECTION
ON BOTTOM. $75 EA
464 0316
1997 Schwinn
Women's Bike
Excellent Cond.
Owner manual
$200 OBO
(352) 465-6830
2010 Craftsman
Generator, 5600
very little use
$300
Tom (920) 224-2513
50" Sony TV w/ remote
$100. 36" TV w/stand
$85. both work good
Nice girls bike 20" $15.
No cls before 10am
(352) 628-4766
CAGE WITH LEGS 62 L
by 32 W 40.00 /obo Linda
419-4788
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $20
352-613-0529
COMMERCIAL
CLOTHING racks(2).
Rollers,adjustable arms,
4 sides. $75 Dunnellon
352-465-4441
COMPUTER DESK
w/hutch pull out end to
form L shape. Like new.
Oak finish. $65. Call
352-382-1154
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER HOLDS 32" TV
MEDIUM OAK FINISH
GOOD CONDITION $30
352-613-0529
FETEC MONO MULLET
CAST NET SS1000- 9ft.
radius super spreader, 1"
sq. mesh, Ex, $40.
352-628-0033
FISH TANK
30 Gal 5 fish,
with all accessories
$100 352-201-4725
Flat Screen TV
Sharp 26"
$100.
Computer, older,
works good $65.
(352) 563-2896
FOOTBALL TABLE
Halex brand, full size,
55"x29",good cond, $95
746-7232 after 6PM
H. P. PRINTER
Office-Jet-All In One
#7210.
Printer-Fax-Scanner.
$55. Call 352-382-1154
HOOVER SELF PRO-
PELLED VACUUM $30
WORKS GREAT CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO INVER-
NESS 419-5981
LAWN MOWERS
[2] MURRAY MOWERS
both 20"cut-3.5hp briggs
eng.-one @ $60.00-one
@ $30.00 [352]746-0167
Lincoln Welder
AC, 225 Amp
$150
Chop Saw
for wood, $80
(352) 563-2896
LP Gas Fork Lift Tank
Good Shape, No leaks

80 Shipping Pallets all in
good shape, no boards
missing $75. obo for all
(352) 563-2385
MAKITA CHOP SAW
USED FOR VINYL
SIDING
ONLY $85 464-0316
Mickey MOUSE
FIGURINE new,in box.
Was $34.95 selling for
$15.00 Linda 419-4788
Moving Boxes
Approx. 30 All sizes,
including wardrobe
$ lea Crystal River
(386) 882-8867
PARROT CAGE ON
STAND Playtop Green
wrought iron 66"H 32"L
23"W Xclean exc shape
$100. 352-270-3909
PAT ROBERTSON
AUTOGRAPHED
"MIRACLES CAN BE
YOURS" $10 BOOK LIKE
NEW 419-5981
Portable Generator
Gegenarec 5000 Watt,
Briggs & Straton 10 HP.
$450 OBO
(352) 489-7930
QUIK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fit's 10'X10'canopy
Never used $40.00 Call
Ray@ 464-0573
REFRIGERATOR BY
MAGIC CHEF Black &
Stainless. Great for office
or work shop. Dorm size.
$75.00 352-613-4279
Rolland Electric Organ
with Bench $8,000 obo
Electric Accordion w/
module & 1 speaker
$3,000 obo, 344-1541
RUBBERMAID STOR-
AGE BOX 24 Gal Rub-
bermaid Action Packer
(new) $15. Call
352-382-1154


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
*k 352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST. SRr DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREWJOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201


