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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02863
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-19-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02863

Full Text


Behind the curtain: UF finally holds open practice


exTODAY CCITRUS COUNTY :.


Variably cloudy, with a
60 percent chance of
thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


AUGUST 19, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


pONICLi.
Lwww.chronicleonline.com
L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 12


DUKE NUKE IMPACT
As Duke Energy contemplates the fate of its non-functioning nuclear plant
in Citrus County, the community ponders the impact of its possible closure.
Today's related stories are an installment in a periodic series on the issue.




Nuke's woes echo


North Korea
A local graduate spends
a month teaching
"behind enemy lines."
/Page C1
IN THE NATION:


wMIV--wu -. A
Fertility cost
Bill would shoulder the
costs of helping injured
veterans become
parents./Page A8


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Castaways Bar owner Dave Finley talks about the hard decisions Duke Energy has to make about what to do at
the Crystal River nuclear power plant. Kinley worked at the facility for many years as an employee and contractor.
He is concerned for the community and the many friends who still work at the plant.


Bar feels ebb, flowfrom plant workforce


Delicate
Expert gardener Jane
Weber writes about
tropical plants./Page E5
HOMEFRONT:


I1
Trowelers
A builders' conference
searches for the "fastest
trowel on the block."
/HomeFront
OPINION:
Voters
made their
choices on
Tuesday, and
we all need to
respect the
final decision.


TOMORROW:
Dementia
Gain understanding of
the problems posed by
dementia./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A10
Classifieds ................D6
Crossword ..............A10
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ....................A10
Obituaries ..............A6
Together............... A12


6 1|1184578 12110 oI


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Castaways Bar and Grill just
north of Crystal River once buzzed
with activity.
Like clockwork, workers from
the Progress Energy energy com-
plex ending their shifts for the day
would make the short trip down
U.S. 19 for a cold beer or a cup of
coffee and some food.
It wasn't abnormal for the place
to be crowed at 7 o'clock in the
morning or around 4 and 5 o'clock
in the afternoon.
But late Thursday afternoon,
only a handful of patrons sat at the
bar. The conversation was minimal
except for the gruff, booming voice
of one man, Dave Finley, who fre-
quents the place because he owns
it.
For nearly 15 years, Finley and
his wife, Pamela, have owned Cast-
aways. During that time, Pamela
said she and her husband have
seen the fluctuations.
The past two months, Finley said,
business at the bar has been slow.
"My sales are really down," Mrs.
Finley said.


Finley believes much of it has to
do with the Progress Energy nu-
clear plant.
So many projects are on hold,
Mrs. Finley added.
"We're not getting as many peo-
ple as we used to," Finley said.
"They have virtually stopped any-
thing out there with the nuke
plant."
Finley also owns a construction
company, F&H Contractors, which
serves more than 20 major electric
utilities, cooperatives and munici-
palities throughout Florida, in-
cluding Progress Energy.
Even his contract work at the
plant has been sluggish, he said.
As Duke Energy contemplates
the future of the nuclear plant, Fin-
ley believes if it permanently
closes, the repercussions will be
substantial.
"If they do shut it down, it will be
a major impact," he said.
From higher taxes and towering
unemployment to business clo-
sures and abandoned real estate,
Finley said the effects would filter
down.
"The county has been spoiled for
See Page A5


Alzheimer's disease is progressive. As
it advances, it becomes harder
for caregivers to endure the
responsibility of care, but there is help.


Taking care


Alzheimer's

disease hits

caregivers, too
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
SUGARMILL WOODS -
Barbara McAdams remem-
bers the day she realized
something about her hus-
band was different
Joe McAdams had been
handy his whole life. As a
young man, he built homes
for a living until he joined
the Navy After the Navy,
he didn't want to go back to
construction. He wanted a
job with benefits.
Therefore, he began
working in the mailroom at
JP Morgan in New York,
where he worked his way up
to a position as vice presi-
dent That is where Barbara,


INSIDE
Support groups
provide information,
solace./Page A2
NEXT WEEK
Series conclusion:
resources, living wills
and health care
surrogates.

who was a secretary, met
and fell in love with him.
Barbara said her hus-
band was widely known as
the memory of the com-
pany, because he could re-
call facts and details from
years ago no one else could.
But even with a corpo-
rate job, Joe stayed good
with his hands.
Little things
Then one day, Barbara
said her husband of 28
years decided to put up a
See Page A2


Business owners

wait, wonder
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
The sea of vacant lots at the
River Lodge RV Resort spoke
volumes.
"This has been the worst
year," Dawn Stranger, a clerk in-
side the park's office, said late
Thursday afternoon. "It's been
terrible."
The spacious park grounds -
north of the barge canal bridge
in Inglis used to be home, on
average, to more than 70
campers. Most were Progress
Energy employees who were
generally in town on three-year
contracts, Stranger said.
However, on Thursday, only 14
campers occupied the park. Of
the 14, Stranger said 12 were
Progress Energy employees.
"That don't even cover the
light bill," she said.
With layoffs and projects being
placed on hold at the Progress
Energy Florida nuclear plant
See BUSINESS/Page A5


MATHEW BECK/Chronicle
Since suffering a heart attack, Barbara McAdams has not
been able to care for her longtime husband, Joe, who suffers
from Alzheimer's disease. McAdams cared for her husband
in their home for seven years before falling ill. In that time,
she turned to painting to cope with the stress.


Associated Press
Vice presidential candidate
Paul Ryan speaks to the
crowd Saturday during a rally
at Lake Sumter Landing Mar-
ket Square in The Villages.


Ryan


visits


Villages


Obama stumps

in New

Hampshire

Associated Press
THE VILLAGES Presi-
dent Barack Obama casti-
gated the Republican
presidential ticket Saturday
for peddling "trickle-down
snake oil" in the form of tax
cuts for the rich, and both
campaigns jockeyed for ad-
vantage over Medicare, a
dicey subject for everyone
in the game.
Speaking to seniors in
Florida, GOP vice presiden-
tial hopeful Paul Ryan ac-
cused Obama of using
Medicare as a "piggybank"
for the president's health
care law. A champion of
changing Medicare, Ryan
spoke passionately in de-
fense of the program, intro-
ducing his mother to voters
to drive home the point the
health program "was there
for our family" and "we have
to keep that guarantee."
Ryan tried to strike a
careful balance on the sub-
ject in his speech at a
sprawling retirement com-
munity. Mitt Romney and
his running mate have
come under withering criti-
cism from Obama for Ryan's
proposals in Congress to
overhaul Medicare. Ryan
said Medicare will be pro-
tected for people in and
near retirement, and he
wants to see younger gener-
ations offered alternatives
to the entitlement
Obama, campaigning in
New Hampshire, cast the
choice on Election Day as
one between two fundamen-
tally different approaches to
the government's responsi-
bility to its citizens. His ap-
proach of casting Romney's
plans as a giveaway to the
rich was familiar but
seemed to have a particu-
larly sharp bite.
"They've been trying to
sell this trickle-down snake
oil before," Obama told an
audience in Windham, N.H.
"It did not work then. It will
not work now. It will not re-
duce the deficit; it will not
create jobs. It's the wrong
direction for America."
Ryan took the stage in
See Page A4


President Barack Obama
campaigns Saturday in Wind-
ham, N.H., at Windham High
School.


& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
74


I INI D II-









Support groups provide information, solace


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

The gradual deterioration
of a loved one with
Alzheimer's disease can be
troublesome and dishearten-
ing for caregivers to watch.
A vibrant, genial individual
who would never harm any-
one could change into a
brutish, mean-spirited per-
son who resorts to physical
violence and spews profanity
"It's absolutely devastat-
ing," said Sue Piatek, social
work supervisor with HPH
Hospice. "It's a ... torture
process."
It's not unusual for care-
givers to become so con-
sumed with tending to their
loved one they fall into iso-
lation, refusing to have a so-
cial life and pushing away
family and friends.
They disregard their own
needs, not realizing the dan-
ger it can pose to their own
emotional, mental and phys-
ical health.



CARE
Continued from Page Al

wallpaper border inside
their Sugarmill Woods
home. Though the 74-year-
old mother of three admits
she's not too handy herself,
she knew something wasn't
right when she saw Joe take
the whole roll of wallpaper,
dip it in water and try to
carry it in the house.
"You have to cut it in
pieces. I knew that much,"
she said. "I thought it was
very strange."
Next, he struggled with
hanging a picture, which
was something Joe had
done numerous times. And
when they would go out of
town, he would travel in cir-
cles, which drove Barbara
crazy
Finally, she decided to
take him to the doctor and
later to a neurologist, who
diagnosed Joe with
Alzheimer's disease.
Knowing about the exis-
tence of such a disease is
one thing, but Barbara said
dealing with it is not the
same.
Luckily, she said her hus-
band was accepting of his
fate so he never became













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The constant fears and
growing liability build
stress. Therefore, when she
conducts a support group
with caregivers, Piatek
heavily emphasizes the im-
portance of taking care of
one's own well-being, not
just that of their loved one.
"I ask, 'What are you
doing for yourself?"' she
said. "You cannot do it 24/7
... without burning yourself
out"
Caregivers need rejuve-
nation, plus reassurance
they are doing the best they
can. Being around others
who understand the strug-
gles with Alzheimer's offers
such encouragement, Piatek
explained, and a safe place
to speak freely
Many who first come to
the meetings already ac-
knowledge the fact some-
thing is wrong with their
loved one. Many also feel
worn out and guilty, Piatek
said, because of the anger
they once had toward their


DEALING WITH STRESS
10 symptoms of caregiver stress:


* Denial.
* Social withdrawal.
* Depression.
* Sleeplessness.
* Lack of concentration.
10 ways to manage stress:


* Anger.
* Anxiety.
* Exhaustion.
* Irritability.
* Health problems.


1. Understand what's happening as early as possible.
2. Know what community resources are available.
3. Become an educated caregiver.
4. Get help.
5. Take care of yourself.
6. Manage your level of stress.
7. Accept changes as they occur.
8. Make legal and financial plans.
9. Give yourself credit, not guilt.
10. Visit your doctor regularly.
Source: Alzheimer's Association


loved one without realizing
he or she was ill.
Piatek notices a lot of
caregivers find comfort in
gaining as much information


NEED HELP?


* The Alzheimer's Association offers a 24/7 helpline
for anyone needing information and support. Call
800-272-3900 for more information. The Alzheimer's
Family Organization also provides several educational
programs, support services and assistance to
caregivers. For information, call 888-496-8004.


angry or violent. He partici-
pated in clinical trials for a
while in hopes of finding a
cure, but soon the disease
progressed too far and he
became ineligible to take
part in them.
Learning to cope
As a caregiver, Barbara
said she learned to cope by
using humor.
For example, she said one
day Joe came into the living
room and wanted to show
her something. She obliged,
and he led her to the garage.
Framed in the doorway,
Joe turned to her and won-
dered aloud how the car
wound up inside the
basement.
Barbara smiled.
"I don't know, Joe," she
said she replied.
There was no sense in
telling him it was the
garage, not a basement. Ex-
perience told her it was best
to go along with the moment
instead of picking a fight


over something trivial.
"I just went along with it
rather than say, 'What are
you talking about?"' she
said.
For seven years, Barbara
cared for her husband. She
remembers the first time
she attended a caregivers'
support group. The speaker
plainly stated how care-
givers usually die before
their loved one from the
stress and how it's impor-
tant to have "me time."
Barbara knew what it felt
like not to have many
breaks. Joe was a big man
who weighed more than 200
pounds.
"He couldn't take care of
himself so I had to," she
said.
Barbara jokes she spent
more time in the bathroom
than anyone because of
Joe's incontinence issues.
She would help him in and
out the shower. And she al-
ways kept a close eye on


as they can about
Alzheimer's. Everything
about Alzheimer's disease
feels out of the caregiver's
control, Piatek said, thus,


LOCAL SUPPORT
GROUPS
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41, Inverness;
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
first Tuesday monthly.
Emeritus At Barrington
Place, 2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway,
Lecanto; 5 to 6:30 p.m.
fourth Tuesday
monthly. Respite care
available.
First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa;
1 to 2:30 p.m. second
Monday monthly.
Respite care available.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills, 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. last Wednesday
monthly. Respite care
available.
For more information
about the support
groups, call Sue Piatek
at 352-527-4600.

him at all times.
"I could never really sit
still," she said.

See Page A4


being able to discover power
on the educational front can
be consoling to some.
"We provide a lot of educa-
tion," she said. "Caregivers
are hungry for information."
From coping tips to help-
ful literature, sharing is a
crucial component of the
support groups. Caregivers
give each other advice. They
share stories. They reassure
each other there's nothing
wrong with occasionally
having selfish moments and
thinking, "I can't stand this
person."
Or taking a second to step
out of the room and collect
one's thoughts when the
stress becomes too over-
whelming.
Too frequently, Piatek
said, caregivers beat them-
selves up because they feel
they should be able handle
it. Unfortunately, it gener-
ally takes something like a
major health scare or
tremendous exhaustion be-
fore caregivers finally real-


ize they need help.
"That's a big step to ask
for help," Piatek said.
And while some may feel
they don't have time to hear
other people's problems at
the support groups or are
too scared to hear what lies
ahead with the disease and
don't want to hear anything
worse, Piatek believes the
support groups actually
offer a safe, welcoming en-
vironment for caregivers to
commiserate and bond over
a common thread.
"There's as much laugh-
ter as there is crying," she
said. "I still think there's
more of a benefit to being a
part and sharing."
For more information
about local support groups,
call Piatek at 352-527-4600.
For online Alzheimer's
support, visit the website
www. alzconnected.org.
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


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Getting to the heart of the matter doesn't always require complicated
surgery. The Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center Team are exceptional
at providing advanced minimally invasive procedures such as balloon angioplasty
and drug eluting stent placement. These procedures help restore blood flow by
opening blocked arteries in the heart that can cause heart attacks as well as other
blood vessels throughout the body.
For those eligible, our Radial Artery cardiac catheterization technique provides
a less invasive approach through the wrist. Thereby, reducing the chance of
complication and providing a faster recovery. Patients often go home within
hours of completing this procedure. Our advanced catheter based Carotid
Artery Stenting and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair procedures correct
narrowed arteries in the neck that provide blood flow to the brain and repair
weakened areas of the aorta located in the abdomen, avoiding open surgery and
resulting in less pain and quicker recovery.
With Citrus Memorial's expert team of interventional cardiologists, nurses and
technologists, coupled with their proven record of successful outcomes and
backed-up by the county's only open heart surgery program, you can have
peace of mind knowing that your heart is in the right place.


Learn more about us by visiting heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.

H CITRUS MEMORIAL

P B |-l a rt
cart
i & VASCULAR CENTER
502 W\est Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


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Page A3 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19,2012



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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



AronTE Cities gear up for conventions
THE STATE


Citrus County

Nature Coast EMS
sets flu shot clinics
Nature Coast EMS will offer
flu shot clinics at the commu-
nity centers listed below. The
cost is $25; the flu shot is free
with valid Medicare Part B;
many other insurance
providers are also accepted.
S9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 7, Marina Del Ray
Apartments, 265 Fathom
Loop, Beverly Hills.
9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 13, East Citrus
Community Center, 9907 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Inverness.
S9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 14, Central Citrus Com-
munity Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
S9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 17, Inverness
Community Center, 1081 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness.
9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 21, Annie Johnson
Senior Center, 1991 Test
Court, Dunnellon.
S9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 24, West Central
Citrus Community Center,
8940 W. Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.
If your organization, busi-
ness, ALF or other group
would like to schedule a flu
clinic at your location, contact
Jane Bedford at 352-249-
4751 or send an email to
JaneB@naturecoastems.org.
Waters week group
to meet Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save
Our Waters Week Committee
will meet at 10 a.m. Monday,
Aug. 20, in Room 219,
Lecanto Government Center,
3600 W. Sovereign Path off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meeting
is to finalize the planning and
execution for Citrus County's
17th annual Save Our Waters
Week, Sept. 14 to 22.
For more information, call
committee co-chairs Lace
Blue-McLean at 352-201-
0149 or Diane Otten at 352-
726-0315.
20120 directors
to convene Aug. 20
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at 5:30
p.m. Monday, Aug. 20, in
Room 117, Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto.
For information about Cit-
rus 20/20 Inc., visit www.cit-
rus2020.org or call
352-201-0149.

Campaign TRAIL


The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forum is
7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at
the College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for su-
perintendent of schools, will
have a barbecue fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 8, at Rock Crusher
Pavilion, 275 S. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. Informa-
tion: 352-726-3181, 352-726-
3966 or 352-637-5191.
An attorney from the
League of Women Voters will
offer a non-partisan explana-
tion of the 11 proposed
amendments on the Novem-
ber ballot at 3 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 23, at the Nature Coast
Unitarian Unversalists, 7633
N. Florida Ave., northwest of
the Holder intersection. Infor-
mation: 352-465-4225.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign


fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.com.
-From staff reports


event to bring crowds, traffic


Bigpolitical

Associated Press

TAMPA During this
summer's national political
conventions, workers in
downtown Tampa and Char-
lotte, N.C., will face throngs
of pedestrians snaking
through intersections,
evening commutes snarled
by street closures and the
threat of unruly protesters.
For waiters who expect
big tips from delegates, the
transportation headaches
should be worth it Some ac-
countants and bankers,
though, are more likely to
fire up their laptops and
work from home. But the
biggest problem for locals as
they plan their workday
routines is uncertainty,
since neither city has hosted


an event this big.
"Honestly, I don't know
what to expect," shrugged
Rosalie Arnone. She works
at the Old Tampa Book
Company, which is about a
mile from the Tampa Bay
Times Forum where the
convention will be held. "We
plan on being open, but if
anything gets out of control,
we're going to close up."
Sure, the Super Bowl has
come to Tampa four times,
and Charlotte has hosted an
NCAA Final Four and a Na-
tional Rifle Association an-
nual meeting. But the cities
have never accommodated
such large numbers of peo-
ple, combined with heavy
security and the threat of
protests.
So when residents of both


areas talk about how they will
handle the traffic, the demon-
strations and the potential
disruption in daily routines,
many express ambivalence,
hope or even confusion.
Betty Ryan, a 36-year-old
Charlotte attorney, said
some of her friends who
work downtown are taking
the week off.
"We're glad the Democ-
rats are coming here. It's a
good thing for Charlotte.
We'll be in the national spot-
light. But if you work here,
good luck. It's going to be
very difficult getting
around. That's why so many
people will be staying home
that week."
The Republican National
Convention will be Aug. 27
to 30, while the Democratic


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Times Forum, right, is the location of the Re-
publican National Convention, which will be Aug. 27 to 30.
Traffic caused by road closures and protests are a concern
of downtown workers and residents.


National Convention will be
Sept. 4 to 6.
Officials in both cities
said stores, restaurants and
bars will be open, but ac-


Volunteers with heart, 'sole'


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Jamie Bowman, center, hopes to entice shoppers in front of the Crystal River Kmart to participate in the National
Day of Service activities sponsored by the Nature Coast Volunteer Center and the Retired Seniors Volunteer pro-
grams. The "Two Good Soles" drive collects shoes and socks for children in need. Other volunteers working with
Bowman, from left, are Robert Scoggins, Sebastian Blanchard and Jacob Reynolds.


'TWO GOOD SOLES' COLLECTION SITES


* Central Citrus Community Cen-
ter, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
* Central Ridge Library, 425 W.
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce offices, 401 Tompkins
Ave., Inverness, or 28 N.W. U.S.
19, Crystal River.
* Citrus County Courthouse, 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
* Citrus Springs Community Cen-
ter, 1570 W. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs.


* Coastal Region Library, 8619 W.
Crystal St., Crystal River.
* Crystal River City Hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Eagles Club of Crystal River,
5340 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* East Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* Floral City Public library, 8360
E. Orange Ave., Floral City.
* Homosassa Public Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.


* Inverness City Hall, 212 W. Main
St., Inverness.
* Inverness Community Center,
1082 N. Paul Drive., Inverness.
* Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
* Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
* VFW Post 10087, 2170 W. Vet
Lane, Beverly Hills.
* West Citrus Community Center,
8940 W. Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.


Local Salvation Army office in new digs


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

They're still working on
getting the phones installed
and all the other things that
go along with moving in, but
the Salvation Army of Cit-
rus County is officially in its
new location west of Inver-
ness at the corner of State
Road 44 and School Av-
enue, 1.7 miles east of
County Road 491.
The correctional services
office in Inverness has al-
ready closed and moved to
the new facility.
The center is now home
to all the services offered,


including Sunday morning
worship.
"People can still come
here for electric and rent as-
sistance, see a social worker,
get food everything we've
always done," said Maggie
Murphy, corps secretary.
They had planned on
moving in last year, but as
they remodeled the former
kitchen showroom building
they had to halt a few times
to get approval from their
division headquarters in
Tampa, Murphy said.
"We're adding new serv-
ices," she said.
They include a teen room
complete with computers


for after-school activities
and programs and a weekly
home league group for
women to do community
service in local nursing fa-
cilities and then have lunch
together
They hope to have an
equivalent evening group
for women who work dur-
ing the day, a book club and
classes dealing with budg-
eting, parenting and other
life skills, as well as re-
sumes and job interviewing
skills.
"We're now on the county
bus route," Murphy said.
"Before, we were out of sight
and away from everything.


Now we're in plain sight"
An open house is sched-
uled from 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 26, with tours
of the facility and light re-
freshments. Girls from
the youth corps dressed in
World War I-era uniforms
will make and serve
doughnuts.
For information, call the
Salvation Army at 352-621-
5532. The phone number
will be working for a few
more days.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can
be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, cor or 352- 564-2927.


State BRIEFS


Three legislative
races go to recounts
One Senate primary and two House
races headed to recounts Friday, after a
deadline for counties to report unofficial
results from Tuesday's elections. A re-
count is required in the Senate District 27
battle between Reps. Jeff Clemens, D-
Lake Worth, and Mack Bernard, D-West


Palm Beach. Recounts also are required
in a House District 55 race between for-
mer Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Sebring, and
Cary Pigman, R-Avon Park, and in a Dis-
trict 107 race between Reps. John Patrick
Julien, D-North Miami Beach, and Barbara
Watson, D-Miami Gardens. The recounts
were triggered because each race was
decided by less than one-half of 1 percent
of the votes cast.


Company may add 300
jobs in Tampa by 2015
Appraisal management company
StreetLinks Lender Solutions will open a
new facility in the Tampa area and add as
many as 300 new jobs during the next
three years, Gov. Rick Scott's office said.
The company is based in Indianapolis.
-From wire reports


knowledge many office
workers could decide to
telecommute and some
businesses may opt to shut
down for a few days.



Overseas


tourism


way up,


numbers


good

The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE
Buoyed by relatively strong
economies, especially in
Latin America, overseas
tourists flocked to Florida
in recent months, with the
number of foreign visitors
jumping by 10 percent for
the quarter ending June 30.
The year-to-year increase
in overseas visitors came
atop steady domestic travel
numbers, a combination
Florida's top tourism offi-
cial said has put the state on
track for a banner year
"In general, we're on pace
for a record year," said
Chris Thompson, president
and CEO of Visit Florida,
the state's tourism market-
ing arm, "Last year was a
record year, and it looks
like, given the first two
quarters, that we are on
pace to break that record. "
An estimated 2.4 million
overseas tourists paid
Florida a visit during the
three-month period. Many of
those came from Central and
South American countries,
which have posted strong
economic performances
over the past few years.
While European econ-
omies have been stymied
by financial uncertainty,
Florida's neighbors have not
"While we've been strug-
gling financially here in the
U.S., their economies have
been in pretty good shape,"
Thompson said.
In addition, 18.8 million
domestic visitors came to
Florida during the quarter,
a 0.3 percent increase that
industry representatives
said is a reflection of a more
optimistic U.S. consumer
"People are ready to
travel again," Thompson
said. "The last couple years
have been real tough and I
think people are ready to
get back to doing some of
the things they used to do."
In all, Florida enjoyed a
1.3 percentage-point uptick
in the number of visitors in
April, May and June, com-
pared to the second quarter
of 2011.
Travel sector employment
in Florida rose 1.1 percent
to 1,041,900, up 11,300 jobs
from the same period a year
ago.
"Increased visitation and
spending by travelers to the
state have fueled 27 straight
months of job growth," said
Glenn Hastings, chairman of
the Visit Florida Board of
Directors, in a statement
Taxable sales for Florida
from January through May,
the last month for which
data were available, totaled
$31.5 billion, a year-over-
year increase of 8.8 percent.


W ..






A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


RYAN
Continued from Page Al

The Villages with his
mother, Betty Ryan Douglas,
78, while Romney sched-
uled a series of fundraisers
in Massachusetts.
The Wisconsin congress-
man said he saw Medicare's
benefits firsthand as a
young man when his grand-
mother, with Alzheimer's,
moved in with his family
"My mom and I were her
two primary caregivers,"
Ryan said before shifting to
his mother and the promise
of Medicare for her.
"She planned her retire-
ment around this promise,"
Ryan said. "That's a prom-
ise we have to keep."
"It's not just a program,"
he added. "It's what my
mom relies on."
He accused Obama of un-
dermining Medicare by cut-
ting billions from the




CARE
Continued from Page A2


Support network
On one particularly hard
day, she remembers sitting
on the floor crying
uncontrollably
"It is what it is," she said.
"You know, at one point
you're always thinking
about the future and the
things you're going to do to-
gether Now you're limited.
It's absolutely horrible."
But Barbara kept a close
network of support. She has
two daughters who live in
the area. Moreover, her
next-door neighbor was car-
ing for her husband who
had Alzheimer's, so they
bonded over their struggles.
After attending the first


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


program to devote to ex-
panded coverage under his
health care law and as-
serted: "We want this de-
bate. We need this debate.
And we are going to win this
debate."
Older Americans have
often resisted changes in
Medicare, the federal
health care insurance pro-
gram for people 65 and
older and for the disabled.
The Romney-Ryan ticket
is betting voters' worries
about federal deficits and
the Democrats' health care
overhaul have opened the
door for a robust debate on
the solvency of Medicare,
one of the government's
most popular and costliest
programs.
In the week since Romney
announced Ryan as his run-
ning mate, Medicare and
Social Security have ap-
peared as driving issues.
Florida, Pennsylvania and
Iowa are among the top five
states in the percentage of


support group meeting, Bar-
bara said she was excited to
attend the next session.
However, after having
minor surgery, she suffered
a heart attack and couldn't
make it.
That's when her other
daughter, who lives in North
Carolina, stepped in and
made the decision her dad
needed to move into a resi-
dential care facility.
"She said, 'This is it, Ma.
You can't do this,"' Barbara
said.
Blinking back tears, she
said it was tremendously
hard to accept the fact she
couldn't care for her hus-
band anymore.
"I couldn't have done it,"
she said, wiping her cheeks
dry
'Hey, it's your wife'
Joe was first placed in a


people 65 and over, and all
three are closely contested
this election.
Polling generally finds the
public places more trust in
Democrats' ability to handle
Medicare. People also gen-
erally oppose plans to re-
place the current program
with one in which future
seniors receive a fixed
amount of money from the
government to be used to
purchase health coverage,
according to polls.
Ryan's stop Saturday at
the gated retirement cluster
known as The Villages was
familiar ground for presi-
dential candidates. Florida
has the highest concentra-
tion of voters older than 65
in the country, with some 17
percent of Floridians falling
into that group. Betty Ryan
Douglas spends part of her
year in Broward County's
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea
community and has been
registered to vote in Florida
since 1997.


facility in Spring Hill, but
Barbara said the constant
traveling back and forth
started to wear on her
Recently, she moved him
to Sugarmill Manor, which
she said has been perfect
for her because she can see
him every day
Though Joe, who is now
78, is in the advanced
stages of the disease, Bar-
bara said he still knows
who she is. Occasionally,
she has to remind him be-
cause he sees many female
staff members at Sugarmill
Manor.
"Sometimes I have to say,
'Hey, it's your wife.' And
then he smiles," she said.
Barbara has also adjusted
to the change. She paints as
a hobby to keep her mind off
everything.
To her surprise, one of the


For the RECORD


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest
Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime
occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see
lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief Larry
Morabito said the fire service is seeking volunteers to
serve alongside paid staff at all stations. For information,
call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-5406.
* The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station WYKE, digi-
tal channel 47 and Bright House cable channel 16. The
show features interviews with sheriff's office staff from all
areas of the agency. It also features Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
taking live calls during the entire show on the last
Wednesday monthly.
* The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all
registered sexual offenders and predators in the county.
Click on the Sexual Offender Information link on the
CCSO website.


most interesting tidbits Bar-
bara said she has learned
during her ordeal is how
people try to keep Alz-
heimer's a secret and not
talk about it.
But Barbara believes
strongly in sharing the news
with people when a loved
one is diagnosed Alz-


heimer's because they do "a
lot of funny things," she said
with a laugh.
"It should be out in the
open."
And for caregivers, Bar-
bara said her advice would
be to find a way to join a
support group, because
help is out there and people


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
David Matthew Vick-
ers, 36, of E. Ming Court,
Inverness, was arrested at
11 a.m. Thursday on a
felony charge of grand theft.
Bond $2,000.
Teresa Frances
Tamme, 56, of N. Reynolds
Ave., Crystal River, was ar-
rested at 9:21 a.m. Friday
on a felony charge of petit
theft (two or more convic-
tions of theft) and a misde-
meanor charge of
knowingly driving with a
suspended license.
Bond $12,000.
Raheem L. Lindsey,
31, of W. Diamond T Lane,
Crystal River, was arrested
at 1:21 p.m. Friday on two
misdemeanor charges of
battery and criminal
mischief.
Bond $1,000.


in the groups can help find
it.
"Go there because you
have people in the same sit-
uation," she said. "They
understand."
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

SB.O.C.C. Commission................................D4, D5

City of Crystal River......................................... B3
/ Fictitious Name Notices...................................D8
Meeting Notices...................................... ..D8
Miscellaneous Notices.....................................D8
S Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices...................D8

if r S Self Storage Notices........................................ D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HHI ,LO PR HI LO PR
88 74 0.60 ,..INA NA NA -.. 83 72 0.10


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Chance of showers and
thunderstorms today.


91 75 0.90 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluseaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 74
Variably cloudy; 60% chance of
thunderstorms
Sr T MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 74
Variably cloudy; 60% chance of thunderstorms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 90 Low: 73
Variably cloudy; 60% chance of thunderstorms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 88/73
Record 95/64
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.40 in.
Total for the month 5.00 in.
Total for the year 42.07 in.
Normal for the year 35.68 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 75
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed,chenopods
Today's count: 3.3/12
Monday's count: 5.4
Tuesday's count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/19 SUNDAY 7:25 1:12 7:49 1:37
8/20 MONDAY 8:19 2:07 8:44 2:32
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


AUG.24


0
AUG. 31


SEPT. 8


SEPT. 15


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 8:05 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:02 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................8:58 A.M.
M OONSET TODAY ............................9:13 P.M .


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:33 a/3:18 a 7:38 p/3:27 p
Crystal River** 5:54 a/12:40 a 5:59 p/12:49 p
Withlacoochee* 3:41 a/10:37 a 3:46 p/11:01 p
Homosassa*** 6:43 a/2:17 a 6:48 p/2:26 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:01 a/3:51 a 8:23 p/4:09 p
6:22 a/1:13 a 6:44 p/1:31 p
4:09 a/11:19 a 4:31 p/11:35 p
7:11 a/2:50 a 7:33 p/3:08 p


Gulf water
temperature


85
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.02 31.99 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.94 36.98 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.71 38.73 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.80 40.79 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


Albany 76 61 .01 s 79 53
Albuquerque 93 63 ts 86 66
Asheville 78 64 .45 ts 77 61
Atlanta 87 69 ts 86 68
Atlantic City 80 63 .19 pc 81 70
Austin 92 75 .38 pc 94 71
Baltimore 84 64 .08 pc 82 66
Billings 82 51 s 89 57
Birmingham 85 71 .29 ts 84 67
Boise 97 60 pc 91 59
Boston 72 65 .04 pc 77 63
Buffalo 74 54 pc 77 56
Burlington, VT 75 57 s 78 51
Charleston, SC 90 72 .01 ts 89 73
Charleston, WV 82 62 .02 ts 80 58
Charlotte 84 65 .01 ts 84 68
Chicago 77 53 sh 74 60
Cincinnati 82 56 pc 81 57
Cleveland 75 55 pc 74 61
Columbia, SC 90 72 ts 88 69
Columbus, OH 81 58 pc 79 57
Concord, N.H. 80 63 .05 pc 79 54
Dallas 87 70 .65 ts 89 67
Denver 81 57 pc 84 58
Des Moines 75 51 pc 78 54
Detroit 76 52 sh 76 57
El Paso 91 69 .08 ts 90 73
Evansville, IN 83 56 pc 82 58
Harrisburg 80 65 pc 79 62
Hartford 80 64 .18 pc 82 58
Houston 94 73 1.06 ts 92 74
Indianapolis 78 54 pc 79 57
Jackson 86 70 1.06 ts 88 69
Las Vegas 10082 pc 103 85
Little Rock 79 70 .15 ts 83 62
Los Angeles 84 70 s 76 67
Louisville 81 60 pc 83 56
Memphis 82 71 pc 84 63
Milwaukee 76 55 sh 72 58
Minneapolis 78 56 pc 74 53
Mobile 90 72 .20 ts 87 72
Montgomery 91 71 ts 89 71
Nashville 84 65 pc 83 62
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 88 73 .35 ts 89 75
New York City 79 63 .36 s 83 66
Norfolk 81 75 ts 82 69
Oklahoma City 79 65 1.27 pc 84 62
Omaha 66 54 .11 pc 80 53
Palm Springs 101 84 pc 106 82
Philadelphia 82 64 .43 pc 83 67
Phoenix 10082 pc 100 85
Pittsburgh 78 57 ts 77 54
Portland, ME 75 66 .06 pc 76 58
Portland, Ore 76 61 c 77 59
Providence, R.I. 73 63 .52 pc 79 61
Raleigh 86 67 ts 85 68
Rapid City 81 54 s 80 54
Reno 88 69 pc 92 62
Rochester, NY 72 51 s 77 56
Sacramento 95 66 s 96 61
St. Louis 83 61 pc 83 61
St. Ste. Marie 72 51 .14 pc 68 47
Salt Lake City 95 68 pc 96 68
San Antonio 99 79 pc 94 75
San Diego 86 72 s 77 70
San Francisco 67 58 pc 70 55
Savannah 90 72 .11 ts 90 73
Seattle 71 58 c 73 58
Spokane 96 63 pc 93 62
Syracuse 74 56 s 78 54
Topeka 87 50 pc 84 54
Washington 86 69 .16 ts 82 68
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 Needles, Calif. LOW 35 Leadville,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/75/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 89/70/s Mexico City
Athens 90/73/s Montreal
Beijing 89/67/pc Moscow
Berlin 90/73/s Paris
Bermuda 86/81/ts Rio
Cairo 96/76/s Rome
Calgary 88/57/s Sydney
Havana 89/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 87/78/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 89/71/s Warsaw


81/66/pc
82/64/sh
89/69/sh
73/58/ts
77/57/s
73/53/pc
99/72/pc
80/60/s
89/71/s
66/44/pc
85/75/pc
72/57/pc
81/66/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T


LHK(ON1CLL
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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kileadowlres t
N \ '- ":

I ICou e Inverness
SCourthouse office
To pkins St. square
S106 W. Main
41Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
Gerry M ulligan ..................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan................................. .............................. Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ .............................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy........................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon ....................... ............................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 564-2930
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WOES
Continued from Page Al

40 to 50 years with Progress.
What else pays like that?"
he asked. "I'm worried
about those who have no
where else to go."
In the meantime, Finley
said, all anyone can do is
wait. He said he under-
stands Duke has to make
good, responsible business
decisions
for the In the
company meantime,
and not
necessar- Finley
ily for
Citrus said, all
County.
Though anyone
he con- can do is
fe s s e s
Progress wait.
Energy
has done a lot for the
community.
And if Duke does decide
not to repair the plant, Fin-
ley said businesses will
have to tighten their belts
and adjust their spending
accordingly
"But it's not going to break
Citrus County," Mrs. Finley
said. "We kind of look at it as
roll with the flow"
Nevertheless, Finley said
the nuclear site would al-
ways be used for something.
"It's too much to let go," he
said. "They're will always be
someone out there."
There's rail, freshwater,
saltwater and "all the power
in the world from the sub-
station," Finley said. The in-
frastructure is there for
something else, Dave said.
He's just not sure what.
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


BUSINESS
Continued from Page Al

north of Crystal River,
Stranger said businesses in
the area are feeling the eco-
nomic strain.
"Our livelihood is
Progress Energy," she said.
Duke Energy acquired
Progress in July through a
stock merger. Early this
past week, Duke CEO Jim
Rogers said the company is
weighing many significant
factors before deciding by
year's end whether or not to
repair cracks in a contain-
ment wall that forced the
plant to be shut down in
September 2009.
Repair estimates were
thought to range from be-
tween $900 million to $1.3
billion, but Duke officials
now say the cost appears to
be higher.
If the nuclear plant per-
manently closes, Stranger
predicts Inglis, as people
know it, will cease to exist.
"This little town is going
to crawl up and die," she
said. "Those people make
good money. They spend
money. If they're not here,
we don't have that."
In Crystal River, the gen-
eral manager of Plantation
on Crystal River, Andrew
Bartlett, said Friday rumors
are swirling around the
community, and causing
concern about the future of
Citrus County
"I'm frightened," he said.
Progress Energy employ-
ees account for most of the
hotel's midweek room
sales. And though Bartlett
admits layoffs have signifi-
cantly cut into the hotel and
restaurant's profits, the
workers still account for 15
percent of their business on


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The River Lodge RV Resort is usually full at this time of year. But while Duke Energy is
charting its best course of action for the Progress Energy Florida Crystal River Energy
Complex, area business are suffering.


the books for the year. With-
out them, Bartlett estimates
losing hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars.
"Or even more than that
in a year," he said.
Loss of room sales means
the county bed tax, which is
3 percent of the money col-
lected from overnight stays,
would suffer, Bartlett
added.
The bed tax is spent on
tourism promotion to bring
people into the community
to spend the night
Additionally, Bartlett said
the Plantation would have
to relook at how it markets
itself and try to fill the gaps.
At Off the Cuff... and On
the Fly, a clothing boutique
on Citrus Avenue, owner
Jennifer Petrella said
Progress Energy employees
account for much of her
business. She said there's
no denying the effect it
would have on her business
and others in the county if


the plant isn't
repaired.
"Obviously, it would be
devastating," she said.
Coleen Brady, owner of
The Wine Shop III and
Wine Bar across the street,
agreed.
Without the plant, Brady
fears a devastating trickle-
down effect, which would
not only hurt shops and
restaurants, but bigger
moneymakers such as real
estate and car dealerships.
"I think every single
business would feel it," she
said.
Looking at the larger pic-
ture, Petrella said the
biggest problem is much of
the county has been built
around the existence of the
plant, causing an overre-
liance on it for economic sta-
bility The local economy
needs diversity, she said,
and she feels county leaders
are desperately trying to ac-
complish that


Even among all the panic
over the idea of losing the
nuclear plant, Bartlett said
he's finding several people
are saying it's too early to
jump to doomsday scenar-
ios.
It's going to take time for
Duke to make a decision,


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Those
people make
good money.
They spend
money. If
they're not here,
we don't have
that.
Dawn Stranger
clerk, River Lodge RV Resort.
and Bartlett said he would
anticipate they would take
the time to explore all the
options.
Petrella also hopes Duke
will take into consideration
what the county has invested
in it, as a company; but, if
not, she strongly believes the
county will survive.
"We'll recover from it,"
she said.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Lawrence
Delgado, 89
CRYSTAL RIVER
On Thursday, Aug. 9,2012,
R. Lawrence Delgado left
this Earth to join his loving
wife, Betty,
and to live
with God in
Heaven. He
lived with
his son and
daughter-in-
law on
King's Bay
Lawrence waterfront
Delgado for the last
seven years.
He was born Nov. 7, 1922,
in El Paso, Texas, to Bruno
and Jovita Delgado, but they
soon moved to Joliet, Ill.,
where he graduated from
Joliet High School. He
joined the U.S. Army and
served a complete tour in
China-Burma-India, with
honors received. He was ac-
tive with his buddies, and
carried the flag at their
meetings until a few years
ago.
Mr Delgado was an en-
graver with A.O. Smith for
40 years in Illinois. He was
active in Central Christian
Church there, also served as
a deacon; in PTA meetings
at his children's school; Cub
Scouts, Boy Scout leader
and Rainbow Council
member
He was a good friend and
helper and would volunteer
to help anyone with carpen-
try, moving, painting, plant-
ing, etc. He loved his family
and would do anything for
them and will miss being
home with Mike and Nan,
his son and daughter-in-law
In 1993, he and his wife
moved to Sugarmill Woods
in Homosassa to be near his
children.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Betty, May 9,
2006, married 60 years; his
little sister, Isabel Delgado;
his mother and father, Jovita
and Bruno Delgado; his
brothers-in-law, Ralph Her-
nandez and Jim Goodrich.
I'm sure they are waiting to
greet him with open arms -
and especially his honey,
with her "Honey Do List"!
Survivors include daugh-

mosassa, Fla.; son, Michael
Delgado and his wife,
Nancy, of Crystal River, Fla.;
sister, Carmen Gutierrez
and husband, David, of
Joliet, Ill.; his baby sister,
Rachel Hernandez, of Mer-
rillville, Ind.; sister-in-law,
Nelda Goodrich of Kanka-
kee, Ill.; sister-in-law, Janet
Fillinger and her friend
Mary of Bourbonnais, Ill.;
and brother-in-law, Richard
Goodrich and his wife,
Juanita, of Kankakee, Ill.
He will watch over his
loving, wonderful grandchil-
dren, Misti Henderson and
her fiance, Larry Sand,
Maxwell Moranz, Justin
Delgado and his wife, Sara,
Nina Smith and her hus-
band, Jason. He will love
and miss his great-grand-
children he adored, Lucas
and Mia Delgado, Abigail
and Gianna Smith. Also, his
special friends Mary Jane
and Bob Edge of New York
(formerly of Sugarmill
Woods); and his wonderful
nieces and nephews all over
the United States. He does-
n't want to forget his bingo
friend who crocheted his
phone carrier, and Nurse
Roz and Sara from Cypress
Cove. Unforgettable canine
best buddy Pepper and his
canine footwarmer compan-
ion Bailey
Lawrence was a wonder-
ful father and role model for
everyone and will be sadly
missed by many
After transferring from
National Cremation Society
to Bushnell, full military
honors will be conducted at
a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Helen
Chasteen, 82
INVERNESS
Helen J. Chasteen, 82, of
Inverness, left this world
and went home to be with
her Lord on
Monday,
Aug. 13,
2012, at
Hospice of
Citrus
County Hos-
pice House
in Lecanto.
Helen Mr ste
Chasteen Chasteen
was born
Dec. 20, 1929, in Canton,
Ohio, to the late Fred and
Wilma (Gorley) Calhoun and
came to this area in 1999
from Tappahannock, Va.
She was a member of the
Rutland Baptist Church, a
devoted Christian, mother,
grandmother and pastor's
wife of the late Rev. John
Chasteen, who passed away
July 14,2004. Helen lived for
many years in Jacksonville,
where she completed more
than two years of college at
Florida Junior College.
She was a real entrepre-
neur in her younger years,
putting herself through
beauty school and opening a
beauty shop in her home.
She became a licensed real
estate agent and worked in
administrative positions for
Gulf Life Insurance and a
physician's medical office.
She leaves to mourn her
loss her daughter, Olivia
(Bill) Bilenky of Inverness;
and her many grand-
children and great-
grandchildren. In addition
to her husband, she was
preceded in death by her
son, Larry, and grandson,
Gabriel, on whose birthday
she left to be with her Lord.
What a joy for him to see his
Nana again on his birthday
The celebration of life
service will be at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 25, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, with the Rev. Bill
Webb officiating. Burial will
follow in Hills of Rest Ceme-
tery at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
memorials to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Audrey
Byerley, 87
INVERNESS
Audrey C. K. (Lange) By-
erley, 87, of Inverness,
passed away Aug. 16, 2012,
at Brent-
wood
Healthcare
Center in
Lecanto.
Audrey
was born
Nov 18,
1924, in
Audrey Belleville,
Byerley Ill., the
daughter of
Elmer and Bertha (Pfeiffer)
Lange. She moved from
Jacksonville, Ill., to Inver-
ness, Fla., in 1985. Audrey
worked for Capital Records
and the Citrus County
Chronicle. She loved cats
and antiques. Audrey was a
Lutheran.
Audrey was preceded in
death by her husband, Don-
ald M. Byerley She is sur-
vived by two daughters,
Pamela G. Staake and Crys-
tal K. Burgan, both of Inver-
ness, Fla.; two
granddaughters, Katie
Frimpter (Kevin) of Inver-
ness, Fla., and Niki Vermi-
lyea (Todd) of Citrus
Springs, Fla.; and five great-
grandchildren, Cheyenne,
Mitchell, Alexia, Josh and
Jake. Heinz Funeral Home
& Cremation, Inverness,
Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Phone 352-
563-5660 for details.


IServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

)~I'll


Maureen
Edwards, 69
LECANTO
Maureen Catherine Ed-
wards aka Cohn, of Lecanto,
Fla., passed to the Lord on
Aug. 14,
2012, at her
home, sur-
S rounded by
d family and
friends and
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Maureen Maureen
Edwards was born in
Pearl River,
N.Y, on Dec. 26, 1942,
daughter of James Patrick
Fagan and Catherine Marie
(Metz) Fagan. She was
raised in Sparkill and Mid-
dleburg, N.Y, and was a life-
long cosmetologist and hair
stylist in Cobleskill, N.Y.,
and Crystal River, Fla. She
loved to ski and play golf.
Maureen is survived by
her husband, Frederick A.
Edwards; her son, Steven
Cohn, his wife, Julie, and
grandson, Nicholas, of An-
them, Ariz.; daughter,
Catherine Thomas and her
husband, Steven, and grand-
sons, Christopher and
Mathew of Morrisonville,
N.Y.; two step-daughters,
Brenda Jo Lindsey of Del-
tona, Fla., and Fredrika Ina
Marie Edwards of Los Ange-
les, Calif. Renee is also sur-
vived by three brothers,
James of Delaware, William
of New Jersey and Daniel of
Florida; various nieces and
nephews; and many friends.
Services will be an-
nounced at a later date at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Fla. She will be in-
urned at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell, Fla. In lieu of flowers,
donations are suggested to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
U.S. flags denote mili-
tary service on local
obituaries.


To Place Your

("In Memory" ad,'
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917


scmiller @ chronicleonline com
or
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@ chronicleonline.com

F C o i i f r a i ad


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. E
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Ronald "Ron"
Fake, 69
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Ronald "Ron"
Quentin Fake, age 69, of
Beverly Hills, Florida, will
be held at 2:00 PM, Tuesday,
August 21, 2012 at the First
Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River with Rev-
erend R. Jackson Alwood of-
ficiating. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, FL. In lieu of flowers
memorial contributions
may be made to the Ameri-
can Diabetes Association
www.diabetes.org Condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr. Fake was born Sep-
tember 9, 1942 in Lebanon,
PA, son of the late Quentin
and Evelyn (Kleinfelter)
Fake. He passed away
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
at his home. He was a re-
tired Phys Ed and Health
teacher from the Wyomiss-
ing School District in Berks
County, PA. Ronald coached
track and field for 32 years
and during that time be-
came the most winning
track and field coach in the
school district's history,
while earning countless
championships, as well as,
"Coach of the Year" honors.
He moved to Beverly Hills
from Berks County in 2001
and was a member of the
First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Carole
Fake of Beverly Hills, son,
David Fake and wife, Leigh
Anne of Seaford, DE, daugh-
ter, Pamela Szal and hus-
band, Ryan of Womelsdorf,
PA, 2 sisters, Sharon Pineda
and husband, Steve of
Lecanto and Kathy Herr
and husband, Leonard of
Woodstock, GA.

