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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02834
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-20-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02834

Full Text

VOLUME 117 ISSUE 348


Afternoon fire
destroys home
in FlOral City
FLORAL CITY -
Afire razed a Floral
City home Wednes-
day afternoon,
causing significant
damage.
According to a Cit-
rus County Sheriff's
Office Fire Rescue
Division fire incident
report, Citrus County
firefighters re-
sponded at 2:20 p.m.
to a structure fire at
383 E. April Court.




just minutes before
fire rescue.
Due to the extent
of the fire, the report
stated crews could
not enter the home
and quickly extin-
guished the fire. In
addition, because of
a lack of fire hydrants
in the area, a water
shuttle had to be
used for firefighters
to eventually put out
the blaze.
The Florida State
Fire Marshal's Office
was notified and re-
sponded to the
scene to investigate
the cause of the fire.
At press time Thurs-
day, the fire was still
under investigation.
Fire rescue esti-
mates the fire caused
$180,000 worth of
damage.
C.R.A.B.
meeting
canceled
The Code Review
and Appeals Board
(CRAB) meeting
slated for Wednes-
day, July 25, has
been canceled.
Members will be noti-
fied by email of the
cancellation, as well
as when the meeting
will be rescheduled.
-From staff reports


SCENE:


Mostly sunny;
10 percent chance
of a thunders r.E 4


Associated Press


SVideo of the Thursday, July 19, North Carolina Utility Commission hearings on former Progress Energy CEO
Bill Johnson's ouster after the Progress Energy/Duke Energy merger can be seen at a Raleigh TV station website at
www.wral.com/business. Johnson gave his side of the story Thursday and answered questions about his surprise
ouster. Two former Progress Energy directors also testified before the commission. The hearings continue today with
two directors from Duke's board answering questions about Johnson's ouster and what the commission should have
known that it did not when it approved the merger.


RALEIGH, N.C. Duke
Energy Corp. displayed
"buyer's remorse" year into
efforts to take over Progress
Energy Inc. and tried to
back out when a federal
agency insisted combining
to form America's largest
electric company required
more concessions to protect
competition, the ousted
CEO told North Carolina
regulators.


Bill Johnson, the execu-
tive dropped within hours
of the two companies com-
pleting their merger July 2,
told the North Carolina
Utilities Commission on
Thursday that Duke execu-


tives tried to slow down
work on completing the deal,
hoping time would run out.
The deal allowed both sides
to walk away without
penalty if that work wasn't
concluded by July 8.


This spring, Duke Energy
CEO Jim Rogers and other
top executives told Wall
Street analysts the deal was
likely to break up and that
Duke would be better off,
Johnson said.


Duke executives asked to
renegotiate the merger
after the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission
last December insisted on

See Page A5


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Community .. . .
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MATTHEW BECK
Staff Wr-iter
-EFANNING SPRINGS
crossing over the
Bridge may not
sound like much of a feat
to many, but for four
developmentally dis-
abled program partici-
pants from the Key
Training Center, the
crossing is a true
accomplishment.
Thursday marked the
fourth day in the 36th an-
nual Run for the Money
fundraiser for the Key
Center. A group of run-
ners from the Citrus
Roadrunners club and
members of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
have been methodically
making their way south,
One step at a time, on
their way to Crystal
River from the Capitol
steps in Tallahassee. The
group has run along
U.S. 19.
Their mission is sim-
ple, yet profound.
That is to raise aware-
ness of developmentally
disabled adults partici-
pating in programs and
living in group homes at
the Key Center in Citrus
County.
Chris Moling is one of
the run organizers. He
and six other runners
Slowed their pace and
walked Thursday morn-
ing alongside the four
develop mentally dis-
abled Key Center resi-
dents taking part in the
river crossing, each run-
ner supplying ample en-
couragement to the Key
residents as they were
wheeled across the
bridge into Gilcrest
County. The group
paused at the bridge's
crest to take in the view
of the fabled Suwannee.
Marie Winterling's
wheelchair is one that
rides low to the ground,
and the chair's height


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Marie Winterling is lifted up in her wheelchair to get a better view of the Suwannee River on Thursday morning with the
help of Chris Moling, right, and Robert Williams. A group of runners participating in the 36th annual Run for the Money
benefit walked with and pushed the chairs of four program participants from the Key Center across the Suwannee.


Moling is in his 11th year of
running in the benefit and
said each time brings new
obstacles
"Every year is different," he
said. "And every year we're
faced with new challenges. It
could be the number of runners
we have forcing some of usto run
a lot of extra miles; some years
we've had bad-weather issues
and the heat is always a prob'
lem. But for us, the mosquitoes
have been terrible this year
That's been the kicker. We've
always had mosquitoes, but
this year they were definitely
worse than ever. They have
been worse than the heat."
Moling admits that while
running 180 miles in the sum-
mer heat is challenging, it
pales in comparison to the
daily struggles Key Center
participants endure.
See Page A9


Marilynne
Denison
steadies
Loretta Davis
Thursday as a
group slowly
crosses the
Suwannee
River Bridge.
Denison
teaches
Zumba
class nat the

I emay oer
there ti ed,
but I always
come out
refreshed "
she said.
"They just
have so much
love and joy.
They deserve
everything in
the world and
I do this for
them."


aThe Key Training Center's
Run for the Money will
conclude Saturday with a
community celebration
when te runnr s arrive at

Lecanto campus. The
campus is at the corner
of West Gulf to Lake
Highway and North Van
Nortwick Road.

prohibited her from getting a
view of the river. Moling and
Citrus County Deputy Robert
Williams gently lifted Winter-
hing's chair off the ground and
held it high so the young
woman could see the
molasses-colored water flow-
ing west toward the Gulf of
Mexico.
"We do this because a lot of
these people can't," Moling
said after wrapping up the
morning run.


Election 2012:' CITRUSJ~ COUNTY SH~ERItFF:


Burch: Streamline

the sheriffs office
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Wr-iter
Republican candidate for sheriff
Steve Burch has a simple message for voters
in Citrus County.
"Been there, done that," he
said.
r~ ~re~Burch, the former Crystal
River police chief, touts his 28
Years in law enforcement as
c -P1-lample reason for voters to
choose him Aug. 14 over his
~GOP primary opponents Winn
fsteve Webb and Hank Hemrick.
Burch"?Twenty out of my 28 years in
law enforcement I spent as a supervisor from
sergeant, lieutenant to police chief. I wrote the
budget and managed the budget," Burch said.
See Page A5

mWHAT: Republican primary for a WHO:
sheriff of Citrus County. and H~
Sheriff


Steve Burch, Winn Webb
ank Hemrick; incumbent
:Jeff Dawsy, Democrat.


mWHEN: Primary election Aug. 14; m SALARY: $125,794.
general election Nov. 6.


British Open: The biggest surprise? Beautiful skies /B1


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Ousted CEO: Duke had 'buyer's remorse'


Upon te uwwannee


Hemrick: Drugs

are out of control
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Wr-iter
Hank Hemrick is hoping the third time will
be the charm.
Hemrick, who ran two pre-
vious times for the office of
sheriff, is hoping his message
resonates with voters against
fellow Republicans Steve
Burch and Winn Webb at the
Aug. 14 primary.
Hemrick's message is con-
sistent: The sheriff 's office is
Hank top-heavy financially, elimi-
Hemrick nate take-home vehicles for
what he calls non-responders and return fire
rescue services to county control.
"And I am a constitutional guy. I like things
See Page A5


Webb: Sheriffs


plane going on eBay
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Winn Webb offered a direct retort when
asked about what his position is regarding the
merger of the sheriff's office
and fire rescue services.
"I am not a fireman. I don't
intend to be a fireman and
like the current sheriff is
~ .. iI~doing, I am not going to train
to be a fireman," he said.
Webb, who is vying for the
Republican nomination to be-
WIinn come sheriff, said he was the
Webb only Citrus County commis-
sioner to vote against the merger of the public
safety agencies in 2011, and is still against it.
"The wheel wasn't broken, why fix it? That's
See Page A5





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A2 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


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DAVE SIGLEPJChronicle
Citrus County workers recently installed video cameras at the intersection of State Road 44 and County Road 491 in Lecanto. The cameras
will be used to detect traffc patterns and change the color of the light, according to a representative from Aldis, the camera manufacturer.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Arud utf;


AIDS.gov website, the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention es-
timates more than one million peo-
ple are living with HIV in the U.S.
And in Citrus County, Tear said there
are people living with HIV/AIDS.
For several years, the health de-
partment has offered a HIV support
group at its Lecanto location.
Whether one or 15 people show
up for the group, Tear said it doesn't
matter; they never cancel based on
the size of attendance.
A nurse with the health depart-
ment oversees the group, and each
week, the session features different


topics, ranging from nutrition to
even holistic ways to cope with HIV
Those who attend the support
group pick the topics.
"It's very grassroots-driven," Tear
said.
People don't have to be HIV posi-
tive to attend the support group.
Friends, family members and sig-
nificant others are welcomed, Tear
said.
And though each meeting is a
group session, people can ask ques-
tions afterward if they feel more com-
fortable speaking to the nurse
one-on-one about a particular matter


"You're with your peers in a clin-
ical setting," Tear said. "It's a real
safe environment."
The HIV support group takes place
from 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday
of each month at the Citrus County
Health Department, 3700 Sovereign
Path, Lecanto. Persons attending may
remain confidential, and any testing
done will be anonymous. Reserva-
tions are not required to attend.
For more information, call 352-
527-0068, ext. 281.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Wr-iter
LECANTO A visit to the doctor
for a regular checkup could lead to
questions about weight, blood pres-
sure or cholesterol levels.
But nowadays, said Judith Tear,
spokeswoman for the Citrus County
Health Department, getting tested
and finding out one's HIV status
should be just as important.
"Really, you need to know," Tear
said Thursday
According to the U.S. Department
of Health & Human Services'


Hospital board
set to meet Friday
The Citrus County Hospital
Board, which hasn't met
since early April due to lack of
a quorum, goes back to busi-
ness Friday with a budget
workshop and regular
meeting .
The CCHB trustees meet
at 9 a.m. for a budget work-
shop on the third floor of the
Masonic Building in down-
town Inverness.
Trustees have a regular
meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the
same location. Trustees Deb-
bie Ressler and Michael
Smallridge will welcome new
trustee Robert Priselac, who
was appointed to the CCHB
by Gov. Rick Scott.
Board business will include
paying $414,955 in bills that
have compiled since the
board's late meeting. Attor-
ney's fees represent nearly
the entire total.

Inglis group to host
candidate meeting
The Inglis Recreation Advi-
sory Board Activities Commit-
tee (RABAC) will have a
candidate "Meet and Greet"
d ym 63 8:3 e pl. lihurs-
Community Center.
All qualified candidates in
the Levy County election
have been invited to attend.
The candidates will have ta-
bles set up with information.
They will be given the oppor-
tunity to speak for one minute
on why they feel they are
most qualified for the position
they are seeking and what
ideas/suggestions they have
for the people of South Levy.
The remaining time will be al-
lotted for one-on-one time
with the candidates.
Bring questions and let
candidates know that South
Levy wants to be an informed
electorate. Any candidates
who wish to attend should
email the RABAC at
inglis.rabac@gmail .com, or
call 352-447-0236.
Elks to honor
Purple Heart recipients
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693 will host a buffet


memorate the 230th anniver-
sary of the Purple Heart and
to honor all Purple Heart
recipients.
The families of those who
died in combat and all com-
bat-wounded veterans and
their guests are cordially in-
vited. Attendees are re-
quested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing
carriejeanettedlemons
@yahoo.com or calling Car-
rie at 352-628-1633. Please
indicate the number in your
party 7
toGen ial Georg Washing-
ton etablshed he Prp e
Heart, originally known as the
Badge of Military Merit, on Au-
gust 7, 1 782. The first Ameri-
can award made available to
the comn solit osn nhe
the world in present use and is


selflessly made the supreme
sacrifice or shed their blood on
the field of battle.
Citrus a proved for
FEMA assistance
Citrus County is now on
the list for individual assis-
tance in response to the
damage caused by Tropical
Storm Debb
Group fr m the state of
Florida and FEMA will be
coming to Citrus County to
speak with residents regard-
ing possible financial assis-
tance for damage incurred
during the storm, through the
individual assistance pro-
gram. You must be registered
with FEMA beforehand.
For residents who sus-
tained damage from the
storm and want to inquire fur-
ther about applying and reg-
istering for assistance, visit
www.DisasterAssistance .gov
or call 800-621-FEMA (3362)


or 800-462-7585 (TTY) for
the hearing and speech
-- From staff reports


..:



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~


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GAIL TIERNEY
Special to the Chronicle
LECANTO Starting on Aug. 14,
individuals who are interested in
becoming volunteer firefighters will
have the opportunity to complete
Firefighter I standards training
under the auspices of the Citrus
County Public Safety Training Cen-
ter (CCPSTC).
Fire Academy students will re-
ceive 250 hours of orientation for
the fire service, fire alarms and
communications, vehicles, firefight-
ing apparatus and equipment, fire
behavior, portable extinguishers,
fire streams, fundamentals of extin-
guishment, and ladders and hoses.


In addition, these first respon-
ders will receive instruction in
tools and equipment, forcible entry,
salvage, overhaul, ventilation, res-
cue and protective breathing
equipment. Beyond that, students
will learn about the principles of
in-service inspections, safety, con-
trolled burning and employability
skills.
According to Citrus Sheriff Fire
Rescue's training coordinator, Curt
Clendenney, classroom instruction
and hands-on skills development
will be conducted at the Citrus
County Fire Training Center at
1300 S. Lecanto Highway in
Lecanto. Training will run from
from 6 to 10 p.m. Tuesday and


Thursday and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
on Saturday from mid-August
through Nov. 17.
The registration deadline for cer-
tified Firefighter I training is Tues-
day, July 31.
From Sept. 10 through Dec. 12, a
Firefighter I and II minimum stan-
dards Fire Academy will give first
responders not only the chance to
become volunteer firefighters, but
to pursue a career in the fire serv-
ice as well.
This time, 500 hours of certified
training will take place at the Fire
Training Center in Lecanto, and
classes will run from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.
The registration deadline for the


academy is Friday, Aug. 24.
Because personal physical fit-
ness, along with health and well-
ness, is an integral part of the fire
service, students also will be re-
quired to pass a physical fitness as-
sessment successfully to graduate
from either program.
For more detailed information
about these two Fire Academies'
curricula, application process,
scheduling and associated fees,
please contact Ana Ramos, CCPSTC
administrative assistant, at 352-726-
2430, ext. 4352, or by email at
Ramosa~~citrus.kl2.fl.us
Gail Tierney is the spokeswoman
for the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.


Special to the Chronicle
CRYSTAL RIVER -
From 12 to 3 p.m. Monday,
the YMCA and Nature
Coast EMS are cleaning up
King's Bay on the last
cleanup day of the summer
at Hunters Spring Park.
Both groups helped clean
out more than three tons of
Lyngbya algae from the
beach and swimming areas
at the park on July 3. Now
they are back, helping the
community with the "1 Rake
at aTime" project sponsored


bTh se v ce pr jcTwas
started in September 2011
and has removed more
than 100 tons of the noxious
algae from the waters of
Kings Bay. Lyngbya algae
grows on pollutants in the
bay, including all the dead,
decaying Lyngbya and
muck covering the white
sand on the bottom of Kings
Bay.
The last big cleanup with
the YMCA was filmed by
WYKE and will be airing at
noon every Sunday in Au-


d it oncbeacdh tnellal6
nel 47.
Those wishing to help
should bring sunscreen,
hats, gloves and shoes that
can get wet. The Kings Bay
Rotary provides rakes and
other equipment.
Current updates on the
project can be found on
Facebook under "Save
KingsBay"
For more information,
call Art Jones at 727-642-
7659 or email MrAWJones
@aol.com.


Special to the Chronicle

The Community Food
Bank of Citrus County an-
nounced the addition of
seven new board members:
Gregg Barber, mechanical
supervisor, Progress En-
ergy; Joseph Cappuccilli,
vice president/broker, Gulf
to Lakes Real Estate; Paul
Cash, CPA, Williams, Mc-
Cranie, Wardlow and Cash;
Duane Dueker, retired IBM
executive; John "JJ" Ken-
ney, county commissioner;
Jewel Lamb, vice president,
Crystal Motors; and Debbie
Roberts, retired elementary
school teacher.
The new board members
are joining JoAnne Boggus,
retired high school princi-
pal; Wayne Dupler, store
manager of Sweetbay Super-
markets; Steve Ponticos,
CEO, Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus County; Phil Scarpelli,
community development ad-
ministrator of the Florida
Department of Children and
Families; and John Marmish,


former United Way of Citrus
County executive.
Marmish, who serves as
the board president, said
that "the new board mem-
bers bring a wide variety of
business, professional and
nonprofit skills to the board.
"The combination of the
new board members with
the original active board of
five members will insure
that new leadership will be
available to continue the
work of the Community
Food Bank in providing
food to feeding organiza-
tions throughout Citrus
County," Marmish said.
The Community Food
Bank is a 501(c)(3) tax-ex-
empt organization that re-
lies on volunteers and
monetary donations from
the community.
The opening date of the
Community Food Bank is
planned for November 2012.
The mailing address is Com-
munity Food Bank of Citrus
County, EO. Box 2824, Crys-
tal River, FL 34423-2824.


Associated Press


1st District Court of Appeal
said Gainesville-based Santa
Fe College must release the
name of a student who sent
the school an email com-
plaining about former math
instructor Darnell Rhea's
classroom performance.
"Hot diggity dog," said
Rhea, who doesn't have a
lawyer and argued the case
himself, when he learned


of the decision from The
Associated Press. "This is
amazing."
The appellate panel
unanimously agreed with
Rhea's argument that the
student's name is not cov-
ered by state and federal
laws granting confidential-
ity to education records be-
cause such complaints don't
directly relate to students.


TALLAHASSEE The
identity of students who
submit complaints about
teachers to public schools,
including colleges and uni-
versities, are public records
and must be disclosed to
citizens, a Florida appellate
court ruled Thursday.
A three-judge panel of the


Page A3 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


LOCAL


Health dept. offers HIV support group


Trafi ca GS


Fire academies set to offer certified trammig


Bay cleanup slated for Monday


Food Bank welcomes


HOW board members


Court: ~ ~ Stdet ms ietfd





Legal 80titts in t048['s Citrus County Chronicle


, .g.




. I~~F


Southwest FL Water Mg mt.Dist... .......... ..........A6

SMeeting Notices C18...............

Miscellan00US Notices...................................1

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..................C18

Notice to C red itors/Adm i nistration ...............C1 8

Self Storage Notices...................................C1

.~ Ta X Deed Notices......................................C1

Dissolution of Marriage Notices...........C1 5, C18

Termination of Parental Rights Notices.......C15


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Trina Murphy ............................ Oper-ations/Adver-tising Director, 563-3232
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Tom Feeney ........................ ...... .............. Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .................... ........................ Circulation Director, 563-5655
John Murphy ........................ ... ...... ........... Online M/anager, 563-3255
John Murphy......................... ..... ............ Classified M/anager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon ....................... .. ..... ............. Business M/anager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold...................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................... Darlene M/ann, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-M/iche Soracchi, 563-3261
Sound O ff ........................................ ............ .....................5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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A4 FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012


LOCAI/STATE


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office

Burglaries
MAvehicle burglary occurred
at about 7:27 a.m. July 18 in the
4000 block of E. Scotty Street,
Inverness.
HA commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 7:29 a.m. July
18 in the 8000 block of W. Miss
Maggie Drive, Homosassa.
HA residential burglary oc-
curred at about 1:23 p.m. July
18 in the 8000 block of N.
Hillview Circle, Dunnellon.
SA vehicle burglary oc-
curred at about 11:33 p.m. July
18 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
HA residential burglary oc-
curred at about 4:04 a.m. July
19 in the 5900 block of W. Fox
Lane, Crystal River.
Thefts
HA grand theft occurred at
about 7:25 a.m. July 18 in the
9400 block of N. Elliot Way,
Dunnellon.
HA grand theft occurred at
about 9:44 a.m. July 18 in the 100
blockofS.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.

ab utA10p:2 a.h tJuly 1 indth
900 block of W. Starjasmine
Place, Beverly Hills.


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News


the boy was found at his Marion
County home with his father: Accord-
ing to the father who is Italian, not
Hispanic as reported in online alerts
Thursday the child is autistic and
has tantrums when he does not get
what he wants.
"He's safe and sound, thank God,"
Parker said, noting Lt. Sue Webb
spoke to the child and checked the
home's surroundings. "Evidently, he
was not very happy about not getting
the toy he wanted."


Earlier in the day, law enforcement
officials were told by a witness that
they saw what they believed to a 10-
year-old Hispanic male being dragged
to a car screaming, "No, No."
According to officials, a witness stated
seeing a Hispanic male, 35 to 40 years
old, taking the child.
Officials said the witness heard the
child screaming and also told author-
ities the adult dragged the child by the
arm across the parking lot and put him
in a red Kia Rondo hatchback vehicle.


DUNNELLON -Dunnellon Police
Department officers located a 6-year-
old boy at his home late Thursday af-
ternoon, after a "suspicious incident"
in the parking lot at the Dunnellon
Wal-Mart had authorities scouring the
area for the vehicle witnesses saw
drive away from the store.
According to Darlene Parker, the
agency's public information officer,


Man charged in cliniC
fire pleads guilty
PENSACOLA--An illiterate
homeless man with a long crim-
inal history pleaded guilty on
Thursday to setting a fire that
gutted a Pensacola abortion
clinic in January.
Bobby Joe Rogers, 41, faces
up to 21 years in prison for de-
stroying the American Family
Planning Clinic.
The clinic has been the site of
protests and violence. In 1994,
dn antbrto oac ist kld a

escort outside the clinic.
At the Thursday hearing,
Rogers told U.S. District Judge

Cs Rdher hg ar e a ut

that he cannot ra or wri e.ad

out of prisons for drug and alco-
hol-related crimes since he was
16, said he had lIwed in the Pen-
sacola area for about eight months
before he set fire to the clinic.

Rogr tod iaastigatrs he
made a fire bomb and threw it
at the clinic on the morning of
Jan. 1 because of his hatred for

p rkn Iot enr rth ciir cand

es ho nofte gtewt d ousds


the clinic. Rogers had no history
of political or social activism.
The judge scheduled an Oct. 4
sentencing hearing after Rogers
pleaded guilty to one charge of
arson and another charge of
destroying a business that pro-
vides reproductive services.
"The Justice Department will
continue to vigorously prose-
cute acts of violence that
threaten reproductive health
workers and establishments."
U.S. Attorney Pamela C. Marsh
said in a statement released
after Thursday's plea hearing.

Tomato grower settleS
harassment lawsuit
IMMOKALEE One of the

s atesmag o eomato 0 wesO


wth lheasdsmen Irco plaints to

According to the Fort Mlyers
News-Press, the women
worked in DiMare Ruskin's
Immokalee fields for three
months and were sexually ha-

fie h n rhy op anee
The U.S. Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission brought
the lawsuit. According to records,

ntowid ani-thora ta

ao t- ani dri iain laws.


For the next three years,
DiMare must report to the
EEOC how it handles any
discrimination complaints.

AllegCed killer's girfriend
t0 be tried again
TAMPA- A day after a
judge declared a mistrial, fed-
eral prosecutors say they will
retry Cortnee Brantley.
Ajr deadlocked Wednesda
in the case against Brantley. Sh'
accused of fleeing the scene

byfrienud ngter prosecu ors Ilege
she saw him kill two Tampa po-
lice officers. After more than


eight hours of deliberations, U.S.
District Court Judge James
Moody declared a mistrial.
Brantley's boyfriend, Dontae
Morris, is charged with killing
Officers David Curtis and Jeffrey
Kocab during a traffic stop in
June 2010. Morris was riding with
Brantley, who was pulled over
for not having a license plate.
Prosecutors said Brantley
fled the scene of the shootings,
which disturbed the crime
scene and deprived investiga-
tors of evidence. They say she

asto r fsed to identify Morris to
ecivs
-From wire reports


cuIRsus .


cuNTY~


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderda e
Fort Myers
Gainesvile
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
ts
ts
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


Southwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
..III have a light chop. Expect a slight
chance of showers and thunderstorms
today.


Location LA Ed LVLThu. Full
Withlacoochee at H-older 30.54 30.82 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.13 35.20 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 36.91 36.97 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.33 40.39 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
anna fleoo wthic hhah a 43-p eo dna ctc Mofnbaen getuae sdr crt dsed tnnty ooeyr i nis od ae
will the District or the I.nited States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796 7211

THE NATION


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 95 L w: 73
..e~ Mostlm sunny; 10% chance of a

SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
SHigh: 94 Low: 75
_~~~T' IPartly cloudy; 30% chance of a t-storm

SUNDAY & MIIONDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 73
.---l Partly sunny; 50% chance of t-storms

ALMANAC


'. - - 1 ,
.. Sony 70s
80 70sb, 2 90s -- s 0 OU~i I..0
--- -- ..

..r C
74 rr.
Los
Lrseles .
1%toSEIL~aO rn -p~ 90s .


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 7 p.m, at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m.


89/72
98/64
92/71
81
-1

trace
4.55 in.
32.17 in.
28.08 in-


POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopod, grass
Today's count: 2.9/12
Saturday's count: 4.8
Sunday's count: 3.2
ALIR QUALLITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


100s P

FORECAST IFOR 3:00 P.MI.
IFRIDALY


6sos


nonclulu
87/72
das


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate'

7BAROhM TRI 3 ESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 30.15 in.


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Ahville
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham

Buffalo
Bur ington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
charotte


Co umbia, SC
Co umbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Haris N g
Hartford
Houston
Ind anapolis
La eas
Llttie Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville


Mnneapolis
Montgomnery
Nashville


ThuLd p. Fc t L


Ciy Thursda FridayL
New Orleans 90 75 .85 ts 89 76
New York City 76 69 .02 r 74 65
I ahma City 14 78 pc 14 5
Omaha 97 71 pc 93 70
Palm Springs 106 82 pc 104 81
Philadelphia 85 76 ts 81 66
Phoenix 107 87 pc 109 86
Pittsburgh 84 69 1.13 ts 81 66
Motad rE 6 sh 765
Providence, R.I. 78 67 pc 78 60
Raleigh 97 76 ts 93 73
Rapid City 107 67 ts 102 73
Reno 77 65 s 88 61
Rochestei ONY M76 pc 746
S Lo is arie 3 pc 967
Salt Lake City 94 65 pc 93 77
San Antonio 91 73 pc 96 75
San Diego 74 68 pc 73 64
San Francisco 70 55 pc 69 54
Savannah 92 75 .99 ts 91 74
Seattle 77 58 sh 69 57
Spokane 89 64 ts 82 57
Syracuse 83 60 pc 75 57
Tpseki gton 2 .15 tpsc 997
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Philip, S.D.
LOW 36 Stanley, Idaho
WORLD CITIES


84 61 pc
92 68 pc
97 04 t
83 73 .04 ts
93 71 pc
95 76 ts
100 67 ts
92 72 ts

79 66 c
76 54 s
90 75 .43 ts
89 68 158 ts
92)7 ts
86 73 8 t
94 73 ts
82 71 .08 ts
80 53 pc
10079 pc
99 64 pc
94 72 s
76 71 .13 pc
92 73 pc
1007 tpse
81 70 r
93 74 pc
92 73 pc
20 7 83 tpsc
10379 pc
85 65 pc
98 73 .04 pc
817 28 pc

92 73 ts
95 71 ts


74 55
96 67

80 72
98 75
83 68
99 66
90 74

76 63
79 55
91 75
84 68
M3 7


93 74
86 68
78 50
100 76
98 66
92 70
80 65
95 75

77 59
93 76
84 67
12 8
102 76
72 63
90 72
97 7

90 74
91 71


SOLUNAR TABLES
DA~TE DA~Y MINOMRORM JOR MINOFRERM JOR

7/20 FRIDAY 7:05 12:53 7:29 1:17
7/21 SATURDAY 7:56 1:45 8:20 2:08
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
OO *SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 8:28 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:45 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................8:09 A M.
JGI2 AllRG. 1 UG. 0 M6. 17 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 9:22 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
~Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
hnt /mf eonfon dfr gmhiceo dtis /pk ise visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:

WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
H-and watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


CITY IFI/ /K
Acapulco 91/79/ts
Amsterdam 64/51/sh
Ates 98 76
Berlin 64/51/sh
Bermuda 86/78/pc
Cairo 99/76/s
Calgary 78/55/ts
Havana 89/73/ts
Hong Kong 90/79/pc
Jerusalem 93/71/s


Madrid
Mexico City
M nroe I
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


98/68/s
72/54/ts

65/52/c
72/60/s
89/68/s
62/47/s
82/71/sh
79/59/pc
64/50/c


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King s Bay
Friday
City HighlLow HighlLow
Chassahowitzka* 7:45 a/3:11 a 7:02 p/3:04 p
Crystal River** 6:06 a/12:33 a 5:23 p/12:26 p
With accochee* 3:53 a/10:14 a 3:10 p/10:54 p
Homosassa*** 6:55 a/2:10 a 6:12 p/2:03 p


'**At Mason's Creek
Saturday
HighlLow HighlLow
8:14 a/3:44 a 7:43 p/3:45 p
6:35 a/1:06 a 6:04 p/1:07 p
4:22 a/10:55 a 3:51 p/11:27 p
7:24 a/2:43 a 6:53 p/2:44 p


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c~cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h~hazy; pc~partly cloudy; r~rain;
rs~rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh~showers;
sn~snow; ts~thunderstorms; w~windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Mladison, Wi,


Child involved in'suspicious incident' safe


ON THE NET
aFor the Record reports
are also archived at
www. ironic e
on ine.com.


MA petit theft occurred at
about 12:43 p.m. July 18 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
MA grand theft occurred at
about 2:11 p.m. July 18 in the
5700 block of S. Garcia Road,
Homosassa.
MA petit theft occurred at
about 2:38 p.m. July 18 in the
1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
MA grand theft occurred at
about 3:34 p.m. July 18 in the
6200 block of S. Canna Lily Av-
enue, Homosassa.
HA grand theft occurred at
about 3:45 p.m. July 18 in the
5500 block of S. Bob White
Drive, Homosassa.
HA petit theft occurred at
about 4:41 p.m. July 18 in the
1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
abA petit tpt ocu8 ndath
10 block of S. Fillmore Street,
Beverly Hills.


State BRIEFS


YESTERDAY'SS WVEATIHEIR


FLORIIDA TEMIIPERATURIES


MVARINIYE OUlTLOOK


Gulf water
temperature


85O
Taken at Aripeka


HI LO PR *IL PH
93 77 0.00 193 75 0.00

THREE D)AY OUTLOOK( Exc'uasdaily


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CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CBUR H
Continued from Page Al

He said it is that budget-
savvy approach, coupled with
his experience and knowl-
edge he plans to bring to the
sheriff's office if elected.
Burch told the Chronicle
Editorial Board about his
eight-point plan to reorgan-
ize the agency.
He said some of the first
things to go if he is at the helm
would be the "42 cars that go
home" with non-sworn offi-
cers and one of the public in-
formation officer positions.
"We will also have to look
at the air force and having
multiple armored vehicles,"
Burch said.
He said he doesn't think
there is need for two helicop-
ters and a fixed-wing plane.
"Everything willhave to have
a clear, definable benefit to the
citizens of the county," he said.
Burch would also give back
to the county Fire Rescue serv-
ices, which merged with the
sheriff's office in 2011. He took
issue with the notion that
sheriff's deputies would be
volunteering as firefighters as
a way to buttress the service
and cut costs.


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 A5


"I think that's against the
Fair Labor and Standards
Act. You can't have people
who work for an agency or
business having to volunteer
for them," he said.
Burch said instead he
would focus the agency's re-
sources in building a traffic
unit to combat aggressive
driving and DUI issues. He
said patrol deputies will be
encouraged to focus more on
those traffic issues rather than
minor traffic infractions.
Burch said he would also
return Child Protective In-
vestigations to Department
of Children and Families.
"My question is, if it's such
a wonderful idea, why aren't
the other 60 counties doing
it?" he asked.
The sheriff's office and six
others have contracts with DCF
to investigate incidences of
child abuse and neglect.
Burch began his career at
Clearwater Police Depart-
ment and was the last police
chief in Crystal River before
the sheriff 's office took over
operations in 2008. Burch
also served a short stint as
police chief in Lake City.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at352-
564-2925 or at asidibe@
chronicleonline.com.


n't want to be stuck with me
as the person who dragged
them to it," Johnson told
state regulators investigat-
ing the aftermath of the
merger involving North
Carolina's two Fortune 500
energy companies.
Duke's board of directors
never told the utilities
commission that officials
were considering a change
at the top for two months,
even as the regulatory
agency rushed to meet the
timetable for merging the
two companies. The utili-
ties commission is investi-
gating why Johnson was
dumped as CEO a detail
commission Chairman Ed-
ward Finley called "a pri-
mary factor of the merger"
Commissioners also want
to know why they weren't
told.
The commission can re-
scind or alter its approval
of the merger, including
imposing fines or setting
new conditions. The com-
mission also approves re-
quests for rate increases,
and Duke's operating eom-
panies are expected to file
two rate requests later this
year.
Rogers testified to the
commission last week that


directors told him they
were disappointed with
Johnson's "autocratic"
style, his handling of ongo-
ing problems with Progress
Energy's closed Crystal
River nuclear plant in
Florida, and the company's
financial performance.
Johnson's narrative de-
picted those explanations
as a ruse to get rid of him.
Johnson said tensions
with Rogers and with their
executive teams rose after
December, when FERC for
the second time rejected
approval of the merger
over concerns it would re-
duce competition for
wholesale electricity in the
Carolinas.
"It was very apparent to
me that the Duke manage-
ment had had a change of
heart when they started
looking at what the mitiga-
tion plan for FERC would
cost," Johnson said under
friendly questioning from
Finley. The two men
worked together two
decades ago as utilities law
specialists in the same
Raleigh law office.
In March, Duke and
Progress said they would
spend $110 million to build
new or upgrade existing


power transmission lines
to increase the electricity
that can flow into their
home territories from out-
side suppliers. Johnson
said the total cost of meet-
ing FERC's conditions is
$225 million. Duke Energy
spokesman Tom Williams
said the full cost is still
being determined.
Progress had been ap-
proached by corporate
buyers several times and
once came "exceedingly
close" to merging with At-
lanta-based Southern Co.
before talks collapsed.
Progress recognized it was
carrying heavy debt and
knew that merging with an-
Other company would help
it save on fuel costs, labor
and lower borrowing costs
for upgrading decades-old
coal and nuclear plants.
Progress faced financial
trouble if the Duke deal
fell through, Johnson said.
Progress agreed to be
bought out for a price just 5
percent higher than its
stock was trading not so
Johnson could become
CEO, but so the combined
company would be more
profitable in the first year
than the separate compa-
nies could be, he said.


drug problem, you will see
other crimes decrease,
Hemrick said.
He said he would also set
up a traffic unit to go after
aggressive drivers and
drunk drivers, but leave
Others alone.
Hemrick said being a
constitution guy, he disap-
proves of officers setting
up check points and stop-
ping motorists without rea-
sonable suspicion.
He recounted a story of
an elderly driver who was
allegedly stopped going 29
in a 25 mph zone and told
she would not get ticket if
she agreed to a search of
her vehicle. Hemrick said


would handle what he calls
the issue of "toys" in the
agency
"The air force. In my
first day in office, I will
have the fixed-wing air-
craft on eBay. It is my un-
derstanding that thing has
not even been used in
years," Webb said.
He said there is also the
issue of the 10 captains the
agency currently has.
"I will do like they do in
the military: one captain for
about 200 officers. I will cut
spending and not services,"
Webb said.
He also pledged to strip
the take-home vehicle pro-
gram for non-sworn officers
and introduce a more trans-
parent budgetary process.
"Everything will be item-
ized," Webb vowed.


K-9 was called, but upon
arrival, the woman was
suddenly told to go on
without explanation. He
said those are the kind of
encounters he will seek to
discourage as sheriff.
"I would want all my
deputies to go introduce
themselves to people in the
community and get to know
them. Engagement is going
to be a big part of what do,"
Hemrick said.
He said fiscally, he
would reorganize a man-
agement structure he con-
tends accounts for nearly
$2 million in pay and
benefits.
Hemrick said he will cut


While he said he has no
problems with the sheriff's
office retaining Child Pro-
tective Investigations, Webb
said said he does have is-
sues with the cost of the re-
cent spate of child sex-sting
operations. He estimates
they cost an average of
$10,000 per defendant
through the legal process in
the county.
"I think we should keep
tabs on the deviants here in
this county and not get oth-
ers to come here," Webb
said.
Webb also said even in
these economic times, the
sheriff's office has managed
to give pay raises "averaging
about 72 percent in the past
two years."
"I think we can do it for
less," he said.


all unnecessary expendi-
tures and functions, but
not services.
"I will have a line-item
budget, unlike what we
have now. My question is
why can't we (trim) the
budget," he said.
Hemrick is a retired
deputy warden of the New
York City Department of
Corrections. Hemrick has
run unsuccessfully for
sheriff in 2004 and 2008.
He also finished third in a
three-way school board
race.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Webb is a Navy veteran
and was a deputy with
the sheriff's office until
2008. He became a county
commissioner that same
year

Chronicle Reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached 352-
564-2925 or at asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


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Please RSVP: S per n Resi eces ofLecant (352 746-5483


0000C1LO


Continued from Page Al

changes to protect whole-
sale power customers in
North Carolina and South
Carolina, Johnson said.
Raleigh-based Progress
Energy refused unless
Charlotte-based Duke paid
the $675 million break-up
fee, Johnson said. Work on
integrating the two compa-
nies halted in January, the
same time Progress hired
outside lawyers to make
sure the deal got done,
Johnson said.
The merger went ahead.
Duke Energy now has 7
million electricity cus-
tomers in North Carolina,
South Carolina, Florida,
Indiana, Ohio and Ken-
tucky. But Johnson was out
hours after the deal was
done. Rogers was again
named CEO of Duke En-
ergy. Johnson left with
nearly $45 million in sever-
ance, pension benefits, de-
ferred compensation, and
stock awards.
"They wanted the
merger, then they didn't
want it, then they couldn't
get out of it, then they did-


CHEMRI K
Continued from Page Al

done according to the Con-
stitution," Hemrick to the
Chronicle Editorial Board.
However, Hemrick sees a
clear and present danger
facing the county the
drug problem.
"I will be the sheriff that
will do things. We will be-
come a major player in the
war on drugs," Hemrick
said.
He said he would set up
an elite task force to take
on the issue head on.
"If we can reduce the



WEBB
Continued from Page Al

the way I see it," he said.
Webb told the Chronicle
Editorial Board his philoso-
phy is people-oriented
policing.
"When I was a deputy and
you go into Wal-Mart and a
parent with a little child will
see you coming and they
will tell the child, 'See, if
you don't behave, I will have
the officer arrest you.' No,
that's not the image I want
children to have about offi-
cers. I don't want fear: I want
them to trust officers and
feel free to approach them,"
he said.
Webb said officer rapport
with the community can
give unlimited access to
valuable information for
sheriff's office personnel in
the performance of their du-
ties.



sics," Webb said.
He said Citrus is "basi-
cally a good county" with a
big drug problem that is
bemeg overliodokhed.wudst
up specialty drug units to
tackle the problem. He also


Safeguard w

you value me

YOUR FAMILY


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stands or is repealed if
Obama is defeated and Re-
publicans regain control of
the Senate in the Novem-
ber election.
Edmund Haislmaier, a
senior research fellow for
the Heritage Foundation,
predicted many employers
will find ways to drop
health care coverage for
their workers if the law re-
mains on the books.
some aspects already
have gone into effect such
as requiring insurers to
cover children's pre-exist-
ing conditions. The most
far-reaching elements, in-
cluding a requirement for
most people to buy health
insurance coverage, will
not go into effect until
2014.
"We're going to see fewer
products and fewer op-
tions, which I don't think is
good ultimately for Floridi-
ans," the board's chairman,
Insurance Commissioner
Kevin McCarty, said after
the meeting.




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Carol Neeld, 70

.HOM~oe OAf~-

mosassa, Fla., passed into
the loving arms of Jesus on
July 17, 2012.
She was also affection-
ately known as "Ms. Carol"
to the faculty and students
at Homosassa Elementary
School where she worked
for many years, and to the
staff and patients of Cypress
Cove Care Center where
she faithfully looked after
her aging mother for more
than a decade. Carol was
born in Staten Island, N.Y.,
the daughter of the late S.
Ward Taylor and Magna H.
Taylor.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 25 years, R.
Murray Neeld; her son,
James P! Lambert (Jo Anne),
of Sarasota, Fla.; her daugh-
ter Cynthia M. Brown (Dan),
of Marietta, Ga.; five grand-
children and two step-grand-
children. She also leaves
behind her mother, Magua H.
Taylor, of Crystal River, Fla.,
and her brother, Er~anklin H.
Taylor (Martha), of Braden-
ton, Fla. Additionally, she
was a loving and loved step-
mother to Robert M. Neeld
Jr, of Cape Coral, Fla., Lillie
N. "Cissy" Mason (Steve), of
North Fort Myers, Fla.,
Colleen E. Neeld, of Vero,
Fla., and Judith N. Fitzger-
ald, of North Fort Myers,
Fla.; five grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren.
For everyone who knew
Carol, she was an inspira-
tion; a woman who truly
lived out her faith. She was
a loving, giving and forgiving
ok of Crisbt, er Lridnand

deeming the time and mak-
ing the most of every
opportunity. Her hands
were never idle. Her depar-
ture from this world is
mourned, but her long-
awaited entrance to her
heavenly home is cause for
rejoicing. She will be truly
missed on this earth, but her
fani n whs that sh lis se-

Jesus. We look forward to
being reunited with her one
day. Her wish would be that
everyone would come to
know her Lord and Savior


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0720-FRCRN

Notice of Development of Rule Making
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) gives notice that it is developing
rules as part of a statewide effort headed by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) and joined by all five water management districts (WMDs), to increase consistency in the
consumptive use permitting (CUP), minimum flows and levels (MFLs), and water supply related
programs of the WMDs. This rule development is proposed to be coordinated with similar rule
development by the other WMDs throughout Florida. This rule development will make appropriate
rule amendments to SWFWMD's Chapters 40D-1, 40D-2, 40D-8, 40D-21, and 40D-22, F.A.C., and
the Southwest Florida Water Management District Water Use Permit Information Manual to address
the following goals of the DEP and the WMDs for this rulemaking: (1) making the CUP rules less
confusing for applicants; (2) treating applicants equitably statewide; (3) providing consistent
protection of the environment; (4) streamlining the application and permitting process; and (5)
incentivizing behavior that protects water resources, including water conservation. Additional
information about the statewide CUP consistency initiative is available at DEP's website at:
www. dep. state. fl. us/water/waterpolicy/cupcon. htm.
SUBJECT AREA TO BE ADDRESSED: This rule development will include, but may not be limited
to, the amendment, repeal, or development of rules as needed to accomplish CUP consistency
goals, on the following subjects: (1) consumptive use permit criteria; (2) limiting conditions (permit
conditions by rule); (3) permit thresholds; (4) permit types; (5) permit duration; (6) water
conservation requirements; (7) annual allocation requirements and other rules needed to provide
continuous reasonable assurance throughout the duration of a permit; (8) modification of permits;
(9) 10-year compliance reports; (10) compliance monitoring and forms; (11) application forms; (12)
permit fees to address related changes to permit thresholds or permit types; (13) procedural rules in
chapter 40D-1, F.A.C.; (14) water shortage plan rules in chapter 40D-21, F.A.C.; (15) minimum flows
and levels (MFLs) rules in chapter 40D-8, F.A.C.; and (16) other rules for which conforming
amendments may be needed along with any rule changes made in the subject areas identified
above.

Note: Members of the District's Governing Board may attend the scheduled Rule Development
Workshop.
RULEMAKING AUTHORITY: 373.044, 373.113, 373.171, FS.
LAW IMPLEMENTED: 373.042, 373.0421, 373.109, 373.118, 373.219, 373.223, 373.227, 373.229,
373.236, 373.239, 373.246, 373.250, FS.
A RULE DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP WILL BE HELD AT THE DATES, TIMES AND PLACES
SHOWN BELOW:
DATE AND TIME: Immediately following the Chapter 62-40 rule workshop of the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, which is scheduled to begin at 9:00 a.m. on August 15,
2012
PLACE: SWFWMD, Governing Board Meeting Room, District Headquarters, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, Florida 34604
DATE AND TIME: Immediately following the Chapter 62-40 rule workshop of the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, which is scheduled to begin at 9:00 a.m. on August 16,
2012

PLACE: SWFWMD, Governing Board Meeting Room, Tampa Service Office, 7601 Highway 301
North, Florida 33637
DATE AND TIME: Immediately following the Chapter 62-40 rule workshop of the Florida
department of Environmental Protection, which is scheduled to begin at 9:00 a.m. on August 21,

PLACE: Florida Cattlemen's Association, 800 Shakerag Road, Kissimmee, Florida 34744
THE PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING THE PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT AND
A COPY OF THE PRELIMINARY DRAFT, IF AVAILABLE, IS: Laura Jacobs Donaldson, Esq.,
Southwest Florida Water Management District, Office of General Counsel, 7601 US Hwy. 301,
Tampa, FL 33637-6759, (813) 985-7481 or 1-800-836-0797 (Florida only),
laura.donaldson@swfwmd.state.fl.us or Sonya White, Senior Legal Assistant, Southwest Florida
Water Management District, Office of General Counsel, 7601 US Hwy. 301, Tampa, FL 33637-6759,
(813) 985-7481 or 1-800-836-0797 (Florida only), So nya.Wh ite @swfwmd.state.fl .us.
THE PRELIMINARY TEXT OF TH E PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT AVAILABLE


Board Certified American Board of Dermatology; American Society for Dermatology Surgery;
Mem ber American Association of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Fellow American Society for MOHS Surgery


A6 FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


personally and share her as-

srn re ts ntrna 1 flh3 M

ers, donations can be made
to Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs, Fla.,
www wilderfuneral. co m.

Josie Berk, 89
CR Y STAL RIVER
Josie Jane Berk, 89, of
Crystal River, died July 18,
2012, at Health Center at
Brentwood. Wilder Funeral
Home assisting family with
the arrangements.






Robert 'Bob
Fichtner, 94
LECANTo

Robert "Bob" J. Fichtner,
94, of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away July 18, 2012, under
the care of Hospice of Citrus
County.
Born on April 21, 1918, in
Akron, Ohio, he served in
the Army during World War
II. Bob was an avid chicken
farmer and raised a few
cows. Bob had the most
wonderful sense of humor.
He was an insurance sales-
man for many years.
Bob leaves behind his lov-
ing son Robert; his compan-
ion Eliner Oglesby; three
sisters, Marylynn, Pat and
Anita; brother, Joe; grand-
daughter Angie; grandson
Bobby gre tgad aghe

son Jake. Private cremation
will take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be made
to Hospice of Citrus County.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. con2.

OBERJARIES
a Deadline is 3 p.rn. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
a Phone 352-563-5660.


Ludwig,


Ludwig and Annette Na-
hodyl's memorial service of
remembrance is at 11 a.m.
Monday, July 23, 2012, at
Beverly Hills Community
Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Flineral Home.


O'Sullivan, 83
BE VER LY HILLS
Irene A. O'Sullivan, 83, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Wednesday, Julyl18, 2012. Vis-
itation is from 2 p.m. until the
Rosary service at 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 22, 2012, at Fero
Flineral Home. A funeral
Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday, July
23, at Our Lady of Grace, with
entombment to follow at
Fero Memorial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Flineral Home.

Death
ELS EWNHERE

FOrreSt
McCartney 81
FO 'E
FORMERY SP
K EN NEDY A E
DIRECTOR
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
_ Retired Air Force Lt
Gen. Forrest McCartney, 81
a former director of
Kennedy Space Center who
was crucial in getting
NASA's shuttles flying again
after the Challenger
tragedy, died Tuesday.
McCartney took charge of
t en thySspa 1 Ce trt in
1986 Challenger launch ac-
cident. He served until 1991
three years after the re-
sumption of shuttle flights.
NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden said in a
statement that McCartney
was one of the finest of
Kennedy's 10 directors over
the past half-century. Mc-
cartney was a nuclear engi-
neer by training and served
as commander of the Air
Force Space Division in the
early to mid-1980s.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
consumer advocate urged
Florida insurance officials
on Thursday to seek public
comment on essential
health care benefits under
the federal Affordable Care
Act.
Laura Goodhue, the con-
sumer representative on
the Florida Health Insur-
ance Industry Advisory
Board, made her appeal at
a meeting of the panel,
which focused on other as-
pects of President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul following a U.S.
Supreme Court ruling that
upheld the law.
The board, made up
mainly of insurance indus-
try and business represen-
tatives, did not take public
testimony on the law's es-
sential health care benefits
provision, but the state has
received some written com-
ments and will keep the
record open so more can be
submitted, said Deputy In-
surance Commissioner
Michelle Robleto.
States have the flexibility
to implement essential
health benefits under the
law beginning in 2014. They
include hospitalization,
prescription drugs, mental
health, maternity and
newborn care and emer-
gency services.
Goodhue, executive di-
rector of Florida CHAIN, a
halth advocacy opr niza-

providers and employers
should have a role in mak-
ing those decisions.
"It really should be
made with public input
and not unilaterally and


not behind closed doors,"
Goodhue said.
Plans to accept comment
are fine but the state
should first advance some
proposals so the public can
react to them, she said.
Goodhue acknowledged
federal officials have yet to
issue formal regulations on
the essential benefits, but
she said they have pro-
vided enough informal
guidance for the state to
begin developing
proposals.
Gov Rick Scott, a
staunch opponent of the
Affordable Care Act, has
announced he doesn't in-
tend to expand the state-
federal Medicaid program
for low-income and dis-
abled patients. The
Supreme Court ruled the
federal government cannot
force the states to imple-
ment that part of the law.
The board also heard
from representatives of a
private health insurance
industry group, a state
agency that oversees
Florida's Medicaid pro-
gram and the conservative
Heritage Foundation.
Many of their comments
were hypothetical depend-
ing on whether the law





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CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 A7


re enuesat $1ft15bllh6Hontsr1n

the elease fwearni gs re 1 s. Rdod

quarterly loss since the company's initial
public offering in March 1986.
Microsoft's fortunes are tied to the Octo-
ber release of Windows 8, the most extreme
redesign of the company's flagship operat-
ing system since 1995. Windows 8 will fea-
ture a new look that will show applications
in a mosaic of tiles and boast new technol-
ogy that will enable the operating system to
work on touch-controlled tablet computers,
as well as its traditional stronghold on
desktop and laptop computers. In conjune-
tion with Windows 8, Microsoft is planning
to release its own tablet, the Surface.
A revamped version of another lucrative
franchise, Microsoft's Office software that
bundles word processing, spreadsheet and
email programs, is also in the works. Ear-
lier this week, Microsoft previewed how
the next version of Office, expected to be
released next year, will work on tablet
computers running on Windows 8.
With Windows 8-powered devices still a
few months away, some prospective PC buy-
ers have been postponing their purchases
sontheyoca hu utlheT laest echniolotgydtrm
slowdown in PC sales, and revenue in Mi-
crosoft's Windows division has now
dropped in five of the past seven quarters.