SAMSUNG GRAVITY
CELL PHONE Full sliding
kb, mint in box. tmobile
only. $45 Inverness
864-283-5797
Sewing Machine
Husqvarna (Viking)
Many decorative
stitches, plus button
holes, great cond. $150
(352) 628-9660
SEWING MACHINE
JANOME(NEW HOME)
DC 4030 Like new.
Used 6 months. Origi-
nal Cost $699. 30
Stitches, Auto Lock
Stitch, Needle Threader,
much more. Ideal for
Quilters. All metal
parts. $450 OBO
352-746-7355
SONY 36" TELEVISION
WITH STAND GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529
SPRINKLER
JOHN DEERE Large
walking sprinkler that
tracks the hose, $40.
352-628-0033
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $45 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
419-5981
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 ALL
CONNECTIONS, BOOK
AND BOX LIKE NEW
419-5981
TELEVISION 13"
WITH REMOTE $15
352-613-0529
TV & RADIO COMBO
PORTABLE $15
352-613-0529
Utility Trailer Like New
5ft x 10ft. treated wood
floor, steel mesh ramp
tailgate, new spare
$800. General Electric
110V, 12,000 BTU,
remote control
Air Conditioner, $175.
Cell (740) 610-8076
WATER SOFTENER
Ecowater
Asking $200
Call (352) 382-1424




3 Wheel Scooter
Excellent Condition
$475
(352) 341-4008
3 WHEELED WALKER
ONLY $60 464 0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75 4640316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ALUMINUM WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
CLEAN & STERILIZED
$30 4640316
DEPENDS FOR MEN
Large quantity Size s/m
unopened packages over
150 pair Sell $60.00
Dunnellon 465-8495




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




AMPLIFIER
Line 6 Spider III guitar
amp, 15 watts, $50.
352-419-4464
AMPLIFIER
Peavey Max 112 Bass
amp. $95. 352-419-4464


BALDWIN ELECTRIC
ORGAN Small Baldwin
Electric Organ that is in
very good shape. Very
good tone and was in-
spected just a few
years ago. Please con-
tact Ed Hill
254-564-0688. Perfer-
ably afternoon.
DRUM SET Drum Set
minus Toms. Zilgin and
Sabian Cymbals. $75
obo. Call 352-563-0166
Guitar gig bag.$10
352-419-4464
GUITARS
V-Type Sunburst finish
$200.
Blonde & Gold Tell Type
$190.
(352) 746-6624
MITCHELL MO100S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG, TUNER,
STRAP, ETC $95
352-601-6625
MUSIC STAND used but
good cond. $10.00
513-7743


Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
VIFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
P FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 k
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292
TOP NOTCH Carpentry
and Remodeling
Kitchen/Bath Specialist
All Handyman Needs
Lic. (352) 220-8801


CLASSIFIED




PIANO
Upright Koholer Camp-
bell, Millennium series,
excellent condition.
$900 (352) 628-5752
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
soft brown tuffed seat
opens for storage $40
513-4473




12 X 12 TILES 140
pieces. Light colored
$20 Linda 419-4788
2" FAUX WOOD BLINDS
WHITE five 25" x 49"
$50.00 FIRM
352-382-4911
2" FAUX WOOD BLINDS
WHITE Two 70" x 64"
$50.00 FIRM
352-382-4911
LANTERN new, in box.
Was 44.00, selling for
$15 Linda 419-4788
MONGOOSE BICYCLE
21 speed men's
mountain bike. Like new.
$70.00 Phone
352-249-6509
Nordictrack easy entry
R400 bike with covers.
Round pedestal patio
48" fiberglass table. 4
Sunbrella chair cush-
ions. Hitachi VCR, JVC
27" TV. Waring food
slicer, Rival Slow
cooker, Rival Crockpot,
LeCreuset granite cas-
serole dish. Framed Pic
(352) 637-3059
RUSSELL HOBBS
STAINLESS STEEL
ELECTRIC FONDUE
SET New $15 Call
352-726-0040
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE New in box.Was
59.99/selling for 20.00
Linda
419=4788
SOARING EAGLE. New,
in box Was $59.95, sell-
ing for $20 Linda
419-4788




DP EXERCISE BIKE
UPRIGHT W/ FAN.
WORKS THE ARMS.
ONLY $85 464-0316
GAZELLE EDGE Exer-
cise glider 4-function car-
dio workout computer
tracks spd,dist,tm,+ cal
$75 746-7232 after 6pm
NICE MANUAL TREAD-
MILL TOO HOT OUT
LOSE WT INSIDE
ONLY $85. 464 0316
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE STAMINA
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS $100 464-0316




