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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02836
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-22-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02836

Full Text



Back in lead: Adam Scott out in front at BritisttOope L1


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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 117


ISSUE 350


Searching for Robert Goocher


State House candidate running stealth campaign


Glitzy train
Take a trip through
history on vintage train
lines./Page All
COMMENTARY:







Lights off
Guest columnist Capt.
Stacy Dunn writes about
the use of flash
photography./Page Cl
NATIONAL NEWS:


Mourning
Residents of Aurora,
Colo., honor those who
died in movie theater
shooting./Page A10
BUSINESS:







Iconic logos
The value of a good
logo is priceless, but
how to companies come
up with them?/Page D1
ENTERTAINMENT:


Dyn-O-Mite
Jimmie Walker, now a
senior citizen, performs
his stand-up act on the
road./Page B6
HOMEFRONT:










Waterproof, insect-



resistant and sturdy,
floorcloths proving
popular./HomeFront


TOMORROW





111 III' % I
lCrossword ..............A12



Editorial....................C2
Entertainment .........B6


Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
-o i % I% d i i
TM *R ROW
















Lottery Payous ........
floorcloths proving






place./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ..............D4


Movies .........word...........A12
Editorial ................A6C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ..............B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
M ovies ....................A 12
Obituaries ..............A6
Together................ A14


6 1|1|8457812110 oI


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
Robert Goocher cannot
be reached for comment
Numerous calls to his cell
phone are not returned.
He isn't listed in the
phone book. An Internet
search turns up no number.
He's a mechanic at his fa-
ther's business, Bob's Car
Care on State Road 44 in In-
verness. A person answer-
ing the phone Friday said
he wasn't working that day
On a previous day, the per-


son said Robert
couldn't take per-
sonal calls while at 1
work.
Lynn Dostal hasn't
seen Goocher any-
where. That's un-
usual, because
Dostal and Goocher Ro
are both Democrats Goo
in the state House of
Representatives District 34
race. Goocher paid a $1,781
filing fee in June and faces
Dostal in the primary.
Goocher's only interview
with the Chronicle lasted


about two minutes,
and it occurred at the
end of qualifying
S week in early June.
He said he was run-
ning to make a differ-
ence and he paid his
S filing fee on his own,
bert despite reporting a
icher salary of $19,000 as a
mechanic.
Goocher ended the inter-
view by saying he had to go
do an oil change and would
call right back. He hasn't
See Page A7


SPROBERT GOOCHER |

COURAGE TO STAND UP
FOR WORKING FOLKS
obeM n Gcher has thecouragote o a te on omrn tclcr and stand .l i \
up for eryday Flondias. He's rme leader we need n Tallaahassee


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Special to the Chronicle
This mail piece was put out by Putting Florida First Inc.


I AN


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Key Training Center's 36th annual Run for the Money concluded Saturday on the campus of the Key Training Cen-
ter. Volunteer runners staged a weeklong run from the steps of the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee to the Key Training
Center in Lecanto. The real race came at the end, when James Wiggins, left, and Jason Isaak attempted to break
through the banner the plastic banner held tight, causing a collision of several Key runners at the finish line.

Key Training Center's annual fundraising efforts wrap up


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
-LECANTO
The weary runners
rounded the corner off
State Road 44, pounding
the hot asphalt as they
made their way toward


the cheering crowd on the Key
Training Center grounds.
Though the traditional breaking
of the banner didn't quite materi-
alize as planned the thing re-
fused to break it didn't stop the
celebration that erupted as every-
one congratulated the runners on
the completion of another suc-


cessful Run for the Money
"I cry every time," said Neale
Brennan, Key Foundation direc-
tor "I can't help it."
Capt. Phil Royal of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, crossing
the finish line with his longtime
See Page A9


Doctor


charged


with


sexual


battery

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Cit-
rus deputies arrested a
Crystal River doctor Friday
after a fe-
male pa-
tient filed a
complaint
alleging the
physician
sexually
battered
her.
Dr. Jo- Dr. Joseph
seph Miller Miller
was taken charged with
into cus- sexual battery.
tody on an
active warrant issued by
the Citrus County State At-
torney's Office. He was
charged with one count of
sexual battery. His bond
was set at $5,000.
According to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, an
adult Citrus County woman
filed a complaint against
Miller roughly a week and a
half ago. In the complaint,
the woman stated she con-
tacted Miller, who is her
OB-GYN, regarding a pain
in her arm.
The woman said Miller
reportedly told her unless
she was willing to wait until
the following morning, he
could only see her after
hours that day
Authorities said the
woman went to Miller's of-
fice in Crystal River expect-
ing a routine checkup.
There were reportedly no
See Page A4


Election 2012: COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5


County commission candidates talk about issues


Adams: Learning

from mistakes
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Not getting elected the last time
he stood for office did him some
good: Scott Adams said he got his
life together.
"I plan on bring-
ing things up with
diplomacy," Adams
said. "I'm ener-
getic, I'm young, I
have time. I will
work hard and I
will bring things to
people's attention Scott
to solve problems." Adams
Diplomacy was
not a word used to describe Adams
when he was defeated in 2002 by
then County Commissioner Jim


Poliseno: Hit

ground running
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
A Miami youngster who moved to
Citrus County for keeps has worked
his way through the ranks, done a
great deal of com-
munity service and
raised a family.
"I bring educa-
tion, I bring a busi-
ness mind and
integrity," said
Charles Poliseno,
District 5 candi-
date. "I have a rep- Charles
utation in this Poliseno
community that I'm
very proud of. I have been involved
in county government, so I know
how county government works. I


Rusnak: More

public input
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
For the past eight years,
Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak has scru-
tinized county government as part
of a watchdog
group known for its
attention to detail. 1
"We try to tackle
and investigate cur-
rent issues in local
government," said
Rusnak, who
stepped down from
four terms as presi- Teddi
dent of the Citrus Rusnak
County Council
(CCC), "a not-for-profit, nonpartisan
consortium of homeowner associa-
tions, civic groups and


Smallridge:

Budget relief
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Citrus County Chronicle


Mike Smallridge learned about
budgets during his hospital board
term and offers new concepts if
elected District 5
commissioner.
Although public
perception about
the Citrus County
Hospital Board has
been negative be-
cause of its long-
term dispute with
Citrus Memorial Mike
Foundation about Smallridge
which entity con-
trols Citrus Memorial hospital,
Smallridge, hospital board chair-
man, said he welcomed his


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Hardball politics and a dash of Wawa


JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE
Florida lawmakers are fond
of passing resolutions that
mean relatively little. So
here's an idea for a new res-
olution: Declare mid-July as
"Dog Days in Tallahassee."
But while the capital
saunters through humidity
and swarms of mosquitoes,
campaign action is picking
up in legislative races
across the state. Redistrict-
ing and the exodus of long-
time lawmakers have
helped create a collection of
marquee election battles.
The campaigns took a
nasty turn this week when a
mail piece attacked the per-
sonal life of former Senate
President Tom Lee, who is
running against Rep. Rachel
Burgin for a Hillsborough
County Senate seat
The mail piece also high-
lighted the prevalence this
year of shadowy political
committees that are collect-
ing large amounts of money
to try to influence legislative
races often by tearing
down candidates.
Gov Rick Scott isn't on the
ballot this year, but even he
isn't seen much in Tallahas-
see these days. Scott spent
part of the week touting
more jobs coming to Florida,
though two new reports
showed the employment pic-
ture remains murky.
READY TO RUMBLE
Politics, as the old cliche
goes, ain't beanbag. But the
mail piece this week attack-
ing Lee even drew a public
rebuke from state Republi-
can Chairman Lenny Curry
The mailer, in big letters,
said "Character Matters"
and lumped Lee with Hills-
borough County Property
Appraiser Rob Turner, who
has been embroiled in con-
troversy recently about
sending pornographic
emails. The intent of the
mailer clearly was to cast
doubt about Lee among Re-
publican voters in the
largely conservative District
24, as the Aug. 14 primary
against Burgin approaches.
A group called The Amer-
ican People Committee, Inc.,
was behind the mailer,
which asserted past marital
infidelity by Lee. The com-
mittee is chaired by lobbyist


Keyna Cory, whose lobbyist
husband, Jack, backs Burgin.
Lee, who is seeking to re-
turn to the Legislature after
six years on the sidelines,
blasted the mailer.
"This is a full-contact
sport I get that," he told
The Tampa Tribune. "But it
shouldn't touch your family."
Republican Senate lead-
ers, meanwhile, continued
rallying around Lee's cam-
paign, with Sens. John
Thrasher of St. Augustine
and Joe Negron of Stuart
publicly backing him. Bur-
gin said she wasn't sur-
prised and contended that
Republican leaders have
targeted her because they
don't agree with her conser-
vative agenda.
"It is unprecedented," the
Riverview Republican said.
"But I'm not overly sur-
prised to see that the Talla-
hassee insiders are trying to
circle the wagons."
The Lee-Burgin contest is
on a short list of the most
closely watched legislative
races. New campaign-
finance reports offer a good
guide to those fights, which
in the Senate also include a
Jacksonville-area race be-
tween Rep. Mike Weinstein
and former Rep. Aaron
Bean; a Daytona Beach-
area race between Rep.
Dorothy Hukill and Volusia
County Chairman Frank
Bruno; a St. Petersburg-
area race between Reps.
Jeff Brandes and Jim Fr-
ishe; and a South Florida
race between Sens. Ellyn
Bogdanoffand Maria Sachs.
But as in the Lee-Burgin
race, the candidates' cam-
paign-contribution reports
likely only tell a piece of the
story Obscure political com-
mittees often with upbeat
names such as Teachers
United for Better Schools
and Florida Freedom Coun-
cil have been busy col-
lecting and parceling out
money to try to influence
races.


Weekly ROUNDUP


-Wa


~uurrr1


Special to the Chronicle
Gov. Rick Scott, center in blue shirt, welcomed Wawa con-
venience stores to Orlando on Wednesday at the grand open-
ing of the first store in the state of Florida.


SCOTI GOES WAWA
FOR JOBS
Scott continued his quest
to attract jobs, including
making an appearance
Wednesday at the opening
of Florida's first Wawa con-
venience store in Orlando.
Wawa, which operates in
five other states, plans to
open 100 Florida stores and
employ 35 people in each.
"Today's grand opening is
evidence that more compa-
nies want to grow and ex-
pand here in Florida
because of all we are doing
to make our state the best
place for business," Scott
said in a news release.
Scott also announced Dig-
ital Risk, a company that
provides mortgage-related
services, will expand in
Florida. The expansion is
expected to total 1,000 jobs,
with 150 added in Boca
Raton by early September.
But a state report came
out Friday that showed only
modest jobs improvement
in June. That report showed
the state's jobless rate was
unchanged from 8.6 percent
in May though it was 2.1
percentage points lower
than in June 2011.
Earlier in the week, state
economists released an-


other report crediting much
of the recent drop in the
state's unemployment rate
to a shrinking labor pool
and not to more people find-
ing work. Nevertheless,
Scott remained positive
after Friday's report.
"As companies are choos-
ing to grow and expand in
our state, we are continuing
to see Florida experience a
positive economic recov-
ery," the governor said in a
statement. "Floridians have
more and more opportuni-
ties to get back to work, and
last month, 9,000 Floridians
were able to get a job and
provide for their families."
PRIVATIZATION PLAN
GETS NEW LIFE
Barring a successful legal
challenge, two firms Cori-
zon and Wexford Health
Sources likely will be
looking to add employees in
Florida during the coming
months.
The only catch: The De-
partment of Corrections will
be shedding many of those
same employees.
DOC this week decided to
move forward with a contro-
versial plan to privatize
prison health services across
the state, with Corizon and
Wexford getting the con-


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tracts. The decision came
after Leon County Circuit
Judge Kevin Carroll declined
to rule in a challenge filed by
the Florida Nurses Associa-
tion and the American Fed-
eration of State, County and
Municipal Employees.
The groups' lawsuit cen-
tered on the fact that law-
makers last year used
budget fine print, known as
proviso language, to call for
prison health privatization.
The lawsuit contended that
making the change in pro-
viso language was unconsti-
tutional, but Carroll did not
rule on the question be-
cause the language expired
with the June 30 end of the
fiscal year.
State lawyers have long
contended DOC has the
legal authority to do such a
privatization, regardless of
the proviso language.
In announcing Tuesday
the agency would move for-
ward, Secretary Ken
Tucker said the move would
save money and was "best


for the taxpayers."
But the announcement
could spur further legal
wrangling.
"It doesn't shock me," said
Don Slesnick, an attorney for
the nurses association. "It
disappoints me that the state
is that devious and the DOC
is being that anti-employee."
STORY OF THE
WEEK: The Department of
Corrections decided to
move forward with privatiz-
ing prison health services.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "My worst night-
mare is we get close to a
presidential election, and
someone challenges maybe
100,000 possible non-citizens
at the polls on Election Day
If that happens, we won't get
our results for weeks." -Vo-
lusia County Supervisor of
Elections Ann McFall, ex-
pressing caution about try-
ing to purge ineligible
voters, even after the state
received approval to use a
U.S. Department of Home-
land Security database.


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When it comes to outstanding cardiovascular care, trust
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With nearly a decade of experience, our expert team of
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expertise when you need it most, right here at home.

From advanced heart surgery such as coronary artery
bypass (CABG) and heart valve repairs to the implantation
of pacemakers and automatic defibrillators, Citrus
Memorial is at the heart of it. Our minimally invasive
abdominal aneurysm surgery, carotid artery procedures
and lung surgery techniques help in reducing the risks and
complications associated with more traditional methods
and promote improved healing that helps speed you back to
normal daily living.

So when it comes to matters of the heart, coupled with
our proven record for compassionate care and excellent
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comprehensive heart and vascular center.

Learn more about us by visiting heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


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CITRUS MEMORIAL


; He art
SB & VASCULAR CENTER
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A2 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


STATE


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Page A3 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012



TATE &


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Dozens of All voters to cast ballots in primary
-. I -1.


schools


grades


increase

Recalculations

lead to change

from B toA

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
School grades in 40 of the
state's 67 school districts
have been bumped up
after they were miscalcu-
lated under a question-
able evaluation system,
education officials said.
The agency said Friday
district
superin-
tendents
many of
the grades
should
s r o r
have been
higher be-
Gerard cause of
Robinson an eror
said he will in calcu-
look for ways lasting stu-
toimprovethe d e n t
grade learning
calculation
process. gains. The
error
raised further questions
about the state's system of
evaluating students and
comes as the grading sys-
tem is under some of the
sharpest criticism it has
endured in the years since
former Gov Jeb Bush first
pushed it into place.
More than 100 schools
jumped from a B to an A
grade. Fifty-five school
grades changed from a C to
a B. Thirty-five school
grades changed from a D to
a C, and seven school grades
changed from an F to a D.
Commissioner of Edu-
cation Gerard Robinson
said he will look for ways
to improve the grade cal-
culation process.
"The strength of our ac-
countability system de-
pends on the partnership
between school districts
and the department, and
these revisions are a di-
rect result of that
process," Robinson said in
a statement.
Each year the state
hands out A-to-F grades
used to financially reward
top schools and sanction
those with failing marks.
Grades are based primarily
on student performance on
a series of high-stakes tests
in reading, math, writing
and science. Part of the
grade is also based on

stated learning gains over
year's writing scores were
surprisingly low.

earlier this month the
school grades would drop
because ofrecent changes
to the state's grading sys-
tem, but said it didn't nec-
essarily mean the schools
aren't doing as well as
they were before.
Education officials said
the error came from the
way they weighted stu-
dents' learning gains. The
state passed a rule last
year saying students who
scored at levels 1 and 2 on
last year's FCAT and got a
third more points than was
needed to be considered to
have made learning gains
on the FCAT this year,
would receive a weighted
learning gains score.
But the state failed to in-
clude students who were
at levels 1 or 2 last year,
but scored at higher levels
this year when calculating
the weighted points.

CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS GRADES
SOnly five schools in
Citrus County did not
receive an A grade.
Inverness Middle and
Crystal River Primary


received Bs. Citrus,
Crystal River and
Lecanto high schools'
grades were pending.


Voters are encouraged to mark
the sample ballot and take it to use
as a guide when casting their ballot
at an early voting site or at the polls
on Election Day. Copies of the sam-
ple ballot are available on the Su-
pervisor of Elections Inverness
office, the Crystal River office at
Meadowcrest and the elections
website at www.votecitrus.com. Vot-
ers also may call 352-341-6740.
Early voting for the primary elec-
tion is from Saturday, Aug. 4


through Saturday, Aug. 11, including
Sunday Hours are from 10 a.m. to
6p.m.
Early voting locations are:
Central Ridge Library, 425 W.
Roosevelt Blvd.;
Crystal River Elections Office,
1540 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.;
Homosassa Public Library,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.;
Inverness City Hall, 212 W.
Main St.
The primary election is Aug. 14.


Special to the Chronicle
Despite Florida being a closed
primary state, all voters regardless
of party affiliation can vote in the
upcoming primary races.
The reason for the change this
year is all three county commission
races District 1, 3 and 5, and the
public defender have only Republi-


The Citrus County Chronicle's political
forums are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31, at the
Citrus County Auditorium; and 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18, at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Candidates for county commission
and state representative are invited to par-
ticipate in the Save Our Waters forum at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 1, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida in Lecanto. Informa-
tion: 352-860-5175.
Nancy Argenziano, Independent for
state House District 34, will speak at 1 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Citrus County Tea
Party Patriots meeting at the Women's
Club, 1715 Forest Drive, Inverness.
The Citrus County Republican Execu-
tive Committee will have a grand opening
for its office at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9,
at 2456 N. EssexAve., Citrus Hills. Infor-
mation: 352-410-6125.
Scott Adams, Republican for county
commission District 5, will have the follow-
ing meet-and-greet events: 1 p.m. Friday,
July 27, at Fat Boy's BBQ in Crystal River;
and 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, July 28,
at Frog Holler Antiques and Collectibles,
7736 U.S. 41, Floral City.
Michael Smallridge, Republican for


can candidates. Therefore, the race
becomes a universal primary and
the winner will be elected Aug. 14.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections, said the official
sample ballots for the Aug. 14 pri-
mary election will be mailed Mon-
day, July 23. Voters who have
requested a vote-by-mail ballot will
not receive a sample ballot.


Key Telethon raises more than $230,000


ABOVE: Inverness
City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni, the city's
mascot Sunny Cooter
and Inverness city clerk
Debbie Davis join Neale
Brennan, Key Training
Center Foundation
director, during the Key's
annual Run for the
Money Telethon. The
telethon ran from 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Saturday at
WYKE studios. This
year's campaign raised
$238,036.26. Proceeds
from the event provide
vital services to more
than 300 developmen-
tally disabled adults and
scholarships to roughly
70 individuals who re-
ceive no funding from the
state. RIGHT: DiGiovanni
wrestles the check for
the Key Training Center
away from Sunny Cooter.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


Stuff the Bus events
July 29 and Aug. 4
The Citrus County School District
is preparing for the annual Stuff the
Bus back-to-school drive, which
provides needy students with basic
school supplies.
The drive will start collecting do-
nations from 10 a.m. to noon July
28 at the Kmart in Crystal River and
Wal-Mart in Inverness. The next
collection will be from 10 a.m. to
noon Aug. 4 at the Wal-Mart in Ho-
mosassa and Publix in Beverly
Hills.
For a list of supplies, visit the Cit-
rus County School District's website
at citrus.k12.fl.us. Click on the "Stuff
the Bus Events" link.
Eagle Snag Bird Trail
temporarily closed
Because of heavy rains Citrus
County has been experiencing, the
Eagle Snag Trail at the Citrus
County Central Landfill has been
temporarily closed.
Once the unpaved trail is acces-
sible, the public can enjoy the ea-


gles, vultures, gulls and many other
birds along the trail.
For information on Eagle Snag
Trail, call 352-527-7670 or visit
bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm/
solid waste.htm.
More than $15M in
Debby disaster aid OK'd
TALLAHASSEE More than
$15 million in state and federal dis-
aster aid is headed for Florida vic-
tims of Tropical Storm Debby.
The Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency on Friday said
that's how much assistance has
been approved for nearly 10,000
survivors since it struck Florida a
month ago.
Government aid includes $12.3
million in FEMA housing grants for
short-term rental assistance, home
repairs and replacement costs and
$1.6 million to cover other needs
such as medical expenses and lost
personal possessions.
The SBA has approved $1.4 mil-
lion in loans to repair homes and re-
place personal property.
-From staff and wire reports


county commission District 5, has a meet-
and-greet from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July
26, at Citrus Springs Community Center. In-
formation: 352-302-7406.
The Ronald Reagan Republican As-
sembly of West Central Florida will have a
fund-raiser at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 28, in
the South Square Plaza, 938 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River, for county commission
candidates Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Shannon Heathcock and
Michael Smallridge. Information: 352-
257-5381.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel, Democrat in-
cumbent for superintendent of schools, will
have a bowling fundraiser from 1 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 12, at Manatee Lanes on
State Road 44 in Crystal River.
The Beverly Hills Civic Association
candidates' forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Information: Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Association is
hosting a candidates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a listing of political
happenings for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign fundraisers to Mike
Wright at mwright@chronicleonline.com.


LOCAL


GOP only candidates in four races


SCampaign TRAIL


County, State BRIEFS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Greene to speak at
IOTA meeting
INVERNESS The Greater
Inverness Olde Towne Associa-
tion of Businesses (IOTA) will
conduct its monthly general
membership meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 25, at The
Masonic Business Center
Building third-floor ballroom at
111 W. Main St., Inverness.
Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser Geoffrey Greene will
give a presentation and answer
questions about local property
values for 2012-13. You can
learn more about how your
property (home or business)
was determined and what fu-
ture trends will most likely be.
IOTA is an association of
local businesses, professionals
and residents that cooperatively




CHARGED
Continued from Page Al

female staff members pres-
ent in the office when the
woman arrived and while in
the examination room, the
woman allegedly stated
Miller began to examine her
"intimately"
According to officials, the
woman contended Miller
proceeded to perform sex
acts on her without her con-
sent and made inappropri-
ate sexual remarks toward
her, including telling the
woman she was "just too
tempting."
Upon completion of their
investigation, detectives
with the CCSO's Special Vic-
tims Unit submitted their
case report and evidence to
the state attorney's office.
In addition to the sexual
battery charge, Miller was
also arrested on a misde-


advertises, promotes, en-
hances and markets the unique
community as a destination
area to live, shop, dine and
enjoy the beauty and cultural
heritage of Inverness.
Visit IOTA at www.inverness
oldetowne.org.
Elks lodge to honor
Purple Heart award
The West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the Purple
Heart and honoring all Purple
Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat
wounded veterans and their
guests are cordially invited. At-
tendees are requested to regis-
ter for the free breakfast by


meanor charge of driving
with a suspended/revoked
license.
According to the arrest re-
port, Miller's license was
suspended July 12 for not
completing court-ordered
compliance school. After
yelling he wasn't speeding
at the deputy and asking
why he was being stopped,
Miller reportedly told the
deputy the suspension was a
setup since he asked the
judge not to order him to
take the class because he
didn't have time.
He also told the deputy he
was on his way to the hospi-
tal for surgery, and he
wasn't a bad person, but he
needed to drive to work.
Miller, though not em-
ployed at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River, did have med-
ical staff membership at the
hospital, spokeswoman
Dorothy Pernu said Saturday
Pernu said the hospital


mailing carriejeanetteclemons
@yahoo.com or calling Carrie
at 352-628-1633. Please indi-
cate the number in your party.
Gen. George Washington es-
tablished the Purple Heart, orig-
inally known as the Badge of
Military Merit, on Aug. 7, 1782.
The first American award made
available to the common sol-
dier, it is the oldest military dec-
oration in the world in present
use and is a badge of honor
that recognizes those patriots
who have selflessly made the
supreme sacrifice or shed their
blood on the field of battle.
Habitat orientation
set for Aug. 11
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County is looking for part-
ner families to build their own
Habitat home. People inter-


was made aware of the al-
leged charges and the inci-
dent in question was not
related to any care provided
at the hospital.
Hospital officials did take
immediate action, Pernu ex-
plained, and suspended


HABITAT INFO
Call 352-563-2744.

ested in becoming Habitat
homeowners must attend a
mandatory orientation course
from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday,
Aug. 11, at the Realtors Associ-
ation of Citrus County building,
714 S. Scarboro Ave. in
Lecanto.
Attendance is required to
enter the Habitat program and
apply for a Habitat home. Po-
tential applicants will receive a
full explanation of the program,
timeline, income and service
requirements and other
information.
Children cannot be accom-
modated at the meeting. For in-
formation, call the Habitat office
at 352-563-2744.


Miller's membership pend-
ing the outcome of the case.
Miller was arrested in Cit-
rus County one time before
on a fugitive from justice
charge in reference to an
Ocean County, N.J., warrant
for his failure to comply


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Joshua Paul Oglesbee,
32, 779 N. Hollywood Circle,
Crystal River, at 4:28 a.m.
Thursday was arrested on
charges of petty theft and bur-
glary. Bond $15,250.
Steven James Ryland,
27, 135 N. East Ave., Inver-
ness, at 8:20 p.m. Thursday
was arrested on charges of ex-
posure of sexual organs, bat-
tery, resisting arrest and public
intoxication. Bond $2,150.
Tammy Jo Bryant, 42,
680 N. Independence Highway,
Inverness, at 10:06 p.m. Thurs-
day was arrested on charges of
obstruction by a disguised per-
son and violation of probation.
Bond $500.
Stephanie Norrell Clay-
born, 25, 3995 E. Gloria Drive,


with a court order.
The warrant was related
to two counts of contempt of
court, and a spokesman for
the Ocean County Clerk's
Office told a Chronicle re-
porter the contempt-of-
court charges stemmed


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
For the Record reports
are archived at www.
chronicleonline.com.

Hemando, at 10:06 p.m. Thurs-
day was arrested on a charge
of obstruction by a disguised
person. Bond $500.
Joshua Daniel Clayborn,
28, 3995 E. Gloria Drive, Her-
nando, at 10:06 p.m. Thursday
was arrested on a charge of ag-
gravated assault with a deadly
weapon. Bond $3,000.


from a domestic violence
matter where Miller vio-
lated a restraining order.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at swiles@
chronicleonline. com or352-
564-2924.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle






SMeeting Notices...................D6




Miscellaneous Notices........D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 90 77 ts Miami 87
Ft. Lauderdale 89 79 ts Ocala 94
Fort Myers 93 76 ts Orlando 94
Gainesville 94 72 ts Pensacola 91
Homestead 88 79 ts Sarasota 93
Jacksonville 93 74 ts Tallahassee 94
Key West 88 81 ts Tampa 92
Lakeland 94 75 ts Vero Beach 89
Melbourne 89 78 ts W. Palm Bch. 89


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Chance of thunderstorms
today.


98 74 000 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluseaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 75
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of a
Thunderstorm.
r MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 74
Mostly cloudy; 60% chance of thunderstorms.

.........TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 75
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of a thunderstorm.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 94/73
Record 100/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 84
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 4.55 in.
Total for the year 32.17 in.
Normal for the year 28.55 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.10 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 72
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.1/12
Monday's count: 3.7
Tuesday's count: 3.4
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/22 SUNDAY 8:49 2:37 9:13 3:01
7/23 MONDAY 9:42 3:30 10:06 3:54
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


AUG. 9


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:42 a/4:17 a 8:27 p/4:27 p
Crystal River** 7:03 a/1:39 a 6:48 p/1:49 p
Withlacoochee* 4:50 a/11:37 a 4:35 p/-
Homosassa*** 7:52 a/3:16 a 7:37 p/3:26 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
9:13 a/4:51 a 9:16 p/5:12 p
7:34 a/2:13 a 7:37 p/2:34 p
5:21 a/12:01 a 5:24 p/12:22 p
8:23 a/3:50 a 8:26 p/4:11 p


Gulf water
temperature


87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.96 31.08 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.22 35.24 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.01 37.07 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.42 40.43 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


r-r- -ne "

=AnCnoaqj a 1 '4P '"O U
S s 5


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 84 58 ts 86 69
Albuquerque 91 71 ts 93 70
Asheville 83 68 ts 83 65
Atlanta 84 75 ts 92 74
Atlantic City 76 66 c 81 72
Austin 98 75 pc 97 72
Baltimore 70 64 .71 ts 85 73
Billings 96 65 s 98 67
Birmingham 88 77 pc 90 74
Boise 98 63 ts 98 64
Boston 74 61 pc 83 68
Buffalo 82 59 ts 87 71
Burlington, VT 84 53 ts 85 65
Charleston, SC 92 77 ts 90 76
Charleston, WV 80 68 pc 90 70
Charlotte 90 72 ts 91 70
Chicago 87 65 pc 90 76
Cincinnati 85 59 pc 93 69
Cleveland 81 66 ts 87 74
Columbia, SC 88 77 .11 ts 95 75
Columbus, OH 85 65 pc 90 72
Concord, N.H. 82 49 ts 85 63
Dallas 10776 pc 101 77
Denver 10268 pc 99 66
Des Moines 97 68 s 101 77
Detroit 90 59 pc 90 74
El Paso 93 72 pc 97 76
Evansville, IN 90 67 pc 95 74
Harrisburg 74 63 .08 ts 86 70
Hartford 80 61 pc 86 67
Houston 95 80 pc 92 77
Indianapolis 91 61 pc 95 75
Jackson 87 72 2.52 pc 91 74
LasVegas 10686 ts 10484
Little Rock 97 77 pc 98 76
Los Angeles 73 63 pc 73 65
Louisville 88 67 pc 95 74
Memphis 97 80 pc 96 77
Milwaukee 87 67 pc 90 74
Minneapolis 89 71 .22 pc 91 74
Mobile 81 72 .13 pc 90 73
Montgomery 94 75 pc 93 73
Nashville 89 73 pc 91 72
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


101T77* \ __----




FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 86 72 ts 89 77
New York City 78 61 pc 84 71
Norfolk 81 73 .70 ts 86 73
Oklahoma City 10479 pc 103 76
Omaha 98 75 s 103 77
Palm Springs 10784 pc 108 84
Philadelphia 81 64 c 86 72
Phoenix 10885 ts 103 82
Pittsburgh 74 63 .01 ts 85 68
Portland, ME 79 54 ts 80 65
Portland, Ore 79 61 .01 pc 71 55
Providence, R.I. 80 58 pc 83 68
Raleigh 93 74 ts 93 72
Rapid City 96 67 ts 96 72
Reno 97 64 pc 96 62
Rochester, NY 83 57 ts 89 71
Sacramento 101 60 s 101 63
St. Louis 94 70 pc 104 78
St. Ste. Marie 83 60 .06 pc 85 64
Salt Lake City 99 72 ts 96 74
San Antonio 98 75 pc 96 75
San Diego 75 67 pc 75 66
San Francisco 81 56 s 70 55
Savannah 93 75 trace ts 91 76
Seattle 75 60 c 68 53
Spokane 79 55 pc 87 57
Syracuse 85 64 ts 88 69
Topeka 10066 pc 105 75
Washington 71 67 .20 ts 86 75
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 121 Death Valley, Calif.
LOW 38 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/80/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 69/55/s Mexico City
Athens 98/78/s Montreal
Beijing 90/74/ts Moscow
Berlin 66/50/pc Paris
Bermuda 84/79/pc Rio
Cairo 95/79/s Rome
Calgary 76/53/s Sydney
Havana 88/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 92/79/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 89/67/s Warsaw


82/65/s
72/51/s
95/65/s
74/53/ts
88/69/ts
72/55/ts
75/57/s
79/67/s
82/68/ts
61/46/pc
80/75/c
89/65/pc
68/51/pc


C I T R U S


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


Worth NOTING


For the RECORD


C 0 U N T


LHKON1CLL
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*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
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Dnenteld I Meadowcrest
D nkenled r_- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
Ave Crystal River,
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kileadowlres t
N \ -

SI C e Inverness
SCourthouse office
To pkins St. square
S n 2 106 W. Main
41Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ... ................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ......................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie Brennan ........................................................................ Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ .............................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy........................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................... Business Manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold........................................ Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


JULY 28


0
AUG. 1


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:27 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:47 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:07 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:35 PM.


ii iiiiil


A4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SMALLRIDGE
Continued from Page Al

appointment in 2008 because:
"There was a wrong that needed
to be corrected."
"For me, the situation has been
about accountability and trans-
parency," Smallridge said. "It's
also taught me about budgets:
What can be done in budgets and
what can't be done in budgets. I
see it as a plus," he said of his
experience.
Applying his experience to the
county budget, Smallridge said, "I
would propose a multifaceted
approach."


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 A5


First: More cuts.
"I'm not going to say a 3-percent
cut or 10-percent cut, because I
think anybody who says that needs
to be able to prove it," Smallridge
said.
Second: Combine services.
"I think there has to be some
consolidation of services, such as
human resources, fleet mainte-
nance," Smallridge said. "We need
to get an independent person who
can come in and look at all the dif-
ferent government services that
can be combined or consolidated
for efficiency reasons and that
may include constitutional offi-
cers and other branches of the
government like the school board
or mosquito control."


The third part would be to go to
mobility fees.
"The Legislature lets you collect
transportation impact fees for
roads and use it for trains and
buses," Smallridge said.
Mobility fees replace trans-
portation impact fees and charge
higher rates for new construction
in rural and suburban areas than
in urban areas to give counties
more flexibility in how trans-
portation money is spent.
Smallridge favors construction
of Suncoast Parkway II and devel-
opment of Port Citrus if the feasi-
bility study supports it and it is
privately funded.
"If I'm a sitting county commis-
sioner, I'm going to be wide open


to whatever government can do to
create those jobs," he said.
Other job creation ideas include
promoting the medical corridor,
training the workforce to service
it and ecotourism.
"We can do a better job to pro-
mote ecotourism in this county,"
Smallridge said.
"According to Florida Trend, if
you can bring in 86 new tourists,
that creates one full-time job and
that one job spins off 0.8 other full-
time jobs."
Asked to grade CountyAdminis-
trator Brad Thorpe's perform-
ance, Smallridge said he had no
criticism, but because there's al-
ways room for improvement he'd
give Thorpe a B.


Smallridge would like to open
up commissioners' Monday brief-
ing sessions to the public so com-
missioners could get more public
input before they vote at Tuesday
commission meetings.
If a future sheriff asked the
BOCC to take back the fire service,
Smallridge would agree to it, be-
cause an elected sheriff should
work fulltime on law enforcement,
not animal control or fire services.
If moving government offices to
Meadowcrest turned out to be a
bad idea, Smallridge would work
to correct it.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2916.


RUSNAK
Continued from Page Al

environmental groups," to
become a Republican can-
didate for County Commis-
sion District 5.
As CCC president, Rusnak
has been chief spokes-
woman attending most
county commission meet-
ings the past four years to
represent a consensus of
CCC members' opinions.
No stranger to leadership,
Rusnak said she came to
Citrus County in 2003 after a
30-year career in business
in the Chicago area.
"My area of expertise was
economic development and
workforce training," Rusnak



POLISENO
Continued from Page Al

have the ability to hit the
ground running the first
day"
In 1985, Poliseno gradu-
ated from Citrus High
School and became a volun-
teer firefighter before pur-
suing a career in emergency
management services as a
paramedic in 1987.
While working and rais-
ing a family, Poliseno at-
tained scholarly degrees:
an associate's in emergency
medical services from Cen-



ADAMS
Continued from Page Al

Fowler, who focused on
Adams' arrest record. Ten
years later, Adams has built
experience through many
types of businesses and said
he could use that knowledge
to help the county.
"The first half of my life...
you had to fight for every-
thing in the type of business
I was in," Adams said. "I was
a working guy in the con-
crete and masonry business.
It was a lot of physical
labor."
It was a learning experi-
ence. The Adamses had
children, settled in, got
older, "a lot wiser."
"It gives you knowledge
from all the mistakes you


said. "Why I am running is
because after the amount of
time I have spent advocat-
ing on behalf of the home-
owners and the taxpayers
and the small business com-
munity here in this county, I
feel that my experience in
both business and civic ac-
tivity gives me a unique per-
spective."
If elected to the commis-
sion, Rusnak said she would
focus on bringing busi-
nesses and jobs to the
county, based on her work
experience.
"From Day 1 in my career,
I had to go out and market
whatever organization I was
with aggressively their serv-
ices and their products,"
Rusnak said.
Having witnessed the evo-


tral Florida Community
College, a bachelor's in or-
ganizational studies from
Eckerd College, and a mas-
ter's in business adminis-
tration from St. Leo
University.
Poliseno was the county's
public safety director from
1999 to 2008, when the posi-
tion was eliminated through
reorganization. He then
went to work for what is now
Duke Energy as the emer-
gency preparedness super-
visor in charge of the
emergency preparedness
program for the nuclear
plant.
"People may say that I'm


made," Adams said.
The 46-year-old said he
wanted to use the second
half of his life applying the
knowledge he gained from
his rough start
The greatest issue Adams
sees before the county is the
economy, providing for jobs
and business "and our re-
tired people being able to
have an affordable living."
The trick would be to
maintain a low-as-possible
residential tax base.
Adams said being in pri-
vate business he can think
out of the box and under-
stand economic growth.
"I have to take a penny
and make a dollar," Adams
said. "Typically, government
takes a dollar and asks for
two more."
Bringing vision would be
a goal.


lution of the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council (EDC), Rusnak sup-
ported its joining the Tampa
Bay Partnership for its net-
working opportunities and
source of hard data for mar-
ket planning. But she was
concerned the county would
outsource sales and market-
ing efforts to Tampa Bay
"We hear about leads, but
nothing seems to come
about," Rusnak said. "We
need to aggressively follow
up on this."
While focusing on build-
ing environmentally sound
industries and developing
enterprise zones, Rusnak
said the Port Citrus project
needs consideration.
"We have to look at the
feasibility study," Rusnak


a good old boy or I am a gov-
ernment insider," Poliseno
commented about his broad
background. "I don't agree
with that at all. I have expe-
rience in how to get the job
done. I can make decisions.
I've made true life-and-
death decisions as a para-
medic and a firefighter."
As public safety director,
Poliseno was in charge of
many services people could
find unpleasant: firefight-
ing, the jail, animal control
and code enforcement. In
completing the duties,
Poliseno took a positive atti-
tude: "The customer is not
always right, but the cus-


"On the economic stand-
point on long-term planning
for the county, I probably
understand that better than
anybody because I've been
involved in so much long-
term planning and projects
and been successful,"
Adams said.
To create jobs, Adams
would bring ideas inspired
by his commercial
experience.
With Port Citrus, Adams
said he would not be scared
to make the hard decisions
after he received all the in-
formation from the feasibil-
ity study about whether the
project should go forward.


said. "We have to have a
cost-benefit analysis done of
this venture. We've got the
canal. It's a reality. Another
reality, too, however, is that
we have the greenways
trail."
She was skeptical about
how barges would coexist
with kayaks on the canal,
but it was an issue to ana-
lyze, particularly as Plum
Creek Timber Company
would be clearing about
9,000 acres for the Tarmac
Mine, meaning rock and
wood somehow would have
to be shipped.
Regarding the Suncoast
Parkway II, Rusnak said she
would rather see public fo-
rums presenting both sides
of the argument, followed by
a public referendum, which


tomer is always treated with
respect"
His Duke Energy career
taught him that, economi-
cally, the county needs to di-
versify its taxpayer base and
not rely on one industry
If elected, Poliseno said
he would keep his job at
Duke.
"We ran it through corpo-
rate legal and ethics: I
would be able to maintain
my job," Poliseno said. "I
would not be involved in
any of the aspects that inter-
face between the county
and Duke Energy."
In dealing with county
budget challenges, Poliseno


"Either way they go, I
want to make sure I'm on
the right side," Adams said.
His decision would be
based on learning how the
project would affect job
growth, how much money
would need to be spent and
where the money would
come from.
The most important envi-
ronmental issue to Adams
was water, both quality and
quantity.
Water standards could be
maintained by keeping to
regulations and being rea-
sonable with county
projects.
Promoting growth would


she admitted likely would
be nonbinding.
In evaluating County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe,
Rusnak said she would give
him a C plus.
She said she approached
issues from a classic busi-
ness problem-solving
model.
One change Rusnak
would like to make would
be to the Monday briefing
session before Tuesday's
county commission meet-
ings. Rather than county
staff conferring one on one
with commissioners, Rus-
nak proposed a group ses-
sion with the public present.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicleon-
line. com or 352-564-2916.


said he would look at every
single cost base within it. He
would check for duplication
of services and cut costs on
travel.
"We can't keep relying on
going into our reserves,"
Poliseno said.
Having fire services
under the jurisdiction of the
sheriff's office seemed a
good idea. Poliseno would
support Port Citrus if the
feasibility study supported
it The Meadowcrest govern-
ment office a central loca-
tion sharing a building and
putting multiple services
under one roof, Poliseno
said.


be balanced with protecting
the environment.
In grading the county ad-
ministrator's performance,
Adams said he needed time
to work alongside him.
Describing county govern-
ment in gridlock, Adams
said it needed a better rela-
tionship with state
government.
"We need state help so


WHAT: Citrus
County
Commission
District 5.
WHO: Republicans
Scott Adams,
Charles Poliseno,
Theodora "Teddi"
Rusnak and
Michael Smallridge.
TERM: 4 years.
COVERS: All of
Citrus County.
PAY: $56,714.
ON THE BALLOT:
Universal Aug. 14
primary wins
election. All
registered
voters may vote
regardless of
political affiliation.



County Administrator
Brad Thorpe has done an
above-average job, probably
a B or an A-minus.
He can see the benefit of
Suncoast Parkway II, espe-
cially if Port Citrus is
developed.
Sewer systems make
sense as a revenue source
and protecting water qual-
ity. Poliseno would priori-
tize systems for areas that
are most environmentally
sensitive.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916


we're not bearing the bur-
den of financing," Adams
said.
Current projects Adams
would like to get moving
would be the Inverness Air-
port and Suncoast Parkway
II.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicleon-
line.com or 352-564-2916.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Violet 'Vi'
Phillips, 91
LECANTO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Violet "Vi"
M. Phillips, age 91, of
Lecanto, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Thursday,
July 26, 2012 at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes with Rev Gor-
don Condit officiating. A
luncheon will be served fol-
lowing services in the Com-
munity Room of the Beverly
Hills Chapel. Cremation
will be under the direction
of Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464. In-
urnment will be held on a
later date at Mount Pleasant
Rural Cemetery, Mt. Trem-
per, NY. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www HooperFuneralHome.
com.
Mrs. Phillips was born
January 12, 1921 in Monroe,
NJ, daughter of the late Rus-
sell and Laura (Miller) Sava-
cool. She died July 18, 2012
in Inverness, FL under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County. Raised and schooled
in New Jersey, she spent
most of her adult life living
in New York City. After re-
tirement in 1987, she moved
and lived full time in Ulster
County where she and her
husband maintained a sec-
ond home for many years in
the Kingston / Phoenicia
area. Her business career
was in fund-raising and ad-
ministration, working for
non-profit health organiza-
tions including the Cystic Fi-
brosis Foundation and The
National Multiple Sclerosis
Society.
She was a dedicated vol-
unteer and while living in
New York gave time to the
ASPCA, RSVP AARP and
The Hudson River Maritime
Museum. She was a member
of the Shandaken Theatrical
Society and served as board
member, business manager
and editor of the Newsletter
She enjoyed being on stage
and performed in a number
of productions. After becom-
ing a Florida resident, she
volunteered for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Depart-
ment and became a member
of the Red Hat Society. An
outdoor person, her favorite
activities included motorcy-
cling, downhill skiing, golf
and tennis. She was a mem-
ber of the Crystal River
United Methodist Church.
Mrs. Phillips was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band Phillip Phillips in July
of 1990. Survivors include
two sisters, Arbutus Patter-
son of Crystal River, FL and
Iris Scheisswohl of New
Milford, NJ, niece, Nancy
Alford of Inverness, FL,
nephew, Kenneth Mills of
Beverly Hills, FL and
grand-niece, Davina Eng-
land of Colorado. Arrange-
ments are under the
direction of the Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory
Dale Lewin, 60
BEVERLY HILLS
Dale A. Lewin, 60, of Bev-
erly Hills, died Friday, July
20, 2012, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County in
Lecanto.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @chronicleonline comn
or
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@ chronicleonline com

~i 'II~R


Leslie 'Buddy'
McKay Jr., 83
INGLIS
Leslie "Buddy" Brydon
McKay Jr, 83, of Inglis,
passed away Sunday, July 15,
2012, at Hospice of Citrus
/Nature Coast after a brief ill-
ness. Mr McKay was born in
Jacksonville on Oct 15, 1928.
He served his country in the
U.S. Navy and U.S. Marines
during WWII and Korea. Mr
McKay was
a project
manager for
JE Aber-
crombie
Company
Inc. in Jack-
sonville. He
was a mem-
ber of the Leslie
Ell z e y 'Buddy'
Methodist McKay Jr.
Church, en-
joyed fishing, bowling and
reading. He was a member of
the Moose Lodge 455 in Jack-
sonville, VFW Post 8698 of
Inglis, American Legion Post
155 of Crystal River,
AMVETS 447 of Inglis, and
the Marine Corp. League of
Spring Hill, Fla.
He is survived by his wife,
Mary Ellzey McKay, of In-
glis; two sons, Darrell
McKay and Danny McKay,
both of Jacksonville; a
daughter, Terry (Luis) Dag-
day, ofWichita Falls, Texas;
a sister, Mary Ellen Barn-
well, of Jacksonville; seven
grandchildren; seven great-
grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews. He
was preceded in death by a
son, Leslie McKay III; Ann
Grace McKay, a grandchild;
and his parents.
Funeral services were Fri-
day, July 20, 2012, at Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell, with full military hon-
ors. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to
Hospice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Arrangements were
under the care of Hiers-
Baxley Funeral Services,
1301 N. Young Blvd.,
Chiefland. 352-493-0050. Con-
dolences can be made at
www.hiers-baxley.com.

C-i. EIavi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
Cremation
Member of
Inernational Order of the
Ge)LDEN P~IS

For Information and costs,
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William
'Crabby Bill'
Ludixen, 64
HERNANDO
William A. "Crabby Bill"
Ludixen, 64, Hernando,
died Friday, July 20, 2012, at
his residence. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.
OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in submit-
ted material are
charged at the same
rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


%0tc


Scientists, seminarians


debate evolution online


Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Public discussion of evolu-
tion often turns into a
nasty debate between
young-earth creationists
on one side and atheists
who believe science dis-
proves the existence of
God on the other. But it
doesn't have to be that way
Witness the gracious di-
alogue taking place be-
tween Southern Baptist
seminary professors and
evangelical scientists on
the BioLogos website.
In a series of essays ti-
tled "Southern Baptist
Voices," the two groups
consider questions such as
whether the existence of a
historical Adam and Eve
created in the image of
God is compatible with the
gradual development of
humans through evolution.
While there is disagree-
ment, the authors are
quick to emphasize places
where they do agree, such
as the reality of the mira-
cles described in the
Bible, including the bodily
resurrection ofJesus. And
there is room for give-and-
take on both sides.
The series came about
after Southeastern Bap-
tist Theological Seminary
Academic Dean Kenneth
Keathley and BioLogos
President Darrel Falk met
at a Christian scholars
conference last year.
Keathley agreed to invite
seminary professors to
contribute essays describ-
ing their disagreements
with BioLogos, a non-
profit foundation "com-
mitted to exploring and
celebrating the compati-
bility of evolutionary cre-
ation and biblical faith,"
according to its website.
Keathley begins the
first essay by noting the
Southern Baptist state-
ment of faith is silent on
how God created the uni-
verse. But he goes on to


Associated Pres
Darrell Falk, Ph.D., president of The Biologos Foundation,
relaxes on his front porch rocker July 17 in San Diego. Falk
and his foundation's website state they are "committed to
exploring and celebrating the compatibility of evolutionary
creation and biblical faith."


ONLINE
http://biologos.org

say Southern Baptists' very
literal interpretation of
Scripture leads many in the
denomination to hold the
view God created the world
in six, 24-hour days less than
10,000 years ago.
Many Roman Catholic and
mainline Protestant Chris-
tians today see parts of the
Bible such as the creation as
metaphorical, but for many
evangelical Christians such
a belief is untenable.
Southern Baptist Semi-
nary President Albert
Mohler, a young-earth cre-
ationist, has called the at-
tempt to reconcile
evangelicals to evolution a
"direct attack upon biblical
authority."
Keathley, meanwhile,
calls himself an old-earth
creationist who accepts the
universe is billions of years
old, but also believes God di-
rectly intervened at certain
points in natural history
In an introductory essay to
the series, Keathley lays out
several points where he be-
lieves Southern Baptists are
at odds with the BioLogos


model. Among them is
whether Adam and Eve were
real people who experienced
a real fall from grace with God
that brought sin into the
world. The concept is also
central to the ideaJesus saved
the world from sin through his
death on the cross.
Falk and two other writ-
ers stated science tells us
"there was never a time
when the human population
from which all modern hu-
mans descended was as
small as two individuals."
Instead, they suggest the
possibility "God began a
covenantal relationship
with a real, historical first
couple who brought about
spiritual death as a result of
their disobedience."
Keathley also points out
for some Christians, evolu-
tion presents a problem be-
cause it implies suffering
and death have been with
the world from the begin-
ning, rather than resulting
from rebellion against God.



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A6 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SEARCHING
Continued from Page Al

been heard from since.
Dostal and former state


Sen. Nancy Argen-
ziano, an Independ-
ent in the race, are
convinced Republi-
cans are using
Goocher as a prop
to help incumbent
Rep. Jimmie T
Smith by drawing
votes away from
Argenziano.
Dostal had
planned to suspend
his campaign when
Argenziano entered
the race. After
Goocher filed his
paperwork, Dostal
decided to stay in
the campaign.
Smith, R-Inver-
ness, said he doesn't
know Goocher ex-
cept that his ex-wife
has had her oil
changed at Bob's
Car Care.
Goocher's ab-
sence from the cam-
paign trail is
frustrating to peo-
ple organizing can-
didate events.
At a Citrus Hills
forum Thursday
night, where
Goocher was a no-
show, organizer
Cathi Smith said
she tried to visit
Goocher three
times at Bob's Car


Jimm
Sm
incumb
HouseE


Nan
Argen
candid;
Houses
District


Care and was turned away
every time.
"I'm beginning to think,"
she said, "that he's a figment
of our imagination."
'He's a little
over his head'
Goocher, 24, is a regis-
tered Democrat, though
elections records show he
has never voted.
According to the supervi-
sor of elections office,
Goocher's address is the
same as his parents, Robert
and Jomarie Goocher, in
Sugarmill Woods. His father
is registered no-party affili-
ation and his mother is a
Republican.
Much of what the public
knows about Goocher is
found on his Facebook page,
where he wrote he is "ready
to have fun love the water
fishing boat etc my family
and friends mean every-
thing to me!"
Shawn Keenan, who lives
in Beverly Hills, offered
Goocher some political tips
early on.
Keenan said he had never
met Goocher when he re-
ceived a call from Goocher's
mother asking for help. He
said Mrs. Goocher knew he
had helped Thomas
Kennedy on his successful
school board campaign in
2010.
Keenan met with Goocher
and gave him contacts with
the local Democrat party
"I spent a few weeks with
him, gave him a Politics 101
and see what he needed,"
Keenan said. "I gave him


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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 A7


the basics to go with."
Keenan also said that,
while Goocher said he
wanted to make a differ-
ence, he had few
suggestions.
"He's a little over his
head," Keenan said.
"He didn't really
have much going
on."
For one, Keenan
said Goocher was
surprised to learn
that running for of-
fice meant being fre-
e T. quently out in
ith public.
Keenan said he
set in doesn't think
_t 34. Goocher is a Repub-
lican plant
"This is a guy
who's just fed up
with the situation,"
,-i. Keenan said.
S Reports show that,
as of July 13, he had
raised $2,540
through six cam-
)ostal paign donors.
ate for Chase Palmes do-
seat in nated $1,000 total on
:t 34. behalf of himself
and his business,
Sheldon-Palmes In-
surance of Ho-
mosassa. Palmes
gave an identical
amount to Smith's
campaign, as well.
S Palmes did not re-
turn phone calls for
icy comment.
ziano Two Winter Park
ate for political action com-
seat in mittees each do-
:t 34. nated $500.
Another $500
came from a Levy County
bail bondsman.
And $40 was donated by
an Inverness business, Con-
fetti Embroidery, which is
owned by Goocher's mother
Mrs. Goocher refused to
discuss her son's campaign
or her donation when a re-
porter stopped by one day
last week.
"That is none of your busi-
ness!" she said before ask-
ing the reporter to leave.
Mrs. Goocher is renting
her shop space from attor-
ney Bill Grant, who repre-
sents the Citrus County
Hospital Board and is one of
Smith's strong backers.
Grant said he has nothing
to do with the Goocher
candidacy
"I don't know him to save
my life," Grant said. "If the
guy walked in right now I
wouldn't know who he was."
The bail bondsman, Tony
Weeks, is a Bronson town
commissioner He said he
never met Goocher but that
two Citrus Springs friends
had recommended Goocher
to him.
"Sometimes I donate to
Democrats to help them
out," said Weeks, a regis-
tered Republican.


Special to the Chronicle
The front of a mail piece supporting Robert Goocher's is shown. It is put out by the Tallahassee-based group Putting
Florida First Inc., an electioneering communication organization. It collects and spends money like other special interest
groups, but there is no limit to individual contributions it receives.


Told that Goocher is no
actively campaigning
Weeks said he didn't know
that.
"I wish I had known tha
before I wrote him the
check," he said.
Weeks' friend, Patric]
Tavers, said he met Gooche:
at a rally a few months back
but he couldn't remember:
when or where it happened
"I liked the fact that he's
moderate Democrat,'
Tavers said.
He said Goocher criti
cized President Barac]
Obama's health care plain
and was against wate:
transfers to southern
counties.
"He had a lot of ideas a:
far as what he was going to
do," Tavers said.
Mail piece backs
Goocher
Some voters last week re
ceived one or two mai
pieces on Goocher's behal
from a Tallahassee-based
group called Putting
Florida First Inc.
WATERING FINES
Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
County has stopped
issuing warnings for
first offenders of local
watering rules.
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.


t


t
e

k
r

r
i.
a


k
n
r
n

s






If
d


One mail piece shows
photos of Goocher smiling
and working under the hood
of a customer's car
"Robert Goocher has the
courage to take on corrupt
politicians and stand up for
everyday Floridians," it
reads. "He's the leader we
need in Tallahassee."
While the piece supports
Goocher, there is no men-
tion of the state House race.
Putting Florida First is an
electioneering communica-
tion organization. It collects
and spends money like
other special interest
groups, but there is no limit


to individual contributions
it receives.
The group's website listed
five Democrat state House
candidates "associated"
with the organization. The
list includes House Minority
Leader Rep. Ron Saunders,
D-Key West.
Saunders said he has
never heard of Goocher He
said the organization cannot
formally support or oppose
any candidate unless the
candidate associates him-
or herself with the group.
"I've seen them do things
that are kind of innocuous,"
he said. "It helps build
1.r


name recognition."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Renee
Christopher-
McPheeters
Candidate for Citrus Co. Comm. Dist. 1
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Republican, for Citrus County,
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Calls for gun control stir little support


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Gun
control advocates sputter at
their own impotence. The
National Rifle Association is
politically ascendant. And
Barack Obama's White
House pledges to safeguard
the Second Amendment in
its first official response to
the deaths of at least 12 peo-
ple in a mass shooting at a
new Batman movie screen-
ing in suburban Denver
Once, every highly publi-
cized outbreak of gun vio-
lence produced strong calls
from Democrats and a few
Republicans for tougher con-
trols on firearms.
Now those pleas are
muted, a political paradox
that's grown more pro-
nounced in an era scarred by
Columbine, Virginia Tech,
the wounding of a congress-
woman and now the shooting
in a suburban movie theater
where carnage is expected
on-screen only
"We don't want sympathy
We want action," Dan Gross,
president of the Brady cam-
paign said Friday as Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
Republican challenger Mitt
Romney mourned the dead.
Ed Rendell, the former
Democratic governor of
Pennsylvania, was more em-
phatic than many in the early
hours after the shooting.
"Everyone is scared of the
NRA," he said on MSNBC.
"Number one, there are
some things worth losing for
in politics and to be able to
prevent carnage like this is
worth losing for"
Yet it's been more than a
decade since gun control ad-
vocates had a realistic hope
of getting the type of legisla-
tion they seek, despite pre-
dictions that each shocking
outburst of violence would
lead to action.
In 1994, Congress ap-
proved a 10-year ban on 19
types of military-style assault
weapons. Some Democrats
quickly came to believe the
legislation contributed to
their loss of the House a few
months later
Five years later, Vice Pres-
ident Al Gore cast a tie-
breaking Senate vote on
legislation to restrict sales at
gun shows.
The two events turned out
to be the high-water mark of
recent Democratic drives to
enact federal legislation
aimed at reducing gun vio-
lence, and some Republi-
cans said they could see the
shift coming.
"The news media in its
lather to distort this whole
issue may be wrong in their
estimation that this will help
Al Gore," then-Senate Major-
ity Leader Trent Lott, R-
Miss., said in an Associated
Press interview a few weeks
after the tie-breaking vote.
"As a matter of fact, it may al-
ready have hurt him, and it
may hurt him a lot more."
By 2004, when the assault
weapon ban lapsed, congres-
sional Democrats made no
serious attempt to pass an
extension. President George
W Bush was content to let it
fade into history
Public sentiment had
swung.
According to a Gallup poll
in 1990, 78 percent of those
surveyed said laws covering
the sale of firearms should
be stricter, while 19 percent
said they should remain the
same or be loosened.
By the fall of 2004 support
for tougher laws had
dropped to 54 percent In last
year's sounding, 43 percent
said they should be stricter,
and 55 percent said they
should stay the same or be
made more lenient
In terms of electoral poli-
tics, Harry Wilson, a
Roanoke College professor
and author of a book on gun
politics, said violent crime
has been declining in recent
years and, "It becomes in-
creasingly difficult to make
the argument that we need
stricter gun control laws."
Additionally, he said in
some regions, gun control
"can be a winning issue for
Democrats. But nationally,


it's a loser ... and they have
figured that out." Attempts
to emphasize the issue will
"really motivate the opposi-
tion. And in a political cam-
paign, nobody wants to do
that," he said.
At its core, Wilson said, the
issue divides rural voters
from urban voters.
Often, that means Republi-
cans on one side, Democrats
on the other But not always.
In the current election


cycle, the NRA has made 88
percent of its political dona-
tions to Republicans, and 12
percent to Democrats, ac-
cording to OpenSecrets.org.
The disparity obscures that
the organization consis-
tently supports some De-
mocrats, a strategy that
allows it to retain influence
in both parties.
It also reported spending
$2.9 million on lobbying last
year
Its clout was vividly on dis-
play in 2010 when majority
Democrats in the House
sidetracked legislation giving
the District of Columbia a
voting representative in the
House of Representatives.
Republicans had vowed to
add an NRA-backed provi-
sion invalidating a city ban
on handgun possession as
the price for passage, and
there was little doubt it had
the votes to prevail.
Later in the year, the NRA
objected to legislation to re-
quire groups airing political
advertising to disclose
donors. Fearing the fallout,
enough rank and file Democ-
rats demanded changes that
the leadership had to revise
the bill. A revised bill, grant-


Associated Press
President Barack Obama pauses Friday as he speaks about the Aurora, Colo., shooting at
a campaign in Fort Myers, Fla.


ing the NRA and other large
organizations an exemption,
eventually passed.
Gross, head of the Brady
Campaign, said Democrats
have drawn the wrong les-
sons for years. "The cultural
narrative exists because of
the assessment of Al Gore's
loss in 2000 and the mid-
terms in 1994, and in both
cases I think the gun issue
was scapegoated," he said.


"Those who didn't vote forAl
Gore weren't going to vote for
him anyway"
At the same time, Gross
readily conceded the linger-
ing hold of the issue.
"Look at Kerry when he
felt he needed to dress up in
hunting gear," he said, refer-
ring to the Democratic pres-
idential candidate's well-
photographed excursion into
a duck blind in camouflage


clothing in swing-state Ohio
a few weeks before the 2004
election.
Four years later, Obama
won the White House de-
spite strong opposition from
the NRA
As a senator from Illinois
and state lawmaker before
that, he was a strong sup-
porter of gun control.
Following last year's
killing of six people and the


wounding of Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords in Tucson, Ariz.,
Obama called for steps to
"keep those irresponsible,
law-breaking few from get-
ting their hands on a gun in
the first place."
He advanced no legislative
proposals then, and on Fri-
day, spokesman Jay Carney
said, "The president believes
that we need to take com-
mon-sense measures that
protect Second Amendment
rights of Americans, while
ensuring that those who
should not have guns under
existing law do not get them."
Obama isn't the only 2012
White House candidate to
adjust his views on gun
control.
In a losing Senate cam-
paign in Massachusetts in
1994, Mitt Romney said, "I
don't line up with the NRA"
A decade later, as governor,
he signed legislation making
a state assault weapons ban
permanent.
This year, bidding for sup-
port at the NRA convention,
he said: "We need a presi-
dent who will enforce cur-
rent laws, not create new
ones that only serve to bur-
den lawful gun owners."


Ten of the most admired women of Citrus County will be featured in the
special section on Wednesday, September 12,2012



NOMINATION BALLOT


Sponsored by:
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10 Most Admired Women in Citrus County


Most Admired in the Arts
Name:
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Admired attributes:


Most Admired in Government


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Most Admired Mother
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business office no later than 5 p.m. on July 25, 2012. 3. Only one nomination per category will be accepted.
These may be delivered to the Meadowcrest or 4. Additional information for each nominee may be
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A8 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Teams take part in the first "Walk a Mile in My Shoes," fundraiser Saturday at the Key
Training Center's Run for the Money finale. Altrusa organized the event for the 13 teams.


RUN
Continued from Page Al

running partner and Key
client, Dorothy Cole, said it
felt nice to finish another
run for such a deserving
cause.
Though Royal admits he
didn't run as much as he
had in previous years, he
said this year's event was
"really flawless."
The weather was good,
despite a few showers Tues-
day The only true aggrava-
tion on the trail was
mosquitoes. Royal said the
mosquitoes were so big they
could "carry you away"
"And in the wrong direc-
tion," joked fellow runner
Sgt. Misty Clendenney, also
with the sheriff's office.
When asked what in-
spires them to run annually
during one of the hottest
times of the year, Royal
quickly said his running
partner, Cole.
But Royal and Clenden-
ney agreed, they also run for
the clients.
"I can (run). They can't,"
she said.
Following the grand fi-
nale, Brennan couldn't help
but stand in awe as she
looked at the number of
people who came out to sup-
port the Key
"Look at this," she said,
pointing toward the crowd.


Singer/songwriters Andrew Kyburz, left, Joey Lazio, center,
and Jerry Ledsome performed after the runners finished
Saturday at the Key Training Center's Run for the Money.


"This is everything Run for
Money is supposed to be."
Brennan expressed ap-
preciation for all the com-
munity involvement this
year, especially during the
Key's inaugural Walk a Mile
in My Shoes event, which
took place before the run-
ners arrived.
"And they came through.
They all did it," she said.
Thirteen teams including
176 participants, with Key
clients as honorary team
captains, walked a mile
around the Key campus.
Each team had representa-
tives from different busi-
nesses and organizations.
Waiting to walk with their
team captain, Norine, com-
munity liaison Jennifer Duca


with Comfort Keepers said
she and the rest of her team
were excited about the event
"It's for a good cause, and
we're gonna have fun," she
said.
Anne Black, who helped
organize the event, said she
got involved after Brennan
approached Altrusa Inter-
national Inc. of Citrus
County about enhancing
Run for the Money with a
new walking event.
With some help from Cit-
rus Roadrunners, Black
said the event came to-
gether beautifully And with
so many people expressing
interest in participating this
year, she's confident it will
be bigger and better next
year.


Citrus County Sher-
iff's Capt. Phil Royal
* .kisses Dorothy Cole
after the Key Train-
ing Center's Run for
the Money on Satur-
day. Cole is the sis-
ter of Key Center
founder Chet Cole.
Chet Cole started
the run decades ago,
from Tallahassee to
Citrus County, to
raise awareness of
developmentally dis-
abled people. The
Key has grown to
serve about 1,300
clients since it
began, funded by
government grants,
thrift store income
and public donations.





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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WodBRIEFS COVERAGE OF THE COLORADO SHOOTING

In a parade


Police: Attack planned for months


Associated Press
A chihuahua dog named
Miss Chiwa, is dressed up
in Belgium's tricolor, during
the parade for the national
day Saturday in front of the
Royal Palace in Brussels.


African countries
lose AIDS funding
JOHANNESBURG -An
independent, global medical
and humanitarian organiza-
tion said African nations are
not receiving adequate inter-
national funding to fight
HIV/AIDS, leaving them to
face catastrophic conse-
quences without enough
medication.
Experts at Medecins Sans
Frontieres, or Doctors Without
Borders, on Thursday said
Congo is only able to supply
anti-retroviral drugs to 15 per-
cent of the people needing
them and "patients are literally
dying on our doorstep."
In a statement released in
Johannesburg ahead of the
United Nations world AIDS
conference, the organization
said countries worst affected
by the pandemic were the
least able to provide "the best
science" available to fight it.

Taliban kill 10 in
attack in Pakistan
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -
ATaliban suicide car bomber
attacked a rival militant com-
mander's compound in north-
western Pakistan on
Saturday, killing at least 10
people, as heavily armed as-
sailants killed eight members
of the coast guard in the
southwest, officials said.
There has been significant
infighting over turf and leader-
ship positions within the Pak-
istani Taliban, an umbrella
organization set up in 2007 to
represent roughly 40 insur-
gent groups, many of whom
are waging a bloody cam-
paign against the government.
The compound attacked
was in Spin Dal village in the
Orakzai tribal area and was
owned by militant commander
Mullah Nabi, said senior tribal
police official Amjad Khan.
Nabi was once a close ally to
a prominent Pakistani Taliban
commander from Orakzai,
Mullah Toofan, but the two are
now fierce rivals.
Nabi was at the compound
when the attack occurred but
was not hurt, said Khan. The
10 killed included five chil-
dren, he said.

Norway's
tolerance tested
OSLO, Norway Nor-
way's commitment to face
xenophobia with tolerance on
the first anniversary of bomb
and gun attacks by a con-
fessed right-wing killer is
being put to the test by hostile
reactions to an influx of Gyp-
sies from Eastern Europe.
Norwegian Prime Minister
Jens Stoltenberg said he has
been disturbed by the tone of
a recent debate over the small
camps of makeshift huts set
up by Gypsies in Oslo and
other Norwegian cities.
The anti-Roma sentiment
has been no worse than else-
where in Europe many
Gypsies said they are treated
better in Norway than in their
home countries, including Ro-
mania and Bulgaria.
But the discussion comes at
an uncomfortable time for Nor-
way as it prepares to honor
the 77 victims of the country's
worst peacetime massacre in
memorial services Sunday.
-From wire reports


Colo. shooting suspect

purchased ammunition

online, set traps at home

Associated Press

AURORA, Colo. The Colorado shoot-
ing suspect planned the rampage that
killed 12 midnight moviegoers with "calcu-
lation and deliberation," police said Satur-
day, receiving deliveries for months which
authorities believe armed him for battle
and were used to rig his apartment with
dozens of bombs.
Authorities on Saturday were still work-
ing to clear dangerous explosive materials
from inside James Holmes' suburban Den-
ver apartment a day after police said he
opened fire and set off gas canisters in a sub-
urban theater minutes into the premiere of
the Batman film "The Dark Knight Rises."
The attack left 12 dead and 58 injured.


Associated Press

AURORA, Colo. Ashley
Moser drifted in and out of
consciousness in the ICU, bul-
lets lodged in her throat and a
gunshot wound to her ab-
domen. In her waking mo-
ments, she called for her
6-year-old daughter Veronica.
Nobody had the heart to tell
the 25-year-old mother that
Veronica was already dead, the
youngest victim killed at a Col-
orado movie theater in one of
the worst mass shootings in
U.S. history
"All she's asking about, of
course, is her daughter," said
Ashley Moser's aunt Annie
Dalton. "She was a vibrant 6-
year-old. She was excited,
she'd just learned how to
swim. She was a great little
girl, excited about life she
should be at 6 years old."
The young girl was among the
12 people killed when a gun-
man barged into a crowded Col-
orado theater, set off gas
canisters and opened fire as
spectators dove for cover
Dozens of others were injured,
including the 25-year-old Ash-
ley Moser and 10 others in criti-
cal condition as of Friday night.
Colorado authorities Satur-
day released the names of
those killed, eight men, three
women and Veronica Moser-
Sullivan. The oldest victim was
51-year-old Gordon Cowden.
All died of gunshot wounds,
according to the Arapahoe
County coroner's office.
One of the 12, Matthew
McQuinn, has been tentatively
identified and is awaiting final
identification, though his fam-
ily's attorney confirmed to The
Associated Press that McQuinn
was among those killed.
Rob Scott of Dayton, Ohio,
said McQuinn died after diving
in front of his girlfriend and
her older brother to shield


His apartment was rigged with jars of liq-
uids, explosives and chemicals that were
booby trapped to kill "whoever entered it,"
Aurora Police Chief Dan Oates said, noting
it would have likely been one of his officers.
"You think we're angry? We sure as hell
are angry," Oates said.
Authorities wouldn't discuss a motive for
one of the deadliest mass shootings in re-
cent U.S. history
Holmes apparently had prepared the at-
tack at the Aurora theater well in advance,
receiving multiple deliveries by mail for
four months to his home and school and
buying thousands rounds of ammunition on
the Internet, Oates said.
"We think this explains how he got his
hands on the magazine, ammunition," Oates
said, as well as the rigged explosives in his
apartment "What we're seeing here is evi-
dence of some calculation and deliberation."
Federal authorities detonated one small
explosive and disarmed others inside
Holmes' apartment after sending in a robot
to take down a trip wire, FBI Special agent
James Yacone said.


From left,
Pastor Mary Lu
Saddoris
comforts Isaac
Pacheco and
Courtney
McGregor,
friends of
shooting victim
Alex Sullivan,
on Saturday as
they visit a
memorial near
the movie
theater in
Aurora, Colo.
YOUNG CHANG/
The Denver Post


TWELVE VICTIMS WHO DIED


* Jessica Ghawi, 24.
* Matt McQuinn, 27.
* Micayla Medek, 23.
* Jesse Childress, 29.
* Jonathan T Blunk, 26.
* Alexander C. Teves, 24.

them from the gunfire. Scott's
account could not be immedi-
ately verified.
For Alex Sullivan, he
planned to ring in his 27th
birthday with friends at the
midnight showing of "The
Dark Knight Rises" and then
celebrate his first wedding an-
niversary Sunday
Late Friday, Sullivan's family
confirmed police told them he
was among those killed.
Micayla Medek, 23, was also
among the dead, her father's
cousin, Anita Busch, told the
Associated Press.
"I hope this evil act... doesn't
shake people's faith in God,"
she said.
On Saturday morning, par-
ents of John Larimer released
a statement that Navy officials
notified them about midnight
their 27-year-old son was one
of the 12 killed.


Veronica Moser,
Alex Sullivan, 27.
John Larimer, 27.
Gordon W. Cowden, 51.
Rebecca Ann Wingo, 32.
Alexander J. Boik, 18.

An Air Force reservist who
worked at Buckley also was
among the victims killed. Sgt.
Jesse Childress, 29, was a
cyber-systems operator, the Air
Force said in a statement..
A blogger and aspiring
sports reporter who recently
wrote of surviving a Toronto
shooting was killed, the
woman's brother said.
The death of Jessica Ghawi,
who was also known as Jessica
Redfield, was a "complete and
utter shock," said her brother,
Jordan Ghawi.
Aurora Police Chief Dan
Oates said Friday evening 10
victims died at the theater and
two others later died from
their injuries.
The other victims were
Alexander J. Boik, Jonathan T
Blunk, Rebecca Ann Wingo
and Alexander C. Teves, ac-
cording to the coroner's office.


Associated Press
An ATF agent arranges boxes for evidence Saturday in front
of the apartment of James Holmes in Aurora, Colo. Federal
authorities detonated one small explosive and disarmed
another inside Holmes' apartment, but other explosive
devices remained, said Aurora police Sgt. Cassidee Carlson.


QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
ABOUT MASS SHOOTING
Associated Press

Q: WHAT HAPPENED?
A: On Friday, shortly after midnight
Thursday, a gunman wearing a gas
mask and black SWAT gear set off two
gas canisters and then opened fire
inside a crowded theater in the Denver
suburb of Aurora, Colo., killing
12 people and wounding nearly
60 others, authorities said. The
suspect was arrested near a car be-
hind the theater and identified as
24-year-old James Holmes. Authorities
have not released a motive.
Q: WHO IS THE SUSPECT?
A: Holmes was studying neuroscience in
a Ph.D. program at the University of
Colorado-Denver. He enrolled in June
2011 but left a year later, though it
wasn't immediately clear why.
He played soccer at Westview High
School in the San Diego area and
graduated with honors from the Uni-
versity of California, Riverside, in
spring 2010 with a bachelor's degree
in neuroscience.
Those who knew Holmes described
him as a shy, intelligent man who
grew up in San Diego with parents
who were active in their well-to-do
suburban neighborhood.
Q: WHAT IS GOING ON AT HOLMES'
APARTMENT?
A: Police disarmed trip wires and explo-
sive devices that authorities said were
"set up to kill" people inside Holmes'
third-floor apartment. Federal authori-
ties detonated one small explosive
and disarmed another, but several
other explosive devices remained,
Aurora police Sgt. Cassidee Carlson
said Saturday.
Authorities are hoping to find clues to
his motive without destroying key evi-
dence in a blast.
Police have evacuated surrounding
buildings.
The apartment is about four miles
from the theater.
Q: ARE MOVIE THEATERS STILL
SHOWING THE FILM?
A: Yes, though with increased security.
AMC Theaters, the nation's second-
largest chain, barred customers from
wearing masks or costumes.
Also, in a rare show of solidarity, Holly-
wood studios delayed their weekend
box-office reporting because of the
shootings. Sony, Fox, Disney, Universal
and Lionsgate said Saturday they were
joining "Dark Knight Rises" distributor
Warner Bros. in withholding their box-
office numbers for the weekend.
Q: HOW MANY GUNS DID THE
SUSPECT HAVE?
A: Officers found an AR-15 assault rifle
the civilian form of the M-16 a
Remington 12-gauge shotgun and a
.40-caliber Glock handgun in the the-
ater and another identical handgun in
the car. The gunman also set off two
devices that released a smoke or an ir-
ritant, Aurora Police Chief Dan Oates
said.
Q: WHEN WAS THE LAST MASS
SHOOTING IN THE U.S.?
A: The massacre in Aurora was one of
the deadliest in the U.S., and the
worst mass shooting in the U.S. since
the Nov. 5, 2009, attack at Fort Hood,
Texas, when an Army psychiatrist
killed 13 soldiers and civilians and
more than two dozen others wounded.
In Colorado, it was the deadliest
shooting since the Columbine High
School massacre on April 20, 1999,
when two students opened fire at the
school in the Denver suburb of Little-
ton, killing 12 classmates and a
teacher and wounding 26 others be-
fore killing themselves.


In mourning


Associated Press
From left, Tylecia Amos, 14, Shatyra Amos, 15, Michael Walker, 17, and Mykia Walker, 16, carry
flowers to lay at a makeshift memorial Saturday across the street from the Century Theater
parking lot in Aurora, Colo. Twelve people were killed and dozens were injured in the attack early
Friday at the packed theater during a showing of the Batman movie, "The Dark Knight Rises."

Police identify final movie theater rampage victims











CCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can
be found on PageA13
of today's Chronicle. ,
Q/Y


Riding the Eastern &


Oriental Express train


Associated Press
This undated image released by the Eastern & Oriental shows the Eastern & Oriental train crossing the Kanchanaburi Bridge on the River Kwai in Thailand.
Dancers perform in January for passengers of the Eastern & Oriental train from Bangkok to Laos on a scheduled tour stop at Phimai, the site of an ancient Khmer city in
Korat, Thailand. The Eastern & Oriental is owned by the same company that took over the storied Orient Express, which began running between Paris and Vienna in 1883.
That legendary route changed and expanded over time and by the 1930s, the trains also served destinations in central and southern Europe.



Journey wends through picturesque parts of Asia


CHARMAINE NORONHA
Associated Press
-ABOARD THE EASTERN &
ORIENTAL EXPRESS
eads of sweat
trickle down my
forehead on a
muggy night in
Bangkok when I realize
I'm late for the Eastern &
Oriental Express train.
I've missed the shuttle
from my hotel and my
baggage bounces over the
unevenly paved streets as
I run to the station in
a panic.
As I fly down the platform, my dress
billows behind me. I feel like a charac-
ter in an old movie as I sprint for the
train, but it's not Paris in the 1920s and
I'm not chasing the love of my life. In-
stead, I plan to be chasing back marti-
nis as I journey through northeast
Thailand's picturesque landscapes of
rice paddy fields and lush hilltops,
en route to Laos on this modern
luxury train.
Flustered, I hop on seconds before
the green and cream train toot-toots out
of the station, and just as I imagined,


it's as though I've landed in a bygone
era. Cherrywood-walled corridors in-
laid with deep-set maroon carpets pave
the way to elm-burr paneled cabins,
outfitted with floral-patterned furniture
and adorned with veneers of rosewood
marquetry and intricate inlays.
Flamingo pink and brass lampshades
create warm, buttery hues inside cozy
cabins. Elegantly suited attendants
pepper the corridors, ready to oblige
your every need. In the distance, a bar
piano tinkles Dixieland jazz.
The Eastern & Oriental is owned by
the same company that took over the
storied Orient Express, which began
running between Paris and Vienna in
1883. That legendary route changed
and expanded over time and by the
1930s, the trains also served destina-
tions in central and southern Europe.
Luxurious interiors and service at-
tracted royalty, diplomats, business ex-
ecutives and the bourgeoisie, and the
brand including sister trains like the
E&O still carries that reputation for
luxury The team that refurbished the
modern Venice Simplon-Orient Ex-
press train created the interiors for the
Eastern & Oriental, which began run-
ning in Asia in 1993. Its carriages incor-
porate Eastern motifs and themes.
The E&O has several routes, includ-
ing journeys to Singapore and through
Malaysia. I picked a four-day, three-
night round-trip from Bangkok to Laos.
Unfortunately, we lost a day's ride due
to flooding that had washed out tracks
in the south, so instead of winding
through the countryside by day for a


stop in Chiang Mai, we listened to a lec-
ture about Thailand's textile culture
and history at Bangkok's Mandarin Ori-
ental hotel, followed by a delectable
evening spread. With full bellies, we
boarded the train just in time for a
night cap, an introduction to our cozy
cabins and attendant, and moments
later, our bumpy ride into the night
began.
At dawn, the smell of percolating cof-
fee wafted through the corridors and
the jostling of locomotive travel shook
us from slumber Our cabin attendant
greeted us with a continental breakfast,
including a selection of scrumptious
gluten-free baked goods to accommo-
date my allergy And then it was off to
Phimai, one of the most prominent
Khmer ruins complexes in Thailand,
which is on the tentative list of UN-
ESCO World Heritage sites. Located in
Korat in northeastern Thailand, Phimai
was the site of a Khmer city, built be-
tween 1579 and 1589 by the Khmer King
Suriyavaraman I as part of the Khmer
Empire. Here, we were treated to a tra-
ditional Khmer dance performance and
a lecture about the significance and his-
tory of the sprawling ancient city.
We hopped back onto the train for
lunch and journeyed through pictur-
esque Khao Yai, where we disem-
barked for an afternoon tour of the
GranMonte Family Vineyard, a unique
grape-growing region and winery in the
country's north. After sampling several
international award-winning selec-
tions, we stumbled back onto the train
to glam it up for dinner The E&O en-


courage a formal dress code for its
night-time noshing as a means to help
preserve its glitzy past, and also encour-
ages passengers to get to know each
other, so you're seated among other
guests for a fancy-shmancy meal and
entertaining conversation. I dined with
a couple who had recently lost their
home and belongings in the
Christchurch, New Zealand, earth-
quake, and who were using the tragic
incident as a catalyst to begin anew,
along with a fellow Canadian who re-
galed me with fascinating stories about
working around the world as an inter-
national conflict resolution expert with
the United Nations.
The next morning, the train rode over
the Mekong River via the Friendship
Bridge on newly laid tracks linking
Thailand to Laos. We were greeted by
another traditional dance, this time
Laotian, before setting off to explore
the capital city of Vientiane, as well as a
textile factory started by a former U.N.
development worker originally from
Ethiopia. The day of touring did not
provide enough time to do the city jus-
tice, but we headed back to the train for
the last evening of cocktailing and con-
versation. After a delightful, waist-ex-
panding three-course dinner, I snuggled
into bed for the last night's journey
back to Bangkok.
Before drifting off, it occurred to me
that if I had been chasing the love of my
life, I might have let him go so I could
spend more time chasing adventures on
the Eastern & Oriental through
Southeast Asia.


Dog days of summer

Penny Jordan and Gucci Johnson, from Homosassa, spent a week at a rental house
on Cape San Bias Beach in the Panhandle of Florida. It was a perfect place for the
two BFFs to relax and enjoy the beautiful beach and sunsets. Oh, yes, they did bring
their parents, Sophie Jordan and Mary Lee Johnson, along.

Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sister resents being


cut out of mom's will


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 22, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News perform. (In Stereo)'PG'"
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N 50 119 Locklear, Max Martini, Gabrelle Rose. I Luner, Chris Kramer. N Nelson, Michae Riley. "
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Dear Annie: Six years
ago, my 54-year-old
divorced sister,
"Sue," decided to move in
with my parents because
she was afraid to live by her-
self.
At the time, Sue had a
part-time job and my par-
ents were in good health.
Within a year, however, my
father was diag-
nosed with
Alzheimer's and
Mom developed
heart problems.
The other day I
visited Mom, and
she informed me
that Sue can no
longer work be-
cause she has to
take care ofthem
full time. She
wants to pay Sue ANN
for her "ser-
vices," as well as MAIL
take care of all of
Sue's bills.
Mind you, Sue built up a
nice savings account be-
cause my parents paid for
everything, and she now has
more than $150,000 in the
bank. She also will be re-
ceiving a portion of her ex-
husband's pension in a few
years. Despite this, Sue has
convinced my parents that
she will be homeless.
I could live with that, but
Mom also let me know that
she is changing her will so
Sue gets everything. She
based this decision on the
fact that I seem to be doing
OK and my son, her only
grandson, is fine.
I know that taking care of
my parents is not an easy
job. I also realize it's their
money and they are entitled
to do what they want with it.


S Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 11:15a.m., 11:45 a.m.,
2:55 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:45 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
12:10 p.m., 4:55 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 10:25 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) 12 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:25 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Dark Knight Rises"
(PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20 p.m.,


3:25 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 6:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
2:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
In 3D. 12:05 p.m., 5 p.m., 10 p.m.
No passes.
"Savages" (R) ID required.
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 12:50 p.m.,
3:30 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Underground
passage
6 Scarecrow stuffing
11 Subsequently
16 Possessed
21 Church governance
22 Baggy
23 Steed
24 Baton -
25 Catkin
26 The upper crust
27 Wipe out
28 Cake-serving shape
29 Legendary bird
30 Make confused
31 Effortless
32 Compass pt.
34 Mars or Mercury
35 Noisy fight
38 Travis or Newman
40 Touch
41 Printers' measures
42 European range
44 Spray
45 Shoe part
47 Under the weather
49 Aquarium creature
52 Flatten
54 Colorful fabric
56 Wet nurse
60 Bugle
61 Earthenware jar
62 Recipe direction
63 Grass for grazing
65 about time!
66 Redden
67 Kind of monster
68 Traveled on
69 Linden or Holbrook
70 Quid quo
71 Abundant
72 Stop
73 Saloon
74 Charmingly smooth
76 Going-away party (hyph.)
78 Chore
79 Splice
80 Barkin or Burstyn
81 Lout
82 Great composer
83 Poet
84 Container
for ashes
85 Berate
88 Bottle stopper
89 "Of--and Men"
90 Conquering one
94 Pitched


95 Decompose
96 Water or trailer
97 Poker stake
98 Drs.' org.
99 Estuary
100 An astringent
102 Insulated wire
103 Angry
104 To wit (Lat. abbr.)
105 Alleviated
107 Cry heard at sea
108 Cover girl
109 Farm structure
110 Annoyance
111 Place for wine storage
113 Sofa
114 Leggy bird
115 Newt
117 Plant fluid
118 Trick
119 Implement
121 Touch lightly
124 -of Misrule
126 Underway
128 Stippled
132 Female sheep
133 Raw material
134 Say grace
135 Island
139 Abbr. in a schedule
140 Colorful bird
142 Ill-mannered one
144 Tantalize
145 Tropical fruit
147 Chatter
148 Relating to hearing
149 Speed
150 Elemental gas
151 Singing voice
152 Rings
153 Old anesthetic
154 Overact

DOWN
1 Ascot
2 State of mind
3 Betel palm
4 Fish paddle?
5 Tit for-
6 Toboggan
7 Related
8 Stir up
9 Star-shaped
printing character
10 Small
11 In front
12 Bell-shaped flower
13 Salver
14 Letter for plurals


15 Actress
Witherspoon
16 "Animal Farm"
author
17 Grief
18 Push
19 Prod(2wds.)
20 Things done
30 Snake
31 Medical specialty (abbr.)
33 Grabbed
36 Name in Genesis
37 Totality
39 Cigar residue
40 Swamp
43 Back of the neck
44 "-Ado About Nothing"
46 Lubricant
48 Workroom,
for short
49 Masted vessels
50 Dame
51 Illegal burning
53 One of the Golden Girls
54 Young horse
55 Prickle
57 Taj-
58 Century plant
59 Hayes or Mirren
61 Precipice
62 Cheat
64 Coolly formal
66 The Great
White Way
67 Cut
68 Foray
72 Taxi driver
73 Drill
75 Skeletal part
77 Distribute
(with "out")
78 Bakery item
79 -o'-lantern
82 Deep sound
83 Cage occupant
84 "Wait Dark"
85 Sandal part
86 Where
Valparaiso is
87 Some exams
88 Unrefined
89 Poppins or Pickford
90 Devise
91 Bowie or Beckham
92 French writer
Zola
93 Shaving need
96 Destitute
97 Opera by Verdi


101 Reader
in a church
102 Thicket of shrubs
103 Adore
106 Consumed
107 Winglike part
108 Abuse
109 of the earth
112 Drug letters
113 Twosome
114 Court


116 Blossom
118 Rogers or Orbison
120 Work in verse
121 Lure
122 Conscious
123 Certain nut
125 Summarize,
for short
127 Tumbles
129 Argentine dance
130 Rye fungus


131 Hum
134 Aqua-
136 Dinerfood
137 Bone(prefix)
138 Antlered animal
141 From---Z
143 Shade
144 An article
145 West of old
movies
146 Branch


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


But Sue has always been the
golden child, and taking me
out of the will is a slap in the
face.
I'm hurt that my son and I
have been excluded. It's not
about the money It's about
being disregarded. Even a
small token would mean
something.
I'm struggling with how to
accept this with-
out hard feelings,
but obviously
those feelings are
already there.
Any suggestions?
Thought I
Meant More to
Them
Dear Thought:
Parents often
don't realize that
leaving all of
their possessions
IE'S to one child cre-
BOX ates hurt feelings,
jealousy and es-
trangements.
It doesn't matter that one
child is needier, only that all
children are acknowledged.
Please tell your mother
how you feel. Ask whether
she would leave you and
your son a cherished pos-
session as a keepsake.
When she understands
that it's truly not about the
money, we hope she will
reconsider.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors ofthe Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A12 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the
Purple Heart and honoring all
Purple Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing car-
riejenetteclemons@yahoo.com,
or calling Carrie at 352-
628-1633. Indicate the number
in your party.
General George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782. The first American award
made available to the common
soldier, it is the oldest military
decoration in the world in
present use.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase Ill. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on
a marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times.
To help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com,
or call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do


not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.


Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at
several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle
yoga from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
e Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to
5 p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m.
Thursday.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from
10 to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-
382-7397.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328 for more
information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcome
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current coali-
tion members are welcome.
Members are encouraged to at-
tend general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
more than 10,000 communities.
The principles of the American


Legion Auxiliary are to serve
veterans, families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,


or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Join the post for a baked
ham dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, July 27; cost is $8 and
children younger than 6 eat
for $4.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is now a non-
smoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility-challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, call


Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at
352-560-3867 or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome for
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume
in September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in


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Beverly Hills. New members
are welcome. Membership fee
is $30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or
three-piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for a printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. Call the post


at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at
1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly. Any veteran who has
seen honorable service in any
of the Armed Forces of the U.S.
is eligible for membership if
said service was within Korea,
including territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are invited.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit www.Postl55.org.

See VETERANS/Page A14


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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Warning: Column


may cause drowsiness


Most of the prescrip-
tions I have ever
gotten warn me not
to drive, operate heavy
equipment or use a chain-
saw while taking the medi-
cine which was never a
big problem when I was
young and lived in Manhat-
tan. I didn't own a car or a
chainsaw, and operating
heavy equipment was so far
out of my comfort zone, it
wasn't even an issue. Pretty
much the same for light
equipment.
I thought the
only people who
owned chain-
saws were serial
killers and
Mafia enforcers.
When watching
the news after a
hurricane or tor-
nado had hit
some unfortu-
nate town, it al- JI
ways seemed MULl
strange to see
homeowners
emerge from their houses
lugging giant chainsaws and
start cutting apart fallen
trees. Where did they learn
how to use them? How often
does this town get hit by tor-
nadoes? If it's a regular
thing, I'm not sure owning a
chainsaw will solve the
problem. Maybe there's
something about chainsaws
that attracts tornadoes.
But now that I live in a
real place that is not Man-
hattan, a place where peo-
ple drive cars and live in
houses with yards and oper-
ate heavy equipment for a
living, I realize that a chain-
saw is a handy thing to have
around.
I've learned that even a
garden-variety thunder-
storm, the kind that will
never make the national
news, can leave a lot of
downed tree limbs in its
wake, most of them in my
backyard. My chainsaw has
paid for itself many times
over
But as I get older, along
with most of my friends and
neighbors, I now take lots of
medicines all the time, not
just for a week while some-
thing gets better Nothing we
have now is going to get bet-
ter All the medicines we
take, we take to keep things
from getting worse. And
they all seem to have side
effects and warning labels.
The caution not to oper-
ate heavy equipment and
chainsaws is still very popu-
lar, but one is new to me.


I
I


The warning on a common
medicine taken by almost
100 percent of the residents
of places with names like
Sun City and Valley of the
Sun says, "Avoid exposure to
direct or artificial sunlight
while on this medication."
Isn't this why old people
who take this medicine
move south in the first place
to spend time in the sun?
And what does "artificial
sunlight" mean? Are we
supposed to live in the
dark?
The next bottle
says this drug
"may cause dizzi-
ness." But that's
OK, because the
doctor gives me
another medicine
for the dizziness.
SIt says, "Do not eat
S grapefruit while
taking this medi-
cine." I can live
LEN with being dizzy;
I'm not sure I can
live without
grapefruit.
Several of the medicines
say they should be taken
with food, while some say
they should not. One says it
shouldn't be taken for an
hour after eating a meal
high in fiber I nearly missed
that, as the warning is writ-
ten in letters so small that
you need a microfiche to
read them. It's a medicine
mainly for the reading-glass
set. Maybe someone should
explain to my pharmacist
that eyesight, as with so
much else, does not get bet-
ter with age. I notice the
amount of my co-pay is
printed in large, easy-to-
read numbers.
It's funny how health care
is the one thing we pay for
without knowing its price
before we buy it. I know
people who will go to a dif-
ferent supermarket to save
15 cents on a can of peas
and people who will drive
miles out of their way to buy
gas that's 3 cents a gallon
cheaper But when they get
a bill for $1,783.62 for a test
they can't remember taking
at a doctor's office, they pay
their share (or the whole
thing) without complaint.
After all, that's why they
call them your "golden
years." Because that's what
it costs to live during them.


Jim Mullen's newest book,
"How to Lose Money in Your
Spare Time -AtHome, "is
available at amazon. com.


July 23 to27 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian
vegetable medley, applesauce,
white bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, graham
crackers, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange-
pineapple juice, breaded fish
filet with tartar sauce, cheese
grits, tomatoes and okra,
oatmeal raisin cookie, whole-
grain bread with margarine,


low-fat milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
spinach, peaches, whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Pork chop patty with
brown gravy, black-eyed peas,
country vegetable medley,
mixed fruit dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


SEND US YOUR NEWS
* The Chronicle welcomes announcements of weddings,
engagements, anniversaries, births and first birthdays
for print on the Sunday Together page each week.
Email announcements to community@chronicleonline.
com or visit the website at www.chronicleonline.com
and follow instructions for posting your news there.


1(
b 'I


Norman and Loretta
Robey of Homosassa are
celebrating their 60th
wedding anniversary on
July 24, 2012. The couple
were married in Prince
Georges County on July
24, 1952, in Hyattsville,
Md.
Longtime residents of
Citrus County, they are re-
tired and spend their free
time fishing, seeing family
and friends, camping along
the coast and treasure
hunting.
To celebrate their 60th
anniversary, the couple
plan an adventure through
the Midwest on Route 66.
The couple had four


Lauren and Blake
DeCarlo of Jacksonville,
N.C., announce the birth of
a daughter, Ella Adele
DeCarlo, at 11:38 p.m. Sat-
urday, July 7, 2012, at
Flagler Hospital.
The baby weighed 7
pounds, 9 ounces and was
20 inches long.
Maternal grandparents


Divorces 719112 to 7/15/12
Amber M. Cason vs.
Clayton M. Cason
Marriages 7/9/12 to 7/15/12
Jared Stephen Brodsky,
Hernando/Melanie Rose
Pullen, Inverness
Aaron Bruce Butterworth,
Albuquerque, N.M./Selina
Marie Willey, Inverness
Sean Alexander Coughlin,
Lynnwood, Wash./Courtney
Diann Gavin, Lynnwood,
Wash.
Carl Eugene Hilgert,
Inverness/Stephanie Ann Lutz,
Inverness


children; their first son,
Norman, passed away in
2010 and was a resident of
Orlando. Their son Lenny
is now traveling through-
out the Midwest. They have
two daughters, Dana Lee,
who lives in Florida, and
Jade Fay, who lives in
Branson, Mo.
They have 10 grandchil-
dren and four great-grand-
children.
Their children and their
spouses, as well as their
grandchildren will help
make their anniversary a
memorable occasion.
Friends and well-wishers
are welcome to contact the
happy couple.


are Adele and the late
Kevin Fitzpatrick of St. Au-
gustine. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Mr and Mrs. David
DeCarlo of Inverness.
Great-grandparents are
Andrew Stregare of Holiday
and Dorothy Fitzpatrick,
Barbara Cooper and Mr.
and Mrs. Bill DeCarlo, all of
Inverness.


Earl T. Leatherbarrow,
Homosassa/Cecile N.
McClain, Homosassa
Travis Keith Leturno,
Homosassa/Katrina Ann
McBride, Homosassa
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
(352) 341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


Humane Society
OF CITRUS CO.

Amigo


Special to the Chronicle
Amigo is a handsome little fellow. It's hard to tell in pho-
tos, but he is actually a dark steel gray with tan markings
(and white chest). He is very sweet. He is friendly with
people, playful and gets along very well with other dogs his
size. He is about 2 years old, neutered, and up to date on
medical. An approved adoption application and adoption
fee are required. To access an adoption application or view
other adoptable pets, visit www.roomforonemore.net, and
for more information, call Karron at 352-586-9699.


Katie Leigh Huddleston
of Keystone Heights and
Chad Michael Goulet of In-
verness exchanged nuptial
vows at 3 p.m. June 2, 2012,
at Our Lady Star of the Sea,
Ponte Vedra Beach. The
Rev Jim Prose and Deacon
Robert Smith officiated at
the ceremony
The bride is the daughter
of Wayne and Martha Hud-
dleston of Keystone
Heights. The groom is the
son of Lawrence and Susan
Goulet of Inverness.
Given in marriage by her
parents, the bride wore an
ivory corset-style Maggie
Sottero fitted A-line gown
with embellished lace,
finely constructed organza
flower motifs along the
hem and flowing onto a
cathedral train. A cathe-
dral tulle veil flowed from
a custom organza flower
hairpiece. She wore tear-
drop earrings and beach
blue peep-toe heels with a
six pence inside the heel.
The bride also wore her
mother's garter and car-
ried her grandmother's
handkerchief in her bou-
quet as something old. Her
bouquet was filled with
creamy ivory garden roses,
creamy ivory porcelain
roses, ivory hydrangeas
and accented with coral
garden roses, all wrapped
with ivory satin ribbon and
her grandmother's hand-
kerchief.
Amy Barry of Orange
Park attended her sister as
matron of honor She wore
a blue Aflred Angelo knee-
length, one-shoulder dress,
accented with a pearl neck-
lace and earrings and coral
organza flower hairpiece.
Bridesmaids were Grace
Huddleston, St. Augustine,
niece of the bride; Jessica
Hagans, Keystone Heights,
childhood best friend of the
bride; and Rachel Krueger,
Dunn, N.C., best friend of
bride. Junior bridesmaid
was Brooke Barry, Orange
Park, niece of the bride.
The bridesmaids' dresses
matched that of the matron
of honor
Brynna Barry, niece of


On May 19,2012, Lindsay
Clark-Barber and Steven
Ash became husband and
wife in an outdoor garden
ceremony Surrounded by
five acres of sunflowers (in
full bloom), the informal
ceremony took place at
Sweetfield Farms in
Masaryktown.
Bridesmaids included
Rachel Frazier (maid of
honor), Sarah Seaton,
Priscilla Carpenter-McLain,
Hannah Crawford, Sheena
Ash-Cisneros and Taylor
Beverland.
Groomsmen included
Michael Bundy (best man),
Stephen Cassidy Clark, Kyle
Beverland, Ray Cisneros,
Sean Strout and Clayton
Cisneros.
The flower girl was
Reaghan Cisneros and the
ring-bearer was Matthew
Barber (son of the bride).
Lindsay was walked down
the isle by her father,
Robert Lindsay Clark, and
the other parents in the au-
dience included her
mother, Judy Clark, and
parents of the groom, Durk
and Cindy Beverland.
The reception immedi-


the bride, was flower girl,
and ring-bearer and bell
ringers were Blaize Barry
and Walker Huddleston,
both nephews of the bride.
Best Man: Scott Goulet of
Inverness stood by his
brother as the best man.
Ushers and groomsmen
were three of his childhood
friends: Stephen
Hanewinckel, Dunnellon;
Chadd Brown, Ocala;
and Christopher Kingree,
Inverness.
Junior groomsman was
Brett Barry of Orange Park,
nephew of the bride.
A reception followed the
ceremony at The Serenata
Beach Club, Ponte Vedra
Beach. The couple enjoyed
a seven-day honeymoon
cruise with Royal
Caribbean to the Eastern
Caribbean.
The new bride earned
her Bachelor of Science in
molecular biology at Palm
Beach Atlantic University
in 2009 and her Master of
Science in clinical re-
search in 2011. She is now
a third-year pharmacy stu-
dent. Her husband earned
his Bachelor of Science in
business administration at
Palm Beach Atlantic Uni-
versity in 2010.
They are now at home in
Lillington, N.C., where the
bride is a pharmacy intern
with CVS Pharmacy and a
biology lab instructor at
Campbell University, and
her husband is with the
North Carolina State
Highway Patrol.


ately followed the cere-
mony at the beautiful (non-
working) residential barn
of Desnee Elgin, in
Brooksville.
Lindsay Clark-Ash works
in Lecanto for the Citrus
County School Board and
Steven Ash works as a com-
puter IT professional for
the state of Florida (office
located in Tampa). The
couple immediately trav-
eled to Gatlinburg, Tenn.,
for a weeklong honey-
moon. They now reside in
Brooksville.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV


Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome.
Meet new friends and dis-
cuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-
2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5


p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are wel-
come to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie


at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
E The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at
the Embassy Suites Hotel,
1445 Lake Cook Road,
Deerfield, Ill. Group reservation
code is CGN.
Call 847-945-4500 for reser-
vations. Ask for the USS Long
Beach reunion rate of $99.68,
which includes all taxes on
rooms. Cutoff date is Aug. 13.
Contact Don Shade, 299
Kiantone Road Lot 92,
Jamestown, NY 14701-9370,
or email Ibcgn9@aol.com or
visit www.usslongbeach-as-
soc.org.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.


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CUR I A LIOOS E HOURS E ROU GIE
AMENT E L I TE ERASE WEDGE
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SNA I L CR US HCH I NT Z AMAH
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T EIN0OIRNP|E A|L S ET H IE|RN E MIO|TIE


7-22


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


60th ANNIVERSARY:


The Robeys


Wedding

Huddleston/Goulet


New ARRIVAL


Ella Adele DeCarlo


For the RECORD


Wedding

Clark-Barber/Ash


A14 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


TOGETHER











SPORTS


Former Florida
Gator Ryan Lochte
unflappable in,
out of pool./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


a~~ ~B
re


Rays' bats flail in 2-1 loss to Mariners


Vargaspitches

into seventh to

defeat Tampa Bay

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Jason
Vargas took a shutout into the sev-
enth inning, Michael Saunders
had two RBIs, and the Seattle
Mariners beat the Tampa Bay
Rays 2-1 on Saturday night.
Vargas (10-7) gave up one run
and seven hits in six-plus in-
nings as the Mariners stopped a
nine-game losing streak against
the Rays.
Seattle loaded the bases with


two outs in the first and took a 2-
0 lead on Saunders' line single to
left offAlex Cobb (4-7), who left
after bruising his right lower leg
after the second.
Tom Wilhelmsen, the fourth
Seattle reliever, pitched the ninth
for his ninth save.
Desmond Jennings singled
against Vargas leading off the sev-
enth and scored to cut deficit to 2-
1 when right fielder Ichiro Suzuki
made a bad throw to third at-
tempting to record an out on Jose
Labaton's single.
Cobb made a nifty play after
taking Suzuki's second-inning
grounder off his leg. The right-
hander chased down the ball
after it went toward the plate and
flipped it to Labaton, who tagged
out Carlos Peguero as he tried to


score from third.
Cobb went down to the ground
after the inning-ending play and
needed assistance to leave the
field. He allowed two runs, three
hits and two walks in two innings.
Cesar Ramos, recalled from
Triple-A Durham after Tampa
Bay placed designated hitter
Luke Scott on the 15-day disabled
list with a right oblique injury, re-
placed Cobb and gave up two hits
and struck out six over four
scoreless innings.
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher
Alex Cobb fields a ball that lined
off of his leg to throw out Seattle
Mariners' Carlos Peguero at home
during the second inning Saturday
in St. Petersburg. Cobb left with
an injury following the play.
Associated Press


Very good Scott


Golfer vaults back

into British Open

lead in third round

Associated Press
LYTHAM ST ANNES, England -
Adam Scott has never had a better
chance to end that long wait for a major
championship mostly because of that
long putter.
Scott stayed in the game early with
two key par saves, pulled away with
three birdies around the turn and was
solid at the end Saturday for a 2-under
68 that gave him a four-shot lead going
into the final round at Royal Lytham &
St. Annes.
"It was all pretty solid stuff, consider-
ing the circumstances and how much
trouble
there is on British Open leaders
this golf
course e," Adam Scott 64-67-68 -199 -11
Sc t s G.McDowell 67-69-67 -203 -7
Sc s Brandt Snedeker 66-64-73-203 -7
The golf TigerWoods 67-67-70-204 -6
course, Zach Johnson 65-74-66 205 -5
even with- Ernie Els 67-70-68 205 -5
out wind
for three For the entire
days, swal- list of par scores,
lowed up see Page B4.
Brandt
Snedeker
during a 10-hole stretch in the middle of
the round and nearly knocked him out
of contention.
This is the fourth time in the last nine
majors that someone took at least a four-
shot lead into the final round. The only
player who failed to win was Rory McIl-
roy at the Masters in 2011.
But this Open was far from over.
Scott narrowly missed a 20-foot birdie
putt on the final hole that would have
given him a share of the 54-hole Open
scoring record. He settled for 11-under
199 and will play in the final group with
Graeme McDowell, who had a 67 to get
into the final group for the second
straight time at a major.
Snedeker birdied two of his last three
holes to salvage a 73 and was tied with
McDowell.
See Page B4
Adam Scott of Australia watches his shot
off the eighth tee at Royal Lytham & St.
Annes Golf Club on Saturday during the
third round of the British Open Golf Cham-
pionship in Lytham St. Annes, England.
Associated Press


A'


CR Majors


stopped by


Bayshore

CR seniors rained

out, willplay

doubleheader for

possible state berth
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Crystal River Majors fought
the good fight in sectional base-
ball play Saturday against Dis-
trict 6 champs Bayshore in St.
Pete. Despite Crystal River play-
ing a great defensive ball game,
Bayshore pulled out in front and
never let up its lead to win 8-2.
"We fielded great but
(Bayshore) is a good hitting
squad," Crystal River head
coach Mike Lemar said of the
loss.
"It was a tight ballgame (for
the majority) of the innings. We
just couldn't manufacture the
plays late in the game."
Bayshore hit three solo home
runs in the final innings to take
and hold the victory
Crystal River's Caleb Dix
pitched a standout complete
game with seven strikeouts on 86
total pitches.
Kyle Mitchell played well at
shortstop for Crystal River,
keeping one of the top teams in
the sectional tournament from
getting too comfortable at the
plate.
TJ Keefer scored one run for
Crystal while driving in Cody
Jones for the other.
"This is the proudest I have
ever been of the team. Despite
losing they really played tough
against a very good team."
Lemar said.
Crystal River meets up with
District 5 champs Northeast
today at 11 a.m.
Senior Baseball
The Crystal River sectional
tournament game against Dis-
trict 6 Keystone was postponed
due to inclement weather.
Instead Crystal River will play
a doubleheader today against
Keystone at 1 p.m. then play Dis-
trict 12 champs Largo in the
evening.


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CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS

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EEDWAY HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


IN


THE


jAME


Back-to-back champs


Blue team comes

back to snare

26-20 victory
COREY EDWARDS
Special to the Chronicle
The best two teams the Citrus
County Parks and Rec men's flag
football league had to offer faced
off Thursday night.
Pink, led by QB Michael Skjefte
and a strong core of wide re-
ceivers, finished the season with
the best overall record and all the
well-deserved confidence. On the
other side of the ball was the Blue
team, who finished with the third-
best record but with veterans
looking to defend last year's
championship.
Both teams showed why they
deserved to be in the champi-
onship but in the end it was the
will and determination to win that
propelled the Blue team to a 26-20
victory Thursday night.
The win allowed the Blue team
to become back-to-back champi-
ons in the league.
"I can't believe the way we
turned it on in the playoffs, we
lost four games this season and
two of those were to Pink," said
Blue team captain Brandon Buck-
ingham. "I'm proud of my guys for
sticking in there and not giving
up. This is our eighth season, our
first six seasons we were just a
blimp on the radar. Now look at
us, we're back-to-back champs.


Special to the Chronicle
The Blue team defeated the Pink team to win the Citrus County Parks and Rec men's flag football championship
Thursday. The team is, back row from left, Brandon Buckingham, Patrick Rash, Jason Weeks, Josh Hall, Chris
Bunch, Arlando Madison and Will Bunch. In the front row from left is Drew Austin, Joe Bertine and K.J. Atkins.


We're ready for the chance of a
three-peat next season."
Pink started the game with the
ball and drove it down into the red
zone, facing a fourth-and-goal. The
Blue defense stepped up and
stopped Pink but a penalty on
Blue for hitting the quarterback's
hand while in motion gave Pink a
fresh set of downs and allowed it
to score the first touchdown of the


game with a connection from
Michael Skjefte to Joey Calcagino.
An interception by Johnny Mac-
donald gave Pink the ball back
and the team didn't waste any
time driving the ball back into the
red zone. Blue, however, deflected
three passes in a row and forced a
fourth down for Pink's offense. A
huge sack by Arlando Madison
caused a turnover on downs and


gave Blue's offense a chance to
run their two-minute offense.
Chris Bunch led the Blue of-
fense down the field and con-
nected with K.J. Atkins for a
35-yard touchdown and tied the
game up at 6. With 26 seconds left
on the clock, Pink drove the ball
down to the 35-yard line. The first
half ended with a TD pass thrown
from Michael Skjefte to Macdon-


aid to give Pink a 13-6 lead.
The Blue team came out in the
second half to make a statement
with a well-orchestrated drive
that led to a touchdown pass to
Madison in the back of the end
zone. With Pink ahead 13-12, the
Blue team's defense caused a
turnover on downs. Blue then took
its first lead of the contest team on
a touchdown pass from Will
Bunch to Buckingham.
On Pink's next drive, the ur-
gency to score was evident Faced
with fourth-and-1, Michael Skjefte
pump-faked and threw a pass
downfield to Logan Skjefte for a
40-yard touchdown and the
one-point lead in the game.
Blue, though, immediately re-
sponded on its next drive, march-
ing 70 yards and culminating with
K.J. Atkins' scoring catch. Patrick
Rash came up with a big-time
grab on the two-point conversion
and gave the Blue team a 26-20
lead.
Pink couldn't get anything work-
ing on its next drive and decided
to punt with 7:12 left on the clock.
Things weren't looking good for
Pink with the Blue team marching
its way into the red zone and the
clock approaching two minutes.
The game's intensity turned up
a notch with a timely interception
by Pink's Calcagino on his own 1-
yard line. With the clock ticking
under two minutes, Pink drove the
ball down the field but faced an-
other critical fourth down.
The Blue team came up huge on
this particular fourth down by
causing an incomplete pass and a
turnover on downs by Pink.


Olympians vs, SEALs


What is the difference between
an Olympic athlete and a
Navy SEAL? This is a fa-
vorite subject in our family, espe-
cially since I'm on my way to San
Diego to see the second of my sons
graduate from SEAL training and re-
ceive his SEAL Trident.
By the time you read through this
article, you will surmise
as I have that the Trident
is physically smaller than
the Olympic medal hang-
ing on my wall but it car-
ries the weight of superb
endurance, physical skill
and extreme mental
toughness.
Both the Olympic ath-
lete and SEAL are in top Dr. Ron
physical condition, both DOCT
represent our country,
both want to be the best ORD
and both are willing to
work hard to achieve their goals and
pay a great price for doing so. The dif-
ference comes in the training and,
more importantly, in attitude.
The SEALS have learned that,
"The human body can always
achieve more than we believe and
that is controlled purely by our
minds," states Olympic gold medalist
Garrett Weber-Gale, who went
through a SEAL training program
specifically for Olympic Training
Center athletes in Colorado Springs
a few months ago.
An article in USA Today focused on
what the Olympians had learned
from the two-day SEAL training pro-
gram. The Olympic athletes quickly
learned the basis of the motto "the
only easy day was yesterday" The
athletes, regardless of their training
background, found that "no matter
how tough a day you're having, it will
never be as tough as the day you had
with the Navy SEALS."
The U.S. Sailing athletes (used to
sailing the cold waters of the Atlantic
Ocean) had to wake up at the crack of
dawn, do hundreds of push ups and
roll logs. When the SEAL instructors
told them they were too hot, they had
to jump into a lake that was about 45
degrees over and over until they were
shaking and approaching hypother-
mia. As a team, they then carried 200-
pound logs for miles. At the end of the
day, only a third of the athletes were
still in it. Some dropped out after the
first hour, including previous
Olympic medalists.
Amanda Clark, a 2008 and 2012
member of the Olympic Sailing team,


will face such extreme conditions in
London with the cold and wind of the
Atlantic and the pressure of the
Olympics. Therefore, learning how to
control her shaking body, sore mus-
cles and keep her mind from quitting
during her event could help result in
a win for the U.S. Prominently in the
back of these athletes' minds will be
how they survived that
day with the SEALS. They
know they did it once and
now they can and will do
it again.
For the last nine years,
the SEALS have helped
train U.S. Olympic ath-
letes. The U.S. Field
Hockey team related that
Joseph this was the ultimate boot
OR'S camp. The SEAL training
program, even though they
ERS did it only for a few hours
to a few days, is tougher,
psychologically and physically than
any other training they had done.
The U.S. Water Polo team won its
first Olympic medal in 20 years in
2008 after training with the SEALS.
From a team standpoint, going to
the breaking point and frequently
beyond helps forge togetherness like
no other experience. The previous
athletes note it helps them perform
under pressure. The athletes quickly
learn their mind can and will control
the body's effort, endurance and
performance.
Knowing that you can push your-
self farther by having done it already
is the key. Olympians have to push
their limits mentally and physically
Driving your kids around in Florida
traffic takes mental awareness, en-
durance and patience. So does fac-
ing cancer and surviving, getting
through financial hardships or just
waking up in the morning and hav-
ing your life. It all takes mental
toughness and fortitude.
The one thing us regular people,
athletes of all proficiencies and
week-end warrior types will never
hear as we work out and enjoy our
athletics is the repeated and dreaded
call of "get wet and sandy"
When you watch and read about
these great U.S. Olympians and
Navy SEALS, remember the sacri-
fice they have made and are making
to represent us and (in the SEALs'
case) protect us.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at Sea-
Spine Orthopedic Institute, can be
reached at rbjhand@cox.net.


Adult co-ed kickball
league starts soon
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation is hosting its summer co-ed
kickball league, which kicks off
July 25.
While maintaining its competitive-
ness, this sport was created to bring
the community together for a good,
old-fashioned time in the park.
This league is designed for
players 18 and up. Games will be
held 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30
p.m. every Wednesday night at
Bicentennial Park.
The league is filling up fast so
make sure you give us a call as
soon as possible if you're inter-
ested in playing.
For more information, contact
Corey Edwards on Monday
through Friday at 352-527-7547.
YMCA is Silver
Sneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an offi-
cial SilverSneakers location for
their group exercise program in
Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the nation's
leading exercise program designed
exclusively for older adults and is
available at little or no additional
cost through Medicare health
plans, Medicare Supplement carri-
ers and group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet at
the First United Methodist Church
in Homosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays. Classes
include cardio interval, Pilates, and
stability and strength. To find out if
you are eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider. For
more information, call the YMCA
office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus County,
2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto,
is host site for a community Divine
Yoga class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge and
is open to all ages and physical
abilities. Some of the benefits of
yoga are improved balance, coor-
dination, strength and flexibility.
Yoga is also helpful in counteract-
ing stress and anxiety.
For more information, call Sheila
Abrahams at 352-270-8019 or
email divineyogas@gmail.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA now
offers its Group Exercise program
at First United Methodist Church in
Homosassa, the Y's westside


Recreation BRIEFS
venue for health and wellness
classes.
Currently, there are Pilates, car-
dio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered.
For more information about the
YMCA Group Exercise program, call
the office at 352-637-0132. Finan-
cial assistance is available to all
those who qualify. The YMCA office
is in Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and is open noon
to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and pre-
payment are required at the park
office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for four
hours, or $30 per hour. Times are
arranged with the instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for registra-
tion and information. Whispering
Pines also offers racquetball les-
sons. Call for information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers a low-impact stretching class.
This ongoing class will be from 10 to
11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretching
helps to make you more flexible
and regular stretching will help mo-
bility and balance. This helps to
slow down the onset of common
degenerative conditions, such as
osteoarthritis. Stretching increases
physical and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can improve
health and fitness without harming
weight-bearing joints. Research
suggests that moderate-intensity,
low-impact activity is just as effec-
tive as high-impact activity in low-
ering the risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com and
click on instructional classes, or
call 352-465-7007.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers Zumba classes with in-
structor Lynn DaSilva at Citrus
Springs Community Center.
Zumba is a fitness program de-
signed with exciting Latin and inter-
national dance rhythms. No
membership or contracts.


Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Tuesday; and 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or call
352-465-7007.
Yoga at canning center
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers yoga with Laura Boetto
from 10 and 11 a.m. Tuesday and
Friday at the Canning Center in
Lecanto. Yoga improves flexibility
and balance, increases energy,
strengthens and tones muscles
and reduces stress.
Cost is $6 per class; $20 monthly.
No pre-registration required.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or call
352-465-7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club
plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and
Friday and at 1 p.m. Wednesday
at Floral Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet
people in the community, and get
some light exercise. We welcome
all newcomers. Yearly dues are $3
per person, and there is no need to
purchase any equipment.
Call the vice president of the
Floral City Shuffleboard Club,
Dana Bause, at 352-726-0670.
Day at the
Swamp Celebration
All Gator fans are invited to join
the Citrus County Gator Club at the
2012 Day at the Swamp Celebra-
tion from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
25, at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds in Inverness.
Come join fellow Gators for an
evening of fun, food and bever-
ages, games, raffles, a silent auc-
tion and giveaways. Former Gator
Football player Travis McGriff will
be the special guest speaker.
Tickets are $10 for alumni club
members; $15 or two for $25 for
non-alumni club members, or $15
at the door, if available. Kids
younger than 5 will be admitted
free. Tickets may be purchased
from any club officer or at Fancy's
Pets in Crystal River or Brannen
Banks in Inverness.
Citrus County Gator Club is a
nonprofit organization affiliated with
the University of Florida, raising
scholarship funds for Citrus County
students. For more information,
call 352-634-0867.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Tigers 7, White Sox 1


Chicago

De Aza cf
Youkils 3b
A.Dunn dh
Konerk lb
Rios rf
Przyns c
Viciedo If
AIRmrz ss
Bckhm 2b

Totals
Chicago
Detroit


Detroit


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0 AJcksncf
4 0 0 0 Raburn If
4 00 0 MiCarr3b
3 0 1 0 Fielder lb
3 1 0 0 DYongdh
3 0 1 0 JhPerltss
3 0 1 1 Boesch rf
3 0 0 0 D.Kelly rf
3 0 1 0 Laird c
Worth 2b
30 15 1 Totals
000 010 000
000 023 02x


ab r h bi
5024
5 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
5010
3110
4000
4000
3220
3 1 1 3
1 0 0 0
3113
1000
3220
2110
2 1 1 0
33710 7
1
7


DP-Chicago 1, Detroit 2. LOB-Chicago 2,
Detroit 7. 2B-A.Jackson (18), Raburn (13).
HR-Boesch (10). SB-Mi.Cabrera (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
SaleL,11-3 7 7 5 5 4 6
Axelrod 1 3 2 2 1 1
Detroit
PorcelloW,7-5 8 5 1 1 0 4
Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1
Porcello pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.

Rangers 9, Angels 2
Texas Los Angeles


Kinsler 2b
Andrus ss
Hamltn If
Beltre 3b
MiYong lb
N.Cruz rf
Napoli dh
Torreal c
Gentry cf




Totals
Texas
Los Angele


ab r h bi


5 2 2 3 Troutct-lt
5 1 2 0 TrHntrrf
5 01 0 Pujolslb
5 1 1 2 Bourjoscf
5 01 1 Trumolf-lb
4 01 0 KMorlsdh
4 2 2 2 Callasp 3b
5 1 3 1 HKndrc2b
4 22 0 Aybarss
Mlzturs ss
Hester c
Calhon ph
BoWlsn c
42 9159 Totals
151 000 020
s 001 010 000


ab r h bi


302 4 2
9
2


DP-Texas 1. LOB-Texas 8, Los Angeles 6.
2B-Kinsler (27), Torrealba (8), Gentry (10).
HR-Kinsler (11), Beltre (18), Napoli 2 (14),Tor-
realba (3). SB-N.Cruz (7), Trout (31),
H.Kendrick (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
DarvishW,11-6 7 3 2 2 4 11
Ogando 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nathan 1 1 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
E.SantanaL,4-10 12-3 8 6 6 0 0
D.Carpenter 4 3 1 1 0 2
Hawkins 11-3 2 0 0 1 1
Takahashi 2 2 2 2 1 0
HBP-by Darvish (Hester).

Orioles 3, Indians 1
Baltimore Cleveland


ab r h bi
Markksrf 4 0 2 0 Choorf
Hardy ss 3 1 1 0 ACarerss
Thomedh 4 1 1 2 Kipnis2b
AdJons cf 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf
Wieters c 4 0 1 0 CSantn c
Betemt3b 4 0 0 0 Hafnerdh
C.DavisIf 3 00 0 Damon If
EnChvzlf 0 00 0 Ktchmlb
MrRynllb 3 00 0 Hannhn3b
Flahrty 2b 3 1 1 1
Quntnll 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 36 3 Totals
Baltimore 000 000 210
Cleveland 100 000 000


ab r h bi
4 1 11
4000
4000
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
4010
3010
4000
4010
4010



34 171
3
1


DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Baltimore 3, Cleveland
7. 2B-Wieters (16), C.Santana (14). HR-
Thome (2), Flaherty (4), Choo (11).
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
TillmanW,2-1
Patton H,7
Strop H,16
Johnson S,29-31
Cleveland
McAllister L,4-2
Sipp
Pestano


72-3 5 3 3 0 6
1-3 1 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


Mariners 2, Rays 1


Tampa Bay


ab r h bi
Ackley2b 4 00 0 BUpton cf
ISuzukirf 4 01 0 C.Penalb
C.Wells If 4 1 0 0 Zobrist 2b
Jasoc 3 1 2 0 Kppngr3b
Seager3b 3 0 1 0 Joyce rf
MSndrs cf 4 0 1 2 Matsui dh
Smoaklb 4 00 0 DJnngslf
Peguerdh 4 02 0 Loatonc
Kawskss 3 01 0 SRdrgzss
Totals 33 28 2 Totals
Seattle 200 000 000
TampaBay 000 000 100


ab r h bi
2000
4000
3000
4030
4010
4000
4110
4020
2000
311 7 0
2
1


E-I.Suzuki (1). DP-Seattle 2. LOB-Seattle
10, Tampa Bay 7. CS-B.Upton (5). S-
Kawasaki, S.Rodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
VargasW,10-7 6 7 1 0 3 5
KelleyH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
O.PerezH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
League H,4 2-30 0 0 0 0
WilhelmsenS,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
CobbL,4-7 2 3 2 2 2 3
C.Ramos 4 2 0 0 0 6
Badenhop 1 1 0 0 1 1
Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 3
W.Davis 1 2 0 0 1 2
Vargas pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by C.Ramos (Jaso).WP-Cobb.

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 3


ab r h bi
Gose rf 3 00 0
RDavisph-rfl 21 0
Lawrie3b 3 01 3
Rasmscf 3 1 0 1
Encrnclb 3 1 1 2
Lind dh 5 00 0
Arenciic 4 1 1 1
KJhnsn2b 4 1 1 0
YEscorss 4 1 1 0
SniderIf 4 0 1 0
Totals 34 77 7
Toronto 001
Boston 030


Boston

Nava rf
Crwfrd If
Pedroia 2b
AdGnzl lb
C.Rossdh
Sltlmch c
Mdlrks 3b
Sweeny cf
Ciriaco ss

Totals
002 301
000 000


ab r h bi
3000
4000
4 0 1 0
4 1 1 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 1 3
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 1 0

323 5 3
4010
4110
3110
4113
4000
3000
3010

32 3 5 3
7
3


E-Y.Escobar (9), Ciriaco (1), Middlebrooks (9).
DP-Toronto 1, Boston 1. LOB-Toronto 7,
Boston 4. 2B-R.Davis (10), K.Johnson (10),
YEscobar (12), C.Ross (17). HR-Encarnacion
(26), Arencibia (14), Saltalamacchia (18). SB-
R.Davis (25), YEscobar (3), Ciriaco (4). S-
Lawrie. SF-Lawrie.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
VillanuevaW,5-0 61-3 4 3 3 2 5
HappH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Oliver H,11 1 1 0 0 0 1
Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Boston
A.CookL,2-3 61-3 4 5 3 1 1
FMorales 1-3 0 1 1 1 1
Albers 0 1 0 0 2 0
A.Miller 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Padilla 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tazawa 1 1 1 1 1 0
Albers pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP-Villanueva.


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 57
Baltimore 50
Tampa Bay 49
Boston 48
Toronto 47


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
36.613 6-4
44 .532 7/2 5-5
46 .516 9 1/2 5-5
47 .505 10 2/2 5-5
47 .500 10/23 5-5



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
39 .581 - 5-5
42 .553 2/2 7-3
47 .500 7/2 5 2-8
50 .468 10/28 3-7
54 .432 14 11/2 4-6


Home Away
30-17 27-19 Detroit
23-22 27-22 Chicago
28-24 21-22 Cleveland
25-27 23-20 Kan. City
25-20 22-27 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
44 .537 - 8-2
44 .532 '2 3-7
47.500 3/2 3 3-7
53 .430 10 9/2 3-7
55 .415 11/211 3-7


Home Away
27-21 24-23
24-22 26-22
24-23 23-24
17-29 23-24
19-30 20-25


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-1 27-19 27-20
L-1 24-24 28-18
L-2 26-22 21-25
L-4 24-24 20-26
L-3 17-29 24-25


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
40 .574 - 8-2
40.570 '2 7-3
45 .521 5 3 5-5
49 .473 9/2 7/2 5-5
55 .409 15/213/2 6-4
60 .362 20 18 2-8


Str Home Away
W-3 30-18 24-22
W-4 31-14 22-26
W-2 25-20 24-25
L-2 26-23 18-26
L-2 24-21 14-34
L-4 24-21 10-39


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
37.602 6-4
44 .537 6 4-6
44 .527 7 /2 8-2
55 .427 16/210 5-5




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
41 .564 - 7-3
44 .537 2Y2 1/2 4-6
48 .484 7/2 6/2 5-5
55 .421 13/212/2 6-4
57.380 17 16 4-6


Home Away
29-16 27-21
26-19 25-25
27-21 22-23
17-27 24-28


Str Home Away
W-2 29-16 24-25
W-3 29-20 22-24
W-1 24-21 21-27
W-4 21-28 19-27
L-3 20-29 15-28


Rangers' Darvish dazzles Angels


Tigers beat ChiSox,


take over firstplace


inAL Central

Associated Press

ANAHEIM, Calif. Mike Napoli
homered twice against his former
team, Yu Darvish struck out 11 over
seven strong innings, and the Texas
Rangers battered struggling Angels
starter Ervin Santana for a 9-2 vic-
tory Saturday over Los Angeles.
Napoli, Yorvit Torrealba and
Adrian Beltre homered during
Texas' five-run second inning, chas-
ing Santana (4-10) after just 13 bat-
ters. Torrealba had three hits in his
return from paternity leave, while
Ian Kinsler homered and drove in
three runs for the Rangers, who have
won six of nine.
Darvish (11-6) had little trouble
holding an early seven-run lead in
the Japanese All-Star's first victory
of July, yielding three hits and four
walks.
Darvish has struck out a career-
high 11 four times this season.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Tigers 7, White Sox 1
DETROIT Rick Porcello pitched bril-
liantly into the ninth inning, and the De-
troit Tigers took over first place in the AL
Central with a 7-1 victory over the
Chicago White Sox.
Brennan Boesch hit a three-run homer
and Austin Jackson drove in the other
four runs for the Tigers, who lead the
White Sox by a half-game in the Central.
Detroit was six games out after a loss to
the Chicago Cubs on June 12.
Porcello (7-5) fell just short of his first
complete game, departing after he al-
lowed two hard-hit singles to start the
ninth. He allowed a run and five hits.

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 3
BOSTON Edwin Encarnacion tied
the game with a two-run homer in the
sixth, then J.P. Arencibia gave Toronto the
lead with a seventh-inning solo shot and
the Blue Jays beat the Boston Red Sox
7-3.
Carlos Villanueva (5-0) allowed three
runs on four hits over 6 1-3 innings to win
his third consecutive start. He walked two
and struck out five.
Aaron Cook (2-3) allowed five runs -
three earned on four hits and a walk
while striking out one. He had allowed
five earned runs in his previous four starts
to drop his ERA from 20.25 to 3.34.
On the night dedicated to longtime
catcher Jason Varitek, replacement Jar-
rod Saltalamacchia hit a three-run homer
in the second inning to break a scoreless
tie. It was his 18th homer of the year, ex-
tending his career high.

Orioles 3, Indians 1
CLEVELAND Jim Thome's two-run
homer in the seventh inning led the Balti-
more Orioles to their fourth straight victory,
a 3-1 win over the Cleveland Indians.
Thome, who passed Sammy Sosa for
seventh place on the all-time home run
list on Friday, hit his 611th and second
with Baltimore since being acquired
from Philadelphia on July 1 off Zach
McAllister (4-2).
Chris Tillman (2-1) allowed only Shin
Soo-Choo's leadoff homer in the first in 6
2-3 innings. He gave up six hits, struck
out four and walked one.

Royals 7, Twins 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Lorenzo Cain
drove in three runs and Alex Gordon had
three hits and scored two runs as the
Kansas City Royals beat the Minnesota
Twins 7-3.
Cain delivered run-producing singles in
the first and fifth innings and he had an
RBI-double in the seventh. Cain's three
RBIs matched a career high, accom-
plished twice in 2010 when he was with
Milwaukee.
Gordon had his 34th multihit game and
is hitting .352 since moving back to the
Royals leadoff spot on May 27.
Luis Mendoza (4-6) made his sixth
quality start in seven appearances to col-
lect the victory, but only his second since
May 13. He yielded three runs and seven
hits in 6 1-3 innings.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 12, Cubs 0
ST. LOUIS Jake Westbrook worked
seven innings of three-hit ball and the St.
Louis Cardinals finally backed him and
then some by tying a 76-year-old
major league record with seven doubles
in a 12-0 victory over the Chicago Cubs.
Rafael Furcal's go-ahead single in the
seventh turned out to be a mere appe-
tizer as the Cardinals also matched an


Associated Press
Texas Rangers starter Yu Darvish pitches to the Los Angeles Angels in the
second inning Saturday in Anaheim, Calif. Darvish struck out 11 Angels in
seven strong innings during the Rangers' 9-2 win.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 3, 14 innings
Saturday's Games
Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 1
Texas 9, L.A. Angels 2
Baltimore 3, Cleveland 1
Kansas City 7, Minnesota 3
Seattle 2, Tampa Bay 1
Toronto 7, Boston 3
N.Y Yankees at Oakland, late
Sunday's Games
Chicago White Sox (Humber 4-4) at Detroit (Ja.Turner 0-
1), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (H.Alvarez 5-7) at Boston (Lester 5-7), 1:35 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 4-6) atTampa Bay (M.Moore 6-6), 1:40 p.m.
Minnesota (Deduno 0-0) at Kansas City (Guthrie 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 0-0) at Cleveland (Tomlin 5-6), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 10-3) at Oakland (B.Colon 6-8),
4:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 12-4) at L.A. Angels (Haren 6-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 4, Washington 0,1 st game
L.A. Dodgers 8, N.Y. Mets 5
San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5, 10 innings
Washington 5, Atlanta 2, 2nd game
Pittsburgh 5, Miami 1
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2
St. Louis 12, Chicago Cubs 0
Houston at Arizona, late
Colorado at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-6) at N.Y Mets (Niese 7-4), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Fiers 3-3) at Cincinnati (Cueto 11-5), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Jurrjens 3-3) atWashington (Detwiler4-3), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (A.Sanchez 5-6) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-2), 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 8-6) at Philadelphia (Blanton 8-8), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (TWood 4-4) at St. Louis (Lynn 11-4), 2:15 p.m.
Colorado (Friedrich 5-7) at San Diego (Ohlendorf 3-0),
4:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 2-6) at Arizona (Collmenter 1-2), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.


86-year-old franchise record for runs in
an inning. St. Louis totaled 10 hits with
multiple hits by three players including
pinch-hitter Allen Craig, who doubled
twice with an RBI.
The Cardinals tied the major record for
doubles in an inning by the Boston Bees
at St. Louis in the first inning of Game 1
of a doubleheader on Aug. 25, 1936.
They tied the franchise record for runs
in an inning set in 1926 against the
Phillies, in the third inning of the opener
of a doubleheader in Philadelphia.

Braves 4, Nats 0, 1st game;
Nats 5, Braves 2, 2nd game
WASHINGTON Bryce Harper re-
turned from an ankle injury to single and
score as a pinch-hitter, and Roger
Bernadina had a tiebreaking hit in the
seventh inning as the Washington Nation-
als earned a split of the day-night double-
header with a 5-2 victory.
Harper injured his ankle in the opener
and was lifted after the second inning.
The Braves won the first game 4-0 be-
hind Ben Sheets' strong performance.
Bernadina replaced Harper in center
field and had five hits in the two games.
Harper entered as a pinch-hitter in the
eighth. He singled, stole second and
scored.
John Lannan (1-0) pitched seven in-
nings for the win. Braves reliever


Cristhian Martinez (4-2) was the loser.

Dodgers 8, Mets 5
NEW YORK Juan Uribe broke out of
a long slump with a homer and four RBIs,
Chris Capuano pitched seven solid in-
nings against his former team and the
Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the stag-
gering New York Mets 8-5.
Uribe hit an early two-run double to
end a 1-for-38 slide. He added a two-run
homer in the ninth inning off 13-game
winner R.A. Dickey, who was making his
first relief appearance of the season to
help an overtaxed Mets bullpen.
Matt Treanor also stopped a slump with
a run-scoring hit and the Dodgers won
their third straight following a 1-7 skid. Matt
Kemp had an RBI triple and Capuano
(10-5) struck out nine for his first victory in
seven career starts against the Mets.

Giants 6, Phillies 5, 10 innings
PHILADELPHIA-All-Star pitchers
Cole Hamels and Matt Cain hit homers in
the same inning, and Gregor Blanco
drove in the tiebreaking run with a drag
bunt single in the 10th to lead the San
Francisco Giants to a 6-5 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
All-Star game MVP Melky Cabrera hit
a tying homer off Hamels in the eighth
and Buster Posey hit a two-run shot for
the NL West-leading Giants, who are 7-1
since the All-Star break.
Ryan Howard hit a three-run homer
and Chase Utley also went deep for the
last-place Phillies, who've lost three in a
row and seven straight at home.
The five-time defending NL East cham-
pions are 41-54 and moving closer to per-
haps being a seller before the non-waiver
trade deadline on July 31.

Reds 6, Brewers 2
CINCINNATI Ryan Ludwick and
Brandon Phillips each hit two-run homers,
powering Cincinnati to a 6-2 victory over
the fading Milwaukee Brewers that ex-
tended the Reds' surge without Joey Votto.
The NL Central leaders have gone 4-2
since Votto learned he needed surgery
for torn knee cartilage. The Reds have
won 10 of 12 overall, moving a season-
high 14 games over .500.
Ludwick homered as part of a four-run
first inning off Yovani Gallardo (8-7).
Phillips homered in the eighth off Jose
Veras, dropping the defending division
champion Brewers a season-high 9 1/2
games out.

Pirates 5, Marlins 1
PITTSBURGH -A.J. Burnett re-
mained undefeated at home by pitching 7
2/3 strong innings and the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates matched a season high with their
fourth consecutive win, beating the Miami
Marlins 5-1.
Burnett (11-3) allowed one run and
eight hits. A homer by Justin Ruggiano
was his only blemish as he improved to
7-0 at home this season and Pittsburgh
(53-40) moved 13 games over .500 for
the first time since the end of the 1992
season.
The Pirates entered the day a half-
game behind the Cincinnati Reds in the
NL Central.
Garrett Jones had two RBIs and Alex
Presley scored two runs for the Pirates,
who have the majors' best home record
at 31-14. Pittsburgh has won 20 of its
past 24 at home and 15 of its past 20
overall.
The Marlins have lost four straight.


Bourn cf
Prado If
Heywrd rf
C.Jones 3b
FFrmn lb
Uggla 2b
D.Ross c
Janish ss
Hinske ph
Delgad p
JFrncs ph
CMrtnz p
Varvar p
McCnn ph
Totals
Atlanta


4 0 1 0
4010
4000
3 1 0 0
3100
3 1 1 1
4021
2000
3000
3010
1000
1000
1000
20000
30000
3 0 1 0
1 0 0 0



0 000

30 25 2
200


Lmrdzz lf-2b 5 00 0
Berndncf 4 1 3 1
Zmrmn3b 4 02 0
Morse rf-lf 3 00 0
LaRochIb 4 00 0
Dsmndss 3 00 1
SBurnttp 0 00 0
Harper ph-rf 1 1 1 0
Espinos 2b-ss3 2 1 1
Leon c 3 12 0
Lannanp 1 01 0
DeRosa ph-lf 1 00 0
Clipprdp 0 00 0

Totals 32510 3
000 000 2


Washington 000 011 12x 5
E-Janish (1). DP-Atlanta 1, Washington 1.
LOB-Atlanta 7, Washington 8. 2B-C.Jones
(12), Janish (2). SB-Harper (12). S-Delgado,
Lannan, DeRosa.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Delgado 6 6 2 2 1 4
Martinez L,4-2 12-3 4 3 2 0 1
Varvaro 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
Lannan W,1-0 7 5 2 2 2 3
S.Burnett H,20 1 0 0 0 0 2
ClippardS,16-19 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Varvaro (Leon), by Delgado (Morse),
by Lannan (Uggla, C.Jones). WP-Delgado,
C.Martinez, Varvaro.

White Sox acquire
Myers from Houston
DETROIT The Chicago
White Sox have acquired Hous-
ton reliever Brett Myers for two
minor league pitchers and a
player to be named.
Myers had 19 saves and a
3.52 ERA for the Astros this
season and will try to bolster an
inexperienced Chicago bullpen.


Seattle


Toronto


NL

Dodgers 8, Mets 5
Los Angeles New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Abreu If 4 0 0 0 Tejada ss 5 1 1 0
GwynJIf 1 0 0 0 AnTrrscf 4 00 0
AKndy2b 4 2 1 0 DWrght3b 3 00 0
Kempcf 4 1 2 1 Hairstn rf-lf 5 1 2 1
Ethier rf 4 1 1 0 Bay If 3 01 1
Loneylb 5 1 2 1 Edginp 0 00 0
Uribe3b 3 3 2 4 Byrdakp 0 00 0
L.Cruzss 4 01 1 DnMrpph-2b 1 1 1 1
Treanrc 4 0 1 1 I.Davislb 4 0 1 0
Capuanp 3 00 0 RCeden2b 3 1 2 1
JRiverph 1 0 1 0 Niwnhsph 1 00 1
Belisarip 0 00 0 Dickeyp 0 00 0
Jansenp 0 0 0 0 Nickesc 3 01 0
Tholeph-c 1 00 0
Batista p 0 0 0 0
Vldspnph 1 1 1 0
Hefnerp 0 0 0 0
Duda rf 2 00 0
Totals 37 8118 Totals 36510 5
Los Angeles 103 110 002 8
NewYork 002 001 020 5
DP-New York 1. LOB-Los Angeles 8, New
York 8. 2B-Uribe (9), Treanor (3), R.Cedeno
(6). 3B-Kemp (2), Dan.Murphy (3). HR-Uribe
(2), R.Cedeno (2). CS-J.Rivera (3). S-Hefner
IP H R ERBBSO
Los Angeles
CapuanoW,10-5 7 8 3 3 1 9
BelisarioH,15 1 2 2 2 0 0
JansenS,18-23 1 0 0 0 2 1
NewYork
Batista L,1-3 3 5 4 4 3 2
Hefner 2 2 2 2 2 1
Edgin 2 1 0 0 1 3
Byrdak 1 1 0 0 0 2
Dickey 1 2 2 2 0 0

Giants 6, Phillies 5,
10 innings
San Francisco Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Schrhltrf 5 01 0 Rollinsss 4 10 0
Theriot2b 4 1 0 0 Victorn cf 4 1 1 0
MeCarrlf 3 3 2 1 Utley2b 3 1 1
Poseyc 5 1 4 3 Howardlb 4 1 1 3
Sandovl3b 5 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 01 0
Pagancf 3 010 Pencerf 4 000
GBlanccf 1 01 1 Pierre If 3 00 0
Arias ss 4 0 2 0 Mayrry If 1 00 0
Beltib 5 0 0 0 Fontent3b 2 00 0
M.Cainp 3 1 1 1 Polanc3b 0 00 0
BCrwfrph 1 0 0 0 Hamelsp 3 1 1 1
JaLopzp 0 00 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Romop 0 00 0 Papelnp 0 00 0
Christnph 1 00 0 Wggntnph 1 00 0
SCasillp 0 000
Totals 40 6126 Totals 335 5 5
SanFran 003 010 010 1 6
Philly 101 003 000 0 5
DP-San Francisco 2, Philadelphia 1. LOB-
San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 2. 2B-Schier-
holtz (3), Posey (20), Pagan (16).
HR-Me.Cabrera (10), Posey (12), M.Cain (1),
Utley (3), Howard (3), Hamels (1). SB-Theriot
(10). CS-Posey (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
M.Cain 8 5 5 5 2 4
Ja.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
RomoW,3-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
S.Casilla S,24-30 1 0 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
Hamels 72-310 5 5 3 6
Bastardo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Papelbon L,2-4 2 2 1 1 1 2
HBP-by M.Cain (Utley), by Papelbon (Arias).

Braves 4, Nationals 0,
first game
Atlanta Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourn cf 5 1 2 0 Lmrdzzlf 4 00 0
Prado If 4 02 0 Harpercf 1 00 0
Heywrdrf 3 00 0 Berndncf 3 02 0
FFrmnlb 4 00 0 Zmrmn3b 3 01 0
McCnnc 2 1 1 1 Morse rf 3 01 0
Uggla2b 4 00 0 LaRochlb 3 00 0
JFrncs3b 4 0 2 0 Dsmndss 4 01 0
Janishss 4 1 1 0 Espinos2b 3 01 0
Sheetsp 2 00 0 Floresc 3 00 0
Hinskeph 1 0 0 0 EJcksnp 2 00 0
Medlenp 0 00 0 TMooreph 1 00 0
C.Jones ph 1 1 1 2 HRdrgzp 0 00 0
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 Matthsp 0000
McGnzlp 0 00 0
Totals 34 49 3 Totals 300 6 0
Atlanta 010 000 012 4
Washington 000 000 000 0
E-McCann (2). DP-Atlanta 3, Washington 1.
LOB-Atlanta 8, Washington 6. HR-McCann
(16), C.Jones (9). SB-Bourn 2 (28), Prado
(12), Bernadina (10), Desmond (15).
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Sheets W,2-0 6 5 0 0 3 6
MedlenH,7 2 1 0 0 0 1
Durbin 1 0 0 0 0 1
Washington
E.Jackson L,5-6 7 5 1 1 2 9
H.Rodriguez 0 1 1 1 2 0
Mattheus 12-3 3 2 2 1 1
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
H.Rodriguez pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WP-E.Jackson, H.Rodriguez.

Nationals 5, Braves 2,
second game
Atlanta Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi






B4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


British Open
Saturday
At Royal Lytham & St. Annes,
Lytham St. Annes, England
Purse: $7.75 million
Yardage: 7,086, Par: 70
Third Round
Adam Scott 64-67-68 -199 -11
Graeme McDowell 67-69-67-203 -7
Brandt Snedeker 66-64-73--203 -7
TigerWoods 67-67-70--204 -6
Zach Johnson 65-74-66--205 -5
Ernie Els 67-70-68--205 -5
Thorbjorn Olesen 69-66-71 -206 -4
Bill Haas 71-68-68--207 -3
Thomas Aiken 68-68-71 -207 -3
Bubba Watson 67-73-68--208 -2
Louis Oosthuizen 72-68-68--208 -2
Mark Calcavecchia 71-68-69--208 -2
Matt Kuchar 69-67-72 -208 -2
Dustin Johnson 73-68-71 -209 -1
Kyle Stanley 70-69-70 -209 -1
Luke Donald 70-68-71 -209 -1
Jason Dufner 70-66-73--209 -1
Vijay Singh 70-72-68 210 E
NickWatney 71-70-69 210 E
Anirban Lahiri 68-72-70 -210 E
Simon Khan 70-69-71 -210 E
Greg Chalmers 71-68-71 -210 E
James Morrison 68-70-72 -210 E
Steven Alker 69-69-72 -210 E
Keegan Bradley 71-72-68--211 +1
Matthew Baldwin 69-73-69-211 +1
Justin Hicks 68-74-69--211 +1
Alexander Noren 71-71-69 -211 +1
Hunter Mahan 70-71-70 -211 +1
Thomas Bjorn 70-69-72--211 +1
PeterHanson 67-72-72--211 +1
Steve Stricker 67-71-73--211 +1
Joost Luiten 73-70-69-212 +2
Padraig Harrington 70-72-70--212 +2
Harris English 71-71-70--212 +2
Francesco Molinari 69-72-71 -212 +2
Dale Whitnell 71-69-72-212 +2
Jamie Donaldson 68-72-72--212 +2
Garth Mulroy 71-69-72--212 +2
Simon Dyson 72-67-73--212 +2
Carl Pettersson 71-68-73-212 +2
Paul Lawrie 65-71-76 -212 +2
Rickie Fowler 71-72-70 -213 +3
Gary Woodland 73-70-70-213 +3
Troy Matteson 70-72-71 --213 +3
Rafael Echenique 73-69-71 -213 +3
JimFuryk 72-70-71-213 +3
Branden Grace 73-69-71 -213 +3
Greg Owen 71-71-71 -213 +3
lan Poulter 71-69-73-213 +3
Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-69-73--213 +3
Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-73- 213 +3
Toshinori Muto 67-72-74--213 +3
Lee Westwood 73-70-71 -214 +4
Adilson Da Silva 69-74-71 -214 +4
Sang-moon Bae 72-71-71 -214 +4
K.J. Choi 70-73-71 -214 +4
Pablo Larrazabal 73-70-71 --214 +4
Nicolas Colsaerts 65-77-72--214 +4
G. Fernadez-Castano 71-71-72-214 +4
Yoshinori Fujimoto 71-70-73--214 +4
Thongchai Jaidee 69-71-74-214 +4
Ted Potter Jr. 69-71-74--214 +4
Brendan Jones 69-74-72-215 +5
FredrikJacobson 69-73-73-215 +5
Rory Mcllroy 67-75-73-215 +5
Richard Sterne 69-73-73--215 +5
Bob Estes 69-72-74-215 +5
Retief Goosen 70-70-75-215 +5
Juvic Pagunsan 71-72-73-216 +6
Aaron Baddeley 71-71-74-216 +6
Warren Bennett 71-70-75--216 +6
JohnSenden 70-71-75-216 +6
Lee Slattery 69-72-75--216 +6
AndresRomero 70-69-77-216 +6
Chad Campbell 73-70-74 -217 +7
Ross Fisher 72-71-74-217 +7
Charles Howell III 72-71-74--217 +7
Rafael Cabrera-Bello 70-71-76-217 +7
Jeev Milkha Singh 70-71-76--217 +7
Tom Watson 71-72-76 -219 +9
John Daly 72-71-77-220 +10
Martin Laird 70-69-82-221 +11


British Open Tee Times


At Royal Lytham & St. Annes,
Lytham St. Annes, England
Purse: $7.75 million
Yardage: 7,060; Par: 70
All Times EDT
(a-amateur)
Sunday
2:20 a.m.- Martin Laird
2:30 a.m. -John Daly, Tom Watson
2:40 a.m. Jeev Milkha Singh, Rafael
Cabrera-Bello
2:40 a.m. -Charles Howell III, Ross Fisher
3 a.m. -Chad Campbell, Andres Romero
3:10 a.m.- Lee Slattery, John Senden
3:20 a.m.-Warren Bennett, Aaron Baddeley
3:30 a.m.- Juvic Pagunsan, Retief Goosen
3:40 a.m.- Bob Estes, Richard Sterne
3:55 a.m. Rory Mcllroy, Fredrik Jacobson
4:05 a.m.- Brendan Jones, Ted Potter Jr
4:15 a.m. Thongchai Jaidee, Yoshinori
Fujimoto
4:25 a.m. Gonzalo Fernadez-Castano,
Nicolas Colsaerts
4:35 a.m.- Pablo Larrazabal, K.J. Choi
4:45 a.m.-Sang-moon Bae, Adilson Da Silva
4:55 a.m. Lee Westwood, Toshinori Muto
5:05 a.m. Geoff Ogilvy, Miguel Angel
Jimenez
5:15 a.m.- lan Poulter, Greg Owen
5:30 a.m. Branden Grace, Jim Furyk
5:40 a.m.- Rafael Echenique, Troy Matteson
5:50 a.m. Gary Woodland, Rickie Fowler
6 a.m.- Paul Lawrie, Carl Pettersson
6:10 a.m.- Simon Dyson, Garth Mulroy
6:20 a.m.-Jamie Donaldson, Dale Whitnell
6:30 a.m.- Francesco Molinari, Harris English
6:40 a.m.- Padraig Harrington, Joost Luiten
6:55 a.m. Steve Stricker, Peter Hanson
7:05 a.m. -Thomas Bjorn, Hunter Mahan
7:15 a.m. -Alexander Noren, Justin Hicks
7:25 a.m. Matthew Baldwin, Keegan
Bradley
7:35 a.m. -Steven Alker, James Morrison
7:45 a.m.- Greg Chalmers, Simon Khan
7:55 a.m. -Anirban Lahiri, NickWatney
8:05 a.m. -Vijay Singh, Jason Dufner
8:20 a.m. Luke Donald, Kyle Stanley
8:30 a.m.- Dustin Johnson, Matt Kuchar
8:40 a.m. Mark Calcavecchia, Louis
Oosthuizen
8:50 a.m. Bubba Watson, Thomas Aiken
9 a.m.- Bill Haas, Thorbjorn Olesen
9:10 a.m.- Ernie Els, Zach Johnson
9:20 a.m. -Tiger Woods, Brandt Snedeker
9:30a.m.- Graeme McDowell, Adam Scott




Tour de France results
Saturday
At Chartres, France
19th Stage
A 33.1-mile individual time trial from Bon-
neval to Chartres
1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 1
hour, 4 minutes, 13 seconds.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 1
minute, 16 seconds behind.
3. Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabobank,
1:50.
4. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, 2:02.
5. Richie Porte, Australia, Sky Procycling,
2:25.
6. Patrick Gretsch, Germany, Argos-Shimano,
2:28.
7. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, 2:34.
8. Vasili Kiryienka, Belarus, Movistar, 2:46.
9. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, 2:50.
10. Jeremy Roy, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 3:05.
11. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 3:12.
12. Matthieu Sprick, France, Argos-Shimano,
3:20.
13. Ruben Plaza, Spain, Movistar, 3:24.


SCOREBOARD


FOr lthe record d


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
.. CASH 3 (early)
8-1-1
CASH 3 (late)
5-9-7

S PLAY 4 (early)
5-0-0-4
PLAY 4 (late)
3-2-4-1

FANTASY 5
Fklda LOttfy 8-10-11-22-27

POWERBALL LOTTERY
9-31-38-54-56 10-14-15-31-34-50
POWER BALL XTRA
20 5


On the AIRWAVES


14. Daniel Oss, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale,
3:27.
15. Anthony Roux, France, FDJ-Big Mat,
3:34.
16. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, 3:38.
17. Christian Vande Velde, United States,
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 3:40.
18. Bert Grabsch, Germany Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, 3:43.
19. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 3:49.
20. Jens Voigt, Germany, RadioShack-Nis-
san, same time.
Also
26. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, 4:22.
34. George Hincapie, United States, BMC
Racing, 4:57.
44. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 5:33.
52. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing,
5:54.
141. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, 9:41.
151. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 10:56.
Overall Standings
(After 19 of 20 stages)
1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling,
84 hours, 26 minutes, 31 seconds.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
3:21.
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, 6:19.
4. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, 10:15.
5. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, 11:04.
6. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nis-
san, 15:43.
7. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing,
15:51.
8. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar,
16:31.
9. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 16:38.
10. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat,
17:17.
11. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 17:54.
12. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 19:33.
13. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 19:55.
14. Chris Anker Sorensen, Denmark, Team
Saxo Bank-Tinkoff Bank, 25:27.
15. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, 27:22.
16. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-
Nissan, 28:30.
17. Egoi Martinez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
31:46.
18. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 37:03.
19. Eduard Vorganov, Russia, Katusha,
38:16.
20. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar,
42:26.
Also
32. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, 1:16:29.
38. George Hincapie, United States, BMC
Racing, 1:30:38.
60. Christian Vande Velde, United States,
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 1:58:40.
100. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 2:52:38.
151. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 3:54:54.


Pirates 5, Marlins 1
Miami Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Reyesss 4 0 1 0 Presley f 3 2 0 0
Bonifaccf 3 01 0 Walker2b 3 0 1 1
Ca.Leelb 4 01 0 AMcCtcf 4 01 0
Morrsnlf 4 01 0 GJonesrf 2 0 0 2
Rugginrf 4 1 1 1 GHrndzrf 0 0 0 0
Dobbs3b 4 02 0 McGehlb 3 00 1
Infante2b 4 02 0 PAlvrz3b 4 0 1 0
J.Buckc 4 0 0 0 Barajsc 3 1 0 0
Zamrnp 1 00 0 Barmesss 3 1 1 0
Gaudinp 1 00 0 Lincolnp 0 00 0
Cousins ph 1 0 0 0 AJBrntp 0 1 0 0
H.Bellp 0 0 0 0 Mercerss 1 0 1 0
Totals 34 19 1 Totals 265 5 4
Miami 010 000 000 1
Pittsburgh 100 400 00x 5
E-J.Buck (6). DP-Pittsburgh 2. LOB-Miami
7, Pittsburgh 10. 2B-Reyes (19), Morrison
(15), Walker (22). 3B-Mercer (1). HR-Rug-
giano (7). SB-Bonifacio (25). CS-Walker (5).
S-A.J.Burnett 2. SF-Walker.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
ZambranoL,5-8 31-33 5 4 6 2
Gaudin 32-31 0 0 1 5
H.Bell 1 1 0 0 1 1
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,11-372-3 8 1 1 1 3
LincolnS,1-2 11-31 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Zambrano (Barajas, Barmes).
Cardinals 12, Cubs 0
Chicago St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJesscf 3 01 0 Furcalss 4 2 2 1
Campnph-cf0 00 0 Descalsss 0 0 0 0
SCastross 4 01 0 Schmkr2b-rf 4 2 2 3
Rizzolb 4 0 1 0 Hollidylf 3 1 1 2
ASorinlf 3 00 0 Brwnngp 0 0 0 0
Clevngrph 1 00 0 VMartep 0 00 0
LaHairrf 3 01 0 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
Soto c 4 0 0 0 Beltran rf 5 1 2 1
Barney 2b 3 00 0 Greenepr-2b 0 0 0
Dolis p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 3 1 0 0
Valuen3b-2bl 00 0 TCruzph-c 1 00 0
JeBakrph-2b1 0 0 0 Brkmnlb 5 0 2 0
Garzap 1 00 0 Freese3b 5 2 3 2
Germnp 0 00 0 Jaycf 4 1 1 2
Russellp 0 00 0 Westrkp 2 01 0
Corpasp 0 00 0 Craigph 2 22 1
Mather3b 1 00 0 MCrpntlf 1 00 0
Totals 29 04 0 Totals 39121612
Chicago 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 000 000 (12)0x 12
E-S.Castro (14). DP-Chicago 2, St. Louis 1.
LOB-Chicago 6, St. Louis 9.2B-Schumaker
(11), Holliday (23), Beltran (13), Berkman (7),
Freese 2 (17), Jay (7), Craig 2 (16). 3B-Schu-
maker (3). SB-Berkman (2). S-Germano,
Schumaker.
ID H H CD 4 R n


Chicago
Garza
Germano L,0-1
Russell
Corpas
Dolis
St. Louis
WestbrookW,8-8
Browning
VMarte
Rosenthal


3 2 0 0 2 3
3 4 1 1 0 1
2-3 4 6 6 2 0
0 3 4 4 1 0
11-3 3 1 1 0 2

7 3 0 0 2 5
2-3 0 0 0 1 0
1-3 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0


Germano pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Corpas pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
WP-Dolis.


Reds 6, Brewers 2


Milwaukee


Cincinnati


ab r h bi
Aoki cf-rf 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf
Ishikawlb 3 2 2 0 Cozartss
CGomz ph-cfl 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b
Braun If 4 0 1 0 Bruce rf
ArRmr3b 4 01 0 Rolen3b
Hartrf-lb 3 0 1 1 Ludwcklf
RWeks2b 3 0 0 0 Frazierlb
Mldndc 4 00 0 Ondrskp
Bianchi ss 3 0 0 0 Hanign c
Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Arroyo p
Axford p 0 00 0 Paulph
Clzturs ph 1 0 1 0 Arrdnd p
Verasp 0 0 0 0 Marshllp
LHrndzp 0 00 0 LeCurep
Cairo lb
Totals 32 26 1 Totals
Milwaukee 000 101 000
Cincinnati 400 000 20x


ab r h bi
4000
3 2 1 0
3210
4222
4 1 2 1
4121
3011
4122
4020
0000
3000
2000
1 0 0 0
1000
0000
0000
0000
0000
32610 6
2
6


E-M.Maldonado (3). DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-
Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 5. 2B-Ishikawa 2 (7),
Ar.Ramirez (30), Bruce (24). 3B-Rolen (1).
HR-B.Phillips (12), Ludwick (15). SB-Bruce
(6). CS-Frazier (2). SF-Rolen.
IP H RERBBSO


Milwaukee
Gallardo L,8-7
Axford
Veras
L.Hernandez
Cincinnati
Arroyo W,5-6
Arredondo H,7
Marshall H,13
LeCure
Ondrusek


52-3 9 4
1-3 0
1 1
1 0


TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300 qualifying
12 p.m. (FOX) Formula One: Grand Prix of Germany
(Same-day Tape)
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Firestone Indy Lights
1 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series: Grand Prix of
Mosport
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Edmonton Indy
3 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: STP 300 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Mopar Mile-High Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at New York Mets
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Pittsburgh Pirates
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays
2:05 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals
8 p.m. (ESPN) Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels of
Anaheim
BASKETBALL
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Argentina vs. United States
(Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 20
1 p.m. (NBC) 2012 Tour de France Stage 20 (Taped)
GOLF
6 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 Open Championship Final Round
8 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 Open Championship Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) American Century Championship Final
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: True South Classic Final
Round
9 p.m. (ESPN2) 2012 Open Championship Best of the
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR George Paul Memorial,
Night 2 (Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) Toluca vs. Chivas de Guadalajara
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&T Atlanta Open
final
5 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA U.S. Open Series: Mercury Insurance
Open final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Camping World Truck
American Ethanol 225 Results
Saturday
At Chicagoland Speedway
Joliet, Ill.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (11) J. Buescher, Chevy, 150 laps, 47 points.
2. (6) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 150, 0.
3. (4) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 150, 42.
4. (9) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 150, 40.
5. (17) Parker Kligerman, Ram, 150, 40.
6. (14) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 150, 39.
7. (8) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 150, 37.
8. (5) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 150, 36.
9. (13) Jason White, Ford, 150, 35.
10. (21) David Starr, Toyota, 150, 34.
11. (22) Rick Crawford, Chevrolet, 150, 33.
12. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 150, 33.
13. (19) Ross Chastain, Toyota, 150, 31.
14. (16) John Wes Townley Toyota, 150, 30.
15. (2) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 150, 30.
16. (20) Dakoda Armstrong, Toyota, 150, 28.
17. (10) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 150, 28.
18. (7) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 150, 26.
19. (18) Paulie Harraka, Ford, 150, 26.
20. (28) Chad McCumbee, Chevrolet, 150, 24.
21. (1) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 150, 24.
22. (15) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 149, 22.
23. (34) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, 144, 21.
24. (23) Bryan Silas, Ford, 142, 20.
25. (36) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 142, 19.
26. (12) Nelson PiquetJr, Chevy, accident, 94,18.
27. (33) Chris Fontaine, Chevy, accident, 92, 17.
28. (25) Clay Greenfield, Ram, brakes, 90, 16.
29. (29) C.E. Falk, Chevrolet, vibration, 72, 15.
30. (24) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, engine, 45, 14.
31. (30) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, engine, 25, 13.
32. (31) Blake Koch, Ram, vibration, 13, 0.
33. (27) Dennis Setzer, Chevy, electrical, 10, 0.
34. (35) T.J. Bell, Ram, vibration, 3, 0.
35. (26) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, rear gear, 2, 0.
36. (32) J. Chapman, Toyota, vibration, 2, 8.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 119.362 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 53 minutes, 6 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.247 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 31 laps.
Lead Changes: 16 among 10 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Lofton 1-12; B.Gaughan 13-46;
R.HornadayJr 47; M.Paludo 48-52; PKligerman
53-58; PHarraka 59-60; B.Gaughan 61-100;
J.Coulter 101-103; J.Lofton 104; TDillon 105;
J.Lofton 106-116;T.Dillon 117-132; B.Gaughan
133-141; TPeters 142-143; J. Buescher 144-148;
TPeters 149; J.Buescher 150.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): B.Gaughan, 3 times for 83 laps; J.Lofton,
3 times for 24 laps; TDillon, 2 times for 17 laps;
J.Buescher, 2 times for 6 laps; PKligerman, 1
time for 6 laps; M.Paludo, 1 time for 5 laps; T.Pe-
ters, 2 times for 3 laps; J.Coulter, 1 time for 3
laps; PHarraka, 1 time for 2 laps; R.Hornaday
Jr., 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. T.Peters, 395; 2. TDillon,
372; 3. J.Lofton, 365; 4. J.Buescher, 360; 5.
PKligerman, 346; 6. M.Crafton, 345; 7. R.Hor-
naday Jr., 335; 8. J.Coulter, 322; 9. N.Piquet Jr.,
302; 10. J.White, 295.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.
IRL
Edmonton Indy Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Edmonton City Centre Airport
Edmonton, Canada
Lap length: 2.224 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (10) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 103.65.
2. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.41.
3. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 103.238.
4. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 103.157.
5. (3) Hello Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.122.
6. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 91.432.
7.(9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 91.293.
8. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda,
91.147.
9. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet,
90.722.
10. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 90.291.
11. (28) x-Ryan Hunter-Reay Dallara-Chevro-
let, 103.664.
12. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet,
90.222.
13. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 104.496.
14. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet,
104.013.
15. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda,
104.313.
16. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 103.993.
17. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.995.
18. (5) E.J.Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.99.
19. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda,
103.969.
20. (22) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.454.
21. (4) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.27.
22. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.25.
23. (78) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus,
102.674.
24. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet,
103.053.
25. (14) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 101.503.
x-penalized for an unapproved engine change.



BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended Cleveland RHP Roberto
Hernandez three weeks for engaging in age
and identity fraud.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Added INF Omar
Quintanilla to the roster. Designated OF Steve
Pearce for assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX--Acquired RHP
Brett Myers and cash considerations from
Houston for RHP Matt Heidenreich and LHP
Blair Walters and a player to be named. Op-
tioned RHP Brian Omogrosso and RHP Dylan
Axelrod to Charlotte (IL). Reinstated RHP Jesse
Crain from the 15-day DL.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Signed LHP JC
Romero to a minor league contract and as-
signed him to Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Optioned LHP
Francisley Bueno to Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS-Placed 1B Justin
Morneau on the paternity list. Recalled 1 B Chris
Parmelee from Rochester (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS--Placed DH Luke Scott
on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Cesar Ramos
from Durham (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS-Announced C Yorvit
Torrealba was reinstated from restricted list. Op-
tioned C Luis Martinez to Round Rock (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS--Placed RHP Jason


WP-Axford. Balk-Marshall.

Royals 7, Twins 3
Minnesota Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 4 00 0 AGordn If 5 23 1
Mstrnnrf 0 00 0 AEscorss 5 1 2 0
Revere rf-cf 3 1 1 0 Butlerdh 5 1 2 0
Mauerc 3 0 1 1 L.Cain cf 4 0 3 3
Wlnghdh 3 1 1 0 JDysonpr-cf 0 0 0 0
Doumitlf 4 01 0 S.Perezc 3 0 0 0
Parmellb 4 12 1 Mostks3b 4 1 2 1
Dozier ss 4 00 0 Francrrf 4 1 1 0
ACasill2b 3 0 1 0 Hosmerlb 3 0 1 0
JCarrll 3b 3 0 1 1 YBtncr2b 4 0 2 2
Getzpr-2b 0 1 0 0
Totals 31 38 3 Totals 37716 7
Minnesota 000 200 100 3
Kansas City 110 020 12x 7
E-A.Casilla (6), Parmelee (2). DP-Minnesota
5, Kansas City 3. LOB-Minnesota 5, Kansas
City 8.2B-J.Carroll (12), L.Cain (3), Francoeur
(16), Y.Betancourt (13). 3B-Revere (3). S-
Mauer.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Diamond L,8-4 6 10 4 4 2 2
Gray 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
Duensing 2-33 2 2 0 0
AI.Burnett 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
MendozaW,4-6 61-37 3 3 2 4
MijaresH,11 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
CrowS,2-6 2 0 0 0 0 1
Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Mendoza (A.Casilla).WP-Duensing.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Trout, Los Angeles, .354; Mauer,
Minnesota, .334; MiCabrera, Detroit, .328;
Cano, NewYork, .321; Konerko, Chicago, .321;
Beltre, Texas, .319; AJackson, Detroit, .317.
RUNS-Trout, Los Angeles, 69; Kinsler,
Texas, 67; Granderson, New York, 65; Ortiz,
Boston, 65; Bautista, Toronto, 63; Cano, New
York, 63; AdJones, Baltimore, 63.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 78; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 77; Fielder, Detroit, 68; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 68; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 66; Bautista,
Toronto, 65; ADunn, Chicago, 65; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 65.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 124; Jeter, New
York, 122; Cano, New York, 116; Beltre, Texas,
111; Fielder, Detroit, 109; AGordon, Kansas
City, 109; AdJones, Baltimore, 109; Rios,
Chicago, 109.
DOUBLES-AGordon, Kansas City, 31;
Choo, Cleveland, 30; Cano, New York, 28;
Brantley, Cleveland, 27; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27;
AdGonzalez, Boston, 27; Kinsler, Texas, 27.
TRIPLES-Andrus, Texas, 5; Berry Detroit,
5; De Aza, Chicago, 5; AJackson, Detroit, 5;
Rios, Chicago, 5; ISuzuki, Seattle, 5; JWeeks,
Oakland, 5.
HOME RUNS-ADunn, Chicago, 28; Hamil-
ton, Texas, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Trumbo,
Los Angeles, 27; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26;
Granderson, New York, 25; Ortiz, Boston, 23;
Willingham, Minnesota, 23.
STOLEN BASES-Trout, Los Angeles, 31;
RDavis, Toronto, 25; Revere, Minnesota, 21;
Kipnis, Cleveland, 20; Crisp, Oakland, 18;
JDyson, Kansas City 17; DeJennings, Tampa
Bay, 17.
PITCHING-Price, Tampa Bay, 13-4; Weaver,
Los Angeles, 12-1; MHarrison, Texas, 12-4;
Sale, Chicago, 11-3; Verlander, Detroit, 11-5;
Darvish, Texas, 11-6; Sabathia, NewYork, 10-3;
Doubront, Boston, 10-4; Nova, NewYork, 10-4;
Vargas, Seattle, 10-7.
STRIKEOUTS-FHernandez, Seattle, 143;
Verlander, Detroit, 142; Scherzer, Detroit, 134;
Darvish, Texas, 132; Shields, Tampa Bay 124;
Price, Tampa Bay 120; Peavy, Chicago, 120.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 29; Rodney,
Tampa Bay, 27; CPerez, Cleveland, 26; RSori-
ano, New York, 24; Broxton, Kansas City, 22;
Aceves, Boston, 20; Nathan, Texas, 19.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .371;
MeCabrera, San Francisco, .357; Ruiz,
Philadelphia, .347; DWright, New York, .346;
Votto, Cincinnati, .342; CGonzalez, Colorado,
.334; Holliday, St. Louis, .319.
RUNS-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 65; Bourn,
Atlanta, 64; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 64;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 64; Braun, Milwaukee,
61; DWright, NewYork, 61; Furcal, St. Louis, 59;
Holliday St. Louis, 59; Pence, Philadelphia, 59;
Uggla, Atlanta, 59.
RBI-Beltran, St. Louis, 68; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 66; DWright, New York, 66; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 65; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 65; Kubel,
Arizona, 64; Holliday St. Louis, 62.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 131;Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 126; Bourn, Atlanta, 121;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 115; DWright, NewYork,
115; Prado, Atlanta, 111; Holliday, St. Louis,
110.
DOUBLES-Votto, Cincinnati, 36; Ar-
Ramirez, Milwaukee, 30; DWright, NewYork, 30;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 28; Cuddyer, Colorado,
27; DanMurphy, New York, 27; Prado, Atlanta,
25; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 25.
TRIPLES-Fowler, Colorado, 9; Bourn, At-
lanta, 8; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 8; SCas-
tro, Chicago, 7; Reyes, Miami, 6; 13 tied at 5.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 26; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 22; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh,
20; Beltran, St. Louis, 20; Bruce, Cincinnati, 19;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 19; Stanton, Miami, 19.
STOLEN BASES-DGordon, Los Angeles,
30; Bourn, Atlanta, 28; Bonifacio, Miami, 25;
Campana, Chicago, 25; Schafer, Houston, 23;
Pierre, Philadelphia, 21; Reyes, Miami, 21; Vic-
torino, Philadelphia, 21.
PITCHING--Dickey, New York, 13-1; GGon-
zalez, Washington, 12-5; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh,
11-3; Hamels, Philadelphia, 11-4; Lynn, St.
Louis, 11-4; Cueto, Cincinnati, 11-5; Bumgar-
ner, San Francisco, 11-6.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 140;
Kershaw, Los Angeles, 132; Dickey, New York,
132; Hamels, Philadelphia, 131; GGonzalez,
Washington, 129; MCain, San Francisco, 128;
Gallardo, Milwaukee, 122.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 28; Hanrahan,
Pittsburgh, 27; SCasilla, San Francisco, 24;
Motte, St. Louis, 21; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 21;
HBell, Miami, 19; Myers, Houston, 19.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Buescher



wins



Truck race


Associated Press

JOLIET, Ill. James
Buescher took the lead from
Timothy Peters on the last
lap, then held off a charge
from Brendan Gaughan to
win the NASCAR Truck Se-
ries race at Chicagoland
Speedway on Saturday night
It was Buescher's third
career win, with all three
coming this season.
Buescher previously won at
Kansas and Kentucky
Gaughan finished second
after dominating the majority
of the race. Peters was third,
followed by Matt Crafton and
Parker Kligerman.
It was the 200th career
start in Trucks for Todd Bo-
dine, making him the only
driver with at least 200
starts in all three of
NASCAR's national series.
Bodine finished 18th.



SCOTT
Continued from Page B1


Right behind them were
three major champions,
starting with the guy who
has won 14 of them. Tiger
Woods recovered from a
sloppy start and was within
three shots of the lead on
the front nine until Scott
pulled away Woods missed
a short par putt on the 15th
and didn't give himself
many good looks at birdie
on the back nine for a 70,
leaving him five shots be-
hind. Woods has never won
a major when trailing going
into the last round.
Three-time major cham-
pion Ernie Els was solid in
his round of 68 and was six
back, along with former Mas-
ters champion Zach John-
son, who had a 66.
Even so, the biggest chal-
lenge might be the weather.
If the forecast holds true -
and there's been no reason
to believe that--the greatest
defense of links golf could fi-
nally arrive with wind pro-
jected to gust up to 25 mph.
"It will be in Adam's hands
tomorrow if the conditions
are as straightforward as
they have been the last few
days," McDowell said.
"Throw a bit of wind across
this course like perhaps they
are forecasting, he will have
to go and work a lot harder
and he will have to go win it.
"He's going to have to go
win it anyway, for sure."
McDowell was seven shots
behind as he walked up to
the 13th green and found
three birdies coming in to
get into the last group, just as
he was at Olympic Club last
month in the U.S. Open,
where he was one putt away
from forcing a playoff.
Snedeker opened this
championship by playing 40
holes without a bogey and
then he couldn't buy a par.
He had to blast backward
out of a bunker, chunked a
pitch shot from the fairway,
missed short putts and was
reeling. He started with a
one-shot lead and was six
shots behind after only 11
holes. Snedeker rolled in a
birdie on the 16th and
stretched out his arms in
mock wonder, and then fin-
ished with a birdie that
could bode well for Sunday
"It's just one of those
things where you've got to
find out if you have some
guts or don't," he said. "I
could have packed up and
gone home today, but I
didn't"
Scott was becoming a for-
gotten star until he switched
to the long putter in Febru-
ary of last year, and it has
been the biggest reason for
the turnaround his run-
ner-up at the Masters last


year, winning his first World
Golf Championship at Fire-
stone, and now on the cusp
of his first major.
It certainly was the key to
his third round.
Showing nerves on the
opening tee, he hit into a
bunker and played a beauti-
ful shot from the back of the
wet sand to 8 feet, holing the
putt for par. Scott made an-
other par putt from the
same distance on the third
hole. And in the middle of
his run of birdies includ-
ing a 30-foot putt on the
eighth he escaped with
par on the 10th hole by mak-
ing one from 18 feet.


Frasor on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 17.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Reinstated
RHP Takashi Saito from the 15-day DL. Op-
tioned RHP Jonathan Albaladejo to Reno
(PCL).
ATLANTA BRAVES-Placed OF Matt Diaz
on the 15-day DL. Activated LHP Jonny Venters
from the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Randall Del-
gado from Gwinnett (IL).
NEWYORK METS-Placed LHP Johan San-
tana on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Jeremy
Hefner from Buffalo (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Recalled RHP Evan
Meek from Indianapolis (IL). Placed RHP Juan
Cruz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 18.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Recalled LHP
John Lannan from Syracuse (IL). Reinstated OF
Xavier Nady from the 15-day DL and desig-
nated him for assignment.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lochte's world


U.S. Olympic swim team member Ryan Lochte enjoys a laugh with teammates before practice at the
Tennessee's Allan Jones Aquatic Center on July 12 in Knoxville, Tenn.


Associated Pres
University o


Laid-back U.S. Olympic swimmer unfazed in and out ofpool


Associated Press

Ryan Lochte has been
building toward the London
Games since he walked
away from Beijing dissatis-
fied four years ago.
His results two gold
medals, two bronze, a cou-
ple of world records and the
first individual title of his
Olympic career would be
more than enough for most
swimmers.
Not for the surfer dude
from Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lochte believed he was ca-
pable of so much more, say-
ing, "I wanted to get faster."
So he changed his diet out
with his favorite candy and
sugary sodas and intensi-
fied his training in and out of
the water Inspired by watch-
ing Strongman competitions
on television, he incorpo-
rated throwing tires and
dragging heavy chains into
his routine. The results
started coming.
Last summer, Lochte won
five golds, one bronze and
set the first world record
since high-tech body suits
were banned over eight
days at the world champi-
onships. Most notably, he
beat Michael Phelps in both
their matchups.
But Lochte didn't see
himself as the top dog. Men-
tally, he cast himself as the
underdog, a role he's known
well while swimming in the
Phelps era.
"I knock myself down to
the bottom of the totem


pole," Lochte said at the
time.
He spent the past year
building himself back up to
the top.
Phelps was already there,
having rededicated himself
since last summer.
"He will always be there
no matter what,"' Lochte
said.
The swimmer with 14
Olympic gold medals in-
cluding eight from his his-
toric performance in
Beijing beat Lochte in
three of four events at the
U.S. trials last month.
Lochte readily acknowl-
edges Phelps as "the world's
best swimmer ever." Yet he's
not intimidated by the man
he once lost 17 straight
races against in the 200-
meter individual medley
"I always feel like I can
win everything. It's just how
my mind works," said
Lochte, competing in his
third Olympics. "I know I
can win and I know I can
swim multiple events back-
to-back and I think that's
what keeps me going."
The Lochte-Phelps ri-
valry, so compelling at the
U.S. trials when they were
separated by a few ticks of
the clock, will surely be one
of the highlights of the Lon-
don Games.
"Because of what they
have accomplished there
has never been this much
exposure for swimming,"
said U.S. Olympian Tyler
Clary, who often competes


against the two stars. "They
push the best out of each
other every time they get in
the pool."
They'll swim against each
other twice: in the 200 and
400 individual medleys.
The 400 IM comes up on the
first day of competition
next Saturday
"I don't want him to win.
He doesn't want me to win,"
Phelps said. "It's kind of like
when we step on the pool
deck, that's our field, our
battlefield, and we do every-
thing we can to try to get our
hands on the wall first"
Phelps' coach, Bob Bow-
man, questions how much
the rivalry fuels Phelps.
"The main competition is
himself. I think he's spurred
on by having people to race,
I think he likes that," Bow-
man said. "But I think the
primary measure of success
is did he hit the time he
wanted to hit."
Lochte isn't caught up in
what Phelps is doing in or
out of the pool.
"I'm lost in my own world
and I just stay there," he
said.
Lochte's world is as color-
ful as Phelps' is strictly reg-
imented. Lochte's idea of
fun away from the pool in-
volves skateboarding off
ramps, surfing and riding
scooters. In his only nod to a
more sedate life, he draws.
Typically, Lochte arrives
at major meets with tales of
a recent injury from his ad-
ventures on wheels. Phelps'


favorite pursuits are gol
and poker.
Lochte is outgoing and ac
tively engages his fans oi
Twitter. His tanned, chis
eled body and former
floppy hair draw lusty com
ments from women youn
and old. He hates disap
pointing anyone seeking ai
autograph or photo. Even i
his generous instincts ir
coach Gregg Troy
At the U.S. trials, Locht
stopped early in the meet t
chat with reporters instead(
of moving quickly to th
warmdown pool. Troy ap
peared and hissed at hi
star before yanking hin
away by the arm.
"It's a little bit of a weak
ness," Troy said. "He has t
learn to say no once in
while."
Phelps is the guarded
gawked-at superstar wh
never moves about alone
He's in his own world in th
pre-race ready room, ea
buds pumping music an(
his eyes in a steely gaze
Lochte saves his favorite
rap music for later an(
often walks out smiling.
"If I win, I win," he said
"If I don't, I don't It's not th
end of the world."
Lochte's easygoing, goof
nature and his props dia
mond grillz on his teeth oi
the podium, crazily colore(
hightops, sunglasses bear
ing his favorite made-up ex
pression of "Jeah!" mak
him a relatable star wit]
fans and teammates.


Tour all but



locked up


II
r


y
I-
g
i-
n
if
k

e
o
d
e
i-
s
n

C-
o
a

1,
o
.
e
r
d
e
d

1.
e

y
i-
n
d
e-

e
h


Which Peyton will we see?

b season following four neck
QB has ways to operations. Indy will start
... A. anew with Andrew Luck.
go hearing om Manning moved to Den-
ver, rented Mike Shanahan's
neck surg massive mansion and went
gey right to work, rehabbing in
the morning, throwing in


Associated Press


DENVER It'll take
some getting used to, seeing
Peyton Manning with the or-
ange-maned mustang on his
helmet instead of the blue-
on-white horseshoe.
The four-time MVP is mak-
ing a comeback in the city de-
fined by them thanks to
another iconic quarterback
When John Elway de-
cided to go after the biggest
free agent prize in NFL his-
tory, the Denver Broncos'
brassy boss was first in line
to make his pitch. Then
Elway gave Manning some
space, figuring he'd appre-
ciate not being pestered
with follow-up calls.
It was a sign of respect
from one superstar quarter-
back to another as Elway sat
back and watched Manning
meet with his other suitors
and decide where he'd
begin his comeback from a
lost 2011 season.
"I knew if I was on the
market in the prime of my
career, then that's the way I
would want to be treated,"


Associated Press
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning begins a new
chapter of his career after 14 years with the Indianapolis Colts.


Elway explained.
Displaying the same icy
resolve he demonstrated
while leading the Broncos
on all those fourth-quarter
comebacks and to so many
Super Bowls, Elway pa-
tiently told an ever-antsy
coach John Fox one morn-
ing last March that they'd
just sit back and wait for
Manning to call them -
hopefully with good news.
Just then, Elway's phone
rang. He took the call, gave
his coach a thumbs-up and
Fox jumped for joy, joking


he nearly sprained both an-
kles during his silent cele-
bration. When Elway hung
up, they hollered and the
rest of the coaching staff
came running.
Elway's strategy had
worked.
Will his bold bet also pay
off?
The Broncos are betting
$96 million it will.
They jettisoned Tim
Tebow a day after landing
Manning, who was released
by the Indianapolis Colts in
March after missing last


the afternoon and poring
over the playbook and film
into the wee hours.
During offseason prac-
tices, Manning showed no
ill effects of the nerve issue
that caused weakness in his
throwing arm last year and
led to his tear-filled divorce
from the team and town he
brought to the forefront of
pro football.
The euphoric Broncos say
they've seen no reason to go
easy with Manning when
training camp begins
Wednesday Although Man-
ning insists he has a ways to
go in his rehab, his arm
strength looks good and his
deciphering of defenses ap-
pears as astute as ever
What he lacks is timing
with his new targets, and old
pals Brandon Stokley and
Jacob Tamme are on hand
to help with that.
"There's no question it's
been a big change, a big
switch. It's one I'm trying to
adjust to," Peyton said at his
family's passing camp in
Louisiana earlier this month.


Wiggins'

lead nearly

insurmountable

Associated Press

CHARTRES, France -
For Bradley Wiggins, the
champagne on the
Champs-Elysees is about
to flow.
He all but locked up the
Tour de France title with a
tour-de-force performance
to win the final time trial
putting him on the cusp
of becoming the first
Briton to win cycling's
showpiece race.
Wiggins blew away the
field in Saturday's race
against the clock in Stage
19, his second Tour victory
this year in a time trial, his
specialty
"I really wanted to go
out there and finish with a
bang, and fortunately I
was able to do that," said
Wiggins, noting he real-
ized the breadth of emo-
tion when he spotted his
mechanic in tears.
ss Even before the Tour
f started, Wiggins was the fa-
vorite. The 32-year-old
rider took the yellow jersey
in Stage 7. Then came
questions about the unity
If of his Sky Team, pre-race
preparations and his abil-
ity to get up mountains -
n all of which he put to rest
S_ There was also the ab-


Associated Press
Bradley Wiggins of Britain, wearing the overall leader's
yellow jersey, strains in the last meters of the 19th stage
of the Tour de France on Saturday, an individual time trial
covering 33.2 miles. The stage started in Bonneval and
finished in Chartres, France.



Stallings jumps into


True South lead


Third round

not completed

due to darkness

Associated Press

MADISON, Miss. -Scott
Stallings took a four-stroke
lead Saturday at the True
South Classic after shoot-
ing 6 under through the
first 10 holes of the third
round at Annandale Golf
Club.
Stallings made four
birdies and an eagle be-
fore darkness suspended


play, and is at 18 under for
the tournament. The 27-
year-old is trying for his
second career PGA Tour
victory He'll continue his
round on Sunday morning
at 8 a.m.
Billy Horschel, Heath
Slocum and Jason Bohn
are tied for second place at
14 under.
The tournament has been
plagued by heavy rain, with
one weather-related delay
during each of the first
three days. Only a handful
of players finished their
third round Saturday, in-
cluding William McGirt,
who shot an 8-under 64 and
was five strokes back


Associated Press
Scott Stallings watches the flight of his drive from the No.
10 tee box during the third round of the True South Clas-
sic on Saturday in Madison, Miss. Stallings holds a four-
stroke lead after play was called because of darkness.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 B5


sence of two-time Tour
champion and cycling su-
perstar Alberto Contador,
who is serving a doping
ban. That led many to won-
der whether Wiggins was
really the sport's best.
Wiggins has been vocal
in his criticism of doping in
cycling and said the sport
may be changing after the
sport's governing body put
tough controls in place.
"I think the Tour is a lot
more human now with
everything the UCI is
doing," he said, suggesting
dopers and their inter-
mittently astonishing per-
formances are being
driven from the sport
Wiggins is a three-time
Olympic track champion
who made the difficult
transition to road racing.
He crashed out of the Tour
a year ago with a broken
collarbone. He envied Aus-
tralia's Cadel Evans, who
had the elation of winning
the yellow jersey
"That was my motiva-
tion: I want to feel what
he's feeling," Wiggins said.
The Team Sky leader
obliterated the pack in the
33-mile ride from Bonneval
to Chartres and punched
the air and shouted as he
crossed the finish line.
Sunday's ride to the fin-
ish on Paris' Champs-Ely-
sees will be largely
ceremonial Wiggins is
too far ahead for any com-
petitor to erase his lead
over the 75-mile ride from
Rambouillet.


k


t

3












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Book REVIEW



Cronkite


excels at


telling it


straight

Associated Press

"Cronkite" (Harper), by
Douglas Brinkley
Memo to bloggers:
Earning the title "most
trusted man in America"
doesn't happen overnight.
For longtime "CBS
Evening News" anchor
Walter Cronkite, decades
spent reporting not ren-
dering opinions pre-
ceded his unofficial
coronation as the person
to turn to for the straight
story.
It didn't have to be that
way. As historian Douglas
Brinkley relates in his de-
tailed and insightful biog-
raphy, Cronkite could
have become a crusader
like his CBS News col-
league Edward R. Mur-
row. Or he could have
turned temporary gigs
hosting a morning show
or a game show into his
life's work. For that mat-
ter, he could have re-
turned to his native
Missouri.
But reporting the news
favored Cronkite's nature
- he enjoyed finding
facts and talking to peo-
ple and it matched his
training as a newspaper-
man and his early experi-
ences in radio and as a
wire service reporter For
him, reporting with accu-
racy and fairness was a
worthy calling and at
times an exciting one.
Cronkite (1916-2009)
was a good writer and
tireless when it came to
getting information. He
moved from United Press
postings in Kansas City
and New York to London
as the U.S. entered World
War II. His experience as
a war correspondent and
as a postwar reporter in
Moscow further seasoned
his perspective and
added to his credibility
Cronkite joined CBS
News in 1950, a late ar-
rival to big-time broad-
casting the loyal
"Unipresser" had turned
down Murrow's offer of a
radio job during the war
- but then excelled in
the new medium with a
wide variety of assign-
ments. Brinkley writes of
Cronkite's stature in 1960,
two years before he
began a 19-year run as
the network's evening
news anchor:
"He had come to per-
sonify the CBS eye even
more than Murrow, and
was anointed by the TV
viewers as America's most
likable and professional
eyewitness to the 20th
century"
Professional but not
flawless. Brinkley points
out Cronkite had a sizable
ego and found it difficult
to fault himself whenever
he suffered a career
stumble. He stayed neu-
tral on the air during the
McCarthyism period, ap-
parently not wanting to
risk derailing his own ca-
reer, and later saw noth-
ing wrong with being a
cheerleader for the space
program or the environ-
mental movement.


Dyn-o-Mite senior


Asso
Jimmie Walker from the 1970s series "Good Times," said he's come to grips with the fact that he'll nev
big as he was in the 1970s.

'Good Times'actorJimmie Walker in his 60s and on the


ALLEN G. BREED
AP National Writer

RALEIGH, N.C. -Just like in the
theme song, Jimmie Walker is
scratchin' and survivin'. At 65, "Kid
Dyn-o-Mite!" is a senior citizen, and
his career has come full circle.
Raised in the housing projects of
the South Bronx, Walker got his
start opening community rallies for
the militant Black Panthers, then
playing the clubs around New York.
His big break came in 1973, with his
first national TV appearance, on
ABC's "Jack Paar Tonight."
"I'm from the ghetto," he joked.
"I'm here on the exchange program.
You can imagine what they sent
back there."
His star turn as James "J.J."
Evans Jr on the hit television series
"Good Times" made him a house-
hold name, and his catch phrase
part of the lexicon. At the end of the
1970s, Time magazine dubbed him
"Comedian of the Decade."
But when the show ended in 1979,
after six seasons, Walker faded
largely into the background.
These days, Walker is on the road
doing his standup routine about 45
weeks out of the year. He's also pro-
moting his just-released book,
"DYN-O-MITE!: Good Times, Bad
Times, Our Times -A Memoir," co-
written with Sal Manna.
In it, he writes of going from being
"too black for TV" to later being ac-
cused of "cooning it up." He also
dishes on "Tonight Show" host Jay
Leno, who actually wrote jokes for
Walker during the latter's heyday
"Show business is like a greased
pole even if you have climbed to
the top, sooner or later you are
going to slide back down. I still
climb the pole every day," he writes.


This book cover image released by
Da Capo Press shows "Dyn-O-Mite:
Good Times, Bad Times, Our Times,"
by Jimmie Walker with Sal Manna.
"I may not reach the top again, but
at least my butt is off the ground!"
In the foreword, comedian David
Brenner said he's tired of hearing
other black comics "make fun of
Jimmie, referring to him as a Stepin
Fetchit type."
"What they should acknowledge,"
he said, "is that if it weren't for Jim-
mie Walker busting through, thanks
to 'Good Times,' TV's white, glass
ceiling, they would still be black,
but they wouldn't be comedians."
Walker- his head shaved, and no
longer string-bean thin recently
appeared at Raleigh's Goodnights
comedy club. In an interview with
The Associated Press, he talks about
his book, Leno and life on the road.
AP: Obviously, when you started
out, there weren't that many black


comedians out there. How
landscape changed?
Walker: I think the black
because of Pryor, has c
Everybody wants to be F
and, you know, it's the ol
Bentsen line: I KNEW
Pryor And you're no Richar
There's ONE Richard Pr
DONE. It's over Time for p
move in a different direct
the language has gotten a lit
I think it hurts us, in terms
ings. Because most come
think black comics are goil
dirty. And that's a bad thin
We don't need that.
AP: Do you miss being on
regular basis?
Walker: Well, it's alwa;
being on a TV show. Because
does is, it exposes you to
people. People see you cons
you're on all the time.... You
yourself and say, 'No, I'm
than that.' Television is the
go. Better than movies. Bet
anything else. ...
AP: I realized the other (
Dyn-o-mite, you're 65 year ol
I mean, you're a senior citiz
Walker: Yes, I can get free
Denny's now. Half price....
AP: So, are you in AARP'
Walker: You get it autom
They cannot, they send it
Whenever I get something
them or anybody else, Soci
rity, you go, "I guess they mi
seen the act. It's all over Ge
AP: Is this you kind o
funny or you being serious
yourself?
Walker: It's the reality of
a reality-ist- if there's sucl
as that. I didn't go to colle
don't know if there's such
But reality-ist I'm THAT


FICTION
1. "Shadow of Night" by Deborah Hark-
ness (Viking)
2. "1, Michael Bennett" by James Patter-
son, Michael Ledwidge (Little, Brown)
3. "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins
(Scholastic Press)
4. "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins
(Scholastic Press)
5. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown
Publishing Group)
6. "Backfire" by Catherine Coulter (Putnam)
7. "Artemis Fowl: The Last Guardian" by
Eoin Colfer (Hyperion Books)


Birthday You're likely to be most successful in the year
ahead with products, methods or persons that are progres-
sive in nature. Operating along traditional lines is safe, but it
could hold you back from advancement. Try to get involved
with trailblazers.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) When out with friends, some-
one might talk in a negative way about an absent pal. If you
don't think he or she deserves to be put down, defend your
buddy.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You should screen new involve-
ments very carefully at this time, because if you don't you
could be held partially liable for a financial expense. Set
firm ground rules for any new undertaking.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be extremely careful what you
say when dealing with an unfamiliar group, in case one
among them is a troublemaker who might later repeat your
words in a very unflattering light.


8. "Dork Diaries: Tales From a Not-So-
Graceful Ice Princess" by Rachel Renee
Russell (Aladdin)
9. "The Next Best Thing: A Novel" by
Jennifer Weiner (Atria Books)
10. "Wicked Business" by Janet
Evanovich (Bantam)
NONFICTION
1. "Jesus Calling: Enjoying Peace in His
Presence" by Sarah Young (Integrity Pub-
lishers)
2. "StrengthsFinder 2.0" by Tom Rath
(Gallup Press)
3. "Wild" by Cheryl Strayed (Knopf)


Today's HOROSCOPE

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Any favor you do for another
should come from the goodness of your heart. If your kind-
ness has other motives, it will backfire on you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A poorly informed friend
might encourage you to gamble on something about which
you both know little or nothing. Don't allow the blind to lead
the blind.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Ambition is an extremely
laudable trait, provided you don't hurt anybody else in your
quest for success. Acquiring a tarnished victory won't give
you much to admire.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you deviate from your
plans, you're likely to lose focus and squander effort on un-
productive targets. Stick to your agenda, and you'll do just
fine.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Make sure you stay on your
toes when it comes to a group endeavor. Be certain each


4. "Unbroken" by Laura Hill
(Random House)
5. "The Amateur" by Edward
nery Publishing)
6. "Killing Lincoln" by Bill O'
tin Dugard (Holt)
7. "The Wimpy Kid Do-lt-Yo
by Jeff Kinney (Abrams)
8. "Dream Team" by Jack MI
(Ballatine Books)
9. "The Skinny Rules" by Bo
with Greg Critser (Ballantine E
10. "Cowards" by Glenn Be
old Editions)


person can hold up his or her end, and every
group benefits equally.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A matter signi
and your mate could easily pull you in two se
tions if you're not on the same page. Hold tog
Aries (March 21-April 19) Think twice bei
friend up on his or her offer to help you out w
Unless he or she is a pro, this person might t
hindrance than a benefit.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It might be wise
knowingly going out on a limb and taking a hi
risk. Unless you're absolutely sure you can si
pay back any involved loans, hold off.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) The difference
mony and anger in your household might lie i
very delicate balance. Be extra careful, becau
small infraction could ignite a firestorm.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW


Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JULY 20
Mega Money: 3 -18 25 36
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 $2,314.50
3-of-4 MB 43 $353.50
3-of-4 883 $51
2-of-4 MB 1,328 $23.50
1-of-4 MB 11,241 $2.50
2-of-4 26,466 $2
Fantasy 5:2 9 12 28 34
5-of-5 3 $75,295.69
4-of-5 299 $121.50
3-of-5 10,042 $10
THURSDAY, JULY19
Fantasy 5:5 15 16 -19 20
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ciated Press Tod y in
er be as
HISTORY

road Today is Sunday, July 22,
the 204th day of 2012. There
are 162 days left in the year.
has the Today's Highlight:
comedy On July 22, 1862, Presi-
hanged. dent Abraham Lincoln pre-
Richard sented to his Cabinet a
d Lloyd preliminary draft of the
Richard Emancipation Proclamation.
rd Pryor On this date:
yor It's In 1587, an English colony
people to fated to vanish under myste-
on. And rious circumstances was es-
tie dirty tablished on Roanoke Island
of book- off North Carolina.
dy clubs In 1893, Wellesley College
ng to be professor Katharine Lee
g for us. Bates visited the summit of
Pikes Peak, where she was
TV on a inspired to write the original
version of her poem "America
ys good the Beautiful."
e what it In 1934, bank robber John
a lot of Dillinger was shot to death by
stantly if federal agents outside
n better Chicago's Biograph Theater,
e way to where he had just seen the
ter than Clark Gable movie "Manhat-
tan Melodrama."
day, Kid In 1942, gasoline rationing
d, right? involving the use of coupons
en. began along the Atlantic
e food at seaboard.
In 1962, Mariner 1, NASA's
? first attempt at sending a
latically spacecraft to Venus, was de-
to you. stroyed shortly after launch
ng from because of faulty steering.
al Secu- In 1975, the House of Rep-
ust have resentatives joined the Sen-
et out" ate in voting to restore the
)f being American citizenship of Con-
is about federate Gen. Robert E. Lee.
In 1992, Colombian drug
Saliword lord Pablo Escobar escaped
ge so r from his luxury prison near
a word. Medellin. (He was slain by
guy security forces in December
1993.)
Ten years ago: Factory
worker Alejandro Avila was
charged with murder and kid-
napping in the abduction and
enbrand slaying of 5-year-old Saman-
tha Runnion of Stanton, Calif.
SKlein (Reg- (Avila was later convicted
and sentenced to death.)
Reilly & Mar- Five years ago: Padraig
Harrington survived a calami-
urself Book" tous finish in regulation and a
tense putt for bogey on the
IcCallum final hole of a playoff to win
the British Open.
ob Harper One year ago: President
looks) Barack Obama formally
ck (Thresh- signed off on ending the ban
on gays serving openly in the
-Associated Press military.
Today's Birthdays: Opera
singer Licia Albanese is 99.
Former Senate Majority
one in the Leader Bob Dole, R-Kan., is
89. Fashion designer Oscar
ficant to you de la Renta is 80. Game
parate direc- show host Alex Trebek is 72.
jether. Actor Danny Glover is 66.
fore taking a Actor-comedian-director Al-
ith a project, bert Brooks is 65. Movie
be more of a composer Alan Menken is
63. Actor Willem Dafoe is 57.
ge financial Thought for Today:
successfully "Falling in love consists
merely in uncorking the imag-
between har- nation and bottling the com-
n keeping a mon sense." Helen


use even a Rowland, American writer
and humorist (1875-1950).


Wall Street Journal BEST-SELLERS












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


n ao


U QDOTO if ^^ D~


Courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The requirement to get a permit to use flash photography in Three Sisters Springs has generated controversy, causing some to feel it is
government overreach. Others feel requiring a permit is justifiable, for the benefit of the manatees.


Tour guide: Flashes not needed at Three Sisters Springs


CAPT. STACY DUNN
Crystal River
I really wish the City Council of Crystal
River fully understood things before
jumping to the conclusion that the feds
are just doing something because they
"can." In response to the debate about flash
photography used up in Three Sisters Springs,
I agree, it's not needed. It's disruptive to the
manatees and annoying to people, too.
It's not needed for the everyday person
snorkeling to use the camera flash mode. You
have beautiful white sand, lots of manatees,
usually a great deal of sunlight; however,
many people come to Three Sisters Springs
as clueless about photography as they are of
the manatees and have to be told what is and
isn't needed when in the presence of endan-
gered animals.
Flashes are not needed. The professional
photographers or those who want to be pro-
fessional can pay for the special-use permit
(SUP) provided by the refuge. The do's and
don't that goes along with the SUP are ex-
plained in great detail.
Most professional photography cameras
have special lights/strobes/flashes. These
special-use permit holders are easily marked
with a yellow vest issued to them by the
refuge when they pay for the permit. If they
do wrong, you can call in their number to the
refuge and warnings are given, or even the
vest and SUP privileges taken away in worse
cases.
They get a few extra privileges that go
along with the permit they are paying for but
are still monitored and sometimes stripped
of the special-use permit if disobeying the


rules of its use. If you see these yellow-vested
photographers chasing and disrespecting the
manatees, then get the number off the vest
and call the refuge. We all are responsible to
make sure the manatees staying here to sur-
vive the winter are safe and respected.
You have many folks trying to snap their
own award-winning "claim-to-fame" photo
and they can many times be disrespectful
and disruptive to resting, sleeping, nursing or
even sick or injured manatees. If you want to
use flash, then buy an SUP The everyday
snorkeler/tourist does not need one, and can
use their cameras as they want just turn
the flash off. It's simple really
Let the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Refuge offi-
cials do their jobs. They are trying to correct
years and years and years of problems asso-
ciated when the manatees come here to sur-
vive the cold waters of the Gulf. Disrespectful
people will not let them have any rest. It's not
a matter of what the U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service can do, but what is the right thing to
do.
Many scenic and unique places all around
the world demand you not use flash so
what is the big deal here, especially when the
manatees are here to survive the winter?
Would you think to stick a camera with flash
into a bear's den and right into his face? Just
because a manatee has no way to defend it-
self and won't risk leaving the warm springs
doesn't mean we should abuse it; yes, I mean
abuse it. Just think if you were trying to sleep
or you aren't feeling good and every time you
close your eyes you have cameras going off-
you can see it through your eyelids. If you've
ever had trouble sleeping during a lightning-
rich thunderstorm, that would be similar It's


MATTHEW BECK/Chroniclefile
One local captain agrees with Fish and
Wildlife Service officials who believe even ca-
sual photographers do not need to utilize flash
photography while photographing manatees in
Three Sisters Springs, favoring the require-
ment of a special-use permit.
scary and disturbing.
Ban the flashes from cameras for the
everyday snorkeler Everyone else who wants
to use flash can pay if they want to play with
the pros! (Professional photographers, that
is).

Capt. Stacy Dunn is based in Crystal River


Future corridors: Planning or payola?


Florida needs an integrated
and well-maintained trans-
portation system.
But the cost of building and main-
taining roads far exceeds the money
the state has for that
work. We have an infra-
structure deficit. Despite
not having the necessary
funds through tolls and
general revenue dollars
to proceed with the proj-
ects already included in
the work program, well-
connected landowners
have applied political
pressure to purchase Paula
rights-of-way and build FLOI
new toll roads to direct
development near their VOI
land.
The Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) describes
this plan, the Future Corridors, as a
cooperative effort with the Florida
Transportation Commission to work
with statewide, regional, and local
partners to identify corridors that
will be significantly improved,
transformed or built over the next
50 years.
Wow, that sounds pretty good.
Could this be a visionary plan or


D


simply a way to direct road building
to people with the right political
connections?
Well, let's look at some of the
major players and their roles in
how this program got
started and how it weath-
ered three gubernatorial
administrations.
The Future Corridors
Program generally refers
to at least four toll roads
that would crisscross the
state's rural areas to
spur economic growth.
Over the past six to eight
)ockery years, a well-hatched
RIDA plan was put into motion,
often with the Legisla-
CES ture and FDOT taking
action that got little or no
scrutiny Some examples:
The need for a state report:
A group of politically influential
landowners primarily based in the
state's interior organized to devise
a plan. With the help of lobbyists
and a few like-minded legislators,
they urged Gov Jeb Bush to support
their plan to acquire right-of-way
and to start planning highway proj-
ects. "Florida's Future Corridors
Action Plan" was released in 2006


by FDOT "in cooperation with its
partners."
The Legislature designates
areas of critical state concern:
The report describes the need for
rural economic development and
the Legislature designates three re-
gions as Rural Areas of Critical
State Concern. They are the interior
counties of South Florida; counties
around the Apalachicola River
along the Northwest Gulf Coast; and
the area between Gainesville, Jack-
sonville and Tallahassee. These
areas match up with the group's
plan for their highway corridors.
Extending the period for
feasibility:
An attempt to push the develop-
ment of a corridor in the "heart-
land" was rebuffed by Gov Charlie
Crist, who cited the fact that there
would not be enough traffic to gen-
erate the tolls to pay for the high-
way Florida law requires that a
proposed toll road become prof-
itable in 20 years. After Crist left of-
fice, those same legislators quietly
changed the legal threshold to 30
years, making it much easier to jus-
tify construction.
Increasing bonding authority:
In 2007 the Republican-con-


trolled Legislature, which generally
opposes more debt, increased the
bonding authority so the state could
borrow more money for its roads
program.
As the economy soured, money
for roads was drying up. A few leg-
islators tried repeatedly to increase
the bonding authority even though
a bond finance report showed that
the state was dangerously close to
its debt limit.
Folding expressway authorities
into the Turnpike Authority:
Several high-ranking senators
proposed the merger on the as-
sumption that a single large author-
ity would be able to borrow money
more easily. In 2011, a coalition of
Tampa and Orlando senators, who
saw the merger as a raid on the tolls
collected through their expressway
authorities, killed the plan. Unde-
terred, the same players tried a dif-
ferent tact in 2012. They kept the
expressway authorities as inde-
pendent entities but provided for
revenue sharing to assist in their
desire for increased bonding
capability.
Funding a small future corridor


Page C4


Stimulate,

educate

and vote
We at the Chronicle
spent last week
talking to the
candidates who are run-
ning for public office in
the August primary
It has been a tradition at
the newspaper for many
decades to bring in the
candidates for public of-
fice and sit with them and
discuss the issues. We have
an editorial board that
conducts the interviews
and when they're com-
plete, we sit around and
make decisions on who the
newspaper should en-
dorse for the races.
Endorsements are
weird things, and our in-
tent is to get folks thinking
deeply about who they are
going to vote for on Elec-
tion Day When we en-
dorse a candidate, it's our
collective opinion. But that
doesn't necessarily mean
our recommendation is
the best choice according
to your set of values.
We don't set out to select
winners, and our recom-
mendations are based on
who we think would do the
best job for Citrus County.
Our collective values are
that we look for intelligent
candidates who have ini-
tiative; who are willing to
do the public's business in
the open; and who can
solve problems without
personally attacking peo-
ple who might disagree.
We like solutions that don't
involve higher taxes and
that protect individual
rights. Our priorities in-
clude creating a thriving
economy, protecting our
environment and fostering
community pride.
Some candidates appre-
ciate our endorsement, but
in truth, we've had other
candidates ask us not to
endorse them because we
might damage their cam-
paign. One incumbent can-
didate from Lake County,
seeking re-election to a
state Senate seat, actually
told the editorial board
that she "hated" us and
didn't like the county that
much either
We did not endorse her.
We simply hope our sug-
gestions get you thinking
and help motivate you to
go to the polls and
participate.
The Chronicle editorial
board does a few interest-
ing things that have be-
come part of our tradition.
For one, our editorial
board does not just include
people who are employed
by the Chronicle. We have
guest editorial board mem-
bers, readers and citizens
from the community who
are invited to participate
in our regular process of
writing editorials and
helping us form our collec-
tive opinion. They have an
equal say on the endorse-
ments of candidates.
Currently, we have
three guest members on
our eight-member board.
Curt Ebitz of Sugarmill
Woods has been the
longest serving. The re-
tired Army colonel is
deeply involved in veter-
ans' affairs in Citrus
County and the state of
Florida. He is a conserva-
tive Republican who will
poke you in the eye if you
talk about raising taxes.
The second guest board
member is Mac Harris, a
former newspaperman
and Texan who went to
work for Progress Energy
and eventually served as
See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


I







Page C2 *SUNDAY, JULY22, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .......................editor
S Mike Arnold ................. ................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz................. ................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SHORT-TERM SOLUTION





Budget is





a one-year





proposal


Citrus County taxpayers
will not see a big cut in
services this next year.


And most won't
see any increase
in their property
tax bill.
Despite the col-
lective despair ex-
pressed earlier in
the budget year by
county officials,
the decrease in
the taxable value


THE IS
The count

OUR OP
Pushing
down th


of property will not create crit-
ical shortfalls.
Instead of cutting services,
the county will be able to bal-
ance its budget by using some
of its reserves; accessing some
legal funds not needed at this
time; and raising the millage
rate.
Since this is an election year,
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe's plan will inevitably
be called a tax increase by
challengers. But it is not.
The county will actually
spend less money next year
than it is spending this year.
According to Thorpe's report,
the county's spending will drop
from $234 million in the cur-
rent fiscal year to $222 million
next year.
The taxable value of prop-
erty in the county decreased
3.7 percent over the past 12
months. Because of that, the
millage rate levied against the
taxable value was increased
from 6.9 mills to 7.1 mills to
raise basically the same
amount of tax dollars.
The only residents and busi-
nesses that will see their taxes
rise are the lucky few whose
property has not lost value as
quickly as the average property
owner.
While we understand the tax
formula, most of the politicians
in the county spent a decade ig-
noring our warning that they
were drastically raising taxes
while keeping the millage rate
flat. When property values
were soaring, county govern-
ment was reaping millions of
new dollars each year and the
politicians smugly told taxpay-
ers that they were holding
down spending. They weren't.
Instead, they were acting like
drunken sailors with their
newfound riches.


Now they are suffering from
the reverse trend; decreasing
property values means a
higher village
number is needed
5SUE: to raise the same
y budget. amount of funds.
In their defense,
INION: most of the
elected officials
problem and administra-
e road. tors today were
not sitting in the
same seats six
years ago when the problem
was being ignored.
Going forward, the moving of
funds will help the county
avoid program catastrophe in
the near term. But there does
not seem to be any reason to
believe the trend of decreasing
property values will stop. Un-
less there is a significant
change in the state's stalled
economy, the county has just
delayed by one year the in-
evitable. As our elected offi-
cials move to approve this
year's flat budget, they should
begin plans to look at the re-
ductions that will be necessary
in the following year.
You can only raid reserves
and legal funds so long before
you run out of money
There are services provided
by the county that are a luxury
and should be stopped. It will
take some strong leadership to
identify those cuts because
every service supported by a
tax has a constituency that will
complain about reductions.
The larger dilemma facing
the county involves the nuclear
plant at the Duke (Progress En-
ergy) site near Crystal River. If
the new owners at Duke decide
to decommission the nuclear
plant, Citrus County will face
an economic disaster.
Hundreds of residents will
lose their jobs; unoccupied
homes will flood the market;
and the decreased value of the
Crystal River energy site will
create a huge tax dollar short-
fall that will be felt in every
town in our community.
County officials need to look
to the future and recognize that
the basic structure of what gov-
ernment now does is going to
have to change. Those are
tough choices and cannot be
kicked down the road forever.


Provide photo OUND
-qOUND


It's 2012 and I think if
you can't come up with a
photo ID, you have no
right to vote.
Test voters


j,


You know, with all of
this voter situation, I seri- CAL
ously think they need to 56
come up with some sort OU
of very simple test before
you're eligible to vote; like, how
many states there are in the na-
tion, how many senators in the
Senate and how many branches
of government we have. Some


3-0579


simple things.
GOP sponsored
This is July 9, "Crack-
down on voters." I'll bet
if the Chronicle looks into
it, I'll bet you will find the
Republicans are behind
this bill to look for this
because they know
Florida is mostly a Demo-
cratic state. What an-
other way for them to get


votes. Have a nice day.


* Hot Corner files are compiled
from daily Sound Off calls.


"Every child born in America can hope
to grow up to enjoy tax loopholes."
Richard Strout (TRB), 1898-1990


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


7 habits of ineffective government


Stephen Covey, the manage-
ment guru who died this
week, would have had a
hard time selling his books in
Benjamin Franklin's
America, or Abe Lin-
coln's. His best seller
"7 Habits of Highly Ef-
fective People" would 0
have been considered "V
a self-evident truth,
one drummed into
earlier Americans by
schools, churches and
the Puritan ethic.
Today, Covey's Cal T
thoughts about how to OTI
become a success by VOI
applying principles
with a proven track
record seem innovative and cut-
ting edge. His work is a rebuke to
the notion that government can
do it all for you.
Contrast Covey's ethic with
what President Obama said dur-
ing a campaign stop in Roanoke,
Va., last Friday: "If you've got a
business, you didn't build that.
Somebody else made that
happen."
He mentioned roads and
bridges as examples. Did he
mean we should thank govern-
ment for the structures because
without them we might not be
able to travel to a job interview,
or to work? The subplot in the
president's campaign remarks
seems to be that none of us can
make it without government. So
what happens to those who do
manage to succeed on their own?
Are they to be taxed and regu-
lated to death as a lesson to other
upstarts?
As I read the president's re-
marks, I thought of those in my
life who have helped me. My par-
ents, of course; they remained
married and taught me about
thrift, paying bills on time and
personal responsibility There
were also high school and college
teachers who inspired me.
Journalistic mentors included
David Brinkley, Frank McGee


h
H
Ic


and Sander Vanocur. These ac-
complished broadcast journalists
started small and seemed to suc-
ceed without much, if any, gov-
ernment help. Many of
their generation bene-
fited from the GI Bill, a
government-funded re-
source that helped pay
for college for return-
ing World War II veter-
ans. But unlike most
government aid pro-
grams, the GI Bill as-
sisted initiative, it
lomas didn't replace it.
IER Later, a newspaper
DES publisher-Tom John-
son-opened the door
for me as a columnist.
He didn't sell it. I sold it by visit-
ing scores of newspaper editors
around the country, telling con-
servative audiences to subscribe
to the paper when it started car-
rying me. That would fit under
Stephen Covey's number one
principle: be proactive.
A financial adviser helped me
make good investments so I can
take care of my wife and myself
should I ever decide to retire (lib-
erals, don't hold your breath). It
was money I earned, not money
government gave me.
Government that is too large
and controlling stifles ambition
and initiative by penalizing
success.
As the Obama campaign at-
tacks Mitt Romney's business
success and by association all
who have succeeded or wish to
succeed Romney should turn
the tables and attack seven prin-
ciples that have made govern-
ment highly ineffective.
They are:
1. High taxes. High taxes rob
the productive and discourage
innovation.
2. Too many regulations. Over-
regulation inhibits private indus-
try from performing up to its
potential.
3. Overspending. When an indi-
vidual is in debt, he or she aims


Government that is
too large and
controlling stifles
ambition and
initiative by
penalizing success.

to spend less until the family
budget is in balance. When gov-
ernment spends more than it
takes in, it creates an addiction
and burdens current and future
citizens. Politicians won't tell
anyone "no," so government
keeps spending.
4. Foreign adventures. We can-
not afford to go everywhere in
hopes of promoting liberty We
should only send troops where our
interests are clearly defined and
an achievable outcome is likely
Countries receiving military assis-
tance must help pay the bill.
5. Bureaucracy There are too
many people working for govern-
ment. Many agencies and pro-
grams are unnecessary
6. Health care. Government
can't make you healthy Oba-
macare will not only cost more,
but will reduce the quality and
availability of good health care,
as in the U.K. A private-sector so-
lution is preferable.
7. Ignoring the Constitution.
The best habit the American gov-
ernment could practice is a re-
turn to the principles of that great
document that set boundaries for
government and removed them
for its citizens.
Inspiration and perspiration
are habits that usually lead to
success. Government's bad habits
produce unending debt and stifle
private-sector job creation. That's
the counterargument to these
bad habits.

Readers may e-mail Cal Thomas
at tmseditors@tribune.com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Follow Flag Code
Allow me to be among the first
to point out that your Sunday,
Julyl5, full-color ad in the
Comics Section for the upcoming
political forum (July 31, 2012)
pictures at least two infractions
of the Flag Code, i.e. 4 USC Sec-
tion 8... Specifically: (b) The flag
should never touch anything be-
neath it, such as the ground,
the floor, water or merchandise.
(d) The flag should never be
used as wearing apparel, bed-
ding or drapery It should never
be festooned, drawn back, nor
up, in folds, but always
allowed to fall free.
Thomas Fallon
Lecanto
Editor's note: Thanks for the
details. More than one reader
called this to our attention, and
the image is no longer used.

Spanish Americans
Congratulations to the 2012-13
president and board of directors
of the Spanish American Club of
Citrus County
We would like to take this op-
portunity to congratulate the
newly elected 2012-13 president
and board of directors of the
Spanish American Club of Citrus
County (SAC), and also thank the
outgoing board for their diligent


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

efforts and service to the club
and to the community
Throughout the past 25 years,
the Spanish American Club has
evolved into a formidable organ-
ization in Citrus County, assist-
ing many individuals and groups
in our community by conducting


dances and fundraisers, by pro-
viding scholarships to college-
bound students, providing
donations for needy families,
and through the support of their
Angel Network.
Over the years, we have per-
sonally worked on various com-
munity venues with SAC, which
have been extremely rewarding
and beneficial to all concerned.
As a loyal sponsor of the Spanish
American Club, we will continue
to promote the importance of
SAC's role as a viable source of
cultural events in the commu-
nity, as well as the dances as a
means of fundraising for the or-
ganization. We will also continue
to garner the support of addi-
tional members and sponsors in
order to aid the club with its fi-
nancial goals.
Best wishes are extended to
officers Ben Cruz, Marie Coim-
bre, Janette Rodriquez, Iris
Rodgers, Maritza Soto, Cecilia
Frenkel, Sandy Thomas, Herb
Valez; Amelia Torres, sergeant at
arms; and newsletter editors
Lou Torres and Peter Velez. May
God bless you with good health,
and may you have a fabulous
and successful year! iBuena
Suerte!
Kindest personal regards,
Mary-Ann, Arnold and Arnold
Jr. Virgilio
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: VOTERS


L _- V





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Will you still need me when I'm sixty-four?


"Give me an answer,
fill in a form, mine
forever more, will you
still need me, will you
still feed me, when I'm
sixty-four?"
"When I'm Sixty-
Four"
John Lennon, Paul
McCartney, Fred
Fred B
c. 1966.
A SI
T oday, July 22, OF
2012, is a very
special birthday for a very
special someone.
On this very day, my Cheryl is 64.
OK.
OK.
I hear the moaning and
groaning out there, but I asked her
before I wrote these words and
she said it was fine, that she was-
n't at all bothered by the number.
The aches and pains that have
come with the years are some-
thing else, but the number doesn't
bother her a bit.


I

I


I've spent the past
.. several hours thinking
S about how to write this
slice.
How do you put into
600 words or less the
thoughts about a life-
time spent together?
The first of her
rannen birthdays we cele-
LICE brated together was
IE her 18th. It was just a
LIFE few days before my
21st birthday and some
two months before we were mar-
ried. To add to the coincidental
chemistry of all of this, the Beat-
les recorded "When I'm Sixty-
Four?" that same year, 1966.
From the numbers already pro-
vided, you can figure it we've
spent 46 of her 64 and my 67 years
together
I remember snickering at the
words when the song first came
out, thinking about old people get-
ting older, but still craving love,
care and affection.


Special to the Chronicle
Cheryl Brannen has been married to Fred for 46 of her 64 years. Happy birthday, Mrs. Brannen.


At that time I thought, when
we're 64, will we even care?
It was much too early then to
think about such circumstances
and the fact that, whether we like
it or not, if we continue to live,
we'll continue to get older.
Now that we're there, take it
from we, we still care.
I still cherish her smile sent es-
pecially to me from across a


crowded room and the momen-
tary sensation that no one else is
even there.
I still feel an odd combination of
pride and jealousy when other
men, both older and younger men,
flirt with her and it happens
much more frequently than you
might imagine.
She's no longer 18, she's 64, but
she's still a blue-eyed, blond-


haired knockout she's my blue-
eyed, blond-haired knockout, and
yes, I most certainly still need her
and it is still very much my privi-
lege to feed her, even though she's
sixty-four!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Unions downfall of



public education

An educated citizenry is necessary for formance. (Everyone else in society faces
maintenance of our American form the risk of losing his job, if his work is un-
of self government and the freedom satisfactory Why must teachers demand
and prosperity that it gives us. There is also tenure?)
a direct correlation between ed- Teacher unions limit the abil-
ucational achievement of stu- ity of management to change
dents and national wealth work schedules and move em-
formation. If America is failing ployees to respond to the chang-
today, it is in no small part due to ing needs of students. They fight
the failures of our public schools against establishment of public
to properly educate our charter schools because the
children. union rules do not apply in these
Some teachers and school 'schools. They make excuses for
board members complain that the fact that, on average, charter
teachers have to spend so much school students learn more than
time teaching students the stan- Dr. William Dixon do public school students.
dardized tests required by law- OTHER Unions, and their political al-
makers that actual education of VOICES lies, rail against use of tax dol-
students has begun to suffer ___ lars to pay tuition at private
Suffer compared with what? schools for students of failed


The educational process that, during the
past 30 years, has seen no improvement in
student performance in reading and a sig-
nificant drop in science and math? The ed-
ucational process that requires 30 percent
of graduates to take remedial courses when
they attend college? The education estab-
lishment that has, over 30 years, doubled
the number of its employees and tripled its
cost while student enrollment has in-
creased a mere 9 percent?
Some of the blame for the failure of pub-
lic education can be laid on parents and on
lawmakers. Many of today's parents are
part of an American culture that has be-
come coarse and ill-mannered, less disci-
plined, less principled and just plain
ignorant. Their children reflect this cul-
ture in the classroom. Some are nearly im-
possible to educate or even keep under
control.
Lawmakers have placed demands upon
public schools to educate all students no
matter whether they bring behavioral,
physical or mental disabilities to class. The
needs of students with disabilities now
trump the schools' goals of graduating stu-
dents prepared to compete in a worldwide
marketplace. It may help an autistic stu-
dent or a student with behavioral problems
to be placed in classes with other students,
but it very likely takes away from how much
is learned in that classroom.
Teachers, themselves, and their unions
have contributed greatly to the failures of
public education. They are major obstacles
to making needed improvements. Unions
have fought against competition among
teachers for continued employment, ad-
vancement and higher levels of pay Union
rules protect teachers from losing their
jobs as the result of unsatisfactory per-


public schools. They claim the money is
better used to improve the failing public
schools. Yet, more money has never worked
where union rules prevent administrators
from firing incompetent teachers and re-
structuring hours and curricula to accom-
modate student needs.
Congress, former Florida Gov Jeb Bush
and the Florida Legislature tried to ad-
dress the failures of public schools with
what tools the Democrats and their union
supporters would permit. They came up
with charter schools, educational scholar-
ships and the hated standardized tests. Ob-
viously, teachers and their unions, in
resisting any change that might improve ed-
ucational outcomes, brought these burden-
some standardized tests upon themselves.
It would take decades to change a culture
that produces failed parents and sends
troubled kids into the public schools. Pub-
lic schools will have to make changes to bet-
ter deal with them while educating those
who want to learn. Teachers know better
than anyone what changes are needed and
likely to be effective. If they ever get beyond
limitations imposed by their unions, I be-
lieve they and school administrators will
get all the support they need to remake our
public schools.


William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University New York Medical College and
the USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces officer
achieving the rank of lieutenant colonel.
He was an assistant professor ofsurgery
at the University of Georgia before
enteringprivate practice. Dr Dixon can
be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Letters to the EDITOR


Thanks for support
The family of David P Kish sincerely
wishes to acknowledge and thank all lov-
ing relatives, devoted friends, and caring
acquaintances for their endless support,
words of encouragement, and generosity,
during the passing of our beloved hus-
band, father, grandfather and brother on
this his first anniversary in Heaven.
We love you, and God Bless You All!
Susan Kish
Forked River, N.J.
Editor's note: Sunday July 8, was the an-
niversary of the passing of David P Kish.

Witnessing fraud
In a typical political spin tactic, Mr. J.
Blasi took exception to a letter I sent in re-
garding one of my employees asking to re-
duce his hours in order to qualify for food
stamps. In so doing, Mr. Blasi offers many
scenarios as to how this might be a legiti-
mate assistance request and concludes I
didn't have all the facts, or perhaps the
employee was just "yanking my chain." Or
maybe he needed time off to care for a
sick individual. Or maybe ...
Let me assure Mr. Blasi this employee
unashamedly came to me and told me ex-
actly what his motives were, and he asked
me to falsify income statements on his ap-
plication for food stamps. I am not assum-
ing fraud, I witnessed it The only


assumptions here are on the part of Mr
Blasi that I didn't have my facts straight be-
fore sending that letter I commented on a
specific situation firsthand while Mr Blasi
tried to rebut my points hypothetically
Mr. Blasi goes on to accuse me of want-
ing to "throw out the entire system be-
cause of one employee." Really? Another
absolute inaccuracy printed for people to
read.
First, I was a supervisor for a contractor
and oversaw 100 men daily I now employ
40 or more. I can't count the instances
where people live together in mixed and
matched families with one partner claim-
ing subsidies without disclosing there is
additional income in the household.
Mr. Blasi's contentions lead him to his
point it is actually Gov Romney responsi-
ble for unemployment in his state. At last
check, it was not just Massachusetts that
has increased unemployment, but the en-
tire United States.
After changing my words, he asserts inac-
curately I wish to "throw the baby out with
the wash" and take away a program for the
truly deserving. I do not wish to "throw out
the babies," but rather, to throw out the fed-
eral bureaucracy that has become the
"babysitters" at taxpayers' expense.
Mr. Blasi is free to donate to charities
that do the same thing if this is his true
concern.
Mitch Simmons
Crystal River


p~p~lai~)Z50~~Bu H OE3QW'~4M. YUCU~r'-UFS1 2~


Resolve tax problems

President Barack H. Obama, elected healthy economy today Our inaction con-
president of our United (but di- tinues with defense budgets including bil-
vided) States of America made a lions for items unwanted by the Secretary
wrong decision. You and I forced him into of Defense, but funded on demand from


making it
What decision could that be?
Offering a tax cut to the middle
class when he should have de-
manded a tax increase.
Why? All politicians, from
presidents to county commis-
sioners, want to be elected and .
re-elected and re-elected. They
know citizens want 150 percent
services from our local, state
and federal governments, yet George
pay little for it. They know GUI
promises of lowering taxes and COL
providing more benefits than
opponents is election
insurance.
Under President Obama, we now have
the unenviable, to me and should be to
you, lowest federal tax rate in 30 years.
Federal taxes last year equaled 14.4 per-
cent of the nation's economic output, the
lowest level since 1950. Add state and local
taxes, and the share nearly doubles, still
lower than at almost any other point in the
past 40 years.
Here is our history of federal marginal
tax rate ranges for the past 60 years:
1962 low of 20 percent and high of
91 percent.
1972 low of 14 percent and high of
70 percent.
1982 low of 12 percent and high of
80 percent.
1992 low of 15 percent and high of
31 percent.
2002 low of 10 percent and high of


our legislators who control and
approve the budget.
We have become a nation of
expecting something for noth-
ing and we seem to be demand-
-- ing it more and more. We do
need all the services our local,
state and federal governments
provide, and more. We need leg-
islators interested in biparti-
sanship and good local, state
Harbin and federal governments, ade-
EST quately staffed, not outsourced
UMN at higher costs. And we must be
willing to pay for it!
We should also welcome new
taxes that benefit our nation. A University
of California study proposed 1 cent per
ounce "fat tax" on sweetened beverages. It
is estimated the cost and "idea of it being
a tax" would save 2.4 million diabetes
cases, 95,000 heart disease cases, 8,000
strokes and 26,000 premature deaths. In-
come to states is an estimated $13 billion
in tax revenues and $17 billion in health
care costs.
Why "United (but divided) States"?
There again, you and I are failing by not
demanding bipartisanship from our legis-
lators. We are not getting what we pay
them for.
You must, as will I, write or call U.S. Rep.
Rich Nugent, and Sens. Bill Nelson and
Marco Rubio, demanding bipartisanship
and early action on resolving our tax prob-
lems and getting this country back to work.
You should write Gov Rick Scott and our
state legislators asking them to support our
national health care plan and favor the on-
line product purchase tax, which could
add billions to our state income.


George Harbin is retired Homosassa
resident who has been appointed Citrus
County Democratic Executive Committee
public information officer and has
served on the committee since 2000. He
was a contracting officer for the
Department ofDefense, including 13
years in the Pentagon, writing and
awarding contracts for construction,
research, other services and products for
25years, most with the Corps of
Engineers and finally in the Office of the
Secretary of the Army George Harbin
can be emailed atgharbinl4@gmail.com.


e EDITOR

Liberal ideology
When liberal ideology is truly exposed,
it is normally accepted by very few
people.
Therefore, continue to publish
Leonard Pitts. He does more to sway peo-
ple over to the Republican side than any-
thing the Republicans themselves could
possibly do.
Case in point MSNBC has tried for
years to thwart the ratings of Bill O'Reilly
and they've failed miserably Why? Be-
cause liberal ideology is normally ac-
cepted by very few people. The facts
prove it
Brad Block
Homosassa


I
I


38.6 percent.
2012 low of 10 percent and high of
35 percent.
Our presidents and legislators, Democ-
rats and Republicans alike, recognized the
war costs of Vietnam and funded it
through higher taxes
Shamefully, our legislators and presi-
dents these past few years called for tax
cuts in spite of mounting government
costs, principally war costs. This, too, was
caused by your failure and mine to de-
mand realism and appropriate taxation,
as our national debt and deficit mounted.
Instead, we permitted some of our legisla-
tors to passionately continue calling for
tax cuts aided by an equally passionate mi-
nority of constituents.
With our laissez faire and pinch-a-penny
beliefs, we passed up opportunities for a


Letters to th

Dixon got it right
Dr (William) Dixon's column address-
ing the immigration issue is hitting the
nail on the head with a 20-pound sledge-
hammer. He has cited the issues and how
we (America) need to approach a resolu-
tion. This is one of the best assessments
of the immigration issue I have seen and
read. Our elected officials, both parties,
should be so enlightened and take appro-
priate action instead of using the issue
for political gain.
I am not normally in agreement with a
lot of what Dr. Dixon writes. This was a
major exception.
Charles Stovall
Beverly Hills


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 C3










Protecting innocence
Those who help destroy the most inno-
cent among us lose the moral high ground.
Why are some people so anxious to help
destroy other women's innocent unborn
children?
We know abortions resulting from rape
and incest are about 1 percent We have
free will and with nimble minds easily jus-
tify any action we take, as Jo Darling does
to justify abortion.
Why not list the reasons to save their
lives? There are laws that control abor-
tions, which, by their existence, exert
some control over births. Again, they are
to protect the most innocent among us, not
to rally against women.
Based on one letter-writer, bias against
the Catholic Church appears to continue.
But does it justify disregarding the funda-
mental right of religious freedom? Bigotry
against the Catholic religion and some oth-
ers has existed since before Jesus Christ
Today it appears in society, some news
media and apparently in our government.
Ruth J. Anderson rallies against 1 per-


VOICES
Continued from Page C1

segment as a connector:
The Heartland Parkway
had been put on hold to the
chagrin of its powerful sup-
porters. To justify the need
for a new north/south corri-
dor through the state's inte-
rior, some of the landowners
and their allies directed
state-funded projects into
the vicinity, building poten-
tial ridership. Proponents
hoped their chances to res-


cent of past priests and leaders of the
Church who committed acts of evil. The
church has acknowledged mistakes and
worked very hard to remove all of these
people. A recent published report stated
abuse among non-Catholic religious lead-
ers was about 5 percent. That's in line
with the estimated 5 percent to 6 percent
of society in general. Unfortunately, evil
exists. Catholic institutions are among the
very safest environments for children
today It would be fantastic if society was
99-plus percent clean.
I have been accused of hating women,
but I have a wonderful wife, great daugh-
ters, a great deceased mother and a de-
ceased mother-in law whom I regard as
one of the top five smartest people I have
met in my life. I also have six great sisters-
in-law, and all of the above agree with my
position on abortion!
Again, how many of you abortion sup-
porters are happy to have been born?
End of story
Ken Geiger
Hernando


urrect the Heartland Park-
way would fare better under
Gov Rick Scott. The new ef-
fort was a smaller bite of the
apple. Using their political
influence, they were able to
persuade FDOT to add an
extension of the existing
Polk Parkway as a connector
to their much desired Heart-
land Parkway, jumping over
many projects further along
in the planning, design and
engineering. While one can
make a case for addressing
future needs, what about
our present needs?
Is it fair to the residents of


Poinciana, an unincorpo-
rated area spanning Polk and
Osceola counties, who have
been begging for a road that
would connect the greater
Poinciana area and its 83,000
residents with Interstate 4 via
County Road 54? With their
transportation needs under-
served for more than a
decade, isn't this where we
should concentrate our lim-
ited transportation dollars?
On the taxpayers who are in
an underserved area?
SA new state study by the
same cast of characters:
The Associated Press re-


I>?


COMMENTARY


Letters to the EDITOR


cently reported that "as part
of its future corridors effort,
the state is spending as
much as $106,000 to have
consultants interview major
landowners across the state
to find out about their de-
velopment plans. The con-
sultants are also supposed
to come up with ways that
the state could strike deals
with these landowners to set
aside land for what would
most likely be toll roads."
The players?
The two people conduct-
ing these interviews are
Billy Buzzett, formerly of


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

its chief public information
guy in Florida. Mac is re-
tired and very active in the
Citrus County theater
scene. He quotes Shake-
speare and Mark Twain
with equal accuracy
And our final guest board
member is Rebecca Martin,
a health care consultant
who is a mediator. She has
very good credentials for
dealing with some of the
sticky issues facing us.
We believe in these guest
editorial board positions
because we are not so arro-
gant that we think we have
the best insight on every-
thing that goes on in our
community Our guest
members cover some pretty
important population seg-
ments in Citrus County


the St. Joe Development
Company and Scott's head
of the Department of Com-
munity Affairs until the
agency was dissolved in
2011; and Chris Corr, also
formerly with St. Joe and
now the executive vice pres-
ident ofAECOM, a develop-
ment consulting company
The landowners include
Lykes Brothers, U.S. Sugar
Corp, Collier Enterprises
and Alico. Many of them
were part of the original
group that first approached
the governor and FDOT
with their idea of a Future


C4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY

Art Center Theatre
PRESENTS


Frederick Loewe ,
and Alan Jay Lemer
['., I", t'/
Mac & Sharon Harlis
Sally Robb

July 13-29,'12
Show time starts at 7:30 pm Sunday Matinees at 2:00 pm
Extra Performance, July 26 at 7:30pm .


Call: 352-746-7606 ,J,.
Box Offie Hours Monday through Fridy 1 4 -
www.rtcenter.cc Ci(i*l E**
000BWLW By -.1_.W- mmh 'r-m -4 ME MO

CCCC Proudly Presents

Rodgers And

Hammersteinon
Broadway

Come out
and support
the Choir!


Great
Music!
July 29, 2012 3:00 pm
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL
Aug. 3, 2012 7:30pm
Beverly Hills Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, FL
August 5, 2012 3:00pm
Faith Lutheran Church
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto, FL
Adults $10 donation, children 12 and under are FREE
Tickets will be sold at the door.
Two $1000 Scholarships will be presented.
ThankYou patrons,sponsors and advertisers
for supporting our Scholarship program.
For information Call 352-381-7071
OOOBYE1 \ mnk .


Miliary ard art


Wednesday Aupust 22


St. Benedict's Catholic Church


455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


A Lunch
4 at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.

Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"

All proceeds to benefit
the Pregnancy &
Family Life Center V

For more information .
call us at 344-3030 1I II )NiC .E
OOOBVYH w- iwch lc 4Noiiin 4.co


226 E -
SPONSORED
EVENTS SO '
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chlonicle is committed to supporting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraisers and entertainment throughout our
community. The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and work. Don't
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
of your sponsorship needs!


While interviewing the
candidates, there is an
overriding theme that car-
ries through.
The clear majority of the
candidates are running for
office because they want to
make Citrus County a bet-
ter place to live.
Sure, there is a minority
that suffers from the over-
inflated ego syndrome, but
in truth you need a pretty
big ego to put yourself out
there and let voters give
you a thumbs-up or a
thumbs-down on Election
Day
The other somewhat un-
usual thing the Chronicle
editorial board does is that
we sit down with every can-
didate and get in-depth on
the issues. It doesn't take
long to figure out who
knows what they're talking
about and who doesn't.
Most candidates want to
talk about things in the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

past. You know, "If I was
elected I would have never
voted this way on Port Cit-
rus or Meadowcrest..."
The few who have in-
sights into the future are
the ones you need to pay at-
tention to. Citrus County
has great opportunities
going forward. We get en-
thused about the candi-
dates who recognize those
opportunities and want do
something about them.
Important decisions are
going to be made by the vot-
ers on Aug. 14 in our first
open primary
Even if you disagree with
every candidate recom-
mendation our newspaper
makes, I urge you to get out
and vote.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.

Corridors Program.
It seems we've come full
circle. Was it an informed
Legislature openly debating
the need for future corri-
dors at the expense of cur-
rent projects? More likely, it
was the tail wagging the dog.

Paula Dockeryis a
term-limited Republican
senator from Lakeland who
is chronicling her final
year in the Florida Senate.
She can be reached
atpdockery@
floridavoices. com.


.












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
This image released by Ford Motor Company shows the company logo featuring its signature blue oval. The most iconic company logos such
as Ford, McDonald's, Target, Apple and Nike are visual cues that are seared onto people's consciousness without their even realizing it. That
kind of influence has always been valuable, but now it's priceless.


Your


How a logo

becomes an icon
MAE ANDERSON
Associated Press
NEW YORK
n almost every corner of the
world, golden arches symbol-
ize something. So does a red
bull's-eye. The same is true
for a half-eaten apple. Ditto for
the well-known swoosh.
The most iconic company logos
such as those of McDonald's, Tar-
get, Apple and Nike are visual
cues that are seared onto peo-
ple's consciousness without their
even realizing it.
That kind of influence has al-
ways been valuable, but now it's
priceless. Companies are fighting
for the shrinking attention spans
and wallets of consumers who in-
creasingly get their information
on tiny cellphone screens. And as
companies expand into emerging
markets, images matter more
than words. The brand identity
that a logo brings can pay off, and
companies know it.
That's why Ford's executive
chairman Bill Ford described the
day the automaker got back its
signature blue oval as "one of the
best days I can remember." The
company gained back the logo
along with other assets in May
after having used them as collat-
eral for a $23.5 billion loan six
years earlier
"Logos are a symbol of who you
are, a rallying point, an identifi-
cation of the company that lets
you stand out from others," said
Robert Passikoff, president of
Brand Keys Inc., a New York cus-
tomer research firm that meas-
ures company image.
What's better, people like logos.
LogosQuiz, a smartphone appli-
cation that tests people's knowl-
edge of company logos, is one of
the top free games on Apple's
iPad tablet and iPhone. And a
short animated French film made
up of nothing but logos called
"Logorama" won an Oscar in
2010.
That kind of hype translates
into dollars for companies. Inter-
brand, which tracks brand values,
of which the logo is a key part, val-
ues Coca-Cola's brand at $71.86
billion; McDonald's at $35.59 bil-
lion, Nike's at $14.53 billion and
Ford's brand at $7.5 billion.
Here is a look at how compa-
nies create and maintain iconic
logos.
Target: Hitting
the bull's-eye
Target Corp.'s bull's-eye was
born when department store op-
erator The Dayton Co. decided to
open a discount chain in Min-
neapolis in 1962.
Stewart K. Widdess, Dayton's
publicity director, was given the
task of naming the company so
shoppers wouldn't confuse it with
the department-store chain.
After considering 200 other
names, Widdess came up with
both the name "Target" and the
now ubiquitous red-and-white
bull's-eye.
"As a marksman's goal is to hit
the center bull's-eye, the new
store would do much the same in
terms of retail goods, services,
commitment to the community,
price, value and overall experi-
ence," Widdess has been quoted
as saying.
The company at first consid-
ered using a bull's-eye with a few


logo here


This image released by McDonald's shows their company logo featur-
ing the famed golden arches used for road signs. McDonald's was
started in by brothers Dick and Mac McDonald. But by the early
1950s, the Oakbrook, III.-based company began to franchise and grow
rapidly when businessman Ray Kroc joined the company. The logo is
one of the most iconic in the world. It wasn't until 1968 that the dou-
ble arches became the company's official logo.


bullet holes in it. That, however,
didn't seem appropriate for a
family store.
The first logo had the name
"Target" written in black over a
red and white bull's-eye with
three red circles and two white
circles. The store's first print ad
campaigns used the Target as
their theme with the tagline:
"Aim straight for Target discount
stores."
The bull's-eye was simplified
in 1968 with a red center, one
white circle and one red circle,
without the name on top of it. Ex-
perts say that logo stuck because
it embodies the two hallowed
traits of a good icon: it's simple
yet distinctive.
"It's incredibly eye catching in
general and it's a simple, clean
design," said Allen Adamson,
managing director of branding
firm Landor Associates. "It's one
of the strongest brandmarks in
the marketplace."
Of course, Target had some-
thing else on its side, too: time.
It's more difficult to come up
with a memorable logo today
than 50 years ago because many
iconic symbols such as the
bull's-eye already are
trademarked.
McDonald's: Inspired
by architecture
Would McDonald's Corp. be the
world's biggest fast-food chain if
it kept its original symbols the
McDonald family crest or
"Speedee" the chef- instead of
the Golden Arches?
McDonald's was started in 1948
in San Bernardino, Calif., by
brothers Dick and Mac McDon-
ald. But by the early 1950s, the
Oakbrook, Ill.-based company
began to franchise and grow rap-
idly when businessman Ray Kroc
bought the company
In 1953, architect Stanley Me-
ston designed the first franchised
building, in Phoenix, Ariz., with
red and white tiles and a sloped
roof. Dick McDonald thought the
design was a bit boring, so he
sketched in the now-famous yel-
low arches, dubbing them the
"Golden Arches," according to
Mike Bullington, McDonald's
archivist
But Meston didn't like them. So
McDonald's hired sign maker


George Dexter to create them. He
added in yellow neon and the
arches soon became emblematic
of McDonald's restaurants.
Still, they weren't yet part of
the logo. Originally, McDonald's
used the McDonald family crest,
a shield with a dragon, fish and
boat icon on it, as the logo. When
it began to open franchise restau-
rants, road signs incorporated a
single arch along with a chef
character called "Speedee,"
which was intended to represent
McDonald's "Speedee Service
System."
It wasn't until 1968 that the
double arches became the com-
pany's official logo. It was de-
signed by Paul Schrage, then
McDonald's chief marketing offi-
cer, and D'Arcy, their advertising
agency
Ironically, that was about the
same time actual arches were
disappearing from stores, as the
company expanded and remod-
eled old stores. Most arches were
gone from McDonald's locations
by the end of the 1960s, but the
Golden Arches of the logo re-
mained. In fact, they've become
such an icon that they've hardly
been altered since 1968, and are
easily recognized globally
"As a symbol, it's simple and
sticky," said Adamson, the brand-
ing expert. "Show the logo to kids
without the word and they'll
know it's a hamburger and french
fries."
Gap: Lost in
translation
Not every logo is a hit, of
course, especially when a com-
pany tinkers with a beloved one.
In 2010, without any announce-
ment or warning, Gap Inc.
changed its white type-on-navy
"blue square" logo, which it had
introduced more than a decade
earlier. The new logo had a low-
ercase "gap" with a blue box in
the right hand corner
Officials revamped the logo at
a time when the retailer, which
had brought khakis to the masses
in the 1990s, had lost its fashion
edge. Sales were slipping.
Gap officials were hoping the
new logo would communicate to
customers it was updating its
image with more modern designs
of jeans, pants and other cloth-


ing. But that message was lost on
customers.
After the new logo was out, Gap
fans voiced their discontent with
it on social media sites like Face-
book and Twitter. A fake Twitter
feed, (at)GapLogo, even was cre-
ated to lampoon the move (it cur-
rently has more than 3,600
followers).
"Our Creative Director just
quit, the ACD is in a corner drink-
ing and muttering to himself and
Jenna the intern is softly crying.
JUST GREAT," the feed tweeted
humorously the day after the
flap.
About a week later, the retailer
decided to reinstate its old logo.
The lesson? It's tempting for a
company with a well-known logo
to want to tinker with the image
to boost a sagging reputation. But
that's often a mistake since logos
become more recognizable, and
thus more valuable, the longer
they've been around. And of
course, a logo change can't solve
all of a company's problems.
"We remind clients that a logo
is not going to change people's
minds, but it can stay in the mind
and burn into memory," said Sagi
Haviv, a partner at Chermayeff &
Geismar, a firm that designed the
Chase bank logo, among others.
Aetna: Change
can be good
Sometimes, though, a re-
vamped logo is just what a com-
pany needs.
A new logo can be critical
when a company is trying to get
the word out about a new mes-
sage. For instance, when the in-
dustry has gone through
substantial changes or there are
different company services being
offered.
"If the character of the mark no
longer jibes with the positioning
of the company or product then it
makes sense to change," said
Haviv, from Chermayeff &
Geismar.
Aetna, the big insurer, re-
vamped its logo in January to ad-
dress changes in the health care
industry Health care legislation
that is likely to be phased in over
the next several years includes a
system in which consumers can
buy insurance through new on-
line marketplaces.
For insurers like Aetna, that
means they will have to more ac-
tively market their products to
consumers -not just businesses.
In order to do that, Aetna decided
it would need a more consumer-
friendly logo.
"We are much more focused on
consumers and consumers have
a much greater voice," said Be-
linda Lang, vice president of
Brand, Digital and Consumer
Marketing, for Aetna. "The logo
needed to be effective in a
digital, mobile and social
environment"
Aetna worked with branding
firm Siegel + Gale to revamp its
logo: a blue wordmark or logo
that is only text, with a stick fig-
ure of a person. The result? The
new logo is a purple wordmark
with a lower case font and linked
letters. The stick figure is gone.
The company said the re-
sponse to the logo has been posi-
tive. Lang said the logo has gotten
good reviews in the design com-
munity and employees, an im-
portant group to win over, have
said they like the new logo.
"I continually get emails about
how much they love pulling out
their new business cards," she
said.


Bye-bye,


security


deposit
DEAR BRUCE: To
make some extra
money, I spent
some money and had a lit-
tle house on the back of
my property renovated
and turned into a studio
rental. I have been lucky
and have had no problems
renting it
Recently it became
empty, so I put an ad in
our local paper. A poten-
tial renter wanted to start
renting immediately She
checked out, and she gave
me a security deposit
A week before she was
to move in, she called and
said she didn't want to
move in after all.
She is asking for her de-
posit back, and I'm in-
clined to say no. I've had
to take the unit off the
market, and other people
have inquired about it.
Now I'm out of luck. Am I
right in my thinking? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The
purpose of a security de-
posit is to guarantee both
parties will perform as ex-
pected. The landlord will
provide the property in
appropriate condition,
and the renter will pay for
the privilege of occupying
someone else's space.
This individual has de-
faulted, and you're enti-
tled to keep the deposit as
a "cure" for your damages.
One thing you did not
address in your letter was
whether you had your po-
tential tenant sign an
agreement and, if so,
whether the agreement
addressed this issue. If
not, you should include
this verbiage in any future
agreements.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 85
years old. I feel it's time to
hang up my driver's li-
cense, so I'm going to sell
my car. What is the best
way to go about this?
My husband used to do
all of this for us, and he
has since passed away
I have friends who will
take me to the store and to
get my hair done, so I
won't really be missing
anything.
I'm just afraid I'm not as
sharp as I used to be. -
Jean, via email
DEAR JEAN: Congratu-
lations on making an in-
telligent decision after
determining your driving
skills have deteriorated.
Now is the time to give up
the keys, before a serious
accident occurs.
As to the sale of the car,
your best option is to ask
your friends to help you
put an ad on the Internet.
Then see if they would be
willing to be with you
when potential buyers
come over to look at the
car.
Next, you will need to
prepare a simple bill of
sale, over and above sign-
ing the certificate of own-
ership. It will simply
include the date of the
sale, the two parties in-
volved, the VIN number
on the car and a statement
that the car's ownership is
being transferred that day
from you to this new party.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money
PO. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns.










D2

SUNDAY
JULY 22, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan ai
this:


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Schlabach Security team receives advanced Denon certification


Schlabach Security and Sound
in Lecanto is pleased to announce
that Ken Van Houten II, Paul Jor-
dan and Jim Loos received certi-
fication in Advanced Custom
Integration of the Denon Audio
Video Product Line.
"Your Smart Phone is now the
remote!" exclaims Paul Jordan,
Lead Tech for Schlabach. "No
more looking for the remote. It is
in your pocket," Paul added.
Ken knows SSS clients will ap-
preciate how the Denon Receiver
allows you to play internet radio
stations and automatically re-
duces the volume level of loud, an-
noying commercials when
watching TV stations.
Jim Loos enjoys the clarity of
the Denon Receivers.
"As we age, we begin to miss
some of the details in music and
movies," says Jim, "the additional


power of the Denon results in bet-
ter clarity of both voice and music.
We don't have to make it louder;
we set up your system to make it
sound clearer."
The Denon training certifies
that authorized dealers have com-
pleted the courses to profession-
ally sell, integrate and calibrate
all Denon CI products. Schlabach
has been an authorized dealer in
Citrus County since 1995.
"The Custom Integration (CI)
line is the foundation of your net-
worked home entertainment sys-
tem," according to Jarey
Schlabach, company President.
Contact Schlabach Security and
Sound at 352-527-3201.

From left: Schlabach Security and
Sound Team members Paul Jor-
dan, Jim Loos, Ken Van Houten II.


Dr. Oz and '15-minute Physical Exams'


Cheryl McFarland-Bryant, D.C., of Better Health Chiropractic, participated in performing complimentary health screen-
ings with Dr. Oz as part of the Dr. Oz program "15-minute physical exams" at the Pepin Heart Institute, part of the Uni-
versity of South Florida. The results of the study were that 67 percent of the participants were obese. Dr. McFarland-
Bryant counseled the patients about lifestyle modification through improving their diet and exercise regimens.


News You CAN USE


FREEBIES for those in
need Those in need of gen-
tly used household items,
shoes, toys and clothing are in-
vited to the Freebies giveaway
at the Homosassa Civic Club
TODAY from 1 to 3 p.m. The
Civic Center is on Mason
Creek Drive, behind the Fire
Station in Old Homosassa.
Volunteers gather donations
all year long. In addition to
gently used items, the program
is also looking for a storage fa-
cility for the donations.
If you can donate or assist,
please contact freedomwayl
@gmail.com and reference the
Freebies Giveaway program.
CORRECTION The cor-
rect address for our new
Chamber member, Home
Again Resale Store, is 1980 N.
Future Terrace, Lecanto, FL
34461 (on C.R. 486 across
from the Chevron). Proceeds


from this upscale store benefit
the Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club.
Store hours are from 9 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and from noon to 4
p.m. Sunday.
SCHOOL SUPPLY COL-
LECTION Cadence Bank
will collect school supplies for
Inverness Primary School (pre-
Kindergarten through fifth
grade) from July 20 through
Aug. 10, at its Inverness
branch at 301 U.S. 41 S. (352)
726-8772.
KINGS BAY CLEANUP -
from noon to 3 p.m. Monday,
July 23, at Hunter Springs Park
in Crystal River, the YMCA and
Nature Coast EMS have their
last big cleanup day of the
summer for Kings Bay.
Part of the Kings Bay Rotary
service project "1 Rake at a
Time", the July 3rd cleanup re-


moved more than 3 tons of
Lyngbya. Those wishing to
help should bring suncreen,
hats, gloves and shoes that
can get wet. The Kings Bay
Rotary provides rakes and
other equipment. Current up-
dates on the project can be
found on Facebook under
"SaveKingsBay" For more in-
formation, call Art Jones at
727-642-7659 or email
MrAWJones@aol.com.
NOMINATIONS
10 Most Admired Women
- We know you know her, one
of Citrus County's "10 MostAd-
mired Women." There are 10
categories in this, the 16th year
of the recognition: Arts, Athlet-
ics, Business, Community In-
volvement, Education,
Government, Health Care,
Leadership, Mother and Up-
and-Coming Youth.


YOU

CAUGHT MY

EYE...

Liz Lounsbury
Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
Greg Molloy
Bright House Network


Nominations are due by 5
p.m. Wednesday, July 25.
Mail to The Chronicle at
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 and be
sure to mark the envelope "10
MOST ADMIRED WOMEN," or
fax to 352-563-5665.
Industry Appreciation
Nominees The Economic
Development Council is ac-
cepting nominees of local busi-
nesses and industries in the
categories of Outstanding
Small Business, Outstanding
Employer or Corporate Citizen,
and Person of the Year.
Deadline for nominations is
Aug. 20. Award winners will be
honored at the Annual EDC In-
dustry Appreciation Luncheon
at College of Central Florida,
Lecanto, on Friday, Sept. 7.
Nomination forms are available
at http://www.citrusedc.com
/events.html.








Kristy Stauffer
SunTrust Bank,
Inverness
Jay Santero
Ed's Towing


... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!


UPCOMING CHAMBER EVENTS


Aug. 10 -August Chamber
Lunch at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
Aug. 16 -After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer -
COMFORT KEEPERS/LIFE
CARE CENTER
Aug. 17 Next Generation
Professionals workshop: "The
How of Wow!"
Sept. 22 Business
Women's Alliance Health and
Fitness Expo
Oct. 11 -After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer- Na-
ture Coast EMS
Oct. 12- October Cham-
ber Lunch at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club


CITRUS COUNTY


Oct. 23 -After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer Al-
paca Magic
Nov. 1 -After Hours Busi-
ness Networking Mixer -
Hospice of Citrus County
Nov. 9 November Cham-
ber Lunch at Plantation on
Crystal River
Dec. 1 Christmas Parade
- Crystal River
Dec. 8 Christmas Parade
- Inverness


EDC UPCOMING EVENTS
MARK YOUR SEPTEMBER
CALENDARS and get ready for
Industry Appreciation. Spon-
sorships are available for the
EDC luncheon, Golf Outing
and BBQ. Contact Keith Pul-
lias at 352-795-3149 or at CTRU COUT
keith@citruscountychamber. counc,
com. For more detailed infor-
mation about the following
events, please visit www.citrusedc.com.
Sept. 6 Industry Appreciation Mixer- Crystal
Chevrolet
Sept. 7 EDC Industry Appreciation Lunch -see
NOMINATIONS under News You Can Use
Sept. 13 EDC Annual Board Meeting
Sept. 14- Celebrate Industry Appreciation Month
Golf Outing
Sept. 20 Industry Appreciation BBQ-EDC
March 20 and 21 Legislative Days in Tallahassee



Give a shout out to employees

who focus on Customer Service

The Citrus County Cham- ber of Commerce sends a
ber of Commerce is proud to letter to the employee's
promote its "You Caught My manager noting the recogni-
Eye" program. tion. We are excited to offer
The program allows resi- such interaction between
dents and visitors to recog- businesses and community
nize employees who go residents.
beyond in their attention to So, go ahead, give a shout
Customer Service. out to someone who gave
In addition to the em- you exceptional customer
ployee's name ap- service.
pearing in the Please note: Business must
newspaper, the Cit- be located within Cit-
rus County Cham- rus County
S------------ -----------------*
I YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
IPERSON you are nominating:
I I
IBUSINESS they work for:
I I
ADDRESS of business:
I I
City:
DATE of contact:

WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?
I I


Your Name:
Your Phone Number:
IDate Submitted: I
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: CINDI FEIN,
CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 N.W. U.S. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
-L_-----------------------


...ON THE MOVE

Nancy Wheelerjoins

StoreRight Self Storage
Nancy Wheeler recently joined StoreRight Self
Storage, 1227S. Lecanto Highway Lecanto, as theirnew
manager
Nancy is originally from New England, and has a
Bachelor's from the University of Massachusetts at
Amherst. She has extensive managerial experience in
a variety offields. Over the years, Nancy has worked in
Boston, Providence and Worcester primarily in finance
and customer service.
As a Crystal River (Meadowcrest) resident since 2004,
she has worked in retail and hospitality She attended
the annual Self Storage Association Spring Conference
and Trade Show at Gaylord Palms in Orlando.
She also has completed the SelfStorageAssociation's
Facility Management course and has received the des-
ignation of Certified Self Storage Manager (CSSM).
You may reach Nancy at StoreRight Self Storage at
352-527-9777.


f b "like"us on
facebook


Meet Meek! Amy Meek joins Melissa Benefield on
Monday's edition of Chamber Chat. Amy Meek talks
about her role and her goals as Executive Director
of Citrus United Way. Born and raised In Citrus
County, Amy Meek shares what she and husband
Joe love about living and raising a family in our
local community. Chef Mark Secker of the Fat Cat
Grill shares some fantastic summer recipes. His
Tropical Scallop Ceviche will make your mouth
water and a King's Bay Mojito Cocktail will
definitely quench your thirst. Bum off all those
excess calories with a Kettle Ball! Susan Viola from
Anytime Fitness in Inverness is going to show us
why a Kettle Ball is the newest, hottest fitness
sensation. Start your week of right by watching
Chamber Chat on WYKE every Monday night at
6pm. Want to be on Chamber Chat? Email Melissa
Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. Don't
forget to 'LIKE" us on Facebook!


r






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's onneition


D3

SUNDAY
JULY 22, 2012


F.D.S. voted the best


ED.S. Disposal Inc. and
Single Stream Processors
Inc. would like to take this op-
portunity to thank Citrus
County for voting us Best of
the Best again for 2012.
With your continued sup-
port, ED.S. Disposal Inc. is
able to continue our generos-
ity with our local charities
such as the Key Training Cen-
ter, the United Way and


countless others. By shopping
local, you reinforce your
county and make it stronger
Through your continued
support we are able to pro-
vide jobs to more than 100
men and women that live,
shop, send their children to
school and pay taxes right
here in Citrus County.


ED.S. Disposal Inc. has a
variety of services that we
provide from residential,
commercial curbside pick up
to dumpster services and roll
off containers for your refuse
needs.
In addition to trash re-
moval, we also provide yard
waste removal, single stream


recycling and we can provide
recycling education for your
family or your business.
Thank you for your contin-
ued support! Please contact
ED.S. Disposal Inc. for your
disposal needs at 352-746-
0617 or fdsdisposalinc
@aol.com. To schedule a re-
cycling education class,
please call Erin Ray at 352-
527-4281.


ID I hiSr"A

badISrDSAL.

Ina Ray, left, and Erin Ray of F.D.S. Disposal Inc.


CCBA gives back to community


The Citrus County Builders Association (CCBA) proudly presented a check for more than $200 to the Citrus County Children's Advocacy
Center Inc., also known as Jessie's Place, from the Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing proceeds. From left are CCBA President Wayne
Bardsley; Melissa Bowermaster, program coordinator for Jessie's Place, and Dan Kern, 2012 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing chair-
man. The CCBA was pleased to have Jessie's Place as its first contribution recipient for the popular annual event that was sponsored by
Spires Contracting Inc. and played March 10 at Inverness Golf and Country Club. The CCBA looks forward to continuing incorporation of local
nonprofits in their events. For more information on the Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing, please contact the CCBA at 352-746-9028 or
visit the Golf Committee page of www.CitrusBuilders.com.


F.D.S. supports fishing tournament


CCIA

2012-2013
OFFICERS AND
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
To be elected Aug. 23, 2012.
PRESIDENT:
Bill Larder,
Larder & Sons Construction
PRESIDENT-ELECT:
Randy Clark,
Clark Construction
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT:
Michael Gilbert,
Gold Crest Homes
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT:
Wayne Bardsley,
Quality Crafted Builders
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT:
Dan Kern,
Quality Crafted Builders
SECOND ASSOCIATE
VICE PRESIDENT:
Mark Schroder,
Kings Bay Engineering
CONTRACTOR DIRECTORS
Rusty McDermott,
Dream Custom Homes
Virginia Will
Scott Schnettler
(one open slot)
ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS
John Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing
Eric Swart,
Citrus Pest Management
Ken Lindquist,
Ken Lindquist Corp
John Jobe,
City Electric Supply


Candidates stump at


CCBA political mixer


I :, 1



The Citrus County Builders Association proudly presented a special appreciation plaque to
F.D.S. Disposal Inc. in appreciation for their Exclusive Platinum Sponsorship of the 17th an-
nual CCBA Family Fishing Tournament at the F.D.S. Disposal office at 711 S. Adolph Point
in Lecanto. F.D.S. Disposal, a four-year member of the Citrus County Builders Association,
has held the Exclusive Platinum Sponsorship of this local tournament for the entire four
years of its membership. The support of F.D.S. Disposal during the past four years has been
far more than just monetary, as F.D.S. Disposal Inc. provides recycling alternatives, volun-
teers, staff shirts, a custom-made fish cooler, supplies and food for the Aaron Monier Me-
morial Youth Tournament, and many other areas of support for the tournament that are
much above and beyond the normal sponsorship support for this tournament. From left are
Marcia Cobb of F.D.S. Disposal Inc., 2012 Tournament Chairman Randy Clark of Clark Con-
struction, Ina Ray of F.D.S. Disposal Inc. and Erin Ray of F.D.S. Disposal Inc. For more in-
formation on the CCBA annual Family Fishing Tournament, contact the CCBA at
352-746-9028 or visit the fishing tournament committee page of www.CitrusBuilders.com.


IMPORTANT UPCOMING CCBA EVENTS
14-Hour CILB Renewal Course Aug. 9 and 10.
Citrus County Builders Association General Membership Meeting and Elections -
Aug. 23.
Citrus County Builders Association Awards & Installation Banquet Sept. 28.
2012 Home & Outdoor Show Nov.10 and 11; remaining booth spaces will open to
the general public, with restrictions, after Aug. 27.



Apply to become a member of CCBA


To request membership in the Citrus
County Builders Association, please call
the CCBA at 352-746-9028 to obtain a mem-
bership application, or download the form
in pdf format on the CCBA website at


www CitrusBuilders.com.
CCBA was founded in 1977 as the Citrus
County affiliate of the Florida Home
Builders Association and the National As-
sociation of Home Builders.


As the highest ranking elected official in
the room at the time, state Rep. Jimmie T
Smith was chosen as the first candidate
speaker to lead the evening Thursday, July
12, at the 2012 Political Stump & Mixer
Sponsored by Gulf Coast Ready Mix and
the Villages of Citrus Hills, the stump in-
cluded 17 candidates, representatives for
three absent candidates, the Supervisor of
Elections Office and many attendees from
several different Citrus County business
organizations.
CCBA would like to thank the following
candidates for attending our event:
SJimmie T Smith for the Florida House
of Representatives
Hank Hemrick for Sheriff
Steven Burch for Sheriff
Winn Webb for Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy for Sheriff Campaign
Representatives
Dennis Damato for County Commis-
sion District 1
Renee McPheeters for County Com-
mission District 1
Joe Meek for County Commission Dis-
trict 3 Campaign Representative
Shannon Heathcock for County Com-
mission District 3
Charles Poliseno for County Commis-
sion District 5
Mike Smallridge for County Commis-
sion District 5
Scott Adams for County Commission
District 5
Teddi Rusnak for County Commission
District 5
Sam Himmel for Citrus County School
Superintendent
Sandy Balfour for Citrus County
School Superintendent
Rob Cummins for Citrus County
School Superintendent
Bill Murray for School Board
District 4
Angela Vick for Citrus County Clerk of
Courts


Representative Jimmie T. Smith "stumping"
for re-election at the 2012 Political Stump
& Mixer on Thursday, July 12, at the Citrus
County Builders Association.

Mike Graves for Public Defender
Gloria Fisher for Republican State
Committee Woman
Special thanks to John and Dusty Porter
for providing an authentic stump for this
event, and to Event Solutions by Linda for
wireless sound assistance.
Don't forget to vote!! Primary Election is
Aug. 14, 2012.


June V.I.P.










With gov't support, small businesses buy offices


PALLAVI GOGOI
AP Business Writer

Las Vegas dentist Chris
Cozine wanted to cut costs
after the Great Recession.
He found an unlikely way:
He ditched the office he was
renting and bought 6,600
square feet of his own.
Besides improving his
surroundings he left the
gray walls of the old place in
favor of an open layout with
modern glass tiles and a mix
of colors Cozine is paying
$1,800 a month less on the
mortgage than he was pay-
ing in rent.
"I save money, but the
icing on the cake is that the
office decor is of my
choice," Cozine said.
At an otherwise bleak
time for real estate, there's a
mini-boom in one corner of
commercial property. Den-
tists like Cozine, restaurant
owners, doctors and other
business owners are snap-
ping up space in vacant strip
malls and office buildings.
They're doing it with help
from a government loan



Mehl earns PR
accreditation
INVERNESS Katie Mehl,
public relations coordinator for
Citrus Memorial Health System
and president-elect for the Na-
ture Coast
Chapter of
the Florida
Public Rela-
tions Associa-
tion, has
successfully
completed
the Examina- ie e
tion for Ac-
creditation in Citrus
Memorial
Public Rela- Health System.
tions, entitling
her to use the APR professional
designation. The announce-
ment was made by the Univer-
sal Accreditation Board (UAB),
a consortium of nine profes-
sional communication organiza-
tions, including the Florida
Public Relations Association,
that direct this competency cer-
tification program.
The accreditation program
aims to improve the practice of
public relations by assessing
competence in 60 areas of


program for small busi-
nesses that has been around
since 1959 but has shot up in
popularity since the end of
the recession, with private
lenders wary about extend-
ing real estate loans.
The amount of small busi-
nesses loans under this pro-
gram rose at an annual rate
of 16 percent in the three
years after the end of the re-
cession in 2009 to $4.45 bil-
lion, according to the Small
Business Administration.
After the 2008 financial cri-
sis, banks were so reluctant
to lend that 27 percent of
such loans disappeared in
2009.
It's a good time to be a
buyer now. Commercial real
estate prices are at rock bot-
tom, fallen 30 percent from
the peak nationally And in-
terest rates for those who
can get loans, anyway are
at historic lows.
However, small busi-
nesses balk at the 25 per-
cent required up front for a
typical loan, especially at a
time when they have
worked hard to save cash



knowledge, skills and abilities
associated with the profession.
The examination is designed
for public relations profession-
als with five to seven years of
job experience and a bache-
lor's degree or higher in a com-
munication field. Candidates
who successfully complete the
rigorous process, including pre-
senting a portfolio to a readi-
ness review panel of three
peers and sitting for a com-
puter-based examination, are
granted the APR.
"Earning the APR reflects a
mastery of the knowledge, skills
and abilities needed to succeed
in our increasingly complex pro-
fession," said Janet E. Kac-
skos, APR, Fellow PRSA, 2012
chair of the Universal Accredita-
tion Board. "Practitioners who
achieve the designation are
demonstrating their commit-
ment not only to our profession,
but also to a strong code of
ethics and to the betterment of
their organizations and clients."
Professionals earning the
APR must maintain their cre-
dential through continuing pro-
fessional development,
providing leadership to the pro-


Classifieds


after surviving a brutal
recession.
"Cash is a security blan-
ket for small businesses,
and they would be scared to
put a big check down now,"
said George Smith, head of
business banking at Bank of
America.
But these government-
backed loans make it entic-
ing. Business owners are
required to put up a down
payment of 10 percent, com-
pared with the 25 percent to
40 percent demanded in a
commercial property loan.
The attraction for banks is
a less risky loan, because
they commit only 50 percent
of the loan, while the gov-
ernment shoulders 40 per-
cent that's left over.
"Our job is to keep credit
flowing when times are
tough," said Jeanne Hulit,
associate administrator
capital access at the Small
Business Administration.
The SBA didn't provide
default rates for the loans.
But Scott Geller, CEO of
business banking at JPMor-
gan Chase, said these loans


fession and serving their local
communities.
The UAB was established in
1998 by a coalition of public re-
lations professional organiza-
tions that today include the
Agricultural Relations Council,
Asociacion de Relacionistas
Profesionales de Puerto Rico,
Florida Public Relations Associ-
ation, Maine Public Relations
Council, National School Public
Relations Association, Public
Relations Society of America,
Religion Communicators Coun-
cil, Southern Public Relations
Federation and Texas Public
Relations Association.
The Florida Public Relations
Association (FPRA) is the old-
est public relations organization
in the United States. Members
represent a variety of different
organizations including private
and public corporations, gov-
ernment entities, not-for-profits,
counseling firms and independ-
ent practitioners. As a statewide
Association, FPRA boasts
nearly 1,500 professional and
student members, all which


typically have had superior
performance in a portfolio
of commercial real estate
loans. That's because one of
the requirements of the
loan is the property is pri-
marily occupied by the bor-
rower
Owners who occupy the
building space are more
likely to pay back their
loans, unlike an investment
property where if renters
leave, borrowers are more
likely to default unless they
find another business to
lease it.
At some banks, the num-
bers of these loans have
soared. In the first three
months of this year, such
government-backed loans
grew by 16 percent, after
growing 23 percent for all of
2011, atJPMorgan Chase. At
Bank of America, which did-
n't provide the latest num-
bers, such loans grew by 20
percent last year
Who qualifies for the
loans, termed SBA 504, de-
pends on the industry. For
the most part, government
rules require the business


make up the 15 professional
and 11 student chapters. For
more information about the
APR designation, visit
www.fpra.org.
Extension Service
offers mentoring
To assist people with their
personal finances during tough
economic times, the University
of Florida/IFAS Citrus County
Extension office has volunteer
Master Money Mentors avail-
able who can provide one-on-
one financial mentoring.
The program is similar to the
popular UF/IFAS Master Gar-
dener program, but instead of
dealing with plants, the Master
Money Mentor program seeks
to help low- to moderate-in-
come families who are strug-
gling financially.
Bank of America made a gift
to the University of Florida to
support the project, so the
Florida Master Money Mentors
are now in 29 counties in
Florida. Master Money Mentors
have received approximately


have less than $5 million in
income and fewer than 500
employees.
Loans are typically for 20
years compared with the
standard 30 years for most
fixed-rate home loans -
and come with interest rates
that are slightly below mar-
ket rates.
Moving up
It was a winner for Gary
and Zell Dwelley, the hus-
band-and-wife owners of
Beach Break Cafe in Ocean-
side, Calif., just north of San
Diego.
They had leased their
restaurant space for 22
years and wanted some-
thing bigger to fit the 500-
odd customers who file in
on Sunday for their popu-
lar coffeecakes and banana
crunch French toast.
"What we really felt bad
about was that we only had
one bathroom, which wasn't
even handicapped-accessi-
ble," Zell Dwelley said.
Down the street from
their restaurant, a devel-
oper had refurbished an



20 hours of intensive training
and have been background
screened.
They are ready to give back
to the community by working
with people to help them get fi-
nancially organized, create a
spending and savings plan, as-
sist them to analyze their credit
behavior and limit debt, and
find money to save.
Every situation is different
and the Master Money Mentors
are committed to empowering
people to discover their options
to improve their financial
situations.
There is no cost to work with
a Master Money Mentor and all
information provided is dealt
with in a nonjudgmental and
confidential manner.
For information or to work
with a mentor, call Monica
Payne at the Citrus County Ex-
tension office at 352-527-5713.

Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of


abandoned gas station with
plans to rent space to Star-
bucks. However, the devel-
oper couldn't get Starbucks
in after the 2008 financial
crisis and the recession.
The Dwelleys noticed the
price on the property
dropped from $1.2 million
before the recession to less
than $700,000 in 2010. They
decided to bid.
The restaurant owners
clinched the deal at
$690,000 and scraped to-
gether everything they had
for the 10 percent down pay-
ment. JPMorgan Chase fi-
nanced the deal. Now the
restaurant has two bath-
rooms, both accessible to
the disabled.
Commercial property
prices have become very at-
tractive, said Walter Page, a
director of research at PPR,
a division of CoStar Group,
a commercial real estate
data company
"There is an abnormal
amount of opportunity now
- if people want to buy, or
fix and renovate, now is the
time," Page said.



Commerce, will return from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 22, at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River.
Registration is open to
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities, and the popular
Spa Zone are available from
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's Crystal River of-
fice at 28 N.W. U.S. 19, phone
352-795-3149, or from any
Business Women's Alliance
member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.
Proceeds from last year's
expo helped to fund nine schol-
arships in health care and busi-
ness careers.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I AM LOOKING FOR
that special lady up to
age 40. You may the
one! Call anytime
352-422-0440


Petite SWF looking for
SWM Average Weight
and Height 60-70, who
wants to enjoy a little
traveling, dinner, movie,
etc. non-smoker, social
drinker. Looking forward
to meeting you.
Blind Box 1790P
do Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


Wealthy 75yr old SWM
looking for attractive,
non-smoking SWF
50-60yr old, for com-
panionship. If inter-
ested, email pictures
and phone number to
jnrherk@cox.net


WHERE IS SHE?
Friendly widower in
good health, socially
active, fun to be with.
Everyone I know says
she's out there some-
where, you will find her
one of these days. but
frankly I'm dubious. I
hope I'm not asking too
much when I'm seeking
to meet a haDpy, at-
tractive, intelligent, gra-
cious, humorous, extra-
verted Christian lady
between 65-75+ in
aood health, with a
warm personality, slim
or average build for
meaningful conversa-
tion & other social
activities & perhaps a
loving personal
relationship. If you
somehow fit the bill,
please don't be afraid
to call me at 527-0591.
I would love to hear
from you.


h ... ..... a -*



Avr 01 I 1.... .. .... . .


Wvvr o1 lonely
looking for SWM 60-80
for fun reply to
Box Holder,
PO BOX 911
Hernando, FL 34442



Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR
Craftsman Tool Set $45
Metal Tool Box $45,
Like New Stihl Chain Saw
$50, Like New Bosch Half
inch drill $35
(352) 503-7977
Crystal River
3/2/2 Spacious, New
kitchen, appliances incl.
$850/mo. no util. stone-
housecountry
@gmail.com
(352) 302-7488
HERNANDO
Sunday 22, 8am 2pm
Car, Boats, Household
Items, Exercise Equip.
4199 N. Longvalley Rd
Citrus Hills North
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Tltled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



2 Male Ducks
Pets Only
1 Mini Pot Belly Pig
Female Call after 9am
(352) 726-9573


FI-K iOAI W/llllle!
Call Phil
(352) 220-9435
FREE Horse Manure
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge 746-3545
Free Kittens
to good home,
15 weeks
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Pit Bull &
Cur Dog puppies
2 females, 2 males dona-
tions for their care up till
adoption are accepted
(352) 423-0819



Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262



Large Maine-Coon Cat
Male, black/brown, collar
with his name, address
and phone goes by
"Bentley", lost in vicinity
of Longvalley Rd Her-
nando, offering $200 re-
ward (352) 586-8162
Lost Black & White
Jack Russell, Male
Near Rooks Rd.
& Hwy41
(352) 422-7707
LOST -FOUND -ADOPT
Please visit Citrus County
Animal Services,
352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com
Lost Gray
Domestic Short Cat.
Neutered, male,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 527-9050


LUO I gray wnite cat
Hampshire Hills near
Croft Avenue Green
and white collar with bell -
352-212-398one
Lost Orange/Peach
Tabby Cat
8 years old with Tag on
collar Name Harley If
found Please Call
(352) 563-1063
in Connell Heights Area
Harley is missed by
Granddaughter
Lost Small Brown Dog
Answer to Oscar
Dachshund & Terrier
Mix. Beverly Hills
Forest Ridge Area
(352) 249-7131



Found light/peach col-
ored tabby cat, in
Sugarmill Woods near
Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303
Found Tiger Cat
Female, Pregnant
S. Sunfish Ave.
Inverness
(352) 726-7849
LOST -FOUND -ADOPT
Please visit Citrus County
Animal Services,
352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com



Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct$8/1b. deliv
(772)781-1262




TEACHER
Fulltime/Part time, Exp.
Req. CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


PT or FT
Nail Technician
For Upscale Golf &
Country Club Apply in
Person @ 2125 W.
Skyview Crossing
Hernando



Housekeeping
Person
Opening on house-
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laun-
dry, as well as offices
and models needed.
Full time position,
Wednesday-Sunday
work schedule. Apply
at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL






Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




L )y UD..)
i 1 \ L


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CAREGIVER
Private home health
care for elderly woman
in advanced stages of
dementia. Position
requires lifting several
times a day. Soft spo-
ken person in excellent
physical condition is
needed. Three 12-hour
shifts per week. (Two 8
8 day shifts, one 8 8
night.) Possibility of
flexible scheduling pre-
ferred. Applicant must
be permanent resident
with references & back-
ground check available
at interview
Non-smokers only call
(352)637-1793.
$10.00 per hr

Evening
RN Supervisor
Our 5-Star Rated
SNF is expanding &
now offers a unique
opportunity for a
highly experienced
RN in short term
rehab and long term
care management.
Applicants should
possess:
*knowledge of state
/federal regs.
*excellent technical
skills and judgement
*expertise in
communications
and customer service
We offer a fantastic
working environment
and benefits! Please
fax or email resume
to: Linda Pursley,
RN/DON
diamondridgedon
@earthlink.net
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab
Voted
Best of the Best!!


CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512

HOME HEALTH
CARE PROFES-
SIONALS
Rapidly expanding home
health company, Village
Home Care is seeking
additional staffing Citrus
County, The Villages and
Ocala. these individuals
must have experience in
Medicare Home Health.
Full time and part time
positions are available for
RNs, LPNs, Physical
Therapists, Occupational
Therapists, Medical So-
cial Workers.
Please respond by email:
plarkin@villagehomecare.org
or fax:
352-390-6559

LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
PHLEBOTOMIST
Wanted for office based
medical practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

Medical
Asst/Receptionist
for medical practice.
Email resume:
kingsbayfamilycare@
yahoo.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


COLLEGE of
C. ENTRY A
FLORID
-an equal opportunity
college-
Multiple
Employment
Opportunities
Available
at the College!
Administrative
Associate Dean,
Health Sciences,
review date is 8/7/12
Professional
Auditorium Manager
Visual and Performing
Arts, close date is
07/25/12
Programmer
Analyst II,
close date is 8/06/12
Instructional
Faculty Computer
Information Technol-
ogy (New Position),
review date is 8/20/12
Please view the CF
Employment Website
for full job description
information at
www.CF.edu.
An unofficial copy of
transcripts must be
submitted with the
online application
for all positions that
require a degree.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application at
time of submission.
Alternatively fax
transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd
Ocala. FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer


Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus Co
Accepting applica-
tions. Exp. working
school Age Youth,
public Relations,
Communication Skills,
supervisory/ training
experience helpful.
Download app. from
www.citrusbgc.com
Fax
Resume/Application
to 352-621-4679

You've Got It!


Somebody



Wants


It!


Business DIGEST


I


D4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r:l
-


:.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RESTAURANT
MANAGER
Seeking a restaurant
professional with 10+
years experience in a
full service restaurant.
Excellent opportunity
for a motivated individ-
ual. Please fill out an
application and bring
your resume to
The Blue Gator
12189 S. Williams St.
Dunnellon Fl, 34432.
Ask for Bob.

TEACHER

Full time needed for
Christian Preschool,
CDA preferred.
(352) 746-4888





BARTENDER
For Bar in Back
Apply in Person in at
Front SABINA'S DINER
Hernando, after 2pm

BREAKFAST COOK
Experience Only
& SERVERS
Now Taking
Applications
A.J.'s CAFE
Crystal River





AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring 2
Sales Professionals to
join our growing staff
Be a part of the
HOTTEST new car
brand in he country
professional training,
competitive pay and
bonuses provided to
the right people. If
you have the skills to
give our customers
the best car buying
experience of their
lives, WE NEED YOU!
Apply In Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Crystal Rlver


CHSalNIeHE

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
Expanding Again!
The Citrus County
Chronicle is seeking
an energetic individual
to consult businesses
on the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire to
work in a fast paced,
fun, environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
* Develop classified
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting
* Strong rapport
building,professional
communication and
good listening skills
* Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing
Qualifications
* High School
diploma or
equivalent
* Prior telemarketing
experience a plus
Send resume to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screening for
final applicant



WHAT'S
IMPORTANT?

FUTURE
CAREER
INCOME
A local established
and respected
company has
prestige positions
available. Duties will
require an experi-
enced, compassion-
ate, and caring
person to provide
a genuine service
to the people of the
community. This is a
sales oriented
position with a secure
income potential.
Strong prospecting
skills required.
Women do excep-
tionally well.
Company benefits
and training.
This is a solid Career
position, don't
miss this opportunity.
Fax Resume to
352-746-2875 or call
1-352-746-4646
Email
letty.howard@dignity
memorial.comrn


AUTO TECHS Needed.
Competitive Pay & Ben-
efits. ASE & or Ford Cer
tified line techs. Call
(352)493-4297 for Russ
Hall for in person
resume/interview appoint-
ment.
Diesel Mechanic
Wanted
Organized and
motivated, clean
Class A license, CDL
preferred. Five years
experience involved
in the repair and
maintenance of con-
struction company
fleet equipment.
Send resume to
info@fieldco.biz

Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift Apply at
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
(352) 795-3552



Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, Registers
and Diffusers
is currently accepting
applications for an
experienced
Production/Assembly
worker.
Must be able to read
tape measure and
assemble parts using
hand tools, hands
and machinery.
Welding experience
a plus.
Apply in person to
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI33513.
Excellent benefits
package, 40 1k.
DFW, EOE.
ROOFERS
REPAIRS & SALES
Truck & Tools, 489-0360




2012 POSTAL
POSITIONS
$13.00-$32.00+/Hr.
Federal Hire/
Full Benefits
No Experience
CALL TODAY
1800-593-2664


l I 1 ll\" t1 '







( ', ,. S ..
CILG


Customer Service
Specialist
Announcement
# 12-40

Heavy public
contact work at the
Lecanto Government
Building. Must have
excellent communi-
cation skills with a
pleasant, clear
speaking voice. Cash
handling or account-
ing experience
required. Must have
at least one year
related work experi-
ence. $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, July 27, 2012
EOE/ADA


Housekeepers/
Locker Room
Attendants and
Laundry Person
PT or FT
For Upscale Golf &
Country Club Apply in
Person @ 2125 W.
Skyview Crossing
Hernando


LIGHT EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Announcement
#12-39

Semi-skilled work in
the operation of
automotive public
works equipment
and performing
manual labor.
Graduation from HS
or GED. Must have a
valid Florida CDL
Class "A" with
endorsements N
or be able to obtain
within 90 days of
appointment.
$9.22 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, July 27, 2012.
EOE/ADA


CLASSIFIED




Lawn Service Help
EXP. ONLY, Must have
Clean Driver Lic.
(352) 302-6034


MAINTENANCE
TECH
Arbor Trail Rehab
Full Time
Maintenance Tech.
Experience in build-
ing maintenance
is a must.
Apply in person at:
Arbor Trail Rehab &
Skilled Nursing Center
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL 34453
Fax resume to:
352-637-1921
or email to: athrc@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


STORE CLERK
Must be over 18 and
available for week-
ends Good math ,
computer & people
skills A MUST!
Fishing exp helpful
but not necessary.
Apply in person at
Twin Rivers Marina.
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt.
Crystal River.









YARD HAN


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


GOOD CONDITION
100.00/ OBO Linda
341-4449



BEAUTIFUL, LIKE NEW
4 PERSON HOT TUB
WITH BUBBLE JETS,
HEATER, COVER AND
MULTI-COLORED
LIGHTS JUST
$500.00-PAID $3,000.
352-628-3865



110V Dryer, Sears
Apartment Size
$150
Call Mel
(352) 344-8067
Almond Side by side
22 cu. ft.
w/ice & water
3 month old
$800 (352) 586-6746
DRYER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty
352-364-6504
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
W/D Front Load
$500 ea. Like NEW!
(352)344-5734
WASHER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty
352-364-6504



Solid wood desk w/ 3
drawers $50
(352) 489-8783



Craftsman Tool Set $45
Metal Tool Box $45,
Like New Stihl Chain Saw
$50, Like New Bosch Half
inch drill $35
(352) 503-7977



AIWA STEREO STYTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & 2
SPEAKERS $100
352-613-0529
Big Screen TV
$60
352-227-7401


COMPUTER DESK
Great Condition 62 x
40in. $40.00 Linda
352-341-4449
COMPUTER desktop
monitor keyboard mouse
printer speakers 90.00
352 212-2266 Iv mess
DELL COMPUTER
SCREEN 15 in/ Good
condition, $25.00 Linda
352-341-4449
Deluxe Playstation 3
w/8 games $400 for all,
retails for >$1000
(352)795-7513
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
E Machine, W260
w/ dell keyboard
and screen
$100
(352) 563-2896
EPSOM,
PRINTER-COPIER
Stylus NX400
$25.00 513-4027



2 BRWN WICKER ARM
CHAIRS W/ottomans &
cushions & tbl. Wicker is
plastic coated. Exc,
Nice little set Pd $425
asking $75. 382-2733
Patio Set
6 chairs,
$100.
(352) 382-5661
Patio Set table 4 x 4ff
round PVC, 4 chairs
with cushions $250
(352) 382-4891
PVC Patio Set
42" round table, 4 chairs
w/cushions, good cond.
$50
(352) 794-3925



4 Piece Oak Queen
Bdrm Set, incl. mattress
and boxspring, $195 obo
(352) 400-8646
Chest of Drawers,
Dresser, set of box
springs $150.
Glider Rocker,
w/ foot stool $50.
(352) 795-7254


COMPLETE NASCAR
KIDS BEDROOM SET
Rooms to Go Kids
Bobby Labonte #43
twin bookcase bed,
mattress, dresser, mir-
ror, nite stand, pit box
for tv and nascar rug.
Excellent Condition!
Real wood not plastic
racecar bed! Email
jamar1021@yahoo.com
for pics.
$675 352-613-2794


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012




STANDS Cherry Wood large $100
Armour with 2 matching (352) 382-489
nightstands. $60.00 Call
352-586-1970 G rdnL
Coffee Table, 3 x 3ffulie
square with glass top
$100 (352) 382-4891 CRAFTSMAN LAW
Dinning Room Table, TRACTOR- Moc
Italian glass octagon, LT2000.42-inch c
seats 8, 5 x 5ft, $600 Briggs/Stratton 18h
Aumuar/Bar Pine, OHV motor. Mow
6x 3.5ft $500 deck, motor in ex
(352) 382-4891 lent condition. Trc
needs some rep
END TABLE Beautiful but is operational.
solid wood end table. Call 352-422-62
"Thomasville"!!! Compan- anytime after 11
ion pieces available. JhDe1
89.00 352-726-9132 John Deere 1998
Model, 72" cut,.
Entertainment Center Yanmar Diesel e
9ft L, 61/2ft H, 27" Deep Ready for work $,
White, fits up to 50" TV Heavy Duty com
$200 cial (352) 422-30
(352) 382-7473
ENTERTAINMENT MTD Riding Mc
CENTER light color brand necknd
4 ft x 3.5 ft $35 $600
352-212-2266 Lv Mesg (352) 746-735
FOUR PIECE COUCH
25.00 / good Murry Riding Mo'
condition/needs cleaning 12 HP. 40 in. cut
Linda 3414449 wheeled push m
Heavy Rattan 5hp 22in cut $80
Entertainment Center (352) 302-606
w/ 5 glass shelves
$150 Walnut Desk 561/ Riding Mower Trc
x 19/4 File drawer + 5 Like New Ariens rr
drawers, w/brown #93526942 cut
leather chair $160 Mulcher, Cost $1
352-503-2123, 212-6453 Asking $700.
High End Quality Resale (352) 422-013
Furniture & Accessories
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803 HERNAND(
House full of furniture Sunday 22, 8am -
Lots of items, All must go! Car Boats, Hous
loveseat $100 obo, Items, Exercise EC
Desk+chair $125, queen/ 4199 N. Longvalle
full size beds $500 ea. Citrus Hills Nort
(352) 527-6879
Kitchen Table HERRY'S
with 4 chairs, white MARKET DA
$100 (352) 382-4891 FREE VENDOR SPA
Kitchen wood table 50" Outdoor Flea Ma
round bar high w/ extra held on the group
glass top 4 bar high 8471 W Periwinkl
stools 1 yr. old HOMOSASSA
$150 (352) 795-4372 (behind Wendy
Marble Top Last Saturday Ev
Dining Rm. table w/6 Month 8am -no
high back leather Saturday, July,
chairs, (buffet) server Call Caroline
used twice 352-527-202
$1,200 (352) 586-6746
Mattress, Box spring HOWARD'S
and maple FLEA MARKET
headboard, King 352-628-4656
$400 (352) 382-4891
Moving Sale INVERNESS
Lots of furniture and 3373 s Coffee Pt I
misc. ing Sale: Househ
(352) 344-2903 Items, Yard Tools,
(352) 860-1768 letic Equip, Tools,
Preowned Mattress tinue until gone!
Sets from Twin $30; Lakes Sub off E L
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. Estate Dr. Sign Pc
352-628-0808
-352-628-080 Wanted Hunting Er
QUEEN MATTRESS Fishing Equip. Co
Queen mattress and Tools, Knives, swo
boxspring$40.00 Call War items 352 613
352-586-1970
RATTAN ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER great
shape natural finish $75.
call 352-257-3870 MENS CLOTHIP
Sofa and Love Seat LARGE JEANS, PA
LIKE NEW! $450 SHORTS & SHIRT
(352)344-5734 352-613-0529


I





WN
del
ut w
p I/C
,ing
xcel-
actor
airs,
$250
Q50
a.m.
F935
3 cyl
eng,
4,800
mer-
015
power
ition
7
wing
$300
h
power
firm
9
victor
model
and
I400
9




2pm
*hold
quip.
ey Rd
th

Y
DACE!
irket
inds
e Ln
/ys)
'ery
oon
28
.at
20


iT
6


Mov-
lold
Ath-
con-
7
lake
sted
quip.,
llect.
rds &
-2944



NG
ANTS,
S $25


~Th~3D~w~ft~r


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881


-U
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia
Incontinency No Prob.
(SL 6906450) 503-7052



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730





.. .. _


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lie. & Ins.,
A 352 422-7279 *



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
VFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lie. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *A
CONCRETE
REFINISHING
Painting Inside & Out
Handyman
(352) 476-0680
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


igg1 LIIA


CARPET & t

UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Speci ng in: urniture
Cleaned for
Carpet Stretching AFREE- Ask
Carpet Repair o
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty




Boulerice

QB0002180 u P L Y INC.

In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
S$125 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF
I One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
-T' FREE ESTIMATES
S (352) 628-5079


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120

Green Valley
Landscape & Design
Complete lawn maint.
(352)280-0269





Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570

ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554


Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


IREMODEIN


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
* "NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
* Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 "1
2780 N Florida Ave, Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


35-74-38:,Tp
Crystal

1500
OFF
with ad


GENERIC AC
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians


352-621-124


Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341 -3300




"APPRAISALS"
Jewelry, Art, Antiques
Family Bus.Since 1932
GIA Diamond Graduate
GIA Equipment, Lic.,Ins.
Fast, Dependable
352-266-6884 or
Tscudder@gcon.me




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT. LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.


WINDO

We Clean Windows and o Whole tot MoreI
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

* FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD! SOD! SOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221


Acrylic & Glass WIHDOWS
Custom made for your screen room

't1 A^ CRC058138
r T rjCT[ rr
(352)465-4629
*Installation may vary.





AAA ROOFING
Catl the "eak&ausse "
Free Written Estimate

*100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000BVPX


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
SRepairs
f"/ Small Carpentry
.Fencing
C* Screening
= clean Dryer
S Vents
SAffordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
A 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722




Fast In-Home
Service








VISIT OUR WEBSITE at itruTeci.cO
Comptr lA.

0B00ZDO





POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
f STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
00OB6SU


I







D6 SUNDAY,JULY 22, 2012


!!!!!!!!215/65 R17!!!!!!!!
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
!!!!!!!245/65 R17!!!!!!!
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****225/70 R16*****
Good tread! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)586-5485
2 FOUR WHEEL WALK-
ERS WITH SEATS- folds
for storage, basket, hand
brakes & locks, Ex. $50
ea. 628-0033
2 RED ROD IRON
PORCH CHAIRS 45.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
3 ceiling Fans White,
w/out lights $35 ea.
(352) 291-1556
8000 BTU ARCTIC
KING AIR CONDI-
TIONER Excellent condi-
tion 100.00/OBO IINDA
341-4449
2" FAUX WOOD WHITE
BLINDS Like New sev-
eral sizes 8 total for
$100.00 352-382-4911
40" Lawn Aerator $50
Shop-vac 16 gallon 6.5
hp $50
(352) 726-3878
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & 2
SPEAKERS $100
352-613-0529
Antique Solid Oak
Side Table $140
Samsung Digital Home
Theater Surround Sound
$60. (352) 341-5978
BOAT AND/OR UTILITY
TRAILER DOLLIE- Dual
wheels, 4 air tires, must
see, Ex., $50
352-628-0033
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,$25
(352) 465-1616
BREADMAKER Oster
company, white color, ex-
cellent condition. $25
(352)465-1616
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS $25
352-613-0529
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
INCLUDES SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $50
352-613-0529
COMPUTER STAND
ARMOIRE TYPE
$20.00 Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
CORNER CURIO CABI-
NET, curved glass, 59"
high, 28" wide, good
condition, $95, (352)
465-1813, Dunnellon
DINNING TABLE FOR 8
Brand New with tag
wood, excellent Condi-
tion. No chairs, just table.
$100 (352) 465-1616








HAND PULL
BOAT/UTILITY TRAILER
DOLLIE- 1-7/8" ball, 4-
dual air tires/wheels, Ex.,
$50 352-628-0033
HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok
condition. Heats up to
180 sq. ft. area. $10
(352) 465-1616
INFANT CAR SEAT good
condition. Safety 1st co.
$20(352)465-1616
JOHN DEERE TRAVEL-
ING SPRINKLER- cast
metal housing, follows
hose, looks like a tractor,
$40, 352-628-0033
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262

LOVESEAT Dual reclin-
ing. Beige with brown and
blue design $100.
628-6396

ELECTRIC POLE CHAIN
SAW- hand or adjustable
up to 10ft. Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
SEWING MACHINE Ken-
more 1760 Zig Zag Pine
Cab, 24threaded bob-
bins, buttonholer,30 pat-
tern cams. $85 382-4873
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE New/was 59.95
selling for 20.00 Linda
341-4449
SOFA TABLE
$10.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal Head
board, $30
(352)465-1616
VACUUM CLEANER Eu-
reka!, needs some
repair. Big vacuum with
hose. $10
(352) 465-1616
Vinyl Double-paned Win-
dow, white 32x53 $25
(712) 251-6603
WATER SOFTENER
Do not Need
Was Just Disconnected
$250
Call (352) 382-1424
WATERBED Queen size
flotation type $100.
628-6396



GO GO Elite Scooter
used once, paid
$750+tax, will sell for
$550 no tax, must see
(352) 726-2695
PRIDE SCOOTER Never
used.
Brand new condition.
Price:Origina--$2845-Sell
$1000. call: Joe
352-341-6269


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



DRUM SET Minus Toms,
Sabian symbols, Zilgan
symbols, $99.
352-563-0166
Ludwig 5 Piece
3 cymbals, black
$250
(352) 489-9181
Small Organ w/bench
and music, exc. cond.
$150 obo
(352) 400-8646
Spinet Piano
with padded storage
bench. Also has heater
cinnamon color
$600. 352- 795-4372


6 UNOPENED ROLLS
SHRINK WRAP-2 clear,
2 pink, 1 red, 1 green. $5
for all. Orig $2.97 per roll.
(352) 341-3607
19" WHITE PANASONIC
TV/VCR W/ REMOTE
Old-school, but works
great.$35 INVERNESS
(352) 341-3607
CHEROKEE MATTED &
FRAMED PRINT NATIVE
AMERICAN
AWARD-WINNINNG
ARTIST $35 341 3607
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened self-adhesive
repositionable $20
(352) 341-3607
MEDIUM BAR FRIDGE
White Large Bar Fridge -
Works Great $100
352-601-3506
MICROWAVE Black
E-WAVE brand for
over-stove installation.
Turntable works some-
times. $35 341-3607
SOFA, CHAIR, &
CHAISE LOUNGER
Sectional Sofa and Chair
with matching foot stools.
Excellent condition.
$400.OBO Chaise
Lounger. Excellent
condition. $150.OBO
352-795-0841
TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES BRAND
NEW 2 tissue holders 3
wall units 12 shower
hooks $40 341-3607
WHITE FREEZER
CHEST White Freezer
Chest Like new -
Excellent Condition -
$100 352-601-3506



TREADMILL Weslo Ca-
dence C44 spacesaver
comfort cushion treadmill.
Firm $99.00 3824873



Bike Gary Fischer
Men's Napa Model
$250 & Schwinn 4-bike
car hitch carrier $50
(352)209-7257
Billiards Table, Craft
Master, walnut 8FT by
4ft, new apperiance,
with combination
hanging triple light set,
multiple ques standard
and short sized with
stylish wooded que
stick holder and
decrotive "pool ball"
clock for further pool
room
atmosphere, $650
(352) 220-0134
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
MEN'S GOLF CLUBS &
BAG Wilson Aggressor
irons, 2 to SW, driver thru
5 wood plus bag, $50.00
352-382-0953
RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquarters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River

SWE BUY GUNSm
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


Utility Trailer
4x8 $100.
5 x 10 $200.
(352) 382-5661


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom 2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916




3 MALTESE, Available
2 females $600. ea
I male $500. Health
certs & CKC registered,
3 Morkies & 5 Shorkies
AVAILABLE SOON
352-212-4504, 212-1258
8 month old female
Great Pyrenees Puppy,
up to date on
shots, AKC, spayed
All white $600
(352) 634-5415
BOMBAY CATS 3 yr old
Bombay sisters, beauti-
ful sweet girls. Up to
date on all shots,
spayed, worm and flea
treated. 1/2 price in July
- $17.50! Id's 16650822
and 16651569 Citrus
Cty Animal Shelter, 352
746 8400, Tues-Sat
10-5pm
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 628-2483
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Female Yorkie-Poo
20 wks,4 lbs,
initial shots, cage, etc.
$350.
(352) 746-7815


crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com

Humane Society
of Florida
We have several
Medium Large Dogs
that needs loving
homes Fully Vetted
$50. adopt fee.
Stop By 11 a-5p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City, or see our
dogs online: www.
humanesociety
offlorida.org
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com
MaltiPoo
Teacups, 2 male $500,
1 female $550
8 weeks, Fluffy and
Adorable, have 1st
shots (352)794-3081
Red Nose Pit Bulll
Puppies 6 wks old,
de-wormed, 1st shots
done, females $200 ea.
males $175 ea.
352-364-1838, 212-9369
Rottweiler Pups 1 male
($700), 5 Female ($850)
Pure German AKC
7wks 352-302-3735
SHIH-TZU MIX Young FE
good natured, smart. Up
to date shots. Can't keep.
$250. (352) 563-1265
Sugar Glider Female
1 1/2 yrs old gray and
black, $100 with Extras,
cage not included
(954) 295-3055



Bermuda Hay- 501bs-$6
Never Been Rained On
352-795-1906, 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARMS, CR
RATS
Wholesale, farm raised
rats/mice, all sizes, de-
livery available.
(352) 445-3681

Livestock


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


MIKIMAROONS.PRESIDENT
AUTOMATION


352-746-6721 ext 6148 www.takestockinchildre

SZO6 Tae Stok In CMdren, I All rightss r .seved.


CLASSIFIED



20 ft Hydra Sports
CC, 150hp Yamaha Salt-
water series II, w/trailer
$5700
(352) 634-1140
CANOE
16' ALUMINUM, $99.
352-563-0166
CAROLINA SKIFF
J16 '96, 28HP Jhnson,jet
drv, bimini top, fish
find, w/trlr. All recently
second $3995. 746-1115
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(@Hotmail.com
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Kayak Current Design
Fiberglass, 14 ft
w/rudder, sit-in $750
(352) 344-2161
PONTOON
20' with trailer, 60hp
Johnson Nice and
clean $3,200
(352) 726-6197



1994 ALLEGRO BAY
32ft MH, 47K miles,,
generator, 2 AC's, 2
new batteries, Qn BR
sleeps 5, TV, excel.
cond. Can be seen at
Dan's Clam Stand
Hwy 44 Crystal River,
Ask for Dan $8,500 obo
(352) 302-8561
Club Car
2007 EXC. COND.
$2500 neg. Blue
w/all-terr. tires 4 pas-
senger w/ grab bar
(352) 795-1887
Coachman
31ft. Leprachaun, 40k mi-
les, rear bdrm, runs
great, all new tires $19k
(352) 447-0968
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298



R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825


Your World






CHR)NI LE


r& coo,










n.org Help good kids

become great


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945



Ford 4 speed
Transmission
w/ Granny Gear
$100 (352) 382-5661
PONTIAC GTO '05
Rare, Red!6.0V8, 6sp,
0-60 in 4.5. 450 BHP. 200
mph. New Tires. Cry Riv
$14,400 727-207-1619



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 237-1892



CADILLAC DEVILLE
'03 78K mi, Carriage
roof, Mint, Lthr! Clean
Auto ck. $5950.
257-4251, 352-794-6069
Chevrolet
2000 Lumina
excellent cond. $2,500
obo
(352) 726-3703
Chevrolet
'83 Monte Carlo V-6
body off re-build $2500
(352) 400-2020
FORD
2008 Taurus Selling my
mom's 2008 Taurus SEL.
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18
months or until 36,000
miles. Lt blue exterior.
Tan leather interior.
Sunroof. Great shape.
$13,495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326
JAGUAR
1987 XJ6
$2000 OBO
KEVIN
352-634-4207
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 72,000 mi. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$4,800 (352) 860-1106,
MUSTANG
1995 GT 5.0 HO 69K
miles. Cool Air, elec
windows,seat, mirrors.
Color PINK Black
Interior. $4,500 OBO
352-628-3485


MERCURY SABLE GS
78K mi, Xtra Clean, 6
cyl, Cold A/C, Sedan
$3500. 352-257-4251
cell or 352-794-6069 off

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *r
Financinga For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
'77, Corvette, numbers
matching, 350,4 spd.,
restored, excel cond.
many trophies, many
receipts, same owner
last 17 yrs. asking
$16,500 352- 560-7377
FORD
1931, Model A, restored
in Arizona, 5 window
deluxe coupe, rumble
seat, leather seats
23,195 miles $17,500.
(352) 628-1734







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4


CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352)465-0812
352-322-5555
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $22,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798








TOYOTA TOCOMA
'07, $8,995, Incld. warr.
Fin. avail, bad credit ok
352-322-1299 the
lastfrontierautos.com
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! "*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN
2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6,150k miles,
A/C, tinted windows, tilt,
pw, pd, cruise. $2,950
(352) 527-3894


I, I A ,II' 11d st.I
Y<>i '.o l< I IIISt.



CH CaNICiE
Classifieds


FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.,
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack and
fact. shelveing $2,800
(352) 726-2907




Harley '02
Road King, black, lots of
chrome, senior owned
15k miles, gar.kept
$9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810

Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902

HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760

Honda
'06, Silver Wing, 600CC,
26K mi.Taller wind-
shield, rear carrier case
$4,000 (352) 489-2457

HONDA 2007
750 Shadow. WS, pipes,
SB, Rack, C bars, extra
clean 8200 mi., $3,850
(352) 860-1106, Bob

SUNL SCOOTER 07
150 cc, red, looks &
runs great, rejet carb,
$295. UNtitlable, Grt for
farm, long drway, priv
rds. 637-6046

SUZUKI
'09, S40, 652CC, with
706 miles, w/ extras
$3,000
(352) 795-0150


ROUTES


AVAILABLE


NO,


Great Part-t.i.mej*obfr*








t Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

Vt Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance


If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River


IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
cru,. NICLE



Swww.chronicleonline.com


385-0721 CRSUN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Steven D. Bradley David K. Collett, Jr.
3311 E. Odier St. 9512 E. Village Green Cir.
Inverness, FL 34453 Inverness, FL 34450
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than (30) days after
the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligi-
bility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter reg-
istration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at
the below listed address or call 352-341-6747
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 22, 2012


386-721 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY July 25, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, Florida 34461
DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
LEONARD FRESHMAN GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE
MARIE GRACE
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES
(5) SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD: None
(6) CITATIONS: None
(7) SCHEDULED DISCUSSION:
RESOLUTION NO. 2012 (Fee Schedule Revisions)
A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING AND ESTABLISHING A
FEE SCHEDULE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT; ESTABLISH-
ING A TABLE OF CONTENTS; INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE BUILDING DIVISION, EX-
HIBIT "A"; INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION, EXHIBIT "B";
INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE LAND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, EXHIBIT "C"; INCORPO-
RATING FEES FOR THE GEOGRAPHIC RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY PLANNING DIVI-
SION, EXHIBIT "D"; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION LI-
CENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUB-
LIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560 AT LEAST
TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE
TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle Sunday, July 22, 2012


"That your contribution to Take Stock in Children

will go far and so will these children."


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Noti


Meeting^f
I Ntics :


Meeting^f
I Ntics :


Meng
I Ntics






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS
AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!
THERE WILL BE
NO SALES PEOPLE MANAGERS OR
EMPLOYEES ON THE PREMISES.
(NO ONE WILL EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)



Because new models are arriving daily, management has been ordered to eliminate excess
inventory. All prices will be slashed and will be clearly posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and paper.
Write down the stock number and price. Come in as early as possible on Monday, July 23rd.

FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!
I I t 0 1 lo t 9 1 9

i -L-J -- Jeep TENT EVENT




AUTOMOTIVE
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd 2077 Highway 44W 937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Homosassa, FL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


D8 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012






H Section E -SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


P Sikorski's
L Attic
PAGEE4


ESTATE GUIDE


.j 1 ; I I


1 "k91


,all/


U I
r i


---- -,
-.
"Basic Checks." a floor-
cloth created by Lisa Mair.
is shown in in her 200 year
old Vermont farmhouse in
Perkinsville. Vt.


h7 MhL


j;


JIA


1k;


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I;1: 1 '11A41114 *iII; Y 2417 INFO LINE I.24137 INF 2
2417NY24/IFo LILENE
1:i163.s2)'637-282 -63282 8 _e5l 637-2828-
En's 63?.~Ij (352) 6372a2. 'e' Enter house #526 637hou.2828
Er~ ~#~5 nterhouse #4874 Enterhos



-=~f
Nr #


LAUREL RIDGE
*3BD/2BA/2CG Shows Like A MODEL
* Lots of Tile Nearly 1,800 SF Living
* Oversized Lanai Across From Golf Course
PETER & MARVIA KOROL _
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


526 NW 9TH AVENUE, CRYSTAL RIVER
*3BR/3BA/3CG Home
SGreat Room wNaulted Ceilings Gourmet Ktchen
* Lg. Master Suite Screened Pool & Spa
* Lots of Beautiful Declkng *900 Sq. Ft. Workshop
*2 Covered Boat Slips
* Beautiful Natural FL Setting
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


46 BEECH STREET
SUGARMILL WOODS
*3BR/2BA/2CG Golf Course Home
* Great Room Lg. Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook
SGas Fireplace Screened Lanai & Pool
SBeautiful Landscaped 1+ Acre
*Well Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net











CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES
2/2/2 beautiful home on private lot in a good
community with nice trees and great views.
Located on a cul-de-sac road, with green
space in the rear and along one side, great
privacy Home comes with appliances and
washer and dryer Close to the community
clubhouse, with pool and tennis courts
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


Canal short distance to the
Hernando Lake. 2BR/2BA,
carport, fenced-in areas for pets,
hot tub and workshop with power.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmils@earthlink.net


This 3/1 home has had lots of love in recent
years with a metal roof, new A/C, new carpet
and vinyl and is located in a quiet country
subdivision. Situated on a cul-de-sac lot with
large backyard. Move right in and know that
you have time for hobbies instead of lots of
maintenance!
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WoyneHemmerich.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


2 i H yII, B H 51 .e 6
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


la/Z/ + u IItC:
SUGARMILL BEAUTY
Gorgeous solar-heated pool w/waterfall,
oversized garage & utility room are a bonus
Home built in 2006, over 2,300 s.f. liv area,
crown molding, very open floor plan, deep
green belt, and A+ for curb appeal. Like-new
home.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


Ben Branch
352 564.2250
NMLS ID: 432391

Bankof America Home Loans

1a1 ofle NA. MeW a FI Cr a i La r..Iil ad .2W m:i
* *nr ""e i "tifwjjyt """,^'a r; J ""t *nilia


LECANTO
SPACIOUS 3/2/2 POOL HOME in gated
"community" of Citrus Hills This Victoria Model has
cathedral ceilings, split bedroom, expanded
breakfast nook with oak floors, ceramic tile, large
master bath with jetted tub & walk-in shower,
covered lanai to caged pool, nicely landscaped,
corner lot A great community that offers golf
courses, swim & fitness centers, tennis, fine dining,
First Class spa/salon
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 M
Email mailha slheii ema nel [b *,.J
VIRTUAL TOURS al. ,. miailha salhei ieman coin L "J


I MLS li s 51


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Prevent tree decay


D ecay in
living
trees is
the most damag- ,
ing disease for all
species of trees
worldwide.
It usually kills
trees slowly, ren-
dering them
worthless for Kerry I
products or TH
shade, and even-
ARBO
tually useless or
even hazardous.
All tree decay begins with
wounding any break in
the bark that exposes un-
derlying wood. The extent of


I
I


decay depends
on the wounds:
when they hap-
pen, how many,
how deep, and
where on the tree
they occur.
Therefore, one of
the first tasks for
the arborist is to
Kreider inspect the tree
IE and survey it for
T wounds.
Brok en
branches and
topped trees create exposed
wood that rots away, leading

See ABORIST/Page E5


i6i
. Mor n 16


A SHADY LADY AWAITS!
In a quiet W. Highlands area is this immaculate 3/2/2, occupied by the
original owner. Cooled by a stand of tall trees. Dining room plus casual
dining in kitchen, and lazy days back porch. MLS #355048. $89,900
Marilyn Booth, your hostess. Phone 726 6668


S i I E 746-9000


Amnda & irk Jmhnm Tom Balfour l Avenus & Hal Steiner ArtPaty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROER/ASSOC.' EALTR REACTOR ALTOR-BROER REALTOR






238 TRIPLE CR 745 E. SAVOY 10953 N TARTAN TERR 2372 W. SNOWY EGRET PL. 4275 N. MODELWOOD DR.
4/3/3 353329 $359 500 /356 $159900 4/2/2 $104,900 4/2/2 356193 $189,900 3/2.5/2 356464 $149,900




6560 N. DELTONA 7768 N SARAZEN 4889 N.PEPPERMINT DR. 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 3132 E. GERALD
3/2/2 355155 $129,900 3/2/2 354564 $144,900 3/2/2 354938 $149,900 4/2/2 350502 $128,900 2/2 354530 $128,000 3//3/2 356619 $77,500




21 TRUMAN BLVD 521 N HARRISON 1945 W. OLIVER 3 CLIFFORD 10923 N. AIRWAY LP 4506 N TUMBLEWEED
2/2/2 351656 $59,900 222 350036 $59,900 2/2/2 355628 $74,900 1 2/2/2 355613 $59,900 3/2/2 354815 $79,900 3/356299 $55,000




52 S. COLUMBUS 3755 N. ROSCOE 1 NEW NORTH CT. 400 S. WASHINGTON 6541 W. COPENHAGEN 328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
2/2/1 356520 $54,900 356615 $39,900 1/2 356609 $32,500 2/2/2 356626$62,500 3/2 356535 $89,500 3/2/1 356581 $69,900




LI Ii. LL, MIJ I-J I- J&.j j V EW ',,iC,
27 S. FILLMORE 16 S. ADAMS 15 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE 29 N. WASHINGTON
3/1/1 356531 $53,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 354341 $84,900 2/1 356448 $42,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SJackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtord, A HOSE Realtor
S302.3179 soLoNan"! 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 003KE

4531 N. JADEMORE DR.
S3/2/2 GOLF COURSE home,
30x18 kidney-shaped, solar heated,
self-cleaning pool, living room, family
room, eat-in kitchen, new double pane
windows. More! More! More!
6340 N. WHISPERING OAK LP.




735 W. COLBERT CT.
Luih ,,,, i, ,iii) I,,wuylimi. I ,uvv ,,u i
A/C and water tank in 2010, updated
appliances, large family sized eat-in kitchen
w/island, great view from private back yard.


I A1GITO DUT N DI AW


EVERLY HILLS Jamaican model, 2 DUNNELLON 1998 nobility d/w m/h w/ 3
rooms, 15 baths, 1 car garage, family bedrooms, 2 baths, on 25 acres. Master bath
i, screen porch, country kitchen, dining rm, garden tub w/ dbl vanity & shower. Country
eds lots of work and cleaning; assumable kitchen, vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 work shop
mortgage; off of Forest Ridge Blvd., newer w/electric, inside laundry w/washer dryer.
mes area. #352929 $50,000 #348244 $65,000
.- .


CRYSTAL RIVER-NORTH 2.5 acres, 3
bedroom, 2 bath, D/W M/H with 3 car HOMOSASSA 3 bedroom, 2 bath,D/W M/
.. 1. od deck on front H on 6 acres of land. 12 x 24 workshop w/
I I I I I .. country kitchen, electric, metal roof over, updated appliances,
large master bath w/garden tub & separate fenced and cross fenced, covered rear porch,


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomelFont is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..........................352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plan your family land's future


any landowners are faced next generation. They will also be able
with the challenge of finding to define conservation easements and
ways to provide for how these easements are
their retirement and for appraised, as well as un-
their heirs, while ensuring derstand financial and tax
that their land is kept in the impacts of a donated or
family for future genera- purchased conservation
tions. Farmers, foresters p easement. Purchasing pro-
and ranchers tend to have grams that are available for
a lot of value sitting in real conservation easements
estate with limited revenue and understanding the
to support all their family steps and costs to create a
members. Furthermore, Joan Bradshaw conservation easement will
there is often pressure to FLORIDA- also be presented at the
sell off land to develop- FRIENDLY seminar.
ment. Often, family mem- Farmers, foresters,
bers are not certain if or LIVING ranchers, landowners and
how they may participate their families, as well as ac-
in the future management of their countants, appraisers, lawyers, stu-
land. dents, and others interested in the
The University of Florida/IFAS Ex- protection of the special places in our
tension, in conjunction with the Con- state, are encouraged to attend the
servation Trust for Florida Inc. (CTF), seminar. To date, more than 300
is offering an interactive seminar for landowners, professionals, and stake-
landowners to learn practical steps for holders from 28 Florida counties have
passing their land from one genera- attended these seminars.
tion to the next. Seminar attendees Please join us from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
will review the options to protect their Thursday, July 26 at UF/IFAS, Citrus
family land. After attending the semi- County Extension Office, 3650 West
nar, landowners will be better able to Sovereign Path, Suite 1, Lecanto. Pre-
initiate the planning process for how registration is required by contacting
their land may be passed on to the the Conservation Trust for Florida at


352-376-4770. Registration is $10,
which includes lunch. For more infor-
mation go to www.conserveflorida.org.
Conservation Trust for Florida
Inc.(CTF) is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit land
trust. They work with private
landowners to protect their farms,
ranches, and timberlands.
CTF works with landowners to find
the best land conservation solution to
meet their long-term financial and
land management needs. Options in-
clude conservation easements, pur-
chase or donation of land, carbon
credits, and assistance with
landowner succession and estate
planning.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural
needs.
Programs and activities offered by
the Extension Service are available to
all persons without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, religion, or na-
tional origin.

Dr Joan Bradshawis the UF/IFAS
Citrus County Director


Restored chest of drawers probably dates to 19th century


D earJohn: I am enclos-
ing photos of an old
chest of drawers we
found in my parents' attic
many years ago. At
the time the chest
had three coats of
paint on it. We had
the paint profes-
sionally removed
and the result is
what you see. The
chest has a very
heavy Italian mar-
ble top, which we John S
just washed and it SIKOF
came out beauti-
ful. A neighbor A
said she thought
the chest dated back to the
early 1900s. Each drawer has
an individual key lock and
the base has a hidden
drawer. The side photo of the
chest shows the construction
of the drawers.
I would appreciate any in-
formation you could give me


i
1
1


about this piece and what its
value might be. Thank you for
your time and consideration.
We are four faithful readers
of your column. -
PA, Homosassa
Dear PA: You
certainly did the
right thing by hav-
ing the ugly paint
removed and the
marble top chest
brought back to
life. The chest was
korski made in America
SKI'S after the Civil War,
S circa 1880s. The
S style is Renais-
sance Revival. The
drawer construction is called
peg and scallop, it was the
first use of machine-made
dovetails. Current potential
dollar value is $250 to $500.
DearJohn: I was thrilled to
see my whale carvings pic-
ture gracing your weekly ar-
ticle in today's Chronicle. I


took your advice and drilled
down deeper into the Inter-
net and located two pictures
of Captain Joline. He was a
Chief Boatswains Mate and
Officer in Charge on the
Stone Horse until at least
1955. Now that I have this
definite trail of provenance,
can you venture a guess as to
the piece's worth and where I
might get an appraisal? You
had mentioned that without
finding Joline it would be
worth up to, perhaps, $500.
Many thanks for all your
help. By the way, I am a
listener! G.S., Homosassa
See ATTIC/Page E5
This chest of drawers
was done in a style known
as "Renaissance Revival."
It uses "peg and scallop"
construction, which was the
first use of machine-made
dovetails.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ARBORIST
Continued from Page E3

to deep openings into the tree and ex-
tensive internal decay. Fire and ma-
chinery damage trees, especially near
the base.
Birds, insects, squirrels, beavers,
bears and other animals wound trees.
People also wound trees, especially
those who are inexperienced in their
attempt to perform tree care.
Recreational activities in forests,
parks and construction, such as home-
site preparation, can also wound a
tree.
Root damage from excavation and



ATTIC
Continued from Pag E4

Dear G.S.: I am glad to hear you did
further research and were successful.
My guess is it would certainly add to
the salability of the item. Whether the
information is enough to push it be-
yond the $500 range, I am not sure. I
suggest you contact Eldred's Auction
Company in Cape Cod; they specialize
in marine and nautical theme auc-
tions. Ask what they think it would sell
for through their auction. Let us know
what you discover. The website is
www.eldreds.com.
Dear John: I have six memorial
magazine editions of Elvis Presley
dated 1977 and one 1978. I would like
to know where I could sell them and
what do you think they are worth. -
ML.H., Inverness
Dear M.L.H.: Elvis Presley's death
in 1977 triggered a variety of printed
articles in massive quantities. Current
potential dollar value for various me-
morial editions is low. It would be bet-
ter to keep them and pass them on in
the family if there is interest.
DearJohn: Lately I have been read-
ing the poet Lord Byron's biography by
Frederic Raphael. My interest was
piqued because I have a copy of Lord
Byron's "Don Juan," which I picked
out of an old book bin at a rummage
sale. As I read the biography and then
rechecked the date of publication, I
realized the little book was published
while Byron was alive in 1822 London.
It was printed by and for Hodgson &
Co., 10 Newgate Street, with a preface
by a clergyman. The copy is hard-
bound. The front cover is detached
from the rest of the book, with perhaps
one to two blank pages missing, maybe
not. There are two sepia pen inscrip-
tions on the inside of the front cover,
which I am unable to decipher at this
time. The print is small, clearly read-


earth moving causes the potentially
disastrous condition of extensive
decay hidden at the base of the tree.
When a tree is wounded, it produces
callous tissue to seal the wound. A
young, vigorous, fast-growing tree may
be successful in sealing the wound
and preventing decay
Any microorganisms entering the
wound will cause discoloration and
decay, which may involve heartwood,
as well as sapwood.
The greater the microorganism in-
vasion, the greater the decay
A qualified professional can prop-
erly evaluate the severity of a wound
to determine if decay has begun and
to what extent, as well as offer
solutions.

able on all pages. Pages are intact
though discolored by time.
Would you be so kind as to tell me
where I may get a knowledgeable ap-
praisal of this book? I started with you
since my dear friend, Carolyn, sug-
gested your name and you are the best
local source of this type of information
I know of. C W, Ocala
Dear C.W: Condition is a major fac-
tor in the book-collecting world; under
"as-is" condition, dollar value can drop
radically I suggest you contact rare
book dealer Books Inc. at 352-374-4241.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol.com.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
S Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
S For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.7 million already closed by June 29, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
E r To Learn More v
(352) 746-9924 '' "-

DRASTICALLY REDUCED
to $220.500
l ... : i ,- the
I. ..1, P the
iT llE li ,n- I:-i I ith
the comforts of home!
1.72 groomed acres with FL friendly landscape; 2006
Premier construction-2/2/+study' quality architectural
details & decorating: 2,100 liv./3,100 under roof. Dream
pool & spa-Koi pond! 2 greenhouses + historic post
office on site! This deal won't last long! MLS# 355244
Call Debbie Cleary A
Realtor Associate
Office: 352-746-7113 Fax: 352-746-7203 KELLER
Cell: 352-601-6664 WI IA
Website: debbiecleary.com R
Rt E A- I T s


-
Kerry Kreider is a member of the In-
terna tional Society ofArboriculture,
a tree preservationist and president
ofAction Tree Service. You can
reach him at 352-726-9724 or by email
at actionproarborist@yahoo. com.


.7 ri HOT
FORECLOSURES
FOR SALE!!!
A TAA h AMAZING, TASTEFUL BREATHTAKING! Hardly begins to
WATERFRONT GETAWAY! 2/1 cozy home nestled on / acre 7071 Ardmore Rd, Brooksville $15,000 ds be his custom 2005, 3/3/2, pool home need on one are with
canaL-frontwigi stately oaks, fenced yard end privacy. Home features "i
huge screened lanai, great for relaxing and entertaining 3143 N Hooty Pt, Inverness $24,500 ., .,, ,,,,., ,,,., ,,,, i .i ',,,,,I". ,.i
5503 S. Marlin Pt., Floral City $68,500. MLS 3356493 9631W Moss Rose Ln, Crystal River $29,500 .,,,, .... ii ..... ... ........ ..,.. i, ..,,. .
Call Tonya Koch 352-6136427 or Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983 74 S Fllmo11 ,. I,, I d ,, I.. I $I29

740 N Charles Ave, Inverness $42,900 -
56 S Lincoln Ave, Beverly Hills $52,500
6177 W Nielsen Ct, Homosassa $53,000
406 W Dade, Bushnell $53,900
BROYHILL ESTATES Custom Built 2005 3/2/3 inground 600 E GILCHRIST CT 2B, Hernando $54,900
caged pool w/1,765 living features fully landscaped and fenced SUPER DEAL ,,S D EA i,,1i.
yard wood cabinets, stainless steel appliances and priced 11609 E Salmon Way, Floral City $58,900 ....... . .
to call your own. ONLY $184,500 MLS#356182 20380SW97thSt, Dunnellon $58,900 looking for offers MLS# 355082, asking $77,900
7521 E Broyhill PI Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 516 Tuck, Inverness $62,000 3034 Buley Pt. Call Kathy Chapman
5304 S JAMES TER, Homosassa $64,000 "
9765 W Laurel Oak Lane Crystal River $67,200
642 W Diamondbird Lp, Hernando $79,000 "
295 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto $79,900
6111 E Seneca St, Inverness $79,900 WOW! 4 acre property on the lake in Inverness Owner hd
AFFORDABLE AND NICE! Don't miss this 2/2/2 home in 6716 E Dogwood Hammock, Inverness $84,900 the home built to their specifications with custom upgrades
move-in condition with updated baths, spadous kitchen, living 12430 Daffodill, Floral City $86,900 th t Hie oversized garage with 2 roll doors and office
room, family room & Florida room. New roof shingles 2006. 1991 CR 652A,... features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathroom and an
732 Wharton Ter., Inverness. 69,000, MLS 356474. 1991CR652A, Bushnell $86,900 immee ......... 354,900. MLS# 355889
CallTony Koch 352613-6427 or DebbieTannery352-613-3983. 257 W Casurina PI., Beverly Hills $87,900 Call Kthy I. ..i.. .
11358 Bayshore Dr, Crystal River $89,900
14630 W Black Creek Dr, Crystal River $94,900
510 Baylor Terr, Inverness $99,900
S 6840 WAvacodo, Crystal River $99,900
8001 CR 674, Bushnell $100,000 .
WANTED: LARGE FAMILY for extra special main house and 4711 Hawkdale, Lecanto $103,000
guestcottage. Circa 2003 D/W features 3/2 split plan w/master DOGGONE GOOD BUY!!!! 1985 3/2 home with 2042
uite, designer kitchen, oversized screened porch, private dock, 6610 Owl Pt, Crystal Rive $119,000 living re Loted t 6716 Dogwood Lane for ONLY
shed and guest house. Come and see this canal front beauty. 6 Byrsonima E, Homosassa $129,900 $84,900 i ..............
ONLY $98,000 ML 355442 7840 E Smoke Trail 251 S Highview Ave, Lecanto $134,900 2BONES7 Cll52..i i. .... .... ll.
Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 352212-5752.
6225 N Misty Oak Terr, Beverly Hills $139,000
7495 SW 202nd Ct., Dunnellon $149,900
8573 S Vision, Inverness $144,000
3897 CR 532A, Bushnell $144,900
- 22 Pine St, Homosassa $179,900
PEACH OF A DEAL!! MOVE-IN READY 1994 2/2/1 home 5328 N Bronco, Beverly Hills $189,900
located at 6122 Peach Lane for ONLY S$54,500! New interior 8847 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa $199,900
paint & flooring, new A/C, rear patio, living room, breakfast bar,I
'.;,.I;,,; .,, t. -t .I;.,,- and more. Come 5884 N Hazelwood Dr Beverly Hills $209,900
I., ..I i. 1... ,all Tomika Spires- 48 Cypress Blvd, Homosassa $209,900
H . I. 1172W Legion Ct, Hernando $214,900
202 N Indianpolis, Hernando $219,900
1407 E Allegrie Dr, Inverness $234,900
16201 Paxford Ln, Brooksville $237,900 ...
7351 Castleberry Dr, Webster $239,900
Some houses are NASTY...Some are nice....this one is lust kinda 5881 N Petuna Terrace,Bev Hills $239,900
NASTY! Its the perect investor buy for ONLY $34,900! SIMPLY IRRESISTABLE! Once you walk through the
3/1 T Garden home with 1,406 square feet of living. This 1192W Diamond Shore Lp, Hernando $240,000 doors you will look no more! Stunning Sugrmill Woods
home features terrazzo floors, living room, rear enclosed porch, 3/2/2 pool home loaded fealoures galore! CALL ANYTIME FOR
... ...... i Home in need of Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 YOUR PRIVATE TOUR MLS# 355303. 80 W Cypress Blvd.
i, ii i i i I l Call Tomika Spires- $263,700. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 586-6598 or Kim Fuller
Hanssen 586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 (block) 352212-5752


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HELLO AGAIN TO




FLOORCLTHS

Traditional decoration
seen making a comeback


KIM COOK
For The Associated Press
If you were the artistic
wife of a sailor back in
17th century France, you
didn't let modest means
deter you from decorating
your home in style.
You transformed your
husband's old sails into
beautifully painted floor


coverings that rivaled those
in wealthy homes. British
sailors started bringing
them back as souvenirs,
and a fad with impressive
reach and longevity was
born.
The heavy canvases -
called "oilcloths" in Britain
and floorclothss" when the
See Page E9


--, \,\- -




,--\-% %











A "Finch" floorcloth by Lisa Mair. Her use of heavy
canvas and high-quality paints make her floorcloths more
durable than many on the market.
.." ,r\ ^ .


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


, Simpson's Stopper a versatile addition


Homeowners like to grow tall
evergreen shrubs near the cor-
ners of buildings to soften the
hard outlines of the structures. Ideally,
such a shrub should be attractive,
bushy and dense, evergreen, fragrant,
pest- and disease-tolerant, and have

Simpson's Stopper blooms in May lo-
cally, followed by fruit containing sev-
eral seeds that mature orange in
August and September. Crush to eas-
ily remove the seeds and eat the fresh
fruit. Dry or freeze the fruit for later
use. Bake into muffins, mix with ce-
real, stew into a compote or cobbler
or make a flavorful jam.
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle


flowers, nectar, pollen and pruning in February locally
fruit. Simpson's Stopper, before the new spring
Mercianthes fragrans, has leaves appear
such qualities and is read- There are small Simp-
ily available. son's Stopper trees with ex-
Native Simpson's Stop- foliating orange bark
per grows naturally in growing in the shady under-
South and Central Florida story of Rainbow Springs
in cold Zones 8B to 11 and Forest off State Road 40 in
tolerates heat zone 10 with / Marion County. Mature at 15
hot wet summers. Twig tips Jane Weber to 20 feet tall, with an 8-foot
will die off in freezing tem- diameter spread, they are
peratures to naturally JANE'S likely 50 years old. Potted
prune the plant and main- GARDEN plants transplant well to
tain it for more than 15 garden situations
years as a dense, 10-foot-tall shrub. Di- I had a mature 17-year-old, 10' x 5'
ameter at a house corner will proba-
bly reach 5 feet. It responds well to See Page E9


-" I
OWNER FINANCING-FLORAL CITY, FL '
Spify waterfront 2BR/2BA mobile in Withlapopka BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
Islands. Great for weekender, winter or year round 2BR home with in ground pool on approx 1.84
living. $39,900 MLS#355787 acres.$55,900 MLS#356543


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL
5 acres in Citronelle/Mini Farms/Citrus Springs area.
Out in the country. $20,900 MLS#356452


-:
BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
Two-story 4BR/2.5 bath home close to schools.
$94,900 MLS#355301


0EVN AL OFCTUSCUT


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(kn Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM NEW LISTING



' '- .
$Cd, ,l" Mmn 0 D D ,fA S 4394 N. Indianhead Rd. M 2193 N. Folkslone Lp.
MLS #354139 $279900 MLS #353960 $229,900 ake staq MLS #356196 $134,900 7iJga 1094W. Skyview Landing Dr.
Comfortable 4/3/3 Custom Built home. Elegantly3/3/2 Sweetwater custom home Elegant 2/2/2+den pool home MLS 356539 $375,000
Directions: Rte 486to south on Citrus Hills on 1.30 acres. in immaculate condition. Picturesque 3/25/2 vill
Blvd., to left on Liherty, to right on Directions: Rte. 486 to north on Annapolis, Directions: Rte. 486 to Canterbury Lakes Dr, a icturesque 3/2.5/2 vila
Man-O-War, to #444onright to end ofroad, right on Indianhead to #4394. to right on Folkstone, to home on corner a much sought-after neighborhood.
DickHildebrandt 352-568-0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714 S"


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frugal uses for chopsticks

D ear Sara: I was given a glass lizes again, you can heat it like a bra clip) that broke.
gallon-jar of honey. Over the up again. You can freeze it, I thought about sewing
last two years, I have used 3/4 too (it just thickens). I the sides together, but I
of the jar I'd like to store what is left in would store most of it in wonder if there is anything
a more manageable container The small, 3- to 4-ounce airtight else I could do to fix it. I
gallon jar is too large to microwave, so glass canning jars and some don't have a sewing ma-
I expect I'll have to simmer it on the of it in a honey dispenser chine, but I do sew by hand.
stove to break down the crystallized (similar to a syrup dis- Any ideas? -Rhayne, New
I, -^^, f\- ^^ 4-1 ^ ,^ -^ l-, K ^^ ^^ -^ -^^^-\ ,^ ^, -, -^1 4^^ ^ ^^ ^ L. ^^ ^^ H ^, ^r


IUloey. \IIOnce the UIoneIy lhas ben re-t -
stored, how should I store it for ease
of use? I have a 1/2-gallon plastic
pitcher, would that work better? Is
there a way to keep it from crystalliz-
ing again? I've kept it in a cabinet and
not the refrigerator, but in our heat it
still sets up. -Laurie, Florida
Dear Laurie: Heating it will remove
the crystallization, but don't let it boil.
Don't store it in the refrigerator; your
pantry is fine.
Aim for 50-70 degrees F, and don't
leave it exposed to light. If it crystal-


!00BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


penser), notL 111 a plastic
container I like the Norpro
honey dispensers that re-
lease from the bottom, ver-
sus dispensers that pour
from the top.


Sara
FRU
LIVI


For ease of use directly
from a canning jar, you can use a
honey dipper/spoon.
If using it for baking, oil your meas-
uring cup to keep the honey from
clinging.
Dear Sara: I have a one-piece swim-
suit that had a back clip on it (sort of


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house .conm


dtl ney
Dear Rhayne: Check your
Noel local fabric/craft store, such
GAL as Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft,
ING for a clip. You can purchase
a cheap swimsuit at the
thrift store or at a garage
sale and reuse its clip, too. There's a
company that sells a bikini top re-
placement hook, which is probably
very similar to the one you need. Visit
bikinihookrescue.com. You could al-
ways use a piece of ribbon and tie it
closed, too.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village
(www.frugalvillage. com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St., Kansas City
MO 64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME 500K BELOW
In the equestrian section of Pine INVESTMENT
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a ,. .
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www.mypineridgehome.com.
MLS #355468.$410,000 $- 499.000






i i 3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. 3 GAZANIA CT.
ARBOR LAKES SMW
NATURE LOVERS Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open space, open floor plan, all neutral colors.
and private setting -perfect retreat! floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a Quiet cul-de-sac street w/lots of green
Rolling pasture and mature oaks. Take the spacious patio and the yard even has space. Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
tour at wwwmyflorida ranch.com. room for a pool! Parkway.
MLS #353046 $400,000 MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #355830 $99,000





115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and LIVING ON THE WATER!
nice lir.l-'in. in beautiful Citrus This classic contemporary pool home is 3686 N. PALOMINO TERR.
Hills!! .... ..a one acre comer lot, the right setting for living the Florida
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in lifestyle. Open and airy with the PINE RIDGE
pool and patio area offers you the privacy plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. Nice flat wooded 5+ acre parcel right at the
you want!! Everything is very well 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of riding trails in the equestrian section of
maintained. New roof 5/2009. Just bring room to dock all the water toys Pir Pi-- ri- you direct access to up
... .. . .. imaginable! to '. i i..
1, 5 175,000 MLS#354435 $489,000 MLS #355271 $109,000


1


E8 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


Real Estate DIGEST

T_. Ellie and Kelly work together
Sin the Central Ridge office on
County Road 491.
-^ / The entire RE/MAX team
S-- congratulates these three on
S their success.
Wayne Ellie EXIT Realty agents
Hemmerich Sutton stay on top
RE/MAX RE/MAX EXIT Realty Leaders would
Realty One. Realty One. like to extend joyful congratu-

Three new agents nations to all of its agents in
hit milestone June for reaching honors from
it mile one EXIT Realty Florida. EXIT Re-
The brokers and staff of alty leaders place no. 11
RE/MAX Re- among the top 25 offices in
alty One are new listings taken, No. 4 for
very pleased total listings, No. 9 for total
to announce agent count, No. 10 for sales
that three of volume, No. 15 for sales vol-
their agents ume per agent, No. 7 for
have qualified closed sides, No. 6 for closed
for the presti- K y sides per agent, No. 11 for
gious multimil- GoddaKelly gross closed commissions,
lion dollar RE/MAX and No. 8 in CD fees gener-
club. Realty One. ated.
Wayne EXIT Realty Leaders is
Hemmerich, Ellie Sutton and committed to providing excel-
Kelly Goddard have each lent service for all your real es-
passed the $2 million mark in tate needs.
sales volume this year. All vet- Any of these agents can be
eran Realtors, these three reached at the Beverly Hills lo-
have a long history of success cation 352-527-1112 or the
in Citrus County. Crystal River location 352-
Wayne works out of the 794-0888, or online at
Crystal River office on U.S. 19. www.exitrealtyleaders.com.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLOTHS
Continued from Page E6

art came to North America -
would be painted with simple or
elaborate designs depending on
the skill level of the artists (often
house painters) and the financial
status of homeowners. The term
"oilcloth" probably refers to the
oil-based paints and linseed oil
coatings applied to the canvases.
Waterproof, insect resistant and
sturdy, floorcloths became just as
popular in American homes.
Thomas Jefferson. George Wash-


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E9


ington and John Adams had floor-
cloths in their homes; you can still
see one at Mount Vernon a solid
green, as Washington sought to
simulate the grass outdoors inside.
Near the start of the 20th cen-
tury, the advent of mass-produced
linoleum sent labor-intensive
floorcloths out of style, but in the
'60s and again more recently,
artists have rediscovered the
craft.
Julie Biggs of Pickerington,
Ohio, paints hers with contempo-
rary designs like polka dots or naif
flowers in hues of pink, turquoise,
yellow and charcoal gray A green
polka dot rug would look fresh


and young in a child's room.
She's playing with other ideas,
too.
"My favorite technique right
now is a layered, worn look, which
includes several layers of designs
on one floorcloth," Biggs says.
"Once I'm finished painting each
layer, I sand off some of the top to
let the sub-layers peek through. It
gives the floorcloth a warm, loved
look that's very charming. Re-
cently, I've been inspired by the
colors and designs of modern fab-
rics and quilts."
Weathersfield, Vt.-based Lisa
Curry Mair crafts her rugs in a
200-year-old farmhouse adorned


with many of her creations. She
brings a love of history, children's
book illustrations and mathemat-
ics to her designs.
A mariner's compass, an arti-
choke and a woven, cane-like pat-
tern are among her best-sellers,
and she does custom designs. The
hardest thing to get across, she
says, is how durable the pieces
are, and that's largely due to the
number of "hobby" crafters pro-
ducing inferior product.
"They use lightweight canvas,
cheap paint and finishes. A floor-
cloth in a high-traffic kitchen
should stand up to dogs, kids and
all kinds of abuse," Mair says.


A good heavy floorcloth should
lie flat with no bumps or ripples,
she says. "When I make floor-
cloths for museums, they must
stand up to 30,000 visitors a year
walking on them."
Lucia Blum of Wilmington, N.C.,
gives rugs a folk-art look. "Cat
Nap" features a black and white
cat surrounded by the stuff of cat
dreams: goldfish, birds and mice.
"Bunny" romps on a green field
circled by carrots and radishes.
If you're interested in trying
your hand at the floorcloth craft
yourself, HGTV's website offers
instructions. Mair's website has a
how-to video plus a supplies shop.


JANE
Continued from Page E7

which had never been pruned at my
old nursery farm. Zone 9A has about
10 to 15 frosty winter mornings. Zones
are creeping northward due to climate
change. Plants follow the warming
shift. Average low temperatures from
30 to 40 degrees now range to a diago-
nal line between the Suwanee River
at the Gulf of Mexico to Amelia Island
on the Atlantic seaboard.
My new home was in Zone 8B but
might be 9A now I planted large Simp-
son's Stoppers about 5 feet from the
front corners of the house. Along the
side property lines, I mixed this
species into the evergreen buffer for a
privacy screen. Companion screening
plants include Saltbush, Bacchar-
ishalimnifolia; Loblolly Bay, Gordo-
nialassianthus; Red Cedar, Juniperus
virginiana; Schellings Holly, Ilex vom-
itoria; Wax Myrtle, Morella cerifera
(formerly Myrica c.); Longleaf Pine, Pi-
nuspalustris; Live Oak, Quercusvir-
giniana; Encore Azaleas,
Rhododendron hybrids; dwarf en-
demic Scrub Palmetto, Sabal etonia;
and Sabal Palms, S. palmetto,
Florida's State Tree. A variety of na-
tive and exotic vegetation makes a
good wildlife habitat, providing nest
sites, butterfly nectar and host plants,
wind protection, shelter from rain and
frost, pollen, seeds and fruit, as well as
cover from predators. Add a bird bath
and water dish on the ground to com-
plete the attractive wildlife habitat.
Amend sandy soil with plenty of
humus to retain soil moisture and pro-
vide an ongoing supply of nutrients.
Top the soil with organic mulch of nat-
urally occurring pine needles or leaf
litter to shield roots from the sun, mod-
erate soil temperatures, reduce soil
moisture evaporation and help prevent
weed seed germination. Once estab-
lished, Simpson's Stopper can survive


on natural rainfall, but water weekly in
times of drought, particularly in the dry
months of April and May in Florida.
Fertilizer is unnecessary Pests and dis-
eases are nonexistent.
Plant Simpson's Stopper in full sun
or part shade in well-drained soil con-
taining humus. It remains shorter and
denser in sun, taller and more open in


REALTY GROUP
2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL 34442
352-746-6121 1-800-323-7703
www.TerraVistaRealtyGroup.com


shade. Small, fragrant white flowers
bloom in May, locally, followed by fruit
containing several seeds that mature
orange in August and September.
Crush to easily remove the seeds and
eat the fresh fruit. Dry or freeze the
fruit for later use. Bake into muffins,
mix with cereal, stew into a compote
or cobbler or make a flavorful jam.


Arentwoodpr
REALTY
1624 W. Caroline Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0210


- 6 Months or Moeold


Vill.~6~~~ l~)i c
-.40..
.. ^ ^,^.^


DETACHED VILLA -WOODVIEW VILLAS- 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
.LA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR Home n theSpectacular C[
Open floor plan with large kitchen countertops,tileand carpel
mbership included included
........ ...... $1100 # 1228................................................$1500


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeber12385@gmail.com.


I NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


- 11. MIN
I 6 Of Citrus

Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL

SKEYs "Always There For You"
REAL GAlL COOPER
S mm multimillion Dollar Realtor
.rn... Cell: (352) 634-4346
S Office: (352) 382-1700x309


PLUSH WOODED GREENBELT!
* 2+office/2/2 2000 sqft living
* Extended glassed Florida room
* 4' x 5' walk-in pantry
* Wall of storage cabinets in garage
* Newer dishwasher and microwave
* Home warranty for the buyers
#355730 $99,000


ON AN ACRE OF GORGEOUS OAKS!
* 3/2/3 heated pool home
* Fairview Estates Mitch Underwood builder
* Dual pane windows well for yard
* Remote system for salt pool maintenance
* Large walk-in pantry gas oven range
* Home warranty for the buyers
#351060 $219,000


Complete Package

s199,800
6 Month Bild Time


Nicely maintained villa in Brentwood
Lawn maintenance and Social Club Me
#1267.........................


~E~E~


m-I::lT' Se V 1irta Tours @ w rsaehme uco


....... ....... ...... .


'. .. . .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. T .








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate

Classifieds


'Wi-


To place an ad, call 563-5966


S Classifieds


In Print


S ..... and


f r Online


All


~SF ~F~B -eaa.a~~ Th~e Time
9I 1. ,% SU* *
-1 Mbl Home Mobile Home Mobile HM iI m R/ p' en

r n 1 F In


Bring your fishing
pole!


IINVtKNtess, I.L
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water.
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rosella Court Rentals off
N. Turkey Oak Dr. 2&3
BR mobiles. $450/month
and up, plus utilities. No
pets. 1 yr. lease. 1st &
sec. Call 352-325-1799.
FLORAL CITY
Small 2/1, Includes All
Appl's ideal for singles
or couples, $400/mo
w/lyr lease
352-560-7837
Hernando
Single Wide 2-3 bdrm 2
bath, nice quiet neigh-
borhood, Ig. yard
w/fence, semi-furnished,
no pets, bkgd chk.
$550/mo. 1st & sec.
(352) 419-5603
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $485 mo
352-422-1932
HOMOSASSA
3/2, D/W, 2 AC, $650.
1st Ist sec 207-651-0923
Homosassa 3/2/1
CH/A, V2 Acre, $425.mo
212-2051 or 220-2447
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on lake. Fur-
nished 1 bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1, Seniors Welcome.
(352) 628-2312


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
Mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com

YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Furn.,
New W/D. $600mo
+ $300 dep. 15 min.
from power plant Paul
(407) 579-6123
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre Addition
Partly furn, Huge Deck
$525.mo 352-628-5244

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807


For Sale .*
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2
bath. 2007 Nobility
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18'x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247

INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Village
4/2 From 499 Mo
Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo
Loaded
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down
800-622-2832 x 210


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH.
carport dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925






HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition.
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926


INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964

OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified I


OWN TODAY!





IUW-
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?



4/3/Carport, Pool.....$875
2/1.5/1.................. $650
2/1/Screen Room....$550
2/1 Apts................. $450

3/1.5/1................. $650

2/1.5/1................. $600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010



-ACTION-
I RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Cilrus(ounlyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
146 W Seymeria Dr. (BH).....$675
2/1.5/1 cute home, corner lot
6913 Gladstone Dr (CS)......$825
3/2/2 newer home,open floor plan
7635Greendale ((S)..........$1200
3/2/2 pool,fireplace,close to school
CRYSTAL RIVER
1460 N. Endicott Pt .........$1200
2/2/2 furn.villa Meadowcrest comm.
pool
HOMOSASSA
6944W. Grant St. ..............$725
2/2/1 newer home
6139 S. Royal Dr. ..............$875
2/2/2 Canal side, lanai
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
994 E. Winneka St........... $675
2/1.5 SW on 1 acre!
3529 E.Sapphire Ln.......... $725
2/2/1 canal front AVAIL AUG. 1st!





CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857


CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, fully furnished,
W/D, dishwahser, big
screen tv $695/mo.
352-212-9205
352-212-9337
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen. All Utilities, Ca-
ble included $525 mo.
pet ok 352- 228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









Sugarmill Woods
Rent Special for 2/2
Upscale House in a quiet
area. Call for Details
(352) 564-0314


Commercial
Building
For Rent, located in
Rooks Industrial Park
Homosassa 900 sf
interior is light, bright,
mint cond. Lrg overhead
door, Entry door, back
door, % bath, lighted
parking lot, perfect for
business or storage
$450 mo.
To view please
Call (352) 628-4066



Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, Car Port $825
mo. (352) 613-5655




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
1,& 2 BR. Furn./Unfurn.
Uke New, 352-302-1370
Crystal River
3/2/2 Spacious, New
kitchen, appliances incl.
$850/mo. no util. stone-
housecountry
@gmail.com
(352) 302-7488
Sugarmill Woods
2 master bedrooms!
Ig garage, updated, SS
appl., $875/Mo.
352-302-4057


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Country Living on large
1/2 acre lot. 3 bd. 2 ba
home. Garden area,
fenced area. Well &
Septic-so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
FLORAL CITY
Share a home w/ 5
acres, non-smoker,
non-drinker, $700
month Available Aug. 1
(352) 726-4049


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.Dantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 1/1 cor-
ner lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
1br Iba $550/mo In-
cludes water, garbage &
lawncare. 352-270-7420
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Room, C/H/A
$675 1st mo. FREE
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
Move in special!
Immaculate 2or 3BR,
1BA/1-car 1st last sec.
$575 mo 352-400-1501
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
Citrus Springs 3/2/2
newly remodeled$800
+ Sec. 352 302-8265
CITRUS SPRINGS
A Nice 3/2/2, close to
schools $800. mo.+ sec.
(352) 628-0731
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile firs,
nice area, across rails
to trails $845. mo.No
pets (352) 598-0235
CR/HOM., 3/2/1
RC Elem., CHA, $575.
212-2051 or 220-2447
CRYSTAL RIVER
GOLF COURSE
HOME
3 bedroom. 3 bath. Exec-
utive Home. 7th Fairway.
Plantation Resort.
$2500.00 month.
(plus deposit & last
month)
Owner (239) 896-0123


CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Beautiful, Quaint home
on deepwater Canal
with Dock and storage.
Out door glassed in
Room and Screened
porch on a large lot.
Redone 1960's Cottage
with separate
washer-dryer room and
bathroom with shower.
A Fishing and Boating
Paradise on NW 18th
St. Call 352-794-6716
leave message. 900.00
per month.
Crystal River 2/1,
Duplex CHA, 4496.
212-2051 or 220-2447
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 2/2/2, Inground
Pool, Ist &Sec.
$850/mo. 352-302-6633
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $775 mo
900 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell



CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, Apt. Waterfront
$650. mo. 1st sec. Inclds
Dock. water, trash.
No pets. (352) 563-5004
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Furnished Prime
area, updated, wood
floors, dock, paid $445K
rent $2,000 inc. Ulti.
Steve Latiff, Realtor
352-634-0101
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai. shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & w/d
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
CRYSTAL RIVER
Bdrm w/priv bth. furn
w/TV. All incl plus Cbl &
WiFi. Country Setting,
near town.$400mo. +
dep 794-3295/209-5012
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share my home $85/wk.
includes elect, sat dish
352-563-1465/212-1960




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Beverly Hills
1//1 $29,500
(352) 270-7420


-a
Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K down $495/mo.
(352) 600-8174



FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


RV Resort ESTATE
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.detailsbyowner.com for
pictures and info.
$89,500. 352-843-5441



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275



EQUAL. "USING
OPPORTUNITY


-3
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof,
New appl's. irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must see $29,995 firm
(352) 345-6499
ATTENTION INVES-
TORS! $525/mo cash
flow. 2 BED/2 BATH/1
CAR. Tenant occupied
2+ yrs-wants to stay.
$49,900. 527-1239




HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newer roof & CHA, scr
porch, fenced, gar, good
neighborhood. Reduced
for quick sale at $49,900.
Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


Homiiysas

2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2, Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf.
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down. Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RM* XK
REALTY ONE

-S= 11


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy)
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



Sellers I have
SOLD 13 Homes
in 6 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY. Real Estatel..
(352) 613-3503 it's what I do.
CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath ERA American
Make Offers Realty
352-563-9857 Phone:(352) 726-5855
CITRUS COUNTY Cell:(352) 302-8046
Lake front, spacious Fax:(352) 726-7386
3/2/2, $800. Rent or Email:debinfantine@
Sale (908) 322-6529 yahoo.com

6 -:L S -


REALTY ONE I #1 Employment source is I


HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile carpet,
dbl lot. $700. rent. 1st Ist
sec. 813 908-5550


CUEI4f[U

Clsified


I www.chronicleonline.com r


Ciru


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a
Mo.


H

OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


Home o Finder


Fut Your Orwn Home>
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehon iufinder.com


SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872



SUGARMILL WOODS.
BUILDING LOT
IN OAK VILLAGE
$20K Firm
352- 726-9587
352-228-0357


Waefrn


SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 Ell


I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEING SOLD TOGETHER

r. .. .. I h.. ..1 lh .


-I'1 = 211 $56.900
Call Vich Roor Reallor Associate
352.212. 1926 or housesciitos.- gmai .coin


HORSE PROPERTY
I Jlllllfl i m ] \ 1 1 =ll' h i
,ifI ,.I, Iill .i ll I, I

Call Mal/tha Sn der 352 14768727
Ask lotr ile =355667


uuOarL ISLANU HUME UN Z LUI
* PF, _BA IF i ...1.1 F F
. ,, ,lh h l ,I ,,I ,, ,,, ,,,,, ,, li
F, 1x q. t:1, il Al" ,

Mi 5 = 3I'.: I ONLY $134,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


* _:,F. PATH I ill PI AN I I.ITF
* MIVF IN F-AIl fi', _FFAT F0 IJIJ .
* NF-VVFWE hUUF IJIlIFT NllI.HCIJF.HI]I] I
MI 5 = .hII/, $113,000
nI'I' I ciliIscouni'sold. coim
Jeanne b Wtllaid Pickiel 352 212 3410


WATERFRONT HOME!
..] I I. ].ji .j.* I .iIll it 11. ..1.lI 1' / I I

I.ll 1..- M AKI Mi 5 = ._l::. $66,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


/( .i(, ~i IlilC~II~v.... l ,,l,,lli v. i,.l l ,
I Ii, lii



Mi 5 = 3.' $850,000
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173 cell


UUi EfnrnvE I
p i1l ii .1 I'.i l''' I .1 ,1 I l ,i i ,lill i:iIt
i.lljill: ,I \ll\ 1|1: li l: E I, ill l vihvll ; lll

hin i'l ,j ,: i l l h.. ll vnlll.... l'll. dl
ML 5 = .3 ,3 $119,900
Call Jim Motion at 352 422 2173 cell


nivcnrnum I
Hliijq i i mjl ,ljro 1"lll II... lil ll I ,I lrl J Iv' c
ff', I p,]i; 3 i 1 .,. l [ ,l ,i,;'lf it1 I ,- 11 ,l t Ii I I
Hi 'll i h) i I.ll .|.il. | I
$199,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


RAIN, KEEP COMING!

l II .-l l L.l.. i..J.' ...I 1 j'. .-.I 1
1. 1 11 1 .. I11 -1C1

11- -= ':.':.; $54,900
Call Tim Donovan 352 726 6668


VICTORIAN ERA HOME -
ZONED COMMERCIAL
.... H I .
...... . I I .I I.... F. i. I h... I. ..'


1.1 =- ASKING $168,900
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
View hosting at atrtrra c21patdavis corn
a--







MAGNIFICENT
PINE RIDGE ESTATE

p ih ] l l,.,:li, s, h .p H .illl:

lu i ll I~ .4,l~led enll~an H ..I i i l ml ,,iv I
Mi 5 = l..i7 $395,000
Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072
t'it'n'. sellinctilluscouniiIllnhomes. com


INVERNESS 3/2/2 HOME


.i.I= i .. i., $79,900
C.ll Ch.r/es (re/ll 352 422 2387









COZY WINTER GETAWAY
Fln :p : ,:,inh i .i I Thi I l r,,...

i,dJ., ,. "I I:]II h,,,',-i i ,:.. ,)lj.l Ii ,::, pl.l..:

$38,500
Call Terry Blanco 352 419 9252


3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME
l -ljl l I . lI. h l f.
'- -ll" Ll I ..I .=1 .... II,,
i. ll...l? o v t .. aln i a ... I.-ll... Mi, II'n I. l.
IIlI. l l nm ljllll lL1' H l plll 1 llllllll
IL' = --.i $139,000
I'tI'it. ciiIuscounIl'sold. com
Jeanne b Willaid Pickiel 352 212 3410





(.





WATERFRONT



Mi 5 = 'l $18,000
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202


WATERFRONT!



, 11,I,:I..i ,M'i',t I 1. 1 I ,,' ,,, I,,i I i ..

ONLY $89,900
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 7699


LAKE HOME & ADJACENT
VACANT HOMESITE
F_- ,,ll',,,',, . J I ", ...... ....." I I ..,'
.. .. -.. ... ..., l.
.ir I., I .. ii-i -i' ii ...- .II. .. .
rli.:'= i'i $274,500
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
Vier hosting at ir r''r.c2l1atdawvs.com


E12 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012


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