Mrm faults 2007
d COmpany purchase

Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Microsoft said Thurs-
day that an accounting adjustment to re-
flect a weak online ad business led to its
first quarterly loss in its 26 years as a pub-
lic company.
The software company had warned that
it was taking a $6.2 billion charge because
its 2007 purchase of online ad service
aQuantive hasn't yielded the returns envi-
sioned by management. The non-cash ad-
justment is something companies do when
the value of their assets decline. Microsoft
Corp. paid $6.3 billion for aQuantive, only
to see rival Google Inc. expand its share of
the online ad market.
The charge led to a $492 million loss in
the April-June quarter, or 6 cents a share.
That compares with earnings of $5.9 bil-
lion, or 69 cents, a year ago.
Revenue rose 4 percent to $18.06 billion.
Excluding the adjustment and the de-
ferral of some revenue into the current
quarter related to its launch of Windows 8,
earn ngs caemetsto 73scients er shtarde,bbeaat-

alysts polled by Factset.
Although the earnings were higher than
expected, analysts were looking for higher


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO The
Silicon Valley venture capi-
tal firm of Kleiner, Perkins,
Caulfied & Byers has been
generating buzz for decades,
spotting early investment
opportunities and making
billions with companies like
Google and Amazon. This
summer, the attention is no
different, but the reason for
it is.
The firm, with a roster of
senior partners including Al
Gore and Colin Powell, is
embroiled in a lawsuit that's
the talk of the valley, ex-
changing nasty accusations
with a junior partner who
accuses Kleiner of gender
bias, sexual harassment and
overall boorish behavior to-
ward women.
The legal fight offers an
inside peek at the firm's jet-
setting ways, internecine
fights over board of director
seats at "portfolio" compa-
nies and the cost of social
snubs.
The lawsuit was filed by
Ellen Pao, a 42-year-old
Harvard Law School gradu-
ate who joined the firm in
2005.
Pao accuses Kleiner of
blocking her and other
women from advancement
and lucrative positions she
claims are reserved for
men. The firm has pro-
claimed its innocence and
alleges Pao "twisted facts


and events in an attempt to
create legal claims where
none exist."
Pao still works at the firm,
which calls itself one of the
most "progressive" compa-
nies in Silicon Valley in its
hiring practices. Kleiner
says that one-quarter of its
senior partners are women.
Since Pao filed the law-
suit in May in San Francisco
Superior Court, the tech
world has been abuzz. Tech
web sites have closely cov-
ered the case, even live
blogging routine hearings.
In larger context, Pao's
suit highlights an oft-heard
claim that, despite progress,
it's difficult for women to
break through in Silicon
Valley's male-dominated
culture.
Kleiner opened its doors
in Menlo Park in 1972, when
few independent invest-
ment firms existed. Its rise
mirrored that of Silicon Val-
ley's. The firm's early in-
vestments in some of the
computer industry's biggest
names propelled it to
prominence.
Kleiner has hired high-
priced employment attor-
ney Lynn Hermle to do
battle with Pao's equally
high-profile attorney, Alan
Exelrod.
Regardless of what hap-
pens next, damage already
is done. The court records
are full of accusations,
counter accusations and


long-simmering resent-
ments of Pao and her bosses
at Kleiner, who labeled her
a poor performer passed
over for promotion only for
lack of merit.
Pao claims her troubles at
the firm started almost upon
her arrival.
Pao said she filed her law-
suit after enduring five
years of harassment from
Ajit Nazre, a junior partner
when she was hired who
was later promoted to sen-
ior partner. Nazre left the
firm in January and didn't
respond to email and phone
messages.
Pao claims that senior
partners such as Doerr ig-
nored her complaints about
Nazre. She concedes she and
Nazre had "two or three"
consensual sexual encoun-
ters but alleges he began ha-
rassing her after she broke
off their relationship.
According to her lawsuit,
Nazre began excluding her
from important meetings,
email chains and withhold-
ing necessary information
for her to succeed at
Kleiner. Instead of address-
ing her alleged problems,
Pao claims partners either
ignored her complaints,
joined in her ostracism or
worse.
The firm said Pao never
complained about Nazre or
any other harassment until
she hired her attorney in
late 2011.


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Silicon Valley rocked by


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A8 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


NATION/WORLD


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


such as a ban on overtime
from July 27 to Aug. 20 -
what is expected to be one
of the busiest periods ever
for London's airports.
In more transit trouble,
about 400 train workers
have threatened to strike for
three days in central Eng-
land during the Olympics in
a pension dispute. Drivers
for East Midlands Trains
said Thursday the strike
would be from Aug. 6 to 8.
The strikes could be
highly disruptive to the
games Olympic soccer
matches are being held
across the U.K, many work-
ers and Olympic tourists are
coming from outside London
and thousands of spectators
are likely to use trains to get
to venues around the capital.
British public sector
workers have held a series
of strikes in a largely unsuc-
cessful bid to derail govern-
ment spending cuts.
Cameron's Conservative-led
administration is aiming to
slash the budget by $130 bil-
liOn by 2015 in a bid to curb
a deficit swollen by the
global financial crisis.
The strikes are the latest
in a long list of pre-Olympic
glitches. Officials had to
scramble to plug security
gaps for the games, after
contractor G4S admitted it
would not be able to provide
the thousands of guards it
had promised.


Associated Press
St. Paul's Cathedral is seen in the distance as the Olympic rings hang Thursday from the Tower Bridge in London. Open-
ing ceremonies for the 2012 London Olympics are Friday, July 27.


ments in place to ensure we
can deal with people coming
through the border as
smoothly as possible."
Jeremy Hunt, the top gov-
emnment official handling the
Olympics, said he was "ab-
solutely confident" that the


government would be able to
minimize any disruption.
During previous border
guard strikes in November
and May, the government
drafted in managers and civil
servants including Prime
Minister David Cameron's


press secretary to help
staff immigration desks and
minimize the disruption to
incoming travelers.
The government eager
to avoid any disruption as
visitors descend for the July
27 to Aug. 12 games is


hoping that many staff turn
up for work despite the
walkout. Only 20 percent of
union members voted in the
strike ballot.
The union said its mem-
bers also will take other
forms of industrial action,


Associated Press

ATLANTA The U.S. ap-
pears headed for its worst
year for whooping cough in
more than five decades,
with the number of cases
rising at an epidemic rate
experts said may reflect a
problem with the effective-
ness of the vaccine.
Nearly 18,000 cases have
been reported so far -
more than twice the number
seen at this point last year,
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention said
Thursday. At this pace, the
number for the entire year
will be the highest since
1959, when 40,000 illnesses
were reported.
Nine children have died,
and health officials called
on adults especially preg-
nant women and those who
spend time around children
- to get a booster shot as
soon as possible.
"My biggest concern is for
the babies. They're the ones
who get hit the hardest,"
said Mary Selecky, chief of
the health department in
Washington, one of the
states with the biggest out-
breaks. Washington and
Wisconsin have reported
more than 3,000 cases each,
and high numbers have
been seen in a number of
other states, including New
York, Minnesota, Kansas
and Arizona.
Whooping cough has gen-
erally been increasing for
years, but this year's spike is
startling. Health investiga-
tors are trying to figure out
what's going on, and theo-
ries include better detection
and reptng fioeams'es, sme
teria that cause the illness,
or shortcomings in the
vaccine.
The vaccine that had
been given to young chil-
dren for decades was re-
placed in the late 1990s
following concerns about
rashes, fevers and other
side effects. While the new
version is considered safer,
it is possible it isn't as effec-
tive long term, said Dr. Anne
Schuchat, who oversees the
CDC's immunization and
respiratory disease
programs.
Some parents in Califor-
nia and other states have re-
belled against vaccinations
and gotten their children
exempted from rules that
require them to get their
shots to enroll in school.
Washington state has one of
the highest exemption rates
in the nation. But the CDC
said that does not appear to
be a major factor in the out-
break, since most of the
youngsters who got sick had
been vaccinated.
Whooping cough, or per-
tussis, is a highly contagious


disease that can strike peo-
ple of any age but is most
dangerous to children. Its
name comes from the sound
children make as they gasp
for breath,
It used to be a common
threat, with hundreds of
thousands of cases annually.
Cases gradually dropped
after a vaccine was intro-
duced in the 1940s, and the
disease came to be thought
of as a relic of another age.
For about 25 years, fewer
than 5,000 cases were re-
ported annually in the U.S.
The numbers started to
climb again in the 1990s.
In both 2004 and 2005,
cases surpassed 25,000. The
numbers dipped for a few
years but jumped to more
than 27,000 in 2010, the year
California saw an especially
bad epidemic.
Experts believe whoop-
ing cough occurs in cycles
and peaks every three to
five years. But they have
been startled to see peaks
this high. Vaccinations are
supposed to tamp down
the amount of infection in
the population and make
the valleys in the cycles
longer, said Pejman Ro-
hani, a University of
Michigan researcher who
is co-leader of a federally
funded study of whooping
cough trends.
The government recom-
mends that children get vac-
cinated in five doses, with
the first shot at age 2 months
and the final one between 4
and 6 years. A booster shot
is recommended around
age 11 or 12.
Vaccination rates for
abun herdunt ang30 ar-
olds have gotten the rec-
ommended number of
shots. But fewer than 70
percent of adolescents
have gotten all their shots.
Most states require pertus-
sis vaccinations for school
attendance.
In possible indicator of
a problem with the vaccine,
investigators in Washington
state were alarmed to see
high rates of whooping
cough in youngsters around
13 and 14.
Whooping cough typi-
cally starts with cold-like
symptoms that can include
a runny nose, congestion,
fever and mild cough. The
CDC advises parents to see
a doctor if they or their
children develop a pro-
longed or severe cough.
Whooping cough is treated
with antibiotics, the earlier
the better.
Health authorities are
girding for what may be a
bad couple of years.
"There is a lot of pertussis
out there, and there may be
more coming to a place near
you," Schuchat said.


*To help defer additional
costs foardship ing and handling


Border guards to strike on eve of Olympics


bdt dtCRC dipr



Associated Press

LONDON -Border
guards at British airports will
walk off the job July 26, the
day before the London
Olympics begin, creating an
Olympic-sized logistical
headache for British officials.
Members of the Public
and Commercial Services
Union voted for the 24-hour
strike in a dispute over pay
and job losses,
Even without the strike,
London's Heathrow Airport
has been beset for months by
sporadic long lines at pass-
port control, which the union
blames on government
spending cuts. The problem
had eased in the last week as
thousands of Olympic VIPS
arrived for the games, but a
walkout threatens a return of
the endless waits at the worst
possible moment for Britain's
international image.
Theresa May, Britain's in-
terior minister, called the de-
cision to strike on the eve of
the games "shameful." She
said the government would
"put contingency arrange-


CDC: Whooping


cough rising at

alarming rate in US


Donate $25 or more to the Key Training Center /

during the month of July and receive a custom

11X14 photo print of "FREEDOM" by Artist ggypTO B
Don Mavo. Larger nhoto prints un to 20x25

are aVailable by calling 352-795-DUCK(3825). *'

AII contributions are accepted by CHECK ONLY M

made out to the Key Training Center and are

gratefully appreciated. Mail orders can be sent to
P.O. Box '1209, Crystal River, FL 34423*.


CUStom nhoto prints are available at the Citrus County

Chronicle in Crystal River. Please watch this ad all month for

ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS to make your donation and receive

the Don Mayo "FREEDOM" print.


Special thanks to VisualSports.org for their printing the custom
photo for the Key Training Center.


www.chronicleonline.com
1 624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429






















































































KEY TRAINING CENTER
Kindness, Love, Dignity, and Respect



It's Run for the Money Week,
with runners taking turns cover-
ing the 180 miles between the
Capitol in Tallahassee and the
Key Training Center campus in
Lecanto. While the grueling jour-
ney is to raise awareness about
the developmentally disabled, it
is especially significant in that it
brings attention to the need for
donations to cover the expenses
of Key clients who don't receive
government support.

I Now on the final leg of their
Creek and Inglis.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY:
1991
When they reach the Inglis
traffic light, runners adhere to
tradition and celebrate, pray,
drink Gatorade cocktails and
just sit in the roadway median
being thankful for the many
miles they traveled. "But there's
just a real feeling of road weari-
ness here. We d on't want to
stretch this out one more mile
than we have to."
MYTH: Educational and vo-
cational training will not help
people who have developmental
disabilities.
FACT: The people we serve
at the Key Training Center
prove this myth wrong every


of Citrus County, Inc.


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Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning July 23, 2012.

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CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 A9


Associated Press

GOSHEN, Conn. The birth of
a white bison, among the rarest of
animals, is bringing Native Amer-
icans who consider it a sacred
event to celebrate at one of the
least likely of places, a farm in
New England.
Hundreds of people, including
tribal elders from South Dakota,
are expected to attend naming
ceremonies later this month at
the northwestern Connecticut
farm of Peter Fay, a fourth-
generation Goshen farmer.
Native Americans in the area
have come with gifts of tobacco
and colored flags for Fay and the
bull calf since it was born there a


month ago, and Fay is planning to
offer his hay field as a campsite
for the expected crowds.
"They say it's going to bring good
things to all people in the world.
How can you beat that? That's the
way I look at it," Fay said.
Connecticut farms host only
about 100 bison, a tiny fraction of
the populations in Western states.
Fay, whose family traditionally
stuck to dairy farming, took on
bison four years ago as a hobby,
enamored by the animals' tough-
ness. He built his herd to 40 be-
fore recently selling half of them.
Word spread rapidly after the
arrival of the white bison, which
experts say is as rare as one in 10
million, and Fay invited Native


Americans for the ceremonies at
his farm below Mohawk Mountain.
The calf, born on June 16, is off-
white not an albino and Fay
said he is certain the bloodlines
are pure, although he has sent its
DNA for testing to confirm there
was no intermingling with cattle.
Tens of millions of bison once
roamed America's plains, but the
over-hunted population shrank to
about 1,000 toward the end of the
1800s. Their numbers have re-
bounded to several hundred thou-
sand, and wildlife and tribal
groups are now pushing Congress
to have the bison recognized as
America's "national mammal." The
National Bison Legacy Act was in-
troduced in the Senate in May.


A white bison
calf walks in
a field with
another bison
calf Wednesday
at the Mohawk
Bison farm in
Goshen, Conn.
Hundreds of
people are
expected to
attend naming
ceremonies at
the Goshen
farm where the
animal wal6
brn lune 1.


Associated Press


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Program participants Loretta Davis, Shelly Hilsman, Dorothy Cole and Marie Winterling are eased across the Suwannee River Bridge by seven runners who are taking part in the
Run for the Money benefit.


Run for the MONEY


"I work with the clients.
I have about 90 of them
that come to the Zumba
classes I teach," she said.
"I may go there tired, but I
always come out re-
freshed. They just have so
much love and joy. They
deserve everything in the
world and I do this for
them."
Like many of the 18
other runners, Denison
has taken time off from
work to run this week.
"I took a week off of
work to do this," she said.
"And we're just enjoying
the experience."
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Deputy Robert
Williams is running in his
first Run for the Money
and said the run is per-
sonal for him.


"You get a real sense of
personal satisfaction out
of this," he said. "The
cause is great and today is
fantastic with the clients
being out here. Today we
get to see the folks who are
being helped by all of this.
I wish I would have done
this last year."
Denison, who is the fit-
ness director at Dynabody
Fitness Club in Inverness,
said this run and the
clients it serves are spe-
cial in her life.
"I'm a personal trainer
and fitness is in my blood,"
she said. "But the Key Cen-
ter is in my heart."

Chronicle staff writer
M~atthewBeck can be reached
at 352-564-2919 or mbeck@
chronicleonline. com.


journey, runners trek through the long, flat stretch between Otter


day. Many are working in the
community and have learned
many new jobs. We have many
who live in their own apart-
ments and could not have done
so without learning new skills
as they do each day in classes
at ADT (Adult Day Training) or
in their apartments.
Shirl Blder, Key Training
Center vocational services
director
MYTH: Adults with develop-
mental disabilities cannot make
their own friends and prefer tO
be with people like themselves.
FACT: Persons with develop-
mental disabilities enjoy partici-
pating in a variety of activities
surrounding their specific inter-


ests. They enjoy new and chal-
lenging experiences where they
meet new individuals who allow
them to develop new and last-
ing friendships. Persons with
disabilities have friends that
have disabilities but they have
many friends without disabilities
as well.
Sara Roberts, Key
Training Center housing and
residential director


Waterbody Plant
Hernando Pool Torpedograss / Nuphar /
Tussocks


Herbicide Used
Glyphosate /2,4D


Inverness Pool Torpedograss / Hydrilla / Super K /Aquathol / Diquat /
Nuphar/Tussocks/ Floating Glyphosatel 2,4D


Floral City Pool Torpedograss /
Foating Heart / Nuphar /
Floating


Hand Removal / Glyphosate /
Diquat / 2,4D


H~ernarlo Pooll fusss IBladderwort


Harvesting
Harvesting


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated
areas will be Identified with "Warning Signs" Indicating the date of treatment and the
necessary water use restrictions. For further Information, please call 352-527-7620
or vewhtour Cwe I 0 ntyht / iiww. bccdcit u.fL us pubworks/aq uatics/aquatic-


Native Americans to celebrate white bison in Conn.


Continued from Page Al

"All of our tolls that we
go through out here are
nothing compared to what
many of these clients go
truh hn daily b ss"
ther sd. 'That's what ,e
remember when we're out
here grinding it out trying
to get our miles in. And
we're all happy to bring at-
tention to it."
Moling said one motorist
stopped her vehicle this
week after seeing the run-
ners logging their miles
and asked about the pur-
pose of the run. After a
brief explanation from the
runners, he said, the
woman gave them a $50
cash donation on the spot.
"Stuff like that just
warms your heart. People
can embrace it," he said.
"So these able bodies are
out here putting in the
miles for those folks from
the Key that can't."
Marilynne Denison, 68,
is a volunteer at the Key
Center. She is also a fitness
trainer and marathon run-
ner who is participating in
her third stint in the Run
for the Money event.


Chris Moling, one of the run's

Organizers, said one motorist
stopped her vehicle this week after
Seeing the runners logging their
miles and asked about the purpose
Of the run. After a brief explanation,
the woman gave them a $50 cash
donation on the spot.













































































ii: ii~i d ~
~
~
1 b i r'

;~B


A10 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


OPINION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Chris Moling's contributions to center win begh praise


Gitrus County schooki eamn top recognition


MELISSA WALKER
Special to the Chronicle
The Key Training Center, a
nonprofit organization that pro-
vides year-round services to
more than 300 adults with devel-
opmental disabilities, had the
distinct honor of recently pre-
senting this year's Citizen of the
Year award to Chris Moling.
There is hardly an event or oc-
casion in this community that
happens without this man's ex-
pertise and dedication. It could
be a wedding; it might be a bike
race; it could be an all-nighter
for Relay for Life; or it might be
the music man for a charity
dance.
He sets up the soundtrack for
a chamber video, flies to the
trails to organize a fundraising
marathon, lays the groundwork
for a benefit rally and sets up the
amplifiers for a tournament.
His entrepreneurial adven-
tures began in his early teens,
when he borrowed the money
from his dad to go into the DJ
business, with his first gig at the
Roller Barn in Inverness. And
yes, he paid his dad back.
Today his office and his home
are lined with notes and memos
of things to do, places to be,
speeches to give, music to play,
races to run and organizations to
help. While his ideas turned into


a career and his ideals turned
into passions, he found the time
to achieve a personal goal, to
climb to the highest point in
every state in the United States.
But nowhere are those heights
greater than what he has done
for the Key Training Center
For decades, he has made
everyone at the Key Training
Center feel like they come first.
He brings his music and his DJs
to every dance for the clients.
He designs the roadmap for the
Clean Air Ride and then turns
around and donates the pro-
ceeds to the Key. He brings his
troops in for the Run For the
Money 5K Run/Walk and was in-
strumental in every step of this
year's Walk a Mile in Their
Shoes, bringing hundreds of
men, women and children to
hold hands with the men and
women of the Key for the grand
finale of that special day -a day
which he has helped coordinate
and support and he will run
alongside the others as they
sweat their way on the pave-
ment from Tallahassee.
And still, he willecross that fin-
ish line this year with that con-
tagious, infectious grin to tell
everyone the best is here and
the best is worth being a part of.
And because he believes it, so do
others. And he won't even look
tired.


As a sought-after motivational
speaker, he is armed with cards
of advice that he readily shares
with others, and truly lives by.
One of these cards reads:
SPromise yourself to be so
strong that nothing can disturb
your peace of mind.
SPromise yourself to make all
of your friends feel that there is
something in them.
SPromise yourself to forget
the mistakes of the past and
press on to greater achieve-
ments of the future.
SPromise yourself to wear a
cheerful countenance at all
times, and give every living crea-
ture you meet a smile.
SPromise yourself to be too
large for worry, too noble for
anger, too strong for fear and too
happy to permit the presence of
trouble.
These are not just words he
carries around in this pocket,
but truly the standards he has
chosen to live by. This year's
award honors much more than
his talent, his expertise, his ef-
fectiveness and his accomplish-
ments we honor Chris
Moling's heart. The Key Train-
ing Center gives our thanks, our
appreciation and in return, our
smiles to Chris Moling.
M~elissa Walkeris assistant ex-
ecutive director of the Key
Training Center

Sound oF1F ~


MELISSA WALKER
Special to the Chronicle
The Key Training Center's recip-
ient of the Organization of the Year
Award goes to an instrumental
group that believes in the unlimited
potential of our Citrus County stu-
dents by respecting and developing
their unique learning styles and in-
terests.
This organization fosters a cul-
ture of civility where students and
adults are treated with fairness, are
respected for their contributions,
and are celebrated for their suc-
cesses. Partnering with this organi-
zation for more than 30 years has
strengthened the Key Center's edu-
cational and athletic experience for
adults with developmental disabili-
ties.
With the assistance of the Citrus
County schools, the Key Center is
able to receive annually the Adults
With Disabilities Grant that goes to
fund two adult basic education
teachers and supplies vital to Key
clients hands-on learning about
meal planning, cooking, nutrition,
cleaning, exercise, laundry, sewing,
public transportation, traffic sig-
nals, and computers.
These teachers teach reading,
writing, money management, telling
time, making change, and relation-
ship with others. When visiting a
Key Center Adult Basic Education
Classroom, you just never know


what type learning you will witness,
but rest assured you'll have a class
of smiling faces with inquisitive
questions.
Each year, more than 350 athletes,
consisting of Key Center clients and
students of the CREST public
school, make their way to Crystal
River High School for the much-an-
ticipated Citrus County Field Day.
This day is a celebration of young
and older adults with developmen-
tal disabilities participating to the
best of their athletic abilities in a
variety of events, including the
three-wheel bicycle race, softball
throw, 25- to 50-yard dash, basket-
ball throw, Erisbee throw and soccer
kick, putting challenge and much
more. The Citrus County schools
makes this memorable day possible
with the assistance of their dedi-
cated administrators, talented
teachers and committed students.
The day ends with a lot of smiles,
but more importantly, the tremen-
dous sense of pride backed with
well-deserved medals of accom-
plishment. The joy shown on the
athletes' faces as they cross the fin-
ish line, whether they are first or
last, is a priceless expression of
total excitement. It does not get any
better than that.
The Key Training Center proudly
recognizes the Citrus County School
System as their 2012 Organization of
the Year for making a real differ-
ence in the lives of persons with de-


really concerned. I see nothing
but foreclosure upon foreclosure. I
count almost 11 homes that are
closed up with the papers on the
windows saying it's a foreclosure.
Nine of these, the grass is getting
really high. I'm concerned who's
going to take care of these
homes.
Action, reaction
If the nuke plant did shut down,
would they have to stop building
the sidewalks to start with?
Lightning storms
This is in reference to the July
12 front-page article in the Chroni-
cle about "Flash photography at
issue in springs." Think about the
lightning and thunderstorms that


are normal here in Florida. If
flashbulbs will worry and hurt the
manatees, they must go com-
pletely out of their minds during
thunder-and-lightning storms.
Tong trick
If an item falls on the floor and
you can't bend down to pick it up,
use a pair of tongs to pick it up
with. Also, if you use a walker, buy
sticky Velcro and put it on your
walker and tongs. Enjoy your
new toy.
Drug m ster
I don't know how these NASCAR
drivers, how stupid do they think
we are as race fans, citizens, pri-
vate people. But now all of a sud-
den, Allmendinger said he tested


positive for a banned substance
but doesn't know how he got it,
which is amazing, the mystery
and everything. Also, he wants to
appeal and be tested again. Well,
everybody knows if you wait long
enough, any banned substance
will be eliminated from one's body
just through normal nutrition. So I
think if he waits long enough and
is tested again, oh my gosh, he's
not going be, he'll be drug free.
COSily COngfOSS
The cost of keeping Congress
open for one single day is
$30,275.
Made in China
I just heard the Olympic players
are now wearing uniforms made


in China. I think that is a disgrace.
I think they should be ashamed of
themselves. I think the USOC
should be ashamed of them-
selves. Where is our American
pride? To wear clothing made in
China? That is disgraceful. I won't
even watch them.
Clearing hydran s
Not for nothing, Joe Spoto, but
if I lived in Pine Ridge, I wouldn't
be worried about somebody else
clearing the hydrants. When you
live among a bunch of flammable
pine trees, I'd be finding the two
nearest hydrants, clearing them,
keeping them clear and painting
them the brightest neon color I
could find. I mean, but that's just
me.


*1~IIIIIIIIL ,~iiiU~Cr"Y~n.'~


Key honors citizen, organization


Athletic losers
It's amazing these athletes
today who are on physical-enhanc-
ing drugs, all of them don't know
they're doing it. Why do these
people feel they can't compete in
a sport, that they've got to take
drugs so they're winners? They're
not winners. Anybody (who) has to
take a drug to win something is a
loser in my book. It's so foolish to
say that's what they've got to do
to get their name in the paper. In
the long run, they're taken to
court, it's proven and they're look-
ing like an idiot.
Foreclosures
I've lived in Citrus Springs for
almost 25 years and I'm getting


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Citrus County's Oldest Gun Dealer
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Heathcock helpful
You will be pleased to
know in the District race
for county commissioner we
have a candidate to vote for
by th name ofShannon11
Hetco k, wo as a sma l
successful business owner
fully understands what it
takes to lower the unemploy-
ment rate in the county, and
how to help local businesses
thrive in this tough economy,
because he has done it
Shannon Heathcock
owns Dash Transport,
which provides non-emer-
gency medical transporta-
tion to everyone who needs
a ride to their doctor, or
elsewhere, so Shannon is
already helping those in
need in our community, and
now he wants to do more.
It is a well-known fact
small businesses drive the
economy everywhere, and
employ the majority of
qualified workers, who in
turn spend their hard
earned cash locally. So it
helps everyone in the com-
munity to do whatever they
can to help hard-working
small business owners.
All of the present county
commissioners talk a good
game about what they are
doing to help businesses, but
when they as a group pass a
Secondhand Dealers Ordi-
nance that hurts a large
bunch of honest business
people in the county, you
have to ask "How can I be-
lieve or trust these people?"
This ordinance negatively
affects jewelry stores, con-
signment shops, secondhand
dealer shops, pawn shops,
coin shops, flea markets,
auction houses, precious
metal dealers, mail-in sec-


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I ~


CrrRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 All


ondhand precious metal
dealers, and even yard sales.
Personally, I'm tired of
hearing the same old prom-
ises and excuses from the
BOCC, while they throw
away our tax dollars on Ot-
tawa Street, Port Citrus, the
Taj Mahal-Meadowerest Gov-
ernment Center plus other
expensive boondoggles. So
get to kmnow and remember


the name Shanne
cock and listen to
for Citrus County
lets elect Shanno
cock, a real hone
ness smart straig
businessman to D
You will be glad y
Wi


Hemrick q
I believe Hank
a well-qualified i
having life exper
City of N.Y Corre
ing as an assistant
warden. He has b:
pervisor with a cl
agency in Brookl
trained with the j
forcement Admir
He is a U.S. Ail
eran and a Vietn;
who was honora~
charged. He hold
degree in public
tion from John J~
Criminal Justice
York City I think
agree he is immi:
ified to be our sh
Hank has an u
manner about h
stills confidence
who meet him. 1
impressed with
ment to ethics a:
lence in all that
Hank thinks on


business community, re-
tirees, and remainder of the
hard-working folks in Citrus
County, then Mr. Kitchen
should definitely be your
candidate of choice.
After attending several
forums I was amazed at the
amount of research Mr.
Kitchen appears to have
undertaken prior to speak-
ing and presenting his vi-
sion for Citrus County. If
you want a candidate who
will give you 110 percent, if
you want a candidate who
will deliver his leadership,
experience and commit-
ment to each and everyone
of us in Citrus County, then
Mr. Ron Kitchen should be
your choice for commis-
sioner, District 1.
Patrick Shipman
Crystal River

Webb working
Citrus County is a fabulous
place to live but, we real-
ize this little piece of para-
dise has been trailing behind
most of the country when it
comes to economic growth.
Many businesses have either
closed or relocated. Those
that remain have had to lay
off or cut wages and benefits,
not because they wanted to,
but because the economy
has forced their hand.
Property values are
down, homes are being
foreclosed and that means
a big reduction in our tax
revenues. We have the nu-


clear plant issue hanging
over our heads, and if that
closes, our county will lose
megabucks in tax revenues.
Counties larger than ours,
all across the country, are
experiencing huge financial
crises and bankruptcies.
Our present sheriff has kept
our county safe, but, with an
extremely large budget.
At this time, it is essen-
tial for all of us to elect
candidates who will ensure
the necessary services and
safety and security of our
citizens, as well as our fis-
cal integrity. Now is the
time to cut wasteful spend-
ing, and rid ourselves of ex-
traordinary maintenance
expenses on grandiose
equipment that we simply
do not need to keep our
county safe and secure.
There is such a candi-
date for sheriff who also
happens to be:
HA native of Citrus
County
MA veteran who proudly
served his country.
HA former business
owner who understands fis-
cal prudency while main-
taining quality standards.
HA former Citrus County
deputy who remains dedi-
cated to the safety and se-
curity of every resident.
Winn Webb knows he can
do the job without breaking
the bank. He's got my vote!
Peggy DeFrancisco
Lecanto


on Heath- has many ideas for saving
,his ideas taxpayer dollars.
, ad then I agree with Hank that
n, Heath- too much money is spent on
st to good- the sheriff 's office aviation
ht shooter unit and not enough on
districtt 3. drug interdiction. Hank be-
ou did. lives it is unnecessary for
the Citrus County Aviation
nston Perry Division to have two heli-
Homosassa copters and a twin-engine
fixed-wing aircraft. One
qualified helicopter would be suffi-
Hemrick iscent for search and rescue.
ndividualHank believes the fire
ience in the department should be re-
3ctions, retir- turned to the county. We
Itdeputy have a fire chief who can
een a su handle the department, we
hild welfare should let him do his job.
yn, N.Y, and Hank will brmng much-
Drug En- needed change to the sher-
nistration. iff's office with a healthy
r Force vet- infusion of ethics and morale
am veteran building. Discipline will im-
bly dis- prove with written standards
Is a master's everyone can understand
administra- and adhere to. Take-home
ay College of cars will be curtailed and
in New will only be allowed for
;you would emergency responders.
nently qual- What does all this mean?
eriff. There will be a noticeable
assuming scaling back of sheriff 's of-
im that in- flee operations with no loss
Sin people of protection or enforce-
They are ment actions. We are a small
his commit- county with roughly 143,000
nd excel- people living here. We are
he does. not a county with many mil-
his feet and lions in population and a


tax base to match. Hank will
watch your pocketbook He
knows how to do it
Please support Hank
Hemrick for sheriff of Citrus
County
Richard "Dick" Callahan
Crystal River
Kitchen the choice
I moved to Citrus County
nearly four decades ago. I
have witnessed the good
times and not-so-good
times in this evolution.
The upcoming open pri-
mary election for commis-
sioners is as important as it
has ever been. Many chal-
lenges will continue to face
Citrus County and its diver-
sity of citizens in the future.
If your criteria as a voter
is based on the number of
signs a candidate has
posted throughout the
county, then Mr: Ron
Kitchen is not your choice
in the District 1 county com-
mission race. However, if
you want a commissioner
whose primary mission is to
balance the needs of the


/i


Fla~Jwr~*~~?la(r~a~,.!
"1


L~YI


Endorsement LETT ERS


EDITOR'S NOTE
With elections soon upon us, the Chronicle has enacted
its practice of asking that endorsement letters be
limited to the reasons writers are supporting candidates
not why they won't support candidates.
While it's acceptable to address specific issues of con-
cern, anti-candidate letters will not be published and/or
sections of letters focused on criticizing specif ic
candidates will be deleted.


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Yesterday Pvs Day

Argent 4.5530 4.5570
Australia .9589 .9659
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 2.0192 2.0243
Britain 1.5720 1.5643
Canada 1.0074 1.0111
Chile 485.25 487.75
China 6.3739 6.3722
Colombia 1775.50 1777.50
CZech Rep 20.70 20.61
Denmark 6.0585 6.0655
Dominican Rep 39.12 39.10
Egypt 6.0678 6.0670
Euro .8145 .8154
Hong Kong 7.7556 7.7564
Hungary 231.49 232.08
India 55.150 55.390
Indnsia 9451.00 9445.00
Israel 4.0033 4.0155
Japan 78.58 78.80
Jordan .7075 .7079
Lebanon 1502.00 1501.50
Malaysia 3.1540 3.1640
Mexico 13.2261 13.1675
N. Zealand 1.2446 1.2516
Norway 6.0547 6.1018
Peru 2.620 2.621
Poland 3.38 3.40
Russia 31.8550 32.2586
Singapore 1.2534 1.2584
So. Africa 8.1676 8.1718
So. Korea 1139.25 1141.98
Sweden 6.9208 6.9451
Switzerlnd .9782 .9791
Taiwan 29.99 30.01
Thailand 31.61 31.67
Turkey 1.8024 1.8030
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 21.5999 21.5999
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.2b .00-.2b
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.10
6-month 0.14 0.15
5-year 0.61 0.63
10-year 1.51 1.48
30-year 2.61 2.56



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

LtSweetCrudeNYMXSepl2 92.97+2.80
Corn CBOT Decl2 778V2 -53/
Wheat CBOT Sep 12 935 +313/
Soybeans CBOT Nov 12 1652V/4 +32V/4
Cattle CME Decl2 128.07 +.95
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 12 23.25 +.30
Orange Juice ICE Sep 12 112.60 -3.50


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1580.10 $1564.90
Silver(trovoz.. spot) a2/.194 a2/.136
Copper(pound) $3.5340 $3.411b
Platinum trovev oz., spot)$142U./U $14US.8U

NMER =New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT-=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER =Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE =New York Cotton, Sugar &Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN =New York Cotton Exchange.


Name Div Yld PE Last Chg%YTD Name Div Yld PE Last Chg %YTD
AK Steel .20 3.6 ... 5.48 +.15 -33.7 McDnlds 2.80 3.0 17 92.76 +.54 -7.5
AT&T Inc 1.76 5.0 51 35.48 -.71 +17.3 Microsoft .80 2.6 11 30.67 +.22 +18.1
Ametek s .24 .7 21 34.24 +.12 +22.0 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 19 47.51 +.85 +2.6
ABlnBev 1.57 2.0 ... 79.44 +.93 +30.3 NextEraEn 2.40 3.4 14 70.30 -.20 +15.5

Bkf~ .04 .6 58 76 .+36 ende Ofc 80 4 10.2(66 +.95 -41.

CntnjLink 2.90 7.0 34 41.59 +.82 +11.8 RegionsFn .04 .6 25 6.65 -.07 +54.7
Citigroup .04 .2 8 26.59 -.51 +1.1 SearsHldgs .33 ... ... 54.06 -.48 +70.1
CmwREIT 2.00 10.4 23 19.23 -.04 +15.6 Smucker 2.08 2.7 19 76.95 +.99 -1.6
Disney .60 1.2 1848.99 -.36 +30.6 SprintNex ... ... ... 3.71 +.05 +58.5
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.6 17 66.12 +.05 ... Texlnst .68 2.4 18 28.04 +.39 -3.7
EnterPT 3.00 6.9 31 43.74 -.06 +.1 TimeWarn 1.04 2.7 14 39.14 +.22 +8.3
ExxonMb| 2.28 2.6 10 86.21 ... +1.7 UniFirst .15 .2 14 64.20 -1.04 +13.1
FordM .20 2.1 6 9.35 -.03 -13.1 VerizonCm 2.00 4.5 48 44.54 -1.35 +11.0
GenElec .68 3.4 16 19.80 -.04 +10.6 Vodafone 1.99 6.9 ... 28.84 -.20 +2.9
HomeDp 1.16 2.3 19 50.96 +.05 +21.2 WalMart 1.59 2.2 15 71.53 -1.32 +19.7
Intel .90 3.5 11 26.06 -.15 +7.5 Walgrn 1.10 3.2 12 34.62 +3.65 +4.7
IBM 3.40 1.7 14 195.34 +7.09 +6.2 YRC m ... ... ... 5.97 +.24 -40.1
Lowes .64 2.5 17 26.03 +.37 +2.6


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


CleanHs 59.53 +.84 EOGRes 98.25+t1.55 FMCG 34.42+t1.40 HarmonyG 8.99 -.06 iSEafe 50.33 +.46
CliffNRs 47.16 +1.30 EQCo~rp 55.41 -.41 Freescale 10.21 +.68 HartfdFn 16.86 -.02 iShiBxHYB 91.78 +.23
Clorox 73.37 +.14 EastChm s 49.84 -.12 Fusion-io 20.30 +1.33 HawaiiEl 28.73 -.51 iSR1KG 64.14 +.39
CloudPeake 15.88 -.08 Ealon 39.53 +.41 I HltCrREIT 60.75 -.10 iShR2K 79.95 -.27
Coach 61.02 +3.03 EVEnEq 10.76 +.04 Hlt~gmt 7.63 -.07 iShUSPfd 39.40 +.03
CobaltlEn 24.07 +.31 Edisonlnt 45.80 +.15 GATX 41.50 +2.41 HlthcrRlty 24.28 -.11 iShREst 64.95 -.55
CCFemsa 123.09 -.55 Ban 13.87 +.12 GabelliET 5.44 +.01 Hecktmann 3.36 +.06 iShDUHm 16.58 -.29
CocaCola 77.55 +.11 BdorGldg 10.46 +.11 GabHlthW 8.64 +.06 HeclaM 4.37 +.05 iStar 6.63 -.21
CocaCE 27.44 +.25 Embraer 25.56 +.73 GabUIl 8.24 +.01 Heinz 55.25 +.03 ITTCps 18.72 +.37
CohStlnfra 17.49 -.08 EmersonEl 47.03 -.13 GameSlop 16.80 -10 Hertz 12.21 -.32 Idacorp 43.19 -.18
ColgPal 105.62 +.34 EmpDist 21.68 -.25 Gannett 14.86 +.08 Hess 44.99 +.09 ITW 53.64 +.90
CollcWvBrd 21.51 -.01 EnbrdgEPt 30.00 +.07 Gap 29.48 +.36 HewlettP 19.10 -.21 Imaton 5.58 -.04
Comerica 31.20 -.42 GenDynam 65.99 +.19
CmwREIT 19.23 -.04
CmlyHlt 27.11 -.56
CompSci 23.60 -.26 ''
ComstkRs 17.60 +.87
Con-Way 34.88 -.23 1
Conngra 24.58 -.19 1
ConchoRes 90.17 +1.03 www.chronicleonlime.com
Cono~cPhils 56.37 +.26
ConsolEngy 30.29 -.40
ConEd 63.36 -.14
ConstellA 29.15 -.20
ContlRes 76.26 +3.81
Cnvrgys 14.95 -.05
Cooperlnd 68.60 +.36
Corning 12.46 +.07
CottCp 8.40 +.09 j a
CovantaH 17.21 +.12
Covidien 53.64 +.43
Crane 38.19 +.78
CSVSavxxS 3.17 -.06
CSVellVSt 13.39 +.32
CredSuiss 17.63 -.72
CrwnCsle 59.10 +.28
CrownHold 36.07 +1.87
Cumns8.7 1.6 5 63 -5 65 5




Hoio Chargernay vary at first transaction and at each vacation start


Keycorp 7.91 +.08 MobileTelel8.25 +.56 Prmian 18.50 +.21 Renren 4.20 -.05
KimbClke 85.88 -.19 Molymrp 19.75 +.25 PetrbrsA 19.58 +.52 RepubSvc 27.52 +.33
Kimco 19.24 -.16 MoneyG rs 16.06 +.06 Petrobras 20.12 +.52 Revlon 14.83 +.09
KindME 86.47 +1.09 Monsanio 86.78 +.26 Pfizer 23.80 +.13 ReynAmer 46.24 -.31
KindMorg 35.25 -.14 MonstrWw 7.52 -.09 PhilipMor 89.55 +.14 Riollnio 46.74 +.99
KindrMwt 2.70 +.06 MorgStan 13.25 -.74 Phillips66n 35.60 -1.50 RiteAid 1.20 -.08
Kinrossg 8.02 +.15 MSEmMkt 13.96 +.02 PiedNG 32.41 +.33 RockwlAut 65.90 +.22
KnghtCap 10.31 -.13 Mosaie 57.62 -.53 PimmStrat 11.86 +.03 RockColl 50.63 +1.73
KodiaktOg 9.00 -.25 MotrlaSolu 47.51 +.85 PinWst 53.30 -.01 Rowan 35.11 +.50
Kohls 49.36 +.17 MurphO 51.83 +.66 PioNtrl 93.49 +3.59 RylCarb 25.04 +.40
KrispKrm 6.58 -.01 NCRCorp 24.44 -.07 PitnyBw 13.48 +.03 RoyDShllA 69.69 +.09
Kroger 21.59 -.39 NRG Egy 18.10 +.17 PlainsEx 40.37 +.37 Royce 12.60 -.02
LSICorp 6.26 +.31 NVEnergy 18.04 +.09 PlumCrke 40.46 -.33 RoycepfB 25.70 +.03
LTCPrp 36.02 -33 NYSEEur 25.84 -33 Polariss 75.0 +.83 Ralnd 25.1 -.2
LaZBoy 12.54 +.16 Nabors 14.42 -.03 PostPrp 50.72 -.56
LabCp 88.12 -5.52 NatFuGas 49.67 -.07 Potash 45.31 -.53
Laclede 40.82 -.13 NatGrid 52.56 +.09 PwshDB 27.63 +.33 SAIC 11.33 -.12
LVSands 42.02 +2.20 NOilVarco 70.47 +1.46 PSAgri 30.10 +.15 SAPAG 62.53 +.21
LaSalleH 27.44 -1.23 Navistar 24.78 -.17 PS USDBull 22.81 -.01 SCANA 48.62 +.10
LearCorp 37.09 -1.17 NewAmHi 10.56 +.06 PSSPLwV 28.01 +.01 SKTlcm 12.90 -12
LeggMason 26.10 -.48 NJRscs 46.05 -.04 PSlndia 16.99 +.14 SMEnergy 54.51 +1.15
LeggPlat 21.97 +.40 NwOri~ds 11.20 +1.70 Praxair 109.12 +.47 SpdrDJIIA 129.32 +.36
LennarA 30.32 -.06 NYCmlyB 12.65 -.05 PrecDrill 7.53 +.40 SpdrGold 153.38 +.33
Lexmarke 19.82 -.17 Newcaste 7.16 -.21 PrinFnd 26.14 +.12 S&P500ETFl37.73 +.36
LblyASG 4.00 +.05 NewellRub 18.33 +.34 ProLogis 32.68 -.37 Spdr Div 56.42 +.35
LifeT~it 44.64 -1.88 NewidExp, 32.65 +1.18 ProShtQQQ 26.17 -.29 SpdrHome 21.71 +.15
LillyEli 44.40 -.11 NewmtM 45.15 +.49 ProShtS&P 36.00 -10 SpdrS&PBk 21.87 -.27
Limited 47.14 +.35 NewpktRes 6.36 -11 PrUShS&P 15.21 -.11 SpdrLehHY 39.85 +.07
LincNat 20.90 Nexeng 17.28 +.01 PrUltQQ~s 54.72 +1.16 SpdrS&PRB27.38 -.38
Lindsay 71.59 +.43 NextEraEn 70.30 -.20 PrUShQQQ C31.28 -.69 SpdrRed 59.84 +.28
Link~edln 108.65 +4.04 NiSource 25.34 +.05 ProUltSP 55.74 +.28 SpdrOGEx 51.84 +.46
Lockh~dM 88.51 -.09 NikteB 95.26 +.63 ProUShL20 14.95 +.09 SpdrMetM 40.12 +.34
Loews 40.99 -03 Nbeop 3.7 +1 PrUltSP500 78.65 +.53 Safeway 15.80 -.69
LaPac 10.69 -.69 Nben 8.0 231 PrUVxSTrs 6.57 -.32 St~oe 16.97 -.03
Lowes 26.03 +.37 NoktiaCp 1.85 +.12 PrUltCrude 32.43 +1.71 St~ude 38.38 +.63
L onBasA 41.9 -.28 Nordstrm 53.28 +.38 ProUShEuro 22.18 +.02 Saks 10.23 +.23
usa ori~o 7.18 .38 ProctGam 64.92 +.10 Salesforce 139.11 +4.21
M&T Bk 86.62 -.30 pG 48 +22 aUs 2K 3. t2 uaB 164 .2
MBIA 10.1 +.2 Nvari 5736 +.00 PUSSP500rs45.47 -.35 SandRdge 6.69 +.17

MGURCs 2.8 -1 NOv"fdnc 97.52 +.04 PTrpdn 105 -.8 Seanrfid 38.6 2.

