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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02848
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08-04-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02848

Full Text


Missy the missile: Teen sets world record en route to gold /B


I I I I


Rain chances ramp up
this weekend, reaching
60 percent today.
PAGE A4


CITRUS COUNTY





[B )RONICLei
www.chronicleonline.com
;Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VC


2012Election: COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5


History is present for candidates


Adams: Criminal charges thing ofpast


Poliseno on former boss: We didn't hit it of


Early voting
starts today
Early voting for the pri-
mary election starts today
and ends Aug. 11.
Qualified voters may
cast their ballots from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the fol-
lowing locations:
Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Crystal River Elections
Office, 1540 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River.
Homosassa Public
Library, 4100 S. Grand-
march Ave., Homosassa.
Inverness City Hall,
212 W. Main St., Inverness.

Social Security
checks missing
Citrus County residents
who are on Social Secu-
rity usually go to the post
office every third day of
the month to pick up their
checks from the Social
Security office.
However, this Friday,
most of the checks did
not come. Post offices
countywide could not ex-
plain why most of the
checks hadn't arrived.
The Social Security Ad-
ministration in Gainesville
advised people to wait
three days before calling
again to inquire about
their missing checks.
The number for the So-
cial Security Administra-
tion office in Gainesville is
877-219-8323.

Florida shoppers
get tax break
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's popular back-to-
school sales tax holiday
is returning this year.
Shoppers will not have
to pay sales tax on cloth-
ing items worth $75 or
less or on school supplies
costing $15 or less.
The tax break applies
to most clothing items, in-
cluding shoes but does
not apply to watches, um-
brellas or jewelry. School
supplies such as tape,
crayons, pencils and
notebook paper are tax-
free but this year's break
does not apply to books.
The tax holiday started
at 12:01 a.m. Friday and
runs until Sunday night.


TOMORROW:
On the road
The state is asking po-
tential Suncoast Park-
way 2 motorists how
much they would be
willing to pay in tolls to
avoid traffic in Citrus
County /Sunday


Comics ..........C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment ..... B6
Horoscope ........B6
Lottery Numbers ...B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ........ C9
TV Listings .......C7


I6 184178I [ 2002 II


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Scott
Adams hopes voters don't
hold his past against him.
Adams, one of four candi-
dates in the county commis-
sion District 5 primary on Sco
Aug. 14, had drug and alco- Adar
hol arrests two decades ago candida
that continue to haunt him. BOC
"I'm not proud of a lot of
things I did in my youth," said
Adams, now 46. "I have never been
convicted of anything that's kept me
from running for office. I have never
been convicted of any dishonest act"


Adams,
terests inc
recycling
sued gov
and been
.ting issue:
His cou
pair of do:
tt junctions
ns dropped a
ate for atedinthe
C. traffic inf
and three
ties dating back
fact, is challen
ticket he receive


whose business in-
clude construction,
and cattle, also has


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer


ernment agencies CRYSTAL RIVER -
sued over permit- Charles Poliseno's nine-year
s. career with Citrus County
irt file includes a government was chugging
mestic violence in- along nicely until he ran
one was into a buzz saw named An- Ch
and he was exoner- thony Schembri. Poli
e other-plus nine Poliseno, the county's candi
fractions in Citrus public safety director, found BC
surrounding coun- himself in Schembri's line of
to 1985. Adams, in fire within weeks of the former De-
iging a speeding apartment of Juvenile Justice secre-
d in late June. tary becoming county administrator
in April 2008.
See Page A5 Schembri, who quickly became


ar
is.
da
)C


known for his fiery emails to
subordinates, accused
Poliseno of wasting money
on questionable purchases
S for the firehouses.
"Please advise me as to
why it is necessary to pur-
chase six leather recliners in
tles the amount of $3,199?"
eno Schembri began in a lengthy
ite for email to Poliseno. "Why are
:C. we purchasing cake servers?"
He ended the email this
way: "Get your hands around your
department. My patience with you
is exhausted."


Page A5


FROM CUBAN FUGITIVE TO AMERICAN CITIZEN, RAGOLTA FINALLY


RETURN


SHO


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Ray Ragolta was born in Cuba but escaped as a young man to the United States after the Fdel Castro revolution.
Ragolta, who has spent many years in Florida, is now a Citrus County resident and works as a night caretaker at
Key Training Center. Ragolta is seen around the area, shining shoes for donations for the Key Training Center as a
way to give back to those in need.


E


After 47years

in exile, man

reunites with

family in Cuba

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
For an 18-year-old, it
was a tough deci-
sion.
Ray Ragolta, now 69, had
grown up in Cuba. At 18, he
was about to be drafted
into the Cuban army
However, life in the mili-
tary earning only seven
pesos and a pack of ciga-
rettes a month didn't ap-
peal to him. So he decided
to seek employment at the
U.S. Navy base at Guan-
tanamo Bay where his
father worked.
"I started out washing
and detailing cars and
doing anything I could at
the Navy Exchange,"
Ragolta said. "I wanted to
be a machinist, but there
was no job for me."
Eventually, his father-in-
law got him a job on the
base in a machine shop,
cleaning for four hours and
learning the trade the rest
of the day
Growing danger
He was 18, married -
and about to become a po-
litical fugitive.
"I was wearing my
clothes from the base and
people were calling me
'worm,' also when I went to
the bank to change my dol-
lars into pesos they called
me that," he said.
There was a growing ani-
mosity among Cuban na-
tionals toward other
Cubans who mixed with
Americans. It was 1963 and
Castro was already in
power. People told Ragolta
he was only good for cut-
ting sugar cane.
Isolation
He decided to seek asy-
lum at the Navy base,
working at his job during
the day and sleeping in
civilian barracks at night.
See Page A2


Crystal River to vote on charter changes


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Back in
January, a committee of five -
Joe Chrietzberg, Daniel
Grannan, Gail Jannaronne,
William "Dude" Phelan and


David Tagye quietly began
tweaking the city charter. Sev-
eral months later, on Aug. 14,
voters will be asked to deliver a
verdict on the proposed
changes.
City Manager Andy Houston
said the proposed changes are


meant to eliminate redundan-
cies and codify certain prac-
tices already in effect.
"Things like a provision ask-
ing for the mayor to be the tie-
breaker vote. The mayor
currently is a full voting mem-
ber of the city council just like


any other council member,"
Houston said.
He explained that provision
is a holdover from the days
when the mayor was a non-
voting council member.


Andy
Houston


city manager of
Page A4 Crystal River.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
92
LOW
77


AUGUST 4, 2012


NEWS





A2 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012

RAGOLTA
Continued from Page Al

There he was a free man,
but only as long as he was on
the base. He could see his
father, who also worked on
the base, but not his mother
or his sister Maria, who
was 7.
He couldn't see his young
wife of only six months ei-
ther But he had an idea to
leave Cuba and get his wife
out, too.
It would take four years.
Escape and return
Eventually, he and his
wife came to America, to
Tampa and then to
Brooksville, but it would
take 22 years until he saw
his mother again and 47
years until he returned to
Cuba to see little Maria, now
a grown woman.
Ragolta saw her this past
December
"I had my birthday when I
was there, and it was the
most wonderful time," he
said. "We danced until 2:30
in the morning and talked
until early in the morning. It
was my dream."
Difficult choice
The decision to leave
Cuba was not easy, Ragolta
said, nor was the process
simple. As he worked on the
base and saved his money,
he was lonesome for his
wife and family But he
wanted a better life than
what he could have in Cuba.
Eventually, he was able to
get a flight to Puerto Rico on
a Navy plane and soon es-
tablished himself as a resi-
dent in the U.S. territory
Meanwhile, he worked to
find a way to get his wife. He
tried Jamaica and Mexico,
but was denied. Finally, he
could get her to Spain, and
from Spain she would be
free to come to Puerto Rico.
Life in America
They lived 10 years in
Puerto Rico with two
daughters, then sold every-
thing and moved to Tampa
- Ybor City, in 1972.
"Fifteen days after I ar-
rived with my toolbox, I got
a job," he said.
He and his wife went on
to have two more children.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


They divorced after more
than 25 years of marriage.
Later, he remarried and di-
vorced another wife. He
said he's not sure if he'll try
a third time.
After about five years in
Tampa, the family moved to
Pasco County, then to
Brooksville and finally to
Citrus County about 24
years ago.
Professional career
Ragolta spent his career
as a machinist and repair-
ing business machines, in-
cluding 24 years with the
Citrus County School Board.
Currently, he works as a
night time caregiver at one
of the Key Training Center
group homes in Inverness.


He also shines shoes for do-
nations for the Key Center
at various locations around
the county, including the
Key Center thrift stores and
Golden Corral.
Family dreams
"Leaving Cuba was dan-
gerous, but I wasn't scared,"
Ragolta said. "I was at the
base two weeks when my
mother got a telegram for
me to go into the (Cuban)
military So, I was a 'fugi-
tive."'
From that time, it had
been his dream to see his
family again.
After 22 years, his mother
was finally allowed to come
to Florida for a visit.
Ragolta lived in Brooksville


Special to the Chronicle
While visiting family in Cuba recently, Ray Ragolta celebrated his birthday with his
sister, Maria, whom he hadn't seen in 47 years. Pictured, from left, are Ragolta's aunt
Zeidad, Ragolta, sister Maria Caridad, niece Mimi holding the baby and an unnamed friend
of the family in pink shirt. Inverness resident Ray Ragolta recently returned to his
native Cuba where he reunited with his family after leaving home at age 18.


then, on a farm another
one of his dreams.
When she got there, she
wasn't well. She said she
had allergies, but a doctor-
friend of Ragolta's looked at
her and said she should go
to the hospital, that it looked
like she had emphysema.
"I took her to the hospital
where they said she had
cancer and emphysema,
and about 10 months to
live," he said. "She went
back to Cuba and two
months later she died. But I
saw her! That was my last
dream, to see my mother."
Sisterly reunion
Likewise, seeing his sister
was a dream come true. He
said his life has been good,
that God has given him his
dreams.
He became an American
citizen in 1972.
"Things are very bad in
Cuba," he said. "With money


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you can find things on the
black market, but every-
body's poor. Every day peo-
ple have to look for
breakfast, for lunch and din-
ner When I was there, we
were without water for 16
days.


"It's a privilege to live in
this country," he said.
"Here, we have so many
things."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, cor or (352) 564-2927.


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Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
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re







Page A3 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Stuff "The Duck"
today in Inverness
The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office will have "The Duck,"
the amphibious armored per-
sonnel carrier, in Inverness
from 8 a.m. to noon today at
the Wal-Mart Superstore.
CCSO school resource of-
ficers Joe Faherty, Tim
Langer and Todd Farnham
will be on hand to receive do-
nations for school supplies.
Also, the FOCUS (Filtering
Out Crime United with Stu-
dents) cars will be on display.

Miami

Judge sanctions firm,
bank in Ponzi case
A Miami federal judge has
ordered sanctions against a
major law firm and a bank for
violations in a lawsuit arising
from the Scott Rothstein
Ponzi scheme.
U.S. District Judge Marcia
Cooke ruled Friday that law
firm Greenberg Traurig and
its client, TD Bank, violated
rules regarding evidence pro-
duction in a lawsuit filed by
investors in Rothstein's $1.2
billion scam. Despite the vio-
lations, Texas-based Coquina
Investments won a $67 mil-
lion judgment earlier this year
against TD Bank for its role in
handling suspicious Roth-
stein accounts.
Cooke ruled the bank and
law firm should pay Coquina
attorney fees and costs re-
lated to the sanctions mo-
tions. The amount will be
decided later.
A disbarred lawyer, Roth-
stein is serving a 50-year
prison sentence.
Possible deal to keep
'Burn Notice' home
The spy series "Burn No-
tice" might blow up its own
studio space, if one Miami of-
ficial gets his way.
The series currently in
its sixth season films at a
defunct, city-owned conven-
tion center, but a master plan
calls for the building to be de-
molished and replaced with a
waterfront park. Commis-
sioner Marc Sarnoff, whose
district includes the conven-
tion center, has recently sug-
gested not renewing the
show's lease when it expires
in October, regardless of
whether it's approved for a
seventh season.
Sarnoff is now making a
new proposal: Instead of its
normal $240,000 annual rent
payment for a seventh sea-
son, the show would cover the
demolition costs for the con-
vention center, possibly work-
ing the building's destruction
into the show's eventual finale.

Winter Park
Man makes threats
during Obama visit
A Florida man has been
committed for a mental evalua-
tion after he made threats on
the same day President Obama
and former President Clinton
visited the Orlando area.
Orange County Sheriff's of-
ficials said the unidentified
man made the threats Thurs-
day, the same day Obama
addressed a campaign crowd
at Rollins College, and Clin-
ton attended a fundraiser for
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.
Deputies arrested the man at
a Winter Park apartment com-
plex and transported him to a
facility for mental evaluation.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction
Because of a staff writer's
error, the arrest records on
page A4 of Friday's edition,
"For the Record," contained
incorrect information. Megan
Kathleen Strange's address


is 7219 S. Sonata Ave.,
Homosassa.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


SBA offers help to TS Debby victims


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Financial aid for people and
businesses that experienced dam-
age or economic injury from Tropi-
cal Storm Debby is still available
through the U.S. Small Business
Administration (SBA).
Angel Class, public affairs spe-
cialist with the SBA, said there is a
common misconception the SBA
only helps small business owners
when a disaster strikes.
However, Class said there is a
range of different options for both
individuals and businesses that may
need long-term recovery assistance.
Renters may be eligible for loans
of up to $40,000 to replace or repair
damaged personal property. Home-


owners can receive up to $200,000
in loans to fix structural damage
plus up to another $40,000 for per-
sonal property.
In addition, Class said eligible
business owners and private non-
profit organizations could receive
up to $2 million in disaster loans to
repair or replace any assets that re-
ceived physical damage.
Businesses and private nonprof-
its that may not have received phys-
ical damage but have suffered any
economic losses, may also qualify
for SBA economic injury loans to
meet immediate financial obliga-
tions, and expenses like payroll and
utility bills.
The interest rates for home loans
begin as low as 1.938 percent. For
business loans, the rate can be as


low as 4 percent. And for nonprofit
groups, the rate can start as low as
3 percent.
Class said there is a major push
to get people to apply for aid be-
cause there are filing deadlines.
The deadline for physical damage
loan applications is Sept. 4; the
deadline for economic injury is
April 3.
For more information or to regis-
ter for assistance, storm victims can
visit the disaster recovery center,
which is located at the Citrus
County Emergency Operations Cen-
ter, 3549 Saunders Way, in Lecanto.
The center will remain open
through Wednesday, Aug. 8. Hours
are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through
Saturday
People can also register by one of


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The city of Crystal River recently added several new benches in the downtown area as a part of the streetscape
project that was completed last year.


Bench


mark


Crystal River plans to add more seating throughout city


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
David Zeiher said at age
70 he is getting long in the
tooth and therefore does-
n't move around as easily
as he used to.
He said his inability to
stay on his feet for long
periods became glaring
during the annual Scallop
Jam festival at King's Bay
Park.
Zeiher said he parked
on North Citrus Avenue
and walked over to the
event site, but had diffi-
culty finding benches to
rest at intervals.
"There are some
benches near the water,
but I think we could use


There are some benches
near the water, but I think we
could use more in other parts of
downtown for people like us
who are a little elderly.

David Zeiher
city resident who wants more benches.


more in other parts of
downtown for people like
us who are a little eld-
erly," Zeiher said.
City Manager Andy
Houston said the city has
been installing benches
in the downtown core, es-
pecially south of U.S. 19.
"I would say we have


eight or nine of them on
that side. We put some in
as part of our streetscap-
ing project on South Cit-
rus and added bike
racks," Houston said.
He said benches and
bike racks are part of the
city's bigger plan to trans-
form the downtown core


into a bicycle-friendly
area.
Houston said the city
already has plans to add
benches and bike racks to
areas north of U.S. 19.
In the summer of 2011,
the city repaved and used
decorative adornments to
add polish to South Citrus
Avenue. Pavers were
used for the sidewalks
and decorative street
lamps and benches were
added to help make the
area walkable.
"I think we could use 10
to 15 more benches,"
Zeiher said.
Chronicle reporterAB.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


the following methods:
Call 800-621-FEMA (3362). As-
sistance is available in most lan-
guages and lines are open 7 a.m. to
10 p.m., seven days a week. For
those with a telecommunications
device, call 800-462-7585.
EVisit wwwdisasterassistance.
gov
By smartphone or tablet, use
the FEMA application or go to
m.fema.gov
For information on SBA disaster
loan applications, call 800-659-2955
or 800-877-8339 for people who use
a telecommunications device.
Information is also available on-
line at www.sba.gov
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


Florida


regulators


question


insurance


savings

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE
Florida regulators warned
that a preliminary report
estimating a new law will
cut no-fault auto insurance
premiums by 12 percent to
20 percent may be mislead-
ing and overly optimistic.
The Office of Insurance
Regulation released a con-
sulting firm's draft report
Friday in response to public
records requests by the
news media. The final ver-
sion is due Sept 15. It's re-
quired as part of the new
law, which is designed to re-
duce insurance fraud.
"The final conclusions
may, and probably will,
change prior to the report
being finalized," wrote of-
fice spokesman Jack Mc-
Dermott, who also issued a
list of caveats.
One is that the estimate is
for premiums that insurers
are entitled to receive. Com-
panies, though, often ask for
lower premiums because
auto insurance is highly
competitive. The difference
could reduce or eliminate
any savings.
Another caveat is the sav-
ings would be just for per-
sonal injury protection, or
PIP, which accounts for only
about 20 percent of a typical
insurance bill.
Also, any savings will not
be realized until Jan. 1, 2013,
at the earliest and there's no
requirement for insurers to
accept the report's findings.
Insurance companies,
meanwhile, could seek pre-
mium increases for other
reasons that could negate
all or part of any savings.
Donovan Brown, state gov-
ernmental relations counsel
for the Property Casualty In-
surers Association of Amer-
ica, also urged caution on the
draft report prepared by Pin-
nacle Actuarial Resources.
Brown said the law will not
be fully implemented until
next year and courts may in-
terpret it differently than the
Legislature intended.


SUnsolved MYSTERIES



Detectives search for leads in murder of elderly man


shortly before 11
a.m. on Dec. 2,
2000, a man went
to 1565 Lockport Lane in
Dunnellon to check on a
friend who lived there.
When he was unable to
get a response, he called
a family member of the
friend, who responded
to the residence. To-
gether they were able to
gain access to the home,
where they discovered
the body of Nathaniel
Thomas.


Lee Alexander
UNSOLVED


MYSTI


Deputies were called to the scene
and began investigating the cause of
death. After an autopsy, the medical
examiner ruled the death a homi-
cide as a result of blunt-force trauma.


Thomas was 81 years
old and lived alone;
however, he frequently
had temporary resi-
dents who would stay
with him.
The follow-up investi-
gation revealed Thomas
was a heavy drinker De-
tectives also discovered
that at the beginning of
the month, he would


ERIES have cash on hand.
After many inter-
views, detectives discov-
ered several people who had seen
the victim within 24 hours prior to
his death, including two who were
at the residence in the early-morn-
ing hours on the day of his death.
The information provided by these


people led detectives to try to iden-
tify an unknown person who might
have been present just prior to the
victim's murder
Detectives need your help in
identifying and solving the murder
of Nathaniel Thomas. Any piece of
information, no matter how in-
significant, that you can give may be
the key to solving this homicide.
Please contact CrimeStoppers of
Citrus County by calling 888-ANY-
TIPS, texting the word CITRUS
plus your tip to 274637 or visiting
crimestopperscitrus.com. You may
be eligible to receive a cash reward
and you can remain anonymous.

The column is submitted by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES
OF CITRUS COUNTY
VICTIM: Nathaniel Thomas.
DATE OF BIRTH: Nov. 25,
1919.
CAUSE OF DEATH: Homicide
blunt force trauma.
DESCRIPTION: Black male, 5
feet 7 inches, 172 pounds,
white hair, brown eyes.

Retired sheriff's office Detective
Lee Alexander is a volunteer with
the CCSO Cold Case Unit.
The Unsolved Mysteries column
will appear weekly on Saturdays
highlighting a cold case, unsolved
burglary or crime.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Going for a swim

:..:. '


Associated Press
Moscovy ducklings swim between bubbles, caused by rain drops from an afternoon thunderstorm, at a pond Thursday in
Pembroke Pines, Fa.


CHARTER
Continued from Page Al

Other changes voters will
see include:
Eliminating outdated
wording related to prior
elections and the resultant
terms for each council seat
Allowing supplemental
appropriations to be intro-
duced and approved in a
single council meeting,
which is consistent with
current practice.
In its current form, the
charter requires supple-
mental appropriations be
introduced at one meeting
and final action taken at a
subsequent meeting.
Allowing the city man-
ager to change the depart-
mental structure and


responsibilities without
prior council approval.
The committee agreed
this level of flexibility was
appropriate for the man-
ager to have, particularly
since reorganizing can't in-
crease appropriated
funding.
Allowing the city man-
ager to serve as the head of
a department without the
prior consent of the council.
The committee agreed
this level of flexibility was
consistent with the reality
that the city manager gener-
ally serves as the acting de-
partment head following the
departure of a department
head and subsequent re-
cruitment period due to lim-
ited depth in departmental
staffing.
Conducting a charter
review process at least once


every 10 years rather than
every four years, based on a
belief a four-year cycle is
excessive.
Extending a review of
all city ordinances to deter-
mine legality or obsoles-
cence from at least once
every five years to 10 years.
The committee proposed
the change based on a five-
year cycle is excessive and
since it was unable to deter-
mine when such a review
was last conducted.
Eliminating the charter
provision relating to the out-
come of a 1998 election.
The committee felt it was
outdated.
Eliminating the
charter provision relative to
term of office.
The committee felt it was
redundant with Section
3.03.


Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


. ska


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
MA commercial burglary was
reported at 10:16 a.m. Aug. 2 in
the 2000 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:29 a.m. Aug. 2 in
the 10 block of Plaza Street,
Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary was
reported at 12:28 p.m. Aug. 2 in
the 2900 block of W. Birds Nest
Drive, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary was
reported at 4:11 p.m. Aug. 2 in
the 5500 block of S. Bluegill
Way, Floral City.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:58 p.m. Aug. 2 in
the 10 block of S. Barbour
Street, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:06 p.m. Aug. 2 in
the 10 block of W. Murray
Street, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary was
reported at 11:35 p.m. Aug. 2 in
the 4600 block of E. Parsons
Point Road, Hemando.
Thefts
SA petit theft was reported at
12:44 a.m. Aug. 2 in the 2900


Igal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







SMeeting Notices,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,C15




Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices,,,,,,C15


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
,"ij lll l" 'i lll
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


oIsu .
8os


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
97 74 0.00 92 74 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK foExcusivedaty

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
S High: 92 Low: 77
,S ._ Rain chances ramp up over the
weekend, reaching 60% today.

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
SHigh: 91 Low: 77
Sunday looks similar as thunderstorms and
showers are expected.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SH... High: 91 Low: 78
i "' Late afternoon to early evening storms.
5w'.,a


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 91/72
Record 99/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.10 in.
Total for the year 37.17 in.
Normal for the year 31.71 in.
'As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 61%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grass, chenopods
Today's count: 3.7/12
Sunday's count: 4.1
Monday's count: 3.8
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
8/4 SATURDAY 7:58 1:47 8:21 2:10
8/5 SUNDAY 8:49 2:38 9:12 3:00

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SU SET TO IGHT ................. 8:19 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.......... 6:54 AM.
S O M CMOONRISE TODAY.....................9:49 PM.
AMG. All G.17 AlG. 4 MG6. 31 MOONSET TODAY ............................9:21 AM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division i. F. ... ) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please ,, ii. ., f Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or rn,: .:. rnQal.'.ri of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka" 8:05 a/3:42 a 7:51 p/3:45 p
Crystal River" 6:26 a/1:04 a 6:12 p1:07 p
Withlacoochee* 4:13 a/10:55 a 3:59 p/11:23 p
Homosassa*** 7:15 a/2:41 a 7:01 p/2:44 p


**At Mason's Creek
Sunday
HighlLow High/Low
8:32 a/4:13 a 8:33 p/4:25 p
6:53 a/1:35 a 6:54 p/1:47 p
4:40 a/11:35 a 4:41 p/11:52 p
7:42 a/3:12 a 7:43 p/3:24 p


East winds from 5 tO 10 knots. Seas 1
to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
smooth. Partly cloudy with scattered
thunderstorms developing today.


Gulf water
temperature



89
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.02 32.00 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.97 36.00 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.06 38.13 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.79 40.78 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United Slates Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


THE NATION


F. go


SSa. 90s -



Los s



,f -e .

I


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston. SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


90 70
92 65
84 64
99 71 trace
91 74
99 71
92 71
73 56 01
89 73 15
89 59
92 72
95 69 01
91 69
90 71 01
90 66 .03
93 71
95 71
85 69
95 68
95 71
95 72
91 62
10480
98 65
98 74
93 71
101 75 01
92 71
89 71 .49
92 72
97 80
93 73
94 78
10484
10381 02
73 63
84 73 32
93 77 92
85 71
89 70
93 76 08
93 72 1.69
89 74


91 71
91 69
79 66
87 72
84 75
100 74
94 78
81 54
89 74
90 57
87 70
86 75
89 71
88 75
90 72
88 71
92 73
90 74
93 75
91 73
92 72
88 66
102 80
81 59
88 63
91 75
101 76
98 74
90 71
89 71
94 78
94 74
94 76
103 82
100 79
71 62
94 76
96 78
87 70
81 59
90 74
88 75
91 74


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


* 7?-
V7,7-


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 92 81 02 ts 91 77
New York City 89 75 pc 89 74
Norfolk 91 72 ts 92 74
Oklahoma City 11384 pc 110 74
Omaha 97 71 pc 82 63
Palm Springs 10683 pc 106 81
Philadelphia 92 75 .03 pc 92 75
Phoenix 10987 pc 107 85
Pittsburgh 90 64 pc 90 70
Portland, ME 90 64 pc 84 66
Portland, Ore 89 61 s 96 64
Providence, RI 91 71 pc 89 69
Raleigh 93 70 ts 91 72
Rapid City 81 57 s 79 53
Reno 101 59 pc 98 65
Rochester, NY 88 68 pc 92 73
Sacramento 93 58 pc 90 61
St. Louis 97 74 pc 101 75
St. Ste. Marie 76 58 pc 83 67
Salt Lake City 93 65 s 92 68
San Antonio 10075 pc 99 77
San Diego 71 65 pc 72 65
San Francisco 69 53 c 68 55
Savannah 95 69 .21 ts 91 75
Seattle 81 55 s 89 60
Spokane 82 57 s 88 61
Syracuse 92 70 pc 94 74
Topeka 96 74 ts 94 66
Washington 96 75 ts 93 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 114 Guthrie, Okla. LOW 31 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/79/ts
Amsterdam 72/59/sh
Athens 94/78/pc
Beijing 87/70/ts
Berlin 78/59/pc
Bermuda 85/79/pc
Cairo 94/75/s
Calgary 80/53/s
Havana 89/73/ts
Hong Kong 93/82/ts
Jerusalem 87/67/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


79/62/s
70/54/ts
95/62/s
74/53/ts
90/71/pc
84/65/ts
74/58/c
85/67/s
91/68/s
62/46/pc
90/77/pc
89/69/pc
82/63/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY N


For the RECORD


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


60s
0s M.nn sL I "'"'

Cr.-ago
L-- .. --

10.90s

-So 2 M1o.o
_'- 100


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Report a news tip:
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I-


A4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


LOCAL


block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
SA petit theft was reported at
3:19 a.m. Aug. 2 in the 2300
block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 9:09 a.m.Aug. 2 in the
10800 block of W. Gem Street,
Crystal River.
SA petit theft was reported at
12:54 p.m. Aug. 2 in the 6800
block of S. Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported at
4:55 p.m. Aug. 2 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 1:58 p.m. Aug. 2 in the 100
block of Rose Avenue, Beverly
Hills.

ON THE NET

SFor more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.


....;. -



j ~ r .d ' '"' '*bTe? tfuk
i^^^^^-^^ Lff*^ 'iT'l l;ilf'i'lC


4

10





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ADAMS
Continued from Page C1

"I've made mistakes and
they've taught me lessons,"
he said.
Adams blames political op-
ponents for making issues of
his past shortly before the
primary The same thing hap-
pened in 2002, when oppo-
nent and eventual winner
Jim Fowler raised Adams'
drug and alcohol arrests dur-
ing the county commission
District 4 race.
"I've straightened my life
up," he said.
According to Citrus County
court records, Adams in 1993
was charged with battery on
a law enforcement officer,
reckless driving and posses-
sion of marijuana. The bat-
tery charge is a felony; the
other charges are misde-
meanors.
Records show he pleaded
no contest in 1994 to reckless
driving and the other charges
were dismissed. Adjudica-
tion was withheld and he was
ordered to spend three days
in jail and serve two years on
probation.
In a Citrus County Chroni-
cle online candidate question
about arrests, Adams re-
sponded: "Twenty years ago,
I was pulled over and
charged with DUI and pos-
session of marijuana. The
charges were either dropped
or adjudication withheld."
Actually, Adams combined
two separate cases and mis-
stated the results of one of
them.
While what he wrote is
true regarding the reckless
driving case, he was arrested
in 1994 in Marion County on
a charge of driving under the
influence and violation of a
restricted driver's license.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 A5


He pleaded no contest, was
adjudicated guilty and
served 10 days in the Marion
County jail. He was ordered
to perform 80 hours of com-
munity service and his dri-
ver's license was suspended
for one year
Adams said he had forgot-
ten about the DUI result until
a reporter brought it to his at-
tention.
"It's a minor thing," he
said. "I haven't drank a drop
of alcohol since Thanksgiving
night 1999."
As for the domestic vio-
lence cases, Adams said one
in 1993 involved a custody
battle with his son's mother
Records show the woman
dropped the injunction for
protection complaint about a
week after filing for it
The 2002 case, he said, was
related to his political cam-
paign against Fowler
Records show a woman
had filed a small-claims law-
suit against Adams and his
business partner, Charlie
Strange. She said she was
driving her car behind a Scott
Adams Excavating dump
truck and debris flew from
the truck, damaging her car
At a settlement conference,
the woman claimed Adams
leaned back in his car, "made
a gun with his hand, pointing
it at me," and then mentioned
he planned to go hunting
after the meeting.
"With the high-profile cov-
erage of Scott, I do not know
what he might do or have
done to me," she wrote.
The court issued a tempo-
rary injunction to keep Scott
500 feet from her home and
workplace.
Adams' attorney, however,
argued the woman's descrip-
tion of Adams actually fit
Strange, who also attended
the hearing and made a com-
ment about hunting.


Adams said in court papers
the woman called his office
and threatened to ruin his
political campaign against
Fowler The hearing was the
day after the election, and
the woman teased Adams
about losing the race, court
records show.
A judge lifted the tempo-
rary injunction and ordered
the woman to pay $189 in fees
associated with filing the
court paperwork
"It was a political scam
with that woman," Adams
said in an interview. "That
was a politically motivated
issue."
Court files also show the
county suing Adams over a
wood recycling business he
co-owned with Strange on
County Road 486 in Her-
nando. The lawsuit, filed in
2000, dragged through the
courts for seven years with a
circuit court and appeals
court agreeing with the
county that Adams violated a
permit
Prior to the case going to
court, Adams was particu-
larly critical of county offi-
cials, including Richard
Wesch, then the assistant
county attorney
"Every time we have some-
thing good for the county, a
bunch of bureaucrats want to
mess it up," Adams said in
1999.
Adams said this week if
elected commissioner he
would hold no grudge against
Wesch, now the county attor-
ney
"That's been a number of
years ago," he said. "As long
as everybody does their jobs,
no problem. That was then,
this is now. That's over and
done with."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline.com.


POLISENO
Continued from Page Al

That was May 1, 2008.
The next day Poliseno re-
signed and a short time
later was hired as a fire
prevention inspector -
he's now emergency pre-
paredness supervisor-at
the Progress Energy
power complex north of
Crystal River.
Poliseno, one of four
candidates in the county
commission District 5
race, said Schembri did
not fire him nor was he
forced out.
Rather, Poliseno said, he
decided to take advantage
of county policy that allows
two months' severance
package for department
directors who resign or are
fired.
"Clearly he and I were
not hitting it off," he said.
"I said, 'let's just end this.
Let's end it on a good
note."'
Oddly, Schembri gave
Poliseno a perfect score
five days later on a super-
visor evaluation and rec-
ommended a 5 percent
merit pay raise.
Schembri said Friday
he couldn't discuss the in-
cident. He said his recol-
lection was he agreed not
to speak publicly of
the details surrounding
Poliseno's departure.
Schembri said the eval-
uation likely was related to
Poliseno's "separation
agreement" with the
county that required
Schembri to give him a
positive job reference for
prospective employers.
Poliseno, in an inter-
view, defended the pur-
chases Schembri


EARLY VOTING STARTS TODAY
Early voting for the Aug. 14 primary starts today. Qualified
voters may cast their ballots between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. at:
Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills.
Crystal River Elections Office, 1540 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
Homosassa Public Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Inverness City Hall, 212W. Main St., Inverness.


I was a stellar employee
who he didn't like.
Charles Poliseno
on his former boss Anthony Schembri.


criticized. He provided
records that showed the
county commission had bud-
geted more for the recliners
than was spent He said the
"cake servers" were actually
kitchen utensils for the new
career fire station at Connell
Heights.
He said Schembri didn't
seem to understand that fire
stations housing full-time
firefighters required some
comfort and convenience.
"I was a stellar employee


who he didn't like," Poliseno
said.
Schembri resigned 10
months later under sharp
criticism by county commis-
sioners for an incident involv-
ing a homeowners' group.
Asked whether he thought
Poliseno would make a good
commissioner, Schembri
said: "I have no comment"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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I I


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L__^_'-'!' -
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Martha
Haines, 95
INVERNESS
Martha Ellen Good
Haines, 95, of Inverness
Fla., moved to her eternal
home with her Lord and
Savior,
Jesus
Christ, on
Wednesday,
[ e August 1,
2012. She
Swas a loving
mother,
grand-
Martha mother, and
Haines
Haines a special
friend to everyone. To know
her was to love her, and her
kind and caring life will live
on through the lives of all
who have had the great
pleasure of calling her
"friend."
Martha was born Dec. 15,
1916, in Marion, Ind., the
daughter of William and
Mary Good. "Will" brought
his family, including three
young girls Margaret,
Anna Marie, and Martha -
to St. Petersburg, Fla., in
1920. "Will" was a construc-
tion engineer and built
many homes in the north-
east section of St. Peters-
burg, and the couple owned
and managed a boarding
house on 4th Street North.
The girls attended Roser
Park Elementary School,
Mirror Lake Junior High
School, and St. Petersburg
High School. After gradua-
tion, Martha married Mac S.
Haines on Feb. 17, 1935, and
he later was elected and
served Pinellas County for
16 years as the Tax Assessor
(Property Appraiser) until
his death in 1976. Martha
was a devoted wife and
wonderful mother of two
children Lois Anne and
William E. "Bill." For a few
years, Martha managed a
postal substation at the Park
Inn Drugstore in St Peters-
burg. They were committed
members of Christ United
Methodist Church, and she
was a member of The
United Methodist Women,
Mothers' Christian Study
Club, Past Matron of Bethle-
hem Chapter No. 169 of The
Order of the Eastern Star,
and Beta Sigma Phi sorority
Martha moved to their
planned retirement home in
Citrus County in 1976,
where her children subse-
quently joined her She has
been a committed member
of First United Methodist
Church of Inverness. She
was a Charter Member of
Susanna Wesley Circle and
served as president and
spiritual leader of the
Church Unit of the United
Methodist Women. She also
served as the District Offi-
cer for Spiritual Develop-
ment in the Tampa District,
and was the first president
of the Leesburg District in
the Florida Conference of
the United Methodist
Women. She was Past Ma-
tron, 50-year member, and
life member of Inverness
Chapter No. 65, and served
the Florida Grand Chapter
as Grand Representative of
Maine in Florida of the
Order of the Eastern Star.
Martha was a woman of
God and lived her life as a
witness to her love for her
Lord and Savior, Jesus
Christ. Throughout her
adult life, she taught Sunday
school to children and
youth, assisted in Vacation
Bible Schools, and partici-
pated in many Bible studies.
She loved to cook and do
handwork sewing and
needlepoint which she
constantly was doing in
order to share the com-
pleted work with others.
Martha's life was a testi-
mony to her great faith, and
she leaves a huge cloud and
crowd of witnesses to con-
tinue her example of love
and devotion to the princi-
ples of Christianity.
Martha was preceded in
death by her husband, Mac
S. Haines, and her son,
William E. "Bill" Haines.
Surviving are her daughter,
the Rev. Dr. Lois Anne
Haines Wolfe (Walter), of In-
verness, Fla.; daughters-


I gi4i,




37.EAS WIT
DIGIT &REPETW





wwwdign oiali


in-law, Beth Haines
Thorbin, of Clearwater, Fla.,
Patricia Haines, of Beverly
Hills, Fla.; six grandchil-
dren, Martha Wolfe Brown
(Bill), of Hernando, Fla.,
Michelle Haines Starr, of
Tampa Fla., Karen (Keith)
Haines Bukovan, of Tampa
Fla., Sarah Haines, of Bev-
erly Hills, Fla., Justin
Haines, of Hernando, Fla.,
Kyle Weaver, of Crystal
River, Fla.; 10 great-grand-
children, Bryan Brown,
Shannon Brown, Timothy
Brown, Fred Lintz, Dan
Lintz, Alex Boston, Jack
Boston, Kayleigh Bukovan,
Kenadie Bukovan, Chloe
Haines; three great-great
grandchildren, Emma
Marie Brown, Trevor Lintz,
James William Schone; sis-
ter-in-law, Elaine Haines, of
Springfield, Ohio; brother-
in-law, Hugh Haines (The-
ola), of Indiantown, Fla.;
many nieces and nephews;
and an extraordinary
amount of friends.
A celebration of the life of
Martha E. Haines will be at
11 a.m. Saturday, August 11,
2012, with visitation from 10
a.m., at the First United
Methodist Church of Inver-
ness, Fla. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to
her First United Methodist
Church memorial account.
Arrangements by Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home & Cre-
matory of Inverness FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Alma
Britsch, 91
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Alma Owen
Britsch, age 91 years, of In-
verness, will be held 2:00
PM, Sunday,
August 5,
2012 at the
Inverness
Chapel of
Hooper Fu-
neral
Homes. Pri-
vate inter-
Alma ment will
Britsch take place
beside her husband at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. Friends may call
from 1:00 PM until the time
of service Sunday at the
Chapel.
Mrs. Britsch was born
January 6, 1921 in Inverness
to Charles A. and Mary Jane
(Rooks) Owen, the oldest of
eight children. She gradu-
ated from Citrus High
School and attended busi-
ness college in Ocala. Her
first job was with the War
Department, Civilian Re-
tirement Records in Wash-
ington, DC. After 2 1/2 years
she transferred with the di-
vision to Charlotte, NC. She
worked there for a year and
transferred to the Internal
Revenue Service, Audit
Dept. in Jacksonville. She
worked there 8 years, met
her husband, married, had
two children and moved to
Palm Beach Gardens, FL.
She worked in the account-
ing department at the Pro-
fessional Golfers'
Association for 15 years. She
retired in 1986 and moved
back to Inverness where she
worked during tax season
for Maria Duteau, CPA. Mrs.
Britsch was a member of
First Baptist Church of In-
verness and an associate
member of the Citrus
County Retired Educators.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Edward J.
Britsch, Jr.(July 16, 1988); a
son: Edward J. Britsch III
(May 5,2011); and her broth-
ers and sisters, Addie Owen
Lake, Carl Owen, Alfred
Owen, Tom Owen, Jane
Gilmore, Sam Owen, and
Lavonia Thompson. Surviv-
ing are her daughter: Mrs.
Loretta K. (Andrew L. Rein)
Britsch, Rolling Hills Es-
tates, CA; and a grand-
daughter: Becky Rein,
Rolling Hills Estates, CA;
many nieces, nephews, sis-
ters in law and brother in
law.


C .a. E. ,avu
Funeral Home With Crematory
MICKEY COCHRAN
Service: Tues. 11:00 AM
Hernando United Methodist
JOSEPH & DEBORAH DAVENPORT
Service: Mon. 6:00 PM
Cornerstone Baptist Church
JOSEPH KUEFNER,JR.
Graveside: Tues. 11:00 AM
Florida National Cemetery
MARTHA HAINES
Service: Sat.(August 11) 11:00 AM
First United Methodist Church
726-8323 000jCT


Deborah
Davenport, 47
INVERNESS
Deborah May Davenport,
47, Inverness, died Aug. 1,
2012.
Debbie was born Jan. 6,
1965, in Miami Beach, Fla.,
to the late Ken and Bobbie
(Beale) Hull. She was em-
ployed by Cinnamon Sticks
and Beef O'Brady's restau-
rants and currently at Bealls
in Crystal River as a visual
fashion merchandiser Deb-
bie was very involved in her
children's lives, supporting
them as a Girl Scout leader
and with their sports activi-
ties. She enjoyed crafting
and cooking.
Survivors include her
children, Tiffany, Joey Jr
and Savanna Davenport, In-
verness; her sister, Cyndi
(Jake) Weber, Cinnaminson,
N.J.; and nieces Melissa,
Jessica and Rebecca Mor-
ris; and many other numer-
ous extended family
members.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at 6
p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, 2012, at
Cornerstone Baptist Church
with Pastor Greg Kell offici-
ating. In lieu of flowers, me-
morial donations may be
made for the care of the
children to FBO Tiffany,
Joey and Savanna Daven-
port, c/o Old Florida Bank,
1777 W Main St., Inverness,
FL 34450. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crematory
is assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Joseph
Davenport, 48
INVERNESS
Joseph Howard Daven-
port, 48, Inverness, died
Aug. 1, 2012.
Joe was born Aug. 4, 1963,
in Willingboro, N.J., to
Norm and Shirley Daven-
port. He was a commercial
truck driver for Walbon. He
enjoyed woodcrafting, fish-
ing and traveling on vaca-
tion with his family He was
active and supportive in his
son's Boy Scout troop and
his children's sports and
school activities.
Survivors include his
children, Tiffany, Joey Jr
and Savanna Davenport, In-
verness; his parents, Norm
and Shirley Davenport, Del-
ran, N.J.; brother, Eddie
Davenport and his partner
Kevin Moore, Pensauken,
N.J.; sister, Dawn (Bob)
Gaven, Delran, N.J.; and
nieces Heather Dunn,
Amanda Davenport and
nephews Brian Davenport
and Ryan and Robert
Gaven; many other numer-
ous extended family mem-
bers. He was preceded in
death by a brother, Norman
Davenport Jr
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at 6
p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, 2012, at
Cornerstone Baptist Church
with Pastor Greg Kell offici-
ating. In lieu of flowers, me-
morial donations may be
made for the care of the
children to FBO Tiffany,
Joey and Savanna Daven-
port, c/o Old Florida Na-
tional Bank, 1777 W Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.



To Place Your

("In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917


Richard
Briggs, 61
TAMPA
Richard Davies Briggs, 61,
of Tampa, passed away with
his family at his bedside on
the morning of July 31, 2012.
He was preceded in death
by his father, Robert
Briggs Sr
He was a pharmacist for
more than 35 years and en-
joyed working in the hospi-
tal setting. He loved animals
and leaves behind his
beloved dogs. He was a lov-
ing father and a friend to
many
He is survived by his two
sons, Richard and David;
his daughter Lea; his two
brothers, Robert and
Charles; and their mother,
Jeanne. He will be greatly
missed by his loving family
and his partner, Jan Birch.
A celebration of life will
be held Sunday August 5,
2012, at Grand Oaks club-
house, 25849 Frith St, Land
o' Lakes FL 34639. Arrange-
ments by Brandon Crema-
tion & Funeral Services,
Inc., Brandon, FL, 813-
654-4400.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Death
ELSEWHERE

John
Keegan, 78
BRITISH MILITARY
HISTORIAN
LONDON British aca-
demic John Keegan, 78,
whose studies of men at war
are counted among the clas-
sic works of military history,
has died, The Daily Tele-
graph said Friday
A scholar of battle who
never served in the military,
Keegan's interests ranged
from the American Civil
War to the Iraq War by way
of Agincourt, Waterloo and
both world wars. His 1976
work "The Face of Battle,"
which provided a soldier's-
eye view of the blood and
terror of combat, remains
one of his most popular
works. Yet in his introduc-
tion he denied possessing
any special insight into the
trappings of warfare.
Born in London on May
15, 1934, Keegan followed
the progress of World War II
from rural England, where
his father had been charged
with looking after children
evacuated from the cities to
escape German bombing.
His interest in war grew
into a specialization in mili-
tary history at Balliol Col-
lege, Oxford. In 1957, he
received a scholarship for
travel to American Civil War
battlefields. He then worked
at the U.S. Embassy in Lon-
don, and he would remain a
strong supporter of the al-
liance between Britain and
the United States.
-From wire reports


RNC organizers


readying for weather


Heat, not hurricanes the worry


Associated Press

TAMPA The Republi-
can National Convention
and the peak of hurricane
season collide in Tampa
this month. And though
planners are banking on
years of data that a major
storm won't hit, they also
have laid out worse-case
scenarios that include can-
celing if it's clear the 70,000
expected delegates, offi-
cials, journalists and pro-
testers would be in harm's
way
Tampa is one of the
places in the region most
vulnerable to storm surge.
In a major hurricane,
floodwaters could reach
some 3 miles inland -
Tampa is on a bay, not di-
rectly on the Gulf of Mexico
- and storm surge could
reach as much as 17 feet.
The Tampa Bay Times
Forum, the convention's
home, is in an area that
would be required to evac-
uate if winds exceeded
96 mph.
But that doesn't seem
likely, said experts, whose
studies determined storms
usually don't hit Florida's
Gulf coast at the end of
August
More of a worry is that
people will suffer prob-
lems during the hot and
steamy Tampa summer.
"It is brutally hot down
here," said Steve Huard,
spokesman for Hillsbor-
ough County Health De-
partment. "We're trying to
do everything we can to
keep people from passing
out."
In May, Florida officials
held a four-day mock hur-
ricane drill. Officials laid
out a worst-case scenario
for the emergency plan-
ners: what if (fake) Hurri-
cane Gispert a (fake)
Category 3 storm struck
Tampa on the second day
of the RNC?
Under that scenario,
state leaders canceled the
convention. RNC organiz-
ers have been asked re-
peatedly to talk about what
will happen if a hurricane
threatens the convention.
While they acknowledge
the possibility, like many
security issues, they are
close-mouthed about any
evacuation plans.
Political conventions
have been held before in
cities where hurricanes
and the heat are summer-
time threats, though none
have been in Florida for 40
years. The RNC was in
Houston in 1992, New Or-
leans in 1988 and in Miami
Beach in 1968 and 1972 -
all cities that have been hit
by storms, and during a


time when hurricane fore-
casts weren't as accurate as
they are today
Forecasters say that for-
tunately, most Gulf storms
emerge earlier or later in
the hurricane season,
which runs from June 1 to
Nov 30.
In late August, "the ma-
jority of the activity shifts
to the Atlantic. But it's not
impossible, of course," said
Anthony Reynes, a fore-
caster at the National
Weather Service in Ruskin.
The last major storm to
hit Florida's west coast was
Hurricane Charley, a
Category 4 packing 150
mph winds. The Aug. 13,
2004, storm was small yet
powerful and was ini-
tially forecast to strike the
Tampa Bay area before it
turned and slammed Port
Charlotte, about 100 miles
south.
Tampa Mayor Bob Buck-
horn points out that a
major hurricane hasn't hit
the area in more than 90
years and that even if one
were to threaten the re-
gion, everyone would have
several days' notice. Not
only would convention-
goers be in danger, so
would some of Tampa's 4
million residents.
"Hurricanes don't occur
overnight," he said.
Heat is another story,
however. Officials worry
that the tens of thousands
convention visitors won't
understand that danger
and some could wind up in
the hospital or worse.
The convention in down-
town Tampa from Aug. 27
to 30 will be during the
swampy summertime,
when tourists usually avoid
the Sunshine State.
Forecasters said the
weather will almost cer-
tainly follow a late summer
pattern of hot, humid
mornings followed by rainy
afternoons. The average
temperature is in the mid-
90s, said Reynes, while the
humidity can reach 75 to 80
percent.
"That makes for a very
uncomfortable, muggy
day," he added. "You can
have a heat index possibly
to 100."
Floridians know how hot
that can feel and respect it
by staying inside if possi-
ble. But out-of-state visitors
may be clueless.
"The folks that are com-
ing here may not realize
just how hot it can be,"
Buckhorn said.
Added Tampa Police
Chief Jane Castor: "I be-
lieve that after all is said
and done, that the heat will
probably be the biggest
issue that we deal with."


( jlitri0oe s-


scmiller @ chronicleonline com
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@ chronicleonline.com


Cloin tiefrpacig d-


A6 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Adam Steltzner, Mars Science Laboratory's entry, descent
and landing phase leader at NASA's Jet Propulsion Labo-
ratory, uses a scale model to explain the Curiosity rover's
path to the surface during a news conference Aug. 2, at
the laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. The rover is headed for
a two-year mission to study whether Mars ever had the
elements needed for microbial life.