Ida
Cruikshank, 85
INGLIS
Ida Louise Cruikshank,
85, of Inglis, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday,
Aug. 8, 2012.
She was born July 17,
1927, in Pittsburgh, Pa., and
moved to Florida in 1978.
She was employed by De-
cembers Fine Dining for 25
years. Mrs. Cruikshank was
a member of First Baptist
Church of Inglis. She loved
cooking and baking.
She is survived by her sis-
ter, Mary Johnson, of Inglis;
two nieces, Francine Salter,
of Inglis, and Karen John-
son of Dunnellon; three
nephews, Lance Caliguire,
of Portland, Ore., Don
Caliguire, of Arab, Ala., and
Michael Caliguire, of Ocala;
six great-nephews; and
eight great-nieces.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Frank Cruikshank; and her
two brothers, Felix Caligu-
ire and Mike Caliguire.
A memorial service will
be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21,
2012, at First Baptist Church
of Inglis, 1001 Hwy 40 E., In-
glis, FL 34449. Memorial
contributions may be made
to Hospice of Citrus County
Cremation handled by
Florida Cremation, Ocala.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.








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Bruce
Francis, 83
HERNANDO
Bruce Francis, 83, of Her-
nando, Fla., died Aug. 18,
2012, at Health Center at
Brentwood in Hernando.
Bruce was born Nov. 19,
1928, in Fall River, Mass.,
the son of William and Ethel
Francis. He served in the
U.S. Air Force during the
Korean Conflict. Bruce was
a technician for New Eng-
land Telephone. He moved
to Hernando in 2006 from
Stuart, Fla.
Survivors include his
wife, Bennie Francis of Her-
nando, Fla.; son, Malcolm
Francis and wife, Annette,
of Lecanto, Fla.; grandchil-
dren, Craig M. Francis and
wife, Crystal, of Beverly
Hills, Fla., and Erin A.
Sleeper and husband, Eric,
of Tequesta, Fla.; and two
great-grandchildren, Shane
M. Francis and Rebecca J.
Francis, both of Beverly
Hills, Fla.
Graveside services for Mr.
Francis will be at 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012, at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, Fla. Military
honors will be provided by
Inverness VFW Post 4337.
Those wishing to attend
may meet at the funeral
home at 10:30 a.m. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE


Ann Byrnes
Kuebler, 61
JAZZ ARCHIVIST
A jazz archivist known for
her work on the Smithson-
ian's Duke Ellington papers
has died in New Jersey Ann
Byrnes Kuebler was 61.
Her former supervisor at
the Institute of Jazz Studies
at Rutgers University, Vin-
cent Pelote, said she died of
a brain aneurysm Monday
at a hospital in Atlantic City
Kuebler helped make
200,000 pages of music and
documents in the Smithson-
ian Institution's Ellington
collection public and be-
came a noted Ellington
scholar.
She went to Rutgers in
2001 and was the lead
archivist on its Mary Lou
Williams collection. She
also helped the university
acquire the collection of pi-
anist and composer James P
Johnson.
Kuebler was from Balti-
more. She started her ca-


reer as a volunteer at the
Archives Center of the
Smithsonian's National Mu-
seum of American History
in Washington, D.C.

Tom Meier, 61
WOLF EXPERT
One of North America's
most acclaimed wolf ex-
perts has died.
The Fairbanks Daily
News-Miner reported Tom
Meier was found dead in his
home near Denali National
Park on Tuesday He was 61.
Friends went to check on
him after he failed to show
up for a wolf seminar at the
park's Murie Science and
Learning Center
Meier was a leading re-
searcher on the park's wolf
packs. He helped write the
2003 classic "The Wolves of
Denali," considered to be
one of the most comprehen-
sive studies of wolves for the
general public.
The cause of death was
not immediately known.

Veronique
Peck, 80
ACTOR'S WIDOW
Veronique Passani Peck,
the widow of actor Gregory
Peck and a longtime arts
patron, has died. She was
80.
Family publicist Monroe
Friedman saids Veronique
Peck died Friday of heart
failure at her Los Angeles
home.
Born in Paris, Veronique
Peck met the actor when
she interviewed him for the
newspaper France Soir.
At age 23, she moved to
the United States and mar-
ried the movie star.
Their marriage lasted 48
years until his death in 2003.
Veronique Peck helped
create the Inner City Cul-
tural Center in South Los
Angeles, was a founder of
the Los Angeles Music Cen-
ter and a longtime
fundraiser for the Los Ange-
les Public Library
She is survived by two
children, writer/producer
Anthony Peck and docu-
mentary filmmaker Cecilia
Peck Voll, a brother and
three grandchildren.
-From wire reports



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A6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Aug. 13 to 17MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled
mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Hot dog with bun,
uncrusted PBJs, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baked
french fries, warm apple slices,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Chicken nuggets,
ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, turkey wrap, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled pears, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich


stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled
pineapple, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, ham super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, Mexicali corn,
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked
beans, potato triangles, chilled
peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, macaroni and cheese,
turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, green beans, warm
apple slices, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and


rice, maxstix, turkey with gravy
over noodles and ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
turkey salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, peas, celery, peaches,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Tasty turkey
wrap, chicken alfredo with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, pizza, ham salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, potato triangles, dried
fruit, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, turkey salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans,
potato roasters, mixed fruit, cu-
cumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecue sandwich,
spaghetti with ripstick, pizza,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, cold corn salad, potato tri-
angles, peaches, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian
vegetable medley, applesauce,
white bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, graham
crackers, whole-grain wheat
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Orange-
pineapple juice, breaded fish
filet with tartar sauce, cheese
grits, tomatoes and okra, oat-
meal raisin cookie, whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
spinach, peaches, whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Pork chop patty with
brown gravy, black-eyed peas,
country vegetable medley,
mixed fruit, dinner roll with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


College loans, job-search groans


Where did all the terday to catch up with
good, high-paying some of my classmates, who
jobs for aren't having any
B.A.'s in English better luck find-
Lit go all ofa sud- ing a job than I
den? Four years am.
of my life, wasted. "If only I had
Actually, the learned how to
years weren't use a tattoo nee-
wasted; I was. dle," said
Now I'm going to Faberge, who
have to move earned a mas-
back into my par- JI ter's in fine arts.
ents' house. Well, J "That's where all
not my parents' MULLEN the money is, in
house, because contemporary
they don't have one any- art But my parents don't un-
more. They've moved back derstand. They think in-
in with their parents. So I'll stead of spending $16 a day
be living in my grandpar- at Starbucks, I should be
ents' house with them. How working at one. Like that's
did things come to this? going to pay my bills."
We didn't have the biggest "Why don't you just start
house in our subdivision, painting and sell your stuff
but my siblings and I each for a couple million dollars
had an extra bedroom for a canvas?" I asked. "After
our toys and clothes, and the all, you have a degree, and a
four-car garage had plenty of lot of way famous artists
room for our golf clubs and never had a degree."
kayaks. Dad put in a pool, "Good idea. And why don't
and Mom had the kitchen you go home and knock out
redone to look like an Ital- a few best-sellers?"
ian palace she saw on one of
our twice-a-year cruises.
Then, all of a sudden, we're
broke. I never figured out M oE I S
how that happened. B ra
Grandpa is an electrician, B race
and Grandma never worked n
outside the house. They n
never went to college, they I
never take vacations and
they still live in a tiny house
they bought when they were
first married. With cash,
Grandpa keeps telling me, -
he doesn't owe anyone a
penny. Well, duh. He never
buys anything. Anybody
could do that.
I don't know why he and
Grandma seem so happy.
They don't have anything. Do you want to have gorgeous,
His car is from the '90s! There is an ALTERNATIVE
There's not an HDTV in the
house; they don't even get
basic cable. He's never MON
heard of "Halo" and "World CoSIX MON
of Warcraft" or beer pong. "We Cater tt
He wouldn't know an app if e
it bit him on the face. He
doesn't know how to text, yet
they still let him drive, even
though he's in his 60s! 364(
Me, I'm $130,000 in debt, Horn
and no one wants to learn (35:
about Chaucer
I went to Starbucks yes- Ledgerden


"I studied English, not
writing."
"You couldn't go read
Dickens at the library for
free? You had to go to col-
lege for that?" Faberge is to-
tally lacking in the
sympathy department.
"Why would anyone read
Dickens if they didn't have
to?" I replied. "That's the
whole college experience -
doing things that make you
miserable. My cousin Billy
wouldn't do it. He and I are
exactly the same age, and he
spent the last four years
learning how to be an elec-
trician with my granddad.
He could have gone to col-
lege, but he'd rather do
something he likes. It's
going to hold him back the
rest of his life."
"Wait a minute," Faberge
said. "Didn't he just get mar-
ried and buy a house?"
"Yeah, a little one."
"You've seen it?"
"No, but he said there
wasn't enough room for me
to move in with them."


Wearing

s, too!
ou Te l?
a,.


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to long term metal braces.


rH SMILES'
aces Syslem
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Jeremy A. Ledger. D.M.D., P.A.
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osassa, FL 34448
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itistry.com Se Habla Espaiol


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Donation to Citrus United Basket
Every year, Enterprise Rent A
Car and its local partners make
donations to charitable
organizations in their market
area. This year, they have
selected CUB or Citrus United
SBasket to be the recipient of a
check for $1000.00 dollars.
Pictured from left to right is
Stephen McMullan, Branch
Manager for Enterprise Rent A
Car, Lisa Davis, Asst. Executive
Director for Citrus United
Basket, and 'h ,,,, Bryant, Vice
President of Nick Nicholas Ford.

IHwy. 44 W. Inverness

ICIO (352) 726-1231

nicknicholasford.com
coaccuu


CARDIOLOGY
Consultants, RA.
www.citruscardiology.org


Our Crystal River Office is now open 5 days a week!




Aa-















Dr. Suman Pasupuleti (above left) and Dr. Nishant Nerella (above
right) are now scheduling appointments for the Crystal River
office Monday Friday, 8am 5pm to meet your needs.
Same day appointments are available in some cases!
Call Patti at 352-795-4165 to schedule your visit!

TODAY'S HEART-HEALTH TP
Did you know the benefits of quitting smoking take effect almost Immediately?
Within: 1 year: Risk of coronary heart disease is cut by 50
20 minutes: Heart rate and blood pressure drop. percent compared to that of a smoker.
12 Hors: Carbon monoxide levels in blood drop to a 5 to 15 years: Risk of stroke is reduced to that of a
normal range. nonsmoker.
2 weeks to 3 months Circulation and lung functions 10 years: Risk of lung cancer is 50 percent less than a
improve, smoker and risk of mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder,
1 to 9 months: Shortness of breath and/or coughing cervix and pancreatic cancer decreases.
decreases, cilia regain normal function, increasing the 15 years after: Coronary heart disease risks are that
ability to handle mucus and clean the lungs. of a nonsmoker.
ts never too late to quit smoking.
For more information on this and other ways to help reach your optimum heart health,
call Citrus Cardiology Consultants serving Florida hearts for over 30 years!
ICANL CANL

INVERNESS
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452 ... ...... .... icine
(352) 726-8353 ...


CRYSTAL RIVER
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-4165
WV dI bJ U UU l dL i dI~


00OCOTA Five Locations To Serve You


BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL



Eye Exams Eyeglasses Contact Lenses Bi-Focals
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.; Optometric Physician Pediatric & Adult Eye Care
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LOCAL


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 A7











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

Recalled







Associated Press
The 2006 Chevy TrailBlazer
SS sport utility vehicle is
being recalled because the
window and door lock
switches can cause fires.
GM, Isuzu recall
258,000 SUVs
DETROIT General Mo-
tors and Isuzu are recalling
more than 258,000 SUVs in
the U.S. and Canada to fix
short-circuits in power win-
dow and door lock switches
that can cause fires.
The recall covers Chevrolet
TrailBlazer, GMC Envoy,
Buick Rainier, Isuzu Ascender
and Saab 97-X SUVs from
the 2006 and 2007 model
years. The SUVs were sold
or registered in 20 U.S.
states; Washington, D.C.;
and Canada, where salt and
other chemicals are used to
clear roads in the winter.
GM has reports of 28 fires,
and it doesn't know of any in-
juries caused by the problem.
Fluid can get inside the dri-
ver's door and cause corrosion
in the power window and door
switch circuit boards, GM said
in documents posted on the
U.S. National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration website.
The corrosion can cause
short-circuits, knocking out the
switches and causing fires.
The recall affects SUVs
sold or registered in the fol-
lowing states: Connecticut,
Delaware, Illinois, Indiana,
Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Mas-
sachusetts, Michigan, Min-
nesota, Missouri, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, West
Virginia and Wisconsin.

WorldBRIEFS


UK, Ecuador seek
solution to Assange
LONDON Britain is
seeking an amicable solution
with
Ecuador to
their diplo-
matic




Asuliange Assange,
Assange Assange, a
U.K. official
insisted Saturday, as the
secret-spiller prepared to
make his first public state-
ment since the Latin Ameri-
can nation confirmed it would
offer him asylum.
Assange, who took shelter
in the Ecuadorian Embassy
on June 19 after he ex-
hausted all routes of appeal in
the U.K. to avoid extradition to
Sweden for questioning over
sexual misconduct allega-
tions, is scheduled to make a
public statement Sunday.
London diplomats have
spoken with Ecuadorian Am-
bassador Ana Alban since the
South American country
granted Assange asylum
Thursday, a move which
threatens to further compli-
cate Sweden's two-year long
attempt to have the activist
extradited from Britain.
Tropical storm hits
Mexican coast
VERACRUZ, Mexico -
Former Tropical Storm He-
lene headed inland on Mex-
ico's Gulf Coast early
Saturday after making landfall
and quickly losing strength,
falling to a tropical
depression.
Helene still posed a threat
to areas where thousands of
people were still recovering
from flooding spawned last


week by Hurricane Ernesto.
But the Veracruz state civil
defense office said none of
the region's many rivers had
yet reached flood stage.
-From wire reports


Airstrike kills eight in Syrian city


Algerian Brahimi to be next UN envoy


Associated Press
BEIRUT -A Syrian warplane Sat-
urday bombed a small town partially
controlled by anti-regime fighters near
the Turkish border, killing eight peo-
ple and wounding at least 20, the latest
escalation in the use of air power by
President BasharAssad's government
in the Arab nation's civil war
The afternoon airstrike, reported by
activists in the area as well as the
British-based Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights, was one of at least two
that took place Saturday The in-
creased use ofairstrikes by the regime
is taking its toll on civilians, and, in the


eyes of activists, is evidence of its in-
sensitivity to civilian casualties as it
battles for survival against the rebels.
The regime's growing use of war-
planes comes at a time when western
powers are looking into suggestions for
militarily enforcing a no-fly zone in
northern Syria Russia rejects the idea.
The airstrike on the town ofManbej
in the Jarablous area came hours after
a government announcement said
Syria welcomed the appointment of
former Algerian diplomat Lakhdar
Brahimi as the U.N.'s new point-man
in efforts to halt the civil war
The announcement was made by
the office of Vice President Farouk al-


Sharaa, which denied Arab
media reports al-Sharaa had ".
defected to the opposition. Al-
Sharaa "did not think, at any
moment, of leaving the coun-
try," the statement said. The
regime has suffered a string of
prominent defections in re-
cent months, though Assad's Laki
inner circle and military have Bra
largely kept their cohesive is rep
stance behind him. Kofi Ar
Brahimi, the new U.N. the ne
envoy, takes over from former en
Secretary-General Kofi
Annan who is stepping down Aug. 31
after his attempts to broker a cease-
fire failed. His appointment comes as
U.N. observers have begun leaving
Syria, with their mission officially over


h
hi
la
in,
w
vo


Cost to conceive

::::::::::: .iiii :::::::::::::::::: F :::. ...


Associated Press
Brenda and Chuck Isaacson play in their backyard Aug. 6 with their 16-month-old daughter in Sun Prairie, Wis.
Brenda explained the VA insurance plan covered retrieving her husband's sperm, but would not help pay for
infertility services to help them have a child because they were not medically or psychologically necessary.


Proposed bill would expand fertility


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The roadside
bomb that exploded outside An-
drew Robinson's Humvee in Iraq
six years ago broke the Marine staff
sergeant's neck and left him with-
out use of his legs. It also cast doubt
on his ability to father a child, a
gnawing emotional wound for a
then-23-year-old who had planned
to start a family with his wife of less
than two years.
The catastrophic spinal cord in-
jury meant the couple's best hope
for children was in vitro fertilization,
an expensive and time-consuming
medical procedure whose cost isn't
covered by the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs. Robinson and his wife
were forced to pay out of pocket,
with help from a doctor's discount
and drugs donated by other patients.
A bill being considered in the
Senate would expand the VAs med-
ical benefits package so other vet-
erans, and their spouses or
surrogates, don't have to bear the
same expense. The department cur-
rently covers a range of medical
treatment for veterans, including
some infertility care, but the legis-
lation specifically authorizes the VA
to cover IVF and pay for procedures
now provided for some critically in-
jured active-duty soldiers.
The bill's meant to help
wounded veterans start families as
they return home from war and ad-
dress a harrowing consequence of
combat that can radically change a
couple's marriage but receives less
attention than post-traumatic
stress disorder and brain injuries.
"It's common sense: a male vet-
eran cannot have a kid by himself. It
doesn't happen. They need obviously
to have it with their wife or a part-
ner," said Robinson, of Florence,
N.J., who is now 29 and was injured
in a 2006 explosion in Al Anbar
province. "So for the VA to say 'Oh,
we can only cover this part of it,' it
just kind of doesn't make sense."
Promising option
In vitro fertilization, the process
of mixing sperm and eggs in a labo-
ratory dish and transferring the re-
sulting embryo into a woman's
uterus, costs thousands of dollars
and each cycle can take weeks. It's
physically taxing, too, requiring
hormone injections and other inva-


coverage for veterans


Matthew Keil gives twins Matthew Jr. and Faith a ride around the house
at their home near Parker, Colo. The Keil twins were conceived with IVF
after Matthew was shot in the neck in 2007 and rendered a quadripelgic.


sive steps, and can take multiple
tries to produce a viable pregnancy
For many wounded veterans, it rep-
resents the most promising option.
More than 1,830 veterans of the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have
suffered pelvic fractures and geni-
tourinary injuries since 2003 that
could affect their abilities to re-
produce, according to Pentagon
figures provided to Sen. Patty Mur-
ray, the bill's sponsor and chair-
woman of the Senate Veterans
Affairs Committee.
"Because they served our coun-
try, they now can't have a family,
which is part of their dream," said
the Washington state Democrat,
who hopes the committee will act
on the bill after returning from Au-
gust recess. "I think we now have a
responsibility to not take that
dream away."
Reproductive injuries
Combat injuries can dampen a
soldier's ability to have children in
any number of ways, said Mark
Edney, a Maryland urologist and
Army reservist who treats veterans.
For men, a blast to the genitalia
can harm sperm-producing testi-
cles, while a spinal cord injury can


cause erectile dysfunction or ejac-
ulatory problems. For women,
shrapnel can injure the pelvis and
fallopian tubes, preventing
fertilization.
Although expertise exists to help
them become parents, Edney said
veterans with fertility problems
form a "relatively small subset of
patients that are just forgotten in
terms of policy"
Legislative assistance
The legislation would likely have
helped spouses like Brenda Isaac-
son, who said the VAs insurance
plan covered the cost of recovering
sperm from her husband, Chuck -
an Army staff sergeant paralyzed
by a 2007 helicopter crash in
Afghanistan but not the more
than half-dozen IVF attempts the
couple underwent before finally
having a daughter nearly a year
and a half ago. She bristled at
being told by officials that infertil-
ity services were not medically or
psychologically necessary
"You tell that to a man who's just
been wounded that it's not psy-
chologically necessary to have chil-
dren when that's all we'd talked
about, having babies," she said.


at midnight Sunday
In Syria, activists and the
London Observatory could not
saywhat was the intended tar-
get of the lone air force MiG-25
when it rocketed Manbej,
which has a population of
40,000. The wounded were
dar treated in field hospitals in the
imi town and in clinics across the
cing border in Turkey
an as Asecond airstrike earlier in
U.N. the day targeted the northern
y. border town of Azaz, where
more than 40 people were
killed and at least 100 wounded in an
airstrike earlier this week, according
to international watchdog Human
Rights Watch. Activists said Saturday's
bombs hit an open field.



Tribes


upset over


Black


Hills sale

Sioux consider

site sacred
Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. It's
advertised as a one-of-a-
kind deal: Nearly 2,000
acres of prime real estate
nestled in the Black Hills of
South Dakota for sale to the
highest bidder
But the offer to sell the
land near Mount Rushmore
and historic Deadwood has
distressed Native American
tribes who consider it a sa-
cred site. Although the land
has been privately owned,
members of the Great Sioux
Nation known as Lakota,
Dakota and Nakota have
been allowed to gather there
each year to perform cere-
monial rituals they believe
are necessary for harmony,
health and well-being.
Members now fear if the
property they call Pe' Sla is
sold, it will be developed and
they will lose access. The
South Dakota Department of
Transportation and the Fed-
eral Highway Administra-
tion are studying the
possibility of paving one of
the main roads that divides
the land, a fact mentioned in
the advertisement touting its
development potential.
The tribes have banded to-
gether to try to raise money
to buy back as much of the
land as they can. But with a
week to go until the Aug. 25
auction, they have only
$110,000 committed for prop-
erty they believe will sell for
$6 million to $10 million.
"A lot of our people who
practice our way of life go
there to pray, and there are
a lot of us that go up there,"
said Rodney Bordeaux,
president of the Rosebud
Sioux Tribe, which is lead-
ing the effort. "Basically, it's
an opportunity for the tribes
to become involved and
save Pe' Sla from develop-
ment, commercial develop-
ment, up there and try to
save it and keep it in its cur-
rent state, so people can al-
ways go up there to pray"
The area is the only sacred
site on private land outside
Sioux control. The tribes be-
lieve the Sioux people were
created from the Black Hills,
and part of their spiritual
tradition says Pe' Sla is
where the Morning Star fell
to earth, killing seven beings
that killed seven women.
The Morning Star placed the
souls of the women into the
night sky as "The Seven Sis-
ters," also known as the
Pleiades constellation.
The land 1,942 acres of
pristine prairie grass is
owned by Leonard and Mar-
garet Reynolds, who would
not comment on the sale.
Chase Iron Eyes, a member
of the Standing Rock Sioux
Tribe, said they should be
commended for how well
they have preserved the
land and for giving the
tribes access. Iron Eyes


founded Last Real Indians,
a website that promotes in-
digenous writers.






E Veterans
Notes can be
found on
Page All of
today's
Chronicle.

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Head to Africa for an out-of-the-way






ADVENTURE


-:A a-g"= a


Karyn and Neil Sawyer take time to pose for a photo at the Cape of Good Hope.


Special to the Chronicle
Looking down on the Cape of Good Hope.


Cape Town offers many options for holiday-makers


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle

Cape Town,
South Africa,
is a city to visit
only on
purpose,
because it is not "on the
way" to anyplace else.

Unlike Atlanta, Hong Kong, or Lon-
don, which are crossroads to many
other points on the globe, Cape Town is
a destination in its own right the end
of the world in Africa, the southern
hemisphere. But, for the vacationing
traveler that can be a good thing, as it
is not overrun by tourists, and the
economy is not built on tourism.
If you are fortunate enough to visit
Cape Town, there are many options for
holiday-makers. However, there are
two major attrac-
tions, both natu-
ral and
man-made, that
are not to be
missed.
Table Mountain
is a 3,000-foot-
high block of
Sandstone that of-
fers a panoramic
Neil Sawyer view of Cape
SPONTANEOUS Town and the
TRAVELER Cape Peninsula.
Table Mountain is
accessible by two
scenic cable cars, each with a capacity
of 65 passengers, with a revolving floor,
giving each passenger a 360-degree
view of Cape Town, surrounding com-
munities and beaches.
We were warned that it could be
cold, windy and often socked in by
clouds, as frequently portrayed in pic-
tures. Luck was on our side, as we
were affected only by the first two con-
ditions wind and cold. We were ap-
propriately dressed for the occasion
and spent a couple of hours wandering
about enjoying scenes of Cape Town, to
the north, a city of 4,000,000 inhabi-
tants, and Robben Island in the dis-
tance to the north. This is where
Nelson Mandela and other anti-
apartheid activists were incarcerated.
Other notable landmarks are the Cape
of Good Hope, to the south, and a hazy
view of the Stellenbosch- Franschhoek


Cape Town, looking down from Table Mountain.
cable car going up Table Mountain. Table Mountain.


: : . .
. .= .
C 4l:3 =. ;


areas, to the east, noted for their vine-
yards and wine production.
Intermittent clouds on top and
patches of fog along the beaches pro-
vided kaleidoscopic views due to the
ever-changing light conditions. A sec-
ond go-around on top of the table re-
vealed new discoveries.
Meanwhile, warmer weather and a
late lunch beckoned from below.
Following a winding road with unob-
structed views down to the sea, we ar-
rived at the Cape of Good Hope,
about an hour's drive south of Cape
Town. The Cape anchors the merging


of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and
creates a treacherous transit for sailing
ships. It's at this point that many early
seafaring adventurers, seeking trade
routes to the Far East, met their fate as
the strong winds and unpredictable
tides thrust their ships onto the rocks.
There are actually two major capes,
Cape of Good Hope and Cape Point,
each offering unique views of the rocky
shores. These rocky promontories, con-
nected and accessible by walking
trails, are covered with large boulders
intermingled with a variety of wild
shrubs and beautiful flowers.


Do take this short and easy walk with
camera in hand, for breath-taking
views of the rugged rockscapes.
This area of the ocean is host to an
abundance of sea life, squid, krill, an-
chovies and other small fish, because
of the converging waters of the two
oceans. Whales and dolphins, as well
as penguins returning from their long
quest for food at sea, can be seen from
various points on the cape. Be sure to
take your binoculars for easier spotting
of these entertaining creatures.
Always carry a good highway map if
you are driving, but also for tracking
purposes if on a guided tour, so that
you have a good feel for not only where
you are, but to be informed of where
you are headed. Regardless of how I
travel, I always have an up-to-date map
in my pocket, usually well worn by the
time I exit an area.
Leaving the Cape, go north to High-
way M4 to False Bay and an area called
Boulders. Here, you will find the most
observer-friendly man-made penguin
viewing area in existence. Elevated
boardwalks lead to sandy beaches,
strewn with huge boulders, where the
penguins come ashore after feeding
at sea.
This is home to the African penguin
- formerly and frequently referred to
as jackass penguins because of their
donkey-like braying. It's most enter-
taining to watch them wash in on a
wave, then, after getting a foothold,
waddling around searching for their
mates or young. This is also an excel-
lent spot for picture taking.
To continue north back to Cape
Town, get on Highway M3, which will
take you on the backside of Table
Mountain to the city.
Your full day enjoying the scenic
beauty of the Cape will have all been
within the boundaries of Cape Penin-
sula National Park, where you will
have witnessed breathtaking views
from Table Mountain and the thrill of
being at the scene of a famous ship
wreck.
In 1729, infamous Capt. Vander
Decken declared that he would round
the cape in the Flying Dutchman if it
took him 'til doomsday Captain, we're
still waiting.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for27 years.
They travel frequently having been to
48 states, 64 countries and seven
continents. Contact Neil via email to
gobuddy@tampabayrrcom.


Denali National Park and Preserve
Mount McKinley, now Denali, is the highest mountain in North America. Steven and
Sydelle Levy of Homosassa were lucky enough to catch a view of the mountain
through the clouds on a recent trip. They were informed by residents that there are
only about five days a year when you can see Mount Denali without the clouds
blocking the view. Denali National Park and Preserve was one of high points of their
trip, which included a land tour of Alaska and a tour of Vancouver, Canada, on a
cruise. They were also able to see wild Dall sheep, moose, bears, caribou and birds.


Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS
ywea caffe t

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the


year and that photograph
will win a prize.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


MIA






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pursue interests,


make new friends


SUNDAY EVENING AUGUST 19, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC 'PG' NFL Preseason Football Indianapolis Colts at Pittsburgh Steelers. News Access
Andre Rieu: Live in Tuscany Love songs in Italy Dudu Fisher: In Concert From Israel Great Performances (In Stereo) Ed Slott's Retirement
S [ED PBS 3 3 14 6 (In Stereo)'G' N Israeli songs.'G' N 'G' c Rescue! 'G' N
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Bridge School 25th Great Performances 'G' Rock, Pop and Doo Wop (My Music)'G' Ribbon MI-5 "The Kidnap"
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0 [ ANB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) 'PG' Heinz Field in Pittsburgh. (N) (In Stereo Live) c Program
_ WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: WeightLoss Edition A new- News Sports
WF ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' (In Stereo)'PG' c lywed tries to lose weight.'PG' Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Big Brother (N) (In The Good Wife (In The Mentalist "Pink 10 News, Paid
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WTVT O 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) American Cleveland The The Family Guy Family Guy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News The Closer
0( WT]T FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Dad'14' Show Simpsons Simpsons '14' '14' (In Stereo) B
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D 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
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T ABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: WeightLoss Edition A new- News Grey's
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Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Precious" Law & Order "Virtue" *** "The Brothers" (2001, Comedy-Drama)
(W o IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory 'PG'c '14'0 Morris Chestnut. R R
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King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Without a Trace NUMB3RS"When The Unit "Unknown
SW CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' HalfMen Half Men "Derailed"'PG' "Heartbeats"'PG' Worlds Collide"'PG' Soldier'14'
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M N Mi FAM 16 16 16 15Dog Club Spotlight USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
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SXPX IO1N 17 Flashpoint'PG' Flashpoint'PG' ** "ISpy"(2002)Eddie Murphy'PG-13' Leverage'PG' Leverage'PG'
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(AE) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars WarsPG WarsPG Wars WarsPG WarsG Wars Wars'PG Wars'PG WarsPG' WarsPG'
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55 64 55 Wyatt Earp for the OK Corral showdown. 'R Nebraska"'14' future o the business. Bad
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i 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo)'PG' Wildman Hook Hook Hook Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Stereo)'PG'
"Mama, I Want to Sing" (2010) Ciara. A Sunday Best (N) Sunday Best'PG' Sunday Best "No Let's Stay Let's Stay
T1 96 19 96 preachers daughter becomes a pop star. 'PG' I Fear..All Faith"'PG' Together Together
IB l 254 51 254 NYC |To Be Announced Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ
"Joe Dirt"(2001, Comedy) David Spade, Daniel Tosh: Tosh.0 Tosh.0 ** "ZackandMiriMake a Porno"(2008)
S 27 61 27 33 Dennis Miller, Brittany Daniel'PG-13' Completely Serious 14' 14 4 '14' Seth Rogen, Traci Lords.'R'
m 98 4 9 2 7 "RV" ** "National Lampoon's Vacation" (1983) "RV" (2006, Comedy Robin Williams. A dysfunctional Redneck Island (In
98 45 98 28 37 'PG' Chevy Chase. (In Stereo) 'R' family goes on vacation. (n Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo)'PG'
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IM J 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) NN Newsroom (N) America to Work Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Americato Work
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(ESPNI 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter(N) Little League Baseball NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Nationals. From Brainerd, Minn.
EWTN 95 70 95 48 Ben. Crossing Sunday NightPrime Catholic. |Savoring G.K. Rosary Catholic Compass |God Bookmark
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**2 "Sabrina" (1995, Romance-Comedy) ***t "The English Patient" (1996) Ralph Fiennes. Count's fling with a *** "The Constant
(IIX) 118 170 Harrison Ford, Julia Ormond.'PG' British newlywed leads to tragedy (In Stereo)'R' Gardener"'R'
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
(FOO] ) 26 56 26 Diners Diners Chopped 'G' CupcakeWars (N) Chopped (N) Food Truck Race Chopped
FSNFL 35 39 35 Marlins Bull Rding CBR Hobbs. (Taped NFL Preseason Football Miami Dolphins at Carolina Panthers. Taped) Dolphins
S*3 "Armageddon" (1998) BruceWillis. A hero ** "Knowing" (2009) Nicolas Cage. A note found in a time "Knowing"(2009, Science
SX 30 60 30 51 tries to save Earth from an asteroid, capsule predicts disastrous events.'PG-13' Fiction) Nicolas Cage. PG-13'
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"The Wish List" "A Crush on You" (2011, Romance-Comedy) "Smart Cookies" (2012, Comedy-Drama) Frasier PG Frasier'PG'
HALL 39 68 39 45 54 (2010)BN Brigid Brannagh.'NR' c Patricia Richardson, Jessalyn Gilsig. N
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*** "Game Change" Real Time With Bill *** "Puss in Boots" (2011) "Little Fockers" (2010) Robert Hard Knocks: Training
303 202 303 (2012) N Maher'MA' c Voices of Antonio Banderas. De Niro.'PG-13' c Camp
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Pawn Stars PawPawn Starn awn Stars Pawn Stars Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers (N) Countin Counting SharkWranglers (N)
(S 51 25 51 32 42 PG PG PG PG 'PG' 'PG Cars P' Cars PG '14'
**2 "Two Weeks ** "Made of Honor" (2008 Romance- Drop Dead Diva (N) Army Wives Kevin ** "Made of Honor"
LE 24 38 24 31 Notice" Comedy) Patrick Dempsey'PG-13' 'PGC returns home. (N) 'PG' (2008) 0
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(N 50 119 SigourneyWeaver. NR N Christine Lahti, Nicholle Tom.'NR' Suspense) Michelle Stafford. NR'
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TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 **t "Meet the Fockers" (2004) *** "Hitch"(2005) Will Smith.'PG-13' *** "Hitch"(2005) Will Smith. 'PG-13'
9 53 19 30 35 *** "Raintree County" (1957, Drama) **** "North by Northwest" (1959) Cary Grant. A case of North by **** "A Hatfulof
i 16953 16930 35 Montgomery Clift.'NR' mistaken identity endangers an ad agent's life. Northwest Rain" (1957)'NR'
SSurvivorman "Deep Survivorman "South Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction
53 34 53 24 26 Woods"'PG' c Pacific" 'G' B Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings Kings
(TD 50 46 50 29 30 Lottery Changed Lottery Changed Hoard-Buried Hoard-Buried High School Moms Hoard-Buried
S 350 261 "Beware the Gonzo" (2010) Zo6 Kravitz. Eddie ***t "The Help" (2011) Viola Davis.An aspiring writer *** "Another Happy Day" (2011)
L 350261 350 starts an underground movement, captures the experiences of black women. N Ellen Barkin. 'R'
S** "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Leverage (N)'PG' Falling Skies (Season The Great Escape (N) Falling Skies'14' m
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[TOON] 38 58 38 33 "Tom and Jerry" "Tom and Jerry" NinjaGo NinjaGo Venture King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Dynamite
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IWGNWA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30 Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: I am a sin-
gle parent. My
youngest left for col-
lege last fall, and I did OK
handling the changes in my
home and heart. I took on a
few redecorating projects,
attended numerous local
events and accepted an-
other job to help with tu-
itions and to get out of the
house. But I still find myself
lonely.
I have few
friends. When I
go out, it's usually
by myself. I'm
fine with that, but
having another
person to talk to
does make the
time go by in a
more pleasant
way I've called
former mom
friends for lunch
or conversation, ANN
but no one re- MAIL
turns my calls,
everyone is busy
or our calendars just don't
mesh.
Solitude is nice every
once in a while, but it's emo-
tionally draining day in and
day out. The new school
year is fast approaching,
and my kids will be leaving
again. How does someone
my age make friends and get
past this hurdle in life? -
Young Empty Nester
Dear Empty Nester: At-
tending an occasional local
event is fine, but it doesn't
allow enough time to build
friendships. You need to
find group activities that
you enjoy on a regular basis.
Do you like to sing? Join a
choir. Do you like to exer-
cise? Take a gym class, or
join a bike-riding group.
Work for a political candi-
date. Do some charity work,
volunteer at a hospital, get


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Campaign" (R) ID required.
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Total Recall" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Sparkle" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"The Expendables 2" (R) ID
required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Paranorman" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
7 p.m.


"Paranorman" (PG) In real 3D.
4:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"The Campaign" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
4:35 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
In 3D. 1:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Gaiety
6 Big black bird
10 Enlistees' meal
14 Who's on stage
18 Loves
20 Learning
21 Where Provo is
22 Old Greek
meeting place
24 Petty scholar
25 Italian island
26 Scandinavian
27 Ere
29 Gaga
30 Ellipse
32 Young goat
34 Food store,
for short
36 Ancient garment
37 Isle of-
38 Mine entrance
39 Girl in the funnies
41 Lake
43 Kettle
44 Marine plant
45 Stage setting
47 Show sorrow
49 Dependable
52 Mongrels
53 Dutch or double
55 Bull's-eye
59 Proportion
60 Church district
62 Twofold
64 Copy illegally
65 Rara -
66 Pressed
67 High card
69 Edge
71 Tell of danger
72 Brooks or Gibson
73 Scornful look
74 bono
75 Car type
77 Flight formation shape
78 EU nation
80 Marsh plant
82 Fight against
84 Make expiation
85 Carry
87 Microscopic
88 English poet
89 Ancient Greek city
90 Left out
92 "-Gabler"
93 Man at sea


94 Dress in finery
96 Cup handle
97 Like a chimney
99 Decade
102 Auditory
104 Broken-down horse
105 To and -
106 Challenges
107 Adriatic resort
108 Scarlett of Tara
110 Smith or Ferrell
112 Hexes
114 Daniel the pioneer
115 Hereditary ruler
117 British prep school
119 Gone
120 Traffic regulator
121 Cry of delight
123 Drew
125 Ersatz
126 Fond du -, Wis.
129 Worsted
131 Not at all cramped
132 Yield by treaty
133 Books pro (abbr.)
136 Burden
138 Gator relative
140 Born(Fr.)
141 Cards held
142 Makeshift knife
143 Showy and
tasteless
145 Daring
147 Slender
149 Venue
151 Of few words
152 "Essays of-"
153 Pavilion
154 Item for a
schoolroom
155 Buckordoe
156 Indolent
157 Church calendar
158 Peak

DOWN
1 Kind of sugar
2 Ego-
3 McDowall or Piper
4 In-box
5 Farm denizen
6 Anti-slip device
7 Bun
8 Spherical body
9 Failing
10 Made dirty
11 Letter after zeta


12 Castle material
13 Ovine animals
14 Cupboard
15 Stone or space
16 Cushiony
17 Group of soldiers
19 Stuffy
23 Jason's ship
28 Have some dinner
31 By way of
33 Hotel
35 Word in a weather report
38 Singing voice
39 Bitter
40 Destroy by degrees
42 Unhearing
44 Final-sale words
45 More secure
46 bet!
48 Ship's bow
49 Mine wagon
50 Rantand -
51 Being of service
52 Imprison
54 Hardly ever
56 Force of attraction
57 Exit
58 Doctrine
60 Victim
61 Male red deer
63 Removable cover
66 Forget
68 Kind of pin
70 Grocery stores
73 -Fe
74 Equivocate
75 Do wrong
76 Poor

79 Rocky hill
80 bono
81 First or foreign
83 Down in the dumps
84 Indifference
85 Big sandwich
86 Adams or
Winehouse
89 Rose
91 Town in
New Mexico
92 Farm implements
95 Uncooked
97 Low-cal lunch
98 French airport city
100 St. Vincent Millay
101 Mr. Coward
103 Bird's crop


Story
Decimal system name
Theater area
Pale
Abbr. in business
Tropical tree
Two-wheeler
Tutor
Twelve o'clock
Seat of a kind


Go wrong
John -
Swamp
Ship's record
Body structure (abbr.)
Preserved
Peace prize name
Bel -
Run after
Heaps


135 Turn aside
137 Father
139 Beverage in cans
141 Back
142 Mark from an injury
144 Dir. letters
146 Ms. Taylor,
familiarly
148 That girl
150 Grampus


Puzzle answer is on Page A12.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


involved in community the-
ater. Decide what interests
you, and then look for or-
ganizations that allow you to
be part of an ongoing activ-
ity Try meetup.com to find
groups in your area.
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Feeling Inconve-
nienced," who didn't want
her daughter's young step-
son to stay with her during
his visitation
month.
When my
S daughter married
a man with three
little girls, I
thought, "She's
getting in too
deep. Will he ever
want children
with her?" Let
me tell you, these
three girls have
brought such joy
IE'S to my life. My
BOX daughter is a
wonderful step-
mom to them. She
is patient, helps with home-
work, nurses them when
needed, teaches them how
to cook and drive, and is
every bit a mother to these
fine girls.
I can't imagine feeling any
closer to a biological grand-
child.
Treasure the moment to
be an influence in a child's
life. Yes, a 5-year-old has
lots of energy Aren't you for-
tunate to have a healthy lit-
tle one to take to the park,
and laugh, snuggle and
watch movies with? What a
gift! -D.


Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Feb. 21 through March
9. Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(stay in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal Lahina
Resort).
Reservations should be
made as soon as possible. Call
352-637-5131, or email
dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. Annual membership
donation is $10 for a calendar
year or $25 for three years. The
CCVC is a nonprofit corpora-
tion, and your donations are tax
deductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m., with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
The post is sponsoring a bus
trip to Tropicana Field on
Wednesday, Sept. 5, for a
baseball game featuring the
Tampa Bay Rays vs. the New
York Yankees.
A chartered bus will leave the
post at 4 p.m. with an approxi-
mate return at midnight. The
cost includes bus fare, game
ticket and refreshments. This
event is open to the public, in-
cluding children accompanied
by an adult.
Tickets are limited and can
be purchased at the Legion,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway, in
Crystal River. Call the post at
352-795-6526 for ticket price
and information.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in


10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
The Auxiliary will serve swiss
steak dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 22, at the
post home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
All members and the public
are welcome to come dine with
their friends and families for a
donation of $7. All profits from
the dinners go to support the


many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary.
For additional information,
call Unit President Sandy White
at 352-249-7663.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The VFW Mixed Golf League
plays Thursdays alternating be-
tween Twisted Oaks Golf Club
and Citrus Springs Country
Club. Tee time is 8 a.m. New
players, both men and women,
are welcome. You do not have
to be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call Rich or
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
The post will celebrate Labor
Day with an old-fashioned
Labor Day Picnic at noon Mon-
day, Sept. 3, at the post. On the
menu are half a grilled chicken,
including all the fixings, plus
dessert and coffee for a dona-
tion of $7 per plate. The public
is welcome. For more informa-
tion, call 352-746-0440.
The public is also welcome
to participate in the post's sixth
annual golf scramble Saturday,
Sept. 15, with a shotgun start at
8 a.m. at Twisted Oaks Golf
Club. Registration forms are
available at the post. Entry fee
is $55 per player, which in-
cludes greens fees, cart fees,
food and a goodie bag. Pro-
ceeds from the event will go to
Hospice of Citrus County. A
banquet will immediately follow
the tourney at the post; it will in-
clude awards and presenta-
tions, and is also open to the
public.
For more information, call
Jayne Stasik at 352-464-3740.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
The Friday night dinner Aug.
24 will be chicken from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Cost is $8. Children
younger than 6 eat for $4. All
are welcome.
Karaoke with Mike and all-
you-can eat spaghetti dinner
will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 26, at the post. Cost is $5.
All are welcome.
The post is planning a bus
trip to the Hard Rock Casino in
Tampa on Wednesday, Aug. 29.
Cost is $30. We will leave the
post at 8 a.m. Call the post for
more information.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
All are welcome to join the
post for its Labor Day Picnic at
11:30 a.m. Monday, Sept. 3.
Hamburgers, hot dogs, potato
salad and baked beans will be
served for $5. Karaoke with
Mike.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our food drive.


Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.


Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during August, but will
resume meeting in September.
Phone Commander Linda Brice
at 352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334. The DAV Auxiliary
continues projects to help
needy veterans. We need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., and toiletry articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. Call Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will Sept. 15.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call


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club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. Call
the post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-


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orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
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Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-
3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will meet at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the new
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All el-
igible veterans welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
The post will have its inaugu-
ral yard sale and bake sale
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 24, and Saturday, Aug. 25.
Come and check out all the mil-
itary, household and unique
items available, including
homemade goodies at the Aux-
iliary's bake sale. For informa-
tion, call Roger Galyean at
352-344-5159 or Tom
Gallagher at 352-860-1629.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David and Joan Hill of
Beverly Hills celebrated
their 59th wedding anniver-
sary on July 25, 2012.
They were married July
25, 1953, at the Presbyterian
Church in Paterson, N.J.
They are the parents of


Al
7V '


I' I
Mel and Mary Ann Rus-
tom celebrated their 50th
anniversary July 21, 2012.
The couple were married
in St. Anthony's Church in
Bronx, N.Y They met at an
advertising agency in New
York City Mel was an art di-
rector in New York's top ad
agencies and created
award-winning ads and TV
commercials. Mary Ann was
a registered nurse at North
Shore LIJ health System on
Long Island, and was much
honored for her outstanding


Special to the Chronicle

Thanks in large part to its
major sponsors, this year's
Women's Health and Fit-
ness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance
of the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, will be
able to deliver another ex-
cellent event
This year's expo will be
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 22, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River.
Sixty exhibitors and Spa
Zone consultants will share
information, offer screen-
ings and demos, and show
new products. Exhibits and
experts will be available for
heart health, women's
health, hearing, vision, den-
tal health, surgery, rehabili-
tation and physical therapy,
home care, mental health,
gastrointestinal and urolog-
ical health, chiropractic,
skin care and cosmetic pro-
cedures, wellness, vitamins,
and a variety of healthy
lifestyle practices including
exercise, nutrition and re-
laxation, among many
others.
Walgreens will offer flu
protection, free with
Medicare Part B; if you have
commercial insurance,
check to see if it's covered,
or plan to pay a nominal fee
at the event.
Also at the Expo look for
Nature Coast EMS; they'll
have first-aid kits for pur-
chase. New this year, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center will give attendees
the opportunity to try con-
trolling the arms of the
daVinci Robot, used in min-
imally invasive surgery The
bloodmobile will be at the
Expo. Citrus 95 will be
broadcasting live from the
event, too.
Three attendees will win
prizes in a special free
drawing. There is a $1,000
gift basket of services from
Genesis Women's Center &
Medical Spa; a 12-month
membership from Citrus
County Jazzercise (value


three children: David, de-
ceased, and Gerald and
Stephanie of Florida.
They have seven grand-
children and two great-
grandchildren.
The couple retired and
moved here 18 years ago.


nursing.
The couple retired to Cit-
rus County in 2006 and live
in Terra Vista. They have
three children: Dr. Dennis
Rustom in Virginia, Debo-
rah DiMatteo in New York
and Shireen Muehlberger
in Massachusetts.
They have four grandchil-
dren: Isabelle, Pierce,
Amanda and Jessica.
The entire family got to-
gether at an oceanfront re-
sort for a week in Ormond
Beach to celebrate.


$500); and a Universal Stu-
dios gift basket from Tally
Ho Vacations that includes a
two-night stay for two at
Holiday Inn Main Gate and
two passes to Universal Stu-
dios (value $500).
Major sponsors include
presenting sponsor Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Advanced Urology
Specialists, Citrus Memo-
rial Health System, Genesis
Women's Center & Medical
Spa, Publix and media
sponsors Citrus County
Chronicle, Citrus 95 and
Classic Hits The Fox.
The Expo's purpose is to
educate women and those
around them about their
health, fitness and wellness.
Proceeds fund scholarships
for students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto
high schools and Withla-
coochee Technical Institute
for health care and business
careers.
For more information,
call the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce's
Crystal River office at 352-
795-3149.