Macys ~ Nco 35.49 +.8Qat4 c227 .9 Sein 124 47
MagMCt 75.97 +.23 O eg49 nmSSG 1.34 +.12 Sidemrura 58.18 +.04
Magnalnt 40.61 -.78 OlRPb8.3 .0 stig 16.1.0 -2.02 Silvhtng 26.31 +.35
MagRe 3.67 -.13 Nw Upp 52 Qetr 207 .2 Sio0o 581 11
Mniwc 11.038 -.209 OPlno .21. .204 Qkslvtes 14.75 +.04 Skechersl 20.22 +.30
Manwr 3570 .80 OmgaHt 2.11 -.1 Qukslvr 2.51 +.17 SmalihA 51.36 -.73
Manulife 10.75 +.16 Onicom 50.01 -.28 CERPM 297.5 +1.10 SmithfF 18.52 -.03
Marathiet 45.51 -1.32 Oneok~r 57.80 +.30 Radianexrp 2.96 -.10 Snapent 67.24 +5.90
MktVyol 41.59 +.47 Oshkosht 20.76 -.43 R~adioShk 3.671 -.12 Soeino 129.23 -1.67
MVgilys 375.76 +.25 Ovehipt 69.51 -1.31 RtDcor 61.91 -.92 Soderurnd 52.66 -.08
MVgemin 31.38 +.26 Owenseorn 29.298 +.21 Ra n 12.6 .8 Suhno 4.0 -1
MktVRus 2.7.2 +.42 Owdensll 820.0 +.98 Rangeia 61.60 -1.19 Stl~hngpe 32.31 +.56
MkntVorol 18.81 +.24 Oi 1.5 t2 R~~amvesn 34.05 +.02 Swstchrl 90.15 -.27
MktAnlfgr 1.5 On 50331 +.05 Raynir 47.10 +1.10 Swstnhng 31.68 +.08
MarshMO 32.80 +.20 PNCO~ 61.310 +.31 Rtl 4.0 -4 pii031 12
Martewrt 35.28 -1.04 PNM eols 2.0.2 -.09 Redl~pat 55.614 1.65 Sprintex 36.71 +.0
Mc~mln 1197 .15 PPLorp 28.4 +18 Rgyianrs 47.67 -.44 SnPH~th 38.74 5.
McVnlds 92.76 .547 Pall~orhp52.84 +.02 Regionshn 36.0 -.07 SPnnmt 35.26 -1.05
McGMH~v 47.48 -.19 Pandoa 10.31 -1.41
Mcaloon 12.91 -.41 Pareharm 50.05 -.01
Medtrnic 31.8.9 -.02 PweabdyE 292.8 +.01 Rarn 122 77 oh~ 77
MMerck 272 43. 4 2 Pengrthg 60.22 +.06 Theoe remande of th
MetroH~~Ragth 9.660 -.2 ene 2.6 9
MMorsnd 41.67 +1.04 Pepoy9.7 -17Fund on. the2 nextir page-.
MMkA~pt 69.13 -.72 Pepunold 19.63 +.10 *wh~ 1.8 t0
MarltA 3.29 .9 PGe~pso 750.4 +.04


Uranerz 1.45 -.02



VangTotW 46.05 +.28
VantageDrl 1.51 -.01

nit ~old 3.9 -006
VoyagerOG 1.49 +.03
Vringo 3.70 +.10
WFAdvlnco 10.38 +.13
WFAdMSec 15.55 +.07
WizrdSftrs 2.35 +.20
YMBiog 2.00 -.04
ZBBEngy .33 -.01


~ )I~(I L' I~ 1(~11 I~ I LI1 II


SvcSource 12.33 -.14 TrstNY 5.66 -.06
SvArtsrsh .04 -.01 Trustmke 25.69 -.45
Shire 90.23 +1.38 21Vianet 10.03 +.63
Shuf~st 1564 .13 USATechh 1.46 +.01
Shutteriy 32.80 -.73 UTarm 10 -.2
SigmaDsg 6.66 +.22
SigmaAld 72.22 -.29 Ulrdd140 +.4
SilicGrln 6.66 -.01 Ubiquitn 12.43 -.63
Silienlmg 3.90 +.04 UltaSalon 92.51 +.5
SilenLab 36.89 -.10 Ultratech 33.71 +2.94
SilienMotn 13.04 +.64 Umpqua 12.84 -.90
Slcnware 4.82 +.05 Unilife 3.37 -.08
SilvSidg 11.78 +.18 UBWV 24.55 +.50
Sina 46.59 +1.32 UdtlF 5. -19
Sindair 9.79 -.06
SiriusXM 2.11 Udnn 4.4
SironaDent 45.99 +1.16 U~r 24 .4
Sktullcandy 14.81 +.75 UidTherap 53.32 -.19
SkyWest 8.03 -.11 UnivDisp 37.69 +1.54
Skywk~sSol 29.17 +2.53 UnivFor 40.44 +.13
SmartBa 9.59 -.10 UranmRsh .53 -.01
SmithWes 9.70 +.07 UrbanOut 31.56 +.49
SodaStrm 39.20 +.52
Sohu.cm 36.13 +.08 I-
Solazyme 13.49 +.16 VCAAnt 21.58 +.01
Somaxonh .42 -.01
SonicCorp 10.43 +.20 VX~d 81 .2
Sonus 1.77 -.01 ValueClicke 16.38 +.18
SouMoBc 22.81 -.44 VanSTCpB 79.73 -.01
Sourcefire 47.69 +1.93 VangR1K 62.78 +.17
SpectPh 16.39 -.15 VanlntCpB 86.68 -.16
SpiritAir 21.23 -.47 Veenlnst 32.85 -.37
Splunktn 29.19 +.27 Vel 5.87 +.28
Spreadtrm 17.61 -.04 VBradley 21.25 +.66
Staples 12.76 -.03
StarBulkth .62 -.05 Vrsgn 44.00 +. 9
StarSdent 4.24 -.15 5.4 -
Starbuck~s 54.20 +.90 VerbtPh 52.10 -1.51
SIDynam 12.61 +.16 ViacomB 46.65 -.97
StemCllrsh 1.40 -.09 Vical 3.54 -.01
Stericyde 94.17 +1.01 VrgnnMdah 25.13 +.25
SMadden 34.62 +.92 ViroPhrm 22.90 -.25
Stratasys 54.82 -3.75 VisnChina .52 -.07
SunOpta 5.41 +.09 VistaPrt 33.00 +.24
SunPower 4.38 -.12
SunshHrtn 10.26 +.36 Virang 4.78 -.27
SuperMicro 13.74 -46 Vivus 25.78 -3.23
Supernusn 14.86 +.22 Vodafone 28.84 -.20
SusqBnc 10.46 -.25 Volcano 28.76 +.48
Susser 35.75 +.65 Volterra 25.00 +1.01
SwisherHlf 2.22 -.17 WarnerCh 18.18 -.22
Symantec 13.84 +.26 WarrenRs 2.24 -.10
Symetricm 6.04 WashFed 15.94 -
Synaurn 13.02 -1.98 Web.com 19.27 +.45
Synaplcs 26.35 +.54
Synpss 0.8 -07 WebMD 18.89 -.46
SyntaPhm 6.35 -.02 WendysCo 4.73 -.05
Syntel 59.54 +.96 WernerEnt 22.85 -.61
TICCCap 9.55 -.10 WDigital 32.71 -.69
TTMTch 10.15 +.40 Westmrki 9.21 -.45
twtdelem 25.19 -.29 Wstptlnng 37.30 +1.57
Tak~eTwo 9.84 +.64 WetSeal 3.06 -.03
Tangoen 21.62 -.27 WholeFd 90.54 -2.00
Targacept 4.22 -.05
TASER 4.86 -.15 WillsLpfA 11.36 +.09
TechData 47.68 -.01 WilshBcp 5.51 -.19
Tellabs 3.24 -.01 Windstrm 9.94 -.03
TeslaMot 32.27 +.12 Wintust 36.81 +.11
TesseraTch 14.20 -.05 WisdomTr 7.08 -.02
TetraTc 27.13 -.07 WldAccep 68.99 -4.42
TxCapBsh 41.85 -.84 Wowjointh .32 +.02
Texlnst 28.04 +.39 WrightM 19.37 +.02
TexRdhse 18.57 +.10
Theravnce 29.79 -1.90 Wynn 99.66 +3.37
TheStreet 1.46 -.01 XM .3 -1
Thoratec 35.52 -.22 )Glinx 31.30 -.72
ThrshdPhm 7.14 -.37 Xyratex 11.24 +.30
TibcoSft 29.58 +.94 YRCrs 5.97 +.24
TitanMach 29.26 -.74 Yahoo 15.73 +.03
TiVolnc 8.10 +.16 Yandex 19.45 +.76
Towerstm 4.16 -.15 Zagg 10.88 +.25
TractSupp 81.30 +1.77 Zalicus 1.05 -.02
TransceptP 6.52 +.41 Llw 4.8 .9
Travelzoo 20.98 -.75
TrimbleN 43.41 +.67 aonBcp 19.24 -.21
TripAdyn 45.10 -.32 Zumiez 35.98 +.48
TriC~uint 5.32 +.18 Zyngan 4.56 -.06
TriusTher 5.87 -.36 pSivkia 2.74 +.60


A12 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2536524 7.26 -.27 CheniereEn 76081 13.83 +.26 PwShs QQQ467661 65.10 +.71 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF11 68895137.73 +.36 NwGold g 29473 10.17 +.42 SiriusXM 458409 2.11 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
NokiaCp 954748 1.85 +.12 Vringo 29092 3.70 +.10 Microsoft 412572 30.67 +.22 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Pfizer 869606 23.80 +.13 NovaGld g 18469 5.83 -.02 Intel 361854 26.06 -.15 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day
MorgStan 581603 13.25 -.74 GoldStr g 17789 1.17 +.04 eBay 338185 43.95 +3.49 Ch:LsorgifrtedaNocneidctdby..

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempton by company d New 52-week
low. dd Loss In last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chq %Chq Name Last Chq %Chq Name Last Chq %Chq Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus Ilst-
Nw~r~d 1120 +.70 +179 PwrRET 900 .84 +10. Melanx 9.90 27.2 +1.5 Ing qualification. n Stock was a new Issue In the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
Calix 5.45 +.71 +15.0 WizrdSftr n .35 +.20 +9.4 pSivida 2.74 +.60 +28.0 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock Issue. pr Preferences. pp -
E-House 4.84 +.59 +13.9 Alderonlr g 2.61 +.16 +6.5 SelCmfrt 27.60 +5.83 +26.8 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s -
GaGul 32.67 +3.82 +13.2 SwGA Fn 9.21 +.50 +5.7 OCZTech 5.61 +1.05 +23.0 Stock has spilt by at least 20 percent wthin the last year. wl Trades wll be settled when the
ETYaxSSD 23.90 +2.61 +12.3 Barnwell 3.05 +.15 +5.2 PluristemT 3.20 +.51 +19.0 stock Is Issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high, un Unit, Including more than one security. v] Company In bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) celvership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears In front of the name.
Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
OvShip 6.51 -1.31 -16.8 Medgenwt 7.05 -.80 -10.2 IgniteRstn 15.15 -3.91 -20.5


NVR 744.85-121.58 -14.0 Compx 12.47 -1.00 -7.4 Synacorn 13.02 -1.98 -13.2
BiP GCrb 10.00 -1.34 -11.8 ASpecRlty 3.50 -.25 -6.7 Sypris 6.44 -.94 -12.7


52-Week
High Low Name
13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,487.74 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
487.34 381.99DowJones Utilities
8,423.05 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amexlndex
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
847.92 601.71Russell20000


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg % Chg
+34.66 +.27 +5.94 +1.72
+46.72 +.91 +3.33 -4.52
+.64 +.13 +5.01+10.57
+18.66 +.24 +4.98 -6.68
+19.66 +.82 +6.03 -.98
+23.30 +.79+13.85 +4.64
+3.73 +.27 +9.46 +2.43
+32.15 +.22 +9.20 +.94
-2.89 -.36 +8.27 -4.65


Last
12,943.36
5,186.89
487.98
7,849.75
2,415.68
2,965.90
1,376.51
14,403.99
802.17


DIARY


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,578 Advanced
1,421 Declined
146 Unchanged
3,145 Total issues
188 New Highs
22 New Lows
3,939,222,401 Volume


232 Advanced
192 Declined
33 Unchanged
457 Total issues
14 New Highs
5 New Lows
65,883,055 Volume


1,083
1,387
121
2,591
86
38
1,682,917,031


Name Last Chg BuSBrasil 7.15 -.02
Bk~ofAm 7.26 -.27
Bkd~ontg 57.82 +.70
BkN~YMel 21.29 -.40
ABBLid 16.05 -.12 Bra 02 .0
ACE~d 7.64 .56 BariPVix 12.55 -.30
AESCorp 12.82 +.21 BarrickG 34.77 +.46
AFLAC 44.04 +.14 Baxter 56.44 +.27
AGCO 42.54 -.54 Beamlnc 62.97 +.10
AGL Res 39.80 +.50 BeazerHm 2.59 -.09
AKSteel 5.48 +.15 BectDcke 75.95 +.53
AOL 27.94 +.27 Bemis 31.33 +.70
ASAGold 21.31 +.17 BerktHaA126995.00 -394.00
AT&Tlnc 35.48 -.71 BerktHB 84.63 -.35
Abiab 65.80 -.13 BestBuy 18.76 -.09
AberFitc 36.53 +.59 BBarrett 21.76 +.98
Accenture 59.35 +.41 BioMedR 18.60 -.22
AdamsEx 10.80 +.05 BlktHillsCp 32.13 +.28
AMD 4.86 -.03 BlktDebtStr 4.18
Aeropost 19.94 -.32 BlktEnhC&I 13.29 +.03
Aetna 38.16 -.84 Blk~lbOp 13.40 +.01
Agilent 38.46 +.10 Black~sione 12.99 +.09
Agning 37.30 +.57 BlocktHR 16.58 -.16
Albemarle 57.53 +1.92 Boding 74.86 +.97
AlcatdlLuc 1.17 +.08 BorgWarn 65.30 +.80
Alma 8.38 +.05 BostBeer 114.81 +1.21
AllegTch 32.10 +.22 BostProp 110.35 -.67
Allergan 87.46 -.06 BosionSci 5.58 +.02
Allete 42.12 -.26 BoydGm 7.00 +.05
AlliBGlbHi 15.37 +.09 Brink~er 33.82 +.38
AlliBlnco 8.46 -.05 BrMySq 36.15 +.06
AlliBern 12.62 +.07 Brki~dAsg 33.81 +.22
Allstate 34.71 +.48 Brki~dOfPr 17.32 +.01
AlphaNRs 6.75 -.15 Brunswick 22.99 +.39
AlpTotDiv 4.35 +.02 Buckeye 54.00 +.35
AlpAlerMLP 16.55 +.05 BurgerKn 15.63 +.06
Altria 35.94 +.02 CBLAsc 19.17 -32
AmBev +75 .25 CB EGrp 16.3 t3

AMovilL 26.94 -.31 CHEngy 65.00 -.22



11lnGrp 31.76 -.08 CSSlnds 20.13 -.45


Ameriprise 51.91 -.24 CblvsnNY 14.16 t78
AmeriBrgn 39.73 -.02 CabotOGs 39.38 -53
Ampheno~l 59.01 +.07 CalDive 1.85 t01
Anadark~o 72.59 -.04 CallGolf 5.62 t05
AnglogldA 31.00 -34 Cli 1. t8
ABlnBev 79.44 t93 Calpine 17.49 +.18
Annal 16.97 -05 Camecog 22.60 +.53
Aptln e 27.62 35. CampSp 33.58 +.32
Apuakv 276.4 123 CdnNRsgs 28.73 +.96
Aqum 64 -.1 CapOne 56.37 +1.48
ArcelorMit 15.41 +.16 CapMpfB 15.49 +.38
ArchCodl 6.22 +.17 CardnlHlth 43.50 +.44
ArchDan 2. -.3 CarMax 27.28 +.53
Am or 1. -.3 Carnival 33.40 +.46
ArmourRsd 7.36 Caterpillar 82.63 +.11
Ashland 69.36 -.26 Celanese 36.83 +1.88
AsdEstat 14.62 -.18 Cemex 6.78 +.20
AssuredG 12.60 +.44 Cemigpfs 19.30 +.14
AstraZen 47.34 +.65 CenovusE 32.70 +.10
ATMOS 36.59 -.32 Centene 37.58 +.19
AuRicog 6.18 ... CenterPnt 20.92 -.03
AuioNatn 40.78 -1.67 CntryLinke 41.59 +.82

BB&nTCp 3. t3 hs 182 9
BHPBillIt 65.15 +1.75 ChesUI 45.75 -.32
BPPLC 41.86 +.12 Chevron 108.84 +.96
BRFBrasil 14.62 +.43 Chims 15.25 +.06
BRT 6.30 -.08 Chimera 2.30 -.02
BaktrHu 41.75 -.09 Cigna 42.38 -.65
BallCorp 42.31 +.80 Cimarex 59.54 +1.14
BuBradpf 15.24 +.27 CindBdll 3.83 -.13
BuSantSA 5.56 ... Cilgroup 26.59 -.51


D naHldg 1. -0
Danaher 51.12 -.99
Darden 52.09 +.61
DeanFds 12.60 -.38
Deere 75.69 +.03
DelphiAun 27.20 -.01
DeltaAir 10.00 -.23
DenburyR 15.51 +.79
DeutschBke 31.53
DevonE 58.95 +.22
DiaOff 65.71 +1.84
DiamRke 9.66 -.24
DigitldRlt 73.23 -3.08
DxFnBullrs 88.60 -1.97
DirSCBear 17.75 +.16
DirFnBear 22.54 +.53
DirDGldBll 8.62 +.23
DrxEnBear 9.88 -.11
DirEMBear 14.47 -.42
DirxSCBull 54.46 -.54
DirxEnBull 43.92 +.50
Disaver 34.93 -.24
Disney 48.99 -.36
DollarGen 52.29 -1.45
DomRescs 5. 1

DowChm 31.32 +.58
DuPont 49.20 +.28
DuPFabros 26.40 -.86
Duk~eEnrs 66.12 +.05
Duk~eRlty 14.52 -.26
E-House 4.84 +.59
EMCCp 25.46 +.38


EnCanag 20.72 +.21
Enerplsg 13.94 +.08
Engilityn 17.80 +.12
EnPro 36.42 -.18
ENSCO 51.43 +1.54
Entergy 71.47 -.05
EntPrPt 54.67 +.06
EqtyRsd 64.54 -.41
EsteeLdrs 54.68 +2.09
ExuRes 7.34 +.10
Exdlon 39.08 +.25
Express 18.17 +.10
ExxonMbl 86.21
FMCTech 42.45 +1.21
FairchldS 13.68 +.35
FamilyDlr 66.06 -.37
FedExCp 92.79 +.07
FedSignI 5.93 -.01
Ferrellgs 20.23 +.07
Ferro 4.09 +.04
RidlN~in 19.04 -.06
RidNatlnfo 32.60 -.53
Rfth&Pac 10.30 +.55
FstHorizon 8.55 -.32

FTrnq 1 .1 --.03
FirstEngy 50.26 +.51
Fluor 49.22 +.13
FootLockr 33.76 +.31
FordM 9.35 -.03
ForestOils 7.17 +.15
FBHmScn 22.90 +.48
FranceTel 13.62 -.03


HighwdPrp 33.75 -.65
Hillshiren 26.24 -.46
HollyFrts 36.54 -1.19
HomeDp 50.96 +.05
Honwlllni 57.95 -.23
Hormdl 28.64 -.01
HospPT 24.99 -.08
HostHots 15.20 -.19
HovnanE 2.60 -.07
Humana 73.52 +.11
Huntsmn 12.40 +.27
IAMGldg 10.93 +.35
ICICIBke 35.02 +.44
ING 6.56 +.01
iShGold 15.39 +.02
iSAsia 22.69 +.38
iShBraz 52.70 +.78
iSCan 26.27 +.27
iShGer 20.25 +.24
iShHK 16.81 +.10
iShJapn 9.18 +.07
iSMalas 14.58 +.02
iShMex 62.68 -.47
iShSing 13.02 +.08
iSawn +20 .16

iShS&P100 63.36 +.18
iShChina25 33.71 +.74
iSSP500 138.29 +.28
iShEMktts 39.17 +.36
iShiBxB 120.61 +.21
iShB20T 128.49 -.33
iShB1-3T 84.52 +.02


ImaxCorp 24.42 -.28
IngerRd 41.47 +.08
IntegrysE 59.74 +.40
IntentEx 133.77 -1.90
IBM 195.34 +7.09
InlGame 15.63 +.04
IntPap 32.59 +.26
Interpublic 11.56 +.06
Invesco 22.34 +.02
IronMtn 32.25 +.24
ItauUnibH 14.92 +.35
IvanhMa 8.89 +.13

JPMorgCh 34.46 -.50
Jail 20.83 +.54
Jaguarg .78 +.07
JanusCap 7.36 -.13
Jefferies 12.37 -.39
JohnJn 69.53 +.16
JohnsnQi 26.07 -2.25
JoyGlbl 52.90 +1.07
JnprNtwke 15.84 +.63
KBHome 9.64 -.25
KRlnc 23 t.4

KTCorp 13.79 -.40
KCSouthn 71.86 +3.18
Kaydons 20.81 -.07
KAEngTR 27.31 +.09
Kelbogg 48.07 +.01
KennWils 13.33 -.20
KeyEngy 7.41 -.19


GenElec 19.80 -.04
GenGrPrp 17.51 -.34
GenMills 38.98 -.03
GenMolors 20.14 +.07
GenOnEn 1.87 +.05
GenuPrt 64.37 +1.52
Genworth 5.06 -.06
GaGulf 32.67 +3.82
Gerdau 9.05 +.25
GlaxoSKln 46.69 +.6
GlobPay 44.57 -.06
GolLinhas 4.64 +.23
GoldFLid 11.85 -.07
Golderpg 33.28 +.75
GoldmanS 95.00 -1.51
Goodrich 127.15 -.10
Goodyear 10.09 -.07
GtPlainEn 22.38 +.01
Griffon 9.11 -.15
GpTelevisa 22.68 +.05
GuangRy 15.89 +.16
Guess 28.81 +1.19
HCAHIdg 27.79 -.81
H lnc 45.6 -.42

HSBCCap 26.18 +.08
Hallibrtn 30.21 +.04
HanJS 16.50 -.17
HanPrmDv 14.68 ..
Hanesbrds 30.29 +.02
Hanoverlns 35.65 -3.22
HarleyD 44.78 +.76


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.77 +.01
AbdnEMTel 19.24 +.20
AdmRsc 46.09 +.20

Alx ~g 4.0 t0
AlldNevG 26.72 -.07
AlmadnMg 1.97 +.11
AmAppardl .88 +.00
Aurizong 4.53 +.03
AvalnRare 1.51 +.02
Bacterin 1.86 +.28
Banrog 3.50 +.02


BarcUBS36 43.48 +.78 CrSuiHiY 3.15 -.01
karM Svi 227 t6
BrigusGg .80 +.00
BritATob 107.21 +.87 DejourEg .23
CardiumTh .24 -.00 DenisnMg 1.39 +.08

Cel ag 19.3 t01 Fuidn 1. -0
CheniereEn 13.83 +.26 EV/Muni2 13.90 -.05
CheniereE 24.95 +.14 ElephTalke 1.48 -.06
ClaudeRg .57 -.01 EllswthFd 7.14 +.08
ClghGlbOp 10.84 +.04 EnovaSys .04
Comstk~n 3.08 -.03 EntGmgrs 2.12 -.08
CornstProg 5.18 +.03 ExiorreGg 4.09 -.01
CrSuislnco 3.87 +.02 FrkStPrp 10.64 -.24


GamGldNR 13.18 -.04
GascoEngy .17
GenMoly 3.10 -.09
GoldResrc 25.22 -.26


GoldStrg 1.17 +.04
GldFld 2.15 -.13
GranTrrag 4.55 +.10
Grt~asGg .59 +.01
GtPanSilvg 1.68 +.01
GugFront 19.67 -.12
Hemisphrx .38 -.03


NthnO&G 16.30 +.56 Richmntg 3.59 +.02

MadCatzg .67 -.03 uw~v2 dg 1 3 1
Medgenics 13.90 -1.38 NuvDiv3 15.34 +.04
Meetlle 1.94 -.06 SmOG 1 +
Metalin 2.14 -.11 Pdaingych 71 -3 T t .00 -1
okigG& 1.4 +.01 m Snzoy 3.2 t0

Nadea~o 454 .15 PolyMetg 1.07 +.03 Tengsco .86 +.06
NeoStem .66 -.03 Protalix 5.70 +.14 TrnsalPet 1.03 +.02
NBRESec 4.59 PyramidOil 4.50 +.20 TravelCtrs 5.02 +.07
Nevsung 2.89 +.10 Q~uestRMg 1.34 -.02 TriangPet 5.73 +.14
NwGoldg 10.17 +.42 RareEleg 4.71 -.07 USGeoth .35 -.01
NAPallg 1.78 +.05 Rentech 2.05 -.10 USAnimny 3.36 -.03
NDynMng 2.65 -.03 RexahnPh .50 +.09 Ur-Energy .68 +.01


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 43.14 +.39
APITech 3.30 -.11
ASMLHld 55.75 +1.18
AT O&G 2.94 -. 2

Abiome 23.71 -22

Acadac 397 t0
AcadiaPh 1.59 t01
Accura 6.51 t01
Achillio 6.65 -10
AcmePkt 17.55 +.09
Ac ie~ h 123 t

Acxiom 15.97 -.05
AdobeSy 31.89 +.46
Adtran 21.97 +.25
AdvEnld 11.98 +. 0
A~engh .4 -. 1
Affymax 16.94 +.04
Affymetrix 4.51 -.03
Ak~amaiT 30.49 +.57
Ak~orn 15.29 -.72
Alask(Com 2.26 -.04
Alexion 100.32 +.21
AlignTech 31.70 +.84
Alk~ermes 18.78 +.65
AllosThera 1.75 -.01
AllotComm 24.71 +1.22
AllscriptH 9.99 +.50
AlnylamP 18.76 +.04
AlteraCplf 31.91 +.13
Amarin 15.36 +.70
Amazon 226.17 +8.70
Amedisys 13.44 +.12
ACapAgy 34.15 +.23
AmCapLid 9.86 +.04
ACapMign 24.44 +.26
ARltyCTn 11.06
AmSupr 4.33 -.15
Amerigon 10.99 +.35
Amgen 79.64 +.01
AmicusTh 6.10 -.41
Amk~orTch 4.94 +.07
AmpioPhm 3.07 +.06
Amylin 30.79 -.01
Amyris 3.55 +.09
AnalogDev 37.99 +.40
Anlogic 64.34 -.40
Analystlnt 4.03 +.02
Ancestry 27.38 -.41
Ansys 58.15 +1.37
AntaresP 5.10 -.10
AntheraPh 1.16 -.17
A123Sys .69 +.00
ApolloGrp 30.20 -.43
Apollolny 7.94 +.01
Applelnc 614.32+t8.06
ApldMal 10.70 +.01
AMCC 4.86 +.12
Approach 28.31 -.09
ArchCap 39.56 -.09
ArenaPhm 9.65 -.33
AresCaph 16.57 -.07
AriadP 18.24 +.29
Aribalnc 44.45 -.02
ArmHld 23.61 +1.17
ArrayBio 4.02 +.03
Arris 13.83 -.23
ArubaNet 14.32 +.42
AscenaRts 19.24 +.16
AscentSolh 1.24 +.04
AsialnfoL 10.85 +.14
AspenTech 23.24 +.16
AssaxiBanc 12.95 -.22
AstexPhm 2.22 -.04
athenahlth 87.18 -1.20
Atmel 6.40 +.08
AuthenTec 5.02 +.10
Auiodeske 33.45 +1.24
AuioData 56.50 -.35
Auxilium 26.87 -.06
Avago~ch 36.04 +2.25
AvanirPhm 3.21 -.04


AvisBudg 14.75 -.54 Comcast 32.38 -.01
Aware 6.25 -.31 Comcspd 31.91 +.08
Axcelis .91 +.01 CmcBMO 40.31 ..
BBCNBcp 11.28 -.04 CommSys 11.15 -.16
BEAero 43.20 +1.09 CommVlt 45.60 +2.09
BGCPtrs 5.92 -.11 CmplGno~m 2.87 -.01
BMCSft 40.83 +.23 Compuwre 9.20 +.19
Baidu 110.74 +3.28 Comverse 5.46 +.04
BktOzarktss 33.07 -1.03 ConcurTch 66.85 -.26
Bazaanicn 17.04 +.79 Conmed 28.75 +.10
BeacnRfg 27.61 +.10 Conns 16.88 +.73
BeasleyB 5.92 -.06 ConstantC 18.05 +.26
BedBath 62.29 +.44 Coparts 24.56 +.17
BioRetab 26.55 -.68 CorinthC 2.55 -.06
Biocryst 4.54 -.07 Costa 95.95 -.01
Biogenldc 143.74 -1.22 Creelnc 24.45 +.40
BioMarin 40.72 -.26 Crocs 15.31 +.39
BioSanters 1.60 -.05 Ctrip.mm 14.83 +.32
BlktRKelso 9.64 -.08 CubistPh 40.63 -.55
BlueNile 24.44 +.23 Cymer 60.55 -.27
BobEvans 40.79 +.41 CypSemi 11.59 -.36
BostPnt 8.80 -17 p
BreitBurn 17.96 +.14
Brighipnt 8.96 -.01 DTSlnc 19.60 +.66
Broadcom 32.45 +1.80 DeckrsOut 48.55 +.69
BroadSoft 23.38 +1.68 Ddlcath 1.82 +.02
Broadwdh .29 -.00 Ddlllnc 12.23 +.16
BrcdeCm 4.83 +.29 Dndreon 6.41 -.18
BuffaboWW 85.50 +.64 Dentsply 37.30 +.62
CAlnc 26.51 +.06 DexCom 12.77 -.01
CBOE 28.26 -.14 DiamndFlf 18.45 -.64
CEVAlnc 16.50 +1.26 DianaCont 6.15 -1.05
CH Robins 59.53 +.29 DigitalGen 11.01 +.29
CMEGrp 260.55 -3.17 DigRiver 16.95 +.28
CSRplcn 18.09 +.45 DirecTVA 48.95 +.35
CTCMedia 7.82 +.10 DiscCmAh 51.04 +.54
CVBFnd 11.58 -.17 DiscCmCh 46.91 +.64
Cabt~ics 29.49 +.49 DiscovLab 2.71 -.04
CadencePh 4.33 +.03 DishNetwke 29.88 +1.04
Cadence 11.71 +.21 DollarTrs 52.67 -.22
CalaGDyln 8.28 +.03 DonlleyRR 12.87 -.28
CalaStrTR 9.87 +.12 DrmVVksA 19.60 -.05
CalAmp 7.30 -.39 DryShips 2.36 +.10
Callidus 4.64 +.15 Dunktinn 34.66 +.61
CdnSolar 3.80 -.08 DurataThn 9.04 ..
CapCtyBke 7.66 -.16 DurectCp 1.03 -.13
CpstnTrbh 1.05 -.01 DyaxCp 2.72 -.03
Cardiomgh .36 -.03 Dynavax 4.00 -.17
Cardtronic 30.03 -.99 E-Trade 7.82 -.08
CareerEd 5.66 +.14 eBay 43.95 +3.49
CaribouC 11.20 -.40 EVEngy 52.81 -2.07
Carrizo 25.82 +.27 EaglRktEn 9.57 +.09
CanvteBrs 7.50 +.34 ErthLinke 7.20 +.04
Caseys 57.49 -.79 EstW~sBcp 22.24 -1.51
CatalystPh 1.02 +.06 EdelmanFn 8.70 +.01
Catamaran 90.32 -1.52 EducDevh 4.00 -.10
CathayGen 16.10 -.71 8x81nc 5.06 +.44
Cavium 25.19 +.97 ElectSd 11.23 -.02
Celgene 67.98 +.64 ElectArts 12.27 +.77
CellTherah .61 +.01 Emurers 5.06 +.36
CelldexT11 5.47 +.05 EmmisCm 2.02 -.02
Celsion 3.55 -.11 EndoPhrm 31.45 +.66
CentEuro 3.10 -.12 Endobogix 14.16 -.17
Centhl 6.50 +.12 EngyXXI 32.70 +1.37
Cepheid 43.73 +.54 Entegris 8.10 -.17
Cerner 78.14 -.42 EnteroMed 4.28 -.06
Chartlnds 66.62 +2.50 EntropCom 5.92 +.08
CharterCm 74.81 +1.86 Equinix 166.03 -.11
ChktPoint 49.93 +1.18 Ericsson 8.80 +.15
Cheesecakte32.39 -.03 ExactScih 10.89 +.05
ChelseaTh 1.10 -.04 Exeliks 6.19 -.01
ChildPlace 51.48 +.91 E~deTc 3.24 -.17
ChrchllD 59.38 +.21 Exp~edias 47.57 +1.02
CienaCorp 15.28 +1.08 Exp~dlnl 38.47 +.02
CinnFin 37.66 -.05 Ep~Scripts 58.76 +1.07
Cintas 38.04 +.13 EZchip 34.90 +1.49
Cirrus 28.51 +1.92 Ezcorp 25.13 -.16
Cism 16.68 -.03 F5Netwkts102.75 +4.16
CitzRepBc 17.75 -.28 FLlRSys 19.47 +.32
CitrixSys 82.63 +1.14 FSllnl 3.57 +.14
CleanEngy 14.19 +.13 Facebooktn 29.00 -.11
Clearwire 1.03 +.01 Fastenal 45.30 +.42
CognizTech 58.96 -.35 FifthStFin 10.09 ..
CogoGrp 1.75 -.11 Fifthhird 13.80 +.03
Coinstar 61.00 -1.29 51job 36.13 -.61
ColdwCrkth .68 +.01 Fncllnst 18.00 +.03
Colmbus 15.09 +1.27 Finisar 12.14 +.33


FinLine 21.30 +.03 Infosys 40.16 +.37
FstCashFn 41.91 -.07 InigDv 5.05 ..
FMidBc 11.20 -.05 Intel 26.06 -.15
FstNiagara 7.78 +.05 InteractBlf 13.55 +.12
FstSolar 15.13 +.66 InterDig 28.16 +1.03
FstMerit 16.53 -.17 InterMune 11.90 -.02
Fisent 71.52 -.43 IntSpdw 26.31 -.30
FiveBehvn 26.50 ... Intersil 10.18 -.03
Flextrn 6.30 +.05 IntentdlLs 18.96 -.45
FocusMda 18.95 +.20 Intuit 59.62 -.14
ForcePro 5.55 ... IntSurg 544.21 -5.15
FormFac 6.09 -.19 InvRIEst 8.06 -.21
Forinet 24.04 +.56 IronwdPh 13.31 -.07
Fossillnc 72.15 +4.05 Isis 12.96 -1.07
FosterWhl 17.39 +1.04 Itron 41.03 -.19
Francescn 31.02 -.16 IvanhoeEh .63 +.03
FreshMkt 54.60 -1.01
FronterCm 3.72 -.15
FudlCell 1.11 +.01 j2Global 29.56 +.01
FulionFncl 9.38 -.22 JASolar 1.01
JacktnBox 27.44 -11
Jamba 2.69 -.05
GSVCap 8.86 +.20 JamesRiv 2.07 +.04
GTAdvTc 5.00 +.14 JazzPhrm 48.92 +.36
GabdliEqrt .04 -.02 JetBlue 5.48 -.18
GalenaBio 1.85 -.14 JiveSoftn 20.00 +.67
Garmin 37.28 -.01 JoesJeans 1.16 +.07
GenProbe 82.61 +.01 JosABanke 43.45 +.81
Gentex 22.31 +.07 KITDigit 3.77 -.28
GeronCp 1.65 -.02 KLATnc 49.34 +.64
GileadSd 53.76 +.61 Keryx~io 1.89 -.05
GladerBc 15.78 -.22 Kraft 40.20 +.23
GlbSpcMet 12.92 +.12 Kulick~e 8.76 +.19
GluMobile 5.52 +.16 LKQ~Corp 35.23 +.32
GolLNGLid 39.54 -.12 LSllndlf 6.65 -.40
GolLNGPt 31.90 -.20 LTX-Cred 5.91 -.09
Google 593.06+12.30 LamResrch35.18 +.15
GrCanyEd 19.72 -.02 LamarAdv 30.09 +.54
GreenMtC 17.74 -.24 Landstar 49.30 +.58
Greenlight 24.45 -.09 Latice 3.58 -.13
GrifolsSA 10.50 -.08 LeapWirlss 5.75 -.29
Grouponn 7.40 +.33 LekPhrm 2.83 -.01
GulfportE 21.50 +.57 LibGlobA 52.94 +1.21
HMN Fn 2.90 LibGlobC 50.40+t1.07
HMSHkis 31.87 -.14 LibCapA 94.67 +.45
HSN Inc 42.74 -.50 LiblylntA 18.53 +.14
Haincel 56.68 -.58 LifeTech 43.88 -.09
Halozyme 9.20 -.12 LimeEngy .95 -.04
HancHld 30.71 -.13 LimelghtN 2.73 -.04
HansenMed 1.90 -.15 Lincare 41.34 -.01
HntrdBbo 3.89 +.18 LinearTch 31.08 +.08
Hasbro 33.72 +.45 LinnEngy 40.42 +.30
HawHold 6.30 -.23 Liquidity 41.70 -.83
HlthCSvc 22.98 -.19 LodgeNet 1.22 -.07
Heathwys 9.29 -.15 Logitech 9.79 +.10
HrindEx 13.79 -.15 LogMeln 32.98 -.60
HSchein 79.00 +.37 LookSmth .91 ..
HercOffh 3.55 +.21 Lulkin 55.82 +1.35
Hologic 19.24 lululemngs 59.30 +2.15
HomeAway 21.85 -.27
HorizPh n 7.12 -12
HorsehdH 8.98 -.27 MBFncl 20.48 -.08
HotTopic 10.03 +.11 MELASci 3.90 -.15
HubGroup 31.87 +.41 MGE 48.41 -.16
HudsCity 6.02 -.12 MIPSTech 6.42 ..
HumGen 14.21 ... MTS 39.47 -.17
HuntJB 55.20 +.33 MagelnHI 52.56 +5.80
HuntBncsh 6.55 -.06 MagicJckts 21.29 +.59
IAClnter 48.50 -.40 MAKOSrg 13.39 -.10
IdexxLabs 92.71 +.65 MannKd 2.68 -.11
IPG Pholon 44.22 +1.26 MktAxess 30.09 +.80
iRobot 20.35 -.33 MantellT 11.14 +.26
iShAsiaexJ 52.54 +.44 Masimo 23.89 +.33
iShACWI 44.33 +.24 Mattdl 34.58 +.35
iShsSOX 50.43 +.99 MattrssFn 27.21 +1.02
iShNsdqBiol34.12 -.64 Mattson .99 -.02
IconixBr 17.49 +.22 Matmlnig 25.67 +.40
IdenixPh 10.15 +.07 MaxwllT 6.59 -.08
IgniteRstn 15.15 -3.91 MedAssets 13.54 -.03
Illumina 43.02 +.48 MedicActn 3.78 +.05
ImunoGn 15.94 -.06 MediCo 23.60 -.65
Impax~abs 20.20 -.24 Medivaton 94.67 -.49
Incyte 25.11 -.29 Melc~an10.57 +.43
Infinera 6.43 -.01 Mellanox 93.90+27.52
InfinityPh 16.48 +.09 MeniorGr 14.94 -.11
Informat 30.36 +.77 MercadoL 73.48 +1.59


Methanx 29.84 +1.01 PnnNGm 42.52 -.6
Micrel 9.36 -.03 PennantPk 10.68 -.10
Microchp 32.82 +.25 PeopUidF 11.98 -.07
MicronT 5.78 -.07 PeregrinPh 1.28 -.05
MicrosSys 49.22 +.02 PerfectWld 9.78 +.12
MicroSemi 18.53 +.22 Perrigo 114.76 +.03
Microsoft 30.67 +.22 Pet~mart 69.55 +.01
Misonix 3.14 +.09 Pharmacyc 49.70 -2.80
MitektSys 3.10 -.75 Photrln 6.18 +.02
MModdl 14.46 +.04 PinnaclFn 19.53 -.01
Molex 24.70 +.33 Plexus 29.75 +2.30
MonPwSys 19.50 +.75 PluristemT 3.20 +.51
MonroMuf 37.21 +.80 Polymm 10.10 +.23
MonstrBvs 67.83 -4.07 PoolCorp 36.87 -3.6
Mylan 22.61 +.06 Popularrs 14.35 -.45
MyriadG 25.96 +.06 Parlnteg 34.92 +.38
NETgear 34.30 +.29 Power-One 4.55 +.12
NICESys 34.36 +.11 PwShsQQQ 65.10 +.71
Nll HIdg 8.51 +.10 Pwrwvrsh .56 -.04
NPS Phm 8.73 ... Presstekth .48 -.04
NXPSemi 22.94+t1.08 PriceTR 62.70 -.25
Nano~sphere 2.85 +.24 priceline 672.67 +16.99
NasdOMX 22.81 -.09 PrUPQQCCs 52.00 +1.64
Natlnstrm 27.87 +.32 ProceraN 23.88 +.70
NatPenn 9.52 -.20 PrognicsPh10.43 -.12
NektarTh 9.52 -.08 ProgrsSoft 19.92 +.30
Neonode 5.31 -.16 Proofpntn 14.50 -.64
NeptuneTg 4.72 +.10 PUShQQC~Crs44.58 -1.50
NetApp 31.12 +.86 ProspctCap 11.14 -.04
NetEase 55.44 +.14 PureCycle 2.21 -.02
Netiix 83.12 +1.85 QIAGEN 17.49 -.10
NtScout 21.93 +2.27 Qlik(Tech 19.95 +1.04
NetSolTh .57 +.03 Qlogic 12.68 +.01
NetSpend 9.41 -.18 Qualum 58.44 +2.39
NetwktEng 1.42 ... QualitySs 23.99 +.02
NYMigTr 6.76 -.08 Quant~uh .86 -.01
NewsCpA 22.40 +.03 QuestSft 27.87 ..
NewsCpB 22.62 -.01 Questcor 43.71 +1.03
NobltyHlf 5.32 +.21 QuinStreet 10.05 +.09
Nordson 53.07 +.79 RFMicD 4.40 +.22
NorTrst 46.00 -.24 RainmkSh .80 +.01
NwstBcsh 11.69 -.17 Rambus 5.22 +.01
Novavax 2.13 -.01 Randgold 87.82 -.22
NuVasive 24.54 +.31 RealPage 22.21 -.61
NuanceCm 22.07 +.62 Regenrn 120.61 -3.32
NutriSyst 10.98 -.02 Renasant 16.57 +.16
Nvidia 13.19 +.13 RepubAir 5.11 -.15
02Micro 3.90 -.04 RschMotn 6.96 +.01
OCZTech 5.61 +1.05 Retail~pp 12.38 -.05
OReillyAu 94.15 -.41 RexEnergy 12.1 +.01
ObagiMed 16.06 -.28 RigelPh 10.01 -.03
Oclaro 2.33 +.01 RiverbedT 15.98 +.61
OdysMar 3.91 +.06 RosttaGrs 10.35 +.58
OmniVisn 12.76 +.35 RosettaR 42.99 +.14
OnAssign 16.50 -.11 RossStrss 68.54 -.69
OnSmend 6.82 -.01 Rovicorp 11.60 +1.59
Onuthyr 4.24 +.03 RoyGld 72.47 -.38
OnyxPh 68.40 +.64 RubianTc 10.31 -.35
OpenTxt 48.41 +.84 Ryanair 2938 +.09
OpenTbleh 37.89 +.20
OpntTch 26.98 +2.17
OpbmerPh l4.71 -.11 SBACom 56.50 -.12
Oracle 30.87 +.37 SEllny 21.27 +.09
OraSure 11.75 -.14 SLMCp 15.20 -.85
Orexigen 6.32 -.60 SS&CTech 24.68 -.20
Orthfx 41.26 +.02 STEC 7.63 +.25
OtterTail 23.91 +.05 SVBFnGp 59.05 -.39
Overstk 6.60 +.12 SabraHltc 18.43 -.10
SalixPhm 52.06 +.16
SanderFm 38.19 +.10
PDCEngy 26.35 -.56 SanDiske 35.08 +.82
PDLBio 6.85 -.01 Sanmina 7.63 +.01
PLX Tch 5.72 -.07 Sanofirt 1.47 +.05
PMC Sra 5.86 +.11 Santarus 7.28 ..
PSSWrld 22.28 +.01 Sapient 10.08 -.03
PacWstBc 23.92 -.82 Satconrs 1.34 -.20
Paccar 37.74 +.14 SavientPh .51 -.07
PacEthanh .30 +.00 Schnitzer 29.59 -.36
PacSunwr 1.98 +.04 Scholastc 28.35 -.81
PanASly 14.27 +.09 SdClone 6.25 +.08
PaneraBrd 150.69 +.11 SdGames 8.92 +.13
ParamTch 19.76 +.51 SeagateT 27.17 -.37
Parexel 28.74 +.15 SearsHldgs 54.06 -.48
Park~erVsn 3.09 -.04 Seatt~en 26.79 +.25
Patterson 35.05 +.03 SelCmfrt 27.60+t5.83
PattUTI 15.18 +.07 Sdleclvlns l7.82 -.25
Paychex 32.73 -.46 Semtech 24.09 +.6
PeetsCfeT 57.91 +3.33 Sequenom 4.03 +.13


HooperH .67 +.03


Imp0ilgs 43.43 +.83
Ino~vioPhm .56 +.01
IntellgSys 1.75 +.01
IntT eg2 1282 tl
IsoRa 1.04 -03


KeeganRg 2.92 +.07
LongweiPI 1.30 +.01
LucasEngy 1.64 +.07







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 A13


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital1:
Balancp 16.71 +.01
Retlnc 8.97 -.01
Alger RFinds6 8 04
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 16.64 +.01
GlbThGrAp59.91 +1.02
SmCpGrA 38.04 +.33
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.11 +.29
Allianceer rB43 .7

Go ht 26.61 + 2

AllianceBern C:
I p~Ctds30s52 +.26
NFJDvVI 12.12 +.02
SpI alzMun.20 ..
AGICGrthC 25.77 +.30
Amer Bneacon Insti:-.5

AmerBeac Inyn:-.

Ameri Century ist:

Amew Centur 6Adv:+.0
EqGroAp 23.49 +.04
Ae Centur7.7 ...
AIICapGr 3 .01 +.27
Ba anced 1. t0

thln 2 73 .01
Heritagel 21.98 +.15

InA jBd 43.2 +.04
IntDisc 9.26 +.18
InG pp 10.1 +14

Oehd 1.2 t.
RealEstl 23.33 -.24
elny 25.28 +.23
American Funds A:


BalAp 19.63 +.05
CBondAp +292t01
CpWGAp 3. t1

EupacAp 37.25 +.36
IdnvA~p 38 25 + 16
GovtAp 14.62 ..
G ~p 3. t1
IncoAp 1 .58 +.0

InlGrlncAp28.13 +.23
ILCTAp 2.4 t.


NwWrldA 49.34 +.32

Smpp 3.0 +.13
TxExAp 13.03+t.01

AWie Amest ens:+.9
Apec 4. t2

Artisan Funds:
Inst 22.1 +22
InlValf 26.61 +.19

SaVal 1. t0
Bron lund1523+.5
Asset 49.33 +.41

oma lap 79.8 0
Bernstein Fds:


axMgdn k .66 +.11
EqtyDivx 19.44 -.05
GAIArx 18.8 -0

Inl0pAp 29.34 +.35
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICtx 17.54 -.01
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDvx 19.48 -.06
GlbAllocrx 18.92 -.09
HiddBd 7.78 +.02

Hc.Fun 621 +.01
BruceFund397.91 +.34
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 28.25 +.02
CGM Funds:


Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 49.72 +.60
Calvert Invest,
Incop 16.41 +.01
Sn aqApp 1. t3
SocBdp 16.43 -.01

Cohen & Steers:
CR t~rsiaC 7A:-.64


DivOpplyA 8.58 +.01
LapGrApt2564 +.2
MdCpGrOp 9.89 +.05
oidV ppp 7.9t0


FrontierA 10 61 +.17
Glbeha ,04 G:.24
EmMktOpIn 7.78 +.07
Columbia Class8Z:+.5


IntBdZ 9.53

Lg a r 1.8 +23
ValRestr 47.06 +.24
Crediteklisse Com 2


Dn ~o s: 9.39 +.10
USCorEqinl1.68 +.02
US orEqe2 n1 46 ..

CommAp 18.73 -.01
DWSlnve~st1 3-.9

CorPlslnc 11.16 ..
EmhMkmG 15.1 +.15

GbhS bC r 3. t2
GlblThem 21.30 +.14
Gold rc 1. t3
IntTxAMT 12.14 +.01
InlFdS 38.80 +.20
LgCpFoGr 32.49 +.31
Lt if~ 38.72 +.30
MATFS 15.16 +.01
SP500D 18 34 + 0

WlDav n2unds 6 .07
Davis FundsB:

INanFBnd33C30 -.06
NY~enC 33.62 -.06
Da iFunds:37.6

Delaware Invest A:
Diverlncp 9.46 +.01
SMIDCapG 24.40 +.04
U pwae Ini tO B:
SelGrBt 34.12 +.24

Em~~ nnal82 +.12
EmMktV 26.78 +.13
ItSm an 139 t2

TA S~rE22n9632

USMicron 14.37 -.07
USTgdVal l6.32 -.06
USSmalln 22.28 -.05
USSmVa 25.15 -.14
IntSmCon 14.22 +.19
EmMktSCnl9.06 +.07
EmgMktn 24.73 +.20
Fixdn 10.35 ..
IntGFxlnn 13.16 -.01
IntVan 14.51 +.13
Glb5Fxlncnl1.26 +.01
2YGIFxdn 10.13 ..
DFARIEn 26.70 -.28


Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 72.78 +.30
Income 13.77 ..
IntStk 30.21 +.22
Stock 111.35 +.55
Double~ine Funds:

I~N p 1. 8



Dreyf 9.37+t.06
DryMidr 28.11 +.02
GNMA 16.19 +.01
GrChinaAr 29.81 +.14
HiddAp 6.45 +.01
StratValA 28.16 +.01
TechGroA 33.01 +.73
DreihsAclnc 10.38 ..



