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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02856
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-12-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02856

Full Text


Drive for five: US women's basketball team claims old /B1


TODAY ? CITRUS COUNTY
Next
morning OF


Partly cloudy with a
40 percent chance of
scattered storms.
PAGE A4


AUGUST 12, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


L www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 5


Race takes nasty turn


Adams: I had nothing to do with attack ads


Flipped
Builders of handcrafted
scow work to turn their
project./Page A3
COMMENTARY:
Water wars
The amount of
water
available
from
Florida's
aquifer do
does not
seem to support the
state's growth./Page Cl

SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:


Blue globe
This apothecary's globe
could fetch major
money./Page E4
OPINION:
While the
nuclear plant
faces a
number of
problems, they
are all
resolvable.


BUSINESS:


On time
Airlines deliver more
travelers on time than in
recent history./Page Dl
HOMEFRONT:


Grow it
Expert gardener Jane
Weber writes about
Simpson's Stopper fruit
and more./HomeFront


TOMORROW:
Water permit
Crystal River officials
are not thrilled about a
permit to allow water
withdrawals./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A33
Classifieds................ D3
Crossword ............ A30
Editorial .......... ...C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope................ B6
Lottery Numbers ...... B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A36
Obituaries ............ A6
Together ................. A28


6 11||||84578 L2007I5 o


Poliseno
candidate for
commission
District 5.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER First came
the automated phone calls.
"Hi, it's Bob again. Well, I have
more disturbing news about Charles
Poliseno," one call began.
The calls accused Poliseno of mis-
management during his nine years


as Citrus County public safety direc-
tor, which ended with his May 2008
resignation.
Shortly after the calls, two glossy
anti-Poliseno pieces arrived in the
mail.
Floridians for Conservative Val-
ues, a West Palm Beach-based elec-
tioneering communication com-
mittee, or ECC, authored the mail-


out. It echoed many of the claims
made in the phone calls and said
Poliseno was blamed in an audit of
missing equipment.
"For nine years Charles Poliseno
lived off of our tax money And what
did we get in return?" one mail
piece reads.
Poliseno, one of four candidates in
the Citrus County Commission Dis-
trict 5 race, said he doesn't know why
a South Florida political committee
See Page A15


Make a plan of care


Alzheimer's dis-
ease is progres-
sive. As it
advances, it be-
comes harder for
caregivers to en-
dure the responsi-
bility of care
alone, but there is
help. Whether it's
home health care
or placing some-
one in a residen-
tial care facility,
the options avail-
able are abundant.
And with the
opening of two
new local facilities
completely dedi-
cated to memory
care, the choices
have expanded.

Many care

options exist

for weary

caregivers
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
There may come
a point in a care-
giver's life when
caring for a
loved one with
Alzheimer's disease
alone becomes a load too
heavy to shoulder
Jerry Fisher, a pro-
gram specialist with the
Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter, said the hardest part
for caregivers is making
the decision that they
need help. Many times,
he said caregivers feel
like they have to admin-
ister the care them-
selves, not realizing they
could be putting them-
selves and their loved
one in danger
It's tough to choose
what care options are
necessary, but fortu-
nately, there are many
available, whether it's
hiring a home health
See Page A16


*ad~mmmm..mj~


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Last-minute touches are being put on Superior Residences of Lecanto. Superior is an
80-bed assisted living facility for people suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other
memory-related disorders.


Sunshine Gardens open for

Alzheimer's patients


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Marcey Mast continually
makes it known she car-
ries an overwhelming
amount of compassion for
the families of
Alzheimer's patients.
"My heart just goes out
to them," she said.
Mast is the executive
administrator of Sun-
shine Gardens, a newly
opened 24-bed assisted
living facility for those


Marcey Mast
shows one of
the residential
units at
Sunshine
Gardens. The
24-bed
assisted living
facility in
Crystal River
is one of two
new facilities
opening in the
Citrus County
area
specializing in
the care of
only
Alzheimer's
and dementia
patients.


New memory care facility

touts focus, environment


with Alzheimer's and SHEMIR WILES
other memory problems. Staff Writer
Robert R. Hilger,
owner of Sunshine Gar- LECANTO Inun-
dens, said he built his dated with phone calls
first Sunshine Gardens from families looking for
facility a spe-
n e a r NEXT WEEK cialized
Dun- mem -
nellon U What's it like to be a caregiver? o r y
20 years c a re
ago, but later sold it. He center for their loved
then went on to build two ones, Theressa Foster
more facilities in Du- said it became clear Cit-
rango, Colo., before he rus County needed an as-
sisted living facility
See Page A17 completely focused on


the needs of Alzheimer's
and dementia patients.
Slightly hidden away
from the traffic along
State Road 44 near St.
Michael the Archangel
Greek Orthodox Church,
Superior Residences of
Lecanto is only days away
from unlocking its doors
to the public.
A grand opening is
scheduled for 3 to 7 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 17. It will be
a sister community to


Page A17


Adams
candidate for
commission
District 5.


Romney


picks


Ryan


Associated Press
Republican Presidential can-
didate, Mitt Romney, right,
and his running mate, Rep.
Paul Ryan, R-Wis., shake
hands during a rally Saturday
at Randolph-Macon College
in Ashland, Va.

Wisconsin Rep.

tapped for VP

Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. Repub-
lican Mitt Romney anointed
Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan,
an ardent
conserva- WHO IS
tive and de-
v o ted PAUL
budget cut- RYAN?
ter, as his
vice presi- profile.
dential run- page All
ning mate
Saturday,
and the two men immedi-
ately embarked on a tour of
campaign battleground
states vowing to defeat
President Barack Obama
and repair the long-ailing
U.S. economy
America is "a nation fac-
ing debt, doubt and de-
spair," and a transformative
change in leadership is
vital, Ryan declared to a
flag-waving crowd in the
first moments after Romney
introduced him as his part-
ner for the fall campaign.
"Regrettably, President
Obama has become part of
the problem ... and Mitt
Romney is the solution,"
said the seven-term law-
maker, who at 42 is a gener-
ation younger than Romney,
65. Ryan is chairman of the
House Budget Committee,
the chief architect of deeply
controversial budget plans
and widely viewed by Re-
publican lawmakers as an
intellectual leader within
the party
The two Republican ticket
mates basked in the cheers
of supporters in a made-for-
television debut on a ticket
hoping to make Obama's
first term his last.
"I did not make a mistake
with this guy," Romney said.
Romney declared that in
the campaign to come, Re-
publicans will present eco-
nomic solutions "that are
bold, specific and achiev-
able. ... We offer our com-
mitment to help create
12 million new jobs and to
bring better take-home pay
See Page A10


I

Ii


LOW
73


Im


I IN S1 11.IDE I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


jw A


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Page A3 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Lane shifts
start Monday
Motorists driving along
County Road 486 need to be
aware of a traffic shift starting
Monday, Aug. 13. The con-
tractor working on the C.R.
486/491 road widening proj-
ect will shift traffic to its final
configuration through the in-
tersection.
New signal heads will be
installed and construction
drums will be removed to
allow for open lanes of traffic
in all directions.
Law enforcement officers
will assist with traffic control
at the intersection. Motorist
should expect delays in the
area through the end of the
week.
For information, call the
County Engineering Depart-
ment at 352-527-5446.
Storm drain
repairs closing road
The Citrus County Road
Maintenance Division will re-
pair part of West Riverwood
Drive in Crystal River from
Monday, Aug. 13, to Monday,
Aug. 20. The roadway on
West Riverwood Drive be-
tween North Evenstock Way
to West Flaxen Drive will be
closed so crews can replace
a failing storm drainage cross
drain.
Closure signs and detour
routes will be posted for driv-
ers in the area. For informa-
tion, call the Citrus County
Road Maintenance Division
at 352-527-7610.
Gov. Scott taps local
man for committee
Gov. Rick Scott on Friday
appointed an Inverness man
to a 13-person committee to
study investor-owned water
and wastewater utility
systems.
Michael Smallridge, who
owns Pinecrest Utilities, said
he will represent the small
utilities on the panel.
Smallridge, who also is
chairman of the Citrus
County Hospital Board, is
one of four candidates in the
Citrus County Commission
District 5 primary race
Tuesday.

Tallahassee
Praetorian Insurance
facing rate cut
Praetorian Insurance Co. is
facing up to a 36 percent rate
reduction for Florida
homeowners.
Florida Insurance Commis-
sioner Kevin McCarty on Fri-
day announced his intent to
disapprove a company pro-
posal for a 2.2 percent de-
crease. McCarty said his
Office of Insurance Regula-
tion has demonstrated a re-
duction of 35 percent or 36
percent is required.
The Consumer Federation
of America said Praetorian
sold more than $430 million
in what's known as forced
placement coverage last year
in Florida as Balboa Insur-
ance Co. and QBE Specialty
Insurance Co. The group had
advocated for at least a 44
percent reduction.
The company can request a
hearing on McCarty's decision.

Loxahatchee
Nudist park's event
for younger crowd
Nudist resorts have a repu-
tation for attracting older
adults, but one Florida park is
trying to change that.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reported Sunsport
Gardens will hold a weekend
bash aimed at attracting nud-
ists ages 18 to 30. The Florida
Young Naturist's fourth annual
End of Summer Naked Bash
is slated to be a celebration of


body acceptance.
Sunsport Gardens princi-
pal shareholder Morley
Schloss told the paper the
park has been trying to bring
in younger members with
lower prices, 24-hour hot tubs
and Friday night drum circles.
-From staff and wire reports


Boat builders on a roll


I k

, 3.. .. : ;, '




-. ...,; .-. .- ^
++ .... . .:,
- + ., .. ,.: . .. .


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Steve Kingery, left, watches as several of his top men crank the
come-along to pull the scow named Wartappo over onto her bottom. The
boat was built upside down, as many boats of the early 1800s were con-
structed. Bill Whalen keeps a close eye on the balance
and distance the boat needs to go to shift the balance of the scow.
The scow has gone as far as it can, and the hull is held
up only by the straps and cables. One final check and the cables were
cut, setting the Wartappo on a waiting bed of hay. Members of Crystal
River Boat Builders started working on the scow in 2010. A 6-foot model
of the Civil War-era vessel is on display at the Crystal River Preserve
State Park. The group's goal is to have the replica finished by the next
big boat bash event in April.


Club constructing replica of 19th-century boat draws crowd at event


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER The ropes stayed taut
Saturday morning as creaks escaped from
the heavy hull.
With pull after pull from the dedicated
Crystal River Boat Builders Association vol-
unteers, the man-made scow shifted.
The daunting task left many exhausted.
The nearly unbearable heat left spectators
gathered at Crystal River Preserve State
Park weary and sweaty but still eager to see
what they all gathered to witness the offi-
cial upending of the Wartappo.
Crystal River Boat Builders (CRBB), a local
chapter of the Traditional Small Craft Asso-
ciation, has been working since 2010 con-
structing a full-size replica of the USS
Wartappo, a southern sailing scow captured
and used by the Union's navy along the Crys-
tal River shore during the Civil War.
A 6-foot model is on display at the state
park to give visitors an idea of what the full-
scale version will look like.
A common vessel that would have been
seen around the Crystal River area prior to
the Civil War, the scow would have been used
to navigate shallow creeks and rivers
because the craft's flat bottom drew little
water, Dr. Jason Moser, outreach coordinator
with the Florida Public Archeology


Members of Crystal River
boat Builders are working
on building a scow.

Network, explained.
"It would have been used as a basic work
boat for that period," he said.
Capable of hauling goods such as lumber,
cotton, turpentine and even cattle during the
Union naval blockade, Moser said it's possi-
ble Sen. David Yulee used such a sailing scow
to move his goods from Homosassa to the
railroad in Cedar Key
Bob Richardson, a CRBB volunteer, said
he's been working on the boat since Septem-
ber. Volunteers who show up work on the boat
Wednesday and Saturday mornings for three
to four hours at the Preserve, weather per-
mitting.
After many months of serious manual
labor, Richardson said the groups was ex-
cited to see the bottom of the hull completed
so they could roll it over.
Determined not to use too much modern
technology, the group used a series of pulley-
like leverage devices to get the boat up and
over on its bottom.
Steve Kingery, the club's president, said
the boat probably didn't suffer too much dam-


The builders gather after the flip to check for
any damage and share a job well done with fel-
low boat builders.
age from the ordeal.
Their goal is to have entire scow con-
structed by the next boat bash event in
April.
Moser said he hopes people show up for
the next major milestone, which is launching
the 36-foot vessel.
The Crystal River Preserve State Park is at
3266 N. Sailboat Ave. in Crystal River, north
of Crystal River Mall.
For information about CRBB, visit
www.tsca.net/CRBB.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline com.


Life Choice Care Center adding Crystal River office


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Be-
ginning in September, Life
Choice Care Center will op-
erate an office in Crystal
River.
The nonprofit pregnancy
resource center has been
helping single mothers and
families in Citrus County at
its Inverness location since
1999.
According to center direc-
tor Kathy Davis, 40 percent
of their clients come from


the west side of the county.
"They come once, but
they don't come back," she
said, noting the distance is a
hardship to many "We real-
ized that there's a real need
out there."
The new location is at
9030 Fort Island Trail, Crys-
tal River. Recently, commu-
nity volunteers refurbished
the office with warm colors
and comfortable furnish-
ings. Last week, Darla
Graber from Teen Court and
a group of teens worked on
the landscaping, pulling


weeds and trimming plants.
"We plan to start seeing
clients at the Crystal River
location on Mondays,
Wednesday and Thursdays
starting in September,"
Davis said.
Life Choice Care Center's
free services include preg-
nancy tests and options
counseling, classes in devel-
oping healthy relationships
as well as parenting skills.
By attending the free
classes, clients earn points
they use to "shop" for dia-
pers, wipes, baby clothes or


maternity clothes. When
they complete a class series,
they are provided with a
larger item, such as a crib,
high chair or stroller.
"We also encourage and
provide guidance to our
clients toward achieving
their GED or attending ca-
reer training," Davis said.
"One of our volunteers is
available to help with re-
sume preparation."
Because the emphasis is
on healthy relationships, the
center hosted a "Silver Ring
Thing" abstinence event,


which 748 youths and 147
parents attended. Look for
another event in February
Volunteers are always
needed. Positions include
receptionists, client advo-
cates, someone to manage
the Baby Boutique, a grant
writer, an events coordina-
tor and a fundraiser. Email
office @li fechoicecare
center.org or call 352-341-
5176.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nken nedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NASA's mega-rover landed


on Mars. What's next?


Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. -After a spectacular
landing on Mars, the rover Curiosity wasted
no time embracing its inner shutterbug, de-
lighting scientists with vistas of Gale Crater
complete with sand dunes, mountain views
and even haze.
Now what? The nuclear-powered, six-
wheel Curiosity is on a quest to learn
whether the Martian environment could
have been favorable for microbial life. Be-
fore it can drive, it has to slog through
weeks of health checkups. Since it's the
most complex spacecraft ever sent to the
red planet, engineers want to make sure it's
in tip-top shape before they hand over the
keys to scientists. It already has done a cur-
sory check of its 10 science tools, but more
tests are needed. This weekend, its com-
puters get a software update a process
that will last several days.
When can we watch a movie of the
touchdown? The footage is recorded and
stored on board Curiosity and will be down-
loaded as time allows. It sent back a low-
quality video and several high-resolution
frames that captured the last few minutes
of the descent, providing a sense of a space-
craft landing on another planet. In the
video, the protective heat shield pops off


The primary election is
Tuesday, Aug. 14. Polls are
open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. For
precinct information, visit
www.votecitrus.com.
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's next political forum is at
7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at the
College of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for super-
intendent of schools, will have a
bowling fundraiser from 1 to 4
p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, at Mana-
tee Lanes on State Road 44 in


and tumbles away It ends with billowing
plumes of dust as Curiosity was safely de-
livered to the surface.
What are the first impressions of Gale
Crater? The mission's chief scientist John
Grotzinger said it was like staring at Cali-
fornia's Mojave Desert. The landing site is
pebbly with sand dunes nearby and moun-
tains off in the distance. A curtain of haze
hung over the site. Curiosity's destination
is Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mountain ris-
ing from the center of the crater floor near
the equator. Observations from space re-
veal the base of the mountain shows signs
of past water a good place to hunt for the
chemical ingredients of life.
How did the landing go? Curiosity's
performance was pretty much on target
with expectations. Because it weighed
nearly 2,000 pounds, it had to be gently low-
ered to the surface a routine NASA had
never tried before. A preliminary recon-
struction indicates it landed 1 1/2 miles
downrange from the bull's-eye.
How many rovers are now on Mars?
Curiosity joins the long-running Opportu-
nity, which has been exploring craters in
Mars' southern hemisphere since 2004. Op-
portunity's twin, Spirit, fell silent in 2010
after getting stuck in a sand trap. Curiosity's
prime mission lasts two years.


Campaign TRAIL

Crystal River.
Phillip Mulrain, Democrat
for clerk of courts, will have a
fundraiser at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 18, at his home, 5595 S.
Chestnut Terrace, Lecanto.
An attorney from the
League of Women Voters will
offer a nonpartisan explanation
of the 11 proposed amend-
ments on the November ballot
at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, at
the Nature Coast Unitarian Un-
versalists, 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
northwest of the Holder inter-
section. Information: 352-
465-4225.


The Beverly Hills Civic As-
sociation candidates' forum is
at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, at
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. In-
formation: Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Asso-
ciation is hosting a candidates'
forum at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct.
4, at the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season. Send
events or campaign fundraisers
to Mike Wright at mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
Laurie Ann Weinbrenner,
51, of 68225 N. Birch Terrace,
Hemando, at 5:35 p.m. Wednes-
day on a charge of driving under
the influence of alcohol. Accord-
ing to the arrest report, Wein-
brenner refused to submit to a
Breathalyzer test. Bond $500.
Molly Ann Carter, 49, of
9189W. Hercules Lane, Crystal
River, at 5:55 a.m. Thursday on
charges of knowingly driving
with a suspended license, dam-
aging property or another per-
son while driving under the
influence and driving while
under the influence of alcohol.
According to the arrest report,
Carter's blood-alcohol concen-
tration was 0.113 percent and
0.110 percent; the legal limit in
Florida is 0.080. Bond $1,500.
Other arrests
Cole Mackenzie State, 20,
of Inverness, at 8:13 p.m.
Wednesday on a charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
Randy D. Wolensky, 49,
of Hernando, at 9:23 a.m.
Thursday on a felony charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 7:46 a.m. Aug. 8 in the
3600 block of E. Bernice Street,
Inverness.
HA commercial burglary was


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking volun-
teers to serve alongside paid staff at all stations. For
information, call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator,
at 352-527-5406.
* The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking
all registered sexual offenders and predators in the
county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link
on the CCSO website.


reported at 10:50 a.m. Aug. 8 in
the 9300 block of W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 6:04 a.m. Aug. 8 in the 300
block of S. U.S. 41, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 2:25 p.m. Aug. 8 in the 60
block of Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills.
A grand theft was reported
at 2:06 a.m. Aug. 9 in the 3400
block of S. Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 2:06 a.m. Aug. 9 in the 3400
block of S. Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa.


A grand theft was reported
at 12:55 p.m. Aug. 9 in the 1500
block of N. U.S. 41, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 1:35 p.m. Aug. 9 in the 5200
block of S. Manatee Terrace,
Homosassa.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 4:02 a.m. Aug. 8 in the area
of N.W. 19th Street and N.W.
20th Avenue, Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported
at 6:52 a.m. Aug. 9 at Utah
Street, Beverly Hills.
A vandalism was reported
at 12:25 a.m. Aug. 10 in the
16000 block of W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

SBOCC Commision.......................................... A33
BOCC Commission............................... A34
City of Crystal River.......................................A33
/ Primary Election Sample Ballot.....................A16
4 I Primary Election Sample Ballot
Precinct 105.............................................A17
Meeting Notices................................................D5
S Miscellaneous Notices..............0.......................D5
Self Storage Notices...................................0D5


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
)PR Hl LOPR HI LO PR
0.00 | NA NA NA -.. 88 73 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
s
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 5 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
be smooth. Chance of thunderstorms
today.


96 74 trace NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eclus aily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 73
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of
scattered storms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 93 Low: 73
Partly cloudy; 30% chance of scattered storms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 73
7r Partly cloudy; 40% chance of scattered storms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/72
Record 99/66
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.60 in.
Total for the month 3.10 in.
Total for the year 40.17 in.
Normal for the year 33.84 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.98 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 3.1/12
Monday's count: 4.8
Tuesday's count: 4.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/12 SUNDAY 1:58 8:10 2:22 8:35
8/13 MONDAY 2:42 8:54 3:07 9:19
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
AUG. 31


SEPT. 8


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 8:12 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:58 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................2:20 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ............................4:27 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:06 a/9:23 a 1:53 p/11:25 p
Crystal River"* 1:27 a/6:45 a 12:14 p/8:47 p
Withlacoochee* 10:01 a/4:33 a /6:35 p
Homosassa*** 2:16 a/8:22 a 1:03 p/10:24 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
4:14 a/10:44 a 3:02 p/-
2:35 a/8:06 a 1:23 p/9:40 p
12:22 a/5:54 a 11:10 a/7:28 p
3:24 a/9:43 a 2:12 p/11:17 p


Gulf water
temperature



89
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.12 32.06 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.58 36.62 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.51 38.55 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.78 40.80 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


81 67
97 70
79 65
87 71
83 71
10270
87 69
80 61
85 69
94 60
81 71
73 63
85 67
89 72
76 59
83 71
78 56
80 62
70 59
81 72
73 60
81 66
99 72
91 71
82 56
72 60
10073
84 57
84 70
85 72
98 78
79 60
91 68
11088
89 66
82 69
82 59
88 69
76 56
79 54
87 75
89 74
82 61


.05 ts
ts
s
.02 s
.38 pc
pc
.31 pc
.10 pc
s
s
ts
ts
.74 ts
.44 pc
s
.03 pc
pc
s
.05 pc
.34 pc
.13 pc
.03 pc
pc
s
ts
.03 pc
pc
pc
.01 pc
.08 ts
pc
pc
s
ts
pc
pc

pc
s
c
.02 pc
.56 s
s


84 62
98 65
81 58
87 65
85 71
100 73
89 74
88 56
89 66
93 57
79 68
74 63
82 64
89 73
81 58
88 66
77 66
83 64
76 62
90 68
80 62
82 60
102 78
89 61
78 61
80 65
100 78
86 65
85 64
86 66
95 79
81 65
93 70
108 87
93 73
75 65
86 65
90 72
76 64
74 58
93 74
92 70
87 63


New Orleans 88 73 .18 pc 93 77
New York City 87 75 ts 87 70
Norfolk 87 74 .04 pc 86 70
Oklahoma City 96 65 pc 103 71
Omaha 82 55 ts 81 61
Palm Springs 11490 pc 106 86
Philadelphia 86 75 .07 pc 88 70
Phoenix 11092 pc 113 90
Pittsburgh 68 58 pc 77 59
Portland, ME 80 67 .04 pc 76 63
Portland, Ore 87 57 s 89 60
Providence, R.I. 84 72 .07 ts 81 67
Raleigh 88 74 .34 pc 88 67
Rapid City 80 62 .17 pc 81 56
Reno 101 61 ts 100 65
Rochester, NY 76 63 ts 79 62
Sacramento 10557 pc 106 63
St. Louis 86 61 pc 87 69
St. Ste. Marie 80 60 pc 76 58
Salt Lake City 91 67 ts 94 72
San Antonio 10274 pc 100 76
San Diego 80 69 pc 79 70
San Francisco 71 52 pc 71 55
Savannah 87 72 trace pc 91 74
Seattle 83 56 s 78 55
Spokane 90 57 s 95 58
Syracuse 87 68 ts 80 60
Topeka 90 54 pc 92 64
Washington 89 71 .07 pc 89 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 115 Thermal, Calif. LOW 35 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/75/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 79/57/s Mexico City
Athens 92/74/pc Montreal
Beijing 85/68/c Moscow
Berlin 70/51/pc Paris
Bermuda 85/80/pc Rio
Cairo 99/80/s Rome
Calgary 78/51/pc Sydney
Havana 91/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 88/81/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 89/71/s Warsaw


79/64/pc
78/57/sh
93/65/pc
65/54/ts
83/65/ts
74/51/ts
76/58/pc
82/62/s
87/68/pc
60/46/c
86/77/ts
75/64/ts
68/47/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY N


CHRONICLE
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N \ l:1l

IInverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. square
.0 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ .............................. Online M manager, 563-3255
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Jeff Gordon ....................... ............................. Business M manager, 564-2908
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Report a news tip:
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


AUG.17 AUG. 24


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 Paid Advertisement
As seen in


oradley
Short


Experience

Rapid Weight

Loss and

Control Your

Diabetes


Most patients at Citrus
Diabetes Treatment
Center lose 20 to
30 pounds within
the first month on a
program that combines
medication and dietary
modifications.


Each day on the job, medical assistant Bradley
Shortt helps diabetes and weight loss patients.
"I check blood pressure and pulse,"
describes Brad, "take their weight, height, and pre-
pare them to meet with the doctor."
Both Brad and his mother, Melissa Shortt, work
together at Citrus Diabetes Treatment Center.
"I love it," he says. "Everybody likes each
other here."
Their boss is Eihab H. Tawfik, MD, a board-cer-
tified internist who has made weight loss and diabetes
management central to his practice.
But there's a bit of a twist to the story 19-year-
old Brad first came to Dr. Tawfik as a patient when
his family moved from Maryland to Florida three
years ago.
"I've had type one diabetes since I was five
years old," he reveals. "I also had high blood pres-
sure and cholesterol."
Brad and Dr. Tawfik share a special connection,
as both men suffer from the chronic disease.
"I was diagnosed when I was twelve," remembers
Dr. Tawfik. "I've been on insulin ever since."
Even though Brad is still technically a teen-
ager, his lifestyle isn't reflective upon his age. He
and his wife, Bethany, are parents to a young son
named Lucas, and they are avidly looking to pur-
chase a home.
Yet, Brad still felt he could improve his physi-
cal health to provide a brighter future for Bethany
and Lucas.
"I'd been smoking since was thirteen and I quit
a month ago," Brad shares.
Another goal on his mind was losing weight,
and he saw a clear way to accomplish that through
his own workplace.
"Patients come here all the time and I see first-
hand how much weight they lose," says Brad. "Dr.
Tawfik's weight loss program is great. So I tried it
and I love it!"


Bradley Shortt, 19, lost 41 pounds within just two
months on Dr. Tawfik's treatment program.


Making a change
"Our program not only changes our patients' eat-
ing habits, but it also supports the development
of a better, healthier life," explains Dr. Tawfik.
"Approximately fifty percent of our weight loss
patients are diabetic."



CitruD ETES
Treatment Center
CITRUS PHYSICIANS WEIGHT LOSS
EIHAB H.TAWFIK, MD, PA


At Citrus Diabetes Treatment Center, non-dia-
betic weight loss patients see Dr. Tawfik's registered
nurse on a weekly basis. She gives them vitamin injec-
tions, takes their vital signs, and ensures that they
are losing weight. The doctor sees his non-diabetic
weight loss patients once every four weeks.
For diabetic weight loss patients, Dr. Tawfik
says treatment typically necessitates a visit to the
office every week. "As patients lose weight, their
insulin requirements decrease, so it becomes criti-
cal to make adjustments."
Additionally, the doctor shares, unlike most of
the traditional diabetes medications that often make
patients gain weight in the long run, he is particu-
larly pleased with the results of a new medication
to treat the condition.
The medication, named Victoza, is an injectable
drug that helps to regulate blood glucose. According
to Dr. Tawfik, the drug obtained FDA approval in
early 2010. It is a member of a class of drugs known
as incretins, which are gastrointestinal hormones that
increase insulin secretion.
"One of the main jobs of incretins, once they
are secreted by the small intestine in response to
food, is to increase insulin production from the
pancreas and slow the absorption of glucose from
the gut," he explains.
The end result is better glucose control, in addi-
tion to losing weight.
"Weight loss for diabetic patients can make
all the difference," Dr. Tawfik says. "Many of our
patients can eventually be freed for life from insulin
injections or other diabetic medications."

Weight loss success
The weight loss component of his practice, the doc-
tor is pleased to report, has been effectively assisting
patients for approximately five years now. Based on
a combination of appetite suppressant medications,
vitamin injections, and a diet program specifically
tailored to each individual, patients notice dramatic
results immediately.
"Our medications suppress the appetite sig-
nificantly and increase the metabolism. When the
metabolic rate goes higher, patients are basically
burning fat cells to accommodate the high metabo-
lism," he explains. "They're eating less and getting
rid of more."
Brad appreciated the fact that Dr. Tawfik's eating
plan is simple and recommends items easily found at
the grocery store.
"There's no special food to buy like with other
diet programs," Brad says.
As Brad began rapidly losing weight in the first
month, he also gained self-confidence and motivation
through the process. "Instead of eating that bag of
chips, you go out for a walk."


According to Dr. Tawfik, the eating program
begins with five days of very lean protein followed by
five days of higher-calorie protein lean as opposed
to very lean giving patients more menu options
from which to choose.
After ten days, it is important to add in a few
carbohydrate supplements in the form of veg-
etables and fruits, the doctor stresses. In the first
week, he says, patients typically lose up to ten
pounds, with an average weight loss in four weeks
ranging between 20 and 30 pounds.
Brad lost approximately 30 pounds during
the first month in the program, and continues
to slim down as his weight has dropped from
242 to 201 pounds.
"I've lost forty-one pounds in under two
months," he notes. "I'm trying to get down to one
hundred and eighty-seven pounds, and Dr. Tawfik
thinks I can get down to one hundred and eighty."
Dr. Tawfik was once in Brad's shoes, as he has
spent a lifetime struggling with his own weight. He
started at 220 pounds and is now 160 pounds.
"During medical school and my residency, it
was very difficult to lose weight," recalls Dr. Tawfik.
"Once I started practicing, I realized the impor-
tance of controlling my weight. A patient should
not come to a weight loss center only to see a doctor
who is overweight himself."
Another crucial component of his practice,
Dr. Tawfik notes, is that patients receive medical
monitoring each week while they are on the weight
loss program. "When they come to the office for
their diet injection, we measure heart rate, blood
pressure, etc. If there's even a slight increase in
those areas compared to the last visit, a nurse auto-
matically puts the patient in an exam room and it
becomes a medical visit."
Such instances are rare, the doctor stresses, but
the ability to respond to medical concerns imme-
diately is an important benefit of choosing Citrus
Diabetes Treatment Center & Citrus Physicians
Weight Loss.
With Brad's weight on the decline and his
health improving, that translates into more qual-
ity time with his family.
"I feel great," he says. "I can go on longer walks.
I go out fishing all the time, and even find I can deal
with the Florida heat better."
FHCN


Insulin Pump
Management
Continuous Glucose
Monitoring (CGM)
Treatment &
Screening for
Diabetes
Vascular
Complications
& Nerve Damage
Hypertension
& Cholesterol
Treatment
Effective Medical
Weight Loss Program
Wound Care
&Much More


Physicians Medical
Weight Loss Program
Hypertension
& Cholesterol
Management
Heart Attack/Stroke/
Cancer Prevention
& Screening
Physical Exams and
Routine Care for
Men and Women
Pap Smears and
Breast Exams for
Women
SickVisits &
Much More


HEALTHY RESULTS
Good health care can be a phone call away, and the staff of Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center warmly invites readers to call for more information or to
schedule an appointment. Please call (352) 564-0444 for the office at 7394 West
Gulf to Lake Highway in Crystal River or (352) 397-2099 for the Brooksville
location at 10089 Cortez Blvd., Suite 91.


Eihab H. Tawfik, MD, is board certified by the American Board
of Internal Medicine. Beginning his undergraduate work at St.
Peter's College, Jersey City, NJ, he earned his BA in Biology from
Rutgers University, Newark, NJ. Dr. Tawfik was awarded his medi-
Scal degree from Ross University, School of Medicine in Roseau,
Dominica and served his residency at Drexel University Veteran
Affairs Medical Center in Wilkes-Barre, PA.


COPYRIGHT 2012 FLORIDA HEALTH CARE NEWS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ARTICLE AND PHOTOS USED WITH PERMISSION OF FLORIDA HEALTH CARE NEWS, INC.


000CB46


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


David
Humphries
Sr., 70
CITRUS SPRINGS
David Scott Humphries
Sr. of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
was born Dec. 28, 1941, in
Portland,
SMaine, and
S was the son
of the late
S Kenneth
a n d
Dorothy
Humphries,
nee Inger-
David son. He at-
Humphries Sr. t e n d e d
schools in
Bath, Maine, and graduated
from Morse High School.
David was a devoted hus-
band, father and grandfa-
ther. He shared a devoted
marriage with his late wife,
Jean Wildes for over 40
years and took exceptional
care of her during her strug-
gle with colon cancer As she
said, "he was her rock" to
the end. David and Jean
were married in 1968,
spending their lives to-
gether in Maine and
Florida.
David was extremely
proud of his children, Scott
and Michelle, and they ad-
mired and appreciated his
love and lessons as a father.
David was looking forward
to attending Michelle's
graduation from law school
in May and he had just be-
come a grandfather to a sec-
ond granddaughter
David graduated from
Morse High School and then
the University of Maine in
Orono. His professional
studies were at the Univer-
sity of Maine Law School in
Portland, graduating in
1967, and he passed the bar
exam on his first attempt.
He served as an estate at-
torney for the Maine Sav-
ings Bank for several years
before the family moved to
Citrus Springs, Fla., so
David could care for his ail-
ing parents.
David always had a love
for cars and owned motor-
cycles and sports cars dur-
ing his life. David's passion
was sailing and he reveled


in his summers in Bonny
Eagle and Watchic Lake, en-
joying swimming and never
getting enough of that
Maine seafood. He and his
family took many wonderful
vacations together, includ-
ing a trip to Maine every
summer and trips to Eu-
rope, Alaska and the
Caribbean, and the memo-
ries of those travels are
cherished by his family
David is survived by his
daughter, Pamela-Jean
Michelle of N.C.; his son,
David Scott Humphries Jr
and his wife Chau of Va.; his
granddaughters, Malia and
Eliana; his cousins, Larry of
Fla., Gerry of Maine, Carole
Brochure of Ga.; his uncle
and aunts, Robert Ingerson
of Maine, Lois D'Andrea of
Fla., and Virginia Williams
of Maine. He was preceded
in death by his wife, Jean
Wildes.
David passed away at
home in Citrus Springs,
Fla., on Feb. 19, 2012. A me-
morial service will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 18,
at the Dolby & Dorr Funeral
Chapel, 76 State St.,
Gorham, Maine. A private
burial will be held in River-
side Cemetery, Cornish,
Maine. Memorial donations
in his honor may be made to
Humane Society of the US,
The HSUS, Dept. MEM1T9,
2100 L St. NW, Washington,
DC 20003. Online condo-
lences may be made to
www.dolbyfuneralchapels.
com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.




S-O


S.. S S -
& CS]REMTR

In eres


Leonard
'Lenny'
Damron III, 61
CRYSTAL RIVER
The Service of Remem-
brance for Leonard "Lenny"
Alfred Damron, III, age 61,
of Crystal River, Florida,
will be held 10:00 AM, Tues-
day, August 14, 2012 at the
Gulf to Lake Church with
Pastor Lloyd Bertine offici-
ating. Entombment will fol-
low at Memorial Gardens
Cemetery, Beverly Hills,
Florida. The family will re-
ceive friends from 5:00-7:00
PM, Monday, August 13,2012
at the Beverly Hills Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Homes.
The family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
form of memorial donations
to the Boys and Girls Club of
Citrus County and the
YMCA of Citrus County in
care of LKQ Corporation,
1550 North Meadowcrest
Boulevard, Crystal River,
FL 34429. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.HooperFu-
neralHome.com.
Lenny was born March 31,
1951 in Dearborn, MI, son of
Leonard and Geri Damron.
He died August 10, 2012 in
Crystal River, FL. Lenny
was the founder of Damron
Auto Parts and was Senior
Vice President of LKQ Self
Service and Heavy Truck
Divisions. His family moved
to Citrus County when he
was just 2 years old and he

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @ chronicleonline com
or
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@ chronicleonline.com
FClsig imfoplcig d-


has been a lifelong resident
His hobbies were collecting
muscle cars and hot rods
and fishing. He was an avid
Gator fan, enjoying all Gator
sports and loved spending
time with his grandkids.
Lenny was preceded in
death by his brother Gary
and his father, Leonard A.
Damron. Survivors include
his wife of more than 40
years, Diane Damron of
Crystal River, FL, 2 sons,
Chad (Annette) Damron of
Crystal River, FL, Casey
(Katie) Damron of Crystal
River, FL, mother, Geri
Damron of Crystal River,
FL, sister, Sharon (Ronnie)
Owen of Crystal River, FL, 4
grandchildren, Caroline,
Connor, Colby and Will,
niece, Keri Maggiore, and
nephew, Jason Owen.

Elizabeth
Hedden, 71
HERNANDO
Elizabeth Jean Hedden,
71, of Hernando, died Sun-
day, Aug. 5, 2012.
A memorial service of re-
membrance will be at 11
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012,
at Fero Funeral Home.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6





Richard Hall, 61
HOMOSASSA
Richard A. Hall, 61, of Ho-
mosassa died Thursday,
Aug. 9, 2012, in New Port
Richey.
He was
born July
29, 1951, in
a Putnam,
/ Conn., and
moved to
Sb Homosassa
55 years ago
Richard from St. Pe-
Hall tersburg. He
was a re-
tired surveyor for Swiftmud
and a Navy veteran of
Vietnam.
Richard enjoyed boating,
fishing, bowling and remote
model airplanes. He was a
loving dad, pa pa, son and
brother.
Richard was preceded in
death by his father, Maurice
Hall.
He is survived by his son,
Michael R. Hall (Tara) of In-
verness; daughter, Kelsey
Borgersen of Homosassa;
mother, Geraldine Hall of
Inverness; sisters, Christine
Hall of St. Petersburg and
Sandy Hall of Tallahassee;
grandchildren, Iris and
Mason Hall.
Funeral services will be
at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 17,
at Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs. Burial
with full military honors
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery Friends
will be received Friday from
9:30 a.m. until the hour of
service.
Condolences may be
given at wwwwilder
funeral.com.

Mildred
Bagley, 97
HERNANDO
Mildred Elizabeth Bagley,
97, of Hernando, died Fri-
day, Aug. 10, 2012, at Hos-
pice of Citrus County Unit
in Inverness.
Mildred was born on June


OBITUARIES


23, 1915, in Montreal,
Canada, the daughter of
Henry and Agnes Weather-
wax. She retired as an ac-
countant from the state of
New York. Mildred moved
to Citrus County in 2004
from Bradenton, Fla. She
was a member of the United
Methodist Church of
Hernando, Fla.
Mildred was preceded in
death by her husband
LeRoy Bagley Survivors in-
clude her daughter, Sandra
La Monday, of Hernando,
Fla.; and several nieces and
nephews.
Visitation for Mrs. Bagley
will be from 1:30 p.m. to the
hour of service on Wednes-
day, Aug. 15, 2012, at the
Heinz Funeral Home in In-
verness. The memorial serv-
ice will begin at 2 p.m. with
the Rev Jerry Carris presid-
ing. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be given to
Hospice of Citrus County.
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Gerhard
Nordahl, 92
OCALA
Gerhard Nordahl, 92,
Ocala, died Wednesday, Aug
8, 2012.
A memorial will be at 11
a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, at
Joy Lutheran Church,
Ocala. Military honors will
be at 2:30 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 16, at Florida National
Cemetery
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home With Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.


Page A12


SO YOU KNOW
SEmail obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
obituary details and
pricing options.
a Obituaries will be posted
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A9


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A10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


ROMNEY
Continued from Page Al

to middle class families."
The party establishment,
rank-and-file conservatives
and tea party groups all
cheered the pick made by
Romney, whose own record
as a moderate during his
term as Massachusetts gov-
ernor less than a decade ago
made his march to the pres-
idential nomination an un-
even one.
Obama's campaign didn't
wait long to respond. It crit-
icized the budget blueprints
Ryan has authored, particu-
larly his recommendations
to fundamentally remake
Medicare and cut $5.3 tril-
lion in government spend-
ing over the coming decade.
Ryan joins a race that has
been defined from the be-
ginning by a weak economy
and high unemployment,
measured most recently at
8.3 percent in July Even so,
recent national polls as well
as surveys in several battle-
ground states indicate a
narrow advantage for
Obama.
While Romney's pick uni-
fied Republicans, the im-
pact in swing states such as
Florida, Iowa and Pennsyl-
vania was an open question.
All are home to large num-
bers of seniors whose reac-
tion to Ryan's prescription
for Medicare is certain to be
tested by Democrats.
Ryan's selection as well as
Romney's own nomination
will be ratified by delegates
to the Republican National
Convention that begins
Aug. 27 in Tampa.
Obama and Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden will be nom-
inated for a second term at
the Democratic convention
the following week. The vice
president called Ryan to
congratulate him on his se-
lection, the president's cam-
paign said.
The GOP ticket made its
debut at a naval museum in
Norfolk, Va., opening stop of
a long-planned bus tour
through four states in as
many days. A trip to Ryan's
home state was added to
previously scheduled ap-
pearances in Virginia, North
Carolina, Florida and Ohio.


The USS Wisconsin,
berthed at the museum, pro-
vided a bunting-draped
backdrop, a symbol of the
nation's military strength as
well as an obvious reference
to Ryan's home state.
First Romney, then Ryan,
jogged down the ship's gang-
plank to the cheers of hun-
dreds and the stirring
soundtrack from the movie
"Air Force One."
As his family came on
stage, Ryan knelt to em-
brace his daughter, Liza, 10,
and sons Charles, 8, and
Sam 7, before kissing his
wife, Janna.
Later, the two held a rally
in Ashland, Va., where Ryan
said he had good news and
bad news.
The bad news is "Presi-
dent Obama is the president
of the United States, and the
good news is that on Novem-
ber the 6th he won't be any
longer," he said.
A fired-up crowd cheered
Romney and Ryan, support-
ers on bleachers at one
point stamping their feet to
create a loud rumble.
One campaign official said
Romney settled on Ryan on
Aug. 1, more than a week ago,
and informed Beth Myers,
the longtime aide who had
shepherded the secretive
process that led to the selec-
tion. The official spoke on
condition of anonymity, not
authorized to be named in
providing details.
Romney and Ryan had an
unannounced meeting last
Sunday, and the congress-
man accepted the offer,
campaign officials said.


Asked during the day if
accepting the offer was an
easy decision, Ryan replied,
"It was, it was, we've got to
save the country"
In making his pick, Rom-
ney bypassed other poten-
tial running mates,
including Ohio Sen. Rob
Portman, Florida Sen.
Marco Rubio, former Min-
nesota Gov Tim Pawlenty
Virginia Gov Bob McDon-
nell and New Jersey Gov
Chris Christie.
Officials said he had
called all five to notify them
of his decision.
"I am deeply excited and
honored to join you as your
running mate," Ryan said in
his first words at Romney's
side.


Democrats took a dim
view of Ryan's record.
"The architect of the rad-
ical Republican House
budget, Ryan, like Romney,
proposed an additional
$250,000 tax cut for million-
aires and deep cuts in edu-
cation, from Head Start to
college aid," Jim Messina,
the president's campaign
manager, said in a written
statement.
"His plan would also end
Medicare as we know it by
turning it into a voucher sys-
tem, shifting thousands of
dollars in health care costs
to seniors."
There was one unscripted
moment during the day,
when Romney mistakenly
introduced Ryan as the next


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president. He returned to
the podium to say, "Every
now and then I'm known to
make a mistake. I didn't
make a mistake with this
guy. But I can tell you this,
he is going to be the next
vice president of the United
States."
As chairman of the House
Budget Committee, Ryan is
primary author of conserva-
tive tax and spending blue-
prints that the tea
party-infused Republican
majority approved over vig-
orous Democratic opposition
in 2011 and again in 2012.
They envision transform-
ing Medicare into a program
in which future seniors
would receive government


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

checks that they could use
to purchase health insur-
ance. Under the current
program, the government
directly pays doctors, hospi-
tals and other health care
providers.
Ryan and other support-
ers say the change is needed
to prevent the program from
financial calamity. Critics
argue it would impose ever-
increasing costs on seniors.
Other elements of the
budget plan would cut pro-
jected spending for Medi-
caid, which provides health
care for the poor, as well as
food stamps, student loans
and other social programs
that Obama and Democrats
have pledged to defend.


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The surgeons at ISA are qualified to diagnose and treat a wide variety
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vascular surgery. Each doctor is board-certified and brings a particular
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Declan Hegarty, M.D., FACS
Dr. Hegarty joined ISA in June 2010. In addition to general surgery, he
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Compared to the conventional or "open" hernia repair surgery, this
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Farhaad Golkar, M.D.
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for pancreatic cancer, biliary disease, liver disease, and minimally
invasive/laparoscopic surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease
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changes, followed by drug therapy. Patients who do not respond to
these treatments can often find relief through minimally invasive/
laparoscopic surgery.

Torr Carmain, M.D.
Dr. Carmain's areas of medical expertise include advanced laparoscopy
for ventral hernia and colectomy, breast surgery including sentinel
lymph node and stereotactic biopsy, upper and lower endoscopy,
ultrasound guided venous access, and colonoscopy.


Quehuong Pham, M.D., FACS
As a champion for women's health, Dr. Pham believes that a person's
diet and lifestyle have a significant impact on their health. Her areas
of medical expertise include advanced laparoscopy for ventral hernia
and colectomy, breast surgery including sentinel lymph node, and
stereotactic biopsy.

Michael Brown, D.O.
Dr. Brown is known across the country for his work in vascular
surgery. Prior to joining ISA in 2008, he was an attending surgeon at
the University of Florida's Shands Hospital and the Malcolm Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Gainesville. His particular areas
of interest include the management of aortic aneurysms, carotid
artery disease, and minimally invasive treatment of lower extremity
vascular disease.

