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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02835
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-21-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02835

Full Text




~sameara


TODAY
& next



93Expect isolated
LOW thunderstorms as the
87 drier air leaves.
PAGE A4


Republican
rally today
at C.R. mail
The Citrus County
Republican Party is
having a campaign
rally from 4:30 to
7:30 p.m. Saturday
at Crystal River Mall.
Candidates for
local offices will be
on hand to greet the
public. Everyone is



esry oadworkone


West Cypress Boule-
vard in Sugarmill
Woods, the road be-
tween Pine Drive
and Pine Street
(across from the Cy-
press Run condo-
miniums) will be
closed through Tues-
day, July 24. The
road is scheduled to
reopen Wednesday,
July 25.
While traveling on
W. Cypress Boule-
vard, the detour will
take motorists
around the construc-
tion using Pine Drive
and Pine Street.
For more informa-
tion, call the Citrus
County Water Re-
sources Department
at 352-527-7650.
Child with
cancer gets
Disney trip
TOLEDO, Ohio -
A4-year-old cancer
patient from Ohio
who was denied a
Make-A-Wish trip to
Disney World by her
father will get to go
after all.
mMcKanna May
mother said so many
donations have
poured in during the
last few days that
they'll be able to pay
for the trip themselves.
Online donations
topped $11,000 on
Friday.
The girl's father ini-
tially refused to sign
off on the Make-A-
Wish trip because he
said she was in re-
mission and the trips
should go to children
who are sicker than
his daughter.
McKenn Ive i
Haskins neri soeno.
She had the trip post-
poned twice while she
tasufdrn itaeat-
Her last treatment
was about month

-From staff and wire reports



TOMORROW:
Where's the
candidate?
Robert Goocher is
running a stealth
campaign for state
House Distict 34.
/Sunday


Comics .. .. .. ..C8
Community .. .. ..C6
Crossword .. .. ..C7
Editorial .. .. .. ..A8
Entertainment. .. .B6
Horoscope .. .. ..B6
Lottery Numbers ..B4
Lottery Payouts . ..B6
Movies .. .. .. .. ..C8
Obituaries .. .. .. .A5
Classifieds .. .. .. .C9
TV Listings .. ..C7



6 845178 12110025 5.


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOLUME 117 ISSUE 349


sHEMIR WILES
Staff Wr-iter
The regional unemploy-
ment rate inched back
above 10 percent for the
month of June, an increase
officials said was not unex-
pected as the state entered
its "spring slump."


According to numbers re-
leased Friday by the
Florida Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity (DEO),
unemployment rose from
9.7 percent to 10.2 percent
in the Workforce Connec-
tion region, which includes
Citrus, Marion and Levy
counties.


from May. The rate was 10.2
percent in Marion County,
up 0.4 percent, and 9.7 per-
cent in Levy County, up 0.6
percent.
According to a news re-
lease from Workforce Con-
nection, CEO Rusty
Skinner said the increase
reflects end-of-the-year


cuts in education-support
employees.
"It's another month that
we're bouncing around
here, that's an indicator of
the economy," he said.
When it comes to measur-
ing the area's economic

See .Page A2


aTehrees yrs si ce te
states have yet to
regainnthe jobs they've


In Citrus County, June's
unemployment rate was
10.3 percent, up 0.5 percent


Associated Press
Tom Sullivan, center, embraces family members Friday outside Gateway High School, in Denver, Colo., where he had been searching frantically
for his son Alex, who celebrated his 27th birthday by going to see "The Dark Knight Rises." A gunman opened fire at a midnight screening of the
movie in Aurora, Colo., killing 12 people


Suspect caught
Associated Press

AURORA, Colo. As the new
Batman movie played on the
screen, a gunman dressed in
black and wearing a helmet, body
armor and a gas mask stepped
through a side door. At first he
was just a silhouette, taken by
some in the audience for a stunt
that was part of one of the sum-
mer's most highly anticipated
films.
But then, authorities said, he
threw gas canisters that filled the
packed suburban Denver theater
with smoke, and, in the confusing
haze between Hollywood fantasy
and terrifying reality, opened fire


ajier 12 killed 59 wounded in movie theater shJooting


as people screamed and dove for
co east 12 people were killed
and 59 wounded in one of the
deadliest mass shootings in re-
cent U.S. history.
"He looked like an assassin
ready to go to war," said Jordan
Crofter, a moviegoer who was un-
hurt in the attack early Friday,
about a half-hour after the spe-
cial midnight opening of "The
Dark Knight Rises."
The gunman, identified by po-
lice as 24-year-old James Holmes,
used a military-style semi-auto-
matic rifle, a shotgun and a pistol,
stopping only to reload.
See /Page A2


Suspect saarmn

Boobf-trappea
Associated Press

AURORA, Colo. Colorado firefighters
are monitoring an apartment building for
gases in an effort to determine what chem-
icals one of its residents might have used
to booby trap the place in case the ma-
terials go off, authorities said Eriday.
The resident, James Holmes, 24, is the
suspect in a mass shooting early Friday at Holmres
a movie theater about four miles awYay. SUSpect in
See Page A9 Shooting.


1McPheeters:

New views

CHRIS VAN ORMER
staf wr-iter
Offering a different perspective, Renee
Christopher-McPheeters lends new ideas to
familiar issues.
"I've asked the commission-
ers to vote for senior home-
stead exemptions," said
Christopher-McPheeters, a Re-
publican candidate for District
~ ~ 1, discussing how she would
improve the economy and add
jobs. "Most counties have
Renee them. Seniors go out of the
~christoper-e county when theycan'tget that
Ivicheeershere. It would help the real es-
tate market to have that."
Christopher-McPheeters, who lost the 2008
See Page A5

m WHAT: County Commission a WHO:
District 1. Christ
icm
M COVERS: All of Citrus County. iu


Republicans Renee
opher-McPheeters,
Bent Dennis Damato, Ron


Page A5


Kitchen: City tips

for county budget

CHRIS VAN ORMER
staf wr-iter
Crystal River's budget offers tips to county
spending, according to Ron Kitchen, District 1
candidate.
A refinanced bond debt will
save Crystal River residents
S almost$1 million.
., "If our ideas can save Crys-
tal River $1 million, that's
what I say we apply to the
county," Crystal River Council-
A / man Kitchen said. "We have a
Ron declining millage rate and in-
Kitchen creasing services. We gave our
employees a 3 percent raise last year with low-
ering taxes."
Kitchen also has been on the city's zoning
See Page A5

4 m SALARY: $56,714.
ll otes HTERM: Four years.
party.


aWHEN: Universal Aug. 1
primary wins election; a
may vote regardless of


Special section: Back to School 2012-13 /Inside


CITRI.JSl COUNT







www.chronicleonline.om


Jobless rate jumps slightly


Chaos in Colorado


Election 2012C~OUNlTY ~COMMtVISS~ClIO DISTRICT~ 1


Damato: Proud of


past record
CHRIS VAN ORMER
stafS writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Serving twice as the
chairman of the county commission since
elected in 2004, Dennis Damato, Republican
incumbent for District 1, has
the seniority to go along with
his desire to serve another
term.
"I have a lot of unique expe-
rience that not a lot of the
other commissioners have,"
Damato said.
Currently, Damato is chair-
Dennis man of the Withlacoochee
DamatoPlanning Council, chairman of
the Withlacoochee Regional Water Supply Au-
thority twice, Citrus County Port Authority












































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during the month of july and receive a custom

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Don Mayo. Larger photo prints up to 20x25

are available by calling 352-795-DUCK((3825).

AII contributions are accepted by CHECK ONLY **,

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Custom photo prints are available at the Citrus County

Chromicle in Crystal River. Please watch this ad all month for
ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS to make your donation and receive

the Don Mayo "FREEDOM" print.


Special thanks to VisualSports.org for their printing the custom
photo for the Key ~Training Center.


A2 sATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

One shot in the mouth and the
other one crying. He asked them if
they were OK. "Help us. Help us,
please," he recalled them saying.
Those who knew Holmes de-
scribed him as a shy, intelligent
person raised in California by par-
ents who were active in their well-
to-do suburban neighborhood in
San Diego. Holmes played soccer
at Westview High School and ran
cross-country before going to
college.
Holmes graduated from Uni-
versity of California, Riverside,
in the spring of 2010 with a
bachelor's degree in neuro-
science, a school spokesman
said. Mai said the mother told
him Holmes couldn't find a job
after earning a master's degree
and returned to school.
In 2011, he enrolled in the Ph.D.
neuroscience program at the Uni-
versity of Colorado-Denver but
was in the process of withdrawing,
a university spokeswoman said.
On Friday morning, police es-
corted Holmes' father, a manager
of a software company, from their
home while his mother, a nurse,
stayed inside, receiving visitors
who came to offer support.
Holmes also has a younger sister.


would not confirm that informa-
tion, but did say he had spoken to
Kelly. The two used to work to-
gether in New York. Asked
whether Holmes had makeup to
look like the Joker, Oates said:
"That to my knowledge is not true."
It was the worst mass shooting
in the U.S. since the Nov. 5, 2009,
attack at Fort Hood, Texas. An
Army psychiatrist was charged
with killing 13 soldiers and civil-
ians and wounding more than two
dozen others.
It was the deadliest in Colorado
since the Columbine High School
massacre in suburban Denver in
1999, when two students killed 12
classmates and a teacher and
wounded 26 others before killing
themselves.
The new Batman movie, the last
in the trilogy starring Christian
Bale, opened worldwide Friday
with midnight showings in the
U.S. The plot has the villain Bane
facing Bale's Caped Crusader with
a nuclear weapon that could de-
stroy all of fictional Gotham.
The shooting prompted officials
to cancel the red-carpet premiere
in Paris, and some U.S. movie the-
aters stepped up security for day-
time showings.


The attack began shortly after
midnight at the multiplex in Au-
rora, an urban community on Den-
ver's east side. Audience members
said they thought it was part of the
movie, or some kind of stunt asso-
ciated with it.
A federal law enforcement offi-
cial said Holmes bought a ticket to
the show, went into the theater as
part of the crowd and propped
open an exit door as the movie
was playing. The suspect then
donned protective ballistic gear
and opened fire, the official said,
speaking on condition of
anonymity to discuss the ongoing
investigation.
At some point, the gunman ap-
peared to have stepped outside
because several witnesses saw
him come through the door.
"All I saw is the door swinging
open and the street lights behind,
and you could see a silhouette,"
said Crofter, who was sitting on
the left side of the theater and to-
ward the front.
Sylvana Guillen said the gunman,
clad in dark clothing, appeared at
the front of the theater as the char-
acter Catwoman appeared in the
movie. Then they heard gunshots
and smelled smoke from a canister


he was carrying.
As she and her friend, Misha
Mostashiry, ran to the exit, Guillen
said, they saw a man slip in the
blood of a wounded woman he
was trying to help.
Oates said the gunman wore a
gas mask and a ballistic helmet and
vest, as well as leg, groin and throat
protectors. He said among the guns
was an AR-15 rifle and that the
gunman used two gas canisters.
"I thought it was showmanship.
I didn't think it was real," Seeger
said. She said she was in the sec-
ond row, about four feet from the
gunman, when he pointed a gun at
her face. "I was just a deer in
headlights. I didn't know what to
do," she said.
Then she ducked to the ground
as the gunman shot people seated
behind her.
Seeger said she began crawling
toward an exit when she saw a girl
of about 14 "lying lifeless on the
stairs." She saw a man with a bul-
let wound in his back and tried to
check his pulse, but "I had to go. I
was going to get shot."
Moviegoer Eric Hunter and his
friends made their way to an exit.
When he opened the door, he
said,he saw two teenage girls -


community, he said baby
steps are still being made to
rsd reo ehe lhocalldecomomy,
improvement in August.
Across the region in June,
the labor force dwindled by
151 to 205,570, the number
of unemployed increased by
973 and the number of those
with jobs dropped by 1,124.
In Citrus County, the labor
force decreased by 474 to
55,314, the number of em-
ployed fell by 716 to 49,608
and those without jobs in-
creased by 242 to 5,706.
Florida's seasonally ad-
justed June unemployment
rate was 8.6 percent, the
11th highest in the nation,
and the United States rate
was 8.2 percent.
ChroniclereporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


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S 0 H TIN
Continued from Page Al

The suspect marched up the
aisle in the stadium-style theater,
picking off those who tried to flee,
witnesses said. Authorities said he
hit 71 people. One of them was
struck in an adjacent theater by
gunfire that went through the wall.
"He would reload and shoot and
anyone who would try to leave
would just get killed," said Jen-
nifer Seeger, adding that bullet
casings landed on her head and
burned her forehead.
Within minutes, frantic 911 calls
brought some 200 police officers,
ambulances and emergency crews
to the theater. Holmes was cap-
tured in the parking lot.
Authorities gave no motive for
the attack. The FBI said there was
no indication of ties to any terror-
ist groups.
In New York City, Police Com-
missioner Raymond Kelly said: "It
clearly looks like a deranged indi-
vidual. He has his hair painted
red. He said he was the Joker, ob-
viously the enemy of Batman."
Aurora Police Chief Dan Oates


RTE
Continued from Page Al

recovery, both Skinner and
DEO's chief economist Re-
becca Rust agreed people
should look at the overall
trend of the numbers, not the
month-to-month variations.
For example, the region's
June rate is 2.2 percentage
points lower than last year's
rate of 12.4 percent when
there were 25,749 jobless
and 3.1 percentage points
lower than June 2010 when
27,108 were out of work.
John Siefert, executive di-
rector of the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council, said Friday he
agreed with Skinner's ex-
planation of the "June
bounce" in unemployment.
But from what he sees in the


["~;


corru cdi llar4 ouv y r


www.chronickonline.com
1 624 N. IMeadowerest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429
























































































































UllSOlved MYvST ERI ES


mlalZo; New witnesses sought in murder of Debra Sue Owens


j _Li 11/ _1


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


n display
battling for control of Citrus
Memorial hospital.
Smallridge, chairman of
the hospital board, said he
has heard suggestions that
he sought appointment to
the CCHB to gain a foothold
in the commission race. He
said that was untrue.
"Why would you get in the
middle of this ... mess to run
for county commission?" he
said.
aDistrict 5 candidate
Charles Poliseno said he
would work to preserve the
environment and promote
ecotourism as a revenue
source.
SDistrict 1 challenger
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
went after both the incum-
bent, Dennis Damato, and
challenger Ron Kitchen, a
Crystal River councilman.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Wr-iter
CITRUS HILLS Candi-
dates brought their "A"
games to a political forum
Thursday night at a packed
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club.
About 250 people at-
tended the forum to hear
candidates whose names
are on the primary ballot
present their platforms in
five-minute speeches.
County commission can-
didates, in particular, are
hoping to elbow their way to
the front for races that will
be decided in the Aug. 14
primary.
District 3 challenger
Shannon Heathcock admit-
ted his mailer claiming the
county's total debt at $182.8


million was incorrect, as a
Chronicle story pointed out
Thursday.
Heathcock said he would
replace his total with in-
cumbent Joe Meek's num-
bers, which were derived
from the Citrus County
Clerk of Courts. They show
the debt at roughly $110 mil-
lion about $6.2 million
less than four years ago
when Meek took office.
Heathcock said that's still
too high. He blamed com-
missioners for poor spend-
ing decisions.
"Because of all these
things, we're going to have
our taxes raised this year,"
he said.
Meek, however, said the
board has cut spending by
more than $40 million in
four years.


"I'll continue to work to
make sure our house is in
Order," he said.
Other forum highlights:
SCommission District 5
candidate Scott Adams said
he's running to give back to
his community.
"This isn't the best job I'll
ever have in my life," he said.
SDistrict 5 candidate
Theodora "Teddi" Rusnak,
past president of the Citrus
County Council, urged
transparency in county
government.
"There seems to be too
many times there are pre-
selected winners in county
decisions," she said.
SMichael Smallridge, an-
other District 5 candidate,
spent much of his time ex-
plaining why the Citrus
County Hospital Board is


1.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Harry Rainey Jr. is not doing Tai Chi at Lake Hernando. Instead he is practicing another hobby. Rainey was preparing to brace himself against
the tree to shoot a video of the lake to send to a fellow metal-detecting friend. Rainey plans to come back when the weather cools to see what
treasures he can find in the lake's swimming area. "That water is 84 or 85 degrees and it's like hunting in a sauna," he said Friday. "You can
get heat exhaustion even if you're in the water." Rainey lives in Minneola and said he will post the video on YouTube.





TruStees say they must protect hospital's debt


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Wr-iter


Trustees had a budget
workshop Er~iday morning at
the Masonic Building in
downtown Inverness.
Finance Director Harry
Kilgore said the Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation,
which oversees Citrus Me-
morial hospital on a lease
arrangement with the
CCHB, expects to lose $5.8
million this year and $7.2
million next year
Kilgore said next year's
projections assume the CCHB
will provide $2 million for
indigent care to the hospital.
Even though the CCHB budg-
ets $2 million, it has spent


less than $900,000 each of
the past two years and has
sent no money to the hospi-
tal from this year's budget.
The CCHB levies a tax rate
of .0245 mills, or about $24.50
for many homeowners.
Along with budgeting for
indigent care, the CCHB also
budgets $1 million to help
the foundation with capital
expenditures and $2 million to
help pay down hospital debt.
CCHB Chairman Michael
Smallridge said the board
should eliminate its hospi-
tal subsidy except where
necessary because of the
foundation's dire budget


predictions.
The CCHB has an obliga-
tion to help pay for charity
care and debt, but the exact
amount is up to the trustees,
board attorney Bill Grant said.
He also said if the founda-
tion were to default on bond
payments, the hospital
would revert back to trustee
oversight.
Smallridge said the CCHB
should cover its public pay-
ments on the bond in case
the hospital slips further in
its budget projections.
"I'm probably being para-
noid about the worst-case
scenario," he acknowledged.


Priselac, who was an ad-
visory member of the hospi-
tal foundation before his
appointment to the CCHB,
said Smallridge's concern
was well-founded.
"How are we going to han-
dle the situation if it is pre-
sented?" Priselac said. "We
need to be prepared."
The CCHB scheduled an-
other budget workshop for
9 a.m. Monday, July 30, in
Grant's law office confer-
ence room.
Chronicle reporter M~ike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


INVERNESS The Cit-
rus County Hospital Board
did Friday what it hadn't
done in more than three
months: conduct a meeting.
With Gov Rick Scott's ap-
pointment of Robert
Priselac to the board of
trustees, the five-member
board now has three mem-
bers, giving it a quorum to
meet and conduct business.
There is no word on when
Scott may fill the final two
slots. One has remained
open for longer than a year.


Winn W~ebb, who is seek-
ing the GOP nomination for
Citrus County Sheriff, said
when he mentioned a 72 per-
cent salary increase over two
years at the sheriff's office, he
meant Fire and Rescue's
budget for salaries and bene-
fits went up by that figure in
the past couple of years. He
said he was wondering where
that money came from. Fire
and Rescue merged with the
sheriff's office last fall. Prior to
the merger, fire services was
under cou nty control.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office received a call from
an off-duty Florida Highway Patrol
trooper that two individ-
uals had come by his
residence and reported
they found a body in the
woods. 6
Deputies immedi-
ately responded to the ..
residence and con-
tacted the man and
woman who made the
discovery. The couple Lee Al~
said they had been U S
walking their dogs off
Trail 11 of the Withla- MYST
coochee State Forest
near County Road 480 when they
observed what appeared to be a
human body lying in the brush. The
man then led the deputies to the lo-


cation, where the body of a white
female was found in the brush just
off the trail.
Investigation at the scene re-
vealed the deceased was
the victim of gunshot
wounds, and the autopsy
would later classify the
death as a homicide. De-
tectives working the
case identified the vic-
tim as 41-year-old Debra
Sue Owens, of 5514 S.
Cast Point, Homosassa.
xander Mrs. Owens' activities
,LVED during the days leading
up to the discovery of
ERIES her body were tracked
by detectives. The last
time they were able to account for
her whereabouts was on the
evening of Sept. 25, 2002.
Mrs. Owens was going through a


identifying and solving the murder
of Debra Sue Owens. Any piece of
information, no matter how
insignificant, may be the key to solv-
ing this homicide. Contact
CrimeStoppers of Citrus County by
calling 888-ANY-TIPS, texting the
word CITRUS plus your tip to
274637 or visiting crime stoppers
citrus.com. You may be eligible to
receive a cash reward and you can
remain anonymous.


The Unsolved Mysteries
column will appear weekly on
Saturday highlighting cold case,
unsolved burglary or crime.
This column is submitted by the
Citrus County Sheriff 's Office.
Retired sheriff 's office Detective
Lee Alexander is a volunteer with
the CCSO Cold Case Unit.


VICTIM: Debra
Sue owens.
AGE: 41.
CAUSE OF
DEATH:
Homicide -
gunshot wound.
DESCRIPTION:
W/F; 5'2", 115 |bs.,
brown hair & eyes.


Debra
Sue owens


divorce at the time of her murder.
She was separated from her hus-
band and living at an undisclosed
location other than her primary
address.
Detectives currently working on
the case are following new leads
and are looking for additional wit-
nesses to close this investigation.
Detectives need your help in


e


Page A3 SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


LOCAL


THE STAErun T Candidates put platforms or


at forum

"The county is in debt be-
cause of the spending habits
of the incumbent over the
years," she said.
Damato did not attend the
forum. He sent a letter stat-
ing the Withlacoochee Re-
gional Planning Council, of
which he is chairman, met
Thursday night.
SKitchen fired right back
at Chri stopher-McPheeters.
"When you have nothing
to offer, the best thing you
can do is attack other
things," he said.
Kitchen encouraged vot-
ers to compare credentials.
"You will be the purpose
of my work," he said, "and
not an interruption of it."
Chronicle reporter M~ike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Citrus County

Pet adoption event
today in Homosassa
The public is invited to a
pet adoption event from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July
21, at Village Cadillac Toyota,
2431 U.S. 19, Homosassa.
Pets will be available for
adoption from various rescue
organizations as well as Cit-
rus County Animal Services.
These organizations are look-
ing for good homes for home-
less animals
Donations of various sup-
plies and cash are appreci-
ated and will be accepted at
this event. Needed items in-
clude laundry detergent,
paper towels, dog treats (no
rawhide), harnesses of all
sizes, dog toys and dog beds
of all sizes. For information,
call 352-628-5100.
TOO FAR to hear from
SWFWMD official
The guest speaker at TOO
FAR's July 26 general meet-
ing will be Roy Mazur. Mazur
is bureau chief of operations
and land management for the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District, as well
as administrator of the dis-
trict's Surplus Land Program.
The meeting will begin at
7 p.m. at the East Citrus
Community Center on State
Road 44, about 4 miles east
of Inverness. TOO FAR
meetings are open to the
public.
Call TOO FAR at 352-
726-5004 with any questions.
Republican club won't
meet this month
The North Suncoast Re-
publican Club will not hold a
general meeting in July due
to annual vacation schedules.
The club will participate in the
"Republican Rally" from 4:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Satur-
day, July 21, at the Crystal
River Mall. For further infor-
mation, visit www.NSRC-gop.
com or call Bill Connery at
352-382-0811 or Bruce Bryn
at 352-503-7375.

Tallahassee

Feds expediting
expansion at seaports
The federal government is
expediting review and permit-
ting for port expansion projects
in Miami and Jacksonville.
The White House an-
nounced the decision Thurs-
day as part of President

Bac cbayma sWoef ECnan't

neers is completing a feasibil-
ity study on deepening the
Jacksonville port's channel
so it can handle bi ger ships
The Corps also is review-
ing a proposal for a new in-
termodal container facility at
the Jacksonville port.
Work already has begun
on deepening the Miami
port's channel because the
state advanced money to
cover the federal share of the
dredging.
Miami port director Bill
Johnson said he hopes the
decision to expedite permit-
ting is a signal the White
House intends to include the
project in the federal budget
for the 2014 fiscal year.


In search of hidden treasure


g P
f


4(





















































eg lnotices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


e .i~:i CitV Of Crystal River A5................


SCitfUS County School Board ............A9


"C Fidtiti0US Name NotiCOS 11111111111I1IIII1


NotiCO to Creditors/Administration, ............11


ii iiiiil


95 741 NA 1 93 75 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK ,E~ls aly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 78
As the drier aid mn place slowly leaves,
IIexpect isolae tun esormS
pr SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 79
Rain chances spike to 50% as moisture returnS
\ \\ Y\ \bringing numerous showers and storms.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNINa
High: 90 Low: 78
Expect thunderstorms on Monday.

ALMANAC


SUNSET TONIGHT ...............8:28 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:46 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................9:08 A M.
MOONSET TODAY ............................ 9:59 PM.


It's Run for the Money Week,
with runners taking turns cover-
ing the 180 miles between the
Capitol in Tallahassee and the
Key Training Center campus in
Lecanto. While the grueling jour-
ney is to raise awareness about
the developmentally disabled, it
is especially significant in that it
brings attention to the need for
donations to cover the expenses
of Key clients who don't receive
government support.


Melissa Walker, Key
Training Center assistant
executive director
MYTH: There is no hope for
the developmentally challenged.
They suffer life-long, and we
should feel sorry for them.
FACT: There is abundant
evidence that the developmen-
tally disabled are more like us


CH CLE
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Report a news tip:
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A4 sATURDA1, JULY 21, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


H Day Six will begin at the
Citrus/Levy county line where
runners cross over the Cross-
Florida Barge Canal and run
through the City of Crystal

RiTeHIS DAYIN HISTORY:
2007
The fire engine rounded the
corner, lights and sirens signal-
ing the finish. The runners,
hand in hand, jogged through
the "Run for the Money" ban-
ner. Then the dark clouds in
the sky opened and provided
much-needed relief for the
sweaty participants. Despite
the sun shower, supporters
stood along the road, clapping
and cheering.
MYTH: Persons who are
severely and profoundly de-
velopmentally disabled must
be locked away in institutions
for their own and society's
safety.
FACT: As society embraces
persons with developmental
disabilities, it has been proven
the most effective environment
to learn and develop in is one
that is in the community and
which offers a family-like at-
mosphere of caring and
nurturing.


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. North
Carolina utilities regulators
said Friday they will con-
tinue their investigation
into whether they were in-
tentionally misled by execu-
tives and directors
assembling the country's
largest electric company
The North Carolina Utili-
ties Commission ended
three days of hearings Fri-
day after testimony from
two directors of Charlotte-
based Duke Energy Corp,
which finalized its takeover
of Raleigh-based Progress
EnTeg cInep on Jul 2.dfra


year and a half that the com-
bined company would be
headed by former Progress
CEO Bill Johnson. But
within hours after the deal
was done, Johnson was out
and Duke CEO Jim Rogers
was again the top executive.
The commission questioned
both men under oath, as
well as Duke directors Ann
Maynard Gray and Michael
Browning. ?Two members of
Progress Energy's former
board who became direc-
tors of the expanded Duke
Energy also testified.
"We will proceed with ad-
ditional phases of the inves-
tig ion,'ns dw Co msion


than different; that they need
- just as we all do love, joy,
activity, a chance to grow and
progress; and a chance to be-
come independent. Research
shows that 89 percent of men-
tally challenged are only mildly
delayed. This means given the
appropriate opportunity, they
can live and thrive in their own


communities and lead happy,
productive and useful lives as
full citizen partners. The inclu-
sion of those with disabilities
into our society should be done
not out of charity but to respect
them as any other fellow
human being.
Chet Cole, Key Training
Center executive director


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Wr-iter

CRYSTAL RIVER -A 13
-year-old was in custody Eri-
day, accused of sexual bat-
tery and lewd and lascivious
molestation of a 9-year-old,
according to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
The male teen was ar-
rested Thursday after an
adult caregiver reported the
alleged crimes to authori-
ties and interviews were
conducted with the victim
and suspect, according to
the arrest affidavit.
In the report, the teen is


accused of violence, such
as punching and use of a
pillow to obstruct breathing
to coerce the girl into sub-
mitting to inappropriate
sexual actions, according
the report. The girl report-
edly told investigators the
teen threatened to "hurt
her real bad" if she ever
told. The girl, however, did
tell, and the teen was ar-
rested and transported to
the Juvenile Assessment
Center.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


/poTUrSu


cuNr y


Dattna Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Ginesvilled

Jackso nvilIle
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts

pc
ts
ts
ts


C t

Ocala
Orlando
Pnsacola

Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F"'cast
ts
ts

ts
ts
ts
ts


Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. A few thunder-
storms will be possible today.


Location LKThu LV SFri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.82 30.96 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.20 35.22 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 36.97 37.01 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.39 40.42 42.40
Levels reported In feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood. the en
annuau efluod which hah aw4e recent hance ofnbae ng equaled ro ecedeed Ineantoone year Thosd tae I
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 9374
Record 100/66
Normal 9271
Mean temp. 84
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION* 0.0i.

Total for the month 4.55 in.
Total for the year 32.17 in.
Normal for the year 28.31 in.
UV INDEX: 11
0 mniml 1 + rh d-6 moderate,
BALROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.11 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 58%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Grasses, Chenopods
Today's count: 2.8/12
Sunday's count: 3.4
Monday's count: 3.0
ALIR QUALLITY
Friday was moderate with pollutants
mainly particulates.


H ,
n*r ~


- r


h,-
-: 708
n Juneau ?
od .eoi\"


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City FriLaPcp. F~c tu aL
Albany 74 64 pc 83 61
Albuquerque 94 69 pc 96 66
Asheville 82 68 .10 ts 79 67
Atatc City 776.42 ts 79
Austin 96 75 pc 98 74
Baltimore 79 70 .20 sh 76 71
Billings 91 75 ts 95 64
Birmingham 88 75 .11 ts 89 74
Boise 98 70 s 93 60
Boston 71 66 s 78 63
Buffalo 74 63 .06 pc 81 66
Burlington, VT 78 52 pc 85 61
Charleston, SC 92 76 pc 90 76
Charleston, WV 78 70 .01 pc 84 67
Charlotte 93 73 .36 ts 86 72
Chicago 81 71 s 87 75
Cincinnati 81 72 .20 pc 86 66
Cleveland 75 69 pc 78 70
Columbia, SC 93 75 ts 87 73
Columbus, OH 78 73 .13 s 85 65
Concord, N.H. 76 53 s 81 51
Dallas 10577 .10 pc 103 77
roines 106 pc 102 6
Detroit 82 66 s 83 70
El Paso 91 71 pc 98 77
Evansville, IN 91 73 pc 90 69
Harrisburg 73 66 .11 c 76 64
Hartford 70 64 .29 s 82 60
Houston 94 79 pc 95 76
Ind anapolis 8 psc 896
Las Veas 103 82 pc 106 84
siteA soc 18 .09 pc 10 7
Louisville 89 73 .44 pc 91 70
rnmph s 107 pc 967
Minneapeoeis 87 67 pc88 72
Mbleomer 1 .04 t 7
Nash ille 91 70 1.40 pc 90 71
KEY TO CONDITIONS: o~oloudyi dr~drizzlei
f~fairi h~hazyi po~partly cloudy r~raini
rs~rainisnow mixi s~sunnyi sh~showersi
sn~snowi ts~thunderstormsi w~windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Oiy FridL cp FSatuvday
New Orleans 81 71 3.46 ts 91 76
New York City 72 61 .46 pc 78 67
Norfolk 91 75 .02 ts 85 73
Ok aoma City 109 78 pc 14 5
Palm Springs 110 81 ts 109 83
Philadelphia 73 66 .26 c 79 64
Phoenix 109 86 ts 105 87
Pittsburgh 73 70 .51 pc 82 64
Portland, ME 76 56 s 75 61
Portland, Ore 72 62 .04 pc 78 57
Providence, R.I. 69 64 .16 s 80 62
Raleigh 95 74 .14 ts 88 73
Rapid City 103 65 pc 94 70
Reno 93 58 s 97 64
Rochester, NY 74 66 c 82 66
Sacramento 94 57 s 101 63
St. Louis 86 75 pc 98 75
St. Ste. Marie 81 56 pc 80 60
Salt Lake City 95 70 pc 94 74
San Antonio 94 75 pc 98 73
San Diego 79 67 pc 74 65
San Francisco 71 57 pc 71 54
Svn~nah .60 75 p 2
Spokane 85 66 .23 pc 82 56
Syracuse 79 62 pc 87 65
Topeka 98 69 s 105 76
Washington 82 74 .10 sh 77 74
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Borrego Springs, Calif. LOW 37
Angel Fire, N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SO LUNAR TABLES
DALTE DALY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/21 SATURDAY 7:56 1:45 8:20 2:08
7/22 SUNUDAY 8:49 2:37 9:13 3:01
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


L


JUIY 28


O
AUG. 1


AUG.S


SA\TURDA\Y Lisbon
CITY HILISKY London
mt redom d44i eic City
Athens 101/76/s Montreal
eiring 6961/5722/ts Mo cow
Bermuda 87/79/pc Rio
Cairo 95/75/s Rome
Calgary 74/51/s Sydney
Havana 88/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 92/82/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 89/71/s Warsaw


83/67/s
70/53/sh

84/68/pc

74/62/s
88/68/pc
61/47/pc
79/70/sh
83/69/pc
65/49/c


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City HighlLow HighlLow
Chassahowitzka* 8:14 a/3:44 a 7:43 p/3:45 p
Crystal River"" 6:35 a/1:06 a 6:04 p/1:07 p
Withlacoochee* 4:22 a/10:55 a 3:51 p/11:27 p
Homosassa"* 7:24 a/2:43 a 6:53 p/2:44 p


***At Mason s Creek
Sunday
HighlLow HighlLow
8:42 a/4:17 a 8:27 p/4:27 p
7:03 a/1:39 a 6:48 p/1:49 p
4:50 a/11:37 a 4:35 p/~-
7:52 a/3:16 a 7:37 p/3:26 p


Duk HnerH k E




probe still on


Teen ccusd of



child molestation


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER

PR OP HI L30 NP


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK


Gulf water
temperature

87O
Taken at Aripeka


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For mor nn rmao hel tlridsDlvesaon of Forhestr at (352) 74-677.Weorbm re
http://fla me.fl-dof.com/fi re weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-

Qe tons concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.























































































SuMnlrSQG


CKIT HEN
Continued from Page Al

board, community redevel-
opment agency and been
elected mayor: He served on
the Workforce Florida
board and currently chairs
the Citrus County Trans-
portation Planning
Organization.
He also has served on the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council. President
and CEO of Barbaron Inc.,
one of 334 certified golf
course builders in the
United States. Kitchen has
been a county resident for
25 years.
His dedication to win-
ning, he said, is shown by
the length of his campaign.
"Two years ago, I started
my campaign," Kitchen
said. "I've been going
around listening to what
people had to say"
People, Kitchen said,


Funeral Home With Crematory
HELEN MOORE
Private Arrangements
JACK SHAY
Service: Mon. 2:00 PM
Florida National Cemetery
HARRY KNOTT
Service: Sat. 10:00 AM Chapel
Burial: Mon. 12:30 PM
Florida National Cemetery
SUSAN BECK
Private Arrangements
LAWRlENCE MOLFETTO
Pending
726-8323 000COTI


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 A5


Obituarie

Margaret
Brown, 81
CITRUS SPRINGS
Margaret Ann Brown,
81, of Citrus Springs, died
Wednesday, July 18, at
Woodland Terrace in Her-
nando. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation in In-
verness is handling
arrangements.

Lawrence
Molfetto, 58
THURS DAY
Lawrence M. Molfetto,
58, of Inverness, died
Thursday, July 19. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home, In-
verness, Fla., is in charge
of arrangements.


OBITUARIES
m Chronicle policy permits
free and paid obituaries.

a Oeeuadries hmuhst be

fue ocme roreo
arrangements.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mil-
itary. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
a Deadline is 3 p.m.
for obituaries to ap-
pear in the next day's
edition.
m Email obits@
chronicleonline.com,
fax to 352-563-3280
or call 352-563-5660
for details.



10 flate 10lll

' In M818ry" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @chronicleonline com
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason @chronicleonline *com


State BRIEF

Lawyer to
compete as
Hemi g a
KEY WEST A Florida
attorney who was denied a
motion to recess a federal
murder trial in order to
compete in an Ernest
Hemingway look-alike
competition in Key West
has realized his desire, de-
spite the judge's ruling.
Frank Louderback, of St
Petersburg, competed in
Friday's second preliminary
round of the "Papa" Hem-
ingway Look-Alike Contest
because his client pleaded
guilty July 9, the day the
trial began.
Louderback is among
140 stocky bearded men
being judged on their like-
ness to Hemingway during
the author's later years.
The event is being staged
at Sloppy Joe's Bar.
-From wire reports








:(Ill


http://www.chronicleonline.com/su mmersplash ~~FO

Call 352-563-5655 or after 5 pm 352-563-3295

I H~~ew S~ubscrip~tion or Gif Subscr~iption


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


On the issue of developing port
on the barge canal, Christopher-
McPheeters said she is a Reagan
conservative who believes entre-
preneurs should pay for Port Citrus.
"The Port Citrus thing falls into
the category of a wild goose chase,"
Christopher-McPheeters said. "The
incumbent did not vote to fund the
Small Business Development Cen-
ter to save the money for a consult-
ant for Port Citrus. I would never
have done that. I'm for shoring up
the businesses that are here al-
ready."
Christopher-McPheeters wants
the public to decide about building
Suncoast Parkway II.
"I believe there should be a ref-
erendum on that even though that
wouldn't be the final answer: It
would be up to the commissioners


As for central sewage systems,
Chri stopher-McPheeters would
want proof they were needed. For
protecting water quality, she would
prevent runoff, which she did when
she worked toward stopping a proj-
ect to build a Wal-Mart in Crystal
River
"With a huge Super Wal-Mart, I
don't see how they could have
avoided runoff with a huge parking
lot like that," Christopher-
McPheeters said. "Plus, it was over
a major springshed they were plan-
ning on and that could have af-
fected the underground springs
with more salt-water intrusion."
Christopher-McPheeters opposed
moving West Citrus Government
Center to Meadowerest.
"They had different ways to go,"
she said. "They could have stayed
where they were and had the roof
fixed. I went into the old place and


I never saw any major problems
when I was there."
If elected, she would oppose buy-
ing the Meadowerest building.
If she were a commissioner and
a future sheriff asked the BOCC to
take back the fire service, Christo-
pher-McPheeters said: "As a com-
missioner, I would like to have as
much control over the taxpayers'
money as possible myself
directly."
If forced to cut spending between
parks or libraries, Christopher-
McPheeters would save the li-
braries.
"Knowledge is power," she said.
"We need to learn things to help the
economy. Then everything else will
fall into place."
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvan orm er~chronicleonlin e. com
or352-564-2916.


t the Asked to give Thorpe a
of the grade from A to F on per-
onary formance, Damato said he
gave him 3.95 out of 4 in a
Citrus recent evaluation.
r to Asked about his problem-
good solving technique, Damato
d, be- said he is a general contrac-
Irystal tor, so he puts it on paper
er op- and makes it real.
s were "Then I connect the dots,"
build Damato said. "I'm the best
,rCity dot connector in Citrus
al gas County."
Third Asked if he regretted any
I, and decisions in office, Damato
3.89 a replied, "Absolutely not. On
Sto $6 any vote I ever made, I can
which stand here and look you in
d the the eye and tell you: 'I was
right. '"


to vote on it,"
McPheeters said.


, such as roads and

far as I know, I am
nly county commis-
:hairman who ever
Agenda and every-
I ever outlined when
chairman in 2010-
come to fruition,"
to said.
BOCC did everything
le to bring jobs to the
, he said.
e whole destiny lies
the county commis-
s," Damato said, as it
controll of new infra-
ure and "the two peo-
lo run the show: Brad
e, the administrator,
Richard Wesch, the


Christopher-


county attorney."
Developing Port Citrus
would be the trigger to solv-
ing the problem of arsenic
in well water in the north of
the county.
"If Port Citrus does be-
come a reality, I can almost
guarantee that the DEP (De-
partment of Environmental
Protection) will step to the
plate and pay for a majority
of the water lines to Port Cit-
rus, which will alleviate the
arsenic problem north of
the mall."
Speaking to criticism
from challenging candi-
dates about how much more
the county budget could be
trimmed, Damato said they


were saying pretty much the
same thing, which he listed
as five issues.
mThe county's purchase
in 2010 of Ottawa Avenue for
$2.9 million to create a con-
necting road.
SMoving the West Citrus
Government Center to
Meadowerest.
SPort Citrus develop-
ment project.
SConsolidating fire serv-
ices with the sheriff 's office.
aThe county budget.
What all five issues had in
common, Kitchen said, is
that people thought each
was a done deal before it
happened, which showed a
lack of trust in county gov-
ernment. When people
would take their issues be-
fore the commissioners,
they felt abused, he said.
Kitchen recommended
making the public input a


were naivee aboul
process." About half
budget is nondiscreti
spending.
Moving the West (
Government Cente
Meadowerest was a
choice, Damato saic
cause the city of C
River offered no bett
tions. The alternative~
to remain on U.S. 19,
on top of Crystal Rive
Hall or use the feder
plant on Northeast
Street, Damato said
Meadowerest cost $:
square foot compared
for the old building,
the owner expected
county to repair


constant time on the agenda
at the beginning of the
meeting.
Regarding Meadowerest,
months before the decision
about moving county gov-
ernment offices, Kitchen
said County Administrator
Brad Thorpe sent the city a
three-page letter detailing
reasons to move to Meadow-
crest. Nothing came of the
city's offers of joint work-
shops.
Kitchen said the county
could have considered put-
ting the offices in Crystal
River Mall. If elected, he
would not vote to purchase
the Meadowerest building,
but look at alternatives in-
cluding more county trans-
actions on the Internet that
would lessen the need of of-
fice space.
Kitchen reserved judg-
ment on assessing Thorpe's


performance, although he
said Thorpe was "very hos-
tile" toward him when he
discussed the county
budget.
Experts have told
Kitchen: "Port Citrus would
be a wonderful idea, but it is
unviable."
If viable, it should be paid
for by the private sector
On its budget, the county
should have trimmed near
core spending first and set it
below its previous budget
rather than maintain the
same level of spending,
Kitchen said.
"You cut everything you
can first before you start
raising taxes," Kitchen said.
He would approach the
county budget as he had the
city budget.
"The only thing I would
say is: Hold me to that,"
Kitchen said.


pL\ISYOur Choice of 3 Summer G



S2 Tickets to Weeki Wachee Springs or,
(while supplies last)



~F~amiy 4Pack to Homosassa Wildlife P




Q One Month FREE!


oooscoU


M PHEETERS
Continued from Page Al

Republican primary, has gone be-
fore the Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC) a
number of times with requests as a
county resident. She has asked for
the establishment of an ethics com-
mittee to help avoid the expense of
county lawsuits, she said, which
also would help the economy: "Bad
publicity is not good for business."
Among her accomplishments as a
civic activist, Christopher-
McPheeters founded the first 9-11
memorial in Citrus County She has
received nine proclamations
against child pornography from dif-
ferent governments and has con-
ducted fundraisers for children in
need.



~ODA MA county
sewer.
"As
Continued from Page Al the o,
sion c
chairman and chairman of did an
the Value Adjustment thing
Board. I was
"I'm going to run on a 11has
sterling record Damato Damal
said about his campaign for The
reelection. "There's no possib
doubt about that I've done a county~
good job for the citizens in "Th~
the eight years that I've with i
been there." sioner
Since 2004, Damato said is in c
the Citrus County Board of struct
County Commissioners ple wh
(BOCC) has brought an up- Thorp
grade to every portion of the and I


0721 0727 CRN

Public Notice
The City of Crystal River residents are invited to apply
for our City Volunteer Boards. The Planning Commission
and the Waterfronts Florida Advisory Board currently
have vacancies. There are two County seats available
on the Waterfronts Florida Advisory Board at this time.

Planning Commission. These terms are for 3 years.
The Planning Commission serves as the Local Planning
Agency (LPA) pursuant to Florida Statutes and makes
recommendations to the City Council regarding various
issues and applications that come before this
Commission relative to zoning, subdivisions, planned
unit developments, variances and other types of land
use scenarios.

Waterfronts Florida Advisonr Board. The terms for
these positions are 4 years. This Board is charged with
studying and monitoring water quality of Kings Bay, the
Floridlan aquifer, flora and fauna, the care and
protection of the Florida Manatee and the impact of
storm water and septic tanks.

Tree City USA Board. This is a 3-year term. This
Board is charged to study, investigate, counsel and
develop andlor update annually, and administer a written
plan for the care, preservation, pruning, planting,
replanting, removal or disposition of trees and shrubs in
parks, along streets and in other public areas.

For further information on the Planning Commission and
Waterfronts Florida Advisory Boards, please contact
Laura Black at 795-4216 ext. 306. For further
information o tahte7T e Ct6 UStA Board, p ease contact

available on our website at crystalriverfl.org or you can
pick one up at City Hall, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River.


iflts


'ark or,


km., sense.


















































































































































Yesterday Pvs Day

Argent 4.5620 4.5530
Australia .9640 .9589
Bahrain .3769 .3770
Brazil 2.0257 2.0192
Britain 1.5617 1.5720
Canada 1.0123 1.0074
Chile 488.15 485.25
China 6.3764 6.3739
Colombia 1778.50 1775.50
Czech Rep 21.02 20.70
Denmark 6.1183 6.0585
Dominican Rep 39.10 39.12
Egypt 6.0652 6.0678
Euro .8224 .8145
Hong Kong 7.7567 7.7556
Hungary 235.59 231.49
India 55.275 55.150
Indnsia 9450.00 9451.00
Israel 4.0076 4.0033
Japan 78.46 78.58
Jordan .7074 .7075
Lebanon 1502.50 1502.00
Malaysia 3.1505 3.1540
Mexico 13.3331 13.2261
N. Zealand 1.2518 1.2446
Norway 6.0723 6.0547
Peru 2.629 2.620
Poland 3.42 3.38
Russia 32.0495 31.8550
Singapore 1.2555 1.2534
So. Africa 8.2881 8.1676
So. Korea 1141.80 1139.25
Sweden 6.9412 6.9208
Switzerlnd .9877 .9782
Taiwan 30.00 29.99
Thailand 31.67 31.61
Turkey 1.8096 1.8024
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 21.5999 21.5999
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreigncurrency



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.2b .00-.2b
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.10
6-month 0.14 0.13
5-year 0.58 0.62
10-year 1.46 1.49
30-year 2.55 2.58



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Sep 12 91.83 -1.14
Corn CBOTDecl2 7953/4+171/4
Wheat CBOT Sep 12 943V/4 +8'/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 1686'/4 +34
Cattle CME Oct 12 123.10 -1.30
Sugar(world) ICE Octl2 23.92 +.67
Orange Juice ICE Sep 12 110.00 -2.60



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gol (ro o..sot) $1582.50 $1591.60
Silver(trovoz.. spot) a2/.2/9 a2/.344
Copper(pound) $3.4485 $3.bo0b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1412.1U $1432.bU

NMER =New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT-=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER =Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE =New York Cotton, Sugar &Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN =New York Cotton Exchange.


C~t~


Name Div Yld PE Last Chg%YTD Name Div Yld PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel .20 3.8 ... 5.24 -.24 -36.6 Lowes .64 2.5 17 25.79 -.24 +1.6
AT&T Inc 1.76 5.0 51 35.29 -.19 +16.7 McDnlds 2.80 3.1 17 91.58 -1.18 -8.7
Ametek s .24 .720 33.79 -.45 +20.4 Microsoft .80 2.7 11 30.12 -.55 +16.0
ABlnBev 1.57 2.0 ... 77.87 -1.57 +27.7 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 19 46.50 -1.01 +.5
BkofAm .04 .6 8 7.07 -.19 +27.2 NxtEraEn 2.40 3.4 14 04 .918

tL n~k 2.9 7 0 4PiedmOfc .80 4 13 16.94 -17 -6
Citigroup .04 .2 7 25.87 -72 -1.7 RegionsFn .04 .6 24 6.41 -.24 +49.1
CwREIT 2 00103393 +.1 6. SrHkixgs 23 2 1~ 19 8+6.

DukeEn rs 3.06 4.6 17 66.22 +.10 Texlnst .68 2.5 18 27.25 -.79 -6.4
EnterPT 3.00 6.9 31 43.37 -.37 -.8 TimeWarn 1.04 2.7 14 38.86 -.28 +7.5
ExxonMb| 2.28 2.7 10 85.95 -.26 +1.4 UniFirst .15 .2 14 62.94 -1.26 +10.9
FordM .20 2.2 6 9.21 -.14 -14.4 VerizonCm 2.00 4.5 44 44.49 -.05 +10.9
GenElec .68 3.4 16 19.87 +.07 +10.9 Vodafone 1.99 7.1 ... 28.20 -.65 +.6
HomeDp 1.16 2.3 19 50.70 -.26 +20.6 WalMart 1.59 2.2 16 72.25 +.72 +20.9
Intel .90 3.5 11 25.52 -.54 +5.2 Walgrn 1.10 3.2 12 34.60 -.02 +4.7
IBM 3 40 1 8 14 192 45 -2 89 +4 7 YRC m ... ... ... 6.08 +.11 -39.0


D% 52-wk
lg %Chg


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


cor o wr y* t



www.chronicleonulne.om













m Pa









*Charge rnay vary at frst transaction and at each vacation start.


PNC 59.14 -2.18 RPM 27.24 -.26
PNMRes 20.45 +.20 Rackspace 43.89 -1.25
PPG 113.85 +1.89 RadianGrp 2.90 -.06
PPLCorp 29.03 +.09 RadioShkt 3.71 +.04
PallCorp 52.04 -.80 Ralarp 61.53 -.38
PaloANetn 53.13 ... RJamesFn 33.49 -.56
Pandora 10.56 +.25 Rayoniers 47.21 +.11
ParPharm 50.13 +.08 Rayteon 56.11 -.75
PeabdyE 22.66 -.14 Rltylnco 41.53 -.17
Pengrthg 6.24 +.02 RedHat 53.72 -1.89
PennVaRs 25.74 -.04 RegalEnt 13.35 -.61
PennWstg 12.98 -.12 RegionsFn 6.41 -.24
Penney 20.62 -.04 RegisCp 17.28 -.30
PepBoy 9.79 +.06 Renren 4.18 -.02
PepmHold 19.69 +.06 RepubSvc 27.22 -.30
PepsiCo 69.96 -.47 Revlon 14.80 -.03
Prmian 18.54 +.04 ReynAmer 46.12 -.12
PetrbrsA 19.05 -.53 Riollnio 45.33 -1.41
Petrobras 19.58 -.54 RiteAid 1.20
Pfizer 23.70 -.10 RockwlAut 64.90 -1.00
PhilipMor 88.89 -.66 RockColl 49.28 -1.35
Phillips66n 35.32 -.28 Rowan 35.18 +.07
PiedNG 32.31 -.10 RylCarb 24.40 -.64
PimuStrat 11.90 +.04 RoyDShllA 69.31 -.38
PinWst 53.76 +.46 Royce 12.45 -.15
PioNtrl 92.75 -.74 Roc B 2.9 -0
Pitny~ 13.4 -02 R~ eI~ 9 0
PlainsEx 40.34 -.03
PlumCrkt 39.96 -.50 SAIC 11.12 -.21
Polariss 74.70 -.33 SCANA 48.67 +.05
PostPrp 50.95 +.23 SKTlcm 12.89 -.01
Potash 45.43 +.12 SpdrDJIIA 128.04 -1.07
PwshDB 27.63 ... SpdrGold 153.67 +.29
PSAgri 30.32 +.22 S&P500ETFl36.47 -1.26
PSUSDBull22.98 +.17 SpdrDiv 56.08 -.34
Praxair 107.53 -1.59 SpdrHome 21.63 -.08
PrecDrill 7.51 -.02 SpdrS&PBk 21.44 -.43
PrinFnd 25.58 -.56 SpdrLehHY 39.61 -.24
ProLogis 32.11 -.57 SpdrRed 59.05 -.79
ProShtS&P 36.31 +.31 SpdrOGEx 51.82 -.02
PUICCs33 P 13 STp Mia 3. -.2


PoShL20145 -3 ude 3.0 -
PrUltSP500 76.52 -2.13 Sakts 10.13 -.10
PrUVxSTrs 7.25 +.68 Salesforce 135.16 -3.95
PrUltCrude 31.68 -.75 SallyBty 25.90 -.15
PrUShCrde41.91 +.93 SJuanB 16.45 +.01
ProUShEuro 22.62 +.44 SandRdge 6.79 +.10
ProctGam 64.73 -.19 Sanofi 38.08 -.55
ProgsvCp 20.02 -.07 Schlmbrg 69.33 +.69
PUShDowrs52.36 +.93 Schwab 12.49 -.44
ProUSR2K 30.76 +.67 SeadrillLid 39.17 +.59
PUSSP500 rs46.66 +1.19 SealAir 15.58 -.09
Prudent 46.70 -1.87 Senslent 36.56 -.62
PSEG 32.84 -.07 Sherwin 131.57 -.86
PubStrg 145.76 -.39 SiderurNac 4.96 -.22
PulteGrp 10.86 +.39 SilvWhtng 26.47 +.16
PPrlT 5.53 -.02 SimonProp 156.97 -1.16
Q~EPRes 29.45 -.31 Sktechers 19.41 -.81
Q~uanexBld 17.80 -.41 SmithAO 51.14 -.22
Q~uantaSvc 22.01 -.70 SmithfF 18.41 -.11
Q~ntmDSS 1.28 -.06 Smucker 76.56 -.39
Q~stDiag 58.76 -2.28 SonomP 29.38 +.15
Q~uestar 21.00 +.21 SoJerlnd 52.87 +.21
QklsilvRes 4.80 +.05 SouthnCo 47.77 +.07
Q~uiktsilvr 2.51 ... SthnCopper 31.82 -.49





The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

fOund on the next page.


VangTotW 45.39 -.66
VantageDrl 1.51 ..
VirnetX 35.25 -3.53
VistaGold 3.02 +.04
VoyagerOG 1.3 -. 0
ng~ 35 -. 3
WFAdvlnco 10.25 -.13
WFAdMSec 15.60 +.05
WizrdSftrs 2.65 +.30
YMBiog 1.99 -.01
ZBBEngy .33 -.00


~ )I~(I L' I~ 1(~11 I~ I LI1 II


-.29 TrimbleN 42.29 -1.12
-.64 TripAdyn 44.90 -.20
-.01 TriC~uint 5.14 -.19
-.57 TrstNY 5.62 -.04
+.4Trustmke 25.55 -.14
+.06
+.1 UTStarcm 1.04
-.94 UllWrldwd 13.65 -.37
-.14 Ubiquitn 12.50 +.07
-1.13 UltaSalon 87.53 -4.98
-.80 Ultratech 32.83 -.88
-.28 Umpqua 12.79 -.05
+.03 Unilife 3.27 -.10
-.4UBWV 24.38 -17
-.07-.7
-.5 UMdNtlF 51.30 -1.25
-.6 UMdOnln 4.21 -.04
+.02 USEnr 2.36 -.04
-.01 UidTherap 52.46 -.86
-1.89 UnivDisp 33.76 -3.93
-.06 UnivFor 33.99 -6.45
-.29 UnvStainls 36.30 -5.71
-.0UnwiredP 2.21 -.01
-.7 UranmRsh .55 +.02
-.13
+.9 UrbanOut 31.01 -.55
-.70 ar ;
+.41
-.14 VCAAnt 21.19 -.39
-.05 VOXXlnd 8.05 -.10
-.20 ValueClicke 16.24 -.14
-.03 VanSTCpB 79.62 -.11
VangR1K 62.15 -.63
-2.02 Veemlnst 32.62 -.23
-.51
-.94 tu~o
-.64
-.31 VBradley 20.29 -.96
-2.08 Verisign 43.19 -.81
-.29 Veriske 49.55 -.89
-.19 VerbtPh 51.27 -.83
-2.24 ViacomB 46.41 -.24
-18 Vical 3.50 -.04
+.5 rgnMdah 25.12 -.01
-.3 roPhr 22.68 -22
-44 r .
-.23 VisnChina .48 -.04
+1.82 VistaPrt 32.99 -.01
-.02 Vivus 24.15 -1.63
+.07 Vodafone 28.20 -.6
-.77 Volcano 27.67 -1.09
-.44 Volterra 25.20 +.20
-.04 WarnerCh 17.91 -.27
-.6WashFed 15.92 -.02
-18
-.6 Web.com 18.80 -.47
-.05 WebMD 18.38 -.51
-1.77 Websense 17.15 -.29
-.33 WendysCo 4.62 -.11
+.07 WernerEnt 22.85
-.12 Wesbanc 21.14 -1.03
-.08 WDigital 32.07 -.64
-.3 Westmrki 9.44 +.23
+.12
-.34 Wstptlnng 37.50 +.20
-42 WetSeal 2.96 -.10
-1.07 WholeFd 84.03 -6.51
-.02 WillsLpfA 11.35 -.01
-.38 Windstrm 9.85 -.09
+.01 Wintust 36.97 +.16
-.14 WrightM 19.07 -.30
-.48 Wynn 97.31 -2.35
+.6XOMA 3.65 +.12
-1.11
-.5 )linx 31.14 -.16
-.79 YRCrs 6.08 +.11
-.71 Yahoo 15.92 +.19
+.18 Yandex 18.97 -.48
-1.16 Zagg 11.11 +.24
+.02 Zalicus 1.03 -.02
-.00 Zhongpin 10.18 -.01
-.0 llow 41.26 -.82
+.19 aonBcp 18.73 -51
-.29 aopharm 5.97 -.12
-3.32 Zulmiez 35.52 -.46
+.09 Zyngan 4.80 +.25
-.66 pSivkia 2.41 -.33


A6 sATURDA1, JULY 21, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1551280 7.07 -.19 CheniereEn 40843 13.78 -.05 Microsoft 564903 30.12 -.55 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETFl274913136.47 -1.26 GoldResrc 38283 17.50 -7.72 Intel 445724 25.52 -.54 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
GenElec 1127204 19.87 +.07 Rentech 30909 2.02 -.03 MicronT 441912 5.83 +.05 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter s list.
Pfizer 929142 23.70 -.10 Vringo 27465 3.57 -.13 Kraft 441443 40.16 -.04 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day
SPDR Fncl 536371 14.38 -.22 NovaGld g 26992 5.66 -.17 SiriusXM 434823 2.10 -.01 Ch:LsorgifrtedaNocneidctdby..