ChinaAp nc5.78 +.13


Name NAV Chg
AMTFMulnc10.35 +.02
Mul1CGrA 8.36 +.06
InBosA 5.84 +.01
LC ~alln 1.5 +.
SpEqtA 15.68 +.10
TradGvA 7.43
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 10.53 +.01
NatlMulnc 10.03 +.02
Eaton Vance C:

NtMnlnc 103 +.02
Eaton Vance 01+.1

GblMacAbR 9.82 +.01
I ds:al18.64 -.01
Focuslnytn49.41 +.03
FMI Funds.1.5 .2

FPA Funds:

nPAr s 2. t0
Fairm dA8.18 -.22
MidGrStA 33.96 +.24

F d raed I :8 :
KaufmnR 5.22 +.03
TtDeBdS 1 .6 +.01
Fidelity Adv Foc T:

Fid liyh Advisor0A:+.6
StrlnA 12.51 +.01
Fid lity Advisor6C.+15

Fidelity Advisorl:

Eqilnln 2. t0

B lngtln 2.3 +.16
Strlnln 12.66 +.01
FI elite/ Advior7T:+.6

DivGrTp 12.54 +.06

EqnTp 2. t0
GrOppT 40.27 +.35
Bin dTp 10.02 +.0

Or eaTp +62 .15
STFiT 9.33 +.01
S MeAIICpe 141 +.07

FF2010n l3.92+t.05

FF2020K 13195 +.06

FF2035n 11.44 +.07
F2035K 12.1 +.09

FF2040K 1348+ .08
F20i45nvels361 +.09

AFgr0rnK 16698 +.06
A r20rn 1. t0
BalanceK 19601 +.08

F23n +i.4 t0
Cap03pn 283.4 +.13

CFn2 ev0 n 134 t0
Chinagr 23621 +.11


CnvrScn 23642 +.01

Divrtkrn 16.34 +.04

AgEmrkn 1.208 +.019
Eqlancn 44.90 +.06

Eluroe 2r7.49 +26
Ech~n 323.88
Cdportn 5. t3
Ca~n 887 t1

Govtncr 910.5 t0

GrowthoK9.70 +.7
rCtr rrn 120 t0

IonmBdn 13415 t5

unv~n 11.6 t0
InDiscqn 29694 +.26
DIvntlSrn +133.8

InvGthn 2.79 t...

nmrpk 2. t1

ECap~al 1. t7

Levortkn 28512 -02

Magelln 70.306 +43

Ag Matk~r 1284 +01
Caupn~nn 2861 +.01
GMtgen 11.35+.1

Nw Itrn + 7t10
Cruncn 13685 +.01

Ohdennn 52348 +.

PcBasn 2272+.18
PAnrion 110
PuitaunK 1917+06


InS~mrgnk 18522 +.13

SInvGr~dF 12.03 t0

St tMun 107 t1
SmCap~iscn166- t06


Laten n 90 1 2

Ue~SBIn 128.02 -
Utlityn 18.73 -.01
Vlowtratn 28.385 +.12

Fidelty Selec ts:

Biotchn 108.35 -.78

hoeunn 1 +.

Con~isn 26.61 +.015
Consunn l3.32-.0
ConStapn791.87 .06
Cstilon 41.66 -.06
Df~uern 82.303 +.93
Electrn 45.73 1.10
Enrgyln 48.74 +.024
Engy~n 1362.9 .40
Eh~nvtnrn15.36 +.01
Fi0ndyn 56.56 -.30
Goldrn 33.79 +.40

Healthn 313.95 -.346
Indtsurn92 481 .14
Lesrnmgk 104.29 .1.32


Materialn 66.47 +.77
MedDln 60.72 -.46
MdEqSysn 27.72 -.05
Multmdn 51.31 +.09
NtGas n 30.49 +.16

R nain 604 +.53



UtilGrn 57.63+t.17
Wirelessn 7.49 +.07
Fidelity Spartan:
5001dxtlnvn 48.80 +.13
5001dx I 48.81 +.14
Intlnxlnyn 31.01 +.31
TotMktln n 39.81 +.09
USBondl 12.02



TotMktAdrn39.81 +.09


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


missed Wall Street's expec-
tations. Slower growth in
watch
Europe weighed on the
2012 credit-card company's re-

+34.66sults as international rev-
+34.66enue fell 4 percent. Amex
12,943.36 lost $2.06 to $56.23.
+23.30 Morgan Stanley fell 74
cents to $13.25, a drop of 6
2,965.90 percent. The investment
+3.73 bank's income and revenue
1,376.51fell far short of what ana-
lysts expected, dragged
-2.89 down by dismal results from
802.17 trading stocks and bonds.
The Dow is now up 1.3
diary percent for the week, and
1,578 the S&P 500 index 1.5 per-
1,421 cent.

d: 146 Among other stocks mak-
ing big moves:
3.9 b Walgreen Co. soared 12

Diary percent, the largest gain in
1,083 the S&P 500. The Walgreen
pharmacy chain and Ex-
1,387 press Scripts reached an
d: 121 agreement in which Wal-

1.7 b green Will OnCe again fill
AP prescriptions from people
in the Express Scripts net-
ed, thanks to work. That ended a dispute
From its Pay- between the two companies.
yments busi- Walgreen gained $3.65 to
e-commerce $34.62.
rose $3.73 to a Textron jumped 12 per-
cent. The maker of Cessna
wavered in planes reported that its
flipping from quarterly earnings nearly
es and back doubled. The results
measure of trounced Wall Street ana-
:in the mid- lysts' estimates, thanks to
on came in rising demand for its Cita-
than econo- tion line of business jets and
pected. Two Bell helicopters. Textron
c reports also gained $2.74 to $26.50.
a.m., homes a Johnson Controls sank 8
ing economic percent. Earnings for the
re also weak. maker of auto parts and
nd financial building equipment fell far
stlylower,fol- short of expectations, par-
earnings re- tially a result of a weaker
American euro and sluggish demand
Morgan Stan- from Europe. The company
said it expects Europe to re-
xpress lost 4 main a problem. Johnson
rgest drop in Controls' stock lost $2.25 to
its earnings $26.07.


Associated Press


NEW YORK Strong
88TflingS from IBM and
Other technology companies
nudged the stock market
higher Thursday, but a trio
Of weak economic reports
kept the gains in check.
IBM surged 4 percent
after it posted a jump in
prOfits late Wednesday even
RS revenue fell. It marked
the 38th consecutive quar..
ter that IBM's net income
TOse over the previous year
IBM leapt $7.09 to $195.34.
The Dow Jones industrial
aVerage rose 34.66 points to
ClOse at 12,943.36 on Thurs-
day, the third straight day of
gaiHS.
"One thing is dominating
today and it's tech earn-
ingS," said Lawrence Crea-
tura, portfolio manager at
the mutual fund manager
Federated Investors. "Earn-
ingS have been better than a
10t of people expected. That
COuld still change, but so far,
So good."
Analysts forecast that
88TflingS at S&P 500 compa-
IlieS shrank 1.5 percent in
the April-through-June pe-
TiOd versus a year ago, ac-
COrding to researchers at
S&P Capital IQ. If that turns
Out to be true, it will be the
WOrst earnings season since
the summer quarter of 2009.
III Other trading, the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
gained 3.73 points to
1,376.51. The Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 23.30
pOints to 2,965.90.
Despite the modest gains,
utilities and consumer sta-
pleS lagged behind the mar-
ket, usually a sign that
inVestors were willing to
take on risk.
eBay jumped 9 percent
after the company reported
that its second-quarter net


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 12.02 ..

Fll tage47.40 +.14
OverseasA 21.20 +.12
First Investors ...


b ptp 1 .5 t.
GrolnAp 15.92 +.05

oATAAp 12.4 1
MITFAp 12.83 ..
NJTFpp 13.7 +.01

OpApp +833 14
SpSitAp 23.71 +.16

ToRtp 1.3 +.04
ValueBp 7.45 ..

rbsuS Irun.25 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.90 ..
ALTFAp 11.91 +.01
sATApp 114
CAlntAp 12.15 ..

COFp 124 +.01
CT ~p 1 .50 +.01
DblTFA 12.37


Fedlntp 12.52 ..
FedTFAp 12.68 +.01
FLTFAp 12.00 +.01
FounFM~pp 1. t0
GoldPrMA 27.43 +.34
Grwt~hAp 48.39 +.2

IncAm~p 21
InsTFAp 12.57 +.01

N TFApp 12
LMGvScA 1036+t.01
M TFAp +20 .01

MTAp +23 .01
MOTFAp 12.75

NCTFAp 12.94

O IFAp 109
Re ~ App1. 1
RisDvAp 36.58+.06
a ~prA 3. t3
Ttl Appp10.4 +.01
UllsAp 14.29

Fr Fk mp Fk5Adv:
GlbBdAdynl3.00 +.05
FncmeAd 216 C+.01

+SVt 68 .01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:

Fr nlmp 43mp A:
DvMktAp 21.52 +.18

Id pp 130 t0
dlthp 1. t0
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:

Gr nklemp Tmp B C
DevMktC 20.94 +.17
ForgnCp 5.77 +.05
GIBdCp 13.06 +.04
Franklin Mutual Ser:
Q~uestA 17.15 +.04
GE Elfun S&S:

GM Irstl I:
CHIE 21.76 +.11
Quality 23.08 +.08
GMOTrustlIV:
InilntrM 18.75 +.12
GM ~ut 0

Gabelli Funds. -
Asset 50.84 +.14
Goldman Sa s2 A:+.7

GoldmanSachslnst:
Gi ppdt 246 t1
HYMunin 9.25+t.01
da~pFVn 36.44 +.0
Harbor Funs:81

CapAplnst 41.28 +.51
Intlnyt 5. t7

Hartford Fds A:


In~ap H d d3 8 +.13
CapAppln 30.98 +.04
Harnoprd HLS IA6 .3

Div&Gr 20.92 +.03
Ba ance +07 .05

Hermessy Funds:

Hussman Funds.
SotF tr 1.0 t0

ICON Fds:

Hlc eSS 1. t0
ISI Funds: 80-1

IVA F nds:
WdieAr 1. t0
Invesco Fds Invest:
D vrs~ivpF 12 9 +.02

Energy 36.10 +.17
Ullsolun :+.7.02

Bat~skA 1. t0
CmstM 16.48
Cnstvp 2. t1
EqlncA 8.87 +.02
frlkcAp 19.99 +.05

HYldupA 46 +.01
InlGrow 26.81 +.29

US MortgA 13.06
I vesco Funds B:+.1

IUnSeot Fun00 +.01
BalRiskY 12.83 +.05

A~sFtCt 23.04 +.26
AssetStAp 23.81+t.27
AsseotStlrn A40 ss.27
J organ A l:
CoreBdA 12.11
CPMo gan C Cass:

Md Mo gan In~stl:
JPI rgan RC0
CrBon 121

JPMorgan Select:
US qu nie C0s:

CoreBd 12.11
HighYld 7.95
IntmTFBd 11.39
LgCpGr 23.53
ShtDurBd 11.01
USLCCrPls 21.65
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.28 +.14
ContrarnT 13.75 +.05
EnterprT 63.18 +.14
FlxBndT 10.97
GlI~feSciTr 29.31 +.03
GlbSelT 9.25 +.13
GITechTr 17.79 +.23
Grw&IncT 32.95 +.26
JanusT 30.57 +.30
OvrseasTr 30.32 ..
PrkMCValT21.08 +.05
ResearchT 30.61 +.25

Swny 5 .6 +.93


JohnHancockA:
BondAp 16.12 +.01
RgBkA 14.19 -.14
StrlnAp 6.61
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.61
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.14 +.06


Name NAV Chg
Lazard lnstl:
IEmgart p18.30 +.18
EmgMkOp 18.71 +.19

CBASgr in3 4 -.04
CBprp 153 .
GCIAIICOp 7.89 +.09


Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrst 20 7 +.16

CM pnvp 28.69 +.16

Longleaf Partners:
Pres 2. -0

Loomis Sayles:
LBondl 1.6 t.

LSBondR 14.59 +.03
StrlncA 14.93 +.04
Loomis Sayles Iny:
Inv r~Ap 1. t0
Lord Abbett A:

IudEq 1.6 +. 3
B ~eApp7.89 +.01
MidCpAp 16.51 +.01
Lrd Abbett 64 ..

Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.61 +.01
MFS Funds A.
MIT 2 .59 + 0

EmGA 46.03 +.33
HinA 3.49

TotRA 14.76

VleA 2.2 +.01
MFS Funds B:
MIBn 1. t0
HilnBn 3.50 +.01
Mol~ 18.94 +.01
MFS Fundsl:

IF Funds : +.01

I i Snay F A:+.20
HiYldBA 5.99 +.01
MainStay Rmnds B:+.2
GovtBt 9.02

Hn mlr 171 t0
I SqBay 1:+8 .14
ICAPSIEq 35.86 -.06
I airs Power 7+.9

Managers Funds:
Imankonp 8d39 +.01
ManningA&Na i~er F 08

Matthews Asian:

Ans alnyr 1. t0
PacTgrlnv 21.56 +.13
ier eFun 5 83 +.01

I oWest45 05 +.18
TotRetBd 10.81

MI s Fundis0.0 ..
MidasFdt 2.19 +.04
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.04 +.15
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.35 +.06
MorganStanley lnst:
InlEql 13.25 +.12

MunderFundsA:
GwthOppA 27.93 +.20
MunderFundsY:
MCpCGrY 30.91 +.18
Mua Seri s

GlbDiscZ 29.32 +.03
Q~uestZ 17.31 +.04
SharesZ 21.62 ..
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
enuesslnst 4.7 t.
Intr 16.02 +.21
LgCaVlnv25.6mT:.03
Genesis 50.55 +.09
Niicholas Gro~u89 +.2
Ncr ersnn 45.8 +.30
Bondldx 11.12 -.01
HYF lne 7.0t

Stklcd 17.08 +.05
I Chly 5.17 +.22
HYMuBpdp 16.7 +.02

Nuveen Cl R:

DYM dBd 167 +.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
Realstnoc21d8 -.22

WhitOkSG 40.21 +.31
0 mark Funruls81:-.2

Gnloball 2. t1
Oakmark 46.30 +.17

el estbur Fs:+.1
ldbpC 1 219 t02
LgCapStratp 9.34 +.10
eaRneteie5.2 +.04
AMTFMu 7.15 +.01
AM~rnNY 12.1 t0
CapApAp 46.99 +.53
Cpncp 90


EquityA 9.17 +.05
GbpA 2. t1
GblStrlncA 4.26 +.01
Goldp 27.99 +.36
IntBdAp 6.46 +.03

PAMuniAp 11.44 +.01


Op~pe~nhueimer j +.1
AMTFrNY 12.18 ..
CpncBt ...
EquityB 8.43 +.05
Ope hme4.och:
LtdNYAp 3.39 ..
RoMuAp 16.94 ..
RcNtMuA 7.46 +.01

DvkYeim 34 +.33
InlBdY 6.45 +.02
Ons row s2u7r3 s:.43
Strlncon 11.55 +.01
hIMCO Admin PIMS:

PMol Instl1 4M4S: ..
AIAsetAutr 10.82 +.06
AllAsset 12.24 +.05
ComodRR 6.95 +.11
Divlnc 12.02 +.02
EmgMkCur 10.23 +.02
EmMkBd 12.07 +.02
Fltlncr 8.67 +.03
ForBdUnr 11.08 +.03
FrgnBd 11.04 +.01
HiYld 9.36 +.01
InvGrCp 11.10 +.02
LowDu 10.56
ModDur 11.03
RealRtnI 12.46 +.01
ShortT 9.84
TotRt 11.44
TRll 11.03 +.01
TRIll 10.08
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAut t 10 74 +.05


RealRtCp l2.46+t.01
TotRtCt 11.44 ..
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.46 +.01
TRtnp 11.44
PIMCO Funds P*
AstAIIAuthP 10.80 +.05
TotRtnP 11.44

Eqyno F85 +.10
Permannt 46.98 +.08


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:

Bn aAp 17.2 +.12
PionFdAp 40.52 +.16
Pine rFund B: ..
P ildet Fun0 : .03
HiYldCt 10.11 +.04

SatnecrYp 1104 +.01
Price Funds:
Bda aen 2 .6 + 0

C onn 11 4

DivGron 25.30 +.02
EMu pn 1. t0
EmMktSn 29.95 +.30

Eqnexn 3. t1
Europen 14.38 +.14
GNMAn 10.16 ..
Growthn 36.34 +.34
Grlnn 2. t0
HiYieldn 6.75 +.01

Isildn 1.5 j .
BCEqGrn 29.0 +14
IntDisn 41.57 +.32


Japann 7.66 +.08
LatAmn 38.43 +.37
MDShrtn 5.24 ..
M ~ndn 1106

MCapValn 23.33 +.04
NAn rn 34.2 + 2

New rann 40.7 + 2

Nlncn 9.91 +.01
r onn 118 t.
PSlncn 16.65+t.05
Real strn 110 -1 -

R015 +245t05
R2020n 17.19 +.07

R2035n 12.70 +.07

Si ecn 25.7 +.4

SmCpStkn 34.64-.11
SmC pValn374 -1

Speclnn 12.78 + 0
TxFrHn 11.71 ..

USTlntn 63-.01
USTLgn 14.46 -.04
VBondn -.02

Dv nlnt 9.37 +.09
LgCGlln 9.86 +.11
L 220n 1. t0
Prudential Fds A:
BendA 1 .3 t0

Mu IlncA 1021 +01

Prudential Fds B:
Growh 176 t.

Prudential Fds Z&I:
MadCapGrZ31.97 +.16
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.25 -.01
AZTE 9.54
ConvSec 19.26 +.02
DvrlnAp 7.50 ..

GeoBalA 12.81 -.01
GlbEqtyp 8.70 +.04
GrlnAp 13.61
GlblHIth 44.85 -.05


Intirlnp 8.61 +.07
InvAp 13.88 +.05
NJTxA p 9.85
MullCpGr 52.93 +.43

ETxExp 953 .01
TFlnAp 15.68

U GVp 1. -0
GlblUtilA 10.47 +.03

Ptn~am Fund B:+.1
Ta Frlnts 15.7 +01

Eqlnct 15.82 -.02
GeBalB 1. -0
GlbEqt 7.84 +.03
GI t~t 16.5 +.1

GI t~hB 357 -0
HYAdB tx 5 86 -.01
IncBn 7 2-0
InlGrtht 13.01 +.13
BxvBt 12.4 +.0
MulltpGr 4 .24 +.36
TFY t126 t01

GlblUtilB 10.43 +.02
VoFBuns 17.46 +.18
IntirA 16.09 +.29
Ig~phaA 4. t1

RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkA 151.31 +.15

Microcapl 14.84 -.06
Penn ulrr 1. t0

ToRetltr +..07
Russell Funds S:

Rd Advi 114
NasdaqAdv i6.09 +.18

SEmgAk Fud8.61 +.13
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 19.78 +.01
10001nvr 39.02 +.12

TSMSelf 25.00 +.06
Scout Fund .8+.9

Se eced Fu~n2 -07

Sentinel Group:
SCeoqiAp 134 t0
Sit Funds:

SoS nClny n053 .1
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.81 +.08
Stratton Funds:


SmCap 52.78 -.03
Sun erica runds*.1

TCW Funds:
Eom tl 19.01 +.02

TIAUnRtEF Funds:-.1
Eqldxlnst 10.49 +.02
InLEqllnst 14.71 +.14
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.31 +.19
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 15.10 +.13
REVallnstr 24.51
Valuelnst 45.25 +.03
Thornbu gFds*
IntValAp 25.14 +.31
IncBuildAt 18.47 +.07
IncBuildCp l8.47 +.07
IntValuel 25.70 +.31
LtTMul 14.65
Thrivent Fds A*
HiYld 4.92 +.01
Incom 9.20

a gnaHYp4 +.02
Flexlnc p 9 19 +.01


AllAm 24.43+t.07
ChinaReg 6.69 +.01
GlbRs 9.22 +.07
Gld&Mtls 10.49 +.16
WldPrcMn 10.50 +.14
USAA Grou~p5.8+2

ASV~ 3. t2


Grwth 15.67 +.12
Gr&Inc 15.48 +.07


Name NAV Chg
IncStk 13.30 +.01
Inco +.#5

NYBd 12.48
Prc MM 244 .1

t tpk 142 +. 3
TxElt 13.65

VABd 11.62
VWldGr 19.46 +.19
C Idx

Value Line Fd:

Vagnard A~d ral:+.3
BalAdmln 23.24 +.04
CAITAddmnn16 t:2
CpOpAdln 73.12 +.31
EMAdmrrn33.08 +.25
Energyn 108.33 +.60
ElA Inn 39. t0
ExplAdmln 71.23 +.26
xd~dmmni +.#6
GNMAAdnnll + 0

Ht ~rn 60.4 -.03

InfPro dnn 2 08 t. 2
ITBdAdmln l2.15
ITsfyAdmln 11.84
IntirAdmn 55.02 +.74

ni~~dn 1.3 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.18
GirdAd lnl.O +.01


MuHYAdm n11.18
NLdn rnn .35
PALTAdm n11.69
s I~dri94.06 -.9
B y~mln 66 7

STFdAdn 10.88 ..

G Cdmnn 3.6 -.08
TxMCaprn 68.81 +.17
TSddn 3.2 +.08
Va~mn 2. -0
Wellin~dmn57.53+t.08

Ws rldnn 4. -0
Vanguard Fds:9 +.1
CapOppn 31.65 +.13
Covrn nnn 54 +05
DivdGron 16.45 +.01

ixln 7. t2
E Ln 1.76 + 0
GNMAn 11.10 +.01
rlobnEcqnn 1. t
GrthEqn 12.04 +.13
HlhC~re 1431 -0
InaP n +8 t.2

InlGrn 17.29 +.23

IT~aen 1. t0
ITTsfyn 11.84
LifeConn 16.96 +.03
LifeGron 22.54 +.08
Lifelnc n 14.62 +.02
LifeModn 20.26 +.06
LTIGraden 11.03 +.01
LT~sfyn 13.91 -.03
ruH n +.1 8
Mulntn 14.33
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.73
MuShrtn 15.93

N n~En +26 .01
PALTn 11.69
PrecMtlsrn 15.00 +.22
PrmcpCorn 14.42 +.08
Prmcprn 66.81 +.33
luArn 1.9 +.07
STIGrade n10.80

STdsyn 10 7
StratEqn 20.02

TgtRee220210n 11905 t0
TgtRee2010n3205n 6
TtRe2035nl3510 +06
TgR 22n231 t0
Tg~tRe2045n103191 +.

USV uen 11.22.1 -.01
Tgi25nn .6 + 0


Wndsrn 13.89 +.03
VWndsll nd I2x8 -.03
DynMku Ilrn91.77s.+.87
Pxklin 188+.if

To "n~drre757 t2
TotlntllPrn 91.08 +.86
TtlntSigrn273 t2
B lnedn 323 + 0

Europen 23.06 +.20
Gown 3.5 +.28
LgCaplxn 25.37 +.08

Md apnn +12 t0

SmCapn 36.59 -.09
SmopdGthn 360+t.0
TotBndn 11.20
Il~tn n 42 t0
Vluen dI2sit ds-.05

Baln tn 23.24 +.04
DevnMklnstn4881 +.09
FTAllWldlr nB104 +.74

Instldx n 126 19 + 36

Intl tldxni10 t0
dnTCS ~us 3110 t0

RIlnsitrn l4.5 -.15
SClnstn 36.64 -.08

T ansn +42 .08
Valuelstn 21.98 -.04
Van uard Si~g .29

GIr nin 32.88 +.26
MidCpldxtn 30.38 +.11

S pignn 3.0 -.09
TotBdSgln 11.20
TtStkSgund13.08 +.08

EmMktlund9A47 +.03
MulSStAp 4.86 +.01
Waddell &Reed Adv*
AssetSp 9.01 +.10
CorelnvpA 6.36 +.06
DivOppAp 15.05 +.06
DivOppCt 14.89 +.06
Wasatch*
Sm pGr 41.78 +.17

VW els Fargo Adv2C 0 :
W tklnv 2023 +.09
Opptylny 38.33 +.28
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82 ..
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 40.20 +.46
Wells Fargo Instl:

West A~ss 2
Crl~~p .9


l~B~~ll~l~ll1lI


IA~ 1 5242 +1 .6
ValeS pf 19.1Ap 4 +.04
Var nth 4797 +.02
Val par 50.56 -56
VangREIT 66.40 -.70
Vagmg 3. t4

VnEFdE 3180 +.26




VimpelCm 8.72 +.26
Visa 125.39 -2.43
Vishaylnt 8.79 +.14
VMware 92.76 +2.78
Vonage 1.89
Vornado 84.38 -1.21
WGL Hoki 40.77 +.42
WPXEnn 15.28 +.49
Wabs 6.4 -0


WsteMlnc 33.33 +.11
WatsnPh 76.97 -.49


Market
Julyl19,

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000

NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:


income double~
higher revenue
Pal online pa:
ness and its
websites. eBay
$44.19.
The market
early trading, J
gains to loss~
again, after a
manufacturing
Atlantic regic
much weaker
mists had ex
other economic
released at 10
sales and lead
indicators, wer
Big banks a
firms were mot
lowing poor I
ports from
Express and n
ley.
American E
percent, the la
the Dow, after


Associated Press


NEW YORK Rising
terisions in the Middle East
have pushed oil prices up 19
percent over the past three
weeks and are leading to a
TiSe in prices at the gasoline
pump.
Since the start of July, ay-
Trage gaSoline prices in the
U.S. have climbed 11 cents
to $3.44 per gallon. Pump
prices are expected to creep
higher in the coming weeks,
and they aren't likely to fall
back to their June low of
$3.33 for the rest of the sum-
mer, T181ySts say.
Crude rose $2.79, about 3
percent, to $92. 66 per barrel
Thursday, its highest level
Since mid-May. The price
has risen $15 per barrel
Since June 28, when oil hit a
10w of $77.69.
The oil market is re-
Sponding to a series of
eVents in recent days that
have raised concerns yet
again that Iran will try to
block oil shipments through
the Strait of Hormuz, a nar-
TOw waterway in the Per-
Sian Gulf through which
One-fifth of the world's oil
travels every day.
17811 raiSed this threat late
lRSt year after the U.S. and
Europe announced sanc-
tions designed to crimp
17811's oil sales, sending oil
Soaring above $100 per bar-
Tel. WeStern nations are try-
irig to force Iran to abandon
what the West says are ef-
forts to develop a nuclear
WeapOn.
TellSions eased, and oil


agreed to enter negotiations
Over its nuclear program.
But in the past few weeks,
those negotiations ap-
peared to have failed, a U.S.
Navy ship fired on a boat in
the Persian Gulf and Iran
said it has devised a specific
plan to block oil shipments.
Then, on Wednesday, seven
Israelis were killed in a sui-
cide attack in Bulgaria. Israel
blamed Iran for the attack,
and vowed to strike back.
Iran has denied involvement.
"It's raised the fear quo-
tient," said Tom Kloza, chief
oil analyst at the Oil Price
Information Service. "This
was more than just talk and
taunting."
If oil buyers worry that oil
will soon be in short supply,
they buy oil futures con-
tracts to lock in the price as
insurance against future
price spikes. Those pur-
chases drive up benchmark
oil prices and can eventu-
ally lead to higher prices at
the pump.
Brent crude, which is
used to benchmark the oil
bought by most U.S. refiner-
ies, has jumped 21 percent
in about a month. On Thurs-
day, Brent rose $2.64 to
$107.80. Brent hit a low of
$89.23 on June 22.
Brent would be most af-
fected by disruption in the
Middle East because it is
used to price seagoing
crude that competes with
crude shipped through the
Persian Gulf. Also Brent,
which is priced in London,
has been pushed higher by
lower oil production in the


Further increases are
possible over the next few
weeks, development driv-
ers are unlikely to welcome.
"It's going to translate to
upward pressure at the
pump," said Jim Ritter-
busch, an independent oil
trader and analyst.
But the rise won't likely
be dramatic or long-lived.
The growth in global de-
mand for oil has weakened
in recent months as the
economies of the West have
sputtered and China's eco-
nomic growth has slowed.
And oil supplies remain
high because output has
risen in Saudi Arabia,
Libya, the U.S. and else-
where.
"There's stagnant de-
mand, and lots of supply,"
said Judith Dwarkin, chief
energy economist at ITG In-
vestment Research.
That leads analysts to
think that prices won't sky-
rocket unless supplies are
disrupted by Middle East vi-
olence or a hurricane in the
Gulf of Mexico.
Kloza doesn't see gasoline
rising much beyond $3.50
for the rest of the summer.
After that, he says, gasoline
prices could fall sharply as
supplies increase and refin-
ers switch to cheaper winter
blends offuel.
In other energy trading in
New York, natural gas rose
2.6 cents to close at $2.935
per thousand cubic feet.
Heating oil rose 7 cents to
close at $2.95 per gallon and
wholesale gasoline rose 6
cents to close at $2.94 per
gallon.


priceS fell,


when Iran North Sea.


Name Last Chg
SPConsum 44.29 +.29
SPEng 68.63 +.21
SPDR ncl 14.60 -.10
SPlnds 35.60 +.17
SPTech 29.09 +.25
SP UIl 37.59 +.07
SidPac 6.11 -.27
Standex 45.39 -1.00
StanBlktDk 66.09 +2.83
StarwdHI 52.04 +.93


Sunamis 46.30 -.27
Sunarhgs 83 +.44

SuplEr 21.18 0.3
S Trmug 2.35 t.01
S cTras 76.96 -327
Synovugs 10.96 -.01
Syn~sm 29.07 -5


Sym 290


TIMPartn 21.46 -2.27


TJXs 44.98
TRWAuto 36.88
TaiwSemi 12.86
TalismEg 11.16
Target 61.25
TecktResg 30.98
Teek~ayTnkc 4.07
TdefeBrasil 23.60
TdlefEsp 12.28
TempurP 27.57
ea Ith 37 6
Teradata 68.30


Tevahrm413.82


Textron 26.50
Theragen 1.87
ThermoFis 53.03
ThomCrkg 2.85
3MCo 90.83
Tiffany 57.18
TWCable 85.68
W l~n 446


TorchEngy 1.64
Torchmarke 51.58


TorDBkg 79.85
TotalSA 45.02
TotalSys 24.20
Transocn 47.75
Travdlers 63.69
Tredgar 14.43
TriCOMl 15.76
TwoHrblny 10.83
Tyalnt 53.00
Tyson 15.36
UBSAG 106
UIL Hold 37.28



U dAA s 5 .5
UniFirst 64.20
UnilevNV 33.28
UnionPac 122.77
UMdCont 22.05
UMdMicro 2.10
UPSB 79.97
UidRentals 29.80
USBancrp 33.80



U~dhlthGp 54.99
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WeinRlt 26.81
Wdllcare 67.36
WdllPoint 62.70
WdllsFargo 34.15
Wesulni 56.07
WestarEn 30.75
WAstEMkt 14.90
WstAMgdHi 6.22
WAstlnfOpp 13.32
WstnRefin 23.96
WshnU on 1696




WmsPtrs 55.38
Winnbgo 11.06
WiscEngy 41.20
WTlndia 17.14
Wortihgi 22.71
Wyndham 51.35
XL Grp 20.84
XcdlEngy 29.03



YumBrnds 65.86
Zimmer 64.32


Stocks creep up* IBM,


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OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
a viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.

t e~reosrelreneth lel, chairnens nd
cood taste
Letters must be no longer than
t50w ds, ad Iwnters will nth.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. '
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chromecleonline.com.

country as a whole. Consider
cuts in loan repayment rates for
future college students, the sud-
den necessity of solving the
plight of 800,000 young illegal


"Every man is as heaven made him,
and sometimes a great deal worse. "
Miguel De Cervantes, 1547-1616


CITRus CouNTY CHRONICIT


they hate all
R n e w ta x e s buteulcn s a
apparently one sort of
tax is fine with many of
them: a poll tax.
This is a loaded ,
phrase that should not
be used lightly. But e
when Attorney General
Eric Holder addressed Cokil
the NAACP convention Steven
in Houston, he was ab- OTH
solutely right in his de-
scription of new voting VOI(
laws passed by Repub-
lican legislatures in a dozen
states: "We call those poll taxes."
The long, if imperfect, history
ofAmerican democracy reflects a
steady expansion of the fran-
chise: to non-property owners,
former slaves, women, youths
under 21. Reversing that trend,
and restricting the franchise, is
simply an outrage a violation
of our most basic values. Fortu-
nately Holder, the first African-
American attorney general, is
making the issue a top priority.
"Let me be clear," he told the
NAACP! "We will not allow politi-
cal pretexts to disenfranchise
American citizens of their most
precious rights."
Requiring a photo ID on Elec-
tion Day is the most popular new
poll tax, but there are other ver-
sions: Florida is making it harder
to register new voters, for in-
stance, and Ohio has cut back on
early voting. The Justice Depart-
ment and the Obama campaign
have each filed lawsuits in sev-
eral states in an effort to block
these laws. Rep. Lamar Smith of
Texas argues that these counter-
measures "aren't just wrong, they
are arrogant, undemocratic and
an insult to the rule of law."
He would be right if voting
abuse -the purported reason for
the new laws was a real prob-


Slem. But it is not.
Widespread fraud is a
Fiction. The new laws
Shave only one pur-
pose: to help Republi-
cans by reducing the
number of poor and
minority voters. Just
listen to Mike Turzai,
the Republican leader
~and in Pennsylvania's leg-
Roberts islature. That state's
IER new voter ID law, he
boasted, "is gonna
CES allow Governor Rom-
ney to win the state of
Pennsylvania." No spin machine
can explain that one away.
The Associated Press studied
the numbers and concluded
"fraud appears to be rare." The
Republican National Lawyers As-
sociation could identify only 400
fraud persecutions over a decade
nationwide, and as AP reported,
"That's not even one per state per
year" By contrast, in Georgia and
Indiana, where voterlDD aws were
in effect for the 2008 election, 1,200
valid ballots were tossed out in
those two states alone.
"The numbers suggest that the
legitimate votes rejected by the
laws are far more numerous than
are the cases of fraud," AP con-
cluded. "Thousands more votes
could be in jeopardy for this No-
vember, when more states with
larger populations are looking to
have similar rules in place."
The catalyst behind these new
laws is obvious: the rapidly
changing face of America. In
1980, when Ronald Reagan won
his first term, the electorate was
88 percent white; in 2008 that fig-
ure dropped to 74 percent, and
this year it should be about 72
percent. Demographers expect
whites to be a minority in about
30 years.
This trend clearly favors De-
mocrats. Obama won 53 percent


of the overall vote four years ago,
but 95 percent of blacks and 67
percent of Latinos. The president
also attracted two out of three
voters who made under $30,000 a
year or didn't finish high school.
And these are exactly the voters
most likely to be affected by the
new laws.
This all became clear last week
in a federal courtroom in Wash-
ington. Under the Voting Rights
Act, Texas is one of 16 jurisdic-
tions with a history of racial dis-
crimination that must clear all
changes in voting laws with the
Justice Department. After the
Obama administration blocked
the state's new voter ID measure,
a three-judge panel heard the
case.
Texas Attorney General Greg
Abbott argued the law is permis-
sible because the ID requirement
"applies equally to all Texans."
True. But a poll tax can have a
discriminatory impact even if its
bias is not explicit. Texans who
lack IDs and could be barred
from voting are heavily poor,
young and non-white that is,
Democrats. And if you think the
law was not aimed at them, con-
sider this.
The Legislature decided that a
Texan with a concealed gun per-
mit could qualify as a voter but a
college student with a school ID
could not. Real subtle. Lawmak-
ers also created a new free voter
ID card, but applicants would
have to pay for the supporting
documents needed to obtain the
card, like a birth certificate.
so the Justice Department es-
timates that getting a "free" voter
card would cost at least $22. And
that, by any name, is a poll tax.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email at
stevecokie~gmail. com.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .................. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................. ............... ......editor
Mike Arnold .................. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick. ................... ........ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................. ....................citizen member
b une 1 Mac Harris .................. ...................citizen member
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................... .............guest member
'You may dzf~er with my choice, but not my right to choose "
David S. Arthurs publisher emen'tus


RUN FOR THE MONE Y




J g g




SatuOr HI'



S d rai n


e


nificant milestone will
be visible Saturday
morning as Run for the Money
participants complete the last
leg of the 180-mile
journey from Tal-
lahassee to THE I!
Lecanto.
The impending Run fr
arrival of thosefi
running in sup-
port of the Key OU O
Training Center Join the ct
will take center supper
stage, but activi- telet
ties in recognition
of the feat are var-
ied and run TELE
throughout Satur-
day morning. SATU
Motorcyclists The annu
will show their the Money t
support for the be from 9 a.
care the Key Cen- Saturday. T~
ter provides to the WVYKE TV-C
developmentally to watch.
disabled in an era To donate
where government telethon call
funding cuts cre- H 1-352-~
ate hurdles to the ("1" and are;
mission of provid- necessary if
ing dignity, love distance).
and respect H 1-888-:
through jobs and toll free.
life-skills training.
Participants in
the Bikers for the Key Charity
Ride are to register at 9 a.m. at
the Chet Cole Life Enrichment
Center on the Key Center cam-
pus, off North Van Nortwick
Road, which is off State Road
44 a short distance east of the
S.R. 44/Rock Crusher Road in-
tersection. Kickstands up at 10
a.m. and the ride will run to
Sand Hill Saloon, High Octane
Saloon, Castaways then back to
the Key Center Campus.
The Walk a Mile in Their
Shoes event begins at 11 a.m. at
the entrance to the Key cam-
pus, at East Van Nortwick and


S.R. 44. There will be 13 teams
encompassing 176 partici-
pants, with Key clients as hon-
orary team captains.
Then comes the grand finale
at noon, when fire
engines will es-
CSUE: cort the runners
to the finish line
e Mne at the Key cam-
le. pus, where they
will be joined by
INION:the Walk a Mile
lebration, teams, Key sup-
rt the porters, clients,
hon. family and
friends.
Bluegrass music
'HON and hot dogs will
fill the air and
RDAY stomachs of those
lIRun for joining in the cele-
lethon will bration.
m. to 6 p.m. The telethon
ne in to will run through-
hannel 16 out the morning
and afternoon,
during the where a host of
local notables and
27-2341 volunteers will
code only serve as emcees
ong and donation-tak-
ers. Tune into
77-0340 WYKE TV-Chan-
nel 16 to watch
from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Donations
during those hours can be
made by calling 1-352-527-2341
or, toll free, 1-888-377-0340.
While fun, hoopla and com-
munity spirit will be ever-pre-
sent Saturday, at the heart of
the celebration is the reason
why runners endure the steam-
ing pavement of U.S. 19 in the
dead of summer: to illustrate
the challenges the develop-
mentally disabled face daily.
All concerned are encour-
aged to join in the excitement
and help the Key to maximize
the potential of a very special
segment of citizens.


S
h
a

P
e
oI



T

a
e
u





a
l

3;


LETTERS M2 to the Edztor


immigrants, valiantly fighting
the contrived "war on women,"
bashing the evil wealthy 1 per-
cent while taking campaign cash
from the unblemished, civic-
minde Hlyood super ric .
The administration and its al-
lies have increased the food
stamp program by 58 percent, ig-
noring eligibility requirements
but gaining grateful potential vot-
ers. Taxpayer-funded Pell Grants
have increased by 50 percent;
college students are happy but
we pay more in taxes and tuition
rises to capture the new cash.
A successful Washington, D.C.,
scholarship program was halted
as a sop to the teachers' union.
meelplyn fe ad dqua
ous" investigation was halted by
the president's invoking of execu-
tive privilege. "The most transpar-
ent administration in history?" A
recent lawsuit alleges parts of
Dodd-Er~ank are unconstitutional;
large banks are protected by "too
big to fail," but smaller banks are
not. Equal treatment?
Has President Barack Obama
been good for America? Ab-
solutely not.
Joseph P. Ryan
Homosassa


Progress report
Americans are watching a pre-
cipitous decline in U.S. leader-
ship and stature in the world.
Our dealings with Syria, Egypt,
Iran, Pakistan and Russia are
viewed as weak and inconsis-
tent. Here at home, the presi-
dent has presided over growth of
under 2 percent annually while
shackling future generations
with an additional $5 trillion
debt. The impending tax explo-
sion in January is ignored, as is
the dramatic cut in defense
spending. In 3 1/2 years the ad-
ministration has submitted no
plan for energy improvement,
tax reform, Social Security re-
form or nee edM Ipdes to

iAn even more c roswv trend
isgr wng inorRp i,
namely the diminishing of our
reliance on the rule of law. Law
is defined as "an ordinance 0,
reason for the common good,
emphasis on common. But the
president seems to reject that;
his policies are class warfare
and division.
On an almost regular sched-
ule, another favored group is re-
warded with special beneficial
treatment to the detriment of the


off and then buys a gallon of
milk, ice cream and some other
junk food with an EBT
RIcard, a food stamp card.d tht
g And I'm thinking, lady,
if you just used that
money you're wasting on
the lottery to buy your
food, I wouldn't have to
dpay fr it. No, she can't


rus County bus route to
include Homosassa, down to Sug-
armill Woods, up to the Crystal
River Mall.
I would just like to see a couple
nights of bus service a month,
maybe going to 11 o'clock, so citi-
zens from Floral City and Inver-
ness can head over to various
festivals.


I was in a store the other day
trying to pay for my gas and there
were two women in front of me
buying lottery tickets.
The one buys $40 worth of lot-
tery tickets and then a $2 scratch-


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
CONINENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Page A14 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


GOP wants to restrict voters


[TH(R
(ooIS CMz1


Clarification

An editorial on Page A8 of Wednesday's edition warrants clarification. Ac-
cording to the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, Seniors vs. Crime relies on an
army of dedicated volunteers, more than 800 of whom have logged nearly
26,000 volunteer hours since it began in 2002.


Taj? Terrific!
I, for one, praise the "Taj Mahal
Meadoweres~t (Govern-
ment Center) O
Every time I visited
there, it's been less than
20 minutes as opposed
to the one that used to
hbr tvv.S )19 which
hous a o t w~norao
So I think it's a great 4
deal and I don't think it's
throwing money away, as56
per the letter from Win-
ston Perry today
(July 12).
Taxpayer tickets


-0579


111


Expansion plans
I applaud the decision
plans to expand the Cit-


















































































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Restaurant & Bakery


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STATE


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 A15


Associated Press

IN THE OCEAN OFF
KEY LARGO, Fla. Ocean
explorer Sylvia Earle sported
one Rolex dive watch on
each wrist as she slipped be-
neath the balmy waters of the
Florida Keys for a weeklong
stay at an undersea research
lab where marine biologists
have kept constant watch on
a coral reef.
In 1970, Rolex gave Earle
a small gold watch when she
led the first team of women
"aquanauts" to a lab off the
U.S. Virgin Islands. Back
then, prolonged underwater
exploration was still some-
thing of a novelty.
She got a larger black dive
watch not long before arriving
in Key Largo last week for
what could be the last mission
for her and other scientists to
the Aquarius Reef Base.
It seems that time has al-
most run out for the lab in
the Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary. The mis-
sion ending Saturday could
be at the last publically
funded lab of its kind, be-
cause the Obama adminis-
tration has cut Aquarius' $3
million annual funding.
The National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Adminis-
tration owns the lab that has
rested for two decades some
60 feet below the water's
surface. The federal budget
cuts threaten to close the
lab unless it can secure pri-
vate funding.
"At the very time the
ocean needs all the help it
can get, it really is a tray-
esty," said Earle, former
chief scientist at NOAA and
currently explorer-in-
residence at National Geo-
graphic. She's staying at
Aquarius for the third time.
Aquarius is a pressurized
lab whose residents are
called "aquanauts." Air, hot
running water, electricity
and high-speed communica-
tions lines snake down from
a life support buoy to those
confined to the 43-foot-long
metal tube. Food, comput-
ers and supplies are deliv-
ered in water-tight drums.


Scientists and support
staff who scuba dive to the
lab reside in a 400-square-
foot chamber that includes a
kitchen and bunks six. From
video streamed live from the
lab this week, it looks like
Earle and five other scien-
tists, filmmakers and staff
are living in a mobile home
encrusted with coral.
The base lets researchers
to scuba dive up to nine con-
tinuous hours a day on the
reef, seeing marine life tran-
sition from day to night. No
breaks are needed to return
to the surface, and no de-
compressing. Scientists say
they accomplish in a week
what might take months to do
in shorter dives from a boat.
Mark Patterson, a marine
science professor at the Vir-
ginia Institute of Marine
Science at the College of
William and Mary, is at
Aquarius for the eighth time
- to research involving
corals, sponges, plankton
and goliath grouper
He also builds underwa-
ter robots, but said
adamantly that scientists
must spend time underwa-
ter. This week, he's brought
electrode-tipped instru-
ments to measure corals.
"A robot could never do
this in a million years, even
though I love robots to
death," Patterson said.
Without Aquarius, in fu-
ture experiments he'll have
to transfer corals in limited
dives from a boat to a lab on
land.
"I'll have to do my science
in a very different way," Pat-
terson said.
Year-round research for
two decades at Aquarius has
allowed scientists to com-
pile a continuous stream of
data from one reef in a re-
gion where the fragile ocean
ecosystems have rapidly de-
clined. Scientists largely
blame climate change and
man-made stresses for the
change.
"The trend is not good.
The good news is, we know
why," Earle said in a video
chat Tuesday from Aquarius.
Advanced diving tech-


Associated Press
ABOVE: In this undated photo released by One World One Ocean, Sylvia Earle looks out of a porthole from Aquarius, the
undersea research laboratory in the Florida Keys. Aquarius is part of NOAA's National Undersea Research Program, but
the budget has been cut by the federal government. BELOW: D.J. Roller adjusts his helmet before a dive to the undersea
research laboratory Aquarius Reef Base on July 13 in the Florida Keys.


that NASA will continue to
train astronauts there.
"It would be a shame to
see it go away," he said.
U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-
Lehtinen, R-Fla., said
budget cutbacks were un-
avoidable. Government offi-
cials have left the door open
for private funding to con-
tinue research there.
"Unfortunately, our budget
environment is very, very
challenging and we are un-
able to do all that we would
like," NOAA spokesman
David Miller said, calling
Aquarius vital. "We hope that
additional sources offunding
can be found."
Social media and out-
reach for the independent
Aquarius Foundation es-
tablished to raise the money
to run the lab -is as much a
focus of this week's mission
as recording more data from
the reef. Filmmaker Greg
MacGillivray's one World
One Ocean campaign is doc-
umenting the mission and
posting live updates online.


niques pioneered 50 years
ago by explorers such as Ed
Link and Jacques Cousteau
allowed people to stay un-
derwater for days or weeks
at a time. These techniques
also have been adapted for
offshore drilling operations,
and one lab has been turned


into an undersea hotel off
Key Largo. But Aquarius ap-
pears to be the only under-
water research station left.
Since 2001, NASA also
has trained astronauts to
live and work in space at
Aquarius, including a mis-
sion in June that simulated


a visit to an asteroid.
Mare Reagan, director of
last month's NASA training
mission at Aquarius, said
the watery environment is
akin to a low earth orbit.
He's optimistic other fund-
ing will come through to
keep Aquarius running and


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potato salad.
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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




"~:ti. ",'hE."~ Obama, Romney trade jabs


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Campaigning in coveted
Florida, President Barack
Obama warned Thursday
that Republican challenger
Mitt Romney would be
"squeezing more money out
of seniors" by turning
Medicare into a voucher pro-
gram. Romney, firing away
near his Boston home base,
accused Obama of putting
his needs above the nation's.
The daily war of words
Came RS polling shows the
presidential contest contin-


ues to be close nationally,
with both men pouring most
money and attention into
the collection of less than 10
states expected to decide
the election.
The president opened two
days of campaigning in
Florida in search of military
veterans, seniors and un-
aligned voters in the state's
crucial midsection. Florida is
the largest and most coveted
of the nation's Election Day
toss-up states.
In Jacksonville, the presi-
dent broadened his attack
on Romney's support for a


House Republican plan that
would change Medicare
from a fee-for-service pro-
gram into one where future
retirees buy insurance
using government subsidies,
Romney, in remarks to re-
porters near Boston, kept
the focus on the sluggish
economic recovery under
Obama's watch. He cited
new government figures
showing the number of
Americans seeking unem-
ployment benefits rose by
34,000 last week, a figure
that may have been skewed
higher by seasonal factors.


Associated Press
This combination of 2012 and 2011 file photos shows
Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney, left, and President Barack Obama.


Associated Press
The sun rises Thursday
over a corn field in rural
Springfield, Neb. The
drought gripping the United
States is the widest since
1956.

Mom accused of
changing grades
NEW TRIPOLI, Pa. -A
Pennsylvania woman al-
legedly changed her children's
grades after logging into a
school computer system using
passwords obtained when she
worked for the district.
Investigators said Cather-
ine Venusto used the superin-
tendent's password to change
the grades. She was ar-
raigned Wednesday on a half-
dozen felony counts and
released on bail.
Officials said Venusto
changed a failing grade to a
medical exception for her
daughter in 2010, when she
was still a district secretary.
The woman is also accused
of bumping one of her son's
grades from 98 to 99 percent

State police said Venusto
admitted changing the
grades, saying she thought
her actions were unethical
but not illegal.

WOTUdBRIEFS

Prot"s


Associated Press
ABOVE: In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Lt. j.g. K. Smith, right, explains energy-effcient systems Wednes-
day aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chafeeto Navy Secretary Ray Mabus during the U.S. Navy's Great
Green Fleet demonstration. BELOW: In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz par-
ticipates in the Great Green Fleet demonstration portion of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 exercise on
July 18. Nimitz took on 200,000 gallons of biofuel in preparation for the demonstration.