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 634-4745
| CONCEALED J
WEAPONS CLASS
Saturday 25th 11 am,
$35. (352) 419-4800
Elliptical Exercise
Machine. Like New
$300
352-422-0273
FED HI-SHOK 357
AMMO 125g jhp, new
$65 Inverness
864-283-5797
Golf Cart
Gas,
Runs Good
$1,200 obo
352-400-0312

GOLF CLUBS -
RH Ping G2 Driver $55;
Ping G2 3 Metal $45;
graphite A shafts
(352) 860-0984
MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRES
4-knobbies 2-city tread
Kenda Specialized In-
nova All six for $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
NEW NEVER BEEN
FIRED TAURUS
44 Mag SS 8 3/8 in bar-
rel ported, also reload
dies, 3 boxes ammo
(150 RD) Zipper case.
$650 OBO (352)
249-3110 after 9am

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238




4X8 Utility Trailer
Good condition $450
(352) 464-2180


BEST IN FLORIDA
Experienced Expert
CALL Marcia, FREE Est.
(352) 560-7609
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


SATURDAY,AUGUST 25, 2012 CII


GRACO INFANT SWING
Two speeds in excellent
condition. $25.00
352-364-6704


Sell r Swa


V4=





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944

$$$$$$$$
WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
liard Cues Coins & Jew-
elry Best Prices Paid
Chris @ 352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$


CAT 4YR OLD MALE
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207


Roxy
Small, spayed, yellow
Retriever mix approxi-
mately 1 1/2 years old.
She has a medium en-
ergy level and would do
well even in a smaller
home. She is quiet, re-
served and very well
mannered. She gets
along with dogs and
cats. 352-201-8664


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC PAINTING
Book it Now
and Finish your List
before the Holidays
Dale 352-586-8129
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201


Puppies
8 weeks old
(352) 419-4084
CHIHUAHUA PUP Long
haired, 8 wk old male.
350$ firm Serious in-
quires only.
352-201-8004
Dachshunds Mini. Long
Hair, 10wks, Blk. &
Cream Choc. & Cream
Males & Females,
Health Certs, Champ.
bloodline, perfect
markings $200 & up
(352) 795-6870
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $350
(352) 794-3081


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL-IN-ONE PAINTING
Repairs, Drywall,
Ceilings, Doors, Roofs,
RottEn Wood, Pressure
Cleaning 352-406-0201
PIC PICARD'S
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting
352-341- 300




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




JOHN GORDON
ROOFING, EXPERT
REPAIRS & REROOFS
ccc132549 302-9269


Pet Carrier
28 x 201/2, 21'/2
never used
$50. (352) 637-5969
Pug Puppies
5 puppies 9 weeks old
$200 each
621-7507
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Tiny-Shorkles, Morkies &
Yorkies, males & females
$500-$700 ckc, fl. health
certs., very socialized!
(352)212-4504
(352)212-1258

ivestock^


\ .





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






Bring your fishing
pole!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Picture Perfect Photos
of FAMILY, PETS, or
CASUAL WEDDINGS
Barb Malz 352-212-2439


MAC'S MOBILE RV 1,*II .-1 I l iist.
REPAIR & MAINT. / .'.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech C .RO.NitL-E
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Classifieds


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077

HERNANDO
(No Pets) 3BR/2BA,
All Appl's $495.mo
2/1 All Appl's $395
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815

HERNANDO
2/1%, Furnished MH,
Lrg. Fm Rm. Laun. Rm. &
Carport RetiremntArea,
1/2 mi. to Beach
$650 mo. 1st & Last
(352) 746-0850

HERNANDO
Newly Remodeled DW
2/2, Adult Community
(352) 270-8269

Hernando/ C Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre fenced,
paved road $625/m
(352)795-7813

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

INVERNESS
2428 Jungle Camp RD
2/1, freshly painted
Call 813-365-6040

INVERNESS
3/1, $350. mo Ist, last
sec. No Pets
4095C Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385





BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
312 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


SOUU! uSOU! U!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING

352-257-1831




TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!









