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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02849
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-05-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02849

Full Text



Golden exit: Phelps on winning relay team in last race,^/B1


TODAY CITRi. CS MOUNT
& next
morning



LOW Thunderstorms likely;
78 rain chance 70%. '
LO PAGE A4 www.chronicleonline.com


AUGUST 5, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 117 ISSUE 364


EXCURSIONS:


What is Alzheimer's?


Expert: 'Big difference'between

dementia andAlzheimer's


Wild ones
Travel columnist Neil
Sawyer writes about
Botswana./Page A25
COMMUNITY PIONEER:
Dead at 86
Fourth-generation
Citrus County native Kay
Barco Tolle died Friday
at her home. Read the
obituary/Page A6
NATIONAL NEWS:


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Occasionally forgetting to
pay a bill or sometimes hav-
ing trouble finding the right
word to describe something
can be normal memory
lapses any person might ex-
perience in a lifetime.


However, losing the abil-
ity to manage a budget or
misplacing things and being
unable to retrace steps to
find them may be a sign of
something more severe
than just a momentary slip
of one's recollection.
Any memory loss that in-
terrupts a person's every-


NEXT WEEK
Local facilities cater to
patients with memory
issues.

day life is a symptom of de-
mentia, which, contrary to
widespread belief, is not
the same as Alzheimer's
disease.
"There's a big differ-
ence," said Jerry Fisher,


Page A5


Research works toward a cure


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Most of what people
know today about
Alzheimer's disease has
only been discovered in
the past 15 years.
Years ago, senility was
viewed as a natural part of
growing old, but now ex-


perts agree dementia is
not normal.
Currently, Jerry Fisher,
a program specialist with
the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion's Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, said several im-
portant studies being con-
ducted look at the


Page A4


Wildfire
Residents find little left
in burned Oklahoma
town./Page A24
OPINION:
President
Obama is not
the problem.
We are.



BUSINESS:
Price hikes
Drought affects corn
crops, which affect food
prices./Page D1
OLYMPICS:


Jamaicans
The Jamaicans of Lon-
don have got their soul
food sizzling, their Red
Stripe on ice and their
expectations sky
high./Page A17


COMMENTARY:


No-kill
Guest columnist Art
Yuelling makes the case
for no-kill shelters in the
county./Page C1


TOMORROW:
Under water
Many on the county's
east side blame clogged
road drains for flooding
in their yards./Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A26
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword .............A26
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ..... ...........B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A26
Obituaries ................A6
Together................A28


.6 11184578121100 oI


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Traffic along U.S. 19 in Homosassa often takes three light changes to get through the Grover Cleveland Boulevard
intersection on a weekday. Weekends can be even worse, as cars snarl the intersection with travelers and tourists
coming to spend a weekend in Citrus County.


Motorists asked

views on Suncoast

Parkway tolls
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- It's a fine-line
question of economics.
Florida's Turnpike Enterprise
wants to know how much Citrus
County motorists would pay if any-
thing- in tolls on the proposed Sun-
coast Parkway 2 to avoid traffic
congestion on north-south highways
such as U.S. 19.
If the toll is too high, motorists will
stay away If it's too low, the parkway
won't generate enough revenue to
support itself.
"We need to know what contribu-
tion toward funding could be ex-
pected from toll revenues," Turnpike
Enterprise project manager Dave
Wood said.
So the state is asking motorists
directly
Hundreds of people have already
responded to an elaborate online
survey designed to zero in on toll
amounts motorists would pay to
travel certain distances in Citrus


M


.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
The Turnpike Enterprise survey is trying to gauge potential usage of the
Suncoast Parkway 2 in Citrus County. The parkway ends south of the Citrus
County line.


County
Resources Systems Group Inc. has
a $138,900 contract with Turnpike
Enterprise to conduct the survey The
company has conducted similar sur-
veys to gauge interest in other toll
roads or toll lanes on Interstate 75.
Plans for Suncoast 2, which would


connect the parkway just south of the
Citrus County line to U.S. 19 near
Red Level, stalled in 2008 when state
officials said they no longer could af-
ford to continue studies or buy right
of way


Page A8


ON THE NET
* Although the
current survey is
by invitation only,
a comment form
is available on
the official
Suncoast
Parkway 2
website, www.
suncoast2online.
com.
PARKWAY
TIMELINE
* A Project
Development and
Environment
study was
initiated in 1994
for the Suncoast
Parkway 2
project.
* The 1998 State
Environmental
Impact Report
(SEIR) listed the
project as a
"build" option
with an approved
alignment.
* In September
2006, the Citrus
County
Commission
endorsed a plan
to move forward
with the
alignment ap-
proved in the
1998 SEIR.
* In the summer of
2008, Florida's
Turnpike
Enterprise's
consultants were
approximately 30
percent complete
in developing the
construction
plans.
* As of 2009, the
continued
downturn of the
economy resulted
in having to
reassess the
tentative five-year
work program.
The FTE
suspended work
on the Suncoast
Parkway 2
project upon the
completion of
the 60 percent
design phase.
Source: www.
suncoast2online.
com


A peek at what NASA's new rover packed for Mars


Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. If you were packing
for Mars, what would you bring?
NASAs latest tourist, the roving robot
named Curiosity, will lug around a suite of
gadgets to snap pictures, sniff, taste and
even drill. It will study the environment to
figure out whether the giant crater where it
lands ever possessed a habitable environ-
ment for microbial life.
The six-wheel, nuclear-powered rover is
far more tech-savvy than anything that has
landed before on the red planet. Here's a
glimpse of some of the cool things Curios-
ity can do:
It carries a laser that can zap a hole in
rocks up to about 25 feet away and identify


SO YOU KNOW
SThe Curiosity rover is to touch down on
Mars at 1:31 a.m. tonight. Information
about the mission's success will not be
available in Monday's paper. -

the chemical elements inside. This point-
and-shoot strategy saves time because if a
rock looks boring, Curiosity can roll on.
Its 7-foot-long robotic arm has a power
drill at the end that can bore into rocks and
soil. Like a scientist in a laboratory, it can
transfer the ground-up powder to its on- Associated Press
board workbench to tease out minerals and This undated image made available by NASA shows Mars'
sniff for organic, considered the chemical Gale Crater, looking south. The formation is 96 miles in
building blocks of life. diameter and holds a layered mountain rising about 3 miles
See Page A8 above the crater floor. See story, Page A8.


What's it worth to you?


4-GRVE CLVEAN
^^HALLRIER D +





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Early voting started Saturday, and Scott Toomey sat in the sun in a kayak to win votes for Gloria Fisher for Republican
State committeewoman at the Crystal River elections office in Meadowcrest. The early voting period has been shortened
to only one week this year, and early voting will conclude Saturday, Aug. 11.


Early voting under way


Scott a hit



on blog


Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE Gov
Rick Scott shot back Satur-
day at opponents who have
sued and criticized his con-
servative agenda and was
cheered by an audience
who supports his efforts to
drug test welfare recipi-
ents, strip teachers of
tenure and make Florida
more business-friendly
Scott was a big hit ad-
dressing a gathering organ-
ized by the conservative
RedState blog, drawing
laughs several times as he
made fun of people who op-
pose his policies. The gover-
nor, whose approval rating
was 36 percent in a poll re-
leased last week, clearly was
in front of a friendly crowd
and he received a standing


ovation when he wrapped
up the speech.
"If you do conservative
things in Florida, now you get
sued," Scott said, adding he
gets criticized for spending
money on lawyers to defend
the laws. 'After they sue you
... then they say, 'Why are you
wasting state dollars?' Be-
cause it's the rightthingto do.
That's why you're doing it"
Scott has been sued over
laws that require drug test-
ing for welfare recipients,
create stricter voter regis-
tration rules, prevent doc-
tors from asking patients
about gun ownership, force
state workers to contribute
to their pension plans and
more. He was also sued for
ordering a purge of voter
rolls to make sure non-
citizens can't vote.


Special to the Chronicle
Early voting for the pri-
mary election continues
through Saturday, Aug. 11.
Qualified voters will be
able to cast ballots from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the follow-
ing locations:
Central Ridge Library,
425 W Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills.
Crystal River Elections
Office, 1540 N. Meadowcrest
Bvld., Crystal River.
Homosassa Public Li-
brary, 4100 S. Grandmarch
Ave., Homosassa.
Inverness City Hall, 212
W Main St., Inverness.
By law, Florida is a closed
primary state. In this pri-
mary election, all three
county commission races
and the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit public defender race
include only Republican


candidates. This is called a
"universal primary" be-
cause the winner will be de-
cided during the primary
election. Therefore, the
race for Citrus County Com-
mission Districts 1, 3, and 5
and the public defender will
be on all ballots Republi-
can, Democrat and nonpar-
tisan, allowing all voters to
have a say in the selection of
the elected officials.
Some things voters should
be aware of for the primary
election are:
Last day to request a mail
ballot is Wednesday, Aug. 8,
at 5 p.m.
Voters may not change
party at the polls. Voters
must present photo and sig-
nature ID when voting or
vote a provisional ballot.
Voters who have moved to
Citrus County from another
Florida county should re-


port their address change to
the Supervisor of Elections'
office before going to vote at
an early voting site or they
will be statutorily required
to vote a provisional ballot
Voters new to Florida,
who have never voted in
Florida, were required to
submit a voter registration
application by book-closing
date, July 16, 2012, in order


to be eligible to vote in this
election.
Some polling locations
have changed due to redis-
tricting this year by the
Florida Legislature. Citrus
County has 31 polling loca-
tions instead of 41.
Find your polling location
on your voter information
card or go online at
www.votecitrus.com.


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TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THE STATEround FCAT critics see hope in Robinson's exit
THE STATE ~t1seis


Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's next political
forum is 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, at the College of
Central Florida in Lecanto. In-
formation: Mike Wright, 352-
563-3228.
Nancy Argenziano, In-
dependent for state House
District 34, will speak at
1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, at
the Citrus County Tea Party
Patriots meeting at the
Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Drive, Inverness. Also tenta-
tively scheduled to speak is
Jeff Dawsy, Democrat in-
cumbent for sheriff.
The Citrus County
Republican Executive Com-
mittee will have a grand
opening for its office at 4:30
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, at
2456 N. Essex, Citrus Hills.
Information: 352-410-6125.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for su-
perintendent of schools, will
have a bowling fundraiser
from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug.
12, at Manatee Lanes on
StateRoad 44 in
Crystal River.
Phillip Mulrain, Demo-
crat for clerk of courts, will
have a fundraiser at 1 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 18, at his
home, 5595 S. Chestnut
Terrace, Lecanto.
An attorney from the
League of Women Voters will
offer a non-partisan explana-
tion of the 11 proposed
amendments on the Novem-
ber ballot at 3 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 23, at the Nature Coast
Unitarian Unversalists, 7633
N. Florida Ave., northwest of
the Holder intersection.
Information: 352-465-4225.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 4, at the Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.com.

Tallahassee

Palmer to replace
current APD director
Mike Hansen, a longtime
legislative staffer who has
served the past year as direc-
tor of the state Agency for
Persons with Disabilities, sub-
mitted his resignation Friday
and will be replaced by APD
Chief of Staff Barbara Palmer.
Hansen said in a resigna-
tion letter to Gov. Rick Scott
he has accepted a job in the
Senate, though he did not de-
tail the nature of the position.
Hansen has had a series
of budget-related jobs during
his career, including serving a
stint as director of former
Gov. Jeb Bush's Office of
Policy and Budget.
He said in the letter his
resignation would be effective
Aug. 20. "Serving as your
APD director has been a
tremendously rewarding pub-
lic service opportunity,"
Hansen wrote. "I have been
deeply moved by the courage
our customers and their fami-
lies demonstrate on a daily
basis as they strive to over-
come sometimes overwhelm-
ing challenges."
Palmer, who has been
APD's chief of staff since last
year, came to the agency
after working as an assistant
secretary for administration at
the Florida Department of
Children and Families.
APD, which serves people
with developmental disabili-
ties such as Down syndrome,
autism and cerebral palsy,
has grappled with a series of
budget problems in recent
years. The agency has run re-
peated deficits in its largest
service program, causing


Hansen and others to look for
ways to hold down costs.
-From staff and wire reports


The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE With
Education Commissioner
Gerard Robinson resigning
in the wake of a series of
public-relations miscues
and grading mistakes sur-
rounding Florida's high-
stakes testing and
accountability regimen, crit-
ics are sensing an opening
to change the direction of
the school-reform move-
ment in Florida.
Lawmakers and parent
organizations who want the
state to focus less on FCAT
results in evaluating schools
are trying to use the search
for a replacement for
Robinson who resigned
this week to spend more
time with his family as a
reason to re-evaluate the
system he oversaw
"It's a chance to throw out
the old status quo of high-


stakes testing and look at
what might be best for kids
and make some changes,"
said Kathleen Oropeza, one
of the founders of Fund Ed-
ucation Now, an advocacy
group.
Rep. Perry Thurston, a
Plantation Democrat set to
lead his party in the next
legislative session, was
more blunt.
"The FCAT has failed stu-
dents, teachers, and our
state," he said in a state-
ment responding to Robin-
son's resignation. "A new
state education commis-
sioner can help Florida in-
stall a better and broader
education accountability
system for every school re-
ceiving taxpayer dollars
that takes into account all
the things students and
teachers accomplish
throughout the year"
Robinson's tenure was
marked by a major collapse


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

INVERNESS -After months of planning,
Girl Scout Cadettes Kellie Faulk and Alexis
Duca expressed relief Saturday as they sur-
veyed the incredible turnout at the inaugural
Kids' Expo at the Citrus County Auditorium.
The girls, who are earning their Silver
Award, decided to tackle a project that would
highlight services, activities and events for
children in Citrus County.
Duca, 13, said she was pleased with the
number of people wandering the auditorium,
looking at booths and enjoying the
entertainment.
The hardest part of the project was getting
people to respond, 14-year-old Faulk said.
But once people understood what the expo
was all about, momentum picked up.
Duca said the Kids' Expo put all the par-
ticipating businesses and organizations
geared toward children in one place so
parents can see what is available in
Citrus County
Before, she said she would hear disap-


in FCAT writing scores,
blamed on increased stan-
dards, and a revision to
school grades that changed
the marks for more than 200
schools after the grades
were released.
The PTA has pressed
members to send emails to
Gov Rick Scott encouraging
him and state Board of Edu-
cation members to appoint
"a Commissioner of Educa-
tion who values a well-
rounded, high quality public
education and reduces the
emphasis on high-stakes
testing." The emails have
poured into Scott's inbox.
Another email of unclear
origin that has shown up
several times in Scott's
inbox which can be publicly
viewed on the governor's
Sunburst email system -
hits many of the same notes.
"Commissioner Robin-
son's resignation will not
quiet the discontent of


pointment from both parents and children
because it felt as if there was nothing for
youths to do. However, judging from the more
than 20 exhibitors filling the auditorium,
Faulk and Duca agreed there is plenty to do.
Faulk said she and Duca hope to form a
board and keep the project going so they can
use it to earn their Gold Award. She admits
she is already bouncing around ideas in her
head for next year
Beginning Wednesday, Aug. 15, a website -
www.citruscountykids.com will be avail-
able listing different events, activities and
services for children in the county.
Eugenie Dexter, ballet instructor for Dance
Central in Inverness, said it was nice to see so
much interest from people at their booth.
"It's been great for getting the word out,"
April Metcalf, also with Dance Central, said.
Working quietly on a craft at her booth,
Georgette Bokash said the community was
"screaming" for something like the
Kids' Expo.
As a small businesswoman, Bokash said it
had been difficult to find time to promote her
paper-crafting services. Therefore, she


Floridians for current polit-
ically-driven reform ef-
forts," the letter begins.
Sen. Bill Montford, a Tal-
lahassee Democrat who also
serves as CEO of the Florida
Association of District
School Superintendents, is
not as critical of the FCAT as
some other Democrats, but
still said the state should re-
evaluate the test regardless
of Robinson's decision.
"Let's have a serious dis-
cussion about, is this the
best approach?" he said.
Even Scott recently ques-
tioned in off-the-cuff re-
marks whether Florida
might "test too much,"
though he hasn't elaborated
on that thought since, and
hasn't made any suggestion
that he is likely to push for a
major change in that area.
But Republicans seem un-
likely to budge from the re-
form effort that has formed
the backbone of their educa-


tion agenda since former
Gov Jeb Bush pushed ac-
countability during his
tenure. And Bush's Founda-
tion for Florida's Future re-
mains influential in school
debates in the Legislature.
Patricia Levesque, execu-
tive director of the founda-
tion, praised Robinson and
the state's high-stakes test-
ing model in a statement fol-
lowing the commissioner's
resignation.
"He kept Florida an edu-
cation-reform model for the
nation," Levesque said.
"Under his leadership,
Florida pushed forward
with important improve-
ments to its standards and
accountability system to bet-
ter prepare students for
success."
An overhaul of the state's
testing system is already on
the way as Florida and other
states move toward a more
standardized curriculum.


The coordinators of the Kids' Expo are Girl
Scout Cadettes Alexis Duca and Kellie Faulk,
who are earning their Girl Scout Silver Award.

thought the expo would be a great place to
reach her target audience: adults with
children.
"It's my opportunity to get exposure," she
said. "I thank the Girl Scouts who put it to-
gether"
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can
be reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


FHP checkpoints throughout Citrus County this month


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Highway Pa-
trol is conducting driver li-
cense and vehicle
inspection checkpoints
during the month of August
throughout the seven-
county region of Troop C
on the roadways listed
below.
Recognizing the danger
presented to the public by
defective vehicle equip-
ment, troopers will concen-
trate their efforts on
vehicles being operated
with defects such as bad


brakes, worn tires and de-
fective lighting equipment.
In addition, attention will be
directed to drivers who
would violate the driver li-
cense laws of Florida.
These checkpoints are
random, daytime operations
that typically delay mo-
torists for only a few
minutes.
Supervisors select the
time, location and duration
of the checkpoints on the
roadways listed below
based upon staffing,
weather and traffic
conditions.


Local checkpoints will
be on:
Citrus County Roads: 39,
470,480,486,488,490,490A,
491, 494; local roads: High-
lands Street, West Cardinal
Street, Century Boulevard,
Elkcam Boulevard, West
Pine Ridge Boulevard,
Dunkenfield Road, Rock
Crusher Road, North Croft
Avenue, West Seven Rivers
Drive, West Venable Street,
Pleasant Grove Road, Green
Acres Boulevard, Fort Is-
land Trail, West Riverbend
Road, Fishbowl Drive, Miss
Maggie Drive, Gobbler


Drive, North Citrus Avenue,
Turkey Oak Drive, Dunklin
Avenue, Yulee Drive West,
North Citrus Springs Boule-
vard, Grover Cleveland,
Turner Camp Road, Is-
tachatta Road, West High-
land Street, Halls River
Road, and Old Floral City
Highway
The Patrol has found
these checkpoints to be an
effective means of enforcing
the equipment and driver li-
cense laws of Florida while
ensuring the protection of
all motorists.
If you have questions or


concerns, contact Sgt Steve
Gaskins at the Tampa FHP
Station at 813-215-1867 or
stevegaskins@flhsmvgov
For real-time traffic and
road condition reports, as
well as maps and other
safety tips, the public is
urged to visit the FHP web-
site at wwwflhsmv.gov/fhp/.
Florida drivers can also call
511 on their cell phones for
up-to-the minute updates on
traffic congestion, road con-
struction, lane closures, se-
vere weather and travel
delays on Interstates and
major highways.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Audrey Duncan, right, talks to dancers Alex Calderone, Christina Calderone, Jasmine Lopez and Madison Rash from the School of Dance Arts
of Inverness about taking classes from the school. The school participated during the inaugural Kids' Expo on Saturday at the Citrus County
Auditorium.



Connecting kids with fun






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1906: German physician Alois Alzheimer
describes the haunting case of Auguste
D., a patient who had profound memory
loss, unfounded suspicions about her
family and other worsening psychologi-
cal changes. In her brain at autopsy, he
saw dramatic shrinkage and abnormal
deposits in and around nerve cells.
1910: Emil Kraepelin, a German psychia-
trist who worked with Dr. Alzheimer, first
names "Alzheimer's Disease."
1976: Neurologist Robert Katzman identi-
fies Alzheimer's disease as the most
common cause of dementia and a major
public health challenge.
1983: Awareness of Alzheimer's disease
increases, leading Congress to designate
November 1983 as the first National
Alzheimer's Disease Month.
1984: Researchers George Glenner and
Cai'ne Wong report identification of a
cerebrovascular amyloid protein known
as beta-amyloid the chief component
of Alzheimer's brain plaques and a
prime suspect in triggering nerve cell


MAJOR MILESTONES IN UNDERSTANDING ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE


damage.
1986: Researchers discover tau protein is a
key component of tangles another
prime suspect in nerve cell degeneration.
1987: The National Institute on Aging
(NIA) and Warner-Lambert Pharmaceuti-
cal Company (now Pfizer) launch and re-
cruit participants for clinical trials of
tacrine, the first drug specifically target-
ing symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
1987: Researchers identify the first gene
associated with rare, inherited forms of
Alzheimer's disease.
1991: The NIA established the Alzheimer's
Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a na-
tionwide medical network to facilitate
clinical research and conduct federally
funded clinical trials.
1993: Researchers identify APOE-e4 as the
first gene that raises risk for Alzheimer's
but does not determine a person who
has it will develop the disease.
1993: The Food and Drug Administration


(FDA) approves tacrine (Cognex) as the
first drug specifically targeting
Alzheimer's memory and thinking
symptoms.
1994: President Ronald Reagan an-
nounces he has been diagnosed with
Alzheimer's disease.
1994: The first World Alzheimer's Day
(WAD) launches Sept. 21.
1999: The first in a series of reports is
published showing injecting transgenic
"Alzheimer" mice with beta-amyloid pre-
vents them from developing Alzheimer-
like brain changes.
2003: The Alzheimer's Association part-
ners with NIA to recruit participants for
the National Alzheimer's Disease Genet-
ics Study. The study is a federal initiative
to collect blood samples from families
with several members who developed
Alzheimer's disease late in life in order
to identify additional Alzheimer's risk
genes.


2004: Researchers at the Alzheimer's As-
sociation International Conference on
Alzheimer's Disease (AAICAD) share
their first report on an imaging agent
called Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB), a
major potential breakthrough in disease
monitoring and early detection.
2010: The Alzheimer's Association and its
partners in the Coalition Against Major
Diseases (CAMD) release a first-of-its
kind database of 4,000 patients who
participated in 11 pharmaceutical
industry-sponsored clinical trials of
Alzheimer's treatments. The combined
data will offer unprecedented power to
understand the course of Alzheimer's.
2010: The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) releases data showing
Alzheimer's disease is now the sixth-
leading cause of death in the United
States.
2011: Legislation establishes the first-ever
framework for a national strategic plan
to address the Alzheimer's crisis.
Source: Alzheimer's Association


RESEAR
Continued from

treatment and possi
for Alzheimer's dise
Though much of*
searchers have is
based on theory,
Fisher said they
are really looking
at genetic risk fac-
tors to discover an
easy and precise
way to identify
Alzheimer's be-
fore its symptoms
begin.
According to
Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation, scientists
have already iden-
tified one gene
that increases the
risk of Alzheimer's
not guarantee an in
will develop the d
Experts are also lo
biomarkers (short f
logical markers") as
detect Alzheimer's


CH
Page Al

ible cure
easa


in patients. Biomarkers are
used in the scientific field
as reliable predictors and
indicators of a disease's
development.
Dominick DePetrillo, ex-


zhat .- ecutive director of the
what re-
Alzheimer's Fam-
It normally ily Organization,
recently said the
takes eight University of
Philadelphia
to 12 years School of Medi-
before a cine used bio-
markers to
person develop a spinal
fluid test that will
starts be able to confirm
exhibiting or rule out
exibiting Alzheimer's dis-

Alzheimer's ease in people.
Fisher said the
SymptomS. reason finding a
way to identify
but does Alzheimer's early is so im-
dividual perative is it normally takes
disorder. eight to 12 years before a
oking at person starts exhibiting
for "bio- symptoms. And many times
a way to DePetrillo said people are
earlier already in the middle stages


of the disease before seek-
ing care and by then, it's
often too late.
Current diagnosis of
Alzheimer's relies largely
on documenting a person's
mental deterioration be-
cause a definite diagnosis
can only be done by autopsy
once a person is dead.


Fisher did note a recent
positive step in Alzheimer's
research. This year, the
Obama administration es-
tablished legislation and
presented a national plan to
fight Alzheimer's. There
was no federal commitment
to Alzheimer's research be-
fore this year, Fisher said.


Now, a committee will be
formed to make recommen-
dations on what needs to be
done. One of the first steps,
Fisher said, will be encour-
aging the government to
spend more on studies.
However, as researchers
continue to make headlines
with new and fascinating


discoveries, DePetrillo said
finding a cure for the dis-
ease still appears far away
"It doesn't look like any-
thing is on the horizon," he
said.
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at
swiles@chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2924.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Bid Notices............................D5



A Meeting Notices....................D5




j I Miscellaneous Notices.........D5


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
)PR HI LOPR HI LO PR
0.00 01 Q -79 0 00-. 92 70 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 89 75 ts Miami 89
Ft. Lauderdale 89 79 ts Ocala 90
Fort Myers 92 75 ts Orlando 91
Gainesville 90 73 ts Pensacola 92
Homestead 89 75 ts Sarasota 95
Jacksonville 89 74 ts Tallahassee 92
Key West 88 81 ts Tampa 91
Lakeland 89 74 ts Vero Beach 88
Melbourne 89 76 ts W. Palm Bch. 89


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 5 knots. Seas
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
smooth. Chance of thunderstorms
today.


95 72 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluseaily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 92 Low: 78
Thunderstorms are likely as rain
chances reach 70% today.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 78
Expect the wet conditions to continue as rain
chances remain at 70%.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 78
Showers and storms are still expected.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 93/71
Record 102/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.10 in.
Total for the year 37.17 in.
Normal for the year 31.97 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 2.4/12
Monday's count: 3.3
Tuesday's count: 3.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/5 SUNDAY 8:49 2:38 9:12 3:00
8/6 MONDAY 9:40 3:29 10:02 3:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


O
AUG. 31


SUNSET TONIGHT ................. 8:18 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:55 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:23 PM.
M OONSET TODAY ..........................10:18 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:32 a/4:13 a 8:33 p/4:25 p
Crystal River** 6:53 a/1:35 a 6:54 p/1:47 p
Withlacoochee* 4:40 a/11:35 a 4:41 p/11:52 p
Homosassa*** 7:42 a/3:12 a 7:43 p/3:24 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:59 a/4:42 a 9:16 p/5:06 p
7:20 a/2:04 a 7:37 p/2:28 p
5:07 a/12:16 p 5:24 p/-
8:09 a/3:41 a 8:26 p/4:05 p


Gulf water
temperature



89
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.00 32.04 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.00 36.08 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.13 38.17 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.78 40.77 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


jos 7 s
. 60s1 Juneau q"p"''
e a80s.


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


92 71
93 66
81 67 .67
94 73 .90
87 69
99 74
93 76
81 49
92 73
95 59
82 74
96 73
94 64
90 74
91 70 .04
91 72
93 71 .37
92 73
94 72
92 76
93 73
92 65 .01
10280
83 58
85 69 .81
91 71
10273
91 78
87 72 .97
91 73
96 78
94 73 .25
95 76
104 85 trace
10678
74 63
90 77 .01
96 80
88 73 .07
78 66 .04
93 74
94 72
94 77 .22


87 70
88 69
82 67
90 73
85 74
97 74
93 74
94 59
93 73
95 63
87 72
84 64
87 67
89 75
87 71
90 72
80 64
84 61
84 63
91 74
83 62
87 68
102 79
90 64
82 61
85 64
97 75
90 67
91 71
86 73
94 78
87 60
93 74
105 83
97 75
72 64
88 66
96 75
77 61
77 59
92 74
95 73
92 74


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 91 73 1.55 ts 91 78
New York City 90 75 ts 87 76
Norfolk 91 75 pc 91 74
Oklahoma City 10980 pc 99 73
Omaha 84 68 s 85 61
Palm Springs 10981 s 109 82
Philadelphia 93 75 ts 90 74
Phoenix 111 88 pc 110 87
Pittsburgh 89 71 ts 83 63
Portland, ME 83 67 pc 82 69
Portland, Ore 102 59 s 94 63
Providence, R.I. 89 72 pc 86 73
Raleigh 92 75 ts 92 73
Rapid City 79 48 s 90 60
Reno 98 65 ts 92 61
Rochester, NY 92 69 ts 86 67
Sacramento 79 57 s 91 58
St. Louis 98 77 .13 pc 90 66
St. Ste. Marie 91 64 ts 74 56
Salt Lake City 94 64 ts 96 70
San Antonio 99 77 pc 97 76
San Diego 73 65 s 73 65
San Francisco 65 54 c 66 55
Savannah 91 75 ts 89 75
Seattle 92 62 s 90 61
Spokane 88 58 s 95 65
Syracuse 97 69 ts 89 67
Topeka 90 76 s 89 61
Washington 96 79 ts 94 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 113 Coffeyville, Kan. LOW 29
Yellowstone Park, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/79/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 74/57/ts Mexico City
Athens 97/79/s Montreal
Beijing 88/75/ts Moscow
Berlin 75/61/ts Paris
Bermuda 85/79/pc Rio
Cairo 94/75/s Rome
Calgary 88/56/s Sydney
Havana 90/72/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/82/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 85/68/s Warsaw


77/57/pc
67/57/ts
85/57/pc
74/54/ts
86/71/ts
81/56/ts
74/56/pc
80/63/sh
91/70/pc
66/46/pc
90/77/pc
84/63/ts
88/66/ts


C I T R U S


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


COUNTY N


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AUG. 9 AUG. 17 AUG. 24


I


I-


A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 WARNING SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER'S
1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life.
2. Challenges in planning or solving problems.
3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work
or at leisure.
4. Confusion with time or place.
5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial rela-
tionships.
6. New problems with words in speaking or writing.
7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace
steps.
8. Decreased or poor judgment.
9. Withdrawal from work or social activities.
10. Changes in mood and personality.
Source: Alzheimer's Association

ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT GROUPS


Continued from Page Al
program specialist with the
Alzheimer's Association's
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
The Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter covers 17 counties,
including Citrus. According
to the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs, about 172,000
persons with Alzheimer's
disease reside in the chap-
ter's coverage area, with an
estimated 6,553 of those
cases in Citrus County
Fisher, who has been a
program specialist for a little
more than seven years, said
many people incorrectly in-
terchange the terms demen-
tia and Alzheimer's.
"Dementia is not a dis-
ease. It's a group of symp-
toms," he said.
Simply put, Dominick De-
Petrillo, executive director of
the Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, said dementia is
the inability of the mind to
control the body The
Alzheimer's Family Organi-
zation services eight counties
containing more than 100,000
cases of Alzheimer's disease.
More than 100 different
conditions can disrupt a per-
son's memory function such
as thyroid problems, vitamin
deficiencies or Parkinson's
disease. But the best way to
have a clear idea of what
could be causing dementia is
to see a doctor, Fisher said.
Though there is no one
test that can show someone
has Alzheimer's, there are a
series of exams and evalua-
tions doctors can do to make
a diagnosis.
Nevertheless, Alzheimer's
disease accounts for 70 per-


* Find local support
groups for caregivers
by reading the Health &
Life section./Tuesdays

cent of most cases of demen-
tia. Starting at age 65, one in
eight people will be diag-
nosed with Alzheimer's dis-
ease. That number increases
(one in two) for individuals
older than 85. And with
many of the baby boomers
growing older, Fisher said,
the numbers are anticipated
to double every five years.
According to the
Alzheimer's Association,
Alzheimer's disease is a pro-
gressive brain disorder that
damages and eventually de-
stroys brain cells. The oblit-
eration of these cells leads to
loss of memory, thinking and
other brain functions, which
makes the ailment fatal.
"It is a very, very devastat-
ing disease," Fisher said.
While age is the most ac-
knowledged risk factor for
Alzheimer's, family history
and genetics, along with a
person's overall health and
lifestyle choices can all enter
into the equation.
People with Alzheimer's
usually live an average of
eight years after being diag-
nosed, though in some cases
people have been able to live
for as long 20 years with the
disease.
Usually, the early signs of
Alzheimer's involve a person
losing the ability to problem
solve, Fisher said. There
may also be increasing trou-
ble with planning and organ-
ization and issues with
short-term memory loss.
As the disease progresses,


TO LEARN MORE
* Citrus Memorial Health System along with the
Alzheimer's Association is hosting a number of free
seminars this month focusing on dementia and
Alzheimer's disease. The seminars are conducted at
the Citrus Memorial Auditorium, 402 W. Grace St., In-
verness. Call 352-560-6266 to register.
* 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 8: Driving and Dementia. We
discuss what happens to driving ability during the
Alzheimer's disease process. We give tips for dealing
with someone who refuses to give up their drivers li-
cense and present available options.
* 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15: Making the Placement
Decision. A discussion of different types of facilities
and levels of care. Determine what programs are avail-
able to help pay for the placement. Suggestions of
what to look for in finding a good facility.
* 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22: Legal and Financial Is-
sues. Understand the importance of advance direc-
tives and of involving the person with dementia.
Identify steps in getting legal and financial plans in
place. Be familiar with specific legal and financial is-
sues pertaining to dementia and future care.
* HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimer's As-
sociation Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, will host two free
seminars to provide information and assist community
members who are caring for a loved one with
Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. Seminars
will be at HPH Hospice administrative offices, 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. The free seminars re-
quire pre-registration because seating is limited. Call
HPH Hospice at 352-527-4600 to register.
* 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, Jerry Fisher from
the Alzheimer's Association will present "Changes in
Communication" to share tips and communication
skills to help exchange ideas, wishes and feelings.
* 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, Fisher will present
"Solutions for Difficult Behaviors," how patients can
become anxious or aggressive and sometimes misin-
terpret what they hear. He will share ways to identify
those behaviors and explore possible solutions to help.


DePetrillo said people start
forgetting their own per-
sonal history They can be-
come moody or start to
withdraw from people and
social activities.
"Alzheimer's is a disease
of isolation," he said.
When some people with
Alzheimer's start to act out
and display socially unac-
ceptable behavior like in-
tense aggression or walking
around naked because they


forget to put on clothes, De-
Petrillo said people start
pulling away Then argu-
ments over whether or not
to place someone in a facil-
ity can cause added stress
between the caregiver and
other family members, he
said.
In the final stages, a per-
son with Alzheimer's starts
requiring additional assis-
tance with daily tasks such
as dressing, eating, bathing


ALZHEIMER'S FACTS & FIGURES
* 5.4 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's dis-
ease.
* One in eight older Americans has Alzheimer's disease.
* Alzheimer's disease is the sixth-leading cause of
death in the United States and the only cause of death
among the top 10 in the United States that cannot be
prevented, cured or even slowed.
* An estimated 800,000 individuals with Alzheimer's
disease ( one in seven) live alone.
* More than 15 million Americans provide unpaid care
valued at $210 billion for persons with Alzheimer's
and other dementias.
* Payments for care are estimated to be $200 billion in
the United States in 2012.
Source: Alzheimer's Association


or using the toilet. They may
wander or become lost be-
fore eventually losing the
ability to control movement
or respond to their
environment.
Fisher said it's losing that
sense of one's self that can
be particularly scary for not
only the person with
Alzheimer's but for the care-
giver and family
"What we need to realize
is there are malfunctions of
the brain," DePetrillo said,
"and the person needs help.
There is help out there."


For more information
about the Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation, call the 24-hour
helpline at 800-272-3900 or
visit the Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter's website at
www.alz.org/flgulfcoast.
For more information
about the Alzheimer's Fam-
ily Organization call the
helpline at 727-848-8888 or
toll-free at 888-496-8004. Or
visit alzheimersfamilyorg.
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at
swiles@chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2924.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Kay Tolle, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Beulah Katherine "Kay"
Barco Tolle, 86, of Crystal
River, passed away at home
surrounded
by her fam-
ily on Fri-
day, Aug. 3,
S 2012.
S- Kay was a
Lifelong,
fourth-gen-
eration resi-
Kay dent of
Tolle C i tr u s
County She
was born Sept. 18, 1925, in
Crystal River to Hugh C. and
Edna Eubanks Barco, both
from pioneer families of
Crystal River. She attended
elementary through high
school in Inverness and con-
tinued her education at
Florida Southern College in
Lakeland, Fla., graduating
with a BA in Education. At
Florida Southern, she met
her husband, Edgar "Ed" E.
Tolle Jr They were married
March 14, 1946, and this
year celebrated their 66th
wedding anniversary. They
had three children, Edgar
E. Tolle III (deceased),
Hugh (Kathy) Tolle, and
Laura Lou (Pat) Fitzpatrick.
Kay took great pride in her
seven grandchildren and 10-
plus great-grandchildren:
Brandon (Tina) Tolle, Ryan
(Wendy) Tolle, Jessica (Jed)
Byrd, Shane (Alyse) Fitz-
patrick, Erin (Matt) Mar-
rero, Elaina (Matt) Ryals,
and Elisha (Tyler) LeMieux.
(Great grandchildren) Riley
Tolle; Madelyn Tolle; Trace
Fitzpatrick; Payton,
Matthew Jr and Eli Mar-
rero; Dean and Dylan Ryals;
Lilly and Vaden LeMieux,

00C7DT

ooper
FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills
(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
www.HooperFuneralHome.comn


and still counting....
The funeral service for
Kathrine Barco Tolle will be
conducted at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the
Crystal River United
Methodist Church with pas-
tors David Rawls and Lloyd
Bertine officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at the Old
Crystal River Cemetery
Strickland Funeral Home of
Crystal River is assisting the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.















Louis
Murdock, 83
Louis Joseph Murdock,
Dec. 19, 1928 -July 30, 2012.
We All Love and Miss You
Evermore.
"Lou" was born 83 years
ago in Cincinnati, Ohio, of
Lebanese parents, the third
of four and last to pass on.
He completed Air Force
R.O.TC. while attending
Ohio State University on a
baseball scholarship from
Price Hill's Elder High
School. Despite offers to
pitch in Major League Base-
ball, as A.F 1st Lieutenant,
Murdock trained recruits to
pilot 1,445-horsepower sin-
gle-engine T-6 Texan fight-


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ers. While stationed at
Smokey Hill Air Force Base,
Kan., he coached and
pitched for their champi-
onship winning baseball
team.
Lou's tenacious sales
drive at International Busi-
ness Machines New York
operations led to numerous
100% Club Awards while re-
siding with his family of six
in Stamford, Conn. He
coached North Stamford
Little League's AMF cham-
pionship baseball team and
was North Stamford Babe
Ruth League president with
wife, Barbara, as secretary
Eventual appointment fol-
lowed as IBM Airline Sys-
tems Sales and Marketing
Manager encompassing the
Middle East, Asia, Africa
and Europe. To accomplish
this vast overseas assign-
ment, he brought his family
to reside in Kew Gardens,
Surrey, England, for four
years. Upon retiring, Lou
built a cabin in the Catskill
Mountains of New York and


another lakeside retreat in
Crystal River, Fla. Member-
ships included Toastmaster
International and the Ro-
tary Clubs of New York and
Florida. Lifelong pursuits
as a sportsman afield and
on water led to many mag-
nificent hunting and fishing
adventures.
Lou leaves Barbara, his
devoted wife of 59 years;
daughter, Michelle, and son-
in-law, David, with grand-
daughter, Madelyn, all of
Colorado; eldest son, Guy, of
Maine; and his youngest
son, Blair.
Lou, known for his life-
long Roman Catholic devo-
tion, had unmatched
physical strength, superior
mentality and an unsur-
passed will to successfully
serve God, wife, children
and friends. He will be gen-
tly laid to rest with his son
Dirck at Queen of Peace
Cemetery in Stamford,
Conn. Thank you Dad for
everything and God Bless
You! Say hello to Dircky and


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all whom we know and love.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County Inc.,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Marjorie
Jais, 94
HOMOSASSA
Marjorie M. Jais, 94, Ho-
mosassa, died Friday Aug. 3,
2012, at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Hospital in
Crystal River.
She was born April 10,
1918, to Harold and Sadie
(Pearson) MacKenzie in
Amesbury, Mass., and came
here six years ago from
Riverview, Fla. Mrs. Jais
was a 25-year volunteer
for the Hillsborough County
School System. She
was a loving mother

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @ chronicleonline com
or
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and grandmother.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death
by her husband, Angelo
"Lefty" Jais; and brother,
Alan MacKenzie.
She is survived by her
daughters, Judith White
(Peter) of Riverview, Billie
Tice and Lynne Coughlin of
Homosassa; a son, Brian
Wells (Fujiko) of California;
nine grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren. Strick-
land Funeral Home with
Crematory of Crystal River
is assisting the family with
private arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
See DEATHS/Page A7


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A6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Alma
Britsch, 91
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Alma Owen
Britsch, age 91 years, of In-
verness, will be held 2:00
PM, Sunday,
August 5,
S 2012 at the
Inverness
Chapel of
Hooper Fu-
n e r a 1
[ Homes. Pri-
vate inter-
Alma ment will
Britsch take place
beside her
husband at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell.
Friends may call from 1:00
PM until the time of service
Sunday at the Chapel.
Mrs. Britsch was born
January 6,1921 in Inverness
to Charles A. and Mary Jane
(Rooks) Owen, the oldest of
eight children. She gradu-
ated from Citrus High
School and attended busi-
ness college in Ocala. Her
first job was with the War
Department, Civilian Re-
tirement Records in Wash-
ington, DC. After 2 1/2 years
she transferred with the di-
vision to Charlotte, NC. She
worked there for a year and
transferred to the Internal
Revenue Service, Audit
Dept. in Jacksonville. She
worked there 8 years, met
her husband, married, had
two children and moved to
Palm Beach Gardens, FL.
She worked in the account-
ing department at the Pro-
fessional Golfers'
Association for 15 years. She
retired in 1986 and moved
back to Inverness where she
worked during tax season
for Maria Duteau, CPA. Mrs.
Britsch was a member of
First Baptist Church of In-
verness and an associate
member of the Citrus
County Retired Educators.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Edward J.
Britsch, Jr.(July 16, 1988); a
son: Edward J. Britsch III
(May 5,2011); and her broth-
ers and sisters, Addie Owen
Lake, Carl Owen, Alfred


Owen, Tom Owen, Jane
Gilmore, Sam Owen, and
Lavonia Thompson. Surviv-
ing are her daughter: Mrs.
Loretta K. (Andrew L. Rein)
Britsch, Rolling Hills Es-
tates, CA; and a grand-
daughter: Becky Rein,
Rolling Hills Estates, CA;
many nieces, nephews, sis-
ters in law and brother in
law.






Henry "Hank"
Cieply, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Henry "Hank" Cieply, 80,
of Beverly Hills, went to be
with his Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ on Aug. 2, 2012.
He passed peacefully sur-
rounded by his loving family
and HPH Hospice Nurses
after a long, courageous bat-
tle with lung cancer.
Hank was born in Galway,
N.Y He graduated from
SUNY Utica with a degree
in textiles. He proudly
served as an honor guard in
the U.S. Air Force. While
standing in salute before
Eisenhower at his inaugura-
tion, Hank had the distinc-
tion of being personally
addressed and commended
for his service by the new
president. He volunteered
for the Korean War, where
he was a dog handler, pro-
tecting ammunition posts.
He was honorably dis-
charged after losing his vi-


sion and breaking his hand
in service. Hank was a qual-
ity control inspector and
traveled extensively to nu-
clear plants around the
country He was an avid
fisherman and loved spend-
ing the day deep-sea fishing
on the Apollo. He spent his
youth fishing, hunting, and
trapping on the Great
Sacandaga Lake and
streams. He also loved play-
ing cribbage and sports. His
main love always was his
family and God.
Hank was preceded in
death by the love of his life,
his beautiful wife, Joan; his
parents, Tony and Mary
Cieply; and his brother,
Frank Cieply Survivors in-
clude his children, Joe
(Cathy) Cieply of Hudson
Falls, N.Y, Virginia "Ginny"
Cieply of Beverly Hills, Fla.;
and JoAnn "Muffy" (Jim)
Morin of Beverly Hills;
seven grandchildren, Chris
(Tara) Morin of Beverly
Hills, Fla., Emily Ball of
Hudson Falls, N.Y, Darla
(Ryan Wistuk) Cieply of
Troy, N.Y, Charles "Chuck"
Cieply of Marine Corps,
Calif., Brian, Artie and Rob-
bie Cieply, all of Hudson
Falls, N.Y; great-grand-
daughter, Abbie Ball of
Hudson Falls, N.Y; his long-
time best friends, George
Clark, Dave and Judy Mello,
Sarah and Vito Dandreano,
The Caudill Family, Nancy
and Harold Long, Wayne
and Nancy Ellis, Yolanda
and Luis Ortiz, and his "pre-
cious little girl" Biscuit, the
beagle.
In lieu of flowers, please


make donations to HPH
Hospice or the Ron Paul
campaign. Per Hank's re-
quest, there will be no serv-
ices. A private celebration
of his life will be held. Hank
and his family wish to pub-
licly thank Dr. Babol, the
VA., and the entire HPH
staff with special thanks to
Jane Skidmore and Kathy
Kidd for their love, support
and kindness. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Raul Garcia, 85
HOMOSASSA
Raul Garcia, 85, Ho-
mosassa, formerly of
Tampa, died Aug. 3, 2012. in
Cypress
SCove. A na-
tive ofCuba,
She lived in
Tampa be-
fore moving
S,: to Citrus
County in
2001. He
Raul was em-
Garacia played by
Owens-Illi-
nois Glass Company in
Vineland, N.J., before mov-
ing to Florida.
He was predeceased by
his wife, Antonia Garcia, on
Jan. 10, 2001.
Survivors include three
children, Raul Garcia Jr,
Millville, N.J., Jeanette
Quigley, Vineland, N.J.,
Maria Carlton, Homosassa;
foster daughter, Nadine
Sloan, Vineland, N.J.; nine
grandchildren; and five


great-grandchildren.
Graveside services are at
2 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7, from
The Fountains Memorial
Park of Homosassa with in-
terment following. There
will be calling hours at the
funeral home. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home With
Crematory is assisting the
family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Joseph Kuefner
Jr., 71
Joseph F Kuefner Jr, 71,
died Thursday, Aug. 2, 2012.
A graveside service will be
held at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 8, 2012, at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery Visitation
is at 9:30 a.m. at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory

Brian
Kozlowski, 44
HERNANDO
Brian L. Kozlowski, 44,
Hernando, died Aug. 3,2012,
at Citrus Memorial Hospital
in Inverness.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A7

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Paul
McCracken, 96
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
FORMER
PRESIDENTIAL
ADVISER
Paul W McCracken, a for-
mer economic adviser to sev-
eral U.S. presidents, died
Friday in Ann Arbor at age 96.
McCracken was a member
of President Dwight Eisen-
hower's Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers and later
chair of the council under
President Richard Nixon.
Herbert Hildebrandt, a
retired University of Michi-
gan business professor and
longtime friend, said Satur-
day he was told of the death
by McCracken's daughter,
Linda Langer
McCracken was professor
emeritus of business admin-
istration, economics and
public policy at the Ross
School of Business at the
University of Michigan in
Ann Arbor. An announce-
ment of his death on the
school's website said Nixon
once wrote that during his
first term he depended on
McCracken "for his incisive
intellect and his hard-
headed pragmatism."
"He was a key adviser
during a crucial time in our
nation's history," Nixon
wrote in 1985.
He is survived by two
daughters, Langer and
Paula McCracken.


-From wire reports


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A8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


Mars rover to land in giant crater


Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. The latest Mars
destination is a giant crater near the equa-
tor with an odd feature: a mountain rising
from the crater floor. How did it get there?
Gale Crater was gouged by a meteor im-
pact more than 3 billion years ago. Over time,
scientists believe sediments filled in the 96-
mile-wide crater and winds sculpted the 3-
mile-high mountain, called Mount Sharp.
Mount Sharp's stack of rock layers can be
read like pages in a storybook with older


deposits at the base and more recent mate-
rial the higher up you go, providing a
record of Mars history through time.
Images from space reveal signs of water
in the lower layers of the mountain, includ-
ing mineral signatures of clays and sulfate
salts, which form in the presence of water
Life as we know it needs more than just
water. It also needs nutrients and energy.
During its two-year mission, the NASA
rover Curiosity will trek to the lower flanks
of the mountain in search of the carbon-
based building blocks of life.


NASA Mars mission
The Curiosity rover is designed to travel Mars studying climate and geology. The rover is
looking for signs of carbon, the building blocks of life. Some of the rover's features:


Robotic arm Las
Used to examine and Bur
manipulate soil and rod
rocks; it also has two 23 f
scientific instruments, ider
one uses X-rays to eler
determine materials'
composition and the
other is a magnifying
camera




Photo courtesy
of NASA







Weather station Rad
Records wind speed/ Mea
direction, air pressure, front
humidity, temperature sup.
and UV radiation other


;er
ns small holes in
ks and soil up to
feet away and
itifies chemical
nents


1-I---


Color cameras
Stereo mastcams
on either side of the
rover's mast take
color pictures and
movies in 3-D


liation detector Inside:
asures radiation Chemistry lab
n the sun, Analyzes rock
ernovae and and soil samples
er sources for organic


UHF antenna
Primary
transmission
antenna

Plutonium
power source
A nuclear battery
that converts heat
into electricity

Neutron
detector
Detects water in
rocks and soil


Mineral detector
Shines an X-ray beam at
a rock or soil sample to
identify types of minerals


SOURCE: NASA


MARS
Continued from Page Al

What's the point of an ex-
traterrestrial trip if you can't
sight-see? Curiosity prom-
ises to be a shutterbug, tot-
ing around a set of
2-megapixel color cameras
that can beam panoramas
back to Earth. With YouTube
fans in mind, it also packed
a video camera that will
record the last few minutes
of its hairy descent to Mars.
Like Mars rovers before


it, Curiosity carries a
weather station to take daily
temperature and pressure
readings and record sea-
sonal changes.
Even before landing, Cu-
riosity has been doing ex-
periments, tracking
radiation during the 8 1/2-
month cruise to Mars. That
should help NASA gauge ra-
diation risk to future dis-
tance-traveling astronauts.
As sophisticated as Cu-
riosity is, it won't be able to
tell us whether primitive
life existed on Mars once
upon a time or if it's there


now. The one-ton rover isn't
equipped for that and its
cameras are not powerful
enough to see fossil relics -
if they exist.
Smarts aside, engineers
also outfitted Curiosity with
a sense of style. It boasts 20-
inch aluminum wheels -
twice the size of the wheels
on twin rovers Spirit and Op-
portunity that landed in 2004
- with spokes made of tita-
nium and cleats for traction.
Curiosity may be tricked
out, but expect some slow
going. Its top speed: one-
tenth of a mile per hour.