1la mah $


Military using biojuel in the jight

d!"dinSt &#pedenCC ON TC/977 off


Associated Press

ABOARD THE USS NIMITZ -
Some 100 nautical miles northeast
of Oahu in the Pacific Ocean, a
fleet of U. S. Navy fighter j ets slings
from the deck of the U.S.S. Nimitz
aircraft carrier, leaving thin trails
of smoke on the tight runway.
The operation, part of maneu-
Vers involving several thousand
sailors as part of the world's
largest naval exercises in waters
off Hawaii, was at the center of a
growing controversy involving de-
fense spending and foreign oil.
The dozens of air and sea ves-
sels surrounding the Nimitz, in-
cluding helicopters, fighter jets
and destroyer ships, were running
on a biofuel blend that can be sub-
stituted for traditional fuel with-
out any engine modifications.
Navy officials said using the al-
ternative fuel helps the military
address weaknesses. Operations
that use more than 50 million gal-


lons of fuel each month rely on pe-
troleum, making the U.S. military
heavily dependent on foreign oil.
Market volatility causes Navy
spending to swing by tens of mil-
lions of dollars each time the price
of a barrel goes up or down $1.
"We're not doing it to be faddish,
we're not doing it to be green," Navy
Secretary Ray Mabus said aboard
the U.S.S. Nimitz on Wednesday.
"We're not doing it for any other rea-
son except it takes care of a military
vulnerability that we have."
But the plan to use a 50-50 blend
of alternative and petroleum-
based fuel has hit a snag Con-
gressional lawmakers who bristle
at spending time and money chas-
ing alternative energy at a time
when defense spending is being
cut and traditional oil is cheaper.
The Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee last month narrowly passed
an amendment pushed by Republi-
can Sens. John McCain of Arizona
and Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma that


Associated Press
Demonstrators protest
Thursday against austerity
measures announced by the
Spanish government in
Barcelona, Spain. The
country is in its second
recession in three years and
its government borrowing
rates are unsustainably high
as investors worry the
government may face new
costs in rescuing the banks.
1rzi: Oil le k

larger than thought
RIO DE JANEIRO -
Brazil's oil regulator said
Chevron Corp. could have
prevented an offshore oil leak

lasttdear Irtalso ad thelleak

Magda Chambriard said
the National Petroleum
Agency she heads has con-
cluded its investigation into
Chevron's leak off the Rio de
Janeiro state coast in Novem-
ber and a second smaller
leak in March
Chambriard said the stud
determined that about
155,000 gallons seeped into
the sea from cracks on the
ocean floor near a Chevron
wellhead. Previous estimates
put it at 110,000 gallons -
dShe nai thhe aenc ns s
will face, but it's likely to be
d Brath max m a lwe~d
million total.
Chevron said it will com-
ment soon on the regulator's
findings.
--From wire reports


would prohibit military spending on
alternative fuels if their costs ex-
ceed the cost of traditional fossil
fuels. The provision is now part of
an overall defense budget bill mak-
ing its way through Congress.


Associated Press

DOLO, Somalia The
long, dusty walks from hun-
gry homes to far-away
refugee camps are again
claiming lives in Somalia
one year after up to 100,000
people died in the country's
worst famine in generations.
Two lethal factors are
again combining to send
families fleeing from their
homes: Too little rain and
too many gunS.
Enough rain did fall in
Somalia this year to prevent
a repeat of last year's mas-
sive famine, but it wasn't
enough to keep everyone
fed. In addition, al-Shabab
militants who have been
forced out of larger cities
are infiltrating smaller
towns where they are de-


ried on her mother's back in
recent weeks died during
the walk, a doctor said.
In a cruel replay of last
year's hunger marches,
many families who left
refugee camps as the crisis
eased this year went home,
attempted to plant food but
are now returning to the
stick-hut camps.
"Before we were hoping
for a good rain. But we got
very little," said Ali Ganoon
Associated Press Abdi Rahman, a 75-year-old
gee camp in who walked nine days with
hiewaiting his wife, daughter and four
grandchildren. They ar-
to roads of rived in Dolo earlier this
week,,,,twee.


Somahi car bomb
kills member
of parliament
MOGADISHU, Somalia
- A police commander
said a remotely detonated
car bomb blast in Soma-
lia's capital has killed a
member of parliament.
The body of Mohamud
lbrahim Garweyne was
bumed beyond recognition.
Garweyene was previously
trade and industries minister
in the Somali government.
Five civilians were
wounded in the blast.
Such attacks are typi-
cally carried out by al-
Shabab, Somalia's most
dangerous militant group.
-- From wire reports


A Somali child who recently arrived at a reful
Dolo, Somalia, sits under a tree Wednesday w
for food rations.


manding payments from
families in money, livestock
or children, residents said.
The weeklong walks to
refugee camps made by
hundreds of thousands of
Somalis last year turned


est victims. Refugees in
Dolo are telling similar
heartbreaking tales of weak
children being left behind
to die. One baby being car-


sandy paths in
d th f th f


Rahman said al-Shabab
militants are active in his
village in the Bay region of
Somalia, but he hopes to
return.


NATION


~TORLD


i1sraelplaces

blame on Iran
Associated Press

BURGAS, Bulgaria He
looked like any other impa-
tient tourist checking the
big board at airport arrivals:
a lanky, long-haired man in

had antlle paopckwts of hs
plaid Bermuda shorts, a
bulky backpack hanging
from his shoulders.
Minutes later, authorities
say, the man, filmed by se-
curity cameras at the Bur-
gas airport, would board a
bus filled with young Israeli
tourists and blow himself

up ks lln six othe s

who he was, using his fin-
gerprints, his DNA and his
fakeensMichigan driver's
Despite the uncertainty,
Israel was quick to blame
Iran and its Lebanese allies
Hezbollah for the attack
Wednesday, which killed
five Israelis, including a
pregnant woman.
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu said the bomb-
ing "was carried out by
Hezbollah, the long arm of
Iran." Iranian Foreign Min-
istry spokesman Ramin
Mehmanparast called the
accusation "baseless," say-
ing it was aimed at diverting
world attention from Is-
rael's role in the assassina-
tion of Iranian nuclear
scientists.
Israel has attributed a se-
ries of attacks on its citizens
around the world in recent
months to Iran and its Shiite
proxies, threatening to esca-
late a shadow war between
the two arch-enemies that
has escalated over Israeli
allegations that the Iranians
are trying to build nuclear
weapons.


Famine anniversary: Somalis dying on food walks







Secfiion B-FRIDA'IJUL"I20, 2012



PORTS


9 H Auto racing/B2
H Tour de France/B3
Golf, NBA, NFL/B3
Olympics/B4
H TV, lottery/B4
H MLB/B5
H Entertainment/B6


phyia eauto S i be
provided by Dr. John Gelin
and his team of physicians
at First Baptist Church of
Inverness from 6 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, August 1.
Pick up the required pa-
mawok rdoam t7h amo 3

Thusoyi'A te ceitus High
Front Office. Forms are
also available at the Citrus
Schools website at:
www.citrus.kl 2.fl.us/news/
enroll Ireg istration.htm.
Print and complete the
forms and bring them and
proof of medical insurance
with you to the event.
For more information,
contact Sharon Seagle,
Citrus High School athletic
department secretary, at
726-2241, ext 4514.
Storm holding Punt,
Pass, Kick & Cheer
The Inverness Storm
youth football program is
hosting a Punt, Pass, Kick
& Cheer event presented by
Nature Coast Orthopaedics
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, July 21, at Citrus
High School.
There will be a cheer
champ and a longest punt,
pass and kick competition.
Trophies for first, second
and third place will be
awarded. All participants
will receive medals.
Attractions such as a
bounce house, dunking
booth, pie-in-the-face, car-
nival games and more will
be available.
The cost is $15 per child
and includes lunch and ac-
cess to all contests, games
and attractions.
For more information,
call Tommy Frederick at
352-302-7386, Rachel Tap-
ley at 352-642-3136 or visit
www.invernessstorm~com.
Colts sign QB Luck
A person familiar with
the contract said Andrew
Luck and the Indianapolis
Colts agreed to a four-year,
$22.1 million deal.
The Colts announced
they had signed the No. 1
overall pick Thursday.
-- From staff and wire reports


HWiggins still
wearing yellow
jersey at Tour de
France./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


fflfcer wins 1ty,

bT apap Bay beats

Clevebmnd 6-0

Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG David
Price threw another gem.
Price became the A~s first 13-
game winner, B.J. Upton had
three RBIs, and the Tampa Bay
Rays beat the Cleveland Indians
6-0 on Thursday.
Price (13-4) allowed two hits
over seven innings. The All-Star
left-hander had seven strikeouts
and three walks.
"I'd say he's in the top two or
three (AL pitchers), no ques-


tion," Rays manager Joe Maddon
said. "From a purely selfish per-
spective, I'd say he is the best
right now."
Price has won five consecutive
decisions.
"That's why I
felt that (Wednes-
day's) win was so
important for us,
because you re-
ally don't want
come into the last
game of the se-
David Price ries trying to tie
pitcher won the series against
AL-leading David Price," In-
13th game. dians manager
Manny Acta said. "He overpow-
ered us. We just didn't have good
at-bats against him."
Upton hit a three-run double
off Ubaldo Jimenez (8-9) during a


four-run sixth that put the Rays
up 5-0. After getting two outs,
Jimenez loaded the bases before
giving up Upton's shot down the
third-base line. Upton scored on
Carlos Pena's
Rays box RBI single.
SCore Jimenez al-
lowed five runs
aFor the TB- and seven hits in
Cleveland 5 2/3 innings. He
stats and struck out five
the rest of and walked five.
Thursday's Wade Davis
baseball, pitched the
see Page final two in-
B5. nings and
completed a
two-hitter for
the Rays.
After Carlos Santana walked to

See PLR CE/Page B4


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays base runner Jeff Keppinger slides into third base with
a triple ahead of the tag by Cleveland Indians third baseman Jose Lopez
during the third inning Thursday in St. Petersburg. The Rays won 6-0.


Rays' Price assumes AL lead in wins


Scott teaasi lst M 1

under-par golfers

at Britir Open
Associated Press

LYTHAM ST. ANNES, Eng-
land Unlike the guys in
charge of the weather forecast,
Adam Scott got everything just
about right Thursday in the
British Open.
Scott was determined not to
take himself out of contention in
the opening round at Royal
Lytham & St. Annes, as he had
done in the first two majors this
year. Caddie
Steve whilliams
British gave him a pep i
Open talk to play the I~y ~ ~ ~ l-
scoresfirst hole like it
was the last
aFor one. Even
Thursday's more inspira-
complete tion came from
list of the interna-
golfers, tional flags
see Page posted above
B4. the massive
grandstand
down the left
side of the first tee.
They weren't flapping. They
were sagging.
In surprisingly calm condi-
tions, Scott raced out to the lead
and almost into the record book.
He stood on the 18th tee needing
a birdie to break the major
championship scoring record,
and instead made bogey to settle
for a 6-under 64.
It matched the lowest Open
round ever at Royal Lytham and
gave the Australian a one-shot
lead over Paul Lawrie, Zach
Johnson and Nicolas Colsaerts.
"It was just like a nice walk in
the park today," Scott said. "And -

See LOrlPage B4
Adam Scott of Australia plays a i ?
shot off the 11th tee at Royal
Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club i~
during the first round of the British
Open Championship on Thursday
in Lytham St. Annes, England.
Associated Press


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~ Y AT 3.65% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSmTRIflN PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.





1. Matt Kenseth, 707.
2. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 691.
3. Greg Biffle, 667.
4. Jimmie Johnson, 656.
5. Denny Hamlin, 628.
6. Kevin Harvick, 622.
7. Tony Stewart, 618.
8. Martin Truex Jr., 617.
9. Clint Bowyer, 614.
10. Brad Keselowski, 613.
11. Carl Edwards, 567.
12. Kasey Kahne, 547.
13. Kyle Busch, 545.
14. Ryan Newman,536.
15. Paul Menard, 534.
16. Joey Logano, 533.
17. Jeff Gordon, 524.
18. Marcos Ambrose, 495.
19. Jeff Burton, 493.
20. Jamie McMurray, 486.
Nationwide Series
1. Elliott Sadler, 628.
2. Austin Dillon, 625.
3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 612.
4. Sam Hornish Jr., 596.
5. Justin Allgaier, 555.
6. Michael Annett, 529.
7. Cole Whitt, 514.
8. Mike Bliss, 458.
9. Danica Patrick, 413.
10. Brian Scott, 397.
11.Tayler Malsam, 393.
12. JoeNemechek, 390.
13. Jason Bowles, 370.
14. Jeremy Clements, 362.
15. Mike Wallace, 358.
16. Erik Darnell, 294.
17. ohanna Long, 247
18. Timmy Hill, 246.
19. T.J. Bell, 235.
20. Eric McClure, 231.
Camping World
1. Timothy Peters, 353.
2. :sinLotn .341.
4. James Buescher, 313.
a. arte rKlkiermam, 306.
7. Ron Hornaday Jr., 296.
8. Joey Coulter, 292.
9. Nelson Piquet Jr., 284.
10. Miguel Paludo, 262.
11.Todd Bodine, 260.
12. Johnny Sauter, 260.
1 aao nW ite, 60.
15. Jason Leffler, 233.
16. David Starr, 231.
17. Dakoda Armstrong, 221.
18. Ryan Sieg, 190.
1 Ross hs an, 18818

NHRA
Top Fuel
1. Spencer Massey 984.
2. Tony Schumacher 955.

4. Steve Torrence, 877.
5. Morgan Lucas, 729.
Funny Car
1. Robert Hight, 1,001.
2. Ron Capps, 914.
3. Mike Neff, 807.
4. Jack Beckman, 738.
5. Johnny Gray, 729.

1. Greg Anderson, Stock
2. Jason Line, 998.
3. Allen Johnson, 974.
4. Mike Edwards, 835.
5. vincent Nobile, 810.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Eddie Krawiec, 597.
2. Andrew Hines, 571.
3. Hector Arana Jr., 484.
4.HectongAnana, 67.


IndyCar
1. Ryan Hunter-Reay 335.
2. Will Power, 301.
3 ellt xstroneves, 289.
5. James Hinchcliffe, 268.
6. Tony Kanaan, 267.
7. Simon Pagenaud, 264.
8. Dario Franchitti, 230.
9.Ryan Brice sa

a0 ro SemKi 2200

13. Justin Wilson, 200.
14. J.R. Hildebrand, 199.
15. Marco Andretti, 187.
16. Rubens Barrichello, 183.
17. Takuma Sato, 176.
18. Mike Conway 172.
19. E.J. Viso, 172.
20. Ed Carpenter, 163.
Formula One
1. Fernando Alonso, 129.
2. Mark Webber, 116.
3. Sebastian Vettel, 100.
4. Lewis Hamilton, 92.
5. Kimi Raikkonen, 83.
6. Nico Rosberg, 75.
7. Remain Grosjean, 61.
8. Jenson Button, 50.
9. Sergio Perez, 39.
10. Pastor Maldonado, 29.
11. Paul di Resta, 27.
12. Michael Schumacher, 23.
13. Felipe Massa, 23.
14. Kamui Kobayashi, 21.
15. Bruno Senna, 18.
16. Nico Hulkenberg, 17.
17. Jean-Eric Vergne, 4.
18. Daniel Ricciardo, 2.
Grand-Am Rolex Series
1. Memo Rojas, 233.
(tie) Scott Pruett, 233.
3tieEnzo Potoico, o230.
5. Darren Law, 226.
6. David Donohue, 220.

(te)o Owado Nri Jr., 216.
(tie) Richard Westbrook, 216.
10. Joao Barbosa, 213.


American Le Mans
1. Klaus Graf, 82.
(tie) Lucas Luhr, 82.
3. Chris Dyson, 74.
(tie) Guy Smith, 74.
5. Eric Lux, 26.
(tie) Michael Marsal, 26.
7. Steve Kane, 24.
8. Simon Pagenaud, 20.
9. Johnny Mowlem, 18.


Associated Press

There were moments not
too long ago when both Will
Power and Ryan Hunter-
Reay thought their careers
might be over
Power was deeply in debt
eight years ago, certain he
was headed home to Aus-
tralia to join the family busi-
ness because he couldn't
afford to continue chasing
his racing dreams. Hunter-
Reay couldn't find steady
work for almost two full sea-
sons and figured there was
nothing left for a young
American driver
They stuck with it, and
find themselves locked in a
tight race for the IndyCar
Series championship.
Hunter-Reay goes into
Sunday's race at Edmonton
with a 34-point lead over
Power in the standings. It's
the first time at this level
that he has led the series
standings, and Hunter-Reay
got there with three consec-
utive wins.
At 31, Hunter-Reay is
proof that the journeyman
driver can still be successful.
"I really feel like I'm liv-
ing the American dream
right now, especially be-
cause it's been such a tough
go for me at times through-
out my career," Hunter-
Reay said. "I didn't have the
means, I didn't have the last
name and I've gotten here


the points standings, and he'S
just the 23rd driver in U.S.
open-wheel history to win
three consecutive raceS.
Power is part of that
group, too.
The perennial title con-
tender started the year with
consecutive wins at Barber,
Long Beach and Brazil, and
led in points through seven
races. Crashes at Indi-
anapolis and Iowa have con-
tributed to his slip, but
Power has admittedly not
been on the same pace of
late as Hunter-Reay.
Now, something has tO
give: Of the 21 other driverS
to win three races in a rOW
in a season, only Paul Tracy
in 1997, and A.J. All-
mendinger and Scott Dixon
in 2007, failed to win the
championship in that year
"I feel I'm a contender, I re-
ally do," Power said. "I feel
like if we get everything right
in the next five races we have
a legitimate chance of win-
ning the championship. We're
one of the quickest out there,
and when things go right on a
weekend, we're always on the
podium or we win the race."
History would suggest
Power is the favorite this
weekend at Edmonton,
where he won last year on
the redesigned 2.2-mile, 13-
turn temporary street
course. He started on the
pole in 2010 and finished
second, and he won in 2009.


today based on merits and
work and with results and
persistence."
Stuck in the middle of
America's open-wheel rac-
ing split, Hunter-Reay spent
his first three seasons in
Champ Car with three dif-
ferent teams. But there was
nothing for him in 2006, and
he came close many times to
walking away from racing.
"I got within a couple of
months of not knowing what
to do anymore," he said.
"There was nothing left,
there was nothing out there.
The well was drying up and
I was literally sitting there
every day looking at a list of
phone numbers, dialing
numbers every day, and get-
ting nowhere.
"At some point you have


to look yourself in the mir-
ror and say,'You are going
to have to do something else
if you are going to make a
living."'
The breakthrough came
midway through the 2007
season when Bobby Rahal
called and offered him a
ride for the final six races of
the IndyCar season. It was
the entry he needed, and
Hunter-Reay carved a spot
for himself in the series that
made him a viable option for
Andretti Autosport in 2010.
Now in his third season
with the same team the
longest stretch of job security
Hunter-Reay has had in
years he has put together
an impressive streak. He is
the first American since Sam
Hornish Jr in 2006 to lead


finish second. Kahne also won at Charlotte.

NATIONWIDE
STP 300
Site: Joliett, Ill.
Schedule: Saturday, practice (ESPN2,
12:30-2 p.m., 2:30-4 p.m.); Sunday, quali-
fying (ESPN2, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.), race,
3 p.m. (ESPN, 2-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Last year: Justin Allgaier won, catching
and passing Carl Edwards on the final lap
as both cars ran out of fuel. Allgaier is
from Riverview, Ill.
Last week: Brad Keselowski won at New
Hampshire, taking the lead when fellow
Sprint Cup driver Kevin Harvick was
slowed by Amber Cope's lapped car.
Fast facts: Kyle Busch is the only Sprint
Cup regular entered. He has a record 51
Nationwide victories, two at Chicagoland.
Busch is winless in nine starts this year in
his own Kyle Busch Motorsports No. 54
Toyota. He raced to his last 36 victories and
38 overEl n JoaedGib dRatcings No.nl8 Toy-

standings, three points ahead of Austin Dil-
Son s.. Dardc Patrick is frorn Roce s l
will return to the track in September. Ke-
selowski won the September race last year.
Next race: Indy 250, July 28, Indianapolis
Motor Speedway, Indianapolis.

CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
AMERICAN ETHANOL 225
Site: Joliett, Ill.

Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
eulfyn :SOed 04- p )n.), race, 8 p.m.

Track: Chicagoland Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 225 miles, 150 laps.
Last year: Austin Dillon raced to the sec-
ond of his two 2011 victories en route to
the season title, beating Kevin Harvick in


the September race.
Last week: Timothy Peters won at lowa
Speedway to take the lead in the season
standings. Ron Hornaday Jr. was second.
Fast facts: Peters has a 12-point lead
over Justin Lofton. Ty Dillon is third, 14
points behind Peters.... The 54-year-old
Hornaday has a series-record 51 victories.
... Austin Dillon is now driving in the Na-
tionwide Series.

Next race: Pocono Mountains 125, Aug.
4, Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa.

FORMULA ONE
GERMAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Hockenheim, Germany.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 8-9:30
a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(FOX, noon-2 p.m.; Speed, 9-11 p.m.).
Track: Hockenheimring (road course, 2.84
miles).
Race distance: 190.42 miles, 67 laps.
Last year: McLaren's Lewis Hamilton
raced to the second of his three 2011 vic-
tbories9 batin sFerrriesrbFuerrnnndo Alonso

Last race: Red Bull's Mark Webber won
the British Grand Prix on July 8, overtak-
ing Alonso late in the race to cut the Fer-
rar riv rts lead i hews son standings

Grand Prix in May
Fast facts: Seven-time season champion
Michaelnchumacmheercis makinghi 3f aar-

old driver has a record 91 victories, four at
Hockenheimring. He's winless since re-
turning to racing in 2010 with Mercedes
after a three-year retirement. ... Red Bull's
ea ta~n9Vet els the nad al rinne ind
place. The German star won 11 races last
year en route to his second straight sea-
son title.... The race rotates between
Hockenheim and Nuerburg. In 2010 at
Hockenheim, Alonso won after Ferrari or-
dered Felipe Massa to give his teammate
the lead. Ferrari was fined $100,000.

Next race: Hungarian Grand Prix, July 29,


Hungaroring, Budapest, Hungary

NHRA FULL THROTTLE
MILE-HIGH NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Morrison, Colo.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday
qualifying (ESPN2, 5-7 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 7-9 p.m.).
Track: Bandimere Speedway.
Last year: John Force topped the Funny
Car division, beating Matt Hagan in the
final. Spencer Massey won in Top Fuel,
Mike Edwards in Pro Stock and Karen
Stoffer in Pro Stock Motorcycle.
Last event: Massey raced to his fourth Top
Fuel victory of the season to regain the
points lead, beating Steve Torrence on July
8 in Norwalk, Ohio. Mike Neff won in Funny
Car, Vincent Nobile in Pro Stock, and An-
drew Hines in Pro Stock Motorcycle.
Fast facts: Force won the season-opening
Winternationals in Pomona, Calif., for his
record 134th Funny Car victory The 63-
year-old driver has a record 15 season
championships.... John Force Racing driver
Robert Hight tops the Funny Car standings,
87 points ahead of Ron Capps. Hight won
10u stgte hent fom nerur 9o Ar
points ahead of Tony Schumacher
Next event: NHRA Sonoma Nationals, July
27-29, Infineon Raceway, Sonoma, Calif

OTHER RACES

AARCA1RACIN SRIS Ansel Ac i
Chicagoland Speedway, Joliett, Ill.
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Grand
Prix of Mosport, Sunday (ESPN2, 1-3
p.m.), Canadian Tire Motorsport Park,
Bowmanville, Ontario.
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car: Fri-
day-Saturday, Williams Grove Speedway
Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Sunday, Lebanon
Valley Speedway, West Lebanon, N.Y
U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint Car:
Thursday, Lincoln Park Speedway, Put-
namville, Ind.; Friday, Bloomington Speed-
way, Bloomington, Ind.; Saturday, Tri-State
Speedway, Haubstadt, Ind.


Pae B2 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


RACING


Championship race


x-non-points race
Feb. 18 x-Budweiser Shootout, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 23 x-Gatorade Duel 1, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Tony Stewart)
Feb. 23 x-Gatorade Duel 2, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Matt Kenseth)
Feb. 26 Daytona 500, Daytona Beach

Mrc 4- SuwyFresh Fit 500, Avondale,
Ariz. (Denny Hamlin)
March 11 Kobalt Tools 400, Las Vegas
(Tony Stewart)
March 18 Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn.
(Brad Keselowski)
March 25 Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif.
(Tony Stewart)
April 1 Goody s Fast Relief 500, Ridge-
way, Va. (Ryan Newman)
April 14 Samsung Mobile 500, Fort
Worth, Texas (Greg Biffle)
Apnil 2H- SnTP 400, Kansas City, Kan.

April 28 Richmond 400, Richmond, Va.
(Kyle Busch)
May 6 -Aaron's 499, Talladega, Ala. (Brad
Keselowski)
May 12 Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
(Jimmie Johnson)
May 19 x-Sprint Showdown, Concord
N.C. (Jimmie Johnson)
May 19 x-Sprint All-Star, Concord, N.C.
(Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
May 27 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
(Kasey Kahne)
June 3 Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 10 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa.
(Joey Logano)
June 17 Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn,
Mich. (Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
June 24 Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif. (Clint Bowyer)
June 30 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky
(Brad Keselowski)
July 7 Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Tony Stewart)
Jtlyd15 -- Lenox I dutatal Tools 301,
July 29 "Your Hero's Name Here" 400 at
the Brickyard, Indianapolis
Aug. 5- Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 12 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at
The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y
Aug 1 Pur Michia h400, Boorln Me h

Sept. 2 AdvoCare 500, Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 8 Wonderf ul Pistachios 400, Rich-
mond, Va.

Set 3- Slvaico 00, ol on, N.H.
Sept. 30 -AAA 400, Dover Del.
Oct. 7- Good Sam Club 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 13 -Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 21 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas

Oc.2 -Tums Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va.
Nov 4 AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov 11 Kobalt Tools 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov 18 Ford 400, Homestead, Fla.
Nationwide Series
Feb. 25 DRIVE4COPD 300, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (James Buescher)
March 3 Bashas' Supermarkets 200,
Avondale, Ariz. (Elliott Sadler)
March 10 Sam s Town 300, Las Vegas

Mach 7enh St Ptrick's Day 300, Bristol,
Tenn.(Elliott Sadler)
March 24 Royal Purple 300, Fontana,
Calif (Joey Logano)
April 13 -asO R ySAuto Pares 300, Fort

April 27 Richmond 250, Richmond, Va.
(Kurt Busch)
May 5 Aaron s 312, Talladega, Ala. (Joey
Logano)
May 11L -Darlington 200, Darlington, S.C.

May 20 lowa Spring 250, Newton, lowa
(Ricky Stenhouse Jr)
May 26 History 300, Concord, N.C. (Brad

Kue 12w --hour Energy 200, Dover, Del.
(Joey Logano)
June 16 Alliance Auto Parts 250, Brook-
lyn, Mich. (Joey Logano)
June 23 Road America 200, Elkhart
Lake, Wis. (Nelson Piq~uht dJ 30,Sprt

Ky (Austin Dillon)
July 6 Subway Jalapeno 250, Daytona
Beach, Fla. (Kurt Busch)
July 14 EW. Webb 200, Loudon, N.H.
(Brad Keselowski)
Jul 2 STP 3M0 Jodi r olis


Ag. 11 -U Zpoe at Te lno Watins
Glen, N.Y
Aug. 18 NAPA Auto Parts 200, Montreal
Aug. 24 Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 1 Atlanta 300, Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 7 -Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
Richmond, Va.
Sept. 15 Dollar General 300, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 22 Kentucky 300, Sparta, Ky.
Sept. 29 Dover 200, Del.
Oct. 12 -Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas
City, Kan.
Nov 3 O Reilly Auto Parts Challenge,
Fort Worth, Texas
Nov 10 Wypall 200, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov 17- Ford 300, Homestead, Fla.

Camping World
Feb. 24 NextEra Energy Resources 250,
Daytona Beach, Fla. (John King)
March 31 Kroger 250, Ridgeway, Va.
(Kevin Harvick)
April 15 -Good Sam Roadside Assistance
Carolina 200, Rockingham, N.C. (Kasey
Kahne)
April 21 SFP 250, Kansas City, Kan.
(Jame Buesche )
Maymi8 N.C. E ucation Lottery 200, Con-

Jue1N Luca ni f0 Dover, Del. (Todd

Bun WinStar World Casino 400k, Fort
Worth, Texas (Johnny Sauter)
June 28 UNOH 225, Sparta, Ky (James

Bul sl American Ethanol 200, Newton,
lowa (Timothy Peters)
July 21 --American Ethanol 225, Joliet, Ill.
Aug 4 Pocono Mountains 125, Long

Aug. 18 -VFW 200, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 22 Bristol 200, Bristol, Tenn.
Aug. 31 Atlanta 200, Hampton, Ga.


Sept. 15 American Ethanol 200 (Fall),

oet.2n{ entucky 201, Sparta, Ky.
Sept. 29 Smith's 350, Las Vegas
Oct. 6 Coca-Cola 250, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 27 Kroger 200, Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 2 WinStar World Casino 350, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov 9 Lucas Oil 150, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov 16 Ford EcoBoost 200, Homestead,
Fla.


Associated Press
Ryan Hunter-Reay holds up an American flag after winning the IndyCar auto race on July 16 at the Milwaukee Mile in
West Allis, Wis. Hunter-Reay and Will Power are currently locked in a championship race.


Hunter--Reay Power locked in very close badte for IndyCar tile


- =

IndyCar driver Will Power, the perennial contender, is
suddenly being challenged by Ryan Hunter-Reay, who has
proven there's still hope for the journeyman racer.


Around the TRAC KS


INDYCAR
EDMONTON INDY
Site: Edmonton, Alberta.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday.
practice, qualifying (NBC Sports Network,
6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunday, race, 2:45 p.m.
(NBC Sports Network, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Edmonton City Centre Airport
(temporary road course, 2.224 miles).
Race distance: 166.8 miles, 75 laps.
Last year: Will Power held off Penske
teammate Helio Castroneves for the fourth
of his six 2011 victories. Power also won
the 2009 race.

Last race: Ryan Hunter-Reay raced to his
third straight victory to take the season
points lead, winning in Toronto on July 8.
The Andretti Autosport driver won on the
street course after taking oval events at
Milwaukee and lowa.

Fast facts: Hunter-Reay is attempting to
become the first driver in six years to win
four straight races. He leads Power by 34
points with five races left.... The race is
the seventh of the season on road or
street courses. Castroneves won the
opener at St. Pet rsburg, Pow~ee o the
Sao Pauo and Scott hixon won athBelle

first-place finisher Castroneves was
dropped to 10Oth for blocking teammate
tPhower Cagneves y Ilebd at ofeicral Cr
security chief and shook him.... Canadian

staamndi f r Anrtii hu oprt. H on
the Inedy ight hrasce atet e track last ye~aC

Sports Network, Sunday, 12:30-2 p.m.).
Next race: Honda Indy 200, Aug. 5, Mid-
Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington, Ohio.

SPRINT CUP
Next race: Crown Royal Your Name Here
400, July 29, Indianapolis Motor Speed-
way, Indianapolls.
Last week: Kasey Kahne won at New
Hampshire, taking the lead on the 240th of
300 laps when leader Denny Hamlin fell
back with a four-tire stop. Hamlin rallied to









































































































































I Exclusive Golf


I


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 B3


Associated Press

BAG NERES -DE -LU CHO N,
France Britain's Bradley Wiggins
overcame the mountains and chal-
lengers to retain the yellow jersey,
while Spain's Alejandro Valverde
won the 17th stage of the Tour de
France on Thursday.
After the last hard ascent,
Bradley maintained his overall lead
and said he sensed "that it was
pretty much over" with just three
racing days left. He's trying to be-
come the first Briton to win cy-
cling's biggest race.
Wiggins faces one last test the
individual time trial, his specialty
- on Saturday.
Flat stages await Wiggins on Er~i-
day and Sunday, which features the
ride to the finish on the Champs-
Elysees in Paris. Those stages aren't
expected to alter the standings.
He appears on pace to make some
history: Wiggins would become the
first Olympic track champion to be-


come a Tour winner: He took the yel-
low jersey in Stage 7, and hasn't let
go of it since. No rider has done that
since France's Bernard Hinault
held a lead from the same stage in
1981 all the way to the finish.
An 89-mile ride from the south-
western town of Bagneres-de-
Luchon to the ski station of
Peyragudes on Thursday featured
three hefty ascents in the Pyrenees
and an uphill finish.
Valverde, the Movistar leader who
returned from a two-year doping ban
this year, won his third Tour stage in
a breakaway. Christopher Froome of
Britain was second, and Wiggins was
third, both 19 seconds back
Overall, Wiggins leads Sky team-
mate Froome in second by 2 min-
utes, 5 seconds, and Italy's Vincenzo
Nibali trails in third, 2:41 back,
after losing 18 seconds to them in
the final ascent.
A 2-minute lead after nearly 80
hours of racing and 2 1/2 weeks
might not seem like much of a mar-


gin. But in stage races like the Tour,
the strategy of success for a leader
is keying on his closest rivals.
Wiggins wasn't much worried
about any other riders. After Nibali
and Froome, his next closest chal-
lenger was Jurgen Van Den Broeck,
who was 5:46 back, a deficit almost
impossible to erase without a col-
lapse by Wiggins.
Defending champion Cadel
Evans of Australia, after dropping
out of contention in the first Pyre-
nean day on Wednesday, lost more
time and trailed by 9:57. Still, he
rose to sixth overall, after Spain's
Haimer Zubeldia lost nearly a
minute to the Australian.
American Tejay Van Garderen -
a BMC teammate of Evans rose a
notch to fifth, and was 8:30 back.
Valverde, with tears in his eyes in
the winner's circle, had a rough
start to the Tour with at least three
crashes. He also sensed Wiggins
and Froome closing on him at the
end of the stage.


Associated Press
Bradley Wiggns of Britain, wearing the overall leader's yellow
jersey, still leads alter the 17th stage of the Tour de France onThursday,
which took place over 89.2 miles, starting in Bagneres finishing in Peyragudes, Pyrenees region, France.


Jets coachbarl ost

105 pound since

Lap-Band surgery
Associated Press

NEW YORK Rex Ryan still
loves Mexican food.
Before, he'd eat as many as 12
tacos in one sitting. These days, it's
more like one.
The New York Jets coach with
the big, boisterous personality
never hid that he underwent
weight-loss surgery in March 2010.
Normally happy to talk and talk
- about anything, Ryan was tight-
lipped about the details for more
than two years. He wanted to
reach the milestone of shedding
100 pounds before he opened that
famous mouth,
From a peak of 348 pounds,
Ryan is now down to about 243.
Even Jets fans sometimes don't
recognize the new, slim ReX.
"I feel good because I know I
look better than I did," he said
Thursday, before quickly adding
in typical fashion, "which is not
saying much.
"But it wasn't about that for me,"
Ryan continued. "I've been mar-
ried for 25 years. I wasn't looking
for the young girlfriend or who-
ever. ... I wanted to be healthier
and live a long, healthy life."
At a high in his coaching career,
he was also hitting a high on the
scales. The Jets were about to face
the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC
championship game after the 2009
season when Ryan happened tO
weigh himself. He would get short
of breath going up stairs but never
expected to see the number that
left him "mortified": 348.
The 58-year-old Ryan thought a
fellow coach was playing a trick on
him, putting pressure on the scale
while he stood on it.
"There was nobody there. It was
just me," Ryan said. "I waS
shocked. I thought I was about 300
to maybe 310."
He had tried all sorts of diets in
the past, losing lots of weight only
to gain it all back and more.
Ryan decided to have Lap-Band
surgery after hearing the success
stories of former players Jamie
Dukes and Tony Siragusa.
The device makes him feel full
after eating, say, that one taco,
forcing him to practice portion
control. Ryan acknowledged he
didn't necessarily eat much
healthier just less.
"If I want pizza, instead of eating
a whole pizza like l used to, I'll eat a
slice of pizza, if even that," he said.
The device can be adjusted, so
Ryan had it loosened a bit when
he and his wife recently went to
Paris for their 25th anniversary so
he could fully sample the French
cuisine.
After surgery, his weight loss had
started to plateau when he started
exercising, which melted away
many more pounds. Ryan was at


Associated Press
New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan has now lost 100 Ibs. after having Lap-Band weight-loss surgery in 2010.


about 290 during last season,
At his heaviest, working out was
just too hard on his joints. Now
walking an hour on the treadmill
feels like nothing, and he's think-
ing of running for the first time in
two decades.
His goal is to drop another 20
pounds or so. Ryan has gone from
a 48- to a 38-inch waist, so he's had
to replace all his clothes except
for his socks. His blood pressure
and cholesterol have plummeted.
Without being asked, Ryan volun-
teers that he's getting paid to serve
as a spokesman for Lap-Band.
"My message is: Do I believe in
it? There's no question, 100 per-
cent," he said.
So much so that he persuaded
his twin brother, Cowboys defen-
sive coordinator Rob Ryan, to get


the surgery too. Rob has lost about
60 pounds.
Ryan's attitude often seemed in-
separable from his girth, but he in-
sists he's the same old Rex just
healthier. The Jets' full training
camp opens in Cortland, N.Y., next
Thursday.
Rams' Quinn charged
with drunken driving
ST. LOUIS St. Louis Rams de-
fensive end Robert Quinn has been
charged with drunken driving in subur-
ban St. Louis, police and court officials
said Thursday.
Florissant police Capt. Tim Lowery
said Quinn was involved in a one-car
accident on an exit ramp along Inter-
state 270 at 5:38 a.m. on July 10.
Lowery said the responding officer
suspected Quinn was intoxicated and


arrested him without incident.
"He cooperated fully," Lowery said.
Quinn posted bond that day and waS
released.
In addition to the drunken-driving
charge, Quinn is charged with failure
to exercise a high degree of care, and
with having no insurance. A prelimi-
nary hearing is scheduled for Oct. 11
said Anna Davis, clerk for the munici-
pal court in Florissant.
Quinn does not have a listed
phone number and it wasn't clear if
he had an attorney. His agent, Tony
Fleming, did not return a message
seeking comment.
"The Rams and the NFL office are
aware of the situation," the team said.
"W~e take such matters very seriously,
and we will act accordingly once the
legal process plays out."


Ra e

Play Golf at
Plantation On




+ tax

Any day, any time


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Grant
Hill is following former
Phoenix Suns teammate
Steve Nash to Los Angeles.
Only the seven-time All-Star
forward has signed with the
Clippers.
erlsa ssignedewith the Lahke
tweeted word of Hill's sign-
ing with the other team in
Staples Center earlier this
week via a photo of him
frowning on ?Twitter.


Hill signed a two-year
deal on Wednesday. He
turns 40 in October and is
expected to back up starter
Caron Butler at small for-
ward after reportedly
choosing the Clippers over
the Lakers, NBA champion
Miami Heat and the New

Yo placke the past five
seasons in Phoenix, averag-
ing 10.2 points, 3.5 rebounds
and 2.2 assists in 28.1 min-
utes while playing in 49
games last season. Before


moving west, Hill spent
seven injury-filled seasons
in Orlando, where he was
limited to 200 games be-
cause of left ankle problems.
Hill, an 18-year NBA vet-
eran, received votes for the
All-NBA defensive team
and Defensive Player of the
Year last season.
unggetS FO*Sign Cen Or
Javale McGee
DENVER The Denver
Nuggets have re-signed free
agent center JaVale McGee to a


multiyear contract, fulfilling one
of their top offseason priorities.
Masai Ujiri, Denver's execu-
tive vice president of basketball
operations made the announce-
ment Wed nesday night. Yahoo
Sports reported the deal was for
$44 million over four yars
The 24 Iarod 7-oote a-
eraged 11.3e pnts, 7.8 re-ra-
bounds and 2.16 blocked shots
in 61 games last year for the
Washington Wizards and the
Nuggets, who acquired him in
the Nene deal in mid-March.


~ Ca II 352-795-721 1
to book a tee time no more
than 3 days in advance. s
Coupon good for up to 4 players. Proper golf attire required.
Present coupon for redemption. Restrictions apply. Expires 8/31/12


Wiggins holds yellow jersey, 3 days left in Tour


Slimmed -down nRyan


B:hn up



True South

Associated Press


Boh sh~oO nT & der 6a4st
take an early lead at the PGA
Tour's True South Classic be-
fore heavy rain halted play in
the afternoon.
Luke Guthrie, a 22-year-old
in just his third professional
tournament, opened with a 65.
He finished last week's John
Deere Classic tied for fifth,
J.J. Killeen, Steve Lowery,
Ryuji Imada, Jason Gore and
Willie Wood share a tie for
third, two shots behind Bohn.
After a week of rain, An-
nandale Golf Club's fairways
were soft with areas of stand-
ing water. The PGA allowed
players to lift, clean and place
balls in the fairway, helping
scores stay low.

True South Classic
Thursday
At Annandale Golf Club, Madison, Miss.,
Purse: sa million
Yardage: 7,202, Par: 72 (36-36)
First Round
Play suspended by rain
Jason Bohn 33-31 64 -8
LukeK ehrie 3 -2 65 -
Steve Lowery 32-34 66 -6
RyujilImada 33-33--66 -6
JasonGore 34-32--66 -6
walrco Da son 3-6-6 5
Bud Cauley 34-33 67 -5
Roberto Castro 34-33 67 -5
Russell Knox 33-34 67 -5
Jo atxno nandolph 3- 3-- -5
Tom Pernice Jr. 36-32- 68 -4
Duffy Waldorf 35-33- 68 -4
Skip Kendall 37-31 68 -4
Keott Staelings 35 3-6 -4
Joey Snyder Ill 34-34 68 -4
MarkAnderson 36-32--68 -4
Kevin Kisner 34-34 68 -4
HneroHasmrick 34 3--6 M 4
Chris Couch 35-34 69 -3
John Inman 36-33 69 -3
Jerry Kelly 34-35 69 -3
Len MaK racaek3-4-9
Kyle Reifers 37-32--69 -3
Zack Reeves 35-34 69 -3
Parker McLachlin 34-35 69 -3
oathan ren 3-7-0 -
Bill Lunde 37-33--70 -2
Brendan Steele 35-35--70 -2
DerekLamely 35-35--70 -2
Guy Boros 36-34--70 -2
Erik Compton 34-36 -70 -2
Brendon de Jonge 36-34 -70 -2
Tim Petrovic 36-34--70 -2
MAlex ~illan 3-5-7 2
Bobby Gates 37-33--70 -2
Woody Austin 35-36--71 -1
Scott Dunlap 36-35--71 -1
FrnkuL clter II 3- 2-- -1
Steve Flesch 36-35--71 -1
Brian Gay 36-35--71 -1
Robert Damron 36-35 -71 -1
Richard S. Johnson 37-34 -71 -1
Chrlie Bean 3a -3-7 -1
Peter Lonard 34-38 -72 E
Scott Brown 37-35 -72 E
Brendon Todd 35-37 -72 E
Chnm thieshenk 3 -35-3+
Gene Sauers 34-39--73 +1
Tom Byrum 37-36 -73 +1
Marc Turnesa 38-36 -74 +2
Sung Kang 39-35--74 +2
Jim Carter 38-38--76 +4
Jim McGovern 40-38--78 +6


Clippers sign Hill for two years


'i~w






B4 FRIDA1, JULY 20, 2012


SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


British Open

At RoylLt S. Anndes,

Yariage: 7,086, Par: 70 (34-36)
F rst Rond

Adam Scott 32-32--64 -6

Zaco non 3--6 5
Nicolas Colsaerts 31-34 65 -5
Bra dtESnedeker 3 -4-6 -S4

Bubba Watson 31-36 67 -3
Graeme McDowell 31-36 67 -3

Tohnor Mto o 6-7 -
Rory Mcllroy 32-35 67 -3
Steve Stricker 32-35 67 -3
PeterHanson 32-35--67 -3
JmiesDon ldan 3--6 2
Thomas Aiken 31-37 68 -2
Sctt Pinckneen 3 -5 -6 -

Jbe Kruger 31-37--68 -2
Au nanHi iri 3-5-6 -
Matthew Baldwin 33-36 69 -1
Adilson Da Silva 37-32 69 -1
Thaon ci Jaidee 3-5-6 -1
Charl Schwartzel 34-35- 69 -1
Thorbjorn Olesen 33-36--69 -1
Bebn anones 34 3-9 -1
Steven Alker 35-34 69 -1
Lee Slattery 32-37--69 -1
Frnec Mlnari 333- 1
Fredrik Jacobson 34-35--69 -1
Marc Leishman 34-35- 69 -1

Tev Mikh ingh 623 7
Simon Khan 34-36 -70 E
Kyle Stanley 35-35 -70 E
RfeS Cbrera-Bello 363 0 E
Thomas Bjorn 36-34 -70 E
Jason Dufner 32-38 -70 E

Tro ratit on 3- 7
Aaron Townsend 34-36 70 E

Hnte Mahan 563 5- 0 E
John Senden 33-37 -70 E
Padraig Harrington 35-35 -70 E
Luke Donald 33-37 -70 E

ArsG oeeno 3- 7
Garth Mulroy 36-35--71 +1
Mark Calcavecchia 37-34--71 +1
GregChalmers 36-35--71 +1
Miguel Angel Jimenez 36-35--71 +1
Bill Haas 37-34 -71 +1
Davis Love Ill 37-34 -71 +1
ai k Wa ney 3-67 +
Yoshinori Fujimoto 34-37--71 +1
Tom Watson 35-36 -71 +1
Aaron Baddeley 35-36 -71 +1
WarremhBe nett 3-77 +
Juvic Pagunsan 34-37--71 +1
Greg Owen 34-37--71 +1
Marcus Fraser 34-37--71 +1
Carl Pettersson 34-37--71 +1
Harris English 34-37--71 +1
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 33-38 71 +1
Angel Cabrera 33-38 -71 +1

Kegaan Pe dley 3338-7 as
Rickie Fowler 36-35--71 +1
Alexander Noren 35-36 -71 +1
Richie Ramsay 32-39--71 +1
TodH miton .63-7 +
John Daly 38-34 -72 +2
Raphael Jacquelin 37-35 -72 +2
Steew rtCirna 36 36 --72 +
Steven Tiley 36-36 -72 +2
LucasGlover 35-37--72 +2
Charles Howell Ill 33-39--72 +2

Mark isn 3-87 +
Simon Dyson 35-37--72 +2
Ross Fisher 35-37--72 +2
Sang-moon Bae 36-36 72 +2
Louis Oosthuizen 34-38 -72 +2

T k aigchi 3-77 +

Kroo Keell()d 3533537-7 +
Barry Lane 37-36 -73 +3
RaadelC lceiue 3-7-7 +
Johnson Wagner 36-37--73 +3
Lee Westwood 33-40 -73 +3
Dustin Johnson 33-40 -73 +3

DaI lhopra 3-9-7 +
Joost Luiten 36-37--73 +3
NicholasCullen 36-37--73 +3
Tom Lehman 33-40--73 +3
Pablo Larrazabal 35-38 -73 +3
Gregory Havret 36-37--73 +3
Gary Woodland 35-38 -73 +3
Branden Grace 35-38 -73 +3
Phil Mickelson 37-36 -73 +3
Sandy Lyle 37-37--74 +4
Alejandro Canizares 41-33 -74 +4
taevi Duvale 3-97 +
YE.Yang 36-38--74 +4
Justin Rose 39-35--74 +4
Ryo Ishikawa 34-40 -74 +4
StevenO'Hara 36-38--74 +4
Michael Thompson 35-39--74 +4

Gere Cotzee 3341 _- +
ChezReavie 35-39--74 +4
Trevor Immelman 37-37--74 +4
Richar FnF hd _83 7 +

Alvaro Quiros 36-38 -74 +4
a-ManuelTrappel 37-37--74 +4
Andew Georrg ou 3-87 +
John Huh 38-37--75 +5
Justin Leonard 39-36 -75 +5
a-Alan Dunbar 35-40--75 +5

ad Kreonandehdurst 3-9-7 +
K.T Kim 35-40 -75 +5
Ben Curtis 37-38 -75 +5
Rob er alenb 3-0-7 +
Ja es Driscoll 43-33 -76 +6
Tim Clark 38-38 -76 +6
Darren Clarke 37-39--76 +6
Hroyuki Fujita 38 -76 +
ElliotSaltman 37-39--76 +6
lan Keenan 36-40 -76 +6
Ta aircoThakayama 3 -0-7 +

Martin Kaymer 38-39--77 +7
Mardan Mamat 39-38 -77 +7
GrantVeenstra 37-40--77 +7

Mcbhaea IH y 3-1-7 +
Russ Cochran WD
British Open Tee Times


At R yal Ltame ,St. Annes

Purse: $7.75 million
Yardage: 7,060; Par: 70
AllTimes ED)T

Friday
1:19 a.m. Bob Estes, Steven O Hara
Brendan Jones.
Ni 30 mu --Juvic Pagunsan, Scott Pinckney
1:41 a.m. Steven Alker, Lee Slattery
Mich ael Thomp .Lehman, Pablo Larrazabal
Greg Owen.
2:03 a.m. Marcel Siem, George Coetzee
Chez Reavie.
Gr1 oravmt. -Marcus Fraser, Lucas Glover
2:25 a.m. Charles Howell Ill, Paul Broad-
hurst, Richard Sterne.