C12 SATURDAY,AUGUST 25, 2012


30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Into
(352) 726-2234

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
'/2 acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 312 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182





Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
MANUFACTURED
HOME ON 100+ ft. of
Water Frontage, BOAT
RAMP IN OZELLO
KEYS New Plumbing,
Washer/ Dryer hkup
$78,900.
CALL FOR SHOWING
352-212-0460




HOMOSASSA
6270 W Liberty Lane
3BD/2BA Doublewide
1 acre lot. Deck on front
and rear. Will consider
owner financing with 5K
down. Asking $39,900
(603) 860-6660
JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352) 419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*SUMMER SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Uodated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1 st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090






- ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALLY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(itrus(ounlyHomeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
59 S Tyler (BH).......................$550
2/1 nice home wlh cozy Florida room
1942 N Oberon Ter (CS) ..........$950
3/2/2 Newer home, lots of updates, den
CRYSTAL RIVER
548 N Gulf Ave........................$1750
3/1/1 fenced yard, close to Rock Crusher elem
HOMOSASSA
6944W Grant St...................725
2/2/1 cute newer home centrally located
1843 or 1845 W Solar PI.......$685
2/2newer duplex mcl lwn &waterREDUCED
6618 S Beagle Dr..................$1200
4/3/3 w terfront s ho e, fntslic viewsi
CITRUS HILLS/LECANTO
545 E Alaska Dr ((H) .............. 800
2/2/1 new roof, handicap access
1933 WShanelle Path (t).......$1300
3/2/2 Includes full memb pools/clubhouse


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
Large Studio, furnished
Pool access. $450/mo
Need ref's & Sec.
(352) 804-2953




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts.
2 BR/I BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1,. lawn
water sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $475.mo $250 dep
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985
INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *A
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000
SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





CITRUS HILLS
2/2'/2, Car Port FURN.
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse 2/2'/2,
Furnished. No pets
352-746-0008




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like New, 2/2, All appl.
$625. 954-557-6211
Crystal River
2/1, furnished, util. mincl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.Ist Mo.
FREE MOVE IN with
$600. 352-726-9570
INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
1/1 Lake view, fully
furnished All util. incld
$650.(386) 208-2495
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS 3/1
$400 mo., 1st Ist Sec.
$1,200 Move In no Pets
4308 E. McCartney Lp
(352) 212-3385


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentalscoam
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850 mo. F/L/S
(352) 249-7033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/2 Near power plant
$600 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on /2 Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7p
HIGHLANDS

Inverness 2/1/1, enclosed
lanai, all new kitchen
and bath. Lawn main in-
cluded. No Pets. F/L/S
$650 352-804-4007
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, No pets $550. mo.
Ist + sec (352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN
3/2 pets ok $800/mo.
Lease or rent-to-own.
Avail now. 619-301-5442
between 10:30 am and
11:00 pm only
HOMOSASSA
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 bed 2 bath
1 car garage $700
352 489-0937
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm. CHA,
W/D hk up, frnt. & back
screen porch, corner
lot w/ privacy fence
$750. 1st., last $250 dep
(352) 419-6957
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $795/mo, 1st, last,
sec. dbl lot possible
option. 212-4053
INVERNESS
3/2'/2 $650 mo.Ist & sec
lye mes (561) 313-5308
INVERNESS
Beautiful 3/2/2
w/ pool $775
Immaculate 3/2/2 $875
352-212-4873
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$800. (304) 444-9944
INVERNESS
Waterfront 3/2/1
Remodeled, Dock
F/L/S $850/mo
(352) 270-1775
LAUREL RIDGE
Unfurn 2/2/2 W/ Den
golf course, 12 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880
MEADOWCREST
2/2/2, Pristine Cond.,
Prestigious Fox Hollow
Adult community
no smoking, $750 mo.
352-794-3093, Lye. Mes.
RENT TO OWNI!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$110wkly/120wkly. No
hidden cost. 563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv. Rm./Ba.
share kit. $400 everything
Included 352-875-5998