Anxiety over



rover's Mars



landing


ALICIA CHANG
AP Science Writer
PASADENA, Calif. -
Seven minutes of terror.
It sounds like a Holly-
wood thriller, but the
phrase describes the anxi-
ety NASA is expecting as its
car-sized robotic rover tries
a tricky landing on Mars
late Sunday
Skimming the top of the
Martian atmosphere at
13,000 mph, the Curiosity
rover needs to brake to a
stop in seven minutes.
The rover is headed for a
two-year mission to study
whether Mars ever had the
elements needed for micro-
bial life. Because of its heft,
the 2,000-pound robot can't
land the way previous
spacecraft did. They relied
on air bags to cushion a
bouncy touchdown. This
time NASA is testing a
brand new landing that in-
volves gingerly setting
down the rover similar to
the way heavy-lift helicop-
ters lower huge loads at the
end of a cable. How hard is
it?
"The degree of difficulty
is above a 10," said Adam
Steltzner, an engineer at
NASAs Jet Propulsion Lab-
oratory, which manages the
mission.
And American University
space policy analyst
Howard McCurdy said: "It
would be a major techno-
logical step forward if it
works. It's a big gamble."
A communication time
delay between Mars and
Earth means Curiosity will
have to nail the landing by
itself, following the half mil-
lion lines of computer code
that engineers uploaded to
direct its every move.
After an 8 1/2-month, 352-
million-mile journey, here's
a step-by-step look at how
Curiosity will land:
Ten minutes before en-
tering the Martian atmos-
phere, Curiosity separates
from the capsule that car-
ried it to Mars.
Turning its protective
heat shield forward, it
streaks through the atmos-
phere at 13,200 mph, slow-
ing itself with a series of
S-curves.
Seven miles from the
ground at 900 mph, Curios-
ity unfurls its enormous
parachute.
Next it sheds its heat
shield and turns on radar to
scope out the landing site.
Now it's 5 miles from touch-
down and closing in at 280
mph.
SA video camera aboard
Curiosity starts to record
the descent.
A mile from landing,
the parachute is jettisoned.
Curiosity is still at-
tached to a rocket-powered
backpack, and those rock-
ets are used to slow it to less
than 2 mph.
Twelve seconds before
landing, nylon cables re-
lease and lower Curiosity.


5 things you may
not know about
the planet Mars
PASADENA, Calif. -
Mars is set to get its latest
visitor Sunday night when
NASA's new robotic rover,
named Curiosity, attempts
to land there. Mars has
been a prime target for
space exploration for
decades, in part because
its climate 3.5 billion years
ago is believed to have
been warm and wet, like
early Earth. Here are five
other key points:
COLOR: It's called
the red planet because the
landscape is stained rusty-
red by the iron-rich dust.
WEIGHT: Its gravity is
only 38 percent that of
Earth. So if you weigh 150
pounds on Earth, you
would weigh 57 pounds on
Mars.
HOT AND COLD:
Mars' temperatures can
range from 80 degrees at
its equator to -199 degrees
at its poles.
HAIR: Mars' atmosphere
is mostly carbon dioxide
with traces of nitrogen and
argon. Earth's atmosphere
is a mixture of nitrogen,
oxygen and other gases.
-Associated Press


Picking space taxis


NASA selects 3

firms to for

space travel

SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON NASA
picked three aerospace
companies Friday to build
small rocketships to take as-
tronauts to the Interna-
tional Space Station.
This is the third phase of
NASAs efforts to get private
space companies to take
over the job of the now-re-
tired space shuttle. Compa-
nies will share more than
$1.1 billion. Two of the ships
are capsules like in the
Apollo era, and the third is
closer in design to the space
shuttle.
Once the spaceships are
built, NASA plans to hire
the private companies to
taxi astronauts into space
within five years. Until they
are ready, NASA is paying
Russia about $63 million
per astronaut to do the job.
In a statement, NASA Ad-
ministrator Charles Bolden
said the move "will help
keep us on track to tend the
outsourcing of human
spaceflight."
NASA hopes by having
private firms ferry astro-
nauts into low Earth orbit, it
can focus on larger long-
term goals, like sending
crews to a nearby asteroid
and eventually Mars. The
private companies can also
make money in tourism and
other non-NASA business.
The three companies are
the Boeing Co. of Houston,
Space Exploration Tech-
nologies, called SpaceX, of
Hawthorne, Calif., and
Sierra Nevada Corp. of
Louisville, Colo.
They are quite different
companies. Boeing is one of
the oldest and largest space
companies with a long his-
tory of building and launch-
ing rockets and working for
NASA, going back to the
Mercury days. SpaceX is a
relatively new company
started by Elon Musk, who
helped create PayPal and
runs the electric car com-
pany Tesla Motors. Sierra
Nevada has been in the
space business for 25 years
but mostly on a much
smaller scale than Boeing.
NASAs commercial crew
development program
started with seven compa-
nies. The companies not
chosen can still build pri-
vate rocketships and NASA
still has the option to hire
them to ferry astronauts at a
later date, NASA spokesman
Trent Perrotto said.
Boeing is slated to get the
most money, $460 million for
its seven-person CST-100
capsule. It would launch on
an Atlas rocket, with the
first test flight in 2016. The
company won't say how


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: This artist's rendering provided by Sierra Nevada Space Systems shows the com-
pany's Dream Chaser spacecraft docking with the International Space Station. NASA has
picked three aerospace companies to build small rocketships to take astronauts to the In-
ternational Space Station. BELOW LEFT: This undated artist illustration provided by Boeing
shows the Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100. BELOW RIGHT: This undated computer
generated illustration provided by SpaceX shows a Dragon Crew spacecraft in Earth orbit
showing solar panels in the process of deploying.


The ship is based on an old
NASA test ship design but
hasn't flown as much as
SpaceX's Dragon.
"It may appear as though
we are behind but in many
ways we are more mature,"


said Sierra Nevada space
chief Mark Sirangelo.
Like Boeing's Mulhol-
land, he said his firm will
charge NASA less than the
Russians, but won't give a
specific price.


much it would charge NASA
per seat, but it will be "sig-
nificantly lower" than the
Russian price, said John
Mulholland, Boeing vice
president He said Boeing's
long experience in working
with NASA on human flight
gives it a "leg up" on its com-
petitors.
SpaceX is already in the
lead in the private space
race. The company earlier
this year used their Falcon
rocket to launch their
Dragon capsule into orbit. It
docked with the space sta-
tion and successfully deliv-
ered cargo. NASA plans to
give the company $440 mil-
lion. The capsule holds
seven people and will have
its first test launch with peo-
ple in 2015, said spokes-
woman Kirstin Brost
Grantham. The company
will charge NASA about $20
million per seat, she said.
Sierra Nevada's mini-
shuttle crew vehicle called
Dream Chaser carries seven
people and could be flown
without a pilot. NASA would
give them $212.5 million.


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-


NATION


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 A7


I












ASE S A 4KSTYINR)VCHROIC


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF1289220139.35 +2.71 CheniereEn 55264 13.76 -.01 Facebook n 793595 21.09 +1.05 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 1250916 7.43 +.25 NovaGldg 39962 3.68 -.25 Cisco 396773 16.35 +.61 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
KnghtCap 1128640 4.05 +1.47 NwGoldg 23988 9.97 -.06 OnSmcnd 394177 6.37 -.47 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDRFncl 777254 14.82 +.34 Rentech 23612 2.05 +.09 PwShsQQQ360221 65.60 +1.22 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
iShEMkts 567312 39.93 +1.20 Vringo 21833 3.12 -.04 Microsoft 351848 29.75 +.56 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
KnghtCap 4.05 +1.47 +57.0 SparkNet 6.07 +.57 +10.4 CmtyFinl 5.50 +1.60 +41.0 ng qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
GencoShip 3.73 +.73 +24.3 Suprmlnd 4.00 +.33 +9.0 BlueNile 32.00 +8.25 +34.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences.pp-
MaxLinear 5.61 +1.02 +22.2 VirnetX 26.42 +1.93 +7.9 MercadoL 82.68 +16.16 +24.3 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security ata specified price. s-
MagnaChip 12.31 +2.00 +19.4 IntTowerg 2.68 +.19 +7.6 UnionDrll 4.50 +.75 +20.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -Trades will be settled when the
ProsHldg 15.12 +2.37 +18.6 Augustag 2.04 +.14 +7.4 USecBcAL 6.20 +1.03 +19.9 stock Is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock.u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Molycorp 11.49 -4.58 -28.5 CTPtrs 4.25 -.53 -11.1 Zipcar 6.75 -3.88 -36.5
MolycppfA 36.35 -9.33 -20.4 Ballanty 5.01 -.47 -8.6 Zagg 8.31 -2.39 -22.3
HealthNet 18.36 -4.34 -19.1 NovaGldg 3.68 -.25 -6.4 ComScore 12.21 -3.24 -21.0


ActieNet 11.75 -2.20 -15.8 SwGAFn 7.96 -.53 -6.3 M/A-COM n3.23 -3.48 -20.8
DolbyLab 30.67 -5.13 -14.3 InvCapHId 3.90 -.25 -6.0 AirTmsp 3.91 -.91 -18.9


2,497 Advanced
534 Declined
101 Unchanged
3,132 Total issues
205 New Highs
22 New Lows
3,654,778,162 Volume


DIARY


283 Advanced
142 Declined
39 Unchanged
464 Total issues
14 New Highs
4 New Lows
61,570,882 Volume


DIARY


1,925
562
111
2,598
66
50
1,695,883,522


52-Week
High Low Name
13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,327.67 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71 Russell 200


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Last Chg Chg Chg %Chg
13,096.17 +217.29 +1.69 +7.19+14.43
5,086.31 +102.16 +2.05 +1.33 +8.37
491.08 +5.48 +1.13 +5.68+18.41
7,939.55 +173.95 +2.24 +6.19 +7.02
2,424.53 +33.90 +1.42 +6.42 +7.96
2,967.90 +58.13 +2.00+13.92+17.20
1,390.99 +25.99 +1.90+10.61 +15.98
14,473.15 +272.97 +1.92 +9.73+14.66
788.48 +19.88 +2.59 +6.42+10.33


I NYSE


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BoSantSA 6.11 +.41
BmSBrasil 7.82 +.43
BkofAm 7.43 +.25
BkMontg 57.26 +.79
ABBLtd 17.91 +.79 BkNYMel 21.75 +1.08
ACELtd 73.66 +1.10 Barday 10.67 +.62
AESCorp 12.25 +.14 BariPVix 12.16 -.87
AFLAC 44.58 +1.44 BarrickG 32.75 +.61
AGLRes 40.76 +.57 BasicEnSv 11.78 +.09
AK Steel 4.91 -.03 Baxter 58.93 +.98
AOL 32.63 +1.13 Beam Inc 61.94 +1.52
ASAGold 21.53 +.32 BeazerHm 2.33 +.02
AT&T Inc 37.58 +.04 BectDck 74.35 -.07
AUOpton 2.79 -.06 BerkHaA128479.00+2189.00
AbtLab 66.59 +.25 BerkH B 85.58 +1.50
AberFitc 29.37 +.31 BerryPet 38.20 +1.47
Accenture 60.35 +1.32 BestBuy 17.64 +.25
AccoBrds 8.53 +.34 BBarrett 19.20 +.59
AciveNet 11.75 -2.20 BioMedR 18.76 -.01
AdamsEx 10.82 +.13 BIkHillsCp 31.71 +.51
AdvAuto 68.01 +.87 BlkDebtStr 4.30 +.03
AMD 4.09 +.12 BlkEnhC&l 13.34 +.07
AecomTch 16.08 +.36 BIkGlbOp 13.65 +.10
Aeropost 13.12 +.04 Blackstone 13.90 +.20
Aetna 36.70 +.37 BlockHR 15.91 +.31
Agilent 39.11 +1.36 BdwlkPpl 27.70 +.20
Agniog 43.65 +.14 Boeing 72.81 +.82
Agriumg 95.02 +.83 BostBeer 110.34 +.92
AlcatelLuc 1.16 +.04 BostProp 113.00 +1.19
Alma 8.37 +.19 BostonSci 5.31 +.19
Allergan 85.45 +.56 BoydGm 5.77 +.05
Allete 41.56 +.51 BrMySq 32.64 +.09
AlliBGIbHi 15.66 -.04 BrkfdOfPr 16.82 -.12
AlliBlnco 8.53 +.01 Brunswick 21.66 +1.13
AlliBern 12.30 -.15 Buckeye 54.15 +.38
Allstate 37.04 +.51 BungeLt 65.41 +.40
AlphaNRs 6.89 +.23 BurgerKn 15.23 -.02
AIpAlerMLP 16.48 +.06 CBLAsc 20.42 +.49
Altia 35.92 +.36 CBREGrp 17.08 +.52
AmBev 38.47 +.72 CBSB 35.06 +2.02
Ameren 34.34 +.67 CFlnds 202.02 +7.63
AMovilL 26.54 +.20 CHEngy 65.25 +.10
AmAxe 10.26 +.41 CMS Eng 24.19 +.26
AEagleOut 20.46 +.57 CNOFind 8.38 +.43
AEP 42.34 +.52 CSS Inds 18.62 +.39
AmExp 57.61 +1.12 CSX 23.11 +.51
AmlntGrp 31.34 +.50 CVSCare 44.75 -.16
AmSIP3 7.12 +.02 CYS Invest 14.16 -.04
AmTower 73.07 +.88 CblvsnNY 15.54 +.56
Amerigas 42.97 +.45 CabotOGs 41.18 +.54
AmeriBrgn 39.39 +.52 CalDi~e 1.65 +.10
Anadarko 68.41 +2.19 CallGolf 5.39 +.08
AnglogldA 33.89 +.28 Calpine 16.79 +.04
ABlnBev 81.75 +2.76 Camecog 20.63 +.44
Annaly 17.25 +.03 Cameron 52.09 +2.42
Aonplc 50.49 +1.14 CampSp 32.79 +.32
Apache 84.85 +2.27 CdnNRsgs 27.89 +1.28
AquaAm 25.82 +.10 CapOne 57.58 +2.41
ArcelorMit 15.07 +.98 CapiflSrce 6.98 +.01
ArchCoal 6.72 +.24 CapM pl 15.66
ArchDan 25.54 +.41 CardnlHlh 39.24 -1.65
ArmourRsd 7.48 -.22 CareFusion 24.12 +.11
Ashland 70.40 +1.04 Carnival 34.03 +1.00
AsdEstat 15.26 +.18 Caterpillar 85.02 +1.90
AssuredG 11.50 +.20 Celanese 38.29 +.68
AstaZen 48.21 +1.13 Cemex 7.25 +.18
ATMOS 36.23 +.44 Cemigpfs 19.29 +.12
AuRicog 6.60 +12 CenterPnt 21.16 +.33
Avon 14.89 +.44 Cnthyink 41.74 +.07
BB&TCp 31.65 +.57 Checkpnt 6.97 +.28
BHPBiILt 68.01 +1.90 ChesEng 17.89 -.04
BP PLC 41.03 +1.08 ChesUfi 46.72 +1.26
BRFBrasil 14.43 +.63 Chevron 111.12 +1.87
BRT 6.24 -.02 ChicB&l 36.44 +1.00
BakrHu 46.98 +.84 Chimos 15.66 +.57
BallCorp 41.10 +1.50 Chimera 2.16 +.01
BanColum 56.61 -1.53 ChinaMble 56.88 -.27
BcBilVArg 6.72 +.68 Chipofe 297.65 +13.88
BmoBradpf 15.84 +.55 Chubb 72.88 +.13


Cigna 42.08 +.22 EastChms 53.17 +.45 i-l HawaiiEl 28.51 +.27 iShBarlntC 110.32 -.03
CindBell 3.76 +.07 Eaton 44.23 +1.10 HItCrREIT 61.20 -.25 iShBarcl-3105.00 +.04
Cifgroup 27.40 +1.22 EVEnEq 10.72 +.12 GATX 41.50 +1.07 HItMgmt 6.67 +.12 iShR2K 78.61 +1.83
CleanHarb 60.73 +1.51 Ecolab 64.41 +.93 GNC 39.21 +.22 HIthcrRlty 24.30 +.04 iShUSPfd 39.34 +.12
CliffsNRs 42.11 +1.58 Edisonlnt 45.69 +.68 GabelliET 5.42 +.05 HealthNet 18.36 -4.34 iShREst 65.79 +.48
Clorox 71.76 -.46 Ban 11.35 +.28 GabHIthW 8.42 +.05 Heckmann 3.19 +.10 iShDJHm 16.42 +.14
Coach 52.66 +2.37 BdorGldg 10.83 +.34 GabUDI 8.33 +.01 HeclaM 4.55 +.15 iStar 6.71 +.24
CobaltlEn 22.53 -1.19 Embraer 24.65 +.77 GaisaSA 2.76 +.35 Heinz 55.54 +.81 ITTCps 20.27 +2.09
CCFemsa 115.18 -.32 EmersonEl 48.50 +1.09 GameStop 15.90 +.15 Herbalife 54.00 +1.26 Idacorp 42.67 +.83
CocaCola 80.83 +1.08 EmpDist 21.50 +.35 Gannett 14.46 +.46 Hertz 11.71 +.44 ITW 55.62 +1.94
CocaCE 29.34 +.83 EnbrdgEPt 28.83 -.36 Gap 33.46 +.29 Hess 47.71 +1.19 Imafon 5.62 +.17
Coeur 16.13 +.09 EnCanag 21.63 +.30 GencoShip 3.73 +.73 HewlettP 18.26 +.71 IngerRd 42.60 +.64
CohStlnfra 17.79 -.01 Energizer 66.74 -.56 GenDynam 63.10 +1.11 HighwdPrp 33.43 +.24 IngrmM 14.51 +.05
ColgPal 106.46 +1.09
CollctvBrd 21.57 -.01
Comerica 30.66 +.88 "
CmwREIT 18.59 +.17
ComskRs 16.06 +.84
Con-Way 30.82 +.88 w.hroniIeonIne.com
ConAgra 24.57 +.26
ConocPhils 55.71 +1.06
ConsolEngy 29.13 +1.30
ConEd 64.66 +.41
ConstellA 29.92 +.84
ContlRes 66.23 +3.65
Cnvrgys 15.40 +.54
Cooper Ind 72.49 +.86
Corning 11.34 +.11
CottCp 8.53 +.07
Covdien 56.42 +1.30
Crane 39.73 +.66
CSVS3xSIv 21.93 +1.43N 0 M 0ES
CSVSxVxS 3.01 -.34
CSVellIVSt 13.41 +.89
CredSuiss 17.20 +1.04
CrwnCsfie 62.52 +.52
Cummins 99.00 +3.66

-v 563-5655
DCTIndl 6.33 +.11
DDRCorp 14.86 +.09 it s
DNPSelct 11.36 +.12 VI
DR Horton 17.35 -.20
DSWInc 58.62 +.14 *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start
nTF 6165 717


DanaHldg 12.59 +.26
Danaher 53.36 +.53
Darden 52.45 +1.25
DeVry 18.35 -.31
DeanFds 12.21 +.27
Deere 77.51 +1.10
DeltaAir 9.29 +.06
DenburyR 15.59 +.79
DeutschBk 31.20 +2.85
DevonE 56.32 +.91
DiamRk 9.70 +.33
DiceHldg 7.91 +.33
DicksSptg 51.26 +1.72
DxFnBullrs 91.44 +5.18
DirSCBear 18.35 -1.43
DirFnBear 21.39 -1.41
DirSPBear 19.49 -1.21
DirDGIdBII 9.28 +.45
DrxEnBear 8.98 -.68
DirEMBear 13.37 -1.40
DirxSCBull 51.34 +3.41
DirxEnBull 47.12 +3.02
Discover 36.49 +1.22
Disney 49.77 +.79
DolbyLab 30.67 5.13
DollarGen 51.90 +.43
DomRescs 54.41 +.60
DowChm 29.83 +.75
DuPont 49.47 +.45
DukeEnrs 68.60 +1.14
DukeRlty 14.73 +.23
EMCCp 26.80 +.72
ENI 43.51 +3.32
EOGRes 106.75 +10.63


EngyTsfr 43.50 -.03
Enersis 17.35 +.87
EnPro 32.48 -1.08
ENSCO 55.66 +.98
Entergy 72.71 +.88
EntPrPt 52.97 +.02
EsteeLdrs 53.09 +2.21
ExoRes 7.08 +.12
Exelisn 9.98 +.42
Exelon 38.47 +.51
ExxonMbl 87.55 +1.67
FMCTech 47.20 +1.58
FairchldS 14.19 +.65
FedExCp 89.82 +1.90
FedSignl 5.59 +.24
Ferrellgs 19.84 -.02
Ferro 2.99 +.01
FibriaCelu 7.80 +.40
FidlNFin 18.44 +.09
FidNatlnfo 31.47 +.61
Fifth&Pac 11.56 +.80
FstHorizon 8.29 +.23
FTActDiv 7.90 +.07
FtTrEnEq 11.96 +.12
FirstEngy 49.51 +.61
Ruor 52.20 +2.48
FordM 9.09 +.17
ForestLab 33.54 +.90
ForestOil s 6.68 +.35
FranceTel 13.62 +.67
FMCG 33.50 +.81
Fusion-io 19.49 +1.30


GenElec 20.96 +.44
GenGrPrp 18.79 +.27
GenMills 38.52 +.50
GenMotors 20.04 +.90
GenOn En 2.30 +.01
Genpact 18.66 +.14
Genworth 4.32 +.20
GaGulf 36.50 +1.90
Gerdau 9.28 +.38
Gildan 29.60 +1.52
GlaxoSKIn 46.68 +.39
GlobusMdn 13.50
GoldFLtd 13.32 +.36
Goldrpg 35.98 +.50
GoldmanS 100.98 +3.17
Goodyear 11.16 +.13
GtPlainEn 22.19 +.21
Griffon 9.88 +1.53
GuangRy 15.68 +.05
HCAHIdg 26.60 +.16
HCP Inc 46.43 +.13
HDFC Bk 36.00 +1.66
HSBC 43.68 +1.81
HSBCCap 26.20 -.05
HalconRrs 7.37 +.45
Hallibrth 33.76 +.90
HanJS 16.55 +.14
HanPrmDv 14.97 -.07
Hanesbrds 31.67 +.47
Hanoverlns 34.42 +.43
HarleyD 42.39 +1.19
HarmonyG 9.88 +.16
HartfdFn 16.91 +.75


Hillshiren 25.43 +.97
HollyFrts 38.41 +1.17
HomeDp 52.29 +.90
Honwlllnfi 58.91 +1.59
HospPT 24.49 +.24
HostHofs 15.04 +.52
HovnanE 2.33 +.08
Humana 62.70 -.18
Huntsmn 13.13 +.33
IAMGIdg 11.01 +.45
ING 6.63 +.53
iShGold 15.61 +.14
iSAsfia 23.52 +.45
iShBraz 53.48 +1.50
iShGer 20.69 +1.12
iShHK 16.98 +.30
iShJapn 9.02 +.10
iSh Kor 55.96 +1.28
iShMex 63.29 +1.18
iShSing 13.38 +.31
iSTaiwn 12.43 +.30
iShSilver 26.96 +.65
iShDJDv 57.55 +.80
iShChina25 34.80 +.84
iSSP500 139.87 +2.67
iShBAgB 111.99 -.27
iShEMkts 39.93 +1.20
iShiBxB 120.55 -.29
iShB20T 127.42 -2.09
iS Eafe 50.99 +1.68
iShiBxHYB 91.70 +.38
iSR1KG 64.58 +1.16
iSR2KV 69.70 +1.72


IntegrysE 61.16 +.96
IntcnfEx 132.25 +3.54
IBM 198.52 +4.07
InfiGame 11.20 +.10
IntPap 32.71 +.67
Interpublic 10.97 +1.29
InvenSenn 13.10 +.44
Invesco 22.61 +.90
IronMtn 32.82 +.83
ItauUnibH 15.94 +.69
lvanhM 857 57

JPMorgCh 36.09 +.92
Jabil 22.02 +.87
Jaguar g 1.00 +.07
Jefferies 12.28 +.42
JohnJn 69.12 +.67
JohnsnCf 24.59 +.76
JoyGlbl 50.58 +1.81
JnprNtwk 18.08 +.50
KB Home 9.23 -.15
KTCorp 14.08 +.10
KCSouthn 74.13 +2.65
Kaydon s 21.39 +.48
KA EngTR 26.39 +.01
KAMLP 29.75 -1.46
Kelbgg 50.35 +.91
KeyEngy 7.77 +.22
Keycorp 8.24 +.31
KimbClk 85.35 -1.53
Kimoo 19.94 +.21
KindME 79.83 -.04


KindMorg 35.89 +.49 Molyorp 11.49 -4.58 PetrbrsA 19.67 +.48 ResMed 35.65 +3.82
KindrMwt 2.96 +.10 MoneyGrs 16.09 +.56 Petrobras 20.33 +.62 Revlon 13.86 +.31
Kinrossg 7.72 +.25 Monsanto 87.04 -.34 Pfizer 24.28 +.36 ReynAmer 46.61 +.41
KnghtCap 4.05 +1.47 MonstrWw 6.19 +.09 PhilipMor 91.93 +1.86 Riointo 47.59 +2.39
KodiakOg 8.16 +.60 MorgStan 13.78 +.75 Phillips66n 39.67 +1.37 RitchieBr 19.02 +.01
Kohls 51.11 +.97 MSEmMkt 13.92 +.29 PiedNG 31.83 +.51 RiteAid 1.18 +.03
KrispKrm 6.14 +.14 Mosaic 57.37 +.38 Pier1 16.71 +.37 RockwAut 68.91 +2.38
Kroger 22.20 +.32 MotrlaSolu 47.06 -.75 PimoStrat 11.95 -.04 RockColl 50.80 +1.25
LSICorp 7.29 +.36 MurphO 55.21 +1.21 PinWst 54.09 +.86 Rowan 35.11 +.27
LTCPrp 35.75 +.23 NCRCorp 25.17 +.78 PioNtrl 97.43 +5.43 RBSofind 6.81 +.46
LaZBoy 12.17 +.44 NRGEgy 19.41 +.32 PitnyBw 13.86 +.92 RylCarb 25.34 +.93
Ladede 42.01 +.51 NVEnergy 18.38 +.22 PlainsEx 41.24 +2.08 RoyDShllA 69.92 +1.61
LVSands 38.75 +1.84 NYSEEur 24.91 +.33 PlumCrk 40.62 +.37 Royce 12.37 +.25
LeapFrog 10.69 +.58 Nabors 13.94 +.54 Polariss 74.57 +1.24 Royce pB 25.61 +.11
LeggMason 25.70 +1.14 NatFuGas 49.38 +1.49 PostPrp 51.23 RubTues639 15
LeggPlat 23.08 +.11 NatGrid 52.87 +.89 Potash 42.78 +.11
LenderPS 25.01 +.26 NOilVarco 75.36 +2.62 PwshDB 27.52 +.46
LennarA 30.09 +.50 Navistar 22.39 +.95 PS USDBull 22.63 -.28 SAIC 11.69 +.25
Level3rs 19.09 +.27 NewAmHi 11.11 +.04 PSKBWBk 23.58 +.74 SAPAG 64.85 +2.67
Lexmark 17.92 +.79 NJRscs 45.63 +.48 Praxair 105.78 +2.71 SCANA 49.34 +.77
LbtyASG 3.86 +.04 NwOriEds 11.33 -.39 PrecDrill 8.06 +.09 SKTlcm 13.99 +.32
LillyEli 44.15 +.83 NYCmtyB 12.81 +.15 PrinFnd 26.11 +1.10 SMEnergy 44.07 +2.27
Limited 49.14 +1.42 Newcasle 7.52 +.13 ProLogis 33.66 +1.31 SpdrDJIA 130.73 +2.19
LincNat 22.03 +.69 NewellRub 17.07 +.40 ProShtQQQ 25.91 -.50 SpdrGold 155.55 +1.42
Lindsay 72.19 +2.18 NewfdExp 30.04 +.67 ProShtS&P 35.54 -.67 S&P500ETF139.35 +2.71
Linkedln 108.51 +15.00 NewmtM 44.67 +1.05 PrUShS&P 14.81 -.60 SpdrHome 21.44 +.47
LionsGtg 13.21 +.39 NewpkRes 6.81 +.21 PrUltQQQs 55.43 +1.97 SpdrS&PBk 21.98 +.58
LodchdM 89.39 +.94 Nexeng 25.59 +.33 PrUShQQQ 30.61 -1.22 SpdrLehHY 39.83 +.20
LaPac 11.20 +.53 NextEraEn 70.87 +.67 ProUltSP 56.98 +2.12 SpdrS&P RB 27.26 +.82
Lowes 25.49 +.64 NiSource 25.28 +25 ProUShL20 15.01 +.45 SpdrRef 59.39 +1.36
S96 NikeB 9457 +2.03 ProUPShD3018.38 -1.03 SpdrOGEx 50.86 +1.45
NobleCorp 37.91 +1.54 ProShtR2K 26.79 -.65 SpdrMetM 39.98 +1.00
NokiaCp 2.37 +.10 ProUItR2K 39.12 +1.79 STMiao 5.61 +.44
M&TBk 87.42 +2.91 Nordstrm 5435 +1.04 PrUltSP500 81.11 +4.54 Safeway 15.45 +.35
MBIA 9.21 +.24 NorfikSo 7494 +1.54 PrUVxSTrs 6.02 -.92 StJoe 17.09 +.13
MDU Res 22.27 +.27 NoestUt 39.57 +.32 PrUltCrude 31.18 +2.45 Stude 37.90 +1.21
MEMC 1.96 +10 NorthopG 66 +76 PrUShCrde 41.71 -4.03 Salesforce 128.27 +6.90
MFAFnd 8.11 +.02 NStarR 546 .08 ProUShEuro 21.77 -.73 SJuanB 14.18 -1.09
MCR 9.94 -.02 Novarfs 58.99 +51 ProctGam 65.50 +1.99 SandRdge 6.37 -.21
MGIC .84 -.04 Nucor 39.44 +.96 ProgsvCp 19.57 +.33 Sanofi 41.56 +1.54
MGMRsts 9.26 +.26 NustarEn 53.81 +1.03 ProUSR2K 30.83 -1.57 Schlmbrg 72.39 +1.56
Macquarie 39.32 +.74 NuvMuOpp 15.39 .02 PUSSP500rs43.50 -2.67 Schwab 12.80 +.58
Macys 37.26 +.86 NvPfdlnco 9.55 +02 Prudent 52.03 +1.99 SeadrillLd 39.28 +.80
MageiMPtr 77.78 -.12 NuvQPf2 9.43 +01 PSEG 32.64 +.34 SealAir 13.82 +.67
Magnalntg 40.15 +1.54 OGEEy 55.14 +1.06 PubStrg 147.90 -.91 SenHous 22.64 +.07
MagHRes 3.54 +.1 OcciPet 88.57 +2.92 PulteGrp 11.48 -.09 Sensient 35.25 +.69
Manitowoc 12.19 +.61 PPrIT 5.63 -.02 ShawGrp 39.47 +.43
Maulifeg 10.75 +47 ficeDpt 1.78 +08 QEPRes 27.39 +.39 SiderurNac 5.10 +.34
MarahnO 26.72 +.99 OfficeMa 4.92 .07 QuanexBld 17.59 +58 SilvWhtg 27.62 +.49
MarathPet 49.39 +1.39 OdRepub 8.17 +02 QuantaSvc 24.71 +.78 SilvrcpMg 4.93 -.27
MktVGold 42.86 +.82 Olin 20.64 +.62 QntmDSS 1.41 +.12 SimonProp 163.03 +1.62
MVOilSvs 39.76 +.90 Om Hl t 20 0 Questar 20.29 +.31 Skechers 19.21 +59
MVOlSvs 39.76 +.90 OmegaHIt 24.10 -.02 QksilvRes 4.38 +.09 SmithAO 49.94 +.83
MV Semin 32.84 +.84 Omncre 31.20 QksilvRes 4.38 +.09 Smith 4.94 +.83
MktVRus 27.11 +1.03 Omnicom 50.95 +1.56 Quiksilvr 2.81 +12 SmitfF 18.77 +.27
MktVJrGld 19.47 +.45 ONEOKs 44.72 +.68 RPC 14.45 +17 Smuo er 75.75 +.83
MarlntA 37.55 +1.23 OneokPtrs 57.20 -10 RPM 26.1 +.32 SonyCp 11.64 +40
MshM 41 +47 O h 2 1 Rackspace 45.25 +2.35 SoJerlnd 52.65 +.95
MarshM 331 +47 OhkosC 249 + RadianGrp 2.86 +17 outhnCo 47.35 +.26
Masm 1.21 +11 11 RadioShk 2.75 -.04 SthnCopper 32.45 +.68
Mastec 109 2.7 1 +.71 Ralcorp 63.82 +1.91 SwstAirl 9.13 +.19
McDrmlnt 11.73 +55 PG&ECp 46.50 + 76 RangeRs 63.18 +2.02 SwshEny 30.60 -1.53
McDnlds 89.59 PNC 60.25 1.75 RamesFn 33.59 +1.19 SpectraEn 29.71 +.13
McGrwH 48.42 +1.58 PNMRes 20.80 +.39 Rayoniers 47.84 +.13 SprintNex 4.27 -.02
McKesson 87.43 -.14 PPG 109.20 +1.56 Raytheon 55.20 +.92 SPMals 35.12 +.68
McMoRn 13.54 +.71 PPLCorp 28.68 +.09 Rltylnm 41.41 +.19 SPHlhC 38.49 +.45
McEwenM 3.19 +.30 PVH Corp 77.54 +2.35 RegionsFn 6.93 +.21 SPCnSt 35.75 +.59
Mechel 6.80 +.60 PallCorp 54.31 +1.50 Renren 3.76 +.06 SPConsum 44.33 +.86
Medrnic 39.81 +.91 Pandora 9.55 +.43 RepubSvc 28.73 +.43 SP Engy 70.44 +1.62
Merck 44.15 +.24 ParkerHan 79.97 +1.12
Meritor 4.32 +.23 PeabdyE 21.29 +.97
MetLife 33.19 +1.49 Pengrthg 6.43 +.29
MetroPCS 8.66 +.04 PennVa 6.93 +.45
MetoHlth 7.86 +15 PennVaRs 24.21 -.12 The remainder of the
MKorsn 41.19 +1.60 PennWstg 13.69 +.43
MidAApt 68.80 .22 Penney 20.90 +44 NYSE listings can be
MidstPetn 7.86 +.05 PepBoy 9.05 +.29
MitsuUFJ 4.78 +08 PepsiCo 72.7 +1.07 found on the next page.
MobileTele 19.04 +.24 PerkElm 26.78 +1.95
Mohawk 69.84 +3.82 Prmian 18.07 -.05


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.93 -.02
AbdnEMTel 19.28 +.23
AdmRsc 39.90 +.23
Advenbx .60 -.01
AlldNevG 26.76 +1.09
AlmadnMg 1.94 +.07
AmApparel .91 +.06
Augustag 2.04 +.14
Aurizong 4.31 +.08
AvalnRare 1.50 -.01
Ballanty 5.01 -.47
Banrog 3.81 +.09


BarcUBS36 42.53 +.57 CrSuiHiY 3.20 +.04
BarcGSOil 22.27 +.99 Crosshrg .20 +.01
BlkMunvst 11.15 -.02 CubicEn .23 +.02
BrigusGg .83 +.01
BritATob 109.28 +1.14
CAMACEn .56 -.01 DejourEg .22 -.01
ardimTh 1 DeisnMg 1.30 +.01
CardiumTh .23 -.01 EVLtdDur 16.65
CelSd .35 +.01 EVMuni2 13.69 +.10
CFCdag 20.01 +.29 ElephTalk 1.37 +.05
CheniereEn 13.76 -.01 EllswthFd 7.15 +.04
ClaudeRg .72 +.04 EnovaSys .05 +.01
ClghGlbOp 11.11 +.08 EnteeGold .72 +.16
ComstkMn 2.97 -.02 ExeterRgs 1.60 +.17
CornstProg 5.35 -.05 ExtorreGg 4.14 +.01
CrSuislnco 3.96 +.04 FTEgylno 29.61 -.17


FrkStPr 10.25 +.27

GamGldNR 13.71 +.22
GascoEngy .11 -.02
Gastargrs 1.93 +.10
GenMoly 2.87 +.16
GeoPeto .10 +.02
GoldResrc 18.12 +.13
GoldStdVg 1.83 +.16
GoldenMin 4.09 +.16
GoldStrg 1.18 +.06
GranTrrag 4.40 +.07
GrtBasGg .53 -.01
GtPanSilvg 1.67
Hemisphrx .35 -.02


iBb 1.09 +.08
ImmunoCII 3.10 +.16
ImpOilgs 43.54 +1.08
InovioPhm .52 +.02
IntellgSys 1.67 +.01
IntTowerg 2.68 +.19
Inuvo .64 -.07
IsoRay 1.01 -.00


KeeganRg 3.00 +.04
LadThalFn 1.41 +.10
LkShrGldg 1.03
LucasEngy 1.94 +.05


NovaBayP 1.24 +.02
NovaGldg 3.68 -.25
MAG Svg 9.33 +.21 SamsO&G 1.09 -.01
MadCatzg .67 +.01 Senesco .30 +.04
MeetMe 1.93 +.14 ParaG&S 2.28 +.08 SinoHub .30 +.05
Metalio 1.99 +.14 PhrmAh 1.35 ... SynergyRs 2.91 +.11
MdwGoldg 1.22 +.06 PolyMetg 1.16 +.04 Talbotswt
NavideaBio 3.84 +.18 PyramidOil 4.46 +.07 TanzRyg 4.12 +.05
NeoStem .80 +.01 QuestRMg 1.25 -.05 Taseko 2.58 +.10
NBRESec 4.86 +.09 RareEleg 3.90 -.05 TimberlnR .35 +.00
Nevsung 3.42 +.09 ReavesUtl 25.80 +.04 TriangPet 5.97 +.22
NwGoldg 9.97 -.06 Rentech 2.05 +.09 Tuowsg 1.14
NAPallg 1.64 +.03 RexahnPh .49 -.01 UQMTech .81 +.06
NDynMng 2.53 +.01 Richmntg 3.50 -.05 USGeoth .30 -.01
NthnO&G 15.37 +.15 Rubiong 3.14 +.04 USAnimny 2.70 +.13


Univlnsur 3.27 +.11
Ur-Energy .90 +.05
Uranerz 1.41
UraniumEn 1.97 +.06


VantageDrl 1.57 +.08
VirnetX 26.42 +1.93
VistaGold 2.90 +.06
VoyagerOG 1.20 +.04
Vringo 3.12 -.04
Walterlnv 22.90 +.72
WFAdvlnco 10.68 -.06
WizrdSftrs 4.03 -.07
YMBiog 1.84 -.02


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 43.29 +.49
ARCAbih .39 -.06
ASMLHId 58.12 +2.26
ATPO&G 1.36 +.24
AXT Inc 2.79 +.03
Aastom 1.86
Abiomed 23.20 +.37
Abraxas 2.45 +.11
AcadaTc 23.66 -.17
AcadiaPh 1.51 -.06
Accuray 6.28 +.31
Achillion 6.72 +.03
AcmePkt 15.79 +.39
AmordaTh 22.42 -.22
AcivsBliz 11.12 -.65
Actuate 6.70 +.47
Acxiom 16.43 +.40
AdobeSy 32.02 +1.44
Adtan 20.90 +.10
AdventSoft 22.31 +.91
AdvisBds 43.52 -.22
AEternagh .39 +.00
Affymax 16.31 +.68
Affymetix 4.11 +.15
AirTrnsp 3.91 -.91
AkamaiT 35.48 +.79
Akorn 13.35 +.05
AlaskCom 2.19 +.07
Alexion 106.96 +4.66
Alexzars 2.95 -.07
AlignTech 34.30 +.74
Alkermes 18.11 -.09
AllosThera 1.78
AllotComm 22.12 +.80
AllscriptH 9.19 +.09
AlnylamP 18.03 +.63
AlteraCplf 35.79 +.66
AlterraCap 23.24 +.25
Amarin 11.93 +.39
Amazon 234.97 +4.16
AFTxE 5.69 +.20
ACapAgy 34.83 -.21
AmCapLd 10.61 +.21
ACapMtg 24.59 -.05
ARItyCTn 11.13 +.03
AmSupr 4.00 -.30
Amerigon 12.24 +.20
AmCasino 16.00 +.02
Amgen 82.21 +1.17
AmicusTh 4.83 -.17
AmkorTch 5.28 +.10
Amylin 30.95 -.01
Amyris 3.68 +.30
Anadigc 1.12
AnalogDev 39.80 +.72
Anlogic 64.22 +1.16
Analystlnt 3.62 -.59
Ancestry 33.23 +.95
AngiesLn 13.09 +.90
Ansys 67.71 +1.15
AntaresP 4.63 +.12
AntheraPh 1.01 -.02
A123Sys .49 +.01
ApolloGrp 26.66 +.62
Apollolnv 7.88 +.21
Applelnc 615.70 +7.91
ApldMaf 11.22 +.30
AMCC 5.67 +.09
Approach 27.07 +.29
ArQule 6.41 +.37
ArchCap 39.10 -.12
ArenaPhm 7.39 -.36
AresCaph 16.75 +.03
AriadP 18.69 +.55
Ariba Inc 44.58 +.03
ArkBest 9.92 -.06
ArmHId 26.73 +.76
ArrayBio 4.51 +.05
Arris 12.87 +.15
ArubaNet 13.20 -.22
AscenaRts 17.54 +.38
AscentSolh 1.15 +.07
AsialnfoL 10.09 -.11
AspenTech 23.45 +.84


AsscdBanc 12.79 +.43 ChelseaTh 1.06 +.06
AstexPhm 2.22 -.09 ChildPlace 50.95 -.05
athenahlth 95.01 +2.96 ChinaTDvh .62 +.22
AfasAir 51.26 +4.39 ChrchllD 55.21 +.36
Atmel 5.44 -.10 CienaCorp 16.34 +.95
AtriCure 7.62 -.48 CinnFin 38.24 +.74
Audience 15.30 -.33 Cintas 40.65 +.73
AuthenTec 8.40 +.10 Cirrus 37.98 +1.31
Autodesk 34.98 +1.20 Cisco 16.35 +.61
AutoData 56.93 +1.18 CitzRepBc 19.24 +1.60
Auxlium 24.18 -.86 CitrixSys 72.44 +3.03
AvagoTch 37.11 +.57 CleanEngy 13.96 +.61
AvanirPhm 2.87 +.11 Clearwire 1.30 +.07
AVEOPh 9.85 +.10 CognizTech 57.86 +1.58
AvisBudg 15.17 -.31 CogoGrp 1.78 -.01
Aware 6.17 +.13 Coinstar 46.66 -.15
Axcelis .89 +.11 Comcast 34.61 +.49
BBCNBcp 11.61 +.38 Comcspd 33.67 +.39
BEAero 38.52 +1.05 CommSys 11.19 +.13
BGCPtrs 4.97 +.12 CommVlt 51.45 +2.67
BMCSft 39.13 +1.32 CmplGnom 2.26 +.13
Baidu 124.84 +2.81 Compuwre 9.02 +.13
Bazaarvcn 15.07 +.80 ComScore 12.21 -3.24
BeacnRfg 24.70 +.32 Comverse 5.44 +.20
BeasleyB 4.56 +.01 ConcurTch 64.26 -.45
BedBath 62.44 +1.83 Conmed 26.94 +.76
BioRetlab 26.86 +1.50 ConstantC 17.40 +.84
Bioryst 4.24 -.06 Coparts 24.07 +.56
Biogenldc 145.06 +1.26 CorinthC 1.92 +.09
BioMarin 38.11 +.87 CorOnDem 24.84 +.90
BioSanters 1.25 ... Costm 97.21 +1.51
BIkRKelso 9.47 +.19 Cray Inc 11.36 +.04
Bluora 15.33 +.26 Creelnc 24.97 +.81
BlueNile 32.00 +8.25 Crocs 16.00 +.39
BobEvans 38.67 +.79 Ctip.om 12.97 +.47
BodyCentr 8.22 -1.37 CubistPh 43.08 +.71
BreitBurn 18.70 +.14 CumMed 2.66 +.20
Brighpnt 8.97 +.02 Curis 4.67 +.04
Broadcom 34.01 +.56 CSemi 10.48 -.02
BroadSoft 26.49 +2.65
Broadwdh .29 +.02
BrcdeCm 5.14 +.22 DFCGlbl 19.76 +.83
BrklneB 8.40 +.23 DeclksOut 41.82 +1.60
BrukerCp 11.65 +.29 Delcath 1.64
BuffabWW 73.16 +.87 Dell Inc 11.70 +.23
BldrFstSrc 3.75 +.18 Dndreon 4.45 +.08
CAInc 24.79 +.66 Dennys 4.62 +.23
CBOE 28.19 +.21 Dentsply 36.95 +1.39
CH Robins 53.60 +.46 Depomed 5.19 -.28
CMEGrps 50.93 +1.10 DexCom 11.70 +.36
CSG Sys 17.72 +.34 DianaCont 6.20 +.09
CTC Media 7.28 -.25 DigRiver 14.44 +.43
CVBFnd 11.74 +.27 Diodes 19.19 +.47
CadencePh 4.01 -.06 DirecTVA 50.16 +1.36
Cadence 12.43 +.19 DiscCmAh 52.31 +2.06
CalaStTR 9.96 ... DiscCmCh 48.58 +1.55
Callidus 3.99 -.39 DiscovLab 2.48 +.05
CalumetSp 24.79 -.25 DishNetwk 30.44 +.69
CdnSolar 2.55 ... DollarTrs 51.12 +.48
CapellaEd 29.12 +1.79 DonlleyRR 12.77 +.27
CapCtyBk 7.34 +.22 DrmWksA 17.95 +.16
CapProd 7.55 -.07 DryShips 2.21 +.08
CapFedFn 11.63 +.09 Dunkin 29.87 +.43
CpstnTrbh 1.06 +.02 DyaxCp 2.59 +.14
CareerEd 3.08 -.05 Dynavax 3.77 +.06
CaribouC 11.45 +.53 E-Trade 7.86 +.53
Carrizo 24.67 +.26 eBay 44.50 +.73
CarverBrs 5.16 +.15 EaglRkEn 8.95 -.39
CatalystPh 1.46 +.05 ErthLink 6.35 +.26
Catamaran 90.37 +1.38 EstWstBcp 22.18 +.64
CathayGen 16.54 +.83 EducMgmt 3.01 -.14
Cavium 31.02 +.81 EducDevh 3.95 -.03
Celgene 69.30 +1.09 8x8 nc 5.67 +.19
CellTherah .46 +.01 ElectSd 12.19 +.27
CelldexTh 4.86 +.09 ElectArts 11.97 +.60
Celsion 2.88 -.08 EFII 14.65 +.36
CentEuro 2.96 +.45 Eloquan 14.95 +2.06
CentAI 6.11 +.24 EmmisCm 2.20 +.06
Cepheid 34.07 +1.10 EndoPhrm 30.14 +.89
Cereplasth .31 -.05 Endocyte 8.73 +.91
Cerner 73.68 +1.20 Endobgix 11.65 -.01
CerusCp 3.21 +.14 EngyXXI 31.44 +1.65
Changyou 19.37 +.65 Entegris 8.01 +.16
Chartlnds 66.36 +3.62 EntopCom 5.53 -.14
CharterCm 79.93 +1.63 Equinix 179.22 +2.82
ChkPoint 49.39 +1.18 Ericsson 9.54 +.29
Cheesecake 33.38 +.25 Euronet 17.70 +.66
ChefsWhs 13.79 +1.21 ExactScih 10.38 +.29


Exelixis 5.58 -.34 lonixBr 17.91 +.57
ExideTc 2.96 +.08 IdenixPh 8.15 +.09
Expedias 57.45 +.65 Illumina 42.13 +.64
Expdlnf 36.10 +.91 ImunoGn 13.90 -1.51
ExpScripts 56.72 +.55 ImpaxLabs 23.18 +.54
ExtmNet 3.30 +.09 Incyte 18.48 -1.09
EZchip 36.12 +.68 Infinera 5.58 +.05
F5Netwks 92.78 +2.25 Informat 29.51 +.92
FEICo 52.48 +5.80 Infosys 40.05 +.81
FLIRSys 20.79 +.41 InsightEnt 18.43 +.22
Facebookn 21.09 +1.05 Insulet 19.53 +.58
Fastenal 43.09 +.62 IntgDv 5.08 -.04
FifthStin 10.41 +.21 Intel 26.23 +.55
FifthThird 14.07 +.40 InteractBlf 13.69 +.28
Fndlnst 17.41 +.33 InterDig 30.57 -.39
Finisar 12.99 +.79 InterMune 8.22 +.22
FinLine 21.23 +.67 InflSpdw 25.57 +.46
FstCashFn 39.78 +.46 Intersil 8.85 +.02
FMidBc 11.52 +.43 Intuit 59.07 +1.28
FstNiagara 7.81 +.40 IntSurg 492.85 +15.06
FstSolar 17.06 -.87 InvRIEst 8.07 +.07
FstMerit 16.35 +.44 IridiumCm 7.50 -.01
Fiserv 69.62 +1.43 IronwdPh 12.51 +.34
Flextn 6.36 +.31 Isis 12.08 +.36
FocusMda 19.83 +.56 Itron 42.36 +.19
ForcePro 5.55 ... IvanhoeEh .64 -.05
FormFac 5.52 -.04 b a 15.02 -.03
Forinet 24.27 +.84
Fossil Inc 68.43 +1.91
FosterWhl 19.66 +1.60 j2Global 29.65 +.10
Francesca 30.24 +2.23 JA Solar .97 +.04
FreshMkt 60.59 +.90 JDASoft 29.67 +.81
FronterCm 4.40 -.01 JDSUniph 9.85 +.40
FuelSysSol 17.44 +.93 JacklnBox 26.39 -.24
FuelCell 1.06 +.01 Jamba 2.64 +.16
FultonFncl 9.46 +.22 JamesRiv 2.28 -.09
JazzPhrm 48.50 +1.39
JetBlue 5.07 -.03
GTAdvTc 4.83 +.07 JiveSoftn 18.73 +.67
GalenaBio 1.57 +.03 KIT Digif 2.80 -.20
Garmin 40.26 -.09 KLATnc 52.10 +.50
Gentex 16.30 +.39 KeryxBio 1.83 +.03
Genivah 7.06 +.04 Kforce 11.03 +.23
GeronCp 1.69 +.02 Kimballlnt 10.20 +.54
GileadSd 56.87 -.42 Kraft 40.51 +1.57
GladerBc 15.21 +.28 KratosDef 5.04 -.43
GlbSpcMet 12.96 +.76 Kulicke 10.69 +.10
GluMobile 4.53 -.13 LKQCorp 35.76 +.74
GolLNGLd 39.43 +1.79 LPLFind 27.78 +.34
Google 641.33 +12.58 LSI Indlf 7.05 +.37
GrCanyEd 15.95 -.28 LTX-Cred 5.62 -.06
GreenMtC 21.63 -1.03 LamResrch 34.57 +.90
GreenPlns 4.48 +.21 LamarAdv 30.98 +1.12
Grifolsrs 21.24 +.14 Landstar 50.31 +.95
Grouponn 6.59 +.21 Lattce 3.83 +.29
GulfportE 21.20 +1.28 LeapWirlss 5.22 -.10
H&EEq 16.81 +.38 LedPhrm 2.26 +.07
HMNFn 2.77 -.03 LibGlobA 54.21 +1.53
HMSHd s 34.53 +.40 LibGlobC 51.35 +1.23
HSNInc 42.92 +1.05 LibCapA 96.72 +1.91
HainCel 55.95 +1.03 LibtylntA 19.10 +.36
Halozyme 4.61 +.31 LifeTech 44.87 +1.26
HancHId 30.19 +.91 LimelghtN 2.44 +.02
HanmiFrs 10.97 +.26 Lincare 41.47 +.03
HansenMed 1.75 +.03 LincElec 41.01 +1.20
Harmonic 4.38 +.10 LinearTch 32.46 +.43
Hasbro 36.07 +.71 LinnEngy 38.46 -.32
HawHold 6.38 +.23 Liquidity 40.47 +.97
HIthCSvc 22.21 +.61 LivePrsn 16.26 +.22
Healthwys 10.76 +.22 LodgeNet .69 -.02
HrfindEx 13.70 +.04 Logitech 8.18 -.21
HSchein 76.39 +1.47 LogMeln 19.77 +.35
HercOffsh 3.93 +.21 LookSmth .83 -.07
Hologic 19.53 +.70 Lulkin 47.07 +1.10
HomeAway 23.74 +.91 lululemngs 56.63 +2.15
HomeownC 18.48 -.81 Luminex 17.47 +.30
HorizPhm 5.16 +.08
HotTopic 9.35 +.22
HudsCity 6.34 +.20 M/A-COMn 13.23 -3.48
HuntJB 54.82 +.33 MAPPhm 13.65 +.35
HuntBncsh 6.32 +.16 MCGCap 4.50 +.10
IAC Inter 53.10 +1.40 MGE 48.48 +1.12
ICFInt 21.96 -1.98 MIPSTech 6.27 +.06
IPG Photon 57.24 +2.44 MTS 49.52 +6.50
iShACWI 44.82 +1.06 MSG 37.20 +.96
iShDevRE 30.32 +.60 MagelnHI 48.21 +.70
iShNifty50 21.74 +.46 Majeso 1.70 -.06
iShNsdqBio 132.39 +1.38 MAKOSrg 12.90 +.31