PARKWAY
Continued from Page Al

Although the proposed
alignment is still in place,
the state has never formally
committed itself to building
the 27-mile roadway
Toll revenue forecasts
conducted in 2008 are
being redone as the state is
looking at reviving the proj-
ect. The new traffic and
revenue study, based in
part by survey results, is ex-
pected in March or April
2013, turnpike spokes-
woman Christa Deason
said.
The state sought survey
participants in a variety of
ways. Chiefly, workers pho-
tographed the license
plates of about 10,000 vehi-
cles heading north or south
on U.S. 19, U.S. 41 and
County Road 491. They
matched addresses through
the Department of Motor
Vehicles and sent survey
cards to anyone with a Cit-
rus County ZIP code.
The card told drivers
about the survey and sent


them to an Internet link to
participate.
"How many respond re-
mains to be seen," Wood
said.
Workers also set up loca-
tions at various local sites,
such as libraries and the
YMCA, and randomly led
400 people through the
same online survey
Wood said the survey
company also contacted
area employers and Sun-
Pass owners.
He said the goal is to re-
ceive at least 800 re-
sponses. "I think we'll
probably exceed that," he
said.
The survey ends Aug. 17.
"The whole idea of the
survey is to recruit as many
participants as possible,"
Deaton said. "We want to
hear from potential cus-
tomers."
The survey is interactive
and different for each per-
son who participates. "How
you answer one question
may determine the next
question," Wood said.
It's based on a person's
recent north-south trip and,
depending on answers, sets


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

up a series of either-or sce-
narios with eight sets of po-
tential toll prices.
For example, the survey
may ask whether the mo-
torist would rather pay a
$1.30 toll to drive 35 min-
utes vs. no toll for a longer
drive on a congested
roadway
Each scenario is based
on the motorist's actual
most recent north-south
drive.
Wood and Randy Fox,
turnpike planning man-
ager, said the goal is to
know whether there is
enough interest from Citrus
County motorists to pay a
toll that produces enough
revenue to pay down the
bond.
State law requires the
toll road to pay for 50 per-
cent of the bond debt for at
least the first 12 years, and
100 percent by the 30th
year
Construction estimates
have dropped significantly
since 2008, when officials
estimated the project could
cost up to $850 million.
Deaton said estimates are
now closer to $600 million.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Free things to do


in Tampa, St. Pete


Associated Press
TAMPA- Whether you're
in the Tampa Bay area for
the Republican National
Convention or there on a
family vacation, you're
probably aware of the usual
tourist spots: the beach,
Busch Gardens, the Florida
Aquarium. While the region
does boast some of Amer-
ica's most beautiful
beaches, there are also
some out-of-the-way spots
that reveal a different side
of this sunny state.
Here are five free things
- including one very gor-
geous but little-known
beach to do in the Tampa
Bay region, which encom-
passes both the city of
Tampa and neighboring
Pinellas County.
JOSE MARTI PARK:
While it's in the city of
Tampa's historic district
called Ybor City, this tiny
park is really part of Cuba.
Yes, THAT Cuba. Named
after the revolutionary who
helped oust the Spanish out
of Cuba in 1900 who also
spent time in Florida, the
land was bought by a couple
in the 1950s to honor the
man himself.
TEDDY'S TAMPA: In
1898, before he was presi-
dent, Col. Teddy Roosevelt
once stayed in Tampa on his
way to fight the Spanish-
American War in Cuba. He
and the First United States
Volunteer Cavalry also
known as the Rough Riders
- bivouacked and planned
the invasion at the Tampa
Bay Hotel, an ornate struc-
ture with silver minarets
built by a railroad magnate.
The building is now part of
the campus of the Univer-
sity of Tampa and houses a
museum.
MAFIA CEMETERY:
Did you watch the movie
Donnie Brasco? Remember
how Donnie and Sonny
Black met up with famed
mobster Santo Trafficante
Jr, the mafia boss of Florida
and Cuba? In Tampa, you


can see Trafficante's final
resting place at the LU-
nione Italiana Cemetery in
Ybor City.
SUNSET BEACH: Al-
most all of the Tampa-area
beaches are west of the city
in Pinellas County, and all of
them are gorgeous. But one
of the nicest and most se-
cluded is Sunset Beach, nes-
tled at the tip of a small
beach city named Treasure
Island. There are few busi-
nesses on this part of the bar-
rier island; it's mostly homes
and condos. From downtown
Tampa, take 1-275 South to
22nd Ave. S., then head west
ST. PETERSBURG
WATERFRONT: Downtown
Tampa is mostly concrete
and steel, but across the
bay is a kinder, gentler
cityscape. You can stroll
along parks and waterfront
between the historic,
Mediterranean-revival
Vinoy Renaissance Resort
and Golf Club and the new,
eye-popping Salvador Dali
Museum. Pass by the Mu-
seum of Fine Arts, a marina,
a yacht club and some gor-
geous banyan trees.


Scallop season starts on Gulf


'Forgotten Coast'

lures tourists with

seafood delicacy

Associated Press
PORT ST JOE It is scallop season
along this tranquil stretch of Florida
known as "The Forgotten Coast."
From July to late September, the
tasty shell-food delicacy lures tourists
to this lesser-known part of Florida
that lacks the amusement parks, night
clubs and world-famous beaches found
in other parts of the state. This region,
which stretches east from the Panhan-
dle's Panama City along the Gulf coast
line as it curves south along the state's
Big Bend, is known for its shallow and
wide bays that give shelter to scallops,
oysters and other fragile sea life.
"Scallops need clean water they
don't do well if there are any pollu-
tion issues," said Stan Kirkland, re-
gional spokesman for the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission. "What you notice in this part
of the state is that there aren't the
condominiums and other develop-
ments that might cause water-quality
issues."
Scallops can be found nestled in
turtle grass in about 2 to 4 feet of
water, which makes it easy to wade


HEALTH


SCREENING

Friday, August 17

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments


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DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


Associated Press
From July to September the tasty harvested scallops delicacy lures tourists to
this lesser-known part of Florida known as the "Forgotten Coast."


into the water and collect them. But
longtime scalloper Ronald Pickett
prefers to take his boat out into
deeper water, about 10-12 feet, and
find scallops while snorkeling.
The best way to eat them is raw and
fresh from the bay, he said.
"It is really sweet, it's unbelievable,"
Pickett said as he gulped down a
mouthful of scallop on a recent after-
noon. "If you've never eaten one of
these, you've never eaten a really sweet
scallop. These scallops have so much
flavor to them, it is unbelievable."
Florida banned commercial scal-
lop harvesting in the region in the
1990s to prevent their demise. The


three-month season is for recre-
ational scallop harvesters only and
the state limits each person to two
gallons of whole scallops per day A
state fishing license is required, with
costs varying based on residency and
the length of license.
The season, which runs from July 1
to Sept. 24, is a summertime tourism
boon for sleepy Gulf County, said Jen-
nifer Jenkins, executive director of
the Gulf County Tourist Development
Counsel.
"We talk to people all the time and
they just love this. Really and truly, it
is like Easter egg hunting in the
water," she said.


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A10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


STATE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
In this image provided by Brian Buckland, 138 skydivers form a massive snowflake
formation Friday, Aug. 3, over Ottawa, III. Three judges representing the Federation
Aeronautique Internationale, the international air sports agency, certified that 138
skydivers created the formation over Ottawa, about 80 miles southwest of Chicago.

Breaking a world record


138 skydivers
set brand-new
vertical limit
Associated Press
OTTAWA, Ill. Falling at
speeds of up to 220 mph, a
group of nearly 140 sky-
divers shattered the vertical
skydiving world record as
they flew heads-down in a
massive snowflake forma-
tion in northern Illinois.
Three judges represent-
ing the Federation Aeronau-


tique Internationale, the in-
ternational air sports
agency, certified 138 sky-
divers created the formation
Friday evening over Ottawa,
about 80 miles southwest of
Chicago. It took 15 attempts
over three days for the team
to break the previous record
of 108 skydivers, which was
set in 2009.
"I feel amazing," Rook
Nelson, an organizer and the
owner of Skydive Chicago
where the record was bro-
ken, said shortly after he
made the jump. "There was
a lot of emotion and a lot of
days where we should have
got it. But we dug down deep


and stuck at it."
Following months of plan-
ning, tryouts and camps to
decide who could take part
in the dangerous challenge,
the record breakers
squeezed into six aircraft
and launched themselves
into the air at 18,500 feet
Flying at such a high altitude
presents a risk of altitude
sickness, so the skydivers
and pilots used oxygen tanks
aboard the planes.
Four camera operators
shooting video and stills
jumped with the 138 partic-
ipants to record their
achievement for the FAI
judges.


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Political Advertisement


As a lifelong resident of Citrus County, Scott has been involved in community activities that include many organizations
in a variety of avenues: Cattlemen's Assoc., Little League, Soccer, Boys & Girls Club, Sheriff's Youth Ranch, American
Cancer Society, Key Center, Shriners, Citrus County Seniors Sports Assoc., area churches and veterans activities.
* Private Business Experience Affordable Living Lifestyle


* Responsible Accountability
* Jobs and Businesses
* Water Quality


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* Working Full-Time &
Accessible to the People


ElectSCOtt Adams FOR Citrus County Commission District 5
My name is Scott Adams. My wife Pam and I are lifelong residents of Citrus
County. We have been married for 16 years and have two children.
As a young man, I started working as a farm hand laborer. I have gone on to build
numerous successful businesses and I will never forget my roots. I've truly lived
the American dream and understand how hard life is for everyone.
Why am I running for office?
* I am a concerned business owner and private citizen who is passionate about
the community I live in.
* I am financially conservative and believe government should be business and job
friendly toward private enterprise (big or small).
* I want to help build a future for our children while preserving an affordable
lifestyle for our retired seniors with set incomes.
My Goals:
* To always be accessible to the citizens
* Expand jobs by creating opportunities
* Quality development and planning for the future which required less tax dollars
and less congestion for the citizens, if done properly
* Protect our natural resources (lakes & rivers)
What I bring to the board:
* Ability to scrutinize large financial budgets and understand the value of a dollar
* Understanding of the real issues facing people today
* Fresh outlook (have not held an elected or government position)
* Quality business sense and experience
* The ability to be accessible to the citizens


352-341-0903


Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Scott Adams, Republican, for County Commissioner, District 5
Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by ScottAdams, Republican, for County Commissioner, District 5


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 All









Is your problem gluten or faddish eating?


Research suggests

morepeople sick

from Celiac disease

MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer
ATLANTA It sounds like an un-
folding epidemic: A decade ago, virtu-
ally no one in the U.S. seemed to have
a problem eating gluten in bread and
other foods. Now, millions do.
Gluten-free products are flying off
grocery shelves, and restaurants are
boasting of meals with no gluten.
Celebrities on TV talk shows chat
about the digestive discomfort they
blame on the wheat protein they now
shun. Some churches even offer
gluten-free Communion wafers.
"I don't know whether there's more
people getting this or that more peo-
ple are noticing" they have a problem,
said the Rev Richard Allen, pastor at
Mamaroneck United Methodist
Church, north of New York City.
Or is it just another food fad?
Faddishness is a big part of it. Amer-
icans will spend an estimated $7 bil-
lion this year on foods labeled
gluten-free, according to the market
research firm Mintel. But the best es-
timates are more than half the con-
sumers buying these products -
perhaps way more than half don't
have any clear-cut reaction to gluten.
They buy gluten-free because they
think it will help them lose weight, or
because they seem to feel better, or be-
cause they mistakenly believe they are
sensitive to gluten.
"We have a lot of self-diagnosing
going on out there," said Melissa Ab-
bott who tracks the gluten-free market
for the Hartman Group, a Seattle-area
market research organization.
Fads aside, research suggests more
people are truly getting sick from the
gluten found in wheat, rye and barley,
but the reasons aren't clear.
In the most serious cases, gluten
triggers celiac disease. The condition
causes abdominal pain, bloating and
intermittent diarrhea. Those with the
ailment don't absorb nutrients well
and can suffer weight loss, fatigue,
rashes and other problems.
It was once considered extremely
rare in the U.S. But about 20 years ago,
a few scientists began exploring why
celiac disease was less common here
than in Europe and other countries.
They concluded it wasn't less common
here; it was just under-diagnosed.
More recently, a research team led
by the Mayo Clinic's Dr. Joseph Murray
looked at blood samples taken from
Americans in the 1950s and compared


W. I I -Amer


Associated Press
Bertha Domimguez prepares gluten-free dough July 14 at Pure Knead
bakery sandwich bread in Decatur, Ga. Scientists suggest there may be more
celiac disease today because people eat more processed wheat products than
in decades past, which use types of wheat that have a higher gluten content.
A worker packages gluten-free bread July 14 at Pure Knead bakery sand-
wich bread in Decatur, Ga.


them with samples taken from people
today, and determined it wasn't just
better diagnosis driving up the num-
bers. Celiac disease actually was in-
creasing. Indeed, the research
confirms estimates about 1 percent of
U.S. adults have it today, making it four
times more common now than it was
50 years ago, Murray and his col-
leagues reported Tuesday in the Amer-
ican Journal of Gastroenterology.
That translates to nearly 2 million
Americans with celiac disease.
Celiac disease is different from an
allergy to wheat, which affects a much
smaller number of people, mostly chil-
dren who outgrow it.
Scientists suggest there may be
more celiac disease today because
people eat more processed wheat
products like pastas and baked goods
than in decades past, and those items
use types of wheat that have a higher
gluten content. Gluten helps dough
rise and gives baked goods structure
and texture.
Or it could be due to changes made
to wheat, Murray said.
In the 1950s, scientists began cross-
breeding wheat to make hardier,
shorter and better-growing plants. It
was the basis of the Green Revolution
that boosted wheat harvests world-
wide. Norman Borlaug, the U.S. plant
scientist behind many of the innova-
tions, won the Nobel Peace Prize for
his work.
But the gluten in wheat may have
somehow become even more trouble-
some for many people, Murray said.
That also may have contributed to
what is now called "gluten sensitivity."


Doctors recently developed a defi-
nition for gluten sensitivity, but it's an
ambiguous one. It's a label for people
who suffer bloating and other celiac
symptoms and seem to be helped by
avoiding gluten, but don't actually
have celiac disease. Celiac disease is
diagnosed with blood testing, genetic
testing, or biopsies of the small
intestine.
The case for gluten sensitivity was
bolstered last year by a very small but
often-cited Australian study. Volun-
teers who had symptoms were put on a
gluten-free diet or a regular diet for
six weeks, and they weren't told which
one. Those who didn't eat gluten had
fewer problems with bloating, tired-
ness and irregular bowel movements.
Clearly, "there are patients who are
gluten-sensitive," said Dr. Sheila
Crowe, a San Diego-based physician
on the board of the American Gas-
troenterological Association.
What is hotly debated is how many
people have the problem, she added.
It's impossible to know "because the
definition is nebulous," she said.
One of the most widely cited esti-
mates comes from Dr Alessio Fasano,
a University of Maryland researcher
who led studies that changed the un-
derstanding of how common celiac
disease is in the U.S.
Fasano believes 6 percent of U.S.
adults have gluten sensitivity But
that's based on a review of patients at
his clinic hardly a representative
sample of the general public.
Other estimates vary widely, he said.
"There's a tremendous amount of con-
fusion out there," Fasano said.


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Mohammad Ansari, MD
Cardiologist
Gisela Trigo, MD
Candiologist
Luis Delfin, MD
Cardiologist


Exceptional services and excellent patient outcomes are important
reasons why Citrus County's leading cardiologists choose Citrus
Memorial Heart and Vascular Center for their patients. Our highly
skilled team of surgeons and physicians, coupled with dedicated
and compassionate nurses and rehabilitation specialists, ensure
that patients receive the best cardiovascular care possible, with a
proven track record of success.
For nearly a decade, our dedicated Heart and Vascular Center has
provided the most comprehensive cardiovascular care available in
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A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BP~;~





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Restaurants on the go


Food trucks
provide training

for owners
JOYCE M.
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK Putting the
cart before the store was the
right recipe for ice cream
maker Buck Buchanan.
Back in 2001, Buchanan
was a stay-at-home dad using
his training as a chef to give
cooking lessons to supple-
ment his wife's income.
Boredom set in and he de-
cided to start a gourmet ice
cream cart Later, he added
a truck and drove to con-
certs and sporting events to
sell his cold, tasty treats. In
March, he opened his first
Lumpy's Ice Cream shop in
downtown Wake Forest, N.C.
"My thought was to build
a clientele, build a customer
base, so when I actually
opened the store, people
would flock to it," Buchanan
said. After about five years,
"people started hollering
and screaming on Face-
book: 'I love your ice cream,
but I can't get it anywhere."'
Buchanan waited until he
was sure he had enough cus-
tomers to support a store. He
found a spot in the city's
downtown, which is being
revitalized. The location has
a parking lot That's great for
customers who have to travel
to the store from far away
"The goal is to be the ice
cream king of North Amer-
ica," Buchanan said.
But he wants to be sure
first there'll be even more
demand for Lumpy's choco-
late, vanilla and specialty fla-
vors like Jamaican Joy -
which includes pineapple
and raisins soaked in rum. In
addition to the cart, truck
and store, Lumpy's also sells
ice cream at parties and spe-
cial events and to restaurants
and stores like Whole Foods.
Lumpy's is part of a small
but growing trend spawned


Associated Press
Van Leeuwen Artisan Ice Cream co-owners, from left, Ben
Van Leeuwen, Laura O'Neill and Pete Van Leeuwen laugh
while talking about the origins of their business while eating
ice cream in front of one of their trucks on Bedford Avenue
in the Williamsburg section of New York's Brooklyn borough.


by the proliferation of food
trucks and carts in cities
and suburbs across the
country Entrepreneurs who
thought it would be cool and
lucrative to sell gourmet
tacos, barbecue, ice cream
and other food from trucks
are opening stores and
restaurants to build on their
success. They're proving
that taking an idea and try-
ing it out on a small scale -
and in this case, putting on
training wheels is a pru-
dent way to start a company
The experience of running
the cart and truck taught him
a lot about how to run a busi-
ness, Buchanan said.
"We grew what I called
smart.... We'd get a new con-
tract and we'd figure out
how we'd work the contract.
We wouldn't grow any fur-
ther until we figured it out.
You never want to promise
something and not be able
to deliver."
Food trucks and carts have
been around for generations.
Most are sellers of hot dogs
and ice cream bars or are
canteens on wheels that
bring staple breakfast and
lunch items to factories, auto
repair shops and other busi-
nesses. What's different
about the mobile food vehi-
cles that have cropped up in
cities and suburbs the last
few years is these serve


trendy fare like Korean bar-
becue, Jamaican jerk
chicken and cupcakes. They
travel from one spot to an-
other, often congregating in
high-traffic areas like down-
towns and state government
complexes. Some have web-
sites or Facebook pages so
hungry fans can find out what
day and time they'll show up.
Street food has flourished
in the weak economy as peo-
ple seek inexpensive meals.
Some want treats such as
cupcakes and ice cream that
are different from what
they'd find in a supermarket
For entrepreneurs who
dream of opening a restau-
rant, it's a cheaper and less
risky way to get into business.
If a cart or truck is at a loca-
tion where it's not doing well,
it's easily driven elsewhere.
But an owner with a store in
a bad location is stuck-usu-
ally with a lease. Restaurant
failure rates are high stud-
ies generally put it around 30
percent in the first year of
operation. The trucks them-
selves are great advertising
for mobile or fixed locations.
Trucks in New York called,
simply, Pizza Truck, are
bright red or a collage of psy-
chedelic colors. Kogi Korean
barbecue trucks, which op-
erate in Los Angeles, have
big red flames painted on
their sides.


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A13










Number of farmers markets surge


Local venues selling

produce increase by

9.6percent

Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. As demand
for locally grown fruits and vegeta-
bles has increased, so too has the
number of urban farmers markets
sprouting up across the nation.
The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture announced Friday the
number of direct-sales markets
has increased 9.6 percent in the
past year, with California and New
York leading the way
"Farmers markets are a critical
ingredient to our nation's food sys-
tem," USDA Deputy Secretary
Kathleen Merrigan said. "These
outlets provide benefits not only to
the farmers looking for important
income opportunities, but also to
the communities looking for fresh,
healthy foods."
After 18 years of steady in-
creases, the number of farmers
markets across the country now
registered with the USDA is 7,864.
In 1994, there were 1,744.
Organizations such as Slow
Food, founded in 1989 to counter
fast-food, junk-food lifestyles, first
ignited consumer demand for
fresh, local produce.
"My husband and I prefer to eat
locally and organically," said Tracy
Stuntz, a college instructor who
shops at Fresno's Vineyard
Farmer's Market. "You go to the
grocery store and everything is the
same. The farmer's market has
yellow zucchini and green onions
that are like a foot long. Produce
you don't see other places."
Today, some markets are so pop-
ular there are wait lists for farmers
to sell there, including one of the
largest and most diverse of all, the
Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San
Francisco. Farmers from across the
region travel there three days a
week to sell fruits, vegetables and
artisan breads and cheeses to thou-
sands of shoppers, including top
chefs from the food-centric city.
Operated by the Center for
Urban Education about Sustain-
able Agriculture, the iconic mar-
ket on the San Francisco Bay is
celebrating its 20th birthday


SFlorida markets will
accept EBT cards soon
Special to the Chronicle


Associated Press
ABOVE: Benina Burroughs of
Merced, Calif., looks over a display
of cherry tomatoes by Farmers with
ALBA from Salinas, Calif., at a
farmer's market Aug. 29, 2008,
during Slow Food Nation in San
Francisco. RIGHT: Ching Thao, of
Mao's Farm, center, gives change
to Richard Wolk, right, on Nov. 13,
2010, at the Vineyard Farmers
Market in Fresno, Calif.
"When we started there were
only three markets in the city, and
now there are 29," said Liz Hunt, a
center spokeswoman.
Grant Brians of Heirloom Or-
ganic Gardens sells more than 200
old-fashioned varieties of vegeta-
bles, herbs and fruit grown on two
farms in San Benito County, about
100 miles south of San Francisco.
Others bring in stone fruits from
the San Joaquin Valley, and
berries from the coast.
Dave Stockdale, the center's ex-
ecutive director, said farmers
markets empower consumers to
become active supporters of their
communities.
"Every day eaters have the op-
portunity to vote with their forks
and support small-scale farmers,
investing resources in their com-
munities, stimulating their local
economies, and keeping ag land in


sustainable production," he said.
The center uses the markets to
educate consumers about unique
varieties of produce and how to
prepare them. Stockdale said the
growing interest in farmers mar-
kets has prompted others to ask
the center for help creating edu-
cational programs.
San Franciscan Bryan Miller
frequents the Heart of the City
farmer's market at the San Fran-
cisco Civic Center, a venue so pop-
ular it recently added Fridays to
its normal Wednesday and Sunday
operations.


"It's fresh and cheap, to be quite
honest," Miller said. "I can go to
the store on the bus and buy black
ugly mass-market stuff, but I don't
want to do that. I would rather get
local produce."
The USDA has worked to make
the markets accessible to people of
all income levels by outfitting
more with the ability to accept
payments from the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program, for-
merly known as food stamps. More
than $4 million are being made
available to equip markets with
wireless point-of-sale equipment.


TALLAHASSEE Farmers mar-
kets across Florida can begin ap-
plying for free equipment to allow
them to handle purchases through
an Electronic Benefits Transfer
Card, which is used by those who
receive temporary federal benefits,
including food and cash assistance.
The U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture gave the Florida Department of
Children and Families $78,749 to
help 100 local farmers markets
begin accepting EBT cards.
"This funding will help local small
businesses across this state in-
crease their customer base and
their revenues," DCF Secretary
David Wilkins said. "More impor-
tantly, this grant gives us the oppor-
tunity to provide better options for
healthy food to many children and
families in Florida."
Farmers markets, which do not al-
ways have access to phone lines or
electricity, have had difficulty re-
deeming food assistance benefits
through the EBT system. As a result
of this funding, Florida is providing
wireless equipment to multi-stall
farmers markets who are not al-
ready accepting EBT cards. There
will be no monthly transaction fees
for food assistance transactions, and
the farmers markets can choose to
use the equipment to process regu-
lar debit and credit card transac-
tions, although fees would be
charged in those instances.
This grant is part of $4 million in
funding nationwide to encourage
farmers' markets to make EBT trans-
actions available. Nationwide, more
than 1,500 farmers markets are using
EBT technology. Since 2008, food
assistance expenditures at farmers
markets have risen by 400 percent.
The USDA National Farmers Mar-
ket Directory lists farmers markets
that accept EBT and other federal nu-
trition programs. The directory,
http://farmersmarkets.usda.gov, is an
easy-to-use tool that allows users to
search for markets based on location,
available products and types of pay-
ment accepted. There is information
on 203 Florida farmers' markets
available at this site.


FRONT ROW L-R: Melissa CarusoST; Peter Yung Kim, MD, Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgeon; Jessica McDonald, CST; Sharon Stewart-Dunn, RN, BSN, CVOR Mgr; Chuck Wood PA-C
MIDDLE ROW L-R: Valerie Bordeleau, RN; Carlette Wright Barfield, RN; Dr. J. Emilcar, MD, Cardiac Anesthesiologist; Ron Fritchey, Paramedic; Stephanie Nathan, RN; Patrick McCoy, RN
BACK ROW L-R: Luis Hernandez, LPN; Frank Janus, CCP

Citrus County's only heart surgery program has earned the highest 3 STAR
quality rating for coronary artery bypass surgery from The Society of


The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has developed a comprehensive rating
system that allows for comparisons regarding the quality of cardiac surgery ST I
among hospitals across the country. Only about 14% of more than 1,000
hospitals nationally receive a 3 STAR rating, which denotes the highest '
category of quality. Based on current national data covering the period of
January through December 2011, the cardiac surgery performance of Citrus
Memorial's Heart and Vascular Center was determined to be in the highest
quality tier thereby receiving the coveted 3 STAR rating. byhe Society of oracic Surgeon for2011


The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is a not-for-profit organization representing
more than 6,400 surgeons, researchers, and allied health professionals
worldwide, who are dedicated to ensuring the best possible heart, lung,
esophageal, and other surgical procedures for the chest. Founded in 1964, the
mission of STS is to enhance the ability of cardiothoracic surgeons to provide
the highest quality patient care through education, research and advocacy.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Olympic athletes queue up July 31 at the McDonald's inside the dining hall at the
Olympic Village in London. The athletes' dining room in the Olympic village is a food court
like no other, offering the world's elite athletes healthy, hearty food and fuel, 24 hours a
day and doing it the Slow Food way. And yet, off in the back corner of the dining room,
next to the coffee bar that's disproportionately populated by Italians queuing up for their
morning espresso, lurks McDonald's and its Sausage & Egg McMuffins. Fresh
fruits are on display as Olympic athletes dine at the dining hall inside the Olympic Village
in London.




Food for all

Fancy a curry? Olympians have range ofchoices


Lend Your Ears










Lend Your Ears


Associated Press
LONDON Fancy a tra-
ditional English fry-up for
breakfast? How about a
chicken curry or some kim-
chi? Or would a lamb
samosa and some baba
ganoush from a halal
kitchen be more to your
taste?
Step right this way. The
athletes' dining room in the
Olympic village is a food
court like no other, offering
the world's elite athletes
healthy, hearty food and
fuel, 24 hours a day and
doing it the Slow Food way
The milk is organic, the
coffee free-trade and eggs
free-range. The chicken,
which is flying off the grill as
athletes opt for basic pro-
tein, carries Britain's "Free-
dom Food" label, certified
by the Royal Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to An-
imals as meeting its strict
animal welfare standards.
Recycling and compost
bins proliferate and where
possible, local farmers have
grown the produce. The
seafood part of Britain's fa-
mous fish and chips is made
from sustainably caught
fish.
And yet, off in the back
corner of the dining room,
next to the coffee bar that's
disproportionately popu-
lated by Italians queuing up
for their morning espresso,
lurks McDonald's and its
Sausage & Egg McMuffins.
Fast-food giant McDon-
ald's, Coca-Cola and Cad-
bury are official sponsors of
these games and have
branding rights inside
Olympic Park.
And so the Golden Arches
have no corporate competi-
tion in these parts just
whatever chief Olympic
caterer Jan Matthews and
her crew of chefs from
around the world can dish
up for the more than 24,000
athletes, coaches and team
officials from 200-plus coun-
tries who pass through her
dining room on any given
day
"Our view was that if we
got good ingredients and we
had good chefs, we would
get great food," Matthews
said over coffee one morn-
ing amid the breakfast bus-
tle in the dining room.
She acknowledges the in-
congruity of McDonald's in
her Slow Food-inspired din-
ing room, but says no one is
forcing anyone to eat it.
"I think it's a choice
thing," she says. "The fact is,
people like it."And besides,


McDonald's in recent years
has changed its menu to re-
flect demands for healthier
food. And it's an official
Olympic sponsor.
Matthews' aim in her
kitchen was to showcase
British food, sustainable
food and food that reflects
the trend for better animal
welfare, because "better an-
imal welfare in many cases
actually does mean better
meat at the end of the day"
It's an Olympian feat
given the numbers involved.
Over the course of the 17-
day games, Olympic organ-
izers estimate 14 million
meals will be served to ath-
lete and spectator alike. On
a busy day in the athletes'
dining room, chefs will
serve 65,000 meals. In the
Olympic village alone, that
breaks down to:
25,000 loaves of bread
31 tons of poultry items
232 tons of potatoes
19 tons of eggs
20,000 gallons of milk
Matthews goes through
the shopping list outlined in
her "Food Vision" a man-
ifesto of sorts for these 2012
Foodie Games and real-
izes the numbers are al-
ready way off.
"I think we'll probably
beat that, and that, and that
and that," she says running
her finger down the line.
"Demand across the board
is higher than we
anticipated."
But fear not, Michael
Phelps. The food won't run
out while you're off winning
another medal. Matthews
says her food budget, which
started out in the single-
digit million-dollar realm, is
flexible and no more expen-
sive than if she hadn't in-
sisted on an
environmentally sensitive
menu.
"If Michael Phelps comes
in and he wants his eggs and
his steak, he gets his eggs
and his steak," Matthew
said.
Phelps is not alone in get-
ting special treatment. The
Australians requested jars
of their beloved Vegemite,
the brown goo (high in Vita-
min B) made from brewing
beer that's a popular bread
spread Down Under. The
highly endorsed Americans
asked that Kellogg's cereals
be available, if not adver-
tised as such.
Matthews brought in the
grain spelt for the handful
of wheat-intolerant athletes.
The three to four Orthodox
Jews are getting their
kosher meals delivered


from a London kosher
kitchen.
But most athletes are
sampling fare from home
and far away at the five food
"pods" that ring the cav-
ernous dining room. Front
and center sits the "Best of
Britain" offering traditional
English breakfast of eggs,
bacon, sausage, black pud-
ding, roast tomatoes and
mushrooms.
For a country whose culi-
nary reputation for years
centered on mushy peas
and boiled potatoes, the de-
cision to showcase British
food might strike some as
odd. But the "Best of
Britain" food station is the
most popular among ath-
letes and coaches, Matthews
said.
The selection of fruits
at the Europe/Americas/
Mediterranean station
would make any foodie's
mouth water. Condiments
take up an entire counter:
Balsamic vinegar, rapeseed
oil, sweet chili sauce and
blue cheese dressing. Con-
spicuously absent: poppy
seeds. ("It will show up on
an anti-doping test,"
Matthews says.) And alco-
hol. The athletes village is
officially dry
Next door at the halal
food station which pro-
vides food slaughtered and
prepared according to Is-
lamic law curried
spinach and aubergines
vied for attention with the
baba ganoush and fava
beans.
Rotisserie chickens
roasted on a spit at the
"African and Caribbean"
station while at the bustling
"India and Asia's Finest"
pod, Hong Kong fencer Sin
Ying Au piled some nasi
goreng fried rice next to her
bacon and eggs and bowl of
hot milk.
"I like it very much," she
said. "Every day they have a
new style, and I think the
taste is very authentic."
Polish team psychologist
Maciej Regwelski lined up
behind her, looking for some
pierogis, the traditional Pol-
ish stuffed dumplings.
"We don't have typical
Polish food here," he said.
"Sometimes there are little
pierogis at the Asian sta-
tion," but not today He
walked away with sushi. For
breakfast.
While Matthews is de-
lighted that so many athletes
are spreading their gastro-
nomic wings and "tucking
in," she's well aware that they
eat for one reason only: fuel.


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cfii


LIV EEXT RA All 32 sports. All 302 events. All LIVE from London.
IOirnpTti'TT ^'~.;i i u.-:-,; .: .. i ,j ..^^l


Associated Press
This image made from an NBC Sports website shows their live gymnastics coverage on
Sunday, July 29. For the first time, NBC Sports is showing all competition and medal
ceremonies live over the Internet in the U.S.


Review: NBC offers plenty

of live Olympics online


ANICK JESDANUN
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK Soccer
and balance beam gymnas-
tics on the desktop. Swim-
ming and badminton on the
laptop. Boxing on the
iPhone. Gymnasts' floor ex-
ercises on the iPad. Vault
routines on an Android
phone. And rowing on TiVo.
Welcome to the Olympics
of the digital age.
For the first time, NBC
Sports is showing all com-
petition and medal cere-
monies live over the
Internet in the U.S. The un-
precedented online cover-
age addresses one of my
biggest gripes with
Olympics coverage in past
years: NBC used to with-
hold the popular sports for
prime-time television and
show them on a delayed
basis.
At one point, I had seven
live streams going at once,
plus NBC's TV broadcast
recorded on my digital-
video recorder. I got flus-
tered with all the choices in
no time but I appreciate
having the choice to view
any event live. Tape delay
doesn't work anymore. It's
especially compounded by
the five-hour time differ-
ence between New York
and London.
Although the coverage at
NBCOlympics.com isn't flaw-
less, it's the network's best ef-
fort yet and comes a long way
from 2000, when "video"
meant still images grabbed
from television footage. It's
also the first time live video
is extending to mobile de-
vices, through apps forApple


and Android phones and
tablet computers.
So get up at 4 a.m. EDT
this Thursday to watch an
elimination round in
women's archery Or watch
the woman's marathon in its
entirety this Sunday at 6
a.m. Some sports offer mul-
tiple feeds, so you can keep
watching the javelin throw
even if everyone else turns
to Usain Bolt on the track.
All this is free, but there's
a big catch: You must have a
TV subscription with a
cable, satellite or phone
company at a service level
that comes with CNBC and
MSNBC.
I was able to watch live
video once I verified my
cable account (for Time
Warner Cable, I simply had
to enter the same username
and password used to ac-
cess bills). It's something I'm
supposed to have to do only
once per computer or mo-
bile device, though I ran
into a few hiccups because
of cookie settings on my
browser. If you have trouble,
you can get a one-time, four-
hour pass for free while you
figure it out.
If you still get television
over the air or don't even
own a TV set, you'll be able
to access non-video fea-
tures, including a prime-
time companion app with
trivia and quizzes. But
videos will be limited to
highlights, previews and
other clips. Full-length
video won't be available
until two days after an event
takes place.
Dare I say I'd gladly pay
$25, $50 or even $100 to
watch the streams ifI didn't


have the required TV sub-
scription. I get most of what
I watch through Hulu,
iTunes or Netflix, and all I
need cable for is the occa-
sional big event such as the
Olympics. I'd rather pay a
one-time fee for that than a
recurring cable bill.
That mentality is pre-
cisely the reason NBC isn't
making live video available
for non-subscribers. NBC
paid nearly $1.2 billion for
U.S. rights to the London
Games. Increasingly, it
makes money from fees that
cable and satellite compa-
nies pay to carry channels
on their lineups. NBC and
other networks get a good
chunk of your cable bill
each and every month and
don't want to jeopardize that
for a fee you pay just once.
Of course, when NBC
chose not to show the open-
ing ceremonies live, even
online, links to unautho-
rized video feeds quickly
circulated. I was able to
watch a feed from British
television briefly, until
my conscience and work de-
mands got to me.
For the majority of Amer-
icans who do pay for TV
you're in for a treat.
Most of the video steams
allow you to rewind the ac-
tion. Start from any point if
you are joining late or after
an event is over, or hit a re-
play button to go back sev-
eral seconds.
The exceptions are with
high-profile sports such as
swimming and gymnastics.
If you missed it, you typi-
cally must wait for televi-
sion or the next day
online.


IPhone appeal dims; Samsung shines


Associated Press
NEW YORK The once-
sexy iPhone is starting to
look small and chubby
That's become a problem
for Apple, which revealed
last week that iPhone sales
have slowed. Part of the
problem is that the competi-
tion has found a formula
that works: thinner phones
with bigger screens.
For a dose of smartphone
envy, iPhone owners need to
look no further than Sam-
sung Electronics Co., the
number-one maker of
smartphones in the world.
Its newest flagship phone,
the Galaxy S III, is sleek and
wafer-thin. It can run on the
fastest networks and act as a
"smart wallet," too two
things the Apple's iconic
phone can't do.
Says Ramon Llamas, an
analyst with research firm
IDC: The iPhone "is getting
a bit long in the tooth."
Apple has become the
world's most valuable com-
pany on the back of the
iPhone, which makes up
nearly half of its revenue.
The iPhone certainly has
room to grow: Only one in six
smartphones sold globally in
the second quarter had an
Apple logo on its back
When Apple reported fi-
nancial results for its latest
quarter last week, a new
phenomenon was revealed:
Buyers started pulling back
on iPhone purchases just
six months after the launch
of the latest iPhone model.
Apple executives blamed
the tepid sales on "rumors
and speculation" that may
have caused some con-
sumers to wait for the next


Associated Press
Samsung Electronics' Galaxy
S, left, and Apple's iPhone 4
are displayed at a mobile
phone shop in Seoul, South
Korea.
iPhone, which is due in the
fall. But in the past, iPhone
sales have stayed strong nine
months after the new model
is launched, then dipped as
people began holding off,
waiting for the new model.
In the April to June pe-
riod, Apple sold 26 million
phones, 28 percent more
than it did in the same quar-
ter last year
Most other phone makers
"would kill" for those num-
bers, says Stephen Baker, an
analyst with research firm
NPD Group. But since the
iPhone's introduction in
2007, the average annual
growth rate has been 112
percent
The competitor that does-
n't need to kill for those num-
bers is Samsung, which has
solidified its position at the
world's largest maker of
smartphones. Analysts be-
lieve it sold just over 50 mil-
lion smartphones in the


second quarter, or nearly
twice as many as Apple. Its
smartphone sales have
nearly tripled in a year, from
18.4 million.
Most of Samsung's sales
comprise cheaper smart-
phones that don't compete
directly with the iPhone. Its
flagship phones, though,
have emerged as the
iPhone's chief rivals.
Samsung and Apple have a
complicated relationship.
They're rivals in the smart-
phone and tablet-computer
markets, and are set to
square off in a high-profile
trial over mobile patents in
San Francisco this week.
Samsung is one of Apple's
largest suppliers of chips and
displays, and Apple is one of
Samsung's largest clients.
Together, Samsung and
Apple make half of the
world's smartphones, and
since competitors are losing
money or breaking even,
they account for nearly all of
the profits in the industry
Though Apple is known as
a relentless innovator, the
iPhone's screen has been
the same size 3.5 inches
on the diagonal since the
first iPhone came out.
Samsung has increased
the screen size of its Galaxy
series with every model
since it debuted in 2010. The
Galaxy S had a screen that
measured 4 inches diago-
nally, and was followed by
the S II, at 4.3 inches. The S
III, the latest model, meas-
ures 4.8 inches. The screen
is nearly twice as large as
the iPhone's. Yet the Galaxy
is slightly thinner than an
iPhone 8.6 millimeters
versus 9.3 and lighter -
133 grams versus 140 grams.


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Jamaicans of London eye solid-gold party


Britons of

Caribbean

descent think

'homegame'

Associated Press
LONDON The Ja-
maicans of London have got
their soul food sizzling, their
Red Stripe on ice and their
expectations sky high.
They're ready for what
they hope will be a solid-
gold weekend celebration
featuring Usain Bolt and
other world-class sprinters
from their Caribbean island
nation.
"Jamaicans are very opti-
mistic. We almost see this as
a home game," said Clive
Saunders, a community
leader for the nearly 1 mil-
lion Britons of Jamaican de-
scent, most of whom are
preparing late-night parties
in London parks, Olympic
venues and homes for the
women's 100-meter finals
Saturday and the men's 100
meter Sunday
At the last Olympics four
years ago, Jamaican sprint-
ers cemented their status as
the world's fastest. The
women took all three
medals, while Bolt set a new
world record, a mark he's
bettered since. This time Ja-
maicans are hoping for an
even more dominant show,
with Jamaican women posi-
tioned for a second clean
sweep and Yohan Blake hot
on Bolt's heels for the title
of world's fastest man.
Many are predicting the
greatest national hangover
in Jamaican history on Mon-
day, when the former colo-
nial possession celebrates
its 50th year of independ-
ence from Britain.
"We'll all be getting' the
rum out tonight, and Satur-
day, and Sunday!" declared
Gorgeous Williams, a 43-
year-old woman selling jerk
chicken at a London food
stall.
Desiree Lewis, a 30-year-


. '


Associated Press
Jamaica's Rosemarie Whyte stands in the pouring rain Friday during a women's 400-meter heat in Olympic Stadium.


old nurse, was hefting three
overflowing bags of gro-
ceries home Friday on a
London bus. Her stockpile
of yams, grits, cornmeal and
canned callaloo was testi-
mony to the many Jamaican
bellies she'd have to fill this
long, raucous weekend.
"My young boys think
they're British. We're going
to make them proper, proud
Jamaicans this weekend,"
said Lewis, who immigrated
as a child to London. "We're
surrounding them with
everything Jamaica. All our
cousins from Birmingham
(England's second-largest
city) are crashing in our flat
this weekend. We've family
here from Kingston (Ja-
maica's capital) too."
Richie Bailey, a 26-year-
old bicycle courier taking a
break to watch the Olympics
on a cafe TV was displaying
his Jamaican pride with a


Rastacap bearing the is-
land's colors of green, yel-
low and black. He predicted
that Bolt would put the up-
start Blake into his rightful
second place and leave the
foreign competition a pitiful
speck on the horizon.
"My man Bolt is gonna
beat them bad, man," he
said. "This weekend, Ja-
maica is gonna be the most
powerful nation on earth."
Indeed, these next few
days could be among the
most special in the history
of Jamaica, a nation of
fewer than 2.9 million peo-
ple, mostly descendants of
slaves brought from Africa
to work the island's sugar
plantations.
"Without a shade of a
doubt, this is as big as it gets
for all Jamaicans," said
Ernie Harriott, a.k.a. Daddy
Ernie, who hosts a nightly
reggae show on London sta-


tion Choice FM and has
been centrally involved in
the past week's Olympic-re-
lated parties for the London
Jamaican community.
He noted that the festivi-
ties have been magnets for
"Jafakins," people who want
to be accepted as Jamaican
for the occasion.
On Monday, the nation
celebrates its Aug. 6, 1962,
independence from Britain,
a moment accompanied by
soul-searching over
whether to loosen the ties
that still bind Jamaica con-
stitutionally to its former
colonial master.
Elizabeth II remains
queen of Jamaica, its sym-
bolic head of state, but the
7-month-old government of
Prime Minister Portia
Simpson Miller says the
time is coming when Ja-
maica will declare itself a
full republic and the


British monarch will no
longer grace the nation's
money
Jamaica first plans to
break a key legal link to
Britain by switching the na-
tion's highest court of ap-
peal from faraway London
to the neighboring island
nation of Trinidad.
For Saunders, a 56-year-
old London management
consultant who immigrated
to London as a teenager,
these Olympics represent a
moment when the city's Ja-
maican minority can feel
most at home in their
adopted land.
"There was lots of overt
racism when I came here in
the 1970s. It's no longer like
that. Jamaicans are much
more integrated into the
wider community," said
Saunders, who leads a char-
ity helping Caribbean resi-
dents. "But we still face


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A17


discrimination in employ-
ment, in more subtle ways.
So these Olympics present
an opportunity for us to step
aside from the troubles of
daily life for a moment, be-
fore we go back to the real
world."
The weekend parties in-
clude Friday's official open-
ing of Jamaica House, a
sold-out venue in the river-
side 02 Arena featuring Ja-
maican music and food, and
informal parties in Hyde
Park.
For Daddy Ernie, who's
emceeing the Sunday party
atJamaica House alongside
performances by Damian
Marley, son of late reggae
great Bob Marley, nothing
will top the showdown be-
tween Bolt and Blake or
the generosity of Jamaicans
this weekend.
"It's going to be an open-
door policy where every
home has the rum and Red
Stripe going, every telly (TV)
will be tuned to the athlet-
ics, and the rice and peas
and jerk chicken, the salt-
fish will just keep coming,"
he said. "It'll be better than
Christmas."
Once the 100-meter frenzy
is past, there'll be little time
to rest. Jamaicans also
could medal in the 200 and
400 meter events next week.
And after the Olympics,
on Aug. 16, Jamaicans plan
to fill Emirates Stadium,
home to Arsenal soccer
club, for an independence
dinner hosted by the Ja-
maican prime minister. The
dinner honors two of the na-
tion's greatest sprinters:
Merlene Ottey, who won an
incredible nine track
medals at five Olympic
games from 1980 to 2000;
and Don Quarrie, who won
four Olympic medals from
1976 to 1984 and today
serves as the technical man-
ager for the Jamaican track
and field team.
After that, it's back to the
usual Jamaican-led celebra-
tions, including the Notting
Hill Festival on Aug. 26-27
that's the second-biggest
street party in the world
next to Rio's Carnival.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


United Way allocation


-*'-- ----.r. _- ---I, --: -- _-
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Special to the Chronicle
The United Way of Citrus County recently presented Big Brothers Big Sisters with their
2012 allocation of $13,000. Big Brothers Big Sisters is one of the 19 agencies in Citrus
County supported by the United Way of Citrus County. At the check presentation, United
Way CEO Amy Meek expressed sincere thanks and appreciation for the relationships that
BBBS fosters between children and mentors. Pictured, from left, are: United Way Director
of Finance and Operations Jennifer Barber, Meek and Big Brothers Big Sisters representa-
tive Sherry Chancey.


Car club donation


Special to the Chronicle
On July 25, the Citrus MOPARS Car Club made a $500 donation to the Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute (WTI), establishing a scholarship fund for a qualified individual in the Auto
Body program. Presenting the check were Mike Bonadonna, president of the club, and Ken
McNally, vice president. Receiving the funds on behalf of WTI was Sandy VanDervort, fi-
nancial aid counselor. Citrus MOPARS Car Club raises money through car shows and 50/50
drawings, which enables members to donate some of the funds to local charities.


Spay, neuter for less


Rescue plans weekly drawing, low-costprogram


Special to the Chronicle

Precious Paws Rescue
will have a weekly drawing
for a free spay or neuter for
a dog or cat to kick off their
low-cost dog spay/neuter
program to go along with
their feline plan.
To participate in the
weekly drawing, stop by the
Crystal River Mall Adoption
Center, PetSupermaket,
FCVH or Center State Bank
in Inverness to complete an
entry form. There is no
charge to enter but only one
entry per pet owner is
allowed.
Thanks to a bequest from
a community pet lover and
the continued support and
participation of the Floral


City Veterinary Hospital,
Precious Paws Rescue has
added a low cost spay/
neuter program for dogs.
The fee for dogs is based on
their weight starting at $25
to neuter a male dog up to
50 pounds, to $50 for dogs of
more than 100 pounds.
Spays for females start at
$30 for dogs weighing less
than 20 pounds, up to $60
for dogs of more than 100
pounds. Cat procedures
continue at $20 (spay) and
$10 (neuter).
Pet owners wishing to
participate in these pro-
grams must come to the
mall adoption center and
purchase a voucher for the
desired procedure. They
are responsible for making


their appointment directly
with the FCVH and trans-
porting the pet for the sur-
gery The adoption center is
down the hall from
JCPenney and is open noon
to 4 p.m. Thursday through
Sunday Any additional
services such as vaccina-
tions or tests must be
arranged directly with
FCVH and paid for at the
time of the service.
Precious Paws Rescue
will continue the programs
based on the availability of
funds. Donations are wel-
come and appreciated.
PPR is an all-volunteer
nonprofit dedicated to
helping needy pets.
For more information,
call 352-726-4700.


Scouts plan recruitment


Kindergarten through

12th grade welcome
Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Girl Scouts will stage a Re-
cruitment Fair for girls in kindergarten
through 12th grade at two locations in
August:
Monday, Aug. 20 6 to 8 p.m. at Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W Highland
Blvd., Inverness.
Saturday, Aug. 25 2 to 4:30 p.m. at
Homosassa Elks Lodge, 7890 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
There are no plans to have recruitment


events at any area schools.
Come explore the past, see what is hap-
pening today and help realize the future of
Girl Scouts in this 100th anniversary year of
the organization. As well as on-site regis-
tration, there will be exhibits and hands-on
activities, and troop leaders will be present
Age levels for Girl Scouts are: Daisy,
kindergarten through first grade; Brownie,
grades two and three; Junior, grades four
and five; Cadette, grades six through eight;
Senior, grades nine and 10; and Ambassa-
dor, grades 11 and 12.
For more information, call Roni Francois
at 813-262-1798, or email her at
rfancois@gswcf.org, or call Alison Wernicke
at 813-325-1875, or email her at
awernicke@gswcf.org.


Learn about citrus at free clinics


Special to the Chronicle

We live in Citrus County,
so it sounds as if it should
be easy to grow citrus here,
doesn't it? However, there
is a lot more to growing cit-
rus in Citrus County than
just digging a hole.
Winter temperatures
often drop to freezing or
below. Citrus is a semi-trop-
ical plant, so careful variety


selection is required to suc-
cessfully grow oranges,
grapefruit and lemons.
To learn about growing
citrus, the public is invited
to a Citrus County Exten-
sion Service Master Gar-
dener Plant Clinic in
August:
Wednesday, Aug. 8 -
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Friday, Aug. 10 -


1:30 p.m. at Coastal Region
Library, Crystal River
Tuesday, Aug. 14 -
1 p.m. at Lakes Region
Library, Inverness.
Wednesday, Aug. 15 -
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library
Tuesday, Aug. 28 -
2 p.m. at Homosassa Library
For more information,
call the Extension Service
at 352-527-5700.


A18 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sponsors, exhibitors
soughtfor annual event
Special to the Chronicle
Thanks in large part to its major spon-
sors, this year's Women's Health and Fit-
ness Expo, hosted by the Business Women's
Alliance of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will be able to deliver another
wellness event.
This year's expo will be from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Thank you to presenting sponsor Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center; plus Ad-
vanced Urology Specialists; Citrus Memo-
rial Health System; Genesis Women's
Center & Medical Spa; Publix Super Mar-
ket; and media sponsors the Citrus County
Chronicle and Citrus 95/Classic Hits the
Fox.
In addition to gathering health and well-
ness information, and enjoying demos and
screenings, Expo attendees may register
free for the door prize drawings. Prizes so


far include: a 12-month membership and
a basket of logo items from Citrus County
Jazzercise; a Universal Studios gift basket
from Tally-Ho Vacations that includes a
two-night stay for two at Holiday Inn Main
Gate and two passes to Universal Studios;
and a gift basket of services from Genesis
Women's Center & Medical Spa.
Exhibit space and sponsorship opportu-
nities are still available.
The expo's purpose is to educate women
and those around them about their health,
fitness and wellness.
Sponsorship helps fund scholarships for
students from Citrus, Crystal River and
Lecanto high schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute for health care and
business careers. The BWA was able to
award nine scholarships for the past year.
Details on exhibit registration, the pop-
ular Spa Zone area and sponsorship op-
portunities are available from the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce's Crystal
River office at 28 U.S. 19 N.W, phone 352-
795-3149, from the chamber website, or
from any Business Women's Alliance
member. Also, find us on Facebook at
bwacitrus.


Learn about Alzheimer's

Educational seminars look at effects ofdementia


Special to the Chronicle
HPH Hospice, in partner-
ship with the Alzheimer's
Association Florida Gulf
Coast Chapter, will host two
seminars to provide infor-
mation and assist commu-
nity members who are
caring for a loved one with
Alzheimer's disease and re-
lated dementia.
These diseases can gradu-
ally diminish a person's abil-
ity to communicate, and also
to act in different and un-
predictable ways. Two free


seminars will be at HPH
Hospice Administrative Of-
fices, 3545 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, to help
educate anyone interested
in learning more about
Alzheimer's disease.
Jerry Fisher from the
Alzheimer's Association will
present "Changes in Com-
munication" from 2 to 3:30
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16. He
will share tips and commu-
nication skills to help ex-
change ideas, wishes and
feelings.
Next, from 2 to 3:30 p.m.