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Home o Finder
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


16- ul

Fic Your treAw Homew

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


Lb IAI L bALL: In Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site, almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, stor-
age building, and sepa-
rate gated storage lot. All
for $79,500. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national ongin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com











For Sale By
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
1,800 SF, 4BR/2BA
home on .44 acres
Zoning:
COMMERCIAL (CG)
Prime location in
historical downtown
Crystal River 2 blocks
from US HWY 19
Permitted uses in-
clude office, medi-
cal, restaurant, retail,
day care center,
school, bed & break-
fast, vet office, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
839 N Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL
THUR. SEPT 6@2p
OPEN from 1 PM

Call 352-5193130
for more info
For Details
Visit our Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com









FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990
HOMOSASSA
7311 W Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. 1 acre, 145 ft
Frontage, 300 ft deep,
Zoned GNC, Older
livable mobile. Will con-
sider owner financing
with 20K down.
Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660



2/2/2, Located on
Culdesac, min. from
golf club. All rms open
to enclosed pool & la-
nai New AC, $144,000
owner fin. 15% down
terms negotiable
(352) 465-2372
HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprnngs $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497
RENT TO OWNI!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




6090 N Silver Palm Way
Charming 3/2/2 pool
home in the Oak Ridge
community. New roof,
gutters, hot water heater,


AC, kitchen granite
countertops & SS appli-
ances installed in last 3
yrs. Pool re-marcited and
newly screened enclo-
sure this year. Call (352)
586-7691 or (352)
8974164.
$159,900
2/2/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884


Real Esta
For Sal


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169
SMW 2/2/2 W/ Den and
Fireplace, Many Updates
Sale/Lease/Trade
$99,000 (863) 414-7169


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


CLASSIFIED




3 Bedroom, 2V2 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master,
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239,900
(352) 860-0444




OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418
Open House
Sat & Sun 10-3
Canterbury Lake Est
3035 Brigadoon Ct
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cath Ceiling, upgrades
$146K. 352-419-4192




GREAT INVESTMENT IN
HEATHERWOOD 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Block
Home with over 1,200 sq
ft of living area on approx
1.23 acres with 20 X 40
detached garage. Home
in need of repairs. Asking
$35,000 352-726-8559
HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

YOU'LL THIS!

Inver/Highlands
LARGE 1 Fam, 2.8
acres, residential area,
fully fenced, 4 BR, 3 BA,
pool, own deep well,
costly updates 2011.
Offered AS IS. $189,900.
Call Owner419-7017.



Crystal River

Spacious DW Moduler
on corner lot with 4
bedrooms. 5th room
could be an office or
sitting room. 3 full
baths. Screened in
solar heated in ground
pool & Jacuzzi. 2 car
garage, sprinkler sys-
tem fireplace in FR,
alarm system, central
vac system, lots of
kitchen cabinets, dou-
ble oven, ceramic tile &
carpet throughout. All
on a landscaped yard-a
must see! $185,000.
352-220-6187 or
609-290-4335




2 STORY Farmers
Porch, 3/2 Carport
washed, porch off din.
room, Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $20,000
down, Asking $68,000
(603) 860-6660
HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, Nice, Clean
Rent to Own
$675. mo.
813-335-5277




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118, 000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
'Gold Medal"
REALTOR,
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.