Jim and Helen Gilbert of
Floral City celebrated
their 65th wedding an-
niversary Aug. 11, 2012.
Jim Gilbert and Helen
Crippen were married
Aug. 11, 1947, at St. Luke's
Lutheran Church in
Rochester, N.Y They have
two children, Jim Jr of Flo-


Lucille Agnes Neeld will
celebrate her 100th birth-
day with her family on Sat-
urday, Aug. 25, 2012. Born
in 1912, she's a Florida na-
tive and moved to Inglis in
1932.
She is the mother of five
sons, Herbert, Johnny,
Gilbert, Mitchell and
Michael (deceased) and
two stepsons, Bunny and
Lynnie (deceased). She has
three daughters, Euverla,
Carolyn and Magdalene.
She's grandmother to 27
grandchildren, great-
grandmother to 37 great-
grandchildren, and great-
great-grandmother of 10.
She has spent her life
busy with a family, being
very active in her church,
caring for her family, tak-
ing soups and custards to
the sick and shut-ins. She
always had her Bible with


Divorces 8/6/12 to 8/12/12
Larry Fox, Beverly Hills vs.
Sherri Fox, Hernando
Edmund P. Kuchling,
Inverness vs. Elvira I.
Kuchling, Inverness
Shawn C. Loreth, Hernando
vs. Michelle L. Loreth,
Hernando
Marlene Schick, Floral City
vs. Kevin R. Schick, Floral City
Otto R. Stayler Jr., Crystal
River vs. Teresa Stayler,
Beverly Hills
Daniel Womack, St.
Petersburg vs. Salina
Womack, Inverness

Marriages 8/6/12 to 8/12/12
Scott Jeffrey Butschke,
Beverly Hills/Deborah Kay
Houtz, Beverly Hills
Robert Owen Chamberlain,
Inverness/Malisa Elaine
Butler, Inverness
Joshua Brady Critchfield,
Greeley, Colo./Cynthia
Rivera, Greeley
Charles Albert Dougherty,
Dunnellon/Cosette Gizelle



SEND US YOUR
FAMILY NEWS
* To submit items for
the Sunday Together
news, email
community@
chronicleonline.com.
* For more information
about guidelines, call
Sarah Gatling, com-
munity editor, at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1197.


ral City and Linda of
Rochester, and two grand-
children and one great-
grandchild.
Helen is a retired school
bus driver in New York and
Florida, and Jim is a re-
tired operating engineer
The couple have lived in
Citrus County for 33 years.


her and stood behind her
husband, Louis, who
played a major role in
south Levy County.
She welcomes birthday
greetings to: Mrs. Lucille
Neeld, 19498 S.E. Ham-
mock Road, Inglis, FL
34449.


Donato Sabino, Dunnellon
Robert Edward Fiedler,
Dunnellon/Lillian Ann Calisanti
Pereyra, Ocala
Charles Ray Kemper II,
Crystal River/Bantawan
Kaewkanok, Cabin John, Md.
Tristan Ryan Morrison,
Hernando/Kori Lynn Blenco,
Hernando
Theodore Matthew
Rubel, Citrus Springs/
Denise Christina Forlaw,
Citrus Springs
Gerald Wayne Runnels,
Crystal River/Brenda Marline
Runnels, Crystal River
John Stephen Vankleeck,
Citrus Springs/Lois Jean
VanKleeck, Citrus Springs

Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public
record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts
Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-
6400 or visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us/.


65th ANNIVERSARY:

The Gilberts


Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Gilbert were married Aug.
16, 1947, in First Presbyte-
rian Church in Lincoln
Park, Mich.
They lived in Michigan
the next 40 years, while
raising three sons: Larry,
Gerald and Randy All
three sons served in the
military, as did their father
Two grandsons were in


the military; one is now on
active duty. The couple
have four grandsons and
one granddaughter, and
nine great-grandchildren.
They moved to Ho-
mosassa, then to Crystal
River, where they have
resided for 25 years and
are active members of the
Four Square Gospel
Church.


Shelley Marie Signs
and Jeffery Neal Bellcase
have announced their
engagement
Born in Norwalk, Ohio,
the bride-elect grew up in
Orlando and moved to Cit-
rus County in 1995. She met
her fiance at a barbecue in
the spring of 1995 and the
two became fast friends.
They officially started dat-
ing Dec 26, 1997.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Reggie and
Ruth Phillips of Norwalk,
Ohio. She graduated from
Oakridge High School, Or-
lando, in 1984 and San-
dusky Career Center,
School of Practical Nurs-
ing, in 2010. She will be en-
rolling at the College of
Central Florida in January
2013 to complete Bachelor
of Science-Health Admin-
istration degree. She is
presently a licensed practi-
cal nurse at a local resi-


dent-care facility.
The prospective groom is
the son of Bob and Barbara
Bellcase of Homosassa
Springs. He graduated
from Crystal River High
School in 1982, and later
from the U.S. Marine Corps
electronics school at
Twenty Nine Palms, Calif.
He was in the Marine
Corps from 1982 to 1988,
serving in Beirut, Korea
and Okinawa. He is now a
supervisor at Progress/
Duke Energy's Crystal
River nuclear plant.


=- Engagement

Maynard/Fester


a*a


i-


Theresa "Terri" May-
nard of Inverness and
Jason Fester of Andros
Town, Bahamas, will ex-
change nuptial vows at 7
p.m. March 3, 2013, at
Fresh Creek, Andros Town,
Bahamas.
The bride-elect has an
Associate of Science de-
gree and is a current stu-


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The prospective groom
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59th ANNIVERSARY

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65th ANNIVERSARY:

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50th ANNIVERSARY

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SPORTS


The Boston Red
Sox try to even things
up against the New
York Yankees./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Adult recreation/B2
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Tennis, basketball/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


AP Top 25 poll has USC at No. 1


FSUcomes in at

No. 7, UF near

bottom at No. 23

Associated Press
NEW YORK Southern Cali-
fornia is No. 1 in the AP Top 25,
tossing off the weight of NCAA
sanctions and returning to a fa-
miliar place in the rankings -
with a boost from LSU's problems.
USC earned the top spot in The
Associated Press' preseason col-
lege football poll for the seventh
time in school history and the first
time in five seasons, edging out
No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 LSU.


The Trojans, who were banned
from postseason play the past two
seasons, received 25 of a possible
60 first-place votes from a media
panel in a close vote. USC re-
ceived 1,445 points. Defending na-
tional champion Alabama had 17
first-place votes and
1,411 points while
LSU, the Crimson AP Top
Tide's SEC rival, got 16 U For the
first-place votes and list, see
1,402 points.
"We definitely didn't
come here to be underdogs," Tro-
jans safety TJ. McDonald said Sat-
urday "The ranking doesn't mean
we've done anything as a team.
But it's good to see we're back
where we're supposed to be."
Oklahoma was fourth with a sin-
gle first-place vote and Oregon


was fifth. Michigan, at No. 8, re-
ceived the only other first-place
vote.
The Tigers were poised to start
the season No. 1 before Heisman
Trophy finalist Tyrann Mathieu
got kicked off the team a week ago.
In light of that devel-
opment, the AP ex-
25 poll tended the voting
entire deadline. Before
Page B4. Mathieu was dis-
missed, reportedly for
failed drug tests, LSU
had received 28 of a possible 60
first-place votes. USC was a close
second with 22 first-place votes
and Alabama was third with nine.
The USA Today coaches' poll,
which was released Aug. 2, had

See Page B4


USC quarterback
Matt Barkley and
the Trojans are
ranked No. 1 in
the AP's Top 25
college football
poll released Sat-
urday. USC, com-
ing off a two-year
ban from post-
season play, is
slightly ahead of
No. 2 Alabama
and No. 3 LSU to
begin the season.
Florida State was
the top Florida
team at No. 7
while UF comes
in ranked No. 23.
Associated Press


behind the curtain


UFfootball

holds rare, open

practice forfans

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Two
weeks before the season
opener, No. 23 Florida held a
rare, open practice Saturday
in The Swamp.
The Gators better hope it's not
an indication of things to come.
About 1,000 fans showed up
for a two-hour session in full
pads that coach Will Muschamp
called a "little
sluggish."
Florida's of-
fense, led by
9 ii competing
quarterbacks
P Jacoby Bris-
S sett and Jeff
Driskel,
JeffDriskel mostly strug-
UF sophomore gled in 11-on-
QB competing 11 drills. In
for starter job. fairness, the
Gators were coming off a phys-
ical scrimmage the day before
and were fairly basic in hopes
of keeping coordinator Brent
Pease's revamped offense
under wraps. Florida opens
Sept. 1 against Bowling Green.
"Obviously with today's
technology, as we all see here,
anything you say, do, show, it's
there, it's out there and it's
going to be on the Internet five
minutes later," Muschamp
said. "We did discuss that
briefly as a staff (Friday). What
are we doing today? What do
we want to do? What do we
want to show? ...
"At the end of the day, they
got to know when you're going
to call it"
Nonetheless, Muschamp has
declined to show much during
his two seasons in Gainesville.
Saturday's practice was just
the third open to the public
and media.
Saying he wanted to take ad-
vantage of the team's one shot
at having the element of sur-


Associated Press
Florida coach Will Muschamp yells during practice Saturday at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville.
The Gators held a rare, open practice for fans.


prise, Muschamp closed every
practice last year. He has
opened things up some in Year
2, but the coach still plays in-
juries and depth charts rela-
tively close to the vest.
He has offered little insight
into the quarterback battle,
other than to insist that Florida
can win with either Brissett or
Driskel under center
Neither looked polished in
team drills Saturday
Muschamp said the coach-
ing staff would take an in-


depth look at the roster Sun-
day and put together a plan
outlining who will get more
repetitions in preparation for
the season.
"We got to start figuring out
where these reps are going and
that includes special teams, of-
fense and defense," Muschamp
said. "Right now, certainly it's
a critical time these past two
days for our players to take a
step forward."
That includes Brissett and
Driskel.


"Yeah, there is no question,"
Muschamp said. "We have to
start figuring that out as we
move forward. I think both
guys, looking at it right now,
are very even in what they
want to do."
Brissett completed 46.2 per-
cent of his passes for 206
yards, with two touchdowns
and four interceptions. Driskel
wasn't any better, completing
47.1 percent of his passes for
See Page B4


Surging


Sergio up


in N.C.

Garcia takes

1-stroke lead

at Wyndham

Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. No
lead is ever really safe at
birdie-friendly Sedgefield
Country Club. The last time
Sergio Garcia played here, he
learned that the hard way
Garcia shot a 4-under 66 on
Saturday to take the lead at
14-under 196 after three
rounds at the Wyndham
Championship.
It's a familiar spot for the
Spaniard, who shared the
third-round lead in 2009 but
wound up fin-
ishing fourth
after falling a
stroke shy of a
three-man
playoff.
"Eighteen
pars are not
going to win
it," Garcia Sergio
said. "You Garcia
have to make shot 66 at
some birdies Wyndham.
out there.... I don't have a
number I'm not going to say I
need to shoot 4 under, 5 under,
or whatever Someone might
go out and shoot 9 under, and
5 under's not good enough."
Tim Clark and Bud Cauley
were a stroke back, and Jason
Dufner, Harris English and
Carl Pettersson were at 12
under in the last event before
the FedEx Cup playoffs.
Dufner shot a 63 -the day's
best round. Cauley had a 66,
Clark shot a 67, and English
and Pettersson had 68s.
Garcia whose second-
round 63 marked his best PGA
Tour round in a decade -
made a move with consecu-
tive birdies midway through
the back nine that briefly
helped him leapfrog his play-
ing partner, Clark.
Garcia plopped his tee shot
4 feet from the flagstick on the
par-3 12th and tapped in, then


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CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS


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EEDWAY HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


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Volleyball league set for bumps, spikes


Men'sfootball,

b-ball leagues

upcoming

Special to the Chronicle
Beach volleyball is sched-
uled to start Tuesday, Aug.
28. This is a 4-on-4 league
for adults 18 and older The
league is semi-competitive
and plays at Bicentennial
Park.
All games will be played
at 6:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. and
8:45 p.m. on Tuesday nights.


The last chance to register
is Aug. 21.
For more information,
contact Parks and Recre-
ation Adult Program Spe-
cialist Corey Edwards at
352-586-3545.
Men's flag football
kicks off Sept. 13
Men's fall flag football is
scheduled to start Sep. 13.
This is a 7-on-7 league for
players who are 18 and older.
The league is designed to
bring friends together and re-
live the good old days on the
football field.
The league plays 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Thurs-


days at Homosassa Area
Recreational Park. The last
chance to get your $50 registra-
tion fee in is Sept. 3.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among every team. For more
information, contact Parks and
Recreation Adult Program
Specialist Corey Edwards
at 352-586-3545.
Men's hoops league
tips off Sept. 24
Men's basketball is back
again and hosted by Citrus
County Parks and Recreation.
The league is scheduled to


start on Sept. 24. This is a com-
petitive league designed to
bring the community together
on the court.
The league plays games at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30
p.m. on Mondays and Wednes-
days at local indoor facilities.
This is a 5-on-5 full-court
league.
The last chance to register
will be Sept. 12. Team fees are
based on the number of entries
per league and are divided up
equally among the teams.
For more information, con-
tact Parks and Recreation Adult
Program Specialist Corey Ed-
wards at 352-586-3545.


OpeUiai LU Lio t lleIlIIIIIC
A 4-on-4 beach volleyball league hosted by Citrus County
Parks and Recreation will begin Aug. 28 with three different
game times. For more information, call Corey Edwards at
352-586-3545.


Stingrays complete successful summer


Special to the Chronicle
The Inverness Swim
Team, the Stingrays, finished
up a great year of swimming
successes. The team com-
peted in several meets and
finished up with a record of
4 wins and 1 loss at the indi-
vidual meets and finished
second (a first in Stingray
history) at the Kingdom of
the Sun Championship meet

Members of the Stingrays
swim team threw coach Kurt
Lynn in the pool in celebra-
tion this summer.
Special to the Chronicle


in Ocala on July 28.
The team had great par-
ticipation throughout the
summer with over 75 youth
swimmers ranging in age
from 5 to 17 and adult swim-
mers who participate in
local triathlons, Masters
swimming and other sport-
ing events around the state.
Many individual records
were set in all the age
groups and all the kids im-
proved on their stroke tech-
niques and speed.
All of the children prac-
ticed and competed with
smiles on their faces
throughout the entire sum-


mer. The coaches at the
team did a fine job with the
children.
A special thanks goes out
the parents and volunteers
who helped at the meets and
practices and made this sum-
mer an exciting and positive
experience. Head coach
Kurt Lynn and assistant
coaches Donnie Lynn and
Sissy Ashley did a great job
leading and inspiring, taking
many children who barely
knew the water to a level of
competitive swimming with
a big smile on their faces and
an urge to continue in high
school competition.


Recreation BRIEFS


SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an of-
ficial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise program
designed exclusively for older
adults and is available at little or
no additional cost through
Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers
and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet
at the First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa on Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fri-
days. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates, and stability
and strength. To find out if you
are eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider.
For more information, call the
YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for a
community Divine Yoga class at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge
and is open to all ages and
physical abilities. Some of the
benefits of yoga are improved
balance, coordination, strength
and flexibility. Yoga is also help-
ful in counteracting stress and
anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA now
offers its Group Exercise pro-
gram at First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa, the Y's
westside venue for health and
wellness classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered.
For more information about
the YMCA Group Exercise pro-
gram, call the office at 352-637-
0132. Financial assistance is
available to all those who qualify.
The YMCA office is in Beverly
Hills at 3909 N. Lecanto High-
way, and is open noon to 5:30
p.m. Monday through Friday.


tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests that moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or


call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered at
Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired
dance-fitness class, is offered
at4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's
Club is offering Zumba classes
in air-conditioned comfort from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Everyone is welcome. For in-
formation, call 352-447-2057.
Yoga at canning center
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers yoga with
Laura Boetto from 10 and 11
a.m. Tuesday and Fridays at
the Canning Center in Lecanto.
Yoga improves flexibility and
balance, increases energy,
strengthens and tones muscles
and reduces stress.
Cost is $6 per class; $20
monthly. No pre-registration
required.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club
plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday
and Fridays and at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at Floral Park in
Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to
meet people in the community,
and get some light exercise.
We welcome all newcomers.
Yearly dues are $3 per person,
and there is no need to pur-
chase any equipment.
Call the vice president of the
Floral City Shuffleboard Club,
Dana Bause, at 352-726-0670.
Body sculpting,
Pilates class offered
Pure Elements Wellness,
1925 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal
River, offers a no-impact body
sculpting/Pilates class at 4:30
p.m. on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. This ongoing class uti-
lizes slow, graceful movements
to enhance muscle tone,
strength, balance and flexibility.
The cost is $7 per class. For


more information, call Linda
Bishop at 352-628-4254 or
email lab34448@yahoo.com.
Register now for
annual veterans tourney
The eighth annual Citrus
County Veterans Golf Tourna-
ment will be Sept. 8 at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club Course for the benefit of
the Citrus County Veterans
Foundation Inc.
The foundation is a non profit
entity that has provided more
than $100,000 in emergency fi-
nancial assistance to local needy,
honorably discharged veterans
and their surviving spouses since
its inception in 2004.
Check-in for the four-person
scramble will be at 7:30 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. Individuals and groups
short of four persons will be
combined to make four-person
teams. You do not need to be a
veteran to participate.
Registration form and dona-
tion of $55 per person must be
received no later than Aug. 28.
Each participant's donation in-
cludes golf and cart, beverages
on the course and lunch at the
country club. Prizes will be
given for first, second and last
places, closest to the pin, hole
in one (to include a car), plus
door prizes. Charitable tax-de-
ductible contributions for door
prizes and hole sponsorships
for $380, $300, $200 or $100
are available.
Participating golfers should
make a check or money order
payable to Citrus County Veter-
ans Foundation and send it with
their registration form to: Citrus
County Veterans Foundation,
Attn: Dan Birstler, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Key #13,
Lecanto, FL 34461-7718.
For more information or a
registration form, visit the Cit-
rus County Veterans Founda-
tion website at www.citrusvf.org
or call Dan Birstler at
352-601-8051.
Golf tourney needs
committee members
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization will have its 12th An-
nual Charity Golf Tournament on
Nov. 10 at Seven Springs Golf
and Country Club, New Port
Richey. Committee members
are needed to assist in the coor-


dination of the fundraising event.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization serves the central
Florida area, including Citrus,
Hernando, northern Hillsbor-
ough, Lake, Pasco, northern
Pinellas and Sumter counties.
The Florida Department of
Elder Affairs has determined
this region has more than
100,000 Alzheimer's disease
sufferers. By assisting the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, participants network with
local and regional professionals,
golfers and concerned mem-
bers of the community helping
those afflicted with Alzheimer's
disease and their families.
For more information, call
727-848-8888, or toll free at
888-496-8004.
Day at the Swamp
Celebration
All Gator fans are invited to
join the Citrus County Gator
Club at the 2012 Day at the
Swamp Celebration from 6 to 9
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at the
Citrus County Fairgrounds in
Inverness.
Come join fellow Gators for
an evening of fun, food and
beverages, games, raffles, a
silent auction and giveaways.
Former Gator Football player
Travis McGriff will be the spe-
cial guest speaker.
Tickets are $10 for alumni
club members; $15 or two for
$25 for non-alumni club mem-
bers, or $15 at the door, if avail-
able. Kids younger than 5 will
be admitted free. Tickets may
be purchased from any club of-
ficer or at Fancy's Pets in Crys-
tal River or Brannen Banks in
Inverness.
Citrus County Gator Club is a
nonprofit organization affiliated
with the University of Florida,
raising scholarship funds for Cit-
rus County students. For more
information, call 352-634-0867.
Also look for the Citrus County
Gator Club page on Facebook
or visit on the Web at http://
citruscounty.gatorclub.com.
Coed kickball
held at park
If you ever thought of joining
the thrilling world of kickball,
well here's your chance. The
next season of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's coed kick-
ball league is coming up.


Kickball is an exciting game
that can be played by people of
all ages. It's a great way to
meet new people and get a little
exercise while having fun. You
must be 18 years old to partici-
pate. Game times will be at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. on
Wednesday. Games will last
one hour or nine innings,
whichever occurs first. All
games are held at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River.
If you have a business,
group of friends, or maybe a
close neighborhood this is a
great way to build some team-
work and have some fun bond-
ing time. For more information,
call Andy Smith, Parks &
Recreation supervisor, at
352-400-0960.
Come play disc
golf at park
Whispering Pines Park in In-
verness, the city of Inverness and
Citrus Disc Golf Club will host
Community Disc Golf day from 9
a.m. to4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19,
at the park, 1700 Forest Drive.
The event is for all disc golf
novices who have never entered
a disc golf competition. Start
times, number of holes played
and divisions will be as flexible
as possible to encourage maxi-
mum participation. Loaner discs
will be available and certificates
will be awarded as prizes.
Learn to play disc golf with
the members of the Citrus Disc
Golf Club. If you have never
played disc golf, this is your op-
portunity to learn the game. It is
played with flying discs similar
to a Frisbee, but with differing
aerodynamics. Bottled water
will be provided or you may
bring your own.
Participants are encouraged
to bring a nonperishable food
item to be donated to CUB
(Citrus United Basket).
The course at Whispering
Pines Park is free to play and
you can borrow discs for your
playing pleasure when the park
is open. Discs may be checked
out at the pool during open
swim hours or at the adminis-
tration office at Whispering
Pines. Hole No. 1 is just behind
the pool. Maps and score
sheets are also available.
For more information, call
Bob Theis at 352-895-6097, or
email rollertheis@yahoo.com.


YMCA is Park offers


Pe Z s ATGl





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Allgaier nips Villeneuve to win at Montreal


Driver stuns

crowd at

Nationwide

Associated Press

MONTREAL Jacques
Villeneuve was in the dri-
ver's seat heading to the
white flag, more than 20 car
lengths ahead and his first
victory in NASCAR just a
lap away on the track
named for his dad.
Then, in the blink of an
eye, Justin Allgaier bumped
past him for the victory Sat-
urday in a Nationwide race
as a stunned crowd at Cir-
cuit Gilles Villeneuve re-
coiled in disbelief.
"It's tough when you have
a driver who has his last
name on the race track,"
Allgaier said after his sec-
ond victory of the season
and third of his career. "Ob-


viously, this is a big race for
him and a big venue."
Having maintained the
top spot through restart
after restart in the final laps
of a race that went six extra
circuits around the 14-turn,
2.7-mile layout, Villeneuve
was running low on fuel and
kept turning off the engine
of his No. 22 Dodge to
conserve.
What seemed like an in-
surmountable lead van-
ished on the last lap.
Allgaier closed in a hurry as
Villeneuve suddenly slowed
and was hit from behind.
"I don't know if he went
into protect mode," Allgaier
said. "We knew he was
going to be close on gas. My
first thought was he was
out. I had too much steam
running my normal pace,
and we got together. I'm
sure he's not happy about
that, but I know that the 30
(polesitter Alex Tagliani)
got taken out by that car. I
guess at the end of the day


Associated Press
Justin AlIgaier leads Jacques Villeneuve through the Senna
corner on his way to winning the Nationwide Series auto
race Saturday at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal.


what goes around comes
around."
Villeneuve should know.
He took out Danica Patrick
at Road America on the
final lap in June, depriving
her of a top-five finish, and
bumped Tagliani, a Mon-
treal native, out of the lead
late in Saturday's race.
Tagliani finished 22nd.


"We got together," Vil-
leneuve said. "He was really
slow and just blocking, brak-
ing on the inside and the
guys behind me were catch-
ing me. We tangled a little
bit and I thought it would be
all right. I didn't get off the
gas because I didn't want
the cars behind me to catch
me, and I ended up turning


him around.
"That's a shame for him.
That wasn't my intention,
but at that point I couldn't
just stay behind him."
Villeneuve, who started
third, survived three late
restarts in a wild race that
saw Patrick lead 20 laps.
"We were the quickest car
out there," said Villeneuve,
who led 43 laps. "When you
run in the front all day and
get taken out on the last lap,
it's just frustrating. I guess
that's life. When it's a mis-
take, you let it go, but when it
seems to be done on pur-
pose, that gets a little bit
annoying."
Sam Hornish Jr finished
second and Villeneuve was
third, giving Dodge two in
the top three. Elliott Sadler
and Ron Fellows rounded
out the top five. Hornish's
finish put him in a tie for
second in Nationwide
points with Ricky Sten-
house Jr, who was strong
with the laps winding down


but spun out challenging for
the lead and finished 12th.
Kyle Busch, who flew in
from the Cup race in Michi-
gan to drive his No. 54 Toy-
ota, arrived about 2 hours
before the green flag,
started at the back of the
field because of a driver
change Owen Kelly qual-
ified fifth for Busch on Fri-
day and finished 10th
after briefly challenging Vil-
leneuve for the lead with 20
laps left.
Patrick also ran second to
Villeneuve for another 12
laps before she suffered a
broken rear axle after her
No. 7 Chevy hit a shoe
thrown on the track while
she was tracking Villeneuve
in her rearview mirror She
finished 27th.
"How disappointing!
What can I say?" Patrick
said. "We've got to get some
luck sometime. At the end of
the day, I just can't believe
how unlucky we've been. It's
got to come."


Play it again, guys




Djokovic, .
Federer reach i._ I m.*-


Cincyfinals

Associated Press

MASON, Ohio No
medal involved this time.
Little drama, either. Novak
Djokovic simply ground his
way to another title shot.
And Roger Federer will
be waiting for him.
Djokovic reached the fi-
nals of the Western & South-
ern Open for the second
straight year Saturday, beat-
ing Juan Martin del Potro 6-
3, 6-2 in a reprise of their
meeting in the Olympics.
Del Potro defeated Djokovic
for the bronze medal on
Wimbledon's lush grass two
weeks ago.
The sequel on a hard
court? Not even close.
The final will match the
world's top two players, the
first time that's happened in
Cincinnati. If Federer wins,
it'll give him a record five ti-
tles in the tournament.
"It's a nice bonus, really,"
Federer said. "When I was a
kid I wasn't thinking of win-
ning five Cincinnatis, but
then again here I am in this
great situation being able to
do it, the first man ever. So
I'm obviously excited. Very
often when I do now reach a
finals there is something on
the line. Here we go there


I :.
Associated Press
Roger Federer hits a return against Stanislas Wawrinka during a semifinals match Saturday at
the Western & Southern Open tennis tournament in Mason, Ohio. Federer won 7-6 (4), 6-3.


is something there."
Top-ranked Federer beat
Swiss countryman Stanislas
Wawrinka 7-6 (4), 6-3 in the
other semifinal. It'll be the
seventh time that Federer
and Djokovic have played
for a tournament title, the
last time in 2011 at Dubai.
Federer beat Djokovic for
the Cincinnati title in 2009.
Federer leads the career
series 15-12, but it's taken a
few interesting turns lately
Djokovic beat him in the
semifinals at the U.S. Open


last year, then again in the
semis at Rome and the
French Open. Federer got
the upper hand again in the
semifinals at Wimbledon.
Venus Williams hurts
back, loses to Li
MASON, Ohio -Venus
Williams' reinvigorating week
ended with a gritty comeback
that wasn't quite enough.
Williams played through a
bad back that forced her to get
treatment and reduced her sec-
ond serve to 63 mph in the third


LeBron just getting started


Teammate

Wade says sky

is the limit

Associated Press

MIAMI BEACH -All Le-
Bron James has done so far
this year is win the NBA's
MVP award for the third
time, an NBA Finals MVP
trophy to go along with that
one, his elusive first cham-
pionship and a second
Olympic gold medal.
Dwyane Wade thinks his
Miami Heat teammate is
just getting started.
With the start of Heat
training camp now just six
weeks away, Wade said on
Friday that he expects
James to be even better this
coming season now that the
will-he-ever-win-a-
championship question has
been forever put to rest.
"That monkey is off his
back and now he's just play-
ing basketball," Wade said
while taking a break from
his annual fantasy camp,
where fans pay up to $12,500
to get a four-day luxury taste
of NBA life. "I think we'll
see a better LeBron James
- scary to say, three-time
MVP than we've seen.
And it's because all he has
to do is play basketball now.
He doesn't have to worry
about what he hasn't done.
It'll always be something,
but he's got the biggest one
off his back"
Wade was a James fan
instead of a James team-
mate this summer, when


I I- m
Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade said teammate LeBron
James made playing in the Olympics look effortless.


the U.S. men's basketball
team won its second
straight Olympic gold.
Wade could not play while
recovering from knee sur-
gery but was in London for
part of the Olympic tourna-
ment, and he said James
made playing at a high
level such as a triple-
double against Australia in
the quarterfinal round -
seem "effortless."


It's been that way for a
while, too.
Going back to Miami's
win-or-go-home Game 6 in
Boston of the Eastern Con-
ference finals, James has
played in 20 games with the
Heat and for USA Basket-
ball. In those, his teams are
19-1, with the lone loss
being Game 1 of the NBA
Finals against Oklahoma
City.


set. China's Li Na reached the
finals of the Western & South-
ern Open with a 7-5, 3-6, 6-1
victory on Saturday night.
Li is trying for her first title
this season. She lost in finals
at Sydney, Rome and Mon-
treal, where Petra Kvitova beat
her for the Rogers Cup title a
week ago.
Kvitova played Angelique
Kerber in the other semifinal on
Saturday. Kerber ended Serena
Williams' 19-match winning
streak a day earlier.


Ibaka signs

$48 million

extension

Forward will

stay with

Oklahoma City

Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -
NBA blocks leader Serge
Ibaka has agreed to a con-
tract extension with the
Oklahoma City Thunder,
bringing back another key
contributor to a team that
made the finals last season.
General manager Sam
Presti an-
nounced
Saturday
that Ibaka
had agreed
to a multi-
year exten-
sion but did
not provide
details, cit- Serge
Ibaka
ingteampol- f d
icy Yahoo! forward will
icy Yahoo!
icy Yahoo! stay in OKC.
Sports first
reported he deal is for four
years and $48 million.
Ibaka's signing could piv-
otal in the future of the fran-
chise, which already has
All-Stars Kevin Durant and
Russell Westbrook locked into
expensive, long-term con-
tracts. This summer is the first
time Ibaka and Sixth Man of
the Year James Harden are
eligible for extensions to their
rookie contracts, and the
small-market team could be
in a crunch to bring both back
beyond next season.


0819 SUCRN
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID

OWNER: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
123 NORTH WEST HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428

Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of:

CULVERT REPLACEMENT at the Intersections of
NE 6th Ave. & Crystal St.,
NE 7th Ave. & Crystal St.,
NE 6th St. & NE 7th Ave.,
NE 11th St. & NE 7th Ave.,
NE 9th Ave. & NE 2nd St.

BID NO. 12-B-14

BIDS will be received until 10:30 AM, Thursday,
September 13, 2012 opened and read aloud at 10:35 AM
at the Crystal River City Hall, 123 North West Highway 19,
Crystal River Florida 34428.

WORK shall consist of the following items:

Perform all work and furnish all necessary labor, equipment,
material and transportation for the construction of the
CULVERT REPLACEMENT Project located at
Intersections of

NE 6th Ave. & Crystal St., NE 7th Ave. &
Crystal St., NE 6th St. & NE 7th Ave.,
NE 11th St. & NE 7th Ave., NE 9th Ave. &
NE 2nd St.

The work generally includes, but is not limited to, clearing
and grubbing, excavation; removal and replacement of
stormwater culverts of varying size; pavement and driveway
restoration; installation of sod; protection of existing
structures, landscaping, trees and utilities; erosion control;
and maintenance of traffic. All Work is to be performed per
the current edition of the Florida Department of
Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge
Construction, supplements thereto, when not specifically
stated in the Special Provisions section of this bid package,
or shown on the plans.

ALL BIDDERS must be qualified for the type of work for
which the BID is submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an
opaque envelope and marked:

"BID FOR Culvert Replacement" BID NO. 12-B-14, AND
THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS.

BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:

CITY CLERK'S OFFICE
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
123 NORTH WEST HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428

The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, consisting of
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS, INFORMATION FOR
BIDDERS, BID, AGREEMENT, GENERAL CONDITIONS,
SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL CONDITIONS (if applicable),
NOTICE OF AWARD, NOTICE TO PROCEED, CHANGE
ORDER, PROJECT PLANS, SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND
ADDENDA, MAY BE EXAMINED AT THE FOLLOWING
LOCATIONS AT NO CHARGE:

CRYSTAL RIVER CITY HALL, PUBLIC WORKS
DEPARTMENT, 123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER,
FLORIDA, 34428 CONTACT THERESA KRIM 352-796-
4216, EXT. 314 OR LOU KNEIP EXT. 305

Hard copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be
purchased at the office of:

BURRELL ENGINEERING, INC.
12005 N. FLORIDAAVENUE
DUNNELLON, FL 34434


Payment for hard copy plans
non-refundable fee of $50.00


& specifications is a


EMAIL REQUEST TO:

troyburrell@bellsouth.net

Or Call:
Troy Burrell, P.E.
352-489-4144

Plans and specifications may also be viewed or
downloaded at no charge on the City website;
www.crystalriverfl.org Bidders using the website are
advised to check it regularly and prior to submitting
bids for any addendums or updates that may be issued.

No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days
after closing time scheduled for receipt of BIDS.

A Bid Bond will be required for this Project. The bid bond
shall be in the amount of 5% of the bid amount.

The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all
BIDS for any reason whatsoever and waive all
informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID RESPONSE THAT IN ITS
SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS
NEEDS.
000CE1X


SPORTS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012



AP Top 25
college football poll
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
preseason college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, final 2011 records, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote, and
2011 final ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Southern Cal (25) 10-2 1,445 6
2. Alabama (17) 12-1 1,411 1
3.LSU (16) 13-1 1,402 2
4. Oklahoma (1) 10-3 1,286 16
5. Oregon 12-2 1,274 4
6. Georgia 10-4 1,107 19
7. Florida St. 9-4 1,093 23
8. Michigan (1) 11-2 1,000 12
9. South Carolina 11-2 994 9
10.Arkansas 11-2 963 5
11.West Virginia 10-3 856 17
12. Wisconsin 11-3 838 10
13. Michigan St. 11-3 742 11
14. Clemson 10-4 615 22
15.Texas 8-5 569 NR
16.VirginiaTech 11-3 548 21
17. Nebraska 9-4 485 24
18. Ohio St. 6-7 474 NR
19. Oklahoma St. 12-1 430 3
20.TCU 11-2 397 14
21.Stanford 11-2 383 7
22. Kansas St. 10-3 300 15
23. Florida 7-6 214 NR
24. Boise St. 12-1 212 8
25. Louisville 7-6 105 NR
Others receiving votes: Notre Dame 83, Wash-
ington 55, Auburn 53, North Carolina 32, Utah
30, Georgia Tech 25, BYU 22, Tennessee 15,
South Florida 11, Baylor 9, Texas A&M 5, UCF
4, Cincinnati 3, Missouri 3, N.C. State 3, Houston
1, Louisiana Tech 1, Mississippi St. 1, N. Illinois 1.



PGA Tour
Wyndham Champ.
Saturday
At Sedgefield Country Club,
Greensboro, N.C.
Yardage: 7,117, Par: 70
Third Round
Sergio Garcia 67-63-66-196 -14
Bud Cauley 66-65-66--197 -13
Tim Clark 63-67-67-197 -13
Jason Dufner 68-67-63--198 -12
Harris English 66-64-68--198 -12
Carl Pettersson 62-68-68 -198 -12
Davis Lovelll 67-66-66 -199 -11
Matt Every 65-66-68--199 -11
JimmyWalker 66-62-71--199 -11
Justin Leonard 68-68-64 -200 -10
Will Claxton 69-66-65-200 -10
Richard H. Lee 66-69-65-200 -10
Chad Campbell 71-64-65--200 -10
Bill Haas 68-65-67--200 -10
Troy Matteson 64-68-68-200 -10
Webb Simpson 66-63-71 -200 -10
Bobby Gates 69-67-65--201 -9
Charl Schwartzel 67-68-66--201 -9
Scott Stallings 64-70-67-201 -9
Tommy Gainey 66-67-68--201 -9
Nicolas Colsaerts 67-65-69-201 -9
Billy Horschel 69-67-66--202 -8
Heath Slocum 68-67-67-202 -8
John Merrick 66-69-67--202 -8
Brandt Snedeker 67-67-68-202 -8
Kevin Streelman 68-66-68--202 -8
Brendon de Jonge 68-68-67--203 -7
D.A. Points 68-68-67--203 -7
Graham DeLaet 69-67-67-203 -7
Rocco Mediate 70-65-68--203 -7
Trevor Immelman 67-68-68--203 -7
John Huh 69-65-69--203 -7
Angel Cabrera 67-71-66-204 -6
Patrick Cantlay 70-68-66-204 -6
Gary Christian 67-70-67--204 -6
Tim Herron 76-61-67--204 -6
Dicky Pride 69-68-67-204 -6
Kyle Thompson 69-67-68 -204 -6
Chris Kirk 66-69-69--204 -6
Rod Pampling 68-66-70-204 -6
Kyle Reifers 67-72-66 -205 -5
Blake Adams 67-71-67-205 -5
JeffOverton 69-69-67-205 -5
Russell Knox 68-68-69--205 -5
YE. Yang 67-69-69--205 -5
Alexandre Rocha 68-68-69-205 -5
NickWatney 66-69-70--205 -5
Jamie Donaldson 68-66-71 -205 -5
Nick O'Hern 68-71-67-206 -4
Jonas Blixt 72-67-67-206 -4
Scott Dunlap 70-69-67-206 -4
Kevin Stadler 73-65-68--206 -4
Ryan Moore 71-68-68--207 -3
Stuart Appleby 67-71-69-207 -3
Ryujilmada 67-70-70-207 -3
JoshTeater 67-71-69-207 -3
Derek Lamely 69-68-70--207 -3
Charles Howell III 67-69-71 -207 -3
Chez Reavie 67-69-71 --207 -3
David Mathis 63-71-73-207 -3
Troy Kelly 71-68-69-208 -2
Cameron Beckman 73-66-69--208 -2
Jerry Kelly 72-67-69 -208 -2
Brendan Steele 72-65-71 -208 -2
Kevin Kisner 68-71-70-209 -1
Ben Kohles 72-67-70--209 -1
CharlieWi 72-67-70--209 -1
CamiloVillegas 72-67-70--209 -1
Chris Stroud 68-70-72 -210 E
Arjun Atwal 66-69-75 210 E
Tom Pernice Jr. 70-68-74--212 +2
Jason Kokrak 66-69-77-212 +2
Jeff Maggert 68-71-74 -213 +3
Billy Mayfair 69-70-74--213 +3
PaulCasey 68-70-77--215 +5
Champions Tour
Dick's Sporting
Goods Open
Saturday
At En-Joie Golf Course, Endicott, N.Y.
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 6,974, Par: 72
Second Round
John Huston 65-67-132 -12
Brad Faxon 67-66 -133 -11
Willie Wood 67-68-135 -9
Peter Senior 68-67--135 -9
Fred Funk 67-69-136 -8
Dick Mast 69-67- 136 -8
BillGlasson 68-69-137 -7
Tom Lehman 69-68--137 -7
Mark McNulty 67-70--137 -7
Michael Allen 66-71 -137 -7
Mark O'Meara 68-69--137 -7
Kenny Perry 65-72 -137 -7
Steve Lowery 70-68 -138 -6
Bernhard Langer 65-73-138 -6
Mark Calcavecchia 70-68--138 -6
Roger Chapman 71-67-138 -6
John Cook 66-72-138 -6
JoeySindelar 67-71 -138 -6
Joel Edwards 69-70-139 -5
Loren Roberts 69-70-139 -5
Brad Bryant 72-67--139 -5
Tommy Armour III 68-71 -139 -5
Tom Jenkins 71-68--139 -5


Jay Don Blake 69-70-139 -5
Jeff Sluman 68-72-140 -4
MarkWiebe 68-72-140 -4
Chien Soon Lu 69-71 -140 -4
Andrew Magee 70-70 -140 -4
MikeGoodes 71-69-140 -4
Jay Haas 70-70-140 -4
Steve Jones 70-71 -141 -3
Lonnie Nielsen 70-71 -141 -3
Jeff Hart 75-66-141 -3
Mike Reid 74-67-141 -3
Corey Pavin 70-71 -141 -3
Tom Watson 70-72 -142 -2
Bob Gilder 71-71 -142 -2
Dan Forsman 73-69-142 -2
Wayne Levi 70-72-142 -2
Gil Morgan 73-69-142 -2
Hal Sutton 73-69- 142 -2
KirkTriplett 71-72-143 -1
David Frost 70-73 -143 -1
Joe Daley 69-74-143 -1
Chip Beck 71-73-144 E
PH. Horgan Ill 71-73-144 E
Steve Pate 71-73-144 E
Fuzzy Zoeller 69-75-144 E
Sandy Lyle 72-72 -144 E


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr thLe record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
.. CASH 3 (early)
.. .. 8-0-8
CASH 3 (late)
7-7-8
PLAY 4 (early)
0-1-8-4
PLAY 4 (late)
6-0-5-9
LOTTERY
4-26-39-42-45-47
XTRA
FWlIda Lottry s

POWERBALL Fantasy 5 numbers were
14 26 41 55 59 unavailable at press time.
POWER BALL Please see Monday's paper.




On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Pure Michigan 400 race
2 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series at Road America
(Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Nationals (Same-day
Tape)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Pure Michigan 400 race
(Same-day Tape)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
2 p.m. (ABC) Petaluma (Calif.) vs. Goodlettsville (Tenn.)
5 p.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Chinese Taipei vs. Japan
MLB
1 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati Reds
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at Atlanta Braves
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Colorado Rockies
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels of
Anaheim
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees
FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (NBC) Indianapolis Colts at Pittsburgh Steelers
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Dolphins at Carolina Panthers
(Taped)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Wyndham Championship -
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Wyndham Championship Final
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Dick's Sporting Goods
Open Final Round (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Amateur final
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Safeway Classic Final
Round
RODEO
6:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR Hobbs (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) Toluca vs. Pachuca
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Philadelphia Union at D.C. United
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (CBS) ATP U.S. Open Series: Western &
Southern Open Men's Final
4 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: Western &
Southern Open Women's Final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Rod Spittle
Robin Byrd
Bob Tway
Tom Kite
Mark Brooks
David Eger
Hale Irwin
D.A. Weibring
Tom Purtzer
Andy Bean
Allen Doyle
Jim Rutledge
Peter Jacobsen
Bruce Fleisher
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
Scott Simpson
Bobby Clampett
Craig Stadler
Vicente Fernandez
Olin Browne
Fulton Allem
David Peoples
Ted Schulz
Bobby Wadkins
Gary Hallberg
Jeff Freeman
Ken Green
Graham Marsh
Mike McCullough
Jay Sigel


-144 E
-144 E
-145 +1
-145 +1
145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-148 +4
-148 +4
-148 +4
-149 +5
149 +5
-150 +6
-150 +6
-152 +8
-153 +9
-154 +10
-154 +10
-157 +13
-157 +13


Nationwide Series
NAPA Auto Parts 200
Results
Saturday
At Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
Montreal, Canada
Lap length: 2.709 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (15) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 81 laps, 103
rating, 47 points, $94,318.
2. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 81, 122.6, 43,
$60,193.
3. (3) Jacques Villeneuve, Dodge, 81,143.8,43,
$47,893.
4. (17) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 81, 92.7, 41,
$43,093.
5. (8) Ron Fellows, Chevrolet, 81, 99.3, 39,
$32,875.
6. (6) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 81, 104.3, 0,
$34,118.
7. (22) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 81, 77.6, 37,
$31,893.
8. (9) Billy Johnson, Ford, 81, 116.1, 36,
$24,200.
9. (19) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 81, 79, 35,
$31,368.
10. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 81,97.5, 0, $24,050.
11. (11) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 81,
102.6, 0, $28,818.
12. (16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 81, 90.5, 32,
$29,543.
13. (23) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 81, 75, 31,
$28,218.
14. (32) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 81, 67.9, 30,
$28,068.
15. (20) Alex Kennedy, Toyota, 81, 81.7, 29,
$28,918.
16. (34) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 81, 52.7, 28,
$21,350.
17. (36) Tim Andrews, Ford, 81, 50.1, 27,
$21,225.
18. (42) Derek White, Chevrolet, 81, 48, 26,
$21,075.
19. (41) Eric McClure, Toyota, 81, 44.4, 25,


$27,418.
20. (21) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 81, 75, 24,
$27,968.
21. (27) Kyle Kelley, Chevrolet, 81, 74.6, 23,
$20,975.
22. (1) Alex Tagliani, Chevrolet, 81, 103.4, 23,
$30,593.
23. (31) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, 81, 53.5, 21,
$27,143.
24. (10) Brian Scott, Toyota, 81, 86.6, 20,
$27,068.
25. (26) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 81, 71.2,
19, $27,468.
26. (18) Jason Bowles, Toyota, brakes, 77, 68.6,
18, $26,948.
27. (4) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 75, 101.1, 18,
$31,693.
28. (33) Michael Annett, Ford, 73, 56.6, 16,
$26,848.
29. (13) Patrick Carpentier, Toyota, 69, 51, 15,
$26,813.
30. (39) Joe Nemechek, Dodge, radiator, 62,
49.1, 14, $27,078.
31. (37) John Young, Dodge, drive train, 59,
57.6, 13, $20,250.
32. (12) Andrew Ranger, Dodge, suspension,
57, 68.6, 12, $20,215.
33. (7) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, engine, 54, 72, 11,
$26,653.
34. (28) Kenny Habul, Toyota, accident, 46,
50.2, 10, $20,150.
35. (38) Dexter Stacey Chevrolet, accident, 30,
35.6, 9, $20,110.
36. (29) Timmy Hill, Ford, transmission, 21,
41.9, 8, $26,543.
37. (14) Eric Curran, Dodge, transmission, 15,
41.7, 7, $20,025.
38. (35) Louis-Philippe Dumoulin, Ford, sus-
pension, 14, 37, 6, $19,981.
39. (24) Chris Cook, Chevrolet, brakes, 6, 36.2,
0, $19,845.
40. (43) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, over-
heating, 6, 31.9, 4, $19,710.
41. (30) Blake Koch, Chevrolet, brakes, 5, 33,
3, $19,625.
42. (40) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, brakes, 4,
31.9, 2, $19,570.
43. (25) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 2, 29.3,
1, $19,392.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 70.043 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 7 minutes, 58 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.353 seconds.
Caution Flags: 8 for 22 laps.
Lead Changes: 12 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Tagliani 1-2; S.Hornish Jr. 3;
A.Tagliani 4-5; S.Hornish Jr 6-7; J.Villeneuve 8-
19; S.Hornish Jr. 20; D.Patrick 21-40; J.Vil-
leneuve 41-45; E.Sadler 46-51; J.Villeneuve
52-63; A.Tagliani 64-66; J.Villeneuve 67-80;
J.Allgaier 81.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Villeneuve, 4 times for 43 laps; D.Patrick,
1 time for 20 laps; A.Tagliani, 3 times for 7 laps;
E.Sadler, 1 time for 6 laps; S.Hornish Jr., 3
times for 4 laps; J.Allgaier, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 824; 2. R.Sten-
house Jr., 802; 3. S.Hornish Jr., 802; 4. A.Dil-
Ion, 789; 5. J.Allgaier, 756; 6. M.Annett, 690; 7.
C.Whitt, 633; 8. M.Bliss, 609; 9. B.Scott, 540; 10.
J.Nemechek, 506.
Sprint Cup
Pure Michigan
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Michigan International Speedway


Brooklyn, Mich.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 199.706.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 198.626.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 198.44.
4. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 198.183.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 197.878.
6. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 197.78.
7. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 197.65.
8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 197.493.
9. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 197.433.
10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 197.163.
11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 197.114.
12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 197.012.
13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 196.893.
14. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 196.877.
15. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 196.732.
16. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 196.501.
17. (22) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 196.249.
18. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 196.217.
19. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 196.18.
20. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 196.052.
21. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.956.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.822.
23. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.299.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 193.268.
25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 193.138.
26. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 192.988.
27. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 192.709.
28. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.596.
29. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.56.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 192.539.
31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 192.359.
32. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 192.282.
33. (19) Jason Leffler, Ford, 192.205.
34. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.179.
35. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 192.118.
36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 191.79.
37. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.724.
38. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 189.944.
39. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 189.036.
40. (32) TJ. Bell, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (98) Mike Skinner, Ford, 189.939.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 189.444.
45. (37) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, 188.157.