Marc Fernandez, M.D., FACS
Dr. Marc Fernandez joined ISA 16 years ago and is Chief of Surgery
at Citrus Memorial Hospital. An accomplished surgeon, Dr. Fernandez
presents at multiple professional conferences and provides educational
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ISA's surgeons are here to help you regain your health-no matter
what concern you may be facing. With a strong commitment to quality
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ISA is available to provide you with the surgical care you need-when
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Pictured left to right:
Declan Hegarty, M.D., FACS
Quehuong Pham, M.D., FACS
Marc Fernandez, M.D., FACS
Michael Brown, D.O.
Farhaad Golkar, M.D.
Torr Carmain, M.D.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ryan seen as Romney's

bridge across GOP spectrum


BRIAN BAKST
Associated Press
JANESVILLE, Wis. Even before Wis-
consin sent Paul Ryan to Congress, he was
meticulously carving a path that seemed to
point only upward.
As a young Capitol Hill staffer, he im-
pressed Republican lawmakers with his hus-
tle and intellectual curiosity He blended
quickly with an elite crop of conservative
thinkers. By his 30s, he was a congressman
on his way to becoming a GOP name brand
with his push-the-edge budget proposals.
Ryan's climb reached new heights Satur-
day when Republican presidential nominee
Mitt Romney announced him as his running
mate.
"Mitt's Choice for VP is Paul Ryan," said a
phone app Romney's team created to spread
the word to supporters.
As the chairman of the House Budget
Committee, Ryan gives Romney a link to
Capitol Hill leadership and underscores
Romney's effort to make the election a ref-
erendum on the nation's economic course.
Romney also could see his standing improve
in Wisconsin, a state President Barack
Obama won handily four years ago, but that
could be much tighter this November
Even so, Ryan has been a double-edged
sword for Romney The congressman's en-
dorsement of Romney came at a critical
stage of the GOP primaries, giving him a
boost in the Wisconsin race that effectively
buried Romney's final threat. But it also
meant Romney was embracing the Ryan-
sponsored budget proposal that Democrats
fiercely target as painful to the poor and
elderly
Still, the square-jawed congressman is
viewed as a bridge between the buttoned-up
GOP establishment and the riled-up tea
party movement
At 42, Ryan has spent almost half of his life
in the Washington fold, the last 14 represent-
ing a southern Wisconsin district that runs
from the shores of Lake Michigan through
farm country south of Madison.
Ryan grew up in Janesville and still lives
down the block from where he spent his boy-
hood. During summers in college, Ryan was
a salesman for Oscar Mayer and once drove
the company's famed Wienermobile.
Ryan's father, a lawyer, died of a heart at-
tack when Ryan was a teenager. It's why


* NAME Paul Davis Ryan, 42; born
Jan. 29, 1970; Janesville, Wis.
EXPERIENCE U.S. Representative;
1999-present; marketing consultant,
Ryan Inc. Central, 1997-1998;
legislative director for U.S. Sen. Sam
Brownback, R-Kan., 1995-1997;
adviser and speechwriter, Empower
America, 1993-1995; aide to U.S.
Sen. Bob Kasten, R-Wis., 1992.
EDUCATION Bachelor's degree,
Miami University of Ohio, 1992.
FAMILY Wife, Janna; daughter Liza,
10; sons Charles, 8, and Sam, 7.
QUOTE "Here in Wisconsin, I picked
who I think is going to be the next
president of the United States I
picked Mitt Romney. The moment is
here. The country can be saved. It is
not too late to get America back on the
right track. ... It is not too late to save
the American idea." Ryan, speaking
during an April 2012 campaign stop
with Romney after endorsing him in
the Republican primary.
Ryan is a fitness buff, leading fellow law-
makers through grueling, early-morning
workouts and pushing himself through
mountain climbs.
That same intensity propelled him on the
political front, too.
He was first exposed to Congress as a sum-
mer intern to former Sen. Robert Kasten, R-
Wis. With an economics degree in hand,
Ryan worked his way through committee
staff assignments, a prominent think tank
and top legislative advisory roles until op-
portunity arose with an open seat from his
home turf. He leveraged Washington con-
nections, local ties forged through the family
construction business and the backing of
anti-abortion groups en route to his surpris-
ingly comfortable victory
As a 28-year-old, Ryan entered Congress
brimming with idealistic views about forcing
government to become leaner and less in-
trusive, principles he thought even fellow
Republicans were abandoning too readily
"One of the first lessons I learned was,
even if you come to Congress believing in
limited government and fiscal prudence
once you get here you are bombarded with
pressure to violate your conscience and your
See Page A15


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A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012

DEATHS
Continued from Page A9




Nicholas
Tarr, 21
INVERNESS
Nicholas James Aaron
Tarr, age 21, Inverness, died
Aug. 9, 2012.
A lifelong native of Inver-
ness, he was born Sept. 25,
1990, to William G. and Tina
(Arancibia)
Tarrn Nick
was a 2009
graduate of
Citrus High
SSchool and
was an ex-
cellent stu-
dent and
Nicholas athlete. He
Tarr loved to
read, motorcycle and swim.
He was a humble person
and a wonderful son,
nephew and friend to many
Nick was currently a mid-
shipman at the United
States Naval Academy in
Annapolis.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his parents, William
Tarr, Summerfield; Tina
and her husband, Barrie
Haines, Inverness; his sis-
ter, Felicia Arancibia, Inver-
ness; Grandmother Alice
Arancibia, Inverness; Aunt
Doris Philpot and her chil-
dren, Richard, Jason and
Matthew; Aunt Judy and
Uncle Earl Brumbaugh and
their children, Erik and
Todd; Aunt Monica Geir and
Uncle John Tarr and their
children, Shaun, Jason and
Erick Tarr; and Aunt Kath-
leen Hebling; as well as
many dear friends, neigh-
bors and midshipman
classmates.
A funeral service of re-
membrance will be at 3 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 13, 2012, at
Cornerstone Baptist Church
with Pastor Greg Kell.
The family will receive
friends in visitation from 2
p.m. until the hour of
service.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
Francis 'Frank'
Hanson, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
Francis "Frank" E. Han-
son, retired detective, age
76, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Friday, Aug. 10,
2012, at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River, Fla.
He was born Oct. 31,1935,
to Frank Hilmer and Vir-
ginia (Crawley) Hanson in
Kingston, N.Y. He came
here 21 years ago from Gulf-
port, Fla. Frank was a re-
tired detective with the
Gulfport Police Dept. with
24 years of service.
He is survived by daugh-
ters, Cynthia L. Hanson of
Homosassa, Fla., and
Christina Gregg of Citrus
Springs, Fla.; a son, David
Shamer of North Carolina;
two grandchildren, Stacey
Perkins-Brooks (Anthony
'Al") and Robert Perkins;
and seven great-grandchil-
dren, Whitney, Adrian, Al-
Ton, Elaina, Bryce, Rylie
and Natalie.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 15, 2012, at the Strick-
land Funeral Home Chapel
in Crystal River, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. con.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Albert Freeman
Jr., 78
ACTOR
Albert Freeman Jr, the
veteran actor who played
Elijah Muhammad in Spike
Lee's epic film, "Malcolm
X," has died. He was 78.
Howard University in
Washington, D.C., confirmed
his death Friday night but
details weren't immediately
available. Freeman taught
acting there for years and
served as chairman and
artistic director of its the-
ater arts department.
Freeman earned an
NAACP Image Award for
playing Malcolm X's mentor
in Lee's 1992 biography
-From wire reports


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..
-.n m n n .


PIZZA CArE
II U
nnnnmunnni.muinliunnn


Dpnen-=4n ei-e
Car E t t r nt 63-12


1 P!7 i


Great Food and Great Service

Don't take our word for it. Read what your friends and neighbors have

said over the last 10 years and then come in and see for yourself!


/ eat there
at least once a week and
never had a bad pizza."
"Delighted to find a good deal
on GOOD pizza. And even more
delighted with their 2 for 1 wine
special! Yummy garlic knots
too!"
"The Best Pizza with whole wheat
crust and the best service around."
"We have been going to this
restaurant ever since the week
they opened the doors! Great
food made to order, Excellent
daily specials. The staff always
greets us with a smile. Warm and
friendly dining atmosphere. The
food portions are huge, and the
prices are very reasonable.
Definitely a slice above the
rest!"
"After having many unsatisfying
experiences at other pizza joints
around Citrus County I decided to
give one more a try. Now living all
the way in Crystal River I did not
want to see myself disappointed
again. Boy was I wrong. I started out
with an awesome salad they had
advertised on their special board
called a bleuu cheese delight' and it
was absolutely delicious. For the
rest of my dinner I had a small sized
pizza with all the goodies on it. They
call it their Chef Anthony's Special.
After finishing almost the whole
pizza I decided to box the rest up
for dessert. Reasonably priced,
great timing, staff and decor. I was
very pleased well worth the drive.
Great place to bring the family!"


"The food is great!!!!!!! Especially the Specialty St
must try sandwich. The people are very nice. "
"Love everything about this friendly atmosphere! Hot fo
hot! Owners and staff make you feel like family. Service til
My favorite selection on the menu is the fresh subs, and w1
pasta, I always order Extra garlic knots! Exceedingly great
"We love the pizza, garlic knots and wings, their q
always great, never had a bad thing there."
"The food and service was excellent. Don't be put o
location; it was hard to see because of the traffic ligh
the linguini Alfredo with chicken. They do something
interesting with the marinade for the chicken. Save ro
dessert. The cheese cake is one of the best I have hac
"This is a restaurant that we frequent...we love it...they

For more patron comments go to pizzacaf


I think it is important to let people know when they are doing
something right; you are definitely doing it right.
My family has operated a pizzeria in Queens for the past 32
years so I think I know something about pizza.
My parents now live in Citrus Hills and I visit them a few times
a year.
We have patronized many restaurants in Citrus County and have
found them wanting. My parents called me several weeks ago to
tell me they had found a good pizzeria in Florida. Needless to say
I thought "Yeah right."
Over the years we have tried every pizza place in Citrus County
and they were all bad (Frozen dough balls, canned sauce, poor
service & bad d6cor)
When we pulled into the parking lot I thought, "here we go
again". However, being a former Marine I did like the Marine flag
proudly displayed out front. I walked in the door I thought wow,
what a shock.
The color scheme & wallpaper were inviting, the overhead lattes
work, paintings and lighting created an ambiance normally
reserved for fine dining establishments.
A friendly server that knew my parents by name greeted us with
a smile, followed by the owners that made us feel very welcome.
We had Garlic Knots that were outstanding & a salad with a
nice house merlot. The timing between our appetizer and pizza
was perfect. The pizza was true New York style with a flavored
crust and just the right amount of olive oil to blend the flavors of
the pizza toppings. Everything was so good I made my parents
take me back the next night.
The waitress recommended a Calzone or Stromboli. We had a
Chef Anthony's Special Calzone and I can say that it was truly the
best Calzone I ever had.
Keep up the Good Work
Semper Fi ~'a
R.S. De ari eaevi


next. If you want call
ahead before you dine
they take about 20 mins
to cook. Well worth the
* wait!"
"This place is the BEST,
. they deliver to me a couple
of times a week. The girls
r that answer the phones are
friendly and act like pros.
The delivery drivers are
always happy and have no
problem talking with you,
always a hello how are you.
* Teresa and Kevin are good
people. I am very glad they
opened in the Hernando
area. KEEP UP THE GREAT
WORK AND SERVICE."
"I have had Pizza Cafe
deliver to my house so
many times, and delivery
is always fast. The "small"
pepperoni roll is huge and
so good! The Specialty
Steak Sub is delicious and
unique. The chicken
tenders and french fries
are another favorite. They
are thin strips of chicken
fried in a tasty batter. The
fried mushrooms and
mozzarella sticks are great
appetizers! And best of all,
you can't beat the prices!
You get a lot of food for a
little bit of money!"


L-


-in an dCrew.
We areta Crew.
our meetintig this opor..
associates h and seminar suchi to thank youv
ggestion to praise fur guests an busiesng
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F EHC ANTHONY
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S PIZZA CAFE 352-637-1920 Sun.-Thurs.11:00-8:00 Fri. & Sat.11:00-9:00
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL Intersection of Hwy. 200 and Highway 41 in Hernando Plaza


"Just a little note to
inform you of what a great
crew you have. From your
drivers, to Haley, Ashley
who answer your phones.
They all do their job and
do it well! They all
deserve a nice raise!!"
\ "This is the best pizza
place around. I don't like
pizza from anywhere else.


garlic knots and wings in the area. Thanks for offering the certificate."
"Nice view from the dining room looks much better on the
inside than the outside. Good place to meet with friends, staff
was very attentive."
"Pizza Cafe is one of our favorite places!! Food is great.. Very
affordable when you just don't feel like cooking..Staff is wonderful!!!! I
love Chef Anthony's calzones and I always order the extreme! If you're
in Citrus County, treat yourself to one! The dining room is very warm
and the staff is friendly."
"Wonderful service! Calzone was hands down the best I ever
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A14 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RYAN
Continued from Page All

commitment to help secure
the people's natural right to
equal opportunity," Ryan
wrote in a 2010 book.
Critics question Ryan's
own consistency They note
he backed a costly prescrip-
tion drug benefit during Re-
publican George W Bush's
presidency that added strain
to the Medicare budget,
which Ryan touted at the
time as "one of the most crit-
ical pieces of legislation" en-
acted since he joined
Congress. He said in a June
interview with The Associ-
ated Press he took a "defen-
sive" vote to ward off a more
expensive Senate version.
More recently, Ryan served
on a bipartisan presidential
debt commission but balked
at its report because a tax in-
crease was on the menu of
options.
He is a disciple of and past
aide to the late Rep. Jack
Kemp, once a GOP vice pres-
idential nominee himself
who effusively promoted tax
cuts as a central tenet for
economic growth.



NASTY
Continued from Page Al

is coming after him.
"I think it's horrible
they're attacking me per-
sonally," he said. "It's not
true. What has been done, is
they've cut and pasted small
excerpts out of a report that
later goes on to say the
county staff should be com-
mended for the work they've
been doing."
Neither the mail pieces
nor the automated phone
calls actually encouraged a
vote for any person. In fact,
the mail pieces don't even
say Poliseno is a candidate
for any political office.
The phone calls con-
cluded with: "Hey, by the
way, this was paid for by
Concerned Citizens of Cit-
rus County"
According to state
records, there was a group
by that name for a short
time in the mid-1980s, but it
has been defunct since 1988.
Poliseno believes com-
mission opponent Scott
Adams is behind the at-
tacks, since the mail pieces
and Adams' own mail-outs
are sent from the same West
Palm Beach political con-
sultant: Public Concepts
LLC.
Adams said Friday he is
not involved.
"It's none of my business
what anybody does," he
said. "If somebody does
something, I have no control
over it. My name isn't on
that thing."
According to reports with
the Citrus County Supervi-
sor of Elections Office,
Adams paid Public Con-
cepts $22,480 for his own
mail pieces. Each mail
piece includes a disclaimer
saying it came from the
Adams campaign.
Floridians for Conserva-
tive Values has collected
close to $900,000 since 2008.
According to state election
reports, the group does not
fund candidates. Rather, it
spends money on advertis-
ing and consulting, includ-
ing more than $400,000 to
Public Concepts.
The committee funds
anti-candidate advertise-
ments, mainly in legislative
races, according to online
news reports.
Public Concepts is a na-
tionally known political
consultant and direct-mail
company, according to its
website.
Adams is one of two
county commission candi-
dates in all three races to
hire an out-of-county com-
pany to send his mail
pieces. District 5 opponent
Michael Smallridge hired a
Clearwater company.
Poliseno said he con-


fronted Adams about the au-
tomated phone calls after a
Republican club meeting
earlier last week.
"I told him, 'somebody is
saying negative things about
me and I hope it's not you
doing it,"' Poliseno said.
"He said, 'Charles, I can as-
sure you there are no funds
expended from my cam-
paign account"'
Another candidate in the
same race, Theodora
"Teddi" Rusnak, said she
saw Poliseno at the same
meeting and told him she
had received one of the
calls.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A15


From the title page of his
idyllic "Path to Prosperity"
budget plan down to the
most scrutinized fine print,
Ryan is adept at framing
proposals in the most pleas-
ant terms.
Ryan's opponents charge
his call to open Medicare to
more private competition is
too risky even if implemen-
tation would be a ways off;
he counters the latest ver-
sion was fashioned in con-
sultation with prominent
Democrats in hopes of head-
ing off an all-out program
collapse that would devas-
tate the financial security of
future retirees. Foes say his
plans to scale back food
stamps and housing assis-
tance are mean-spirited;
Ryan describes the moves,
which would allow states to
further customize their wel-
fare programs while impos-
ing tougher time limits and
work requirements, as em-
powerment for the down-
trodden who he argues are
being lulled into lives of
complacency and depend-
ency
It took time for Ryan's own
party to get fully behind his
ideas. A few years ago, when
Ryan first proposed dra-


matic changes to entitle-
ment programs such as
Medicare some in the GOP
were skittish because De-
mocrats pounced on the
plans as undermining the
health program accessed by
millions of retirees.
Kasten said Ryan's re-
fusal to back down paid off
politically
"If all the sudden you be-
come the dartboard for
everyone on the left and you
are willing to stand there
and take the heat and the
darts, you develop a tremen-
dous amount of respect even
from those who are throwing
he darts," Kasten said. "In
the beginning, it's a grudging
respect. It grows into a true
respect."
Ryan has let opportunities
to advance come and go,
most recently when he
opted not to seek an open
U.S. Senate seat. His young
family factored into his con-
siderations; he and wife, tax
attorney Janna, have a
daughter and two sons, ages
10, 8 and 7.
Associated Press writers
Steve Peoples and Matthew
Daly in Washington and
Kasie Hunt in Norfolk, Va.,
contributed to this report.


* WHAT: Citrus County Commission District 5.
* WHO: Republicans Scott Adams, Charles Poliseno,
Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak and Michael Smallridge.
* TERM: Four years.
* COVERS: All of Citrus County.
* PAY: $56,714.
* ON THE BALLOT: Universal Aug. 14 primary wins
election. All voters may vote regardless of political
affiliation.


"I was really disturbed by
that," she said.
Rusnak said she has no
involvement in the anti-
Poliseno campaign.
"If I were a betting per-
son, I'd put my money on
Scott Adams," she said.
"Scott was bragging that he
had a professional cam-
paign manager and they
were out of the South
Florida area. The first se-
ries of mailers I got from
Scott had a West Palm
Beach postmark. If that's
where this other stuff is
coming from, I don't think
you need a magnifying glass
to follow those bread crumb
trails."
Adams would not say why
he chose Public Concepts as
a campaign consultant, or
how he knew about the
company
"You look things up and
you do research," Adams
said.
Asked what he learned in


his research about Public
Concepts' success, Adams
said: "I have no idea. I hired
them because I wanted to."
Adams said it was a coin-
cidence that Public Con-
cepts has him and
Floridians for Conservative
Values as clients, and both
would have mail pieces in
Citrus County.
"They do it all over," he
said. "That's where the ma-
jority of these people are."
Poliseno said he is disap-
pointed to see the campaign
reach a negative point with
the Aug. 14 primary so close.
"I thought all of us would
run on our merits and what
we could offer the county as
a whole," he said. "If you
have to tear somebody
down, I guess that means
you don't have something to
offer"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


HAVE YOU HAD

ENOUGH?
I'm Hank Hemrick and I'm running for
Sheriff. My platform is simple. It is time
for a change. I cannot be bought. The
big money people and the good
oleboy's do not want me to win this
election. Have you had enough of the
serious unchecked drug problem, the
out of control spending, the ego's and
attitudes in the Sheriff's department,
and the ever present double standard?
Then it's time for a change. I ask you for
your support and your vote.
HEMRICK FOR SHERIFF
www.HemrickforSheriff.com
Pd. Pol. adv. Paid for and approved by Hank
Hemrick, Republican, Sheriff






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I deaHelth






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEMORY CARE PLAN


Local assisted living fa-
cilities with memory
care units:
* Avante at Inverness -
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness: 352-
726-3141.
* Brentwood Retirement
Community-- 1900 W.
Alpha Court, Lecanto:
352-746-6611.
* Crystal Gem Manor -
10845 W. Gem St.,
Crystal River: 352-
794-7601.
* Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
Center 136 N.E.
12th Ave., Crystal River:
352-795-5044.
* Diamond Ridge Health
and Rehabilitation
Center 2730 W.
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto: 352-
746-9500.
* Emeritus at Barrington
Place 2341
W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto:
352-746-2273.
* Nature Coast Lodge -
279 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto:
352-527-9720.
* Pleasant Grove Manor
5701 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness:
352-726-2555.
* Sugarmill Manor-
8985 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa:
352- 382-2531.
* Woodland Terrace of
Citrus County- 124
W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando:
352-249-3100.
Source: HPH Hospice.


Continued from PageAl


care agency or moving a loved one
into a residential care facility.
Home health care includes a broad
array of services, which in essence
keeps a person with Alzheimer's at
home and provides supplementary
support to caregivers.
Nevertheless, the Alzheimer's As-
sociation states not all home health
care services are alike. Some give
only non-medical help with daily
living tasks while others may offer
medical care provided by a licensed
health professional.
Many of the common types of in-
home services include:
Companion services super-
vision, leisure activities or visiting.
Personal care services -
bathing, dressing, toileting, eating
and exercising.
Homemaker services house-
keeping, shopping or meal
preparation.
Skilled care wound care, in-
jections, physical therapy and other
needs requiring a licensed health
professional.
Costs vary, but Medicare does
cover certain home health care
services if the person's needs meet
the eligibility requirements.
Locally, Citrus County Senior
Care Services offers a number of
grant programs and services such
as homemaking, personal care,
home-delivered meals, emergency
alert products and respite care to
help seniors stay in their homes.
For more information about Sen-
ior Care Services, call 352-527-5930.
For a comprehensive list of home
health care agencies in the county,
visit www.floridahealthfinder.gov/
index.html.
Sometimes when the care needs
completely outweigh what can be
provided at home, a residential


HOW TO CHOOSE?

Tips for selecting the right care
option:
Research all care options
before deciding which is a
good fit.
Ask providers if they have
training in dementia care.
Familiarize providers with the
needs and likes of the person
with dementia.
Know it's normal to be
apprehensive about changing
care.
Re-evaluate care as needs
change.
Source: Alzheimer's Association.


care facility might become the most
advantageous choice.
Several housing options exist,
such as:
Retirement housing: Retirement
housing may be suitable for those
with early-stage Alzheimer's because
the person may be able to live alone
safely, but has difficulty managing an
entire house. This type of housing
provides limited supervision and op-
portunities for social activities, trans-
portation and other services.
Assisted living (also called
board and care, adult living, sup-
ported care): Assisted living bridges
the gap between living independ-
ently and living in a nursing home.
Assisted living typically offers a com-
bination of housing, meals, 24-hour
staff support, recreational activities,
housekeeping, transportation and
health care. These facilities may or
may not offer services exclusively
for people with dementia, so it is im-
portant to ask.
Nursing homes (also called
skilled nursing facility, long-term
care facility, custodial care): Nurs-
ing homes provide 24-hour, long-
term medical care and often have
services and staff to address issues


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Theressa Foster shows one of the areas at Superior Residences intended to
spark some memories in the residents and help them deal better in their liv-
ing situation.


such as nutrition, care planning,
recreation and spirituality. The
staff-to-resident ratios vary at nurs-
ing homes. In addition, the staff at
one nursing home may have more
experience or training with demen-
tia patients than the staff at another
Alzheimer special care units
(SCUs) also called memory care
units: SCUs are designed to meet
the precise needs of people with
Alzheimer's and other dementias.
SCUs can take many forms and
exist within various types of resi-
dential care facilities. There often
is a cluster setting, in which persons
with dementia are grouped to-
gether on a single floor or a unit
within a larger facility.
Continuing care retirement
communities (CCRC): CCRCs pro-
vide different levels of care (inde-
pendent, assisted living and nursing
home) based on a person's needs. If
the needs change, the resident is
able to change levels of care.
The cost for care at residential
care facilities varies. According to a
recent MetLife survey, the national


average cost for basic services in an
assisted living facility is $41,724 per
year. In a nursing home, it's $78,110
per year for a semi-private room and
$87, 235 per year for a private room.
Most care costs are paid out of
pocket by the families, though cer-
tain types of benefits, such as veter-
ans benefits and Medicaid, may
cover nursing care.
Medicare, however, does not
cover the cost of long-term care in a
care facility, according to the
Alzheimer's Association.
There is a wide assortment of fi-
nancial and legal issues when it
comes to home health care or plac-
ing a person in a residential care fa-
cility. Several of the phone calls
Fisher said he receives come from
people already in crisis and by then,
the options are limited.
While the task of choosing care
for a loved one can seem daunting,
Fisher said having a plan and plan-
ning early is the key
Information from the Alzheimer's
Association, wwwalz.org, was used
in this report.


0812 SUCRN


Voter Information



Primary Election


Sample Ballot



TUESDAY,

AUGUST 14, 2012
POLLS OPEN FROM
7am to 7pm


Requiremen
You must show
early or at the po
and signature ID
101.043 (2)).

Acentahle 1


it for Voters
a photo and signature ID when voting
polls. Voters who do not show a photo
)must vote a provisional ballot (F.S.


IFrms of Phntn and


Signature ID:
* Florida Driver's License
*Florida ID
* US Passport
*Military ID
*Student ID
* Debit or Credit Card with Photo
* Retirement Center ID
* Neighborhood Association ID
* Public Assistance ID




OFFICIAL


Prepare Now for the Primar


v Election


ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
O Is the address and name on my voter
information card correct?
O Do I have the appropriate photo ID with
signature to bring when voting?
o Do I know enough about the candidates to
make an informed decision?
0 Do I know where my polling location is to
cast my vote?


Has Your Signature Changed
Since You First Registered?
Signatures on mail ballots are checked against your
most recent signature on file. Update your signature by
completing a voter registration application and
delivering it to the elections office.


Sample Ballot Primary Election


Polls Open: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 from 7am to 7pm
This is your official Sample Ballot for the August 14, 2012, Primary Election. This information is
being provided in advance of the election to give you the opportunity to study the candidates. If you like, you may mark
this Sample Ballot and take it with you when voting to use as a reference. This Sample Ballot shows all ballot styles.

Please urge your family and friends to vote on August 14,2012. If you have questions about the election process or need
further information, please visit our web site at www.votecitrus.com or call the Supervisor of Elections office at 352-341-6740.


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT
REPUBLICAN PARTY
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14,2012
TO VOTE COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXTTO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
0 George LeMieux REF
ODeon Long REI
0 Connie Mack REF
S Mike McCalisler REF
OMarelena Stuart REF
ODave Weldon REF
PUBLIC DEFENDER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
S Mike Graves RE
0 Bo Samargya REF
SHERIFF
(Votefor One)
O Steven Burch REF
O Hank Hemrick REI
SWinn Webb REI
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
(Vole for One)
0 Sandy Balfour REF
S RobertJ. (Rob) Cummins RE


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
Universal Primary Conest
(Vote for One)
O Renee Chistopher-McPheetas REF
0 Dennis Damato RE
OC Ronald Kitchen Jr REI


I ---- .. S C


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
O Shannon Heathcock RE
O Joe Meek REF
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
O Scott Adams REF
D Charles Polieno REI
O Theodora Tedd' Rusnak REF
O Michael "Mike" Smallrdge REI


SCHOOL BOARDMEMBER
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
OSusan "Sue" Hale
S 0 ill Murray
PARTY OFFICES


STATE COMMTTEEWOVAN
(Vote for One)
0 Glona Fisher REP
O Michele M. Kemm REP


SAMPLE BALLOT


SA

Notice to the Voter:
Two candidates in the republican
race for the office of United
- States Senator have withdrawn or
have been disqualified such that:
A vote cast for George LeMeux
wdll not mount.
A vote cast for Deon Long will
n-t count.


PRIMARY ELECTION


SAMPLE BALLOT

Fill out this sample ballot and use it as a
guide at the polls on Election Day!


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14,2012
TOVOTE, COMPLETELYFILL IN THE OC L NET TO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black Ink pen.
fyou mae a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
SGlenn A Burkett DEM
S Bill Nelson OEM
PUBLIC DEFENDER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5
Universal Primary Conestt
(Vole for One)
0 Mike Graves REP
C BO Samargya REP
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 34
(Vote for One)
0 Lynn Thomas Dostal DEM
C Robert Raymond Goocher DEM


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
O ReneeChnstopher-McPheetrs REP
0 Denns Damato REP
0 Ronald Kitchen Jr. REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Universal Primay Contest
(Vote for One)
0 Shannon Heathock REP
0 Joe Meek REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
Universal Prmary Contest
(Vote for One)
C ScottAdams REP
D Chades Poliseno REP
O Theodora Teddi'Rusnak REP
C Michael "Mike" Smalridge REP


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
S Susan 'Sue" Hale
0Bill Murray


SAMPLE BALLOT


lW's
100 Red Level Baptist Church
11025 W. Dunnellon Rd.
101 Crystal River United Methodist Church
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
102 River Gardens Batist Church
3429 W Dunnellon Rd.
104 First Batist Church of Crystal River
700 N. Citrus Ave.
105 Crystal River City Hall
123 N.W Hwy. 19
107 Crystal Oaks Clubhouse
4958 W. Crystal Oaks Dr.
108 M- '-"'-'-
109 Pine Ridge Community Building
5690 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
110 Citrus Srin2s Community Center
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.


290's
200 Ouail Run Community Building
1490 E. Redpoll Trail
201 Hernando United Methodist Church
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy (C.R. 486)
202 Citrus Hills Lodge
350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)
203 Central Ridge Library
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
204 Knights of Columbus
2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)
205 Beverly Hills Lions Club
72 Civic Circle
206 Our Lady of Grace Church
6 Roosevelt Blvd.
208 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)


OFFICIAL NONPARTISAN BALLOT
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14, 2012
TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OML NEXTTO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.


PUBLIC DEFENDER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5
Unival Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
S Mike Graves REF
O Bo Samargya RE


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
Univel Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
O Renee Chrstopher-McPheeters RE
S Dennis Damato REI
O Ronald Kitchen Jr. REF
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
0 Shannon Heathcock RE
0 JoeMeek REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
Univeral Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
O Scott Adams RE
S Charles Poliseno RE
O Theodora Teddr" Rusnak RE
OMichael Mike"Smalldge RE


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT
(Volte for One)
O Susan "Sue" Hale
C Bill Murray


SAMPLE BALLOT


30's
300 Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
301 National Guard Armory
8551 W. Venable St.
302 West Citrus Elks Lodge
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
305 Christian Center Church
7961 W. Green Acres St.
307 Homosassa Methodist Church
8831 W. Bradshaw St.


4fsa
400 First United Methodist Church
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. (C.R. 581)
401 Crossroad Baotist Church
5335 E. Jasmine Ln.
402 Church of the Nazarene
2101 N. Florida Ave.
403 Inverness City Hall
212 W. Main St.
404 Point O' Woods Clubhouse
9228 E. Gospel Island Rd.
405 Citrus County Auditorium
3610 S. Florida Ave.
406 American Italian Social Club
4325 S. Little Al Pt.
407 Floral City Methodist Church
8478 E. Marvin St.
408 Floral City Lions Club
8370 E. Orange Ave.


CITRUS COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
120 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL, 34450-4238
(352) 341-6740 TTY: (352) 341-6752
t i h www.votecitrus.com



/ The ultimate

A voting machine... YOU




VOTE 2012


MARK YOUR BALLOT
CORRECTLY!
FILL IN THE
OVAL NEXT TO
/ YOUR CHOICE.


UiV ersal rima
J ndalithree County Commission races and the 5th

ala n


Democratic and Non-partis allowing all voters to
have a say in the selection of the elected official.


POLLING LOCATIONS w..,V,.l.,,in...r.c.coa...i,,,.rS ,,li.,,.mm .i


tEPI


A16 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



SUNSHINE
Continued from Page Al

decided to construct an-
other in Crystal River,
where he has lived for
nearly 50 years.
"This is home," he said.
The reason he said he
built the more-than-$2 mil-
lion facility, next to Wal-
greens in Crystal River off
U.S. 19, is simple: there was
a need for a facility specifi-
cally catering to those with
memory impairment
Leading a tour through
the facility, Mast said Sun-
shine Gardens provides
resident-focused care,
which means the staff finds
what works for the patient,
not what works best for the
staff.
"They deserve to have as
much of a life as they can,"
she said.
Not every resident re-
sponds to the same stimuli,
so she said it is important to
find out what a person will
and won't react to. Resi-
dents are encouraged to
bring their own furniture to
feel at home. The staff tries
to learn likes and dislikes
so care is individualized.
"We work around you,"
she said.
On one side of the build-
ing, Sunshine Gardens fea-
tures efficiency bedrooms,
which Mast said serve as
rooms for individuals with
advanced Alzheimer's.
"The further demented
the person becomes the
smaller the space because
it's less to deal with," she
said.
The smaller bedrooms


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A17


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The dining area at Sunshine Gardens can be used as a
multi-purpose area for the residents.


could also be used for short-
term respite care, Mast
added.
The area features laun-
dry facilities and lockers as
well as a spa, allowing peo-
ple to wash either in the
shower or walk-in tub.
Larger bedrooms able to
accommodate couples are
on the south end of the
building, along with a se-
cure outdoor patio area.
Mast said the area can fea-
ture cookouts and other
outdoor activities.
To maintain the safety of
residents, each door lead-
ing outside has a 15-second
delay before opening and
an alarm.
"We do not have a keypad,
locked facility," she said.
Staff and patients are
monitored by cameras fac-
ing every doorway And as
the resident population
grows, the staff will grow.
In addition to incorporat-
ing other agencies to pro-
vide care, Mast said


Sunshine Gardens is slated
to have a staff size above
what is mandated, and they
will keep a close eye on
residents.
Sunshine Gardens will
also look for volunteers to
work with the residents,
Mast said. And family in-
volvement is encouraged.
Sunshine Gardens is a
private-pay facility, though
Mast said they do accept
some veterans' benefits.
At the end of September,
the facility will host a mem-
ory screening for those who
are interested. It is not for
diagnostic purposes, Mast
said. Anyone with concerns
about their memory should
talk to their physician.
For information about
Sunshine Gardens, call 352-
563-0235.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


SUPERIOR
Continued from Page Al

Sunflower Springs, an assisted living facil-
ity in Homosassa.
The focus of Superior Residences will be
providing a completely secured environ-
ment for those with memory-related disor-
ders.
Recently, Foster provided a tour of the
80-bed assisted living facility, which has
numerous amenities for patients' needs.
Much of the building is secure to guar-
antee the well-being of their residents, Fos-
ter explained, since individuals with
dementia and Alzheimer's are more likely
not to make good decisions.
However, despite the need for safety
measures, Foster said Superior Resi-
dences ventures far from an institutional-
ized environment.
The facility's two wings house spacious
and lengthy hallways perfect for wander-
ing, which is a common symptom for peo-
ple with Alzheimer's. A number of benches
are scattered through the secured areas,
allowing residents to rest. Courtyards offer
a change of scenery and a giant fielded
area perfect for barbecues and other out-
door events, Foster said.
From windowed nurses' offices good for
keeping an eye on residents to activity
rooms equipped with restrooms for those
with pressing bathroom needs, the facility
is all about convenience, comfort and se-
curity, Foster said.
As a facility geared toward treating those
with early to advanced stages of dementia
and Alzheimer's, Foster said if the needs of
the individual change because of the dis-
ease, the levels of care change.
Once more residents arrive, the commu-
nity will not be as mixed, and residential
areas will be separated based on function-
ality level.
Foster emanated enthusiasm about Su-
perior Residences' opening because she
said she knows the county will eagerly em-
brace the facility At Sunflower Springs,
Foster said they would receive phone calls


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The dining area at Superior Residences
can be used as a multi-purpose area for the
residents.

all the time from people asking if they of-
fered memory care.
At Superior Residences, Foster said an
emphasis will be placed on learning about
the residents and catering to their specific
needs. They want families and staff to
allow residents to live in the moment, even
if their recollection isn't quite accurate.
"Let them enjoy," she said. "They can't
help they can't remember."
So often, Foster said, people want to
avoid Alzheimer's instead of rallying
around it But in the end, she said, people
with dementia and Alzheimer's need to be
safe and cared for in a thoughtful, sympa-
thetic manner.
Consequently, Foster said Superior Res-
idences is looking for employees, but they
aren't interested in people who are just
looking for a job.
"We are looking for people who are com-
passionate, from dietary staff to nurses,"
she said.
Superior Residences is completely pri-
vate pay For more information, call 352-
746-5483.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


PRIMARY ELECTION for Crystal River, FL ~ Precinct 105

Fill out this sample ballot and use it as a guide at the polls on Election Day!


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14, 2012

TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL W NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
C Glenn A. Burkett DEM
0 Bill Nelson DEM
PUBLIC DEFENDER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

0 Mike Graves REP
0 Bo Samargya REP
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 34
(Vote for One)
D Lynn Thomas Dostal DEM
CD Robert Raymond Goocher DEM









-v
O


.oV


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)
CD0 Renee Christopher-McPheeters REP
0 Dennis Damato REP
CD Ronald Kitchen Jr. REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

C Shannon Heathcock REP
CD Joe Meek REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

0 Scott Adams REP
CD0 Charles Poliseno REP
CD0 Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak REP
CD Michael "Mike" Smallridge REP


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
C Susan "Sue" Hale
0 Bill Murray
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 1
Eliminates transitional language
from former restructuring of terms
which is no longer required.
Explanatory Statement
Avote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would eliminate outdated wording
related to prior elections.

CD YES
CD NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 2
Addsideletes cross references to
other sections of the City Charter.
Explanatory Statement
Avote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would eliminate or add cross
references to other sections of the City
Charter.
CD YES
C) NO


UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
CD George LeMieux
CD Deon Long
0 Connie Mack
D Mike McCalister
CD Marielena Stuart
CD Dave Weldon
PUBLIC DEFENDER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)


D Mike Graves REP
CD Bo Samargya REP
SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
CD Steven Burch REP
0 Hank Hemrick REP
O Winn Webb REP
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
(Vote for One)
0 Sandy Balfour REP
0 Robert J. (Rob) Cummins REP


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

C Renee Christopher-McPheeters REP
C0 Dennis Damato REP
CD0 Ronald Kitchen Jr. REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

CD Shannon Heathcock REP
C Joe Meek REP
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One)

0 Scott Adams REP
0 Charles Poliseno REP
0 Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak REP
CD Michael "Mike" Smallridge REP
SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 4
(Vote for One)
C Susan "Sue" Hale


PARTY OFFICES

STATE COMMTTEEWOMWN
(Vote for One)
0 Gloria Fisher REP
E Michele M. Klemm REP
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 1
Eliminates transitional language
from former restructuring of terms
which is no longer required.
Explanatory Statement
Avote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would eliminate outdated wording
related to prior elections.

CD YES
OC NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 2
Addsideletes cross references to
other sections of the City Charter.
Explanatory Statement
Avote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the Charter, which
would eliminate or add cross
references to other sections of the City
Charter.

CD YES
CO NO


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF BALLOT


CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 3
Eliminates tie breaking provision no
longer required since Mayor now
has full voting privileges.
Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would eliminate a provision allowing
the Mayor to vote to break a tie. A
previous Charter revision made the
Mayor a full voting member of the
Council.

O YES
O NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 4


CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 5

Grants City Manager authority to reorganize
administrative departments, and transfer
responsibilities between departments and
divisions.

Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an amendment
to the City Charter, which allows the City
Manager authority to reorganize and reassign
duties and responsibilities of administrative
departments, units or divisions, and transfer
resources and responsibilities within the
current assets shown on the organizational
chart without City Council approval.
D YES
EC NO


CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 8
Requires City Council to review City
Ordinances for legality or
obsolescence every ten (10) years.
Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
amemedment to the City Charter, which
changes the current period of five (5)
years to ten (10) years for a
mandatory review of the City Code of
Ordinances.
CD YES
CD NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 9

Deletes section of Charter setting


Allows suDDlemental appropriations -- I schedule of events following City


to be introduced to City Council and
approved at same council meeting.
Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would allow the City Manager to
request a supplemental appropriation
at a City Council meeting and obtain
final City Council action at that same
meeting and not require a second City
Council meeting for a final action.

CO YES
CO NO


Notice to the Voter:

Two candidates in the republican
race for the office of United
States Senator have withdrawn or
have been disqualified such that:

A vote cast for George LeMieux
will not count.

A vote cast for Deon Long will
not count.


CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 6 election in 1998.


Grants City Manager authority to serve as
department head without prior consent of
City Council.

Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an amendment
to the City Charter, which would allow the City
Manager to serve as a department/office
director as deemed necessary.
CDYES
O NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 7
Requires City Council to have committee
review the City Charter every ten (10) years.

Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an amendment
to the City Charter, which changes the current
period of four (4) years to ten (10) years for a
required review of the City Charter by an
appointed charter review committee.
CDYES
C NO


Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would delete a section of the Charter
relating only to the 1998 Council
election.
CD YES
O NO
CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 10

Deletes section of Charter relating
to prior City elections of 2004/2006.
Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
amendment to the City Charter, which
would delete a section of the Charter
relating only to prior elections of
2004/2006.
C YES
O NO


OFFICIAL NONPARTISAN BALLOT
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14,2012

TOVOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL W NEXTTO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.

PUBLIC DEFENDER COUNTY COMMISSIONER SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5 DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 4 .
Universal Primary Contest Universal Primary Contest (Vote for One)
(Vote for One) (Vote for One) Susan "Sue" Hale

0 Mike Graves REP O Renee Christopher-McPheeters REP 0 Bill Murray
0 Bo Samargya REP CD Dennis Damato REP CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 1
0 Ronald Kitchen Jr. REP
Eliminates transitional language
COUNTY COMMISSIONER from former restructuring of terms
DISTRICT 3 which is no longer required.
Universal Primary Contest
(Vote for One) Explanatory Statement
A vote of "yes" would approve an
0 Shannon Heathcock REP amendment to the City Charter, which
CD Joe Meek REP would eliminate outdated wording
related to prior elections.
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
0 DISTRICT 5 O YES
VV Universal Primary Contest CD NO
(Vote for One)
(Vote for One) CHARTER AMENDMENT NO. 2

vAdds/deletes cross references to
C- Charles Poliseno REP other sections of the City Charter.
C Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak REP
C Michael "Mike" Smallridge REP Explanatory Statement
amendment to the City Charter, which
would eliminate or add cross
references to other sections of the City
Charter.

O YES
O NO.




VOTE BOTH SIDES OF BALLOT
j,


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF BALLOT





OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT
REPUBLICAN PARTY
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 14, 2012

TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL W NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE
Use a blue or black ink pen.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.


VOTE BOTH SIDES OF BALLOT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I.I.'IIIIJ


A A Ai~ii~ i~


-- FALL 2012
MONDAY 12:30pm LIVELY BUNCH Meets Tues. 9/4 Starts Mon. 9/10
Mixed Senior Handicap Teams of 4* $11.00 Per Week
MONDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL Drop In Fun for Everyone continuous
Money Shots/Prizes $8.25 Week
MONDAY 6:30pm TURNOVERS Meets Mon. 8/13 Starts Mon. 8/20
Mixed Handicap Teams of 5 15.00 Per Week
MONDAY 7:00pm PBA EXPERIENCE Meet & Bowl Starts Mon. 9/10
^}]!'W- Weekly Pay-Out Shot Changes Every 3 Weeks
TUESDAY 9:15am MORNING BIRDS Meets Tues. 8/14 Starts Tues. 8/21
Ladies Handicap Teams of 4* $11.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 12:30pm SR. NO TAP Meets Tues. 9/18 Starts Tues. 9/25
-A1M Mixed Handicap 8 & 9 Pins=Strike $12.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 1:00pm SUGAR BABES Meets Tues. 9/11 Starts Tues. 9/18
Ladies Handicap From Sugarmill Woods $11.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 4:30pm YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Tues. 8/14 Starts Tues. 8/21
Teams of 3* $17.00 Sanction Fee Includes Team Shirt* Bantams $6 Per Week* Prep/Junior$7 Per Week
TUESDAY 6:30pm TUES. MEN'S HDCP Meets Tues.8/21 Starts Tues. 8/28
Handicap Teams of 5 $16.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Budget Truck Rental
TUESDAY 6:30pm TUES. GALS Meets Tues. 8/21 Starts Tues. 8/28
Handicap Teams of 5* $15.00 Per Week
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm SR. STARS Meets Wed. 8/22 Starts Wed. 8/29
Mixed Pins Over Average Teams of 3' $11.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Pepsi
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm EL DORADO Continuous
Mixed Teams of 4 from El Dorado Subdivision
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL Drop In Fun for Everyone continuous
Money Shots/Prizes* $8.25 Week
WEDNESDAY 7:00pm CCML MENS Meets Wed. 8/15 Starts Wed. 8/22
Mens Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Manatee Lanes
WEDNESDAY 7:00pm WEDNESDAY MIXERS Meets Wed. 8/15 Starts Wed. 8/22
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4* $15.00 Per Week


SCHEDULE --
THURSDAY 10:00am POWDER PUFFS Meets Thurs. 8130 Starts Thurs. 916
Ladies Handicap Teams of 4 $11.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 12:30pm SR. MEN'S HDCP Continuous
Sanctioned Drop-In Weekly Payouts $12.00 Per Week Only Pay Weeks You Bowl
THURSDAY 3:00pm MEADOWCREST Meets Thurs. 1014 Starts Thurs. 10/11
Mixed Handicap Residents of Meadowcrest Teams of 4 $7.75 Per Week
THURSDAY 7:00pm MANATEE MATCH-PLAY Meets Thurs. 8/16 Starts Thurs. 8124
Mixed Handicap Match-Play Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 7:15pm FLORIDA POWER Meet & Bowl Starts Thurs. 916
Mixed Teams of 5* $13.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 9:30pm-CL DOLLAR NIGHT Continuous
$1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling. $1 Shoe Rental* $1 Hot Dogs* $1 Draft. $1 Small Soda
FRIDAY 9:30am-Noon DOLLAR DAY Continuous
$1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling- $1 Shoe Rental $1 Hot Dogs $1 Draft* $1 Small Soda
FRIDAY 12:30pm MANATEE MIXERS Meets Fri. 8/17 Starts Fri. 8/24
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $12.00 Per Week
FRIDAY 2:00pm CITRUS HILLS Meets Fri. 9/21 Starts Fri. 9/28
Mixed Handicap Residents of Citrus Hills
FRIDAY 6:30pm FUN BUNCH Meets Fri. 8/24 Starts Fri. 8/31
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week
FRIDAY 6pm-9pm RENT-A-LANE Continuous Starts Fri. 8/24
Any Two Hours in this Period $35/Lane With FREE Shoe Rentals
FRIDAY 9:30pm-12:30pm VERTIGLOW Continuous
Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music $35 Per Lane with FREE Shoe Rentals
SATURDAY 9:30am YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Sat. 8/18 Starts Sat. 8/25
Youth League Teams of 4*. Pee-Wee (5 & Under) $4. Bantam (8 & Under) $6* Prep/Junior (9 & Older) $7
SATURDAY 3-5:30pm KIDS KAMP Continuous
Family Bowling with Vertiglow Bowling Music, Prizes, FREE Shoe Rentals, Sm. Soda* $8.50 Per Person
SATURDAY 7:30pm-10pm & 10:30pm-.lam VERTIGLOW BOWLING continuous
Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music* $35 Per Lane with FREE Rental Shoes Call for Reservations No Deposit Required.


11


A18 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World l iBRIE h D 1S

Protest Blasts, gunfire hit Damascus
Protest


Associated Press
An exile Tibetan prostrates
himself on the road during
a peaceful protest march
Saturday in New Delhi,
India. The march was held
to express support and
solidarity with Tibetans
who allegedly immolated
themselves in protest
against Chinese rule
Thursday in Tibet in Amdo
Ngawa in Tibet, according
to the protesters.


Afghan policeman
kills 10 officers
KABUL, Afghanistan -An
Afghan police officer killed at
least 10 of his fellow officers
Saturday, a day after six U.S.
service members were gunned
down by theirAfghan partners
in summer violence that has in-
ternational and Afghan forces
questioning who is friend or
foe.
Attacks on foreign troops
by Afghans working with the
alliance are on the rise and,
while cases of Afghan secu-
rity forces killing within their
own ranks are less frequent,
together they show how bat-
tle lines have blurred in the
decade-long war.


High flying


Rebels break

through president's

security cordons

Associated Press
DAMASCUS, Syria Gunmen det-
onated back-to-back roadside bombs
and clashed with police in central
Damascus on Saturday in attacks that
caused no damage but highlighted
the ability of rebels to breach the in-
tense security near President Bashar


Assad's power bases.
The apparently coordinated
blasts point to the increasing use of
guerrilla-style operations in the
capital to undermine the govern-
ment's claims of having full control
over Damascus. It also suggests
rebel cells have established a Dam-
ascus network capable of evading
Assad's intelligence agents and slip-
ping through security cordons.
Assad's regime, however, has dis-
played no hesitation on the battle-
field despite blows such as
Damascus attacks and defections of
high-ranking military and political
figures, including the prime minis-


ter earlier this week.
In Aleppo, activists said Syrian
forces pressed ahead with an offen-
sive to break rebel footholds in the
nation's largest city. The London-
based Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said a helicopter
gunship fired missiles on apart-
ment buildings a day after protest-
ers begged for international
shipments of anti-aircraft weapons.
With diplomatic efforts all but ex-
hausted, strategic planning has
moved into high gear forAssad's pos-
sible fall or worst-case scenarios if
the civil war deepens, including use
of his suspected chemical arsenal.


In Istanbul, U.S. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton and
Turkey's foreign minister said their
countries were creating a special
joint task force to respond to poten-
tial crises such as victims of chemi-
cal attacks or a dramatic spike in
the more than 200,000 refugees who
have already fled Syria.
"We have been closely coordinat-
ing over the course of this conflict,
but now we need to get into the real
details of such operational plan-
ning. It needs to be across both of
our governments," Clinton said
after talks with Foreign Minister
Ahmet Davutoglu.


Associated Press
A Bleriot plane performs in
flight Saturday during a
celebration marking the
Russian air force's 100th
anniversary in Zhukovsky,
outside Moscow, Russia.


Iran earthquake
kills at least 87
TEHRAN, Iran -A
6.2-magnitude earthquake
killed at least 87 people and
injured more than 600 others
Saturday in northwestern
Iran, state TV reported.
Iran's main news channel
said the quake hit the towns of
Ahar, Haris and Varzaqan in
EastAzerbaijan province at
4:53 p.m. local time, also dam-
aging hundreds of homes.
The TV quoted Khalil Saei,
local Crisis Committee chief,
as saying 30 people were
killed in Ahar, 40 in Varzaqan
and 17 others in Haris.
The broadcast said at least
60 villages sustained damage
ranging from 50 percent to 80
percent, while four other vil-
lages had been totally leveled
to the ground.