Quade

Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qfeeser@yahoo.com
CENTURY 21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450













Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty




YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOT,VERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$75,000.CALL
(352)513-5001




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


a a

Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745




FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
clear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
$25k.have title asking
$14,500 o.b.o.
813-792-1355




2 boarding ramps, 8ftx
3ft ea., heavy alum.
w/side rails $250 ea.,
$450/both
(352) 489-8637




AVON
12 ft. Avon 10 man
profsnl. river raft, infltbl,
soft bottom w/motor mt.
$600 firm (352) 489-8637
Jet Ski
Seadoo, 1999, Bombar-
dier GS, 720 CC, w/
trailer, new wheels Sr
Mechanic owned, runs
great real nice cond.
1,250. (352) 422-1026


Citrus County
Homes -1


II I 1 1 1 1 1


@2012UFS, Dist by Univ Uclick for UF


4. Bad muscle twitch in a deep gorge (2)


5. Get-rich-quick plotters' leg bones (2)


6. Apple MP3 devices' 3-legged stands (2)


7. Ives' litho partner's mink coat dealers (3)


SHlRaIIfl SIItIHf *L S(OdIlHI S(OdI 9 SHflN A SIIW3HJS 's
WSVdS ISVH3 I' VAIHHI AI 'S 'I3HW T JIS *' IHOdS 180d t
8-25-12 SH3AMSNK


2 Wave Runners
2 seat & 3 sweater
w/Trailers. Large Child's
ATV $1,300 for All
All needs little work
727-207-1619 Crys. Riv.
CANOE
16 ft., American Eagle,
ready for water. Only
$175. Come see at
717 Newton Ave., Inv
GHEENOO
1991 15'9" /9.9 horse-
power Johnson, low
hours, galvanized trailer
$1500 352-424-2760
GLASS STREAM
14 ft20H Evinrude troll-
ing mtr., hummingbird
dep. find. &trlr. $1,500
obo (352) 726-9708
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
LANDAU
1994 Landau 12 ft. Jon
Boat, alum., like new
$350
(352) 489-8637
SWEETWATER
20ft. 50HP evinrude,
galvanized trailer,
$3500
(352) 613-2333




2001 RV BUMPER
PULL
26 foot
$4,250 obo
(352) 400-0312
Car Tow Dolly
with surge brakes, LED
lights, tongue jack &
wheel covers, extras
$1,775, 352-249-7896
JAMBOREE

'05 Jamboree 30 ft class
C Motor home. Excellent
Cond. Ford V10 20K mi-
les, NADA 38,000 asking
29,750. No slides.
746-9002

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298




GULFSTREAM
2008, 18 FT.
KINGSPORT LITE
$7,800 Negotiable
(352) 726-8005
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
KZ Sportsman
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 6, air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK |
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892


CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $21,000
call 1-352-503-6548
DODGE
89 Dodge Colt
Mitsubishi engine, 5
speed, 11Okmi, $1000
(352) 563-0166
FORD
'04, Thunderbird, conv.
w/ hardtop 35K mi.
excel, cond. $17,500
(352) 564-6833
FORD
2000 Taurus LX 4dr, V6
auto, air, power windows,
locks. 90,000, good con-
dition. $2500.00 OBO
352-746-3065
HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS
352-628-4600
JAGUAR
2004 X-Type excellent
cond 95K miles
garage kept 1 owner
$ 6900.
97 MERCEDES diesel
$2500.
352-341-4586

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCURY
Mountaineer Auto, V8,
4 door SUV, 2000, Fac-
tory Mags, tinted windows
Electric everything!
$3500 727-207-1619 CR
PONTIAC
'06, G6, V6 Engine
70,000 miles
very good cond.
$8,400. (352) 601-0276
SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600
SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$17,995 (352) 746-3988



CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster.
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426
MERCEDES
1981, Classic SL380
Roadster, 2 seater Lt.
Blue w/ Dark Blue Top,
Interior, New brakes &
shocks Runs great Looks
great $7,000
(352) 794-5446







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVY
'03 Silverado Pickup
2500 HD Model, loaded
50k miles, $10,500
(352)447-1244
(352) 344-2927
CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel, cond.
$13, 300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555


CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018
DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8,
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4, 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
'98, B2500, Extra Cab,
4 cyc. 5 speed, cold air
$2,900 obo
352-447-2366




Jeep
1998 Sahara 67K, 6 cyl, 5
speed, options, garaged,
exc cond, $8850/neg
352-322-5679
CHEVY
'99, Blazer, 4 DR, 2 WD,
AC, in Good Cond.
$2,800 obo
(352) 860-0420
HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8, 4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600




DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 7! $5,450.
352-341-0018
PLYMOUTH
'97, Voyager, Van,
needs module
$1,800 obo
325-220-0133
TOYOTA
2006 Sienna XLE 62K
miles, Viewpoint rear en-
try, lowered floor, wheel-
chair conversion. Wheel-
lock and Qstraint retracta-
ble tie downs. Will fit 2
Wheelchairs and has flip
down rear bench seat,
leather. $29k OBO
352446-3110
Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018




Gas prices are going up
again. Motor Scooter
for Sale. Illness forces
sale. 2007 250 CC
$1,000 obo Looks and
runs great.
(352) 220-8454
Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank, '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000, Custom built, 20K
miles, $800. worth of
added lights & chrome
Tom (920) 224-2513
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
VW TRIKE
VW Tnke New only 900
miles Garage Kept Looks
& runs great. $8000.00
352-344-9340 Phone
YAMAHA
2012, Zuma Scooter
49 CC, 100 miles,
$2,300 obo
(352) 527-0347

Misc. otice


237-0825 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
ABANDONED VEHICLE/VESSEL NOTICE: NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, at Kings Bay, Crystal
River, FL 34428; the following described vessel: 1980 Irwin Sailboat, HIN#
XYM30436M80B, FL Registration # FL6504FU, White; was abandoned/found. The prop-
erty may be claimed by the owner Wendell Haywood, last address 32116 Division St,
Deland, Florida; or by any person having a legally recognized interest in the prop-
erty, by contacting Deputy Brian Coleman, Citrus County Sheriff's Office, 1 DR. MLK
Blvd, Inverness Fl 34450 (352) 726-4488.
August 18 and 25, 2012.


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I needLIST-

INGS!


WORDY G RD BY TRICKY RICY KANE
1. Harbor city athletic pursuit (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Terrifically fine actor Gibson (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
Definition tells you how many
3. Three plus two flourish (1) syllables in each word.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I1


a. Fl


YOU PAY PER MO
$21,999* 289
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


A -I


ft I


YOU PAY PER MO
20,999 *275
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


m -
U -


S lI l


SJ I .- -


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


CRYSTAL


SWJ CHEVROLET M
CrystalAutos.com 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515
++$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER.*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSIS-
TANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE
EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65%
APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


MEN


I
T T
THE PRICE YOU SEE IS
HE PRICE YOU PAY


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C13


I40]


III




C14 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


A m A H N AG


-S S Es op


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAVE TO 11,000
OFF NEW BMWs!


BMW In Ocala

bmwinocala.com


0
The Ultimate
Driving Machine-


All New 2011 & 2012 Models Must Go!

Get .99% APR 7 MONTHS
FINANCING To On All NewBMWs
In Stock!*


BMW Ultimate Service :
Pay Nothing 4 Years or 50,000 Miles
Total Maintenance Charges: $0


New 2012 BMW 650i Convertible


Discounts exclude tax, tag, title, registration and dealer fees. All pictures are for illustration purposes
only, may not be actual vehicle. All vehicles subject to prior sale. See dealer for complete pricing
details. **1.99% APR financing for 72 months is $14.75 per month per $1000 borrowed with
$0 down on approved credit for well-qualified buyers. Cannot be combined with any other offers.
All offers expire end of day 8/26/2012.


BMW
of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
BMWinOcala.com


Oww
/_--r-iz2^^J /> P;;fnv-


All lease offers exclude sales tax and include tag, title, registration and dealer fees. All leases are 39 months with
$4775 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit for well-qualified buyers. All leases are
10,000 miles per year, 200 per mile thereafter. *0% APR financing for 60 months is $16.67 per month per $1000
borrowed with $0 down. "0% APR financing for 72 months is $13.89 per month per $1000 borrowed with $0
down. All offers are subject to credit approval. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 8/26/2012.