MannKd 2.16
MktAxess 32.58
MarvellT 11.35
Masimo 21.63
Mattel 35.22
Mattson .83
MaximlnIg 27.55
MaxvdlT 6.95
MedAssets 15.77
MedicAcin 3.60
MediCo 25.16
Medidata 36.11
MeloCrwn 10.20
Mellanox 106.92
MentorGr 15.49
MercadoL 82.68
MrcCmp 8.89
MergeHIth 3.27
Metabolix 1.79
Methanx 27.39
Micrel 9.39
Microchp 34.70
MicronT 6.33
MicrosSys 48.72
MicroSemi 19.34
Microsoft 29.75
Micrvisrs 1.80
MillerHer 18.49
Mindspeed 2.69
Misonix 2.90
MitekSys 4.50
MModal 14.13
Molex 25.99
Momenta 13.77
MonPwSys 20.08
MonstBvs 66.78
Moticityh .46
Moticityrt .01
MulimGm 14.83
Mylan 23.13
MyriadG 24.68
NETgear 35.34
NICESys 31.75
NIl HIdg 6.80
NNInc 9.17
NPS Phm 7.32
NXPSemi 22.30
Nanosphere 2.81
NasdOMX 22.96
NatCineM 14.30
Natlnstm 25.53
NatPenn 8.91
NektarTh 8.21
Neonode 4.68
NetApp 32.34
NetEase 53.17
Netiix 53.91
NetSpend 8.95
NetworkEq 1.34
Neurcrine 6.87
NYMtgTr 6.87
NewsCpA 23.47
NewsCpB 23.61
NobltyHIf 5.63
NorTrst 45.48
NwstBcsh 11.85
Novadaqg 8.16
Novavax 2.09
nTelosrs 15.47
NuVasive 19.66
NuanceCm 21.45
Nvidia 13.72
02Micro 3.75
OCZTech 5.71
OReillyAu 85.72
ObagiMed 12.21
Oclaro 2.42
OdysMar 3.74
OldDomFrt 44.27
Omnicell 13.69
OmniVisn 14.00
OnAssign 15.36
OnSmcnd 6.37
OnyxPh 70.43
OpenTxt 48.55
OpenTbleh 39.55
OpbmerPh 14.49
Oracle 30.72


OraSure 10.67 +.40
Oredgen 4.68 +.29
OriginAg 1.46 +.16
Orthfx 41.77 +.80
OtterTail 23.35 +.35
Overstk 8.48 +.35

PDC Engy 24.50 +.81
PDLBio 6.91 +.23
PLXTch 5.48 -.01
PMCSra 5.50 +.16
PSSWrld 20.80 +.39
Paccar 39.72 +1.15
PacEthanh .33
PacSunwr 2.16 -.09
PainTher 3.57
PanASIv 14.90 +.34
PaneraBrd 155.97 +.92
ParamTch 21.90 +.50
Parexel 28.30 +1.04
ParkerVsn 2.26 +.12
Patterson 34.44 +.74
PattUTI 15.58 +.31
Paychex 32.61 +.55
Pendrell 1.12 +.03
PnnNGm 37.38 -.20
PeopUdF 11.55 +.20
PeregrinP 1.66 +.01
Perrigo 115.84 +1.63
PetSmart 67.24 +.99
Pharmacyc 55.60 +2.01
Polymm 8.81 +.35
Popularrs 15.10 +.54
Pwrlnteg 36.50 +1.22
Power-One 5.13 +.15
PwShs QQQ 65.60 +1.22
Presstekh .39 -.00
PriceTR 60.81 +1.69
priceline 663.99 +14.98
PrivateB 15.84 +.55
PrUPQQQs 52.96 +2.85
ProceraN 22.51 -1.88
PrognicsPh 4.42 -.20
ProgrsSoft 19.31 +.78
PUShQQQrs43.08 -2.60
ProspctCap 10.97 +.14
PureCycle 2.11 +.03
QIAGEN 17.44 +.34
QLT 8.20 -.19
QlikTech 20.17 +1.32
Qlogic 11.56 +.19
Qualom 60.24 +1.36
QualitySs 17.06 +.63
QuantFuh .88 -.02
QuestSft 27.92 -.03
Questor 35.19 -.15
RFMicD 3.72 +.13
RPXCorp 11.41 +1.14
Rambus 4.21 +.09
Randgold 90.63 +1.33
RealPage 24.01 +1.78
Regenrn 136.96 +.49
RentACt 36.35 +1.30
Replgn 4.68 +.14
RepubAir 5.01 +.23
RschMotn 6.99 +.04
RexEnergy 12.68 +.21
RiverbedT 17.87 +.54
RosttaGrs 4.77 -.99
RosettaR 40.11 +.55
RossStrss 68.12 +1.85
RoviCorp 14.52 +1.19
RoyGId 77.60 +.60
RubionTc 9.26 -1.44
Rudolph 9.90 +.17

SBACom 59.19 +.73
SEllnv 21.45 +.59
SLMCp 16.02 +.48
SS&CTech 24.59 +.34
STEC 7.98 +.16
SabraHltc 18.83 +.29
SalixPhm 44.94 +.55
SanderFm 37.22 -.13
SanDisk 41.37 +.62
Sanmina 8.54 +.39


Santarus 7.47 +.33 ThrshdPhm 7.08 +.23
Sapient 10.11 +.45 TiboSft 27.82 +.70
Sareptars 8.73 -.02 TVo Inc 8.74 +.22
SaientPh .62 -.01 TowerGrp 17.84 +.06
Schnitzer 30.72 +1.59 Towersh 4.02 +.21
SciClone 5.35 -.03
SciGames 8.59 +.64 TractSupp 90.45 +1.13
SciQuest 15.13 -1.89 TrimbleN 45.28 +1.73
SeagateT 30.94 +.98 TripAdvn 36.68 +.47
SearsHldgs 49.32 +.81 TriQuint 5.65 +.07
SeattGen 24.65 -.07 TrueRelig 21.75 +1.18
SelCmfrt 27.01 +.83 TrstNY 5.50 +.13
Selectvlns 17.71 +.52 Trusbmk 24.45 +.67
Semtech 24.54 +.91 UTStam 1.01 .01
Sequenom 3.13 +.40 U n 1.4 .20
SvcSource 8.45 +.05 Ubiquiln 12.41 +20
SvArtsrsh .03 -.01 UltaSalon 87.78 +2.53
ShandaGs 3.33 +.02 Umpqua 12.32 +.43
Shire 91.17 +1.97 UtdOnln 5.12 -.08
ShufiMstr 14.18 +.17 USEnr 2.30 +.04
Shutterfly 32.23 +.71 UtdTherap 54.02 +.27
SierraWr 8.84 -.54 UnivDisp 30.90 -.68
SigmaAld 70.22 +1.99 UnivFor 34.17 +1.33
SilicGrln 6.71 +47 UranmRsh .59 +.02
Silicnlmg 4.96 +.10
SilicnMotn 15.38 +.23 UrbanOut 3016 +47
Slcnware 5.45 +.14
SilvStdg 12.56 +.21
Sina 44.55 +.03 VCAAnt 18.51 +.36
Sindair 11.67 +.44 VOXX)In 7.23 +.13
SiriusXM 2.16 +.05 ValueClick 15.31 -.22
SironaDent 48.36 +5.00 VanSTCpB 79.79
Skullcandy 14.67 +.82 Veeolnst 34.47 +.60
SkyWest 6.42 +.11 VelD 5.75 +.30
SkywksSol 28.32 +.45 VBradley 22.20 +.02
SmartBal 10.99 +.35 Vaey 20 0
SmithWes 9.60 -.02 Verisign 45.65 +.54
SodaStrm 40.57 -.76 Verisk 47.38 -.41
Sohu.cm 34.70 -.37 VertxPh 49.34 -.28
SoltaMed 2.77 +.06 ViaSat 33.85 -3.90
Somaxonh .34 ... ViacomB 47.20 +1.37
SonicCorp 9.69 +.33 Vical 3.44 +.14
Sonus 1.69 +.08 VirgnMdah 27.84 +.65
SouMoBc 23.44 +44 ViroPhrm 19.87 +.01
Sourcefire 45.05 +1.39 inah 04
SpectPh 13.62 +.22 s h +04
SpiritAir 20.49 +.08 istaPrt 36.39 +1.44
Splunkn 27.94 -.34 Vivus 20.92 +.16
Spreadtm 18.99 +.53 Vodafone 29.71 +.47
Stamps.cm 20.50 +.44 Volcano 27.03 +1.07
Staples 12.93 +.41 WarnerCh 17.39 +.73
StarSdent 3.99 +.12 WarrenRs 2.52 +.31
Starbucks 43.91 +.75 WashFed 15.89 +.36
SiDynam 12.73 +.35 Web.com 17.94 +.74
StemCllrsh 1.74 +.04 Web. 1 .7
Stericyde 91.84 +1.44 WebMD 15.28 +79
SMadden 40.00 +1.04 WendysCo 4.49 +.02
StewEnt 6.91 +.27 WernerEnt 23.35 +.47
Stratasys 63.64 +1.92 WDigital 41.00 +1.10
StudentTrg 6.08 -.03 Wesimrd 7.14 +.13
SunHIth 8.35 +.02 Wstptlnng 39.04 +4.45
SunPower 4.09 +.11 WetSeal 2.74
SuperMicro 12.43 +.13 WholeFd 94.60 +1.69
SusqBnc 10.44 +.36 WL pA 1
SwisherHIf 2.10 +.06 WsLpfA 11.29 +.29
Symantec 16.80 +.49 WlshBcp 6.40 +.20
Symetricm 6.15 +.15 Windstm 10.04 +.07
Synaorn 10.10 +.98 WisdomTr 7.04 +.29
Synaptcs 28.03 +2.59 Woodward 34.50 +1.59
Synchron 21.77 -.28 WrightM 19.65 -.15
Synopsys 30.55 +.44 Wynn 95.56 +2.03
SyntaPhm 6.99 -.13 XOMA 3.29 +.17
TTMTdc 9.40 +.42 Xlinx 33.36 +.74
twteleom 24.37 +.27
TakeTwo 8.08 +.26 Xyratex 12.24 +01
Tangoe 19.78 +.27 YRCrs 5.43 -.34
Targacept 4.31 Yahoo 15.97 +.23
TASER 5.49 -.01 Yandex 20.47 +1.22
TechData 47.28 +1.63 Zagg 8.31 -2.39
Tellabs 3.33 +.09 Zalicus 1.12 -.01
TeslaMot 27.27 +1.17 Zllow 38.63 +2.29
TetaTc 25.60 +1.01 ZonBcp 18.93 +.88
TxCapBsh 43.59 +1.34 193
Texlnst 28.27 +1.02 Zopharm 5.26 .33
TexRdhse 17.36 +.04 Zpcar 6.75 -3.88
Theravnce 27.64 -.57 Zoltek 8.71 +.10
TheSteet 1.37 -.13 Zumiez 33.87 +1.55
Thoratec 32.08 +.16 Zyngan 2.72 +.02


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.5780 4.5870
Australia .9473 .9567
Bahrain .3771 .3770
Brazil 2.0270 2.0493
Britain 1.5645 1.5506
Canada .9996 1.0076
Chile 481.68 484.83
China 6.3744 6.3679
Colombia 1778.50 1792.50
Czech Rep 20.36 20.80
Denmark 6.0123 6.1118
Dominican Rep 39.10 39.12
Egypt 6.0805 6.0810
Euro .8080 .8213
Hong Kong 7.7550 7.7545
Hungary 224.57 230.58
India 55.755 55.835
Indnsia 9473.00 9480.00
Israel 3.9734 4.0205
Japan 78.59 78.25
Jordan .7076 .7085
Lebanon 1503.50 1504.00
Malaysia 3.1260 3.1220
Mexico 13.1447 13.3645
N. Zealand 1.2220 1.2363
Norway 5.9747 6.0524
Peru 2.650 2.627
Poland 3.28 3.38
Russia 31.9825 32.6665
Singapore 1.2425 1.2494
So. Africa 8.1421 8.3490
So. Korea 1126.78 1135.02
Sweden 6.7117 6.8092
Switzerlnd .9710 .9866
Taiwan 29.93 29.97
Thailand 31.49 31.63
Turkey 1.7793 1.8022
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6730
Uruguay 21.3499 21.3499
Venzuel 4.2949 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.08 0.09
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 0.67 0.58
10-year 1.56 1.46
30-year 2.64 2.55



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Sep 12 91.40 +4.27
Corn CBOT Dec12 80712 +113/4
Wheat CBOTSep12 891/4 +26/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov 12 16283/4 +12/4
Cattle CME Oct 12 124.37 -.73
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 22.00 -.04
Orange Juice ICE Sep 12 112.20 +2.95



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1606.00 $1582.50
Silver(troyoz., spot) l2/./90 $2/.2/9
Copper(pound) $3.3/10 $3.4485
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1414.40 $1412.10

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I I I


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel ... .. ... 4.91 -.03-40.6 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 89.59 ... -10.7
AT&TInc 1.76 4.7 50 37.58 +.04 +24.3 Microsoft .80 2.7 15 29.75 +.56 +14.6
Ameteks .24 .8 18 31.17 +.77+11.1 MotrlaSolu 1.04 2.2 23 47.06 -.75 +1.7
ABlnBev 1.57 1.9 ... 81.75 +2.76 +34.0 NextEraEn 2.40 3.4 14 70.87 +.67 +16.4
BkofAm .04 .5 8 7.43 +.25 +33.6 Penney ..... 20.90 +.44 -40.5
CapCtyBk ...... 7.34 +.22-23.1 PiedmOfc .80 4.61 17.37 +.16 +1.9
CntryLink 2.90 6.9 34 41.74 +.07 +12.2 RegionsFn .04 .6 17 6.93 +.21 +61.2
Citigroup .04 .1 8 27.40 +1.22 +4.1 SearsHldgs .33 ... ... 49.32 +.81 +55.2
CmwREIT 2.00 10.8 22 18.59 +.17+11.7 Smucker 2.08 2.7 19 75.75 +.83 -3.1
Disney .60 1.2 18 49.77 +.79 +32.7 SprintNex ... ... ... 4.27 -.02 +82.5
DukeEnrs 3.06 4.5 18 68.60 +1.14 ... Texlnst .68 2.4 20 28.27 +1.02 -2.9
EnterPT 3.00 6.6 21 45.47 +.89 +4.0 TimeWarn 1.04 2.5 16 41.38 +.71 +14.5
ExxonMbl 2.28 2.6 11 87.55 +1.67 +3.3 UniFirst .15 .2 14 64.63 +2.02 +13.9
FordM .20 2.2 7 9.09 +.17-15.5 VerizonCm 2.00 4.5 44 44.46 -.16 +10.8
GenElec .68 3.2 17 20.96 +.44 +17.0 Vodafone 1.99 6.7 ... 29.71 +.47 +6.0
HomeDp 1.16 2.2 20 52.29 +.90+24.4 WalMart 1.59 2.1 16 74.55 +.50 +24.7
Intel .90 3.4 11 26.23 +.55 +8.2 Walgrn 1.10 3.1 12 35.80 +.05 +8.3
IBM 3.40 1.7 14198.52 +4.07 +8.0 YRC rs ........ 5.43 -.34-45.5
Lowes .64 2.5 17 25.49 +.64 +.4


A8 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 A9


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.78 +.15
Retlnc 8.99 -.02
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 6.70 +.14
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 16.74 +.21
GlbThGrAp 58.58 +1.79
SmCpGrA 37.68 +1.00
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.17 +.64
AllianceBern B:
GlbThGrBt 50.26 +1.52
GrowthBt 26.67 +.53
SCpGrBt 30.06 +.80
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 30.22 +.80
Allianz Fds Instl:
NFJDvVI 12.34 +.26
SmCpVI 30.07 +.63
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 26.17 +.61
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 20.80 +.46
Amer Beacon lnv:
LgCaplnv 19.71 +.43
Ameri Century 1st:
Growth 27.71+.54
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 23.72 +.44
EqlncAp 7.82 +.11
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 30.09 +.60
Balanced 17.20 +.17
DivBnd 11.28 -.03
Eqlnc 7.82 +.11
Growthl 27.45 +.53
Heritagel 22.00 +.51
IncGro 26.70 +.47
InfAdjBd 13.33 -.04
IntDisc 9.29 +.25
InfGrol 10.42 +.29
NewOpp 7.73 +.18
OneChAg 12.79 +.21
OneChMd 12.35 +.16
RealEstl 23.69 +.18
Ultra 25.33 +.51
Valuelnv 6.11 +.12
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 20.61 +.35
AMuEAp 28.01 +.42
BalAp 19.80 +.24
BondAp 12.91 -.03
CaplBAp 52.67 +.64
CapWGAp 34.92 +.76
CapWAp 21.26 +.04
EupacAp 38.04 +.83
FdlnvA p 38.75 +.74
GIblBalA 25.81 +.35
GovtAp 14.61 -.03
GwtAp 32.19 +.61
HI TrAp 11.06 +.02
IncoAp 17.74 +.21
IntBdAp 13.77 -.02
InlfGrlncAp 28.71 +.74
ICAAp 29.93 +.57
LtTEBAp 16.35 -.02
NEcoAp 27.06 +.46
NPerAp 29.22 +.65
NwWrldA 50.32 +.80
STBFAp 10.09 -.01
SmCpAp 36.78 +.70
TxExAp 13.07 -.02
WshAp 30.79 +.50
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 41.40 +1.17
Ariel 45.24 +1.21
Artisan Funds:
Inl 22.69 +.57
Inllnst 22.83 +.57
InfVal r 27.27 +.67
MidCap 36.99 +1.01
MidCapVal 20.48 +.39
SCapVal 14.88 +.39
Baron Funds:
Asset 49.11 +1.20
Growth 55.29 +1.08
SmallCap 24.38 +.64
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 14.17 -.05
DivMu 14.91 -.01
TxMgdlnI 12.85 +.34
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.61 +.32
GIAIAr 18.95 +.22
HiYlnvA 7.83 +.01
InlOpAp 29.74 +.76
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 17.64 +.20
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 19.65 +.31
GlbAllocr 19.04 +.22
HiYldBd 7.83 +.01
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlYn 6.23 +.01
BruceFund 394.19
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 27.80 +.68
CGM Funds:
Focus n 25.53 +.43
MutI n 25.72 +.34
Realty n 29.85 +.40
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 49.98 +1.14
Calvert Invest:
Inco p 16.36 -.05
InfEqAp 13.07 +.38
SocialAp 30.10 +.31
SocBdp 16.41 -.06
SocEqAp 36.68 +.82
TxFLgp 16.44 -.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 69.74 +.70
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 28.49 +.66
DivEqlnc 10.25 +.17
DivOpptyA 8.66 +.14
LgCapGrAt 25.98 +.50
LgCorQAp 6.39 +.11
MdCpGrOp 9.90 +.21
MidCVlOpp 7.81 +.14
PBModAp 11.02 +.10
TxEAp 14.26 -.02
SelComm A43.66 +.97
FrontierA 10.60 +.27
GlobTech 20.67 +.44
Columbia Cl I,T&G:
EmMktOpln7.97 +.14
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 29.55 +.69
AcornlntZ 37.66 +.76
DivlncoZ 14.83 +.21
IntBdZ 9.54 -.03
IntTEBd 11.01 -.01
LgCapGr 12.88 +.42
ValRestr 47.59 +.88
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.21 +.12
DFA Funds:
InlCorEq n 9.47 +.25
USCorEql nll.74 +.24
USCorEq2nll.52 +.25
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 19.20 +.26
DWS Invest S:
CoreEqtyS 17.16 +.30
CorPlslnc 11.13 -.03
EmMkGrr 15.35 +.26
EnhEmMk 10.96 -.01
EnhGlbBdr 10.24 -.02
GlbSmCGr 35.84 +71
GlblThem 21.54 +.53
Gold&Prc 12.80 +.23
HiYldTx 12.96 -.01
IntTxAMT 12.17 -.02
Inl FdS 39.63 +1.23
LgCpFoGr 32.56 +.73
LatAmrEq 39.33 +1.05
MgdMuniS 9.50 -.01
MATFS 15.25
SP500S 18.54 +.35
WorldDiv 23.29 +.52
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 35.10 +.71
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 33.41 +.67
Davis Funds C:
NYVen C 33.73 +.68
Davis FundsY:
NYVenY 35.51 +.72
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Inc p 9.44 -.04
SMIDCapG 24.24 +.54
TxUSAp 12.25 -.01
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 33.84 +.81
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn18.30 +.35
EmMktV 27.14 +.56
IntSmVan 13.95 +.27
LargeCo 10.99 +.21
TAUSCorE2 n9.37 +.20
USLgVan 21.11 +.47
USMicron 14.20 +.38
USTgdVal 16.24 +.41
US Small n 22.03 +.57
USSmVa 25.03 +.71
InlSmCon 14.20 +.27
EmMktSCnl9.20 +.33
EmgMktn 25.20 +.49
Fixdn 10.35
IntGFxlnn 13.13 -.06
IntVan 14.67 +.46
Glb5Fxlncnll1.26 -.02
2YGIFxdn 10.13
DFARIEn 27.04 +.23


Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 74.26 +1.31
Income 13.80 -.03
IntStk 31.06 +.93
Stock 114.32 +2.71
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdIn 11.26 -.01
TRBdNpn11.26 -.01
Dreyfus:
Aprec 44.22 +.84
CTA 12.41 -.02
CorVA
Dreyf 9.53 +.19
DryMidr 27.96 +.55
GNMA 16.18 -.01
GrChinaAr 29.44 +.28
HiYdAp 6.49 +.01
StratValA 28.63 +.68
TechGroA 33.41 +1.07
DreihsAclnc 10.38 +.02
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 27.50 +.41
EVPTxMEm 44.78 +.85
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 15.92 +.24


Name NAV Chg
AMTFMulnc 10.41 -.01
MuICGrA 8.42 +.19
InBosA 5.87 +.01
LgCpVal 18.90 +.37
NatlMunlnc 10.11 +.02
SpEqtA 15.73 +.36
TradGvA 7.43 -.01
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 10.23 +.09
NatlMulnc 10.11 +.02
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.42
NatMunlnc 10.11 +.02
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 9.01
GblMacAbR 9.81 -.01
LgCapVal 18.96 +.38
FBR Funds:
Focuslnvtn48.40 +.83
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 16.94 +.30
FPA Funds:
Newlnco 10.65
FPACres 27.84 +.41
Fairholme 28.12 +.46
Federated A:
MidGrStA 34.26 +.86
MuSecA 10.71 -.02
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 5.12 +.10
TotRetBd 11.57 -.02
SbrValDvlS 5.15 +.07
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 34.94 +.91
HItCarT 23.47 +.28
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 22.15 +.38
SblnA 12.57 +.02
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 20.91 +.36
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrln 64.57 +1.20
Eqlnl n 25.61 +.45
IntBdln 11.68 -.02
Nwlnsgtln 22.45 +.39
SbtlnIn 12.72 +.02
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 16.29 +.18
DivGrTp 12.64 +.27
EqGrTp 60.29 +1.12
EqInT 25.21 +.44
GrOppT 40.06 +.74
HilnAdTp 10.08 +.04
IntBdT 11.66 -.02
MulncTp 13.73 -.02
OvrseaT 16.51 +.47
STFiT 9.33
SkSelAIICp 19.58 +.36
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 13.99 +.14
FF2010K 12.81 +.12
FF2015n 11.69 +.12
FF2015K 12.87 +.13
FF2020n 14.12 +.16
FF2020K 13.26 +.15
FF2025n 11.72 +.16
FF2025K 13.36 +.18
FF2030n 13.95 +.20
FF2030K 13.49 +.20
FF2035n 11.52 +.20
FF2035K 13.54 +.23
FF2040n 8.04 +.14
FF2040K 13.57 +.23
FF2045n 9.50 +.17
FF2045K 13.70 +.24
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.61 +.24
AMgr50On 16.01 +.13
AMgr70rn 16.82 +.22
AMgr20rxn13.24 +.01
Balancn 19.76 +.23
BalancedK 19.76 +.23
BlueChGrn 47.82 +.95
BluChpGrK 47.90 +.95
CAMunn 12.89 -.02
Canada n 51.00 +.88
CapApn 28.45 +.50
CapDevOn11.39 +.24
Cplncrn 9.21 +.03
ChinaRgr 26.50 +.33
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 12.11 -.03
Contran 76.02 +1.34
ContraK 76.01 +1.33
CnvSc n 23.61 +.30
DisEqn 23.86 +.52
DiscEqF 23.85 +51
Divlntl n 27.76 +.71
DivrslntKr 27.75 +.72
DivStkOn 16.51 +.35
DivGthn 28.78 +.62
EmergAs r n26.78 +.24
EmrMkn 21.30 +.35
Eqlncn 45.59 +.82
EQIIn 19.29 +.33
ECapAp 16.99 +.64
Europe 28.20 +1.00
Exch 323.88
Exportn 23.21 +.37
Fidelxn 34.97 +.32
Fifty rxn 19.27 +.32
FItRateHi r n 9.86
FrlnOnen 28.24 +.52
GNMAn 12.00 -.01
Govtlnc 10.94 -.03
GroCon 92.58 +1.94
Grolncn 20.35 +.38
GrowCoF 92.57 +1.93
GrowthCoK 92.56 +1.93
GrStratrn 19.60 +.40
Highlncrn 9.14 +.02
Indepnn 23.84 +.52
InProBdn 13.44 -.03
IntBdn 11.10 -.02
IntGovn 11.07 -.02
IntmMun 10.65 -.02
InlDiscn 30.13 +.76
InlSCprn 18.44 +.35
InvGrBdn 12.04 -.03
InvGBn 7.97 -.02
Japanr 9.38 +.12
JpnSm n 8.64 +.07
LgCapVal 10.94 +.22
LatAm 49.12 +1.00
LevCoStkn 28.50 +.52
LowPrn 38.73 +.73
LowPriKr 38.73 +.74
Magellnn 70.65 +1.32
MagellanK 70.60 +1.32
MDMurn 11.67 -.02
MAMunn 12.74 -.03
MegaCpStkxnl1.36+.15
MIMunn 12.53 -.02
MidCapn 28.44 +.54
MNMunn 12.04 -.02
MtgSecn 11.38 -.01
Munilncn 13.52 -.02
NJMunrn 12.32 -.02
NwMktrn 17.42 +.09
NwMilln 31.55 +.52
NYMunn 13.69 -.03
OTCn 57.95 +1.04
OhMunn 12.37 -.02
100ndex 10.02 +.18
Ovrsea n 29.74 +.90
PcBasn 22.75 +.25
PAMunrn 11.46 -.02
Puritnn 19.27 +.20
PuritanK 19.27 +.21
RealE n 32.44 +.31
SAIISecEqF 12.62 +.24
SCmdtyStrtn9.07 +.14
SCmdtyStrFn9.09 +.13
SrEmrgMkt 15.50 +.27
SrslntGrw 11.17 +.27
SerlnlGrF 11.20 +.27
SrslntVal 8.69 +.26
SerlnlValF 8.72 +.27
SrlnvGrdF 12.04 -.03
StlntMu n 10.88 -.01
STBFn 8.57
SmCapDiscn21.27 +.44
SmllCpSrn 17.02 +.38
SCpValur 14.96 +.31
SFkSelLCVrnll.31 +.24
SkSlcACapn27.18 +.49
SkSelSmCp 19.02 +.48
Sbratlncn 11.25 +.02
SbrReRtr 9.66 +.05
TaxFrBrn 11.67 -.02
TotalBdn 11.27 -.03
Trendn 75.78 +1.26
USBI n 12.02 -.03
Utilityn 19.06 +.18
ValStratn 28.72 +.61
Valuen 70.30 +1.54
Wrldwn 19.04 +.39
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 36.78 +.57
Banking n 19.02 +.46
Biotchn 105.29 +.82
Brokrn 44.47 +1.04
Chemn 111.28 +1.79
ComEquipn20.51 +.49
Compn 62.74 +1.53
ConDisn 26.58 +.47
ConsuFnn 13.60 +.28
ConStapn 81.22 +1.21
CstHon 41.78 +.73
DfAern 80.77 +1.95
Elecb n 46.07 +.81
Enrgyn 49.91 +1.28
EngSvn 66.94 +1.97
EnvAltEnrnl5.50 +.32
FinSvn 57.08 +1.00
Gold r n 34.92 +.58
Healihn 134.52 +1.56
Insur n 48.87 +.92


Leisrn 96.92 +2.12
Materialn 66.67 +1.21
MedDIn 57.12 +.74
MdEqSysn 27.13 +.55
Multmdn 53.02 +1.18
NtGasn 31.18 +.67
Pharmn 15.00 +.18
Retail n 60.52 +1.11
Softwrn 82.35 +1.55
Techn 97.96 +1.96
Telcmn 49.92 +.17
Transn 51.57 +.83
UtilGrn 58.20 +.80
Wireless n 7.71 +.08
Fidelity Spartan:
5001dxlnvn 49.34 +.92
5001dx I 49.35 +.93
Intlnxlnvn 31.47 +.91
TotMktlnvn 40.10 +.77
USBondl 12.02 -.03
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdr n38.12 +.80
5001dxAdv n49.35 +.93
IntAdrn 31.49 +.91


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
TotMktAdrn40.10 +.77
USBondl 12.02 -.03
First Eagle:
GlblA 47.65 +.53
OverseasA 21.29 +.14
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.48 +.15
GovtAp 11.55 -.01
GrolnAp 16.15 +.33
IncoAp 2.57
MATFAp 12.51 -.02
MITFAp 12.86 -.03
NJTFAp 13.80 -.02
NYTFAp 15.29 -.02
OppAp 28.39 +.69
PATFAp 13.76 -.03
SpSitAp 23.61 +.50
TxExAp 10.28 -.02
TotRtAp 16.48 +.18
ValueBp 7.53 +.13
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.24 -.03
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.89
ALTFAp 11.93 -.02
AZTFAp 11.50 -.02
CallnsAp 12.94 -.02
CAIntAp 12.18 -.02
CalTFAp 7.50
COTFAp 12.47 -.01
CTTFAp 11.52 -.02
CvtScAp 14.51 +.16
DblTFA 12.40 -.02
DynTchA 32.43 +.70
EqlncAp 17.79 +.31
Fedlntp 12.55 -.03
FedTFAp 12.69 -.02
FLTFAp 12.02 -.02
FoundAlp 10.57 +.20
GATFAp 12.76 -.02
GoldPrMA 28.64 +.55
GrwthAp 48.38 +.84
HYTFAp 10.89 -.02
HilncA 2.03 +.01
IncomAp 2.19 +.02
InsTFAp 12.59 -.02
NYITFp 11.91 -.03
LATFAp 12.05
LMGvScA 10.35
MDTFAp 12.06 -.02
MATFAp 12.19 -.03
MITFAp 12.33 -.02
MNInsA 12.97 -.03
MOTFAp 12.78 -.02
NJTFAp 12.67 -.02
NYTFAp 12.15 -.02
NCTFAp 12.98 -.02
OhiolAp 13.13 -.03
ORTFAp 12.63 -.03
PATFAp 10.95 -.02
ReEScAp 17.12 +.16
RisDvAp 36.75 +.56
SMCpGrA 35.47 +.84
Stratlncp 10.54 +.02
TtlRtnAp 10.44 -.01
USGovAp 6.91
UbIsAp 14.37 +.17
VATFAp 12.28 -.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdvn13.16 +.06
IncmeAd 2.17 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomCt 2.21 +.02
USGvC t 6.86 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.62 +.38
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 21.69 +.33
ForgnAp 6.05 +.22
GIBdAp 13.20 +.06
GrwthAp 17.62 +.52
WorldAp 14.73 +.41
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.10 +.32
ForgnCp 5.91 +.21
GIBdCp 13.23 +.07
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.32 +.22
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 12.08 -.03
US Eqty 43.15 +.87
GMOTrust III:
CHIE 21.95 +.46
Quality 23.27 +.39
GMOTrust IV:
InllntVI 19.01 +.61
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.81 +.23
Quality 23.28 +.39
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.14 +1.07
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.65 +.81
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.48 +.57
HiYield 7.25 +.02
HYMunin 9.30 -.01
MidCapV 36.98 +.82
ShtDrTFn 10.66 -.01
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.83 -.03
CapAplnst 41.11 +.98
Intllnvt 56.66 +1.67
Intl r 57.28 +1.68
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 30.76 +.51
DivGthAp 20.39 +.37
IntOpAp 13.88 +.37
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 30.81 +.52
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 39.96 +.72
Div&Gr 21.12 +.38
Balanced 20.97 +.25
MidCap 26.70 +.52
TotRetBd 12.26 -.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StTotRetr 12.34 +.01
StrGrowth 11.19 -.12
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 18.62 +.45
HIlhcareS 16.85 +.22
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.98
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.59 +.18
Wldwide I r 15.60 +.17
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.00 +.26
Invesco Funds:
Energy 36.77 +.99
Ublibes 17.97 +.21
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.67 +.09
Chart p 17.34 +.32
CmskA 16.68 +.35
Constp 23.16 +.45
DivrsDivp 13.01 +.26
EqlncA 8.94 +.10
GrlncAp 20.21 +.35
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.28
HYMuA 10.04-.01
InlfGrow 27.33 +.65
MunilnA 13.91 -.02
PATFA 17.03 -.02
US MortgA 13.09
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.89 -.02
USMortg 13.02
Invesco FundsY:
BalRiskY 12.75 +.09
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 23.38 +.48
AssetStAp 24.17 +.50
AssetSblr 24.41 +.51
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.08 -.04
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.14 -.03
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 26.73 +.52
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondn 12.08 -.04
ShtDurBd 11.00 -.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.97 +.24
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.07 -.04
HighYldn 8.00 +.03
IntmTFBd n 11.40 -.01
LgCpGr 23.64 +.50
ShtDurBd n 11.00 -.01
USLCCrPIsn22.08 +.53
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.38 +.25
ContrarnT 13.39 +.15
EnterprT 62.89 +1.08
FlxBndT 10.96 -.03
GlUfeSciTr 29.02 +.45
GIbSelT 9.10 +.18
GITechTr 17.76 +.41
Grw&lncT 33.09 +.57
Janus T 30.72 +.53
OvrseasTr 29.85 +.58
PrkMCValT21.16 +.36
ResearchT 30.74 +.60
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 59.37 +1.06
VentureT 57.99 +1.54
WrldWTr 42.14 +.91
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.15 -.01


RgBkA 14.16 +.40
StrlnAp 6.64 +.01
John Hancock B:
StlncB 6.64 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.21 +.24
LSBalanc 13.11 +.16
LSConsrv 13.28 +.05
LSGrwth 12.94 +.22
LSModer 13.05 +.11
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.73 +.33


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.14 +.34
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 124.50 +2.47
CBApprp 15.54 +.24
CBLCGrp 23.20 +.46
GCIAIICOp 8.02 +.23
WAHilncAt 6.04 +.01
WAMgMup 17.12 -.02
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.09 +.42
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 27.72 +.57
CMValTrp 40.10 +.82
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 28.89 +.66
SmCap 28.45 +.43
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.67 +.07
StblncC 14.96 +.12
LSBondR 14.61 +.07
StlncA 14.87 +.11
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.46 +.02
InvGrBdY 12.46 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.45 +.23
FundlEq 12.73 +.26
BdDebAp 7.93 +.02
ShDurlncAp 4.62
MidCpAp 16.65 +.38
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.64
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.61
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.04 +.48
MIGA 17.06 +.41
EmGA 46.39 +.92
HilnA 3.51
MFLA
TotRA 14.88 +.16
UtilA 17.97 +.29
ValueA 24.68 +.50
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.29 +.36
GvScBn 10.56 -.03
HilnBn 3.52 +.01
MulnBn 8.97 -.01
TotRBn 14.89 +.17
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 24.80 +.51
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 17.32 +.58
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.01 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.73 +.15
GovtBt 9.03
HYIdBBt 5.98 +.01
IncmBldr 17.33 +.23
InflEqB 10.35 +.27
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 36.33 +.76
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 79.64 +1.76
Managers Funds:
Yackfnanpnl8.57 +.31
YacktFocn 19.98 +.31
Bond n 27.25 -.01
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.16 +.21
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.98 +.21
Indialnvr 15.55 +.20
PacTgrlnv 21.82 +.25
MergerFdn 15.87 +.06
Meridian Funds:
Growth 44.00 +1.10
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.84 -.02
TotRtBdl 10.83 -.02
Midas Funds:
MidasFdt 2.30 +.05
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.04 +.29
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.49 +.26
MorganStanley Inst:
InfEql 13.43 +.36
MCapGrl 33.65 +.76
Muhlenkn 55.20 +.94
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 27.99 +.51
Munder FundsY:
MCpCGrY 30.92 +.70
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.78 +.21
GblDiscA 29.27 +.57
GlbDiscZ 29.67 +.58
QuestZ 17.48 +.21
SharesZ 21.81 +.38
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.18 +.44
Geneslnst 47.90 +.97
Intir 16.19 +.34
LgCapV nv 25.89 +.57
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 49.65 +1.01
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.77 +.03
Nicholasn 45.61 +1.00
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.11 -.03
HiYFxlnc 7.34 +.01
SmCpldx 8.74 +.22
Stkldx 17.27 +.32
Technly 15.24 +.40
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.81 -.02
LtMBAp 11.26
Nuveen CI R:
IntDMBd 9.36 -.01
HYMunBd 16.81 -.01
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 22.09 +.19
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 40.98 +.86
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.19 +.37
Globall 20.99 +.36
InllIr 17.66 +.54
Oakmark 47.00 +1.00
Select 31.11 +.72
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.27 +.06
GIbSMdCap 14.04 +.26
LgCapStrat 9.43 +.24
RealRet 9.32 +.11
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.19 -.01
AMTFrNY 12.23 -.02
CAMuniAp 8.74 -.01
CapApAp 47.36 +.97
CaplncAp 9.13 +.04
ChmplncAp 1.83
DvMktAp 32.27 +.63
Discp 61.52 +1.47
EquityA 9.26 +.18
GlobAp 57.81 +1.78
GIbOppA 28.28 +71
GblStrlncA 4.26
Goldp 29.12 +.59
IntBdAp 6.48 +.03
LtdTmMu 15.10 -.01
MnStFdA 35.95 +.65
PAMuniAp 11.47 -.01
SenFltRtA 8.20 +.01
USGvp 9.84 -.03
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.15 -.01
AMTFrNY 12.24 -.02
CplncBt 8.94 +.04
ChmplncBt 1.83
EquityB 8.50 +.16
GblStrlncB 4.27
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40
RoMuAp 17.00 -.01
RcNtMuA 7.50 -.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 31.95 +.62
InlBdY 6.47 +.03
IntGrowY 27.90 +.88
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.57 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.84 -.01
TotRtAd 11.45 -.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.88 +.08
AIIAsset 12.32 +.10
ComodRR 6.83 +.10
Divlnc 12.06
EmgMkCur 10.29 +.11
EmMkBd 12.18 +.04
Fltlncr 8.72 +.04
ForBdUnr 11.13 +.08
FrgnBd 11.05 +.02
HiYld 9.42 +.02
InvGrCp 11.10 -.04
LowDu 10.57
ModDur 11.03 -.02
RealRhil 12.47 -.04
ShortT 9.84 -.01
TotRt 11.45 -.02
TRII 11.03 -.03
TRIll 10.09 -.02
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.81 +.09
LwDurA 10.57
RealRtAp 12.47 -.04
TotRtA 11.45 -.02
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.69 +.09
RealRtCp 12.47 -.04


TotRtCt 11.45 -.02
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.47 -.04
TRtnp 11.45 -.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.87 +.09
TotRtnP 11.45 -.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 28.80 +.42
Perm Port Funds:
Permanent 47.34 +.55
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.83 -.02


Name NAV Chg
IntValA 17.39 +.48
PionFdAp 40.70 +.74
ValueAp 11.76 +.23
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.05 +.08
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 10.15 +.08
Pioneer Fds Y:
StratlncYp 11.07 +.01
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.32 +.29
BIChipn 43.99 +.90
CABondn 11.48 -.02
CapAppn 22.50 +.30
DivGro n 25.62 +.46
EmMktBn 13.85 +.07
EmEurop 17.53 +.44
EmMktSn 30.70 +.56
Eqlncn 25.23 +.47
Eqlndexn 37.52 +.71
Europen 14.57 +.52
GNMAn 10.17 -.01
Growth n 36.48 +.69
Gr&lnn 21.83 +.42
HIlSci n 40.98 +.59
HiYield n 6.78 +.01
InsfCpG 18.06 +.36
InstHiYldn 9.56 +.02
MCEqGrn 28.80 +.61
IntlBond n 9.88 +.05
IntDisn 41.51 +.80
IntlG&l 12.03 +.30
InlStkn 13.23 +.35
Japan n 7.62 +.08
LatAmn 39.06 +1.27
MDShrtn 5.25
MDBondn 11.09 -.01
MidCapn 56.38 +1.15
MCapValn 23.64 +.40
NAmern 34.02 +.63
NAsian 15.41 +.17
NewEran 41.38 +1.00
NHorizn 34.35 +.77
Nlncn 9.91 -.03
NYBondn 11.89 -.02
OverS SFn 7.84 +.21
PSIncn 16.76 +.17
RealAssetrnl0.65 +.20
RealEstn 21.33 +.21
R2010n 16.18 +.17
R2015n 12.55 +.16
R2020n 17.34 +.26
R2025n 12.67 +.21
R2030n 18.16 +.32
R2035n 12.82 +.24
R2040n 18.23 +.35
R2045n 12.14 +.23
SciTecn 26.14 +.50
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 34.37 +.75
SmCapVal n37.19 +.96
SpecGrn 18.59 +.39
Speclnn 12.82 +.03
TFIncn 10.54 -.02
TxFrHn 11.75 -.01
TxFrSIn 5.72
USTIntn 6.33 -.02
USTLgn 14.36 -.21
VABondn 12.31 -.02
Value n 24.98 +.49
Principal Inv:
Divlnllnst 9.49 +.23
LgCGI In 9.87 +.21
LT20201n 12.29 +.16
LT20301n 12.09 +.19
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.31 +.40
HiYldAp 5.58 +.01
MuHilncA 10.28 -.01
UllityA 11.77 +.15
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.68 +.42
HiYldBt 5.57 +.01
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ32.13 +.66
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.26 -.03
AZ TE 9.56 -.02
ConvSec 19.47 +.22
DvrlnAp 7.60
EqlnAp 16.22 +.37
EuEq 18.11 +.74
GeoBalA 12.95 +.13
GIbEqtyp 8.79 +.20
GrlnAp 13.79 +.30
GIblHIthA 44.80 +.68
HiYdAp 7.73 +.01
HiYd In 6.02 +.01
IncmAp 7.12 -.02
IntGrlnp 8.82 +.30
InvAp 14.01 +.28
NJTxA p 9.88 -.02
MulICpGr 53.07 +1.21
PATE 9.55 -.01
TxExA p 9.07 -.01
TFInAp 15.73 -.02
TFHYA 12.66 -.01
USGvAp 13.73 -.02
GIblUtilA 10.39 +.19
VoyAp 20.89 +.55
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.74 -.02
DvrlnBt 7.53
Eqlnct 16.08 +.37
EuEq 17.33 +.70
GeoBalB 12.81 +.13
GIbEqt 7.92 +.18
GINtRst 16.80 +.46
GrlnBt 13.54 +.29
GIblHIthB 35.70 +.54
HiYldBt 7.72 +.02
HYAdBt 5.90 +.01
IncmBt 7.06 -.01
IntGrln t 8.73 +.29
InlfGrtht 13.27 +.37
InvBt 12.59 +.26
NJTxB t 9.87 -.01
MulCpGr 45.35 +1.03
TxExB t 9.07 -.01
TFHYBt 12.68 -.01
USGvBt 13.66 -.02
GlblUtilB 10.35 +.19
VoyBt 17.54 +.46
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.51 +.51
LgCAIphaA 41.90 +.53
Value 23.59 +.36
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 1.36 +.27
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 14.55 +.35
PennMulr 11.17 +.28
Premierl r 18.82 +.51
TotRetl r 13.20 +.27
ValSvct 10.73 +.29
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.33 -.04
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.21 +.31
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.96 +.31
Schwab Funds:
HIlhCare 19.68 +.33
l0001nvr 39.37 +.73
S&P Sel 21.91 +.41
SmCpSI 20.40 +.51
TSMSelr 25.19 +.49
Scout Funds:
Inl 30.13 +.83
Selected Funds:
AmShD 42.72 +.88
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.93 +.65
Sequoia 155.67 +2.55
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 46.55 +.91
SoSunSClnv t n20.34+.51
St FarmAssoc:
Gwh 55.17 +1.10
Stratton Funds:
Muld-Cap 35.36 +.83
RealEstate 31.03 +.28
SmCap 52.93 +1.25
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.30 -.04
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.09 +.03
TotRetBdl 10.03 -.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.02 -.04
Eqldxlnst 10.57 +.20
InlEqllnst 14.92 +.43
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.81 +.60
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 15.27 +.29
REVallnstr 24.75 +.36
Valuelnst 45.96 +.77
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.51 +.50
IncBuildAt 18.61 +.22
IncBuildCp 18.61 +.23
IntValue I 26.08 +.51
LtTMul 14.67 -.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.95 +.01
Income 9.21 -.03
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.44 +.02
Flexlncp 9.18
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 33.98 +.92
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.24 +.35
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.43 +.42
ChinaReg 6.69 +.03


Name NAV Chg
Inl 23.47 +.75
NYBd 12.51 -.02
PrecMM 25.27 +.45
SciTech 14.30 +.23
ShtTBnd 9.23
SmCpStk 14.24 +.35
TxElt 13.68 -.01
TxELT 13.85 -.02
TxESh 10.85
VABd 11.64 -.01
WldGr 19.80 +.56
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.19 +.40
Stkldx 26.08 +.49
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.03 +.36
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.34 +.24
CAITAdmn 11.69 -.02
CALTAdmn11.93 -.02
CpOpAdln 74.03 +1.50
EMAdmr rn 33.75 +.71
Energyn 109.53 +2.87
EqlnAdm n n50.04 +.86
ExplAdmln 70.23 +1.59
ExtdAdmn 42.73 +.91
500Adml n 128.41 +2.42
GNMAAdn11.09 -.01
GrwAdm n 35.82 +.68
HlthCr n 59.22 +.55
HiYldCpn 5.97 +.01
InfProAdn 29.12 -.08
ITBdAdml n 12.12 -.05
ITsryAdml n 11.81 -.04
IntGrAdm n 56.21 +1.61
ITAdmln 14.36 -.02
ITGrAdmn 10.35 -.03
LtdTrAdn 11.19
LTGrAdmlnll.01 -.12
LTAdmln 11.76 -.02
MCpAdml n 96.33 +2.02
MorgAdmrn 60.21 +1.21
MuHYAdm nll.21 -.02
NYLTAdn 11.78 -.02
PrmCap r n 70.07 +1.37
PALTAdmn11.71 -.02
ReitAdm rn 95.24 +.83
STsyAdml n 10.79
STBdAdmlnl0.66 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.88
STIGrAdn 10.80 -.01
SmCAdm n 36.22 +.84
TxMCap rn 69.39 +1.31
TUBAdmln 11.19 -.03
TStkAdm n 34.53 +.67
ValAdmln 22.22 +.41
WellslAdm n58.97 +.25
WelltAdn n57.99 +.65
Windsor n 47.35 +.96
WdsrllAdn 50.50 +1.00
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.93 -.02
CapOppn 32.05 +.65
Convrtn 12.63 +.11
DivApplnn 23.31 +.41
DivdGron 16.46 +.25
Energy 58.33 +1.53
Eqlnc n 23.87 +.41
Explrn 75.43 +1.71
FLLTn 12.19 -.02
GNMAn 11.09 -.01
GlobEqn 17.34 +.40
Grolncn 29.63 +.54
GrthEqn 11.92 +.28
HYCorpn 5.97 +.01
HlthCren 140.33 +1.30
InfaPron 14.83 -.04
InlExplrn 13.48 +.28
IntlGrn 17.66 +.50
InfValn 28.33 +.85
ITIGraden 10.35 -.03
ITTsryn 11.81 -.04
LifeConn 17.03 +.12
LifeGro n 22.72 +.38
Lifelncn 14.66 +.04
LifeMod n 20.38 +.24
LTIGraden 11.01 -.12
LTTsryn 13.80 -.21
Morg n 19.41 +.39
MuHYn 11.21 -.02
Mulntn 14.36 -.02
MuLtdn 11.19
MuLongn 11.76 -.02
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.35 -.02
NYLTn 11.78 -.02
OHLTTEn 12.68 -.01
PALTn 11.71 -.02
PrecMtlsrn 15.15 +.31
PrmcpCorn 14.62 +.29
Prmcprn 67.51 +1.32
SelValurn 19.86 +.39
STARn 20.09 +.26
STIGraden 10.80 -.01
STFedn 10.88
STTsryn 10.79
StratEqn 20.14 +.41
TgtRetlncn 12.09 +.06
TgRe2010n23.92 +.19
TgtRe2015n13.18 +.14
TgRe2020n23.33 +.30
TgtRe2025 n13.25 +.19
TgRe2030 n22.69 +.38
TgtRe2035nl3.62 +.25
TgtRe2040n22.35 +.43
TgtRe2050 n22.25 +.42
TgtRe2045n1l4.03 +.26
USGron 20.30 +.39
USValuen 11.39 +.23
Wellslyn 24.34 +.10
Welltnn 33.57 +.37
Wndsrn 14.03 +.28
Wndsll n 28.46 +.57
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n93.08 +2.73
ExtMktIn 105.46 +2.25
MidCplstP n1 04.97+2.21
TotlntAdm r r23.07 +.60
Totlntllnstr n92.25 +2.36
TotlntllPrn 92.28 +2.37
TotlntSig r n 27.67 +.71
500n 128.40 +2.42
Balancedn 23.34 +.25
EMktn 25.68 +.54
Europe n 23.58 +.90
Extend n 42.69 +.91
Growth n 35.82 +.68
LgCaplxn 25.61 +.48
LTBndn 14.74 -.17
MidCapn 21.22 +.45
Pacific 9.55 +.13
REITrn 22.32 +.20
SmCapn 36.17 +.83
SmlCpGth n23.23 +.55
STBndn 10.66 -.01
TotBndn 11.19 -.03
Totllntln 13.79 +.36
TotStkn 34.52 +.67
Value n 22.22 +.41
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.34 +.24
DevMklnstn 8.93 +.26
Extlnn 42.73 +.91
FTAIIWIdl r n82.26 +2.19
Grwthlstn 35.82 +.68
InfProlnstn 11.86 -.03
Instldxn 127.58 +2.39
InsPIn 127.59 +2.40
InstTStldxn 31.25 +.60
InsTStPlus n31.25 +.60
MidCplstn 21.28 +.45
REITInstrn 14.74 +.13
STIGrlnstn 10.80 -.01
SCInstn 36.22 +.84
TBlstn 11.19 -.03
TSlnstn 34.53 +.66
Valuelstn 22.22 +.41
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 106.07 +2.00
GroSign 33.17 +.63
ITBdSign 12.12 -.05
MidCplcbdx n 30.40 +.64
STBdlcbdxn 10.66 -.01
SmCpSig n 32.63 +.75
TotBdSgln 11.19 -.03
TotStkSgln 33.33 +.65
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.87 +.01
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 9.62 +.15
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetSp 9.14 +.18
CorelnvA 6.47 +.15
DivOppAp 15.30 +.26
DivOppCt 15.13 +.26
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.01 +1.04
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.94
Wells Fargo Adv :
CmSklnv 20.09 +.48
Opptylnv 38.21 +.85
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 40.44 +1.05
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CrPlsBdF1 p 11.59 -.04
CorePlusl 11.60 -.03
William Blair N:
GrowhN 11.85 +.22


GlbRs 9.24 +.17
Gld&Mtls 10.91 +.14
WdPrcMn 10.76 +.14
USAA Group:
AgvGt 35.46 +.67
CABd 11.02 -.02
CrnstStr 22.33 +.22
GovSec 10.42
GrTxSt 14.44 +.11
Grwth 15.92 +.36
Gr&lnc 15.59 +.36
IncStk 13.39 +.22
Inco 13.41 -.03


Stocks soar after





strong July job report


Associated Press


NEW YORK-A surge in
hiring last month got a big
welcome on Wall Street
Friday.
The Dow Jones industrial
average surged 217.29
points to close at 13,096.17,
ending a four-day losing
streak. It was the best day
for the Dow since June 29.
Markets had been slump-
ing all week after central
banks in the U.S and Eu-
rope took no new action to
shore up the economy, as in-
vestors had hoped.
The Labor Department's
closely watched monthly
jobs report gave investors
assurance that the U.S.
economy may be doing bet-
ter on its own. U.S. employ-
ers added 163,000 jobs last
month, far more than the
100,000 economists were ex-
pecting. From April through
June, the economy added an
average of just 73,000 jobs a
month, compared with an
average of 226,000 in the
first three months of the
year.
"It's one step forward,"
said Joe Bell, senior equity
analyst at Schaeffer's In-
vestment Research. "But we
would like to see continued
improvement in the labor
market in coming months."
There was more to cheer
about from the service sec-
tor, which employs 90 per-
cent of all Americans.
The Institute for Supply
Management reported that
U.S. service companies
grew at a slightly faster pace


Market
Aug. 3,2

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



in July The IS
index rose to 5
in June, which
est reading sii
2010. Any read
means that
growing for
providers.
The good eco
caused investor
risk assets like
ment debt. The
prices down an
The benchma
Treasury note
1.57 percent, u
percent Thursd
Oil prices als
vestors beca


optimistic about the econ-
watch omy Benchmark crude shot
2012 up $4.27 to $91.40 on the
New York Mercantile Ex-
+217.29 change.