Associated Press
USA guard Russell Westbrook dribbles past Great Britain's
Nate Reinking during an Olympic exhibition match Thursday
at the Manchester Arena in Manchester, England. Competi-
tors from around the globe are arriving in London to prepare
for the upcoming London 2012 Olympic Games.


money, creating the richest
known Olympics financial incen-
tive program offered by any cy-
cling organization in the world.
The new program, called the
"London 100K Challenge," will
be officially announced in the
coming days. It includes up to
$75,000 for silver medalists and
up to $50,000 for bronze
through funding from the U.S.
Olympic Committee, USA
Cycling and the USA Cycling
Development Foundation.
The U.S. team has strong
medal aspirations in several
events in London, including
men's and women's BMX,
mountain biking, several track
disciplines and the women's
time trial, where Kristin Arm-
strong is the reigning Olympic
gold medalist.
The bonus money provided
by the USOC comes from its


0 on a seventh-inning run-
scoring double.
Luke Scott put the Rays
up 1-0 on a third-inning solo
homer. He is 14 for 33 in
eight games against Cleve-
land since the weekend be-
fore the All-Star break,
while going hitless in 38 at-
bats in 12 games against all
other teams.
"It's a very comfortable
feeling when you have the
lead out there, even if it's
one," Price said. "They've
done a very good job for me
this year of scoring runs
early and I appreciate it,
Honestly I feel like we've
played our best baseball
when I've been on the
mound."
The Rays loaded the
bases with two outs in the


Olympic incentive program,
which this year will award
$25,000 for gold medals,
$15,000 for silver and $10,000
for bronze.
USA Cycling's podium pro-
grams for 2012 and 2013 will
provide an additional $40,000
for gold medals, $35,000 for
silver and $30,000 for bronze.
The USA Cycling Development
Foundation will kick in an addi-
tional $35,000 for gold medals,
$25,000 for silver and $15,000
for bronze.
There are certain stipulations
that accompany the bonus
money.
For instance, members of
the men's road and time trial
teams are not eligible to earn
money from the 2013 USA
Cycling Podium Program due
to commitments to their
professional teams.


first, but failed to score
when the struggling Hideki
Matsui struck out. After hit-
ting homers in two of his
first three games with the
Rays, Matsui is 12 for 79.
Jimenez helped himself
defensively in the fourth by
fielding Sean Rodriguez's
bunt and tagging out
Desmond Jennings, who
tried to score from third, at
the plate.
"I thought Ubaldo battled
well for us," Acta said. "He
gave us five innings to do
something, to score runs,
and we couldn't do it"
Tampa Bay second base-
man Ben Zobrist made a
nice running catch in shal-
low center on Shin-Soo
Choo's soft liner leading off
the first.


2:36 a.m. -Carl Pettersson, K.T Kim, Gary
Woodland.
2:47 a.m. Ben Curtis, Paul Casey Trevor
Immelman.
2:58 a.m. Richard Finch, Mark Wilson,
Branden Grace.
3:09 a.m. Harris English, Simon Dyson,
Go~nzalo Ferna nez Catb a KJ.Coo os
Fisher.
3:31 a.m. -Jonathan Byrd, Sang-moon Bae,
Alvaro Quiros.
Ma4 a~m r SnN olas Colsaerts, Hunter
3:58 a.m. Bo Van Pelt, Francesco Molinari
Toshinori Muto.
n:9a~m.-- Rory Mcllroy Louis Oosthuizen
4:20 a.m. Rickie Fowler, Padraig Harring-
ton, a-Mianuel Trappel.
4:31 a.m. Luke Donald, Phil Mickelson
Geof20giF.- Steve Stricker, Toru Taniguchi
Anders Hansen.
4:53 a.m. Peter Hanson, Retief Goosen
Robert Allenby.
5:04 a.m. Jim Furyk, Koumei Oda, Fredrik

San ko xande Mrcr L~eishman, Brandt

Ri2 e6aams- Andres Romero, Jbe Kruger,
5:37 a.m. Ted Potter Jr., lan Keenan, An-
drew GeorgiouTroy Kelly, Morten Orum Mad-
sen, Anirban Lahiri.
5:59 a.m. -Prayad Marksaeng, Justin Hicks,
Ashley Hall.
G6 1M a.lln Barry Lane, James Driscoll,
6:42 a.m. Matthew Baldwin, Adilson Da
Silva, Tadahiro Takayama.
6:53 a.m. Rafael Echenique, Kodai Ichi-
hara, John Huh.
7:04 a.m. Sandy Lyle, Todd Hamilton,
Mark Calcavecchia.
7:15 a.m. Alejandro Canizares, Jeev
Milkha Singh, Greg Chalmers.
7:26 a.m. John Daly, Chad Campbell,
Michael Hoey.
Le 3a7da mo hTahongchai Jaidee, Justin
7:48 a. m.- David Duval, Raphael Jacquelin,
MiguelAngelJimenez.
7:59 a.m. Stephen Ames, Robert Rock,
Kyle Stanley.
8:10 a.m. -Stewart Cink, Rafael Cabrera-

B81: 1 nW --men Dnaldson, Bill Haas, YE.
'809-
8:32 a.m. Davis Love Ill, Tim Clark, Paul
Lawde a.m. Adam Scott, a-Alan Dunbar,
Matt Kuchar.
8:59 a.m. --Vijay Singh, Nick Watney, lan
Poult0 a.m. Darren Clarke, Ernie Els, Zach
Johnson.
9:21 a.m. Lee Westwood, Yoshinori Fuji-
moto, Bubba Watson.
Do2 ~m ykD~uu t Johnson, Graeme Mc-
9:43 a.m. -Tiger Woods, Justin Rose, Ser-
gio Garcia.
To5 aas. Ryo Ishikawa, Martin Kaymer,
10:05 a.m. Thomas Bjorn, Aaron Badde-
ley, Charl Schwartzel.
Kel 16aa.m. Jason Dufner, Martin Laird,
10:27 a.m. James Morrison, Daniel
Chopra, Joost Luiten.
10:38 a.m. -Thorbjorn Olesen, Troy Matte-
so4 Thomas AikBerd Kennedy, Mardan Mamat,
Steven Tiley
11 a.m. -Warren Bennett, Aaron Townsend,
GrantVeenstra.
lio1 1 1a.m. -Dale Whitnell, Sam Walker, El-




Tour de France Results
Thursday
At Bagneres-de-Luchon, France
17th Stage
1. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 4
Shores Fr rnues, 1Brian nSk Procycling, 19
seconds behind.
3. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling,
same time.
4.Thibraut Pnat dFr ce, DJ-i Mtro 2ar
:26.
6. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, same time.
da ,Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
8. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, :54.


9. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 1:02.
10. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, 1:11.
11. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 1:14.
12. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondi Jle 3a0(endert, Belgium, Lotto Belisol,
1:39.
14. Richie Porte, Australia, Sky Procycling,
1:46.

1 Crisop Kheorn Fre, Er pc~ar
2:10.
17. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same

tim. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing
same time.
19. Michael Rogers, Australia, Sky Procy-
cling, same time.
220. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale
Also
22. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nis-
sa3 Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega
Pharma-QuicekSt pc 8 UiedSats BC

Raci ,C rs an Vande Velde, United States,
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 30:57.
ShlaS Davkid Zbiskie U ited States, Garmin-
144. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, same time.
Overall Standings

1. Bradley Wigis sB an, ky Procycling,
78 hours, 28 minutes, 2 seconds.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
2:05.
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, 2:41.
4. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, 5:53.
5. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMc
Racing, 8:30.
6. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 9:57.
sa Hl mar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nis-
8. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar
10:17.
9. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 11:00.
10. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat,
11:46.
M dNi ol~as Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
12. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 14:09.
13. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioChackissAnake Srinsen, Denmark, Team
Saxo Bank-Tinkoff Bank, 18:34.
15. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, 22:42.
16. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-
Ninan, 2 : rtinez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi
25:32
18. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 29:23.
19. Eduard Vorganov Russia, Katusha
33:07.
33 3 Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar
Also
30. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega
Pharma-QuicekSt p, 5p Unte taes Bc

Racing, 1:25:29.
62. Christian Vande Velde, United States.
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 1:55:00.
S108. Davki Zb iskie United States, Garmin-
152. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 3:44:02.


BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Recalled LHP
Donnie Veaafn m Chadotottle L). Optioned LHP

KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to terms
with C Jason Kendall on a minor league con-
tract and assigned him to Northwest Arkansas
(TL). Optioned RHP Vin Mazzaro to Omaha
(PCL)R Recalled RUHPJII S~mt hOm n a~hap

Sam Dyson to New Hampshire (EL).
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Assigned

LMIAM kMTAhISt A Reisare eRH ward
Mujica from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Reinstated
RHP Drew Storen from the 15-day DL. Recalled
ChSanday Leon from Harrisbur (DEL)re Pa vc C
to July 18. Designated OF Rick Ankiel for
assignment.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods walks off the 18th hole at Royal Lytham & St.
Annes golf club after his first round of the British Open Golf
Championship on Thursday in Lytham St. Annes, England.


prefers calm conditions, so
maybe this was more to his
liking. He wound up in the
group at 67 after a wild day
filled with great shots, bad
luck and a bump on the head
for a 16-year-old spectator
standing in the wrong spot.
McIlroy was at 3 under
with four holes remaining
when his drive on the 15th
hole sailed to the right of
the fairway. It plunked the
teenager in the head and
caromed farther to the
right. The teen was OK. The
ball settled a few inches be-
yond the out-of-bounds
stakes near a corporate
tent, sending McIlroy back
to the tee to play his third
shot. McIlroy gave the lad a
glove on which he wrote
"Sorry" with a frown face
and "Rory."
"He could have headed it
the other way," McIlroy
joked later. "It would have
been on the fairway."
He bounced back from
that double bogey by driving
the 336-yard 16th hole and
two-putting for birdie, then
making birdie on the final
hole to join guys like Ernie
Els, Masters champion
Bubba Watson, Graeme Mc-
Dowell and Steve stricker,
who followed an eagle from
the 13th fairway with a dou-
ble bogey on the next hole.
One sign of the easy scor-
ing was that no one shot in
the 80s. That hasn't hap-
pened in the opening round
of the British Open since


1998 at Royal Birkdale,
where conditions also were
benign. Woods opened with
a 65 that year, only to get
blown away in bad weather
the next round.
Perhaps bad weather is
On the way. The forecast
hasn't been nearly as accu-
rate as Scott was with his
tee shots on Thursday -
sunshine when it calls for
rain, clouds when the fore-
cast is for dry spells.
Els and his caddie, Ricci
Roberts, figured out imme-
diately that dead calm
translates to low scores.
"It's on today," he said. "I
said to Ricci, 'I might not
have the chance again.' You
never know how the
weather is going to be."
But even in such weather
suited for low scores,
Lytham still required tee
shots in the fairway. It still
demanded good shots. And
it was a struggle for some.
Lee Westwood, despite a
birdie-birdie start, hit a
bunker shot across the
third green to take double
bogey, and had to play a
left-handed shot out of the
back end of a pot bunker on
the 13th hole as he stag-
gered to a 73. Luke Donald
made a sloppy bogey his
only one of the round on
the final hole for a 70.
Justin Rose played in the
same group as Woods and
already was nine shots be-
hind after eight holes. He
rallied for a 74.


E7lOrit/4 LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Th ursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
. 7 3- 3
."...CASH 3 (late)
~5- 4- 4
PLAY 4 (early)
1 -9 4- O
PLAY 4 (late)
8 8-2 9

Due to early deadlines,
n~r~botn Fgantabsy nmersere



On2 the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Pittsburgh Pirates
7 p.m. (SUN) Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays
8:05 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 18 Plain
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Cesar Vazquez
GOLF
7 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 British Open Golf Championship -
Second Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) U.S. Girls' Junior Amateur Day 5
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) American Century Championship First
Round
7 p.m. (ESPN) 2012 British Open Golf Championship -
Best of the Second Round (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) 2012 British Open Golf Championship -
Second Round (Same-day Tape)
TENNIS
4 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&T Atlanta Open
Second Quarterfinal
7 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&T Atlanta Open
Third Quarterfinal
11 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP U.S. Open Series: BB&T Atlanta
Open Fourth Quarterfinal

NOte: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
On the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


USA pounds Great Britain


Men's Olympic

basketball teamn


wans by 40

Associated Press

MJANCHESTER, England
- Carmelo Anthony and
Deron Williams responded to
lineup change with 19 points
apiece, and the U.S. men's
Olympie basketball team beat
Britain 118-78 on Thursday in
an exhibition game.
LeBron James added 16

holdnts amdrRusseeHWmestbcroosk
who built 40 pont Iad

a anstnt1eir ie prene
and overmatched opponent,
and every basket from there
seemed to be a dunk.
U.S. coach Mike
Krzyzewski changed up his
starting lineup, inserting
Kevin Durant for Anthony,
and Williams for Chris Paul,
and both Anthony and
Williams flourished in their
new roles.
Williams, who couldn't
scrimmage with the Ameri-
cans when they opened

st pd bh as mielihadn't
tension with the Nets yet
made 7-of-8 shots, going 5 of
6 from 3-point range.
USA Cycling offers
$100k for gold
USA Cycling will reward gold
medalists at the London Games
with up to $100,000 in bonus



PI E
Continued from Page B1

start the fifth, Jose Lopez
lined a single to center for
the Indians' first hit. Price,
however, was able to work
Out of the jam, aided by San-
tana getting thrown out at-
tempting to steal third
during a double-steal try
"My fastball's gotten bet-
ter," Price said. "I have
more velocity; it's consistent
throughout the entire game.
The curveball's better and
my cutter is more consistent
right now. I throw my
changeup whenever I need
to and that's a little tougher
for those guys."
Jeff Keppinger made it 6-




LO W
Continued from Page B1

it was not what we've experi-
enced in the practice rounds.
I'm sure there's going to be
some weather elements
thrown at us the next three
days, so just going to have to
knuckle down to handle that.
But I'm confident. My ball
striking is good. I think I can
get it around no matter what
the conditions are."
The proof was in limp
flags and red numbers on
the sreb ardsmotre

dozen players with rounds
in the 60s, a group that in-
cluded Tiger Woods. Trying
to end a four-year drought
in the majors, Woods raced
out to four birdies in seven
holes to take the early lead,
only to settle into a series of
pars and one adventure
through grass up to his
knees for a lone bogey that
gave him a 67. In his third
Open at Lytham, Woods said
it was as easy as hehad ever
Seen it play
"The wind wasn't blowing,
and we're backing golf balls
up," Woods said. "That's
something we just don't see."
Lawrie won his British
Open in nasty conditions at
CarTOustie in 1999, and the
Scot showed he could han-
dle the calm weather with
equal aplomb. He ran off
three birdies over the last
five holes. Johnson, who
won the 2006 Masters in the
wind and cold at Augusta
National, flirted with a
major record-tying 63 until a
bogey on the 17th hole. Col-
saerts, the big hitter from
Belgium, holed out with an


8-iron on the 481-yard sec-
ond hole for eagle and
added four birdies for his 65.
Brandt Snedeker was an-
Other shot behind at 66.
"We had a little wind
early on the front nine, but
it kind of calmed down the
second half," Snedeker said
"That's the best Americans
are going to see over here."
Rory McIlroy was panned
last summer at Royal St.
George's for saying he






CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL


Rays 6, Indians 0
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Choo rf 4 0 0 0 BUpton of 5 1 3 3
ACarer ss 3 0 1 0 C.Pena lb 5 0 1 1
Hannhn ss 1 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-rf 4 0 1 0
Kipnis 2b 4 00 0Scott dh 42 2 1
Brantly dh 3 0 0 0 Kppngr3b 3 0 21
CSantn lb 1 0 0 0 Conrad 3b 0 0 0 0
JoLopz 3b 3 0 1 0 Matsui rf 3 0 0 0
Duncan If 2 00 0EJhnsn ss 10 0 0
Marson c 2 0 0 0 DJnngs If 21 0 0
Cnghm of 3 00 0JMolin c 31 2 0
SRdrgz ss-2b 3 1 0 0
Totals 26 02 0 Totals 33 611 6
Cleveland 000 000 000 0

DPm Iev land 1,0T~ampa0 11 x.LOB--Geve6
land 3, Tampa Bay 9. 2B-B.Upton 2 (14), Scott
(13), Keppinger (7). 3B--Keppinger (1). HR-
Scott (12). SB--Zobrist (11), J.Molina (1). CS-
C.Santana (3), Zobrist (8).H RB O

Cleveland
Jimenez L,8-9 52-3 7 5 5 5 5
Barnes 11-3 3 1 1 0 1
Accardo 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
Price W, 13-4 7 2 0 0 3 7
W.Davis 2 0 0 0 1 3
HBP-by Jimenez (De.Jennings). WP-Barnes,
Price.
Umpires-Home, CB Bucknor; First, Mark Weg-
ner; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Dan lassogna.
T-3:00. A--27,856 (34,078).


Tigers 5, Anglels 1
Los Angeles Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Trout If 4 1 1 1 AJcksn of 4 0 2 0
Aybar ss 4 00 0Berry If 4 00 0
Pujolsdh 3 0 0 0 MiCarr3b 4 11 1
Trumo rf 4 0 0 0 Fielder lb 3 1 2 0
KMorls ib 3 0 0 0 DYong dh 4 0 0 0
Callasp 3b 3 0 1 0 Boesch rf 3 0 0 0
Mlzturs 2b 2 0 1 0 D.Kelly rf 1 0 0 0
Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 2 2 1
BoWlsn c 2 00 0Avila c 4 11 2
Calhon ph 1 0 0 0 Worth 2b 2 0 1 1
Hester c 00 0 0
Totals 29 13 1 Totals 33 5 9 5
Los Angeles 000 001 000 1
Detroit 030 110 00x 5
E--AybarD t1) iD6P 2Btoi Il LOB-Lo r -

(21), Jh.Peralta (20), Worth (3). HR--Trout (14)
Mi.Cabrera (21), Avila (6).
IP H R ER BB SO

Wilamnsg L7 6 9 5 5 1 3
Takahashi 2-3 0 0 0 1 2
Hawkins 1-3 0 0 0 0 0


Scer erW9S-5 7
Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 0
Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 1
Williams pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.


BASEBALL


FRIDA1, JULY 20, 2012 B5






Braves 3, Giants 2


East Division
L Pot GB WC L10
34 .626 - 8-2
44 .522 9'/ '/ 4-6
45 .516 10 1 5-5
45 .511 10 1/21% 5-5
47 .489 121/ 31/ 3-7



East Division
L Pot GB WC L10
37 .589 - 5-5
41 .549 3'/ 8-2
45 .511 7 3'/ 3-7
48 .478 10 6'/ 4-6
52 .441 13'/ 10 4-6


Str Home Away W
W-3 30-17 27-17 Chicago 50
W-2 23-22 25-22 Detroit 49
W-1 27-23 21-22 Cleveland 47
W-1 24-25 23-20 Kansas City39
L-3 25-20 20-27 Minnesota 38


Central Division
L Pot GB WC L10
41 .549 - 6-4
44 .527 2 8-2
45 .511 3'/ lb/ 4-6
52 .429 11 9 2-8
54 .413 12'/ 10'/ 3-7


West Division
L Pot GB WC L10
36 .604 - 5-5
43 .538 6 4-6
44 .516 8 1 8-2
54 .426 161/ 91/ 5-5




West Division
L Pot GB WC L10
41 .554 - 6-4
44 .527 2'/ 2 3-7
48 .478 7 6'/ 5-5
55 .409 13'/ 13 5-5
56 .385 15'/ 15 4-6


W
New York 57
Baltimore 48
Tampa Bay 48
Boston 47
Toronto 45


Home Away
24-22 26-19
25-21 24-23
24-21 23-24
16-28 23-24
19-30 19-24


Home Away
29-16 26-20
25-18 25-25
25-21 22-23
17-27 23-27


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


San Francisco Atlanta
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


GBlanc rf
BCrwfr ss
MeCarr If

s ndvl 3b
Pagan of
Belt lb
Christn ph
Arias 3b
Burriss 2b
Bmgrn p
Hensly p
Schrhlt ph
Totals


4 0 0 0 Bourn
4 0 0 0 Prado
3 12 0 Heywre
3 01 2 0 anz
4 0 0 0 D.Ross
3 0 1 0 Uggla
1 0 0 0 Janish
0 0 0 0 THuds
4 0 21 OFlhrt
3 0 1 0 Hinske
0 0 0 0 Kimrel
1 00 0
34 29 2 Totals


of
3b
d rf
lb


2b
ss
n p
p
ph
p


Central Division
L Pot GB WC L10
40 .565 - 8-2
40 .560 H2 6-4
45 .511 5 3'/ 4-6
47 .484 7'/ 6 6-4
53 .418 13'/ 12 7-3
58 .370 18 16'/ 2-8


Str Home Away
L-1 26-17 27-20
W-124-24 26-17
W-1 26-20 21-25
L-2 24-24 20-24
L-1 17-27 24-25


Str Home Away
W-1 28-18 24-22
W-2 29-14 22-26
L-2 23-20 24-25
W-2 26-23 18-24
W-2 24-21 14-32
L-2 24-21 10-37


Str Home Away
L-1 29-16 22-25
W-1 29-20 20-24
L-1 23-21 21-27
W-2 19-28 19-27
L-2 20-29 15-27


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


27 33 3


San Francisco 010 00 01 -- 2

E--Sand~ovl ().dLoOB--San3Fman icoa8, rAr

(8), Bourn (7). HR-E Freeman (13), D.Ross (5).
SB--Burriss (5). S-THudson. SF-Posey

San Francisco IP HREBBS
Bumgarner L,11-6 7 3 3 2 0 8
Hensley 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
THudsonW,8-4 71-3 8 2 2 2 3
0 Flaherty H,17 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel S,28-29 1 0 0 0 0 1

MetS 9, Nationals 5
NewYork Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Tejada ss 5 2 21 Lmrdzz 2b-lf 5 0 2 0
AnTrrs of 4 32 0Harperrf 5 00 0
DWrght3b 4 2 2 5 Storenp 0 00 0
Hamrtn d 400mman3bb22
Bay If 4 0 0 0 LaRoch Ib 2 0 0 0
1.Davis lb 4 12 2HRdrgzp 0 00 0
JuTrnr 2b 4 0 2 0 Dsmnd ph-ss 1 1 1 0
Thole c 3 1 1 0 Morse If-rf 4 1 1 2
Dickeyp 3 0 0 0 Espinosss-2b5 0 1 0
ByRdak 0 0 0 0 Be~rndn of 5 0 2 1)
Edgin p 0 0 0 0 Leon c 3 0 1 0
Parnell p 00 00 GGnzlz p 1 00 0
Stmmn p 1 00 0
TMoore lb 2 02 0
Totals 36 9118 Totals 41 514 4
NewYork 212 400 000 9
Washington 100 001 021 5
E--Dickey (2), D.Wright (9). DP--New York 1,
Washington 1. LOB-New York 5, Washington
12. 2B-An.Torres (9), Ju.Turner (8), Thole (9),



IP H R ERBB SO
New York
Dickey W13-1 71-310 4 3 1 5
Bydakie 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Edgin 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Parnell 1 2 1 1 0 2
Wonah gt 2-5 3-6 6 6 3 2

H.Rodriguez 11-3 0 0 0 0 0

R.airez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.O
HBP--by Parnell (Desmond). PB--Thole.


I . .<..si'rErz1CaPPISe~B~Ln aws~-=-- -~ I
Associated Press
San Francisco Giants base runner Emmanuel Burriss steals second base as Atlanta Braves shortstop Paul Janish
handles the throw in the fifth inning Thursday in Atlanta. The Braves won 3-2*




FreemRH, BOss home runs




power Br aves past Giants 3-


Baltimore

Markks rf
Hardy ss
Thome dh
AdJons of
Wieters c
Betemt 3b
C. Davis If
EnChyz If
MrRynl Ib
Flahrty 2b
Totals
Baltimore
Minnesot(


Minnesota


Arizonaabrbi

Blmqst ss 5 2 2 0
A.Hill 2b 5 12 2
Kubel If 5 01 0
Gldsch ib 5 0 2 1
J.Upton rf 4 11 0
CYoung of 4 1 1 1
mi tsb 3 00 0

MMntr ph-c 1 0 1 0


Cincinnati

Stubbs of
Valdez ss
BPhllps 2b
Bruce rf
Frazier 3b
Heisey If


Cairo lb


walked pinch-hitter Xavier Paul and lead-
off batter Drew Stubbs. Wilson Valdez'S
grounder skipped under the glove of first
baseman Paul Goldschmidt for a run-
Scoring error, setting up Phillips' game-
tying two-run double to left-center field.
Phillips moved to third on Jay Bruce'S
groundout to Goldschmidt against reliever
Mike Zagurski and scored on Frazier'S
single to left off of reliever Brad Ziegler "
Alfredo Simon (2-1) allowed one hit in
1 2-3 innings for the win.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

TigIers 5, AngIels 1
DETROIT Max Scherzer struck out
nine and got plenty of run support as
Miguel Cabrera and Alex Avila homered
to help the Detroit Tigers beat the LOS
Angeles Angels 5-1.
Detroit won the four-game series and
has 10 victories in its last 12 games.
The Angels have won just five of their
last 13 games.
Scherzer (9-5) gave u only one run -
on Mike Trout's homer in the sixth inning
- three hits and four walks over seven
Innings.
Jerome Williams (6-7) allowed five runS
and nine hits over six-plus innings.
Williams has lost five straight starts for
the first time in his career.

Orioles 4, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS Mark Reynolds'

tws rounn s ger an te ei innin ba~chnd

and rallied the Baltimore Orioles to a 4-3
victory over the Minnesota Twins.
Chen (8-5) gave up three runs and siX
hits with five strikeouts in seven innin gS
for his first win since June 17, and Jim
Johnson picked up his 28th save in 30
chances for the Orioles.
Cole De Vries allowed one run and five
hits with five strikeouts in six innings for
the Twins, who led 3-2 going into the
eighth inning. But Minnesota's normally
reliable bullpen faltered, with Anthony
Swarzak giving up a soft single tO
Reynolds that put Baltimore in front.
The Twins had a chance to tie it in the
bottom of the frame, but Brian Dozier
popped out with a runner on third to end
the inning.

MarinerS 6, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Felix Hernan-
dez won his fourth straight decision
Jesus Montero homered and drove in
four runs as the Seattle Mariners de-
feated the Kansas City Royals 6-1.
Hernandez (8-5) is 4-0 with a 1.37
ERA in his past seven starts since a IOSS
to San Diego on June 12. While he
leads the majors with 143 strikeouts,
Hernandez struck out only three, tying
his season low. He allowed one run and
eight hits, throwing only 89 pitches in
eight innings.
Hernandez worked out of a bases-
loaded, one-out jam in the eighth, striking
out Alcides Escobar and retiring Billy But-
ler on a grounder.
Will Smith (1-3), just recalled from
Triple-A Omaha, gave up four runs on
eight hits in 6 1-3 innings, while walking
two and striking out five.


ab r h bi
5 0 1 1 Span of
4 0 1 0 Revere rf
5 0 1 0 Mauer c
4 0 1 0 Wlngh dh
3 1 0 0 Mornea lb
2 1 0 0 Plouffe 3b
3 2 1 1 DoumitIf
0 0 0 0 MstrnnIf
4 0 2 2 Dozier ss
3 0 0 0 ACasill 2b
33 47 4 Totals
010 000 120
a 200 100 000


ab r h bi
5 00 0
51 1 0
31 1 0
3 01 1
4 12 0
4 01 1
2 00 0
10 0 0
4 01 0
3 00 1
34 3 7 3
-4
-3


ab r h bi




3 01 1
3 00 0
0 00 0
40 0 0


JSndrs p 3 01 0Mesorcc 4 01 0
Shaw p 0 0 0 0 Chpmn p 0 0 0 0
Zagrsk p 00 0 0Leake p 2 00 0
Ziegler p 00 0 0Simonp 0 00 0
Overay ph 1 0 1 0 Paul ph 0 1 0 0
DHrndz p 00 00 Ondrskkpf 0 (H)

Totals 39 6146 Totals 31 76 6
Arizona 101 013 000 6

na odshmidt () OLO 3-Ar z~oxa 7, Cincir7
nati 5. 2B--Bloomquist (18), J.Upton (14),
C.Young (12), B.Phillips (16). HR--A.Hill (13),
H7 lnco o1), BPlips 1s)1 SB--Bloomquist
IP H R ERBB SO
Arizona
J.Saunders 6 4 3 3 3 5
Shaw L,1-4 1-3 1 4 2 2 0
Zagurski 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Ziegler 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Leake 51-3 11 6 6 1 2

sin rs k 10 0-
Marshall H,12 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
Chapman S,15-19 1 0 0 0 0 2

Cubs 4, Marliins 2


EO--BC DaiSo~reP8 utner soDP82--M2Bnent
(20), Plouffe (12). HR--C.Davis (15). SBE-Re-
vere (20). S--Flaherty. SF--A.Casilla.
IP H R ER BB So
Baltimore
W.Chen W,8-5 0 6 1 5

Patto 0 1 0 0 0 0
Strop H,15 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson S,28-30 1 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
De Vries 6 5 1 1 1 5
Duensing H,6 1 1 1 1 2 0
Al.Burnett L,3-3 1-3 0 2 2 2 0
TRobertsonH,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Swarzak BS,1-1 11-3 1 0 0 0 4
O Day pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Patton pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP--by WChen (Doumit).

Mariners 6, Royals 1


Seattle


Kansas City


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Chicago
ab h


Ac lyk2b 4 ~rn fs 0

C.Welf sdh 0 Butle dhb 4

amoaekrlb 1 o~s nerb 41 2
Jaso c 3 0 1 0 S.Perez c 3 0 2 0
MSndrs of 4 0 2 1 Getz 2b 3 0 1 1
Ryan ss 3 0 0 1 JDyson of 3 0 1 0
Totals 35 6116 Totals 32 1 8 1
Seattle 030 010 101 6
Kansas City 000 010 000 1
DP--Seattle 2. LOB--Seattle 8, Kansas City 5.
2B-1I.Suzuki (15), J.Montero (15), Hosmer (16).
HR-J.Montero (9). CS-Getz (2). S-Jaso.
SF-J.Montero, RyalP HRERB o

seattle
HernandezW,8-5 8 8 1 1 1 3
Luetge 1 0 0 0 0 0

Wmts Ci -3 61-3 8 4 4 2 5
L.Coleman 0 1 1 1 1 0
Bueno 22-3 2 1 1 0 1
L.Coleman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP--WSmith 2


ab r h bi


Reyes ss 4 10RJhnsn ef-rf 0
Bnifacc1 0b za trobss 4 (H)

Hj zb 4 00OMrl 0 0
Kearns If 2 00 0JeBakrrf 3 12 0

Dnoa tep2b 3 O~toes of 0 )0
J.Buck c 3 00 0Barney2b 3 12 0
Buehrle p 10 0 0Valuen3b 2 00 1
DSolan ph 1 1 1 0 Mahlm p 2 0 0 0
LeBlnc p 00 0 0CampnIf 0 00 0
Mujica p 0 00 0
Morrsn ph 1 00 0

ekpl 301 02 2 Totals 27 49 4
Miami 000 001 001 2
Chicago 000 040 00x 4
DP--Miami 4. LOB--Miami 5, Chicago 3. 2B-
Re.Johnson (9).3SB--D.Solano (1). HR--A.So-
riano (18). CS--Reyes (5), Ruggiano (5).
S--Maholm. SF--Valbean R BS

uiami
Buehrle L,9-9 5 6 4 4 1 1
LeBlanc 12-3 30 0 0 1

i ceak 1
Chicago
Maholm W,8-6 8 5 1 1 1 4
Marmol S,11-13 1 1 1 11 2
HBP-by Cishek (Rizzo), by Maholm (Kearns).
WP--Maholm.

NL LEADERS
G AB R H Pot.
McCutchen Pit 87 333 65 123 .369
MeCabrera SF 88 359 60 128 .357
DWright NYM 88 326 61 115 .353
Ruiz Phi 84 280 44 98 .350
Votto Cin 86 298 52 102 .342
CGonzalez Col 84 339 63 113 .333
Holliday StL H9 e n 56 107 .316

Braun, Milwaukee, 26; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 22; Beltran, St. Louis, 20; PAlvarez, Pitts-
burgh, 19; Stanton, Miami, 19.
Runs Batted In
Beltran, St. Louis, 66; Braun, Milwaukee, 65;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 65; DWright, NewYork,
65 Kubl Arizona, 6e3; CGonzalez, Colorado,

Pitching
Dickey, New York, 13-1; GGonzalez, Wash-
ington, 12-5; Hamels, Philadelphia, 11-4; Lynn,
ene Luis,S11-4;FCueto Cincinnati, 11-5 Bum-
Pittsburgh, 10-3.


G AB
71 290
84 313
93 371
83 307
87 339
91 353
71 281
89 342
89 320
89 383
Home Runs


Trout LAA
Mauer Min
MiCabrera Det
Konerko CWS
Beltre Tex
Cano NYY
AJackson Det
Rios CWS
Ortiz Bos
Jeter NYY


Bautisa nTorno 2; Tubao, os Ane e, 26
Encarnacion, Toronto, 25; Granderson, New
York, 25; Ortiz, Boston, 23; Willingham,
Minnesota, 23.

Hamilton, Texuns,8; Mabera, Detroit, 76.
Fielder, Detroit, 67; Willingham, Minnesota, 67,
Bautista, Toronto, 65; ADunn, Chicago, 65;
Trumbo, Los Angeles, 65.
Pitching
Price, Tampa Bay, 13-4; MHarrison, Texas
1- Weae"Sa hiaAngelesor 1-; NSale
New York, 10-4; Doubront, Boston, 10-4.


AM ERICAN LEAGUE


N AT IONAL LEAG U E


_,; .


Orioles 4, Twins 3


Reds 7, D-backs 6


5RBss pur Met to




A scitd Pvs


ATLANTA Freddie Freeman
and David Ross hit home runs as the
Atlanta Braves made the most of
their three hits to beat the San Fran-
cisco Giants 3-2 to avoid a sweep.
Tim Hudson (8-4) helped an At-
lanta bullpen that was drained by
Wednesday night's 9-4 loss in 11 in-
nings. He gave up eight hits and tWO
runs in 7 1-3 innings to outpitch Gi-
ants left-hander Madison Bumgarner.
The Giants were denied their first
sweep at Turner Field. They haven't
SWept a series of at least three gameS
in Atlanta since 1988 at old Atlanta-
nulton County stadium.
The NL West-leading Giants' five-
game winning streak ended with
their first loss since the All-Star
break. They began the day a season-
best three games ahead of the sec-
ond-place DodgerS.
The Braves were held to three hits,
none after the fourth inning.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

MetS 9, Nationals 5
WASHINGTON David Wright home-
red twice and had five RBls and R.A.
Dickey won his league-leading 13th
game and the New York Mets broke a
Six-game losing streak with a 9-5 win
ovrthe Wash nton Natioas
Dickey (13-1) pitched 7 1-3 innings tO
break a streak of rare ineffectiveness this
Se8Son. After throwing consecutive one-
hitters last month, Dickey had won just
one of four starts getting no-decisionS
in three of them. In his past two, he gave
up five runs in each game.
Against Washington, he gave up four
runs three earned and 10 hits. He
Walked one and struck out five. Dickey
has won 11 straight decisions.
The Nationals' Ryan Zimmerman hit a
first-inning home run, his 11th, and by the
time Washington scored again, the MetS
had an eight-run lead.

Cubs 4, Marlins 2
CHICAGO Paul Maholm pitched
eight innings, Alfonso Soriano homered
and the Cubs beat the Miami Marlins 4-2,
ruining Mark Buehrle's return to Chicago.
Maholm allowed one run and four hitS
10 win his fourth consecutive start, match-
ing a career best. Including his first career
relief appearance July 8 against the Mets,
the left-hander has allowed just three runS
in his last 30 1-3 innings for an impressive
0.89 ERA over his last five games.
Pinch-hitter Greg Dobbs delivered an
RBI single in the ninth before Carlos Mar-
mol finished the five-hitter for his 11th
Save in 13 chances as Chicago won for
the 14th time in its last 19 games.

Reds 7, Diamondbacks 6
CINCINNATI Brandon Phillips


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 0
Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 1
Baltimore 4, Minnesota 3
Seattle 6, Kansas City 1
Chicago White Sox at Boston, late
N.Y Yankees at Oakland, late
Friday's Games
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 1-1) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 8-7)
7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 7-6) at Detroit (Verlander 10-
5), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (lwakuma 1-2) at Tampa Bay (Shields 8-6),
7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Laffey 1-1) at Boston (Beckett 5-7), 7:10 p.m.

Mnnesuta (Blackburn 4-5) at Kansas City (Hochevar 6-8),
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 10-4) at Oakland (Milone 9-6),
10:05 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 6-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 11-1)
10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 3:05 p. .

Texas at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Atlanta 3, San FranT usday Gaes
Cincinnati 7, Arizona 6
N.Y. Mets 9, Washington 5
Chkcag Cub 4, Meiamil2te

'Frid y's Games
Atlanta (Hanson 10-5) at Washington (Strasburg 10-4),
7:05 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 8-7) at Pittsburgh (Correia 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
San7Frandisco (Lincecum 3-10) at Philadelphia (Worley 5-
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 6-5) at N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 6-6)
7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 0-3) at Cincinnati (Bailey 8-6)
7:10 p.m.
Chicagm Cubs (Dempster 5-3) at St. Louis (Lohse 9-2)

Houston (B.Norris 5-7) at Arizona (Cahill 7-8), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-4) at San Diego (Marquis 2-5)
10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 1:05 p.m., 1 st game
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Miami at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.


homered and had five RBls, then scored
the go-ahead run in the seventh inning on
Todd Frazier's single to help the Cincinnati
Reds rally from a six-run deficit to pull out
a 7-6 win over the Arizona Diamond backs.
Arizona led, 6-3,with one out in the
seventh when reliever Bryan Shaw (1-4)


AL LEADERS














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Anna Chlumsky, left, Kate Buddeke, Hannah Cabell and Jake
Silbermann perform a scene from David Adjmi's play, "3C,"
off-Broadway at Rattlestick Playwrights Theater in New
York.

- one tomboy, the other a roommates in a rundown
sexy ditz and aguy who Santa Monica apartment
spontaneously become after wild party! They clash


Cee Lo postpones

LAS OGssso ger-
songwriter Cee Lo Green





cee to causheof
oeingsce-

ule ~ La fo B' T e a

Te "Ce L~o resen o


Presents Loberace" show
was set to launch Aug. 29
at the Planet Hollywood
resort, but it's now sched-
uled to start Feb. 27..
Ticketholders are eligi-
ble for refunds.
The performer is most
recently known for the
Grammy-winning 2010
single "Forget You." He
said the 28-show Las
Vegas run will feature
showgirls, pyrotechnics
and other over-the-top

Green is a coach on
"The Voice." He's also
one-half of the duo
Gnarls Barkley, which
poduced the 2006 hit
Irazy. )

Actor accused
of lewd act
LOS ANGELES -
Actor Ered Willard, per-
haps best-known as a
dog-show announcer in
the movie
"Best in
Show,"
has been
9*1C arrested
on suspl-
cion of
commit-
g ~ting a
lewd act
Fired at a Hol-
Willard Iood
adult theater
Los Angeles police Sgt
MVark Ro says uniformed
vice officers were conduct-
ing a routine investigation
of the theater shortly be-
fore 9 p.m. Wednesday and
saw Willard engaging in a
lewd act.
He says Willard ap-
peared to be alone.
The 72-year-old actor
was booked at the Holly-
wood police station on
suspicion of committing a
lewd act in public. Ro
said Willard was released
after midnight without
posting bail.
Willard was nominated
four times for Emmys for
guest roles on TV's "Mod-
ern Family" and "Every-
body Loves Raymond."S



good for concert
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
Fans still holding tickets
for a canceled 1979 show
in Rhode Island by
British rock band The
Who can finally use them.
The Who's 1979 concert
in Providence was can-
celed by then-Mayor
Buddy Cianci after a
stampede before a show
in Cincinnati, Ohio,
killed 11 people.
The Who is now sched-
uled to play in Provi-
dence in February at the
Dunkin Donuts Center,
and arena General Man-
ager Lawrence Lepore
said the venue will honor
tickets from the canceled
1979 show.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Lena Headey, as Cersei Lannister, left, and Peter Dinklage, as Tyrion Lan-
nister, are shown in a scene from HBO's "Game of Thrones." The program
was nominated Thursday for an Emmy award for outstanding drama series.


The miniseries was the most-
watched entertainment telecast
ever on basic cable, drawing about
13 million each for its first two parts
and hitting a high of 14.3 million for
its third chapter. The best the net-
works had to offer that week: NBC's
"America's Got Talent," seen by 11.5
million people.
Networks increasingly rely on tal-
ent contests and sports, program-
ming that invites live viewing and
means fewer people will record the
airings and skip commercials.
News magazines, relatively cheap
to produce, have been another
broadcast staple.
Scripted series, whether drama
or comedy, tend to be formulaic -
which certainly doesn't mean un-
popular. CBS is the most-watched
network on the strength of crime
dramas including "NCIS," "CSI"
and their spinoffs.
But innovation is coming from
shows like "Mad Men," which
earned a leading 17 Emmy nomina-
tions and the chance to earn its fifth
best drama award and set a new


record as the most-honored drama
in television history
The shows it's currently tied with
and could leave behind: the broad-
cast dramas "Hill Street Blues," "L.A.
Law" and "The West Wing," which
once represented the best of TV
"I always use 'L.A. Law' as an ex-
ample," said "Mad Men" creator
Matthew Weiner. "If you went to
pitch 'L.A. Law' to NBC right now,
you'd end up on Showtime."
But he said he's hesitant to talk
about the broadcast vs. cable
dynamic.
"It's because, in the end, I think
people should remember that the
same companies are making both
products, and really it's a diversifi-
cation businesswise," he said. "If
you are in the business of Viacom,
you are making'Homeland' and you
are making 'The Mentalist."'"
"There is always room to take a
risk when you don't have to deliver
25 million people, and that's an un-
fair advantage," Weiner said.
The Emmy ceremony will air
Sept. 23 with Jimmy Kimmel as host.


Associated Pres


with a dislikable landlord
who makes offensive, homo-
phobic jokes. The play-
wright is exploring the idea
of a culture avoiding hard is-
sues and problems by re-
treating into sex and drugs
The law firm Kenyon &
Kenyon, which represents
DLT Entertainment, the
owners of the TV sitcom
"Three's Company," sent
Adjmi a letter demanding
that he cease further per-
formances of the play any-
where. The lawyers claim
that "3-C" is damaging to a
proposed stage version of
"Three's Company."
In their defense ofAdjmi,
the theater professionals
argue that his play is a
"clearly and patently and
unremittingly parody."


NEW YORK -A group of
theater community heavy-
weights including Jon
Robin Baitz, Stephen Sond-
heim, Tony Kushner, John
Guare and Terrence Mc-
Nally have signed an
open letter defending a
playwright whose play par-
odying 1970's sitcoms has
been accused of copyright
infringement by lawyers
representing the TV show
"Three's Company."
The collection of play-
wrights, theater profession-
als and performers are
backing David Adjmi, whose
play "3-C" just ended its run
at Rattlestick Playwrights
Theater.
The play is about two girls


Birthday The seeds you've sown by doing good deeds
in the past are likely to take root and blossom in the year
ahead. A number of people whom you went out of your way
to help will be paying you back in greater measure.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Strive to maintain strong,
friendly relations with everyone, including the in-laws.
Someone you know is likely to put you on track to some-
thing that could be materially beneficial.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Solutions to problems that have
everyone else baffled will be very evident and clear to you.
Don't hesitate to speak up when you believe you have the
answers others are seeking.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Old friends are likely to be
more fortunate for you than usual, so stick with them, espe-
cially those who share an interest with you in the world of fi-
nance or commerce.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The most enjoyable time you're


Today's HORsOSCPE
likely to have will be sharing your day with people whom
you haven't seen for a while. A number of good things
could come from such a reunion.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your objectives will be more
easily achieved if you keep your intentions to yourself -
the fewer people who know about them, the better. This in-
cludes your close buddies.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Even if you're doubtful of
the merits of your suggestions, associates who believe in
them will take it upon themselves to try out your ideas and
verify their value.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)- Unless you are confronted by
a challenge, your tenacity and determination may never sur-
face. If they do, however, even the blase will be impressed.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't hesitate to make a
critical decision, because you already have the answer
within you. All you have to do is allow what you've learned


from experience to guide you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) By all means, show a will-
ingness to be helpful to those to whom you're obligated.
Don't miss any opportunities to reciprocate and express
your appreciation.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Although it might inconven-
ience you to do so, you'll still come through and honor all of
your commitments, earning you the respect of your friends
and associates.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Even if you are the catalyst
for some fun activities, you still might not feel gratified or
fulfilled unless you first get involved in something construc-
tive.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because your custodial in-
stincts are seeking expression, they are likely to impel you
to inoffensively step in and manage a situation that is giving
others fits, satisfying everybody.


Cable shows dominate




Emmy nominations


SO YOU KNOW




owWEDN SDAY, JULY1 5
Powerbal: 3winr


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4-of-6 2,755 $40.50
3-of-6 43,453 $5
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5-of-5 3 winners $79,826.86
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3-of-5 9,231 $11.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS

aTo verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers off icially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.





Today is Friday, July 20,
the 202nd day of 2012. There
are 164 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 20, 1969, astronauts
Neil Armstrong and Edwin
"Buzz"Aldrin became the first
men to walk on the moon after
reaching the surface in their
Apollo 11 lunar module.
On this date:
In 1861, the Congress of
the Confederate States con-
vened in Richmond, Va.
In 1871, British Columbia
entered Confederation as a
Canadian province.
In 1942, the first detach-
ment of the Women's Army
Auxiliary Corps later
known as WACs be an
basic training at Fort Des
Moines, iowa. The Legion of
Merit was established by an
Act of Congress.
In 1944, an attempt by a
group of German officials to
assassinate Adolf Hitler with
a bomb failed as the explo-
sion at Hitler's Rastenburg
headquarters only wounded
the Nazi leader.
In 1951, Jordan's King Ab-
dullah I was assassinated in
Jerusalem by a Palestinian
gunman who was shot dead
on the spot by security.
In 1960, a pair of Polaris
missiles were fired from the
submerged USS George
Washington off Cape
Canaveral, Fla., at a target
more than 1,100 miles away.
In 1988, Massachusetts
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis re-

ceve the Demoontic prnesi

Ten years ago: Twenty-
nine people died in a blaze
started by bartenders who
were doing tricks with fire at
Utopia, an unlicensed night
club in Lima, Peru.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush signed an
executive order prohibiting
cruel and inhuman treatment,
including humiliation or deni-
gration of religious beliefs, in
the detention and interroga-
tion of terrorism suspects.
One year ago: Six Repub-
lican presidential hopefuls
traded tweets in the first pres-
idential debate conducted
through Twitter, outlining their
agendas across the popular
social media service.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Diana Rigg is 74. Rock
musician John Lodge (The
Moody Blues) is 69. Singer
Kim Carnes is 67. Rock mu-
sician Carlos Santana is 65.
Rock musician Paul Cook
(The Sex Pistols, Man Raze)
is 56. Rock singer Chris Cor-
nell is 48. Rock musician
Stone Gossard (Pearl Jam) is
46. Actor Reed Diamond is
45. Actor Josh Holloway is
43. Singer Vitamin C is 43.


Actor Omar Epps is 39. Actor
Simon Rex is 38. Actress
Judy Greer is 37. Actor Char-
lie Korsmo is 34. Thought for
Today: "Never miss a good
chance to shut up." Will
Rogers, American humorist
(1879-1935).


with 17 including

best drama~ awad d

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES "Mad Men" is
on the brink of making Emmy
drama series history, Lena Dun-
ham's comedy "Girls" is the buzz du
jour, and both are on cable. As
Thursday's nominations proved,
the gap between cable and the
broadcast networks is stunningly
wide and only getting wider
Five out of six best drama series
slots were claimed by cable shows,
both premium and basic, with the
sixth going to PBS. Networks, which
had controlled the comedy genre
last year, lost fully half of that turf to
"Girls "Veep" and "Curb Your En-
thusiasm," all HBO.
Not a single actor in a network
drama series earned a lead or sup-
porting bid for September's Emmy

Awarbdl channels offer so much
awards-caliber programming that
even theatrical films, increasingly
dependent on action films and ado-
lescent comedies, can look shabby
in comparison.
"A lot of what's happening on
cable TV you'd be hard-pressed to
see that happen in a studio film,"
said Don Cheadle, whose perform-
ance in Showtime's "House of Lies"
earned him a best comedy actor
bid. "Right now, one of the most dif-
ficult things to put together are
movies which have interesting con-
tent and adult themes.
For writers and actors who want
to pursue creative work, that leaves
independent films or the expanding
number of cable channels willing to
invest in ambitious scripted
projects.
Lena Dunham, who made a
splash with her indie film "Tiny
Furniture," breathed life into the
TV sitcom with "Girls," a darkly
comedic coming-of-age New York
story on HBO. It received a best
comedy nod and acting, writing and
directing nominations for her.
"Girls" is HBO's "current spin on
'Sex and the City,' which was a
strong past Emmy favorite," said
Tom O'Neil, editor of the Gold
Derby awards website. He called
Dunham the current "toast of
Hollywood."
History Channel moved into
scripted fare in a big way (after
backing away from airing the con-
troversial "The Kennedys") with its
"Hatfields & McCoy," starring Kevin
Costner, which earned solid re-
views and spectacular ratings this
spring and 16 nods Thursday.


Play parody defended by theater biggies







In Saturrday's Classifieds A *
Shop in our
Garage and Yard Sales Category
SAVE BIG! O


I



GENE


CITRus COUNTY CHRONICLE


" (he bad-boy drug-
gic appeal of"Say-
ages" did not suck
me in. However, the pre-
view's vibrant skull aesthetic
- whose climax features the
Virgin Mary flipping into a
psychedelic Grim Reaper -
is haunting and poetic.
For a movie about mari-
juana, "Savages" never hits
its commercials' sublimity.
Rather, director Oliver Stone
delves into a mockumanda


The first half-hour of "Say-
ages" feels like a legalize
marijuana PSA. Of course,
Oliver Stone has a right to his
opinion, but his political
push borders on propaganda.
It is not too sophisticated.
Besides narrations cooing
over Ben and Chon's "clean"
pot business, "Savages" de-
monizes the states for de-
priving chemo patients of a

See Page C7


(mock + documentary +
propaganda). Thankfully,
"Savages" shifts to a more
multifaceted argument and
gritty character development
saves it.
Essentially, "Savages" con-
cerns a peaceful pot enter-
prise among botany and
business graduate Ben (Aaron
Johnson), his best friend and


war veteran Chon (Taylor
Kitsch) and their girlfriend, O
(Blake Lively). However,
when Ben and Chon turn
down Mexican drug queen
Elena (Salma Hayek) for a
"joint" venture, her goons
take O hostage. Ben, the
brains, and Chon, the brawn,
then battle unseemly drug
lords to save their beloved O.