Wave kills two in
eastern Caribbean
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad
- Two people died and an-
other two are missing in
Trinidad as a tropical wave
lashed the Eastern Caribbean
with heavy rains and wind,
authorities said Saturday.
The victims died after heavy
rainfall unleashed floods and
mudslides in Trinidad's west-
ern suburb of Diego Martin,
relatives said. The dead were
identified as 66-year-old
Solomon Britto and 31-year-
old Everold Bentham.
Prime Minister Kamla
Persad-Bissessar declared
Diego Martin a disaster area.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -
The United States is in the
midst of the worst drought
in decades, and the dry
weather and soaring tem-
peratures are taking a toll
on people living and
working in Ohio west to
California and Texas
north to the Dakotas.
Farmers have watched
their corn wither and cat-
tle go hungry Homeown-
ers have seen their lawns
turn brown and gardens
wilt. Communities in the
Midwest that rarely expe-
rience water shortages
have enacted restrictions,
and businesses are look-
ing for ways to stay afloat
as sales fall off. Here are a
few of their stories:
Water for quarters
The creeks and ponds
that Cimeron Frost's 300
cows and calves drink
from in central Illinois are
almost dry
So each day, he takes
rolls of quarters to what
amounts to water vending
machines in nearby towns.
He drops in the coins, col-
lects the water in metal
and plastic tanks and tows
it on trailers to his pas-
tures around the town of


C




Farmer Randy Pettinghill examines an ear of undersized corn in a field
Aug. 1 near Plumerville, Ark. Pettinghill buys water from the city of Morrilton for his
farm in the Arkansas River Valley, but this year, the city put a cap on what he could
have. A weeping willow shows signs of scorching Aug. 2 at the
Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe, III. Many of the garden's 2.5 million plants have
required extra watering during the summer's triple-digit heat.


Tallula. He hauls 4,000 gal-
lons a day in four separate
trips, dumping or piping
the water into big,
galvanized-steel troughs
for his herd to drink.
Even at 40 to 50 gallons
per quarter, it adds up.
"It takes a little over two
rolls of quarters a day,
plus probably $40 in gaso-
line a day, to water all our
cows in all our locations,"
Frost, 65, said.
At $10 a roll, that's about
60 bucks a day, or $420 a
week, and he's been hauling
every day since mid-June.
He estimates he has


spent about $2,700 so far
But he worries more about
what could lie ahead.
Weeping willows
The limbs of the weep-
ing willows gracing banks
of a lake at the Chicago
Botanic Gardens drooped
more than usual, and the
leaves normally plush
and green wilted and
began to fall after several
weeks of unusual heat
Weeping willows are
water-loving trees, said
Tim Johnson, horticulture
director for the botanic gar-
dens: "When things dried


Police embrace emerging

Associated Press people were killed, three missing children. Previ-
others wounded and dozens ously, the service has
SAN FRANCISCO--Min- terrified in the deadliest helped police in Amarillo,
utes after a shooting near mass shooting in the city's Texas, capture a fugitive
the Oakland Airport this history wanted for aggravated rob-
year, the gunman was on the Bolton later gave those on bery and probation viola-
loose. And police Sgt. Chris edge an update: "Possible tion; and authorities in
Bolton quickly fired off a suspect in custody No im- Fayetteville, N.C., nabbed a
flurry of text alerts to thou- minent public safety threat suspect wanted for armed
sands of nearby residents appears to exist in immedi- robbery soon after a Nixle
through a social media ate area." alert was sent to residents.
tool for law enforcement Across the country, law of- With the San Francisco-
agencies. ficers are adding a new based service approaching
"Stay out of area," said form of social media to their 1 million subscribers, with
one alert. "Multiple shoot- arsenal of crime-fighting police departments partici-
ing victims reported. Med- tools. pating in major cities such
ical on-scene. Police are Almost 6,000 law enforce- as Chicago, Los Angeles,
evacuating a nearby, af- ment agencies are now de- Baltimore and Dallas, it is
fected business." playing the public part of what one expert calls
Officers would eventually notification service Nixle to a new "blue wave" of elec-
discover a grisly scene in- provide residents with real- tronic community policing
side a tiny Christian college time alerts on crimes in that lets cops reach out di-
on that spring day Seven progress, traffic messes and rectly to the public.


down, they responded. The
leaves yellowed up and
some dropped."
Many of the gardens'
2.5 million plants have re-
quired extra watering
during the summer's
triple-digit heat, but the
willows were a special
case. Groundskeepers
have been excessively wa-
tering the willows about
once a week for a month,
drawing water from sev-
eral lakes on the property
to deluge the roots for
about 30 minutes.
One tree that was in par-
ticularly bad shape re-


quired 850 gallons of
water, an amount that usu-
ally hydrates several miles
on the 385-acre reserve,
during one watering alone.
Resource rationing
Randy Pettinghill buys
water from the city of Mor-
rilton for his farm in the
Arkansas River Valley, but
this year, the city put a cap
on what he could have. It
turns on the spigot every
third night from 7 p.m. to 7
a.m., and Pettinghill col-
lects as much as he can in
lagoons on his property in
Arkansas' Conway County.
He tries to ration the
water, but with the tem-
perature regularly over
100 degrees, he's losing a
lot to evaporation.
He has wells on his
property, too. He spent
$25,000 to have the second
one drilled in July be-
cause the first was pro-
ducing half its normal
amount of water. He con-
nected the two, and they
still aren't producing
enough to keep his corn
and soybeans irrigated.
He left about two-fifths of
his 1,700 acres unplanted
this year, and he's been
pumping water onto the
rest, spending $22,000 a
month for fuel.


social media tool


Associated Press
Oakland police Sgt. Chris Bolton demonstrates usage of the
Nixie notification service Aug. 10 at police headquarters in
Oakland, Calif. Across the county, law enforcement agen-
cies have added a new form of social media to their arsenal
of crime-fighting tools.


Associated Press
Tony Frost, of Frost Farms, surveys a pond in the cattle pasture that serves as the water source for his cattle that has nearly dried up Aug. 3
in Tallula, III.

Tales of woe across the United States stem from lack of rain and water


9











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes
can be found
on Page A24
of today's
Chronicle.


Associated Press
Streets of San Francisco Bike Tours guide and co-founder Eoin Canny explains the history of mural art in the Mission District during an October tour in San Francisco. Streets
of San Francisco Bike Tours was launched in early 2011 by a group of friends who are passionate about both San Francisco and bicycles, and who'd worked as travel guides
internationally before returning home to lead their own tours.


San Francisco bike tour lets visitors feel more like locals


PAULA FROKE
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO
R eveling in the
lush green
canopy above
and savoring the
fragrance of eucalyptus
trees as we pedaled
through the Golden Gate
Park Panhandle, we
paused for a few moments
to take in the scene:
San Franciscans young
and old wandering by on
foot, on bikes or in
strollers; balls and
Frisbees sailing through
the air; friends sipping
coffee and chatting.
Against this backdrop, our tour guide
enlightened us with tidbits of history
and local color We were on a tour, but
we felt nothing like tourists. We felt as
if we belonged there.
Just then I noticed a tour bus chug-
ging along a nearby street, and I real-
ized why touring San Francisco by bike
was the way to go. Stuck on the bus,
those visitors could only look out the
windows at places we were experienc-
ing with all our senses.


p,p


/


Timothy McCarthy, of Berkeley, Calif., consults a trail map at Point Reyes National
Seashore in Marin County, Calif., north of San Francisco, as part of a series of bicy-
cle excursions in Northern California. This part of the tour included a hiking and
mountain bike jaunt along some of the park's many trails.


In all we pedaled an 18-mile route
that took us farther and wider than we
ever could have gotten on foot, with
stops for delights that included treas-
ures tucked away in the park, a riveting
view of the Golden Gate Bridge, street
murals in the Mission District, and vi-
brant street scenes in the Castro and
Haight-Ashbury
Our tour was run by Streets of San
Francisco Bike Tours, launched in
early 2011 by a group of friends who
are passionate about both San Fran-


cisco and bicycles, and who'd worked
as travel guides internationally before
returning home to lead their own tours.
Since my boyfriend, Timothy Mc-
Carthy, and I both love bikes, it's natu-
ral that we would gravitate to a city
bike tour (We love wine, too, which is
why we also gravitated to the heavenly
pairing of bikes and wine called Velo
Vino Napa Valley More on that in a
bit.)
But even if you're not a frequent bike
rider, these tours can be for you, as


long as you're reasonably fit. SoSF pro-
vides city bikes with easy gearing, and
the pace is relaxed enough to keep you
comfortable and enjoying the sights.
There are plenty of stops along the way,
and the bikes have baskets to tote what
you need for the day
There's a choice of four basic tours,
ranging from nine miles in three hours
to 18 miles in six hours, and some cus-
tom options too. Somehow, they man-
age to wiggle around not up- almost
all of the famed San Francisco hills.
Our journey started in Alamo Square
Park, looking out on the "Painted
Ladies," a row of exquisite Victorian
houses against a backdrop of the city
below. Guide and SoSF co-founder
Eoin Canny set us up on the bikes and
gave us an overview of the day as well
as some safety reminders.
Then we were off, and immediately
overcome by the simple joy of turning
the pedals around, feeling the breeze,
and savoring new sights. It was like
being 10 years old again.
After a few more stops in Golden
Gate Park, we pedaled to the Presidio,
a woodsy former military post now part
of the Golden Gate National Recre-
ation area, with spectacular views
down to the San Francisco Bay
Then it was on to Crissy Field, with
the Golden Gate Bridge rising from the
fog in the background, and some magi-
cal moments listening to water music
through the Wave Organ, an "acoustic
sculpture" on a jetty across from Ma-
rina Boulevard.
A cruise down the Embarcadero took
us to the Ferry Building, whose grand


Page A23


A bit chillier there

Dan Perreault and Carol Baziow of Beverly Hills cruised Alaska in June. After a
breathtaking flight in a helicopter out of Juneau, they were able to spend time
exploring the sights on Mendenhall Glacier. The temperature on the glacier was
barely out of the 30s, with a 20 mph wind. Not what they are accustomed to in
Florida, but something they will never forget.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS
r0ata Coanest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


- 7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SIGHTS
Continued from Page A21

past recalls the history of
commuting by boat on the
water rather than by car
over bridges. It was the per-
fect place to pick up what
amounted to picnic sup-
plies, which we then en-
joyed on the vast grassy
lawn across the street, as
kids and dogs frolicked
around us.
Onward we pedaled,
checking out AT&T Park,
home of the San Francisco
Giants, before heading on to
the Mission District and an
extended stop to chat with
an artist painting another
addition to the neighbor-
hood's famous street mu-
rals. Timothy and I are big
fans of street art, so Canny
gave us a look at some more
murals, on the Women's
Building, and then of course
the Duboce Bikeway Mural
in celebration of our fa-
vorite activity.
By the time we got back to
Alamo Park, my diehard
New York-ness was giving
way to a new love for all the
quirkiness that is San Fran-
cisco, while Bay Area native
Timothy was enamored of
local lore he'd never known.
Best of all, we felt as if we'd
truly experienced the city in
a personal way
To cap off our visit, Canny
offered tips on culinary
treats in the neighborhood.
Smitten Ice Cream, a few
blocks down the street,
turned out to be the perfect
choice. Our taste buds prac-
tically jumped up and down
with joy when greeted with
the freshest and most flavor-
packed ice cream imagina-
ble olive oil (yes!) for me,
salted caramel for Timothy
- made from scratch in 60
seconds with a liquid-nitro-
gen-powered ice cream
maker. (Hey, we earned it
with all of our biking!)
Before our trip was over,
we also sampled several op-
tions north of San Fran-
cisco. Topping the list was a
stop at Velo Vino Napa Val-
ley in St. Helena. The name
sums it up: a haven for
lovers of wine or bicycles, or
both.


EXCURSIONS


IF YOU GO
Streets Of San
Francisco Bike
Tours: 385 Linden
St., San Francisco;
www.sosfbiketours.
com or 415-448-
7673. Tour prices
range from $65 to
$115 depending on
distance. The Food
Tour, $95. Custom
options available.


It's the creation of Gary
Erickson, who made his
name by developing Clif
Bars (named after his fa-
ther) to sustain himself over
long bike rides. Typically
those long rides end in cele-
bration with a glass or two of
wine. You start to see the
connection.
After Clif Bars started fill-
ing the jersey pockets of cy-
clists everywhere, Erickson
turned his passion for sip-
ping wine into a passion for
making wine. The next logi-
cal step: Velo Vino, where
visitors can simultaneously
taste Clif Family Wines and
ogle all of the cycling photos
and memorabilia mingling
with wine glasses and Clif
Family Farm products. On
the morning we were there,
winemaker Bruce Regalia
stopped in and chatted with
other tasters.
Our only regret: that we
hadn't been there on one of
the days when they offer
bike rides starting at Velo
Vino, with rentals available
from the nearby Calistoga
Bike Shop.
Instead, we went on to
Napa Valley Bike Tours in
Yountville, where we'd
arranged to rent road bikes
for a self-guided tour of
Napa and Sonoma valleys.
While we chose to go it
alone, the company also of-
fers a variety of tours and
packages as well as private
group tours.
The next day brought one
final stop on our mini-bike-
extravaganza: Point Reyes
Outdoors in Point Reyes
Station, where we rented
mountain bikes and took to
the trails around the Point
Reyes National Seashore.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A23


* Send your community news and photos to Community Editor Sarah Gatling at community@chronicleonline.com.
For more information, call 563-5660, ext. 1197.


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A24 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Luncheon
for Military Women will take
place at noon Monday, Nov. 12,
at the Crystal River Woman's
Clubhouse, 320 N. Citrus Ave,
Crystal River.
Those who have never re-
ceived an invitation in the past
may call Leslie Martineau at
352-746-2396 to be added to
the mailing list.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21,2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@
tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.


Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at


several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from 10
to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-
7397.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. The next
meeting will be Aug. 18. For
more information, call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60thAve., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more infor-
mation.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
The post will serve a roast
pork dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 17, at the post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
On the menu for Aug. 22 is a
Swiss steak dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m.
All members and the public
are welcome to come dine with
their friends and families for a
donation of $7. All profits from
the dinners go to support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary.
For additional information,
call Unit President Sandy White
at 352-249-7663.
All members and the public
are welcome to come and


enjoy dinners with their friends
and families for a donation of
$ 7. All profits from the dinner
will go to support the many pro-
grams of the American Legion
Auxiliary.
For additional information,
call Unit President Sandy White
at 352-249-7663.
The post is sponsoring a bus
trip to Tropicana Field on
Wednesday, Sept. 5, for a
baseball game featuring the
Tampa Bay Rays vs. the New


York Yankees.
A chartered bus will leave the
post at 4 p.m. with an approxi-
mate return at midnight. The
cost includes bus fare, game
ticket and refreshments. This
event is open to the public, in-
cluding children accompanied
by an adult.
Tickets are limited and can
be purchased at the Legion,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway, in
Crystal River. Call the post at
352-795-6526 for ticket price
and information.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the commu-
nity.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for actities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi-Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
There will be no dinner on
Friday, Aug. 17, but karaoke will
be with Mike beginning at
7 p.m.
Karaoke and all-you-can eat
spaghetti dinner will be from 4
to 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26, at
the post. Cost is $5. All are
welcome.
Karaoke with Mike begins at
noon Labor Day, Sept. 3.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is planning a bus
trip to the Hard Rock Casino in
Tampa on Wednesday, Aug. 29.
Cost is $30. We will leave the
post at 8 a.m. Call the post for
more information.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch. Wi-Fi is now
available.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their


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disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
See VETERANS/Page A25


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A24

Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first


Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be
Sept. 15.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for from all
wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information


about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for infor-
mation.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-


HEALTH SERVICES, PA
Dr. Claudia L. Chavez, OD
Optometric Physician Pediatric & Adult Eye Care
Lane Shaw
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3451 E. Louise Lane, Suite #124
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tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available


ii


for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 is on West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal
River and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-


Event for military women

Special to the Chronicle Crystal River Woman's Clubhouse, 320 N.
Citrus Ave, Crystal River
Crystal River Woman's Club's Apprecia- Those who have never received an invita-
tion Luncheon for Military Women will take tion in the past may call Leslie Martineau
place at noon Monday, Nov 12, at the at 352-746-2396 to be added to the list


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Experience the passion of Greece with
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Tuesday
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Reservations Recommended
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Crystal River (East of Rock Crusher
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A25

ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
See. Page A26


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A26 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012

VETERANS
Continued from Page A25

www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.


U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills


Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular


meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on


Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet
new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-
447-3495 for information about
the post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
See Page A27


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You will receive free services that include:
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A27





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Nahmiases

Janet and Jack Nahmias
of Inverness celebrated
their 60th wedding anniver-
sary Aug. 2, 2012.
They were married Aug.
2,1952, at St Mary's Roman
Catholic Church in New | \
Haven, Conn.
They have a son, Gary,
who lives in Garland, Texas,
and one grandson, who lives
in Detroit, Mich. t
The couple are retired
and have been residents of *
Inverness for 22 years.


For the RECORD


Divorces 7/30/12 to 8/5/12
John P. Bianco, Inverness vs.
Darlene N. Bianco, Inverness
Toni M. Cassell, Bartow vs.
Steven E. Cassell, Floral City
Brian R. Lazio, Hernando vs.
Terrina B. Lazio, Brooksville
Ronnie Michael Pope, Lake
Panasofkee vs. Cecilia Eliza-
beth Pope, Inverness
Anthony M. Possidente, Ho-
mosassa vs. Yvonne N. Possi-
dente, Spring Hill
Kevin Ryan, Inverness vs.
Angela Ryan, Webster
Daniel Womack, St. Peters-
burg vs. Salina Womack, Inver-
ness
Marriages 7/30/12 to 8/5/12
Lamar Sylvester Barnes,
Lecanto/Carol Louise Louis-
saint, Lecanto
James William Bishop III, In-
verness/Brandi Michae Alexan-
der, Hot Springs National Park,
Ark.
Howard Larry Enstrom, In-
verness/Margaret Ann Shaffer,
Citrus Springs
Jeffrey Michael Fitzpatrick,


Beverly Hills/Beth Cecelia Whe-
lan, Beverly Hills
Matthew Wallace Hand,
Crystal River/Amy Marie Mottl,
Citrus Springs
Edward Michael Kreiden-
weis, Inverness/Adriana Elaine
Griffin, Inverness
Ray Donald Lockley, Crystal
River/Corene Tara Wynne,
Crystal River
Frederick Samuel Lyles, Ho-
mosassa/Estella Jessie Ma-
goon, Homosassa
Joshua Franklin Nixon, Crys-
tal River/Tara Fay Smith, Crys-
tal River
Christopher Michael Ramos,
Silver Springs/Samantha Dawn
Powers, Silver Springs
Timothy Michael Roller, Ho-
mosassa/Dawn Ann Ristau,
Homosassa
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400.


Jim and Helen Gilbert of
Floral City celebrated
their 65th wedding an-
niversary Aug. 11, 2012.
Jim Gilbert and Helen
Crippen were married
Aug. 11, 1947, at St. Luke's
Lutheran Church in
Rochester, N.Y They have
two children, Jim Jr of Flo-
ral City and Linda of
Rochester, and two grand-
children and one great-


grandchild.
Helen is a retired school
bus driver in New York
and Florida, and Jim is a
retired operating engineer.
The couple have lived in
Citrus County for 33 years.


Engagement

Brooks/Grehl

Amanda Brooks of Bev-
erly Hills and Russell
Grehl of Homosassa have
announced their engage-
ment and upcoming
nuptials.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Peter Weissgarber,
and TracyAlwill and Scott
MacGregor. Her fiance is
the son of Robin Lee
Knapp of Chicago, Ill.
The couple will ex-
change wedding vows at 2
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29,
2012, in Beverly Hills.


Harvey and Astrid Dunn
celebrated their golden
wedding anniversary Aug.
11, 2012.
Harvey Dunn and Astrid
Kuettner exchanged vows
Aug. 11, 1962, in a U.S.
Navy chapel in Pearl Har-
bor, Hawaii. Harvey and
Astrid had met about two
years earlier on a blind
date in Daytona Beach,
while he was attending the
local community college in
the town where she had
grown up.
As the Vietnam War
began to heat up, he an-
swered the call and joined
the Navy Eventually, he
was stationed at the com-
munications station in
Pearl Harbor. Astrid flew
to Hawaii to marry Harvey


where they resided for a
few years.
Harvey never had to go
over to Vietnam and they
eventually made their way
back to Florida. They had
five children, moved to the
old historic family home in
Floral City and found ways
to serve God and their
community.
Astrid was a housewife
and in later years worked in
the church bookstore. The
Rev Harvey Dunn retired as
associate pastor of the In-
verness Church of God.
The couple celebrated
50 years of marriage with
family and friends at a pri-
vate dinner party. The
childhood friend of
Astrid's who introduced
the couple on that blind
date was there, as was the
wedding photographer
who became their friend in
Hawaii.


C CITRUS COU NTY'S -






af a/ed, .i..
cy *,


I -'c


For Keeps
By Tresa Erickson

When a bride and groom exchange vows, they hope it is forever, but no one knows for sure. While some couples
remain together "until death do [them] part," others split up within days after. The reasons behind the success
of one marr ,.. ..... of another are not always clear, but here are some quotes on the matter.
"I used to believe that marriage would diminish me, reduce my options. That you had to be someone less to
live with someone else when, of course, you have to be someone more."
actress Candice Bergen, married to Louis Malle from 1980 until his death in 1995 and to Marshall Rose
since 2000
"People shop for a bathing suit with more care than they do a husband or wife. The rules are the same. Look
for something you'll feel comfortable wearing.Allow for room to grow."
humorist Erma Bombeck, married to Bill Bombeck from 1949 until her death in 1996
"My wife tells me that if I ever decide to leave, she is coming with me."
singer Jon Bon Jovi, married to Dorothea Hurley since 1989
"The heart of marriage is memories; and if the two of you happen to have the same ones and can savor your
reruns, then your marriage is a gift from the gods."
comedian Bill Cosby, married to Camille Hanks since 1964
"Don't marry the person you think you can live with; marry only the individual you think you can't live
without."
evangelical Christian author James Dobson, married to Shirley Dobson since 1960
"A happy marriage is the union of two good forgivers."
writer Ruth Bell Graham, married to Billy Graham from 1943 until her death in 2007
"Every good relationship, especially marriage, is based on respect. If it's not based on respect, nothing that
appears to be good will last very long."
singer-songwriter Amy Grant, married to Vince Gill since 2000
"What a happy and holy fashion it is that those who love one another should rest on the same pillow."
writer Nathaniel Hawthorne, married to Sophia Peabody from 1842 until his death in 1864
"I think what makes our marriage work amid all the glare is that my husband is my best friend. He inspires
everything in my life and enables me to do the best that I can. I want to hang out with him more than
anyone."
singer Faith Hill, married to Tim McGraw since 1996
"I have a terrific marriage, but unlike a lot of relationships where they ebb and flow, no matter what happens
you fall deeper and deeper in love every day. It's kind of the best thing that can happen to you. It's thrilling."
actor Hugh Jackman, married to Deborra-Lee Furness since 1996
"One of the good things that come of a true marriage is, that there is one face on which changes come
without your seeing them; or rather there is one face which you can still see the same, through all the
shadows which years have gathered upon it."
writer George MacDonald,married to Louisa Powell from 1851 until her death in 1902
"I'm most proud of the longevity of my marriage, my kids, and my grandchildren. If you don't have that,
you really don't have very much."
actor Bob Newhart, married to Ginnie Quinn since 1963
"My husband is a homebody and has nothing to do with the celebrity world.
We've been married 44 years and have worked so well together because we're
not in the same business."
singer-songwriter Dolly Parton, married to Carl Dean since 1966
"I love being married. It's so great to find that one special person you want to
annoy for the rest of your life."
comedienne Rita Rudner, married to Martin Bergman since 1988
"Chains do not hold a marriage together. It is threads, hundreds of tiny threads
which sew people together through the years."
actress Simone Signoret, married to Yves Montand from 1951 until her
death in 1985
"And in a marriage you can't TRY and be married. You're married or you're not
married...as far as I'm concerned."
singer-songwriter Ringo Starr, married to Barbara Bach since 1981
"I suppose it's about keeping love alive, learning how to fall in love over and
over again,not taking each other for granted, forgiveness, trust."
actor Patrick Swayze, married to Lisa Niemi from 1975 until his death in
2009
"I once read that in any good marriage, one partner is the gardener and the
other is the garden. We take it in turns to be either."
actress Meryl Streep, married to Don Gummer since 1978
"Love seems the swiftest but it is the slowest of all growth. .. ...
woman really knows what perfect love is until they have I..... i. .li .
quarter of a century.:'
author Mark Twain, married to Olivia Langdon from 1" -I, .,, I ..
death in 1904
"The secret of a happy marriage remains a secret."
comedian Henny Youngman, married to Sadie Cohen from
1928 until her death in 1987
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A28 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


TOGETHER





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wrapping up our summer, gearing up for fall


As summer prepares to
give way to the cool
crispness of fall, many
of us find ourselves tying up
loose ends and clearing the
slate for a new list of events.
There's a new "VA Blue
Button" system of
accessing your
medical informa-
tion including
blood tests, lab re-
ports and appoint-
ment schedules
(past, present and
future) as they ap-
pear on record
with the Veteran's
Administration. Barbara
This system is also VETEI
known as "My- VIE
HealtheVet." De-
tails are available
at your local VA Clinic. Reg-
istering for this online access
is as easy as filling in some
information at www.my-
health.va.gov, then making a
personal appearance at your
local VA Clinic to verify your
registration. From that point
on, you'll be able to access
your information, download


it to your own computer,
compact disc or thumb drive,
plus print it, 24 hours a day,
seven days a week.
Earlier this summer, the
Associated Press (AP) re-
ported on the White House
Administration's
,- announcement
regarding a re-
S design of the
S' transition pro-
gram for military
veterans nearing
their separation
date. The up-
dated program,
formerly known
Corcoran as the Transition
RANS' Assistance Pro-
WVS gram, is titled
"Transition GPS,"
and claims to in-
clude more one-on-one
counseling, with a separate
focus for those wanting to
further their education or
begin a new business. It also
features five- to seven-day
classes versus the current
three-day sessions. Manda-
tory requirements are also
being increased.


Citrus County veterans
have an exciting and varied
lineup building on the fall
schedule. Registration is in
progress for booths at the Cit-
rus County Veterans' Coali-
tion (CCVC) monthly yard
sale that resumes on Satur-
day, Sept. 8, at the Our Lady
of Fatima Church on U.S. 41
South in Inverness. Single
booth spaces are $10, early
access is allowed to pre-reg-
istered sellers and the gates
open to the public from 6
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Registration
and details may be obtained
by calling Dan Corcoran at
352-400-8952. This event is
scheduled to be held on the
second Saturday of every
month from September
through May
Also on Sept 8, the CVCC
will be present at the fifth an-
nual Veterans' Picnic at 9631
East Jacaranda Loop in In-
verness. This event, hosted
by Donn Blake and Bobalou,
honors Citrus County's dis-
abled veterans, and is open
to veterans and their fami-
lies. There will be free food


and beer, karaoke and live
entertainment beginning at
noon. The Young Marines
will make a special appear-
ance. Donations will help the
CVCC feed local veterans in
need. Call 352-726-2455.
The coalition's general
membership meetings will
begin again on the fourth
Thursday of the month at 10
a.m., beginning Sept. 21 at
the Disabled American Vet-
erans (DAV) Headquarters,
1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness.
The CVCC is organizing a
quarterly Family Fun Day,
proposed to commence in
November. Check www.cvcc
fl.org for updates.
Veterans and civilians are
invited to attend a horseshoe
tournament for all skill levels
on Dec. 1. The Beverly Hills
Horseshoe Club is co-hosting
this event, featuring plenty of
hot dogs, hamburgers and
cold drinks. Donations will
help local veterans in need.
Call Skipper Dickman at 352-
344-0461 or Ron Fair at 352-
746-3924.


The CVCC's Food Bank is
currently assisting an aver-
age of 30 veteran households
per month. We now have dry
dog food and dry cat food for
our veterans' four-pawed
family members in need. The
Food Bank is at the DAV
headquarters, operating on
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537 with inquiries.
The coalition helps local
veterans, but we're not doing
it alone. Dunkin' Donuts has
provided coffee and donuts
to serve at the local veterans'
clinic. Other projects were
made possible with the help
of the folks at Mike Scott
Plumbing, Hise Roofing,
Tinsley Electric, Mitch Dun-
can & Son Plumbing and
more.

Barbara L. Corcoran is the
public information officer of
the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She
maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl. org


I


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A29


VETERANS
Continued from Page A26

at the DAV Building, Inde-
pendence Highway and U.S.
41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber
American Legion Post 225
meets at 7 p.m. third Thurs-
day at the new post home,
6535 S. Withlapopka Drive,
Floral City.
All eligible veterans
welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for
information and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at
Denny's in Crystal River at
2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Mer-
chant Marine Veterans of
World War II meetings for
2012 will be at 11:30 a.m. at
Kally K's restaurant in
Spring Hill on the following
dates: Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov.
10 and Dec. 8.


CITRUS COUNTY'S


.. .. .( .. .. 6( 0
S( Va / We



ad


Timeless pieces to celebrate
your everlasting love.


Jim Green Jewelers
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1665 SE Hwy. 19 *'Next to Sweetbay
352-563-0633
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L-__ CNIATONJIr _CIE M.. _N-

BA NI QiETI


AVAILABLE FOR: '
Wedding Receptions Anniversaries
SProms Social Events Seminars, Etc.
Full Service Available
(Sit Down or Buffet)
Seating for 300 Guests
4705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
1 Mile W. of491 orHwy.44 I
See web site for Details
wwwstmichaelgoc .org
SE-mail: banauets@stmichaelgoc.org

352-746-1177


(Q Paper Roje,
'"byj iliOe sko k"

Over 60 Colors Available
Sizes vary frpm 10 12" across
j/ cat for/all occasieons!r

alLTodaCLyFor A Q 6 352-601-6749


I


I


iI


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunday PUZZLER


Puzzle answer is on Page A36.


8-12 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ACROSS
1 Celestial body
6 Chair
10 Jessica Parker
15 Hoisting device
20 Sakes -!
21 Couple
22 Throw
23 Fastened a
certain way
24 Bishop's hat
25 Summit
26 "Sesame Street" star
27 Holy Roman -
28 "The Raven" poet
29 Too hasty
31 Jai -
33 Leisurely
35 English school
36 Plantation
37 Feeling frightened
39 Cash dispenser
41 Open to all
44 Daring
45 Oven shelf
48 Earthy pigment
53 Chinese or
Japanese
54 Withered


55 Jubilant
57 Daniel the pioneer
58 Highlander
59 Let it stand!
60 Daddy
61 Salver
63 Death notice,
for short
64 Before
65 Heavenly
instrument
66 --del Sol
68 Bamboozle
70 Work in verse
71 Extinct bird
72 Last course
74 Pull
76 Many times
79 Charred
81 Dull
83 Change over time
87 Sierra -
88 Love god
89 Help in crime
91 Walter-- Disney
92 Stylish
94 Boor
96 Young horse
97 Staggers


Greek letters
One with a mentor
Limerick
Cloth for dusting
Service org.
Hawke or Frome
Chick
Everyone's uncle
Elliptical fish
Form of wrestling
Islet
Gardening item
Cube


121 Lukewarm
123 White-sale items
125 Bearded animal
126 Hidden store
127 Greek island
128 "Star -"
129 Make indistinct
130 Trip
131 --de-sac
133 Long pastry
136 Loathsome
137 Thick slice
141 Antitoxins
144 Injure
145 Sloping way
146 Vestment
149 Touch lovingly
151 Savory jelly
153 Duck
155 Wheel spokes
157 James Cameron film of
2009
158 Reeked
159 A Great Lake
160 Silly
161 Tower of-
162 Little finger
163 Harangue
164 Stopwatch


DOWN
1 Bivouac
2 Hodgepodge
3 Little bit
4 Holiday time
5 Area of land
6 Cramp
7 Apiece
8 Goal
9 Molasses,
British style
10 Cut the wool from
11 Nest on a height
12 Sprinted
13 Rara--
14 Shoe part
15 Rotating part
16 Mellow
17 Dismounted
18 Notorious ruler
19 Paradise
23 Mr. Gingrich
30 Curved path
32 Boy
34 City in California
36 Level


I CARPTj TILE,,,OODIoVI.YLLDAMI.NiTEI


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9-1on
-.r


COLORCENER


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CCC#28371
SERVINGITRJSl OUTYSINCE1


Kind
Kind of cleaning
Unruly crowd
Tempo
Employer
Hepatic secretion
Leave-a-message sound
Sternward
Mongrels
Bill and -
Vagrant
Town in
Oklahoma
Plexus
Flashing light
Chinese idol
Chose
Down in the dumps
Pillar
Time past
Truthfulness
Condemn
Accuse formally
in court
Vacillated
Dim-witted
Sag
Kind of tennis
Folklore creature
Hoary
- -de-lance
Digit
Web address
- canto
Palter
Kilmer the actor
Curved letter
Office worker
Vegetables
Complete
Trick
Sink deliberately
Out of world


Mineral
Mil. gp. on campus
Mimic
Stare
Love god
Male hog
III
Yearn
Sports event
Popular song
Be in the red
Unit of time
Native of
Copenhagen
Calendar abbr.
Get with effort (with
"out")
Sparkle
Guilty one
Gin mill
Carrey or
Morrison
Defunct alliance
Opening
Fortuitous
Manservant
Strikebreaker
Molten rock
Graceful horse
- noire
File
Wine city in Italy
Drizzle
Genesis name
Cord
Coffin stand
- soda
Skillet
Time
Black cuckoo


HEALTH


SCREENING


Friday, August 24

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Anne Marie Newcomer, OD
Please RSVP 352.628.3029
Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446
In association with:
CATARACT &
/.ek LASER INSTITUTE
L10 01 "Excellence...with love"
StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


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A30 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


MFS


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CARPET &*T
-.- BH.. B mi. . ........^






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A31




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATCH SHOWS

NOT COMMERCIALS
WITH THE HOPPER WHOLE-HOME HD DVR SYSTEM
Monthly DVR fee and receiver fees apply.
































S 11928 N Williams St., Hwy. 41,
Sls&S B Downtown Dunnellon, in the Triangle Building d
S Antenna Satellite 489-5676
Sales & Service .Since 1973 WWW.alstvdish.com IJ i
PrimeTime Anytime feature is only available with ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC in HD. AutoHop feature is only available with playback of select HD primetime shows on ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC AUTHORIZED RETAILER
as part of PrimeTime Anytime feature.
Both features must be enabled by customer and are subject.to availablhty
Digital Home Advantage plan requires 24-month agreement and credit qualifl cation Cancellation fee of $17 50/month remaining applies if service is terminated before end of agreement With qualifying packages, Online Bonus credit requiresAutoPay with Paperless Billing, e-mail opt-in for DISH E-Newsletter and online
redemption at wwwmydish com/getonlinebonus no later than 45 days from service activation After applicable promotional penod, then-current pnce will apply $10/mo HD add-on fee waived for life of current account, requires continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing 3-month premium movie offer value is up to
$132, after 3 months then-current price applies unless you downgrade Free Standard Professional Installation only All equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply Upfrontfee, monthly fees, and limits on number and type of receivers will apply PrimeTime Anytime
feature not available in all markets Number of recording hours will vary 2000 hours based on SD programming Equipmen comparison based on equipment currently available from major TV providers as of 8/01/12 HD programming requires HD television All prices, packages, programming, features, functonality and offers
subject to change without notice Offer available for new and qualifi ed former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer agreements Additional restrictions may apply Offer ends 1/31/13 HBO, Cinemax and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Offi
ce, Inc SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc, a CBS Company STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC
1l,





ce, Ine SHOWNTIVE is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Ine ,a CBS Company STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Stamt Entertainment, LLC


Blueberry Hill Farm is a family run equestrian facility.
L.,'d1Li, IU r, ss S h. I s tr.lf). o )i,, Ti' MNIL P IL ,ILin \ (tL t .i 'L Ic, ,'i itIS ).1 'I
3,000 i) r.s il t r, 11, n Iki.., iiis, Ifl I Ifl. L'DLipMf. tLILiIUll ,S.


Bluiicirri Hill Firm ,ttcr, GUIDED TRAIL RIDES Dc, FI, [rl i..,',
N ..I.tC C', .. n. 1 ,'cn.r I- ., ik r ni.. ic n ..i ii.l,.l ri.iil i.l lt u rI,.1 c k
\\'irlil.., icl, Sr..irc F, ic,[r .in.id C pl .Iic FIc 'i E l .i,,i i lu I' c..i,.,\
r Bl. iclcrr\ Hill F..m i 'ttci\, tCiill I," '..,ii.hin,', ri..inin,', I ." 'l. & n c 'i 'mc
1ir .ii d r..ikc .. ,ti i r t 4 lic him ..nI.l prc\ic\ rli c l .i-1 'c l c l..i\ i, lin,' iin. \\ii ir. l
C ,im rplct iUi. m p C 'Iiic, .I I. .lu I pen, 3 ',..,.ll', I..iii _c ,cl ..1..s\ [11. '.1[ U i, .in.l.. I, I IIIC
K Id, ..l ini .., lrI.h, \\,ill c ,I I\ .pcnII.in .' rIn. c ..ir Bli.icI'cii\ HIIl F..in \ i i ^iIic 4r
rlc\ ..IIC rlC c.n i. l .. I,.-II I, rlcI I l l. I_1.1 \- c I,1.,npc r r .I c l \ I I, lCI I,


Tanmmy Woodburn the owner, Com e and visit us at
..f .., , ... , o..,1- r ,, ,,, .., ,, h I .., ,l
S. .. Blueberry Hill Farm!
S .. .. _.. ,.. I... I ... . ,
i, .'. I'""' ''. .'.....'' 1'"' "'" 7088 N. Lecanto High\way, Hernando, FL 34442
I"'.-' 1. ,1 . h i .. i . . . I, . I .. I .r .... ,. i[ , i[, I l I IIII H 11 1 I, F L h id n n i :.." i iil 1,, , h (. i [ i 1 I',f, 1 ,I
Il ,r r r.. d ., I.., r, l. I .. , ,... 11 1 1 .......I
.I. II,,,, ,,.i, I ,,, i Contact us at (352) 489-2383
i,. .., ... or visit our website at: http://xv.\\v.flhorsebackriding.com
,. ,.... ....., e-mail at: tammvn\\oodburgr@gmail.com


A32 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ConquistadorsPG Conquisadors PG American Masters (In elen of Troy The truth about Helen of Troy. (In As Time As Time
Stereo) 'PG'm Stereo) 'PG E Goes By


S1W CMFT) PBS 5 5 5 41 Dyer Dr. Fuhrman- Immuni ty Use Your Brain to Change Your Age 'EdSullan's Top Performers 1966-1969
El U NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly XXX Summer Olympics XXX Summer Olympics Cbsing Ceremony. From London.(N Animal News Summer
8 8 News London Gold. Same-day Tape) (In Stereo) N Practice Oly.
0 M ABC 20 20 20 News wd .. .'. '. Extreme Makeover:t Weiht Loss Edition A 45- News Sports
0 C 0N, 1 ..... year-old mom tries to get healthy. 'PG' Ngh
_ (i) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 2012 PGA hapinship 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Big Brother (N) (In Criminal Minds True The Mentalst 'Pretty 10 News Paid
flW S10 Final Round(N) a Stereo) B Genius"'14' Red Balloon 'l 4' 11pm(N J Program
SFFOX 13 13 13 13 OX136:00News(N) Amercan Cleveland The Cleveland ..... .. ....... FOX1310:00News (N) News The Cbser
S FOX13 13 13 13 (InStereo) a Dad 14 Show Simpsons Show .1 i (In Stereo) N
S WCJB ABC 11 -11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: Welqh Loss Edition News Brothers
S F ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
W I 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Kolenda Duphnts Dayna Awaken
11 News World ... ..... ... ... Extreme Makeover: Weiht Loss Edition A 45- News Grey's
ED WETSABC 11 11 11 News H ... ,- i: ,..... year-old mom triestoge healthy.'PG Anatomy
c (F iiiii IND 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Ban g B ang i 1... i.. _aw & Order I ... i .......
B WMOR IND 12 12 14 '14' Theory Theory -.i., i:' 'Competence"'PG'[ ,.i,., ,, ..i .,,, f.
EB WMTi MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "Fat Albert" (2004) KenanThompson. Seinfek Seinreld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born Ride Paid
E (WA TBN 21 21 ___In Touch Reioce in the Lord Variety Variety Journey CrefloD. Connec JimRale yna Kingdom
CW 4 4 4 12 12 Kingof TilDeath Twoand Twoand Criminal Minds "The 1.d ,I .i .. 1i Mr" Atomic No. The Unit "Endgame" (In
E CW 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Hal Men Fox" PG'E ,1. I. :, iStereo) 14'
M WYEaFAM 16 16 16 15 CastaBig Rotary Sunfbwer Inverness Your Citrus County Court Music Mix MusicMix The Cisco Black
Do C Club Spotlight USA USA KidlG' Beauty
120 (WOOI FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang BigBan Amercan Cleveland Simpsons Cleveland IFam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Law & Order PG'
( WV UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coned. Noticiero La Familia P Luche Peuehos Gi antesPG' (SS) Sal y Pmienta14' Coined. |Noticiero
(WDPB ION 17 Leverage LGeverageePG'r | "Twofornthe'Money"(2005)APacino.'R' LeveragePG'm Leve'agePG'
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5 5 27 n,,,, i the Light"'14 &Demand"'14' Summe"14'[l N ,,,.1,.,,n, 11.
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E P 352 35 52 19 217 C rs n, Cal of all hN 11 . the On1 e t he Calo Cao O the Of the
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EWN 9 7 9 B :. Cros"s:,, ,,NPi a o:- av Sunday Best Jason Sunday Best'PG'o et'ssStay Let'sStiay
C L 96 19 96 ,,., i .. i,:,,,, :.....1.. ...i... i. Nelson performs. Together Together
AV 254 51 254 |Housewives/NJ Housewves/HNJ Housewives / NJ New Jersey Social Housewes/NJ Housewives/NJ
(^ .- o-* l'',',: v. r ,., u ,,,: L '.'. : ",'" Tosh.0 Tosh.O'MA'.Tosh.O Tosh.O The Comedy Central Roast Comedy
S27 61 27 33 ,, ,, .0 0 0 Rosenne" (N)'MA' Roast
7 he Redneck Island (In Redneck Isnd(In My Bg Redneck My Big Redneck Redneck
I 23 457 28 42 5 Hn ;1 H Stereo)s'PG'Ntl o Stereo) lm Vacation l Vacation' l Vacation
SPaid Insanity Dbetes Wal St Lives Ripping Mind ofGoogle PAmer. Greed Crime Inc. Vt
S 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN newsroom (N) CNN Presents PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'P
S 46 40 46 6 5 Austin Ihake t hake IShake It Good Shae 1 se Code 9 My Austin AN.T.
E 3 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at New York Mets. Live SportsCenter (N)
[ESPN 34 28 34 43 49 Little League ATPTenne Workld/Poker World/Poker MLSSoccer
EWT 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing Sunday Night Prime Catholic. |Savoring IG.K. M Rosary Catholic Compass God Bookmark
29 52 29 20 28 ,i ., : ,,, ,., , I ,1 i :,, ,, ,,M,, I .1 I e
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S 23 57 23 4252 Hunters HuntaIntl Hunters HuntlIntl Property Brothers'G' Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection |Holmes Inspecton
Ci 51 25 51 32 42 Cajun Cajun Pawn Stas Pawn Stars Ice Road Truckers A ce Road Truckers (N) Picked Off Firemen to '.-
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TC-IFM 24 38 24 31 ', ,, ,-1 ,-, Itka, ,: LadB (I S .,t ;
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S 109 65 109 44 53 Lockdown Newbies" Lockdown Lfe in a i .. ITaboo'Prison Love"'14'Taboo 'PrBon Love"'14
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Woman not wrong to speak


up about suspected abuse


Dear Annie: Last
month, I took my
grandkids to a water
park. While I was watching
the crowds, I no-
ticed a man with
a boy who
looked to be
around 12 years
old crouched be- ft
hind a picnic
table. They
looked as if they
were waiting for
someone to
come by so they
could jump up
and startle the ANIN
person.
What I found MAIL
odd was that the
man kept pulling the boy
into his lap, putting his
arms all the way around
the boy's waist
The boy tried to pull
away, but the man kept
pulling him back. Then, the
man leaned forward and
gently kissed the boy on the
back. The boy bolted. A lit-
tle later, I saw the man, the
boy and a woman in a pool
where the boy was floating
on an inner tube, and the
man had his hand on the
boy's behind.
At one point, I saw the
woman by herself and
asked whether she and the
man were married.
She told me they had
been married for eight
years, so I don't know
whether the man was the
boy's father or not. I told
her I had misinterpreted
something I saw, but since
she was married to the
man, I was probably mis-
taken. I felt like a fool.
If she had been dating
this guy, I would have told
her the whole story Should
I have approached her or
just minded my own busi-
ness? Plainview, Texas
Dear Texas: Married or
not doesn't matter. But it
is not a simple thing to in-
terpret such actions. The
man may have molested
the boy previously, which
would explain the child's
reaction. But it is also pos-


That buzzing is time flying, old man


People naturally worry
about their memory
as they get older "Oh,
I can't remember where I
put my reading glasses. It
must be the beginning of the
end." Really? Follow a
teenager around someday
and watch how much they
forget.
"My math final is today,
and I forgot to
study for it!"
"I kissed Billy
I forgot I was dat-
ing Bobby!"
"I forgot I was-
n't supposed to
take Dad's car
without permis-
sion."
"No, I don't re-
member you ever J
saying that I MUL
couldn't get a tat-
too until I was
40."
In healthy people, much
of what is remembered is a
choice. We remember the
things that are important to
us, while unconsciously de-
ciding that other things are
not worth it. That's why for-
geting birthdays and an-
niversaries is considered so
unforgivable. The injured
party senses that the special
date wasn't important
enough to be remembered.
"I don't remember the
doctor saying I shouldn't eat
so much salt and should cut
down on calories." Why
would you bother to remem-
ber something like that?
"I don't remember you
telling me your mother was
coming to visit. For three
weeks."
"I shot a par. My partner
says I got a six. He must


have a lousy memory"
These kinds of things can
be explained as lapses, lies,
denials or delusions. How-
ever, there is one kind of
memory distortion that is
not so easy to explain.
Just last week, I was
telling one of my many riv-
eting and entertaining sto-
ries to some friends at
dinner. I picked
something I knew
they had never
heard before, be-
cause I don't want
to become known
as one of those
boring old men
who tell the same
stories over and
over again. Even
the best story can
LEN stand only so
many telling.
So I was telling one of my
many riveting and enter-
taining stories to some
friends at dinner.
I picked something I
knew they had never heard
before, because I never
want to become known as
one of those boring old men
who tell the same stories
over and over again. At the
end, Bob woke up and said,
"How long ago did that hap-
pen?"
I said, "Oh, eight or 10
years ago."
Sue said, "It was 25 years
ago." It seems she had
heard the story before (and,
of course, she was in it).
Could it have been that
long ago? Well, let's see,
when was Jimmy Carter
president? Ten, 15 years
ago? Thirty? Really?
Someone mentioned a


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone num-
ber, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
563-5660 and ask for Cheri Harris.
NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
Call Editor Charlie Brennan at 563-3225.


popular film. When did that
come out?
I remembered seeing it
with Sue in a movie theater
and the snacks we ate while
watching it. I remembered
the theater wasn't very
crowded. I remembered it
was cold that day
"When did that come
out?" Mary asked.
"Five, six years ago," I
said.
"1996," said Sue. Well, I
was close.
I asked my friend John,
who just turned 62, if he had
experienced this odd mem-
ory quirk.
"All the time," he said. "I
used to be able to tell you
what year something hap-
pened. One day that
stopped. I could still tell you
in which decade something
happened, but not the year
"When did this Beatles
record come out? I could
tell you it was in the '60s.
Disco? The '70s. 'The Mary
Tyler Moore Show'? Fax
machines at home? Some-
where in there.
My first home computer?
My first Starbucks coffee?


I throw up my hands.
Sometime in the past 30
years.
"The division of time in
my head is not years, but
eras. That happened in
grade school. That hap-
pened in high school. That
happened in college, that
happened at this job, that
happened when I worked
for so-and-so.
"In my head, I'm not 62.
I'm 35. If something hap-
pened 40 years ago, subcon-
sciously I must think I'm not
old enough for that to have
happened 40 years ago. So I
say five years ago. Or 10."
"I've just noticed it hap-
pening to me this year," I
said.
"The rest of us have been
noticing you doing it for 10
years," John said.
"Twenty-five," said Sue.