Reds 5, Cubs 3,
first game
Chicago Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJessrf 3 10 0 Cozartss 4 01 0
Vitters3b 4 0 0 0 Heiseycf 3 0 1 0
Rizzo b 4 00 0 Stubbscf 0 0 0 0
ASorinlf 4 22 2 BPhllps2b 4 0 0 0
SCastro ss 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 1 1 0
WCastll c 4 0 2 1 Frazier3b 3 2 2 2
TWoodpr 0 00 0 Paul If 31 2
BJcksncf 3 00 0 Cairo b 3 11 1
Matherph 1 00 0 Hanignc 3 0 1 0
Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 Cueto p 3 0 0 0
Smrdzjp 2 00 0 Ludwckph 1 0 0
Beliveap 0 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Corpas p 0 000
Valuenph 1 0 0 0
AlCarrp 0 0 00
Totals 32 35 3 Totals 31 5 8 5
Chicago 200 000 001 3
Cincinnati 020 200 01x 5
E-Samardzija (1). LOB-Chicago 4, Cincinnati
7. 2B-Cozart (30). 3B-Bruce (2). HR-A.So-
riano (22), Frazier (17), Paul (1), Cairo (1). SF-
Frazier.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Samardzija L,8-11 5 6 4 4 0 5
Beliveau 1 0 0 0 2 0
Corpas 1 0 0 0 0 2
AI.Cabrera 1 2 1 1 1 0
Cincinnati
CuetoW,16-6 8 3 2 2 0 8
ChapmanS,29-33 1 2 1 1 1 2
Cubs 9, Reds 7,
second game
Chicago Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Valuen 3b 4 1 2 1 Stubbs cf 5 0 1 0
Matherlf 5 1 1 0 Valdezss 5 1 0 0
Rizzo b 5 2 1 1 BPhllps2b 5 1 2 0
SCastro ss 5 1 3 2 Ludwcklf 4 3 2 3
LaHairrf 3 1 1 2 Frazier 1b 5 01 1
Russellp 0 00 0 Brucerf 4 22 0
Camp p 0 00 0 Rolen 3b 3 01 1
Marmlp 0 00 0 Mesorcc 4 00 0
Clevngrc 4 00 0 Rdmndp 1 00 0
BJcksncf 5 1 1 1 Simonp 0 00 0
Cardns2b 4 1 2 1 Heiseyph 1 0 1 1
Barney 2b 1 00 0 LeCure p 0 00 0
Raleyp 4 01 0 Paulph 1 00 0
Corpasp 0 00 0 Marshllp 0 00 0
DeJessrf 1 1 1 1 Cairoph 1 0 1 1
Ondrskp 0 00 0
Totals 41 9139 Totals 39711 7
Chicago 010 313 001 9
Cincinnati 010 012 210 7
E-Valbuena (6), Redmond (1), Frazier (6).
DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-Chicago 10, Cincinnati
7. 2B-Valbuena (14), S.Castro (17), Cardenas
(6), B.Phillips (24), Rolen (12). 3B-S.Castro (9),
Cairo (2). HR-B.Jackson (1), DeJesus (5), Lud-
wick 2 (25). SB-S.Castro (20), LaHair 2 (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
RaleyW,1-2 51-35 4 3 2 4
Corpas 12-33 2 2 0 1
Russell 0 1 1 1 0 0
CampH,13 1 1 0 0 0 1
MarmolS,15-17 1 1 0 0 0 2
Cincinnati
Redmond L,0-1 31-37 4 4 5 2
Simon 12-32 1 1 0 2
LeCure 1 3 3 1 0 3
Marshall 2 0 0 0 0 4
Ondrusek 1 1 1 1 0 0
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE


Trout LAA
MiCabrera Det
Mauer Min
Revere Min
Jeter NYY
Ortiz Bos
Konerko CWS
Fielder Det
AEscobar KC
AJackson Det


G AB
97 392
120 473
109 404
82 345
118 504
89 320
103 385
120 436
116 444
98 386
Home Runs


ADunn, Chicago, 35; Hamilton, Texas, 34;
Granderson, New York, 32; MiCabrera, Detroit,
31; Encarnacion, Toronto, 31; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 31; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 29.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 104; Hamilton, Texas, 101;
Willingham, Minnesota, 89; Fielder, Detroit, 88; Ad-
Gonzalez, Boston, 84; ADunn, Chicago, 83; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 82; Pujols, Los Angeles, 82.
Pitching
Price, Tampa Bay 16-4; Weaver, Los Ange-
les, 15-3; Sale, Chicago, 14-4; MHarrison,
Texas, 13-7; Vargas, Seattle, 13-8; Sabathia,
New York, 12-3; Scherzer, Detroit, 12-6.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
McCutchenPit 116 433 85 154 .356
MeCabreraSF 113 459 84 159 .346
PoseySF 108 383 53 126 .329
CGonzalezCol 108 428 78 137 .320
DWright NYM 116 429 73 137 .319
YMolinaStL 102 379 47 120 .317
AltuveHou 112 448 68 137 .306
HollidayStL 117 448 75 137 .306
BraunMil 111 429 78 131 .305
FreeseStL 110 397 56 119 .300
Home Runs
Braun, Milwaukee, 33; Beltran, St. Louis, 28;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 25; Kubel, Arizona, 25; Lud-
wick, Cincinnati, 25; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 24;
Hart, Milwaukee, 23; Holliday, St. Louis, 23;
LaRoche, Washington, 23; Stanton, Miami, 23.
Runs Batted In
Beltran, St. Louis, 83; Braun, Milwaukee, 83;
Holliday St. Louis, 81; CGonzalez, Colorado, 79;
Kubel, Arizona, 77; LaRoche, Washington, 77;
FFreeman, Atlanta, 76; Posey, San Francisco, 76.
Pitching
Cueto, Cincinnati, 16-6; AJBurnett, Pitts-
burgh, 15-4; Dickey, New York, 15-4; GGonza-
lez, Washington, 15-6; Strasburg, Washington,
14-5; Hamels, Philadelphia, 14-6; Lynn, St.
Louis, 13-5.


Curacao, Conn., Mexico
remain in LLWS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa.
- Kevin Oricoli finally has brag-
ging rights over his big brother.
Not many 12-year-old boys
can say they hit a two-run single
at the Little League World Series.
Oricoli's two-out clutch hit
keyed a three-run third inning,
and Matt Kubel silenced Ne-
braska's bats to help Fairfield,
Conn., avoid elimination Satur-
day at the Little League World
Series with a 12-0 victory.
The kids from Curacao were
feeling pretty good, too, after
staying in contention with a 14-2
victory over Ramstein Air Base,
Germany. The Kearney, Neb.,
team and Germany will play
Monday in a consolation game
after both teams were eliminated.
Mexico also relied on the lum-
ber in eliminating from contention
the adopted hometown favorites
from Uganda, 12-0. Three Mex-
ico pitchers tossed the first com-
bined perfect game in World
Series history in a contest that
ended after four innings due to
Little League's 10-run rule.
In the nightcap, Emil Matti hit
two solo homers and scored
four runs to spark Parsippany,
N.J.'s 10-4 victory that elimi-
nated Gresham, Ore. Uganda
will play Oregon in another con-
solation game Tuesday.
Giants stifle Jets
in 26-3 triumph
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- Rookie Jayron Hosley re-
turned an interception of Mark
Sanchez 77 yards for a touch-
down, and the New York Gi-
ants' defense stifled the Jets'
starters in a 26-3 preseason
victory between the hometown
rivals on Saturday night.
Tim Tebow, making his home
debut for the Jets (0-2), didn't
fare much better in his six se-
ries. But the backup quarter-
back led the Jets (No. 14 in the



SURGING
Continued from Page B1

followed that with a birdie
on No. 13 to move to 14
under. Then, after just his
second bogey of the tourna-
ment, he bounced back with
a birdie on No. 15.
If he can keep it rolling
for one more round, he
might claim his first win on
the tour since 2008 and
strengthen his chances to
make the European Ryder
Cup team.
"Winning means a lot, no
matter what," Garcia said.
Clark might have had the
lead comfortably to himself,
had he not missed short
birdie putts on consecutive
holes midway through the
back nine.
Instead, he'll have to set-
tle for a share of second




TOP 25
Continued from Page B1

LSU at No. 1, followed by
Alabama and USC.
Rounding out the top 10 in
the AP rankings, Georgia
was No. 6, followed by
Florida State and Michigan.
No. 9 South Carolina and
No. 10 Arkansas give the
Southeastern Conference
half of the first 10 teams.
The rest of the Top 25 was
heavy on Big 12 and Big Ten
teams.
Big 12 newcomer West Vir-
ginia was llth, followed by
Big Ten rivals Wisconsin and
Michigan State.
The Big 12 also placed
Texas (No. 15), Oklahoma
State (No. 19), TCU (No. 20)
and Kansas State (No. 22) in
the rankings to give the




CURTAIN
Continued from Page B1

148 yards, with no touch-
downs and two interceptions.
The Gators, who ranked
105th in the nation in total of-
fense in 2011, are counting on
the sophomores to improve


under Pease. The new of-
fense includes lots of shifts
and motions that could be de-
ceptive to opposing defenses.
Not surprisingly, the Gators
used none of that in Satur-
day's open practice.
"Stuff that is on tape, peo-
ple have a book on you,"
Muschamp said. "Anything
that was totally different or
new, we didn't do."
There were plenty of
positives.
The defense looked stout,
as expected. Running back


AP Pro32) to their only points of
the night Josh Brown's
30-yard field goal.
Lawrence Tynes kicked four
field goals for the Giants (1-1).
Eli Manning and the Giants
(No. 3) starters were mostly
quiet, with the Super Bowl MVP
going 7 of 14 for 62 yards and
an interception.
Sanchez finished 9 of 11 for
59 yards and the costly inter-
ception, and was under pres-
sure nearly every play.
Mika Miyazato on
top at LPGA Tour
NORTH PLAINS, Ore.-
Japan's Mika Miyazato shoot a
4-under 68 on Saturday to take
a two-stroke lead after the sec-
ond round of the LPGA Tour's
Safeway Classic
Miyazato, tied for the first-
round lead with Sydnee
Michaels after a 65, had an 11-
under 133 total on Pumpkin
Ridge's Ghost Creek Course.
South Korea's So Yeon Ryu,
the Toledo Classic winner last
week, was second after a 68.
Cristie Kerr and Inbee Park
shot 70 to reach 8 under, and
Michaels had a 72 to join top-
ranked Yani Tseng and Paula
Creamer at 7 under. Tseng had
a 67, and Creamer shot a 69.
Michelle Wie was tied for
11th at 5 under after a 70.
Huston takes slim lead
on Champions Tour
ENDICOTT, N.Y. Defend-
ing champion John Huston shot
a 5-under 67 to take a one-
stroke lead over Brad Faxon
after the second round of the
Dick's Sporting Goods Open.
Huston had a 12-under 132
total in the Champion Tour
event at En-Joie Golf Club.
Faxon shot a 66.
Willie Wood and Peter Sen-
ior were three strokes back at 9
under. Wood had a 68, and
Senior shot 67.
From wire reports


place with Cauley, who had
three straight late birdies.
"Today, the scoring was
out there and obviously, the
leaders didn't really get
away from anyone," Clark
said. "I felt like we all could
have gone a little bit lower,
but it's going to be the same
tomorrow, really A shootout.
There's so many guys, proba-
bly, still in this tournament."
It's usually a birdiefest
every August at this Donald
Ross course, but for most
players, it seems to be play-
ing a little tougher this year.
The cut of 1 under was the
event's highest since it
moved to Sedgefield in
2008.
The average winner's
score in four years at this
course has been 19 under,
and it sure looks as if this
year's champ whomever
it is will approach that
number.


league six teams overall,
matching the SEC for the
most
No. 23 Florida is the sixth
SEC squad.
The Big Ten added Ne-
braska (No. 17) and Ohio
State (No. 18) for a total of
five teams. The Buckeyes, in
their first season under
coach Urban Meyer, are
banned for the postseason
this season because of NCAA
sanctions.
Defending Atlantic Coast
Conference champion Clem-
son (No. 14) and Virginia
Tech (No. 16) give the ACC
three teams in the Top 25.
No. 21 Stanford is the third
Pac-12 team in the poll.
No. 24 Boise State is
ranked in the preseason
for the fourth straight year
and No. 25 Louisville is the
only Big East school in the
rankings.


Mike Gillislee solidified his
spot as the starter. Receiver
Frankie Hammond Jr contin-
ued to show consistency. De-
fensive end Dante Fowler,
cornerback Loucheiz Purifoy,
tight end Kent Taylor and re-
ceiver Latroy Pittman all
were impressive. And after
calling his team soft late last
season, Muschamp said it


will be tougher, especially
along the offensive line.
"Who are we going to win
the SEC championship
with? That's my question,"
Muschamp said. "It's not
about who we can win with.
We understand what our
goal is here and where we
need to go. ... Who's ready
for this opportunity? We're
still investing time in every-
body, but we need to start
dwindling the reps down
and we need these guys to
continue to pick it up."


Sports BRIEFS


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Red Sox 4, Yankees 1


Boston


NewYork
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Ellsurycf 5 00 0 Jeterdh 3 0 0 0
Crwfrdlf 5 1 1 0 Swisherlb 4 0 3 0
Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Cano2b 4 0 0 0
AdGnzllb 3 1 2 2 AnJonsrf 3 00 0
C.Rossdh 4 00 0 ErChvzph 1 0 1 0
Lvrnwy c 4 00 0 McGeh 3b 3 00 0
Pdsdnkrf 4 1 1 0 lbanezph 1 0 0 0
Ciriacoss 4 1 4 0 Grndrscf 3 1 2 1
Punto3b 3 01 1 RMartnc 4 00 0
J.Nixss 3 0 0 0
ISuzuki If 3 0 1 0
Totals 37 4103 Totals 32 1 7 1
Boston 200 010 001 4
NewYork 000 100 000 1
E-An.Jones (1). DP-Boston 2. LOB-Boston
8, New York 6. 2B-Pedroia (26), Ciriaco (7),
Punto (6), Granderson (13). HR-Ad.Gonzalez
(14), Granderson (32). SB-C.Crawford (5),
Ciriaco (8), Punto (5), I.Suzuki (19).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
LesterW,7-10 7 5 1 1 2 4
A.Bailey H,1 1-31 0 0 0 1
BreslowH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
AcevesS,25-31 1 1 0 0 0 1
New York
Phelps L,3-4 62-37 3 3 0 7
Logan 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Eppley 2-3 2 1 1 1 1
Rapada 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
D.Lowe 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Eppley pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
WP-Lester, Eppley

Rangers 2, Blue Jays 1
Texas Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler2b 4 0 0 0 RDavislf 5 0 1 0
MiYong ss 3 00 0 Rasms cf 5 00 0
Andrusss 0 00 0 Encrncdh 2 0 0 0
Hamltnlf 4 0 0 0 Cooperlb 4 0 1 0
Beltre3b 4 1 2 0 YEscorss 4 0 1 0
N.Cruzdh 3 1 1 2 McCoy3b 0 0 0 0
DvMrprf 3 00 0 KJhnsn2b 3 00 0
Morlnd b 3 0 2 0 Mathisc 4 0 1 0
Gentrycf 3 00 0 Goserf 3 1 1 0
LMrtnzc 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr3b-ss 3 0 2 1
LMartn ph 1 00 0
Soto c 0 00 0
Totals 30 25 2 Totals 33 1 7 1
Texas 000 020 000 2
Toronto 001 000 000 1
E-Jenkins (1). LOB-Texas 2, Toronto 10.
2B-Beltre (23), Hechavarria (2). HR-N.Cruz
(19). SB-R.Davis (38), Gose (10). CS-
Dav.Murphy (3), Gentry (6). S-Hechavarria.
I1 l nQ DD :RQ


IPH n eB D
Texas
Oswalt 42-32 1 1
R.Ross 11-33 0 0
Scheppers H,3 1-3 2 0 0
KirkmanW,1-2 H,2 2-3 0 0 0
Mi.Adams H,22 1 0 0 0
NathanS,24-25 1 0 0 0
Toronto
Villanueva L,6-3 61-34 2 2
Loup 2-3 1 0 0
Jenkins 11-30 0 0
Oliver 2-3 0 0 0
Loup pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Oswalt (Encarnacion). PB-
Balk-Oswalt 2.


1 4
0 0
0 1
0 0

-Mathis.


Orioles 3, Tigers 2


Baltimore Detroit
ab r h bi
Markks rf 3 0 2 0 AJcksn cf
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b
McLothlf 4 0 0 0 MiCarr3b
AdJonscf 4 1 0 Fielderlb
Wietersc 4 1 1 0 JhPerltss
C.Davisdh 4 1 2 3 DYongdh
MrRynllb 3 0 1 0 Avilac
Machd3b 3 00 0 JeBakrrf
Andino 2b 3 0 1 0 Boesch ph
Dirks If
Totals 32 38 3 Totals
Baltimore 000 000 300
Detroit 000 000 020


ab r h bi
4 1 2 0
4 0 1 0
2 1 2 0


4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
31 2 8 2
4120
4010
2120
2000
4012
4010
4000
3000
1000
3010

3
2


E-McLouth (1). DP-Baltimore 3, Detroit 1.
LOB-Baltimore 3, Detroit 6. 2B-A.Jackson
(21). HR-C.Davis (19). CS-MarReynolds (3),
Andino (5), Dirks (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
Britton W,2-1
Strop H,21
Ji.Johnson S,36-39
Detroit
Porcello L,9-8
Villarreal
Coke
Dotel


7 6 0 0 3 5

1 0 0 0 00
760035
122201
100000


Porcello pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Strop (Mi.Cabrera). WP-Strop.

Royals 9, White Sox 4
Chicago Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Wise cf 4 0 1 0 L.Cain cf 5 01 0
Youkils3b 4 1 1 0 AEscorss 5 3 4 0
A.Dunnlb 3 2 2 2 AGordn If 5 2 3 1
Konerkdh 4 1 1 2 Butlerdh 4 2 3 3
Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Mostks3b 4 1 2 4
Viciedolf 4 0 1 0 Francrrf 5 00 0
AIRmrzss 4 01 0 Hosmerlb 4 1 1 1
Flowrsc 4 01 0 B.Penac 4 01 0
Bckhm 2b 3 00 0 Giavtll 2b 4 0 0 0
Totals 34 48 4 Totals 40915 9
Chicago 000 002 020 4
Kansas City 102 011 04x 9
E-Youkilis (9), Rios (5), Flowers (2), Beckham
(6). DP-Chicago 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-
Chicago 4, Kansas City 9. 2B-Wise (4),
A.Dunn (15), A.Gordon (39). HR-A.Dunn (35),
Konerko (20), Moustakas (19), Hosmer (11).
SB-Wise (8), A.Escobar (24).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
PeavyL,9-9 51-39 5 3 1 6
N.Jones 0 2 0 0 0 0
Veal 1-30 0 0 0 1
Humber 11-30 0 0 0 1
Myers 1 4 4 4 0 0
Kansas City
B.ChenW,9-10 6 5 2 2 1 5
K.HerreraH,15 1 1 0 0 0 0
CollinsH,7 1-3 2 2 2 0 1
CrowH,14 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
L.Coleman 1 0 0 0 0 1
N.Jones pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Peavy (Butler).

Tampa Bay Rays
upcoming schedule
Aug. 20 Kansas City 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 21 Kansas City 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 22 Kansas City 1:10 p.m.
Aug. 23 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 24 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 25 Oakland, 1:10 p.m.
Aug. 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 30 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 31 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Sept. 1 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 2 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 3 N.Y.Yankees, 1:10 p.m.
Sept. 4 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 5 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 7 Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 8 Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 9 Texas, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Sept. 14 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
NewYork 71
Tampa Bay 65
Baltimore 65
Boston 59
Toronto 56


Wash.
Atlanta
NewYork
Philly
Miami


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
49.592 7-3
54 .546 5/2 8-2
55 .542 6 6-4
62 .488 12126/2 4-6
64 .467 15 9 3-7



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
46 .617 - 7-3
50 .583 4 7-3
63 .475 17 9 4-6
65 .458 19 11 5-5
66 .450 20 12 4-6


Str Home Away
L-1 38-24 33-25 Chicago
W-2 32-27 33-27 Detroit
W-1 32-29 33-26 Cleveland
W-1 29-34 30-28 Kan. City
L-1 31-29 25-35 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
54.546 5-5
56 .533 1'2 1 4-6
65 .454 11 10'24-6
66 .445 12 11/2 7-3
68 .424 14/214 3-7


Home Away
32-26 33-28
34-24 30-32
30-29 24-36
25-33 28-33
24-37 26-31


Texas
Oakland
Angels
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-1 33-23 41-23
L-1 36-28 34-22
W-1 28-30 29-33
W-126-33 29-32
W-129-31 25-35


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
48 .603- 7-3
54 .550 6/2 3-7
55 .542 7/2 1 5-5
65 .454 18 11/2 4-6
72 .395 25 18/2 4-6
82 .322 34 27/2 3-7


Home Away
40-22 33-26
37-23 29-31
37-25 28-30
35-27 19-38
30-28 17-44
27-34 12-48


San Fran.
Dodgers
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
50.580 5-5
55 .534 5/2 1 5-5
58 .517 7/2 3 3-7
64 .467 13/29 5-5




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
54 .546 - 6-4
55 .545 /2 7-3
59 .508 4/2 5 5-5
69 .430 14 14/2 5-5
72 .385 19 19/2 6-4


Home Away
36-22 33-28
35-26 28-29
33-27 29-31
28-30 28-34


Str Home Away
W-1 35-26 30-28
W-1 33-25 33-30
W-3 31-26 30-33
L-4 27-31 25-38
L-1 25-38 20-34


Associated Press
New York Yankees catcher Russell Martin tags out Boston Red Sox base runner Pedro Ciriaco, who was trying to score
from third in the ninth inning Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Red Sox defeated the Yankees 4-1.




Red Sox get badly needed win


Associated Press

NEW YORK Jon Lester shut
down the Yankees' offense for seven
innings, Adrian Gonzalez provided an
early lead with a two-run homer and
the Boston Red Sox beat New York
4-1 Saturday for a badly needed win.
Yankees nemesis Pedro Ciriaco
was 4 for 4, raising his average
against New York this year to .517 (15
for 29), and Boston reliever Craig
Breslow and catcher Ryan Lavarn-
way became what is thought to be the
first all-Yale battery in the major
leagues since 1883.
The fourth-place Red Sox won for
just the fourth time in 11 games as they
try to right their foundering season.
Lester (7-10) won consecutive starts
for the first time since mid-May, al-
lowing five hits with four strikeouts.
Curtis Granderson homered in the
fourth for the Yankees' only run.
Rangers 2, Blue Jays 1
TORONTO Nelson Cruz hit a two-
run homer, Joe Nathan converted his
team-record 22nd straight save opportu-
nity and Texas beat Toronto.
Nathan broke the Rangers mark he
shared with Francisco Cordero, who was
successful on 21 chances in a row in 2004.
Nathan was the sixth pitcher for Texas.
Roy Oswalt started in place of Ryan
Dempster, who missed his regular turn
because of personal issues. Oswalt al-
lowed one run and two hits in 4 2-3
innings, striking out five and balking twice
in his first start since July 30.
Michael Kirkman (1-2) escaped a bases-
loaded jam in the seventh. Mike Adams
pitched the eighth and Nathan closed it out
for his 24th save in 25 chances.

Orioles 3, Tigers 2
DETROIT Chris Davis hit a three-
run homer and the Baltimore Orioles
snapped the Detroit Tigers' four-game
winning streak with a 3-2 victory.
Adam Jones and Matt Wieters opened
the seventh inning with consecutive sin-
gles off Rick Porcello (9-8). Davis then
drove a 1-1 pitch over the wall in left for his
19th homer, snapping the scoreless tie.
Zach Britton (2-1) struck out five in
seven sparkling innings and Jim Johnson
got three outs for his 36th save.

Royals 9, White Sox 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Mike Mous-
takas hit a three-run shot and the Kansas
City Royals beat the Chicago White Sox
9-4, overcoming Adam Dunn's 400th
career homer.
Moustakas connected in the eighth and
drove in four runs for the Royals, who
have won four of five. Alcides Escobar
had four infield singles, scored three runs
and had his team-leading 24th steal.
Chicago trailed 5-2 before Dunn drove
a 2-2 pitch from Tim Collins over the wall
in left-center in the eighth. Kevin Youkilis,
who singled with one out for his 1,000th
career hit, was aboard for Dunn's major
league-best 35th homer of the season.
Dunn is one of 11 active players with
400 homers and No. 50 to reach the
mark overall.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Mets 2, Nationals 0
WASHINGTON Jonathon Niese
pitched into the eighth inning and Ike
Davis hit a two-run homer in the seventh
to lead the New York Mets over the
Washington Nationals 2-0.
Nationals starter Edwin Jackson al-
lowed one hit through six innings a
triple to Mike Baxter in the first and


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Detroit 5, Baltimore 3
N.Y Yankees 6, Boston 4
Toronto 3, Texas 2
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Oakland 6, Cleveland 4
Tampa Bay 12, L.A. Angels 3
Seattle 5, Minnesota 3
Saturday's Games
Texas 2, Toronto 1
Boston 4, N.Y Yankees 1
Baltimore 3, Detroit 2
Kansas City 9, Chicago White Sox 4
Cleveland at Oakland, late
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, late
Minnesota at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Baltimore (W.Chen 11-7) at Detroit (Fister 7-7), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 13-7) atToronto (H.Alvarez 7-10), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-2) at Kansas City (Guthrie
2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 9-7) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 1-1),
3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 9-10) at Oakland (J.Parker 7-7),
4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Deduno 4-0) at Seattle (Beavan 7-7), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 5-10) at N.YYankees (Kuroda 11-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 3, 1st game
Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 7, 2nd game
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 4
Arizona 12, Houston 4
N.Y Mets 2, Washington 0
L.A. Dodgers 6, Atlanta 2
Philadelphia 4, Milwaukee 3
Miami at Colorado, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Volstad 0-9) at Cincinnati (Latos 10-3),
1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-9) atAtlanta (Minor 6-9), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Hefner2-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 15-6),
1:35 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 10-10) at Houston (Galarraga 0-3),
2:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 5-9) at Milwaukee (Wolf 3-9),
2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-3) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-4), 2:15 p.m.
Miami (Jo.Johnson 7-9) at Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-7),
3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-6) at San Diego (Richard 9-
12), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Miami at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B4.


struck out a season-high 10. In the sev-
enth, Jackson (7-8) issued a leadoff walk
to David Wright and Davis drove the next
pitch the other way to left field for his
22nd home run.
Seventeen of his 22 homers have
come on the road, most in the NL.
Niese (10-6) allowed one-out singles to
Danny Espinosa and Ryan Zimmerman
in the first. With Espinosa on third, Zim-
merman stole second, but the left-hander
pitched out of trouble.

Cardinals 5, Pirates 4
ST. LOUIS -Yadier Molina had three
hits and two RBIs in his return to the
lineup, leading the St. Louis Cardinals to a
big 5-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
St. Louis bounced back from Friday
night's 2-1 loss in the series opener and
pulled within a game of Pittsburgh for the
second NL wild-card spot. Jaime Garcia
is expected to come off the disabled list to
start Sunday's series finale against Pi-
rates right-hander Jeff Karstens.
Molina also had two RBIs and scored a
run after missing the previous three
games with a sore back. He hit a


tiebreaking two-run double off Erik Be-
dard (7-13) in the fifth inning to give the
Cardinals a 5-3 lead.
Jordy Mercer had two hits and two RBIs
for the Pirates, who struck out 14 times.
Dodgers 6, Braves 2
ATLANTA- Hanley Ramirez drove in
four runs with two homers, including the
first of three straight shots by the Los An-
geles Dodgers in the second inning dur-
ing a 6-2 win over the Atlanta Braves.
Ramirez, James Loney and Luis Cruz
hit consecutive homers in a span of four
pitches from Ben Sheets. Ramirez added
a three-run homer in the sixth.
The four homers were the Dodgers'
only hits.
Aaron Harang (9-7) pitched around five
walks. He gave up one run on four hits
with eight strikeouts in 6 2-3 innings.
Phillies 4, Brewers 3
MILWAUKEE John Mayberry Jr. and
Erik Kratz hit back-to-back home runs
and Cole Hamels tied a season high with
10 strikeouts to help the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Milwaukee Brewers 4-3.
Hamels (14-6) gave up eight hits and
three earned runs in 7 2-3 innings. He
walked just one batter, but gave up a
two-run homer to Ryan Braun with two
outs in the eighth. Jonathan Papelbon
came on and struck out Aramis Ramirez,
then pitched a scoreless ninth to record
his 27th save.
Hamels entered the game having
thrown 22 consecutive scoreless innings
over his previous three starts. The stretch
included consecutive nine-inning
shutouts, against Atlanta on Aug. 7 and
Miami on Monday.
After retiring the Brewers in order in the
first inning, the left-hander, who was the
MVP of the 2008 World Series, yielded a
home run to Ramirez to lead off the bot-
tom of the second inning.
D-backs 12, Astros 4
HOUSTON -Aaron Hill hit a three-run
homer in a nine-run fifth inning, Chris Young
had four hits and the Arizona Diamond-
backs routed the Houston Astros 12-4.
Young also drove in three runs and
finished a triple shy of the cycle. Justin
Upton added two hits for Arizona and
Ryan Wheeler hit his first major league
home run.
Patrick Corbin (5-4) went seven in-
nings, allowing four runs and seven hits
with five strikeouts. Corbin has three
straight wins in four outings since moving
back into the rotation at the beginning of
August. He has gone at least six innings
in each of those starts.

Reds 5, Cubs 3, Game 1;
Cubs 9, Reds 7, Game 2
CINCINNATI Brett Jackson hit his
first career home run to help Brooks Raley
earn his first major league win, leading the
Chicago Cubs to a 9-7 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds and a split of their day-
night doubleheader on Saturday.
Starlin Castro had three hits and two
RBIs as the Cubs rebounded after losing
the first two in the four-game weekend
series. David DeJesus added his fifth
home run of the season in the ninth.
Raley (1-2) gave up four runs, three
earned, and five hits in 5 1-3 innings.
Ryan Ludwick went deep twice and
drove in three runs for the Reds
Johnny Cueto knows how to prepare
for day games, and his routine is working
out quite well for him.
Cueto pitched eight crisp innings, Todd
Frazier hit a go-ahead homer for the sec-
ond straight game and the Cincinnati
Reds beat the Chicago Cubs 5-3 in the
opener of a day-night doubleheader.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 B5




NL

Cardinals 5, Pirates 4
Pittsburgh St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMarteIf 2 1 1 0 Furcalss 5 22 0
YNavrrlf 2 0 0 0 MCrpntrf-lb 4 0 1 1
Mercer2b 4 1 2 2 Hollidy If 4 0 1 0
AMcCtcf 5 0 0 1 Craigib 4 1 2 0
GJoneslb-rf4 01 1 Boggsp 0 00 0
Sniderrf 2 0 0 0 Descals2b 0 00 0
JHughsp 0 0 0 0 Freese3b 2 1 0 0
JHrrsn2b 2 0 1 0 YMolinc 4 1 3 2
PAIvrz3b 3 0 0 0 SRonsncf-rf 4 02 2
Barajs c 3 0 0 0 RJcksn 2b 2 00 0
Barmesss 3 1 1 0 Beltranph 1 00 0
McKnrph 1 00 0 Mottep 0 00 0
J.Cruzp 0 00 0 Lynnp 2 00 0
Bedardp 2 00 0 Brwnngp 0 00 0
GSnchzlb 2 1 2 0 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
Schmkrph 1 0 0 0
Mujicap 0 00 0
Jay cf 0 00 0
Totals 35 48 4 Totals 33511 5
Pittsburgh 001 020 001 4
St. Louis 100 220 00x 5
E-Freese (10). DP-Pittsburgh 2. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 10, St. Louis 8. 2B-Mercer (4),
G.Sanchez (13), Furcal (17), Y.Molina 2 (24),
S.Robinson (6). SF-G.Jones.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Bedard L,7-13 42-39 5 5 3 4
J.Hughes 21-30 0 0 0 1
J.Cruz 1 2 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Lynn 41-34 3 3 3 8
Browning W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
RosenthalH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
MujicaH,19 1 1 0 0 0 0
BoggsH,23 1 2 0 0 0 2
MotteS,28-33 1 1 1 0 0 1

Mets 2, Nationals 0
NewYork Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Tejadass 4 0 0 0 Werthcf-rf 4 00 0
Baxterrf 4 0 1 0 Espinos2b 4 02 0
DWrght3b 3 1 0 0 Zmrmn3b 4 01 0
I.Davislb 4 1 2 2 Morserf-lf 4 00 0
DnMrp2b 4 0 0 0 LaRoch b 4 0 1 0
Vldspn If 3 0 0 0 Dsmndss 3 00 0
Frncsc p 0 0 0 0 TMoore If 3 00 0
AnTrrscf 3 00 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Thole c 3 00 0 McGnzl p 0 00 0
Niesep 3 00 0 Floresc 3 0 1 0
Rauchp 0 00 0 EJcksnp 1 00 0
Bay If 0 0 0 0 Harper cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 23 2 Totals 31 0 5 0
NewYork 000 000 200 2
Washington 000 000 000 0
E-Desmond (13). LOB-New York 3, Wash-
ington 5. 2B-LaRoche (26). 3B-Baxter (2).
HR-I.Davis (22). SB-Zimmerman (5). S-
E.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Niese W,10-6
Rauch H,13
FFrancisco S,20-23
Washington
E.Jackson L,7-8
Mattheus
Mic.Gonzalez


71-35 0 0 0 7
2-3 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1

7 2 2 2 1 11
12-30 0 0 0 3
1-3 1 0 0 0 1


Dodgers 6, Braves 2
Los Angeles Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Victorn If
M.Ellis 2b
Kemp cf
Ethier rf
HRmrz ss
Loney lb
L.Cruz 3b
A.Ellis c
Harang p
Choate p
Guerra p
ShTllsn p
Jansen p

Totals


4 000
4000
3 1 0 01
3100
3100
4224
3 1 1 1
4 1 1 1
3000
3000
0000
0000
0000
0000

31 64 6


Bourn cf
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
FFrmn lb
Uggla 2b
D.Ross c
Janish ss
Sheets p
Avilan p
Hinske ph
CMrtnz p
JFrncs ph
Venters p
Totals


Los Angeles 030 003 000 6
Atlanta 100 000 001 2
LOB-Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 11. 2B-Prado
(31), C.Jones (20), Janish (5). 3B--Bourn (10).
HR-H.Ramirez 2 (18), Loney (4), L.Cruz (3),
Prado (7). SB-Kemp (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
HarangW,9-7 62-34 1 1 5 8
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Guerra 1-3 0 0 0 2 0
Sh.Tolleson 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
JansenS,25-31 11-31 1 1 0 3
Atlanta
Sheets L,4-3 6 4 6 6 2 3
Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 0
C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 0
Venters 1 0 0 0 1 0

Phillies 4, Brewers 3
Philadelphia Milwaukee
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollinsss 50 00 Aokirf 3 000
Frndsn 3b 4 00 0 Lucroy c 4 1 2 0
Utley 2b 4 1 2 0 Braun If 4 1 3 2
Howardlb 4 0 2 1 ArRmr3b 4 1 11
DBrwnlf 4 0 0 0 Hartlb 4 0 1 0
Papelnp 0 0 0 0 CGomzcf 4 0 1 0
L.Nix rf 2 1 0 0 Ransm 2b 4 00 0
Mayrrycf 3 1 1 2 Segurass 3 00 0
Kratz c 4 1 1 1 Fiers p 1 00 0
Hamelsp 3 00 0 MRgrsph 1 00 0
Pierre If 1 0 1 0 Loep 0 00 0
FrRdrgp 000 0
RWeksph 1 00 0
Hndrsnp 0 00 0
Totals 34 47 4 Totals 33 3 8 3
Philadelphia 031 000 000 4
Milwaukee 010 000 020 3
LOB-Philadelphia 8, Milwaukee 4. 2B-
Howard 2 (6). HR-Mayberry (10), Kratz (6),
Braun (33), Ar.Ramirez (17). SB-Aoki (17),
Braun (20), C.Gomez (23). CS-Aoki (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
HamelsW,14-6 72-38 3 3 1 10
Papelbon S,27-30 11-30 0 0 0 3
Milwaukee
FiersL,6-6 5 5 4 4 4 5
Loe 2 1 0 0 0 1
Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 3
Henderson 1 1 0 0 0 2

D-backs 12, Astros 4
Arizona Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GParra If 6 1 2 0 Altuve 2b 3 1 1 0
A.Hill2b 4 2 2 3 R.Cruzp 0 0 0 0
Elmore2b 0 0 0 0 Greeness 4 1 2 2
J.Uptonrf 6 1 2 1 Pearcelb 4 01 0
Gldschib 4 1 1 1 Maxwlllf 4 00 0
MMntr c 3 2 1 0 BFrncs rf 4 00 0
Bergsn p 0 0 0 0 Wallac 3b 4 12 0
Zagrskp 0 0 0 0 BBarnscf 4 00 0
CYoungcf 5 2 4 3 CSnydrc 3 1 1 2
Drew ss 4 1 0 1 Lyles p 2 00 0
RWhelr3b 4 21 1 XCedenp 0 00 0
Corbinp 4 0 0 0 Fickp 0 0 0 0
Nievesc 1 0 0 0 FMrtnzph 1 00 0
SMoore2b 0 00 0
Totals 41121310 Totals 33 4 7 4
Arizona 010 090 110 12
Houston 001 210 000 4
E-Wallace (3), Altuve (11). DP-Houston 1.
LOB-Arizona 9, Houston 3. 2B-G.Parra 2
(16), M.Montero (17), C.Young (19), Altuve (30).
HR-A.Hill (15), C.Young (13), R.Wheeler (1),
Greene (6), C.Snyder (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CorbinW,5-4 7 7 4 4 1 5
Bergesen 1 0 0 0 0 0
Zagurski 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
LylesL,2-10 4 8 7 5 3 4
X.Cedeno 2-3 0 2 0 1 2
Fick 21-33 2 2 1 1
R.Cruz 2 2 1 1 2 3


BB SU












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE-

Hanks surprises
N. Dakota diner
WEST FARGO, N.D. -
The owner of a diner in
North
Dakota
got a sur-
prise Fri-
day when
actor Tom
Hanks
showed
up for an
Tom Hanks early
breakfast.
Tammy Hagensen said
she got a call Thursday
evening from a jet com-
pany that often sends
their pilots to TNT's
Diner in West Fargo. A
company official asked if
she would open early Fri-
day for a special guest
whose name could not be
revealed right away
Hagensen told the
Forum newspaper she
agreed to open early be-
cause she was curious.
She said she was stunned
when Hanks, his wife,
Rita Wilson, and their
two sons walked through
the door
Hagensen said Hanks
and his family ate break-
fast and left, but not be-
fore a couple of photos
were taken.

Reports: Tonight
Show cuts staff
LOS ANGELES Pub-
lished reports say The
Tonight Show has laid off
two dozen
workers
and host
Jay Leno
has taken
a large
pay cut to
save the
jobs of
Jay Leno other
staffers.
The moves are part of a
restructuring to save
money at NBC. NBC Uni-
versal imposed the cut-
backs Friday, according
to reports in The Wall
StreetJournal and the
Los Angeles Times. Both
newspapers cited an un-
named person familiar
with what happened.
The layoffs and Leno's
salary concessions were
first reported by Dead-
line Hollywood, a website
that tracks the entertain-
ment industry
NBC Universal de-
clined comment.

Miss World 2012
crowned
ORDOS, China-
China's Yu Wenxia has
been crowned the 2012
Miss
World.
This is
the sec-
ond time
Miss
China has
been
awarded
Yu Wenxia the title.
The last
time was in 2007 when
Zhang Zilin took the
honor
The first runner-up is
Sophie Elizabeth Moulds
of Wales and the second
runner-up is Jessica
Michelle Kahawaty of
Australia.
The 23-year-old Yu is a
music student who said
she wants to be a teacher.
This is the first time for
the Inner Mongolian city
of Ordos to host the inter-
national beauty pageant.
-From wire reports


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

The stop-motion animated "Para-
Norman" unfolds tragically: So
much drawing for such an unworthy
script.
The labor necessary to create a
film like "ParaNorman" is colossal.
Tens of thousands of facial expres-
sions were drawn. 3-D printers (a
new advancement in stop motion
pioneered here) ran through 3.8
metric tons of printer powder One
scene alone took a year to shoot.
So it's tempting to applaud the 3-
D "ParaNorman" politely, sympa-
thetically simply because of the
admirable work. No one wants to
tell 60 puppet makers that their
months of toil were ill spent.
But though "ParaNorman" is im-
pressively crafted, the frequently
wondrous and whimsical visuals far
surpass the disappointingly slip-
shod story of an 11-year-old boy
named Norman (voiced by Kodi
Smit-McPhee) who can see and
speak to the dead.
While stop-motion animation has
largely gone out of favor with the
rise of computer animation, the
Portland-based studio LAIKA has
carried the flame. The studio,
which is owned by Nike founder
Phil Knight and run by his son,


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

You'll either be inspired
or nauseated by "The Odd
Life of Timothy Green."
This is a member of the
nauseated camp speaking.
The movie from novelist
and filmmaker Peter
Hedges, author of "What's
Eating Gilbert Grape" and
creator of Katie Holmes'
lovely independent fea-
ture "Pieces of April,"
strains to Disney-ize the
family dysfunction terri-
tory he explored so well in
those works.
In "Timothy Green," it's
all gone flat, mushy and
hollow. Adapting a short
story byAhmet Zappa (son
of Frank), writer-director
Hedges tries for old-fash-
ioned wholesomeness
only to flounder amid a


Birthday Conditions in general look to be rather inter-
esting for you in the year ahead. You should be able to
do quite well for yourself, regardless of whether your ef-
forts are independent or involve a collective endeavor.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You're likely to come up with
an idea for devising a spin-off from one of your greatest
sources of earning. It may require an imaginative twist,
but it's well within your scope.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You'll be at your best in a
situation where you have to juggle two endeavors simul-
taneously. You'll understand how these projects are inter-
related, which will give you the advantage.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you're smart, you won't dis-
cuss with others your plans to further a personal ambi-
tion. This includes even people you hope will eventually
participate.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your pals will have a


Travis Knight (a producer on "Para-
Norman"), previously made 2009's
"Coraline."
"ParaNorman" bears some of the
same fantasy-horror spirit of"Cora-
line," which was based on Neil
Gaiman's novella. It also has some
of the elements of the British studio
Aardman Animations ("Wallace and
Gromit"); "ParaNorman" is di-
rected by Sam Fell (who co-directed
Aardman's "Flushed Away") and
Chris Butler, who also wrote it.
With a thick forest of rigidly
spiked brown hair, Norman ap-
pears as if in perpetual fright. But
he greets the paranormal with ca-
sual familiarity, talking to his grand-
mother (Elaine Stritch) while they
watch TV and greeting invisible
passersby while he walks down a
seemingly empty street.
He's an avid horror film watcher
with zombie posters in his bedroom
and a cell phone ringtone of the
"Friday the 13th" theme. His par-
ents (Jeff Garlin, Leslie Mann) and
older sister (Anna Kendrick) have
little patience for Norman's eccen-
tricities and the kids in school call
him "Abnorman" and worse.
Norman is contacted by his uncle
Prenderghast (John Goodman) who
shares Norman's gift. He tells him
the myth of their town, Blithe Hol-
low that it was cursed by a witch


Associated Press
Cameron "CJ" Adams, left, and Odeya Rush are in a
scene from "The Odd Life Of Timothy Green."


well-intended but sappy
tale of a childless couple
mystically granted a test
run at parenthood.
That very odd premise of
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" is this: Cindy and
Jim Green (Garner and
Edgerton) desperately
want a child, and of course,
they can't have kids.


On a whim that wafts in
from nowhere, they write
down the perfect qualities
that their perfect child
would have in a perfect
world where they could
procreate.
Cindy and Jim put these
offspring wishes in a box
and bury it in their gar-
den. After a dark and


Today's HOROSCOPE
stronger than usual influence on your outlook and atti-
tude. If you're smart, you'll take your cues from friends
who are upbeat and progressive.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Agreat deal of personal
satisfaction will be gained from a challenge that requires
your intelligence and resourcefulness to overcome.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Usually, it's not a good
idea to offer advice to just anyone. However, if one of
your friends is in dire need of some helpful suggestions,
don't hesitate to speak up.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When in a partnership
arrangement, you should let your cohort do the legwork
while you take care of the thinking. The chance for a suc-
cessful conclusion is greater if you mastermind the effort.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) There's a chance you
might have to make a decision on an issue that has sev-
eral alternatives of equal value from which to choose.


300 years ago is true, and it's now
Norman's duty to keep her at bay
with a ritual.
Prederghast, who promptly
croaks, also appears to Norman
from the bowels of a school toilet.
It's the scene that took a year to
shoot, and it's when "ParaNorman"
is at its best: brilliantly textured,
comical and bizarre.
After Norman fails in the ritual,
he and an improvised gang his
round redhead friend Neil (Tucker
Albrizzi), Neil's hunky and dimwit-
ted older brother (Casey Affleck), a
bully who resembles the one who
preyed on Calvin from Calvin and
Hobbes (Alex Borstein), and Nor-
man's sister flee from a septet of
zombies, with much shrieking and
plan making.
The setup is promising and film
has its charms Norman responds
to a demand to "swear!" with hesi-
tance: "Like, the F-word?" but it
never quite finds its tone, and some-
times seems lucky to have avoided a
PG-13 rating.
"ParaNorman," blessed with oth-
erworldly animation, can't escape
the demons of story
"ParaNorman," a Focus Features
release, is rated PG for scary action
and images, thematic elements, some
rude humor and language. Running
time: 92 minutes. Two stars out of four



bad Capra-corn


stormy night, a boy named
Timothy (CJ Adams)
emerges from the ground,
wanders into the house
and starts calling them
Mom and Dad.
The Greens accept him
as their own without
question.
Then Timothy proceeds
to sow little graces and
nuggets of wisdom to his
overprotective, ill-prepared
parents, along with every-
one else in town.
Beneath the pretty pic-
tures is a silly, shallow stab
at Capra-corn, the sort of
magical story of simple,
genuine people mastered
by Frank Capra with such
films as "Meet John Doe"
and "It's a Wonderful Life."
Sadly, "The Odd Life of
Timothy Green" is all
corn, no Capra. Two stars
out of four


Don't be indecisive instead be conclusive.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be prepared to teach in-
stead of merely talking. No one is going to follow your
ideas or suggestions unless you first demonstrate how
well they work. Seeing is believing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Make it a point to set some
time aside for a little fun. A well-deserved break will serve
as a marvelous release from any tensions.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Prioritize your goals and
complete the most important one first. Only by carefully
delegating your time and effort can you hope to get any-
thing done.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Being extremely observant
at present, there isn't much that is likely to escape your
attention. You'll not only grasp the essence of ideas
quickly, but you'll be equally as eager to impart what you
learn.


PG movies opening this weekend focus on two





ABNORMAL KIDS


Actress Kyra Sedgwick is 47.
Thought for Today:
"Don't worry about people
stealing your ideas. If your
ideas are any good, you'll
have to ram them down peo-
ple's throats." Howard H.
Aiken, American computer
pioneer (1900-1973).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17
Mega Money: 3- 5 -14 -16
Mega Ball: 11
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 10 $809
3-of-4 MB 70 $253
3-of-4 1,257 $42
2-of-4 MB 1,769 $20.50
1-of-4 MB 13,751 $2.50
2-of-4 36,515 $2
Fantasy 5:4 9 10 14 25
5-of-5 6 $36,981.50
4-of-5 369 $96.50
3-of-5 11,113 $9
THURSDAY, AUGUST 16
Fantasy 5:1 2- 12- 19-29
5-of-5 2 winners $97,192.28
4-of-5 331 $94.50
3-of-5 9,655 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 19,
the 232nd day of 2012. There
are 134 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 19, 1812, the
USS Constitution defeated
the British frigate HMS Guer-
riere off Nova Scotia during
the War of 1812, earning the
nickname "Old Ironsides."
On this date:
In 1807, Robert Fulton's
North River Steamboat ar-
rived in Albany, two days
after leaving New York.
In 1848, the New York Her-
ald reported the discovery of
gold in California.
In 1909, the first automo-
bile races were run at the
just-opened Indianapolis
Motor Speedway.
In 1951, the owner of the
St. Louis Browns, Bill Veeck,
sent in 3-foot-7 Eddie Gaedel
to pinch-hit in a game against
Detroit. (In his only major
league at-bat, Gaedel walked
on four pitches and was re-
placed at first base by a
pinch-runner.)
In 1982, Soviet cosmonaut
Svetlana Savitskaya became
the second woman to be
launched into space.
In 1991, Soviet hard-liners
made the stunning announce-
ment that President Mikhail S.
Gorbachev had been removed
from power. (The coup attempt
collapsed two days later.)
Ten years ago: An ailing
and aging John Paul II bid a
tearful farewell as he con-
cluded a four-day visit to the
Krakow region of Poland (it
turned out to be his last visit
to his homeland).
Five years ago: Hurricane
Dean, which had already
killed eight people on its de-
structive march across the
Caribbean, pummeled Ja-
maica with gusting winds and
torrential rains as a Category
4 storm.
One year ago: Three men
- Damien Echols, Jason
Baldwin and Jesse Misskel-
ley who'd spent nearly two
decades in prison for the
nightmarish slaying of three
Cub Scouts in Arkansas,
went free after being permit-
ted to plead guilty to murder
in exchange for time served.
(The so-called West Mem-
phis Three continue to main-
tain their innocence.)
Today's Birthdays: Actor
L.Q. Jones is 85. USTA East-
ern Tennis Hall of Famer
Renee Richards is 78. Actor
and former U.S. senator Fred
Thompson is 70. Former
President Bill Clinton is 66.
Tipper Gore, wife of former
Vice President Al Gore, is 64.