13,096.17 The broader Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose 25.99
+58.13 points to 1,390.99, and the

2,967.90 Nasdaq composite index
added 58.13 points to
+25.99 2,967.90.
1,390.99 Despite the gain in hiring,

+19.88 there were still enough
signs of weakness in the lat-
788.48 est jobs report to keep hope

diary alive that the Federal Re-
2,497 serve may still take more
steps to kick-start the econ-
534 omy at its next meeting in
: 101 September. A separate sur-

3.6 b vey of households by the
Labor Department found
diary that the unemployment rate
1,925 rose to 8.3 percent in July
562 from 8.2 percent in June.
6 "I'm not ready to declare
: 111 victory just yet," said Uri

1.7b Landesman, president of
AP hedge fund Platinum Part-
ners. "Lending activity is
M's services still pretty low because
2.6 from 52.1 banks aren't taking that
was the low- much risk, and it's hard for
nce January an economy to expand when
ing above 50 banks are on tenterhooks
business is themselves."
r service At the end of a two-day
policy meeting on Wednes-
onomic news day, the Fed said it would
rs to sell low- take action on the economy
U.S. govern- "as needed to promote a
selling drove stronger economic recov-
nd yields up. ery" On Thursday, markets
ark 10-year fell sharply after the Euro-
was yielding pean Central Bank didn't
ip from 1.48 announce specific plans to
lay tackle the continent's debt
so rose as in- crisis, as many investors ex-
ame more pected it would.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


AT&T sets deadline

for 2G sunset in four years

NEW YORK-AT&T Inc. said Friday that the
shutdown of its second-generation, or "2G," wire-
less network will be complete by the end of 2016,
a process that will force customers with older
phones to upgrade to "3G" or "4G" handsets.
In a regulatory filing, the Dallas-based com-
pany said 12 percent of its customers on con-
tract-based plans, or 8.4 million people, have 2G
phones.
AT&T said it's shutting down the older network,
which doesn't support high data speeds, city by
city. It said earlier this year that the process has
started in New York City, and it's trying to move
the city's 2G subscribers to new phones.

EA sues Zynga claiming

copyright infringement

NEW YORK Electronic Arts Inc. has sued
online game maker Zynga saying that its new
game "The Ville" infringes its own game, "The
Sims Social."
EA said Friday that 'The Ville" is "unmistakable"
in its similarity to 'The Sims Social," which launched
more than a year earlier. EA says the games are
"largely indistinguishable" to a casual observer.
The games are both played on Facebook.
Players create characters who live, work and in-
teract with each other in virtual neighborhoods.

Oil surges 5 percent

on strong jobs growth

NEW YORK The price of oil posted its
biggest gain in more than month, jumping nearly
5 percent, after the government reported a sharp
rise in jobs growth for July.
Benchmark U.S. crude on Friday rose $4.27
to end the day at $91.40 per barrel in New York.
Brent crude, which sets the price for oil imported
into the U.S., climbed $3.04, or 2.9 percent, to
$108.94 per barrel in London.
Prices climbed after the government said U.S.
employers added 163,000 jobs in July. Last
month's hiring was the best since February,
though it wasn't enough to drive down the unem-
ployment rate. Prices for oil and gasoline tend to
rise on signs of strength in the economy, which
increases energy demand.

Consumer agency probes

mortgage insurance deals

WASHINGTON The government's con-
sumer finance watchdog is investigating deals
that transferred billions in premiums charged to
mortgage borrowers from mortgage-insurance
companies to the banks that made the loans.
The deals amounted to kickbacks, because
the banks pressured insurers into them in ex-
change for a share of the banks' mortgage-insur-
ance business, according to civil lawsuits filed by


borrowers and legal experts.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
has served subpoenas to American International
Group Inc., MGIC Investment Corp., Genworth
Financial Inc. and Radian Group Inc., the com-
panies said in public filings this week. The CFPB
asked for documents and answers to written
questions about captive mortgage reinsurance
deals, they said.

Toyota raises sales plan

as quarterly profit zooms

TOKYO Toyota raised its sales target for
this year to a record 9.76 million vehicles and re-
ported a strong recovery in quarterly profit Fri-
day, underlining its bounce back from a
disaster-plagued 2011.
Toyota Motor Corp. said April to June profit
zoomed to $3.7 billion. Its new sales target would
represent a 23 percent increase from the 7.95
million vehicles sold in 2011, and is 180,000 vehi-
cles more than Toyota's last forecast in February.
The car maker's quarterly sales soared nearly
60 percent to $70.5 billion, rebounding from a
sales crash that all Japanese automakers suf-
fered after the earthquake and tsunami in north-
eastern Japan in March last year.

Procter & Gamble

4th quarter up on snack sale

NEW YORK Procter & Gamble Co. said
Friday that its net income climbed 45 percent in
its fiscal fourth quarter, boosted by the sale of its
snacks division. Even without the impact of the
sale, its earnings beat Wall Street expectations
and the company said it was making progress
with its cost cutting plan and strategy to improve
results by focusing on its most profitable
categories.
The maker of Tide detergent, Crest toothpaste
and other consumer goods also said Friday that
it plans to buy back $4 billion in shares this fiscal
year. That's a reversal from June, when the com-
pany said it did not plan any share repurchases.
P&G has admitted missteps in pricing and bal-
ancing growth in emerging markets, which make
up about 30 percent of its sales, with the realities
of an uncertain global economy and lackluster
market share growth.

Viacom 3Q profit down

7 percent on TV ad decline

NEW YORK Viacom Inc., the owner of
Paramount Pictures, MTV and Nickelodeon, on
Friday said that its net income fell 7 percent in
the latest quarter as advertising revenue de-
clined more than expected and its movie re-
leases failed to measure up to last year's.
Viacom earned $534 million, or $1.01 per
share, in the April to June quarter. That com-
pares with $574 million, or 97 cents per share, in
-From wire reports


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
SPDRFncl 14.82 +.34
SPInds 36.16 +.77
SPTedch 29.54 +.57
SP UI 37.86 +.44
StdPac 5.92 +.21
Standex 43.52 +1.23
StanBlkDk 68.01 +2.45
StarwdHl 55.71 +1.95
StateStr 40.70 +1.14
Steris 32.36 +.81
SIIwtrM 8.45 +.48
StoneEngy 24.09 +1.22
StratHotels 6.16 +.27
Sbyker 52.75 +1.35
SturmRug 45.50 -.56
SubPpne 40.91 +.16
SunCmts 47.29 +.40
Suncorgs 31.58 +1.22
SunriseSen 7.58 +1.00
SunstnH 10.19 +.46
Suntech .94 -.01
SunTrst 24.09 +.88
SupEnrgy 21.25 +.57
Supvalu 2.57 +.11
Synovus 1.95 +.10
Syso 29.23 +.43
TCFFncl 10.51 +.33
TDAmeritr 16.07 +.70
TEConnect 32.98 +1.00
TECO 17.98 +.21


TIMPartn 22.05
TJXs 45.11
TRWAuto 40.02
TaiwSemi 14.18
Talbots 2.76
TalismEg 13.30
Target 62.36
TataMotors 20.65
TeckResg 27.30
TelefEsp 11.44
TempurP 28.85
TenetHlth 4.69
Teradata 72.70
Teradyn 14.80
Terex 19.19
TerraNitro 228.88
Tesoro 31.79
TetraTech 6.98
TevaPhrm 39.51
Textron 26.46
Theragen 1.84
ThermoFis 56.60
3MCo 91.70
Tiffany 54.74
TWCable 89.20
TimeWarn 41.38
Timken 37.70
TitanMet 12.14
TollBros 29.24
TorchEngy 1.55
Torchmark 51.36
TorDBkg 78.80


TotalSA 47.73
TotalSys 23.47
Transom 48.75
Travelers 63.71
Tredgar 13.89
TriConfi 15.80
TwoHrblnv 11.22
TyolnI 56.22
Tyson 15.40
UBSAG 10.77
UDR 26.38
UIL Hold 36.87
UNS Engy 40.68
USAirwy 10.89
USG 16.95
UltraPtg 21.01
UndArmrs 56.11
UniFirst 64.63
UnilevNV 35.44
Unilever 36.42
UnionPac 124.54
UtdConl 18.26
UtdMicro 2.16
UPSB 75.76
UtdRentals 30.23
USBancrp 33.49
USNGsrs 19.78
US OilFd 34.07
USSteel 21.72
UtdTedh 76.81
UtdhlthGp 51.61
UnumGrp 19.18


ValeSA 18.28 +.45
ValeSApf 17.97 +.45
ValeantPh 47.93 +1.00
ValeroE 27.84 +.54
VangTotBd 84.79 -.31
VangTSM 70.96 +1.41
VangREIT 67.13 +.52
VangEmg 40.76 +1.18
VangEur 44.09 +1.90
VangEAFE 32.28 +1.05
Vanbvn 22.00
VarianMed 55.46 +1.05
Vecren 29.70 +.36
Ventas 67.05 -.17
VeoliaEnv 10.34 +.39
VerizonCm 44.46 -.16
VimpelCm 8.95 +.25
Visa 130.98 +1.71
Vishaylnt 9.73 +.36
Visteon 28.42 -.19
VMware 93.05 +5.46
Vornado 85.65 +1.72
WGL Hol 40.25 +.45
WPXEnn 15.06 +.34
Wabash 6.63 +.32
WalMart 74.55 +.50
WaErn 35.80 +.05
WalterEn 36.41 +1.02
WsteMInc 34.77 +.51


Weathflni 11.88
WeinRIt 27.65
Wellcare 55.12
WellPoint 55.04
WellsFargo 34.34
WestarEn 30.58
WAstEMkt 15.13
WstAMgdHi 6.27
WAstlnfOpp 13.32
WstnRefin 24.99
WshUnion 17.26
Weyerhsr 23.65
Whrlpl 69.54
WhitngPet 41.22
WmsCos 31.52
WmsPtrs 52.18
Winnbgo 10.38
WiscEngy 40.35
WT India 16.93
Worthgn 21.95
XLGrp 21.20
XcelEngy 29.32
Xerox 6.93
Yamanag 14.78
YingliGrn 1.68
Youku 16.37
YumBrnds 67.53
Zimmer 59.02







Page A10 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,2012



PINION


"Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the
right to vote except the American people themselves -
and the only way they could do that is by not voting."
Franklin D. Roosevelt, Oct. 5, 1944


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


the city was too slow to offer
any solutions and the owner of
the old office space was slow to
make repairs.
The incumbent commis-
sioner could do a better job lis-
tening to the opinions of others
- especially when folks dis-
agree with his view of the


THE ISSUE:
County Commission
District 1 race.

OUR OPINION:
Damato deserves
another term.

Candidates not endorsed
by the Chronicle Editorial
Board are invited to issue
rebuttals. They may be
emailed to Charlie Brennan,
editor, at cbrennan@
chronicleonline.com.


county government should ac-
complish.
As a private contractor of
custom homes, Damato is an
organized and practical
problem-solver. He has proven
he knows how to accomplish
things and win consensus from
other members of the commis-
sion.
Some of Damato's ideas have
been controversial, but he has
never been one to sit back and
let other people come up with
solutions. He first proposed
the concept of turning County
Road 491 into a medical corri-
dor to attract new businesses
and jobs.
When the county struggled to
find office space solutions in
Inverness, Damato worked
with Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni to resolve
the issue When the same prob-
lem happened in Crystal River
after the state turned over the
driver's license bureau to the
county, creating a new urgency,
Damato led the charge to es-
tablish the government annex
at Meadowcrest.
He was an early advocate of
studying the feasibility of Port
Citrus. He stands by his contro-
versial decision to purchase
Ottawa Avenue so an east-west
bypass could be available for
the future.
Damato's drive to get things
done can sometimes leave vic-
tims in his wake. The county
commissioner doesn't have
many friends on the Crystal
River City Council after he led
the effort to move the govern-
ment complex off U.S. 19 to
Meadowcrest, outside the city
limits. City officials com-
plained Damato did not com-
municate with them about his
sense of urgency, but Damato
rejects the criticism. He said


world. And a little
humility would go
a long way toward
winning over
those critics.
But Damato's
leadership and vi-
sion outweigh any
shortcomings he
might have. Each
year he produces
a written vision
for the next 12
months and then
methodically goes
about trying to
achieve the goals.
He has been a
civic leader for 40
years and was the


long-time volunteer chairman
of Crystal River's Community
Redevelopment Agency.
Ms. Christopher-McPheeters
challenged Damato four years
ago in the election. She has
failed to articulate any serious
public policy issues during the
current campaign.
Ron Kitchen, a veteran city
official from Crystal River who
also has served as mayor, is a
serious candidate. He has ar-
ticulated a strong position in
the campaign and does a very
good job of connecting with
disaffected voters.
Kitchen is critical of county
government and promises
change. He favors across-the-
board budget cuts and has
found support from those criti-
cal of Damato's actions on such
issues as Port Citrus, Meadow-
crest and Ottawa.
We endorse Damato because
we believe county government
has made good progress over
the past four years. Spending of
local property tax dollars has
dropped dramatically, even
though we agree the county's
latest budget effort was a one-
year delay of seriously address-
ing spending practices.
The county has changed its
anti-business philosophy and
the Economic Development
Council now aggressively
searches out new employers.
The Citrus County Commis-
sion is a cohesive group of
problem-solvers that is free of
the petty politics that crippled
it in decades past. During these
tough economic times we be-
lieve a cohesive and aggressive
approach to problem-solving
far outweighs the benefits of
dumping those in charge.
We recommend voters return
Dennis Damato for another
four years in office.


ENDORSEMENT LETTERS
* The Chronicle has enacted its practice of asking that endorsement
letters be limited to the reasons writers are supporting candidates
not why they won't support candidates.
* To be published by Election Day -Tuesday, Aug. 14-
endorsement letters must be received by noon Thursday, Aug. 9.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .......................editor
S M ike Arnold ..........................................HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
S Curt Ebitz..................................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENDORSEMENT





Incumbent




best choice




for District 1


LETTERS to the Editor


Medicate carefully
At some stage of the aging
process, individuals over the age
of 65 learn to never take things for
granted and to focus on or rethink
important decisions, and one that
is extremely critical is the use of
prescription medication.
Leading medication experts in-
dicate medication errors result in
at least 1.5 million preventable
injuries every year Four hundred
thousand of those occurred in
U.S. hospitals. One study by a
Southern University hospital re-
ported there was some type of
error in many prescriptions.
A Department of Veterans Af-
fairs study indicated people
(older than) 65 take an average of
four to six medications, and the
Food and Drug Administration
reported half of medication er-
rors that end in death occur in
those (older than) 60.
An article in the latest AARP
Bulletin told of an incident of a
patient presenting a prescription
for hydraline and the pharmacist
giving her hydroxyzine.
Other mistakes include not fol-
lowing physician instructions for
usage; a prescription for one pa-
tient mistakenly being given to
another; taking medications sim-
ilar in appearance to others one
has; taking the wrong medica-
tions at night in the dark; im-
proper recording of medications
when medical histories are given;
and changes to prescriptions
going unnoticed by patients, who
may continue taking a previously
prescribed medication.
To avoid prescription prob-
lems, be aware of every medica-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tion taken; get medication from
just one pharmacy; keep medica-
tion in the containers they come
in; understand what the prescrip-
tion is for; ask pharmacists or
physicians for details if you have
any questions; keep a reference
list for oneself and for medical
professionals; and do not
under/overdose.
A common problem of elders is
getting to a stage in life when one
needs to focus on basic processes
of life, and then denying that such


a need exists. This can be deadly
in many ways, and taking a wrong
pill is one of those.
William C. Young
Crystal River

Lower TV costs
A satellite TV provider asks
"Are you paying too much for
TV?" Here's how to answer that
question:
For about the same price as
one year of any TV provider serv-
ice you can buy a 40-foot antenna
tower, a rotor, a signal amplifier,
Winegard's best deep fringe an-
tenna and all the wiring you need
to enjoy free TV forever.
With this equipment in Citrus
County, you will pick up ABC, NBC,
CBS, FOX, PBS, ME TV MOR, and
CW along with the multiple chan-
nels sent by each of the networks.
For example, PBS Channel 3
beams four channels of different
programming simultaneously. You
can choose from Orlando,
Gainesville or Tampa channels at
any given time with the rotor
Unfortunately, you will not get
10 country music channels, eight
shopping channels, dirty movies
or any of those other expensive
offerings of your paid package
deals.
But install this system, and
after the first year you can an-
swer the question "Are you pay-
ing too much?" with "Only if free
is too much." As a bonus, you
know you are not paying for the
commercials, either.
Steve Brown
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


A legislator's parting gift
D during the last apartment of Economic Against this backdrop, the law
legislative ses- Opportunity, STEM- creating Florida Polytechnic re-
sion, one legisla- related jobs account quires by the end of2016, it be fully
tor used his position as for 10 percent of accredited and functioning with at
appropriations chair to Florida's job market, least 1,244 full-time students, half
push through a bill cre- a number that closely of whom are pursuing STEM de-
ating the state's 12th mirrors the nation's. grees. If it meets its goals, that
university while cutting And during the next means Polytechnic would have 622
$300 million from the seven years, the DEO STEM students in four years.
existing 11. Not one of projects that STEM- Compare that to Georgia Tech,
the legislative leaders Paula Dockery related jobs in Florida where 92 percent of its 20,941 stu-
reined in his costly pet FLORIDA will grow at a faster dents were seeking STEM de-
project. Some claimed rate 2.16 percent grees last year Or better yet, let's
the state needed more VOICES versus 1.56 percent for compare it to Florida's existing
STEM degrees short non-STEM jobs. universities.
for science, technology, engineer- Still, even with a slightly faster According to a Board of Gover-
ing and mathematics as though growth rate, the actual number of nors report, 20 percent of degrees
UF's College of Engineering is jobs will be small since STEM is awarded by Florida's universities
somehow a front for the liberal such a small sector of the market last year were in the STEM fields,
arts. This is simple math, a subject I or a total of 14,855 degrees. The
Despite editorials in opposition excel at even with my non-STEM University of Florida awarded
from all the state's major newspa- degrees, the most, with 30 percent of de-
pers, as well as the well-reasoned And how do we know the jobs grees, or 4,430 students.
advice from the Council of 100, will be there? The Washington At a June meeting of the board,
Gov Rick Scott, once hesitant on Postthis month published a story FSU officials said with $50 mil-
the issue, signed the bill into law, under the headline: U.S. pushes lion a lot less than the cost of
declaring: "At a time when the for more scientists, but the jobs building a new university- they
number of graduates of Florida's aren't there. It quoted one woman could double the size of their
universities in the STEM fields is who gave up trying to find a per- STEM program.
not projected to meet workforce manent job in her field three If increasing these degrees re-
needs, the establishment of years after earning her doctorate, mains our goal, wouldn't it be
Florida Polytechnic University and another who was laid off more efficient and effective to in-
will help us move the needle in after 20 years of designing phar- vest limited dollars in the exist-
the right direction. Failing to maceuticals for drug giants. ing, growing and accredited
meet this challenge will be costly According to Jim Austin, editor programs at FSU, UF and the
to our state for decades." of Science Careers, "Anyone who other state universities?
The governor's statement went goes into science expecting em- With a better understanding of
unchallenged. Even those op- players to clamor for their serv- the outlook, and what is already
posed to creating a 12th univer- ices will be deeply disappointed." being offered, the case for STEM
sity in a shaky economy tend to Several factors explain this does not match the governor's
agree that STEM degrees are trend of unemployment in the sci- call to action.
needed. But are they? What does entific fields: the supply of scien- Which begs the question, is the
the data indicate? tists has grown faster than the creation of the 12th university jus-
According to Florida's Board of number of academic positions; re- tified at this time, or is it just a
Governors, our 11 universities search jobs have taken heavy hits lovely (and costly) parting gift for
offer degrees in 16 STEM disci- over a decade of mergers, stagnat- the Senate Appropriations Chair?
plines, with differences among ing profits and job outsourcing;
them. These degrees are rigorous and there's declining investment
for students and expensive for in research and development. Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
the universities, especially with Now, the $10 billion federal- Republican senator from Lake-
other universities recruiting pro- stimulus injection that created or land who is chronicling her final
fessors with the offer of higher retained 50,000 science jobs is yearin the Florida Senate. She
salaries. running out, putting those jobs at can be reached at
According to the governor's De- risk as well. pdockery@floridavoices.com.


hree candidates are
seeking the District 1
county commission seat
representing the Crystal River
area. It's our recommendation
that voters return incumbent
Dennis Damato to the job.
Damato, who has served
eight years as a commissioner


and served two
terms as chair-
man, is being
challenged by
Crystal River City
Councilman Ron
Kitchen and polit-
ical activist Renee
Christopher-
McPheeters.
Damato has
done a good job
during his eight
years on the com-
mission. He cares
deeply about the
future of Citrus
County and is a vi-
sionary when it
comes to what




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Everyone is Welcome!
... AND BRING A FRIEND!


APPREI Ttt DAY!


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Free Pizza and Drinks!
Basket Drawings!


It's our way of saying thank you to our community.


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in BREF Good: US hiring picked up in July

Kissin'


Associated Press
Jim Fortier, left, and Mark
Toomajian, kiss Friday as
they join about two dozen
members of gay rights
groups and others protest-
ing outside the Decatur,
Ga., Chick-fil-A restaurant.
Activists protest
Chick-Fil-A
ATLANTA- Gay rights ac-
tivists and other supporters of
marriage equality planned a
national "Kiss In" at Chick-fil-
A restaurants Friday to
protest the fast-food chain
owners' opposition to same-
sex unions.
Participants were encour-
aged to come to the fast-food
chains and kiss a fellow
demonstrator of the same
sex. One organizer, Carly
McGehee of Dallas, said she
hopes the event "helps LGBT
youth who feel isolated and
are victims of bullying."
The gatherings come two
days after hundreds of thou-
sands of customers, many of
them conservative Christians,
recognized "Chick-fil-AAppre-
ciation Day" at more than
1,600 locations.
Chick-fil-A president Dan
Cathy stirred the controversy
by confirming his opposition
to same-sex marriage. The
Southern Baptist Cathy family
has long been known for pub-
licly expressing its faith, in-
cluding never opening their
businesses on Sundays.

WorldBRIEFS

Outspoken


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy generated
jobs last month at the fastest
pace since February, a sign
it is resilient enough to pull
out of a midyear slump and
grow modestly as the rest of
the world slows down.
The 163,000 jobs employ-
ers added in July ended
three months of weak hir-
ing. But the surprising gains
weren't enough to drive
down the unemployment
rate, which ticked up to 8.3
percent last month from 8.2
percent in June the 42nd
straight month the jobless
rate has exceeded 8 per-
cent. The United States re-
mains stuck with the
weakest economic recovery
since World War II.


The latest job numbers,
released Friday by the
Labor Department, pro-
vided fodder both for Presi-
dent Barack Obama, who
highlighted improved hiring
in the private sector, and
Republican challenger Mitt
Romney, who pointed
toward higher
unemployment.
"It's not especially weak,
but it's not especially
strong," said Scott Brown,
chief economist at the in-
vestment firm Raymond
James.
Investors focused on the
positive. The Dow Jones in-
dustrials surged 217 points.
Three more monthly jobs
reports will come out before
Election Day, including the
one on October employment
on Friday, Nov 2, four days


before Americans vote.
No modern president has
faced re-election when un-
employment was so high.
President Jimmy Carter was
bounced from office in No-
vember 1980 when unem-
ployment was 7.5 percent
In remarks at the White
House, Obama said the pri-
vate sector has added 4.5
million jobs in the past 29
months. But he acknowl-
edged there still are too
many people out of work.
"We've got more work to do
on their behalf," he said.
Former Massachusetts
Gov Romney focused on the
increase in the unemploy-
ment rate, as did other Re-
publicans. "Middle-class
Americans deserve better,
and I believe America can
do better," Romney said in a
statement.
The economy is still strug-
gling more than three years


after the Great Recession
officially ended in June
2009. The collapse of the
housing market and the fi-
nancial crisis that followed
froze credit, destroyed tril-
lions of dollars in household
wealth and brought home
construction to a halt. Con-
sumer spending, which ac-
counts for 70 percent of
economic output, remains
weak as American families
pay down debts and save
more.
From April through June
this year, the economy ex-
panded at a listless 1.5 per-
cent annual pace, a
slowdown from the January-
March pace of 2 percent.
The job market got off to a
strong start in 2012. Employ-
ers added an average
226,000 a month from Janu-
ary through March.
But the hiring spree was
caused partly by a surpris-


Electrifying issues


Associated Press
An Indian boy stands Thursday near open power meters on electric poles in Gurgaon on the outskirts of New Delhi,
India. India suffered the worst blackouts in history this week, which left over 600 million people without power.
The lights are back on, for now, but the crisis is evidence of deep problems in a sector teetering on the edge of
bankruptcy for the second time in a decade. As much as 40 percent of the power generated in India is not paid
for. The bulk of it is stolen.


India left in dark by utilities losing $10B a year


Associated Press
Pussy Riot members, from
left, Nadezhda Tolokon-
nikova, Yekaterina Samut-
sevich and Maria Alekhina
sit in a glass cage Friday at
a courtroom in Moscow,
Russia. Russia's President
Vladimir Putin on Thursday
criticized the feminist punk
rockers facing trial for per-
forming a "punk prayer"
against him at Moscow's
main cathedral, but said a
punishment for them
shouldn't be too severe.


Tropical Storm
Ernesto stronger
ROSEAU, Dominica -
Tropical Storm Ernesto is
dumping heavy rain across
the eastern Caribbean as it
heads west toward Jamaica
and Mexico.
Dominica closed its inter-
national airport for a second
day on Friday, while St. Lucia
ordered businesses to close
for half the day. A ferry that
travels to Guadeloupe, Do-
minica, Martinique and St.
Lucia also has temporarily
suspended service.
No damage or flooding has
been reported on islands af-
fected by the storm. Gusts of
up to 63 mph were reported
in some areas.
The National Hurricane
Center said Ernesto was lo-
cated about 210 miles west of
St. Lucia by late afternoon
with top sustained winds of
50 mph.
It is moving at 21 mph and
is expected to strengthen into
a hurricane by Monday.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

MUMBAI, India -A decade ago,
Chandrakant's fishing village in
India's financial capital Mumbai
lived mostly by candlelight. What
people did not have electricity
- they stole.
It was easy enough to hook onto
the two thin power lines that
passed over the village and take a
little for themselves.
Today, his settlement has moved
up the feeding chain of Mumbai
neighborhoods and most residents
have city electricity meters. But the
loose habits of the past persist.
Residents still steal power on spe-
cial occasions, weddings or funer-
als that need to be lit brighter than
their home meters can bear
An electrician like Chandrakant
- who asked that his full name and
that of his neighborhood not be re-
vealed because of his illegal activ-
ity just hooks onto one of four
main distribution lines in the vil-
lage, with the quiet approval of
local officials.
India's power sector is lousy with
thieves. Men like Chandrakant are
the least of them.


As much as 40 percent of the
power generated in India is not
paid for The bulk of it is stolen.
If that seems unsustainable, it is.
India suffered the worst black-
outs in history this week, which left
more than 600 million people with-
out power The lights are back on,
for now, but the crisis is evidence
of deep problems in a sector tee-
tering on the edge of bankruptcy
for the second time in a decade.
Investigators have yet to pinpoint
the cause of this week's shutdowns.
Early, contested reports suggest
states were drawing more than
their share of power Scanty rain-
fall has driven up demand, as farm-
ers switch on electric pumps for
irrigation, and crimped hydroelec-
tric supply, which generates about
20 percent of India's electricity
The deeper problem, however,
stems from decades of populist pric-
ing and inefficiency that have pushed
losses at state utilities to an estimated
$10 billion in the year that ended in
March, according to the Planning
Commission, a top government advi-
sory body That's roughly 1 percent of
India's gross domestic product
Losses from theft aside, state


utilities are losing increasing
amounts on every unit of electric-
ity they sell because tariffs set by
regulators have not kept pace with
rising costs.
In the most recent fiscal year,
utilities lost an estimated 2 cents
per kilowatt hour, up 40 percent
since fiscal year 1999.
New Delhi is now contemplating
a $21.7 billion bailout for state util-
ities, last thrown a lifeline in 2001.
The problem really begins in the
ground, with coal, which accounts
for more than half of India's elec-
tricity supply
Efforts to force Coal India an
inefficient government behemoth
with a near monopoly on coal min-
ing to ramp up supply have
foundered. Fights over land acqui-
sition and stalled environmental
clearances have made it difficult to
open new mines. Power companies
now are looking overseas for coal.
In the last four years, the cost to
utilities of buying power rose 21
percent faster than ever before,
according to Pricewaterhouse-
Coopers but they have been un-
able to pass that on to consumers
because of price regulations.


Ind. fairgoers shake off shadow of stage collapse


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Grief
over a deadly stage collapse
gave way to excitement over
animal exhibits and deep-
fried bubblegum Friday as
thousands of people poured
into an Indiana State Fair,
trying to bounce back from
its most trying year
Visitors bustled from
rides to food stands, with
only a few pausing to read
the seven names inscribed
on a plaque that serves as a
memorial to those killed
last August while waiting
for the country duo Sugar-


land to perform.
The strong early atten-
dance was a good sign for
fair officials who hope this
year's event will help heal
emotions and put the fair
back on sound financial
footing. Revenue and atten-
dance plummeted last year
after the stage collapse, and
many questioned whether
the event often likened to a
family reunion would ever
be the same.
The Aug. 31, 2011, col-
lapse occurred when high
winds sent stage rigging
plunging onto fans awaiting
the Sugarland concert


Associated Press
The Indiana State Fair opened Friday with many changes
after last year's deadly stage collapse.


Bad: So did unemployment


locked Security Council and
the world at large into action
on stopping the civil war


ingly warm winter that al-
lowed construction compa-
nies and other firms to hire
earlier in the year than
usual, effectively stealing
jobs from the spring. The
payback showed up as weak
hiring an average 73,000 a
month from April through
June.
Then came the 163,000
new jobs in July, beating the
100,000 economists had
expected.
Now that the warm
weather effects have worn
off, economists expect job
growth to settle into range of
100,000 to 150,000 a month.
Which would be consis-
tent: The economy has
added an average of 151,000
jobs a month this year But
that hasn't been enough to
bring unemployment down.
At 8.3 percent, unemploy-
ment was as high in July as
it had been in January



Syrian


regime


asks


Russia for


aid
Associated Press

BEIRUT Syria reached
out to its powerful ally Russia
on Friday, as senior officials
pleaded with Moscow for fi-
nancial loans and supplies of
oil products an indication
that international sanctions
are squeezing President
Bashar Assad's regime.
The signs of desperation
came as resilient rebels
fought regime forces in the
Syrian capital only two
weeks after the government
crushed a revolt there. The
renewed battles in Damas-
cus show that Assad's victo-
ries could be fleeting as
armed opposition groups re-
group and resurge.
"The fighting in Damas-
cus today proves that this
revolution cannot be extin-
guished," said activist Abu
Qais al-Shami. "The rebels
may be forced to retreat be-
cause of the regime's use of
heavy weaponry but they
will always come back."
Syria is thought to be
burning quickly through the
$17 billion in foreign re-
serves that the government
was believed to have at the
start of Assad's crackdown
on a popular uprising that
erupted in March 2011. The
conflict has turned into a
civil war, and rights activists
estimate more than 19,000
people have been killed.
Deputy Prime Minister
Qadri Jamil, who has led a
delegation of several Cabi-
net ministers to Moscow
over the past few days, told
reporters Friday they re-
quested a Russian loan to
replenish Syria's hard cur-
rency reserves, which have
been depleted by a U.S. and
European Union embargo
on Syrian exports.
"We are experiencing
shortages of diesel oil and
gas for heating purposes,"
Syrian Oil Minister Said
Maza Hanidi said in
Moscow. "This unfair block-
ade has hurt all layers of the
population."
The Syrian regime has
blamed sanctions for short-
ages that have left Syrians
across the country standing
in long lines to pay inflated
prices for cooking gas, fuel,
sugar and other staples.
Syrian officials refused to
mention specific figures but
said deals with Moscow
could be finalized within
weeks. There was no imme-
diate comment from the
Russian government.
On Friday, the U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly overwhelm-
ingly denounced Syria's
crackdown in a symbolic ef-
fort meant to push the dead-











SPORTS


Jim Furyk continued
his stellar play Friday
at the Bridgestone
Invitational./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Olympics/B2, B3
0 Golf/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
STV, lottery/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Moore, Rays shut down Orioles


Upton hits 100th career HR on

same night as his brother in win


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG B.J.
Upton joined elite company
by hitting his 100th career
homer and the
Tampa Bay Rays Rays b<
beat the Balti- For the s
more Orioles 2-0 from the
on Friday night. Bay-Ba t
Upton put the,
Rays ahead 1-0 on game, s
a fourth-inning
homer to center off Tommy
Hunter (4-7). Upton joins
Rickey Henderson, Barry


Bonds, Bobby Bonds, Cesar
Cedeno, Lloyd Moseby, Eric
Davis and Hanley Ramirez as
the only players to amass 100
homers and 200 steals before


ox score
statistics
Tampa
more
ee Page B5.


age 28.
Upton turns 28
on Aug. 21. His
brother, Ari-
zona's Justin
Upton, also hit
his 100th career
homer earlier in


the night at Philadelphia.
Tampa Bay's Matt Moore (8-
7) improved to 7-2 in his past


11 starts after giving up six
hits over 5 1-3 innings. Fer-
nando Rodney, the fourth
Rays' reliever, pitched the
ninth for his 32nd save.
Desmond Jennings made it
2-0 on a solo shot in the sixth.
Hunter has given up 26
homers this season.
Orioles center fielder
Adam Jones later in the sixth
made a catch near the wall to
take away an extra-base hit
from Carlos Pena with run-
ners on first and second.
Hunter allowed two runs
and six hits over 5 2-3 innings.
Baltimore loaded the bases
with two outs in the first, but
failed to score when Moore
struck out Mark Reynolds.
Jake McGee replaced


Moore with a runner on sec-
ond and one out during the
sixth and worked out of the
jam. Joel Peralta struck out
Reynolds and pinch-hitter
Wilson Betemit with two on to
end the eighth.
Notes: Tampa Bay manager
Joe Maddon said 3B Evan
Longoria, out since May 1
with a partially torn left ham-
string, could rejoin the team
during a three-game series
against Toronto that starts
Tuesday
Tampa Bay Rays starting
pitcher Matt Moore delivers
in the first inning Friday
against the Baltimore Orioles
in St. Petersburg.
Associated Press


London 2012 SUMMER OLYMPICS





Young and fast


Associated Press
The United States' Missy Franklin starts in the women's 200-meter backstroke final Friday at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park
during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Franklin won a gold medal in the event.

Teens Franklin, Ledecky goldenfor US. women swimming Friday


Associated Press victims of the theater shooting
not far from her Colorado
In what might be viewed as a home. "In that last 25, I knew I
symbolic changing of the guard was giving it everything I had
from America's retiring swim- because I couldn't feel my arms
ming star to the next big and legs and I was just
thing, 17-year-old Missy trying to get my hand to
Franklin set a world the wall as fast I could."
record in the 200 back- Fifteen-year-old
stroke, her third gold in Katie Ledecky the
London, just minutes r youngest member of the
before Michael Phelps U.S. team nearly
took center stage at the broke the world record
Olympic Aquatics to win gold in the 800
Centre. Katie freestyle, denying
Another American Ledecky Britain's Rebecca
teen, 19-year-old Eliza- won 800-meter Adlington a repeat be-
beth Beisel, claimed freestyle race. fore her home fans.
the bronze in that race. Adlington settled for bronze in
"I can't believe what just a race Ledecky dominated from
happened," said Franklin, who start to finish, falling off record
had dedicated her Olympics to pace only in the last 15 meters.


Franklin and Ledecky are
just getting started.
"Missy The Missile" has cer-
tainly lived up to her nick-
name, completing a sweep of
the backstroke events in a time
of 2 minutes, 4.06 seconds, eas-
ily eclipsing the record of
2:04.81 set by defending
Olympic champion Kirsty
Coventry at the 2009 worlds in
a now-banned bodysuit
Russia's Anastasia Zueva
took silver, a body length be-
hind Franklin in 2:05.92. Beisel
put a second American on the
medal podium in 2:06.55, while
Coventry finished sixth.
"I could never dream for it
to happen like that," said


See Page B4


Lineman


talks big


game

Nicks believes

Buccaneers offense

will be better

Associated Press
TAMPA- Carl Nicks believes
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
should be able to put up plenty
of points this season.
The All-Pro guard was ac-
quired in free agency to bolster
an offensive line that figures to
be one of the team's strongest as-
sets. And he expects the unit to
set the tone for quarterback Josh
Freeman to re-establish himself
as a rising young star
The 6-foot-5, 343-pound Nicks
spent the past four seasons as
part of one of the
NFEs most
prolific
offenses
in New
Orleans.
The
Bucs had
one of the
league's
worst rushing attacks last sea-
son, when Freeman also took a
step back in his development.
The arrival of Nicks could
make Tampa Bay better on the
ground, as well as through the
air
"It all starts up front," said
Nicks, who signed a five-year,
$47.5 million contract in March
after helping the Drew Brees-
led Saints set a single-season
record for yards in 2011. "We're
going to be the leaders of this
team. We're going to win or lose
games off our backs. That's how
I take it. That's how the whole
offensive line's got to take it."
The Bucs have invested heav-
ily to try to protect Freeman,
who was sacked 29 times and
had 22 interceptions last season.
In addition to bringing in
Nicks, two-time Pro Bowl guard
Davin Joseph is entering the
second season of a seven-year,
$52.5 million deal, and left
tackle Donald Penn is in year
three of a deal worth $48 million
over six seasons.
Acquiring Nicks also enabled
See Page B4


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2012

MORE INSIDE
* Michael Phelps adds
another gold medal to his
legendary Olympic haul.
See Page B2
* The U.S. women's hoops
team keeps motoring on
with a lopsided victory
over the Czech Republic.
See Page B3


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PAGE B2 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,2012




SUMMER CLYMPICS


Saturday's
SCHEDULE

Athletics
At The Mall
Men's 20km Race Walk, Noon
At Olympic Stadium
Men's 100 classification heats, round 1,
400 round 1; Women's 3000 Steeplechase
round 1, Pole Vault qualifying, Heptathlon:
long jump, javelin, 5 a.m.
Men's 400 Hurdles semifinals, 10,000
final, Long Jump final; Women's 100 semifi-
nals and final, 400 semifinals, Discus final,
Heptathlon: 800 (medal), 1:50 p.m.
Badminton
At Wembley Arena
Men's Doubles semifinals and Women's
Doubles bronze medal match, 4 a.m.
Women's Singles bronze and gold medal
matches, Women's Doubles gold medal
match, 8:30 a.m.
Basketball
Olympic Park-Basketball Arena
Men
Tunisia vs. France, 4 a.m.
Russia vs. Spain, 6:15 a.m.
Lithuania vs. United States, 9:30 a.m.
China vs. Brazil, 11:45 a.m.
Britain vs. Australia, 3 p.m.
Nigeria vs. Argentina, 5:15 p.m.
Beach Volleyball
At Horse Guards Parade
Men's round of 16 (1 match), 4 a.m.
Women's round of 16 (1 match), 4 a.m.
Men's round of 16 (1 match), 8 a.m.
Women's round of 16 (1 match), 8 a.m.
Men's round of 16 (1 match), Noon
Women's round of 16 (1 match), Noon
Men's round of 16 (1 match), 4 p.m.
Women's round of 16(1 match), 4 p.m.
Boxing
At ExCel
Men's Light Flyweight (49kg); Men's Light
Welterweight (64kg) and Men's Light Heavy-
weight (81kg) round of 16, 8:30 a.m.
Men's Light Flyweight (49kg); Men's Light
Welterweight (64kg) and Men's Light Heavy-
weight (81kg) round of 16, 3:30 p.m.
Cycling (Track)
At Olympic Park-Velodrome
Men's Omnium flying lap; Men's Sprint
qualifying, 1/16 finals, 6:30 a.m.
Men's Omnium 30km points race, elimi-
nation race; Men's Sprint 1/16 finals
repechages, 1/8 finals & repechages, race
for 9th-12th places; Women's Team Pursuit
round 1, finals, 11 a.m.
Diving
At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre
Women's 3-Meter Springboard semifinal,
9:30 a.m.
Equestrian (Jumping)
At Greenwich Park
Individual Jumping First qualifier; Team
Jumping qualifier for round 1, 5:30 a.m.
Fencing
At ExCel
Women's Team Epee round of 16, quar-
terfinals, classifications (5th-8th places),
semifinals, 4 a.m.
Women's Team Epee bronze and gold
medal matches, 1 p.m.
Field Hockey
Women
At Olympic Park-Hockey Centre
Australia vs. South Africa, 3:30 a.m.
Netherlands vs. South Korea, 5:45 a.m.
Japan vs. Belgium, 8:45 a.m.
China vs. Britain, 11 a.m.
United States vs. New Zealand, 2 p.m.
Germany vs. Argentina, 4:15 p.m.
Gymnastics
At Trampoline North Greenwich Arena
Women's Trampoline qualification, final, 9
a.m.
Rowing
At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire
Men's Fours classification and final, Light-
weight Double Sculls classifications and
final; Women's Lightweight Double Sculls
classifications and final, Single Sculls clas-
sifications and final, 4:30 a.m.
Sailing
AtWeymouth and Portland, Dorset
Women's 470, Elliott 6m, Laser Radial,
RS:X, 7a.m.
Shooting
At The Royal Artillery Barracks
Women's 50-meter Rifle 3 Positions qual-
ification; Women's Trap qualification, 4 a.m.
Women's 50-meter Rifle 3 Positions final,
19:45 a.m.
Women's Trap final, 10a.m.
Soccer
Men
At Old Trafford, Manchester
Japan vs. Egypt, 7 a.m.
At Wembley Stadium
Mexico vs. Senegal, 9:30 a.m.
At St James' Park, Newcastle
Brazil vs. Hondurasl, Noon
At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales
Britain vs. South Korea, 2:30 p.m.
Swimming
At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre
Men's 1500 Freestyle final, 4X100 Medley
Relay final; Women's 50 Freestyle final,
4X100 Medley Relay final, 2:30 p.m.
Table Tennis
At ExCel
Men's Team first round, 5 a.m.
Women's Team quarterfinals, 9:30 a.m.
Women's Team quarterfinals, 2 p.m.
Team Handball
Men
At Copper Box
Tunisia vs. Britain, 4:30 a.m.
South Korea vs. Serbia, 6:15 a.m.
Sweden vs. Argentina, 9:30 a.m.
Croatia vs. Denmark, 11:15 a.m.
Iceland vs. France, 2:30 p.m.
Hungary vs. Spain, 4:15 p.m.
Tennis
At Wimbledon
Men's Doubles bronze medal match,
Women's Singles bronze medal match,
Mixed Doubles bronze medal match, Men's
Doubles gold medal match, Women's Sin-
gles gold medal match, 7 a.m.
Triathlon
At Hyde Park
Women's race, 4 a.m.
Volleyball
Men
At Earls Court
Germany vs. Tunisia, 4:30 a.m.
Britain vs. Poland, 6:30 a.m.
Australia vs. Italy, 9:45 a.m.
Russia vs. United States, 11:45 a.m.
Argentina vs. Bulgaria, 3 p.m.
Brazil vs. Serbia, 5 p.m.
Water Polo
Men


At Olympic Park-Water Polo Arena
Montenegro vs. Romania, 5 a.m.
Croatia vs. Australia, 6:20 a.m.
Greece vs. Spain, 9:10 a.m.
Italy vs. Kazakhstan, 10:30 a.m.
Hungary vs. Britain, 1:20 p.m.
Serbia vs. United States, 2:40 p.m.
Weightlifting
At ExCel
Men's 94kg group B, 10:30 a.m.
Men's 94kg group A (medal), 2 p.m.


MEN'S COMPETITIONS





Adding to his haul


Associated Press
United States swimmer Michael Phelps competes in the men's 100-meter butterfly final Friday at the Aquatics Centre in
the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Phelps won gold in his final individual event at the Olympics.
The swimmer still has today's 4X100 medley relay final left.