Thursday, Aug. 23, Fisher
will present "Solutions for
Difficult Behaviors." He will
discuss how Alzheimer's and
related dementia patients
can become anxious or ag-
gressive and sometimes mis-
interpret what they hear. He
will share ways to identify
those behaviors and explore
possible solutions to help.
The free seminars require
pre-registration because
seating is limited.
Call HPH Hospice at 352-
527-4600 to register for one
or both seminars.


Golf tourney to benefit vets


Citrus Hills will host

8th annual fndraiser
Special to the Chronicle
The eighth annual Citrus County Veter-
ans Golf Tournament will be Sept. 8 at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club Course
for the benefit of the Citrus County Veter-
ans Foundation Inc.
The foundation is a non profit entity that
has provided more than $100,000 in emer-
gency financial assistance to local needy,
honorably discharged veterans and their
surviving spouses since its inception
in 2004.
Check-in for the four-person scramble
will be at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at
8:30 a.m. Individuals and groups short of
four persons will be combined to make
four-person teams. You do not need to be a


veteran to participate.
Registration form and donation of $55
per person must be received no later than
Aug. 28. Each participant's donation in-
cludes golf and cart, beverages on the
course and lunch at the country club.
Prizes will be given for first, second and last
places, closest to the pin, hole in one (to in-
clude a car), plus door prizes. Charitable
tax-deductible contributions for door
prizes and hole sponsorships for $380, $300,
$200 or $100 are available.
Participating golfers should make a
check or money order payable to Citrus
County Veterans Foundation and send it
with their registration form to: Citrus
County Veterans Foundation, Attn: Dan
Birstler, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court, Key
No. 13, Lecanto, FL 34461-7718.
For more information or a registration
form, visit the Citrus County Veterans
Foundation website at www.citrusvf.org or
call Dan Birstler at 352-601-8051.


* Send your community news and photos to: community@chronicleonline.com


Gator Clubbies


Special to the Chronicle
Immediate Past President DeeDee Pierce Wilcox, at far left, front row, was awarded two
Clubbies during the University of Florida's Gator Gala at the Fontainebleu in Miami. For
her Quest for Excellence and Outstanding Leadership at the 2011-12 president of the Cit-
rus County Gator Club, she received the Region 3 VIP Award. (Region 3 consists of Cit-
rus, Hernando, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk and Tampa clubs.) Through her efforts, coupled with
a great team, the Citrus County Gator Club received its first Clubbie for the Most Out-
standing Medium Size Gator Club in the state of Florida. The Clubbie is a coveted Oscar-
like trophy depicting UF's mascot, "Albert."

Day at the Swamp Celebration


Special to the Chronicle
All Gator fans are invited
to join the Citrus County
Gator Club at the 2012 Day
at the Swamp Celebration
from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 25, at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds.
Come join fellow Gators
for an evening of fun, food
and beverages, games, raf-


fles, a silent auction and
giveaways. Former Gator
Football player Travis Mc-
Griff will be the special
guest speaker
Tickets are $10 for alumni
club members; $15 or two
for $25 for non-alumni club
members, or $15 at the door,
if available. Kids younger
than 5 will be admitted free.
Tickets may be purchased


from any club officer or at
Fancy's Pets in Crystal
River or Brannen Banks in
Inverness.
Citrus County Gator Club
is a nonprofit organization
affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Florida, raising
scholarship funds for Citrus
County students.
For more information,
call 352-634-0867


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Scholarship award


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Shooting Club awards scholarship money to students of Citrus County
who are going to college to study some form of law enforcement. This year's student is
Patrick Rizzo. Luis Michaels, club scholarship chairman, presents Rizzo with a check for
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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's all in the name


C ount Lipschitz is on the phone,"
S Sue yelled. There was an unsaid
"again" in her voice.
He is becoming a pest, always calling just
as I'm going out the door or just when din-
ner is ready It's uncanny how he knows ex-
actly when I shut the door to the bathroom.
He never wants anything, he just wants to
chat about what he and Lady Lipschitz did
last night usually something I'm not in-
terested in, like a masquerade
ball or a dog show or a single-malt
scotch tasting.
Count Lipschitz is not royalty;
that's just his first name. His par-
ents had the wisdom to realize
that with a name like that, he
could get preferential treatment
his whole life. Sure enough, he
got into the most exclusive pri-
vate kindergarten in his home-
town of Newark, N.J. without J
having to supply seven character MUI
references and tons of financial
statements like the other kids.
They even gave him a scholarship. He can
call the most popular, exclusive restaurant
in the world and get a reservation instantly
Sometimes he doesn't even have to pay
People fawn over him as if he were Pippa
Middleton in a thong. He's never had a job,
yet he never goes hungry
I suppose his parents could have named
him Doctor Lipschitz or Cardinal Lipschitz
or General Lipschitz and gotten some of the
same effects the instantly returned
phone calls, the not-so-subtle sucking up,
the feeling that when people ask "How can
I help you?" they actually mean it
But Doctor, Cardinal or General wouldn't
have worked like Count did at private
schools. Besides, those names all come
with baggage: At some point, people will ex-
pect the people with those titles to show
some expertise in something.
For example, Doctor Lipschitz would be
expected to look at that mole on the maitre
d's cheek to see if it might be melanoma,
whereas no one expects Count Lipschitz to
know that or anything else. If Doctor Lip-
schitz botched the Heimlich maneuver on
a fellow diner, he'd be banned from the
restaurant. Count Lipschitz could continue
eating for free while customers all around
him turned blue. The staff might even apol-
ogize to him for the inconvenience of it all.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, chilled peaches,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Chicken nuggets,
ham super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plae, garden
salad, green beans, apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, turkey wrap, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled pears, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch


Canteen offers
free hot meal
The Salvation Army Canteen
provides a hot meal from 5 to 6
p.m. Wednesday at the Ho-
mosassa Lions Club.
The club is about 1/2 mile
east of U.S. 19 on Homosassa
Trail. Everyone is welcome.

Genealogists
to meet Aug. 14
The Citrus County Genealog-
ical Society will meet at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 14, at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints, 3474 W.
Southern St., Lecanto.
There will be an informal
question-and-answer session.
Members are requested to
bring genealogy questions to
this meeting. Many members of
the genealogy society have
years of experience in tracing
their family histories and will
offer suggestions to solve prob-


Cardinal Lipschitz would stop getting
special treatment the first time he showed
up with a date, yet if Count showed up with
a woman who was not his wife, no one
would say a word. It might even be ex-
pected. After all, counts will be counts.
General Lipschitz would have to be deci-
sive. He can't ask what is better, the fish or
the fowl he has to pretend he knows. Yet
Count and Lady Lipschitz can pester the
servers, endlessly asking for
things that aren't on the menu
and then not eating them be-
cause that's what everyone ex-
pects of them.
Everyone knows that Colonel
Sanders wasn't really an Army
Colonel, but did that hurt him?
No. He wasn't ever really a pri-
vate, either, but if you're going
to fluff up the resume, you've
IM got to get the balance just right
LLEN General Sanders would be too
much, Private Sanders too little.
Naming your child Professor
doesn't work, because it won't get him a
table at a good restaurant. Sir Lipschitz
sounds pretentious. Other people can call
you sir, but it's not really something you call
yourself.
Some say Count's parents were wrong to
give him that name after all, he hadn't
deserved the title. As if real counts did
something to earn theirs. Unlike Count,
Lady Lipschitz' parents were not planning
that she be mistaken for royalty; they just
thought Ladybird Johnson's name was won-
derful and unique. It got shortened to Lady
on the first day of kindergarten. She hasn't
forgotten how cruel children can be in 50
years.
Count Lipschitz was calling to find out if
he could borrow a cup of money No, just
kidding. He was going out of state to visit
his brother Duke and wanted to know if I'd
take care of his dog.
"Can't you leave him in a kennel for a few
days?" I asked.
"No," he said, "They don't take royalty"

Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to Lose
Money in Your Spare Time -At Home,"
is available at amazon.com. You can
follow him on Pinterest at
interest. com/jimmullen.


Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked
beans, potato triangles, chilled
peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, macaroni and cheese,
turkey super salad with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, warm
apple slices, fruit juice, milk va-
riety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, grits,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Wednesday: Tasty turkey
wrap, chicken alfredo with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, chilled baked beans, po-
tato triangles, dried fruit, baked
beans, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
turkey salad with roll, moz-


lems. Guests are welcome to
attend.
Visit the website at www.
citrusgenealogy.com.
Teaching event
slated for Aug. 14
The American Board, a non-
profit dedicated to recruiting
and certifying community-
based teachers in Florida, will
host a public event on how
local residents can become cer-
tified Florida teachers. It will
begin at 5:30 and 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Aug. 14, at the Holiday Inn
Express, 903 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway.
The event is free and open to
the public.
"Anyone with a bachelor's
degree can become a full-time
teacher within a year as long as
they plan the right path." Har-
grove said. "We are searching
for people who have real-life
experience and want to apply
that experience in the
classroom."


zarella maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, green
beans, potato roasters, mixed
fruit, cucumbers, celery, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Barbecue sandwich,
pizza, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, peas, peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Flame-broiled beef
patty with brown gravy, mashed
potatoes, corn with red pep-
pers, applesauce, whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Birthday celebra-
tion: Noodles Romanoff with
chicken, green beans, carrot
coins, cake, dinner roll with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad with
whole-grain bread, lettuce with
carrot and tomato, marinated
broccoli salad, fresh orange,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken
thigh with coq au vin sauce,
herb mashed potatoes, country
vegetable medley, pineapple,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Hot dog with bun,
baked beans with tomato,
mixed vegetables, coleslaw,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
Call 352-527-5975.


Hargrove can be contacted
at hhargrove@americanboard.
org or 407-437-6628. Visit
www.abcte.org for more
information.
Work through
grief in group
Feeling overwhelmed or
alone?
HPH Hospice will host an
eight-week Grief's Journey Be-
reavement Group from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
15 through Oct. 3, at St. Timo-
thy's Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19).
The program will be led by
Paul Winstead, an HPH be-
reavement specialist. The
group is available to anyone
who has experienced the loss
of a loved one.
Emotional support and edu-
cation about grief and coping
with loss will be provided. Call
the HPH Hospice office at 352-
527-4600.


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Aug. 6to 10MENUS


News NOTES


A20 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Save Our Waters

Adopt-A-Shore/Coastal Clean-Up to be Sept. 15


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus 20/20's Save Our Waters Week
Committee, in cooperation with the Citrus
County Aquatics Service Division and the
Ocean Conservancy, announces the
county's 23rd annual Adopt-A-
Shore/Coastal Clean-Up will begin at sun-
rise Saturday, Sept 15, and continue until
11 a.m.
Groups of two or more are invited to join
other volunteers across the county in re-
moving debris from shorelines, waterways
and the beaches of lakes, rivers and oceans.
People of all ages, from any walk of life, can
participate. Friends, families, neighbors,
club members, scouts troops, grade school
classes and so forth are needed to work to-
gether to help clean up Citrus County wa-
terways.
Those living on the west side of the
county who wish to participate may contact
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-201-0149 or via
email to info.citrus2020@gmail.com; those
on the east side may contact Greg
Schmukal at 352-860-2762 or via email to
basscatchers@embarqmail.com; or call the
Citrus County Aquatics Services directly at
352-527-7620.
A Program Agreement will be mailed out,


along with a participant signup sheet. Each
group will be responsible for knowing the
accessibility of the area being adopted, or-
ganize and transport the group as neces-
sary and the general safety of the group.
Want to join an existing group, or don't see
an area to clean up? Interested persons
will be assisted in locating a group or area
to adopt. All groups must be registered by
Sept. 10 to participate in this year's event
More information and event forms may be
downloaded at wwwcitrus2020.org.
Supplies for the cleanup will be provided
at the safety meeting scheduled for 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the Citrus County
Lecanto Government Building, room 166,
3600 W Sovereign Path (off County Road
491) in Lecanto. The meeting will last ap-
proximately one hour and at least one rep-
resentative from each adopting group must
attend in order to receive supplies for their
group.
This event coincides with the Ocean Con-
servancy's International Coastal Clean-up,
a worldwide effort to use the information
collected from the cleanup to effect posi-
tive change on all levels by reducing the
amount of marine debris, enhancing ma-
rine conservation and educating the public
on the issue of marine debris.


Getting ready to sale


SUE HADERER/Special to the Chronicle
The Friends of the Citrus County Library System (FOCCLS) has been blessed with a host of
special interest books for the upcoming sale, Sept. 28 through Oct. 2 at the Citrus County
Auditorium. Pictured, from left, FOCCLS Friends Jean Racine and Lynne Boele with John
Hawley show a sampling of the huge 1,400 volume donation from the private collection of
John's brother, Robert Hawley, an artist and devoted patron of Citrus County libraries. In-
cluded are books from faerie lore, Celtic mythology, wildlife photography, vintage books
and classics. The fall sale will also feature current bestsellers in fiction and nonfiction in-
cluding history, biography, children's books and cooking. As a special feature of this sale,
the Friends will sell raffle tickets on a new Lenovo 15.6-inch laptop, a $499 value, donated
by Quest Wealth Management Advisory Firm, for $5 a ticket. Drawing will be on Tuesday
afternoon of the sale. The winner will be notified; presence at the drawing is not required.
FOCCLS is a partnership of Friends groups from Central Ridge, Coastal Region and Lakes
Region libraries. The five-day mega event will offer more than 80,000 books in 40 different
categories, as well as CDs, DVDs, games and puzzles. The Friends' semi-annual book sales
benefit Citrus County libraries. For more information, call 352-746-1334 or 352-527-8405,
or visit online at www.foccls.org.



Clubs offer children


out-of-school options


Parents can now register kids


Special to the Chronicle
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County are now reg-
istering children for the be-
fore- and after-school
programs at each club.
Clubs open as early as 6
a.m. for before-school pro-
gramming with children re-
maining until the school bus
transports them to their re-
spective schools.
Buses also transport chil-
dren in the afternoon when
school is out to the clubs for
the after-school program
with parents picking up
children by 6 p.m.
Children will be trans-
ported from Crystal River
Primary School, Lecanto
Primary School, Lecanto
Middle School, Homosassa
Elementary School, Rock
Crusher Elementary School
and Crystal River Middle
School to the Robert


Halleen Boys & Girls Club
in Homosassa.
Students at Inverness Pri-
mary School, Pleasant
Grove Elementary School,
Inverness Middle School
and Hernando Elementary
School will be transported
to the Evelyn Waters Club in
Inverness.
Members from Forest
Ridge Elementary School,
Central Ridge Elementary
School and Citrus Springs
Middle School will be trans-
ported to the Central Ridge
Boys & Girls Club in Beverly
Hills.
The after-school program
is $70 per month with dis-
counts for multiple chil-
dren.
The before-school pro-
gram is $20 per week, also
with discounts for multiple
children. Some scholar-
ships are expected to be
available.


Club personnel will work
with payment plans for par-
ents who have hardships.
Additional discounts are
available for those attend-
ing both before- and after-
school programs and half
price for teens between the
ages of 13 and 18.
Clubs offer programs in
five core Boys & Girls Clubs
of America program areas:
Character and Leadership
Development; Education
and Career Development;
Health and Life Skills; The
Arts; and Sports, Fitness
and Recreation.
To register a child or to
learn more about the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus
County programs, call the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club at 352-270-8841, the
Robert Halleen Boys & Girls
Club at 352-795-8624, or the
Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls
Clubs at 352-341-2507, or the
Boys & Girls Clubs adminis-
trative office at 352-
621-9225.


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A21





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


" Preserving Charleston Light


Associated Press
A woman prays Saturday in front of the cenotaph
dedicated to the victims of atomic bombing at the Peace
Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan. Hiroshima will
mark the 67th anniversary of the atomic bombing Aug. 6.

Truman's grandson

visits bomb memorial


Associated Press
TOKYO A grandson of
former U.S. President
Harry Truman, who or-
dered the atomic bombings
of Japan during World War
II, is in Hiroshima to at-
tend a memorial service
for the victims.
Clifton Truman Daniel
visited the Hiroshima
Peace Memorial Park on
Saturday and laid a wreath
for the 140,000 people killed
by the Aug. 6,1945, bombing
authorized by his grandfa-
ther Another atomic blast
in Nagasaki three days later
killed 70,000 more.
"I think this cenotaph says
it all -to honor the dead to
not forget and to make sure
that we never let this hap-
pen again," Daniel said after
offering a silent prayer.
Daniel, 55, is in Japan to
attend ceremonies next
week in Hiroshima and
Nagasaki marking the 67th
anniversary of the bomb-
ings. His visit, the first by a
member of the Truman
family, is sponsored by the
peace group Sadako
Legacy, named after
Sadako Sasaki, an A-bomb
victim who died of
leukemia at age 12. While
in the hospital, Sadako
folded hundreds of paper
cranes after hearing a leg-
end that people who make


KYODO NEWS/Associated Press
Clifton Truman Daniel, a
grandson of former U.S.
President Harry Truman,
prepares for a wreath-laying
Saturday at the Hiroshima
Peace Memorial Park in
Hiroshima, Japan. Daniel,
whose first visit to Japan
was sponsored by a Japan-
ese peace group, paid re-
spect to the 140,000
people killed by the Aug. 6,
1945 bombing authorized by
his grandfather.
1,000 origami cranes can be
granted a wish. Origami
cranes have since become
a symbol of peace.
Daniel, a former journal-
ist, met Sadako's 71-year-
old brother, Masahiro
Sasaki, who survived the
bombing, at a peace event
in New York in 2010.


Offc ponder

plansfor historic

S. lighthouse
Associated Press
SULLIVANS ISLAND,
S.C. The last major light-
house built in the United
States is showing its age at
50, but the National Park
Service is reviewing a man-
agement plan to maintain
the beacon that still shines
27 miles out into the At-
lantic Ocean on clear nights.
The black and white
Charleston Light rising 140
feet above this affluent beach
community on the northeast
side of Charleston Harbor
was commissioned in 1962.
It's unique among the
hundreds of lighthouses in
the nation in that its tower is
triangular, the better to
withstand hurricane winds
that periodically pound the
coast. And instead of walk-
ing up the tower on a spiral
staircase, the lantern room
can be reached by elevator.
Designed by Jack Graham,
who studied under noted
American architect Louis
Kahn at the University of
Pennsylvania, the light was
the second-brightest in the
Western Hemisphere when
it was commissioned with 26
million candlepower. That
proved much too bright for
the locals, and the Coast
Guard reduced the light to
1.5 million candlepower
Also, island residents did-
n't care for the lighthouse's
original red-orange color -
like that on Coast Guard hel-
icopters. So the tower was
painted black and white.
Charleston Light, known
locally as the Sullivans Is-
land lighthouse, replaced
what is now the Morris Is-
land lighthouse. Because of
erosion, the Morris Island
lighthouse is washed by the
sea in an area that used to
be high ground on the other
side of Charleston Harbor
People are always at-
tracted to lighthouses, said
Rick Dorrance, the chief of
resource management at


Associated Press
Charleston Light, the last major lighthouse built in the United States, is seen on Sullivans
Island, S.C. The National Park Service is considering alternatives in a draft management
plan to refurbish the lighthouse and provide public access.


the Fort Sumter National
Monument.
"They are beautiful and
they are associated with the
water, and people love the
water. It's an unusual struc-
ture, and people know there
aren't many of them in the
United States," he said.
About 600 lighthouses are
in the nation, according to
the Wisconsin-based United
States Lighthouse Society
The Fort Sumter National
Monument includes the fort
in the harbor where the Civil
War began, the Charles
Pinckney Historic Site in
nearby Mount Pleasant, as
well as Fort Moultrie and the
U.S. Coast Guard Historic
District on Sullivans Island.
The Park Service ac-
quired the lighthouse and
adjoining Coast Guard
buildings in 2008 under the
National Historic Light-
house Preservation Act,
Dorrance said. The Coast
Guard put the lighthouse on
its surplus property list with
lighthouses becoming obso-
lete in an era of global posi-
tioning system navigation.
Under the act, anyone who
acquires a lighthouse must
maintain the structure and
provide public access. In this
case, the Coast Guard keeps


Charleston Light shining, and
it is still an aid to navigation.
The National Park Service
maintains the light tower and
associated buildings.
The Park Service provides
public access four times a
year to the property, with the
next time this Tuesday on
National Lighthouse Day
There has been no access
to the inside of the lighthouse
in recent months. Lead paint
is flaking off the side and gets
into the air when people
walk on it, Dorrance said.


Even Coast Guard personnel
have to wear protective suits
when they service the light
The Park Service recently
received public comment on
a draft management plan for
the next five to 10 years. One
of the alternatives in the
plan would be to paint and
provide public access to the
lantern room and perhaps
the catwalk around it at the
top. The alternative also
proposes linking the light-
house district with trails to
nearby Fort Moultrie.


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A22 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


NATION/WORLD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Valentin Pazhetnov, second right, honored Russian
biologist and creator for the protocol at the IFAW's Bear
Rescue and Rehabilitation Program, sits with his family
members, from left, grandson Vasily, son Sergei, grand-
daughter Elia and wife Svetlana in his home near the village
of Bubonitsy, Russia, 220 miles northwest of Moscow.
: Brown bear cubs take their first steps down the
porch of their "den house" inside the forest enclosure of the
IFAW's Bear Rescue and Rehabilitation Program.
ONE FAMILY'S MISSION:


Saving the


orphan cubs


Russians save bears
by keeping distance
Associated Press
BUBONITSY, Russia Russian
hunters have long been in the habit of
rousting hibernating bears from their
winter dens, shooting them for their
pelts and meat, and leaving the cubs to
starve or freeze to death. But Valentin
Pazhetnov has a method of keeping the
little ones alive and returning them to
nature.
The secret, the Russian biologist
said, is minimal contact with humans,
so the cubs learn to fend for them-
selves.
"Bear cubs shouldn't get used to the
smell of humans, to human houses...
the human voice," he told AP Televi-
sion. "They must avoid people, fear
them. This is the only way they can sur-
vive in the wild."
The bears are brought in by volun-
teers, hunters or people who stumble
upon them by chance, and are shel-
tered at the Bear Rescue and Rehabil-
itation Program at Bubonitsy, a village
220 miles northwest of Moscow. The
program is funded by the U.S.-based In-
ternational Fund for Animal Welfare,
Here Pazhetnov, his wife Svetlana,
son Sergei, two grandchildren and vol-


Associated rress photos
Biologists Vasily Pazhetnov, foreground, and his father, Sergei Pazhet-
nov, prepare food for bear cubs at the IFAW's Bear Rescue and Rehabilitation
Program near the village of Bubonitsy, Russia. Vasily uses a bottle to
feed a brown bear cub.


unteers raise the cubs in a wooden
den, where they live in darkness. The
staff wear clothes impregnated with
bear odor, deliver food to the animals
quickly and refrain from fondling or
communicating with them.
In spring, the cubs are moved to
larger enclosures, and are released in
the autumn.


Pazhetnov said some 200 cubs have
been saved since 1996, and he wel-
comes a nationwide ban on hunting
bears in dens that was enacted in
March 2011.
He noted aside from the cruelty in-
volved, the bear is a Russian symbol,
so "It was the right step and we are
happy that the ban has been signed."


e Welcome


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Dentures
These days it is a bit overwhelming with all of the advertising for
dentures. What is the difference, basically the quality of the material used,
as well as the processing methods! We would like to share our experience
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only high quality acrylic well known in the dental industry for many
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A23











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Escapg Gunmen kidnap Iranian pilgrims
Escaping


Associated Press
Residents carry their
belongings on a horse cart
and leave for safer land
Saturday during a flash
flood on the banks of the
River Tawi in Jammu, India.
A flash flood alert was
sounded in Jammu region,
where intermittent overnight
rains resulted in the flooding
of rivers.

Flash floods in
India leave 7 dead
LUCKNOW, India Flash
floods and landslides trig-
gered by torrential rains have
killed at least seven people in
northern India, including three
firefighters who were swept
away as they helped rescue
the stranded, an official said
Saturday.
At least 19 other people -
all construction workers -
were missing and may have
been washed away by the
floods that hit the Himalayan
foothills in Uttarakhand state,
said district official R. Ramesh.
The men were working on
a hydro-electric project when
they disappeared, he said.
There has been incessant
rain in the state since late
Thursday and rivers are over-
flowing their banks. Scores of
homes have been washed
away and people have
moved to buildings on safer
ground. Soldiers are helping
to evacuate people to relief
camps that have opened in
schools and government
buildings

Sweet 15th





Sf v


Associated Press
Karine Velazquez is lifted
up by members of her court
as they pose for photos on
her 15th birthday, or
quinceafiera, Friday at the
Revolution Monument in
Mexico City. Quinceafiera
marks a woman's transition
from childhood to adult-
hood and is common in
Mexico and other Spanish-
speaking countries.


TS Ernesto heads
toward Jamaica
KINGSTON, Jamaica -
Tropical Storm Ernesto blew
across open waters Saturday
on a projected path that
would skirt Jamaica and hit
Mexico after dumping heavy
rain on islands in the eastern
Caribbean.
The U.S. National Hurri-
cane Center said Ernesto
was expected to roll south of
Jamaica as a hurricane Sun-
day evening. The forecast
would carry it into the coastal
resorts of Mexico's Yucatan
Peninsula as a Category 1
hurricane on Wednesday.
Long lines formed at gro-
cery stores in the Jamaican
capital of Kingston as people
bought water, bread and
canned goods.
"We're going to have heavy
rains, so I'm stocking up,"
said Marco Brown, a
Kingston resident in his late
50s.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
BEIRUT Gunmen
snatched 47 Iranian pil-
grims just outside Damas-
cus on Saturday in a brazen
attack that revealed the
growing instability at the
center of President Bashar
Assad's power.


The abduction came as
Syrian troops moved to
crush one of the last rebel-
dominated neighborhoods
in the capital, shelling the
area heavily No group im-
mediately claimed responsi-
bility, although Iranian state
media blamed the rebels
fighting the Assad regime.


The pilgrims were on a
bus taking them from the
suburb of Sayeda Zeinab,
about 10 miles south of
Damascus, to the airport to
return home when they
were kidnapped, according
to the Iranian state news
agency, IRNA. The agency
said the whereabouts of the
pilgrims was known, but did
not elaborate further.
Predominantly Shiite
Iran is a close ally of the be-
leaguered Syrian govern-
ment, which is dominated


by the Alawite sect, an off-
shoot of Shiism. Syria has
long welcomed Iranian pil-
grims visiting the ornate
gold-domed shrine of
Sayeda Zeinab, the Prophet
Muhammad's granddaugh-
ter; up to 700,000 pilgrims
used to come every year,
IRNA said, although the
number has fallen precipi-
tously since the 17-month
uprising that has killed an
estimated 19,000.
The kidnapping under-
scores the inability of the


Blazing destruction


Associated Press
A home burns during a large wildfire Friday in Luther, Okla. A wildfire whipped by gusty, southerly winds swept
through rural woodlands north and south of Oklahoma City, burning several homes as firefighters struggled to
contain it in 113-degree heat.

Residents find little left in burned Oklahoma town


Associated Press
LUTHER, Okla. While resi-
dents of one Oklahoma town sifted
through their charred belongings
Saturday to salvage what they
could after a roaring wildfire that
may have been deliberately set,
residents in two other towns were
being ordered to evacuate their
homes.
The fire near Luther, which is
about 25 miles northeast of Okla-
homa City, destroyed nearly five
dozen homes and other buildings
before firefighters gained some
measure of control Saturday
The fire was one of several burn-
ing Saturday in Oklahoma, where a
severe drought has parched the
landscape.
Fires include a large one in Creek
County, in northeastern Oklahoma,
which officials said had claimed
about 78 square miles, and another
about 35 miles to the west in Payne
County. Emergency management of-
ficials ordered residents of Mann-
ford, in Creek County, and Glencoe,
in Payne County, to leave their
homes, according to Oklahoma De-
partment of Emergency Manage-


I EAE I
Ruth Hood hugs her dog Punky
while waiting at a gas station
Friday at Southeast 108th and
Highway 9 after evacuating her home
nearby as a wildfire burns through
Cleveland County near Norman, Okla.
ment spokeswoman Keli Cain.
Cain said no serious injuries had
been reported.
Authorities suspect the fire near
Luther may have been intentionally
set, while the cause of the others
was undetermined. The Oklahoma
County sheriff's department said it


was looking for someone in a black
pickup truck who was seen throw-
ing newspapers out a window after
setting them ablaze.
Department spokeswoman Mary
Myers said there were "no arrests,
no suspects" but deputies were
"working around the clock" to find
anyone responsible.
Gov Mary Fallin toured Luther
on Saturday, hugging residents
whose homes and belongings were
destroyed by the fire that swept
through treetops on 24 mph winds.
"It's heartbreaking to see fami-
lies that have lost so much," Fallin
said after talking with some who
were milling around the still-
smoking debris that had been their
homes. "I gave them a hug, told
them I was sorry"
The fire burned more than 4
square miles, including an area
near the Turner Turnpike, which
carries Interstate 44 between Okla-
homa City and Tulsa. The super-
highway was briefly closed Friday
and traffic was diverted onto old
Route 66, the cross-country highway
that brought Luther a glimmer of
life before the interstate bypassing
the town was built in the 1950s.


Could tougher laws squelch youth vote?


MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer


CHICAGO Gone are the
days when young voters
weren't taken seriously. In
2008, they helped propel
Barack Obama into the Oval
Office, supporting him by a
2-1 margin.
But the higher profile has
landed them in the middle
of the debate over some
state laws that regulate
voter registration and how
people identify themselves
at the polls.
Since the last election,
Pennsylvania, Kansas, Wis-
consin, Texas and other states
have tried to limit or ban the
use of student IDs as voter
identification. In Florida,
lawmakers tried to limit
"third party" organizations,
including student groups,
from registering new voters.


Associated Press
Aubrey Marks, left, helps a University of Central Florida
student to register to vote July 31 in Orlando. While most
college campuses are relatively quiet, students at the
University of Central Florida have taken it upon themselves
to register their peers during the summer.
Proponents of voter ID tent, they say, is to make
and registration laws say sure people who are voting
the laws are intended to are who they say they are
combat voter fraud. The in- and have the right to vote.


"In this day and age,
nothing could be more ra-
tional than requiring a
photo ID when voters
come to the polls," Penn-
sylvania's senior deputy
attorney general, Patrick
Cawley, said recently
when defending the
state's new law in court.
Others see these efforts
as attempts to squelch the
aspirations of the budding
young voting bloc and other
groups, and they're using
that claim to try to get more
young people fired up.
"You think your vote
doesn't matter? Then why
are they trying so hard to
take it away from you?"
asks Heather Smith, pres-
ident of Rock the Vote, a
group that works to regis-
ter young voters. "It does
demonstrate the power
they have."


Forty-seven people abducted

near Syrian capital Saturday


RaoufAbrahimi, speaker of
the lower house of parlia-
ment, said after the vote.


regime, which is fighting
rebels in all the major cities
of the country, to even con-
trol the immediate environs
of the capital city. Just a few
miles from the site of the
kidnapping, regime forces
encircled the southern
Damascus neighborhood of
Tadamon, a bastion of rebel
support. Heavy explosions
shook the capital Saturday,
and plumes of smoke rose
from the neighborhood that
was attacked by regime
forces the night before.



Afghans


vote to


oust key


ministers

Parliament

nixes interior,

defense officials

Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan -
The Afghan parliament
voted Saturday to dismiss
the country's defense and
interior ministers, a move
that threatens to throw the
country's security appara-
tus into confusion as foreign
forces withdraw.
The vote demanded the
dismissal of two of Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai's key se-
curity lieutenants: Defense
Minister Abdul Rahim War-
the top
Afghan offi-
cials most
trusted by
Washington,
and Interior
Minister
Bismullah
K h a n Abdul
Mohammadi. Rahim
The votes Wardak
of no confi- Afghanistan
dence come Defense
Minister.
at a critical Minister.
time in the
war, when
Afghan po-
lice and sol- _
diers are w
increasingly
taking over
responsibil-
ity from de- Bismullah
parting Khan
interna- Mohammadi
t i o n a 1 Afghanistan
troops, who Interior
are sched- Minister.
uled to
leave Afghanistan or move
into support roles by the
end of 2014.
Separately, the U.S.-led
coalition said two NATO
service members were
killed Saturday in an insur-
gent attack in eastern
Afghanistan. No other infor-
mation was released. So far
this year, 268 U.S. and NATO
troops have died in the war
Legislators faulted the de-
fense and interior ministers
for what they view as the
government's weak re-
sponse to cross-border at-
tacks that Afghans blame on
the Pakistani military, with
lawmakers asking why
Afghanistan has not
launched a military re-
sponse. The parliamentari-
ans also asked the ministers
about allegations of corrup-
tion within their ministries,
and alleged security lapses
that led to recent assassina-
tions of top officials.
The parliament then
passed a measure to remove
Wardak by a vote of 146 to 72.
A separate vote of no confi-
dence on Mohammadi
passed 126 to 90. Both meas-
ures needed 124 votes to pass.
"Both ministers are dis-
qualified from their posi-
tions and we request His
Excellency President
Karzai to introduce new
ministers for these positions
as soon as possible," Abdul











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNT













(f .


The tall grasses in Botswana are

the perfect hiding places for wild

dogs to rest before the next hunt.

An errant flip of the tail or twitch of

an ear is enough to reveal a hiding

place. And so it was that we spotted

a pack of the motley-hued canines.




Botswana's packs impressive, entertaining


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle
As we drove on a dusty trail in
Botswana in an open safari vehicle, al-
most simultaneously with seeing the
dogs, we surprised a family of Vervet
monkeys, which are common to the
woodlands and savannas of Botswana.
The Vervet has long legs, giving the ap-
pearance of being on stilts, and a tail
that is longer than its body perfectly
designed for extra-long leaps and
swinging in the trees.
Our arrival triggered screeching and
physical antics by the monkeys, which
alerted the nearby dogs, who sprang
into action to investigate the situation,
possibly sensing an opportunity to nab
their next meal. As the dogs ap-
proached, the monkeys would drop
out of the trees just far enough from
the dogs that, with a couple of leaps,
they could bound back into a tree to
safety. The mon-
keys would taunt
the dogs in this
fashion while
screeching and
baring their
teeth, as if flash-
ing the dog a big
smile. Even the
younger monkeys
participated in
Neil Sawyer this game.
SPONTANEOUS Of course, the
TRAVELER dogs were in hot
pursuit in every
direction, as
there were approximately a dozen
monkeys in the act. Not a single mon-
key was caught and after awhile the
dogs lost interest and proceeded
through the grass in search of easier
prey Cirque du Soleil would do well to
mimic this display of nature's crea-
tures in action. Monkey meat, how-
ever, is not a favored food of the dogs
- they much prefer impala, gazelle or
calves of larger animals such as water
buffalo or giraffes.
We trailed the dogs as they targeted
another area of interest. A herd of ele-
phants was coming up out of the Zam-
bezi River as we came into view. A
huge bull led the herd and greeted us
with the usual swinging of its trunk
and flapping its huge ears in a threat-
ening manner At this moment we
were encircled by the pack of dogs,


___ *
NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
An elephant investigated the group, flapping his ears and swinging his trunk.
The pack of wild dogs also came out to investigate the ruckus.
(Photo top right is courtesy zookeepersjournal.com)


who watched the elephants intently,
paying no attention to us whatsoever,
but keeping an eye on a young ele-
phant calf being protected by its eld-
ers. The elephants appeared to be
black in color from being in the water,
as they ambled down a trail and disap-
peared, while the dogs, again losing
interest, veered off in another
direction.
We were told that it is rare to see a
large pack of dogs such as we encoun-
tered, as they are loners, having a
range of about 25 to 580 square miles,
depending on availability of game.
They occasionally and randomly form
packs for no determinable reason, ex-
cept for the advantage in hunting
larger prey They are clever fighters,
bringing down very large prey by one
dog going for the nose while another
one holds the tail practically immo-
bilizing the animal as other dogs
disembowel their catch. An entire
pack will feast on the carcass but al-
ways allow the younger ones to eat
first. Some of the older dogs will take
food back to the den to feed those left
to guard the den and care for the
younger pups.
Wild dogs, among packs, are some of
the most civilized of all wild animals.
They have a strict social order that re-
spects each individual. Order in the
pack is established without bloodshed
and they form a hierarchy based on
submission rather than dominance.
Yet, they are skilled hunters and fierce
fighters against any foe.
The wild dog is just one of many dif-
ferent animals in Africa that allows a
closeup of the marvels of nature.
Everything they do is geared to sur-
vival, while being entertaining to us.
Among the joys of travel, particu-
larly to foreign countries, is that there
are never-ending surprises beyond
every horizon and behind every build-
ing or bush new discoveries,
whether in the cities, in open terrain,
or on safaris.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for 27 years.
They travel frequently having been to
48 states, 64 countries and seven
continents. Neil welcomes travel-
related questions from readers.
Contact him via email to
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


* Read about Citrus County veterans' organizations: Veterans Notes can be found on Page A27 of today's Chronicle.



Out West

Dick and Laurie Kansky of Hernando recently traveled to Arizona and Nevada.
de They are pictured in Oak Creek Canyon, just north of Sedona, Ariz., which was
their favorite place to hike. After five days in Sedona, they spent five days at the
Grand Canyon, south rim, which was highlighted by a helicopter tour. They ended
their trip in Las Vegas.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS
r0ata Coanest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mom worries about


child's oral health


SUNDAY EVENING AUGUST 5, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DA: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
B WESH NBC 19 19 News News XXX Summer Olympics Gymnastics, Track and Field, Diving, Beach Volleyball. (N Same-day Tape) N
Great Performances at American Experience "Victory in the Pacific" The The War "Pride of Our Nation" On D-Day, Allied troops As Time
ED PBS 3 3 14 6 the Met 'PG' battle of Okinawa. (In Stereo 'PG' invade France. '14' (DVS) Goes By
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News Nightly XXX Summer Olympics Gymnastics, Track and Field, Diving, Beach Volleyball. From London. Gymnastics: men's floor
S W NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News exercise final; track and field; diving; beach volleyball. (N Same-day Tape) (In Stereo) a
S V ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A 543- News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' (In Stereo)'PG' pound man works to get healthy'PG' Night
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S[WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover:Weight Loss Edition News Brothers
SN 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
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SABC 11 1 1 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A 543- News Grey's
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Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Blue Law & Order "Family ** "Just One Night"(2000, Romance-
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(WGNFAl 18 18 18 18 20 MLBBaseball 30 Rock Mother Mother | Mother other Mother News |Replay The Unit 14'


Dear Annie: I have a
beautiful 3-month-
old daughter. We live
close to my parents, and
they babysit "Abby" all the
time.
Here's the problem. At my
last dental visit, my dentist
told me about a study that
says adults with bad oral hy-
giene can transmit bacteria
to children through kissing
and sharing utensils, caus-
ing tooth infections in the
kids.
My mom hasn't been to a
dentist in years. When I told
her about the study and sug-
gested she get a checkup,
she blew up at me and now
refuses to see her grand-
daughter. I realize my
mother has a
phobia, but I
thought she'd
make the effort
for Abby's sake.
How can I make
her understand O
that this is not
an attack on her,
but about the
well-being of my
daughter?
Clean Teeth in
Pennsylvania
Dear Penn: ANNI
Tooth decay is MAILI
caused by spe-
cific germs and
is more common among
young children than any
other chronic illness. Some
of this is caused by poor
brushing and flossing, too
much sugar in the diet, and
relying exclusively on bottled
water, which usually doesn't
have fluoride. But it also hap-
pens when saliva is trans-
ferred to the baby's mouth by
eating from the same spoon,
sharing cups and utensils,
letting your toddler put your


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Dairy of a Wimpy Kid: Dog
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No passes.
"Dairy of a Wimpy Kid: Dog


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"Step Up 4" (PG-13) In 3D.
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(PG-13) 12 p.m., 12:30 p.m., 3:30
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"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) 12:10 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15
p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Unpleasantly
pungent
6 The States (abbr.)
10 Refrigerate
14 Crow
19 Brightness
20 No longer
interested
22 Increased
24 Genus of geese
25 Ballroom dance
26 Usual weather
in a place
27 Analyze,
as a sentence
28 String
29 Small hill
30 Demise
32 Speed
34 Does sums
35 A pronoun
39 Soak
41 Turban or miter
43 Food fish
45 Word with cold
or sour
47 Stiff
48 Keyboard option
51 Tastelessly showy
53 Small amount
55 Delay
56 Paved ways (abbr.)
59 Gelatin
61 Rounded roof
62 Gator's cousin
64 Ceremony
66 Capital of Oregon
68 Excursion
70 One of the Muses
72 Puccini opera
73 Face
75 Prevent from
happening
77 Dipper
79 Mutilate
80 Talk idly
82 "The Thinker" sculptor
84 Reserved
86 On in years
88 orange
90 Change the decor
91 Townsperson
95 Tightfisted one
97 Account


Terza -
Tibetan monks
Rose oil
Sword
Meat stock jelly
Usual
Short tail
Water barrier
Two-channel sound
Require
Exude
Work by Zola
Chum
Pappy
Word in a forecast
Irish accent
Drug letters
Bourne or
Robards
Itinerary
Kind of yell
Round
Brown ermine
Set free
Jog
Locations
Material for a hat
Reduce
Wake up
Very angry
Failed Ford
To what place?
State in India
Any
British length
Consumed
Judges
Gen. Robert--
Act
Mix


DOWN
1 "Jetsons" dog
2 Kind of reaction
3 Wash
4 Swallow
5 volente
6 As easy as-
7 Growth on stale bread
8 American Indians
9 Second game
10 Recipe measure
11 Moonfish
12 WinfreyofTV
13 Secondary


Cudgel
Ahead
Stage whisper
Transmits
Blond lock
Prevent from
acting
Specification
Attention
- Rice Burroughs
Work unit
Burden
Anger
Make very dry
Finger
Like a wallflower
Ethical
Chore
Another time
Light wood
Passover meal
Word with cap
or circle
Boyle or Sarandon
Unspoken
Bridge term
Remainder
Fruity drink
Book
Alloy
Black
Of little
importance
Modify
Kingly
First man
Sea duck
One of Lear's daughters
Aerie
Brittle resin
Fiend
"- Make a Deal"
Prospect
Drive
Animal dwelling
Harder to find
Fast car
Candid
Competitor
Early time of life
Coarse file
Smudge
Hearsay
Look at books
Fragrant wood


So long, amigo!
Zoo animal
Fertile spot
TV, slangily
Tractable
Bonkers
Like Santa Claus
Long fish
Flotsam and -
Aborigine


132 Tribal emblem
134 Deadly
135 Fine violin,
for short
136 Ordinary language
137 Dwelling
138 Flat
140 Liking
142 Mountain ridge
143 Sea nymph


Correct a text
Beget
Used to be
Print measures
Tint
Directed
Part of www


Puzzle answer is on Page A28.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


toothbrush in his mouth, or
kissing the baby on the
mouth if you have poor den-
tal hygiene.
Your mother's phobia is so
severe that she has chosen
not to see her grandchild
rather than submit to a den-
tist. This not only damages
her relationship with Abby,
but risks her physical health,
as poor dental hygiene can
lead to heart disease. Please
explain all this to Mom and
ask her to be careful around
Abby Then wipe the baby's
teeth, tongue and inner
cheeks with a clean, wet
cloth every few hours,
whether she's around Mom
or not
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to "North
Carolina Step-
mom," who com-
S plained that her
husband pays regu-
lar child support,
yet still has to buy
his girls clothes,
shoes, etc.
There is no re-
quirement that
child support be
used directly on the
child, but it doesn't
E'S do much good to
BOX spend it on clothes
if the mother does-
n't have the income
to pay rent or buy groceries.
It is quite possible that the
mother of those two girls is
using the child support on
basic necessities. Grand
Rapids, Mich.


Email anniesmaibox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A26 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
E





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Crystal River Woman's
Club's Appreciation Luncheon
for Military Women will take
place at noon Monday, Nov. 12,
at the Crystal River Woman's
Clubhouse, 320 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River.
Those who have never re-
ceived an invitation in the past
may call Leslie Martineau at
352-746-2396 to be added to
the mailing list.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the
Purple Heart and honoring all
Purple Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing car-
riejenetteclemons@yahoo.com,
or calling Carrie at 352-
628-1633. Indicate the
number in your party.
General George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source
office is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@
tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is


trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-


terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously ob-
tained career fields or retraining
into select career fields. Some
of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields, and vari-
ous other specialties. Enlisted
career openings that include
the opportunities to retrain con-
sist of special operations posi-
tions and unmanned aerial
vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at
several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m.
Thursday.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from 10
to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-
382-7397.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328 for
more information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
The post is sponsoring a bus
trip to Tropicana Field on
Wednesday, Sept. 5, for a
baseball game featuring the
Tampa Bay Rays vs. the New
York Yankees.
A chartered bus will leave the


post at 4 p.m. with an approxi-
mate return at midnight. The
cost includes bus fare, game
ticket and refreshments. This
event is open to the public, in-
cluding children accompanied
by an adult.
Tickets are limited and can
be purchased at the Legion,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway, in
Crystal River. Call the post at
352-795-6526 for ticket price
and information.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call


Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Join the post for pork and
sauerkraut dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10; cost
is $8 and children younger than
6 eat for $4.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is planning a bus
trip to the Hard Rock Casino in
Tampa on Wednesday, Aug. 29.
Cost is $30. We will leave the
post at 8 a.m. Call the post for
more information.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch. WiFi is now avail-
able.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-


abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at
352-560-3867 or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines


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Call Ora For Other Dates & Price.
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meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will Sept. 15.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for from
all wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com.


Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529, or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.

See VETERANS/Page A28



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 A27





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Divorces 7/16/12 to 7130112
John P. Bianco, Inverness vs. Darlene
N. Bianco, Inverness
Carlton Green, Citrus Springs vs. Alice
Green, Inverness
Michael D. Kennedy, Tampa vs.
Melanie Dawn Kennedy, Inverness
Thomas David Krug, Homosassa vs.
Kristina Marie Krug, Forestville
Lidiya M. Lane vs. Robert C. Lane Jr.
Ashley M. Phelps, Inverness vs. Travis
A. Phelps, Inverness
Gloria Tubolino, Hernando vs. Samuel
Tubolino, Hernando
William Chad Wilkins, Homosassa vs.
Theresa Ann Wilkins, Beverly Hills
Seth Barnard, Bremerton, Wash. vs.
Catherina Barnard, Homosassa
Christopher J. Connelly, Beverly Hills
vs. Jillian G Connelly, Citrus Springs
David B. Jefford, Inverness vs. Jessica
Rene Jefford, Inverness
Jaime Dawn Lowdermilk, Hernando vs.
Roy Curtis Lowdermilk, Floral City


VETERANS
Continued from Page A27

U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189
Ladies Auxiliary facility on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley-Davidson. We meet in
the small building to the left of
the main building. All former
and current post members, as
well as all interested veterans,
are cordially invited to be a part
of American Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and


For the RECORD
Savannah Marie Mercado, Inverness
vs. Adam Mercado, Inverness
Zanetta Joan Skelton, Dunnellon vs.
James Conner Skelton, Lecanto

Marriages 7/16/12 to 7/30/12
Drake Allen Barahona, Citrus
Springs/Rachael Eyleen Hill, Citrus
Springs
Daniel Scott Boston, Floral City/
Kaitlyn Ann Foster, Floral City
Leo James Bouchard, Hernando/
Jennifer Lynn Stewart, Hernando
Gary Fayne Brumit, Homosassa/
Amy Lou Boyd, Homosassa
David Allen Buckingham, Floral
City/Michelle Stum Gribnitz, Inverness
Ronald Edward Buzard Jr.,
Inverness/Kristin Nicole Rozmus,
Inverness
Allen Louis Dorsey Jr.,
Citrus Springs/Qwan Lashun Larry,
Citrus Springs
Donald Marcus Flaitz, Floral City/


Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Amer-
ican Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially
invited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call


Susan Spungen Barmon, Floral City
Donald Gene Keelin, Floral City/
Shirley Janulis, Floral City
John Christopher Leone,
Homosassa/Sandra Dale Smith,
Homosassa
Jessie Kavin Morse, Inverness/
Tonya Ann Pack, Inverness
Branden Lee Ollhoff, Portage,
Wis./Heidi Leigh Adams, Portage, Wis.
Lawrence Damon Steinmetz,
Homosassa/Jesse Mattson Wright,
Homosassa
Stephen Randolph Boyett, Huntsville,
Ala./Lisa Todd Kofmehl, Crystal River
Donald John Lesoine, Inverness/
Susan Lorenzo, Inverness
Charles Everett Perkinson, Cedar
Rapids, lowa/Kimberly Sue Patterson,
Zanesville, Ohio
Timothy Michael Roller, Homosassa/
Dawn Ann Ristau, Homosassa
David Yam, Inglis/Robin Angela
Brummett, Inglis


Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Superior Bank.
Social hour follows. All Marines
and FMF Corpsmen are wel-
come. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW
meets at 5 p.m. and the mem-
bership meeting is at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday at
the post.
Call the post at 352-
447-3495 for information about
the post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,


9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans ar
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
E The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at
the Embassy Suites Hotel,
1445 Lake Cook Road, Deer-
field, Ill. Group reservation
code is CGN. Call 847-945-
4500 for reservations. Ask for
the USS Long Beach reunion
rate of $99.68, which includes
all taxes on rooms. Cutoff date
is Aug. 13.
Contact Don Shade, 299
Kiantone Road Lot 92,
Jamestown, NY 14701-9370,
or email Ibcgn9@aol.com or
visit www.usslongbeach-
assoc.org.


Send news and photos
for the Veterans Notes,
printed each Sunday,
to community@
chronicleonline.com


65th ANNIVERSARY

The Thachers


William A. and Jean
Thacher are celebrating
their 65th anniversary on
Aug. 16, 2012.
When William was dis-
charged from the Army, he
journeyed up to Woodruff,
Wis., where he met Jean
Wollangk, who later became
his wife on Aug. 16, 1947.
Bill and Jean moved to
South Holland, Ill. After a
two-year stay, they went
back to Wisconsin, and later
ventured down to Holly-


I I i<-wm
wood, Fla., and Fort Laud-
erdale. After 27 years in
Fort Lauderdale, they
moved to Leesburg, where
they resided for seven years.
In 1986, they settled in In-
verness, where they attend
the First Presbyterian
Church.
The couple have two sons,
Bill and Bob, and a daugh-
ter, Jill. The have five grand-
children, two great-
grandchildren and one on
the way


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in
another county, contact the clerk in that area.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A26.

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8-5 0 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


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A28 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


TOGETHER


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;I;











SPORTS


The Rays try to
stay in front of the
Baltimore Orioles in
the AL East standings
Saturday night./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Olympics/B2, B3
' Golf, auto racing/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
STV, lottery/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Serena's resume now truly golden


Associated Press
The United States' Serena Williams celebrates after defeating Russia's Maria
Sharapova to win the women's tennis singles gold medal match Saturday at the
All England Lawn Tennis Club at Wimbledon in the 2012 Summer Olympics.


Williams downs

Sharapovafor

Olympic gold
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England As
Serena Williams stood atop the
medal podium, her career Golden
Slam complete thanks to an
Olympic rout, the gusty wind on
Centre Court blew the U.S. flag off
its pole midway through the na-
tional anthem.
Old Glory came to rest in front of
the Royal Box.
"It was probably flying to come
hug me because the flag was so
happy," Williams said.