Associated Press
Characters, from left, Grandma Babcock, voiced by Elaine Stritch, Sandra Babcock, voiced by Leslie Mann, Perry
Babcock, voiced by Jeff Garlin, Norman, voiced by Kodi Smit-McPhee, and Courtney, voiced by Anna Kendrick, are
in the 3D stop-motion film, "ParaNorman."

Review: 'ParaNorman'doomed by script demons


Review: Garner's 'Timothy Green'is












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


'Behind enemy lines'


- 4
Cortney Stewart
GUEST
COLUMN


Teaching in

North Korea
A almost 10 years ago, I
graduated from
Lecanto High School
and reluctantly left Citrus
County for college. After
four years at Florida State
University and short-term
visits to nearly 30 countries,
I completed a three-year
stint of nonprofit work in
India.
Promptly upon my return
to the states, I moved to San
Francisco for my graduate
studies. With my freshly
printed graduate degree in
hand, I applied for a teach-
ing internship in the most
reclusive nation in the
world North Korea.
To be honest, I was fairly
certain there was no way
an American female with
degrees in political sci-
ence, international affairs
and intercultural studies
would ever set foot into a
nation whose ideology has
kept its people from any
type of cross-cultural inter-
action for more than 50
years.
I was wrong.
The same enigmatic
regime that has success-
fully kept the Internet and
most other technological
advances from infiltrating
its borders issued me a sin-
gle-entry visa for a one-
month stay So on June 27,
2012, I found myself behind
enemy lines.
I had been to places be-
fore where the U.S. was not
the most favored nation in
the world. I had even been
to other Communist coun-
tries. But I knew I was in
for a different kind of ad-
venture altogether when I
arrived at the Beijing air-
port and received my Dem-
ocratic People's Republic
of Korea (DPRK) or
North Korean -visa.
Trip to nowhere
Because we have no
diplomatic relations with
the country, my visa was at-
tached to my passport by a
paperclip. Upon arrival at
the Pyongyang airport, the
immigration officer
stamped my visa, not my
passport, and sent me on
my way
As I left Pyongyang, the
immigration officer un-
clipped my visa, handed
me my passport and waved
me through. They never
stamped me in or out.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


u; I NtY 51 tWAK I/pecial to tne unronicle
and During a monthlong teaching internship in North Korea, former Lecanto High
School graduate Cortney Stewart saw some of the thousands of monuments, statues and murals ded-
icated to worship of the Communist country's leaders. A


I stamped out of China
on the 26th of June and
stamped back into China
on the 27th of July Accord-
ing to my passport, between
those two dates, I was
nowhere.
Pyongyang is like no
other city in the world. It is
late 1950s Soviet bloc coun-
try meets the novel "1984"
meets Asia. It's almost im-
possible to wrap your mind
around. On the bus ride
from the airport, my eyes
were glued to the window. I
thought for sure I would
see some of the mass
poverty I had seen in India
or the filthy streets and
buildings of rural Vietnam.
Pyongyang was quite the
opposite.
The streets were pris-
tine. Hundreds of people
walked the streets in suits
and women in nice skirts
and blouses. There was a
nice skyline of relatively
modern-looking buildings.
Yet there were few cars on
the roads, and most driven
exclusively by military per-
sonnel. The cable cars for
public transportation were
ancient, and while there
seemed to be many build-
ings perched along the
road, no one seemed to be
going in or out of them. I
was more confused than
ever.
My internship was at Py-
ongyang University of Sci-
ence and Technology
(PUST), the only interna-
tional university in the
country In 1992, an ambi-
tious South Korean busi-
nessman, Dr. James Kim,
launched an international
university in Yanji, China,
near the northern border of
North Korea. The school
was incredibly successful,
employing more than 200
faculty members from 13
countries.
Miraculously, Dr Kim


was approached by offi-
cials from the North Ko-
rean education sector
about starting a school like
this in Pyongyang. After al-
most a decade of planning
and construction, and of
course, receiving loads of
approvals from the govern-
ment, PUST opened its
doors in 2010.
Class monitor
I was an English lecturer
for incoming freshmen a
class of 25 of the nation's
best and brightest boys. I
was their first professor at
PUST and the first foreign
professor they had ever
had. Needless to say, it was
a somewhat rocky and
stilted beginning. In each
class there is a "monitor"
- a student whose job is to
report everything the for-
eign teachers teach, say
and do to the school admin-
istration.
That first week, I was a
nervous wreck.
I would scan the stu-
dents' faces to get a clue as
to whether or not I had
made a misstep or said
something I shouldn't have.
It was to no avail. I couldn't
read them one way or the
other. But there weren't a
lot of smiles that week.
As that first week in the
classroom dragged by and I
began to think about just
how difficult this task was
proving to be, I began to
think about those students.
How confusing for them?
They have grown up in a
country where they have
been emphatically made to
believe all Americans are
imperialist war-mongers
who had aggressively and
still continue to ag-
gressively destroy
their motherland.
Their whole lives
have been satu-
rated in the con-


cept of juche, or self-re-
liance The\er.\ essence :o
their beinL is Ipred itited :n
the ide.l the\ need n:o o:ne
else and interaiction with
the world It lar.-e is to tlhe
detriment :o e\ery\tlhin
they hoIld dleir
The.\ jii nee\er adinit
weakness I:- t.lrIIlt The.\ i:.
never d(: .mni~llini to: bri)n
shame to: the leaders ofi
their njtill
Propjl. iljnd I.i i. litter
every jrej of tlie ii:nllltr.\.
remindiiin theiii tlit their
great leaders a.iid fLthelis.
Kim I] SIll1 an1 d Kii JI:,ii
II, are tfore:er \'att:linL
them. Ajnd Ilec.iie the.\ ~re
taught toe Ielie\e w itli their
whole lIi\e, tlijt tliee t\wo
greatllell '\e theiii e\ er -
thing ihe hlij\e. ..ii\ de\ I-
tion to tile rilht i:rI left .:f
that th lli-llt is t lltjlllo tlll
to treas:on
And s. in the middle of
that, there I \i.l their
.:- Page C3


'Future Corridors' to improve infrastructure


How can Florida
have the best
transportation
system in the nation?
Last summer, I unveiled
Florida's Transportation
Vision for the 21st Cen-
tury our state's
roadmap for the future.
This plan recognized
that, for our state to
maintain its competitive
edge in the nation's
economy, we must not
only maintain our exist-


Ananth Prasad
FLORIDA
VOICES


ing system at the highest levels, but
we must also have a transportation
network to address our growing
needs for many decades to come.
To further this vision, FDOT
began a "Future Corridors" initia-
tive that will include existing trans-
portation improvements, as well as
new transportation corridors to ac-
commodate highways where feasi-
ble and appropriate.
As we emerge from the recession,
Florida is expected to regain its po-
sition as one of the nation's fastest-


growing states. Popula-
tion, visitors, and freight
tonnage are projected to
grow 35 percent or more
between 2010 and 2040.
This means our trans-
portation system will
need to move more peo-
ple and freight over the
next several decades to
support our economic
growth and quality of life.
Clearly, our existing
highway system will not
be able to keep up with


this increase in demand.
The core of our approach is to get
the most we can from our existing
highway corridors, which are the
backbone of our economy Our
highly successful managed lanes
project called 95 Express in South
Florida benefits all users. It makes
1-95 a better experience for drivers,
residents and transit users alike by
creating more travel options and
encouraging the use of ridesharing
and transit alternates.
We want to expand managed


lanes in Florida, so our travelers in
other areas of the state can see
those same benefits.
Our transportation corridors will
need to accommodate not just auto-
mobiles, but rail facilities, gas and
electric transmission lines, fiber op-
tics and other technologies to mini-
mize the impact on adjacent lands.
We may need better connections be-
tween some regions, such as Tampa
Bay to Jacksonville or between
Southeast Florida and Central
Florida.
FDOT is engaging all its stake-
holders by working with our state
agency partners such as the De-
partment of Economic Opportunity,
Department of Environmental Pro-
tection, Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services and the
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission to coordinate our
plans and determine what critical
statewide assets need to be
protected.
We are also reaching out to major
landowners in the state to under-
stand their plans and visions for


growth in the future. In addition, we
are talking to environmental organ-
izations, business organizations, gas
and electric utilities, local govern-
ments, and land use advocates to
better understand how they envi-
sion the future of Florida.
It is a long-term view a multi-
tiered approach to planning our
next steps.
We can accomplish this vision
only if we work together to meet our
transportation challenges by meet-
ing our future mobility needs and
supporting appropriate develop-
ment patterns while also protecting
our fragile environmental assets.
Transportation doesn't drive
growth, but when growth happens,
we need to be there with the trans-
portation infrastructure to support
it. We invite the input of all Floridi-
ans as we continue to develop our
transportation vision.


Ananth Prasad is secretary
of the Florida Department of
Transportation


Elections

over, thank

goodness

Joe Meek won more
votes than any other
Citrus County candi-
date during the Tuesday
primary balloting to se-
cure his second term as a
county commissioner.
And that is as it should
be.
The 31-year-old Meek
has the combination of
humility, intelligence and
passion that comes
through so honestly that
most people can't help but
like him. He ran a very
competent race against
businessman Shannon
Heathcock who could
not really chink the Meek
armor.
Americans love to hate
their politicians and con-
stantly criticize them.
Heck, it's fun.
But Joe Meek is the real
deal. He's the first local
politician to bubble up out
of here in a long time who
has got his priorities in
order. Unless you are a
total cynic, it's hard to
criticize a guy who has
been working so hard on
the right thing (trying to
find jobs for Citrus County
residents).
Instead of having big
dreams about going to Tal-
lahassee or Washington,
Meek is sitting back and
learning how to problem-
solve on the local level.
Those skills will become
useful as the years go by.
Meek's time will come
when he will be called
upon to play another role.
Voters also showed
good sense in supporting
Lynn Dostal in the Demo-
cratic race for Florida
House District 34. Dostal
ran against the best-fi-
nanced ghost candidate of
all time Robert
Goocher Goocher was
talked into running in the
Democratic primary by a
bunch of Republicans
who were afraid that for-
mer state Sen. Nancy Ar-
genziano would run a
head-to-head race against
incumbent GOP House
member Jimmie T Smith.
I know this is compli-
cated, but Argenziano is
now an Independent and
she is feared by the GOP
leadership in the state be-
cause she doesn't deal
well with cow manure a
substance that is in great
supply in Tallahassee.
Goocher, an auto me-
chanic, never made a
campaign appearance
during the primary but
the state GOP spent tens
of thousands of dollars
trying to get him elected.
Voters didn't buy the dis-
tortion campaign and
overwhelmingly backed
Dostal the only candi-
date who really
campaigned.
After Nancy Argen-
ziano kindly hinted that
Dostal should get out of
the race so she can go
head-to-head with Smith,
the Democratic nominee
decided to do just that.
Dostal got with his advis-
ers on Thursday evening
and decided to withdraw
from the race and permit
Argenziano to take on
Jimmie T Smith in a one-
on-one contest. The state
GOP will make this race
one of its top priorities.
Smith was a strong sup-
porter of Gov Rick Scott
during the last legislative
session and they will pull
out all stops to get him
re-elected.
Scott Adams won a


Page C3


I







Page C2 -SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................... .................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
M ike Arnold ................... .................... HR director
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ELECTIONS




Sliver of voters



set the course



for the future


he great thing about
elections is that they are
like a cold front sweep-
ing through the Florida penin-
sula. They wash away all of the
pollution and we are reminded
that we live in a great place.
The primary elections are
over and most of
the verbal and
printed pollution THE I!
is temporarily be-
hind us. Here are The p
a few observa- elec
tions about what
took place: OUR 01


Incumbent
candidates did
much better in
2012 than they did


S
ri
t

P


Voters m
choice


in 2010 when all of the sitting of-
ficeholders got the boot. On
Tuesday, both incumbent county
commissioners -Joe Meek and
Dennis Damato won re-elec-
tion. In 2010, none of the incum-
bents won re-election.
The primary season had
some of the nastiest campaign-
ing ever seen in Citrus County
as candidates hid behind un-
limited funding to political ac-
tion committees to launch their
attacks. Floridians are being
made fools of by their own
politicians who created cam-
paign finance laws that hide
the facts. Finance reports were
not released until the Friday
before the Tuesday election -
blocking any real information
being released to voters in time
to take the slush-fund sources
into consideration. The laws
are a joke.
Early voting was huge in
Citrus County, but many voters


Business over people
The Republican plan to do away
with Medicare and force people to
deal with private insurance compa-
nies is more to support the giant
corporations and make the rich
even richer. My grandfather died in
1959, before Medicare. He was put
in a ward with nine other
men having to share the
same bathroom. He had 0
two major cancer surger-
ies and Jackson Memorial
Hospital in Miami, for the
fee, asked for a percentage
of how much money they
had. And in 1969 when
my grandmother had sur-
geries under Medicare, the CAL
hospital and doctors ac- 56
cepted the Medicare pay- -(
ments in full.
Stamps just for food
About the food stamps issue: I
just want to clarify something for
people. You cannot buy lottery tick-
ets with the food stamps card. The
EBT card is strictly for food. You
may get cash assistance, but I
doubt if the woman who was buy-
ing just food with her food stamps,
it's very unlikely she bought the lot-
tery tickets with the food stamps
card. And what people do with
their cash that they earn, however
they earn it, is their business. Peo-
ple should leave well enough alone.
Black-market stamps
I'm calling about the food
stamps people are selling. There's
not just people that have kids that
do it; there's a lot of older people
who have food stamps that live
right here ... that use their money,


I


lost the opportunity to partici-
pate in the debate during the
last weeks of the campaign be-
cause they had already voted.
While the supervisor of elec-
tions loves early voting, it may
not be the best process for
making good decisions. Re-
member that it
was just a few
;SUE: years back that a
local candidate
imary for school board
ion. was arrested at
the mall for sitting
'INION: in his car without
lake the his pants on. That
ces. was not an advis-
able campaign
strategy, but imag-
ine how bad you would feel if
you cast your ballot for him in
early voting?
More Republicans in Cit-
rus County voted than Democ-
rats. According to voting
results, 38 percent of the Re-
publicans showed up and only
23 percent of the Democrats.
Since everyone got to vote in
the open primary, it's hard to
understand. Since there are no
Democratic candidates in five
of the races, the final decision
was made Tuesday.
The overall voter turnout
of 27.06 percent was pretty low
compared to other counties in
Florida.
Voters made their choices
on Tuesday, and we all need to
respect the final decision. Cit-
rus County is still a small
enough place that we can put
aside political grudges and
work together to solve the
county's many problems.


their food stamps, and sell them
for money to make sure they have
money for alcohol or beer at their
house or to go to the bars. I think
it's just sickening, sickening.
Future looking dim
I just came back from voting
and while I was there, I'm thinking
back, you know, there
J ND was a day when you put a
JN screen door up to keep
Sthe flies out and that's all
you had to worry about.
And the politicians, when
you voted, you voted for
the one best qualified
and you knew who was
best qualified because
they told you what they
)579 stood for. Now when you
go in, because you have
no information like that
to work with, you find yourself
voting for the one you dislike the
least and you've got bars on the
windows and bars on the doors.
I've just got to wonder, where are
we going?
There ought to be a law
Is anybody else getting sick and
tired of all these lawyer commer-
cials on television? There's at least
13 lawyers on television just ham-
mering us every day and they're
all the best just ask them.
Prompt service
I called Mosquito Control a cou-
ple of weeks ago. They came out
that night and the next day they
were spraying our yard. We live by
the water and they just came by
now. Thank you so much, guys.
My skin thanks you.


Little League thanks
The Inverness Little League
All Star softball team won the
Little League Florida District 15
Title.
The girls team hasn't won in
five years. The team then ad-
vanced to play in Pinellas Park
in the Sectionals.
The girls went out to the com-
munity asking for help and look-
ing for donations to help with
the cost of food, gas and lodging.
Without the generous help
from the community, the trip
would not have been a great
success.
The girls finished second in
the Sectionals.
We would like to give a big
thank you to the following busi-
nesses and people for their sup-
port in making the trip a success.
Ace Hardware in Inverness,
Apopka Marine, Mr Charles
Dean, Colonial 50 Pawn, 29th
Paradlet Custom Computer,
Winn Dixie Inverness, Subway
Inverness, Dr Glen Floral City,
The Hay Barn, Auto Zone Inver-
ness, Welsh Appliance Inver-
ness, MrChad Waller, Ice Cream
Doctor, Joe's Deli, Micheal's
Flooring, Quality Production
Service, Nick Nicholas Ford In-


"Do you ever get the feeling that the
only reason we have elections is to
find out ifthe polls were right?"
Robert Orben


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


2012: Apocalypse not


sometimes the news is that
something was not news-
worthy. The United Na-
tion's Rio+20 conference -
50,000 participants from 188 na-
tions- occurred in June, without
consequences. A generation has
passed since the 1992 Earth Sum-


mit in Rio, which
begat other confer-
ences and protocols
(e.g., Kyoto). And, by
now, apocalypse fa-
tigue boredom from
being repeatedly told
the end is nigh.
This began two gen-
erations ago, in 1972,
when we were warned
(by computer models
developed at MIT) that
we were doomed. We
were supposed to be
pretty much extinct by


regarding climate change re-
spect for science was said to re-
quire reverential suspension of
skepticism about scientific hy-
potheses. Time magazine's story
about "The Limits to Growth" ex-
emplified the media's frisson of
hysteria:


George Will
OTHER
VOICES


now, or at least miserable. We are
neither So, what when wrong?
That year begat "The Limits to
Growth," a book from the Club of
Rome, which called itself "a proj-
ect on the predicament of
mankind." It sold 12 million
copies, staggered The New York
Times ("one of the most important
documents of our age") and ar-
gued that economic growth was
doomed by intractable scarcities.
Bjorn Lomborg, the Danish aca-
demic and "skeptical environ-
mentalist," writing in Foreign
Affairs, said it "helped send the
world down a path of worrying ob-
sessively about misguided reme-
dies for minor problems while
ignoring much greater concerns,"
such as poverty, which only eco-
nomic growth can ameliorate.
MIT's models foresaw the col-
lapse of civilization because of
nonrenewablee resource deple-
tion" and population growth. "In
an age more innocent of and rev-
erential toward computers,"
Lomborg writes, "the reams of
cool printouts gave the book's ar-
gument an air of scientific au-
thority and inevitability" that
"seemed to banish any possibility
of disagreement." Then as now,


"The furnaces of
Pittsburgh are cold; the
assembly lines of De-
troit are still. In Los
Angeles, a few gaunt
survivors of a plague
desperately till free-
way center strips ...
Fantastic? No, only
grim inevitability if so-
ciety continues its
present dedication to
growth and 'progress.'"
The modelers exam-
ined 19 commodities
and said 12 would be


Aluminum, Lomborg writes, is
one of earth's most common met-
als. But until the 1886 invention
of the Hall-Heroult process, it
was so difficult and expensive to
extract that "Napoleon III had
bars of aluminum exhibited
alongside the French crown jew-
els, and he gave his honored
guests aluminum forks and
spoons while lesser visitors had
to make do with gold utensils."
Forty years after "The Limits to
Growth" imparted momentum to
environmentalism, that impulse
now is often reduced to children
indoctrinated to "reduce, reuse
and recycle." Lomborg calls recy-
cling "a feel-good gesture that
provides little environmental
benefit at a significant cost." He
says "we pay tribute to the pagan
god of token environmentalism by
spending countless hours sorting,
storing and collecting used paper,
which, when combined with gov-
ernment subsidies, yields slightly
lower-quality paper in order to
secure a resource" forests -
"that was never threatened in the
first place."
In 1980, economist Julian
Simon made a wager in the form
of a complex futures contract. He
bet Paul Ehrlich (whose 1968
book "The Population Bomb"
predicted "hundreds of millions
of people" would starve to death
in the 1970s as population growth
swamped agricultural produc-
tion) that by 1990 the price of any
five commodities Ehrlich and his
advisers picked would be lower
than in 1980. Ehrlich's group
picked five metals. All were
cheaper in 1990.
The bet cost Ehrlich $576.07.
But that year he was awarded a
$345,000 MacArthur Foundation
"genius" grant and half of the
$240,000 Crafoord Prize for eco-
logical virtue. One of Ehrlich's
advisers, John Holdren, is Barack
Obama's science adviser
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


OPINIONS INVITED
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cle editorials are the opinions of
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Viewpoints depicted in political
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Groups or individuals are invited
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Persons wishing to address the
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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letters@chronicleonline.com.

verness, Dr Wexler, and Texaco
Food Mart in Homosassa.
Sincerely,
The girls, coaches and parents
of the Inverness Little League


All Star Team.


Thanks for voting
I would like to thank everyone
so much for re-electing me, and
allowing me to continue to be
your county commissioner
Thank you all so much for your
support and help throughout
this campaign.
There are so many people that
did so much for me, and I am
grateful to everyone. I am ex-
tremely fortunate and thankful
to have such wonderful family
and friends that have supported
and helped me along the way
It is an absolute honor and priv-
ilege to have the opportunity to
represent the people of Citrus
County, and help make the place I
was born and raised in, and
where Amy and I are raising our
family, a better place to call home.
I will continue to do every-
thing I can, to make Citrus
County better From making sure
we are an affordable place to
live, to working to grow our
economy, I promise I will work
my hardest for you. From my
family to yours, thank you!
Joe Meek
Citrus County Commissioner


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


gone long before now alu-
minum, copper, gold, lead, mer-
cury, molybdenum, natural gas,
oil, silver, tin, tungsten and zinc.
Lomborg said:
Technological innovations
have replaced mercury in batter-
ies, dental fillings and ther-
mometers, mercury consumption
is down 98 percent and its price
was down 90 percent by 2000.
Since 1970, when gold reserves
were estimated at 10,980 tons,
81,410 tons have been mined and
estimated reserves are 51,000
tons. Since 1970, when known re-
serves of copper were 280 million
tons, about 400 million tons have
been produced globally and re-
serves are estimated at almost
700 million tons. Aluminum con-
sumption has increased 16-fold
since 1950, the world has con-
sumed four times the 1950 known
reserves, and known reserves
could sustain current consump-
tion for 177 years. Potential U.S.
gas resources have doubled in
the last six years. And so on.
The modelers missed some-
thing human ingenuity in dis-
covering, extracting and
innovating. Which did not just ap-
pear after 1972.


LETTERS to the Editor


Jason Newberry
Inverness





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Haggis? Chicken Napoleon? To each his own


H aggis is a
savory meat
pudding
containing a sheep's
heart, liver and lungs, *
mixed with onions,
oatmeal, suet, salt and
spices and then
simmered for some
three hours in the
sheep's stomach. Fred Bi
Sounds absolutely A SL
awful, doesn't it? OF I
But the Scots, God
love 'em, think it's
great so much so that it's
considered Scotland's national
dish. One of their most favorite
sons, the incomparable poet
Robert Burns, even wrote a poem
titled "Address to a Haggis" in
honor of this accumulation of
uninviting ingredients.


I can see myself
eating haggis, but I'd
S have to be very hungry,
S and I can't imagine ever
actually enjoying it
To each his own.
Back when Cheryl
and I were first
married, we had a
grocery budget of $9
rannen per week that's
.ICE right, nine dollars per
.IFE week. We bought what
we could, and surpris-
ingly I don't ever re-
member my sweet little wife
failing to have something on the
table when it was time for us to
eat. It wasn't necessarily what we
wanted, but eating it together was
always a treat.
One of her culinary talents was
to cut a single chicken into enough


pieces to make two meals of fried
chicken, and a third one we called
Chicken Napoleon because she
made it from the bony parts! She
used the back and neck, plus the
innards the liver, the heart and
the gizzard.
Most recently, daughter Becky
and her family were here from
Houston. During their visit, we
celebrated Becky's birthday and,
after a little bit of begging, I re-
lented and agreed to fry chicken
for her birthday dinner. Frying
chicken doesn't sound so bad, but
when you do it for our entire fam-
ily, it's a big job. KFC or a local su-
permarket's fried chicken just
isn't the same; she specifically
wanted daddy's fried chicken and
she got it. The chicken met every-
one's expectations and the feast
was a success, but I also ended up


with a lot of Chicken Napoleon
components.
I still remember Cheryl and my
early days together; and, if "thou
shalt not waste food" isn't the 1lth
commandment, it ought to be. So, I
gathered the bony parts, livers,
gizzards and hearts, washed them
thoroughly, put them in a crock
pot with an onion, salt, pepper, a
tablespoon of garlic and enough
water to cover, then turned the
dial to high. When it had cooked
for four hours, I picked out the
bones and chopped up the in-
nards, producing what was a just-
right combination of broth and
chicken chunks, into which I
dumped a cup of uncooked rice,
turned the heat down to low, let it
simmer for another hour, and
shazzam perfect Chicken
Napoleon!


At least Cheryl and I thought it
was perfect
Our guests weren't thrilled, es-
pecially son-in-law Kurt who,
while his complexion was becom-
ing a color similar to split-pea
soup, allowed as to how he could-
n't imagine eating such a dish -
sort of like how I feel about haggis.
He stopped before calling it
"yucky," but I know that's what he
was thinking. Maybe I should have
offered to stuff it all into a sheep's
stomach for him.
Again, to each his own.
The Scots delight in haggis, and
Cheryl and I still enjoy Chicken
Napoleon.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Register to vote now


his message is extremely important
to younger citizens, especially be-
tween the ages of 18 and 30. Why? Be-
cause your vote in the upcoming election is
essential to our nation continuing as a
democracy And every Democratic vote
counts, yours included!
As a citizen, you owe it to yourself and
your family to become familiar with politics
at county, state and federal lev-
els. Closely studied, you will find
politics involved in every breath
you take, every personal activity,
every food or beverage you con-
sume, the education you receive
from elementary school through
college, and your military
service.
The decisions you make voting
for those legislators who best
represent you must be based on George
a balanced view after consider- GUI
ing the sources advocating ex-
tremes and moderate views. COLI
Voting for candidates based on a
single issue will not benefit you or the pub-
lic. And, you must demand a bipartisan
commitment from those you vote for, espe-
cially when their record of bipartisanship
is not evident.
If you are not a registered voter, I urge
you to do so now! Being a Democrat, I rec-
ommend you register with our party
You can register to vote on the supervisor
of election's website www.votecitrus.com.
Full instructions are supplied in the web-
site. You will need to complete the applica-
tion, sign, and mail or deliver it.
You can register by calling the Supervisor
of Elections Office, 352-346-6740, asking for a
mailed copy of the application. You will need
to complete the application, sign it, and mail
or deliver it to the supervisor's office.
You can register, by visiting the Supervi-
sor of Elections Office, public libraries, post
offices and numerous other places listed in
the website, asking for an application, com-
pleting, signing and returning it there, or
mailing or delivering it to the same location.
At libraries, they will provide you the ap-
plication, help in completion if needed, and
mail it in for you.
All applicants will be verified electroni-
cally with Tallahassee. Give yourself a one-
week deadline to complete and return the
application, It will be ample time to be reg-
istered and ensure receipt of your absen-


I
I
A


tee ballot in the mail, well ahead of the Nov
6 general election. To me, using the absen-
tee ballot system is the preferred choice
rather than using early voting or going to
the polls on Election Day, and it is a must
for shut-ins or the disabled. Using an ab-
sentee ballot eliminates a potential voter
ID problem. For currently registered vot-
ers, it's not too late to apply for an absentee
ballot. This can also be accom-
plished online at
www.votecitrus.com.
Those who are independents
and dissatisfied Republicans
-- should change their registration
now to support the Democratic
Party
SElection results in Citrus
County in our presidential elec-
tion of November 2008, in spite
Harbin of an unusual effort to get out the
EST vote, was an unacceptable 61.2
percent of our 37,786 registered
JMN Democrats actually voting. This
compared with the 74.8 percent
of all registered voters who voted, giving
Republican and Independents even higher
percentages. And in the Aug. 14 primary, an
unacceptable 23.4 percent of our current
32,034 Democrats actually voted. We're now
involved in a similar "get out the vote" cam-
paign again this year. You too can help
these remaining days by helping with our
campaign and by voting!
With over two months remaining before
the election, it is not too much to ask that
you and the other 32,033 of our registered
Democrats make an obligation now to vote
this November. I'd also like to ask those
with other parties to support our Demo-
cratic ideology bound to succeed with a re-
turn to an improving economy


George Harbin is retired Homosassa resi-
dent who has been appointed Citrus
County Democratic Executive Committee
public information officer and has served
on the committee since 2000. He was a
contracting officer for the Department of
Defense, including 13 years in the Penta-
gon, writing and awarding contracts for
construction, research, other services and
products for 25years, most with the Corps
of Engineers and finally in the Office of
the Secretary of the Army George Harbin
can be emailed atgharbinl4@gmail.com.


A democracy? No
Throughout the majority of the Ameri-
can media today, along with most modern
political debates and discussions, the
word "democracy" has appeared numer-
ously The United States has been la-
beled as a democracy, and it seems as
though it is in our foreign policy to
spread this form of government through-
out the world.
The strange thing is, however, that the
word never appears in any of our found-
ing documents ... at least in a favorable
way Samuel Adams, Alexander Hamilton
and James Madison all antagonized
democracy as being a horribly unstable
form of government in their writings,
viewing it as the main cause of the rise to
power of the aristocracy, or oligarchy,
something that phases out liberty. Truth
be told, the founders did everything they
could to prevent the United Sates from
having a democracy, giving us a form of
government known as a "republic."
The differences between a republic
and a democracy are not very well known
by many Americans today
A democracy is a system of government
that advocates majority or mob rule,


somehow stating that the majority of peo-
ple can make decisions for all things. A
republic, however, states that the ulti-
mate authority is the law. An example of
the great principles of our republic
would be the fact that all Americans who
have been accused of a crime are enti-
tled to a fair trial. If the United States
was an absolute democracy, this would
be different. Instead of a trial, the major-
ity of people would most likely gather
around and vote on what to do with the
person accused.
If we keep on going down this road to
democracy, it is inevitable that our rights
will slowly be taken away The link be-
tween democracy and oligarchy (a system
of government ruled by a few people in
power) is highly seen throughout history,
especially with Rome, which was origi-
nally a republic, until however, democ-
racy overcame. Eventually, the elite
seized the power granted from the ex-
tremes of democracy, and Rome became
a highly authoritarian oligarchy
Which system do you prefer?
John Houston, age 14
Citrus County,
ninth-grader at Florida Virtual School


KOREA
Continued from Page C1

enemy and their teacher all
wrapped into one.
What they believe
I could talk about their ideology for
days. There are books upon books and
yet we still don't really have a firm
grasp on the concept. It was created
and is perpetuated on a foundation of
lies and untruths.
For instance, the students truly be-
lieve the DPRK is the greatest nation
in the world; that there is no hunger
there and that capitalist nations send
out the strong to kill and destroy the
weak.
In fact, I read a piece of literature
there at a bookstore in one of the ho-
tels that said that capitalists in Amer-
ica wait in long lines for bread that is
never received and that Americans
might even be cannibals because of
the depth of hunger the country faces.
So obvious are the lies, yet with no
Internet access or interaction outside
of the world created for them by their
dear leaders, how could they possibly
know any different?
The holes in the juche idea are so
plentiful, yet the people fail to see the
irony For example, we were on a tour
of the great monuments in Pyongyang.
(On a side note, I would love to see the
ledger sheet for how much money is
spent on the construction, mainte-
nance and upkeep of the thousands of
statues and murals all dedicated to
worship of the leaders.)
We were at the juche tower, a monu-
ment dedicated to the praise of the
self-reliance idea. It was huge and
beautiful. We went inside and I waited
as some of the other teachers went to
the top to get a view of the city. Our
government-issued "minder" or "mon-
itor," who told us what we could and
could not take pictures of and closely
watched us anytime we were away
from the school, came in to get re-


My goal was to
play a part in the role
of diplomacy.

prieve from the heat He walked up to
the gift shop there inside the tower
and promptly bought himself a Coca-
Cola.
That's right, friends straight from
Atlanta via China.
I sat in utter amazement. Here, at
the very place dedicated to showing
the world that they needed no one, you
could buy the one item that screams
globalization. I couldn't believe it.
Comprehensive
oppression
There are many places in the world
where oppression reigns. I have to say,
however, that I'm not sure any are as
holistically oppressed as North Korea.
It's not just physical but sociologi-
cal, psychological and spiritual. We
took a trip to the demilitarized zone
(DMZ) between North and South
Korea.
As we stood looking across the line
to the freedom that reigned in the
South, one thing caught my attention.
The South Korean soldiers all stood
with their backs to their own country,
at the ready to defend its citizens from
any danger that might come. The
North Korean soldiers stood with
their backs to the South, guns at
attention.
It gave me the eerie feeling that
their sole purpose was not to protect
its citizens from the dangers without,
but to prevent its citizens from escap-
ing the world within.
Diplomatic mission
I don't know if I accomplished any-
thing by going to North Korea.
My goal was to play a part in the role
of diplomacy These students will be in
leadership positions someday
They are chosen by their govern-
ment to be the next generation to con-


trol the country
That first week was rough, but as I
interacted with my students taught
them, played soccer with them, ate
with them they began to thaw little
by little. Their smiles came through;
they laughed with me and joked with
me. And when the summer was over,
they were genuinely sad to see me go.
But I hope that when they look back
on their time at PUST, they will re-
member their first foreign professor
- thatAmerican girl- and somehow,
that memory will elicit a positive emo-
tion; they will remember a positive ex-
perience.
The chances for most of us to meet a
North Korean in our lifetimes are
pretty slim. But this experience gave
me an opportunity to build bridges
and to think about what it might be
like to be them, and to realize that at
the end of the day, most of them are
just as confused about us as we are
about them.
None of us can pretend to know the
thoughts of their new mysterious
leader, Kim Jong Un. Neither can
Washington, for that matter. But there
is hope.
I don't believe there will ever be a
utopian world a peace like the kind
that every Miss America contestant
desires. But there is hope for some
kind of peace somewhere in the fu-
ture. I saw its spark in the eyes of my
students playing soccer or using an
iPad for the first time.
Hatred on their part and ignorance
on ours is a far greater evil than Com-
munism and we all fear what we do
not understand.
They may never embrace capitalism
or run toward democracy But perhaps
when it comes time for both our gen-
erations to be decision-makers, this
experience will propel us all to reach
for love instead of hatred.


Cortney Stewart is a 2003 graduate of
Lecanto High School and former
Chronicle columnist and intern.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

seat on the Citrus County
Commission and that is a
victory for Sen. Charles
Dean of Inverness. Dean,
the former county sheriff,
has been at odds with the
county commission for a
number of years dating
back to the controversy
over his barn. Sen. Dean is
a business partner with
Adams and he now has an
ally inside the county
courthouse.
As expected, County
Commissioner Winn Webb
won the GOP nomination
to face Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
in the November general
election. But the surprise
in that race was that for-
mer Crystal River Police
Chief Steven Burch did as
well as he did. Burch re-
ceived 37 percent of the
vote in the three-way race
and was only 904 votes be-
hind the county commis-
sioner once all the votes
were counted. With Webb's
strong name recognition in
his current role, that was a
very close contest
The closest race of the
primary season was Crys-
tal River City Councilman
Ron Kitchen's attempt to
defeat two-term County
Commissioner Dennis
Damato. Only 424 votes
separated the two and
third-place candidate
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters had 6,602 to
spare. Damato won a third
four-year term because no
Democrats qualified for
November.


It's no insult to
Bill Murray that
he lost and
there was no
outcry about his
performance.

School board member
Bill Murray lost his re-
election bid to teacher
Susan Hale of Lecanto and
that race deserves men-
tion. Murray, also a former
educator, served on the
school board and did a
good job. He is a very nice
man who is very positive
and supportive of the
school system. But it's not
a bad thing that new peo-
ple come to the table with
a different set of ideas and
a new view of the system.
On policy-making boards
such as the school board,
county commission or city
council, it's good to have
new blood filter in during
the elections. It's no insult
to Bill Murray that he lost
and there was no outcry
about his performance.
Policy-making politicians
are not serving life terms.
Get elected, implement
your ideas, speak your
mind and make room for
someone else.
As Bill Murray gets
ready to leave office, he
deserves the recognition
for the good things he's
done during his time.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


Guest COLUMN


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 C3


r
L
L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Breaking it down for viewers at home


I'm very excited about a new op-
portunity that has come my way
Starting this week and lasting
through the end of the 2012 election
season, I will be joining the ABC Ac-
tion News team in Tampa as a politi-
cal analyst.
This endeavor allows me
to combine two of my loves
- politics and talking.
The political bug bit me
early First it was with stu-
dent government at Coral
Springs High School. That --
was followed by the Student
Senate at my alma mater,
the University of Florida, Paula r
where I earned a BA in Po-
litical Science and an MA in FLOI
Mass Communications, VOIl
once again combining my
loves of politics and communicating.
It was not my intention to run for of-
fice, but to be a political consultant. In
May of 1996, I found myself a reluctant
candidate determined to prove that
Florida House District 64 could be
won by a Republican for the first time.
As term limits end my 16-year stint
in the Florida Legislature, I've been
given two opportunities to put my mass
communications degree to good use.
The first was to pen this weekly col-
umn for Florida Voices, which I have
found both challenging and rewarding.
The second is to join newscaster
Brendan McLaughlin. With Tampa
Bay in the spotlight for the Republi-
can National Convention and the
highly competitive races taking place
here, this will be the hotbed of politi-
cal activity. It is my intention to pro-
vide an insider's perspective to the
races, having walked in the candi-
date's shoes and having served with
many of those running.



ima I mhko,47fC


It's been my style to steer clear of re-
gurgitating the talking points and to
instead call it as I see it without regard
to political correctness. There are so
many back stories to each of these
races that offer a glimpse into the
inner sanctum of power
politics. I hope time per-
mits us to explore some in
depth.
e/ The convention is the
main event. Being there
S with press credentials is an
S interesting twist for a sit-
ting state senator, but one I
will relish.
)ockery This won't be my first
S convention. That occurred
RIDA in 1988 in New Orleans,
CES when I was a young aspir-
ing political operative. It
also happened to be my first date with
a wonderful man whom I married a
year later.
I remember the convention vividly
My favorite president, Ronald Reagan,
was, sadly, leaving office and George
H.W Bush and Dan Quayle were being
nominated. As Reagan finished his
speech, tears were streaming down
my face, not wanting this wonderful
leader to leave office. And I got goose-
bumps when Lee Greenwood took the
stage and sang "God Bless the USA."
The mood of the hall was electrified
with an overwhelming sense of pride
and patriotism. It is one of my fondest
memories.
My second convention was in San
Diego in 1996, the year I became a re-
luctant but successful candidate for the
state House. We left for California in
the midst of the campaign to see U.S.
Sen. Bob Dole and his VP pick, Jack
Kemp, accept the GOP nomination.
Now in 2012, with the convention in


' A^^


Starting this week and
lasting through the end
of the 2012 election
season, I will be joining
the ABC Action News
team in Tampa as a
political analyst.

my legislative backyard, I'll be attend-
ing the convention that coincides with
the end of my time in the legislature.
Each convention I attend seems to
mark a significant event in my per-
sonal or professional life.
Many thanks to ABC Action News
for the opportunity to offer my analy-
sis, perspective and opinion for all of
the important campaign events -pri-
mary election, Republican conven-
tion, Democratic convention,
presidential debates and the general
election on Nov 6.
I hope to bring a fresh, honest and
frank perspective to the 85 days that
are left in the election cycle and to
make sense of the campaigns for those
who don't live and breathe politics.
This life-long Republican is looking
forward to sharing the "big tent" re-
publican perspective that Ronald
Reagan espoused in that moving
speech at my first convention.

Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland
who is chronicling her final year in
the Florida Senate. She can be
reached atpdockery@
florida voices. com.


End Bush tax cuts
On Jan. 25, 2012, the
Senate passed the Middle
Class Tax Cut Act by 51 to
48, with 51 Democrats vot-
ing for it and all Republi-
cans voting against it.
Senate Democrats voted
to end the Bush tax cuts
for the richest 2 percent of
Americans who don't need
them.
I believe it is the right
thing to do to get our
economy back on track
and a good first step to
repair a tax system rigged
for the ultra-rich and
corporations.
The Bush tax cuts that
are set to expire at the
end of the year always dis-
proportionately favored
the rich. Those making
more than $1 million a
year got an average tax
break of $143,000, the mid-
dle-class families got an
average tax break of
$1,000.
Ending the Bush tax
cuts on household income
above $250,000 would save
the government nearly $1
trillion, according to Con-
gress' Joint Committee of
Taxation. The GOP plan to
extend all of the cuts over
the next decade would
not save the government
anything.
It's sad when the GOP
bleats about small busi-
nesses being hurt by end-
ing the Bush tax cuts for


the rich, but that's a lie.
According to a report by
the Treasury Department,
fewer than 3 percent of
small business owners
make more than $250,000
a year
It's time for Republi-
cans in the House to do
the right thing by support-
ing this common-sense
bill. I believe there is
something terribly wrong
with people who side with
the 2 percent while com-
plaining the poor are
causing the national debt
It's time for the 2 percent
to pay their fair share.
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness

OPINIONS INVITED
Letters must be no
longer than 350
words, and writers will
be limited to three
letters per month.
Send letters to: The
Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429; fax to 352-
563-3280, or email to
letters@ chronicle
online.com.
The Chronicle has
enacted its practice
of asking that
endorsement letters
be limited to the
reasons writers are
supporting candidates
not why they won't
support candidates.


S.. -,
aw-


mi I

l,
Kv. ,lr


I


0


I


8th Annual
Citrus County Veterans

4 Person

Scramble


ONLY
'5500
per person

Proceeds donated to the Citrus County Veterans Foundation.
DO NOT NEED TO BE A VETERAN TO PLAY

September 8th
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
Check in is at 7:30 am in the Hampton Room.
Shotgun Start is at 8:30 am


by'RAugst31orfirsCt12
Ipaers. C Ih ry Ibl I


Foundation andail to^
2804.'arc Knighton -


Price includes: golf cart,
beverages on course,
lunch at the clubhouse.
Prizes: Ist, 2nd & Last
Closest to the Pin
Hole in One Prize
For registration form, call 527-5915
or visit the website at www.cltrusvf.org

CHRNiCltE


An Entertaining Interactive
Murder/Mystery/Music/Comedy Dinner Theater.

September 7 9, 2012
Portion of September 7 & 8: Doors open at 6:00 pm.
Proceeds September 9: Doors open at 3.00 pm.
to Benefit
Encore Ensemble Ballroom
CENTRAL RIDGE COMMUNITY CENTER
WOUiNDIID wARIO 77 Civic Circle
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
Caleredl Dinner and Perlormance for
$25 per Person

EY IESEcVATION ONLY?
Lease Call
(352) 212-5417

Produced through special arrangement with Mysteries by Moushey, Inc
Sponsored by
CH ILE

Bingo begins Monday, September 3rd.
Cards available in the Chronicle
Sunday, September 2nd.


El


IET BI


II0 -::


1. Traditional Bingo $100
2. Double Bingo $200

3. Full Card Bingo $300
A Bingo number will be printed somewhere in the
Chronicle each day for the month of September.


p cI-.
--


2ti-


"Offer
pr


Sign up Online or
Call For Subscriptions
http://ww.chronileonlin...om./bingo ubscription
Call 352-563-5655 or
after 5pm 352-563-3295
a Bingostals Sept 3rd Ths subscnpton mustbe pe-paid The offerwil bevalid fro


The Chronicle is committed to sulfpoi ting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
sei vices, fundialsels and entei tainment throughout ouI
community The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citi us County the best place to live and wvoi k. Don t
hesitate to contact The Chionicle at 352-563-3226 foi all
of yorII Sponsoiship needs!


Letter to the EDITOR


Enccre Ensemble Theater, Inc.
Urohudvly Dresents...
llffe w J 'PTM Jc


P4--- ~- --


C4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


COMMENTARY


Sunda*y l^ [* i iMond II[n* a,' il -


W RYm Frida Saturday


D
R
(c


Gae Rules... : .. ..... ......... .