Jim Mullen's newest book,
"How to Lose Money in
Your Spare Time -At
Home," is available a t
amazon.com. You can
follow him on Pinterest at
pinterestcom/jimmullen.


sible that the man was sim-
ply trying to show affection
to his stepson, and the boy
was resisting, as many 12-


HIE'S
LBOX


year-olds would.
You were not
wrong to speak
up, and we
would have sug-
gested telling
the mother
more specifi-
cally of your
concerns so she
could be aware
of the situation.
If she is upset
with you, it is a
small price to
pay for poten-
tially protecting


this boy
Dear Annie: My mother
lets the dog lick from our
plates and pans.
She has no problem with
this, but it disgusts me. I re-
alize everything gets
washed in hot water after-
ward, but still, I don't want
to eat off a plate that the
dog ate off of. Thoughts? -
Chicago
Dear Chicago: Believe it
or not, if the plates are
washed in soap and hot
water after the dog licks
them, they are clean
enough to be used.
Even though it is suffi-
ciently sanitary, you obvi-
ously object to the idea of
it, so we suggest you scrub
each plate to your satisfac-
tion before eating off of it.
Dear Annie: "Disgusted
in Louisiana" disagreed
when you said couples
should flirt with each other.
My precious husband and I
hit a "stale season" in our
marriage in our late 40s. It
could have ended badly,
but we each had an affair
- with each other


My mother lets

the dog lick

from our plates

and pans. She

has no problem

with this, but it

disgusts me. I

realize

everything gets

washed in hot

water

afterward, but

still, I don't

want to eat off

a plate that the

dog ate off of.
We enjoyed renewing
our love, and the romance
and excitement made our
everyday marriage special
again.
Of course, my hair-
dresser had to tell some of
her clients the truth when
they started spreading ru-
mors about my "affair," and
my aunt called to scold me,
asking how I could do this
to such a wonderful man.
But it was great fun for
us. We are celebrating our
55th year of "happily ever
after" this month. Still
Happily Married


Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254


For


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

DISTRICT 4
Political advertisement paid for and approved by
c0m00i Bill Murray, School Board, District 4.

0812 SCRN
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
HVAC Improvements City Hall
Design/Build
Bid # 12-B-10
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for HVAC
Improvements City Hall. You are hereby invited to submit a bid
on the above referenced project.
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428

Bids will be received until 10:30 AM, on September 11, 2012.
BIDS will be opened and read aloud on September 11, 2012 at
10:35 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Perform all design/build services
and furnish all necessary labor, equipment, material and
transportation for the construction of the installation of new HVAC
system for parts of City Hall.
The work includes, but it not limited to the Design/Build
specifications listed in bid documents. Pre-Bid Meeting is
mandatory for this project

ALL BIDDERS must possess a valid state, local or federal license
(if a license is required) to perform the work for which the BID is
submitted and must be qualified for the type of work for which the
BID is submitted. BIDDERS who do not possess the requisite
minimum qualifications for this project shall be disqualified. BIDS
must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"BID HVAC IMPROVEMENTS (CITY HALL) PROJECT
Design/Build
BID NO. 12-B-10
NAME OF THE BIDDER
BIDDER'S ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL A. HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
Once opened, all contract documents may be examined at
City Hall.
Any BIDDER that withdraws his/her/its BID prior to the time
scheduled for the opening of BIDS, shall be disqualified from re-
submitting a BID for this particular INVITATION TO BID.
Any BIDDER that withdraws his/her/its BID during the SIXTY
(60) day period following the time scheduled for the opening of
BIDS, shall be disqualified from submitting BIDS on future
Invitations to Bid posted by the City of Crystal River, Florida, for a
period of twelve (12) months.
The City of Crystal River ("OWNER") reserves the right to
reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever.
THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT
THE BIDDER THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST
RESPONDS TO ITS BUSINESS NEEDS AS OUTLINED IN
THE INVITATION TO BID.
Hard copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be
obtained at:
City of Crystal River
123 NW Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Public Works Department
352-795-6149 x 314
000CJ1


n (WED PBS1 3 3


0812/19 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a public
hearing in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting
Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, at 1:45 pm on August
28, 2012, for the purpose of hearing public comment on
the adoption of a Resolution of the Board ratifying and
confirming the assessment roll for the Citrus County Solid
Waste Municipal Service Benefit Unit for Fiscal Year 2012/
2013 and address same to the Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. Said comments must be
received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, August 27, 2012.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any
matter considered at this public hearing he will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
which record shall include the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.

WINN WEBB
CHAIRMAN
DDDCRDX


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A33


IF
Ll






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0812/19 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a public hearing in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, at 1:30 pm on August 28, 2012, for the purpose of hearing public comment on the adoption of a
Resolution of the Board adopting the method of determining the amount of the Annual Disposal Assessment for the Citrus County Solid Waste Municipal Service Benefit Unit and
determining the annual rates, fees, charges, assessments, or service charges to be imposed upon the owners of Improved Real Property and the Disposal Service Unit Rate
(commercial solid waste disposal fee) as described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof. Also to be considered is the Fee Schedule for the Citrus County Landfill for
Fiscal Year 2012/2013 as described in Exhibit "B" attached hereto and the Emergency Fee Schedule as described in Exhibit "C" attached hereto. Anyone not attending the hearing but
who wishes to make comments shall do so in writing and address same to the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. Said
comments must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, August 27, 2012.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing he will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.


WINN WEBB
CHAIRMAN


EXHIBIT "A"
EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012

RESIDENTIAL DISPOSAL ASSESSMENT


$25.00 per residential dwelling unit
(Each single-family residence, condominium unit, apartment, mobile home or mobile home
within a mobile home park shall constitute a residential dwelling unit, but shall not apply to
commercial as defined in Section 90-731, Citrus County Code.)

COMMERCIAL DISPOSAL FEE

$1.20 per cubic yard (Disposal Service Unit Rate)
(Nonresidential or commercial as defined in Sections 90-731 and 90-763, Citrus County Code.)


EXHIBIT "B"
FEE SCHEDULE
EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012

CHARGED AT LANDFILL:

TRANSACTION FEE:................................................. $ 4.00 per visit for all paid items
(Certified Haulers and Municipalities exempt)


BAGGED OR CANNED WASTE:
Residential Solid Waste/Trash





Residential Yard Waste


Up to 5 30 gallon bags or cans
Included under transaction fee
$ 1.00 additional per bag from
6 to 9 30 gallon bags or cans
10 and over will be per ton rate

Up to 8 30 gallon bags or cans
Included under transaction fee
9 and over will be per ton rate


CERTIFIED W EIG HT........................................ ....................................... $ 5.00

RESIDENTIAL SELF-HAUL BULKY WASTE:............................................ No Charge
Consists of furniture / carpet & padding / mattress & box springs

SORTE-E CLEAN RECYCLABLES:
As defined in the county's single stream recycling drop-off program........No Charge

CLEAN CONCRETE FOR RECYCLING:.......... ..........................................No Charge

ALL COMMERCIAL HAULERS AND LOADS OF LOOSE DEBRIS (NOT BAGGED
OR CANNED) WILL BE CHARGED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING RATES,
WITH WEIGHTS DETERMINED BY THE LANDFILL SCALES.

SOLID WASTE:
Uncovered or uncontained waste surcharge.......................................$10.00 per Ton
Contract haulers and residential self-haul.......................................... $30.00 per Ton
City trucks/city contract haulers........................ ........................ $45.00 per Ton*
Non-contract haulers and business self-haul......................................$60.00 per Ton
Roll-off containerized waste from unincorporated areas.....................$60.00 per Ton
Roll-off containerized waste from cities............................................... $45.00 per Ton
Mixed city/county routes..........BlendeodRate-......Per agreement with BOCC only
Out of County Waste............................................... Per agreement with BOCC only
FDEP Certified Recyclers for the disposal of......................................$30.00 per Ton
Household generated recyclable residuals

YARDWASTE:
Uncovered or uncontained waste surcharge.......................................$10.00 per Ton
Grass, leaves, trimming debris, branches, palm fronds........................$22.50 per Ton
Residential Christmas Trees........................................ No Charge (Dec. & Jan. only)
Stumps in excess of 4 feet in diameter will not be accepted
Logs in excess of 4 feet in diameter or in excess of 10 feet in length will not be accepted.

SPECIAL WASTE: (1) Asbestos (Friable), Sludge (Dried), Oil-Contaminated
Materials by staff pre-approval only
(2) Whole Boats or Trailers greater than 14' and
(3) Items requiring verified burial............................ ......... $90.00 per Ton

CITRUS COUNTY UTILITIES / MUNICIPALITIES DRIED SLUDGE:....$45.00 per Ton

SCRAP METAL:................... ............................. ... .............. No Charge

METAL APPLIANCES: Commercial Residential
Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C Units $ 7.50 Each No Charge **
Propane Tanks
Up to 30-pound capacity $ 2.50 Each No Charge **
Over 30-pound capacity $10.00 Each No Charge **
Other Metal Appliances (Stoves, Washers, etc) No Charge No Charge
* Maximum 2 per visit and 4 per year


TIRES:
Passenger Car Tires (up to 5)
Passenger car or small truck tires (over 10)
Oversize tires (any number)


Commercial Residential
$ 2.00 Each No Charge**
$ 95.00 per Ton $ 95.00 per Ton
$200.00 per Ton $200.00 per Ton
* *Maximum 5 per visit and 10 per year


WASTE RELOCATION CHARGE: (1 HOUR MIN.).......................$90.00 per Man-Hour

EUFLICATE TICKET CIIARGE 2CC


LATE CUSTOMER CHARGE........................................................... $ 1.50 per Minute
Beginning 10 Minutes after Published Closing

LEAD ACID & RECHARGABLE BATTERIES..........................................No Charge

MERCURY CONTAINING DEVICES:
Fluorescent Lamps (straight, circular, U-shaped &
compact fluorescent bulbs first 6 free residential & commercial).....$ 0.80 per Lamp
Mercury Containing Devices (first 6 free residential) Lamps (Metal. Hlide,
Mercury Vapor, High Pr ure S diu )..... .............................$2.00 per Lamp
(Theiniolu etei The.i.0uotats, Sopygiml eteis)....................................$ 2.00 Each


ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT:
Televisions and computer monitors
Computers and all other electronic items


Commercial Residential
$ 8.00 No charge**
No charge No charge
**Maximum 2 per visit and 4 per year


WASTE DELIVERED BY REGISTERED NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS WITH THRIFT SHOPS
SO LID W A STE :.................................. .................. ............................. $30.00 per Ton
BULKY WASTE: First 600 pounds per month each organization..............No Charge
All amounts thereafter................................ ............. $30.00 per Ton


ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT:
Televisions and computer monitors: First-2-4 units per month each organization..No Charge
All amounts thereafter................................ ............. 8.00 each
Computers and all other devices:............................................... ...................No Charge

METAL APPLIANCES:
Refrigerators, Freezers, AC units: First 2 units per month each organization....No Charge
All amounts thereafter.......................................................................... .......$ 7.50 each
Propane Tanks up to 30-lb capacity: First 2 units per month each organization. No Charge
All amounts thereafter......................................................................... ........$ 2.50 each
Propane Tanks over 30-lb capacity: First 2 units per month each organization..No Charge
All am ounts thereafter................................. .............. $10.00 each
Other Metal Appliances................................................... No Charge

TIRES:
Passenger car tires: First 5 per month each organization..............................No Charge
Regular charges thereafter


ANNUAL RESIDENTIAL SELF-HAUL ADVANCE DISPOSAL PAYMENT PROGRAM:
SUBJECT TO LIMITATIONS IN PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Bagged Household Garbage / Bagged Yard Waste
Eight 30 Gallon Containers per Week
(Rates for new pass holders or in-person renewals)
Purchase Date:
Oct. 1-Dec. 31 $ 96 per Vehicle
Jan. 1-Mar. 31 $ 72 per Vehicle
Apr.1-June 30 $ 48 per Vehicle
July 1-Sept. 30 $ 24 per Vehicle
(Rates for renewal by mail only)
Purchase Date:
Oct. 1- Dec. 31 $ 86 per Vehicle

Loads may be combined with "No Charge" items up to per-visit limits and still use bypass lane.
Loads that contain items for which there is a charge must use the scale lane.

MATERIALS DELIVERED BY CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY
GENERATORS
Hazardous Waste (excluding all paint related materials)..................................$1.00 per Lb
Ballasts and capacitors (with possible PCB's) ................................................. $1.00 each
Used Oil, Oil Filters and Antifreeze (10 gallon limit per disposal)........................No Charge

PAINT MATERIALS DELIVERED BY CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY
GENERATORS
Latex Paint (First 10 gallons or 60 pounds free of charge)..............................$ 0.35 per Lb
Oil Based Paint and Paint Thinners............................................... $1.00 per Lb

HAZARDOUS WASTE FROM SMALL QUANTITY (AND LARGER) GENERATORS
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

HAZARDOUS WASTE AND PAINT DELIVERED BY RESIDENT'S
Materials Delivered on Program Days and Times (First 10 gallon or 60 Ibs).......No Charge
Materials Delivered on Program Days and Times (Over 10 gallons or 60 Ibs) $ 0.35 per Lb

PAINT DELIVERED BY RESIDENTS ON NON-PROGRAM DAYS AND TIMES
(10 gallon or 60 Ib limit per disposal)................................................. No Charge

*City trucks/city contract haulers collected as follows: $30.00 per ton charged at time of disposal.
The additional $15.00 per ton charge added to the monthly invoicing based on the number of units
submitted by written reports. The industry standard for the amount of waste that is generated by a
household on an annual basis is 1 ton or 2,000 Ibs per year.
Residential: Units x 2,000 (= Ibs per unit) 12 (= Ibs per month) 2,000 (=tons per month) x $15.00 =
additional charge per month.
Commercial: Can size (=garbage collection container) x frequency of collection (per week) x 4.33 (=
weeks per month per year) x 80 (=lbs per yard) 2,000 (=tons) x $15.00

Note: Highlighted items reflect proposed changes from current fee schedule.


EXHIBIT "C"
FEE SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2012
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT EMERGENCY FEE SCHEDULE

This fee schedule may be implemented under the following conditions:
Locally declared state of emergency, or
Failure of the landfill's normal and backup power supply, scales, scalehouse building
and/or computers for scalehouse management system.

This fee schedule will be terminated and the regular fee schedule will be reinstated under
the following conditions:
Return of function for power, scales, scalehouse building and/or computers for the
scalehouse management system or
Termination of state of emergency or
Direction of BOCC.

Charge customers certified waste collectors
Front load and rear load route trucks. Weight is equal to the maximum load weight for that
collection vehicle, for the same waste type, within the past 30 days. Rate is the normal per
ton rate. If the truck has no visits during the period of record, use the most similar truck
(type, capacity) from the same collection company for the maximum load.
Rolloff truck with open-top box. Weight is equal to the density calculated for landfill CSA
waste boxes times the capacity of the open-top box. Rate is the normal per ton rate.
Compactor rolloff boxes. Weight is equal to the maximum weight for that container within
the past 30 days. Rate is normal per ton rate. If the container has no visits during the
period of record, use the most similar container from the same collection company for the
maximum load.

Receipts will be manual tickets indicating date, time, truck number and material and if
applicable, rolloff container capacity.

Charge customers all others See below.

Residential and commercial cash customers prices include transaction fee
Car or van $ 5.00
Single axle pickup truck $ 9.00
Dual axle pickup truck $18.00
Car or van with trailer $ 6.00
Pickup truck with trailer <12 feet long $18.00
Pickup truck with trailer > 12 feet long $27.00
Dual axle with trailer <12 feet long $36.00
Dual axle with trailer > 12 feet long $60.00

Dump trucks Weight is equal to the density calculated for landfill CSA waste boxes times
the capacity of the dump bed. Rate is the normal per ton rate.

Items that are normally free for residents will be charged. Material separation for disposal
location remains in effect. Receipts for all transactions (if requested) will be manual tickets
indicating date, and cash amount paid.

No vegetative debris will be accepted during the first three days following a natural
disaster.


tptjtlu~l t= I luptt= I Ul 1


A34 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


%I\ 3t ............ ................................. z .UU





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Disney's



new drive

The Path of Citrus County
collecting socks to distribute


Special to the Chronicle
Warming and comforting
the feet of families in need
is the goal of a North Amer-
ican effort the Association
of Gospel Rescue Missions
(AGRM) launched during
July in cooperation with
The Walt Disney Studios
and Hanes.
The Path of Citrus County,
an AGRM member, encour-
ages community members
to donate new socks to help
local families as part of
"The Odd Life of Timothy
Green" Sock Drive.
Inspired by "The Odd Life
of Timothy Green," a Disney
film slated for release mid-
August, the drive will be in
gear through early Septem-
ber Check with local movie
theaters for movie dates and
showtimes in Citrus County.
Designated boxes are
available now at community
drop-offlocations, including
two Walgreens in Beverly
Hills (3506 and 4020 N.
Lecanto Highway/County
Road491), two Walgreens in


Inverness (Apopka Avenue
and State Road 44), Wal-
greens in Hernando
(Norvell Bryant
Highway/County Road 486),
Bealls in Inverness (off
Croft Road), and TJ Maxx in
Inverness (after Aug.
18).The Path will distribute
the socks to the families it
serves.
"Homelessness and near-
homelessness are more and
more difficult to define with
the present economy, and
especially in an area like
ours," said DuWayne Sipper,
Path executive director.
"We want to show our
struggling neighbors in a
small, tangible way that we
are concerned about them,
and they are not invisible."
Hanes will match North
American donations up to
10,000 pairs of socks.
For more details about
the sock drive, visit
www.agrm.org/sockdrive.
For more information
about The Path and its mis-
sion, visit www.pathofcitrus.
org or call 352-527-6500.


Center collects for troops abroad,
victims of crime here at home


Special to the Chronicle
The Center for Victim
Rights and Wear to Go! con-
signment are teaming up
again to help out U.S. troops
overseas and crime victims
at home.
Needed supplies are
small-size toothpaste, sham-
poo, conditioner, soap,
toothbrushes, mouthwash,
combs, dental floss, hand-
held games, game books


(word search, sudoku, etc.
and other such items to
send to the troops overseas.
No longer needed cell
phones are still being col-
lected.
Items can be dropped off
at Wear to Go! In Times
Square Plaza, 3802 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
For more information, call
Cynthia at 352-628-6481 at
The Center for Victim
Rights.


Want to help? Come clean


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus 20/20's Save Our
Waters Week Committee, in
cooperation with the Citrus
County Aquatics Service
Division and the Ocean
Conservancy, announces
the county's 23rd annual
Adopt-A-Shore/Coastal
Clean-Up will begin at sun-
rise Saturday, Sept. 15, and
continue until 11 a.m.
Groups of two or more
are invited to join other vol-
unteers across the county
in removing debris from
shorelines, waterways and
the beaches of lakes, rivers
and oceans. People of all
ages, from any walk of life,
can participate. Friends,
families, neighbors, club
members, scouts troops,
grade school classes and so
forth are needed to work to-
gether to help clean up
Citrus County waterways.
Those living on the west
side of the county who wish


to participate may contact
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
352-201-0149 or via email to
info.citrus2020@gmail.com
- those on the east side
may contact Greg Schmukal
at 352-860-2762 or via email
to basscatchers@embarq
mail.com; or call the Citrus
County Aquatics Services
directly at 352-
527-7620.
A Program Agreement will
be mailed out, along with a
participant signup sheet.
Each group will be re-
sponsible for knowing the
accessibility of the area
being adopted, organize
and transport the group as
necessary and the general
safety of the group. Want to
join an existing group, or
don't see an area to clean
up? Interested persons will
be assisted in locating a
group or area to adopt All
groups must be registered
by Sept 10 to participate in
this year's event. More in-


Wednesday, August 22
St. Benedict's Catholic Church
455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River

A Lunch
+ at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.
Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"


All proceeds to benefit
the Pregnancy &
Family Life Center


For more information\ /, /
call us at 344-3030 I )N(,1.1
000BVYH www.chronlclmllne.co


formation and event forms
may be downloaded at
www.citrus2020.org.
Supplies for the cleanup
will be provided at the
safety meeting scheduled
for 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
12, at the Citrus County
Lecanto Government Build-
ing, room 166, 3600 W Sov-
ereign Path (off County
Road 491) in Lecanto. The
meeting will last approxi-
mately one hour and at
least one representative
from each adopting group


must attend in order to re-
ceive supplies for their
group.
This event coincides with
the Ocean Conservancy's
International Coastal
Clean-up, a worldwide ef-
fort to use the information
collected from the cleanup
to effect positive change on
all levels by reducing the
amount of marine debris,
enhancing marine conser-
vation and educating the
public on the issue of ma-
rine debris.


e Welcome


'alue


ental


You To


Care


Dentists Dr. Michael Welch, DMD; Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD; Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD and associates offer high quality dentistry in a friendly
atmosphere. From the moment you enter our office our caring staff welcomes you with a smile. Dr. Welch and associates take time in reviewing the
recommended treatment that is within your financial means and will answer any questions or concerns that you may have. Our friendly staff will
assure that your visit is as pleasant as possible. Dr. Welch and associates strive to provide quality dentistry at affordable prices. Our monthly
specials are geared to help people afford dental services, whether you have insurance or not.


Dentures
These days it is a bit overwhelming with all of the advertising for
dentures. What is the difference, basically the quality of the material used,
as well as the processing methods! We would like to share our experience
and background with our community. First of all, our technicians are
extremely experienced with over 90 years combined experience. We use
only high quality acrylic well known in the dental industry for many
years. All of our dentures are thermostatically cured for eight hours. We
offer three levels of dentures so everyone can afford to have new teeth.
* Our Economy denture consists of our stock teeth with lucitone 199 plain
pink acrylic with a smooth finish; this denture has a six month warranty.
* Our Midgrade denture consists of economy teeth, midgrade hygienic
acrylic and the finish is slightly characterized. This denture has a one year
warranty.
* Our Elite denture includes Bioform plastic teeth or portrait teeth, which
is a high grade tooth used by many of the well known doctors in our area.
The finish on the Elite denture is highly characterized and this denture
has a two year warranty.


We also can reline and repair your dentures the same day if you come
in early enough.

Crown And Bridge
Value Dental Care offers several types of crowns to suit your personal
needs. Our metal free Zirconia crowns are an especially popular choice
for a great cosmetic result; this is an all porcelain crown that looks very
natural with no worry of metal exposure. We offer several types of high
quality porcelain fused to metal crowns as well.


Our crown and bridge lab has over 30 years experience.


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.
F Crystal River
352-794-6139


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates


Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD I


I ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICANMADE! We*do not shiptoChin


wwwchronicleonline.com
















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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 A35





A36 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


Aug. 13 to 17MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS

Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, grits,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk vari-
ety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, turkey super salad with rip-
stick, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, sweet peas, chilled
pears, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with
ripstick, hot ham and cheese on
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled
mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, macaroni and
cheese, yogurt parfait plate,


garden salad, green beans,
chilled peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, tasty turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, dried fruit mix, fruit
juice, milk variety.


Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, cheesy
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled mixed
fruit, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, macaroni and cheese,
ham super salad with ripstick,


yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
pears, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Barbecued
chicken sandwich, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles,
dried fruit mix, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey super
salad with ripstick, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, sausage pizza, PB dip-
per, fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, chilled peaches, fruit
juice, milk variety.


High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,


cereal and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, fresh
broccoli, potato potato roasters,
dried fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken,
maxstix, turkey with gravy over
noodles and ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas,
celery, peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Cheesy
chicken and rice burrito,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
chilled baked beans, potato tri-
angles, mixed fruit, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
ham super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans, po-
tato triangles, applesauce, cu-
cumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, spaghetti with rip-
stick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, cold


corn salad, potato triangles,
corn, peaches, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbecued
chicken, Lyonnaise potatoes,
California-blend vegetables,
sugar cookie, whole-grain
wheat bun with margarine, low-
fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean beef
chili, parslied rice, carrot coins,
peaches, wheat crackers with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sausage and
bean casserole, buttered
spinach, yellow corn, citrus fruit,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Sliced meatloaf,
tomato gravy, mashed pota-
toes, green peas, graham
crackers, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef's salad (ham,
cheese, whole boiled egg,
tomato), French dressing, car-
rot-raisin salad, mixed fruit,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Market to

showcase

Model A's

Special to the Chronicle

The Aug. 17 Beverly
Hills Arts Crafts and Farm-
ers Market will be en-
hanced by a display of two
Model A Fords from the
early 1900s. The market
runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in
Lake Beverly Park, 77
Civic Circle, the first and
third Fridays of each
month.
Civic Association Office
Manager Bonnie Larson
said the most recent mar-
ket on Aug. 3 had good
crowds at the flea market
tables in a shady area of
the park. Recent markets
have showcased arts,
crafts and produce of be-
tween 45 and 55 vendors.
Vendors should register for
$10 booth spaces in ad-
vance by calling Larsen at
352-746-2657 from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Monday through
Friday The market bene-
fits the Beverly Hills Civic
Association and Central
Ridge Community Center


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A30.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Campaign" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13) 1:10
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Dairy of a Wimpy Kid: Dog
Days" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Total Recall" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Campaign" (R) 2 p.m.,


4:35 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Hope Springs" (PG-13)
1:55 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Total Recall" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Dairy of a Wimpy Kid: Dog
Days" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) 4:55 p.m.
"The Watch" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) In 3D. 4:10 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Never played at The Plantation on Crystal River
or maybe it's been a while?

You're Invited to be a

Member for a Day.
Play at Plantation on Sat. Aug. 25" for only a member cart fee.
9:30 AM Shotgun start. After the round enjoy free draft beer and
receive a voucher to come back and be a member for another day.
Don't miss this opportunity to play one c i i1. 'finest courses in
Citrus Countyfor only the price of a member cart fee.
Field is limited so call 795-7211 to reserve your spot and
take advantage of this exclusive special offer today!
9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River --
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com pLA AN TION
352-795-7211 1 onC River


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SPORTS


The Tampa Bay
Rays try to keep
pace in the playoff
race Saturday night
in Minnesota./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2
'-~ U Sports briefs/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 NFL/B4
0 Auto racing/B4
0 Olympics/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Local rider best in region at show


Huntington had

great showing at

state level as well
J.M. SORACCHI
Staff Writer
Hannah Huntington had quite the
summer vacation.
Huntington, a 17-year-old Beverly
Hills resident, took first place in Eq-
uitation Over Fences this past week-
end at the 2012 Southern Regional
4-H Horse Championships in Perry,
Ga. The Lecanto High School stu-
dent also came in fifth in Hunter
Over Fences and Dressage as well.
Her performance comes after plac-
ing first in two events (Hunter Over


Fences, Equitation on the Flat) in the
senior division of the Florida 4-H
State Horse Show on July 12 through
14 in Tampa. She also finished sec-
ond in Equitation Over Fences.
She was also the High Point
Hunter at the state show.
"It's nice for the hard work to pay
off, because there's so many factors
that go into it," Huntington said. "You
have to be having a good day, the
horse has to be having a good day
"Because it's a subjective sport, the
judge has to like what you're doing."
The main difference between
Hunter and Equitation events is the
horse is judged in the former while
the rider is judged in the latter.
The equestrian events Huntington
competes in have much more in
common with gymnastics or figure
skating than any team sport, where
an otherwise perfect run can be un-


dermined by the smallest of errors.
Huntington had such an example
from the regional meet. Heading
into the final portion of the Equi-
tation on the Flat in first place,
Huntington fell out of placing after
an admittedly less-than-perfect
performance near the end.
"If you make one little mistake, it
can all be over," Huntington said.
Adding to her first place at the re-
gional level, the rider also grabbed
fifth-place finishes in Hunter Over
Fences and Dressage, which is the
See Page B4
Beverly Hills resident Hannah Hunting-
ton recently took first place in Equi-
tation Over Fences this past weekend
at the 2012 Southern Regional 4-H
Horse Championships in Perry, Ga.
Special to the Chronicle


2012 London SUMMER OLYMPICS





High five for US


Women 's

basketball grabs

5th straight gold

Associated Press
LONDON The names
change, not the results. Just
call the U.S. women's basket-
ball team Olympic champion.
The Americans won their
fifth straight gold medal Sat-
urday, routing France 86-50 l-
and putting more distance be-
tween themselves and the rest
of the world heading to Rio for
the 2016 Games.
Candace Parker scored 21
points, including eight straight
during the game-changing run
in the second quarter as the
U.S. won its 41st straight "
Olympic game since taking'
bronze medal in 1992. ,
In that stretch, the Ameri-
cans have won by nearly 30 '
points a game. Only one team .
has stayed within single digits
of them, and they've lost just
once in major international
competitions, to Russia in the
semifinals of the 2006 world
championship.
Teresa Edwards, Dawn Sta-
ley, Sheryl Swoopes and Lisa
Leslie got the amazing run
started and now Diana
Taurasi, Sue Bird and Tamika
See Page B3


Associated Press
United States forward Candace Parker shoots past France's Endene Miyem during the women's
gold medal basketball game Saturday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


McIlroy,

Singh hold

slippery lead

Third round of

PGA Champ.

rained out

Associated Press
KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. -
First came the black cloud that
has been following Tiger
Woods on the weekend at the
majors. The real storm showed
up a short time later Saturday
in the PGA Championship,
halting the brilliant start by
Rory McIlroy and giving Woods
a chance to
stop his slide at
Kiawah Island.
McIlroy
opened with
three birdies
and two par
saves, none
bigger than on
the third hole Rory
when his tee IVMcllroy
shot lodged in
a thick tree k''a-,
limb that was
rotting about 7
feet off the
ground. He
reached up to
remove the
ball, took a Vijay Singh
penalty drop
and made a 6-foot par putt to
continue on his way
It all looked so easy for McIl-
roy, who was at 6-under par
through nine holes and tied for
the lead with Vijay Singh when
the third round was suspended.
"Just great position going
into tomorrow, and that's all I
can really ask for, so happy
with where I am," McIlroy said.
For Woods, it was a grind on
another windswept day at
Kiawah Island.
He failed to birdie the par-5
second hole, and then badly
missed a 4-foot birdie putt on
the next hole. He hit a specta-
tor with a fairway metal off the
tee at the fourth, pulled a shot
into the mounds short of the
par-5 fifth hole and made yet
another bogey on the par-5 sev-
enth with two poor shots to the
right, a wedge over the green
into a waste area and another
See Page B4


-r-----------------------*-


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11


00


2012
MORE INSIDE
* U.S women's. 4x400-
meter relay team fulfills
golden destiny.
* Boudia claims gold in
10-meter platform diving.
See Page B5


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B2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012



AL

Rays 4, Twins 2
Tampa Bay Minnesota
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DJnngslf 4 1 1 0 Reverecf 4 0 0 0
BUpton cf 4 2 2 3 JCarrll 3b 4 0 0 0
Joyce rf 4 1 1 1 Mauerdh 4 0 0 0
Longoridh 4 0 0 0 Wlngh If 4 1 1 0
Zobr.ss-2b 4 0 3 0 Mornealb 4 0 2 0
C.Pena b 3 0 0 0 Mstrnn rf 3 0 2 1
Kppngr3b 4 0 1 0 Dozierss 3 1 1 1
EJhnsn ss 0 0 0 0 Butera c 2 01 0
Rorts2b-3b 4 0 2 0 Doumitph-c 1 00 0
JMolin c 4 0 1 0 ACasill2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 35 4114 Totals 32 2 7 2
Tampa Bay 300 010 000 4
Minnesota 010 010 000 2
DP-Tampa Bay 2, Minnesota 2. LOB-Tampa
Bay 5, Minnesota 3. 2B-Zobrist (26). HR-
B.Upton 2 (12), Joyce (14), Dozier (6). SB-
De.Jennings (20), Zobrist (13).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
PriceW,15-4 7 7 2 2 0 5
Jo.Peralta H,27 1 0 0 0 0 1
RodneyS,35-36 1 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
BlackburnL,4-8 6 11 4 4 1 2
AI.Burnett 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
TRobertson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Fien 1 0 0 0 0 2
Burton 1 0 0 0 0 1

Yankees 5, Blue Jays 2
New York Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeter dh 5 0 2 1 RDavis If 4 2 2 0
Swisherrf 4 0 0 0 Gosecf 4 0 0 0
Teixeirlb 3 1 1 0 Encrncdh 3 0 2 2
Cano2b 4 0 0 0 YEscorss 1 0 0 0
AnJonslf 3 1 0 0 Vizquelph-3b1 0 0 0
ISuzukilf 0 00 0 Cooperlb 4 00 0
Grndrscf 3 0 0 0Sierrarf 4 0 0 0
J.Nixss 4 1 1 1 KJhnsn2b 4 0 1 0
McGeh 3b 4 2 2 3 YGomsc 3 00 0
CStwrt c 4 0 1 0 Hchvrr 3b-ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 34 57 5 Totals 31 2 5 2
NewYork 000 401 000 5
Toronto 000 100 010 2
DP-New York 1. LOB-New York 8, Toronto
5. 2B-Jeter (22), McGehee (2), C.Stewart
(7), R.Davis (16). HR-McGehee (1). SB-
R.Davis (32).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
NovaW,11-6 71-35 2 2 1 10
D.RobertsonH,15 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano S,28-30 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
Laffey L,3-3 52-37 5 5 4 2
Loup 11-30 0 0 0 1
Jenkins 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lyon 1 0 0 0 1 2

Indians 5, Red Sox 2
Boston Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsurycf 4 1 2 0 Donald2b 4 01 0
Crwfrdlf 3 1 0 0 Hannhn3b 0 0 0 0
Pedroia2b 4 0 1 0 AsCarrss 3 1 0 0
AdGnzllb 4 01 2 Choo rf 2 00 0
C.Rossrf 3 00 0 CSantndh 3 1 1 0
Sltlmchc 3 0 0 0 Brantlycf 2 1 0 1
Lvrnwy dh 3 0 0 0 Duncan If 3 0 0 0
Avilesss 3 0 0 0 Carrerlf 1 0 1 1
Ciriaco 3b 2 0 0 0 Lillirdg 3b-2b 4 2 3 2
Pdsdnkph 1 0 0 0 Ktchmlb 3 0 0 0
Valenci 3b 0 0 0 0 Marson c 2 00 1
Totals 30 24 2 Totals 275 6 5
Boston 000 200 000 2
Cleveland 001 011 11x 5
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston 2, Cleveland 5.
2B-Ellsbury 2 (12), Ad.Gonzalez (35), C.San-
tana (21), Lillibridge (3). HR-Lillibridge (1).
SB-As.Cabrera (6), Choo (13), Carrera (2).
S-C.Crawford, Marson. SF-Brantley.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
FMorales L,3-3 51-32 3 3 4 6
A.Miller 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Melancon 11-32 1 1 0 0
Breslow 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Mortensen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
McAllisterW,5-4 8 3 2 2 0 4
C.PerezS,31-35 1 1 0 0 0 0

A's 9, White Sox 7


Oakland Chicago
ab r h bi
Crisp cf 6 3 3 0 De Aza cf
JGomsdh 5 1 2 2 Youkils3b
Reddckrf 6 1 1 1 A.Dunnlb
Cespds If 4 2 1 0 Riosrf
Carterlb 5 1 3 2 Przynsdh
Inge3b 3 1 1 1 AIRmrzss
DNorrs c 3 0 1 2 Viciedo If
Rosales ss 3 0 1 1 Flowrs c
Pnngtn ss 2 0 1 0 Bckhm 2b
JWeeks 2b 4 0 0 0
Totals 41 9149 Totals
Oakland 005 100 021
Chicago 020 121 100


ab r h bi
4100
4222
4000


4 1 1 0
4 1 11
3133
3000

36710 7
9
7


E-Flowers (1). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Oak-
land 12, Chicago 7. 2B-Crisp 2 (13), Carter
(5), D.Norris (5), Pennington (14), AI.Ramirez
(16), Viciedo (11), Flowers (5). HR-J.Gomes
(13), Youkilis (14), Flowers (3). SB-D.Norris
(4), J.Weeks (15).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Blackley 5 6 5 5 1 6
Norberto BS,2-3 11-32 2 2 1 3
R.CookW,5-2 11-32 0 0 0 1
BlevinsH,8 1-30 0 0 0 0
BalfourS,8-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Liriano 31-37 6 6 3 5
Humber 3 0 0 0 3 5
Crain 2-3 1 0 0 0 2
Thornton L,4-8 2-3 3 2 2 0 0
Myers 11-33 1 1 0 0

MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
Trout LAA 90 365 88 126 .345
MiCabreraDet 113 449 75 145 .323
AJacksonDet 91 357 72 114 .319
MauerMin 104 385 64 122 .317
KonerkoCWS 101 377 49 119 .316
Ortiz Bos 89 320 65 101 .316
JeterNYY 111 476 64 150 .315
CanoNYY 113 445 72 140 .315
RiosCWS 109 421 68 132 .314
Fielder Det 113 415 63 130 .313
Home Runs
ADunn, Chicago, 31; Hamilton, Texas, 31;
Granderson, NewYork, 30; MiCabrera, Detroit,
29; Encarnacion, Toronto, 29; Trumbo, Los An-
geles, 29; Willingham, Minnesota, 29.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 96; Hamilton, Texas, 96;
Fielder, Detroit, 84;Willingham, Minnesota, 84; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 77; AdGonzalez, Boston, 76;
Pujols, Los Angeles, 76; Tebieira, NewYork, 76.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
McCutchenPit 109 408 78 148 .363
MeCabreraSF 110 446 81 155 .348
VottoCin 86 298 52 102 .342
RuizPhi 95 313 47 105 .335
Posey SF 103 370 49 122 .330
DWrightNYM 110 408 68 132 .324
HollidayStL 111 423 73 135 .319
CGonzalezCol 102 405 73 129 .319
YMolina StL 100 372 45 117 .315
BraunMil 105 404 73 123 .304


Home Runs


Braun, Milwaukee, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 28;
Kubel, Arizona, 25; LaRoche, Washington, 23;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 23; Holliday St. Louis,
22; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 21; Bruce, Cincinnati,
21; Hart, Milwaukee, 21; Stanton, Miami, 21.
Runs Batted In
Beltran, St. Louis, 82; Holliday, St. Louis, 79;
Kubel, Arizona, 77; Braun, Milwaukee, 76;
Posey, San Francisco, 75; FFreeman, Atlanta,
74; CGonzalez, Colorado, 74; LaRoche, Wash-
ington, 74; DWright, New York, 74.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 67
Baltimore 61
Tampa Bay 61
Boston 56
Toronto 53


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
46.593 7-3
52.540 6 7-3
52.540 6 8-2
59 .487 12 6 3-7
60 .469 14 8 2-8


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43 .619 - 9-1
47.584 4 7-3
60 .474 161/29/2 4-6
62 .456 18/2 11/2 4-6
62 .451 19 12 5-5


Str Home Away
W-4 34-22 33-24 Chicago
W-1 29-27 32-25 Detroit
W-5 32-27 29-25 Cleveland
L-1 29-34 27-25 Minnesota
L-5 28-25 25-35 Kan. City


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
51 .545- 6-4
52.540 '2 7-3
61 .465 9 8/2 3-7
64 .434 12/212 5-5
64 .429 13 12Y2 6-4


Home Away
31-26 30-25
33-23 28-29
30-28 23-33
23-34 26-30
21-32 27-32


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-732-22 38-21
W-332-26 34-21
L-2 27-30 27-30
W-1 28-28 24-34
L-1 25-33 26-29


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
46 .596- 5-5
50 .558 4/2 4-6
52 .544 6 1'2 6-4
61 .455 16 11/2 5-5
68 .393 23 18/2 1-9
77.330 30'2 26 3-7


Str HomeAway
W-2 36-20 32-26
L-3 35-20 28-30
W-1 34-23 28-29
L-2 33-26 18-35
L-2 28-26 16-42
W-2 27-31 11-46


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
46.586 6-4
52.540 5 5-5
53 .531 6 1 4-6
63 .447 15/210/2 4-6



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
52 .544 - 6-4
53 .535 1 2/2 5-5
56 .504 4/2 6 5-5
64 .443 11/213 7-3
70 .369 19/221 4-6


HomeAway
34-22 31-24
34-26 27-26
31-22 29-31
25-29 26-34


Home Away
33-24 29-28
33-25 28-28
30-25 27-31
27-30 24-34
21-37 20-33


Associated I-ress
Tampa Bay Rays hitter Matt Joyce, left, congratulates B.J. Upton, center, as Upton and Desmond Jennings, right, score
on Upton's two-run home run off Minnesota Twins pitcher Nick Blackburn in the first inning Saturday in Minneapolis.



Five in a row for Rays

ive in a row for Rays


Upton's HRs help


TB to 4-2 victory

Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS B.J. Upton hit
two home runs, Matt Joyce also
homered, and David Price earned
his 15th victory as the Tampa Bay
Rays stretched their winning streak
to five by beating the Minnesota
Twins 4-2 on Saturday night
Ben Zobrist went 3-for-4 for the
Rays, who have won 10 of 13 and kept
pace in the AL East and AL wild card
races. Tampa Bay is on its longest
winning streak since a six-game run
from April 29-May 4.
Price (15-4) held the Twins to two
runs and seven hits in seven innings.
He has worked at least seven innings
in 10 consecutive starts.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Yankees 5, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO Ivan Nova snapped a
five-start winless streak, Casey McGehee
hit a three-run home run and the New
York Yankees won their fourth straight
game, beating the Toronto Blue Jays 5-2.
Derek Jeter had two hits, boosting his
AL-leading total to 150 and joining Hank
Aaron as the only players to record 17
straight seasons with at least 150 hits.
Rajai Davis had two hits and scored
twice but it wasn't enough as slumping
Toronto suffered its fifth consecutive de-
feat and its 11th loss in 13 games.
Indians 5, Red Sox 2
CLEVELAND Brent Lillibridge
homered, drove in two runs and scored
on a squeeze bunt to back Zack McAllis-
ter's strong pitching as the Cleveland In-
dians beat the Boston Red Sox 5-2.
Lillibridge, acquired on July 24 from
Boston, tied a career high with three hits.
He hit his first homer in nearly a year and
had an RBI single off Franklin Morales
(3-2).
McAllister (5-4) allowed three hits, in-
cluding a two-run double by Adrian Gon-
zalez, in a career-high eight innings.
Chris Perez pitched the ninth for his
31st save in 35 chances for Cleveland,
3-1 since an 11-game losing streak.
Athletics 9, White Sox 7
CHICAGO Jonny Gomes homered
to tie the game, and Brandon Inge hit a
go-ahead single as the Oakland Athletics
scored twice in the eighth inning and beat
the Chicago White Sox 9-7.
Oakland had a five-run third and led
5-2, but the White Sox rallied and took a
7-6 lead in the seventh on A.J. Pierzyn-
ski's RBI single off Ryan Cook (5-2).
After Gomes homered off Matt Thorn-
ton (4-8), Yoenis Cespedes and Chris
Carter singled before Inge greeted Brett
Myers with the go-ahead single into the
right field corner. Gomes added an RBI
single in the ninth to put the A's up two.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 9, Mets 3
NEW YORK- Freddie Freeman had
five RBIs in the first two innings and the
Atlanta Braves battered Johan Santana
in his return from the disabled list, routing
the sluggish New York Mets 9-3.
Michael Bourn had three hits, Chipper
Jones chased Santana with an RBI single
in a seven-run second inning and Atlanta
sent the two-time Cy Young Award winner
to the worst start of his career.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 2
Cleveland 5, Boston 2
Oakland 9, Chicago White Sox 7
Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 2
Kansas City at Baltimore, late, rain
Detroit at Texas, late
Seattle at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's Games
Boston (Lester 5-10) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
N.YYankees (PHughes 11-9) atToronto (Happ 0-1), 1:07p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 8-9) at Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 4-7),
1:35 p.m.
Oakland (B.Colon 9-8) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 13-3),
2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 10-7) at Minnesota (Diamond 10-5),
2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 9-6) at Texas (Darvish 11-8), 3:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 12-8) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 15-1), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Texas at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 2
San Francisco 9, Colorado 3
Houston 6, Milwaukee 5, 10 innings
San Diego 5, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1
Atlanta 9, N.Y Mets 3
Miami 7, L.A. Dodgers 3
Washington at Arizona, late
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 10-8) at Miami (LeBlanc 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Ohlendorf 4-2) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 6-12),
1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 13-5) at Philadelphia (Worley 6-7), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 10-8) at Houston (Lyles 2-8), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 14-6) at Chicago Cubs (Raley 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
Colorado (White 2-6) at San Francisco (Zito 9-8), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 6-4) atArizona (Corbin 3-4), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Sheets 4-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 8-6), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B3.


Kris Medlen (3-1) pitched effectively
into the seventh inning, striking out seven
while improving to 2-0 since joining the
rotation. A solid reliever most of the sea-
son, he has permitted one run in each of
his three starts.
Santana (6-8) got only four outs. He
was charged with eight hits seven sin-
gles and a season-high eight runs in
his first outing since July 20.
Marlins 7, Dodgers 3
MIAMI Carlos Lee hit one of the
Marlins' season-high five doubles and
drove in two runs, leading Miami to a 7-3
win over the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Ricky Nolasco (9-11) allowed two runs
and nine hits in five innings for Miami.
Matt Kemp had three hits, stole two
bases, and drove in a run for the Dodgers.
Shane Victorino bounced into a
fielder's choice to drive in the Dodgers'
first run and Andre Ethier's RBI single
gave Los Angeles a 2-0 lead.
Dodgers starter Joe Blanton (8-10) al-
lowed just one hit through four innings
before running into trouble in the fifth.
Reds 4, Cubs 2
CHICAGO Ryan Ludwick hit a two-
run double in the eighth and the Cincin-
nati Reds rallied to a 4-2 win over the
Chicago Cubs.
After Drew Stubbs doubled and Brandon
Phillips singled off Cubs reliever James
Russell (5-1), Ludwick looped a pitch down
the left-field line and into the corner.
The comeback made a winner of Bron-
son Arroyo (8-7), who held the Cubs to
two runs and five hits over eight innings.


Arroyo gave up both runs early, but set-
tled down to improve to 5-0 in his last
seven starts at Wrigley Field.
Reds closer Aroldis Chapman contin-
ued his recent dominance by setting
down three straight in the ninth and con-
verting his 27th save, including his last 19
straight. Since Chapman last blew a save
on June 24, he's thrown 20 2-3 scoreless
innings and struck out 44.
David DeJesus had a two-run single
for Chicago.

Giants 9, Rockies 3
SAN FRANCISCO Buster Posey hit
a home run and drove in two runs to back
Matt Cain's seven solid innings and the
San Francisco Giants beat the Colorado
Rockies 9-3.
Cain (11-5) gave up two runs on seven
hits in 7 1-3 innings, and added an RBI sin-
gle, to win for the first time since July 15.
He walked one and struck out six. Angel
Pagan hit a two-run triple, and Marco Scu-
taro, Hunter Pence and Joaquin Arias also
drove in runs for the Giants.
D.J. LeMahieu hit his first major league
home run or the Rockies.
Drew Pomeranz (1-7) gave up four runs
on five hits over four innings to remain win-
less (0-4) over his last six starts. He struck
out three and did not walk a batter.

Cardinals 4, Phillies 1
PHILADELPHIA- Matt Holliday hit a
three-run homer and Jake Westbrook
won his fifth straight start to lead the St.
Louis Cardinals to a 4-1 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Cliff Lee (2-7) retired 12 straight batters
before the Cardinals tagged him for con-
secutive hits to open the sixth inning. Hol-
liday followed with a shot to right for his
22nd homer of the season.
Lee has allowed eight homers over his
last three home starts and 19 overall on
the season. Lee gave up 18 homers in
232 2-3 innings last season.
The World Series champion Cardinals
are in the thick of the wild-card hunt and
Westbrook gave them a needed 7 2-3
strong innings. Westbrook (12-8) allowed
four hits, walked two and struck out three.

Padres 5, Pirates 0
PITTSBURGH Jason Marquis took a
no-hitter into the seventh inning Saturday
night before settling for a two-hitter as the
San Diego Padres beat the Pirates 5-0 for
their 11th straight win in Pittsburgh.
Travis Snider broke up the bid with an
infield single off the pitcher's mound lead-
ing off the seventh inning. Second base-
man Alexi Amarista dived to his right but
the ball glanced off his glove.
Released earlier this season by Min-
nesota, Marquis struck out four and
walked one in his first shutout since April
29, 2011, for Washington against San
Francisco, and fifth of his career. Pedro
Alvarez was the only other Pittsburgh
player to reach base. He walked in the
second and singled in the eighth.
Houston 6, Milwaukee 5,10 inns.
HOUSTON Scott Moore hit an RBI
single with none out in the bottom of the
10th inning, lifting the Houston Astros to a
6-5 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers.
Jose Altuve led off the 10th with an in-
field single off Jim Henderson (0-1). Mar-
win Gonzalez and Steve Pearce followed
with walks to load the bases before Moore
singled, giving Houston consecutive wins
for the first time since June 26-27.
The Astros won in their final at-bat for
the second straight game.