Williams wo
after she becai
woman to achi
winning the
women's final
Saturday by be
pova 6-0, 6-1.
The victory
markable run o
No. 4-seeded
only 17 games
route to her
medal. She wei
at the All Engla
won her fifth
month ago.
It took the N
pova 45 minute
and by then s
Williams don
serve and repe


London 2012 SUMMER OLYMPICS


A


1-ti


Phelps wins 18th

gold medal in last

Olympic race

Associated Press
LONDON As if 22 medal
ceremonies over the last three
Olympics weren't enough,
Michael Phelps was summoned
back to the pool deck for one
more accolade.
This time, he received a tro-
phy rather than a medal, an
award that sought to sum up a
career like no other.
"To Michael Phelps," it said,
"the greatest Olympic athlete of
all time."
Too bad it was silver
Gold was the
only color for
this guy.
lt In a final race
that was more a
coronation than
a contest,
Phelps headed
into retirement
Michael the only way
Phelps imaginable -
with an 18th gold medal. Re-
claiming the lead with his trade-
mark butterfly stroke, the one
seen in his Olympic debut as a
15-year-old in Sydney a dozen
years ago, he capped off a mind-
boggling career with a victory in
the 4x100-meter medley relay
Saturday
"I've been able to do every-
thing that I wanted," Phelps
said.
When it was done, he hugged
his teammates Matt Grevers,
Brendan Hansen and Nathan
Adrian before heading off the
deck for the final time in his hip-
hugging swimsuit. He waved to
the crowd and smiled, clearly at
peace with his decision to call it
a career
And what a career it was!
"I was able to really put the
final cherry on top tonight, put
all the whipped cream I wanted
and sprinkles. I was able to top
off the sundae," Phelps said.
"It's been a great career. It's
been a great journey I can't be
any more happy than I am."
Phelps retires with twice as
many golds as any other


e


gre.


re a smile herself Linemen lead
me only the second charge into HoF
eve a Golden Slam,
most lopsided CANTON, Ohio-Willie
in Olympic history Roaf was in an unfamiliar
*ating Maria Shara- role the center of atten-
tion in front of a large
completed a re- crowd, being singled out
>f domination by the for something good.
Williams, who lost No, make that: Some-
in six matches en thing great.
first singles gold With current Saints play-
nt 13-0 this summer ers standing and cheering,
nd Club, where she the for-
Wimbledon title a mer New
Orleans
[o. 3-seeded Shara- offensive
tes to win a game, tackle led
he trailed 6-0, 3-0. a charge
linated with her of line-
atedly blasted win- men into
See Page B4 the Pro willie Roaf
Football
alf lineman one of
Hall of six inductees.
Fame on
Saturday night, a six-man
induction that tilted toward
those who relish the less-
than-glorious role.
Four linemen were in-
c luded Roaf, Chris
Doleman, Cortez Kennedy
and Dermontti Dawson,
along with running back
Curtis Martin and 1950s
cornerback Jack Butler.
Roaf led it off with a
speech short and humble,
fitting someone who played
a stellar career appreciat-
Sing the scrums rather than
the spotlight.
'You know, it's an offen-
sive lineman," said Roaf,
who was very hard to get
S... around on the field. "I didn't
.. get singled out in front of a
large audience very often,
and when I did, it was usu-
. ally by a referee who was
singling me out by saying,
'Holding No. 77.


Associated Press
United States swimmer Michael Phelps competes in the men's 4x100-meter medley relay final Saturday
at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Phelps pushed
the United States in front to win the race, after which he is retiring. He leaves the sport with a record 18
golds and 22 medals overall.


Olympian, and his total of 22
medals is easily the best mark,
too. He can be quite proud of his
final Olympics as well, even
though there were times he had
trouble staying motivated after
winning a record eight gold
medals at the Beijing Games
four years ago.
The 27-year-old could surely
swim on for another Olympics,
See Page B4


Montoya takes pole
at Pocono Raceway
LONG POND, Pa. -
Juan Pablo Montoya's con-
tribution to the NASCAR
highlight reel so far this
season was his crash into
a jet dryer in the season-
opening Daytona 500.
Montoya finally had a
bright spot that didn't in-
volve explosions and rag-
ing fuel fires.
He turned a lap of
176.043 mph Saturday to
win the pole at Pocono
Raceway. The winless
Montoya won his first pole
since April 2011 in Rich-
mond, Va. He hasn't won a
race since Aug. 8, 2010 at
Watkins Glen.
The pole was a needed
lift for Montoya and his No.
42 Earnhardt Ganassi Rac-
ing team. He's 21st in the
standings and has yet to
drive to a top-five finish. He
only has two top 10s and
has continued a string of
mediocre seasons since
qualifying for the Chase for
the Sprint Cup champi-
onship in 2009.
Montoya admitted he
was "shocked" he beat out
Pocono qualifying stars
such as Denny Hamlin,
Joey Logano and Kasey
Kahne to lead the field in
Sunday's 400- mile race.
"We know we're work-
ing in the right direction,
we know we're working
hard, we feel the cars are
getting a little better,"
Montoya said.


SFrom wire reports


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MORE INSIDE
"\a The U.S. men's basketball team
0 L narrowly avoids an upset against
Lithuiania on Saturday.
SL=-- NDC-N See Page B2
2012i The U.S. women's 4x100-meter
medley relay team sets a world
record en route to Olympic gold.
See Page B3


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PAGE B2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5,2012




SUMMER CLYMPICS


Sunday's
SCHEDULE

Athletics
At The Mall
Women's Marathon, 6 a.m.
At Olympic Stadium
Men's 100 semifinals and final, 400
semifinals, 1500 semifinals, 3000 Stee-
plechase final, High Jump qualifying,
Hammer final; Women's 400 final, 400
Hurdles round 1, Triple Jump final, 1:50
p.m.
Badminton
At Wembley Arena
Men's Singles and Doubles bronze
medal matches, 4 a.m.
Men's Singles and Doubles gold medal
matches, 8 a.m.
Basketball
Olympic Park-Basketball Arena
Women
France vs. Russia, 4 a.m.
Angola vs. Czech Republic, 6:15 a.m.
Canada vs. Australia, 9:30 a.m.
China vs. United States, 11:45 a.m.
Croatia vs. Turkey, 3 p.m.
Britain vs. Brazil, 5:15 p.m.
Beach Volleyball
At Horse Guards Parade
Women's quarterfinals (2 matches), 1
p.m.
Women's quarterfinals (2 matches), 5
p.m.
Boxing
At ExCel
Women's Flyweight (51kg); Women's
Lightweight (60kg) and Women's Mid-
dleweight (75kg) round of 16, 8:30 a.m.
Men's Bantamweight (56kg) and Men's
Heavyweight (91kg) quarterfinals, 3:30
p.m.
Cycling (Track)
At Olympic Park-Velodrome
Men's Omnium: 4km individual pursuit;
Women's Sprint qualifying, 5 a.m.
Men's Omnium: 15km scratch race, 1km
time trial-(medal); Men's Sprint quarterfi-
nals, race for 5th-8th places; Women's
Sprint 1/16 finals & repechages, 1/8 finals
& repechages, race for 9th-12th places, 11
a.m.
Diving
At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre
Women's 3-Meter Springboard final, 2
p.m.
Equestrian (Jumping)
At Greenwich Park
Team Jumping: round 1, 6 a.m.
Fencing
At ExCel
Men's Team Foil round of 16, quarterfi-
nals, classifications (5th-8th places), semi-
finals, 4 a.m.
Men'sTeam Foil bronze and gold medal
matches, 1 p.m.
Field Hockey
Men
At Olympic Park-Hockey Centre
New Zealand vs. Belgium, 3:30 a.m.
Pakistan vs. South Africa, 5:45 a.m.
India vs. South Korea, 8:45 a.m.
Netherlands vs. Germany, 11 a.m.
Britain vs. Australia, 2 p.m.
Argentina vs. Spain, 4:15 p.m.
Gymnastics
At Artstic North Greenwich Arena
Men's Floor Exercise final; Men's Pom-
mel Horse final; Women's Vault final, 9
a.m.
Sailing
At Weymouth and Portland, Dorset
Men's 49er, Finn (medal race), RS:X,
Star (medal race); Women's RS:X, 7 a.m.
Shooting
At The Royal Artillery Barracks
Men's 50-meter Pistol qualification and
Men's Trap qualification (Day 1), 4 a.m.
Men's 50-meter Pistol final, 7:30 a.m.
Synchronized Swimming
At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre
Women's Duets technical routine, 10
a.m.
Table Tennis
At ExCel
Men's Team quarterfinals, 5 a.m.
Men's Team quarterfinals, 9:30 a.m.
Women's Team semifinal, 2 p.m.
Team Handball
Women
At Copper Box
Sweden vs. South Korea, 4:30 a.m.
Brazil vs. Angola, 6:15 a.m.
Montenegro vs. Russia, 9:30 a.m.
Croatia vs. Britain, 11:15 a.m.
Norway vs. Spain, 2:30 p.m.
Denmark vs. France, 4:15 p.m.
Tennis
At Wimbledon
Men's Singles bronze medal match,
Women's Doubles bronze medal match,
Men's Singles gold medal match,
Women's Doubles gold medal match,
Mixed Doubles gold medal match, 7 a.m.
Volleyball
Women

Algeria vs. Dominican Republic, 4:30
a.m.
China vs. South Korea, 6:30 a.m.
Britain vs. Japan, 9:45 a.m.
Italy vs. Russia, 11:45 a.m.
United States vs. Turkey, 3 p.m.
Brazil vs. Serbia, 5 p.m.
Water Polo
Women
At Olympic Park-Water Polo Arena
Quarterfinal, 9:50 a.m.
Quarterfinal, 11:10 a.m.
Quarterfinal, 2 p.m.
Quarterfinal, 7:20 p.m.
Weightlifting
At ExCel
Women's +75kg group A (medal), 10:30
a.m.
Wrestling (Greco-Roman)
At ExCel
Men's 55kg and 74kg qualifications, 1/8
finals, quarterfinals, semifinals, 8 a.m.
Men's 55kg and 74kg repechage
rounds, bronze and gold medal contests,
12:45 p.m.

CHANNELS
WITH OLYMPICS
COVERAGE


* MSNBC
* NBC
* CNBC
* NBCSPT
For events,
see Page B4.


MEN'S COMPETITIONS





US escapes upset


Men's b-ball

beats Lithuania

99-94

Associated Press

LONDON When the
moment arrived, the Ameri-
cans responded.
They're still unbeaten,
but no longer untested.
Pushed to the max by a
fearless Lithuanian team
smelling a world-shaking
Olympic upset, the U.S. col-
lection of basketball super-
stars united as one.
And LeBron James led
the way
Two days after running
and gunning to a record-
shattering 83-point win, the
U.S. was forced to play a pos-
session-for-possession game
in the fourth quarter in a 99-
94 win over Lithuania.
The Americans were in
serious trouble until James
- in his third Olympics -
stepped up in the closing
minutes.
"It was like LeBron said,
'I got this, I'm doing this,"
U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski
said.
James scored 9 his 20
points in the final four min-
utes for the U.S. (4-0), which
had looked nearly invinci-
ble in thrashing Nigeria 156-
73 on Thursday night while
breaking several records.
But the Americans were re-
minded that the path to a
gold medal is loaded with
traps and Lithuania nearly
sprang one.
"You want to get tested,"
James said. "The best teams
want to be tested. We love
the competition. We've got
some of the greatest com-
petitors in our league, in
this world, so you want to
have a game where you feel
like you were tested, and we
had that today"
And then some.


Associated Press
USA forward Lebron James hauls down a rebound against Lithuania's Martynas Pocius
during a men's basketball game Saturday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


The U.S. trailed by two
points with under six min-
utes left before using a 15-4
run to put away Lithuania
(1-3), which was seeking to
duplicate its stunning win
over the Americans in 2004
win at Athens, when the
U.S. program dropped to
its low point after decades
of dominance.
However, James, who was
an Olympic rookie eight
years ago, refused to allow it
The reigning MVP and a
recently crowned NBA


champion knocked down a
3-pointer from the top of the
key, and after Paul stole the
inbounds pass, James took a
feed down the right side and
delivered one of his trade-
mark dunks, a basket that
brought the American play-
ers off the bench and
seemed to restore world
basketball order.
Carmelo Anthony added
20 points, Kevin Durant 16
and Chris Paul added seven
rebounds, six assists and four
of the U.S. team's 17 steals.


After making a record 29 3-
pointers in their epic win
over Nigeria, the Americans
missed 23 of 33 attempts be-
hind the arc and too often
settled for outside shots.
The U.S. wasn't sharp on
defense either as Lithuania
ran a high pick-and-roll to
death that the Americans
never really figured out how
to stop.
"We can play better offen-
sively and defensively, no
questions about that,"
Krzyzewski said.


Pistorius easily advances to 400 semis


'Blade Runner' i 1st amputee

to compete in Olympic track

Associated Press

LONDON The man known as the "Blade Run-
ner" finally got his Olympic moment Saturday when
he took to the starting line of the 400-meter heat and
easily advanced to the semifinals.
Oscar Pistorius worked for six years to get the I
chance to run, and he became the first amputee to
compete in track in the Olympics. With 80,000 fans
watching him make history, he cruised past a couple
of opponents in his heat to advance to Sunday night's
semifinals.
"I found myself smiling in the starting block," Pis-
torius said. "Which is very rare in the 400 meters."
Pistorius was born without fibulas and his legs
were amputated below the knee before he was 1. He
runs on carbon-fiber blades and fought to get to the
starting line. He had friends and family in the stands
- including his 89-year-old grandmother, who was
carrying the South African flag.
South Africa's Oscar Pistorius and Jamaica's
Rusheen McDonald compete in a men's 400-meter
heat Saturday in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012
Summer Olympics in London.
Associated Press


Olympic BRIEFS


Farah wins 10,000 on
golden day for Brits
LONDON Mo Farah won
the 10,000 meters at the Lon-
don Olympics to give Britain
three gold medals in track and
fieldon Saturday
The Somali-born Farah kicked
away from a big pack coming
into the final straight and won in
27 minutes, 30.42 seconds,
holding off training partner Galen
Rupp of the United States, who
took silver in 27:30.90.
Tariku Bekele finished in
27:31.43 to pick up bronze for
Ethiopia.
Earlier Saturday, Jessica
Ennis won the heptathlon and
Greg Rutherford won the long
jump for Britain.
Bryan brothers win
tennis gold
WIMBLEDON, England -


Top-seeded Bob and Mike Bryan
won Olympic gold in men's dou-
bles on Saturday, beating
Michael Llodra and Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga of France 6-4, 7-6 (2).
The American twin brothers,
who have won 11 Grand Slam
doubles titles, won a bronze
medal in Beijing in 2008.
First-time Olympians Richard
Gasquet and Julien Benneteau
of France won the bronze medal
by beating David Ferrer and Fe-
liciano Lopez of Spain 7-6 (4),
6-2.
Usain Bolt advances to
Olympic 100 semifinals
LONDON -After overcom-
ing a sloppy start to his London
Olympics, Usain Bolt looked
into a TV camera, held up his
right index finger and declared:
"No. 1, baby. All day, every day."
Well, on this day, he was
merely OK.


Hardly dazzling after so
much anticipation, Bolt was
pedestrian out of the blocks -
his reaction time ranked sixth of
the eight runners in his heat -
then insisted all that mattered
was that he made it to the
semifinals by shrugging off that
poor beginning to win his race
in 10.09 seconds Saturday.
"I stumbled on the start," the
25-year-old Jamaican said. "I re-
ally didn't do a lot of executing."
At Beijing in 2008, a show-
boating Bolt ruled track and field,
winning golds in world-record
times in the 100, 200 and 4x100
relay something no man had
ever done at an Olympics. At the
2009 world championships, he
lowered his 100 mark to 9.58,
which still stands.
But he's been less than out-
standing more recently. A false
start knocked him out of the


dash at last year's world cham-
pionships, and he lost to train-
ing partner Yohan Blake in the
100 and 200 at the Jamaican
Olympic trials. Bolt blamed his
poor showings at home on
back and hamstring issues.
Blake, whose intensity in
practice led Bolt to nickname
him "The Beast," looked quite
good in his Olympic debut, re-
ally coasting at the end while
winning his heat in 10 seconds
flat.
Asked to assess his showing,
Blake said: "It's not the finals."
The defending Olympic
champion in the 400, LaShawn
Merritt, will not join Pistorius in
Sunday night's semifinals. Mer-
ritt, who served a 21-month
drug suspension after his Bei-
jing title, pulled up halfway
through his heat with a tender
left hamstring.


LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS

Medal

count
as ofAug. 4

COUNTRY G S B TOT
United States 26 13 15 54
China 25 16 12 53
U.K. 14 7 8 29
Russia 3 15 10 28
Japan 2 10 12 24
France 8 6 8 22
Germany 5 10 6 21
Australia 1 12 7 20
South Korea 9 3 5 17
Italy 5 5 3 13
Canada 1 3 6 10
Netherlands 3 1 4 8
New Zealand 3 0 4 7
Romania 1 4 2 7
Ukraine 2 0 5 7
Belarus 1 2 3 6
Brazil 1 1 4 6
Cuba 2 2 1 5
Denmark 1 2 2 5
Hungary 2 1 2 5
Kazakhstan 5 0 0 5
North Korea 4 0 1 5
Czech Rep. 1 2 1 4
Mexico 0 3 1 4
Poland 2 1 1 4
Slovakia 0 1 3 4
South Africa 3 1 0 4
Colombia 0 2 1 3
Spain 0 2 1 3
India 0 1 2 3
Slovenia 1 0 2 3
Sweden 0 3 0 3
Belgium 0 1 1 2
Ethiopia 1 0 1 2
Greece 0 0 2 2
Croatia 1 1 0 2
Indonesia 0 1 1 2
Jamaica 1 0 1 2
Kenya 0 1 1 2
Moldova 0 0 2 2
Mongolia 0 1 1 2
Norway 0 1 1 2
Serbia 0 1 1 2
Azerbaijan 0 0 1 1
Swizerland 1 0 0 1
Egypt 0 1 0 1
Georgia 1 0 0 1
Guatemala 0 1 0 1
Hong Kong 0 0 1 1
Iran 0 0 1 1
Lithuania 1 0 0 1
Qatar 0 0 1 1
Singapore 0 0 1 1
Thailand 0 1 0 1
Tunisia 0 0 1 1
Taiwan 0 1 0 1
Uzbekistan 0 0 1 1
Venezuela 1 0 0 1
AP

Saturday's
SCORES

BASKETBALL
Men
Group A
France 73, Tunisia 69
United States 99, Lithuania 94
Group B
Russia 77, Spain 74
Brazil 98, China 59
Australia 106, Britain 75
SOCCER
Men
Quarterfinals
South Korea 1, Britain 1
Brazil 3, Honduras 2
Mexico 4, Senegal 2
Japan 3, Egypt 0
HANDBALL
Men
Group A
Tunisia 34, Britain 17
Sweden 29, Argentina 13
Iceland 30, France 29
Group B
Serbia 28, South Korea 22
Croatia 32, Denmark 21
Spain 33, Hungary 22
HOCKEY
Women
Pool A
Netherlands 3, South Korea 2
Japan 1, Belgium 1
China 2, Britain 1
Pool B
Australia 1, South Africa 0
New Zealand 3, United States 2
Argentina 3, Germany 1
VOLLEYBALL
Men
Pool A
Poland 3, Britain 0 (25-16, 25-19, 25-18)
Italy 3, Australia 2 (21-25, 18-25, 25-21,
25-14, 15-13)
Argentina 3, Bulgaria 1 (25-18, 21-25, 25-
19,25-20)
Pool B
Germany 3, Tunisia 0 (25-15, 25-16, 25-
16)
Russia 3, United States 2 (27-29, 19-25,
26-24, 25-16, 15-8)
WATER POLO


Men
Group A
Croatia 11, Australia 6
Spain 11, Greece 9
Italy 9, Kazakhstan 6
Group B
Serbia 11, United States 6
Hungary 17, Britain 6
Montenegro 12, Romania 8








Page B3 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5,2012



SUMMER OLYMPICS


WOMEN'S COMPETITIONS


r


r


im


Associated Press
The United States women's 4x100-meter medley relay team from left, Allison Schmitt, Dana Vollmer, Rebecca Soni and Missy Franklin pose with their
gold medals Saturday at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

US women's 4x 00-meter medley relay team claims gold sets new world mark


Associated Press


Missy Franklin capped off a bril-
liant Olympic debut by helping the
U.S. take gold in the women's 400
medley relay with a world-record
time, no less.
The 17-year-old Franklin, who
will begin her senior year of high
school when she gets back to Col-
orado, seems destined to be Amer-
ica's new star in the post-Michael


Phelps era after taking four golds
and a bronze while swimming seven
events the same number as
Phelps.
A definite bit of symmetry there,
though Franklin doubts anyone can
ever replace Phelps.
"I don't think his shoes will ever
be filled. They're so huge," Franklin
said. "Hopefully I can make little
paths next to him."
And let's not forget Allison


Schmitt, another swimmer with
ties to Phelps. They trained to-
gether over the past year in Balti-
more, becoming fast friends with
all their goofy antics. But they
sure took care of business in the
pool, with Schmitt winning three
golds, a silver and a bronze in
London.
Franklin grabbed the lead right
away in the backstroke, Rebecca
Soni stretched out the advantage


in the breast, Dana Vollmer
cruised through the fly and
Schmitt finished it off in the free,
pulling away for a time of 3:52.05,
beating the mark of 3:52.19 set
by China at the 2009 world
championships.
It was the second world record of
the night and ninth of the Olympic
meet, proving that fast times are
still possible even without banned
high-tech bodysuits.


So far, London doping cases are good news


No athlete caught

cheating during

actual competition

Associated Press

LONDON -At the midway point
of the London Games, no competi-
tor has been caught doping at their
event. At least, not yet.
Still, every day a different name
of a suspected offender has
emerged because of an extensive
pre-Olympics testing program to
target and identify the drugs cheats
before they get near a venue.
On Saturday, a Colombian runner,
a Brazilian rower and a Moldovan
hammer thrower all made minor
headlines and all were not al-
lowed to start their event
Olympic officials think each case
at this stage is a success in keeping
the London Games clean. From
here on, every positive doping re-
sult from an in-competition sample
becomes more problematic for the
Olympic image.
Disqualifications follow, often
requiring medals to be stripped
and results redrawn. Then comes
the possibility of lengthy legal ac-


Associated Press
The IOC confirmed Saturday that Russian track cyclist Victoria Baranova,
right, was expelled from the 2012 Summer Olympics after failing a pre-com-
petiton test. Her positive test on testosterone of exogenous origin had been
confirmed by cycling's governing body.


tion as the field of play switches to
the Court of Arbitration for Sport
in the International Olympic Com-
mittee's home city of Lausanne,
Switzerland.
For now, the IOC's legal slate is
clean.
"We have shown that we take
swift action, that cheats are caught
and ejected from these games,"
spokesman Mark Adams said. "I


would say at this stage, it's a pretty
low number."
Four is low. That's the number of
actual cases requiring IOC sanc-
tions from testing since the athletes
village officially opened July 16.
They are Colombian 18-year-old
400-meter runner Diego
Palomeque (substance not identi-
fied); Russian track cyclist Victoria
Baranova (testosterone); gymnast


Luiza Galiulina of Uzbekistan
furosemidee); and Albanian
weightlifter Hysen Pulaku
(stanozolol).
The week the games opened, the
World Anti-Doping Agency said 107
athletes were removed from the
London picture by suspensions im-
posed in the first six months this
year.
Then add a few more July cases,
involving new positive tests and old
appeals resolved, which removed
genuine medal contenders from the
track and field program: in men's
discus, hammer and high jump, and
the women's 1,500 meters.
Those athletes are implicated in
taking stanozolol better known
as the steroid Ben Johnson took at
the 1988 Seoul Olympics the clas-
sic blood-booster EPO and, in the
case of Hungarian former discus
silver medalist Zoltan Kovago, flat
out refusing to cooperate with test-
ing teams.
The numbers suggest WADA and
the International Association of
Athletics Federations got their long-
term strategy right.
Every athlete at the 2011 World
Championships in Daegu, South
Korea, had to provide a blood sam-
ple to help WADA laboratories set
baseline levels for future monitor-
ing and targeted follow-up tests.


Olympic BRIEFS


Jamaican Fraser-Pryce edges
Jeter for Olympic gold
LONDON Of course the gold
medal stays in Jamaica. Shelly-Ann
Fraser-Pryce wouldn't have it any
other way.
Her golden necklace banging against
her chin, the bubbly Jamaican made it
back-to-back Olympic titles in the
women's 100 meters Saturday night,
closing ground over the last 20 meters
and leaning at the line to win in 10.75
seconds and edge American Carmelita
Jeter by .03 seconds.
Fraser-Pryce became the first woman
to repeat in the 100 since Gail Devers of
the U.S. did it in 1992 and 1996.
Veronica Campbell-Brown finished
third for her second career 100-meter
bronze. Jamaica fell out of the running


for a repeat of its sweep in Beijing after
2008 silver medalist Kerron Stewart
failed to make it through the semifinals.
Gray's shooting garners gold,
world records for USA
Jamie Lynn Gray of the United States
won the gold medal in women's 50-meter
three-position rifle shooting, setting two
Olympic records along the way.
The American's final score was
691.9 points, topping the previous total
Olympic mark of 690.3 set by China's
Du Li at the 2008 Beijing Games. She
clinched gold on her final shot with a
10.8 -just 0.1 off what would have
been perfect.
May-Treanor, Walsh win in
Olympic beach volleyball
LONDON Two-time gold medalists


Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-
Treanor beat the Netherlands in straight
sets on Saturday night to advance to the
quarterfinals of the Olympic beach vol-
leyball tournament.
The Americans beat Marleen van
lersel and Sanne Keizer 21-13, 21-12.
Walsh Jennings and May-Treanor
won gold medals in Athens and Beijing
without losing a set. That streak was
snapped on Wednesday in the final of
the round-robin.
In all, the two-time defending champi-
ons have won 18 consecutive Olympic
matches.
Richards-Ross cruises
into Olympic 400 final
LONDON -American runner Sanya
Richards-Ross walked through
Olympic Stadium carrying her gold-


bottomed cleats.
If things go as planned, she'll be
doing the same with a gold medal.
Richards-Ross won her semifinal heat
in the women's 400 meters Saturday
night, setting a blistering pace before
coasting to a spot in the final.
It sure looked like she was showing
off. If so, who could blame her? She had
her husband, Jacksonville Jaguars cor-
nerback Aaron Ross, on hand for his
first Olympics.
Ross left training camp Friday and
arrived the following day, just in time to
spend some time with Richards-Ross
before her latest race. He had to be im-
pressed. After all, Richards-Ross was
way out front after they turned for
home.
-From wire reports


Saturday's
MEDALISTS
ATHLETICS
Men
Long Jump
GOLD-Greg Rutherford, Britain.
SILVER-MitchellWatt, Australia.
BRONZE-Will Claye, Phoenix.
20Km Road Walk
GOLD-Chen Ding, China.
SILVER-Erick Barrondo, Guatemala.
BRONZE-Wang Zhen, China.
10000
GOLD-Mohamed Farah, Britain.
SILVER-Galen Rupp, Portland, Ore.
BRONZE-Tariku Bekele, Ethiopia.
Women
100
GOLD-Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Jamaica.
SILVER-Carmelita Jeter, Gardena, Calif.
BRONZE-Veronica Campbell-Brown, Ja-
maica.
Discus
GOLD-Sandra Perkovic, Croatia.
SILVER-Darya Pishchalnikova, Russia.
BRONZE-Li Yanfeng, China.
Heptathlon
GOLD-Jessica Ennis, Britain.
SILVER-Lilli Schwarzkopf, Germany
BRONZE-Tatyana Chernova, Russia.
BADMINTON
Women
Singles
GOLD-Li Xuerui, China.
SILVER-Wang Yihan, China.
BRONZE-Saina Nehwal, India.
Doubles
GOLD-China 2 (ZhaoYunlei, Tian Qing).
SILVER-Japan (Mizuki Fujii, Reika Kaki-
wa).
BRONZE-Russia (Nina Vislova, Valeria
Sorokina).
CYCLING TRACK
Women
Team Pursuit
GOLD-Britain (Dani King, Joanna Rowsell,
Laura Trott).
SILVER-United States (Dotsie Bausch,
Louisville, Ky, Sarah Hammer, Temecula,
Calif., Lauren Tamayo, Barto, Pa.).
BRONZE-Canada (Gillian Carleton, Jas-
min Glaesser, Tara Whitten).
FENCING
Women
Team Epee
GOLD-China (Li Na, Luo Xiaojuan, Sun
Yujie, Xu Anqi).
SILVER-South Korea (Choi Injeong, Jung
Hyojung, Shin A Lam, Choi Eunsook).
BRONZE-United States (Courtney Hurley
San Antonio, Maya Lawrence, Teaneck, N.J.,
Susie Scanlan, St. Paul, Minn., Kelley Hurley).
ROWING
Men
Fours
GOLD-Britain (Alex Gregory, Pete Reed,
Tom James, Andrew Triggs Hodge).
SILVER-Australia (William Lockwood,
James Chapman, Drew Ginn, Joshua Dunk-
ley-Smith).
BRONZE-United States (Glenn Ochal,
Philadelphia, Henrik Rummel, Pittsford, N.Y,
Charles Cole, New Canaan, Conn., Scott
Gault, Piedmont, Calif.).
Lightweight Double Sculls
GOLD-Denmark (Mads Rasmussen, Ras-
mus Quist).
SILVER-Britain (Zac Purchase, Mark
Hunter).
BRONZE-New Zealand (Storm Uru, Peter
Taylor).
Women
Single Sculls
GOLD-Miroslava Knapkova, Czech Re-
public.
SILVER-Fie Udby Erichsen, Denmark.
BRONZE-Kim Crow, Australia.
Lightweight Double Sculls
GOLD-Britain (Katherine Copeland, So-
phie Hosking).
SILVER-China (Xu Dongxiang, Huang
Wenyi).
BRONZE-Greece (Christina Giazitzidou,
Alexandra Tsiavou).
SHOOTING
Women
50m Rifle 3 Positions
GOLD-Jamie Lynn Gray, Lebanon, Pa.
SILVER-Ivana Maksimovic, Serbia.
BRONZE-Adela Sykorova, Czech Repub-
lic.
Trap
GOLD-Jessica Rossi, Italy
SILVER-Zuzana Stefecekova, Slovakia.
BRONZE-Delphine Reau, France.
SWIMMING
Men
1500 Freestyle
GOLD-Sun Yang, China.
SILVER-Ryan Cochrane, Canada.
BRONZE-Oussama Mellouli, Tunisia.
4 x 100 Medley Relay
GOLD-United States (Matthew Grevers,
Lake Forest, Ill., Brendan Hansen, Havertown,
Pa., Michael Phelps, Baltimore, Nathan Adrian,
Bremerton, Wash., Nick Thoman, Cincinnati,
Eric Shanteau, Lilburn, Ga., Tyler Mcgill,
Champaign, Ill., Cullen Jones, Bronx, N.Y).
SILVER-Japan (Ryosuke Irie, Kosuke Ki-
tajima, Takeshi Matsuda, Takuro Fujii).
BRONZE-Australia (Hayden Stoeckel,
Christian Sprenger, MattTargett, James Mag-
nussen, Brenton Rickard, Tommaso D'or-
sogna).
Women
50 Freestyle
GOLD-Ranomi Kromowidjojo, Nether-
lands.
SILVER-Aliaksandra Herasimenia, Be-
larus.
BRONZE-Marleen Veldhuis, Netherlands.
4 x 100 Medley Relay
GOLD-United States (Missy Franklin, Cen-
tennial, Colo., Rebecca Soni, Plainsboro, N.J.,
Dana Vollmer, Granbury, Texas, Allison
Schmitt, Canton, Mich., Rachel Bootsma, Eden
Prairie, Minn., Breeja Larson, Mesa, Ariz.,
Claire Donahue, Lenoir City, Tenn., Jessica
Hardy, Long Beach, Calif.).
SILVER--Australia (Emily Seebohm, Leisel
Jones, Alicia Coutts, Melanie Schlanger, Brit-
tany Elmslie).
BRONZE-Japan (Aya Terakawa, Satomi
Suzuki, Yuka Kato, Haruka Ueda).
TENNIS
Men
Doubles
GOLD--United States (Mike Bryan, Ca-
marillo, Calif., Bob Bryan, Camarillo, Calif.).
SILVER-France (Michael Llodra, Jo-Wil-
friedTsonga).
BRONZE-France 2 (Julien Benneteau,
Richard Gasquet).


Women
Singles
GOLD-SerenaWilliams, Palm Beach Gar-
dens, Fla.
SILVER-Maria Sharapova, Russia.
BRONZE-Victoria Azarenka, Belarus.
TRAMPOLINE
Women
GOLD-Rosannagh Maclennan, Canada.
SILVER-Huang Shanshan, China.
BRONZE-HeWenna, China.
TRIATHLON
Women
GOLD-Nicola Spirig, Switzerland.
SILVER-Lisa Norden, Sweden.
BRONZE-Erin Densham, Australia.
WEIGHTLIFTING
Men
94Kg
GOLD-Ilya Ilyin, Kazakhstan.
SILVER-Alexandr Ivanov, Russia.
BRONZE-Anatoli Ciricu, Moldova.






B4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012



Bridgestone Invite
Saturday
At Firestone Country Club (South Course)
Purse: $8.5 million
Yardage: 7,400, Par: 70
Third Round
Jim Furyk 63-66-70 -199 -11
Louis Oosthuizen 67-65-68 -200 -10
Keegan Bradley 67-69-67-203 -7
Rory Mcllroy 70-67-67-204 -6
Steve Stricker 68-68-68 -204 -6
Bo Van Pelt 70-69-66 -205 -5
Justin Rose 70-69-66--205 -5
JohnSenden 66-70-69-205 -5
Luke Donald 66-69-71 -206 -4
Jason Dufner 67-66-73-206 -4
Graeme McDowell 70-67-70-207 -3
Simon Dyson 66-71-70-207 -3
Branden Grace 72-70-66--208 -2
Martin Laird 68-72-68-208 -2
Bill Haas 67-71-70-208 -2
Carl Pettersson 67-70-71 -208 -2
Lee Slattery 65-71-72 -208 -2
K.T. Kim 67-67-74 -208 -2
David Toms 68-67-73 -208 -2
Rafael Cabrera Bello 66-65-77--208 -2
ZachJohnson 68-73-68-209 -1
Scott Piercy 69-70-70-209 -1
Geoff Ogilvy 67-70-72 -209 -1
K.J. Choi 71-72-67 210 E
Tiger Woods 70-72-68 210 E
Kyle Stanley 69-73-68 -210 E
Matt Kuchar 70-70-70 -210 E
Sergio Garcia 67-72-71-210 E
Aaron Baddeley 73-66-71 -210 E
Dustin Johnson 69-68-73 -210 E
Brandt Snedeker 71-70-70 -211 +1
Bubba Watson 66-73-72-211 +1
NickWatney 69-70-72--211 +1
lan Poulter 74-69-69-212 +2
Marc Leishman 70-72-70--212 +2
Adam Scott 71-70-71 -212 +2
Martin Kaymer 68-72-72-212 +2
Retief Goosen 67-72-73--212 +2
Johnson Wagner 71-74-68--213 +3
Francesco Molinari 74-70-69-213 +3
Ryo Ishikawa 71-72-70--213 +3
Alvaro Quiros 70-71-72-213 +3
Phil Mickelson 71-69-73-213 +3
Ernie Els 73-73-68--214 +4
G. Fernandez-Castano 71-73-70--214 +4
Paul Lawrie 72-68-74-214 +4
YE.Yang 69-71-74--214 +4
Sang-Moon Bae 72-66-76--214 +4
Hunter Mahan 73-73-69--215 +5
Jonathan Byrd 73-73-69-215 +5
Jason Day 75-70-70--215 +5
Peter Hanson 73-71-71 -215 +5
Bernd Wiesberger 70-71-74-215 +5
Nicolas Colsaerts 73-68-74--215 +5
Thomas Bjorn 71-70-74-215 +5
Charl Schwartzel 69-75-72-216 +6
MarkWilson 72-71-73-216 +6
Jamie Donaldson 68-73-75--216 +6
Marcel Siem 76-71-70-217 +7
Greg Chalmers 71-75-71 -217 +7
Toshinori Muto 73-71-73-217 +7
FredrikJacobson 71-73-73-217 +7
Jeev Milkha Singh 73-74-71 -218 +8
Yoshinori Fujimoto 73-74-71 -218 +8
Rickie Fowler 70-80-69-219 +9
DannyWillett 72-74-73--219 +9
Ted Potter, Jr 72-72-75 -219 +9
Kevin Na 72-76-72-220 +10
Joost Luiten 72-71-77-220 +10
Lee Westwood 68-72-81 -221 +11
Robert Rock 76-72-74--222 +12
Michael Hoey 78-75-70--223 +13
Robert Allenby 73-79-72-224 +14
Oliver Bekker 77-72-76- 225 +15
Tom Lewis 78-76-74-228 +18
Ben Crane 66-75-WD
ToruTaniguchi 72-78-WD
3M Championship
Saturday
At TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn.
Purse: $1.75 million
Yardage: 7,114, Par: 72
Second Round
David Peoples 68-62-130 -14
Eduardo Romero 68-65-133 -11
Joe Daley 67-67-134 -10
Olin Browne 68-67-135 -9
Joel Edwards 66-69-135 -9
Lance Ten Broeck 71-65-136 -8
Tom Kite 69-67-136 -8
Bernhard Langer 67-69-136 -8
Mark McNulty 66-70-136 -8
Peter Senior 65-71-136 -8
Chien Soon Lu 65-71 -136 -8
Steve Pate 65-71 -136 -8
Loren Roberts 71-66-137 -7
Kenny Perry 69-68-137 -7
David Frost 67-70 -137 -7
Wayne Levi 71-67-138 -6
Gary Hallberg 70-68-138 -6
MarkWiebe 69-69-138 -6
Jeff Sluman 69-69-138 -6
Craig Stadler 69-69-138 -6
Tom Lehman 68-70-138 -6
Jeff Hart 67-71 -138 -6
Gil Morgan 65-73-138 -6
Larry Nelson 72-67-139 -5
Mark Calcavecchia 71-68-139 -5
Don Berry 70-69-139 -5
Steve Lowery 70-69 -139 -5
Mark O'Meara 68-71-139 -5
JoeySindelar 68-71--139 -5
D.A.Weibring 67-72-139 -5
Willie Wood 67-72-139 -5
JimThorpe 72-68--140 -4
Bruce Vaughan 70-70- 140 -4
Jim Rutledge 70-70--140 -4
Fred Funk 69-71 -140 -4
Tommy Armour III 73-68--141 -3
Dave Tentis 72-69 141 -3
John Huston 71-70 -141 -3
Andrew Magee 71-70--141 -3
Bill Glasson 70-71 -141 -3
Blaine McCallister 70-71 -141 -3
Tom Jenkins 66-75-141 -3
BobTway 77-65 142 -2
Bob Gilder 73-69-142 -2
Brad Faxon 73-69 -142 -2
Larry Mize 73-69-142 -2
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 73-69- 142 -2
David Eger 72-70--142 -2
Brad Bryant 71-71-142 -2
Jay Haas 71-71 -142 -2
MikeGoodes 70-72-142 -2
Dan Forsman 69-73-142 -2
John Jacobs 69-73-142 -2
Chip Beck 71-72--143 -1
Ted Schulz 70-73--143 -1
Tom Purtzer 70-73-143 -1
Nick Price 76-68 -144 E


Sonny Skinner 73-71 -144 E
Kirk Triplett 72-72 -144 E
Rod Spittle 72-72 -144 E
Scott Simpson 72-72 -144 E
PH. Horgan lll 70-74 -144 E
Hal Sutton 70-74 -144 E
Jim Carter 75-70-145 +1
Jay Don Blake 74-71 -145 +1
Vicente Fernandez 75-70-145 +1
Kirk Hanefeld 72-73-145 +1
Mark Brooks 72-73-145 +1
Dana Quigley 73-73-146 +2
Sandy Lyle 72-74- 146 +2
Bobby Wadkins 70-76-146 +2
Fuzzy Zoeller 74-73-147 +3
John Harris 74-74-148 +4
Hale Irwin 74-74-148 +4
Keith Fergus 75-74-149 +5
Bobby Clampett 78-72-150 +6
Jeff Freeman 75-75-150 +6
Jay Sigel 77-73 -150 +6
Bob Niger 73-78-151 +7
Graham Marsh 80-73-153 +9
Mike McCullough 75-80-155 +11


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= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
2-5-2
*-'" CASH 3 (late)
6-0-9

PLAY 4 (early)
3-7-7-0
PLAY 4 (late)
0-5-5-4

FANTASY 5
d LOtty 5-9-15-30-31

POWERBALL LOTTERY
19 30 48 53 55 2-26-36-37-40-43
POWER BALL XTRA
18 3


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar: Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio race
1 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Pennsylvania 400 race
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'ReillyAuto Parts Northwest
Nationals (Same-day Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Pennsylvania 400 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Chicago
White Sox
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers
8 p.m. (ESPN) Milwaukee Brewers at St. Louis Cardinals
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN2) PBA Summer Shootout (Taped)
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational
Final Round
2 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational -
Final Round
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Chick Fil-A-Bowl Challenge (Taped)
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Web.com Cox Classic Final
Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: 3M Championship Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Reno-Tahoe Open Final
Round
OLYMPICS
6 a.m. (NBC) Track and field; beach volleyball; tennis;
volleyball; water polo; basketball; cycling
7 a.m. (MSNBC) Water polo; tennis; beach volleyball;
wrestling; field hockey; table tennis; handball
8:30 a.m. (CNBC) Boxing: women's elimination bouts
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tennis; beach volleyball; weightlifting;
volleyball; cycling; badminton
3:30 p.m. (CNBC) Boxing: men's quarterfinals
7 p.m. (NBC) Gymnastics: men's floor exercise final; track
and field; diving; beach volleyball (Same-day Tape)
12:35 a.m. (NBC) Track and field: finals; badminton (Same-
day Tape)
4 a.m. (NBCSPT) Basketball; soccer:; boxing; field hockey;
volleyball; weightlifting; shooting
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR World Championship -
Part 1 (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) Toluca vs. Leon
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) FC Dallas at Portland Timbers
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders
TENNIS
4 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: Citi Open final
VOLLEYBALL
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Beach Volleyball (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Sprint Cup
Penn. 400 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (42)J. Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 176.043 mph.
2. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 175.795.
3. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 175.627.
4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 175.439.
5. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 175.432.
6. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 175.339.
7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 175.169.
8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 175.131.
9. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 175.097.
10.(48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 175.067.
11. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 175.036.
12.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.965.
13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 174.805.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 174.795.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 174.618.
16. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 174.561.
17. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 174.432.
18.(55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 174.419.
19. (15)Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 174.314.
20. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 174.277.
21.(29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 174.213.
22.(83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 174.162.
23. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 173.92.
24. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 173.571.
25. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 173.524.
26.(38) David Gilliland, Ford, 173.41.
27. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 173.3.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 173.197.
29. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 172.864.
30. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 172.619.
31. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 172.371.
32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 172.038.
33. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 171.916.
34. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 171.913.
35. (37) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, 171.808.
36. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 171.638.
37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 171.246.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 170.804.
39. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 170.658.
40. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 170.581.
41. (32) Jason White, Ford, owner points.
42. (36) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, owner points.
43. (98) Mike Skinner, Ford, 170.516.
Failed to Qualify
44. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 170.487.


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX -Traded RHP Garrett
Mock to Houston for future considerations.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Traded RHP Chris
Devenski to Houston. Agreed to terms with OF
Dewayne Wise on a minor league contract.


TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated RHP
Andrew Carpenter for assignment. Optioned
LHP Brett Cecil to Las Vegas (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Released
1B Lyle Overbay.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Assigned
LHP Michael Antoini to Albuquerque (PCL).
Optioned RHP Stephen Fife to Albuquerque
(PCL).
MIAMI MARLINS Optioned RHP Evan
Reed and LHP Brad Hand to New Orleans
(PCL). Placed OF Emilio Bonifacio on the 15-
day DL. Recalled INF Nick Green from New Or-
leans (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES- Placed C Car-
los Ruiz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 3.
Recalled 1 B Hector Luna from Lehigh Valley (IL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned C
Sandy Leon to Syracuse (IL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS-SignedS Jim Leonhard.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Agreed to terms with
P Brandon Fields on a four-year contract ex-
tension.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Announced
the retirement of G Robert Gallery.



Twins 6, Red Sox 4
Minnesota Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Spancf 4 1 0 0 Kalishcf 2 1 0 0
Revererf 5 1 3 0 Ciriacoph 1 1 1 1
Mauerlb 4 1 1 3 Ellsurycf 0 0 0 0
Morneadh 4 02 1 Crwfrdlf 4 01 1
Doumitc 4 01 0 Pedroia2b 3 1 0 0
Mstrnnlf 3 01 0 AdGnzllb 4 01 0
Wlngh ph-lf 1 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 4 0 1 1
Dozierss 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch dh 3 0 1 0
ACasill2b 3 1 1 0 Avilesss 4 1 1 1
JCarrll3b 4 22 1 Shppchc 3 0 0 0
Lvrnwyph 1 0 0 0
Punto 3b 3 0 0 0
Mdlrksph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 6125 Totals 334 6 4
Minnesota 000 010 014 6
Boston 110 000 020 4
E-Shoppach (4), Buchholz 2 (3). DP-Boston
2. LOB-Minnesota 7, Boston 5. 2B-Mas-
troianni (3), A.Casilla (12), C.Crawford (2). HR-
Mauer (7), Ciriaco (1), Aviles (11). SB-Revere
(26), Pedroia (7). SF-Morneau.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
DeVries
Perkins
AI.Burnett W,4-3
Burton S,5-7
Boston
Buchholz
A.Miller
Aceves L,2-7
Breslow


7 4 2
2-3 1 2
1-3 1 0
1 0 0

7 7 1
0 1 1
12-34 4
1-3 0 0
130 0


Angels 6, White Sox 5,
10 innings
Los Angeles Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Trout cf 4 2 2 0 De Aza cf 5 2 2 0
Mlztursss 5 1 1 0 Youkils3b 3 2 2 3
Pujolslb 5 1 2 2 A.Dunndh 4 0 0 0
Trumorf 4 1 0 1 Konerklb 4 0 0 1
TrHntr rf 0 0 0 0 Rios rf 5 0 1 0
KMorls dh 4 0 2 0 Przyns c 5 1 1 1
Callasp3b 4 1 2 0 Viciedolf 4 00 0
HKndrc2b 4 02 2 AIRmrzss 4 0 1 0
V.Wellslf 4 00 0 Bckhm2b 4 0 0 0
lannettc 4 000
Totals 38 6115 Totals 385 7 5
L.Angeles 310 000 100 1 6
Chicago 101 001 200 0 5
E-Callaspo (8). DP-Chicago 2. LOB-Los
Angeles 7, Chicago 7. 2B-M.lzturis (11),
Callaspo (12), De Aza (23). HR-Pujols (24),
Youkilis 2 (12), Pierzynski (20). SB-Pujols (8).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
E.Santana
Hawkins BS,2-3
Jepsen W,2-1
Frieri S,13-14
Chicago
Floyd
N.Jones
Myers
Crain
Thornton L,4-7


2 1 3
2 0 2
0 1 0
0 0 1
001


HBP-by E.Santana (Konerko, Youkilis), by
Floyd (Trout, Trumbo). WP-Floyd.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Trout, Los Angeles, .349; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .323; Mauer, Minnesota, .320;
Rios, Chicago, .317; AJackson, Detroit, .316;
Ortiz, Boston, .316; Konerko, Chicago, .315.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 86; Kinsler,
Texas, 78; Granderson, New York, 74; MiCabr-
era, Detroit, 70; De Aza, Chicago, 69; AdJones,
Baltimore, 69; Cano, NewYork, 68.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 90; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 88; Willingham, Minnesota, 80; Fielder, De-
troit, 77; Pujols, Los Angeles, 76; ADunn,
Chicago, 74; Encarnacion, Toronto, 72; Trumbo,
Los Angeles, 72.
HITS-Jeter, NewYork, 138; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 137; Cano, NewYork, 130; Rios, Chicago,
127; AdGonzalez, Boston, 125; AGordon,
Kansas City 125; AdJones, Baltimore, 125.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 37;
Choo, Cleveland, 33; Cano, New York, 31;
Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Kinsler, Texas, 30; Pu-
jols, Los Angeles, 30; AdGonzalez, Boston, 29.
HOME RUNS-ADunn, Chicago, 31;
Granderson, NewYork, 29; Hamilton, Texas, 29;
Encarnacion, Toronto, 28; Trumbo, Los Ange-
les, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 27.
PITCHING-Weaver, Los Angeles, 14-1;
Price, Tampa Bay 14-4; MHarrison, Texas, 13-
6; Sale, Chicago, 12-3; Vargas, Seattle, 12-7;
Sabathia, NewYork, 11-3; Darvish, Texas, 11-7;
Verlander, Detroit, 11-7; PHughes, New York,
11-8.
STRIKEOUTS-FHernandez, Seattle, 159;
Verlander, Detroit, 152; Scherzer, Detroit, 151;
Darvish, Texas, 145; Shields, Tampa Bay 145;
Price, Tampa Bay 141; Peavy, Chicago, 134.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 32; JiJohnson,
Baltimore, 31; CPerez, Cleveland, 29; RSoriano,
New York, 26; Broxton, Kansas City 23; Aceves,
Boston, 22; Valverde, Detroit, 21; Nathan,
Texas, 21.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .369;
MeCabrera, San Francisco, .351; Votto, Cincin-
nati, .342; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .335; DWright,
New York, .331; Posey, San Francisco, .325;
CGonzalez, Colorado, .324.
RUNS-Bourn, Atlanta, 72; Braun, Milwau-
kee, 72; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 72; MeCabr-
era, San Francisco, 71; CGonzalez, Colorado,
71; Holliday, St. Louis, 71; JUpton, Arizona, 70.
RBI-Beltran, St. Louis, 77; Holliday St.
Louis, 76; Braun, Milwaukee, 74; Kubel, Ari-
zona, 73; CGonzalez, Colorado, 72; DWright,
New York, 72; LaRoche, Washington, 69.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 146; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 141; Bourn, Atlanta, 129;
Holliday, St. Louis, 128; DWright, New York, 126;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 125; Reyes, Miami, 125.
DOUBLES-ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 36;
Votto, Cincinnati, 36; DanMurphy, New York,
32; DWright, NewYork, 32; Cuddyer, Colorado,
30; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Alonso, San
Diego, 29.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 29; Bel-
tran, St. Louis, 25; Kubel, Arizona, 23; LaRoche,
Washington, 23; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 22;
PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 21; Bruce, Cincinnati, 21;
Holliday St. Louis, 21.
PITCHING-Dickey NewYork, 14-3; Cueto,
Cincinnati, 14-5; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 13-3;
Lynn, St. Louis, 13-4; GGonzalez, Washington,
13-6; Hanson, Atlanta, 12-5; Miley, Arizona,
12-6.
STRIKEOUTS-Dickey, New York, 156;
Strasburg, Washington, 154; Hamels, Philadel-
phia, 147; GGonzalez, Washington, 147; Ker-
shaw, Los Angeles, 143; Lincecum, San
Francisco, 136; MCain, San Francisco, 135.
SAVES-Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 31; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 31; Chapman, Cincinnati, 25; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 24; SCasilla, San Francisco, 24;
Motte, St. Louis, 23; Clippard, Washington, 22.



GOLDEN
Continued from Page B1

winners from the baseline,
taking a big swing with al-
most every stroke despite
the windy conditions on
Centre Court.
Williams said the tourna-
ment was the best she has
played from start to finish.
"I was so focused here,"



GREAT
Continued from Page B1

maybe two, but there's really
no point
"I told myself I never want
to swim when I'm 30," Phelps
said. "No offense to those
people who are 30, but that
was something I always said
to myself, and that would be
in three years. I just don't
want to swim for those three
years."
He hugged his longtime
coach, Bob Bowman, who
was teary eyed as he whis-
pered three words that said it
all, "I love you." Their part-
nership was formed 16 years
ago, when Bowman took a
gangly, hyperactive kid with
an extraordinary gift and
helped turn him into a swim-
mer the likes of which the
world had never seen.
"Bob and I have somehow
managed to do every single
thing," Phelps said. "If you


Associated Press
Jim Furyk chips to the 16th green during the third round of
the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament Saturday at
Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Furyk is 11-under par
after the third round.