Ln












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'Crowdfunding'


Kickstarter

projects make

millions
PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer

NEW YORK A funny
thing happens on Kick-
starter, the website where
people ask for money to fi-
nance their projects. Some-
times, they get more money
than they ask for
Sometimes, they get mil-
lions more.
In April, three-person
startup Pebble Technology
sought to raise $100,000 to
make 1,000 wristwatches
that can be programmed
with different clock faces.
Donors on Kickstarter
showered them with more
than 100 times that amount:
$10.3 million. It would have
gone higher had Pebble not
put a cap on contributions
and ended the fundraising
early
"We had tried raising
money through the normal
routes, and it didn't really
work," said Eric Migicovsky,
the 25-year-old founder of
Pebble.
Kickstarter is the largest
of dozens of sites devoted to
crowdfunding, in which
donors contribute small
sums of money to get a proj-
ect off the ground.
Inventors, artists and en-
trepreneurs post their proj-
ects on a Kickstarter page,
usually with a video presen-
tation. They set a fixed du-
ration for their fundraising,
from one to 60 days, and a
dollar goal for contribu-
tions. Anyone can con-
tribute. If the goal isn't
reached by the deadline, no
money changes hands and
the project is canceled.
Usually, the contributors
get something beyond the
satisfaction of knowing they
helped turn a dream into
reality like a ticket to a
theater production, or in
the case of Pebble, a pro-
grammable watch.
Designer Casey Hopkins
asked for $75,000 to make a
luxury iPhone dock out of
solid aluminum. He got $1.4
million. When that hap-
pened, in February, his was
the first Kickstarter project
to surpass $1 million.
There have been eight
more since then. Artist
Rich Burlew asked for
$57,750 to put his comic
books back in print, and
ended up with $1.3 million.
Since launching in 2009,
Kickstarter has raised $323
million for projects. Start-
ing a project is free, but
Kickstarter takes 5 percent
of contributions if a project
is funded, and Amazon.com
Inc. takes another 3 percent
to 5 percent for processing
the payments. The funds


Associated Press
Pebble Technology founder Eric Migicovsky poses for a portrait wearing the Pebble watch
April 27 in New York. In April, three-person startup Pebble Technology sought to raise
$100,000 to make the programmable wristwatch. Donors on Kickstarter showered them
with more than a hundred times that amount: $10.3 million. Kickstarter is at the center
of a new phenomenon known as "crowdfunding," in which donors contribute small por-
tions of money to get a project off the ground.


are usually subject to taxes
as well.
Crowdfunding started as
a way to fund band tours
and albums. Kickstarter
wasn't the first site of its
kind. It is, however, the most
successful. Co-founder
Perry Chen has said that the
site was born out of his frus-
tration at being unable to
organize a concert. But it's
becoming a potent launch-
pad for tangible products as
well, upending in some
cases the usual way things
get made.
There's a time-worn
route for entrepreneurs:
They come up with an idea,
find funding, make a prod-
uct, sell it, then pay back the
funders with interest or
an equity stake in the fledg-
ling company Under that
model, funders are usually
looking for a big payoff on
their early investment.
Finding funding is, of
course, where many proj-


ects hit the rocks. Those
who put up money for a
project have to be con-
vinced that it will yield
something others want -
and that's not easy to figure
out.
For contributors to take
part in a Kickstarter proj-
ect, all they have to do is ask
themselves: Do I want that?
In that sense, Kickstarter
is a great way to sell things
that don't yet exist In effect,
Pebble sold 85,000 watches,
and artist Rich Burlew sold
94,000 books. Now, they just
have to make these things.
Migicovsky, the Pebble
founder, is based in Silicon
Valley, where venture capi-
tal runs in rivers. He got
some funding from "angel
investors" wealthy indi-
viduals early on and pro-
duced a small run of
watches last year But to re-
alize his vision of a pro-
grammable watch that only
needs to be charged once a


week, he needed more
money The venture capi-
talists, who generally invest
bigger sums than angels,
didn't bite. They're used to
backing Web and software
projects but are apprehen-
sive about hardware, he
says.
So Migicovsky went to
Kickstarter, figuring he'd
raise enough money for a
production run of 1,000
watches. But the project got
attention from technology
blogs, and the orders
started pouring in. Over 37
days, he sold one watch
every 38 seconds. Franti-
cally trying to satisfy the or-
ders, he hired six people in
two weeks, tripling Peb-
ble's staff.
The watches will be ready
this fall without the help
of venture capital.
"You want to spend your
time talking to customers.
You don't really want to
spend your time talking to


venture capitalists. Because
at the end of the day, they're
just guys with money," Migi-
covsky says.
The success of Pebble
and others is clearly attract-
ing more ambitious proj-
ects. A Los Angeles-based
startup, Ouya, is collecting
money to create a game
console. It set a $950,000
minimum reflecting the
complexity of competing
against the PlayStation,
Xbox and Wii and hit $8.6
million in pledges.
David Tisch, the founder
of "startup accelerator"
firm TechStars, says posting
a product on Kickstarter is
a great way to gauge de-
mand. If it turns out to be
strong, that can make it eas-
ier to attract investment
that can turn the project
into an ongoing business.
"For the first time, there's
a way to get customer feed-
back with money attached
to it," he said.
While entrepreneurs
revel in the attention they
get from donors on the web-
site, Kickstarter's founders
are uncomfortable with the
site's role as a fundraising
tool for products. The com-
pany wouldn't comment for
this story, and it doesn't re-
lease financial data to the
public because it's a private
company
In past interviews, co-
founder Yancey Strickler
has suggested that Kick-
starter wasn't intended to
be an engine of commerce
or a route to riches.
"There is this greater
idea of helping people out
and that art still has value
in the world," he told
board-game blog Purple
Pawn earlier this year "We
generally don't like Kick-
starter to be used to, say,
start a business."
Of course, several Kick-
starter projects have turned
into businesses, like Eleva-
tionLab, the Portland, Ore.-
based startup that makes
the Elevation iPhone dock-
ing station and Touchfire, a
company in Redmond,
Wash., that created a key-
board for the iPad.
The majority of Kick-
starter projects are still
non-commercial ventures
like photo books and ama-
teur musicals. At this year's
South by Southwest Film
Festival in Austin, 33 films,
or 10 percent of the lineup,
were funded through
Kickstarter
Kickstarter's focus on
artistic and creative pur-
suits to the exclusion of oth-
ers might make it
vulnerable to competition.
Sam Gordon, who funded
his "Brydge" keyboard for
the iPad through the site,
says Kickstarter needs to
clearly define its guidelines
for product development.
"If they don't, then
there's room for other
sites," Gordon said.


Sign up for fall 2012 business seminars


CORE, this fall, will
present a series of
business seminars
with an approach toward
meeting the demands of
the current economy
The newly revised
three-part educational
platform will kick off
with the R U Ready ses-
sion scheduled for 6 to 8
p.m. Sept. 18 at the Col-
lege of Central Florida.
An open forum will fol-
low, with SCORE men-
tors present to answer
questions.


Dr. Fre
Her
EXPER
MATn


There is no charge for the R U
Ready conference. Attendees will
be able to sign up and advance for
the next session, the Small Business
Institute and related round tables.
The latter two programs start two
weeks later on Oct. 2.
R U Ready?
Being in and/or going into a small
business is the basis of the R U
Ready presentation. This session


will discuss the personal
discipline and mental
preparedness required.
Alerting attendees with
an understanding of
what it takes to start and
stay the course of busi-
ness ownership is the
goal.
During this session, at-
derick tendees will ask them-
zog selves: "Will I have the
HENCE energy, financing and de-
termination to perse-
ERS vere? Do I understand
and accept the personal
sacrifices required to go the dis-
tance in the short and long term?
Can I look beyond the realities of
time, money and mentored busi-
ness education?"
The following session, the Small
Business Institute, is reinforced by
the third aspect of this triad, the
Round Table Discussions.
Small Business Institute
Step two of SCORE's new offering
is the (SBI) Small Business Insti-


tute. This phase is focused on im-
proving the performance of existing
businesses and enhancing a startup
venture.
The Tuesday SBI's content will be
followed up by a Thursday session
during the same week titled Round
Table Discussions. This component
represents part three of the pro-
gram scenario.
The strength of a platform struc-
tured in this way offers an interac-
tive learning environment. The
Round Table is facilitator-led, and
seasoned mentors are present. Par-
ticipants are encouraged to ask spe-
cific questions to improve their
personal take-away benefits.
SBI runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 2, at the College of Central
Florida, in Lecanto. Business basics
and measuring results are the first
subjects. The Round Table Discus-
sions begin during the same week,
from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4.
Each round table, thereafter, is
scheduled for Thursday following
the Tuesday SBI.


Real-time help
After the opening session, SBI
presentations will center on: busi-
ness problem-solving projection
improvements, research and mar-
keting; and market media con-
tinuous improvement and
summary
Time to decide
Make up your mind to improve
your business practices and sign up.
Watch for announcements of the
RU Ready and SBI in the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Pricing and room locations at the
College of Central Florida will be
included.
SCORE office hours are 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday.
Call 352-249-1236 and leave contact
information, which allows us to re-
spond to your questions.

Dr FrederickJ. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County SCORE.
Email fherzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Paying


mortgage


by credit


card

EAR BRUCE: I
currently have a
second mortgage
of $25,000 with a rate of 8
percent, and my payment
is only an additional $200
a month.
I have no problem pay-
ing this, but I want to put
it to rest. I have excellent
credit, and I received a
credit card with a limit
that could easily handle
the rest of what I owe. The
rate on the credit card is
zero percent interest for
the first year
I'm thinking about pay-
ing off the mortgage with
the credit card and then
just paying off the credit
card in the next year I will
save on interest, and I can
put the mortgage to rest.
What do you think? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: If you
can borrow the money at
zero percent rather than
the 8 percent you are pay-
ing, I would go for it.
It will take discipline on
your part to put the money
aside and pay off the
credit card bill in that
year's time.
By all means under-
stand that if you don't ad-
here absolutely to the
terms of the zero interest
loan, you could suddenly
be hit with a huge interest
bill. A small slip could be
costly
DEAR BRUCE: We
have a home in Alabama,
and we would like to buy a
retirement home in
Florida. We have vaca-
tioned there many times
and love it. We just don't
know if we should buy a
house or a condo. We go
round and round about
this all the time.
Any thoughts? We have
agreed that we will listen
carefully to what you have
to say John and Susan
in Alabama
DEAR JOHN AND
SUSAN: It sounds like a
plan to me!
I have said this many
times: Buying a house or a
condo is purely a matter
of personal choice.
There is no right or
wrong answer
With a house, you have
the responsibility of the
lawn and exterior mainte-
nance although merci-
fully if you're in Florida,
there is no snow to shovel.
With a condo, all of
these things are done for
you.
Most condos are analo-
gous to apartment living,
which may be perfectly
agreeable to you. But if
you're accustomed to hav-
ing more privacy, as you
do with a house, you might
wish to continue that.
You need to think about
how you want to spend
your retired years: mow-
ing grass or hitting the golf
course? Florida is a won-
derful place to live. Wel-
come to my part of the
world.
[]
Send questions to bruce
@brucewilliams.com or
to Smart Money PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions of general
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing
to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot
be provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can
now be heard at
wwwbrucewilliams. com.









D2

SUNDAY
AUGUST 19, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Damron will be missed

in Citrus County


-- -- - -C
-Ur





Pictured with Jim Drake and his son, James Drake, are Cit-
rus County Ambassadors (from left) Lillian Smith, Mary
Kay Cosmetics; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River;
Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Jeanne Green, The Grove
Downtown; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus
County; Dan Pushee, Associate Member; Jennifer Duca,
Comfort Keepers; Sarah Fitts, First International Title;
Rhonda Lestinksy, Nature Coast Bank; and Jenee Vickers,
KiddeeKampus Learning Center.

Drake Carpet Services joins
Chamber of Commerce


Drake Carpet Services is
a family owned and oper-
ated business that has
been in Citrus County
since 2006. Owner Jim
started in carpet cleaning
when he was 18 and
through the years he has
learned a lot about what
does and does not work.
Their carpet services in-


clude carpet cleaning and
repairing, carpet stretch-
ing and dying. They also
perform pet spot and odor
removal as well as grout
cleaning.
Jim stands by his motto:
Most thorough clean or it's
free.
Call Drake Carpet Serv-
ices today at 352-795-0859.


The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce and EDC
extend our condolences to
the family and staff of Lenny
Damron.
He will be missed in the
Citrus County community
Damron was senior vice
president managing LKQ's


Self Service and Heavy
Duty Truck divisions in Cit-
rus County
The Chamber of Com-
merce proceeded with its
decision to honor LKQ with
the August New Image
Award at its luncheon on
Aug. 10.


YOU CAUGHT


MY EYE ...
Gary Joregensen and Jeramiah Kirkland
A Crystal River Kayak Co., Crystal River
Joy Bishop
Dillon's Cinnamon Sticks, N
Inverness
Marge Stidd
Publix, Shoppes of
Sugarmill Woods
Bonnie Mann
Reservationist at Citrus County Transit
... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


COUNTY MARKS MONTH TO HONOR INDUSTRY


County Commissioners and members of the EDC and Chamber of Commerce join John Seifert, far right, executive director of the EDC, in accepting from the County Commissioners a
proclamation declaring September as Industry Appreciation Month. With Seifert, from left, are: Commissioner Denis Damato; Commissioner J.J. Kenney; Jeff Inglehart; Cira Schnettler;
Mike Orlito; Cindi Fein; Josh Wooten, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce; Gailen Spinka and Jennifer Duca of Comfort Keepers; Keith Pullias; Commissioner Rebecca Bays;
Commissioner Joe Meek; Ardath Prendergast; Randy Clark of Clark Construction; and Commissioner Winn Webb.


/ 4 /-


Sponsor

CRYSTAL
AU TO rOTIV


Sponsor

September

y'|
a I


To"rgst Sponsor aybvt3 aR53 r i.eptemoer

To register for any event 352.795.3149; or www.cirusedc.comlevents


I ,

I S





-I
MoiVtIlNG


EVEN-d TJ ]:".

) Thill ;r !W


SEPTEMBER 20


Sponsor




Sponsor

September
l. ..
a' *-


Scan Mij
this:
FrBI r.


1i "like" us on
facebook










Melissa Benefield. Renea shares some great programs
that the YMCA will be offering this fall. You will see why
Citrus County loves the "Y". Are you 55+ and looking
for an independent senior living facility? Liz Ziolkowski
Director of Communication & Marketing for Kingsway of
Beverly Hills tells how you can have all the comforts of
home without all of the responsibilities- nestled right
with us all the many facets of her business. From travel,
to events, pageant productions and even fashions,
KarElli Enterprises has it all. In our final segment, we
will be bringing Homosassa Butterfly to you! Learn
what butterflies eat, how they communicate and why
they are so important to our environment. Homosassa
Butterfly can also host your next function! You have
three chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday night
at 6pm, Thursday morning at 8am and Friday at
12:30pm-- Don't miss it! "LIKE" Chamber Chat on
Facebook! If you would like to feature your business or
event on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email
Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.


ffi-,awa


AMMMON,
rl"C%






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's lonneition


D3

SUNDAY
AUGUST 19, 2012


Anchored in Citrus County


July V.I.P.

John Jobe an asset to

company, community

John Jobe was born in Alexandria, Va., and
lived there until he was 14 years old. His fam-
ily then moved to Inverness where John grad-
uated from Citrus High School in 1980. He has
lived in other cities in Florida, but always
seemed to return to Citrus County
He has lived in Inverness for more than 25
years, where he lives with his wife, Valorie.
They have been together for 13 years and have
no children, but they do have two very spoiled
dogs. Some ofJohn's hobbies that he enjoys in-
clude boating, fishing, camping and riding
ATVs.
A branch manager for City Electric Supply
in Crystal River, John has been in the electri-
cal industry for more than 30 years either as a
journeyman electrician or in electrical distri-


John Jobe, City Electric Supply
bution. He has been extensively trained in
lighting and energy-saving solutions, and can


easily do lighting designs and layouts
John joined the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation in 2001, at which time he was work-
ing with another company, but is able to
participate more in the organization with his
current company He feels joining and partic-
ipating in the CCBA has helped him establish
and maintain good relationships that he would
not have had otherwise.
Even though he enjoyed fishing in many
tournaments over the years, he joined the
CCBA Fishing Tournament committee two
years ago and has more fun helping run the
tournament with the other members of the
committee than he was fishing in it He is cur-
rently the chairman of that committee.
John has had many opportunities to move
out of the county or out of state, but would
much rather stay here in Citrus County, a
place he calls "Home."
John says, "With God, all things are possi-
ble. And I believe as long as I stay true to my-
self, continue to love my family, and remain
humble, I'm good, because I know from whom
my blessings come from."


Tournament gives back


From left are Erin Ray of F.D.S. Disposal, CCBA President Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders, Randy Clark of Clark Construc-
tion Inc. and Cmdr. Richard Allen of the Military Order of the Purple Heart Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776.

CCBA honored by Military Order of the Purple Heart


embers of the
CCBA Fishing
Tournament Com-
mittee were
treated to break-
fast with the Military Order of
the Purple Heart Aaron A
Weaver Chapter 776 on Tues-
day, Aug. 7, getting a history of
the order and a special oppor-
tunity to learn a little more
about what the Military Order
of the Purple Heart does.


At this special breakfast,
hosted by the Homosassa Elks
Club in honor of National Pur-
ple Heart Day, CCBA Presi-
dent Wayne Bardsley of
Quality Crafted Builders, Fish-
ing Tournament Chairman
Randy Clark of Clark Con-
struction and Exclusive Plat-
inum Sponsor Erin Ray of
ED.S. Disposal Inc. presented
Cmdr Richard "Bud" Allen of
the Military Order of the Pur-


ple Heart with a check in the
amount of $1,513.79 on behalf
of the CCBA Annual Family
Fishing Tournament.
Cmdr Allen, in return, pre-
sented President Wayne Bard-
sley with a plaque honoring
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation for the donation. The
17th Annual Family Fishing
Tournament, presented by
ED.S. Disposal Inc., was May 5
and 6, 2012, at the Homosassa


Riverside Resort. Organizers
pledged a portion of their pro-
ceeds to a local nonprofit for
the first time in the history of
the tournament.
The CCBA is proud to have
had this opportunity to give
back to such a worthy cause
and is looking forward to more
community organization part-
nering in the future.
Learn more about MOPH at
www.citruspurpleheart.org.


Beware unscrupulous contractors when repairing, rebuilding


It's an unfortunate fact of life
that after a natural or man-made
disaster, there are people who will
try to profit from a community's
misfortune.
Tornadoes, floods, hurricanes,
earthquakes, wildfires, wind-
storms and other disasters can de-
stroy lives and property without
warning. Sadly, in the wake of the
tragedy, unscrupulous contractors
often flock to an area to take ad-
vantage of the distressed home
owners who are trying to repair
the damage or rebuild their
homes.
But a fly-by-night contractor is
one disaster you can prevent if
you pay attention to some com-
mon warning signs.
In fact, it makes sense to look
for these signs when you are eval-
uating any potential contractor,


whether it's for post-disaster re-
pairs or a planned-for renovation
to your home.
Here are some common warn-
ing signs:
Price and payment
You're told you have to sign
the contract today to get the
quoted price, and that if you sign
later the price will be higher
You're asked to pay the full
cost in advance, before work be-
gins. Paying a deposit of anywhere
from 20 percent to 50 percent is
common, however.
You're asked to pay cash to a
salesperson instead of a check,
money order or credit card to a
company
The salesperson says you're
getting a special low price be-
cause you've been "chosen" as a
demonstration project.


The contractor asks you to
sign over your insurance settle-
ment check to him instead of pay-
ing him directly
References
The contractor doesn't have a
verifiable mailing address for his
business.
The business has complaints
that have not been resolved against
them with the Better Business Bu-
reau. You can find the nearest Bet-
ter Business Bureau location at
www.bbb.org/us/find-a-bbb/.
The contractor won't provide
references for past work, or the
references can't be reached.
The contractor does not ap-
pear on the state licensing website
at www.MyFloridaLicense.com
Contract and completion
You're told that "a contract
won't be necessary" Make sure


you insist on a complete and
clearly written contract signed by
you and the contractor
You're expected to make final
payment before the job is com-
pletely finished and you are fully
satisfied with it. Find out if any of
the work requires city or county
inspection, and make sure that is
done and you have paperwork to
prove it before you make the final
payment.
Paying attention to these warn-
ing signs will help you select a
contractor who will do quality
work, and stand behind it.
For more information about
finding a reliable contractor with
an established business in our
community, contact the Citrus
County Builders Association at
352-746-9028 or visit the Web at
www. CitrusBuilders. com.


2011-2012
OUTGOING
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion thanks you for your service!
PRESIDENT:
Wayne Bardsley,
Quality Crafted Builders
PRESIDENT-ELECT:
Bill Larder,
Larder & Sons Construction
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT:
Randy Clark,
Clark Construction
IMMEDIATE
PAST PRESIDENT:
Ron Lieberman,
Steel Structures of Florida
FIRST ASSOCIATE
VICE PRESIDENT:
Hazel Carlson,
Franklin Realty Consultants
SECOND ASSOCIATE
VICE PRESIDENT:
Dan Kern,
Gulf Coast Ready Mix.
TREASURER:
Gaston Hall,
Hall Bros of Citrus County
SECRETARY:
Kathleen Gilbert,
Gold Crest Homes Inc.
CONTRACTOR DIRECTORS
Randy Clark,
Clark Construction
Rusty McDermott,
Dream Custom Homes Inc.
Michael Gilbert,
Gold Crest Homes Inc.
Virginia Will,
Will Construction Corp.
ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS
Eric Swart,
Citrus Pest Management
Erin Ray,
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
John Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing
Mark Schroder,
Kings Bay Engineering



Important

upcoming

CCBA events
Citrus County Builders As-
sociation General Membership
Meeting and Elections spon-
sored by Florida Public Utilities
- Aug. 23. Register online at
www.CitrusBuilders.com or call
352-746-9028. Reservations must
be paid in advance.
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation Awards and Installation
Banquet sponsored by Progress
Energy Sept 28. Dress as your
favorite movie character from
1950 and before, and join us for
Surf& Turf dinner Reservations
must be prepaid.
Ro-mac Night CCBA Gen-
eral Membership Mixer 5 to 7
p.m. Oct. 25, location TBD. Mixer
is open to all members of the Cit-
rus County Builders Association,
Citrus County Chamber and
Hernando County Builders
Association.
2012 Home & Outdoor Show
presented by Home Improve-
ment Sponsor Florida Public
Utilities Nov 10 and 11 at the
National Guard Armory in Crys-
tal River. Remaining booth
spaces will open to the general
public, with restrictions, after
Aug. 27. Sponsorship opportuni-
ties are now available as well.
Visit www.CitrusBuilders.com or
call 352-746-9028 for information.

PLANNING A PARTY
OR RECEPTION?
The Citrus County Builders
Association has a Banquet
Hall available to rent, and
it's open to the public!
Free Internet access, plenty
of outdoor parking and a
covered entryway are
among the amenities this
facility has to offer. Non-
profit organizations are eli-
gible for special rate.
Visit www.CitrusBuilders.
com, stop by the Citrus
County Builders Association
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday or
call 352-746-9028.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


20th anniversary


Special to the Chronicle
Gastroenterology Associates in Crystal River recently honored Dr. Anil K. Ram's 20-year
anniversary of service to his community and practice. From left are: Dr. Paul Hellstern, Dr.
Anil K. Ram, Dr. P.R. Bikkasani, Dr. S. Mathur and Dr. S. Chandrupatla. Not pictured are Dr.
L.R. Reddi and Dr. T. Shind6. For information about Gastroenterology Associates, visit
www.citrusge.com or call 352-563-2450.


Moring appointed Grand opening Aug. 21
to hospice board


LECANTO Jack A. Mor-
ing, P.A., has been appointed to
the Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast Board of Directors.
Moring is a
lawyer at the
Moring &
Moring Law .
Firm at 7655
W. Gulf-to- S
Lake High-
way in
Crystal River.
He is a grad- Jack
Morning
uate of the Hospice of
University of Citrus County.
Florida, Col-
lege of Law
and was admitted to practice
law in Florida in 1985. He is
board-certified by The Florida
Bar in marital and family law
and is the only Citrus County
attorney to hold that distinction.
"Each board member is val-
ued for their unique expertise
and enthusiasm, affording Hos-
pice of Citrus County and Hos-
pice of the Nature Coast to fulfill
its vital mission throughout North
Central Florida," said Anthony
Palumbo, chief executive officer.
"Indeed, all members of our gov-
erning board bring an amalgam
of applicable knowledge and ex-
perience to the table."
Established in 1983 and li-
censed in 1985, Hospice of Cit-
rus County Inc./Hospice of the
Nature Coast is a not-for-profit
charitable organization provid-
ing comprehensively respon-
sive and compassionate
end-of-life services to people
and their families facing end of
life issues throughout North
Central Florida. For information,
call 352-527-2020 or visit
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
Wade on board with
Crystal Automotive
Charlie Wade, former owner
of Suncoast Bicycles Plus Inc.,
announces his affiliation with
Crystal Automotive, premier
dealers for Chrysler, Dodge,
Jeep, Chevrolet and Nissan.
Charlie will be associated with
the Inverness Crystal Dodge,
Chrysler and Jeep dealership at
2077 State Road 44 W. in In-
verness. The phone number is
352-726-1238.
CCA facilities
get high scores
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Eight
CCA facilities have been ac-
credited or re-accredited by au-
ditors with the American


Special to the Chronicle
Anytime Fitness, a 24-hour co-ed fitness franchise, is open
for business in the Highland Plaza at 345 E. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness. A grand opening celebration will take place from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21.


Correctional Association (ACA).
The average score exceeds 99
percent, with two facilities re-
ceiving an impressive 100 per-
cent. The accreditations were
awarded at ACA's summer con-
ference July 22 in Denver, Colo.
"ACA standards are the road-
map to excellence in every as-
pect of what CCA strives for,"
said Jan Fuson, CCA consult-
ant for Quality Assurance. "Up-
holding the highest standards
possible ensures CCA is doing
its very best to protect commu-
nities, the individuals in our
care and each of our 17,000
dedicated employees."
Accreditation by the ACA oc-
curs every three years and is
the industry 'gold standard.'
Currently, more than 93 percent
of CCA's operating facilities are
ACA-accredited, among the
highest rates of similarly sized
corrections systems.
"Every aspect of the correc-
tional facility operations and
practices is thoroughly meas-
ured," said Don Murray, CCA
managing director for Quality
Assurance. "Accreditation is an
intense top-to-bottom on-site
audit and review of everything,
from security to training ... in-
mate rehabilitation to health-
care services."
The following facilities were
successfully re-accredited with
the exception of Nevada South-
ern Detention Center, one of
CCA's newer facilities, which
received accreditation for the
first time.
Citrus County Detention
Facility Lecanto, Fla.
Coffee Correctional Facil-
ity Nicholls, Ga.
Eloy Detention Center -
Eloy, Ariz.
Kit Carson Correctional


Center Burlington, Colo.
Nevada Southern Deten-
tion Center Pahrump, N.V.
New Mexico Women's
Correctional Grants, N.M.
Wheeler Correctional Fa-
cility -Alamo, Ga.
Winn Correctional Center
- Winnfield, La.
CCA is the nation's largest
provider of partnership correc-
tions to federal, state and local
government, operating more
than 60 facilities, including
more than 40 company-owned
facilities, with more than 90,000


American Queen


Special to the Chronicle
Tally Ho Vacations was invited to attend the inaugural year
of the American Queen Steamboat sailings. The American
Queen sails the Mississippi, Tennessee and Ohio rivers with
many different itineraries to select. Pictured is Debbie Muir,
manager of Tally Ho Vacations, and chef Regina Charboneau.
She has written many cookbooks and has appeared on vari-
ous cooking programs. Charboneau is the creative master-
mind behind the gourmet cuisine onboard the Queen. For
information, call 352-860-2805 or dmuir@tallyhovaca-
tions.com.


beds, in 20 states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia. In addition to
providing the residential serv-
ices for inmates, CCA facilities
offer rehabilitation and educa-
tional programs, including edu-
cation, vocation, religious
services, life skills and employ-
ment training and substance
abuse treatment. Visit
www.cca.com and www.cca
communities.com.
Seven Rivers
earns gold award
CRYSTAL RIVER Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
has received the Get With The
Guidelines-Heart Failure Gold
Quality Achievement Award
from the American Heart Asso-
ciation. The recognition signi-
fies Seven Rivers Regional has
reached an aggressive goal of
treating heart failure patients
according to the guidelines of
care recommended by the
American Heart Association/
American College of
Cardiology.
This marks the seventh year
Seven Rivers Regional has
been recognized with a quality
achievement award.
Get With The Guidelines-


Heart Failure helps hospital as-
sociates develop and imple-
ment acute and secondary
prevention guidelines to im-
prove patient care and out-
comes. The program provides
hospitals with a Web-based pa-
tient management tool, best
practice discharge protocols
and standing orders, along with
a robust registry and real-time
benchmarking capabilities to
track performance.
Quick and efficient use of
guideline procedures can im-
prove quality of care for heart
failure patients, save lives and,
ultimately, reduce health care
costs by lowering the recur-
rence of heart attacks.
"Recent studies show that
patients treated in hospitals
participating in the American
Heart Association's Get With
The Guidelines-Heart Failure
program receive a higher qual-
ity of care and may experience
better outcomes," said Lee H.
Schwamm, M.D., chair of the
Get With The Guidelines Na-
tional Steering Committee and
director of the TeleStroke and
Acute Stroke Services at Mas-
sachusetts General Hospital in
Boston, Mass. "Seven Rivers


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.
Information related
to professional
development may be
considered for the
Education section.

Regional is to be commended
for their commitment to improv-
ing the care of their patients."
"We are dedicated to making
our care for heart failure pa-
tients among the best in the
country. Participating in Get
With The Guidelines helps us to
accomplish this goal," said
Joyce Brancato, chief executive
officer at Seven Rivers Re-
gional. "This recognition
demonstrates that we are on
the right track and we're very
proud of our associates."
According to the American
Heart Association, about 5.7
million people suffer from heart
failure. Statistics also show
that, each year, 670,000 new
cases are diagnosed and more
than 277,000 people will die of
heart failure. However, many
heart failure patients can lead a
full, enjoyable life when their
condition is managed with
proper medications and de-
vices and with healthy lifestyle
changes.
For information about Get
With The Guidelines, visit
heart.org/quality.
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, a 128-bed general,
medical/surgical acute care fa-
cility serving Citrus, Levy and
south Marion counties, opened
its doors in 1978. Visit Seven
RiversRegional.com.
See DIGEST/Page D6


0819 SCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
RFQ No. 033-12
Fixed Base Operator Lease Agreement
for the Crystal River Airport

Citrus County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida (the
"County"), is soliciting Proposals from qualified fixed base
operators for the operation and lease of facilities at the Crystal
River Airport ("Airport").
The Crystal River Airport is a general aviation airport which is
set on approximately 198 acres. It is located on the west coast of
Florida, which is known as the Nature Coast, and within the City of
Crystal River limits. The Airport is an uncontrolled airport and
serves both reciprocating engine and jet aircraft. Runway 09/27 is
4,550' long by 75' wide, has a maximum weight limit of 40,000 Ibs.,
and has straight-in GPS approaches. This runway is scheduled to
be extended to 5,000' in 2014-2015. Runway 18/36 is a turf
runway in good condition and is 2,665' long by 100' wide.
The Crystal River Airport currently has one fixed base operator
which operates 10 hours a day, seven days a week. Facilities at
the Airport include (see exhibit "A") a terminal consisting of
approximately 3,000 square feet with a connecting 10,000 square
feet maintenance hangar, two large open-sided hangars (one is
drive through and stores 6 aircraft and one is nested and hold 12
aircraft), and one 8,000 square feet hangar. There is
approximately 164,00 square feet of aircraft apron with
associated tie-downs. The fuel farm contains one (1) 12,000
gallon storage tank for Jet-A and one (1) 12,000 gallon storage
tank for Avgas.
In selecting an FBO, the following objectives will be considered
to ensure that, at a minimum, all existing services are provided:

1. Ensure the public interest is met by requiring the widest
range of services be offered.
2. Maximize direct and indirect monetary return to the County.
3. In furtherance of objectives 1 and 2, ensure lease provisions
support a viable FBO.

Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Proposal
To be eligible for consideration for this RFQ, the Respondent
must meet the following minimum qualifications:

1. A minimum of five years prior experience in the FBO
business.
2. Financial capability to operate the FBO.

SEALED Responses are to be submitted on or before
September 17, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Office of
Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Responses is scheduled for
September 17, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies
who submitted Responses.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public
opening because of a disability or physical impairment should
contact the Office of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at
least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Qualifications Document
for this announcement, please visit the Citrus County Website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand side of the
Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/
Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman


0819 SCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 034-12
Wet-Tap Construction/Installation
Services on Water & Wastewater Lines

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
invites interested parties to submit a Bid to perform
the work to construct/install Wet-Taps on Water
and Wastewater lines. Throughout the year there
is a need to construct/install "Taping Sleeves and
Valves" herein also referred to as Wet-Taps to
piping for the County's Water and Wastewater
lines.

Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid

Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following
requirements to be determined a responsive and
responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:

1. Contractor shall be familiar with and use parts
and equipment acceptable in the Citrus County
Utilities Division (CCUD) Minimum Standards and
Construction Manual located on the internet at:
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/waterres/utilities/
manual/msc manual.htm or as presented with
this bid packet or as negotiated and approved for
individual specific situations while working with the
Contractor awarded the Term Contract.

2. Contractor responsible to have any necessary
Federal, State, County or Local Certifications or
Licenses to perform work and purchase equipment
and components required for said services.

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or
before September 19, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for
September 19, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 226, Lecanto, Florida
34461.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations
at the Public Opening because of a disability or
physical impairment should contact the Office of
Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least
two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)
527-5312.

To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this
announcement, please visit the Citrus County
Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the
Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.


CITRUS COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman


0812/19SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a public
hearing in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting
Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, at 1:45 pm on August
28, 2012, for the purpose of hearing public comment on
the adoption of a Resolution of the Board ratifying and
confirming the assessment roll for the Citrus County Solid
Waste Municipal Service Benefit Unit for Fiscal Year 2012/
2013 and address same to the Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. Said comments must be
received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, August 27, 2012.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any
matter considered at this public hearing he will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
which record shall include the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.

WINN WEBB
CHAIRMAN


D4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


BUSINESS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0812/19 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a public hearing in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, at 1:30 pm on August 28, 2012, for the purpose of hearing public comment on the adoption of a
Resolution of the Board adopting the method of determining the amount of the Annual Disposal Assessment for the Citrus County Solid Waste Municipal Service Benefit Unit and
determining the annual rates, fees, charges, assessments, or service charges to be imposed upon the owners of Improved Real Property and the Disposal Service Unit Rate
(commercial solid waste disposal fee) as described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof. Also to be considered is the Fee Schedule for the Citrus County Landfill for
Fiscal Year 2012/2013 as described in Exhibit "B" attached hereto and the Emergency Fee Schedule as described in Exhibit "C" attached hereto. Anyone not attending the hearing but
who wishes to make comments shall do so in writing and address same to the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. Said
comments must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, August 27, 2012.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing he will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.


WINN WEBB
CHAIRMAN


EXHIBIT "A"
EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012

RESIDENTIAL DISPOSAL ASSESSMENT


$25.00 per residential dwelling unit
(Each single-family residence, condominium unit, apartment, mobile home or mobile home
within a mobile home park shall constitute a residential dwelling unit, but shall not apply to
commercial as defined in Section 90-731, Citrus County Code.)

COMMERCIAL DISPOSAL FEE

$1.20 per cubic yard (Disposal Service Unit Rate)
(Nonresidential or commercial as defined in Sections 90-731 and 90-763, Citrus County Code.)


EXHIBIT "B"
FEE SCHEDULE
EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012

CHARGED AT LANDFILL:

TRANSACTION FEE:..................................................$ 4.00 per visit for all paid items
(Certified Haulers and Municipalities exempt)


BAGGED OR CANNED WASTE:
Residential Solid Waste/Trash






Residential Yard Waste


Up to 5 30 gallon bags or cans
Included under transaction fee
$ 1.00 additional per bag from
6 to 9 30 gallon bags or cans
10 and over will be per ton rate

Up to 8 30 gallon bags or cans
Included under transaction fee
9 and over will be per ton rate


CERTIFIED W EIG HT........................................ ..................................... $ 5.00

RESIDENTIAL SELF-HAUL BULKY WASTE:.............................................No Charge
Consists of furniture / carpet & padding / mattress & box springs

SORTEB-CLEAN RECYCLABLES:
As defined in the county's single stream recycling drop-off program........No Charge

CLEAN CONCRETE FOR RECYCLING:.......... ..........................................No Charge

ALL COMMERCIAL HAULERS AND LOADS OF LOOSE DEBRIS (NOT BAGGED
OR CANNED) WILL BE CHARGED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING RATES,
WITH WEIGHTS DETERMINED BY THE LANDFILL SCALES.

SOLID WASTE:
Uncovered or uncontained waste surcharge.......................................$10.00 per Ton
Contract haulers and residential self-haul......................................$30.00 per Ton
City trucks/city contract haulers................... ................. $45.00 per Ton*
Non-contract haulers and business self-haul......................................$60.00 per Ton
Roll-off containerized waste from unincorporated areas.....................$60.00 per Ton
Roll-off containerized waste from cities............................................... $45.00 per Ton
Mixed city/county routes......... Blend~odRate......Per agreement with BOCC only
Out of County Waste............................................... Per agreement with BOCC only
FDEP Certified Recyclers for the disposal of......................................$30.00 per Ton
Household generated recyclable residuals

YARDWASTE:
Uncovered or uncontained waste surcharge.......................................$10.00 per Ton
Grass, leaves, trimming debris, branches, palm fronds........................$22.50 per Ton
Residential Christmas Trees.......................................... No Charge (Dec. & Jan. only)
Stumps in excess of 4 feet in diameter will not be accepted
Logs in excess of 4 feet in diameter or in excess of 10 feet in length will not be accepted.

SPECIAL WASTE: (1) Asbestos (Friable), Sludge (Dried), Oil-Contaminated
Materials by staff pre-approval only
(2) Whole Boats or Trailers greater than 14' and
(3) Items requiring verified burial......................... ............... $90.00 per Ton

CITRUS COUNTY UTILITIES / MUNICIPALITIES DRIED SLUDGE:....$45.00 per Ton

SCRAP METAL:................... ............................. .. .............. No Charge

METAL APPLIANCES: Commercial Residential
Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C Units $ 7.50 Each No Charge **
Propane Tanks
Up to 30-pound capacity $ 2.50 Each No Charge **
Over 30-pound capacity $10.00 Each No Charge **
Other Metal Appliances (Stoves, Washers, etc) No Charge No Charge
* Maximum 2 per visit and 4 per year


TIRES:
Passenger Car Tires (up to 5)
Passenger car or small truck tires (over 10)
Oversize tires (any number)


Commercial Residential
$ 2.00 Each No Charge**
$ 95.00 per Ton $ 95.00 per Ton
$200.00 per Ton $200.00 per Ton
* *Maximum 5 per visit and 10 per year


WASTE RELOCATION CHARGE: (1 HOUR MIN.).......................$90.00 per Man-Hour

nmi IPI IATE TIirKET r l IArr-P. nn$ 2I~


LATE CUSTOMER CHARGE........................................................ $ 1.50 per Minute
Beginning 10 Minutes after Published Closing

LEAD ACID & RECHARGABLE BATTERIES..........................................No Charge

MERCURY CONTAINING DEVICES:
Fluorescent Lamps (straight, circular, U-shaped &
compact fluorescent bulbs first 6 free residential & commercial).....$ 0.80 per Lamp
Mercury Containing Devices (first 6 free residential) Lamps (Metal Halide,
Mercury Vapor, High Pr ure S diur)....................................$2.00 p r La p
(TheinoUneters, TIhei states, pyI. u etel s)....................................$ 2.00 ECaulch


ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT:
Televisions and computer monitors
Computers and all other electronic items


Commercial Residential
$ 8.00 No charge**
No charge No charge
**Maximum 2 per visit and 4 per year


WASTE DELIVERED BY REGISTERED NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS WITH THRIFT SHOPS
SO LID W A STE:.................................. .................. ............................. $30.00 per Ton
BULKY WASTE: First 600 pounds per month each organization..............No Charge
All amounts thereafter............................... .............. $30.00 per Ton


ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT:
Televisions and computer monitors: First-2-4 units per month each organization..No Charge
All am ounts thereafter............................... ............... 8.00 each
Computers and all other devices:............................................... ...................No Charge

METAL APPLIANCES:
Refrigerators, Freezers, AC units: First 2 units per month each organization....No Charge
All amounts thereafter........................................................................... ......$ 7.50 each
Propane Tanks up to 30-lb capacity: First 2 units per month each organization. No Charge
All amounts thereafter.......................................................................... .......$ 2.50 each
Propane Tanks over 30-lb capacity: First 2 units per month each organization..No Charge
All amounts thereafter.................................................. $10.00 each
Other Metal Appliances................................................... No Charge

TIRES:
Passenger car tires: First 5 per month each organization..............................No Charge
Regular charges thereafter


ANNUAL RESIDENTIAL SELF-HAUL ADVANCE DISPOSAL PAYMENT PROGRAM:
SUBJECT TO LIMITATIONS IN PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Bagged Household Garbage / Bagged Yard Waste
Eight 30 Gallon Containers per Week
(Rates for new pass holders or in-person renewals)
Purchase Date:
Oct. 1-Dec. 31 $ 96 per Vehicle
Jan. 1-Mar. 31 $ 72 per Vehicle
Apr. 1-June 30 $ 48 per Vehicle
July 1-Sept. 30 $ 24 per Vehicle
(Rates for renewal by mail only)
Purchase Date:
Oct. 1- Dec. 31 $ 86 per Vehicle

Loads may be combined with "No Charge" items up to per-visit limits and still use bypass lane.
Loads that contain items for which there is a charge must use the scale lane.

MATERIALS DELIVERED BY CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY
GENERATORS
Hazardous Waste (excluding all paint related materials)..................................$1.00 per Lb
Ballasts and capacitors (with possible PCB's) ................................................. $1.00 each
Used Oil, Oil Filters and Antifreeze (10 gallon limit per disposal)........................No Charge

PAINT MATERIALS DELIVERED BY CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY
GENERATORS
Latex Paint (First 10 gallons or 60 pounds free of charge)..............................$ 0.35 per Lb
Oil Based Paint and Paint Thinners............................................... $1.00 per Lb

HAZARDOUS WASTE FROM SMALL QUANTITY (AND LARGER) GENERATORS
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

HAZARDOUS WASTE AND PAINT DELIVERED BY RESIDENT'S
Materials Delivered on Program Days and Times (First 10 gallon or 60 Ibs).......No Charge
Materials Delivered on Program Days and Times (Over 10 gallons or 60 Ibs) $ 0.35 per Lb

PAINT DELIVERED BY RESIDENTS ON NON-PROGRAM DAYS AND TIMES
(10 gallon or 60 Ib limit per disposal)............................................... No Charge

*City trucks/city contract haulers collected as follows: $30.00 per ton charged at time of disposal.
The additional $15.00 per ton charge added to the monthly invoicing based on the number of units
submitted by written reports. The industry standard for the amount of waste that is generated by a
household on an annual basis is 1 ton or 2,000 Ibs per year.
Residential: Units x 2,000 (= Ibs per unit) 12 (= Ibs per month) 2,000 (=tons per month) x $15.00 =
additional charge per month.
Commercial: Can size (=garbage collection container) x frequency of collection (per week) x 4.33 (=
weeks per month per year) x 80 (=lbs per yard) 2,000 (=tons) x $15.00

Note: Highlighted items reflect proposed changes from current fee schedule.


EXHIBIT "C"
FEE SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT EMERGENCY FEE SCHEDULE

This fee schedule may be implemented under the following conditions:
Locally declared state of emergency, or
Failure of the landfill's normal and backup power supply, scales, scalehouse building
and/or computers for scalehouse management system.

This fee schedule will be terminated and the regular fee schedule will be reinstated under
the following conditions:
Return of function for power, scales, scalehouse building and/or computers for the
scalehouse management system or
Termination of state of emergency or
Direction of BOCC.

Charge customers certified waste collectors
Front load and rear load route trucks. Weight is equal to the maximum load weight for that
collection vehicle, for the same waste type, within the past 30 days. Rate is the normal per
ton rate. If the truck has no visits during the period of record, use the most similar truck
(type, capacity) from the same collection company for the maximum load.
Rolloff truck with open-top box. Weight is equal to the density calculated for landfill CSA
waste boxes times the capacity of the open-top box. Rate is the normal per ton rate.
Compactor rolloff boxes. Weight is equal to the maximum weight for that container within
the past 30 days. Rate is normal per ton rate. If the container has no visits during the
period of record, use the most similar container from the same collection company for the
maximum load.

Receipts will be manual tickets indicating date, time, truck number and material and if
applicable, rolloff container capacity.

Charge customers all others See below.

Residential and commercial cash customers prices include transaction fee
Car or van $ 5.00
Single axle pickup truck $ 9.00
Dual axle pickup truck $18.00
Car or van with trailer $ 6.00
Pickup truck with trailer <12 feet long $18.00
Pickup truck with trailer > 12 feet long $27.00
Dual axle with trailer <12 feet long $36.00
Dual axle with trailer > 12 feet long $60.00

Dump trucks Weight is equal to the density calculated for landfill CSA waste boxes times
the capacity of the dump bed. Rate is the normal per ton rate.

Items that are normally free for residents will be charged. Material separation for disposal
location remains in effect. Receipts for all transactions (if requested) will be manual tickets
indicating date, and cash amount paid.

No vegetative debris will be accepted during the first three days following a natural
disaster.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 D5


__n hn_n h nnnlh


.. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .... -- .k






D6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012



DIGEST
Continued from Page D4

SRRMC welcomes
Dr. Padala
CRYSTAL RIVER On
Aug. 13, Lakshmi N. Padala,
M.D., was appointed to the
medical staff at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.
Padala specializes in family
practice.
"Dr.
Padala's edu-
cation, expe-
rience and
passion for
helping peo-
ple align with
the hospital's
mission to Lakshmi
provide ex- Padala
cellence in Seven Rivers
health care," Regional.
said Joyce Brancato, chief ex-
ecutive officer. "He will provide
the best quality care for our
patients."
Padala earned his medical
degree from NTR University of
Health Science Kakatiya Med-
ical College in Warangal, India.
He completed his internship in
general surgery at Creighton
University Medical Center in
Omaha, Neb., and a residency
in family practice at Central
Main Medical Center in Lewis-
ton, Maine. Padala joins Seven
Rivers Regional after practicing
in the northeast for six years.
He is board-certified in family
practice.
"With open hands, we wel-
come Dr. Padala to the Seven


BUSINESS


Rivers Regional family," said
William V. Harrer III, M.D., chief
of staff.
For information about the
hospital and its medical staff,
visit SevenRiversRegional.com.
PR professionals
on state board
ST. AUGUSTINE Two
members of the Nature Coast
Chapter of the Florida Public
Relations Association (FPRA)
were sworn in as officers of the
Association's Board of Direc-
tors at its recent annual confer-
ence in St. Augustine.
Katie Mehl, APR of Citrus
Memorial Health System, and
Kathy Nielsen of Progress En-
ergy also serve on the Nature
Coast Chapter's board as pres-
ident and president-elect. As
state officers, each will be ex-
pected to travel to quarterly
board meetings throughout the
state and represent Nature
Coast members in Association
business. They will hold a term
of office for one year.
The Nature Coast Chapter of
FPRA meets the first Friday of
each month at 11:30 a.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club. For information on the
Nature Coast Chapter of FPRA
please call Nature Coast Chap-
ter Public Relations Director
Bob Crowley at 352-527-0005.
FPRA is dedicated to devel-
oping public relations practition-
ers who, through ethical and
standardized practices, en-
hance the public relations pro-
fession in Florida. The
organization's 15 professional
and 12 student chapters pro-


vide professional development,
networking and recognition op-
portunities for nearly 1,500
members across the state.
FPRA is the nation's oldest
public relations organization,
established by Lt. Col. John
Dillin, APR, CPRC in 1938. Visit
www.fpra.org.
Raymond James
marks 50 years
HERNANDO -Raymond
James is celebrating its 50th
anniversary throughout 2012.
On Aug. 16,1962, Raymond
James was founded as a differ-
ent kind of financial services
firm. While other organizations
were simply selling stocks or
mutual funds, Raymond James
focused on financial planning
for the individual.
Since its modest beginnings,
the firm has grown into one of
the largest financial services
firms in the United States, with
2,400 locations worldwide. Ray-
mond James stock is traded on
the New York Stock Exchange
(RJF). In October 2011, the firm
marked its 95th consecutive
quarter of profitability.
The 50th anniversary is an
opportunity to reflect on the
past, but also to celebrate the
things that have not changed
throughout the years a spirit
of integrity and independence,
of entrepreneurialism and em-
powerment, of collaboration
and respect.
To participate in the Ray-
mond James 50th anniversary
celebration, a Giving Thanks by
Giving Back Blood Drive will be
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thurs-


day, Aug. 16, at Raymond
James Financial Services Inc.,
in The Shoppes of Citrus Hills
at Publix, 2657 N. Forest Ridge
Blvd., Hernando. All blood
donors will receive lunch
catered by Outback Steak-
house and be entered into a
drawing to win a gift basket or
two tickets to a Rays game! All
are invited to attend this free
event. RSVP to Liz Hughes at
352-527-3700.

Entrepreneur
academy at CF
OCALA- The College of
Central Florida will offer an En-
trepreneur Academy beginning
in September. The program
provides a step-by-step ap-
proach to planning a successful
business venture and is de-
signed to guide individuals who
are new to owning and operat-
ing their own business.
The program will be offered
from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tues-
days, Sept. 11 through Oct. 30,
at the CF Hampton Center,
1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd.
The fee is $160.
Participants will explore top-
ics including: managing your
personal financial condition; de-
termining the barriers to enter-
ing a market; refining the
business idea; developing the
business plan; and more. They
will have the opportunity to
meet local entrepreneurs and
representatives from SCORE,
Small Business Development
Center and the U.S. Small
Business Administration.
The program is offered in co-
operation with the University of


Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences Exten-
sion. The deadline to enroll is
Friday, Sept. 7. For information
or to register, call 352-873-5804
or visit CFltraining.cf.edu.