Swimmer Phelps claims another gold in men's 100-meter butterfly


Associated Press

LONDON Seventh at
the turn, an Olympic cham-
pion at the end.
Make it 17 gold medals for
Michael Phelps.
Was there any other way
to go out in the final individ-
ual race of his career?
With those long arms
whirling through the water,
Phelps was next-to-last
when he touched the wall at
the far end of the pool in the
100-meter butterfly but in a
familiar position when he
made the touch that
counted Friday his name
atop the leaderboard, a
smile on his face, another
gold medal around his neck.
"I'm just happy that the


last one was a win," Phelps
said. "That's all I really
wanted coming into the
night."
He claimed his third gold
of the London Games and
17th of his career, adding to
an already absurd record
total that should be twice as
much as anyone else by the
time he swims the final race
of his career, the 4x100 med-
ley relay Saturday night
The Americans are huge
favorites in a race they have
never lost, and it's unfath-
omable to think the Phelps
era could end with anything
less than a performance
that puts him atop the
podium one last time.
But no one has dominated
like Phelps, who increased


his career overall medal
total to 21.
"He's the king of the
Olympics Games," said his
butterfly rival, Serbia's
Milorad Cavic.
Even though Phelps didn't
go as fast in the final as he did
in the semifinals, he actually
won by a relatively comfort-
able margin compared to his
two previous Olympic wins in
the 100 fly: four-hundredths
of a second over Ian Crocker
in 2004, then one-hundredth
of a second -the closest race
possible against Cavic
at the Beijing Games four
years ago.
That was the victory that
kept Phelps on course to
win a historic eight gold
medals in China.


This was about going out
in style.
Phelps slammed the wall
in 51.21 seconds for payback
against the guy who edged
him in the 200 fly, Chad le
Clos. No gliding into this fin-
ish, the move that cost
Phelps a gold in their first
meeting.
Le Clos finished in 51.44,
patting Phelps on the shoul-
der after tying for silver
with Russia's Evgeny Ko-
rotyshkin. Cavic tied for
fourth in 51.81, not even
close to Phelps in their final
meeting.
"I cannot be compared to
Michael Phelps," said Cavic,
who also plans to retire
after the London Games.
"I'm a one-trick pony"


Defending champs lose in beach volleyball


Dalhausser, Rogers

fall to unheralded

Italian duo

Associated Press

LONDON Defending beach vol-
leyball gold medalist Phil Dalhausser
saw the Italian points pile up on the
scoreboard and knew his hopes for a
repeat were over when Todd Rogers'
final Olympic touch fell short of the net.
"It's a little bit different when you
win: It takes about a month for it to
sink in," Dalhausser said Friday after
the Americans lost to Italy in the round
of 16 at Horse Guards Parade. "When
you lose, it smacks you right in the face
the second the ball hits the sand."
Paolo Nicolai and Daniele Lupo beat
Rogers and Dalhausser 21-17, 21-19,
fighting off one last rally to advance to
the quarterfinals and put a surprising
end to the Beijing gold medalists'
Olympic run. Although the Italians were
one of the last teams to qualify for the
London Games, it is the third time they
have beaten Rogers and Dalhausser
"We've won two times against them,


Associated Press
American Phil Dalhausser reacts near the end of a two-set loss to Italy during
a beach volleyball match Friday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


but everything is a battle," Nicolai
said. "They are the best team in the
world, I am sure. If we play in another
match, they can win the gold medal."
The Italians went 1-2 in the prelim-
inary round, losing not only to top-
seeded Emanuel and Alison of Brazil
but also to an Austrian team that did
not make the medal round.
That forced Italy to play a lucky
loser match on Friday night. They beat
Canada to earn a matchup with the de-


fending champions.
That turned out to be bad luck for
the Americans, who finished pool play
unbeaten: The combination of 6-foot-
8-inch Nicolai blocking at the net and
Lupo chasing down balls behind him
is a mirror image of the U.S. pair.
"People say, 'They're the young Phil
and Todd,"' said Rogers, who has said
he will retire from international play
after the Olympics. "I guess they 'Phil
and Todded' us to death."


Olympic BRIEFS


US boxer still fighting
after overturned result
LONDON -Afew hours
after the U.S. men's boxing
team thought it was done at the
Olympics, amateur boxing's
governing body decided Errol
Spence deserved to fight on.
AIBA overturned Spence's
loss to Indian welterweight Kr-
ishan Vikas late Friday night,
five hours after the defense-
minded Vikas had apparently
clutched and grabbed his way
to a 13-11 victory.
After the American team
protested the result, AIBA's
competition jury reviewed the
bout and ruled Vikas had com-
mitted nine holding fouls in the
third round alone. He also inten-
tionally spit out his mouthpiece
in the second round, which
should have resulted in at least
four points of deductions.


Spence advanced into the
quarterfinals to face Russia's
Andrey Zamkovoy on Tuesday.
If he wins, the American men's
team will avoid leaving the
Olympics with no medals for
the first time ever.
Federer, Murray to
meet for men's gold
WIMBLEDON, England -
Roger Federer leaned on the
net, exhausted but exhilarated
after winning the final set 19-
17 to earn his first Olympic
singles medal.
The wait included an Olympic
marathon Friday, when Federer
played for four hours, 26 minutes
to beat Juan Martin del Potro of
Argentina 3-6, 7-6 (5), 19-17. It
was the longest three-set men's
match of the Open era.
Federer converted only two
of 13 break-point chances, the
second coming in the next-to-


last game, and had several
nervous moments. But he held
serve 12 times in the final set to
stay in the match.
With the comeback victory,
the four-time Olympian is as-
sured at least a silver. On Sun-
day he'll play in the final against
No. 3 Andy Murray of Britain,
who beat No. 2 Novak Djokovic
of Serbia 7-5, 7-5.
Federer beat Murray on the
same court in the Wimbledon
final a month ago.
Americans Bob and Mike
Bryan are assured at least a
silver after beating Julien Ben-
neteau and Richard Gasquet of
France 6-4, 6-4 in the semifi-
nals of men's doubles. Mike
Bryan and Lisa Raymond ad-
vanced to the first Olympics
mixed doubles final since 1924
by beating Del Potro and
Gisela Dulko 6-2, 7-5.


Majewski wins shot put
gold, U.S. takes bronze
LONDON Tomasz Majew-
ski beat some of the burliest
athletes in track and field to be-
come the first man since 1956
to retain an Olympic shot put
title, so he was hardly going to
let a pack of slender distance
runners curb his celebration.
He was the first non-Ameri-
can to win back-to-back titles,
and the first man since Parry
O'Brien in 1952 and '56 to re-
peat as champion.
German David Storl earned
the silver with 71-84 (21.86),
and Reese Hoffa of Augusta,
Ga., gave the U.S. the bronze
with 69-8 (21.23).
The Americans have domi-
nated the Olympic event over
the years, but haven't won the
shot put title since Randy
Barnes in 1996.


Olympic medal
COUNT

At London
Friday, Aug. 3
22 of 22 medal events
113 of 302 total medal events
Nation G S B Tot
United States 21 10 12 43
China 20 13 9 42
South Korea 9 2 5 16
Britain 8 6 8 22
France 8 5 6 19
Germany 5 9 6 20
Italy 4 5 3 12
North Korea 4 0 1 5
Kazakhstan 4 0 0 4
Russia 3 12 8 23
South Africa 3 1 0 4
New Zealand 3 0 3 6
Japan 2 8 11 21
Cuba 2 2 1 5
Netherlands 2 1 3 6
Hungary 2 1 2 5
Poland 2 1 1 4
Ukraine 2 0 4 6
Australia 1 9 4 14
Romania 1 4 2 7
Brazil 1 1 4 6
Belarus 1 1 2 4
Slovenia 1 0 2 3
Ethiopia 1 0 0 1
Georgia 1 0 0 1
Lithuania 1 0 0 1
Venezuela 1 0 0 1
Mexico 0 3 1 4
Canada 0 2 5 7
Colombia 0 2 1 3
Spain 0 2 1 3
Czech Republic 0 2 0 2
Sweden 0 2 0 2
Denmark 0 1 2 3
Belgium 0 1 1 2
India 0 1 1 2
Indonesia 0 1 1 2
Kenya 0 1 1 2
Mongolia 0 1 1 2
Norway 0 1 1 2
Croatia 0 1 0 1
Egypt 0 1 0 1
Taiwan 0 1 0 1
Thailand 0 1 0 1
Slovakia 0 0 3 3
Azerbaijan 0 0 1 1
Greece 0 0 1 1
Hong Kong 0 0 1 1
Iran 0 0 1 1
Moldova 0 0 1 1
Qatar 0 0 1 1
Serbia 0 0 1 1
Singapore 0 0 1 1
Uzbekistan 0 0 1 1


Friday's
SCORES

BASKETBALL
Women
Group A
Croatia 75, Angola 56
Turkey 82, China 55
United States 88, Czech Republic 61
Group B
Australia 70, Russia 66
Canada 79, Brazil 73
France 80, Britain 77
SOCCER
Women
Quarterfinals
Canada 2, Britain 0
United States 2, New Zealand 0
France 2, Sweden 1
Japan 2, Brazil 0
HANDBALL
Women
Group A
Angola 31, Britain 25
Croatia 27, Montenegro 26
Russia 31, Brazil 27
Group B
France 24, South Korea 21
Spain 25, Sweden 24
Norway 24, Denmark 23
HOCKEY
Men
Pool A
Australia 2, Argentina 2
Britain 4, Pakistan 1
Spain 3, South Africa 2
Pool B
Netherlands 5, New Zealand 1
Germany 5, India 2
Belgium 2, South Korea 1
VOLLEYBALL
Women
Pool A
Russia 3, Japan 1 (27-25, 25-17, 20-25,
25-19)
Dominican Republic 3, Britain 0 (25-9, 25-
18, 25-19)
Italy 3, Algeria 0 (25-11, 25-12, 25-17)
Pool B
Brazil 3, China 2 (25-16, 20-25, 25-18, 28-
30, 15-10)
Turkey 3, South Korea 2 (25-16, 21-25,
25-18, 19-25, 15-12)
United States 3, Serbia 0 (25-17, 25-20,
25-16)
WATER POLO
Women
Group A
Spain 13, Hungary 11
United States 7, China 6
Group B
Italy 10, Britain 5
Australia 11, Russia 8


CHANNELS
WITH OLYMPICS
COVERAGE

BRAVO


* MSNBC
* NBC
* CNBC
* NBCSPT
For events,
see Page B4.








Page B3 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,2012



SUMMER LYMPICS


WOMEN'S COMPETITIONS





U.S. women on a mission


Americans roll past

Czechs 88-61

Associated Press

LONDON Coach Geno Au-
riemma is looking for little ways to
improve an already dominant U.S.
women's basketball team.
His focus for Friday's game was
rebounding.
Tina Charles and her teammates
got the message, then pulled down a
team-record 62 rebounds in an 88-
61 win over the Czech Republic on
Friday night
"Coach definitely put an empha-
sis of getting on the offensive
boards," said Charles, who grabbed
15 rebounds and had 16 points. "We
got to keep doing that."
With center Sylvia Fowles still
resting her sore left foot and
Charles setting the tone, it became
contagious. Angel McCoughtry fin-
ished with 11 boards, Lindsay
Whalen nine and Maya Moore eight.
The team turned 27 offensive re-
bounds into 24 points.
"I think we had six in a row on
one possession," Auriemma said.
Diana Taurasi scored 18 points to
lead the Americans (4-0), who have
now won 37 straight games in the
Olympics. The U.S. started slow but
looked fresh after its first day off
since getting together on July 14 to
start training for the London Games.
The Americans had rolled
through their first three opponents,
winning by 36 points a game. The
onslaught continued against the
Czechs (1-3), who will need to win
their final game Sunday to possibly
advance to the quarterfinals.
The Czechs jumped out to a quick
lead scoring the first 10 points of the
game in just two minutes. It was the
Americans' biggest deficit in the
Olympics since they trailed the
Czechs 13-2 in the opener of the
2008 Beijing Games. They went on
to win that game by 40 points.
"We had a little bit of a tough time
getting shots to go in and the Czech
Republic team did a great job of hit-
ting their threes," Moore said of the
Americans' slow start "We just try to
stay aggressive. It's about when the
other team hits you, you gotta get
back up and figure out a way to over-


Associated -ress
USA's Diana Taurasi grabs a rebound against Czech Republic's Michaela Zrustova (5) during a women's
basketball game Friday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


come it. And that's what we did."
The Czech Republic also played
the U.S. tight for a half in the 2010
world championship gold medal
game, trailing by five at the break.


The U.S. won that contest by 20.
The Czechs led 26-24 after the
first quarter after hitting six of
their first 10 3-point attempts. They
didn't hit another 3-pointer the rest


of the game, missing their final
11 attempts.
While the Czechs went cold, the
Americans heated up behind
Charles and Catchings.


American soccer moves into semifinals


Team downs

New Zealand;

Canada next

Associated Press

NEWCASTLE, England
- These were supposed to
be the Hope Solo Olympics
for the U.S. women's foot-
ball team. Or the Alex Mor-
gan Games. Instead, they
belong so far to the old reli-
able, Abby Wambach, who
has scored in every match
to lead the Americans into
the semifinals.
The 32-year-old striker
slid onto a pass in the 27th
minute Friday to knock
home her fourth goal of the
tournament and then cele-
brated with a cartwheel in
the United States' 2-0 win
over New Zealand in the
quarterfinals of the Olympic
tournament.
Sydney Leroux added an
insurance goal in the 87th
minute for the two-time de-
fending Olympic champion
Americans, who will play
Canada in Manchester on


Associated Press
New Zealand's Ria Percival fights for the ball with the United States' Abby Wambach
during their quarterfinal women's soccer match Friday in the 2012 Summer Olympics at St.
James' Park in Newcastle, England.


Monday The Americans beat
the Canadians 4-0 in Olympic
qualifying in January
the winner of the Britain-
Canada match in Manches-
ter on Monday
Wambach extended her


U.S. record with her eighth
career Olympic goal a
mark she holds despite miss-
ing the Beijing Games with a
broken leg and pushed
her international tally to 142,
only 16 behind Mia Hamm's


world record. For most of the
year, she has yielded much
of the scoring load to young-
ster Morgan, but Morgan has
played the role of catalyst in
this tournament, getting
three assists and doing much


of the hard work to set up
Wambach's goal Friday
Taking a long ball from
Rachel Buehler, Morgan
juked one defender and
threaded her pass through
two others to put the ball on
Wambach's sliding right foot
at the far post. The U.S.
players, always looking for
novel ways to display their
happiness, then ran to the
corner of the field and
started doing cartwheels be-
fore the crowd of 10,441 at
venerable St. James' Park,
home of Newcastle.
Wambach's scoring spurt
is remarkable given all the
attention she draws from
the opposition. She's still
one of the strongest players
in the game and is un-
matched in the air, yet three
of her four goals have come
with her feet She's also con-
stantly battling her nagging
Achilles tendinitis and used
a series of holistic and tra-
ditional treatments to get
ready for the Olympics.
The only downside to
Wambach's performance
was a yellow card, picked
up in the 42nd minute for a
hard tackle on midfielder
Katie Hoyle.


Friday's
MEDALISTS
ARCHERY
Men
Individual 70m
GOLD-Oh Jin Hyek, South Korea.
SILVER-Takaharu Furukawa, Japan.
BRONZE-Dai Xiaoxiang, China.
ATHLETICS
Men
Shot Put
GOLD-Tomasz Majewski, Poland.
SILVER-David Storl, Germany.
BRONZE-Reese Hoffa, Augusta, Ga.
Women
10000
GOLD-Tirunesh Dibaba, Ethiopia.
SILVER-Sally Jepkosgei Kipyego,
Kenya.
BRONZE-Vivian Jepkemoi Cheruiyot,
Kenya.
BADMINTON
Men
Mixed Doubles
GOLD-China (Zhang Nan, ZhaoYunlei).
SILVER-China 2 (Ma Jin, Xu Chen).
BRONZE-Denmark (Joachim Fischer,
Christinna Pedersen).
CYCLING TRACK
Men
Team Pursuit
GOLD-Britain (Steven Burke, Edward
Clancy Peter Kennaugh, Geraint Thomas).
SILVER-Australia (Jack Bobridge,
Rohan Dennis, Michael Hepburn, Glenn
O'shea).
BRONZE-New Zealand (Sam Bewley
Aaron Gate, Marc Ryan, Jesse Sergent).
Women
Keirin
GOLD-Victoria Pendleton, Britain.
SILVER-Guo Shuang, China.
BRONZE-Wai Sze Lee, Hong Kong.
FENCING
Men
Team Sabre
GOLD-South Korea (Gu Bongil, Kim
Junghwan, Won Woo Young, Oh Eunseok).
SILVER-Romania (Tiberiu Dolniceanu,
Rares Dumitrescu, Florin Zalomir, Alexan-
dru Siriteanu).
BRONZE-Italy (Aldo Montano, Diego
Occhiuzzi, Luigi Tarantino, Luigi Samele).
JUDO
Men
100+Kg
GOLD-Teddy Riner, France.
SILVER-Alexander Mikhaylin, Russia.
BRONZE-AndreasToelzer, Germany
BRONZE-Rafael Silva, Brazil.
Women
78+Kg
GOLD-Idalys Ortiz, Cuba.
SILVER-Mika Sugimoto, Japan.
BRONZE-Tong Wen, China.
BRONZE-Karina Bryant, Britain.
ROWING
Men
Single Sculls
GOLD-Mahe Drysdale, New Zealand.
SILVER-Ondrej Synek, Czech Republic.
BRONZE-Alan Campbell, Britain.
Pairs
GOLD-New Zealand (Eric Murray
Hamish Bond).
SILVER-France (Germain Chardin, Do-
rian Mortelette).
BRONZE-Britain (George Nash, William
Satch).
Quadruple Sculls
GOLD-Germany (Karl Schulze, Phillipp
Wende, Lauritz Schoof, Tim Grohmann).
SILVER-Croatia (David Sain, Martin
Sinkovic, Damir Martin, Valent Sinkovic).
BRONZE-Australia (Christopher Mor-
gan, Karsten Forsterling, James Mcrae,
Daniel Noonan).
Women
Double Sculls
GOLD-Britain (Anna Watkins, Katherine
Grainger).
SILVER-Australia (Kim Crow, Brooke
Pratley).
BRONZE-Poland (Magdalena Fular-
czyk, Julia Michalska).
SHOOTING
Men
50m Rifle Prone
GOLD-Sergei Martynov, Belarus.
SILVER-Lionel Cox, Belgium.
BRONZE-Rajmond Debevec, Slovenia.
25m Rapid Fire Pistol
GOLD-Leuris Pupo, Cuba.
SILVER-Vijay Kumar, India.
BRONZE-Ding Feng, China.
SWIMMING
Men
50 Freestyle
GOLD-Florent Manaudou, France.
SILVER-Cullen Jones, Bronx, N.Y.
BRONZE-CesarCielo, Brazil.
100 Butterfly
GOLD-Michael Phelps, Baltimore.
SILVER-Chad le Clos, South Africa.
SILVER-Evgeny Korotyshkin, Russia.
Women
800 Freestyle
GOLD-Katie Ledecky, Bethesda, Md.
SILVER-Mireia Belmonte Garcia, Spain.
BRONZE-Rebecca Adlington, Britain.
200 Backstroke
GOLD-Missy Franklin, Centennial, Colo.
SILVER-Anastasia Zueva, Russia.
BRONZE-Elizabeth Beisel, Saunder-
stown, R.I.
TRAMPOLINE
Men
Individual
GOLD-Dong Dong, China.
SILVER--Dmitry Ushakov, Russia.
BRONZE-Lu Chunlong, China.
WEIGHTLIFTING
Men
85Kg
GOLD--Adrian Edward Zielinski, Poland.
SILVER--Apti Aukhadov, Russia.
BRONZE-Kianoush Rostami, Iran.
Women
75Kg
GOLD--Svetlana Podobedova, Kaza-
khstan.
SILVER--Natalya Zabolotnaya, Russia.
BRONZE--Iryna Kulesha, Belarus.


:Olympic BRIEFS:


Williams, Sharapova set to
meet in gold medal match
Serena Williams clinched her first
Olympic singles medal by beating No.
1-seeded Victoria Azarenka 6-1, 6-2.
Today, the No. 4-seeded Williams will
face first-time Olympian Maria Shara-
pova, who beat Russian teammate
Maria Kirilenko 6-2, 6-3.
Williams teamed with sister Venus to
win the gold in doubles in 2000 and
2008. They have a chance to clinch at
least a silver in the semifinals today.
Kessey, Ross advance to
beach volleyball quarters
Jennifer Kessy and April Ross of the
U.S. beat Switzerland's Simone Kuhn


and Nadine Zumkehr to advance to the
quarterfinals of the women's tournament.
American indoor volleyball
clinches top spot in pool
Destinee Hooker scored 19 points
and the U.S. women's team clinched
the top spot in its pool with a prelimi-
nary-round victory over Serbia in
straight sets.
Logan Tom added 12 points in the
25-17, 25-20, 25-16 sweep. The U.S.
will wrap up the preliminary round with
a match against Turkey on Sunday.
U.S. water polo squad
into the next round
Maggie Steffens scored three goals
and the U.S. women's team beat China


7-6 in its final preliminary-stage game.
The U.S. finished the preliminary
round even with Spain at the top
Group A with five points. But Spain
earned the top spot because of the
tiebreaker, and the Americans will play
2012 European champion Italy in Sun-
day's quarterfinals.
Whirlwind awaits Douglas,
gymnastics' newest queen
LONDON Too excited to sleep
and too early to wander the Olympic
village, Gabby Douglas messaged her
family and asked if they could have a
video chat.
When her mom turned on the
computer, there sat her daughter,
eyes wide, hands on her cheeks,


mouth agape.
"It reminded me of Macaulay Culkin
in 'Home Alone,"' said Natalie
Hawkins, Douglas' mother.
And this was before the 16-year-old
Olympic all-around champion got her
own cereal box cover, hobnobbed with
Matt, Al and others at NBC's "Today"
show, and had tweet-happy celebrities
eager to be her new BFFs.
"It's pretty exciting," Douglas said
Friday. "It really hasn't hit me yet."
Apparently not. She forgot to bring
her gold medal with her for the rounds
of meet and greet.
The Olympic all-around title is gym-
nastics' biggest prize, and it can turn a
sprite into an international superstar


overnight. The world is still on a first-
name basis with Nadia and Mary Lou,
and Gabby could wind up being bigger
than both of them.
Adults want to hug her, and little girls
shriek at the sight of her. Her smile
alone is enough to dazzle Madison Av-
enue, and her personality gives new
meaning to the word "outsized." Not
only is she the first African-American
gymnast to win the all-around title,
she's the first to win any individual gold
in gymnastics. Throw in her adorable
"Flying Squirrel" nickname, and the
back story of leaving home at 14 to
pursue an Olympic dream and, guar-
anteed, her life will never be the same.
-From wire reports


I






B4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012



Bridgestone Invite
Friday
At Firestone Country Club
(South Course), Akron, Ohio
Purse: $8.5 million
Yardage: 7,400, Par: 70
Second Round
Jim Furyk 63-66-129 -11
Rafael Cabrera Bello 66-65-131 -9
Louis Oosthuizen 67-65-132 -8
Jason Dufner 67-66-133 -7
K.T. Kim 67-67-134 -6
David Toms 68-67-135 -5
Luke Donald 66-69-135 -5
Lee Slattery 65-71-136 -4
JohnSenden 66-70-136 -4
Steve Stricker 68-68-136 -4
Keegan Bradley 67-69-136 -4
Simon Dyson 66-71 -137 -3
Rory Mcllroy 70-67-137 -3
Dustin Johnson 69-68-137 -3
GeoffOgilvy 67-70-137 -3
Graeme McDowell 70-67-137 -3
Carl Pettersson 67-70-137 -3
Sang-Moon Bae 72-66-138 -2
Bill Haas 67-71 -138 -2
Scott Piercy 69-70-139 -1
NickWatney 69-70-139 -1
Aaron Baddeley 73-66-139 -1
Retief Goosen 67-72-139 -1
Bubba Watson 66-73-139 -1
Justin Rose 70-69-139 -1
Sergio Garcia 67-72-139 -1
BoVanPelt 70-69-139 -1
Martin Laird 68-72-140 E
YE.Yang 69-71 -140 E
Martin Kaymer 68-72-140 E
Paul Lawrie 72-68 -140 E
Matt Kuchar 70-70 -140 E
Phil Mickelson 71-69-140 E
Lee Westwood 68-72 -140 E
Nicolas Colsaerts 73-68-141 +1
Thomas Bjorn 71-70-141 +1
Alvaro Quiros 70-71 -141 +1
Brandt Snedeker 71-70-141 +1
Jamie Donaldson 68-73-141 +1
Bernd Wiesberger 70-71--141 +1
Adam Scott 71-70-141 +1
Zach Johnson 68-73-141 +1
Ben Crane 66-75-141 +1
Kyle Stanley 69-73-142 +2
TigerWoods 70-72-142 +2
Branden Grace 72-70-142 +2
Marc Leishman 70-72-142 +2
Joost Luiten 72-71 -143 +3
lan Poulter 74-69-143 +3
Ryo Ishikawa 71-72-143 +3
MarkWilson 72-71 -143 +3
K.J.Choi 71-72-143 +3
Francesco Molinari 74-70-144 +4
FredrikJacobson 71-73-144 +4
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 71-73-144 +4
Toshinori Muto 73-71 -144 +4
Peter Hanson 73-71-144 +4
Ted Potter, Jr. 72-72-144 +4
CharlSchwartzel 69-75-144 +4
Jason Day 75-70- 145 +5
Johnson Wagner 71-74-145 +5
DannyWillett 72-74-146 +6
Hunter Mahan 73-73-146 +6
Jonathan Byrd 73-73-146 +6
GregChalmers 71-75-146 +6
Ernie Els 73-73-146 +6
Marcel Siem 76-71--147 +7
Yoshinori Fujimoto 73-74-147 +7
JeevMilkhaSingh 73-74-147 +7
Robert Rock 76-72-148 +8
Kevin Na 72-76-148 +8
OliverBekker 77-72-149 +9
ToruTaniguchi 72-78-150 +10
Rickie Fowler 70-80-150 +10
RobertAllenby 73-79-152 +12
Michael Hoey 78-75-153 +13
Tom Lewis 78-76-154 +14
Champions Tour
Friday
At TPC Twin Cities, Blaine, Minn.
Purse: $1.75 million
Yardage: 7,114, Par: 72
First Round
Chien SoonLu 31-34-65 -7
Steve Pate 32-33 -65 -7
Gil Morgan 32-33-65 -7
Peter Senior 33-32- 65 -7
Tom Jenkins 34-32-66 -6
Joel Edwards 34-32--66 -6
Mark McNulty 34-32-66 -6
Willie Wood 33-34-67 -5
Joe Daley 35-32-67 -5
David Frost 33-34 -67 -5
D.A.Weibring 35-32-67 -5
Bernhard Langer 33-34 -67 -5
Jeff Hart 33-34--67 -5
David Peoples 33-35-68 -4
Joey Sindelar 34-34 -68 -4
MarkO'Meara 35-33- 68 -4
Tom Lehman 33-35- 68 -4
Olin Browne 34-34 -68 -4
Eduardo Romero 36-32- 68 -4
John Jacobs 36-33 -69 -3
Craig Stadler 35-34 -69 -3
Dan Forsman 34-35- 69 -3
Kenny Perry 31-38 -69 -3
Fred Funk 36-33 -69 -3
Tom Kite 37-32 -69 -3
MarkWiebe 34-35-69 -3
Jeff Sluman 36-33 -69 -3
Blaine McCallister 35-35-70 -2
Jim Rutledge 35-35 -70 -2
Steve Lowery 35-35 -70 -2
Bobby Wadkins 34-36-70 -2
Tom Purtzer 34-36 -70 -2
Hal Sutton 34-36-70 -2
Ted Schulz 38-32 -70 -2
BruceVaughan 36-34 -70 -2
Mike Goodes 36-34--70 -2
Gary Hallberg 35-35--70 -2
PH. Horgan III 35-35-70 -2
Don Berry 36-34 70 -2
Chip Beck 38-33--71 -1
Andrew Magee 36-35--71 -1
Wayne Levi 37-34 71 -1
Loren Roberts 35-36 -71 -1
Mark Calcavecchia 37-34 -71 -1
Brad Bryant 37-34 -71 -1
Jay Haas 36-35--71 -1
Lance Ten Broeck 35-36--71 -1
John Huston 36-35-71 -1
Jim Thorpe 37-35 72 E
Scott Simpson 37-35 72 E
Kirk Hanefeld 37-35 72 E
Mark Brooks 37-35 72 E
David Eger 38-34 72 E
Sandy Lyle 36-36 72 E
Kirk Triplett 35-37 -72 E
Rod Spittle 35-37 -72 E
Larry Nelson 37-35 72 E
DaveTentis 37-35 -72 E
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 38-35- 73 +1
Tommy Armour Ill 37-36-73 +1
Dana Quigley 38-35- 73 +1
Larry Mize 36-37--73 +1
Bob Gilder 36-37--73 +1
Brad Faxon 39-34 -73 +1
Bob Niger 38-35--73 +1
Sonny Skinner 37-36- 73 +1


FuzzyZoeller 36-38-74 +2
Hale Irwin 40-34-74 +2
Jay Don Blake 37-37-74 +2
John Harris 38-36 -74 +2
Vicente Fernandez 40-35-75 +3
Mike McCullough 36-39-75 +3
Jim Carter 37-38--75 +3
Keith Fergus 35-40-75 +3
Jeff Freeman 37-38- 75 +3
Nick Price 35-41 -76 +4
Jay Sigel 38-39-77 +5
BobTway 39-38-77 +5
Bobby Clampett 42-36-78 +6
Graham Marsh 39-41 -80 +8



MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Trout, Los Angeles, .347; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .326; Konerko, Chicago, .323;
Mauer, Minnesota, .321; AJackson, Detroit,
.318; Jeter, NewYork, .316; Ortiz, Boston, .316.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 83; Kinsler,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr thev record


= lorida LOTTERY


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Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
S:* 5-4-9
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f -: -*:*- 7~r 7-5-9
PLAY 4 (early)
8-2-6-8
PLAY 4 (late)
3-3-1-7
FANTASY 5
1-10-14-26-34
MEGA MONEY
8-16-20-33
Flida Lottery MEGA BALL
9


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Pennsylvania 400 qualifying
2 p.m. (ABC) American Le Mans Series: Mid-Ohio
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: U.S. Cellular 250
qualifying
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: U.S. Cellular 250 race
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'ReillyAuto Parts Northwest
Nationals qualifying (Taped)
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals
7 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at
Chicago White Sox
BOWLING
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) PBA Summer Shootout (Taped)
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Golden Boy: Deontay Wilder vs.
Kertson Manswell
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) 2012 Pro Football Hall of Fame Induction
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational
Third Round
2 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: WGC Bridgestone Invitational -
Third Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Web.com Cox Classic Third
Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: 3M Championship -
Second Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Reno-Tahoe Open- Third
Round
2012 LONDON SUMMER OLYMPICS
7 a.m. (MSNBC) Soccer: men's quarterfinals; water polo:
men's qualifying; badminton; track and field
8:30 a.m. (CNBC) Boxing elimination bouts
9 a.m. (NBC) Track and field; tennis; beach volleyball;
volleyball; water polo; cycling; rowing
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) Basketball; triathlon; tennis; beach
volleyball; field hockey; equestrian; cycling
3:30 p.m. (CNBC) Boxing elimination bouts
8 p.m. (NBC) Swimming; track and field; beach volleyball;
diving (Same-day Tape)
12:30 a.m. (NBC) Track and field: finals; cycling: track
events. (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tennis; beach volleyball; weightlifting;
volleyball; cycling; badminton
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: Citi Open semifinal

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Texas, 77; Granderson, New York, 74; MiCabr-
era, Detroit, 70; AdJones, Baltimore, 69; Cano,
New York, 68; Choo, Cleveland, 67; De Aza,
Chicago, 67.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 88; Hamilton,
Texas, 88; Willingham, Minnesota, 79; Fielder,
Detroit, 77; ADunn, Chicago, 74; Pujols, Los An-
geles, 73; Encarnacion, Toronto, 72.
HITS-Jeter, NewYork, 138; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 137; Cano, New York, 129; AGordon,
Kansas City, 125; AdJones, Baltimore, 124; Ad-
Gonzalez, Boston, 123; Rios, Chicago, 123.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 37;
Choo, Cleveland, 32; Brantley, Cleveland, 30;
Cano, NewYork, 30; Kinsler, Texas, 30; AdGon-
zalez, Boston, 29; Pujols, Los Angeles, 29.
TRIPLES-JWeeks, Oakland, 6; 11 tied at 5.
HOME RUNS-ADunn, Chicago, 31;
Granderson, NewYork, 29; Hamilton, Texas, 29;
Encarnacion, Toronto, 28; Trumbo, Los Ange-
les, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 27.
PITCHING-Weaver, Los Angeles, 14-1; Price,
Tampa Bay, 14-4; MHarrison, Texas, 13-6; Sale,
Chicago, 12-3; Vargas, Seattle, 12-7; Sabathia,
NewYork, 11-3;Verlander, Detroit, 11-7; Darvish,
Texas, 11-7; PHughes, NewYork, 11-8.
STRIKEOUTS-FHernandez, Seattle, 153;
Verlander, Detroit, 152; Scherzer, Detroit, 151;
Shields, Tampa Bay, 145; Darvish, Texas, 145;
Price, Tampa Bay, 141; Peavy, Chicago, 134.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 32; JiJohnson,
Baltimore, 31; CPerez, Cleveland, 29; RSoriano,
NewYork, 26; Broxton, Kansas City 23; Aceves,
Boston, 22; Nathan, Texas, 21; Valverde, De-
troit, 21.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .373;
MeCabrera, San Francisco, .352; Votto, Cincin-
nati, .342; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .335; DWright,
New York, .333; CGonzalez, Colorado, .326;
Holliday, St. Louis, .322.
RUNS-Bourn, Atlanta, 72; Braun, Milwau-
kee, 72; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 72; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 71; Holliday St. Louis, 70;
JUpton, Arizona, 70; MeCabrera, San Fran-
cisco, 69.
RBI-Beltran, St. Louis, 76; Holliday, St.
Louis, 75; Braun, Milwaukee, 73; Kubel, Ari-
zona, 73; DWright, New York, 72; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 71; LaRoche, Washington, 67; Ar-
Ramirez, Milwaukee, 67.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 145; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 141; Bourn, Atlanta, 129;
DWright, New York, 126; CGonzalez, Colorado,
125; Holliday St. Louis, 125; Prado, Atlanta, 123.
DOUBLES-ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 36;
Votto, Cincinnati, 36; DanMurphy, NewYork, 32;
DWright, New York, 32; Cuddyer, Colorado, 30;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Alonso, San Diego,
28; Ethier, Los Angeles, 28; Prado, Atlanta, 28;
Ruiz, Philadelphia, 28.
TRIPLES-Fowler, Colorado, 10; MeCabr-
era, San Francisco, 9; Bourn, Atlanta, 8; SCas-
tro, Chicago, 8; Reyes, Miami, 8; Colvin,
Colorado, 7; DeJesus, Chicago, 7.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 29; Bel-
tran, St. Louis, 24; Kubel, Arizona, 23; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 22; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh,
21; Bruce, Cincinnati, 21; Holliday, St. Louis, 21;
LaRoche, Washington, 21.
PITCHING-Dickey New York, 14-2; Cueto,
Cincinnati, 14-5; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 13-3;
Lynn, St. Louis, 13-4; GGonzalez, Washington,
13-6; Hanson, Atlanta, 12-5; Miley Arizona, 12-6.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 154;
GGonzalez, Washington, 147; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 147; Dickey, New York, 147; Ker-


shaw, Los Angeles, 143; Lincecum, San Fran-
cisco, 136; MCain, San Francisco, 135.
SAVES-Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 31; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 31; Chapman, Cincinnati, 24; SCasilla,
San Francisco, 24; Motte, St. Louis, 23; Papel-
bon, Philadelphia, 23; Clippard, Washington, 22.


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled OF Eze-
quiel Carrera from Columbus (IL). Designated
OF Johnny Damon for assignment.
DETROIT TIGERS Reinstated OF Andy
Dirks from the 15-day DL. Designated OF Don
Kelly for assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Optioned RHP
Garrett Richards to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled
RHP David Carpenterfrom Salt Lake.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Selected the con-
tract of RHP Dan Straily from Sacramento (PCL).
Recalled C Derek Norris and OF Michael Taylor
from Sacramento. Acquired RHP Pat Neshek
from Baltimore for cash considerations and se-
lected his contract from Sacramento. Optioned
RHPJim Millerand RHP Evan Scribnerto Sacra-
mento. Placed OF Seth Smith on the 15-day DL.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled 2B Will
Rhymes from Durham (IL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Assigned LHP
Frank Gailey to Dunedin (FSL).
National League
CINCINNATI REDS Assigned RHP An-
drew Brackman outright to Bakersfield (Cal) and
3B Mike Costanzo outright to Louisville (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS-Placed RHP Fran-
cisco Cordero on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP
Mickey Storey from Oklahoma City (PCL).
MIAMI MARLINS-Optioned LHP Dan Jen-
nings to New Orleans (PCL). Recalled RHP
Chris Hatcher and LHP Brad Hand from New
Orleans.
NEW YORK METS-Activated RHP Frank
Francisco from the 15-day DL. Placed LHP Tim
Byrdak on the 15-day DL, retroactive to August 2.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES -Traded RHP
Joe Blanton to the L.A. Dodgers for a player to
be named or cash considerations. Recalled
RHP B.J. Rosenberg from Lehigh Valley (IL).
Sent LHP Raul Valdes to Lehigh Valley for a re-
habilitation assignment.
ST LOUIS CARDINALS-Placed 1B Lance
Berkman on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Shane
Robinson from Memphis (PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Selected RHP Cory
Burns from Tucson (PCL). Designated RHP Kip
Wells for assignment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Recalled
LHP John Lannan from Syracuse (IL). Traded C
David Freitas to Oakland for C Kurt Suzuki and
cash considerations. Designated C Carlos Mal-
donado for assignment.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DENVER BRONCOS -Waived WR D'An-
dre Goodwin.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed RB
Patrick DiMarco.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Waived WR
Chris Givens. Signed CB Cord Parks.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS Signed CB
Josh Victorian to a one-year contract. Placed
CB Terry Carter on the waived/injured list.
TENNESSEE TITANS Announced the re-
tirement of LB Keith Bulluck.


Associated Press
Jim Furyk tees off on the third hole during the second round of the Bridgestone Invitational
golf tournament Friday at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio.



Furyk's steady putting


Shortgame

helps golfer

keep lead

Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio Jim
Furyk and Tiger Woods
each carried momentum
into the second round of the
Bridgestone Invitational.
That meant the best 36-hole
score for Furyk in his PGA
Tour career, and the worst
start for Woods in nearly
fourth months.
Furyk had another good
day with the putter, mak-
ing a few birdies early and
saving par from the bunker
four times on the back
nine at Firestone for a 4-
under 66 and a two-shot
lead over Rafa Cabrera-
Bello of Spain.
It helped that Furyk
opened with a 63 on Thurs-
day afternoon, allowing him
to turn around Friday morn-
ing and try to resume his
good play That's what he
did, starting with a tricky
birdie putt on the second
hole and following his lone
bogey with a 20-foot birdie
on the ninth.
He was at 11-under 129,
two shots clear of Cabrera-
Bello, who had a 65. Louis
Oosthuizen used his putter
from just off the ninth
green to finish with a
birdie and a 65, leaving him
three shots behind going
into the weekend of this
World Golf Championship.
Jason Dufner had a 66 in
the afternoon and was four
shots behind.
Woods, a seven-time win-
ner at Firestone, can't seem
to get anything going.
He threw away three
shots on the back nine
Thursday, the last one a



FAST
Continued from Page B1

Franklin, who also has a
bronze in her first Olympics
and one more race to go in
the 4x100 medley relay
Ledecky seemingly came
out of nowhere to claim a
spot on the U.S. team, and
she nearly took out a world
record in her first Olympics.
She was ahead of Adling-
ton's record pace (8:14.10)



NICKS
Continued from Pag B1

the Bucs to move Jeremy
Zuttah from left guard to
center another move
coach Greg Schiano thinks
will make the line stronger
The Bucs ranked 30th in
rushing in 2011, averaging
91.1 yards en route to a 4-12
record that included 10 con-
secutive losses to end the
season. They were middle of
the pack 16th in pass-
ing, but a porous defense
and the lack of a consistent
running game made Free-
man's job much more diffi-
cult.
Nicks is confident that
will change with the addi-
tion of wide receiver Vin-
cent Jackson, tight end
Dallas Clark, rookie run-
ning back Doug Martin and
himself to an offense also
featuring promising young
players such as running
back LeGarrette Blount and
receivers Mike Williams
and Arrelious Benn.
"I'm kind of looked at as


three-putt on the 18th hole
for a 70. He started his sec-
ond round by driving into a
bunker and making a bogey
on the 10th hole, and it
never got much better. For
the second straight day, he
had to lay up with his third
shot on the par-5 16th. And
the low point of his putting
woes came on No. 7, when
he stuffed his tee shot in-
side 5 feet and three-putted
for bogey
Woods had a 72 and was at
2-over 142, leaving him 13
shots behind on the course
where he had never fin-
ished worse than fifth the
first 11 times he played. It
was his highest 36-hole
score to par since his 3-over
145 start at the Masters.
Reno-Tahoe Open
RENO, Nev.-Alexandre
Rocha had seven birdies and an
eagle to take the second-round
lead in the Reno-Tahoe Open.
The 34-year-old Brazilian
had 24 points in the modified
Stableford scoring system that
gives players eight points for
double eagle, five for eagle,
two for birdie, zero for par,
minus-one for bogey and
minus-three for double bogey
or worse.
Winless on the PGA Tour,
Rocha opened birdie-birdie-
birdie-eagle on Nos. 10-14 and
overcame three bogeys.
J.J. Henry had his second
eagle of the tourney, and John
Mallinger had six birdies to
move into a tie for second
at 22.
First-round leader Andres
Romero of Argentina and Arjun
Atwal of India had 21 points,
and 2010 Reno-Tahoe winner
Matt Bettencourt followed with
20. John Daly was seventh
with 19. He birdied six of his
last 10 holes.
3M Championship
BLAINE, Minn. Sixty-five-


from the Beijing Olympics
until right at the end, finally
tiring just a bit for a time of
8:14.63.
Not to worry The
teenager still has plenty of
time to go faster Mireia Bel-
monte Garcia of Spain was
far behind for silver in
8:18.76, while Adlington
held on to take bronze at
8:20.32. She burst into tears
on the medal stand as the
crowd of 17,000 chanted
"Becky! Becky! Becky!"
There was no catching


the veteran, and this is
barely my fifth year. It's kind
of a different role for me,"
Nicks said.
"We're a young team
that's got a lot of talent that's
got to come together. Our at-
tention to detail has got to
be second to none, and our
game preparation has to be
the best," he said. "If you
can protect the quarterback
and run the ball, why should
you lose. If they score 70,
you've just got to score 71. I
put it on my back, the whole
offensive line does."
Teammates say Nicks not
only brings championship
experience to a team that
hasn't won a playoff game
since the Super Bowl fol-
lowing the 2002 season, but
an element of nastiness.
"It's just going to make
our line solid from left to
right," Joseph said, adding
that Nicks also is leading by
example with his work
ethic.
"We had a very good line
last year, but his level of
play is, of course, All-Pro
status. He's going to make
Donald Penn a lot better, he


year-old Gil Morgan shot his
age for a share of the first-
round lead in the Champions
Tour's 3M Championship.
Chien Soon Lu, Steve Pate
and Peter Senior also shot 7-
under 65 at the TPC Twin Cities.
Joel Edwards, Tom Jenkins
and Mark McNulty were a
stroke back. Past event cham-
pions David Frost, Bernhard
Langer and D.A. Weibring were
at 67 along with Joe Daley, Jeff
Hart and Willie Wood.
On an ideal sunny day with a
slight breeze, Morgan had
seven birdies in his bogey-free
round. He won the last of his 25
Champions Tour titles in 2007
at Pebble Beach.
Tom Lehman, the former Uni-
versity of Minnesota player who
teamed with Arnold Palmer to
design the TPC Twin Cities,
had a 68. Lehman grew up in
Alexandria, Minn.
Defending champion Jay
Haas opened with a 71.
Junior PGA Champ.
FORT WAYNE, Ind. -
Thailand's Ariya Jutanugarn
successfully defended her title
in the Junior PGA Champi-
onship, and Robby Shelton of
Wilmer, Ala., won the boys'
division.
The 16-year-old Jutanugarn,
a 10-stroke winner last year,
birdied the last four holes at
Sycamore Hills for a 5-under
67 and 14-under 274 total,
three strokes better than 15-
year-old Samantha Wagner of
Windermere, Fla.
Wagner finished with a 70.
The 16-year-old Shelton
closed with a 70 to finish at 13
under. He had a course-record
64 on Thursday.
Cameron Champ of Sacra-
mento, Calif., shot a 72 to finish
second, three strokes back.
The top two players in each
division earned spots on the
U.S. Junior Ryder Cup team.


Ledecky
"Michael's and Missy's
races really got me
pumped," the youngster
said. "I really wanted to see
what I could do to represent
the U.S."
Ledecky settled for crush-
ing a hallowed American
record, Janet Evans' mark of
8:16.22 set in Tokyo on Aug.
20,1989 nearly eight years
before Ledecky was born.
"I figured I was going
pretty fast," the teenager
said.


going to make Jeremy Zut-
tah a lot better, he's going to
make me a lot better," added
Joseph, a Pro Bowl selec-
tion in 2008 and 2011. "A guy
of that status coming in
here, working as hard as he
has is really encouraging to
see. He's not really going off
of his past, he's working to
be a better player."
Nicks smiles when asked
about the importance of the
offensive line jelling into a
physical, dominating unit
With Brees leading the
way, the Saints were a pass-
oriented team. He's looking
forward to doing more run-
blocking as Tampa Bay tries
to take some of the pressure
off Freeman with a strong
rushing attack.
"The first thing is it gets
the defensive line tired. We
wear them down and that
help your pass protection,"
"Nicks said. "Another thing
is knocking a guy down and
watching him get up, seeing
the tiredness and hurt in his
eyes. You thrive off that.... If
I could maul somebody on
every play, that's what I'd
do."


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL

Rays 2, Orioles 0


Baltimore


Tampa Bay


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Markks rf 5 0 1 0 DJnngs If 4 1 1 1
Hardyss 4 0 0 0 BUptoncf 4 1 1 1
AdJonscf 4 02 0 Joycerf 3 0 1 0
Wietersc 4 0 2 0 Zobrist2b 3 0 2 0
C.Davisdh 2 0 1 0 C.Penalb 3 0 0 0
MrRynllb 4 00 0 Kppngrdh 2 0 1 0
Ford If 3 00 0 Fuldph-dh 1 0 0 0
Betemt3b 1 00 0 RRorts3b 3 0 0 0
Quntnll2b 3 0 1 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 0
Andino3b-lf4 01 0 EJhnsnss 3 0 0 0
Totals 34 08 0 Totals 29 2 6 2
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 000 101 00x 2
DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Baltimore 10, Tampa
Bay 4. HR-De.Jennings (8), B.Upton (10).
CS-Quintanilla (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Tom.HunterL,4-7 52-36 2 2 1 3
O'Day 2 0 0 0 0 2
Patton 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Tampa Bay
M.MooreW,8-7 51-36 0 0 3 6
McGeeH,12 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Farnsworth H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta H,25 1 2 0 0 0 3
RodneyS,32-33 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-M.Moore.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Alfonso
Marquez; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Brian
O'Nora.
T-2:44. A-18,410 (34,078).

Yankees 6, Mariners 3
Seattle NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ackley2b 4 1 1 2 Grndrscf 3 1 1 2
C.Wellscf 4 1 1 1 Jeterss 3 0 1 0
Seager3b 4 00 0 Cano 2b 4 02 1
JMontrdh 4 0 0 0 Teixeirlb 4 0 1 0
Carplb 3 0 0 0 Ibanezdh 4 1 1 1
Olivo c 3 0 1 0 Swisherrf 3 0 1 0
Thamsrf 3 00 0 ErChvz3b 4 1 2 2
TRonsnIf 3 0 0 0 J.Nix3b 0 0 0 0
Ryanss 2 1 0 0 ISuzuki If 4 1 1 0
RMartn c 4 2 2 0
Totals 30 3 3 3 Totals 33612 6
Seattle 000 100 002 3
NewYork 002 002 20x 6
DP-Seattle 2. LOB-Seattle 1, New York 6.
2B-Olivo (9), Jeter (21), Cano (30), R.Martin
(12). HR-Ackley (8), C.Wells (7), Er.Chavez
(10). SB-R.Martin (3). SJeter.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
Millwood L,4-9
C.Capps
O.Perez
Pryor
New York
Sabathia W,11-3


6 9 4
1-3 1 2
2-3 2 0
1 0 0


9 3 3 3 1 10


Tigers 10, Indians 2
Cleveland Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Kipnis2b 5 02 1 AJcksncf 3 1 0
AsCarrss 4 01 0 Berry If 5 2 2 1
Lillirdgss 0 0 0 0 MiCarr3b 5 2 3 1
Choo rf 4 01 1 JhPerltss 0 00 0
CSantnc 3 00 0 Fielder b 4 2 3 4
Brantlycf 3 0 1 0 Boeschdh 5 1 2 0
Rottinolf 1 0 0 0 Dirksrf 4 1 2 1
JoLopz dh 4 0 1 0 Avila c 5 0 2 2
Ktchmlb 4 01 0 RSantgss-2b3 1 0 0
Hannhn3b 3 1 0 0 Infante2b-3b 3 0 1 1
Carrer If-cf 4 1 2 0
Totals 35 29 2 Totals 37101610
Cleveland 001 000 100 2
Detroit 012 403 00x 10
E-As.Cabrera (13), Dirks (1). DP-Cleveland
1, Detroit 1. LOB-Cleveland 8, Detroit 10.2B-
Kipnis (14), Berry (6), Fielder (23), Avila (15).
3B-Infante (2). HR-Fielder (18). SF-Infante.
IP H RERBBSO


Cleveland
Masterson L,7-10
Accardo
C.Allen
Detroit
A.SanchezW,1-1
D.Downs
Villarreal


4 10 7 7 4 4
2 6 3 3 1 0
2 0 0 0 1 3

6 8 2 1 2 5
2 1 0 0 0 3
1 0 0 0 0 2
100002


Rangers 5, Royals 3
Texas Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler2b 3 1 1 0 AGordn If 5 0 1 0
Andrusss 3 01 0 AEscorss 5 0 1 1
Hamltn cf-lf 4 01 0 L.Cain cf 4 01 0
Beltre3b 3 1 1 0 Butlerdh 3 0 1 0
N.Cruzrf 3 00 1 S.Perezc 4 1 3 0
MiYongdh 4 1 1 0 Francrrf 3 1 0 0
DvMrplf 4 01 1 Hosmerb 3 0 1 0
Gentrycf 0 00 0 YBtncr3b 4 01 1
Sotoc 3 1 0 0 Getz2b 4 1 1 0
Morlndlb 3 1 1 3
Totals 30 57 5 Totals 35310 2
Texas 100 100 300 5
Kansas City 010 000 110 3
DP-Texas 2, Kansas City 2. LOB-Texas 3,
Kansas City 9. 2B-Y.Betancourt (14). HR-
Moreland (11). SB-Francoeur (2). CS-
DavMurphy (2). SF-N.Cruz.