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempton by company d New 52-week
i~dS L 1 1Chi % 3 z ftBL5 C~~q%+q8N PA 21t9+ hi %TO low. dd -Loss Inlas 1 mos ec Cornpany to meerly lise codm heAena dxrnp Ilst-

DoleFood 10.15 +1.32 +14.9 Glowpoint 2.22 +.14 +6.7 HeliosMIT 3.44 +.44 +14.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock Issue. pr Preferences. pp -
Edenor 2.60 +.28 +11.9 ASpecRlty 3.67 +.17 +4.9 AstexPhm 2.52 +.30 +13.5 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s -
MexEqt pf 16.71 +1.70 +11.3 EntGmgr a .21 +.09 +4.2 OnyxPh 76.38 +7.98 +11.7 Stock has spilt by at least 20 percent wthin the last year. wl Trades wll be settled when the
WhitingTr 10.09 +.98 +10.8 MeetMe 2.1+.07 +3.6 PacSunwr 2.21 +.23 +11.6 stock Is Issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high, un Unit, Including more than one security. v] Company In bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) celvership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears In front of the name.
Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Chipotle 316.98 -86.88 -21.5 GoldResrc 17.50 -7.72 -30.6 StaarSur 6.00 -2.08 -25.7

bMDkn- 64 -- 2~ VirnA mn 35.E -3.5 --. Cp~hbe 3 .1) -77 -- 7.

Valhis 11.37 -1.30 -10.3 Medgenwt 6.47 -.58 -8.2 UnivFor 33.99 -6.45 -15.9 52-Week Net % YTC
BadgerMtr 35.91 -3.57 -9.0 AdmRsc 42.77 -3.32 -7.2 BldrFstSrc 4.11 -.77 -15.8 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,487.74 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
488.43 381.99DowJones Utilities
8,423.05 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amexlndex
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71Russell20000


-120.79 -.93 +4.95 +1.12
-114.69 -2.21 +1.05 -6.56
+1.36 +.28 +5.31+11.41
-90.16 -1.15 +3.78 -7.71
-34.95 -1.45 +4.49 -2.83
-40.60 -1.37 +12.29 +2.33
-13.85 -1.01 +8.35 +1.31
-146.28 -1.02 +8.10 -.23
-10.63 -1.33 +6.83 -5.97


12,822.57
5,072.20
489.34
7,759.59
2,380.72
2,925.30
1,362.66
14,257.71
791.54


DIARY


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,016 Advanced
2,010 Declined
118 Unchanged
3,144 Total sues
130 New Highs
39 New Lows
3,789,827,709 Volume


179 Advanced
238 Declined
39 Unchanged
456 Total issues
12 New Highs
7 New Lows
58,575,325 Volume


634
1,812
124
2,570
42
49
1,709,808,048


Name Last Chg BakrHu 45.59 +3.84
BallCorp 41.77 -.54
BcBilVArg 5.62 -.52
BuBradpf 15.10 -.14
ABB~d 1.20 .15 BuSantSA 5.11 -.45
ABM 8.99 -.31 BuSBrasil 7.07 -.08
ACELid 70.78 -.86 Bk~ofAm 7.07 -.19
AESCorp 12.77 -.05 Bkd~ontg 57.39 -.43
AFLAC 43.28 -.76 BkN~YMel 20.77 -.52
AGLRes 39.90 +.10 Barday 9.91 -.36
AKSteel 5.24 -.24 BariPVix 13.20 +.65
ASAGold 21.29 -.02 BarrickG 34.57 -.20
AT&Tlnc 35.29 -.19 Baxter 56.21 -.23
Abiab 65.06 -.74 Beamlnc 61.87 -1.10
AberFitc 36.71 +.18 BeazerHm 2.68 +.09
Accenture 59.00 -.35 BectDcke 74.79 -1.16
AdamsEx 10.73 -.07 Bemis 31.13 -.20
AMD 4.22 -.64 BerktHa A125730.00-1265.00
Aetna 37.66 -.50 BerktHB 83.83 -.80
Agilent 37.56 -.90 BestBuy 18.23 -.53
Agning 37.50 +.20 BioMedR 18.54 -.06
AirProd 80.43 -1.07 BlktHillsCp 32.19 +.06
Albemarle 57.07 -46 BlktDebtStr 4.24 +.06
AlcatdlLuc 1.14 -.03 BlktEnhC&I 13.12 -.17
Alma 8.26 -.12 Blk~lbOp 13.33 -.07
AllegTch 30.84 -1.26 Black~sione 13.15 +.16
Allergan 85.15 -2.31 BlocktHR 16.55 -.03
Allete 42.00 -.12 Boding 73.89 -.97
AlliBGlbHi 15.41 +.04 BorgWarn 63.99 -1.31
AlliBlnco 8.54 +.08 BostBeer 111.34 -3.47
AlliBern 11.98 -.64 BostProp 109.93 -.42
Allstate 34.41 -.30 BosionSci 5.38 -.20
AlphaNRs 6.74 -.01 BoydGm 6.66 -.34
AlpAlerMLP 16.54 -.01 BradyCp 26.10 -.66
Altria 35.91 -.03 Brandyw 11.62 -.27
AmBev 37.39 -11 Brink~er 32.79 -1.03
Ameren 33.83 +.09 BrMySq 35.42 -.73
AMovilL 26.80 -14 Brki~dOfPr 17.39 +.07
AmA e 9.86 -.31 Brunswick 22.20 -.79
AmCampus 47.13 +.36 Buckeye 53.67 -.33
A aleut20 5 -2 ugrn 1. t2


AlnlGrp 31.3 -7 CSnBs 214 -
AmTower 70.92 +.40 CH Engy 65.00
Amerigas 41.57 -11 CITGrp 34.80 -.19
Ameriprise 50.30 -1.61 CMS Eng 24.54 +.11
AmeriBrgn 39.21 -.52 CNOFind 7.80 -.22
Ampheno~l 58.18 -.83 CSSlnds 19.62 -.51
Anadark~o 72.06 -.53 CSX 22.37 -41
A lgdA 31.77 t77 CSa 4. -3
AoByne 77.87 -157 CYjnetl41 t0
Annaly 17.04 t07 CbvnY 1.7 t4
Aon plc 46.98 -41 CbtGs 402 .2
A ache 85.08 -1.84 Clof -0
Ap lv 2. -.2 Calpine 17.43 -.06
AquaAm 26.66 +.26 Camecog 22.56 -.04
ArcelorMit 14.73 -.68 Cameron 45.66 +.39
ArchCodl 6.16 -.06 CampSp 33.19 -.39
ArchDan 27.00 -.29 CdnNRsgs 28.42 -.31
ArmsDor 12.56 -.35 CapOne 55.88 -.49
ArmourRsd 7.45 +.09 CapMpfB 15.53 +.04
Ashland 69.31 -.05 CardnlHlth 43.10 -.40
AsdEstat 14.81 +.19 Carlisle 53.37 -.39
AssuredG 12.19 -.41 CarMax 26.94 -.34

Asa~ 46.85 -.9 Ct tilar 8. 9 8
ATMOS 36.59 ... Celanese 35.94 -.89

A tNah 39.6 -10 6 xipf s 191 -2
Auioliv 55.48 -1.16 CenovusE 32.09 -.61
Avon 15.73 -.88 CenterPnt 21.15 +.23
B&G Foods 27.35 +.60 CntryLinke 41.48 -.11
BB&TCp 31.68 -.32 Checkp~nt 8.35 -.08
BHPBillIt 64.05 -1.10 Chemiura 13.13 -.92

BFrasil 1. -1 hs 44 t6
BRT 6.27 -.03 Chevron 109.19 +.35


Chims 14.95 -.29 hollarGen 52.34
Chimera 2.31 +.01 EomRescs 53.96
ChinaUni 13.74 +.67 hover 53.42
Chipole 316.98 -86.88 howChm 30.92
Chubb 70.59 -1.06 DuPont 48.87
Cigna 41.68 -.70 DuPFabros 26.29
Cimarex 57.04 -2.50 DukteEnrs 66.22
CindBell 3.79 -.04 DukteRlty 14.27
Cinemarke 23.15 -1.12 EMCCp 25.05
Cilgroup 25.87 -.72 EOGRes 99.23
Clarmr 48.07 -.43 EQCo~rp 56.53
CleanHs 58.47 -1.06 EastChms 49.19
CliffNRs 45.99 -1.17
Clorox 72.74 -.63
Coach 58.84 -2.18
CCFemsa 123.20 +.11
CocaCola 77.03 -.52
CocaCE 26.84 -.60
Coeur 16.03 +.34
CohStlnfra 17.60 +.11
ColgPal 103.90 -1.10
CollcWvBrd 21.52 +.01
Comerica 30.66 -.54
CmwREIT 19.36 +.13
CompSci 23.35 -.25
ComstkRs 18.06 +.46
Con-Way 33.43 -1.45
ConAgra 24.13 -.45
Cono~cPhils 55.99 -.38 n
ConsolEngy 30.90 +.61
ConEd 63.77 +.41
ConstellA 28.44 -.1
ContlRes 76.05 -.21
Cnvrgys 14.67 -.28
Cooperlnd 68.19 -.41
CoreLogic 20.89 +.42
Corning 12.27 -.19
CottCp 8.13 -.27
Covidien 53.30 -.34
Crane 37.87 -.32




Cummins 86.09 -2.61
CurEuro 120.91 -1.15
Ealon 39.06
EatnVan 26.43
DCTlndl 6.04 -.20 EVEnEq 10.62
DDRCorp 14.86 -.02 Ecolab 67.23
DNPSelet 11.52 +.04 Edisonlnt 46.01
DRHorion l8.88 +.41 EdwLfSci 101.09
DSWlnc 55.30 -1.10 Ban 13.72
DTE 61.03 +.35 BdorGld g 10.34
DanaHldg 11.90 -.08 Embraer 25.54
Danaher 51.14 +.02 EmersonEl 46.25
Darden 51.10 -.99 EmpDist 21.65
DeanFds 12.13 -47 EnbrdgEPt 30.00
Deere 75.88 +.19 EnCanag 20.54
DelphiAun 26.98 -.22 Energen 47.45
DeltaAir 9.94 -.06 Enerplsg 13.90
DenburyR 15.56 +.05 EnPro 36.10
DeutschBke 30.05 -1.48 ENSCO 52.19
DevonE 58.99 +.04 Entergy 71.31
DiaOff 66.05 +.34 EntPrPt 54.66
DiamRke 9.65 -.01 EqtyRsd 64.09
DDgtll B 35 rs -8 Este lds 53 2
DirSCBear 18.36 +.61 Exdoen 39.24
DirFnBdear 236 bl8 Exrs 76

DrxEnBear 9.81 -.07 FMCTech 42.09
DirEMBear 15.09 +.62 FairchldS 13.34
DirxSCBull 52.55 -1.91 FamilyDlr 66.77
DirxEnBull 44.17 +.25 FedExCp 90.08
Disaver 34.91 -.02 FedSignI 5.77

oeeed +01 t13 Igse 24. 0


RibriaCdlu 7.50
RidlNFin 18.82
RidNatlnfo 32.13
Rifth&Pac 10.20
FstHorizon 8.09
FTActDit 7.64
FtTrEnEq 11.78
FirstEngy 50.37
FlagstBcp .91
Fluor 48.73
Footockr 32.96
FordM 9.21


GoldFLid 12.18 +.33
Goldcrpg 33.66 +.38
GoldmanS 94.16 -.84
Goodrich 127.18 +.03
Goodyear 9.81 -.28
GtPlainEn 22.42 +.04
Griffon 9.25 +.14
GuangRy 15.60 -.29
HCAHldg 27.52 -.27
HCPlnc 45.19 -.44
HSBC 41.71 -1.40
HSBCCap 26.28 +.10


ItauUnibH 14.76 -.16 McDrmlnt 11.45 -.52
IvanhMa 8.40 -.49 McDnlds 91.58 -1.18
SMcGrwH 46.99 -.49
McMoRn 13.25 +.34
JPMorgCh 33.90 -.56 MeadJohn 74.08 -.84
Jail 20.55 -.28 Mechel 5.80 -.27
Jaguarg .72 -.06 Medtrnic 38.22 -.74
Jefferies 12.01 -.36 Merck 43.41 -.53
JohnJn 68.63 -.90 MercGn 41.35 +.83
JohnsnC 25.28 -.79 Me~ife 29.53 -1.25
JoyGlbl 51.54 -1.36 MetroPCS 6.41 -.14
JnprNtwke 15.65 -.19 MetroHlth 9.50 -.16
KBHome 9.81 +.17 MKorsn 39.98 -1.69
KBR~c 2.46 .93 MidAApt 68.61 -.52
KTCorp 13.57 -.22 MobileTele 18.21 -.04
KCSouthn 70.79 -1.07 Molymrp 19.24 -.51
Kaydons 20.55 -.26 MoneyGrs 15.91 -.15
KAEngTR 27.25 -06 Monsanio 87.52 +.74
Kellogg 47.64 -.43 MonstrWw 7.24 -.28
Key~gy .61 .20 Moodys 36.31 -.68
Keycrp .89 .03 MorgStan 12.78 -.47
Kim~lk 84.3 -.05 MSEmMkt 13.71 -.25
Kimco 19.05 -.19 Moe 570 -.2
KindME 85.58 -.89 Moralu 4.0 -01
KindMorg 34.99 -.26 Mrh 17 .6
Kind~wt .65 .05 NCRCorp 23.10 -1.34
Kinrossg 8.03 +.01 NGg 80 .5
Kodiaks 8.61 -.39 NVEnergy 18.16 +.12
Kohls 48.76 -.60 NYSEEur 25.63 -.21
KrispKrm 6.31 -.27 Nabors 14.29 -.13
Kroger 21.47 -.12 NatFuGas 49.95 +.28
LSICorp 6.16 -.10 NatGrid 51.39 -1.17
LTC~r 35.7 -.24 NOilVarco 69.21 -1.26
LaZBoy 152.6 -.186 NatRetPrp 29.50 +.10
Lab~p 85.26 2.86 Navistar 24.00 -.78
Ladee 4.97 .15 NewAmHi 10.59 +.03
LVoandb 40.74 -1.28 NJss 4.5
LaSalleH 26.82 -.62 Nwids 1.1 171
LeggPlat 21.60 -.37 NYmB 125 -.7
LennrA 3.84 .52 NewellRub 18.12 -.21
LtAG 3.9 s


Linkedn 106.26 -2.39 Noue 256 +.0

LockhdM 87.71 -.80 NikoreB 93.08 -2.18
LaPac 10.87 +.18 Noblteo 936.96 +1.39
Lowes 25.79 -.24 Noble~on 88.9 12 38

Noktia 1.71 14
uYIBG 36 aolen8p 1 -. 8
Nordstrm 52.44 -.84
M&TBk( 84.97 -1.65 NrikSo 729 -1. 9
MBIA 10.50 -.21 Net 4. -. 2
MD Res 227 -.1 Noth o~pG 6. -3

MFAFnd 7.85 +.04 Novaris 57.09 -.27
MCR 9.84 +.02 Nucor 37.96 -.27
MGIC 2.38 ... NustarEn 53.90 -.41
MGMRsts 9.78 -.54 NuvMuOpp 15.26 +.04
Macquarie 33.67 -.32 NvPfdlnco 9.49 -.03
Macys 35.60 +.11 NuvQPf2 9.24 -.03
MagdlMPtr 76.08 +.11 OGEEngy 53.64 +.62
Magnalntg 39.94 -.67 OasisPet 28.10 +.31
MagHRes 3.63 -.04 OcciPet 87.20 +.03
Manitowoc 10.67 -.36 OfficeDpt 1.94 -.04
ManpwrGp 33.46 -2.24 OiSAC 5.46 +.01

Marau@0 265 OdSRepub 1.0 -1
MarathPet 45.56 +.05 Olin 21.64 -.01
MMVPOl s 17 t Ome Enlt 2398 -.1
MVSemin 30.86 -.52 ONEOKs 44.06 -.04
MktVRus 26.73 -.47 OnecktPts 57.43 -.37
MktVJrGld 18.62 -.19 Oshk~oshCp 20.22 -.54
MarlntA 36.85 -44 OwensCorn 28.23 -1.06
MarshM 32.37 -.43 Owenslll 19.64 -.41
MStewrt 1.3 t06

McCorm 60.88 -.39 PG&ECp 45.48 +.18


Forestab 34.90 -.51
ForestOils 7.20 +.03
FranceTel 13.11 -.51
FranktRes 110.35 -3.05
FMCG 33.77 -.6
Freescale 9.55 -.66
Fusion-io 19.50 -.80

GATX 41.42 -.08
GabelliET 5.37 -.07
GabHlthW 8.59 -.05
GabUIl 8.13 -.11
GaisaSA 2.37 -.16
GameSlop 16.30 -.50
Gannett 14.81 -.05
Gap 29.20 -.28
GardDeny 52.95 +3.78
GenDynam 64.97 -1.02
GenElec 19.87 +.07
a I~Psrp 1. -2
GenMolors 19.36 -.78
GenOntEn 6.8 -5

Genworth 4.79 -.27
GaGulf 34.35 +1.68
Gerdau 8.78 -.27
GlaxoSKln 46.26 -.43
GlimchRt 10.13 -.10
slba 4 .34 .3


Hallibrtn 30.77
HanJS 16.44
HanPrmDv 14.76
Hanesbrds 29.76
Hanoverlns 35.19
HarleyD 43.91
HartfdFn 16.27
HawaiiEl 28.81
HltCrREIT 60.47
Hlt~gmt 7.68
HlthcrRlty 24.17
Hecktmann 3.41
HeclaM 4.39
Heinz 54.97
HdmPayne 45.59
Hertz 11.94
Hess 45.40
HewlettP 18.61
HighwdPrp 33.53
Hillshiren 26.39


Honwlllni 57.74

HopT 2. 4
HostHots 15.04
HovnanE 2.66
Humana 73.62
Huntsmn 12.36
IAMGldg 10.93
GIccBke 33 8


iSTaiwn 11.97
iShUK 16.41
iShSilver 26.48
iShChina25 33.26
iSSP500 137.01
iShEMkts 38.59
iShB20T 130.06
iShB1-3T 84.53
iS Eafe 49.15
iSRusMCG 58.86
iShiBxHYB 91.35
iSR1KV 68.12
iSR1KG 63.49
iShR2K 78.93
iShUSPfd 39.41
iShREst 64.73
iShDUHm 16.82
iStar 6.86
ITTCps 18.82
Idacorp 43.01

I tlon 53 1
ImaxCorp 24.02

ItgyE 600
IntenlEx 131.09
IBM 192.45
InlGame 15.28
IntPap 32.29
Interpublic 11.59
Inyeo 215


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.77 ..
AbdnEMTel 19.20 -.04
AdmRsc 42.77 -3.32
Adventrx .74 +.01
AlldNevG 26.45 -.27
AmAppardl .88 ..
Augustag 1.79 -.04
Aurizong 4.47 -.06
AvalnRare 1.45 -.06
Bacterin 1.74 -.12
BarcUBS36 43.55 +.07
BarcGSOil 22.41 -.29


Biollme 4.41
BrigusGg .81
BritATob 105.35
CAMACEn .60
Carderog .86
CardiumTh .24
CelSd .38
CFCdag 19.31
CheniereEn 13.78
CheniereE 25.50
ClaudeRg .59
ClghGlbOp 10.72
Comstk~n 3.08
CornstProg 5.18
CrSuiHiY 3.18


GenMoly 3.08
GoldResrc 17.50
GoldSidVg 2.00
GoldenMin 4.14
GoldStrg 1.18
GldFld 2.02
GranTrrag 4.42
Grt~asGg .59
GtPanSilvg 1.61
Hemisphrx .36
HstnAEn .90
ImmunoclI 3.40
Imp0ilgs 43.14
InovioPhm .52
IntellgSys 1.78


Metalin 2.13
MdwGoldg 1.42
NavideaBio 4.66
NeoStem .67
NBRESec 4.61
Nevsung 2.91
NwGoldg 10.09
NAPallg 1.78
NthnO&G 16.00
NovaBayP 1.32
NovaCppn 1.86
NovaGldg 5.66
NCaAMTFr 15.24
NCADy3 14.05
NMuHi~p 13.60


ParaG&S 2.36 -.05 SamsO&G 1.23
PhrmAth 1.60 -.03 SynthBiol 2.25
PolyMetg .99 -.08 TanzRyg 4.12
Protalix 5.72 +.02 Tasek~o 2.60
PyramidOil 4.40 -.10 TimberlnR .29
Q~uestRMg 1.29 -.05 TrnsalPet 1.00
RMRRE 17.30 -.05 TriangPet 5.76
RareEleg 4.80 +.09 TwoHrbwt .40
ReavesUtl 25.60 -.54 USGeoth .34
Rentech 2.02 -.03 USAnimny 3.06
RexahnPh .48 -.03 Univlnsur 3.29
Richmntg 3.48 -.11 Ur-Energy .68
Rubiang 2.95 -.06 Uranerz 1.37


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 43.27 +.13
APITech 3.32 +.02
ASMLHld 55.47 -.28
mTO& 2.7 -2
Abraxas 2.73 t01
AcadaTc 3 .0 -5. 7

Accura 6.54 t03
Achillio 6.37 -.28
AcmePkt 16.86 -.69
AclivsBliz 12.01 -.34
A xom 1. -. 3

Adtran 21.67 -.31

A iBds 4.4 .0
AEternag .44 -01
Affym-agh 16.76 -18
A fyetix 4.39 -. 2

Ak~amaiT 29.91 -.58
Ak~orn 14.90 -.39
Alask(Com 2.28 +.02
Alexion 99.35 -.97
AlignTech 34.18 +2.48
Alk~ermes 18.85 +.07
AllosThera 1.76 +.01
AllotComm 23.67 -1.04
AllscriptH 9.90 -.09
AlnylamP 18.74 -.02
AlteraCplf 31.23 -.68
AlterraCap 23.22 -.49
Amarin 15.16 -.20
Amazon 228.29 +2.12
Amedisys 13.85 +.41
ACapAgy 34.33 +.19
AmCapLid 9.89 +.03
ACapMign 24.58 +.14
ARltyCTn 11.12 +.06
AmSupr 4.39 +.06
Amgen 77.77 -1.87
AmicusTh 5.69 -.41
Amk~orTch 4.91 -.03
AmpioPhm 3.28 +.21
Amsurg 30.79 -1.22
Amylin 30.79
Amyris 3.45 -.10
AnalogDev 37.49 -.50
Anlogic 63.88 -.46
Analystlnt 4.05 +.02
Ancestry 27.35 -.03
AngiesLn 14.59 -.39
Ansys 57.42 -.73
AntaresP 5.32 +.22
AntheraPh 1.14 -.02
A123Sys .76 +.07
ApolloGrp 29.38 -.82
Apollolny 7.82 -.12
Applelnc 604.30 -10.02
ApldMal 10.51 -.19
AMCC 4.82 -.04
Approach 28.20 -.11
ArchCap 39.15 -.41
ArenaPhm 9.52 -.14
AresCaph 16.58 +.01
AriadP 17.91 -.33
Aribalnc 44.42 -.03
Ark~est 11.64 -.20
ArmHld 23.26 -.35
ArrayBio 4.31 +.29
Arris 13.62 -.21
ArubaNet 13.61 -.72
AscenaRts 18.83 -.41
AscentSolh 1.18 -.06
AspenTech 22.82 -.42
AssaxiBanc 12.33 -.62
AstexPhm 2.52 +.30
athenahlth 92.97 +5.79
Atmel 6.07 -.33
AuthenTec 5.01 -.01
Auiodeske 32.16 -1.29
AuioData 56.10 -.41
Auxilium 26.19 -.68


AvagoTch 35.28
AvanirPhm 3.07
AvisBudg 14.46
Aware 5.85
Axcelis .92
BEAero 42.63
BGCPtrs 5.80
BJsRest 40.98
BMCSft 40.42
Baidu 110.23
Bazaanicn 16.31
BeacnRfg 26.98
BeasleyB 5.89
BedBath 61.38
BioRetab 25.88
Biogenldc 142.21
BioMarin 40.25
BioSanters 1.62
BlktRKelso 9.68
BlueNile 24.25
BobEvans 38.97
BodyCentrl 11.04
BostPnt 8.99
BreitBurn 18.19
Brighipnt 9.00
Broadcom 31.62
BroadSoft 23.22
Broadwdh .28
BrcdeCm 4.83
BrktlneB 8.87
Bruk~erCp 13.73
BuffaboWW 82.54
BldrFstSrc 4.11
CAlnc 26.05
CBOE 28.13
CHRobins 56.96
CMEGrp 257.00
CVBFnd 11.64
CadencePh 4.35
Cadence 11.57
CalaGDyln 8.17
CalaStrTR 9.81
Callidus 4.46
Calumet~p 25.50
CapCtyBke 7.41
CpstnTrbh 1.06
Cardiomgh .36
CareerEd 5.54
CaribouC 11.20
Carrizo 25.16
CanvteBrs 6.79
Caseys 56.69
CatalystPh 1.10
Catamaran 89.88
CathayGen 16.12
Cavium 24.49
Celgene 66.42
CellTherah .59
CelldexT11 5.40
Celsion 3.71
CentEuro 3.21
CEurMed 5.11
CenGrdAlf 11.06
Centhl 6.23
Cepheid 36.01
Cerner 77.02
CerusCp 3.18
Chartlnds 65.09
CharterCm 74.37
ChktPoint 49.38
Cheesecakte 31.87
ChelseaTh 1.15
ChildPlace 50.97
ChrchllD 58.24
Cienacorp 14.82
CinnFin 37.23
Cintas 37.66
Cirrus 27.60
Cism 16.36
CitzRepBc 17.56
CitrixSys 80.75
CleanEngy 13.99
Clearwire 1.02
CognizTech 57.32
CogoGrp 1.76
Coinstar 61.01
Comcast 32.18
Comcspel 31.73


-.76 CmcBMO 40.20 -.11
-.14 CommSys 11.11 -.04
-.29 CommVlt 43.72 -1.88
-40 CmplGno~m 2.94 +.07
+.01 Compuwre 8.97 -.23
-.57 Comverse 5.45 -.01
-12 ConcurTch 64.94 -1.91
-1.18 Conmed 28.48 -.27
-.41 ConsolCom 15.69 -.29
-.51 ConstantC 18.62 +.57
-.73 Copano~En 30.11 +.10
-.63 Coparts 24.38 -.18
-.03 CorinthC 2.52 -.04
-.91 CorOnDem 24.61 +.71
-.67 Costa 95.61 -.34
-1.53 Creelnc 23.84 -.61
-.47 Crocs 15.12 -.19
+.02 Ctrip.mm 14.63 -.20
+.04 CubistPh 41.28 +.65
-19 CypSemi 10.81 -.78
-1.82 Cytlodneth .73 +.01

+.19 a
+.23
+.04 DTS Inc 19.32 -.28
-.83 DealrTrke 29.17 +.45
-16 DeckrsOut 46.67 -1.88
-.01 Ddlcath 1.90 +.08
+.01 Ddlllnc 12.01 -.23
-.07 Dndreon 6.52 +.11
-40 Dentsply 36.79 -.51
-2.96 DexCom 12.01 -.76
-.77 DiamndFlf 17.61 -.84
-.46 DianaCont 6.15 ..
-13 DigitalGen 10.71 -.30
-2.57 DigRiver 16.80 -.15
-3.55 DirecTVA 48.33 -.62
+.06 DiscCmAh 50.12 -.92
+.02 DiscCmCh 46.33 -.58
-.14 DiscovLab 2.71 ..
-.11 DishNetwke 29.49 -.39
-.06 DollarTrs 51.38 -1.29
-18 DonlleyRR 12.61 -.26
+.21 DrmVVksA 19.16 -.44
-.25 DryShips 2.26 -.10
+.01 Dunktinn 33.21 -1.45
-.00 DurectCp 1.16 +.13
-.12 DyaxCp 2.75 +.03
.. Dynavax 4.02 +.02
-.66 E-Trade 7.39 -.43
-.71 eBay 44.85 +.90
-.80 EVEngy 52.50 -.31
+.08 EaglRktEn 9.68 +.11
-44 ErthLinke 7.06 -.14
+.02 EstW~sBcp 22.17 -.07
-.70 EchoGLog 17.29 -1.58
-1.56 EdgarOnI 1.08 ..
-.02 EducDevh 4.01 +.01
-.07 8x81nc 5.03 -.03
+.16 ElectSd 11.04 -.19
+.11 ElectArts 11.98 -.29
+.12 EFll 15.47 +.14
-11 EmmisCm 2.01 -.01
-.27 EndoPhrm 31.11 -.35
-7.72 Endocyte 8.02 -.03
-1.12 Endobogix 13.89 -.27
-.28 EngyXXI 33.20 +.50
-1.53 Entegris 8.03 -.07
-.44 EnteroMed 4.10 -.18
-.55 EntropCom 5.79 -.13
-.52 Equinix 167.92 +1.89
+.05 Ericsson 8.71 -.10
-.51 ExactScih 10.65 -.24
-1.14 Exeliks 6.17 -.02
-.46 E~deTc 3.17 -.07
-.43 Exp~edias 47.10 -.47
-.38 Exp~dlnl 37.05 -1.42
-.91 Ep~Scripts 57.21 -1.55
-.32 ExtrmNet 3.41 +.05
-.19 EZchip 34.15 -.75
-1.88 Ezcorp 24.75 -.38
-.20 F5Netwkts 96.10 -6.65
-.01 FEICo 47.92 -.39
-1.64 FLlRSys 19.13 -.34
+.01 FSllnl 3.48 -.09
+.01 Facebooktn28.76 -.24
-.20 Fastenal 43.96 -1.34
-.18 FkiBcPA 21.09 +8.31


FifthSt~in 10.06 -.03 Illumina 42.71 -.31
FifIthTird 13.64 -.16 Imuno~Gn 15.83 -.11
Fndlnst 17.70 -.30 ImpaxLabs 19.71 -.49
Finisar 12.25 +.11 Incyte 24.55 -.56
FinLine 20.97 -.33 Infinera 6.26 -.17
FstCashFn 41.54 -.37 InfCBAcun 8.01 ..
FMidBc 11.09 -.11 InfinityPh 15.68 -.80
FstNiagara 7.55 -.23 Informat 29.11 -1.25
FstSolar 14.79 -.34 Infosys 39.54 -.62
FstMerit 16.32 -.21 InnerVVkgs 11.56 -.25
Fiserv 71.10 -.42 Insulet 20.25 -.14
FiveBehvn 27.27 +.77 InigDv 4.84 -.21
Flextrn 6.21 -.10 Intel 25.52 -.54
FocusMda 19.07 +.12 InteractBlf 13.38 -.17
ForcePro 5.55 ... InterDig 27.54 -.62
FormFac 6.13 +.04 Intrface 12.55 -.50
Forinet 23.47 -.57 InterMune 11.71 -.19
Fossillnc 68.51 -3.64 IntSpdw 25.80 -.51
FosterWhl 17.27 -.12 Intersil 10.02 -.16
Francescn 30.26 -.76 Intuit 58.69 -.93
FreshMkt 51.90 -2.70 IntSurg 498.50 -45.71
FronterCm 3.74 +.01 InvRIEst 8.15 +.09
Fudelel 1.10 -.01 IridiumCm 9.25 -.06
FulionFncl 9.33 -.05 IronwdPh 13.17 -.14
Fusi~o 8.6 -01 Isis 12.97 +.01
Itron 39.72 -1.31
IvanhoeEh .66 +.03
GSVCap 9.01 +.15 Ita 12.73 -.14
GTAdvTc 4.86 -.14
GabdliEqrt .02 -.02
GalenaBio 1.89 +.04 j2Global 29.41 -.15
Garmin 36.86 -.42 JASolar .97 -.04
GenProbe 82.61 JDSUniph 9.31 -.28
Gentex 21.92 -.39 JacklnBox 27.10 -.34
Geores 35.33 -.12 Jamba 2.61 -.08
GeronCp 1.65 JamesRiv 2.15 +.08
Gevo 4.50 +.02 JazzPhrm 47.74 -1.18
GileadSd 53.08 -.68 JetBlue 5.26 -.22
Gleacherh .74 +.01 JiveSoftn 19.69 -.31
Globalsth .27 -.00 JoesJeans 1.14 -.02
GlbSpcMet 12.58 -.34 JosABanke 43.36 -.09
GluMobile 5.59 +.07 KITDigil 3.74 -.03
GolLNGLid 39.48 -.06 KLATnc 49.22 -.12
Google 610.82 +17.76 Kayaktn 33.18 ..
GrCanyEd 19.28 -.45 Keryx~io 1.99 +.10
GreenMtC 17.57 -.17 Kraft 40.16 -.04
GrifolsSA 10.40 -.10 Kulick~e 8.58 -.18
Grouponn 7.40 LKQ~Corp 34.83 -.40
GulfportE 21.76 +.26 LSllndlf 6.55 -.10
HMNFn 2.80 -.10 LamResrch34.80 -.38
HMSHis 31.61 -.26 LamarAdv 30.28 +.19
HSN Inc 42.28 -.46 Landstar 48.63 -.67
HainCel 54.34 -2.34 Latice 3.48 -.10
Halozyme 8.96 -.24 LeapWirlss 5.62 -.13
HancHld 30.30 -.41 LekPhrm 2.71 -.13
HansenMed 1.79 -.11 LibGlobA 52.24 -.70
Harmonic 4.01 -.10 LibGlobC 49.40 -1.00
Hasbro 33.84 +.12 LibCapA 93.83 -.84
HawHold 6.08 -.22 LiblylntA 18.37 -.16
HlthCSvc 22.37 -.61 LifeTech 43.34 -.54
HlthStrm 24.10 -1.99 LigandPh 17.51 -.02
HrindEx 13.74 -.05 LimeEngy .91 -.04
HSchein 77.96 -1.04 LimelghtN 2.73 ..
HercOffh 3.72 +.18 Lincare 41.38 +.04
Hologic 18.96 -.28 LincElec 44.60 -.02
Homelnns 17.00 -.45 LinearTch 30.77 -.31
HomeAway 22.13 +.28 LinnEngy 40.26 -.16
HomeTrBn 12.04 +.04 Liquidity 41.10 -.60
HorizPh n 7.20 +.08 LodgeNet .88 -.34
HorsehdH 8.73 -.25 Logitech 9.32 -.47
HotTopic 9.89 -.14 LookSmth .89 -.03
HubGroup 28.60 -3.27 Lulkin 58.10+t2.28
HudsCity 5.87 -.16 lululemngs 57.35 -1.95
HumGen 14.22 +.01 Luminex 16.95 -.50
HuntJB 54.40 -.80
HuntBncsh 6.33 -.22
IAClnter 48.56 +.06 MAPPhm 14.30 -.28
IdexxLabs 89.84 -2.87 MELASci 3.72 -.18
II-VI 16.13 -.40 MGE 48.59 +.18
IPGPholon 44.22 ... MIPSTech 6.26 -.16
iRobot 20.16 -.19 MTS 39.48 +.01
iShAsiaexJ 51.94 -.60 MagelnHI 55.12 +2.56
iShACWI 43.70 -.63 MAKOSrg 12.78 -.61
iShsSOX 49.59 -.84 MannKd 2.62 -.06
iShNsdqBiol32.71 -1.41 MktAxess 29.21 -.88
IconixBr 17.41 -.08 MantellT 10.86 -.28
IdenixPh 10.35 +.20 Masimo 23.31 -.58
IgniteRstn 14.20 -.95 Mattdl 34.39 -.19


Mathlnt 28.96 -2.67 PDLBio 6.65 -.21
Mattson .95 -.04 PLXTch 5.46 -.26
Maximlnig 25.30 -.37 PMCSra 5.80 -.06
MaxvdllT 6.45 -.14 PSSWrld 22.02 -.26
MedAssets 13.23 -.31 Paccar 37.22 -.53
MedicAcbn 3.67 -.11 PacEthanh .30 +.00
MediCo 23.36 -.24 PacSunwr 2.21 +.23
Medivaton 95.58 +.91 PanASly 14.21 -.06
MeluCrwn 1035 -.23 PaneraBrd 144.97 -5.72
Mellano~x 89.24 -4.66 ParamTch 19.53 -.23
MeniorGr 14.91 -.04 Parexel 28.06 -.68
MercadoL 73.65 +.17 ParkterVsn 3.11 +.02
MergeHlth 3.14 +.01 Patterson 34.77 -.28
Merrimktn 7.87 +.62 PattUTI 15.26 +.09
Microchp 32.39 -.43 Paychex 32.43 -.30
MicronT 5.83 +.05 PeetsCfeT 57.16 -.75
MicrosSys 47.89 -1.33 Pendrdll 1.06 ..
MicroSemi l7.76 -.77 PnnNGm 41.53 -.99
Microsoft 30.12 -.55 PeopUidF 11.51 -.47
Micndisrs 1.63 +.05 PeregrinPh 1.29 +.01
Misonix 3.10 -.04 PerfectWld 9.80 +.02
MitektSys 3.04 -.06 Perrigo 112.88 -1.88
MModdl 14.48 +.02 Pet~mart 68.87 -.68
Molex 24.24 -.46 Pharmacyc 49.99 +.29
Momenta 13.61 -.78 Plexus 28.75 -1.00
MonPwSys 19.28 -.22 PluristemT 3.38 +.18
MonroMuf 36.13 -1.08 Polymm 9.77 -.33
MonstrBvs 64.97 -2.86 PoolCorp 36.82 -.05
Mylan 22.30 -.31 Popularrs 13.85 -.51
MyriadG 25.63 -.33 Power-One 4.50 -.05
NETgear 33.29 -1.01 PwShsQQQ 64.24 -.87
NIlHIdg 8.40 -.11 Pwrwvrsh .57 +.01
NPSPhm 8.64 -.09 PremExhib 2.35 -.08
NXPSemi 22.41 -.53 Presstekth .47 -.01
Nano~sphere 2.69 -.16 PriceTR 61.47 -1.23
NasdOMX 22.37 -.44 priceline 673.20 +.53
NatCineM 14.51 -.63 PrimoWtr 1.75 +.17
Natlnstrm 27.54 -.33 PrivateB 15.09 -.24
NatPenn 9.38 -.14 PrUPQQCCs 50.00 -2.00
NektarTh 9.28 -.25 PrognicsPh 10.10 -.33
Neonode 5.10 -.21 ProgrsSoft 19.45 -.47
NeptuneTg 4.68 -.04 PUShQQ~rs46.26 +1.68
NetApp 31.19 +.08 ProspctCap 11.13 -.01
NetEase 54.90 -.54 PureCycle 2.16 -.05
Netiix 81.82 -1.30 QIAGEN 16.89 -.60
Nelist 1.46 -.17 Qlik(Tech 19.32 -.63
NtScout 23.20 +1.27 Qlogic 12.70 +.02
NetSpend 9.29 -.12 Qualum 57.68 -.76
NetwktEng 1.41 -.01 QualitySs 23.41 -.58
Neurcrine 7.72 -.09 Quant~uh .88 +.02
NYMigTr 6.80 +.04 Questlft 27.87
NewsCpA 21.99 -.41 Questuor 44.12 +.41
NewsCpB 22.23 -.39 RFMicD 4.32 -.08
NobltyH If 5.32 ... Rambus 4.30 -.92
Nordson 51.92 -1.15 Randgold 86.19 -1.63
NorTrst 45.30 -.70 RealPage 21.59 -.62
NwstBcsh 11.46 -.23 Regenrn 121.65 +1.04
Novavax 1.90 -.23 RentACt 33.08 -.63
NuVasive 24.00 -.54 RepubAir 4.96 -.15
NuanceCm 21.43 -.65 RschMotn 6.78 -.19
NutriSyst 11.00 +.02 ResConn 11.61 -.37
Nvidia 12.81 -.38 RexEnergy 12.65 +.14
NxStageMdl5.17 -.10 RiverbedT 15.29 -.70
OCZTech 6.00 +.39 RosettaR 42.39 -.60
OReillyAu 91.31 -2.84 RossStrss 67.41 -1.13
ObagiMed 16.09 +.03 Rovicorp 12.50 +.90
Oclaro 2.29 -04 RovGld 7421 +1.74
OdysMar 3.89 -.02
Omeros 9.04 +.30
OmniVisn 12.39 -.37 SBACom 56.29 -.21
OnAssign 15.60 -.90 SEllny 20.74 -.53
OnSmend 6.76 -.07 SLMCp 15.69 +.50
Onuthyr 4.29 +.05 SS&CTech 24.59 -.09
OnyxPh 76.38 +7.98 STEC 7.52 -.11
OpenTxt 47.41 -1.00 SabaSftwlf 8.74 -.23
OpenTbleh 37.89 SalixPhm 51.82 -.24
OpbmerPh 14.59 -.12 SanderFm 36.97 -1.22
Oracle 30.12 -.75 SanDiske 38.70 +3.62
OraSure 11.15 -.60 Sanmina 7.41 -.22
Orexigen 6.11 -.21 Sanofirt 1.47 ..
Oritani 14.35 .. Santarus 7.21 -.07
Orthfx 40.79 -.47 Sapient 9.82 -.26
Osiris 9.88 +.39 SavientPh .51 +.01
OtterTail 23.67 -.24 Schnitzer 28.94 -.6
Overstk 7.21 +.61 Scholastc 28.81 +.46
SdGames 8.76 -.16
SeagateT 26.80 -.37
PDCEngy 26.89 +.54 SearsHldgs 51.26 -2.80


Seatt~en 26.50
SelCmfrt 26.96
Selectylns 17.81
Semtech 23.52
Sequenom 4.07
SvcSource 12.39
SvArtsrsh .05
Shire 89.29
ShufiMstr 15.50
Shutteriy 31.67
SigmaAld 71.42
SilicGrln 6.38
Silienlmg 3.93
SilienMotn 13.00
Slcnware 4.75
SilvSidg 11.73
Sina 45.13
Sindair 9.81
SiriusXM 2.10
SironaDent 44.10
Sktullcandy 14.75
SkyWest 7.74
Skywk~sSol 28.58
SmartBa 9.42
SmithWes 9.57
SodaStrm 39.79
Sohu.cm 35.43
Solazyme 13.90
SoltaMed 3.22
Somaxonh .36
SonicCorp 10.23
Sonus 1.75
SouMoBc 22.81
Sourcefire 45.67
SpectPh 15.88
SpiritAir 20.29
Splunktn 28.55
Spreadtrm 17.30
StaarSur 6.00
Staples 12.47
StarSdent 4.05
Starbuck~s 51.96
SIDynam 12.43
StemCllrsh 1.55
Stericyde 93.34
SMadden 34.18
StewEnt 7.10
Stratasys 56.64
SunHlth 8.35
SunPower 4.45
SuperMicro l2.98
Suprtex 17.35
SusqBnc 10.43
Susser 35.69
Syk~esEnt 15.59
Symantec 13.58
Symetricm 5.99
Synaurn 11.25
Synaplcs 26.02
Synchron 19.00
Syno~psys 30.71
SyntaPhm 6.27
TFSFncl 9.47
TTMTch 10.27
twtdeuem 24.85
Tak~eTwo 9.42
Tangoen 20.55
TASER 4.84
TechData 47.30
TICmSys 1.25
Tellabs 3.10
TeslaMot 31.79
TesseraTch 14.56
TetraTc 26.02
TxCapBsh 41.28
Texlnst 27.25
TexRdhse 17.86
Theravnce 29.97
Thoratec 34.36
ThrshdPhm 7.16
TibcoSft 28.59
TitanMach 28.66
TiVolnc 8.29
TowerSmh .61
Towerstm 3.87
TractSupp 77.98
TransceptP 6.61
Travelzoo 20.32


-.05 CIShI .1 t0
+.01 5
-1.86
D jourEg .23 +.00
+.01 DenisnMg 1.36 -.03
+.00 n
+.2 EVMuni2 13.97 +.13
-.06
-.05 a.
+.5ExeterRg 1.33 +.02
-12

.. GamGldNR 13.30 +.12
+.03 GascoEngy .17 ..


IntTowerg 2.70 -.12
Inuvo .56 +.02
IsoRa 1.04 ..

K eanR~g 2.80 -.
LadThalFn 1.56 -02
LlS rlg 0

Lucas~in 153 11

MadCatzg .68 +.01
Medgenics 14.20 +.30
Meet~e 2.01 +.07


UraniumEn 1.96 -.05







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 A7


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: AMTFMulnc10.37 +.02
Balancp 16.63 -.08 MultCGrA 8.25 -.11

AgrundsB B ~palln 1. -8

AllianceBern A: SpEqtA 15.46 -.22
G laAp 65 -.1 TaGv nc7 4 +.01
I alpcBrA v:. -.53 IncS~ 10.4 -.12
LgCpGrAd 28.77 -.34 EatonVanceC:
Alliancer t0.59 -.84 NtM plnc 1 .
GrowthBt 26.33 -.28 EatonVance 01
I pGc~ r29C93 -.43 Glac~bR9.82

I C~rds30s09 -.43 I ds:al 18.46 -.18

NFJDpyVI M19 --1 Fcu lnvdtn48.88 -.53
Allianz Funds C: LgCap pn 16.59 -.16
AGICGrthC 25.50 -.27 FPAFunds:
Amer Bneacon Insti:-.25 nro s -.

AmerBeaconlny: Fairholme 27.63 -.55

nmewri ent ry ist: FdraS dA 3354 -42
Amer Century Adv: Federated Instl:
EqGroAp 23.24 -.25 KaufmnR 5.14 -.08
e entur 7.67 -.05 VoRDtBdS1.5 t0
AIICapGr 29.53 -.48 FidelityAdvFocT:
Ba anced 170 (T EegT 3. t0

thln 2 68 --05 Fidliyh/Advisor5A:-.5
Heritagel 21.52 -.46 StrlnA 12.51 ..
Ajc~ d 26. -2 Fid lityAdvisorC.-23
IntDisc 9.11 -.15 FidelityAdvisorl:
pplro 10.0 --18 EqGidlnn 6.3 --

Oehd 1. -.1 B lgtln 2. -5
RealEstl 23.21 -.12 Strlnln 12.66
elny 24.9 --35 FidelityAdvisorT:
Valulnv .98 .06 BalancT 16.09 -.08
American Funds A: DivGrTp 12.40 -.14


BalAp 19.52 -.11 GrOppT 39.64 -.63
CBon ~p 129 B.2 inMTp 1. -0

aWGAp 211 .2 Or aTP 1. -2
EupacAp 36.71 -.54 STFiT 9.33
FdnAp 3. -42 S MeAIICp 923 -.18
GovtAp 14.64 +.02 FF2010n 13.86 -.06
GwthAp 31.42 -.36 FF2010K 12.70 -.05
HITrAp 11.00 -.01 FF2015n 11.58 -.06

InlGrlncAp27.66 -.47 FF2020K 13.12 -.07

NwrlAp 48.86 -.48 FF2035n 11.35 -.09
StT Bp 163 .1 F2035K 13339 -- 9
TxEoA p 13.059 .02 FF2040K 13.37 -.11
WshrAp 30.27 -.27 FF2045K 13.49 -.12

Awrild 45.98 -.65 AFgr50n 15.85 -.07
Ats~anpun6d@8 -.3 F20n A .9 0

rxx~ -30 .0 end0 K 1. -1
Midhap 36092 -.77 Blue0h5r n 4696 60
darpapal 2netmns 2 --22 ChupnG K
Gprowt 55.16 -.63 CapIevt~n 11.15 -.11
Sar~ie n :44. -.365 A 8r50 25 0

ATxigdn 14 -.23s Contra0n 74978 -.88
Bbckoc 21.8 -.16 AgE~n32 -.
In10pA p 28 87 -.47 Divlntln 269.0 -.43
Bnl~ackrock -.12 rSane~l5 -.

Bbdap k 3oc l9 -.16 r s~hrn469 -6
r~pa 149 --2 n ~nn 1. t0
Brinon FundsY: Iladn 5. -4
use IF d39 -.33 Eur~p 26.94 -.55
Bufaow run211 -.14 ftpvn 3 .l -.20

Folcusn 25.50 -.24 Cpnr .4-0
Muntein 25.88 -.13 Rag~rn2 .1 -.31

Clv~ mosFu90 9 .19 GNMunn 121.9 +.01
TxGrwthl 4915 -.57 Cobn 7.9 8
Clalvertinel 39 -.02 F .9 19

Sn qAy~pp Growth16 vCoK91.27 -.1.3
SocIdp 16460 +.03 riStr n 19442 -.2


Cnop~ ns&St -.43 DIvntldn 11.11 +.01
BlCkolubi BClsA: unrsnt~ 68 -.
v InIc Int2-.2 Divscn 29226 -.47
Divkopply 8.51l -.07 th 2. -3
pquir~v 19t2 p.1 Emrrn263 -0
M pGlblorp 9.76 -.13 Em~n 2.8 1
MidCVdp 7.71 -.08 Vqnna 1 .5 3
EMinon pud Lat: 4Cll 8.47 -60
Sruel unoemA -3 LUOev~~k 28.9 -38

Glbmchp 20.11 -.36 Exot 2. -0

Acor nlntZ 370 -4 I Munn 12.54 +.02
Dnivln oZ 5 1 .2 Midfapn 28.22 -.39
g r MNateeucnn 203 +0
Veal~etn 49656 -509 uIncrnn 277 .
Creit uise 2 Nw tn -19 t0
Clm Funds: 92 .9 N~n 30+2
USlorhqi n91.5 -.13 nn

Davr InestlS4 .5 asnn
Cor~qtS 685-.1 Pritncn 19086 -019
CorPI nrcr Rur EnnK
bn~~ r26 -.0 e r
Glb~mCr 35.9 -.49 CmdyK~91.3 1+.03
Glblahem 20.96 -.34 rmgk 51 .2
GoldPrc 2.34-.04 Sr trntr 10.85 -.17
Hiddgx 12.92 +.01 SeIndeprF1.0.8 -.16
IntXAM 1216 .02 SrIntro al 8.346 -.18
InidShr 38.06 -.74 Srn3 l 83 .8
Lg~~o~ 3.93-.5 SInvirdF 12.105 .02
Latmr~ 3.03-.6 SIntnhun 10.88 +.01
MgdouniS 98.49 +.02 SBn .7
MATFS 15.18+.02 mapiscn 21.37 -.29
WolDiv~ 22.064 -.24 Spalr1.0 .2
Davi Funs B: StknlSmCpr 18.87 -.24
NYvenBy 33.00 -.30 Srtnn1.0
NY~en 33.2 -.3 TaxrBrn 11.66 +.02
DgavisrundsY: TotalvBdn 11.28 +.02

Divernc)p 9.48 +.02 tltn 187 .1
SMI~ap24.6 -34 altatn 28.08 -.30
TxUS~rp 122 .2 aun6.76 -. 82
DelawrelnestB: Wrldn 18.64 -.23
SedCl~pt 33.76 -.36 Fdltyeet:
Dimensioal Fds: Air n 37.68 -.65
EmMktVp 26.48 -.30 Bocn 17.4-.1
Int~~anl3.8 -.5 Bokr 43.32 -.59
Lxargp 10.76 -.11 LeChemn 110.14 -.73
TAUSCorEA2n.22 -.10 Cmqupl.8 .0
US~~an20.4 -24 omprn 60.56 -.80
USonicron 14.17 -.20 Cnin262 .1
USoTgdca 16.12 -.20 Cnu3 n1.2 .7
US Smll n 1.98 .30 C n~tpn 79.17 -.70
USlumba 24.8 -.31G CsteonK 41.51 -.15
EmMktSlnl8.88 -.18 Electrn 44.60 -1.13

Int~xln13.9 .03 EnAltunrn l5.14 -.22
IcontZ n 1.14-.437 Finav n 55.93 -.63
Gcrlb5xnnt 1.270 +.01 Glrn 3.7 .2
2YIvxdnco 10.13 -...Hahn1563-.2
DFAIE 2654 .16 Insur n 47.48 -.66


Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 100.89 -3.40
Balanced 72.17 -.61 Materialn 65.90 -.57
Income 13.79 +.02 MedDln 60.18 -.54
IntStk 29.63 -.58 MdEqSysn27.32 -.40

Dou lel~ne F~ulds:12 Mtu sdnn3. 0

pRdn 11ct t0 hrn 1. -3



Dreyf 9.26 -.11 UtilGr n 57.77 +.14
DryMidr 27.81 -.30 Wirelessn 7.40 -.09
GNMA 16.20 +.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 29.51 -.30 5001dxtlnvn 48.31 -.49
HiddAp 6.45 5001dx I 48.32 -.49
StratValA 27.88 -.28 Intlnxlny n 30.38 -.63
TechGroA 32.42 -.59 TotMktln n 39.40 -.41
DreihsAclnc 10.39 +.01 USBondl 12.05 +.03
Driehaus Funds: Fidelity Spart Adv:
EMktir 26.80 -.22 ExMktAdrn38.01 -.44

Ea En 98nc S:Itdn n039 -6
Ciap 156 .9 Ttk~r3.0 -4


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell

prceeo Nmt rstu alu (NAV) and daily net change.

NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


watch Ranadt ost $hl.22 to $40. tar

2012 maker Fender abruptly can-
celed its plans to go public,
-120.79blaming "current market
12,822.57 conditions" and "concerns

-40.60 about economic conditions
in Europe." And General
2,925.30 Electric, though its stock
-13.85 edged up 7 cents to $19.87,
1,362.66noted Friday its orders also
fell in Europe.
-146.28 "We prepared ourselves
791.54 for a pretty tough year this
year, or certainly volatile

dia 01 year," CEO Jeff Immelt said
10 in a call with analysts. "We
2,011 haven't been disappointed."
.' 117 GE's finance officer, Keith
Sherin, said the company is
3.7 b making "a full-court press"

Diary to reduce exposure to
634 Europe.
Even thelInternet power-
1,812 house Google noted growth
:124 in Southern Europe had

1.7 b slowed, particularly in
AP Spain. But Google also re-
ported higher revenue and
ip maker Ad- profit, and its stock rose
Devices fell $17.76, to$610.82.
;4.22, afterre- All the major U.S. stock
emand in Eu- indexes fell. The Dow Jones
~ed down industrial average dropped
r revenue. 120.79 points to 12,822.57.
ned its earn- The Standard & Poor's 500
as Europeans fell 13.85 to 1,362.66. The
luipment. In- Nasdaq composite index
whose prod- lost 40.60 to 2,925.30. All
Trane air three indicators were down
cut its rev- about 1 percent. They eked
ion for the out tiny gains for the week
Xerox fell 49 and are about flat for the
~nd Ingersoll- month to date.


Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000



Adva ce :

Declined:
Unchan dc

volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

volume:



$33.46, and chi
vanced Micro
13 percent, to $
porting weak d
rope drag
second-quarter
Xerox trim
ings forecasts ~
bought less eq
gersoll-Rand,
ucts include
conditioners,
enue predict
same reason.
cents to $6.70, a


l~B~~ll~l~ll1lI


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 12.05 +.03

Fll st~ge46.98 -.42
OverseasA 21.00 -.20
First Investors ...

Glb pp 1 36 -.0
GrolnA p 15.76 -.16

oATAAp 12.5 +.02
MITFA p 12.85 +.02
NJTFApp 13.80 +.04


SpSitAp 23.46 -.25
TR xp 102 .
ValueBp 7.39 -.06
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.27 +.02
Frank/Temp Emok A:

ALTFAp 11.93 +.02
ATFsApp 11.5 +02
CAlntAp 12.16 +.01

C TFp 124 t0
CT ~p 11.52 t02
DblTFA 12.39 +.02
Dn~cA 3. -4
Fedlntp 12.54 +.02
FedTFAp 12.70 +.02
FLTFAp 12.01 +.01
FoundAlpp 1. -1
GoldPrMA 27.25 -.18
Grwt ~p 4. -6

HicncAp 0
InsTFAp 12.59 +.02

NY FApp 1. t0
LMGvScA 10.36
MDTFA p 12.07 +.02
MATFAp 12.17 +.01

MOTFAp 12.78 +.03

o TFp 1. t0

ORTFAp 12.63 +.02

RisDvA p 36 21 -.37
SMCpGrA 34 86 -.69

USGovAp 6.92 +.01
UlAp 1. t0
Fr pirrn Fk7A 03
IncmeAd 2.15 -.01
Frankl~emp Frnk C .1


F G klemp 7tlA&B:
SharesA 21.23 -.20
F~ra lepmp2 3mp 18

Id pp 130 -0
GrwthAp 16.89 -.32

Fra k ~mp Tmp A-21

F akl~emp Tp B C
DevMktC 20.76 18
dornCpp 1.6 -1
Franklin Multual3Ser 12

GE Elfun S&S:

USEqt 4. -7
GMOETrustl .35 .41

rusaltl22.84 -.24
InilntrM 18.25 -.50
GiMOMTrustVIO.0-.3

C~ait Fun84 -.25
Asset 50.37 -.47
IdCp nSh8s0A:-.32
Goldman Sachs Inst:
Gi Idt 24.3 -.31
Hied 39720

Harbor Funds:

Cpplnst 4. -7
Inilnvt 54.65 -.94
Il rtfr F55.24 -.95

App~Ap 2. -- 8
In~a Hrp Fd3 54 -.24
CapAppln 30.53 -.45
Harnoprd HLS IA: -.2

B ln~ced 20.6 9

d p~eBd +22 3
Hermessy Funds:

Hussa Funds.
SbTs Rer 12.30 ..
S~rOGowth 11.44 +.03

Hlc eSS 1. -9
ISI Funds:8.0

IVA F nds:
WlwdeAr 1. -7
bIvesc rds Invest:-3

Invesco Funds:


I~nvlesc Funds A: -.2
Chartp 16.89 -.06
Cmstk 16.33 -.15
Cnstvp 226-2
E lncA 8.83 -.04
GrlncAp 19.83 -.16
HilncMu p
HiYId 4.25 -.01
HYMduA 10.00 +.01
InlGrow 26.48 -.33
MunilnA 13.89 +.02
PATFA 17.01 +.02
US MortgA 13.07 +.01
Inves oFunds B:+.2

USMort 13.00
I~nvlescoYFundsY: -.2
I Funds*


AssetSrl r 23.85 -.19
JPMora A Clas *
Coreo n 12.13s.+.02
CPMorgan C Cass:+.3

M~d~ol 12n6. -.26
JPMorgan RCl:
CoreBondnl2.14 +.03
ShtDurBd 11.02 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.71 -.12
JPMorgan Sel Cis:
CoreBdn 12.13 +.03
HighYldn 7.96
IntmTFBdn 11.41 +.01
LgCpGr 23.31 -.42
ShtDurBd n 11.01
USLCCrPlsn21.47 -.23
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.13 -.15
Contrarn T 13.60 -.15
EnterprT 62.47 -.71
FlxBndT 10.98 +.01
GlI~feSciT r 28.95 -.36
GlbSel T 9.12 -.13
GITechTr 17.59 -.20
Grw&IncT 32.61 -.34
JanusT 30.21 -.36
OvrseasTr 29.62 -.70

eshM~r T 31



J nsn Fun s


John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.13 +.01
RgBkA 14.00 -.19
StrlnAp 6.62 +.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.62 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.00 -.14
LSBalanc 12.95 -.09
LSConsrv 13.20 -.02


Name NAV Chg
Lazard lnstl:
IEmgart p18.14 -.16
EmgMkOp l8.54 -.17

CBASgr in3 9 -.85
CBprp 1. -. 0
GCIAIICOp 7 74 -.15
WA~in~ 1 +3
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrst 20.0 -.17

CMpnvpp2.2 -- 0
Longleaf Partners:
Sahr 2.3 -. 7
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.61 -.04
StrlncC 14.93 -.08
LBnondR 145 --04
Loomis Sayles Iny:
Iny rBdAp l2.46 -.0

Lord Abbett A:

IudEq 1. -2
B ApbAp 78
MidCpAp 16.34 -.17
Lrd Abbett 64 ..

Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurl 61 ...
MFS Funn s A.
MIT 2 .40 -19

EmGA 45.55 -.48
HinA 3.49

TotRA 14.68 -.08

aU eA 239-2
MFS Funds B:
MGn 1. -8

HlBn 2 5
TotRBn 14.68 -. 9
IVI Funds .1 -27

MFS Funds Instl:

I i Snay F A:-.30
HiYldBA 5.99
IMainStay Fumds B:-.6
GovtB t 9.02
HYldBB t 5.96
In mBldr 1. -- 4

MainStay Fundsl:
I ar &~ ow551 -.35

I ewns F :4 -.77
Yacktman pnl8.35 -.18
YctoNa i97e8 F-.20

Mtp As 87 -.11
AsianGllny 16.60 -.18

Pa~rnv 2. -1
ier eFun 5d82 -.01
Growth 44.42 -.63
IMetro Wst FO +01

I s undl10.82 +.02
Midas Fd t 2.19 ..
I nettan ru 8 -.16
I organ Stanley9B:-.6

IMor~ganStanley91nst*.6

MCapGrl 34.01 -.47
Muhek n5d : -.64
Gwt ~ppAn2d7s6 -.32

MCpCGrY 30.46 -.45
Mutual Series*
BeacnZ 12.56 -.12
G licA 28.62 -- 0

Q~uestZ 17.19 -.12

euesrger&Br mF s
enuesslnst 4.2 -. 3
Intr 15.83 -.19
LC pVlnv2.27mT:.29

Geeic s50.00 -.55
Hilnc In 9.86 -.01
NN rh rsnn 4 M3 -.49
Bondldx 11.14 +.02

Y ndlcb 8.7 -.12
Stklcd 16.91 -.17
Technly 14.94 -.23

N ~Bdp 6.74 +.02
LtMBAp 11.24
Nuveen Cl R.93 .1

NYuynd I 16.74 +.03
Real stno 21d.73 -.11

WhitOkSG 39.80 -.41
Oakmark Fu2d Os2:-.6

Go alcr 20.65 -.37

Oakmark 45.75 -.55

el Westbur Fs:-.9
GlobOpp 7.18 -.03
Gb dapl931992 -1
eaRneteie5.3 +.04

A TrMY 12.2 t0
CAMuniAp 8.71 +.01
C p~Ap 46.46 5

Dmktp c3p3 -.32
Discp 60.55 -1.05
EquityA 9.08 -.09
GlobAp 55.75 -.97
GlbOppA 28.45 -.89
GblStrlncA 4.25 -.01
Goldp 27.89 -.10
IntBdAp 6.44 -.02
LtdTmMu 15.09 +.02
MnStFdA 35.33 -.36
PAMuniAp 11.46 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.19 ..
USGvp 9.87 +.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.12 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.21 +.03
CplncBt 8.87 -.02
ChmplncBt i.82 ..
EquityB 8.35 -.08
GblStrlncB 4.27 ..
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.40 +.01
RoMuAp 16.97 +.03
RcNtMuA 7.47 +.01
OppenheimerY:
DevMktY 31.02 -.32
InlBdY 6.44 -.01
IntirowY 26.95 -.44
Osterweis Funds:
Strlncon 11.55 ..
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.85 +.01
TotRtAd 11.46 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.79 -.03
AllAsset 12.21 -.03
ComodRR 6.97 +.02
Divlnc 12.03 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.18 -.05
EmMkBd 12.06 -.01
Fltlncr 8.65 -.02
ForBdUnr 11.03 -.05
FrgnBd 11.04
HiYld 9.36
InvGrCp 11.12 +.02
LowDu 10.57 +.01
ModDur 11.05 +.02
RealRtnI 12.50 +.04
ShortT 9.85 +.01
TotRt 11.46 +.02
TRll 11.05 +.02
TRlI O0.un AO.02


PIC Fund A


RealRtC p 12.50 +.04
TotRtCt 11.46 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.50 +.04
TRtnp 11.46 +.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.78 -.02
TotRtnP 11.46 +.02
Parnassus Funds-
Iqyncon 28.29 -.21

Pra nt F4u6n -.16


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
Bon Ap 1 83 t01
PionFdAp 40.05 -.47
Pine rFund B:-.2
P ~det Fun: -.02
HiYldC t 10.08 -.03

atnecrY~p 104 ..
Price Funds:
B lnen 1. --0
Bhin 4. -5

DivGro n 25.09 21
EMu pn 1. -0
EmMktSn 29.67 -.28
Eqlncn 24.76 -.22
Eqlndexn 36.74 -.37
Eumopen 14.0 -2
Growthn 35.93 -.41

Glf nc n 4.2 3
HiYieldn 6.75 ..
dns~p 17.83 -.2

BCEqGrn 28.60 --41
IntDisn 41.02 -.55
SnGlk 1.7 -. 2
Japann 7.52 -.14
LatAmn 37.86 -.57
MDShrtn 5.24 ..
M ~ndn 1. t0

MCapValn 23.10 -.23
n mrn 33.8 --40

New rann 40.6 -- 6

Nlncn 9.93 +.02
NYBond 118 t0

PSlnc 16.55 -.10
RealAsset rnl0.42 -.09
RealEstn 20.95 -.15
R0 0n 15.9 --2

R2020n 17.05 -.14

R23n 1.8 1

R2045n 11.89 -.13
Si ecn 25.44 -.31

SmCpStk n 34 25 -.39
SmCapVal n36 91 -.53
SpecGnrnn1.2 2
TFlncn 10.53 +.01
Tx Iri 1 .3 +.02

gSL~ 146 t1
VABond n 12.30 +.02
Prialle 24.27 -.25

DvlnGls 9.2 -. 5
LT20201n 12.12 -.09

Lr~u2 nal Fs A:-.1
BendA 171 -. 4

MuHilncA 10.22 +.01

P~r de~ntial F B:-.1
Growh 174 -.3

Prudential Fds Z&I:
pMu up~Zn15 -.44
AmGvAp 9.7t0
ConvSec 19.2 -06

EqlnApp 15.80 -.15
GeBalA 12. 1
GlbEqtyp 1.5 1
GlblHIth 44.24 -.61
HiYdAp 7.71
HiYldln 5.97
Inc Ap 7.0t0

InvAp 13.73 -.15

Tb p~pGr 52g2 -6
ETxE 9.4 + 0
TFlnAp 15.71 +.03
T HYA 12.6 +.02

GblUtilA 1. -2

Putnam Funds B:
Ta Frlnts 157 t0

Eqlnct 15.66 -.16
GeBalB 1. -0
GlbEqt 7.74 -.10
GINtRst 16.40 -.12

GlllB 3. -4

HY~dBtt ...
IncmBt 7.04 +.02

InGrr t 128 -2

BJxBt 1.8 t0
MultCpGr 44.70 -.54
YBHYtt 19065 +02

GbtiBE 1.3 -.1
FoButns 17.15 -.31
IntirA 15.80 -.29
IgnphaA 4. -4

RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkA 151.14 -.17


Premierlr 18.68 -.21
TotRedlr 1. -6

Rus IIl Funds3S:+.3

Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv i5.86 -.23
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.44 -.17
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 19.50 -.28
10001nvr 38.62 -.40
S&PSel 21.45 -.22
SmCpSI 20.47 -.27
TSMSelf 24.74 -.26
Scout Funds:
Inl 29.13 -.45
Selected Funds:
AmShD 42.12 -.35
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.09 -.35
Sequoia 155.35-1.88
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 45.53 -.52
SoSunSClny t n20.30-.23
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.30 -.51
Stratton Funds:
Mull-Cap 34.56 -.35
RealEstate 30.50 -.16
SmCap 52.29 -.49
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.34 +.03
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.02 +.01
TotRetBdl 10.02 +.02
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.06 +.03
Eqldxlnst 10.38 -.11
InLEqllnst 14.38 -.33
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.00 -.31
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 14.94 -.16
REVallnstr 24.39 -.12
Valuelnst 44.93 -.32
Thornburg Fds*
IntValA p 24.86 -.28
IncBuildAt 18.30 -.17
IncBuildC pl 8.30 -.17
IntValue l 25.42 -.28
LtTMul 14.66 +.01
Th ivnt Fds A*
HiYld 4.92

Ta sameric9. .01



orsnY~ 94


AllAm 24.15 -.28
ChinaReg 6.68 -.01
GlbRs 9.20 -.02
Gld&Mtls 10.45 -.04
WldPrcMn 10.44 -.06
USAA G p
AgyGt ro3 .97 -.41
CABd 11.01 +.01
CrnstSt 22.02 -.12


Gr&Inc 15.33 -.15


Name NAV Chg
IncStk 13.15 -.15
Inco 1. t0

NYBd 12.50 +.02
Prc cM 2. -0

t tpk 142 -2
TxElt 13 67 +.02
TX LT 13.8 +.0

VA Bd 11.64 +.02
VWldGr 19.16 -.30
VLC Id -

Value Line Fd:
Lgon ard.ld 6l-.21
BalAdmln 23.11 -.13
CAITAdmn11.68 +.01
CALTAdmnl1.92 +.02
CpOpd~lnn 7. -9
Energyn 108.15 -.18
ElA Innn 2 35 4
ExplAdmln 70.27 -.96
xd~dmmni4. 5
GNMAAdnn 0 _

HlthCrn 59.67 -.75

Hnf rdo dnn 291 +.10
ITBdAdmln l2.18 +.03
ITsryAdmlnl1.86 +.02
IntirAdmn 54.08 -.94

LtdTrAdn 11.18
LGirAdlmlnljl t.

MCp dmn9506 .0
MuHYAdmnl1.20 +.02
NYL rnn 117 t0
PALTAdmnl1.70 +.01
ReitAdm rn 93.50 -.56
STsyAdmln 10.79
SB ~mlnl06 +.01

STFdAdn 10.88
mnIr~ n -.8 0

T ACd Irnn 68.1 -7
TStkdmn 33.92 -.35
V ~mln 2. -1
Wellin~dm n57.21 -.32
Windsor n 46.52 -.34
VW sldnF :942 -.45
CALTn 11.92 +.02
CaO pn 3. 4

G vppnnn2.9 2
Energy n 57 59 10
qnrcnn 233-
ALLn 12.18 +.01
GlobEqn 16.99 -.20


HlhCC e 145.4 -1.79
IniaPron 14.86 +.05
IntExplrn 1. -2

IT~aen 603 5 0
ITTsfy n 11 86 + 02
Lieonn 1. -0

Liern 623 0 2

LTIGraden 11.1 t0

Morgn 19.14 -.25


uodngn +17 .0
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.33 +.02
NYLTn 11.77 +.02
PLTTn 1. t0
PrecMtlsrn l4.75 -.25
Pm pCornl42 -1

Se~lurn 1. -5

STIGrade n 10.80

S srdyn 107


TgRRee200115n1303 9
TRe2020n23.02 -.17

RgRee220320nn22.30 -
Tgt e03n a. -- 5
Tgt~e002.1 -2
Tgt e20 0n2 82 -.24
USGron 19.95 -.21
US Mlen 1. -0

Weln 3312 -.19

VWndslland I2x7 s 26



tvkntPigr n89 9 5
B edktn 20.3 -1.2


MidCaplt n2093 5-27

CC Gnthn 1-e. 3 5

Totllntll~n 13.34-16 2
TotlnStkrn33.91 -.35
Valun 121.79 -1.19
Ballnstdn 23.11 -.13
DevMkntn 84.61 -.20
Extendn 42.55 -.52
Growhlsn 35.11 -.40
InfaPolnsn 511.8 +.03
ITnstdxn 124.92 -1.27

MidCplsn 21.00 -.26
REITnsrn l4.47 -.09
SmClnsn 36.19 -.45
ToBlstn 11.22 +.02
ToSlnt n 33.92 -.36
Valuelsn 21.79 -.19
Vanguardignatl d:
500lSgtn 103.85 -1.0
GroklSign 32.51 -.37
Midtldxn30.00 -.38
STAI~dldx n10.67 +1.01
SmwpSign 32.60 -.41
TotnSgln 11.22 +.026
nTotStklgxn32.74 -.34
VirTtlusunds*0 .3
REm~lktln 9.41 -.06
MuI~lnStnp 4.86
As~setS 8.94 -.07
Corlsnvp 6.28 -.08
Divopptp 14.95 -.10
Dvalppltn 14.79 -.10

SmGrog 41.18 -.60

iCmlctkny 19.77 -.26

TOpty~lny 327.8 -.344
Wells Faro d Is :

UIutSulnc 4.82
Wadells&argodAdmi:


SpGrowst1ago3 -.69


Business H1C


Heineken makes $4.1 billion

bid to raise Tiger beer stake

SINGAPORE Heineken said Friday it is of-
fering $4.1 billion to buy out its partner in the Sin-
gapore-based maker of Tiger beer, attempting to
neutralize a Thai tycoon's competing bid for influ-
80Ce Over the brand as the Dutch brewer ex-

pands in emerging markets.
Heineken said it has made a proposal to the
board of Fraser & Neave Ltd., which shares owner-
Ship of the Tiger beer brewer Asia Pacific Breweries
Ltd. with Heineken, to pay 50 Singapore dollars
($40) a share for F&N's nearly 40 percent stake.
The offer is worth $4.1 billion and would give
Heineken about an 82 percent stake in APB. If
the offer is accepted, Heineken would spend a
further $2.4 billion in Singapore to buy out the
minOrity APB shareholders.

Auto sales weaken

a bit in early Jul

DETROIT The raft of gloomy economic
nOWS may be starting to hurt U.S. auto sales.
Industry analysts and dealers said this week
Sales during the first half of July slowed a bit
from the robust pace in June. But they still were
eXpected to be better than July 2011.
Dealers may be wondering if car buyers,
Who've largely ignored sobering economic head-
linOS, are finally getting discouraged. A widely fol-
lOwed reading on consumer confidence has
fallen for four straight months. Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged this
Week that the economy has weakened.

IPO market heats up after

Facebook freeze

NEW YORK Investors showed their ap-
petite for freshly public technology stocks on Fri-
day, but a decidedly old-school company -
Fender Instruments bowed out of its planned
initial public offering, citing market conditions.
Analysts were quick to isolate the guitar maker
aS a solo act, out of tune with the broader IPO
market. The rest of the bunch did well, after all.
The stock of security software company Palo
Alto Networks popped 27 percent in its market
debut. The stock of Kayak, the travel-booking


SH LIG HTS

website, jumped 28 percent.
So much for the "Facebook freeze." Eight IPOs
are scheduled for next week. They include a secu-
rity software maker from the Netherlands, a high-
end steakhouse from Texas and a natural-food

grocery store chain from Lakewood, Colo. The di-
versity of companies taking the plunge, along with
their sheer number during the usually slow sum-
mer season, shows that the market for initial public
offerings is in the midst of a rebound after a lull
that followed Facebook's mid-May debut.

Star bucks opening 3 new

Evolution juice stores

NEW YORK Starbucks Corp. already con-
quered the coffee market. Now it wants to mix it
up with fresh juices.
The Seattle-based company on Friday will an-
nounce the opening of three more Evolution Fresh
Inc. juice stores, in addition to the one it opened
earlier this year. Starbucks is also expanding distri-
bution of ready-to-drink bottles of Evolution juice in
supermarkets and other stores to capitalize on the
rapidly growing market for premium juices.
The move is Starbucks' latest push to move
beyond its caf~s at a time when the company is
facing growing competition from fast food chains
that serve specialty coffees.

GE 2Q earnings drop

16 percent; reaffirms outlook
NEW YORK General Electric's shift back to
its manufacturing roots is paying off.
The conglomerate founded by light bulb inventor
Thomas Edison has pumped billions of dollars into
new energy-related businesses during the past few
years while selling its stake in NBC, commercial
real estate and other businesses. The move has
softened the blow from the recession, and it ex-
pects double-digit earnings growth this year.
GE said Friday net income fell 16 percent in
the second quarter, mainly due to lingering
charges from financing companies that were
sold off several years ago. Its energy infrastruc-
ture business, meanwhile, reported double-digit
growth in the period, and profits surged for its
transportation business. The company's quar-
terly results topped Wall Street expectations.
rm wire reports


Name Last Chg
SwstAirl 8.86 29
Swst~nE 31.97 +.29
SpecranEn 30.41 +.03
SprintNex 3.66 -.05
SPMals 35.42 -.22
SPHIthC 38.25 -.50
SPCnSt 35.04 -.22
SPConsum 43.75 -.54
SD ~ncl 1. -2


StawdH1 5.1 9 -.13

Stadr 4401 -1. 8
Stranltolds 66.21 +.09

Stryker 51.38 -.76
SturmRug 42.58 -.07
SubPpne 43.80 -.93
SunCmis 46.34 +.04
SunCok~eE 15.61 +.59
Suncorgs 30.07 -.27
Sunonm 48.10 -.04


Supvalu 2.25
Swifffrans 7.94
Synovus 1.91
Sysm 28.87
TCF Fncl 9.85
TDAmeritr 15.70
TE Connect 31.79
TECO 18.24
TIMPartn 21.23
TR Auto 361



Tawempu 12.654
Tearism~ 36.67
Treadta 66.97
Tellradyn 13.64
Terex~s 15.24
Tesoroa 27.43
Tearaiec 7.32
Tevat~lhm 41.61



Thomrkg 27.77


3M Co 89.99
TIffany 55.97
TWCable 84.80
TImeWarn 38.86
Tilmken 43.38
TItanMet 11.34
TollBros 30.71
TorchEngy 1.64
Torchmarke 51.19




TyonDk 15.09
UBtaSAG 410.5
UDRl~y 26.90
UGTrpvlr 30.79
UILHodga 37.40

UySoiw 12.01
UBSG 20.13
Ultrat 21.88

UndSrmr 49.359
cSiw 1 .0
Ulbontg 21.55


UtdMicro 2.16 +.06 WGL Hold 40.86
UPS B 78.45 -1.52 WPX En n 15.54
UtdRentals 30.39 +.59 Wabash 6.05
US Bancrp 33.60 -.20 WalMart 72.25
US NGs rs 21.08 +.53 Wlgrn 34.60
USOilFd 34.20 -.44 WalterEn 36.75
USStedl 18.81 -.92 WsteMlnc 32.95
UtdTTech 74.23 -1.59 WatsnPh 75.81
UtdhlthGp 55.41 +.42 Weathflnl 13.20




pn~E~ 1 1 5 enl n66
Vang~mg 39.38 -.60 yerhs
VangEu 419.99 -1.15 Whi gret 43.14
VangEAFE 31.10 -.70 Wmstos 314.31
Varianted 57.08 -2.35 Wms~tr~ 55.21
Vaentas 65.39 -.14 WAT India 16.87
Veoli~ny 0.86 -.64 Worhgein 22.46
Veri~oe 36.2 -.40 XL Gr 20.41
Verzn~mg 44.49 -.605 XcEnyet 29.20

Vainem 170 d3

Veornao 83.48 -.90 Zimmery 62.64


kM Ukt take a R OSRmt


European usudy Market
luJ 20


Cdld5C~ SCOC7 CO






Associated Press


NEW YORK For the
paSt few days, the U.S. stock
market was able to forget
about problems in Europe.
Friday put Europe
Squarely back in the spot-
light.
U.S. stocks fell sharply as
eScalating problems in
Spain jolted investors.
Spain's stock market
plunged 6 percent and its
borrowing costs spiked after
r egiOnal government
aSked for a financial life-
line.
The drop on Wall Street,
which sent the Dow JoneS
industrial average down as
much as 133 points, marked
a U-turn for the market.
Stocks had risen over the
paSt three days as investors
focused on healthy earnings
frOm U.S. companies like
Mattel, Honeywell and
COca-Cola.
On Friday, talk of slug-
giShness in Europe was
prevalent as more compa-
HieS turned in their quar-
terly results.
Staffing agency Man-
pOwer fell 6 percent, to


I1 I lan~

ail lililll!=





nn-J-



LETTERS *~ to the Editor


"Pride thadt dines on vanity sups oncontempt. "
Benjamin Franklin, 1757


CITRus COUNTY CHRONICLE


recently returned home to the
in the United Arab Emirates
(UAE) for two years. When I
headed to the Middle East, I
thought I would be see-
ing lots of camels and
struggling to find some
booze. 4
Instead, I often felt '
like I was in Florida.
First, it's hot and has r
lots of beaches. I
played more golf in I
Abu Dhabi, where I
lived, than I ever
played in the U.S. Tom C
Even though it's a grim FLOI
desert, the UAE man- VOI
aged to find enough
water to keep its many
golf courses green.
Dubai, the country's largest
city, reminded me of South
Beach. Luxury cars. Fancy
restaurants on the beach. Gor-
geous women toting shopping
bags from upscale stores.
The Emiratis know the oil will
run out some day, so they're try-
ing to build Disney World in the
desert to attract tourists. Unlike
their neighbors in Saudi Arabia,
they're not terribly strict when it
comes to Islamic practices. Thus,
you could get alcohol almost any
time of day.
The UAE is an artificial coun-
try. It was created only 40 years
ago and 90 percent of the popula-
tion comes from somewhere else,
Despite its enormous wealth
and relatively progressive ways,


this oil-money miracle is doomed
when the oil is gone, in my opin-
ion. I predict that 100 years from
now, Florida will be thriving and
the glitzy malls and exclusive re-


love bureaucracy and dislike
work.
SShabby. For all the glitz, most
of the UAE is a tacky place lit-
tered with discarded plastic bags
and stray cats. Everything is built
poorly so it's a city that's always
under repair.
STacky. I suppose displays of
expensive toys are unavoidable
in a country where the wealth is
so new. But it's draining to see
unearned opulence day after day.
SGrim for poor workers. I ad-
mire the Filipinos, the Pakista-
nis, the Indians, the Bangladeshis
and the tsunami of other people
who leave their families and
work 70-hour weeks for peanuts.
They're grateful for the chance to
provide for their families, but it
borders on slavery.
SOddly inspirational. I ad-
mired the cab drivers, security
guards, tea boys and coffee-shop
clerks. Their good humor and
work ethic give me hope about
the human race.
HA sweet deal for skilled ex-
pats. High pay, tax free. Lots of
vacation. Short plane flights to
fascinating places to visit. Tee
times that are never rained out.
You get to hear the Islamic "call
to prayer" while standing over a
putt.


A former managing editor of the
Palm Beach Post and the
Cleveland Plain Dealer Tom
O'Hara is a na tional columnist
for Florida Voices.


sorts in the UAE will
be shuttered.
The desert is too
harsh and the region
too volatile for coun-
tries like the UAE to
survive without the
unimaginable wealth
it now gets from the ex-
traordinary amounts
of oil and gas that lie
beneath it,
Now, allow me to
share some other ob-
servations about the
UAE.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
aerry Mulligan .................. ................... ..publisher
Charlie Brennan ................. ............... ......editor
Mike Arnold .................. ................... ..HR director
Sandra Frederick. ................... ........ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................. ....................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........... ............citizen member
Wi laon Rebecca Martin ........... ........guest member
"You may di fer with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Q U ESTIONABLE DECISION








U.S. OFym SU



d h rm

mad 9 Of OW


The country is:
aUninhabitable. Without
enormous amounts of oil to pro-
vide the power to supply air-con-
ditioning and water, humans
can't survive here much of the
year.
SSafe. I never locked my car. I
never felt threatened on the
streets at night. There are many
poor people there, but they are
not willing to jeopardize their op-
portunity to be overworked and
underpaid by stealing a car.
SRich. For the 800,000 Emirati
natives, it's a cradle-to-grave wel-
fare state. For the royalty, it's a
life of shipping your Rolls Royce
to London for the summer, where
the family goes shopping at Har-
rod's every day.
MInefficient. The Emiratis


you wonder what they were
thinking. Uniforms for the
U.S. Olympic teams supplied
by Ralph Lauren are made in
China.
OK, we recog-
nize that 98 per-
cent of all THI
apparel and 99 T I
percent of all U.S. Olym
footwear sold in uniforms
the U.S. is manu- Ch
factured abroad,
as textile indus- OUO
try representa-
tives said in What'i
congressional Braziliai
testimony last juice as t
year. U.S. Olymr
Still, this is for beve
the United States
Olympic Team -
representatives of our country
--wearing uniforms made by
our biggest economic competi-
tor.
This decision led to wide-
spread criticism and a mea culpa
from Ralph Lauren and the U.S.
Olympic Committee (USOC).
While a representative of the
USOC initially tweeted that the
criticism was nonsense, the
agency and Ralph Lauren now
say while it is too late to re-
make the uniforms, the ones
for the 2014 Winter Olympics
will be made in the U.S.A.
It's about time.
One would think that the
USOC would have been sensi-
tized a decade ago, when there
was controversy over the berets
for the 2002 team being made
in Canada. But no, parts of the
uniforms for the 2008 summer


team and the 2010 winter team
were made in China.
Perhaps with no one making
an issue of these, folks at USOC
and Ralph Lauren assumed no
one would either notice or care
the 2012 uniforms
were made in
SUE* China.
*SE This is a deci-
pic team sion on par with
made in the 1872 observa-
na. tion by professor
of physiology that
INION:"Louis Pasteur's
theory of germs is
next, ridiculous fic-
orange tion," or H.M.
re official Warner's 1927
pic team statement "who
age? wants to hear ac-
tors talk?"
With the current
focus on American jobs and
outsourcing of American prod-
ucts, the information about
Olympic uniforms did not go
unnoticed; hence the USOC's
pledge for the 2014 uniforms to
be American-made.
This is a good decision, and
we are glad they made it,
though in reality they proba-
bly had no choice other than
to make the commitment or
live with a continuing ava-
lanche of criticism.
Still, we are glad future
Olympic uniforms will have
"Made in America" sewn in
their labels. Olympic athletes
spend years conditioning their
bodies to represent this coun-
try on the international stage.
It seems that as a minimum,
they should be wearing clothes
made in America.


Nickel-and-dimed
I am writing you because I re-
ceived a letter from my financial
institution informing me the
minimum balance requirement
to waive a monthly maintenance
fee has increased from $500 to
$1,500. Of course, they tell you
how you can waive the fee if you
have direct deposit.
I am outraged. Last year, we
dealt with the debit card fees
they were trying to force on us,
and now they are hitting the
weakest, most vulnerable in our
community, the elderly and the
families struggling to make ends
meet. What is next? A fee to cash
our checks or deposit fees? Don't
laugh some banks already do

th .this what we want for Citrus
County?
I am fighting mad, and the rest
of us who live here should be as
well. Don't let this happen.
I tried to get the name of the
bank president, but that infor-
mation is safely guarded. They
wouldn't give me that informa-
tion. They didn't want to give me
his name. They did give me his
mailing address. I am going to
write in protest of this latest
scheme to take our money.
I hope you are as fired up over
this as I am. It is time to put a
stop to the endless and persist-
ent leeching of the working man
and woman,
Ann Watson
Hernando

Manage health care
Any radical changes in our
present health care industry


wi h tams fo -dpia le ite on
every level would dramatically
offset operational costs.
Fraudulent claims have sky-
rocketed way out of control. Min-
imizing these excessive costs
could have a dramatic effect on
controlling spending. Doctors
are literally bombarded by exu-
berating medical malpractice in-
surance premiums. By
minimizing frivolous lawsuits,
our overall health costs would
bei to declie
The upswing to managed state-
run facilities and better commu-
nity outpatient clinics will provide
jobs nationwide. It's critical that
every state becomes involved in
our nation's health care dilemma
fn ddno rly comp etely on the
ment's role should be to ensure
state-mandated compliance is en-
acted in ever state.
A more comprehensive gov-
erning board of bipartisan ad-
ministrators, both on a local
and federal level should be in
the forefront for overseeing
and managing these changes.
Our country is literally becom-
ing crippled by rising health
care costs. No one entity alone
can solve this problem, yet if
each state pitched in and did
what is right and fair for our
citizens, only then will fairness
and affordability prevail. We
should never have to rely on
one politician, nor one politi-
cal party, or any group of
politicians to solve the prob-
lems in our health care indus-
try ever again,
Robert Hogerheide
Inverness


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Mead wret Blvd ,
Crystal River, FLw e4s29. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


during these uncertain times
could put the whole health
care industry in a spiraling
tailspin. This could damage
the whole industry as we have
come to know it.
We need to initiate a plan of
attack in all four corners of the
industry for sustainable
change. It would be more prac-
tical first, if each state in our
union begins to make health
care more accessible with no
frills to its citizens. Having the
federal government dictate to
the nation what is to become of
our health care industry would
have major consequences and
setbacks.
Better state-sponsored facili-
ties would be better able to hone
in on the actual needs of the
community The ability to adapt
to the medical needs of the citi-
zens of different states could
easily minimize excessive and
unwarranted costs. State-oper-


extra dollars to go after those who
don't buy health insurance. Why
not just add teh cwohs on the free-

caught?
JD Seeing the sea
G Vhen is the ost hte
peo le a ot reading the
water? And when are they
goin to re uire that
when they go to deep
g water, they carry a sea
anchor? From an old
)579 seaman
Whose lawn?
The person complaining of the
rats, snakes and moles destroying
his lawn is confused, to say the
least. Rats, snakes and moles do
not destroy a lawn. You simply
like to complain. Their habitat is
destroyed by construction and fire
and you wonder why they are on
your lawn. Being born a human
does not give us the right to de-
stroy all lesser forms of life on
this planet. There is a reason for
all of us being here.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
CONINENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Page A8 SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


COming Home to America


,





O'Hara
RIDA
CES


S


i

P
s
n
h

r


COIreTioCEl

An editorial on Page A8 of Wednesday's edition and a clarification on Page
A14 of Friday's edition warrant correcting, as the information in Friday's edition
was again in error.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office has a total of more than 800 volunteers
who work in a variety of assignments in different locations around the county.
Only about 14 of them specifically donate their time, efforts and expertise to the
Seniors vs. Crime project.
The Chronicle regrets the errors.


Fruits of capitalism
To the (person) who's upset
ambaok aPs do aEnglish:" You're
nthig Othe cutre O
nhoat do not haea con ri s C
as) a primary I ng a
over language. Overseas
I've heard English music
in airports, restaurants,
English-spoken signs all A
over the place, and all is
well. But other countries
have bilingual and trilin-56
gual citizens and children
and we're lucky if our
own citizens or children even
speak English correctly. People
like you make people hate Ameri-
cans. Spanish brings in the
almighty dollar. After all, isn't this
what the U.S. is all about capi-
talism?
Charge freeloaderS
Regarding the call titled "Extra
agents," on July 13. The caller
complained that the government
will have to hire extra agents at


I]


-C









HVisit www.Chronicle~nline.com to read today's headlines, add your thoughts to the
weekly opinion poll, search the classified ads, look up movie times or play games.


0721 SACRN

NOTICE OF TAX

FOR SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY
The Citrus County School District will soon consider a measure to continue to impose a 1.750 mill
property tax for the capital outlay projects listed herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board s proposed tax of 5.889 mills for operating expenses and is
proposed solely at the discretion of the school board.
The capital outlay tax will generate approximately $16,281,816 to be used for the following projects:

CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING
Crystal River High School site work, renovation, remodeling and new construction
Removal of portables at Crystal River High
Lecanto High School reroofing
Citrus Springs reroofing and HVAC upgrade
Inverness Middle School site work, renovation, remodeling, new construction and transportation
improvements
Floral C tesElementary replace portables with permanent classrooms, sewer upgrades and cafeteria

District Services building renovations, remodel and HVAC work
Feasibility study for Invemess Primary, Invemess Middle and Citrus High schools
Site work for New Elementary School in Pine Ridge area
Purchase properties adjacent to existing school sites
Purchase properties for future educational use
Consultant services related to engineering and architectural work, as well as feasibility studies related to
facility planning

NC tcross Stp n ng E tearyn nirso Spin Mi dew kEST Cry tal Rer H ge grysta Risyr Middle,
Crystal River Primary, Floral City Elementary, Forest Ridge Elementary, Hernando Elementary,
Homosassa Elementary, Invemess Middle, Inverness Primary, Lecanto High Lecanto Middle, Lecanto
Primary, Marine Science Station, Pleasant Grove Elementary, Renaissance Center, Rock Crusher
Elementary, Withlacoochee Technical Institute, District Services buildings, Student Services buildings
and Transportation buildings

MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION,AND REPAIR ..
Roof repairs,plumbmng repairs, electrical repairs, additional computer drops,pamnting, ceiling repairs'
flooring repairs, HVAC repairs and upgrades, minor remodel and renovation work, bleacher repairs,
Fire, Health and Safety related issues and site security issues,ADA renovations and repairs, fire alarm,
electrical repairs and modifications, ceilings, walls, doors, windows and slabs, sites and ground
improvements, indoor air quality, bathroom renovations, correct and improve drainage and erosion
problems, lockers, fencing, gym and stage floors, carpet cleaning, paying, resurfacing, floor coverings,
sidewalks, covered bus loading ramps and other areas, covered walkways, parking area expansion,
storage buildings, doors and locks, painting, athletic facilities and cabinet construction at Central Ridge
Elementary, Citrus High, Citrus Springs Elementary, Citrus Springs Middle, CREST, Crystal River
High, Crystal River Middle, Crystal River Primary, Floral City Elementary, Forest Ridge Elementary,
Hernando Elementary, Homosassa Elementary, Invemess Middle, Inverness Primary, Lecanto High ,
Lecanto Middle, Lecanto Primary, Marine Science Station, Pleasant Grove Elementary, Renaissance
Center, Rock Crusher Elementary, Withlacoochee Technical Institute, District Services buildings,
Student Services buildings and Transportation buildings

MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES
Purchase of eight (8) School Buses

NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT, COMPUTERS AND ELECTRONIC LEARNING
DEVICES,AND ENTERPRISE RESOURCE SOFTWARE
Fire alarm systems, air conditioning equipment, ADA required equipment and furniture, vocational
equipment, school bus digital cameras and communication equipment, furniture and equipment,
computers, server and technology related equipment, enterprise software, custodial and maintenance
equipment
PAYM NTS FO EDCATIONAL FACILITIES AND SITES DUE UNDER A LEASE-

Payments for principal and interest on Certificates of Participation and Qualified School Construction
Bonds

PAYMENTS FOR RENTING AND LEASING EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AND SITES
One (1) Year Lease of Portable Classrooms at various school sites

PAYMENT OF COSTS OF COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL STATUTES, RULES
AND REGULATIONS
Removal of hazardous waste materials, maintenance of DRAs, asbestos abatement, fire safety, ADA
compliance, indoor air quality and radon testing
PAYMENT OF PREMIUMS FOR PROPERTY AND CASUALTY INSURANCE NECESSARY
TO INSURE THE EDUCATIONAL AND ANCILLARY PLANTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT
All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to be held on July 24, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. at The
Citrus County School Board, District Services Center, 1007 West Main Street, Invemess, Florida.

A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY TAXES will be made at this hearing.


PROPOSED MILLAGE LEVIES
NOT SUBJECT TO 10O-MILL CAP


Operating or Capital Not 0.0000
To Exceed 21 Years


PROPOSED MILLAGE LEVIES SUBJECT TO 10-MILL CAP


Federal sources 615,000 11,828,362 12,443,362
State sourceS 43,961,861 83,085 530,900 107,000 44,682,846
Local sourceS 60,487,415 1,187,634 16,653,016 14,029,100 850 92,358,015
TOTAL SOURCES 105,064,276 13,099,081 530,900 16,760,016 14,029,100 850 149,484,223
Transfers In 11,099,588 5,443,020 16,542,608
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets 10,597,823 1,181,692 88,284 50,221,059 1,736,503 100,072 63,925,433
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS &
BAI.ANCES $126,761,687 $14,280,772 $6,062,204 $66,981,075 $15,765,603 $100,922 $229,952,264

EXPENDITURES
Instruction 69,576,492 3,686,641 73,263,133
Pupil Personnel Services 4,798,433 734,757 5,533,190
Instructional Media Services 1,480,748 1,480,748
Instructional and Curriculum Development Services 1,475,630 2,112,044 3,587,674
Instructional Staff Training Services 916,134 272,179 1,188,313
Instructional Related Technology 1,491,592 1,491,592
Board of Education 678,942 678,942
General Administration 434,076 434,076
School Administration 8,034,059 8,034,059
Facilities Acquisition and Construction 832,683 25,723,479 26,556,162
Fiscal Services 853,588 853,588
Food Services 6,467,860 6,467,860
Central Services 2,260,539 14,058,305 16,318,844
Pupil Transportation Services 8,134,914 8,134,914
Operation of Plant 9,642,852 11,865 9,654,717
Maintenance of Plant 6,561,849 6,561,849
Administrative Technology Services 1,729,933 54,320 1,784,253
Community Servies 664,492 1,000 665,492
Debt Services 5,973,920 320 5,974,240
TOTAL. EXPENDITURES $119,566,955 $13,327,801 $5,973,920 $25,723,799 $14,070,170 $1,000 $178,663,645
Transfers Out 16,542,608 16,542,608
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets 7,194,731 952,972 88,284 24,714,668 1,695,433 99,922 34,746,011
TOTAL. APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES,
TRANSFERS, RESERVES & BALANCES $126,761,687 $14,280,772 $6,062,204 $66,981,075 $15,765,603 $100,922 $229,952,264 l
The tentative, adopted, and/or final budgets are on file in the office of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record.


CITRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 A9


Associated Press
Firefighters and law enforcement personnel remove equip-
ment Friday from the roof of the apartment of the alleged
gunman, James Holmes.


booby trapped, and was
shaken by the news.
"I'm concerned if I had
opened the door, I would
have set it off," she said.
Fonzi said she had seen
the man one or two times
before but never talked with
him.
She said she believes the
music was on a timer be-
cause it started about the
time of the shootings.
Police have searched
apartments and broken out
windows at the building, but
Fonzi said she doesn't know
the condition of her apart-
ment or car.
When asked about plans
to possibly try to detonate
the device with a robot, she
said, "It's not an ideal situa-
tion, but if that has to be
done to keep safe, then it
has to be done."
University of Colorado
pharmacy student Ben Lung,
27, who lives two floors down
from the suspect, said he and
other residents were evacu-


ated around 2 a.m. by SWAT
officers armed with
rifles.
"I heard a loud crash. It
sounded like an air condi-
tioner falling to the ground.
About 10 minutes later, I
heard police knock on my
door. Police were armed
with assault rifles and they
brought us outside the
apartment building and
started questioning us,"
Lung said.
Lung said a few residents
upstairs had called police
around midnight and com-
plained about loud music
coming from the suspect's
apartment.
Michelle Thuis, 26, who
lives in an apartment near
the entrance to the building,
said police woke her up
when they stormed in
around 2:30 a.m.
"I heard them breaking
down the front door: I called
the police on them, then I
looked out and saw it was
the police," she said.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HE ARIN G


The Citrus County School Board will soon consider a

budget for the 2012-2013 fiscal year.



A public hearing to make a DECISION

On the budg et AN D TAX ES

Will be held on.

July 24, 201 2

5:30 p.m.



The Citrus County School Board

District Services Center

1007 W. Main St.

Inverness, FL 34450


BUDG ET SUMMARY

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL

DISTRICT ARE 8.3% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPEN DITU RES.

FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013


Required Local Effort
(including prior period adjustment)
Local Capital Improvement (Capital Outlay)
Discretionary Operating
Discretionary Capital Improvement


5.1410


1.5000
0.7480
0.0000


Discretionary Critical Needs-Capital
Additional Millage Not to Exceed 4 Years
(Operating)


0.2500
0.0000


Debt Service


Total Millage


TRUST AND
AGENCY FUND


0.0000


7.639


GENERAL
FUND


SPECIAL
REVENUE


DEBT
SERVICE


CAPITAL
PROJECTS


INTERNAL
SERVICE


TOTAL ALL
FUNDS


ESTIMATED REVENUES:


Continued from Page Al

"It's a pretty extensive
booby trap. We're not sure
what its a tahedT oer here
three containers and we
don't know what's inside,"
said Chris Henderson,
deputy Aurora fire chief.
If there is a detonation
that causes a fire, firefight-
ers will fight it from the out-
side of the building, he said.
The building and several
around it have been
evacuated.
Kaitlyn Fonzi, 20, a gradu-
ate student at University
Hospital, said she lives in
the apartment below that of
the suspect.
About midnight, Fonzi
said she heard like techno-
like, deep-based reverberat-
ing music coming from that
unit apartment. She went
upstairs to the suspect's
place and put her hand on
the door handle. She felt it
was unlocked, but she didn't
know if he was there and
decided not to confront him.
"I yelled out and told him
I was going to call the cops
and went back to my apart-
ment," she said.
Fonzi called police, who
told her they were busy with
a shooting and did not have
time to respond to a noise
disturbance. She said she
was surprised to learn later
that the apartment was













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WOT~B RIEF:S nm ly e rs i ta s

Celebrate Ielp~ m n ie 7sae


Associated Press
A Palestinian boy plays
with fireworks Friday as he
celebrates the start of the
Muslim holy month of
Ramadan in Gaza City.


Troops reclaim
Damascus area
DAMASCUS, Syria Syr-
ian troops and tanks Friday
drove rebels from a Damas-
cus neighborhood where
some of the heaviest of this
week's fighting in the capital
left cars gutted and fighters'
bodies in the streets. More
than 300 people were killed in
a single day, activists said, as
the military struggles to re-
gain momentum after a stun-
ning bombing against the
regime's leadership.
Afourth member of Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's inner
circle, national security chief
Gen. Hisham Ikhtiyar, died of
wounds he suffered in
Wednesday's bomb blast,
which went off during a high-
level security meeting in
Damascus, the government
announced.
The bombing has been a
resounding blow to Assad,
killing his defense minister
and his influential brother-in-
law along with another secu-
rity official, all central to
directing the crackdown on
the uprising against his rule.
The blast, six days of sus-
tained fighting in neighbor-
hoods across the heart of the
capital and the fall of several
border posts into rebel hands
have pointed to the unravel-
ing of Assad's grip on power.

Iraqis flee Syria in
droves by land, air
BAGHDAD -Thousands
of Iraqi nationals have fled by
land and air from Syria over
the past two days to escape
an escalating civil war, offi-
cials said Friday, as Iraqi
troops were rushed to seal
the border across from a post
seized by rebels. Baghdad's
prime minister called for the
U.N. to help protect the
refugees and get them home.

1,0 hadqihof in sdht fl ghts
from Damascus, which in the
last week has seen its heavi-
est fighting in Syria's 16-
month uprising. Thousands
more poured through a land
crossing to Iraq despite the
rebel takeover of one other
major Syrian border post.
The U.N. refugee agency
reported Friday unknown gun-
men shot dead an Iraqi
refugee family of seven in their
Damascus apartment. Agency
spokeswoman Melissa Flem-
ing said the group, including
children, was found "mur-
dered" at close ran e


Eleven states see

rates do in une
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Unemploy-
ment rates rose in 27 U.S. states last
month, the most in almost a year
and a reflection of weaker hiring
nationwide.
The Labor Department said Fri-
day unemployment rates fell in 11


states and Washington, D.C. the
fewest since August. Rates were un-
changed in 12 states.
Nationwide, employers added
only 80,000 jobs last month, the
third straight month of weak job
growth. The national unemploy-
ment rate stayed at 8.2 percent.
Still, 29 states added jobs in June,
up from 27 in May. Unemployment
rates can rise even if more jobs are
created if more of those out of work
start looking for jobs. The number
of Americans searching for jobs na-


tionwide increased last month,
Nevada recorded the highest un-
employment rate, at 11.6 percent,
the same as the previous month. It
was followed by Rhode Island at
10.9 percent and California at 10.7
percent
North Dakota had the lowest un-
employment rate at 2.9 percent.
It was followed by Nebraska at
3.8 percent.
Several states reported big in-
creases in unemployment. Rates
rose 0.4 percentage points in Ala-


bama and New Jersey, to 7.8 per-
cent and 9.6 percent, respectively.
Some states kept hiring at a
healthy pace in June. California
added 38,300 jobs and Ohio added
18,400, after similar gains in both
states in May. And North Carolina
rebounded after losing jobs in May,
adding 16,900 jobs last month.
Still, others lost jobs. Wisconsin
shed 13,200 positions, the most of
any state. It was followed by Ten-
nessee, where employers cut 12,100
jobs.


Lyric Cook- Elizabeth
I~liorrissey collins
has been has been
missing since missing since
July 13. July 13.

*oic




wac on


mlSSill








NSAL, ,oa- u


thorities in Iowa have taken
Steps to keep a closer watch on
the father of one of two missing
cousins, a man with a lengthy
criminal history who stopped
cooperating with police in the
week-old investigation, court
records showed Friday.
A judge has ordered Daniel
Morrissey, 36, placed in a pre-
trial supervision program of
the Iowa Department of Cor-
rections while he faces trials
in two separate drug cases.
The change means Morrissey,
who has been free on bond,
will be supervised by parole
officers who will make sure he
shows up in court and does not
violate the terms of his release.
Morrissey is the father of 10-
year-old Lyric Cook-Morris-
sey, who vanished near an
Evansdale lake while riding
bikes with her cousin, 8-year-
old Elizabeth Collins. Their
bikes were found later on a
path near Meyers Lake.
A special 10-member FBI
dive team used sonar equip-
ment on boat for hours Friday
to search the 26-acre lake.
Divers waded through the
water looking for evidence, but
did not appear to go beneath
the surface. By mid-afternoon,
an FBI truck and many other
police officers had left.
Black Hawk County prosecu-
tor Brad Walz petitioned to
place Morrissey under supervi-
sion Thursday, the day authori-
ties said he and his wife had
stopped cooperating with inves-
tigators. Walz cited Morrissey's
arrests on methamphetamine-
related charges and noted Iowa
law allows a person on bond
who is considered "a habitual
felon" to remain under supervi-
sion as a condition of release.


Associated Press
East Troy, Wis., farmer Cindy Chapman, left, sells fruits and vegetables July 12 at the West Allis Farmers
Market in West Allis, Wis. Chapman said some of her radishes are especially hot this year, echoing
observations of other Midwestern farmers who said a recent spell of 100-degree days and drought conditions
are leading to extra-fiery peppers and fruits that have more flavor.


Heat, arou ht-rse

COnditlONS Aher


pro uce sdvor
Associated Press

MILWAUKEE Chef Dan Ja-
cobs expected his recent batch of
jalapelio poppers to be tame be-
cause peppers grown at this time
of the year are generally mild. But
he quickly discovered his spicy ap-
petizer carried an unexpected
fire.
"Wow, those things are no joke.
They are hot," said Jacobs, the top
chef at Roots Restaurant and Cel-
lar in Milwaukee. "At this time of
year, they shouldn't be this hot. But
the warm weather, the no rain,
that's going to cause that."
Temperatures above 100 de-
grees and drought-like conditions
have baked parts of the upper
Midwest for weeks, taking a severe
toll on corn and soybeans. But the
heat brought an expected benefit
for peppers and other crops: Their
flavors became unusually concen-
trated, producing some of the most
potent-tasting produce in years.
In peppers, that means the dif-
ference between a lightly tingling
tongue and heavily watery eyes.
The effect comes from alkaloids,
the substance that binds to heat
receptors on the tongue.
"Peppers really like hot
weather," said Irwin Goldman, a


Chef Dan Jacobs holds a plate of shishito peppers at Roots Restaurant
and Cellar in Milwaukee. Jacobs has noticed the recent heat wave has
helped make some peppers extra-spicy.


horticulture professor at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin-Madison.
"When it's dry and hot outside,
you'll get a higher concentration of
alkaloids."
The same phenomenon also
happens in onions, garlic and cer-
tain fruits, he said.
Scientists say a pepper's hot-
ness is generally determined by
genetics, although environment
can play a role. Long hot days
cause peppers to produce more
capsaicin, the specific alkaloid
that delivers the spicy kick.
The absence of water also has
an effect. The higher a vegetable's


water content, the larger and
juicier it is, but the more diluted
the flavor.
Farmers said they've noticed a
taste difference in several of their
crops over the past month or so.
Cindy Chapman, who raises corn,
beets and other vegetables, said
she noticed the radishes she har-
vested earlier in the year were es-
pecially flavorful.
"They were much hotter, really
sharp," said Chapman, a farmer in
East Troy. "Some people won't eat
them when they're that sharp, and
then there are other people who
love the stronger flavor."


Associated Press

MOSCOW A stooped
woman in her 70s dropped
off a kettle and about $600 in
cash in Moscow, while a
thick-necked businessman
uDIOaded an SUV packed
with brand new strollers and
jumbo packages of diapers.
It was part of a sponta-
neous wave of charity for
flood victims in the town of
Krymsk, jump started by so-
cial networking sites and
through a handful of inde-
pendent radio and TV sta-
tions. It was also part of a
growing penchant for inde-
pendent action that un set-
ties the powerful.


A week after the unprece-
dented flood volunteerism
emerged, a Kremlin-linked
body proposed a bill that
regulates charity drives.
Critics suspect the move is
aimed at keeping a tight
leash on popular movements
that could snowball into anti-
government protest.
In the wake of the massive
opposition protests that
erupted over the winter, offi-
cials are uneasy with signs of
newly energetic independ-
ent initiatives. Recently
passed laws put non-govern-
mental organizations under
intimidating scrutiny and
impose ruinous fines on par-
ticipants in unauthorized


demonstrations.
While the eagerness of
Russians to rise to the flood
cause was seen by many as a
heartening advance for civil
society, it also appeared to
be tacit criticism of Russian
authorities as untrustworthy
and ineffectual.
"The government is terri-
fied of an awakening civil
society," Genady Gudkov, an
opposition member of par-
liament, said Monday on
Echo Moskvy radio. "Volun-
teers and mass volun-
teerism have only just
appeared, and there is a
genuine fear that this volun-
teer movement will morph
into something else."


Associated Press
Muslim women on Friday
perform an evening prayer
called "tarawih" marking
the first eve of the holy
fasting month of Ramadan
at Istiqlal Mosque in
Jakarta, Indonesia. During
Ramadan, the holiest
month in the Islamic calen-
dar, Muslims refrain from
eating, drinking, smoking
and sex from dawn to dusk.
--From wire reports


Associated Press
A man carries a food box to where people are collecting
supplies July 9 to be sent to Krymsk, Russia, for flood victims.


NATION


~TORLD


POwer ful peppers


PErayi ne


Russian flood brings volunteer spirit, new law









SP. R


H Youth recreation/B2
H Tour de France/B3
Football/B3
Golf/B4
Scoreboard/B4
TV, lottery/B4
H MLB/B5
H Entertainment/B6


~i~CRYSTAL 352-564-1971
N AN9' S ucos ld.HmsasF


$21 500 STARTING MSRP
p D u Mn With $2.999 Due At
~~~2 MCUz~ONH~TsHLEAS ModeP~l# 131


MThe Tampa Bay Rays
went to extra innings
with the Seattle
Mariners on Friday
night./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Go fer leath Britzsh Open at event s

Itup1 OO rUtflUI" ur~t hot ace


this Open was just getting started.
On another benign day when
the only concern was pools form-
ing in the bottom of pot bunkers
from overnight rain, Snedeker
became the latest player to match
the course record
at Royal Lytham
with a 6-under 64
that gave him a
One-shot lead.
He has yet to
make bogey over
36 holes, the first
player to go
Tiger bogey-free in the
Woodsopening two
sits at 4-under rounds of a major
at British Open. since Woods won
at St. Andrews in 2000. Snedeker's
10-under 130 tied the 36-hole


Associated Press
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England
- Brandt Snedeker plays fast
and talks even faster, and he was


Not so fast.
Along came Adam Scott, play-
ing cautiously and picking his
spots for three birdies on the
back nine to pull within one shot.


on a roll Friday in
the British Open.
He raced up the
leaderboard with
five birdies in a
se ven -hole
stretch, tied the
36-hole record for


Not far behind
was Tiger Woods,
sticking to a con-
servative game
plan and deliver-
ing a dramatic fin-
ish by holing out
from the bunker to


a majOr championship and
looked like he was bent on run-
ning away from the field at Royal
Lytham & St. Annes.


set off a wild cheer from 6,000
spectators crammed into the
bleachers.
As the second round ended,


Associated Press
Brandt Snedeker plays a shot off the 10th tee Friday at Royal Lytham &
St. Annes Golf Club during the second round of the British Open in
Lytham St. Annes, England.


See Page B4


Inside of a week



Olympic jhtme I:~ 3C
amrves i~ndn ,


Associated Press .'=
LONDON With the flame ,..
comes the games.
After years of preparation .
and months of buildup, Lon-
don's Olympic moment finally
arrived Friday night.
Royal Marine Martyn
Williams carried the Olympic
torch as he rappelled down from ......
a Royal Navy Sea King hehicop- -- --
ter into the Tower of London on
the shore of the River Thames. .
The commando's grand en-.
trance plunged the symbol of the a
games into the city's historic
heart, bringing Olympic
pageantry to the British capital
that last held the event in 1948.
Crowds lined the city's famed
river banks to see the torch ar-
rive, while Yeoman warders -
the ceremonial Tower guards .
popularly known as Beefeaters
- looked on from inside the -
landmark's grounds.
For Londoners, the arrival of
the torch ignites a time of ex-
citement as well as four
weeks of extreme crowds and
transport strains.
Organizers have tried to ..
smooth the way. London Under-
ground subway lines are fes- ..::
tooned with large magenta and
pink sigris pointing routes to the
Olympic venues. Cartoony ads
with wide-eyed horses and ...
beefy musclemen warn com- il.
muters to remember that
Olympic competitions are tak-
ing place and to rethink their
daily journeys. Barriers are
being erected to mark the spe-
cial traffic lanes for Olympic ve- i
hicles disparagingly dubbed .
"Zil lanes," after the limousines
granted exclusive use of special
lanes on Soviet-era highways.
Londoners who already
struggle to get to work on any
given weekday aren't con-
vinced all will be well and
haven't been shy about saying Associated Prest
so. The atmosphere of gloom British retired champion Dame Kelly Holmes poses with the Olympic flame at the Tower of London or
Friday. The Olympic Torch arrived in London after it was carried around England in a relay of torchbear
See Page B4 ers to make its way to the London 2012 Olympic Games' opening ceremony on July 27.


See Page B4


Snedeker ties major record for 36 holes


British Open scores
aTo see who made the cut
for one of golf's majors,
see Page B4.


CR Seniors


cruise past

Semmnole

Cyyesponden
The Crystal River Senior
All-Star District 15 baseball
champions started off their
sectional tournament Friday
evening against District 5
champs Seminole in Dunedin.
Strong pitching and clutch
turns at bat brought Crystal
River through the game for the
decisive win over Seminole 8-3.
"We're very proud of how
our team battled against a
very talented Seminole team,"
Crystal River head coach
Dennis McClure said. "Pitch-
ing kept us in the game until
we put together some hits to
(pull away)."
Crystal River
scored five
of its
eight t
runs in
the sev-
enth in-
ning as it
cruised for-
ward to the win.
Cory Weiand (2 for 4 with an
RBI) pitched five innings and
struck out seven batters, giv-
ing up just three hits and
three runs. Jordan
Humphreys (1 for 3 with two
RBIs) closed the game out
with two strike outs of his own.
Crystal River's Austin Wiles
was strong at the plate, batting
an impressive 4-for-5 with two
RBIs.
Sectional play continues
today as Crystal River faces
District 6 champs Keystone at
7 p.m.
Major Baseball
West Pasco 12,
Crystal River 1
The Crystal River Majors -
District 15 Champs also
started sectional play Friday
evening against District 12
champs West Pasco in St. Pe-
tersburg but were unable to
stage a victory.
Plagued by too many errors,
Crystal River fell to West Pasco.
"Too many errors with two
Outs (on the board)," Crystal
River head coach Mike Lemar
said. "Tonight was just not the
night."


5 THE ALL NEW 2013 NISSAN
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OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!

WE CHANGED EVERYTHING EXCEPT THE NAME
BLOW THE DOORS OFF... ALL FOUR OF THEM. THE 2013 ALTIMA SV HAS
BETTER OVERALL ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE THAN THE HONDA
ACCORD SE, HYUNDAI SONATA AND TOYOTA CAMRY SE


iS\Na CRYS ALNIS 2 .CM
~8~; '"Inludes all rebales and Iricenlives. Nol everyone wirll qualliv. 52,999 Cown, cash or Irade eaunly. Excludes lax. lag, I~lle, Dealer Fee oI $599.50. Lease is
.,,,,,,,,,24 monrns. 2-1 000 miles. 50.15 per mile over. With approved credit. Pictures are for illulstrallon purposes only Prior Sales may restrlct stock.









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CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


PLAY back in the fall


:Recreation BRIEFS


PEilAP1
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O OUTDOORS
LINKS







GAhiE


Special to the Chronicle
The next season of PLAY
will begin Sept. 10. The
PLAY program (Preparing
Little Athletes Youth) is a
comprehensive motor-skills
development program that
will prepare you and your
child for the world of organ-
ized sports.
The PLAY program is de-
sgnedhfor lhildrelnrae 3eta
team T-shirt and age-appro-
priate sports equipment.
Each program runs for six
weeks, one night a week for
one hour
Soccer and T-ball will be
the next sports offered. The
cost is $45 per child; sign
your child up for more than
one sport in the same ses-
sion and save $10.
Registration will open on
July 30. For more informa-
tion, call Crysta Henry,
recreation program special-
ist for youth programs, at
352-527-7543 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Camp Fusion still
welcomes participants
Camp Fusion is for children
de mu t 1h0 ars tnx-year-
kindergarten before the start of
summer and 10-year-olds can-
not have started middle school.
There is a registration fee of
$25 per child.
Camp Fusion accepts
weekly, as well as daily registra-
tions. Camp Fusion offers a va-
rietykotfoa tvities throughoutththe

woe and enter ai e.r nre wir
be field trips, guest speakers
and many other activities. Some
of this year's field trips include
the Museum of Science and In-
dustry (MOSI), Lowry Park Zoo,
the Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, trips to Chassahow-
itzka and more.
Monday will consist of stay-
ing onsite and participating in
arts and crafts and listening to a
guest speaker or going on a
field trip. On Tuesdays,
campers and staff will visit the
Crystal River Mall for a family
friendly movie and then make
their way to Bicentennial Park
for sports and swimming.
Wednesday we will go bowling
at Manatee Lanes in Crystal
River, go on one of our exciting
field trips, or stay onsite. Thurs-
days will consist of arts & crafts
and other activities in the morn-


ing and then back to Bicenten-
nial Park for sports and swim-
ming. On Fridays campers will
enjoy sports, arts and crafts,
and guest speakers onsite.
There is a one-time registra-
tion fee of $25. All staff are
trained in CPR and first aid, and
have been background-
checked. The weekly fees are
$60 per child for regular care
and $75 per child per week for
extended care; daily drop-off is
available for $20. Regular care
hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
extended hours are 7:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m.
Camp Fusion will participate
in the free meal program
through July 27. Free breakfast
and lunch are offered on site at
the Renaissance Center, Mon-
day through Thursday. Break-
fast is provided each morning
and lunch is provided on speci-
fied dates to be determined.
This free meal program is spon-
sored by the Citrus County
School System.
For more information about
Camp Fusion, call
352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
YMCA offers swim
lessons this summer
Group swim lessons are of-
fered at Central Ridge Commu-
nity Pool in Beverly Hills. There
are a variety of classes avail-
able, including preschool, youth
and adult. There are also in-
fant/toddler classes offered for
infants age 6 months and older.
Swim sessions generally con-
sist of eight lessons; several
sessions are offered throughout

theRTs rt oun frmns ar avail-
able at www.ymcasu ncoast. org
under Locations/Citrus County
Online registration is available
for those who have an active
membership with the Citrus
County YMCA. Registration
packets may also be picked up
at the YMCA office, 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills
Whispering Pines Park and Hol
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. For more information, call
352-637-0132.
Get in shape for summer
The YMCA offers an outdoor
boot camp at King's Bay Park.
Boot camp classes are from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday
and Thursday. The program fee
is $35 per month.
This energetic workout will
get you in shape by combining


weeks they want to attend
based on the unique theme of
each week. Camp is open for
ages 5 to 12, with a counselor-
in-training program for ages 13
to 15. The Y's Summer Day
Camp will run 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
through Aug. 3, with extended
care from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. for
no extra charge. Financial as-
sistance is available to those
who qualify.
Registration forms are avail-
able at www.ymcasuncoast.org
under Locations/Citrus County.
Online registration is available
for those who have an active
membership with the Citrus
County YMCA. Registration
packets may also be picked up
at the YMCA office, 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills,
Whispering Pines Park and Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. For more information, call
352-637-0132.
B&GC camps run
through Aug. 3
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County has extended en-
rollment for summer camp in all
three locations: Beverly Hills,
Inverness and Homosassa.
Call and apply today for chil-
dren to attend an action-packed
summer camp program where
they will not only have fun with
other children, but participate in
swimming, bowling, skating,
reading, sports, recreation, arts,
crafts, cooking, computer
Iab/games, science and leader-
ship programs, along with in-
door and outdoor games.
Exciting summer fun and ed-
uctona ci viti are pl nd
week. Special field trips are of-
fered to the Clearwater Aquar-
ium, MOSI, IMAX Theatre,
Weeki Wachee, Buccaneer Bay
and Two Tails Ranch for retired
elephants.
The Boys & Girls Club Sum-
mer Camp will run through Aug.
3. Camp doors open at 6:30
a.m. (7 a.m. in Inverness) and
close at 6 p.m. daily. Cost is
$80 per week, with a discount
for a second child.
As children continue to regis-
ter for summer camp and the
field trips draw near, any busi-
nesses or individuals still wish-
ing to sponsor children for the
field trips or scholarships for
camp should call the adminis-
trative office at 352-621-9225.
For more information or to
enroll a child, parents may call
club directors at their sites. Call


Amy at the Central Ridge Club
at 352-270-8841 in Beverly
Hills; Amber at the Evelyn Wa-
ters Club at 352-341-2507 in In-
verness; and Beth at the Robert
Halleen Club at 352-795-8624
in Homosassa.
Park offers
tenniS leSSORS
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Come Ila
disc golf at park
Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness, the city of Inver-
ness and Citrus Disc Golf
Club will host Community Disc
Golf day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 19, at the park,
1700 Forest Drive.
The event is for all disc golf
novices who have never entered
a disc golf competition. Start
times, number of holes played
and divisions will be as flexible
as possible to encourage maxi-
mum participation. Loaner discs
will be available and certificates
will be awarded as prizes.
Learn to play disc golf with
the members of the Citrus Disc
Golf Club. If you have never
played disc golf, this is your op-
portunity to learn the game. It is
played with flying discs similar
to a Frisbee, but with differing
aerodynamics. Bottled water
will be provided or you may
bring your own.
Participants are encouraged
to bring a nonperishable food
item to be donated to CUB (Cit-
rus United Basket).
The course at Whispering
Pines Park is free to play and
you can borrow discs for your
playing pleasure when the park
is open. Discs may be checked
out at the pool during open
swim hours or at the adminis-
tration office at Whispering
Pines. Hole No. 1 is just behind
the pool. Maps and score
sheets are also available.
For more information, call
Bob Theis at 352-895-6097, or
email rollertheis@yahoo.com.


Camp Fusion recently went to a Tampa Bay Rays game.


cardio, strength and core con-
ditioning with lots of fun. It is
everything you need to burn fat
and calories, plus it is de-
signed for all levels of fitness
because everyone works out
at their own pace.
Here is what you will need to
get started: water, a towel and
dumbbells that weigh 5 to 8
pounds Just show up at the
park to get started.
For more information, call
352-637-0132 or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
Inverness offers
lifeguward camp
Whispering Pines Park and
the city of Inverness will offer
Junior Lifeguard Camp 2012
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 30 to
Aug. 4. Cost is $50 for a six-
day session. There is only one
available session left.
The camp is to give young
people (ages 11 to 14) the op-
portunity to experience the role
of a professional lifeguard in a
fun learning environment. Par-
ticipants will learn the funda-
mentals of lifeguarding, gain
basic knowledge of CPR and
first aid, and learn basic water
rescue techniques. On the final
day of the camp, participants
will present a demonstration to
parents with skills learned over
the course of the week.
Junior lifeguards can expect


to participate in fun and chal-
lenging leadership and team-
building activities as well as
physical fitness.
In order to become a city of
Inverness junior lifeguard, can-
didates must pass three prereq-
uisites: swim front crawl for 25
yards; submerge to a depth of
10 feet; and tread water for one
minute.
Space is limited. Call
352-726-3913.
YMCA camp continues
through Aug. 3
Citrus County YMCA is into
its 2012 Summer Adventure
Camp, and registration is be-
ginning to increase rapidly as
Citrus County residents make
their summer plans.
Adventure Camp -"'Where
Learning & Fun Come To-
gether" will be at two loca-
tions: Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness and the Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park in Homosassa. Each
week of camp has a separate
theme and will incorporate ac-
tivities such as sports,
arts/crafts and field trips, but will
also focus on literacy.
Field trips planned for the
campers this summer include
MOSI, Lowry Park Zoo, The
Florida Aquarium and a Tampa
Bay Rays game.
Campers may choose the


Tapley at 352-642-3136.
Physicals available
for CRHS athletes
All Crystal River High School stu-
dents planning to try out and partici-
pate on a school-sponsored athletic
team for the 2012-13 school year will
be required to have a physical on file
with the athletic department.
Citrus Chiropractic Group will be
giving physical to any CRHS student
on Wednesday, July 25, in its office at
2320 N. Sunshine Path (next to Dan's
Clam Stand). The cost is $15.
Checks should be made payable
to CRHS Athletics. Participation
packets (including FHSAA-required
physical forms) can be picked up at
the CRHS office or downloaded from
C2Cschools.com.
Appointments will be made accord-
ing to last name. Last names beginning
in A through F are at 1 p.m., G through
L at 1:45 p.m., M through R at 2:30
p.m. and S through Z at 3:15 p.m.
Lecanto High School
volleyball holding open gym
Lecanto High School volleyball will
be having an open gym and condition-
ing beginning Monday, July 23, at the
Lecanto High School gym from 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
CF holding basketball
camp in Ocala
Coach Tim Ryan, the men's basket-
ball coach at the College of Central
Florida, is hosting Camp Patriot Bas-


ketball Camp for the ninth straight year.
The camp is for boys and girls ages
8 to 18 and is located at the Ocala
Campus of CF. The final session is
July 23-26. The hours each day are 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
The cost is $150. Please visit
www.camppatriotbasketball.com or call
Coach Ryan at 352-427-7435 if you
have any questions.
Baseball team wants players
Diamond Kings 13 U travel baseball
team is looking for players.
Come try out for this established
championship baseball team. Players
and parents must be willing to travel.
Tryouts will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, July 28, at Whispering
Pines Park Field 3.
For more information, call or email
Ed at 352-201-8424, or
1 diamondkings@gmail.com.
FlagI football, cheer signups
Early signups for Gulf-to-Lakes
Church's flag football and cheerleading
will be at the church through July 31.
Evaluations for the program will be
on Aug. 4 and Aug. 11 at the church,
starting at 9 a.m. Every Citrus County
student in kindergarten through eighth
grade may participate. A parent or
guardian must be with the student for
signup and evaluations.
The season starts on Sept. 8 and
runs through Nov. 11, with play at the
Crystal River Methodist Church start-
ing at 9 am. Call Chris Hope at 352-
586-4685 for more information.


Special to the Chronicle
Sophia Macaisa, a 10-year-old swimmer, will be competing at the
Florida Age Group Championships this weekend. Macaisa, a member
of the Hilitoppers of Terra Vista swim club, is seeded as the fourth-
fastest 10-year-old in the state for the meet. She's also qualified in five
other events and is seeded in the top 20. Macaisa will compete in four
freestyle races (50, 100, 200 and 400) and the 50- and 100-meter
backstroke events. Also pictured is Hilitoppers coach John Hodgdon.


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS


a
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c


ao ~tr
o
ADULT LEAGUE SPORTS


y
c
a
z
a
o
o


HITTING THE


.ae8 SATUIR DAY, JULY 2Z1, 2012




GET IN THE


Multi-faceted swimmer heads to state meet


Free physical for
Citrus High School students
Free pre-participation physical eval-
uations will be provided by Dr. John
Gelin and his team of physicians at
First Baptist Church of Inverness from

6 Pc 8kp theerde urdead p prwork
from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through
Thursday in the Citrus High School
Athletics Office or Front Office.
thF ms ar has savailal tee
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us/news/

enailntr ads compte te forms and
bring them and proof of medical insur-
ance with you to the event.
Inverness Storm holding
Punt, Pass, Kick & Cheer
The Inverness Storm youth football
program is hosting a Punt, Pass,
Kick & Cheer event presented by
Nature Coast Orthopaedics from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 21, at
Cthre Hi Ibe a Iheer champ and a
longest punt, pass and kick competi-
tion. Trophies for first, second and
third place will be awarded. All partici-
pants will receive medals.
Attractions such as a bounce house,
dunking booth, pie-in-the-face, carnival
games and more will be available.
The cost is $15 per child and in-
cludes lunch and access to all con-
tests, games and attractions.
For more information, call Tommy
Frederick at 352-302-738 or Rachel



















































































































































Citrus Pulblishing employees and their families are not elighl to enter. Email


crrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 B3


Ggins poisea



Brit to win Tour

Associated Press

BRIV E- LA- GAILLARD E,
France Bradley Wiggins moved
closer to becoming the first British
champion of the Tour de France
while teammate and countryman
Mark Cavendish won the 18th
stage in a sprint.
The ride along four small hills
Friday took the pack 138 miles from
Blagnac to Brive-la-Gaillarde, a
transitional stage before Saturday's
time trial. The three-week race
ends Sunday in Paris.
Wiggins, Cavendish and the Sky


team made it look easy with an al-
most textbook sprint setup. With
less than a mile to go, Wiggins took
the head of the pack and chased
down six breakaway riders, then
peeled away.
The Sky train motored ahead
and Cavendish, showing he's per-
haps the world's most explosive
rider, whirred around the remain-
ing escapees in the last few hun-
dred yards to win by a couple of
bike lengths.
Luis Leon Sanchez, seeing
Cavendish speed by, appeared to
sigh with resignation. Cavendish
beat Matt Goss of Australia, with
Peter Sagan of Slovakia in third
place.
"It was dangerous in the final,"
said Wiggins, who hugged
Cavendish at the finish. "This
morning we decided to put the
train in place and help Mark in


the final. It's my gift to him."
Cavendish has been largely
overshadowed on Sky by Wiggins.
He won a stage for the second
time on this Tour, giving him 22
stage victories for his career and
tying him with seven-time cham-
pion Lance Armstrong.
"I just used the slip streams,"
Cavendish said. "I have used this
technique to win 22 stages. ... It's a
magic number -there's one more
to go."
The top of the standings didn't
change. Wiggins leads Sky team-
mate Christopher Froome by 2
minutes, 5 seconds. Vincenzo Ni-
bali of Italy is third, 2:41 behind.
Defending champion Cadel EvanS
of Australia is sixth, 9:57 back.
Cavendish's victory gives Britain
five stage wins this year from four
riders: Wiggins, Cavendish,
Froome and David Millar


Associated Press
Tejay van Garderen of the U.S., wearing the best young rider's white jer-
sey, right, and Bradley Wiggins of Britain, wearing the overall leader's yel-
low jersey, talk prior to the start of the 18th stage of the Tour de France
on Friday The 138.3 mile-long stage started in Blagnac and finished in
Brive-la-Gaillarde, France.


peals hearing, which a lawyer
for Vilma dubbed "a sham."
That doesn't even take
into account the collusion
lawsuit, in which the union
accuses the NFL of having a
secret salary cap in 2010 that
Smith says could have cost
players $1 billion in wages.
This lawsuit stems, in part,
from the NFL stripping the
Redskins ($36 million) and
Cowboys ($10 million) of
salary cap space for 2012
and '13. The league says the
union has no grounds for the
action and is prohibited
from filing it by the collec-
tive bargaining agreement.
With the merging of
nearly 100 concussion suits,
the plaintiffs hope to hold
the NFL responsible for the
care of those players suffer-
ing from such health prob-
lems as dementia and
Alzheimer's disease.
Elsewhere, players even
sued coaches, with the
NFLPA bringing a court ac-
tion against the Coaches
Association seeking pay-
ment of a $650,000 loan the
players' union said it gave
the coaches' group.
The league locked out the
on-field officials in June
when their contract expired
and has begun searching for
replacements. The NFL has
been down this path before
and began the 2001 season
with replacement officials.
Just one week before some
camps open, three players
critical to their teams'
chances this season were ar-
rested. Seahawks running
back Marshawn Lynch, who
served a three-game league
suspension in 2009 for vio-
lating the personal conduct
policy, was cited for DUI.
Cowboys receiver Dez
Bryant was charged with
family violence for hitting
his mother. Bryant had a se-
ries of off-field issues while
at Oklahoma State and was
barred from playing his
final season at the school.


A2CCU2ltZ(f

Associated P

CORAL GABI
Miami coach Al
second season at t
is beginning mucl
first one, with new
tions of rule brea
looming threat o~
NCAA sanctions al
parent end in sigl
long probe into th
canes' comp
practices.
Citing uniden-
tified sources,
Yahoo Sports
reported Friday
that former
Miami football
employee Sean Al
- who has been i
one-time booster
convicted Ponzi
architect Nevin
through the impro
efits scandal th~
last year assist
bers of Golden's (
staff with recruitil
If true, that co
major NCAA viol
the troubled prog
spite Golden's rep
sistence that he
"get it fixed."
Earlier Friday,
ple with knowled
situation told Th~
ated Press that N\
vestigators visited
for several days ea
month, just the lat~
of the lengthy inq
the Hurricanes'
department. The
spoke to the AP o
tion of anonymity
information abe
probe has not be
licly released.S


claims that he provided
Lines dozens of Miami athletes
and recruits with extra
new benefits over an eight-year
span were published by
O S Yahoo Sports last August.
OnS The university did not
have immediate comment
ryess Friday.
Golden is scheduled to
LES discuss the coming season
Golden's attheAtlantic Coastconfer-
he school ence media days in North
h like his Carolina early next week
vaccusa- A significant portion of
king, the Shapiro's allegations from
f serious last year revolved around
nd noap- Allen, who was an assistant
ht for the football equipment man-
le Hurri- ager until leaving the pro-
liance gram last year: Shapiro
said he gave Allen
more than
$200,000, most al-
legedly spent on
players and re-
L~cruits, as well as a
luxury car. Allen
len denied those claims to
linked to Yahoo Sports in 2011, and
and now hasnot responded to inter-
scheme view requests from the AE~
Shapiro Shapiro's attorney, Maria
'per-ben- Elena Perez, also did not
at broke immediately respond to re-
ed mem- quests for comment Friday.
coaching She deposed Allen late last
ng. year shortly before court
uld be a rec rds showed Miami en-
lation by tered into an agreement
~ram, de- with a bankruptcy trustee
eated in- to return $83,000 it said it
wants to received "directly and in-
directly" from Shapiro.
two peo- Miami has been bracing
ge of the for additional allegations,
e Associ- and was aware earlier this
JCAA in- week that they were com-
d Miami ing. In an e-mail obtained
Irlier this by the AP: university Presi-
est round dent Donna Shalala told
uiry into trustees Thursday that
athletic "someone who had a low
People level position at one time"
,n condi- was expected to allege that
because Miami assistant coach and
out the former NFL player
~en pub- Micheal Barrow committed
jhapiro's recruiting violations.


Associated Press
Marshawn Lynch's DUI arrest on July 14 was just one of several
unsavory incidents involving the National Football League.


veloped, with more than
2,400 retired players suing
the league over brain in-
juries. The retirees claim
the NFL did not do enough
to shield them from the
long-term effects of re-
peated hits to the head,
even when medical evi-
dence established a connec-
tion between head trauma
in football and health prob-
lems later in life.
And on yet another front,
the union has filed a lawsuit
accusing owners of colluding
to keep salaries down during
the uncapped 2010 season
that preceded the lockout.
When it came to the boun-
ties, Goodell took a tough
stance.
He suspended Saints
coach Sean Payton and line-
backer Vilma for the 2012


season. Gregg Williams, for-
merly New Orleans' defen-
sive coordinator and
subsequently hired by the
Rams, was suspended in-
definitely as the ringleader
of the bounty program.
There wasn't much push-
back from Saints manage-
ment on those punishments,
but when Vilma, defensive
end Will Smith (four games),
DE Anthony Hargrove, now
with Green Bay (eight games)
and LB Scott Flijita, now with
Cleveland (three games) were
suspended, they appealed.
And the union filed two
grievances, claiming Good-
ell didn't have jurisdiction
to hand out discipline or to
hear the appeals.
The league won on both
fronts, so the players didn't
actively take part in their ap-


Associated Press

TAMPA The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers have
signed first-round draft pick
Mark Barron to a five-year
contract.
The hard-hitting safety
from Alabama was the sev-
enth overall selection after
helping the Crimson Tide
win the BCS championship
last season. He's expected
to become a starter for a
team that allowed an NFL-
high 494 points in 2011.
Barron was a two-time
team captain at Alabama,
where he appeared in every
game over his final three
seasons. The Crimson Tide
led the nation in rushing,
passing, scoring and total
defense a year ago when
Barron was a finalist for the
Jim Thorpe Award, pre-
sented annually to the na-
tion's best defensive back.
The Bues announced the
signing Friday, a day after
rookies reported for train-
ing camp. The first full-
squad workout is July 27.
Tebow working on his
throwing with House
LOS ANGELES New York
Jets backup quarterback Tim
Tebow has been working on his
throwing mechanics with former
major league pitcher Tom House,
ESPN.com reported Friday.
Tebow, whose unorthodox
throwing motion has been often


Drew Brees and Alex Smith.
House tells ESPN.com he
thinks Tebow is "getting better,
but the proof is in the pudding.
Being out here at USC is differ-
ent than being with the New
York Jets."


criticized, spent this week with
House at the University of
Southern California. House, a
volunteer pitching coach for the
Trojans, has worked with sev-
eral NFL quarterbacks over the
years, including Tom Brady,


Close to setting a precedent


Eventful offs eason for NFL


Reot oilde"'


A news adsn '

been good for

fOOf 4 Ifdgile

Associated Press

NEW YORK Bounties
and bans. Replacement refs
and rules changes. Tebow
and Manning.
And litigation galore.
The NFL made headlines
without even trying during
an offseason when there
was almost never a day off
- certainly not for the
league's attorneys.
Forget the 2011 lockout,
when everyone was focused
on talks between the league
and the players' union. This
year, pretty much since the
Giants beat the Patriots in
the Super Bowl back in Feb-
ruary, it has been nonstop
mayhem away from the field.
Since early March, the
NF~s dominant storyline
has been the Saints' bounty
program. After a lengthy in-
vestigation, the league said it
found evidence of a three-
year, pay-for-pain system in
which Saints defensive play-
ers targeted specific oppo-
nents, including Brett Favre
and Kurt Warner all with
the knowledge of members of
the coaching staff and even
the team's general manager
"It is the obligation of
everyone, including the play-
ers on the field, to ensure that
rules designed to promote
player safety, fair play, and
the integrity of the game are
adhered to and effectively
and consistently enforced,"
Goodell said. "Respect for
the men that play the game
starts with the way players
conduct themselves with
each other on the field."
The commissioner's com-
ments came as another
theme of the offseason de-


Bucs sign rookie Barron


*if *iict






B4 sATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012




British Open
Friday
At Royal Lytham & St. Annes,
Lytham St. Annes, England
Purse: $7.75 million
Yardage* 7,086, Par: 70


Brandt Snedeker amte6r6-64--130 -10
Adam Scott 64-67--131 -9
Tiger Woods 67-67--134 -6
Thorbjorn Olesen 69-66 135 -5


Ga me MDowell 679-13 -
Jason Dufner 70-66--136 -4
Thomas Aiken 68-68 -136 -4
Ernie Els 67-70 -137 -3

Suk DoArld 7- 8-- -2
Steve Stricker 67-71 -138 -2
James Morrison 68-70--138 -2
Cal Pethnrsson 71-68-3 _

Tohno Mulo 6 -2-139 -1
Andres Romero 70-69--139 -1
Mark Calcavecchia 71-68 -139 -1
Greg Chalmers 71-68 -139 -1
Simon Khan 70-69--139 -1
KyleStanley 70-69--139 -1
Bill Haas 71-68 -139 -1
Zach Johnson 65-74 -139 -1
Thomas Bjorn 70-69 -139 -1
Mari nO~oa uizen 7-8-4 E
Geoff Ogilvy 72-68 -140 E
Retief Goosen 70-70 -140 E
Ted Potter Jr. 69-71 -140 E
Anirban Lahiri 68-72 -140 E
Garth Mulroy 71-69 -140 E
Thongchai Jaidee 69-71 -140 E
Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-69 -140 E
Jamie Donaldson 68-72 -140 E
ba Pulter 16 --4 E
Dale Whitnell 71-69 -140 E
Bob Estes 69-72--141 +1
Lee Slattery 69-72--141 +1
Hunte Mahan 70-1-4 +

Francesco Molinari 69-72 -141 +1
Jeev Milkha Singh 70-71 -141 +1
Rafael Cabrera-Bello 70-71 -141 +1
Nick Watney 71-70 -141 +1
Yosh nrihFujimoto 717--4 +

Warren Bennett 71-70--141 +1
Greg Owen 71-71 --142 +2
Richard Sterne 69-73--142 +2
Ba dnGI ce 736--4 +
Gonzalo Fernadez-Castano 71-71 -142 +2
Nicolas Colsaerts 65-77--142 +2
Rory Mcllroy 67-75--142 +2
Padraig Harrington 707--4 +

Fredrik Jacobson 69-73 -142 +2
Alexander Noren 71-71 --142 +2
Justin Hicks 68-74 -142 +2
Matthew Baldwin 69-73--142 +2
Rafael Echenique 73-69--142 +2
Vijay Singh 70-72--142 +2
AamMnBaddeley 71-7 --4 +
Brendan Jones 69-74--143 +3
Juvic Pagunsan 71-72--143 +3
Pablo Larrazabal 73-70 -143 +3
Carls owel 111 27 --"4 +
K.J.Choi 70-73--143 +3
Ross Fisher 72-71 --143 +3
Sang-moon Bae 72-71 --143 +3
Keegan Bradley 71-72--143 +3
Rickie Fowler 71-72 -143 +3
Adilson Da Silva 69-74 -143 +3
John Daly 72-71 --143 +3
Chad Campbell 73-70 -143 +3
Lee Westwood 73-70 -143 +3
TomWatson 71-72--143 +3
Joost Luiten 73-70--143 +3
Failed to Qualify
Nicholas Cullen 73-71 --144 +4
Marcel Siem 74-70 -144 +4
George Coetzee 74-70 -144 +4
Marcus Fraser 71-73--144 +4
Mark Wilson 72-72 -144 +4
Anders Hansen 68-76 -144 +4
KoumeiOda 72-72--144 +4
Marc Leishman 69-75 144 +4
Jbe Kruger 68-76--144 +4

Rp ael Ja elin 7-2-14 +
YE. Yang 74-70 -144 +4
Justin Rose 74-70 -144 +4
Sergio Garcia 72-72 -144 +4
Charl Schwartzel 69-75--144 +4
StevenTiley 72-72--144 +4
Aaron Townsend 70-74 -144 +4
Scott Pincknney 6-7-14 +

Gregory Havret 737-15+

Bo Van Pelt 71-74 -145 +5
Morten Orum Madsen 74-71 --145 +5
David Duvalk 7- -1 +

Steven O Hara 74-72--146 +6
Jonathan Byrd 74-72--146 +6
Ashley Hall 71-75--146 +6
BarryLane 73-73--146 +6
SandyLyle 74-72--146 +6

Aljdn~dr Cizares 7-2-14 +
a-Alan Dunbar 75-71 --146 +6
Ryo Ishikawa 74-72--146 +6
Martin Kaymer 77-69--146 +6
Sam Walker 76-70 -146 +6
Michael Thompson 74-73 -147 +7
Toru Taniguchi 72-75 -147 +7
Roebere lenb 757- -14
Darren Clarke 76-71 --147 +7
Daniel Chopra 73-74 -147 +7
Lucas Glover 72-76 -148 +8
Andrew Georgiou 74-74 -148 +8
Troy Kelly 72-76 -148 +8
Tadahiro Takayama 77-71 --148 +8
John Huh 75-73--148 +8
Justin Leonard 75-73--148 +8
Hiroyuki Fujita 76-72 -148 +8
Brad Kennedy 75-73--148 +8
Chez Reavie 74-75 -149 +9
Ben Curtis 75-74 -149 +9
Trevor unmelnan 7475 --149 +

Robert Rock 78-71 --149 +9
Johnson Wagner 73-76 -149 +9
Prayad Marksaeng 75-75 -150 +10
Kodai Ichihara 77-73--150 +10


Dais Love Ill 717--5 +0
Kevin Na 73-77--150 +10
Paul Casey 72-79 -151 +11
PlM cemsaonn 73 --15 +
Angel Cabrera 71-81 -152 +12
James Driscoll 76-76--152 +12
Paul Broadhurst 75-78 -153 +13
Richard Finch 74-79--153 +13
Michael Hoey 79-75 -154 +14
Grant Veenstra 77-79 -156 +16
a-Mianuel Trappel 74-83 157 +17
Ian Keenan 76-83--159 +19
Mardan Mamat 77-72 DQ
British Open tee times
At Royal Lytham & St. Annes
Lytham St. Annes, England
Purse: $7.75 million
Yardage: 7,060; Par: 70
AllTimes ED)T

Saturday
3:10 a.m. -Joost Luiten


SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


B 2. ua o He, Ar etina, Team Saxo
13. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky
Procycling, same time.
14. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
1i~akNsan aetm.5. Koen de Kort, Netherlands, Argos-Shi- V
manor, 4 seconds behind.


same tL l u auSo .G
18. Lars Bak, Denmark, Lotto Belisol, same
time. g
19. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, I

sa0. Mro Marcato, Italy, Vacansoleil-DCM,
same time. Als

22. Chris Froome, Br tain, Sky Procycling, As
same time.
26. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto MJADI
Belisol, same time. Horsche
27. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon- in the se

o0 Crs opahersHorner, United States, Ra- dtay to ta:
dio~ackNissn, ame ime at he r
39. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Horsc:
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, same time. free rou
R40.Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMc on both :
Racing, same time. a 13-und
50. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Mat
Bat
Racing,:.16.
95. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 2:07.
Phla. Lev Le pheinabUnited States, Omega
Overall Standings
(After 18 stages) Ct
1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling,
83 hours, 22 minutes, 18 seconds. Zach (
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
2:05. off at th~
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon- River bl
dale, 2:41. able to e
4. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto in the
B. e sj Vn Garderen, United States, BMc Joe c
Racing, 8:30.
6. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 9:57.
7. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nis-

sa Pirr Rolland, France, Team Europcar, C
10:17.C
9. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 11:00.
10. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat, has beet
11:46. never-en
M dNi ol~as Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La stant st~
12. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra- aott
dioShack-Nissan, 14:05. COntractl
13. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra- enough ~
dioShack-Nissan, 14:22. The m
14. Chris Anker Sorensen, Denmark, Team for the n
Saxo Ban-T neknochBanku a846)(tsa,2:4 in it."

16. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack- Speak
Nissan, 24:24.th To
17. Egoi Martinez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, Johnson
25:32. the torcl
18. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 29:51. last rer
19. Eduard Vorganov Russia, Katusha, dampner
33:07. "It wil
320. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar ln u
Also thusiasm
31. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega and the I
Pharma-QuickStep, 1:06:48. Kelly Ho
39. George Hincapie, United States, BMc ble gold
Ra.chingC sn Vande Velde, United States, 2004, tou
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 1:55:00. the land
106. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin- held alof
Sharp-Barracuda, 2:49:26. Ready
151. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin- are a r
Sharp-Barracuda, 3:43:58. e i
and lime
London

Cardinals 4, Cubs 1 Cyclops-
lock an
Chicago St.Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJess of 4 0 2 0 Schmkr 2b 4 0 1 0
SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 Greene ph-2b1 0 0 0
Rizzo lb 4 01 0 Craigrf 4 11 0
ASorinlf 4 010 Jaypr-cf oooo Ct
LaHair rf 2 1 1 0 Hollidy If 3 2 2 1
JeBakr ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Beltran ef-rf 4 11 1
Clevngrc 4 01 0 Yolin c 3 01 1 TOCOrd s
Barney 2b 3 0 0 1 Brkmn lb 4 01 1 1992 whe
Valuen3b 40 Fru ase3b Muirfie

Cap ph 1 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 00 shots the
Corpas p 00 0 0Boggs p 0 0 00 Lytham.
Maine p 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 00 Even
MCrpnt ph 1 0 00 Snedeke
Totals 33 17 1 Motl 304 410 ofth
Chicago 010 000 000 1 days.
St. Louis 301 000 00x 4 "iNo b(
E--Furcal (12). DP-St. Louis 1. LOB- getting
Chicago 7,St. oci (. B--A. oino (1 andplaS
SB-Jay(8). SF-Barney. gl,
IP H R ERBB So mantra
Chicago get the b
Dempster L,5-4 6 7 4 4 2 2 fast as pc
Corpas 1 1 0 0 1 0 there, I
Mai ui 1 2 0 0 0 2 hand for
Lohse W,1 0-2 7 6 1 1 1 4 greens. J
BoggsH,14 2-31 0 0 0 0 keep do
RzepczynskiH,12 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Weekend
Motte S,21-25 1 0 0 0 0 1 Snede
MLB leaders the cut
AMERICAN LEAGUE trips to
BATTING--Trout, Los Angeles, .352; Mauer, though t
Minnesota, .329; MiCabrera, Detroit, .328; Bel- 110thing
tre, Texas, .322; Konerko, Chicago, .321; Cano, the PGA
New York, .319; AJackson, Detroit, .316; Ortiz, 10 under

RBoIn- H ilton, Texas, 78; MiCabrera, De-th No
troit, 77; Fielder, Detroit, 68; Willingham, Min- Pnsb
nesota, 67; Bautista, Toronto, 65; ADunn, for a 61.
Chicago, 65; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 65. third wil
HOME RUNS-ADunn, Chicago, 28; Hamil- rallying
ton, Texas, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Trumbo, deficit or
Los Angeles, 26; Encarnacion, Toronto, 25; "Branl
Granderson, New York, 25; Ortiz, Boston, 23;
Willingham, Minnesota, 23. type guy
PITCHING-Price, Tampa Bay, 13-4; MHarri- and star
son, Texas, 12-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 11-1; and hitti
Sale, Chicago, 11-2; Verlander, Detroit, 11-5; Calcavec
Sabathia, NewYork, 10-3; Doubront, Boston, 10- who doe
4; Nova, Ne~w York, 1FO4 Darvish, Txas e ;plas q

Verlander, Detroit, 142; Scherzer Detroit, 134; quick te
Darvish, Texas, 121; Price, Tampa Bay, 120; quick. A
Peavy, Chicago, 120; Shields, Tampa Bay, 114. That's a~
NATIONAL LEAGUE What (
BAaTbTI5NG--MczCutcen, Pibrh t Ste2de


Cincinnati,.342; CGonzalez, Colorado .333; more ho
Holliday, St. Louis, .319. h pen '
RBl--Beltran, St. Louis, 67; DWright, New Ad th

6itbr hB 6au Kubl Arn, 66; CG~o Iae the 32-y
Colorado, 62;Ethier, LosAngeles,60O;Holliday, began r
St. Louis, 60. move u]
HOME RUNS--Braun, Milwaukee, 26; Mc- He bogey
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 22; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, for the ~
20; Beltran, St. Louis, 20; Bruce, Cincinnati, 19;
Stanton, Miami, 19; CGonzalez, Colorado, 18; and then
ASoriano, Chicago, 18. smashin
PITCCHING-Dickey, New York, 13-1; GGon- bounced
zalz I hhsehilaon 1-L4; uySt L ris t14 right of t
11-5; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 11-6; 7 tied at 5 seventh
10. two-putt
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 135; opened
Kershaw Los Angeles, 132; Dickey, New York, back-to-i
1P32;GGpon alez, Wa hng~ton,Fla2n; is mele he ht
Lincecum, San Francisco, 121; Gallardo, Mil- to 8 feet
waukee, 121. On the 1~


roun led er 06o Bh
was also at 12 under through
nine holes and must finish
his round Saturday morning.

brIttawias ippngday n th

for Horschel, who fought a
one-hour rain delay in the
morning and temperatures
that reached the low 90s in
the afternoon. The 25-year-
old played 31 holes on Fri-
dy, finishing hisaf rt rtohund
derstorms ended Thurs-
day's round early.
About half the field will
have to finish the second
round on Saturday.


pitchiirjnthe next five innings

Crystal River's Taylor La-
belle was forced in from
third base in the bottom of
the fifth after a teammate
earned a bases-loaded walk
for the team's lone run.
Crystal River faces Dis-
trict 6 champs Bayshore
today at 11 a.m.


dancing around central Lon-
don tourist attractions in a
desperate bid to be huggable.
The city's famous red double-
decker buses are sporting ads
flogging the last of the unsold
Olympic soccer tickets.
The stadiums themselves
are nearly ready. At the ath-
letes village, Cuba and Den-
mark have been the first to
drape flags off their bal-
conies. The Olympic clock
ticking down the days in
Trafalgar Square has
reached single digits.
Olympic historian David
Goldblatt, co-author of "How
to Watch the Olympics," said
the flame's arrival in London
marks a key turning point.
"I think it signifies the mo-
ment when everyone,
whether for, against or indif-
ferent, is thinking 'Oh Lord
let's just get the bloody thing
started,' he said.
It was only weeks ago that
celebrations marking Queen
Elizabeth II's Diamond Ju-
bilee sent Britons into a
spasm of patriotic flag waving
and "God save the Queen"
singing as they watched a
flotilla of 1,000 boats on the
River Thames.

Scott, who had a 64 on
Thursday, has never been in
such good shape at a major
going into the weekend.
"Why I've played good this
week is kind of a culmina-
tion of everything I've done
over the last couple of
years," Scott said. "I feel like
this is the path I've been
going down, and just hap-
pens to have happened here
that I've put myself in good
position after two days at a
major"
Much like Snedeker,
thuh or indidtn't reach
"I think you look at the
names that are five and six
shots back, and it means
even less," he said.
The biggest name was
Woods.
Woods mapped out astrat-
egy for navigating the
bunkers of Royal Lytham,
and not even a change in the
weather only a breath of
wind -will take him away
from that. He has hit driver
only three times this week.
On the par-5 11th, where sev-
eral players hit driver for a
chance to go for the green in
two, Woods laid back with an
iron. He pulled it into the
rough, and it cost him. Woods
had to get up-and-down from
behind the green for a bogey.
That was his lone mistake,
however: He holed an 18-foot
birdie on the 16th hole, and
then fooled by what little
wind there was on the 18th,
recovered by holing out from
the greenside bunker with a
shot that rolled into the cup
for his second straight 67 and
a 6-under 134.

h e wa' as hard alssit may
"Because I was on the up
slope, I could take out that
steepness coming off the
bunker and land the ball on
the flat. So just threw it up
there, and I played about a
cup outside the left and it
landed on my spot and rolled


to the right."
Woods will find out if his
record in the majors still
means anything. This was
the eighth time he has
opened a major with two
rounds in the 60s, and he
went on to win on the seven
previous occasions in-
cluding all three of his Open
titles.


E107#14 LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
E~f~iday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)

PLAY 4 (e rly)

SPLAY 4 (late)


~Fantasy 5 and Mega
MOney were bohunavai bt -
atle at press thoe elfe r

the winning numbers.


On2 the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300 practice
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: STP 300 practice
5 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Mopar Mile-High NationalS
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
6:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Edmonton Indy qualifying
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FOX) Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels of
Anaheim
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Pittsburgh Pirates
7 p.m. (SUN) Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay RayS
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis CardinalS
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 19 -
Individual Time-Trial
BOWLING
4 p.m. (ESPN2) PBA Summer Shootout (Taped)
BOXING
10 p.m. (H BO) Adrien Broner vs. Vicente Escobedo, Junior
Lightweight
GOLF
7 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 British Open Championship Third
Round
9 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 British Open Championship Third
Round
3 p.m. (NBC) American Century Championship Second
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: True South Classic Third
Round
6 p.m. (GOLF) U.S. Girls Junior Amateur
7 p.m. (ESPN) 2012 British Open Championship Best of
the Third Round (Same-day Tape)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
4:30 p.m. (N BCSPT) AMA Motorcross Highlights (Taped)
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) AMA Motocross: Moto 2 (Taped)
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) Philadelphia Union at New York Red Bulls
TENNIS
7 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&T Atlanta Open
Second Semifinal
11 p.m. (ESPN2) WVTA U.S. Open Series: Mercury Insurance
Open Second Semifinal

NOte: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
On the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


3:20 a.m. -Tom Watson, Lee Westwood
3:30 a.m. Chad Campbell, John Daly
3:40 a.m. -Adilson Da Silva, Rickie Fowler
3:50 a.m.- Keegan Bradley Sang-moon Bae
4 a.m. Ross Fisher, K.J. Choi
4:10 a.m. -GaryWoodland, Charles Howell Ill
4:20 a.m.- Pablo Larrazabal, Juvic Pagunsan
4:30 a.m. Brendan Jones, Troy Matteson
4:45 a.m. -Aaron Baddeley, Vijay Singh
Ba5 na.m. Rafael Echenique, Matthew
5:05 a.m. Justin Hicks, Alexander Noren
5:15 a.m. Fredrik Jacobson, Jim Furyk
5:25 a.m. -Padraig Harrington, Rory Mcllroy
5:35 a.m. Nicolas Colsaerts, Gonzalo
Fernadez-Castano
5:45 a.m. Harris English, Branden Grace
5:55 a.m. Richard Sterne, Greg Owen
6:) am. -Warr n Benn t~toDusi k ha o

6:30 a.m. Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Jeev
Milkha Singh
6:40 a.m. Francesco Molinari, John
Senden
6:50 a.m. Hunter Mahan, Lee Slattery

7:1 a~. -BobBbe atson l oulter
7:20 a.m. -Jamie Donaldson, Miguel Angel
Jimenez
7:30 a.m. -Thongchai Jaidee, Garth Mulroy
7:45 a.m. -Anirban Lahiri, Ted Potter Jr.
7:55 a.m. Retief Goosen, Geoff Ogilvy
8:05 a.m. Louis Oosthuizen, Martin Laird
8:15 a.m. -Thomas Bjorn, Zach Johnson
8:25 a.m. Bill Haas, Kyle Stanley
8:35 a.m. Simon Khan, Greg Chalmers
8:45 a.m. Mark Calcavecchia, Andres

R8:55 oa.m. Peter Hanson, Toshinori Muto
9:10 a.m. Simon Dyson, Carl Pettersson
9:20 a.m. James Morrison, Steve Stricker
9:30 a.m. Luke Donald, Steven Alker
9:40 a.m. Ernie Els, Thomas Aiken
9:50 a.m. -Jason Duf ner, Graeme McDowell
10 a.m. Matt Kuchar, Paul Lawrie
10:10 a.m. -Thorbjorn Olesen, Tiger Woods
10:20 a.m. -Adam Scott, Brandt Snedeker
True South Classic
Friday
At Annandale Golf CLub, Madison, Miss.
YPurse :$3 I n72 n
Partial Second Round
Note: Play was suspended and
will be completed Saturday.
Billy Horschel 68-63 -131 -13

aeri cdr t76-- -
ChrisStroud 69-66--135 -9
Gary Christian 67-68 -135 -9
Gavin Coles 68-68--136 -8

Rc Mdame 6-9-13 -
PaulStankowski 66-70--136 -8
Mathew Goggin 66-71 -137 -7
Garrett Willis 66-71 -137 -7
J.J. Henry 70-67--137 -7
Josh Teater 73-64 -137 -7
Patrick Sheehan 69-69 138 -6
David Hearn 71-67--138 -6
Patrick Reed 73-65 -138 -6


Vaughn Taylor 72-67--139 -5
Mark Brooks 71-68 -139 -5
William McGirt 70-69 -139 -5
Omar Uresti 68-72--140 -4
Ca~meronkBeeckman 69 1-14 -
Michael Bradley 68-72--140 -4
Stuart Appleby 69-71 -140 -4


Chris Riley 70-70 -140 -4
Roland Thatcher 71-69 -140 -4
Alexandre Rocha 67-73--140 -4
EricAxley 73-67--140 -4
Ted Purdy 69-72 -141 -3
Dicky Pride 75-66 -141 -3
ArjunAtwal 70-71--141 -3
Kyle Thompson 69-72 141 -3

G n.Tr han 7-9-14 -
Hunter Haas 69-73 -142 -2
Lee Janzen 71-71 -142 -2
Notah Begay Ill 72-70 -142 -2
Grant Waite 69-73 -142 -2
Mige dAnge Carballo 7-69-4 -
Stephen Gangluff 70-72--142 -2
Shaun Micheel 71-72 -143 -1
Blake Adams 70-73 -143 -1
ril iacKenzie 7)7 N-14 E
Danny Lee 74-70 -144 E
Edward Loar 71-74 -145 +1
Blaine McCallister 75-71 --146 +2
Kent Jones 72-75--147 +3
Anthony Price 71-77--148 +4
Robin F eman N475--149

Jim Gallagher Jr. 76-73--149 +5
FultonAllem 73-77--150 +6
TedTryba 73-77--150 +6
M Ik enn 74 77-151 +
Greg Sonnier 76-77--153 +9
Austin Gutgsell 76-78 -154 +10
Spike McRoy 79-75--154 +10
Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORE
THRU

2. Mt retts c urt F
2. Jason Bohn -12 9
4. Steven Bowditch -11 F
5. J.J. Killeen -10 12
6. Chris Stroud -9 F
6. Gary Christian -9 F
6. Chris Kirk -9 F
6. Bud Cauley -9 7
6. Jason Gore -9 8
11. Heath Slocum -8 F
11. Scott Stallings -8 9
11. GavinColes -8 F
11. Rocco Mediate -8 F
11. Paul Stankowski -8 F



Tour de France results

At Brive-11a aI adee, France

An l38-2-mile, mostly flat ride from Bla-
gnac to Brive-la-Gaillarde, with four easy
climbs
holurbark navuerdsh, ritain, ky Procycling, 4
2. Matthew Harley Goss, Australia, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
3. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, same time.
4. Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabobank,
same time.
5. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
6. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-
.Baru auaBsoaz c, Snia, Astana, same time.
8. Sebastien Hinault, France, France, AG2R
La Mondiale, same time.
9. Daryl Impey, South Africa, Orica

Grleenadges r\oliFrance, Cofidis, same
time.
11. Andre Greipel, Germany, Lotto Belisol,


Horschel takes


I



One sarokEe

sociated Press

SON, Miss. Billy
l1 shot a 9-under 63
:cond round on Eri-

kueeaS o-stroke lad

hel played a bogey-
nd and made eagle
No. 5 and No. 18 for
ler 131 total.
~ettencourt was one





continued from Page B1

O'Callaghan started
e mound for Crystal
ut West Pasco was
~arn five runs early
first inning. Cody
ame on in relief,




. E
continued from Page B1


n segmented by the
Hiding rain and a con-
ream of headlines
e failure of security
or G4S to provide
guards.
layor has a message
aysayers: "Put a sock

ing at a ceremony at
er of London, Boris
said the arrival of
h would "dispel any
gaining clouds of
ss and anxiety"
l1 spread the crack-
hfire of Olympic en-
Sthroughout this city
country," he said, as
lImes, a British dou-
Smedal winner in
Hired the ramparts of
mark, with the torch

Sor not, the games
!ality! Olympic ban-
lot pink, acid yellow
Green have painted
in neon. The tubby
like mascots, Wen-
d Mandeville, are



ont nud fro Page B1



et by Nick Faldo in
,nhe won the Open at
d, and it broke byfour
e 36-hole record at

more amazing?
,r hasn't hit into any
106 bunkers in two

ogeys around here is
some good breaks
dngsom psr tt god
neekr ai. "y
all week has been to
,all on the greens as
possible. Once l'm on
have a pretty good
r the speed of the
lust going to try and
,ing that over the

ker has never made
in three previous
the British Open,
;his brand of golf is
new. As a rookie on
Tour in 2007, he was
through 10 holes on
th Course at Torrey
Ifore having to settle
.He picked up his
n there this year by
from a seven-shot
n the last day
dt is a momentum-
, once he gets going
rting making putts
ng shots," said Mark
chiaa, another player
sn't waste time. "He
ick and he's got the
!mpo and he putts
nd they go in quick.
awesome golf."
does that get him?

1rseaid t" e'oe g 3
,les to go. A lot can

rat was before Scott
ear-old Australian,
making his steady
p the leaderboard.
:yed the third hole
secondd straight da ,


Turned it around by
g a 3-wood that
Soff a hillock to the
he green on the par-
h hole and set up a
birdie. Scott
the back nine with
back birdies, and
two beautiful shots
;for another birdie
8th and a 67.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Tigers 4 White Sox 2
Chicago Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
De Aza of 3 1 2 2 AJcksn of 4 0 1 1
Youkils 3b 4 0 0 0 Berry If 31 0 0
A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 MiCarr3b 4 1 2 1
Konerklb 4 0 0 0 Fielderlb 4 0 2 1
Rios rf 2 0 1 0 DYong dh 4 0 1 1
Przyns c 3 00 0Boesch rf 3 01 0
Viciedo If 3 00 0D.Kelly rf 00 0 0
AIRmrz ss 3 1 1 0 Raburn ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0 Avila c 4 0 0 0
JhPerlt ss 3 22 0
RSantg 2b 3 0 1 0
Totals 29 24 2 Totals 33 410 4
Chicago 002 000 000 2
Detroit 003 000 10x 4
DP--Ch cago 1, Doesro 2 LOB--Chircaago ,

D.Young ld(65), Soe h(1R8a) rhzPeralta (21).

IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Peavy L,7-7 7 8 4 4 0 7
Omogrosso 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
Veal 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Detroit
Verlander W,11-5 8 4 2 2 2 6
Valverde S,18-22 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP--by Peavy (Berry). Balk--Peavy.

Blue Jays 6, Red Sox 1
Toronto Boston
ab r h bi ab r hbi
Gose rf 3 1 0 0 Ellsury of 4 0 1 0
Rasms of 5 12 2 Crwrd If 4 01 0
Encrnc lb 3 21 1 Pedroia 2b 4 01 0
Lind dh 4 0 2 1 AdGnzl ib 4 0 0 0
Arencii c 3 01 1C.Ross rf 4 01 0
KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Mdlrks 3b 4 1 2 0
YEscor ss 4 1 1 0 Shppch c 3 0 2 0
Snider If 3 1 1 0 Nava ph 0 0 0 0
YGoms 3b 4 0 1 1 Aviles ss 4 0 1 1
Ciriaco dh 3 00 0
Sltlmchph 10 0 0
Totals 33 69 6 Totals 351 9 1
Toronto 220 010 001 6
Boston 000 000 001 1
E -M dbdeb ooks (8) P-Toronte d Bosto 4


BASEBALL


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 B5


East Division
L Pot GB WC L10
35 .620 - 7-3
44 .527 8'/ '/ 4-6
45 .516 9'/ lb/ 5-5
46 .511 10 2 6-4
47 .495 111% 31/ 4-6


East Division
L Pot GB WC L10
37 .589 - 5-5
41 .549 3'/ 8-2
45 .511 7 3'/ 3-7
49 .473 10'/ 7 3-7
53 .436 14 10'/ 4-6


Home Away
30-17 27-18 Chicago
23-22 26-22 Detroit
27-23 21-22 Cleveland
25-26 23-20 Kan.City
25-20 21-27 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pot GB WC L10
43 .538 - 4-6
44 .532 H2 8-2
46 .505 3 2'/ 4-6
52 .429 10 9'/ 2-8
54 .413 11'/ 11 3-7


West Division
L Pot GB WC L10
36 .604 - 5-5
43 .538 6 4-6
44 .522 7'/ 1 8-2
54 .426 16'/10 5-5



West Division
L Pot GB WC L10
41 .559 - 7-3
44 .527 3 2 3-7
48 .478 7'/ 6'/ 5-5
55 .415 13'/ 12'/ 5-5
56 .385 16 15 4-6


W
New York 57
Baltimore 49
Tampa Bay 48
Boston 48
Toronto 46


Home Away
24-22 26-21
26-21 24-23
24-22 23-24
16-28 23-24
19-30 19-24


Home Away
29-16 26-20
25-18 25-25
26-21 22-23
17-27 23-27


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


Reds 3, Brewers 1
Milwaukee Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Aoki rf 4 0 1 1
CGomz of 4 01 0
Braun If 4 02 0
ArRmr3b 4 0 0 0
Hart lb 4 00 0
RWeks 2b 3 00 0
Mldnd c 3 1 2 0
Ransm ss 3 00 0
Estrad p 2 00 0
Ishikaw ph 10 0 0
Loe p 00 0 0
Totals 32 1 6 1
Milwaukee 000
Cincinnati 000


Stubbs of
Cozart ss
BPhllps 2b
Bruce rf
Ludwck If
Chpmn p
Rolen 3b
Frazier lb
Mesorc c
HBaily p
Heisey If
Totals
000 010
100 20x


Central Division
L Pot GB WC L10
40 .570 - 8-2
40 .565 H2 6-4
45 .516 5 3 4-6
48 .478 8'/ 6'/ 6-4
54 .413 14'/ 12'/ 7-3
59 .366 19 17 2-8


Home Away
26-17 27-20
24-24 26-17
26-20 21-25
24-24 20-25
17-28 24-25


Str Home Away
W-2 29-18 24-22
W-3 30-14 22-26
W-1 24-20 24-25
L-1 26-23 18-25
L-1 24-21 14-33
L-3 24-21 10-38


Str Home Away
W-1 29-16 23-25
W-1 29-20 20-24
L-1 23-21 21-27
W-3 20-28 19-27
L-2 20-29 15-27


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


E. nsoBMi e I k iucnkneaei 5. 2-Anok

e(1 ) M al ona o (4) 100 ar 92 ) B u eR ( 3

IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Estrada L,0-4 7 7 3 3 0 5
Loe 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cincinnati
H.Bailey W,9-6 8 6 1 1 0 10
Chapman S,16-20 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP--Estrada.

Giants 7, Phillies 2
San Francisco Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GBlanccf 5 0 0 0 Rollnsss 4 0 1 0
Theriot 2b 5 1 4 0 Victorn of 4 1 1 0
MeCarr If 5 11 0Utley2b 4 01 0
Posey lb 31 0 0Howardlb 3 11 1
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0
Kontos p 00 0 0Pencerf 3 00 0
Sandovl 3b 3 1 1 1 Pierre If 3 0 0 0
Schrhlt rf 3 2 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 1 0
BCrwfr ss 4 12 5Worleyp 2 00 0
Whitsd c 4 01 1 Schwm 0 00 0
Linccm p 2 0 0 0 Pridie ph 1 0 0 0
Beltib 1 0 0 0 Horstp 0 0 0 0
Fontentph 1 00 0
Totals 35 7107 Totals 33 2 6 1
San Francisco 000 015 010 7

Ph~iladelapahin rn 00 101 000) 2

Howard (2). SB--Rollins (15). CS--Theriot (4).
SF--Sandoval.
IP H R ER BB SO
Franec m,10 7 5 2 2 2 6





Horst 2 3 1 1 0 2
Balk--Lincecum.

Pirates 4, Marlins 3
Miami abr iPittsburgh a hb

Reyes ss 51 3 1PresleyIf 3 10 0
Bonifac of 5 1 10Walker2b 4 12 1
Ca.Lee lb 4 0 0 1 AMcCt of 3 0 2 0


Dobbs 3b 4 01 0 Mc~eh l 4 00 0
Bnant ~b 4 12 0 Ir j b 41 1)
Nolasco p 10 0 1Barmesss 3 01 1
DSolanph 1 0 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0

cnan ap 0 0 0 0 Hnhpnp 0 0 0 0
Kearns ph 1 0 1 0 Correia p 1 0 0 0
HRmrzpr 00 0 0Resopp 0 00 0
Mercer ss 1 o1 o

siai 23030 ts0 000 31 4
Pittsburgh 100 210 00x 4
DP--Miami 1, Pittsburgh 2. LOB--Miami 8,
Pittsburgh 6.2B-J.Buck (7), Barajas (9), Mer-
ce 2). R--Reyes (251) W ler (), P2Alvarez
H.Ramirez (14). S--Nolasco, Correia.
IP H R ERBB SO
Milam o L,8-8 6 8 4 4 1 7
M.Dunn 1 1 0 0 1 2
Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 3
Pittsburgh
CoreiaHW7-6 5 8 3 3 0 5
J.Hughes H,8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0

Hnaan aS 7-30 1 2 2


Rasmus (4).


LafyW2-1
Oliver



Msct nLn,5-8

Tazawa
WP-Janssen.


IP H R ER BB SO

7 8 00 04
10 00 0 1
11 1 2


11-3 2 1
2-3 0 0


hit a grand slam and drove in five runs,
Tim Lincecum threw seven sharp innings
and the NL West-leading San Francisco
Giants beat the Philadelphia Phillies 7-2.
Ryan Howard hit a solo homer for the
last-place Phillies, who have lost two in a
row after winning four straight.
Lincecum (4-10) looked more like the
pitcher who was a two-time Cy Young
Award winner than the one who entered
the game with a 5.93 ERA. He allowed
two runs and five hits, striking out six.
Phillies starter Vance Worley (5-6)
gave up six runs and six hits in six in-
nings, striking out nine.
The Giants broke it open with five runs
in the sixth,

PirateS 4, Marlins 3
PITTSBURGH Pedro Alvarez hit hiS
20th homer of the season, Andrew Mc-
Cutchen had two hits to boost his batting
average to a major-league best .372 and
the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Miami
Marlins 4-3.
Kevin Correia (7-6) overcame a shaky
start to win his fifth consecutive decision.
Joel Hanrahan worked out of a two-on,
one-out jam for 27th save as the PirateS

0 ved5t )saado -mas el2a gam oer

behind Cincinnati for first place in the NL
central.
Neil Walker led off the sixth with a
homer off Ricky Nolasco (8-8) to help the
Pirates rally for their 27th come-from-be-
hind victory, second-most in baseball.
Jose Reyes had three hits, including
his fifth homer of the season, for the Mar-
linS. John Buck singled and doubled for
Miami, which has dropped three straight
and SeVen o1.

DodgIers 7, Mets 6
NEW YORK Matt Kemp homered
early and the Los Angeles Dodgers ham-
mered a struggling Johan Santana before
holding off the New York Mets 7-6.
Luis Cruz connected for his first major
league home run and the Dodgers finally
solved Santana (6-7), who entered 5-0
with a 0.50 ERA in five career startS
against them. That included eight in-
nings of three-hit ball in a 5-0 win June
30 at Los Angeles, but the two-time Cy
Young Award winner has hit the skidS
hard since then.
In addition to the two-run homers by
Kemp and Cruz off Santana, the DodgerS
got RBI singles from Jerry Hairston Jr.
and Juan Rivera. The early offense bene-
fited starter Aaron Ha rang (7-5), who al-
|owed one earned run in five innings.
Kenley Jansen worked a scoreleSS
ninth for his 17th save.

Cardinals 4, Cubs 1
ST. LOUIS Kyle Lohse worked
seven strong innings and the St. LouiS
Cardinals' slumbering offense ended
Ryan Dempster's 33-inning scoreless
streak with a three-run first in a 4-1 vic-
tory over the Chicago Cubs.
Matt Holliday added a third-inning
home run estimated at 469 feet, the
longest at 7-year-old Busch Stadium.
Lohse (10-2) won his fourth straight de-
cision over five starts to complement a
lineup that topped three runs for the first
time in 12 gmeS
The def ending World Series champi-
ons found an unlikely victim in Dempster
(5-4), who hadn't allowed a run since May
30 while winning five straight starts. He
entered with a major league-best 1.86
ERA before running into immediate trou-
ble, giving up four straight singles in a
span of six pitches with one out.


Baltimore


Cleveland


ab r h bi ab r h bi
Markks rf 4 00 0Choo rf 4 02 0
EnChyz rf-lf 1 0 1 0 Cnghm rf 1 0 0 0
Hardy ss 6 11 0ACarer ss 31 1 1
Thome dh 5 2 3 1) JL z b 2

Wieters c 4 1 01 Brantly of 4 00 0
Betemt3b 2 1 1 1 CSantn c 1 0 0 0
CDvslf r 11Hf fhd 3 1
MrRynl ib 5 1 1 2 Ktchm ib 4 0 0 0
Flahrty 2b 5 1 1 3 Hannhn 3b 4 11 1
I orel 391011196 To~t s 0034 2 91
Cleveland 100 000 100 2
DP--Baltimore 2. LOB--Baltimore 10, Cleve-
land 9. 2B-En.Chavez (3), Hardy (16), Thome
r3,A~d.oes dss )5)Be emit (1 )), C.avs ( 3)
HP---Thome (1), Flaherty (3), A.Cabrera (12)


Hanh ().

Baltimore
Gonzalez W,2-1
Uindstrom

Cleveland


IP H R ER BB so

62-3 7 2 2 2 5

11-3 0


D.Lowe L,8-8 3 7 9 9 5 0
C.Allen 2 0 0 0 2

J. ih 1 0 0 0 0 0
Sipp 1 1 0 0 1 1


H Pb idtro ( at nh), thM~ig.G~on-
zalez (Haf ner). WP-D. Lowe.

SMLB TR ADE

Astros pick up
Splayed i trad

HOUSTON The Houston
Astros have acquired closer
Francisco Cordero and out-

fedr IBe rFradnciscohas rpoart f

mHoustaon wiaso edcewve four

right-handed pitchers Joe Mus-
grove and Asher Wojciechowski,
left-handed pitcher David Rollins,
catcher Carlos Perez and a
player to be named later. The
Blue Jays will receive pitchers
Brandon Lyon, J.A. Happ and
David Carpenter from Houston.
Cordero has 329 career
saves, second among active
players to the New York Yan-
kees' Mariano Rivera (608). In

t7h9e43careeer r lef appearance'
3.28 ERA and has reached 40
or more saves in three sea-
sons. Cordero is 3-5 with two
saves in 41 appearances for
Toronto this season.
Francisco is hitting .244 in 23
games for Toronto in 2012.
Royals g~et RHP P
Guthrie for LHP Sanchez
The Colorado Rockies
traded right-handed pitcher Je-
remy Guthrie to Kansas City
on Friday in exchange for
Jonathan Sanchez, the strug-
gling lefty starter who was des-
ignated for assignment this
week by the Royals.
The 29-year-old Sanchez is
1-6 with a 7.76 ERA in 12 starts
this season. A seven-year
major league veteran, he is 39-
52 with a 4.50 ERA, 420 walks
and 772 strikeouts in 186
games (130 starts.
Sanchez threw a no-hitter
against San Diego in 2009 and
the Royals traded away Melky
Cabrera to get him last No-
vember in what turned out to
be one of the worst trades in
team history.


Dodgers 7, Mets 6
Los Angeles New York

Abreu If ab 2 h Tejada ss ab r
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Ttal ngl37 7130172 To as 1036 610 6
NewYork 200 011 200 6
E--Hairston Jr. 2 (8). LOB-Los Angeles 7,
he ok10. 2B7Rthie Km4),(1G4y Jrur (,
Valdespin (6). SB--Ethier (2), Gwynn Jr. (13).
SF--D.Wright, I.Davis.
IP H R ER BB SO

sa sgW7- 5 4 3 1 3 5
Lindblom H,15 1-3 1 1 1 2 1

Guerra H,3 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Belisario H,14 1 1 0 0 0 1
JansenoSl7-22 1 1 0 0 0 2
J.Santana L,6-7 3 7 6 6 3 3
Beato 2 0 0 0 0 1
R.Ramirez 2 2 1 1 1 3
udcahk 1 0 2


500 Home Runs
activev)
Thr ugh July 20
Player No.
1.kry Bonds 6
3. Babe Ruth 714
4.Willie Mays 660
e.xArl rRodr guez 643
7. x-Jim Thome 610
8.Sammy Sosa 609

10MrkkMc~wr nr
11. Harmon Killebrew 573
12. Rafael Palmeiro 569
13. Reggie Jackson 563
1 MannS Ra iez 5
16. Mickey Mantle 536
17. Jimmie Foxx 534
18. Frank Thomas 521
e8 Wlie MicaCovey 521
21.Ernie Banks 512
21. Eddie Mathews 512
34 Mar Oheffield 50
25. Eddie Murray 504


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Balttiotoe c0 Cevelande2o 2
Toronto 6, Boston 1
Seattle at Tampa Bay, late
Minnesota at Kansas City, late
N Yankees at Oakland late

Saturday's Games
ChicagoWhite Sox (Salell1-2) at Detroit (Fbrcello 6-5), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 10-6) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-9), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore(CTillman i-1) at Cleveland (McAllister 4-1), 7:05 p.m.

nanttee jar as t- at~ma B (o46) 7130 1p.m.
Toronto (Villanueva 4-0) at Boston (A.Cook 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y~ankees (PHughes 9-7) at Oaldand (J.Parker6-4), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Toronteo aat BostonB Om.3 .m.

Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m
Baltimore at Cleveland, 3:05 p.n
N.Y Yankees at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Bat more xtCalue ed, 7:05 p.m.

Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Ptsbn Facso 7 hladelphia 2

Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 4, Chicago Cubs 1
Atlanta at Washington, late
Hostaodnoaat Anona atelae
Saturday's Games
Atlanta (Sheets 1-0) at Washington (E.Jackson 5-5), 1:05 p.m.,
1st game
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 9-5) at N.Y Mets (Batistal1-2), 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 10-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 11-4)'

Atla~ntamDelgado 4-9) at Washington (Lannan 0-0), 7:05 p.m.,
2ndgame
Miami (Zambrano 5-7) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 10-3), 7:05

Mihwaukee (Gallardo 8-6) at Cincinnati (Arrayo 4-6), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 5-7) at St. Louis (Westbrook 7-8), 7:15

Hoston (Keuchel l-1) at Arizona (Miley 10-5), 8:10 p.m.
Colorado (Francis 2-2) at San Diego (K.Wells 1-3), 8:35 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Mami rn citsough i.3 I,135p..
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.

Chicago Cubs at Pittso agh, 7:0 p
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Wahntoat N.Y Mets, 7:1p0 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


FOr more box scores,
see Page B4.

the Milwaukee Brewers and Zack Cozart
hit the first of Cincinnati's three solo
homers for a 3-1 victory that kept the
Reds in first place in the NL Central.
The Reds have won nine of their last
11 games, moving 13 games over .500
for the first time this season.
Bailey (9-6) has beaten the defending
World Series champion Cardinals and the
defending division champion Brewers in
his last two starts. He's won four straight
starts for the first time in his career.
The right-hander had been 0-5 in 10
career games against Milwaukee.
Cozart, Jay Bruce and Scott Rolen
homered off Marco Estrada (0-4), who
gave up seven hits overall in seven in-
nin s
Giants 7, Phillies 2
PHILADELPHIA-- Brandon Crawford


AM ERICAN LEAGUE


NL


N AT IONAL LEAG U E


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher James Shields throws against the Seattle Mariners on Friday night at Tropicana Field
in St. Petersburg. The Rays and Mariners were tied at 3 in the 14th inning as the game was not over at press time.



Verlander bests White Sox


One oftbree Ize


eMa~-znnzn ames

Associated PrCSS

DETROIT Justin Verlander
shut down the White Sox after the
third inning, and the Detroit TigerS
backed their ace with timely hitting
in a 4-2 victory over Chicago in the
opener of a big three-game serieS.
Detroit inched closer to the top of
the AL Central. The Tigers trail the
first-place White Sox by a half-game.
Detroit was six back after a loss tO
the Chicago Cubs on June 12.
Verlander (11-5) allowed four hitS
in eight innings, including a two-run
homer in the third by Alejandro De
Aza. He struck out six and walked
two. Jose Valverde finished for hiS
18th save in 22 chances.
Jake Peavy (7-7) struck out the first
five batters he faced and seven over-
all, but Detroit scored three runs in


thu husand tds t hitsn ,ae dur
ing Detroit's big third inning. Jhonny
Peralta led off with a double but had
to stay at second on Ramon Santi-
ago's single because the ball waS
nearly caught on the fly by right
fielder Alex RiOS.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Blue Jays 6, Red Sox 1
BOSTON Aaron Laffey pitched
seven shutout innings and Colby Ras-
mus drove in two runs, lifting the TorontO
Blue Jays to a 6-1 victory over the
Boston Red Sox.
The win snapped a three-game losing
streak for Toronto, and was just its sixth in
its last 15 games.
Boston, which entered the game
leading the majors in runs, had won
four of five.
Adam Lind added two hits and an RBI
for the Blue Jays.
Laffey (2-1) scattered eight singles and
worked out of trouble in the third and sev-
enth innings. He struck out four and didn't
walk a batter.
Josh Beckett (5-8) was plagued
again by a rough opening inning and
took the loss.

Orioles 10, Indians 2
CLEVELAND Jim Thome hit his

610thc teerchaormeerl omove ito eianrth

Orioles pounded out a 10-2 victory over
the Cleveland Indians.
Thome passed Sammy Sosa on the
career list with a towering 418-foot shot
off Derek Lowe (8-8) to open the fourth
inning.
Ryan Flaherly had a three-run homer
and Mark Reynolds doubled home two
runs in a six-run third for Baltimore, which
won its third straight.
Miguel Gonzalez (2-1) gave up seven
hits over 6 2-3 innings in his third career
start. The right-hander struck out five and
is 1-0 with a 2.14 ERA on the road.
Asdrubal Cabrera and Jack Hannahan
homered for Cleveland, which has lost six
of its last nine.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Reds 3, Brewers 1
CINCINNATI Homer Bailey pitched
eight innings for his first career win over


Orioles 10, Indians 2














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
__A surfer leaves the water as the sun sets
at Ipanema beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Heloisa "Helo" Pinheiro, the woman who
inspired the classic bossa nova tune, "The Girl
From Ipanema," poses for a picture in Sao Paulo,
Brazil. The quintessential tune was inspired by
Pinheiro when she passed the songwriters in a
beachside bar on her way to the sea 50 years ago.


Lotto: 1-3-7-23-33-44
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 49 $2,688.50
4-of-6 2,755 $40.50
3-of-6 43,453 $5
Fantasy 5: 2 17 32 34 35
5-of-5 3 winners $79,826.86
4-of-5 269 $143.50
3-of-5 9,231 $11.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS

STo verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
Sdouble-check the num-
9 bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.






Today is Saturday, July 21,
the 203rd day of 2012. There
are 163 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 21, 1925, the so-
called "Monkey Trial" ended
in Dayton, Tenn., with John T.
me. ButScopes convicted of violating
ic, com- state law for teaching Dar-
,owerful wisThooEvltn
contem- w" Tery o vltn.
ong. The (The conviction was later
stepped overturned on a technicality.)
ecededOn this date:
shes for In 1861, during the Civil
it of surf War, the first Battle of Bull
Run was fought at Manas-
,Au Bon sas, Va., resulting in a Con-
;a nova, federate victory.
bout the In 1930, President Herbert
luce the Hoover signed an executive
3r bossa order establishing the Veter-
samba" ans Administration (later the
.so were U.S. Department of Veterans
;time. Affairs).
:0 feet In 1944, American forces
ons real- landed on Guam during
ary was World War II.
tle stage. In 1949, the U.S. Senate
when itratified the North Atlantic
memberTreaty.
e oftheIn 1959, the NS Savannah,
ust com- the first nuclear-powered
scrap of merchant ship, was chris-
write it tened by first lady Mamie
;aid. "At Eisenhower at Camden, N.J.
just lis- In 1961, Capt. Virgil "Gus"
~ck, and Grissom became the second
'ter that, American to rocket into a
sub-orbital pattern around the
Earth, flying aboard the Lib-
erty Bell 7.
In 1969, Apollo 11 astro-
nauts Neil Armstrong and

otos ::n romthz donrinbor etdhe
ascent stage of the lunar
,, module for docking with the
command module.
In 1980, draft registration
began in the United States
for 19- and 20-year-old men.
Ten years ago: Telecom-
munications giant WorldCom
Inc. filed for bankruptcy pro-
tection about a month after
disclosing it had inflated prof-
its by nearly $4 billion through
deceptive accounting.
Five years ago: "Harry
SPotter and the Deathly Hal-
1, L; ~lows," the final volume of the
wizard series by J.K. Rowl-
ing, went on sale.
Associated Press One year ago: The 30-
a photo of year-old space shuttle pro-
te celebrity gram ended as Atlantis
saw, Poland. landed at Cape Canaveral,
Fla., after the 135th shuttle


Associated Press


their muse saunter by in the song's
eponymous neighborhood. "For me,
Rio de Janeiro is this song, is bossa
nova; the city has this rhythm, this
charm, this sensuality."
Indeed, the song carries within
its chords and lyrics an image of a
city that's light and easy, palm trees
and blue sky, a sun-kissed life with-
out care.
Rio is in "the levity of the song, its
absolute elegance, the way it does-
n't take itself seriously" said Ruy
Castro, a writer and journalist who
has chronicled the city, its music
and its nightlife.
This girl who "swings so cool and
sways so gently" first stepped out in
public August 1962, in a cramped
Copacabana nightclub.
On stage together, for the first and
only time, were the architects of
bossa nova: Tom Jobim on piano
and Joao Gilberto on guitar, with
help from the poet Vinicius de
Moraes, who gave "The Girl" her
lyrics. Also performing was the
vocal group Os Cariocas.
Bossa nova was still young then,
somewhat of a novelty even in Rio.
The name meant "new trend" or
"new way," and that's what it was: a
fresh, jazzy take on Brazil's holiest
tradition, the samba.


The rhythm was the sal
where samba was cathart:
munal, built on drums and p
voices, bossa was intimate,
plative, just a singer and a sc
melody, on guitar or piano,
up to the front. Percussion r
played sometimes with bru
a softer texture reminiscent
washing on the sand.
The 1962 show at the club
Gourmet established boss
wrote Castro in his book a~
genre. It didn't just introd
Jobim-penned "Girl"; other
classics, such as "So danco
and "Samba da bencao," al
played publicly for the first
The small club 20 by 13
sold out every night as patre
ized something extraordin;
happening on the cramped lit
Severino Filho was there
happened. As an original 1
of Os Cariocas, he was on
first to ever hear the song.
"Tom and Vinicius had j~
posed it; it was still on a t
paper. Only later did they
out on a clean sheet," he s
first, people in the audience
tened. But they'd come ba
would start to sing along. Af
bossa nova just exploded."


RIO DE JANEIRO "Tall and
tan and young and lovely ... You've
heard of her. The Girl From
Ipanema.
You might have come across the
bossa nova classic while on hold on
the phone, during a long elevator
ride, or in a caf4 in Beirut or
Bangkok but you've heard it. It's
been recorded by everyone from
Frank Sinatra to Amy Winehouse,
and survived bad lounge singers
and Muzak incarnations to become,
according to Performing Songwriter
magazine, the second most
recorded song in the world.
The quintessential bossa nova
tune, inspired by a young woman
who passed the songwriters in a
beachside bar on her way to the sea,
introduced Rio de Janeiro to the
world. Now, it's turning 50, and to its
legions of fans, the decades have
only heightened its allure, adding a
wash of nostalgia to this hymn to
passing youth and beauty.
"I love this music, and had been
searching for this place," said
Venezuelan tourist Xiomara
Castillo, who with her husband was
taking pictures inside the bar
where the song's authors watched


Associated Press

WARSAW, Poland -
Poland plans to auction off
part of a photographic col-
lection that includes hun-
dreds of photographs of
Marilyn Monroe.
The collection includes
close to 4,000 photographs
taken by the late celebrity
photographer Milton H.
Greene. Some are well-
known images, but Polish of-
ficials say they believe the
collection might contain
some previously unpub-
lished works.
The photos ended up in
Poland's possession as the
result of a complex embez-
zlement scandal that shook


the country in the early
1990s. A Chicago business-
man accused of cheating
Poland out of millions of
dollars gave the collection
to Poland in partial repay-
ment for the government's
loss.
They have been stored in
a New York warehouse for
years and only arrived in
Warsaw recently.
The Polish official in
charge of cleaning up the
lingering mess from the cor-
ruption affair, Marta Maci-
azek, said the photographic
collection is valued at
$680,000. She said some of
the photos will goon exhibi-
tion soon and then will be
put up for sale.


Photo gallery curator Anna Wolska presents
Marylin Monroe and Arthur Miller by the la
photographer Milton H. Greene on Friday in War


flight.
Today's Birthdays:
Singer Kay Starr is 90. Movie
director Norman Jewison is
86. Former Attorney General
Janet Reno is 74. Singer
Yusuf Islam (formerly Cat
Stevens) is 64. Comedian-
actor Robin Williams is 61.
Comedian Jon Lovitz is 55.
Actress Ali Landry is 39.
MLB All-Star pitcher CC
Sabathia is 32. Actress
Vanessa Lengies is 27.
Thought for Today: "Sus-
pense is worse than disap-
pointment." Robert Burns
(1759-1796).


Birthday You could be luckier than usual in the year
ahead, even though the victories you hope to reach might
not come on your first try. Stay the course because
chances are your second effort will be dynamite.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you do not succeed on
your first attempt, at least give yourself credit for what you
tried to do. After patting yourself on the back, take a deep
breath, regroup and try again.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When your desires are purely
materialistic in nature, gratification is likely to evade you. To
get things back in proper balance, think of ways to enrich
your soul and spirit, not just your wallet.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Friends usually do things for
us out of affection, not in order to incur an obligation. I
doubt yours will be any different. Try using smiles, not
snarls, to induce cooperation.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) One of the best ways to inhibit


Today's HORsOSCPE
your progress is to take things too seriously. Conversely,
adopting a philosophical outlook could put you in the
winner's circle.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Instead of leaving an impor-
tant matter to a friend who sometimes is known to be unre-
liable, take control of the situation yourself, even if you'd
prefer to do otherwise.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be careful not to insinu-
ate yourself with people who aren't in harmony with your
philosophy. If you do, you risk getting involved in something
you don't want to be part of.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you have a tricky assign-
ment to take care of, analyze its potential problems well in
advance. Otherwise, you could end up running around in
circles without a game plan.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Try not to be too posses-
sive of someone to whom you are attracted. Be relaxed


and generous, and good things could come about.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order to protect your in-
terests and position, chances are you might have to do a
bit of negotiating up front. It behooves you to focus on your
strongest areas.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It will all depend upon your
attitude as to whether you succeed or fail. When con-
fronting a difficult situation, seek out its positive attributes
and go from there.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) There is everything to lose
when involved in high-risk ventures. Conversely, your
chances of yielding a profit will increase by proceeding
along prudent, practical lines.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Although you might have to
deal with a lot of uncertainties early in the day, as time ticks
on, one by one they should gradually disappear, and you'll
get everything under control.


Direc V






SettlO








regain ~
Nickelodeon

Associated Press

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -
DirectTV subscribers who
want their MTV Sponge
Bob SquarePants or co-
median Jon Stewart are
getting their wish.
Viacom Inc. and the
satellite TV service
provider said Friday they
have settled a dispute that
had cut off access to17 Via-
com channels for DirectTV
subscribers. Terms of the
deal were not disclosed.
Channels such as MTV
Comedy Central and
Nickelodeon had been in-
accessible to 20 million
DirecTV customers since
July 10 as the two compa-
nies haggled over how
much DirecTV should pay
to carry those channels.
A day later Viacom also
shut off access to full-
length episodes on its own
websites such as MTI~com
and ComedyCentral.com
to all visitors, even those
who had no stake in the
dispute. That was appar-
ently in response to Di-
recTV telling its U.S.
subscribers where they
could find programs on the
Internet that they could no
longer watch on TV
With viewers frustrated
by the lack of accessibility,
Viacom decided Tuesday
to let new episodes of
"The Daily Show with Jon
Stewart" and "The Col-
bert Report" be shown on
its websites, easing the
blockade of online view-
ings it imposed last week.
The move came a day
after both shows resumed
new episodes following a
two-week hiatus.
As part of the new long-
term deal, DirecTV Group
Inc. subscribers can watch
Viacom shows on tablets,
laptops and other devices
using DirecTV's Every-
where platform.
While the two compa-
nies have struck a deal,
DirecTV made it clear it
was not happy with what
had transpired.
"The attention sur-
rounding this unnecessary
and ill-advised blackout
by Viacom has accom-
plished one key thing: it
serves notice to all media
compne that bdullyies
customers with blackouts
won't get them a better
deal," Derek Chang, exec-
utive vice president of
content strategy and de-
velopment for DirecTY
said in a statement.
DirecTV said while the
dispute with Viacom was
going on it received sup-
port from not only cus-
tomers, but competitors as
well. The satellite televi-
sion provider said 850
small and independently
owned local cable systems
that make up the Ameri-
can Cable Association
were opposed to Viacom's
actions, as were Cox
Communications, Time
Warner Cable and
Mediacom.


InSpiring Ipanema


SO YOU KNOW
mLast night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JULY19
Fantasy 5: 5 15 16 19 20
5-of-5 2 winners $103,092.98
4-of-5 319 $104
3-of-5 9,979 $9
owWEDN SDAY, JULY1 5
Powerball: 3
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 3 winners
No Florida winner


Poland to auction 1Marilyn 1Monroe ph













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


VINO WONG/Atlanta JournalI-Constitution
Pastor Bryant Wright of Johnson Ferry Baptist Church in Marietta, Ga., checks his smartphone. Wright still writes his sermons and his daily
radio spots "Right From the Heart" in longhand on yellow legal pads. But the advent of the iPhone has suddenly launched this self-described
"Neanderthal pastor" into the online world. A member of his ministry helps load his devotionals onto Facebook and Twitter, and using his
smartphone, he also tweets personal thoughts and news, recently tweeting from the convention in New Orleans. His Facebook postings are
read by more than 4 million people a month, he said.


Patstors increasingly us~ing socia media took to connect with congregations


super-engaged."
Though Lady Gaga might have
26 million followers to Joyce
Meyer's 1 million, Meyer, a
charismatic evangelist based in
St. Louis, was having a bigger
impact because of her connec-
tion with her followers.
"Joyce Meyer will send out,
whether a Bible verse or uplift-
ing commentary, or an aphorism
or a message, and we see her
being retweeted more than Lady
Gaga," Diaz-Ortiz said. Such
retweeting produces more rip-
ples than the original message,
because the rule in social media
is that a message from a friend
has more impact than a message
from an institution.
Twitter, like other social
media, is dedicated to serving
its big customers, so Diaz-Ortiz


relocated to Atlanta this year for
easy access to the megachurches
in the Southeast, and the reli-
gious leaders that set Twitter on
fire.
Among them are heavy hitters
such as Andy Stanley of At-
lanta's 25,000-member North
Point Ministries, with 177,000
followers.
Stanley, 54, has embraced so-
cial media as a way to stay in
touch with a large congregation
without being spread too thin.
"You don't have all the time in
the world to do this face-to-face
relationship building," Diaz-
Ortiz said. "?Twitter is an excel-
lent way for him to reach his
flock."
Stanley's tweets range from
Bible verses to personal history
to name-checking amusing prod-


uct reviews in Amazon. He also
retweets folks ranging from
Gene Simmons of Kiss to Albert
Einstein. ("Everyone is a genius.
But if you judge a fish on its
ability to climb a tree, it will live
its whole life believing that it's
stupid. Einstein")
Churches conservative and
progressive connect with their
congregations through social
media, even preachers who
never learned how to use a
computer.
Bryant Wright, outgoing presi-
dent of the Southern Baptist
Convention and pastor at John-
son Ferry Baptist Church in Ma-
rietta, still writes his sermons
and his daily radio spots "Right
From the Heart" in longhand on


Bo EMnERSON
The Atlanta
]ournal-Constit~tion
ATLANTA

of being obsessed with
mindless earthly trivia, from
Justin Bieber's latest heartfelt
tweet to his Beliebers to LeBron
James' reflections on winning
the NBA championship.
But Atlanta-based Twitter ex-
ecutive Claire Diaz-Ortiz
learned something surprising
from an examination of the most
popular tweets: Spiritual tweets
were whooping up on the
mundane.
"We came upon data that reli-
gious leaders were completely
punching above their weight on
?Twitter," she said. "They were


Judi Sie al
JUDI'S
JOURNAL



Hail


Page C5


LDaders see potential for growth


"Recently, my pastoral in-
tern Darrell Reneau and I
sat down with Steve Tamposi
from Citrus Hills and just
talked about the future de-
velopment of the area," said
the Rev. Greg Kell, senior
pastor at Cornerstone.
"Some of what he shared is
not public knowledge yet, but
in general there are some ex-
citing plans for the (County
Road) 486 corridor over the


:Relzgion NOT ES
Camp Soquili. During July,
one-week sessions are offered
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Learn to
groom, tack, and care for your
equine partner's daily needs.
Learn to ride Western using
quiet hands and soft legs or
polish your Western skills.
Space is limited and filling
quickly. Call Merlyn or Diane at
352-206-2990, email faith
havencrc@gmail.com or visit
www.faithhavencrc.org.
I Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church will continue its "End of
Summer Weekend Blast," a
fun, dynamic and spirit-filled Va-
cation Bible School for children
ages 3 to 11. Parents are also
welcome to come and enjoy the
good times. Kids will learn to
trust God and know that every-
thing is possible with God at Sky
VBS. Join us for games, science
gizmos, music and a mission
project. Today's program is from
9 a.m. to noon with morning
snack and lunch; and continues
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. worship (or
your home church) with a lunch
celebration beginning at 11:30
a.m. To register, visit the church


next 10 to 20 years. When you
look at the several thousand
homes which are still to be
built in Terra Vista, plus the
number of homesites still
available in Citrus Springs
and Pine Ridge, the whole
Central Ridge area is poised
for tremendous growth as the
economy heals."
Kell said as they looked at
a map of Citrus Hills, they
saw that the area is under-


served in many ways, in-
cluding retail stores and
churches.
"People love going to
church in their neighbor-
hood, and they love feeling
a sense of ownership. Start-
ing a second campus in Cit-
rus Hills gives us the
potential to tap into both,"
Kell said.

See Page C5


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Wr-iter
INVERNESS One of
the best ways to grow a
church is to divide it.
Not yet 10 years old, Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church in
Inverness is strategically
taking some of its members


and starting a new church in
the Central Ridge area of
Citrus County.
At 10:30 a.m. Sunday, the
public is invited to a pre-
view service at the Seventh-
day Adventist Church, 1880
N. Trucks Ave., Hernando.
A children's church and
nursery will be provided.


(This is the second in a
two-part series on Jews
and the American
presidents.)

Jewish community
celebrated its 300th
anniversary. President
Dwight Eisenhower was
the first president to par-
ticipate in a national TV
program sponsored by a
Jewish organization. On
this network show, he ex-
pressed his satisfaction
for his part mn bringing the
Nazi regime and its atroc-
ities toward the Jews in
Europe to a halt. He was
glad that the survivors
could live in peace and
freedom in Israel.
The first Catholic presi-
dent appointed two Jews
to his cabinet, Abraham
Ribicoff as Secretary of
Health, Education and
Welfare (he grew up in my
hometown of New Britain,
Conn.; he became famous
- I did not.) and Arthur
Goldberg as Secretary of
Labor. A national Jewish
award for peace spon-
sored by the Synagogue
See Page C4


3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness. Camp includes ac-
tivities and trips not just
babysitting in a safe, accred-
ited setting. Breakfast, lunch
and an afternoon snack served
daily. Cost is $50 per week. For
information andlor reservations,
call Pam at 352-344-4331.
Space is limited.
H Crystal River United
Methodist Church hosts "Sum-
mer Camp 2012" for grades K-
5 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
weekdays through Aug. 3. Free
VBS is included from 9 a.m. to
noon. Nonrefundable costs in-
clude a one-time activities fee
of $25 due at registration and
the $85 weekly camp fee due
two weeks prior to each ses-
sion. Preregister now to hold
your spot. Camp themes are as
follows: July 23-27 Pirate
Adventure Week; July 30- Aug.
3 Final Fling Week. The
church is at 4802 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. Call 352-
795-1240.
H Soquili Stables at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center
in Crystal River is hosting


at 439 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way, across from Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando, or call
the office at 352-746-7141.
I Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church's "Adventures on
Promise Island" VBS for ages
5 through fifth grade is from 9
a.m. to noon Monday through
Friday. Cost is $12 per child;
scholarships available. Amid
the swaying palm trees, exotic
wildlife and welcoming sun-
shine, students will learn about
God's promises through
games, songs, crafts, and Bible
stories while enjoying tasty
snacks. The church is at 7045
S.WV. 83rd Place at State Road
200, Ocala. Students in the
sixth grade and older and
adults are invited to volunteer
and assist the teachers. Call
Joan Greve at 352-304-8711 or
the church office at 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
I Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando, will host Vacation
Bible School for ages 3 through
fifth grade from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday. The


theme is "The Mystery of
God's Great Plan!" Kids will
enjoy crafts, games, snacks,
stories and puppet shows. To
register, call 352-726-6144. Van
pick-up is available if mentioned
during registration.
H Does your child explode
with anger? Hide it all inside?
Have a hard time apologizing?
These are just a few of the be-
haviors we'll explore at the First
Spanish Church of Citrus
County on Croft Avenue
through 2012 VBS: "Good
Anger; Bad Anger" from 6 to
8:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day and 10:45 a.m. Sunday,
July 29. Bring your children for
an unforgettable English and
Spanish adventure as we travel
and visit Antarctica, meet a
crazy character who will illus-
trate how to live or not "The
Point," learn Christ-like charac-
ter traits through Bible stories,
crafts, snacks and games, and
have a blast doing it all. Enroll
your children today by calling
352-341-1711.

See Page C2


Tweeting t he faith


O K,



le t's




st op!

Editor's note: Nancy
Kennedy is on vacation
this week This column is
one of her favorites, first
run in July 2008.
he other morning
worker Cristy andI
devised a solution for all
the major problems of the
universe.
Everybody stop.
Just stop. Take a breath.
Step back. Chill out.
Politicians, stop poli-
ticking. Forget about focus
groups and pork spending
and back room deals and
war room strategies. De-
mocrats aren't evil and
neither are Republicans,
so stop treating people
withewhom ou d sgrel
Americans, so stop!
People need to stop their
violence. Stop beating your
wife or your boyfriend or
your kid. Stop getting
drunk. Stop shooting up or
snorting coke. Stop having
babies with multiple part-
ners. Just stop.
See Page C2


Cornerstone to plant new church in Central Ridge


Summer fun
I Summer camp at North
Oak Baptist Church runs the
entire summer. For $14 per
day, children receive breakfast,
lunch and a snack, as well as
games, crafts and Bible study.
Field trips to places like Chuck
E. Cheese, Don Garlits Racing
Museum and the Butterfly Farm
are planned for the summer. All
children K through 5th grade
are welcome to attend. Camp
hours are 6:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Monday through Friday and
there are discounts for multiple
children from the same family.
All workers are background
screened and fingerprinted.
Call 352-489-3359 or 352-228-
2422 for more information. The
church is at the corner of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard in Cit-
rus Springs.
H Summer day camp for
children ages 6 through 12 con-
tinues all summer from 6:30
a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday at First United
Methodist Church of Inverness,



































































Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

SCome on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! .:


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
LI.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
-MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00 m
Sun.: s:3o a 1oisoam

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced

CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pm ,
795-4479






















Special
Event or

Weekly
Se rvi ces

Please Call

Beverly at
564-29 2

Fo r

Advertising
I nfo rm~ati o n


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yu lee Drive Homosassa
Rev.6J. Aa~nRitter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 m0Saunda rc o eu bg i noups)
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org





HRYO U' LL FIND
A CARIN G FAM ILY
IN CH RISTI

C AYSTAL



4 E~TH 0 0 15T
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
WWW.CrUmIC.COM I
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor



At:30 & darl o 10ages.

Youth Friell owship
Sun0Trday 4:30

Wednesday 6:30


Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
:. A Steph n9 Miist40Provider .


ICrystal Ofver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult&8CNIldre sA Worship
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S(12th Ave.) Nursery
2 Provided



Homosassa
Fiirst United
1Methodist
Church


CHRISF
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 &r 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.Mr. 11:00 A.Mr.* 6:00 P.r.
Wednesday
7:00 P.r.
Com Wo shi With Us!
Bible questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 46-1239


ST. UNRE'SH
A Parish in the
Anglicanz Coninunion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Tsoebe on ein hrist in our
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:0a.nt

mrin gP aver & Daily Oa sso

Gospel Sing Along


352-795-2176
www~stannescr.org -


"i"St. Timonthy
L~utheran Church
EL~CA
Saturday informal Worship,
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Altnday SholM
(Coffee Fello eship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion -10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
lo7o N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more nfo mti n call
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor





Citrus
Church of Christ

9592 W.Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www~westeitruscoc~com
W.Deep Woods Dr.


o



US Hwy. 19


C2 sATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

State Road 44, directly behind the
RaceTrac gas station). Enjoy a great
night of Southern Gospel music. Free
admission to the concert. A barbecue
dinner before the concert will be
served at 5 p.m. for $7 per person.
Call Shirley Pittman at 352-201-0603
for reservations. Call the church at
352- 344-1908.
I Genesis Community Church is
partnering with Gulf Coast North Area
Health Education Center (AHEC) to
provide a free six-week tobacco de-
pendence program to anyone inter-
ested in quitting tobacco use. The
program, funded by the Florida De-
partment of Health, aims to facilitate
the process of quitting, using counsel-
ing and optional nicotine-replacement
therapy. Participants are eligible to re-
ceive up to four weeks of free products
including gum, patches and lozenges.
The meetings will take place from 6 to
7 p.m. Monday at the Genesis Com-
munity Church next to Knights of
Columbus on Norvell Bryant Highway
in Lecanto. Physical, behavioral, spiri-
tual and emotional components are all
used to maximize quitting success. To
register for the program, call 352-697-
0705 or email facilitator Wendy Hall,
LCSW, at wendyhall@
tampabay~rr.com.
I Ladies and girls ages 13 and
older are invited to "Girls Night Out,"
at 7 p.m. Friday in the Worship Center
of Cornerstone Baptist Church. Cor-
nerstone Women's Ministry is hosting
a free showing of the movie, "October
Baby," a story of the coming-of-age of
Hannah, a beautiful 19-year-old col-
lege freshman. In spite of her ener-
getic (if somewhat nalve) personality,
Hannah has always felt like an out-
sider. Something is missing. She has
always carried a deep-seated sense
that she has no right to exist. Hannah
finds out secrets from her past that
rock her world. Come and find out how
Hannah copes with her past and
learns in the process hope, love and
forgiveness. This uplifting and beauti-
ful film may change the way you look
at the world, your loved ones and life.
Moms are required to accompany their
teenage daughters to this film. There
will be no chaperones and the content
of the movie should be shared with the

See NOTES/Page C3


should stop nagging or demand-
ing perfection. Kids should not
be rude or defiant.
No one should be envious or
proud or boastful or lazy. Let's all
do what Rodney King suggested
and all get along.
Stop being greedy. Start
sharing.
If you don't want to eat meat or
sugar or trans-fats, let those who
do enjoy them. Same with those
who don't want to believe in God.
Let those of us who do, do so.
Stop trying to remove God from
American society.
Stop being offended. Everyone
is offended over everything.
When did we humans get to be
such namby-pamby weenies?
Stop it! Just stop.
We all want the same things.
We all want peace in our soul. We
want love and we want to be
needed. We want to enjoy our
work and our leisure and our
food. We want to laugh with joy
and delight because, despite
hardship and adversity, life is
good.
we want to express our cre-

iat hianndhair aa sbnoao h sk n
We want hope.
I think sometimes we forget
that's what we really want. When
we do and chase power and pres-
tige and money and might, that's
when we hurt others and hurt
ourselves, so letsjust stop.
Stop, and listen to our hearts
beat, feel the rise and fall of our
chests as we breathe, stop and
marvel at the complexities of the
universe and the wonder of nature.
In Psalm 46 God says, "Be still
and know that I am God."
That means stop. Take a
breath. Step back. Chill out. Since
God says it, maybe we all should
do it. It just might make a differ-
ence, at least it might be a start.

Nancy Kennedy is the author of
"M~ove Over Victoria --IKnow
the Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing,"and herlatest book,
"Lipstick Grace. "She can be
reached at 352-564-2927, M~on-
day through Thursday or via
emailatnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


H Abundant Blessings Messianic
Congregation will conduct a biblical
archeological expedition at 10 a.m.
every other Saturday beginning July
28 at Homosassa Public Library on
Grover Cleveland Boulevard. The
theme is "Back to the First Century."
Everyone is invited to come and par-
ticipate in a first century Nasraye or
Nazarene (Messianic) service of "The
Way" (first century Christianity) with
the ancient liturgical readings of the
Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in
relation to the weekly Torah reading,
the Ides (songs) of Solomon, and the
teachings of the Nazarenes. Call 352-
544-5700.
I First Baptist Church of Rutland
will host its third Saturday of the month
free food and clothing giveaway
from 9 a.m. to noon today at the
church on State Road 44 east of the
Withlacoochee River bridge and west
of 1-75. This is an outreach of help
from the church family to those having
a hard time providing for their families
in these difficult times. No vendors
may participate. Call 352-793-3340
and leave a message.
I The Isaa hF dating In. wII
present a seinar tned "nsi .,wi
Autism Caring for Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder," from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. today at First Baptist
Church of Inverness, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. The seminar
is sponsored by the United Way of Cit-
rus County. Registration fee is $10.
Bring a brown-bag lunch. Water and
iced tea will be provided. No kitchen
facilities will be available. For more in-
formation or to register, call Barbara
Wash burn at 352-527-0112 or email
isaiahfoundation@ymail.com.
H Third Saturday supper is from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian Church,
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes meatloaf,
mashed potatoes and gravy, mixed
vegetables, garden salad, rolls, cook-
ies, coffee and tea for $10 for adults
and $5 for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Takeouts avail-
able. Call the church at 352-489-1260.
H The public is invited to a "Gospel
Music Spectacular" at 6:30 p.m.
today at First Christian Church of In-
verness, 2018 Colonnade St. (on


TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller


drIuta y 4:30 P.MV.
sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.

LI 11 ~ 1 1 1- ...m ...r st
~ ITT 4 .,.


Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dn e~nfi IdAve.


A FU LL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


A Disciple
of Christ


Sna y Wors 2

Sunday School
9:00 a
Rever nd
Kip Younger
Pastor

883109 Emm 4rdha
352-628-4083
wwlunic.org

8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


~remp.
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
358-686-7034
Rabbi
LeRnny Sarko
Services
F'ridays 8PM 1

Sa dgou Sc AM
Sunday
9AM-Noon


SERVICES

BSuenda y 0
Worship 10:30
Sunday P1M
Worship 6:00
Wednesday

Bible Study 7:00


THE R ST. THOMAS
SALVATION CATHOLIC

ARMY """ CHURCH

Sunday SS ool :45 A.M
Morning Worship Hour MASSES:
11:00 A.M. 1


EVANGELIST


Continued from Page C1

Pedophiles, stop molesting
children. Pornographers, stop
making the stuff. Mean people,
stop being mean.
Stop stealing. Stop lying. Stop
backbiting. Stop killing.
If you're holding a grudge
against someone stop. It does-
n't matter. It's over. Get on with
living because you're only hurt-
ing yourself.
Cristy and I decided that wars
should stop and the oil compa-
nies should drill for oil in our
own country. We decided that gas
prices should stop rising and go
back to an affordable amount.
Cars should stop making ex-
pensive-sounding noises and so
should any electronic device or
major appliance. Poverty and
hunger should stop immediately.
People should stop breaking
the law. That way they won't get
arrested and wind up with their
names in the paper and get upset
woheen thle do (and call the paper
People should stop driving too
fast and too recklessly. Stop text
messaging when you're supposed
to be watching the road. (I added
that one.) Everybody should
wear seatbelts and take a multi-
vitamin daily and eat enough
fiber and treat their animals
kindly.
If everyone would simply stop
and take a breath and chill out
all at the same time, we could re-
group. We could all see that what
we're doing isn't working, that
our world is in a whirlwind,
much like an overtired toddler
who badly needs a nap.
What if we all stopped and
took a nap. Pour a glass of milk
and maybe grab a cookie and
then find a blanket and a comfy
corner and be still for a little
while.
Parents should stop putting
guilt trips on kids (that was
Cristy's idea) and kids should
stop being sneaky. They should
make their bed every day, keep
their rooms clean and be nice to
their brothers or sisters. Parents


Continued from Page C1

I Come enjoy the "Adventures on
Promise Island" where kids discover
God's lifesaving love, from 5:15 to 8
p.m. Sunday through Thursday, July
29 through Aug. 2, at St. Margaret's
Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola
Av, down own Inverness. V in-
cludes games, crafts, music and Bible
stories for children ages 3 through
adulthood. Supper served at 5:15 p.m.
at no charge.
I Children ages 3 through 12 are
invited to VBS, "Adventures on
Promise Island" from 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday through Friday, July 30
through Aug. 3, at Inverness Church of
God, at 416 U.S. 41 South. Children
will learn about God's Promises: "I am
with you, I care about you, I give you
what you need, and I will save you."
VBS includes games, crafts, music
and Bible stories. Call the church at
352-726-4524.
I The Church of the Advent will
present its annual Vacation Bible
School program Monday through Sat-
urday, Aug 6-11. Children ages 4 to 11
are invited to attend this free program.
The theme is "The Amazing Desert
Journey." Children will have fun with
interacting Bible stories, music, crafts
and games while learning the prayer
of Jesus (The Lord's Prayer). Registra-
tion forms are available at the church
or via email at jsickle391 @gmail.com.
Call the church at 352-465-7272 or
Mrs. Florence at 352-566-6934.

Special eventS
H First Baptist Church of Floral City
will celebrate its 124th year of service
in the community through a special
"Homecoming Service" on Sunday,
July 29. There will be no early service
but Sunday School will begin at 9:45
a.m. with a combined worship service
at 10:30 a.m. featuring contemporary
and traditional music. A potluck dinner
will begin at noon. Following the dinner
is the regular fifth Sunday sing with
special guests, the Gulf Ridge Singers
and Paul Giglio. Come and be a parl
of a great time to praise God for the
ministry that has been accomplished
through this church.


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal River III~C ytal
CHURCH OF BE iver


- -


Smmagtgg


I


SBob Dickey





CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 N TE
Continued from Page C2

parent present. Call Corner-
stone Baptist Church at 726-
7335 for free complimentary
tickets.
I Members and friends are
invited to join a Volunteer in
Mission team in Guatemala
today through July 30 that will
be sent out from Crystal River
United Methodist Church. The
purpose is to share the love of
Christ in a Mayan community in
the Highlands of Momoste-
nago. Call Christine Dial at 352-
794-3584 or email
CD1945@aol.com for more in-
formation. To support the proj-
ect, the youth of the church are
collecting beanie babies and
new shoes to send with the
Dials to take to the children.
Donations of either item may be
left in the church office or in the
sanctuary on Sunday. The
church is at 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
H Early sign-ups for Upward
Flag Football and Cheerlead-
ing will continue through July
31. Evaluations will take place
Aug. 4 and Aug. 11 (times will
be on the registration form).
The season will run from Sept.

Come as you are!
-- II
COMMUNITY CHURCH


Places of worship that



offer love, peace



and harmony to all.


C0171 011 0787 10 His" h10115, lour spirits will 178 lifed! ! ~ ~~*?

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


PASTOR BRIANI ANID
KATHY BAGGS

ahlre' Ch. 10:00 AM
Meetng t Knght of olu'nsBldg.



Floral City
United Methodist

8478 Eas tMurvn Sht.
(across from Floral City School)
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home. "
WheeleChair Access
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com





















The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Con ve~an t en ist r g to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Semior Pastors & Founders


1 /


Grace Bible
Church


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd. ,
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www~newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow~embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


2101 N. Florida Ave,
H er nando FL

7276-6 44
Nursery Provided

*Cl--lLDREN

YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.

Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
PraieSO 89VICO
6:00 P.M.

PraiSO & Prayef

(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Parstor
www.hernandonazarene.org


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
[fftjOr (Jp JesuS
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbefloralcity.org


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 C3

Sunday. Jones-Pokorney's ser-
mon is titled, "Unitarian Univer-
salists Invite Differences." We
say we are many beliefs in one
faith, but inviting many beliefs
also invites conflict. As Unitar-
ian Universalists, how do we
address the conflicts that arise?
How do we "love alike" when
we don't "think alike"? Jones-
Pokorney is a member of the
Unitarian Universalists Fellow-
ship of Gainesville. The Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalists
Fellowship is at 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs.
Call 352-465-4225.
M Everyone is invited for
worship this summer at 8 and
10 a.m. at Homosassa First
United Methodist Church.
Meet the church's new pastor,
the Rev. Kip Younger. The nurs-
ery is available for both serv-
ices and Sunday school is at 10
a.m. for children and youth.
Visit the church website at
www. 1umc.org for updates and
coming events.
I St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a church in the An-
glican Communion) will cele-
brate the eighth Sunday after
Pentecost at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services. St. Anne's will

See NOTES/Page C4


8 through Nov. 17 (Saturday
games). Cost is $45 for Flag
Football and $48 for Cheerlead-
ing (before July 31). Registra-
tion forms are available at Gulf
to Lake Church. Evaluations
will be at Gulf to Lake Church;
games will be at Crystal River
United Methodist Church.
Coaches, referees and conces-
sion help are needed. Volun-
teers are welcome. Call Chris
Hope at 352-586-4685.
H The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
"Clothe the Children" drive
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 9, in the church hall.
New and used clothing will be
distributed to families in need.
Applications will be available at
the door. Call 352-489-1984.
I Church of the Advent will
have its annual outdoor "Trash
to Treasure Sale" on Saturday,
Sept. 29. Rent 109-by-109-feet
spaces for $15 each. Shaded
spaces available on a first-
come-first-served basis.
Crafters, flea market and food
vendors are invited to partici-
pate. The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front of
the new firehouse. For registra-
tion and information, call Al
Sickle at 352-208-5664 or


Maryanne Brennan at 352-
347-2428.
I Inverness First United
Methodist Church's "Stepping
Out Ministry" is heading to the
Eastern Caribbean to visit Half
Moon Cay in the Bahamas, St.
Thomas, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, and Grand Turk. The
price includes deluxe motor
coach, cruise, port charges, all
taxes and the bus driver's tip. It
is not necessary to be a mem-
ber of the church to attend. Call
Coordinator Carole Fletcher at
352-860-1932, or Debbie Muir
at Tally-Ho Vacations at 352-
860-2805.

Worship
I Pastor Brian Kinker and
his wife, Kim Kinker, have
started a new church,
Covenant Love Ministry, in
building 11 at Shamrock Acres
Industrial Park, 6843 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. The church
is a spirit-filled, word-of-faith
family ministry that plays tradi-
tional and contemporary music.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday, which gives the com-
munity and children a safe,
positive place to come to on
Friday nights. Regular church
services are at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
days. Follow us on Facebook:


@Covenant Love Ministry or
@Kinker Family Worship. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Brian Kinker at
352-601-4868.
I Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the eighth Sunday
after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today
and 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
There is a healing service and
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS is at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church with summer
hours from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Thursday through September.
Evening Bible study will resume
in September.
H A come-as-you-are service
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services are
announced. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.stti methyl utherancrystal
river.com.
M Faith Lutheran Church in


Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to Saturday and Sun-
day services. At 6 p.m. today
and 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Pastor
Stephen Lane will continue his
theme with the 4th Command-
ment, "Thou Shalt Honor Thy
Father and Mother," found in
Exodus. The church is wheel-
chair accessible, offers assis-
tance for the hearing impaired
and has a cry room for small
children where the parents can
hear and see the services in
progress. Following the Sunday
service is a time of fellowship,
and at 11 a.m., Sunday school
and Bible study. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
Everyone is invited to all serv-
ices and functions.
I The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
I The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists in Citrus
Springs welcome JoLaine
Jones-Pokorney to the pulpit


July and August

Worship

9:30 am
*Fellowship After Worship
*Weekly Communion
*Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


SGl01'y t0 GIOry
1Miistries
A Faunly

The Love Of Jesus!

Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a~m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
SPastor Brian Gulledge
S1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,


Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
MVOnday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......~Awana (Sept.- Apr.)

7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
P1/2 mi ~east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.


P~.V O.Bx1067
Homosassa,FL.34447-
www. grace bi ble ho mosass~
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.c


S


1067 L3 33 I Good
a.org (352) 746-9422 S e h r

Luth~eran

.. .. hurch

SShepherd' ELCA


EPIscoPAL CHURCH ,


a beu onu onfit tonbwn
for engaging all persons
in t love a truth

Bishop Jim Adams, Rector


Communion:
Saturday


Sunday

10:30 am

Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
wwwSOTHEC~org

2' c- i


COM E

Whourshi With h--

FlorcaateCiaty, FI rida

Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Stud
9 30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed.IEve. Bible Study
6.00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.. Floral City, FL.


Rev. Stephen Lane iit


L8 I th


935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Cry~sta 1e Sub iv ison


CO ME
WNORSH I P
WITH US
Sunday Service
*:3 AM
Sunday Bible Study
& children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.

yelwhi e S nda Wrship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www~aithecano~c
AS~ert eG~or ~


HERNANDO

Umited
Methodist
C~hur ch




)O~ff




,. y for ChildrenandFamilies '
2125 E.Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(W12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www~hernandoumcfl org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM ,





























































































Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! 'Iq

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


s C



All are invited to our

Heamng

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist -
Inverness ?
224 N. Osceola Ave. *
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


IRTBrnin Chist

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637 3
Missouri Synod
www. 1stlutheran. net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA

Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Spnings
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
IRfoIrmatiOR:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com



Redemptil00


SUNDAY
Bible School... .......9:00
Worship..................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
currentiv meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
99(V7Elassth ulf- oLake Highway

For mzore
informaon cnan / j
352-422-6535
PaStOr
Todd
Langdon


C4 sATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

I Peace Lutheran Church has
Sunday morning Bible classes for chil-
dren and youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and
10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. All
residents of the area are welcome.
Sunday morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church, "The
Church On The Hill," is five miles north
of Dunnellon at the junction of U.S. 41
and State Road 40. Call the church of-
fice at 352-489-5881 or visit
www. PeaceLutheranOnline.0rg.
H First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs, at 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd., meets at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday for Sunday school and at
10:30 for morning worship. Sunday
evening services begin at 6. Wednes-
day night Bible studies are at 7. We are
a nondenominational church that
preaches the Word of God from the
Bible, believing that the entire Bible is
true. Call the church at 352-628-5556.
H Find a church home at Faith Bap-
tist Church, 6918 S. Spartan Ave. (one
mile from U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Services are
interpreted for the deaf. Sunday school
classes at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday wor-
ship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednesday Bible
study and prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through 12 from
6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-628-4793.
I For new friends and fellowship,
come to Parsons Memorial Presbyte-
rian Church at 5850 Riverside Drive in
Yankeetown. Enjoy coffee and sweets
at 10 a.m. Sunday in the fellowship
hall followed by the worship service at
11 a.m. Communion is served the first
Sunday monthly. After church, return to
the fellowship hall to visit and eat. Call
352-447-2506.
H First Church of God of Inver-
ness, a nondenominational church
which meets at 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sunday
morning worship services at 10:30
and an old-fashioned Sunday evening
service at 6 filled with singing, testi-
monies and the Word, including a
Christian education hour for children.
Call 352-344-3700.
I First Baptist Church of Ho-
mosassa weekly schedule: Sunday
school for all ages at 9 a.m., followed
by morning worship at 10:25 a.m. Kids
worship dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fellowship
hall. Sunday evening Bible study at 6.
Lifecare center is open (food and cloth-
ing) from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is in Old
Homosassa at 10540 W. Yulee Drive.
Turn onto Yulee Drive from U.S. 19 at
Burger King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on left.
Call 352-628-3858.
I First Christian Church of Chas-
sahowitzka, 11275 S. Riviera Drive,
Homosassa, meets at 9:30 a.m. Sun-
day for Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is
nondenominational and Bible based,
only preaching the Word as it is in the
Bible. All are welcome. Call 352-
382-2557.


eral, for the most part, in their
political views). The list in-
cluded Richard Perle, chair of
the Pentagon's defense policy
board, and Deputy Defense Sec-
retary Paul Wolfowitz, along
with Undersecretary of Defense
Douglas Feith, Dov Zakheim,
Edward Luttwak, PaulAdelman
and National Security Advisor
Elliott Abrams. And the prest-
dent's spokesman, Ari Fleis-
cher, kept us up to date with
presidential announcements.
Bush's most important Jewish
appointment after 9/11 was
Michael Chertoff, Secretary of
Homeland Security and co-au-
thor of the Patriot Act. Bush was
also the first president to cele-
brate Chanukah in the White
House. We might say, therefore,
that in those years 2001-09,
there was a "Chanukah Bush,",
as well as a Christmas tree in
the White House!
Barack Obama is credited
with appointing Elena Kagan to
the Supreme Court, making it
the most Jewish in American
history, with three justices of
the Jewish faith on the bench.
He has also surrounded himself
with Jewish advisors, including
David Axelrod, former Senior
Advisor to the President (now
his reelection campaign man-
ager); Rahm Emanuel, former
Chief of Staff; and the Sabbath-
obsrvantt Jck Lew as the new

Though President Obama has
angered the Jewish community
at times with his comments on
the Israeli-Palestinian peace
process, in truth he has done
much to insure Israel's security,
from the toughest Iran sanc-
tions legislation in history to
prevent the build-up of nuclear
weapons to diverting funds for
innovative defense systems
such as Iron Dome, which helps
shoot down Iranian-backed
short-range missiles being
launche~dafro~mr e Hamas-con-
President Obama was the
first president to host a
Passover seder in the White
House residence. It is quite
likely that gefilte fish graced the
official White House china, a
tradition that Obama has held
for three years.
Whoever is elected in No-
vember, be it President Obama
or Mit Romney, it will be inter-
esting to see how history will
play out in the appointment of
Jews. From George Washing-
ton's famous letter of ensuring
religious freedom to Jews to the
many presidential appoint-
ments, especially in recent
years, American Jews
have been proud to serve their
country.


Judi Siegal is a retired teacher
and Jewish educator: She lives
in Ocala with her husband,
Phil. She can be reached at
niejudis~yahoo. com.


H First Baptist Church of Her-
nando Sunday school begins at 9:30
a.m., following fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service begins at 6.
Midweek services are at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Young Musicians/Pup-
peteers meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
The church is on East Parsons Point
Road in Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
I Anglican Church of the Holy
Spirit offers traditional Anglican wor-
ship with Holy Communion at 10:15
a.m. Sunday at various locations. The
1928 Prayer Book is used. For this
week's service address, call 1-855-
426-4542 or 352-489-7868.
H Glory to Glory Ministries offers a
children's ministry at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
days led by Jessica Gulledge. The
men's ministry meets at 6 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly. The women's min-
istry SOIL (Serving Others In Love)
meets at 6:30 p.m. the fourth Saturday
monthly. The group is led by Ginny
Cieply and Muffy Morin. The prayer
ministry is led by Melanie Cook. The
music ministry consists of Pastor Brian
Gulledge, Joe Correas and Tony An-
glin. The church is led by Pastor Brian
Gulledge and his wife Jessica. Glory to
Glory Ministries is in the Picard Storage
Building on County Road 486. Call 352-
220-0550.
H The Potter's House Church has
Sunday worship services at 10:30 a.m.
Come early for Sunday school. Join us
on Wednesday evening for Dr. and
Mrs. Paul and Kathy Hall's "Disciple-
ship Class." Visit www.potterhouse-
church.com for all events and activities.
For prayer, call 352-249-8980.
H It's going to be an awesome day
tomorrow at Gravity Church. We will
have a short service at 11 a.m. at 801
S.E. U.S 19, then proceed to Fort Is-
land Beach for the church's first beach
Baptism. Everyone is invited. Visit
www.gravitychurch.org.
H First Christian Church of Inver-
ness has discontinued Wednesday
evening meals through August and will
resume in September. Sunday school is
at 9 a.m. with worship services at 10:15
a.m. Sunday. Wednesday evening
choir practice is at 5 followed by Bible
study and prayer meeting at 6 p.m.
Everyone is invited. The church is at
2018 Colonade St., behind the new
RaceTrac gas station on State Road 44.
H First Baptist Church of Inver-
ness offers the following Sunday activi-
ties: SONrise Sunday school class at
7:45 a.m., blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4 through
fourth grade during the 9 a.m. service
featuring Bible stories, skits, music and
group activities; Sunday school classes
for all ages at 10:30 a.m. A nursery is
available for all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday evening, Con-
nection classes are offered. A midweek
worship service for adults is offered at 6
p.m. Wednesday. For the youths, we
offer "Ignite," and for children, "Wednes-
day Worship Kids." Call the office at
352-726-1252. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. The
website is www.fbcinverness.com.


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352)746-3620
Pastor stewart R.Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch~embarqmail.com

WednesdayBibleStudy 6p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion-1 st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


aHwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services
Traditional
5m 11:00 AM
Casual Service
S9:30 AM
m 11:00 AM Service
MTapes & CD's Available
*Sunday School for all ages

Nur"r sPro ided
mFellowship &~ Youth Group a
S 5 to 7 PM
a 24-Hour Prayer Line
S 563-3639
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
S Podcast: FPC inv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770
a Pastor Craig Davies


VIGII. MASSES:
4:00 P.M. L 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. L10:00 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:oo PI.


CONFESSIONS:
1:30 P.M~ to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointinent
*************
WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd .
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
.www.ourlarlyofgracefl,
i..catholicweb.com .


ST'
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL~
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 3445()
726-31 53
www.stmaggle.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesa 123 .M.
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor ~



CONGORMEGUA I AL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH








'/ll~lllw?{ (/;'ll */****<<,9

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


CSH IE F
Continued from Page C1

Council of America was re-
named the John E Kennedy
Peace Award after his assassi-
nation in 1963.
Richard Nixon appointed the
first Jewish Secretary of State,
Henry Kissinger. Nixon is cred-
ited with saving Israel from de-
struction during the Yom
Kippur War of 1973 with an air-
lift of arms. This decision, solid-
ifying American support for the
Jewish State, resulted in the
Arab oil embargo.
A mild-mannered peanut
farmer from Plains, Georgia,
successfully negotiated one of
the most famous peace accords
between Israel and its then-
most-dangerous enemy, Egypt.
James Earl Carter was able to
bring Menachem Begin and
Anwar Sadat to the peace table,
the first treaty between Israel
and an Arab country. The treaty
is still in force today. The iconic
picture of the signing still is a
powerful statement. Unfortu-
nately, as of late, the now-for-
mer president has been critical
of Israeli policies concerning
the Palestinians.
When George H. W Bush was
vice president, he played a per-

Joha,"rth p ogram Orat arn
lifted 10,000 Jews out of
Ethiopia and directly to Israel.
This was in 1985. As president,
in 1991, he took an important
role in "Operation Solomon," al-
lowing 14,000 Jews to escape
Ethiopia and to resettle in Is-
rael. (When I visited Israel in
1991, I met some of these
refugees) However, it was a coup
for him when he was able to get
the U.N. to rescind its 1975
"Zionism is Racism" resolution.
By the time of the 1990s, the
sppint~ment of Jew nby presi-
ernment was more
commonplace. Bill Clinton ap-
pointed more Jews to his cabi-
net than all other presidents
before him, as well as Ruth
Bader Ginsburg and Steven
Breyer to the Supreme Court,
both first appointed by Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter
Clinton had 43 Jews in staff
positions, including Robert
Rubin, Secretary of the Treas-
ury; Dan Glickman, Secretary of
Agriculture; Stuart Eizenstat,
Undersecretary of State; and
Samuel Berger, National Secu-
rity Council advisor, to name a
few. Madeline Albright, Secre-
tary of State, had Jewish par-
ents but was raised as a
Christian. William Cohen, who
has an obvious Jewish-sounding
name, is actually a Unitarian.
George W Bush has the dis-
tinction of assembling the
largest group ofJewish neocon-
servatives in history. (Jews tend
to vote Democratic and are lib-


NOT.
Continued from Page C3

host Our Father's Table today from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Overeaters
Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the parish library. The
"Recovering from Food Addiction"
group meets at 1 p.m. Thursday in the
parish library. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and Monday in
the prsh lipbpai rary.
.5 St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
will celebrate Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at 8
a.m. Sunday and Holy Eucharist Rite 2
at 10:30 a.m. Children's church is dur-
ing the 10:30 a.m. service. Adult Sun-
day school is at 9:30 a.m. Morning
prayer is at 9 a.m. Monday through
Wednesday. Feed My Sheep Ministry
will host a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday for those in need, followed
by a healing and holy Eucharist service
at 12:30 p.m.
I Inverness Church of God Sun-
day worship services are at 8:30 and
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Children's
church is during the 10:30 a.m. worship
service in Room 102. Sunday school
begins at 9:30 a.m. with classes for
ever one. The church has many Chris-
tian education opportunities at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Missionettes and Royal
Rangers Clubs meet for children from
the age of53a The a~d t class metn

day. The youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth Ministries
Building. The church is at 416 U.S. 41
South, Inverness. Call the church at
352-726-4524.
I NorthRidge Church welcomes
the community to worship services at 9
a.m. Sunday. We are a nondenomina-
tional church where you will experience
a friendly, loving and casual atmos-
phere; a place where you can come
just as you are. Following the service
will be a coffee fellowship. Weekly Bible
study meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday
studying and discussing the book of
Ephesians. The church meets at the In-
verness Woman's Club, 1715 Forest
Ridge Drive, across from the Whisper-
ing Pines Park entrance. Call Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
I First Presbyterian Church of In-
verness is at 206 Washington Ave.
Summer Sunday worship schedule:
Casual praise and worship at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school from 9:30 to 10:30
a.m., and traditional worship at 11 a.m.
This Sunday, the Rev. Craig S. Davies
will preach on "When You Feel Inade-
quate," with readings from John 6:1-14.
Call the church at 352-637-0770.
I Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church observes its summer worship
schedule with only one service at 9:30
a.m. Sunday during July and August.
All are invited to hear an inspirational
message from Pastor Kenneth C. Blyth
followed by coffee hour in the fellow-
ship hall. The church is barrier free and
offers a free CD ministry, large-print
service helps and hearing devices. All
are welcome. The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills Boule-
vard in Hernando. Call 352-746-7161.





11:30 am -2:00 pm 5 $i

DLANTATI~ON

Call for reservations 352-795-4211


Food and Drug Administration,
including the so-called morning-
after pill. The pill has no effect if
a woman is already pregnant,
but many religious conserva-
tives consider it tantamount to
an abortion drug.
The Becket Fund for Reli-
gious Liberty, a nonprofit law
firm, is representing Wheaton.
With the addition of Wheaton,
Becket said a total of 24 law-
suits have been filed challeng-
ing the mandate in the
Affordable Care Act.
150J to back
InmateS in
tObacco suit
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. The
U.S. Department of Justice is
supporting Native American in-
mates in their lawsuit challeng-
ing South Dakota's ban on
tobacco in religious
ceremonies.
Inmates Blaine Brings Plenty
and Clayton Creek in their 2009
federal lawsuit against the
South Dakota Department of
Corrections contend that a
prison policy that bans the use
of tobacco during religious cer-
emonies is discriminatory. The
state said ceremonial tobacco
inside the state penitentiary
was becoming increasingly
abused, and the policy is not
overly restrictive because it al-
lows other botanicals such as
red willow bark to be burned.
The Justice Department, in a
brief filed last week, said the
state's position runs contrary to
the Religious Land Use and In-
stitutionalized Persons Act and
U.S. Supreme Court precedent.
"The court should decline this
invitation to determine the im-
portance of tobacco use to
practitioners of Native American

that attend our church, but
we will never have as large
a presence as if we had a lo-
cation there."
Darrell Reneau will serve
as campus pastor.
"As a church, Cornerstone
is simply looking at this as
an opportunity to better
serve the needs of our Cit-
rus County community. For
now this will be treated as a
second location same
name, same leadership and
structure, etc.," Kell said.
"This allows us to work ag-
gressively without having to
duplicate a lot of the admin-
istrative support system,
plus it is more cost-effec-
tive."
A second preview service
is planned for Sunday, Aug.
19 and a third on Sunday,




"Firs Fr C r~"...Johnl:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CNHURRCNH OF
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.


Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study






First CHUR SOSF GOD

No.
SDenominational
Tom Walker


10:30 AMunda6 00 P.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln e

ALARE EC ME


l~~~l PRIMER IESIA

DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios


Inverness, Florida
ORDENODE SERVICIOS:

9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dorninical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Predica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n

7:00 PM E~~is Biblicos
Les Esperamas! z
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711


PISCOS of worship that



Offer love, peace and P



harmony to all.


C0171 011 OVeT 10 "His" house, your spirits will be ifted! !


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS a


Wheaton College
to sue over Obama
birth control rule
WHEATON, Ill. Wheaton
College, a top evangelical
school, is joining a raft of law-
suits challenging the Obama
administration mandate that
most employers offer health in-
surance that covers birth
control
The college, based in
Wheaton, Ill., filed the federal
suit Wednesday in the District
ofs Ckyl baRoman Catholic
dioceses, schools, charities and
health care agencies filed a
dozen federal lawsuits around
the country, arguing the require-
ment violates religious freedom.
Among the plaintiffs in those
suits are the University of Notre
Dame and Catholic University
of America.
Health and Human Services
adopted the mandate as part of
President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul. The goal
is to improve health care for
women and children by allow-
ing women to space their preg-
nancies.
A religious exemption gener-
ally allowed churches and other
houses of worship to opt out,
but kept the requirement in
place for religiously affiliated
nonprofits, including hospitals,
colleges and charities.
Many religious leaders
across faith traditions argued
the exemption was far too nar-
row, and the Obama adminis-
tration offered to soften the rule.
However, the plaintiffs in the
lawsuits said the accommoda-
tion doesn't go far enough.
The requirement includes all
birth control approved by the


CCH UR H
Continued from Page C1

He added that they want
and plan to grow numeri-
cally in their Inverness loca-
tion, but are also aware that
they will start feeling "full"
as they reach 1,000 regular
attendees on a weekend.
Currently, the church av-
erages between 550 and 650
people, depending on the
time of year.
"Launching a second lo-
cation actually generates
excitement and momentum
that can result in more
rapid growth in our min-
istry," he said. "We presently
have quite a few families
from the Central Ridge area

NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH





SUNDAY
Family Worship
Coffee Fellowsi polo ing the Senrice
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
Meeting at the Iv rnes Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813



Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/Weekday Mass: 8A.M. \
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 -3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. /

726- 1670




OF GOD
Rev.I. arrv Power


Sunday Services:

Contemporary Service...........10:30 As
Evening Service......................6:00 ru
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 PM
Teens .................................7: 15, P

Locae et 41 wy.4 Sout
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 7264524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center


I~~YUIO 01First



Assembly

Of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
.Dairold


Rushing


SOFFICE: (352) 726-11UI1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 C5

t"tenta."It s about rea i-
through the use of media "
Wright said.
It's a natural fit for Chris-
tian churches that are di-
rected by the Bible to
spread the word. Lee
Rainie, director of Pew Re-
search Center's Internet
and American Life Project,
said American evangelists
have long been skillful at
pursuing new media.
"This follows a long-
standing historical rela-
tionship between the
evangehecal community and
technology," Rainie said.
"Some of the popular early
radio shows wereBTvangeli

ham was one of the earliest
stars of television."
The Internet simply
opened up a new world of
channels, he said.
"Churches instinctively un-
derstand when new com-
munications technology
come into being, then they
should figure them out."


religions," the Justice Depart-
ment attorneys wrote. "Accord-
ingly, the court should also
reject defendants' argument
that they have not placed a
substantial burden on plaintiffs'
religious exercise."
The South Dakota prison
system went tobacco-free in
2000 but made an exception for
tobacco used in Native Ameri-
can ceremonies. But officials in
October 2009 eliminated that
exemption.
AdventistS
challenge city'S
door-to-door laW
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. A
church group says in a new
federal lawsuit that an Alabama
city is illegally restricting it and
other religious groups from
doing door-to-door solicitations.
The South Central Confer-
ence of Seventh-day Adventists
is challenging the constitutional-
ity of two Alabaster ordinances.
The church claims the ordi-
nances bar it from doing door-
to-door solicitations unless they
first register and pay license
fees.
Church officials say the law-
suit was filed after a member of
the church's Summer Student
Missionary Program was tick-
eted in June by an Alabaster
police officer for selling books
door-to-door without a city per-
mit. The group suspended its
program in Alabaster after the
citation.

Bishop Malone
to continue to lead
Maine's CatholicS
PORTLAND, Maine -
Bishop Richard Malone will
continue to lead the Roman

Sept. 16. The church is
planned to launch full time
in October.
To introduce themselves
to the community, the
church invites the public to
a community block party
from 3 to 6 p.m. today at the
Sanderson Bay Fine Homes
office at the corner
of County Road 486 and
North Prospect Avenue


Catholic Diocese of Portland
even after he is officially in-
stalled as bishop of the Diocese
of Buffalo, N.Y., next month.
The Maine diocese an-
nounced Tuesday that Mal-
one's appointment as apostolic
administrator in Portland by
Pope Benedict XVI will allow
him to continue to lead the
church's fight against the legal-
ization of gay marriage in
Maine.
A statewide referendum on
same-sex marriage is sched-
uled for Nov 6
Malone wII continue to lead
Catholics in Maine and western
New York until the pope names
a new bishop for the Diocese of
Portland.
The pope appointed Malone
in May to lead the Buffalo Dio-
cese, which has three times as
many Catholics as the Portland
Diocese.
Most of 11 closed
Ohio churches get
SUMMer eO~pening
CLEVELAND Two of the
11 local Roman Catholic
churches closed but later
spared by the Vatican are back
in operation, and reopening
dates are set for all but two of
the remaining facilities.
Three churches will reopen
this weekend. Four more will
reopen between July 25 and
Aug 12.
The churches were among
50 closed or merged by the
Diocese of Cleveland because
of declining congregations, fi-
nances and priests. The Vati-
can sided with parishioners
who appealed and said the
closings weren't done
properly.
-- From wire reports

in Hernando.
There will be free food, a
huge blow-up slide for chil-
dren and lots of good
fellowship.
For information, call the
church office at 352-726-
7335.
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleon-
line.com or 352-564-2927.


3896 5. Pleasant Grove Rd*
Inverness, FL34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
10meUS you ve.
(352) 726-2522
TONY R SENBERGER

Seio Pls


8:30 AM
Traditional WorshiP
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & WorshipE


InVernOSS
Y2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Fo mallyoC branry Bible


YOU're iRited
10 Our ServiCcs
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fun dam entfal
PaStor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Ic tory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship
Sunda5., Evening
Wednesday
Choir Practice


10:45 AM
6:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
- 1p~rlacto belong. Place to become."


TWEET
Continued from Page C1

yellow legal pads. But the
advent of the iPhone has
suddenly launched this
self-described "Nean-
derthal pastor" into the on-
line world.
A member of his ministry
helps load his devotionals
onto Facebook and ?Twitter,
and using his smartphone,
he also tweets personal
thoughts and news, recently
tweeting from the conven-
tion in New Orleans. His
Facebook postings are read
eymoreo tha4 m llan peo-
His first reaction to ?Twit-
ter was typical of many in
his generation. "Some of
the things people were
tweeting I thought, 'That is
ridiculous. Who would
want to read about so-and-
so going to the bathroom at
such and such a place?"'"
But then he saw the po-


Religion BRIEFS


*is td~ltr




C ic r y








Page C6 SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Everyone is invited to the
Freebies giveaway from 1 to
3 p.m. Sunday, July 22, at
Homosassa Civic Club
Gently used clothing
housewares, shoes, toys and
more will be available for
free. Ongoing collections are
handled by volunteers, so
local folks can enjoy some-
thing new to them for free. It's
a fun way to spend Sunday
afternoon.
For more information,
email Theresa Waldron at
freedomwayl @gmail.com, or
call 352-746-5984.
'Family to Family,
classes on tap
NAMI Citrus will offer
"Family to Family" classes in
a 12-week course beginning
at 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, County Road 486,

Cth cuse is for family
members only (parents and
siblings) of someone suffer-
ing from mental illness. NAMI
Citrus membership is appre-
ciated, but not required.
Pre-register by calling Mrs.
Welch at 352-277-1832.
Vendors sought
for market day
Herry's Market Day is the
last Saturday of each month
from 8 a.m. to noon at the
Hospice of Citrus County
Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift
Shoppe, 8471 WV. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa (behind
W~endy's, east of U.S. 19).
July's Market Day is
Saturday, July 28.
This outdoor flea market
features a variety of mer-
chandise from old to ordinary
to useful, sublime, cool and
collectible.

an i binsg ord re afo a
limited time. Call Caroline at
352-527-2020 for additional
information or visit www.
hospiceofcitru scou nty~org.
Sertoma Volunteer
Appreciation set
The Citrus Sertoma Volun-
teer Appreciation and Kick-off
Party will take place at 6:30
p.m. Thursday July 26, at the
Lions Club Depot, 109 N.E.
Crystal St., Crystal River.
Everyone is invited to
come and join in the fun of
celebrating another year of
service to mankind.
RSVP to Maureen at 352-
422-3435.

Humankade ~n
OF FLORIDA


News NOTES

Adults can learn
to make jewelry
There will be an adult jew-
elry-making class at the Citrus
Springs Memorial Library at 1
p.m. Tuesday, July 24.
Edna Mikel will be teaching
how to make a beaded stretch
bracelet.
Participants have their
choice: They can bring
enough beads to create an 8-
inch bracelet or they can pur-
chase a prepared kit (colors
may vary), which will have all
required materials.
If students are bringing their
own materials, the rest of the
materials will be here for them
to use.
Because of the nature of
the class materials, it is imper-
ative that students pre-regis-
ter for the class by coming in
or calling the Citrus Springs
Memorial Library at 352-
489-2313.
Literary group to
take 2-day trip
How would you like to take
a two-day bus trip and have a
night tour of Cassadaga Spiri-
tual Center? The Literary
Group of Crystal River
Woman's Club plans the trip
for Sept. 19 and 20.
In addition, the group will
visit DeBarry Hall Historic
Site. All are welcome to the
psychic adventure.
For more information and to
RSVP, call Jo Ann, educa-
tional department chair, at
352-382-1138.
Tobacco-Free group
to convene July 26
Everyone is invited to the
next Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Citrus County meeting,
at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, July
26, in the Community Room
of the Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inverness.

the hswm2e0eltbn3 kicly ar,
reviewing the goals and suc-
cesses of the partnership and
taking a look at the needs of
the community for future
activities.
The Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship's goals are to prevent ini-
tiation of tobacco use among
youths and young adults, cre-
ate tobacco-free policies to
protect everyone from sec-
ondhand smoke exposure,
and to increase the numbero
people who receive informa-
tion about quitting tobacco
use.
For more information, call
Jillian Godwin at the Citrus
County Health Department,
352-726-1731, ext. 242, or
email jillian~godwin@
doh.state.fl.us.
Model A club
meets in Floral City
The Citrus A's Model A club
meeting will be at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 7, at the Floral
City Lions Club on East
Orange Avenue.
All are welcome; new mem-
bers are encouraged.
For more information, call
secretary Patti Tompkins at
352-688-3931, or visit the
website at www.citrusas.com.
Habitat orientation
Set for Aug. 11
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County is looking for part-
ner families to build their own
Habitat home. People inter-
ested in becoming Habitat
homeowners must attend a
mandatory orientation course
from 10 a.m. to noon Satur-
day, Aug. 11, at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County
building, 714 S. Scarboro Ave.

At"endnce is required to
enter the Habitat program and
aply for a Habitat home.
Ptni app icant wil re-
ceive a full explanation of the
program, timeline, income
and service requirements and
Other information.
Children cannot be accom-
modated at the meeting.
For more information, call
the Habitat office at 352-


563-2744.


Sun~shmne State Romance Authors plan fee seminadr~uly 28


Special to the Chronicle

Have you started writing your novel,
and wondered exactly what genre
you've written and what your readers'
expectations are for that genre? Need
some tips to improve your writing?
Join this month's meeting of the
Sunshine State Romance Authors


(SSRA), the newest chapter of Ro-
mance Writers of America, as they
offer a free seminar geared to aspiring
or serious writers.
The seminar will take place at
SSRA's monthly meeting from 10 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, July 28, in the
Homosassa Library community room,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.


Founded by local authors, SSRA's
goal is to educate and support area
writers in their efforts to write and
market quality novels in all genres.
SSRA welcomes new members and
anyone interested in writing and be-
coming published.
For more information, call Loretta
Rogers at 352-628-7286.


Special to the Chronicle
Vickie Oorbeck and SPC J.B. Lewis display a beautiful, hand-sewn blanket presented during the ceremony.


Legion Post 155 plays host to ceremony for returning soklier


Special to the Chronicle

On June 29, American Le-
gion Post 155 was the place
to be when Operation Wel-
come Home (OWH), Citrus
County's volunteer non-
profit organization devoted
to welcoming local veterans
at completion of their tour in
the war on terrorism, hon-
ored Army Specialist J.B.
Lewis after his return from
a tour in Afghanistan.
Nearly every Citrus
County veterans' organiza-
tion was represented and
many presented SPC Lewis
with items honoring his
service. Retired Air Force
Chief Master Sgt. John
Stewart, OWH secretary and


webmaster, was master of
ceremonies with OWH
board members Barbara
Mills and Cynthia Holden.
Stewart read an excerpt
from an overseas newspaper
article containing horrific
details of one 24 -our battle
where SPC Lewis and his
unit directly engaged over-
whelming enemy forces.
OWH President Barbara
Mills presented a large bas-
ket filled with gift cards and
other items donated by local
businesses and private citi-
zens. Gary and Vickie Oor-
beck presented one of the
most remarkable gifts since
OMH's activation nearly
eight years ago. After many
hours of hard work, Vickie


had hand-sewn a patriotic
blanket for SPC Lewis.
"On behalf of OWH I
would like to thank Post 155
Commander Mike Klyap
and his staff for hosting this
event and we look forward
to another program there
next month, when we will be
welcoming home the post
commander's own son from
the war," said Stewart. "Ad-
ditionally, we have been
contacted by families of
other Citrus County veter-
ans anticipated to return
from the war during August
and September.
"I hope all veterans'
groups will attend and I
highly encourage private
citizens and organizations to


come out, display your ap-
preciation for our military
veterans and present items
to welcome these troops
home while honoring their
service to America," he said.
"Watch our website at
www. operationwelcome-
homeveterans.org for de-
tails as they become
available."
OWH needs gift card and
monetary donations to allow
the organization to continue
their program. To donate
and to learn more about
OWH and how to help, call
Barbara Mills at 352-422-
6236, email her from the
website, or email John
Stewart at cornhusker
69@yahoo. com.


Special to the Chronicle
Morgan, a gray and white
kitty girl, is ready to talk
her way mnto your home. At
12 weeks old she is full of
love and ready to share it.
if, however, you are looking
for a more mature feline,
we are running a Summer
Special Adoption through
July -- all a ul ctria op
$27.50. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday at
the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or visit
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fll86.htmi.


Special to the Chronicle

Hospice of Citrus County will pro-
vide orientation training for individu-
als who are interested in learning
more about hospice and hospice vol-
unteer opportunities. The class will be
from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, July
26, at the Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Education Center, 8471 W Peri-
winkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.


The class provides an overview of
hospice philosophy and history. Par-
ticipants will become acquainted with
services provided by Hospice of Citrus
County for patients and families.
They will also become familiar with
the concept of palliative care and
learn the importance of confidential-
ity. Attendees will also receive infor-
mation regarding volunteering in
several different areas. Teens and


high school students are encouraged
to attend. Volunteering for Hospice of
Citrus County will provide community
service hours for the Bright Futures
Scholarship and other
academic needs.
To register or to request training for
a group, call Director of Volunteer
Services Cathi Thompson at 352-527-
2020 or email CThompson~hospice
ofcitruscounty org.


m Submit information at least two weeks before the event. m Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
a Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


a Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
Expect notes to run no more than once.


New NOTES o e ryn


Operation~~ Wlo Hm


SEEK

CORfOFrecg

The Florida Federation of Garden Clubs,
a leading conservation organization in
the state, sponsors an annual SEEK
Conference at Edward Ball Wakulia
Springs State Park south of
Tallahassee. The local Citrus Garden
Club awarded Jennifer C. Hafner a
scholarship that covers all costs of
lodging, meals and conference fee. The
focus is on climate change and
energy conservation, water pollution
and conservation, and preservation of
native vegetation and wildlife habitat.
Conference activities include field trips,
intereSting talks, hands-on workshops,
information on careers in environmental
science and conservation, as well as
swimming, hiking and canoeing.

Special to the Chronicle


MIo rga n


Hospice of C~itrus County plans orientation








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(HnlUl 39 68 39 45 54 (2010)o Polo, Bailee Madison.'NR' o Mabius, Brooke D'Orsay Premiere. (2012)=
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Bride

North 07-21-12
4 843
VrAK 6 5



West East
4 ? 7 6 2 & ? 10 9 5
V QJ 10V
+ Q 9 6 5 + K 10 8 4 3
S8 3 & 76 5
South


Vr 98 7 43


A K Q 10 9

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1A PRSS
1 VPass 2 V Pass
4 V PaSS PaSS PRSS


Opening lead: V Q

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterpr-ise Assn.

Will Rogers said, "I guess there is nothing that
will get your mind off everything like golf. I have
never been depressed enough to take up the game,
but they say you get so sore at yourself you forget
to hate your enemies."
Bridge is surely an even better escape from re-
ality than golf. But the key word for today's deal is
"guess" how can South guess spades? He is in
four hearts, and West leads the trump queen.
The bidding was straightforward. Remember,
though, that because North might have raised one
heart to two with only three-card support, South's
jump to four hearts promises at least a five-card
suit. With only four hearts, South should make a
different rebid, perhaps three no-trump.
The lead suggests that trumps are 3-1, not 2-2.
And if so, declarer might lose two spades, one
heart and one diamond. If South had to guess
spades now, he should play low to his jack. West,
with the spade ace, would not have led the suit;
but with only the queen, he might have chosen that
lead.
However, unless East has the diamond king and
queen, South does not need to guess at all. He
should win the first trick on the board and play a
diamond to his jack.
Let's assume West wins with his queen and per-
severes with another trump. South wins, cashes
the diamond ace, and plays on clubs.
If West ruffs in, he must either lead a spade
around to declarer's king-jack, or concede a ruff-
and-sluff. And if West discards throughout, he is
given the lead at trick nine with a trump. Again,
West is endplayed.


DIAIMI K IM GAIP
UITE H IMIOIS I G RIE
BIET A IBIUIT I U DIO
SINIEIA K IEIRI IRO0N
L IB AIB NIE R
M INI IE IDD IIE
AIVE OIDIE I RAITI
PEITIA LK ID ANIA
R I LEIDIU M SIK
CIAN OE EIS A
F IDO GIRA IT EI FUL
IDOIL GA ILAA ESIE
NEIRDI S ILKI SEIE
EIRE NIYEI TSIK


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 C7


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DOLYD

2I Tnun Medda Services. Inc

SCLOKB



SSTOLCY


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Y N Y I
kR KT I THeV ENJovab THE MOVE
ABOUT THE CEMETERY
SIGOPS BEGA~USE T HAD THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
1 suggested by the above cartoon.

answerhere Kmrx xn nvs
(Answers Monday)
Ysedys Jumbles: INEPT STAFF TAVERN GOALIE
Answer: When she complained about him taking too
many naps, he said this GIVE IT A REST


says "no," what does it
mean? Some men just
don't get it. Or do they
believe it really means
"~yes")?
I have a wonderful
friend, "Homer," and I
love him dearly, but I
am not "in love" with
him. We are both in
our 80s and widowed,
and I thought it was
nice to have him as a
friend. But Homer's
kisses are getting too
mushy and lingering. ANN
He often says, "I can't MAII
wait to make love to
you," and I reply each
time, "No chance."
We could have so much fun to-
gether, but he always has sex on
his mind. I have no interest in
getting into bed with him or any
other man. If that's all he wants,
he's welcome to find someone
else. I would miss him, but I've
had about all I can take.
Other than being downright
nasty, how can I make Homer un-
derstand? He gets his feelings
hurt easily. Too Old To Be
Etrisky
Dear Too Old: If you are kissing
Homer, you give the impression
that there could be more than
friendship. At that point, your
words are contradicted by your
actions. No wonder he doesn't
understand "no." Some women
mistakenly believe that they can
do lots of kissing and snuggling
and guys are happy to stop at
that. But Homer (like a lot of
men) isn't wired that way.
Please try to communicate bet-
ter. Stop kissing or doing any-


thing else that Homer might in-
terpret as romantic. Tell him you
enjoy his company, but from now
on, the relationship is
strictly platonic. If he
still doesn't get the
message, you will
need to see less of
him.
Dear Annie: My 83-
year-old mother is a
chain smoker. All I ask
when I visit is that she
smoke on her small
balcony. I still get
some fumes, but I
IE'S never complain.
BOX I drove four hours to
see her on Mother's
Day, and she insisted
on smoking indoors. When I
asked why, she replied, "Because
I feel like it." When I said her
newly painted walls were already
covered in smoke residue, she
gave me a dirty look and said the
world is not going to end because
there is cigarette smoke in the
house. I realized she didn't care
about my well-being, so I left. I
told her that from now on, I will
stay in a hotel.
It's not the only evidence of her
disinterest in me. Only once in 20
years has she bothered to make
me a meal. I always end up tak-
ing her out or putting something
together for both of us. I know for
a fact that my mother does not
love me, so should I continue
making an effort when she shows
a total lack of consideration for
my feelings? Very Sad
Daughter
Dear Sad: We're not sure how
you know "for a fact" that your
mother doesn't love you. It's more
likely that she's a difficult person


who, as a matter of self-protec-
tion, is uncomfortable showing
love because it makes her vul-
nerable to being hurt. We agree
that you should stay in a hotel,
because Mom is too addicted to
care about anyone else's comfort.
But instead of cutting her off,
lower your expectations. She is
who she is.
Dear Annie: You often print
letters from women who com-
plain about their husbands' ex-
wives. I came along after my
husband and his ex-wife resolved
to be on friendly terms. Over the
years, Kay always has been kind
to me, and at times, if it wasn't for
her support during some heart-
wrenching "tough love" issues
with the kids, I probably wouldn't
still be married.
Recently, I traveled to Arizona
to stay with Kay while she
mended from an operation. I
cooked meals, cleaned the house
and walked her dog. We laughed,
cried and entertained each other.
We believe our actions teach
"our" children and grandchil-
dren an important lesson in for-
giveness and human compassion.
- Debbie and Kay


Annie's M~ailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and M~arcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox~comcast~net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find outmore about
Annie's M~ailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
wwmecrea tors. com.


ACROSS
1 Shriner's hat
4 Note before la
7 Where
hackles rise
11 Grande or
12 B mosoaked
cake
13 Not theirs
14 Sm g -
16 -a-brac
17 Rousseau

g8 nt la train
19 Truckers'
radios
20 Pollende
21 Chr olate
bean
24 Gretel's
brother
27 Hatchet
28 Bombay
30 Drawn tight


32 Spanish boy
34 Evening
36 Country addr.
37 Pressure
39 Eyedltl
41 Cmpmmand to
a mule
42 Belt maker's
43 tT can
feature
45 Iffy attempts
v8Ci ilrit
52 Walk heavy
53 Declare
54 RV haven

member
57 Flow back

DOWN
1 Friar's title .
2 Gael rephuble
4 Overfeedsrpy


Answer to Previous Puzzle


5 Kimono

6 S elac resin
7 Most
high-minded
8 Mystique


9 Goody-goody

12Roct'solast
name
15 Isinglass
18 Swamp
20 Words feom

21 Re epacle
22 Po ees
connector
23 Small change
I-lHerr' uabosd ,

bluegrass
26 Troubadour
prop
29In entoron hd.
Turner
33 Thin crisp
fabric
35 Bow and

38 Mo e alert
40 Tickled pink
42 Knotted scarf
43 String tie
44Wnged gd
47 Stuck-up
person
48 ER practice
49 Skip stones
50 Ms. Arden
51 Talk on


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


7-21


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I





I WAS MANIPULATING
A 3-D NETWORK MODEL
USING MY HAND
MOTION SENSORS-







The Born Loser


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public L clR D O WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by~ famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands another.
TODAY S CLUE: S slsnbe tl


"BJ LCJ F JCJ UT J LCV F VU MU Z UUM



VU UV FJCR BF FLV V FJ U V FJCR LCJ



F JCJ PUC H MUT 'V OTUB ."


B.- LAMJ T

Previous Solution: "Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, po-
etry is just the ash." Leonard Cohen
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-21


C8 SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Pickles

HEY, You KMOth W7AY
OLD GL19 DoWd WtE
STREET 6(19 LONGf
UE'9 TLIakindhG Wn\ETY
TIOMORRo1.








Sally Forth -


For Better or For Worse


19A76 OLV3! /

OLD? fcAfs \UE


11CKS
ME OFF.


Beetle Bailey


HE READS TOO
MUCH INTO SOME49 / *
OF THE PAINTINGS o


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


IN THE NEAR FUTURE


IT WAS ALL GOOD
UNTIL I SNEEZED AND
ACCIDENTALLY MERGED
MY NETWORK DESIGN
WITH MY OUTLOOK
CALENDAR.


Blondie


GODNEWS, MR.! BCI~OV, KIDS THESE DAYS )|
DISTURBING VOUR MOVIES? i
NAP GUZ WE'RE ci I









Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


POOC
I\


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Wow! Jeffy's plant is really growing !
When he gets older, he's gonna be
a very good mother."


" (T1L BE EAsi To FIND M'/ BAGr. IT'S THE ONE
T4AT~ SOUNDS LIKE THERE'S A FRoG \N IT."'
Betty


Doonesbury


Big Nate -


Frank & Ernest


HOW '7L
COME?


YES IM
A GOTf(


Arlo and Janis


p.m., 10:35 p.m., 11:05 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 2:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m., 5

"S vges 'mR)D reured. 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40

"T e 50ain ,S ier- an" (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30
p~m.
"Ted" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 3:30 p.m. No passes.

Visit mw.chronnid onince.com for area movie listings and


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Dark Knight Rises" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m.,
2:55 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:20
p.m. No passes.
"Ice Ae 5Coritinental Drif" (PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:30

"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 4:55 p.m.
No passes.
"TeAmzn z pdrMn P-3 1n2: p3:. mpm.
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 10:25 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) 12 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Dark3Knight Rises" (PG-13) 11:50 am.,12:1200p~m.,


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Garfield


WHEN I SHOULD
WILL YOU BE DONE
HAVE THAT BY. .THE
FIXED? 15TH OF

CISCO.


IONCETHOOC~M~ NOKI~-
ABOUTDA~NG DINC~?
TAYLORWIFT. WHY'DYOU
PULL UP~


~s


C~REAT! YOU CRICKET?
KNOWABOUT THATWAS
CRICKET, OF YEAR~AGO,
COURSE...
~AWC7.




~~~ ~I

1.1~
''' j




t~oW \ UM... BECAUSE/
E~JI PULLED OFF
MOS~ OF ~Y
EYELASHES.


Today's M OVI ES

















































8 6 9 5 7 4 2 3 1_

91 2 74 8 3 65

6 8 7 2 3 5 1 4 9
4 5 3 9 1 6 7 8 2

1 9 8 4 5 7 6 2 3

2 7 ir" 1 6 3 4 i9 8

3 41~ 6 5 1 7


I AM LOOKING FOR
that special lady up to
age 40. You may the
onel Call anytime
352-422-0440
Petite SWF looking for
SWM A tra6e -Welhto

wants to enjoy a little
traveling, dinner, movie,
etc. non-smoker, social
drinker. Looking forward
to meeting you.
Bllnd Box 1790P
clo Citrus County Chronl-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal


looking for SWM 60-80
for fun reply to
Box Holder,
PO BOX 911
Hernando, FL 34442
Wealthy 75yr old SWM
looking for attractive,
non-smoking SWF
50-60yr old, for com-
panionship. If inter-
ased eomai pcupres
jnrherk@cox.net

FrieWdl R S SH in
good health, socially
active, fun to be with.




hope I~m not asking too
much when I~ eedtng

tractive, intelligent, gra-
cious,_ yingings, extra-
verted Christian lady

ao d hal 7 it~
warm personality. slim
or average build for
meaningful conversa-
tion & other social
activities & perhaps a
loving personal
srelatinho .t I, yo
please don't be afraid
to call me at 5709.

from you.


I :
8 month old female
Great Pyrenees Puppy,
up to date on
shots, AKC, spayed
All white $600
(352) 634-5415
110V Dryer, Sears
Apartment Size
$150
Call Mel
(352) 344-8067
BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 21st, 7am
Hsehld goods, furniture
&4L90ts of Baby Itms
359N amaris Ae.
CITRUS SPRINGS
A Nice 3/2/2, close to
schools $800. mo.+ sec.
(352) 628-0731
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRACTOR- Model
LT2000. 42-inch cut w
Briggs/Stratton 18hp 1/C
OHV motor Mowing
deck, motor in excel-
lent condition. Tractor
needs some repairs,
butcis3 oe rai l $0250
anytime after 11 a.m.

SrArAftAQAr
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad





Call ouro Cae ifi d
352-563-5966
AAAAA AA b~


CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Beutiful, Quaint home
on deepwater Canal
with Dock and storage.
Out door glassed In
Roo caudaSc eentd
Redone 1960 s Cottage
with separate
washer-dryer room and
bathroom with shower.
A Fish andNBoat hg
St. Call 352-794-6716
leave message. 900.00
per month.

3/22 Spa lous,vNeer
kitchen, appliances incl.
$850/mo. no util. stone-
housecountry
@gmall.com
(352) 302-7488
DUNNELLON
Multi Family Sale
Sat.21, 8am-4pm,
Furniture-new queen
boxs rng
matress&be frame,
memorlabilla, 54" proj.
TV & ents cnter,


for everyone
Corner of Hwy

P3R28 &RHCy ER

Stylus NX400


Transmission
w/ Granny Gear
$100 (352) 382-5661

LnGsreen Valeysin
Complete lawn maint.
(352)280-0269
Heavy Rattan
Entertainment center
w/ 5 glass shelves
$1590 Wailntd w r56/2
drawers, w/ brown

35 -5 3123 121- 453
HOME HEALTH
CARE PROFES-
SIONALS
Rapidly expanding home
health company, Village
Home Care Is seeking
additional staffing Citrus
County, The Villages and
Ocala. these Individuals
must have experience In
Medicare Home Health.
Full time and part time
positions are available for
RNs, LPNs, Physical
Therapists, Occupational
Therapists, Medical So-
clal Workers.

Please respond by email:
plark~n@villagehomecare.org
or fax:
352-390-6559


Saturday 21st, 8AM
Church Yard/ Sale
972 N. Christy WaY

OPEN HOUSE
Sat. July 21, Ila-3pm
2/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
1747 sfuneAC
Completely updated

820 W. kuens~eewtrip Dr -
BEVEARLY HILLS
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089
Red Nose Pit Bulll
Puppies 6 wks old,
de-wormed, 1st shots

3doe feaeM T009 t3


52me N Ainunodel

Mulc~hr Cs $01,400
(352) 422-0139


6 chairs, hJumbo Gul Shrimp
(352) 382-5661 1 0/15ct7$88/b.2 elyv.
SEWING MACHINE Ken- (772) 8-16
more 1760 Zig Zag Pine

bins bttonho e,30 p t- .-
tern cams. $85 382-4873 r
TREADMlI Weslo Ca-


dence C44 spacesaver
comfort cushion treadmill.
Firm $99.00 382-4873


5 x10 $200.
(352) 382-5661
WAN TOT LB H UE
Condition or situation.
CallFrred, 5272-769369




SOFA, CHAIR, &
CHAISE LOUNGER
Sectional Sofa and Chair
with matching foot stools.
Excellent condition
$400.OBO Chalse
Lo nger. E~x Ie O n
co352-795-0841







Grover Cleveland
SBIv 2Homosassa I





$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID -$200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



2 Sago Palms to anyone
who can remove them.
Call 464-3914
FREE BOAT wlTitle!
Call Phil
(352) 220-9435
FREE Horse Manure
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge 746-3545
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654

to eodhmnes
15 weeks
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
FREE to a good home 2
yr old male
chlhuahualpug mix shots
& micro chipped
527-13991513-5010
Free to a good home 3 yr
old Male Beagle-shots &
micro-chipped.
527-13991513-5010
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Landscape Boulders,
you remove
(352) 726-9708


cream color, 4 months
old, free to a good home
(352) 795-6870
Natural Soil Builder

You L od Pn~e Rdge



2 femalreD, maes ona-
tions ftor their care utpetdll

(352) 423-0819


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Hppy
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified

D p2- r3d5e9ais







CAREGIVER
Private home health
care for el erl toa m

dementia. Position

tm s ada Sf vsep
ken person In excellent
physical condition Is
needed. Three 12-hour



ferred. Applicant must
w hpe~rmanertsresbdaen
ground check available
at Interview
Non-smokers only call
( 5)67- BS-



CNA

Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with beneailts, Fore
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512


HOME HEALTH
CARE PROFES-
SIONALS
Rapidly expanding home
health company, Village
Home Care Is seeking
additional staffing Citrus
County, The Villages and
Ocala. these Individuals
must have experience In
Medicare Home Health,
Full time and part time
positions are available for
RNs, LPNs, Physical
Therapists, Occupational
Therapists, Medical So-
clal Workers.

Please respond by email:
plark~n@villagehomecare.org
or fax:
352-390-6559


LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office based
medical practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

Medical
Asst/Receptionist

for mdical tme prac ice.
knEmail r Iumcea@
kigsbayfaiyae





D pna le
CNA's/H HA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885






BOyS & GirlS
Clubs of Citrus Co




public Relations,
Communication Skills,
supervisory/ training
experience helpful.
Download app. frorn


Resume/Application
to 352-621-4679




















RESTAURANT
SeMANaAGtERrat
professional with 10+
years experience In a
full service restaurant.
Excellent opportunity
for a motivated Individ-
l. F aosne fil ou a

your resume to
The Blue Gator
D2ul89 n.W llams S.
Ask for Bob.


TEACHER

Full time needed for
CrsinPreschool,
CApreferred,
(352) 746-4888







Front SABINA'S DINER
Hernando, after 2pm

BREAKFAST COOK
Ex eriec Oly


Now Taking
Applications
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River




AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring 2
Sales Professionals to
join our growing staff
Be a part of the



bonuses provided to
the rgh~ttpeosle to

give our customers
the best car buying
experience of their
lives E NEED YOU!

Crystal River


OMM ~rj~d;

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES

Expanding Again!
The Citrus County
Chronicle is seeking
an energetic individual
to consult businesses
on the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire to
work in a fast paced,
fun, environment please
apply today.

* Dev lop classified

cold ca rsnganrog
prospecting
* Strong rapport
building,professional
communication and
good listening skills
* Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing

* Hig Sh o
di loma or
euvlent
* Prio tlemarketing
exp erience a plus
Send resume to:
marnold@
chronicleonline.com

EOE, drug screening for
final applicant

WANTED


Higvy Ief moiae

vacation & Holidays.
Be efats avalbe. A e-
from 9am to4 pm
Mon-Fri, At
Brays
Pest Control
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP





D eel Mech ni
isWantedanc

mtgaa i edca n
Class A license, CDL
preferred. Five years
experience involved
in the repair and

mai tnanue f con-

Send resume tO
info@fieldco.biZ



7 Eayps. Mar ne

2T nNR sbif Ael a~t

Crystal River FI 34429
(352) 795-3552



Manufacturer of

il/C Grill f, Rgseenr


ap p iaionscfor an
ProductionkAssembly

Mast e b e te dd d
assemble parts using
hand tools, hands
and machinery.
Welding experience
a plus.
AMpl innper on to
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI 33513.
Excelln tb efis

DFW, EOE.


ROOFERS
REPAIRS & SALES

Truck & Tools, 489-0360




Housekeepers/
Locker Room
Attendants and
Laundry Person
PT or FT

For Upscale Golf &
Country Club Apply in

Sek iw C osi
Hernando

Lawn Service Help

EXP. ONLY, Must have
Clean Driver Lic.
(352) 302-6034
PUMP REPAIR
plumbinglelectrical exp,
clea dl/back rud a
cmaunst send rer rnea
cprs11 @centurylink.net

STORE CLERK

Must be over 18 and
available for week-

ekl oA MUT

but not necessary.
Rplyin peseln .
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt.
Crystal River.















16 BUCKET STORAGE
Primary colors
Great for kids
$25.00
Call 352-628-4271




1816 JENNY STAMP
GOOD CONDITION
100.00 / OBO Linda
341-4449




BEAUTIFUL, LIKE NEW
4 PERSON HOT TUB
WITH BUBBLE JETS
HEATER, COVER AND
MULTI-COLORED
LIGHTS JUST
$500.00-PAID $3,000.
352-628-3865




110V Dryer, Sears
Apartment Size
$150
Call Mel
(352) 344-8067
Almon~d2Side by side

w/ ice & water
3 month old
$800 (352) 586-6746

CAP UC IMPR SO


352-560-7747
DRYER Kenmtore super

$100.00 or best offer call
352-400-0452
DRYER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty
352-364-6504
GE NAUTLILUS


condition $60.00 OBO.
352-527-1 399
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryrREpc up


cleaning stove, white with
new bake element
$100.00 call
352-400-0452 after 5:00

5 D Frn ktead
(352)344-5734
WASHER Kenmore
washing machine, white,





352-364-6504




Solid wood desk wl 3
drawers $50
(352) 489-8783



Craftsman 12" Band
Sawew owners m I a
(352) 344-2161



48 INCH TV floor model
works great $50 home
3535 -915102 cell

AlWA STEREO STYTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE& 2
SP AKERS $2100


S d kOU U AAAAAA 4puz.corn





/34 3 6





8 6


8/1 7 1


5 9





51 8




Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.



~~t~~dcccwced ~ ~ wiKsiu~ Alo u wthstand

IIStallations by Brian escusassa3-, wnds .

Ilmft~u~ ~c352-627519





I Engineering Fees I ~


*Siding*Soffit*Fascia*5kiring*Roolovers*Carports*Screen Rooms*Decks*Windows*DoorsAdditions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


A1VA:I"LA B"LE




=====-












/ Able to work early morning
hours before 6am
/ MUSt be 18 years old
/ Flori a drivers license


If interested come to the Meadowcrest

Plant beween l as o2 an,stdrive around to


1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd*

CryStal River

IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE



www.chronicleonline.corn


COMPAQ COMPUTER
Tower,Keyboard,Dell
15" monitor
$40.00 Call
352-628-4271
COMPUTER DESK
Great Condition 62 x
401n. $40.00 Linda
352-341-4449
COMPUTER desktop
monitor keyboard mouse
printer speakers 90.00
352 212-2266 Iv mess

sDEEE COM UTGERd
condition, $25.00 Linda
352-341-4449




DIESTLER COMPUTER
pew s.U sedsy~sdms
352-637-5469
E Machine, W260
w/ dellkeyboard
and screen
(352) 563-2896
EPSOM
PRINTER-COPIER
$2lu sNX440007




2 BRWN WICKER ARM
cCuH oR sW/otoboars &
Ilastic cted. E e
N ce I~ttle st Pd $25
asking $75. 382-2733
4 PATIO CHAIRS $50.
AlTaupe Pwdre Cotedat
conmj M esture resin t nt.
586-904-3262 SMW
PatiO $Of
6 chairs,
$100.
(352) 382-5661
Patio set table 4 x 4ft
round PVC, 4 chairs
with cushions $250
(352) 382-4891
PVC Patio Set
42" round table, 4 chairs
w/cushions, good cond.
$50
(352) 794-3925




3 SWIVAL BARSTOOLS
wrought Iron wlback &
padded brown crushed
velvet seats $85-A-1
352-628-9838
4 Piece Oak Queen
Bdrm Set, incl. mattress
and boxspring, $195 obo
(352) 400-8646


8- ffSLEEPER SFA
light fabric with, swirl
color pattern
Come and get it!
$350.(352) 513-4507
ARMOUR AND NIGHT-
STAN DS Cherry Wood
Armour with 2 matching
nightstands. $60.00 Call
352-586-1 970
Chest of Drawers,
Dresser, set of box
s riing $50.r

w/3otstoo $550.
Coffee Table, 3 x 3ft
square with glass top




$100 (352) 560-3519

Itala I Is omt~aab ,
seats 8, 5 x 5ft, $600
Aumuar/Bar Pine,
6x 3.5ft $500

END3 )B3LE Butiful
solid wood end table.
"Thomasville"!!! Compan-
lon pieces available.
89.00 352-726-9132
Entertainment center
9ft L, 61/2ft H, 27" Deep
White, fits Opoto 50" TV

(352) 382-7473
CN ER IN ENT
4 ft x3.5 ft $35
352-212-2266 Lv Mesg
FOUR PIECE COUCH
25.00 /good
condition/needs cleaning
Linda 341-4449
Heavy Raftan
Entertainment center
w/ 5 glass shelves
$150 Walnut Desk 56'/2
x 19%/ File drawer + 5
drawers, w/ brown
leather chair $160
352-503-2123, 212-6453
High End Quality Resale
Furniture & Accessories.
SECOND TIME AROUND

Lecan Hy.227605-8 03
House full of furniture
Lots of Items, All must go.
loveseat $100 obo,
Desk+chaire 25, queen/
fulsize 527-68790 ea.
(352) 5767
KING CANOPY FRAME
Headboard,footboard
C np,m Ia
352-628-4271
King Size Bed frame,
cherry finish,
exc l. cond.

(352) 382-3682
KING SIZE SERTA
mattress,box spring &

$1 0 0scdrlfc for
ONLY $150.
352-637-3636





LEATHER R LINER
leather, 84 ,- 2 r cinng
seats. Good cond/no
stains $100.
352-527-9639
Marble Top
Dining Rm. table w/6
high back leather
chairs, (buffet) server

$1,200 ( 52) 5-6746


oI lst my
bracelet.....Please,
Please, If you foundfi~nd a
gold/dlamond bracelet,
return .tto me for ou Orre-

Tree, Home Depot, How-
ards Flea Mkt and
SaveALot...lt could be an-

32-h5 e-0007
Large Maine-Coon Cat
Male, black/brown, collar
with his name, address
and phone goes by
"Bent e", lotIn vicinity

nando, offering $200 re-
ward (352) 586-8162
Lost Black & White
Jack Russ ,sMale
& Hwy 41
(352) 2C-7707

gray & white, long hair
house cat, has a chip,
vicin ty of 50 Cr~ral



LOST -FOUND -ADOPT
Please visit Ctrus C unty

352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscntters.com

Domstic haort Cat.
Neutered, male,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 527-9050
LOST gray white cat
Hampshire Hills near
and wi ev cor with IIl -
352-212-3980ne
Lost Small Brown Drog

Dachshund & Terrier
Mix, Beverly Hills
Forest Ridge Area
(352) 249-7131
Pitbull/Terrier
white/black, 801bs, goes
by "Diesel", lost 7/13/12
In the vicinity of Cardinal
and 491, needs meds.
(352) 270-5114




16" spare truck tire, found
In front of Fred s Barber
shop, 7/12/12
(352) 564-8436
FOUND Female Bulldog
Terrier Mix wearing a
black harness on July
17th In Inverness.Contact
Citrus County Animal
Services, Animal
ID#A1 6739739,
352/746-8400, 4030 S
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscntters.com
Found Ilght/peach col-
ored tabby cat, In
Sugarmill Woods near
Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303
FOUND Neutered Male
White and Tan Cocker

2anl 1 th Cotct Cir s
County Animal Services'
Animal ID#A16743092,
352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,




Please visitiru Couty
Animal Servies,

ArotRInverness,

wwwaecitrscnt Cterus com






Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
1 0/15ct $8/Ib. delly.
(772)781-1262





TEACHER

F lt me ~rt t me Ep.

LEARNING
(352) 560-4222






Nail Technician

For Upscale Golf &
Cou tr nCub Appl in

Skyview Crossing
Hernando





Housekeeping
Person


kO pin stafn aCtrs
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laun-
dry, as well as offices
and models needed.
WFudl tim ap itio ,
work schedule. Apply
at Terra Vista
W lcomeeCe tera

Blvd, Hernando, FL


CITRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


CIASSIFIEDS


SATURDAY,JULY 21, 2012 09


K O PBLRE ON CR
Rooms to Go Kids

tBMn boocs bebd3
mattress, dresser, mir-
ror, nite stand, pit box
for tv and nascar rug.
Excellent Condition!
Real wood not plastic
racecar bed! Email
jamar1021@yahoo.com

$675 3o5r2 6-2794


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Timne









C10 sATURDAY,JULY 21, 2012


3 cymbals, black
$250
(352) 489-9181
Small Organ wlbench
and music, exc. cond.
$150 obo
(32 00-86460


b th s hdda aat r
cinnamon color
$600. 352- 795-4372




6 UNOPENED ROLLS
SHRINK WRAP--2 clear,
2 pink, 1 red, 1 green. $5
for all. Ong $2.97 per roll.
(352) 341-3607
19" WHITE PANASONIC
TVIVCR W/ REMOTE
Old-school, but works
great.$35 INVERNESS
(352) 341-3607
CHEROKEE MATTED &
FRAMED PRINT NATIVE
AMERICAN
AWARD-WINNING
ARTIST $35 341 3607
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened self-adhesive
repositionable $20
(352) 341-3607
MEDIUM BAR FRIDGE
White Large Bar Fridge -
Works Great $100
352-601-3506
MICROWAVE Black
E-WAVE brand for
over-stove Installation.
Turntable works some-
times. $35 341-3607
SOFA, CHAIR, &
CHAISE LOUNGER
Sectional Sofa and Chair
with matching foot stools.
Excellent condition.
$400.OBO Chalse
Lounger. Excellent
condition. $150.OBO
352-795-0841
TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES BRAND

NhW 2u tsue hsolr 73

WHITE FREEZER
CHEST White Freezer
Chest -Like new -
Excellent Condition -
$100 352-601-3506




TREADMILL Weslo Ca-
dence C44 spacesaver
comfort cusion tre mill.





Bike Gary Fischer
Men's Napa Model
$250 & Schwinn 4-blke
car htc heamn $50


Batr wal et 8 Tt b
4ft, new apperiance,
with combination
hanging triple light set
multiple ques standard
and short sized with
stylish wooded que


room
atmosphere, $650
(352) 220-0134
CONCEALED WEAPONS

at the Inverness
VFW Post 4337
Sat. July 21, 2012,
10 am $55. The most
entertaining &
informative instruction
ever! Call 352-220-4386
for info & reservations
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
MEN S GOLF CLUBS &
BAG Wilson Aggressor
Irons, 2 to SW, driver thru
5 wood plus bag, $50.00
352-382-0953
RACKET BALL RACKET
Leach, "Charles
Brumfleld" with cover,
$25.00. 513-4027
RA Wel homes ydoursto

for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River
S/W Model 50 ,4 Ato,

S/W Model 60, s/steel,
.8spdl,d Asw-$300,

.223, L,LR, V.Good -$300
S/W Model460,.460,
.454, .45LC, NIB $1250.
Hi-Std Victor, Target
Auto, .22 LR, Hartford
Mfg, AsNew$875
(352) 356-0124


1 1/2 yrs old gray and
black, $100 with Extras,
cage not included
(954) 295-3055





Wholesale frm raised
rats/mice, all sizes, de-
livery available.
(352) 445-3681


CLASSIFIED




Yonex RQ-380, never
used with case, $45.00.
Spalding used, $35.00 no
case. 513-4027

WE BUY GUNS
On St~e2)Gu~n6Smit~hing





Uti||fy Trai|gr







White Baby Crib
& Car $ggt
$60.
(352) 795-4394


ARMOIRE TYPE
$20.00 Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
CORNER CURIO CABl-
NET, curved glass, 59"
high, 28" wide, good
1 diio, D95n 3 2

DllBNINGNTeAwB.EhFOR 8
wood, excellent Condl-
tron. No chairs, just table.
$100 (352) 465-1616

DW NEh aOR MA nEd
beagle excellent tem-
perment 527-1399









HAND PULL
BOAT/UTILITY TRAILER
DOLLIE- 1-7/8" ball, 4-
dual air tires/wheels, Ex.,
$50 352-628-0033
HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok
condition. Heats up to
180 sq. ft. area. $10
(352) 465-1616
INFANT CAR SEAT good
condition. Safety 1st co.
$20 (352) 465-1616
JOHN DEERE TRAVEL-
ING SPRINKLER- cast
metal housing, follows
hose, looks Ilke a tractor,
$40, 352-628-0033
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1
1 0/15ct $8/Ib. delly '
(772)781-1262
LOVESEAT Dual reclin-
Ing. Belge with brown and
blue design $100.
628-6396
REMINGTON 10FT.
ELECTRIC POLE CHAIN
SAW- had or ax uatable


SEWING MACHINE Ken-
more 1760 Zig Zag Pine
Cab, 24threaded bob-
bins, buttonholer,30 pat-
tern cams. $85 382-4873
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE Newlwas 59.95
selling for 20.00 Linda
341-4449
SOFA TABLE
$10.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal Head-
board, $30
(352)465-1616
VACUUM CLEANER Eu-
reka!, needs some
repair. Bi a uum with


Vinyl D50 b 6pa Win-
dow, white 32x53 $25
(712) 251-6603
WATER SOFTENER
Do not Need
Was Just Disconnected
$250
W 1(5E 38u2s14ze
flotat602n ty6 6$100.



I

GO GO Elite Scooter
used once, paid
$750+tax, will sell for
$550 no tax, must see
(352) 726-2695
PRIDE SCOOTER Never
used.
Brand new condition.
Pnas:OnginaC-$284-Sell
$1000. call: Joe
352-341-6269




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" BLEM ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR WI
GIGBAG, TUNER,
STRINGS, STRAPETC
$45 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLEM ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR WIGIGBAG,
STRAP, ETC PLAYS

3 2 6316255
M'N1E MITCOH
WITUNER, STRAP.
STRINGS,ETC $90
352-601-6625
DRUM SET Minus Toms,
Sabian symbols, Zilgan
symbols, $99.
352-563-0166


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


with 4 chairs, white
$100 (352) 382-4891
Master Bedroom Set,
king bd. w/ mattress 2
night stands, 2 lamps, 2
db| dressers. Matching

Full Bed 4o Set, w/

mBryl tri ea dr s erd
Irg. mirror, 1 night stand
$500. (352) 563-6327
Mattress, Box spring


$40e0 (32 n8-891
Moving Sale
Lots of furniture and
misc.
(352) 344-2903
(352) 860-1768
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS
Queen mattress and
boxspring$40.00 Call
352-586-1970
RATTAN ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER great
shape natural finish $75.
call 352-257-3870
Sofa and Love Seat
LIKE NEW! $450
(352)344-5734
Sofa multi colored,
large $100
(352) 382-4891
Teal Wicker Set, love
seat, 2 chairs, coffee
table. Flowered cush-
ions, like new $195. obo
King Mattress & spring
box $175. obo
(352)302-9507




CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRACTOR- Model
LT2000. 42-inch cut w
Briggs/Stratton 18hp 1/C
OHV motor Mowing
deck, motor in excel-



anytime after 11 a.m.
John Deere 1998 F935
Model, 72" cut, 3 cyl
Yanmar Diesel en .
Ready for work $4,800
Heavy Duty commer-
cial (352) 422-3015
MTD Riding Mower
38 Deck, .
brand new condition

(352) 746-7357
Murry Riding Mowin
12 HP40 in. cut $3000
Firm, MTD High
wheeled push mower
5hp 22in cut $80 firm
(352) 302-6069
Riding Mower Tractor
Like5N2w Aens mo I

Mulc~hr Cs $01,400
(352) 422-0139


I :
BEVERLY HILLS

Hsel ros, co urntmure
3549 N. Tamarisk Ave.

BIG SALE

Fri, & a a tV 2m
Antiques, collectible
glass & pottery,
jewlry, coins, tools
& More behind
Olive Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
4451 N Tallahas Rd
Fri Sun 8a-2p.
CRYSTAL RIVER
4531 N Mitchum Pt.
SAT. 8a-4p Furniture,
Womens size 2-4, xmas,
much misc, Turkey Oak
to Holiday to Gum
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & SM. 8lam-3pm
39Mult cFamily Sale~e
off Ft. Isl. Trail, &m Geerr
Leaf F et
CRYSIAor RVER
Multi Family. Sat only
7a-3p. 6125 W Wood-
side Cir, Connell Hgts.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat 8a-3p. 8758 W
Orange Tree St
DUNNELLON
Multi Family Sale
Sat.It21 8am-4pm,
boxspring
mma ressbe dframe,
TV & ent. centepro.
Trunks. '
Something
for everyone
Corner of Hwy
328 & Hwy 41


MOVING SALE! All Con-
tets of home, make
offer Fri -Sun~a-3p,
5273 SW 196th Ave
or call465-7000
HOMOSASSA -
W2ALDEa o OrODa h

M7VN l3 SAT &SUN
7121-229a 3m
HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET


IlNVERI ESS


972 N. Christy Way



INVERNESS CLUB
Sat. 2sit, t0am-2pm

& Rummage Sale
Inside ALL Buildings &

SENIOR APTS
25 Tables set up to
Sell Hand made
Crafts, Jewlry, and
Rummage Items
518 ELLA AVE
Behind Inverness
Middle School
4444444444

Rainbow SpringS
Sat. 7/21, 8a-2p,
4-drawer file cab.,
should items,
garden tools.
19031 SW 98th Loop
Sugarmill Woods
Estate Sale Sat. 9a-3p
Furn., tools, TVs, hsehld
Items, plants
22 Wild Olive Ct
Wanted Hunting Equip ,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944





LA NS LENOS, P TS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS $25
352-613-0529




!!!!!!!!215/65 R17!!!!!!!!
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
!!!!!!!245/65 R17!!!!!!!
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****225/70 R16*****
Good tread! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)586-5485
2 FOUR WHEEL WALK-
ERS WI H SEATS- I ld
brakes & 3okEx. $50

2 RED ROD IRON
PORCH CHAIRS 45.00
9Bevel 19- 6s6

3 ceiling Fans White,
w/out lights $35 ea.

ad35G2) 21 OCIC

TIONER Excellent condl-
tlon 100.00/OBO IlNDA
341-4449
2" FAUX WOOD WHITE
BLINDS Like New sev-
eral sizes 8 total for
$100.00 352-382-4911
40" Lawn Aerator $50
Shop-vac 16 gallon 6.5
hp $50
(352) 726-3878
AlWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & 2
SPEAKERS $100
352-613-0529
Antique Solid Oak
Side Table $140
Samsung Digital Home
Theater Surround Sound
$60. (352) 341-5978
BATHROOM VANITY
White 2 door vanity,
countertop, sink and
hardware. $70.

BOA3 ANIOR UILITY
TRAILER DOLLIE- Dual
wheels, 4 air tires, must
see, Ex., $50
352-628-0033
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,$25
(352) 465-1616
BREADMAKER Oster
company, white color, ex-
celle~n clo~nl6io.$25

CLOTH NGSM I S,
SHORTS & SHIRTS $25
352-613-0529
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
INCLUDES SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $50
352-613-0529


QQSaQ



Tell that special
perSOn
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
NOteS.
Only $28.50
includes a photo



352-563-5966
QAAAAAAAA




Bring your fishing
pole!


Single Wide 2-3 bdrm 2
bath, nice quiet neigh-
borhood, Ig. yard
w/fence, semi-furnished,
no pets, bkgd chk.
$550/mo. 1st &sec.
(352) 419-5603
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $485 mo
352-422-1932
HOMOSASSA
3/2, D/W, 2 AC, $650.
ist Ist sec 207-651-0923
Homosassa 3/2/1
CH/A, V/2 Acre, $425.mo
212-2051 or 220-2447
INVERNESS
Brigyu fish polel
55 prq on bke Fur-

nw/ceta 6A4C6 e

LECANTO
2/1, Seniors Welcome
(352) 628-2312
YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Furn.,



(407) 579-6123
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre Addition

$525ao or35 -68D5 4




BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home In new
coondio with 2 x 6
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807


For SaleffVnd
Inverness 3 bedroom. 2

28ax0Hm Or veN d In
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
In 12 x28 Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens In 18'x12 Lanal,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247


INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
on your lot, .
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C

35 61 981


Palm Harbor Village

D uwbls Snd ess

80 62 2 232 ml 21


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from

bu Ivny r hDails
352-621-9183


YES!
New 312 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.441mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C'
come & View
352-621-9182






Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. Ia-
nai, shed f/1/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077






HERNANDO
2/2 Dbl. wide, great cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29,900.
(813)240-7925








HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition,
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244


HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217





Lee k
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER

ItSUMVE SE IAL it
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161





OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, watersewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
clous lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
JUSt $582. a

mo.








AURORA

ARESa
Rv community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


AAAAAAAA ftf
Tell that special
perSOn
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
NOteS.
Onl $28.50
inclu es a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Ar a
Condition or situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom /2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916




32MAmTSE .viable

c mae $500 ds l

AVAILABLE SOON
352-212-4504, 212-1258
8 month old female
Gredt Pyren es Puppy
up t a o
shots AC p64 ed


BOMBAY CATS 3 yr old
Bombay sisters, beauti-
ful sweet girls. Up to

sp yd, wom ond lea
treated. 1/2 price in July
- $17.50! Id's 16650822
and 16651569 Citrus
Cty Animal Shelter, 352
746 8400, Tues-Sat
10-5pm
Cute Chihuahual
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 628-2483
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Female Yorkie-Poo
20 wks, 4 lbs,
initial shots, cage, etc.

(352) 734560.7815
MaltiPoo
Teacups, 2 male $500,
I female $550
8 weeks, Fluffy and
Adorable, have Ist
shots (352)794-3081
Red Nose Pit Bulll
Puppies 6 wks old,
de-wormed, 1st shots
done fema es $200 ea.
352-364-1838, 212-9369
Rottweiler Pups 1 male
($700), 5 Female ($850)
Pure German AKC
7wks 352-302-3735
SHIH-TZU MIX Young FE
good natured, smart. Up
to date shots. Can t keep.
$250. (352) 563-1265


55+ par on laew/5
piers, clubhouse and
much morel Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water.
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rosella Court Rentals of
N. Turkey Oak Dr. 2&3
BR mobiles $45/month

pes. sd ~1 9e .ese 1

FLORAL CITY
Small 2/1, Includes All
Appl's ideal for singles
or couples, $400/mo
wilyr lease
352-560-7837

OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, watersewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
clous lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
JUSt $582 a

MO.








AURORA

MA RES
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
Psl ame slr
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777



Paintn nie Out



Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570



Free Es.(352)Es.949-2292




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
A GREAT RATEs A
352-503-7800, 476-3820
MAID TO ORDER
It House Cleaning A
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel


R E / niio~m~m.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






The TI Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap.Lic/Ins.#2441.


ALL OF CITRUS
CEeANthUi Cr rAN OU S
352-628-6790






30 rsEx Exc. Ref. 1 s
yr352-464-1397 n.
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting

5eds OE.&Is RE

& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Pi PI ARD'S P esisnure

352- 41-3300





Feely P r A 2 ue
GIA Diamond Graduate
GIA Equipment, Lic.,lns.
Fast, Dependable
352-266-6884 or
Tscudder@gcon.me


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp Ilc2875.
all your drywall needs
Selling &Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

AeNNIE' E ECR

EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '781 Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A STAR COMPANY

GAll TypENS FrENCING
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING






ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881


ALUMINUM

5" & T"SemeUCsREGutt ers
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977





Andrew JoehI
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.




Affordable Handvman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
r/FAST 100% Guarr
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
A 352-257-9508 A

AffordabL Can~dvmarn

Many Fix It Repairs
s/FAST 100% Guarr.
AFFORDABLE
r/RELIABLE* Free Est
A 352-257-9508 A

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
VFAST 100% Guarr.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
Ar 352-257-9508 A

A t Le otdrn to
Many Fix It Repairs
r/FAST 100% Guarr.
AFFORDABLE
r/RELIABLE* Free Est
A 352-257-9508 I


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visal MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST


352 R2-55, 4-3730




BIANCHI CONCRETE



IStain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-21201410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Licilns 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
te o ts Trado work,

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBCO57405, 427-5775



Enn
All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licilns 352-795-5755


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955







Sie RBp PrieE n k




Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120





JUSTIN LAWN CARE
HeL .e &dr~e~e rim ing

Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570

ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848or 634-0554





A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT. LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Licilns.





Attention consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
lieude uberr in a
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
yciu maan ube cconrtact-
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service

ta vie aro n oo
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SODI SODI SODI
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452

STEE EVC


Free Est. (352)302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881





SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia
Incontinency No Prob .
(SL 6906450) 503-7052

LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
NCodk, (le~an2 9D~a yl




1 ,

SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


~ ~91P~~~s;gg~









SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 C11




WORDYGURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE

1. Omit a five-digit mail code (1) Every answer is a rhyming
II I Ipair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Those people's risky challenge (1) they will fit in the letter
III I Isquares. The number after the
definition tells yon how man
3. Horse house billiards furniture (2) syllables in each word.

I I II I ll I I 92012 UFSDist.by UnivUclicfor UFS
4. Select high heels or loafers (1)


5. Bother Fred Flintstone's pal Barney (2)


6. Great Gretzky's coils of yarn (1)


7. Actor Sutherland's concise info providers (2)


SBB68lII Sausly*' L SNISHS SBNAVTM 'S 888[118 BBn308'9
SBOHS BSOOHD' 878I 8TH7 THIS 'E SHYT(IBISHI'Z dlZ dlHS '1
7.21-12 S~IMSMSNV


INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@5 $001.oaeda dirta
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964


Sugarmill Woods
Rent Special for 2/2
Upscale House In a quiet
area. Call for Details
(352) 564-0314




Commercial

For eut lcnaedIn
Rooks Industrna Park

Interior Is light, bright,

m o co d. r vehad

parking lot, perfect for
busin ess o stoxage


Call (352) 628-4066




Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




CITRUS HILLS
2/2V/2, Car Port $825
mo. (352) 613-5655




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Wato' FsFh Cmp





CRYSTAL RIVER
1,& 2 BR. Furn./Unfun.
Like New, 352-302-1370
Crystal River
3/2/2 Spacious, New
kitchen, appliances incl.
$850/mo. no util. stone-
housecountry
@gmall.com
(352) 302-7488
INVERNESS
country Living n lar e

home. Garden area
fenced area. Well &



2 master bedrooms!
Ig garage, updated, SS
appl., $875/Mo.
352-302-4057




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. Incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
FLORAL CITY
Share a home w/ 5
acres, non-smoker,
non-drinker, $700
month Available Aug. 1
(352) 726-4049


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Wso's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. Ia-
nai, shed f/1/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077
. :


CRYSTAL RIVER
Bdrm w/priv bth, furn



dep 794-3295/209-5012

Sha el myhAom V8E5wk.
includes elect, sat dish
352-563-1465/212-1960




Beverly Hills
1/1/1 $29,500
(352) 270-7420
Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2, 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K3dwn 89N5 mo.



UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BE17ER
MITHA PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
Cro S2)d7 4nc -
mmmimilmanually In


2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2 Carport washed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,

R cn~tly Rmodel
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/lellc ve

dbl lot. $700. rent. 1st Ist
sec. 813 908-5550


I BUY RV'S'
Travel Trailers,

Call Me 352-201-6945




Ford 4 speed
Transmission

$1w0G32n)n38G r661
PONTIAC GTO '05
Rare, Red! 6.0 V8, 6 sp,



mh e ie. Cr i


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID -$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$

VEY 8VE1R !

Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO TALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
It Low Payments It
Financing For AU.


BUying Of Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,

ER35KE Realy nc.
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


CIASSIFIEDS





OWN TODAY!







NO FEcT TC E~cE -
Home, ,erseer,
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
ciu lt wit your


COI UNI is
I eaeadu ful28 acres
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
JUSt $582 a

MO*








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood








'FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists











Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation



2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FTSCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
C5ALL DE3B8%




SUGARMILL WOODS.
BUILDING LOT
IN OAK VILLAGE
$20K Firm
352- 726-9587
352-228-0357




Evinrude
2 Propellers, 70hp, 1
re-built, 1 used both $50
(352) 726-9708




20 ft Hydra Sports
CC, 150hp Yamaha Salt-
water serie I w/traller

(352) 634-1140

16 A UAINN 99
352-563-0166
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at SUcEEdL
2003@Hotmail.com
Gheenoe
13.5 ft on trailer wl5hp 4
stroke eng., swivel seats,
elec. troller wlacc., mint
cond. $1700
(352) 489-8271
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For

Ponon nDe k& tis h-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Kayak Current Design
Fiberglass, 13 ft


PONTOON
20~ with trailer, 60hp
Johnson Nice and
clean $3,200
(352) 726-6197




1994 ALLEGRO BAY
32ft MH, 47K miles,,
generator, 2 AC s, 2
new batteries, on BR
sleeps 5, TV, excel.
cond. Can be seen at
Dan s Clam Stand
Hwy 44 Crystal River,
Ask for Dan $8,500 obo
(352) 302-8561
Club Car
2007 EXC. COND.
$2500 neg. Blue





31. Lep ach un 40 smi-

(352) 447-0968


REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113,Liln.
SUNNYBROOK '05
3k6g Ik wheel, 2 ldmes
serv. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298




R-Viso B+ LE
Oh4e mint cnditioe
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
mary e tas. Getly

Call (352) 419-6825


DODGE GND

2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6, 150k miles


(352) 527-3894
FORD
1996, E250, 95K org. mi.
new tune up, new feul
pump, roof rack and
fact. shelveing $2,800
(352) 726-2907



I~ i .


Classlfreds


Road Kin blak ,20ts of
chrome, senior owned
15k miles, gar.kept

(30 0449810
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men s ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
rnileis, welc rnant. alil

$10,900 (352) 697-2760


CITRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


Honda
'06, Silver Wing, 600CC,
26K mi.,Taller wind-
shield, rear carrier case
$4,000 (3D2A 489-)2457

750 Shadow. WS, pipes,
SB, Rack, Cbars, extra
clean 8200 ml., $3,850
(352) 860-1106, Bob
SUNL SCOOTER 07
150 cc, red, looks &
runs great, rejet carb,
$295. UNtitlable, Grt for
farm, long drway, priv
rds. 637-6046
SUZUKI
'09, S40, 652CC, with
706 mile3,w extras

(352) 795-0150


NO CREDIT CHECKS
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, watersewer,
























hw.irrouse & oolRenlax co


c93 lous lotn wit your ...8
famil are ndol friends. ....I

MUYSTA SIEE

COMMUNTY s
locate WGonl 28. acres .97

ohaakttewr ss erd
gazeb. oso D. Your NEW ...87

h/. Wousei oremoeld

22 to cal irot HOME AG.s!




moR $5. NerT






CRSAC RIES
RV 21 Comull nity d
11240 N Nohwooder b

auroraesflv $com o





RENIAL EMETr

(352-795-7368


ww.itrsxontye omRenal stcom



BEVERLY HILLS/CTUSRNS





CRYSTAL RIVER
1146 Nl i. inictt d P.....$1200



2/2/ 1 newr hme $
32/2/2 Canalside0lanai





CYTLRIVER REC

215 BR$5. ,ie Near Twn
348352-756-9857


Lg. 2/1 full furishbed,
sc h r n 2 ty 6 92 0 o .


LAEFON 1 Bedrm.


Thi *ntto is a

Alexander eal stte

Crystl Rier Ats




BEVE RLHILLRS

Ktchn CAll Utiitesc-
ble included $525mo.

C RYSTAL RosIVER a






APARTMENG T 59



ApplicaWtions a
Over 62 or RDisbe o
with Powr withot Rd
ch 30 ilden



eqapot~unit HOSN




provder Hand







Talou ClallHome!

7et o dt d

WellRI andA ts

H DRECION: t


ro f,7 mint trr glaen
Auto ck. $5950.
257-4251, 352-794-6069
Chevrolet
2000 Lumina
excellent cond. $2,500

(352) 726-3703
Chevrolet
'83 Monte Carlo V-6
body off re-build $2500
(352) 400-2020
DODGE
'89, Colt, Mitsubishi
engine, 110K mi.,
5 spd. runs great
REDUCED TO $1,000
352-563-0166
FORD
2008sTau~ru Se gingmy
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18



$13,495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326
JAGUAR
1987 XJ6
$2000 OBO
KEVIN
352-634-4207
LINCOLN
'00, Towncar, signature
series, w/ all opt., white
tan leather uphol.
$4,999. (352) 527-3151
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 72,000 ml. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$4,800 (352) 860-1106,
MERCURY SABLE GS
78K mi, Xtra clean, 6
cyl, Cold A/C, Sedan
$3500. 352-257-4251
cell or 352-794-6069 off
MUSTANG
1995 GT 5.0 HO 69K
miles. Cool Air, elec
win~dows,sea Bmirmors.
Interior. $4,500 OBO
352-628-3485

VERY! VERY!
A IGSL!A
Consignment USA
consignmentusa.orq
BE -O LTA L
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Sr Low Payments* S
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




'65 GTO
BI, 454, mint cond.,
$24K OBO. 302-8265
'66 Nova
custom, 327, mint,
$28K OBO
(352) 302-8265
CHEVROLET
'77, Corvette, numbers
matching, 350 4 spd.,
restored, eel cmoand.

receipts, same owner
last 17 yrs. asking
$16,500 352- 560-7377
FORD
1931, Model A, restored
in Arizona, 5 window
deluxe coupe, rumble
seat, leather seats
23,195 miles $17,500.
(352) 628-1734




CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pk excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent

6 7-2 8r9 4-2798









TOYOTA TOCOMA
'07, $8,995, Incld. warr
Fin. avail. bad credit ok
352-322-1299 the
lastf ro ntie rautos .com

VERY! VERY -
A BIG SALE! A
Co sinm taUSA

BE DO ITANL
C RTR CKBO TRV


461-4518 & 795-4440




SUZUKI
2007 XL-7 SUV
Lots of room for the kids
and the toys and priced
to move stock #H75400

352-628-4600


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857


RV Resr E ATEu*
SALE: RV site, 5th
wheel RV with slides,
gated storage lot, golf
cart, fishing equipment,
patio furniture, tools,
etc.
www.delailsbyownerscomfor
pic res5 5441 in

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE* -




gal to advertise "any
preference, Ilmitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, famillal
status or national origin,
or an Intention, to make
such preference, Ilmital
t onm r Idiscriminatin "
hallda dauesr tnhc us
cof dren unde te age
en 18r lel glcuhstpoadr-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which Is
In violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
Informed that all
dwelling advertised
anytai b wpaer Tare
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tlon cal HUD 1ol-free at

toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing Impaired Is
1-800-927-9275 -



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Secializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





OPEN HOUSE
Sat. July 21, I la-3 m
2/2/1 w/ Bonus Room
1747 sfuneAC
Completely updated
Like New
820 W. Sunset strip Dr.
BEVERLY HILLS
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089




2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof,
New appl s, irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must se $4259-,5 firm
ATTENTION INVES-
TORS! $525/mo cash







HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 cargarage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm
newr eoo g Hso
nihborhood. Reduced
fo qulck sale at $49,900
S rosm Inus.


3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 26E Ohom es parting

55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
la55+ park. bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


1310-0726 CRN
Hamer Sell, Kenneth Notice to Cred. (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2012-CP-0275
IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH HAMER SELL
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary Administration)
TO: ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notilled that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of KENNETH HAMER SELL, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-0275 by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 N. Apopkta Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent s date of death was
February 3, 2012; that the total value of the estate is less than $75,000.00 and that
the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order is:
NAME & ADDRESS
JANICE MARIE SELL SHIRLEY A. WEEKLY
5959 Vance Point 1207 Russell Rd.
Hernando, FL 34442 Tecumseh, MI 49286
MITCHELL SELL, SR. KAfHRYN JEAN SELL
5816 S. Occidental Rd. Strandweg 2-A
Tecumseh, MI 49286-9405 23570 Travenunde, Germany
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this Notice to Creditors (Summary Administration)
is July 21, 2012.

Persons Giving Notice:
JANICE MARIE SELL
SHIRLEY A. WEEKLY
MITCHELL SELL SR.
KAfHRYN JEAN SELL

Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
SUSAN COHILL FOGARTY, ESQUIRE
408 Lakte St.
P.o. Box 715
Inverness, FL 34451-0715
Florida Bar No. 667706

e-MiA dres:2 63 ac garty~gmail.com
July 21 & 28, 2012


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term

See allr trarentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 1/1 cor-
ner lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Room, C/HIA
$675 1st mo. FREE
(352) 422-7794
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
A Nice 3/2/2, close to
schools $800. mo.+ sec.
(352) 628-0731
CITRUS SPRINGs
Newer 3/2/2, tile flts,
nice area, across rails
to trails $845. mo. No
pets (352) 598-0235
CR/HOM., 3/2/1
RC Elem., CHA, $575.
212-2051 or 220-2447

CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath
Beautiful, Quaint home
on dee water Canal
wih Dock and storage.
Out door glassed In
Room and Screened
porch on a large lot.
Redone 1960 s Cottage
with separate
washer-dryer room and
bathroom with shower.
A Fishing and Boating
Paradise on NW 18th
St. Call 352-794-6716
le e m nsaet h O.o






Crystal River, 2/1,
2D2u- 05xl o024 7
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743

3B NBVEiRNE7SSmo
900 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell




CRYSTAL RIVER
56 1,mApt.1 ds rfo
Dock. water, trash.
No pets. (352) 563-5004
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Furnished Prime
area, updated, wood
floors, dock, paid $445K
Le t f00 ina.Ult .
352-634-0101


2305-0728 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-208 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX
DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN GERRITS CITRUS
INC
The holder of the following
certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be
issued thereon The certifi-
cate number and year of is-
suance, the description of
the property, and the names
in which it was assessed
are as follows
CERTIFICATE NO
10-0732 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY
SHAMROCK ACRES OF
CRYSTAL RIVER PHASE 1
UNREC SUB LOT 18 DESC
AS COM AT SW COR OF







F 22 N Aicunder
tious Name law, pursuant
atu eedion 865.09, Florida
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-
ness under the fictitious
name of Janitorial One lo-
cated at 28 N. Desoto St.,

thev yountl sofLCitr 5 i
tends to register the said
name with the division of

Deatetof St ty Tl

Florida this 17th say of
July, 2012.
P simual Ram~sey20wner
224-0721 CHRSA
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under
F i c i -
tious Name law, pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida
Statues.
tNhTC IS eunRsB eGIVdEeN
siring to engage in busi-


SE 1/4 OF SEC 4-18-17 TH
N 89DEG 13M E AL S LN
OF SD SEC 4 6818 FT TH
N 24DEG 15M 54S E
144 78 FT TH N 65DEG
44M 08S W 50 FT THN
24DEG 15M 54S E 1463 22
FT TH N 45DEG 06M 56S
W 2530 66 FT TO POB TH
CONT N 45DEG 06M 56S
W 302 63 FT TO A PT
THAT IS 50 FT FROM
MEASURED AT A RIGHT
ANGLE TO W LN OF E 1/2
OF NW 1/4 OF SD SEC 4
TH N ODEG 51M 41S W
PAR TO SD W LN 39 03 FT
TH N 44DEG 53M 04S E
63276 FT TO A PT THAT
IS 50 FT FROM MEAS-
URED AT A RIGHT ANGLE
OT SW'LY R/W LN OF FLA
POWER CORP POWER LN
TH S 45DEG 06M 56S E
PAR TO SD R/W LN 330 58
FT TH S 44DEG 53M 04S
W 660 FT TO POB SUB TO








Florida in the County of
Cit~rusa i tendseto chgistth
division of Corporations of
Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Dated at Citrus County,
Florida this 12th say of
isBe~v rl Backthoff,
Owner
Published July 21, 2012


F i t2 2N e under
tious Name law, pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida
NT CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-
ness under the fictitious
name of Thomas Lawn
Service located at 8527
Briarpatch Avenue Crys-
tal River, Florida in the
Coont goef Ciru intends
with the division of Cor-


15 FT EASE AL EACH
SIDE AND REAR LT LN
FOR DRAINAGE R/W DESC
IN OR BK 1388 PG 1141 TI-
TLE OR BK 2000 PG 424
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED
THE AFFORDABLE HOME
COMPANY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus. State of
Florida
Unless such certificate shall
be redeemed according to
law, the property described
in such certificate shall be
sold to the highest bidder
on line, on August 8, 2012
at 9 30 AM at www
citrus realtaxdeed com
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Citrus County. Florida
By Bonnie C Tenney.
Deputy Clerk
July 7,14,21,28 2012








Florida this 13th say of
isu h2d homas, Owner
Published July 21, 2012

226-0721 CHRSA
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under

tkouSe tome8 5aw 9 oda
Statues.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN



Counselor located at 353
W Cobblestone Loop Her-
nn O Flo rias in te
to register the said name
with the division of Cor-
porations of Florida De-
partment of State, Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Dated at Citrus County,
Florida this 13th say of
iaggD, 20F. Griffis, Owner
Published July 21, 2012







~n


1


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1


2012 RAM 1500 2012 RAM 3500


.4 1 ill 31~


012 sATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


1


::13 Y~~: :I:(:CI :1 I:Il,'i ~4~Yi~~llillll:l:: II1~11 11::1 C
1


1


1


::13Y~1~: :I:(:CI :II :ll,'i ~Yi~~~rlllll:l: :I
1


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'Pip~DO -/ Jeep


1005 South Sunceast Blvd. Haonisassa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


*PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC ^LEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39,000 MILES FOR
THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WAC +0% AVAILABLE ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS FOR A LIMITED TIME WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES IWLY RESTRICT STOCK.


S3 3, 74 9b *O/ 0% "?".4


*1 7,91 SRST 0 REOR.


D
D


I


CRYSTAL


g .....


2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453





CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012 C13


~t ~


I"


Jr,
_i


With $2,999
Doe AtSigin g3


*Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. $2,999 down, cash or trade equity. Excludes tax, tag, title, Dealer Fee of $599.50. Lease is 24 months, 24,000 miles. $0 15 per mile over. With approved
credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior Sales may restrict stock.


THIE ALLNEWIVV2013NFISSANU
A~LTI M A


OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!
WE CHANGED EVERYTHING EXCEPT THE NAME


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CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


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352-563-6363

WWW.ChfOnicleOnline.com


G2 Saturday, July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


I want to take this opportunity to
welcome you back as we begin the
2012-2013 school year. I can't wait
until all of you return
from the summer and
we officially start the -
year! Make sure '.
you're well rested and
eager to hit the ground
running as we continue
to provide opportuni-
ties and make the con- .
nections necessary for
high achievement in
the coming year and
success in the future.
While we have made
progress in many areas
and have received state Sandra
recognition, there is
Still much work to be done to ensure
all of our students are successful in


whatever they choose to do upon grad-
uation. Parents, please know that I
deeply appreciate and value the role
you play in your
child's education. I
urge you to stay in-
volved each year of
his/her school career to
ensure the greatest pos-
sible success.
I want you to know
how honored and ex-
cited I am to continue
to serve each of you as
your Superintendent of
Schools. No matter
Where I go and no mat-
ter whom I meet across
m" Himmel the state, I always take
time to share the won-
derful things that are happening in our
schools with the support of our entire


community. Thank you for allowing
me to serve you in this role.
As always, I look forward to seeing
all of our returning school family as
well as meeting each of you who are
just beginning your partnership with
us. Don't hesitate to stop me as you
see me at school events or in the com-
munity or drop me a line to let me
know your thoughts. Together, we can
make sure that great things are going
to continue to happen within our Citrus
County Schools ... Where Learning is
the Expectation and Caring is a Com-
mitment!





Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent of Schools


"San


AK MELcm bac 1.de


What's Inside

School Board members/meetings ................................................Pg 3
Meet your teacherlorientation dates ..............................................Pg 4
2012-2013 school calendar..................................................Pg 5
G uidance counsel rs ...........................................................Pg 6
Health services ................................................................P g 7
School meal information .......................................................Pg 8
Administrative staff directory ..................................................Pg 10
Public school di rector y.................................................... Pag 1
Private sc hool directory .......................................................Pg 12
Become a school volunteer ....................................................Pg 12
School transportation services .................................................Pg 14
Back to school information ....................................................Pg 15
Establishing a school bus stop .................................................Pg 15
Transportation request form ...................................................Pg 16
Student dre ss code ..........................................................Pg 1 7
Strategic Planning Framework/Mission ..........................................Pg 17
Attendance policy ............................................................Pg 18
Ph ysicals ....................................................................P g 1 8
2012-2013 adult education schedule.........................................Pg 21
School Resource Officer program............................................Pg 22
School Advisory Enhancement Council ...........................................Pg 22
General contact information ....................................................Pg 22
Gene~raleFnadce D................... r ie e3
WTI extend Dycaesrie ..................................................





Saturday July 21, 2012 63


Citrus

County

School

Board

~~e~b r

2012-2013


BACK TO SCHOOL


After Sdsool

Marrtarl Alrt Pro rans
Let your child enjoy a CONSTRUCTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO DAYCARE
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(wHEN~~ sc00S IfnSportation from area schools
Full-day program on most school holidays
* Martial arts class after school and nights classes included in weekly fee
* Students learn discipline, respect, exercise, manners & self-defense while earning belt ranks





*MARTIAL ARTS 81 FITITESS, LLC
3 52-34 I 04 96
312 S Kensington Ave., Lecanto, FL 34461


Virginia "Ginger"
Bryant, Vice Chairman


352-476-4031
District 1


352-795-2053
District 2


TRA


Pat Deutschman Bill Murray


Linda B. Powers,
Chairman


352-344-3463
DistrictS


352-382-0731


352-726-6938


District 4


Citrus County School

Board meetings


The Citrus County School Board
meets at 3 p.m. the second Tuesday of
each month and additional special meet-
ings/workshops as needed. For more in-
formation please call 726-1931, ext.
2206 or log on to www.citrus.kl2.fl.us
and click on the "School Board" link to
view meeting agendas and minutes.


Citrus County School Board
(District Services Center)
1007 W. Main Street,
Inverness, 34450
352-726-1931
WWW.citrus.kl2.fl.us


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G4 Saturday, July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Forest Ridge Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Pre-K through 5th grade
Friday, Aug. 3 4 6 p.m.

Hernando Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3 4 p.m
1st through 5th 4 6 p.m.

Homosassa Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3 4 6 p.m.

Inverness Primary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3 4 6 p.m.

Lecanto Primary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3:30 p.m. sharp
1st through 5th
4:30 6:30 p.m.


Pleasant Grove Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3
New to PGE 3:30 4 p.m.
All others 4 6 p.m.

Rock Crusher Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3 4:30 6:30 p.m.



Middle Schools

Citrus Springs Middle
Meet your Teacher/Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6 3 5:30 p.m.

Crystal River Middle
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6
2:30 5:30 p.m.

Inverness Middle
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6 3 6 p.m.


Lecanto Middle
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6 3 6 p.m.



H ig h Schools

Citrus High
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Tuesd ay, Aug 7
9 a.m. Noon FRESHMAN only
Fall Open House:
Tuesday, Aug. 21
6 p.m. 7 p.m.
Informational session at
5:30 p.m. for anyone pursuing
AP courses.

Crystal River High
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6
5:30 7 p.m. FRESHMEN only


Lecanto High
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Tuesday, Aug. 7 FRESHMEN
and new students only
8 11:30 a.m.


Other Schools

Academy of
Environmental Science
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Thursday, Aug. 2
4 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Lecanto Campus

CREST
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6
2 6 p.m.

Renaissance Center
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Monday, Aug. 6
3 6 p.m.


Meet your teacher and orientation dates announced


Elementary

Central Ridge Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3 4:30 6:30 p.m.

Citrus Springs Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Pre-K through 5th grade
Friday, Aug. 3 4 6 p.m.

Crystal River Primary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3
Pre-K and Kindergarten
3 p.m. meet in the cafeteria
1st 5th grades 4 -6 p.m.

Floral City Elementary
Meet your Teacher / Orientation
Friday, Aug. 3
Pre-K, Kindergarten and
New Students 9:30 10 a.m.
Meet your Teacher Pre-K 5th
10 a.m. noon







Saturday July 21, 2012 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


2012 2013 Citrus County School

District Calendar


August
Aug. 1 Professional Development Day
Aug. 2-7 Teacher Workdays
Aug. 8 First Day of School

September
Sept. 3 Labor Day
Sept. 28 High School Professional Development Day /
Parent Conference Elementary and Middle Student Holiday

October
Oct. 11-12 Exam Days No Early Release / End of Reporting
Oct. 15 Teacher Workday

November
Nov. 12 Veterans Day Observed
Nov. 19-23 Thanksgiving Holiday

December
Dec. 20-21 Early Dismissal for Exams / Teachers Workday End of Reporting
Dec. 24-31 Christmas Vacation

January
Jan. 1-2 Christmas Vacation
Jan. 3 Professional Development Day
Jan. 4 Teacher Workday
Jan. 7 Students Return to School
Jan. 21 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

February
Feb. 18 President's Day

March
March 7-8 Early Dismissal for Exams / Teacher Workday End of Reporting
March 25-29 Spring Break

April
April 1 Easter Monday

May
May 16 CREST Graduation
May 17 Last Day for Seniors
May 20 WTI Graduation
May 21 Crystal River High School Graduation
May 22 Citrus High School Graduation
May 23 Lecanto High School Graduation
May 22-23 Early Dismissal for Exams / Teacher Workday End of Reporting
May 23 Last Day of School
May 24 Teacher Workday
May 27 Memorial Day


-






































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G6 Saturday, July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Elementary Schools
Central Ridge Elementary ..........._..........................Lois Campbell
Citrus Springs Elementary ......................................Holl Becker
Crystal River Primary. .............................................Terry Cates
Floral City Elementary ........._ ...............................Julie Keiper
Forest Ridge Elementary ........................................Mri Brown
Hernando Elementary ............................................ua Bailey
Homosassa Primary ............................................er Harmon
Inverness Primary............................................Din Buie
Leca nto Primary ........._.._.............._.................._...........Con i Young
Pleasant Grove Elementary ....................................Linda Braden
Rock Crusher Elementary ........._.._.............._............Beth Noland

Middle Schools
Citrus Springs Middle........................Teresa Pettit, Tracie Stokes
Crystal River Middle..........................Debra Kidd, Claudia McCoy
Inverness Middle ................Connie Hooker, Stephanie Skoblicki,
.........................Sherina.. Anderson
Lecanto Middle ......................................Patt Martin, Diane Head


High Schools
Citrus High ............Trudee Lightbody, Cali McClain, Roy Swihart,
..........._................._..........Kristin Johnson, Thurman "Butch" Keiper

Crystal River High........................Jamie Kolley, Sherry Snowden,
............................................................. i h e N elson

Lecanto High ..........Judy Clark, Shedrick Staley, Stacey Swihart,
.................... ................. ................. .....Beth Evans, William Bond

Other Schools
Renaissance Center ..............................................ioh Hall

Withlacoochee Technical Inst. ........................Lucinda Chandler,
..............................................Ryan Naugle, Sandra Van Dervort

CREST....................... ........._...... ........._...... .......Stephanie Mihalic


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Saturday July 21, 2012 G7


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


Medication Policy
The appropriate Citrus
County Public Schools' per-
sonnel will be authorized to
assist the students) mn the
administration of prescrip-
tion medication according to
the Florida Statute 1006.062.
Over the counter, OTC, med-
ication will be handled in the
same manner as prescription
medication.
All medications must be
properly labeled from the
pharmacy and in the original
container. A separate medica-
tion authorization form is re-
quired for each drug
administered. The prescrip-
tion bottle must be within the
expiration date. An adult
must bring all medication to
the school
Medicines and treatments
considered outside medical
protocols, as established by
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, such as herbal
treatments for ADD/ADHD,
caffeine pills, aloe for burns,
and meat tenderizer for bee
stings require a physician's
note.
Medications should be ad-
ministered at school only if it
is necessary to give the med-
ication during school hours,
for example, a medication
given three times a day could
be given before school, after
school, and at bedtime.
Over-the-counter medica-
tions are treated just like pre-
scriptions. It is
recommended that students
who require the use of over-
the-counter medications at
school for three consecutive
days should receive medical
attention for that health con-
dition. OTC medication may
be limited or require a physi-
cian's order.
Students shall not carry
any medications including


Tylenol, eye drops or cough
drops, etc. EXCEPT for what
is allowed by state statute:
students who are asth-
matic and use an mnhaler,
students who are highly
allergic to bee stings and/or
foods and use an epinephrine
injection (Epi-pen),
* students who are diabetic
and carry their diabetic sup-
plies,
and/or students with cys-
tic fibrosis who carry their
pancreatic enzymes.
These students are allowed
to personally carry medica-
tions/equipment at school
with the permission of their
physician and parents)
and/or legal guardian(s).
Make sure the inhaler, Epi-
pen, diabetic supplies, and/or
enzymes are labeled with the
student's name. A special
permission form (PFC 43
EDS) must be completed.

Immunizations
Parents need to provide the
school with a shot record.
These immunizations are re-
quired by Statute 1003.22
and normally include:

(iphther aP etanus/P ertus-
sis)
4 Polios (the forth one
after age 4)
3 Hepatitis B's (2 if
qualified for Hepatitis 2 dose
series)
O 2 MMRs
(Measles/Mump s/Rubella)
* 1 Varicella (chicken-
pox) for Pre-K and 5th
through 11th grades.
9 1 PCV (Pneumococ-
cal Conjugate) 1 required for
PK
2 Varicella (or date of
Chickenpox disease) for
grades KG through 4th grade
1 Booster Td
(Tetanus) is required for 7th


dren at the Health Depart-
ment regardless of family in-
come

Physicals
Students entering Kinder-
garten must provide the
school proof of a current
physical examination by a
medical doctor or by the
Health Department prior to
the first day of school. Stu-
dents entering a Florida
school for the first time also
need to present a physical
dated within the last year.
The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHS) requires
appointments for physical
examinations: The main ap-
pointment number is 527-
0247. The CCHD offers
these physical on a sliding
fee scale and will assist with
eligibility applications for


other programs such as Med-
icaid and food assistance.
Call your nearest Health
Department for more mnfor-
mation or to make an ap-
pomntment.


Registration
Requirements
Parents) and/or le al
guardian(s) of all children
entering Citrus County Pub-
lic Schools' for the first time
are required to have the fol-
lowin items to r sister:
Birth Certificate
* Certificate of Immuniza-
tion (680 card)
Physical Examination
(done within 1 year of entry
date)
Proof of Florida Resi-
dency
A Social Security Card is


/


compliance. If the temporary
card expires, the child will be
excluded from school until
the next shot is given.
Students in Kindergarten
through 12th grades are re-
quired to have the Hepatitis B
series and a Tdap Booster is
also required for the 7th grade
in addition to the initial
school entry immunizations.
No shot, no school, no kid-
ding.
All immunizations are free
of charge to school age chil-


grade entry.
680 immunization cards are
the official immunization
document required by the
State of Florida and can be
completed by the Health De-
partment, a physician's office,
or by the school nurse.
The Hepatitis B series takes
four to six months to com-
plete. If a child has not com-
pleted this series, the child
will be allowed to start school
with a valid temporary 680
card and be monitored for


Citrus Counlty public schools' health ser vices
































KUMON MATH & READING CENTERs

KUMON

3380 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. ctr. 352-726-9694
Inverness, FL. 34453 fax. 352-726-9694




JODI C. BILLINGS
Instructor/Alumnus


Bright Beginnings Preschool

A Ministry of Crystal River

United Mlethodist Church

4801 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River

795-1240











> A Structured & Loving Christian Environment
> Before and After School Program Available
> High Reach Curriculum 6 wks to 3 yrs.
> Ellm Curriculum-VPK (used in Citrus County Schools)
> Hands on Bible Curriculum
> Handwriting without Tears
> Children's Chapel
> Computers
> College Degreed and/or Fully Credentialed Staff
> Secure Facility
Brenda Stokes -Director


GS Saturday, July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County School
Board Food and Nutrition
Services announces its pol-
icy for Free and Reduced-
Price Meals for students
under the National School
Lunch and Breakfast
Programs.
Any interested person may
review a copy of the policy
by contacting the Food and
Nutrition Services Depart-


ment, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, FL 34450,
352-726-1931 or 1-800-
788-1930.
Application forms are
being sent to all homes with
a letter to parents or
guardians. There are two
ways to apply for Free or Re-
duced-Price Meals. House-
holds may apply online by
following the Free and Re-


duced-Price Meal Applica-
tion link at http://cafe.cit-
rus.kl2.fl.us or complete the
paper application and return
it to the Citrus County
School Board District Office.
Additional copies are avail-
able in the Food and Nutri-
tion Services Department at
the School Board Office. The
information provided on the
application will be used for
the purpose of determining
eligibility and may be veri-
fled at any time during the
school year. Applications
may be submitted at any
time during the year.
Household size and mn-
come criteria will be used to
determine eligibility. An ap-
plication cannot be approved
unls it c n insacomplenece

approved, meal benefits are


good for an entire year. You
need not notify the organiza-
tion of changes in income
and household size.
Households that receive
SNAP (Supplemental Nutri-
tion Assistance Program) or
TANF (Temporary Assis-
tance for Needy Families)
are required to list on the ap-
plication only the child's
name, SNAP/TANF case
number for ANY family
member, and signature of
adult household member.
Foster children will re-
ceive free benefits regardless
of the child's personal in-


come or the income of the
household.
Households with children
who are considered homeless
or runaway should contact
the district liaison, District
Student Services Center at
352-527-0090. Households
with children who are con-
sidered migrant should con-
tact the migrant coordinator,
Migrant Education at 352-
228-0377.
For the purpose of deter-
mining household size, de-
ployed service members are
considered a part of the
household. Families should


include names of the de-
ployed service members on
their application. Report only
that portion of the deployed
service member's income
made available to them or on
their behalf to the family.
Additionally, a housing al-
lowance that is part of the
Military Housing Privatiza-
tion Initiative is not to be in-
cluded as income.
All other households must
provide the following infor-
mation listed on the applica-
tion:

continued on page 9


FREE MEAL SCALE
Twice Every
Monthly Per Month Two Weeks
....1,211........ .606 ......_..559

. .. .2,6498. . .. .1249.. .. .. .1,53

....2,927...... .1,464........1,351
....3,356 ...... .1,678........1,549
....3,785 ...... .1,893.......1,747
....4,214__ ....2,107........1,945


Household
Size

1 ........


5 ........
6 ........
7 ........
8 ........


Annual
.14,521



.29,965
.35,113
.40,261
.45,409
.50,557


Weekly
.........280



..........676
.........5775

.........874
.........973


For each additional family member add:
.........5,148 ......429..._......215 .........198 ....


. .99


Household
Size
1 . . . .
2 .. .. .. .
3 .. .. .. .
4 .. .. .. .
5 ........
6 .. .. .. .
7 ........
8 ....


Twice
Per Month
.. ..862 ....
. ..1,167 . .
. ..1,472 . .
. ..1,777 . .
....2,083....
. ..2,388 . .
....2,693....
..2,998 _


Every
Two Weeks
.. ..795
. ..1,077
. ..1,359
. ..1,641
....1,922
. ..2,204
....2,486
..2,768


Annual
.20,665
.27,991
.35,317
.42,643
.49,969
.57,295
.64,621
.71,947


Monthly
. .1,723
. .2,333
. .2,944
. .3,554
. .4,165
. .4,775
. .5,386
5,996


Weekly
.. .. .. ..398
.. .. .. ..539
.. .. .. ..680
.. .. .. ..821
.........961
.. .. ..1,102
.......1,243
....1,384


For each additional family member add:
...........7,326 ......611........ .306 ........_282.........141


Free and reduced-price meals at school


FlOnda income eligibility guidelines


for free and reduced-price meals

Effective from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013


REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SCALE





SStep _N' Time, Inc. Sc hool of Dance Arts '

OPEN HOUSE
REGISTRATION

July 30th
1 andr July 31st
Foi mo ire Info irmatio n
352-637-4663 4
~www.schofdancearts.com *


I


Saturday July 21, 2012 G9

gross income by 12.

Remember: The total in-
come before taxes, social se-
curity, health benefits, union
dues, or other deductions
must be reported.
"In accordance with Fed-
eral Law, and U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture policy,
this institution is prohibited
from discriminating on the
basis of race, color, national
origin, sex, age, or disability.
To file a complaint of dis-
crimination write USDA,
Director, Office ofAdjudica-
tion, 1400 Independence Av-
enue, SW, Washington, DC
20250-9410 or call toll free
866-632-9992 (voice). Indi-
viduals who are hearing im-
paired or have speech
disabilities may contact
USDA through the Federal
Relay Service at 800-877-
8339; or 800-845-6136
(Spamish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer."


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


a request either orally or in
writingto:
Sandra "Sam" Himmel -
Superintendent
1007 West Main Street,
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1931 or 1-800-
788-1930
Unless indicated otherwise
on the application, the infor-
mation on the Free and Re-
duced-Price Meal
application may be used by
the school system in deter-
mining eligibility for other
educational programs.

To determine annual mn-
come:
If you receive the income
every week, multiply the
total gross income by 52.
If you receive the income
every two weeks, multiply
the total gross income by 26.
If you receive the income
twice a month, multiply the
total gross income by 24.
If you receive the income
monthly, multiply the total


from page 8


Total household income
listed by gross amount re-
ceived, type of income (e.g.,
wages, child support, etc.)
and how often the income is
received by each household
member;
Names of all household
members check the "no in-
come" box if applicable, if
household member is a
child, list school name for
each;
Signature of an adult
household member certify-
ing the information provided
is correct; and
The last four digits of the
social security number of the
adult signing the application
or check the no social secu-
rity box for this household
member if he or she does not
have a social security num-
ber.
If a household member be-
comes unemployed or if the
household size changes, the
District Food and Nutrition
Department office should be
contacted.
Under the provisions of
the Free and Reduced-Price
meal policy, the Director of
Food and Nutrition Services
will review applications and
determine eligibility. If a
parent or guardian is dissat-
isfied with the ruling of the
official, he or she may wish
to discuss the decision with
the determining official on
an informal basis. If the par-
ent wishes to make a formal
appeal, he or she may make


Citrus County offers
MyPaymentsPlus, a state-of-
the-art online service that
provides you the convenience
and information you need to
manage your student's meal
account.
This system speeds up
serving lines in the cafeteria,
eliminates the need to send
checks to school or worry
about lost or forgotten lunch
money, and ensures that your
child will receive a nutritious
meal.
At NO cost, MyPayments
Plus allows any family to:
Create a free, secured ac-
count to manage all of your
student's accounts.
Check your student's
current account balance.
Monitor the items your
student has been purchasing
in the cafeteria.
Create settings to receive
email notifications when the
account reaches a low
balance.


For a small program fee,
MyPaymentsPlus allows any
family to:
Make a prepayment into
your student's meal account
using a credit card or debit
card. This can be done
through MyPaymentsPlus or
by calling 877-634-9609.
Funds deposited through
MyPaymentsPlus are usually
available for student use
within a matter of minutes.
Create settings to auto-
matically replenish your stu-
dent's account when it
reaches a low balance.
For the 2009-2010 school
year, we strongly encourage
all parents (even if you do
not prepay for your student's
meal account) to create an
account at MealpayPlus at
no cost.
For the 2012-2013 school
year, we strongly encourage
all parents, even if you do not
prepay for your student's
meal account, to create an ac-


count at MyPaymentsPlus at
no cost.
Citrus County offers sev-
eral convenient ways to ac-
cess MyPaymentsPlus. You
can follow the link on our
website at
http://cafe.citrus.kl2.fl.us ,
go directly to MyPayments
Plus at www.mypayments
plus.com or call 877-
634-9609 from anywhere, at
anytime.
To create a new account on
the website, follow the on-
screen directions and register
your student using their 7-
digit District Student ID
number. If you need assis-
tance locating this number
please call the District Food
& Nutrition Services Depart-
ment at 352-726-1931, ext.
2402 or 2425.
We constantly strive to find
new and better ways to serve
our students and our families,
and we thank you for partner-
ing with us in this effort.


Free and reduced-priice meal application processing
Citrus County Schools incomplete applications. http:.//cafe.citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Food & Nutrition Services When entering your applica- and follow the Free & Re-
Department offers state-of- tion online, you only need duced-Price Meal Applica-
the-art online processing of the student's name and birth- tion link. You can enter the
Free & Reduced-Price Meal date. If you need assistance, application from the conven-
Applications. This service please call the District Food ience of your own home, use
provides you the conven- & Nutrition Services Depart- a friend's computer, go to the
ience and confidentiality you ment at 352-726-1931, ext. library or come by the Citrus
desire when applying for 2402 or 2425. County Schools Food & Nu-
benefits. Additionally, it ex- For the 2012-2013 school trition Services office. Our
pedites the approval process, year, Citrus County encour- office is available to assist
eliminates the need to mail ages parents to apply online you Monday thru Friday
back the paper application for Free & Reduced-Price from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm.
and also eliminates process- Meals. Please visit our
ing delays associated with website at


Michael D. Bays
Insurance Agency Inc.
Mike Bays, Agent
3905 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-746-7008
Fax 352-746-0310


Elementary Level
Full price breakfast ..................$1
Reduced-price breakfast ......$.30
Full price lunch ........................$2
Reduced-price lunch ............$.40

Secondary Level
Full price breakfast ..............$1.25
Reduced-price breakfast ......$.30
Full price lunch ....................$2.25


Reduced-price lunch ............$.40

Adults
Breakfast ............................$1 .75
Lunch ..................................$3.25
Signature salads with tea....$3.75
All
Milk .................. ....................$.50
Juice, 4 ounce ......................$.50


State Farm Mutual AutomobilelInsurance Company
State Farm Indemnity Company
Bloomington, IL


1001010.1


Online Mea ~ayPlus offers convenience


U'I~~;_l i 1


Stop by a State Farm"
agent'S office, or call me
t0day to find out how
much you can save.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.*
CALL ME TODAY.


Meal Prices 2012 2013


Monday Friday
9:00am 5:00pm
Mike@MikeBaysagency.com


AStateFarm-







G10 Saturday July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
Extension: 2202
himmels@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Mike Mullen
Assistant Superintendent,
theon iOperat ons
mullenmi@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Kenny Blocker
Assistant Superintendent,
Business and Support Services
Extension: 2412
blockerk@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Mark Klauder
Executive Director,
Educational Services
Extension: 2245
klauderm@citrus.kl 2.fl.us


Hugh Adkins
Supervisor, Marine Science Station
795-4393
adkinsh@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Chuck Dixon
Director, Planning and
G:-3t~h6Wanagement
dixonc@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Lindy Woythaler
Director, Professional
Development and
Community Services
Extension: 2232
woythalerl@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Patrick Simon
Director, Research and Accountability
Extension: 2235
simonp@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Bob Brust
Supervisor,
Achievement Data Technology
Extension: 2244
brustr@citrus.kl2.fl.us

John Mullen
Supervisor,
Achievement Data Technology
Extension: 2259
mullenj2@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Reg ina Al leg retta
Director, Student Services
527-0090
allegrettar@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Cheri Cernich
Coordinator, Student Services
527-0090
cernichc@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Kathy Pomposelli
Coordinator, Title 1 /NCLB
Extension: 2227
pomposelli@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Marilyn Farmer
Coordinator, Transportation
Extension: 2370
farmerm@citrus.kl 2.fl.us


Carol Mainor
Director, Area Schools &
Elementary Education
Extension: 2251
mainorc@citrus.kl2.fl.us


Gayle Nobles
Coordinator,
Special Academic Programs
Extension: 2248
noblesg@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Bruce Sheffield
Coordinator, Health,
PE & Special Programs
Extension: 2239
sheffieldb@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Nancy Haynes
Director, Exceptional
Student Education
Extension: 2331
haynesn@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Julie Kelsay
Coordinator,
Exceptional Student Education
Extension: 2330
kelsayj@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Alan Burcaw
Director, Facilities and Construction
Extension: 2478
burcawa@citrus.kl 2.fl.us


Pat Rundio
Director, Finance
Extension: 2411
rundiop@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Karen Briggs
Supervisor, Accounting and
Internal Accounts
Extension: 2417
briggskl @citrus.kl2.fl.us

Tammy Wilson
Supervisor, Business Operations
Extension: 2472
wilsonta@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Roy Pistone
Director, Food Services
Extension: 2404
pistoner@citrus.kl2.fl.us

Jonny Bishop
Director, Human Resources
Extension: 2281
biahopj1@citrus.kl 2.fl.us


Suzanne Swain
Coordinator, Certification
and Professional Standards
Extension: 2273
swains@citrus.kl2.fl.us

David Stephens
Director, Human Resources
& Risk Management
Extension: 2270
stephensd@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Steve Chamblin
Director, Information Services
746-3437
chamblins@citrus.kl 2.fl.us

Dr. Mike Geddes
Director, Instructional Technology
746-3437
geddesm@citrus.kl2.fl.us

John Colasanti
Coordinator, Maintenance
Extension: 2444
colasantij@citrus.kl 2.fl.us


Administrative staff directory for Citrus County schools


CitfUS County School Board



(District Services Center)



1 007 W~est Main Street

Inve rn ess, 34450

352-726-1 931

WWW. Cit fUS. kl2.fl. us


Office H ou rs:

7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.








Saturday, July 21, 2012 Gll


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


Floral City Elementary
8457 E. Marvin Street
Floral City, FL 34436
Mailing Address:
PO Box 340, Floral City, 34436
352-726-1554
Fax: 352-249-2127
Email Secretary: careym@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Janet Reed
Assistant Principal: Jennifer Hetland
Volunteer Coordinator: Julie Keiper
Chaperone Coordinator: Michelle Carey
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Michelle Carey
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. -3: 30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.

Forest Ridge Elementary
2927 N. Forest Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL34442
352-527-1808
Fax: 352-249-2128 Administration
Fax: 352-249-2129 Guidance
Email Secretary: heltk3@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Laura Windham
Assistant Principal: Brendan Bonomo
TOSA: Kathy Kopp
Volunteer Coordinator: Shelley Schantz
Chaperone Coordinator: Karen Helt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Susan Nyswaner
Student School Hours: 9:10 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:05 a.m. 3:50 p.m.

Hernando Elementary
2975 E. Trailblazer Lane
Hernando, FL34442
352-726-1833
Fax: 352-249-2130
Email Secretary: beldena@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Laura Manos
Assistant Principal: Amanda Parker
TOSA: Jamie Fehrenbach
Volunteer Coordinator: Joyce Scott
Chaperone Coordinator: Joann Tarpey
Contact for Transportation: Joann Tarpey
Student School Hours: 9:10 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.

Homosassa Elementary
10935 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-2953
Fax: 352-249-2131
Email Secretary: balkcomp@citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Principal: Chris Bosse
Assistant Principal: Jill Young
Volunteer Coordinator: Debi Harmon
Chaperone Coordinator: Sherry Bandstra
Contact for Transportation: Mary Schaentzler
Student School Hours: 8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.


Inverness Primar
206 S. Line Avenue, Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-2632
Fax: 352-249-2134
Email Secretary: wearl@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Marlise Bushman
Assistant Principal: Michelle McHugh
TOSA: Heather McLeod
Volunteer Coordinator: Michelle McHugh
Chaperone Coordinator: Lory Wear
Contact for Transportation: Lory Wear
Student School Hours: 8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m.

Lecanto Primary
3790 W. Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2220
Fax: 352-249-2139
Email Secretary: pietroburgor@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Vicki Lofton
Assistant Principal: Jennifer Homan
TOSA: Michelle Loreth
Volunteer Coordinator:
Coni Young & Dolores Ramos
Chaperone Coordinator: Deborah Cahela
Contact for Transportation: Deborah Cahela
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:05 a.m. 3:50 p.m.

Pleasant Grove Elementary
630 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, FL 34452
352- 637-4400
Fax: 352-249-2141
Email Secretary: kellyj21@citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Principal: Lynne Kirby
Assistant Principal: Rob Hermann
TOSA: Julie Jones
Volunteer Coordinator: Linda Braden
Chaperone Coordinator: Lynn Brooks
Contact for Transportation: Joyce Kelly
Student School Hours: 8:50 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8 a.m. 3:45 p.m.

Rock Crusher Elementary
814 S. Rock Crusher Road
Homosassa, FL34448
352-795-2010
Fax: 352-249-2143
Email Secretary: gushak@citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Principal: John Weed
Assistant Principal: Rene Johnson
TOSA: Debi Collins
Volunteer Coordinator: Pam Burns
Chaperone Coordinator: Sharon Erlandson
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Rene Johnson
Student School Hours: 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.


Citrus County public school dir ec tory


Citrus County public

elementary schools

Central Ridge Elementary
185 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
352-344-3833(Citrus)
352-465-5709 (Marion)
Fax: 352-249-2103
Email Secretary: withringtonk@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Nancy Simon
Assistant Principal: Kay Harper
TOSA: Sharen Lowe
Volunteer Coordinator:
Karen O'Bryan-Chiavetta
Chaperone Coordinator: Linda Peltier
Contact for Transportation:
Karen O'Bryan-Chiavetta
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15 a.m. 4 p.m.

Citrus Springs Elementary
3570 W. Century Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34433
352-344-4079 or 489-8144
Fax: 352-249-2110
Email Secretary: mckeownl@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Scott Hebert
Assistant Principal: Alice Harrell
TOSA: Amy Crowell
Volunteer Coordinator: Anne Fleck
Chaperone Coordinator: Gloria Driscoll
Contact for Transportation: Jane Branham
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:10 a.m. 3:55 p.m.

Crystal River Primary
8624 W. Crystal Street
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-2211
Fax: 352-249-2109
Email Secretary: kaiserianc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Donnie Brown
Assistant Principal: Lee Mulder
TOSA: Virginia George
Volunteer Coordinator: Terry Cates
Chaperone Coordinator:
Terry Cates, Linda Laing
Contact for Transportation:
Assistant Principal, Lee Mulder
Student School Hours: 9:20 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8:15a.m. 4 p.m.


CitfUS County public

middle schools

Citrus Springs Middle
150 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
352-344-2244
Fax: 352-249-2111
Email Secretary: kruegerk@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: David Roland
Assistant Principals:
Jason Koon, Jennifer Sasser
TOSA: Eileen Jenkin
Volunteer Coordinator: Tracie Stokes
Chaperone Coordinator: Kimberly Krueger
Contact for Transportation: Muriel Dufresne
Student School Hours: 7:45 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.

Crystal River Middle
344 N.E. Crystal Street, Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-2116
Fax: 352-249-2108
Email Secretary: hudsona@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Gloria Bishop
Assistant Principals:
Inge Frederick, Brian Lancaster
TOSA: Deirdre Barrett-Murray
Volunteer Coordinator: Claudia McCoy
Chaperone Coordinator: Carolyn Jackson
Contact for Transportation: Jennifer Paugh
Student School Hours: 7:45 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.

Inverness Middle
1950 U.S. 41 North, Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1471
Fax: 352-249-2133
Email Secretary: perkinsy@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Patricia Douglas
Assistant Principals: Joseph Susi, Rick Darby
TOSA: Karen Tyler
Volunteer Coordinator: Stephanie Skoblicki
Chaperone Coordinator: Faye Hoff
Contact for Transportation: Steven Baumer
Student School Hours: 7:55 a.m. 2:20 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.











continued on page 12








612 Saturday July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


from page 11



Lecanto Middle
3800 W. Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2050
Fax: 352-249-2138
Email Secretary: nelsond@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: William Farrell
Assistant Principals:
William Nelson, Ryan Selby
TOSA: Michelle Tripp
Volunteer Coordinator: Michelle Tripp
Chaperone Coordinator: TBA
Contact for Transportation: TBA
Student School Hours: 8 a.m. 2:35 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:05 a.m. 2:50 p.m.





Citrus County public

high schools

Citrus High
600 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-2241
Fax: 352-249-2102
Email Secretary: neanders@citrus.kl2.fl.us


Principal: Dale Johns
Assistant Principals: Teresa Alvarado,
Deon Copeland, Linda Connors
Dean of Students:
Phillip McLeod & Anna Rae Miller
Activities Director: Laura Aguilera
Volunteer Coordinator: Anna Rae Miller
Chaperone Coordinator: Anna Rae Miller
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Linnet Calise
Student School Hours: 7:50 a.m. 2:20 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.

Crystal River High
1205 N.E. Eighth Avenue, Crystal River, FL 34428
352-795-4641
Fax: Main Office 352-249-2106
Fax: Guidance Office 352-249-2105
Email Secretary: carterl@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Mark McCoy
Assistant Principals:
Charles Brooks, Kit Humbaugh
Dean of Students: Richard Wilson
Activities Director: Tony Stukes
Volunteer Coordinator: Tony Stukes
Chaperone Coordinator: Cheryl Pratt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Kim LaRue
Student School Hours: 7:45 a.m. 2:23 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.


Lecanto High
3810 W. Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-2334
Fax Number: 352-249-2136
Email Secretary: Headk@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Jeff Davis
Assistant Principals: Doug Connors,
Tony Whitehead, Shawyn Newman
Dean of Students: William Miller &
Robert Smith, Anthony Branch
Activities Director: Ron Allan
Volunteer Coordinator:
Diana Brown & Ron Allan
Chaperone Coordinator: Diana Brown
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Kim Head
Student School Hours: 7:55 a.m. 2:22 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7 a.m. 2:45 p.m.



Other

Schools / sites

Academy of Environmental Science
12695 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-8793
Fax: 352-249-2100
Email Secretary: fletcherd@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Administrator: Ben Stofcheck
Chaperone Coordinator: Wendy West- Cleary
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Donna Fletcher
Student School Hours: 8 a.m. 1:45 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.

CREST
2600 S. Panther Pride Drive,
Lecanto, FL 34461
Telephone Number: 352-527-0303
Fax Number: 352-527-0355
Email Secretary: foresterm@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Rich Hilgert
Assistant Principal: Anita Moon
Volunteer Coordinator: Susan Castorina
Chaperone Coordinator: April Schmitt
Contact for Transportation Request forms:
Anita Moon
Student School Hours: 8:45 a.m. 3:15 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 8 a.m. 3:45 p.m.

Renaissance Center
3630 W. Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-4567
Fax: 352-249-2144
Email Secretary: gerhardtc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Principal: Danita Eatman
Assistant Principal: Ernie Hopper
Volunteer Coordinator: Cherri Gerhardt
Chaperone Coordinator: Cherri Gerhardt
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Vicki Miranti
Student School Hours: 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m.


Withlacoochee Technical Institute
1201 W. Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-2430
Fax: 352-249-2157
Email Secretary: tobinc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Director: Denise Willis
Assistant Directors: Richard Van Gulik
(Curriculum)
Judy Johnson (Adult Education)
Volunteer Coordinator: Helena Delgado
Chaperone Coordinator: Becky Strittmatter
Contact for Transportation Request Forms:
Roberta Lawrence/Registration
Secondary Student School Hours:
8:15 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Post-Secondary Student School Hours:
7:45 a.m. 2:45 p.m.
Teacher School Hours: 7:15 a.m. 3 p.m .

Citrus County School Board
(District Services Center)
1007 W. Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-1931
www.citrus.kl 2.us
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Student Services Center
2575 S. Panther Pride Drive,
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0090
Fax: 352-249-2145
Email Secretary: welshj@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Director: Regina Allegretta
Coordinator: Cherise K. Cernich
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Planning and Growth Management
2575 S. Panther Pride Drive,
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-3960
Fax: 352-249-2145
Email Secretary: Mosert@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Director: Chuck Dixon
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Technology and Information Services
3741 W. Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-3437
Fax: 352-746-3550
Email Secretary: chancec@citrus.kl 2.fl.us
Director: Dr. Mike Geddes,
Instructional Technology
Director: Steve Chamblin, Information Services
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Marine Science Station
12646 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-4393
Fax: 352-249-2140
Email Secretary: proveauxc@citrus.kl2.fl.us
Supervisor: Hugh Adkins
Volunteer Coordinator: Catherine Proveaux
Office Hours: 8 a.m. 4 p.m.


GA RE END the


OT THE D

After school programs offered
at most Citrus County schools *















YMCA OF THE 5UNCOAST CITRUS COUNTY PROGRAM BRANCH
3909 North Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 63 7-01 32 | www.ymcasuncoast.org
YMCA Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through
programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.
000COO4









Crime stopping

stats ith







Of Citrus Coun ty, In c.




TEXT TIPS
NOw you can send a tip anonymously B
ffOm your cell phone. Text "Citrus
plus your tip" to 274637(CRIMES) Y


B oErOat $10 er
Law enforcement and school officials agree that
most students want to do the right thing to keep
their neighborhoods and schools safe but
sometimes are afraid to act. The Crime Stoppers
program offers the safety of complete anonymity
while allowing students to take action against
victimization and crime.




Text CITRUS to 274637(CRIMES)





www.crimestopperscitrus.com




Yotr COtrI get a
ORsh rewIFrE Of 1-888-An -Ti s



For more information, visit
Wwwwcrimestopperscitrus ,com
Funded by the Office of the Attorney
_General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund.


Saturday, July 21, 2012 613


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


Inverness Christian Academy
Grades: K2 through 12
4222 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
352-726-3759
Email: office@invernesschristian.org
P iial DaD R ly8


Pope John Paul II Catholic School
Grades: EC3 through 8
4341 W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto
352-746-2020
Email: office@pjp2.net
Principal: Dr. Lou Whittaker
School starts Aug. 20


Seven Rivers Christian School
Grades: PK3 through 12
4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Lecanto
352-746-5696
Email: dnelson@sevenrivers.org
Principal: Scott Jackson
School starts Aug. 20


Solid Rock Christian Academy
Grades: K through 8
972 N. Christy Way, Inverness
352-726-9788
Principal: Sheila Chau


St. Paul's Lutheran School
Grades: Preschool through 8
6150 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
352-489-3027
Email: office@stpauls.edu
Principal: Kyle Bender
Preschool Director:
Kay-Lynn Johnson


West Coast Christian School
Grades: K through 12
718 N.W. First Ave., Crystal River
352-795-2079
Principal: Marlene Pringle


A Citrus County School
District volunteer may be a
parent or grandparent, a
member of the business
community, a retiree, or any
individual who is willing to
give freely of his or her
time to make a positive dif-
ference in the lives of stu-
dents. Every day during the
school year, hundreds of
volunteers are spending
time in Citrus County
schools and classrooms and
sharing their talents with


students and teachers.
Volunteers serve in a
wide variety of ways. They
may choose among numer-
ous activities that include
mentoring or tutoring stu-
dents, sharing special inter-
ests or talents, working in
media centers, listening to
children read, setting up
learning centers, and help-
ing students with special
proj ects.
Helping children reach
their full potential in the


classroom and become suc-
cessful citizens is a wonder-
ful benefit of serving as a
volunteer. If you are inter-
ested in enriching the lives
of young people in our
community, you are invited
to join the Citrus County
School District volunteer
community. For more in-
formation on volunteer op-
portunities and district-wide
volunteer training, please
call Helen Pannelli at 352-
726-1931, ext. 2233.


Citrus County private



school directory


Become a school volunteer































































GO BACK JO-SMcr~ul 18 Point
S WI o inspection
I Change oil (up to 5 qts.)hng o fle

I IVobil El ubricto chass s
SLub ,xrss Check brake fluid
I r~~ Ch ese e~ruid
$500 0 FF7 Check coolant
011 Change ': Check differentials
Most vehicles. Cannot be 10. Light Check
combined with any other offer 11. Courtesy Vacuum
Expires 8/31/12 12. Check adjust tire

*FILREOD HRE! 13. Ce k arrefilter
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Propne 1 Chck wper blaaks
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S1050 SE US Hwy 19, Crystal Rive 352-795-2333


614 Saturday July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Bus information will be
available by the following
ways:
Citrus County School
District's Official Web Site:
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us
Due to the vast number of
requests received to change
or add bus stops, bus sched-
ules will not be finalized
until Aug. 1. Parents are
asked to confirm any bus
stop information received
prior to Aug. 1.
Transportation personnel
will be available at each
school's Meet Your Teacher/
Orientation.
Call the Citrus County
public schools' back to
school information hot line
at 637-2233. The back to
school information hot line
will be open Friday, Aug. 3
from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30
p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 4 from
9 a.m. until 1 p.m.; Monday,
Aug. 6 from 8:30 a.m. until
4:30 p.m.; Tuesday, Aug. 7
from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.;
Wednesday, Aug. 8 the
first day of school and
Thursday, Aug. 9 from 6 a.m.
until 6 p.m.
The back to school infor-
mation hot line (637-2233)
will have information avail-
able for the entire school dis-


trict.
The Hot Line will have
multiple lines and informa-
tion will be available for the
entire school district.
For information prior to
Aug. 3 or after Aug. 9,
please call: 344-2193.
Bus stop information is
also available on the website
at the transportation link.
* Parents) and/or legal
guardian(s) requesting a bus
stop change should complete
the Transportation Request
Form available at all Citrus
County Public Schools. Re-
quests for bus stop changes
or for new bus stops will not
be processed from July 31
through Aug. 14 to allow ad-
equate time to finalize infor-
mation for release to students
and parents. Any request for
bus stop changes or new bus
stops received during that
time period will be processed
after Aug. 14. Students will
need to access existing stops
until late requests can be
processed:
"Twelve most asked
questions and answers"
1) Why is the bus late?
We are sorry that the bus is
late. Please allow a 15-
minute window of time be-
fore and after the designated


time during the first week of
school.

2) Why is the bus over-
crowded?
Please allow the Trans-
portation Services Depart-
ment a reasonable time for
adjustment during the first
week of school. School bus
seats are designed to carry
three passengers on each
seat. When the bus exceeds
the rated seating capacity,
routes are adjusted and the
overcrowding is eliminated.

3) Can the bus stop be
changed?
Yes, the bus stop can be
changed for the following
reasons:
Establish new transporta-
tion service.
Bus stop is more than .5
miles from home address.
Intersection of the nearest
cross street is more than .5
miles from home address.
* Walk route to the bus stop
is hazardous (multiple
curves, no shoulders, etc.)
Location of present bus
stop requires student to cross
a divided highway.

4) Can you drop my child
at day care?
If the day care is in the
zone for the school you are
attending and if it is an ap-
proved safe bus stop.

5) How do I request a bus
stop change?
Parent(s)/legal guardian(s)
should complete a Trans-
portation Request Form (di-
rections are on the form).
The forms are available at
each school from the Trans-
portation School Contact
Person as listed below:

Academy of
Environmental Science
Donna Fletcher


Central Ridge Elementary
Karen Chiavetta

Citrus High
Linnet Calise

Citrus Springs Elementary
Jane Branham

Citrus Springs Middle
Muriel Dufresne

CREST
Anita Moon

Crystal River High
Kim LaRue

Crystal River Middle
Jennifer Paugh

Crystal River Primary
Lee Mulder

Floral City Elementary
Michelle Carey

Forest Ridge Elementary
Susan Nyswaner

Hernando Elementary
Joann Tarpey

Homosassa Elementary
Mary Schaentzler

Inverness Middle
Steven Baumer

Inverness Primary
Lory Wear

Lecanto High
Kim Head

Lecanto Primary
Deborah Cahela

Pleasant Grove Elementary
Joyce Kelly

Renaissance Center
Vicki Miranti

Rock Crusher Elementary
Rene' Johnson


Withlacoochee
Technical Institute
Roberta Lawrence/
Registration

6) When are the Meet Your
Teacher Orientations?
Information is available in
the following ways:
Citrus County School
District's Official Website:
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us
A schedule can be found
on page G4 of this special
supplement
Call the Citrus County
public schools' back to
school information hot line
at 637-223, which will be
open Friday, Aug. 3 from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.;
Saturday, Aug. 4 from 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 6
from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30
p.m.; Tuesday, Aug. 7 from
8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.;
Wednesday, Aug. 8 The
first day of school and
Thursday, Aug. 9 from 6 a.m.
until 6 p.m. The Hot Line
will have multiple lines and
information will be available
for the entire school district.

7) What school does my
child attend?
Please call 746-3960 for
zoning information or look
up the information on the
website at the transportation
link. (When calling the Back
to school information hot
line at 637-2233, the opera-
tor will look up information.)

8) Can my child attend an-
other school?
For in-county request,
please contact the zoned
school to request a Special
Attendance Request Form.
For out-of-county request,
please call 746-3960.

9) If I have a Special Atten-
dance approval can I ride
the bus?


If the School District has
approved the Special Atten-
dance Request, you may ride
the bus at the nearest bus
stop ofthe reassigned
school.

10) Whom do I call for an-
imal safety concerns?
Please contact the Citrus
County Animal Control at
726-7660.

11) Whom do I call for sus-
picious persons concerns?
Please contact the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at
726-4488.

12) Do school buses make
rain stops?
Parents are encouraged to
arrange for inclement
weather.

General Information
The Citrus County Public
Schools provide daily bus
service for all students living
in excess of 2 miles from the
school. Also, the Citrus
County Public Schools' pro-
vide daily bus services for
students who require accom-
modations or who walk in
areas exposing them to haz-
ards (as defined by the State
Statute and the Citrus
County School Board Pol-
icy) regardless of the dis-
tance. The Transportation
Department looks forward to
safely serving the students of
the Citrus County Public
Schools.
The personnel of the
Transportation Department
recommend that parents)
and/or legal guardian(s) dis-
cuss and review the proce-
dures of Student Safety, the
Bus Rules and parents)
and/or legal guardian(s) re-
sponsibilities with all stu-
dents who will be riding the

continued on page 15


Citrus County public schools' transportation services













The following "Back to School Information" is also available on
the hotline, website or in the Back to School Information packet:

Administrative Staff Directory
* School Board Members
School Calendar
Extended Day Care Services
Food Services
* General Information
Home Education and Special Attendance
Health Services (including registration requirements)
School(s)/Other Sites Directory
School Registration Requirements
* School Volunteer Coordinators
* Student School Hours
Teacher School Hours
* Meet Your Teacher Orientation Dates and Times
* School Guidance Counselors
Transportation Request Form (for back to back copies)
Transportation Services (Bus Information)
Media Directory


Saturday, July 21, 2012 615


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL CHRONICLE





Bak tal0








Back to school information
hot line 352-637-2233

The Back to school information
hot line (637-2233) will be open
Friday, Aug. 3 from 8:30 a.m. until
4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 4 from 9
a.m. until 1 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 6
from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.;
Tuesday, Aug. 7 from 8:30 a.m.
until 6 p.m.; Wednesday, Aug. 8 -
THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL -
and Thursday, Aug. 9 from 6 a.m.
until 6 p.m.
The hot line will have information
available for the entire school dis-
trict.

Information will be available for
the entire school district

Citrus County School District's
Official website:
www.citrus.kl2.fl.us


BACK TO SCHOOL


by the bus driver.


from page 14


The following bus rules are
the responsibility of the stu-
dents:

Respect the bus driver
and follow instructions.
Remain seated; keep
head and arms inside the bus
and hands to yourself.
Keep door and aisle clear
of obstacles. No pets, glass
or large items, including
band instruments will be al-
lowed on the bus.
Do not throw anything,
at anytime, on or out of the
bus.
Be absolutely quiet when
the dome lights are on.
Do not eat, drink, or
chew gum on the bus.
Keep conversations
quiet.
* Use no profane or ob-
scene language or gestures.
Cross the road in front of
the bus, after waiting for the
driver's signal.
Present a permission
slip, signed by your
parent/legal guardian and
the principal or designee,
for riding a bus other than
the usual one or getting off
at a different stop than the
usual one.

tenc a l arod coss-

Comply with all regula-
tions in the Student Code of
Conduct.

Parents / legal guardians
are responsible for the su-
pervision of students as they
travel to and from the bus
stops and while they wait
for the bus to arrive. Par-
ents/legal guardians are en-
couraged to contact the Bus
Driver and/or to request a
conference with the Bus
Driver arranged through the
school and the Transporta-
tion Department whenever
they have a concern.


school buses. By reviewing
the information with the stu-
dent, parents) and/or legal
guardian(s) will assist the
bus drivers to continually
provide safe transportation
for all students. Violation of
the Bus Safety Rules could
result in the loss of bus rid-
ing privileges for a student.
ONE student whose actions
are distracting to the Bus
Driver can endanger the
safety of all children. Stu-
dents may be videotaped
anytime while on the school
bus. The Citrus County
Public Schools' appreciate
the continued support and
cooperation of the students)
and parents and/or legal
guardian(s).

Citrus County Public
Schools' encourage the fol-
lowing for student safety:

Leave home each day to
be at the bus stop at least
five minutes before the bus
arrives,
Face the traffic and walk
on the shoulder of the road
when no sidewalk is avail-
able.


highwa and terbuomto d
other traffic comes to a full
stop, and the bus door is
opened before moving to-
ward the bus.
Cross in front of the bus
at a distance of 10 feet to 12
feet.
Never run alongside a
moving bus.
Report any illness or in-
jury sustained on or around
the bus immediately to the
bus driver.
For the safety of all stu-
dents, students will maintain
complete silence at all rail-
road crossings and when
otherwise deemed necessary


SFrom Aug. 3 9, please do not
give the Transportation Department
number to any caller.


SRefer them to the Information
Hotline Number (637-2233) for any
information about transportation is-
sues-


Florida Statutes (FS), Florida Ad-
ministrative Code (FAC) and Citrus
County School Board Policies Re-
lated to the Establishment of School
Bus Stops

Chapter 234.01, FS instructs Florida
school boards to provide transportation
for students whose homes are more
than a "reasonable walking distance"
from the student's assigned school.

Chapter 6A-3.001, FAC defines a rea-
sonable walking distance as "any dis-
tance not more than two (2) miles
between the home and school or one
and one-half (1 1/2) miles between the
home and the assigned bus stop."


Citrus County School Board Policy
3.21(1), School Bus Scheduling and
Routing is the basis for the establish-
ment of stops within our district. These
guidelines are:

Buses will be filled to maximize
capacity
Stops will be only on roads with
conditions and bridges which will
support the bus
Stops will not be scheduled any
closer than two tenths miles (.2) apart
Routes will not be extended to ac-
commodate students within a reason-
able walking distance from the school
School bus routes will be restricted


to main thoroughfares and all-weather
roads
Spur routes are defined as roads
where the bus is required to leave the
main thoroughfare for less than five
tenths (.5) of a mile to make a stop and
then make a turnaround and return to
the main thoroughfare and are not
within the scope of the policy
Spur routes will not cause poor
scheduling, such as causing students to
leave home at an unreasonable time
When a route necessitates a tumn-
around, a suitable turning area must be
available for the bus
Changes in routes must be made by
the Transportation Supervisor


Establishing a school bus stop







G16 Saturday July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County Public Schools' Transportation Request Form

Directions for Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s): (PLEASE PRINT)
Please complete the Transportation Request Form and return to the Transportation School Contact Person at the assigned school or mail to the Transportation
Department, Citrus County School Board, 1007 W Main St Iny, FL 34450 or Fax to 352-249-2147.

Date:

Name of Student:

Name of Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s):

Street Address:

Home Telephone: Business Telephone:

Name of School: Grade: Age:

Assigned Bus Stop Location:

Nearest Cross Street:

Please allow up to 10 working days for a decision on the requested bus stop change. Transportation Services Department personnel will contact parent(s)/legal
guardian(s) by telephone when a decision is made.

Reason for Request:
O Establish new transportation service. O Bus stop is more than .5 miles from home address.
O Intersection of the nearest cross street is more than .5 miles from home address. O Walk route to the bus stop is hazardous (multiple curves, no shoulders, etc.).
O Location of present bus stop requires student to cross a divided highway. O Other

Please Note:
If the School District has approved a Special Attendance Request, the student may ride the bus at the closest bus stop of the reassigned school.
* Please contact Citrus County Animal Control at 726-7660 for animal safety concerns.
* Please contact the Citrus County Sheriff's Office at 726-4488 for suspicious persons concerns.

Please review the Citrus County School Board Transportation Policy and the Florida Statues on the back of this form.


O Approved Not Approved

District Contact Person: Date Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s) Notified:

Florida Statutes (FS), Florida Administrative Code (FAC) and Citrus County School Board Policies Related to the Establishment of School Bus Stops
Chapter 234.01, FS instructs Florida school boards to provide transportation for students whose homes are more than a "reasonable walking distance" from the stu-
dent's assigned school.
Chapter 6A-3.001, FAC defines a reasonable walking distance as "any distance not more than two (2) miles between the home and school or one and one-half (1 1/2)
miles between the home and the assigned bus stop."
Citrus County School Board Policy 3.21(1), School Bus Scheduling and Routing is the basis for the establishment of stops within our district. These guidelines are:
Buses will be filled to maximize capacity
Stops will be only on roads with conditions and bridges which will support the bus
* Stops will not be scheduled any closer than two tenths miles (.2) apart
Routes will not be extended to accommodate students within a reasonable walking distance from the school
School bus routes will be restricted to main thoroughfares and all-weather roads
* Spur routes are defined as roads where the bus is required to leave the main thoroughfare for less than five tenths (.5) of a mile to make a stop and then make a
turnaround and return to the main thoroughfare and are not within the scope of the policy
Spur routes will not cause poor scheduling, such as causing students to leave home at an unreasonable time
When a route necessitates a turnaround, a suitable turning area must be available for the bus
* Changes in routes must be made by the Transportation Supervisor







Saturday, July 21, 2012 617


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


We believe that:
A safe and caring envi-


all individuals.
Individuals and organi-
zations are accountable for
their behaviors and actions.
High expectations and
challenging standards pro-
mote continuous improve-
ment and high achievement.
All individuals can leam
at different times, in differ-
ent ways, and at different
rates.
Mutual respect is a key-
stone of learning.
Recognition promotes
higher accomplishment and
self-esteem.
Community involve-
ment and teamwork are
critical to a high-quality
educational system.
It is essential to embrace
the diversity of individuals,
ideas, talents, and learning
styles *
High-quality education
demands innovation and
risk -
The balance of academ-
ics and extracurricular ac-
tivities is essential for a
well-rounded education.
* Students require disci-
pline and direction in order
to be successful learners.
Open and honest com-
munication is essential to
effective human interaction.
Lifelong learning im-
proves the quality of life.

Strategic Goals
All students will develop
a foundation of knowledge
and skills through a rigor-
ous and relevant curriculum
that exceeds local, state
and national expectations,
closes all performance
gaps, and helps all students
realize their full potential.
Schools will be safe and


MissioH


Citus: onthShoeol
District is to educate all
students through relevant
curriculum and experi-
ences for life in an
ever-changing world.

secure for all individuals
and will provide students
the opportunity to partici-
pate in a school community
that creates a caring envi-
ronment committed to
building positive relation-
ships.
Strategies used to achieve
the Strategic Goals will
involve:
* Innovative and research-
based curriculum and pro-
gram delivery systems
Emphasis on at-risk and
special groups of learners
(including gifted)
Staff development, re-
cruitment, and retention of
workforce
Data systems
(technology)
Allocation of resources
(human, physical, techno-
logical, financial)
Career preparation
Community connections
Strategic Delimiters
We will not initiate any
new program or service
unless:
it is consistent with and
contributes to our mission.
it is accompanied by the
training and resources
needed to assure its effec-
tiveness.
it is fiscally responsible.

To view the current
Strategic Plan objectives,
visit The Citrus County
School District Webpage
(wwwrcitrus.kl2.fl.us) and
click on the Strategic Plan
link.


The Citrus County School Board
recognizes that clothing fashions
change and that fads come and go, but
distinctions still need to be made as to
what is acceptable attire for educa-
tional purposes. Some clothing which
might be appropriate in other settings
would be completely inappropriate
and disruptive for the learning atmos-
phere in a school setting.
The principal or designee is respon-
sible for interpreting and clarifying
the student dress code upon student or
parent request. The principal or de-
signee is the final authority for inter-
preting and applying the student dress
code related to special events and ac-
tivities conducted at the school.
Students will dress in attire which
does not distract from the learning
process or the educational environ-
ment. The Citrus County School
guidelines specify the following:
Clothing should not be sexually
suggestive and it should cover and
conceal body parts, e.g. chest, midriff,
back, legs (to mid-thigh or longer),
shoulders (2" wide shoulder straps
minimum) .
Clothing should cover all under-
garments.
Shorts, skirts, or pants should be
worn at natural waistline.
Attire should not illustrate, en-
hance or depict tobacco/alcohol/drugs,
nor have offensive, racial, satanic,
gang-related, sexual or violent mes-
sages, or images.
Attire should contribute to the
health and safety of all students and
staff. Jewelry, shoes, accessories, hair
color and hair styles must be free of
conditions that could be considered
hazardous or disruptive.
Accessories such as, but not lim-
ited to, spiked neck, spiked wrist-
bands, and wallet chains are not
permissible.
Blankets used for jackets and
sleepwear (i.e., pajamas, house slip-
pers) are not allowed.


HEAD COVERS
Hats and distracting head covers
should not be womn in designated
school areas at any time.

FOOTWEAR
Footwear should contribute to the
health and safety of all students and
staff. Roller shoes and house shippers
are not permitted. Tennis shoes/
sneakers may be required for physical
activity.

CLOTHING
The following administrative guide-
lines must be followed by all students
when wearing shorts, skirts, pants,
and dresses:
1. Length of shorts, skirts, and
dresses must be mid-thigh or longer
when standing.
2. Dresses, skirts, and shorts that are
too tight or too baggy will not be per-
mitted. Items such as leggings, bicy-
cle shorts, aerobic shorts, etc. are not
permitted unless under approved
clothing.
3. Shorts, skirts, pants, and dresses
must be hemmed.
4. Pants that are too tight, too baggy,
or too long will not be permitted.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of each
student to come to school in the ap-
propriate dress, have respect for self
and others, and understand the role


that appropriate dress and respect for
self and others has on an orderly
learning environment. Therefore, stu-
dents, while attending school during
the regular school day, are prohibited
from wearing clothes that expose un-
derwear or body parts mn an indecent
or vulgar manner or that disrupts the
orderly learning environment. Any
student who violates this dress policy
is subject to the following disciplinary
actions:
1. For a first offense, a student shall
be given a verbal warning and the
school principal shall call the stu-
dent's parent or guardian.
2. For a second offense, the student is
ineligible to participate in any ex-
tracurricular activity for a period of
time not to exceed five days and the
school principal shall meet with the
student's parent or guardian.
3. For a third or subsequent offence,
a student shall receive an in-school
suspension pursuant to (1003.01(5),
Florida Statutes, for a period not to
exceed three days, the student is ineli-
gible to participate in any extracurric-
ular activity for a period not to exceed
30 days, and the school principal shall
call the student's parent or guardian
and send the parent or guardian a
written letter regarding the student's
in-school suspension and ineligibility
to participate in extracurricular
activities.


Student dress code for




Citrus CounMty pubhlC schools


Strategic Plannling Framework


V gy n yA OP TH


ST UDEN T DRE SS CODE

Any student violating the student dress code may be sent home to
change, or the parent may be asked to bring a change of clothes to
the school for the student. Any absence caused by a student dress
code violation will be an unexcused absence for each period or day
missed. A violation may also result in a suspension.
Nothing in this section is intended to keep school principals from
using their best judgment as to how to best implement this code.





618 Saturday July 21, 2012


BACK TO SCHOOL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


It is the position of the Citrus
County School Board that students
must attend school on a regular and
timely basis to maximize educational
opportunities offered in Citrus
County Schools. Regular and timely
student attendance can be success-
fully achieved through a strong part-
nership between the home and
school representatives.
This policy is applicable for all
Pre-K-12 students in Citrus County.
The superintendent may approve ex-
ceptions to this policy for special
programs, such as alternative educa-
tion, magnet programs, and adult ed-
ucation programs for the purpose of
enhancing the goals of these pro-
grams.

I. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
Florida Statute 1003.21 requires
that all students between the ages of
six (6) and eighteen (18) attend
school r gularl The parents or
guardians are responsible for their
child(ren)'s attendance and to follow
co pulsor attendance laws. Stu-
dents are obligated to attend one
hundred eighty (180) days of school
each year. Regular attendance is a
critical co ponent for student suc-
cess. Students between sixteen (16)
and eighteen (18) years of age who
plan to terminate their school enroll-
ment must complete a formal decla-
ration signed by the student and the
student's parent or guardian prior to
the termination going into effect.

Parent Responsibilities
Florida Statutes 1003.21 and
1003.24 clearly define the responsi-
bility of parents for the attendance of
their children) at school. The school
district expects parents to fulfill their
responsibilities to ensure student at-
tendance in school.
It is the responsibility of the par-
ent(s) to be aware of all absences
and the penalties associated with ex-
cessive absences and unexcused ab-
sences and tardies. Schools will
provide information to parents about


attendance requirements, will make
reasonable attempts to notify parents
of student absences, and will work
with parents to resolve attendance
concerns. The principal/designee
will contact the parent or guardian to
determine the basis for unexcused
absences or absences when the rea-
son is unknown.
If a student has unexcused ab-
sences sufficient enough to jeopard-
ize academic progress and it is
determined that the student's parent
or legal guardian is at fault for these
absences, the appropriate school per-
sonnel will adhere to Florida Statutes
1003.24, 1003.26 (Enforcement of
School Attendance), and 1003.27
(Court Procedures and Penalties).

Non-enrollment of Compulsory
Attendance Age Students
Written notice shall be given in
person or by retumn-receipt mail to
the parents) or guardian(s) or other
person exercising in loco parents,
when no valid reason is found for a
child's non-enrollment. If the notice
and requirement are ignored, the des-
ignated school representative shall
report the case to the superintendent
and refer the case to the Student
Services Department for compliance
with the Florida Compulsory Atten-
dance Statute (Florida Statute
1003.1 .

Notification of Loco Parentis
In cases in which a student is not
residing with his/her parentss/
guardian(s), the parent of the student
must designate in writing the adult
persons) with whom the pupil re-
sides who stands in loco parents so
that the pupil may be admitted to or
continue in school. This statement
must be notarized and presented to
the principal/designee for accept-
ance.

II. STUDENT ABSENCES
Excused Absences
Excused absences, tardies, and
permission to leave school early will


be allowed only for the following:
Illness of the student
Major illness in the family of
the student
* Medical appointments of the
student
Death in the family of the student
Duration of a religious holiday
of the specific faith of a student
* Subpoena or forced absence by
any law enforcement ogepc he

subpoena or court summons must
be presented to the principal or
des gnee.)
Major disaster that would justify
absence in thn judgment of the

Head lice, a maximum of two (2)
days for each occurrence
Planned absences approved in
advance by the principal/designee
It is the responsibility of the par-
ent(s) or guardian(s) to provide a
written statement indicating the rea-
son for the absence within two (2)
days of the student's return to
school. If the written statement is not
provided by the parent, the
absence(s) will be unexcused. The
written statement must include the
following information for each ab-
sence.
Date the excuse is written
Date(s) of the absence(s)
Full name of the student
Reason for the absence
Day time telephone number of
parent or guardian
Signature of the parent or
guardian
Final determination of whether an
absence, tardy, or early dismissal is
excused or unexcused is the respon-
sibility of the local school princi-
pal/designee. Any planned absences,
other than medical appointments,
must be approved in advance by the
principal/designee.

III. TARDIES &
UNEXCUSED
DISMISSALS


A tardy is defined as an arrival to
class or school after the designated
starting time or the tardy signal has
sounded. Reasons for excused
tardies are the same as for excused
absences. Three (3) unexcused
tardies within a nine-week grading
period are equivalent to one (1) un-
excused absence.
Students may leave early for those
reasons accepted for excused ab-
sences. To leave school early without
an acceptable reason is an unexcused
absence/early dismissal. Three (3)
unexcused early dismissals within a
nine-week grading period are equiv-
alent to one (1) unexcused absence.
Parents are encouraged to maintain
student attendance for the entire
school day with minimal interrup-
tions or unnecessary requests to
leave school early. For high school,
students must attend class 50% or
more to avoid absences.
When tardies or early dismissals
become excessive, the problem may
be addressed through a required par-
ent conference with the school prin-
cipal/designee, and appropriate
disciplinary action may be taken,
The disciplinary actions may in-
clude, but not be limited to:
Detention
In-School Suspension
Saturday School

IV. SCHOOL
RE SPONSIBILITY
AND AUTHORITY
After 10 days of excused or unex-
cused absences, a written statement
of illness from a licensed health care
practitioner will be required for sub-
sequent absences due to illness mndi-
cating they are under the supervision
of the physician. Absences previ-
ously documented by a licensed
health care practitioner, a court offi-
cial, a church official and out-of-
school suspensions are excluded
from the 10-day absence count.
(NTOTE: For purposes of this policy,
continued on Page 19


Homosassa
Citrus Memorial Health
System has announced that
its walk-mn climecs in Lecanto
and Homosassa will offer af-

rdys lalss fro ildrde Pr-K
through 12th grde. Apont
ments are not required and
weekend hours are adai1able.

dl physic ls are awh ims-
izre b npf mcan alho spe-

Insurance is not accepted for
physical exams and payment
is due at the time of the visit.
Picmng is as flows:
School Physicals- $25
Sports Physicals- $20
School and Sports
Physical Package- $40
In addition to school and
sports physical, Citrus Me-
morirseal offer D partm nt of
Transportation (DOT) physi-
cals during regular hours.
For more information call
Allen Ridge Walk-In Clinic
at 352-746-2700, Sugarmill
Woods Walk-In Clinic at
352-382-6111 orst
www.citrusmh.com/
walk-in-climecs.

About Citrus Memorial
Health System
Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital
that provides healthcare
services to residents of Cit-
rus County and surrounding
communities. More than 150
physicians and 1,000 em-
ployees provide a wide range
of services at the Invemness
campus and at medical of-
fices and clinics in Citrus
and Sumter Counties. Citrus
Memorial is fully accredited
by the Joint Commission and
is fully licensed by the State
of Florida.


Walk-In Clinics *



pse.,-s., Citrus Count attendance polic
o tnaceL and



















































Appeal Process F Iow Chart


Appeal denied -
notification of status




Student receives an
F for the final grade


Saturday, July 21, 2012 G19


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


(Florida Statute 1003.21).


be documented by a parent/
guardian's note three (3) days in
advance.
Absences for approved college
visitation days. A maximum of four
(4) documented college visitation
days will be allowed for students
beginning the second quarter of the
junior year through the end of the
senior year. Armed Forces Acade-
mies and vocational school visits
will also fall under this provision.
These absences must be applied for
three (3) days in advance. The prin-
cipal may allow additional days
when necessary.
Absences due to subpoena or
forced absence by any law enforce-
ment agency. Verification must be
provided by a copy of the subpoena
or court summons.
Homebound education place-
ments due to an extended illness
are not considered absences.
School-sponsored activities are
not considered absences. (i.e., field
trips, school sponsored assemblies,
extra-curricular activities.)
Absences resulting from out of
school suspensions. Absences re-
sulting from out of school suspen-
sions are unexcused absences. A


high school student with 5 unex-
cused absences in a class must pass
a final comprehensive exam to re-
ceive credit for the course.

Grading and the
Attendance Policy
The attendance policy shall im-
pact only the final grade of the
quarter.
The teacher shall not give any
student an "F" for a mid-term
grade based on the student having
five (5) or more absences from
his/her class.

Appeal Process
Administrative Review: A high
school student who has 5 or more
excused or unexcused absences in a
quarter may present documentation
to the designated administrator for
waiver of the failure because of ex-
cessive absences.
An administrative review of a
student's appeal will occur using
the following procedures:
An appeal request for an Admin-
istrative Review waiver must be
submitted prior to the first sched-
uled final exam.
The request must consist of a


written explanation of absences
and the reasons for requesting the
waiver. Appropriate documentation
for the reasons for all absences
must be attached to the request.
Absences for extended illnesses or
hospitalization must be docu-
mented with a statement of illness
by a licensed health care practi-
tioner. Chronic illness requires an
annual verification by a licensed
health care practitioner. The princi-
pal/designee will review the docu-
mentation, render a decision, and
notify the student's parent/guardian
and teachers.
Denied waivers will automati-
cally be reviewed by the Atten-
dance Appeal Committee.
The Attendance Appeal Commit-
tee may consist of school-based ad-
ministrators, district-based
administrators, counselors, or
teachers.
The responsibility for initiating
the appeal process will rest with
the student/parent or guardian.
Any denied appeals beyond the
Attendance Appeal Committee will
be in accordance with the Griev-
ance and Complaint Procedure,
School Board Policy.


from page 18


V. HIGH SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE
REQUIREMENTS
FOR COURSE CREDIT
Possible Failure Due to
Excessive Absences
When a high school student ac-
cumulates 5 or more excused (see
B, 1-8 below) or unexcused ab-
sences in a class in any one quarter,
the student may receive a final
grade of "F" and receive no credit
for the course. In addition, this stu-
dent may be withdrawn from class
by the principal for the remainder
of the quarter. A student may re-
quest an administrative review or
appeal to an attendance committee
for a waiver of this rule. It is the re-
sponsibility of the students and par-
ents to be aware of all excused and
unexcused absences and to verify,
in writing, all absences in the event
of an appeal with documentation.
If a student has 5 or more ex-
cused or unexcused absences and is
granted a waiver by the administra-
tion or the Attendance Appeal
Committee, the student will receive
the calculated quarter grade aver-
age for the classess, provided the
student passes the final comprehen-
sive exam.
If a student has 5 or more ex-
cused or unexcused absences and
does not apply for or is denied a
waiver by the administration and/or
the Attendance Appeal Committee,
the student will receive an "F"
(failure because of excessive ab-
sences) for the quarter grade.

Exceptions to the Failure
Due to Excessive Absences
The following excused absences
from school shall NOT be counted
as absences for calculating exces-
sive absences. Written documenta-
tion MUST be provided when
involving:
Absences for illnesses of other
health-related reasons that are doc-
umented by a statement from a li-
censed health care practitioner.
Absences due to death in the
family or absences for religious
holidays.
Absences due to holidays must


a licensed health care practitioner
is defined as follows: medical doc-
tors and persons who are licensed
to practice medicine in psychiatry,
osteopathy, podiatry, optometry,
dentistry, or chiropractic medicine.
An Advanced Registered Nurse
Practitioner (ARNP) or a Physi-
cian's Assistant (PA) practicing
under the protocol of a supervising
physician is also allowed to sign.)
If no medical documentation is
provided, further absences are con-
sidered unexcused. Failure to com-
ply with these requirements,
followed by continued absences of
the student, may result in discipli-
nary action as defined in the Code
of Student Conduct (i.e., detention,
in-school suspension, Saturday
school, etc.) and considered appro-
priate by the school principal. A
parent conference with the school's
attendance assistant may also be re-
quired to discuss compliance with
the Florida Compulsory Attendance
Statute (Florida Statute 1003.21).
If a student has had at least five
(5) unexcused absences, or ab-
sences for which the reason is un-
known, within a calendar month or
ten (10) unexcused absences, or ab-
sences for which the reason is un-
known, within a 90 calendar day
period, the student's primary
teacher shall report to the school
principal/designee that the student
may be exhibiting a pattern of non-
attendance. The principal shall, un-
less there is clear evidence that the
absences are not a pattern of nonat-
tendance, refer the case to the
school's child study team to deter-
mine if early patterns of truancy
are developing. If the child study
team finds that a pattern ofnonat-
tendance is developing, whether
the absences are excused or not, a
meeting with the parent must be
scheduled to identify potential
remedies.
After fifteen (15) unexcused ab-
sences accumulate within any
ninety (90) calendar days, the Stu-
dent Services Center will deter-
mine the appropriate steps for the
enforcement of the Florida Com-
pulsory Attendance Statute.


Student with 5 or more excused or un-
excused absences, NOT including the
list items 1-8, within any one quarter
may file an attendance appeal.


Attendance appeal
committee review


Administrative review Completed appeal form Administrative review -
appeal APPROVED -- returned to school office appeal DENIED
notification of status


Appeal approved -

notification" ofsats


Student does
not pass exam



Student receives
an F for the final
grade


Student passes
exam



Student receives
the calculated
grade








G20 Saturday July 21, 2012


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CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


day ofa student's absence will be
taken or turned in on the day the
student returns to school.
Planned absences, other than
medical appointments, must have
the prior approval of the princi-
pal/designee. At least three (3)
school days prior to the absence,
students are to make pre-arrange-
ments for their test(s) and school
work to be completed. Tests are
to be taken and work will be due
the day the student returns to
school.

Unexcused Absences
Each school will develop ad-
ministrative practices and proce-
dures regarding make-up work for
students with unexcused absences.
Input and involvement from the
faculty, staff, and school enhance-


ment council should be included
in the development of these prac-
tices and procedures. To maintain
academic progress, students
should be encouraged to make up
work, even if credit will not be
awarded. Parents and students
will be provided information re-
garding these practices and proce-
dures.

Suspensions
Students suspended out of
school may be denied the opportu-
nity to make up work for credit.
Determination of this considera-
tion is the responsibility of the
local school principal/dsge.


VII. ENFORCEMENT OF
COMPULSORY SCHOOL


ATTENDANCE
In cases of excessive absences,
tardies, or early dismissals, an at-
tendance assistant or school social
worker may visit or make other
contact with the parents) or
guardian(s) at the home or other
places to discuss the attendance
problem for the purpose of return-
ing the student to regular atten-
dance. Legal action against a
student and parents) or
guardian(s) may be taken for not
complying with the Florida Com-
pulsory School Attendance Statute
(Florida Statute 1003.21).


VIII. DRIVING
PRIVILEGES
Students who fail to comply
with attendance requirements will


lose their driving privileges. Pur-
suant to Section 322.091, Florida
Statute requires schools to report
to the Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicle
(DHSMV) the names of minors
who attain the age of 14 and
above that have accumulated 15
unexcused absences in a period of
90 calendar days. The school prin-
cipal/designee is the contact for
additional information regarding
these requirements.


ATTENDANCE RECORDING
Student attendance records are
to be maintained in accordance
with School Board Policy. Stu-
dents who are on hospital/home-
bound instruction are counted as
present.


from page 19


VI. PROVISIONS AND
DIRECTIONS FOR
MAKE-UP WORK
Excused Absences
Students with excused absences
are given the privilege of making
up work for credit. Students are
allowed the same number of days
for make-up work as the number
of days absent, not to exceed six
(6) school days. The principal/de-
signee may grant extensions to the
make-up time limit for extenuat-
ing circumstances. It is the stu-
dent's responsibility to obtain and
complete all make-up work within
the time specified.
All scheduled tests and assign-
ments that were due on the first












Adult education schedule 2012 2013


LOCATION ROOM # START DATE END DATE START DATE END DATE HOURS DAYS INSTRUCTOR
Online FATDEC-Office Hours 706 8/8/2012 12/20/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 3 5 p.m. M-TH Mitchell, Al
WTI-Day Class
*Free child care available NMonday Thursday,
8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. for qualified participants
For details call: 726-2430, ext. 4326 or 4363 WTI 706 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 8:15 a.m. 2:45 p.m. M-F Mitchell, Al
WTI-Evening Class WTI 706 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 4 8 p.m. M-TH Marshall, Pam
Homosassa Elementary Tech Lab 8/9/2012 12/20/2012 1/8/2013 5/23/2013 4 7 p.m. T & TH Fischofer, Joan
Bldg 200
Crystal River High Room 115 8/8/2012 12/19/2012 12/19/2012 5/22/2013 5 8 p.m. M &W Moore, Linda
Meeting Russ, Kathryn;
Citrus County Jail Room Ongoing Schantz, Shelley



LOCATION ROOM # START DATE END DATE START DATE END DATE HOURS DAYS INSTRUCTOR
WTI: Low to Intermediate WTI 707 8/9/2012 12/20/2012 1/8/2013 5/23/2013 9 a.m. noon T & TH Bennett, Wanda
WTI: High Intermediate to Advanced WTI 707 8/8/2012 12/19/2012 1/7/2013 5/22/2013 9 a.m. noon M & W Bennett, Wanda
WTI: Evening All Levels WTI 707 8/2/2012 12/19/2012 1/7/2013 5/22/2013 4:30 7 p.m. T &TH Ubinas, Laura
Forest Ridge Elementary Tech Lab 8/8/2012 12/19/2012 1/7/2013 5/22/2013 5 8 p.m. M &W Barker, Katherine



LOCATION ROOM # START DATE END DATE START DATE END DATE HOURS DAYS INSTRUCTOR
Vary Please Schedule an
Career Center WTI Room 705 Varies 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 Appointment Blake, Jennifer
Vary Schedule through
Rotating Sites: Reading, Writing, Math Support Varies 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 your GED Instructor Fischofer, Joan




LOCATION ROOM # START DATE END DATE START DATE END DATE HOURS DAYS INSTRUCTOR
WTI Applied AcademicsNPI: Before School WTI 708 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 6:45 7:45 a.m. M-F Hulbert, Janie
WTI Applied AcademicsNPI: Morning WTI 708 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 8:15 11:15 a.m. M-F Hulbert, Janie
WTI Applied AcademicsNPI: Afternoon WTI 708 8/8/2012 12/21/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 11:45 a.m. 2:15 p.m. M-F Hulbert, Janie
WTI Applied Academices/VPI: Homosassa
Elementary Tech Lab 8/9/2012 12/20/2012 1/8/2013 5/22/2013 4 7 p.m. T & TH Fischofer, Joan
Bldg. 200
WTI Applied AcademicsNPI: Crystal River High Rm. 115 8/8/2012 12/19/2012 1/7/2013 5/23/2013 5 8 p.m. M &W Moore, Linda
WTI Applied AcademicsNPI: Late Afternoon
& Evening WTI 708 8/9/2012 12/20/2012 1/8/2013 5/22/2013 3 7 p.m. T &TH Pineau, Sheryl

* Child Care Participants must bring child's Birth Certificate, Current Immunization Record (Blue Card), and Current Physical (Yellow Card)


Saturday, July 21, 2012 G21


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL



























































C 71 5 ~~fPZZ~'


oI yac toSh


G22 Saturday July 21, 2012


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CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


mentoAcil sSAEC hv
been established at each
school in Citrus County. The
SAEC is comprised of par-
ents, students, teachers, sup-
port staff, businesses and
community members and the
principal.
As a resource to the school
and principal, the SAEC:
* facilitates school commu-
nication with parents and
community members
assists in providing pro-
gram support to parents, stu-
dents, teachers and the
community
informs and advises
school staff regarding com-
munity conditions
assists the principal in
preparing and evaluating the


preparation of the school's
annual budget
One of the primary funlc--
tions of the SAEC is to assist
the school in identifying, de-
veloping and implementing
school goals through a
school improvement plan-
ning process. This plan ad-
dresses the needs of the
student as they relate to state
goals and district strategic
aims. SAEC meetings are
open to all school and com-
munity members. Teamwork
and the power of collective
thinking as seen through the
work of the SAEC have re-
sulted in meaningful and
positive change in our school
and district.


The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office School Resource Offi-
cer (SRO) program is a
tremendous resource and tool
for students, teachers and par-
ents in Citrus County. SROs
have been a part of the
county's educational land-
scape since 1985, and the pro-
gram has grown significantly
over the years.
The SRO program takes a
three-pronged approach to
school safety through law en-
forcement, teaching and coun-


selling. With law enforcement
being their primary role,
SROs work daily to keep
school campuses safe. They
also work
in the class- What t~
room teach- hod is
ing such
curricula as OXpansio
Filterin emphasis
Out Crime
United with interv
Students
(FOCUS), Child Lures Pre-
vention and cyber safety in


the elementary schools, a
"Know the Law" course in the
middle schools and a high-im-
pact program called
"Choices"
e future in the high
ontinuedschools. In
addition,
i, with an SROs work
on early closelywith
students in
!ntion. school-
based clubs,
and as coaches in school
sports.
The main goal of the SRO
program is to develop a solid
rapport with students, parents,
teachers and school adminis-
trators, and to serve as a liai-
son with the Sheriffs Office.
What the future holds is con-
tinued expansion, with an em-
phasis on early intervention.
The National Association of
School Resource Officers rec-
ognized the Citrus County
Sheriffs Office as a Model
SRO Agency in 2005.
Former President George
W. Bush paid tribute to Citrus
County's SRO program dur-
ing the 2006 Conference on
School Safety held in Wash-


ington, D.C., where Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy served as a pan-
elist. As a direct result, the
National Sheriffs' Association
uses Citrus County as a suc-
cessful program model for in-
formation distributed to the
nation's sheriffs and police
chiefs looking to find an ini-
tiative for maintaining safe
schools.
The SROs also received a
national award for their posi-
tive impact on school safety at
the 2010 School Safety
Advocacy Council's annual
conference.
Sergeants Ron Frink and
Dave Vincent oversee the
day-to-day activities of the
SROs on the east and west
side of the county, respec-
tively. Currently, there are 14
SROs assigned to a unit that
serves all of the schools
throughout Citrus County.
For more information about
the award-winning SRO pro-
gram, call the Sheriff's Office
at 352-726-4488, and ask for
either Sgt. Frink or Sgt.
Vincent. Or call the SRO pro-
gram supervisor, Lt. Kevin
Purinton, at 352-249-2714.


General contact information
For: Home Education
Contact: Cherise K. Cernich
Coordinator of Student Services
352-527-0090

For: Zoning information and
special attendance requests
Contact: Chuck Dixon
Director of Planning and
Growth Management
352-746-3960
Place: Student Services Center
Located in the Lecanto School Complex
2575 South Panther Pride Drive
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hours: 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.





Tae Kwon Do Junior Beginners
Monday and Wednesday 4:30pm to 5:30pm
With one month paid tuition, get a Dobok uniform FREE

K md Monday and Wednesday:0p ad730mb~;
Wt ne month paid tuitio ,3 mea ud pFmREE g
Schrade Taekwondo & Kumdo, LLC
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info@Schradesteekwondo.com ~ QL


School Advisory

Enlhancement Couned


Citrus Co~unty Sheriff's Office



School Reso~urce Officer program


ht
c
nr
s










Citrus CountyJ Public Schools 2011-2012 Genleral Falcts


Partners For A
Substance-Free Cit


Saturday, July 21, 2012 G23


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACK TO SCHOOL


ElIe m enta ry .......... .....

M iddle ................ ..



Other Schools ............

Total (Pre-k 12) ..........

Anticipated 2012-2013......


..6,960

..3,396

..4,551

....901


......1,246


Tom Rogers, creator of Tommy Tucker and owner of
Graphic Elite Printng and Blue Heron Tees in Inverness;
an~d Maleah Williamson, a Homeschooled student who
portrays Tommy Tucker.

substancefree .citrus @yahoo .com
Like us on Face book
rus 586-7214 601-6620


School Population Data


School District

PG rS On n91


Instructional


Non-Instructional ..1,066

Administrative ............87


.15,808 | Total Employees ....2,399


.15,469


WTI

Extended

Day care

Services
Morning, 6:30 a.m. until
start of school, $21 Week
Afternoon, Dismissal to 6
p.m., $21 Week
Morning and Aftemnoon,
$42 Week
Payment for the first two
weeks will be collected at
the time of registration.
Registration is available at
each Elementary School
Open House. Extended Day-
care staff will be available to
meet with parents and stu-
dents. For additional infor-
mation call Michelle Jones at
726-2430 x. 4360.






G24 Saturday July 21, 2012


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CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


II(


II aar...) t upaed wio oureetlisnl aL.


College of Central Florida offers equal access and opportunity in employment, admissions and educational activities. The college
will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, marital status, national origin, genetic information
or d isa biIi ty status in its employment: practices or in the admission and trea tme nt of students. Recognizing that sexual harassment
constitutes discrimination on the basis of gender and violates this policy statement, the college will not tolerate such conduct. The
following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Carol W. Smith J.D., Equity Officer,
Ocala Campus, Ewers Century Center, Room 201C, 352-854-2322, ext. 1437 or smithcecf.edu. For complete "Continuous Notice
of Nondiscrimination" information visit CF~edu/about/equal access.htm.


Visit the Citrus Learning and Conference Center.


3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto 352746-6721




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