Edward Jones team
gets training
Craig O'Dell, a financial ad-
viser with the financial-services
firm Edward Jones in Crystal
River, and Marcie Loos, a
branch office administrator, re-
cently attended an invitation-
only training opportunity at the
firm's headquarters in St. Louis.
The three-day Advanced
Practice Management Forum is
offered to branch teams
throughout the country who
rank among the top third most
successful in the firm in helping
clients work toward their long-
term financial goals. O'Dell and
Loos were among more than
180 associates, out of more
than 12,000, invited to attend
this session.
"The Advanced Practice
Management Forum gave us
an opportunity to share ideas
with other successful teams,
visit with home-office experts to
discuss ways to meet more
clients' needs and view techni-
cal demonstrations highlighting
a variety of systems and tools,"
O'Dell said. "Marcie and I also
were able to tailor some of the
training to focus on areas of our
business that we want to grow."
Loos said, "Attending this
training together will help us
better serve our clients. We
now share a clearer vision of
the best practices, tools and re-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

sources to use in earning new
clients, deepening relationships
with existing clients and overall
delivering an ideal client
experience."
Edward Jones provides fi-
nancial services for individual
investors in the United States
and, through its affiliate, in
Canada.
Edward Jones is headquar-
tered in St. Louis. The Edward
Jones website is www.edward
jones.com, and its recruiting
website is www.careers.edward
jones.com. Member SIPC.
CF Foundation
sets meeting
Meetings of the CF Founda-
tion of the College of Central
Florida are open to the public. A
copy of the agenda will be
available at each meeting. For
information, contact the CF
Foundation office, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala, FL
34474.
CF Foundation Board of
Directors Meeting, 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 22, at CF
Founders Hall Boardroom,
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road. Purpose: general
business of the board.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Call 352-795-3149.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


", ,, ,di ,


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S

J .-. -



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,, "; .
ty *!^ **;**'-ic5I'^

''^r^. 3^^ r/: 1


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


ROUTE'S


AVAILABLE




N o In- SM


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager or
email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
C I T R U S5 _-.hC 0 U N T Y


SCHRONI E
www.chronicleonline.com


I am an attractive,
young at heart, young
widow, looking for that
sincere, great,
lonesome gentleman.
In his late 70's to 80's.
I know I can fix that
lonesomeness. Think
about it because Im not
dreaming. So don't hesi-
tate to write me and
lets get together
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1796 P
106W Main St
Inverness FI 34450

WWM Sr seeking female
for friendship. Age not im-
portant. Semi-retired, NS,
ND. Like fishing, music,
country living. Call RBY
Call R.B.Y. 352-563-1033




Jeep
1998 Sahara 67K, 6 cyl, 5
speed, options, garaged,
exc cond, $8850/neg
352-322-5679

BOSE Acoustimass
600, 5.1 channel, 5
Speakers, subwoffer
complete w/ manual
$135 OBO
(352) 746-0921

Estate Sale
2 BR, Living Rm, Din-
ing Rm, kitchen table, 4
chairs, 3 bar stools,
fridge/freezer, framed
pics
(352) 746-0084


ESTATE SALE
6147 N. Nakoma Drive
Beverly Hills, 34465
8/23-8/25 9a-3p

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -noon
Saturday, August, 25
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020


Since '78 Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907
PET SITTER
Reliable person.Short
term In home. 564-8605



OPEN
HOUSE

SUGARMILL
SUNDAY 1p-4p
3/2/2/ POOL
Estate Lot $179,900.
97 Douglas Street
(Hwy 19 to Cypress W.
Left on Douglas St.,
GATE HOUSE REALTY
(352) 382 4500
YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOTVERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$75,000.CALL
(352)513-5001



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389



3 Healthy Quarter Horse
Mares ages 7,13, & 13.
Free to good homes)
Recently widowed and
unable to care for them.
352-212-5809
3 Kittens
gray striped, very cute.
Free to good home.
(352) 287-5336
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
Free to good home
7 month Lab Mix
has all shots
needs yard to run
(352) 364-1521
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Shepard Mix, female, 8
mo. old, spayed, free to
good home because I
have to move, good
w/other pets and kids


LUD I UUUr\i ItL grey
& yellow with orange
cheeks. Lost on 8/3 in
Pine Ridge, near Mus-
tang &Amarilo. Please
call 746-3901 or
476-5215.
Lost Mixed
Chihuahua/Poodle
Male. Inverness.
Perry St. off
Independence Hwy
(352) 419-6299
Pit Bull Mix, female, 5 yrs
old, white w/brown spots,
lost in vicinity of Parson's
pt and US 41 Hernando
(352) 364-3227


Female, Spayed,
Blue eyes "Dreams"
Hibbard Path
Floral City
(352) 228-7762
YORKIE
Missing from
Pine Ridge, Family
Devistated Reward
(352) 527-7980



Found Black Kitten
2-3 months old.
Inverness Area
(352) 726-4476
Found Domestic Bunny
mostly white
Citrus Springs Area
Sussex Drive
(352) 465-9201
Found Set of Keys
Court House Area
Inverness
Call to Identify
Name on Dog tags
(352) 344-9567
Tabby Cat
BrownAdult Spayed
Female
Inverness Highland
(352) 637-2205



r------ E

NOW
ENROLLING
SFor All Programs
COSMETOLOGY
SIBARBER
*wMASSAGE THERAPY
*wNAIL TECH
SKIN CARE TECH
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredlted
727-848-8415

PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful flower
of
Mt. Caramel,
fruitful vine, splendor of
heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin, as-
sist me in my
necessity.
O Star of the Sea, help
me and show me here
you are my mother.
0 Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen
of Heaven and Earth,
I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my
heart to secure me in
my necessity. (Make
request). There are
none that can withstand
your power.
O Mary, conceived
without sin, pray for us
who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this
cause in your hands (3
times).
Say this prayer for
3 consecutive days and
then you must publish
and it will be granted to
you.
M.S.


Huge discounts
when you buy 2 types
of advertising!
120 community
newspapers. 32
websites. 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with
Advertising Networks
of Florida
(866)742-1373



Sr. Woman Seeking
Sr. Companionship and
light help in exchange
for Room and board
Located in Inverness
(352) 489-2099



ACCOUNTING
CLERK
Announcement
#12-47
Responsible for per-
forming accounting
and clerical support
functions at Parks
and Recreation.
Three years financial
accounting experi-
ence. Must be able
to multitask in a
fast paced office.
$10.77 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path. Suite 178.
Lecanto. Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Aug. 24, 2012.
EOE/ADA.




HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
*d A- -k ^ -d A-


EXPERIENCED
OPHTHALMIC TECH
NEEDED P/T
Send resume to:
Suncoast Eye Center
221 N.E. Hwy 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
or email:
dmsuncoast@hotmail.com
CNA PREP COURSE
AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
EXP. RDH
Needed for
established local
practice. We are
looking for somebody
with great
communication skills.
professionalism and
a positive attitude.
parttime position with
possibility of
becoming full time.
Must be interested in
helping patients
increase their
knowledge of the
importance of oral
hygiene and good
dentistry. Knowledge
with computer
program.
Eaglesoft a plus.
Salary based on exp.
Please Fax resume to
352-746-3810
All resumes strictly
confidential
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Busy medical office in
need of an experienced
medical assistant.
Eclinical a plus. Please
fax your resume to
352-637-4243.
MEDICAL
CAREERS
BEGIN HERE -
GET TRAINED IN
MONTHS. NOT YEARS.
FINANCIAL AID IF
QUALIFIED. HOUSING
AVAILABLE.
JOB PLACEMENT
ASSISTANCE. CALL
CENTURY INSTITUTE
(877)206-6559

MEDICAL
CAREERS
begin here Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
www.
CenturaOnline.com

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES
Billing Clerk
Receptionist
*Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


FRONT BACK
MEDICAL OFFICE
Podiatry busy practice ex-
perience preferred will
train call 352-746-3333
NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN I CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions available for
Florida-licensed
nurses and certified
nursing assistants.
Full-time hours are
3 p.m.-ll p.m. PRN
positions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience is
preferred. We offer
great pay and
benefits to full-time
associates, including
medical coverage,
401(k) and paid va-
cation, sick days and
holidays.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hannah Mand@
LCCA.com
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D- 34547

Ut.
Cmter


RN

Needed for Bushnell
Elementary School,
in Sumter County.
Down Load
Application from
www.sumter.k12.fl.us

Specialty
NP/PA
Mid Level
Needed, Respond to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
Blind Box 1768 P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
Florida, 34429




ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722


Fax ( 52 56 -5 65 1 T llFr e:(88 ) 52 234 1 Em il ... . . .. .. . ... . .... . .. ...... ...








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Experienced
Legal Secretary

For small law office in
Crystal River. Only
experienced need
apply. Must have sub-
stantial experience,
preferably in one or
more of the following:
Civil Litigation,
Contract, Corporate
and/or Real Estate
Law. Potential for
part time or full time
employment.
Send Resume to
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River Fl. 34423


Fiscal Specialist
Announcement
# 12-46

Track and/or
oversee department
revenues and ex-
penditures, assure
accuracy and com-
pliance with County
policies and proce-
dures, statutes,
regulations and
GAAP. Ensure errors
or discrepancies are
avoided or corrected
in a timely manner
May train and/or
supervise administra-
tive or fiscal staff.
Graduation from an
accredited college
or University with a
Bachelor's degree in
accounting or
related field. A
comparable amount
of relevant training or
experience may be
substituted for the
education qualifica-
tions. At least three
year's experience in
accounting, budget-
ing, contract and
grant management
or related field.
Additional education
may be substituted
for up to two years of
experience. Pay
range $1,718.17-
$2,525.70 B/W, DOQ
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, Aug. 24, 2012.
(Pending Final
Board Approval)
EOE/ADA.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




HOME HEALTH AIDE
Will care for elderly or
handicap, light house
keeping, no heavy
lifting. PT Homosassa
Area (352) 628-6387

Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD


LIC. TITLE
AGENT

Hwy 44 Lecanto Fl.
(352) 746-2626
Tues.-Wed-Thurs
Between 10-12
Ask for Toni Gatlin



Youth Care
Worker

Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for

Youth Care Workers
* Must be over 21
years of age, have
High School Diploma
and be able to pass
a Level 1 back
ground screening
* Must be able to
com plete self- de-
fense and physical
intervention training.
* Ability to tolerate
verbal and mental
abuse while main-
taining a professional
demeanor
* Ability to perform
appropriate crisis in-
tervention, including
physically breaking
up fights.
PICK UP AN
APPLICATION AT
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO







Experienced
ervers
Accepting Application
10a-1:30 & 2-4p
Apply In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
Nextto Mr.B's C.R.
Drug Free Work Place






Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SALES
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales expert
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The Mall.
Drug Free Workplace


COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic.
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838


NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460

Telemarketing

Regional Builder
has opportunities for
telemarketers to culti-
vate large prospect
database. No cold
calling. Late after-
noon, evening and
weekend hours with
flexible schedules.
Must be personable
and computer
literate.
E-mail resume to
nancy@citrushills.com

WANTED
Highly self motivated
SALES PEOPLE
Company truck is
provided. Paid
vacation & Holidays.
Benefits available.
Apply in Person
ONLY from 9 a to 4 p
Mon-Fri, At
Brays
Pest Control,
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP







Employment
source is...


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


1-855-WE-AERATE

It's Time To Aerate!

-Help your lawn grow

fuller and greener!







1-855-932-3728


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakusters"
Free Written Estimate


$1OO OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 oooces3

ITM.T


Outside Sales
Associate

Fountains Memorial
Park
Experience a plus.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 628-2555






DRIVER

Over The Road
Flatbed, 2 Yrs Exp,
ClassACDL
(352) 799-5724


EXPERIENCED
Cabinet & Millwork
Fabricator Installer
Apply in person:
Built-Rite Cabinets
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis, Fl

EXPERIENCED
ROOFING TECHNI-
CIAN
We are looking for an ex-
penenced commercial
roofing technician. Spe-
cializing in TPO, PVC,
EPDM, and SBS. Must
be willing to travel and
drug free. Need a valid
Drivers License. Please
call 352-564-8319 be-
tween 9am and 4pm
Monday- Friday

TOW TRUCK
DRIVER
Dave's Body Shop.
Training NOT avail.
MUST have exp. with roll-
back and wheel lift. Clean
record for law enforce-
ment rotation calls.
352-628-4878


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
* FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
VIFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292
TOP NOTCH Carpentry
and Remodeling
Kitchen/Bath Specialist
All Handyman Needs
Lic. (352) 220-8801



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018


CLASSIFIED





Area Tours

Enthusiastic, ener-
getic and persona-
ble driver to conduct
area tours for visitors
to country club com-
munity. Sales support
function. Clean
driving record a must.
Schedule to
include weekends.
Please email resume
to
nancy@citrushills.com



Attn: Drivers
Great Miles

+ Top 5% Pay :
Money Security + Re-
spect= PRICELESS 2
Mos CDL Class A Exp
(877)258-8782



DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!

Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises.
Earn $800 per week!
Local CDL Training
(877)214-3624



DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!

Learn to drive for
Stevens Transport!
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job Ready
in just 15 days!
(888)368-1964


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244


Drivers
100% Owner
Operator Co.

Regional &
Dedicated Home
weekly Class A C.D.L.
lyr. exp. in last 3
Call (800)695-9643


Drivers
Refrigerated and
Dry Van freight.

Flexible hometime.
Annual salary $45K to
$60K. Quarterly Bo-
nus. CDL-A, 3 months
current OTR exp.
(800)414-9569.
www.
driveknight.com


Drivers/Flatbed
Class A.

GET HOME WEEK-
ENDS! Southeast Re-
gional, Earn up to
39c/mi. 1 year OTR
Flatbed experience
required,
(800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS

earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Leaded Glass Installed in your i~'
EXISTING DOOR! CARPET & LW
"NO ROT" UPHOLSTERY

* Blinds Between CLEANING
the Glass urnur
* Custom Carved ng in: Cleaned for
Glass (Art Pieces/ Carpet Stretching FREE Ask
Bath Glass) Carpet Repair
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors 352-282-1480 cell
352-726-6125 1 .' 5 -282-1480 cell
352-726-6125 I 352-547-1636 office -
2780 N Florida Ave, Hernando, FL(Hernando Plaza) Free In Home Estimates
I ,I^ ^ &Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
V Repairs
S, Small Carpentry


.P (Clean Dryer
.. Vents
Affordaue & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S s 352.344-0905
Scell 400-1722
;ured Lic.#3 7761


S

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto



Office Staff

F/T position. Will train;
benefits, vacation
Apply in person
CITRUS PEST MGT.
406 NE First St
Crystal River (across
from Post Office)






SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SUNDAY,AUGUST 19,2012 D7


Auto Detail/Clean
Up Person

Automotion, Floral City
352-341-1881
PET SITTER

Reliable person.Short
term In home. 564-8605
SUBSTATION CON-
STRUCTION
Elite Construction of
Ocala, Inc. Foreman,
Wireman, Concrete &
Laborers. Exp Preferred.
Minority/ Femailes en-
couraged to apply.
EEO/DFWP. 311 NW
11th PI, Ocala, FL 34475
or Fax 352-622-5667.

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced

Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean




CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time Customer
Service/Food Prep posi-
tion. 15 Hours a week.
Must be available even-
ing hours 4-7pm and
weekends.Customer
Service and typing skills
required.Fax resume to
352-527-9605

000000
P/T OFFICE
ASSISTANT
20-35 Hours Per Week
Friday & Saturdays
a must!
Must have computer &
bookkeeping exp., be
very honest, sharp &
dependable!
Please email resume
to: terrilynne69
@hotmail.com





AIRLINES
ARE HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED
Become a Medical
Office Assistant at SC
Train!! No Experience
needed! Online
training gets
you job ready!
HS Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


nyuroseeuiiyg lupcuL
30 day result, free estim.,
bermuda & centipede
we accept credit cards
352-302-6053
SOD! SOD! SOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.corn) 400-2221

SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831

Summertime Specials
lawn replacement, FREE
estimates, Call J&J
we accept credit cards
(352) 302-6049




TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lic. #2713, Insured.


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42R




When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
V-', Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
| - Residential &
: = 0Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


Meet singles
right now!

No paid operators,
just real people like
you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange mes-
sages and connect
live. Try it free.
Call now
(888)744-4426


S ""NOW 7
ENROLLING
For All Programs
*COSMETOLOGY
IPBARBER
-MASSAGE THERAPY
*NALIEC.H
SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415






12 ACRES
PRIME REAL ESTATE
8 MOBILE HOMES
Good Income *
Lots of possibilities.
Own. Finan., Reason-
able down payment
(352) 212-6182

Established pizza
shop in Floral City.
Good Money Maker.
$18,000 586-9932




Antique Oak Hoosier
Refinished, excel.
cond. tin flower bin
8 milk glass spice jars,
storage on top and
bottom $750. obo
(352) 795-1381


Colectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"# "A r r O'# "# "


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
SOD, LANDSCAPING
& MOWING
352-364-1180,
352-257-1831




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


B0002180 & SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned And Operated
In Citrus County For 25 Years.
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
$125 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF:
* One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
"m FREE ESTIMATES.
S(352) 628-5079



WIN


GENIE.
We Clean Widows md o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill





GENERAL
Stand Alone .
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians |
ER0015377

352-6124


Victim Resource Advocate
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
A PART TIME VICTIM RESOURCE ADVOCATE.
Part time position working 24 hours per week. Work schedule will be from
8:00AM to 5:00PM on 3 weekdays to be determined. Position requires being
on-call using a flexible rotating schedule or as needed. Duties: Assisting
victims of crime ranging from domestic violence, battery, sexual assault,
elder abuse, homicide, burglary, robbery, to financial crimes. Incumbent
provides short-term crisis counseling to victims and their families and make
referrals to appropriate social service agencies and programs, including
assistance with crime compensation. Inform victims of their legal rights and
provide information regarding the civil, criminal and juvenile justice systems.
Coordinate and organize caseload. Research and provide advocacy program
developments, create and conduct public and training presentations. Prepare
grants and prepare statistical anr1 nl-ti l r. irt- in lIin monitoring and
record keeping. Incumbent is .. p .. .. 1i.. iI.........- rant and agency
policies and guidelines. Work will be in both indoor and outdoor conditions;
may be exposed to verbal abuse and hostile conditions; travel in the county
will occur daily; must occasionally work odd hours on short notice and must
work overtime when required.
QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED: High school diploma with two years
practical work experience in victim assistance, social work, rehabilitation
counseling or related field preferred; or associate, decree in pqvchnlnev
sociology, criminal justice, or a related field; or an e' 1.i. .I .- .. .. rI ,, I
education, training and experience. Current Florida driver's license required.
Experience creating and working under grants preferred.
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at WWW.sheriffcitrus.olrg
0oocCTI Equal opportunity Employer MF/D/V


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


I LOVE CHEW 11


. EEE^v









D8 SUNDAY,AUGUST 19, 2012


Disney 40th
Anniversary Collection
16 Plates, signed &
numbered, Cert. of
Auth. $250. obo
(352) 746-3327




HOT TUB
4 person, with lounger
bought with house do
not want $500. obo
in crystal river, you haul
(386) 882-8867
HOT TUB THERMA-SPA
BRAND WITH COVER
5'X7' 3 PERSON, 2
SEATS AND CHAISE
LOUNGE, IN GREAT
CONDITION. $895.00 JP
352-726-4987, JOANNE
352-346-6023




19 cu. ft Kenmore
Fridge
in-door ice maker $100
352-726-7485
Amana
working refrigerator
Free. Must pk up
352-601-7113
Black Kenmore
Refrigerator, matching
electric stove, excellent
condition $500/palr
(352) 563-9830
DRYER$100 Works great
with warranty
Call/text352-364-6504
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Upright Freezer
runs well
$100.
(352) 465-9130
WASHER
$100 Works great with
warranty. Call or text
(352) 364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can De-
liver. 352 263-7398




BOSE Acoustimass
600, 5.1 channel, 5
Speakers, subwoffer
complete w/ manual
$135 OBO
(352) 746-0921
MAGNAVOX 36" TV with
LARGE MATCHING
STAND, used very little,
excellent condition, $95,
(352) 465-1813
SONY 36 TV WITH
STAND GOOD CONDI-
TION $100 352-613-0529
SONY 42 COLOR TV
WITH STAND.
EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $75
(352)527-0324
TV & RADIO
PORTABLE GOOD
CONDITION $20
613-0529
TV 13" WITH REMOTE
GOOD CONDITION $20
613-0529




AC MOBILE POWER
SUPPLY FOR AUTO DC
to AC Converter. 12VDC
to 120VAC works great.
$25 (352) 726-9983
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Pavillion
Laptop
$175
352-586-6891
X BOX Game System
w/11 games$250 obo
Play station 3 w/5 games
$200 OBO
Both in great cond
(352)795-7513




4 Piece Olive Green Lazy
Boy Sectional with chase
and pull out queen bed
$400; coffee table and
side table $20, dinning
room table with 8 chairs,
2 leafs, buffet w/ upper
cabinet with iron scroll
and glass shelves. $700
Round pedestal table w/
leaf and 4 chairs$200
(352) 249-7837
6 pc Oak Entertainment
Center; expandable
Selling w/ 51 in. Hitachi
TV. $1200. Will sell sep-
arately if interested.
(352) 527-7980
Beautiful Dining
Room Set
Wood Table, 6 chairs &
glass top plus china
cabinet. $495
(352) 726-6228
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURN www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Contemporary Bar
w/ bar stools
$160.
Dining Room Table
$100
(352) 257-3802
Dining Room table
42x54 light maple, w/4
chairs, 18" leaf, like new,
photos avail. $275
(352) 341-6991
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER HOLDS 32" TV ME-
DIUM OAK FINISH $40
352-613-0529

Estate Sale
2 BR, Living Rm,
Dining Rm, kitchen
table, 4 chairs, 3 bar
stools, fridge/freezer,
framed plcs
(352) 746-0084

Hitchcock Dining Room
Set Table w/ 3 leafs & 6
chairs. Custom Pads.
Excellent Condition
$650 OBO
(352) 564-3994
LARGE STORAGE CAB-


INET Oak Look storage
cabinet,2 door, 3 shelves
30x59x16 ,$70. or BO
352-382-0069
Like new off white sofa
and love seat, dinette
table w/ 4 chairs, and
TV's(352) 344-2903
MAUVE WING-BACK
CHAIR made by Pioneer
in USA very good condi-
tion $60.00 527-1399
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Qn Size Sofa bed
$150; Sofa &
Loveseat $200; 2
high back chairs
$757ea. Mint Cond.
352-637-1701


uensize so a I Submersible pump
hide a bed tropical 2 wire & 3 wire $75.
pattern. Very good Guaranteed
condition $165. All will demonstrate
wood Coffee Table $65 352-726-7485
(352) 637-5755 TREADMILL
Sofa $200 Sears, Lifestyler,
& Love Seat $175 Expanse 800
Hunter green, Excel cond. $300 Cash
w/tropical pillows, (352) 445-9448
(352) 563-5386 WATER SOFTENER
SOFAAND LOVESEAT Ecowater
Beige colour Sofa and Asking $200
Loveseat in excellent Call (352) 382-1424
condition. Price $ 300.
Local pickup only. Call
804 212 3170
SOFA AND LOVESEAT
Navajo Indian pattern Commercial Mayfear
VERY comfy BOTH for Large Panini Sandwich
$80.00 Lecanto Grill, excel. cond. $350
352-621-0175 Cecilware Electric
flattop griggle Stain.
WOOD OAK HEAD- Steel used lyr in Deli
BOARD EXCELLENT Business $375. Good
CONDITION $40 working order 287-9073
352-777-1256



3 WHEELED WALKER
Hesqvarna ONLY 65.00 464 0316
Riding Mower, 464 0316
42" Cut, Automatic, 4 WHEELED WALKER
good cond. $400. WITH BRAKES AND
(352) 637-4718 SEAT 75.00 464 0316
Push Mower 3-Wheel Handicap
Craftsman, runs great Scooter
$45. NEW $500
(352) 503-7992 (352) 527-3698
Toro Self Propelled DEPENDS FOR MEN
Mulching Mower Large quantity size s/m
$100 unopened packages over
Coleman Generator 150 pair Sell $60.
1850W $100 Dunnellon 465-8495
(352) 302-6069 MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
100.00 464 0316
Power Wheel Chair
Mobility Pride
Z Chair
Excel cond. $450 obo
(352) 637-1859




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid.We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




S- *| Amp
(352) 746-6624
Guitars V-Type
Sunburst finish $200
Blonde & Gold Tell Type
$190
(352) 746-6624
PIANO
ESTATE SALE Upright Koholer Camp-
6147 N. Nakoma Drive bell, Millennium series,
Beverly Hills, 34465 excellent condition.
8/23-8/25 9a-3p $900 (352) 628-5752

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Produce, Seafood, 60" SONY BRAVIA 1080
Floral Needed! REAR PROJECTION TV
Outdoor Flea Market $300, Blue Sleeper Sofa
held on the grounds $300, matching Blue
8471 W Periwinkle Ln Reclining Loveseat $200,
HOMOSASSA Excellent Condition
(behind Wendy's) 352-726-0264
Last Saturday Every GRILL, CHARCOAL,
Month 8am -noon BRAND NEW, never
Saturday, August, 25 used, suce(on
t t t used, 18" surface (on
Call Caroline at wheels). Paid $60, Sell,
352-527-2020 $30 Call 228-7372 (local)
KING NOBILITY ABER-
WANTED DEEN COMFORTER
New & Used Items SET 7 pieces LIKE NEW
in garage, $45.00 FIRM
rods, reels, tackle, 352-382-4911
toolscollectibles, Nordictrack easy entry
hunting equip. R400 bike with covers.
352-613-2944 Round pedestal patio
S 48" fiberglass table. 4
Sunbrella chair cush-
ions. Hitachi VCR, JVC
27" TV. Waring food
2 225/75/16 LTALL TER- slicer, Rival Slow
RAIN TIRES good con- cooker, Rival Crockpot,
dition no dry rot %50-%60 LeCreuset granite cas-
tread call 352-464-4280 serole dish. Framed Pic
2 Automatic Pool (352) 637-3059
Cleaners, Alpha 3 F it
Barracuda by Zodiac &
Great White, w/ hoses I E Lu
excel. cond. $135. ea
(352) 270-8475 DP EXERCISE BIKE
FAN TYPE UPRIGHT
2 CEMETERY PLOTS WORKS THE ARMS
For Sale TOO ONLY 85.00
Hills of Rest Cemetery 464 0316
Floral City Nordic Track EXP
Beautiful Location! Nordic TrackEXP
$600 each or make offer $2500
Call (352)249-7131 or (352 3448843
Email:doodalsyl42 (352) 344-8843
@yahoo.com PILATES PERFORMER
2 Front, Tires WORKOUT MACHINE
24540n re has video and foldout in-
2 Rear Tires structions. $85. please
27535ZR 18$100 call 352-860-0444
Michelins off Mercedes RECUMBENT
(352) 344-1413 EXERCISE BIKE
WORKS THE ARMS
2 RAIN BARRELS WITH TOO ONLY 100.00
HOSE CONNECTION T 0000
ON BOTTOM 75.004603
EACH 464 0316 SEARS PRO-FORM
370E CROSSWALK
2 Wave Runners TREADMILL EXER-
2 seat & 3 seater CISER In excellent condl-
with Trailers tion. $150 firm Telephone
Large Child's ATV 352 382 8960
$1,500 for All 32 3
All needs little work S
727-207-1619 Crys. Riv.
50" Sony TV w/ remote
$100. 36" TV w/ stand Bersa 380 auto, very
$85. both work good good cond., $280 firm
Nice girls bike 20" $15. (352) 794-3441
No cls before 10am
No52s ber CABIN ON 40 ACRES
(352) 6284766 Hunting recreational
Bed liner for a small in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
truck, good condition Area, well, pond, ATV
$65 trails Price Reduced
(352) 503-7992 352 795-2027/ 634-4745
BEDSIDE COMMODE COLT official police 38
ALUMINUM WITH special revolver, nickel
ADJUSTABLE LEGS plated with holster, 4 in
CLEAN AND STERI- barrel. $350 cash
LIZED 30.00464 0316 (352) 344-5283
BIRD CAGE PARROT GOLF IRON SET Adams
On stand/playtop 66"H Idea Hybrid Irons MRH
32"L 23"D Excellent 3-pw TT Gold Lite Shafts
CLEAN cond $100. xclnt new grips $100.
352-270-3909 Dunnellon 352-465-8495
CLOTHING MENS MINN KOTA ENDURA
LARGE PANTS, JEANS, 55 Great trolling
SHORTS & SHIRTS $20 motor.Like new, used
613-0529 only about 10 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT CEN- $180 352-527-0433 Bev-
TER MEDIUM OAK FIN- early Hills
ISH GOOD CONDITION MOUNTAIN BIKETIRES
$40 352-613-0529 4-knobbles 2-city tread
Floor model air condl- Kenda Specialized In-
tloner, Everstar, move nova All $25. Dunnellon
from room to room $100 465-8495
(352) 503-7992 NEW NEVER BEEN
KING SIZE BED WITH FIRED TAURUS
BOX SPRINGS SERTA 44 Mag SS 8 3/8 in bar-
PERFECT SLEEPER rel ported, also reload
CLEAN NON SMOKING dies, 3 boxes ammo
HOME $100 613-0529 (150 RD) Zipper case.
$650 OBO (352)
MAKITA CHOP SAW 249-3110 after 9am
USED FOR VINYL SID- Recumbent Bike
ING 95.00464 0316 ecume Bik


Nordic Irack
MOTOR SCOOTER $100.
Yamaha, 1988 (440) 812-5154
0049CC, 973 org. miles.
excel. cond., runs like Salvage 243 Rifle
new $,1000. firm, cash Model 11, Bolt Action
checkered walnut
(352) 445-9448 stock. Simmons 3 to 9
PURPLE MARTIN BIRD- power x 32 scope,
HOUSE Pole included, comes with sling & hard
Must dig out of ground. cover carrying case
$50.00. 352 726 5753 $350.(352) 795-1854
SEWING MACHINE
JANOME(NEW HOME) WE BUY GUNS
DC 4030 Like new. On Site Gun Smithing
Used 6 months. Origi- Concealed Weapons
nal Cost $699. 30 Permit Course
Stitches, Auto Lock DAN'S GUN ROOM
Stitch, Needle Threader, (352) 726-5238
much more. Ideal for
Quilters. All metal UJi
parts. $450 OBO
352-746-7355 Tale
SONY 36" TV WITH 4X8 Utility Trailer
STAND GOOD CONDI- Good condition $450
TION $100 352-613-0529 (352) 464-2180


4 x 8 foldable
2 wheel, lights no Tag
$75. (352) 795-6160




BOUNCE MUSICAL $20
AND 2 MORE BOUNCE
FOR $10 EACH 2 CAR
SEAT FOR INFANT $20
EACH 352-777-1256
HIGH CHAIR BLUE
SMALL FOR DINNER
ROOM $10 EACH
STROLLER GREEN $20
352-777-1256
PLAYPEN PINKAND
BROWN AND
STROLLER EXCELLENT
CONDITION FOR GIRLS
$40 each 352-777-1256




Need to fill your bracelet
Authentic Pandora Beads
$20/ea Variety of beads
with bracelet and clips
email lithgowmaureen@
yahoo.com


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED New & Used
Items in garage, rods,
reels, tackle, tools, col-
lectibles, hunting equip.
352-613-2944
WANTED TO BUY
14- 16 ft Jon Boat
& Trailer Reasonable
(352) 634-1324
Wanted to Buy
Acetylene Torches
hoses and tanks
(352) 270-4087
Wanted to Buy
Utility Trailer at least 48"
wide & 8. 10 or 12ft.
Long w/ fold up gate.
in good condition
Reasonable and
Wanted Nice Queen or
King Size Bedroom Suite
Reasonable
(352) 419-7097

$$$$$$$$
WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
liard Cues Coins & Jew-
elry Best Prices Paid
Chrs @ 352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$




BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Aug 19, 9-4 Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
Fruit & Nut Treat, Cage
Wire, Guineas & More!
727-517-5337 8260
Adrian Drive Brooksville


CAT 4YR OLD MALE
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207
CHIHUAHUA PUP Long
haired, 8 wk old male.
350$ firm Serious in-
quires only.
5o? on1 onn4


LItLLI Dear Is a IdILa tLIL
dog! This shepherd mix
just wants to be with his
human, whether that's
lounging by your feet at
home, hanging out at the
park or walking on the
trail. He is only 2 years
old but he has a very ma-
ture, relaxed disposition
and has great house
manners. He is a smart
boy who learns quickly.
Little Bear walks well on a
leash and knows some
commands already. He
gets along with other
dogs and likes to play
while out in public, but he
wants to be your one and
only pet at home. He has
been at the shelter pa-
tiently waiting for his new
best friend to find him so
they can start their new
lives together. His adop-
tion fee of $30 includes
microchipping, vaccina-
tions, a month of free pet
insurance, free obedi-
ence class and neutering.
352-568-5095


CLASSIFIED



DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 28th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
Free To Good Home
Friendly 1 yr old Black
Labrador, female,
Spayed and rabies shot.
(352) 351-1954

HAPPY JACK@
DuraSpot:
latest technology in
flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs.
Patented. At farm,
feed & hardware
stores. Distributed by
Fuller Supply
(205)343-3341.
www.
happyjackinc.com

Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 1 1a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352)419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com
Macaw Blue and Gold
10 yrs old, needs a good
home, comes w/xtra large
cage & free-standing
perch $1500
(352) 621-9810
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $375 (352)
794-3081 or 795-5204
Purebred Black & Tan
Miniature
Dachshunds
Great Breeder
$250.
(352)613-5817
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpuos.net







It'

SIMON

Is a 1 Year Old Male
Terrier Mix
In excellent physical
shape. Very gentle.
calm, gets along with
other dogs, not
interested in cats.
Walk well on a leash
very affectionate.
Found as a stray.
deserves a wonderful
forever home.
(352) 795-1288
Tiny-Shorkles, Morkles &
Yorkles, males & females
$500-$700 ckc, fl. health
certs., very socialized!
(352)212-4504
(352)212-1258
Toy Poodle & Chihua-
hua 6 yr old males, neut.
shots, house trained,
sleep in crates, must stay
together $275 for both
(352) 503-7270


r



TRACKER

Tracker is a 1 1/2 y.o.
neutered male,
heartworm negative.
German Shephard
mix, housebroken.
He gets along with
dogs and no cats.
good with children
and adults. Needs
fenced yard to run.
Call 352-621-4982




Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906,586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR

^^^^^^-I


*

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 boarding ramps, 8ftx
3ft ea., heavy alum.
w/side rails $250 ea.,
$450/both
(352) 489-8637




12 ft. Avon 10 man
profsnl. river raft, infltbl,
soft bottom w/motor mt.
$600 firm
(352) 489-8637




1994 Landau 12 ft. Jon
Boat, alum., like new
$350
(352) 489-8637
2001 Key Largo
18 1/2 ft
90 HP Mercury
$6900 (352) 795-0363
11ft. Hydroplane Race
boat, built in 50's, recently
refurbished, $600 obo
Leave message. I will call
you back (352) 344-0071
FLOTEBOAT
1988 Heritage 24' pon-
toon, aluminum deck, 90
horsepower Johnson 2
cycle, no trailer, will de-
liver, $3200
352-424-2760
Gheenoe
Classic Low side
13% feet
$600
(352) 726-6197


1991 15'9" /9.9 horse-
power Johnson, low
hours, galvanized trailer
$1500 352-424-2760
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
PONTOON
1997 22 foot Rehab Proj-
ect: Godfrey
pontoon;good platform;45
hp Honda 4 stroke
motor;no trailer;on
Withlacoochee. $1500
352-465-7812
Sweetwater
20ft. 40hp evinrude, gal-
vanized trailer, $3500
(352) 613-2333




Jamboree '05
30 ft class C Motor
home Excellent
Cond.Ford V10 20K
miles, NADA 38,000
asking 29,750. No
slides. 746-9002
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new. 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298




GULFSTREAM
2008, 18 FT.
KINGSPORT LITE
$7,800 Negotiable
(352) 726-8005
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
1997, Layton, 27ft.,
very very clean, in-
cludes hitch. $3,495
(352) 201-6111
KZ Sportsman
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 6, air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098
Simplicity
Washer/Dryer combina-
tion. Brand new, nvr
installed.Org $1100, sell
for $500. 628-9551




Dodge
Truck Topper
Fiberglass
$500. obo
352-220-7483
Maroon Cap 64/2 x 81 /2
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brake & inter lights off a
Dakota. New $1500 sell
$225.obo 352-795-3920




CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

LIQUIDATION
k BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892




1998 Buick LeSabre
Limited $2000
In Good Condition
(352) 628-7585



CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $22,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CHEVROLET
'83 Monte Carlo V-6
body off re-build
$2000
(352) 400-2020
Dodge
89 Dodge Colt
Mitsublshl engine, 5
speed, 11k mi, $1000
(352) 563-0166
HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID.
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY.
V6. LEATHER .ALLOYS
352-628-4600
LINCOLN
1989 Town Car RUNS
GOOD. NO LEAKS.
COLD AIR. GOOD RUB-
BER. DEPENDABLE.
$1100.00 BRUCE
352-256-8488
LINCOLN
'99 Continental, white
w/ gray leather interior,
all the bells and whistles
$4,250obo 352-897-4490
LIQUIDATION
k BIG SALE! *k
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


MERCEDES
'03, C240 Sport Wagon
107k mi., moon rf. CD.
new tires, excel, cond.
in & out. $6,950 obo
516-978-6011
MERCURY
MountaineerAuto, V8,
4 door SUV, 2000, Fac-
tory Mags, tinted windows
Electric everything!
$4200 727-207-1619 CR
SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600


SUBARU
2009 Outback Special
Edition 43,000 mi. in
Pristine Condition
by Elderly Gentleman
$19,500 (352) 746-3988





CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble, 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426








Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






Chevy
'03 Silverado Pickup
2500 HD Model, loaded
50k miles, $10,500
(352) 447-1244
(352) 344-2927

CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel, cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555

DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ma


2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab,
Diesel Dually 50K Excel-
lent cond. $21,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8.
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4, 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018

LIQUIDATION
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

MAZDA
'98, B2500, Extra Cab,
4 cyc. 5 speed, cold air
$2,900 obo
352-447-2366
TOYOTA TACOMA
extra cab, automatic,
runs excellent, A/C
$4950
Cell 352-257-4251,
Ofc 794-6069




Jeep
1998 Sahara 67K, 6 cyl, 5
speed, options, garaged,
exc cond, $8850/neg
352-322-5679
HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8,4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600


CHEVY
'97, Astro Van, 7 Pass.,
143K miles, dual AC,
Cruise, Rack, PW, PL
$2,800 (352) 637-5491

DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl.
seats 7! $5,450.
352-341-0018

Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018




Above ground Pool
24 x4 ft
Never been put up.
Brand New $500. obo
(352) 860-1426

Gas prices are going up
again. Two Motor
Scooters for Sale.
Illness forces sale.
1 2007, 250 CC $1,000
obo 1 2007, 150 CC
$750 obo. Both look
and run great.
(352) 220-8454

Harley Davidson 1200
Sportster XL Custom
2003 100 yr anniv bike
4300 mi, extra clean
$9000 422-2913

Harley Davidson
1978 Shovel Head, new
fenders, new tank, '02
Springer front end, belt
drive, $7,500 613-2333

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902

HONDA
1 Small Motorcycle
1 Large, Motorcycle For
parts or need repair
$500. (352)860-1426

YAMAHA
2012, Zuma Scooter
49 CC, 100 miles,
$2,300 obo
(352) 527-0347


Misc. otice


306-0819 SUCRN
Eig, To Vote- Kelly Honeycutt
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Kelly M. Honeycutt
1789 S. Gettysburg Dr.
Homosassa, FL 34448

You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.

Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle August 19, 2012


398-0819 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
08-29-12 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:

PERSONAL MINI STORAGE


- DUNNELLON
UNIT
#00163 MARINDA GARRI-
SON
#00248 EDWARD GROSS II
#00261 PATRICIA ANN
SEYMOUR
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VE-
HICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.




305-0826 SUCRN


OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.

LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- August 29th
@ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY

PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
August 12 & 19, 2012.


Vs Hays, Stephen R Case No'09-2010-CA-002774 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2010-CA-002774

DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,

vs.

STEPHEN R. HAYS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated August 09, 2012 and entered in Case No 09-2010-CA-002774 of the Circuit Court of
the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE is the Plaintiff and LINDA L HAYS; are the
Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at
By electronic sale beginning at 10'00 AM on the prescribed date at
www citrus realforeclosure com
at 1000AM, on the 8th day of August, 2012, the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment
LOT 82, HAMPTON HILLS, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 12, PAGES 20 THROUGH 23 INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 1536 NORTH ABALONE TERRACE, HERNANDO, FL 34442
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on August 9, 2012

Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court

By/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
"See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:
Mr. John D. Sullivan
110 N. Apopka Street
Inverness, FL 34450-4231
Phone: 352-341-6700
Fax: 352-341-7008
August 19 &26, 2012


304-0819 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Transportation Regional Incentive Program (TRIP)
Friday, September 14, 2012
J.B. Starkey Wilderness Park Environmental Center
10500 Wilderness Park Boulevard, New Port Richey, FL 34655

Notice is hereby given that the West Central Florida Metropolitan Planning Organiza-
tions Chairs Coordinating Committee (CCC), which includes the counties of Citrus,
Hernando, Hillsborough, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk and Sarasota, will conduct a
Public Hearing on Friday, September 14, 2012 at 12:00 pm. The purpose of the Hear-
ing is to afford the public the opportunity to comment on the Transportation Re-
gional Incentive Program (TRIP) Priority Projects for the Florida Department of Trans-
portation (FDOT) District 7. TRIP was created by the 2005 Florida Legislature to help
improve regionally-significant transportation facilities. TRIP provides matching grants
to local governments and others to help pay for transportation projects that will ben-
efit the region.

To receive a copy of regionally-significant transportation projects to be addressed
by TRIP, visit the CCC website at www.RegionalTransportation.org, or contact your
local Metropolitan Planning Organization.

"Persons in need of special accommodations under the Americans with
Disabili ties Act or persons who require interpreter services (free of
charge) for this meeting should contact: Pasco County
Metropolitan Planning Organization, 8731 Citizens Drive, New Port
Richey, FL 34654. Call (727) 847-8140, or E-mail to mpocomments@pas-
cocountyfl.net. Contact no later than September 5, 2012.

In accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other nondiscrimination
laws, public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin,
age, sex, religion, disability, or family status.

BY: /s/ Michelle Greene

Director of Planning and Administration
TBARTA
August 19, 2012.


303-0819 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of:
LEGACY KOI, located at
4560 Hidden Oaks Way,
Crystal River, Florida
34428, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.


DATED at Crystal
RIver
this 13th day of August,
2012.
/s/ Jack York Jr.
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. August 19, 2012.


Metn


Metn


MeBn






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 D9







BEST SELECTION AND BEST PRICES


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


I =' = !^ ^ I W I 1'i'i'i ^:^ II jH :i' j j V 1^ I'i l i 'Il'^ ;1 :Ja1 fIcI


2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ET. 52575


2006 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 52300


2006 NISSAN SENTRA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ET. 52110


2006 FORD F150 2006 DODGE MAGNUM 2006 DODGE DURANGO
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52330 800-584-8755 EXT. 52614 800-584-8755 EXT. 52334
2006 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO 2006 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 12254 800-584-8755 EX. 12248 800-584-8755 ET. 12203
2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2006 FORD F350 2006 FORD F250
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 12151 800-584-8755 EX. 42271 800-584-8755 ET.32169
2006 TOYOTA CAMRY 2005 CHRYSLER 300 2005 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 62217 800-584-8755 EX. 52440 800-584-8755 ET. 52213
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 JEEP WRANGLER 2005 CADILLAC CTS
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 ER 52502 800-584-8755 EX. 12234 800-584-8755 ET. 12174
2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 2005 DODGE RAM 1500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 42282 800-584-8755 EX. 32373 800-584-8755 ET. 61274
2005 DODGE DAKOTA 2005 BUICK LACROSSE 2004 KIA SEDONA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 62382 800-584-8755 EX. 62414 800-584-8755 ET. 52287
2004 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2004 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 52508 800-584-8755 EX. 12261 800-584-8755 ET. 42226
2004 DODGE CARAVAN 2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER 2004 FORD F150
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 42248 800-584-8755 ER. 37858 800-584-8755 ET. 32342
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 2004 NISSAN XTERRA 2004 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 62400 800-584-8755 EX. 62351 800-584-8755 ET. 62273
2003 FORD FOCUS 2003 DODGE CARAVAN 2003 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 37726 800-584-8755 ET. 37711 800-584-8755 ET. 62139
2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE 2002 NISSAN FRONTIER 2002 UNCOLN NAVIGATOR
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 52254 800-584-8755 EX. 52398 800-584-8755 ET. 12208
2002 FORD F350 2002 CHRYSLER 300M 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 12139 800-584-8755 EX. 12373 800-584-8755 ET.42267
2002 HONDA ODYSSEY 2002 CHEVROLET S10 2002 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 42228 800-584-8755 EX. 33005 800-584-8755 ET. 62355
2001 FORD WINDSTAR 2001 TOYOTA TUNDRA 2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRACK
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 52493 800-584-8755 ER .52524 800-584-8755 ET. 12408
2001 NISSAN ALTIMA 2001 GMC JIMMY 2001 SATURN SW2
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 12448 800-584-8755 EX. 42276 800-584-8755 ET.42582
2001 DODGE RAM 3500 2001 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 2001 TOYOTA AVALON
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 32093 800-584-8755 EX. 62279 800-584-8755 ET. 62314
2000 DODGE NEON 2000 FORD MUSTANG 2000 CHEVROLET TAHOE
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 E. 52448 800-584-8755 EX. 52482 800-584-8755 E. 12412
2000 FORD EXPLORER 2000 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 2000 CHEVROLET S10
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 47623 800-584-8755 EXT. 42259 800-584-8755 EXT. 37738


CRYSTALAUTOS. CO M


D10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







INSIDE
I Sikorski's
a Attic E4
V 9J PAGE E4


OCS MEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Romeo Sarmiento from Tampa
competed at the senior level of
competition in the apprentice-
ship program portion of the
"fastest trowel on the block"
competition at the recent
Florida Home Builder's Associa-
tion 2012 Southeast Building
Conference in Orlando.
-: i--" 1 I l-. 11 1 1-. I.


W o


k










E2 SUNDA'I~ AuGusT 19, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


24/I FLjjX
(352)637~2a28
Enterhou! 2N


SPACIOUS UPGRADED BEAUTY!!
* Beautiful Master Cooks Kitchen
| Salt Water PooVSpa Plantation Shutters
SNice Large Lot 4/2/3 Car Gar.
* Hurricane Trusses Upscale Gated Comm.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.elliesulloia eirmaux.inel


*3BD/2BA/3CG Beautifully Maintained
. Solar Heated Pool Over 2,000 SF Living
* Corner Lot w/Shed Many Upgrades
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


RIVER GLEN
Well-maintained, very affordable, 2BR/
1BA + 2 half BA situated on 2 lots. 6x26
enclosed porch, 15x20 Fla. room., laundry
room, with half BA & whirlpool tub, concrete
parking pad, 11x17 workshop/storage
building. Nice greenbelt, paved road, close to
shops/restaurants. -
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 -
Email: lounalley@tampabay.rr.com


JU51 LI. 1:U!
Come live the casual Florida
lifestyle. Open floorplan with tons
of natural light. Pool, spa, and
distant sunsets await!