Furyk holds on



to tenuous lead


Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio -A steady
diet of pars kept Jim Furyk
in the lead Saturday in the
Bridgestone Invitational,
but not by much.
Furyk made his only
birdie on the par-5 second
hole and had to rely on a
couple of strong par saves
on the back nine at Fire-
stone for an even-par 70, giv-
ing him a one-shot lead over
Louis Oosthuizen going into
the final round of this World
Golf Championship.
Furyk began the week
with a 63, and he's not sure
he didn't hit the ball better
in the third round. Under
three days of sun-baked
conditions, the greens lost
their moisture and enough
wind arrived to make play-
ers think more than they
would prefer.
Oosthuizen had to scram-
ble for pars at the start be-
fore he settled into his
round of 68.
Keegan Bradley, who can
move into the top eight in
the Ryder Cup standings
with a runner-up finish, had
a 67 and was four shots be-
hind. He will be in the final
group Sunday, when the tee
times are pushed forward to
avoid thunderstorms fore-
cast throughout the day
Rory McIlroy, with an out-
side chance of returning to
No. 1 in the world if he were
to win, had a 67 and joined
Steve Stricker (68) at 6-
under 204, five shots behind.
Top-ranked Luke Donald
also was chipping away, as
he often does, until he hit a


tree on the last for a bogey
for a 71, falling seven shots
back.
Tiger Woods broke par for
the first time all week,
though his 68 left him 11
shots behind on a Firestone
course where he has won
seven times.
Reno-Tahoe Open
RENO, Nev. J.J. Henry
had an eagle for the third
straight day and scored 14
points to take the third-round
lead in the Reno-Tahoe Open.
John Daly and Justin Leonard
were among more than a dozen
players within striking distance
in the PGA Tour's first modified
Stableford scoring system event
since 2006.
Henry had 36 points overall,
three more than second-round
leaderAlexandre Rocha in the
format that awards eight points
for double eagle, five for eagle,
two for birdie and none for par.
Players are docked a point for
bogey and three points for any-
thing worse.
3M Championship
BLAINE, Minn. David
Peoples matched his career
best with a 10-under 62 on Sat-
urday to take a three-stroke
lead in the Champions Tour's
3M Championship.
Peoples, who twice shot 62
on the PGA Tour, had a 14-
under 130 total. He got into the
field Tuesday when Russ
Cochran withdrew because of a
back injury.
The 52-year-old Peoples
made six straight birdies at the
TPC Twin Cities to get to 10
under through seven holes.


Associated Press

NEWTON, Iowa Elliott
Sadler rebounded from the
disappointment of his
jumped-restart penalty last
week in Indianapolis to win
the NASCAR Nationwide
Race at Iowa Speedway on
Saturday night.
Sadler denied Ricky

she said. "I remember I was
serving and I was thinking:
'Serena, this is your best
chance to win a gold medal.
You're at Wimbledon, you're
on grass, you play great on
grass, pull it together, just
win this.' And that's what I
thought about."
The career Golden Slam
was first achieved by Steffi
Graf, who did it when she
won at the Olympics in 1988
after sweeping all four

can say that about your ca-
reer, there's no need to move
forward. Time for other
things."
Bouncing back from a dis-
appointing first race in Lon-
don, a fourth-place finish in
the 400 individual medley,
Phelps wound up with more
medals than any other swim-
mer at the games: four golds
and two silvers.
Sounds familiar
"Honestly, the first race
kind of took the pressure off,"
Bowman said. "If it's not
going to go too well, we should
at least have fun while we're
here. That helped us relax a
little bit, then he started
swimming well in the relays
and he picked it up again."
Grevers had the Americans
in front on the opening back-
stroke leg, but Kosuke Kita-
jima putJapan slightly ahead
going against Hansen in the
breaststroke. Not to worry,
not with Phelps going next
He surged through the
water in the fly, handing off a


Stenhouse Jr a fourth
straight victory at Iowa
Speedway, and increased
his lead in the series stand-
ings to 18 points over Austin
Dillon.
Sadler won the pole with
a track-record qualifying
speed of 135.141 mph and
was near or at the front of
the pack the entire race.

major titles.
"Growing up watching
her, I always liked her,"
Williams said. "Having a
chance to be mentioned in
the same name I always
thought, 'OK, one person I'll
never be mentioned in the
same name is Steffi Graf.
She's done everything."'
Williams can add the gold
medal to her 14 Grand Slam
singles championships, the
most of any active woman.

lead of about a quarter of a
second to Adrian for the
freesytle anchor The Ameri-
cans won going away in 3
minutes, 29.35 seconds, just
offtheir own Olympic record
from Beijing. Japan held on
for silver in 3:31.26, with Aus-
tralia taking the bronze in
3:31.68.
The U.S. men had never
lost the medley relay at the
Olympics, and they weren't
about to now on the final
night of swimming at the
Olympic Aquatics Centre, on
the final night for such a mo-
mentous athlete.
How momentous? The gov-
erning body of swimming,
FINA, broke with Olympic
protocol to present Phelps
with an award recognizing his
entire body of work While a
video montage played on the
board, he made one more vic-
tory lap around the pool, even
stopping off again at the
medal podium he spent so
much time on during the
Olympics.


Sadler snags win



on Nationwide


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL

Orioles 4, Rays 0


Baltimore


Tampa Bay


ab r h bi
Markks rf 3 2 1 1 DJnngs If
Hardy ss 5 02 0 BUpton cf
C.Davisdh 5 0 2 2 Zobrist2b
AdJonscf 4 0 1 0 Kppngrdh
Wietersc 3 0 1 1 C.Penalb
Betemt3b 4 0 1 0 SRdrgzss
Andino 3b 0 0 0 0 Rhyms ph
McLothlf 4 1 2 0 Fuldrf
MrRynllb 3 1 0 0 RRorts3b
Quntnll2b 4 0 0 0 JMolin c
Totals 35 4104 Totals
Baltimore 110 200 000
Tampa Bay 000 000 000


ab r h bi
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
3020
4010
4 0 1 0
3000
3000
1 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
1000
4010
3000
3010
3 0 1 0
320 6 0
4
0


DP-Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Baltimore 8, Tampa
Bay 7. 2B-McLouth (1). SB-Wieters 2 (3),
B.Upton (20). CS-Fuld (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
W.ChenW,10-6 7 5 0 0 1 4
Strop 1 1 0 0 1 1
Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson L,6-7 4 8 4 4 4 4
Howell 2 0 0 0 0 4
Badenhop 2 1 0 0 0 2
W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T-2:49. A-20,612 (34,078).

Mariners 1, Yankees 0


Seattle


NewYork


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ackley2b 4 00 0 Grndrscf 3 0 0 0
MSndrs cf 4 00 0 Jeterss 4 0 0 0
JMontrdh 4 02 0 Cano2b 4 0 1 0
Jasoc 4 1 2 0 Teixeirib 3 0 0 0
Seager3b 4 00 0 Ibanezdh 2 0 0 0
C.Wellslf 4 00 0 Swisherrf 3 0 0 0
Carplb 4 02 1 ErChvz3b 3 0 0 0
Thams rf 4 0 2 0 ISuzuki If 3 0 1 0
Ryan ss 1 00 0 RMartn c 3 0 0 0
Kawsk pr-ssl 0 0 0
Totals 34 18 1 Totals 280 2 0
Seattle 010 000 000 1
NewYork 000 000 000 0
DP-Seattle 1, New York 1. LOB-Seattle 8,
New York 3.2B-Jaso (13), Carp (6), Thames
(8), Cano (31).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHernandezW,10-5 9 2 0 0 2 6
New York
Kuroda L,10-8 61-37 1 1 1 4
Logan 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
D.Robertson 11-30 0 0 0 3
Rapada 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Kuroda (Ryan).


Blue Jays 3, A's 1,
11 innings


Toronto


Oakland
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


YEscorss 5 01 0 JWeeks2b 4 0 1 0
KJhnsn 2b 5 0 0 0 Taylorrf 4 0 0 0
Encrnclb 5 12 0 Crispph-cf 0 00 0
Cooperdh 5 1 1 1 Reddckcf-rf 5 0 0 0
RDavislf 4 1 1 0 Carterlb 2 0 0 0
YGomsc 2 00 0 Cespdspr 0 00 0
Mathisph-c 2 0 0 0 Moss b 1 000
Sierra rf 5 0 3 1 JGomsf 5 0 0 0
Gose cf 4 02 0 Inge 3b 5 1 0 0
Hchvrr3b 3 0 0 0 DNorrsdh 3 0 1 1
Kottarsc 3 0 1 0
Rosalesss 2 0 1 0
Sogard ph-ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 40 3102 Totals 35 1 4 1
Toronto 000 000 001 02 3
Oakland 010 000 000 00 1
E-Kottaras (1). DP-Toronto 2. LOB-Toronto
8, Oakland 8. 2B-Sierra (1), Gose (2), D.Nor-
ris (2). HR-Cooper (3). SB-Encarnacion 2
(12), R.Davis (29). S-Gose.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
R.Romero 7 3 1 1 4 5
Delabar 11-30 0 0 1 3
Janssen 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
J.ChavezW,1-1 1 1 0 0 2 1
OliverS,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Oakland
Griffin 12-31 0 0 0 0
Norberto 32-34 0 0 0 4
NeshekH,1 12-30 0 0 1 1
BalfourH,15 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.CookBS,7-18 1 1 1 1 0 0
BlevinsL,4-1 2 4 2 2 2 3
WP-R.Romero 2.

Rangers 4, Royals 2


Texas


Kansas City


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Kinsler2b 5 1 3 0 AGordn If 4 0 0 1
Andrusss 5 1 2 0 AEscorss 4 0 0 0
Hamltn cf-lf 5 0 1 2 L.Cain rf 4 0 2 0
Beltre3b 4 01 0 Butlerdh 4 0 1 0
N.Cruzrf 4 00 0 Mostks3b 4 0 1 0
MiYongdh 4 1 1 0 S.Perezc 3 1 0 0
Napolic 2 1 0 0 Hosmerlb 4 1 2 0
DvMrplf 3 01 0 Getz2b 4 0 0 1
Gentrycf 0 00 0 JDysoncf 3 0 2 0
Oltlb 2 0 1 2
Morlnd ph-lbOO 0 0
Totals 34 4104 Totals 342 8 2
Texas 002 101 000 4
Kansas City 000 020 000 2
E-Napoli (6), Olt (1), A.Escobar (12). DP-
Texas 2, Kansas City 2. LOB-Texas 9, Kansas
City 6. 2B-Andrus (26). SB-A.Escobar (20),
J.Dyson (21). SF-Olt.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
Feldman W,6-6
Mi.Adams H,19
Ogando S,3-6
Kansas City
W.Smith L,2-4
K.Herrera
Jeffress


72-36 2
1-3 0 0
1 2 0

52-38 4
21-31 0
1 1 0


Tigers 6, Indians 1
Cleveland Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kipnis2b 4 0 0 1 AJcksncf 5 0 1 0
AsCarrss 4 00 0 Berry If 3 01 0
Choorf 4 0 1 0 MiCarr3b 4 00 0
CSantnc 4 00 0 RSantg2b 0 00 0
Brantlycf 3 0 1 0 Fielder b 3 2 2 0
JoLopzdh 3 00 0 Boeschrf 4 1 2 1
Ktchmlb 3 00 0 DYongdh 2 1 0 1
Hannhn 3b 3 00 0 Avilac 3 1 1 0
Carrer f 3 1 2 0 JhPerltss 4 1 2 2
Infante 2b-3b 3 0 1 2
Totals 31 14 1 Totals 31 610 6
Cleveland 000 000 001 1
Detroit 020 301 00x 6
DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Cleveland 3, Detroit 7.
2B--Choo (33), Berry (7), Boesch (20), Jh.Per-
alta (22). 3B-Carrera 2 (2), Boesch (1), Jh.Per-
alta (3). SB-Infante (1). SF-D.Young, Infante.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
JimenezL,8-11 51-37 6 6 4 4
E.Rogers 22-33 0 0 0 3
Detroit
FisterW,6-7 9 4 1 1 0 6
WP-Jimenez, E.Rogers.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 62
Baltimore 56
Tampa Bay 56
Boston 53
Toronto 52


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
44.585 4-6
51 .523 6Y2 1/2 5-5
51 .523 6Y2 1/2 6-4
55 .491 10 5 4-6
55 .486 10/25/2 4-6



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43 .598 - 6-4
46 .570 3 8-2
55 .486 12 8/2 5-5
59 .454 15/212 4-6
59 .449 16 12/2 5-5


Home Away
33-22 29-22 Chicago
25-26 31-25 Detroit
29-26 27-25 Cleveland
27-32 26-23 Minnesota
28-23 24-32 Kan. City


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
48 .547 - 7-3
50 .533 1'2 Y2 5-5
57 .467 8/2 7/2 1-9
60 .439 11Y2102 7-3
62 .415 14 13 3-7


Home Away
28-23 30-25
30-21 27-29
27-25 23-32
23-32 24-28
20-32 24-30


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-131-22 33-21
L-1 31-26 30-20
L-1 26-26 26-29
L-1 27-27 22-32
W-122-30 26-29


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
41 .617- 9-1
46 .566 5/2 6-4
49 .542 8 2/2 7-3
58 .453 17/212 4-6
61 .413 21/216 5-5
72 .333 30/225 2-8


Str Home Away
W-5 36-19 30-22
L-2 33-16 27-30
W-2 31-21 27-28
L-2 30-26 18-32
L-3 27-24 16-37
W-1 25-27 11-45


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43 .594 - 6-4
49 .542 5/2 5-5
50 .537 6 5-5
58 .468 13Y27/2 8-2




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
49 .538 - 3-7
50 .533 /2 3/2 4-6
52 .514 2/2 5/2 6-4
63 .417 13 16 4-6
66 .365 18 21 2-8


Home Away
34-21 29-22
32-24 26-25
30-22 28-28
25-29 26-29


Str Home Away
W-1 32-23 25-26
W-1 30-23 27-27
L-1 30-24 25-28
W-1 23-29 22-34
L-1 21-35 17-31


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starter Jeremy Hellickson gave up four runs in four innings of work Saturday night against the Balti-
more Orioles at Tropicana Feld in St. Petersburg. The Rays lost 4-0.



Orioles blank Rays in 4-0 win


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Wei-Yin
Chen allowed five hits in seven in-
nings, Chris Davis had two RBIs, and
the Baltimore Orioles beat the
Tampa Bay Rays 4-0 on Saturday
Chen (10-6) struck out four and
walked one, improving to 4-1 in his
past six road starts. After Pedro
Strop gave up a single in the eighth,
closer Jim Johnson pitched the ninth
in a non-save situation to complete a
six-hitter.
The Orioles took a 4-0 lead on
Davis' two-run single in the fourth off
Jeremy Hellickson (6-7). Davis has
driven in 12 runs during a nine-game
hitting streak.
Hellickson lasted just four innings,
allowing four runs and eight hits.
The right-hander struck out four and
walked four
Matt Wieters put the Orioles ahead
1-0 on a first-inning RBI single. Bal-
timore had gone 0 for 22 with run-
ners in scoring position in its
previous two games.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Mariners 1, Yankees 0
NEW YORK- Felix Hernandez domi-
nated the Yankees in their own ballpark
again, pitching his third shutout of the
season to lead the Seattle Mariners to a
1-0 win.
Hernandez outpitched Hiroki Kuroda in
a duel of pitchers who haven't lost since
June. Mike Carp hit an RBI single in the
second inning for Seattle, which bounced
back from having its seven-game winning
streak ended Friday night. The Yankees
have lost 10 of 15.
Hernandez (10-5) just didn't give the
Yankees any room. After Robinson Cano
doubled with two outs in the first, Hernan-
dez didn't allow a runner to second.

Rangers 4, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Josh Hamilton
drove in two runs, Scott Feldman won his
sixth straight decision and the Texas
Rangers defeated the Kansas City Roy-
als 4-2.
Feldman (6-6) became the first pitcher
in 29 years to win six consecutive deci-
sions after starting the season 0-6. Doyle
Alexander did it in 1983 with the New
York Yankees and Toronto Blue Jays.
Hamilton, who leads the majors with 90
RBIs, hit an opposite-field single in the
third inning to score lan Kinsler and Elvis
Andrus. Kinsler singled with one out and
went to third on Andrus' double.

Blue Jays 3, A's 1, 11 innings
OAKLAND, Calif. David Cooper hit
a tying homer in the ninth inning and
Edwin Encarnacion scored on catcher
George Kottaras' throwing error in the
11th, lifting the Toronto Blue Jays over the
Oakland Athletics 3-1.
The Blue Jays ended a six-game los-
ing streak a day after they fell to the A's
5-4 in 15 innings.
Cooper hit a solo homer off Ryan
Cook with one out in the ninth. Cook
gave up a tying, three-run shot in the
ninth on Friday night.

Tigers 6, Indians 1
DETROIT Doug Fister retired his
first 17 batters and then settled for a four-
hitter in the Detroit Tigers' 6-1 victory over
the fading Cleveland Indians.
Fister's bid for a perfect game was bro-
ken up with two outs in the sixth inning
when Ezequiel Carrera tripled over Austin
Jackson's head in center field. Fister (6-7)
finished with six strikeouts but lost his
chance at his first career shutout when
Carrera tripled again in the ninth and
scored on a groundout.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Seattle 1, N.Y Yankees 0
Toronto 3, Oakland 1,11 innings
Texas 4, Kansas City 2
Detroit 6, Cleveland 1
Baltimore 4, Tampa Bay 0
L.A. Angels 6, Chicago White Sox 5, 10 innings
Minnesota 6, Boston 4
Sunday's Games
Cleveland (Seddon 0-0) at Detroit (Scherzer 10-6), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 2-2) at N.Y Yankees (FGarcia 4-5), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 4-6) at Boston (FMorales 2-2), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 3-2) at Tampa Bay (Price 14-4),
1:40 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 8-8) at Chicago White Sox (Liriano
3-10), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Holland 7-6) at Kansas City (Hochevar 7-9), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Laffey 2-2) at Oakland (Milone 9-8), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 3, Arizona 0
Washington 10, Miami 7
Houston 3, Atlanta 2
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 1
San Francisco at Colorado, late
N.Y Mets at San Diego, late
Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 13-3) at Cincinnati (Bailey 9-6),
1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 9-9) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 2-6), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 5-8) at Atlanta (Medlen 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 8-10) at Washington (Strasburg 11-5),
1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 5-11) at Colorado (Undecided),
3:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Harvey 1-1) at San Diego (Marquis 4-6), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Germano 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang
7-6), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 0-4) at St. Louis (Lohse 11-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.




Ubaldo Jimenez (8-11) allowed six runs
and seven hits in 5 1-3 innings for Cleve-
land, which has lost eight straight.
Brennan Boesch and Jhonny Peralta
each hit a double and a triple for the
Tigers.
Twins 6, Red Sox 4
BOSTON Joe Mauer hit a three-run
homer with two outs in the top of the ninth
inning, lifting the Minnesota Twins to a
6-4 comeback win over the struggling
Boston Red Sox.
Ben Revere had three singles and ex-
tended his hitting streak to a career-best
18 games for Minnesota, which has won
the first three games of a four-game se-
ries. The Twins have the AL's second-
worst record.
Pedro Ciriaco hit a pinch-hit homer for
the first of his career, breaking an eighth-
inning tie and giving the Red Sox the lead
before Mauer hit a 3-2 pitch into the Green
Monster seats off Alfredo Aceves (2-7).

Angels 6, White Sox 5, 10 inns.
CHICAGO -Albert Pujols homered
again and Howie Kendrick hit a go-ahead
single in the 10th inning that sent the Los
Angeles Angels over the Chicago White
Sox 6-5.
Kevin Youkilis homered twice for the
White Sox and A.J. Pierzynski hit a solo
shot.
Pujols' 24th home run was his sixth in
his last five games. Mike Trout singled
twice and scored two runs.
Kendrick singled with two outs off Matt
Thornton (4-7).
Kevin Jepsen (2-1) worked a scoreless
ninth. Ernesto Frieri pitched the 10th for
his 13th save in 14 chances.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Nationals 10, Marlins 7
WASHINGTON -Adam LaRoche
homered twice, Danny Espinosa hit a
three-run shot in Washington's six-run
eighth inning, and the Nationals beat the
Miami Marlins 10-7.
Combined with Houston's 3-2 win over
Atlanta, the Nationals increased their lead
over the Braves in the NL East to three
games.
Washington trailed 6-4 heading into the
eighth, but the Nationals tied it on run-
scoring singles by Steve Lombardozzi
and Tyler Moore against Mike Dunn (0-1).
Dunn allowed six runs all unearned -
but his error caused the damage. He
dropped Carlos Lee's toss on LaRoche's
ground ball with one out.
Espinosa, who had committed two er-
rors leading to Miami runs, hit his 10th
homer of the season over the bullpen in
left field. Bryce Harper followed with his
10th to make it 10-6.
Ryan Mattheus (4-1) pitched 1 2-3 in-
nings for the win. Tyler Clippard allowed a
run in the ninth.
LaRoche homered twice off Marlins
starter Mark Buehrle, giving LaRoche 23
this season.

Astros 3, Braves 2
ATLANTA- Justin Maxwell had a ca-
reer-high four hits, including two homers,
rookie Lucas Harrell won his first career
start at Turner Field, and the Houston As-
tros snapped a four-game losing streak
with a 3-2 victory over the Atlanta Braves.
The Astros won for just the fourth time
in 33 games, improving to 11-45 on the
road the worst mark in the majors.
Paul Maholm (9-7) lost his Atlanta
debut, three hits, six hits, and two walks.
He struck out eight in seven innings.
The Braves had won two straight and
nine of 10.

Cardinals 6, Brewers 1
ST. LOUIS -Adam Wainwright
pitched a five-hitter and also contributed
at the plate, leading the St. Louis Cardi-
nals to a 6-1 win over the Milwaukee
Brewers.
Wainwright (9-10) moved closer to .500
after starting the season at 0-3. He threw
73 of 98 pitches for strikes, walking none
and fanning seven.
Wainwright also hit an RBI double and
a single, and he scored a run.
Carlos Beltran hit his 25th homer, giv-
ing him an NL-leading 77 RBIs. Jon Jay
also homered for the Cardinals.

Reds 5, Pirates 4
CINCINNATI Scott Rolen tripled
and scored the go-ahead run in the
eighth inning as the Cincinnati Reds won
their fifth straight game, 54 over the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
The Reds have won 15 of 16 and
opened a 5%-game lead over Pittsburgh
in the NL Central.
It was 4-all when Rolen led off the
eighth with a line drive off the right-center
field wall, beating the relay with a head-
first slide into third base. Todd Frazier hit
a chopper that was fielded by pitcher
Jared Hughes (2-1) too late to get Rolen
at the plate.
Phillies 3, Diamondbacks 0
PHILADELPHIA- Roy Halladay gave
up three hits over seven innings and Erik
Kratz homered and drove in a pair, lead-
ing the Philadelphia Phillies to a 3-0 vic-
tory over the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Halladay (5-6) allowed just four runners
and struck out five to earn his first win
since May 17. The two-time Cy Young
Award winner was winless in his previous
five starts, including three after returning
from a two-month stint on the disabled list.


BASEBALL


Houston Atlanta
ab r h bi


Altuve2b 1 00 0
MGnzlz ss 4 0 1 0
BFrncsrf 4 1 1 0
Wrghtp 0 00 0
WLopezp 0 00 0
Wallaclb 4 00 0
Maxwllcf 4 2 4 3
JDMrtnlf 4 0 1 0
MDwns 3b 4 0 2 0
CSnydrc 4 00 0
Harrellp 2 0 0 0
FRdrgzp 0 00 0
Schaferph 1 0 0 0
Bogsvcrf 0 00 0
Totals 32 39 3
Houston 000
Atlanta 000


Bourn cf
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
FFrmn lb
McCnn c
Uggla 2b
Janish ss
JFrncs ph
Mahlm p
Hinske ph
Gearrin p
Avilan p
Durbin p
Totals
200 100
002 000


ab rh bi


DP-Houston 2, Atlanta 3. LOB-Houston 5,
Atlanta 6.2B-J.D.Martinez (13), Heyward (19).
HR-Maxwell 2 (12). SB-Maxwell (3). CS-AI-
tuve (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
HarrellW,9-7 6 4 2 2 5 5
Fe.RodriguezH,11 1 0 0 0 0 0
W.WrightH,15 11-30 0 0 0 2
W.LopezS,1-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
MaholmL,9-7 7 6 3 3 2 8
Gearrin 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Durbin 1 2 0 0 0 0

Reds 5, Pirates 4
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Presleylf 4 1 2 0 Cozartss 3 1 1 0
JHughsp 0 00 0 Stubbscf 4 22 0
GSnchzph 1 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 1 1 0
Walker2b 2 0 0 1 Ludwcklf 4 01 1
AMcCtcf 4 0 0 0 Rolen3b 4 1 2 2
GJoneslb 4 1 2 0 Frazierib 4 01 2
McKnrc 4 1 2 1 DNavrrc 4 0 0 0
PAlvrz3b 4 0 0 0 Hanignc 0 00 0
Sniderrf 3 0 0 1 Valdez2b 3 0 0 0
JHrrsnss 3 1 2 1 Marshllp 0 00 0
JMcDnlp 2 00 0 Broxtnp 0 00 0
SMarteph-lf2 0 0 0 Paul ph 1 00 0
Chpmnp 0 000
Leake p 2 00 0
Cairo 2b 1 0 1 0
Totals 33 48 4 Totals 335 9 5
Pittsburgh 011 101 000 4
Cincinnati 202 000 01x 5
E--AIvarez (16), Leake (2). DP-Cincinnati 1.
LOB-Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 6. 2B-G.Jones
(17), Ludwick (19). 3B-Presley (4), Rolen (2).
HR-McKenry (11), J.Harrison (3). SB-Cairo
(2). SF-Walker, Snider.
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald
J.Hughes L,2-1
Cincinnati
Leake
Marshall
Broxton W,1-0
Chapman S,25-29


6 7 4 3 1 7
2 2 1 1 1 0
221110


Phillies 3, D-backs 0
Arizona Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GParracf 3 0 0 0 Rollinsss 4 00 0
Drew ss 4 0 2 0 Frndsn3b 4 1 1 0
Kubel If 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0
Gldschlb 4 0 1 0 Howardlb 4 1 2 0
J.Uptonrf 3 01 0 Mayrrycf 4 01 0
MMntrc 3 0 0 0 DBrwn If 3 0 1 1
CJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Kratz c 3 1 1 2
JMcDnl2b 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 01 0
JSndrsp 2 0 0 0 Halladyp 2 00 0
Zieglerp 0 00 0 Wggntnph 1 01 0
RWhelrph 1 00 0 Lindlmp 0 00 0
Zagrskp 0 0 0 0 Papelnp 0 00 0
Albersp 0 000
Totals 30 04 0 Totals 323 9 3
Arizona 000 000 000 0
Philadelphia 001 100 01x 3
DP-Arizona 1. LOB-Arizona 5, Philadelphia
7.2B-Drew (7), Mayberry (16). HR-Kratz (4).
CS-G.Parra (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
J.Saunders L,5-8 61-36 2 2 2 3
Ziegler 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Zagurski 1-3 2 1 1 0 1
Albers 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia
HalladayW,5-6 7 3 0 0 1 5
LindblomH,17 1 0 0 0 1 2
Papelbon S,24-27 1 1 0 0 0 2

Nationals 10, Marlins 7
Miami Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Petersnlf 5 1 3 0 Espinosss 5 1 2 3
Cousins rf 4 0 0 0 Harper rf 5 21 1
Reyesss 4 43 0 Zmrmn3b 4 02 1
Ca.Leelb 4 1 2 2 MorseIf 5 01 1
Dobbs3b 5 01 0 Clipprdp 0 00 0
DSolan2b 3 01 2 LaRochIb 4 32 2
GHrndzcf 4 1 0 0 Werthcf 3 1 2 0
J.Buckc 4 0 1 1 KSuzukc 3 00 0
Buehrlep 3 0 1 0 Lmrdzz2b 4 1 1 1
H.Bellp 0 0 0 0 Zmrmnp 1 1 0 0
Ruggin ph 1 00 0 Grzlny p 0 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 DeRosaph 1 00 0
Zamrnp 0 00 0 McGnzlp 0 00 0
Matthsp 0 00 0
TMooreph-lf 1 1 1 1
Totals 37 7125 Totals 36101210
Miami 021 020 101 7
Washington 012 001 06x 10
E-M.Dunn (1), Espinosa 2 (9), Lombardozzi
(3). DP-Washington 1. LOB-Miami 9, Wash-
ington 6.2B--Petersen (1), Reyes (26), Ca.Lee
(18), J.Buck (11). HR-Espinosa (10), Harper
(10), LaRoche 2 (23). SB-Reyes 2 (27). S-
Cousins, D.Solano, K.Suzuki.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Buehrle 6 7 4 4 2 2
H.BellH,5 1 0 0 0 0 2
M.DunnL,0-1 2-3 4 6 0 1 1
Zambrano 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Washington
Zimmermann 5 7 5 4 1 3
Gorzelanny 1 2 0 0 1 0
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 0 1 0 1 0
MattheusW,4-1 12-31 0 0 0 1
Clippard 1 2 1 1 0 0

Cardinals 6, Brewers 1


Milwaukee

CGomz cf
Morgan rf
Braun If
Hart lb
RWeks 2b
Lucroy c
Clzturs ss
Ransm 3b
MRgrs p
Ishikawph
LHrndz p
Aoki ph
FrRdrg p
Totals
Milwaukee
St. Louis


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
4110
4000
3 0 0 1
3 0 1 0
3001
3010
3000
3000
3000
3020
1000
1 000
0000
1010
0000
29 15 1
100
014


St. Louis

Furcal ss
Craig lb
Hollidy If
Beltran rf
Freese 3b
YMolin c
Jay cf
Descals 2b
Wnwrg p


ab rh bi


Totals 33 6 9 6
000 000 1
001 OOx 6


DP-St. Louis 1. LOB-Milwaukee 2, St. Louis
4.2B-C.Gomez (13), Descalso (7), Wainwright
(2). HR-Beltran (25), Jay (3). SB-Y.Molina
(11). SF-Braun.
IP H RERBBSO


Milwaukee
M.Rogers L,0-1
L.Hernandez
Fr.Rodriguez
St. Louis
Wainwright W,9-10


5 7 5 5 1 5



9 5 1 1 0 7
575515
221101
100000

951107


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 B5



NL

Astros 3, Braves 2












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Spike Lee will
stick with Knicks
NEW YORK- He's
New York's most promi-
nent Knicks fan. But he's
also a
proud son
of Brook-
lyn.
So
would
Spike Lee
ever con-
sider
Spike switching
Lee teams
and root-
ing for the Brooklyn
Nets?
No, no and no.
That's what Lee tells
The New York Times in an
interview discussing his
split loyalties between the
Knicks and the beloved
hometown borough that
has been the setting for
many of his films.
The Nets will play
their first games in
Brooklyn this fall, after
moving from New Jersey
It's far from the first
time Lee has vowed to go
to his grave a Knicks fan.
Last year he tried to
hammer home the point
on Twitter, saying anyone
who thinks he's switching
to the Nets "is on crack,
meth and malt liquor"

Newport Jazz
Festival under way
NEWPORT, R.I. The
Newport Jazz Festival is
back for another year, 58
years after it began in
Rhode Island's city by the
sea.
The iconic musical
event began Friday night
with a kickoff concert fea-
turing Dr. John and the
Preservation Hall Jazz
Band at the International
Tennis Hall of Fame.
The festival moves to
Fort Adams State Park on
Saturday for a lineup that
features guitarist Pat
Metheny, singer Diane
Reeves, guitarist Bill
Frisell and jazz trio The
Bad Plus.
The event concludes
Sunday
The festival, first held
in 1954, has showcased a
who's who of jazz stars.
George Wein, the event's
long-time producer, took
the festival and the New-
port Folk Festival non-
profit last year in an
attempt to ensure their
long-term success.

Shuttered lodge
to be reopened
GLOUSTER, Ohio -A
shuttered, state-owned
lodge at a southeastern
Ohio park will be re-
opened this fall and its
rooms are expected to
undergo hefty renova-
tions as part of an agree-
ment with a new state
contractor
The state's Department
of Natural Resources re-
cently announced U.S.
Hotels, a hospitality com-
pany, will operate Burr
Oak Lodge and Confer-
ence Center in Glouster
under a two-year con-
tract with the state.
The facility has been
closed since January due
to sparse use and poor fa-
cility conditions. Plus,
the previous company
that ran the lodge chose
not bid on a new contract.
The state did not have
another bidder to replace
the operator.
-From wire reports


Musical has 'spirit fingers'


Associated Press
Adrienne Warren, foreground center, and Taylor Louderman perform in "Bring It On: The Musical," at the St. James
Theatre in New York.

'Bring It On'music creators cheer their team


Associated Press

NEW YORK Don't bother try-
ing to figure out who wrote what in
"Bring It On: The Musical."
Co-song creators Lin-Manuel Mi-
randa, Tom Kitt and Amanda Green
enjoyed reading reviews of their
show as it toured the country and
critics tried to untangle their con-
tributions. Some saw Kitt's finger-
prints all over a song he didn't
write. Another was certain Miranda
could be heard in something he had
no part of.
"Usually when someone tried to
do that guessing game, they got it
wrong," Miranda said with a laugh.
"That just feels like it's a credit to
our process."
Inspired by the teen cheerlead-
ing movie franchise, "Bring It On:
The Musical" was as risky a move
for the creators as one of the human
pyramids the performers do on-
stage. Yet all three are now basking
in the glow of its well-received
Broadway debut.
"Whether you were a cheer-
leader or whether you were a the-
ater geek as I was something
in the show will hopefully speak to
you. That's always the goal: To tran-
scend everybody's stereotype," said
Miranda.
The musical has an original story
by Jeff Whitty, who wrote "Avenue
Q," and is directed and choreo-
graphed by Tony winner Andy
Blankenbuehler, who choreo-
graphed "In the Heights." But the
real key to the show has been its
songs assigned not to a single
person, but to three.
Miranda, who conceived and
wrote the music for "In the
Heights" and Pulitzer Prize-winner
Kitt, who wrote the songs for "Next
to Normal," had admired each
other's work, but never collabo-
rated before. Green had teamed up
with Kitt before, writing lyrics to
their musical "High Fidelity," but


hadn't worked with Miranda.
Blankenbuehler approached
each with the idea of joining forces
and they jumped maybe even
tumbled at the chance. "When
the idea was first presented to me,
the team of artists was so exciting,
you just thought, 'Well, that's a room
I want to be in,"' Kitt says.
The musical tells the story of a
white cheer queen from Truman
High School who is redistricted into
a more urban school the summer
she is supposed to take over the
squad as captain. Thrust into the
unfamiliar Jackson High School,
she adapts and helps build her own
dance crew to compete with her old
school.
Miranda, whose credits also in-
clude the Spanish translations for the
2009 Broadway revival of "West Side
Story," sees a connection between the
feel-good story and the real-life
process of creating the musical.
"I think the show is about theater
It is about how you cannot create
something like this on your own.
Having the best idea in the room
win and having the interplay of col-
laboration both onstage and off, we
can create something larger than
ourselves if we do it right. That's
what our characters come to realize
in the show and that's the lesson we
relearned working together"
More than 20 songs have made
the final score following a 13-city
national tour and one in Act II is
new for Broadway (In fact, it's only
a few weeks old.) The creators say
the writing process was organic.
"We started bringing stuff in and
establishing our own musical vo-
cabulary and, then as we continued
working, we started borrowing
themes, we started writing songs to-
gether, and now I don't think there's
a song in the show that we all don't
have our fingerprints on at some
point or another," says Miranda.
Or as Green puts it: "We really got
into each other's jar of


peanut butter"
To learn more about the young
people they were writing about, the
team learned cheer vocabulary,
trolled web sites of interest to high-
schoolers and watched competitions
on ESPN. Green and Kitt actually
went to a meet the National
Cheerleaders Association at Man-
hattan's Hammerstein Ballroom.
"We were all chasing this very
contemporary, heightened cheer
world," said Miranda. Of the music
they heard, he added: "It's these
pop songs sped up to a crystal meth-
crack level. So what's the musical
theater version of that?"
Once written, though, their songs
often needed serious tweaks since
they weren't exactly fitting into a
conventional musical. For one
thing, they learned it's hard to sing
while making a basket catch.
"We'd come in with a soaring bal-
lad, only to be informed that it
wouldn't work then because two of
the girls will be upside down and
three others will be making a cos-
tume change," Miranda said.
Behind the scenes, the trio insist
there was little rancor among the
accomplished songwriters. "I think
we all pushed each other," said
Green, whose father is Broadway
lyricist Adolph Green.
Miranda agrees: "It ended up
being sort of a wonderful system of
checks and balances. If we were all
on board, then we knew we had
something special."
Kitt is in synch with that notion:
"Everybody was so respectful. It's
that great thing where people argue
their points people are going to
disagree but it's in the name of
the piece. Everyone was working
toward one thing."
So happy was the collaboration
that the team has jokingly made up
titles for a sequel. There's "Bring It
On 2: Electric Boogaloo" and "Bring
It On 2: Summer School." Miranda's
favorite is "Still Bringing It."


Tyson said he's used to putting life on stage


Associated Press


NEW YORK Pounding
out the details of his per-
sonal life on a Broadway
stage doesn't seem to faze
Mike Tyson. The former
heavyweight champ said
that's what he's used to
doing, "and at least now I
don't have to go to hospital
every time."
The 46-year old Tyson is
appearing in the one-man
show, "Mike Tyson Undis-


Birthday Even though you'll have ample opportunity to
expand your social circle in the year ahead, take care to
mix different elements carefully. For example, if you're
wise, you might want to keep your business friends sepa-
rated from your close pals.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be up front and forthright about re-
questing favors, and you're more likely to be granted what you
ask of others. When you're coy, it tends to cause people in
your sphere of influence to feel as if they're being manipulated.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) Keep your expectations within rea-
sonable bounds when negotiating a deal with another. Remem-
ber, each time something is given to you, it is best to always
give something that is at the very least equivalent in return.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't hesitate to disassociate
yourself from your associates or co-workers in order to
achieve an important objective, if you find they can't emu-
late your ambition and drive.


puted Truth." Directed by
Spike Lee, the nearly two-
hour show chronicles Tyson's
life from childhood and his
early boxing career to his
public divorce from Robin
Givens and his time spent in
prison. He even talks about
an incident with Brad Pitt
"I'm just joking and stuff.
I'm not mad at anyone. I
hope he gives me a damn
job," Tyson said when asked
about the incident. The
boxer spoke to The Associ-


ated Press Thurs-
day, the same day as
the show's opening.
Lee chimed in:
"He asked for a job."
Lee, famous for
chronicling stories
about Brooklyn in
such films as
"Crooklyn," "She's
Gotta Have It," and
the upcoming "Red
Summer," feels this
adds nicely to
collection.


Today's HOROSCOPE

Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you want to do your best in
a competitive involvement, playing the game must be more
important to you than winning. Stay loose, and you'll enjoy
every minute of it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Although there are usu-
ally some complications involved, joint ventures look to be
promising for you. Attempt to maintain parity of effort re-
gardless of who else is involved.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Unless you and your mate
are in accord on the major and minor points of an important
issue, little of value will be achieved. Each must be support-
ive of the other.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be very careful about your
spending habits if you are shopping with someone who isn't
as materially fortunate as you. Thoughtless actions could
make him or her feel totally inferior.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't put yourself in the po-


"You can't get
more Brooklyn than
Mike Tyson. And if
you remember the
film, 'Do the Right
Thing,' the great
Robin Harris (play-
ing Sweet Dick
Mike Willie) had many
Tyson references to Mike.
And at the side of
Hook Sal's Famous Pizzeria we
work painted a mural, Brooklyn's
the Finest: Mike Tyson, so this
is history," Lee said.


sition of having to make a choice between spending time
with someone you like and with someone you're obligated
to. Find a way to get everyone mixing together.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -An activity that appeals to
you might not be as equally tantalizing to another, so don't
foist it on him or her. Try to come up with something that
everyone enjoys.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Try to relax and enjoy life a
bit, but don't do so at the expense of neglecting a big re-
sponsibility or major duty. You wouldn't have any fun with
things hanging over your head.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Although you'll be both indus-
trious and clever, you could easily yield to extravagant whims
that would diminish your returns. Try to stay on course.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Do your best to keep your
emotions on an even keel so you don't suffer any sudden
mood swings that could frustrate everyone.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3
Mega Money: 8 16 20 33
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,344
3-of-4 MB 51 $288.50
3-of-4 844 $52
2-of-4 MB 1,269 $24
1-of-4 MB 11,756 $2.50
2-of-4 26,915 $2
Fantasy 5:1 10 14 26 34
5-of-5 3 $76,864.29
4-of-5 284 $130.50
3-of-5 9,558 $10.50
THURSDAY, AUGUST 2
Fantasy 5: 5 14- 15 28- 29
5-of-5 3 winners $68,520.33
4-of-5 295 $112
3-of-5 8,667 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1
Powerball: 3-16-48- 56- 58
Powerball: 4
5-of-5 PB 4 winners
5-of-5 No winners
No Florida winners


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 5,
the 218th day of 2012. There
are 148 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 5, 1962, actress
Marilyn Monroe, 36, was
found dead in her Los Ange-
les home; her death was
ruled a probable suicide from
"acute barbiturate poisoning."
On this date:
In 1884, the cornerstone
for the Statue of Liberty's
pedestal was laid on Bedloe's
Island in New York Harbor.
In 1912, the Progressive
Party, also known as the "Bull
Moose Party," convened in
Chicago. (The party was
formed by former President
Theodore Roosevelt follow-
ing a split in the Republican
Party.)
In 1924, the comic strip
"Little Orphan Annie" by
Harold Gray made its debut.
In 1936, Jesse Owens of
the United States won the
200-meter dash at the Berlin
Olympics, collecting the third
of his four gold medals.
In 1969, the U.S. space
probe Mariner 7 flew by
Mars, sending back photo-
graphs and scientific data.
Ten years ago: The coral-
encrusted gun turret of the
Civil War ironclad USS Moni-
tor was raised from the floor
of the Atlantic, nearly 140
years after the historic war-
ship sank during a storm.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush and Afghan
President Hamid Karzai
began meeting at Camp
David to discuss security is-
sues in Afghanistan.
One year ago: A sun-pow-
ered robotic explorer named
Juno rocketed toward Jupiter
on a five-year quest to dis-
cover the secret recipe for
making planets.
Today's Birthdays: Former
astronaut Neil A. Armstrong is
82. Actor John Saxon is 76.
College Football Hall of Famer
and former NFL player Roman
Gabriel is 72. Country song-
writer Bobby Braddock is 72.
Rock musician Rick Huxley
(The Dave Clark Five) is 72.
Actress Loni Anderson is 67.
Actress Erika Slezak is 66.
Rock singer Rick Derringer is
65. Actress Holly Palance is
62. Singer Samantha Sang is
59. Actress-singer Maureen
McCormick is 56. Rock musi-
cian Pat Smear is 53. Actress
Tawney Kitaen is 51. Country
musician Mark O'Connor
is 51.


Thought for Today: "For
life: It is rather a determina-
tion not to be overwhelmed.
For work: The truth can only
be recalled, never invented."
- Marilyn Monroe (1926-
1962).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Pets in perpetuity


Working toward

a no-kill shelter
FRANK YELLING
Special to the Chronicle
On July 10, a "No Kill Res-
olution" for Citrus
County Animal Services
was given to Citrus
County commissioners to be
placed on their agenda for a vote.
This will give Animal Services
three months to draw up their no-
kill plan and submit it to our
county commissioners.
They will have two years to ac-
complish the goal of saving 90
percent of the shelter animals.
The Manatee County Animal
Shelter is working toward no-kill
and is now at an 81 percent save
rate. This includes both dogs and
cats.
Hillsborough County has now
hired a no-kill director and is
working toward no-kill.
This is happening all over the
country It is estimated that 17
million people will bring home a
new dog or cat during the next
year. There will be 4 million ani-
mals killed in shelters. Therefore,
no healthy or savable animals
should be killed in animal shel-
ters. Shelters need to do a much
better job of promoting the ani-
mals so the majority of these peo-
ple will adopt their new cat or
dog from a shelter, thereby saving
those animals' lives.
Having a shelter that works to-
ward no-kill doesn't mean hous-
ing more and more animals as
some people think. It means the
shelter manager and director will
initiate the right practices to get
the animals adopted. They must
have more offsite adoptions, not
depending solely on an outside
rescue group but also having their
own adoption events with their
staff participating to maximize
the number of animals adopted.
Rescue groups and volunteers
are appreciated but do need as-
sistance from the shelter The
shelter needs to provide counsel-
ing for anyone attempting to turn
in their pets; one person assigned
to give the people advice on
where free food is available, and
where low-cost spay and neuter
and low-cost vaccinations are
available. There needs to be a
waiting period before you can
turn in a pet and given this coun-
seling during this time.
They must also be told that
their pet may be euthanized if it
is not adopted. People are not al-
ways aware of this and may have
a friend or relative who may take
their pet instead of leaving it at
the shelter. Or, upon hearing this,
they will find a shelter that is no-
kill where the chances of getting


Re: July 30 article, "Kings Bay
sewer plan pulls owners together '
The city of Crystal River, in
partnership with the Board
of County Commissioners, is
currently engaged in extending
sewer service into a portion of the
unincorporated area
adjacent to Fort Island
Trail.
This project is being
funded to a significant
extent (85 percent) by a
Department of Environ-
mental Protection grant
sought and secured by
the city more than a
decade ago to protect
water quality. Andy
The extension of GUI
service into the area in COLI
question, which was al-
ways identified to be a part of the
project, was initiated only after all
sections of the city proposed for in-
clusion in the grant project had
been completed. City residents
have already been assessed for
those improvements in the same
manner as has been proposed for
the residents of the unincorporated
area in question.
The city and the county executed
an interlocal agreement in 2009
that dealt specifically with the ex-
tension of sewer service into this
area.
Since that time, the city has pro-


ceeded to meet its obligal
under that agreement by design
and installing the required i:
structure, and the county has
its obligations by taking the n,
sary steps to establish an as
ment district to recover the po:
of project costs not
ered by the grant
This has not be
universally embr
project, with somE
fected residents
.. pressing concerns
the cost and displ
the environmental
efit of the project. I
cordance with state
[ouston those residents
EST been given several
JMN portunities to forr
register those conc
and to argue against the pro
Both the city and the county ur
stand that these are difficult
nomic times, and that this
difficult time to move forward
assessment programs of any so
the same time, it has been re
nized this 85 percent grant fun
may never be available again.
that the need to install sewer
ice into an environmentally s
tive area in the immediate vic
of an Outstanding Florida V
(King's Bay) is critical. On


-- --, Wdv
Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Pres
Jodi Polanski, founder and executive director of Lost Our Home Pet Foundation, poses July 12 with pets ii
Phoenix. Lost Our Home helps people facing foreclosure place their pets with other families or in foster envi
ronments until their owners can get them back. It has 35 to 40 animals in the shelter and 220 in foster homes
and has placed 2,000 animals in four years. On July 10, a "No Kill Resolution" for Citrus County Animal Serv
ices was given to Citrus County commissioners to be placed on their agenda for a vote. If passed, Citrus Count:
Animal Services will have two years to accomplish the goal of saving 90 percent of the shelter animals.


A pair of foster kittens play inside Lost Our Home Pet Foundation in
Phoenix. It is estimated that 17 million people across the country will
bring home a new dog or cat during the next year. There will be 4 million
animals killed in shelters.


an animal adopted are much
higher
Our shelter here in Citrus
County is closed on Sundays and
Monday. Shelters should always
be open on both Saturdays and
Sunday when parents and chil-
dren are off together Weekends
are the best adoption days along
with holidays.
Animal Control is separate
from Animal Services and is
under the sheriff's office here in
Citrus County. They need to do
everything they can in the field to


School starts Wednesday


While it seems early, I hear
from plenty of students
(and parents) that they are
eager to return to school.
So here is the latest
on what they will find.
We have approxi-
mately 100 new teach-
ers this year, more than
a few who are Citrus
County public school
graduates returning
home to teach. They
bring a new wave of en-
thusiasm and are help- Pat Deu
ing usher in the GUI
increased use of tech-
nology in the classroom COLI
because this new gener-
ation of teachers has never lived in
a world without computers. (That
should make some of us feel plenty
old I remember our first
television!)
Imagine the day students will not
need backpacks to carry around 50
pounds of text books. At Citrus
Springs Middle School,that day is
here. All seventh-grade students
are being given their own iPad to
use in place of traditional text-
books and they will be used as a
method to do assignments they can
turn in to the teacher via email!
Funding for this project was from
the Race to the Top grant and they
will be our prototype classrooms.
This powerful handheld tablet
computer cannot only access the
Internet but comes packed with
many "apps," or programs, such as
iPresidents, rich with historical in-


formation like an encyclopedia,
videos on science lessons, a chalk-
board-like ability to "write" on the
iPad surface and reading text that
allows the user to touch
any word with their fin-
ger and its definition
pops up!
A student can even
dissect a "virtual" in-
sect almost better than
a real one no mess,
S no smell, no blades.
Studying geography, a
;schman student can access a 360
EST degree view of anyplace
they are studying, from
JMN on top of the Eiffel
Tower to the foot of the
Great Pyramids.
How the world has changed.
Students will be allowed to take
their iPad home to do their home-
work, read their textbook or review
the lessons. It will also let them
work on a group project with other
students from anywhere in the
world. Pretty cool stuff.
This moves us closer to changing
the way students are taught. With
the use of technology, the classroom
can be "flipped" by providing stu-
dents a pre-recorded video lesson
taught by their teacher; they can
watch as their homework assign-
ment from home. They then come
prepared to class with questions,
work on solving problems and dig
deeper on developing a project.
The student can review the "les-
son" as many times as they need to
See Page C3


t
E
A


reunite the loose animals with
their owners.
They all need to scan the ani-
mals in the field to see if they
have a microchip. They should
also go door to door where the an-
imal is found and check to see if
anyone knows where the owner
lives and take the dog or cat back
there.
Also, they should post signs on
poles in the area with this ani-
mal's information and picture.
Then, make sure it is put online
and shared through the shelter


site and also on Facebook. Re-
turn-to-owner is one of the best
ways to lower admissions at a
shelter.
We must work with the public
and help them get their animals
back without imposing a heavy
fine where they cannot afford to
pick up their dog or cat and then
it winds up being euthanized.
I have seen people walk away
from the counter at Animal Serv-
ices and leave without their dog
because they could not afford to
pay the fees. We were successful
in adopting the feral cat ordi-
nance here in Citrus County, and
The Humanitarians have done an
excellent job of spaying and neu-
tering more than 600 cats in
colonies.
Our commissioners showed
their concern for the animals as
all voted unanimously for this. We
now ask them to continue working
toward a no-kill animal shelter by
placing this resolution on their
agenda and adopting it.
All healthy and savable animals
need to be given the chance to
find a "forever home," and we as
a humane people have an obliga-
tion to make this happen.
-
Frank Yuellingis a no-kill
advocate in Citrus County for
shelter animals, a 37-year Floral
City resident and an Inverness
real estate broker


How


much


info is


too


much?