Texas
M.Harrison W, 3-6
Scheppers H,2
Mi.Adams H,18
Ogando S,2-5
Kansas City
Guthrie L,0-3
Mijares
L.Coleman
Jeffress


IP H RERBBSO


62-38 2
1-3 0 0
1 2 1
1 0 0

6 6 3
1-3 1 2
12-30 0
1 0 0


Phillies trade RHP
Blanton to Dodgers
PHILADELPHIA- Joe Blan-
ton earned a World Series ring
the last time he was traded.
He's hoping for an encore.
The right-hander was sent
from the Philadelphia Phillies to
the Dodgers on Friday after Los
Angeles claimed him on
waivers.
Blanton will join outfielder
Shane Victorino, who was
traded from Philadelphia to Los
Angeles on Tuesday. The last-
place Phillies also dealt out-
fielder Hunter Pence to San
Francisco earlier this week.
"It was a little bit of a shock,
especially since the trade
deadline had passed," Blanton
said. "But when you're in trade
rumors, you've got to be ready
to do whatever. And I was
happy if I stayed. At the same
time, it will be a new thing, a
new adventure to go. And
that's always fun."
The 31-year-old Blanton is 8-
9 with a 4.59 ERA in 20 starts
and one relief appearance. He
is making $8.5 million and, like
Victorino, can become a free
agent after the season.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 62
Tampa Bay 56
Baltimore 55
Boston 53
Toronto 51


Wash.
Atlanta
NewYork
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43.590 5-5
50 .528 6/2 1 7-3
51 .519 7/2 2 4-6
53 .500 9/2 4 5-5
54 .486 11 5/2 3-7



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43 .594 - 6-4
45 .575 2 9-1
54 .491 11 8'2 5-5
58 .458 14/212 4-6
59 .443 16 13/2 5-5


Home Away
33-21 29-22 Chicago
29-25 27-25 Detroit
25-26 30-25 Cleveland
27-30 26-23 Minnesota
28-23 23-31 Kan. City


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
47.548 7-3
50 .528 2 1 4-6
56 .472 8 7 2-8
60 .429 12Y211Y2 5-5
61 .419 13/212/2 4-6


Home Away
27-22 30-25
29-21 27-29
27-25 23-31
23-32 22-28
20-31 24-30


Texas
Oakland
L. Angeles
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-1 30-22 33-21
W-231-25 30-20
W-226-26 26-28
W-1 27-27 22-31
L-2 21-30 26-29


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
41 .613 - 9-1
45 .571 4Y2 6-4
49 .533 8/2 4 6-4
56 .462 16 11/2 4-6
60 .417 20/216 5-5
72 .327 30/226 1-9


Str Home Away
W-4 35-19 30-22
L-1 33-16 27-29
L-1 29-21 27-28
W-3 30-26 18-30
L-2 27-24 16-36
L-4 25-27 10-45


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
43 .590 - 5-5
48 .543 5 6-4
49 .538 5/2 5-5
58 .463 13/28 8-2




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
49 .533 - 3-7
50 .528 '2 4/2 4-6
51 .519 1/2 5/2 7-3
63 .411 13 17 3-7
65 .369 17 21 2-8


Home Away
34-21 28-22
31-23 26-25
30-22 27-27
25-29 25-29


Str Home Away
L-2 32-23 24-26
L-3 29-23 27-27
W-4 30-24 25-27
L-3 22-29 22-34
W-1 21-34 17-31


\' '." '.- _- = Ja w .ii;;T; ^ .... gr ,..-: i -'i :" =:".j; = "--=* *._ ^ '* -- 1 I
Associated Press
Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla throws across his body after fielding a ball hit by the Houston Astros' Ben
Francisco in the sixth inning Friday in Atlanta. Uggla's throw was off-target and Francisco was awarded second base.




Braves tough to beat at home


Atlanta now 7-1 on


current homestand

Associated Press

ATLANTA- Tim Hudson gave up
only four hits and no earned runs in
7 1-3 innings to remain unbeaten in
his career against Houston, and the
Braves stayed hot with a 4-1 win Fri-
day night that left the Astros with
their worst 32-game stretch in fran-
chise history
The Astros are 3-29 in their last 32
games. Houston's worst 32-game
stretch before the 2012 season was 5-
27, most recently from June 26 to July
29, 1962 as the Colt.45s, according to
STATS LLC.
The Braves improved to 7-1 on
their 10-game homestand.
Hudson (11-4) improved to 5-0 in
seven career starts against the As-
tros. He allowed one unearned run,
four hits and two walks and has won
five straight decisions.
Chipper Jones had a two-run dou-
ble in Atlanta's three-run third in-
ning. Martin Prado had two doubles,
including a run-scoring hit in the
fourth.
Craig Kimbrel struck out the side
in the ninth to earn his 31st save.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Nationals 7, Marlins 4,
first game
Marlins 5, Nationals 2,
second game
WASHINGTON Josh Johnson out-
pitched Gio Gonzalez for another win
over Washington, and the Miami Marlins
beat the Nationals 5-2 Friday night to split
their doubleheader.
In the first game, Adam LaRoche and
Mark DeRosa each drove in three runs,
leading John Lannan and the Nationals to
a 7-4 win.
Johnson (7-7) improved to 9-1 lifetime
against Washington. He fell one out short
of his first complete game since Apr. 26,
2010.
Johnson gave up one earned run and
five hits. He struck out nine and walked
none, and also got two hits.

Diamondbacks 4, Phillies 2
PHILADELPHIA- Justin Upton hit his
100th career homer, lan Kennedy threw
six effective innings, and the streaking
Arizona Diamondbacks beat the Philadel-
phia Phillies 4-2.
Jason Kubel also went deep for the de-
fending NL West champion Diamond-
backs, who have won four in a row and
six of seven. Arizona entered just two
games behind division-leading San
Francisco.
Kennedy (10-8) allowed seven hits and
two runs.
Takashi Saito and David Hernandez
each worked a scoreless inning before
J.J. Putz finished for his 20th save in 23
tries.

Reds 3, Pirates 0
CINCINNATI Mat Latos pitched
shutout ball into the eighth inning and hit
a two-run homer as the NL Central-lead-
ing Cincinnati Reds opened a three-game


series against their closest pursuers with
a 3-0 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
Chris Heisey hustled for an inside-the-
park home run and Aroldis Chapman
closed out the win that gave the Reds a
4%-game lead over the Pirates.
The Reds have won 14 of 15 and
moved 24 games over .500 for the first
time since 1999.
Latos (10-3) allowed four hits in 7 1-3
innings. Jonathan Broxton got a key dou-
ble play to end the eighth and Chapman
recorded his 24th save.
Zack Cozart added three hits for the
Reds.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 6, Mariners 3
NEW YORK CC Sabathia pitched a
three-hitter and struck out 10 strikeouts,
dominating the Mariners as usual while
leading the New York Yankees to a 6-3
victory Friday night that stopped Seattle's
seven-game winning streak.
Eric Chavez hit a two-run homer and
Curtis Granderson had a two-run single
off Kevin Millwood, sending the AL East
leaders to their second consecutive win
following a 3-9 slide.
Sabathia (11-3) rebounded from a
rocky start against Boston with another
overpowering performance against his
favorite foe. Pitching in the sort of thick
humidity that he's always enjoyed, the
big lefty improved to 8-0 with a 1.20 ERA
in his past eight starts against the
Mariners.

Tigers 10, Indians 2
DETROIT Prince Fielder homered
and drove in four runs, helping Anibal
Sanchez win for the first time with the
Tigers in Detroit's 10-2 rout of the Cleve-
land Indians on Friday night.
Fielder also hit a two-run double.
Sanchez (1-1) allowed one earned run in
six-plus innings. The right-hander was
acquired in a July 23 trade with the
Miami Marlins.
The Indians, who designated outfielder
Johnny Damon for assignment before
the game, lost their seventh straight.
Justin Masterson (7-10) allowed seven
runs and 10 hits in four innings. He
walked four and struck out four.
Fielder and Miguel Cabrera had three
hits each for Detroit.

Rangers 5, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Matt Harrison
gave the beleaguered Texas pitching
staff a strong start, Mitch Moreland hit a
three-run homer and the Rangers de-
feated the Kansas City Royals 5-3.
The Rangers starters had allowed at
least six runs in the previous four games,
but Harrison (13-6) held the Royals to
two runs and eight hits in 6 2-3 innings.
Harrison, who went 1-3 in July, walked
three and struck out three, departing
after 109 pitches.
Moreland's home run in the seventh
inning came off Royals lefty relief spe-
cialist Jose Mijares, who had not yielded
a home run to a left-handed hitter this
season. Moreland hit an 0-2 pitch out to
right with Michael Young and Geovany
Soto aboard.
Jeremy Guthrie (3-11) held the
Rangers to three runs and six hits over
six-plus innings.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Minnesota 5, Boston 0
Texas 15, L.A. Angels 9
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 6, 11 innings
Oakland 4, Toronto 1
Friday's Games
Detroit 10, Cleveland 2
N.Y. Yankees 6, Seattle 3
Tampa Bay 2, Baltimore 0
Texas 5, Kansas City 3
Minnesota at Boston, late
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, late
Toronto at Oakland, late
Saturday's Games
Seattle (F.Hernandez 9-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 10-
7), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 8-8) at Oakland (Griffin 3-0), 4:05
p.m.
Texas (Feldman 5-6) at Kansas City (W.Smith 2-3), 6:10
p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 8-10) at Detroit (Fister 5-7), 7:05
p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 9-6) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 6-6),
7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 5-10) at Chicago White Sox
(Floyd 8-9), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (De Vries 2-2) at Boston (Buchholz 9-3), 7:10
p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cleveland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Texas at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Cincinnati 9, San Diego 4
N.Y Mets 9, San Francisco 1
Washington 3, Philadelphia 0
Atlanta 6, Miami 1
Colorado 8, St. Louis 2
Friday's Games
Washington 7, Miami 4, 1st game
Arizona 4, Philadelphia 2
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 0
Atlanta 4, Houston 1
Miami 5, Washington 2, 2nd game
Milwaukee at St. Louis, late
San Francisco at Colorado, late
N.Y Mets at San Diego, late
Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, late
Saturday's Games
Arizona (J.Saunders 5-7) at Philadelphia (Halladay 4-
6), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (Buehrle 9-10) at Washington (Zimmermann 8-
6), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 8-7) at Atlanta (Maholm 9-6), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 10-5) at Cincinnati (Leake 4-
7), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (M.Rogers 0-0) at St. Louis (Wainwright 8-
10), 7:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-6) at Colorado (Francis
3-3), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Hefner 1-4) at San Diego (Volquez 7-7), 8:35
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Volstad 0-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
8-6), 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Houston at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


NL


D-backs 4, Phillies 2
Arizona Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Drew ss 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0
A.Hill2b 4 1 1 0 Schrhltrf 3 01 1
Kubellf 4 1 1 1 Utley2b 3 1 1 1
Gldschlb 3 00 1 Howard1b 4 00 0
J.Uptonrf 4 2 2 1 Mayrrycf 4 02 0
MMntrc 4 0 1 0 DBrwn If 4 01 0
CJhnsn3b 3 0 1 1 Frndsn3b 3 1 1 0
CYoung cf 3 0 0 0 Schndrc 1 00 0
IKnndyp 1 00 0 Wggntnph 1 00 0
Saitop 0 0 0 0 Kndrckp 1 0 1 0
JMcDnlph 1 00 0 Horstp 0 00 0
DHrndzp 0 00 0 Mrtnzph 0 00 0
Putzp 0 00 0 Rosnrgp 0 00 0
Pierre ph 00 0
Bastrdp 0 00 0
Lindlmp 0 00 0
L.Nixph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 46 4 Totals 28 2 7 2
Arizona 010 200 001 4
Philadelphia 000 110 000 2
E-Rollins (8). DP-Arizona 2, Philadelphia 1.
LOB-Arizona 2, Philadelphia 7. 2B-A.Hill
(25), Mayberry (15). HR-Kubel (23), J.Upton
(9), Utley (6). S-M.Martinez, Pierre. SF-Gold-
schmidt, Schierholtz.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
I.KennedyW,10-8 6 7 2 2 2 1
Saito H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0
D.HernandezH,15 1 0 0 0 1 1
PutzS,20-23 1 0 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia
K.KendrickL,4-9 4 5 3 2 0 2
Horst 1 0 0 0 1 1
Rosenberg 2 0 0 0 0 3
Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lindblom 1 1 1 1 0 1

Nationals 7, Marlins 4,
first game
Miami Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bonifac2b 4 1 0 1 Espinosss 4 1 1 0
DSolanlf-3b5 0 1 0 Lmrdzz2b 5 0 1 0
Reyesss 5 02 0 Zmrmn3b 3 22 0
Ca.Leelb 3 0 1 0 Werthcf-rf 2 21 0
Kearnsrf 2 1 0 0 LaRochlb 4 23 3
DMrph3b 3 0 1 0 TMoore If 4 01 1
Rugginpr-lf 1 1 0 0 DeRosarf 3 01 3
GHrndz cf 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 00 0
Webbp 0 00 0 McGnzlp 0 00 0
Petersn ph-cfl 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Hayes c 3 1 2 1 Floresc 4 00 0
Handp 1 00 0 Lannanp 3 00 0
Cousinscf 2 00 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Hatchrp 0 0 0 0 Berndnph-cf 1 0 0 0
Dobbsph 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 48 2 Totals 33710 7
Miami 100 000 201 4
Washington 301 300 00x 7
DP-Miami 1, Washington 3. LOB-Miami 8,
Washington 11.2B-Reyes (24), Do.Murphy (3),
Hayes (6), Espinosa (27), Zimmerman 2 (24),
LaRoche (23). HR-LaRoche (21). SB-G.Her-
nandez (3), Espinosa (17), Zimmerman (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Hand L,0-1 32-36 7 7 6 3
Webb 21-33 0 0 1 1
Hatcher 2 1 0 0 2 0
Washington
LannanW,2-0 6 4 3 3 5 4
Mattheus 1 1 0 0 0 0
Storen 2-3 1 0 0 2 1
Mic.Gonzalez H,4 1-3 2 1 1 0 1
Clippard S,22-25 1 0 0 0 0 0

Marlins 5, Nationals 2,
second game
Miami Washington
ab rh bi ab r hbi


Bonifac2b 5 0 1 1
Cousins If 0 0 0 0
DSolan3b 4 1 1 0
Reyesss 5 23 0
Ca.Leelb 4 0 1 3
Dobbs If-3b 4 0 2 1
Kearns rf 3 0 0 0
Petersnrf 1 00 0
GHrndzcf 3 1 0 0
J.Buckc 4 0 1 0
JJhnsnp 4 1 2 0
Cishekp 0 0 00
Totals 37 5115
Miami 000


Lmrdzz 2b
Harper rf
Zmrmn 3b
LaRoch lb
Morse If
Espinos ss
Berndn cf
Leonc
GGnzlz p
Tracy ph
Stmmn p

Totals
003 011


Washington 100 000 001 2
E-Reyes (13), Bonifacio (4). DP-Washington
1. LOB-Miami 7, Washington 4. 2B-Reyes
(25), J.Buck (10), Morse (11). 3B-Lombardozzi
(2). SB-Bonifacio (30). SF-Zimmerman.
IP H RERBBSO


Miami
Jo.Johnson W,7-7
Cishek S,6-9
Washington
G.Gonzalez L,13-6
Stammen


82-35 2 1 0 9
1-3 0 0 0 0 1

8 9 4 4 0 10
1 2 1 1 2 0


Reds 3, Pirates 0
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
SMartelf 4 0 0 0 Cozartss 4 03 0
Sniderrf 3 00 0 Stubbscf 4 01 0
AMcCtcf 3 0 1 0 Ludwcklf 4 00 0
GJoneslb 4 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Walker2b 2 0 0 0 Rolen3b 3 00 0
PAlvrz3b 3 0 1 0 Frazierlb 3 0 0 0
Barajs c 2 0 0 0 Heisey rf-lf 3 1 1 1
Mercerss 0 0 0 0 Cairo2b 3 00 0
Barmes ss 2 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 1 1 0
McKnrph-c 1 0 1 0 Latosp 3 1 1 2
WRdrgp 2 0 1 0 Broxtnp 0 00 0
GSnchzph 1 0 0 0 Bruce rf 0 00 0
Quallsp 0 000
Totals 27 04 0 Totals 303 7 3
Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0
Cincinnati 010 020 00x 3
DP-Pittsburgh 1, Cincinnati 3. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 4, Cincinnati 3. HR-Heisey (4), Latos
(1). SB-Snider (1). CS-A.McCutchen (8).
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
W.Rodriguez L,7-10
Quails
Cincinnati
Latos W,10-3
Broxton H,2
Chapman S,24-28


7 7 3 3 0 4
773304
100001

71-34 0 0 3 5
2-30 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 2


Braves 4, Astros 1


Houston Atlanta
ab r h bi


Altuve2b 4 0 1 0
MGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0
BFrncsrf 3 1 1 0
Wallaclb 2 00 0
JDMrtnlf 4 0 1 1
SMoore3b 3 0 0 0
Wrghtp 0 00 0
Storey p 0 00 0
R.Cruzp 0 00 0
Bogsvcph 1 00 0
Corprnc 4 00 0
Schafercf 4 0 1 0
Galrrgp 2 0 0 0
MDwns3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 14 1
Houston 000
Atlanta 003


Bourn cf
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
FFrmn lb
McCnn c
Uggla 2b
Janish ss
THudsn p
OFlhrt p
Hinske ph
Pstrnck pr
Kimrel p

Totals
001 000
100 OOx


ab rh bi


E-Uggla (10). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Houston
7, Atlanta 10.2B-Prado 2 (28), C.Jones (17),
Uggla (19), Hinske (6). SB-Bourn (29).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Galarraga L,0-1 51-35 4 4 7 4
W.Wright 11-30 0 0 1 1
Storey 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Cruz 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
THudsonW,11-4 71-34 1 0 2 3
O'FlahertyH,19 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
KimbrelS,31-33 1 0 0 0 0 3


BASEBALL


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Stevie Wonder
files for divorce
LOS ANGELES Ste-
vie Wonder is ending his
11-year marriage to fash-
ion de-
signer Kai
Millard
Morris.
The 62-
year-old
musician
cites ir-
reconcil-
Stevie able
Wonder differ-
ences in
papers filed Friday in
Los Angeles Superior
Court. He filed the docu-
ments under his real
name, Stevland Morris.
Wonder and Millard
were married Sept 1,
2001. According to court
documents, they sepa-
rated in October 2009.
They have two sons, 10-
year-old Kailand and 7-
year-old Mandla. Wonder
is seeking joint legal and
physical custody of the
two boys and agrees to
pay spousal support to
his former wife.

Mix of musicians
at RNC parties
TAMPA-An eclectic
mix of musicians will
play to crowds at private
parties
during
the Re-
publican
Y National
Conven-
tion in
Tampa.
The
Willie Tampa
Nelson Bay
Times re-
ported singer Willie Nel-
son and fellow country
singer Jerry Jeff Walker
will be part of a benefit
show for Got Your 6, a
nonpartisan organization
that wants to "bridge the
civilian-military divide."
Journey's VIP-only
show Aug. 30 is expected
to cap a week of enter-
tainment
at Liberty
Plaza, a
swank
party
zone pro-
posed
near the
conven-
Trace tion site.
Adkins Booked
earlier
that week at the plaza are
Lynyrd Skynyrd, Trace
Adkins and Kid Rock
Several musical acts are
also expected during the
convention kickoff party
at Tropicana Field in St
Petersburg. The RNC will
take place Aug. 27 to 30.

Free Wi-Fi now at
Magic Kingdom
ORLANDO Guests at
Disney's Magic Kingdom
are getting a pleasant
surprise with their ticket
- free Wi-Fi.
The Orlando Sentinelre-
ported Friday that Disney
quietly implemented the
free service Wednesday.
The newspaper reports
guests have free access to
Wi-Fi once they agree to
Disney's terms of service.
The Sentinel reported
Disney plans to start pro-
viding free Wi-Fi at its
other Orlando theme
parks next year.
This year, Disney
began offering free Wi-Fi
at its Orlando resorts.
-From wire reports


Larger than life


Associated Press
The curious gather July 15, 2011, around Seward Johnson's 26-foot-tall sculpture of Marilyn Monroe, in her most
famous wind-blown pose, on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. After causing some controversy in Chicago, the statue
now resides in Palm Springs, Calif. Monroe passed away a half-century ago this week, a murky death that remains
one of Hollywood's most tantalizing mysteries. But look around: Her legend lives on, more vibrantly than ever. In
a twist she surely would have appreciated, this 1950s bombshell has become a 21st-century pop culture phenom.

50years on, Marilyn Monroe's starpower shines bright


Associated Press

NEW YORK Only 11 years
after her death, Elton John sang his
ode to Marilyn Monroe. "And I
would have liked to have known
you, but I was just a kid," went the
lyrics. "Your candle burned out long
before your legend ever did."
What John didn't know was how
much truer his words would ring a
few decades later
Monroe passed away a half-cen-
tury ago this Sunday, a murky death
that remains one of Hollywood's
most tantalizing mysteries. But look
around: Her legend lives on, more
vibrantly than ever. In a develop-
ment this fiercely ambitious actress
surely would have appreciated, the
1950's bombshell has become a 21st-
century pop culture phenomenon.
Just flip through a celebrity mag-
azine: Some of-the-moment young
starlet or pop singer will be chan-
neling (or outright appropriating)
those platinum locks, the bright red
lips, moist and slightly parted, and
that joyously, almost defiantly curvy
figure, sheathed in something skin-
tight and glamorous.
Was that Marilyn on the red car-
pet at last year's Teen Choice
Awards? No, it was Taylor Swift,
wearing a white halter-style dress
just like Marilyn's in "The Seven
Year Itch," in which the actress
stood atop a subway grate and let
the breeze of a passing train lift her
skirts. (Oh, and that dress? It sold at
auction last year for a mind-bog-
gling $5.6 million, including com-
mission.)
And there was Charlize Theron in
a Dior ad last year, meeting up with
the real Marilyn, not to mention
Marlene Dietrich and Grace Kelly,
via CGI. Magazine spreads have fea-
tured Nicole Kidman, Lindsay
Lohan, Rihanna, Michelle Williams,
Viola Davis and others having their
Marilyn moment.
Madonna, of course, has famously
appropriated Monroe's look into
her image. So have singers
Christina Aguilera and Gwen Ste-
fani. In June, on what would have
been Marilyn's 86th birthday, Lady
Gaga tweeted "Happy Birthday
Marilyn They'll never take our
blonde hair and lipstick," along
with a picture of herself, Monroe-
like. Nicki Minaj says she's "ob-
sessed with Marilyn Monroe."
On the big screen, actress
Williams earned an Oscar nomina-
tion for her moving portrayal of


Birthday In the year ahead, there are strong indications
that many Leos might be doing more traveling than usual.
Many of these trips will be purposeful, but not necessarily
of long duration.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Changes to your routine should
work out rather well, especially those where chance inter-
venes. Shifts you personally engineer are likely to be a bit
more complicated.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your warm, cooperative per-
sonality is extremely contagious. Your friends and col-
leagues will find this to be quite appealing, encouraging
them to act similarly.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Because your pride, not your
ego, will dominate your behavior, it's likely to be a very re-
warding day for you. You won't hesitate to affix your signa-
ture to any of your efforts.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Being a bit of a risk- taker


Monroe in "My Week With Marilyn."
And one of TV's most popular new
shows is "Smash" on NBC, which
follows a Broadway musical based
on Marilyn's life, with two actresses
competing to play her.
Heck, there's even been a giant
Marilyn traversing the country: A
26-foot-tall, 34,000-pound statue of
the actress, white dress billowing
and undies showing, by artist Se-
ward Johnson, now resting in Palm
Springs, Calif.
And there are plans for much
more thanks to the purchase in
late 2010 of Monroe's estate, which
includes among other things her
name and image by Authentic
Brands Group and its partner,
NECA. The company's CEO, Jamie
Salter, says he aims to upgrade the
Marilyn brand by moving away from
cheap souvenirs and developing
Marilyn-themed cosmetic lines,
spas and salons, sportswear,
swimwear, footwear, handbags and
more. There are even plans for -
wait for it the inevitable Marilyn
Monroe reality show, in which
young women would compete to be-
come a new Hollywood icon.
But just what is the secret of Mar-
ilyn's enduring appeal? It depends
on whom you ask and that's fit-
ting, really, because Marilyn, more
than other iconic celebrities, was
different things to different people.
There was, most simply, Marilyn
the actress a Marilyn that often
got lost in all the hype, despite her
desperate aspirations to be taken
seriously Film historian Leonard
Maltin laments that many people
know Marilyn "as an image and an
icon," but not as an actress.
Monroe showed off her dramatic
chops in "The Misfits," for example,
and "Bus Stop." But she is probably
best remembered for her delightful
comic turns in "Gentlemen Prefer
Blondes" as the gold-digging
Lorelei Lee who sang "Diamonds
Are a Girl's Best Friend" in that
classic pink gown; as the sensuous
but ditzy Girl in "The Seven Year
Itch"; and as sexy band singer
Sugar Kane in "Some Like it Hot."
Still, an entire younger genera-
tion is enamored of her for some-
thing completely different, says
Brandon Holley, editor in chief of
Lucky magazine, which draws
women in their 20s and 30s.
"I think most women under 40
haven't seen her movies," Holley
says. "For them, she's a style type -
the ultimate hourglass figure. And a


Today's HOROSCOPE
could work to your advantage if you use your daring pro-
ductively. Thus, make sure that attaining what you go after
is within the realm of probability.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Apply your efforts toward
concluding a promising situation, instead of branching out
into doing something new. Your biggest rewards will come
from things already under way.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Persons can be swayed to
your way of thinking if you use a friendly, logical approach
on them. Conversely, if you try to force your thinking on oth-
ers, you're not likely to make any headway.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you're involved in a pay-
ment scheme that involves commission, this could be a
good day. It's important, however, that you don't put all your
eggs in one basket. Limit your offerings.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) There is a very fine line be-
tween being assertive and being aggressive. Don't think


Actress Marilyn Monroe, right, and
celebrity promoter Earl Blackwell
pose May 19, 1962, for a publicity
photo at the party following the birth-
day gala for President John F.
Kennedy, where she sang "Happy
Birthday," in New York.

lot of women identify with that."
Christopher Nickens agrees.
"Marilyn was the epitome of a cer-
tain kind of feminine ideal," says
the co-author of the recently re-
leased "Marilyn in Fashion," a rare
look at Monroe's influence in that
field. Her key fashion legacy, he
says, was to bring body-conscious
clothes into everyday life, with
elegance.
Though she wasn't seen as a fash-
ion icon during her lifetime, Nick-
ens thinks Marilyn shared
something with other style icons like
Jackie Kennedy, Grace Kelly, and
Audrey Hepburn. "They didn't fol-
low trends," he says. "It's about
knowing yourself and what works for
you, and having that confidence."
And her dumb blonde screen
image? Nothing like her, says her
latest biographer, Lois Banner, a
professor of history and gender
studies at the University of South-
ern California. "She was extremely
intelligent."
But why has Marilyn's appeal
only gotten stronger? "First of all,
she died very young," says Banner,
freezing her image for eternity. But
another reason is the existence of
thousands of photographs of Mari-
lyn, bursting with life. "She's con-
ceivably the most photographed
person of the 20th century," says
Banner. The author's third reason
is more cynical: "There's a lot of
people making money off her," she
said.


your associates won't see the difference. Avoid being
pushy or arrogant at all costs.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't hesitate to offer a help-
ing hand when you see a friend in need of assistance.
You'll know how to help out in a manner that doesn't make
him or her feel inadequate.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A new way to make some
money that has captured your fancy is worthy of your atten-
tion. Check it out thoroughly, in order to appreciate all of the
possibilities it offers.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -A situation you have been
evading isn't likely to be as bad as you've led yourself to
believe. If you try to meet it head-on, chances are you'll dis-
cover this for yourself.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you're able to choose be-
tween assignments of a physical and mental nature, tackle
the one that uses your mind more than your muscles.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1
Fantasy 5: 5 14- 15 28- 29
5-of-5 3 winners $68,520.33
4-of-5 295 $112
3-of-5 8,667 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1
Powerball: 3-16-48- 56- 58
Powerball: 4
5-of-5 PB 4 winners
5-of-5 No winners
No Florida winners
Lotto: 22 27 31 38 39 42
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 21 $6,982.50
4-of-6 1,380 $85
3-of-6 30,522 $5.50
Fantasy 5:1 15 21 26 35
5-of-5 3 winners $80,367.91
4-of-5 293 $132.50
3-of-5 9,576 $11
TUESDAY, JULY 31
Mega Money: 4 7 -15 16
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 10 winners $620

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Aug. 4,
the 217th day of 2012. There
are 149 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 4,1892, Andrew
and Abby Borden were axed
to death in their home in Fall
River, Mass. Lizzie Borden,
Andrew's daughter from a
previous marriage, was ac-
cused of the killings, but ac-
quitted at trial.
On this date:
In 1735, a jury found John
Peter Zenger of the New
York Weekly Journal not
guilty of committing seditious
libel against the colonial gov-
ernor of New York, William
Cosby.
In 1830, plans for the city
of Chicago were laid out.
In 1936, Jesse Owens of
the U.S. won the second of
his four gold medals at the
Berlin Olympics as he pre-
vailed in the long jump over
German Luz Long, who was
the first to congratulate him.
In 1977, President Jimmy
Carter signed a measure es-
tablishing the Department of
Energy.
In 1987, the Federal Com-
munications Commission
voted to abolish the Fairness
Doctrine, which required
radio and television stations
to present balanced cover-
age of controversial issues.
Ten years ago: Gonzalo
Sanchez de Lozada won the
presidency of Bolivia for a
second time.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush toured the
site of a collapsed highway
bridge in Minneapolis, pledg-
ing to cut red tape that could
delay rebuilding.
One year ago: A Texas
jury convicted polygamist
sect leader Warren Jeffs of
child sexual assault in a case
stemming from two young fol-
lowers he'd taken as brides
in what his church called
"spiritual marriages." (Jeffs
was sentenced to life in
prison.)
Today's Birthdays: Jour-
nalist Helen Thomas is 92.
Singer Frankie Ford is 73.
Actress-singer Tina Cole is
69. Actor-comedian Richard
Belzer is 68. Football Hall-of-
Famer John Riggins is 63.
Former Attorney General Al-
berto Gonzales is 57. Actor-
screenwriter Billy Bob
Thornton is 57. Actress Kym
Karath ("The Sound of
Music") is 54. Track star Mary


Decker Slaney is 54. Actress
Lauren Tom is 53. President
Barack Obama is 51.
Thought for Today: "The
beginning is the most impor-
tant part of the work." -
Plato, Classical Greek
philosopher.












RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inspired by the Torah


BENJIE SANDERS/Arizona Daily Star
Mordecai Colodner stands in his art studio in his Tucson, Ariz., home looking at one of his pieces he painted called "Sacrifice." Colodner finds
faith just as important a tool as any brush, canvas or easel when it comes to creating art. His paintings vary, from abstract pieces to serene
Southwest scenes, but his primary inspiration derives from the teachings of the Torah.


Arizona artist turns to his faith as inspiration for his uniquepaintings


and Esau Yin Yang," portrays
the biblical brothers as babies in
the womb, struggling with each
other with a ladder between
them.
"The ladder is the ladder of
Jacob's dream, which symbol-
izes God," Colodner explains.
Colodner calls his works "Vi-
sual Midrash," his own artistic
interpretations taken from
phrases or scenes from Judaic
Scripture.
His unique paintings, mostly
done in acrylics, have popped
up in private collections nation-
ally, as well as in local institu-
tions, such as the Tucson Jewish
Community.
Colodner said that his
Midrash paintings are not
simply biblical illustrations.
"I am creating something
that's new, something that's dif-
ferent," he said.
Colodner has always had a
strong sense of faith.
He was raised in a Moder Or-
thodox Jewish home in Brooklyn


in the 1930s and '40s.
It was his aunt, a housewife
and part-time painter named
Gertrude Bronfman, who en-
couraged him to dabble in art at
a young age.
"She used to tell me all the
time that my stuff was great,"
Colodner said. "It probably
wasn't."
Colodner didn't truly become
interested in art and design
until late high school, during a
visit to a local movie theater.
The Charlie Chaplin revival
film he went to see was pre-
ceded by a short about indus-
trial designer Raymond Loewy.
Colodner was intrigued by
Loewy
"I liked that what he did com-
bined art with commerce," he
explained.
Colodner began researching
industrial design, eventually
turning his attention toward
graphic design and advertising,
which was booming in the 1950s,
with giants such as Paul Rand


and Milton Glaser making their
mark.
Colodner's fascination led to
his enrollment at Brooklyn Col-
lege and then the prestigious
Parsons School of Design.
He eventually became a ca-
reer designer, creating promo-
tional materials and brochures
for firms and advertising agen-
cies in and around New York
City for decades.
He retired from his own com-
pany, Mordesign Advertising &
Promotion Inc., in 2005.
When his daughter, Debra
Colodner, took a job in Oracle to
work at Biosphere 2 around the
same time, an opportunity pre-
sented itself.
"A lot of our friends and fam-
ily were moving to Florida," he
said. "I had been to Florida. I
didn't like it at all. We chose Ari-
zona."
The Southwest inspired
Colodner and still does. He has


Page C5


GERALD M. GAY
Arizona Daily Star

TUCSON, Ariz.
ordecai Colodner finds
faith just as important a
tool as any brush, canvas
or easel when it comes to creat-
ing art.
His paintings vary, from ab-
stract pieces to serene South-
west scenes, but his primary
inspiration derives from the
teachings of the Torah.
Every room in his home just
north of Oro Valley contains
framed acrylic works, each re-
lating to a different story from
the Hebrew Bible.
One titled "Nishmat Spirit
of All Living" features primitive
stick-figure deer, turtles and
other animals, not unlike early
cave drawings.
Colodner, 77, said the work is
based on a prayer that says,
"The spirits of all living will
praise your name."
Another work, called 'Jacob


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Family


and


faith
very family begins
with a marriage.
Two weeks ago, my
family got together in Cal-
ifornia to celebrate our
parents' marriage with a
huge party for their 60th
anniversary
It was a '50s party,
minus the poodle skirts
and black leather jackets.
My sister transformed
her garage into a'50s-style
combination soda shoppe
and hot rod garage, com-
plete with a jukebox in the
corner playing classic
oldies music.
Our cousin, Jan, a third-
generation bakery owner
like our grandmother,
used a photo from my par-
ents' 1952 wedding and
amazingly replicated the
wedding cake our grand-
mother had made for
them.
Other cousins came
from around the state,
some of whom I hadn't
seen in decades. Also, my
91-year-old only living
aunt was there, my mom's
older and only sister
My daughters and
granddaughter came too,
from Virginia and North
See Page C5


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


The

Celebration marks completion of Talmud reading Jewish


New Jersey ceremony equal partsjoyous, serious


Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. In a sports stadium
transformed into what was
called the world's largest
synagogue, tens of thou-
sands of people celebrated
the completion of the read-
ing of the Talmud, the book
of Jewish laws and
traditions.
The program at MetLife
Stadium on Wednesday
night combined a festive at-
mosphere of singing and
dancing with the more seri-
ous pursuits of prayer and
reflection; it was dedicated
to the victims of the
Holocaust.


The community is invited
to a family fun day event,
hosted by Crystal River Church
of God, to benefit "Transplant
for Trish," covering costs as-
sociated with an upcoming kid-
ney transplant for church
member Trish Bannister. The
event will take place from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Blacks-
hear's II Aluminum, 8111 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. There will be a yard
sale/bake sale/family fun day
event with clowns, skits, gospel
singing, food, cotton candy,
bounce houses and kids activi-
ties, and more. All donations
will go to benefit "Transplant for


"Tonight is a night of in-
spiration and opportunity,"
Rabbi Elly Kleinman told
the gathering.
Rabbis from around the
world addressed the audi-
ence during the five-hour
program, and speeches and
prayers in Hebrew and Eng-
lish were streamed by audio
and video throughout the
stadium's concourses.
The celebration, called
Siyum HaShas, marks the
completion of the Daf Yomi,
or daily reading and study of
one page of the 2,711-page
book. The cycle takes about
seven and a half years to
finish.
Organizers marked the


Trish." Donations can also be
made at www.transplantfor
trish.com or at any Bank of
America branch office.
Special events
Five area churches will
host the annual Citrus County
Bible Conference at 7 p.m.
Monday through Friday, Aug.
20-24. The guest speaker is
James Knox of Deland. Church
meetings will take place as fol-
lows: Monday Bethel Baptist
(352-726-1095). Tuesday -
New Testament Baptist (352-
726-0360). Wednesday -
Freedom Baptist (352-726-
1966). Thursday Bible Bap-


start of the 13th cycle of
study and reading. The
event was organized byAgu-
dath Israel of America, an
Orthodox Jewish organiza-
tion. It started celebrating
the cycle of study in Europe
in 1923.
Thousands of folding
chairs and white plastic
flooring transformed the
stadium's playing field. A
dais was built for about 500
rabbis.
A massive mechitzah, or
divider that separates men
and women during prayers,
encircled the upper deck of
the stadium, where women

See Page C5

Religion NOTES

tist (352-795-4389). Friday -
Trinity Baptist (352-726-0100).
A "God and Country Rally" will
take place at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 21, in front of the Old
Courthouse in Inverness. For
more information or location,
call the respective numbers
above.
Join Mission Possible Min-
istries for an all-you-can-eat
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. today at 9921 N. Del-
tona Blvd., Citrus Springs. Cost
of $5 per person includes
drinks. Visit www.missionpossi-
bleministries.com or call 352-
489-3886.
The Men's Ministry of


Associated Press
A crowd of mostly young Orthodox Jewish men and boys
dance and sing Wednesday at MetLife stadium in East
Rutherford, N.J., during the celebration Siyum HaShas. The
Siyum HaShas marks the completion of the Daf Yomi, or
daily reading and study of one page of the 2,711-page Tal-
mud. The cycle takes about 7 1/2 years to finish.


Abundant Life, Men of Pur-
pose, will meet at 8:30 a.m.
today at Oyster's Restaurant on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The
breakfast is open to all men in
the community. Men of Purpose
is focused on developing the
whole man spirit, soul and
body while providing oppor-
tunities to worship, fellowship
and participate in teachings
from the Scriptures.
Call the church at 352-795-
LIFE or visit www.abun-
dantlifecitrus.org.
Abundant Blessings Mes-
sianic Congregation is conduct-
ing a Biblical archaeological
expedition with the theme


"Back To The First Century."
Members and guests will take
part in a first-century Nasraye
or Nazarene service and hear
the Odes of Solomon of The
Way; the Messianic liturgical
readings of Matthew, Mark and
Luke in relation to the Torah
portion; and authentic teach-
ings of the Nazarenes of the
Way.
The Messianic Biblical Ar-
chaeological Study Group will
meet at 10 a.m. Saturday at
Homosassa Public Library in
Study Room B. Call 352-
544-5700.

See Page C2


Day of


Love

Most Jews and oth-
ers are aware of
the ninth of the
Jewish month of Av as a
national day of mourning
for disasters that have be-
fallen the Jewish people,
namely the destruction of
the two Jerusalem tem-
ples and the expulsion of
the Jews from Spain. Not
many are aware that just a
few days later comes a
holiday devoted to love,
romance, courting and
finding a life partner The
fifteenth day of Av fulfills
that function, and its
resurgence in modem
times has added new
meaning to the role of love
in Judaism. The holiday
this year was observed
Aug. 3.
Tu B'Av, "tu" meaning
"fifteen," is a post-Biblical
holiday like Chanukah
and Purim. It was started
by the rabbis during the
time of the Talmud, about
1,500 years ago. It always
occurs on the full moon, as
the Jewish calendar is a
lunar one.
There is also the con-
nection with the moon as
a symbol of fertility, love
and romance, which was
See Page C5





C2 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

The Church of the Advent
will present its annual Vacation
Bible School program Monday
through Saturday, Aug. 11. Chil-
dren ages 4 to 11 are invited to
attend this free program. The
theme is "The Amazing
Desert Journey." Children will
have fun with interacting Bible
stories, music, crafts and
games while learning the
prayer of Jesus (The Lord's
Prayer). Registrations forms
are available at the church or
via email at jsickle391@
gmail.com. Call the church at
352-465-7272 or Mrs. Florence
at 352-566-6934.
The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
"Clothe the Children" drive
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-
day in the church hall. New and
used clothing will be distributed
to families in need. Applications
will be available at the door.
Call 352-489-1984.
Mary and Martha's, the
Women's Ministry of Abun-
dant Life, will meet from 6:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday at the
church, 4515 N. Tallahassee
Road, Crystal River. All women
in the community are invited to
attend this time with other
Christian women. Bring a cov-
ered dish and come out and
enjoy this time together. Mary
and Martha's helps women
grow spiritually and provides
opportunities for fellowship with
other women. Women's groups
from all churches in the com-
munity are invited. Call the
church at 352-795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Third Saturday supper is
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 18, in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Com-
munity Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes roast beef,


RELIGION


roasted potatoes, fruit salad,
carrots and peas, Yorkshire
pudding, trifle, apple pie, coffee
and tea for $10 for adults and
$5 for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
Eleven proposed amend-
ments to Florida's Constitution
are on the November ballot. A
nonpolitical presentation of
these measures will be open to
the public at 3 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 23. The Unitarian Univer-
salists in Citrus Springs will
host a forum with Judy John-
son, an attorney who is expert
in this topic, from the Marion
County League of Women Vot-
ers. The league is a nonparti-
san organization encouraging
information and participation in
government. All are invited. The
Nature Coast Unitarian Univer-
salist Fellowship is at 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41, northwest
of the Holder light). Call 352-
465-4225 or visit naturecoast
uu.org.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala invites the community
to meet and greet its new spiri-
tual leader, Rabbi Karen Allen,
at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, at the
Collins Center, 9401 State
Road 200, Suite 303, Building
300 in Ocala. Rabbi Allen will
conduct Shabbat evening serv-
ices with her unique blend of
music, congregational participa-
tion and discussion. She brings
to this Reconstructionist con-
gregation a wealth of experi-
ence in the world of music,
drama and Jewish learning.
Her goal is to make Judaism
relevant and meaningful to
each Jewish person in today's
world. An Oneg will follow the
service and prospective mem-
bers are encouraged to attend.
Call Judi at 352-237-8277,
email bethisraelocala@embar-
qmail.com or visitbethisraelo-
cala.org. Beth Israel Ocala is
an affiliate of the Jewish Recon-
structionist Movement. It is a
liberal, progressive and inclu-
sive congregation.


Church of the Advent will
have its annual outdoor "Trash
to Treasure Sale" on Saturday,
Sept. 29. Rent 10-by-10-feet
spaces for $15 each. Shaded
spaces available on a first-
come-first-served basis.
Crafters, flea market and food
vendors are invited to partici-
pate. The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front of
the new firehouse. For registra-
tion and information, call Al
Sickle at 352-208-5664 or
Maryanne Brennan at 352-
347-2428.
Inverness First United
Methodist Church's "Stepping
Out Ministry" is heading to the
Eastern Caribbean to visit Half
Moon Cay in the Bahamas, St.
Thomas, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, and Grand Turk. The
price includes deluxe motor
coach, cruise, port charges, all
taxes and the bus driver's tip. It
is not necessary to be a mem-
ber of the church to attend. Call
Coordinator Carole Fletcher at
352-860-1932, or Debbie Muir
at Tally-Ho Vacations at 352-
860-2805.
Worship
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America, 1277 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, invites
the public to attend Great Ves-
pers at 5 p.m. Saturday and Di-
vine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Come and experience the undi-
luted truth of Orthodoxy. This
Sunday, fresh fruits brought by
parishioners will be blessed by
Father David Balmer in com-
memoration of the Transfigura-
tion of Our Lord.
Pastor Brian Kinker and
his wife, Kim Kinker, have
started a new church,
Covenant Love Ministry, in
building 11 at ShamrockAcres
Industrial Park, 6843 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. The church
is a spirit-filled, word-of-faith
family ministry that plays tradi-
tional and contemporary music.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday, which gives the com-
munity and children a safe,


positive place to come to on
Friday nights. Regular church
services are at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
days. Follow us on Facebook:
@Covenant Love Ministry or
@Kinker Family Worship. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Brian Kinker at
352-601-4868.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the 10th Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
There is a healing service and
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS is at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church with summer
hours from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Thursday through September.
Evening Bible study will resume
in September.
A come-as-you-are service
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services are
announced. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutherancrystal-
river.com.
The public is invited to Sat-
urday and Sunday services at
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto. At 6 p.m.
today and 9:30 a.m. Sunday,
Pastor Stephen Lane will con-
tinue his theme of the Sixth
Commandment, "Thou Shalt
Not Commit Adultery." The
church is wheelchair accessi-
ble, offers assistance for hear-
ing impaired and has a cry
room for small children where
the parents can hear and see
the services in progress. Fol-
lowing the Sunday service is a
time of fellowship, and at 11
a.m., Sunday school and Bible


Study. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered. A midweek worship
service for adults is offered at 6
p.m. Wednesday. For the
youths, we offer "Ignite," and for
children, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the 10th Sunday after
Pentecost at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services. St. Anne's will
host Our Fathers Table today
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the parish library. The "Recov-
ering from Food Addiction"
group meets at 1 p.m. Thurs-
days in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Monday in the
parish library. St. Anne's will re-
sume hosting the monthly Blue-
grass Gospel sing-alongs at 6
p.m. the fourth Sunday monthly.
Annie and Tim's Bluegrass
Gospel Band will perform. All
are welcome to join in the fun.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Children's church is
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Adult Sunday school is at 9:30
a.m. Morning prayer is at 9 a.m.
Monday through Wednesday.
Feed My Sheep Ministry will
host a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday for those in need,
followed by a healing and holy
Eucharist service at 12:30 p.m.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
Room 102. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. The church has
many Christian education op-
portunities at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. Missionettes and Royal
Rangers Clubs meet for chil-
dren from the age of 3. The
adult class meets in rooms 105
and 106 at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The youth group meets at 7
p.m. Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call the church at 352-
726-4524.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. We are a nondenomi-
national church where you will
experience a friendly, loving
and casual atmosphere; a
place where you can come just
as you are. A coffee fellowship
will follow the morning service.
Weekly Bible study meets at 7
p.m. Wednesday. The book of
Ephesians is the topic of study
and discussion. The church
meets at the Inverness
Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive, across from the
Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. Call Kennie Berger at
352-302-5813.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths

See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal River Temple
CHURCH OF | Beth David


CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
I 0 r I, ll r t
II,. ll ]1 .[ H , ] ]

-Mi ,


13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


ST. ANNE'S
S CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, asHis servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES-
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pm
795-4479


S r Crystal
0 River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


Special
Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising
Information


THE
SALVATION
A M CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller

395W Goe


HEEK, YOU'LL FIND
A CA IN G FAMILY
IN CH IST!

C KYSAL
RIVCK
VNITD
ETCTHOD IT
CHU KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.Crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-, A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


r est
Citrus


Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.
-o

2
u>

US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00


EVANGELIST


0 Crystal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) N
Provided



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church


Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ


Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 10:00 am
Sunday School
9:00 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F


Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
STEPHEN NISTRY


SBob Dickey


*


I I


Q





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Indiana megachurch
fires pastor amid
police investigation
HAMMOND, Ind. -A northwestern
Indiana megachurch has fired its pas-
tor amid a police investigation into the
independent Baptist congregation and
a college it operates.
The First Baptist Church of Ham-
mond said in a news release Tueday
that pastor Jack Schaap committed "a
sin that has caused him to forfeit his
right to be our pastor." Church repre-
sentatives said they were cooperating
with police, but offered no specifics on
the allegations against Schaap.
Lake County Sheriff John Buncich
told The Times of Munster that his de-
partment began a criminal investiga-
tion of the church and Hyles Anderson
College after talking with high-ranking
representatives of the congregation.
He declined to identify the target of the
investigation or other details.
First Baptist elected Schaap its pas-
tor in February 2001, a month after the
late Rev. Jack Hyles died of a heart
attack.
Schaap, now 54, is a Holland,
Mich., native who came to northwest-
ern Indiana in 1977 to attend and
graduate from Hyles-Anderson Col-
lege, which Hyles founded four


decades ago. He met and married
Hyles' youngest daughter, Cindy, and
served the church early in his career
as an assistant youth director, bus
captain and mentor to young students.
He preached and taught in the col-
lege, and was its vice president for
four years before becoming pastor.
Schaap committed himself to carrying
on Hyles' fundamentalist view of the
Christian faith.
Ohio city delays
decision on removal of
religious symbolism
STEUBENVILLE, Ohio Officials
in an eastern Ohio town have halted a
plan to remove religious symbols from
the city logo.
The Steubenville City Council had
decided to change the logo after a citi-
zen complained that it included the
cross and silhouette of the Christ the
King Chapel on the Franciscan Uni-
versity of Steubenville campus. The
Freedom from Religion Foundation in
Madison, Wis., threatened to sue if it
didn't happen. Now a groundswell of
support and offers of free legal repre-
sentation to fight the complaint have
city officials reconsidering the deci-
sion. The issue is on hold for now.
The Steubenville Herald-Star re-
ported that a petition with 300 signa-


tures protesting the move was pre-
sented to city officials at a meeting
Tuesday night.
Dalai Lama plans
to visit Kentucky
Buddhist temple in May
LOUISVILLE, Ky.- The Dalai
Lama plans to visit Louisville next year
to visit and bless a Tibetan Buddhist
temple and teaching center and make
other public appearances.
The Courier-Journal reports the 77-
year-old Dalai Lama is scheduled to visit
May 19-21. The Nobel Laureate and ex-
iled spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists
last visited Louisville in 1994 and last
visited Kentucky in 1996. He regularly
visits Bloomington, Ind., where his late
brother founded a Buddhist center.
Anne Walter, board president of the
Drepung Gomang Institute, the temple
and teaching center, said her group
had invited the Dalai Lama for the
blessing and also to give talks about
compassion to the general public.
Court spurns inmate's
claim of religious right
to use Muslim name
WICHITA, Kan. -An appeals court
said the federal justice system's re-
fusal to recognize an inmate's new
Muslim name does not violate the con-


vict's religious rights.
The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals ruled Tuesday that Michael
White failed to show it was unreason-
able to deny his request to amend all
records in his criminal case.
A lower court held that replacing the
name Michael White with Abdul Ha-
keem Kareem Mujahid in all federal
court records would create confusion.
Mujahid is serving 10 years at a
prison in Colorado for killing another
inmate at the federal prison in Leaven-
worth.
Pennsylvania pastor
to fight charges in
mock kidnapping
LANCASTER, Pa. The attorney
for an Assemblies of God youth pastor
who staged a church youth group kid-
napping as a lesson on religious per-
secution said his client will fight the
charges.
Andrew Jordan blindfolded the
teens in March, bound their wrists and
drove them in a cargo van to a dingy
basement where they overheard mock
torture. His attorney, William DeSte-
fano, said there was no evidence any-
one hurt the girl whose complaint led
to charges of assault and false impris-
onment against the Glad Tidings As-
sembly of God youth pastor.