Email: kim@kimdevane.com


*Very Cute 1BD/1 BA Garage Now Bonus RM
* New Roof, A/C New Windows & Gutters
* New Lawn & Sprinkler Shed & Partial Fence
* A Lovely Little Home For A Lovely Price
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


GLORIOUS ESTATE HOME
ON FIVE MANICURED ACRES
Over 4,200 square feet of living area in this immaculate
well-built home Located in a great neighborhood this
home includes a 4-bay garage, large family room,
hardwood floors, custom woodwork and 3 gorgeous
baths Huge master suite and 2 large guest bedrooms
along with inside laundry and formal dining A must seel

STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


*3BR/3BA3CG Home
* Great Room w/Vaulted Ceilings Gourmet Kitchen
* Lg Master Suite Screened Pool & Spa
* Lots of Beautiful Decking 900 Sq Ft Workshop
* Covered Boat Slips Beautiful Natural FL Setting

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net I


Great buy on this 3/2/2 home on corner lot in great
community of Canterbury Lake Estates Nice open floor
plan, split bedrooms, huge master walk-in closet, ceramic
tile, double pane windows, security system, covered lanai,
screened patio, circular drive New A/C & water heater
2010 Community offers clubhouse, pool, & tennis
courts Enjoy the Florida lifestyle
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martha.satherremax.com





RB*





REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


S3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Cornan counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadalremax.net


Big 3/2.5/2 home with waterfront views from
all rooms. Big lanai with inground pool.
Fireplace in family room. Big kitchen loaded
with cabinets. Living room/dining room
combo. Breezeway from garage to house.
Private spot surrounded by high-end homes.
JENNIFER STOLT (352) 637-6200
Email: Ifo@CitrusCountyHomes.com
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


IN." .FO LINE
Ente house u






46 BEECH STREET
SUGARMILL WOODS
*3BR/2BAi2CG Golf Course Home
* Great Room Lg Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
* Gas Fireplace Screened Lanai & Pool
* Beautiful Landscaped 1 + Acre Well Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kunningham@remax.net


0^ _4


UPtlH NIut: CnlH WUUU J/i/i Un A PhilVil
CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready. Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadalremax.net


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
SHardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
SRoom for Pool and More
*Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


2421 N. H e H s -w .


A MUST SEE HOME
With a total of 1,440 sq. ft. of
living space, this home has a lot to
offer. Fenced backyard, large FL
room, 3BR/2BA garage, brand
new roof, move-in condition, and
much more. S
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net


#1 in Citrus County


E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA agents hit new
milestones
ERA
American
Realty & In-
vestments is
proud to an-
nounce the
latest produc-
tion level
achieved by Dawn
one of its In- Theroux
verness office ERAAmerican
agents for Realty.
2012.
Dawn Theroux has sur-
passed the $2 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2012.
Dawn Theroux can be
reached at the Inverness office
of ERAAmerican Realty by call-
ing 352-726-5855.
ERAAmerican Realty is also


joined the
company's
Beverly Hills
office, where
she will work
as a sales as-nd hs ld
sociate.
She has
ere e Marge
s ntact Mge Maszota
needs of buy- ERAAmerican

ers for more
than six years and has lived in
Citrus County for more than 30
years.
Contact Marge Maszota at
the Beverly Hills office at 352-
746-3600 or by email at kel-
marmm@tampabay.rr.com.

RE/MAX agents
continue to perform
The associates and staff of


please to announce mat RlIVIMA l ealty One are very
Marge Maszota has recently pleased to announce that Jeff


l IJackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
-. Realtorn A HOUSE Realtor
302.3179 SOLDN-ai' 287-9022 |
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl WEE 7466700IL BDOO

6135 N. WHISPERING OAK
Don't pass up this beautiful Rusaw built
3/2/2 home w/den. Completely upgraded
Kitchen, with Silestone Quartz countertops,
kiL- c/c.. ; CC--


Al


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Great commercial building location 2 blocks
from courthouse. 100 x 162 lot.
$125,000 MLS#356806




BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Large 2BR/2BA pool home on 1 acre. Original garage
converted to living area. Detached 2 car garage.


Stone has
passed the
$1 million
mark in *
sales vol-
ume this
year.
This
qualifies Jeff Stone
Jeff as a RE/MAX
Jeff as a Realty One.
Million Dol-
lar Producer. Jeff is a Realtor in
the Crystal River office of
RE/MAX Realty One located on
U.S. 19.
Realtors Dawn Wright and
Leo Smith have both qualified
for the multimillion dollar pro-
ducers club this year. Each of


Dawn Wright
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Leo Smith
RE/MAX
Realty One.


these agents surpassed the $2
million mark in sales volume,
which is an exceptional accom-
plishment in this market.
Dawn and Leo both work in
the Crystal River office of
RE/MAX Realty One. They
have a long history of success


in the Citrus County market-
place and continue to place in
the top echelon of local agents.
The brokers and staff of
RE/MAX congratulate Dawn
and Leo on their efforts to
achieve this prestigious award.

Kudos to
Stokley for champ
performance
EXIT Realty Leaders wishes
to congratulate Mike Stokley
for closing more than $1 million
in 2012. Mike can be reached
at 352-794-0888, or you can
visit his website at www.exitre-
altyleaders.com.


Amanda & irk Jolhno Tom Ballour UI Avenus & Hal $Steiner Art Paty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROIR/ASSO. t EALIT O CI REALTOR ALTOR-BROKER REALTOR




`7 .....


238 E. TRIPLE CROWN LP 745 E. SAVOY 4275 N. MODELWOOD 2372W.SNOWY EGRETPL. 10100 ROY THOMAS RD 3273 W. FAIRBANKS
4/3/3 353329 $359,500 3/ 356292 $159,900 3/2/2 356461 $149,900 4//2 356193 $189,900 3/1.5/2 356947 $295,000 3/2/2 357008 $126,900


4506 N. TUMBLEWEED


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Corner commercial location off Hwy 44 east & -
Gospel Island Road. $61,500 MLS#354972
6277 N. MATHESON
3/2/2 357083 $94,900


Im
'9-
FORMER BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Prime location, multi-use building. Next to Citrus I, 1I L i. J
High School. $349,989 MLS#354393 27S3 FILLMORE
1 356531 $53,900


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
SEmail: roybass@tmpabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 321302-6714


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 E3


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication.
* Send in information
attn: Community
Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to
352- 563-3280,
attention: Club
meetings.
* Email to community
@ chronicleonline.
com. Include "Club
Meetings" in the
subject line.







E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cii ONi ci


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



For health, shake salt habit


Follow easy guidelines to keep sodium intake at reasonable levels


Most Americans could benefit
from shaking the salt habit, as
consuming too much salt plays
a role in high blood
pressure.
Keeping blood pressure
in the normal range re-
duces an individual's risk of
cardiovascular disease,
congestive heart failure,
and kidney disease. Every-
one, including children,
should reduce their sodium
intake to less than 2,300 mg.
of sodium a day -about 1 Monica
tsp. of salt. CONS
People 51 and older,
blacks of any age, and indi- SCIE
viduals who have high
blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic
kidney disease should further reduce
their sodium intake to 1,500 mg.
Since most of the sodium we con-
sume is found in processed foods, we
can choose to eat processed foods less
often or in smaller portions. Examples
of these processed foods are pizza,
cured meats, such as bacon, sausage,
and hot dogs, deli/luncheon meats,


i


and ready-to-eat foods, like canned
chili, ravioli, and soups.
To understand which packaged or
canned products are lower
in sodium, read the Nutri-
tion Facts Label and the in-
gredients list. Look for
foods that are labeled "low
sodium," "reduced
sodium," or "no salt
added."
Fresh foods are generally
lower in sodium. When
cooking, prepare food with
Payne little or no salt. Instead of
UMER salt, use herbs, spices, gar-
lic, vinegar, or lemon juice
NCE for seasoning.
Consuming plenty of
fruits and vegetables helps us in two
ways: First, fruits and vegetables are
naturally low in sodium, and second,
they are potassium-rich. Foods which
are high in potassium help to lower
blood pressure.
Potassium is found in vegetables
and fruits such as potatoes, beet
greens, tomato juice and sauce, sweet
potatoes, beans (white, lima, kidney),


and bananas. Other sources of potas-
sium include yogurt, milk, clams, hal-
ibut, and orange juice.
When eating out, ask for your meal
to be prepared with less salt and get
sauces and dressings on the side so
you can use less. If you cut back on
your sodium intake gradually, then
your taste for salt will lessen over
time.
For more information, call Monica
Payne at the Extension office at 352-
527-5713. Citrus County Extension
links the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions, or
affiliations.
Monica Payne is the Family and
Consumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


Size of Chinese statue affects value; Jadeite water server


Dear John: Enclosed are
pictures of a statue or
figurine. I bought my
house about 35 years ago, and
while I tried to work
in my yard, this
statue was sitting in
the front of my house.
I tried cleaning it up
to the best of my abil-
ity. The statue has no
chips or cracks. It is
in perfect condition. I
was hoping you could
give me any informa- John ,
tion on its age and SIKOI
value. I appreciate
any information you AT
can give. KG.,
Inverness
Dear KG.: Your porcelain fig-
ure of a man was likely made in
China sometime after World
War II. You did not include the
dimensions.
If the figure is 9 to 10 inches
tall it would likely sell in the
$200 range. If it is 19 to 20


I

1
T


inches tall, it might sell for close
to $1,000.
Dear John: I somehow ended
up with this water server from
my husband's family,
and I am trying to
identify the age and
the potential value. I
have not been able to
find the information
anywhere so far. I
have seen similar
items and deter-
mined that perhaps it
korski is a Jadeite water
SKI'S server, from the
Sneath Glass Com-
IC pany I hope you can
shed some light on
this for us. -J.L, Internet
Dear J.I.: Glass that was made
to look like or resemble jade ac-
cording to research records has
been made since the 4th cen-
tury B.C. in China. It was made
in Egypt and Venice as well.
It was popularized in the 19th
century by English and Ameri-


can glass companies. I was not
able to find any connection to
the Sneath Glass Company and
Jadeite glass.
There were several makers
known to have produced
Jadeite glass that are likely to
have made your refrigerator
water cooler, including Fire-
King, Jeanette Glass Co., and
McKee Glass.
I suggest you contact Sparkle
Plenty Glass Company Perhaps
they can identify it. Potential
dollar value is $150 to $300.
Dear John: I have had this
chair since around 1961, at
which time I purchased it at an
auction in upstate New York.
When I got it, the frame was ex-
actly as it is now, but the uphol-
stery was all torn, and it was
stuffed with straw. I had it re-
covered in the Naugahyde as
you see it By the way, I paid $10
at auction and $100 to re-cover
The upholsterer wanted to buy
the chair but I said no sale. It is


very heavy and the frame is ma-
hogany After all these years, it
has no creaks. I would appreci-
ate your input as to origin, date,
and value. S.R., Internet
Dear S.R: Your good-looking
armchair was made in America
about 100 years ago. You were
lucky that all it needed was re-
upholstering. The Naugahyde
gives the chair a quality ap-
pearance. You have a chair with
$110 invested that could not be
duplicated in today's world for
five times the money Currently
there is very little interest in
the style, so dollar values are at
See ATTIC/Page Ell
This porcelain figure of a man
was likely made in China some-
time after World War II. If the
figure is 9 to 10 inches tall, it
would likely sell in the $200
range. If it is 19 to 20 inches
tall, it might sell for close
to $1,000.
Special to the Chronicle


I %
t.
ql AZ*.












With tropical plants, careful maintenance is key


,'~F~IC Zsr II; 5;


R
-rr



rr~L~~a~f


here are about 50 species of
evergreen and deciduous
species of Russellia that evolved
in Cuba and from Mexico south
throughout Central Amer-
ica to Colombia. None are
native to Florida. All have
masses of showy tubular
flowers in red, pink or
white. This exotic is not in-
vasive and adds color in
the garden.
Russellia are tropical to
subtropical and conse-
quently frost-tender A
plant killed by frost or
frozen ground is dead. It Jane
cannot sprout next spring. JAN
If gardeners in a frost- GAR
prone zone want exotic
tropical plants, they must
be brought indoors for winter, pro-
tected excessively or replaced each
spring.


See Page E8


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Russellia adds color in the garden. It has attractive clusters of flowers among the narrow leaves.
Holding abundant nectar, Russellia is a popular plant for luring butterflies and hummingbirds to the
garden.
aO-


WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER -
BASS BITING AT YOUR BACK DOOR!
sparkling, this home features OPEN GREAT ROOM WITH
beautiful stone fireplace, fully equipped updated kitchen.
CAGED INGROUND POOL, lots and lots of storage. WORKSHOP.
MOVE-IN READY. Additional lot optional for S12.000.
PROUDLY OFFERED AT $298,900 MLS#35417O


KAREN E. MORTON
Hall of Fame Centurion Memb-,
E-mail: kemorton@tampabayrrcc
Website: karenemorton cc
(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595
TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163
J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE
(.Or tI 5 _- .,,_ ,


GREENBRIAR CONDO
2 bedroom 2 bath FULLY FURNISHED with carport- Spotless
and sparkling, all appliances, easy location to heated
swimming pool. Ready for immediate occupancy. Great
place to park your seasonal visitors while investing in this
Buyers' market $68,500 MIS 355424


WITHLACOOCHEE FOREST IN YOUR FRONT YARD! WHISPERING PINES VILLA FLORAL CTY- 4 ACRE POOL HOME WEST HIGHLANDS-SETTLE THIS ESTATE
FLORAL CITY 4 ACRE POO HOMEOFFERS
18 ACRES (2 parcels), some woods and pasture. Watch MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING AT ITS BEST!!! Immaculate 3 bedrooms l etiitcheitcorer LOOKING FOR OFFERS!
deer leap across your back yard This 3 bedroom 2 bath and sparkling this 2BR, 2BA village w/gar. offers great overlooking Lake Consuela, GRAT ROOM ITH IRPLA den/ge
D MH is hidden the wds but right ff the trilsprivacy with the woods in the back. Lg. fam. Fm. i dit oudRERMDIoR"Ee
W MH is hidden in the woods but riht off the as addition, fully equipped kit., bright and cheery good r.... 111i1' "'"' """ "'" "i' bacard ready for your summer g Iden
Located lO minutes from the north end of the Sunshine morning room. Community pool and RV storage area. ''"'"'1 "' i '' '" ...111 1,.. '.. ".. Lo MLS#354158
Parkway. MLS356359 229,900. MLS #353897. $59,900. Call Karento show 212-595 this beauty MIS 355231 $259,900. PRICED TO SELL AT $59,900


front and rear Lot of room to build add' home garage CHECK THIS ONE OUT FOR
PRICED TO SELL AT $158.900 ONLY $59,900 KM/HMPHR


7'- 7 ,:Y -. This SPARKLING ANi D SPOTLESS Ouality built 32x48
CITRUS HILLS Destiny DW mobile home is MOVE-IN READY "3 BR
Sbedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage a on acre 2 BA* large covered carport, PLUS 2 detached metal
buildings for all your real loves!!! 3 lots Estate
ONLY $79.900 priced to sell at S88,900 KM/CB


000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded
and private setting perfect retreat!
11. ... ... .. ... I rake the
MLS #353046 $400,000





115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and
nice 1...1 ,:.... in beautiful Citrus
Hills!! *,, ., I a one acre comer lot,
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in
pool and patio area offers you the privacy
S.. ... F .: : w ell
... ... ,,, bring
175,000


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house .com


3 GAZANIA CT.
NATURE'S SMW
BEST KEPT SECRET Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River space, open floor plan, all neutral colors
Oaks East, a gated waterfront community Quiet cul-de-sac street w/lots of green
on the Withlacoochee River space Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
$218,000 Parkway
will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS #355830 $99,000






LIVING ON THE WATER!
This classic contemporary pool home is 520 SPRUCE ST., INVERNESS
the right setting for living the Florida This charming, very well-maintained 3/2/1
lifestyle. Open and airy with the home has a lot to offer: close to town,
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. medical ... I 1. :... F.., your fenced
190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of backyard I ... .. ... .... or private
room to dock all the water toys patio Everything is neat and clean, just
imaginable! i. ... :..
MLS #354435 $489,000 i -- $69,900


0"eRmeL


000CIX16 CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 0008SQH


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II
II


Many hobbyists take cuttings in fall
to grow for next year's garden. If stems
are laid on and covered by humus-rich
soil while still attached to the mother
plant, they will usually de-
velop roots at the leaf nodes.
These rooted layers can be
severed from the parent be-
fore the first frost and kept
as house plants until after
the danger of the last frost is
passed in March.
Only one species is read-
ily available in Florida.
Russelliaequisetiformiswas
eber formerly misnamed R.
juncea. It originated in Mex-
E'S ico and thrives in Zones 9 to
DEN 12. To flower well, it needs
full sun and humus-rich but
light, well-drained soil.
For a general garden and potting







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida Home Builder's Association meets in Orlando for Southeast Building Conference


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle
Staying up-to-date in an industry is
important, especially in our present
economic environment Finding out
what's new and what's not provides a vehi-
cle for business owners to offer to their
customers the most current technologies,
products, and skills. It's often said that,
"education is the key," and that's no differ-
ent for a building contractor, remodeler,


or construction tradesman.
An event like the Florida Home
Builder's Association's 2012 Southeast
Building Conference (SEBC) in Orlando is
a "one-stop place to assist those associ-
ated with the construction industry
through education, inspiration, and in-
sight," said Tony Martin of Wells Fargo, co-
chairman of the SEBC.
"The exhibitors provide the latest prod-
ucts, services, and education the industry
has to offer," added Ray Puzzitiello, presi-


dent of Puzzitiello Builders and co-chair-
man of the SEBC.
Whether the contractor needs to know
commercial energy code compliance in
the 2010 Florida Building Code (FBC),
presented by Arlene Stewart, AZS Con-
sulting, Gainesville, or Florida laws and
rules, presented by Jack Glenn of the
Florida Home Builder's Association, or
dozens of other professional educational
offerings, the SEBC provides a location
for the construction industry to gather and


share knowledge.
Because of sagging sales in a down
economy, many of the exhibitors who nor-
mally have participated in past years de-
cided not to attend this year's show.
"Because of a weak market, many of the
other states no longer have this kind of
event. Florida is a bellwether state in the
construction industry We're looking for
things to be much better in 2013 because

See Page E7


E6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CONVO next year," Martin said. "We had 4,300
CON O people register for the event, and 2,400 at-
tended."
Continued from Page E6 One of the co-location partners, the
Florida Masonry Association, had their
40 percent of the existing vendors in this fun-to-watch state-wide "Florida Fastest
year's show have already signed up for Trowel on the Block Competition" in the


exhibit hall.
"The Fastest Trowel on the Block Com-
petition showcases the speed and skill of a
journeyman mason who has 10 to 25 years
of experience. The winner receives a
$5,000 prize and goes on to Las Vegas for
the national competition," said Pat


McLaughlin, executive director of the Ma-
sonry Association of Florida. "We also
have three levels of our apprenticeship
program competing here at the same time.
The winners of the apprenticeship


3566 E SUZIE LANE INVERNESS ...... ,,,, ... -..- ASTOUNDINGLY GOOD BUY ..,. t,, ,1 ,l, ...1 ...1,
. ..... I ,,,, ,I 11 1,,I ... , S . I I, -. . ,,,,, ...... ,, .I l,, ,,I TH E CA T 5 M EO W I. .. I 1.,,,t, 1. 1 ,,,,,h il,,,,
newer hot wtel hete. Detached block wokshop/storage buding 1985, nestled on wooded 1.6 aes. 3600 E. Perry S., Close to downtown Crystal River shopping and entertainment
w/electic. Excellent location for office with mor Highway 44 West o Inverness, $174,900, MLS #356550. Call Tonya Koch ONLY ASKING $79,500. 471 & 473 Elmwood PI
Inverness insight of frontyard. MLS #356457. Call 352-726-5263. 352-613-6427 or Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983. MLS #347933. Kathy Chapman 3524764988.
I.j T':r- g ri i a


DISTRESSED HOMEOWNERS SEMINAR
Is your home UNDERWATER/UPSIDE DOWN?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS!
Come learn what others don't know... FOR FREE!

Seminar Highlights Include:
Short Sales Is my house a good candidate?
Bankruptcy Can it save my home?
Loan Modifications Is anybody getting one?
SDeficiencies What is this? And how can it harm me for years to come?
Misperceptions What are they?
Time Frames How long do I have?
Guest Speaker Michael T Kovach, Jr. Attorney at Law
The Grove Downtown LIMITED SEATING
210 Tompkins Street. Unit B Aug. 21,212 Call today for reservations
Inverness, FL PTrish Antonetti 352-400-3323



FTeramAWta
REALTY GROUP


s- 6 M s o


NO BIG TWINI( E Ii . ,,, ul
BUY THIS GREAT HOUSE NOvv CELEBRATE LABOR DAY IN kA(ETOTHE DiEBY' kiDu(D I' 1 I .I I .. .,. ....... ..i ,,, II, .,,,i,,. I ..I..l,. n Ii I ....
THIS FANTASTK POOL HOM E . .. ... I ". .. I .. I, 11 ,, , .. . .... ,,, ,I ,,, 1... ,,,,, .. ..... I,, ,,, .... , ,,I1 ,,,, ,,,,1 1 ,,,,, .
I,,,,,, h,,, r ,,, ,,,1 ,,,,,, ,,,,,t ... I ,,,1 1,,,,,,h ,hi ....1 ,1,1 Ih,, ... .. .. .. . . , ,I ... . . I H ,,,,,, h1 ,,, r ,,,, ,,,,,,,1 ,,,,1 h 1 ,hi U,,,,, ,1 ,,, 11 1 ,1,,h , ,,,
plans, etin kitden, granite county ...Take a peek! Coll Tomika Spires on one mae MOL! 7590 Pinto. Cll today to se me. Call Tomik Spires-Hanssen I I ,i 1 ..... 1 . ...I .,,,, .1 i..,,,....
Honsen 352-5866598 or Kim Fuller 352-2125752. MLS #356262. 352-5866598 Km Fuller 352-2125752. MLS 35478. I ...... ..h ,,, ... "I 1.
gelC9


Page E9


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 E7







E8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E5

soil mix, use half local
sandy soil amended with
well-aged fine mulch, avail-
able free from the central
landfill on Highway 44 west
of Inverness. Any weed
seeds in the dead and
shredded yard wastes are
cooked to death in the hot
decomposing stage of mak-
ing compost.
The fine mulch is avail-
able for self-loading any-
time. The county will load
pickup trucks and trailers
for gardeners between 9 and
10 a.m. Tuesday to Friday
and from 8 to 2 p.m. on Sat-
urday Phone 352-527-7600 to
be sure they have some. I or-
dered SandLand, a local
trucking company, to deliver
a dump truck full for my gar-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


den when the ground dries
enough to get the big truck
into the pit. Trucking costs
run about $75 to $80 an hour
Common plant names
vary from region to region.
R. equisetiformis is called
Coral plant, Coral fountain
and Mexican Coral Plant.
The small, scale-like leaves
sprout from long pendant
stems. Wiry stems are erect
at first and droop when ma-
ture. The plant looks good
draping over a retaining
wall and in containers.
In warm Zones 9B and far-
ther south, it blooms all year
round. Perennial and ever-
green further south. it will
reach a height and spread of
up to 3 feet Locally in Zones
9A and 8B, where it is
treated as a tender annual,
one can expect Russellia to
become 12 to 18 inches tall
and wide in one growing
season. It has attractive clus-


BUILDING CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


rl rill
119
tJBEST rE dAi
rP:EI Of Citrus
Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


IEN KE Office 382- 1700
ER.A" REmLTYlNC.l
NEW LIST IN S- TAR I O D


ters of flowers among the
narrow leaves. Holding
abundant nectar, Russellia
is a popular plant for luring
butterflies and humming-
birds to the garden.

Jane Weberis a Profes-


sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact JWe-
ber12385@gmail. com.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


KEY "Always There For You"
EAL GAIL COOPER'
L .i a multimillion Dollar Realtor
ERA; Cell: (352) 634-4346
S Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
S2/2 end unit condo
* New carpeting in glassed FL room
* Parking "at your door"
* AC/heat new in 2006
* Newer interior paint
* Community pool steps away
#347098 $85,500


POSSIBLE IN-LAW SUITE!
3/2/3 custom home on half acre
Detached garage w/30amp & 220 wiring
New roof in 2006 new AC/heat in 2005
SFamily room has separate entrance
SSecurity system for house & garage
SHome warranty for the buyers
#355719 $149.900


Near Suncoast: Enjoy this In the Hammocks: where the
newer 2007 great room home with outside & community pool are
4 bedrooms, 2 baths and caged maintained by the association.
pool. Two separate covered lanai Corner villa with 2 lot sides on golf
areas. Half acre estate lot on deep course. Very private 1/3 acre site.
greenbelt. Priced to sell quickly at Great room with FRPLC. 3/2/2
$198,500. MLS#356996 $165,000. MLS#333251
Ton & Lois Shid328257
PoitFo Ou Exeiec wwwgoFhms om


L





Zn


)"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"' @
NANCY .
Cell: 352-634-4225
PONTICOS
Multi-Million $$$ Producer FR!a KEY 1 REALTY INC.
Sr a f 8015 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700




"W,**. .


U SOLAR HEATED POOL! LOTS OF UPDATES
S ON GOLF COURSE BUT PRIVATE! TO THIS FANTASTIC BUY!
S4 Bed /2 Bath / 3 CAR Side Entry Grage 2009 New Roof Shingles Newer Appliances
New GRANITE Island Kitchen AND Tile Floors Private Well for Sprinklers Large Backyard
SCathedral & Tray Ceilings Lois of Storage Updated Oak Wood Cabinets with Drawers
$350,000 MLS#356304 $109,000 MLS#352463
takemy virtual lours t


CAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: 422-4620 iE1
Office: 382-1700


ENCLAVE HOME
* 3/2/3 2389 sq. ft.
* Heated pool Lg scr. lanai
* Fam. rm w/fp Wood, tile & carpet
#355999 $262,000


IeM -


IMMACULATE!
* 4/2/2 4 walk-in closets
* Cath ceilings Lg eat-in kitchen
* Built 2005 Master tub + shower
#350062 $149,000


aaSoI
l['w.467NTURKEYPIN4 ELOO1 inf I' '"


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


30W2
Complete Package

s199,800
6 Month Build Time


---


rEi--"
Val,*


See Vrtunal T.ouIrs@.AI.reJI.I-slIeosucm







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CONVO
Continued from Page E7

program, sponsored by the
Florida Masonry Education
Foundation, also go to Las
Vegas to compete in the Na-
tional Apprenticeship
Challenge."
"In addition, the Masonry
Foundation also sponsors
pre-apprenticeship training
in 100 schools in Florida,
thanks to a partnership with
the National Center for Con-
struction Education and Re-
search at the University of
Florida and the Florida De-
partment of Education."
Whether the contractor
needs continuing education,
product knowledge, or
wants to know what's new in
the construction industry,
the SEBC has the industry
focus to benefit all


attendees.


Bert Henderson, M.Ed., is a
consultant for sustainability
renewable energies, and is
involved in cutting-edge
"green" buildingproduct
research withAZS Consult-
ingin Gainesville. He is also
a national speaker in sus-
tainability and writes and
delivers professional train-
ing programs in sustainabil-
ity renewable energies,
energy efficient design, and
"green" construction. He
has been a Sugarmill Woods
resident for 23years, a
Florida residentfor 53
years, and is a retired fac-
ulty member with the Pro-
grams for Resource
Efficient Communities at
the University ofFlorida
and building science faculty
for the Bushnell Center for
Sustainability


BEST

Realtor


AGEN ONi DUTY SV DA A WEE


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 E9



Soil has significant impact on trees


Through science and research,
experts agree that soil is proba-
bly the single most important
environmental factor controlling tree
health.
Woody plants naturally become es-
tablished most strongly in soils with
the physical and chemical properties
favorable to their survival.
When trees such as ornamental or
shade trees are transplanted, soil
problems often arise because of the
differences between the favorable
planting soils and the transplant-site
soils. Species selection for trans-
planting is seldom made based on soil
compatibility, but rather on some
other preferences of the owner or the
planter.


The two main character-
istics of soils, physical
characteristics and chemi-
cal composition, are inter- ,
related; changes in one
often mean changes in the
other. Physical stress to
soils is usually detrimental
to trees, and mostly is
caused by people overcom-
pacting soil and disturbing Kerry :
its physical properties. TI
Most soils along urban ARB
streets are wholly unsuit-
able for growing healthy
shade trees; the top 12 inches of soil
are usually covered, compacted, or so
drastically altered that the biologi-
cally most active part of the tree's root


:3
HI
O


system cannot function.
Trees need soils with fa-
vorable relative propor-
tions of the sand, silt and
clay to retain moisture but
also drain well. In addition
to proper chemical bal-
ance, they also need some
organic matter to separate
soil particles, encourage
reider good gas exchange and bi-
lE logical activity, and en-
-RIST able root penetration.
Organic matter is one of
the topsoil constituents
most quickly lost because of excava-
tion and other soil-distributing

See ARBORIST/Page E11


--EVIN1]- A OF0CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


6k1 Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Virt l To*Lur or Mu Sli le Photos

Swww.Florida howcaseroperiesc


CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath
CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W M/H by skyline on 4.5 acres of land.
2 car garage w/pool on 2 lots. Screen porch, Country kitchen, dining rm, family rm, wood
chain link fenced, living rm has free standing burning fireplace, Ig master suite w/dbl
wood fireplace. Family rm has glass sliding vanity, shower, garden tub. #356265


HI HOMOSASSA-3/2 home on 160 acres,(2-80
HOMOSASSA off Rockcrusher-lovely ac tracts) surrounded by 5,000 acre
3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car garage home w/circular Homosassa wildlife management area; raise
driveway, large workshop, inground pool, cattle/horse or just enjoy the wildlife.
solarium, living, family & dining rm on Electrically independent-home is powered by
2 acres of land. Woodburning fireplace in photo-electric cells & generator. #352921
family rm w/heatolator. #356390 $165,000 $500,000




JUST NORTH OF CRYSTAL RIVER
24 x 44 1983 dbl wide M/H on 1.77 acres of HERNANDO 1974 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath M/H,
land. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 10 x 16 workshop, one blk from Tsala Apopka Lake for great
paved roads, breakfast bar, cathedral fishing, nearby to Dunnellon, Ocala &
ceilings. Partial fencing, front & rear Inverness. Estate sale. Lg eat in kitchen.
wooden porches. #344452 $65,000 #355716 PRICE REDUCED $24,900


-.il$s 144 E Hartford St
MLS#354754 $169,900
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home on the "Oaks" Golf Course.
Directions: Rte86 to south on Essex,
to left on Hiarord, to home on right.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING


'*yPiNgQ 7890 NTriana Dr
MLS#357034 $118,900
Large open floor plan, fabulous kitchen
& large master suite.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM





fCfils 652 E Falconry
MLS#356500 $154,900
TRUE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE Golf course
location, solar heated 3/3/2 pool home.
Direin Ri6los outon trus l ills Bld.tol onFalconryto # on fiht
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


44ills 1875 W Pearson St
MLS#351889 $204,900
Unique 3/2/2 plus den on a wooded 1 acre lot
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


cMLS#357081 $296,950
Spacious 4/3/3 plus a den
on a lovely wooded acre.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926







a 571 W Massachusetts St
fidUts MLS#356487 $189,900
One of a kind pool home in Citrus Hills
on a pretty wooded acre lot.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


C, ,dhfils.s 1599 E St Charle
jdenIS MLS#356960 $174
Popular"Windward" floor plan
with many upgrades.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


i a,, ,s 3846 N Sean Ter,
,l,,: ., $99.900
2000 Skyline lived in very little
in a Very private rural setting.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


810 E Gilchrisl CI28 5A *I 156 E Glassbior, CI 13 6a 580 E Keller Ct 206 S Columbus St
MLS#356430 $65,900 MLS#344656 $39,900 MLS#354108$199,900 4 MLS#356736 $59,500
EASY, BREEZY FLORIDA LIVING. Lovely unitwell cared for and ready Elegant Pool Home on the Oaks Golf Course. One owner, perfect condition, clean as a
2/2 second floor condo. for a new owner. Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 whistle, nice neighborhood.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the M
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


,4ezxatdee,#
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE COM









E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012




Chronicl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Bring your fishing
pole!

Br


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
HERNANDO
11/2/112, MH Lrg. Fm Rm.
Laun. Rm. & Carport
Attached Retiremnt
Area, 1/2 mi. to Beach
$650 mo. 1st & Last
(352) 746-0850
Hernando/ C Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre fenced,
paved road $625/m
(352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
HOMOSASSA
2/1, CHA, $400/m $400/
dep 352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
Unfurn. 2/2, DIb Car-
port, No pets. $650.Mo.
F./L/S. 352-613-4884
352-503-2405
LECANTO
2/1, Big Yard to play
$350, 4906 N. Trinity
(352) 302-9013 or 1449




30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Info
(352) 726-2234


3/2 Double wide
peaceful area,
in Heatherwood
Reduced to $55,000
(352) 637-2872

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807


MOBILE HOME
1979 14X60 SW 2BR/2BA
$1299 OBO
352-621-0437
9AM-9PM


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock sc. la-
nai shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
MANUFACTURED
HOME ON 100+ ft. of
Water Frontage, BOAT
RAMP IN OZELLO
KEYS New Plumbing,
Washer/ Dryer hkup
$78,900.
CALL FOR SHOWING
352-212-0460




2BR-Log Cabin Decor
Off 486 -Den-FP-AC-Kit.
Bar 4 stall barn 24x24,
/2 end. w/AC, Approx.
1 Acre, fenced-well.
$56,900. Call Jackie
352-634-6340
Cridland Realestate
3/2 Double wide, on
large corner lot. New
AC in 2011, Many Up-
grades, quiet and close
to shopping $42,000 by
owner (352) 628-4819

Crys. Riv. Area 2BR+Den
3 yr. New AC. Remod-
eled RV Hkup. $39,900
off US 19, Pool-fenced,
Jackie (352) 341-5297
Cridland Real Estate


JUST REDUCED!
4/2 wl Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346







CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


Lecanto 55 +
2BD/1BA. screened porch
carport $11,500
(352) 746-4648

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090

Re lEtt

Fo Rn


-ACTIONU
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHonmeRenlols.com
CITRUS SPRINGS
7635 Greendale ....................1200

693 Gladstone...................... 825
3/2/2 newer home,open floor plan
HOMOSASSA
5180 SAustin Pt ....................700
2/2/2 nice home
4199 Wining Oaks ................750
3/2/2 available now
HERNANDO
994 E Winetka St ...................675
2/1 5/carportSW on 1 ACREt
3441 E (happel (...................$600
2/1 odorob, close to lake, mins to Ocala
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N rede ........................ 450
2/1 single wide, furnished,inrl lown
8520 N Shanon Ave ............ 300
3/2/2avl furn or unfurnished,
close to power plant
CITRUS HILLS
545 E.Alaska.........................800
2/2/1 Handica access


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us our vacant home
and watch us work or you!

3/2/2............$750
2/1/1..............$575
Includes Lawncare
2/1/1..............$625
2/1.5/1..........$650
2/2 VILLA...$700
Pritchard Island

2/1.5/1..........$750
Lakeview
2/1.................$550
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


CRYSTAL RIVER
Open Fl. Plan 2/1, fully
furn. Apt. IncIds water,
sewer, lawn & garb.
$550 mo. $250 dep.
No Pets 352-212-9205
352-212-9337
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



Homosassa
2/1 $500/m
352-465-2985
INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, Car Port $825
mo. (352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse 2/2/2.
Furnished. No pets
352-746-0008



CITRUS SPRINGS
Like New, 2/2, All appl.
$625. 954-557-6211




HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $125/wk.
$475 sec $600 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Hernando
1br. house end of
Parson's Pt washed $375
(352) 697-1911


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1/2, + Carport
(352) 489-0117
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on 72 Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile, carpet, wood
firs.. Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7p
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, No pets $550. mo.
1st + sec (352) 628-4210


HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN
3/2 pets ok $800/mo.
Lease or rent-to-own.
Avail now. 619-301-5442
between 10:30 am and
11:00 pm only
Homosassa SMW
Large 2 Master Bedrms!
Lg. garage, $875/Mo.
$200 Bonus 302-4057
HOMOSASSA
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 bed 2 bath
1 car garage $725
352 489-0937
INVERNESS
2/1, Waterfront.
$750. mo. 1st, last, sec.
(352) 344-8129
INVERNESS
2/1/1, w/ FI. Rm. New
appl's CHA, Sr. Disc.
Applylst & Sec. 650.
Mo. Pet OK 249-6227
INVERNESS
2/2, W/D, Dhwsher New
Tile & Carpet, Breakfast
Bar, Light & Brite $600.
mo. F/L/S. 352-634-1141
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $650 mo.lst &sec
Ive mes (561) 313-5308
INVERNESS
New 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$825. (304) 444-9944
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai. shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ATTIC
Continued from Page E4


the bargain level though
should you decide to sell it, you
might get more than you have
in it.
Dear John: I have enjoyed
listening to your program on
NPR and never anticipated
having a question for you. But I
have been cleaning house and
came across a gift from a
woman I no longer have contact
with. I want to know its general
value, please.


It is an 8 1/2 inch diameter
hand-painted plate decorated
in a pink floral design of roses
and daisies with gold edge cir-
cumference. The stamp on the
rear center reads "Paulo, Made
in Brazil," below a stamped
crown. Hand-painted in green,
closer to the rear edge, it looks
like the signature of the artist
Terezinha Golovac. Can you
possibly help me in valuing this
item? -J.K, Internet
Dear J.K: I was not able to
find any information about the
maker of your decorative plate.
There is no specific category of
collector interest. The dollar


value is dependent on the qual-
ity of the painting. You did not
include a photograph, so that is
all I can say If you like take a
good clear photo of the plate, I
will give you my opinion of its
potential dollar value.


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Sat-
urdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box2513, Ocala
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


SOIL
Continued from Page E9


activities. Topsoil is ei-
ther removed com-
pletely during
construction or heavily
diluted with subsoils.
Soils altered drasti-
cally by excavation
and construction bear
little resemblance to
soils in forests and
fields; they are dense,
compacted blends of
low organic content


and are hostile envi-
ronments for trans-
planted trees and
shrubs.


Kerry Kreider is a
practicing arborist
and a member of the
International Society
ofArboriculture, a
tree preservationist
and president ofAc-
tion Tree Service. You
can reach him at 352-
726-9724 or by email
at actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 Ell



GOT A NEWS TIP?

* The Chronicle wel-
comes tips from read-
ers about breaking
news. Call the news-
room at 352-563-
5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of the
news event. To submit
story ideas for feature
sections, call 352-563-
5660 and ask for
Nancy Kennedy.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EAuM HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





REAL ESTATE
Auction,
Executive Mountain
Home w/Guest
House & Lake on
212+/-Acres Divided,
Independence, VA.
9/8/12 at 2 p.m. On
Site at 1002 Saddle
Creek Road,
Independence, VA.
Live & Online. Iron
Horse Auction Co.
(800)997-2248.
NCAL3936. VAAL580.
ironhorse
auction.com


ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
1,800 SF, 4BR/2BA
home on .44 acres
Zoning:
COMMERCIAL (CG)
Prime location in
historical downtown
Crystal River 2 blocks
from US HWY 19
Permitted uses in-
clude office, medi-
cal, restaurant, retail,
day care center,
school, bed & break-
fast, vet office, plus
much morel
Auction held on site
839 N Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL
THUR. SEPT 6 @ 2p
OPEN from 1 PM
sale day
Call 352519-3130
for more info
For Details
Visit our Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.corn









FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990





2/2/2, Located on
Culdesac min. from
golf club. All rms open
to enclosed pool & la-
nai New AC, $144,000
owner fin. 15% down
terms negotiable
(352) 465-2372


HUGE 4/2.5/3
Built in 2006,
on oversized corner lot.
649 W. Fortune Lane
Citrus Srprings $129.900
Call (561) 262-6884
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3 Bdrm. 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



212/1, 2150 sf total living
area. Big rooms & open
floor plan. Below Market
Deal. 328 S Monroe St.
Beverly Hills $49,900.
Call (561) 262-6884



3 Bedroom, 2'/2 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239.900
(352) 860-0444

-~I


OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat& Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418
Open House
Canterbury Lake Es-
tates
Sat & Sun 10-3
3BR/2BA/2+ Htd Pool
Cathedral Ceiling, up-
grades $146K. 419-4192



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well. pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745


Country Living
within City Limits
3/2/2, with Pool
$115,00
(352) 344-0033
GREAT INVESTMENT IN
HEATHERWOOD 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. Block
Home with over 1,200 sq
ft of living area on approx
1.23 acres with 20 X 40
detached garage. Home
in need of repairs. Asking
$35,000 352-726-8559
HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 cararage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

YOU'LL v THIS!
Inver/Highlands
LARGE 1 Fam, 2.8
acres, residential area,
fully fenced, 4 BR 3 BA
pool, own deep well,
costly updates 2011.
Offered AS IS. $189,900.
Call Owner 419-7017.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Crystal River
Spacious DW Moduler
on corner lot with 4
bedrooms. 5th room
could be an office or
sitting room. 3 full
baths. Screened in
solar heated in ground
pool & Jacuzzi. 2 car
garage, sprinkler sys-
tem fireplace in FR,
alarm system, central
vac system, lots of
kitchen cabinets, dou-
ble oven, ceramic tile &
carpet throughout. All
on a landscaped yard-a
must see! $185,000.
352-220-6187 or
609-290-4335


2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2, Carport w/shed,
porch off din, room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M"K
REALTY ONE

HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, Nice, Clean
Rent to Own
$675. mo.
813-335-5277




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




3/2/2 with Fireplace,
New A/C & New Roof
$118,000
PRINCIPLES ONLY
352-726-7543





OPEN
HOUSE

SUGARMILL
SUNDAY p-4p
3/2/2/ POOL
Estate Lot $179,900.
97 Douglas Street
(Hwyl 9 to Cypress W
Left on Douglas St.,
GATE HOUSE REALTY
(352) 382 4500


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.



FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
clear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
$25k.have title asking
$14,500 o.b.o.
813-792-1355



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well. pond.ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


MICHELE ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


DEB INFAN-
TINE
(352) 302-8046

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com




SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
"Gold Medal"
REALTOR,
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.


Quade
Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qfeeser@yahoo.com
CENTURY 21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty




YANKEETOWN
2BR,2BA.OFFICE,
1040 SQ.FT.,EXTRA
LOTVERY PRIVATE,
NO GARAGE,"SOLD AS
IS",NO REALTORS,
$75,000.CALL
(352)513-5001




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


C ituCon
Hlme


I
r II HI I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RETURN TO THE FARM
24320 SW Shoiteood Di N Dunntllon
I' u I,,,,,I I. J I.. . "( ,,,,I hI, ". I"
I-. l Illl,,. ll IH., II Ii


Ml1- =i5. : PRICE AT $499,500
Call C.ise j keatse oei pren e .i 352 416 659
1r., n ,, L .. s..i- h .. h.... .. ni . ...... ,,










TWO CHIEFLAND COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS FOR ONLY $ 38.23/SF!
Offered At $260,000
B..Ii.li .j 4 11:111 if B l.l.. .j i i : .1:111 if


Call Elias G Kiallah lot more inlotnmalon
at 352 100 2635


PRESTIGIOUS POOL HOME




Mi l =i .Qi'-. .' ,l ', $480,000
Call Jim Motion at 42221/73
lot fout personal tout


* Ti i v.' i e . ii

* NI Is h I),) ll -Ws I C.H1,1 I i
MLi = 9.il:. $145,000
Jeanne or Wllaid Pickiel 352212 3410
n:'I''. ciltuscount 'sold. conm


H ,.i i i .l sI I,,: ,l Iii. p (, ii ,l I ,:i.n l l.:.l
THIS WON'T LAST AT $62,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


II I


"FIRE SALE"
ON 10 ACRE EQUESTRIAN HOME SITES
PRICES REDUCED FROM S220,000 TO S95,000!!!
I .. Id, 1. 11 II 1 ,11 11- Ill h , 11 f 1 11.1
,h. ,. ... l.. ,- ,,,n h. ,h ,l.,-. ,l ,,1 I, , ,,, i l,..
h ,, I ill II. n IIII. I li .. 1 I.I H ,, III ,III I l ,-
,,, ,I l, ,, h-, l, ,,h , ,m I),,,, I ,,,, lh ,,l, l ,,,,,, ,l
Mlti = h.l $95,000
C.ll Jim l]/tion 352 726 6668


I ... I All A 1111 IN '.. h hl. l. h ,1 1.1 .. I.. ,llr,, ,, i.. 1h. I
6, 11, 1 .. 6,I,, h ll, .l II 1..1. ,6ll I I .
I,,, II 1, ,,, I ,,I . I I I,,,, ,, I II,, ,, 1 ,,
l.. 1. 6 1 1 1 1 1.. 11 . d I I .... 1. II ... :6 I. 1 1 ... 1 1 l
rl: = .. : ASKING $168,900
Put Di ,352212 7280
..ii ,in.ng Io11 II ii /lpird, 1,4 con


* IuCF, 'PA .li p..1.i I ,.:
" jh.ih: h.ui.:.h P.A i.l,:l.jhil
* l-I)(l I- .)i.i IJ l.. ,:i .AN i 'l I II-

MiL = .III:,i $220,000
Jeanne o/ Wdilaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
tr'l'' cilltuscountI'sold. comn


WARM & INVITING
IS THIS WELL KEPT HOME
S ,,I-- viiizi ...uu iu v .iz,. I I .l .l.iii in.. 11
iIli.. li v.il v ,iiI H ,i .inu .u ..i lli.i..i .i nii.l i
I,,i :i hll I,,i : lIv i IIl n iv i u ii l i i I luu su- i l
L.i il 7i l l ii.il l ii ld:
Mi 5 = .i '" $59,900
loaamne 0 Regan 352 586 0075


WINItK Ib JUsI AKHUUNU ink UUHNtK
II you wanl Io spend ii in Florida
have a look al Ihis!!




I I I. I
ONLY $30,000
C. i I iu nU'i Ii m.iri ,lm.u rrm tl J J, 'i/ ni


PICTURE YOUR DAYS ON THE
WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER

liuii'iu iii hii6i. i-i-.i iuuu. i- vii. .i ui. .i n
I blu -' .iijJl b Jif b.ilh ,1 ,i il
bll iui lul hliii. l.,. ..u .i.j I .. ,,I l
1111 Ir lll .. II si-l. I .I . uirlh .- .inl ill
PRICED TO SELL NOW $219,000
Call Mar tha Snj der todaj 352 476 8727











HARD TO BEAT THE PRICE

* lu II I 1 .' .6l l II kil .il .

Mi_ =i.h'. 7 ASKING $75,000
Call hNancy Jenks 352 400 8072
isisr'i'i. sellinmcilluscountl/lhaomes. coin


WATERFRONT 2/2 ON DOUBLE LOT
t I l I'. p..] ] 0..h] jII h' "

Il'ill ".ll h i.. 1 L, l i1 'l A.)ili ll, l

ASKING $69.900
Par Dalls 352 22 7280
1len listng n _1 1 n c21lpatdals comn


INVERNESS 2008 HOME
* :uiu h uiI iiij i ,, lidi

* VV .niii l.. li .v i ..
M I=.,III: $149,900
Call Cha/les Kelly 352 422 2387


RIVERFRONT CABIN!

A l i 1 i ll ll l,; 1 0 ll :1 : l :l .


I Ai I TIjIIA' IT VviN T I AI T'
ONLY $89,900
I: ,ill I ,i,:l,, Ih ,^i )'(,_ ~I1_" /~ '


HORSE LOVERS WANTED!

Li- l i i i 1 l l iiil l i l'l I. '. I... ll, l i 'l

ML 5 = ..7/:. $154,900
Call Isaac S. Baylon 352 697 2493


p ,. 1 II HI 1,ni l... h I. .II... II l:l
. dI ,]iI luN'.'h .l .1 ,]1 .n...w l...I I.... .h
.j..I I. c ,ll 6 W l %Villh .. ...W ll cl,
$67.900
Call Ruth Frederck 1 352 563 6866










RACE FOR THE SPACE!

V .i ll,l i :i ^ l iin l 'll" ThiI
0~l^ ll ffl '" l. illllll H ,:V l.' ,:lll 11 .ll ,:'. l l


ML = _:ll7 $79,900
Call Marldn Booth 637 4904


ALMOST 6 ACRES!

hi .. i' II b..illl I bvi .i l l I l llr .i .in

hir.iv i I i b.i, u. i l i I I i ill u i l vill

1, n. ll j l -al i .. 1 li .ll vl l Ji l- i: .l:i- ..i
liu. = -i.i. 7 LISTED AT 130,000
Call todaj Mati Patsons 634 1273


31 ACRES WITH 1004 FEET
OF HIGHWAY FRONTAGE
, l l l ll ll' I .:ll '! IIN. :ill l'

MlI = .'. :. ASKING $850,000
Juti cill Jin Motiot .it 422 2113 lot Iout
petioi.il ptieuen ol dihi totell tolling p.itcel


SPACIOUS 3/2/2

, ii ,: l h1.i llli l, ,llllli ii i' nll .iil, .i.. h j'l ll'l
V" I h ... I _I .. a lhi ...a n ... .. [ .v I



fPRIh I- i ..- = f I. Il
Pal Davis ,3521212 7280
View listing iri'i'r c2/1aldaris com


E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012