Heather Foster
FOSTER
ON FILM


Special to the Chronicle
Stacey Griffis portrays
Eliza Doolittle at the
Ascot races in the play
"My Fair Lady," which is
this weekend at the Art
Center Theater in Citrus
Hills.

Inverness

Inverness Highlands
"Olde-Tyme" jam
Fort Cooper's "Olde-
Tyme Music" event will
have its second jam ses-
sion from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday, July 21.
Snacks will be available
during intermission; musi-
cians have first dibs.
Musicians call Chuck
Mclntyre at 352-419-5181
for details. For general
questions, call Jodie Hen-
derson at 352-560-3151.


Tricky Dogs Show
On Thursday
The Citrus County Library
System's Tricky Dogs Show
will be at 10:30 a.m. Thurs-




comedy dog act is the fi-
nale for the children's sum-
mer reading program.
Key Training Center
telethon Saturday
To raise support through
pledges and donations, the
Key Training Center
telethon will be from 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Saturday, July 21
on WVYKE TV cable chan-
nel 16 or digital channel 47.
During the telethon, Key
Training Center clients will
share their stories and
local and national talents
will perform.
To donate, call 352-527-
2341 or 888-377-0340.

CitfUS Hills

"My Fair Lady" at
Art Center Theatre
"My Fair Lady' shows
will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, and 2 p.m.
Sunday, at the Art Center
Theatre in Citrus Hills. Re-
served tickets are $18.
The play features a
young cockney girl who
takes lessons from a lan-
guage professor so she
can speak "like a lady" and
get a job in a flower shop.
It has been called "the per-
fect musical," with a blend
of memorable songs, color-
ful characters and a strong
story.
The Art Center's produc-
tion features Stacey Griffis
as Eliza Doolittle, Lowell
Smith as Professor Higgins,
Ralph Shafer as Col. Hugh
Pickering, Julian "Doc"
Weingarten as Alfred P.
Doolittle, Brady Lay as
Freddy Eynsford-Hill,
Shirley Perregaux as Mrs.
Pearce, Katherine Corneilus
as Mrs. Higgins and a tal-
ented cast of singers as
cockneys, maids and
guests at the Ascot races
and the Transylvanian Ball.
For information, call 352-
746-7606.
-- From staff reports


Associated Press


Christian Bale reprises his role as the caped crusader in the "The Dark Knight Rises." The movie opens at midnight Friday.





Third time not a charm


MOvile Crit/C.'

'Dark Kni t

Rises'a letdown
CHRISTY L.EMIRE
AP Movie Cr-itic


cludes his Batman trilogy
in typically spectacular,
ambitious fashion with "The
Dark Knight Rises," but the
feeling of frustration and disap-
pointment is unshakable.
Maybe that was inevitable.
Maybe nothing could have met
the expectations established by
2008's "The Dark Knight,"
which revolutionized and set
the standard for films based on
comic books by being high-
minded and crowd-pleasing.
With Christian Bale as his tor-
tured superhero starting from
2005's "Batman Begins," Nolan
has explored the complicated
and conflicting motivations of
man as well as the possibility
of greatness and redemption
within society
Here, as director and co-
writer, he's unrelenting in
hammering home the
dread, the sorrow, the sense
of detachment and futility
of a city onII thle brlin o~f
collapse wilthl no
savior in silht
Gotham I
under
slege in


that he is willing to challenge us
this way when summer block-
busters so often feel flashy and
hollow. And yet at the same time,
it takes some giant leaps with its
characters which either make no
sense, haven't earned the emo-
tions they're seeking, or both.
"The Dark Knight Rises" does
feature the kind of impeccable
production values we've come
to expect from Nolan's films;
many members of his core team
are back, including cinematog-
rapher Wally Pfister, editor Lee
Smith and production designers
Nathan Crowley and Kevin Ka-
vanaugh. "The Dark Knight
Rises" feels weighty and sub-
stantive and, thankfully, isn't
in 3-D but it takes on an even
grittier look than its predeces-
sors as Gotham City devolves
into desperation and ruin.
But Nolan's approach is so
coldly cerebral that it's a detri-
ment to the film's emotional
core. It's all doom and gloom
and no heart. There is no rea-
son to care about these
S characters. w~ho fune-