Dauphin County prosecutors said
the half-hour ordeal included interro-
gation and staged torture using power
tools.
DeStefano told the Intelligencer
Journal/Lancaster New Era he can
challenge the false imprisonment
charge because the girl never tried to
flee her fake captors.
Fort Collins church
eyes split from
Presbyterians
FORT COLLINS, Colo. Leaders
of First Presbyterian Church of Fort
Collins are seeking dismissal from the
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), which
last year struck down a barrier to or-
daining gay leaders.
The Coloradoan reports leaders of
the Fort Collins church are citing "ir-
reconcilable spiritual differences" in
recommending that it join the Fellow-
ship of Presbyterians and seek dis-
missal from its denomination.
The Fort Collins congregation of
about 1,000 would have to take an ad-
visory vote on leaving, and Executive
Presbyter of the Presbytery of Plains
and Peaks Dan Saperstein must ulti-
mately approve whether the dismissal
occurs. A final decision could come
within a year.
From wire reports


JHomosassa Springs
SSEVENT-DAYAD-VENTIST'HCHIU


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com



















HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Heart~
opewt F

Miidw,

Doors

y for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


Glory to Glory
.Ministries
I X A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational I
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
SPastor Brian Gulledge
| 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando,FL


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Littil Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

Church (.M.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{Caf wor tte w. ''


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Hernando
Church of
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144


Nursery Provided


*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


\of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
ofJesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Holy
Communion:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00
&
10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1/2 mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders
Ir .1


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 am
Saturday
vigil
4:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352) 746-9422


Come as you are!
GEnESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH



AAI


KATHT BAGG5
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253
www TgenesI( iscommuniycurch = orgl


0


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA










July and August

Worship

9:30 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

A3 76


HeIn."do FL34442
352-72'i-6734

2 3790 E. PlIso n's Point Rd.
Visit us on the Web at
w .fbc
ww -- hermendexem
Z,


RELIGION


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 C3


. I I





C4 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

at 9. Adult Bible study groups
also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday
and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All residents of the
area are welcome. Sunday
morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call 352-628-3858.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N Lecanto High-
way in Beverly Hills, continues
its Sunday summer worship
schedule at 9:30 a.m. Precious
Lambs Preschool and St.
Paul's School begins Aug. 20.
Call 352-489-3027. For any
questions regarding Kingsway
Retirement Community, call
352-465-6006.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Summer Sun-
day worship schedule: Contem-
porary worship at 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school from 9:30 to
10:30 a.m., and traditional wor-
ship at 11 a.m. Call the church
at 352-637-0770.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church observes its
summer worship schedule with
only one service at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday during July and Au-
gust. All are invited to hear an
inspirational message from
Pastor Kenneth C. Blyth fol-
lowed by coffee hour in the fel-
lowship hall. The church is
barrier free and offers a free CD
ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. All
are welcome. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service be-
gins at 6. Midweek services are
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young


RELIGION


Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando (di-
rectly across from the Her-
nando Post Office).
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs, at 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Sunday school and at 10:30 for
morning worship. Sunday
evening services begin at 6.
Wednesday night Bible studies
are at 7. We are a nondenomi-
national church that preaches
the Word of God from the Bible,
believing that the entire Bible is
true. Call the church at 352-
628-5556.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call 352-382-2557.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
For new friends and fellow-
ship, come to Parsons Memo-
rial Presbyterian Church at
5850 Riverside Drive in Yan-
keetown. Enjoy coffee and
sweets at 10 a.m. Sunday in
the fellowship hall followed by
the worship service at 11 a.m.
Communion is served the first
Sunday monthly. After church,
return to the fellowship hall to
visit and eat. Call 352-
447-2506.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call 352-
746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at


352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers traditional An-
glican worship with Holy Com-
munion at 10:15 a.m. Sunday
at various locations. The 1928
Prayer Book is used. For this
week's service address, call 1-
855-426-4542 or 352-
489-7868.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes the
Rev. Warren Thompson to the
pulpit at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The Rev. Thompson's topic,
"Medical Ethics and Compas-
sion," discusses how ethics and
compassion help us make in-
formed decisions when dealing
with serious medical issues.
The Rev. Thompson has been
the senior chaplain with Hos-
pice of Marion County since
1994. The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship is at
7633 N. Florida Ave.(U.S.41) in
Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
Glory to Glory Ministries
offers a children's ministry at
10:30 a.m. Sunday led by Jes-
sica Gulledge. The men's min-
istry meets at 6 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly. The
women's ministry, SOIL (Serv-
ing Others In Love), meets at
6:30 p.m. the fourth Saturday
monthly. The group is led by
Ginny Cieply and Muffy Morin.
The prayer ministry is led by
Melanie Cook. The music min-
istry consists of Pastor Brian
Gulledge, Joe Correas and
Tony Anglin. The church is led
by Pastor Brian Gulledge and
his wife Jessica. Glory to Glory
Ministries is in the Picard Stor-
age Building on County Road
486. Call 352-220-0550.
The Potter's House
Church has Sunday worship
services at 10:30 a.m. Come
early for Sunday school. Join
us on Wednesday evening for
Dr. and Mrs. Paul and Kathy
Hall's "Discipleship Class." Visit
www.potterhousechurch.com
for all events and activities. For
prayer, call 352-249-8980.
First Church of God of
Inverness, a nondenomina-
tional church which meets at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, invites
the public to Sunday morning
worship services at 10:30 a.m.
Call 352-344-3700.
Rediscover church at
Gravity Church at 11 a.m.
Sunday. Come early to Grav-
ity Church Cafe for coffee, pas-
tries and fellowship. The church
is at 801 S.E. U.S. 19 Crystal
River. Visit www.gravity
church.org.
First Christian Church of
Inverness has discontinued
Wednesday evening meals
through August and will resume


in September. Sunday school is
at 9 a.m. with worship services
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday.
Wednesday evening choir prac-
tice is at 5, followed by Bible
study and prayer meeting at 6
p.m. Everyone is invited. The
church is at 2018 Colonnade
St., behind the new RaceTrac
gas station on State Road 44.
Live & learn
Lifelong Bible enthusiast
Jim Septer leads a Bible study
class from 1 to 3 p.m. and at 6
p.m. Wednesday at Unity
Church of Citrus County, 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto
(off County Road 491, across
from Black Diamond golf
course, south of Beverly Hills).
The class features a format of
open discussion and exchange
of ideas. Call 352-746-1270.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala announces open reg-
istration of its religious school,
Congregation Beth Israel
School of Jewish Education.
The school currently meets
once a week on Sunday morn-
ings at various places in the
community. The curriculum
consists of Jewish life cycle and
history, Hebrew, Bible, holidays
and traditions, and courses on
Israel and pre-bar and pre-bat
mitzvah and confirmation
classes. The school caters to
the individual needs of the stu-
dents and parent participation
is encouraged. The staff con-
sists of caring, experienced
teachers. Suzanne Boetger is
educational director. For more
information and enrollment, call
Suzanne at theboetgers@
yahoo.com or Judi at 352-
237-8277.
Inverness Church of God
conducts a David Ramsey Fi-
nancial Class from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Wednesday in Over-
flow Room "B." The public is in-
vited to attend this informational
class. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 South, Inverness. Call the
church office at 352-726-4524.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
begin a 30-week study of the
books of Amos and Isaiah on
Thursday, Sept. 6, from 9:45 to
11:45 a.m. at First Baptist
Church of Beverly Hills, at the
intersection of Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491) and
Forest Ridge Boulevard. This
class is open to men and
women and includes a program
for children ages 5and younger.
CBS is part of an international
organization that provides inter-
denominational Bible study for
people who desire an in-depth
study of God's word along with
opportunities for fellowship.
Preregistration is necessary. To
register or for more information,
call Terry at 352-382-2365, Lori
or Ron at 352-746-7581, or


SUBMISSION
DEADLINES
Follow these guide-
lines to help ensure
timely publication of
submitted material.
The earlier Chronicle
editors receive sub-
missions, the better
chance of notes run-
ning more than once.
Community notes: At
least one week in ad-
vance of the event.
Veterans Notes: 4
p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
Together page: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publi-
cation Sunday.
Business Digest: 4
p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m.
Monday for publica-
tion Wednesday.
Health Notes: 4 p.m.
Friday for publication
Tuesday.
Religious events : 4
p.m. Tuesday for pub-
lication Saturday.
Real Estate Digest: 4
p.m. Thursday for
publication Sunday.
Photos and stories
are published as
space is available.
The Chronicle cannot
guarantee placement
on color pages.
Submit material at
Chronicle offices in
Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-
3280; or by e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicle
online.com.

Linda at 352-746-1698.
Trusting Heart Ministries
Bible Study group meets at 6
p.m. the second and fourth
Thursday monthly at 176 N.
Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all denomina-
tions. Call 352-860-0052 or
352-586-5174 or email trusting
heartministry@yahoo.com.
Celebrate recovery
Celebrate Recovery, a
Christ-centered 12-step fellow-
ship, meets at 6 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. Meetings
begin with dinner and fellow-
ship, followed by worship and
gender-based, small-group
meetings, concluding with Cof-
fee House fellowship at 9 p.m.
Call 352453-5501 for
information.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fri-
days at Christian Recovery
Fellowship Church, 2242 W.
State Road 44. Call 352-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication
on the Community
page each weekday.
Include the name of
the organization, the
time, day and place
of the meeting,
whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom
to call for details.
Send in information
attn: Community
Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to
(352) 563-3280,
attention: Club
meetings.
Email to community
@chronicleonline
.com. Include "Club
Meetings" in the sub-
ject line. For special
events or fundraisers,
submit a separate
news release.

726-2800.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 6 p.m. Friday at the Gulf to
Lake Ministry Complex in
Meadowcrest, left of SunTrust
Bank. A meal for a minimum
amount is served, followed by
praise, worship and a lesson or
testimony, then gender-specific
small groups. The evening
ends with fellowship, coffee and
dessert. The step studies, an
extremely important extension
of the program's healing
process, take place on a differ-
ent night. Call 352-586-4709 or
e-mail celebrate.recovery
@gulftolake.com. A locator for
groups throughout the United
States is found at the website
www.celebraterecovery.com.
Announcements
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
accepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Estate donations are
also accepted. Pick-up is avail-
able for larger donations. Items
donated are tax deductible and
a form is provided from Helping
Hands. Call 352-726-1707.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheart
ministry@yahoo.com.


FIRST Br
Bringing Christ
IR I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 PM.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 -3:30 PM.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.

726-1670


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M. ,
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Lighti
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA |
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday

Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


COMMUNITY
8 CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH









tou G,,o, ,oj u
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260
lU.L I'l l lil.1 "l .l. J.l. l. ll i i.l.J. i. .


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


* U










VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM 8&10:00 AM

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 Pa.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:30 P.. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
rwwwourladyofgracefl
.catholcweb.com .:


0 Hwy. 44 E @
* Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services
Traditional
S 11:00 AM
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Group m
5 to 7 PM
* 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
* Podcast: FPC inv.com
S Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor Craig Davies *


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TALMUD
Continued from Page C1

were seated. Its curtains
were drawn during prayers
and opened when they
were over.
Women in the upper deck
prayed from prayer books,
listened intently to
speeches and took cell
phone videos of the gather-
ing. Men rushed around the
stadium's hallways and
field when not praying.
A little more than mid-
way through the celebra-
tion, the rabbis sang Siman
Tov and Mazel Tov, a song of


TORAH
Continued from Page C1

created several pieces pay-
ing homage to the Santa
Catalina Mountains, in-
cluding a large acrylic work
with Pusch Ridge as its
focal point, splayed out in
bright blues, purples and
yellows, that is mounted in
his bedroom.
One of the greatest ad-
vantages to moving west
was the abundance of
space for Colodner to work
on fine art, particularly his
Midrash pieces.
The shed in his carport
that once held the tools and
building supplies of the


LOVE
Continued from Page C1

common to ancient
cultures.
On this special day in an-
cient Israel, the young
maidens would come forth
dressed in white dresses
and dance in the vineyards,
hoping to attract the atten-
tion of the eligible young
men. The white dress, a
symbol of purity, was a way
for the men to look beyond
the material things the
women might possess and
to be concerned with their
spiritual and inner beauty.
It was the conduit for all
the daughters of Israel to
have an equal chance for
marriage.
In light of today's highly
materialistic society, with
TV and Hollywood blasting
out their messages of sexu-
ality, this seems a far gen-
tler way of choosing a mate,
and it was a great way to
celebrate the end of the
grape harvest
According to the Talmud,

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD

S Non
Denominational
Pastor
Tom Walker

Sunday
10:30 AM. & 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 PM.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALL ARE WELCOME


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH





SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
mli ., ,i,,,,.,,,h ,,,.,,,i,,,,,i,.,,,,i h.,l, h
S t the Inverness Womans ( ,
171 i Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


21 e 6 S I ne
344-190


RELIGION


celebration. Attendees
danced, swayed in the
stands and formed large
circles on the field. Rabbis
on the dais draped their
arms around one another
and sang into microphones
while rocking from side to
side.
The celebration was the
largest celebration to date,
officials said, with more
than 90,000 tickets sold and
simulcasts taking place at
more than 100 locations
worldwide.
It cost about $4 million,
said Rabbi Yosef C. Gold-
ing, executive director of
the Rofeh Cholim Cancer
Society in Brooklyn, N.Y,

previous owner is now
filled with paints, brushes
and other creative
supplies.
An adjacent storage
space holds stacks of fin-
ished works, many of them
Midrash works, that Colod-
ner has created since mov-
ing to the area seven years
ago.
"Our apartment in New
York was too small for any
of that," he said.
Many of Colodner's vi-
sions have been featured in
Tucson-area galleries, in-
cluding the Toscana Studio
and Gallery, 9040 N. Oracle
Road.
Gallery owner Linda
Ahearn is a longtime fan of
Colodner's art, whether it's

the holiday has several
events associated with the
date. On this day, all the
tribes were allowed to in-
termarry During the time
of the desert wandering,
this was not allowed, be-
cause there was concern
that proper land inheri-
tance would be lost. The
day became a favorite for
weddings.
On this day, Jews were al-
lowed to bury the followers
of Bar Kochba, who led a
revolt against the Romans.
The last stronghold, Betar,
was conquered by the Ro-
mans. It marked the end of
Jewish resistance against
the Romans.
The day also marked the
end of the Exodus genera-
tion who wandered the
desert for 40 years. Only
those not born as slaves
were to enter the Promised
Land.
In ancient days, the
brides-to-be of Shiloh, in
northern Israel, danced in
the vineyards. Today, many
Israelis go to the ancient
first capital of Israel to
watch modern dancers in


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30 AM
Sunday School.........................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service.......................6:00 P
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes..................7:00 M
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 -
Teens............................. 7:15 M
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


j"oo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


who was in charge of logis-
tics. Most of the money was
raised from sales of tickets,
which ranged from $18 to
$1,000.
The program helped
unite thousands of people
worldwide who are study-
ing the same page each day,
said Rabbi Gedaliah Wein-
berger, chairman of the Daf
Yomi Commission at Agu-
dath Israel.
"In a certain sense it
helps unite everyone, be-
cause you have these many
thousands of people, tens of
thousands of people, who
are each studying the same
page at any given day,"
Rabbi Weinberger said.

the Midrash pieces or his
modern acrylic abstracts.
"I find his work to be
some of the most unique
examples of creativity,"
Ahearn said. "He is always
trying to find new ways to
do things. It is that kind of
art that really stands out -
the stuff that you've never
seen before."
Colodner said the art
market has been slow as of
late, which has been dis-
couraging, but he has faith
things will pick up.
He'll continue to paint in
the meantime.
"I want to create some-
thing that will give people a
good feeling," he said. "An
understanding of some-
thing that is in my mind."

the Jewish community
dance while serenaded by
song. Thus a beautiful tra-
dition is kept alive in the
Jewish State.
Tu B'Av remains a popu-
lar date for weddings. In
Israel, dance festivals and
musical concerts are held
to commemorate the day
Although it is treated as a
regular workday, as in our
American holiday of
Valentine's Day, it is cus-
tomary to send flowers,
small gifts and cards to
loved ones. In our world
today, filled with so much
violence and unrest, it is
pleasant to reflect on a
holiday which celebrates
just the opposite, that is,
one that elevates love and
affection.
May we all love one an-
other, thereby bringing us
closer to a world at peace.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

Carolina. Neither my par-
ents nor my aunt had seen
my granddaughter, Caro-
line, now 10 years old, since
she was a newborn.
My aunt loves to say her
name Caroline Kennedy
Smith.
My job for the party was to
show up, clean my sister's
downstairs bathroom and
give a welcoming toast
When the time came and
everyone had quieted, I
raised my glass of cham-
pagne and spilled it.
And then I turned to my
parents and said:
"Every family begins with
a marriage, and in our fam-
ily it began with yours.
"From this marriage came
O'Brands (our family name
is O'Brand), Kennedys and
Watsons, Smiths, Fiamengos
and Astorgas 26 of us so
far.
"From this marriage came
machinists and electricians,
military veterans, college
students and graduates,
marathon runners, writers,
firefighters and EMTs.
"From this marriage came
four children, seven grand-
children and now five great-
grandchildren. From this
marriage we now have Car-
oline and Dylan, Wesley,
Madison and Leah."
I told my parents to look
around the room, that this
family was and is their
legacy
And then I joked, "This is
all your fault!"
It was a fun, joyful mo-
ment as was the rest of the
party
One of the best things
about family is the telling of
stories. My sister, cousin Jan
and I told my granddaugh-
ter about how our grand-
mother used to ice cupcakes
at her bakery by scooping
her bare hands into a huge
tub of chocolate frosting -
while wearing multiple dia-
mond rings -plop the frost-
ing on and twist off the
excess.
I remember being fasci-
nated at her speed. She
could ice a dozen cupcakes
in probably less than a
minute.
My cousin said after our
grandmother died she
found a ring that still had
chocolate in it and that she
would never have it cleaned
because that was a part of
our family heritage and his-
tory
At the party we talked
about the house where we


grew up and wondered if
the "hairy eyeball," a glass
marble stuck in the mortar
of a cement block wall that
we walked past on the way
to school, was still there.
We whispered about the
time Mom found a mari-
juana plant growing in the
back yard and she pulled it
out and taped it to the wall
with a note: "Who does this
belong to?" We laughed
about that, also about the
time Dad danced the en-
tire 27 minutes of "In-A-
Gadda-Da-Vida" with us
and then dove into the
swimming pool with all his
clothes on.
We've told the same sto-
ries a billion times, but
that's what binds families
together.
By our stories we reaffirm
ourselves as a family, these
people to whom we are for-
ever connected, for better or
for worse.
Likewise, that's what
binds God's family together.
We tell each other stories
about our Father and our
common faith.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 C5

When it comes to family,
no one chooses which one to
be born into. We don't
choose our parents or our
siblings. We can't custom de-
sign our children. It's a toss
of the dice we play the
hand we're dealt.
Even so, the psalm writer
said God sets the lonely in
families (Psalm 68:6). He
chooses moms and dads,
brothers and sisters. We
may get along or we may ir-
ritate like sandpaper, but
we are family nonetheless.
As a family, we grow. We
comfort each other in bad
times and celebrate the
good times like the mar-
riage that began our family
60 years ago.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


- H.L Iv\JOb I Ur.,ILU & L^ .LrILN LU U ANUIUAL VVI. H 2 6YL A LrUtJ
LAW ENFORCEMENT IN FLORIDA INCLUDING CHIEF OF POLICE
* PREPARED AND MANAGED LAW ENFORCEMENT BUDGET'S
* DOES NOTAND WILL NOTACCEPT CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS FROM
SPECIAL INTERESTS. "POWER BROKERS" OR SHERIFF'S OFFICE
EMPLOYEES
* NOT ONE OF THE "GOOD OLE BOYS"
* THE ONLY CANDIDATE WITH A REAL PLAN FOR ORGANIZATION AND
LEADERSHIP
* THE ONLY REPUBLICAN THAT CAN WIN IN NOVEMBER!!!

* ESTABLISH FISCALACCOUNTABILITY & RESPONSIBILITY WITH OPEN
PROGRAM BASED BUDGETING
* LEAD BY EXAMPLE IN CUTTING COSTS, BY REDUCING MY SALARY AS
SHERIFF BY $20,000
* REALIGN THE $2 MILLION DOLLARS IN WASTEFUL SPENDING TO IMPROVE
SERVICES AND TRAINING, WHILE REDUCING THE BUDGET
* FORM A REGIONAL DRUG TASK FORCE WITH OTHER LAW ENFORCEMENT
AGENCIES
* BE ACCOUNTABLE TO OUR DEPUTIES & OUR CITIZENS WITH OPEN, FAIR
AND EQUITABLE DISCIPLINE IN THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
GO TO WWW.BURCH4SHERIFF.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT STEVEN
BURCH AND WHYAVOTE FOR STEVEN BURCH IS VOTE FOR PROFESSIONAL
AND FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE LAW ENFORCEMENT LEADERSHIP
(352) 464-4495 steven@burch4sheriff.com
Pd for by Burch for Sheriff Campaign and approved by Steven Burch, Rep.


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all. i


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS I |
c


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
% Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201
- --


First United


Methodist V4ory


of Inverness esu


3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sind,., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
OFFICE: (352) 726-1107







Page C6 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Learn 'how to'
at the mall
Crystal River Mall an-
nounces August Home Im-
provement Classes with The
Home Depot. The August
clinic will cover "Raised Gar-
den Beds."
Participants will identify the
basic steps involved in raised
bed gardening and then build
a raised garden bed, finally
identifying the basic steps in-
volved in planting annuals
and perennials.
This is a free class, open
to the public. The "Raised
Garden Bed" clinic will be at
2 p.m. every Thursday in Au-
gust in the Center Court of
the Crystal River Mall.
For more information, call
the mall office at 352-795-
2585 or visit www.thecrystal
rivermall.com.
Learn to make
jewelry at library
There will be an adult jew-
elry making class at the Cit-
rus Springs Memorial Library
at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
15. Edna Mikel will be teach-
ing how to make a necklace.
Participants have their
choice: they can bring
enough beads to create a
necklace or they can pur-
chase a prepared kit (colors
may vary) from Mikel which
will have all the required ma-
terials. If students are bring-
ing their own materials, the
rest of the materials will be
here for them to use.
Because of the nature of
the class materials, it is im-
portant that students prereg-
ister for the class by coming
in or calling the Citrus
Springs Memorial Library at
352-489-2313.
Go with Legion
to Rays' game
American Legion Post 155
in Crystal River is sponsoring
a bus trip to Tropicana Field
on Wednesday, Sept. 5, for a
baseball game featuring the
Tampa Bay Rays vs. the New
York Yankees.
A chartered bus will leave
the post at 4 p.m. with an ap-
proximate return at midnight.
The cost includes bus fare,
game ticket and refresh-
ments. This event is open to
the public, including children
accompanied by an adult.
Tickets are limited and can
be purchased at the Legion,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
in Crystal River. Call the post
at 352-795-6526 for ticket
price and information.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


New interim director


Tom Chancey appointed to lead Community Food Bank


Special to the Chronicle

The Board of Directors of the Com-
munity Food Bank of Citrus County
has announced Tom Chancey has


been appointed as the interim
executive director of the Com-
munity Food Bank.
Chancey has been a Citrus
County resident for more than
25 years. He has more than 40
years of experience as a busi-
ness developer in more than
20 community and commer-
cial centers throughout
Pinellas and Citrus counties.
The Citrus County develop-
ments include Arbor Lakes,
Heritage and Woodview
Center.
He attended Florida State


ToI
Chan
interim d
Comm
Food E


University where he majored in mar-
keting and business management be-
fore being drafted into the U.S.
Marine Corps from 1969-75 as a sup-
ply sergeant. He is a 2012 graduate of
Leadership Citrus and has been a
member of the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Board of County


Commissioners Stakeholder's Advi-
sory Council and the School Board
Long Range Planning Board. He has
served as a mentor in the Citrus
County School System.
Chancey acquired his pas-
sion for serving the hungry by
volunteering for four years as
the director of SHARE, a com-
munity food distribution pro-
gram through Anona United
Methodist Church in Largo.
His passion continued on
the Board of Directors for the
Community Food Bank. He
m has been involved in numer-
icey ous fundraising events for var-
irector, ious nonprofits and looks
unity forward to raising funds for
the operations of the Commu-
nity Food Bank, getting the fa-
cility organized and operational as
soon as possible, recruiting volun-
teers and more.
A Big Brother in the local Big
Brothers Big Sisters program, he is
married to Sheri Chancey and they
have three children and four grand-
children.


He can be reached at 352-422-0199
to speak to agencies/organizations in-
terested in becoming member agen-
cies in the fight against hunger, or to
provide tours of the 7,200-square-foot
food bank.
Mail can be sent to the Community
Food Bank of Citrus County, PO. Box
2824, Crystal River, FL 34423-2824.
Volunteers are needed to provide
administrative/office work, carpentry,
photography, grant writing and cre-
ative writing for publications.
Later, volunteers will be needed to
sort produce, bakery and nonperish-
able food donations, stocking food
pantry shelves at the Food Bank or
packaging dry beans/rice into family
portions.
The Community Food Bank of Cit-
rus County is a nonprofit organization
with the mission to provide food to
member feeding organizations in
Citrus County.
The Community Food Bank is com-
pleting requirements and training to
be affiliated with Feeding America
Tampa Bay Expected opening date is
November 2012.


Carlos Nessi Award


Every year, the Rotary Club of
Homosassa Springs gives its
most prestigious award, the
Carlos Nessi Award, to a
person in Citrus County who
has made a difference in
people's lives. This year's
recipient is Art Jones, who
received the award for his
efforts leading the charge to
clean up King's Bay. His
continued efforts to clean the
lyngbya from King's Bay have
been well publicized. This is a
big undertaking, but he, along
with volunteers and several
organizations, have made and
will continue to make a big
difference in the health of
King's Bay. Pictured, from left,
are: Past President of the
Rotary Club of Homosassa
Springs Luke Todd and Jones.
For more information about the
Rotary Club of Homosassa
Springs, g to www.rotaryclub
ofhomosassasprings.org.
Special to the Chronicle


Special to the Chronicle

Friends for Life will have
lunch at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, at Chef's of Napoli II,
1546 U.S. 41 in the Kmart
mall in Inverness; order
from the menu.
The Friends will meet at
11 a.m. Monday, Aug. 13, at


the Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club, 3150 Country Club
Drive. Lunch will begin at
11:45 a.m. The entrees are
spaghetti and meat sauce, or
salmon, baby bakers and
broccoli. The program will
feature Florence McCann,
talking about her life as a
Wave in the U.S. Navy.


On Monday Aug. 27, the
Friends will dine at the Olive
Tree Restaurant, 963 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River, at
11 a.m.; order from the
menu.
On Wednesday, Sept. 5, the
group will have lunch at
Skeet's Restaurant in Bev-
erly Hills, 3887 N. Lecanto


Highway, at 11 a.m.; order
from the menu.
Those who need a ride can
request one when making
reservations. Reservations
must be made for all events
by calling Myrna Hocking at
352-860-0819, Claire Quigley
at 352-563-1998, or Teddie
Holler at 352-746-6518.


Teardrop Clubs plan start of afterschool programs


Special to the Chronicle
Teardrop is a lovely 4-
years-young calico who is
looking for a new home.
She is homeless due to un-
fortunate circumstances,
and now she needs a new
family. We are running a
Summer Special Adoption
through August all adult
cat adoption fees are half
price at $27.50. Visitors
are welcome from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fll86.html.


It's hard to believe August is al-
ready here and school will soon
begin. With school comes the start
of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County before- and afterschool pro-
grams. At each club site, Beverly Hills,
Inverness and Homosassa, club direc-
tors and staff are eager to welcome
kids back.
Parents will love that Monday
through Thursday, when
kids get off the bus and set-
tle into the clubhouse,
after a snack, their first
order of business is home-
work or other school as-
signments. Children do
schoolwork with the help
of staff members. Most
parents are thrilled that by
the time they pick their
children up at the club Lane
door to go home after a BOY
long day at work, home-
work is done. Moms and GIRLS (
Dads don't have to contend
with "My teacher didn't
say I should do it that way!" or have a
fight on their hands about whether or
not it's not due until next week.
Boys & Girls Club parents only have
to worry about fixing dinner, what TV
shows to watch and getting the kids to
bed at a reasonable hour, as if that
wasn't enough. With computer labs at
each site, members also have access to
Internet sites for research or help
writing a report. This study time is


I


called Power Hour at each club and
most club directors insist that if there
is no homework, it's a good, quiet time
to enjoy a book. Once Power Hour is
over, of course, there is plenty of run-
ning and playing sports and games
outside and working off some of that
pent-up energy.
We always like to determine if
Power Hour was successful or not by
reviewing grades and test
scores at the end of the
school year. We are happy to
report that from the 2011-12
school year, 98 percent of
our kids made a "C" or
higher in reading. In fact,
more than half made a "B"
as their final reading grade
and 23 percent made an "A."
They also did well in math,
Vick with 94 percent making final
S grades of "C" or above and
76 percent making a "B" or
LJLUBS higher On the FCAT, 76 per-
S cent of Boy & Girls Club kids
scored a level 3 or higher
(level 3 is considered adequate aca-
demic progress or on grade level by
the state of Florida) in reading. And 68
percent scored level 3 or above in
math.
So, we at the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County are pleased with our
kids' work and with club programs
such as Power Hour We also do lots of
other good programs in the areas of
sports and recreation, nutrition, arts


and crafts, technology, character de-
velopment, community service and
leadership. You can make your chil-
dren a part of the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County by calling the club di-
rector at your neighborhood club and
enrolling them. The afterschool pro-
gram is $70 per month with discounts
for multiple children. We will know
soon about available scholarships.
We will provide transportation or
children will ride the school buses to
clubs from Central Ridge Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Citrus
Springs Middle School, Lecanto Pri-
mary, Lecanto Middle School, Pleas-
ant Grove Elementary, Inverness
Primary, Inverness Middle School,
Hernando Elementary, Crystal River
Primary, Rock Crusher Elementary,
Homosassa Elementary and Crystal
River Middle School. Call Miss Amber
at the Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Club
in Inverness at 352-341-2507, Miss
Melissa at the Central Ridge Boys &
Girls Club in Beverly Hills at 352-270-
8841, or Miss Beth at the Robert
Halleen Boys & Girls Club at 352-
795-8624.
Clubs are supported partially by the
United Way of Citrus County, fundrais-
ers, donations and grants and the
super-supportive Citrus County com-
munity.

Lane Vickis grant coordinator of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County


News NOTES

Salsa back at
'Copacabana'
Citrus Hills will host its an-
nual Copacabana Night from
7 to 11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17,
at the Citrus Hills Activity
Center Auditorium, 240 W.
Fenway Drive, Hernando, in-
side the Terra Vista gated
community.
Latin band "Expresion
Latina" returns by popular de-
mand and will keep the
dance floor hopping with
salsa and merengue dance
numbers. The evening be-
gins with a free dance lesson
at 6:30 p.m. with Butch
Phillips and deejay Ben Cruz
will keep the music flowing all
night long. Open seating for
all.
A dessert buffet with coffee
and tea will be set up in the
atrium; $1 drafts, house
wines and margarita punch,
along with a salsa/chips bar
and a cash full bar.
Cost is $20 for Citrus Hills
members and $25 for guests.
The Spanish American Club
will receive a 15 percent do-
nation when SAC members
purchase a guest ticket.
Tickets are on sale now at
the Activity Center Service
Desk, 352-746- 7633.
Club to stage
annual fundraiser
The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County will
have its annual Scholarship
Fundraiser from 3 to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 29, at the
Knights of Columbus 6168
Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto. The event
is open to the public.
During the past 12 to 15
years, the club has awarded
financial aid to many Citrus
County high school
graduates.
There will be comedy skits,
singing, poetry reading, a
fashion show and more. This
year will include professional
performances by Los Ca-
balleros Del Sol doing "Mu-
sica De Trio," and guest
vocalist Frank J. Torrales
singing love ballads. The
event will also include a buf-
fet dinner. Seating is limited.
Tax-deductible donations are
$25 per person.
For more information and
to RSVP, call Benny Cruz,
SAC president, at 352-746-
3599.
Buy books from
Dunnellon Friends
The Friends Books Store
inside the Dunnellon Public Li-
brary has a "Dog Days of Au-
gust" half-price book sale
lasting all of August. Inven-
tory changes daily depending
on the great book donations
received. Store hours are 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. daily and 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
All proceeds benefit the
Dunnellon Public Library.
Contact Friends of Dunnellon
Public Library at 20351
Robinson Road, Dunnellon,
FL 34431 or 352-438-2520.

Pet SPOTLIGHT


Dusty


Special to the Chronicle
Dusty was removed from a
puddle in the road at night.
The injured nursing pup
had been tossed out the
window of a moving car.
With a lot of TLC, he sur-
vived and thrived. Now, the
affectionate 9-year-old
Huskie mix is a healthy 85
pounds. He lives with
Robert Maas Jr., son of
Joan Doerr of Inverness.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed, community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Dine, meet with Senior Friends


Y 11 1 qll






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING AUGUST 4, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 I 9:00 I 9:30 I10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Access 0 Zone XXX Summer Olympics Swimming, Track and Field, Beach Volleyball, Diving. (N) c
Orangutan Diary (In The Lawrence Welk AreYou Keeping AsTime AsTime Waiting for Yes Globe Trekker'G' c
1 WED PBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo)'G' Show Served? Up Goes By GoesBy God Minister'PG'(DVS)
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith Griffith Movie'MA' Austin City Limits Artists Den
SN News Nightly Entertainment Tonight XXX Summer Olympics Swimming, Track and Field Beach Volleyball, Diving. From London.
Q IWFLA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N)'PG' c Swimming; track and field; beach volleyball; diving. (N) (In Stereo Live) a
SC Ns News World Jeopardy! Wheelof *Y "Norbit"(2007, Comedy) Eddie Murphy (In Castle "Linchpin" News HotTopics
B (WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News 'G' c Fortune Stereo) 'PG-13' 'PG' c'PG'
SPCBS 10 10 10 10 10 News Evening Inside Young NYC 22"Ransom" (N) NYC 22"Samaritans" 48 Hours Mystery (In 10 News Paid
SIWTSP]CBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) News Edition Icons '14' (N)'14' c Stereo)'14'c 11pm (N Program
_ o 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) (In Stereo) UFC: Shogun vs. Vera (N) (In Stereo Live) X FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Touch'PG'
S(WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) c 'PG'Xc (In Stereo) s
D WJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Entertainment 'Night *, "Norbit"(2007) Eddie Murphy. c Castle'PG' News Crook
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E "Seventeen Again" (2000, Comedy) Tia ** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" (2005, Comedy- *** "The Best Man" (2005)
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EWI) 95 70 95 48 Life |Fathers |Angelica Live *** "Lourdes"(2009)'NR' |Rosary Living Right The Journey Home
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H V 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Huntlntl Novo |Dina Design Design Grt High Low Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl
American Pickers American Pickers Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
HIST 51 25 51 32 42 PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG PG 'PG' 'PG' 'PG
*** "Vicky Cristina Barcelona"(2008) Javier *** "Spanglish" (2004) Adam Sandier, Tea Leoni. Premiere. A house- Drop Dead Diva "Road
(L 24 38 24 31 Bardem. Premiere.'PG-13' keeper works for a chef and his neurotic wife.'PG-13' c Trip'PG'
"The Perfect Assistant" (2008, Drama) Rachel "The Perfect Child" (2007, Drama) Rebecca "The Perfect Neighbor" (2005, Suspense)
( I) 50 119 Hunter, Chris Potter.'NR' c Budig, Lochlyn Munroe.'NR' c Perry King, Susan Blakely, c
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(lP j 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
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( FitAZJ 370 271 370 2" (2002) 'G' story of the 1973 Triple Crown winner. Cameron Diaz.'R' c Bridges. (In Stereo) 'PG'
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(I 36 31 36 Rays Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) Rays Rays Rays
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L 8 33 48 31 4 Matt Damon, Julia Stiles.'PG-13' E Nazi scalps in German-occupied France.'R' c (DVS)
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triuT 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking'14' Most Shocking Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Combat Combat Forensic Forensic
TVLI 32 49 32 34 24 Griffith |Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Kng
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UA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Shots"'PG' c
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(WGN-Ai 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: CI Videos |White MLB Baseball: Angels at White Sox WGN News at Nine


North
A A 7 4
*A74
V A6 2
+ 9


SA 10 8 6 5 3
East


52


South
SKJ3
V Q 8 5
SQ85
SKJ 6 5
* K92


S10
SK J 10 7 4
SA 10 8 3
*QJ7


Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East

3 NT Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: V 9

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Albert Einstein said, "When you are courting a
nice girl, an hour seems like a second. When you
sit on a red-hot cinder, a second seems like an
hour That's relativity"
Oh, that his Theory of Relativity were that easy
When you are playing an easy contract, five min-
utes seems like a second. When you are in an im-
possible contract, five minutes quickly runs up to
10 minutes.
If today's deal looks familiar, you read yester-
day's column. Then, South, in three no-trump, won
the first trick with dummy's heart ace and played
on clubs to get home.
Now suppose that South plays low from the
board at trick one. What should happen?
South's three-no-trump response showed a good
12 to 15 points, a balanced hand, fewer than four
spades (no negative double), and at least one heart
stopper. His hand is nearly perfect; it would be im-
proved with a second heart stopper
After declarer plays low from the dummy, East
wins with his king. But what does he do next?
West's lead must be a singleton or the higher
card of a doubleton. So South has two heart stop-
pers. And dummy's club suit is threatening to pro-
vide sufficient tricks for the contract.
Since plowing on with hearts won't be good
enough, East should shift to a diamond. And given
dummy's singleton nine, he ought to lead the 10.
This establishes three diamond tricks to go with
the heart king and a club winner.
When working on one suit looks as though it will
not defeat the contract, look at the other choices,
however long that takes you.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SMUYH

O2012 Trbune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
OGUBS I



CAFEED i



FIMRON


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Don't come Whoa! I just
nearly wanted to know if
foils! you need any help
carrying anything.


I _







HE WAS THIS WITH
HIS 1 XPEN5IVE FENCING
S eQUIPMu NT.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: If
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SUSHI BEGAN SWIVEL INDICT
I Answer: The conversation about current events while
they fished resulted in NEWS CASTS


ACROSS
1 Regard
5 Cowboys'
charges
10 Fabric for
sails
12 Agency
13 Mountaineer's
coup
14 Used-car deal
15 Navy or
vanilla -
16 Narrow inlet
18 Sanctioned
19 Reached
across
23 School org.
26 Puffin kin
27 Danger
30 Blows, as a
volcano
32 Increased
sharply
34 Fragrant trees
35 Dropped a
clue
36 Metric pound
37 Gigantic bird
of myth


38 PC key
39 Not kosher
42 Kind of scout
45 National bird
of Australia
46 Squishy
50 Rich, as
farmland
53 Took a
snooze
55 Less trusting
56 Icy
downpours
57 Teen lingo
58 Ferber or
Millay

DOWN
1 Urn
2 Andes empire
3 Roulette bets


Answer to Previous Puzzle


4 opposite of
ruddy 9 Woodpecker's
5 Color treat
6 Hosp. areas 10 ics
7 Notfake vehicle
8 Cartoon 11 Waltz king
chipmunk 12 Kind of muffin
17 Pen fluid


20 Walk the beat
21 Beethoven's
Third
22 Ape studier
Fossey
23 Delt neighbor
24 Safari
25 Volkswagen
kin
28 Mile. in
Barcelona
29 Faint, with
"over"
31 Sanskrit
dialect
32 Ninjas'
leaders
33 Banned
insecticide
37 Sleep phenom
40 Wolfish look
41 Goes at an
easy gait
42 Harsh calls
43 Eurasian
range
44 Silent screen
temptress
47 Forthright
48 Frat Z
49 Gridiron
meas.
51 Storage box
52 Trouser part
54 Stein filler


Dear Annie: I have had all I
can take from your female
readers who complain
about the lack of inti-
macy from their hus-
bands. You tell them to
have their husband's
testosterone checked
and seek counseling.
Allow me to give you a
better answer. It's true
that men, as they get
older and live with
their partners for
years, might not be as
excited about intimacy
as in their younger ANN
days. That does not MAII
mean they are not in-
terested in intimacy It
means they are not interested in
their partner.
Here are my questions for
those female readers: How big is
your rear end? Do you have nu-
merous health issues that make
your partner think he is living in
a nursing home? Are you out of
shape and overweight because
you sit, eat and watch TV all day?
Do you snore, keeping your part-
ner up most of the night?
I could go on, but I think you
get the point. In my opinion, 80
percent of females over the age of
30 are overweight, and a good
percentage are obese. Let's face
it. They are not sexy So, after 30-
plus years of marriage, you look
at your spouse, and what else can
I say? I know men have issues,
too, but we don't all need to have
our testosterone checked if we
are not intimately excited by our
mate. This does not mean we
don't still love them. Bob (Lo-
cation Secret for Obvious Rea-
sons)


Dear Bob: Well, you are cer-
tainly frank. But the majority of
our sex-deprived male readers
have let us know that
they would rather be
intimate with their 50-
plus wives than with
anyone else. They
want the affection that
intimacy provides, re-
gardless of body shape
or age. But we are cer-
tain you will have pro-
voked our readers,
who will be eager to
set you straight, so ...
IE'S let the games begin.
BOX DearAnnie: I have a
very close family We
are not perfect, but we
try to be there for one another
when it counts. My in-laws are a
different story They are very self-
absorbed. In my family, when
someone is seriously ill or hurt,
we call and visit and try to help.
But when I had surgery, and
again when my husband was sick,
my in-laws didn't even phone. In
the 20 years that I have known
them, they have never done any-
thing remotely thoughtful for us.
When we first married, I tried
to be positive by saying they are
simply different. I told myself
that I owe them my respect be-
cause they are my husband's fam-
ily I never complained about
them. However, as the years
passed, it's become harder to tol-
erate their behavior, and I can no
longer hold in my feelings. My
husband still thinks we should
have his parents over for dinner
and holidays, but it's hard to be
around them for an hour, much
less an entire evening.
Am I being unfair to my hus-


band? I'm trying to follow your
advice and find something to like
about my in-laws, and I simply
cannot. Could you help me han-
dle it better? N.Y Wife
Dear Wife: The only thing you
need to like about your in-laws is
that they raised your husband,
whom you love. And it's possible
that their lack of consideration is
less about not caring and more
about not knowing how to behave
appropriately Please continue to
invite them for holidays and an
occasional dinner out of respect
for your husband, and work on
finding a calm place in your
head.
DearAnnie: Here's a tip for "',"
who asked whether she had to tip
the grocery store clerk for help
while shopping with her two
small children.
Our daughter solved this prob-
lem by parking next to the cart
return. When she comes out of
the store, she can put the kids
into the car and return her cart
without worry Grandma in Illi-
nois


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators.com.


West
A Q 9 8 6
4Q986
S 93
Q 7 4 2
I4


STUMP FAJV OR
RET I RE TI RADE
SEASON BLENDS
OTT OMIS
CCS RAINS ZE N
HO A IDE LEVI
AURI CE H IRES
PRINT AMAZONS
ESPN ETON ETA
LES PLEAD SSN
YAWW TI C
MEDUSA ECOLES
GREASY DAMASK
MAINE PATSY


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 C7


08-04-12


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


HOW WOULD YOU LIKE
TO BUY A WATERCOLOR
PICTURE OF YOUR 006?



k -K-,

* -. -
,. -^.- .,_ 1
- "1] '-'


Pickles


Sally Forth


THAT WAS THE YOU'RE RIGHT,
HIGHEST-PITCH LAURA. HE DOES
SCREAM I'VE SOUND LIKE JANET
EVER HEARD LEIGH IN "PSYCHO."
FROM A MAN.


m2I,)


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Seriously, whose bright idea was this? ...
We can't even read."


Doonesbury


60TANY /WELb, YOU
OTHER CAN AULAYS
BUPC6T USE THE
TRICKS, CHEAPER
PAP? CHARACTERS.









Big Nate

WE'RE ALREADY LOSING
5-2' WE CAN'T LET
THESE GUYS GET TOO
FAR AHEAD

wHo's
NEXT
OAC




Arlo and Janis -


HE POE5NT
OKAY, YOU CANT. EXCUSE WORKEEK-
W'LL USE HE'S UN- ME? ENS. YOU
ZIPPER AVAILABLE. NEYER NO-
TOPAY. TICEP?


-. ? jJ
K-
-~ c~'



\j X'.~


The Grizzwells


Blondie

CAN YOU IMAGINE THE YEARS OF BAM!! AND JUST LIKE THAT, OMIGOODNESS! WHAT HAPPENED
TRAINING THOSE OLYMPIC RUNNERS THE RACE IS OVER! TO YOUR HAIR?! "
ENDURE JUST FOR ONE RACE?! THE END -
S-- -" I THINK IT
CLIP 0 .r. 1TDO WITH A NEWER
SW', ORL RECORD

e -is -t .. Me.n c T. I i rc
-._ I_ . .





Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Dinner is served, and the venue
will be the kitchen."


"I LIKE PICNICS' ALL I HAFTA BRING
t6 IWs AFTITE.'
Betty


Frank & Ernest


KIM, I JUST HEARD
THE OTHER TEAM SAY
THAT YOUR ROMANCE
WITH CHESTER. 15
DOOMED TO FAIL.
-7/-


I
WILL
DESTROY
THEM

COMEBACK
TIME


dil


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days" (PG) 12:15
p.m., 2:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Total Recall" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 5 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Watch" (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) In 3D. 2:25 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Total Recall" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20


p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days" (PG) 12:35
p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) In 3D. 3:10 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 10:25
p.m.
"The Watch" (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m., 2:45 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 12:30
p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:25 p.m., 7:55
p.m., 10:25 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: slenbe y


"UOJ NDEO RFJWW BK FDUO KNDXJ, UOJ


KMMN ANMZ OBTLJN."


- ROMWJZ GWJDEOJZ


"FOGU'R G RMBK VDUEOJT?"