How much do you
really want to
know about the
candidates whom you vote
s for on Election Day?
n Is it relevant that a can-
i- didate had a DUI as a
s young adult?
V- How about failed
y businesses?
How about getting fired
from a public job?
How about a candidate
who has been charged
with more than a dozen
criminal and traffic in-
fractions over a 20-year
period?
Do we all need to know
that a candidate had his
house foreclosed upon?
How about a candidate
who has frequently ig-
nored development rules
in a three-county area and
has been taken to court
for infractions?
In the last election we
had a candidate who
served state prison time.
Another had a marijuana
arrest on his record as a
young adult.
With the primary elec-
tions less than two weeks
away, not a day goes by that
S the Chronicle office does
not get an email, an anony-
mous letter or a telephone
call from someone who
S wants to make sure we
know all the dirt on one
candidate or another
Usually there are politi-
cal opponents behind the
anonymous tips.
It is no fun making the
judgments about what
gets published and what
doesn't. Candidates would
like us to print nothing
about them but everything
about their opponents.
We tend to believe in
the right of the public to
S know as much as possible.
People who run for pub-
lic office should do so with
the knowledge that their
lives will become part of
n the public discussion.
No one forces individu-
als to run for public office
and past indiscretions are
tons part of the life story that
,ning each of us has. That life
nfra- story is one piece of the
met puzzle that voters should
eces- have in determining
sess- which candidate will do
rtion the best job.
cov- Let's face it, an individ-
ual's personality doesn't
en a suddenly change because
ed af they got elected to public
e office. We have enough ex-
ex- politicians serving time in
wit prison to demonstrate
ting that change is difficult.
Iben- On the other hand, we
n ac- certainly need good peo-
law, ple involved in the process
ave of leading our county, state
Sop- and nation. I admit, I get
ally aggravated with the self-
erns righteousness of some
)ject. folks who demand that we
ider- publish this fact or that
eco- about certain candidates.
is a Somewhere in the Bible
with there are some really
rt. At good suggestions about
ecog- the person who throws the
Lding first stone.
, and One of the revelations
serv- that some really good can-
ensi- didates hate is when we
inity talk about the net worth of
afterr individuals. The state col-
that lects the information as


Page C4


Page C3


Don't be deceive


by misinformation:


I


F
E
A







Page C2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012



PINION


"Pro football is like nuclear
warfare. There are no winners,
only survivors."
Frank Gifford


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ...................publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .......................editor
S Mike Arnold ................. ....................HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENT





Webb offers




breadth of




experience


Voters in the Republican
primary have three op-
tions in the race for Cit-
rus County sheriff. The winner
will face JeffDawsy in the gen-
eral election.
Candidates
Hank Hemrick THE IS
and Steve Burch Republica
have master's de- d
grees. Hemrick is
retired from a ca- OUR
reer in correc-
tions, having Winn Wel
served as deputy suited ca
warden of the
New York City De-
partment of Correction. Burch
has spent 28 years in law en-
forcement, 24 of which were
with the city of Clearwater Po-


lice Department.
He spent four
years as chief of
the Crystal River
Police Depart-
ment.
While candidate
Winn Webb's aca-
demic credentials
are modest hav-
ing a high school


S
ir


P
b
a


Candidates
endorsed b
Chronicle E
Board are i
issue rebut
may be em
Charlie Bre
editor, at cl
chronicleor


degree and earning some col-
lege credits he brings a
blend of business, law enforce-
ment and county government
experience to the table.
Presently a Citrus County com-
missioner, Webb served 17
years as a deputy with the
sheriff's office and operated a
business for nine years.
While the three men share a
vision for cracking down on
drug offenses, taming the cost
of running the sheriff's office
and escalating road patrols to
combat aggressive and
drunken driving, it is Winn


Webb whose breadth of experi-
ence and leadership qualities
give him the edge in this race.
As a county commissioner,
Webb has done a good job at
working with fel-
low board mem-
;SUE: bers and
n sheriff's administrative
ates. staff to right-size
county govern-
NION: ment in an eco-
INIO nomically chal-
b is best lenging era.
ndidate. While some may
assert that being a
native Citrus
Countian places Webb in the
good-old-boy club, his familiar-
ity with the county, its resi-
dents, the sheriff's office and
county govern-
;not ment are an asset.
)y the All three candi-
ditorial dates have been
invited to campaigning hard,
tals. They yet Winn Webb has
failed to kept an exhausting
Innan, schedule, appear-
brennan@ ing nearly any-
nline.com.
where and
everywhere where
potential voters could bend his
ear and share their thoughts
about Citrus County's public
safety needs. At the same time,
he has not shied away from his
responsibilities as a county
commissioner.
While Hank Hemrick and
Steve Burch offer resumes and
experiences that could serve
the county well, it is Winn
Webb who is the best equipped
of the Republicans to lead the
sheriff's office.
We encourage voters to con-
sider Winn Webb when they
cast their ballots.


EDITORIAL BOARD ENDORSEMENTS
The Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board has endorsed the fol-
lowing candidates in the Aug. 14 primary elections. Log on to
www.chronicleonline.com to read past endorsement editorials.
Early voting continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday,
Aug. 11, at locations in Homosassa, Crystal River, Beverly Hills and
Inverness. Election day is Tuesday, Aug. 14.
* Fifth Circuit Public Defender: Mike Graves.
* School Board, District 4: Susan Hale.
* Superintendent of Schools: Sandy Balfour.
* County Commission, District 1: Dennis Damato.
* Sheriff: Winn Webb.


Give that man a medal
I just sat down to watch the
evening news and I have a sugges-
tion: I think the inventor of the
mute button especially
at election time should 0
get a Nobel Peace Prize.
Leno's line
I was watching Jay
Leno last night and he
don't understand why the A
VFW calls themselves the
Veterans of Foreign Wars. CAL
He said, "Aren't all wars
foreign?" I just thought it 563-
was a different comment.
Stir things up
B.J. Upton on the Tampa Bay
Rays lately has been wearing knee
socks and knee pants and high
socks. It would be nice if the


I


whole team would get together
and wear them just for one game.
Weigh consequences
This is in response to
ND the Wednesday, July 25,
JN Sound Off where some-
rP body said, "Don't steal,"
that if you're breaking
into your neighbor's
house, it's breaking and
entering. Actually, the law
is: If they're breaking into
Sthe neighbor's house and
it's occupied, it's bur-
)579 glary of an occupied
57 structure, which is a sec-
ond-degree felony which
carries a sentence up to
25 years. Maybe you might want
to think about that. Twenty-five
years for breaking into your neigh-
bor's house to steal some stuff?
Not a good idea.


US football's big problem


re you ready for some
football? First, however,
are you ready for some
autopsies?
The opening of the
NFL training camps
coincided with the
closing of the investi-
gation into the April (
suicide by gunshot of
Ray Easterling, 62, an
eight-season NFL
safety in the 1970s. The -
autopsy found moder-
ately severe chronic Georg
traumatic en- OTI
cephalopathy (CTE), VOI
progressive damage to
the brain associated
with repeated blows to the head.
CTE was identified as a major
cause of Easterling's depression
and dementia.
In February 2011, Dave Duer-
son, 50, an 11-year NFL safety,
committed suicide by shooting
himself in the chest to spare his
brain tissue for research, which
has found evidence of CTE. Brain
tissue of 20-season linebacker
Junior Seau, who was 43 when he
killed himself the same way in
May, is being studied. The NFL
launched a mental health hotline
developed and operated with the
assistance of specialists in sui-
cide prevention.
Football is bigger than ever, in
several senses. Bear Bryant's
1966 undefeated Alabama team
had only 19 players who weighed
more than 200 pounds. The heav-
iest weighed 223. The linemen av-
eraged 194. The quarterback
weighed 177. Today, many high
school teams are much bigger In
1980, only three NFL players
weighed 300 or more pounds. In
2011, according to pro-football-
reference.com, there were 352,
including three 350-pounders.
Thirty-one of the NFEs 32 offen-
sive lines averaged more than
300.
Various unsurprising studies
indicate high early mortality


H
(


rates among linemen resulting
from cardiovascular disease. For
all players who play five or more
years, life expectancy
is less than 60; for line-
men it is much less.

ing for her husband,
Easterling's widow is
one of more than 3,000
plaintiffs former
players, spouses, rela-
tives in a lawsuit
charging that the NFL
e Will inadequately acted on
IER knowledge it had, or
DES should have had, about
hazards such as CTE.
We are, however, rap-
idly reaching the point where
playing football is like smoking
cigarettes: The risks are well-
known.
Not that this has prevented
smokers from successfully suing
tobacco companies. But then,
smoking is an addiction. Football
is just an increasingly guilty
pleasure. MightAmericans some-
day feel as queasy enjoying it as
sensible people now do watching
boxing and wondering how the
nation was once enamored of a
sport the point of which is brain
trauma?
That is unlikely Degenerate
prize fighting, or prize fighting for
degenerates -called mixed mar-
tial arts or "ultimate fighting" -
is booming.
Still, football has bigger long-
term problems than lawsuits.
Football is entertainment in
which the audience is expected
to delight in gladiatorial action
that a growing portion of the au-
dience knows may cause the
players degenerative brain dis-
ease. Not even football fans, a
tribe not known for savoring nu-
ance, can forever block that fact
from their excited brains.
Furthermore, in this age of
bubble-wrapped children, when
parents put helmets on wee tricy-
cle riders, many children are


STATUS SYMBOL BACS...


oiLETTERSAr

LETTERS


Passion for the truth
Re: Mike Wright's article Aug.
3, "Argenziano's big splash"
By their definition, "brash-
ness" (unthinking and impetu-
ous), and "bravado" (a pretense
of courage) are incorrect words
to describe my responses to
questions.
My answers were factual, re-
searched, experience-based, and
were far from "unthinking."
I said that "special interests"
were the biggest threat to sur-
face and ground waters because
they were buying the undoing of
laws that protect the resource.
The "water wars" of the past,
which cost millions in litigation
and caused damage, were finally
addressed legislatively years ago
when we passed good. fair,
water law. This was based on
much debate, science, public
hearings throughout the state,
and crossed the aisle and re-
gional boundaries. This policy
had stood and protected us for
years until gutted by the current
"Bozos" in the Legislature, doing
so without compelling debate or
reason, giving "special interest"
what they paid for
When Mr Smith said he would
leave a decision to be made lo-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

cally, I reminded him it was his
own bill that took that local con-
trol away. That is not "bravado,"
it is fact.
My contempt for hypocrisy,


going to be steered away from
youth football, diverting the flow
of talent to the benefit of other
sports.
In the NFL, especially, football
is increasingly a spectacle, a
game surrounded by manufac-
tured frenzy, on the grass and in
the increasingly unpleasant am-
biance of the fans in the stands.
Football on the field is a three-
hour adrenaline-and-testosterone
bath. For all its occasional ele-
gance and beauty, it is basically vi-
olence for, among other purposes,
inflicting intimidating pain. (Seau
said his job was "to inflict pain on
my opponent and have him quit")
The New Orleans Saints'
"bounty" system of cash payments
to players who knocked opposing
players out of games crossed a
line distinguishing the essence of
the game from the perversion of
it. This is, however, an increas-
ingly faint line.
Decades ago, this column light-
heartedly called football a mis-
take because it combines two of
the worst features of American
life violence, punctuated by
committee meetings, which foot-
ball calls huddles. Now, however,
accumulating evidence about
new understandings of the
human body the brain, espe-
cially, but not exclusively com-
pel the conclusion that football is
a mistake because the body is not
built to absorb, and cannot be ad-
equately modified by training or
protected by equipment to ab-
sorb, the game's kinetic energies.
After 18 people died playing
football in 1905, even President
Theodore Roosevelt, who loved
war and gore generally, flinched
and forced some rules changes.
Today, however, the problem is
not the rules; it is the fiction that
football can be fixed and still re-
semble the game fans relish.
--In--
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


contempt for the lack of inde-
pendent thought, contempt for
100 percent Kool-Aid drinking
following the leader, should not
be labeled as "brashness." It is
passion for the truth.
Nancy Argenziano
candidate for Florida House,
District 34

Lions an asset
This is in regard to our local
Lions Club. I hope everyone in
our community realizes what an
asset this organization is. We
have many clubs in our area who
do wonderful things; especially
for their members.
I have never needed assis-
tance from any club or organiza-
tion. However, as life goes,
circumstances change and we
find ourselves in a time of need.
The Lions Club helped me get
my vision restored. Special
thanks to Chuck Speedwalk, who
was my contact from the club.
So a big "thank you" to all
members of the Lions. I hope
everyone in our community tries
to help and support this wonder-
ful organization.
Betty Wilson
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I to the Editor





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An idiotic decision should be called one


Most recently, I read about a
state law set to take effect
in two years that will
require all eighth-graders to pass
a civics test before they
can go on to high
school. It seems
everything else they've
done during their
previous nine years of
public schooling makes
no difference. One test,
one subject, pass or
fail. No ifs, no ands, no
buts. Fred B
Taken a step further, A S
a student who doesn't
pass the test will be OF
stuck in eighth grade,
forever.
If I'd read this on an Internet
site, I would have dismissed it as
fictionalized rabble-rousing, but I
didn't. It was printed in the
Chronicle with comments from
one of our school board members


I

I
I


who categorized the law as
"idiotic."
Going to school certainly isn't
what it used to be.
Cheryl and I have
grandchildren in
fkB three different school
zones two districts
in Florida and one in
Texas and we never
really know when the
kids will be in school
and when they won't.
They begin and finish
rannen on different dates; the
LICE time for spring break
ranges by as much as a
LIFE month from one dis-
trict to another; holi-
days taken are not consistent; and
there are any number of teachers'
work days and early dismissal
days determined by heaven only
knows what.
From the time I started in 1951
until graduating in 1963, school al-


ways started on the Tuesday after
Labor Day and always ended dur-
ing the first week of June. No
doubt this was influenced by the
fact I went to school here in
Florida and never saw an air-con-
ditioned classroom. We simply
didn't have it, so going to school in
July and August would have been
horrendous because of the heat.
We had two days off for
Thanksgiving and two weeks off
for Christmas. There was no such
thing as spring break, we got the
Friday before and the Monday
after Easter that was it.
Yes, it was simpler back then,
but that doesn't mean we were ex-
empt from idiotic decisions.
The civics test issue reminded
me of a last-minute requirement I
had to meet in order to graduate
from high school. I'd spent the
first three years making sure all of
my required courses were com-
pleted so, as a senior, I only


needed to take two classes,
leaving me free to work every
afternoon. That is, until someone,
somewhere decided that to
graduate, all students must take
and pass a course in Americanism
vs. Communism. I've always
suspected it was the same guy who
decided to teach us to duck under
our desks and cover our heads to
be safe during a nuclear attack.
The Americanism vs.
Communism class would've
wreaked havoc on my work
schedule, but I, along with others,
was vocal enough to be "allowed"
to come in at 7 o'clock in the
mornings to complete the nine-
week course. I made an "A" on the
subject matter, but my outspoken
displeasure at the idiocy of the
requirement earned me a "D" for
deportment.
That "D" was the only grade
lower than an "A" I received
during my senior year, but it was


the grade of which I was most
proud. It really felt good to stand
up to the system and speak my
mind, especially when, after being
told to sit down and be quiet, I
replied to those in charge that
freedom of speech, including my
freedom of speech, was at the very
core of Americanism. It felt good,
but it netted me a threat of a three-
day suspension for in-
subordination, and at that point, I
had enough sense to sit down and
shut up.
To the outspoken school board
member who will remain
nameless in this column due to the
upcoming elections, I say, "Amen."
When the system runs amok, an
idiotic decision should be called
an idiotic decision.
--In--
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Modern America is to blame


ne hears constant criticisms of Pres-
ident Obama as the election in No-
vember nears: He does not
understand economics because he never
held a job in the private sector nor ran a
business. (He did hold a private-sector job
for a short time, but tells us he felt as if he
were in the enemy's camp.)
The grandparents who raised
him were political radicals op-
posed to market capitalism. His
mentor, Frank Marshall Davis,
was a staunch believer in com-
munism as the best economic
system. Another mentor and
Chicago community organizer,
Saul Alinsky, wrote the hand-
book for radicals on the best Dr. Willi
ways to take down our constitu-
tional republic without starting OTI
an open revolution. (Hillary VOI
Clinton was and may still be an
Alinsky follower, as well.) His
preacher of 20 years who officiated at his
marriage and later baptized his children
was an overt racist who blamed whites and
capitalism for all of the world's wrongs.
His political background is Chicago,
famed for corruption and dirty tricks. He
won his first state Senate seat by under-
handedly disqualifying his competitors. He
was elected to the national Senate when his
Republican opponent dropped out. Myste-
riously, the sealed divorce proceedings of
Obama's opponent containing accusations
of serious misbehavior appeared on the
desk of the local editor in typical Chicago
fashion right before the election.
Anyone who took the time to look at
Obama's background would have known
what he would do once elected to the pres-
idency He told us he would radically
change America. He has made a good start
at taking control of our economy and regu-
lating it to achieve social and economic
"justice."
President Obama is not the problem. We
are. We have the government we deserve.
Most of us have become lazy and self-
indulgent. We want what we want now, and
if we cannot get it, then we demand the gov-
ernment help us get it. If we make bad judg-
ments about getting an education or about
a mortgage, if we make self-destructive
choices regarding our health, if we have not
saved enough for retirement, then, govern-
ment is to help us. If government must take
property from other citizens to satisfy our
needs, well, we are entitled to the help. It
seems to us only "justice" to take from peo-
ple who have more than they need.
Our Constitution is a statement of indi-


SCHOOL
Continued from Page C1

understand it and the
teacher can spend less time
in front of the class "teaching
the lesson" and spend more
time helping each individual
student master the skills
taught Those who "get it"
quickly can move on to the
next lesson at their own pace
and students who need more
time, miss a class, or like to
review, have the instruc-
tional lesson at their finger-
tips any time, any place.
All of our classrooms are
now equipped with interac-
tive Smart Boards in place
of blackboards and chalk (no
more sneezing). Teacher or
students can write on an
electronic tablet that is pro-
jected on the board, post
problems to solve, show
videos or have students
show their work on the
board while she can be
standing in the back of the
class or walking around con-
trolling everything that is on
the board at the same time.
It has unleashed the teacher
from simply standing in the
front of the class, enriches
the lessons, and completely
engages students in active
learning. I never see stu-
dents not paying attention or
acting up as the classroom is
an exciting place with so
much going on.
Many classrooms use
student-held clickerss" (they


I
3
H
K


vidual rights linked with limitations on the
freedoms governments may take from indi-
vidual citizens. Our nation became great on
the backs of individuals, not committees,
individuals working for rewards or a profit
Their efforts raised us all up and added
wealth to our nation. We once rewarded in-
dividual efforts and praised
winners.
Not so much today Profit has
become a dirty word. Our
schools discourage individual
winners for fear of offending the
sensibilities of the losers. We
favor group efforts, group pride,
togetherness no matter the bad
outcomes. Being "average" is
m Dixon most acceptable. We spend more
time and wealth helping our fail-
IER ures than we do in promoting
CES our winners. Yet, most who are
failing will remain failures de-
spite all.
And if someone wins? We accuse him of
doing so on the backs of others: "You didn't
make that!" We accuse the successful of tak-
ing a too-big share of the economic pie at
the expense of the rest of us. We raise their
taxes and make them feel guilty about their
success. That they have added to our
wealth and created opportunities for oth-
ers goes unremarked.
Make no mistake. I believe President
Obama needs to be replaced. He has suc-
cessfully and articulately led us away from
the principles that made us the greatest na-
tion in the history of the world. But, if he is
defeated, will it make a difference? The next
president will face demands for goods and
services from the same dependent, unen-
lightened citizenry that elected Obama.
What will happen when their needs go
unmet? Will they not, once again, trade away
their freedoms and independence to leftist
politicians who promise them security?
For those of us who would change the di-
rection of our country back toward its roots,
this election is but the first battle in a very
long war whose outcome I may not live long
enough to see.


William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University New York Medical College and
the USF College ofBusiness Administra-
tion. He served in the Army as a surgeon
and as a Special Forces Officer achieving
the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was an
assistant professor of surgery at the Uni-
versity of Georgia before entering private
practice. Dr Dixon can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


All parents will be issued through a
"Parent Portal" their own user ID
and password to access their child's
school records, including grades,
progress reports, the ability to view
their assignments or communicate
with the teacher.


look like a remote control).
These devices are used to
electronically answer multi-
ple-choice questions, with
the answers instantly tabu-
lated. The teacher immedi-
ately knows which students
understand the lesson, get
confused, or need more in-
struction. This helps ensure
students have mastered a
skill before they move on.
All schools have been
equipped with WiFi, en-
abling students to use their
own laptops anywhere in
the school.
It is also the end of the
"dog-ate-my-report-card"
era. All parents will be is-
sued through a "Parent Por-
tal" their own user ID and
password to access their
child's school records, in-
cluding grades, progress re-
ports, the ability to view
their assignments or com-
municate with the teacher.
I'm not so sure all students
will welcome this new ad-
vancement in transparency,
but it will certainly change
the definition of parent
involvement.


The use of technology has
enhanced student learning
by putting the world at their
fingertips. Studies have
shown marked improve-


frtj/9aiB2OrR )J1GurI~Y HtUWJU/4'S-N YIaIoor.aYI


Endorsement LETTER


Uncommon candidate
Who is this Jimmie T Smith? In my
humble opinion, he is the common man
(make that the uncommon man) who is
the epitome of the citizen legislator.
Jimmie's goal is to serve the people of
District 43 by giving them the finest rep-
resentation possible.
As a freshman in Tallahassee, he ac-
complished much more than should be


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

part of the election process
and we report it.
But is it really relevant
how much a certain candi-
date might be worth? In a
weird twist of democracy,
the general public seems
aggravated with people
who have achieved great
wealth.
I don't really understand
that. When I see a candi-
date's financial disclosure
statement and it says he or
she is a millionaire, I say
that candidate has been
successful at something
and just maybe those skills
can be transferred to get-
ting things done for the
public.
Net worth is not as im-


ments in student learning
when technology is used not
to take the place of the
teacher but extend the
classroom to wherever the
student is. Imagine your
own tutor whenever you
need it. Besides the class-
room instructor, free online
lessons are offered from
companies like the Khan
Academy, which have revo-
lutionized the notion of on-
line learning.
While there may be some
speculation about why Cit-
rus County schools outper-
form most other schools in


expected of a "newbie." I have seen some
of the congratulatory messages sent to
Jimmie by his colleagues.
If you haven't registered yet, please do
so today Then remember to vote on Elec-
tion Day
Let's proudly send Jimmie back to
Tallahassee.
Gerhard E. Koehlinger
Beverly Hills


portant as where wealth
comes from. If a candidate
earned great wealth as a
personal injury lawyer, you
most likely know how that
candidate will vote on legal
issues.
If a candidate has gener-
ated wealth through a
health care company, it will
be natural for that person
to have more insight and
compassion for the role of
health care providers.
The same is true when
you look at the past profes-
sions of a candidate. Farm-
ers tend to care more about
agricultural issues. Retired
sheriffs have lots of opin-
ions about law enforce-
ment Teachers tend to get
involved in education is-
sues.
If you sent me to Talla-
hassee as a legislator, I
would probably pass a law


Florida, it is clearly evident
that success is achieved by
enthusiasm for teaching, a
commitment to the latest
techniques and training,
leadership that puts stu-
dents first, and a community
that supports public educa-
tion wholeheartedly This
comes from the efforts of our
3,000 employees from the


that requires everyone to
get a newspaper delivered
to their home.
There are exceptions
that break every rule, but
we all tend to gravitate to
those areas we are most fa-
miliar with.
The great truth about all
of this political stuff is that
on Aug. 14, we can give our
local government a report
card on performance.
There are very few places
on Earth where the elec-
tion process is as pure and
as open as it is in our
country
We should never forget
how unique and fortunate
we are.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


bus drivers to the cafeteria
workers to the instructional
staff to the superintendent
and the school board. It's a
team effort and I am proud
to be part of the team.


Pat Deutschman is a
member of the Citrus
County School Board.


LAW ENFORCEMENT IN FLORIDA INCLUDING CHIEF OF POLICE
* PREPARED AND MANAGED LAW ENFORCEMENT BUDGET'S
* DOES NOTAND WILL NOT ACCEPT CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS FROM
SPECIAL INTERESTS. "POWER BROKERS" OR SHERIFF'S OFFICE
EMPLOYEES
* NOT ONE OF THE "GOOD OLE BOYS"
* THE ONLY CANDIDATE WITH A REAL PLAN FOR ORGANIZATION AND
LEADERSHIP
* THE ONLY REPUBLICAN THAT CAN WIN IN NOVEMBER!!!
ASYOURSHERI FF I WI LL:
* ESTABLISH FISCALACCOUNTABILITY & RESPONSIBILITY WITH OPEN
PROGRAM BASED BUDGETING
* LEAD BY EXAMPLE IN CUTTING COSTS, BY REDUCING MY SALARYAS
SHERIFF BY $20,000
* REALIGN THE $2 MILLION DOLLARS IN WASTEFUL SPENDING TO IMPROVE
SERVICES AND TRAINING, WHILE REDUCING THE BUDGET
* FORM A REGIONAL DRUG TASK FORCE WITH OTHER LAW ENFORCEMENT
AGENCIES
* BE ACCOUNTABLE TO OUR DEPUTIES & OUR CITIZENS WITH OPEN, FAIR
AND EQUITABLE DISCIPLINE IN THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
GO TO WWW.BURCH4SHERIFF.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT STEVEN
BURCH AND WHY VOTE FOR STEVEN BURCH IS A VOTE FOR PROFESSIONAL
AND FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE LAW ENFORCEMENT LEADERSHIP.
(352) 464-4495 steven@burch4sheriff.com
Pd for by Burch for Sheriff Campaign and approved by Steven Burch, Rep. I


All are invited to attend the

Open House

of Citrus County Democrats

Headquarters

Saturday, August 11,2012
12:00-4:00pm
581 SE Hwy. 19
(behind the former Dillon's Restaurant)
Crystal River, FL 34429
Refreshments available. Come visit us and pick up
information regarding Voter Registration,Voter
Information, Democratic Clubs in Citrus County,
and the Obama Campaign. Candidates running for
public office in Citrus County will be on hand.
For more information, please call
Ellen Joyce at 352-382-0343.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


GUEST
Continued from Page C1

basis, public policymakers
have moved forward with
the project.
Some residents have con-
tinued to argue against the
project, and Mr Norm Hop-
kins has surfaced as a
spokesman for that cause.
In that role, Mr. Hopkins ap-
parently spoke with the
Chronicle and made a num-
ber of comments, as re-
flected in a recent story, that
are simply inaccurate, or
which display a lack of un-
derstanding of how this
project has progressed to
the point it has today
To address his state-
ments, I would offer the fol-
lowing responses:
Statement: The city and
county are working from the
wrong type of agreement.
Response: An interlocal
boundary agreement, iden-
tified by Mr. Hopkins as the
appropriate type of agree-
ment, is authorized by
171.20 of Florida Statutes
and is intended to deal with
annexation or contraction
of city limits, and the provi-
sion of services in such situ-
ations. An interlocal
boundary agreement would
be inappropriate for this
project inasmuch as the
clear intent of both the city
and the county was to not
require annexation as a
condition of getting sewer
service (Section 3 of the


agreement).
An interlocal boundary
agreement was used in the
case of the Plantation Inn,
as noted by Mr Hopkins, be-
cause the Plantation had re-
quested to annex into the
city, and there was a con-
cern that completing that
annexation might create an
impermissible enclave with
the Harbor Isle neighbor-
hood. To eliminate that po-
tential concern, and to
provide assurance to the
Harbor Isle residents that
they would not be forced to
annex at some point in the
future, the city and the
county executed the inter-
local boundary agreement.
Interlocal agreements
have been used to establish
utility service areas be-
tween the city and the
county since at least 1992.
An interlocal agreement has
been in place between the
city of Inverness and the
county since 1989 for the
same purpose.
Statement: The original
state grant required the
county to provide a match-
ing fund of 15 percent, and
later transferred that re-
sponsibility to the city.
Response: The city was
the original grant applicant
Statement: The city had
100 percent funding from
the state since it took a loan
for the 15 percent not cov-
ered by the grant.
Response: Loans have to
be repaid. It has always
been the clear intent of the
city that the loan would be


The city of Crystal River is
committed to meeting its
obligations under the 2009
interlocal agreement and completing
all phases of the ongoing sewer
extension project.


paid off through assess-
ments against those prop-
erty owners who received
sewer service. Residents of
the city who got sewer serv-
ice through the DEP grant
were assessed in the same
manner.
Statement: The loan
would be no liability to the
city.
Response: Again, loans
have to be repaid. The city
is the entity that has the ul-
timate legal liability to
repay this loan.
Statement The city is ask-
ing for the money up front
from the property owners.
Response: The county is
handling the assessment
program for this project.
The terms of the assessment
program allow for payment
over 10 years. At the request
of the Board of County Com-
missioners, City Council
took action on Aug. 22, 2011,
to allow payment of the ex-
pansion fee over 10 years.
This allowed for a signifi-
cantly longer payment pe-
riod for the expansion fees
for most property owners
than previously established
under city code provisions.


Statement The connection
fee of $3,425 must be paid for
each parcel, whether a house
is on it or not
Response: The connection
fee is not payable on a va-
cant lot unless and until a
permit is requested to build
a house or commercial
structure on it. The assess-
ment fee is payable on va-
cant lots, as prescribed in
State Statute 153.05 ("all lots
and parcels which abut upon
the side or sides of any street
in or along which side or
sides a sanitary sewer shall
have been constructed").
Statement: The $3,425
connection fee is an arbi-
trary number arrived at as a
legacy figure of $2,740 plus a
25 percent surcharge.
Response: The $2,740 ex-
pansion (capacity) fee was
developed through a Capac-
ity Fee Analysis conducted
as part of the FY 2007 Water
& Sewer Rate Study con-
ducted on behalf of the city
by the firm of Burton & As-
sociates. Burton & Associ-
ates has been providing
utility rate services to gov-
ernments and utilities
throughout Florida for


more than 20 years and con-
ducts over 60 studies a year.
Clients for similar services
in just the past two years
have included Pinellas
County, St. Petersburg, Fort
Myers, Venice, Cape Coral,
Palatka, Fort Lauderdale,
Cocoa, Clearwater, Dunnel-
lon, and Port St. Joe, among
others.
Statement: The 25 per-
cent surcharge is permissi-
ble when administrative
and engineering costs are
not separately funded. The
surcharge should not apply
in this case since adminis-
trative and engineering
costs are included in state
funding.
Response: Section
180.191(l)(a) states that mu-
nicipalities operating a
water or sewer utility out-
side of its boundaries may
charge consumers outside
of its boundaries a sur-
charge of not more than 25
percent of such fees, rates,
and charges charged to con-
sumers inside its bound-
aries. The language is clear,
and there is no mention of
the funding of administra-
tive and engineering costs
as a condition of the 25 per-
cent surcharge being appli-
cable. The interlocal
agreement executed in 2009
clearly sets forth (Sections 5
and 6) that the city shall
charge the allowable sur-
charge. In addition, the city
already charges the sur-
charge to customers outside
of its boundaries, and the
city of Inverness, in accor-


COMMENTARY


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The Chronicle is committed to suppoi ting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
sei vices, fundialseis and entei tainment throughout oul
community The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citi us County the best place to live and voi k. Don t
hesitate to contact The Chionicle at 352-563-3226 foi all
of yoLr S1ponsoiship needs!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

dance with an interlocal
agreement executed with
the county in 1989, does
likewise. There is no basis
to treat the residents of this
area differently
Statement The city would
use the assessment fees to
help pay for a separate proj-
ect, a connection pipeline to
the Crystal River Energy
Complex, which "is not a
permitted use of those
funds."
Response: The assess-
ment fees will be used to
repay the related loan. A
portion of the expansion fee
revenue may be used for the
pipeline project that will
take treated effluent to the
Progress Energy complex
for use in a gas flue desul-
phurization process in lieu
of groundwater withdrawal,
since that project will sig-
nificantly expand the dis-
posal capacity of the city's
wastewater system (in addi-
tion to reducing the nutrient
load to King's Bay by 16 per-
cent, per Southwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict). Expanding the capac-
ity of the overall system is
an allowable use of expan-
sion fee revenue.
The city of Crystal River
is committed to meeting its
obligations under the 2009
interlocal agreement and
completing all phases of the
ongoing sewer extension
project
[]
AR. Houston is
Crystal River city manager


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The Citrus County Gator Club
invites you to join us for the
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"- Sat., August 25th
6pm -9pm
Guest Speaker: Former Florida Great
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Come Join Your Fellow Gator Fans for an Evening of
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BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Less water, more cost


Impact ofcorn gu.'r
--lNo ..... 'i .. ..
prices onfood? lg .l gl ll

Not what you .-

think I


CANDICE CHOI
AP Food Industry Writer

-NEW YORK
Cornflakes won't necessar-
ily be more expensive as a
result of rising corn
prices, but the milk you pour
over them might be.
A drought covering two-thirds
of the country has damaged
much of the country's corn crops
and pushed grain prices to
record levels, triggering fears a
spike in food prices will soon
follow.
But many factors determine
the price of goods on supermar-
ket shelves. A diminished corn
supply doesn't mean all food
prices will be affected the same
way
In fact, you're more likely to
see higher prices for milk and
meat than corn on the cob.
That's because the sweet corn
shoppers buy at a grocery store
is grown differently and not as
vulnerable to drought condi-
tions. As for the corn used as
grain feed for cows, however,
farmers are paying more as the
drought persists.
"The financial stress is start-
ing to mount because the bills
(to feed the cows) are bigger
than they were six months ago,"
said Chris Galen, a spokesman
for the National Milk Producers
Federation.
"What will consumers see as a
result? That's where it gets a lit-
tle murkier."
One major factor complicating
the equation is the amount su-
permarkets decide to mark up
the foods they sell to shoppers.
Since supermarkets are facing
stiffer competition from big-box
retailers and drug stores, they're
being much more judicious
about how much of their rising
costs they pass on to customers.
Nevertheless, the Agriculture
Department said last week it ex-
pects grocery prices to rise be-
tween 3 percent and 4 percent
next year, which is slightly
higher than normal.
Here's a look at how different
foods will be impacted:
Meat and dairy
In addition to paying more to
feed their cows, farmers are
dealing with grazing pastures
that have been baked dry The
combination is resulting in
farmers selling off the animals
they can't afford to feed in re-
cent weeks, particularly since
cattle supplies are already lim-
ited and beef prices have been
climbing steadily in recent
years.
Beef from those animals
streaming into auction yards is
expected to start showing up in
grocery stores in November and
December, temporarily driving
down meat prices.
"The irony is that we could
start seeing some price reduc-
tions in the short run," said


S- 4. W -


Associated Press
Butcher Freddie Quina cuts meat July 25 at Super Cao Nguyen in Oklahoma City. The record drought grip-
ping half the country will help push food prices up by 3 percent to 4 percent next year, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture said.


Bruce Jones, a professor of agri-
cultural economics at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin.
By early next year, however,
prices are expected to spike as a
result of the smaller livestock
herds and dwindling meat sup-
plies. Already, the number of
cattle in the U.S. has been drop-
ping for years and the USDA
said this month the nation's cat-
tle inventory was the smallest
since the agency began an an-
nual count in 1973.
Next year, the USDA said beef
prices are expected to jump 4
percent to 5 percent, making it
among the biggest price hikes
for food. Dairy product prices
are expected to climb 3.5 per-
cent to 4.5 percent, poultry and
egg prices up by 3 percent to 4
percent, and pork prices up by
2.5 percent to 3.5 percent.
Fruits and vegetables
So why isn't anyone talking
about a shortage of fruits and
vegetables in light of the
drought? Unlike the corn grown
to make animal feed and oil,
produce sold in supermarkets is
typically irrigated by farms and
not as affected when there's a
lack of rain.
In addition, supermarkets im-
port many of their fruits and
vegetables from other countries
- such as, bell peppers from
Holland so they can keep sup-
plies and prices in check even if
one source isn't producing a
large amount.
Fruits and vegetables are also
a loss leader for supermarkets.
That means they're often sold at
a loss in hopes of attracting
shoppers who will spend on
other items, said Lisa Schacht,
president of the Ohio Produce
Growers and Marketers
Association.
At farmers markets where
consumers buy directly from
growers, a spike in prices might
be more pronounced. That's be-
cause the relentless heat is mak-
ing it harder to grow certain
fruits and vegetables.
"Even if you irrigate your pep-


* GRRR-OCERY ALERT:
Drought has damaged much
of the U.S. corn crop. As a
result, the Agriculture
Department expects grocery
prices to rise between
3 percent and 4 percent
next year, slightly more than
usual.
BEEF UP: Beef prices are
expected to spike by early
next year as a result of
smaller livestock herds and
dwindling meat supplies.
The USDA says the price
hike will be among the
biggest of any food item, up
to 5 percent.
SPIKE-FREE: Fruit and veg-
etable prices are projected
to rise only 2 percent to
3 percent. Produce is typi-
cally irrigated by farms and
not as affected by drought
conditions.

pers, you're seeing a 30 percent
reduction from the heat," said
Bryn Bird, whose family owns
Bird's Haven Farms, a farm out-
side of Granville, Ohio. "They
just don't want to grow."
The result is Bird's Haven is
selling tomatoes at $3.25 per
pound, compared with the $1.99
per pound that's more typical
this time of year The types of
available produce might differ
too. At Bird's Haven, the okra
and eggplant are growing fine in
the heat, but the family has
given up on cucumbers.
"They're coming up, but
they're just not fruiting," Bird
said. "There a lot of vines with
nothing on them."
As for the ears of corn sold at
supermarkets, there shouldn't
be a huge spike in prices. The
sweet corn people eat is typi-
cally irrigated like other fruits
and vegetables. And although
the drought is pressuring farm-
ers, it's not to the same severity
as the corn fields that produce
animal feed.
Overall, the USDA projects an
overall 2 percent to 3 percent
price increase for fruits and veg-


tables next year. That's in line
with this year's increase.
Packaged foods
Another worry is that the
price of many packaged foods
that contain corn or corn ingre-
dients will climb. High-fructose
corn syrup, for example, is used
in a wide variety of foods such
as cookies, yogurt, cereals and
spaghetti sauces. A can of regu-
lar soda contains 40 grams of the
sweetener.
The corn ingredients that are
used in packaged foods mostly
aren't irrigated either, meaning
they're also vulnerable to the va-
garies of weather and the price
fluctuations.
But keep in mind that such in-
gredients are often a tiny frac-
tion of the costs that go into
packaged foods. Among the
many expenses food makers
such as Kellogg Co. and Kraft
Foods Inc. also have to foot:
packaging material, labor, adver-
tising and fuel for trucks to get
their products to stores.
Based even on today's high
corn prices, a 12-ounce box of
cornflakes would have only
about 8 cents worth of corn, said
Paul Bertels, vice president of
production and utilization at the
National Corn Growers
Association.
That's a very small portion of
the $4 or so consumers might
pay for that box of cereal.
"When you look at final food
products, the more processing
there is, the less significant the
price of the raw materials," Ber-
tels said. "A lot of it is advertis-
ing and marketing."
Food makers also have other
ways of managing their costs,
such as cutting back on how
much they put in a package.
Even before the drought, Pepsi-
Co Inc. said earlier this year it
put fewer chips in its Frito-Lay
bags as a way to offset higher in-
gredient costs.
And for consumers watching
their budgets, a few less chips
per bag might be preferable to
paying more, anyway


Stay ahead of the marketing curv(


he only thing a small business
person can count on today is
change. Staying alert to
change allows the entrepreneur to
stay ahead of the marketing curve.
This practice is a large
part of all strategic plan- ,
ning. Markets change -
constantly and generally
have a ripple effect that .-
impacts small busi-
nesses.
Keeping a watchful
eye on trends that might
create changes in your
business is essential to Dr
long- and short-term
viability. He
The strategic path EXPEl
Success through MAT
growth can no longer
only be measured by remaining
with the same product line or serv-
ice offerings. Strategic mistakes,
during shortfalls in revenue, might
include doing more of the same ex-
pecting improvement in sales.
When a market changes or goes
away, making more of the same


e
r
Ri
rT


won't help. There's no one to sell to.
Staying ahead of the curve means
developing a strategic plan to offset
an abrupt change in your market.
Your business plan
The foundation of your
business is the business
plan, which should pro-
vide for strategic plan-
ning. Review your plan
annually Frequent as-
sessments can open up
ideas for growth
opportunities.
Sudden shifts in mar-
kets can happen as a re-
derick sult of natural disasters,
zog arrival or departure of
IENCE major industries and
*ERS price point spikes or
higher costs. Perform a
SWOT analysis with each yearly re-
view of your business performance.
Remember to SWOT
Performing a SWOT analysis is a
great business discipline. SWOT
stands for identifying:
Strengths areas that give you
an advantage. Look at how they can


be enhanced and if they will remain
positive in the future.
Weaknesses areas in which
your business may not be competi-
tive, and how might this shortcom-
ing be avoided.
Opportunities look for
emerging markets and trends that
could increase sales.
Threats conditions that may
compromise your product line or
service levels. This may represent
new technology, improved service
or product performance, etc.
Success through
information gathering
Information technology has
greatly improved marketing re-
search. If one looks hard enough
there is virtually no limit to finding
opportunity through information
readily available.
Here are a few old and new ways
to collect information to enhance
your business.
New and old techniques
Industry websites and trade as-
sociation memberships.
Specialized magazines,


newsletters and commur
newspapers.
Social media blogs and
cial networking sites such as Fa
book, LinkedIn and Twitter,
latter offers Real Time insights.
Don't be afraid to experim(
Nothing wrong with some mistal
It happens in many good business
Try new things. Some will work, c
ers won't that's business!
SCORE mentors
If, as you read this, there are so
unanswered questions you ha
then it's time to call SCORE at
249-1236. Always leave informant
that allows us to call you back. Off
hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesc
through Thursday It's best to
ahead and make an appointment
There is no charge for our m
touring services and the literature
free. Let us fill in the gaps and h
you grow your business.


Dr FrederickJ. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County SCOi
Email therzog@tampabay.rrco


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Moonlight


to tackle


your debt

D EAR BRUCE:
There was a time
when I was con-
vinced that store credit
cards were the way to go.
Unfortunately, they got
the best of me. Five years
later, I'm still trying to pay
them off. The problem is
the interest on the cards is
as much as 22 percent. I
am not even close to pay-
ing off the principal
amounts. My credit is shot,
and I can't get any loans at
the moment
Do you think I should
consider debt consolida-
tion? I have contacted the
companies and asked
them to lower the interest
rates, but to avail. I don't
know where to turn next.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: When
you say "debt consolida-
tion," I think you are re-
ferring to companies that
negotiate with your credi-
tors for lower rates of in-
terest. Debt consolidators
most likely would charge
you an upfront fee; they
also might charge you a
percentage of the amount
you pay the lender. Even
though you might end up
paying less per month be-
cause of these companies'
ability to negotiate with
your creditors, I would be
reluctant to pay a contin-
uing fee.
If you have a full-time
job and cannot put a dent
in this debt, you should
consider getting a part-
time job and devoting that
money to paying it down.
Good luck.
DEAR BRUCE: My
mother recently died, and
I discovered she has no
will, estate, executor, etc.
When she died, she had
only $350 in her bank ac-
count, which has subse-
quently been closed out.
She has outstanding
bills, and there is no
money to pay any of them.
She didn't even have life
insurance that we could
use to pay these bills. We
had to pay for the funeral
with the money she had
and supplement it with
our own money What hap-
pens to the rest of her
bills? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The
easiest thing for you to do
is to write to each of the
creditors. Enclose a copy
of your mother's death
certificate, along with a
letter telling the creditor
there was no money left in
her estate even to pay for
her funeral.
You can further state
h the estate was not pro-
bated because there was
nity nothing to probate.
I think this should close
so- out the matter Whatever
ace- you do, don't ignore the
the bills. Meet this head-on
and let the creditors know
ent. the situation.
kes. DEAR BRUCE: My
ses. mother, who is 66, works
)th- full time, rents her home
and has nothing set up for
her retirement. Essen-
me tially, she has nothing. She
ve, recently inherited some
S52- money $114,000, to be
ion exact. She has always
fice been a frail person, and I
day guess you could say sickly
call as well. I see her needing
t. some type of assistance in
en- the future. What is the
e is best thing we can do with
elp this money for her? SJ.
in Wyoming
DEAR SJ.: I think what
you're asking me is how
you can protect the
RE. $114,000 in the event your
m. See Page D3










D2

SUNDAY
AUGUST 5, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan RE
this:
ME mm-r


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Mixer, golf, BBQ and more!


Mark your calendars now for a
series of Industry Appreciation
activities sponsored by the Eco-
nomic Development Council and
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce in cooperation with
Citrus County Visitors & Conven-
tion Bureau!
Additionally, we would like to
thank our sponsors, without whom
we could not present these activi-
ties: TITLE Sponsor of all the ac-
tivities Superior Residences of
Lecanto/Sunflower Springs As-
sisted Living Facility; MIXER pre-


senting sponsor-Crystal Chevrolet;
LUNCH presenting sponsor -
Progress Energy/Duke; and BBQ
presenting sponsor Sibex Inc.
For the first time, we kick off the
month with an Industry Apprecia-
tion Mixer hosted by Crystal
Chevrolet from 5 to 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 6, Take this opportunity
to see their new facility and min-
gle with other businesses. This is a
free event; however, please regis-
ter at wwwcitruscountycham-
bercom so our gracious host can
prepare food and refreshments.


CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development
Council, Inc.


We continue the next day, Fri-
day, Sept. 7, with the EDC Indus-
try Appreciation Lunch at the
College of Central Florida,
Lecanto Campus. At this lunch-
eon, we announce the winners of
the Outstanding Small Business,
Outstanding Employer or Corpo-


rate Citizen, and Person of the
Year. Submit your nominations
now for the above awards at
www.citrusedc.com.
New to our celebrations this year
is an Industry Appreciation Golf
Outing. Hosted by the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce and
the Citrus County Economic Devel-
opment Council, the Friday, Sept.
14, fall golf outing provides one
more method to meet other busi-
ness professionals. The day begins
with lunch at SkyviewTerrace be-
fore the shotgun start to the play on
the beautiful Terra Vista Golf
Course. Cost is $75 per person or
$300 per foursome (all prices in-
clude lunch). Visit www.citrus
edc.com to pay through PayPal.
Purchase your tickets now for the


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce
conclusion of the month-long festiv-
ities the popular EDC Industry
Appreciation BBQ. Join us at M&B
Dairy for the BBQ from 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday, Sept 20. Plans are in full
swing to make this a memorable
evening with great food and com-
pany as well as fantastic music. Visit
www.citrusedc.com for more details
and to register/pay for events.
Consider showcasing your busi-
ness at these well attended events;
sponsorships are still available,
call 352-795-3149.


Donna Alexander, holding scissors, joins with Sonic staff and Chamber Ambassadors as she cuts the ribbon
July 31 at Sonic's Grand Opening. Chamber Ambassadors pictured include: Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast
Bank; Tom Corcoran, LifeCare Center; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brent-
wood; Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee and George Pushee, associate members; Kelley Paul,Wollinka-Wikle Title In-
surance Agency; Jenne Vickers, Kiddie Kampus Learning Center; Nicholle Fernandez, Coldwell Banker; Janet
Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; George Bendtsen, Insurance by
George; Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers; and Josh Wooten, President and CEO Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.



Warm welcome for Sonic as


it returns to Crystal River


Sonic Drive-In Restaurants offi-
cially re-opened their Crystal
River location July 31, with a Rib-
bon-Cutting Ceremony sponsored
by the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce. Dozens of Chamber
members and Ambassadors
turned out for the event, along
with local residents and their kids.
Local FM powerhouse Citrus 95.3
was on hand to pump up the vol-
ume at the fun- and prize-filled
event.


Florida Franchisee, the Belle
Grande Group, joined the Cham-
ber over the summer, in prepara-
tion for Sonic's return to Citrus
County
"Getting involved with the local
Chamber was likely the single
most important move we made
upon our return to Crystal River,"
said Media and Marketing Direc-
tor Donna Alexander. "Staff there
has connected us with the 'who's
who' of Citrus County, and intro-


duced us to business leaders and
local civic groups that have clearly
supported our business, and
helped make our return a
success."
Sonic/Belle Grande Group Area
Supervisor Eric Salter also cred-
ited the Citrus County Workforce
Connection with getting the store
staffed. The agency provided
nearly 50 new employees to the
franchise, through local hiring
events and referrals.


CONGRATULATIONS TO:
Plantation Inn- featured in Au-
gust's Coastal Angler Magazine! Check
out page 66 of the August issue and the
article titled Scalloping Florida's West
Coast. Follow the link: www.coastalangler
mag.com/magazines, Incfl/
Lecanto Veterinary Hospital and
Dr. Phillips New Image Award Winner
for July 2012.
DISASTER RECOVERY CENTER:
Citrus County has a disaster recovery
center to help those whose homes or
businesses were affected by Tropical
Storm Debby. At the Citrus County Emer-
gency Operations Center, 3549 Saunders
Way, Lecanto, the center will remain open
through Wednesday, Aug. 8. Hours are 8


UPCOMING EVENTS
Aug. 15 Inserts for September/C
ber newsletter due to Chamber Offic
Aug. 16 -After Hours Business
Networking Mixer COMFORT
KEEPERS/LIFE CARE CENTER
Aug. 17 Next Generation Profess
als Workshop: The How of Wow!
Sept. 6 Industry Appreciation Mi
CRYSTAL CHEVROLET
Sept. 7 EDC Industry Appreciatic
Lunch
Sept. 14 Celebrate Industry
Appreciation Month Golf Outing
Sept. 20 Industry Appreciation E
EDC at M & B DAIRY
Sept. 22 Business Women's Allia
Health& Fitness Expo
Oct. 11 After Hours Business Ne
working Mixer NATURE COAST Ei
Oct. 12 October Chamber Lunch
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
Oct. 23 After Hours Business
Networking Mixer -ALPACA MAGIC


a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday,
closed Sunday. If possible, before going to
a disaster recovery center, people with
storm or flooding losses should register
with FEMA. There are three ways to
apply:
By calling 800-621-FEMA(3362). Or
if TTY is needed, call 800-462-7585.
Online at
www.DisasterAssistance.gov.
By tablet or smartphone using the
FEMA app or m.fema.gov
RED CARPET MIXER: Comfort
Keepers and LifeCare Center of Citrus
County host a Red Carpet event Thurs-
day, Aug. 16, at the LifeCare Center facil-
ity at 3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto.
Let the valet park your car while relax to


the sounds of a sax player and enjoy
homemade marshmallows and a choco-
late fountain.
GRAND OPENING: Join Superior
Residences of Lecanto Memory Care,
4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, as they
celebrate their open house in their new fa-
cility from 3 to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17.
Come and experience the moment!
RSVP: 352-746-5483.
RNC it's almost here: Tune in to
Front Row Tampa Bay a live, stream-
ing Web TV broadcast airing Aug. 27-30
that will showcase life, business and eco-
nomic opportunities across Tampa Bay
during the Republican National Conven-
tion. Learn more at http://frontrowtampa
bay.com/.


NEW WAY TO HONOR

GARY MAIDHOF'S MEMORY


Citrus is such an amazing and
giving community that the
$10,000 goal for a STEPS schol-
arship in Gary Maidhof's name
has been exceeded. Isn't that
great!!
It was suggested that if we
reached the $10,000 goal, we
could start an Education Fund
for Gary's 3-year-old grandson,
Jeramiah. An account is now
open for that specific purpose at
SunTrust Bank of the Nature
Coast. This is another opportu-
nity to continue to help Gary's
family
The advantage of this ap-
proach versus a special-purpose
scholarship for him at our local
community college is that he may
not want to go to CF or they might
not offer what he wants to study
All checks should be made


payable to: Jeramiah Maidhof
Education Fund (yes, that is the
correct spelling of Jeramiah).
These funds may be sent to any of
three places:
Citrus County Administra-
tive Offices, Attn: Brad Thorpe,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness,
FL 34450;
Charlotte Maidhof (custo-
dian of the account) 1050 N. Ot-
tawa Ave., Lecanto, FL
34461-9774;
Avis Marie Craig, Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, West Citrus Gov't Center -
Meadowcrest, 1540 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River,
FL 34428.
You may call Avis Craig at 564-
7151, if you have questions.
-Information provided by
Avis Craig and Susan Gill.