NL

Reds 4, Cubs 2


Cincinnati
ab r h bi


5 0 1 0
5 1 1 0
5010
5110
5230
4012
4 0 1 2
0000
3 0 2 1
4 1 1 0
3021
4110
401 1
4020
2000
1 0 0 0


Cozart ss
Stubbs cf
BPhllps 2b
Ludwck If
Chpmn p
Frazier lb
Heisey rf
Valdez 3b
Hanign c
Arroyo p
Paul ph-lf


Chicago

DeJess cf
Barney 2b
Rizzo lb
ASorin If
SCastro ss
Valuen 3b
Vitters ph
LaHair rf
Mather rf
Clevngr c
TWood p
Russell p
AICarr p


ab r h bi


Totals 37 4124 Totals 32 2 5 2
Cincinnati 000 100 030 4
Chicago 020 000 000 2
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Cincinnati 9, Chicago 4.
2B-Stubbs (13), B.Phillips (22), Ludwick (22),
Heisey (14), Valbuena (11). SB-Heisey (5).
S-Arroyo.
IP H RERBBSO


Cincinnati
Arroyo W,8-7
Chapman S,27-31
Chicago
TWood
Russell L,5-1
AI.Cabrera


8 5 2 2 1 4
1 0 0 0 0 2

7 5 1 1 1 8
1 5 3 3 0 0
1 2 0 0 0 0
852214
100002

751118
153300
120000


Giants 9, Rockies 3
Colorado San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EYongcf 5 0 2 0 Pagancf 5 1 1 2
Rutledgss 4 0 1 1 Scutaro3b 3 1 1 1
CGnzlzlf 4 0 0 0 MeCarrlf 5 1 1 0
RHrndzc 4 0 1 0 Poseyc 4 1 2 2
Pachec3b 3 0 1 0 Pence rf 4 1 1 1
Colvinlb-rf 4 1 1 0 Pilllb 4 1 2 0
McBridrf 2 00 0 Romop 0 00 0
Roenckp 0 00 0 Penny p 0 00 0
JHerrrph 1 0 0 0 Theriot2b 4 1 2 0
Ekstrm p 0 0 0 0 Arias ss 3 2 2 1
Brothrsp 0 00 0 M.Cainp 2 01 1
WRosrph 1 00 0 Mijaresp 0 00 0
LeMahi2b 4 2 2 1 Beltlb 0 00 0
DPmrnp 1 000
Nelson 3b 2 0 1 1
Totals 35 39 3 Totals 34913 8
Colorado 000 001 011 3
San Francisco 022 013 01x 9
E-Arias (7). DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Colorado
7, San Francisco 7. 2B-Pence (19). 3B-
Pagan (7), Arias (4). HR-LeMahieu (1), Posey
(19). CS-Pacheco (1). S-M.Cain. SF-Arias.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
D.PomeranzL,1-7 4 6 4 4 0 3
Roenicke 2 5 4 4 2 0
Ekstrom 1 1 0 0 0 0
Brothers 1 1 1 1 2 2
San Francisco
M.CainW,11-5 71-37 2 2 1 6
Mijares 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Romo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Penny 1 2 1 0 0 0

Cardinals 4, Phillies 1
St. Louis Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jay cf 4 1 1 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0
Craigib 5 2 3 0 DBrwnrf 31 0
Hollidy If 5 1 3 3 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0
Mottep 0 0 0 0Howardlb 4 01 1
Beltranrf 4 0 1 1 L.NixIf 4 0 0 0
Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 Schrhltcf 4 00 0
YMolinc 3 0 2 0 Frndsn3b 3 0 1 0
Furcalss 3 00 0 Kratzc 3 00 0
RJcksn 2b 3 0 0 0 CI.Lee p 2 0 0 0
Descals 2b 1 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0
Westrkp 3 0 0 0 Valdesp 0 0 0 0
Rzpczyp 0 00 0 Pierreph 1 00 0
MCrpntph 1 O0 0 Schwmp 000 0
SRonsn If 0 000
Totals 36 4104 Totals 31 1 4 1
St. Louis 000 003 010 4
Philadelphia 100 000 000 1
E-R.Jackson (1). DP-St. Louis 1, Philadel-
phia 1. LOB-St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 5.2B-
Craig 2 (24), Y.Molina (22), Frandsen (1).
HR-Holliday (22).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WestbrookW,12-8 72-34 1 1 2 3
RzepczynskiH,14 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MotteS,26-30 1 0 0 0 0 2
Philadelphia
CI.LeeL,2-7 7 10 4 4 0 6
Rosenberg 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Valdes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Schwimer 1 0 0 0 0 3

Braves 9, Mets 3


Atlanta
ab r h bi
Bourncf 5 2 3 1
RJhnsnlf 5 1 2 0
Heywrdrf 5 1 2 1
C.Jones 3b 5 1 1 1
FFrmnlb 4 1 2 5
McCnnc 5 00 0
Uggla2b 3 1 1 0
Janishss 4 1 1 0
Medlenp 2 1 1 1
Avilanp 1 00 0
Gearrinp 0 00 0





Totals 39 9139
Atlanta 270
NewYork 010


New York

Tejada ss
DnMrp 2b
DWrght 3b
I.Davis lb
Hairstn If-rf
Baxter rf
Bay ph-lf
AnTrrs cf
Thole c
JSantn p
Hefner p
JuTrnrph
Acosta p
Rauch p
RCeden ph
Frncsc p
Totals
000 000
000 020


ab r h bi


DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Atlanta 6, New York 5.
2B-Re.Johnson (10), FFreeman (27), Tejada
(17). 3B-An.Torres (5). HR-FFreeman (14).
S-Medlen.
IP H RERBBSO


Atlanta
Medlen W,3-1
Avilan
Gearrin
NewYork
J.Santana L,6-8
Hefner
Acosta
Rauch
FFrancisco


61-35 1 1 1 7
11-31 2 2 1 2
11-32 0 0 0 2


Padres 5, Pirates 0
San Diego Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Amarst2b 5 01 0 SMartelf 400 0
EvCarrss 4 1 1 0 Sniderrf 3 0 1 0
Headly3b 4 1 1 3 GSnchzlb 1 0 0 0
Quentinrf 5 0 1 0 AMcCtcf 3 0 0 0
Denorfirf 0 0 0 0 GJoneslb-rf 3 0 0 0
Alonsolb 4 0 1 0 Walker2b 3 0 0 0
Venalelf 4 2 1 PAIvrz3b 2 01 0
Maybincf 4 01 1 JHrrsnss 200 0
JoBakrc 4 0 0 0 JHughsp 0 0 0 0
Marqusp 4 1 2 0 McKnrph-c 1 00 0
Barajsc 3 0 0 0
Grillip 0 00 0
AJBrntp 1 00 0
Mercerss 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 5105 Totals 28 0 2 0
San Diego 101 102 000 5
Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0
E-G.Jones (6), Walker (5). DP-San Diego 1.
LOB-San Diego 9, Pittsburgh 2.3B-Ev.Cabr-
era (2). HR-Headley (18), Venable (7). SB-
Venable (15).
IP H RERBBSO


San Diego
Marquis W,6-6
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett L,14-4
J.Hughes
Grilli


9 2 0 0 1 4
920014

52-39 5 4 210
21-31 0 0 0 2
100001


BASEBALL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


thIe record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S CASH 3 (early)
5-9-6
CASH 3 (late)
3-0-0

PLAY 4 (early)
7-6-7-0
PLAY 4 (late)
1-2-0-2

FANTASY 5
Flrka Lottey 17-18-27 -31-34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
4-13-39-46-51 5-13-32-45-47-48
POWER BALL XTRA
1 5


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup Series at The Glen race
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Dodgers at Miami Marlins
2 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Minnesota Twins
2 p.m. (TBS) Oakland Athletics at Chicago White Sox
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Braves at New York Mets
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Mid-Atlantic Regional final: Teams TBA
FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (FSNFL) NFL Preseason: Tampa Bay Buccaneers
at Miami Dolphins (Taped)
GOLF
11 a.m. (TNT) 2012 PGA Championship Final Round
2 p.m. (CBS) 2012 PGA Championship Final Round
2012 LONDON SUMMER OLYMPICS
6 a.m. (NBC) Track and field: men's marathon
6 a.m. (NBCSPT) Basketball: men's bronze medal;
volleyball; water polo; handball; modern pentathlon
7 a.m. (MSNBC) Cycling: men's mountain bike final; wrestling
8:30 a.m. (CNBC) Boxing: finals
10 a.m. (NBC) Basketball: men's final; volleyball; water
polo; wrestling; rhythmic gymnastics
7 p.m. (NBC) London Gold (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (NBC) Closing Ceremony (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
11 p.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Galaxy at Chivas USA
TENNIS
1:30 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA U.S. Open Series: Rogers Cup
semifinal
7 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: Rogers Cup final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Marlins 7, Dodgers 3


Los Angeles
ab
Victorn If 4
M.Ellis 2b 4
Kemp cf 5
Ethier rf 5
HRmrzss 4
Loneylb 4
HrstnJr3b 3
L.Cruz 3b 1
A.Ellis c 4
Blanton p 1
Uribe ph 1
Guerra p 0
JRiver ph 1
League p 0
ShTllsn p 0
Totals 37
Los Angeles
Miami


Miami
r h bi
1 1 1 GHrndzcf
0 0 0 Ruggin If
1 3 1 Reyes ss
0 2 1 Ca.Leelb
0 1 0 Stanton rf
0 1 0 DSolan 2b
0 1 0 NGreen 3b
0 0 0 J.Buckc
1 1 0 Nolasco p
0 1 0 Kearnsph
00 0 Zamrn p
00 0 MDunnp
0 0 0 Petersn ph
0 0 0 H.Bellp
00 0 Cishekp
3113 Totals
000 110 001
000 040 03x


E-A.Ellis (6), N.Green 2 (2). DP-


ab rh bi
3 1 11
4 0 1 1

4 0 1 0
4 1 2 1
4 1 1 1
4011
3110
4112
4010
4121

41 11

0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3121
1000




-Los Ange-
1110
0000
0000
1000
0000
0000
32711 7
-3
-7
-Los Ange-


les 1, Miami 2. LOB-Los Angeles 10, Miami 3.
2B-Victorino (20), A.Ellis (12), Ca.Lee (20),
Stanton (22), D.Solano (6), N.Green (3), J.Buck
(14). SB-Kemp 2 (6). CS-Ruggiano (6). S-
Blanton, G.Hernandez.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Blanton L,8-10 5 6 4 4 0 3
Guerra 2 2 0 0 0 2
League 2-3 3 3 3 1 1
Sh.Tolleson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Miami
NolascoW,9-11 5 9 2 2 1 1
Zambrano H,2 11-31 0 0 0 1
M.DunnH,13 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
H.BellH,7 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cishek 1 1 1 1 0 1
Astros 6, Brewers 5,
10 innings
Milwaukee Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 5 0 2 2 Greene ss 5 2 2 1
CGomz cf 4 00 0 Altuve2b 5 33 0
Morgancf 1 00 0 Wallac 3b 3 1 1 0
Braun If 5 0 1 0 MGnzlz pr-3b 0 0 0
ArRmr3b 5 1 2 0 Pearcerf 4 0 3 3
Hartlb 5 1 0 0 SMoorelb 5 0 1 1
RWeks2b 4 1 1 0 Bogsvc cf 4 00 0
Lucroy c 3 1 2 1 FMrtnzIf 3 0 1 0
Segura ss 4 1 2 1 Storeyp 0 00 0
Estradp 1 00 0 Maxwllph 1 00 0
Ransmph 1 00 0 WLopezp 0 00 0
LHrndzp 0 00 0 Corprnc 4 00 0
MParrp 0 00 0 Keuchlp 2 00 0
Ishikawph 1 01 0 Fickp 0 00 0
Loep 0 00 0 Wrghtp 0 00 0
Verasp 0 0 0 0 BFrncslf 2 0 1 0
Mldndph 1 0 00
Hndrsnp 0 000
Totals 40 5114 Totals 38612 5
Milwaukee 020 020 001 0 5
Houston 202 010 000 1 6
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Aoki (2), Wallace (2). DP-Houston 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 6, Houston 8.2B-Aoki
(20), R.Weeks (25), Lucroy (12), Greene (10).
3B-Pearce (1). HR-Greene (5). SB-
Ar.Ramirez (6), Altuve (24). CS-FMartinez
(1). SF-Lucroy
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Estrada 4 7 4 4 0 3
L.Hernandez 1 2 1 1 0 0
M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 1
Loe 1 1 0 0 1 1
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 1
Henderson L,0-1 1 2 1 1 2 3
Houston
Keuchel 6 5 4 2 0 6
FickH,1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2
W.Wright 0 2 0 0 0 0
StoreyH,1 11-30 0 0 0 3
W.LopezW,5-1 2 3 1 1 0 3


Frl-


Baseball calendar
Aug 15-16 Owners' meetings, Denver.
Sept. 1 -Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Oct. 5 Postseason begins, wild-card playoffs.
Oct. 6 Division series begin.
Oct. 13 League championship series
begin.
Oct. 24 World Series begins, city of Na-
tional League champion.
November TBA Deadline for teams to
make qualifying offers to their eligible former
players who became free agents, fifth day after
World Series.
NovemberTBA- Deadline forfree agentsto ac-
cept qualifying offers, 12th day afterWorld Series.
Nov. 7-9- General managers meetings, In-
dian Wells, Calif.
Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2013
contracts to unsigned players.



PGA Championship
Saturday
At Kiawah Island Golf Resort
(Ocean Course), Kiawah Island, S.C.
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,676, Par: 72
Partial Third Round
Play suspended by wet grounds
Bo Van Pelt 73-73-67-213 -3
Steve Stricker 74-73-67-214 -2
Jimmy Walker 73-75-67-215 -1
David Lynn 73-74-68-215 -1
Padraig Harrington 70-76-69-215 -1
Geoff Ogilvy 68-78-70 -216 E
Bill Haas 75-73-69--217 +1
Marc Leishman 74-72-71 -217 +1
Jason Dufner 74-76-68-218 +2
Justin Rose 69-79-70-218 +2
Bubba Watson 73-75-70- 218 +2
Greg Chalmers 70-76-72-218 +2
Jim Furyk 72-77-70-219 +3
Louis Oosthuizen 70-79-70-219 +3
J.J. Henry 72-77-70-219 +3
Paul Lawrie 73-75-71 -219 +3
John Senden 73-74-72-219 +3
Ben Curtis 69-76-73--219 +3
Thorbjorn Olesen 7574-471 -220 +4
Rich Beem 72-76-72--220 +4
Alex Noren 67-80-73-220 +4
Ernie Els 72-75-73--220 +4
Sang Moon Bae 72-78-71 --221 +5
Darren Clarke 73-76-72--221 +5
Brendon de Jonge 71-78-72-221 +5
Robert Garrigus 74-73-74 -221 +5
Y.E.Yang 73-74-74--221 +5
Charl Schwartzel 70-77-74--221 +5
GaryWoodland 67-79-75--221 +5
K.J. Choi 69-77-75--221 +5
David Toms 72-78-72-222 +6
Dustin Johnson 71-79-72-222 +6
Matt Every 72-76-74 -222 +6
Chez Reavie 74-76-73--223 +7
Seung-yul Noh 74-75-74-223 +7
Thomas Bjorn 70-79-74--223 +7
Ken Duke 71-78-74--223 +7
Retief Goosen 73-74-75--223 +7
Luke Donald 74-76-74--224 +8
CameronTringale 69-78-77-224 +8
Scott Piercy 68-78-78 -224 +8
Ryo Ishikawa 69-77-79-225 +9
ToruTaniguchi 72-76-78--226 +10
Marcus Fraser 74-75-78 227 +11
George McNeill 71-76-80-227 +11
John Huh 72-78-79-229 +13
Leaderboard
Rory Mcllroy -6 thru 9
VijaySingh -6 thru 7
Adam Scott -5 thru 9
C. Pettersson -4 thru 8
BoVan Pelt -3 thru 18
T. Immelman -3 thru 10
S.Stricker -2 thru 18
R Hanson -2 thru 12
G. McDowell -2 thru 11
Joost Luiten -2 thru 12
lan Poulter -2 thru 8


Schaub makes return,
Texans beat Panthers
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Matt
Schaub led one scoring drive
and threw an interception in his
first action since breaking right
foot last season, and the Hous-
ton Texans beat the Carolina
Panthers 26-13 on Saturday
night in the preseason opener
for both teams.
Schaub completed three
passes for 52 yards on Hous-
ton's opening drive, including a
22-yard strike on third down the
seam to Owen Daniels to set
up a field goal.
Houston's next two posses-
sions ended in turnovers when
Arian Foster fumbled and
Schaub's pass was intercepted
by linebacker Jason Phillips on
a bad throw over the middle.
Playing without his top
weapon Andre Johnson,
Schaub finished 3 of 6 for 52
yards for Houston.
Four South Koreans
share lead at Farr LPGA
SYLVANIA, Ohio South
Koreans Jiyai Shin, I.K. Kim, So
Yeon Ryu and Hee Kyung Seo
dominated the leaderboard,
sharing the top spot at 11-under



FIVE
Continued from Page B1

Catchings have continued it
With young stars Parker,
Maya Moore and Tina
Charles a big part of the suc-
cess in London it doesn't look
like the run will end anytime
soon.
Tamika Catchings said the
Americans "just wanted to
keep that legacy going."
Edwards, a five-time
Olympian, said no worry
there.
"The legacy is real," said
Edwards, who had a front-
row seat Saturday night.
"What these kids have been
doing is amazing. Without
much time to practice. In the
middle of the WNBA season.
And they look good. It's like
the whole world knows who
we are. I'm really proud of
them.
"They're definitely among
some of the best" U.S. teams.
The U.S. faced its only
challenge of the London


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202 on Saturday through the
third round of the Jamie Farr
Toledo Classic.
Two more South Koreans,
Inbee Park and Chella Choi,
are a shot back along with
Japan's Mika Miyazato.
Shin and Kim each shot 5-
under 66 for the low rounds of
the day, while Ryu had a 67
and Seo a 68.
Chad Johnson arrested
for domestic violence
DAVIE, Fla. Police say Dol-
phins receiver Chad Johnson
has been arrested on a domestic
violence charge, accused of
head-butting his newlywed wife
during an argument in front of
their home in Davie.
Davie police Capt. Dale
Engle says Johnson and his
wife were at dinner Saturday
night and she confronted him
about a receipt she had found
for a box of condoms. His wife,
Evelyn Lozada, is on the reality
show, "Basketball Wives," and
the couple married last month.
Engle says when they ar-
rived at their driveway, Lozada
says Johnson head-butted her.
She was treated at a hospital
for a forehead cut.

Games when Australia took a
four-point halftime lead. It
was the first time in 12 years
that the Americans had been
trailing at the half. There was
no panic or worry They just
stepped up their defense and
vanquished the Australians,
winning by 13 points.
"It's not easy to just be put
together and be expected to
win a gold medal," Taurasi
said. "It's a special feeling."
France, which came into
the gold medal game un-
beaten, stayed with the U.S.
for the first 12 minutes be-
fore Parker took over. She
scored eight straight points
during a 13-2 run that gave
the U.S. a 37-23 advantage.
Twice the 6-foot-4 Parker
grabbed the rebound on the
defensive end and dribble up
through the defense scoring
on the other
While Parker who also
had 11 rebounds was pro-
viding the offense, the Amer-
icans turned up their
defense, holding France to
just one basket over the final
7:25 of the half.


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 B3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bucs forge running identity


TB showsfocus

ongroundgame

Associated Press
TAMPA It might be
awhile before LeGarrette
Blount or rookie Doug Mar-
tin is declared the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers' starting
tailback.
Coach Greg Schiano
doesn't see any urgency on
that front.
"I'm not going to make it
happen," Schiano said Sat-
urday "If I feel it should go
one way and the staff feels
that way, I'll do it. Other-
wise they're two good backs
and a lot of teams do that
now, in this day and age."
Developing a running
game is a top priority for
the new head coach of a
team that ran the ball fewer
than 22 times per game last
season, the least of any
NFL team.


PGA
Continued from Page B1

missed putt.
He made everything Fri-
day to take a share of the 36-
hole lead. He made nothing
Saturday Woods already was
five shots behind and facing
a 6-foot par putt on the
eighth hole when the siren
sounded to stop play He was
at 1 under
"I got off to a rough start
today and couldn't get any-
thing going," Woods said
through a spokesman. "I'll
come back tomorrow morn-
ing and see what happens.
There are a lot of holes left
to play"
The wind eased as dark



SHOW
Continued from Page B1

rider leading the horse


mi -.Wd W ,T An


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back LeGarrette Blount
jumps for a one-yard touchdown during the first half of
Friday's preseason football game against the Miami
Dolphins in Miami.


The Bucs ran 25 times in
the first half of their 20-7
win over the Dolphins on
Friday night in the presea-
son opener for both teams,
with Blount and Martin
each getting seven carries
and a touchdown.
"It was good. Everything
that we've practiced is com-

clouds gathered over The
Ocean Course, and rain
poured down on this barrier
island about an hour later
The 26 players who didn't
finish the round will return
Sunday morning. The final
round was to be played in
threesomes of both tees, rare
for a major championship.
Woods was about the only
player going the wrong
direction.
Singh, the 49-year-old who
has not been in contention
at a major in six years,
opened with a 15-foot birdie
putt and made a strong re-
covery from trouble on the
par-5 seventh by making a
25-foot putt to join McIlroy
atop the leaderboard.
Right behind was Adam
Scott, showing no signs so far

through a series of moves to
display the horse's ability,
not unlike ballet
Huntington, who started
riding at 6 years old, said
she enjoys the camaraderie


ing to life," said Blount,
Tampa Bay's leading rusher
in each of the past two sea-
sons. "We scored on our first
two drives, and that's what
you always plan to do."
The Bucs traded into the
first round to draft Martin,
a quick and compact run-
ning back out of Boise

of a British Open hangover
Scott blew a four-shot
lead with four holes to play
last month at Royal Lytham
& St. Annes a month ago by
closing with four straight
bogeys. He came to life to-
ward the end of his front
nine Saturday four birdies
in a five-hole stretch,
capped by a 45-foot birdie
putt on the ninth.
Scott was at 5-under par.
Carl Pettersson, tied with
Woods and Singh at the start
of the round, was at 4 under
through eight holes.
This was the second time
this year Woods had a share
of the 36-hole lead going into
weekend at the majors. He
has not broken par in his
previous six weekend
rounds, including a 75-73 fin-

at the lower levels of
competition.
"It's a lot of fun. All the
girls are really nice and
there's a lot of camaraderie,"
she said. "There's a little bit


State. That sent a message
to Blount, who came to
camp with his job on the
line after losing five fum-
bles last season and experi-
encing a big dropoff from
his 1,007-yard performance
of 2010.
Schiano sent a message
in the spring about the kind
of offense he intends to run,
first by drafting Martin and
then by signing All-Pro
guard Carl Nicks to a five-
year contract. To the coach,
establishing the ground
game is a higher priority
than deciding who will
carry the football.
"No matter what the de-
cision is, they've both
shown already that they're
going to help us, that they're
both going to run the ball,"
Schiano said. "I think it's
going to be a fluid situation
until someone kind of dis-
tinguishes himself as de-
serving more touches. But I
can't tell you how it's going
to go right now. I don't
know."

ish at Olympic Club to go
from a tie for the lead to a tie
for 21st in the U.S. Open.
Stopping play might be
the best thing that happened
to him and a tough break
for Bo Van Pelt and Steve
Stricker, each of whom shot
67 earlier Saturday to climb
up the leaderboard as the
wind gained strength.
"You never know what
the weather will be like
when they go back out," said
Van Pelt, the clubhouse
leader at 3-under 213. "So
they might get the good end
of it or the bad end of it To
me, just glad to be done. I
did what I could do, and I'm
sure before I go to bed
tonight I'll know kind of
where I stand going into
tomorrow."

of a team aspect there (at the
area and state levels.)"
J.M. Soracchi is the
Chronicle Sports Editor He
can be reached at
352-564-2928.


Montoya on pole


for Watkins Glen


Associated Press

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. -
Juan Pablo Montoya
prefers running up front,
and it grates on him when
he doesn't.
For the second straight
week, he has no reason to
beat himself up going into
the race.
Montoya shattered the
Sprint Cup qualifying record
at Watkins Glen Interna-
tional on Saturday Montoya
won the pole for Sunday's
Finger Lakes 355 with a lap
around the 11-turn, 2.45-mile
layout in 69.438 seconds at
127.020 mph.
Kyle Busch set the track
record of 69.767 seconds at
126.421 mph a year ago.
"All my life I've raced to
win," Montoya said after
notching his second straight
pole in the series and ninth
of his career "The last cou-
ple of years have been re-
ally frustrating."
Busch qualified second,
also eclipsing the track
record. Five-time Cup
champion Jimmie Johnson
was third, followed by Brad
Keselowski and Marcos
Ambrose.
Ryan Newman, five-time
Watkins Glen winner Tony
Stewart, Clint Bowyer, Ryan
Truex Jr and Jamie McMur-
ray rounded out the top 10.
Points leader Dale Earn-
hardtJr qualified 16th.
Edwards wins
Nationwide race
WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. -
Carl Edwards has won the
NASCAR Nationwide race at
Watkins Glen International.
Edwards, making his first se-
ries start of the season, beat
Brad Keselowski on a two-lap
dash to the checkered flag for
his 38th career victory, break-
ing a tie with Kevin Harvick for
third all-time.
Pole-sitter Sam Hornish Jr.
finished third, followed by Ricky


Stenhouse Jr. and Ron Fellows.
Kyle Busch, who started from
the back of the field because
his team made changes to his
No. 54 Toyota, managed to
finish sixth despite shifter and
throttle problems.
Danica Patrick, making her
first series start at Watkins
Glen, was taken out on the first
turn of the race by Ryan Truex,
and finished last.
Points leader Elliott Sadler
was 12th.
Sprint Cup
Finger Lakes
355 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Watkins Glen International
Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Lap length: 2.45 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (42) J..P Montoya, Chevy, 127.02 mph.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 126.928.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 126.925.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 126.626.
5. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 126.524.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 126.312.
7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 126.15.
8. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 126.061.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 126.049.
10. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 125.959.
11. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 125.713.
12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 125.643.
13. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 125.612.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 125.518.
15. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 125.516.
16. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 125.5.
17. (22) Sam Hornish Jr, Dodge, 125.419.
18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 125.409.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 125.389.
20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 125.339.
21. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 125.334.
22. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 125.199.
23. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 125.08.
24. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 124.917.
25. (32) Boris Said, Ford, 124.791.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 124.715.
27. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 124.455.
28. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 124.208.
29. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 124.187.
30. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 124.131.
31. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 124.108.
32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 123.868.
33. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 123.71.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 123.576.
35. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 123.471.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 123.436.
37. (10) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 123.27.
38. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 122.531.
39. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 122.335.
40. (19) Chris Cook, Toyota, 118.879.
41. (49) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 118.742.
42. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, owner points.
43. (30) Patrick Long, Toyota, 117.551.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunday's
SCHEDULE

Athletics
At The Mall
Men's Marathon, 6 a.m.
Basketball
At North Greenwich Arena
Men
Bronze Medal
Russia vs. Argentina, 6 a.m.
Gold Medal
Spain vs. United States, 10 a.m.
Boxing
At ExCel
Men's Flyweight (52kg); Men's Lightweight
(60kg); Men's Welterweight (69kg); Men's Light
Heavyweight (81 kg) and Men's Super Heavy-
weight (+91 kg) final, 8:30 a.m.
Cycling (Mountain Bike)
At Hadleigh Farm, Essex
Men's Cross-Country race, 8:30 a.m.
Gymnastics
At Rhythmic Wembley Arena
Women's Group All-Around final, 8:30 a.m.
Modern Pentathlon
Women
Fencing (At Olympic Park-Handball Arena), 3a.m.
Swimming (At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre),
7:35 a.m.
Riding (At Greenwich Park), 9:35 a.m.
Combined Event (At Greenwich Park), 1 p.m.
Team Handball
At Copper Box
Men
Bronze Medal
Hungary vs. Croatia, 6 a.m.
Gold Medal
Sweden vs. France, 10 a.m.
Volleyball
At Earls Court
Men
Bronze Medal
Italy vs. Bulgaria, 4:30 a.m.
Gold Medal
Brazil vs. Russia, 8 a.m.
Water Polo
At Olympic Park-Water Polo Arena
Men
Seventh Place
United States vs. Australia, 5:20 a.m.
Fifth Place
Spain vs. vs. Hungary, 6:40 a.m.
Bronze Medal
Montenegro vs. Serbia, 9:30 a.m.
Gold Medal
Croatia vs. Italy, 10:50 a.m.
Wrestling (Freestyle)
At ExCel
Men's 66kg and 96kg qualifications, 1/8 fi-
nals, quarterfinals, semifinals, 3:30 a.m.
Men's 66kg and 96kg repechage rounds,
bronze and gold medal contests, 7:45 a.m.


Saturday's
SCORES

BASKETBALL
Women
Gold Medal
United States 86, France 50
Bronze Medal
Australia 83, Russia 74
SOCCER
Men
Gold Medal
Mexico 2, Brazil 1
FIELD HOCKEY
Men
Gold Medal
Germany 2, Netherlands 1
Bronze Medal
Australia 3, Britain 1
5th Place
Belgium 5, Spain 2
VOLLEYBALL
Women
Gold Medal
Brazil 3, United States 1 (11-25, 25-17,
25-20, 25-17)
Bronze Medal
Japan 3, South Korea 0 (25-22, 26-24, 25-21)


2012 LONDON SUMMER OLYMPICS


US women win

4x400 relay

Associated Press

LONDON By the time
Allyson Felix was done with
her part, her third gold medal
of the Olympics was all but
hanging around her neck.
Staking the U.S. team to
more than a 2-second lead at
the halfway point Saturday
night, then watching Sanya
Richards-Ross bring home
the blowout victory, Felix
added the 4x400-meter relay
gold to the titles she won ear-
lier in the 4x100 relay and
200-meter sprint.
"By the time I got the stick,"
Richards-Ross said, "it was
basically a victory lap."
The United States finished
in 3 minutes, 16.87 seconds -
good for a 3.36-second rout
over Russia, the biggest mar-
gin in the final of the long
relay at the Olympics since
East Germany beat the U.S.
by 3.58 seconds in 1976.
Jamaica took third in 3:20.95.
"I think we were all pumped
before this race," Felix said.




Boudia of US edges Qiu
for Olympic diving gold
LONDON David Boudia
won the men's 10-meter platform
at the London Olympics, giving
the U.S. its first gold medal in div-
ing since 2000.
Boudia clinched the gold with
his last dive, winning by 1.8
points over Qiu Bo of China.
The American scored 568.65
points in the six-dive final on
Saturday. Qiu took the silver at
566.85.
Brazil stuns US for gold
in women's volleyball
LONDON Destinee wasn't
enough.
Brazil denied the United
States its first Olympic gold
medal in women's volleyball
Saturday in a 3-1 upset that had
the Brazilians turning somer-
saults on the court and some
American players sobbing.
It was the first loss for the U.S. at
the tournament and the second


Bolt anchors Jamaica to
relay record for 3rd gold
LONDON Be it a gold medal
or a souvenir from a record relay
run, Usain Bolt always gets what
he wants at the Olympics.
The Jamaican will leave London
a perfect 3 for 3 three events,
three victories -just the way he
departed Beijing four years ago.
Almost even with the last U.S.
runner when he got the baton for
the anchor leg of the 4x100 me-
ters, Bolt steadily pulled away
down the stretch, gritting his teeth
and leaning at the line to cap his
perfect Summer Games by lead-
ing Jamaica to victory in a world-
record 36.84 seconds.
Bolt added the relay gold to the
ones he earned in the 100 in 9.63
seconds last Sunday the sec-
ond-fastest time in history and
the 200 in 19.32 on Thursday.
The runner-up in both individual
sprints, Bolt's pal and training
partner Yohan Blake, ran the third
leg of the relay, following Nesta


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 B5


Third gold for Felix


straight gold medal for Brazil. Amer-
ican star Destinee Hooker, the sec-
ond-best scorer at the London
Olympics, was held to 14 points.
Jaqueline Carvalho had 18
points to help Brazil overcome a
disastrous first set and win 11-25,
25-17, 25-20, 25-17.
Farah wins 5,000 meters
for distance double
LONDON Mo Farah won
the 5,000 meters to complete an
Olympic distance double for
Britain on Saturday night.
Backed by a boistrous, capacity
crowd at 80,000-seat Olympic
Stadium, Farah surged ahead late
and held on to win in 13 minutes,
41.66 seconds. He still had the
energy to do a few playful situps
on the track before he grabbed a
flag for the real celebrations.
The Somali-born Farah won
the 10,000 meters on Britain's
"Super Saturday" last weekend,
the same night Jess Ennis won
the heptathlon and Greg Ruther-
ford the long jump.


^Assocalatea ress
The United States women's 4x400-meter relay team from left, Francena McCorory, Allyson Felix,
Sanya Richards-Ross and Deedee Trotter celebrate after winning the gold medal Saturday in the
Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


"There was a lot of emotion.
We just wanted to close it out"
The U.S. extended its
Olympic winning streak in
this event to five straight,
dating to 1996.
Felix became the first U.S.
woman to win three golds in


Olympic track since 1988,
when Florence Griffith-
Joyner won the 100, 200 and
4x100 relay in Seoul.
Felix's victories came nearly
a quarter-century later and
half a world away, though she's
now in the same stratosphere


with some of the U.S. greats.
"London is very special to
me," said Felix, who now has
a total of six Olympic medals.
The one she really wanted,
of course, was the gold for the
200-meter sprint that eluded
her in Athens and Beijing.



Carter and Michael Frater.
The U.S. quartet of Trell Kim-
mons, 100 bronze medalist
Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and
Ryan Bailey got the silver in
37.04, equaling the old record
that Bolt helped set at last year's
world championships.
Mexico beats Brazil to
win Olympic soccer gold
WEMBLEY, England Oribe
Peralta scored only 29 seconds
into the Olympic final and added
another goal in the second half
to help Mexico upset Brazil 2-1
and win its first soccer gold
Saturday.
Peralta took advantage of a
mistake by the Brazilian de-
fense in one of the game's first
plays and shot a low right-
footed shot into the net, scoring
the fastest Olympic goal since
FIFA began keeping records of
the competition in 1976.
The striker added the second
with a firm header off a free kick
in the 75th.


LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS
Medal
count "
asofAug 11
COUNTRY G S B TOT
UnitedStates 44 29 29 102
China 38 27 22 87
Russia 21 25 32 78
Bntain 28 15 19 62
Germany 11 19 14 44
Japan 6 14 17 37
Australia 7 16 12 35
France 10 11 12 33
South Korea 13 7 7 27
Italy 8 7 8 23
Netherlands 6 6 8 20
Ukraine 5 4 9 18
Canada 1 5 12 18
Hungary 8 4 5 17
Spain 3 9 4 16
Brazil 3 4 8 15
NewZealand 5 3 5 13
Iran 4 5 3 12
Jamaica 4 4 4 12
Cuba 4 3 5 12
Belarus 3 4 5 12
Kazakhstan 6 0 4 10
Poland 2 2 6 10
Czech Rep 3 3 3 9
Romania 2 5 2 9
Denmark 2 4 3 9
Kenya 2 3 4 9
Azerbaijan 2 2 5 9
Colombia 1 3 4 8
Ethopia 3 1 3 7
Mexico 1 3 3 7
Sweden 1 3 3 7
North Korea 4 0 2 6
South Afnca 3 2 1 6
Georgia 1 3 2 6
Turkey 2 2 1 5
Ireland 1 1 3 5
India 0 1 4 5
Croatia 2 1 1 4
Norway 2 1 1 4
Argentina 1 1 2 4
Lithuania 1 1 2 4
Slovenla 1 1 2 4
Tnn /Tobago 1 0 3 4
Uzbekistan 1 0 3 4
Mongola 0 1 3 4
Slovakia 0 1 3 4
Swtzerand 2 1 0 3
Serbia 1 1 1 3
Tunisia 1 1 1 3
Thailand 0 2 1 3
Armenia 0 1 2 3
Belgium 0 1 2 3
Finland 0 1 2 3
Dom Rep 1 1 0 2
Latvia 1 0 1 2
Egypt 0 2 0 2
Bulgaria 0 1 1 2
Estonia 0 1 1 2
Indonesia 0 1 1 2
Malaysia 0 1 1 2
Puerto Rico 0 1 1 2
Taiwan 0 1 1 2
Greece 0 0 2 2
Moldova 0 0 2 2
Qatar 0 0 2 2
Singapore 0 0 2 2
Algena 1 0 0 1
Bahamas 1 0 0 1
Grenada 1 0 0 1
Venezuela 1 0 0 1
Botswana 0 1 0 1
Cyprus 0 1 0 1
Gabon 0 1 0 1
Guatemala 0 1 0 1
Montenegro 0 1 0 1
Portugal 0 1 0 1
Afghanistan 0 0 1 1
Bahrain 0 0 1 1
Hong Kong 0 0 1 1
Kuwait 0 0 1 1
Morocco 0 0 1 1
Saudi Arabia 0 0 1 1
Tajikistan 0 0 1 1
AP


keep the fire.








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Get back in the game with our short-term Lif
and outpatient rehabilitation programs. C are

Joint Commission accredited Center

352.746.4434 LCCA.COM ofCitrusCounty


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ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The Who,


Spice


Girls close


Olympics

Associated Press

LONDON Get the
Union Jacks out and pre-
pare to party: Olympic
Stadium is being trans-
formed into a giant juke-
box of British pop and
pizazz for the ceremony
that wraps up the so-far
spectacularly successful
London Games.
The Spice Girls and The
Who are among the acts
celebrating two weeks of
sporting competition with
a Sunday finale that artis-
tic director Kim Gavin
called "a mashed-up sym-
phony" of British hits.
Gavin who has di-
rected rock tours and
London's 2007 Princess
Diana memorial concert
- said Saturday he wants
the spectacular to be "the
best after-show party
that's ever been."
"If the opening cere-
mony was the wedding,
then we're the wedding
reception," music director
David Arnold told the
Daily Telegraph.
Although organizers
have tried to keep the cere-
mony acts secret, many de-
tails have leaked out in the
British media and some
performers have let the cat
out of the bag themselves.
The Who, George
Michael, Muse and Ed
Sheeran have all said they
will take part in a show,
including performances
of 30 British hit singles
from the past five decades
- whittled down by Gavin
from a possible 1,000. The
Pet Shop Boys, Annie
Lennox and Fatboy Slim
also will be on hand.
Gavin said the show will
open with a tribute to the
"cacophony" of London life,
with a soundtrack ranging
from the late Edward Elgar
- composer of the "Pomp
and Circumstance" march
- to The Kinks' "Waterloo
Sunset" Frontman Ray
Davies is expected to per-
form the 1960s song, a love
letter to London.
Thousands of athletes
from 204 competing na-
tions will march in and
become a standing,
milling audience Gavin
dubbed them the "mosh
pit" for the main sec-
tion of the show, "A Sym-
phony of British Music."
Details of the perform-
ers have emerged through
tips and photos coming
out of the rehearsal
venue, an old car plant in
east London. While the
creators of the opening
ceremony could rehearse
for weeks inside Olympic
Stadium, Gavin and his
team have less than a day
between the end of track
and field competition and
Sunday's ceremony
Gavin said he had 17
hours to get a show that
involves multiple sets, py-
rotechnics and 3,500 vol-
unteer performers "from
a car park to here."
The Spice Girls were
photographed dancing
atop black London taxis,
so a rendition of their
biggest hit, "Wannabe,"
seems likely.
So does an appearance
by surviving members of
Queen, whose "We Will
Rock You" has been ever-
present at the games.


Comic control


Associated Press
Meredith Walker, left, Amy Poehler and director David Karabinas on the set of "Smart Girls at the Party," the
flagship show for the YouTube channel, and founded by Amy Poehler. "Smart Girls at the Party" is one of the
latest channels to launch on YouTube with funding from the Google video-sharing site.

You Tube channel kicks ofwith comedians at the helm ofshows


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK On the debut
episode of "Smart Girls at the
Party," Amy Poehler sits in a dark
studio and solemnly introduces her
first guest as a "singer, actor, dancer,
musician, feminist, entrepreneur
and skateboarder."
Sitting across from Poehler is a 7-
year-old named Ruby, who cheer-
fully displays a just-completed
drawing.
Charlie Rose, eat your heart out.
This summer, while much of the
TV world is in reruns, a number of
comedians have taken to YouTube,
including Poehler, Rainn Wilson,
Walter Latham and, in a new role,
Shaquille O'Neal.
"Smart Girls at the Party" is the
flagship show for Poehler's
YouTube channel of the same
name, part of an ambitious initia-
tive from Google's video-sharing
site to plant a crop of niche-
oriented channels from show busi-
ness veterans. The rollout has con-
tinued through the year, gradually
premiering more than half of the
nearly 100 channels YouTube has
poured $100 million into, while
pledging to spend another $200 mil-
lion on marketing.
Comedy is only one of the many
genres among the new channels
(they range from the gaming hotbed
Machinima to The Wall StreetJour-
nal), but it's perhaps the most viral-
ready: Production value isn't
needed to send a funny clip sailing
through social media.
Smart Girls
Smart Girls at the Party, which
has some 7,500 subscribers thus far
and has generated more than
400,000 views, is geared toward ado-
lescent girls and young teens with
the stated aim to "celebrate indi-
viduals who are changing the world
by being themselves."
"We wanted to celebrate the non-
celebrity," Poehler said. "We
wanted to embrace and highlight
the cool period in any boy or girl's
life where they're just so full of pos-
sibility and ideas and passion."
The channel includes shows such
as "Ask Amy," a weekly check-in
where Poehler answers questions
from viewers. In one episode,
Poehler, who's shooting a film di-
rected by David Wain ahead of the
next season of NBC's "Parks and
Recreation," waxes about managing
stress while sitting in a bathtub.
In "Meow Meow Music," Poehler's


Birthday Some of the greatest rewards and benefits
you'll receive in the year ahead are likely to come from en-
deavors that turn out to be very difficult to launch. How-
ever, if you are persistent, you will reap a significant
harvest.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't be caught flatfooted. Be
prepared to make your move at a moment's notice, when
you notice momentum starting to pick up.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In order to make a critical de-
cision, you must be able to weigh and balance all the alter-
natives available to you. Don't ignore any unpleasant facts.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Review your goals carefully,
because several objectives that you thought unreachable
could be well within your grasp. Don't waste any time hit
the bricks!
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't be hesitant about as-
serting your authority when you believe a certain situation


friend Amy Miles hosts a mini ver-
sion of a Pee-wee Herman-style va-
riety show. Every episode of "Smart
Girls" ends with a dance party
"YouTube and Google and the In-
ternet in general is filled with so
much I don't know garbage hu-
miliation stuff," said Poehler, who
has two young boys. "We're trying to
do stuff that's not focused on people
falling down. Although don't get
me wrong I love people falling
down, especially when monkeys fall
out of trees. That's my favorite part
of the Internet."
Philosophical
Wilson, who plays Dwight on
"The Office," also has hopes to shift
the online dialogue. His channel is
an outgrowth of an earlier Soul-
Pancake website and book, both of
which grapple with philosophy and
spirituality in a casual way
"We want to engage users cre-
atively, uplift the conversation, dig
into life's big questions and kind of
make thinking and feeling cool and
fun and irreverent at the same
time," Wilson said.
Wilson, a member of the Baha'i
faith, hosts the channel's "Meta-
physical Milkshake," in which he
interviews people in the back of his
custom van. He became preoccu-
pied with readying the van for the
channel: "I've been spending all
this time on eBay and Craigslist
looking for bubble windows."
Other shows include "Live a Lit-
tle," about atypical high schoolers;
"Subcultures," about niche commu-
nities; and "Art Attack," where
artists create something from a sug-
gested "spark." Wilson is particu-
larly enthusiastic about a pilot
called "Last Days," featuring inter-
views of people with terminal ill-
nesses. (He promises it's uplifting.)
Wilson realizes it can be jarring
for audiences to see someone who
many simply regard as Dwight
Schrute discussing such subjects,
but SoulPancake has helped Wilson
unite his professional life and his
spiritual life and mix the profound
with the silly The channel has more
than 25,000 subscribers.
"You can ask someone about
their toenail polish and then you
can also ask them about what they
think happens to you when you
die," he said. "It just doesn't really
happen on television, but that
doesn't mean it's not possible."
Introductions
As the creator and producer of
the popular and lucrative "Original


Today's HOROSCOPE

warrants it. Anything you don't control can just as easily
jump up and take over.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Some kind of domestic
situation that has caused you and your family considerable
discomfort can be improved upon today by openly dis-
cussing it with all concerned. Don't hold anything back.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -There is a huge difference
between seeing what you want to see and looking at
things realistically. You need to view life objectively without
being morose about it.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you are anticipating cer-
tain remuneration for a service rendered another, you had
better spell out the terms in writing beforehand. It will avoid
any misunderstanding later.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Try to keep uppermost in
your mind that certain activities should be engaged in just
for fun and relaxation. Do not take yourself or the events of


Kings of Comedy" tour, Latham has
been a trailblazer before, founding
the black comedy franchise that
featured Steve Harvey, Bernie Mac,
Cedric "The Entertainer" and D. L.
Hughley As a promoter of comedi-
ans and a TV and film producer,
Latham likes to call himself "the
King of Comedy"
"It's the future, man," Latham
said of the YouTube channels. "Es-
pecially for my career as long I've
been in stand-up, always looking for
the next Bernie Mac or the next
Steve Harvey They don't have
shows anymore like they used to on
television to find talent. So
YouTube is a really good platform
for me to introduce new comedians
to a new audience. And the audi-
ence will tell me if they like them."
Walter Latham Comedy, which
has nearly 9,000 subscribers, draws
a considerable chunk of its audi-
ence from archived video of some of
those comedians, particularly
Bernie Mac, who died in 2008. The
lineup of original programming in-
cludes shows hosted by comedians
Hughley, Miss P and Michael Black-
son. But its signature show, "Com-
edy After Dark," includes a variety
of scantily-clad women including
Jenna Jameson.
Time and strategy
Latham has found that length of
videos has a direct effect on their
popularity, having watched classic,
nine-minute-long material from
Bernie Mac get less response than
a lesser joke of two minutes. "Just
get to the joke," is the lesson,
Latham said, and it doesn't hurt if
the thumbnail representing the
video is of one of the attractive fe-
male hosts.
The producer realizes the strat-
egy opens him up to criticism.
"I know that in order to grow and
not become a dinosaur, you have to
do and try different things," he said.
"That may not be the only new thing
that I try, but I had to try something."
New additions add to the growing
comedy presence on YouTube's dig-
ital dial, including My Damn Chan-
nel, the comedy series website that
streams a live show daily; the Onion,
a video offshoot of the satirical news
site; Above Average Network, a Web
series outlet from Lorne Michaels'
production company; and Official
Comedy, which features series from
Bedrocket Media Ventures.
All of the new channels receive
coaching from YouTube on optimiz-
ing programming schedules and
attracting subscribers.


the day too seriously.
Aries (March 21-April 19) There is no need to have
any qualms about your presence being felt. All you have to
do is put yourself out on behalf of others and you'll be both
noticed and appreciated.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When you want to sway oth-
ers to your way of thinking, make sure you're discussing
something in which you truly believe. If your enthusiasm is
halfhearted, no one will care.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You can improve your mate-
rial position in life if you go after your goals with all your
enthusiasm and vigor. This includes being dedicated, real-
istic and totally focused.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Painful lessons you've
learned in the past will now give you an edge over your
competition. Keep those experiences in the back of your
mind when negotiating something big.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10
Mega Money: 9 17 29 41
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 $2,446.50
3-of-4 MB 55 $292.50
3-of-4 1,049 $45.50
2-of-4 MB 1,519 $22
1-of-4 MB 13,052 $2.50
2-of-4 29,780 $2
Fantasy 5: 2 6 32 33 34
5-of-5 1 $224,431.94
4-of-5 279 $129.50
3-of-5 8,799 $11.50
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9
Fantasy 5: 3 8- 9 13- 18
5-of-5 2 winners $101,969.38
4-of-5 509 $64.50
3-of-5 11,515 $7.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 12,
the 225th day of 2012. There
are 141 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 12,1912, comedy
producer Mack Sennett
founded Keystone Pictures
Studio in Edendale, Calif.
On this date:
In 1867, President Andrew
Johnson sparked a move to
impeach him as he defied
Congress by suspending
Secretary of War Edwin M.
Stanton.
In 1902, International Har-
vester Co. was formed by a
merger of McCormick Har-
vesting Machine Co., Deering
Harvester Co. and several
other manufacturers.
In 1944, during World War
II, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., eld-
est son of Joseph and Rose
Fitzgerald Kennedy, was
killed with his co-pilot when
their explosives-laden Navy
plane blew up over England.
In 1953, the Soviet Union
conducted a secret test of its
first hydrogen bomb.
In 1960, the first balloon
communications satellite -
the Echo 1 was launched
by the United States from
Cape Canaveral.
In 1962, one day after
launching Andrian Nikolayev
into orbit, the Soviet Union
also sent up cosmonaut
Pavel Popovich; both men
landed safely Aug. 15.
In 1981, IBM introduced its
first personal computer, the
model 5150, at a press con-
ference in New York.
Ten years ago: Iraq's in-
formation minister, Mo-
hammed Saeed al-Sahhaf,
told the Arabic satellite televi-
sion station AI-Jazeera there
was no need for U.N.
weapons inspectors to return
to Baghdad and branded as a
"lie" allegations Saddam Hus-
sein still had weapons of
mass destruction.
Five years ago: Crooner,
talk show host and game
show producer Merv Griffin
died in Los Angeles at age 82.
One year ago: A divided
three-judge panel of the 11th
Circuit Court of Appeals in At-
lanta struck down the center-
piece of President Barack
Obama's sweeping health
care overhaul, the so-called
individual mandate.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Senator Dale Bumpers,
D-Ark., is 87. Actor George
Hamilton is 73. Singer Kid
Creole is 62. Pop musician
Roy Hay (Culture Club) is 51.
International Tennis Hall of
Famer Pete Sampras is 41.
Actor Casey Affleck is 37. Ac-


tress Imani Hakim ("Every-
body Hates Chris") is 19.
Thought for Today: "A
person without a sense of
humor is like a wagon without
springs. It's jolted by every
pebble on the road." -
Henry Ward Beecher, Ameri-
can clergyman (1813-1887).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Underground war


Water rights

and resources

at odds with

growth
ROBERT L. KNIGHT
Special to the Chronicle

ground zero in
Florida's latest
water war. On one
side are those who wish to
promote additional
groundwater consumption
for urban and agricultural
development. On the other
side is a growing number
of Floridians who believe
they have an obligation to
protect their groundwater
supply
On one side of the battle
line are our state agencies
and the business and po-
litical interests they repre-
sent. This relatively small
number of individuals cur-
rently hold the power to
use taxpayer dollars to en-
courage the creation of
new farms and cities that
need more groundwater
Their doctrine is clear -
Florida cannot survive
without growth to stimu-
late the creation of jobs.
Economic growth leads to
more roads, schools,
houses, restaurants, con-
venience stores and in-
come for the many people
it takes to create that infra-
structure. It means more
landfills, incinerators and
sewage treatment plants.
Growth also means we
need to have more water
for our homes and lawns,
to irrigate farm fields, to
cool our power plants, and
to support industrial and
mining operations.
On the other side of the
battle line are those who
think environmental re-
sources, including ground-
water, are finite, fragile
and necessary for a healthy
economy These folks be-
lieve environmental degra-
dation for short-term
financial gain is unethical,
because future generations
will be left with a world
that is worse than the one
they inherited.
They have decided that
unsustainable use of re-
newable groundwater re-
sources is a one-way street
to destruction and does
not justify the temporary
prosperity it buys along
the way They claim we are
already using too much
groundwater and not leav-
ing enough to nourish our
springs, rivers and lakes.
They claim we can meet
future water needs
through conservation and
development of alterna-
tive water supplies.
As part of their efforts to


LOU ELLIOTT JONES/Special to the Chronicle
The city of Cedar Key has saltwater intrusion in its drinking water wells, located nearly two miles from the Gulf of Mex-
ico. To receive bottled water after the emergency was declared, residents' names were checked against the water dis-
trict's customer list, requiring the presentation of a water bill or a Cedar Key re-entry pass to prove they were qualified
to receive the water.


convince the public to sup-
port unlimited economic
growth, our state govern-
ment is telling us we can
have our cake and eat it,
too. They say we can have
unlimited economic ex-
pansion because we have
a limitless groundwater
aquifer. They claim rain-
fall is the only significant
factor affecting groundwa-
ter levels and spring flows,
and they can continue to
issue groundwater with-
drawal permits in spite of
severe droughts, falling
aquifer levels, and dying
springs.
Increasing evidence
tells us this rosy picture
does not match the facts.
Consider the following:
Average flows in the
springs along the Suwan-
nee, Santa Fe, Ichetuck-
nee, and Withlacoochee
rivers have declined to
levels that are lower than
ever observed in the past
White Sulfur Springs
stopped flowing more than
30 years ago following the
issuance of a groundwater
withdrawal permit that al-
lows extraction of more
than 40 million gallons per
day for a nearby phos-
phate mine. Prior to the
installation of those wells,
White Sulfur Springs had
an average flow of about
35 million gallons per day
and was a major health re-
sort in north Florida.
Private and public
wells throughout much of
north and central Florida
are contaminated by ex-
cessive concentrations of
nitrate nitrogen, a major
component of fertilizers


Map courtesy of www.srwmd.state.fl.us
The Suwannee River Water Management District extends
from the state line down through several counties in north-
ern Florida. The Suwannee River itself beings in Georgia.
Although the water district is different than the one for Cit-
rus County, the Floridan Aquifer underlies both.


and wastewaters. As a re-
sult of excessive nitrate
concentrations in the
groundwater, springs
along the Suwannee River
and the river itself have
nitrate concentrations as
much as 100 times higher
than pre-development
conditions, and have had
their native vegetation re-
placed by algae.
In spite of these warning
signs, groundwater use
permits for intensive agri-


culture and urban/com-
mercial development are
still being issued through-
out the Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict. The private citizens
on the district's governing
board who make these
permit decisions are ap-
pointed by the governor
and often have no special
skills related to water re-
sources management
They must rely on their
staff to provide sound sci-


ence and recommenda-
tions concerning the
groundwater withdrawal
permits they ultimately
approve.
There appears to be lit-
tle urgency at the district
to respond to the existing
crisis of record low spring-
and river flows and
groundwater levels. There
are currently more than
3,300 active groundwater
use permits in the district,
authorizing pumping of
more than 400 million gal-
lons per day from the
Floridan Aquifer. These
permits are only issued to
the largest users and do
not include the tens of
thousands of private wells
in the district. District
staff has convinced their
governing board that this
rate of groundwater pump-
ing is not harmful to
groundwater levels or to
spring flows.
Against this background,
the city of Cedar Key has
experienced an age-old
problem in coastal Florida
- saltwater intrusion in
its drinking water wells lo-
cated nearly two miles
from the Gulf of Mexico.
St. Petersburg's well
field went salty beginning
in the 1920s. South Florida
started experiencing salt
water intrusion by the
1930s. Pinellas County had
to move all of its wells to
the east out of the county
in the 1980s.
The list of coastal cities
with well fields ruined by
saltwater intrusion is very
long. Thousands of private
domestic and agricultural
See Page C3


Retirement becoming impossible dream in Florida


Recent survey of middle-age
Floridians found more and
more of us don't hold out
much hope for retiring as well off as
our parents or even at all.
In a survey titled
"Voices of 50+, Dreams
and Challenges," AARP
found 44 percent of older
Floridians plan to delay
retirement if the econ-
omy does not get better
soon, and 28 percent ex-
pect to work until they
die.
The poll confirms most
Florida baby boomers Steven K
especially those who FLOI
have suffered great per- VOI
sonal losses with the col-
lapse of housing values
- are feeling helpless and pes-
simistic about the future of the Sun-
shine State. Only 20 percent said
they were optimistic about an eco-
nomic recovery here in the next two
years.
Those polled are at an age when
they should be earning the most
money of their lives, yet the biparti-
san pollsters found 69 percent don't
expect to make enough to even con-


sider retirement, and 58 percent
worry they won't live comfortably
when they eventually do stop
working.
If the results of this poll prove


Kurlander
RIDA
CES


anything, it is that the
American Dream is dead
for too many Florida
baby boomers.
"This survey paints a
picture of Floridians age
50+ who are having to
defer their dreams and
come to terms with a
tough economy," said Jeff
Johnson, AARP Florida
interim state director
"For an alarmingly large
number, their dreams are
delayed or slipping out of
reach."


Tallahassee politicians should
wake up and start addressing these
economic anxieties.
Instead, for years, Florida law-
makers have served more as advo-
cates for financial, utility and
insurance institutions than the mid-
dle class. And they are still callously
waiting for an economic cycle to
work its way through, particularly
in regard to foreclosures.


That antiquated thinking is de-
stroying older workers and
Florida's middle class as a whole.
Let's face it. Except for the
wealthy, economic conditions in
Florida are terrible. And despite
what Gov Rick Scott and our legisla-
tive leaders would have you believe,
if creative initiatives are not under-
taken soon, things will not get better
for many years, if not decades.
In an economy forever based on
tourism, real estate and construc-
tion, there continues to be no mean-
ingful job creation. Even then, the
jobs available in these sectors pay
shabby wages. And for those lucky
enough to be working, the state's
right-to-work laws make for poor
working conditions.
The biggest problem is that too
many homeowners are underwater
on their mortgages and lost their
life savings when their home equity
- and stock fluctuations in their
401ks were wiped out by Wall
Street shenanigans.
With rising food and energy
prices, and higher property taxes
and insurance premiums, it's be-
come very expensive to live in the
Sunshine State for workers and the


retired alike. Yet the insurance
market remains so messed up that
Florida is one Category 5 hurricane
away from insolvency
Too many baby boomers and sen-
ior citizens are living on the edge,
and if the drastic increase in
Florida food-stamp recipients is
any indication, it's plain difficult for
Florida's middle class to stay out of
poverty.
Florida benefited greatly from a
migration of seniors and corpora-
tions seeking lower taxes and a bet-
ter quality of life. Over the past
three decades, a third of New York
residents leaving the state have
moved to Florida.
If the AARP poll is any indication,
that migration will end. Perhaps
there will be a reverse migration
back to a region where, despite high
taxes, people can make a living
wage and older workers can again
think about retiring.


Steven Kurlander blogs at Kurly's
Kommentary writes a weekly
column for Fort Lauderdale's
Sun-Sentinel and is a South
Florida communications strategist.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Vote against

the political

skullduggery

Citrus County has
made the big time.
We have learned
to tell lies as well as the
big boys in Tallahassee
and Washington.
Many of you received
recorded messages on
your telephone this past
week that bashed a candi-
date for the Citrus County
Commission. All of us have
gotten dozens of ads in our
mailboxes from different
organizations that have
lied and distorted reality.
Welcome to the big time.
I am not going to argue
the details of any of the
candidate attacks, but let's
make sure that we, as vot-
ers, at least know what is
happening to us.
Because of changes in
campaign finance laws
(and Supreme Court deci-
sions), it is now perfectly
OK for large businesses
and campaign contribu-
tors to give money to
anonymous third-party or-
ganizations. Those organi-
zations can then launch
distorted attacks on polit-
ical opponents without
voters ever being able to
tie the attacks back the
candidate's organization.
But do they think we
are stupid?
We have grown numb to
our national politicians
telling lies, but now the
practice has drifted to the
Citrus County level. Two
years ago, we witnessed
absurd personal attacks
on candidates in local
county commission races.
The main offender was
booted from office by the
voters.
Just when you didn't
think it could get worse, it
did.
It's great when candi-
dates talk directly to vot-
ers and argue the issues.
Voters can pay attention
and then make candidate
decisions based on their
own set of beliefs and val-
ues. The personal-deci-
sion process becomes so
much more difficult when
political operatives use
third-party organizations
to hide behind.
Here's my voter's tip for
2012: Vote for the candi-
dates who are getting
bashed in the anonymous
telephone calls and mail-
outs. Forget about where
they stand on the issues. If
the huge special interests
are so worried that they
have to hide and anony-
mously attack certain can-
didates, you might
conclude that those candi-
dates have something
good to offer.
MEN
Kay Barco Tolle was
buried this past week and
will be missed by many
people in Citrus County.
The Crystal River native
was the matriarch of her
extended family and a
powerful political force in
the county for many years.
Back when she was ac-
tive, everyone in Citrus
County was a Democrat
and she was active in the
party leadership. Ed
Tolle, her husband and
college sweetheart,
served as county property
appraiser and as a city
councilman in Crystal
River.
It was almost 30 years
ago at election time when
Ed and Kay were support-
ing a bunch of candidates
for political office and it
turned out the Chronicle
did not endorse a single
one of them.


Page C4


I











OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .......................editor
Mike Arnold ................ ....... ............. HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

A LOT AT STAKE





Future of




nuke plant




is uncertain


he cost of repairing the
Progress Energy Florida
nuclear plant north of
Crystal River has been a major
factor in the back-
ground of the still- T
unfolding drama T
of the Duke- Increas
Progress Energy for repai
merger, and its fu- fut
ture remains un-
certain. OUR 01
Concerns about
management of Repair
the project were reopening
among the key Citrus Cc
reasons cited in all Progrc
the sudden dis- custo
missal of former
Progress CEO Bill Johnson
hours after the merger closed.
In a recent conference call
with investors, Duke CEO Jim
Rogers said costs for the proj-
ect are "trending higher" than
earlier estimates, and while
the repair plan is "technically
feasible," issues remain and no
decision has yet been made.
One of the key unresolved is-
sues is how much the plant's
insurer will pay The insurer
initially paid claims, but last
year stopped making voluntary
payments. A final decision is
expected later this year, and
the amount the insurer pays
appears to be an important
part of the final decision on the
fate of the plant.
Two additional events have
further clouded the issue.
Last week, the president of
Progress Energy Florida, Vin-
cent Dolan, announced his re-
tirement. Dolan will be missed.
He has been an active civic
leader in the Tampa Bay area,
and a friend to Citrus County.
He has supported repairing the
nuclear plant, and earlier this
year he used his leadership
role in the Tampa Bay Partner-
ship to bring senior executives
from companies in the area to
Citrus County for a meeting.
Alexander "Alex" Glenn, cur-
rently general counsel for
Progress Energy Florida, has
been named to replace Dolan.
Glenn has a long history with
Progress Energy and Florida
Power, and as the company's
lead in dealing with regulatory
issues, he has first-hand knowl-
edge of the Crystal River plant.
We hope he will continue the
company's positive relationship
with the county, and that he will
be an advocate for repairing
and re-opening the plant.
Another headwind for the
plant came a few days ago
when the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission announced it will
not issue licenses for new


63079
563-0579


S
ir
r
u

P
ir
g

Ds


plants or authorize the exten-
sion of licenses for existing
plants until there is a resolu-
tion of the long-term storage of
spent nuclear fuel.
The nuclear
iSUE: plant's current op-
ng cost rating license ex-
s clouds pires in 2016. In
re. 2008, Progress En-
ergy filed for a 20-
INION: year extension
that would extend
ng and the plant's license
benefits until 2036. The
unty and containment dam-
ss Energy age has delayed a
ners. final decision, so
the issue is still
pending.
While the plant faces a num-
ber of problems, they are all re-
solvable, and the benefit of the
plant to Duke and to Florida
customers is its stable long-
term fuel costs. Any replace-
ment plant would be fueled by
natural gas. While natural gas
is currently cheap, its price can
be volatile. Building a natural
gas plant means committing to
the long-term purchase of gas
to fuel the plant, even if the
price doubles or triples or
more in the future.
Duke is well aware of this
fact, and the fact the company
is already heavily dependent
on natural gas in Florida. Re-
pairing and reopening the
plant gives the company a di-
versity of fuel sources it would
lose if the plant is closed.
Aside from the negative im-
pact on the state's power sup-
ply, closing the plant would be
devastating to the local econ-
omy. It would significantly cut
county tax revenues, and hun-
dreds of well-paying plant jobs
would go away. The ripple im-
pact of this loss would mean
many small businesses closing
and other businesses choosing
not to locate in the county.
This is a fundamental eco-
nomic issue for Citrus County,
so it is troubling that one of our
county commission candidates
would ignore the full impact of
the plant closing and urge shut-
ting it and replacing it with al-
ternative energy sources.
Citrus County has been a
good neighbor for the plant for
decades, and the plant has
been a benefit to the county.
Our hope is that as Duke is
making its decision about the
future of the plant, it will con-
sider the total economic im-
pact both for the state and the
community, and it will commit
to making the repairs, extend-
ing the license and continuing
to operate the nuclear plant.


Mess is coming
I have lived here over 25 years in Crystal River
and Homosassa and I drive (U.S.) 19 all the time
and I have never had to wait for three changes of
lights one maybe.
But the longer they wait to build a parkway, the
more it's going to cost. The more it costs, the higher
the toll is going to be and then people won't use it.
What we need is somebody up there with good
old-fashioned common sense to get us out of this
mess.


"Life is a series of collisions with the
future; it is not a sum ofwhat we
have been but what we yearn to be."
Jos6 Ortega y Gasset, 1883-1955


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


It's a question of context


Barack Obama claims only
that his legislative and for-
eign policy achievements
in his first two years matched
those of "any president with
the possible excep-
tions of Johnson, FDR
and Lincoln" in "mod-
ern history." Some
Obama enthusiasts are
less restrained. ri
They suggest that --
among presidents, he /
ranks as the most r
learned since John ,
Quincy Adams, the
most profound since Georg
James Madison and OTI
the most visionary VoI
since Thomas Jeffer-
son. And he is, of
course, the most rhetorically
gifted politician since Pericles.
Yet, remarkably, he is fre-
quently misunderstood. How can
this be?
After the June 8 news confer-
ence in which he said "the pri-
vate sector is doing fine," he,
responding to the public's
strange inability to parse plain
English, held another news con-
ference in which he said: "It's ab-
solutely clear the economy is not
doing fine; that's the reason I had
a press conference."
That clarified everything, but
then on July 13 the public, which
Obama really must regard as a
disappointment, again failed to
comprehend him. In Roanoke,
Va., he gave what any reasonable
person must admit was an ad-
mirably pithy and entirely clear
distillation of his political philos-
ophy: "You didn't build that" The
public's obtuseness forced his
campaign to run an ad saying "my
words about small business" had
been taken "out of context." Ah,
context.
In late October 1980, as Ronald
Reagan prepared for his one de-
bate with President Jimmy
Carter, Reagan's aides worried
Carter might unearth some of the
inconveniently colorful things
Reagan had said over the years,
such as, when Patty Hearst's kid-
nappers demanded the distribu-


I






-i

?<


tion of free food, including
canned goods, Reagan reportedly
said something like: This would
be a good time for a botulism epi-
demic. When an aide wondered
how Reagan could ex-
plain that quip, there
was a long pause, and
then another aide imp-
ishly suggested: "Say it
was taken out of
context."
As Obama tries to
cope with the public's
peculiar inability to
discern his meanings,
e Will perhaps he can take
IER comfort from very sim-
CES ilar difficulties of an-
other candidate for
national office. On Aug.
18, 1920, the Democrats' vice
presidential nominee, campaign-
ing in Butte, Mont., said it would
be fine for the United States to
join the League of Nations be-
cause our nation would have
multiple votes. He assured listen-
ers that "the votes of Cuba, Haiti,
San Domingo, Panama,
Nicaragua and of the other Cen-
tral American states" would not
be cast "differently from the vote
of the United States," which is
"the big brother of these little
republics."
Then, referring to his days as
assistant secretary of the Navy,
the vice presidential candidate
said: "You know I have had some-
thing to do with running a couple
of little republics. The facts are
that I wrote Haiti's constitution
myself and, if I do say so, I think it
a pretty good constitution." He
added: "Why, I have been run-
ning Haiti or San Domingo for
the past seven years."
As David Pietrusza writes in
"1920: The Year of Six Presi-
dents," Haiti and the Dominican
Republic had been U.S. protec-
torates since July 1915 and May
1916, respectively, but the boast-
ful candidate had not written any
constitution. Nevertheless, he re-
peated his indelicate claim -
U.S. Marines had recently been
involved in some Haitian blood-
shed at three more Montana


When an aide
wondered how
Ronald Reagan
could explain that
quip, ... another
aide impishly
suggested: "Say it
was taken out of
context."

stops and then in San Francisco.
When, inevitably, the candi-
date's words caused consterna-
tion here and there, he insisted
he never said them, adding mag-
nanimously, "I feel certain that
the misquotation was entirely un-
intentional." But the controversy
continued, so on Sept. 2, in
Maine, he added: "I should think
that it would be obvious that one
who has been so largely in touch
with foreign relations through
the Navy Department during the
last seven years could not have
made a deliberate false state-
ment of this kind."
Idaho's Republican Sen.
William Borah dryly said: "I am
willing to admit that he didn't say
it, though I was there and heard
him say it at the time." Thirty-one
witnesses of the Butte speech
signed an affidavit attesting that
the candidate had said what he
was reported to have said, but
public attention had wandered
and the issue faded.
Far from being badly injured
by this episode, the vice presi-
dential candidate went on to be-
come one of the three presidents
in "modern history" Obama in-
cludes Lincoln-whose achieve-
ments in their first two years are,
Obama says, "possible" to com-
pare to his. The candidate was
one of liberalism's saints,
Franklin Delano Roosevelt

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


EDITORIAL BOARD ENDORSEMENTS
The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board has endorsed the following candidates in the Aug. 14 pri-
mary elections. Early voting ended Saturday; vote Tuesday in your designated precinct.
* County Commission Dist. 1 Dennis Damato 0 Schools Superintendent Sandy Balfour


* County Commission Dist. 3 Joe Meek


* School Board Susan Hale


* County Commission Dist. 5 Charles Poliseno 0 Public Defender Mike Graves


* Sheriff Winn Webb
* U.S. Senate/Democrat Bill Nelson


* Florida House Dist. 44- Lynn Thomas Dostal
* U.S. Senate/Republican Dave Weldon


* Precinct 105 Charter Amendments "Yes" on all


Endorsement REBUTTAL


Smallridge: I'll do what's right


When I was appointed to the
Citrus Memorial Hospital Board
by our Florida governor and
confirmed by our Florida Sen-
ate, I inherited a situation where
the bill to the taxpayers had re-
cently quadrupled, from $1.7
million to more than $7 million
per year and the millage rate
had been increased from 0.265
mil to 1 mil in 2005.
The citizens of Citrus County
were being charged millions of
dollars to cover the public hospi-
tal's presumed budget shortfall
for charity care.
After demanding the financial
records of the hospital, we the
Trustees, discovered that there
was no shortfall in charity care,
and in fact, it was over-funded.
So the question became where
was the taxpayers' money being
spent?
Under my leadership, the
Trustees started demanding ac-
countability and transparency
from the hospital Foundation. It
was not an easy effort. The Foun-
dation, which is responsible for
the day-to-day operations of the
hospital, refused to produce
public records and financial
documents.
It took the passage of a new
Florida statute, under my leader-
ship, to clarify that the managers
of a public hospital are indeed
accountable to the taxpayers.
The Foundation sued to have the
law declared unconstitutional.
They lost that lawsuit In ruling
in our favor, the court found that
our new law "imposes greater
public accountability and over-
sight on the Foundation."


The Chronicle either fails to
understand the hospital issues
or doesn't wish to report the
long-term savings of millions of
dollars to the taxpayers of Citrus
County under the new law. Exec-
utives who can't balance their
budget, and who hold their hats
out to the taxpayers of Citrus
County each year, should not re-
ceive large pay increases at the
taxpayers' expense.
I did not accept this role be-
cause I thought it would further
a political role, as the Chronicle
once suggested. I accepted this
role as a public Trustee because
it was the right thing to do, and
our governor asked me to. Our
hospital was in desperate need
of leadership that would de-
mand fiscal responsibility. Since
the litigation has ensued, the
hospital suddenly "found" ways
to reduce operating losses by
more than $4 million during the
past year, through cost-reduction
initiatives, without cutting serv-
ice. By insisting that the hospital
produce a realistic budget,
under my leadership, we have
been able to reduce the millage
rate, and hence, cut taxes.
Yes, the Foundation has fought
our efforts, and we've incurred
legal fees to turn the hospital
around, but the amount we have
spent has been a small fraction
compared to the millions the
taxpayers will save. Under the
new law, the Foundation will no
longer be able to allocate $1.4
million to pay for the hospital's
seven highest paid executives.
And our public hospital will be
accountable to the public. Isn't it


time that this level of accounta-
bility be spread to all govern-
mental offices?
I've brought this same level of
fiscal responsibility to all of my
businesses. I was entrusted by a
circuit court judge to be the re-
ceiver of a utility. I turned the
utility around so that it would be
able to sustain itself while still
keeping rates lower than compa-
rable utilities, saving the cus-
tomers money
During my years of dedicated
service on Citrus County's Water
and Wastewater Authority, I was
voted chairman, where again I
demonstrated leadership and
the ability to govern, reviewed
the budget line by line and re-
duced your tax.
As a commissioner I would
bring the same demand for
transparency and accountability
to our county commission. I
would champion ecotourism,
which could immediately bring a
financial infusion and help sup-
port our local businesses. I
would also champion the med-
ical corridor plan, to increase
our citizens' access to medical
services and provide long-term
sustainable jobs.
Our community deserves lead-
ership with the political will to
do what's right. I have demon-
strated that by action, not just
words. I would appreciate your
vote for me, Mike Smallridge,
County Commission District 5.
Mike Smallridge
Republican candidate
County Commission District 5


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Underhanded politics? Is there any other kind?


his writing might at first
appear to be another
broken promise, that is, my
promise to forgo writing about
politics, but it isn't, not really.
A couple of Sundays
ago, the headline
editorial in the
Chronicle presented
an evaluation of
underhanded politics.
The editorial sparked
a memory of an
incident from my
youth and, today, I'm
recounting that slice of Fred B
life, not addressing A SI
modern politics.
Long, long ago, I was OF I
a high school
politician ... and I was good at it. I
was well-known, well-liked, quick
with a smile and a quip and was
comfortable speaking with
individuals or to large groups. I
was always "running for office"
even when no election was in
process.
In May 1962, I was a candidate
for student body president. The
process was that the student
council nominated a candidate


3r
I
L
L


who, since the office was for the
upcoming year, had to be a junior;
and, the junior class nominated
two additional candidates.
I was the student council's
selection and the
candidates nominated
by the junior class
were a football star
and a beauty queen.
It's egotistical to say,
but with that slate of
candidates, I was a
lock.
The football player
rannen and the beauty queen
ICE would surely split the
star-struck segment of
IFE the votes, they'd each
probably take at least a
third of the freshman class; but I
was popular with and would
probably take a majority of both
the sophomore and senior classes;
and, I expected to take 40 percent
of my own class, the junior class,
with the football star and the
beauty queen splitting the
remaining 60 percent
Based on these and all of the
other numbers, my very proficient
campaign manager calculated the


final totals at 40 percent for us, 35
percent for the football star and 25
percent for the beauty queen.
There would be no run-off, a
plurality would prevail and I'd
win.
Things changed.
The beauty queen dropped out,
leaving it a two-man race between
the football star and me. No
worries. We recognized that the
impressionable freshman class
was now a bigger concern, but
after again doing projections, my
competent campaign manager
had us with 52 percent in a one-
on-one match.
Then things got even more
complicated.
Three seniors, one of whom was
the senior class president, came to
me and announced they were
going to take over and manage my
campaign. They didn't want the
football star to win and promised
they'd nail his hide to the wall for
me. I said thanks, but no thanks; I
didn't need 'em; I didn't want 'em;
and, I wanted nothing to do with
their tactics.
This would dramatically change
the dynamics of the election.


Those guys decided to go after
both the football player and me
using a relatively popular
classmate who was more than
willing to play their game as a
write-in candidate. When it
became apparent that a true
write-in campaign wasn't going to
do it, it would require too much
effort, for reasons I've never
understood, adults became
involved.
Then, at the last minute, on the
morning of the election, after
voting had already begun, the
county school superintendent
came to the high school, changed
the rules, had the write-in
candidate placed on the ballot just
as though he'd been properly
nominated, voided the votes
which had already been cast and
started the election over.
End result?
The former write-in candidate
took votes from both of us, but
evidently he took more from me
than he did from the football star.
It's been 50 years, so you would all
know I'm lying if I pretended to re-
call the specifics I don't but I
do remember the order of finish


and the approximate tally of votes.
For illustration purposes only,
I'll say the ringer took 22 percent,
I ended the day with 38 percent
and the football star won with
40 percent.
Was I disappointed?
Of course.
Did I believe the election had
been handled fairly?
No.
Even so, as a 16-year-old kid, I'd
learned a few very valuable
lessons, including that politics,
even at the high school level, can
be underhanded, dirty and unfair;
that as a candidate, the only
actions you can control are your
own; and, that holding onto your
integrity, doing what you think is
right is more important than win-
ning.
I had no regrets and I couldn't
help but chuckle at the irony of it
all the fellows who'd tried to
control the election had precisely
the result they'd set out to prevent.
0]
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


Hot Corner: FOOD STAMPS


Angry and disgusted
Talking about food
stamps and lottery tickets;
here's another one that is
pretty well peeved off. If it
would have been me, I
would have said something
about it. Those food stamps
are to buy for their children,
not for them to sit on their
rear end and raise them out
of wedlock. So, yes indeed,
I would have said some-
thing. And I think it's a law



WAR
Continued from Page C1

wells in coastal areas have
also gone salty. It is ac-
cepted knowledge that salt-
water intrusion in the
freshwater aquifer occurs
due to excessive pumping
from wells.
Other coastal areas, such
as Tampa Bay and Pinellas
County, began fighting a
water war more than 20
years ago. While these legal
battles created great income
for lawyers and experts, the


that they should not or
they should have a law -
that they should not buy lot-
tery tickets, or go out here
and buy their own stuff, be-
cause that is not what
they're supposed to be
doing with the food stamps.
So, yes, I'm angry and I'm
disgusted with people like
that. So thank you for
speaking out. And others
ought to do the same thing
if you've got any backbone


only solution found was to
move well fields inland or re-
duce reliance on groundwa-
ter by developing expensive
alternative water supplies
fed by rainfall or seawater
desalination. These legal
and capital expenses could
have been avoided by re-
sponsible water manage-
ment and water
conservation. Unfortunately,
politics and greed in south-
west Florida prevented a
reasoned and conservative
approach to allocating
groundwater resources.
Cedar Key is the first in-
corporated city in the


or guts.

Give it back
To the person
who wrote in saying
we do not have any
right to stick our )A
nose in their busi-
ness when it comes CAL
to them buying $40 563-
worth of Lotto tick-
ets with their EBT
card: Well, since we, the tax-
payers, are paying for the


Suwannee River district to
suffer the calamity of salt-
water intrusion.
Just a few decades ago
during the Tampa Bay
Water War, the Suwannee
River area was labeled the
"Saudi Arabia" of ground-
water and there was a seri-
ous proposal to pump that
water down to Tampa to
help alleviate over-exploita-
tion of the Floridan Aquifer.
How ironic but foreseeable
that the same woes that
started the Tampa Bay
Water War are now evident
throughout the Suwannee
River Basin.


I

C


cards, we do have
the right to speak
our mind. If you
think us, as the tax-
payers, have stuck
our nose in your
business, why don't
you just give the
card back so it can
)579 be given to some-
one who is more re-
sponsible with the
free gift that we have given
you for food. A taxpayer.


A growing number of the
district's governing board
members are starting to ask
questions. Are they really
getting the whole truth and
nothing but the truth from
their paid staff? Should they
be looking at outside
sources of scientific evi-
dence to explain what they
are seeing with their own
eyes? Are they really pro-
tecting existing users and
the public interest by con-
tinuing to issue more
groundwater consumption
permits?
Residents and landown-
ers in Cedar Key may wish


Stamps for food
Today's Monday, July 30.
On your Opinion page, the
(Sound Off) page, the last ar-
ticle it says, "Make it illegal."
Someone wrote that a
woman by the convenience
station purchased $40 worth
of lottery tickets and a
bunch of other food, staples,
milk and something else and
paid for them with food
stamps. Well, get your facts
straight. It says so right


to engage these board mem-
bers who are starting to
question business as usual.
As the country singer
said, "fool me once, shame
on you; fool me twice,
shame on me." What side of
the North Florida Water
War are you going to be on?


Robert L. Knight, Ph.D.,
lives in Alachua County
and is director of the
Howard T Odum Florida
Springs Institute, a
nonprofit dedicated to the
restoration and protection
of Florida's springs.


there- food stamps, not
anything else. Not makeup,
not Tampax, nothing like
that, just food. Food stamps
(are) to feed your children,
so get your facts straight.


S Renee
Christopher-

SMcPheeters
Candidate for Citrus Co. Comm. Dist.
"AS COMMISSIONER, I WILL NOT
VOTE FOR HIGHER PROPERTY TAXES
OR ADDITIONAL COUNTY DEBT.'
S VOTE FOR ME NO MATTER PARTY
OR DISTRICT ON 8/14/12."
Pd. pol. adv. paid for and
approved by Renee 41
t..J -.
.so'


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tell lawmakers to get to work on economy


he annual salaries for all sen-
ators and representatives, as
members of Congress, is
$174,000 plus perks and full retire-
ment benefits after five years in of-
fice. They are now working from
late Tuesday afternoon until Thurs-
day afternoon.
Representatives are
authorized up to
$1,671,546 (average
$1,446,009) for staffs lim-
ited to 18 and incidental
expenses. Senators are '
authorized $4,685,279
(average $3,206,825.)
with no limits on staffs.
With 50 senators and George
435 representatives, our GU
annual cost for their pay
and average incidental COL
expenses is $163,325,516.
In addition, there are unknown
committee staffing and incidental
expenses.
Are we getting the full legislative
value from those we vote into office
and pay taxes to support? No!
Their current value to us is cor-
rectly rated at 13 percent. They are
not giving us a day's work for a day's
pay and little to no effort in giving
us bipartisan legislation so badly
needed.
Our current House and Senate
majority leaders are so unrelenting
in their ideological objectives and
in ensuring their party's re-election,
little concern is given to the public
need.
Only you and I can demand bi-
partisanship for legislation cur-
rently under consideration. And we
can rightfully demand it by advising


our representative and senators,
their failure to support us will en-
sure an election giving undue sup-
port to an opponent.
Only with enough constituent de-
mand will the majority leaders be
unable to promise the usual, "If you
don't follow the party
line, you'll receive no
party support in the
next election."
yr The most important
4 issue is our economy
That can only be helped
by boosts in employ-
ment. Our debt and
deficit are intolerable,
Harbin but we need immediate
EST increased employment.
Yes, it may increase
.UMN the deficit, but if Con-
gress is really interested
in bringing our economy back
rather than who will be elected
come November, it can, on a bipar-
tisan basis, come up with answers
that will show signs of success be-
fore the election.
It's not too late to ask for a bipar-
tisan commitment through Nov 6!
Has either of our presidential,
Senate and House candidates seri-
ously discussed plans for doing
something for our economy before
Nov 6? No!
Instead, millions are wasted on
exorbitant bickering on issues of no
value. Those boosts in employment
can come with needed improve-
ments in our highways and bridges,
in the return of call centers to the
U.S., and return of outsourced pro-
duction and other services, accom-
plished by congressional incentives


Representatives are authorized up to
$1,671,546 (average $1,446,009) for staffs
limited to 18 and incidental expenses.
Senators are authorized $4,685,279 (average
$3,206,825.) with no limits on staffs.
With 50 senators and 435 representatives,
our annual cost for their pay and average
incidental expenses is $163,325,516.


including corporate tax reductions,
making them cheaper than avail-
able elsewhere.
It's up to you and me to demand,
demand and demand until our leg-
islators realize we are serious and
take affirmative action. You can
contact Sen. Bill Nelson, Sen.
Marco Rubio and Rep. Rich Nugent
at 202-224-3121, toll-free at 800-828-
0498 or by email via the website
Congress.org, typing in your ZIP
code.
There is a glimmer of hope, start-
ing January 2013 our representa-
tives and senators are then
required to be available for legisla-
tion starting at 6:30 a.m. Monday
through 2 p.m. Friday of each week
while in session.
Can we expect compliance? It's
doubtful, because already there are
rumbles from both Democrats and
Republicans who prefer the Tues-
day-to-Thursday schedule and are
already planning ways to continue it
The 114th Congressional Session
starts Jan. 3, 2013. Those we elect
next November will be those who


will either continue to give us on-
the-job performance and bipartisan
legislation we deserve or continue
at the 13 percent public approval
rate.
No matter who you vote for, you
should ask for and hopefully re-
ceive a commitment for bipartisan-
ship and voting for the public
interest rather than party line.


George Harbin is retired
Homosassa resident who has been
appointed Citrus County
Democratic Executive Committee
public information officer and has
served on the committee since
2000. He was a contracting officer
for the Department ofDefense,
including 13 years in the Pentagon,
writing and awarding contracts for
construction, research, other
services and products for25years,
most with the Corps ofEngineers
and finally in the Office of the
Secretary of the Army George
Harbin can be emailed at
gharbinl4@gmail.com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

On Election Day in In-
verness, my wife and I
voted separately Unfortu-
nately, as my wife backed
her car out of the fair-
grounds parking lot, she
managed to bump into
Kay Tolle in her car.
Ed, who was always a
gentlemen, called me and
said: "First you don't en-
dorse my guys and then
you wreck my wife's car.
What's next from the
Chronicle?"
We could laugh, be-
cause back in those days
we did not believe in
conspiracies.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online, com.

OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed
in Chronicle editorials are
the opinions of the news-
paper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in
political cartoons,
columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial
board.
SEND LETTERS TO: The
Editor, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. Or fax to 352-
563-3280, or e-mail to
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online.com.


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Food, Fun, Entertainment, Silent Auctions,
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C4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


COMMENTARY


3

I












SINESSOUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Down to


Now arriving

on time:

Your flight

and suitcase

SCOTT MAYEROWITZ
AP Airlines Writer

NEW YORK- U.S. air-
lines are more punctual
and less likely to lose your
bag than at any time in
more than two decades.
Travelers still have to put
up with packed planes, ris-
ing fees and unpredictable
security lines, but they are
late to fewer business
meetings and are not miss-
ing as many chances to tuck
their kids into bed.
Nearly 84 percent of do-
mestic flights arrived
within 15 minutes of their
scheduled time in the first
half of the year the best
performance since the gov-
ernment started keeping
track in 1988.
The improvement over
the first six months of 2011,
when 77 percent of flights
were on time, is mostly a
result of good weather and
fewer planes in the sky be-
cause of the weak economy
Airlines are also doing a
better job of handling bags.
Fewer than three suitcases
per 1,000 passengers were
reported lost, damaged or
delayed from January
through June, a record low.
The two areas of im-
provement are related:
When flights are late, bags
often miss their connection.
"My flights this year have
been way better," said
Amanda Schuier, a sales
manager for a Kansas City,
Mo., trucking supplier who
flies roughly four times a
week. "In the past six
months, I've only had two
delays."
If the current pace con-
tinues, the airlines will
beat their best full-year
performance, recorded in
1991, when nearly 83 per-
cent of flights arrived on
time. The worst full year
was 2000, when just 73 per-
cent of flights arrived on
time, according to an Asso-
ciated Press analysis of Bu-
reau of Transportation
Statistics data.


heart


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Delta Air Lines ramp agents unload bags Aug. 1 from a flight arriving at JFK International airport in New York. Travel-
ers still have to put up with packed planes, rising fees and unpredictable security lines, but they are missing fewer busi-
ness meetings or chances to tuck their kids into bed. Nearly 84 percent of domestic flights arrived within 15 minutes
of their schedule time in the first half of the year, the best performance since the government started tracking such
data in 1988.


The worst year for bag-
gage handling was 1989,
when nearly eight suitcases
per 1,000 passengers were
reported late, lost or
damaged.
There are still problems.
About one out of every six
flights is late and that's
after airlines have adjusted
schedules to account for
congestion, said airline
consultant Michael Boyd.
"That's an indictment,
not a record," he said.
When flights are on time,
it isn't just good for passen-
gers it also helps the air-
lines' bottom lines. The
industry says it costs an av-
erage of $75 a minute to op-
erate a plane. Last year,
domestic delays cost air-
lines an estimated $5.2 bil-
lion. U.S. airlines made a
combined $577 million in
profit last year
In the first six months of
this year, nature has been
kind to airlines. There have
been 10 percent fewer
thunderstorms than usual,
according to a decade of
data analyzed by the Na-
tional Oceanic and Atmos-


pheric Administration's
Aviation Weather Center.
There has also been less
snow. New York has had
about 3 inches this year,
compared with a 10-year
average of 20 inches.
Chicago, which averages 27
inches of snow from Janu-
ary through June, has had
just 18. And Minneapolis
has had 12 inches, one-
third the normal snowfall
at this point in the year.
The recession led fewer
people to fly and prompted
airlines to ground planes,
clearing up airspace.
In 2007, 14.8 million air-
planes took off and landed
at the nation's 35 largest
airports, according to the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration. Last year, the num-
ber was down 10 percent to
13.3 million.
The airlines also are tak-
ing steps to improve their
on-time performance. They
include:
Better technology Air-
lines are flying newer
planes with fewer mainte-
nance problems. New tools
track the boarding of pas-


sengers and loading of bag-
gage onto individual flights.
If either falls behind sched-
ule, extra workers are de-
ployed to ensure an
on-time departure.
More realistic sched-
ules. Flight times have been
extended on some trips to
account for air traffic de-
lays. For instance, Delta Air
Lines adds up to 16 minutes
for Atlanta-to-New York
flights during peak hours.
Boyd and other critics say
padding schedules may im-
prove on-time statistics, but
it shouldn't be confused
with better service.
Timely delivery of food
and fuel. Airlines have re-
vised contracts with suppli-
ers to include incentives
for on-time deliveries and
penalties for late ones.
Improved boarding
procedures. The order pas-
sengers get on a plane has
been streamlined, and
larger overhead bins have
been installed.
New government rules
also deter delays. The De-
partment of Transportation
now requires airlines to


display the on-time per-
formance of each flight on
their websites.
There are also stiff
penalties for long delays.
For instance, if a plane is
sitting on the tarmac for
more than three hours, the
airline can be fined up to
$27,500 per passenger or
about $4 million for a typi-
cal jet. To avoid those fines,
airlines created new soft-
ware. As delays persist,
special alerts flash for the
local airport manager and
at headquarters.
Since Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood
took office in 2008, the de-
partment has nearly tripled
the number of annual en-
forcement actions taken
against airlines from 20
to 59 last year. Fines have
jumped from $1.2 million to
$6.1 million.
"We sent a very loud mes-
sage to the airlines that
they need to treat people
with respect," LaHood
said. "People pay a lot of
money to get on an airplane
and they expect to have on-
time service."


Crowds flock to reopened Sonic Drive-In


Anyone pulling into Sonic
Drive-In a couple of Tuesday
evenings ago would have
been hard pressed to find a spot to
park. The place, as they
say, was hoppin' make
that car-hoppin' as car-
hops whizzed around
with precision on neon
bright, chartreuse-col-
ored skates, delivering
trays loaded with foot-
long Coneys, Sonic's sig-
nature "Tots" and real
ice cream milkshakes.
A storm had just Laura
passed through, scrub- WORK
bing the air clean of hu- CONNE
midity, cooling things
down enough to entice
groups to dine al fresco. The drive-
in was decked out with balloons and
streamers, and there were plenty of
tchotchkes/Sonic swag to be given
away Citrus 95.3 was on hand doing
a live remote, and the air was
thrumming with hits by Adele and
other pop stars to keep folks in a
festive mood.
The occasion marked the grand
reopening of the iconic Crystal
River drive-in, which was shuttered
in November 2010 but brought back
to very vibrant life by the Okla-
homa-based Sonic company and
franchisee Sonic/Bella Grande
Group of Jacksonville.
Chronicle food columnist Julie
Munn had this to say about Sonic's
reopening in a recent "Over Easy"
column: "It is so cool Sonic drive-in
is returning to Crystal River! Once
again, we will have a fast-food place
to get a variety of delicious hot dogs.
And, best of all, an empty commer-
cial building will come to life."
A commercial building that's


right on a major highway and cen-
tral to many of Crystal River's best-
known water features. Cool, indeed.
In addition to the happy diners -
many oblivious to the sig-
nificance of the moment
the crowd on July 31
included dozens of mem-
bers of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
there for the official rib-
bon-cutting ceremony;
Sonic Drive-In fran-
chisee, hotel and restau-
rant developer Matt
Byrnes Gillio; Bella Grande's
FORCE media and marketing di-
-CTION rector, Donna Alexander;
and even some faces
from Workforce Connec-
tion, including Frank Calascione,
Citrus County business develop-
ment manager
Workforce was there because, be-
hind every great company be it a
fast-food restaurant, manufacturer,
health care provider, retailer, you
name it is a great staff.
But what do you do if, like Bella
Grande, you are new to the commu-
nity and you don't know where to
begin searching for talent? What do
you do when you don't have an of-
fice where you can set up and con-
duct interviews? I'll let Donna
Alexander tell you what Bella
Grande did.
"When you go to staff a drive-in
such as ours, looking for 50 to 70
qualified employees to hit the
ground running, or in our case skat-
ing, when dealing with those kinds
of numbers, you really need a local
expert on your team. And Work-
force Connection was happy to join
our team."
Donna said, "From the very first


moment, I knew I was in good
hands."
"(Workforce) went way above and
beyond the call of duty," she said. "I
was impressed with the level of co-
operation, commitment and assis-
tance to help us getup and running."
That included, in addition to
human resources services, office
space and equipment, two hiring
events, and a place to hold new em-
ployee training at Workforce Con-
nection's Citrus County Resource
Center. All employer services are
offered at no charge.
More than 50 employees were
hired, including 17-year-old Hadley
Skidmore, a senior at Crystal River
High School.
"I read about it in the paper, went
to the job fair and got hired on the
spot, even though I didn't know how
to skate. Luckily, I learned right
away," said Hadley, who plans to at-
tend the College of Central Florida
to become a registered nurse.
Hadley figured working as a car-
hop at Sonic would be good training
for her future profession because
she "likes serving people." She said
the job is also perfect because it en-
ables her to work around her school
schedule.
Hadley is just one example of
what Donna said makes Workforce
Connection such a valuable partner
"Candidates were prescreened,
pre-verified and prequalified be-
fore they ever came to meet us. Be-
cause of that, it made our hiring
process much more streamlined,"
she said. "This is the way I want it
(the hiring process) to go forever
and ever."
Bella Grande is already ramping
up to hire more staff.
"I would use Workforce Connec-


tion again in a heartbeat. When we,
in the next month or so, need to hire
more people, absolutely my first
call will be to Workforce Connec-
tion," she said, adding that in
preparing to open a new store in
Spring Hill, she approached a
neighboring workforce develop-
ment board "hoping to repeat the
positive experience."
"I hooked up with the Workforce
in Hernando County because of
what you (Workforce Connection)
did."
In recent months, there have
been similar successes in Citrus
County and the surrounding area
with hiring events for Taco Bell,
Granny Nannies, Caregiver Serv-
ices, Sitel and Senture, among
others.
These hiring events are different
from the large regional job fairs we
hold where 800 job seekers get a
chance to meet with 25 to 30
employers.
These mini-job fairs, or hiring
events, are customized to meet in-
dividual employers needs and take
place at our offices or wherever
convenient for the company
If your company is interested in
starting or expanding operations,
and needs help finding the right
staff, contact our professional HR
managers and get your own "above
and beyond" service. Give us a call
at 352-637-2223 or 800-746-9950.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a certified
workforce professional and
communications manager a t
Workforce Connection. Contact her
at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-5627,
ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce. com.


I
I




I


Tempted

to retire

DEAR BRUCE: I
have enjoyed your
column so much
over the years. I hope you
will answer my questions.
I am a 69-year-old
woman with some med-
ical problems (five bulging
disks in my back, scoliosis
and Parkinson's disease).
I have worked two and
three jobs most of my life
and raised three children.
I worked 25 years with the
city government and re-
tired from the fire depart-
ment with a pension of
$1,200 a month and a drop
account of $150,000. I
started my part-time job
15 years ago at a church
and receive a lifetime
pension of $305 a month.
I applied for Social Se-
curity at age 67, but I was
penalized with the govern-
mental offset rule. They
deducted about 65 per-
cent; my monthly payment
is $368, and my Medicare
payment is deducted out
of that. Next June I can re-
tire from the state govern-
ment job I am working and
receive a pension between
$800 and $1,000 a month. I
owe about $10,000 on my
home and $7,000 in credit
card debt My car is 6 years
old and paid for, with only
29,000 miles on it. My util-
ities, insurance and taxes
are about $800 a month. I
spend the most on gro-
ceries and gifts. I am al-
ways having my children
and grandchildren over. I
will have to cut back on
that.
I am in a lot of pain and
walk all bent over, but I
am so frightened about re-
tiring. I am worried I will
not have enough to live
on. Is there anything I can
do at this late date to have
peace of mind before tak-
ing this huge step? Do you
think the economy will get
any better? Should I try to
hang on a little longer in
one or both jobs? J.R,
Baton Rouge, La.
DEAR J.R.: You have,
unhappily, some health
problems that very likely
will only get worse, not
better. That having been
observed, and cutting
through the numbers, it
seems you probably will
have to do some cutting
back but should be able to
handle things.
I would not leave work
if you are able to continue
at the present time. Mean-
while, the first thing you
should work on is that
$7,000 in credit card debt.
The interest rates are
high, and that debt will
have to be eliminated be-
fore you retire.
Whether you want to
stay in your home is an-
other question. Depend-
ing on its value, which you
did not indicate, you may
want to consider either
selling the house and
moving into a smaller
rented house, or taking
out a reverse mortgage.
The major problem is that
your age likely will limit
your ability to borrow on a
reverse mortgage. Even
though you have undesir-
able health conditions,
you are still a relatively
young person.
As for the economy, it
will get better and worse;
it always does.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
com or to Smart Money
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns.










D2

SUNDAY
AUGUST 12, 2012


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Scan .
this:
rSi r.*FB


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


New Cub Scouts


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...

Mary Garcia and
Sherry Raines
Citrus Pet Resort,
Homosassa

Dr. Karen
Zimmerman
Midway Animal Hospital,
Homosassa


Pat Jellison
H & P Beads,
Crystal River

Linda Thomas
Black Diamond Realty,
Lecanto


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Wildlife park marks

Florida panther's

17th birthday


-.. .. ." .. .

.


Steve Cox, field director, and New Horizons Village residents Linda Arent and Paul McAloon prepare the flag
for the flag-raising ceremony.

Pack 1275 joins educational program at care facility


The area's first-of-its-kind Cub
Scout Pack made up of 19 de-
velopmentally disabled adults
who live at New Horizons Village
in Lecanto recently marked its
membership in scouting with a
ceremony, highlighted by the rais-
ing of the American flag.
The 19 new members of Pack
1275 are among 48 residents of
New Horizons Village, an inter-
mediate care facility for the de-
velopmentally disabled. New
Horizons provides homes and
around-the-clock care for adults
whose disabilities may result from
autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy,
behavior and other factors.
Scouting fits perfectly into the
educational program New Hori-
zons conducts for its residents.
Scouting, with its programs of


growth and service, will be of
great value to its residents.
Jennifer Siegert is district ex-
ecutive of the Withlacoochee Dis-
trict, a part of the Gulf Ridge
Council, Boy Scouts of America.
She said Pack 1275 is the first such
scouting group in her area of re-
sponsibility called the Withla-
coochee District. She serves some
1,000 scouts in Citrus, Hernando
and Sumter counties, which in-
cludes Crystal River, Inverness,
Wildwood, Bushnell, Brooksville
and Spring Hill.
The 10 men of Pack 1275 are en-
rolled as Cub Scouts, the nine
women as Ventureers.
"The disabled can join scouting
at any age," Siegert said. "They'll
be able to work toward merit
badges and go on outings." She


added that scouting offers alter-
native badge opportunities for ac-
tivities the disabled cannot
perform.
The flag ceremony is an impor-
tant part of the scouting tradition.
"Patriotism and citizenship are
central to scouting," Siegert said.
Everyone who is going to be part
of the pack is so excited.
Residents attend education and
personal growth classes at New
Horizons' recently completed
9,000-square-foot adult learning
center. A recreation program, field
trips, volunteering in the commu-
nity and other activities are all
part of New Horizon Village's care
efforts for the developmentally
disabled.
The New Horizons Village web-
site is www.newhorizonsvillage.us.


Party slated

Sept. 22
The Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park will be celebrat-
ing the 17th birthday of Don
Juan, an endangered
Florida panther and former
dominant male cat in the
Big Cypress National Pre-
serve at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 22, at the Wildlife En-
counter pavilion. The pavil-
ion is adjacent to the
Florida panther exhibit
along the park's Wildlife
Walk.
In addition to displays on
the history of Don Juan be-
fore his retiring to Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park in 2009,
other exhibits will offer in-
formation on the endan-
gered Florida panthers.


Don Juan, also known by
biologists as Panther No. 79,
is approximately 130
pounds and 7 feet long. Bi-
ologists had a radio-
equipped collar on the
Florida panther and care-
fully monitored his move-
ments in Big Cypress
National Preserve. Through
DNA testing, biologists
think he sired more than 30
offspring in his day
At Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, he shares a nat-
urally landscaped 150-foot
by 60-foot habitat with a fe-
male cougar named Maygar
Regular park admission
will apply to attend Don
Juan's birthday celebration.
Be sure to join the fun from 2
to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept 22,
at Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park,
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd, (U.S.
19) Homosassa; 352-628-2311.


News You CAN USE


Congratulations to:
Angelic Air has earned
Better Business Bureau Ac-
creditation. Angelic Air provides
air conditioning and heating
maintenance, service, sales
and installation specializing in
indoor air quality. The company
also services, sells and installs
pool heat pumps and does
duct and dryer vent cleaning.
Cindy Clark, Capital City
Bank in Crystal River, has
been named the assistant vice
president in Capital City Bank's
retail banking division.
Allen Curtis, administrator
of Citrus Health and Rehabilita-
tion Center in Inverness, was
honored by the Florida Health
Care Association as the 2012
Nursing Home Administrator of
the Year.
RED CARPET MIXER:
Comfort Keepers and LifeCare
Center of Citrus County hold a
Red Carpet event Thursday,


Aug. 16 at the LifeCare
Center facility at 3325 W. Jer-
wayne Lane, Lecanto. Let the
valet park your car while relax
to the sounds of a sax player
and enjoy homemade marsh-
mallows and a chocolate
fountain.
GRAND OPENING: Join
Superior Residences of
Lecanto Memory Caare, 4865
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, as
they celebrate their open
house in their new facility from
3 to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17.
Come and experience the mo-
ment! RSVP: 352-746-5483
(Preceeding this open house
event is the official Ribbon Cut-
ting at 2:30 p.m.)
Politics
Primary Date Tuesday,
Aug. 14 Polls are open in
Citrus County 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
If you need assistance to find
your polling place you may call


UPCOMING CITRUS COUNTY
CHAMBER/EDC EVENTS
* Aug. 16 "Red Carpet" After Hours Business Net-
work Mixer-COMFORT KEEPERS and LIFECARE
CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY
H Aug. 17 Ribbon Cutting -
Superior Residences,
Lecanto
* Aug. 17 Next Generation
Professionals Workshop: The
How of Wow! CITRUS COUNTY
* Aug. 21 Ribbon Cutting- EconomcDe"eoprc.'"
Anytime Fitness, Inverness ,
* Sept. 6 Industry Apprecia-
tion Mixer CRYSTAL CHEVROLET
* Sept. 7 EDC Industry Appreciation Lunch
* Sept. 20 Industry Appreciation BBQ-EDC M & B
DAIRY
* Sept. 22 Business Women's Alliance Health and
Fitness Expo
* Oct. 11 After Hours Business Networking Mixer -
NATURE COAST EMS
* Oct. 12 October Chamber Lunch at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
* Oct. 23 After Hours Business Networking Mixer -
ALPACA MAGIC
* Dec. 1 10 a.m. Parade in the Hills, "The Magic of
Christmas" parade, crafts, car show
* Dec. 1 6 p.m. Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Dec. 5 BWA December Luncheon
* Dec. 8 Noon Inverness Christmas Parade
* Jan. 19 and 20 2013 Florida Manatee Festival in
Crystal River


the elections office at 352-
341-6740 or go online to
www.votecitrus.com.
Republican National
Convention: Tune in to Front
Row Tampa Bay a live,
streaming Web TV broadcast
airing Aug. 27 to 30 that will
showcase life, business and
economic opportunities across
Tampa Bay during the Republi-
can National Convention.
Learn more at http://frontrow
tampabay.com/.
For Your Health
Breastfeeding/Infant
Care: Expectant or new moth-
ers learn helpful techniques for
successful breastfeeding as
well as basic infant care at 6
p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, in the
Women's & Family Center. Call
352-795-1234 to register.
Free Balance Screen-
ings: Worried about falling?
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound


Center offers free balance
screenings. The Center is at
1675 S.E. U.. 19 in the Crystal
River Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). Call 352-795-0534
to schedule an appointment.
SAVE THE DATE:
Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 6 The Citrus County
Jeepers hold a Jeep Show at
the Crystal River Mall There
will be interactive Jeep activi-
ties. J&S Entertainment will be
on hand to provide live enter-
tainment and host Karaoke.
For information, call the mall
office 352-795-2585 or visit
www.thecrystalrivermall.com.
Sept. 14 to 22 17th an-
nual Save Our Waters Week
Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 -
first annual Tourette Syndrome
Association of Florida Celebrity
Golf Tournament at Plantation
Inn & Golf Resort. Shotgun
start at 9 a.m., registration at
8a.m.


5 J "like"us on
Sfacebook


Bud Sasada co-hosts Chamber Chat with Melissa
Benefield this week. We talk to Bud about his
company Bud Sasada Painting and their years of
service to our community. PGA Golf Professional
David Collins joins us to talk about an upcoming
golf tournament and how golf can improve your
business. Jim Ferrara shares why Insight Credit
Union was recognized as Top 100 Employers for
Working Families and tells us about their new
Inverness location. In the final segment, meet Jeff
Inglehart! Jeff is our newest team member at the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and a retired
Marine. Jeff tells us how he found Citrus County and
what residents can expect as our new Special
Events and Outreach Coordinator. You have 3
chances to watch Chamber Chat every week--
Monday 6pm, Thursday 8am and Friday 12:30pm.
Don't miss it! If you would like to be featured on
Chamber Chat email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook!


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


I 1 _1 II* I


TO PURCHASE BBQ TICKETS,
PLEASE VISIT WWW.CITRUSEDC.COM


r






CITRUS COUNTY (T1) CHRONICLE



^^q^Sif Chronicle


SUNDAY,AUGUST 12, 2012 D3


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:.(352).563-665.1 Tll Free (888) 82-2340. Email:cs edI www.chronicleonline.com


TOM'S FLEXIBLE
PINOCHLE CLUB
Do you love to play
Pinochle? Currently
I run a club of married
couples & singles.
Because part of our
group has other things
to do on Thursday eve-
nings. We sometimes
have a problem getting
eight people for 2 ta-
bles. if your interested,
we need just a few
people to fill in the gap.
Call Me (352) 527-9632


Little Bear is a fantastic
dog! This shepherd mix
just wants to be with his
human, whether that's
lounging by your feet at
home, hanging out at the
park or walking on the
trail. He is only 2 years
old but he has a very ma-
ture, relaxed disposition
and has great house
manners. He is a smart
boy who learns quickly.
Little Bear walks well on a
leash and knows some
commands already. He
gets along with other
dogs and likes to play
while out in public, but he
wants to be your one and
only pet at home. He has
been at the shelter pa-
tiently waiting for his new
best friend to find him so
they can start their new
lives together. His adop-
tion fee of $30 includes
microchipping, vaccina-
tions, a month of free pet
insurance, free obedi-
ence class and neutering.
352-568-5095








Yourvorld first


Need ajob

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!




Classifieds
CHRPSEK


Nomad 1500
$5200 OBO
352-341-8479
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/11/2,+ Carport
(352) 489-0117
FREE TUITION
TAX SCHOOL
Potential to earn extra
income after taking
course. Flexible
schedules, convenient
locations. Register
now! Courses start
September 10th.
Call (352) 563-2777
Liberty Tax Service
Small fee for books
HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN
3/2 pets ok $800/mo.
Lease or rent-to-own.
Avail now. 619-301-5442
between 10:30 am and
11:00 pm only
LECANTO
2 br 2 ba, e/i kitchen, scr.
porch, laund. room, cent.
h/a, near new Walmart,
$550 mo. + utilities.
352-257-3473
LOST COCKATIEL grey
& yellow with orange
cheeks. Lost on 8/3 in
Pine Ridge, near Mus-
tang &Amarillo. Please
call 746-3901 or
476-5215.
LOST COCKATIEL grey
& yellow with orange
cheeks. Lost on 8/3 in
Pine Ridge, near Mus-
tang &Amarillo. Please
call 746-3901 or
476-5215.
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $400 (352)
794-3081 or 795-5204
Purebred Black & Tan
Miniature
Dachshunds
Great Breeder
$250.
(352) 613-5817



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



3 Healthy Quarter Horse
Mares ages 7,13, & 13.
Free to good homes)
Recently widowed and
unable to care for them.
352-212-5809


FREE DOG
Pit Bull, Male,
1 '/2 yr. old,
house trained, shots
(352) 364-6319


- -eOfes Fu -dIMdia:


3 Kittens
gray striped, very cute.
Free to good home.
(352) 287-5336
Free
Brown plaid Sofa bed
Good contrition needs
slip cover
Twin frame, mattress &
box spring.
352-400-4391
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE TO A GOOD
HOME YOUNG MALE
RARE BLONDE RED
NOSE PUPPY. LESS
THAN A YEAR. AWE-
SOME DOG, FRIENDLY
DOES WELL WITH
OTHER DOGS. NOT
MEANT FOR FIGHTING.
LOVES KIDS. ONLY
SERIOUS INQUIRES
CALL 352 794 6727
Free to good home
1 year old lab/rot mix
352-464-1935
HORSE MANURE AGED
No shavings or chemi-
cals Easy access/Bring
shovel Lecanto
352-621-0175
Pit Bull &
Cur Dog puppies
2 females, 1 male dona-
tions for their care up till
adoption are accepted
(352) 423-0819




Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/lb,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliviverd
(77"178 .1126


Lost cat Homosassa
Long Haired Pure White
11/2 yrs old. Lost in
Cardnial area off
Wildermuth
Reward
(352) 628-6271
LOST COCKATIEL grey
& yellow with orange
cheeks. Lost on 8/3 in
Pine Ridge, near Mus-
tang &Amarillo. Please
call 746-3901 or
476-5215.
LOST
Female Siamese Mix cat
lost Fairview Estates.
352-228-9286
Lost Mixed
Chihuahua/Poodle
Male, Inverness,
Independence
(352) 419-6299
REWARD**** Lost Male
Orange Cat. Very
friendly. No front claws.
Lost around Smith Ave-
nue in Inverness on Aug
8th. REWARD
352-613-6276



Found 2 pair prescrip-
tion eye glasses in fold-
ing cloth case. Publix
parking lot Homosassa
Call 10a-8p pis leave
message
(352) 621-0665


Large, gray w/ green
eyes and pink collar
in Crystal River near
State Park Road
(727) 742-6061


Found
Male Chihuahua
August 2
blond hair, neuterd.
Intersection Floral Park
Rd. & Great Oaks
(352) 287-0792



ADVERTISE YOUR WAY
TO SUCCESS!!
Call now to grow
your business. Get
your classified ad in
119 newspapers with
one order.
Advertising Networks
of Florida.
866-742-1373


ENROLLING
For All Programs
*mCOSMETOLOGY
I :BARBER
|'MASSAGE THERAPY
rSKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415




Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/Ib,
10/15ct $8/Ib. delivered
(772)781-1262




HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


"Thatthekids inTake Stckin WThateveyddd has signed a lhateeyd Alddiers "Thatyoar anc butontoTake
Chidlrenaregood kdswiththe ntractand has u mittedto ontheirpnisetouswill Stod in dren wil go far
potential to begreat" stay ut of t le, get god reeivea clege sdlarship and so wi these children "
mu..,mm grades and paldpateleinour andalifefilled wih M ,,
MISW mentringprograinm." opportuityandhpe.' flwaxO


i.nu.i..m oain4Miw
2MIMBUm wwinmNG~


TaeStoki n .h i *
Thrughs^hlarhip, mntos ad hpe


naMCeOO


352-746-6721 ext 6140 www.takestockinchildren.org


(11111ll

Help good kids become geat.


ADMISSIONS
COORDINATOR
For CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
a Skilled Nursing
Facility in Crystal Riv.
The candidate
should have great
marketing skills. Be
familiar with medical
terminology, and
strong organizational
Skills. LPN or RN would
be preferred Fax
Resume 352-795-0490
or email to:
ccenter14@tam-
pabay.rr.com

F/T Medical
Insurance Biller

Experience required,
Benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1795M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429



Your World

~94'l9en441e4


CHKONICE


AM & PM CLASSES
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
MEDICAL
OFFICE
RECEPTIONIST

-Receives, collects,
verifies, records,
dates & distributes
patient demo-
graphic, physician
and financial infor-
matioin accord-
ance with MBO
standards &
guidelines.
-Coordinates and
verifies insurance
benefits & eligibility
on all patient accts
-Requests co-pays
and co-ins from pa-
tients & documents
accts according to
policy;balances &
maintains cash-
drawer and daily
deposit.
-Answers verbal and
written requests in
accordance with
HIPAA guidelines and
departmental proce-
dures; responds to re-
quests for patient fi-
nancial information;
investigates
concerns/issues and
may refer customers
to appropriate hospi-
tal resources.
-Explains consent
forms and obtains
patient signatures in
accordance with all
applicable state and
federal insurance
regulations.
-Performs administra-
tive support duties
Send Resume to
Michelle @
Health-Wellcare.com



Yil 'I 1 Id I, I st.
L ... L'^ .

CHiONC LE
Classifieds


- -9


RECEPTIONIST
Needed for a busy
two physician office
Fax resume to
352-860-1918
or email
droffice511@vahoo
.com






ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722


Full Time
Lab Technologist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429

Medical Asst
for Family Practice Office.
Fax Resumes to:
352-795-2296

MEDICAL
CAREERS

BEGIN HERE -
GET TRAINED IN
MONTHS, NOT YEARS.
FINANCIAL AID IF
QUALIFIED. HOUSING
AVAILABLE.
JOB PLACEMENT
ASSISTANCE. CALL
CENTURY INSTITUTE
(877)206-6559

MEDICAL
CAREERS
begin here -Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
WWW.
CenturaOnline.com

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN I CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions available for
Florida-licensed
nurses and certified
nursing assistants.
Full-time hours are
3 p.m.-11 p.m. PRN
positions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience is
preferred. We offer
great pay and
benefits to full-time
associates, including
medical coverage,
401(k) and paid va-
cation, sick days and
holidays.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hannah Mand@
LCCA.com
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D 34547



Cen~.0t


CALL NOW *
Looking to fill
Immediate
positions In the
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary.
Call Michelle
352-436-4460




AUTO TECHS Needed.
Co m p e t i t i v e
Pay & Benefits. ASE & or Ford
C e r t -
fed linetechs. Call (352)4934297
for Russ Hall for in person
resume/interview appoint-
ment.

CABLE TV
TECHNICIAN
Candidate should
possess strong techni-
cal ability In all areas
of CATV. On-Call duty
required and valid FL
drivers license with
good driving record.
Apply at Oak Run
SR200/110th Street
Ocala or call
352-854-6557
for more Info or email
at: jobs@
deccahomes.com
EEO/DFWP

Medium
Equipment
Operator-Landfill
Announcement
# 12-44
32 hours weekly
Skilled work in the
operation of moder-
ately complex landfill
equipment. One
year's experience in
the operation and
routine maintenance
of the type of
equipment assigned.
Performs manual
laboring tasks. Must
have or be able to
obtain within 90 days
of employment a
valid Florida CDL, B
with N endorsement.
Starting pay
$10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to
applv online by
Fri., August 17, 2012.
EOE/ADA.


ROUTES




AVAILABLE




NOWJ1teIo


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager or
email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
C I T R U S., N.IC l Eon nY



CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


SNOW HIRING FULL.TIMIE POSITIONS





















BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


229Hy.4 Inens
Se Bede Pu


THE CITY OF
INVERNESS
IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR
SPECIAL EVENTS
DIRECTOR.
Completed applica-
tions are to be
submitted to the City
Administration Office
for handling and
importantly include a
prepared prospectus,
by the applicant, to
illustrate the appli-
cant's approach
to the position of
Special Events
Director, to include
elements of special
event programming
and analysis they
will use to achieve
a desirable outcome
and to state their
conceptual goal of
the outcome.
DETAILED JOB
DESCRIPTIONS AND
APPLICATIONS MAY
BE PICKED UP AT
212 WEST MAIN
STREET, INVERNESS, FL.
OR OBTAINED ONLINE
AT:
www.Inverness-FL.gov
EEO/
ACCOMMODATION
FOR HANDICAPPED
EMPLOYEE-VETERAN
PREFERENCE.


CLASSIFIED


(SWfOOE







D4 SUNDAY,AUGUST 12, 2012


E
Local Tower
Service Co.
Looking for
individuals capable
of ascending
broadcast towers to
service lights.
Electrical
experience
preferred, will train.
Travel required
throughout South-
east. Company
vehicle and hotel pro-
vided. Excellent pay,
per diem, bonus and
benefits. Background
check performed and
clean FL drivers li-
cense
required. Apply in
person at Hilights Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL.
352-564-8830

MASON TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and
from work in in Citrus &
surrounding counties
(352) 302-2395
TOW TRUCK
OPERATOR, SVC
WRITER, SVC
TECHNITION
Taking applications for
positions above. Apply
in person only at 12059
N Florida Ave,
Dunnellon, FL 34434.







Applications
being accepted for

ROUTE MANAGER

for the single copy
sales of newspapers.
Good organizational
skill needed, experi-
ence with sales, able
to work in data
spreadsheets, good
people skills, ability to
work all hours. Send
resume to
kstewart@
chronicleonline.com





ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!
Drive 4 Us Top Pay &
CSA Friendly Equip
401K & Great
Insurance 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782

CLEANER
Flexible Schedule
wkends $9hr. Email
Resume: marketing
@tampabay.rr.com

DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Stevens Transport!
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job Ready
in just 15 days!
(888)368-1964


Drivers
HIRING EXPERIENCED/
INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS!
Great Benefits and
Pay! New Fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 Year OTR
Exp. Req.- Tanker
Training Available.
Call Today:
(877)882-6537
WWW.
OakleyTransport.com

Drivers
Refrigerated and Dry
Van freight.
Daily or Weekly Pay!
$0.01 raise per mile
after 6 months.
CDL-A, 3 months
current OTR exp.
(800)414-9569.
WWW.
driveknight.com

Drivers/Flatbed
Class A.

GET HOME WEEK-
ENDS! Southeast Re-
gional, Earn up to
39c/mi. 1 year OTR
Flatbed experience
required,
(800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

EXP. HORSE
& FARM HELP

STALLS, TURNOUT,
GROOM, MOW
INGLIS AREA, F/T, EOE
352-400-0469

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS
earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE

FREE TUITION
TAX SCHOOL
Potential to earn extra
income after taking
course. Flexible
schedules, convenient
locations. Register
now! Courses start
September 10th.
Call (352) 563-2777
Liberty Tax Service

Small fee for books


CH1- NILdE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHocCLE


Experienced
Shingle Layers

ELITE ROOFING. Must
have truck and tools.
352-586-7037

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced
Must be Lazy, greedy
and willing to make
over $600 a wk.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean



TITLE AGENT/
PROCESSOR/
CLOSER
Title company operat-
ing in Dunnellon area.
Prefer 3+ years exp.
Submit resume with
salary requirement.
Email to: titleclosingsl
@gmail.com
Transfer Drivers
Need 20 Contract
Drivers
(over the road)
CDL A or B to relo-
cate vehicles to and
from various locations
throughout US-
(800)501-3783
www.mamo
transportation.com




Site Manager/
Outreach Worker
(Part time
9:15 am- 12:15 pm
Monday-Friday)
Announcement
#12-45

Routine work coordi-
nating activities and
special events at the
Beverly Hills dining
site. Prepares room
set-up and break
down. Takes temper-
atures of meals and
coordinates
volunteers for serving
lunch. Completes
client assessment
documents and
maintains attend-
ance logs. Performs
daily cleaning.
Graduation from
High School or GED.
Starting pay
$8.45 hourly.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to

applv online by
Fri., August 17, 2012.
EOE/ADA.


Accounting Assist
Parttime, Knowledge
of Peachtree &
Quickbooks helpful
Fax Resume to:
(352)489-6147




AIRLINES
ARE HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED
Become a Medical
Office Assistant at SC
Train!! No Experience
needed! Online
training gets you job
ready! HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Meet singles
right now!

No paid operators,
just real people like
you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange mes-
sages and connect
live. Try it free.
Call now
(888)744-4426

r NOW 7
ENROLLING
I For All Programs
COSMETOLOGY
I*BARBER
MASSAGE THERAPY
re'NAIL TECH
-SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
I Naccas Accredited 1
727-848-8415
I-iiiii=II







Yi~urw'rldlirs[


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



( I. .. . .


CLASSIFIED



P/T Business nets $47k
Christian thyme maga-
zine. No exp nec. Clients
are well established
throughout Fl. Will train.
Retiring $24,900.
828-667-5371




v' THIS OUT!
ANTIQUE TABLE &
CHAIRS Dark
Oak.French,carving,6
cane chairs. Excellent.
$275/set Dunnellon
352-465-4441


Colectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




AIR CONDITIONER 12K
BTU Arctic King window
AC. Excellent, w/remote.
$100 352-465-4441
Dunnellon
Freezer, Upright
almost new
$400 or Trade
Refrigerator
(352) 726-3062
GE Profile Advantium
Over-the-Range Micro-
wave. $75. 352-563-2288
GE Profile Advantium
Over-the-Range Micro-
wave. $75. 352-563-2288
Refrigerator
$150. obo
(352) 476-3793
Refrigerator
25 cu. ft. GE,
side by side, water,
ice in door Almond,
$185. obo
(352) 628-4031
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Table w/ 4 captain
Chairs $60
Swimming Pool Slide
7 ft. $300
(352) 628-7633
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like new, Excel-
lent Condition. Can De-
liver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty.
Call/text352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL DRYER
Front Load, Auto Dry
model,Whi,Exc condition.
$175(352)270-3772 Or
(352)464-1591


COMPUTER PRINTER
TABLE 28 high 20 wide
16 deep
Walnut color $20.00
352-726-0686
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON NX215 INKJET
PRINTER Good condi-
tion. Xtra inks.
$30.00 352-726-0686
HP Pavillion
Laptop
$175
352-586-6891
X BOX Game System
w/11 games$250 obo
Play station 3 w/ 5 games
$200 OBO
Both in great cond
(352)795-7513



2 Twin Beds
white wicker head-
board, mattress &
boxspring $100
(352)527-6527
4 Piece leather
sectional
green,
w/rediner &
queenn bed.
$575. excel
cond.
352- 726-5584
6 pc Oak Entertainment
Center; expandable
Selling w/ 51 in. Hitachi
TV. $1200. Will sell sep-
arately if interested.
(352) 527-7980
ARMOIRE 3 shelves 2
door, oak color,good
condition,59x30x16 $70.
352-382-0069
BEAUTIFUL OAK WOOD
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER 52"x48". Shelves
behind door. Exc. $100
352-465-4441 Dunnellon
Dark Bennington Pine
Dining Room 6 ft table
6 chairs, 6ft x 7 ft wall
cabinet leaded glass
upper cabinet. $700.
2 sleeper couches,
$20. ea.
3 Love Seats $120 ea.
3 Liv. Rm Tables $120
1 glass table $120
6ft TV/Electronics
cabinet $80. Queen
Platform Bed & 2
Dresser $120.
4ft x 16"Table $50.
9 drawer dresser $30
(352) 465-9302
Dining Rm. Set, glass
top, 42" W x 72" L, w/
marble & medal trim,
6 chairs, matching side
table, coffee, 2 end
tables $975 All or
separate. Antique solid
oak drop leaf table 4
bentwood chairs, ex-
cel. $375. 352-726-5584
DRESSER OAK LOOK
Four drawers parti-
cleboard Clean/Good
shape Great for kids $25.
352-270-3909
Ekornes Stressless
Love Seat Light Tan
Leather w/ wood trim
New $,4,500,
Asking $1,500 obo
352-270-0191
LIGHTED CHINA
CABINET Great shape &
value. Price to sell fast.
$100 352-613-4279


LOVESEAT & SOFA
Navajo Indian pattern
NICE condition $80. for
both 352-621-0175
MAUVE WING BACK
CHAIR made by Pioneer
Very good condition
$60.00 527-1399
MOVING SALE
2 BR, Ivg room,
dining rm & enter-
tainment center.
Hunters Ridge Cir
Crystal Oaks
Gated Comm. Ap-
pointments avail
Sat & Sun. Cl
(352) 746-0084
OAK BAR
3X5 L shaped custom
oak bar, on wheels w/ 2
swivel stools, $300
Call 8am-7pm
(352) 465-2823
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen size sofa
hide a bed tropical
pattern. Very good
condition $165. All
wood Coffee Table $65
(352) 637-5755
RECLINER CHAIR Blue
tweed in color, good
cond.Comfort. $40.00
352-513-4473
SOFA 90" LOVESEAT
64" SW pattern Well
made quality Nonsmoker
8am-7pm $80.set
352-621-0175
SOFA FOR SALE
7ft teal, floral, loose cush-
ions, matching chase
lounge chair. Like new
$350. 352- 726-5584
TABLE Round pedestal
with tile top, leaf & 4
chairs. Pine $200.00
352-628-5312
Trademark 3-in- I
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), $250
Broyhill dining room set
(for 6), cream color &
china cabinet, $1,000.
(352) 637-7237
Triple Dresser w/ mirror,
chest, 2 night stands,
dark wood $125.
Oak Table w/ 6 chairs,
excel. cond. $275.
(352) 341-5182
TV Stand holds up to
63" TV, silver w/ glass
shelf $100
(352) 270-0191
Upright Freezer
runs well
$100.
(352)465-9130
WHICKER HEADBOARD
for double bed $40.00
352 513 4473
Wrought Iron
Loft Frame Black
No Mattress
Used 2 months, $100.
firm (352) 364-1562



BRINLY FERTILIZER
SPREADER Pull behind
Cart Spreader Model
BS-36 Excellent Condi-
tion $65.00 352.249.9164
Craftsman Riding
Mower
17%' HP
42" Deck $500
(352) 746-7357
Jon Deere
Mower 42" Cut, w/
wagon, excel. asking
$1,200
(352) 527-0347


OOH LA LA FINE
CONSGINMENTSAND
BOUTIQUE.
352-527-7900
We sell and consign.
Ladies clothing, purses,
jewelry
3871 North Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, Fl 34465



!!!!!!LT35X12.50 R15!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
******225/65 R16*******
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
2 Automatic Pool
Cleaners, Alpha 3
Barracuda by Zodiac &
Great White, w/ hoses
excel, cond. $135. ea
(352) 270-8475
2 Front Tires
24540ZR 18
2 Rear Tires
27535ZR18 $100
Michelins off Mercedes
(352) 344-1413
3 Tires Good Tread
Excellent Condition
225/60/16 $25/each
Water Cooler w/ refrig
Hot/Cold water $25
352-897-4168
3 Wheel Handicap
Scooter
Headlights, taillights
built in charging sys.
Newly refurbished
$450. obo Must Sell
Call Ed (352) 613-6331
7 METAL DOLL STANDS
$10 DIFFERENT SIZES
NEW, NEVER USED
352-419-5981
Above Ground Pool
18 ft. Intex Pool, in-
cludes all accessories
and extras, custom
wood deck avail, must
dismount drain and
Remove. Org $1,500.
sell $850. 352-341-0660
AIR CONDITIONER
Portable By Fedders,
7500 BTU's on wheels,
window vented, Room
to Room Like New $210
(352) 270-8475
Chest Freezer
White $50.
Card/Snooker Table
w/ 6 rolling chairs
$75
(352) 422-2516
CHILDS TRAIN TABLE
step2 deluxe canyon road
and track table with cover
like new 50.00 call
6284447 after 4pm
EPSOM, STYLUS
PRINTER/COPIER
$20.00, excellent condi-
tion. 352-513-4027
FUTON/TWIN BUNK
BED Wood posts w/black
metal frame.Mattress
optional. $100.00 obo
352-628-7504
GAMING TABLE 3 way,
poker/bumper pool
/dining. Good condition.
$50.00 obo.
352-628-7504
HOOVER SELF PRO-
PELLED VACUUM
CLEANER $35 WORKS
GOOD INVERNESS
352-419-5981
JUICY COUTURE PET
CARRIER Leather &
Juicy logo $100.00
352-513-4027


Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct$7/lb,
10/15ct $8/1b. delivered

LAMINATE FLOORING
450 sq ft of laminate
flooring & underlayment
$100.352-341-1086
MALE CHIHUAHUA
PUPPY Aprox. 5 mo. old
Shots & Health
Certificate. $100.00
352- 628-7504
MOTOR SCOOTER
Yamaha, 1988
0049CC, 973 org. miles.
excel. cond., runs like
new $,1000. firm, cash
(352) 445-9448
Oak Entertainment
Center
w/ 27" Sony TV
$350
(352) 344-2109
TELEPHONE
ANSWERING MACHINE
$10 LIKE NEW. ALL
CONNECTIONS
352-419-5981
Toddler Bed
All wood, w/ mattress
Extra side rail for safety
New $50. Mini Ab Circle
Pro New condition $50
(352) 634-1697
Trailer Frame 19ft x 7ft,
dual Axle $500
Lawn Mower
Craftsman LT4000 21H
$400
(352) 419-2144
TREADMILL
Sears, Lifestyler,
Expanse 800
Excel cond. $300 Cash
(352) 445-9448
Treadmill, Proform
I fit function, excel.
cond. $300. obo
Nikon D60 Digital cam-
era w/lens kit, + extra
55-200 mm lens $300.
obo (352) 527-0347
Troybilt
Pressure Washer
2600 PSI, Honda engine
used 2 times $200
(352) 637-5209
WATER HEATER
Electric 52 gal. 15 years
old but never used
$75.00 obo.
352-628-7504
WORK BENCH: Heavy
duty steel. Old but solid.
48Wx29Dx34H.
352-634-3844 $25.
Can email photos.



Commercial Mayfear
Large Panini Sandwich
Grill, excel. cond. $350
Cecilware Electric
flattop griggle Stain.
Steel used lyr in Deli
Business $375. Good
working order 287-9073



3-Wheel Handicap
Scooter
NEW $500
(352) 527-3698
DRIVE STEEL TRANS-
PORT WHEELCHAIR
New wheelchair has
19inch seat and remova-
ble arms and footrests.
Back folds down for stor-
age and transport. Has 8
inch wheels front and
back with rear wheel
locks. Carries up to 300
lbs. Weighs 26 lbs. New
$360.00..Will sell for
$170.00. Call
352-563-0524


a4.



h. ,"O'.r


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


If lll \11

Y L I \\0 ILl lust.
EbLi) Da)



( 1.,


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD

COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *"



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman_
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V'FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
v FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292
TOP NOTCH Carpentry
and Remodeling
Kitchen/Bath Specialist
All Handyman Needs
Lic. (352) 220-8801



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
I am Looking for work
as a housekeeper.
$15. Hr., 3 Hrs. min.
(352) 382-4517
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




HOME SCHOOLING
HS Diploma or GED,
$15 hr. Ages 13 to 65
Call Toni Harris M.E.D.
(352) 341-0660


BBath



The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALLIII
352-563-9824, 228-7320
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(coin) 400-2221




TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree
Svc Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www. natu recast
hI"ome front.comrn


Boulerice

QB000210 & SUPPLY INC.

In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
S 125 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF :
One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
BET FREE ESTIMATES.
(352) 628-5079




WINDOir-
GENIE.
We Clean Windows and Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188




BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000C42R


ROOIN


AAA ROOFING
Call the "Aeak&fusta."
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Sic3./ns CCC. -057537L nc7a


1>aaJ |Bm
Crysal Rver ft ivenSs


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
SAll Home
Repairs
i':, Small Carpentry

Screening
( Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
S Expenence lifelong
3 2-344-0905
0 cell: 400-1722



REMODEIN


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
* "NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
* Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 41" 1 .
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)


GENERAL '
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I


I I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


verse
Power chair,
great for indoor or
outdoor use
$500 352-419-4297




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIG BAG, STRAP,
TUNER, STRINGS &
PICKS "BLEM" $35
352-601-6625
Guitar Gig Bag.$10.
352-419-4464
LES PAUL SPECIAL
STYLE ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT "NEW" $80
352-601-6625
Peavey Max 112
Bass Amp $95
352-419-4464
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
Tufted seat /wood.open
top to store music
$40.00 352-513 4473




8 2" FAUX WOOD
WHITE BLINDS $100 for
all eight various sizes
352-382-4911
HOOVER Wind tunnel
bagless H/D vacuum.
$40. 352-563-2288
KING "NOBILITY" ABER-
DEEN COMFORTER
SET -7 PIECES $45.00
FIRM 352-382-4911
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened. Self-adhesive,
re-positionable. $20
352-341-3607
TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES- Brand
New! 2 Kleenex holders,
3 wall units, 12 shower
hooks. $40 341 3607




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Aug. 11th 9-5p
Sun. Aug. 12th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

GUNS
Buy Sell Trade
All Types All Brands
New & Used
Triggers Down, LLC
(352) 697-0735
Huffy Mountain Bikes
18 speed, 1 ladies
1 mens $75 ea.
excel. cond.
Ladies Silverridge
Road Master Bike $50.
(352) 746-7940
IVER JOHNSON M1
CARBINE 57X44 in great
shape.$700.
352-427-2068

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238






2008 UTILITY LAND-
SCAPE TRAILER Used
modified 4X6 utility trailer
with drive up ramp. Has
spare tire overhead racks
and safety chains. $300
352-436-4578 or
817-279-3203




Need to fill your bracelet
Authentic Pandora Beads
$20/ea Variety of beads
with bracelet and clips
email lithgowmaureen@
yahoo.com


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
liard Cues Coins & Jew-
elry Best Prices Paid
Chris @ 352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net





BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Aug 19, 9-4 Cages,
seed, millet, cuttlebone,
Fruit & Nut Treat, Cage
Wire, Guineas & More!
727-517-5337 8260
Adrian Drive Brooksville
Blue Dobberman
Female Have Papers
Needs Registered Stud
Immediately
Show Papers
(352) 621-3105


BUDDY
Is an 8 year old
German Shepherd
mix, in desperate
need of a home.
Housebroken, gets
along with dogs &
cats. Gentle & calm.
Heartworm -negative
Call Joanne
352-795-1288.
MO- -


,,m uT L-U I*1*^ L*-
NEUTERED How can
you not love this face?
Cooper is a gentle,
sweet, boy and would
make a wonderful fam-
ily pet. He is utd on all
shots, and microchip-
ped. Cooper is a free
adoption to approved
home. 352 746 8400,
352 621 3207
Chihuahua, male, 10 wks
small and sweet $200
(352) 697-1683
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 28th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Free Birds
to good home call for info:
(352) 634-2781
HAPPY JACK@
DuraSpot:
latest technology in
flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs.
Patented. At farm,
feed & hardware
stores. Distributed by
Fuller Supply
(205)343-3341.
WWW.
happyjackinc.com

Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com


lILLI Ole dl 1.r a Idl.ln l,
dog! This shepherd mix
just wants to be with his
human, whether that's
lounging by your feet at
home, hanging out at the
park or walking on the
trail. He is only 2 years
old but he has a very ma-
ture, relaxed disposition
and has great house
manners. He is a smart
boy who learns quickly.
Little Bear walks well on a
leash and knows some
commands already. He
gets along with other
dogs and likes to play
while out in public, but he
wants to be your one and
only pet at home. He has
been at the shelter pa-
tiently waiting for his new
best friend to find him so
they can start their new
lives together. His adop-
tion fee of $30 includes
microchipping, vaccina-
tions, a month of free pet
insurance, free obedi-
ence class and neutering.
352-568-5095
MaltiPoo Pups
Adorable non shed,
great disposition.
1st shots, $400 (352)
794-3081 or 795-5204
Purebred Black & Tan
Miniature
Dachshunds
Great Breeder
$250.
(352) 613-5817
Rottweiler Puppies
AKC /Papers
$400. lOwks
352-302-3735
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net









SIMON

Is a 1 Year Old Male
Terrier Mix
In excellent physical
shape. Very gentle,
calm, gets along with
other dogs, not
interested in cats.
Walk well on a leash
very affectionate.
Found as a stray,
deserves a wonderful
forever home.
(352) 795-1288




Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR

^^^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A ^ "A- A "A- ^ <


Boar Goats for sale
2 males & 2 females
1 male's father is regis-
tered,
(352) 586-2590





Aqua Sport
22 ft. 150H Johnson
Cox free loading trailer
CC, built 1973. $7,500
obo (352) 201-8299

CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(aHotmail.com

GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

LOWE
2011 Jon Boat 14 foot,
9.9 Mercury outboard
motor, trailer, boat cover.
Brand new. $2000.00
Please call 440-813-7169

Sea Doo
1999, Bomdardier,
w/ trailer, not running
$500.
(352) 201-8299





2000 Rialto Winn
22 ft, 20mpg, runs great
new air, 90K, See to ap-
preciatie $23,500. obo
(352) 527-9133

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.

RV LOT FOR RENT
OR SALE by OWNER
LOT #119
Nature Coast Landings
(352) 634-5300

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298




I BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945

KZ Sportsman
2011, Hybrid, 19ft,
sleeps 6, air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098





Maroon Cap 64V2 x 81 V2
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brake & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$225.obo 352-795-3920

Pair of Firestone Tires
FR 710215/55/17
$30.
(989) 255-1513




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892







CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 milestitanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manualleather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $22,000
call 1-352-503-6548

FORD
1995 Crown Victoria.
76,000 miles.
Runs Good,Cold A/C.
Asking $2,500.00
OBO Call 726-7128

FORD
2008 Taurus Selling my
moms 2008 Taurus SEL.
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18
months or until 36,000
miles. Lt blue exterior.
Tan leather interior.
Sunroof. Great shape.
$13,495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326


HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS
352-628-4600

LINCOLN
1989 Town Car RUNS
GOOD. NO LEAKS.
COLD AIR. GOOD RUB-
BER. DEPENDABLE.
$1100.00 BRUCE
352-256-8488

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600




CHEVY
'68, Corvette, Roadster,
matching numbers,
LeMans blue, converti-
ble 4 spd., 327 cu. in.
350HP, Asking $37,000
Serious inquiries only
Please (352) 795-4426
MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
excel. cond., one owner,
81k mi., garage kept
$7,500 (352) 726-0258







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555
CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018
DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab,
Diesel Dually 50K Excel-
lent cond. $21,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8,
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4, 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018


CLASSIFIED




TOYOTA
'98, Tacoma, 4 cyl. 5
speed, runs great,
high miles $2, 400.
352-257-4251, 794-6069
TOYOTA TACOMA
extra cab, automatic,
runs excellent, AIC
$4950
Cell 352-257-4251,
Ofc 794-6069

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments **
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8, 4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600




CHEVROLET
2008 Express Van Chevy
Express 2500 HD Cargo
Van. 24816 miles, excel-
lent condition. Asking
14800. 352-795-3708
DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 7! $5,450.
352-341-0018
DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN
2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6, 150k miles,
A/C, tinted windows, tilt,
pw, pd, cruise. $2,950
(352) 527-3894
FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack & fact.
shelving, Ice cold air
$2,800 (352) 726-2907
Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018




Dune Buggies
1 sand rail $5,000
1 Fiberglass $5,900
Call (352) 322-0178


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 D5


2004 Kawasaki
Nomad 1500
$5200 OBO
352-341-8479
Above ground Pool
24 x 4 ft
Never been put up.
Brand New $500. obo
(352) 860-1426
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra, Sale or Trade
for truck of equal value
$10,500
(352) 601-4722
Harley Davidson 1200
Sportser SL Custom
2003 100 yr anniv bike
4300 mi, extra clean
$9000 422-2913
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HONDA
1 Small Motorcycle
1 Large, Motorcycle For
parts or need repair
$500. (352)860-1426


398-0819 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
08-29-12 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
- DUNNELLON
UNIT
#00163 MARINDA GARRI-
SON
#00248 EDWARD GROSS II
#00261 PATRICIA ANN
SEYMOUR
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VE-
HICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- August 29th
@ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
August 12 & 19, 2012.


397-0826 SUCRN 09/06/12 sale Units 110, 255, 239, 309, 369, 614
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY
RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES SELF STOARGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807: WINDMILL SELF STORAGE.
UNIT # 110 AUDREY EDWARDS
UNIT # 255 JONI PAUGH
UNIT #239 ROBERT NOLAND
UNIT 309 COLLEEN MAHONEY
UNIT #369 HENRY HOWEY
UNIT #614 GLENDA AUSTIN
TENANTS STORED GOODS, IF SALABLE WILL BE SOLD ON SITE AFTER THIS PUBLIC NOTICE
HAS BEEN PUBLISHED TWO TIMES. THE SALE OF THE STORED GOODS, IF NOT REDEEMED
BY PAYMENT IN FULL OF ALL DELINQUENT RENTS AND RELATED COSTS, IN ACCORD-
ANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES. SALE WILL BE HELD ON PREMISES THURSDAY SEPTEMBER
6, 2012 @ 10 A.M. WINDMILL SELF STORAGE 2297- W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. (HWY.44)
LECANTO, FL (352)746-3633
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, AUGUST 12 & 26, 2012.


301-0812 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Debra Fink
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Debra A. Fink
1735 S Palm Ave
Homosassa, FL 34448
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle August 12,2012


302-0812 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
4375 E Archer Ln, Inverness, Fl 34452
4355 Archer Trust
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: 1. Red pickup truck (no tag); 2. Blue sedan (inoperable).
4375 E Archer Ln, Inverness, Fl 34452
4355 Archer Trust
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, cardboard boxes, and miscella-
neous trash and debris.
Babcock EST, H. June
329 S Jackson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Bowman EST, Harold C.
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, household items, doors, windows,
lumber, carpet, tires, plastic barrels, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Bowman EST, Harold C.
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, FI 34446
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain a Develop-
ment Order for two (2) sheds.
Bowman EST, Harold C.
5444 W J P Ct, Homosassa, FI 34446-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One (1) recreational vehicle, two (2) travel trailers, two (2) boats and trailers
and one (1) boat trailer.

Carpenter, Pamela D.
355 S Russell Rd, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(B)(2); The following animals
are specifically prohibited from being considered personal pets under this section
and are allowable only under the provisions of this Land Development Code within
residential districts: Roosters, gamecocks, and turkeys. To Wit: Rooster


Carpenter, Pamela D.
355 S Russell Rd, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(A)(7); The raising of swine in
MDR District is not permitted on parcels less than 2 acres.
Clayson, Denise
33 E Golden St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Davis, Everett Van
18 W Golden St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Appliances, broken lawn equipment, broken bicycles,
a large amount of wooden debirs, toilet, household garbage, and other miscellane-
ous trash and debris.
Faust, Sophia M.
4390 E Amherst St, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Inoperable 4 door SUV covered with a tarp and missing 3 tires.
Faust, Sophia M.
4370 E Amherst St, Hernando, FI 34442-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Remnants of a demo'd single wide mobile home
down to the frame, metal and plastic debris, toilet, household items, and other mis-
cellaneous trash and debris.
Faust, Sophia M.
4390 E Amherst St, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Appliances, broken lawn equipment, broken bicycles,
a large amount of wooden debris, toilet, household garbage, and other miscellane-
ous trash and debris.
Gerardi, Roger L. & Mary Jo
323 S Schmidt Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020. To Wit: Mobile home
Gerardi, Roger L. & Mary Jo
323 S Schmidt Ave, Inverness, FI 34450
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, couch, glass windows, tires, paper,
and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Guy, Randy W.
7898 W Riverbend Rd, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household items, furniture, appliances, plastic contain-
ers, building materials, and large amounts of miscellenaous junk.

Howerton Koon, Jacqueline L. *REPEAT VIOLATION"
1940 S Mooring Dr., Inverness, FI 34450-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: GMC SUV No tag
Lofty, Sandra
6275 S Lima Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, mattresses, table, chairs, furniture, gas
cans, a large amount of tires, and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Lofty, Sandra
6275 S Lima Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Two (2) boats and an RV are located on the property.
Myles, Amber
2141 W Deer Trail Ln, Lecanto, FI 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken toys, carpet
remnants, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Orban, Dalene & Ellis, Beverly S.
7120 W Gulf To Lake Hwy, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 4420A; Accessory uses are not
permitted on lots that do not contain a principal use or structure. The owner of Shed
Movers has 15 20 sheds stored on this property and there is no primary structure on
site since the mattress warehouse burnt down.
Petschow, Rhon D.
4025 N Bloom Pt, Crystal River, FI 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2402; No auto salvage/junkyard is
allowed in Rural Residential Districts.
Regions Bank
7729 E Pocono Dr., Inverness, FI 34450-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Hubcaps, wood, tires, old bicycles, tarp, car seat,
cardboard boxes, household garbage, and miscellaneous trash and debris.
Regions Bank
7729 E Pocono Dr, Inverness, FI 34450
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Roberts, Michael A.
2670 N Lakefront Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Multiple cars, trucks, motor home and motorcycles.
Taromino Jr., Samuel R. & Buset Margaret J.
4212 N Carl G Rose Hwy, Hernando, Fl 34442
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 4631; Storage of vehicles is not al-
lowed unless they are being repaired.
Thomas EST Melvin L.
42 Tyler St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: A gold Concorde vehicle with an expired tag and a trailer with an expired
tag.
Vogelsang, Rebecca
4070 E Lake Park Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain the appro-
priate and necessary Development Orders for two (2) storage buildings.
Yates, James & Patty
6588 W Gannet PI, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,


store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Expired boat tag 11/11, expired tags and inoperable Cadillac and Camaro
vehicles.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.

MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
August 12, 2012


Meeting
I Ntics


Meeting
I Ntics


m
Meeting^
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I Misc. Noti


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Noti


Meeting

I Notices A


Metn


Metn






D6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I


a. Fl


YOU PAY PER MO
$21,999* 289
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


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YOU PAY PER MO
$20,999 *2755
NOT A LEASE, YOU OWN IT!


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CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


CRYSTAL


SWJ CHEVROLET
CrystalAutos.com 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515
++$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER.*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSIS-
TANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE
EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65%
APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
Ilffilllf


MEN


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 D7


I40]


III








BEST SELECTION AND BEST PRICES


Jeep


K>M


EVERY VEHiCLECVEREDBYCYSTALIMITEDiWARNl YII


2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 57556


2012 FORD TAURUS
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52609


2012 FORD MUSTANG
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52280


2012 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 2012 DODGE CHALLENGER 2012 CHEVROLET TAHOE
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 17773 800-584-8755 EXT. 17881 800-584-8755 EXT. 17742
2012 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE 2012 FIAT 500 2012 CHEVROLET MAUBU
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 17832 800-584-8755 EXT. 42335 800-584-8755 EXT. 47488
2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE 2012 NISSAN FRONTIER 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 42217 800-584-8755 EXT. 67705 800-584-8755 EXT. 63009
2012 NISSAN ROGUE 2011 CHEVROLET HHR 2011 CHRYSLER 200
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT 62513 800-584-8755 EXT. 12431 800-584-8755 EXT. 12290
2011 HONDA CIVIC 2011 GMC SIERRA 1500 2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
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800-584-8755 EXT. 52099 800-584-8755 EXT. 52316 800-584-8755 EXT. 57544
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 JEEP WRANGLER 2011 SCION TC
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52521 800-584-8755 EXT. 57566 800-584-8755 EXT. 52406
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY 2011 NISSAN ROGUE 2011 DODGE CHALLENGER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52538 800-584-8755 EXT. 52460 800-584-8755 EXT. 52276
2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO 2011 CHEVROLET MAUBU 2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT 17829 800-584-8755 EXT. 13001 800-584-8755 EXT. 17764
2011 GMC TERRAIN 2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE
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800-584-8755 EXT 17765 800-584-8755 EXT. 17766 800-584-8755 EXT. 17594
2011 CHEVROLET COLORADO 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 2011 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 17783 800-584-8755 EXT. 12139 800-584-8755 EXT. 17836
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO 2011 NISSAN VERSA 2011 DODGE CAUBER
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800-584-8755 EXT. 17530 800-584-8755 EXT. 42210 800-584-8755 EXT. 17616
2011 DODGE NITRO 2011 DODGE AVENGER 2011 DODGE DAKOTA
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800-584-8755 EXT. 42231 800-584-8755 EXT. 47827 800-584-8755 EXT. 47860
2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
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2011 JEEP WRANGLER 2011 NISSAN TTIAN 2011 NISSAN ALTIMA
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800-584-8755 EXT 62287 800-584-8755 EXT. 67761 800-584-8755 EXT. 67585
2011 GMC TERRAIN 2011 NISSAN FRONTIER 2011 NISSAN JUKE
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800-584-8755 EXT. 62213 800-584-8755 EXT. 62310 800-584-8755 EXT. 62433
2011 NISSAN MURANO 2010 MITSUBISHI LANCER 2010 CHEVROLET COBALT
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800-584-8755 EXT 12455 800-584-8755 EXT 52237 800-584-8755 EXT. 52172
2010 DODGE JOURNEY 2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING 2010 DODGE CHARGER
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT. 52462 800-584-8755 EXT. 52461 800-584-8755 EXT. 57265
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING 2010 GMC ACADIA 2010 JEEP COMPASS
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 EXT 52282 800-584-8755 EXT. 52408 800-584-8755 EXT. 52269
2010 DODGE RAM 1500 2010 HYUNDAI SONATA 2010 DODGE CHALLENGER
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1035 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


CRYSTALAUTOS COM


D8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SM PAGE E4


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE
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E2 SUNDA~~ AUGUST 12, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


HRUANE BUILT BEAUTY
*GOLFING COMMUNITY -GORGEOUS POOL
*3/2/2 Custom decor Porcelain Tile
* Corian counters Superb Master bath!
* Very classy home! 2192 sq. ft. with heat/ac
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Floi idaLislinglinlo.com


GOLF COMMUNITY
* SPLISH SPLASH CAGED POOL
LG 24 X 31 garage Family rm Plus LR
*Lg Kit w/Corian ctrs Gas Fireplace
* Split plan 3/2.5 baths A MUST SEE!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-39970
www.ellillsutllon@remax.nel


SEEING IS BELIEVING!
* SO WELL KEPT SON PORCH & DECK
*AG pool with deck Huge MBR-his/her baths
* Pleasant & spacious 3/3 on dead end street
* 2 large sheds PRICED TO SELL!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.kellyg@remax.net


LANDINGS AT INVERNESS
*2BD/2BA/2CG+Dock *1,524 SF Living Area
* Updated Kitchen and Baths Wood & Tile Floors
* Florida Room
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
* 2BD/2BAw/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL | i
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


Custom built 3 bedroom with den 2 bath,
2-car garage block home, located on over
2 acres, paved road, split plan, great
room, SS appliances, large screen porch,
3 sheds, front porch.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


70 MILLION

CLOSED

THIS YEAR!

Nobody Sells

More Than

ReMax

Really One!










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 uyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


CAMBRIDGE GREENS POOL HOME
3BR/2BA on 1/2 acre with club
membership. Move right in and enjoy
the amenities Citrus Hills has to offer.
Screen room with built in bar
great for entertaining.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarinjmills@eoarthlink.net


This large home has 4 Bedrooms PLUS
an Office. Large island kitchen overlooks
the family room. Situated on 1.4 acres
and has a nice lanai and solar-heated pool.
Office has built-ins to keep you organized.
PRICE REDUCED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


*Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Split Floor Plan/Vaulted Ceilings
* Lg Open Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
* Florida Room
* Lots of Upgrades
* Well Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


* 3/2/2 Canal Front 3,323 Sq. Ft. Living
* 1.06 Acres oaks & fruit trees
*Built 1992- Updated 2010
* Beautiful unique design Newer appliances
* Top-of-the-line Water System
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


241N L aio Hw. Bevrl Hil 2-8210*.Mi IIvres7760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


6489 W. CANNONDALE DRIVE
MEADOWCREST
*Beautiful 2BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Lg Great Room
* Eat-in-Kitchen
* Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot
* Well Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpulmer@remax.net


GORGEOUS custom 3/2.5/2 on 1.45 ac. on
the Withlacoochee River. Lush landscaping
provides beauty & privacy. 50' dock + raised
deck. DEEP water Gulf access. Wide open
floorplan w/multiple upgrades, solar heated
pool/spa and relaxing solarium make for perfect
entertaining. Call for your personal tour.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


GRACIOUS LIVING & TRANQUILITY
ABOUNDS IN THIS RIVERFRONT 2 STORY HOME
Numerous sitting areas to partake of views & quiet time. Beautifully maintained
(one owner home). 2 Lots with DEEP WATER DOCK. MLS #355462.
PRICED TO SELL AT LUCY BARNES (352) 634-21o03
$369,000 vEmail: lucybarnes remax.nel
D$369,000 Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverl.com


E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


New blood at ERA
American Realty
ERA
American
Realty and
Investments
is pleased to
announce
that Yan Mak
and Sue
Hartman Sue
have recently Hartman
joined the ERAAmerican
company's Realty.
Beverly Hills
office, where they will work as
sales associates.
Hartman
has served
the real es-
tate needs of
buyers and
sellers in Cit-
rus County
since 2007.
Makisa an M
full-time real Yan Mak
estate con- ERAAmerican
sultant work- Realty.
ing with home buyers, sellers,
and investors in Citrus County
and previously was a teacher
and a restaurant owner/man-
ager. She is fluent in both Man-
darin and Cantonese.
Reach Hartman at the Bev-
erly Hills office at 352-746-3600
or by email at hartmans@


tampabay.
rr.com. Mak
can be
reached at
the Beverly
Hills office at
352-746-
3600, or by
email at Lou
makyan3@ Miele
gmail.com. ERAAmerican
Also, Agent Realty.
Lou Miele has surpassed the
$2 million mark in closed sales
volume in 2012. Reach him at
the Beverly Hills office of at
352-746-3600.
Mayer soars at
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell
Banker In-
vestors Re-
alty is
pleased to '
announce
that Realtor
Ron Mayer
recently sur- Ron Mayer
passed $1 Coldwell
million in Banker.
closed sales
volume in 2012.
He can be reached at the
Coldwell Banker office at 352-
726-9533 or on his cell phone
at 352-634-1337.

See DIGEST/Page E7


- ,- _


1405 E.WEDGEWOOD LN., HERNANDO
A Mitch Underwood Diplomat pool home with
3 bedrooms, 2 Bath, office and extra room off garage,
can be a studio or workshop. 1.6 acre lot in lovely
Fairview Estates. An approved short sale, this home
needs some painting on the inside and the perfect touch
to make it sparkle. MLS 356025 $190,000


105 W. FOREST OAK, BEVERLY HILLS
A great price for this spacious home. Oversized kitchen
and breakfast nook that will delight any cook. Master
bedroom comes with a large sitting room that can have
many functions. A 3BR, 2.5 ba family room with
fireplace. Come see and be surprised!
MLS 355556 $145,900


91 W. FOREST OAK, BEVERLY HILLS
Beautifully maintained solar heated pool home with
3 bedrooms. 2.5 bathrooms split plan home. Summer
kitchen for those outdoor summer cooking, oversized
master bath with jetted tub. This home has great
energy efficient features that will help keep down those
bills. MLS 350752 $178,900


6143 N. WHISPERING OAK LP, BEVERLY HILLS
A perfect winter or year round home features 2 BR 2BA,
LR, FR, and DR with very spacious rooms. Easy to
maintain, close to the community club house
and tennis court. Solar heated pool home overlooking a
private back yard. Come look this home overit could be
yours. MLS 355450 $152,900


Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129


i 4 t o t

THIS SPACIOUS
HAVEN
Sited on one acre in
Presidential Estates, (Citrus
Hills) is this beloved home
I built by original owners with
ALL the bells and whistles!
Step through double entry
ft doors: See the 14' ceilinged
living room with sliding glass
doors to the 35' pool, surrounded by a spacious lanai featuring outdoor kitchen and pool bath.
Check the formal dining room, plus large bonus room for your office, large and elegant kitchen
with spacious breakfast nook, three bedroom split plan, with master BR and bath being
HOLLYWOOD size! Oversized double garage. Detached shed. MLS #356669. $249,000.
David Kurtz, 954-383-8786 and Marilyn Booth, 563-9614, your hosts


rkhITLUJL IDE1 L1ELTY'


nAmnda & Krk Johnl Tom Balfour Li A jnus & Hi Steine Art Paty
BROKER/ASS ROC.EALOI c aI REACTOR REALOR-BROKER REALTOR


746-9000

0,us0bstlu~ a


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor A HOUSE Realtor@
302.3179 SOLowNan 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 ....
C .* A ;L- 1 *
4531 N. JADEMORE DR.
3/2/2, 30x18 kidney-shaped, solar
heated, self-cleaning pool, double pane
windows (2 yrs. ago), newer carpet-
ing, kitchen flooring, appliances & plan-
tation shutters. 6x10 vented room
used as darkroom.
735 W. COLBERT Cr.
3/2/2, new interior paint, tile floors, new
carpeting and blinds throughout. New Carrier
. A/C and water tank in 2010, updated
appliances, large family sized eat-in kitchen
w/island, great view from private back yard.
3540 N. WOODGATE DR.
THE GLEN
-- Cute as a button, move-in ready, 2/2/1,
*. easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
i interior paint, furniture is negotiable with
sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information.................352-563-5966
News information............................................... 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CI ik oii iE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


A visit to Florida 4-H Congress


Citrus County 4-Hers recently trav-
eled to Gainesville to stay on the
campus of the University of
Florida for the Florida 4-H Congress.
This statewide event, held annually, is
similar to a state convention.
This year the theme was
more fun than a three ring S
circus: "Under the Big Top!" "
4-Hers from Citrus County
had to earn the right to at-
tend this educational and
fun event. Senior 4-H mem-
bers, 14 to 18 years old, com-
peted and won blue ribbons
at county events and again at
district events to qualify for -
Congress. Amy I
The following youth either YO
gave a demonstration/illus-
trated talk or a formal IDE
speech at Congress this year:
Cheyenne Concidine, Abby Mattingly,
David and Nathan Meeks, Kylie
Philipps, Nathan and Olivia Snipes,
Robyn Tyler, and Anna Venero.
Each of the 4-Hers, in addition to par-
ticipating in competition, experienced
in-depth learning experiences from
campus professors.
Workshops included hands-on expe-
rience processing pork in the meat lab,
exploring wetlands of the Ichetucknee


River, and even learning how nano-ma-
terials are used in biosensors for en-
hancing transduction of chemical
signals into a measurable output (e.g.,
voltage). Yep, that's some technical stuff.
Giving back through com-
munity service is one of the
essential elements of 4-H. On
Wednesday of Congress
week, 275 youth used their
hands for larger service
across Gainesville. Teams of
teens went out and con-
tributed at worthy organiza-
tions such as the Ronald
McDonald House, Children's
Home Society and Bread of
)uncan the Mighty Food Bank The
UsNG Citrus 4-Hers came back
from their volunteer work
AS dirty, sweaty and tired, but
also with a sense of fulfill-
ment from having made a difference.
Another Congress success was Kylie
Philipps, who with a detailed applica-
tion portfolio qualified for an interview
before a panel of judges. At Congress's
final night award banquet, Kylie was
awarded one of just ten Florida 4-H
delegate positions to the National 4-H
Congress in November in Atlanta, Ga.
Citrus County 4-H is very proud to have
one of our own representing Florida at


this national 4-H event!
The final surprise of the event also
was announced at the banquet 4-H Dis-
trict VII, made up of Citrus, Marion,
Sumter and Hernando counties, was
awarded the coveted "4-H Spirit Stick
Award!" The District VII members
were thrilled to receive the award, a lit-
eral stick cut from a tree branch, deco-
rated with green ribbons. To qualify, the
small district submitted a portfolio of
the year's activities and accomplish-
ments. They then visually represented
the year on a decorative poster, and fi-
nally showed their spirit during a rau-
cous spirit rally assembly Members are
already setting goals and making plans
to win it back next year
For information about how to start or
join a club in your area, please contact
your Citrus County Extension's 4-H Of-
fice by calling 352-527-5712 or email 4-H
Agent Amy Duncan at amy
duncan@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Citrus County Extension connects the
public with the University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth, family, com-
munity, and agricultural needs. Pro-
grams and activities offered by the Ex-
tension Service are available to all per-
sons without regard to race, color, hand-
icap, sex, religion, or national origin.


Apothecary's blue spiral show globe is a valuable curiosity


Dear John: My grand-
mother was known for
her collection of figural
and antique bottles. Upon her
death, I inherited
several pieces from
her estate. One of the
pieces that I now
have is a very large,
hand-blown cobalt
blue pharmacy or
apothecary show
globe that she pur-
chased from a phar-
macist in Kalispell, John ,
Montana in 1963. The SIKOI
pharmacist had pur-
chased the pharmacy AT
and its entire inven-
tory in 1923 from the original
owner, who told him that he
purchased this particular show
globe in 1891 from the Henry
Whitney Glass Company It has
its original wrought iron wall
bracket and is in perfect condi-
tion. Its dimensions are 22
inches tall, 10 wide with a 5-


i

T!


inch mouth or opening. The in-
terior of the glass globe has a
wonderful spiral pattern from
the mouth to the point at the
base. My grand-
mother purchased
the globe with its
bracket for $275.
For the past couple
of weeks I have been
attempting to find
someone to appraise
this piece. I have sent
several emails to bot-
korski tle collectors and an-
SK|'S tique appraisers but
have had no replies. I
IC have called local an-
tique shops around
the Coeur d'Alene and Spokane
area but have not found anyone
that knows much about apothe-
cary show globes or who is able
or willing to give an appraisal. I
would really appreciate any in-
formation you may have about
its possible value or a referral
to someone that could appraise


it. I have attached several pho-
tos of the piece. -JB.E., Seat-
tle, Washington
Dear J.B.E.: Show globes
were fairly large, up to 32
inches tall, glass globes used to
enclose hanging lights in
apothecary storefront windows.
I can just imagine how beauti-
ful your globe looked when lit
with its spiral design showing.
These globes were produced by
numerous glass factories in var-
ious designs in the United
States from the last quarter of
the 19th century and into the
20th. I think your very attractive
cobalt blue globe would sell in
the $600 to $1,200 range.
Dear John: After reading
about your NAWCC member-
ship and interest in watches, I
decided to inquire about my in-
herited one. Attached are three
photos of my great grand-
mother's watch. She was born
in England and was married in
1868, and died in 1919, so the


watch was acquired sometime
during that period.
The watch is 1 3/4 inches in
diameter, has a bail for hanging,
and there is no maker's mark on
the dial. The back side of the
watch, which has no writing or
decoration, opens to reveal
beautiful Old English script that
says Davis & Cie, beneath
which is written London. One
line below says Detached Lever
in regular capitalized script,
and then 13 Jewels, and finally
No 28552, with the "N" in Old
English script.
There appear to be two holes
with square pegs for winding
the watch. On the back's inte-
rior, facing the script are two
logos. A small one just above the
center has a shield, and the
word Argent. Just above the
hinge is a diamond shape with
what looks like a C, and possi-
bly another obscured letter.

See ATTIC/Page E8


Special to the Chronicle
This cobalt blue apothecary show globe was
originally manufactured in 1891. Apothe-
caries used to hang these globes in their
storefront windows. This example would
probably sell in $600 to $1,200 range.


E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


N


L







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



'Root' of the issue


Here are a
few facts
about
tree roots. Most
trees do not have
tap roots. The
deep roots that
do grow directly
beneath the
trunk of some
tree species are
known as tap
roots. Research
shows tap roots
may develop on


Kerry Kreider
THE
ARBORIST


some trees in the woods and
forests in well-drained soils.
However, as a rule, tap
roots usually will not form on


trees planted in
an urban land-
scape. They do not
develop when the
soil is compact or
when the water
table is close to
the soil surface.
Some pines and
oaks will develop
tap roots when
planted in sandy,
well-drained soils.
Roots grow far
beyond the drip


line or edge of the branches.
A healthy tree growing in


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 E5


A i ,



Ls


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Great commercial building location 2 blocks
from courthouse. 100 x 162 lot.
$125,000 MLS#356806


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Corner commercial location off Hwy 44 east &
Gospel Island Road. $64,500 MLS#354972


-I
BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL FORMER BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
5 acres in Citronelle/Mini Farms/Citrus Springs area Prime location, multi-use building Next to Citrus
Out in the country. $20,900 MLS#356452 High School. $399,989 MLS#354393 I


See ROOTS/FMge E9 CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471,
Email: rovbass@tampabav.rr.com www.allcitrusrealtv.com After Hours 52 302-6714 I


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


-0RVI ALL O ITRUS COUNTY


(VA Prudential
Florida Showcase


Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
c OFCE: (352) 795-6633
WWW ALEXRE .COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE .COM


I AGT DUTY I D A


-J. ll 571 W. Massachusetts St.
-fit MLS #356487 $189,900
One of a kind pool home n Citrus Hills
on a pretty wooded acre lot.
Directions: Rte. 486 to south on Essex, to right on Keller, to
left on Fresno, to right on Massachusetts, to home on right.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


.f u MLS, 3 Montana St.
T R MLS #355490 $77,900
MOVE-IN-READY 2/2/2 Imperial Executive II.
Directions: Rte. 491to Truman, nextto Bank of America, to
right on Washington, to left on Montana, to2nd house on left.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
NEW LISTING


MLS #356856 $139,900 c 130 E. Pacilic Ln.
3 bdrm/2 bath pool home offers a MLS #356869 $124,900
country feel with 1.5 wooded acres- Great house at the top of the hill
perfect to bring along your horses! in Cambridge Green.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


NEW LISTING NEW LISTING




5544 N. Crockett Terr.
MLS #356913 $231,000 990 W. Silver Meadow Lp.
Mitch Underwood expanded Capri iJtSa MLS #356919 $199,900
model. 3/2.5/2 pool home on one You much see this
beautifully landscaped acre. "Malibu" model 3/2/2 villa.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING


&,3entood 1844W. Chelsea Ann Way
MLS #356943 $115,900
One of the prettiest 2/2/2 in this
gated community.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


MLS #355794 $357,900
Custom built4/3/3 pool home.
Numerous upgrades. 3+ acres.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


y1 SPENDING PENDING PENDING




206 S. Columbus S 1 5754 N. Calico Dr. 1121 N ProspecI Ave. ,, 864 W. Cockaliel Lp.
MLS#356736 $59,500 MLS#356186 $244,800 MLS356707 $188,800 MLS#356365 $91,900
One owner, perfect condition, clean New Construction of 3/2/3 home FABULOUS VALUE @ $70. per sq. ft. Freshly Painted 3/2/2 villa
as a whistle, nice neighborhood. with 2 car detached garage. w/new metal roof. with new driveway.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Matt Robinson 937-219-6949 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil Photos,
S 6. Fl ria -ocs P rope -tes S


f41 -


Realtor


J2IEW


L












The joys of plant collecting


any gardeners become plant
collectors. There is a compas-
sion for living things such as
stressed plants on the clearance rack
at the back of a big box store. My
neighbor Karyn has a green thumb;
she has rescued dozens of ailing
species, nursed them back to health
then given them a permanent home in
her yard. The process is therapeutic,
the pleasure and satisfaction
gratifying.
The tall, native Simpson's Stopper
shrubs planted at the front comers of


my home had perfumed the air in
May and June with fragrant flowers.
Bees and butterflies had nectared on
them and spread pollen. The blue-
berry-sized fruit matured through
July and into August. Daily I ate the
sweet red fruits and gave away pun-
nits full to friends and neighbors. I
squished out the seeds and froze the
pulp in zipper bags for later use in
pancakes and muffins.
Karyn lent me a big steel sieve so I
could crush eight cups of berries
quickly The resulting paste measured


four cups. I added three cups of sugar
and a tablespoon of lemon juice then
boiled it for about 20 minutes. Soon a
spoonful jelled on a saucer chilled in
the freezer. The unusual jam filled
enough small sterilized jars for guests
to sample.
The rinsed seeds filled a bowl on
the kitchen counter. I could not bear
to toss the thousand seeds on the com-
post pile. Rosalie from Crystal River
visited for lunch five days later. She
noticed the seeds were sprouting in
the bowl. I already had dozens of pot-


ted Simpson's Stoppers growing in
the nursery and did not need more to
tend to. That evening I stretched a 300
foot tape measure across the back
property line, scratched holes in the
sandy soil among the leaf litter and
tossed in a pinch of about 10 seeds
every 2.5 feet. A handful of decayed
compost covered the seeds. Hopefully
the wildlife will not discover them.
Eventually, a hedge should grow to
provide privacy from future homes.

See Page E7


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


E6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DIGEST
Continued from Page E3

DeVane, Palmer
reach new
milestone \
Realtors Kim DeVane
and Len Palmer are
being applauded for
reaching the multi-million
dollar mark in sales vol- Kim Devane
ume this year. They join RE/MAX
a very select group of Realty One.
agents who have accom-
plished this in 2012.
Kim is an agent in the .
Crystal River office of
RE/MAX Realty One lo-
cated on U.S. 19. He's
been a Realtor with
RE/MAX for five years
and in real estate for Len Palmer
more than 10 years. RE/MAX
Len is an agent in Realty One.
Central Ridge office on
County Road 491.
The associates and staff of RE/MAX
congratulate Kim and Len for having
passed this significant milestone.
Citrus Ridge
stars continue
to shine
Citrus Ridge Realty -
is proud to recognize that
Kirk and Amanda John-
son and Buyer's Spe-
cialist Tom Balfour have Kirk and
closed more than $6 mil- Amanda
lion in sales in 2012. Johnson
You can reach them at Citrus Ridge
352-746-9000 or by Realty.
email at AKJohnson@ atlantic.net.


JANE
Continued from Page E6

Wildlife will have nest sites, food,
nectar, pollen, perches and cover
from predators.
Gardener Jim of Black Diamond
wanted long-blooming specialty
plants for his new garden. We hooked
up an enclosed trailer and drove to
wholesale nurseries near Bushnell.
Flowerwood is the only licensed
grower of patented Encore Azaleas in
Florida. Encores flower in July and
from September through to March.
We bought 20 of nine different colors
with different mature heights. The
van and trailer were packed with a
variety Encores; sasanqua, japonica
and reticulata Camellias; 'Queen
Mum' Agapanthus; Tasmanian Flax
Lilies; 'Early Bird' Crape Myrtles; ex-
otic Gingers, 'Jubilation' Gardenias
and butterfly nectar plants. Neither
local nurseries nor big box stores
stock expensive patented plants dur-
ing summer.
I delivered 10 of each azalea vari-
ety to a friend at Cross Bayou nursery
in Holder. Jim and I carefully combed
out or cut the pot-bound Encore roots
before planting in his garden beds.
After helping to space some plants
appropriately, I abandoned Jim to do
the planting himself.
At home, Karyn helped unload and

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
S Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.7 million already closed by June 29, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
i 52 Learn More 6
L' (352) 746-9924
SEALTon


move the rest of the plants to my
backyard potting area. The next day
my collection was re-potted. Like a
compulsive collector, I divided multi-
stuck Agapanthus, Gingers and
Camellias. All were replanted in
larger pots, sprinkled with pre-emer-
gent herbicide to prevent weed seed
germination and put under daily irri-
gation to recover from the surgery
Come fall, they should be ready to
fend for themselves in our gardens.

Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion County garden.
For an appointment call 352-249-
6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.



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Come learn what others don't know... FOR FREE!

Seminar Highlights Include:
Short Sales Is my house a good candidate?
Bankruptcy Can it save my home?
Loan Modifications Is anybody getting one?
Deficiencies What is this? And how can it harm me for years to come?
Misperceptions What are they?
Time Frames How long do I have?
Guest Speaker Michael T. Kovach, Jr. Attorney at Law
The Grove Downtown LIMITED SEATING
210 Tompkins Street. Unit B (A g. 21,2012 Call today for reservations
Inverness, FL 5:30 PI Trish Antonetti 352-400-3323


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 E7







E8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012
ATTI value? Also, would it be possible to put
the watch back in working order, and
if so, where would one find the key to
Continued from Page E4 wind it? -EN, Beverly Hills
Dear E.N.: English keywind and
Below the diamond is a repeat of keyset pocketwatches, unless made by
the serial number. What can you tell notable makers, are low on the totem
me about the watchmaker and its pole of pocketwatch collectors. Your


open face watch was likely made circa
1870-90. The word "argent" indicates
the case is made of silver, likely lower
than sterling content. To have the
watch put in working order as well as
getting a replacement key, contact
Lentz Clock Shop in Gainesville at
www.lentzhouse.com or by phone at
(352) 378-9323. Potential dollar value is
$100 to $200.
Dear John: I enjoy your column on
Sunday. I have found a lot of Occu-
pied Japan. Do you think it will ever
be collectible again? I hope someone
will give you a shot on television; you
have quite a following. A.O.Z.,
Internet
Dear A.O.Z.: Occupied Japan
marked goods are a specific category
of collector interest. All products
made for export from Japan had to be
marked Occupied Japan while the
United States occupied the country
from the end of World War II until
1952. Not long ago these goods could
be purchased in box lots for practi-
cally nothing. Then collecting interest
increased and prices started increas-
ing as well. Typically, porcelain fig-


000BOSH

AMc


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

urines currently sell in the $5 to $20
range that used to sell for nickels and
dimes. This increase caused repro-
ductions of original Occupied goods to
flood the market, which has had a neg-
ative effect on collectors. However,
large quantities are still being bought
and sold in the marketplace.
Dear John: I am mailing this pic-
ture to you for my mother. She got
these two figurines a few years back
and would like to find out more infor-
mation about them, if you can tell any-
thing from the pictures. If you could
look at them and give me any informa-
tion, it would be greatly appreciated.
- D. W, Internet
Dear D.W: I will assume there are
no maker's marks on the figural can-
dlesticks since you have not men-
tioned any They appear to be made of
metal and perhaps pewter. They prob-
ably represent a storybook theme. I
have not been able to establish any
specific collector interest. Potential
dollar value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: After reading your

See ATTIC/Page E9


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@?myflorida-house .com


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and LIVING ON THE WATER!
nice 1...1 ... in beautiful Citrus This classic contemporary pool home is 3686 N. PALOMINO TERR.
Hills!! .,.. i ..a one acre corner lot, the right setting for living the Florida
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in lifestyle. Open and airy with the PINE RIDGE
pool and patio area offers you the privacy plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. Nice flat wooded 5 . .. l1.. ., 1.
.. ... 1.;... ; well 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of riding trails in th '..
...... .... .. bring room to dock all the water toys Pine Ridge Gives you direct access to up
.... ... .. imaginable! to 28 miles of trails
,, $175,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS #355271 $109,000


COLDI^e"
BANKSR







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROOTS
Continued from Page E5

the forest generally has a root sys-
tem reaching well beyond the
perimeter of its branches often,


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 E9


to a distance from the trunk equal
to the tree's height. Roots on trees
and shrubs planted in a landscape
grow to about three times the
branch spread within two or three
years after planting.
Damaging roots on one side of the
tree may cause branch die back ei-


their on that side only or at random
throughout the crown. Unless the
trunk is twisted, roots on one side of
a tree, such as oak or mahogany,
generally supply the same side of
the crown with water and nutrients
absorbed through the roots. When
roots on one side of a tree are in-


jured, branches on that side will
often drop leaves. When trees such
as oaks and pines receive damage
on one side of the root system,
branch death may occur anywhere
in the crown of the tree.
U-* -


Kerry Kreider is a practicing ar-
borist and a member of the Inter-
national Society ofArboriculture,
a tree preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Service. You
can reach him at 352-726-9724 or
by email at actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E8

column in the Chronicle, I decided to
write to you regarding a bronze statue
I purchased about 16 years ago. It is
called "Fan Dancer" and the artist is
Louis Icart. Icart was born in France
in 1855. I have enclosed four pictures
of the bronze and am hoping you can
put a value on it for me. I would ap-
preciate any information you can give
me on it -B.B.K, Hernando
Dear B.B.K: Louis Icart, 1888-1950,
is a name widely recognized in the art
market. I think your bronze was pro-
duced after Icart died. The photograph
you included is not very good but I can


see the overall quality is poor. I think it
might sell in the $150 to $300 range.
Dear John: I have a Mark Twain
book titled "Pudd'nhead Wilson." On
the flyleaf it is signed by Mark Twain,
Copyright 1894 and 1899 by Olivia
Clemons. Does this book have any
value? R.F, Beverly Hills
Dear R.F: If your book is hand-
signed by Mark Twain there will be
considerable value. I suggest you con-
tact PBA Galleries; they specialize in
rare books and have sold a lot of
Twain's books. The website is
www.pbagalleries.com and their
phone number is 415-989-2665.
Dear John: Do you know of a good
appraiser of Swarovski crystal? I have
a nice collection and would like to sell
it Any help you can give me will be ap-


preciated. B.S., Beverly Hills
Dear B.S.: Swarovski is one of the
most recognized names in the world of
fine quality crystal. The company was
established by Daniel Swarovski in
1895 in Tyrol, Austria. The company
continues into current times and is
now located in Zurich, Switzerland.
Currently the secondary market is
very soft for their products. I think you
would be better to keep your collec-


tion for now or pass it on in the family


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


TerraL Yn TeflaVista
I REALTY GROUPaly~oupco


NEED TWO MASTER SUITES?
* Custom 12 room home on the golf course
* 4+office/2/3 on .59 acres
* Vaulted family room with gas fireplace
* Oversized side entry 3-car garage
* New roof 2011 new AC/heat 2006
* Well for yard close to clubhouse
#354992 $159,000


GOURMET CHEF'S KITCHEN!
* 3+office/2/2 with heated pool
* Striking hardwood flooring
* Upgraded stainless steel appliances
* Private lot abuts state forest land
* Gas log fireplace in Great Room
* Separate pantry spacious laundry
#354824 S224.900


11044 W Cove Harbor Dr., Crystal River
Waterfront Maintenance Free villa in
Pelican Cove. MLS#354745
Nanc Ayres ,
352-279-5058 P 7
EXIT Realty Leaders ""
352-527-1112 Z"


1,ES-


- 6 Mos o


KEY1 "Always There For You"
REALTY GAlL COOPER
MAE multimillion Dollar Realtor
ERA' Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


I.OPEN!HOUS 1iS S i B1I.


I S .e V tJal" .ITou,. Al@ .UJ IJ hII.I.I .IoHJ I.









E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


On The Time11

S ... S S- M ills
Fax (32) 63566 1 ollFre: 888 82-240 Emil clssiied~cronclenlne~om wesie: ww~hroiceonineco
MoieHms oieHm oieHm VSe I Rea Esae Aprmet Retl Rn:Hue Wtrrn
Fo Ren Fo Sal an Lad FoMc FrRn nmshJ Hue I Unuish etl


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, short/
long term 352 220-2077
FLORAL CITY
Small 2/1, secluded on
3 acres, appliances
$400/mo 352-560-7837
INVERNESS
2428 Jungle Camp RD
2/1, freshly painted
call 813-365-6040




30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10 x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Info
(352) 726-2234
3/2 Double wide
peaceful area,
in Heatherwood
Reduced to $55,000
(352) 637-2872

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

For Sale o94
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2
bath. 2007 Nobility
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18'x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247
USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
MANUFACTURED
HOME ON 100+ ft. of
Water Frontage, BOAT
RAMP IN OZELLO
KEYS New Plumbing,
Washer/ Dryer hkup
$78,900.
CALL FOR SHOWING
352-212-0460


2BR-Log Cabin Decor
Off 486 -Den-FP-AC-Kit.
Bar 4 stall barn 24x24,
/2 encl. w/AC, Approx.
1 Acre, fenced-well.
$56,900. Call Jackie
352-634-6340
Cridland Realestate
3/2 Double wide, on
large corner lot. New
AC in 2011, Many Up-
grades, quiet and close
to shopping $42,000 by
owner (352) 628-4819
Crys. Riv. Area 2BR+Den
3 yr. New AC. Remod-
eled RV Hkup. $39,900
off US 19, Pool-fenced,
Jackie (352) 341-5297
Cridland Real Estate
HERNANDO
1/1 Mobile, 1/2 Acre
$1K Cash Not A Typo
Parsley Real Estate
Gareth Rouillard
352-422-5731
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925
JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090


RV LOT FOR RENT
OR SALE by OWNER
LOT #119
Nature Coast Landings
(352) 634-5300




J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2 .........$750
2/1......... $550
2/1/1 ........... $600
2/1.5/1 ......$650

3/2/1........$800
Lawncare Inc.
3/2.......... $650
2/1.5/1 .......$750
Lakeview
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruqgs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010
















1 i

I .aI iy )



333 N C A
Inens FI 45


ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.conm
CITRUS SPRINGS
7635 Greendale ............ .. 1200
3/2/2 POOL home cl lwn/poolserv,
RV parking
6973 Gladstone......................$825
3/2/2 newer home,open floor plan
HOMOSASSA
5180 SAustin Pt.................... 700
2/2/2 nice home
4199 Winng Oaks................ $750
3/2/2 available now
HERNANDO
994 E Winetka St ................... 675
2/1 5/carportSW on ACRE
3441 E (happel (t...................$600
2/1 adorble, close to lake, mini to Ocal
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N (rede........................ 450
2/1 single wide, furnishednd lawn
8520 N Shannon Ave ............$1300
3/2/2avail turn or unfurnished,
close to power plant




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
1/1 $450 near hosp
352-422-2393


LECANTO
2 br 2 ba, e/i kitchen, scr.
porch, laund. room, cent.
h/a, near new Walmart,
$550 mo. + utilities.
352-257-3473
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000



CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. Condo Clean
with membership
352-476-4242, 527-8002
CITRUS HILLS
2/2V2, Car Port $825
mo. (352) 613-5655
INVERNESS
1/1 Condo in Royal
Oaks $550/mo Incld
Water/Sewer/Trash/WD
Club Hse 352-302-7406



Crystal River
2/1, furnished, util. incl.
quiet country liv., CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & garbage
incl. No pets, $550mo.
(352) 220-4818



HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $125/wk.
$475 sec $600 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871
HERNANDO
1/1 Lake view, fully
furnished All utilities in-
cluded (386) 208-2495
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


HOMOSASSA
3 bed / 2 bath block
home with 2 car garage
off Stonebrook. $800
first last & security.
Call 352-634-4992


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, CHA, W/D, Sec. &
1st. $550 mo. 212-6560
BEVERLY HILLS
2BR 1BA/garage Central
A/C Tile Floors New
Paint.AII Appliances.
$550/Mo.+ Sec.Deposit
call 352-601-6184
BEVERLY HILLS
Move in special!
Clean 2 or 3BR, 1BA/
1CA 1st, last, sec. $575
mo 352-400-1501
BEVERLY HILLS
Real Nice Section 2/1,
screen rm. extra clean,
back yd. overlook Park,
47 S. Lucille St. $600.mo
Vets & Senior Discount
$550. 352-461-4518

Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1V2, + Carport
(352) 489-0117
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/2 Near power plant
$750 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on 1/2 Acre, fncd yrd.,
new tile carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7p
HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath.
Located on With-
alacoochee River just be-
fore Marion County. Part.
fence, gazebo, board-
walk, shed. Optional 3rd
bdrm. $700per mth.
352-422-4878 or
352-628-4878
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo. Ist + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Meadows $695 up
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN
3/2 pets ok $800/mo.
Lease or rent-to-own.
Avail now. 619-301-5442
between 10:30 am and
11:00 pm only
Homosassa SMW
Large 2 Master Bedrms!
Lg. garage, $875/Mo.
$200 Bonus 302-4057
INVERNESS
2/1/1 All brick w/ tile &
wood fls. Near sch
hosp. Fcd yd. $650 mo.
352-586-8928
INVERNESS
New 3/2/2 Lse., no pets,
$825. (304) 444-9944

Sugarmill Woods
Emaculate 3/2/2, Villa
private site, many
upgrades, $775/month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077
INGLIS 3/2
furn, w/dock on With.
River on stilts. Incl util.
$1400/mo. 352-267-4632




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFOM "
REALTY ONE
Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2, 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K down $495/mo.
(352) 600-8174

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


tME








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-3


Nature Coast Landings
RV Resort ESTATE
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.detailsbyowner.comfor
pictures and infoa
$89,500. 352-843-5441


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


ONLINE REAL
ESTATE AUCTION
Nominal Opening
Bid: $1,000
Lot 2 Marion Oaks
Block Unit 1, Ocala
land
Lot SW 31ST Terr,
Ocala
OBR OBA land
Bidding starts
August 17
williamsauction.com
800.801.8003
Williams & Williams
FL Broker:
Daniel S. Nelson Re
Lic BK3223097;
Williams & Williams Re
Lie 1032049
Auctioneer:
Thomas Barnes Auc
Lic AU3383; Williams &
Williams Auc Lic
AB2784
Buyer's Premium
may apply for this
property.










For Sale By
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
1,800 SF, 4BR/2BA
home on .44 acres
Zoning:
COMMERCIAL (CG)
Prime location in
historical downtown
Crystal River 2 blocks
from US HWY 19
Permitted uses in-
clude office, medi-
cal, restaurant, retail,
day care center,
school, bed & break-
fast, vet office, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
839 N Citrus Ave,
Crystal River, FL
THUR. SEPT 6 @ 2D
OPEN from 1 PM
sale day
Call 352-519-3130
for more info
For Details
Visit our Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com








FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990


2/2/2, Located on
Culdesac, min. from
golf club. All rms open
to enclosed pool & la-
nai New AC, $144,000
owner fin. 15% down
terms negotiable
(352) 465-2372


Citrus Springs 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Beautiful
2006 home with many
upgrades, must see.
Build by papa bear con-
struction on corner lot
with empty lots next door.
Curbing and river rock
around house, stone, irri-
gation system, security
system, new upgraded
ac/heating unit in 2011.
Home is 1750sp.ft living,
Asking price is $129,900.
Call or email for pictures
of info 352-220-8114 or
ghaslett2001@yahoo.com
MOVE IN CONDITION
Owner selling 2007 home
3/2/2, Refig, glass top
stove, micro, DW, W/D,
tiled kitchen & bath floors.
Laminated wood floor Ivg
area. $81,500
718-801-4497




2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$53,900. 352 746-6050

REDUCED!
$83,900. Like New
3/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
New appliances,
flooring, toilet/ vani-
ties, paint in and out.
1747 sf liv. area.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089




3 Bedroom, 212 Bath
Private 1 Acre,
den off of master,
w/ bath to die for.
MUST SEE! $239,900
(352) 860-0444




OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




Country Living
within City Limits
3/2/2, with Pool
$115,00
(352) 344-0033

HIGHLANDS
Lrg. 2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598


YOU'LL v THIS!
Inver/Highlands
LARGE 1 Fam, 2.8
acres, residential area,
fully fenced, 4 BR, 3 BA,
pool, own deep well,
costly updates 2011.
Offered AS IS. $189,900.
Call Owner 419-7017.
NEW LISTING
2BD, 1.5 BA, FI. Rm.
1950 sq. ft. near schools
& hosp. on /2 acre in
high end community
$66,900.
JUSTIN MONAHAN
ERA American Realty
and Invenstments
352-697-0240
Portable Generator,
Duromax Elite MX4500E
4500W 7HP OHV 4cycle
gas pwrd w/ wheel &
electric start, also
matching Duromax
XPSGC Generator
cover, used only
one time. $375.
Massage Chair Shiatsu
Recliner *body scan*
built in Mp3 player, &
w/Heat Therapy* in
beige camel color,
$900. (352) 637-7237




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number
RF, : X


REALTY ONE
Crystal River
Spacious DW Moduler
on corner lot with 4
bedrooms. 5th room
could be an office or
sitting room. 3 full
baths. Screened in
solar heated in ground
pool & Jacuzzi. 2 car
garage, sprinkler sys-
tem fireplace in FR,
alarm system, central
vac system, lots of
kitchen cabinets, dou-
ble oven, ceramic tile &
carpet throughout. All
on a landscaped yard-a
must see! $185,000.
352-220-6187 or
609-290-4335



2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2 Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


HOMOSASSA
3/1/1, Nice, Clean
Rent to Own
$700. mo. Ist/Ist/sec
813-335-5277




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S-11 -1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy(
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available




Sellers I have
SOLD 14 Homes
in 7 mo's!
I need LIST-
INGS!


DEB INFAN-
TINE
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com




SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
"Gold Medal"
REALTOR,
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.


Quade
Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qceese@ycahoo.comCENT
URY 21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872


Hme


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Classifieds!


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012 Ell


Hme


Waefrn


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
clear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
$25k.have title asking
$14,500 o.b.o.
813-792-1355



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745


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E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012


777777j


8525 E. SKYE DRIVE
INVERNESS

: I I:1:1: l..i. .I hn ..h .',i I i,.I .. I
Mt 5 = m U51;11 $69,900
Call Isaac S. Bayron 352 697 2493


HEHmNANnU 154Z MISMAHK
OPEN HOUSE 1-4 P.M.
u .c.h .. a 3 'aii i a' a,4.4,4. ...i.' I I..i.iii
II..uj I.i- lil' .l.u. 1a II .*uail... Hu,.iu
1a' ..- l I. I. 1 i ... I 1 .

Mi = .hhh'i $249,000
David Kuwt 954 383 8786.


TWO BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 1 CG
IN DESIRABLE ROYAL OAKS.

V.l h.ill h..i l.IH l .l .I1.. I .I .! .i I l1.'. .1 ...l l
M.lt = 7''ll ASKING $63,900
Patl Davis i352212 7280
View' all listings rieir c2/paldaris comr


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST
h .:.. j h j ,i .1

H..:. l1 l lu.-..: l-. .:..-. I.1 T 1 1 . .:.1 l a l.-.J .:.11-.I.
.: .:..... .... -...:. i: l h A L iL i I-hlIvlUII:l i-irij
.l-h I..l-h WjfhhrjiT $79,900
1.11 = Mt 3I52 2279
Call Kiaren Morton 352 2/2 7595


h . .h.. ".f ... i] j. ., Il.j: e, .
1. i' ,i ,in. ii Li

$279,000 MNl =~i', ,
Call Jim Motion lot a tout at 422 2173.


PRICED TO SELL QUICKLY...
: i l..II i..ill. :' l.l.il .ii P i .11 I i

A.i ..i $75,000 Mi_ 5 = .. ,'27
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072
i;i'ni'. se//inaciituscounltir/homes.coim


UNEVEN LY nILLa
' t o n.... I ..,: H I .. . ,:,:.' Im.l l ...l .

Mt = i 4')i i4 $59,900
lottaine 0 Regan 352 586 0075


Mi_ 5 = .'I IIiv $62,500
Call Chatrles Hell 352 422 2387


h hI l i I. .. i ..I I .. ..
,i h 111. i ai -, i h III l ll Iiji, l ,, ,1 i


Ilt. = 1347 ASKING $325,000
Pat Davis f352212/ 7280
View, hosting wv ir, c2/patdaris corn


SHORT SALE!
Bc.i, 1.,' ,hll ,l .1I .,.l' 11 I..,I1 I ill : : I

I,. .h .: II ..,Il ..,i> ... ..l I 'J h .i| .h|.l.i ... ir,. '

Ip,, ,, '.-.'. $59,900
Call Dons Mmnet lo appointment
to shot at 352 422 4627
r, 1


NEW LISTING

* lj i l ..i .. I I. h .. 1 h i.
1Au M, i $28,000 MHI-
C1lir C'llunlSilld ' 111111 a 'llu' ;lc unl 'ild C'O
Jeanne & Wi/latd Pickrel 212 3410


REDUCED TAKE A LOOK!
LINh.v Hl.l.I.nnlt I. ..Imh [..,rlJ . ....I /.1_:
I4lllhvl l Hl .. l I. I ..I , .il l
Mi = 'I 4 $67,500
Call Chetjl Sciuggs ot Jennie Fudge
352 726 9010


BANK OWNED


Mi 5 = i-/ \/i $67,000
Cll ChAIles ell) 35S2 422 2387


LARGE TWO STORY
1 h. 1 :. A I.. u r ),, : ..1:1) if I,,,,. ,ii,3
L 1.i : i "1 I :6 1 i- T. 1 l i.. 1 1i- l.:ill
1h 6 1 :. .j .. /.) ll h .. M m q.:lle' I.:] 'll;lll ;
InI l.: I; l n l ,h l..:llh l h lll 'll h l..i
I .... ill I.:If l $h 1661 . Ia. ll .n h l l 7 ll. d1 &
.iih .,:.I.A All ii... i.i ONLY $199KI
Call Ehlias G. Kuallah 352 400 2635







CLEAN, CLOSE, COMFORTABLE

Ivi I. 6 1 .. I I. l I. I ,: 1 o u I 1 l .1 1 H ...1 : 1


ivll i: 1 1 1 lii h l vl i l: l l l l lj lllil I I I1
h.,l 1. ::11 $110,000
SCll Cve Kea,,e to prewen 352 4766549


nmH enrn.mn It 'i
Hi uiis I -I . 'Ii . I ii. .. 'ilh .
1 '" l"q1 l i a 1 u l la l,i" I I.
lI1.' I i~lvI
i.l l. i. ll ,. i., $199,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED .

I ,F I V I.. ,...
... f h .. ... ... ..... 1 luh ... f
'IHP= I'I'l I_'ll' JUST REDUCED TO 521,000
Pat Davis (352/2127280
View lhsitng Centuit 21com


POOL! L1LAt



L".- $289,000


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

Hiii'nuil ll 1 Tin'l IIII lli i \ll i i \ n

Mit = i.56_5 A,.i $165,000
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173 lot a tout.


2/1 97' MOBILEHOME

i li ,.:ll i w.i l I .llil$ lil i ill ..ii bii1 11.
i i l I l i .l I l h I I. I I :l i l 1 Ih
.. i i,:,:,,:,, $38,500
Caiellt. Rlance 352?4199252?


LECANTO ALMOST 8 AC. SERVING r
L|., ,:,:,,,,,i -,, .,,,. ,. US COUNTIq r "
ll; I....I 1.: ,l: l.i. i l,. : h O V E R C

Call =- C.* $224,900 i3i
Call Ndida Cano tce//i 352270 0202



d .


WORKSHOP
* li. l 1Pi.,.u- I. :. ., ..iiiii. y
* UP, ,ilF M H .:.. 1 A.:i
* Iln .I..i..n P.... I P i; H I Tu.l.
* W ,:, l .l..I lhin t l ...I
* p'.j: i en i. Ii [I I..:.n11
$119,000 = 3544:
C.a Colufii Sold ill 111 111 iliuj ,iunalIlld Cilmi
Jeanne B Wi/laid Pickiel 212 3410


MORT1h
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