KGNDR ODWUMT

Previous Solution: "I just think that things should be allowed to run their course, and
not turned into a Disney ride." Fiona Shaw
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 8-4


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tyndale House Publishing remains true to original mission


SUSAN DIBBLE
Arlington Heights
Daily Herald

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS,
Ill. When Ken Taylor
started Tyndale House Pub-
lishers 50 years ago, he
named it after the scholar
William Tyndale, whose
translation of the Bible into
English in the 1500s helped
lead to him being strangled
and burned at the stake.
Opposition to Taylor's
paraphrase of the Bible into
everyday English wasn't
nearly so virulent, but it did
have its critics. Scripture in
the vernacular seemed less
sacred, less authoritative
than King James English
and established publishers
declined to touch it.
The Living Bible, of
course, became a best-seller
for several years running
and since then, Tyndale
House has published nu-
merous other best-sellers in
both fiction and nonfiction.
The company celebrates its
golden anniversary this
year as one of the largest in-
dependent Christian pub-
lishers in the world.
But no one knew the fu-
ture back in 1962.
"We tend to have a short
memory of how important
and revolutionary The Liv-
ing Bible was," said Larry
Eskridge, associate director
of the Institute for the Study
of American Evangelicals at
Wheaton College. "He (Tay-
lor) was taking a big chance,
one that a lot of people crit-
icized him for at that time."
Eskridge said that despite
the initial hesitation to the
new approach to Scripture
in some religious circles,
Tyndale led the way for a
host of new Bible transla-
tions that soon followed and
for the plethora of specialty
Bibles published today that
are geared to particular au-
diences, such as women or
teens.
"The people in the pews
and churches kind of voted
with their purchases," he
said. "That did open the
floodgates for new versions
that were closer to modern
American English."
Ken Taylor passed away
in 2005 at the age of 88, and
his son, Mark, the com-


pany's president since 1984,
still leads Tyndale today
Headquartered in Carol
Stream, the company that
started in an old farmhouse
on the outskirts of Wheaton
now employs 260 staff and
publishes 80 new titles a
year. Like all publishers, it
is navigating the turmoil of
technological change by
branching out into eBooks
and social media marketing.
The means of publishing
may change, but Mark Tay-
lor said the mission of Tyn-
dale House remains the
same: to minister to the
spiritual needs of people
through literature consis-
tent with biblical principles.
"We're standing on the
shoulders of those who went
before us. That means those
who come after us in the fu-
ture will be standing on our
shoulders," Mark Taylor
tells employees. "It's impor-
tant for us to be faithful
stewards of these responsi-
bilities we have."
It was Mark Taylor and
his nine siblings who pro-
vided the initial inspiration
for Taylor to begin the para-
phrase of the Bible into
modern English. Ken Taylor
knew his 10 children did not
understand the King James
Version of the Bible they
used during family devo-
tions. So Taylor, then em-
ployed with Moody Bible
Institute in Chicago, used
his time during the com-
mute back and forth to the
city to write the Bible pas-
sage they would read that
evening into English his
children would understand.
His Living Letters, a para-
phrase of the New Testa-
ment Epistles, was
published in 1962. Interest
in this new version of Scrip-
ture picked up when Billy
Graham endorsed it on tele-
vision and distributed it
during his evangelistic cru-
sades. Taylor left his full-
time job with Moody and
continued to publish para-
phrases of other portions of
Scripture. The Living Bible
was published in its entirety
in 1971 and has since sold
more than 40 million copies.
Tyndale soon followed the
publication of The Living
Bible with a Bible for teens
called The Way One of the


very first specialty Bibles, it
combined the text of The Liv-
ing Bible with contemporary
photos and book introduc-
tions prepared by the staff of
Campus Life magazine.
"Prior to that, there was
no such thing as a teen-ori-
ented Bible," Mark Taylor
said.
One criticism of Bible
paraphrases are they are
not direct translations from
the original languages in
which Scripture was writ-
ten. By the late 1980s, Tyn-
dale addressed that concern
by gathering a committee of
scholars to do a translation.
The Holy Bible, New Liv-
ing Translation, was pub-
lished in 1996 and has sold
26 million copies.
Meanwhile, Tyndale had
branched out into publish-
ing other Christian litera-
ture. Tim LaHaye's
"Spirit-Controlled Tem-
perament," has sold about a
million copies since 1996
and continues to sell well,
according to information
provided by Tyndale House.
LaHaye later teamed up
with Jerry Jenkins to write
Tyndale's first hardcover
novel, "Left Behind," in
1995. The Left Behind se-
ries of apocalyptic novels
has sold more than 63 mil-
lion copies, with the first
book being the company's
best-selling individual title
apart from the Bible, Mark
Taylor said.
Tyndale made a deliber-
ate decision to break from
the past when it decided to
publish Christian novels,
Taylor said.
"Years ago Christian fic-
tion was almost nonexist-
ent," he said. "We decided
we wanted to publish Chris-
tian fiction because fiction
speaks to the heart of the
reader, not to the head. Fic-
tion, storytelling, is a great
way to communicate truth
and values."
Fiction sold by Tyndale
and other Christian publish-
ers includes inspirational
romances, a genre that still
raises eyebrows among
some believers. The fiction
creates sort of a fantasy
world, Eskridge said.
"Some Christians would
not consider that conductive
to producing spiritual


maturity," he said.
Taylor said publishing
has its trends. Self-help
books are no longer as big as
they once were, but heaven
has become a hot topic.
"The Boy Who Came Back
from Heaven," published by
Tyndale in 2010, became a
New York Times bestseller.
"Seventy-five percent of
Americans believe that
there is some kind of after-
life," Taylor said. "We all
want to know what happens
when grandma dies, what
happens when I die."
Other bestsellers pub-
lished by Tyndale House
have included Lisa
Beamer's "Let's Roll" pub-
lished after her husband,
Todd Beamer, led other pas-
sengers in bringing down
the terrorist-hijacked air-
liner bound for Washington,
D.C., during the Sept. 11 at-
tacks. Football coach Tony
Dungy published his mem-
oir, "Quiet Strength," with
Tyndale after leading the
Indianapolis Colts to win
the Super Bowl over the
Chicago Bears.
Tyndale House Publish-
ers, a for-profit company
owned by the nonprofit Tyn-
dale House Foundation, un-
abashedly looks for books
that will sell, Taylor said.
The publishing company ac-
cepts only submissions rec-
ommended by literary
agents and selects titles
carefully The likelihood of
a book's success determines
the size of an author's ad-
vance, Taylor said.
"Advances can range from
a low of $10,000 to a high of
$400 million," Taylor said.
"If an author already has
sold successfully a book
with a half-million copies,
every publisher wants to
publish that author's next
book."
Tyndale House reinvests
as many profits as it needs
back in the company, Taylor
said. Additional profits are
paid in dividends to the
nonprofit Tyndale House
Foundation. Over the years,
the foundation has donated
more than $147 million to
Christian missions and
charities, particularly those
focused on Christian litera-
ture. The company also has
sponsored mission trips to


Costa Rica and to New Or-
leans after Hurricane Kat-
rina. In yet another
outreach, Tyndale employ-
ees help in building homes
for Habitat for Humanity
"We're not asking employ-
ees to take vacation time to
do a mission trip. We see
that as part of our contribu-
tion to the larger commu-
nity," Taylor said.
Taylor, who began work-
ing at Tyndale as a sixth-
grader packing books, said
his father believed that hir-
ing the right people and
treating them well was in-
strumental to the company's
success. The only one of his
10 siblings to work in the
company as an adult, Mark
Taylor edited his first book
as a senior in high school
and, after college, went full-
time in 1973 intending to
stay only a couple of years.
The couple years have
stretched out to more than
30, he noted.
"I'm here because I enjoy
it and it's fulfilling to me,"
he said.
Apparently, many employ-
ees feel the same. Tyndale
regularly gives recognition
to employees celebrating 5,
10, 15,20, 30 years and mile-
stones beyond with the com-
pany Taylor recalled what
one employee had written
prior to a recent service
award presentation.
"I truly look forward to
Monday mornings," the em-
ployee said.
Employees are rewarded
for staying, and given op-
portunities for advance-
ment, Taylor said.
"We move people around
quite a bit from position to
position in the company," he
said. "As the company is
constantly changing, the
needs are changing. We're
always asking ourselves
who on staff has the right set
of skills for this position."
Tyndale also is willing to
keep employees in positions
in which they excel, said
Timothy Botts, senior art di-
rector at Tyndale and a
world-known calligrapher.
Botts said he started with
Tyndale 40 years ago shortly
after college and still de-
signs books. Normally a per-
son of his seniority might
wear a title like creative di-


rector, but no longer actu-
ally be involved with design,
he said.
"I'm not a manager or ad-
ministrator because that's
not what I'm good at," he
said. "I've appreciated the
way they help people in po-
sitions that are best for
them and best for the com-
pany"
An openly Christian com-
pany that holds weekly
chapel meetings, Tyndale is
careful to explain its values
to potential employees so
they may determine
whether they would fit in,
Botts said. Helping people
come to a relationship with
Christ and strengthening
families is central to the
company, he said.
"It really helps to believe
in the work you're doing and
have a mission you can buy
into," Botts said. "When you
come to work each day, it's
great because you know
you're contributing to those
causes."
Gwen Elliott, who began
23 years ago as a typesetter
with no experience and now
works in design composi-
tion, said Tyndale also has
enabled her to balance her
life as mother and now a
grandmother
"They are flexible," she
said.
To celebrate its 50th an-
niversary, Tyndale built its
first float in Glen Ellyn's
July 4 parade; developed an
anniversary page where
readers can share greetings,
a picture or video; and is
compiling a commemora-
tive gift book, "The Tyndale
House 50th Anniversary
Reader," as a limited edi-
tion for distribution to em-
ployees, key retailers and
industry leaders.
But in this ever-changing
world of publishing, what
does the future hold?
"I wish I knew the answer
to that," Taylor said.
Once bookstores were a
key partner, but with their
numbers drastically re-
duced, online sales are be-
coming a greater part of the
company's business. Last
year, 12 percent of Tyndale
House's sales were in
eBooks and Taylor said he
expects that percentage to
be higher this year.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds ,

-- -








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In Print

and

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for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Commission based,
write your own check.
Call (352) 628-5700
Ask for Jean

Wrecker
Operator

Exp. Only need apply
Apply In Person
No Phone Calls
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO
12059 N. Florida Ave.
Dunnellon





CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time customer
service/food prep position
25+ hours a week. Week-
ends required. Customer
service experience and
typing skills required. Fax
resume to 352-527-9605.





AIRLINES
ARE HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance, thru
SC Training. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294



ENROLLING
For All Programs I
I *COSMETOLOGY
BARBER
S MASSAGE THERAPY
*SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited





RUBBER STAMPS
Stampin Up 14 sets,


90+ stamps. Most never
used. $100 ALL
352-422-1309




Antique China Cabinet
Early 1900
New England depres-
sion years, good cond.,
solid wood & some ve-
neer 2 glass doors top,
full bottom drawer 70"
H x 34WW 16D $175 obo
Antique Slant Front
Secretary Desk w/
cubby holes & writing
desk, bottom storage
30W x 161/2 D, 37H, has
decal, red Lion Cabi-
net Co. $125. obo
(352) 382-0069


RECORD COLLECTION
72 pieces, $30 Please
call, 352-726-0040


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** * **
WANTED VINTAGE
Baseball Bats
Old Sporting Equipment
(727) 857-5176




DRYER$100 Works great
with warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Freezer, Upright
almost new
$400 or Trade
Refrigerator
(352) 726-3062
FRIDGE $100 Works
great with warranty.
Call/text352-364-6504
GAS GRILL Char-Broil
Two Burner w/ Side
No Tank- 419-5852
Asking $60.00
MICROWAVE E-WAVE
BRAND. Black.
Over-the-stove installa-
tion. Temperamental
turntable. $35 341 3607
Refrigerator
$150. obo
(352) 476-3793
REFRIGERATOR
.18CUFT. Side x Side,
Excel. $100
Dunnellon (352)465-4441
Side by Side
Refrigerator Kenmore
Water/Ice $300
GE Washing Machine
Heavy Duty $75.
(352) 628-7633
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Table w/ 4 captain
Chairs $60
Swimming Pool Slide
7 ft. $300
(352) 628-7633
Used Frigidaire
Washer & Dryer Set
Heavy Duty
$175.
(352) 302-6418
WASHER$100 Works
great with warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504




Craftsman 10" Radial
Arm Saw
excl. cond. $125
(352) 382-1971




2 40" TV's
Sony, Color Great
$85. ea
No Call before 10 am
(352) 628-4766
32" Sony TV
with Remote, excellent
Condition Color Perfect
$75.
352-382-2733
SONY 42 COLOR TV
Projector TV Good condi-
tion with stand $75.00
3525270324
TV 13 INCH WITH RE-
MOTE GOOD CONDI-
TION $25 352-613-0529
TV PORTABLE WITH
AM/FM RADIO GOOD
CONDITION $30
352-613-0529




DELL computerflat
monitor,mouse,keyboard
$100obo good
cond/works 422-4342
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON STYLUS NX215
INKJET PRINTER NO
WINDOWS 7 XTRA
BLACK INK. $30.00
352-726-0686




Patio Set
Round table w/ 5 chairs
excel. cond.
$80.
(630) 890-6650
THOMASVILLE
WALNUT WOOD
TABLE/CHAIRS Good
cond. $100 obo moving
must sell 422-2719




2 Sleeper Sofa's
Pastels & Rattan,
Matching Cocktail
Table, 2 end tables
Rattan & Glass top
2 Lamps $250.
352-601-0568
3 pc. sectional sofa
soft sage green
showroom condition
$850 obo
(352) 637-2450
3 Wrought Iron
Bar Stools,
Like new, $25. ea.
(352) 382-1630
After 9am, until 8pm
5 Shelf Bookcase
$ 50.00 Tall Table & 4
chairs (Ashley) $ 300.00
Good condition.
By appt. Only.
304-544-8398 Cell
19X64 ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER VERY
NICEHOLDS 32 IN TV
$25.00 352-621-0142
2" FOAM MATTRESS
TOPPER. King.
Zippered Cotton cover.
From JCP. New. $99.00
628-3585


5X8 AREA RUG NICE
MULTI PRINT,2YRS
OLD.$30.00
352-621-0142


Basset Reclining
Rocker,
brown, in great
condition $85. www.
aaraaesale3089.com
(352) 341-3711

BEDROOM SET
Colonial-dresser w/mirror,
chest of drawers, night-
stand. $70 207-385-9322

Boston Rocker
$ 25.
Good Condition
(304) 544-8398

Curio Cabinet,
white
washed oak,
lighted, w/
glass shelves
15'Wx
6ft High $50. Sofa
7ft
teal, floral, loose
cush-
ions, matching
chase
lounge chair. Uke
new
$350. 352-
726-5584

DESK STUDENT WOOD
Some scratches Ideal
for kids Dark Wood $25.
352-270-3909


I 00C8LG(


CLASSIFIED




Dining Rm. Set,
glass
top, 42" Wx 72"
Lw/
marble & medal
trim, 6
chairs, matching
side
table, coffee, 2
end
tables $975 All or
separate. Antique
solid
oak drop leaf
table 4
bentwood chairs,
excel.
$375. 352-
726-5584

DRESSER BEDROOM
desk combo 4 drawers
Oak look particleboard
Nice shape Great for kids
$25 352-270-3909

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 19X64
HOLDS 32 INCH TV
352-621-0142 25.00

ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER HOLDS 32INCH TV
MEDIUM OAK FINISH
GOOD CONDITION $60
352-613-0529


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ETHAN ALLEN HEIR-
LOOM End Tables-$100
352-382-4911
HEADBOARD THE OAK
WOOD EXCELLENT
CONDITION FOR
QUEEN $50
352-777-1256
KING SIZE BED WITH
BOX SPRINGS SERTA
PERFECT SLEEPER
CLEAN $125
352-613-0529
King Size Bed,
headboard, footboard,
side rails, box spring
& Mattress
$200. (352) 220-3212
LAZBOY ROCKER RE-
CLINER Excellent condi-
tion, blue fabric. $100.00
352-257-5722 for details
LEATHER FURNITURE
Sofa and Chair and
Coffee Table. 2 yrs old
excellent condition
$895.
(352) 697-5530
MAUVE WING BACK
CHAIR in very good
condition-no rips-made
by Pioneer-$60.00 OBO
527-1399
Pecan Wood China
Cabinet, glass doors &
sides, has 3 drawers
2 storage doors
50Lx 15W 82H $450
obo (352) 382-0069
Power Adjustable Sleep
System Bed, Twin, extra
long, solid 10" memory
foam, like new $450
Originally $1,100
352-637-3550


Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Bedroom Suite,
white formica- mirror,
headboard 2 end ta-
bles, dresser & mirror
Serta Mattress's & Box
pring $250 Dining Room
Table and 6 chairs,
china hutch, formica,
cream colored, glass &
mirrors, lighted $200.
352-601-0568
Queen Sleigh Bed,
box springs/mattress,
Highboy & Nightstand
$ 500. Ethan Allen Sofa
$ 300. good cond.
Seen by appt. Only.
304-544-8398, Cell
RECLINER CHAIR
Tweed blue cloth good
condition $40.00
513-4473
Tempurpedic
Elec adj
bed, w/remote
full size
1 year old.
Excel cond.
$1,000 White 5 ft.
dresser w/mirror,
night
stand, 2 twin
headboard
frames $300.
726-5584


SOFA
3 Cushioned, floral de-
signed, excel, cond. $100
(352) 795-9664
True Memory 12"
California Kg reversible
latex mattress.
Excel. cond. 6 mo old
New Paid $1,200
Asking $800.
(352) 637-2838
Two 8 Drawer Dressers
w/ new Hardware
$60. ea
(352) 341-4444
Two Matching Sofas,
each w/two matching pil-
lows. Pink floral w/sage.
$55 ea.
(352) 726-4656
WHICKER HEAD
BOARD, FULL BED SIZE
good cond. $40.00
513-4473
Wood Dining Rm Table
Set, Oval 2 22" leaves
6 high back chairs &
china cabinet,
$1,500. obo
(630) 890-6650




I Year Old
48" Walk Behind Mower
with Sulky &
Grass Catcher
$1,500 firm
(352) 860-1611
Garden Tiller
&
Chipper Shredder
Both Have New Engines
$225. ea
Call (352) 795-8085


TROY-BILT lawn mower
21" high-wheel
self-propelled mulching
mower $100.00
(352)726-3731





HUGH GOLDEN BAR-
REL CACTUS 5FT.DIA.
BY 13"TALL IN TERRA
COTTA POT $100FIRM
586-7222





BIG SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri, & Sat 8am to 2pm
Riding mower, DR ta-
ble & chairs, collect-
ible glass, Hummels,
antiques, jewelry
tools & More behind
Olive Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81


CRYSTAL RIVER
11119 West State Park
Street-NON SMOKING
Moving Sale-
ALL MUST GO-
House/Kitchenware,
furniture, electronics,
King Bed, entertain-
ment center, TV's, Gun
Cabinet, books, tools,
fishing equipment,
clothes, etc..Saturday &
Sunday 10-3 Daily-
NO EARLY BIRDS


*No fine print.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VERY DRIVE L N
"VERY DRIVE


EVENT -



1 2012


LINCOLN


JUST SIGN
AND DRIVE


so


DOWN
PAYMENT


MKZ


FIRST MONTH'S
PAYMENT


so


$33 9
W W 7 F 'l.:,,,,,-II-,,-


hilt F.:


PLUS $2,000 LINCOLN COMPETITIVE CONQUEST CASH FOR COMPETITIVE LESSEES


LINCOLN DEPENDABILITY


2012 LI
JUST SIGN
AND DRIVE


NCOLN


MKX


SO DOWN ISf FIRST MONTH'S S
$ PAYMENT.,- PAYMENT


CASH DUE
AT SIGNING


$4491


I I l.- ..


PLUS $2,000 LINCOLN COMPETITIVE CONQUEST CASH FOR COMPETITIVE LESSEES


A NO COMPROMISE CROSSOVER


2012 LI
JUST SIGN
AND DRIVE


so


NCOLN


SO FIRST MONTH'S I
PAYMENT


$ u LF ': LI I -F 1L-
S$4 2 9 ,.:l., ,1 ._I L-i


_: 1~~1111 it1~ 1 ':1 . F


PLUS $2,000 LINCOLN COMPETITIVE CONQUEST CASH FOR COMPETITIVE LESSEES


HIGH PERFORMANCE IN A HYBRID IS POSSIBLE


Nick


Nicholas


Crystal River 795-7371
Visit us at www.nicknicholaslincoln.com


Nick
..\---
Nicholas
Ford S.R.44
Lincoln
Fomly l o F98
Formerly Gulf Coa.t Ford


Squaly for LINCOLN AFS RED CARPET LEASE All
2 See deaer or details Not all buyers will quai


LINCOLN


CASH DUE
AT SIGNING


MKZ
HYBRID


DOWN
PAYMENT


CASH DUE
AT SIGNING


w


m


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 Cll




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


If It Boasts
Zero Maintenance


BMW in Ocala


0


Costs For Four Years... T "eUme
bmwinocala.com Driving Machine"
If It's The Ultimate
Driving Machine...

Then it must be a BMW
from BMW of Ocala.


BMW Ultimate ServiceT":
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Total Maintenance Charges: $0


New 2012


BMW 328i Sedan


Lease For 349Per Month
36 Months with $3999 down, including $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
20 per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 8/5/2012.


New 2012 BMW


328i Convertible


Lease For 469 Per Month
36 Months with $3200 down, including $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
20t per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 8/5/2012.


New 2012 BMW


528i Sedan


Lease For 559Per Month
36 Months with $2000 down, including $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
204 per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 8/5/2012.


New 2012 BMW


X5 xDrive35d


II.

:~ I


Lease For 569 Per Month
36 Months with $2500 down, including $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
20t per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 8/5/2012.



BMW

ofOcala
3949 College Rd. e Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
BMWinOcala.com
DDDC7FB


-ASw SE
ONTVI;;;i


All lease offers exclude sales tax and include tag, title, registration and dealer fees. All leases are 39 months with
$4775 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit for well-qualified buyers. All leases are
10,000 miles per year, 200 per mile thereafter. *0% APR financing for 60 months is $16.67 per month per $1000
borrowed with $0 down. **0% APR financing for 72 months is $13.89 per month per $1000 borrowed with $0
down. All offers are subject to credit approval. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 8/5/2012.


Volkswagen

of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
VWofOcala.com


C12 SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012


/ TI I11 1
. 6 IL^ J lliT ?.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SullMiva N <^wc


SUMMER'S BEST EVENT


FROM
CADILLAC


plO ? A'PR NEW' 01S219
I/ W ROMNOSi ON LE CAI L UI M S .
$16.67 PER THOUSAND FINANCED WAC FROM ALLY FINANCIAL WITH $0 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAG, FEES. *WITH APPROVED CREDIT AT VARIOUS LENDERS AND TERMS BASED ON MODEL YEAR. PLUS TAX, TAG AND FEES.


-l- 6,988
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
s3,988
2005 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
#C2T230A


"13,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$10,995/$207Mo.

2008 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
#C1T072A


W 16,488
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
1 3,488/$21 OMO






CASH OR TRADE EQUITY


2010 HONDA ACCORD CPE
#C2T1 77A


22,489
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$1 9,489P299mo.

2011 GMC CANYON
#C382700


*,26,388
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$23,388I354Mo.

2012 CADILLAC CTS


1984 DATUSN 300Z
NEW PAINT, NEW SEATS, T TOPS


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE
#C2S098J


10,395
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$7,395/$224Mo.

2006 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
#C382420A


*13,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
1 0,995$1 48Mo.

2008 CADILLAC DTS
#2T445A


$16,665
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$1 3,665P21 3o.

2008 SATURN OUTLOOK
#C382630



CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$1 6,325/254Mo.

2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
#C34251OA


%'222,677
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$19,677/5303mo.

2012 LINCOLN MKZ
#C82280


s26,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
523,995P363mo.
2011 CADILLAC DTS



"37,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$34,995/$484Mo.


2005 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
#C382710


113,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
1 0,995P207mo.

2009 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
#C382250A


$14,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
11,995$1 87M.

2006 HUMMER H3
#C385210


'S 167,488
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$14,488I-258Mo.


2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE
#C382070A


*12,495
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$9,495/$178M0.

2010 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
#C382550


*14,688
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
11,688$165mo.

2006 CHRYSLER 300
#C2S149A


516,770
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$13,770/$236Mo.

2011 CHEVROLET IMPALA
#C2T178A


119,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$16,995/$257Mo.

2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
#C381970


^$;A' 22,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$19,995/$249Mo.

2011 MERCEDES BENZ C-CLASS
#C382220


s429,995
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$26,995/$408o.

2009 CADILLAC XLR
24K MILES, SAVE $50K


$49,795
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$46,795/699Mm.


20,965
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$1 7,965/$2800.

2008 CADILLAC SRX TRUCK
#C382440B


*24,250
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$21,250/-331MO.

2011 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
#C2M237A


S 34,500
-s3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$31,500/477Mo.

2011 CADILLAC CTS-V COUPE
#2K610A


s58,000
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$55,000P835m.


2007 CADILLAC STS
#C382570


0
a

O




I





U
.1






.1







0




U



z
i


























I


S34,998
-$3,000
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$31,998I475o.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2012 C13


p









C14 SATURDAY, AU




Aug 4, 9-4, Aug 5 9a-2p
Rattan Furniture,
Antiques, Patio furni-
ture, TV's, China
4735 E. Withlacoochee
Trail. off Hwy CR39
HOMOSASSA
7133 Sue Ann Lane
Huge moving sale every-
thing must go. Items
range from furniture to
collectables and the sale
will be inside and out.
Saturday and Sunday
from 9am to whenever.
HOMOSASSA
Fri, & Sat. 8a-3p
2 Family Sale, Antiques
tools, jewlery, furn., qn.
bed., decorator items,
toys, designer clothes
Lots of Quality Items
11927 W. Timberlane Dr.
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat, 8a-4p
All proceeds go to
feed the hungry.
Helping Hands Ministry
3210 S. Regal Lilly Way
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-Until
Collectors of old LP's,
Avon, Hess Trucks, Fire
Trucks, Sears, Texaco
Hershey trucks. Tools,
outboard motors
& MUCH MORE.
4055 E. Jessie Lane
INVERNESS
Fri. 3, Sat. 4, Sun. 5
INSIDE SALE* 9A-4P
411 Hemlock Street.
PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8a-2p
MOVING IN
Furn., Antiques, tools,
Wash/Dry, Stove,
3135 W. Daffodil Drive



Whole house sale
call for items available
(954) 775-4243



Tony Llama cowboy
boots, 9.5D, slightly used,
great cond. $25
(352) 344-1515



!!!!!!!235/65 R17!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
!!!!!!!35X12.50 R15!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****265/75R15*****
Good tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
****215/65 R17i****
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
::::::::245/65 R17:::::::
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
-----245/45 R18 -----
Good tread!! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)586-5485
1 Angel Coffee table,
with glass Top
and I end table $200
26" Sony TV $150
(352) 489-4761
2 AQUARIUMS 20 gallon
aquarium with
stand,filters,rocks,etc.
30 Gallon aquarium with
stand,filters
,rocks and 3 turtles. Too
many things to mention.
$150.00 takes all
352-637-2726
2 PIN FISH TRAPS- ex-
cellent cond., $15.00
each 352-628-0033
3 MONKEY TAIL CACTI
W/RED FLOWERS
TERRA COTTA WALL
POTS $50/EA FIRM UN-
USUAL 586-7222
3 Wheel Handicap
Scooter
Headlights, taillights
built in charging sys.
Newly refurbished
$450. obo Must Sell
Call Ed (352) 613-6331
4 Piece leather
sec-
tional green, w/
recliner
& qn. bd. $575.
excel
cond. Washer
Dryer Set
Whirlpool, 1 yr.
old
white, like new
$450.
352- 726-5584
ADJUSTABLE TRIPOD
Vivitar 980, $20 Please
Call, 352-726-0040


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179







Nursing Homes
are not the
only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home St. Lic#6906450
Alzhe merDementa
No problem 503-7052







SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518







THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


JGUST 4, 2012



^^^^


P


Portable By Fodders,
7500 BTU's on wheels,
window vented, Room
to Room Like New $210
(352) 270-8475
Air Hockey Table
$250 obo.
TV Stand holds up to
63" TV, silver w/ glass
shelf $100
(352) 270-0191
ALUMINUM LADDER 6
FEET GOOD CONDI-
TION $30 352-613-0529
BLACK DOG CRATE
great cond. small/med.
dog $25 422-2719
BLACKBERRY PEARL
8130 SPRINT $50 EX
condition like new in box
accessories included
270-2414
Chest Freezer
White $50.
Card/Snooker Table
w/ 6 rolling chairs
$75
(352) 422-2516
COMPUTER PRINTER
TABLE 28" HIGH 20"
WIDE 16" DEEP
WALNUT COLOR $20.00
352-726-0686
Ekornes Stressless
Love Seat Light Tan
Leather w/ wood trim
New $,4,500,
Asking $1,500 obo
352-270-0191
H.P.PRINTER-OFFICE
JET-ALL IN ONE #7210.
Pnrinter-Fax-Scanner $55.
Call 352-382-1154
HUGH GOLDEN BAR-
REL CACTUS 5ft DIA.
BY 13"TALL BLOOMING
YELLOW FLOWERS
$100FIRM 586-7222
INFANT'S CAR SEAT
Good condition. Boy's
blue grey. Safety 1st co.
$20 (352)465-1616
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. delv.
(772)781-1262
KING ABERDEEN COM-
FORTER SET 7-Piece
Set Like New $45.00
FIRM 352-382-4911
Kitchen Table Set
w/ 4 cushion chairs
on wheels $500
Washer & Dryer,
Top Loaders Fridgidair
$700. (352) 726-0928
Lg Computer desk
w/cabinet.Pull out end to
form L shape.Like
new.Oak finish. $65.
Call 352-382-1154
LG OPTIMUS SPRINT
$50 TOUCH SCREEN
Mint condition orig box
with accessories included
270-2414
Mikasa Dishes
Set of 12,
Black & white
$50.
(352) 726-0928
ORIENTAL RUGS (6)
Turkish & Hand Loomed
1960's. well cared for.
Origianl owner. 2 extra
large Room Rugs,
4 smaller area rugs.
Beautiful brilliant colors
and patterns $2,2,00 ALL
352-746-1486
RUBBERMAID ACTION
PACKER 24 Gal Rub-
bermaid Action Packer
Storage Box (New) $15.
Call 352-382-1154
SEWING MACHINE
Kenmore 1760 Zig Zag
in pine cabinet.
Works perfect.
$65.00 352-382-4873
Simpsons season 1 dvd
box set $12, 860-2475
TABLE & Chairs, Cap-
tains style Dark Pine
$100.00 352-628-5312
TABLE Round pedestal
with tile top, leaf & 4
chairs. Pine $200.00
352-628-5312
Temper pedic Mattress
Queen temper cloud
line, 9 months old,
med. firmness, like new
sell for $1,700 new
will sacrifice for $1,000
(352) 344-4384
Toddler Bed
All wood, w/ mattress
Extra side rail for safety
New $65. Mini Ab Circle
Pro New condition $70
(352) 634-1697
Trailer Frame 19ft x 7ft,
dual Axle $500
Lawn Mower
Craftsman LT4000 21 H
$400
(352) 419-2144
WATER BED. Like new.
Nice Summa II model.
Queen size. Firm side
with 6 tubes. Fits normal
frame. $50 OBO.
527-6709




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD

COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775


"NEW" 40W STEREO
CHORUS AMP W/I RE-
VERB & 2 8"SPEAKERS
SOUNDS GREAT! $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE GUITAR
VINTAGE SUNBURST,
2 HUMMBUCKERS $85
352-601-6625
ACCORDION
New, with case
48 Bass, Lark,
Pd. $445 Asking $300
(352) 270-8212
ACOUSTIC
DREDNAUGHT GUITAR
W/GIGBAGTUNERSTRAP
STRINGS,ETC $40
352-601-6625
LAGUNA 3/4 SIZE GUI-
TAR 2 HUMMBUCKERS
MAT BLACK W/BLACK
HARDWARE $85
352-601-6625
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
wood and padded bench
access to music sheets in
seat stow. $35.00
513-4473




BEDSPREAD/2 SHAMS
full size cotton multistnpe
blue/green excellent con-
dition $15. 352-270-3909
COMFORTER KING size
brown/beige reversible
CLEAN & NICE $20.
352-270-3909
COMFORTER QUEEN
SIZE BLUE
PLAID/STRIPES CLEAN
& NICE $20.
352-270-3909
COMFORTER QUEEN
SIZE RED AND WHITE
FLORAL CLEAN and
NICE $20. 352-270-3909
COMFORTER SET
FULL size light/dark
gray sheets/bedskirt/4
pillowcases/sheers
NICE $25. 352-270-3909
COVERLET QUEENS-
IZE medium solid blue
in good clean condition
$15. 352-270-3909
FULL SIZE SHEET set
dark green Used good
clean condition $6.00
352-270-3909
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened. Self-adhesive,
re-positionable. $20
341-3607
NAVAJO YEI SANDPA-
INTING Hunchback fertil-
ity gods. Framed, signed,
dated. 16x16 $25
341-3607
SHEET SET DARK
GREEN Queen size used
good clean condition both
sheets/pillowcases $6.00
352-270-3909
SHOWER CURTAINS (2)
Fabric good clean condi-
tion Dark green solid
Red/green pattern $6.
each 352-270-3909
TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES. Brand
New! 2 Kleenex holders,
3 wall units, 12 shower
hooks. $40 341-3607




2 BICYCLES
Men & Women
Pure Sport. Brand New
only used 3 times
$250. ea
(352) 419-5826
16 ft. CANOE AND
TRAILER
$450
(352) 249-0877
357 MAG FED SELF DE-
FENSE AMMO 125g JHP
1 box $65, Inverness
864-283-5797
Bond S/S Over & Under,
Derringer Shoots Colt
.45 Long & .410 2/2"
.410 3" Shotgun Shells
2 set of barrels, C/C
tan leather holster, 4
boxes of ammo $450.
obo 352-344-0084
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
Saturday 4th 11 am,
$35. (352) 419-4800
DOME TENT 14X8
OZARK TRAIL $45 Brand
new never used Sleeps
4-5 comes in Canvas tote
270-2414
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
1911A1 9MM CMDR Un-
cataloged piece by Spr
Armory, polymer Hi-cap
4" SS brl and slide negoti-
ated between Sprg Ar-
mory and Bul LTD same
as Kimber Ten II. Factory
Kimber barrel/sights but
slide/frame marked Spr
Armory 3 mags $685
CCW or rcpt, steve
352-586-4022


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


GUN Mossberg,
12 Ga. Pump, 500A
excel cond. $275.
or trade for pistol
(352) 637-0987
RR STOCKMAN KNIFE
3.5" closed, tortoise
scales, new in box. $13
860-2475
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
YAMAHAALUM PROP
$40 10 3/8X13 VG cond
fits mid size motors with
13 spline shaft 270-2414






2008 UTILITY LAND-
SCAPE TRAILER Used
modified 4X6 utility trailer
with drive up ramp. Has
spare tire overhead racks
and safety chains. $300
352-436-4578 or
817-279-3203



2 CAR SEAT FOR IN-
FANT $25 EACH SMALL
SWING MUSICAL $25
exc cond walker car $10
352-777-1256
BOUNCE DELUXE $25
AND STROLLER
GREEN AND BROWN
$35 gym for baby $20 de-
luxe musical 32-777-1256
STROLLER AND EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
$40 FOR GIRL pink and
brown flower playpen $40
excel cond 352-7771256

^^^^^-I


*\V





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
hliard Cues Coins & Jew-

Chris @352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net





3 MORKIES Available
2 females $550 ea.
1 Male $500.
4 Shorkies 1 Female
$550 3 Males $500 ea.
352-212-4504, 212-1258
Blue Dobberman
Female Have Papers
Needs Registered Stud
Immediately
Show Papers
(352) 621-3105


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


CLASSIFIED



CATS AND KITTENS
Cats and kittens are on
display at Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter!!!! Lots to choose
from!!! All adoptions in-
clude spay/neuter, mi-
crochip, up to date on
all shots, flea and worm
treatment. Our 1/2 price
sale of $17.50 has been
extended!!! Cats and
kittens are great stress
relievers! Come see us!
Citrus Cty Animal Shel-
ter, 352 746 8400, 10-4
Tues thru Sat.
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Female Daschund, AKC
papers, 14 mo., all shots,
spayd, good w/kids,
hsebrkn, all acc. $500
(352) 419-6901

FEMALE PUG
PUPPIES
8 weeks, health certs.
$250 ea.
Dave (352) 419-6954

HAPPY JACK
DuraSpot:
latest technology in
flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs.
Patented. At farm,
feed & hardware
stores. Distributed by
Fuller Supply
(205)343-3341.
www.c
happyjackinc.com


MALE SHEPHERD MIX
Are you looking for your
new best friend? Little
Bear is an awesome
companion. He's a
2-year-old shepherd mix
whose owner gave him
up due to housing issues.
He learns quickly, knows
some basic commands
and is very laid-back and
well mannered in the
house, preferring to rest
on the floor wherever his
human is. While he gets
along well with other dogs
on walks and on public
outings, he would do best
in a home without other
dogs or cats. He is heart-
worm negative and has
already been microchip-
ped. His adoption fee of
$60 includes vaccina-
tions, neutering, free obe-
dience class and a month
of free pet insurance.
Meet him to see if he's
the perfect dog for you.
Email
sheltervol@gmail.com for
info or call 352-568-5095.

MaltiPoo Pups
Teacups, Adorable non
shed, great
disposition. 1st shots,
$400 (352) 794-3081
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpuos.net




Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR


Livestock


*




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* **i* * *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp home cleaner for
hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
LECANTO
2/1, $450. month
(352) 628-2312

OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a

Mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759

auroraacresfl.com




30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Info
(352) 726-2234
BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

DON'T MISS OUT!
2004 Homes of Merit,
3/2 1450 sq. ft., on 1/2
acre corner lot, paved
road. Very clean,
fenced yard, beautiful
oak trees, decks, util-
ity shed. Must see!
$3,000 down
$356. mo W.A.C.
Buy while rates are
at all time low (3.5%)
(352) 621-9181

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

For Sale'g
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2
bath. 2007 Nobility
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18'x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** A* *


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $15
WE DO IT ALLY!
352-563-9824, 228-7320

Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570

ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


8-4 @ LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal Uclick, 2012

"The fingerprint evidence is pretty
conclusive, your honor."



king's Land a Tree Service.
^- Clearing 4^LC
3Y uFree EstImates '

Tree Brush & Stump
)^ J ^Removal
Stump Grinding
7 _.. = Tree Trimming
Hauling,- Light Demolition
I 'Family Owned & Operated


find C' On
uWW.lmustmhhhrIUCOLcCOM Facehook


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




3/2 Double wide, on
large corner lot. New
AC in 2011, Many Up-
grades, quiet and close
to shopping $42,000 by
owner (352) 628-4819
HERNANDO
1/1 Mobile, Y/Acre
MOL, As Is $10,000 Cash
Parsley Real Estate
Gareth Rouillard
352-422-5731
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925







HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition,
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217
JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346


ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536


Lee k
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*SUMMER SPECIAL*
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090






OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a

mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.








Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


RV LOT FOR RENT
OR SALE by OWNER
LOT #119
Nature Coast Landings
(352) 634-5300




OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a

mo.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com











Employment

source is...








www chronicleonlne corn


SOD! SOD! SOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221





TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lic. #2713, Insured.





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


W Alk
loka
L F-W
NOR D









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-YcTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REAllTY, INC
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHomeRenlals.corn
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS
1635 Greendale ...........$1,200
3/3/2 Pool,fireplace,close to schools
146W. Seyneria............. $675
2/1 5/1 Cute cozy home on corner lot
CRYSTAL RIVER
548 N. Gulfl............. $750
3/1/1 Fenced yard,close to
Rock Crusher Elementary
11435 Dixie Shores......... $900
3/1 Stit home, newer floors, dock
HOMOSASSA
6747 W. Oak Park Ln........ $700
2/2/2 NewerSMW Duplex
5865 W.Vilkre Path........ $725
3/2/1 Cozy home, large yard, close to
Rock Crusher Elementary
6139 S.RoyalDr..... REDUCED!S795
2/1/1 Conal side greotview, dock
7843 W.Solr P............ $725
2/2 Incl lawn & water, newer duplex





CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
Large Studio, furnished
Pool access. $450/mo
Need ref's & Sec.
(352) 804-2953





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/I BA $400-$500


BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644


RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

2151 N. River Reach
Circle, Crystal River.FL
34448, 352-795-8024
Now Accepting
Applications
Over 62 or Disabled
with or without
children
1 & 2 bedrooms
Equal Housing
Opportunity






SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY






INGLIS 2/1
Near Power Plant, W/D,
Clean, Quiet, Part. Furn.
$495/mo.(352) 447-6016





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. Condo Clean
with membership
352-476-4242, 527-8002





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 $550/month mncl
water & lawncare
270-7420


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Carport, Carpet
$450.mo. 352-302-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525,
1/1 Corner Lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1
Clean $550mo. Fst.
ILst./Sec(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Cen Air, Remod-
eled like new Sec. 1st.,
$640 mo. 352-228-3454
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, Super Clean, No
Pets, $750. 1st. & Sec.
352-489-2266, 322-5073
CR/HOM., 3/2/1
CHA, $575: 2/1 $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/2 Near power plant
$750 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
FLORAL CITY
3/1, $550. mo. 1st, last,
sec. (352) 228-1272
INV. HIGHLANDS
2/1/1 Avail. Aug. 1, $650.
Mo.(352) 201-0842
INV-WATERFRONT
3/2/1 Sea Wall, Dock,
Remodeled, Like New,
Fenced yard
Come See Vacant
$850.00 1st,last,sec.
(352) 270-1775



HERNANDO
3/2 $550. 1st. Ist. & sec.
No Pets 352-302-2624
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
Female Renter Looking
for female roommate
to share 3/2 Modular
5 acres $300., 697-9819



CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$11Owkly/l420mo. also
avail. $120wkly,
$440mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428



Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own. 3/2. 2.5 ac.. 1,370
s.f.. DDWD. very rural.
10K down. $495/mo.
(352)600-8174
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrmina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
heanng impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


#1 Employment source is














www.chronicleonline.com


Nature Coast Landings
RV Resort ESTATE
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.detailsbyowner.com for
pictures and info.
$89,500. 352-843-5441




FOR SALE OR LEASE
1,200 sq. ft.
OFFICE SPACE
In Executive Condo
Center in Crystal River
352-794-6280, 586-2990




Citrus Spring 3/2/2,
Built in 2007
Move In Ready.
All Appliances,Fenced
Corner Lot, $79,000.
(352) 489-5443


Citrus Springs 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Beautiful
2006 home with many
upgrades, must see.
Build by papa bear con-
struction on corner lot
with empty lots next door.
Curbing and rver rock
around house, stone, irri-
gation system, secunty
system, new upgraded
ac/heating unit in 2011.
Home is 1750sp.ft living,
Asking price is $129,900.
Call or email for pictures
of info 352-220-8114 or
ghaslett2001@yahoo.com




2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$53,900. 352 746-6050

REDUCED!
$83,900. Like New
3/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
New appliances,
flooring, toilet/ vani-
ties, pain in and out.
1747 sf liv. area.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089




Country Living
within City Limits
3/2'/2, with Pool
$115,00
(352) 344-0033
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598




Homosassa


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
Isellcitruscountv@y
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Real Estate
For Sale I


Quade

Feeser
Realtor-Associate
352-302-7699 (cell)
352-726-6668 (office)
qfeeserychoo.comCENT
URY21,
J.W.MORTON
REAL ESTATE
1645 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450


Tony Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell *

I'll Represent YOU

ERA
American Realty






OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a

Mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759

aurorawwsfl.com
auroraacresfl.com


CLASSIFIED




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857

CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2. $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529


OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a

Mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759

auroraacresfl.com


Sellers I have
SOLD 13 Homes
in 6 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!












DEB INFANTINE

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

SOLD 4.1 MILLION
THIS YEAR!!!
If you are looking
for a true
"Gold Medal"
REALTOR.
pick one who will win.
To list and sell, call
Quade 352-302-7699.


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area. well. pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre surveyed,80%
clear corner lot dead end
street.county assessed at
$25k.have title asking
$14,500 o.b.o.
813-792-1355



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



SUGARMILL WOODS.
BUILDING LOT
IN OAK VILLAGE
$20K Firm
352- 726-9587
352-228-0357



CRYSTAL RIVER
Freshwater! Seawall
w/sprgs boat slip 90/110.
$125,000 352-795-6282



CAROLINA SKIFF
J16 '96.28HPJhnson.jet
drv, bimini top. fish
findr. w/trlr. All recently
second $3995. 746-1115
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(Hotmail.com
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
LOWE
2011 Jon Boat 14 foot,
9.9 Mercury outboard
motor, trailer, boat cover.
Brand new. $2000.00
Please call 440-813-7169
PONTOON
20' with trailer. 60hp
Johnson Nice and
clean $3,200
(352) 726-6197
SEASQUIRT
18FT CC, 90HP,
Yamaha ,new power.
head, GPS, Chart plot-
ter. dept Finder, trailer
$5,000. 352-287-1668




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
RV LOT FOR RENT
OR SALE by OWNER
LOT #119
Nature Coast Landings
(352) 634-5300
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides.
kg bdlike new. 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298
THOR, Windsport
2000, Class A, 31 ft.,
V10 Ford w/ 21K mi.,
Sr owned, no pets, no
smoke, 6 new tires, 2
new AC units, no slides
but full basement.
great mileage. $15,900
Gene 352-207-1080




R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof.
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven.
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825


ITBUYTRVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
KZ Sportsman
2011. Hybrid, 19ft.
sleeps 6. air & bath
$8,500 (352) 249-6098



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
I Buy Any Junk Car
$250 FLAT RATE
(800)277-1569
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.


CHEVROLET
1999 Corvette coupe.
White with both tops.
33000 miles,titanium ex-
haust system,goodyear
run flat tires,heads-up
display,6-speed
manual,leather seats,
memory key. Garage
kept in pristine
condition.Asking $22,000
call 1-352-503-6548
CHEVROLET
2000 Lumina
74k miles excellent cond.
$2,000 obo
(352) 726-3703
Ford
'01 Mustang Conv.
83k, leather, V6, ext.
clean,Red Pearl $5950
o (352) 257-4251
c (352) 794-6069
FORD
2008 Taurus Selling my
mom's 2008 Taurus SEL.
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18
months or until 36,000
miles. Lt blue extenor.
Tan leather interior.
Sunroof. Great shape.
$13 495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326
HONDA
'08, Accord, 4 DR,
EX-LNAV 4 cyl. 5 spd.
manual, navagation
leather 57.500 mi.
1 own $14,500
(609) 330-8435 Cell
HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ALLOYS
352-628-4600
PONTIAC GTO '05
Rare, Red! 6.0 V8 6 sp,
0-60 in 4.5. 450 BHP. 200
mph. New Tires. Cry Riv
$14,400 727-207-1619
SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600
TOYOTA '10
Prius, II w/ leather,
sandy beach metalic,
excel. cond. 26k mi.
$19,500 (352) 527-0347
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK '89 89,
Reatta, Red Coupe,
leather int. V6. new ti-
res & air, some restora-
tion. Runs good Selling
cheap (727) 488-6474
MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
excel. cond., one owner,
81k mi., garage kept
$7,500 (352) 726-0258







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555
CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018
DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK. TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $22,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8.
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4 5.4L, leather
loaded Clean, $20.850
352-341-0018


SATURDAY,AUGUST 4,2012 C15




BY TRICKY RICKY KANE

1. Worn-outfood-cooking container (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair ofwords (likeFATCAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Dawdling Dust Bowl inhabitant (2) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Silent politico Gingrich (1) syllables in each word.

I 2012UFS,Dist byUnv Ucick forUFS
4. Torah puncture (1)


5. Red Cross founder Clara's milk boxes (2)


6. Casino employee's potato scrapers (2)


7. Staten Island boats' Spanish wines (2)


SaIrMaHS SaIHSiaa 'L SMa S'Iad SHIIVaa'9 SNOIIVH SNO1Iva 's
aTOH T11oai lMaN aIm' E aHIO AIOd'* lOd 10HS "I
8-4-12 SHAMSNV


ISUZU
'89, Pick Up Truck new
paint, tires,5 spd, 234K
mi. Runs New $1,700.
firm (352) 302-6418
TOYOTA
'98, Tacoma, 4 cyl. 5
speed, runs great,
high miles $2, 400.
352-257-4251, 794-6069

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
*k Low Payments *r
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440





HONDA
2005, CR-V SE. LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8. 4X4.
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600


Nissan
'98 Pathfinder
White w/tan leather V6,
104k, ext. clean, $4950
o (352) 257-4251
c (352) 794-6069




DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 7! $5,450.
352-341-0018

DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN
2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6, 150k miles,
A/C, tinted windows, tilt,
pw, pd, cruise. $2,950
(352) 527-3894

Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed. 4cyl. MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018


Dune Buggies
1 sand rail $5000
1 Fiberglass $5,900
Call (352) 322-0178


2 Motor Scooters
250 CC
150 CC
(352) 220-8454

Harley '02
Road King, black, lots of
chrome, senior owned
15k miles, gar.kept
$9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810

Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra, Sale or Trade
for truck of equal value
$10,500
(352) 601-4722

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902

HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760

HONDA
'07, VLX600, Shadow
sissy bar. engine guard
2,800 miles, like new,
$3,850 (352) 489-5443


1355-0802 THCRN
vs Serrano, James Case No 2011-CA-4268 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO 2011-CA-4268
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v
JAMES R SERRANO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES R SERRANO; CITRUS SPRINGS CIVICASSOCIATION, INC;
JOHN DOE (Unknown Tenant/Occupant) and JANE DOE (Unknown
Tenant/Occupant),
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of foreclosure
datedJuly 12, 2012 and entered in Case No 2011-CA-0004268 of the Circuit Court of the
Fifth Judicial Circuit, in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein CAPITAL CITY BANK is the
Plaintiff and James R Serranoand Citrus Springs Civiv Center Association are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the highest bidder and the best bidder for cash at
www citrus,realforeclose com, at 10'00am on the 16th day of August, 2012, the following de-
scribed properties as set forth in said Final Judgement
Lot 7, Block 1445 of CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 21, according to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 73, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest inthe surplus from the sae, if any other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within (60) days after the sale
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on July 13, 2012

BETTY STRIFLER
CITRUS
COUNTY CLERK OF COURT

By: Amy Holmes
Deputy Clerk
July 26, August 2, 4, & 9th, 2012


1366-0809 CRN
Vs Gary Dias Case No 09-2011-CA-003065 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-003065
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY DIAS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated June 14, 2012 and entered in Case No 09-2011-CA-003065 of
the Circuit Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County,
Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICAN, N A is the Plaintiff and GARY DIAS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY DIAS N/K/A JOVAN DIAS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash at www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00AM, on the
16th day of August, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment
LOT 95B, SHAMROCK ACRES PHASE 3, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THE
SOUTH 1/2 OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY FLOR-
IDA, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, A DIS-
TANCE OF 801.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 0
DEGREES 09 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE A DISTANCE
OF 415 FEET, THENCE EAST 543.78 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF A 50 FOOT WIDE ROAD, THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 415 FEET, THENCE WEST 542.68 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO DRAINAGE RETENTION EASEMENT L AS DE-
SCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 765, PAGES 882
THROUGH 895, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
AIKIA 6674 NORTH SAN JUAN TERRACE, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 33441
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this court on June 15th, 2012
Betty Strifler Clerk of the Circuit Court
By /s/ Christopher Barcley
Deputy Clerk
August 2 & 4 & 9th, 2012


229-0804 SCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Executive Committee of the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Council, Inc. will meet on Thursday, August 9, 2012 at 8:00 am.
at the College of Central Florida, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
August 4, 2012.


Office Open
7 Days a Week


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CRYSTALAUTOS.COM 352-564-1971
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd 2077 Highway 44W 937 S.Suncoast Blvd 14358 Cortez Blvd
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Homosassa, FL Brooksville, FL
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approved credit Severi of credit may require subsli anl dwn payment and aiect seledon. See dealer for complete defl Vehicles subject to prior sale Pictures are for illush on purposes on


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