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...

Debra Moore, DVM
TLC Animal Hospital,
Inverness

Sandra Moffett
Wal-Mart, Vision Center,
Inverness


RJ Cobb
Olive Garden, Inverness

Rick Bruggner
The Hedgeman, Inverness


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Arbonne International Consultants








i ll
J


Arbonne International Consultants Sue Grable and Diane
DeWinter are ready to share Anti-Aging, Health & Wellness,
Swiss formulated, and American made products by pamper-
ing clients and training persons with integrity and enthusi-
asm to do the same. Call 362-603-4436 and find out how to
receive $125 of products FREE. Ambassadors of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce join Sue as she cuts the rib-
bon opening her business. Back row, from left, are: Tom Cor-
coran, LifeCare Center of Citrus County; Sarah Fitts, First
International Title; Kelley Paul, Wollinka-Wikle Title Insur-
ance Agency; and Life Ambassador David Heinz, Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation. Middle row, from left, are: Bill
Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Crystal Ashe, Health
Center at Brentwood; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank Inver-
ness; and Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank Beverly Hills.


Join us as we celebrate Industry

Appreciation Month in September


News You CAN USE


ll- "like" us on
facebook










Are you ready to check the ballot box? On this
weeks Chamber Chat, Susan Gill Supervisor of
Elections co-hosts with Melissa Benefield and
answers all of your election day questions. Want
to look instantly younger? In the second segment
you will discover the latest in advanced skin care
with Sue Grable from Arbonne International.
Ready for a vacation? Sue Fullerton from Walk
Don't Run Travel has a 5 day cruise on Carnival
that is so affordable you can even bring the kids!
In our final segment Dorene Bettis tells us how
we can donate our unwanted household items to
Yard Sale for the Troops, an organization that
sends care packages to our military over seas.
You have three chances to watch Chamber Chat
this week. Monday at 6pm, Thursday at 8am and
Friday at 1pm-- Don't miss it!
Be sure to "LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook.
If you would like to be featured on Chamber Chat
email Melissa Benefield at
SpotlightMelissa@aol.com


_____r\





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Donation to United Way


Special to the Chronicle
The United Way of Citrus County was recently presented
with a generous contribution from Cancer and Blood Disease
Center of Lecanto. The United Way is so thankful for the sup-
port of this wonderful community partner. Pictured from left
to right are United Way CEO, Amy Meek; Dr. Upender Rao of
Cancer and Blood Disease Center of Lecanto; and United
Way President-Elect Ray Chirayath.


Workforce sets
August workshops
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties is offering
more than 40 programs during
the month of August for job
seekers interested in sharpen-
ing their employability skills.
Ranging from open resume
labs to two- and three-day
workshops, the programs are
available at no charge to job
seekers throughout Workforce
Connection's three-county
region.
Participants must be fully
registered with Workforce Con-
nection through the Employ
Florida Marketplace (EFM) at
www.EmployFlorida.com. Addi-
tional workshop registration
may also be required.
Complete program and regis-
tration information is available
at Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.clm-
workforce.com. The following
programs take place at Work-
force Connection Resource
Centers in Chiefland, Inverness
and Ocala, as well as at various
community locations:
Beyond Barriers: Path-
ways to Employment is for
those whose background is-
sues create a barrier to finding
a job. The workshops take
place at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 10 and
Aug. 24 in Ocala.
Computer Basics is de-
signed for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level
computer skills. Sessions are
set for at 9 a.m. Aug. 9 and at
3:30 p.m. Aug. 21 in Chiefland
and at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 17 and at
3:30 p.m. Aug. 31 in Ocala.
Employ Florida Market-
place Essentials, Nail that Inter-
view and Optimal Resume
workshops begin at 8:15 a.m.
Aug. 16 and Aug. 30 in Ocala.
"Nail that Interview" workshops
are also at 1:15 p.m. Aug. 15
and Aug. 29 in Chiefland and at
1:15 p.m. Aug. 17 and Aug. 31
in Inverness.
Navigating the New World
of Work" two-day workshop
takes place every Tuesday and
Wednesday in Ocala beginning
Aug. 14 with sessions at 8:15
a.m. for new job seekers and
those with barriers to employ-
ment and at 1:15 p.m. for dis-
placed professionals.
It is also offered at 8:15 a.m.
Aug. 7 and Aug. 21 in Chiefland
and at 1:15 p.m. Aug. 9 and
Aug. 23 in Inverness. The work-
shops cover how to identify
abilities and transferable skills,
job search strategies/targeted
resume development, inter-
viewing skills/follow up and how
to work effectively with their
own Workforce Connection
placement specialist.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" (Community Work-
shop) offers many of the high-
lights of the two-day sessions
but in a two-hour format.
The condensed workshops
take place in Citrus County at 10
a.m. Aug. 23 at the Homosassa
Library, at 4 p.m. Aug. 23 at the
Central Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills and at 2 p.m. Aug. 23 at the
Coastal Region Library in Crys-
tal River. They will also be of-
fered in Marion County at 2 p.m.
Aug. 14 at Forest Library in Ock-
lawaha, at 10 a.m. Aug. 23 at
Dunnellon Library, at 5:30 p.m.
Aug. 23 at Forest Community
Center in Ocklawaha and at 4
p.m. Aug. 30 at Taylor College in
Belleview.
Open Resume Labs are at



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

mother needs some type of
public assistance, such as
Medicaid.
You will need to concern


9 a.m. and 2 p.m. each Monday
in Ocala, as well as at 9 a.m.
every Friday. The labs also take
place at 8:15 a.m. Aug. 14 and
Aug. 28 in Chiefland, and at 1:15
p.m. Aug. 14 and Aug. 28 in In-
verness. Drop-ins are welcome
and no additional registration is
required, but space is limited.
Refueling and Retooling
for Success for Professionals
Instruction during the three-day
workshop provides eligible par-
ticipants with career tools and
strategies to stay focused and
successful during career transi-
tions. The three-day workshop
begins Aug. 21 at 8 a.m. at the
College of Central Florida's Cit-
rus campus in Lecanto.
Workforce Connection Re-
source Centers are in Citrus
County at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., in Inverness; in Levy
County at 109 N.W. Third Ave.,
in Chiefland; and in Marion
County at 2703 N.E. 14th St., in
Ocala. To sign up for any of the
workshops, call 352-291-9552
or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410 or
register online at https://www.
timecenter.com/wcworkshops.
Fundraiser benefits
animal shelter
The public is invited to a
fundraising event Aug. 23 to
benefit Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services at Black Dia-
mond Clubhouse in Lecanto.
Park Lane Jewelry is hosting
the event, which will include a
25-cent auction, raffles, jewelry
giveaways and door prizes do-
nated by local businesses.
Bring one or two rolls of quar-
ters to play all evening.
Doors open at 5:15 p.m.
Tickets are $12 and include
beverage, appetizers and a
paddle for participation in
"Quarter Mania." Tickets must
be purchased by Aug. 8.
For information, call Kristine
Hamilton at 352-302-0576.
CF Foundation
slates meetings
Meetings of the CF Founda-
tion of the College of Central
Florida are open to the public. A
copy of the agenda will be avail-
able at each meeting. For infor-
mation, contact the CF
Foundation office, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala, FL 34474.
CF Foundation Executive
Committee Meeting, 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 15, at CF En-
terprise Center, Foundation Of-
fice, 3001 S.W. College Road,
Ocala. Purpose: general busi-
ness of the committee.
CF Foundation Board of
Directors Meeting, 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 22, at CF
Founders Hall Boardroom,
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road. Purpose: general
business of the board.
FHCA honors
Allen Curtis
More than 600 long-term care
professionals from across
Florida were on hand to ap-
plaud Allen Curtis, administrator
of Citrus Health and Rehabilita-
tion Center in Inverness, as he
was honored by the Florida
Health Care Association as the
2012 Nursing Home Administra-
tor of the Year.
The award was presented by
FHCA President Nina Willing-
ham during the association's
annual conference in Orlando
and is the pinnacle of recogni-
tion for nursing home adminis-
trators in Florida's long-term
care profession.
Under his leadership since


yourself with the "look-
back" period of five years.
That means that if your
mother requires Medicaid
assistance in the future, the
government will look back
five years in her financial
history. If during that time
she had money but gave it to


Special to the Chronicle
Angelic Air, which was recently awarded an A+ rating and accreditation with the BBB of Central Florida, attended the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce awards banquet this year and took second place for their booth at the Citrus
County Fair.


Angelic Air earns BBB accreditation


Special to the Chronicle

On July 23, Angelic Air received
their accreditation by the Better
Business Bureau serving Central
Florida.
"Angelic Air has become a leader in
the Air Conditioning and Heating in-
dustry by providing the newest tech-
nological advances while still
extending old fashioned service,"
said Susan Shipp, director of market-
ing at Angelic Air. "Angelic Air's A+
rating and accreditation with the
BBB is confirmation of the quality of
service that customers in the Central
Florida area have become accus-
tomed to receiving for over 30 years."
With facilities in Marion, Lake,
Sumter, Hernando, and Pasco coun-
ties and a corporate headquarters in
Citrus County, Angelic Air is able to
easily respond to customers in those


Special to the Chronicle
Allen Curtis, administrator of
Citrus Health and Rehabilita-
tion Center, displays his
plaque proclaiming him 2012
Nursing Home Administrator
of the Year.

2003, the facility has had an ex-
cellent survey history, including
a zero deficiency licensure sur-
vey in 2012.
"FHCA is pleased to honor
Allen Curtis with this prestigious
award," said FHCA Executive
Director Emmett Reed. "His
leadership in the profession
and dedication to the residents
he serves makes him an excel-
lent role model for other long-
term care professionals across
the state."
The Nursing Home Adminis-
trator of the Year Award is given
annually by Florida Health Care
Association to a nursing home
administrator of an FHCA-
member facility with demon-
strated service to the
association, along with his/her
significant and measurable
achievements in overall facility
administration, workforce inno-
vation, survey record and im-
plementation of quality
improvement programs, includ-
ing the Advancing Excellence
campaign and culture change.
Workforce sets
hiring events
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection will conduct two hiring
events to help Senture Connect
fill 125 full-time temporary
openings for inbound health
care insurance agents.
Job interviews will be con-
ducted from 2 to 4 p.m. Tues-
day, Aug. 7, and Tuesday, Aug.
14 at the College of Central
Florida's University Center in
Ocala. Interviews are by ap-
pointment only and may be
scheduled by calling 352-873-
7939, ext. 5707, or 800-434-
JOBS, ext. 5707.


someone else, the govern-
ment will expect that money
as reimbursement.
If your mother gives that
money to you, which she can
do, claiming against her life-
time exemption, and if she
requires no assistance for
the next five years, then the


areas as needed. Angelic Air offers
air conditioning and heating mainte-
nance, service, sales and installation,
specializing in indoor air quality It
also services, sells and installs pool
heat pumps and does duct and dryer
vent cleaning.
The Better Business Bureau's mis-
sion is to be the leader in advancing
marketplace trust. The BBB accom-
plishes this mission by setting high
standards for business conduct and
encouraging and supporting best
practices. The BBB celebrates role
models by awarding accreditation to
those businesses who comply with
their standards while denouncing
substandard behavior which creates
a community of trustworthy busi-
nesses. The BBB standards call for
building trust, embodying integrity,
advertising honestly and telling the
truth, being transparent, honoring


Senture Connect, a Kentucky-
based company with offices in
Ocala, provides call center serv-
ices for clients in the insurance,
financial and governmental
fields. The successful job candi-
date will be offered work from
September to December once
they have earned their Florida
Health Insurance Sales Agent li-
cense.
Senture will cover training
costs and pay the state license
examination fees for qualified
applicants. The inbound health
care insurance agent position
pays $13 an hour; full- and
part-time positions are
available.
A company overview as well
as details about the position
and training program will be
provided during the hiring
events. The inbound healthcare
insurance agent offers a con-
sultative sales approach, help-
ing customers make educated
coverage selection based on
their needs. No hard-sell tactics
are involved and no lead gener-
ation is required.
Eligible applicants must have
a high school diploma or GED
and strong computer skills as
well as excellent verbal and
communication skills. Previous
customer service experience is
also required as well as the ca-
pability and desire to success-
fully complete the 40-hours of
unpaid training and testing in
order to obtain the state license.
Bilingual (English and Span-
ish) candidates are encouraged
to apply and must be able to
speak and write in both
languages.
For information about the po-
sition, go to www.employflorida.
com and reference Job Order
No. 9696889 in the advanced
job search.
Workforce Connection is the
local, business-led organization
that strives to connect qualified
workers with local employers in
Citrus, Levy and Marion coun-
ties through cost-effective, high
quality employment, training
and education services in part-
nership with businesses,
community-based organiza-
tions, educational institutions
and governmental agencies.
SRRMC welcomes
doctors to staff
CRYSTAL RIVER On July
15, Kenneth L. Savage Jr.,
D.O., and Smita Padala, M.D.,
were appointed to the medical
staff at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center.


money is sheltered. You can
spend it on her as you wish,
and she'll be eligible for
public assistance. You might
have her keep $5,000 or so
for her own expenses dur-
ing that time.
The morality of this is an-
other question, but that's


promises, being responsive and safe-
guarding privacy
As a BBB-accredited business, An-
gelic Air contractually agrees to ad-
here to compliance with BBB's code
of business practices and the high
standards set by the organization for
ethical behavior. The BBB is a re-
source for the public, providing ob-
jective, unbiased information about
businesses.
According to BBB reports by
Princeton Research, seven in 10 con-
sumers say they are more likely to
buy from a company designated as a
BBB Accredited Business, To find out
more about Angelic Air's accredita-
tion and The BBB, visit the Better
Business Bureau website at:
www.bbb. org/central-florida/
business-reviews/air-conditioning-
contractors-and-systems/angelic-air-
in-inverness-fl-4001265.


Dr. Savage specializes in
family practice.
"Dr. Savage's education, ex-
perience and
passion for
helping peo-
ple align with .
the hospital's
mission to ,
provide ex-
cellence in
health care," Kenneth
said Joyce savage Jr.
Brancato, Seven Rivers
chief execu- Regional.
tive officer.
"He will provide the best quality
care for our patients."
Savage graduated from Cit-
rus High School in 1997,
earned a bachelor of science in
biology from University of South
Florida in 2001 and received his
medical degree from Kansas
City University of Medicine and
Biosciences in 2005. He com-
pleted an osteopathic internship
in 2006 and a family practice
residency in 2008 at Suncoast
Hospital in Largo. Savage joins
Seven Rivers Regional after
managing his own practice in
Lutz for four years. He is board
certified in family medicine.
Dr. Padala specializes in
nephrology (kidney function
and disease).
"Dr.
Padala's clini-
cal research
and special-
ized training
compliment
the hospital's
services,"
Brancato
Smita
said. "She will Padala
provide the Seven Rivers
best quality Regional.
care for our
patients."
Padala is board-certified in
internal medicine and board-eli-
gible in nephrology. She re-
ceived her medical degree from
Christian Medical College in
Ludhiana, India, and a Master
of Science in chronic kidney
disease epidemiology from
Tufts University in Boston,
Mass. Padala completed an in-
ternal medicine residency at St.
Vincent Hospital in Worcester,
Mass., and a fellowship in
nephrology at Tufts University.
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, a 128-bed general,
medical/surgical acute care fa-
cility serving Citrus, Levy and
South Marion counties, opened
its doors in 1978. Seven Rivers
Regional is fully accredited by
The Joint Commission and has


the way to avoid Medicaid
responsibilities.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral


earned the Gold Seal of Ap-
proval as a Certified Primary
Stroke Center. Visit Seven
RiversRegional.com.
Clark named
assistant VP
CRYSTAL RIVER Cindy
Clark has received the title of
assistant vice president in Capi-
tal City Bank's retail banking di-
vision. In her role as market
leader, Clark oversees the busi-
ness development efforts and
management responsibilities of
the Crystal River Office, at 101
SE U.S. 19.
Clark joined the Capital City
Bank team as a community
banker in 2006 and was later
promoted to market leader. She
began her banking career as a
foreign currency teller with
American Express in Fulda,
Germany, and subsequently
earned 28 years of experience
serving in a number of roles in-
cluding teller, customer service
representative, regional opera-
tions coordinator, small busi-
ness lender and office manager.
Clark is active in her commu-
nity, donating her time to a
number of local philanthropic
organizations. She currently
serves on the vocation board
and scholarship committee for
her local Rotary Club and has
served as a board member for
Altrusa of Citrus County and
the Dunnellon Chamber of
Commerce. She is also an ac-
tive supporter of the annual Key
Training Auction.
Capital City Bank Group Inc.
(Nasdaq: CCBG) is one of the
largest publicly traded financial
services companies headquar-
tered in Florida. The company's
bank subsidiary, Capital City
Bank, was founded in 1895 and
now has 70 banking offices and
74 ATMs in Florida, Georgia
and Alabama. Visit
www.ccbg.com.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Details are available from
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's Crystal River of-
fice at 28 N.W. U.S. 19, phone
352-795-3149, or from any
Business Women's Alliance
member.


interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can
now be heard at
wwwbrucewilliams com.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 D3


















Classifieds



-d-
BEVERLY HILLS EXPERIENCED TUTOR
3Bd, 2Ba,FLA RM, CHA Professional Educator Granny Nannies
w Wa/Dr hookups Rent panish/English Speak CNA'S & HHA'S,
$650 Dep $750 Pets w ers of Other Languages NeededImmediately.
dep. Cats okay, Dogs call (352) 563-6523 Needed rtifiedly.
me. Ph 352-794-0211, (352) 794-3811
813-340-1352
BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D MEDICAL
WIFI UTILITIES OFFICE
$450 (352) 603-0611 Jumbo Gulf Shrimp RPTNIT
headless 16/20ct $7/1, RECEPTIONIST
Nursing Homes 10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
are not the (772)781-1262 -Receives, collects,
are not the verifies, records,
only alternative! dates & distributes
Loving Adult Care patient demo-
Home St. Lic#6906450 graphic, physician
Alzheimer/Dementia and financial infor-
No problem 503-7052 nation in accord-
STEACHER ancewithMBO
Refurbished Club Car standards &
golf cart in great Fulltime position. 40 hr guidelines.
shape! 2006 model w/ certification needed -Coordinates and
upgraded 2010 electric LITTLE DISCIPLE verifies insurance
motor. 48v, PRESCHOOL benefits & eligibility
includes charger. 352-302-2383 on all patient accts
$2,900. (352) 302-8048 2 1 -Requests co-pays
SUMTER and co-ins from pa-
TEACHER tients & documents
SWAP MEETS accts according to
NO SHOW Fulltime/Part time, Exp. policy;balances &
AUGUST 5th Req. CDA Preferred maintains cash-
TADPOLES EARLY drawer and daily
SEE YOU! LEARNING deposit.
SEPTEMBER 2th (352) 560-4222 -Answers verbal and
1-800-438-8559__ written requests in
1-800-438-8559 __ accordance with


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



FREE
2 Dishwashers
working when removed
Call (352) 795-0216
FREE
8 Kittens
Calico to Black
Free to good home
(352) 794-3656
Free Dog
Blackmouth Cur
Female, 2 /2 yrs old
spayed
(352) 746-1019
Free Dog
Female, Great, Lovable
House trained, good
watch dog
(352) 364-3675
free oak firewood haul
away from my home.
Tree cut in March 2012.
Homosassa, FL
628-3421 call before
you come. Thanks.
FREE
WOODEN PALLETS
Rear of CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Help Yourself
But Be Neat.
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Pit Bull &
Cur Dog puppies
2 females, 2 males dona-
tions for their care up till
adoption are accepted
(352) 423-0819




Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262




Lost 2 Gold Rings
1 I love you Ring
I1 Bow Ring
Crystal River or
Homosassa Area
over 2 wks ago
(352)279-7117
LOST CAT Half himala-
yan, half siamese, Tan,
Blue eyes, neutered and
declawed, about a year
old, Lost in Pine Ridge
7/29/12 If you have any
info please call
(352) 302-6928
Lost Cell Phone
US Cellular
In Inverness Area
Bright Blue carrying
case
REWARD
(352) 586-9498



Found Walking Cane
on 8/2
Inverness Walmart
parking lot.
Call to Identify
(352) 419-7627
Set of keys in Shamrock
Area found 8/1. Call to
identify. 795-7282




ADVERTISE YOUR
WAY TO SUCCESS!!
Call Advertising
Networks of Florida for
statewide & regional
advertising
866-742-1373

NOW
ENROLLING
For All Programs
* COSMETOLOGY
*'BARBER
| MASSAGE THERAPY
1*NAIL TECH
SKIN CARE TECH

I BENE'S
| International
I School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
I Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415 0




Your World


<94'?49e44u


CROpNiLE




1*, VI, l'-" ll n, I -e n' l


Clerk Typist
Announcement
# 12-41

Clerical and
customer service
work providing
assistance in the
Citrus County Library
System administrative
office, Central
Ridge Library.
$8.45 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
by Friday, August 10,
2012 EOE/ADA





HAIR STYLIST

Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630






TheIPortHotelandMarina
HIRING
HOUSEKEEPERS
Experienced Preferred
Apply in Person:
1610 SE ParadiseCircle
Crystal River





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetyourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Avante
At Inverness

is currently seeking
full time
C.N.A. for 3-11 shift
apply on line @
Avantecenters.com

CYPRESS CREEK
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 high risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for

Registered Nurse
And a
Licensed
Therapist

Competitive pay rate
Benefit package

Fax resume to
352-527-2235 or
email to: sharon.facto
@us.g4s.com
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO


Medical Assistant
or LPN
Requirements:
-Current Florida CMA
or LPN certificate/
license
EMR experience
(especially eClinical
Works) preferred
-Must be able to
read, write and
speak the English
language fluently
-Strong analytical
and PC skills
Duties
Greet and room
patients
-Prepare equipment
and assist Physicians
-Take and record
vital signs
-Explain procedures
and assist with
patient education
-Draw blood and
administer injections
-Answer phones and
respond to patient
questions
-EMR and Lab
interface focal
Send Resume to
Michelle@
Health-Wellcare.com

MEDICAL
CAREERS

begin here Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
WWW.
CenturaOnline.com


I










1


HIH-AA guidelines and
departmental proce-
dures; responds to re-
quests for patient fi-
nancial information;
investigates
concerns/issues and
may refer customers
to appropriate hospi-

-Explains consent
forms and obtains
patient signatures in
accordance with all
applicable state and
federal insurance
regulations.
-Performs administra-
tive support duties
Send Resume to
Michelle @
Health-Wellcare.com

Open Position

Director of
Community Relations
Must have
knowledge in a
Nursing home setting
with min. of 3 years
of experience
Medicare and
Medicaid knowledge
Maintian a strong
relationship with
hospitals, doctors
and community
have the ability to
establish, implement
and maintain
effective marketing
and public relations

Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1794 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
1 34429

Part time
RECEPTIONIST

For Busy Cardiology
Practice. Cardiology
experience, required
Email resume to:
cvsllc1O@gmail.com

UNIT SUPERVISOR
RN PREFERRED

Osprey Point
Nursing Center
(Mon-Fri 9a-4p)
1104 N. Main Street,
Bushnell 33513,
or Fax Resume
(352) 568-8780





ATTENTION

NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722





COOK/CHEF

Experience in order-
ing, specials, mainte-
nance, etc. Call Bob
(352) 560-0012





CompetLtivs
AUTO TECHS Needed.
C o m p e t i t i v e
ay & Berefits. ASE & or Ford
C e r t i -
fed line techs. Call (352)4934297
for Russ Hall for in person
resume/interview appoint-
ment.

Carpet Cleaners
Positions open now at
Stanley Steemer.
Clean Fl MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
include Paid training,
401k, holiday pay
and more!!
Apply at 911 Eden Dr.
Inverness, or email
toni.aronert@
steemer.com

DECCA CABLE
is looking for a
CableTechnician

Candidate should
possess strong techni-
cal ability In all areas
of CATV. On-Call
duty required and
valid FL drivers
license with good
driving record.
Apply at Oak Run
SR200/I 10th Street
Ocala or call
352-854-6557 X13
EEO/DFWP


D4 SUNDAY,AUGUST 5, 2012



Ci chronicle


AVAILABLE.

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CH-ko'NIcE


TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Commission based,
write your own check.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean


Director of
Music Ministry

P/T Needed immedi-
ately to obtain an
application
Call Hernando UMC
352 -726-7245
or email
hernandoumc@tam-
pabay.rrcom
EXP. TREE CLIMBER
& BUCKET TRUCK
OPERATOR
CALL 352-344-2696
Experienced
Paver Installer

Immediate
Employment with
local landscape Co.
Must Driver's License
(352) 621-7700






CHkONIcE
Applications
being accepted for

ROUTE MANAGER

for the single copy
sales of newspapers.
Good organizational
skill needed, experi-
ence with sales, able
to work in data
spreadsheets, good
people skills, ability to
work all hours. Send
resume to
kstewart@
chronicleonline.com


C OHpNidE


ATTN: DRIVERS...

Apply Now, 13 Driver
Positions Top 5% Pay,
401 K,. Great Insur-
ance New KW Con-
ventionals 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782

Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 12-43
Full time position
assisting volunteers
and clients at the
Central Ridge
Community Center
in Beverly Hills. Must
possess valid Florida
Driver License. Start-
ing pay $7.69 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
by Friday, August 10,
2012 EOE/ADA

DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!

Learn to drive for
Schneider National!
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job Ready
in just 15 days!
(888)368-1964

Drivers/Flatbed
Class A.

GET HOME WEEK-
ENDS! Southeast Re-
gional, Earn up to
39c/mi. 1 year OTR
Flatbed experience
required,
(800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS

earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE

Farm Store Help

Needed. Must enjoy
waiting on customers,
knowledge of farm
animals a must.
Heavy lifting/clean
lic. Background
check will be done.
Call for appointment
American Farm &
Feed (352) 795-6013

HOME MAKER
COMPANION
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

MAINTENANCE

Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
Is Looking for
Motivated Invidual to
do groundskeeping,
park cleaning, and
basic maintenance
work. Seasonal. 40
hrs. per wk. $8 per Hr.
Driv. lic. required
Stop in Parks Main
Office and contact
Park Manager
Art Yerian
(352) 628-5343
ext 1009


COMCNCLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES


CLASSIFIED

mam

CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time customer
service/food prep position
25+ hours a week. Week-
ends required. Customer
service experience and
typing skills required. Fax
resume to 352-527-9605.

Library Aide
(2 positions available)
Announcement
#12-42

P/T working 20 hours
weekly on a flexible
schedule providing
assistance in the
Citrus County Library
system. Must be able
to lift 20 pounds on
occasion. Gradua-
tion from H.S or G.E.D.
$8.45 hourly to start.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
by Friday, August 10,
2012 EOE/ADA




AIRLINES
ARE HIRING
Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance, thru
SC Training. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294



ENROLLING
For All Programs
COSMETOLOGY
BARBER
*MASSAGE THERAPY
**NAIL TECH
.SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited
727-848-8415




RUBBER STAMPS
Stampin' Up ,14 sets,
90+ stamps. Most never
used. $100 ALL
352-422-1309




Antique China Cabinet
Early 1900
New England depres-
sion years, good cond.,
solid wood & some ve-
neer 2 glass doors top,
full bottom drawer 70"
Hx 34W,16D $175obo
Antique Slant Front
Secretary Desk w/
cubby holes & writing
desk, bottom storage
30W x 161/2 D, 37H, has
decal, red Lion Cabi-
net Co. $125. obo
(352) 382-0069




RECORD COLLECTION
72 pieces, $30 Please
call, 352-726-0040
WANTED VINTAGE
Baseball Bats
Old Sporting Equipment
(727) 857-5176




Freezer, Upright
almost new
$400 or Trade


GAS GRILL Char-Broil
Two Burner w/ Side
No Tank-419-5852
Asking $60.00
Refrigerator
$150. obo
(352) 476-3793
REFRIGERATOR
.18CUFT. Side x Side,
Excel. $100
Dunnellon (352)465-4441
Side by Side
Refrigerator Kenmore
Water/Ice $300
GE Washing Machine
Heavy Duty $75.
(352) 628-7633
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Table w/ 4 captain
Chairs $60
Swimming Pool Slide
7 ft. $300
(352) 628-7633
Used Frigidaire
Washer & Dryer Set
Heavy Duty
$175.
(352)302-6418


w/ new Hardware
$60. ea
(352) 341-4444
Two Matching Sofas,
each w/two matching pil-
lows. Pink floral w/sage.
$55 ea.
(352) 726-4656
WHICKER HEAD
BOARD, FULL BED SIZE
good cond. $40.00
513-4473
Wood Table 4 chairs
natural top with white
legs, excel. cond.
$75. obo
(352) 341-2691



1 Year Old
48" Walk Behind Mower
with Sulky &
Grass Catcher
$1,500 firm
(352) 860-1611


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DELL computer,flat
monitor,mouse,keyboard
$100obo good
cond/works 422-4342
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON STYLUS NX215
INKJET PRINTER NO
WINDOWS 7 XTRA
BLACK INK. $30.00
352-726-0686



THOMASVILLE
WALNUT WOOD
TABLE/CHAIRS Good
cond. $100 obo moving
must sell 422-2719



2 Sleeper Sofa's
Pastels & Rattan,
Matching Cocktail
Table, 2 end tables
Rattan & Glass top
2 Lamps $250.
352-601-0568
3 pc. sectional sofa
soft sage green
showroom condition
$850 obo
(352) 637-2450
3 Wrought Iron
Bar Stools,
Like new, $25. ea.
(352) 382-1630
After 9am, until 8pm
5 Shelf Bookcase
$ 50.00 Tall Table & 4
chairs (Ashley) $ 300.00
Good condition.
By appt. Only.
304-544-8398 Cell
19X64 ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER VERY
NICEHOLDS 32 IN TV
$25.00 352-621-0142
2" FOAM MATTRESS
TOPPER. King.
Zippered Cotton cover.
From JCP. New. $99.00
628-3585
5X8 AREA RUG NICE
MULTI PRINT,2YRS
OLD.$30.OO
352-621-0142
BEDROOM SET
Colonial-dresser w/mirror,
chest of drawers, night-
stand. $70 207-385-9322
Boston Rocker
$25.
Good Condition
(304) 544-8398
Curio Cabinet, white
washed oak, lighted, w/
glass shelves 15'Wx
61 High $50. Sofa 71t
teal, floral, loose cush-
ions, matching chase
lounge chair. Like new
$350. 352- 726-5584
DESK STUDENT WOOD
Some scratches Ideal
for kids Dark Wood $25.
352-270-3909
Dining Rm. Set, glass
top,42"Wx72" L,w/
marble & medal trim, 6
chairs, matching side
table, coffee, 2 end
tables $975 All or
separate. Antique solid
oak drop leaf table 4
bertwood chairs, excel.
$375. 352- 726-5584
DRESSER BEDROOM
desk combo 4 drawers
Oak look particleboard
Nice shape Great for kids
$25 352-270-3909
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 19X64
HOLDS 32 INCH TV
352-621-0142 25.00
ETHAN ALLEN HEIR-
LOOM End Tables $100
352-382-4911
HEADBOARD THE OAK
WOOD EXCELLENT
CONDITION FOR
QUEEN $50
352-777-1256
LAZBOY ROCKER RE-
CLINER Excellent condi-
tion, blue fabric. $100.00
352-257-5722 for details
LEATHER FURNITURE
Sofa and Chair and
Coffee Table. 2 yrs old
excellent condition
$895.
(352) 697-5530
Pecan Wood China
Cabinet, glass doors &
sides, has 3 drawers
2 storage doors
50LLx15W,82H $450
obo (352) 382-0069
Power Adjustable Sleep
System Bed, Twin, extra
long, solid 10" memory
foam, like new $450
Originally $1,100
352-637-3550
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Bedroom Suite,
white formica- mirror,
headboard 2 end ta-
bles, dresser & mirror
Serta Mattress's & Box
pring $250 Dining Room
Table and 6 chairs,
china hutch, formica,
cream colored glass &
mirrors, lighted $200.
352-601-0568
Queen Sleigh Bed,
box springs/mattress,
Highboy & Nightstand
$ 500. Ethan Allen Sofa
$ 300. good cond.
Seen by appt. Only.
304-544-8398, Cell
RECLINER CHAIR
Tweed blue cloth good
condition $40.00
513-4473
SOFA
3 Cushioned, floral de-
signed, excel, cond. $100
(352) 795-9664
Tempurpedic Elec adj
bed, w/remote full size
1 year old. Excel cond.
$1,000 White 5ft.
dresser/ mirror, night
stand, 2 twin headboard
frames $300. 726-5584
True Memory 12"
California Kg reversible
latex mattress.
Excel. cond. 6 mo old
New Paid $1,200
Asking $800.
(352) 637-2838
Two 8 Drawer Dressers


Simpsons season 1 dvd
box set $12, 860-2475
TABLE & Chairs, Cap-
tains style Dark Pine
$100.00 352-628-5312
TABLE Round pedestal
with tile top, leaf & 4
chairs. Pine $200.00
352-628-5312
Toddler Bed
All wood, w/ mattress
Extra side rail for safety
New $65. Mini Ab Circle
Pro New condition $70
(352) 634-1697
Trailer Frame 19ft x 7ft,
dual Axle $500
Lawn Mower
Craftsman LT4000 21H
$400
(352) 419-2144
WATER BED. Like new.
Nice Summa II model.
Queen size. Firm side
with 6 tubes. Fits normal
frame. $50 OBO.
527-6709


&
Chipper Shredder
Both Have New Engines
$225. ea
Call (352) 795-8085
TROY-BILT lawn mower
21" high-wheel
self-propelled mulching
mower $100.00
(352)726-3731




INVERNESS
Fri. 3, Sat. 4, Sun. 5
INSIDE SALE* 9A-4P
411 Hemlock Street.



Tony Llama cowboy
boots, 9.5D, slightly used,
great cond. $25
(352) 344-1515



!!!!!!!35X12.50 R15!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
.....265/75R15"....
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
::::::::245/65 R17:::::::
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
1 Angel Coffee table,
with glass Top
and 1 end table $200
26" Sony TV $150
(352) 489-4761
2 AQUARIUMS 20 gallon
aquarium with
stand,filters,rocks,etc.
30 Gallon aquarium with
stand,filters
,rocks and 3 turtles. Too
many things to mention.
$150.00 takes all
352-637-2726
2 PIN FISH TRAPS- ex-
cellent cond., $15.00
each 352-628-0033
3 MONKEY TAIL CACTI
W/RED FLOWERS
TERRACOTTA WALL
POTS $50/EA FIRM UN-
USUAL 586-7222
3 Wheel Handicap
Scooter
Headlights, taillights
built in charging sys.
Newly refurbished
$450. obo Must Sell
Call Ed (352) 613-6331
4 Piece leather sec-
tional green, w/recldiner
&qn. bd. $575. excel
cond. Washer Dryer Set
Whirlpool, 1 yr. old
white, like new $450.
352- 726-5584
ADJUSTABLE TRIPOD
Vivitar 980, $20 Please
Call, 352-726-0040
AIR CONDITIONER
Portable By Fedders,
7500 BTU's on wheels,
window vented, Room
to Room Like New $210
(352) 270-8475
Air Hockey Table
$250 obo.
TV Stand holds up to
63" TV, silver w/ glass
shelf $100
(352) 270-0191
BLACK DOG CRATE
great cond. small/med.
dog $25 422-2719
BLACKBERRY PEARL
8130 SPRINT $50 EX
condition like new in box
accessories included
270-2414
Chest Freezer
White $50.
Card/Snooker Table
w/ 6 rolling chairs
$75
(352) 422-2516
COMPUTER PRINTER
TABLE 28" HIGH 20"
WIDE 16" DEEP
WALNUT COLOR $20.00
352-726-0686
Ekornes Stressless
Love Seat Light Tan
Leather w/ wood trim
New $,4,500,
Asking $1,500 obo
352-270-0191
H.P.PRINTER-OFFICE
JET-ALL IN ONE #7210.
Printer-Fax-Scanner $55.
Call 352-382-1154
HUGH GOLDEN BAR-
REL CACTUS 5ft DIA.
BY 13"TALL BLOOMING
YELLOW FLOWERS
$100FIRM 586-7222
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262
KING ABERDEEN COM-
FORTER SET 7-Piece
Set Like New $45.00
FIRM 352-3824911
Kitchen Table Set
w/ 4 cushion chairs
on wheels $500
Washer & Dryer,
Top Loaders Fridgidair
$700. (352) 726-0928
Lg Computer desk
w/cabinet.Pull out end to
form L shape.Like
new.Oak finish. $65.
Call 352-382-1154
LG OPTIMUS SPRINT
$50 TOUCH SCREEN
Mint condition orig box
with accessories included
270-2414
Mikasa Dishes
Set of 12,
Black & white
$50.
(352) 726-0928
ORIENTAL RUGS (6)
Turkish & Hand Loomed
1960's. well cared for.
OrigianI owner. 2 extra
large Room Rugs,
4 smaller area rugs.
Beautiful brilliant colors
and patterns $1,800 ALL
352-746-1486
RUBBERMAID ACTION
PACKER 24 Gal Rub-
bermaid Action Packer
Storage Box (New) $15.
Call 352-382-1154
SEWING MACHINE
Kenmore 1760 Zig Zag
in pine cabinet.
Works perfect.
$65.00 352-3824873


2008 UTILITY LAND-
SCAPE TRAILER Used
modified 4X6 utility trailer
with drive up ramp. Has
spare tire overhead racks
and safety chains. $300
352-436-4578 or
817-279-3203



2 CAR SEAT FOR IN-
FANT $25 EACH SMALL

352-777-1256
BOUNCE DELUXE $25
AND STROLLER
GREEN AND BROWN
$35 gym for baby $20 de-
luxe musical 32-777-1256
STROLLER AND EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
$40 FOR GIRL pink and
brown flower playpen $40
excel cond 352-7771256


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" 40W STEREO
CHORUS AMP W/ RE-
VERB & 2 8"SPEAKERS
SOUNDS GREAT! $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE GUITAR
VINTAGE SUNBURST,
2 HUMMBUCKERS $85
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC
DREDNAUGHT GUITAR
W/GIGBAGTUJNER,STRAP
STRINGS,ETC $40
352-601-6625
LAGUNA 3/4 SIZE GUI-
TAR 2 HUMMBUCKERS
MAT BLACK W/BLACK
HARDWARE $85
352-601-6625
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
wood and padded bench
access to music sheets in
seat stow. $35.00
513-4473



BEDSPREAD/2 SHAMS
full size cotton multistripe
blue/green excellent con-
dition $15. 352-270-3909
COMFORTER KING size
brown/beige reversible
CLEAN & NICE $20.
352-270-3909
COMFORTER QUEEN
SIZE BLUE
PLAID/STRIPES CLEAN
& NICE $20.
352-270-3909
COMFORTER QUEEN
SIZE RED AND WHITE
FLORAL CLEAN and
NICE $20. 352-270-3909
COMFORTER SET
FULL size light/dark
gray sheets/bedskirt/4
pillowcases/sheers
NICE $25. 352-270-3909
COVERLET QUEENS-
IZE medium solid blue
in good clean condition
$15. 352-270-3909
FULL SIZE SHEET set
dark green Used good
clean condition $6.00
352-270-3909
SHEET SET DARK
GREEN Queen size used
good clean condition both
sheets/pillowcases $6.00
352-270-3909
SHOWER CURTAINS (2)
Fabric good clean condi-
tion Dark green solid
Red/green pattern $6.
each 352-270-3909



2 BICYCLES
Men & Women
Pure Sport. Brand New
only used 3 times
$250. ea
(352) 419-5826
16 ft. CANOE AND
TRAILER
$450
(352) 249-0877
357 MAG FED SELF DE-
FENSE AMMO 125g JHP
1 box $65, Inverness
864-283-5797
Bond S/S Over & Under,
Derringer Shoots Colt
.45 Long & .410 2V2"
.410 3" Shotgun Shells
2 set of barrels, C/C
tan leather holster, 4
boxes of ammo $450.
obo 352-344-0084
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
DOME TENT 14X8
OZARK TRAIL $45 Brand
new never used Sleeps
4-5 comes in Canvas tote
270-2414

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Aug. 11th 9-5p
Sun. Aug. 12th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
GUN Mossberg,
12 Ga. Pump, 500A
excel cond. $275.
or trade for pistol
(352) 637-0987
GUNS
Buy Sell Trade
All Types All Brands
New & Used
Triggers Down, LLC
(352) 697-0735
Refurbished Club Car
golf cart, in great
shape! 2006 model w/
upgraded 2010 electric
motor. 48v,
includes charger.
$2,900. (352) 302-8048
RR STOCKMAN KNIFE
3.5" closed, tortoise
scales, new in box. $13
860-2475
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
1911A1 9MM CMDR Un-
cataloged piece by Spr
Armory, polymer Hi-cap
4" SS brl and slide negoti-
ated between Sprg Ar-
mory and Bul LTD same
as Kimber Ten II. Factory
Kimber barrel/sights but
slide/frame marked Spr
Armory 3 mags $685
CCW or rcpt, steve
352-586-4022
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
YAMAHA ALUM PROP
$40 10 3/8X13 VG cond
fits mid size motors with
13 spline shaft 270-2414


2 females $550 ea.
1 Male $500.
4 Shorkies 1 Female
$550 3 Males $500 ea.
352-212-4504, 212-1258
Blue Dobberman
Female Have Papers
Needs Registered Stud
Immediately
Show Papers
(352) 621-3105


BUDDY
Is an 8 year old
German Shepherd
mix, in desperate
need of a home.
Housebroken, gets
along with dogs &
cats. Gentle & calm.
Heartworm -negative
Call Joanne
352-795-1288.

CATS AND KITTENS
Cats and kittens are on
display at Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter!!!! Lots to choose
from!!! All adoptions in-
clude spay/neuter, mi-
crochip, up to date on
all shots, flea and worm
treatment. Our 1/2 price
sale of $17.50 has been
extended!!! Cats and
kittens are great stress
relievers! Come see us!
Citrus Cty Animal Shel-
ter, 352 746 8400, 10-4
Tues thru Sat.
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 28th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 28th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Female Daschund, AKC
papers, 14 mo., all shots,
spayd, good w/kids,
hsebrkn, all acc. $500
(352) 419-6901

FEMALE PUG
PUPPIES
8 weeks, health certs.
$250 ea.
Dave (352) 419-6954

HAPPY JACK@
DuraSpot:
latest technology in
flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs.
Patented. At farm,
feed & hardware
stores. Distributed by
Fuller Supply
(205)343-3341.
Www.
happyjackinc.com

Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsfiorida@ymail.com


MAL SHEHHERU MIX
Are you looking for your
new best friend? Little
Bear is an awesome
companion. He's a
2-year-old shepherd mix
whose owner gave him
up due to housing issues.
He learns quickly, knows
some basic commands
and is very laid-back and
well mannered in the
house, preferring to rest
on the floor wherever his
human is. While he gets
along well with other dogs
on walks and on public
outings, he would do best
in a home without other
dogs or cats. He is heart-
worm negative and has
already been microchip-
ped. His adoption fee of
$60 includes vaccina-
tions, neutering, free obe-
dience class and a month
of free pet insurance.
Meet him to see if he's
the perfect dog for you.
Email
sheltervol@gmail.com for
info or call 352-568-5095.
MaltiPoo Pups
Teacups, Adorable non
shed, great
disposition. Ist shots,
$400 (352) 794-3081

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR




CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(aHotmail.com


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
liard Cues Coins & Jew-
elry Best Prices Paid
Chris @ 352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$$


Craftsman 10" Radial
Arm Saw
excl. cond. $125
(352) 382-1971




2 40" TV's
Sony, Color Great
$85. ea
No Call before 10 am
(352) 628-4766
32" Sony TV
with Remote, excellent
Condition Color Perfect
$75.
352-382-2733
Big Screen TV
Hardly used
$99.
(352) 227-7401
SONY 42 COLOR TV
Projector TV Good condi-
tion with stand $75.00
3525270324






CLASSIFIED


OII BYNNUS ~ OKi BUIN UN5CR


.. u....... ............ BUYING JUNK CARS
MARINE 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, Running or Not
We Pay CASH For kg bdlike new 60amp CASH PAID $300 & UP
Used Clean Boats serve. NADA $29K asking (352) 771-6191 CHEVROLET
Pontoon, Deck & Fish- $23K 352-382-3298
ing Boats (352)527-0555 1999 Corvette coupe.
boatsupercenter.com THOR, Windsport CASH BUYER'S White with both tops.
2000, Class A. 31 ft.. Buying Used Cars Trucks 33000 milestitanium ex-
LOWE V10 Ford, w/21K mi., & Vans, For used car lot haust system,goodyear
2011 Jon Boat 14 foot, Sr. owned, no pets, no LARRY'S AUTO SALES, run flat tires,heads-up
9.9 Mercury outboard smoke, 6 new tires, 2 Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 display,6-speed
motor, trailer, boat cover. new AC units, no slides manual,leather seats,
Brand new. $2000.00 but full basement, CASH PAID FOR JUNK memory key. Garage
Please call 440-813-7169 great mileage, $15,900 CARS Any Condition kept in pristine
Gene 352-207-1080 Up to $500., Free condition.Asking $22,000
PONTOON Towing 352-445-3909 call 1-352-503-6548
20' with trailer, 60hp c1 0
Johnson Nice and
clean $3,200 I Buy Any Junk Car CHEVROLET
(352) 726-6197 $250 FLAT RATE 2000 Lumina
I BUY RV'S, (800)277-1569 74k miles excellent cond.
SEASQUIRT Travel Trailers, $2,000 obo
18FT CC. 90HP 5th Wheels, VERY! VERY! (352) 726-3703
Yamaha .new power. Motor Homes
head. GPS Chart plot- Call Me 352-201-6945 BIG SALE!
ter, depth Finder, trailer Consignment USA Ford
$5,000. 352-287- 1668 KZ Sportsman consianmentusa.ora '01 Mustang Cony.
O A y2011, Hybrid. 19ft, WE DO ITALL 83k, leather, V6, ext.
T 1 I sleeps 6, air & bath BUY-SELL-RENT- clean,Red Pearl $5950
Rce io $8,500 (352) 249-6098 CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV o (352) 257-4251
R-Vision B+ LE US 19 BY AIRPORT c (352) 794-6069
'04. mint condition. Low Payments *-
MAC'S MOBILE RV Chevy cab, Trail Lite Financina For ALL FORD
REPAIR & MAINT. body, walk on roof. 461-4518 & 795-4440 2008 Taurus Selling my
LLC ladder, self contained mom's 2008 Taurus SEL.
RVTC Certified Tech Corian counters. WE BUY Only 19,000 miles!
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. convection oven. ANY VEHICLE Warranty for another 18
refrig./freezer, full bath Perfect Cond. or Not months or until 36,000
RV LOT FOR RENT slide out. 33K mi. dual TItled,No title, miles. Lt blue exterior.
OR SALE by OWNER wheels, new battery. No problem. Paying up Tan leather interior.
LOT #119 many extras. Greatly to $25K any make, Sunroof. Great shape.
Nature Coast Landings reduced $34.500. any model Call A.J. $13,495 OBO Call Keith
(352) 634-5300 Call (352) 419-6825 813-335-3794/ 237-1892 (813)-493-2326


^ssa^ g^ _"`~`~i


SUNDAY,AUGUST 5, 2012 D5

SI o /Utll


_
E KLO ITF LUG K


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzhelmer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic.. Bonded. Insured
(352)419-6557



EL-y Dy,


Classifieds


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD

COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling& Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '781 Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lie. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
SFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 k
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lie. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




******
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO ITALL!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996

INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996

Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570

Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.







Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad. you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD! SOD! SOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221




TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lie. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal. General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


S1,!.!.1 ADI LSS


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


I3SSEP3S I


Leaded Glass Installed in your IJI ,I V UM
EXISTING DOOR! CARPET & POOL-TEC

Door Units UPHOLSTERY Repairs Equipment
SBlinds Between CLEANING Pumps Filters
the Glass Se in: urniture Heat Pumps
SCustom Carved cin leaned for
Glass (Art Pieces/ Carpet Stretching FREE-Ask Salt Systems
Bath Glass) Carpet Repair
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors Ce 352-282-p480 ai ell
352-2821480cell 32YersE
352-726-6125 352-25471636 office
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL(Hernndoe In Home Estimates A
www ,rrysusfomglasscm ILic& nsLifetime Warranty i SaLc s


ROOFING


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
-' ALL Home
Repairs

P *Fencing
smaLL Carpentry

Screening
CLean Dryer
S Vents
Affordale & Dependable
S Epenence lifelong
35 2344-0905
cell: 400-1722
;ured Lic#37761


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eak&fsate."
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
i if /Inc rrrr 'O 7 q7 n~^


I


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
00QC42R


BoulericeV I

QB000210 SUPPLY INC.

In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
$125 OFF
-ANY RE-ROOF I
SOne coupon per household Expires 12/31/12
" 2 FREE ESTIMATES
en (352) 628-5079


WIRLLO D









GE NIE-,
We Cean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
SWindow Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowge nie.com/springhill


394-0805 SUCRN
Public Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE AIR PERMIT
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Division of Air Resource Management, Office of Permitting and Compliance
Draft Air Permit No. 0170004-036-AC
Progress Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Power Plant
Citrus County, Florida
Applicant: The applicant for this project is Florida Power Corporation d/b/a Progress
Energy Florida, Inc., a direct subsidiary of Duke Energy Corporation. The applicant's
authorized representative and mailing address are: Robby Odom, Plant Manager,
Progress Energy Florida, Crystal River Power Plant, 299 First Avenue North CN77, St.
Petersburg, Florida 33701.
Facility Location: Progress Energy Florida operates the existing Crystal River Power
Plant, which is located in Citrus County at 15760 West Power Line Street in Crystal
River, Florida.
Project: The project establishes a sulfur dioxide (S02) emission standard of 0.15
pounds per million Btu of heat input or 95 percent (%) reduction, whichever is less
stringent, for coal-fired Units 1 and 2. The limit will be accomplished by a combina-
tion of dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and changes to the electrostatic precipita-
tors and/or addition of baghouses to capture the reacted sorbent. This condition
shall become effective upon the effective date of EPA's approval of these specific
requirements in the Florida Regional Haze State Implementation Plan. This is an op-
tion under consideration by the company as an alternative to ceasing operation of
Units 1 and 2 as coal-fired units.
Permitting Authority: Applications for air construction permits are subject to review in
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters
62-4, 62-210 and 62-212 of the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). The proposed
project is not exempt from air permitting requirements and an air permit is required
to perform the proposed work. The Permitting Authority responsible for making a
permit determination for this project is the Office of Permitting and Compliance in
the Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Air Resource Management.
The Permitting Authority's physical address is: 111 South Magnolia Drive, Suite #4,
Tallahassee, Florida. The Permitting Authority's mailing address is: 2600 Blair Stone
Road, MS #5505, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. The Permitting Authority's phone
number is 850-717-9000.
Project File: A complete project file is available for public inspection during the nor-
mal business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal
holidays), at the physical address indicated above for the Permitting Authority. The
complete project file includes the draft permit, the Technical Evaluation and Prelimi-
nary Determination, the application and information submitted by the applicant
(exclusive of confidential records under Section 403.111, F.S.). Interested persons
may contact the Permitting Authority's project engineer for additional information at
the address and phone number listed above. In addition, electronic copies of these
documents may be accessed by entering permit No. 0170004-036-AC on the follow-
ing web site: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/emission/apds/default.asp.
Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit: The Permitting Authority gives notice of its intent
to issue an air construction permit to the applicant for the project described above.
The applicant has provided reasonable assurance that operation of proposed
equipment will not adversely impact air quality and that the project will comply with
all appropriate provisions of Chapters 62-4, 62-204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-296 and 62-297,
F.A.C. The Permitting Authority will issue a final permit in accordance with the condi-
tions of the draft permit unless a timely petition for an administrative hearing is filed
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or unless public comment received in ac-
cordance with this notice results in a different decision or a significant change of
terms or conditions.
Comments: The Permitting Authority will accept written comments concerning the
draft permit for a period of 14 days from the date of publication of the Public Notice.
Written comments must be received by the Permitting Authority by close of business
(5:00 p.m.) on or before the end of this 14-day period. If written comments received
result in a significant change to the draft permit, the Permitting Authority shall revise
the draft permit and require, if applicable, another Public Notice. All comments filed
will be made available for public inspection.
Petitions: A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitt-
ing decision may petition for an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the information set forth below
and must be filed with (received by) the Department's Agency Clerk in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department of Environmental Protection at 3900 Common-


wealth Boulevard, Mail Station #35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Petitions filed by
any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S.
must be filed within 14 days of publication of this Public Notice or receipt of a written
notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person
who asked the Permitting Authority for notice of agency action may file a petition
within 14 days of receipt of that notice, regardless of the date of publication. A peti-
tioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated
above, at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition within the ap-
propriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an
administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to
intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent inter-
vention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the approval of
the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205,
F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Permitting Authority's action
is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each
agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b) The
name, address and telephone number of the petitioner; the name address and tele-
phone number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address
for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of
how the petitioner's substantial rights will be affected by the agency determination;
(c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency ac-
tion or proposed decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If
there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ulti-
mate facts alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner contends warrant re-
versal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) A statement of the spe-
cific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the
agency's proposed action including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate
to the specific rules or statutes; and, (g) A statement of the relief sought by the peti-
tioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wishes the agency to take with re-
spect to the agency's proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the mate-
rial facts upon which the Permitting Authority's action is based shall state that no
such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set
forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the filing of a petition means that the Permitting Authority's final action may
be different from the position taken by it in this Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air Per-
mit. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of
the Permitting Authority on the application have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not available for this proceeding.
August 5, 2012.