Volkswagen
of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
VWofOcala.com


New 2012 BMW X5 Premium


UE
/I
151


New 2011 BMW X6
I


I


STKM7674


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEST SELECTION AND BEST PRICES


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


E VE H A W I CLECVERE BY C R'YI TA i MIT EDWAA 1N1T1Y1 ;1 :Ja1 III


2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52575


2006 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52300


2006 NISSAN SENTRA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ERT. 52110


2006 FORD F150 2006 DODGE MAGNUM 2006 DODGE DURANGO
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52330 800-584-8755 EXT. 52614 800-584-8755 EXT. 52334
2006 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO 2006 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12254 800-584-8755 EXT. 12248 800-584-8755 ERT. 12203
2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2006 FORD F350 2006 FORD F250
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12151 800-584-8755 EXT. 42271 800-584-8755 ET. 32169
2006 TOYOTA CAMRY 2005 CHRYSLER 300 2005 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62217 800-584-8755 EXT. 52440 800-584-8755 ERT. 52213
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 JEEP WRANGLER 2005 CADILLAC CTS
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E.R 52502 800-584-8755 EXT. 12234 800-584-8755 ERT. 12174
2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 2005 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ER. 42282 800-584-8755 EXT. 32373 800-584-8755 ERT. 61274
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 BUICK LACROSSE 2004 KIA SEDONA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62382 800-584-8755 EXT. 62414 800-584-8755 ERT. 52287
2004 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2004 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52508 800-584-8755 EXT. 12261 800-584-8755 ERT. 42226
2004 DODGE CARAVAN 2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER 2004 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42248 800-584-8755 EXT. 37858 800-584-8755 ERT. 32342
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 2004 NISSAN XTERRA 2004 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 62400 800-584-8755 EXT. 62351 800-584-8755 ERT. 62273
2003 FORD FOCUS 2003 DODGE CARAVAN 2003 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 37726 800-584-8755 EXT. 37711 800-584-8755 ERT. 62139
2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE 2002 NISSAN FRONTIER 2002 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52254 800-584-8755 EXT. 52398 800-584-8755 ERT. 12208
2002 FORD F350 2002 CHRYSLER 300M 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12139 800-584-8755 EXT. 12373 800-584-8755 ET. 42267
2002 HONDA ODYSSEY 2002 CHEVROLET S10 2002 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42228 800-584-8755 EXT. 33005 800-584-8755 ERT. 62355
2001 FORD WINDSTAR 2001 TOYOTA TUNDRA 2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRACK
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52493 800-584-8755 EXT. 52524 800-584-8755 ERT. 12408
2001 NISSAN ALTIMA 2001 GMC JIMMY 2001 SATURN SW2
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12448 800-584-8755 EXT. 42276 800-584-8755 ET. 42582
2001 DODGE RAM 3500 2001 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 2001 TOYOTA AVALON
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 32093 800-584-8755 ERT. 62279 800-584-8755 ERT. 62314
2000 DODGE NEON 2000 FORD MUSTANG 2000 CHEVROLET TAHOE
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52448 800-584-8755 EXT. 52482 800-584-8755 EXT. 12412
2000 FORD EXPLORER 2000 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 2000 CHEVROLET S10
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 47623 800-584-8755 EXT. 42259 800-584-8755 EXT. 37738


CRYSTALAUTOS.CO M


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FINAL

NOTICE


SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012 C17


Honda
SUMMER
CLEARANCE
EVENT I JUi-AU oa


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C........................2.. 2012..CITRU....C.................CHR.NIC..E


:iM 2A HRMM IMM INOADM


:iM PA H MMMMWM INMM


:11 2AH :M EEV NOADM


1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosssa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksvilleep, FL 3413
1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453


*PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC ^LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39,000 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WAC +0% AVAILABLE ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS FOR A LIMITED TIME WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR
000CBUL ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


:1M ?AH MMM* A NO=M


FMNM O W1 M N D CN


IN80-8-85 Ei.312


:FM M : M E BEVMIMM C


IN80-8-85 Fa.313


RM 1 M MMM= NOADMN


C18 SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE