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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02842
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-29-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02842

Full Text



Golden boy: Lochte lands first gold medal in 400


Rain chances remain
low as high pressure
persists.
PAGE A4


I-- S o IU I N D r '


NATIONAL NEWS:


State takes a hike on sidewalk plan


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER You
can stop yelling at the state
highway department about
new sidewalks on State
Road 44.
Officials have listened.


Or, at least, they listened to
Citrus County Administra-
tor Brad Thorpe.
The state abruptly
stopped construction of a
new sidewalk on the south
side of the roadway along
the Withlacoochee State
Forest at Thorpe's request.


Instead, the county plans
to seek a state grant for a
walking-bicycling path along
that section of the roadway
that could include trail
heads in the state forest
Citrus County residents
have complained regularly
since the state Department


of Transportation began its
S.R. 44 resurfacing project
between Stokes Flea Mar-
ket and Forest Drive in
Inverness.
The $9.5 million project
included building side-
walks on both sides of the
roadway the entire length of


the project.
Many residents thought it
was a waste of money to
build sidewalks, particu-
larly on the south side of the
roadway east of County
Road 491 that fronts the


Countdown
Obama, Romney dive
into final 100 days of
campaign./Page A2
EXCURSIONS:


Page A5


Citrus County crime


-"Il

Li


An historic mountain
lodge is reborn in North
Carolina./Page A17
COMMENTARY:


United Way
The new president and
CEO of United Way of
Citrus County reports
on her progress and
thoughts after the first
two months./Page Cl
OPINION:


Conniving,
underhanded
politics is alive
and well.


BUSINESS:


Wanna bet?
Although illegal in the
United States, Olympic
betting goes on in Great
Britain./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


Playgrounds
Designer sends play
spaces on a nature
hike./HomeFront


TOMORROW:
Crime, part 2
Day two of the Quality
of Life series focusing
on crime: How safe are
we?/Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A20
Classifieds ................ D4
Crossword ..............A24
Editorial .................. ..C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ..............B6
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ..........A20
Obituaries ............ A6
Together ................ A18


6 11||||84578 L2007I5 o


MAI IlIEW BEi K/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office SWAT team members break down a door of a home in May 2012, where the occupants
were suspected of producing and selling methamphetamine.


Tools of the trade:

BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern
Many viewers have watched tele-
vision accounts of helicopters hov-
ering above suspects fleeing a crime
scene, dodging police cars and in-
nocent bystanders as they speed
away
But local police have additional
tools of the trade to not only capture
bad people but also send them to
jail.
A crime scene can be a setting of
clues and danger, respected by
every law enforcer who comes
across it.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office
is no different when approaching
these locations, abundant with
pieces of the criminal puzzle.
In order to collect each available
clue that could lead deputies to the
suspect, the CCSO utilizes very in-
tricate and useful equipment, some
with cutting-edge technology.
Fingerprints
Fingerprints left behind by a po-
tential suspect are an invaluable
source of information to deputies.
Forensic light sources have been
used for years in police depart-
ments, making black powder dust-
ing and lifting obsolete, and
enhance the opportunity to uncover
prints and bodily liquids.
The UltraLite ALS has been used
by CCSO's crime scene specialists
for five years and is the newest ver-
sion in forensic detection.
"Our main priority is to use them
for fingerprints and biological flu-
ids," said Sgt. Tim Martin, a CCSO
officer who's experienced the Ul-
traLite and previous variations of
forensic lighting.
Compared to just ultraviolet black
lighting alone, UltraLite combines
the effectiveness of a UV and ad-
justable spectrums of light to create
a detailed image of evidence that
will not blur.
By adjusting different wave-
lengths of light, ranging from 455 to
485 nanometers, the UltraLite ALS
is able to pick up the specific color
band of the contamination itself on
any type of texture, without the in-
terference given off by the back-
ground surface.
"It all depends on the chemistry
and the absorption of light that
we're trying to pick up," Sgt. Martin
said.
Not only can prints and fluids be
made visible by the UltraLite, but


Procedure, technology help collect clues


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Sgt. Ray Fischer explains the benefits of a new,
mobile fingerprinting tool the department incorporates to positively identify an
unknown subject.


The UltraLite ALS has been used by CCSO's crime scene specialists for five
years and is the newest version in forensic detection. The compact device
can upload a fingerprint to a national data where a subject's identity can be
confirmed.


strands of hair on a carpet, gunshot
residue, wounds and suspicious
documents can all be identified.
The device is also smaller in com-
parison to its earlier models, but
doesn't come cheap.
"It's hand held," Sgt. Martin said,
"but it's quite an expensive piece of
equipment"
Dusting for clues
A shoe print from an escaped or
fleeing fugitive can be just as useful
as a fingerprint.
While most shoes have a generic
pattern or layout, an imprint can


still be compared to the shoes of a
suspect in custody to connect him
with the scene of the crime.
The Electro-Static Print Lifter
(ESDL) is a device that produces an
electrical current capable of lifting
dust particles and transferring them
to a Mylar sheet and producing a
clear image of a shoe print
"It's useful for any scene that has
dust prints," Martin said about the
portable device. "Like bank rob-
beries, where the suspect jumps
over the counter top."
See Page A14


CITRUS COUNTY

QUALITY
,zOFc;t


LIF E

2012 Chronicle project

Editor's note: The
Chronicle offers a
monthly series on qual-
ity-of-life issues in Citrus
County by focusing on
crime and punishment.

One-pot cook

gives meth a

second act
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Detective Steve Smith
is somewhat of a resi-
dent maven about all
things methampheta-
mines or the drug
commonly called meth.
Over the years, Smith
has made himself a fas-
tidious student of the
hyper noxious and de-
structive drug and is
more than eager to help
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office staunch what
he calls a nationwide
epidemic.
During his time fight-
ing to get the dangerous
and highly addictive
drug off the streets, he
has seen two waves of
meth manufacturing and
abuse. Today, he said the
county and the nation
- is in the throes of a
second act in the meth
war.
And the culprit?
The one-pot cook.
"That has really
changed things around
here and the rest of the
country," Smith said.
He said during its pre-
vious heydays, meth was
a complicated brew of
noxious chemicals, in-
volving a multi-layered
cooking process.
According to the Drug
Enforcement Adminis-
tration, emergency de-
partment visits related to
methamphetamine de-
creased 50 percent from
an estimated 132,576 in
2004 to an estimated
66,308 in 2008.
With a new way of
See Page A8

MORE INSIDE
Domestic violence
keeps shelters
full./Page A9
School Resource
Officers./Page A13
Ride along with a
deputy./Page A13
Seniors Vs. Crime.
/Page A13
Teen Court.
/Page A13
Protect against
property crimes.
/Page A14
How do they
calculate prison
sentences?
/Page A14
Next month: Budgets


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
91
LOW
78


JULY 29, 2012


CITRUS S COUNTYt






www.chronicleonline.com
; Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney, hosts a small-business roundtable during
a campaign stop Monday at Endural LLC in Costa Mesa,
Calif. Stubbornly close and deeply divisive, the presidential
race throttles into its last 100 days as an enormous clash
over economic vision, likely to come down to fall debates,
final unemployment numbers and fierce efforts to mobilize
voters.



Counting




down

Obama, Romney dive into

final 100 days of campaign


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Stub-
bornly close and deeply di-
visive, the presidential race
throttles into its last 100
days as an enormous clash
over economic vision, with
the outcome likely to come
down to fall debates, final
unemployment numbers
and fierce efforts to mobi-
lize voters. It may seem like
an election for the whole
nation, but only about eight
states will decide who wins
the White House.
Polling shows the contest
between President Barack
Obama and Republican Mitt
Romney remains remark-
ably static across the country
and in those pivotal states,
even as both men and their
allies pour money into
largely negative television
advertising to sway opinions.
The two candidates will
intensify their time before
voters in the weeks ahead,
knowing much of the public
will not truly start paying at-
tention until after Labor Day
What voters probably will
see will look a lot like what's
played out so far a bitter,
bruising, personal contest
over who can be trusted to
fix the economy Obama, for
example, used his weekend
radio and Internet address
to blame Republicans for a
stalemate that could raise
taxes on Americans next
year, and he took a swipe at
Romney without mention-
ing his challenger by name.
"Republicans in Congress
and their nominee for pres-
ident believe that the best
way to create prosperity in
America is to let it trickle
down from the top," he said.
"They believe that if our
country spends trillions
more on tax cuts for the
wealthy, we'll somehow cre-
ate jobs even if we have to
pay for it by gutting things
like education and training
and by raising middle-class
taxes. They're wrong."
The upcoming stretch is
loaded with opportunities for
the candidates to capture the
public's imagination, land a
big blow or flub a chance.
Then there are the sur-
prises be they national
events or scares from abroad
-that can jolt the campaigns
and test the candidates.
"We're all looking for that
moment," said David Ger-
gen, a political analyst who
has advised Republican and
Democratic presidents. He
predicted it could come in
the first of the debates, in
Denver on Oct. 3, when
Obama and Romney finally
stand on a stage together


and go at it over economic
policy
Gergen said it could be
the most defining debate in
more than 50 years. "Obama
is leading, but it's often 47-
45. He's still got to get to 50,"
he said. "If the undecided
voters all break at the last
minute, that could go
against the incumbent. If
Obama wants to wrap it up,
the first debate carries
enormous significance."
The daily squabbles and
wrinkles of the campaign will
change. So will the gaffes.
The basic messages will not
Obama's thesis is that his
plan for rebuilding the eco-
nomic base and for ending
tax cuts for the rich will help
everyone, and that Romney
would be a return to reces-
sion-era policies. Romney's
view is Obama came in over
his head, squandered his
shot and must give way to a
leader favoring small gov-
ernment and taxes.
As Obama's wife,
Michelle, put it in an appeal
to supporters: "These last
few months until Election
Day won't be easy."
That sentiment applies all
around.
The state of the race again
shows how certain states
take on outsized importance
in a contest that is decided
by electoral votes, not the
popular vote. Only the states
considered truly up for
grabs get the coveted atten-
tion of the candidates and
their top surrogates, and of
course the onslaught of ex-
pensive advertising.
The most contested are
Colorado, Florida, Iowa,
Ohio, Nevada, New Hamp-
shire, North Carolina and
Virginia. Pennsylvania is
also in the mix.
Foreign affairs has made
a brief run to the front of the
campaign, with Romney,
who has little experience in
that arena, eager to show his
standing on his current trip
across England, Israel and
Poland. Obama has used the
power of his office to try to
upstage Romney's travels
and remind everyone there
is only one president
Yet what matters most is
the basic economic condi-
tion that people feel in their
daily lives.
Economic growth is mod-
est and headed in the wrong
direction, new government
figures show, and so is
monthly job growth. The
next jobs snapshot comes
next Friday, setting the tone
for a month when many
Americans will try grab a
break but the presidential
campaigns will not.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical
professionals
contribute their
expertise to columns in
Health & Life./
Tuesday
* Plan menus for the
week from the tempting
and inspiring recipes in
Flair for Food./
Thursday
* Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./
Friday
* See what local houses
of worship plan to do
for the week in the
Religion section./
Saturday
* Read about area
businesses in the
Business section./
Sunday
* Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing in
on antiques in
HomeFront. /Sundays
* Find out what your
neighbors have to say
in the Sound Off and
letters to the editor in
the Commentary
section. /Sundays



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Gardner Audiology to
perform this study.
You will receive free
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A2 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012







Page A3 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around Reports: Poliseno has developers' support
THE STATE


Citrus County

Water authority
set to meet Aug. 6
The Citrus County Water
and Wastewater Authority will
meet at 1 p.m. Monday, Aug.
6, in Room 166 at the
Lecanto Government Build-
ing, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
Authority members will dis-
cuss: Indian Springs Utilities
Inc.'s 2012 Price Index Appli-
cation, Customer Complaint
Summary, update on monthly
meeting with WellAqua Co.,
rate case updates, an update
on keeping utility regulation
local, and other agenda items.
This meeting is open to the
public. All persons wishing to
speak on any agenda item
must register prior to speak-
ing. Requests to address the
Authority on subjects not on
this agenda must be submit-
ted in writing with explanation
to the County Attorney, 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness,
FL 34450, at least 10 days
prior to the date of the meet-
ing and will be heard under
the "Open to the Public" por-
tion of the meeting.
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a
disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Of-
fice of Utility Regulation, 3675
E. Orange Drive, Hernando,
FL 34442-4353, at least one
week before the meeting. If
you are hearing- or speech-
impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone 352-527-5312.
The Citrus County Water
and Wastewater Authority is
a board of appointees that
provides for the regulation of
private water, bulk water and
wastewater utilities in the un-
incorporated areas of Citrus
County. For more informa-
tion, call 352-419-6520.

Ocala

Social Security
office closed
The Social Security office
in Ocala, at 217 S.E. First
Ave., remains closed due to
extensive flood damage from
Tropical Storm Debby. The
office is scheduled to move to
a new location in August. Be-
cause the damage to the cur-
rent location will take several
months to repair, it will remain
closed and will reopen at the
new location.
Most Social Security busi-
ness does not require a visit
to the office. Services are
available online at www.
socialsecurity.gov. Social Se-
curity's toll free telephone
number is 800-772-1213.
Some of the services avail-
able on the website include:
Apply for Social Security
retirement/spouse/disability
benefits.
Get statements online.
Apply for extra help with
Medicare prescription drug
costs.
Change address or tele-
phone number.
Get a replacement
Medicare card.
Request a proof of in-
come letter.
Get a form 1099.
Online services also
available in Spanish.
Other Social Security of-
fices in the region are:
Gainesville 1610
N.W. 23rd Ave. -877-219-
8323.
Leesburg -118 E. Main
St. 866-836-3623.

Tampa

Heavy traffic
expected during RNC
Tampa Police Chief Jane
Castor said the Republican
National Convention will likely
cause the heaviest traffic in
downtown Tampa on the first
day of the convention.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ports downtown business
owners will also have to
make temporary plans for


their garbage during the
event, which will be
Aug. 27 to 30.
-From staff and wire reports


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

Candidates in the Citrus
County Commission District
5 race are going all out to
raise money or opening
their own wallets in hopes
of earning voter support in
the Aug. 14 primary
Leading the fundraising
is Charles Poliseno, the for-
mer county public safety di-
rector who is emergency
preparedness supervisor at
the Progress Energy plant
north of Crystal River
Poliseno has collected
nearly $25,000, according to
reports with the supervisor
of elections. Of that,
Poliseno donated $3,500.
Poliseno has received more
than $12,000 from develop-


ment interests,
including:
$1,500 total from
Dixie Hollins, his 4a
wife and
Hollinswood Ranch.
$1,500 from
Hollins' environmen-
tal consultant, Honey Sc
Rand, and two asso- Adv
ciated companies.
$2,500 from
companies and as-
sociates of road
builder D.A.B. Con-
structors Inc. D.A.B.
contributed similar
amounts to District
5 opponents Scott
Adams and Michael Cha
Smallridge. Polki
$1,850 total
from seven attorneys with
the Pennington, Moore,


Wilkinson and Dun-
bar law firm, the
county's Port Citrus
lobbyist.
$3,000 from Cit-
rus Hills Investments
and associated
businesses.
ott 0 $1,500 total from
ams attorney Clark Still-
well, his wife and
his law office.
Opponent Scott
-. Adams shows
$37,774 in contribu-
tions; however, about
qI* $22,000 comes from
his own pocket. Most
of his other contribu-
irles tions are from busi-
seno ness owners.
Theodora "Teddi"
Rusnak also invested heav-
ily in her campaign. Accord-


Smart stuff for school


Longtime Citrus County bus driver Gary Koon and school district employee Bernadette .
nated items on the bus Saturday during the Stuff the Bus charity event at the Inverness V
are given to area schoolchildren in need of school supplies. Those who want to help Sti
other chance from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 4, at both the Homosassa Wal-Mar
market in Beverly Hills. Supplies needed include pencils, pens, backpacks, spiral note
three-hole paper, lunch boxes, crayons, markers, three-ring binders, glue sticks
notebooks.


CCSO teams with US Marshals


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO Citrus
County deputies and mem-
bers of the Gainesville Di-
vision of the U.S. Marshals
Florida Regional Fugitive
Task Force arrested an al-
leged Gainesville bank rob-
ber Friday after locating
him inside a Lecanto home.
Authorities booked
Roger Giles, 28, at the Cit-
rus County Detention Fa-
cility on an outstanding
warrant for felony charges
of robbery with a firearm,
false imprisonment, grand
theft and grand theft auto.


His bond was set at
$200,000.
According to U.S. Mar-
shals, Giles was one of
three suspects in an armed
robbery in February of the
Bank of America located
at 7606 W Newberry Road,
Gainesville.
After conducting an in-
vestigation into the rob-
bery, the Alachua County
Sheriff's Office submitted
Giles' arrest warrant to the
regional task force, which
adopted the case.
On Thursday, task force
members reportedly
learned Giles was no
longer living in the


Gainesville area
and was now likely
hiding out in Citrus
County with a girl-
friend. The task
force, along with in-
vestigators from the
U.S. Marshals Serv-
ice, the Alachua
County Sheriff's Of-
fice and the
Gainesville Police
Department, trav-


Rog
Gil
robbi
SUSIC


eled to Inverness and, with
assistance from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
continued the investigation
into Giles' whereabouts.
Friday afternoon, offi-
cials reportedly deter-


Greer suing lawyers in aftermath of RI


The News Service of
Florida
TALLAHASSEE Even
as embattled Republican
Party of Florida Chairman
Jim Greer fights criminal
charges related to his for-
mer tenure, he is also suing
two law firms in connection
with his downfall as the
party's leader
According to papers filed
in Leon County, Greer is
suing the GrayRobinson
and Ausley & McMullen law
firms because of advice he
said attorneys for both
firms gave him surrounding
Victory Strategies, a com-
pany Greer set up to help
raise funds for the party.
Victory Strategies is also
at the center of the criminal
case against Greer, charged
with money laundering and
fraud in relation to an al-
leged fundraising scheme
in which he is accused of
steering party money to the
company while he was
chairman. Greer said party


leaders knew what he was
doing and that a severance
agreement should have
protected him from any
criminal liability
Greer accuses Gray-
Robinson of giving him bad
advice by telling him to set
up Victory Strategies.
"GrayRobinson breached
its duty to Greer by advising
Greer to create Victory
Strategies, LLC for the pur-
pose of entering into a con-
fidential fundraising
agreement with the RPOF,
advising Greer to enter into
the confidential fundraising
agreement with the RPOF
through Victory Strategies,
LLC, and then disclosing to
third parties the confiden-
tial and privileged commu-
nications related to the
creation of Victory Strate-
gies, LLC and the confiden-
tial fundraising agreement,"
the lawsuit states.
It does not specifically
name the third parties that
GrayRobinson allegedly
spoke with.


The firm denies most of
Greer's substantive claims.
"GrayRobinson had no
knowledge of and no com-
munications with anyone
regarding the alleged confi-
dential fundraising con-
tract between Victory
Strategies and the RPOF
and accordingly had no in-
formation it could reveal to
anyone regarding that al-
leged contract," the firm
said in its response.
Greer says Ausley & Mc-
Mullen gave him bad advice
on the deal he signed with
RPOF leaders as he left the
party.
"As to naming Victory
Strategies, LLC by name in
the severance agreement,
Ausley advised Greer that
including a provision ac-
knowledging that fundrais-
ing fees were legal,
authorized and ratified
without naming the specific
entity from which they were
received was broader and
would not limit the clause
to applying only to


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ing to reports, In the two other
$12,000 of the commission races,
$17,220 shown as challengers lag far
contributions were behind incumbents
loans from Rusnak. in fundraising.
All but two of her 50 / The three com-
other contributors mission races are
are individuals. on the Aug. 14 ballot
Michael Small- Michael for all voters
ridge, who has been Smallridge regardless of party
in the District 5 cam- affiliation. Because
paign since Decem- all candidates are
ber, has raised \ Republican, the
$11,649. Contribu- primary becomes
tors include $4,000 an election with
from Citrus County winners beginning
physicians who sup- their terms in
port the Citrus November
County Hospital Chronicle re-
Board in its battle Theodora porter Mike Wright
for control of Citrus Rusnak can be reached at
Memorial hospital. 352-563-3228 or
Smallridge is chairman of m wrightt@chronicle
the CCHB board of trustees. online.com.



Water

district


.unveils

minimum


J i flows for 2

Local rivers

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) unveiled late
Friday a revised minimum
flow recommendation for
the Chassahowitzka and Ho-
mosassa rivers.
According to a release
from Doug Leeper, chief en-
S" s vironmental scientist at the
water district, the recom-
mended minimum flow for
the Chassahowitzka River is
,~ an t91 percent of its natural flow
a and the revised, recom-
mended minimum flow for
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle the Homosassa River is 97
Salmaggi load some do- percent of its natural flow
Wal-Mart. The donations Natural flow is defined as
uff the Bus will have an- the flow that would exist in
rt and the Publix super- the absence of water
books, rulers, loose leaf withdrawals.
and small assignment And, according to Leeper,
minimum flows identify
"the limit at which further
withdrawals would be sig-
nificantly harmful to the
S rewater resources or ecology
of the area."
in arrest Currently, no surface-
mined Giles was water withdrawals from ei-
currently staying their river system are
in a mobile home permitted by the water dis-
at 5120 S. Barker trict. Flow reductions at-
Point in Lecanto, tribute to groundwater
and at approxi- withdrawals are approxi-
mately 7:15 p.m., mately 1 percent of the nat-
task force mem- ural flows, according to the
bers and Citrus release.
ger deputies sur- In essence, according to
es rounded the home Leeper, after looking at data
ect. and located Giles and listening to shareholder
inside, where he input, Chassahowitzka's ini-
was taken into custody tial recommended allow-
without incident. able reductions in natural
Chronicle reporter flow went from 11 percent to
Shemir Wiles can be 9 percent in the plan. Ho-
reached at352-564-2924 or mosassa's earlier recom-
swiles @ chronicle mended flow went from 5
online.com, percent to 3 percent.
The matter now goes be-
fore the district's governing
s board, which is scheduled
POF ouster to meet Aug. 28 in
Brooksville.
fundraising fees receiving The district has estab-
rom that entity, even listed a website for accept-
hough Greer had not re- ing comments on the
ceived fundraising fees proposed minimum flows at
from any other entity," the WaterMatters.org/Springs
suit states. CoastMFL.
Greer also claims the The district is accepting
irm was involved in an ef- comments via this web page
fort to get him to void the through Wednesday, Aug. 15,
severance agreement be- on the revised reconm-
cause party leaders were mended minimum flows for
afraid payments from the the Chassahowitzka and Ho-
RPOF would show up in mosassa river systems. Coim-
)ublic records. ments submitted after this
Instead, Greer said, he date should be submitted in
was urged to sign a separate writing via e-mail or letter,
agreement with a political using the following contact
committee controlled by the information.
House speaker-designate, U Email: executive@
hen Rep. Dean Cannon, R- watermatters.org.
Winter Park, or the Senate U Address: 2379 Broad St.,
)resident-designate, Sen. Brooksville, FL 34604,
Mike Haridopolos. ATTN: Governing Board.
Ausley & McMullen said The recommendations can
he court should wait be- be viewed at
ore moving forward with www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/
he case. projects/mfl/mflreports.php.


But Circuit Court Judge Chronicle reporter A.B.
Terry Lewis denied the Sidibe can be reached
firm's request and ordered at 352-563-5660 or
t to file a response in early asidibe @ chronicle
August. online. com.


*










Week in state gov't: Election time a' coming but when?


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE Any
Floridian with a mailbox, a
telephone or a TV probably
realized this week that an
election is approaching.
Just when people will be
able to vote might actually
be up in the air.
As voters waded through
nasty campaign mailers sent
out by shadowy groups that
may or may not have been
related to candidates, as
surrogates for the presiden-
tial candidates flew all over
the place, a Democratic con-
gresswoman filed a federal
lawsuit over the dates when
Florida voters can start
casting their ballots.
Many Florida voters may
not realize how close the
primary is early voting
for most of us starts at the
end of next week, under the
state's new election law ,
which is about to be used for
the first time since being
overhauled in 2011. But if
the law hadn't changed, vot-
ing would have started at
the beginning of next week.
Congresswoman Corrine
Brown, a Democrat, joined
several Duval County resi-
dents in a
federal law-
suit to block
changes in
Florid a's
election law
that re-
duced the
number of
early voting Corrine
days from Brown
15 to 10. The U.S. House.
new law,
which passed over the ob-
jections of Democrats, also
gives local election supervi-
sors more discretion to de-


cide exactly when polls will
be open for early voting.
Brown's lawsuit alleges
that the changes violate the
U.S. Constitution and the
federal Voting Rights Act.
"Early voting has worked
extremely well for all
Floridians and especially
for African American vot-
ers," Brown said. "In fact,
more than any other racial
or ethnic group, African
Americans have come to
rely on early voting."
Election officials, how-
ever, say the lawsuit is mis-
guided, arguing that Florida
voters will still have ample
time to cast ballots before
Election Day
Brown's is the latest cru-
sade against perceived Re-
publican-backed efforts to
prevent a repeat of 2008
when a wave of new voters
cast ballots early and
flooded the polls on Elec-
tion Day Critics say the re-
strictions are thinly veiled
attempts to make it harder
for Democrat-leaning voters
to cast ballots.
Backers say it's a way to
curb costs for cash-strapped
election supervisors and
prevent fraud.
Even former Gov Charlie
Crist jumped on the "let-the-
people -
vote" wagon
this week as
he told
MSNBC
such efforts
were "un-
c o n -
scionable."
Crist, a Re- Charlie
publican Crist
turned in- former
dependent governor
(and some- of Florida.
times men-
tioned as a potential
Democratic candidate), was


the driving force behind ef-
forts to automatically re-
store voting rights to most
felons who had completed
their sentences.
Crist's reforms were short
lived. Among their first ac-
tions, Gov Rick Scott and
the newly elected, all-Re-
publican Cabinet rescinded
the directive and made it
even more difficult for
felons to get their civil and
voting rights restored.
"The idea of making it
more difficult to exercise
this precious right is just un-
conscionable to me," said
Crist.
ENVIRONMENTALISTS
GO TO COURT
Meanwhile, environmen-
tal groups in separate ac-
tions filed legal challenges
this week in an effort to in-
crease water flows to the
Caloosahatchee River, and
reduce nutrient-laden phos-
phorus levels in the
Everglades.
On Friday, the Florida
Audubon Society filed legal
petitions to force the South
Florida Water Management
District to enforce more
stringent laws put in place
five years ago to reduce
phosphorus levels coming
into the Everglades.
Audubon is seeking ad-
ministrative hearings on
separate permits granted to
U.S. Sugar Corp., Sugar
Farms Cooperative and the
Sugar Cane Growers Coop-
erative that the environ-
mental group says do not
require individual farms to
reduce phosphorus releases
to permissible levels, a re-
quirement that began in
2007.
Water management offi-


cials say phosphorus levels
have dropped significantly
since 1994 and the district
continues to work with
farmers to lower that num-
ber even further
Earlier in the week, envi-
ronmentalists filed suit in
federal court to force the
U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers to clean up the
Caloosahatchee River by
letting the river flow
The Corps operates three
water stations on the river
that control water levels
downstream.
In times of drought, the
Corps largely cuts off the
flow, leading to stagnation
on the lower river that in
turn leads to algae blooms
and unhappy property own-
ers and tourism officials.
PRISONS
An appeals court this
week ruled against Attorney
General Pam Bondi in a
long-running battle over the
Legislature's attempt last
year to privatize prisons
across southern Florida.
The 1st District Court of
Appeal rejected Bondi's ap-
peal of a circuit-court ruling
that blocked the privatiza-


Weekly ROUNDUP


tion plan from going forward.
A three-judge panel ruled
against Bondi on a proce-
dural issue saying she did
not have the authority to file
the appeal after the original
state party in the case, the
Department of Corrections,
declined to do so.
MORE COURT FIGHTS
Meanwhile, the saga of
former Republican Party
Chairman Jim Greer contin-
ued to play out for political
observers, with a few news
organizations this week re-
porting on recordings from
the investigative file in
which Greer acknowledged
pulling down a lot of money
while fundraising for the
party, and wondering what
he did with it.
And in another blast from
the recent past, former
House Speaker Ray Sansom
late this week sued to try to
recoup his legal costs from
his own downfall.
Sansom was ousted as
speaker and later quit the
Legislature over allegations
of improperly steering state
money when he was budget
chairman. But in a criminal
case, he was cleared, and
now he wants to be repaid
the money he spent defend-
ing himself.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


"y j' ; BOCC Commission

Records ....................................... C4


BMeeting Notices............................D6


S.... Miscellaneous Notices.................D6
.,.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
pc

ts


pc
ts
s
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast

ts
ts
ts
pc
ts

pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Sunny to partly
cloudy today.


95 74 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ecalus aily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 78
Rain chances remain low over the
weekend as high pressure persists.
r i MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 77
Rain chances slightly increase to 30% as
isolated storms & showers are expected.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 77
Hot and humid, rain chances remain at 30%.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 90/72
Record 100/68
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday in.
Total for the month 6.95 in.
Total for the year 34.57 in.
Normal for the year 30.21 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, sagebrush
Today's count: 3.0/12
Monday's count: 5.2
Tuesday's count: 5.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/29 SUNDAY 2:40 8:55 3:10 9:25
7/30 MONDAY 3:34 9:49 4:03 10:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


AUG. 9 AUG.17 AUG.24


SUNSET TONIGHT 8:23 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:51 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................5:24 PM.
M OONSET TODAY ............................3:07 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:06 a/10:31 a 2:42 p/-
Crystal River" 2:27 a/7:53 a 1:03 p/9:33 p
Withlacoochee* 12:14 a/5:41 a 10:50 a/7:21 p
Homosassa*** 3:16 a/9:30 a 1:52 p/11:10 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:09 a/12:11 a 3:48 p/11:43 a
3:30 a/9:05 a 2:09 p/10:28 p
1:17 a/6:53 a 11:56 a/8:16 p
4:19 a/10:42 a 2:58 p/--


Gulf water
temperature


89
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 31.79 31.81 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.64 35.67 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.51 37.57 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.63 40.64 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


S70s6 ""
LAnchoraqjaneau Horomu
Z e-s-


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 75 66 .50 ts 84 63
Albuquerque 91 69 pc 92 69
Asheville 90 68 pc 85 63
Atlanta 97 73 .03 pc 94 74
Atlantic City 91 70 1.95 ts 84 72
Austin 98 70 s 99 75
Baltimore 91 72 pc 88 70
Billings 94 60 pc 95 65
Birmingham 97 73 s 95 72
Boise 97 64 s 97 59
Boston 72 63 .40 ts 74 65
Buffalo 82 66 .01 pc 84 63
Burlington, VT 66 61 pc 83 61
Charleston, SC 93 75 .50 ts 92 75
Charleston, WV 85 68 .03 pc 87 64
Charlotte 96 72 pc 93 70
Chicago 82 67 pc 82 69
Cincinnati 84 64 pc 88 64
Cleveland 78 68 .17 pc 82 69
Columbia, SC 97 75 ts 94 74
Columbus, OH 83 68 pc 88 65
Concord, N.H. 79 65 .02 ts 79 59
Dallas 10378 s 101 78
Denver 94 66 ts 95 63
Des Moines 85 66 ts 93 72
Detroit 86 66 .06 pc 84 68
El Paso 91 72 pc 94 74
Evansville, IN 93 66 pc 95 68
Harrisburg 88 69 .13 pc 86 67
Hartford 81 68 1.31 ts 79 64
Houston 96 78 s 98 78
Indianapolis 86 67 pc 90 67
Jackson 96 73 s 95 75
Las Vegas 10876 pc 104 81
Little Rock 10875 s 102 80
Los Angeles 70 61 pc 74 64
Louisville 89 69 pc 90 73
Memphis 97 75 s 99 76
Milwaukee 76 65 pc 81 67
Minneapolis 83 65 pc 87 69
Mobile 90 73 .03 ts 92 77
Montgomery 99 75 pc 97 72
Nashville 93 75 pc 93 69
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Kan- Cfto -- --v.
- 100 '.


Hoaslon ,



FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 91 75 .45 pc 94 77
New York City 80 69 .18 ts 81 69
Norfolk 91 73 pc 92 73
Oklahoma City 10474 s 104 77
Omaha 91 66 s 96 72
Palm Springs 10873 pc 107 80
Philadelphia 93 77 ts 88 72
Phoenix 10091 ts 98 82
Pittsburgh 77 64 .75 pc 82 59
Portland, ME 77 61 ts 75 60
Portland, Ore 79 60 pc 78 57
Providence, R.I. 81 65 .70 ts 77 64
Raleigh 95 73 ts 94 71
Rapid City 95 57 pc 94 68
Reno 93 58 s 95 60
Rochester, NY 80 66 .15 pc 84 60
Sacramento 91 56 s 92 60
St. Louis 93 71 ts 93 74
St. Ste. Marie 82 55 pc 81 63
Salt Lake City 98 75 s 99 71
San Antonio 97 76 s 98 76
San Diego 72 65 pc 74 65
San Francisco 66 54 pc 70 55
Savannah 98 75 .97 ts 93 75
Seattle 72 56 pc 74 56
Spokane 83 55 s 86 61
Syracuse 83 65 .37 pc 85 57
Topeka 101 67 s 107 77
Washington 97 77 pc 88 71
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Needles, Calif. LOW 36 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 91/79/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 65/56/sh Mexico City
Athens 102/82/s Montreal
Beijing 94/72/ts Moscow
Berlin 74/53/ts Paris
Bermuda 85/78/ts Rio
Cairo 96/77/s Rome
Calgary 80/56/s Sydney
Havana 90/73/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 90/81/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 89/66/s Warsaw


82/60/s
68/51/sh
94/69/s
72/51/ts
86/63/s
82/61/s
72/52/pc
84/64/s
83/67/pc
66/45/pc
85/72/ts
83/62/s
86/57/ts


C I T R U S


C O U N TY


CITIZENS BOARD
APPROVES RATE HIKES
The governing board of
Citizens Property Insurance
Corp. approved tentative
rate hikes averaging at least
8.8 percent for its 1.4 million
policyholders. The state Of-
fice of Insurance Regula-
tion has 45 days to approve
or disapprove the rates.
The board also stepped
down from efforts to charge
new policyholders more
and instead will try to in-
crease other costs in an ef-
fort to show all Citizens
customers the real cost of
their below market-rate,
state-backed insurance.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: As the primary ap-
proaches and election in-
tensity increases, the fight
over the state's election law
continued, going to federal
court in a new lawsuit, filed
by Rep. Corrine Brown.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "He's a nice guy"
Former Gov Charlie Crist
when asked what he
thought of U.S. Sen. Marco
Rubio and whether he'd be
qualified to serve as vice
president if he were chosen
as a running mate for Re-
publican presidential can-
didate Mitt Romney


LHKON1CLJt
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N I: \ -- -:"
il l

I Couhose Inverness
Courthouse office
To pkins St. J square
0 Co 106 W. Main
41 Inverness, FL
S 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ... .............. ................................................. P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan .................................................................................. Editor, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 5
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......... .................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
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A4 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








Romney backers buy $1 million in radio ads


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The super
PAC backing Mitt Romney on Fri-
day announced a $1 million radio
ad blitz in nine states attacking
President Barack Obama for neg-
ativity, signaling the fierce cam-
paign spending is heading in force
to drive-time in must-win states.
While both Romney and Obama
- and their allies have been
shelling out millions on television
ads, neither has been aggressive
on radio, a relatively cheap and
ubiquitous medium that is trickier
to track and easier to target. That
relative quiet on the dials was set


to end with a 60-second ad in Col-
orado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada,
New Hampshire, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
"You spent a trillion taxpayer
dollars on the stimulus. It failed,"
a female narrator says of Obama
in the ads. "The jobless rate went
up and has been stuck above 8
percent for 41 straight months.
You increased spending so wildly
that you've added more debt than
the first 41 presidents -
combined."
The ad says Obama has turned
the campaign negative against
Romney because he cannot run on
his time in the White House.


"Imagine you were Barack
Obama. What would you do now?"
the announcer asks.
In recent weeks, Obama's cam-
paign has shifted its strategy to di-
rectly hit Romney with questions
about his tenure at the helm of
Bain Capital, his vast personal
wealth and his honesty. Romney's
team has been on the defense,
even as government reports show
the U.S. economy has struggled to
recover as quickly as Obama and
voters had hoped.
"False desperate attacks with
no record to run on. It's the only
strategy Obama has left," the ad
says.


Obama, meanwhile, is airing
Spanish-language radio ads tar-
geting Hispanic voters and touting
Democrats' health care overhaul.
Other radio ads are reaching out
to rural voters.
"My grandparents came from
the Midwest," Obama says in an ad
that extolls "core middle-class val-
ues that helped to build America."
"People still believe in hard
work, they still believe in personal
responsibility. And that's why
we've spent a lot of time on how
we build on the strengths of rural
America, making sure folks out
there have access to health care,
the ability to export their goods to


markets."
The ads also nod to rural voters'
skepticism of the "big city," in-
cluding Washington.
"Young people can say to them-
selves, 'We can succeed here just
like we can in the big city' because
ultimately, the strengths of those
communities, those are the
strengths of America," Obama
says in the minute-long ad.
For his part, Romney has
bought about $150,000 in radio
time this month in the Columbus,
Ohio, market and about $9,000 in
New Hampshire.
Romney advisers say they do not
have ads on the radio at this time.


.,'..

M~ .~W~W~1A


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Macaroni and
cheese, green peas, parslied
carrots, pears, white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sloppy Joe with
bun, mixed vegetables, pota-
toes O'Brien, peaches, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Blended juice,
chicken thigh with tomato-pep-
per sauce, hot German potato
salad, Tuscan vegetables,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with
sweet and sour sauce, co-
conut rice, green beans, fruit
salad, whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea-
cheese salad, marinated broc-
coli salad, graham crackers,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.


Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Sup-
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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The state abruptly stopped construction of a new sidewalk on the south side of the roadway along the Withlacoochee State
Forest at the request of Citrus County Administrator Brad Thorpe. These machines sit idle Saturday where the sidewalk
ends on State Road 44 near Wal-Mart in Inverness.


SIDEWALK
Continued from Page Al

state forest.
Thorpe said he spoke with Don
Skelton, secretary of the DOT's Dis-
trict 7 office in Tampa, and suggested
the county and state partner for an al-
ternative on that side of the highway
"I said, 'Don, this sidewalk on the
south side of 44 will be rarely used be-
cause there's nothing on the south
side but forest,"' Thorpe said.
Citrus County officials had recom-
mended against sidewalks and sug-
gested a single multi-use path, similar


to what it is building along the newly
widened County Road 486. The state's
response was that it couldn't afford to
build a multi-use path but the county
could if it wanted.
So work on the sidewalks began
shortly after resurfacing started to
take place. Many residents assumed it
was a county project and they called
county offices to complain.
Thorpe, in a guest newspaper col-
umn on the county budget, made a
point to mention the sidewalks were a
state project.
DOT officials had said in late May
that sidewalks may seem unnecessary
now, but they could be needed in the
future as the county grows. They said


the sidewalks were being built to pro-
tect bicyclists and pedestrians.
Thorpe said he understands that
logic for the north side of S.R. 44 with
its commercial frontage.
Thorpe said the county will apply
for a DOT enhancement grant to build
the multi-use trail.
DOT spokeswoman Kris Carson
said the sidewalk project on the north
side of S.R. 44 is nearly complete. She
said sidewalk work on the south side
is limited to the stretch of S.R. 44 from
C.R. 491 west to the project's
boundary
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can
be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Anita
Cantor, 74
BEVERLY HILLS
Anita Ann Cantor, 74, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died July
26, 2012, at the Hospice of
Citrus County House in
Lecanto.
Anita was born on March
6, 1938, in Providence, R.I.,
the daughter of Joseph and
Mary Mancone. She was the
owner of Blue Cat, AYO
Corp in Deer Park, Long Is-
land. She was the past pres-
ident of Colony Point Condo
Association in Pembroke
Pines, Fla. Anita moved to
Beverly Hills in 2004 from
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Anita was preceded in
death by her parents and
her son, Mark Young. Sur-
vivors include her husband,
Sidney Cantor of Beverly
Hills, Fla.; son, Robert
Young of San Diego, Calif.;
brother, Joseph Mancone of
Buffalo, N.Y; sister, Valerie
Michalczyk of Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla.; and five grand-
children; and one
great-grandson.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Mary Kelley, 68
LECANTO
Mary Anne Kelley, 68, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
July 25, 2012, at the HPH
Hospice in Inverness, Fla.
Born Dec. 8,1943, in Mon-
ticello, Ariz., to Hardin and
Katherine (Keen) Kelley
Mary moved to Citrus
County 31 years ago from
Gainesville, Fla. She was an
assembler at the Key Pine
Village and a member of
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto, Fla.
Family will receive
friends from 12:30 until
service time at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will follow at the
Magnolia Cemetery in
Lecanto, Fla.


Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Larry Clark, 69
CRYSTAL RIVER
Larry W Clark, 69, of Crys-
tal River, passed away
Wednesday, July 25, 2012, in
Fan n in
County, Ga.
He was
born April
13, 1943, in
Newnan,
Ga., and
came to .
Florida in
1972 to set- Larry
tle in Ho- Clark
mosassa. He
was a charter member of the
Homosassa Springs Cham-
ber of Commerce and for a
short time owned and oper-
ated a surveying business.
He then moved to the At-
lanta area, where he be-
came vice president of
Riley, Park, Haden and As-
sociates. Larry was an ac-
complished surveyor and
held licenses in seven
states. Upon retirement, he
returned to Crystal River
and established Clark Sur-
veying Inc. He also served
on the Crystal River Plan-
ning commission.
He is survived by his wife,
Ruth Clark, of Crystal River;
children, Laurie (Terry)
Dennison of Canton, Ga.,
Julie Duggar of Knoxville,
Tenn., Beckie (Randy) Car-
gle of Canton, Ga., Rusty
(Debbie) Clark of Paulding
County, Ga., Lafonda (David)
Morrison of Homosassa,
Fla., and Patrick (Terry)
Ruggiero of Inverness, Fla.;
brothers, Richard (Linda)
Clark of Alabama and
Danny (Roxie) Clark of
Newnan, Ga.; more than 17
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at 4 p.m. Wednesday Aug.
1, at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River. In lieu of flowers,
please consider a memorial
contribution in Larry's
name to the charity of your
choice.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Ronald
Ferguson, 49
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ronald James Ferguson,
49, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Friday morn-
ing, July 27,
2012, at the
Hospice of
Citrus ..
County unit
of Citrus
Memorial
hospital in -
Inverness,
Fla. Ronald
He was Ferguson
born Aug. 3,
1962, in Portsmouth, Ohio,
to Samuel and Elizabeth
(Bragg) Ferguson and came
here 45 years ago from
there. He was disabled and
a resident of Contento Cot-
tage at the Key Training
Center in Lecanto, Fla.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
a sister, Lois Veal; and a
brother, Ken Ferguson. He
was survived by his three
sisters, Patricia Unger
(Merle) of Crystal River,
Fla., Connie Mashburn
(Danny) of Inglis, Fla., and
Carol Gerard of Florida; a
brother, Sam Ferguson (Va-
lerie) of Beverly Hills, Fla.;
his nephew, Perry Unger
(Jackie) of Homosassa, Fla.;
and his caregivers at the
Content Cottage, Dawn and
Brittany Cruz.
A visitation will be from 6
to 8 p.m. Monday, July 30,


2012, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel in Crys-
tal River, Fla., where a
funeral service will be at 11
a.m. Tuesday, July 31, 2012,
with the Rev Larry Carter
and wife Mary Lou Carter
officiating. Interment will
follow at the Crystal River
Memorial Park Cemetery
Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Nancy Eddy, 79
INVERNESS
Nancy J. Eddy, 79, of In-
verness, died July 22, 2012,
at Citrus Health & Rehab,
Inverness, Fla. She was born
Nov 12, 1932, in Niagara
Falls, N.Y, the daughter of
Harold and Dorothy Buck-
hout. She was a homemaker
She moved to Citrus County
in 1981 from Largo, Fla.
Survivors include her
husband, Melvin Eddy, of In-
verness; daughters, Robin
Powell (Richard) of Clear-
water, Fla., and Susan Oost
of Roanoke, Va.; sisters, Joan
Vendely of Mentor, Ohio, and
Jean Gould of Dunkirk, N.Y;
three grandchildren; two
great-grandchildren; and
many other family members
and friends.
Private interment will be
at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


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Edgar
Strickland Jr.,
76
FLORAL CITY
Edgar M. Strickland Jr.,
76, of Floral City, died
Thursday, July 19, 2012, in
Inverness.
A graveside service with
military honors for Mr.
Strickland will be at 10 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 3, 2012, at
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. A procession
will leave from Heinz Fu-
neral Home at 9 a.m.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details.


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Ashby White, 97
DUNNELLON
Ashby H. White, 97, of
Dunnellon, died Friday, July
27, 2012, in Ocala.
Graveside service with
full military honors is at 10
a.m. Tuesday, July 31, 2012,
at Fero Memorial Gardens
Cemetery, Beverly Hills.
See Page A7

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A6 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Marjorie
Hibbits, 97
FLORAL CITY
Marjorie Ellen Hibbits,
97, of Floral City, Fla.,
passed away July 25, 2012, at
her daughter's home in So-
cial Circle, Ga.
She was born Jan. 28,
1915, in Coney Island, N.Y,
to the late Fredrick and
Elizabeth Gill Honold of
Brooklyn, N.Y. A native of
Brooklyn N.Y, she came to
Floral City in 1979 from
Long Island, N.Y, with her
late husband James Hibbits.
She was employed with the
State of New York until she
retired in 1977.
Mrs. Hibbits had a great
love and passion for danc-
ing and swimming. She
loved ballroom dancing, as
well as square dancing with
the Square Dance Club in
Inverness. She was a mem-
ber of the senior center in
Inverness as well as the
Happy Timers card group.
In addition to her hus-
band and parents, she was
preceded in death by her
five brothers, Fred, Walter,
Artie, Joe and Al; and a dear
friend, John Mazeika of Flo-
ral City
Mrs. Hibbits is survived
by two daughters, Eleanor
Guarneri and husband, Sal,
of Long Island, N.Y, and
Diane Sebba of Social Cir-
cle, Ga.; four grandchildren,
Stephen Heim of New
Brunswick, N.J., Lori Heim
of Manorville, N.Y, Kevin
Marshall of Social Circle,
Ga., and Lynda Marshall of
Lilburn, Ga.; four great-
grandchildren, Kierra, Syd-
ney, MacKenzie and Isaac;
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
The Mass of Christian


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A7


burial will be offered at 10
a.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, from
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. Burial will follow in
Hills of Rest Cemetery
Reposing hours are from 6
to 8 p.m. Friday at the Chas
E Davis Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




Edward
McGrath, 71
HERNANDO
Edward C. McGrath, 71, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away July 25, 2012, in Her-
nando, Fla.
Born on March 13,1940, in
Bronx, N.Y, to Edward Sr.
and Irene (McKinnon) Mc-
Grath. Edward moved to
Hernando 13 years ago from
Baldwin, N.Y He served his
country in the U.S. Army
and was retired from the
Plumber's Union Local 1.
He was a member and for-
mer captain of the Baldwin
Fire Department Hose No.
2; VFW Post 4252 of Her-
nando, Fla.; the Moose
Lodge; and he was Catholic.
Survivors include his
wife, Idwella P McGrath;
five children, Edward,
Michael, Patricia, James
and Daniel; and 10 grand-
children.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Services will be an-
nounced at a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.


Carl
Peterson, 93
RAINBOW
SPRINGS
Carl Willard Peterson, 93,
passed away July 13, 2012.
He was born Aug. 7, 1918,
in Chicago, Ill., the son of
Edwin and Elvira Peterson,
preceded in death by his
wife Marie after 54 years of
marriage.
He graduated Pullman
Tech School in 1936 then
was employed by Westing-
house Electric. He was in-
ducted in the Army in 1941
and earned an honorable
discharge with the rank of
technical sergeant after re-
ceiving four Bronze Battle
Stars for action in the East
Indies, New Guinea and the
Philippine Liberation. He
then attended Wilson Jr.
College and finished his em-
ployment with Danley Ma-
chine Corp in Chicago. He
was commander of VFW
Post 2240 in the Pullman
neighborhood of Chicago
and was also a 32nd degree
Mason. In 1986, he and
Marie retired to Rainbow
Springs, Fla., where he co-
founded the Sundowners
Golf League and was loved
by most he came in contact
with.
He is survived by his
cousin, Carol Grosan; sister-
in-law, Theresa Unti; niece
and nephew, Karen Zidlicky
and Michael Unti; sister-in-
law, Norma Duncan; niece,
Paula Vansack; and numer-
ous good and loyal friends.
He will be greatly missed.
A graveside memorial
service provided by the
Spring Hill Honor Guard


will be at Florida National
Cemetery at 10 am. Tuesday,
July 31, 2012. Condolences
may be left at Robertsof
Dunnellon.com Arrange-
ments are by Roberts Fu-
neral Home, 19939 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnel-
lon, FL 34432.

Gregory
Phillips, 49
DUNNELLON
Gregory D. Phillips, 49, of
Dunnellon, Fla., passed
away July 11, 2012.
He was born in Leesburg,
Fla., to Thomas "Buzz" and
Margaret "Maggie" Phillips
of Dunnellon. Fla. He is the
brother of Denise (Tom) Vo-
gelgesang of Monticello,
Fla. He also has many
nieces and nephews, five
aunts and one uncle. He
graduated from Leesburg
High School in 1981 and
worked in the computer
electronics field.
A funeral memorial serv-
ice will be at 1 p.m. Aug. 11,
2012, at Holy Faith Episco-
pal Church, Dunnellon, Fla.
Family suggests memorial
donations be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County Con-
dolences may be left at
RobertsofDunnellon. com
Arrangements are by
Roberts Funeral Home,
19939 E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon, FL 34432.

Arthur Simpson
Sr., 86
HOMOSASSA
Arthur Hayward Simpson
Sr, 86, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away July 26 at his
home under the care of his
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County
Born Dec. 10, 1925, in
New York City, N.Y, to Leo
and Amy (Nixon) Simpson.


Arthur moved to Citrus
County in 1995 from
Yonkers, N.Y He was a re-
tired X-ray technician and a
member of the 1st Baptist
Church of Crystal River, Fla.
Survived by his wife, Car-
men L. Simpson, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; three
children, Arthur Simpson
Jr, Lizette Munoz and April
Simpson; five grandchil-
dren, Angela Simpson, An-
drea Simpson, Gabriel
Munoz, Shawn Munoz and
Heidi Munoz; two nephews,
Joey Ryan and Gregory
Ryan; and one niece, Alli-
son Ryan.
Visitation will be at the
family's home Monday and
Tuesday at 7 Myosotis Court
in Homosassa, Fla.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Monday at the fam-
ily's home, with Pastor
David Throckmorton
officiating.
Private cremation will fol-
low under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

James
Williams, 83
CITRUS SPRINGS
James H. Williams, 83, Cit-
rus Springs, died Wednes-
day, July 25, 2012, in
Inverness, Florida. He was
born in Frackville, Pa., and
moved to Citrus Springs,
Fla., in 1990 from Reading,
Pa.
He was a retired electri-
cal engineer with Gilbert
Associates of Reading, Pa.,
with 43 years of service; also
worked as a consultant for
six years with Hill & Bell
Engineering.
He was a member of the
Holy Faith Episcopal
Church, West Reading


Lodge No. 62, Reading
Country Club, Citrus
Springs Country Club and
the Hole-In-One Club. He
was also the Director of the
annual Exeter PTA Show.
He enjoyed music, espe-
cially playing the organ,
doing handyman projects,
traveling and spending time
with his family
Survivors include his
wife, Elizabeth; daughters,
Patricia Delp, Citrus
Springs, and JoAnn
(Michael) Heller, Reading,
Pa.
Services are scheduled
for 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at the Holy Faith Episcopal
Church, Dunnellon with Fa-
ther James Gerhart officiat-
ing and Masonic Rites
presented. Inurnment will
follow in the church mem-
ory garden. Visitation will
be 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
church.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily requests donations in the
memory of Mr. Williams to:
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Online condolences may
be offered at Robertsof
Dunnellon.com.




Donald Wolfe,
78
BEVERLY HILLS
Mr. Donald C. Wolfe, 78, of
Beverly Hills, died Sunday,
July 22, 2012, in Inverness.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
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the next day's edition.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chronicle file
Unlike marijuana, which requires space, light and water to grow the plants, a newer process for creating methamphetamine drugs takes lit-
tle space. The one-pot method also called the shake and bake method is where all the ingredients and chemicals are combined into
a one-reaction vessel, usually a bottle or jar.


METH
Continued from Page Al

making the drug, law enforce-
ment is starting to see an uptick
in usage as well as overdoses.
The process is still toxic, "but
someone came up with a way to
make it in a simplistic way"
The one-pot method also
called the shake and bake
method is where all the ingre-
dients and chemicals are com-
bined into a one-reaction vessel,
usually a bottle or jar.
But because all the ingredi-
ents are brewed together, the
method has shown a high sus-
ceptibility for explosions and
fire. All the ingredients can often
be kept in a backpack making
the lab highly portable.
"You arrest one cook, another
one steps in," Smith added.
Officials began seeing a spike


in this method of manufacturing
in 2011 and a similar rise in
meth abuse.
Smith said he and his fellow
investigators have therefore in
the past year been extremely
busy disrupting, tracking and ar-
resting purveyors and manufac-
turers of the drug.
Smith guesses at least 40 meth
labs have been busted in the past
year.
"And that's because we as an
agency have been really aggres-
sive about going after these
labs," he said.
Smith said federal efforts to
classify ephedrine as prescrip-
tion medication will help to es-
sentially halt domestic
production of meth.
"Without ephedrine, there will
be no meth. What we will see
after that would be the meth
from Mexico," he said.
Mexican meth, said Smith,
usually comes in the form of


CITRUS COUNTY


QUAUTY






UF 2012 Chronicle project

crystal-like shards while home-
grown meth is usually granu-
lated.
According to data from au-
thorities in Tennessee for exam-
ple, when legislation was passed
placing over-the-counter cold
medications containing
ephedrine/pseudoephedrine be-
hind the pharmacy counter, law


enforcement found that small
local labs seized dropped from
1,500 in 2004 to 955 in 2005, with
the most dramatic reductions
seen in rural counties.
In Florida, those buying
ephedrine have to show identifi-
cation and have a quota for the
month, said Smith.
But law enforcement has
found that lab operators use
their friends to purchase
ephedrine for them.
According to officials, a strong
ammonia or solvent smell like an
auto body shop, airline rubber
tubing, ether or camp fuel cans,
plastic bottles, pseudoephedrine
packages, lithium battery cas-
ings and propane tanks with
blue or green discoloration
around the valve are signs of a
meth lab.
Chronicle reporterAB. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925
or asidibe@chroncleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW
* Methamphetamine is abused for its
stimulant and euphoric effects. It
can be taken orally, snorted,
smoked, and injected. Smoking or
injecting methamphetamine results
in intense euphoria and is often
associated with binge use, large
escalation in dose with rapid tissue
tolerance, and high rates of
dependence and addiction.
* "Ice," "Glass" and "Crystal" are
all terms for concentrated
d-methamphetamine HCI chunks
that are smoked.
* Yaba is a Thai name for a colored
tablet containing methampheta-
mine combined with caffeine which
is gaining popularity among
individuals who frequent "raves."
* According to the 2009 National
Survey on Drug Use and Health,
12.84 million individuals, ages 12
and older, reported illicit use of
methamphetamine at least once in
their lifetime. In the past year,
1.17 million reported illicit use of
methamphetamine.
* Methamphetamine is chemically
and pharmacologically similar to
amphetamine, although it has more
potent effects on the central
nervous system that can last for six
to eight hours. Methamphetamine
increases the release of the
neurotransmitter dopamine, which
stimulates brain cells, enhancing
mood and energy.
* At low doses, methamphetamine
produces such effects as increased
wakefulness, increased physical
activity, increased heart rate and
blood pressure, decreased appetite,
increased respiration and body
temperature (hyperthermia), and
euphoria.
* High-dose, chronic use has been
associated with irritability, tremors,
convulsions, anxiety, paranoia and
neurotoxic effects that cause
damage to neurons and blood
vessels. Aggressive and violent
behavior, often directed at spouses
and children, pose a significant risk
to those individuals in contact with
methamphetamine addicts. Death
has resulted from extreme anorexia,
hyperthermia, convulsions and
cardiovascular collapse (including
stroke and heart attacks).
* STREET NAMES: Speed, Meth, Ice,
Crystal, Chalk, Crank, Tweak,
Uppers, Black Beauties, Glass,
Bikers Coffee, Methlies Quick, Poor
Man's Cocaine, Chicken Feed, Shabu,
Crystal Meth, Stove Top, Trash, Go-
Fast, Yaba and Yellow Barn.
Source: DEA


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A8 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Domestic violence shelter full, busy


On September 15, 2011, 42 out of 42, or 100%, of identified loal domestic c violence prCounts

On September 15, 2011, 42 out of 42, or 100%, of identified local domestic violence programs in Florida participated in


the 2011 National Census of Domestic Violence Services.
3,166 Victims Served in One Day
1,926 domestic violence victims found refuge in
emergency shelters or transitional housing provided by
local domestic violence programs. In addition to a safe
place to lay their heads at night, shelter residents were
provided with a variety of comprehensive services, some
of which are listed in the chart below.
1,240 adults and children received non-residential
assistance and services, including individual counseling,
legal advocacy, and children's support groups.
This chart shows the percentage of programs that provided
the following services on the Census Day.


Emergency Shelter (including hotels/safe houses)


I Snivda SupportS oAdvocac


Children's Support or Advocacy


ITa spotaio


Court/Legal Accompaniment/Advocacy


A
100%

93%

55%


119 Unmet Requests for Services
Many programs reported a critical shortage of funds and staff
to assist victims in need of services such as transportation,
childcare, language translation, mental health and substance
abuse counseling, and legal representation.
68% of Unmet Requests Were for Housing
With 81 unmet requests, emergency shelter and transitional
housing continue to be the most urgent unmet needs.
Other frequently requested unmet needs include legal
representation, counseling, and legal advocacy.
Programs were unable to provide services for many reasons:

* 45% reported not enough funding for needed
programs and services.
31% reported not enough specialized services.
31% reported no available beds or funding for hotels.
j 29% reported not enough staff.
12% reported limited funding for translators, bilingual
staff, or accessible equipment.


Adocc Relaed tSChid WefareProtctiv


Bilingual Advocacy (services by someone who is
bilingual)


45%


687 Hotline Calls Answered
Domestic violence hotlines are a lifeline for victims in
danger, providing support, information, safety planning,
and resources. In the 24-hour survey period, Florida
programs answered nearly 29 hotline calls every hour.


"A survivor currently residing in shelter is undergoing
breast cancer therapy. Her abusive partner had
convinced her she would be less of a woman with one
breast, with scars, and no hair, so she originally refused
to have treatment. Prior to coming into shelter she had
decided to just die. Today, she has completed most of
her chemotherapy and is re-learning to live. She will
remain in shelter and we will nuture and support her
through the rest of her treatment."


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
Domestic violence is an
underreported crime that
touches many lives.
According to the National
Coalition Against Domestic
Violence, one in every four
women will experience do-
mestic violence in their life-
time.
Since 1983, Citrus Abuse
Shelter Association (CASA)
has been helping victims of
domestic violence by pro-
viding shelter, safety, inter-
vention and education, and
educating the community
for social change.
So far this summer, Diana
Finegan, executive director,
said CASA has been busy
"Our shelter has been full
for some time," she said.
In addition, the office has
been fielding multiple phone
calls from outside of Citrus
County inquiring about shel-
ter space. Finegan's guess is
other shelters around the
state are full, as well.
The reason could possibly
be women find it easier to
leave the abusive situation
when the children are out of
school. And the current eco-
nomic climate has created a
pressure cooker for many
families who were already
stressed.
"There is already power
and control issues in the
home and then add the
economy to it. Things esca-
late," Finegan said.
But whatever the reasons
may be, she and new pro-
gram manager Judy Shelton
have rolled up their sleeves
to help out with the heavy
caseload.


CITRUS COUNTY

QUALITY





2012 Chronicle project


There is
already power
and control
issues in the
home and then
add the
economy to it.
Things
escalate.
Diana Finegan
executive director, Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association.
Despite the growing num-
bers, the community still
continues to step up and
support CASA, which has
been a godsend, according
to Finegan.
Most of the women who
come to CASA seeking help
are raising school-aged
children. Once at the shel-
ter, the process of recovery
can begin. Falling into the
abuse was a process in it-
self, Finegan explained. It
See Page A14


2011 Domestic Violence Counts: A 24-Hour Census of Domestic Violence Shelters and Services


Courtesy of Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence
This page from the Spring 2012 "Florida Voice" newsletter put out by the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence pro-
vides statistics for domestic violence across Florida in 2011.


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QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Nothing quite as good as a visit to this,





neighborhood Pizzeria


ABOVE: Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe in Hernando serves brick oven-fired pizza, garlic knots and wings like few others in Citrus
County. Diners may add wings, cold beer and delicious homemade apple pie for dessert. The restaurant is at 2780 N. Florida Ave.
in Hernando (352) 637-1920 BELOW LEFT: Simply the best Calzone ever! Found right here at Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe in
Hernando.


Chef Anthony's Pizza Caft uses secret family recipes for pizza dough, sauces


What Makes Us Great?
LELAND ASHBY
Pizza Critic


Today you do not hear
enough positive comments
about young people. I
would like to take the time
to recognize Pizza Caf6's
great staff.
Manager Ashley Zane &
husband Jarred (manager of
Paige's Root beer) are proud
parents of two month old
baby Atticus. Ashley is back
and the perfect complement
to our new and improved
wait staff: Haley, Alex &
Amber. Three great young
ladies working hard to make
sure our customers have a
pleasant dining experience.
In the kitchen we have
Maxwell, John, Richard &
David. David the new guy
with three years and the rest
of the guys have all been
with the Pizza Caf6 for six
or more years. This type of
dedication keeps the food
consistent and the
customers coming back.


We struggled for a few
months getting Paige's Root
beer open and making some
staff adjustments in the front
of the house at Chef
Anthony's But we have
come through it with the
BEST sales quarter in ten
years. All crew members
including servers must work
a shift per week in the
kitchen to learn the product,
timing, etc. to hopefully
improve the customers
dining experience. All new
employees, after successful
completion of probation
period, get a maroon shirt,
showing they are a Pizza
Caf6 employee. Next is the
green shirt showing they are
fully trained and productive
team members. Last is the
black shirt of distinction, for


dedication, positive attitude
& superior performance.
Sincerest thanks to the crew.
Cheney Brothers is our
exclusive food supply. C-B-I
the largest privately owned
food supplier in Florida
providing the best products
on the market. Chef
Anthony's Pizza Caf6 only
uses Grande cheese, there is
no better. Stanislaus tomato
products, best in the
industry. Our product arrives
fresh and clean twice a
week. Pizza Cafe maintains
a clean kitchen and is one of
the few mom and pop
places, maybe the only one
to receive a perfect health
inspection. In ten years of
business they may not have
all been perfect but I can
boast that Pizza Cafe has
never received a bad health
inspection. Go to
myflorida.com hotel &
restaurant and see for
yourself.
Chef Anthony takes the
mystery out of making a
great New York style pizza.
Great pizza sauce starts
with a great tomato. I have
tried multiple brands of
tomato paste, pizza sauce,
and combinations of herbs
and spices. The key is to
understand that all tomatoes
are not created equal. You
have green house, Roma,
field vine, California, etc.
The time of year, amount of
rainfall are a few factors that
affect any tomato gravy.
Start with a good base
sauce. Chef Anthony only
uses Stanislaus, absolutely
the best tomato products on
the market. Gravy should
have a smooth texture with
some small chunks of
tomato still visible. You will
need to add sugar in some
quantity and heat over low
flame for about fifteen
minutes to cook out any
bitterness in the sauce.
Carrots are a good natural
sweetener and will absorb


some of the acid content.
The amount of sugar, cook
time and temperature may
vary depending on some of
the factors listed above.
Chef Anthony uses the
finest base tomato gravy and
adds an assortment of spices
to make a great pizza sauce.
The bottom line is this:
Stay away from precooked
ready to serve sauce. The
correct cook time and
temperature is the key.
Gently stir sauce about
every three minutes, cool
sauce for fifteen minutes and
put in an airtight container
and refrigerator for twelve to
twenty four hours before
serving.
Most Pizza places buy
frozen dough balls from
their food supplier and tell
costumers that they made it
themselves.
At the Pizza Caf6 Chef
Anthony makes dough fresh
every day. I have used
purified water, spring water
and filtered tap water. All
three yield the same result.
However, you cannot use


well water,
otherwise.


filtered or


If you're local pizza shop is
on well water it means one of
two things. They make bad
dough or they buy frozen
dough balls loaded with
preservatives.
Basic ingredients: water,
flour, yeast, salt, sugar, oil &
filler (fillers are secret
ingredients to give the dough
a distinct flavor.)


A few tips:
Do not make your batch sizes
too big, use cold water to
keep the yeast from
activating and the less time
the batch of dough is exposed
to air the better it will be.


DONDE:10


Healthy
Pizza...
Is There
Such A Thing?
Being diabetic does not
mean you have to give up
pizza. Since being
diagnosed with
Type 2 diabetes, Kevin at
the Pizza Caf6 has
created a great tasting
whole-wheat pizza.

The new whole-wheat
crust, in concert with
healthy toppings like
fresh vegetables and
chicken, is fantastic!

Try it with traditional
red sauce, ricotta, or
Alfredo sauce.

Weight Watcher Friendly
Mom's salad, Chicken
Bacon Ranch Wrap, not
so friendly Bleu Cheese
Delight salad-man is it
good, Specialty Steak or
Chicken salad: See full
description at our web site
pizzacafenow.com


Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe

Celebrates Ten Years of Serving

Some of the Best Pizza in Citrus County

It has been an honor p .
to serve our community.
Thank you for your
patronage.
This past quarter has
been the best we have had
in ten years. Because of
you, our loyal customers,
we will be hiring three
new employees.
Keep your community
strong by supporting local
small businesses. It does Photo of: Owners of Chef Anthony's Pizza Cafe
make a difference. Kevin & Teresa Paige Opening Day August 2002.


AlO SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ride-along sheds light on duties Officers


Buster Thompson
GUEST
COLUMN
Many people try not
to get themselves in
the back of a Citrus
County Sheriff's patrol car
I, on the other hand, man-
aged to find myself in the
front seat of one.
I had the privilege of ac-
companying Cpl. Joseph
Casola, call sign 314, during
a part of his 12-hour patrol
shift beginning at 5 p.m. on
a Friday
Known as the "walking
Florida Statute book" by his
fellow deputies, Casola has
been with the CCSO since
early 2001, and is still sur-
prised by the dispatch calls
he receives.
"It's never the same thing
twice, it's always different
and it keeps it interesting,"
he said about patrolling.
Along with three other
units, he patrols the north-
east zone of the county,
where I witnessed places
and people I never knew
existed before the shift
began.
Our first call came up on
in-car computer The caller
received a threat that a
man from New Jersey was
on his way down to burn
down her house.
After showing me the
process on how to accept a
call on his laptop, we drove
off to investigate the house
in Beverly Hills.
"We do this pretty much
ourselves. We don't really
have to talk to our dis-
patcher unless he's sending
us to a call," Casola said.
"Everything is done
silently"
Driving past the caller's
intact house, we both came
to the conclusion it wasn't
on fire, and there were no
indications anybody was
even home.
"I don't put anything past
anybody anymore," the
deputy said about the peo-
ple he deals with. "Society
has definitely changed."
As night finally arrived,
and after a few more inter-
esting calls, Casola and I
found ourselves responding
to a 9-1-1 hang-up, deep in
the rural and wooded out-


Special to the Chronicle


Cpl. Joseph Casola talks with an unidentified woman while on duty.


skirts of the county, popu-
lated by a few small houses
and mobile homes.
Suddenly, the radio
blared out an alarm from
dispatch: "314 respond we
have a suspected burglary
in progress, involving four
suspects."
Since all other units were
busy, we had to go the loca-
tion, miles away, alone.
"Well I guess that's us,"
Casola said calmly before
turning on his sirens and
lights.
I could've sworn I heard
Casola whistling between
dispatches requesting back
up for our unit, as we went
80 mph on a 50 mph road.
As we got closer to the
scene, he turned off his
lights and sirens so as not to
spook the burglars.
When we arrived, neigh-
bors were in the front yard
of the house, yelling to
someone at the back of
house.
The moment the deputy
stepped out of his car,


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY

UOF





2012 Chronicle project


his face went from a smile
to solid, straight-faced
stoicism.
Watching from inside the
car, I saw Cpl. Casola return
from the screened patio
with a young man in hand-
cuffs and placing him in the
back seat behind me.
The young man, who ap-
peared to be intoxicated,
began talking to me after
Casola left to investigate
the house with arriving
deputies and a K-9 unit.
I didn't want to say any-
thing to him, but it's diffi-
cult not to talk to people


who find themselves in this
predicament, so I began to
talk to him.
In the end, the officers
weren't able to find the
other suspects, notice the
house inside to be dis-
turbed or find proof that the
detained individual had
any connection with the at-
tempted burglary and had
to let him go.
Casola told me afterward
that the young man thought
I was very nice when I
spoke to him.
As midnight came close, I
decided my adrenal glands
had had enough for the
night
I thanked Casola for al-
lowing me to join him on
one of his many exciting
nights and left him to con-
tinue his shift, but not be-
fore he went to get a bagel
at Dunkin Donuts at two in
the morning.


Contact Chronicle intern
Buster Thompson at
352-563-5660.


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern

If you were to walk into
any Citrus County school,
chances are you would spot
a uniformed School Re-
source Officer (SRO) roam-
ing the halls.
These deputies from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice are a part of a national
SRO program that works in
conjunction with the CCSO
and the Citrus County
School Board.
"It's a partnership, and just
another tool," said SRO Su-
pervisor Lt Kevin Purinton.
The SRO program is em-
braced by school board mem-
bers and the school district,
Superintendent Sandra
"Sam" Himmel said Friday
"Many things that go on in
the school are reported early
so we can deal with it," she
said. "The officers build a re-
lationship with the students
in elementary school and
that follows them to high
school and that helps. They
are positive role models."
By having a presence on
the school grounds, Himmel
sees it as a proactive
approach.
These officers have the
yearly responsibility of
maintaining a connection
between the students, their
schools and the community,
offering any assistance to
the student body
"We help kids make
proper decisions," said
Kevin Purinton. "We give
them all successful avenues
in school."
Since 1985, the SRO pro-
gram has progressively in-
fused their "Triad Concept"
within the County's educa-
tion system, starting in pri-
mary schools, by helping
concerned students, provid-
ing a law enforcement pres-
ence and teaching law
classes.
"(The SRO) is definitely
considered a staff member.
They're just like any other
teacher," Purinton said.
While younger students
may not necessarily need the
SRO for enforcing law, the


SCHOOL ARRESTS
* School Resource
Officer arrests in
Citrus County schools,
by year.


School Year:
August-May
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12


No. of
Arrests:
82


Data provided by the Citrus
County SRO Program

program still wants to edu-
cate them on how to be suc-
cessful in later years.
"We try to work out with
younger kids and steer them
to an appropriate behavior,"
said Purinton.
Along with protecting
schools from danger, the
SRO provides counseling
for at risk students in order
to reach a preemptive
solution.
"For the students who
struggle, we identify who
they are, find out the problem
and get to the root cause,"
said Purinton.
The proof of the SRO pro-
gram's success in preventing
crime in schools is evident in
their juvenile arrest num-
bers, which have been de-
creasing year by year
"The program has been
very successful," Purinton
said.
Depending on the offense,
SRO's response is to be le-
nient to first-time offenders.
Instead of arresting them, the
student is cited to Teen Court
and is given the opportunity
to show the community that
they can change.
"We refer them to Teen
Court to educate them," Pur-
inton said.
Every school year can
present difficulties to stu-
dents, and the SRO program
makes sure kids can face
those challenges head one
and without reluctance.
"We're here to reinforce
our message," he said. "We're
not going to save them all, but
we give them that chance."


Fraud program works to right wrongs Teen Court: 'Each


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

BEVERLY HILLS A
fraudster's favorite target
is an easy one. *
And sadly, many times
that target is a senior cit-
izen.
According to The Fed- *
eral Bureau of Investiga-
tion (FBI), seniors are
most likely to have a
"nest egg," to own their *
home and/or to have ex-
cellent credit, which
make them attractive to
con artists. *
They are also less
likely to report a fraud
because they don't know *
who to report it to, are too
ashamed at having been
scammed, or don't know
they have been scammed.
Fortunately, Seniors vs.
Crime has been working *
vigilantly in Citrus
County to recover losses
for victimized seniors.
First established in
July 2002, the Seniors vs.
Crime storefront in Bev-
erly Hills was a joint proj-
ect of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office and the
Florida Attorney Gen-
eral's Office. It was the
first of its kind in the state to combine
the multiple resources of a sheriff's
office and the attorney general's of-
fice to assist older adults.
Since then, the hardworking staff of
volunteers has investigated a number
of cases ranging from simple business
to customer miscommunications to
large-scale financial exploitations.
Project staff members not only ad-
vocate for older adults but citizens of
all ages who believe they have been
cheated.
Just recently, Don Moran, founding
storefront manager, said the program
celebrated completing a decade of
service in the county.
Over the years, the program has


Always obtain at least three written
estimates.
Consult with the Better Business
Bureau or government agencies
before having work done.
Have a written contract for all work to
be performed.
Make sure the contractor is licensed, if
required, and has insurance.
Never provide anyone with your bank
account, social security number or
important personal information,
especially over the phone.
Be wary of offers where they are
only "right now."
Solicitors selling items over $25 are
required to have a permit issued by
the county Clerk's Office.

Brochure image courtesy of Citrus County Sheriff's Office


closed 1,596 cases and recovered
more than $2 million in losses. Since
2002, program volunteers have in-
vested more than 25,000 hours into
helping recoup those monies.
Surprisingly, Moran said many of
the people they help come right
through the doors of their storefront.
There are times the problem can-
not be fixed, especially if a contract
has already been signed. But each
case is an individual case, Moran ex-
plained. Therefore, the volunteers
have to be extremely objective and do
a lot of research to see if the case is a
viable one.
"Paperwork is very important to
us," he said.
Many scams exist, but Moran said


the most common in-
volve buying equipment
and household items a
person is overcharged
for or many not necessar-
ily need.
"It's irritating," he
said. "It's buyer beware."
There are also issues
involving contractors
and repair people who
are not licensed or
pulling the permits
needed to do the job.
Moran said people
have to educate
themselves.
"It's an education that
has to happen," he said.
People also have to
learn how to say no and
be less trusting. There
used to be an old saying,
Moran said, that a per-
son's word was their
bond and a handshake
was the contract, but not
anymore.
"People have to pro-
tect themselves," he said.
If you think you might
be the victim of a scam,
call the sheriff's office
immediately at 352-726-
4488. Anyone wanting
more information about
this scam or others can
call the sheriff's office's


Seniors vs. Crime program at 352-249-
9139. Their storefront is at 4093 N.
Lecanto Highway in the Beverly
Plaza in Beverly Hills. Hours of oper-
ation are from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesdays and
Thursday.
Complainants should bring with
them their canceled checks, receipts,
statements, contracts and other docu-
mentation for an initial interview.
Once a complaint is deemed valid,
staff members strive to resolve the
matter favorably and in a timely
manner.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern

INVERNESS Before
Teen Court was established
in 2004, the Juvenile Justice
System was overwhelmed
with adolescents who were
found accused of crimes
that could stain their lives,
but had no way of imple-
menting an educational pro-
gram to prevent another
possible crime.
"No crime is a small
crime," said Teen Court Co-
ordinator Darla Graber about
juvenile arrests, "but so many
kids come into the Juvenile
Justice System."
The Teen Court's 90-day di-
version program, only avail-
able in Florida, is designed to
give young adults the ability
to redeem themselves to the
community, their parents and
their victims.
Every Tuesday evening at
the Inverness courthouse,
teenagers who have con-
sented to entering Teen
Court, and therefore waived
their non-guilty plea, stand
in front of a volunteer judge,
jury and their parents, and
are read their arrest report.
The jury consists of other
kids who have also been
sentenced, watching, listen-
ing and learning about the
in-progress case.
Depending on the guide-
lines of the case, jurors
present the sentenced indi-
vidual with objectives to
complete within the 90-day
period of the program. The
volunteer judge regulates
these requirements.
"Each case is different be-
cause each person is differ-
ent," Graber said.
Along with a mandatory


apology to their parents or
the victimss, community
service, Teen Court jury
duty and essay writing are
some of the main educa-
tional tools used by this cur-
riculum.
"It's not a court program,"
said Graber "It's an educa-
tional program."
The juvenile is not left on
their own during the 90-day
period.
Goal setting classes ease
the strain of the hours and
essays by helping spread the
workload throughout the
course.
A volunteer State Trooper
teaches the kids about what
the consequences of their
crime will be equivalent to as
an adult Their parents are
required to attend as well.
Therapy sessions, like sub-
stance abuse and anger man-
agement counseling, are
offered to best suit the young
adult and their needs.
Darla Graber is technically
the only person employed to
the Teen Court program; the
rest are volunteers.
"We have very dedicated
volunteers," Graber said. "I
would have a very busy Tues-
day if it wasn't for them."
When all service hours
are accounted for, all essays
turned in, every verbal and
written apology given and
all jury duties are served be-
fore time is up, the individ-
ual's record is cleared of the
offense.
The motivation to com-
plete the course is to not go
on probation, pay fines or
have crime on their record
forever if they failed the
program.
"They only get one shot at
Teen Court," Graber said.


patrol





schools


case is different'


QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Show me the permit


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

In 1994, the state of
Florida was awash in prop-
erty crimes, according to fig-
ures from the Florida
Department of Law En-
forcement (FDLE).
With the state population
at a hair below 14 million
people, 991,104 property
crimes were recorded that
year the most since 1960
and the worst after
Actually property crimes
- burglaries, larcenies,
auto thefts and arsons -
have been declining even
with population growth.
Florida population during
the 2010 Census was
18,801,310.
In 2010, FDLE recorded
669,035 property crimes
throughout the state.
Locally, the property crime
numbers are a mixed bag;
categories wax and wane de-
pending on what fuels them,
according to veteran commu-
nity crimes Detective Craig
Fass of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
"The number one focus
right now among the crimi-
nal element is on pills," Fass
said. "They would jump at
every opportunity to get
their hands on those pills."
Fass said their team of 15
detectives often find them-
selves investigating mostly
crimes of opportunity re-
tail theft, break-ins at empty
vacation homes and re-
cently daytime burglaries
involving fake solicitors.
"They will come knock on
your door, pretending to be



TOOLS
Continued from Page Al

Used for five years by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice, the ESDL was designed
to eliminate additional
equipment and wiring com-
mon with the early 1990
models.
With this newer product,
prints can even be gathered
off insulated surfaces and
carpeting.
The ESDL has both posi-
tive and negative posts on ei-
ther end of the device. The
negative post is placed on a
grounded metal plate, while
the positive post is placed on
the Mylar sheet
When turned on, the cur-
rent will suck the Mylar film
onto the surface and gather
the print in a matter of
seconds.
After the film is developed
and then analyzed by the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, the CCSO evi-
dence division can use the
shoe of an apprehended sus-
pect and do a side-by-side
comparison to the prints
gathered at the crime scene.
"Once we have a shoe, we
have a suspect, but if there
are no individual character-
istics, it can prove difficult,"
Martin said.
Nonetheless, the ESDL is a
simpler way for the police to
attain evidence that's hard to
gather
New technology
For an officer in the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, or in
any police department, the
identification of a suspected
individual is crucial to how a
deputy can deal with that
person in any given situation.
Without knowing how dan-
gerous a suspect could be, the
deputies are putting them-
selves more at risk
For close to a year, the
CCSO's sergeants have had in
their possession a live finger
print scanner that they can fit
in their front pocket, utilizing
a more efficient way of gain-
ing information than solely
relying on a laptop.
"If anybody has ever had
their fingerprints taken and
is in the system, and I take
your finger print on the
scene, this device will grab it
and give me your informa-
tion," said Sgt Ray Fischer
Once a suspect is appre-
hended or has consented to
the scan, the deputy has the


opportunity to get an upper
hand.
By scanning two fingers,
this Bluetooth device sends
the prints via the laptop to
the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement, and sends
back the person's local and
national criminal history or
active warrants to the device
while the sergeant is talking
to the suspect
Regardless of whether


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle file
One of the many roles the surveillance unit plays is to perform house checks while residents
are away. Sgt. Ralph Kelley makes it his business to check doors and windows when home-
owners tell the unit they will be out of town.


selling a service if you are
home and will check your
home so they can return
later And, if you are not
home, they would just go
ahead and break in," he said.
Fass recommends the fol-
lowing for residents to keep
their properties safe:
Install better lighting.
Purchase a good alarm
system.
Get a camera system in
place to videotape activity
at your residence when you
are away Some systems in-
volve the ability to monitor
the camera remotely via a
computer or cellphone.
Lock car doors whenever


you park anywhere and
never leave your keys in a car
Demand to see a valid
government-issued permit
from a solicitor who is trying
to do work on your property
Fass, who is doing gradu-
ate degree work in Tampa,
said he would sometimes
share ideas with law en-
forcement officers in that
area and learned there is a
new game in town fraud.
Apparently, a lot of the
burglars are turning to
white-collar crimes like
credit card fraud, he said.
"It is more lucrative and
involves less work than ac-
tually breaking into homes,"


Fass added.
He said one of the meth-
ods these scammers use is
grabbing mail out of boxes
and stealing the person's
identity
"Normally, whatever is
hot in the Tampa area takes
about a few months before it
makes its way here," he
added.
Fass urges vigilance in the
community and encourages
residents to report anything
that does not "fit" in your
neighborhood to officials.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office utilizes a Ballistic Engineered Armored Response Counter
Attack Truck, or BearCat for short, to securely deliver sheriff's office personnel into high-
risk situations.


there's a record or warrant
involving the individual, the
sergeant has more knowl-
edge on how to deal with the
unknown.
"It gives you more of an in-
vestigative tool," Fischer
said. "It gives you more in-
sight on the person."
In addition, the print scan-
ner is useful for identifying
people with a criminal history
who have misplaced their dri-
ver's license, have Alz-
heimer's disease, a missing
person or who is a relative.
Criminals today are used
to having the fingers scanned,
but the device is pro-
grammed to detect any irreg-
ularities with the placement
of the finger
"People will try to move
their fingers around, but if
there's an issue, the device
will tell me to take the print
again," Fischer said.
According to Sgt David
Fields, in the majority of cir-
cumstances, criminals who
are familiar with the scanner
will turn themselves in.
"Once the bad guys see the
device, they just say, 'you got
me,"' said Fields.
Currently, only sergeants
carry the rechargeable and
long-lasting tool because of
the expense, but later down
the road every deputy will
have access to quick back-
ground information.
"The ability's there and
the technology's there,"
Fischer said. "It's just
around the corner"
Crime mapping
There's no question that
crime affects the public, and
for the citizens of Citrus
County, knowing what, when
and where the offense is, can
be the biggest tool in the com-
munity's possession in the
defense against criminals.
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office has given people
the ability to track reported
criminal activity with the use
of CrimeMapping.
Evolving since 2008,


CrimeMapping's interactive
online mapping system, con-
stantly updates crime from
the CCSO reports.
"Citizens know what's hap-
pened. It's a good way to get
interactive information," said
Sgt Chris Evan, supervisor of
Crime Prevention and volun-
teers of Citizens on Patrol.
Evan recognizes Crime-
Mapping as a way for people
to be more aware of what's
going on in their county.
"People seem to think that
there's no crime in Citrus
County," he said. "CrimeMap-
ping wakes them up to pay at-
tention to crime."
Deputies and volunteers of
the CCSO can also use
CrimeMapping to identify
high-risk areas, allowing
them to warn nearby resi-
dents to keep watch and in-
form the sheriff's office if
they notice anything.
"We rely on accurate and
timely information," Evan
said. "Our patrols are very
proactive with our crime
watch activities. I want us to
stop and talk to residents
directly"
Users have access to the lo-
cations of crimes from
months prior, enabling them
to determine patterns of the
transgressions.
"We recommend that peo-
ple set the dates as far back
as they can go, giving them
more of a forecast of crime,"
the deputy said.
Any crime that isn't re-
ported to authorities will not
be displayed, encouraging
citizens to report anything
they find.
"For the map to be useful,
the crime needs to be
known," he said.
By having a more informed
public, sheriff officials hope
to connect further with the
community's policing effort
CrimeMapping is also na-
tionally recognized and is
useful for planning any vaca-
tion around the country.
To investigate recent crim-


inal activity in your neigh-
borhood through CrimeMap-
ping, you can visit the CCSO
website, www.sheriffcitrus.
com, click the "Public Infor-
mation" tab and then on
"CrimeMapping Citrus
County"
BearCat
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office deputies respond
to any call that appears on
their in-vehicle laptop. Even
if it's a police hang-up.
Many scenarios might not
seem like a high-priority or
dangerous situation, but with
crime, anything can happen.
If a deputy approaches a
scene involving an armed or
barricaded subject, some-
times a basic police cruiser
doesn't provide enough secu-
rity
Used by the Citrus County
SWAT team and sheriff's of-
fice, the Ballistic Engineered
Armored Response Counter
Attack Truck or BearCat as
it is known was designed
as a critical response and res-
cue operations vehicle.
"It can be used to provide
cover from thrown objects,
weapons fire when assisting
an officer who is hurt," ser-
geant ray Fischer said, "and
for high-risk warrants."
Welded to a Ford F-550
chassis, steel armored plat-
ing, capable of repelling fire
from multiple assault
weapons, encases up to ten
SWAT team members.
"It's basically a civilian
tank," Fischer said. "It's
pretty neat"
The BearCat allows law
enforcement personnel to get
as close to the action as
possible.
"We can use it to approach
right up to a house, without
anybody harming the offi-
cers," Fischer said.
Capable of successfully
dealing with non-lethal and
lethal encounters with soci-
ety, the BearCat gives local
authorities the ability to deal
with it safely


Prison math


gets complicated


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

In the state of Florida
when it is time to do time,
things can get a bit flum-
moxed or mathematical in
court.
And it is not the simple
arithmetic of a judge say-
ing: "'I now sentence you to
30 years in prison."
The art of sentencing is a
score sheet which requires
a primary offense point
total times a host of other
points depending on fac-
tors such as victim impact.
Enhancements such as
prior criminal history also
factor into the equation.
When everything is tal-
lied, 28 is subtracted from
that number and the num-
ber is then multiplied by
.75.
That ultimate number is
the minimum number of
months a judge can im-
pose, unless the judge
finds mitigating reasons
such as a defendant being
too young to understand
the gravity of the offense in
order to impose something
lower The magic number,
however, is 44 points. Any-
one who scores 44 and
lower is exempt from state
prison, but a judge can sen-
tence to county time or im-
pose other sanctions like
probation.
To the lay person, it all
seems like a jumble, but ac-
cording to Assistant State
Attorney Rich Buxman,
who has to tally the num-
bers, it all makes sense.
"It is the only system I
have known as prosecutor
The legislature came up
with the sentencing guide-
line in 1983 to equalize
things for judges and to
make sure one person is
not getting one kind of sen-
tence in Broward County
and another getting some-
thing totally different in
the Panhandle for the
same crime," Buxman said.
"I think it sets the appro-
priate guidelines. It also
lets the judges retain their
discretion because they
can still sentence you to
the maximum for a crime.
It is only when they have to
depart lower than the
score sheet number that
they have to give a mitigat-
ing reason, like the level of
sophistication of the defen-
dant when they committed
the crime," he said.
With the new sentencing
guidelines, Florida also
abandoned its parole sys-
tem. Life in prison means
for your natural life, and


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY






2012 Chronicle project


CRIMES AND
MAXIMUM
SENTENCES
Capital felony- life in
prison.
First-degree felony-
30 years in prison.
Second-degree felony
15 years prison.
Third-degree felony-
5 years in prison.
First-degree misde-
meanor- 1 year
county jail.
Second-degree misde-
meanor 60 days
county jail.

most of the other hefty sen-
tences require serving at
least 85 percent of the time.
Defense attorney Dale
Merrill thinks the abolition
of the parole system and
score sheets are creating a
prison industry based on
money and an assured sup-
ply of prisoners.
"It is extremely unfair
With the score sheet you
have all these other factors
which can be added to your
score and essentially guar-
antee that you are going to
have to spend a substantial
time in prison," Merrill
said.
"Right now, we have
huge geriatric wards in our
prisons. Feeding and med-
ically taking care of these
people in prison has to be
more expensive than let-
ting them go. Besides, what
kind of threat would a 75-
or 80-year-old pose to the
community?" she said.
Buxman, however, said
the enhancements in the
score sheet such as
prison release offenders
or habitual offenders,
which can sometimes dou-
ble a defendant's prison
sentence are separate
from the goals of the score
sheet system.
"The purpose of the sen-
tencing guidelines remain
the same, which is to
equalize things, bring some
uniformity in sentencing,"
Buxman said.


DOMESTIC The victim
Continued from PaeA9 starts saying
...-__ .' I1- H _- 6I


starts with manipulation,
power and control.
Then the victim begins to
rationalize the abuse, ac-
cording to Sgt. Chris Evan
with the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. Evan has
given presentations at the
College of Central Florida
about domestic violence.
"The victim starts saying
things like, 'I should have
made the meal correctly...
I should have done this. I
should have done that,"' he
said.
And many times, the vic-
tim stays, mainly out of
fear, Evan said.
There's the fear of future
abuse or possibly death.
There is a fear if the
woman has been discon-
nected from the outside
world and now has to care
for herself and her chil-
dren, Finegan said.
In many cases, it can
take as many as seven to
nine times before a woman
leaves for good or dies at
the hands of her abuser
But no matter how long it
takes, Finegan said CASA's
doors are always open.
Besides providing shel-
ter for battered and abused
women, CASA offers many
services such as individual
counseling, women's sup-
port groups, help in secur-
ing relocation money and
crime victim compensation


things liKe, i
should have
made the
meal correctly
... I should
have done
this. I should

have done
that.

Diana Finegan
executive director, Citrus
Abuse Shelter Association.


and legal and court
advocacy
During the support
groups, Finegan said the
women learn about the red
flags of unhealthy relation-
ships, and they learn how
to establish boundaries
and build their self-esteem.
CASA also has great
partnerships with both the
school district and the
sheriff's office.
For information about
CASA or domestic abuse,
call the 24-hour hotline at
352-344-8111.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at swiles@
chronicleonline. corn or
352-564-2924.


VOLUNTEER WITH CCSO
* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-
527-3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


A14 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

Uncommon


US sees ally Israel as spy threat


Associated Press
A white bison calf walks
July 18 in a field at the Mo-
hawk Bison farm in
Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of
Native Americans attended
ceremonies Saturday at
the farm to name the rare
white bison, revered as a
symbol of peace and unity.
The calf was officially
named Yellow Medicine
Dancing Boy.

Rare white bison
birth celebrated
GOSHEN, Conn. -
Dozens of Native Americans
wore the traditional garb of
their ancestors, sang songs
and beat drums on a western
Connecticut farm Saturday in
celebration of the birth of one
of the world's rarest animals
- a white bison.
The miracle calf was offi-
cially named Yellow Medicine
Dancing Boy at the elaborate
ceremony at the Mohawk
Bison farm in Goshen in the
state's northwestern hills. It
was born June 16 at the farm
of fourth-generation farmer
Peter Fay.
Many Native Americans
consider white bison a sym-
bol of hope and unity; some
consider their births sacred
events. Experts say white
bison are as rare as one in
10 million.
Yellow Medicine Dancing
Boy is not an albino, and Fay
said DNA testing confirmed
the animal's bloodlines are
pure and there was no inter-
mingling with cattle.
Lakota tribe members from
South Dakota were among
the hundreds of people who
gathered at the celebration.
Other tribal elders from the
Mohawk, Seneca and
Cayuga tribes participated.

World BRIEFS

Blocked


Associated Press
A protester stands in front
of lines of riot police offi-
cers Saturday in Qidong,
Jiangsu Province, China.
Authorities in eastern
China dropped plans for a
water-discharge project
Saturday after thousands
of protesters, angry about
pollution, took to the
streets in the latest of
many such confrontations
in a country where three
decades of rapid economic
expansion have come at an
environmental price.


Officials: Ebola
virus in Uganda


KAMPALA, U
deadly Ebola vir
14 people in we;
this month, Ugai
officials said Sat
weeks of specul
the cause of a s
ease that had m
fleeing their horm
The officials a
Health Organiza
sentative told a r
ence in Kampale
there is "an outb
Ebola" in Ugand
"Laboratory inm
done at the Ugan
search Institute ..
firmed that the st
reported in Kibaa
Ebola hemorrhac
Ugandan govern
WHO said in join
Kibaale is a d
western Uganda
cure for Ebola, v
224 Ugandans


ganda The
us has killed
stern Uganda
ndan health
turday, ending
ation about
4 A;,.. :


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
CIA station chief opened the
locked box containing the
sensitive equipment he
used from his home in Tel
Aviv, Israel, to communicate
with CIA headquarters in
Virginia, only to find some-
one had tampered with it.
He sent word to his superi-
ors about the
break-in.
The incident, described
by three former senior U.S.
intelligence officials, might
have been dismissed as just
another cloak-and-dagger
incident in the world of in-
ternational espionage, ex-
cept the same thing had
happened to the previous
station chief in Israel.
It was a not-so-subtle re-
minder that, even in a coun-
try friendly to the United


Associated Press
FRESNO, Calif. Imagine being
the only driver on a two-lane asphalt
highway as the stark desolation of
Death Valley National park passes
on each side and the crystal blue sky
stretches up from the horizon.
Or picture a tight left turn on
Yosemite's Glacier Point Road
where in the east iconic Half Dome
suddenly appears against a back-
drop of the snow-capped High
Sierra.
The Google Street View service
that has brought us Earth as we
might not be able to afford to see it
- as well as criticism that some
scenes along its 5 million miles of
the globe's roadways invade pri-
vacy this month has turned its
360-degree cameras on road trips
through five national parks in
California.
"Everyone likes to take a road
trip through a national park," said
Evan Rapoport, the Street View
project manager, who was inspired
by a cross-country camping trip he


States, the CIA was itself
being watched.
In a separate episode, ac-
cording to another two for-
mer U.S. officials, a CIA
officer in Israel came home
to find the food in the refrig-
erator had been rearranged.
In all the cases, the U.S. gov-
ernment believes Israel's
security services were
responsible.
Such meddling under-
scores what is widely known
but rarely discussed outside
intelligence circles: Despite
inarguable ties between the
U.S. and its closest ally in
the Middle East and despite
statements from U.S. politi-
cians trumpeting the friend-
ship, U.S. national security
officials consider Israel to
be, at times, a frustrating
ally and a genuine counter-
intelligence threat.
In addition to what the for-


mer U.S. officials described
as intrusions in homes in the
past decade, Israel has been
implicated in U.S. criminal
espionage cases and disci-
plinary proceedings against
CIA officers and blamed in
the presumed death of an
important spy in Syria for
the CIA during the adminis-
tration of President George
W Bush.
The CIA considers Israel
its No. 1 counterintelligence
threat in the agency's Near
East Division, the group that
oversees spying across the
Middle East, according to
current and former officials.
Counterintelligence is the
art of protecting national se-
crets from spies.
This means the CIA be-
lieves U.S. national secrets
are safer from other Middle
Eastern governments than
from Israel.


took after graduation. "Bringing
unique places to people that they
might not go in the real world is
unique to Street View."
The company sought permission
from the Department of the Inte-
rior before filming in May as driv-
ers hit the road in vehicles rigged
with 15-lens cameras that point in
all directions, Rapoport said. The
camera fires off still images at in-
tervals depending upon the speed
of the vehicle, then custom soft-
ware blurs faces and stitches all of
them together into an ever-
advancing 360-degree panorama.
Click right and see orange-hued
boulders formed from cooling
magma. Click up and squint into
that fireball of a sun hovering over
the southeast California desert in
Joshua Tree National Park, which
is featured with the others along
with the forest-dense Sequoia &
Kings Canyon and Redwood Na-
tional Park at Crescent City near
the Oregon border
Stop in the middle of the virtual
road and do a 360 without worrying


Israel employs highly so-
phisticated, professional
spy services that rival Amer-
ican agencies in technical
capability and recruiting
human sources. Unlike Iran
or Syria, for example, Israel
as a steadfast U.S. ally en-
joys access to the highest
levels of the U.S. govern-
ment in military and intelli-
gence circles.
The officials spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause they weren't author-
ized to talk publicly about
the sensitive intelligence
and diplomatic issues be-
tween the two countries.
The counterintelligence
worries continue even as
the U.S. relationship with
Israel features close coop-
eration on intelligence pro-
grams that reportedly
included the Stuxnet com-
puter virus that attacked


about being rear-ended by a ubiq-
uitous RV
The project was part of a Street
View "refresh" of California that
involved a trip down Highway 1
along the Big Sur coast, including
the famous Bixby Creek Bridge
that spans the mouth of a coast-
hugging canyon.
Is it part of a master plan to cap-
ture people in a virtual world?
"I sure hope not," Rapoport said.
"Part of our goal is to inspire peo-
ple to see these places in person."
As national park attendance con-
tinues to decline, officials welcome
this unique virtual visit as a way to
keep fans connected and inspire
others to experience the sights in
person.
"I often wish we could get the
word out on some of the park sys-
tem's lesser known wonders," said
Candace Tinkler, chief interpreter
at Redwoods, with its massive trees
that can live 2,000 years and soar
up to 350 feet. "This is a wonderful
opportunity for people around the
world to connect to these places."


Assad has many generals to fight Syrian rebels


Associated Press


range ais- BEIRUT The Syrian
any people regime appears to have ab-
nes. sorbed the shock it suffered
and a World in the heaviest blow against
ition repre- it yet in Syria's 17-month-
news confer- old upheaval a bombing
a on Saturday that killed four top aides.
ireak of The blast raised oppo-
a. nents' hopes President
investigations Bashar Assad could fall
ida Virus Re- soon. Instead, he is back on
. have con- the offensive and has
range disease reshuffled his inner circle
ale is indeed of loyalists to brace for a
gic fever," the long battle in what has be-
ment and come an outright civil war.
t statement. Although the president is
district in mid- embattled, he remains sur-
a. There is no rounded by loyal generals,
vhich killed many who are inextricably
2icn 20tied to the regime and have
n 2000. played a key role in the bru-
-From wire reports tal crackdown against the


opposition. He has already
made some progress on the
ground. A counter-offensive
by the government is gaining
momentum and troops have
so far been able to recapture
neighborhoods in the capital
Damascus that rebels over-
ran earlier this month. The
government also launched
an offensive in the northern
city of Aleppo, Syria's
largest, where rebels have
taken over several areas.
Regime forces have
stepped up the use of force.
Helicopter gunships have
been used more than ever be-
fore in the battles with rebels
in Damascus and Aleppo.
Also this week, warplanes
flew over Aleppo, although it
was not possible to confirm
claims by activists that the
fighter jets actually fired on


,:









Associated Press
In this file photo released July 19 by the Syrian official news
agency SANA, Syrian President Bashar Assad, left, meets
with Fahd Jassem al-Freij, Syria's new Defense Minister, in
Damascus, Syria.


rebels which would be a
first since the uprising against
Assad began in March 2011.
"Syria will get much
worse before it gets any bet-
ter Assad might fall, but he


will do his darndest to leave
behind a burned down
country," said Bilal Saab, a
Syria expert at the Mon-
terey Institute of Interna-
tional Studies.


computers in Iran's main
nuclear enrichment
facilities.
While the alliance is
central to the U.S. ap-
proach in the Middle East,
there is room for intense
disagreement, especially
in the diplomatic turmoil
over Iran's nuclear
ambitions.
"It's a complicated rela-
tionship," said Joseph
Wippl, a former senior CIA
clandestine officer and head
of the agency's office of con-
gressional affairs. "They
have their interests. We have
our interests. For the U.S.,
it's a balancing act."
The way Washington
characterizes its relation-
ship with Israel is also im-
portant to the way the U.S. is
regarded by the rest of the
world, particularly Muslim
countries.



US


analysis:


poverty to


plummet


by 2030

Associated Press
ASPEN, Colo. Poverty
across the planet will be vir-
tually eliminated by 2030,
with a rising middle class of
some two billion people
pushing for more rights and
demanding more resources,
the chief of the top U.S. in-
telligence analysis shop
said Saturday
If current trends con-
tinue, the 1 billion people
who live on less than a dol-
lar a day now will drop to
half that number in roughly
two decades, Christoper
Kojm said.
"We see the rise of the
global middle class going
from 1 to 2 billion," Kojm
said, in a preview of the Na-
tional Intelligence Council's
global forecast offered at
the Aspen Security Forum
in Colorado.
"Even if some of the most
dire predictions of eco-
nomic upheaval" in the
coming years prove accu-
rate, the intelligence coun-
cil still sees "several
hundred million people ...
entering the middle class,"
Kojm said.
The National Intelligence
Council analyzes critical na-
tional security issues draw-
ing from all U.S.
intelligence agencies.
The unclassified global
forecast, which is due out by
the end of the year, tries to
"describe drivers of future
behavior" to help govern-
ment agencies from the
White House to the State
Department plan future pol-
icy and programs, Kojm
said.
The rising middle class
will have little tolerance of
authoritarian regimes, com-
bined with the economic re-
sources and education
needed to challenge them.
"Governance will be in-
creasingly difficult in coun-
tries with rising incomes,"
he said, adding "middle-
class people have middle-
class values and
aspirations" for greater in-
dividual empowerment and
are now armed with social
media and other technolog-
ical tools to bring that about,
including the overthrow of
repressive governments.
Education levels are also
rising, with graduation rates
for women set to exceed that
of men if current trends
continue.
On the negative side,
Kojm predicted food de-
mand will rise by 50 percent
in the next 18 years, though
global population will only
rise from 7.1 to 8.3 billion.
Middle-class people want
middle-class diets, which


are heavy in meat, requiring
more water and grain to
produce, he said.


s road trip


n'. -- ^-7 -\

Associated Press
In this undated Street View image provided by Google is Inspiration Point at Yosemite National Park in Califor-
nia. The Google Street View service has brought us Earth as we might not be able to afford to see it, as well as
criticism that some scenes along its 5 million miles of the globe's roadways invade privacy. Google Street View
this month has turned on its 360-degree cameras for road trips through five national parks in California.

A Death Valley drive with the click ofa mouse











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans
Notes can be
found on Page
A19 of today's
Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Historic



mountain



lodge



reborn

ALLEN G. BREED
Associated Press
BLOWING ROCK, N.C.
Sot long after he
and his brother
bought the
derelict Green
Park Inn at auction, Steve
Irace learned something
that astonished him.
"If you looked in the lobby or the din-
ing room or the bar, you saw the
columns," the Long Island, N.Y, native
says. "Those columns are single pieces
of solid American chestnut that run
from floor to ceiling and beyond."
With American chestnut selling for
$12 a board foot on the collector lum-
ber market, he realized the hotel "was
worth more dead than alive."
Luckily for the community, and for
history buffs, that's not why the broth-
ers bought this "Grande Dame of the
High Country"
"We feel that we're caretakers of a
national treasure," Irace said during a
recent visit to this Victorian jewel,
perched atop the Blue Ridge Moun-
tains in western North Carolina. "We
resurrected this property We brought
it back. We wouldn't let it die."
The property started as a boarding
house in 1882. The bulk of the grand
lodge you see today was constructed in
1891. When it opened, each room came
equipped with an electric bell to sum-
mon attendants and running water -
albeit, just a small spigot with which
guests could fill their washbasins.
The lobby walls are lined with photo-
graphs of famous guests Presidents
Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover
slept there, as did first lady Eleanor
Roosevelt, Marilyn Monroe and oil ty-
coon John D. Rockefeller, America's
first billionaire. Annie Oakley gave
shooting lessons on what is now the
inn's parking lot, and Margaret
Mitchell wrote a portion of "Gone With
the Wind" during a sojourn there, Irace
says with pride.
But there was a time, not so long ago,
when the Green Park appeared
headed for the scrap market.
By the May 2010 auction, the hotel
was boarded up and bankrupt. Its spin-
dle-railing Queen Anne balconies were
rotten and sagging, the steam heating
system cold and leaking.
A man from nearby Deep Gap who
had done painting for the Iraces told
them it was up for sale. They were the
only bidders.
The brothers call themselves hotel
"affection-ados." This is the fourth his-
toric hotel property they've rehabili-
tated (the others are in Florida and
Vermont).
The hotel reopened in October 2010
with just 15 of the more than 80 rooms
available for guests. That number has
since more than tripled to 53 22 of
them with balconies.
With their high ceilings and large
windows, the rooms are classic and
airy The luxuriously comfortable beds
and other tasteful furnishings were all
manufactured right here in the Tar
Heel state, Irace says proudly
The rooms no longer come with
buzzers, but each is equipped with a
large flat-screen television and com-
plementary Wi-Fi. Vintage iron lighting
fixtures use energy-efficient compact
fluorescent bulbs.


Associated Press
At the Green Park Inn in Blowing Rock, N.C., flags flap Feb. 25 under blue skies in a gentle Blue Ridge Mountain breeze. The
property started as a boarding house in 1882. A picture of actress Marilyn Monroe, one of the hotel's many famous
guests, hangs on a wall in the lobby of the Green Park Inn in Blowing Rock, N.C.


"We could have made this like a bed
and breakfast, you know, and frou-frou
and cutesy and put, you know, 24 pil-
lows in every room and put chintz on
chintz, and cute little knickknacks and
gewgaws all over," Irace says. "If we
did that, we would have to charge more
for the rooms. And I wanted, if a work-
ing man wanted to come here and show
his kids how Grandma used to vaca-
tion, I wanted him to have that option."
The inn sits at 3,620 feet above sea
level, across U.S. 321 from North Car-
olina's first commercial tourist attraction
- the Blowing Rock. The bar is called
The Divide because the Eastern Conti-
nental Divide runs literally through it.
"If you were to spill a drink on one
half of the building, it would flow to the
Mississippi River, in theory," Irace
says. "And if you spilled a drink on the
other half of the room, it would flow to
the Atlantic Ocean."
A history room off the lobby contains
a collection of chamber pots, vintage
photographs, hardware from the origi-
nal doors and even the old service win-
dow from the days when the Green
Park housed the area's only post office.
Like most historic properties, the
Green Park is not without its tales of
tragedy Laura Green, a member of the
family that founded the place in the
19th century, hanged herself in Room
318, allegedly because her fiancee
didn't show up for her wedding day,
Irace says.
"Haunted Wautauga County, North


Carolina" has a chapter on the inn, al-
though author Tim Bullard declares at
the outset, "It is not haunted repeat,
not haunted. But it sure looks like it
is."
Executive chef, James Welch, had
stayed at the Green Park under its old
management and "never, ever" thought
he would someday be working there.
"Oh, it was disgusting," says Welch,
who got his start at 12, filleting chicken
in his mother's and grandmother's


r




_-I


Greensboro diner. "To be honest with
you, I didn't even want to take my
clothes off to sleep in the bed."
Welch, 47, a James Beard-nominated
chef, had done kitchen stints at Shera-
ton hotels in nearby Greensboro and
Miami before coming to Blowing Rock
18 years ago to help open a restaurant.
He was looking for a new challenge
when the Iraces recruited him to run
See Page A20


Border patrol
Bob and Mary Clark of Crystal River took a motorcycle trip across southern
Arizona. They stayed at Rancho De La Osa Guest Ranch in Sasabe, Ariz., and took
sunrise and sundown horseback rides to the border fence between the U.S. and
Mexico. They said it was very eye-opening. Bob was writing blogs for his
"Itinerant Blues" contribution to the Ted Simon Foundation.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


63rdANNIVERSARY

The Davises


Charlie and Helene Davis
celebrated their 63rd wed-
ding anniversary this past
week.
Years ago, when Charlie
was on leave from the air-
craft carrier USS Valley
Forge, he went to Hillsdale,
N.Y, to see his high school
sweetheart, Helene. Soon
after arriving there, they
eloped and were married in
Lebanon Valley, N.Y, on
July 21, 1949.
Upon completing his tour
of duty with the Navy, Char-
lie left San Francisco on his
trusty Indian Chief motorcy-
cle and set out for Hillsdale
to start a life with his new
wife. Years went by and the
family grew, living in differ-
ent towns such as Hillsdale,
Crystal River, Dunedin and
Fort Myers Beach. After


this, they decided to make two sons, Scott (Penny) of
Crystal River their home in Crystal River, Larry
1970, until 2005 when they (Denise) of Cottonwood, Ala.;
moved to Inverness, where three grandchildren; and
they now reside. three great-grandchildren.
Family members include Happy anniversary!


Engagement

Shana Melvin/Matthew Hampton
Shana Melvin announces
her engagement to Matthew
Hampton.
Shana, of Crystal River, is
the daughter of Linda and
Bruce Melvin of Inverness.
She is a 2012 graduate of
Citrus High School and a
2012 graduate of Manhattan
Academy She is a self-em-
ployed esthetician.
Matthew, of Crystal River,
is the son of Deb and Tom
Hampton of Kite, Georgia.
He is a 2000 graduate of
Belleview High School. He
is employed at Applebee's,
having finished an intern- |
ship as a tattoo artist in May _
Shana and Matthew will
be married at 6 p.m. April
26, 2014, in Twin City, Ga.
New ARRIVAL

Desiree Luzelle Tomaine
Jolena and David
Tomaine of Citrus Springs
announce the birth of a -
daughter, Desiree Luzelle ..
Tomaine, at 8:36 a.m.
Wednesday, July 4, 2012, at -
Munroe Regional Medical --
Center
Desiree weighed 5
pounds, 3 ounces and was 19 I
inches long.
Maternal grandparents
are Lorenzo "Wannie" and
Linda Sanders of Crystal
River. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Reginald "Reggie"
and Nancy Tomaine of Dun-
nellon.
Great-grandparents are
the late Lemmie and E.
Luzelle Sanders, Audrey
Bennett and the late Robert
Bennett and the late
Charles and Ellen Tomaine. ___
New ARRIVAL


Michael Earnest Olsen


Keri Lynne and Helge
Earnest Olsen Jr. of
Crystal River announce
the birth of a son,
Michael Earnest Olsen,
at 10:32 p.m. Thursday,
June 21,2012, at Munroe
Regional Medical Cen-
ter
Michael weighed 9
pounds, 7 ounces and
was 21 3/4 inches long.
Maternal grandpar-
ents are Michael and
Christine Lesyk of Ocala.
Paternal grandparents
are Carl and Ann
Hansen of Crystal River.
Hilda Gray is
Michael's great-grand-
mother.
FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and mar-
riages filed in the
state of Florida are a
matter of public
record, available from
each county's Clerk of
the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the
clerk at (352) 341-
6400 or visit the web-
site at www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us/. For pro-
ceedings filed in an-
other county, contact
the clerk in that area.

FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has
forms available for
wedding and engage-
ment announce-
ments, anniversa-ries,
birth announcements
and first birthdays.
Call 563-5660 for
copies.


Sunday's PUZZLER
Puzzle is on Page A24.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the Pur-
ple Heart and honoring all Pur-
ple Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing car-
riejenetteclemons@yahoo.com,
or calling Carrie at 352-628-
1633. Indicate the number in
your party.
General George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782. The first American award
made available to the common
soldier, it is the oldest military
decoration in the world in pres-
ent use.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131


or email dmclean8@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-422-
8092 or
scook94@tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical


areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at
several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from 10
to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-
7397.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60t Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more infor-
mation.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,


off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays and
Friday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-


dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Join the post for a dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug.
3; cost is $8 and children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,


1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-
3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
See NOTES/Page A21


Dr. Carl W. Magyar, DDS, PA
Dr. Mark A. Lackey, DMD &
Dr. Nina J. Paredes DMD
For gentle dentistry and beautiful smiles!

Please Welcome Our New Hygienist

Laurie Stibbs!

Laurie has been a dental
hygienist in Citrus County
for over 20 years!

Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry
General Dentistry Implant Restoratives
Partial & Full Dentures Orthodontics
* Teeth Whitening Procedures Children Welcome
510 N. Dacie Pt., Lecanto 352-527-8585


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SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A19


s





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JEWEL
Continued from Page A?

the inn's Laurel Room
Restaurant. They gutted the
old kitchen, spent $500,000
to bring it up to code and
opened it a year ago.
Welch and his staff turn
out delicate appetizers -


like mixed baby greens with
raspberries, goat cheese
and shaved chocolate and
hearty entrees such as
braised lamb shank with
wild mushroom risotto and
gremolata. And then there is
his signature dish: Espresso-
crusted, bittersweet choco-
late-stuffed beef tenderloin
with goat cheese pistachio
au gratin, French beans and


Bailey's Irish Cream sauce.
This dish came to him when,
while drafting the next day's
menu, he discovered two
Hershey's kisses his daughters
had given him that morning
melting in his shirt pocket.
Irace realized that he'd
committed to Welch without
ever having tasted his cook-
ing. After the first bite, he
breathed a huge sigh of re-


lief. "I grew up in New York
and I've traveled a lot... and
I've eaten in the finest restau-
rants in the world," he said.
"It knocked my socks off."
Despite the good food and
first-class renovation, things
at the inn have gotten off to
a slow start. Irace admits
that opening a hotel during
the worst recession in gen-
erations wasn't ideal. "We all


Pose question of


abuse differently


SUNDAY EVENING JU LY 29, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 I 8:30 I 9:00 19:30 110:00110:30111:00111:30
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ONews nized springboard final. (Nl(In Stereo Live) cN
WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (In Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition "Nyla" News Sports
W AB 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' B (In Stereo)'PG'B Night
S WTP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Big Brother (N) (In 3 (N) The Mentalist 10 News, Paid
S CBS10 10 10 10 10 News (N) A Stereo) N"Bloodhounds"'14' 11pm(N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) American Cleveland The The Family Guy Family Guy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News The Closer
0 [WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Dad'14' Show Simpsons Simpsons '14 '14' (In Stereo) N
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WCE F IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
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Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Second Law & Order "Coma" ** "Stephen King's Silver Bullet" (1985,
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55 64 55 Stallone, Richard Crenna.'R' Julie Benz.'NR'm B'Pay" (N)'14' Bad'14
1 Gator Boys "Love at Gator Boys (In Stereo) Hillbilly Handfishin' (In Gator Boys (In Stereo) Call of Call of Gator Boys (In Stereo)
52 35 52 19 21 First Bite "PG' BI 'PG' [ Stereo)'PG' 'PG' Wildman Wildman 'PG'
S**1 "Madea's Family Reunion" (2006, Sunday Best "God's Sunday Best "God's Sunday Best "Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 Comedy) Tyler Perry PG-13' Grace' competition. Grace' competition. Encouraged"'PG' Together Together
[BIAVO] 254 51 254 Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ New Jersey Social Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
S 27 61 27 "Harold & Kumar *** "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" (2005, Romance-Comedy) ** "Jackass: Number Two" Tosh.0 Futurama
27 61 27 33 Escape Guantanamo" Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. 'R' B (2006) Johnny Knoxville. '14' '14' m
7 "Smokey- ** "Smokey and the Bandit l" (1980, Comedy) Burt *** "Smokey and the Bandit" l^" ** "Smokey and the
98 45 98 28 37 Bandit" Reynolds, Jackie Gleason. (In Stereo) 'PG' Comedy) Burt Reynolds. (In Sti-c, Fi Bandit I" (T980)
CNBi 43 42 43 Olympics Insanity! Diabetes |Wall St. Millions |Millions Costco Craze American Greed Crime Inc.
(CN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Voters in America: Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Voters in America:
WiJ 46 40 46 Austin& Shake It Austin & Austin& Good- Shake It Jessie Jessie Austin & Austin & My My
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up!'G' Ally G' Ally G' Charlie Up!'G' 'G' Is 'G' M Ally'G' Ally'G' Babysitter Babysitter
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(ESPNW) 34 28 34 43 49 NFLYrbk. NFL NHRA Drag Racing Sonoma Nationals. From Sonoma, Calif. B *** "Senna"(2010) Premiere.'PG-13'
(EWTNJ 95 70 95 48 Ben. Crossing Sunday Night Prime Catholic. |Savoring |G.K. |Rosary England's Nazareth |God |Bookmark
( ) 29 52 29 20 28 "Mulan" (1998, Musical) Voices of Ming- *** "Aladdir" 'l^^ F lisy) Voices of ** "Aladdin" (1992, Fantasy) Voices of
29 52 29 20 28 NaWen, LeaSalonga. G' Scott Weinger, ..... 1ii 'G',, CScott Weinger, Robin Williams.cG'
** "StarTrek: Nemesis" 2002) Patrick ** "Raw Deal" (1986, Action) Arnold ** "ParadiseAlley" (1978, Comedy-Drama)
(TX) 118 170 Stewart. (In Stereo) 'PG-130 Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) 'R Sylvester Stallone. 'PG'
[FNC 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
(FOOD 26 56 26 Food Network Star Chopped 'G' Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped (N)'G' Iron Chef America Anne Burrell
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*** "Superbad" (2007, Comedy) Jonah Hill, ** "The Proposal" (2009) Sandra Bullock. A woman pre- ** "The Proposal"(2009)
(EX) 30 60 30 51 Michael era.'R' tends to be engaged to evade deportation. Sandra Bullock.'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf LPGA Tour Golf Evian Masters, Final Round. Central
** "Love Begins" "Love's Everlasting Courage" (2010, Drama) ** "Love Comes Softly" (2003, Drama) Frasier'PG'Frasier'PG
(ftiJJ 39 68 39 45 54 (2011) Wes Brown. Cheryl Ladd, BruceBoxleitner. N Katherine Heigl, Dale Midkiff. Bc
*** "Scott Pilgrim ** "What's Your Number?" (2011) Anna Faris, True Blood (N) (In The Newsroom "Bullies" True Blood (In Stereo)
302 201 302 2 2 vs. the World" Chris Evans. (In Stereo) 'R' Stereo) 'MA N (N)'MA' B 'MA'm
(fllZ **3 "Phone Booth" REAL Sports With **m "In Time" (2011, Science Fiction) Justin *** "The American" (2010) George Clooney.
303 202 303 (2002) 'R' Bryant Gumbel 'PG' Timberlake. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' B A hit man hides out in Italy'R'
HGIl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl Property Brothers'G' Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection
(iI) 51 25 51 32 42 ce Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Great Lake Warriors SharkWranglers "Line
IST] 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG'm '*PG'[ "Braking Bad"'PG' '14'm of Fire" (N) '14'
S 31*** "The Memory Army Wives Trevor and *** "Forrest Gump"(1994) Tom Hanks, Gary Sinise. An innocent Army Wives Trevor and
(FEJ 24 38 24 31 Keeper's Daughter" Roxy argue.'PG' man enters history from the '50s to the '90s.'PC-13' Roxy argue.'PG'
"Her Deadly Rival"(1995) Harry Hamlin. ** "Obsessed" (2002, Docudrama) Jenna "Intimate Stranger" (2006) Kari Matchett. A
50 119 Family man has deadly secret admirer. B Elfman, Kate Burton, Lisa Edelstein. N man stalks his former girlfriend.'NR'N
ij ) 32**0 221 320 3 "The Girl Next Door" (2004) *** "Die Hard" (1988) Bruce Willis. A New York police- *** "Die Hard With a Vengeance" (1995)
320221 320 3 3 Emile Hirsch.'R' Bcman outwits foreign thugs in an L.A. high-rise. 'R' Bruce Willis. (In Stereo)'R'Bc
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(DWH) 103 62 103 "The Color Purple" Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Next
DXY) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' B Snapped (N) 'PG' Their Baby Law Order: Cl
( ) n340 241 340 4 ***(1) "Fright Night" Weeds Episodes Dexter "ACHorse ofa Homeland Brody's Weeds (N) Episodes Weeds Episodes
[SNOWJ 340 241 340 4 (2011R" ,MA' IMA_' Different ColorK'MA' erratic behavior. 14' IMA' N)MA MA' A'
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[SPEED] 732 112 732 (Live) Despain (N) Garage (N)'G' Laguna Seca.
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SPIK 37 43 37 27 36 'PG' 'PG' Ham's"'PG' Premiere) (N)'PG' Curse" (N) 'PG' 'PC' PC
To 370 271 37 ***70 "The Social Network" ** "30 Minutes or Less" (2011) *** "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" (2011, Suspense) "Resident
AK 370 271 370 (2010) Jesse Eisenberg. Jesse Eisenberg.'R' Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara. (in Stereo)'R' Evil"
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36 31 36 Baseball Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue'G'
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31 59 31 26 29 Village" huge circles in his crop fields. 'PG-13' BN Nicolas Cage, Jon Voight, Harvey Keitel.'PG' N Trek"
(1aS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Failure to Launch" (2006) 'PG-13' ** "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (2009) ** "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (2009)
S 169 53 169 30 3 **** "West Side Story" (1961, Musical) *** "The Band Wagon"l'" Musical) Fred *** "DaddyLongLegs"(1955, Musical) Fred
M 169 53 169 30 35 Natalie Wood.'NR' B Astaire, Cyd Charisse. I A Astaire, Leslie Caron.'NR '
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S 53 34 53 24 26 'PeG' r 'PG'B 'PG' 'PG'Bc 'PG'B 'PG'B
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(TMC] 350 261 350 WarBegan"'R' Ashley Greene.'R Stephen Spinella. 'R B (2011) RutgerHauer.'NR' "Piranha"
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[Gi3NA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: ClI 30Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay The Unit'PG' cm


Dear Annie: I am a
grown man in my
early 30s, and I'm
still having problems with
my parents. My mother has
always favored my older sis-
ter, even though my sister
has been irresponsible her
entire life. She abuses alco-
hol and drugs, but my
mother won't acknowledge
it and blames me for any al-
tercation we have. My father
is too timid to challenge her.
No matter what I have ac-
complished in my life, I've
never been good enough. My
sister, meanwhile, can be
quiet one moment and
screaming the next. I know
it's the drugs, but my par-
ents refuse to believe it.
The problem
now is that they
are treating my
teenage son the
same way they
treat me. My sis-
ter screams at
him, and my
mother defends
her, saying my
son must some-
how be provok-
ing his aunt. My
son loves his
grandparents, ANNI
but even he re- MAILI
alizes it's neces-
sary to keep his distance.
I have spoken to my par-
ents about their treatment
of my son, but nothing changes.
In fact, my mother says it's
my fault. It's hard to lose my
family, but I have no idea how
else to deal with this other
than avoiding them forever.
Do I keep subjecting my son
and myself to this in the hope
things will change? Heart-
broken Without My Family.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m.,
5 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) In 3D. 2:35
p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Watch" (R) ID required.
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 1 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) 12:15 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 10:30
p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 4 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) 2:40 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Step Up 4" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:15


wentthrough differentphases,
different moments when we
said, 'We can't do this. It's not
going to work,"' Irace said.
But they already have de-
voted fans. Judy and Scott
Champney of Johnson City,
Tenn., have stayed there a
half-dozen times on trips to
the area for concerts at Ap-
palachian State University
in nearby Boone. They love


p.m., 5:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Watch" (R) ID required.
12:25 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 12:30 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) 12:10 p.m., 5 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift"
(PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:05 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
3:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
5:05 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


the atmosphere, especially
the pianist and jazz trio who
alternate playing outside
the dining room.
"Our three sons call it 'our
hotel'... like we own it," says
Judy Champney, a retired
high school English teacher.
"I'm just thrilled that they've
restored it, rather than tear-
ing down a beautiful old
building like that."


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

S 352-795-5797
Everything Outdoors www.crysta riverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
S Spectacular
ummer Specials


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the east STEAMBOAT RIVER CRUISE VACATIONS
[rcidwiyShcw 7 night $1QQC YOU ARE INVTED TO ATTEND!
in Tampa rates from I /PP Afternoon with Collette
E Uf $1 0t7 s Vacations Seminar
toseAugust 9,i2012 1-2:30pm
PP ts c Share Club auditorium in Inverness,
Aug. 4 nextto Citrus Memonrial Hospital.
A 1m.n coffeesbottewatersandmorel Seminar on new itineraries,
2012 AIRAND TAXARE NOT INCLUDED seminar sales and discounts.
WITH MOTORCOACH AND .AMERICAN OUEEN- Refreshments and door prizes.
ORCHESTRA SEATING & STEAMBOAT COMPANY RSVP space is limited.

TALLY-HO 352-860-2805
mwww.tallyhovacations.com
S dmuirtallyhovacations.com
ADIVISIONOFEDUCATIONALTOURS FL Seller of Travel 10131


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yat UsyO, g s4tito
Sunday Departures
Imperial Place $169 pp/dbi
Visit 2 Casinos, $55 Free Play,
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Beau Rivage 1 79 pp/dbl


Cruise the Victory Ship $39 pp



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U* Fr.--Upirra.j]s on sa.li:t I ,il. ins
* Free ,r rdlu Il rui.. I.gr& or.
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~uf,)r,-C,:ll,-[: f! I ,'',O "!r .


Dear Heartbroken: Things
probably aren't going to
change, so keeping your dis-
tance is best not only for
you, but for your son. That
doesn't necessarily mean
cutting off the family en-
tirely Your son could learn
how to cope with his diffi-
cult relatives by under-
standing that their behavior
has nothing to do with him.
Dear Annie: I am a recent
widower after being mar-
ried for 57 years. I have met
a wonderful, warm, affec-
tionate widow with whom I
have fallen in love. How-
ever, she thinks I am just
lonely and looking for a
stand-in for my late wife. I
cannot seem to convince her
that memories
should not stand in
the way of our fu-
ture happiness.
Any thoughts? -
E.
Dear E.: You
might be rushing
things a bit. If you
are a "recent wid-
ower," your female
friend may be
right that you are
lonely and confus-
E'S ing love with com-
BOX panionship. Stop
trying to convince
her Allow this relationship
to develop. Let her see for
herself how genuine it is.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
questions to anniesmailbox
@comcastnet or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, 737 Third St,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 W352) 5 78 I
Located Next to Winn Dixie (552) 527-8855


Prices subject to changes. All vendors terms & conditions apply. License # ST38447


A20 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


II
[]


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page A19

an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap robes,
etc., as well as toiletry articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume
in September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.


Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are still
unaccounted for from all wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl 997@
yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a wife,
widow, mother, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of hon-
orably discharged Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are eligible to
belong to the Marine Corps
League. Female Marines (for-
mer, active and reserves) and
associate members are eligible
for MCLA membership. Call
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400 or Secretary/
Treasurer Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway,
State Road 200, Hernando;
352-726-3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.


The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at


Please RSVP
352.7953317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River. FL 34429


www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are always
welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.


In association with:


kLk CATARACT &
.q ,I LASER INSTITUTE
"- ~ "Excellence...with love"
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THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A21

Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith
at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol Kaiser-
ian at 352-746-1959; or visit us
on the web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Septem-
ber and November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin, spouses
and siblings of Purple Heart re-
cipients are cordially invited to
attend and to join the ranks of
Chapter 776. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citruspurple
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call 352-
726-0834 or 352-634-5254.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT




Celebrate the Best in Beauty...


Abitare Salon & Day Spa has celebrated their 20 year
journey within Citrus County, a journey which has
included being named as Citrus County's Best of the Best
by the Citrus County Clit.ni ., as well as one of the
nation's Top 200 salon's by Salon Today, a major accom-
plishment for the local salon. Abitare's owner, Angela
Oliverio, is excited about how far the business has come
over the past 20 years and is actively planning the new
changes and growth for its future.
Abitare (an Italian verb meaning: "to live") was first
established in Citrus County in 1991 as a European spa
that offered customers a skincare clinic and massage ther-
apy. Capitalizing on the fact of the lack of a salon & day
spa in the area at the time, the business expanded its serv-
ices two years later to become just that. "We were thrilled
to bring the concept of the day spa & salon to Citrus
County" Oliverio says.
In 2000, Abitare moved and expanded to its current day
location added along with it the latest in state-of-the-art
salon equipment, products, and services. Today they are
once again updating their space, recognizing in fun that
"even Spa's need a facelift with time". The "facelift"
includes renovations in d6cor, an upcoming new logo, and
staying current with simple additions, such as offering free


WiFi. Part of Abitare's success has been embracing change
to stay in the now, all while holding close to its original
mission of great service.
Abitare's success became most apparent when Oliverio
aligned with the Aveda brand several years ago, a widely
recognized "green" beauty company whose products and
hair colors are derived from 98% flowers and plants and
whose mission is one of giving back to Society. Service
providers stay current with advance classes at The Aveda
Institute in Tampa.
One important aspect of both companies point of differ-
ence is the collaboration of the fashion of beauty and per-
sonalized wellness blended with each service offered. For
instance, they welcome their customers as they would a
guest in their own homes. "Guests" are offered Aveda's
comforting tea, an Aveda foot bath ritual before Spa serv-
ices, and complimentary Aveda stress-relieving services
which including hand or scalp treatments when receiving a
Salon service.
In January 2008, Angela opened a second independent
location at The Plantation Golf Resort known as "The Spa
at Plantation." This location welcomes both locals and
Hotel guests for all of their Aveda services. Most recently
the Spa is excited about the recent acquisition of the


Plantation Resort by Scout Real Estate Group, who pro-
vides guests with unique, high quality experiences, while
celebrating the local character of the communities they
operate in, minimizing the impact on the environment.
The mission of service shared by both Spa's doesn't end
with the services they provide their guests, but extends
through the support of several charitable organizations
such as participation in Earth Month fund raising for the
Gulf Restoration Network, as well as coordinating an
annual Breast Cancer Awareness Fund raiser for the Breast
Cancer Research Foundation founded by Estee Lauder
(Aveda's parent Company) Abitare also supports the Locks
for Love organization by offering complimentary cuts with
mail out service of the donated hair for the making of wigs
for children who have lost their hair while battling Cancer,
thus further supporting a philosophy of "an artist hand
with a servants heart". '


For more information call Abitare at (352) 563-0011
or The Spa at Plantaion at (352) 795-1464. Services and
prices vary per location.
Join Abitare on Facebook for a year full of upcoming
Special Celebration Savings!


HEALTH


SCREENING

Friday, August 10

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Linda Azwell, OD


ADULTS &

CHILDREN

WELCOME
CHECK UP and
CLEANING
NEW PATIENTS
a EMERGENCIES
WELCOME
Hablamos Espanol

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as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or
reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area
bythe American Dental Association orthe Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


. y-- .. ,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(352) 489-3579


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8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa
(352) 628-0123


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A22 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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"A Doctor's Confession to Citrus County "

And why, despite it all, I still do what I do...


Dear friend,
Confessions are tough. Real
tough. But sometimes, a
confession can set the record
straight, and I want to give credit
where credit is due. Before I talk
about my confession, let me say a
few things first.
Years ago something happened
to me that changed my life forever.
Let me tell you my story...
I did not start my career as a
chiropractor until later in life. My first
love and career
was woodworking.
I was a craftsman
and artist for 15
years until tragedy
struck. One day,
working alone in
the shop, a stack
of plywood fell on I
top of my head, -
crushing me into
the ground. I was j .
trapped! After .
what felt like an
eternity, someone
found me and
helped me out
from under the pile of wood. I could
barely stand or walk for weeks. I
was unable to work, so I went to the
medical doctor. He prescribed pain
pills and muscles relaxers which
helped some. I felt great mentally,
but was still unable to do any
physical work because of the pain.
After weeks of medication,
without much improvement, one of
my clients told me about the local
chiropractor, who had helped him
get rid of his back pain. I decided
to give him a chance, 'what did I
have to lose?' I hobbled into his
office; he took x-rays, put me on
electrical muscle stimulation
therapy, and adjusted my spine.
This made me feel better! At first I
was unsure, but after a few
treatments, I was pain-free and


back to work! I am forever indebted
to him for what he did for me.
It wasn't very long after returning
to work when I had a second acci-
dent, whereby I cut my thumb a lit-
tle shorter! Then a week later, I
had a table saw injury. After that,
my loving wife suggested that I
change my career to something
safer. Something I could do into my
golden years with all my limbs
intact! The chiropractic treatment I
received for my injury greatly inter-
ested me, so I
checked into it. I
enjoyed working
with my hands
and helping peo-
ple, so chi-
ro p ra ct i c
seemed to be a
perfect fit.
S- Once I returned
to school, I
found that
chiropractors
were respected
physicians in the
community. They
performed
exams, x-rays, and diagnosed a
multitude of conditions. They also
used many different conservative
care therapies to help people get
out of pain without the use of
medication or surgery. Over the
next six years (since I already had
my two year degree) I studied
science, anatomy and physiology,
physics, pathology, physical
diagnosis, x-ray and spinal
adjusting. I enjoyed school
thoroughly.
I'm no longer an artist working
with wood, now I'm a clinician
working with pain. I still use my
hands, but instead of working with
wood, I get to work with patients.
My skills are used to find the
source of a patient's pain and
correct it. It's satisfying to be able


to assist patients with their
problems. Patients often enter the
office discouraged, suffering, and
sometimes desperate, but leave
happy, pain free, and excited about
their care.
Now people come to see me
with their back problems,
headaches, migraines, neck pain,
shoulder/arm pain, carpal tunnel
syndrome, whiplash from car
accidents, numbness in limbs,
athletic injuries, just to name a few.
Several times a day patients
thank me for helping them with
their health problems, but I can't
really take the credit. My
confession is that I've never healed
or fixed anyone or anything.
I perform a gentle spinal
adjustment to remove nerve
pressure or interference. The body
responds by healing itself. It's as
simple as that!
Being a chiropractor can be
tough. There is a host of so-called
experts out there telling people a
lot of ridiculous things about my
profession. Things that are just not
true. Fortunately, research studies
speak for themselves, one Virginia
study that showed that over 90% of
patients who saw a chiropractor
were satisfied with their care and
results. That's just incredible!
Forty-eight million Americans no
longer have health insurance, and
those who do, have found that their
benefits are reduced. That's where
chiropractic comes in. Many
people find that they actually save
money on their health care
expenses by seeing a chiropractor.
Studies have shown that
chiropractic may double your
immune capacity, naturally without
drugs. The immune system helps
fight colds, the flu, and other
sicknesses to prevent regular
doctor visits. This is especially
important if you are self-employed.


You Can Benefit from an
Amazing Offer- It shouldn't cost
you an arm and a leg to correct
your health. When you bring in this
article (by August 15, 2012) you
will receive my entire new patient
exam for $29. That's with
consultation, exam, complete
history, x-rays of one body region,
report of findings....the whole ball
of wax. This exam could cost you
$170 elsewhere.
The law says that I must tell you
that the patient and any other
person responsible for payment
has a right to refuse to pay, cancel
payment, or be reimbursed for
payment for any other service,
examination, or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within
72 hours of responding to the
advertisement for the free,
discounted fee, or reduced fee
service, examination, or treatment.
Great care at a great fee... I
hope that there's no
misunderstanding about the quality
of care just because I have a lower
exam fee. You'll get great care at a
great fee. I am a graduate of
Logan College of Chiropractic and
I am licensed by the Florida
Medical Board. I've been entrusted
to take care of tiny babies to the
elderly. I just have that low exam
fee to help more people who need
care and want to find out more
about chiropractic.
Our office is both friendly and
warm. My assistants Chris and
Dominique are helpful and
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Our office is NECK & BACK
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phone number is 352-563-5055.
Call today for an appointment. We
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INC


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A23









Vermont gives residents reins to Twitter account


Associated Press


MONTPELIER, Vt -Vermont's
tourism department is giving state
residents reins to a Twitter account
to get the word out about the state.
Each week, a different Vermon-
ter will take over the Twitter han-
dle THISISVT, posting glimpses of
life in Vermont for seven days.


The thinking is that as more
people become dependent on
consumer-generated content such
as product reviews or trip advice,
the Twitter postings will work to
draw people to Vermont.
"We thought this was really
kind of a cool way to create that
user-generated review of why Ver-
mont is a great place to live, work


and visit," said Steve Cook,
deputy commissioner of the Ver-
mont Department of Tourism and
Marketing.
But Vermont wants to avoid the
controversy that Sweden's Twitter
account has stirred after a woman
posted comments about Jews. To
keep the tweets inoffensive and
positive, Vermont's tourism de-

Sunday PUZZLER


apartment said it is requiring resi-
dents to explain why they want to
participate and what they would
talk about, and to provide the state
with their twitter handle.
The account debuted this week
with Ken Millman, who lives in Al-
burgh and works in Burlington,
tweeting about his commute,
cows, fishing in Lake Champlain


and visiting his mother in Quebec.
"I don't care how cliched. I love
cows. Love 'em," he posted Thurs-
day with a photo of himself lying
in a hammock in a farm field sur-
rounded by cows. Later he posted:
"Sure there's a lot of stuff you can
do in VT. I must admit, however,
that this is also a great place to do
nothing at all."


ACROSS
1 Shine
6 Clamping tool
10 Different
15 Horned animal
18 Bird or Hagman
19 Destitution
21 City in Idaho
22 Sufficiently,
formerly
24 Proclamation
25 Of bears
26 Coin of a kind
27 Wrinkle
28 English festival
29 Protective gear
31 Sharp
33 Click beetle
35 Aerie
37 Settled on
a branch
38 Impudent
39 Stir up
40 Many times
42 Thick
43 Symbol on a card
44 Made points
46 Welcome
47 Paved way
48 Cupola
52 New York's
Island
53 Combination
of notes
54 Pierced,
as a blister
56 A letter
57 Goofed
58 Caged creature
59 Sudden movement
60 Perfect
62 Contended
63 Old court dance
65 Big boat
66 Delicate
67 First woman
68 Cain's victim
69 spumante
71 Staring
73 Gambling town
75 Certain voter (abbr.)
76 Mentioned
77 Mother Superior
78 Wilson's
predecessor
82 Australian animal


84 Ladd orAlda
85 Pate de gras
86 Tiny
87 Hindu retreat
90 For
91 Spins
93 Fellow
94 Make swollen
95 More stark
97 Warmth
98 Ripple pattern
99 Cruces
100 Stinging insect
102 Trick
104 Grand Dam
105 Pitcher
107 Something
regrettable
108 Plank
109 Propped
(with "up")
110 Peace goddess
112 Bluff
113 Merchandise
114 Crack in the earth
117 Brag
118 Sausage meat
119 Repeat
123 Money earned
124 Flat cap
125 Sounded loudly
127 Cut down
128 Begone!
129 Old pronoun
131 Liken
133 Kind of liner
135 Little pie
136 Doughnut shape
137 Rivulet
138 White wine
139 Modern (prefix)
140 South American range
141 Pointed arch
142 Inscribe

DOWN
1 Gather
2 Kitchen item
3 American Indians
4 Bow
5 Story of old
6 Exterminator's
target
7 Map showing
detail


Case
Sea eagle
Slow-witted
Gear projection
Walk
Native of (suffix)
Turncoat
Like father and son
Loos or Baker
French artist
Yanked
Ached
Used to be
Devoured
Dramatis personae
Cover
Sounded a horn
Lager
Rapidly
Mr. Flintstone
Unmanned aircraft
Ditty
Endeavor
Move uncontrolled
Monstrous one
- and file
Kiln
Edible portion
Long and wriggling
Disconnect
Movie house
Sensational
Actress
Cameron -
Slander relative
Dormant
Usual food
"-, I'm Adam"
Custom-make
Scandinavians
Depot (abbr.)
Parka
Culpability
Gumbo vegetable
Insert mark
For a short time
Was worried
Tent
Formal promise
Demon
Competent
Cabbage salad
Flexible tube
Victim
Place for mooring ships
Route


Salt water
- meridiem
Frame of mind
Musical drama
Tip
Floating platform
Throttle
Rice dish
Kind of whale
Brownish horse
Liquor


Touch lovingly
Beard
Clenched hand
Of a Peruvian
Indian
Frighten
Setting
Flat surface
Swindle
Throw with effort
Proprietor


124 Fledgling
125 Barrel stopper
126 Prescribed amount
130 Term of
endearment
132 Quid pro-
134 Against


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


7-29 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS





Thank You For Your Votes!


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A24 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rude surprise: French fed up with own incivility


Associated Press


PARIS It's a July
evening on the terrace of
the legendary Cafe Flore.
A coiffed woman sips
chilled wine, another sa-
vors her chocolate eclair.
The one thing to com-
plete this picture of
Parisian life? A dash of
French rudeness.
It comes from the waiter,
who snootily turns away a
group of tourists: "There's
no point waiting," he
shrugs, even though there
are many empty tables.


"No space outside."
Such rituals of rudeness
have long been accepted
by visitors as part of the
price of enjoying such a
beautiful city as Paris. But
it seems the French them-
selves, who over centuries
have turned rudeness into
an art form, have become
fed up with their own inci-
vility, according to recent
polls and publicity cam-
paigns.
There's a fabled history
of French rudeness from
Napoleon, who called the
English a "nation of shop-


keepers," to former Presi-
dent Nicolas Sarkozy, who
infamously snarled at a
voter: "Get lost, poor jerk."
Now, bad manners and
aggressive behavior top
the list of causes of stress
for the French, even
higher than unemploy-
ment or the debt crisis,
says pollster IPSOS. A total
of 60 percent cited rude-
ness as their No. 1 source
of stress in a survey last
year on social trends.
"We're so rude," admit-
ted 34-year-old French
teacher Stephane Gomez,


as he exited a Paris metro
station. "France lacks the
civic sense you find in
Anglo-Saxon countries."
But Paris's public trans-
port authority is leading
the fight-back in a sum-
mer-long publicity cam-
paign against rudeness.
Billboards depicting
Frenchmen with animal
heads have dominated
metro stations; they target
passengers who are rude
to staff and push and
shove. "If you shove five
people getting onboard,"
the posters say, "it won't


make us set off faster." Bus
ads read: "One bonjour
doesn't cost a penny, and it
changes your day."
In France, the world's
most visited country, rude-
ness is also a concern for
tourism companies es-
pecially as France feels
the bite of the financial
crisis.
Atout France, the coun-
try's tourism development
agency launched a sum-
mer campaign in regions
where tourism is suffering
to promote service quality.
Where English-speaking


tourists were once greeted
with raised eyebrows and
a Gallic shrug, more and
more French in the service
industry speak English.
That's just one of the
many ways in which
France is changing.
Earlier this week on a
high-speed train, there
were puzzled smiles from
passengers after a decid-
edly un-French loud-
speaker address:
"Hello, welcome, please
greet your neighbor, and
may you adopt a zen
attitude."


Too much of anything


can get annoying


Remember a few years ago when
term limits were all the rage? The
idea was that every few election cy-
cles, politicians would have to run for a dif-
ferent office or go back home to steal money
the old-fashioned way, by lobbying or lawyering
If term limits are such a good idea for
politicians, why aren't they a good idea for
other professions? Why not have term lim-
its for entertainers? Three tele-
vision sitcoms and, boom, that's
it. You could make movies, tour
in summer stock, make a TV
movie of the week or even get a
real job, but no more TV sitcoms. ,
It should be against the law .I
for any movie to have more than
two sequels. The first three
"Star Wars" that were released
were fine, but that should have Ji
ended it. We didn't need the
other three. MUll
Movie stars should be al-
lowed to get divorced only three times.
That's enough; leave some stars and star-
lets available for the rest of us.
If movie and TV stars haven't worked in
the acting business for a few years, they au-
tomatically should become normal people
once again. No more screaming headlines
that read "'Titanic' actress killed on safari."
And then you find out that she played the
fourth woman in lifeboat No. 6 and didn't
have a speaking part
Recording artists should be allowed only
one "Greatest Hits" album. The second
compilation would have to be called "Not-
So-Greatest Hits." The third one must be
called "My Manager Robbed Me" or "I Wasted
All My Money on Drugs, So This Is My 401(k)."


Only one or two anniversary celebrations
of dubious historic events should be al-
lowed. We need another bogus Woodstock
anniversary like we need another missing
10-year-old. The same thing with reality
show reunions or "all-star" shows.
There should be a limit on how many
times we have to watch the same advertise-
ments. That cute little baby who trades
stocks in his crib? The first few
hundred times it ran, it was
Sc cute. The second thousand
times, not so much.
Is that the purpose of adver-
tising? To make the customer
cranky? If you haven't changed
your car insurance to the com-
pany with the Cockney lizard or
the woman with the fire-engine-
jM red lipstick by now, what is it
going to take?
.LEN At some point, advertisers will
figure out it would be cheaper
to hire mob enforcers to come to your door
and threaten to break your legs unless you
change your insurance company than to re-
peatedly run the same ad. Sorry about your
legs, but why should the rest of us have to
suffer because you're being so stubborn?
If pundits think term limits are a good
idea for politicians, why aren't they a good
idea for pundits? Let's say eight years of
punditry is enough. Then you have to go get
a real job. Or run for office.
-
Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to Lose
Money in Your Spare Time -At Home," is
available at amazon.com. You can follow him
on Pin terest at pinterest.com/jimmullen.


Shutter & Blind

Manufacturing Company
SHUTTERS VERTICALS FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS
CELLULAR SHADES WOVEN WOODS SUNSCREEN SHADES PRIVACY SHADINGS MORE


MADE IN AMERICA


24" W x 36" H $84 Inst.
36" W x 50" H $175 Inst.
48" W x 48" H $224 Inst.
48" W x 60" H $280 Inst.
72" W x 62" H $434 Inst.


2" FAU


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X BLINDS


Our blinds
are built with
a STEEL
HEADRAIL
Unlike the
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like the
HomeCenter's


EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36" W x 48" H $39 Inst.
52" W x 62" H $68 Inst.
60" W x 62" H $75 Inst.
72" W x 72" H $93 Inst.


Exa..I.Iple ofIIur Sunl. reen.ice


SUN SCREENS


OCALA DUNNELLON THE VILLAGES CITRUS GAINESVILLE

(352) 610-3018

shutterandblindmanufacturing.com

i e s timae,- al *d y


SAVE ENERGY


SAVE ENERGY


e Welcome


'alue


ental


You To


Care


Dentists Dr. Michael Welch, DMD; Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD; Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD and associates offer high quality dentistry in a friendly
atmosphere. From the moment you enter our office our caring staff welcomes you with a smile. Dr. Welch and associates take time in reviewing the
recommended treatment that is within your financial means and will answer any questions or concerns that you may have. Our friendly staff will
assure that your visit is as pleasant as possible. Dr. Welch and associates strive to provide quality dentistry at affordable prices. Our monthly
specials are geared to help people afford dental services, whether you have insurance or not.


Dentures
These days it is a bit overwhelming with all of the advertising for
dentures. What is the difference, basically the quality of the material used,
as well as the processing methods! We would like to share our experience
and background with our community. First of all, our technicians are
extremely experienced with over 90 years combined experience. We use
only high quality acrylic well known in the dental industry for many
years. All of our dentures are thermostatically cured for eight hours. We
offer three levels of dentures so everyone can afford to have new teeth.
* Our Economy denture consists of our stock teeth with lucitone 199 plain
pink acrylic with a smooth finish; this denture has a six month warranty.
* Our Midgrade denture consists of economy teeth, midgrade hygienic
acrylic and the finish is slightly characterized. This denture has a one year
warranty.
* Our Elite denture includes Bioform plastic teeth or portrait teeth, which
is a high grade tooth used by many of the well known doctors in our area.
The finish on the Elite denture is highly characterized and this denture
has a two year warranty.


6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.
Crystal River
352-794-6139


We also can reline and repair your dentures the same day if you come
in early enough.

Crown And Bridge
Value Dental Care offers several types of crowns to suit your personal
needs. Our metal free Zirconia crowns are an especially popular choice
for a great cosmetic result; this is an all porcelain crown that looks very
natural with no worry of metal exposure. We offer several types of high
quality porcelain fused to metal crowns as well.


Our crown and bridge lab has over 30 years experience.


Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD I


I ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICAN MADE! We do*notshiptoChin


500 Cleaning Special
0 New Patients Only
FREE Exam & E-Rays
w/Cleaning
D0210 D0150 D1110
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 8/15/12


Coupon required. Not valid with
D27


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Porcelain Dentures F
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Metal Crowns Upper & Lower
(For first one)6
any other offers. Expires 8/15/12 Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 8/15/12 If not chargeable by in
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EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36" W x 48" H $39 Inst
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72" W x 72" H $86 Inst


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36" W x 48"H $62 Inst 72"W x 6'H $131Inst


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performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. I


I


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6.00


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A25


L.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A A Aiiii iiiT


-- FALL 2012
MONDAY 12:30pm LIVELY BUNCH Meets Tues. 914 Starts Mon. 9110
Mixed Senior Handicap Teams of 4 $11.00 Per Week
MONDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL Drop In Fun for Everyone continuous
Money Shots/Prizes $8.25 Week
MONDAY 6:30pm TURNOVERS Meets Mon. 8113 Starts Mon. 8120
Mixed Handicap Teams of 5 15.00 Per Week
MONDAY 7:00pm PBA EXPERIENCE Meet & Bowl Starts Mon. 9110
A Weekly Pay-Out Shot Changes Every 3 Weeks
TUESDAY 9:15am MORNING BIRDS Meets Tues. 8114 Starts Tues. 8121
Ladies Handicap Teams of 4 $11.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 12:30pm SR. NO TAP Meets Tues. 9118 Starts Tues. 9125
-1 P Mixed Handicap' 8 & 9 Pins=Strike' $12.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 1:00pm SUGAR BABES Meets Tues. 9111 Starts Tues. 9118
Ladies Handicap From Sugarmill Woods $11.00 Per Week
TUESDAY 4:30pm YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Tues. 8114 Starts Tues. 8121
Teams of 3* $17.00 Sanction Fee Includes Team Shirt Bantams $6 Per Week Prep/Junior $7 Per Week
TUESDAY 6:30pm TUES. MEN'S HDCP Meets Tues.8121 Starts Tues. 8128
Handicap Teams of 5 $16.00 Per Week $500 Added Prize Money by Budget Truck Rental
TUESDAY 6:30pm TUES. GALS Meets Tues. 8121 Starts Tues. 8128
Handicap Teams of 5 $15.00 Per Week
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm SR. STARTS Meets Wed. 8122 Starts Wed. 8129
Mixed Pins Over Average Teams of 3' $16.00 Per Week' $500 Added Prize Money by Pepsi
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm EL DORADO Continuous
Mixed Teams of 4 from El Dorado Subdivision
WEDNESDAY 12:30pm FUN BOWL Drop In Fun for Everyone continuous
Money Shots/Prizes $8.25 Week
WEDNESDAY 7:00pm CCML MENS Meets Wed. 8115 Starts Wed. 8122
Mens Teams of 4' $15.00 Per Week
WEDNESDAY 7:00pm WEDNESDAY MIXERS Meets Wed. 8115 Starts Wed. 8122
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week


SCHEDULE -
THURSDAY 10:00am POWDER PUFFS Meets Thurs. 8130 Starts Thurs. 916
Ladies Handicap Teams of 4- $11.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 12:30pm SR. MEN'S HDCP Continuous
Sanctioned Drop-In Weekly Payouts $12.00 Per Week Only Pay Weeks You Bowl
THURSDAY 3:00pm MEADOWCREST Meets Thurs. 1014 Starts Thurs. 10/11
Mixed Handicap Residents of Meadowcrest Teams of 4 $7.75 Per Week
THURSDAY 7:00pm MANATEE MATCH-PLAY Meets Thurs. 8116 Starts Thurs. 8124
Mixed Handicap Match-Play Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 7:15pm FLORIDA POWER Meet & Bowl Starts Thurs. 916
Mixed Teams of 5- $13.00 Per Week
THURSDAY 9:30pm.CL DOLLAR NIGHT Continuous
$1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling $1 Shoe Rental $1 Hot Dogs $1 Draft $1 Small Soda
FRIDAY 9:30am-Noon DOLLAR DAY Continuous
$1 Per Game Per Person Open Bowling $1 Shoe Rental $1 Hot Dogs $1 Draft $1 Small Soda
FRIDAY 12:30pm MANATEE MIXERS Meets Fri. 8117 Starts Fri. 8124
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $12.00 Per Week
FRIDAY 2:00pm CITRUS HILLS Meets Fri. 9121 Starts Fri. 9128
Mixed Handicap Residents of Citrus Hills
FRIDAY 6:30pm FUN BUNCH Meets Fri. 8124 Starts Fri. 8131
Mixed Handicap Teams of 4 $15.00 Per Week
FRIDAY 6pm-9pm RENT-A-LANE Continuous Starts Fri. 8124
Any Two Hours in this Period $35/Lane With FREE Shoe Rentals
FRIDAY 9:30pm-12:30pm VERTIGLOW Continuous
Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music $35 Per Lane with FREE Shoe Rentals
SATURDAY 9:30am YOUTH LEAGUE Meets Sat. 8118 Starts Sat. 8125
Youth League Teams of 4' Pee-Wee (5 & Under) $4' Bantam (8 & Under) $6 Prep/Junior (9 & Older) $7
SATURDAY 3-5:30pm KIDS KAMP Continuous
Family Bowling with Vertiglow Bowling Music, Prizes, FREE Shoe Rentals, Sm. Soda $8.50 Per Person
SATURDAY 7:30pm.O1pm & 10:30pm.lam VERTIGLOW BOWLING Continuous
Laser Lights, Red-Pin Bowl, Prizes, Music $35 Per Lane with FREE Rental Shoes Call for Reservations No Deposit Required!


.1


A26 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012





CITRmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ct,...,,


Ben Lambright, M.D.
Fellowship Trained
Refractive, Cornea &
Cataract Surgery


John Rowda, D.O.
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist
Cataract Surgery




IKyle Parrow, M.D.
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist
Cataract Surgery
Glaucoma Fellowship


Amanda Coppedge, O.D.
Board Certified
Optometrist
Primary Eye Care
Contact Lens Fitting


West Coast Eye Institute Lecanto

Welcomes Dr. Ben Lambright

Back to Citrus County

Dr. Ben Lambright is a graduate of the University of South Florida College of Medicine. He served his
Internship at Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans. He completed his Ophthalmology training at
Louisiana State University in New Orleans, and then moved to Tulane University to complete a Fellowship in
Cornea, External Disease, and Refractive Surgery. He's excited to be back in Citrus County July 2012 to serve
the community in which he was raised. His family moved to Citrus County from Sumter County five
generations ago.
Dr. Lambright specializes in the latest corneal transplantation techniques, refractive vision correction, and no-
stitch cataract and implant surgery, including the latest in Lens Implant Technology. He also specializes in the
medical treatment of Corneal and External Eye Diseases. He is the first Cornea Specialist in Citrus County.


Dr. John Rowda is a graduate of the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University. His
ophthalmology training was completed at Tulane University in New Orleans. He spent one year in
ophthalmology training at Providence Hospital outside Detroit. He also spent 10 weeks at Stanford
University in special courses on ophthalmology. He served his internship at Sun Coast Hospital in
Pinellas County. Dr. Rowda is Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology.
Dr. Rowda specializes in no stitch cataract and implant surgery, including the latest in lens implant
technology.

Dr. Kyle Parrow is a graduate of the Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. He
served his internship at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, MA. Dr. Parrow completed his residency
and was chief resident at the Kresge Eye Institute in Detroit, MI. He also completed a Glaucoma
Fellowship at Kresge Eye Institute. He is Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology.
Dr. Parrow is the only Board Certified Glaucoma Specialist in the area. He has authored or coauthored
over two dozen presentations at national and international meetings and has over a dozen publications in
peer-reviewed ophthalmology journals. Dr. Parrow specializes in no stitch cataract and implant surgery
including the latest in implant technology. Dr. Parrow also specializes in glaucoma therapy and surgery.

After graduating from UCLA with a major in Neuroscience, Dr. Coppedge earned her optometry degree
at Nova Southeastern University. Her rotations included the Salisbury VA Medical Facility where she
focused on providing low vision services to geriatric patients, private practice in St. Petersburg were she
focused on providing vision therapy to pediatric patients, and she rotated through the glaucoma specialty
clinic at Nova Southeastern University. She was presented the Dry Eye Award from Alcon for showing
excellence in clinic for diagnosing and treating dry eyes. She is a member of the American Optometric
Association and the Florida Optometric Association.


Dr. Coppedge specializes in primary eye care and contact lens fittings.


Alan M. Lessner, M.D., P.A.
Visiting Consultant


Dr. Lessner is an Oculoplastic Surgeon in private practice in Gainesville, Florida and on the faculty of the
University of Florida. He is a graduate of Albany College and served his residency at the University of
Florida. He completed the Fellowship in Orbital Surgery and Ocular Oncology at the University of British
Columbia. He also completed the Fellowship in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the
Jules Stein, Institute, UCLA.
Dr. Lessner's special interests include cosmetic and reconstructive eyelid surgery.


We offer a wide range of sight-restoring

and sight-saving procedures.
No matter which procedure you require, you can be confident that it will be
performed with advanced surgical techniques.
We specialize in:
Cataract surgery with premium lens implants including toric and
multifocal
Laser eye surgery in office
Medical, Laser and Surgical treatment of glaucoma
Treatment of diabetic eye disorders
Complete eye examinations
Contact lenses including multifocal, monovision, toric, colored and gas
permeable lenses
,. X Cornea transplantation and DSAEK surgery
Our optical boutique has something for everyone quality eyewear, designer
frames, sunglasses, UV and premium scratch-resistant coatings, digitally
surfaced lenses, prescription sports eyewear and frame repair.
S We have an old fashioned commitment to a strong patient-doctor relationship.
And for your comfort, we have created a warm and friendly atmosphere.


240 N Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746-2246 or (800) 330-2246
http://www.westcoasteye.com
Office Hours and Appointments
Monday through Friday 8 am to 5 pm
Most Saturdays 8:30 am to 12:00 noon


I West Coast


Eye Institute
Lecanto


V


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 A27




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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J IIO O/


A28 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


h- kM*
HT-------------"IS^










SPORTS


* Outfield
error proves
costly for
Yankees in
game against
Red Sox./B2


0 Baseball/B2
0 Golf briefs/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
Olympics/B4, B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Citrus grad finishes 11th in local triathlon


Wenger returns to competition after

sufferingfrom bout of pneumonia


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Tim
Wenger was able to enjoy Satur-
day's Twilight Triathlon at Fort
Island Gulf Beach.
The 2012 Citrus High School


graduate and 2011 Chronicle
Male Cross Country Runner of
the Year took 11th in the evening
competition. He had a time of
52:49.5.
"I felt good," said Wenger, who
had his senior track season cut
short because of pneumonia. "It


was a fun race. I am healed of the
pneumonia ... My run was really
good. I surprised myself in the
swimming. It's very competitive.
The winner, Zach Mori, 22, of
Palm Harbor, won with a 49:36.
"This is my first time (at Crystal
River)," Mori said. "I wish it was-
n't a low tide, but other than that,
it's great. It was murky. I like the
scenery I'm going to come back."
Second-place finisher Steven
Miflin, who had a time of 50:49,
ran his second race of the day He


competed in a triathlon Saturday
morning in St. Petersburg.
"I'm tired," the Leesburg resi-
dent said. "I feel good that I did
both races. My times were about
10 seconds apart between the two
races. I was able to keep the same
intensity. I did the sprint series. I
will be back to do this again."
The female winner, Niki Huels-
man, came all the way from Bis-
mark, N.D. She is training at the
triathlon center in Clermont She
had a time of 56:16.


"I have taken seconds all sum-
mer," Huelsman said. "It feels
good to finally take first. I love it
(the course). It is awesome."
Homosassa's Sam Nall was just
happy to finish. He had been
sidelined with a knee injury and
liked being back in competition.
"It was warm," he said. "It is the
first one since I had knee surgery
I feel great. I am always glad to do
it. The reward is the finish line."


Page B3


Magic



hire



head



coach

Vaughn to

lead Orlando

in new season
Associated Press
ORLANDO The
Magic's latest makeover
continues to have a
youthful feel.
Orlando announced
the hiring of Jacque
Vaughn, 37, as its next
head coach Saturday,
bringing the latest 30-
something member to a
basketball operations de-
partment following the
hiring of 30-year-old gen-
eral manager Rob Henni-
gan last month. He will be
formally introduced at a
news conference Monday
Vaughn becomes the
10th coach in team history
and replaces Stan Van
Gundy, who was fired May
21 despite compiling a
259-135 regular-season
record, franchise-best .657
winning percentage and a
31-28 playoff record.
"As we navigated
through our coaching
search, we quickly saw
that Jacque's spirit and
leadership strengths
made him the clear
choice," Hennigan said in
a statement "We are con-
fident that his diligence,
attention to detail and
communication style will
help establish the bedrock
of our culture moving for-
ward. His commitment
and passion to building a
sustainable program will
help steer our organiza-
tion for years to come."
Hennigan chose
Vaughn from a finalists'
pool that included
Phoenix Suns develop-
ment coach Lindsey
Hunter and former De-
troit Pistons head coach
and current Philadelphia
76ers assistant Michael
Curry
A 12-year NBA player
before retiring in 2009
with San Antonio,
Vaughn's career included
80 games for the Magic in
See Page B3


New golden boy?


Associated Press
Ryan Lochte reacts after finishing first in the men's 400-meter individual medley swimming final Saturday at the Aquatics Centre in
the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Michael Phelps reacts after placing fourth.

Lochte wins 400 IM for America's first gold medalk Phelps finishes fourth


PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer
LONDON Ryan Lochte
turned his much-anticipated
duel with Michael Phelps into a
blowout, pulling away to win the
Olympic 400-meter individual
medley by more than 3 seconds
Saturday night Even more stun-
ning: Phelps didn't win any
medal at all.
After barely qualifying for the
evening final in a performance
that hinted at trouble ahead,
Phelps struggled to a fourth-place
finish and was denied his 17th ca-
reer Olympic medal. When it was
done, he could barely pull him-
self out of the pool.
"It was just a crappy race,"
Phelps said. "I felt fine the first
200, then I don't know. They just
swam a better race than me, a
smarter race than me, and were
better prepared than me. That's
why they're on the medal stand."
Lochte took the gold with a
time of 4 minutes, 5.18 seconds.
Brazil's Thiago Pereira (4:08.86)
settled for silver, while Japan's
Kosuke Hagino (4:08.94) claimed
the bronze beating Phelps by a
fairly comfortable 34-hundredths
of a second for the last spot on the
podium.
It was the first time since the


It was just a crappy race. I felt fine
the first 200, then I don't know.
Michael Phelps
who finished fourth in the 400-meter individual medley.


2000 Sydney Games, when
Phelps was a 15-year-old un-
known who qualified in just one
event, that he didn't win at least
a bronze in an Olympic race.
Since then, he was 16-of-16 -14
golds and two bronzes.
Lochte climbed out of the pool
with a big smile, waving to the
crowd and looking about as fresh
as he did at the start. He had


predicted this would be his year
and, for the first race of the
Olympics at least, he was right
on the mark.
"I think I'm kind of in shock
right now," he said. As for
Phelps, "I know he gave it every-
thing he had. That's all you can
ask for."
See Page B4


00


2012
MORE OLYMPIC
COVERAGE INSIDE
* U.S. men's gymnastics team
finishes first in qualifying.
* Sunday's Olympic schedule
and check the medal count.
See Page B4
* U.S. women's basketball
overcome poor play to win.
* U.S. women's soccer team
beats Colombia 3-0.
See Page B5

U.S. MEDALS
WON SATURDAY
* Men's archery team Silver.
* Ryan Lochte in Men's 400
individual medley -Gold.
* Elizabeth Beisel in Women's
400 IM -Silver.
* Women's 4 x 100 Freestyle
relay- Bronze.


'a.i.1* ii Immwa Mi =- --I


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B2 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012



AL

Blue Jays 5, Tigers 1


Detroit


ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 3 0 1 0
Berry If 3 0 0 0
Raburn ph-lfl 0 0 0
MiCarr3b 3 0 1 0
Fielder lb 3 0 0 0
DYongdh 4 1 1 0
Boesch rf 4 0 2 1
JhPerlt ss 3 0 0 0
Avila c 3 0 0 0
Infante2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 30 15 1
Detroit 000
Toronto 001


Toronto

RDavis rf
Rasms dh
Lawrie 3b
Encrnc lb
Snider If
YEscor ss
KJhnsn 2b
YGoms c
Gose cf

Totals
100 000
101 20x


ab r h bi
5 1 1 0
3 1 2 3
4 02 0
2 1 1 1
4 00 0
4 1 1 1
3 00 0
3 02 0
4 1 1 0

32510 5
1
5


DP-Toronto 2. LOB-Detroit 5, Toronto 8. 2B-
Boesch (19), R.Davis (12), Lawrie (19),
YGomes (3). HR-Rasmus (18), Encarnacion
(28), Y.Escobar (7). SB-R.Davis 2 (27), Lawrie
(13). CS-Encarnacion (3). SF-Rasmus.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
A.Sanchez L,0-1 6 8 5 5 3 3
Villarreal 1 1 0 0 1 0
Coke 1 1 0 0 0 2
Toronto
H.AlvarezW,7-7 7 5 1 1 2 4
Happ 2 0 0 0 1 1
A.Sanchez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-A.Sanchez, Villarreal.

Mariners 4, Royals 3
Kansas City Seattle
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AGordn If 5 1 1 0 Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0
AEscorss 4 1 2 1 C.Wellsrf 4 1 2 0
Mostks 3b 1 0 0 0 MSndrs cf 3 0 0 0
Getz 2b 3 0 0 0 JMontr dh 3 1 2 2
Butler dh 3 0 3 1 Figgins pr-dh 0 1 0 0
YBtncr2b-3b4 0 0 0 Seager3b 3 1 1 0
B.Penac 3 0 1 0 Olivoc 3 0 1 1
Francrrf 4 0 1 0 Jasoph-c 1 00 0
Hosmerlb 4 1 1 0 Carplb 3 0 0 1
JDysoncf 2 0 0 0 TRonsnIf 4 0 1 0
L.Cain ph-cf 2 0 1 1 Ryanss 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 3103 Totals 30 4 7 4
Kansas City 100 000 011 3
Seattle 003 000 01x 4
E-Getz (4), Seager (8). DP-Kansas City 1,
Seattle 1. LOB-Kansas City 7, Seattle 7.2B-
A.Gordon (34), Seager (24). 3B-A.Escobar
(4), L.Cain (1). HR-J.Montero (10). SB-
M.Saunders (15), T.Robinson (1). S-Seager.
SF-Carp.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
B.ChenL,7-9 6 7 3 3 1 5
K.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 0
Mijares 0 0 1 1 2 0
G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 1
Seattle
MillwoodW,4-8 61-36 1 0 1 3
O.PerezH,3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
LeagueH,5 1 2 1 1 1 0
WilhelmsenS,13-15 1 2 1 1 0 1
Mijares pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.

Red Sox 8, Yankees 6


Boston


New York


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ellsury cf 4 1 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 1
Ciriaco dh 5 3 3 1 Grndrs cf 4 0 0 0
Pedroia2b 3 2 1 1 Teixeirib 4 1 2 2
AdGnzlib 5 2 3 4 Cano2b 4 0 0 0
C.Rossrf-lf 5 0 1 0 AnJons If 2 1 0 0
Mdlrks 3b 3 0 2 2 RSorin p 0 0 0 0
Shppch c 4 0 0 0 Swisher ph 1 0 0 0
Avilesss 4 0 0 0 J.Nix3b 2 1 1 2
Navalf 3 0 1 0 ErChvzph-3b2 0 0 0
Sweeny ph-rfl 0 0 0 RMartn dh-c 3 1 0 0
ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0
CStwrtc 1 1 1 1
Ibanezph-lf 1 1 1 0
Totals 37 8118 Totals 31 6 6 6
Boston 300 030 002 8
NewYork 001 030 020 6
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston 6, New York 1.
2B-Ad.Gonzalez (28), Middlebrooks (14).
3B-Ciriaco (2). HR-Ad.Gonzalez (10), Teix-
eira (20), J.Nix (4), C.Stewart (1). SB-Ciriaco
(6). S-C.Stewart. SF-Pedroia.


Boston
Lester
Albers H,7
Padilla BS,3-4
A.MillerW,3-1
Aceves S,22-26
New York
Sabathia
Phelps
R.Soriano L,2-1


IP H RERBBSO


6 8 6 6 2 6

1 2 2 2 1 1


Twins 12, Indians 5


Cleveland


Minnesota


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choorf 3 1 1 0 Spancf 5 1 1 2
Brantly cf 2 0 0 0 Revere rf 5 1 3 2
JoLopz3b 1 1 0 0 Mauerc 4 1 1 1
Kipnis2b 4 0 0 1 Wlnghl If 4 2 1 2
CSantnc 4 1 1 3 Mornealb 3 1 0 0
Hafnerdh 3 0 0 0 Doumitdh 4 0 2 0
Damon If 4 0 0 0 Valenci 3b 4 2 1 1
Ktchmlb 2 1 0 0 Dozierss 3 2 1 0
Hannhn 4 0 1 0 ACasill 2b 4 2 2 4
Lillirdgss-cf4 1 1 0
Totals 31 54 4 Totals 36121212
Cleveland 100 000 022 5
Minnesota 000 235 11x 12
E-Hannahan (8), Valencia (3). DP-Minnesota
1. LOB-Cleveland 8, Minnesota 4. 2B-Span
(27), Revere (9), Valencia (6), A.Casilla (11).
3B-A.Casilla (2). HR-C.Santana (9), Willing-
ham (27). SB-Choo (11), Revere (22), Mauer
(5).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Masterson L,7-9 52-37 10 8 2 2
E.Rogers 11-33 1 1 1 1
Sipp 1 2 1 1 0 1
Minnesota
DedunoW,2-0 7 2 1 1 5 6
TRobertson 1 1 2 2 1 2
Perdomo 2-3 1 2 0 3 0
Fien 1-3 00 0 0 1
HBP-by Masterson (Morneau).

Athletics 6, Orioles 1


Oakland


Baltimore
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 Markks rf 5 1 2 1
JGomsl If 1 0 0 0 Hardyss 5 0 0 0
JWeeks2b 5 2 3 0 C.Davisdh 4 0 2 0
S.Smith rf 4 0 1 0 AdJons cf 4 0 0 0
Cespds If-cf 4 2 2 3 Betemt 3b 4 0 1 0
Carter dh 4 1 1 2 EnChvz If 4 0 2 0
Mosslb 3 0 0 0 MrRynlib 4 0 1 0
Inge3b 4 0 1 0 Quntnll2b 4 0 2 0
KSuzuk c 4 1 1 0 Tegrdn c 4 0 0 0
Sogardss 4 02 1
Totals 37 6116 Totals 38110 1
Oakland 000 212 010 6
Baltimore 000 000 001 1
E-Inge (7). DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Oakland
5, Baltimore 11. 2B-K.Suzuki (13), Quintanilla
(2). 3B-Cespedes (2). HR-Cespedes (14),
Carter (8), Markakis (9). SB-J.Weeks (14).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
B.Colon W,7-8
Norberto
Scribner
Baltimore
Tom.Hunter L,4-6
Socolovich
Gregg
WP-Norberto.


52-37 0
12-32 0
12-31 1


51-37 5 5 1 7
22-32 1 1 0 3
1 2 0 0 0 2


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 60
Baltimore 52
Tampa Bay 51
Toronto 51
Boston 50



W
Washington 60
Atlanta 56
New York 48
Miami 46
Philly 45


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
40 .600-- 4-6
49 .515 812 312 5-5
49 .510 9 4 5-5
49 .510 9 4 6-4
51 .495 1012512 4-6


Str Home
L-1 31-18
L-2 24-26
L-2 28-25
W-3 28-22
W-1 25-28


Away
29-22 Chicago
28-23 Detroit
23-24 Cleveland
23-27 Minnesota
25-23 Kan. City


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
45 .550 - 5-5
48 .525 212 212 6-4
51 .495 512 512 3-7
58 .420 13 13 4-6
59 .410 14 14 2-8


Home Away
27-22 28-23
28-21 25-27
27-25 23-26
21-30 21-28
17-30 24-29


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
40 .600 - 7-3 W-128-19 32-21
44 .560 4 7-3 W-426-24 30-20
53 .475 1212812 2-8 L-2 26-26 22-27
54 .460 14 10 2-8 W-126-27 20-27
56 .446 151211Y2 5-5 L-2 21-29 24-27


M~k~i~.T ~ -. -


Associated Press
The New York Yankees' Curtis Granderson can't catch a triple hit by the Boston Red Sox's Pedro Ciriaco during the
ninth inning of Saturday's game at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Red Sox beat the Yankees 8-6.


Ciriaco triples Red Sox to win


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NL

Cubs 3, Cardinals 2


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
41 .586 - 4-6
45 .550 3Y2 6-4
45 .550 3/2 9-1
57 .447 14 10/2 7-3



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
45 .550 - 5-5
47 .539 1 2 7-3
50 .505 4Y2 5Y2 7-3
59 .422 13 14 6-4
61 .378 17 18 3-7


HomeAway
31-1927-22
30-20 25-25
29-21 26-24
21-29 25-28


St. Louis
ab rh bi


Chicago

DeJess cf
SCastro ss
Rizzo 1lb
ASorin If
Marml p
LaHair rf
Campn pr-rf
Soto c
JeBakr2b
Barney 2b
Valuen 3b
Smrdzj p
Russell p
RJhnsn ph
Camp p
Mather If


ab rh bi


Schmkr 2b
Jay cf
Hollidy If
Beltran rf
Brkmn lb
YMolin c
MCrpnt 3b
Descals ss
Greene pr
J.Kelly p
Fuents p
Brwnng p
Craig ph


4 1 2 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
4 0 0 1
3 1 0 0
3 0 1 0
2 0 0 0
3 0 2 1
0 0 0 0
3 00 0
0 0 0 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
40 .596 - 9-1
42 .580 lY2 8-2
47 .535 6 2Y2 7-3
55 .450 14Y211 2-8
58 .414 18 14Y2 5-5
68 .333 26Y2 23 0-10


Str Home Away
W-8 31-18 28-22
W-4 33-16 25-26
L-1 29-21 25-26
L-1 27-25 18-30
W-1 25-22 16-36
L-12 24-27 10-41


w
San Fran. 55
Los Angeles55
Arizona 51
San Diego 43
Colorado 37


Home Away
31-19 24-26
29-20 26-27
30-23 21-27
22-29 21-30
20-30 17-31


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Totals 30 25 2 Totals 30 3 6 3
St. Louis 100 001 000 2
Chicago 200 000 10x 3
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-St. Louis 9, Chicago 5.
2B-S.Castro (12). 3B-A.Soriano (1). SB-
Greene (9), Campana (26). SF-Descalso.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
J.Kelly L,1-4 61-35 3 3 1 6
Fuentes 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Browning 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Samardzija 6 3 2 2 6 7
RussellW,4-0 1 1 0 0 0 0
CampH,12 1 0 0 0 1 1
MarmolS,13-15 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Samardzija.

Dodgers 10, Giants 0
Los Angeles San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
M.Ellis2b 5 2 2 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 1 0
Ethier rf 4 1 0 0 Theriot 2b 4 0 0 0
GwynJ rf 0 1 0 0 MeCarr If 3 0 0 0
Kemp cf 5 3 4 4 Christn ph 1 0 0 0
HRmrz3b 5 1 2 3 Poseyc 3 0 1 0
HrstnJrIf 4 0 1 1 Whitsdc 1 0 0 0
JRiverlb 4 0 0 0 Pagan cf 3 0 1 0
Guerra p 0 0 0 0 Penny p 0 0 0 0
L.Cruz ss 4 1 2 0 Arias ph 1 0 0 0
A.Ellisc 4 1 2 1 Beltlb 2 0 0 0
Blngsly p 2 0 0 1 Kontos p 0 0 0 0
Loneylb 1 0 0 0 GBlanccf 1 0 0 0
Scutaro 3b 3 0 1 0
BCrwfrss 3 0 1 0
Zito p 1 0 0 0
A.Hufflb 2 0 0 0
Totals 38101310 Totals 32 0 5 0
Los Angeles 200 011 303 10
San Francisco 000 000 000 0
E-B.Crawford (13). DP-San Francisco 1.
LOB-Los Angeles 4, San Francisco 5. 2B-
Kemp 2 (9), H.Ramirez (19), Hairston Jr. (13),
L.Cruz (7), A.Ellis (10), Posey (21), Pagan (19).
HR-Kemp (15), A.Ellis (8). CS-Hairston Jr.
(2). SF-Billingsley.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
BillingsleyW,6-9 71-34 0 0 0 2
Guerra 12-31 0 0 0 2
San Francisco
ZitoL,8-7 51-37 4 4 1 4
Kontos 12-33 3 1 0 1
Penny 2 3 3 3 1 1
WP-Billingsley

Braves 2, Phillies I


Johnson caught the Cardinals by sur-
prise when he squared up on the first
pitch with runners on first and third and
two outs. His bunt fell perfectly between
reliever Brian Fuentes and third baseman
Matt Carpenter, allowing pinch-runner
Tony Campana to score.
Dodgers 10, Giants 0
SAN FRANCISCO Matt Kemp
homered among his four hits and drove in
four runs, Chad Billingsley took a two-hit-
ter into the eighth inning and the Los An-
geles Dodgers beat the San Francisco
Giants 10-0.
Hanley Ramirez had three RBIs in
helping the Dodgers beat San Francisco
for the second straight day to pull within a
game of the NL West-leading Giants.
Billingsley (6-9) drove in a run for Los
Angeles with a sacrifice fly. He gave up
leadoff doubles to Buster Posey in the
second and Angel Pagan in the fifth, the
only baserunners he allowed through
seven innings. He gave up two more hits
and was lifted with one out in the eighth.
Braves 2, Phillies 1
ATLANTA- Mike Minor struck out
nine and combined with Craig Kimbrel on
a four-hitter, Jason Heyward had two hits
and drove in a run, and the Atlanta
Braves edged Joe Blanton and the
Philadelphia Phillies 2-1.
Minor (6-7) allowed one run on four hits
and no walks in eight innings. His nine
strikeouts matched his season high. He
retired the last 13 batters he faced.
The Phillies' only run came on Chase
Utley's homer in the fourth.
Marlins 4, Padres 2
MIAMI Jose Reyes hit a two-run
homer and Nathan Eovaldi won his Miami
debut, leading the Marlins to a 4-2 victory
over the San Diego Padres.
Justin Ruggiano also went deep and
Steve Cishek earned his fourth save for
the Marlins, who snapped a three-game
skid.
Nationals 4, Brewers 1
MILWAUKEE Wisconsin-native Jor-
dan Zimmermann pitched his first game
against Milwaukee, and his teammates
hit three home runs in the Washington
Nationals' 4-1 victory over the Brewers on
Saturday night.
Zimmermann (8-6) struck out six and
gave up five hits in six innings. He was
born in Auburndale and played at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.
Tyler Clippard pitched the ninth for his
19th save.
Pirates 4, Astros 3
HOUSTON Rod Barajas hit a
tiebreaking single in the eighth inning and
the Pittsburgh Pirates rallied past Hous-
ton 4-3, sending the Astros to their club-
record 12th straight loss.
Wandy Rodriguez pitched six innings in
his Pittsburgh debut, allowing three runs
and six hits with five walks against his for-
mer team. The free-falling Astros, who
have lost 25 of 27, traded the left-hander
to the Pirates on Tuesday for three minor
leaguers.
Diamondbacks 6, Mets 3
PHOENIX- Miguel Montero home-
red, scored twice and drove in a pair of
runs to help the Arizona Diamondbacks
overcome Ike Davis' three home runs in a
6-3 win over the skidding New York Mets.
lan Kennedy pitched into the seventh
inning and Gerardo Parra added three
hits and two RBIs for Arizona (51-50),
which has won eight of 11.


Philadelphia Atlanta
ab r h bi


ab rh bi


Rollins ss
Victorn cf
Utley 2b
Howard lb
Pence rf
Wggntn 3b
Mayrry If
Kratz c
Blanton p
Ruiz ph
Bastrd p
Totals


4 0 0 0 Bourn
4 0 1 0 Prado
4 1 1 1 Heywn
3 0 0 0 C.Jone
3 0 1 0 FFrmn
3 0 0 0 McCnrn
3 0 0 0 Uggla2
3 0 1 0 Janish
2 0 0 0 Minorp
1 0 0 0 Kimrel
0 000
30 14 1 Totals


cf
If
drf
es 3b
lb
nc
2b
ss
p
p


292 5 2


Philadelphia 000 100 000 1
Atlanta 101 000 00x 2
E-Victorino (1), Howard (2). DP-Atlanta 1.
LOB-Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 6.2B-Kratz (3).
HR-Utley (5). SB-Prado (13), Heyward (15).
SF-C.Jones.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
BlantonL,8-9 7 4 2 2 1 7
Bastardo 1 1 0 0 1 1
Atlanta
MinorW,6-7 8 4 1 1 0 9
Kimbrel S,30-32 1 0 0 0 0 2

Marlins 4, Padres 2


San Diego Miami
ab rh bi


ab r h bi


Amarst2b 4 0 0 0 Bonifac 2b 3 1 0 0
Venale rf 3 0 1 0 DSolan 3b 4 0 0 0
Headly3b 4 1 1 0 Reyesss 4 1 1 2
QuentinIf 3 1 1 0 Ca.Leelb 3 0 2 1
Grand c 2 0 1 1 Dobbs rf 3 0 0 0
Alonsolb 4 0 2 1 Cousins rf 0 0 0 0
Maybin cf 4 0 0 0 Ruggin cf 3 1 1 1
EvCarr ss 4 0 0 0 Morrsn If 2 0 0 0
Ohlndrf p 2 0 0 0 Petersn If 0 0 0 0
Denorfiph 1 0 0 0 J.Buckc 3 0 0 0
Hinshwp 0 0 0 0 Eovaldip 2 1 1 0
Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Kearnsph 1 0 0 0
MDunn p 0 00 0
Cishekp 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 26 2 Totals 28 4 5 4
San Diego 000 001 010 2
Miami 102 000 10x 4
E-J.Buck (7). LOB-San Diego 7, Miami 2.
2B-Quentin (10), Alonso 2 (25). HR-Reyes
(7), Ruggiano (8). SB-Venable (11), Bonifacio
(27). SF-Grandal.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Ohlendorf L,3-1 6 4 3 3 2 4
Hinshaw 2 1 1 1 0 2
Miami
EovaldiW,2-6 51-35 1 1 2 5
Mujica H,12 12-30 0 0 0 2
M.DunnH,9 1 1 1 1 0 0
CishekS,4-7 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Eovaldi (Quentin).WP-M.Dunn.

Nationals 4, Brewers 1
Washington Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Grandson misolays


flyballand Yanks lose

Associated Press

NEW YORK Curtis Granderson
misplayed Pedro Ciriaco's ninth-in-
ning flyball into a go-ahead triple,
and the Boston Red Sox beat the
New York Yankees 8-6 Saturday
night after Mark Teixeira had tied
the score with a two-run homer off
nemesis Vicente Padilla.
Down 6-1, the Yankees closed in
the fifth on Jayson Nix's two-run
homer off Jon Lester and Derek
Jeter's RBI grounder.
After Teixeira's homer in the
eighth, Rafael Soriano (2-1) walked
Jacoby Ellsbury with one out in the
ninth and Ciriaco hit a fly that could
have been caught. Granderson broke
in, then went back and turned the
wrong way before the ball dropped to
his right-field side as he fell. Dustin
Pedroia followed with a sacrifice fly
Andrew Miller (3-1) got one out for
the win, just the second for Boston in
eight games against the Yankees this
year.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Blue Jays 5, Tigers 1
TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion,
Colby Rasmus and Yunel Escobar home-
red off Detroit newcomer Anibal Sanchez,
leading the Toronto Blue Jays over the
Tigers 5-1.
Sanchez, acquired from Miami earlier
in the week along with infielder Omar In-
fante, gave up five runs and eight hits in
six-plus innings in his Detroit debut.
Mariners 4, Royals 3
SEATTLE Kevin Millwood pitched
effectively into the seventh inning, Jesus
Montero hit a two-run homer and the
Seattle Mariners beat the Kansas City
Royals 4-3.
Millwood (4-8) gave up one unearned
run and six hits in 6 1/3 innings. He struck
out three, walked one and was aided by
two excellent plays from shortstop Bren-
dan Ryan.
Athletics 6, Orioles 1
BALTIMORE Yoenis Cespedes and
Chris Carter hit two-run homers to back
an effective pitching performance by Bar-
tolo Colon, and the Oakland Athletics
beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-1 for their
ninth win in 10 games.
Jemile Weeks had three hits and scored
twice for the surging As, who are on
course for the best July in franchise his-
tory. They're 18-3 (.857) this month, and
need only one victory in the next three
games to finish with a better winning per-
centage than the 1931 club (26-7, .788).
Oakland can reach the mark by com-
pleting a three-game sweep Sunday.
Twins 12, Indians 5
MINNEAPOLIS Samuel Deduno
pitched seven strong innings for his sec-
ond major league win and Josh Willing-
ham hit his 27th homer of the season,
leading the Minnesota Twins to a 12-5
win over the Cleveland Indians.
Deduno (2-0) allowed two hits and
struck out a career-high six in his fourth
big league start. The Twins routed the In-
dians for the second consecutive night.
White Sox 5, Rangers 2
ARLINGTON, Texas--Adam Dunn hit
his major league-leading 31st home run,


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y Yankees 10, Boston 3
Oakland 14, Baltimore 9
Toronto 8, Detroit 3
Chicago White Sox 9, Texas 5
Minnesota 11, Cleveland 0
L.A. Angels 3, Tampa Bay 1
Seattle 6, Kansas City 1
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Detroit 1
Boston 8, N.Y Yankees 6
Seattle 4, Kansas City 3
Oakland 6, Baltimore 1
Minnesota 12, Cleveland 5
Chicago White Sox 5, Texas 2
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's Games
Detroit (Fister 4-7) at Toronto (Cecil 2-3), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (Blackley 3-2) at Baltimore (W.Chen 8-6), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 8-9) at Minnesota (Liriano 3-10), 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 5-6) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 0-0),
3:35 p.m.
Kansas City (W.Smith 2-3) at Seattle (EHernandez 9-5),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 8-8) at Texas (Feldman 4-6),
7:05 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 10-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 10-7),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Toronto at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 6
San Diego 7, Miami 2
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 6, Houston 5
Milwaukee 6, Washington 0
Cincinnati 3, Colorado 0
Arizona 11, N.Y Mets 5
L.A. Dodgers 5, San Francisco 3,10 innings
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 2
L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 0
Pittsburgh 4, Houston 3
Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1
Miami 4, San Diego 2
Washington 4, Milwaukee 1
Arizona 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Cincinnati at Colorado, late
Sunday's Games
San Diego (Richard 7-11) at Miami (Jo.Johnson 6-7), 1:10
p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 4-5) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 9-4), 1:35
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 10-4) at Houston (Harrell 7-7),
2:05 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 13-5) at Milwaukee (Rogers 0-
0), 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 8-10) at Chicago Cubs (Maholm 9-6),
2:20 p.m.
Ciincinnati (Latos 8-3) at Colorado (J.Sanchez 0-1), 3:10
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 7-6) at San Francisco (Vogelsong
8-4), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Dickey 13-2) at Arizona (J.Saunders 5-6), 4:10
p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B3.


Philip Humber pitched six solid innings
and the Chicago White Sox won their fifth
straight game by beating the Texas
Rangers 5-2.
Paul Konerko added a two-run homer for
Chicago, which increased itsAL Central
lead to 2 1/2 games over Detroit.
Humber (5-5) didn't allow a hit through
three innings and won for the second
time in three starts.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 3, Cardinals 2
CHICAGO Pinch hitter Reed John-
son drove in the go-ahead with a bunt
single in the seventh inning and the
Chicago Cubs got past the St. Louis
Cardinals 3-2.


Aoki rf
CGomz cf
Braun If
ArRmrb3b
Hart lb
RWeks 2b
Mldnd c
Ransm ss
Wolf p
Lucroy ph
Hndrsn p


DeRosaph 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 00 0
Storen p 0 0 00
Berndn rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 4114 Totals 31 1 6 1
Washington 000 310 000 4
Milwaukee 000 100 000 1
DP-Washington 1. LOB-Washington 7, Mil-
waukee 6.2B-Ar.Ramirez (35), R.Weeks (20).
HR-C.Brown (1), Zimmerman (15), T.Moore
(6). S-C.Gomez.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Zimmermann W,8-6 6 5 1 1 1 6
Storen H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
S.BurnettH,23 1 1 0 0 0 0
ClippardS,19-22 1 0 0 0 0 2
Milwaukee
Wolf L,3-7 7 9 4 4 1 6
Henderson 1 1 0 0 0 2
Loe 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Storen (R.Weeks). Balk-Wolf.


Espinos ss
CBrwn cf
Zmrmn 3b
Morse rf-lf
LaRoch 1 b
TMoore If
SBurntt p
Clipprd p
Flores c
Lmrdzz 2b
Zmrmn p


5 0 1 0
5 1 1 1
3 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
4 1 2 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 2 0
2 0 0 0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




RBC Canadian Open
par scores
Saturday, At Hamilton Golf and Country
Club, Ancaster, Ontario, Purse: $5.2 million,
Yardage: 6,966, Par: 70, Third Round,


a-amateur:
Robert Garrigus
William McGirt
Scott Piercy
Scott Stallings
Chris Kirk
Bo Van Pelt
J.B. Holmes
Ryan Palmer
Josh Teater
Bud Cauley
Retief Goosen
Brendon Todd
Kevin Kisner
Vijay Singh
Nathan Green
Brian Davis
Ken Duke
Troy Matteson
Arjun Atwal
Bill Lunde
Cameron Tringale
Stuart Appleby
Tommy Gainey
Patrick Sheehan
Martin Flores
Will Claxton
Matt Kuchar
Thomas Aiken
Scott Dunlap
Daniel Summerhays
Gavin Coles
Tim Clark
Gary Christian
Garth Mulroy
Daniel Chopra
J.J. Henry
Jimmy Walker
Tom Pernice Jr.
Seung-Yul Noh
Ricky Barnes
CamiloVillegas
JhonattanVegas
Heath Slocum
Brian Gay
Richard H. Lee
Michael Bradley
John Huh
Ted Potter, Jr.
Russell Knox
Jason Kokrak
David Hearn
Brandt Snedeker
Brian Harman
Graham DeLaet
Tom Gillis
Greg Owen
Charl Schwartzel
a-Albin Choi
Ryo Ishikawa
Colt Knost
Spencer Levin
Chez Reavie
Jerry Kelly
Jeff Overton
Matt Every
Kyle Stanley
Matt Hill
Trevor Immelman
Tim Herron
Michael Thompson
John Daly
Kevin Streelman
Hunter Mahan
Miguel Angel Carballo
Billy Horschel
Chris Stroud
Patrick Cantlay
Matt McQuillan
Harrison Frazar


64-66-64-
63-66-66-
62-67-67-
69-66-63-
69-66-63-
65-66-67-
68-68-64 -
69-67-64-
67-65-68 -
70-63-67-
68-70-63-
69-66-66-
69-65-67-
65-67-69-
70-67-65-
69-68-65-
70-65-67-
65-68-69-
69-67-67-
66-70-67-
67-69-67-
65-69-69-
69-65-69-
68-66-69-
69-67-68-
70-66-68-
67-69-68-
69-66-69-
69-69-66-
67-68-69-
65-69-70-
70-62-72-
71-68-65-
73-63-69-
72-65-68-
67-70-68-
68-68-69-
68-70-67-
72-66-68-
71-67-68-
69-64-73-
65-74-67-
67-70-70-
70-67-70-
70-67-70-
69-68-70-
67-70-70-
69-66-72-
68-66-73-
69-67-72-
68-68-72-
70-67-71 -
74-63-71 -
69-69-70-
70-65-73-
63-72-73-
65-74-69-
69-68-72-
67-69-73-
71-67-71-
68-71-70-
68-70-72-
70-68-72-
71-68-71-
70-69-71 -
71-68-71-
70-69-71 -
70-67-74-
70-68-73-
68-70-73-
69-69-73-
68-71-72-
70-69-72-
68-71-72-
71-68-73-
72-67-74-
69-70-74-
70-67-77-
69-69-77-


Senior British Open
par scores
Saturday, At Turnberry Resort (Ailsa
Course), Turnberry, Scotland, Purse: $2 mil-
lion, Yardage: 7,105, Par: 70, Third Round, a-


amateur:
Bernard Langer
Fred Couples
Peter Fowler
John Cook
Barry Lane
Gary Hallberg
Jay Don Blake
lan Woosnam
David Frost
Dick Mast
Tom Watson
Carl Mason
Mark Brooks
Tom Lehman
MarkWiebe
Peter Senior
Corey Pavin
John Huston
Bobby Clampett
Angel Franco
a-Chip Lutz
Mark Calcavecchia
Gary Wolstenholme
Olin Browne
Mike Goodes
David J. Russell
Ross Drummond
Anders Forsbrand
Mark Mouland
Boonchu Ruangkit
Kouki Idoki
Jeff Hart
Kirk Triplett
Loren Roberts
Michael Allen
Mark McNulty
Jay Haas
Joel Edwards
Marc Farry
Chris Williams
Lu Chien-Soon
Des Smyth
Tom Kite
Rod Spittle
Bob Gilder
Jeff Sluman
David Eger
Philip Jonas
Fred Funk
Bill Longmuir
Seiki Okuda
Steve Pate
Tim Thelen
Kevin Spurgeon
Jeff Freeman
Larry Mize
Philip Golding
Eduardo Romero
Juan Quiros
Paul Wesselingh
Anthony Gilligan
Mark James
Tim Elliott
David Merriman
Phil Hinton
Noel Ratcliffe
Mitch Adcock
Lee Rinker
Andrew Murray
Rossouw Loubser
Mike Cunning
Mike San Filippo
John Harrison
a-Randy Haag
Denis O'Sullivan
John Ross


64-73-66
72-68-64
68-72-65
69-72-66
67-74-66
71-63-73
66-73-69
71-70-68
66-73-70
66-73-70
69-75-66
69-74-67
70-71-69
66-71-73
70-71-70
68-71-72
70-72-70
70-72-70
70-71-71
73-73-67
70-76-67
72-72-69
70-73-70
69-73-71
69-73-71
69-73-71
70-74-70
71-72-71
71-72-71
69-73-72
69-76-70
69-76-70
69-74-72
68-75-72
66-74-75
65-75-75
73-74-69
69-77-70
71-74-71
71-73-72
66-77-73
75-70-72
74-73-71
72-74-72
72-74-72
70-76-72
74-70-74
73-71-74
69-74-75
71-77-71
73-74-72
71-75-73
73-72-74
72-73-74
71-74-74
71-74-74
70-75-74
68-74-77
71-76-73
69-76-75
69-73-78
74-74-73
71-76-74
70-77-74
70-75-76
72-76-74
73-74-75
67-78-77
69-78-76
74-71-78
73-75-76
72-76-76
73-74-78
74-74-78
76-72-81
75-71-84


-203 -7
-204 -6
-205 -5
-207 -3
-207 -3
-208 -2
-209 -1
-209 -1
-209 -1
-210 E
-210 E
-210 E
-210 E
-211 +1
-211 +1
-212 +2
-212 +2
-212 +2
-213 +3
-213 +3
-213 +3
-213 +3
-213 +3
-213 +3
-213 +3
-214 +4
-214 +4
-214 +4
-214 +4
-215 +5
-215 +5
-215 +5
-215 +5
-215 +5
-215 +5
-216 +6
-216 +6
-216 +6
-216 +6
-216 +6
-217 +7
-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-218 +8
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-219 +9
-220 +10
-220 +10
-220 +10
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-221 +11
-222 +12
-222 +12
-222 +12
-223 +13
-223 +13
-224 +14
-224 +14
-225 +15
-226 +16
-229 +19
-230 +20


LPGA Evian Masters
Scores
Saturday, At Evian Masters Golf Club,
Evian-les-Bains, France, Purse: $3.25 mil-
lion, Yardage: 6,457, Par: 72, Third Round, a-
amateur:
Inbee Park 71-64-70-205
Stacy Lewis 63-69-73 205
Karrie Webb 70-69-67-206


SCOREBOARD


FOT fthe recoTrd


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S... CASH 3 (early)
7-3-9
^* .CASH 3 (late)
;' a : 8 -7-5

PLAY 4 (early)
S5-9-0-8
PLAY 4 (late)
6-9-9-3

FANTASY 5
rda Lotty 15 28 32 34 36

POWERBALL LOTTERY
5-6-13-36-50 3-8-9-12-33-52
POWER BALL XTRA
13 5



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (10 CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (Taped)
1 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Brickyard 400
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sonoma Nationals (Same-day Tape)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Brickyard 400
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) San Diego Padres at Miami Marlins
2 p.m. (TBS) Washington Nationals at Milwaukee Brewers
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels
of Anaheim
8 p.m. (ESPN) Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Evian Masters, Final Round
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Senior British Open Championship,
Final Round
3 p.m. (10 CBS) PGA Tour: RBC Canadian Open,
Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Web.com: Children's Hospital
Invitational, Final Round (Same-day Tape)
LACROSSE
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Lacrosse Chesapeake Bayhawks at
Boston Cannons (Taped)
2012 SUMMER OLYMPICS LONDON
7 a.m. (8 NBC) Gymnastics, Swimming, Cycling, Beach
Volleyball, Volleyball, Water Polo
7 a.m. (BRAVO) Tennis, early rounds.
7 a.m. (MSNBC) Men's Soccer, Volleyball, Water Polo,
Handball, Table Tennis, Badminton
8:30 a.m. (CNBC) Boxing, elimination bouts
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) Men's Basketball: USA vs. France, Spain
vs. China, Field Hockey, Beach Volleyball, Equestrian,
Weightlifting, Shooting, Archery, Badminton
3:30 p.m. (CNBC) Boxing, elimination bouts
7 p.m. (8 NBC) Gymnastics, Swimming, Diving: women's
synchronized springboard final (Same-day Tape)
12:35 a.m. (8 NBC) Gymnastics: women's team, Canoeing
(Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (NBCSPT) Women's Basketball, Beach Volleyball,
Volleyball, Equestrian, Boxing, Shooting, Archery,
Badminton
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR Silverado Slam (Taped)
SOCCER
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) New England Revolution at Philadelphia
Union
TABLE TENNIS
3 a.m. (47 FAM) ITTF Pro Tour, China Open: Semifinals
(Taped)
TENNIS
4 p.m. (ESPN2) U.S. Open Series: Farmers Classic, Final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Natalie Gulbis
a-Hyo Joo Kim
Cristie Kerr
Carlota Ciganda
Shanshan Feng
Lee-Anne Pace
Suzann Pettersen
Anna Nordqvist
Se Ri Pak
Hee Young Park
Paula Creamer
Lindsey Wright
Jiyai Shin
Mika Miyazato
Ilhee Lee
Karine Icher
Haeji Kang
Hee-Won Han
Becky Morgan
Momoko Ueda
Cheyenne Woods
Julieta Granada
Meena Lee
Azahara Munoz
So Yeon Ryu
Jenny Shin
Mirim Lee
Ai Miyazato
Hee Kyung Seo
Giulia Sergas
Ji-NaYim
Sun Young Yoo
Beatriz Recari
Kaori Ohe
I.K. Kim
Chella Choi
Katherine Hull
Christina Kim
Brittany Lincicome
Amy Yang
Pornanong Phatlum
Ha-Neul Kim
Brittany Lang
Catriona Matthew
Na Yeon Choi
Mariajo Uribe
Juli Inkster
Pernilla Lindberg
Danielle Kang
Jessica Korda
Maria Hjorth
Mina Harigae
Hye-Youn Kim
Alison Walshe
Ran Hong
Shin-Ae Ahn
Cindy LaCrosse
Jennifer Song
Jodi Ewart
Carly Booth
Min-Young Lee
Gwladys Nocera
Sandra Gal
Anais Maggetti
Miki Saiki
Michelle Wie
Linda Wessberg
Jennifer Johnson


69-69-68-
69-68-69-
71-69-67-
73-69-66-
68-72-68-
69-71-68-
69-71-68-
72-67-69-
70-69-69-
65-72-71
68-67-73-
71-70-68-
69-69-71
67-69-73-
66-67-76-
70-72-68-
72-70-68-
72-69-69-
70-71-69-
69-72-69-
71-69-70-
74-65-71 -
69-69-72-
70-68-72-
73-65-72-
73-69-69-
73-68-70
71-70-70-
71-69-71 -
71-72-69-
72-69-71 -
73-68-71 -
71-66-75-
74-71-68-
69-73-71
73-68-72-
71-70-72-
73-67-73-
73-67-73-
72-68-73-
72-70-72-
70-71-73-
71-69-74-
74-72-69-
75-70-70
67-74-74-
71-75-70-
74-72-70-
75-70-71
77-67-72-
72-69-75-
75-71-71-
73-72-72-
76-69-72-
74-68-75-
74-72-72-
76-69-73-
73-72-73-
70-76-73-
72-73-74-
74-72-74-
71-75-75-
69-76-76-
76-69-76-
76-69-76
73-72-76-
75-69-77-
73-70-78-


Amanda Blumenherst
Caroline Afonso
Laura Davies
Felicity Johnson


73-73-77-
73-73-78-
73-72-79-
73-73-79-


Austrian Open
leading scores
Saturday, At Diamond Country Club,
Atzenbrugg, Austria, Purse: $1.21 million,
Yardage: 7,386, Par: 72, Final:
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 71-66-67-65-269
Shane Lowry, Ireland 70-68-68-66- 272
Thomas Levet, France 65-70-69-68 272
Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 70-67-66-70 273
Thorbjorn Olesen, Den. 64-68-68-74 274
Chris Doak, Scotland 73-66-68-68- 275
Benjamin Hebert, France 72-68-64-71 -275
Scott Jamieson, Scotland 71-67-70-68 276
Richard Bland, England 69-67-68-72 276
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 64-76-68-69 276
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 70-68-69-70 -277
Chris Wood, England 71-69-70-68 278
Robert-Jan Derksen, Neth.72-68-69-69 278
Niclas Fasth, Sweden 69-70-72-68- 279
Alastair Forsyth, Scotland 68-72-72-68-280
David Drysdale, Scotland 71-69-70-70-280
Oliver Wilson, England 68-70-68-74 280



Sprint Cup
Brickyard 400 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 182.763 mph.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 181.984.
3. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 181.756.
4. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 181.679.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 181.532.
6. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 181.357.
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 181.046.
8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 181.014.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 180.952.
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 180.654.
11. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 180.61.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
180.516.
13. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 180.487.
14. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 180.473.
15. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180.448.
16. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 180.437.
17. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 180.433.
18. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 180.39.
19. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 180.386.
20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 180.245.
21. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 180.177.
22. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 180.148.
23. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 180.072.
24. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 179.928.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 179.519.
26. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 179.211.
27. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 178.894.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 178.862.


29. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 178.816.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 178.543.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 178.508.
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 178.486.
33. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 178.419.
34. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 177.855.
35. (26) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 177.743.
36. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 177.63.
37. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 177.347.
38. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 177.34.
39. (79) Mike Skinner, Ford, 176.894.
40. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 176.859.
41. (10) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 176.523.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, owner points.
43. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 176.18.
Failed to Qualify
44. (91) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 175.61.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 175.142.
46. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford.



Pirates 4, Astros 3


Pittsburgh


ab rh


SMarte If 5 0 0
Presleyrf 3 1 1
AMcCtcf 3 1 1
GJoneslb 4 1 2
Lincoln p 0 0 0
Grillip 0 0 0
Walker 2b 3 1 1
PAIvrz3b 4 0 0
Barajsc 4 0 1
Barmes ss 4 0 2
WRdrg p 1 0 0
Resop p 0 00
McGehlb 1 00


Houston


bi ab r h bi
0 Altuve2b 5 1 2 0
1 MDwnslb 4 1 1 0
0 Fickp 0 0 0 0
0 FRdrgzp 0 00 0
0 MGnzlzss 1 0 0 0
0 CJhnsn3b 4 00 0
1 JDMrtn If 3 0 0 0
0 Maxwllcf 3 1 1 2
1 BFrncs rf 3 0 0 0
0 CSnydrc 0 0 0 0
0 Bixlerss 1 0 0 0
0 Bogsvcph-rf 1 0 0 0
0 Corprn c 4 0 2 1
Schaferpr 0 0 0 0
WLopezp 0 00 0
Galrrgp 2 00 0
Wrght p 0 0 0 0
SMooreph-1b2 0 1 0


Totals 32 48 3 Totals 333 7 3
Pittsburgh 100 101 010 4
Houston 010 020 000 3
E-M.Downs (5). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 6, Houston 9.3B-G.Jones (2), Maxwell
(1). HR-Presley (8), Walker (10). SB-Schafer
(25). S-W.Rodriguez 2, Bixler.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
W.Rodriguez 6 3 3 5 5
ResopW,1-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lincoln H,5 1 1 0 0 0 1
GrilliS,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 2
Houston
Galarraga 5 5 3 2 1 5
W.WrightaBS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
FickL,0-1 1 2 1 1 1 0
Fe.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1
W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 0
Galarraga pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Fick pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by W.Wright (Walker). WP-Galarraga.
PB-Corporan.
White Sox 5, Rangers 2
Chicago Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EEscor ss 5 0 2 1 Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0
Youkils 3b 2 1 0 0 Andrusss 4 0 0 0
A.Dunndh 4 22 2 Beltre3b 4 0 1 0
Konerklb 4 1 1 2 N.Cruzrf 3 0 0 0
Rios rf 4 0 0 0 DvMrp dh 4 1 1 0
Viciedolf 2 0 1 0 MiYonglb 4 0 1 0
Flowrsc 4 0 0 0 Napolic 3 1 1 2
Bckhm 2b 4 00 0 LMartnlf 3 0 1 0
JrDnkscf 4 1 1 0 BSnydr ph 1 0 0 0
Gentrycf 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 575 Totals 332 5 2
Chicago 000 230 000 5
Texas 000 010 001 2
E-Youkilis (7), E.Escobar (2). DP-Chicago 1.
LOB-Chicago 5, Texas 6. 2B-E.Escobar 2
(4), DavMurphy (14), L.Martin (4). 3B-
Mi.Young (3). HR-A.Dunn (31), Konerko (17),
Napoli (16). SB-Kinsler (18), Andrus (17).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
HumberW,5-5 6 4 1 1 2 4
Crain H,6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Myers 1 0 0 0 0 1
Thornton 1 1 1 1 0 0
Texas
M.Harrison L,12-6 7 7 5 5 3 4
Scheppers 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kirkman 1 0 0 0 0 3
Humber pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Scheppers (Viciedo).WP-Humber.
D-backs 6, Mets 3


New York Arizona
ab r h bi
Tejada ss 4 0 2 0 GParra cf
Vldspn rf 3 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b
RRmrzp 0 00 0 KubellIf
JuTrnrph 1 0 0 0 Gldschib
Acosta p 0 0 0 0 J.Upton rf
Edginp 0 00 0 MMntrc
Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 Drew ss
DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 RWhelr 3b
I.Davislb 4 34 3 IKnndyp
DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0 Saito p
Bay If 4 0 0 0 Blmqstph
Niwnhscf-rf4 0 0 0 DHrndzp
Thole c 4 0 1 0 Putz p
CYoung p 1 0 0 0
AnTrrs ph-cf3 0 1 0
Totals 37 39 3 Totals
NewYork 010 101 000
Arizona 120 300 00x


ab r h bi
4 1 3 2
4 0 1 1
3 0 0 0
4 00 0
4 1 1 0
3 21 2
3 00 0
2 2 1 1

0 00 0
1 0 1 0
0 00 0
0 0 0 0


296 8 6
3
6


DP-New York 1. LOB-New York 9, Arizona 4.
2B-Thole (11), A.Hill (24), R.Wheeler (1).
HR-I.Davis 3 (20), M.Montero (11). SB-
An.Torres (10). S-I.Kennedy.
IP H RERBBSO


New York
C.Young L,2-5
R.Ramirez
Acosta
Edgin
Arizona
I.Kennedy W,9-8
Saito H,1
D.Hernandez H,14
Putz S,19-22
WP-Putz.


4 7 6
2 0 0
11-31 0
2-3 0 0

61-37 3
2-3 0 0
1 1 0
1 1 0


Reds 9, Rockies 7


Cincinnati


Colorado


ab r h bi
Cozartss 5 1 1 1 Fowler cf
Stubbs cf 4 2 2 2 Rutledg ss
BPhllps 2b 4 0 1 2 CGnzlz If
Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf
Ludwck If 4 2 2 2 Helton lb
Rolen3b 4 1 1 1 Fieldpr
Frazier lb 4 2 2 1 WRosrc
Hanignc 2 1 0 0 Pachec3b
Cuetop 1 00 0 LeMahi2b
Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 ABrwn ph
Bray p 0 0 0 0 Fridrch p
Ondrskp 0 00 0 Roenckp
Marshall p 0 0 0 0 Colvin ph
Paul ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p
EYong ph
RBtncr p
Totals 32 99 9 Totals
Cincinnati 021 041 010
Colorado 301 010 200


ab r h bi
3 21 0
5 23 0
4 22 3
5 1 2 2
2 0 1 1

5 0 0 0
5 0 1 0
403 0
1 0 0 0
0000

0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00
0000
1 0 0 0

37713 6
9
7


E-Cueto 2 (4). DP-Cincinnati 1, Colorado 1.
LOB-Cincinnati 2, Colorado 10.2B-B.Phillips
(19), Cuddyer (29), LeMahieu (4). HR-Stubbs
(11), Ludwick 2 (17), Rolen (5), Frazier (11),
Cuddyer (15). CS-Bruce (1), C.Gonzalez (2).
S-Cueto 2. SF-Helton.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
CuetoW,13-5 6 10 5 4 2 3
ArredondoH,9 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
Bray 0 0 0 0 1 0
OndrusekH,12 11-31 0 0 1 1
Marshall H,14 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
ChapmanS,21-25 1 1 0 0 0 1
Colorado
Friedrich L,5-8 41-36 7 7 1 1
Roenicke 12-32 1 1 1 1
Brothers 1 0 0 0 2 0
Belisle 1 1 1 1 0 1
R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bray pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Chapman (Helton). WP-Chapman


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 B3


Associated Press
Robert Garrigus reacts to the crowd after finishing 18 holes
during the Canadian Open golf tournament Saturday at the
Hamilton Golf and County Club in Ancaster, Ontario.


GolfBRIEFS


Garrigus sets record and takes lead in Canada
ANCASTER, Ontario Robert Garrigus broke the 54-hole
scoring record at the Canadian Open that was set more than a
half-century ago by Arnold Palmer.
His next job is to finish like the King.
On rain-softened greens that took the bite out of Hamilton Golf
& Country Club, Garrigus used his power and some timely putts
Saturday for a 6-under 64 that gave him a one-shot lead over
William McGirt, who lost ground with a 66.
Garrigus was at 16-under 194, one shot better than Palmer in
1955 at Weston Golf & Country Club, and matched two years ago
by Dean Wilson at St. George's Golf & Country Club.
Palmer went on to win in 1955 for the first of his 62 PGA Tour
titles. Garrigus will be going for his second.

Lewis, Park share lead at Evian Masters
PARIS -American Stacy Lewis made a birdie on the last hole
to share the lead with South Korea's Inbee Park after the third
round of the Evian Masters on Saturday.
Lewis, who is chasing her third LPGA Tour title of the year, had
a 1-over 73 to finish the day at 11 under. The overnight leader had
two bogeys and a double bogey on the back nine before the
birdie on the 18th.
Park, who was three shots behind Lewis in third place
overnight, had four birdies and two bogeys for a 70.
Karrie Webb (67), Natalie Gulbis (68) and 17-year-old amateur
player Hyo Joo Kim (69) of South Korea are one shot behind the
leaders.
Cristie Kerr had a 67 to finish two shots back. Cheyenne
Woods, niece of Tiger Woods, had a 70 to tie for 19th.

Langer leads by 1 stroke at Senior British Open
TURNBERRY, Scotland Bernard Langer shot a 4-under 66
Saturday for a one-stroke lead over Fred Couples heading into
the final round of the Senior British Open.
Couples had seven birdies in a round of 64, while Peter Fowler
finished with a 65 to trail the leader by two shots.
"I'm just happy to be in the hunt with 18 holes to play," said
Langer, who won this title two years ago at Carnoustie. "There's a
lot of guys in with a chance, so I know I'll have to shoot one of the
lower scores to win."
Americans John Cook (66) and overnight leader Gary Hallberg
(73) joined England's Barry Lane (66) at four shots back.
Tom Watson (66) and Tom Lehman (73) were seven shots be-
hind Langer.

Wiesberger wins Austrian Open by 3 shots
ATZENBRUGG, Austria Bernd Wiesberger had a 7-under 65
to win the Austrian Open by three strokes Saturday for his second
European Tour title.
The Austrian, who was four strokes off the lead going into the
final round, finished with an overall 19-under 269. Shane Lowry
(66) of Ireland and Thomas Levet (68) of France tied for second.
Wiesberger won the Ballantine's Championship in April.
"It's fantastic," Wiesberger said. "My first win in Korea was
great. But this victory in front of my home crowd can only be
topped by winning a major."
Overnight leader Thorbjorn Olesen dropped to fifth place after
the Dane shot 74 with three bogeys on the back nine.
From wire reports


NASCAR BRIEFS


Sadler penalty hands
Indy win to Keselowski
INDIANAPOLIS- Brad Ke-
selowski took the lead when El-
liott Sadler was penalized for
jumping a late restart, then held
on to win Saturday in a contro-
versial finish to the first NASCAR
Nationwide Series race at Indi-
anapolis Motor Speedway.
Sadler passed Keselowski on
a restart with 18 laps to go, but
officials ruled Sadler went too
early and black-flagged him.
Sadler stayed on the track for
several laps, apparently hoping
officials would reconsider the
penalty, before finally coming in
with 12 laps to go and giving up




MAGIC

Continued from Page BI


2002-03. The former Kansas
Jayhawks standout has
never been an NBA head
coach. But he has spent the
past two seasons as an assis-
tant at San Antonio, where
he also won a championship
as a player in 2007.
That is important because
one of the qualities that
Hennigan and Magic CEO





CITRUS

Continued from Page BI


Nall said he plans to com-
pete regularly in triathlons,
including national competi-
tions. He will be in the 70-
age class. About 350 people
were registered for the race.
It is a one-of-a-kind
triathlon that begins at 7:30
p.m. and ends with a beach
party mood under the stars.


the lead to Keselowski.
Keselowski went unchal-
lenged to the finish on the his-
toric 2.5-mile oval.

Hamlin wins Brickyard
400 pole position
INDIANAPOLIS Denny
Hamlin won pole position for
the Brickyard 400, turning a lap
of 182.763 mph in Saturday's
qualifying.
It's the 11th pole of Hamlin's
career and his second this sea-
son. Hamlin also won the pole
at California earlier this year.
Carl Edwards qualified sec-
ond in his first race weekend
with new crew chief Chad Norris.
From wire reports


Alex Martins said the team
was seeking in a successor
to Van Gundy was a champi-
onship pedigree.
Spurs coach Gregg
Popovich is one of the
league's top coaches and
has multiple NBA titles.
Vaughn also has played
under the likes of Boston
coach Doc Rivers, Cleve-
land coach Byron Scott -
both who have titles as
coaches or players and
former Utah coach Jerry
Sloan.



Most triathlons, including
the Crystal River Sprint Se-
ries, begin at 7:30 a.m.
"This is the 12th annual
Twilight Triathlon but the
first time we have done a
sunrise/sunset," race direc-
tor Chris Moling said. "Ap-
proximately 50 of these
athletes ran a triathlon this
morning. Some of them got
up at 3:30 or 4 in the morn-
ing, ran a triathlon and
came up to Crystal River to
do a triathlon."








S Section B4. SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012




SUMMER


SCLYMPICS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Medals TABLE

Saturday, July 28
12 of 2 of 12 medal events
12 of 302 total medal events
Nation G S B Tot
China 4 0 2 6
Italy 2 2 1 5
United States 1 2 2 5
Brazil 1 1 1 3
South Korea 1 1 1 3
Japan 0 2 1 3
Australia 1 0 0 1
Kazakhstan 1 0 0 1
Russia 1 0 0 1
Colombia 0 1 0 1
Netherlands 0 1 0 1
Poland 0 1 0 1
Romania 0 1 0 1
Belgium 0 0 1 1
Hungary 0 0 1 1
North Korea 0 0 1 1
Norway 0 0 1 1
Serbia 0 0 1 1
Uzbekistan 0 0 1 1

Sunday's
SCHEDULE
All Times EDT
Archery at Lord's Cricket Ground
Women's Team 1/8 eliminations, 4 a.m.
Women's Team quarterfinals, semifinals,
bronze and gold medal matches, 10 a.m.
Badminton at Wembley Arena
Men's and Women's Singles, Doubles and
Mixed Doubles Prelims, 3:30 a.m.
Men's and Women's Singles, Doubles and
Mixed Doubles Prelims, 7:30 a.m.
Men's and Women's Singles, Doubles and
Mixed Doubles Prelims, 1:30 p.m.
Basketball at Olympic Park-Basketball
Arena
Men
Nigeria vs. Tunisia, 4 a.m.
Brazil vs. Australia, 6:15 a.m.
United States vs. France, 9:30 a.m.
Spain vs. China, 11:45 a.m.
Russia vs. Britain, 3 p.m.
Argentina vs. Lithuania, 5:15 p.m.
Beach Volleyball at Horse Guards Parade
Men's and women's Prelims (4 matches), 4
a.m.
Men's and women's Prelims (4 matches),
9:30 a.m.
Men's and women's Prelims (4 matches), 3
p.m.
Boxing at ExCel
Men's Lightweight (60kg) and Men's Welter-
weight (69kg) round of 32, 8:30 a.m.
Men's Lightweight (60kg) and Men's Welter-
weight (69kg) round of 32, 3:30 p.m.
Canoe (Slalom) at Lee Valley White Water
Centre, Hertfordshire
Men's Canoe Single heats; Men's Kayak
heats, 8:30 a.m.
Cycling (Road) at The Mall
Women's Road Race, 7 a.m.
Diving at Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre
Women's Synchronized 3-Meter Springboard
final, 10 a.m.
Equestrian (Eventing) at Greenwich Park
Individual &Team Eventing: dressage, day 2,
5a.m.
Fencing at ExCel
Men's Individual Sabre round of 64, round of
32, round of 16, quarterfinals, 5:30 a.m.
Men's Individual Sabre semifinals, bronze
and gold medal matches, 1 p.m.
Field Hockey at Olympic Park-Hockey Cen-
tre
Women
NewZealand vs. Australia, 3:30 a.m.
Netherlands vs. Belgium, 5:45 a.m.
China vs. South Korea, 8:45 a.m.
Argentina vs. South Africa, 11 a.m.
Britain vs. Japan, 2 p.m.
Germany vs. United States, 4:15 p.m.
Gymnastics at Artistic North Greenwich
Arena
Women's qualification, 4:30 a.m.
Women's qualification, 9:45 a.m.
Women's qualification, 3 p.m.
Judo at ExCel
Men's -66kg andWomen's -52kg elimination
rounds, quarterfinals, 4:30 a.m.
Men's -66kg and Women's -52kg
repechages, semifinal contests, bronze and
gold medal contests, 9 a.m.
Rowing at Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire
Men's Lightweight Fours repechage, Single
Sculls repechages, Double Sculls repechage,
Lightweight Double Sculls heats; Women's
Eights heats, Single Sculls repechages, Light-
weight Double Sculls heats, 4:30 a.m.
Sailing atWeymouth and Portland, Dorset
Men's Finn, Star; Women's Elliott 6m, 7 a.m.
Shooting at The Royal Artillery Barracks
Women's 10-MeterAir Pistol qualification and
final; Women's Skeet qualification and final, 4
a.m.
Soccer
Men
at Old Trafford, Manchester
Egypt vs. New Zealand, 7a.m.
Brazil vs. Belarus, 10 a.m.
at City of Coventry Stadium
Mexico vs. Gabon, 9:30 a.m.
South Korea vs. Switzerland, 12:15 p.m.
at St James' Park, Newcastle
Japan vs. Morocco, Noon
Spain vs. Honduras, 2:45 p.m.
at Wembley Stadium
Senegal vs. Uruguay, Noon
Britain vs. United Arab Emirates, 2:45 p.m.
Swimming at Olympic Park-Aquatics Cen-
tre
Men's 100 Backstroke, 200 Freestyle, 4X100
Freestyle Relay heats; Women's 100 Back-
stroke, 100 Breaststroke, 400 Freestyle heats, 5
a.m.
Men's 100 Backstroke semifinals, 200
Freestyle semifinals, 100 Breaststroke final,
4X100 Freestyle Relay final; Women's 100
Backstroke semifinals, 100 Breaststroke semi-
finals, 100 Butterfly final, 400 Freestyle final,
2:30 p.m.
Table Tennis at ExCel
Men's Singles and Women's Singles second
round, 4 a.m.
Men's Singles second round, 8:30 a.m.
Women's Singles third round, 1 p.m.
Team Handball at Copper Box
Men
Iceland vs. Argentina, 4:30 a.m.
Croatia vs. South Korea, 6:15 a.m.
Sweden vs.Tunisia, 9:30 a.m.
Spain vs. Serbia, 11:15 a.m.
France vs. Britain, 2:30 p.m.
Hungary vs. Denmark, 4:15p.m.
Tennis atWimbledon
Men's and women's Singles first round; Men's
and women's Doubles first round, 6:30 a.m.
Volleyball at Earls Court
Men
Britain vs. Bulgaria, 4:30 a.m.
Russia vs. Germany 6:30 a.m.
Australia vs. Argentina, 9:45 a.m.
United States vs. Serbia, 11:45 a.m.
Italy vs. Poland, 3p.m.
Brazilvs.Tunisia, 5p.m.
Water Polo at Olympic Park-Water Polo


Arena
Men
Greece vs. Croatia, 5 a.m.
Kazakhstan vs. Spain, 6:20 a.m.
Italy vs. Australia, 9:10a.m.
Hungary vs. Serbia, 10:30 a.m.
Romania vs. Britain, 1:20 p.m.
Montenegro vs. United States, 2:40 p.m.
Weightlifting at ExCel
Men's 56kg group B and Women's 53kg
group B, 5 a.m.
Women's 53kg group A (medal), 10:30 a.m.
Men's 56kg group A (medal), 2 p.m.


MEN'S COMPETITIONS



U.S. gymnasts cruise to lead


American men in

first after qualifing;

Britain in second

NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer

LONDON The Americans have
insisted for months they can con-
tend for the Olympic title in men's
gymnastics.
Another night like this, and they
won't need to say a word. The color
of their medals will do all the talk-
ing for them.
While perennial gymnastics pow-
erhouses China and Japan bobbled
and wobbled their way through
qualifying Saturday, the Americans
proved they've got the big skills to
back up their big hopes. They didn't
count a single fall, and their final
score of 275.342 is almost three
points ahead of surprising Britain.
"We're going to do everything we
can to make it finish like that," team
captain Jonathan Horton said. "I
was actually joking ... earlier, 'Can
we just get the medals now?' But
we've got one more day to go, and
we're pumped about it"
The team final is Monday Since
2000, when scoring began starting
anew in the final, only one first-day
winner has failed to finish atop the
podium.
Japan, the heavy favorite coming
into the meet, is third (270.503) after
several uncharacteristic errors by
three-time world champion Kohei
Uchimura. Defending Olympic
champion China, which has won
the past five world titles, is fourth
(269.985) after its splat-filled day
"We studied a lot about the Amer-
ican team already," said Japanese
coach Yasunori Tachibana, who


Associated Press
U.S. gymnast John Orozco performs during the artistic gymnastics men's qualification Saturday at the 2012
Summer Olympics in London. The U.S. men's team was in the lead after the qualifying round.


sent a scouting party to last month's
Olympic trials. "So we knew it was
going to be pretty tough."
Germany and Russia compete
later Saturday
Unlike qualifying, when teams
get to drop their lowest score, there
will be no margin of error in Mon-
day's final. Teams compete three
gymnasts on each event, and all
three scores count. Botch one rou-
tine, and it could be the difference
between going home with a gold
medal or a souvenir T-shirt.
But the Americans believe
they're actually better built for that


Associated Press
Kazakhstan's Alexandr Vinokourov celebrates as he
crosses the finish line to win the Men's Road Cycling race
Saturday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.
Rigoberto Uran of Colombia took silver, with Alexander
Kristoff of Norway claiming bronze.



Vinokourov wins



cycling road race


Associated Press

LONDON Alexandr
Vinokourov of Kazakhstan
is leaving the Olympics in
style.
He won the cycling road
race Saturday by prevail-
ing in a two-man sprint to
the finish after favorite
Mark Cavendish dropped
from contention.
Vinokourov, who served
a two-year ban after testing
positive for blood doping
during the 2007 Tour de
France, has said he will re-
tire from cycling after the
London Games.
"It's just unbelievable,"
Vinokourov said. "I fin-



LOCHTE
Continued from Page B1

Phelps was trying to be-
come the first male swim-
mer to win the same
individual event at three
straight Olympics. He'll
have three more chances at
a threepeat before he's
done in London, having also
won the 200 individual med-
ley, plus the 100 and 200 but-
terfly, atAthens and Beijing.
But this was shocking, to-
tally out of character for a
swimmer who won six gold
medals in Athens, then a
record eight in Beijing to
break Mark Spitz's Olympic
record.
Phelps fell behind right
from the start in the butterfly,


ished the Tour de France a
little tired, but the
Olympics, I must go there."
Vinokourov broke away
from the leading group
about six miles from the
finish with Rigoberto Uran
of Colombia. Vinokourov
then accelerated going
down The Mall outside
Buckingham Palace with
300 yards to go to leave
Uran behind.
"It was up-down, up-
down, too many people,"
Vinokourov said. "It was
very dangerous. I knew that
if was following the group I
would have had no chance
in the sprint I finish my ca-
reer with this victory"


his trademark stroke. From
there, it was all Lochte. He
stretched his margin in the
backstroke and breaststroke,
then cruised to the gold in
the freestyle, a good three
body lengths ahead of the
rest of the field.
"It's frustrating, that's all
I can say. It's pretty upset-
ting," Phelps said. "The
biggest thing now is to try to
look forward. I have a bunch
of other races, and hope-
fully we can finish a lot bet-
ter than how we started."
Other memorable races
on opening night in the pool
were:
Sixteen-year-old Ye Shi-
wen of China set a world
record in the women's 400
individual medley only
the third mark to fall since
high-tech bodysuits were


high-risk, high-reward formula, and
this performance will only fuel
their confidence that they can join
Bart Conner and his Golden Gang of
'84 as the only U.S. teams to win the
Olympic title.
Danell Leyva and John Orozco
posted the highest individual scores,
and the team had the highest total
on floor exercise and high bar. They
had only three falls the entire day,
and counted only four scores below
15. Every American Leyva,
Orozco, Horton, Jake Dalton and
Sam Mikulak is in the running to
make at least one individual final.


ARCHERY
Italy wins first gold
ever in team event
LONDON Italy won the
gold medal in men's team
archery at the Olympics on Sat-
urday, beating the U.S. by one
point on the final shot.
The Americans' silver was
the country's first medal of the
games. South Korea took
bronze.
Michele Frangilli, Marco Gali-
azzo and Mauro Nespoli
hugged and raised their hands
in celebration after the final
arrow beat the Americans 219-
218 at Lord's Cricket Ground.
The gold was Italy's first ever in
the event.
TENNIS
Donald Young loses in
Olympic tennis debut
WIMBLEDON, England -
Donald Young remained win-
less since February when he
lost his Olympic debut Saturday
against Andreas Seppi of Italy
6-4, 6-4.
The defeat extended the
American's losing streak to 15
matches. He's 2-18 in 2012 but
is still ranked 60th.
Roddick and Isner lose
in Olympic doubles
WIMBLEDON, England -
Andy Roddick and John Isner
lost their opening doubles
match at the Olympics on Sat-
urday against Marcelo Melo
and Bruno Soares of Brazil, 6-
2, 6-4.
The other U.S. men's team,
top-seeded Bob and Mike


banned at the end of 2009.
She won in 4:28.43, breaking
the mark of 4:29.45 by Aus-
tralia's Stephanie Rice at
the 2008 Beijing Games.
American Elizabeth Beisel
took silver and China's Li
Xuanxu grabbed the bronze.
Sun Yang flirted with a
world record in the men's
400 freestyle. He took gold
in 3:40.14, just off the mark
of 3:40.07 by Germany's Paul
Biedermann in a rubber-
ized suit three years ago.
South Korea's Park Tae-
hwan was the silver medal-
ist in 3:42.06, fortunate even
to take part after initially
being disqualified for a
false start in the prelims.
The ruling was overturned
by governing body FINA a
couple of hours later on ap-
peal. Peter Vanderkaay of


Olympic BRIEFS
Bryan, edged Thomaz Bellucci
and Andre Sa of Brazil, 7-6 (5),
6-7 (5), 6-3. The Bryans never
lost serve.
ROWING
Germany, US advance
to men's eight final
The United States and Ger-
many won heats in the blue-
riband men's eight, leaving a
host of top crews to vie for
places in the final.
Only one crew progresses
from each heat. The Germans,
unbeaten in three years, fin-
ished a half length ahead of
Britain at Dorney Lake. Olympic
champion Canada came in last
in a race fit for the final.
The U.S. beat Australia by a
half length to reach Wednes-
day's final, which should be one
of the regatta highlights.
EQUESTRIAN
Australia ahead of US,
Germany in dressage
Australia took the early lead
in Olympic equestrian evening
at Greenwich Park, with Ger-
many and the United States
close behind.
Half the 50 riders rode their
dressage test that starts the
three-phase competition, which
includes cross-country and
show jumping.
In the individual competition,
Germany's Ingrid Klimke had a
sparkling dressage test to score
39.3 penalty points, followed by
teammate Dirk Schrade on
King Artus with 39.8 and Mary
King of Britain with 40.9 on Im-
perial Cavalier.


"Now is when everyone is finally,
completely realizing how much we
believe in it and today was definite
huge proof of that," Leyva said.
The day didn't look so promising
at the start, when Horton went spin-
ning off pommel horse, his and
the team's worst event. But the
Americans have an unshakable be-
lief in themselves, and they barely
blinked at the miscue. Mikulak,
Leyva and Orozco followed with
stylish sets more typical of the
Japanese or Chinese, and wound up
finishing their toughest event in de-
cent shape.


Several teams, including fa-
vorites Britain and New Zealand,
did not have a complete rotation
of three riders, so team stand-
ings are still preliminary.
American riders included
Boyd Martin of Cochranville,
Pa., scoring 50.7 penalty points
on Otis Barbotiere; Karen
O'Connor of The Plains, Va.,
earning 48.2 on Mr. Medicott;
and Tiana Coudray of Ojai,
Calif., with 52.0 on Ringwood
Magister.
BEACH
VOLLEYBALL
American men advance
The No. 2 U.S. men's team of
Sean Rosenthal and Jake Gibb
needed just 33 minutes to put
away South Africans Freedom
Chiya and Grant Goldschmidt.
BOXING
US men impressive
Americans Joseph Diaz Jr.
and Terrell Gausha posted im-
pressive victories on the first
day of the boxing competition.
Diaz looked sharp in a 19-9
victory over Ukraine ban-
tamweight Pavlo Ishchenko in
the tournament's opening bout,
while Gausha knocked down
Armenian middleweight An-
dranik Hakobyan twice in the
final 7 seconds of his mid-
dleweight bout, winning by stop-
page with no time on the clock.
Georgian middleweight
Merab Turkadze forfeited his
evening bout after failing to
make weight, allowing Algeria's
Amine Mohammed Ouadahi to
win by walkover.
From wire reports


Associated Press
China's Ye Shiwen, left, embraces second-place Elizabeth
Beisel of the United States after winning the women's 400-
meter individual medley swimming final Saturday at the
Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Sum-
mer Olympics in London. Ye set a new world record with a
time of 4:28:43.

the U.S. won the bronze in events to swim in London,
3:44.69. plenty of time to make up
Phelps still has six more for his dismal start.


f


4jL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WOMEN'S COMPETITIONS



U.S. overcomes sloppy play US beats Colombia
n A *AI


Americans beat

Croatia 81-56

in basketball

DOUG FEINBERG
AP Basketball Writer
LONDON The U.S.
women's basketball team
looked nothing like the
squad that is expected to
dominate the Olympics.
Maybe it was first-game
nerves or a hangover from
the opening ceremonies. The
U.S. had to overcome a
sloppy performance Satur-
day before finally putting
away Croatia 81-56 in their
opener
Coach Geno Auriemma
had said he was hoping the
Americans could play a
style of basketball that
would entertain and help
grow the women's game in-
ternationally. That didn't
happen Saturday
"We have five players who
have never been in the
Olympics before so they are
going to be nervous. Every-
body was a little nervous,"
Auriemma said. "We're bet-
ter than we showed, but I
don't know that we're going
to be great right off the bat"
The U.S., which got back
to its hotel at 3 a.m. after the
opening ceremonies, strug-
gled for the first three quar-


ters before winning its
34th consecutive Olympic
contest.
"There was a little jitters,
probably a little sluggish-
ness," U.S. guard Sue Bird
said. "For the most part we
didn't finish off plays we
normally finish off. We al-
lowed a team that when
they get going are known to
spread out the floor and try
to hit as many 3s as they can,
stay with us."
The victory was far differ-
ent than the 54-point pound-
ing the Americans gave
Croatia a week earlier.
Despite missing its first 14
shots, Croatia hung tough
for the first 30 minutes be-
fore the Americans finally
could pull away
The U.S., which has dom-
inated its opponents en
route to the last four gold
medals, only led 53-49 early
in the fourth quarter before
a 16-0 run put the game out
of reach.
"Bottom line is this is the
Olympics," Bird said. "A win
is a win, regardless of how it
works. Beauty is you can
learn from it. Now we know
what we need to work on."
Angel McCoughtry started
the burst with consecutive
layups and Tamika Catch-
ings capped it with a three-
point play that made it
69-49. Swin Cash, who had-
n't played in the first few
quarters also had a three-
point play in the spurt.


Associated Press
Croatia's Andja Jelavic, right, is defended by USA's Tamika
Catchings during the first half of a preliminary basketball
game Saturday at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


3-U on soccer pitcn


Associated Press
GLASGOW, Scotland -
Megan Rapinoe cele-
brated her goal by reach-
ing into her sock and
pulling out a birthday note
for an injured teammate,
part of a dominant and
somewhat feisty perform-
ance that kept the U.S.
women's soccer team un-
beaten after two games at
the Olympics.
The Americans moved
closer to the quarterfinals
Saturday with a 3-0 win
over Colombia, peppering
the opponent's net from
the opening whistle of a
physical game. There was
no early letdown as
there had been three days
earlier in the come-from-
behind win over France -
and the only surprise was
that such a one-sided
match didn't yield a more
lopsided score.
Abby Wambach finally
broke the game open with
a goal in the 74th minute,
making her the Americans'
all-time leading scorer in
Olympic play Carli Lloyd,
back in the starting lineup
after an injury to Shannon
Boxx, scored in the 77th.
Rapinoe's goal came in
the 33rd, a play set up
when Alex Morgan inter-
cepted a pass near the


Associated Press
Carli Lloyd, right, celebrates
her third goal with U.S.
teammates Megan Rapinoe,
top, and Heather Mitts
during the women's group G
soccer match Saturday
against Colombia at
Hampden Park, in Glasgow,
Scotland.
Colombia box. Morgan
passed to Rapinoe, whose
curling 20-yarder sailed
over goalkeeper Sandra
Sepulveda's outstretched
hand. Rapinoe then
reached into her sock and
retrieved a note wishing a
happy birthday to Ali
Krieger, the U.S. defender
who is missing these
Olympics after blowing out
her knee during a qualify-
ing match.


VOLLEYBALL BEACH VOLLEYBALL
Hooker leads US to 3-1 win US women's team advances


Destinee Hooker had 21 points and
the United States held off late-charg-
ing South Korea 3-1 in their opening
match.
The fans at Earls Court chanted
"Des-tin-ee! Des-tin-ee!" at one point
as she dominated in the 25-19, 25-17,
20-25, 25-21 victory.
The U.S., which won the silver
medal in Beijing and is ranked No. 1 in
the world, jumped out to a 17-11 lead
in the first set after one of Hooker's
seemingly effortless spikes, helping
set the tone for the match.


Americans Kerri Walsh Jennings
and Misty May-Treanor, who are trying
for a third consecutive gold medal,
beat Australians Tasmin Hinchley and
five-time Olympian Natalie Cook in the
final match 21-18, 21-19.
TABLE TENNIS
U.S. teenager advances
Sixteen-year-old American Ariel
Hsing is into the second round in table
tennis.
She defeated Yadira Silva of Mexico
in four straight games on the opening


= Olympic BRIEFS =
day. With none of the top 16 players and
favored Chinese entering competition
until the third round, Hsing made the
most of her first Olympic appearance.
JUDO
Brazilian, Russian win gold
Sarah Menezes of Brazil and Arsen
Galstyan of Russia won the first two
golds in the judo competition.
The second-ranked Menezes beat
defending Olympic champion Alina
Dumitru of Romania in the women's
48-kilogram final.
Galstyan defeated one of the 60-kg
favorites, Hiroaki Hiroaka of Japan, for
his first Olympic medal.


FENCING
Italians sweep individual foil
Elisa Di Francisca completed an
Italian sweep in the Olympics' individ-
ual foil, winning the gold 12-11 in over-
time against countrywoman Arianna
Errigo.
Errigo beat three-time defending
champion Valentina Vezzali 15-12 in
the semifinals, denying her Italian
teammate a chance to become the
first female athlete to win individual
gold at four consecutive Olympics.
The 38-year-old Vezzali won a tense
battle for bronze, 13-12 against top-
ranked Nam Hyun-Hee of South Korea.


WEIGHTLIFTING
Wang wins weightlifting gold
LONDON Wang Mingjuan of
China won the first gold medal of the
Olympics weightlifting competition,
taking the women's 48-kilogram title
Saturday with a total weight of 205
kilograms.
The four-time world champion domi-
nated the competition, snatching 91
kilograms and lifting 114 kilograms in
the clean and jerk. Despite being a
top-level lifter for a decade, the 26-
year-old Wang had never competed in
the Olympics due to injuries.
From wire reports


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ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Charlie Sheen
says he's sane
BEVERLY HILLS,
Calif. Charlie Sheen
said he's not insane
anymore.
Instead, these are good
days for the "Anger Man-
agement" star, he de-
clares,
with his
FX sit-
com half-
way
through
its initial
10-
episode
Charlie run and
Sheen poised to
get an
order for 90 more.
Sheen told reporters
Saturday that the prospect
of continuing is as "excit-
ing as hell," and added
cheerily, "I don't think 90's
gonna be enough."
With the expected
pickup, FX plans to bring
aboard Sheen's dad, Mar-
tin Sheen, as a recurring
cast member He will play
the father of Charlie
Goodson, the anger-
management therapist
played by Charlie Sheen.
The veteran movie actor,
who also played Presi-
dent Jed Bartlet on the
drama series "The West
Wing," is guest-starring
on an '"Anger Manage-
ment" episode that airs
Aug. 16.
"I think that was the
best episode we did," his
son said.
Adding Sheen's father
to the series "will give an
extra dimension and
make it a multi-genera-
tional family show," FX
boss John Landgraf said
in making the announce-
ment.
The production sched-
ule would call for filming
a total of 100 episodes in
just two years. This kind
of cost-saving routine
means no time for re-
hearsals, said executive
producer Bruce Helford.
"The actors get the
lines, we see the scene,
the writers make
changes, the actors go to
makeup, cameras are
blocked, we come back
together and shoot the
scene," he explained.

No Norway for
Snoop Dogg
OSLO, Norway- A
lawyer representing
Snoop
Dogg said
the Ameri-
can rap-
per has
been
banned
from en-
tering
Snoop Norway
Dogg for two
years after
trying to enter the country
with a small amount of
marijuana last month.
Holger Hagesaeter, the
rapper's legal represen-
tative in Norway, told
The Associated Press on
Saturday his client "can
live with the decision"
and has no immediate
plans to appeal it
Snoop Dogg, whose
name is Calvin Broadus,
was on his way to a music
festival in southern Nor-
way in June when sniffer
dogs detected 8 grams of
marijuana in his luggage.
He was also carrying
more cash than is legally
allowed and was fined


Fabric of history


Associated Press
Historic black cloth dolls are seen on display Wednesday in New Orleans. Amid rare antique dolls crafted in porce-
lain, whimsical Kewpies and homage to contemporary icon Barbie, cloth dolls in the image of African-Americans
drew special attention as more than 1,200 collectors gathered in New Orleans for the annual convention of the
United Federation of Doll Clubs.


Black cloth dolls growing in collector popularity


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Among
porcelain antique dolls, whimsical
Kewpies, Barbie dolls and even
paper dolls, cloth dolls in the image
of African-Americans drew special
attention among more than 1,200
collectors in New Orleans for the
annual convention of the United
Federation of Doll Clubs.
The oldest of the black dolls on
display was sewn about 1850, said
curator Joyce Stamps of Framing-
ham, Mass., who put together the
exhibit at the federation's request.
Because cloth is fragile, most sur-
viving black cloth dolls date from
about 1870 during Reconstruc-
tion- and on. But records indicate
hundreds were sold at bazaars be-
fore the Civil War to raise money for
the abolitionist newspaper The Lib-
erator, textile historian Roben
Campbell said.
Interest in black cloth dolls from
the Victorian era and early 20th
century has grown in the past
decade, she said.
That's because of a 2007 exhibit
of dolls made from 1870 to 1930,
from the personal collection of an-
tiques dealer Pat Hatch of Harvard,
Mass., Stamps said. Campbell cu-
rated that exhibit, and Stamps said
she and other members of the Black
/Gold Doll Club of New England
helped with it.
"That was kind of the jumping-off
point," she said.
Stamps' exhibit at the convention
ranged from antiques to contempo-
rary dolls owned by Hatch, herself,
and a half-dozen other collectors.
Some were topsy-turvy dolls dat-
ing from the turn of the last century
They have no legs but two heads, one
white and one black; a two-sided
skirt flips to show one or the other
The story is that they were made
by black women working for white
families, and which head was
shown would depend on the race of
any adults in the room, said Stamps,
who is African-American.
"The children, be they black or
white, playing with them... it was like
they really weren't supposed to be
playing with each other," she said.
She created one of seven special
exhibits at the convention this past
week.
Others included dolls depicting
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II from


Antique black cloth dolls are rare be-
cause fabric is fragile and most of
the surviving dolls date from the late
19th century.
childhood to her diamond jubilee,
as well as her great-grandmother
Queen Victoria's diamond jubilee;
the artwork of Susan Beatrice
Pearse, who often painted little
girls playing with dolls; Louisiana
history in dolls; and friendship
dolls sent from Japan to the United
States in 1927.
Campbell said that when she
began work on the exhibit in 2005,
she had to dig deep for information
about black cloth dolls.
The first sold for The Liberator in
the early 1840s were made by an
African-American woman who
taught sewing to young black chil-
dren in Salem, Mass., where black
and white women worked together
in a women's anti-slavery society,
Campbell said.
As children, the author Louisa
May Alcott and her sisters owned
such a doll, most likely bought by
their fervently abolitionist father,
Bronson Alcott, said Campbell, who
works at the Fruitlands Museum on
the site of Bronson Alcott's short-
lived Transcendentalist commune.
Hatch had never even seen such
a doll until 1973 and thought it was
one of a kind, Campbell said. She
said Hatch had collected about 150
by 2005, and sales of the earlier
dolls are now more common.
Black cloth dolls from the 1870s
to 1890s can bring from hundreds to
thousands of dollars, with the de-
ciding factor being whether several
people want the same doll, said


Stuart Holbrook, president of The-
riault's Antique Doll Auctions of
Annapolis, Md. The auction house
took in $2.5 million at a pair of auc-
tions in New Orleans -$1.2 million
for all 900 items from a toy museum
in Davos, Switzerland, last Sunday,
and $1.3 million for about 300 an-
tique dolls auctioned Monday
"One which seems wonderful may
bring $300, and one which seems
equally as wonderful brings $3,000
for no rhyme or reason," he said.
For comparison, a brown-skinned
bisque doll made in France about
1890 and elaborately costumed as
an opera character sold for about
$42,000 in New Orleans, he said.
The doll from about 1850 in
Stamps' display is fashioned as a
boy Clothes sewn as part of the
body include a pair of knee-length
pants. Back then, only a few brave
women wore pants, and those
bloomers were baggy, ankle-length
and widely ridiculed.
Campbell said black cloth dolls
differ from typical rag dolls in sev-
eral ways. Most were made of new
cloth, and the earliest ones tended
to be firmly stuffed rather than
floppy. Those made from about
1870-1890 tended to be more ele-
gantly dressed and durable than the
early 20th-century dolls, which
were often more "squeezy" and
huggable, she said.
Informative quilts, banners and five
dolls shown in New Orleans came
from the National Black Doll Mu-
seum, privately run by Debra Britt
and her two sisters in Mansfield, Mass.
The museum one of two devoted to
black dolls owns about 5,000 and
has 2,000 on display, Britt said.
Barbara Whiteman, who opened
the Philadelphia Doll Museum in
1988, has said that before 1950, most
dolls manufactured for black chil-
dren had exaggerated, stereotypical
features, or were white-featured
dolls tinted brown. Mass-produced
dolls with more realistic images of
African-American children weren't
made until the 1950s.
Britt said the oldest dolls in her
museum have no features at all and
aren't easily recognized as dolls.
They are "wrap dolls" handed
down in her family and made by en-
slaved children, possibly in the
early 18th century They were made
of gourds and vines, and wrapped
with cloth and twigs.


-From wire reports


Birthday Try again in the year ahead to resurrect an old
endeavor that you almost got off the ground in the past.
With the benefit of hindsight, you might be able to figure out
what went wrong and be able to fix it.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When involved in a friendly com-
petitive game, such as tennis, golf or handball, don't make
winning so important that it spoils the fun for everyone else.
Relax and enjoy yourself.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) It's fine to do things that make
you look good, but only if your actions don't come at the ex-
pense of another. Be extra careful to avoid falling into this
pattern unthinkingly.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Usually you go out of your way
to be an extremely diplomatic person, but this wonderful
quality might desert you today. Avoid using excessive flat-
tery, and don't treat others arrogantly.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be alert for uncertainties in


Today's HOROSCOPE
your affairs, and protect your interests at all times. Condi-
tions could have a disturbing influence on your material
dealings, so stay sharp.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) This might not turn out to
be such a nifty day if you and your mate, partner or friend
cannot agree upon a social outing. Toss a coin.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be wary of falling into
patterns that are self-defeating or that make matters more
complicated than the need to be. Work on figuring out ef-
fective shortcuts, instead of dwelling on frustrating
detours.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Awell-intentioned, close pal
isn't likely to be the one you should go to for some con-
structive advice. Talk to someone with a valuable distance
from the matter at hand.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A major achievement won't
be denied you, if you have the fortitude and/or tenacity to


attain it. Persistence will be your watchword don't ever
give up!
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you find yourself in a posi-
tion where must make a decision that would affect friends
who hold opposing positions, try to be as wise and impartial
as possible.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) In order for a joint endeavor
to work out, you need to make sure there is parity between
the players. It won't succeed if the workload is unequal.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Be careful not to automati-
cally veto a partner's wishes without careful consideration.
If you make that mistake, you would be asking for a real
blowup.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't ask and expect a co-
worker to take care of an onerous chore for you without of-
fering to do the same for him or her somewhere on down
the line, fully intending to stand by your word.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

FRIDAY, JULY 27
Mega Money: 2 3 17 27
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.2 million
4-of-4 10 $748
3-of-4 MB 51 $321.50
3-of-4 1,246 $39
2-of-4 MB 1,795 $19
1-of-4 MB 11,924 $2.50
2-of-4 34,905 $2
Fantasy 5:1 5 11 29 -32
5-of-5 3 $73,876.20
4-of-5 271 $131.50
3-of-5 9,507 $10.50
THURSDAY, JULY 26
Fantasy 5: 7 10 23 27 35
5-of-5 2 winners $100,454.41
4-of-5 324 $100
3-of-5 9,237 $9.50
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25
Powerball: 3 14 35 38 46
Powerball: 16
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 5 winners
2 Florida winners

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 29,
the 211th day of 2012. There
are 155 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 29, 1914,
transcontinental telephone
service in the U.S. began
with the first test phone con-
versation between New York
and San Francisco.
On this date:
In 1030, the patron saint of
Norway, King Olaf II, was
killed in battle.
In 1588, the English at-
tacked the Spanish Armada
in the Battle of Gravelines,
resulting in an English victory.
In 1921, Adolf Hitler be-
came the leader ("fuehrer") of
the National Socialist Ger-
man Workers Party.
In 1958, President Dwight
D. Eisenhower signed the
National Aeronautics and
Space Act, creating NASA.
In 1981, Britain's Prince
Charles married Lady Diana
Spencer at St. Paul's Cathe-
dral in London. (The couple
divorced in 1996.)
Ten years ago: In
Afghanistan, a man identified
by authorities as a would-be
suicide bomber with more
than a half-ton of explosives
in his car was stopped by a
chance traffic accident just
300 yards from the U.S. Em-
bassy; a suspect was cap-
tured after a car chase.
Five years ago: British
Prime Minister Gordon
Brown arrived at Camp
David in Maryland for a pri-
vate dinner as well as meet-
ings with President George
W. Bush.
One year ago: Norway
began burying the dead, a
week after an anti-Muslim ex-
tremist killed 77 people in a
bombing and shooting
rampage.
Today's Birthdays: Co-
median "Professor" Irwin
Corey is 98. Actor Robert
Horton is 88. Former Sen.
Nancy Kassebaum-Baker is
80. Actor Robert Fuller is 78.
Former Sen. Elizabeth H.
Dole is 76. Actor David
Warner is 71. Rock musician
Neal Doughty (REO Speed-
wagon) is 66. Marilyn Tucker
Quayle, wife of former Vice
President Dan Quayle, is 63.
Actor Mike Starr is 62. Docu-
mentary maker Ken Burns is
59. Style guru Tim Gunn (TV:
"Project Runway") is 59.
Rock singer-musician Geddy
Lee (Rush) is 59.


Thought for Today: "Man
must rise above the Earth -
to the top of the atmosphere
and beyond for only thus
will he fully understand the
world in which he lives." -
Socrates, Greek philosopher
(469 B.C.-399 B.C.)












COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Little
Tommy Tucker
teaches about
smoking's
health risks.
/Page C6


Building blocks of life


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Amy Meek has completed her first two months as president/CEO of the United Way of Citrus County. With the support of United Way agencies and
volunteers, the areas of education, income and health will be emphasized in an effort to build upon the quality of life in Citrus County.

United Way of Citrus County works to build education, income and health


AMY MEEK
Special to the Chronicle
It has been nearly two months since I
began my new position here at United
Way of Citrus County. I have met with so
many wonderful community leaders and
agency leaders over this past month. It is re-
ally encouraging to see how many people are
working to improve the lives of others.
Our local United Way raises more than
$700,000 annually and funds 19 agencies in
our community. Our local Board of Directors
is comprised of 25 community leaders who
are dedicated to the success of Citrus County
United Way, both locally and worldwide, is
focused on and committed to making a true
community impact. United Way Worldwide re-
leased a study that shows the key building
blocks to successful lives are education, in-
come and health.
These three key areas work together to im-
prove the lives of individuals and that has a
ripple effect that can be seen in that individ-
ual's family and out into the community Our
United Way is dedicated to these building
blocks of life and has set goals to see true
change in Citrus County over the course of the
next 10 years.
It is not enough to just give out the prover-
bial "Band-Aids." We need to get to the root
causes of social needs to truly improve lives
and, in turn, improve our community As a
community, we cannot just fund our problems
away; rather we need a long-term strategic


plan to address the issues we face. Your local
United Way is dedicated to being the organi-
zation that will work with the many nonprofit
agencies in our county, to plan and address
these issues.
Recent census data shows there are more
than 17,000 adults in Citrus County who do not
have a GED or high school diploma. Further-
more, data supports that without this level of
education, the average attainable income is
$13,000.
With a GED/high school education, a per-
son's income can nearly double.
This is why our Education Impact Council
is so focused on building awareness of the
great programs available at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute (WTI) for those in our
community to attain this necessary degree.
The cost of the entire program is about $150
and it takes three to six months to complete.
WTI touts an 86 percent pass rate, free
child care is available and classes are offered
at three locations throughout Citrus County
and online! Impressive, isn't it?
Our Income Impact Council is inspiring the
19 agencies we support in Citrus County to
consider being a part of a 10-class Financial
Stability series. United Way agencies across
the nation are successfully working with indi-
viduals to improve credit scores, build rela-
tionships with local bankers, encourage
saving money, and teach the basics of balanc-
ing a checkbook.
Additionally, class participants will learn
r6sum6-building and interview techniques.


These skills are essential to financial inde-
pendence and as we have seen through the ef-
forts of other United Ways, really work to
improve lives.
The importance of healthy living and
healthy choices has been repeated over and
over again. This is, in large part, because it is
so vital to life!
Our Health Impact Council hopes to begin
an incentive program that provides goals for
children to attain through regular exercise
and provide bicycles for not only the children,
but also for their parents as their reward.
We also want to begin a community garden
that would provide fresh produce for neigh-
borhood volunteers. All fun stuff.
In my life, I have always been fortunate to
have been surrounded by friends and family
who encouraged me to dream big and go after
goals with focus and drive.
Encouragement from others is sometimes
all it takes to motivate a person to take that
next step in their personal lives. We need to
be the encourager, the supporter, the commu-
nity for those in need in Citrus County mo-
tivating them to dream bigger and go after
their goals.
Life does sometimes give you lemons, and
sometimes you need a friend or neighbor to
help you turn it into lemonade!
-
Amy Meek is president/CEO of the United
Way of Citrus County


Stimulus facts are stubborn things


he term stimulus has become
a hot potato in today's divi-
sive political climate. The
truth is stimulus spending has been
employed by both parties to help
jumpstart the economy in times of
recession and high unemployment.

sive public
work projects
to improving
existing infra-
structure,
stimulus
spending has "a--
historically
been an effec-
tive means of Paula Dockery
strengthening
the economy FLORIDA
when imple- VOICES

correctly
Unfortunately, so much rhetoric
and spin has been applied to the
discussion that the facts seem to be
lost. My purpose is not to persuade
you one way or the other on the use
of tax dollars to spur the economy,
it is simply to provide the facts on
Florida's use of stimulus funds.
Love them or hate them, both par-
ties have appropriated them and de-
cided how they will be used. And it's
somewhat disingenuous to say stim-
ulus dollars are bad, but then vote
for a budget that includes them.


During three years under the Bush
administration, Florida received $12 billion in
stimulus funding. ... During four years under
the Obama administration, Florida was
awarded $11.05 billion of stimulus funds.


My analysis covers the period of
2006 to 2012 under Republican
President George W Bush and Dem-
ocratic President Barack Obama.
During that seven-year period, the
Florida House and Senate were in
Republican control and the two gov-
ernors, Charlie Crist and Rick Scott,
were both elected as Republicans.
From informal conversations, as
well as Facebook and Twitter dis-
cussions, it seems many Floridians
believe stimulus funding began
under the Obama administration
and that the federal government -
rather than the state and local gov-
ernments decided how the
money would be spent.
In reality, Florida received a
great deal of stimulus funding prior
to the current administration, and
while there were some strings at-
tached, the Legislature was given a
great deal of leeway in determining
how to best spend the money In
passing seven separate budgets
containing federal stimulus dollars,
state lawmakers did indeed vote to


accept and spend those dollars.
For fiscal years 2006 through
2008, my figures come from the Sen-
ate Budget Committee staff. Start-
ing in 2009, the numbers were
displayed on a website maintained
by Gov Crist's office at FlaRecovery
com. While the website is still ac-
tive, unfortunately, it no longer
breaks down the stimulus dollars
and how they were spent. For fiscal
years 2009 through 2012, my figures
come from a combination of the
state's annual budgets and the fed-
eral website Recoverygov.
During three years under the
Bush administration, Florida re-
ceived $12 billion in stimulus fund-
ing. In 2006, the state's $71.3 billion
budget included $4.1 billion in stim-
ulus funds, or 5.7 percent The next
year, $5.4 billion of the state's $71.95
billion budget came from federal
stimulus dollars, or 7.5 percent. And
in 2008, $2.5 billion of the $66.25 bil-
lion budget came from the federal
stimulus, or 3.77 percent.
During four years under the


Obama administration, Florida was
awarded $11.05 billion of stimulus
funds. While year-by-year break-
downs are difficult to determine, it
appears we received roughly $7.7
billion in 2009, $3.26 billion in 2010,
and less than a billion dollars in
2011 and 2012 combined.
In all, Florida is on pace to have
spent $24.2 billion in federal stimu-
lus dollars.
A 43-page list of Florida's stimu-
lus recipients shows the largest
amount going to the Florida De-
partment of Transportation, with
$1.15 billion. The Executive Office
of the Governor was second highest,
with $730 million.
Of the roughly 2,420 named recip-
ients, at number 17 was CSX Trans-
portation, a for-profit corporation
that received $100 million. School
boards, universities, cities and
counties also are on the list, along
with electric companies and other
private industries.
So let the debate continue. Stim-
ulus is good. Stimulus is bad. But
both parties use it And now you are
armed with the facts.

Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland
who is chronicling her final year in
the Florida Senate. She can be
reached atpdockery@
florida voices. com.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The glass

is half full

after coffee

Is the glass half full or
half empty?
There are optimists
and pessimists and a lot of
folks stuck in between. Per-
sonally, I am an optimist
after I've had a few cups of
coffee in the morning.
But let's look at Citrus
County and some of the
current things both pes-
simists and optimists are
experiencing.
For instance, a pes-
simist looks at the
county's current housing
market and says buying a
home was a horrible in-
vestment. An optimist
looks at the current situa-
tion and says this is a
great time to buy a home
because the cost has
never been lower
Citrus County Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene
put out an analysis re-
cently that noted in 2007,
the average home value in
our community was
$168,350. Today, the aver-
age value has dropped to
$104,600.
A pessimist would have
looked at downtown In-
verness 20 years ago and
said it was time to get out
of town. Frank DiGio-
vanni, the city manager,
was an optimist. DiGio-
vanni led the effort to re-
build downtown Inver-
ness and today it is one of
the nicest small cities in
Florida. Just recently Di-
Giovanni and the city pur-
chased the old Valerie
Theater on the court-
house square and they are
now working on plans to
turn it into a public cul-
tural center. Only opti-
mists make investments
like that.
Pay attention during
this year's political sea-
son. You will find the pes-
simists spend all of their
time talking about the
dumb decisions made by
past or current politi-
cians. The optimists talk
about what they're going
to do in the future to
makes things better. In
America, we should only
elect optimists.
Pessimists will tell you
our public school system
is not working for our chil-
dren. The optimists attend
the graduation parties of
our seniors who are going
off to Harvard, University
of Florida or one of the
military academies.
Pessimists violate the
regulations on how fre-
quently you can water
your lawn. Optimists set
up rain barrels and collect
the water God has made
available free of charge.
Pessimists complain we
are polluting our water-
ways and demand govern-
ment do something about
it Optimists join Art Jones
and his band of merry Ro-
tarians who get out and
clean up Crystal River
and King's Bay on a regu-
lar basis.
Pessimists throw trash
out the windows of their
cars. Optimists recycle.
Pessimists complain
young people today are
unmotivated and are
overly fixated on their mo-
bile devices. Optimists
volunteer to be Little
League coaches, Boy
Scout leaders, YMCA vol-
unteers and Sunday
school teachers.
Pessimists tell you gov-
ernment is the biggest
problem in our lives. Opti-
mists run for political office
and try to change things.


Page C6


I ^ I N S I TIj 1 D-] I1







Page C2 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012



PINION


"I'm not an old, experienced hand at politics. But I am
now seasoned enough to have learned that the hardest
thing about any political campaign is how to win without
proving that you are unworthy of winning."
Adlai Stevenson, 1835-1914


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
H Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
-Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z..Ifl Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................ ...........citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


THE GOOCHER FACTOR




Underhanded



politics is



alive, well


here's a ringer in the
Democratic primary for
the Florida House.
On their primary election
ballot, Democrats will see they
have a choice between Robert
Raymond Goocher and Lynn
Thomas Dostal in
the District 34 THE I
race. The problem
is, Robert Dising
Goocher is a shill; cand
a tool of those
trembling in their OUR 01
tasseled loafers Dirty po
that Independent insult to d
Nancy Argenziano
could whip in-
cumbent state Rep. Jimmie T.
Smith in the November gen-
eral election.
With a Democrat, Republi-
can and Independent in the
general election, there's no
doubt party-line Democrats
would siphon potential Argen-
ziano votes, helping to tip the
scales for Rep. Smith.
Mr. Goocher's primary oppo-
nent, Lynn Dostal, initially in-
dicated he'd bow out of the
race to clear the way for a
Smith-Argenziano faceoff in
November. That was before
Robert Goocher threw his hat
in the ring. Mr. Dostal now as-
serts he's in the race for real.
To that end, Mr. Dostal is out
and about, sharing his platform
at forums and has interviewed
with the Chronicle editorial
board. One big question on his
mind and the minds of many
others: Where is Robert
Goocher?
Goocher, 24, is a mystery man
- a no-show at forums and
candidate interviews. He does-
n't return phone calls or candi-
date questionnaires, and those
seeking to track him down at
his place of employment, Bob's
Car Care, are left disappointed
that they're unable to meet the
man.
In June, he did grant the
Chronicle a brief telephone in-
terview, but said he had to run


U.S. 19 wide enough
I don't think U.S. 19 needs to be
widened at all. It's only a
little crowded in the winter-
time when the snowbirds 0(
come down, but it's fine
during the summer. We
don't need to go to that ex-
pense just for a few months f
out of the year. And then I
they will raise the speed
limit and heaven only CALI
knows what will happen. 563-
It's ridiculous to even think
about widening (U.S.) 19.
A grand re-opening
I guess all of us are excited
about the Margarita Grill coming
back. We understand that they're
going to try to break ground the
end of this month, the end of
July. And they're going to be in
the same location, 10200 W. Halls
River Road in Homosassa. Hope
to see you there. We missed
Tommy and Sandy.
Follow the rules
There is no question in my mind
that our country is in financial dif-
ficulties, but I honestly feel if we


S
e
id

P
01


0


to do an oil change, offering to
call back. A return call never
materialized.
Voters have received high-
gloss mail-outs touting Robert
Goocher's desire to stand up for
the working folks. The problem
is, the literature
;SUE: doesn't mention if
he's running for
fnuous state House, presi-
dacy. dent or Mosquito
Control.
INION: Why would
itics an Robert Goocher
mocracy. run for office if
democracy, he's reluctant to
get out to press
flesh and court votes? Lynn
Dostal and Nancy Argenziano
are sure it's a GOP scheme to
divert votes from Ms. Argen-
ziano in the general election.
That makes sense. Look at
those who have contributed to
his campaign:
His mom, a Republican
who has no interest in answer-
ing a reporter's questions.
A Homosassa insurance
executive, who has also con-
tributed to Rep. Smith's
campaign.
A Republican Levy County
bail bondsman. (Levy County is
not in House District 34.)
Two Winter Park political
action committees.
As for Robert Goocher's
mail-out pieces, they were pro-
duced by some Tallahassee-
based entity called Putting
Florida First Inc., although
that reveals little about the un-
derlying motivations.
There is a Beverly Hills resi-
dent who spent some time
coaching Robert Goocher in
"Politics 101." While he said he
doesn't think Mr. Goocher is a
Republican plant, he did say,
"He's a little over his head."
If there's anything to be
learned about this, it's that con-
niving, underhanded politics is
alive and well and Democ-
rats shouldn't waste a vote on
mystery man Robert Goocher.


would look at some of the simple
things that affect each one of us,
we could help a lot of other
things, besides just the fi-
JND nances. Example: As a vet-
aw eran, people can now wear
1rr any kind of awards and
not have any problem with
it. People want to wear
clothing that looks like the
r American flag and (there
00 is) no problem with it. All
S579 these rules and regula-
tions are out there that
we've lived by for many,
many years and have been sup-
ported by a lot of people, now all
of a sudden, oh well, if it's me it
doesn't bother me as long as it's
not somebody else. Let's get with
the program, people. Support our
own feelings and follow the rules.
Dodging the tax
Last Sunday, July 15, on the
way to church, gas price at the
cheapest place on State Road 44
- $3.27. Sunday afternoon near
Ocala, State Road 200, price of
gas $3.15. Not having my gas
tax money spent on useless roads
bought from developers -
priceless.


Leviathan on a fishing expedition


SAN FRANCISCO
he huge, humpback whale
whose friendliness precip-
itated a surreal seven-year
-so far federal hunt for crim-
inality surely did not
feel put upon. Never- --
theless, our unhinged
government, with an
obsession like that of
Melville's Ahab, has
crippled Nancy '
Black's scientific ca- /
reer, cost her more
than $100,000 in legal
fees so far and
might sentence her to Georg
20 years in prison. OTI
This Kafkaesque bur-
lesque of law enforce- V014
ment began when
someone whistled.
Black, 50, a marine biologist
who also captains a whale watch-
ing ship, was with some watchers
in Monterey Bay in 2005 when a
member of her crew whistled at
the humpback that had ap-
proached her boat, hoping to en-
tice the whale to linger. Back on
land, another of her employees
called the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration to
ask if the whistling constituted
"harassment" of a marine mam-
mal, which is an "environmental
crime." NOAA requested a video
of the episode, which Black sent
after editing it slightly to high-
light the whistling. NOAA found
no harassment but got her in-
dicted for editing the tape, calling
this a "material false statement"
to federal investigators, which is
a felony under the 1863 False
Claims Act intended to punish
suppliers defrauding the govern-
ment during the Civil War.
A year after this bizarre charge
- that she lied about the interac-
tion with the humpback that pro-
duced no charges more than a
dozen federal agents, led by one
from NOAA, raided her home.
They removed her scientific pho-
tos, business files and computers.
Call this a fishing expedition.
She has also been charged with
the crime of feeding killer whales
when she and two aides were in


Ce

C


a dinghy observing them feeding
on strips of blubber torn from
their prey a gray whale. To fa-
cilitate photographing the killers'
feeding habits, she cut a hole in
one of the floating slabs
of blubber, and through
the hole attached a
rope to stabilize the
slab while a camera on
a pole recorded the
whales' underwater
eating.
So she is charged
with "feeding" killer
whales who were al-
Will ready feeding on a gray
IER whale they had killed.
She could more plausi-
WES bly be accused of inter-
feringwith the feeding.
Never mind. This pursuit of
Black seems to have become a
matter of institutional momen-
tum, an agent-driven case. Per-
haps NOAA, or the U.S. Justice
Department's Environmental
Crimes Section, has its version of
Victor Hugo's obsessed Inspector
Javert. In any event, some of the
federal government's crime-
busters seem to know little about
whales hence the "whistle-as-
harassment" nonsense.
Six years ago, NOAA agents,
who evidently consider the First
Amendment a dispensable nui-
sance, told Black's scientific col-
leagues not to talk to her, and to
inform them if they were con-
tacted by her or her lawyers.
Since then, she has not spoken
with one of her best friends.
To finance her defense, she has
cashed out her life's savings,
which otherwise might have pur-
chased a bigger boat. The govern-
ment probably has spent millions.
It delivered an administrative
subpoena to her accountant, al-
though no charge against her has
anythingto do with finances.
In 1980, federal statutes speci-
fied 3,000 criminal offenses; by
2007,4,450. They continue to mul-
tiply Often, as in Black's case,
they are untethered from the
common law tradition of mens
rea, which holds that a crime
must involve a criminal intent -


Six years ago,
NOAA agents ...
told Nancy Black's
scientific
colleagues not to
talk to her, and to
inform them if they
were contacted by
her or her lawyers.
a guilty mind. Legions of govern-
ment lawyers inundate targets
like Black with discovery de-
mands, producing financial bur-
dens that compel the innocent to
surrender in order to survive.
The protracted and pointless
tormenting of Black illustrates
the thesis of Harvey Silverglate's
invaluable 2009 book "Three
Felonies a Day: How the Feds
Target the Innocent." Silverglate,
a civil liberties lawyer in Boston,
chillingly demonstrates how the
mad proliferation of federal
criminal laws which often are
too vague to give fair notice of
what behavior is proscribed or
prescribed means "our normal
daily activities expose us to po-
tential prosecution at the whim of
a government official."
Such laws, which enable gov-
ernment zealots to accuse almost
anyone of committing three
felonies in a day, do not just en-
able government misconduct, they
incite prosecutors to intimidate
decent people who never had cul-
pable intentions. And to inflict
punishments without crimes.
By showing that Kafka was a
realist, Black's misfortune may
improve the nation: The more
Americans learn about their gov-
ernment's abuse of criminal law
for capricious bullying, the more
likely they are to recoil in a liber-
tarian direction and put
Leviathan on a short leash.
--In--
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Remodel shelter
I am a volunteer at Citrus
County Animal Services. The
employees must be recognized
for their outstanding work in a
very stressful environment.
I am concerned about the dis-
cussion to have or not have a
"no-kill" shelter It is important
to recognize the following facts
before going on with the discus-
sion:
1) Because of limited room at
the present facility, it would be
cruel treatment for animals to
be more crowded than they are
now. It is extremely crowded at
the present time;
2) The present critical needs
must be met, namely a quaran-
tine/surgery/nursery area. I un-
derstand there is some money
approved for these pressing
needs. However, construction
has not begun. Why not?
A new facility or major remod-
eling of the present buildings
should be completed before con-
sidering a "no-kill" shelter after
the quarantine/surgery/nursery
area is completed.
Nadia Caron-Davis
Hernando


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Perfect pet facility
Many years ago, my family
adopted a dog from the Humane
Society. After he was home and


his first visit to the vet, we
found he had worms, mange and
kennel cough. He had been
there for two weeks and still his
bones were sticking up on his
hips and his ribs shown through.
I was so upset he not only did-
n't receive better care, but no
one told us. As a result, kennel
cough spread to our other
animals.
When it came time to adopt
a new cat for our home we were
worried. I arrived at The Hu-
manitarians of Florida and was
amazed. Anyone who has cats
knows how difficult it is to
keep "that smell" out of your
house and litter box. And here
was a house full of cats, kittens
and even sick cats in their own
separate room and not one
dirty litter box no smells at all
-not one dirty cat. This place is
spotless, with employees (who)
are constantly cleaning, loving
and caring for their animals.
We adopted a wonderful
healthy cat from kind caring
people and we believe The Hu-
mane Society has a lot to learn
from that amazing facility.
Erin Elder
Citrus Springs


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Expiration dates: Milk is one thing, but what about me!?


I'm an expiration
date checker.
Foodstuff
Bottles, cans and
boxes.
Once that "best if
used before" date is
reached, when I see it,
the stuff is dumped. It
makes no difference
how it looks or smells; Fred E
once the date on the A Sl
label has passed, it's a OF
goner.
Such things don't
seem to trouble Cheryl. If it still
looks and smells OK, it's fine by
her. To make things even a little


Ir

L
L


bit tougher, the girl I
married was evidently
'. born with a cast-iron
stomach something
has to really be bad be-
fore it's bad for her.
Me?
I'm a weak-stom-
ached wimp.
Even one day past
rannen the expiration date,
ICE and I might find myself
LIFE at the emergency
room; and none of us
want that, now do we?
Milk is my most-checked item. I
never want to be without milk be-
cause I'm a morning cereal eater


and folks from my generation gen-
erally believe that man cannot live
by cereal alone, he must have milk
to moisten it!
Leftovers?
Three-day rule.
Whether bought at a restaurant
or cooked at home, on the third
day after a meal has been
prepared, it must either have
been eaten or tossed out of the
refrigerator.
What drives me bonkers is when
I buy something and fail to
remember to look at the
expiration date at the time of
purchase or when I make a
mistake putting it away


We recently were prepping for a
short visit from five of our seven
grandchildren. Milk, much milk, is
always essential when these little
eating machines are with us. We
had a partial half-gallon of milk,
plus one I'd bought a few days
before.
I made the necessary
calculations and knew we needed
one more half-gallon of milk to last
for the kids' visit, so I bought one.
When the partial bottle was used
up, I opened what I thought was
the next one in line. It wasn't.
Sure enough, on July 11, the last
remaining unopened half gallon
of milk had a July 9 expiration


date. I didn't notice it right off, but
persnickety grandson Fred 4 did.
He pointed it out to his
grandmom, and she told me.
Yep. I poured it down the sink.
We're fortunate God doesn't put
expiration dates on us.
Me?
I'm especially blessed, because
if she holds true to form,
expiration date or not, so long as I
look and smell OK, Cheryl won't
throw me out!
--in--
Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Development project at


center of water dispute


K.C. NAYFIELD
Special to the Chronicle

Someone once asked a
billionaire what he wanted
in life. He answered them
with just one word: "More."
That billionaire very well
could have been Frank
Stronach, a 79-year-old
Canadian investor who
made a fortune in the auto
parts and electronics indus-
tries. He is the money be-
hind the Adena Springs
Ranch project and he is
ranked 21 on Forbes list of
wealthiest men in the world.
Adena Springs will en-
compass tens of thousands
of acres in Central Florida.
The project is set to include
a cattle operation, timber, a
biomass generator and a
slaughter house. He is also
planning a housing develop-
ment and golf course
nearby
The biggest problem is
that Mr. Stronach has ap-
plied for a consumptive use
permit (CPU) through the
St. Johns Water Manage-
ment District. He is asking
for the ability to pump over
13 million of gallons of
water daily from the Flori-
dan Aquifer. To put this
amount of water into per-
spective, it is more than the
entire city of Ocala con-
sumes each day
I have no problems with
people making money I
would be the first to con-
gratulate Mr. Stronach on
his successful companies. I
do have a problem with peo-


Guest COLUMN


ple making huge profits at
the expense of the environ-
ment or my quality of life.
The Adena Springs Project
will do both.
The project sits on the
spring shed for the Silver
Springs, which feeds the Sil-
ver River which flows to the
Oklawaha which is the
largest river supplying the
St. Johns River. Spring flows
from the Silver Springs have
already gone down signifi-
cantly in the past few years.
The decreases threaten the
entire ecosystem of that
area.
Of course many people
are protesting the project,
especially the Florida Con-
servation Coalition led by
former governor/U.S. Sen.
Bob Graham. The propa-
ganda wars have begun.
Mr. Stronach claims to
have data that indicates no
damage from this massive
pumping. Common sense
would dictate otherwise.
This water belongs to the
people of Florida and
should not go to just making
a wealthy man wealthier
Mr. Stronach has pro-
claimed he will create jobs
and stimulate the economy
Actually it will cost jobs in
the tourism industry as the
springs are further dam-
aged by over-pumping. He
further claims that the proj-
ect won't be using that large
amount of water. However,
once issued, he may have


the ability to divert the
water into other areas like
bottling. The water district
needs to deny this CUP
To the credit of Mr.
Stronach, he has made huge
donations to the University
of Florida. My opinion is
that if he really wants to do
something good for the state
he should just put that land
into preservation and have
it restored back to its natu-
ral condition. He could put
it into a conservation ease-
ment and set it aside for
aquifer recharge. This is
what the state needs and not
more deforestation and
thousands more methane
belching animals.
Stronach Adena's Springs
Preserve would be of real
benefit to the state. If he re-
ally wants to raise cattle in
Florida, I am sure he could
find an existing ranch to buy
and lessen the environmen-
tal impact
Florida needs less pump-
ing from the aquifer. It
needs less damage to its
fragile environment. Mr.
Stronach needs to realize
that when it comes to pre-
serving ecosystems, less is
actually more.


Dr K.C. Nayfield is a
Crystal River resident who
has served on the
Waterfronts Advisory
Board, most recently as
chairman.


Letters to the EDITOR


Money out of politics
Just about everything wrong with soci-
ety can be summed up in three words:
Money in Politics.
Take corporate interests out of Washing-
ton and state houses, and our elected offi-
cials would have to work for their
constituents instead of multinational cor-
porations. Instead of the filibuster, politi-
cians would trip all over themselves trying
to outdo each other to improve life for the
working-class electorate. Instead, we have
one party that refuses to create jobs, or
build renewable energy solutions to global
warming. Why? Because corporate inter-
ests like the health insurance industry,
Wall Street bankers and the fossil fuel in-
dustry, among others, are much better
served by members of the party of no.
Democrats tend to want to regulate the
bankers (who) brought down the economy,
whereas members of the right prefer to
blame teachers and public workers, and to
cut vital programs to satisfy their corpo-
rate donors.
Take the recent debate over President
Obama's Affordable Care Act: What would
be better for our country than a single-
payer system? It would bring down costs,
renew the economy, create many jobs and
ensure everyone would be covered.
Instead, our elected officials had to
make a deal with the insurance industry,
trading the mandate for insuring folks
with pre-existing conditions, because our
legislators are in the pocket of the insur-
ance industry
There are many benefits in the Afford-
able Care Act, and it's a great place to
start. But if corporate money were not al-
lowed to influence politicians and elec-
tions, we could have quality, affordable
health care for all, right now, like they do
in every other developed country
Citizens' United, building on an earlier
court decision that says money is speech,
and a pre-condition called corporate per-
sonhood, opened the floodgates to un-
precedented amounts of cash in the form
of Super Pacs, effectively killing what was
left of democracy, as only the 1 percent
corporate club is left standing. We must
amend the constitution to stop corporate
money from destroying democracy
Find out where your candidates get
their money For Congressional Reps, go
to opensecrets.org, and for state reps,
followthemoneyorg.
Harriet Heywood
Homosassa


Environmental nonsense
You have to love our environmentalists.
I'm talking about Mike Fahey's letter, in
which he said, "New technologies that
protect the environment will create new
high-paying jobs."
Right on, Mike we call that Solyndra.
In the meantime, you destroyed thousands
of jobs in the coal, natural gas and oil in-
dustries.
Then he goes on to say, "We live in a car-
bon-constrained atmosphere."
That's a political slogan, not a fact. I'll
give him 350 words of Chronicle space to
explain to this old rocket scientist what a
carbon-constrained atmosphere is.
Here's the raw truth: If you don't have
credits in a college-level course in ther-
modynamics, you don't know hot from
cold. I've studied the bios of environmen-
talists from the United Nations' Intergov-
ernmental Panel on Climate Change to the
local level, and there is one fact that
jumps out. A lot of these people don't have
degrees in hard science. This field is a
haven for educated people with degrees
in sociology and political science and a
need to put food on the table.
What does Mike mean by a carbon-con-
strained atmosphere? I picture lumps of
coal falling from the sky. Is he talking
about carbon dioxide? He should say so if
that's the case, because from there we can
have a discussion.
Picture 85,800 molecules of air. Carbon
dioxide will be 0.04 percent of that volume
of air. The reason we picked 85,800 mole-
cules is it makes the math come out easy
Thirty-three molecules will be carbon
dioxide. Thirty-two will be naturally oc-
curring and necessary to support life on
this planet, and one will be manmade.
The historical variance in the naturally
occurring gas is plus or minus two mole-
cules or from 30 to 34 molecules. Mike
would spend billions to do microsurgery
on one molecule out of 85,800. When we
say we will reduce our emissions 50 per-
cent, a one-molecule natural change will
overwhelm it Never forget: In the past
30,000 years, the west coast of Florida has
wandered from 100 miles west of here to
30 miles east, and it will do it again.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
See guidelines on Page C2.


Scholarship thanks
Congratulations Citrus County, you
have done it again! To the many contribu-
tors to the College of Central Florida
STEPS Scholarship in Gary Maidhof's
name, stand tall, the $10,000 goal has ac-
tually been exceeded and the scholar-
ship is now fully endowed at Inverness
Primary School for a young man each
and every year.
The certificate for this brand-new
$4,000 scholarship will begin to be
awarded in the 2013 school year, and be
presented in perpetuity from this time
forward in honor of Gary Maidhof. There
are so many to thank, and each of you
can be proud to have helped make this
happen.
Thanks go to:
Agricultural Alliance of Citrus
County.
0 Ms. Sabrina L. Atwell.
0 Mr. Terry C. Balderson.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Balfour.
0 Mr. Jim Barrows.
0 Ms. Jacqueline C. Boring.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Bradley
0 Mr. David W Burns.
0 Burrell Engineering Inc.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Frederick L. Busack.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Vincent A. Cautero.
0 Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce.
0 Citrus County Department of Public
Works.
0 Citrus County Economic Develop-
ment Council Inc.
0 Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
0 Ms. Jenette B. Collins.
0 Mr. and Mrs. David R. Conrad.
0 Ms. Avis M. Craig.
0 Mr. Michael G. Czerwinski.
0 Daly & Zilch (Florida) Inc.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Deloach.
0 Mr. Frank T Digiovanni.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Dixon.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Steven Epple.
BUT, if you or your organization were in-
tending to contribute and hadn't yet, there
may be another fine alternative for you to
consider Many of us didn't realize Gary's 3-
year-old grandson was actually living with
Gary and his wife, Charlotte Maidhof, and


Patrol parking lots
There is a new scam that
the police and the public of
Citrus County need to be
aware of. I have had this
happen to me on three sep-
arate occasions at three dif-
ferent parking lots in the
county spread out from Ho-
mosassa all the way to In-
verness. I am approached
in the parking lot either by
a man or a woman. The
woman had a child with her
saying they have run out of
gas, that, you know, they've
never had to ask before, but
is there any way they could
borrow $5 so that they can
get gas. One person said so
they could feed their kid.
It's very scary for some-
body to walk up to you in a
parking lot when you're
about to get into your car. I
wish that the patrol officers
of this county would start
patrolling the parking lots
more frequently so that


they were helping to raise him.
With Mr Maidhofgone, opportunities
for the education of that grandson will be
more difficult. Some of the pledged sup-
porters suggested and have agreed to
allow their donations to be redirected to
a special designated fund account
opened at SunTrust Bank to help in his
future college education. Mrs. Charlotte
Maidhof will be custodian of the account.
This fund will remain open for contri-
bution through this calendar year 2012,
to allow Charlotte to put all funds col-
lected toward a prepaid Florida college
program or a 529 fund for the express
purpose of this grandson's education
some 15 years from now, when he is
ready to go to school. Anyone interested
in helping honor Gary Maidhof in this
way, please make checks payable to:
Jeramiah Maidhof Education Fund. Con-
tributions may be sent to any of the fol-
lowing locations and will be directed on
to the special-purpose account:
Citrus County Administrative Of-
fices, Att: Brad Thorpe, 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness, FL 34450.
Charlotte Maidhof, 1050 N. Ottawa
Ave., Lecanto, FL 34461- 9774.
Citrus County Property Appraiser's
Office, West Citrus Govt. Center Mead-
owcrest, Att: Avis Marie Craig, 1540 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34428.
Both vehicles provide worthy educa-
tional support that will honor Mr Maid-
hof. If anyone has further questions,
please contact any of the above individu-
als. Periodically, updates will be pro-
vided to the public on the progress of the
newest education fund established for
Gary's grandson.
Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill and
I were gratified our Citrus community
rallied to endow the first scholarship at
the College of Central Florida. And now
that you know about the second need, we
ask for your continued support. The fam-
ily humbly thanks all who have and will
choose to participate. Likewise, the fam-
ily wants the community to know how
much the outpouring of condolences
have meant to them.
Avis Marie Craig
Crystal River


some of these scams can
be (stopped).
Worry about you
This is in response to the
Sound Off caller who was
complaining about the lady
buying $40 worth of lottery
tickets and then buying
stuff with her EBT card.
Well, I just want to say, first
off, whoever this person is,
they should just mind their
own business. This lady
has a right to buy what she
wants with her EBT card.
You know, if this county
wasn't such an anti-growth,
anti-business county, there
probably would be jobs
here that she could work
at. But being that this is an
anti-growth, anti-business
county, there is not much
here.
Morbid menagerie
FYI: The roadkill count in
front of my house stands
at 20 squirrels, three rab-


bits, one buzzard in front
of my house in Sugarmill.
What can these drivers be
thinking of when they're
supposed to pay attention
to the road and only be
going 30 to 35 mph. Lord
only knows about the other
streets. All since Jan. 1,
2012. The police are out
hiding, waiting to catch
speeders in the afternoon. I
think that 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.
and the 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
would be a whole lot more
productive.
Tabby cat found
This is for the lady that
evidently lost her peach
tabby cat in the Sugarmill
Woods area. She was in the
Sound Off a few days ago. I
did notice there was a
"Found" article also in the
Chronicle that they found a
peach tabby in the Sug-
armill Woods area and
their phone number was
382-9303.


Thank-You LETTER


Sound OFF


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 C3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Balfour for superintendent
Sandy Balfour is certainly qualified to
serve as Citrus County's superintendent of
schools. As a fellow classroom teacher, I
have worked with Sandy in various situa-
tions during the past 10 years and have
come to know her quite well. She has
been consistently open minded, empa-
thetic, willing to learn from and listen to
others' opinions, and committed to the
task at hand. Her main focus remains:
"How will this impact the students?"
Although Sandy began her career as a
business owner, when her children came
along, she became motivated to under-
stand the educational process and make a
difference in not only her boys' lives but
in other youngsters' education as well.
She received her Bachelor of Arts de-
gree in Elementary Education from the St.
Leo University and served at the elemen-
tary level for five years. Later, she served
three years at the middle-school level and
nine years at the high school, one of those
as an administrator. Apparently, she did
make a difference because Sandy was
nominated Teacher of the Year by her
peers at each level, and in 2012 she be-
came the Academy of Environmental Sci-
ence's Teacher of the Year
During these 17 years, Sandy's focus has
evolved on ways the current educational
system might be improved by streamlining
the day-to-day operations in order to
make the system more productive and ef-
ficient. To broaden her knowledge base,
she went on to acquire her Master's De-
gree in Educational Leadership from the
University of South Florida.
In addition, she is a National Board Cer-
tified Teacher (which proves her teaching
methods are excellent and measurable ac-
cording to high national standards), one of
three district-wide mentors/trainers, and a
national assessor Sandy has also served
on the College of Central Florida's Board
of Trustees since 2009.
With her classroom experience, high
standards, focus on improvement of the
educational system, positive attitude to
make a difference in the lives of all our
children, and her service from the ele-
mentary through the college levels, Sandy
Balfour has the insight needed to be Cit-
rus County's superintendent of schools.

Cheryl Morris
Dunnellon

Poliseno has experience
I've had the privilege of knowing
Charles Poliseno for the last eight years
and fully support his run for the
County Commission, District 5.
It was through his involvement in serv-
ing the community that I met him. The
youths in the county couldn't have a
better advocate. Charles had been a
leader in Girl Scouts, and is still an
active leader in Boy Scouts. He has men-
tored many boys and helped them in
their journey to become Eagle Scouts. He
is also an active member of SERTOMA.
He also has experience in Citrus County
government as the former head of the De-
partment for Public Safety He is overall a
well balanced candidate.
I hope everyone who doesn't know
Charles will take the time to check him
out consider him as your choice for county
commissioner on Aug. 14.

William Howard Pippin
Inverness

Webb votes for Webb
I would like to take this moment to en-
dorse Winn Webb, my brother, the Repub-
lican candidate, for the next sheriff of
Citrus County
I write this endorsement to inform those
voters that may have or have not made a
decision on whom to believe or trust My
brother "Winn" is a committed, compas-
sionate, open and honest man. He has
proven this to the many citizens of this
county over his lifetime here, as a resi-
dent and native of Citrus County.
Winn is a previous Citrus County law
enforcement officer and in his 17 years
with the agency, served as a detective,


served on specialty teams, and in commu-
nity affairs. He is a previous business
owner and a military veteran.
When he talks about living in a safe
community, it isn't just talk or political ex-
pression, it's his heart speaking. Winn is
committed to serving; he has served on
and with many local organizations, as well
as the Board of County Commissioners.
Now after serving for 3 1/2 years on the
BOCC where he has helped to trim an ex-
cessive countywide budget, Winn has de-
cided he must look further to the needs of
this county.
Winn has watched this county change,
grow and experience a decline in the eco-
nomic status needed to maintain a
lifestyle we have all become accustomed
to. Winn Webb wants to lead your sheriff's
office and make your money stretch to its
fullest extent. He wants to give you a more
open, personal and community-oriented
agency
As sheriff, Winn can provide a level of
safety and security that is expected by the
taxpayers of this county He can make this
a better community for all to live in.
Winn has the experience, he has the
commitment, he has the knowledge. I
know "Winn Webb" my brother, can do
this! I speak from experience, from knowl-
edge and from my heart. I will choose
Winn Webb at ballot time. I hope you do
the same.

Sue Webb
Dunnellon

Balfour has dignity
We have been impressed by Sandy Bal-
four. She conducts herself with dignity in
a crude environment (the political cam-
paign).

Ed and Carol Mitrani
Beverly Hills

Rusnak knows county
I, like most of you, have received politi-
cal mailers for commission candidates.
They say the candidate is a leader, will
work to create jobs, is committed to Citrus
County families, cares about the environ-
ment, and will stop wasteful spending.
Such rhetoric is cheap.
We are frequent attendees to commis-
sion meetings. The only candidate we con-
sistently see in the chamber is Theodora
"Teddi" Rusnak. She challenges budgets,
contracts, poor land-use applications, pri-
vatization of our water, wasteful spending
(such as Ottawa, Port Citrus, Meadowcrest
and Wal-Mart), overdevelopment and
other things that impact quality of life in
Citrus. She is a defender of taxpayers,
small businesses, farms, the environment,
water quality, manatees and our lakes and
rivers. She has been a fixture in the cham-
ber for at least four years speaking on
these issues.
Where have the other candidates been?
None can say they have put in more hours
or have more knowledge of county govern-
ment than Teddi.
Teddi has 30 years of actual, profes-
sional experience in job creation and eco-
nomic development
She is the widow of a veteran.
She has no connection to any special in-
terests and is not supported by mining or
construction industries. She has no deep
pockets hidden behind her. Teddi is her
own person. She has worked for and will
continue to work for the residents of Cit-
rus County
We have an opportunity to elect an intel-
ligent, hard-working commissioner who
will work full time for us.
We endorse Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak
for District 5 Commissioner,
www.teddi4commish.com.

Pat and John Wade
Inverness

Incumbent has right stuff
A column on Sunday July 15, 2012, writ-
ten by the publisher of the Citrus County
Chronicle, Gerry Mulligan, revealed some


Seventeenth Annual -



Save -N



Our



Waters



Week


Photo


Contest


You could win tickets to W
area attractions and have First Place
your photo entry featured on the cover F
of the Citrus County Chronicle's Winner
Homefront magazine or the Sunday Gets $100!
Commentary Section.
Submit your entry online at
www.chronicleonline.com/saveourwaterscontest
or, bring in or mail your photo to the Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River FL 34429 byAugust 24, 2012.

Photos submitted should depict scenes of Citrus County's waters and/or habitats. Enter
photos by Friday, August 24. Photos must have been taken within the last year and cannot
depict any particular business. All photos become the property of Citrus Publishing, Inc.

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sobering statistics that every voter in Cit-
rus County should take notice and act ac-
cordingly Property values at an all time
low, thousands of residents have left our
county within the past two years, unem-
ployment the likes we have never seen.
Now the threat of Florida Power (Duke
Energy) closing its Citrus operations will
push this county over the edge and we, the
taxpayers, will feel pain.
I have three grandchildren who are cur-
rently in our school system. I fear for their
future. What opportunity will exist for
them here when they graduate? Time to
take off the rose-colored glasses and think
twice about this coming election for county
commissioner of District 1. I1 have found
the person who has the courage, a skilled
leader and a true friend of all the people
of Citrus County. This person I have known
for many years and have placed my trust
in. He is a great visionary with limitless
ideas. He has the necessary attributes re-
quired for the position of Board of County
Commissioners, District 1.
This person has resided in Citrus
County for more than 40 years. A success-
ful businessman, a family man, a person
known to me as someone who genuinely
cares about the quality of our lives. This
person is Dennis Damato, the incumbent
commissioner of District 1. Without hesi-
tation I will stand shoulder to shoulder
with Dennis. He has the right stuff and I
strongly urge the voters to re-elect Dennis
Damato!

Paul Pilny
Inverness

Webb for the citizens
Winn Webb brings a community- and citi-
zen-minded approach to our sheriff's de-
partment. After 16 years of the current
Democrat sheriff, and with the significant
changes that have taken place in our
county government, the election of Winn
Webb as our sheriff completes the process
of returning the Citrus County government
to our citizens. Known for being a non-
friendly place for a long time, the recent
changes from our last election moved to
improve our quality of life through quality
leadership. As voters, our voices have spo-
ken that we want our elected officials to be
more in touch with our community, be ac-
countable for the actions of their specific
departments and our county government in
total, and to lead our community responsi-
bly The votes in our last election spoke
loud and clear that the old regime, spend-
ing without responsibility, and being out of
touch with the citizens is not acceptable.
It is time to complete the changeover
process from old school empire building
government to community minded leader-
ship. Electing a sheriff that is in touch
with the community needs, really listens
and responds to the citizens and one who
is responsible and accountable is in
line with the our voice in and results of
the last election.
It is time to complete the process. It's


SEndorsement LETTERS


Teddi has been pushing hard for the
protection of our water supply, something
I'll bet Cedar Key residents wish someone
had done now that their water is undrink-
able. Ever try to sell a house with saltwa-
ter flowing from the tap?
Teddi is interested in developing sus-
tainable, better-paying employment that
enhances the community's lifestyles not
only financially but environmentally She
has helped to bring the business commu-
nity together to work with locals to their
mutual benefit.
Teddi believes that we should work with
our strengths and utilize the resources we
already enjoy in our community. She does
not think that it is a good idea to turn our
beautiful Nature Coast into an industrial
wasteland. Natural sites have already been
destroyed to construct more Wal-Mart
stores to produce more underemployed
residents. These aren't the jobs we need.
Teddi thinks working together to de-
velop the resources we already have is
more advantageous for Job seekers, tax-
payers, business and the environment.
This partnership will preserve our land-
scape and surroundings, the reasons why
many of us moved here in the first place.
We do not need to be surrounded by an in-
dustrial complex. If we wanted that, we
could move to Tampa where there are
30,000 vacant homes available.
Teddi will fight against turning our
water into a commodity, robbing us of our
domestic drinking water supply We need
commissioners who are interested in the
lives of county residents. That is why I will
vote for Teddi. I hope you will also cast
your vote for her in order to protect your
water supply and your way of life on the
Nature Coast in Citrus County
Roger Dobronyi
Inverness


0729 SUCRN
NOTICE OF UNCLAIMED MONIES

HELD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

CITRUS COUNTY- INVERNESS, FLORIDA
The below listed unclaimed monies shall be declared forfeited to the County unless claimed before the first day
of September 2012.

Persons claiming such funds, or any part of them should file a written claim with sufficient proof
(driver's license, picture ID) with Betty Strifler, Clerk, Citrus County, Inverness, Florida before September 1, 2012.

Betty Strifler
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Laura Frederick
Accounting & Budget Manager
UNCLAIMED MONIES PRIOR TO JANUARY 1, 2011


ACADEMY ELECTRIC
ALBERTELLI LAW
ALEXANDER MORALES
ARGETSINGER, CHARMAIN
ASHMORE, MARIA LYNN
BANK OF INVERNESS THE
BANKS, RUDOLPH H
BARNES, BONNIE L
BEATTY, LINDA
BENDER, JEFFREY
BENROSME, ALEXIUS
BEYERS, GIDGET
BLACK, FELICIA M
BLEVINS, JAMES RYAN
BOLIEK, HEIDI N
BOOST MOBILE
BORGERSON LAW GROUP
BOSTON ENTERPRISES
BRUTY, DAVID MICHAEL
BUTLER & HOSCH PA
CALDARERA, JOHN
CANTAL, AQUINO
CAPONIGRO, ALBERT LOUIS
CENTRAL MOTEL
CHELSEA TITLE COMPANY
CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
CLEMENTS, EDWARD GARRY
CNN
COLLINS, ANDREW BRYCE
COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC
COPLEN ESQ, ROBERT M
COURT TELEVISION NETWORK
DAUGHTER, CHRISTOPHER
DAVIS, ARTHUR GEORGE
DEMARCUS, JO KEATHLEY
DIAZ, TROY JOHN
DUNCAN, TIM
ECKELBERRY, SHAWN MEADE
FEE, CHERYL
FINLEY, PAMELA JEAN
FIRST AMERICAN TITLE
FISHER, WILLIAM CARL
FLORIDA OXYGEN & DME SUPPLIES INC
FORAKER, EDWARD M
FORTY FOUR LIGHTING
FRANKLIN, DAQUIN LAMAR
FRIEDMANS JEWELRY STORE
FUNAIOLE, DANIEL STEVEN
GATELEY, DANNEY L
GILBERT, ARLENE BARBARA
GILBERT, DANIELLE MARIE
GLADSTONE LAW GROUP PA
GOERNDT, JAMES BERNARD
GRADY, CHARLOTTE
GREEN, JAMES WESLEY
GRIMES, ERIC TROUPE
GUSTINIS, BARBARA JEAN
HAYT HAYT & LANDAU PL
HEIMAN, AMBER MICHELLE
HELT, SOPHIA
HOLLAND & KNIGHT LLC
HUDSON, TIMOTHY JAMES
HUGAR, MICHELE LINDA
IGLESIAS ESQ, STEPHEN V
JACOB, JULIUS C
JONAS ESQ, STEVEN K
JONES, MARRIESSE A
KEFFER, THOMAS
KENNEY, JULIE ANN
KEYES, KENNETH F
LE SHOFFIT, KRISTINA
LEGAL LINK 2000
LINDSAY, LESLIE
LLOYD, CHRISTOPHER HAMILTON


27.13
8.50
50.00
13.00
11.66
14.05
15.00
10.00
115.00
54.00
64.00
22.88
182.00
15.00
22.50
17.50
47.00
47.31
15.00
5.00
15.00
47.25
15.00
57.77
8.50
18.00
15.00
200.00
15.00
17.11
100.00
11.00
6.00
15.00
10.00
30.00
14.00
15.00
215.00
15.00
5.50
189.74
10.00
15.00
32.86
50.00
308.00
15.00
80.00
15.00
15.00
9.50
15.00
35.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
35.00
18.00
10.00
22.50
15.00
15.00
5.00
100.00
25.50
57.75
35.00
15.00
15.00
10.06
5.50
53.00
15.00


LYONS, GABY HEIDI
MACDONALD, HAZEL MARGARET
MACHABO, JAMES
MALECKY, LOIS Q
MANNING, SUSAN ELANIE
MCWILLIAMS, JAMES
MEANS, TRESSIE L
MENDEZ, MARINA
MERLINA, DEBORAH
MILLER, KATHY CARPENTER
MILLER, WALLACE ARTHUR
MILLIMAN, DONALD CORY
MOHLER, JAMES T
MOONEY, DARREN
MOREJON, JOSE
MULLADY, WILLIAM T
NEELEY, NATALIE
NELSON, JOEL CHRISTOPHER
NELSON, MELANIE ANNE
NERO, LAWRENCE
NETTLES, PATRICK HALMAN
OIG TITLE & ESCROW
PARRY, SHAYNE ADORE
PHILLIPS, ANDREW J
PHILLIPS, APRIL K
PROGRESS ENERGY
PUBLIC CONSULTING GROUP
PUTHOFF, MICHELLE L
QUINTERO, ALEJANDRA
REDDEN, TRACY
REINHART, JACQUELYN
RENEER, CASSIE LYNN
RICE, MICHAEL
RICKETSON, ROBERT THOMAS
RISTE, RONALD S
ROMEO, DAVID J
RUDEN MCCLOSKY SMITH SHUSTER & RUSSEL
RUSH MARSHAL JONES AND KELLY PA
SALATINO, ANTHONY
SANDS, CHANCE
SCIONGAY, JOSEPH
SELBE, CHAD
SETTLEMENT CORP
SHAEER, ISABELLE
SHAFRITZ & BRATEN PA
SJOGREN, TERESITA J
SMITH, PATRICIA ROSE
SMITH, ROBERT SCOTT
SMITH, TIFFANY
SMITH, TIMOTHY JOHN
SMITH, WADE
SOBOL, ROBERT ALAN
SORRELLS, DANIEL G
SOUTHERN SECURITY TITLE
SPAFFORD, TRACI E
SPRECHMAN & ASSOCIATES PA
SPRINT
STEWART, BOBBY
STEWART, SHERIDAN MARIE
STHILAIRE, JAMES
STOTLER, WILLIAM
SUBWAY
SWEETBAY
THE PANTRY
TITLESERV OF FLORIDA INC
TOYLOY, ANDREA JOY
VICARS, JOHNNY RUSSELL
WAYNE DUKES PLUMBING
WEINKEIN BRANDON J
WENTWORTH, DON J
WILLIAMS, FRANKLIN
YARBROUGH, GLENN MILLION
YERMAN, ALEXANDER JOHANNES
ZAYERS


239.52
15.00
150.00
8.00
15.00
22.50
530.00
164.50
41.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
10.20
150.00
5.00
52.91
64.63
15.00
15.00
6.50
15.00
93.50
70,00
30.00
9.00
125.09
11.00
106.15
16.00
50.00
55.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
8.50
9.50
250.00
40.00
15.00
18,00
39.50
15.00
5.00
30.00
15.00
100.00
100.00
17.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
406.30
15.00
5.00
455.31
28.85
15.00
175.00
130.00
140.00
69.38
10.00
8.10
30.00
20.00
24.77
50.00
50.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
19.00


ENDORSEMENT LETTERS

The Chronicle has enacted its
election-season practice of asking that
endorsement letters be limited to the
reasons writers are supporting
candidates not why they oppose
candidates.
While it's acceptable to address
specific issues of concern, anti-
candidate letters will not be published
and/or sections of letters focused on
criticizing specific candidates will be
deleted.

time to elect Republican Winn Webb as
sheriff of Citrus County
Dale Maim
Beverly Hills

Rusnak has integrity
Teddi Rusnak will be a valuable asset to
the Board of County Commissioners. I
have worked with her on the Citrus County
Council, and I know her focus is on bene-
fitting the community. I have talked with
her at length and feel that she is an honest
person with integrity and experience.
These assets are benefits she will bring to
the Board of County Commissioners.


C4 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


COMMENTARY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Damato a leader
We chose Citrus County for retirement
because of its similarity to the county in
Georgia where we worked and raised our
children. This county's leadership ap-
pears to be on the right track to attract
new business and industry thus increas-
ing the economic tax base. This growth
will allow the county to maintain the serv-
ices offered to its citizens (especially pro-
grams and facilities that will benefit
young and old alike).
In our opinion, Dennis Damato fits the
leadership mold for sound growth in Citrus
County He excels in experience, utilizes a
business approach to policy (which is essen-
tial in today's world of local government),
and he is a "listener" as well as a "doer" He
approaches each issue with an open mind
and makes decisions based on what is best
for the citizens of Citrus County.
We are thankful and happy to be a part
of this great community We insist that all
readers of this letter, as voters, exercise
your privilege on Aug. 14. We also ask and
urge you to vote for Dennis Damato. Cit-


rus County needs his sound leadership.
Jim and Stephanie Booker
Homosassa

Webb for sheriff
Winn Webb, a lifelong resident of Citrus
County, grew up in Floral City Formerly a
small business owner, he entered public
service as a Citrus County Sheriff's
deputy, working throughout the county
His work ethic, versatility and capabilities
resulted in varying assignments within the
agency After 17 years of service, he re-
tired. This was brief as he again felt need
to enter public service and in 2008, was
elected as a Citrus County commissioner,
quickly becoming known as a straightfor-
ward, no-nonsense person who has only
the best interest of county residents at
heart and working to maintain the quality
of life and natural beauty of Citrus County
so important to all. Winn presently serves
as commission chairman. His work ethic,


accessibility and commitment to Citrus
County residents is without question and
his character impeccable. These traits are
some of the reasons he is so well known
and popular throughout the county.
As sheriff, Winn will scrutinize the
budget, eliminating the known excess.
Other cost-cutting goals are non-essential
use of departmental vehicles, reducing
number of non-essential ground and air
vehicles and correcting the disproportion-
ate command staffing. There will be
greater emphasis on enforcing all laws,
particularly those involving illicit drugs,
whether hard drugs or prescription drug
abuses. Close cooperation with all agen-
cies involving safety and welfare of chil-
dren and the elderly will be assured. He is
committed to providing the highest level
of law enforcement and improving com-
munication between residents and all de-
partment personnel.
The day-to-day duties of an elected sher-
iff are similar to that of an administrator


Endorsement LETTERS


SoundOFF


Sell it, help us
The Homosassa Fire Sta-
tion belongs to taxpayers of
Citrus County. The BOCC
should sell the
property to a pri- 0
vate party, putting
it on the tax roll for
years to come. Quit
giving away our
holdings. Take the
selling proceeds of
the fire station in
Old Homosassa to CAL
help the Old Ho- 63
mosassa district. 0
We need sidewalks
and/or improve-
ments to the Mason Creek
boat ramp. You've given our
library to the Civic Club. You
gave Ozello Fire Station to a
food distributor. They spent
$1.2 million on a Taj Mahal.
As the economy gets better,
they will be no longer of any
benefit to this county.
Enough is enough. Sell part
of the Old Homosassa to
help both the county and
the old town.
Don't drive in water
Where do some people
get the idea that they can
drive a car through water?
Granted that the electrical
systems have been im-
proved and they do not
short out as readily as in
the past, but once the ex-
haust pipe gets underwater,
it's all over. The back pres-
sure on the engine kills it,
not to mention that the
brakes fail when wet. Cars
were made to tolerate some
water, not negotiate in
water.
Diesel prices
I don't know why people
have never complained
about the price of diesel


!

.(


fuel. Back in the day, diesel
was pennies cheaper than
gasoline because of the
byproducts for gasoline.
Everybody bought
JUND it and used it in
their homes. They
r called it kerosene.
Hundreds of gal-
Ions.


National


sales tax
q*P Regarding the
federal income tax:
0579 I think it's time that
we get rid of it all
together and come
up with a national sales tax.
I think that would be, in my
opinion, I feel that would be
the best way to go and then
everybody would be paying
their fair share of tax in-
stead of this federal income
tax that should be done
away with all together, in my
opinion.
Whom to pay
Electric bills are still sup-
posed to be made out to
Progress Energy of Florida
Inc. They will notify us when
they want to change the
billing.
Polk salad
Anyone wishing to share
"Polk salad" recipes or
learn about "Polk salad," or
parties wishing to start a
"Polk salad" festival here in
Lecanto, Crystal River or In-
verness, please give me a
call, 352-563-7616.
Embarrassment
As a struggling senior citi-
zen of Citrus County, I find
the salary and pension dis-
cussions about Mr. Beaty of-
fensive. For him to be
making over $6,000 a week


and looking for a raise is be-
yond reason and is an em-
barrassment, to say the
least.
Medical rationale
I'm calling the Chronicle in
reference to this medical
marijuana use. I'd like to
know how it was approved
by the FDA. Under what
medical research was it


proven that it does help peo-
ple? And if they do it in Cali-
fornia, medical marijuana,
why do they have medical
marijuana brownies, mari-
juana cookies? Cut me a
break. Is this for an excuse
for them to use marijuana?


fjSTmom W A -qftT .Tw m



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ENDORSEMENT LETTERS
The Chronicle has enacted its
election-season practice of asking that
endorsement letters be limited to the
reasons writers are supporting
candidates not why they oppose
candidates.
While it's acceptable to address
specific issues of concern, anti-
candidate letters will not be published
and/or sections of letters focused on
criticizing specific candidates will be
deleted.

or executive in that he sets goals, draws up
a realistic budget and ensures policies,
procedures and standards are adhered to.
Winn Webb, with his varied law enforce-
ment background, knowledge of Citrus
County and ongoing issues, his govern-
mental experience coupled with proven
leadership, combine to make him the logi-
cal and outstanding candidate for sheriff.
James Griffin
Inverness


CCCC Proudly Presents

Rodgers And

Hammersteinon
Broadway

Come out
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the Choir!


dGreat
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July 29, 2012 3:00 pm
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
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August 5, 2012 3:00pm
Faith Lutheran Church
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto, FL
Adults $10 donation, children 12 and under are FREE
Tickets will be sold at the door.
Two $1000 Scholarships will be presented.
ThankYou patrons, sponsors and advertisers
for supporting our Scholarship program.


C HmRONIEE


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 CS


/





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to the EDITOR


BOCC's deception
The county commission sent me a let-
ter saying they are going to charge me my
fair share of an expense. A percentage of
that expense is to be paid by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protec-
tion, with the remainder to be paid me
and my friends.
A. In the letter, the total expense is
shown as $4,403,717.18 and the total due
after the FDEP pays its portion is
$1,889,454.18. This is the amount to be
shared by us.
B. Everyone knew the FDEP was pro-
viding 85 percent of the amount and the
remaining 15 percent was obtained
through a low-cost/long-term loan. If the
amount that we, as a group, must pay is
the 15 percent, then why was the incor-
rect figure of $1,889,454.18 reached,
rather than the correct number of
$660,557.56?
C. They then add insult to injury by
sending a select number of us a second
letter giving us the option of "Permanent
Reassignment Development Rights
(DVR)" of our second property (contigu-
ous to our primary property) to avoid


paying the exaggerated unit amount on it
(and giving us a deadline for paying a fee
and signing the DVR).
D. Once that deadline has passed, a
third letter (second to those not having
two contiguous properties) is sent to us
saying that the individual amount for
each of us will probably be less than orig-
inally figured.
So here is the situation: The Board of
County Commissioners intentionally mis-
leads to the point of deception. The
BOCC tries to take our property-develop-
ment rights. The BOCC misleads and mis-
directs to achieve unknown/hidden gains.
The BOCC, proven to be untrustworthy
and not deserving of respect.
Glen Nail
Crystal River

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
All letters must be signed and include
a phone number and hometown, in-
cluding letters sent via email. Names
and hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be published
or given out. See Page C2 for details.


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Pessimists will tell you
Citrus County residents pay
way too much for law en-
forcement services. Opti-
mists have moved here from
Miami, New York, Tampa
and Michigan and they tend
to leave their car doors un-
locked.


Pessimists complain we
have too many mosquitoes
and bugs that make living in
Florida difficult. Optimists
go to the state park in Ho-
mosassa and celebrate the
diverse natural wildlife that
still lives in this area.
Pessimists say we have
too many tourists during the
busy season and our roads
get too crowded. Optimists
open up body repair shops.
Accountants tend to be


Pessimists tend to store canned
goods in the pantry, while optimists
plant gardens in the back yard....
Pessimists critique.
Optimists dream.
Which one are you?

pessimists. Beauty shop mists.
owners are usually opti- In the newspaper busi-


ness, the editorial writers
tend to be pessimists. The
feature writers are optimists.
Pessimists tend to store
canned goods in the pantry,
while optimists plant gar-
dens in the back yard.
We are all hoping the new
CEO of Duke Energy, the
new owner of Progress En-
ergy Florida, is not a
pessimist.
As an optimist, he would
get past the corporate in-


trigue and realize that re-
building the Crystal River
nuclear plant makes good fi-
nancial sense for his
company
Pessimists critique. Opti-
mists dream.
Which one are you?

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


For More Information or to

Participate in the Show

H Call Mike Hurley 249-7012


"SHOPS AT WIREGRASS" WESLEY CHAPEL
SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 2012


COST PER PERSON $45
Which includes bus ride, admission to the
museum and a ride on a train, visit to the
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(food not included in the price)
BUS PICK-UP AND RETURN WILL BE:
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness
8:00 am-6:00 pm
Tickets available from Sue on 352-527-5959
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St. Benedict's Catholic Church
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A Lunch
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Playing begins
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SPONSORED

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The Chionicle is committed to supporting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraisers and entertainment throughout our
community. The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and work. Don't
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
of yOUR sponsorship needs!


ILTLTI O M TUCKB iTOTR S


IF


C6 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


COMMENTARY


m :..











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press


Jamaica's Usain Bolt carries the national flag Friday during the opening ceremony at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.


Gambling rampant on

the London Olympics
PAUL HAVEN
Associated Press
LONDON
What are the odds of a UFO
sighting during the London
Olympics opening cere-
mony? Or of the final torch
bearer tripping as they ascend to light the
flame? Or would you prefer a more tradi-
tional wager on the battle for gold between
Russia and Spain in synchronized swim-
ming duos?
London betting houses will offer odds on
almost anything, including all 26 sports at
the games, from the 100-meter dash to fenc-
ing, from diving to soccer. The industry ex-
pects to handle a record 100 million pounds
($155 million) in wagers during the July 27-
Aug.12 competition even some pretty out-
landish parlays.
"We try to cater to most people's tastes,"
said Joe Crilly, a spokesman for William
Hill, a gambling house that encourages pun-
ters the U.K. term for gamblers to con-
tact them with any bet they can dream up.
They also offer online gambling in 182 coun-
tries, though not in the United States or in
other countries where it is prohibited.
Ladbrokes, another British bookmaker,
will offer 11,000 different wagers during the
games, according to spokeswoman Jessica
Bridge. Those bets include that the
Olympics will be over budget, that a British
athlete will be photographed eating a Mc-
Donald's Big Mac, or that the athletes vil-
lage in Olympic Park will run out of
condoms.
William Hill offers perhaps the longest
odds of the games: 1,000-to-1 that a flying
saucer would appear over Olympic Stadium
during Friday's opening ceremony Tough
luck, presumably, if aliens don't make first
contact until the next day
Other longshots get slightly better odds,
like 250-to-1 that every team in the 4x400-
meter relay final drops the baton, or 33-to-1
that flamboyant London Mayor Boris John-
son accidentally lights his hair on fire with
the Olympic torch.
And this being famously soggy London, of
course they are taking bets on the weather,
paying even-money that rain will mar the
opening night If that's not enough to make
an Olympic fan cry, Ladbrokes will pay $50
on a $1 bet that it will rain every day, and 10-
to-1 that a strike by transit workers will halt
train service on the London Underground.


Flying saucers? Not quite: Lifted above the stadium, the Olympic rings are lit with pyrotechnics
Friday during the opening ceremony in London. Odds were 1,000-to-I that a flying saucer would
appear over Olympic Stadium during Friday's opening ceremony.


But the gambling story is not all fun and
games.
The British betting industry is worth $9
billion a year, one of the biggest in the
world, according to a 2010 study by account-
ing and consultancy firm Deloitte. Most
houses offer online gambling as well.
There have been fears that the massive
gambling volume could lead to corruption,
which would forever mar London's legacy
The IOC has barred athletes from betting on
the games and sports, police and gam-
bling industry officials plan to meet daily to
ensure that no illegal bets are placed.
Jacques Rogge, the president of the Inter-
national Olympic Committee, has said pre-
viously that illegal betting can fuel the
scourge of match-fixing.
Crilly said the betting industry is heavily
regulated and immediately reports suspi-
cious activity to Britain's Gambling Commis-
sion.
"We have a lot of strict regulations in
place to guard against any funny business,"
Crilly said. "If we were to see an unusually
large bet for a sport we were not particu-
larly expecting large amounts of money for,
it would flash up ... If there was any sugges-
tion that it was suspicious we would get au-
thorities involved."
The most heavily wagered event during
the London games is expected to be the 100-
meter dash, where Jamaican Usain Bolt, the
reigning Olympic champion, is still the


odds-on favorite despite a rough run-up to
the games that saw him bested in trials by
countryman Yohan Blake. Soccer will also
be an extremely popular wager, as will the
women's heptathlon, where star British ath-
lete Jessica Ennis is expected to compete
for gold.
A major challenge for the gambling
houses is setting the odds for the more ob-
scure sports. Who is to say Dutch rider
Adelinde Cornelissen should be a 15-to-8
shot in dressage, an equestrian discipline?
Or if Sweden's Anders Gustafsson should be
set as a 9-to-1 shot in the 1,000-meter men's
single kayak race?
Crilly says ahead of the Olympics, betting
firms assign teams to research each sport,
spending weeks immersing themselves in
facts and figures.
Punters can also bet on which country
will win the overall medals table (the U.S. is
favored, with China a close second), or how
many golds the host nation will take home.
Bridge says Ladbrokes has already taken
a 10,000 pound ($15,500) bet on Bolt to win
the 100-meter dash and expects much larger
wagers ahead of the big race.
"We anticipate our high roller customers
will fancy him to do the business,' she said.
"If they were to want 50,000 pounds
($77,500) or more on Bolt, then we will hap-
pily lay it."
Follow Paul Haven on Twitter: www twit-
ter comnpaulhaven.


Face time an important part of hiring


W e recently held
a job fair and, by
most measures,
it was downright suc-
cessful. At least, that's
the sense I get when we
have 824 folks turn out
on a dismal, drizzly j
morning to meet with 23 \
employers, and those
employers in turn had Laura
bona fide jobs to fill. WORK
So that's my story and CONNI
I'm sticking with it, other
than one comment to the
contrary Turns out that one job
seeker in attendance posted she
was "very upset that not one em-
ployer would accept a resume and
wanted you to go online." And for
that, she wrote, she "could (have)
stayed home and (done) the same
thing."
This is in no way intended to sug-
gest the young lady isn't entitled to
her opinion; she certainly is, and
we appreciate it. She is also 100
percent correct, she could have


stayed home and applied
for any of the positions;
in fact, we encourage job
seekers to do just that -
apply-before attending
any job fair.
But could she have ac-
complished the "same
thing"? If garnering valu-
able one-on-one face
time with a hiring man-
ager and making a posi-
tive impression is the
same thing, then no, she


could not.
Simply put, showing up in person
sends a strong message to potential
employers that you are serious
about working, and more impor-
tantly, serious about working for
them.
That said, it's important to recog-
nize most employers have moved to
online applications. Yes, they may
still have job candidates fill out a
paper application in addition to the
electronic version, but given the
volume of applications for every


opening in Florida, the average
is currently a little more than three
to one the process is strongly
skewed toward screening and
culling. Companies use online
screening programs or applicant
management systems to quickly
search applications and r6sum6s
for keywords in order to identify
candidates who might be a good fit
for their position.
Why do we recommend that job
seekers bring printed copies of
their r6sum6 to job fairs? It may
seem old school, but having your r6-
sum6 in hand is still pretty stan-
dard. R6sum6s, after all, can serve
as a "calling card" or way to break
the ice when you first meet the em-
ployer. Plus, having the information
in print creates a ready reference
you can literally point to when de-
scribing your credentials.
Here's the bottom line: offering
your r6sum6 to an employer should
never be considered a substitute for
the employer's specific application
process.


Jo from of Inverness is a great ex-
ample of all this. When I noticed
her at the job fair, she was an island
of focused calm amid the frenzy of
activity, sitting at a table methodi-
cally organizing her cover letters
and r6sum6s, paper-clipping every-
thing into neat stacks based on the
employers she planned to visit that
morning.
While raising her family, Jo had
supplemented the household in-
come by working as a substitute
teacher over the years. Recently
widowed, she is now eager to return
to work full-time and is looking for
"any career-oriented" position.
With a bachelor's degree in edu-
cation and vast work experience -
Even Start teacher at the Hernando
Correctional Institution, grant spe-
cialist for the Florida Department
of Children and Families, trained
EMT and nurse's aide, not to men-
tion all aspects of running a family
restaurant Jo hopes employers


Page D4


Rent to


own on


mobile


home?
DEAR BRUCE: I am
72 and I live in Cit-
rus County, Fla. I
am looking to sell my
home, and of course the
market is terrible. The
home is a 1994 double-
wide mobile home with an
attached two-car garage
and a 12-by-24-foot extra
room attached to the
garage. The home is on
two acres, fully fenced.
My question is, what are
the differences between
rent-to-own and lease-to-
purchase, and what are
the pitfalls? How would
this compare to holding a
mortgage? Are any of
these methods realistic
for someone my age as op-
posed to an outright sale?
- R.N. in Florida
DEAR RN.: Rent-to-
own is simply a way to get
a prospective buyer into
your property who has in
some way damaged his
credit or has no money to
put down. In short, from
the point of view of a dis-
passionate lender, this is
not somebody you want to
deal with. Rent-to-own is
generally offered by a
property owner who has
tried every other way to
sell the property, but has
been unsuccessful.
Holding a mortgage on
a mobile home, in my
opinion, is tantamount to
just loaning money with-
out having anything you
can attach. This is why
mobile homes are more
difficult to get a conven-
tional mortgage on. You
would be far better off to
mark down the mobile
home, which you men-
tioned is almost 20 years
old, to whatever price the
market will bear, or hang
on to it for a time.
If push comes to shove
and you choose not to live
there, I would be more
comfortable with making
it a rental and telling the
tenants that if they can
come up with the down
payment and qualify for a
mortgage, you'll give them
a good deal.
If you feel you want to
venture down the rent-to-
own road, using part of
the tenants' monthly pay-
ment as an eventual down
payment, have your attor-
ney draw up the proper
paperwork. Include lan-
guage saying that if they
default before the speci-
fied period of time you
agreed to rent to them be-
fore they own, make sure
that any money used to-
ward the down payment is
NOT refundable.
DEAR BRUCE: If a par-
ent gifts a child $13,000
and then goes into a nurs-
ing home for several years
and runs out of money,
will Medicaid make the
child give back the $13,000
gift? In other words,
should the gift not be
given if there is any
chance the parent will
need it for the nursing
home within three years?
I hope you are able to
give me some advice. My
mother is in assisted liv-
ing and can support her-
self. But if her condition
deteriorates further and
she has to go to a nursing
home, her funds will be
used up twice as fast as
now. Courtney, via
email
See Page D4


Byrnes
FORCE
SECTION










D2

SUNDAY
JULY 29, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan M.
this:
ihS ri


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Expires 8/1/12 for those of you who
have Serenity Day Spa gift certificates that
you turned in at M Hair Studio Inc. in Crys-
tal River: please note, they are wrapping
up the Serenity Gift Card Special offer.
Make sure you get in before it's too late.
Offer expires Aug. 1!
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Arbor Trail Rehab kicks off its fifth an-
nual school supply drive. Donations go to
Inverness Middle School. A donation box
is located in the front lobby of Arbor Trail
Rehab through Aug. 8.
Arbor Trail is at 611 Turner Camp Road,
Inverness, 352-637-1130.
Cadence Bank will collect school sup-
plies for Inverness Primary School (pre-
Kindergarten through fifth grade) through
Aug. 10 at its Inverness branch at 301


= News You CAN USE

U.S. 41 S., 352-726-8772.
SHREDDING Cadence Bank part-
ners with Cintas to offer FREE shredding
services at their Inverness branch from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3. We will also
be collecting non-perishable food will also
be collected that day to benefit the CUB
Citrus United Basket, 301 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness, 352-726-8772.
BWA EXPO Vendor tables are still
available for this Sept 22nd event at the
National Guard Armory. Applications avail-
able at: www.citruscountychamber.com/
events/eventdetail.aspx?EventlD=86.
TURNKEY OFFICE SPACE Only
ONE left! Thinking about relocating your
home-based business to a professional
office as part of your effort to grow your
business and increase profits?


The Citrus County Economic Develop-
ment Council has one more turnkey office
available in the Citrus Enterprise Center in
Homosassa.
Contact Ardath Prendergast at 352-
795-2000 for more information.
NOMINATIONS: The Economic Devel-
opment Council is accepting nominees of
local businesses and industries in the cat-
egories of Outstanding Small Business,
Outstanding Employer or Corporate Citi-
zen, and Person of the Year. Deadline for
nominations is Aug. 20.
Award winners will be honored at the
Annual EDC Industry Appreciation Lunch-
eon at College of Central Florida, Lecanto,
on Friday, Sept. 7.
Nomination forms are available at
www.citrusedc.com/events.html.


Cutting the ribbon on the new Aviary at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is the grandson of Mr.
Guy Marwick, director of Felburn Foundation. Back row, from left, are: Bill Perko, Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife
Park; Clif Maxwell, bureau chief, Parks District 2; Brian Fugate, assistant bureau chief, Parks District 2; Guy Marwick,
director, Felburn Foundation; and Curtis Kempton, AAA Gator Construction. Front row, from left, are: Vicky lozzia, Friends
of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park; Susan Lowe, state wildlife care supervisor; Art Yerian, park manager; and Dotty
Hahn, Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park.


Come visit the new Aviary

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park debuts exhibit


The new 75-foot by 75-foot cylindri-
cal aviary with a waterway and land-
scaped pond is now open for birds,
and people, too. The $100,000 project
was funded through a $100,000 dona-
tion from the Felburn Foundation.





CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce
UPCOMING EVENTS
SAVE THE DATES:
* Aug. 10 August Chamber
Lunch with guest speaker Richard
Wainio, Port Director and CEO.
* Sept. 6 Industry Appreciation
Mixer- Crystal Chevrolet.
* Sept. 7 -
EDC Indus-
try Appreci-
ation Lunch 4
-see NOM- -.r1 2,
NATIONS in CITRUS COU
News You Economict Develop-.. J
Can Use. aW
* Sept. 13 -
EDC annual Board Meeting.
* Sept. 14-- Industry Apprecia-
tion Golf Outing in the words
of Ralph Kramden, "Hello Ball."
* Sept. 20 Industry Appreciation
BBQ-EDC, 6-10 p.m., M&B Dairy.
More information on the above In-
dustry Appreciation Events at
www.citrusedc.com.
* Saturday, Nov. 3 Stone Crab
Jam; Crystal River Rotary.
* Saturday, Nov. 10, and Sunday,
Nov. 11 35th annual Home &
Outdoor Show. Contact the CCBA
at 352-746-9028.
* Saturday, Dec. 1 Christmas in
the Hills Parade, Holiday Arts &
Crafts/Car Show 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
(see information under news at
www.citruscountychamber.com)
* Saturday, Dec. 1 Crystal River
Christmas Parade, 6 p.m. (details
to come)
* Saturday, Dec. 8 Inverness
Christmas Parade, noon.
2013
* Jan 19 and 20 Manatee Festi-
val, Crystal River.
* March 2 and 3 Strawberry Fes-
tival, Floral City.
* March 20 and 21 Legislative
Days in Tallahassee.


Visitors enter the aviary into an en-
closed viewing area for a closeup
view of the birds and great opportu-
nities for nature photographers.
Park Manager Art Yerian says, "This
will be a photographer's dream."


The exhibit houses a wide variety
of Florida shorebirds, including os-
preys, black-crowned and yellow-
crowned night herons, little blue
herons, green herons, stilts, terns,
ruddy turnstones and more.


Chamber staff retreat: Moving forward


Sheriff Jeff Dawsy stopped by a recent Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
senior staff member retreat and provided a motivational speech focusing on
change and innovation. Sharing a laugh with Sheriff Dawsy on far left are, from
left: Cindi Fein, communications/PR coordinator; Ardath Prendergast, executive
secretary; Keith Pullias, membership/marketing coordinator; Jeff Inglehart, spe-
cial events/outreach coordinator; and Josh Wooten, president and CEO. Not
pictured, because she is behind the camera, is Cira Schnettler, administrative
manager. The staff enjoyed another inspirational guest speaker when Gerry
Mulligan, publisher of the Citrus County Chronicle, stopped by.


Katie Mehl receives two honors for

Public Relations professionalism


Katie Mehl, public relations coordi-
nator for Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem and president-elect for the Nature
Coast Chapter of the Florida Public Re-
lations Association, has suc-
cessfully completed the
Examination for Accreditation
in Public Relations, entitling
her to use the APR profes-
sional designation. B
The accreditation program
aims to improve the practice of
public relations by assessing
competence in 60 areas of Katie
knowledge, skills and abilities
associated with the profession. Candi-
dates who successfully complete the
rigorous process are granted the APR.
Professionals earning the APR must
maintain their credential through con-
tinuing professional development, pro-
viding leadership to the profession and
serving their local communities.
"Earning the APR reflects a mastery
of the knowledge, skills and abilities
needed to succeed in our increasingly
complex profession," said Janet E. Kac-
skos, APR, Fellow PRSA, 2012 chair of


the Universal Accreditation Board.
"Practitioners who achieve the desig-
nation are demonstrating their com-
mitment not only to our profession, but
also to a strong code of ethics
and to the betterment of their
organizations and clients."
Adding to that distinction,
3 Mehl received another local
> honor when the Florida Public
B Relations Association (FPRA)
recently named Katie Mehl,
APR, to its FPRA Rising
Mehl Leader Class of 2012. The class
consists of seven public rela-
tions professionals from the state.
Members of the FPRA Rising Leader
Class are eligible to win the Joe Curley,
APR, CPRC Rising Leader Award,
which identifies and honors up-and-
coming individual FPRA members for
their personal dedication and demon-
stration of emerging leadership traits
along with dedicated active involve-
ment in FPRA chapter activities, pro-
grams, functions and events.
Congratulations to Citrus County's
own, Katie Mehl!


YOU CAUGHT

MY EYE ...

Kristen
Etheridge Barr
Sheldon Palmes
Insurance Agency
Homosassa

Joy Iglesias
CVS Photo
Inverness


Gary Pinney
Daniel's Heating & AC Inc.
Inverness

Linda Wiece
Walgreens
Inverness


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


SCHOOL BEGINS AUG. 8 -
DRIVE CAREFULLY
In addition to sharing the road with our school buses and
students now is the time to gear up for school with all its
necessary purchases of supplies, clothes and shoes. As
we travel store-to-store searching for the perfect items
please remember to SHOP LOCALLY and keep our dol-
lars within Citrus County whenever possible. Take a mo-
ment and pick up an extra pack of pens, binders,
highlighters, or other essential supplies and donate to
one of the local School Supply drives (see News You
Can Use). Here are some of our local Chamber Mem-
bers that may be helpful with school necessities:
* Community Comfort Shoes, 860-1192.
* The Crystal River Mall (Belk, K-Mart, JCR Payless,
Sunshine T's), 795-2585.
* Manatee Office & Computer Supplies, 563-6462.
* Off the Cuff and on the Fly, 422-4438.
* Wal-Mart, Homosassa, 628-4161.
* Wal-Mart, Inverness, 637-2300.


Bud Sasada co-hosts Chamber Chat with Melissa
Benefield this week. We talk to Bud about his
company Bud Sasada Painting and their years of
service to our community. PGA Golf Professional
David Collins joins us to talk about an upcoming
golf tournament and how golf can improve your
business. Jim Ferrara shares why Insight Credit
Union was recognized as Top 100 Employers for
Working Families and tells us about their new
Inverness location. In the final segment, meet Jeff
Inglehart! Jeff is our newest team member at the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and a retired
Marine. Jeff tells us how he found Citrus County and
what residents can expect as our new Special
Events and Outreach Coordinator. You have 3
chances to watch Chamber Chat every week--
Monday 6pm, Thursday 8am and Friday 12:30pm.
Don't miss it! If you would like to be featured on
Chamber Chat email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook!



Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service
The Citrus County Cham- ber of Commerce sends a
ber of Commerce is proud to letter to the employee's
promote its "You Caught My manager noting the recogni-
Eye" program. tion. We are excited to offer
The program allows resi- such interaction between
dents and visitors to recog- businesses and community
nize employees who go residents.
beyond in their attention to So, go ahead, give a shout
Customer Service. out to someone who gave
In addition to the em- you exceptional customer
ployee's name ap- service.
pearing in the Please note: Business must
newspaper, the Cit- X be located within Cit-
rus County Cham- rus County
r ------------------------------------------------9
YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
PERSON you are nominating:

BUSINESS they work for:

ADDRESS of business:

City:
DATE of contact:

WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?



Your Name:
Your Phone Number:
Date Submitted: I
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: CINDI FEIN,
CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 N.W. U.S. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
L__----------------------- J


BW 9 "like" us on
facebook


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Padgett named gen- Directors set for networking group


eral counsel
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Retail Federation (FRF)
announced July 26 it has
named
Samantha
Hunter Pad-
gett as gen-
eral counsel
for the non-
profit trade
association
representing Samantha
the retail in- Padgett
dustry in Florida Retail
Florida. Federation.
Padgett, a
graduate of Citrus High School,
joined FRF as deputy general
counsel in 2007 after a two-
year membership in the Florida
Attorney General's Honors Pro-
gram. During her tenure at FRF,
Padgett has managed issue-
advocacy efforts in the areas of
labor and employment law, tort
reform, business and profes-
sional regulation, emergency
management, environmental
law and regulation, and re-
employment assistance.
"Samantha is a stellar attor-
ney who has served Florida's
retail industry with distinction,
and we are happy that she
agreed to accept the additional
responsibilities of general coun-
sel." said FRF President and
CEO Rick McAllister.
Padgett received her J.D. de-
gree cum laude from the Uni-
versity of Florida College of
Law in 2005, and received her
B.A. from Emory University in
2001. As the chief legal counsel
for FRF, Padgett advises the
Board of Directors and execu-
tive staff on legal matters. Pad-
gett is a member of The Florida
Bar, and appears on behalf of
FRF in court and administrative
proceedings, advises on FRF's
compliance with federal and
state regulations, and oversees
outside counsel hired by FRF.
She is a registered lobbyist,
and advocates on behalf of
FRF and member companies in
front of Florida's legislative and
executive branches of govern-
ment, as well as regulatory
agencies. She serves as the
executive coordinator for the
FRF Beauty Industry, Tourism,
and Sustainability Councils, ad-
vises the Retail Beverage


Special to the Chronicle
The Suncoast Business Masters (SBM), a group of local business owners and managers,
recently announced their Board of Directors for their next fiscal year. Back row, from left,
are: Joanne Crowley, Crowley & Company Advertising Inc.; Susan Cohill Fogarty, Attorney
at Law; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Janice Saltmarsh, CPA, Humphrey & Saltmarsh, PL;
Sharony Sheldon, AAA Insurance Agency; Todd Workman, Suncoast Plumbing & Electric;
Patricia Bonner, Jewels by Park Lane; Sue Fullerton, Walk Don't Run Travel; and Karen
Carnes, Citrus Pool Service. Front row: Newly inducted President Sally Wade, American
Mortgage Lenders; and Past President Gailen Spinka, Comfort Keepers. Inset photo: Lora
L. Wilson, attorney at law. Suncoast Business Masters meets each Wednesday for lunch
at Black Diamond for networking and planning. The group is currently preparing for their
major fund-raising event: the Annual Silent Auction, which will be held this fall to benefit the
Early Learning Coalition. Also, each spring, the club coordinates with the local sheriff's of-
fice at the sheriff's Summer Safety & Youth Expo, which benefits local children to keep
them safe and to find an activity that keeps them busy during the summer months. Busi-
ness people who may be interested in joining the SBM should contact President Sally Wade
at 352-795-LOAN.


Council, and oversees the FRF
Emergency Preparedness Net-
work. Padgett also serves on
the Board of Managers for FRF
Benefits, LLC.
Oak Hill Hospital
gets certification
SPRING HILL- Oak Hill
Hospital has earned an addi-
tional certification from The
Joint Commission. Its Or-
thopaedic & Spine Institute is
the first orthopaedic program in
the region to earn The Joint
Commission's Gold Seal of Ap-
proval for its hip and knee re-
placement program by
demonstrating compliance with
The Joint Commission's Na-
tional Standards for health care
quality and safety in disease-
specific care. The certification
award recognizes Oak Hill Hos-


pital's dedication to continuous
compliance with The Joint
Commission's state-of-the-art
standards.
Oak Hill Hospital underwent
a rigorous on-site survey June
29. The Joint Commission eval-
uated Oak Hill Hospital's Or-
thopaedic & Spine Institute for
compliance with standards of
care specific to the needs of
patients and families, including
infection prevention and con-
trol, leadership and medication
management.
"With Joint Commission certi-
fication, we are making a signif-
icant investment in quality on a
day-to-day basis from the top
down. Joint Commission ac-
creditation provides us a frame-
work to take our organization to
the next level and helps create
a culture of excellence," said


Mickey Smith, Oak Hill Hospital
CEO. "Achieving Joint Commis-
sion certification in hip and
knee replacement, for our or-
ganization, is a major step to-
ward maintaining excellence
and continuing improving the
care we provide."
The Joint Commission's Dis-
ease-Specific Care Certification
Program, launched in 2002, is
designed to evaluate clinical
programs across the continuum
of care. Certification require-
ments address three core
areas: compliance with consen-
sus-based national standards;
effective use of evidence-based
clinical practice guidelines to
manage and optimize care; and
an organized approach to per-
formance measurement and
improvement activities.
Founded in 1951, The Joint


Commission seeks to continu-
ously improve health care for
the public, in collaboration with
other stakeholders, by evaluat-
ing health care organizations
and inspiring them to excel in
providing safe and effective
care of the highest quality and
value. The Joint Commission
currently certifies more than
2,000 disease-specific care
programs, focused on the care
of patients with chronic ill-
nesses such as stroke, joint re-
placement, stroke rehabilitation,
heart failure and many others.
The Joint Commission also pro-
vides health care staffing serv-
ices certification for more than
750 staffing offices. An inde-
pendent, not-for-profit organiza-
tion, The Joint Commission is
the nation's oldest and largest
standards-setting and accredit-
ing body in health care. Visitt
www.jointcommission.org.
Oak Hill Hospital has been
serving the Nature Coast since
1984. It is at 11375 Cortez
Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east
of U.S. 19 on State Road 50.
Visit OakHillHospital.com.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Registration is open to health-
, fitness- and wellness-related
organizations, on a first-come,
first-served basis. Chamber
members receive a discount.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities, and the popular
Spa Zone are available from
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's Crystal River of-
fice at 28 N.W. U.S. 19, phone
352-795-3149, or from any
Business Women's Alliance
member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. Proceeds
from last year's expo helped to


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

fund nine scholarships in health
care and business careers.

Veterans may apply
for fee waiver
TALLAHASSEE The De-
partment of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation (DBPR)
encourages military veterans
who have been honorably dis-
charged within the past 24
months to apply for a new licen-
sure fee waiver available
through the department.
As of July 1, the DBPR will
have the ability to waive initial
licensure fees for military veter-
ans under a new law that
passed during the 2012 Leg-
islative session. The waivers
could save veterans anywhere
from a few hundred dollars to
more than a thousand dollars,
depending on the license type.
"We want to encourage veter-
ans who may be thinking about
starting a business or getting a
professional license in Florida to
apply for this waiver," said Sec-
retary Ken Lawson. "This is our
way of saying 'thank you' to the
veterans who have already sac-
rificed so much to protect and
defend our nation."
The waiver can be down-
loaded from the department's
military services webpage at
www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr
/dbprmilitary.html and should be
included in applications for pro-
fessional licensure.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 D3






D4 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl


will recognize that her skills will
"transfer easily to any career."
Sure, it would have been easier
for her to stay home and save the
commute in bad weather, but Jo
appreciated the opportunity to let
employers meet the person be-
hind the impressive r6sume.
"I'm new to the process," she
said, "but I'm feeling better about
it."
We recognize that not everyone
is able to apply in advance, that's
why we set up computers and
have staff available to assist with
the application process. The goal
is to ensure that anyone who


BUSINESS


wants to apply may do so.
You'll find the same resources
and staff assistance at any of our
resource centers, including Work-
force Connection's Citrus County
Resource Center at 1103 E. Inver-
ness Blvd., in Inverness.
Of course, doing your homework
about the companies and jobs
you're interested in isn't just
something you do before a job fair,
it is necessary every time you
apply for a job whether in per-
son, via a company website or
through the Employ Florida Mar-
ketplace or some other job board.
Workforce Connection has
plenty of free tools and programs
to help you understand and pre-
pare for today's tough job search.
These include:
Job fair preparation tips as


well as job-search strategy help
guides are available on www.
clmworkforce.com, where you'll
also be able to view our full calen-
dar of events.
"Navigating the New World of
Work" workshops provide a
roadmap for today's job search.
Two-day workshops start Aug. 9
and Aug. 23 at 1:15 p.m. at Work-
force Connection's resource center
in Inverness. Two-hour sessions,
capturing the highlights of the
longer workshop, take place at 10
a.m. Aug. 23 at the Homosassa Li-
brary, at 4 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Cen-
tral Ridge Library in Beverly Hills
and at 2 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Coastal
Region Library in Crystal River
Register online at https:///www.
timecenter.com/wcworkshops or
by calling 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410.


Open r6sum6 labs are avail-
able Aug. 14 and Aug. 28 starting at
1:15 p.m. at the resource center;
"Nail the Interview" workshops
are set for Aug. 17 and Aug. 31, also
at 1:15 p.m.
Register with Employ Florida
Marketplace (EFM) at www.em-
ployflorida.com and then contact
us for your own personal one-on-
one consultation with a Workforce
Connection placement specialist.
You may do so by visiting us at our
resource center in Inverness, or
by calling 352-637-2223 to request
an appointment.
Follow us on Twitter @Work
forceCLM for the latest about up-
coming hiring events, hot jobs,
workshops, job-search tips, work-
force trends and other informa-
tion to help you succeed.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Laura Byrnes, APR is a certified
workforce professional and
communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-
5627, ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce.com. Workforce
Connection is an equal
opportunity employer/program.
All voice telephone numbers
listed above may be reached by
persons using TTY/TDD
equipment via the Florida Relay
Service at 711. Ifyou need
accommodations, call 800-434-
5627, ext. 7878, or email
accommodations@clmwork
force. com. Make the request at
least three business days in
advance.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR COURTNEY: I
know of no recapture or call
back on a gift. Under the
IRS provision, you may give
$13,000 to each person every
year. If, however, something
of value is transferred, i.e., a
home, real estate, etc., and
the donor receives Medi-
caid within the five-year
"look-back" period, the state
can then move against that
property to attempt to be
reimbursed.
Transferring property can
be looked at as, and usually
is, a method to impoverish a
person so he or she can col-
lect Medicaid without any
possibility of reimburse-


ment. Essentially, people
are taking assets that they
prefer went to their heirs
and having them trans-
ferred so they do not have to
pay their own bills. I will
leave it to you to determine
your view of the morality of
this type of move.
DEAR BRUCE: My mother
and I were having a discus-
sion recently about her house
and how we need to legally
prepare for the possibility of
her needing long-term care,
and when the time comes,
her death. I am worried that
if she needs long-term care,
the state could take the
house. My father, who is now
deceased, worked so hard to
pay off that house that I
would be heartbroken if that
happened.
My mother went through


a bad time when her father
died because nothing was in
my mother's name. My fa-
ther died a few months after
my grandfather, and had al-
ready transferred all his
property to my mother, so
she had few legal issues. We
had to go through probate
with her father's property
and money, and to this day it
is still not all resolved due to
the laws here in Virginia.
I have one sibling, and my
mother owns her property,
has stocks and owns a vehi-
cle. My sister and I need to
find out what is the best way
to prepare for my mother's
long-term care or death in
order to keep the property
and stocks safe and avoid a
lot of legal battles for trans-
fer of ownership.
What are your sugges-


tions? C.L. in Virginia
DEAR C.L.: I understand
your concerns. What you're
saying is, if your mom re-
quires public assistance, you
want to be sure she doesn't
use her own funds, which
would then be dissipated
and not go to you and your
sibling as an inheritance.
You're not alone in this
type of thinking. As I have
commented often in these
columns, the morality of that
is subject to your own inter-
pretation. The question I
would ask on behalf of the
public is why should we pay
for your mother's care when
the assets she and your dad
worked for are available to
be spent for her benefit?
In answer to your question,
you must transfer the prop-
erties five years before the


need arises. This is called
the "look-back" period. If you
transfer them inside this
five-year period and your
mom requires Medicare as-
sistance, the state has a right
to go after those assets upon
her demise.
There are lots of folks
who think, and I may be one
of them, that it's such a
shame people work all their
lives only to have their as-
sets dissipated at the end
for medical care. Whether
or not what amounts to so-
cialized medicine is the an-
swer, is a subject of great
discourse these days.
DEAR BRUCE: We saw
your recent article where
you gave a very good expla-
nation of why umbrella cov-
erage is so necessary in this
day and age. As an inde-


pendent insurance agency,
time and again we see huge
medical bills pass through
our office. We are wondering
if you would have any objec-
tion to us copying and dis-
tributing your article to our
clients? KO., via email
DEAR KO.: As the author
I have no objection to you
copying and sharing the ar-
ticle. Thank you for your
kind words.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot
be provided.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


SmEImmm mm B
Fa: 32)53-65 Tl Fe:*88)82-34 E al:casifes.honceolneca wbi*:ww crnilonie-o

Choice Los Clrial Medical Trds/ G-ea Pr-t col/ Shos


Widow, attractive, active,
financially secure, looking
for a compatible gentle-
man for companionship,
70 +
Blind Box 1793M c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429




Cleaner Wanted
Energetic & positive.
Must pass back-
ground check.
Transportation
needed. 302-6418

CRYSTAL RIVER
Widow would like to
share spacious home,
room w/private bath
includes all utilities
including in room $400
month (352) 220-6100
YODA
Life-Size, Full color
Statue in Perfect
Cond. weighs 72 lbs.
w/solid wood base.
Prices Range From
$7,300- $13,950.
Asking $4,100 Cash
(352) 795-3007




$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID -$200& UP
(352) 771-6191



3 KITTENS FOR FREE
TO GOOD HOME
2 Gray, 1 multi colored,
all Very cute!!!
9 weeks, litter trained
Florial City
(352) 419-4221
6 Kittens, 7 weeks old,
ready to go to a good
home
(352) 746-5230
a 15'long 3' wide canoe
in good shape. no trl. you
haul away. 628-4340
justice24724@
tampabay.rr.com
FREE Horse Manure
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge 746-3545
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372




Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262


Lost Dog, Tan Shih-Tzu,
female, pink collar
name Blaze
Sunny Lane/ Westmore-
land Area
REWARD
(352) 302-8848
Lost Tool Box Silver
Pry bar, plus
Inverness
(352) 634-1500 Tim
LOST
Women's prescription
Sunglass brown lenses
w/ gold trim. Brown
Case Inverness Area
REWARD (352) 270-8287



Found Chihuahua,
male, chocolate
with white paws
Near Homasassa
off Rockcrusher
(727) 226-4025
Found Pitt Bull Mix
Puppy, Female
Hernando
Near Apachee Shores
(352) 726-5066
Found Terrier
Mixed Breed, Male
Near Dano Street
Inverness
(352) 586-3561



Not Looking for
Someone, just trying to
help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need AnswersCall
someone who
cares 24-7
(352) 464-2390


me Laay wno owns
this dog.
Please Call Project Pet
(352) 464-0779



Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct$8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262



TEACHER
Fulltime/Part time, Exp.
Req. CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222



OFFICE POSITION

Part Time, hr. 9:30-4:30
pm 2 or 3 days a
week hrs. flexible.
Inverness Fl.
20yrs. in business
Email Resume
& work skills to:
bobdaniels350 @
yahoo.com


P/T Receptionist
/Secretary
With Computer
and Quickbooks
knowledge.
Fax Resume to:
352-628-2600



HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue 352-628-0630









Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
DENTAL
ASSISTANT
F/T, Must Have EFDA
& Radiology Cert.,
Must be experienced
Must be able to fabri-
cate temp bridges
Vac., Health Ins.
401K offered.
Fax 352-794-6140
or Email Resume
VDCSH@hotmail.com
or Call (352) 794-6139
Please do not send
Resume unless you
EFDA Cert.

Exp. Dental
Receptionist
Working knowledge
of Dentrix.
Immediate opening.
Fax or email Resume
352-527-3682
or new@
tampabay.rr.com

MEDICAL
CAREERS
begin here -Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
www.
CenturaOnline.com


#1 AfforaaDle
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Exp. LPN/Med Asst
FT For Busy Medical
Office, 3yrs Exp. req.
RECEPTIONIST
Good
Communination Skills
Fax Resume to
(352) 564-4222
Call (352) 476-2581


RN/LPN
3p-1 lp
Apply In person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100




ATTENTION
NATIONAL
RECRUITING
EFFORT
Looking for
Representatives
to Assist Medicare
Recipients in enrolling
For Medicare Part D,
Medicare
Advantage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements
You will be seated in
Local pharmacies to
Assist in these local
Programs. Make
Upwards of $30. per
hr. No exp. Necessary
Will train.
Fax Resume;
352-726-6813 or
Call 352-726-7722




EXP. LINE COOK
Aoolv in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill



COMMERCIAL HVAC
DUCT INSTALLER
Experienced Only
(352) 302-2388

Diesel Mechanic
Wanted
Organized and
motivated, clean
Class A license, CDL
preferred. Five years
experience involved
in the repair and
maintenance of con-
struction company
fleet equipment.
Send resume to
info@fieldco.biz


ESTIMATOR
Part time to start. You will
need experience in Com-
mercial Concrete and
Masonry Estimating. Must
be very computer literate
with an extensive knowl-
edge of Excel.
Email Resume to
wavecrestmasonry@embar
qmail.com

Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift Apply at
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
(352) 795-3552

EXPERIENCED
Cabinet & Millwork
Fabricator
Apply at:
Built-Rite Cabinets
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,

STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
Needed In
Homosassa Area.
Apply: 6260 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa F 34448




ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!
Apply Now,
12 Drivers Needed
Top 5% Pay, 58 Yrs
Stability New KW
Conventional 2 Mos
CDL Class A Driving
Exp (877)258-8782

Cleaner Wanted
Energetic & positive.
Must pass back-
ground check.
Transportation
needed. 302-6418

Delivery/Ware-
house Position
Clean driving record
only. Work well with
others. Part time
24-30 hrs. Weekdays
Only Apply at
GOLDEN X PLUMBING
8 N. Florida Ave
Inverness 34453

DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Schneider National!
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job Ready
in just 15 days!
(888)368-1964

Drivers 100%
Owner Operator
Co.

Regional & Dedi-
cated Home weekly
Class A C.D.L. lyr.
exp. in last 3 Call
(800)695-9643


Drivers
Refrigerated and Dry
Van freight.
with plenty of miles.
Annual Salary $45K
to $60K. Flexible
hometime. CDL-A,
3 months current
OTR experience.
(800)414-9569.
www.driveknight.com

Drivers/Flatbed
Class A.
GET HOME WEEK-
ENDS! Southeast Re-
gional, Earn up to
39c/mi. 1 year OTR
Flatbed experience
required,
(800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS
earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE

P/T DELI HELP
EXPERIENCED ONLY
Sat. a must. No calls.
Apply in person:
Brooklyn Deli 300 NW
Hwy 19 Crystal River
SERVICE TECH
Plumbing/electrical exp,
clean DL background
a must. Send Resume
cprsll@centurylink.net



SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
Email: kstewart@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.



STORE CLERK
Must be over 18 and
available for week-
ends Good math ,
computer & people
skills A MUST!
Fishing exp helpful
but not necessary.
Apply in person at
Twin Rivers Marina.
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt.
Crystal River.

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED
Commission based,
write your own check
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa Fl.


CUSTOMER
SERVICE/FOOD
PREP
Part-time customer
service/food prep position
25+ hours a week. Week-
ends required. Customer
service experience and
typing skills required. Fax
resume to 352-527-9605.


AIRLINES
ARE HIRING
Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance. thru SC
Training.HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


ROUTES




AVAILABLE


NOWJIC~-


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River


IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
SC I T R U S .- C 0 U N



www.chronicleonline.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Meet singles
right now!
No paid operators,
just real people like
you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange mes-
sages and connect
live. Try it free.
Call now
(888)744-4426




50 Charity
Candy Dispensers
some installed, a Great
Business Opport. $2,000
www. garagesale3089.
corn, (352) 341-3711



Antique China Cabinet
Early 1900
New England depres-
sion years, good cond.,
solid wood & some ve-
neer 2 glass doors top,
full bottom drawer 70"
H x 34 W, 16D $300 obo
Antique Slant Front
Secretary Desk w/
cubby holes & writing
desk, bottom storage
30W x 161/2 D 37H, has
decal, red Lion Cabi-
net Co. $150 obo
(352) 382-0069
SEWING MACHINE Ken-
more 1760 Zig Zag and
attachments. Works Per-
fect. $85.00 382-4873

Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAAA^^^AA-


surge milker, milk bucket
with lid. $50 obo
352-364-2184
WANTED VINTAGE
Baseball Bats
Old Sporting Equipment
(727) 857-5176
YODA
Life-Size, Full color
Statue in Perfect
Cond. weighs 72 lbs.
w/solid wood base.
Prices Range From
$7,300- $13,950.
Asking $4,100 Cash
(352) 795-3007




BEAUTIFUL, LIKE NEW
4 PERSON HOT TUB
WITH BUBBLE JETS,
HEATER, COVER AND
MULTI-COLORED
LIGHTS JUST
$500.00-PAID $3,000.
352-628-3865



1 10V Dryer, Sears
Apartment Size
$150
Call Mel
(352) 344-8067
ELECTRIC SLIDE IN
RANGE
Frigidaire professional
series glass top with
convection oven
self cleaning, warming
drawer paid $1200
now $495
call 352 489-5086
GE SPACEMAKER MI-
CROWAVE OVEN Over
the range, white, like new
$85 Call 352-726-0040
ISUZU
'89, Pick Up Truck new
paint, tires,5 spd, 234K
mi. Runs New $1,700.
firm (352) 302-6418
MICROWAVE E-WAVE
brand. Black.
Over-the-stove installa-
tion. Temperamental
turntable. $35 341-3607
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Used Frigidaire
Washer & Dryer Set
Heavy Duty
$175.
(352) 302-6418
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 EACH. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
deliver. 352 263-7398




Youlr \\0oI first.

Ei ( D ,)




i'. 1


Craftsman 10" Radial
Arm Saw
excl. cond. $125
(352) 382-1971
Craftsman Tool Set $45
Metal Tool Box $45,
Like New Stihl Chain Saw
$50, Like New Bosch Half
inch drill $35
(352) 503-7977
PORTER CABLE 352VS
BELT SANDER
Vari-Speed, VG Condition
$25.00 352-527-9639
PORTER-CABLE 352 VS
BELT SANDER
Vari-Speed, Good Cond
$25.00 352-527-9639
PORTER-CABLE 892
ROUTER 1/2-1/4"
vari-speed Good Cond.
25 hrs. $50.00
352-527-9639
PORTER-CABLE 892
ROUTER 1/2-1/4"
Vari-Speed. VG Cond.
25 hrs. $50.00
352-527-9639




2 40" TV's
Sony, Color Great
$85. ea
No Call before 10 am
(352) 628-4766
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH KARAOKE, CD
PLAYER & 2 SPEAK-
ERS $80 352-613-0529
DUAL CASSETTE
PLAYER & TURNTABLE
by Technics, like new,
$20 each. Call:
352-726-0040
PANASONIC WHITE 20"
TV/VCR w/ remote.Front
video ports.Works
great.Replaced w/flat
screen TV. $35 341 3607
TV RCA 27" color in good
condition $50 637-4690




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
PRINTER COPIER
Epson Stylus, Barely
used $25.00
352-513-4027




Patio Set
6 chairs,
$100.
(352) 382-5661
Patio Set
Round table w/ 5 chairs
excel. cond.
$80.
(630) 890-6650
THOMASVILLE PATIO
TABLE AND CHAIRS
Great cond. sold dark
wood table with 4 chairs
422-2719 $100 obo


!!!!!!!!185/65 R15!!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5486
BAR STOOLS (TWO)
Chromecraft off white
leather seat/back/arms
nice cond $40. pair
352-270-3909
Basset Reclining
Rocker,
brown, in great
condition $85. www.
aaraaesale3089.com
(352) 341-3711
BEDROOM DRESSER
desk combo great for
kids room or office me-
dium oak color $25.
352-270-3909
CITRUS HILLS
MOVING SALE*
Furniture & Misc. Hshold
Items (352) 527-9266
CORNER COMPUTER
STATION: Large, tall cor-
ner computer desk
chrome/light color.
$75.00. Phone
352-726-1526
Deck Furniture
Table & 4 chairs
$120.
& 2 Lounges
$50. ea
(352) 382-1786
DESK Glass top & black
metal with sliding key-
board tray. $60
637-4690
DESK REAL WOOD
med dark color 5 draw-
ers nice for small
office/kids room $25.
352-270-3909
END TABLE
lovely design dolphin
have the mate
designer
$75 352-419-5549
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER HOLDS 321N TV
MEDIUM OAK FINISH
GOOD CONDITION $80
352-613-0529
Entertainment Center
Walnut top, hunter green
accent walnut doors; and
glass door; Good looking.
$80 obo 637-4690
ENTERTAINMENT
SHELF light wood color 3
1/2 ft tall X 4 ft long 352
212-2266 leave mess.
$40.
HEADBOARD THE
WOOD $30 FOR QUEEN
BED EXCL CONDITION
352-777-1256
Heavy Rattan
Entertainment Center
w/ 5 glass shelves
$150 Walnut Desk 56/2
x 19% File drawer + 5
drawers, w/ brown
leather chair $160
352-503-2123, 212-6453
King Size Bed,
headboard, footboard,
side rails, box spring
& Mattress
$200. (352) 220-3212


CLASSIFIED



LEATHER FURNITURE
Sofa and Chair and
Coffee Table. 2 yrs old
excellent condition
$895.
(352) 697-5530
LIGHTED CURIO CABI-
NET Lovely, like-new cu-
rio cabinet, cherry with
glass shelves. $90.
Phone 726-1526
MAUVE WING BACK
Chair made by Pioneer.
Excellent condition
$60.00 527-1399
Oak Bedroom Set,
king sz. bed, head-
board Triple dresser w/
mirror, armoir, laundry
chest & 2 night stands
$1,500 (630) 890-6650
Pecan Wood China
Cabinet, glass doors &
sides, has 3 drawers
2 storage doors
50Lx 15W,82H $495
obo (352) 382-0069
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Sofa
$225.
Wing Chair
$100
(352) 382-1786
Two Matching Sofas,
each w/two matching pil-
lows. Pink floral w/sage.
$55 ea.
(352) 726-4656
Wood Dining Rm Table
Set, Oval 2 22" leaves
6 high back chairs &
china cabinet,
$1,500. obo
(630) 890-6650



1 Year Old
48" Walk Behind Mower
with Sulky &
Grass Catcher
$1,500 firm
(352) 860-1611
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRACTOR- Model
LT2000. 42-inch cut w
Briggs/Stratton 18hp I/C
OHV motor. Mowing
deck, motor in excel-
lent condition. Tractor
needs some repairs,
but is operational. $250
Call 352-422-6250
anytime after 11 a.m.
John Deere 1998 F935
Model, 72" cut, 3 cyl
Yanmar Diesel eng,
Ready for work $4,800
Heavy Duty commer-
cial (352) 422-3015
Looking to Rent or Buy
Yard Ariator
(352) 489-8095
MTD Riding Mower
38 Deck,
brand new condition
$600
(352) 746-7357
PUSH REEL MOWER
14 inch New.Great for
small yard. $50.
Call Larry 344-1692


SUNDAY,JULY 29,2012 D5


Troybilt Trimmer /
Mower
excel, condition
$225.
(352) 382-4511

WEEDEATER GAS
FEATHERLITE LIKE
NEW CONDITION $60
352-613-0529




Jade plant $10.00
Paddle plant $5.00
352-212-2051


BEVERLY HILLS
X-MAS IN JULY
25th thru31st10a-3p
17 N. Jefferson St.

HERNANDO
4410 Parsons Pt.
Sat. & Sun. 8a-12N
Tools & Miscellanous




Whole house sale
call for items available
(954) 775-4243


12 PAIR OF BOYS
PANTS Great condition
sizes 12-32/3.00 a pair
Linda 341-4449



BOYS SHORTS Great
condition/8 pair 3.00 each
Linda 341-4449



MENS CLOTHING
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $25
352-613-0529


I D


BLACKBERRY PEARL
SPRINT Like New in Box
all accessories inc
$60 OBO 352-270-2414
LG OPTIMUS SPRINT
Orig box & accessories
inc. Mint Condition $60
OBO 352-270-2414
SAMSUNG INSTINCT
SPRINT good condition
in box with all accessories
$60 OBO 352-270-2414
SAMSUNG MOMENT
Like new in Box all acces-
sories included $60 OBO
352-270-2414


Home o Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


iut Youzr rw* HOmW

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


- J


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

dtllh Ih'llL'
I III V. 1, LI li st.

LOI) d,)



Classifieds


CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
*'FAST. 100%Guar.
&eAFFORDABLE
se RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
eFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
CONCRETE
REFINISHING
Painting Inside & Out
Handyman
(352) 476-0680
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO ITALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244



ANGELA'S TAXI
RELIABLE *
Avail. 24 hrs. 7 days wk
352-503-2784, 212-0706





MOBILE HOME REPAIR
& REMODELING floors
doors bathrooms kitchens
plumbing and roof leaks
relevels CCC2211
352-257-9056
**********e


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC i
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.


- -
Attention Consumers! SOD! SOD! SOD!
Please make sure you FREE Estimates
are using a licensed Circle T Sod Farms
and insured service (.com) 400-2221
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all T e
advertisements. If you
don't see a license 1
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle IFolwthe
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions *ha
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


S iL/l*I II ..I St."
L ......


C Classifieds


TILE INSTALLATION
Showers, Firs. MORE!
352-422-2019 *
Lie. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-1248


REMODEIN


WINDO__ P
GENIE.
We Clean Windows and o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
* "NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
* Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 ArI -
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)






Boulerice l I

QB00021 S UPP L Y IN C.

In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS -~ RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
$1 25 OFF *
-ANY RE-ROOF
I One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
(3 FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 628-50791


POOL-TEC
Repairs Equipment
Pumps Filters
Heat Pumps
Salt Systems



Reieta Co meria


AAA ROOFING

Cal the. "/keakfusates"
Free Written Estimate

: 100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 OOBVPX


BATH RE" ODELINHAN .


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New :i.i ,t-.
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old ,.-'"
Tub to Shower Conversions T...
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
S* Small Carpentry
-Fencing
Screening
CLean Dryer

Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352- 344-0905
cell: 400-1722
wed Lic.#37761


CARPET &
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Spe ng in: leiture
Carpet Stretching FREE Ask
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell i
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR ITERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


I







D6 SUNDAY,JULY 29, 2012


*******265/75R15*******
Good tread!! Only asking
$80 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
--- 225/65 R17- ...
Good tread!! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)586-5485
2 RED ROD IRON
PORCH CHAIRS 45.00
Beverly hills
912-509-5566
4 Tires
Goodyear, Ariva
P225/60/16
Almost New
$165.
(352) 220-2715
1950'S ELGIN BOAT
MOTOR older motor,
hasn't run in many years
in good condition.$150 or
best offer. Wal-
ter@352-364-2582
1970'S OR 1980'S SLOT
MACHINE very good
condition $150firm. Wal-
ter@352-364-2583
Air Mattress $20.
Set of Dishes $10.
Chopper $2.
Wheel Barrel $20.
(352) 382-2493
ALUMINUM LADDER 6
FEET GOOD CONDI-
TION $30 352-613-0529
Antique Solid Oak
Side Table $140
Samsung Digital Home
Theater Surround Sound
$60. (352) 341-5978
BLACK ROD IRON BAR
TYPE TABLE AND 4
STOOLS outside furniture
100.00 OBO beverly hills
912-509-5566
BLACK SMALL/MEDIUM
DOG CRATE used once
great cond. $25
422-2719
COMPUTER DESK Lg
computer desk w/cabinet.
Pull out end to form L
shape. Like new. Oak fin-
ish. $85. 352-382-1154
COMPUTER DESK With
hutch and executive chair
$50 628-6396
EVINRUDE/JOHNSON
ALUM PROP 10 1/2X11
Good condition $45 OBO
352-270-2414
FREEZER Upright white
full size $100 628-6396
HONDA ALUM PROP 13
1/4X17 Like new $70
352-270-2414
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
FOR SALE
Furniture, & Misc. Items
(646) 584-2740, Cell
HP PRINTER HP
Printer-Office Jet-All In
One #7210
(Printer-Fax-Scans)$55.
Call 352-382-1154
Huge Sale of Books,
CDs, DVD, VHS
Whole lot $50.00 OBO
352-513-4027
JIMMY CHOO
DESIGNER Hobo bag,
champane color $99.00
352 212 2266 leave
mess
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262
KINDLE
Mint cond. works perfect,
used once ..$40
422-2719
MONGOOSE XR-75 ALL
TERRAIN BIKE, 24"- 21
speed, dual suspension,
Shimano Controls, blue,
Ex. $70. 628-0033
NEW BUSINESS OPEN
Holmes Internet Market-
ing is now open for busi-
ness at PO Box 811,
Homosassa Springs, FL,
34447. Cell:
443421-8260
PRECIOUS MOMENTS
FIGURINES Set of twelve
months, all in boxes.
$100.00 firm. Please call
3527265753
RECORD COLLECTION
[64] 45's [8] LP Albums
$50 Call: 352-726-0040
RUBBERMAID ACTION
PACKER 24 Gal. Rub-
bermaid Action Packer
Storage Box (New). $15.
Call 352-382-1154
SHOES WOMEN'S 5
PAIRS 4 CASUAL 1
DRESS SIZE 7.5 GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
SOFA TABLE 10.00
Beverly hills
912-509-5566
STAMPIN UP STAMPS
13 sets used and un-
used. $100.00
352 -513-4027
Temper pedic Mattress
Queen temper cloud
line, 9 months old,
med. firmness, like new
sell for $1,700 new
will sacrifice for $1,000
(352) 344-4384
TOTAL GYM XL with
attachments & inst.
Exc. cond. $100
352-201-8784


ImGe


6 UNOPENED ROLLS
SHRINK WRAP 2 clear, 2
pink, 1 red, 1 green. $5
for all. Orig. $2.97 per roll.
341-3607
BEDSPREAD/SHAMS
FULL SIZE Cotton mul-
tistripe blue/green ex-
cellent condition $15.
352-270-3909
CHEROKEE PRINT DBL
MATTED & FRAMED
Native Am.
award-winning artist D.
Vann.$35 341-3607
COUCH Four piece
set.fair condition 25.00
Linda 341-4449
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened. Self-adhesive,
re-positionable.$20
341-3607
MOVING BOXES 16
Wardrobes & dishbarrels
used once $60 for all
Phone 352-249-1124
ROCKETFISH TV
WALLMOUNT brand
NEW in box, low profile
26"-40" TV, $70 Phone
352-249-1124
SEWING MACHINE Port-
able with case; 99K; very
good condition; great for
quilting class. $100
6374690
SHEET SET BRAND
NEW Beige full size
$13. Package unopened
paid $25. 352-270-3909
SOFA, CHAIR, &
CHAISE LOUNGER
Sectional Sofa and Chair
with matching foot stools.
Excellent condition.
$400.OBO Chaise
Lounger. Excellent
condition. $150.OBO
352-795-0841
TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES Brand
New! 2 tissue holders, 3
wall units, 12 shower
hooks. $40 341-3607
WATER BED Nice
Summa II model. Queen
size. Firm side with 6
tubes. Fits normal Queen
frame. $50. 527-6709
YEI NAVAJO SANDPA-
INTING Religious cere-
monial design. Matted,
framed, dated,signed.
$25 341-3607



ELLIPTICAL Image
8.25..excellent
cond..Works Great
422-2719 $100



4 Bicycles for Sale
2 18 speed $60 ea.
2 Bicycles $35 ea.
Will sell all 4 for $175.
(352) 382-4511
2008 TRACKER PT 170
TX boat is in mint cond
never seen rain garage
kept 50 hp mercury fac-
tory riged 100 hrs on mo-
tor just serviced 7800 or
best offer 508 272 3573


Utility Trailer
4x 8 $100.
5 x 10 $200.
(352) 382-5661



BOUNCE DELUXE FISH
AND MUSICAL $20
2-CAR SEAT INFANT
$30 EACH
352-777-1256
STROLLER EXCELLENT
CONDITION $40.00 FOR
GIRL PINK AND
BROWN AND PLAYPEN
$40.00 352-777-1256
STROLLER GREEN $25
GOOD COND BOUNCE
THE BEAR $10 HIGH
CHAIR FOR $10
352-777-1256




Engagement Ring;
White gold diamond,
center stone with 2
diamonds each side,
antique, excellent
condition $350
(352) 860-0984


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






WANTED TO PUR-
CHASE Replacements
China Most Patterns
Crystal Sterling Flatware
Lladro Collectibles Royal
Doulton Vintage Guitars
&Amps Gibson Fender
Musical Instruments Bil-
liard Cues Coins & Jew-
elry Best Prices Paid
Chris @ 352-601-7788
Estatedeals@att.net
$$$$$$$$


I


MALL -IE-IHMLKU MIX
Are you looking for your
new best friend? Little
Bear is an awesome
companion. He's a
2-year-old shepherd mix
whose owner gave him
up due to housing issues.
He learns quickly, knows
some basic commands
and is very laid-back and
well mannered in the
house, preferring to rest
on the floor wherever his
human is. While he gets
along well with other dogs
on walks and on public
outings, he would do best
in a home without other
dogs or cats. He is heart-
worm negative and has
already been microchip-
ped. His adoption fee of
$60 includes vaccina-
tions, neutering, free obe-
dience class and a month
of free pet insurance.
Meet him to see if he's
the perfect dog for you.
Email
sheltervol@gmail.com for
info or call 352-568-5095.


6 GALLON SUZUKI
13.5X15 Like new $60 PORTABLE GAS TANK
352-270-2414 Red poly gas tank for out-
WHITE,STANDING JEW- board motor. $20
ELRYARMIORE 352-270-2414
Beautiful.several drawers CABIN ON 40 ACRES
and two doors,mirror. $30 Hunting recreational
422-2719 in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
WOOD FLOORING NEW Area, well, pondATV
25 Sq Ft Med Oak Great trails Price Reduced
for a foyer, hallway or 352 795-2027/ 634-4745
closet $55 e-mail pic ConcealedWeapons
352-382-3650 Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
YAMAHAALUM PROP DAN'S GUN ROOM
10 3/8X 13 fits most mid (352) 726-5238
size yamaha outboards
$50 OBO 352-270-2414 GENUINE YAMAHA
YAMAHA ALUM PROP OUTBOARD COVER
13 1/4X17 Good Condi- Canvas Cover fits
tion 15 spline hub $50 40-90HP outboards $25
OBO 352-270-2414 352-270-2414
GUN Mossberg,
12 Ga. Pump, 500A
excel cond. $275.
or trade for pistol
GO GO Elite Scooter (352) 637-0987
used once, paid
$750+tax, will sell for GUNS
$550 no tax, must see Buy Sell Trade
(352) 726-2695 All Types All Brands
New & Used
Triggers Down, LLC
(352) 697-0735

BUYING US COINS QUANTUM ESCALADE
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also 40 SPINNING REEL
Buy Gold Jewelry MSRP $129- Perfect in-
Beating ALL Written shore spinning reel $40
Offers. (352) 228-7676 OBO 352-270-2414
- RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquarters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
ACCORDION NEW HOURS
New, with case TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
48 Bass, Lark, SAT. 8A-3P
Pd. $445 Asking $300 STOKES FLEA MARKET
(352) 270-8212 Rt 44 E. of Crys. River
MITCHELL ACOUSTIC
GUITAR "NEW" IN BOX STINGRAY XRIII JR fits
W/CASE,TUNER,STRAP 25-75Hp Outboard
DVD,STRINGS,PICKS motors Like new $75
$85 352-601-6625 OBO 352-270-2414
S WE BUY GUNS t
Ho e o On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


-C
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Alrea
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom /2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916




3 MORKIES Available
2 females $550 ea.
1 Male $500.
4 Shorkies 1 Female
$550 3 Males $500 ea.
352-212-4504, 212-1258
8 month old female
Great Pyrenees Puppy,
up to date on
shots, AKC, spayed
All white $600
(352) 634-5415
BOMBAY CATS 3 yr old
Bombay sisters, beauti-
ful sweet girls. Up to
date on all shots,
spayed, worm and flea
treated. 1/2 price in July
$17.50! Id's 16650822
and 16651569 Citrus
Cty Animal Shelter, 352
746 8400, Tues-Sat
10-5pm
CATS AND KITTENS
Cats and kittens are on
display at Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter!!!! Lots to choose
from!!! All adoptions in-
clude spay/neuter, mi-
crochip, up to date on
all shots, flea and worm
treatment. Our 1/2 price
sale of $17.50 has been
extended!!! Cats and
kittens are great stress
relievers! Come see us!
Citrus Cty Animal Shel-
ter, 352 746 8400, 10-4
Tues thru Sat.
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Tues. Aug. 14th, 10am
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Female Daschund, AKC
papers, 14 mo., all shots,
spayd, good w/kids,
hsebrkn, all acc. $500
(352) 419-6901

HAPPY JACK
DuraSpot:
latest technology in
flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs.
Patented. At farm,
feed & hardware
stores. Distributed by
Fuller Supply
(205)343-3341.
www.
happyjackinc.com

Humane Society
of Florida
We have several
Medium Large Dogs
that needs loving
homes Fully Vetted
$50. adopt fee.
Stop By 11 a-5p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City, or see our
dogs online: www.
humanesociety
offlorida.org
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com
MaltiPoo Pups
Teacups, Addorable
non shed, great
disposition. Ist shots,
$500 (352)794-3081
Red Nose Pit Bulll
Puppies 6 wks old,
de-wormed, 1st shots
done, females $200 ea.
males $175 ea.
352-364-1838, 212-9369
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $375. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




Bermuda Hay- 50lbs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR




Small Chicken Coupe
for Sale
$50.
(352) 341-4152
r -.


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R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825




2006 FORD F150
5 foot Bed Top
in Perfect Condition
Hydraulic side lifts,
spoler with brake light,
Fiberglass black top
$500 obo Contact
Denise (917) 440-6017
Ford 4 speed
Transmission
w/ Granny Gear
$100 (352) 382-5661




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500, Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *k
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/237-1892




97' Buick La Sabre
Low mileage $2700
(352) 527-3509
FORD
2008 Taurus Selling my
mom's 2008 Taurus SEL.
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18
months or until 36,000
miles. Lt blue exterior.
Tan leather interior.
Sunroof. Great shape.
$13495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326
HONDA
2005 ACCORD HYBRID,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY,
V6, LEATHER ,ALLOYS
352-628-4600
HONDA
2007, FIT,
Only 4,000 miles,
Only $5,000.
(352) 746-8630
JAGUAR
1987 XJ6
$2000 OBO
KEVIN
352-634-4207
LINCOLN
'99 Continental,
new brakes, new
shocks, new headliner,
98K mi., white w/ tan
leather seats $4,950
(352) 897-4490
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 72,000 mi. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$4,800 (352) 860-1106,
PONTIAC GTO '05
Rare, Red! 6.0 V8, 6 sp,
0-60 in 4.5. 450 BHP. 200
mph. New Tires. Cry Riv
$14,400 727-207-1619
SATURN
2008, VUE, LOW
MILES, FLAT TOWABLE,
MUST SEE
352-628-4600

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


BUICK '89 '89,
Reatta, Red Coupe,
leather int. V6, new ti-
res & air, some restora-
tion. Runs good Selling
cheap (727) 488-6474

MERCURY '86
Cougar, V8, 1 owner
$2,995. www.
aaraaesale3089.com
or (352) 341-3711







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
2010 Silverado, 8,100
org miles, 1 owner
bedliner, bedcap, run-
ningboard excel. cond.
$18,900 (860)423-0804

CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel, cond.
$13,300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555

CHEVY
2005, Tahoe, LS, pw, pl,
cc, tilt, Cleanest Tahoe
for miles! $12500.00
352-341-0018

DODGE
2007, RAM 2500 HEMI
4X4 CREW CAB, ONE
OWNER TRUCK, TOW
PACKAGE $19995
352-628-4600

Misc. Notice


FORD '03
F250 Super Duty XLT,
ext. cab. 5.4, V8, 132k
mi., full tow. pkg. retired
mechanic owned,
serviced & treated like
a baby. Real nice truck
$9,500 or trade for
smiler or older truckof
equal value 422-1026
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $22,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798
FORD
2002, F150, Harley
Davidson, Leather,
Supercharged V8,
Nice! $13450.00
352-341-0018
FORD
2008 Ford F250, Lariat,
4x4 5.4L, leather
loaded, Clean, $20,850
352-341-0018

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




HONDA
2005, CR-V SE, LOW MI-
LES, 4X4, LOADED, TO
MANY OPTIONS TO LIST
352-628-4600
JEEP
2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
V8, 4X4,
PRICED TO SELL
352-628-4600




DODGE
2002, Caravan,
white, low miles, pw, pl,
seats 71 $5450.
352-341-0018

Misc. Notice


387-0729 SUCHR
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Jennifer A. Trodden Stephen R. Woodruff
2 Clifford Dr. 478 Landing Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Inverness, FL 34450
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
July 29, 2012


390-0729 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 16th day of Auaust. 2012 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that The Annual Public Hearing will be held before this
meeting from 9:30AM 10:30AM.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN,BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
July 29, 2012


917-0719 FCRN
est. Moses, Thaddeus File No. 2011-CP-830
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-830
IN RE: ESTATE OF THADDEUS R. MOSES
Deceased.
NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT ON June 22, 2012, there was placed on deposit in tis of-
fice, funds received from SONDRA F. OLTMAN, as Personal Representative of the Es-
tate of THADDEUS R. MOSES, DECEASED, IN THE AMOUNT OF $33,375.47. Said funds
are all of the assets due to:
BETTY ROBIN MOSES
Whose last known address was:
2712 W. THARPE ST. APT B10
TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303-8612
And said assets remain unclaimed.
Unless said funds are claimed on or before six (6) months from the date of this no-
tice, said funds will be forwarded to the State of Florida, pursuant to Florida Statutes
733.816.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have set my hand and official seal at Citrus County, Florida,
on June 22, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk Circuit Court
(SEAL) By; /s/ M. Davies, Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle June 29 and July 29, 2012


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CAROLINA SKIFF
J16 '96, 28HP Jhnsonjet
dry, bimini top, fish
findr, w/trlr. All recently
second $3995. 746-1115
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(aHotmail.com
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
PONTOON
20' with trailer, 60hp
Johnson Nice and
clean $3,200
(352) 726-6197
SEAEAGLE
Sportscraft 26 ft., great
shape, $6,500 or Trade
for Camper, 5th whl. or
mtr. home. 423-3201
SEASQUIRT
18FT CC, 90HP
Yamaha ,new power.
head, GPS, Chart plot-
ter, dept Finder, trailer
$5,000. 352-287-1668




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298
THOR, Windsport
2000, Class A, 31 ft.,
V10 Ford,w/21K mi.,
Sr. owned, no pets, no
smoke, 6 new tires, 2
new AC units, no slides
but full basement,
great mileage, $15,900
Gene 352-207-1080



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945


388-0729 SUCRN
8/1/12 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, August 1, 2012 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
July 29 2012.


389-0729 SUCRN
8/9/12 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, August 9, 2012 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Flor-
ida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
July 29, 2012


391-0729 SUCRN
88/08 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a special meeting on Wednesday, August 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
July 29, 2012.


352-746-6721 ext 6148 www.takestockinchildren.org


DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN
2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6, 150k miles,
A/C, tinted windows, tilt,
pw, pd, cruise. $2,950
(352) 527-3894
Volkswagen
1993 Eurovan, blue,
speed, 4cyl, MV edi-
tion, $2985.00
352-341-0018




Dune Buggies
1 sand rail $5,000
1 Fiberglass $5,900
Call (352) 322-0178




Harley '02
Road King, black, lots of
chrome, senior owned
15k miles, gar.kept
$9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra, Sale or Trade
for truck of equal value
$10,500
(352) 601-4722
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
Honda
'06, Silver Wing, 600CC,
26K mi. Taller wind-
shield, rear carrier case
$4,000 (352) 489-2457
HONDA
'86, Helix, Like New
Kenwood radio. Call
for List of New parts
$2,475 (352) 341-0140
SUZUKI
'09, S40, 652CC, with
706 miles, w/ extras
$3,000
(352) 795-0150


38e7i9SUCRN
I Ntices :


Meetingfl^

I Ntics :


Meng
I Ntics






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-9054


'11 CRUZE
^A05wpr--


'11 IMPALA


'11 200
^M sL


$15,985*
OR$250 MO.
S'11 HHR



$13985*
OR.$219 9M.
('08 WRANGLER


$14999*
267 PER


[C 6 I : 6i


$14,985
OR$234 MO.
S'09 G6


$9,999 $12,999*
o$ 1 78 Mo. R232 M


:6!l6E l=ESE WITHIN AN
1-800-5N:-8:55 xiA1214


" '07 EQUINOX '


fg^i Il :J


'06 SOLARA


'07 NITRO


FREE24RE MEA=MSCL P
1-800-58"755 EdJ122


60E H MEGHIO G
1-80-8" 55 xt121


r'06 EXPLORER


FREI2EO RDEI N D K
1-800-58"755 EdA122


F *R2R EIMAi .^i'j j i
18:05 85x:bt^7 i


'07 RAV 4

REE2 EIN
10 5 :0-M8 *55 66t. 1


'06 LIBERTY I


$99999 $99999 $10,999*
PER PER178 196E
oh$178M0. O R$1 7 8M07.) O mO,


E24H l= ES S W INOAN EK M
1-80-5-855 xtA22


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


352-5 64-1971
WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL
PRICE/PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1,000 CRYSTAL TRADE IN ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 66 MONTHS AT 5.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT
PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
BxJz


'09 IMPALA

.66y^


s10,999 $11,999
R$ 1 96M. ,oR$214 MO.j


I*ft


"W%


Nk


l^!^,K-1 YL


FRE2HRRCORDED NB GE WrrHINF M WRPRN
1iX0-M -875 Ext74


D8 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012







H Section E -SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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mVPAGEE4


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,1,51sh1 11I


In this photo provided by Natural
Playgrounds Company. an embank-
ment slide is built into a constructed
hill at an elementary school in Glens
Falls. N.Y. The embankment slide is
safer than tower slides with ladders.
Scattered boulders, random dirt
steps. rough terrain, and varied
plantings add to the rich textures
and varied experiences.
fil iu::::'[ 1I"


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E2 SUNDA'I~ JULY 29, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


* Beautiful Lg. Kitchen Pantry/Break. Bar
* Huge Master Bath Inground Pool w/1/2 Bath
* One Acre of Land *24x31 Garage
* Great Curb Appeal Golf/Equestrian Comm.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flol dailllnglnlo .Ico I
www, Floi idaLislinglnlolcoll]


5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


How much
home can I
comfortably
afford?
For more Information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
'"IMLS ID: 432391
Bankof America Home Loans

Id,# .' i.' r 1 ., r1u he


WAHnV AnM wunuInrIUL
This spacious 3 BR, 2bath, 3-car
garage pool home is the lovely
Windjammer model. All the upgrades
and shows like new.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buycitruscounty.com


ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloiidaLisliinighlo.conm


This home has it all. The space you want in
a very unique floor plan. Large country
kitchen with eating area. Formal dining off
the living room with fireplace. Large
indoor laundry. 3 bathrooms and 3
roomy bedrooms on 1.25 fenced acres.
Schedule your showing today.
JEFF STONE 352-650-2378
Email: thestonesmn@yahoo.com











REALTY ONE


2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


H 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish










m1101 WCAIRO DR., CITRUS SPRINGS
Charming 4BR, 2.5 bath home on an
oversized corner lot in Citrus Springs. Formal
living room, along with great room connected
to kitchen/dining room. Kitchen has an island
breakfast bar for those family breakfast
outings. Fenced yard and screened lanai.
Close to the Withlacoochee Trail. II
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyalimen@remax.net a


WATERFRONT HOME ON DEEP CANAL
Good size home on seawalled lot with
floating dock and good access to the
river. 2 bedrooms and 3 baths along
with family room and 2 car garage.
Screened porch and shed too.
Call anytime 627-2828.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.not


TERRA VISTA
*2BR/2BA/2CG Villa
*Open Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar
Den/Office Screened Lanai
Private Backyard Maintenance Free
Built-in-Entertainment Center
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net l 2J

(352)6372828
- T^Sa


S3/3/2 with a Pool .2,687 Feet of Living Space
* Large Pool Deck Summer Kitchen
* Lots of Storage 1 Acre MOL
* Beautiful Landscaping
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


IN P:LlJ&4AN iUV:
This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Corlan counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 Ib lift Call
for your private showing now I
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
*Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


241N L aio Hw. Beel ilI2-82w wRMXcmI 0 .Mi*IIvres7760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionssa6870 w.oueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


* 3BR, 2BA w/2,075 SF Living Great Room Plan
* Formal Dining Room Eat-In Kitchen, Inside Laundry
* Split Plan, Built in 1990 Master Suite w/Jetted Tub
* Huge Glassed-In Lanai
CHRIS GRANT (352) 238-3516
REAL ESTATE WISHES GRANTED
chds@chrisgrantswishs.coim .www.CisGrostWishes.com


1300 N. CIRCUS TERRACE
HAMPTON HILLS
* Beautiful 4BR/3BA/3CG Home Formal Living & Dining Room
* Family Room w/Fireplace Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Office w/Built-In Bookcases & Desk Play/Craft Room
* Caged Lanai & Pool w/Spa Nice Landscaped 1.7 Acres

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpolmer@remax.net


4637 H. BUFFALO DR.
PINE RIDGE POOL HOME
* 4BD/2BA2CG Storage/Workshop w/Electric
* Self-Cleaning Pool 2-Stall Barn w/Tack Room
* Granite Countertops Energy Efficient Windows & Doors
* Stainless Appliances Fenced & Adjacent to Horse Trail
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net ,01
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











Crape Myrtle a popular, classic garden bloomer


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
'Natchez' is one of the many locally cultivated Crape Myrtle
hybrid varieties.


C rape (or 1 from South and
Crepe ) East Asia as far
Myrtle, 1 south as North-
Lagerstromi- ern Australia. L.
aindica, is a pop- i n d i c a w a s
ular exotic thought to have
flowering tree or evolved in India,
large shrub origi- but is now con-
nally from Asia. sidered to be
Carl Linnaeus from South China
named the genus Jane Weber north of the
for his friend, Himalayan
Magnus Von JANE'S Mountains.
Laegerstrom GARDEN Most "Crapes"
(1691-1759), a have peeling, ex-
merchant from Goteborg in foliating bark, a most attrac-
Sweden. There are about 53 tive feature during winter,
species of deciduous leathery oval to elliptic
Laegerstromea, originally leaves, and masses of sum-


mer or fall flowers. Flowers
have five thin, crinkled
petals on a slender stalk.
Large heads mass at the
tips of branches. Balls full of
seeds form soon after flow-
ers fade. Some gardeners
snip them off immediately.
Others like them as decora-
tions. The alien seeds are


S Lou Miele Realtor
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"
Cell: (352) 697-1685


not usually eaten by Florida
birds or wildlife. Crapes
need full sun to flower well.
Soil should be well-drained
and humus-rich. Some vari-
eties are prone to powdery
mildew.
Two species are

See JANE/Page E5


Sii AMERICAN
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. LecatoHwy.
Beverly His, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


Itd:' _Iq-- S1 *-I O ALL O C CT


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(kw Prudential
Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil Photos,
S 6. Fl ria -ocs P rope -tes S


NEW LISTING





5a 1673 E. Westgate Ln.
M LS 356655 $225,000
Perfect home spacious rooms
& generous outdoor spaces.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


NEW CONSTRUCTION


St I I Friup f1 MV.
S MILS 356u $188,800
FABULOUS VALUE
at$70. per sq. ft. w/new metal roof.
Matt Robinson 937-219-6949

PENDING


l a 5754 N. Calico Dr. 444 N. Man 0 War Dr.
MLS #356186 $244,800 Csta, MLS #354139 $279,900
New construction of 3/2/3 home Comfortable
with 2-car detached garage. 4/3/3 custom built home.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


v-, :)j.DaS 2986 W. Camilo Dr.
p' "t MLS 356664 $109,900
A piece of paradise-1,774 sf, 3/2 home sitting
on .76 acres, surrounded by lush landscaping.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507


NEW LISTING




/1.'e i'~ 71I91 E Haniod SI 29 Ib
[*h L %l.1 '. S68.000
Maintenance-free lifestyle,
PRICED to SELL QUICKLY!!!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


PENDING


el'ellb 2684 N. Brentwood Cir.
MLS #347113 $129,000
One owner 3/2/2 pool home
on a nicely wooded lot
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


j <316 N. Turkey Pine Lp.
MLL -ji64Uu $105,900
Very well maintained 3/2/2 home
in nice neighborhood.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


, 4 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr. 9335 E. Sandpiper Dr. 7825 E. Brooks Ln. 3700 N. Honeylocusi Dr.
MLS #355561 $299,000 4i2",-J MLS #353924 $99,000 -C t MLS #353915 $79,900 .-1ti .l :, A. S77.900
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 Split floor plan 3/2/2 Country feel 3/2 mobile Beautiful 2/2/2 in quite neighborhood.
on 2.75 acres. Bring your horses! with Florida room under AC. on 2 acres. Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Sandra Olear 352-212-4058
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the B M
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


.-. Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [
| Realtor, A -OUSE Realtor@
U 302.3179 soLDn--&1 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 000.AD

4531 N. JADEMORE DR.
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30x18 kidney-shaped, solar heated,
self-cleaning pool, living room, family
room, eat-in kitchen, new double pane
windows. More! More! More! I
6340 N. WHISPERING OAK LP.
dr1 ,11' .1 16 ,,, "j.1 ,1 1 ....


735 W. COLBERT CT.
_ Luipeul[iy und bluid illiuuylluul. N w LulIiei
A/C and water tank in 2010, updated
appliances, large family sized eat-in kitchen
w/island, great view from private back yard.


I


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







E4 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012




HOMEFRONT
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published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
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Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
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Cii(ONiTcil


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
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News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Smart irrigation systems save water


When it comes to irrigation sys-
tems, many people have a "set
it and forget it" attitude. But
keeping the irrigation system on all
the time especially during the rainy
season can lead to
wasted water, higher bills,
more maintenance and ( "
plant problems such as root
rot and fungus. "
Florida Statute Section
373.62 now requires an op-
erational rain sensor on all "
irrigation systems. Why not
go a step further by invest-
ing in a "smart" irrigation Audre
technology that can reduce
irrigation by 70 to 90 percent F
without sacrificing plant
quality? This technology prevents
wasteful irrigation that has no benefit
to your plants.
A rain sensor is connected to an au-
tomatic irrigation system and meas-
ures rainfall. It causes the system to
skip an irrigation cycle in the middle
of a rainstorm or prevent an irrigation
cycle from occurring, usually between
12 to 24 hours after a rainfall event.
A soil moisture sensor, on the other
hand, is also connected to an automatic
irrigation system, but measures the soil
moisture each time the irrigation sys-


I
ir


tem is scheduled to operate. If soil
moisture is adequate at the time of a
scheduled irrigation event, the sensor
will prevent the irrigation system from
turning on. A soil moisture sensor will
not cause the irrigation sys-
tem to operate on an un-
scheduled day
A February 2008 quote
S 'from a Sugarmill Woods res-
ident about this "smart" tech-
nology says it all: "I recently
installed a soil moisture sen-
sor and it has cut my water
use by 80 percent! It was the
y Durr best $250 that I have ever
spent. More people should
rN know about this product" In
recent years, soil moisture
sensors have become less expensive,
smaller and more accurate, ranging in
price from $75 to $200.
UF researchers Dr Michael Dukes
and Bernardo Cardenas-Lailhacar have
found potential water savings, without
any decrease in plant quality, of 17 to 34
percent using a rain sensor versus 70 to
90 percent using soil moisture sensors.
Water conservation and an attractive,
healthy landscape are compatible when
"smart" irrigation technology is used to
reduce or eliminate excessive irrigation
that does not benefit plants.


If you would like to permanently re-
duce your water use, there are plenty
of plants, both exotic and native, that
are well-adapted to Florida's ex-
tended dry periods. Almost all of the
plants in our Florida-friendly Learn-
ing Landscape (behind the Extension
office at 3650 W Sovereign Path,
Lecanto) have required little or no ir-
rigation since they were established.
Perennial peanut, Chinese fringe
bush, firebush and pentas are just a
few options. Use the interactive plant
database at www.FloridaYards.org to
create a full list of plants for your yard.
For more information on Florida-
friendly landscaping, call 352-527-
5708, or send an email to
Audrey.Durr@bocc.citrus.fl.us. For
more information online, visit Citrus
County's website at www.bocc. cit-
rus.fl.us, the Southwest Florida Water
Management District's website at
www.WaterMatters.org and the Uni-
versity of Florida's website at www.
SolutionsForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District.


Hand-painted vase hails from pre-1921 Japan; set of spoons


Dear John: This vase
and wicker table was
given to my wife by
her grandmother about 60
years ago. How
long she had them
I do not know. My
wife passed away
in 2003. I am 84
years old and be-
fore I pass on, I
want to know if
they are worth
anything before I
give them to my John S
children.- R.H.T, SIKOF
Homosassa AT
Dear RLHT.: The A
hand-painted
porcelain vase was made in
Japan. The word Nippon that
is stamped on the bottom of
the vase indicates it was
made prior to 1921. In 1921
Nippon was dropped and re-
placed with the English word
Japan. Nippon-marked prod-
ucts have been a category of


I


1


collecting for decades. Col-
lectors refer to the category
as Nippon. You did not in-
clude the dimensions. Cur-
rent potential
dollar value de-
pending on size is
in the $100 to $300
range.
The wicker table
appears to be in
good condition.
Potential dollar
value is below $50.
ikorski Dear John: I
tSKI'S never miss your
IC column in the Cit-
r _ic rus County Chroni-
cle, and have
wanted for years to ask you
about this seven-piece set of
silver teaspoons. There are
six spoons and one sugar
spoon. They originated in
England at least 100 years
ago, maybe more. The set
was passed down to my wife
some 30 years ago from her


mother, who was willed it
from her mother. The history
before that is unknown.
As you can see from the
email photos, the set was the
creation of WC. Mann Ltd.,
Goldsmiths, of Gloucester
England. The markings on
each handle are too tiny for
my camera but I have offered
a very rough sketch of the
symbols as I can best inter-
pret them. The case is a blue
leatherette that has seen bet-
ter days. The clasp is a push-
button, snap-close that
functions well. The spoons
are a clean, smooth, brilliant
silver or silverplate.
We have the usual ques-
tions. Should we keep the set
to pass on to the next genera-
tions or melt it, or sell it to a
collector? And what value
might it have if sold? Thank
you for whatever information
you may be able to provide.
- TLaP, Hernando


Dear T.LaP: You have a
good-looking boxed set of six
spoons. The small spoon is
not part of the set. It appears
to be a tea caddy spoon and
in a collecting category of its
own. The label on the inside
of the box lid is the jeweler in
Gloucester, England that re-
tailed the set of spoons. The
silversmith's marks are im-
pressed on the back of the
handles. The drawing of the
marks you included is not
clear enough for me to say
anything about metal content
or maker. Use a hand magni-
fier and look closely at the
marks, or perhaps you can
make a rubbing with pencil
and paper of the marks. Let
me know what you discover.
See ATTIC/Page E8
This small set of spoons was
evidently produced in Eng-
land around 100 years ago.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E3

commonly sold in Florida. From Zones
11 and 12 of the humid jungles of India,
Myanmar and Sri Lanka L. speciosa,
Queen or Giant Crape Myrtle is also
called Pride of India. It is a large tree,
up to 80 feet tall in the wild. Its timber
was once used for ship building.
Panicles of rose, purple or white flow-
ers can be 16 inches long with showy,
suborbiculate petals over 11/4 inch long
and 3/4 inch wide. Leathery leaves sev-
eral inches long turn copper-red in au-
tumn. Such a giant, single-trunked tree
is too tall for a home garden.
The harsh pruning practice nick-
named "Crape Murder" involves lop-
ping off all the branches before leaves
sprout in spring. Resulting suckers are
weakly attached, very fast growing and


still bear heavy panicles by summer.
In South Florida, heavy rains and
strong winds can cause the branches
to snap off. Frost-tender, this tropical
would be killed in a winter freeze.
The crape myrtle common locally is L
indica or its many cultivated hybrids.
They tolerate freezes from southern New
England's Zone 6 to subtropical Zone 11
in South Florida. The indicaspecies ma-
tures as a small tree, about 25 feet tall.
Shorter hybrids between L indicaand L
fauriei, a Japanese species, usually max
out at 15 to 18 feet tall if not pruned. They
are resistant to powdery mildew if
planted in full sun with ample space and
air flow Many have native Amerindian
names: 'Catawba' has purple flowers;


'Tuscarora' flowers are crimson-pink;
'Natchez' is creamy-white.
The U.S. Department ofAgriculture
developed dwarf varieties like 'Chick-
asaw,' maturing about 2 feet high with
a low, mounding habit and lavender-
pink flowers. Linda Moran grows spe-
cialty dwarf crapes at her fruit farm on
Rooks Road south of Floral City. I
propagate several named varieties for
visitors to my garden.
Flowers are largest at the tips of
strong new growth. Avid gardeners
prune back branches to nubs in late
winter to promote many strong-grow-
ing suckers and consequently many
more flowerheads in summer. If left
unpruned, the tree will be open, with


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6560 N. DELTONA 7768 N. SARAZEN 4889 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 2450 N BRENTWOOD CIR. 3132 E. GERALD
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0J ~LL IO I I 4L1 01111 1A 0,JLLILi
27 S. FILLMORE 16 S. ADAMS 15 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE 29 N. WASHINGTON
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The harsh pruning practice nicknamed
"Crape Murder" involves lopping off all the
branches before leaves sprout in spring.


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smaller flower panicles. To maintain
a standard tree form, prune off the
suckers at the trunk base. A triple-
trunked crape myrtle makes a fine
lawn specimen.

Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
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SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 E5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Playgrounds get natural spin


Associated Press
In this photo provided by Natural Playgrounds Com-
pany, a labyrinth playground is shown. Natural Playgrounds
offers labyrinths because "walking the labyrinth" can be very
calming for children and adults. In this photo pro-
vided by the Natural Playgrounds Company, a Pebble Harp is
shown. The structure makes beautiful, tinkling, harp-like
sounds when children drop pebbles down the slots in the
top, and pebbles drop out the bottom, ready to be reused to
make more music.


Designer seeks to send children'splay spaces on a nature hike


KIM COOK
For The Associated Press
Architect and playground
builder Ron King is part of a ro-
bust movement to bring back
more natural play, with environments
that serve up some messiness and
risk-taking along with exercise.
Kids may play on equipment for a
short time, he says, "but then they want
to run around. They want to climb a
hill, scramble over rocks, listen to the
wind and play in the rain. They want to
explore and discover rather than have
their play experience defined by a
piece of equipment"
So when his company, the Concord,
N.H.-based Natural Playgrounds,
builds a playground for a school or
community, he tries to incorporate


any equipment into the existing land-
scape, using or adding boulders,
wooden beams, hammocks, water
pumps or sand. Polycarbonate slides
are built into embankments so the
slides can be higher but the falls
aren't as dangerous. They're also
treated so that static electricity does-
n't interfere with cochlear implants,
and they're heat-resistant
He might put in a water pump that
needs to be primed, and sand that
can be sculpted. Cedar, steel and cop-
per can be turned into drums, musi-
cal fences, and tubular contraptions
that make interesting sounds when
gravel, water, sticks or hands come in
contact with them. There are places
to play quiet games, and also room to
run with the gang.
Having the opportunity to do both


is optimal, says Susan Solomon, au-
thor of "American Playgrounds" and
the upcoming "The Science of Play"
(both from University Press of New
England). The trend toward more
natural playgrounds, she says, is due
partly to the high cost of the prefabri-
cated, themed structures (jungle, pi-
rate ship, tiny town) found in so many
playgrounds today It's also the result
of growing interest in nature and
local products, and of parental nos-
talgia for what is remembered as a
more unfettered childhood.
Playgrounds in recent years in-
cluding some natural playgrounds -
have gotten a little tame, Solomon
says. Safety and liability concerns
have driven out many tall or fast
See Page E7


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATURAL
Continued from Page E6

pieces of equipment.
And with them some of the fun.
"They don't allow kids to take
chances," Solomon says.
"Risk involves uncertain outcomes
- going fast, reaching great heights
or even hiding, in order to overcome
primal fears and create
exhilaration."
Restoring some of that excitement
safely is one goal of designers of nat-
ural playgrounds.
The Woodland Discovery Play-
ground at Shelby Farms Park in
Memphis, Tenn., is a 3.5-acre amal-
gam of nature, naturalistic elements,
and steel and plastic structures. It
was developed by the New York-
based design firm James Corner
Field Operations after a series of
workshops with local kids.
"What was so remarkable was that
most children actually preferred


woodland exploration to playing on
the existing playground that occu-
pied the site," says the firm's senior
designer, Sarah Weidner Astheimer.
The resulting playground consists
of six play "nests"; features include
climbing walls, a bright red sus-
pended net, a variety of swings, tree
forts, vines and a place for quiet play
A mix of natural and manmade
challenges is also the recipe recom-
mended by Paige Johnson, who
writes a blog called Playground De-
signs. A few natural rocks and tree
stumps aren't enough, she says.
"Some advocates even reject
swings or slides, but the experience

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of dynamic motion, where a child
feels a temporary loss of body con-
trol, is part of great play," she says.
"It makes even grownups laugh."
A natural playground needs a few
key elements, according to Johnson:
a hill, boulders and stumps to climb
on; rocks and gravel to dig in; paths


and perhaps a little bridge to tra-
verse; and a gate or door that kids
can turn into a portal of their own.
Finally, there should be a pile of
loose parts: wood blocks, bricks or
boxes of donated junk that can be
turned into an imaginative, free-
wheeling experience.


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SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for fea-
ture sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.


E,"1 Presented by E.R
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IOffice 352-382-1700
Email: waynecormier@earthlink.net


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ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear John: The pair of
lamps in the photos are an
inheritance. We know they
are at least 65 years old
and were bought in Europe
right after World War II. We
have tried without much
luck to see if they are
French or Italian. Could
you guess at their worth?
We love your column and
look forward to getting an
answer. -JDiP, Inverness
Dear J.DiP: Your metal


and ceramic lamps are re-
productions of Victorian
era ewers. The metal por-
tion is made of white metal
with a bronze finish. The
ovoid pottery portion ap-
pears to be decorated with
a transfer print. Under the
circumstance, where they
were made has no bearing
on dollar value. Potential
dollar value is below $100
for the pair.
Dear John: The jug in
the photos was given to me.
I was told it was a water jug
from the Civil War era. It


See ATTIC/Page E9


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5 acres in Citronelle/Mini Farms/Citrus Springs area.
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Two-story 4BR/2.5 bath home close to schools.
$94,900 MLS#355301


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ,
I Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (352302-6714 -


Prepare


your trees


for storms
Hurricanes and storms are one
of Mother Nature's ways of
weeding out the sick, weak and
declining trees in our forests, allowing
younger and
healthier trees a
chance to ma-
ture. This
method is very ,,
effective for for-
est floors, trees -
and habitat.
However, in
an urban land-
scape, it is up to
the homeowners Kerry Kreider
to take precau- THE
tions and re- ARBORIST
sponsibility for ARBORIST
the health and
well-being of their trees. There are a
few precautions we should take in
preparation for storms and hurri-
canes.
Generally, a Class 2 standard prune
provides enough foliage removal to
allow wind penetration on trees with


See ARBORIST/Page E9


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MLS #353046 $400,000 MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #355830 $99,000




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CITRUS HILLS
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E8 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page X1

has no markings and is in real good con-
dition. Can you tell me anything about the
jug and its value? R.P, Dunnellon
Dear RLP: I do not recognize your
stoneware jug. In order to see if your jug
has any specific collector interest, contact
the specialty auction company Crocker
Farm Auctions located in Sparks, Mo.
They are one of the premier specialists in


stoneware jugs, pottery, etc. The website _ZDeEs tateDIGEST
is wwwcrockerfarm.com. The phone e Stte


number is 410-472-2016. Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a professional in
the antiques business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays
from noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


Duffy joins
team at ERA
ERA American Realty
and Investments is
pleased to announce that
Irene Duffy has joined Irene
the company's Inverness Duffy
office, where she will ERA
work as a sales associ- American
ate. Irene has been a res- Realty.


ident of Citrus County
since 2006. Contact her
at 352-726-5855 or at
irenepduffy@aol.com.
English hits new
milestone
Realtor Geila English
has passed the multi-mil-
lion dollar mark in sales
volume this year.


Geila is a Real-
tor with RE/MAX
Realty One, and
works out of their
Central Ridge of-
fice on County
Road 491. The
brokers of RE/
MAX congratulate
Geila on her con-
tinued success.


ARBORIST
Continued from Page E8

large dense crowns that act
like sails, catching wind and
rain. Trees with large
amounts of moss that get
very heavy during rainy
conditions and trees with
dead wood are vulnerable
to damage as well.


The National Arborist As-
sociation (NAA) tells us that
in certain species of trees,
1/3 of the canopy can safely
be pruned without remov-
ing too much of the energy-
producing foliage. Other
species of trees cannot tol-
erate this practice of
pruning.
A qualified arborist can ex-
plain to you on site, prior to
any work being done, how a


proper Class 2 is performed.
Whenever possible, begin
structural pruning on a tree
when it is young. This will
ensure strong development
as the tree matures.
Additional precautions
include putting your trees
on an annual feeding pro-
gram. Feeding programs
consist of dry or liquid fer-
tilizer, micro injections, wet


and dry inoculation and a
number of other techniques.
An arborist can identify the
proper type of fertilization
needed based on the site,
soil, drainage, and species
of the tree. A healthy tree is
a strong tree.
It is usually when the
storms are brewing that
people begin to worry about
the safety of their property


These concerns should be
evaluated before the threat
of a storm. A qualified ar-
borist can identify weak or
problem trees and recom-
mend a solution.


KerryKreideris a practic-


ing arborist and a member
of the International Society
ofArboriculture, a tree
preserve tionist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach him at
352-726-9724 or by email
at actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.


I "W "i OO*i .


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
S IS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
S OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


tEST

Realtor


Jackde & Bob Davis
I~kl American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 cell
CRYSTAL RIVER NORTH 2 bedroom, ER A
2 bath, 2 car garage home & 2 acres of land HOMOSASSA; 1994 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car ESTA bob@b
plus a huge 4900 sq ft workshop. If you are .. ..-1 :1 'TT .. -1 autifulfully For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:b corn
a car buff or just have lots of hobbies, this is I .. well water
the place for you. Can be used commercially near by to new Super Wal mart; paved road,
under conditions. #355006 $190,000 #356536 $75,000

.......


CRYSTAL RIVER 1981 Skyline D/W M/H HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H
on over half acre, fenced & cross fenced, w/3bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved road,
covered front patio, 2 sheds, vinyl floors, screen porch, workshop, shed, ceiling fans,
Exterior painted 2011, roof cool sealed 2011. formal dining rm & eat-in kitchen
Furniture negotiable price list in mobile, w/breakfast bar. Immaculate inside, near by
#353265 $42,000 to shopping. #355194 $60,000



H LECANTO 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
LECANTO 2003 PALM Harbor D/W M/H w/workbench area on one acre of land.
on over 5 acres of land w/pool, 4 bedrooms, Country kitchen w/breakfast bar overlooking
2 baths, family rm, fenced & x-fenced. family rm w/built in cabinets & shelving,
Circular drive, 4 car detached garage, 20 x 40 dining rm, large master bath w/tile fir, dbl
ft metal drive thru barn, 40 x 20 workshop vanity, separate tub & shower #355208
also. #353359 $185,000 1-$135,000


EXPANDED GOLF COURSE VILLA! BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED BY MITCH UNDERWOOD!
* 2/2 with 1682 sqft of living 3/3/2 with heated marcite pool
* Separate office/family room w/skylight On a 1 acre wooded lot
* Wet bar with sliders to private patio 10x10 detached shed gives extra storage
* New roof 2008 newAC/heat 2004 Full pool bath off the lanai
* Kitchen and both baths have skylights Hardwood floors in vaulted Great Room
* Home warranty for the buyers Dual pane windows and sliding doors
#356549 $79,900 #353759 $234,900
See, Virl"tual Tor @1 wwIresalehomes u(co


Geila
English
RE/MAX
Realty
One.


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 E9


- - -
-v t~if T iiS VAB~









E10 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012



Chronic


Bring your fishing
pole!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water.
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/l
long term 352 220-2077
Homosassa 3/2/1
CH/A, A2 Acre, $425.mo
212-2051 or 220-2447
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on lake. Fur-
nished 1 bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre Addition
Partly furn, Huge Deck
$525.mo 352-628-5244


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
Mo.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com







30 x 60 Home of Merritt
2004, 3/2, screened
lanai, 10x 16 deck
55+ Community Park
Low Rent. Call for Info
(352) 726-2234


INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807


For Sale f
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2
bath. 2007 Nobility
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18'x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352419-6247

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Village
4/2 From 499 Mo
Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo
Loaded
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down
800-622-2832 x 210


YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




3/2 Double wide, on
large corner lot. New
AC in 2011, Many Up-
grades, quiet and close
to shopping $42,000 by
owner (352) 628-4819
HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925






HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition,
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217
JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,


Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
USED HOME/REPO'S (352)419-6926
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from CRYSTAL RIVER
$3,500. VILLAGE
New Inventory Daily/ SUMMER SPECIAL *
We buy used homes. 2BR 2Bath $15,000.
352-621-9183 (352) 795-7161


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
Reasonable, rent or buy
1st mo lot rent waived
during July & August
to qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090




INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
I & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a

mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


RelEtt

Fo Rn


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?



3/2/2................$750
4/2 Pool.......... $900
2/2 Lawn Care Incd ... $750
21/1 ................. $600

3/2/1 Lots of Extras..$800
2/1.5/1 Waterfront.. $750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

-ACION-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHlomeRentals.com
LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS
7635 Greendale ((S) ....... $1,200
3/2/2 Pool home, fireplace, close to
schools
2334 W. Silver Hill lane (L) .... $500
2/1 upstairs apt ind clW/ID, dishwasher,
screened porch
CRYSTAL RIVER
2211 N. Crede ...............$ 450
2//crport, furnished mobile, HUG[
screen porch
548 N. Gulf ............. $750
3/1/1 Fenced yard, close to Rock Crusher
elementary
HOMOSASSA
6944 W. Grant St............ $725
2/2/1 Newer home, central location
6139 S. Royal Dr..... REDUCED $795
2/1/1 reatwater views Boat port, dock
HERNANDO
6315 N. Shorewood Dr.......$700
2/1,900 sq ft cute home, nice backyard
3441 E. Chappel Ct.. REDUCEDI $600
2/1 Adorable, close to lake/Ocala




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen, All Utilities,
Cable incld. $525/mo
Pet ok 352-228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all util. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499
LECANTO
2 br 2 ba, e/i kitchen, scr.
porch, laund. room, cent.
h/a, near new Walmart,
$550 mo. + utilities.
352-257-3473
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218
SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









HOMOSASSA
Large Studio, furnished
Pool access. $450/mo
Need ref's & Sec.
(352) 804-2953
INGLIS 2/1
Near Power Plant, W/D,
Clean, Quiet, Part. Furn.
$495/mo.(352) 447-6016




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, Car Port $825
mo. (352) 613-5655
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2 On Golf course,
unfurnished, ALL NEW
carpet, paint, appl's
W/D, No Smoking/pets
Call (352) 382-5820




CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, $575. Mo.
Tim (352) 464-3522
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


INVERNESS
Country Living on large
1/2 acre lot. 3 bd. 2 ba
home. Garden area,
fenced area. Well &
Septic-so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525,
1/1 corner lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Room, C/H/A
$675 1st mo. FREE
(352) 422-7794
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, $550. mo. + $500
sec. (352) 257-1777
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/112, + Carport
(352) 489-0117
CR/HOM., 3/2/1
RC Elem., CHA, $575.
212-2051 or 220-2447
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Quiet+Great Loc W/D
$750/mo+dep. Lawn mt.
incl. 352-795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River, 2/1,
Duplex CHA, $496.
212-2051 or 220-2447
DUNNELLON
3/2/2 fenced acre,private
road, river access.$775
mo &sec. 352489-3931
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Meadows $675 up
3/2/2 SMW $775.
RIVER LINKS REALTY
352-628-1616
Homosassa Springs
2/1 $700 & 3/1 $800 +
Elec. No shoes or pets
(305) 619-0282, Cell
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 2/2/2, Inground
Pool, Ist &Sec.
$850/mo. 352-302-6633
INVERNESS
2/2, W/D, Dishwasher
New Tile & carpet, $600.
Mo. F/L/S. 352-634-1141
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/1, $700.1st
last sec. (352) 302-1155








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $750 mo
838 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell
LECANTO
2 BR. with den, scrn'd.
porch on 2.5 acres,
close to Walmart
$600. mo. 1st, Ist+ Sec.
(931) 628-3516
(352) 270-1563

-I

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Apt. Waterfront
$650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds
Dock. water, trash.
No pets. (352) 563-5004

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
$600 Mo. HOUSE TO
SHARE (352) 270-8684




CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean, cable, w/d,
$110wkly/420mo. also
avail. $120wkly,
$440mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Widow would like to
share spacious home,
room w/private bath
includes all utilities
including in room $400
month (352) 220-6100
FLORAL CITY
Share a Home w/ 5
acres, non-smoker,
non-drinker, $700 mo.
Available Aug. 1
(352) 726-4049




INVERNESS
Looking to Rent House
with fenced yard for
dogs. 352-287-3342




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Beverly Hills
1/1/1 $29,500
(352) 270-7420

Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2, 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K down, $495/mo.
(352) 600-8174


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
-_..--, -1-s -s


Nature Coast Landings
RV Resort ESTATE
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.detailsbyowner.com for
pictures and info.
$89,500. 352-843-5441
New Cottage ON the
Lake.
ONLY $69,900.
DOCKABLE SHORELINE.
Sale Sat July 28th Only.
NEVER BEFORE
OFFERED! Gorgeous
new designer ready
lakefront cottage in
beautiful wooded sett-
ing on spectacular,
recreational lake. Boat,
ski, swim, fish, more.
Paved roads, power &
phone. Perfect for
vacation home or
weekend getaway.
Must see. Excellent
financing. Call now
(866)952-5336, x222
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EIUAL $U$SNS
OPPORTUNITY







ONLINE REAL
ESTATE AUCTION
Nominal Opening Bid:
$1,000
2221 S Appletree Pt,
Crystal River
Biddina Starts

williamsauction.com
800.801.8003
Williams & Williams
FL Broker:
Daniel S. Nelson
Re Uc BK3223097;
Williams & Williams
Re Lic 1032049
Auctioneer:
Tony Langdon
Auc Uc AU3928
Buyer's Premium
may apply
for this property.








OPEN HOUSE
Sun. July 29, 11:30-3p
2/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
1747 sf under AC
Completely Updated
Uke New $89,900
820 W. Sunset Strip Dr.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089


OPEN HOUSE
Sun. July 29, 11:30-3p
2/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
1747 sf under AC
Completely Updated
Like New $89,900
820 W. Sunset Strip Dr.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089




Citrus Spring 3/2/2,
Built in 2007
Move In Ready.
All Appliances,Fenced
Corner Lot, $79,000.
(352) 489-5443



2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof,
New appl's, irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must see $29,995 firm
(352) 345-6499




Country Living
within City Limits
3/2/2, with Pool
$115,00
(352) 344-0033
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newer roof & CHA, scrn
porch, fenced, gar, good
neighborhood. Reduced
for quick sale at $49,900.
Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
I & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile carpet,
dbl lot. $700. rent. 1st Ist
sec. 813-335-5277


2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2, Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE













Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY
(352) 613-3503
CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529

rr


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


Ci u C u t


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com


Home # Finder

wwwcr onricleio fm finder, com


fi4 your trea 0hm&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
WWW I',1111 ,li i i finder.corn


"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352-634-4745



SUGARMILL WOODS.
BUILDING LOT
IN OAK VILLAGE
$20K Firm
352- 726-9587
352-228-0357



CRYSTAL RIVER
Freshwater! Seawall
w/sprgs boat slip 90/110.
$125,000 352-795-6282


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


Office Open
7 Days a Week


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
.VVI IV ..u.l .i i l .l. i i ..u l ....
WH W 1I .i lj 1 .. 1. 1 .:. : 1 1i .:.1... .) :
I ..:i h .'.. ) ..is:.. .'. c :.. '.. ..... ....: . l..
1 : i d '.'', 1 ..... I
Mt = :;....' $249,000
David KuItt Cell 954 383 8786
Office 352 726 6668


3 UNIT MULTI-FAMILY
"11 .:..:.:. .. ..) 9':":" .. ...1- ,1 _h H _R .: r.

.h': = 1 9 $250,000
Call Emil lupu 352 302 1710 to see.
Must give tenant 24 hour notice.
elupu.i tampabay. it. com


* L .,l l ll l i : l: I ll l n. ..h l.i.: n l

Mi1 = .iIII IIIl $62,500
Call Charles Hellf 352 422 2387


HOME PLEASES EYE -
PRICE PLEASES BUDGET!!
i W .h I1, ...... .. S . f. .. ...I

..III b y ..i i.I'h l .Vulij I IiI V 1 1 I .j i I ii7 i .l i11.jl

PRICED TO SELL AT $78,900
Pat Davis i352/ 212 7280
ieiw hosting at iziiir c2/1atdaris corn


TWO COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS
IN CHIEFLAND CITY LIMITS













Hii I ONLY $38.23/SF
foi mite in/im.ition
ct/ll f/.is G lt/.i/ h i 352 400 2635
I 1.. . ...... ...



















PILOTS DREAM HOME
1* I i ii A i, i l l i.ii ii .



M_ .,l.ol $369,500
'iizi. sell/itociltuscounimrhiomnes. corn
Call Nancf Jenks 352 400 8072


ACREAGE AND LAKE BRADLEY



v,:,.,,,i .: i $92,500 M 5 =3 I
Call Jim Moiton at 422 2173
lot a lout of paradise


INVERNESS POOL HOME!



MNi = 4il ;l1 PRICED TO SELL 5153,500
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


ALMOST 6 ACRES!
I ll- I H I I 11 I IIII IHI I-HII I-HK I


i j. i .ii ... i l. 1 I.. 1 d1 1 .d I.. l

I,,,,I ,,,d ,, I" ,,3 I p I I ,,,,,1,II. ,, ,,,
LISTED AT $130,000
Call tod.ij /I.lmj Parsons 634 1273


* 1illhl hu I\il i h' *.il l. i li i




Mi = ..: : $89,000 SHORT SALE
Jeanne at Willaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
;:',',,. CiliusCounl Sold. corn


/ I. 'l.li il- l -. 1).- I.N |. I.: h llh i l..j ..- .. 1 i.] ,
6, .1.. l I, . ..J .. ..... %.1, .. I .


RECENTLY REDUCED TO $89,500
Call Ten I R Blanco AT 352 7266668


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER
A RARE FLORIDA GEM
AND ITS PRICED TO SELL.

II'.. i I iJ l I' Wli
$165,000
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 7699


^ '- V- -

BANK OWNED TOWNHOUSE ON THIS MAKES HOUSE SENSE
SUGARMILL WOODS GOLF COURSE! -' 2 W. 12. i l. .. .,i,,i -
'' l. f _" h,1l l |1 I. I ,1 1h.1:l ..1 i.:I s .:l. .,f l. 11h N .. H I)A OI, h.: p. I

Il.,,11 I ,:,..-l V.,, Mi i Q.l/ ASKING $113,900
MI = .'-. _ ONLY $63,500 Pal Davis t3521 212 7280
Call Ehas G Kitallah at 352 400 2635 Vieiw stingn: .izi,. c21paidavis.com


rLUIn/4L %11; 1 uE./Ls
SHORT SALE!


. .-.I .. I h it..ij I .I. II ,. ii

S M; = '.li. $59,900
Call Dons Minme 422.4627 ,Celli
o Othice 726-6668


CITRUS SPRINGS

* I l:*.ill [ l:.Jh : 1lr ii l H A
* | li,,,,l IIII

Mi 5 =' 3 :U: $59,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422-2387


_' l.,vlh I . Il i .l . 1- l. l b" v
I I., ... I.h . 6 .., 1 v p ,fy ,ll


Mi5 =' .I Priced at $159,900
Ask lot Cheijl ot Jennie 352 726 6668


-....- -- --- ... .. .. .. -- ..- I


E12 SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2012