396-0805 SUCRN
Elig To Vote- Lorri E Early & Raelynn M, Fudge
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:


Lorri E. Earley
45 Regina Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


Raelynn M. Fudge
4195 E Parsons Pt Rd Lot 30
Hernando, FL 34442


You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle August 5, 2012


392-0805 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 9, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
August 5, 2012
393-0805 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
The Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., will hold a
budget workshop on Friday, August 10, 2012, beginning at 12:00 pm., in the Cypress
Room, located on the first floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School
Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. Copies of the Agenda are available
in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by
this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
August 5, 2012.


395-0805 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 032-12
Heavy Equipment Rental Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide the rental of heavy equipment to the County for construction and
landfill purposes. It is the intent of the County to award to all qualified Bidders.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before September 5, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for September 5, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
August 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HONDA BUICK '89 89 FORD HONDA Dune Buggies
08, Accord, 4 DR, Reatta, Red Coupe '09 F350 Crew Cab, Die- 2005, CR-V SE LOW MI- 1 sand rail $5 000
EX-LNAV. 4 cyl.,5 spd. leather int. V6. new ti- sel Dually 50K Excellent LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO 1 Fiberglass $5.900
manual navigation res &air, some retra cond. $22,900 OBO8 MANY OPTIONS TO LIST Call (352) 322-0178
leather 57,500 mi. tion. Runs good Selling 637-2258 or 634-2798 352-628-4600
1 own $14,500 cheap (727) 488-6474 FORD
(609) 330-8435 Cell FORDJEEP
2002, F150, Harley JEEP
HONDA DavidsonLeathr, 2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
2005 ACCORD HYBRID, MERCURY Supercharged V8 V8,4X4 2 Motor Scooters
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY, '74, Cougar XR7 Nicely $13450.00 PRICED TO SELL 250 CC
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS excel. cond., one owner, 352-341-0018 352-628-4600 0
352-628-4600 81k mi., garage kept 3 41 8150 CC
PONTIAC GTO '05 $7,500 (352) 726-0258 FORD Nissan (352) 220-8454
e R 60 2008 Ford F250, Lariat '98 Pathfinder
Rare, Red! 6.0 V8, 6 sp. 4x4, 5.4L, leather White w/tan leather V6, Harley '02
1-60 in 4.5. 450 BHP. 200 loaded Clean $20 850 104k, ext. clean, $4950 Road King, black, lots oi
mph. New Tires. Cry Riv 352-341-0018 0(352) 257-4251 chrome, senior owned
$14,400 727-207-1619 c (352) 794-6069 15k miles, gar.kept
SATURN ISUZU $9,500 obo
2008, VUE, LOW '89, Pick Up Truck new (352) 344-9810
MILES FLAT TOWABLE, CHEVY paint, tires,5 spd, 234K Harley Davidson
MUST SEE '05, Silverado. ext. cab mi. Runs New $1,700. '04 Ultra, Sale or Trade
352-628-4600 12,000 miles, work trucd firm (352) 302-6418 for truck of equal value
pkg. excel. cond. TYDODGE $10,500
TOYOTA' 10 $1 352650812 TOYOTA 2002, Caravan. 3521 601-4722
TOYOTA'10 $13, 300 (352) 465-0812 allLL01-4722
Prius, II w/ leather 352-322-5555 '98, Tacoma, 4 cyl. 5 white, low miles, pw, pl.
sandy beach metalic. speed, runs great, seats 7! $5.450. HARLEY FAT BOY
excel, cond. 26k mi. high miles $2, 400. 352-341-0018 '02, 26kmiles gar. kept
$19,500 (352) 527-0347 352-257-4251, 794-6069 all main. rcpts.
CHEVY DODGE GRAND $12,200.
VERY! VERY! 2005, Tahoe, LS, pw pl VERY! VERY! CARAVAN (904) 923-2902
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
BIG SALE! k for miles! $12500.00 BIG SALE! 2001 Grand Caravan HONDA '01
Consignment USA 352-341-0018 Consignment USA St 3.3 V6 150k miles, Goldwing 1800 low
consianmentusa.ora consianmentusa.ora A/C, tinted windows, tilt, miles, well maint. all
WE DO IT DO ITWE DO ITALL! pw, pd, cruise. $2,950 service records avail
BUY-SELL-RENT- BUY-SELL-RENT- (352) 527-3894 $10,900 (352) 697-2760
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV DODAM CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV Volkswagen HONDA
US 19 BY AIRPORT 2007, RAM 2500 HEMI US 19 BY AIRPORT 1993 Eurovan bue, '07VLX600,Shadow
SLow Payments* 4X4 CREW CAB, ONE Low Payments speed 4cyl, MV edi- sissy bar, engine guard
Financing For ALL PACKAGE $19995 Fiancin For AL tion $2985.00 2,800 miles, like new,
461-4518& 795-4440 352-628-46005-4440 352-341-0018 $3,850 (352) 489-5443




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D6 SIINDAX Aii&iisT 5 2012 CITRUS Courvm~ ~'FL,) CHRONICLE


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS
AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!
THERE WILL BE
NO SALES PEOPLE MANAGERS OR
EMPLOYEES ON THE PREMISES.
(NO ONE WILL EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)
I


Because new models are arriving daily, management has been ordered to eliminate excess
inventory. All prices will be slashed and will be clearly posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and paper.
Write down the stock number and price. Come in as early as possible on Monday, June 18th.

FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!
1 _'A 1A71%,SIE: DI i11011D IU D JAl

A Lo.w Jeep





AUTOMOTIVE
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd 2077 Highway 44W 937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Homosassa, FL

CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
a..Z;lI


D6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Section E SUNDAY, AUGUST 5,2012



CITRUSOM E COUNTY CHRON
,CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


Frugal
Living
PAGE E3


ESTATE GUIDE


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E2 SUNDA~~ AUGUST 5, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEST OF THE BEST
* Gated Community!! 4/2/3 Car Gar.!
* Saltwater Pool/Spa Cooks Kit. w/Nook
* Gorgeous Wood Floors Over 2500 Sq. Ft. of living
* Hurricane Tresses Relaxing Master Suite!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELIE SUTTON 352-287-3997


www.Floridalistinglnfo.com


^^ ^MISf5 y I'I
PRIVATE GATED ACREAGE!
* Very Tasteful Decor Great Room w/FP
* Kit/Wood Cab/Island MBR w/Walk In
* Elec. Hurr. Shutters 2/2/2 Car Garage
* Steel Frame Const. Secluded Area!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997


~-"

ALL THIS FOR HOW MUCH?
* 2/2/2 Car Gar w/Scrn Very Well Kept Home
* Lovely master/Bath Update AC w/Air Cleaner
* Lots of Cab. in It. Sep. LR + FR CB Home
* Low Elec. Bills! A Must See!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FIlolidLislinglillo,coun


LE;UAII IU
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Maint. Free Villa
* On the Golf Course Screened patio
* Almost 1700 SF Living Social Membership
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875

IFO LIN q
i ii637.2828
_7 -Enier ho,,s a5y


PINt nilUut
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352 527-7842
352 422-3875


3/2/2 Waterfront home close to river,
on cul-de-sac, formal living & dining,
breakfast bar kit. open to fam. rm. Most
rooms have sliders to 35 ft. lanai,
viewing patio decks and long dock w/lift,
1 63 ft. of shoreline.
oDY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Emoil: teom@idtrusreolty.com


65 MILLION

CLOSED

THIS YEAR!

Nobody Sells

More Than

ReMax

Really One!











REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


LARGE HOME ON ACRE AFFORDABLY PRICED!
3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room and garage
all located on a great street in the
West Highlands of Inverness. Brand new
shingles and original owner. Nice sized rooms.
Put this one on your short list of homes to see.
Call John to see it today!
JOHN HOLLOWAY SR. (352) 212-6002
CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


How much
home can I
comfortably
afford?
For more information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
NMLS ID: 432391
Bankof America Home Loans
Bank ofAmenca, NA, Memaer FDIC Equal Housing Le e Credit and collateral
2010 Bank of Amenca Copron. 12-2010 ARM1357
i,-.. r


SBeautiful 3BR/3BA/3CG Home
* Great Room wNaulted Ceilings
* Gourmet Kitchen Lg Master Suite
* Screened Pool & Spa Lots of Beautiful Decking
* 900 Sqft Workshop 2 Covered Boat Slips
* Beautiful Natural FL Setting FBo t
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


* 3/2/2 Canal Front 3,323 Sq. Ft. Living
* 1.06 Acres oaks & fruit trees
*Built 1992- Updated 2010
* Beautiful unique design Newer appliances
Top-of-the-line Water System
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


CORNER LOT. All prettied up and move-in
ready. Split plan; great cooks kitchen w/
breakfast bar. Living and dining rooms
have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
Priced right to sell.
CHERYL HNAAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


PINE RIDGE BEAUTY
3BR/2BA Sanderson Bay home on
1.5 acres, fenced backyard, built in
2005 with a total of 3250 sq. ft.
under roof. Backs up to the horse
trail, move-in condition.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: brbaraimills@earthlink.net


Need a large Citrus Springs home that is priced well
and NOT a short sale?l This one is for youl Large,
possible 4 bedroom, 2 story home in peaceful Citrus
Springs ready for new owner today Interior features
large functional kitchen, family room, living room,
formal dining and huge loft area Large fenced
backyard for boat or RV parking
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


Get away from it all.
1.5 acres, 2 story waterfront home.
Guest area, Spa area, boat ramp.
Covered lift, Dock and ELEVATOR.....
PLUS a workshop.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes remax.net
Visual Tours: www.crystalriverfl.com


IIULT rum iic u -lnII i i ucl uT orgeous
Custom Build 3/3/3 pool home Overlooks the 6th Fairway &
Green with all the bells & whistles Features include poured
concrete construction Aluminum roof, Cupela skylights,
wraparound decks, summer kitchen, pavered dnveway & pool deck,
deluxe island kitchen, granite, Italian tile flooring ...
Florida room, bonus room, Closets galore Muci ...- ..
fine home & fall in love with the view
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martha.sather.remax.com


w ;., .,I" Vo I III
S1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
SHardwood Floors Throughout Home
SLarge Master Suites Split Floor Plan
SSecurity System Fully Enclosed Screen
SRoom for Pool and More
SClose to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


2 N HI 0WInres3-
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


4688 W. CUSTER DRIVE
PINE RIDGE
* Gorgeous 3BR/3BA/2CG Home Great Room w/Gas Fireplace
* Lg Kitchen w/Corian Countertops *Den & Office
* 24x20 Bonus Room/Workshop Screened Lanai/Heated Pool
* Fenced Backyard Beautiful Landscaped 1 Acre

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 -
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


I


E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Add a splash of color to summer table settings


C loth nap-
kins can be
made using
virtually any 100
percent cotton
fabric. Fat quar-
ters, fabric rem-
nants, sheets,
tablecloths, terry
washcloths and
even T-shirts or a
men's dress FRU
shirts work well. LIV
Many of these
can be found at secondhand
stores. The size can be any-
where from 12 to 20 inches
square.
The first reader tip has
another suggestion that
would be wonderful for a
summer barbecue party:
Cloth napkins: Bandanas
would make cute cloth nap-
kins. They're available in a
variety of colors, and they
aren't expensive. Leigh,
Florida
Reuse peanut butter jars:
My husband doesn't like
reusing plastic containers
such as the ones for sour


I
'I


cream, cottage
cheese and
peanut butter, but
that's how I was
raised. I don't
throw away any-
thing that can be
used for some-
thing else. For in-
Noel stance, small
peanut butter
GAL jars are great for
NG cut carrots and
celery; just add a
little water, put the lid on
and enjoy a healthy snack
later! -Bey email
Pantry storage container:
I use a large index box in my
pantry to store envelopes of
taco seasoning and the like.
It makes them easy to find,
and they don't fall behind
the shelf, never to be seen
again. -Bey email
Use Amazon to de-clutter:
The Fulfillment by Amazon
program can be a really
easy solution for getting rid
of things around the house,
such as toys, DVDs and
books and you can still


make money Just box up the
items you want to sell, ship
them to Amazon and let the
site take care of storage and
shipping to the customer.
Here's the full rundown of
how it works: amazonser-
vices.com/content/fulfill-
ment-by-amazon.htm/#!how
-it-works.
A lot of folks don't know
about this service, but it can
be a nice, stress-free alter-
native to a garage sale or
eBay when you want to de-
clutter and get organized. -
Jamie, email
Fun dishes from a waffle


maker and slicer: My mom
used to make "turtles" on
her waffle maker. Prepare
cake mix according to the
directions, then put about
1/3 cup of mix in the waffle
maker. When it's done it will
come out round, and you
can add frosting on top. I
just got a waffle maker yes-
terday and I have a recipe
for cornbread and bacon
waffles. I am going to make
the waffles, then add ham
and cheese to turn them
into Panini sandwiches. The
waffle maker is a great de-
vice for making new things


Amandal&kkJohnso Tom BaHour Ul Aveus & Hal Steier ArtPaty
BROKE/ASSOC. REtATO.R, REACTOR REALTOR BROKER REACTOR


without heating up the
kitchen! I also use a man-
dolin slicer to slice cucum-
bers, then I add some bacon
bits and ranch dressing to
make a cool side dish for
Panini sandwiches or just
about any meal. Bev,
email
Remove eye makeup: I
am a licensed cosmetologist,
and my go-to product for
easy eye-makeup removal
(including waterproof) is
hair conditioner. Most
women have it on-hand, you
only need a small amount, it
doesn't burn your eyes and


it works like a charm. -
Erica, email
MEN
Dear Sara: I have pro-
duce drawers in my refrig-
erator, and while I always
put veggies on one side and
fruit on the other, I'm almost
embarrassed to admit that I
have no idea which humid-
ity setting to use for any of
my produce. I have low to
high settings, with a lot of
choices in between. -Lynn,
California
Dear Lynn: For the most

See FRUGAUPage E5


746-9000


1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN LP 745 E. SAVOY 3427 W PINE RIDGE BLVD 2372 W. SNOWY EGRET PL. 4275 N. MODELWOOD DR.
4/3/3 3533 $359500 3/2/2 356292 $159 900 3/3/2 354267 $229,900 4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/25/2 356464 $149,900




6560 N. DELTONA 7768 N. SARAZEN 4889 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 10953 N. TARTAN TERR.
3/ 355155$119,000 3/ 35454 $144,900 3/2/2 354938 $149,900 4/2/2 350502 $127,900 2/2 354530$128,000 4/2/2 $104,900


ffts lr- 411,-~


Ask a Veteran
Norm
Overfield KELLER
S Realtor WILLIAMS
S (352) R E A L T Y
(352) 586-8620 oooc9BK


rI Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realto A OUSE Realtor
3023179 SOLD 43. LC2879022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD,
The Golden Girl7466700 D94

.7 1, 453 N. JADEMORE DR.






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43 S.,- LIN,,,,


LrN R S IG RlEA -


HENIN


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Remember: Don't skip breakfast


S ince Citrus County Schools make up the nutrients lost by not con-
begin the 2012-13 school year on suming this meal, and they tend to
Wednesday, Aug. 8, this is a great overeat at other meals or have extra
time to discuss the impor- snacks during the day
tance of eating breakfast Ideally, breakfast should
everyday. provide about one-fourth of
Of course, it is important your daily recommended
that everyone, not just chil- intake of calories, vitamins,
dren, eat breakfast! After' and minerals. Visit
all, when you wake up in www.choosemyplate.gov to
the morning, you have un- find out your total calorie
dergone a long period of intake for the day
fasting. Besides supplying For children, breakfast-
the energy that your body should provide between
needs to start the day, Monica Payne 400 and 600 calories. Let
breakfast also contains im- CONSUMER MyPlate be your guide
portant vitamins and min- when planning meals, in-
erals, which aid in the SCIENCE cluding breakfast. MyPlate
growth and development of has five food groups:
children and adolescents. Kids who Grains, Fruits, Vegetables, Dairy, and
regularly consume a healthy breakfast Protein Foods. While it is recom-
tend to have better concentration and mended to get foods from all five food
are more prepared to learn. groups at each meal, at least include
Since many breakfast choices are foods from three of the five food
nutrient-dense, eating breakfast more groups for breakfast Whole grain ce-
often is associated with a higher-qual- real with little or no added sugar, low
ity diet. Contrary to popular belief, fat or fat free milk, and bananas,
skipping breakfast does not help a berries, or raisins added to the cereal
person to lose weight. In reality, en- would be an example.
joying healthy breakfast foods can Eating breakfast at school is another
help maintain a healthy weight and great alternative to having breakfast at
may prevent obesity later in life. Peo- home. Schools provide affordable
ple who skip breakfast often do not meals that must provide at least one-


fourth of the Recommended Dietary
Allowances for protein, iron, calcium,
and vitamins A and C. Children may
even be eligible for free or reduced
breakfasts, depending on family in-
come level.
Visit the Citrus County School
Board's website to apply online for
free or reduced meals at www.cit-
rus.kl2.fl.us/departments/food/de-
fault.htm, or call 352-726-1931, ext.
2429.
For more information, call Monica
Payne at the Extension office at 352-
527-5713. Citrus County Extension
links the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions, or
affiliations.


Monica Payne is the Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


TV programs prove one person's junk is another's treasure


MELISSA RAYWORTH
For The Associated Press

Tracy Hutson wanders through a
graveyard of ovens that haven't roasted
a turkey or baked a ham since decades
before she was born. Picking through
their discarded parts, she muses: "The
rust on this is just so gorgeous."
Her "Picker Sisters" partner, Tanya
McQueen, agrees yet another item to
bargain for, purchase and turn into a
high-end piece of furniture on their
Lifetime network TV series.
You'll find a similar pair of women,
the "Junk Gypsies," doing much the
same thing over at HGTV And these
two pairs are not alone.
The list of television shows about
hunting for elusive treasure amid
mountains of discarded stuff keeps
growing like a suburban landfill. At
least three new entries are premiering
this summer, adding to the already dou-
ble-digit roster of shows about "pick-
ers" and pawn shop owners and people
who bid for the contents of storage con-
tainers.


Why, especially when we're so over-
loaded with our own clutter and junk,
are we so fascinated with the search
through other people's castoffs?
The rush of remembering
Jordan Hembrough, host of "Toy
Hunter," which premieres Aug. 15 on
the Travel Channel, believes people
love junk-hunting shows because they
reconnect us with a time we like to re-
member as simpler and happier
See TREASURE/Page E5

Toy hunter Jordan Hembrough is shown
in his storage space in Ridgewood, N.J.
"Toy Hunter" premieres on the Travel
Channel on Aug. 15. The list of televi-
sion shows about hunting for elusive
treasure amid mountains of discarded
junk keeps on growing like a suburban
landfill. At least three new entries are
premiering this summer, adding to the
already double-digit roster of reality
shows about "pickers" and pawn shop
owners and people who bid for the con-
tents of storage containers.
Associated Press


E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

part, fruits should be stored
in low humidity, vegetables
in high humidity. Think of it
like this: You want your let-
tuce, celery and other leafy
vegetables to have some
moisture so they don't dry
out or get limp, while you
want your grapes to have
low humidity so they don't
mold and rot. I would keep
fruits and vegetables sepa-
rate because some fruits
(apples, avocados, bananas,
pears, peaches, plums, can-
taloupes, honeydew melons
and tomatoes) emit ethylene
gas, and some fruits and
vegetables emit odors that
can be absorbed by other
produce.
As for the multiple set-
tings of high, low and
medium on your crisper
drawers, the lever is simply
the control for an opening
that keeps moisture in or
out Break it down like this:
High humidity for leafy
greens, beans, cucumbers,
asparagus, broccoli and cel-
ery; medium humidity for
things like tomatoes and cit-
rus fruits; low humidity for
garlic, onions and squash.
For more specifics, consult


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 E5


your fridge's manual or con-
tact the manufacturer's cus-
tomer service line.
Some fruits and vegeta-
bles do fine without refrig-
eration. I keep a lot of
produce in fruit bowls on
the kitchen counter or din-
ing room table, and I store
some vegetables in metal
mesh baskets. I keep cut cel-
ery in a jar of water so it
stays crispy and is easy to
grab on the go.
Dear Sara: What's the
threshold that has to be hit
before you turn the air con-
ditioner on in your house?
Do you wait for a certain
date? Do you wait until it
hits a certain temperature
inside the house? -
Nichole, Iowa
Dear Nichole: The
weather is too unpre-
dictable for me to go by a
certain month before I turn
it on. I can tolerate it being
pretty hot inside my house
by spending more time in
our finished basement,
where it stays nice and cool.
Our air conditioner was bro-
ken last year for a short
while, and I felt like I was
really suffering. I'm embar-
rassed by how I ranted over
it, considering that I didn't
have air conditioning at all


See FRUGAL/Page E7


TREASURE
Continued from Page E4

We recognize items instantly, from
toys to household goods to advertising
signage. Previous generations of
Americans kept things longer, and
there was less to choose from when
you did buy new: Many of us had the
same CorningWare coffee pot, the
same Fisher-Price toys as our
neighbors.
Items designed in the 1950s and
1960s "are from a period that con-
sciously looked to the future," says
Allen Topolski, associate professor of
art at the University of Rochester. It
was a time of optimism, and although
"we never got the jet packs we were
promised," we enjoy revisiting that
feeling as junk-hunting TV hosts
come across this stuff, he says.
This experience won't be the same
for future generations because we re-
place things so frequently today
Young people are also less likely to
have the exact same items as their
peers. "More choices means less

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shared history," says John Baick, as-
sociate professor of history at West-
ern New England University, in
Springfield, Mass.
So why do even viewers in their
teens and 20s watch these shows?
The thrill of the hunt
TJ. Heckman has "been into junk,"
for nearly all of his 26 years. He, his
father and his uncle "used to go out


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all the time just picking up stuff. I re-
member when I was 6 years old bring-
ing home a kitchen table on my
bicycle."
In his work as a delivery truck
driver in the Pittsburgh area, he's
constantly scouting roadsides for any-
thing potentially fun or useful. He
loves bringing things home, and loves
See TREASURE/Page E6


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E6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


TREASURE
Continued from Page E5

watching these shows for the excite-
ment of scoring something awesome at
little or no cost.
"The stuff today being made is
garbage compared to the stuff back
then," Heckman says. "They took their
time and put effort into making it."
Craig Dalen, who coordinates sus-
tainability programs at Messiah Col-
lege in Grantham, Pa., sees this as a
strong explanation for the popularity
of these shows. "Many goods now are
designed to break down and need to
be replaced, and our desires are so-
cially engineered to want more, better,
the latest. I think some are rediscov-
ering the value in these goods because
of the craftsmanship and the materi-
als."
Heckman says he is happy when a
TV host can find and repurpose an old
table or chair revealing its endur-
ing value and returning it to daily life.
Television, of course, reliably deliv-


ers those satisfying moments. Through
editing, these shows offer "very clever
storytelling," Baick says. Something
well-made and worthwhile is always
uncovered. "Like the hunt for the Holy
Grail, in all the accounts it ends up
being a humble cup of tremendous
value," he says. For viewers in homes
filled with everyday items, "this is
kind of magical, that you can turn lead
into gold" if you have a discerning-
enough eye.
Two shows that premiered last
month PBS' "Market Warriors"
(from the producers of "Antiques
Roadshow") and the "American Pick-
ers" spin-off "Picked Off" raise the
bar by merging the junk-hunting genre
with competition. "Picked Off" has a
$10,000 grand prize, while the "Market
Warriors" winner only earns "bragging
rights for eclipsing his peers," accord-
ing to the show's website.
The desire to DIY
For the "Picker Sisters" and 'Junk
Gypsies," it's all about what these
found goodies can become. These
shows, along with sites like Pinterest,


offer fresh and sometimes outrageous
ideas for affordable do-it-yourself
projects.
Whether many viewers actually try
their hand at a project is another
question. But it's fun to see someone
turn a chipped sink into a flower-filled
planter rather than tossing it into a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
landfill, even if you'll never attempt a
similar task.
Although the creation and sale of
DIY items via sites like Etsycom is a
trend, "we are also creating in many
ways a voyeuristic culture where we


See Page E8


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunshine Mimosa Is a perennial ground
cover that does not climb vertically.
Mimosa comes from the Greek word
for mimic, as the plant has a tendency
to move like an animal. The long stems
rapidly spread over the ground in sum-
mer and will root down at the leaf
nodes If In contact with soil. Estab-
lished Sunshine Mimosa grows well in
full sun to part shade. Leaves rarely
stand up higher than 6 inches and tol-
erate light foot traffic from a family.
JANE WEBER!Special to the Chronicle


J. '"
; .i '.. .
40'V
. ;- kic
-ORR C ) 1,N. .


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 E7


*In step with


Sunshine


Mimosa
.' he parking lot at Dunnellon
S Public library has been planted
S with many native, drought-toler-
ant plants. Under the tall, shady trees
in the center planting bed are tall Oak-
leaf Hydrangea shrubs, flowering
perennial Black-
eyed Susans and
a carpet of Sun-
shine Mimosa
dotted with pink








One of about 480 GARDEN
pompoms of
flowers.
Mimosa strig-
illosa, Sunshine
Mimosa, is a
perennial
ground cover Jane Weber
that does not JANE'S
climb vertically
One of about 480 GARDEN
species in the
Mimosagenus of the Leguminosae
family, mostly from the Americas, it
ranges from South Florida Zone 10
northward to Georgia's Zone 8 It does
not grow naturally in West Florida's
Panhandle or Alabama. A western
type grows in Louisiana and Texas.
Leaves may die off after a freeze lo-
cally, but return in early spring. fur-
ther south, it will remain evergreen. It
is commonly found along roadsides
and disturbed development areas.
Compound leaves are opposite bipin-
nate, meaning the leaflets grow oppo-
site each other along a central leaf
vein like a feather There can be 6 to
12 pairs per leaf. Each leaflet is fur-
ther divided with tiny leaflets called
secondary divisions. Often, members
of this genus are sensitive and fold up
when touched or during dry times and
at night to conserve moisture.
Mimosa comes from the Greek word
See Page E8


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

as a kid, and I don't remember
ever complaining or being uncom-
fortable.
I've become spoiled by air con-
ditioning, and when I feel uncom-
fortable, I turn it on. I do have
plenty of fans, and I use them to


create a nice cross breeze when
it's not unbearably hot. But at this
point in my life, I adjust my ther-
mostat to a comfortable level. It's
not the most frugal approach, but
when temperatures are in the 90s
and I am home, my air condition-
ing is on.
We also spend a lot of time at the
beach, where the temps are cooler
and there's a wonderful breeze.
Here are a few frugal tips to help


you beat the summer heat: fru-
galvillage.com/2009/07/09/beat-
summer-heat-on-a-budget.
Dear Sara: We have a really
cute teakettle that sits on top of
the stove, but now it has a layer of
greasy grossness on it. Running it
through the dishwasher didn't
help; it still looks gross. Any tips
for getting rid of the grease? -
Maisie, email
Dear Maisie: Without knowing


the material your kettle is made
from, you can soak it in a sink of
hot water and Dawn dishwashing
liquid, then use a nylon scrubber,
or apply a baking soda and vine-
gar paste and scrub it with a nylon
scrubber and rinse with hot water.
Both methods will work. Bar
Keeper's Friend will work, too.
Avoid harsh chemicals or scrub
pads that could harm the outside
of the kettle.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City
MO, 64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.







E8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012

Raised garden bed
class offered
Crystal River Mall an-
nounces August home im-
provement classes with The
Home Depot. The August
clinic will cover raised garden
beds.
Participants will identify the
basic steps involved in raised
bed gardening and then build
a raised garden bed, finally


identifying the basic steps in-
volved in planting annuals and
perennials.
This is a free class, open to
the public. The raised garden
bed clinic will be at 2 p.m.
every Thursday in August in
the Center Court of the Crystal
River Mall.
Call the mall office at 352-
795-2585 or visit www.the
crystalrivermall.com.
From staff reports


I ;L 1
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SCALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ,
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.llcitrusrealty.com After Hours 13, 2302-6714 "'.


TREASURE
Continued from Page E6

can consume the data and
information," Dalen says.
"It's easy to organize and
pin it for a day that it would
be nice to do it."
The hosts
The last piece of the puz-
zle crucial to any success-
ful TV show is the
characters. Junk-hunting
hosts and competitors fall
into two major camps: the
fierce, take-no-prisoners
people who bristle with
bravado, and the folksy,
charming people you'd love
to invite over for dinner.
The friction-filled family
on "Pawn Stars" can't close
a deal without an argument,
while tattooed Darrell
Sheets lovingly bumps


heads with his son Brandon
on "Storage Wars." Mike
Wolfe and Frank Fritz, the
stars of "American Pickers,"
invariably incur the biting
sarcasm of their office man-
ager, Danielle.
How long will these shows
remain popular? Well,
there's an awful lot of junk
out there. And our national
appetite for a voyeuristic
peek into other people's at-
tics and basements seems to
run deep. (The evil mirror
images of these upbeat junk
shows are the shows about
hoarding, where only mis-
ery comes from amassing so
much stuff.)
Craig Dalen thinks that as
the rate of change in our
lives keeps accelerating, our
hunger to look back toward
an era of relative stability--
"this nostalgic kind of grasp-
ing onto what we had" is
only likely to grow.


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e my virtual tous


JANE
Continued from Page E7

for mimic, as the plant has a
tendency to move like an an-
imal. The long stems rapidly
spread over the ground in
summer and will root down
at the leaf nodes if in contact
with soil. It is easy to propa-
gate by gently digging up the
rooted stems and severing
them from the parent plant.
Immediately pot in a sandy,
well-drained potting soil
amended with fine compost
to retain moisture and pro-
vide nutrients. Set the pots
in the shade. Do not let the
tender developing roots dry
out After recovery from the
separation surgery, the new
plants will be ready to trans-
plant into the garden in 4 to
5 weeks.
Established Sunshine Mi-
mosa grows well in full sun
to part shade. Leaves rarely
stand up higher than 6
inches and tolerate light foot
traffic from a family The
colony can be mowed and
string trimmed for a mani-
cured look I let mine run
wild and cascade over a low
retaining wall. Plant 2 feet
apart in a staggered pattern
and sprinkle soil over any
long stems so they will soon
root down and send out
more stems.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
Flowers on long stems
adorn the dark green
ground cover plant from
spring until fall. The flower-
heads are pink to lavender
Minute flowers have 4 or 5
petals, long stamens and to-
gether look like a little pom-
pom powder puff. The three
segment pea-like seed pod
is about an inch long.
The invasive alien weedy
tree called Mimosa or Silk
Tree is Albiziajulibrissim, a
rapid growing tropical pest
plant originally ranging
across Asia from Iran to
China. It has become a
global nightmare difficult
to control and displacing na-
tive species everywhere.
The florist "Mimosa" is ac-
tually an Australian Acasi-
awattle. About 700 of the
1,200 or so Acasia plants are
indigenous to Australia.
Florida's indigenous Sun-
shine Mimosa, with its de-
lightful flowers, is an
excellent ground cover plant
Check it out at the library


Jane Weberis a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion Countygarden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact JWe-
ber12385@gmail.com.


FORMS AVAILABLE
U The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


KEY "Always There For You"
REALTY GAIL COOPER
m multimillion Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: (352) 634-4346
f 1 Office: (352) 382-1700x309
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Herbs a good choice for water-deprived garden


DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Cacti or succulents are
the usual go-to plants when
xeriscaping, or dry-land gar-
dening, but herbs are an at-
tractive alternative.
Many herbs have Mediter-
ranean origins, and can
grow well where the soil is
sandy and water is scarce.
"All plants need water, but
that varies with the variety
and the setting," said Deb-
bie Boutelier, president of
The Herb Society of Amer-
ica. "Herbs are a good
choice if you're experienc-
ing a drought, have high, hot
sun or problem settings."
Such problem areas
might include boulevards,
driveway strips, slopes or
bare spots that have been


baked into lawns.
The best results when
xeriscaping with herbs come
when using native plants, or
plants that have adapted
well to a particular area,
Boutelier said. "Natives
handle climatic change bet-
ter than something you have
to force," she said. "Planting
correctly is the first rule."
Mulching or adding com-
post runs a close second.
"Having plants in the
right place and doing cul-
tural things that help pre-
serve moisture, like mulch,
will provide so many bene-
fits," said Dennis Patton, a
Kansas State University Re-
search and Extension agent
"Soaker hoses and drip irri-
gation also have a place in
the landscape. They can put
water at the base of the


plants where it's needed."
Xeriscaping is a practical
way to garden no matter
where you live, from the
desert Southwest to the
Canadian highlands and
even Hawaii.
"More and more people
are looking for lower main-
tenance in their gardens,"
Patton said. "That means
less watering," and finding
plants that can thrive that
way but still have some fo-
liage. "We're not talking
yucca here. This is where
herbs come in. They're used
to dry climates and give off
splashes of color while pro-


viding other advantages."
Herbs are great all-
around plants, Boutelier
said: "One plant can give
you a lot of purposes culi-
nary, ornamental, medici-
nal, groundcover."
This isn't to say that herbs
don't present challenges.
Many varieties aren't win-
ter-hardy. Perennials often
become annuals in extreme
climates. Others might be
invasive.
"Lavender is a touchy
plant for us here in Kansas
because of our clay soil, but
it would be a good one in
many well-drained parts of


the country," Patton said.
Other drought-resistant
herbs to consider:
Fennel is a perennial
with leaves and seeds used
for flavoring. "It's also good
for attracting butterflies,"
Patton said.
Low-growing herbs in-
clude yarrow (beware the
aggressive runners) and
thyme. "Creeping thyme
makes a good groundcover
and becomes fragrant when
you walk on it," said Jeff
Schalau, an agent with Uni-
versity of Arizona Coopera-
tive Extension. Lavender is
another appealing aromatic


herb, as are rosemary and
oregano.
Taller herb varieties
that pack a lot of color
would include phlomis
(Jerusalem sage) and
evening primrose, but the
latter should be potted to
contain its growth.
Mint, if confined to con-
tainers, bee balm and angel-
ica require little in the way
of water, fertilizer or
herbicides.
Russian sage, hore-
hound, santolina, marjoram,
catnip, sweet alyssum and
lamb's ears also fare well
with minimal watering.


0EVN AL OFCTUSCUT


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a VirtulTor or LMu ltile Phots,,

Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiescom


HOMOSASSA 3 bedroom, 2 bath, split HERNANDO furnished 2 bedroom, 1 I
floorplan on 1 acre of land. Family room bath home w/fenced yard on 3 sides and a
11..... 1 i I. 1i. i.. canal on the other, which is dry at present,
i.- .i1 I . i .. i... 1, 1 ... :hina but when wet has access to Lake Hernando
cabinet. #352950 & Tsala Apopka chain. Large screened


HOMOSASSA 2 master suites, (2 bedroom, CRYSTAL RIVER waterfront 3 bedroom, 2
2.5 bath) 2 car garage, & Ig workshop on bath; 84 ft on deep water canal, covered
S090 acre of land, totally renovated, all new boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall. Tile
2011 appliances, granite counter tops & floors,new carpet in bedrooms, new roof,
i... ii ........ .. i A must double paned windows,updated kitchen &
S. .., baths. #354933 $249,000
lIeP~. F*:. il imii-lfr riiiii eXBi iiflinriiiii


Al


HOMOSASSA on coer of Fitchen and LECANTO nice half acre with well,septic
Cardinal is this D/W M/H w/3 bedrooms 15 and impact fees paid. Mobile not livable but,
baths, carport and shed. covered rear porch. take it off and replace with new. Center of
Gas for cooking. Being sold "as is". county, Lecanto school dist.
#355143 $28990 #356605 $20,000


NEW LISTING
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-3PM



tJi Ut 206 S. Columbus St.
TI4U' MLS #356736 $61,500
One owner, perfect condition,
clean as a whistle, nice neighborhood.
Directions: Rte. 491 to east on Regina, to
right on Columbus, to home on right.
Jane O'wynn 352-302-1926


IU;//< 1U40 W. Pearson St.
-Mt*I MLS #354649 $232,500
Elegant 3/2/3 plus garage on an acre lot.
Directions: Rte. 486 to Ottawa which
becomes Quartz to left on Pearson to #1940.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


ljl 3831 W. Norlhcresl CI. I./1A '*'"'"* 2193 N. Folkslone Lp.
'I MLS#355149 $169,900 MLS#356196 $129,900
Lovely 3/2/2 great room plan Elegant 2/2/2+ den pool home
Rusaw built model, in immaculate condition.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM




.jiwS E F Icu, Iy
MLS #356500 $154,900
TRUE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE Golf course
location, solar-heated 3/3/2 pool home.
Directions: Rte. 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd., to left on Falconry, to #652 on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-568-0478







Mt.gfelfw 2219 N. Brentwood Cir.
MLS #354592 $124,900
Very nice
fully furnished 3/2/2 villa.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
PENDING


S 3709 N. Buckwheat Pt.
Z'tOe MLS#356804 $99,000
SERIOUSLY? A furnished Pine Ridge pool
home on an acre for THIS price? 2 bedroom/
2 bath.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


d 1320 Lake Shore Dr.
MLS#351954 $99,000
Well-kept home with a
great view of Lake Spivey.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058
PENDING
.P. .rr r,-


/O)n&fmeft 806 Inverie Dr. 17 W. Lemon Street 43 W. Skyview Crossing Dr. T 5248 N. Bronco Terr.
MLS#352982 $96,900 1l MLS#355045 $29,900 V MLS#349474 $169,900 MLS,#355458 $165,000
Spotless, upgraded, Enjoy maintenance free living BEST PRICED 4/3/2 pool home
maintenance-free villa at a low price. CUTE, WELL-MAINTAINED HOME. in this 2/2/2 + den. in Pine Ridge!
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Tami Mayer 352-476-1507
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the B M
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


AGEN To I I b i I-Y-STE D


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I








E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


Choil


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966



--. Classifieds


AIn Print


and


Online


All


NThe Time


.Moi Hebl Moble e l Hej R s Re l E eRe l Esta te . aA.-0S


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077


HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311


LECANTO
2/1, $450. month
(352) 628-2312


SOWN TODAY! I


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com


30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Info
(352) 726-2234
BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
1 acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

For Sale %1 I
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2
bath. 2007 Nobility
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18'x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247

Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




3/2 Double wide, on
large corner lot. New
AC in 2011, Many Up-
grades, quiet and close
to shopping $42,000 by
owner (352) 628-4819
HERNANDO
1/1 Mobile, 1/2 Acre
MOL, As Is $10,000 Cash
Parsley Real Estate
Gareth Rouillard
352-422-5731
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925

JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346


HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly turn, addition,
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244


I I


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090




Yotlr\\iorld tir

Need :a joill
or ai
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CH p-NICLE
Classifieds


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com


RV LOT FOR RENT
OR SALE by OWNER
LOT #119
Nature Coast Landings
(352) 634-5300


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK'
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com



Your World






CmopNIcLE


RENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.itrusCounlyHonieRentals.comrn
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS
7635 Greendale ........... $1,200
3/3/2 Pool, fireplace, close to schools
146W. Seyieria............. $675
2/1 5/1 Cute cozy home on corner lot
CRYSTAL RIVER
548 N. Gulf ......... ....... $750
3/1/1 Fenced yard, close to
Rock Crusher Elementary
11435 Dixie Shores......... $900
3/1 Stilt home, newer floors, dock
HOMOSASSA
6747 W. Oak Park Ln........ $700
2/2/2 Newer SMW Duplex
5865 W. Vilkre Path........ $725
3/2/1 Cozy home, large yard, close to
Rock Crusher Elementary
6139 S. Royal Dr..... REDUCED! $795
2/1/1 Cnal side great view, dock
1843 W. Solar PI ............ $725
2/2 Ind wn & water, newer duplex


z-tu ,21.

J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2 ...................$750
2/1/1.................. $600
2/1.5/1 .................... $650
2/1/Screen Rm ..... $550
2/1 ..................... $400

3/2/1 Lawncare lnc..$800
2/1.5/1 Lakeview..... $750

2/1.5/1................ $600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

Get Results

In The Homefront
Classified!


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
Large Studio, furnished







(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/I BA $400-$500

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall
Quite Clean!
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY


INGLIS 2/1
Near Power Plant, W/D,
Clean, Quiet, Part. Furn.
$495/mo.(352) 447-6016




2/2 Furn. Condo Clean
with membership
352-476-4242, 527-8002




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 $550/month incI
water & lawncare
270-7420
BEVERLY HILLS
3Bd, 2Ba,FLA RM, CHA,
w Wa/Dr hookups Rent
$650 Dep $750 Pets w
dep. Cats okay, Dogs call
me. Ph 352-794-0211,
813-340-1352

*1


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.tlantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Carport, Carpet
$450.mo. 352-302-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525,
1/1 Corner Lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1
Clean $550mo. Fst.
ILst./Sec(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Cen Air, Remod-
eled like new Sec. 1st.,
$640 mo. 352-228-3454
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, Super Clean, No
Pets, $750. 1st. & Sec.
352-489-2266, 322-5073
CR/HOM., 3/2/1
CHA, $575: 2/1 $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1'2 Near power plant
$750 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
DUNNELLON
Vogt Springs Lg 3/2/2,
on /2 Acre, fncd yrd..
new tile carpet, wood
firs., Beautiful kitchen
Close to Rainbow River
& Historical District
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7p
FLORAL CITY
3/1, $550. mo. 1st, last,
sec. (352) 228-1272
INV. HIGHLANDS
2/1/1 Avail. Aug. 1, $650.
Mo.(352) 201-0842
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 2/2/2, Inground
Pool, Ist& Sec.
$850/mo. 352-302-6633
INV-WATERFRONT
3/2/1 Sea Wall, Dock,
Remodeled, Like New,
Fenced yard
Come See Vacant
$850.00 lst,last,sec.
(352) 270-1775


-I
HERNANDO
3/2 $550. 1st. Ist. & sec.
No Pets 352-302-2624
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH.
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai. shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
Female Renter Looking
for female roommate
to share 3/2 Modular
5 acres $300., 697-9819




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611


CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$110wkly/ 420mo. also
avail. $120wkly,
$440mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428






AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M(."
REALTY ONE


Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2, 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K down $495/mo.
(352) 600-8174


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


NaIure ,oasl Lanaings
RV Resort ESTATE
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.detailsbyowner.com for
pictures and info.
$89,500. 352-843-5441



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990




Citrus Spring 3/2/2,
Built in 2007
Move In Ready.
All Appliances,Fenced
Corner Lot, $79,000.
(352) 489-5443


Citrus Springs 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Beautiful
2006 home with many
upgrades, must see.
Build by papa bear con-
struction on corner lot
with empty lots next door.
Curbing and river rock
around house, stone, irri-
gation system, security
system, new upgraded
ac/heating unit in 2011.
Home is 1750sp.ft living,
Asking price is $129,900.
Call or email for pictures
of info 352-220-8114 or
ghaslett2001@yahoo.com





2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$53,900. 352 746-6050


REDUCED!
$83,900. Like New
3/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
New appliances,
flooring, toilet/ vani-
ties, pain in and out.
1747 sf liv. area.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089



Country Living
within City Limits
3/2/2, with Pool
$115,00
(352) 344-0033
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
NEW LISTING
2BD, 1.5 BA, FI. Rm.
1950 sq. ft. near schools
& hosp. on /2 acre in
high end community
$66,900.
JUSTIN MONAHAN
ERA American Realty
and Invenstments
352-697-0240



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFW/M
REALTY ONE




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R/O4 "
REALTY ONE




Homosassa
Springs
4/2
$62,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2 $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


www. Employment source is



Www.chronicleonline.com


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv(@
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


OWN TODAY!


.l .


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
Mo.


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis. FL 34449
352-447-2759
aurorcresfl.com
auroraacresfl.com


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty


SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012 E11



aI
Waterfront
a I Homes1


Cir sC u t


!Hmestu Cut


Vacant
PropertyH


eE~
Citrus County
Land


Lev1 ount
a** nd I-


LosFr al


Waterfront
Homes ]


Waterfront
Land !









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S .I
BEVERLY HILLS
lAi,,m m .:h,, ..... I I I... u.,-,, .. ii, _l.lh i,,

I .i ..hl ... .J I ..... | ll .. '. . ill h .

Ml; = :..". $59,900
Call loraine 0 Regan 352 586 0075

WORK OR
LIVE IN

VICTORIAN
ERA
HOME-ZONED
COMMERCIAL
I... I I l l l'lIlI lb. l, ..'..].j l l.li. b ill

. ....I I. '. ....II I . .. '. l I. . t l j l.]



..I H . .... h i i . . j I... l h
Mil = ASKING $168,900
P.At D.iIs 1352212 1280
'lety hi s ing .ft 11 i i c21p.ild.n.i i corn


SNEAK A QUICK PEEK
11u II ..f.. i ....... ." uli I I ..I i

It.I I.. I II, . li l i 3. ...I ..l .p.II


lMi;, = ~-.. $89,000
Ask lot Manlrn Booth 352 637 4904
or Tim Donovan 352 220 0328


2.4 ACRES, NO RESTRICTIONS,
3/2, OFF HWY. 486

Ai l I .:.'.i .. i, ., .j I. i lly I......j 1l .

MiL = : .5 : $58,500
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202


WATERFRONT ACCESS
TO LAKE HENDERSON


Call Maitha Sny'der 352 476 8727
Ask lot lile=356213


* .Uh I llh ... t. .i
* I l I .i* ) Il i s II*l I I ,I i C,
* _inl nini.n:i. i p *Il~h li h: v 'i, l
I I-l .((.lhili .l 'I.IlII pI, f.inh(, .pp.t i .'.(..l
Mi =5."i. $139,000
Jeanne b Wilaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
wirl''. CillusCount Sold. corn


OPEN WATERFRONT .... i1 .il.i
i.i. I,, hI [ illl , lll, l l l h l lll: 111, 1 ,all

Mli: =' 3I I* ASKING $119,900
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173
to viel the potential ol this heautlful
wralelhoni piopeil'


COME SEE THIS BEAUTIFUL
COUNTRY CHARMER!
1 , . i I l 1. : .i .) pi sl I pm. il'.i


PRICED TO SELL AT $269,000
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


NEED LAND AND A BIG HOUSE?
H.ive ,i .i. l1 .' ':. ... M I I I. I) 1 I |
lhr ll I l. In bll i s h h h..i :Jl inhll Ih.l h i
I...l ....... .. l h ..ll I.. ,t Ih.. -.,.

Mi = 'i1,:i1 $300,000
Call Vichi Root Realtoi Associate
352.212. 1926 ot housescitrus ,gmai. corm


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST

'. '3.'. .j '. .. .. ...

H .. I.1 1 II'.: I. lii j' I ..l. 1 i i I.: l
:..:.,i, l j.'..l'. .'.I h I. l.l. pl h l I..I i r.I'.-.j

1 11 I I I I I- h
Call Karen Morton 352 212 7595









PEACE AND TRANQUILITY: ,
V hil y16 1 .I i tVll h1vj dI ml h'Ily II .. illi hilli
IM .F.I ,1 .1 A l.hll~l il .. .i ..i i l' I I1"1"I ..I F .
rt .i l ..l. I. 1 II. Il 3ill. I......l I. l lll I I I. I
. ..i I.i l i... Ii II II: .. hllll .i ll. I. II

$74,900
Call Ruth Frederick 352 56306866









* ti.'iA. l ,Al A i \V LtA
* A '..i. I .i N i,.lN .l
* I_,- i V .1.. l I i ll. h I-


Ml i = .ii. $84,500
Jeanne b Wilaid Pickiel 352 2123410
I'''ir CillusCountI'Sold. corn


WATERFRONT!!
I I 3 1 11111 I Ilf.
1. I I.i H .. ,, s .... .... i j, ..l I .. ...
I 1 I.. I H 1i : ..II -.i ,il I ,iI...

THIS WON'T LAST AT $62,500
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 7699

GREAT
INCOME
PRODUCING
ON
U.S. HWY. 41
ININVERNESS







$990,000
Call Jim Motion at
352422?2173 cell


660-g ".""-- .
LOCATION, LOCATION
1. h 'I.I .,ill h (.5l.. 1l, '

l il- l .,, II I l 3l I 1 ill.l Lu, .1'
IHA VA U,uDA I...I,,i.l ..ii.J N.. HI)A
h i I : .1 p.i i 1. i. : V. .il
Ml i_ = .. 11:1 $78,900
Pat Davis 352 2127280
View listing at v rl '. c21alidavis. con












HORSE LOVERS WANTED!
_/11 h l.la ,.:l4i .If W llI Ih. '. I- ,h ill, I '." .
I.,1 l h .1 .1 .. 11 1.: f l. : l.I .1 I., ll. '

Ml = '.5.l/: $154,900
Call Isaac S. Baylon 3520697 2493


GOSPEL ISLAND HOME ON 2 LOTS

* I l l *I I ll .ll I l l I:...i l


Mi i =' i.l ONLY $134,900
Call Chailes Kellj 352 422 2387


PARADISE PT.
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
I. ,l h l. N .1 .11 J.un i I, ,'

II I Im I 'I II ll Ihh.'llll'l'l'h

Mli=i 1iU $99,900
it'iil'. sellinqcilluscounill//homes. coin
Call Nancf Jenks 352 400 8072


HERITAGE
"1 ,1 1 I II J .: _.' ,u .-. I I., .., .J I -. 1. ,


I ,J :1 : 1 , 1 h f .11 p... j h H
. ... .. l .... .'

I.L- =: : ONLY $179,000
Call EIas G Hiallah at 352 400 2635
Iot mote linlotmation


WATERFRONT!


..it l I i .. I Is. l.). .i l h .. lh 11 u. ei

1,ill l.31 i 1. N. I.. I l I'
ONLY $89,900
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


OH, WHAT A VIEW!


VII LU.*~ ,l, ,Ii. ., I... .I. I- ..1 '.I
* ll ,11 ......| i .i ,l n~ l h i.i inl: I_ l.ll. 1. hlll.ll ,:
* I11II H MIIII H MIIRFn
Mi = =I.L ,I: $480,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 2012


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