Il1:heti llac hi.: lne

~~~tha a rapope


Anne Hathaway portrays Catwoman in the third installment of
director Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy. Morgan Freeman,
left, and Michael Caine reprise their roles as Lucius Fox and Alfred.


ways that tonally and visually
recall 9/11; what is obviously
the island of Manhattan gets cut
off from the outside world at
one point. Rather
than seeming
exploitative,
es* it's just one of
- .us.. many exam-
-ples of the
Script from
Nolan and
his usual col-
laborator, his
brother
Jonathan, mak-
ing the franchise
feel like a rele-
vant reflection of
our times. Iden-
tity theft, eco-
nomic collapse
and an uprising of
the disgruntled,
disenfranchised
have-nots against
the smug, comfy
haves also come
into play
There's so
much going on
here, though,
with so many
new characters
who are all
meant to function
in significant


ways "The Dark Knight Rises"
feels overloaded, and sadly
lacking the spark that gave
2008's "The Dark Knight" such
vibrancy. The absence of
Heath Ledger, who won a
posthumous Oscar for his
portrayal of the anarchic
and truly frightening
Joker, is really obvious .4
here. In retrospect, it
makes you realize how
crucial Ledger's perform-
ance was in making that
Batman movie fly.
By comparison, "The
Dark Knight Rises" is
plot-heavy, obsessed
with process, laden
with expository dia-
logue and flash-
backs that bog
down the mo-
mentum and -
dare I say it? -
just flat-out
boring at
times. Yes,
the Batman
world through
Nolan's eyes
is supposed
to be moody
and intro-
spective;
you've got to
admire the fact


Slow start, but better end in 'Savages'


LOCAL MOVIE REVIEW


AP MOVIE REVIEW


Lecanto



























































Dan's -4


Clam Stand ;
With two convenient locations in Crystal 'i
River and Homosassa, Dan's Clam Stand has
made it easy to enjoy fresh seafood any time
of the week. Since opening seventeen years a11~
ago, the restaurant has earned the distinction
for providing ample portions of quality* 'W,
prepared seafood at a reasonable price. The casual
atmosphere, reasonable prices and kid's menu has
made it the perfect place to bring the entire family or to
socialize with good friends.
The diverse menu features local and New England seafood at its best. Popular taste
pleasers include fried oysters, scallops, shrimp and whole belly clams, New England
steamers, freshly-made New England and Manhattan Clam Chowder, and fresh fish such as
grouper that can be prepared fried, blackened or grilled. Dan's Famous Hamburger is the
recipient of the "Pearly Mae Award," a Chronicle contest that awarded the title to the best
hamburger in Citrus County. Prices range from $5.95 to $25.99.
Dan's offering: 10 Extra Large Shrimp with 1 Side $7.99; 15 Extra Large Shrimp $11.99;
20 Extra Large Shrimp $14.99; 1 Ib. Snow Crab with corn or slaw $9.99 all day, everyday -
add an additional 1/2 Ib, for $4.00; and Maine Lobster market price.
Dan's offers a new Lunch Crunch Menu served daily from 11 am-2 pm, featuring specials
starting at $4.99.
The restaurant also features nightly Sundown Specials from 3 to 6 pm. Choose from fried
clam strips, chicken fingers, fried haddock, popcorn shrimp, or Fish Tacos served with your
choice of regular fries, coleslaw, or hush puppies, tossed salad or chowder, coffee or tea.
Offered for dine-in service only, no substitutions allowed.
In Homosassa, Dan's Clam Stand is located at 7364 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., and on
Hwy. 44 in Crystal River.0Open 1 1 am Tuesday-Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
For more information call 795-9081 Crystal River, 628-9588 Homosassa.


Illllcll

11111


III


3887 N. Lecanto Hwy. Bever y Hills
(across frorn Beverly Hills Car Wash)
Tue. Sat. 8 AM 8 PM Sun. 8 AM -2 PM 352.527.7250


Ili~i~l


C2 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012

MUSEUMS
I "Phosphate Discov-
ery: Florida's Gold Rush"
runs through November 2012
at Floral City Heritage Mu-
seum. Exhibit features the
history of the phosphate in-
dustry in Citrus County and
includes new photos and arti-
facts. Free. Hours are 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday
and Saturday in new Town
Center, 8394 E. Orange
Ave./County Road 48.
www.floralcityhc.org.
352-860-0101, the-fchc@
hotmail.com. Special viewing
can be arranged.
M "Cruisin' the Fossil
Freeway," features 30 fos-
sils, including a complete
skeleton cast of Triceratops
horridus, the famous three-
horned dinosaur, in addition
to Albertosaurus, a ferocious
carnivore that lived about 70
million years ago, Florida Mu-
seum of Natural History in
Gainesville. Fossils comple-
ment 19 color prints and five
large-scale murals of creative
artwork. Exhibit ends Sept. 3.
Admission $5 for adults,
$4.50 for Florida residents,
seniors and college students
and $4 for ages 3 to 17. 352-


SCENE


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

coins include rare King Ferdi-
nand and Queen Isabella re-
lated coins, including a
Spanish piece confirmed to
have been made in Spain be-
tween 1471 and 1474 during
the reign of King Enrique IV,
which may be the oldest con-
firmed European artifact dis-
covered in the United States.
Daily admission $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors 55 or
older and students 19 and
older; $3 for youths ages 10
to 18. Museum hours 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturdays, noon to 5
p.m. Sunday and closed on
Monday, Thanksgiving,
Christmas and New Year's
Day.
I Coastal Heritage
Museum tours, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1 755.
I Olde Mill House
Gallery & Printing Museum,
"Pulp to Print" workshop will
be each month until May
2012, at 10466 WV. Yulee
Drive, Homosassa. 352-
628-9411.


aerial video. Visitors will also
discover how the Maya of
Cerros integrated religious
rituals with daily life, and
view 45 artifacts on display
for the first time, most dating
from 350 B.C. to A.D. 300.
The museum is at 3215 Hull
Road, east of Southwest
34th Street in the University
of Florida Cultural Plaza in
Gainesville. Hours are from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and from
1 to 5 p.m. Sunday.
I "New World Treas-
ures: Artifacts from Her-
nando De Soto's Florida
Expedition," opens Satur-
day, Sept. 22, Appleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of
Central Florida, Ocala. Arti-
facts were discovered re-
cently in Marion County and
will be on display into 2013
as part of the statewide "Viva
Florida 500" anniversary cel-
ebration. This extraordinary
collection of rare 16th century
artifacts includes delicate
blue Murano glass beads
fabricated in Italy during the
early 1500s, pieces of chain
mail from Spanish armor and
the largest cache of medieval
coins found to date on the
American mainland. The


Special to the Chronicle
A large cache of rare medieval 16th century collection of coins found on the American
mainland will be on display Sept. 22 at the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central
Florida in Ocala. The coins are part of "New World Treasures: Artifacts from Hernando
De Soto's Florida Expedition."


273-2062.
H "An Early Maya City
by the Sea: Daily Life and


Ritual at Cerros, Belize,"
runs through Oct. 7, at Florida
Museum of Natural History.


Free. Exhibit illustrates how
the city originally looked
through 3-D maps and an


MedieVal COins from 16th century


Foo~,


8 Eln~ter talment,~


NOW DELIVERING MONDAY-FRIDAY 11AM-3PM\ ini order s30 0[ :~
BRING AFINTO TUESDAY: KIDS EAT FE
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Entree or Basket I I assiu a nlull I
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I HAll OFF II chnet e to be given a~n~y IiC
Hwithpulchaseof2 beveragesNoot er On AUg. 0,
























































































































































ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


Thanks! iiE
For being arsubscriber, w~holcenm~c
Go to www.chronicleon linexcom/subscribercantest
or fill out the form below and mail or bring to Na lme
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429
to enter for your chance to wini Phone
:1trus Publishing employees and their famlies are not eligible to enter. E rail


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ARTS Es CRAFTS
I Appleton summer art
camps for children ages 7 to
14 will be July 16 to 20 and
July 30 to Aug. 3, 4333 E. Sil-
ver Springs Blvd., Ocala.
During one-week session,
children will explore different
art activities, learn major art
movements and create mas-
terpieces. Supplies provided.
$85 per week for museum
members, $95 nonmembers.
Preregistration required.
352-291-4455, ext. 1613.
I Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly
Wildwood Public Library, 310
S. Palmer Drive, Wildwood.
352-748-1158. els34785@
yahoo.com.
I Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. Aug.
4, over a half-mile up and
down scenic Beach Boule-
vard. Third Saturday Art
Walk is 6 to 10 p.m. July 21.
Gulf port Art Walk is the First
Friday and Third Saturday of
every month, year-round.
Parking free. Free trolley
rides from off-site parking
areas. Pet and family friendly.
www.GulfportMA.com.
866-ART-WALK.
H Artist reception for
Diane Becker and Joyce
Sundheim, 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 25, Rising
Sun Cafe, 10 S. Main St.,
Brooksville. Free. Refresh-
ments served.
H The juried "2012 Bien-
nial: Florida Installation
Art" exhibition ends Aug.
12, Appleton Museum of Art,
College of Central Florida.
www.AppletonMuseum.org or
352-291-4455, ext. 1837. $6
adults; $4 seniors 55 or older
and students 19 and older.
and $3 youths ages 10-18'
H "Trading Places a ce-
ramic collaboration exhibition
of 20 ceramic artists affiliated
with the University of Florida
who exchanged undecorated
greenware pieces among
each other, runs through
Sept. 1, Webber Center
Gallery, CF Ocala Campus,
3001 S.W. College Road.
Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Gallery closed Sundays
Monday and college-ob-
served holidays. 352-873-
5809. visit www.CF.edu.
I Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
Fair Ave., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).
H Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at 10
a.m. first Wednesday. All quil-
ters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
I Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meeting, 9 a.m. Saturday,
Aug. 4, at Weeki Wachee
Senior Center off U.S. 19 and
Toucan Trail, Spring Hill. No


SCENE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 C3


Fifth St., State Road 44.
352-817-6879.
H Crystal River Preserve
State Park boat tour, 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays,
Crystal River Preserve State
Park Visitor Center. $10
adults; $8 children ages 7 to
12; free, children 6 and
younger. Tickets on sale in
Preserve Visitor Center one
hour prior to departure; arrive
no less than 15 minutes prior
to departure. 352-563-0450.
www.crystalIrive rstateparks.
org.
I Chapter 156 of The Na-
tional Association of Watch
and Clock Collectors
(NAWCC) meeting, 8 a.m.
fourth Sunday monthly, Her-
nando Civic Center, 3848 E.
Parson's Point Road,
Hernando. 352-527-2669.
I The Capitol Theatre
summer film series:
*7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2
- "Some Like It Hot."
*7:30 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 10 "JAWS."
*7:30 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 18 -"The Notebook."
*3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9
- "Aurora Borealis.
*3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30
- "The Goonies."
Tickets $5. 727-791-7400
or www.atthecap.com.
I The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Soci-
ety meeting, 1 p.m. first Sat-
urday monthly Central
Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
352-726-0162. 352-726-
0162. http://FCHNS.org. 352-
726-0162 or www.fchns.org.
5 2012 Progressive In-
surance Tampa Boat Show,
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 28, and Saturday, Sept.
29, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 30, Tampa
Convention Center, 333
S. Franklin St. In-water area
closes at 7 p.m. daily. Adults
16 and older $12. Youth 15
and younger free when ac-
companied by adult. Tampa
BoatShow.com, or 954-
441-3220.
a Comedian and political
commentator Bill Maher, 8
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall. $89, $65,
and $50. 727-791-7400.
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
H "MythBusters: Behind
the Myths," an evening of
on-stage experiments, audi-
ence participation rocking
video and behind-the-scenes
stories with Jamie and Adam,
8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13,
USF Sun Dome. $200, $60,
$45 and $38. ticketmaster.
com or 800-745-3000.

BUZZ
SUBMISSIONS
mDeadlines for Buzz
submissions are
5 p.rn. Friday for the
following Friday's
edition.


Special to the Chronicle
"Trading Places," is a ceramic collaboration exhibition of 20 ceramic artists affliated with the University of Florida
who exchanged undecorated greenware pieces among each other. The exhibit runs through Sept. 1 at the Webber
Center Gallery, CF Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road.


business meeting but a birth-
day raffle. Julie Polderdyke,
guest artist teacher, will teach
a sunflower clock painted
with acrylics. 352-688-0839
or 352-666-9091. www.
natu recoastdecorativea artists.
com.
H Citrus Watercolor Club
meeting, 1 p.m. second Fri-
day monthly, United Methodist
Church on County Road 581,
Inverness. $5. 352-382-8973
or 352-622-9352.
H Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at 8089 W.
Pine Bluff St., Crystal River.
352-563-6349, 352-861-
8567. www.mhdartists.com.
I Florida Artists Gallery
summer hours, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Wednesday through
Saturday and noon to 4 p.m.
Tuesday and Sundays
through Sept. 30. The gallery
is in the historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City. 352-344-9300.
www.floridaartistsgallery.com.
H Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. The Art
Center of Citrus County is at
2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Her-
nando. 352-746-4089.

ART CLASSES
H The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. www.Florida
artistsgallery.com.
July classes include:
I Drawing with Ann, 10
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Saturday,


July 21, and 28. Instructor Ann
Covington. Charcoal, pencils
and color pencils available.
Class size limited. $20 per class
or $60 for all four in advance.
352-726-2979 or 344-9300.
Fearless Painting with
Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (lunch
from 12 to 1 p.m.) Monday, July
23. Instructor Susi LaForsch.
Students will create an 18-inch-
by-24-inch abstract painting in
one-day workshop. Class limit
is four students. $75 per work-
shop. Materials included. $20
deposit required. Iaforsch@
tampabay~rr.com or
352-726-8710.
Continuing classes:
Art for Children, 10 a.m. to
11:30 p.m. Wednesday. In-
structors Kathy Bird and Ann
Covington. For children be-
tween ages 7 and 11. Materials
provided. 352-344-9300.
Oil painting class, 1 to 3
p.m. Tuesday. Instructor Con-
nie Townsend. For beginners to
advance. $15 per class.
ConnieTown@aol.com or
352-400-9757.
Acrylic painting class, 1 to
3 p.m. Friday. Instructor Con-
nie Townsend. For beginners to
advanced. $15 per class.
ConnieTown@aol.com or
352-400-9757.
H Adult jewelry making
class, 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 24,
Citrus Springs Memorial Li-
brary. Edna Mikel will teach
how to make a beaded-stretch
bracelet. Participants can bring
beads to make an 8-inch
bracelet or purchase a pre-
pared kit with all required mate-
rials. Pre-registration required.
352-489-2313.
H Watercolor classes with
instructor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m.


Tuesday, Citrus Springs
Community Center. $10.
www.citruscountyfl.org, click
on Parks & Recreation to
register. 352-465-7007.
I Floral City Needle
Artists instructs in quilting,
embroidery, knitting and cro-
chet for beginners to ad-
vanced levels, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday at Floral City
Community House between
the library and the museum
on Orange Avenue. Free.
352-344-5896.
H Calligraphy classes,
1 p.m. Thursday, at Hobby
Haven & Gifts, 1239 Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
352-794-6032.
H Learn to draw class,
1-hour lesson at noon, 1
p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. for
groups or private lessons,
Tuesday through Saturday,
Lorna Jean Gallery. Materials
included. Summer special
$15 per class. Pay for four
classes, get one free.
352-564-2781
I Sterling silver jewelry
class, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Friday, Lorna Jean Gallery.
Four-week course starts Aug.
10. Materials and use of tools
included. $140. Limit of four
students. 352-564-2781.
a Watercolor beginner's
class, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
days, Lorna Jean Gallery.
Class starts Aug. 14. Limit of
six students. $15 per class.
Materials list at gallery.
352-564-2781.


I Arts & crafts class,
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sat-
urdays in September for chil-
dren ages 8 to 13, Lorna
Jean Gallery. Materials pro-
vided. 352-564-2781.
I The Garden Shed
classes:
I Origami Jewelry and
Origami Ornament-making
classes. 352-503-7063.
I Calligraphy, 10 a.m.
Thursday, Aug. 2. Five-week
sessions. Bring calligraphy
set or buy one here.
I Scrapbooking, 10 a.m.
to noon Saturday, Aug. 25.
Students to bring at least 20
photos with them. Books,
supplies and instruction
provided. $20.
The Garden Shed is at
2423 S. Rock Crusher Road,
Homosassa. 352-503-7063.
SPECIAL INTEREST
H "'Jurassic Park"
screening, 7 to 9 p.m. Friday,
July 20, Florida Museum of
Natural History. Guest panel
will discuss the art and valid-
ity of the science in the films
every Friday as part of the
UF Creative B program.
Question-and-answer ses-
sion follows each film. Other
films include:
July 27 "Anaconda."
creativeb.aa.ufl.edu.
I Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian Fel-
lowship, conversation and
music from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Village Cafe, 789 N.E.


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The Crystal River Mall
has invited the Citrus County Republican
Executive Committee to sponsor a
Meet and Greet
for Republican primary candidates on
July 21, 2012 from 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm
This is a great opportunity to meet and speak with
candidates prior to the August 14 primary and to
support our small businesses in the Mall.

Visit our candidates, sign the volunteer list, receive a
discount food voucher for use in the Mall food court.


C4 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


SCENE


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Music




Diddley Community Plaza on
corner of Southeast First
Street and East University
Avenue. gylculturalaffairs.0rg.
352-393-8746.
I Citrus Community
Concert Choir Inc.'s ninth
annual summer program.
Dates, venues and times are
as follows:
SSunday, July 29 3
p.m. at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River (352-
795-5325).
I Friday, Aug. 3 7:30
p.m. at Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church, 82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills (352-746-3620).
I Sunday, Aug. 5 3 p.m.
at Faith Lutheran Church, 935
S. Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto (352-527-3325).
H The Cou ntry Su nshine
Band, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Friday, East Citrus
Community Center, 9907
East Gulf-to-Lake Hwy. (State
Road 44 East), Inverness.
Call Annie at 352-465-4860.
I John Thomas Tradi-
tional Country Music Show
and Jam, 6 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days weekly, Oxford Commu-
nity Center, 4027 Main St.,
Oxford. $5. 352-560-7496.
H Crystal River Music in
The Park is looking for any
talented individuals or groups
who would be willing to per-
form for two hours on the
third Saturday of any month.
All are invited to audition.
352-601-3506.
I Ted Nugent, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 6, at Ruth Eck-
erd Hall. $49.50 and $39.50.
727-791-7400.
I Fleetwood Mac gui-
tarist and vocalist Lindsey
Buckingham, 8 p.m. Mon-
day, Aug. 6, at the Capitol
Theatre, Clearwater. $79 to
$59. 727-791-7400.
I Rock the Universe
2012, Florida's biggest Chris-
tian music festival, Sept. 7 and
8, Universal Orlando Resort.
Friday, Sept. 7, line-up in-
cludes Skillet, Newsboys, Je-
remy Camp, for King &
Country, Family Force 5,
Robert Pierre, Group 1 Crew,
We As Human and Everfound.
Saturday, Sept. 8, line-up in-
cludes tobyMac, Switchfoot,
Relient K, Britt Nicole, tenth
avenue north, Rhett Walker
Band, Group 1 Crew, We As
Human and Everfound.
www.RocktheUniverse.com.
1-866-788-4636.
SShaun Hopper, 7:30
p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, Capitol
Theatre. VIP tickets $125.
Regular $25 and $20. 727-
791-7400 or www~atthecap.
com.
SJethro Tull's lan An-
derson, 7:30 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 23, at Ruth Eckerd Hall.
$89.50, $69.50 and $59.50.
727-791-7400. www ruth
eckerdhall.com.
H Florence and The Ma-
chine featuring The Mac-
cabees, 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 25, at USF Sun Dome.
$37.50 and $49.50. Ticket
master.com. 800-745-3000.
H Sesame Street Live
"Elmo Makes Music," Fri-
day, Oct. 5 through Sunday,
Oct. 7, USF Sun Dome. $12,
$16 and $22. Limited number
of $27 Gold Circle seats and
$57 Sunny Seats, which fea-
ture front-row seats and a
pre-show Meet & Greet with
two Sesame Street Live
friends. Facility fee of $2.50
added to all tickets. 813-974-
3004 or 800-745-3000.
www.ticketmaster.com or
www sesamestreetlive .com.
M Chris Robinson Broth-
erhood, 8 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 20, Capitol Theatre. $45,
$35 and VIP tickets $125.
727-791-7400 or www~atthe
cap.com
I Celtic Thunder, 2 and
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall. $75, $60
and $50. 727-791-7400.


Special to the Chronicle
The award-winning 0-Town Sound Chorus, a women's
barbershop chorus (a local chapter of Sweet Adelines
International), is seeking new members and invites
interested singers to a guest night from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. Monday, July 30, at Pine Ridge Presbyterian
Church on South Hiawassee Road in Orlando. Ready to
perform for guests are 0-Town Sound chorus members,
from left, Sandra de Nijs, of Gotha, Chris Payne of
Leesburg, Kathy Ragusa and Doris Birkinbine, both of
Orlando. For information, visit www.otschorus.com or
call Gloria at 352-442-8441.

Music rehearsals

a Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle, two hours before
sunset, Sundays, Fort Island Trail Beach Park, Crystal
River, at far end of beach. Circle begins an hour and a
half before sunset. Bring drums and percussion in-
struments. Chair necessary, beverages optional. 352-
344-8009 or 352-746-0655.
a Encore Swing Band rehearses from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Monday at Calvary Chapel Cafe, 900 S. U.S. 41, Inver-
ness. 352-464-4153 or 352-302-3742. EncoreSwing
Band@embarqmail.com.
M Chorus of The Highlands, the Citrus County chapter
of the Barbershop Harmony Society, rehearses at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday weekly at First United Methodist
Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness,
34452. Male singers welcome. 352-382-0336.
a Hernando Harmonizers, part of Men's Barbershop
Harmony Society, doors open at 6:45 p.m. and re-
hearsals start at 7 p.m. Monday, Nativity Lutheran
Church fellowship hall, 6363 Commercial Way, Spring
Hill. Written arrangements, training techniques and
professional direction provided. 352-556-3936 or 352-
666-0633. BASSharmonySingR@aol.com.
Summer Springs Sweet Adelines Chorus invites
women to rehearse from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Monday at
St. John's Lutheran Church, 10495 Sunset Harbor
Road, Summerfield. Membership not required.
Carpool available from Inverness. 352-726-3323.
H The Nature Coast Community Band, rehearses from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Citrus County Canning
Plant Auditorium on Southern Street, Lecanto.
352-746-7567. nccommun ityband@earthl ink.net.
H Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc., rehearse at
7 p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church Fellowship
Hall, Lecanto. New members welcome to audition,
beginning at 6:30 p.m. 352-628-3492.
a Sugarmill Chorale rehearses from 7 to 9 p.m. Thurs-
days in choir room at First Baptist Church, North Cit-
rus Avenue, Crystal River. Enter the building through
the door under the black canopy by the big trees and
exit the same way. sugarmillchoraledirector@yahoo.
com. 352-697-2309.
a Nature Coast Festival Singers' rehearsals, 7 p.m.
Monday, Nativity Lutheran Church, 6363 Commercial
Way (State Road 50), Weeki Wachee. 352-597-2235.
Marion Civic Chorale rehearses from 6:45 to 9 p.m.
2M80nday at Slt Ge50rg~e4 1gliano Ct5erl d5 .S.E.
wayne@fu mcocala.org.
a The Central Florida Master Choir is auditioning for all
voices, particularly tenors and basses. Rehearsals at
7 p~m.STueesdRy sat0CO ntrcshde Pres yer a~n7Church,

a The Ocala Accordion Club, meets and performs the
last Wednesday monthly, Cherrywood Club House,
6253 S.W. 100th Loop, Ocala. 352-854-6236. FLACC
ASSOC@bellsouth.net. www.accordions.com/florida.
Music rehearsals run at least once a month, space permitting.


BUZZ SUBMISSIONS

a To submit an event to the Buzz, email
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com and include the name
of the event; the time, date and place; ticket prices; a
contact person's name, phone number and email ad-
dress; and any other pertinent information. In the sub-
ject line of the email, type "Attention Buzz."
a To submit photos for the Buzz, email newsdesk@
ch ron icleon line.com. The photo needs to be a high-
resolution photo or at least 1MB. Identify the people in
the photo and the event he or she is involved. Please
include a contact name, phone number and email ad-
dress. Photos will run close to the date of the event.
a It is the responsibility of the organizations listed here
to provide information and updates about their events.
Contact grou ps di rectly for deta ils.
a For information, call Cheri Harris at 352-563-5660.


specilatrne u cnronlcle
ABOVE: 3rd Stone will perform July 27 at the Free Fridays concert series in Gainesville.
Band members include 16-year-old Anthony Kavouklis (lead guitar, keyboards), Jose
"Big Za" Rosado (percussion and vocals), Jonah Henderson (bass), Sean Patrick
McGuire (drums) and Anthony Diaz (percussion). BELOW: An Triier, an Irish traditional
acoustic group comprised of Mick Richmond, Larre Reeves and John Maze will perform
Aug. 3 at the Free Fridays concert series. The band will be joined on stage by Virginia
Boone and Irish dancers from the Williston School of Dance.


House Cafe) Lecanto. The Aug.
4 dance is sold out. No dance in
September. Taking group reser-
vations for Oct. 6 dance. No-
vember dance will be Patriotic
Ball with the date to be an-
nounced. Dance 6 to 10 p.m.
with celebration at 7 p.m. $10.
352-464-0004. www~event
solutionsbylinda.com.
I Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 WV. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Music starts at
7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda
available.
H Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East Cit-
rus Community Center, 9907 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness. $3 per class.
352-344-9666.
I Inverness Square Dance
Club's beginner square dance
lessons, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, East Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, east of
Inverness on State Road 44.
352-860-2090 or 352-465-700.
Next enrollment for square
dance classes is in April.
H Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
days, Beverly Hills Recreation
Center. $3 nonmembers. 352-
746-4882 or 352-527-3738.
I Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, fellowship hall of
First United Methodist Church
of Dunnellon, 21501 WV. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. 352-
489-1785 or 352-465-2142.
I African dance classes at
Central Ridge Library. Free. For
a schedule and to donate
African instruments (djembes,
dun-duns, foot and ankle bells),
new or used, call 352-
249-7283.


www.rutheckerdhall .com.
I Richard Marx, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 1, Capitol
Theatre. $59.50 and $42.50.
727-791-7400 or www.
rutheckerdhall.com.
MEddie Vedder, 7:30
p.m. Dec. 3 and 4, Ruth Eck-
erd Hall, Tampa. $81. 727-
791-7400. www.rutheckerd
hall.com.
FESTIVALS
I 31st annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show, Satur-
day, Oct. 13, and Sunday,
Oct. 14, in historic downtown
Gainesville. 352-393-8536.
www. gylculIturalaffairs.0rg.
DANCE
I Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance, 7:30
to 10:30 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at Lake
Panasoffkee Recreation Park
in blue building at 1582
County Road 459 off County
Road 470. Dances open to
married, couples, singles, and
groups from churches and RV
parks. All ages welcome. No
alcohol. Finger foods or soda
welcome. 352-424-1688.
I Spirit of Citrus
Dancers' Tropical Heat Wave
Dance Party is Saturday, July
21. Wear favorite tropical out-
fit. Deejay Butch Phillips.
I Saturday, Aug. 4 -
Birthday dance party. Butch
Phillips deejay.
I Saturday, Aug. 18 -
"Hot August Nights" ice
cream social dance. Bill Dim-
mitt deejay.
Dances are at the Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center in
Beverly Hills. Doors open at
6:45 p.m. A complimentary
dance lesson at 7 p.m.; gen-
eral dancing from 7:30 to 10
p.m. Admission $6 for mem-
bers; $9 for nonmembers. Ice
and coffee provided; sodas
and bottled water are avail-
able for purchase. 352-344-
1383 or 352-726-1495.
www.socdancer.org.


I Ronnie's Academy of
Dance summer camps:
I Hip-Hop camp, 10 a.m.
to noon, July 23 through 27.
Tumbling camp, 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. July 23 through 27.
352-795-1010.
I Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom music,
twice monthly at community
centers, hosted by deejay
Sapphire. On the second
Wednesday monthly, the tea
dance is 1:30 to 4 p.m. at
Central Citrus Community
Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
352-527-5993. On the last
Friday monthly, tea dance is
from 2 to 4 p.m. at West
Citrus Community Center,
8940 W. Veterans Drive,
Homosassa. $5, with a por-
tion of the proceeds going to
in-home senior services. 352-
527-5993 or 352-795-3831.
H Su nday Dance Social
7 to 10 p.m. is every other '
week, at Recreation Planta-
tion RV Park, 609 County
Road 466 and Rolling Acres
Road, Lady Lake. Next
dances are July 29 and Aug.
12. Singles and couples wel-
comed. Refreshments pro-
vided. B.Y.O.B. $10.
352-304-8672.
I Dancextravaganza
2012, for all dancers, friends
and kids interested in danc-
ing with us, 5 to 7 p.m. Aug.
3, Step N' Time School of
Dance Arts Studio, 301 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.
Free. 352-464-5590 or
LisaCalderl @gmail.com.
H Allan O'Neal sings and
deejays first Saturday of the
month at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Hwy. (County Road
491 across from Havana


Get involved!
See you at "'The Event."


Contacts: Committee Chairman,
Bob Hagaman @ 382-2631 or Committee Member,
Connie Martin Carter @ 746-7249


Free Friday concern ts


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cIfRUS COLDVT (FL CHRONICLE

THEATER
I "Legally Blonde: The
Musical" July 20 through 29,
Ocala Civic Theater, 4337 E.
Silver Springs Blvd. (East
utt road 40 in5A2 274 n
or www.ocalacivictheatre.com.
I Marion Theatre's Sum-
mer Kid Series, 10 weeks of
great children's movies at
downtown theater, 10 a.m.
every Thursday until Aug. 9.
$2 movie combo includes ad-
mission, drink and popcorn.
Tickets will only be sold the
morning of the show, but
large groups can call 352-
622-1245 to reserve seats.
Summer Kid Series lineup:
I July 26 Bee Movie
I Aug. 2 Monsters vs.
Aliens
I Aug. 9 Megamind
I Disney's "Beauty and
the Beast" Broadway musical,
Aug. 1 through 5, at Ruth Eck-
erd Hall in Clearwater. Per-
formances: 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 1 and Thurs-
day, Aug. 2; 8 p.m. Friday, Aug.
3; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
4; and 1 and 7 p.m. Sunday,


SCENE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 C5


Aug. 5. $50. 727-791-7400 or
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
I Ocala Civic Theatre
youth production of "The
Tempest," 7 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 3, and 2 p.m. and 7
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. $10
for adults, $6 for students,
and $5 for Marion players.
352-236-2274 or www.ocala
civictheatre.com.
I Ocala Civic Theatre
youth production's Born To
Be Wild, 7 p.m. Friday, Aug.
10, and 2 and 7 p.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 11. $10 for adults
$6 for students, and $5 for
Marion players. 352-236-2274
or www. ocalacivictheatre .com.
I "The Curse of the
Hopeless Diamond," Sept.
7 to Sept. 9, Encore Ensem-
ble Theater, Central Ridge
Community Center, Beverly
Hills. 352-212-5417.
I "Move Over Mrs.
Markham," Sept. 14 to 30,
Art Center Theater.
FARMERS' MARKETS
H Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Market,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, July
20, at Lake Beverly Park.


Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, 8 a.m. to noon, first
and third Saturdays monthly,
Inverness Government Cen-
ter parking lot. 352-726-2611.
I Saturday at the
Market, farmers' market,
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
weekly, in front of the historic
Courthouse, downtown
Brooksville. 352-428-4275.
I Herry's Market Day,
8 a.m. to noon, last Saturday
of the month at Hospice Thrift
Shoppe, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa (behind
Wendy's, east of US 19).
Herry's Market Day is offering
free vendor space. Space is
limited. 352-527-2020.
I Dunnellon's First Satur-
day Village Market, includes
a variety of street vendors, 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. first Saturday
monthly, Dunnellon's Historic
District on West Pennsylvania
Avenue, Cedar and Walnut
streets. 352-465-2225.
I Market Day with Art &
Treasures, an outdoor event
with plants, produce, arts,
crafts, collectibles and more,


9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Sat-
urdays on the grounds of
Heritage Village, 657 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. 352-
564-1400.
H Circle Square Commons
Farmers' Market summer
hours, 9 a.m. to l p.m. Thurs-
days. Fresh seasonal produce,
flowers, plants, fresh-baked
goods, handmade soaps, deli-
cious pies and more. Circle
Square Commons is adjacent
to On Top of the World Com-
munities at 8405 S.W. 80th St.
in Ocala. 352-854-3670.
www.CircleSquareCommons
FarmersMarket.com.
I Gulfport Tuesday
Fresh Market, includes fresh
produce, seafood, art, live
entertainment, 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. every Tuesday, Gulfport
waterfront district (Beach
Boulevard). http://gulfport
florida.us/tuesday-morning-
fresh-market.
H The Ybor City Saturday
Market, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oc-
tober to May and 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. June to September. His-
toric Ybor City in Centennial
Park is at Ninth Avenue and
19th Street. 813-241-2442.


Open for Lunch & Dinner
12-9pm Sun. 3 -8 *Anything Anytime
A FEW MENO ITEMS
Fried Calamari...................................$
Littleneck Clams..................................$9
Spring Rolls......................................$
Cheese Steak.....................................$
80z. Burgers wlFries............................$7
Fried Haddock Sandwich wlFries........$8
Fish & Chips w/Slaw............................$8
Shrimp Basket w/Slaw.... ............$8
Spinach Salad with Chicken..............$12
DINNEII SPE(`-IALS
Grilled Rib Eye...................................$12
Marinated Steak Tips.........................$14
Fried Haddock...................................1


, k'

Special to the Chronicle
MurderS She Wrote Inc. presents "Murder on Budget
Cruise Lines," a murder-mystery dinner show at
6:15 p.m. Thursday, July 26 at Spaghetti Warehouse,

Cariin Gran hHotl S 6 ,U.S .d Cple rw ter2 T c
ets cost $34.95. Call 813-248-1720 or 813-727-7012.


Vendor spaces $10. Market
days are the first and third Fri-
days of each month, www.


bhcivicassociation.com. 352-
746- 2657.
I Inverness Farmers'


Mullrder mystery theater


ENIERIAININO NO110NI


~IIII~P~FIII~llill!IIIIIIII
Check Out ;
Our Website At 9


nMAMAS KUNTRY KAFE
1 "Hm fteLrge Portions"


50' OFF :s6 ,09
e~~"Our Large Portions *
& Low Prices! *FRI. NIGHTS ONLY
~R.Valid with coupon only 11Valid with coupon only
I Not combined w/any other offer I I Not combined w/any other offer I
I Expires 7/31/12 II Expires 7/31/12
GIFT CE TF ErES




C6 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Winner Winner
Bud Sasada Como RV & Auto
Painting Sales & Service
352-795-1448 352-344-1411


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Welch Appliance
352-726-1911


Honorable Mention
Dr. Swanson/
Complete Family
Dentistry
352-795-1223
M ~YI


Honorable Mention Winner
Bush Pest Control Southern Sun Title
877-345-BUSH Company
352-382-3339

Winner Winner -Tie
Bow Wow Boutique Beckys
352-795-1 684 Travel Store
352-527-8855


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Winner
Brentwvood
Reti rement
Community
352-746-6611


Howarc lW r Market
www.howarclsfleamarket.com


Hon rchl Metion
352-726-7440

rrnr


Winner
Holiday Inn
Express
352-563-1111


Deem's Kit hen &
Bath Sh wom
www.godoew omm
IIBm


Winner
Suncoast Plumbing
and Electric
352-628-6608


Winner
Griffin's
Tree Care LLC
352-249-6495
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Winner Honorable Mention
Calabro Financial Aok aie
Management 352-726-7773
352-527-2866


H 0 10 0


Honorable Mention Winner
Humphrey &Satas Dave's Body Shop
Saltmarsh352-628-4878
352-341-3449


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
George Swedlige The Shoppes of
Painting & Pressure Heritage Village
Cleaning 352-564-1400
352-613-4071


Winner Winner
Bay Area Mr. B's
352-795-COOL 352-795-9274


Winner Winner
Sherwin-Williams Diamond Ridge
www.sherwin-williams.com Health & Rehab
352-746-9500


Honorable Mention HnrbeMnin
Alpha Air Service ServiceMaster Clean
352-726-220235-9007


Winner Honorable Mention
Bud Sasada Life Care Center
Pamnting 352-746-4434
352-795-1448


Honorable Mention Winner
Senica Air Joes Carpet
Conditioning 352-726-4465
352-795-9685


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Frick's Painting The Health Center at
352-287-2144 Brentwood
352-746-6600


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Powers Michael's Floor Pat~s Pawn Robert J. Eldredge
Protection Covering, Inc.35-96005-4-8 0
352-746-3500 323101 HH1


Circ.


Winner Winner
Blackshears II Citrus Chiropractic
Aluminum 352-795-5350
888-474-2269


Winner Honorable Mention
Citrus Pest Crystal River
Management Firestone
352-563-6698 crystalriverfirestone.com


I


Winner Winner
Welch Appliance Abitare of Paris
352-726-1 911 aparisdayspa.com


SI-onra ea~pt t Honorable Mention Winner Honorable Mention WinnerFaW PtWanntiln
Studio Anytime Fitness FDS Disposal Flynn Builders, Inc Kids Trading Post 352-563-5100 Travel
352-637-4200 352-270-8868 352-746-0617 352-746-5992 352-382-5437 323400


Honorable Mention Winner Winner Wine Winner Honorable Mention Winner
Sunflower Springs Waverley Plantation The Ha nr (roup Clover Lawn Sod Diamond Luxury Poe House Books
Assisted Living Florist on Crystal River 352-726-1691 & Irrigation Pools 352-795-3887
Community 352-765-1 424 352-795-4211 1 352-746-4451 352-220-8595
352-621-8017


Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Winner Winner Wne
Cedar Creek Flower Basket M Hair Studio Bell Family Porter's Citrus 95.3 Lecanto Veterinary
at Kings Bay 352-726-9666 www.mhairstuclio.com Insurance Locksmithing www.citrus953.com Hospital
cedarcreeklife.com 352-628-61 68 352-634-0029 352-270-8819


Winner Winner Winner Honorable Mention Winner Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Crystal Automotive AII Prestige Ace Hardware Sheldon-Palmes Comfort Mattress The Fox 96.3 Best Buy Water
352-564-1 971 Automotive, Inc. 352-726-8811 Insurance 352-628-0808 www.thefox963.com 352-795-0003
352-795-7000 www.shelclonpalmesinsurance.com


Honorable Mention Winner Winner Winner Honorable Mention Winner Winner
Eagle Buick GMC Hooper Funeral Professional Smart Interiors Wholesale Rebekah Paradiso Tropical Window
352-7956800 Home & Crematory Hearing Center wwwsmatinte riorsfurn.com Sleep Center 352-527-1 1 12 352-795-4226
352-726-2271 726-4327 1 352-344-8882


Winner Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Winner Winner Winner Winner
Fred's Barber Shop Strickland Audibel Raymond James Citrus Memorial EtRelyLars72 Hour
864 Hwy. 44, Funeral Home Hearing Centers www.raymonclja mes.com/crl Health System wwweitrealtyleaders.com Blind Factory
Crystal River 352-795-2678 855-321-4327 www.citrusmh.org 352-527-0012


Winner Winner Winner Winner Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Honorable Mention
Homosassa Badcock Furniture Comfort Keepers Jim Green Jewelers Taylor Made Homes River Safaris Vertical Blinds
Marine www. badcock.com 352-726-4547 352-563-0633 352-621-9181 352-628-5222 352-628-7888
352-628-2991


Honorable Mention Winner Winner Honorable Mention Winner Winner Winner
Crystal River Marine Tri-County Will Construction Whalen Jewelers Citrus CountY AAA Roofing Cotton Club
35279-298Overhead Door 3-68293576409Chronicle 352-563-0411 352-563-2582
352-726-0072 352-563-6363

























































































SuVMCnBlr S QSG~


Associated Press
Benicio Del Toro, left, and Salma Hayek portray members of
a drug cartel in "Savages." The movie can be seen at
Crystal River 9. For times, see page 010.


http://www.chronicleonline.com/su mmersplash ~~FO

Call 352-563-5655 or after 5 pm 352-563-3295

I H~~ew S~ubscrip~tion or Gif Subscr~iption


,


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KN GH


It's been four years since
"The Dark Knight" came
out, but eight years have
passed in terms of story.
Bale's Bruce Wayne suffers
in self-imposed exile, sulk-
ing about Wayne Manor,
mourning the loss of his
darling Rachel and carry-
ing the burden of blame for
the death of District Attor-
ney Harvey Dent. His goal
of a peaceful Gotham has
been achieved, but he's left
as a man without a pur-
pose. Michael Caine, as the
ever-loyal valet Alfred,
brings dignity and elo-
quence to the film as he
begs Bruce to carve out his
own form of happiness.
Fellow veterans Gary Old-
man as Commissioner Gor-
don and Morgan Freeman
as gadget guru Lucius Fox
are their usual dignified
selves, but they don't regis-
ter the way they should be-
cause the film is so
overstuffed.
Several new characters
manage to draw Bruce out
of his funk in various ways.
Anne Hathaway brings
some much needed zest to
the proceedings as Selina
Kyle, otherwise known as
Catwoman in the Batman
universe, a slinky thief who
punctures Bruce's bubble
when she lifts his finger-
prints from his safe, along
with a beloved pearl neck-
lace. She's selfish and cyni-
cal, only looking out for
herself, but at least she goes
about her crimes with some
verve and style. They never
call her Catwoman by name,
and she's never as campy as
Michelle Pfeiffer and Halle
Berry were in previous film
incarnations of the role, but
she's always fun to watch.
The other woman in
Bruce's life, however, is
woefully underdeveloped
- which is a real problem
because she plays a key
role in the film's climactic
revelations. Marion Cotil-
lard (one of many alumni
from Nolan's "Inception")
co-stars as Miranda Tate, a
wealthy philanthropist who
hopes to work with Wayne
Enterprises on developing
clean, sustainable energy.
The romance that develops
between her and Bruce is
utterly unbelievable.
Joseph Gordon-Levitt
adds a youthful presence
as John Blake, an up-and-
coming member of the po-
lice force who inspires


SCENE


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 C7


Director stzc s wit ~

2-dzmension movie

DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Wr-iter

LOS ANGELES Batman has all
the gadgets Bruce Wayne's resources
can buy, but he doesn't have one thing
nearly every other summer block-
buster has: 3-D.
Director Christopher Nolan made
the 2-D vs. 3-D choice easy for fans
seeing "The Dark Knight Rises," the
finale of his superhero trilogy that
began with 2005's "Batman Begins"
and continued with 2008's wildly
praised "The Dark Knight."
Nolan is not a fan of digital 3-D,
which essentially has turned a fleet-
ing 1950s cinema gimmick into a
multi-million-dollar value-added tax
on fans who decide they want to put
on the glasses and see a film with the
illusion of depth,
With "Avatar" and other early hits
in the digital 3-D era, studios took in
two-thirds or more of their revenue
on that third dimension, which costs a
few dollars more than 2-D screenings.
The 3-D fever has cooled since, with
movies now typically earning well
under half of their income in 3-D,
sometimes as little as a third.
That still means a lot of extra cash
on a movie that nets hundreds of mil-
lions at the box office, but Nolan
never considered following the crowd
and going 3-D on Batman.
"The question of 3-D ii .1 \er.\
straightforward one," NIolln so icld In .
recent interview. "I ne\ er lleet .nI -
body who actually lik~ei the tlol-
mat, and it's always a ilourc~le of
great concern to Ille \i lien
you're charging a highler pIclle
for something that nobal.1 I((
seems to really say tile! late
any great love for.
"It's up to the audience to~ tell
us how they want to watch I tle
movies. More people alo lee
these films in 2-D, and l so it 5 -
difficult data to interprlet -
And I certainly don't we nlt to
shoot in a format jusit to l
charge people a hipller .
ticket price.
The choice this week;
as "The Dark Knight t,:
Rises" opens, is *
whether to see it in a
regular theater or in a
huge-screen IMJAX '
cinema, a format
once reserved
mainly for docu-
mentaries, but
whose Hollywood j
possibilities


Nolan greatly advanced with a splashy
IMJAX release on "The Dark Knight."
Nolan shot nearly half of his Batman
finale using bulky IMJAX cameras,
whose frame is about 10 times the size
of a standard movie camera. He also
insisted that distributor Warner Bros.
release "The Dark Knight Rises" in at
least 100 IMJAX cinemas that can proj-
ect it on film rather than in the digital
format that has been gradually replac-
ing celluloid.
The expanded use of IMJAX makes
for a consistent "Dark Knight" trilogy
whose scale has grown with each film,
while shooting in 3-D on the last one
would have been out of step with the
first two, the filmmakers say.
"It would have been inappropriate
and somewhat gimmicky to have
'Dark Knight Rises' in 3-D," said
Christian Bale, who stars as Batman.
"It seemed that we should continue in
the vein that we had started. I
think Chris recognizes
the need for spectacle.
but for himt. IR LAN is
the spectac le
that he be- ~
lives will
dra w
people
out."


Anne Hathaway, who co-stars as
Catwoman, said she saw "Avatar" in 2-
D and 3-D at a regular cinema and
again in 3-D at an IMJAX theater. The
IMJAX experience was the best.
"It was a lot of information to take
in, but I could get lost in the visuals a
bit more," Hathaway said. "When you
have a filmmaker like Chris or in that
case like James Cameron, who pays
such amazing attention to detail with
the visuals, why not give yourself
more space to enjoy it in?
The giant screens, the clarity pro-
vided by the larger frame size and the
ineffable warmth that purists insist
film provides over digital make the
IMJAX film experience the best way to
see the movie, Nolan said. Like 3-D,
IMJAX costs more nearly $20 a ticket
for evening shows in some cities.
Fans are getting their money's
worth, though, Nolan said.
"People who are lucky enough to
find those venues are going to see
something they can't see anywhere
else and will have never seen before,
frankly," Nolan said. "I know that I
can give the audience something that
I really believe is going to give them
added value when they see
the movie."
Nolan said he's open to shooting in
3-D one day, but only if it would en-
hance the story. He considered con-
verting his 2010 blockbuster
"Inception" to 3-D, saying the added
dimension might have been a nice fit
with the film's dreamscapes. But he
dropped the idea because there was
not time to do a quality 3-D

H 'lille generally not a
3-D~ th1. No:lan likes see-
Ing~ \i\llst other film-
makI~ers do with the
t;:lnnlat, which,
unltlI now, has
b~een used largely
onl action films
anld animation.
MaI~rtin Scorsese
earned raves
fora the 3-D on
"Hugo" and
says he wants
to shoot only
in three di-
mensions
from now on.


Christian
Bale
reprises
his role as
Batman in
"The Dark
Knight
Rises."
Associated
Press


ishment counteracts "Say-
ages'" one dimensionality.
Allegorically, Ben's change
links Mexico's drug wars to
American consumers.
Also, Salma Hayek is bril-
liant as Elena. Opposed to
Ben's disastrous naivete
and O's starlet laments,
Hayek's straight-talking
Elena is incredibly likeable.
Hayek snags Elena's brutal-
ity and self-knowledge. Hor-
rific as Elena's orders are,
Hayek's motherly bouts
rounded what could have
been a hellion diva. She
captures Elena's powerful,
poised monstrosity. Better,
Hayek unveils a surprising,
tender side when the Cartel
Queen treats 0 as a surro-
gate daughter
If "Savages" stuck on the
PSA track, I would have
given it a C. But since Stone
moved to a more realistic
stance and coaxed out mag-
nificent performances, I'll
give it a B-.
With a running time of 130
minutes, "Savages" is rated
R for strong brutal and
grisly violence, some
graphic sexuality, nudity,
drug use and language
throughout.


Heather Foster is a junior
at the University of
Florida.


pL\ISYOur Choice of 3 Summer G



(while supplies last)



~F~amiy 4Pack to Homosassa Wildlife P



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oooBocu


Dark Knight not going 3D


Ri e"D Kve ties
m Citrus Cinemas 6:
11:15 a.m., 11:45
a.m., 2:5p.m., 3:3

p'. 9:45 pm 10:20
p.m. No passes
Crystal River Mall 9:
11:50 a.m., 12:20
p.m., 3:25 p.m., 3:55
p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m.,
10:35 p.m., 11:05 p.m.
No passes.

Bruce to revisit his own
childhood as an orphan.
Gordon-Levitt is solid as al-
ways but there's not much
to his character aside from
earnestness.
Then there's Bane, a
muscular mass of pure evil
who orchestrates an elabo-
rate takeover of Gotham
City. The role is a huge
waste of what Tom Hardy
can do; his character is so
one-dimensional and
poorly defined, he's never
so much a fearsome figure
as a large and hulking one.
It doesn't help matters that
it's often difficult to make
out what he's saying be-
neath the cage-like muzzle
that covers his nose and
mouth and alters his voice.
Hardy can be sexy and
charismatic (as he proved
in "Inception") but also a
dangerous and unpre-
dictable figure. None of
that ison display here. He's
all brute force.
But he is the instigator of
the film's dazzling opening
sequence, worthy of the
best of James Bond: a dar-
ing aerial maneuver in
which Bane kidnaps a sci-
entist by hijacking his
plane from the skies above.
That's probably the most
effective of the many set
pieces Nolan stages here,
although the collapse of
Heinz Field during a
packed football game also
has an urgent, visceral
quality, with thrills that re-
call the most imaginative
moments of "Inception."
This is the problem when
you're an exceptional, vi-
sionary filmmaker. When
you give people something
extraordinary, they expect it
every time. Anything short
of that feels like a letdown.
"The Dark Knight Rises,"
a Warner Bros. release, is
rated PG-13 for intense se-
quences ofviolence and ac-
tion, some sensuality and
language.
Running time is 164 min-
utes. Two stars out of four.


FOSTER
Continued from Page C1

God-given remedy. In truth,
California the location of
"Savages" -legalized med-
ical marijuana in 1996
(Proposition 215, Compas-
sionate Use Act). So, seeing
a cancer patient nervously
sneak weed at some hipster
rat hole is silly.
Plus, Stone's babble of
awesome, delicious THC
just bored me. Cigarettes,
alcohol, pain pills, pot -
legal or not are hardly
worth grandiose philosoph-
ical debate. Imagine a long
Coca-Cola promotion tinged
with religious fervor. That is
'Savages'" all-too-inspiring
kickoff.
Ahem, after slogging
through Stone's wonderful
weed campaign, "Savages"
improves. The ultra-violent
turn contradicts the rosy
opening. Perhaps Stone is
saying Ben, Chon and O
naively perpetuate a brutal
business, or more likely, mar-
ijuana's illegality knotted the
kids in the cartel tangle.
As far as character devel-
opment, I dig how the car-
tels eventually forced
"golden boy" Ben to do his
own dirty work instead of
running to Chon. Ben's pun-


iflts


'ark or,


kmod~ca
wih - po














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



News NOT'ES I News NOTES

Timeshare owners I I Computer club
to meet July 29 1 I I to meet tonight
The Florida Timeshare _I~II~lThe Citrus County Com-
Owners Group will meet at 1 puter Club (CCCC) meets the


re


s-






m.



to


n
will







m

an


p.m. Sunday, July 29, at the
Palm Aire Country Club,

Sauese speakers will be
Robert Stolt, RCl; Scott
Riddle, Trading Time; Dave
Heine, Close My Timeshare
and Lisa Schreier, Timeshal
Insights. A question-and-an
swer period will follow each
speaker. A roundtable discu
sion on timeshare resort
management companies wi
also be conducted.
RSVP to Frank Debar at
fdebar433@gmail.com, 941
351-1384, or by viewing the
website, tsownersgroup.cor
Have a meal with
Senior FniendS
Friends for Life will travel
Ocala for lunch at the
Ipanema Brazilian Steak-
house, 2023 S. Pine Ave. or
Friday, July 27. The group \
be seated at 11 a.m. Order
from the menu or enjoy the
buffet.
On Tuesday, Aug. 7, the
group will have lunch at 11
a.m. at Chef's of Napoli II,
1546 U.S. 41 in the Kmart
mall in Inverness; order front
the menu.
Those who need a ride c;
request one when making
reservations.
Reservations must be
made for all events by calling
Myrna Hocking at 352-860-
0819 or Jackie Bouyea at
352-527-6929.


A Humane Societ
OF CENTRAL F

Shiloh


t rsri and third Fridays of the
month. The next meeting will
be ah7ep m. ttoda ,i sul h2u0rcat
in Lecanto.
Doors open at 6:45 p.m.
The first Friday of the month
has a short business meet-
ing, followed by roundtable
discussion. The third Friday is
demo night, with a variety of
subjects. Come and bring
questions. Guests are always
welcome.
For more information, visit
www.ccccfl.com or call Lee
Boszak at 352-344-1810.
Give gift of life
at blood drive
The joint blood ministries of
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 and Our Lady of Grace
parish are calling on the com-
munity, friends and neighbors
to donate blood, the precious
gift of life, from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, July 21, at the
Our Lady of Grace Parish
Life center on Roosevelt
Avenue in Beverly Hills.
The blood donated is used
in Citrus County to aid the
critical needs of friends and
neighbors, providing them
with hope for a better, health-
ier life. Remember, each unit
of donated blood can touch
up to three lives.
As usual, there will be a
free continental breakfast and
other summertime items.
Bike a bit to help
Key Center clients
Bikers for the Key Charity
Ride is slated for Saturday,
July 21, in conjunction with
the grand finale for this year's
Key Training Center Run For
The Money.
Registration begins at 9
a.m. at the Key Training Cen-
ter's Lecanto campus at the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment
Center parking lot; $25 per
bike. A free breakfast will be
served at High Octane Sa-
loon and Castaway's. All bik-
ers will then meet up with the
runners returning from their
180-mile trek from Tallahas-
see and join them as they
enter the Lecanto center for
welcome-home celebrations.
All proceeds and additional
donations will be presented to
the Key Training Center.
For more information, call
352-422-3710.
Woman's club to
have card party
The public is invited to a
card partylluncheon on Satur-
day, July 21, at First Presby-
terian Church in Inverness,
hosted by the GFWVC
Woman's Club of Inverness.
The luncheon begins at 11:30
a.m. and card playing contin-
ues until about 3 p.m.
Participants usually et to-
ge her teir own group and
bring their own cards or
board games; however, sin-
gles who wish to participate
are welcome.
A buffet salad luncheon
with a variety of desserts is
included. Tickets are $10.
Call Fran Pierce at 352-
637-1582 for tickets.


Special group benejitsc work of Gitrus


County's Boys e& Girks Clubs


Special to the Chronicle

For 20 years, a donation of $20 has
made a difference in the lives of the
children of Citrus County. Some have
made that donation yearly choosing to
be a part of the "Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County 20 Dollar Club." Some
people decide to donate $20 quarterly
Others choose to donate their $20
monthly. Some may even choose to
make a $20,000 donation. All donations,
whether large or small, weekly,
monthly or yearly, make a difference in
the life of a child who is a member of
the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Donations provide a place for kids to
go before school and after school. That
time after school between 3 and 6 p.m.
is well documented by the Juvenile
Justice Department as the most dan-
gerous time for kids. School is out and
moms and dads don't get home till late
from work. Too often, kids with no


place to go are left on their own to get
into trouble or get hurt or even worse.
Boys & Girls Club members have some-
where to go. That $20 donation helps to
keep club doors open. The donations
pay for caring staff members to be in
those club houses, welcoming children
and providing activities that are mean-
ingful and fun.
Club staff members provide accept-
ance and guidance for a child who
often is in bad need of someone to care
or simply to be there to listen when
everyone else seems to be too busy to
notice. Boys and girls receive help with
homework and school assignments
from staff members and mentors. They
learn skills in up-to-date computer
labs. They learn about their community
and they experience through planned
community projects that warm feeling
of what it's like to give back At the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Citrus County, kids
learn to be leaders and they grow into


productive responsible members ofso-
ciety
A20 Dollar Club donation buys many
things. It buys healthy snacks for kids
for a week. A $20 donation pays the
water bill for a couple of days at a club-
house. Four $20 donations will pay for
one week of summer camp to keep a
child off the streets from 6 a.m. to 6
p.m., Monday through Er~iday. Four $20
donations will pay for more than one
month of afterschool programming.
Donations given in Citrus County stay
in Citrus County to help Citrus County
kids.
Anyone wanting to join the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County 20 Dollar
Club may call 352-621-9225, or mail a
donation to the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County, PO. Box 907, Lecanto, FL
34460, and mark it for the "20 Dollar
Club." Donate on the website at
http://www.citrusbge.com/ and click on
"Join the $20 club."


St. Scholastica Council No. 14485 voted Ron Kornatowski
'g as Knight of the Year. Kornatowski has been a member of
this council for four years; during his tenure, he has held
the positions of lecturer, trustee, deputy grand knight,
church director and public relations director. Recently, he
was awarded first place for his work in public relations,
competing against 119 other councils in the state of
y Florida. Last year, as church director, he was awarded first
L place for the council's church activities among the same
number of councils. Kornatowski gathers information for
the council's monthly newsletter and is responsible for the
council's information getting into the church bulletin.
Outside the Knights of Columbus activities, he volunteers
his time with Daystar Life Center, CERT (Community
Emergency Response Team) and is a volunteer member of
the Nature Coast Volunteer Center. He says that in
addition to his volunteer work, he cherishes his time with
his wife, Irene, of 42 years.
Special to the Chaonicle










Updat skt 0


Special to the Chronicle
Florida is a mandated
state and any insurance
COmpany doing business in
Florida must give a discount
to those completing an
AARP Safe Driving Course,
open to all age 50 and older.
Contact your agent for dis-
count amounts.
Update to earn a discount
and learn about newly en-
acted motor vehicle and
traffic laws. Course fee is
$12 for AARP members; $14
for all others. Call the listed
instructor to register,
AARP is offering a special
discount to education pro-
fessionals during August.
Drivers age 50 and older
will be able to take the
course for $5.
Eligibility includes cur-
rent and retired teachers,


school nurses, bus drivers,
custodians, cafeteria work-
ers and other school-related
employees. Call the listed
instructor for registration
and information.
crystal River, Homosassa
MAug. 7 and 8: 1 to 4 p.m.,
Coastal Region Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River. Call Lou Harmin at
352-564-0933.
HAug. 20 and 21: 9 a.m. to
noon, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W
Bradshaw Blvd., Ho-
mosassa. Call Frank Tobin
at 352-628-3229.
Dunnellon
SAug. 17 and 18: 8:30
a.m., First United Methodist
Church, 21501 W. State Road
40, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-
9941. For other classes in
the area, call 888-227-7669
or visit www~aarp. org/drive.


Special to the Chaonicle
Shiloh is an adorable little
deer-type Chdihua ua. He i

blond patoohes on hie had,
ears and base of his tail
He is about 7 pounds and a
little shy, but so loving and
friendly, obedient, house-
broken, crate- and leash-
trained. No kids. He will be
neutered, fully vetted and
micro-chipped. A Humane
Society of Central Florida
Pet Rescue Inc. does home
visits prior to adoptions, so
can only adopt to the Cit-
rus County area. Meet
Shiloh and other little dogs
at the weekly Saturday
adoption events from 10
a.m. to noon at Pet Super-
market, Inverness.


Special to the Chronicle
Alicia Indelicato competed and won the state Right to Life
oratory competition May 26 in Orlando and recently rep-
resented the state of Florida in Washington, D.C., at the
National Right To Life Convention.


Religion N OT ES


The adult Sabbath school program begins at
9:15 a.m. Saturday, followed at 10 a.m. by a
Bible study.
Classes for children are available at 9:30 a.m.
There is a mid-week meeting at 6 p.m. each
Wednesday.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.

Homosassa SDA
Pastor Dale Wolfe will lead the worship serv-
ice at the 11 a.m. divine worship Saturday.
Afellowship dinner will follow.
Sabbath school is at 9:30 a.m. Saturday with
Steve Miller. Sabbath school study begins at
10 a.m. with Bob Halstead on "Thassalonica in
Paul's Day." The 10 a.m. adult Bible study class
will be with Pastor Dale Wolfe.
The Tuesday Bible study is at 7 p.m.
The men's study group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at


352-382-7753. The church is at 5863
Cardinal St.

Glad Tidmngs
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday with
song, then study at Glad Tidings Church. Divine
hour follows at 11 a.m. Elder Mambala brings the
bread of life this Sabbath. Avegan lunch will follow
the service.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday. All are invited.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Program)
alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly.
For information, call Bob at 352-628-1743.
The church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal
River, next to the BP station.

Advent Ho e
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all ages.
The worship service begins at 11:30 a.m. After
the service, there is a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to noon
each Wednesday.


The church is at 428 N.E. Third Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or visit online
at www.adventhopechurch.com.

COngregation Beth Sholom
Saturday morning Sabbath prayer service
has singing, English readings, meditation and the
heart of the service a dialogue and discussion
of the week's portion from the Torah (five books
of Moses). Check us out from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m.
The Genesis Project, an in-depth, intensive
analysis and discussion of the entire text of
Genesis, conducted in English, is coming
in September.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is at
102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, and offers spirited
and participatory-style Friday (7:30 p.m.) and
Saturday (9:30 a.m.) Shabbat
services, as well as social and cultural
activities. For more information, call 352-
643-0995 or 352-746-5303.


m Submit information at least two weeks before the event. m Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
a Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


a Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
Expect notes to run no more than once.


Knight of the Year


Right to Life oratory


Inverness SDA
Saturday Sabbath school starts at 9:10 a.m.;
Saturday children's classes begin at 9:30,
to I mr lass is at 9:45; adult Bible study is at

Clyde Thomas preaches at the worship hour
beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday.
Prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. Wednesday.
Thrift store is open 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday.
The Health Food Store is open 9 a.m. to noon
and reopens again at 7 p.m. Wednesday, and
immediately after sunset on Saturday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens, 4.5
miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
The church phone number is 352-726-9311.
See www.sda-inverness.org.

Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist services
start at 11 a.m. Saturday. Afellowship luncheon
will follow the worship service; all are welcome.








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Bride

North 07-20-12
A 10 5 4



6 A K J 10 8
West East
AA Q 72 49 86 3
VA 43 V 6
+ 9 6 5 2 + Q J 10 8 4
S6 3 6 Q7 4
SOUth
AK J
Vr K Q J109 8
SA 7
S9 5 2

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 V Pass 2 & Pass
2 (1 Pass 3 V Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: V 4

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterpr-ise Assn.

Albert Claude, a Belgian biologist who shared
the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1974,
said, "In the name of the experimental method
and out of our poor knowledge, are we really enti-
tled to claim that everything happens by chance, to
the exclusion of all other possibilities?"
At the bridge table, there is an element of
chance. But you can often improve the likelihood
of making your contract if you consider all of the
possibilities.
This deal contains several possibilities. South is
in four hearts. West leads a low trump. Declarer
wins and returns a heart, West taking his ace and
playing a third round, while East discards two di-
amonds. How should South continue?
North might have rebid four hearts.
There are four potential losers: two spades, one
heart and one club.
A tempting line is to cash dummy's club ace, re-
turn to hand with a diamond, and take the club fi-
nesse.
It is better to cash both of dummy's top clubs be-
fore playing a third round. If West has the club
queen, South is always safe because West cannot
attack spades with effect. With this layout, though,
both of those lines fail, assuming East shifts to a
spade when in with the club queen.
The correct line is to play a diamond to dummy's
king, then to lead a spade to, say, the jack. West
wins and shifts to a club, but declarer wins and
plays another spade. Dummy's 10 is established,
on which South can pitch his third club. He takes
one spade, five hearts, two diamonds and two
clubs without any element of chance.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 09


c~ke
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PINTE

2I Tnun Medda Services. Inc

FASTF



RETVAN



ELOlGA


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

*u ,., do is
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WHEN SHE CoMPLAINED
ABOUT HIM TAKING TOO
MANY NAPS, HE 5AID THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:Km p mm
(Answers tomorrow)
Yetras Jumbles: BRINK CREEK OCTANE BANTER
|Answer: How the chiropractor saw his patients -
BACK-TO-BACK


ear Annie: I've been see-
lives in a trailer park and
has a 23-year-old
daughter who is on
Bud's checking ac-
count and charge
cards. This girl insists
her mother (Bud's ex-
wife) spend weekends
at the trailer, so Bud
spends those week-
ends at my house. He
will not tell his daugh-
ter no.
This has put some
stress on our relation- ANN
ship. His daughter MAIL
often buys things for
her mother, and Bud
pays the bills. I find this a little
strange. Bud doesn't understand
my objections. He has no interest
in saving for our future together
My friends say Bud is using me
because I have a nice house. If I
were to marry him, I would make
him sign a pre-nup, because oth-
erwise he would give away every-
thing I have. Am I being naive
about our relationship? Can't
Take It Anymore
Dear Can't Take It: You're not
naive. You understand what's
going on. But you don't seem to
accept your limitations when it
comes to changing the situation.
A pre-nup won't solve your prob-
lem. Bud is going to continue to
pay for his daughter's bills. He
will continue to acquiesce to her
requests, including having her
mother stay at his place. And you
will continue to be miserable
playing second fiddle to his
daughter. Your decision is how
best to respond to this.
Dear Annie: My husband is one


of five sons. His parents recently
passed away, and he is the execu-
tor of the ests te and is in the
process of selling their
home. He got several
.estimates and selected
'the Realtor he felt
would do the best job.
One brother tried to
get my husband to pick
a friend, but my hus-
band was not im-
." pressed with her.
-Another has been re-
ally nasty, telling my
husband he should try
IE'S harder to get more
.BOX money from the sale.
My husband's niece
would like to buy the
house. She made a reasonable
offer, and my husband was happy
to keep the house in the family.
He called a family meeting, but
only two brothers showed up, one
of whom was the niece's father.
He said my husband should get
the house appraised in case it
was worth more money
When my husband pointed out
the niece might not be able to af-
ford the house if it's priced any
higher, her father said this is a
business deal and to get as much
money as possible.
This is upsetting my husband,
who would love to sell to his
niece. The two brothers already
have stopped speaking to him,
and before this is all over, the
family may fall apart completely.
What is your take? All in the
Family
Dear Family: When parents
die, there is often fallout between
siblings over money. But many
times the real issue is the per-
ception one sibling was loved


more than another. We suspect
your husband was named execu-
tor because his parents thought
he was the best choice to handle
such things, which may also be
the reason why he is getting so
much resistance from his broth-
ers. If the niece is offering a fair
price for the house and your hus-
band wants to sell to her, he
should do so.
Dear Annie: "Sterling, Mass."
said, "Type 1 diabetes is an epi-
demic, and people with the dis-
ease aren't going to wait to eat."
She should have said "Type 2."
The CDC predicts one out of
every three people will have
Type 2 diabetes by 2050. This
form of diabetes is caused from a
mixture of things, including
heredity, eating and exercise
habits. People with Type 2 dia-
betes may or may not use insuhin.
Fast-acting insulins can begin to
work in 10 to 15 minutes, so the
person needs to start eating fairly
soon after injecting. Others might
be able to inject the insulin up to
30 minutes before the meal. -
Advanced Diabetes Nurse Spe-
cialist/Educator, Transcultural
Nurse Specialist


Annie's M~ailbox is written by
Kathyl~itchell and Iarcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast~net, or
write to: Annie's M~ailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's M~ailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndica te Web page at
www crea tors com.


ACROSS
1 Beavers'
project
4 Kipling
classic
10 aonk stpce
11 RN employers
13 "Pretty
14Woman" lead
15 Lie next to
16 Cancel

attract it
20 Rights
movement
21 Dopatch
resident
23 Kind of van
26 A funny
28 lurdphy
29 Lyric poem
30 10 to 1, e.g.
34Or hid i rt


38 Santa winds
39 Annoyed
41 Perfume
42 Brecnhbark
craft
44 NASA
counterpart
46B ser's pal
52 Statue of a
god
53 Benefit, often
54 Lan uage
55 Brainy one,
56 Fbrrom
cocoons
57 Visit
58 Before
59 PS "Science
60 Disapproving
cluck


Answer to Previous Puzzle

3 EID EINTIRIE
4 SIE RIARIEIR
LICIU M L OP ING
OISIRIS GIEIO
EIR LIEIO
LIT LIENA LIBIS
ISM LISU LIEIA
T A LS FIOIA ILS
E GOIOD AMIOIS
AIFR TA W
B A FF IRM
4 CIT S P U E BILO
RIAM BA YIEIR
NIDS SILEIE K
lo fives 7 Rock or
,le out 8 Sruon y
lugh devotion
bric 9 Mlenial worker
rafk ce12 Va able
13 -c pig (sall
"books rodent)
I 3-pg(ml18 Spinks
8922 Fld t ,
23 Atlas page
24 "- been
25 S cer goal
27 Hockey feint
29 Hodgepodge
31 Frat letter
32 Officeholders
33 Acorn
dropper
1 32 3335 Benedict -
37in theory
competitor
41 Mls. West
42 Apple drink
43 Pu sn aa
a so si45 Tent holder
46 Ground up
Drize ebation
50 Takes
advantage of
51 Onion's
COUsin


3
4 To
DOWN fal

1 o ntoancks 6 W


|S |A |
2 Tw


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles
at QuillDriverBooks.com


7-20


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I





WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public L clR D O WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands another.
TODAY S CLUE: 9 slenba 3


"HRT GXA F NOV NG G CTT Z FLT JMT


RW K FWT. F WARVX K FWT F NSVX J FJE



UTK K, HRT GXA F NOV NG G CTPNC ."


KTR JP XLMRCT J

Previous Solution: "What does it take to be a champion? Desire, dedication, deterrni-
nation, concentration and the will to win." Patty Berg
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-20


010 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


YOU TRY TO DO TOO
MUCH,MARCIE..SOMEDAY
YOUR HEAD 15 GOING
TO FALL OF .


Pickles


For Better or For Worse

AUNT BEVI-LIZZIE HMMM Ie'S BEEN
GOT CHASED B~f PRETF/ ORNERY
T~E ROOSTE-a SINce TFHE HNS 1
F14h Aruk Tnall I DISRFPERIREE'


Sally Forth

ALL MY LIFE I'VE DREAMED OF HAVING OKAY, MAYBE IT WON'T WELL, MAYBE ONE
ANABSOLUTELY MAGICAL BE AT SOME EXTRAVAGANT SO YOU'RE OF THOSE SMALLER
WEDDING, SAL. AND IT WILL LOCATION. MAYBE SAYING I TOHO STUDIOS
BE MAGICAL! THERE WON'T BE SOME CAN'T AFFORD MONSTERS
SUMPTUOUSOS FEAST. BUT IT TO BE A LIKE...UH... DARN, TED
WILL BE ABOUT TRUE LOVE BRIDEZILLA? WOULD KNOW THIS
) :. SHARED WITH THE PEOPLE -~IN AN INSTANT -
1, ,0424 WHO LOE YOU MOST.


Beetle Bailey


17-zo LL I
The Grizzwells


Dilbert


The Born Loser

rOU REED TO G~T~ YOURSELF ~ $ E BE.5T THIMG FOR YOU WOUL$ W~-RAT WOULD TA~EC5OND-
IN HRAPE., MLTHORNAPPLEl i EACARD\O WORKOUT FN\E BE5T TWRO GFORRE SE~T









Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie


MY INSATIABLE TASTE6UDS
~SURRENDERED TO ITS LUSCIOUS

/EVER HIEAR CULINARY
OF "UNTOLD MAGNET!


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"No, Daddy, put your hand over
there... then your foot goes over
here... then grab that branch..."


"Honestly, Sybil, can't we ever just have a
normal discussion about your mother
without you always getting so defensive?''


Doonesbury


Betty


Big Nate ~

NATE, YOU LOOK
LIKE A FOOL WEAR-
ING, THAT STUFF
EYE 15LACK IS FOIL








Arlo and Janis-


Frank & Ernest


ITTS A GAME
WITH( A
PARTICULARLY
LAME HAL.F-
TIME SHOW.


10:05 p.m., 10:35 p.m., 11:05 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 2:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m.,

PSaam,10 p( ) rD r qie. 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,

"Th~ep Amz S 9 5 pnin"(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,

1Td 3d) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 3:30 p.m. No passes.

Viit w chrto icleonline.com for area movie listings and


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Dark Knight Rises" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m.,
2:55 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
Ilc Age: Continental Drift"sePG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m.,

"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 4:55 p.m.
No passes.
"TeAmzn z pdrMn P-3 1n:20 p, m .m.
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 10:25 p.m.
"e" (R) 2:)3102pm., 4 p.m. 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Dark3Knight Rises" (PG-13)11:503a~m., 12:20 p.m.,


Times subject to change; call ahead.


NO, 1 CAN'T COME
OUT, SIR..I HAVE TO
PRACTICE THE VIOLIN..


MAYBE YOU'RE
RIGUT.. I'LL
COME OUT FOR
A UL.


SUDDENLY, THE GERMAN CI-OCOLATE
CAKE MASTERPIEGE ENDED UP ON MY

.- A-Y EEVH
ON EIARTH ICVW


Tr~IS "UNTOLD\ PROVING THIAT
STORIES FROM IF LOVINGLY

~ BOS WRONG, I odON T
WANNA BE. RIGHlT!


;EYEERY DAY \s ,
SPORT, MY FRIEND!
HAT'S WHY THlEY CALL a
IT "T+HE GAME (
OF LIFE "! .D1 I


Today's M OVI ES












































EREAKI STeCC OK
&( SERVERS

Now Taking
Applications
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River
C|}2 SD BOUNTY

31ak~e630f rs7



335 I tea so St.
Hlghvlew Estates
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 8lam-3pm
3 4 Nultji ema TeTrr
off Ft. Isl. Trail, & Green
Leaf Forest
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rosella Court Rentals off
N. Turkey Oak Dr. 2&3
BR mobiles. $450/month
and up, plus utilities. No
pes. r d lea5 3s 1 9.
Cute Chihuahual
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 628-2483
Heavy Wicker
Entertainment center

1i 05 gls hl

352-503-2123, 212-6453
Hernando
Single kide 2i-3 b mh-2
borhood, Ig. yard
wlfence semi- urr shed,

$550/mo. 1 st &sec.
(352) 419-5603
HOMOSASSA
3/2, D/W, 2 AC, $650.
1st Ist sec 207-651-0923

LotsMo iurnritur and
misc



Rinbo OW F gs

garden tools.
19031 SW 98th Loop

Es a millS 3p d
Furn., tools, TVs, hsehld
2items,01 slat

Sugarmill Woods
URn rtS~peaial a2 iet
area. Call for Details
(352) 564-0314




mINOv fve S...
1 pmCeryst~a R ver.
IGrover Cleveland
SBlvd Homosassa





$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389


CAS NAI 0000 U P
(352) 771-6191




2 Sago Palms to anyone
who can remove them.
Call 464-3914


in i;n T

that spca OIadGu Ro
age 40. You may the
onel Call anytime
352-422-0440
Petite SWF looking for
SWM Average Weight
and Height 60-70, who
wants to enjoy a little
traveling, dinner, movie,
de c.k nn-smkrn rsocia
to meeting you.
Blind Box 1790P

clc 12 vNd Inid-


looking for SWM 60-80
for fun reply to
BxB Hderl
Hernando, FL 34442
Wealthy 75yr old SWM
looking for attractive'
5non-smoking SWF
pani nship. or intr-
ested, email pictures
and phone number to
jnrherkE@coxH e

Friendly widower in
good health, socially
active, fun to be with.
Everyone I know says
she s out there some-
where, you will find her
one of these days, but
frankly I~m dubious. I
hope I~m not asking too



cioes uoou s e tra-
between 65-75+ in

or average build for
m aninaful con ersla-

activities & perhaps a
loving personal
relationship. If you
somehow fit the bill,
please don't be afraid
to call me at 527-0591.
I would love to hear
from you.





Oakmne Tb 54

$60.
(352) 341-5978

CR GTALALEVER
Frl, & Sat 8am to 2pm
An aques, collectible

jewly, oc n ools
Oiea Te Ress. 0 189'


s o ae un as t 80 8










qualified




This area'$

#I HC(

SmpoymeCO


(orc ,,


.."9 2 I:1 5 4 3 8


3 2 16 7 4 6 5 8

4 5 8 9 1L 3 6 7 2
5 1_ 9 8 3 7 2 6 4
8 4C 3 6 2 5 917

2 6 7 4 9 1 8 3 5


JeuamlbosGlu6 2Shrimp
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv '
(772)781-1262




PT or FT
Nail Technician

For Upscale Golf &
Country Club Apply in
weso 225iW.












Tell that special
person
withappc ass fie ad
under Happy
NOteS.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CAREGIVER
cr vf re hoe yhwecarn
in advanced stages of
deure mit ing s neal
times a day. Soft spo-
ken person in excellent
physical condition is
needed. Three 12-hour
shifts per week. (Two 8
-8 day shifts, one 8 -8
night.) Possibility of
fer phplcn mst


Nohreeene s bcall




CNA

Medical office exp.
Rethulred. Fl i~me
b siy me ical off ce.
2a -esmel t

LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wnte eer e fe cesed

requ rd) 7[ax5Resume

Medical
Asst/Receptionist
for medical practice.
Email resume: kings-
bayfamilycare@
yahoo.com
MEDICAL
BILLING
ASSISTANT


F~u -tme position
assistnt sol

be familiar with
CPT and ICD cod-
ing and data en-
try. Experienced
in medical man-
ager programs a
plus.
Please Fax Resume To
746-9320

NEE DnEDd



Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered






BOys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus Co

A cep ing ap lc-
school Age Youth,
Commblnic ton ,ills,
supervisory/ training
experience helpful.
Download app. from
www.citr~usbgc.com
Resume/Application
to 352-621-4679
TEACHER

Full time needed for
Christian Preschool,
CDA preferred,
(352) 746-4888



Your World









CH MM E


BEAUTIFUL, LIKE NEW
4 PERSON HOT TUB
WITH BUBBLE JETS
HEATER, COVER AND
MLU SOL RD
$500.00-PAID $3,000.
352-628-3865




Almond Side by side

w/ ie water
3 month old
$800 (352) 586-6746
DELONGHI
CAPPUCCINO/ESPRESSO
MACH. Retrolatte
coffee maker wljet
frother.45.00 OBO Call
352-560-7747
DRYER Kenmore super

$1 p.0 tor bestode all

DRYER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty
G35 -64- US4
BUILT-IN DISHWASHER
works iet% a 6ryOgood
352-527-1399
GE SMART-WATER
WATER SOFTENER
Excellent condition.
$175.00-Cash 513-4027
Kitchenaid
side by side, 25 cu. ft.

indor ic ma e

Re figtera htef 55

(352) 527-2757


Refrigerator/eee,
ecle a ,s cold

(352) 72385


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers

d~rye 5,REE pik up

clean ]gb Itvwhite with
$100.00 call
352-400-0452 after 5:00
WID Front Load
$500 ea. Like NEW!
(352)344-5734


WASHER Kenmore
washing machine, white,
super capacity, direct
drive call 352-400-0452

WASHED OR RYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can de-
liver 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 30 day warranty
352-364-6504



Solid wood desk wl 3
drawers $50
(352) 489-8783




S womwne m Iua

(352) 344-2161



48 INCH TV floor model
works great 51$ home
352-4192717
AIWA STEREO STYTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & 2
SPEAKERS $100
352-613-0529




WANTED


st ohe a
352-794-3603 or
813-244-3945 cell.



COMPAQ COMPUTER
Toweir,Key oard,Dell
34.0 C 1l
COMPUTER DESK
Great Condition 62 x

C400 n. 0.0 Lnkdta

mo ctr kyord mo se
352 212-2266 Iv mess
DELL COMPUTER
SCREEN 15in /Good
condition, $25.00 Linda
352-341-4449


For Bar in Back
Apply in Person in at
Front SABINA'S DNER
Hernando, after 2pm


BREAKFAST COOK
Experience Only
&( SERVERS


A.J.'s CAFE
21 Nt. IHw el9






AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring 2
Sales Professionals to
join our growing seaff
HOTTEST new car
brand in the country
cprofes final tann gd
bonuses provided to
the right people. If
you have the skills to
give our customers
the best car buying
experience of their
lives, WE NEED YOU!
Apply In Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Cr stal River





CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES

Expanding Again!
The Citrus County
Chronicle Is seeking
an energetic Individual
to consult businesses

classinie ea e tin .

fun eionenftn p e s


D el t at Fnctons
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting
Iudn ~prpo ssional
communication and
good Istenin~gwskills

cut nu ftdoo

Ctuse Pbw isng
oualif catlons


* eo r tlmrketin
experience a plus
Send resume to:
chronicleonline.com

EOE, drug screening for
final applicant

WANTED

Highly self motivated
SALES PEOPLE
Company truck is pro-

Beneisaale A-
from 9 am to 4 pm
Mon-Fri, At
Brays
Pest Control,
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP






Exkp.iMar ner

7 day shift Apply at
2T nNRiversbMarina
Crystal River FI 34429
(352) 795-3552



Manufacturer of
A/C Grilles, Registers
and Diffusers

is currently accepting
applecatiions for an
Production/Assembly
worker.
Must be able to read
atsap asurt a d
hand tools, hands

Wel ing exe ice
a plus.
ppl lin person to

400sW WaFI r v.,
Excellent beefits
pac age, 0l.
DFW, EOE.


REPARS RSLES

Truck & Tools, 489-0360





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED

Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
6421 W. Hp m sassa
Trail, Homosassa Fl.


Housekeepers/
Locker Room
Attendants and
Laundry Person
PT orFT

For Upscale Golf &
Country ClulbAp~pl in
Sk viw Crossing
Hernando

PUMP REPAIR
p rbn ilbedc rcau exp,

cprs11@ce ntu ryl ink. net

STORE CLERK

aa st oeover k8aendds
Good math computer
& people skills A MUSTI
Fishing exp helpful but
not necessary.
Apply in person at
Twin Rivers Marina.
2880 N. Sea- breeze Pt.
Crystal River.
















16 BUCKET STORAGE
Gmat for ods
$25.00
Call 352-628-4271





1816 JENNY STAMP
GO 0 CO DT


AVA ILABLaE
i. -




*** -J


Siudoku AAAA ptJzcoTT


1 3 8 5


















6 4 3 5







Fill in the squares so that each row, colurnn, and
3-by-3 box contain the nurnbers 1 through 9.




. 120m h
IIStR Rat ORS by Brian one 25sassa ,, wnd .

~kk~ 352-628- 7519





I Engineering Fees I
\ Up to $200value S
4 -
*Siding*Soffit*Fascia* Skirting*Roolovers*Carports*Screen Roms* Decks*Window s* Doors*Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


li f ot oftFrekd' Ebuenrd
shop, 7/12/12
(352) 564-8436
FOUND Female Bulldog
Terrier Mix wearing a
black harness on July
17th in Inverness.Contact
Citrus County Animal
S rvce~s, Amal


www.citruscritters.com
F und lg tec h aolr

Pine St. and Greentree
(352) 382-9303
Found male dog, black
and whiteF, Wht ntitp on
area of Hwy 44 and 5th
street crystal River.
(352) 464-1697
FOUND Neutered Male
White and Tan Cocker
Spaniel in Beverly Hills on
July 17th. Contact Citrus
Cont AI al6Ser~v es,
352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com
LOST -FOUND -ADOPT
Please visit Citrus County
Animal Services,
352/746-8400, 4030 S
Airport Rd, Inverness
www.citruscritters.corn







Precious Paws

preci usa sfno da.c
om
726-4700




"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAW AT A









CRYSTAL IE MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
THusrys Fi Sa Sun
Noon-4pm



PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Hul to Lake


goMal rc sstre h -
hua minorpin mix, a k

(352) 216-ag 4g
Free 10 week old shep-
herd mix puppy's. Very
loving and in need of a
good home.
352-423-0094
FREECBaOAT wlTitle!
(352) 220-9435
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old litrtned


to good home,
15 weeks
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
FREE to aldgor I home 2
chihuahualpug mix shots
& micro chipped
527-13991513-5010
Free to a good home 3 yr
old Male Beagle-shots &
micro-chipped.
527-13991513-5010
KEEP yur used auto
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Landscape Boulders
you remove
(352) 726-9708
Mini long-haired
Daschund, English

0d fr3e to 5g od hrse
NatwraleSi aBuilder

You Load. Pine Ridge
(352 i2 l-9372
Cur Dog lupes
2 fema th,2 mleps dona-
tions f teir care up t l
adoption are accepted
(352) 423-0819




Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
h 7des 1 10d 711,





I lost my
bracelet.... .Please,
Please, if you found/find a
retkldidamond bracelt,e-
ward. Went to Olive
TreardHsm DeaDto How-
SaveALoth..it could be an-
35 -56 0007
Large Maine-Coon Cat
Mal, blcirwcla

nwnadoi n58e 28010e-

hous cate has a hi,
vicinity" loft 550 vcorral
Pflogaclein RidgHe
$100o RfEWRDn $0 e
wr(352)746-0362
LOT OUND CADOT

Plese isity Citrus County

(352) 74SOv3 S


Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com



and white collar with bell -
352-212-3980ne
PitbulllTerrier
white/black, 801bs, goes
by "Diesel", lost 7/13/12
in the vicinity of Cardinal
and 491, needs meds.
(352) 270-5114


/ Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

? IVust be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance


If interested come to the Meadowcrest

Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to

the back and ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd.

OfyStal River


IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE





www.chromceleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY(FO) CHRONICLE


CIASSIFIEDS


FlunAY,JUI:Y 20, 2012 C11


Vie ou dp le

adoptaresc pdet
.com or call
352-795-9550


ADOPTIONS are
held every
Saturday 10am-12pm
PetSupermarket
Inverness
(exceptions below)
Saturday 7/21
10am-12p

2431 Suncoast Blvd

"J ireRn NEE of
save
more dogs. To foster

to visit us at Pet
S permarskset



SADO TONS I


come see

OUr
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.

Moo 'iSt Od~a .
All Cats and Kittens
are, mcr -c ipe
Felne uk n Aids.


Phonei t2-613-1629
www.hofspha.orq,
ar stop by owr off ce
Corner of 44 and
Conant.
Loo ir irtghw i white
bright paw prints.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Clalssifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Timte


person

wiH d casifi ad


inclu es a8 photo

Cal du a sifi d
352-563-5966












wl8 games $400 for all,
retails for >$1000
(352)795-7513
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visal MCard
352-637-5469
E Machine, W260
w/ dell keyboard
and screen
$100
(352) 563-2896



2 BRWN WICKER ARM
CHAIRS W/ottomans &
cushions & tbl. Wicker is
plastic coated. Exc,
Nice little set Pd $425
asking $75. 382-2733
4 PATIO CHAIRS $50.
Taupe Pwdr Coated
Alum. Green Mesh great
cond. Moisture resistant.
586-904-3262 SMW
Patio Set
6 chairs,
$100.
(352) 382-5661
Patio set table 4 x 4ft
round PVC, 4 chairs
with cushions $250
(352) 382-4891
PVC Patio Set
42" round table, 4 chairs
w/cushions, good cond.
$50
(352) 794-3925


Im r
3 SWIVALiBARSTOkOLS

padded brown crushed
velvet seats $85-A-1
352-628-9838
4 Piece Oak Queen
Bdrm Set, incl. mattress
and boxspring, $195 obo
(352) 400-8646
8 ft. SLEEPER SOFA
Excellent cond.
light fabric with, swirl
coo ra tte!
$350.(352) 513-4507
ARMOUSRAND NWGI -

Armour with 2 matching
nightstands. $60.00 Call
352-586-1970


springs 150.
Glider Rocker,
w/ foot stool $50.
(352) 795-7254
Coffee Table, 3 x 3ft
square with glass top
$100 (352) 382-4891


4451 N Tallahasse Rd.
Fri Sun 8a-2p.

CR3YSTAtL RVEtR
SAT. 8a-4p Furniture
Womens size 2-4, xmas,
much misc, Turkey Oak
to Holiday to Gum
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 8lam-3pm
Multi-Family Sale
394 N. Michaelmas Terr
off Ft. Isl. Trail, & Green
Leaf Forest
CRYSTAL RIVER
7Multi 15my. Sat O V
side Cir. Connell Hgts
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat 8a-3p. 8758 W
Orange Tree St
DUNNELLON
MOVING SALE! All Con-
tents of home, make
offer Fri -Sun8a-3p,
5273 SW 196th Ave
or call 465-7000
HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET
352-628-4A6

INVERNESS
7521 E Broyhill P -
Items include
housewares, furniture,
men/women clothing.
Sat. July 21 8:00 am



INVERNESS CLUB
sat. 21st, 10am-2pm
Residents' Craft

Ins de mLmBued nas at
INVERNESS CLUB
SENIOR APTS
25 Tables set up to
Sell Hand made
crafts, Jewlry, and
Rummage Items
518 ELLA AVE
Behind Inverness
Middle School


INVERNESS
Frid~aH Onl 8arn 2pm
Off of Turner Car p Rd
Rainbow Springs
Sat. 7/21, 8a-2p,
4-drawer file cab.,


1903 od 98h Lop
Sugarmill Woods
Estate Sale Sat. 9a-3p
Furn.,i tols TVs,tshsehld
22 Wild Olive Ct
Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944




MENS CLOTHING
LARGE JEANS, PANTS
SHORTS & SHIRTS $25
352-613-0529





Goo t2ed 50 y aig
$60 for the pair
(352)586-5485
!!!!!!!245/65 R17!!!!!!!
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****225/70 R16*****
Good tread! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)586-5485
3 ceiling Fans White
wlout lights $35 ea. '
(352) 291-1556
8000 BTU A RCTIC
KING AIR CONDI-




Shop-vac 16 gallon 6.5

(352) 76-03878
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & 2
SPEAKERS $100
352-613-0529
Antique Solid Oak
Drum Table $140
Samsung Digital Home
Theater Surround Sound
$60.
(352) 341-5978
BATHROOM VANITY
White 2 door vanity,
countertop, sink and
hardware. $70.
352-201-2665
BOAT ANDIOR UTILITY
TRAILER DOLLIE- Dual
wheels, 4 air tires, must
see, Ex., $50
352-628-0033
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,$25
(352) 465-1616


company, white color, ex-
cellent condition. $25
(352)465-1616
CLOTHING MENs
LARGE JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS & SHIRTS $25
352-613-0529
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
INLLUODES S EET 0
352-613-0529
CORNER CURIO CABl-
NET, curved glass, 59"
onhdit o, $5, (3o502d
465-1813, Dunnellon
DINNING TABLE FOR 8
Brand New with tag
wood, excellent Condi-
tion. No chairs, just table.
$100 (352) 465-1616
FREE GOOD HOMES
WANTED FOR 2 MALE
DOGS chihuaha pug and
beagle excellent tem-
perment 527-1399
GO GO Elite Scooter
used once, paid
$750+tax, will sell for
$550 no tax, must see
(352) 726-2695








HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok
condition. Heats up to
18(03 s ft. area dio
INFANT CAR SEAT good
condition. Safety 1st co.
$20 (352) 465-1616
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp
headless 16/20ct $7/1,
10/15ct $8/Ib. deliv.
(772)781-1262
LOVESEAT Dual reclin-
ing. Beige with brown and
blue design $100.
628-6396
REMINGTON 10FT.
ELECTRIC POL CHAllN

up to 10ft. Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
SOARING EAGLE
STATVr Ne ias 5n.9 5


TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal Head-

(3 25136016
VACUUM CLEANER Eu-
reka!, needs some
repair. Big vacuum with
hose. $10
(352) 465-1616
Vinyl Double-paned Win-
dow, white 32x53 $25
(712) 251-6603
WATER StOFTEdNER

Was Just8 Dsonnected

Call (352) 382-1424
WATERBED Queen size
flotation t6p 6$100.




PRIDE SCOOTER Never
used.
Brand new condition.
Price:OriginaE-$2845-Sell
$1000. call: Joe
352-341-6269




BUYING US COINS
Top $$G$ Paid We Also
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" BLEM ACOUS-
GI CGUITTAURNW
STRINGS, STRAPETC
$45 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLEM ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR WIGIGBAG,
STRAP, ETC PLAYS
GREAT! $35
352-601-6625
"NEW"MITCHELL
MO100S ACOUSTIC
WITUNER, STRAP.
STRINGS,ETC $90
352-601-6625
DRUM SET Minus Toms,
Sabian symbols, Zilgan
symbols, $99.
352-563-0166
Ludwig 5 Piece
3 cymbals, black
$250
(352) 489-9181
ORGAN
Lowery Promenade
LX400, like new. $3,000.
Call(352) 861-9305


CLASSIFIED




and music, exc. cond.
$150 obo
(352) 400-8646
Spinet Piano
with padded storage
bench. Also has heater
cinnamon color
$600. 352- 795-4372




6 UNOPENED ROLLS
SHRINK WRAP--2 clear,
2rpik rired,219green.r .
(352) 341-3607
19" WHITE PANASONIC
TVIVCR W/ REMOTE
Old-school, but works
great.$35 INVERNESS
(352) 341-3607
CHEROKEE MATTED &
FRAMED PRINT NATIVE
AMERICAN
AWARD-WINNING
ARTIST $35 341 3607
Keurig Coffee Maker
Platinum edition, lyr old,
Cost $179at purchase
sell $70, acc. avail.
(352) 344-0686
LIGHTHOUSE WALLPA-
PER BORDER 35+ yds.
unopened self-adhesive
repositionable $20
(352) 341-3607
MEDIUM BAR FRIDGE
White Large Bar Fridge -
Works Great $100
352-601-3506
MICROWAVE Black
E-WAVE brand for
a erstov ins la in.


TROPICAL FISH BATH
ACCESSORIES BRAND
NEW 2 tissue holders 3
wall units 12 shower
hooks $40 341-3607
WHITE FREEZER
CHEST White Freezer
Chest -Like new -
Excellent Condition -
$100 352-601-3506


9mm, ANIB -$450
S/W Model 60, s/steel,
.38spel, As New-$300
S/W Model 18, Target,
.22S,WL,LRo VGod -$300

.454, .45LC, NIB 51 0.
Hi-Std Victor, Target
Auto, .22 LR, Hartford
Mfg, As New $875
(352) 356-0124
TENNIS RACQUET
Yonex RQ-380, never
used with case, $45.00.
Spalding used, $35.00 no
case. 513-4027
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




5x8 heavy Duty util
trailer $600.
4x8 Alum trlr. $450. Or
Best offers. 794-3603
Utility Trailer
4 x 8 100.
5 x 10 $200.
(352) 382-5661




White Baby Crib
& Car Seat
$60.
(352) 795-4394


C12 FRIDAY,JUIY 20, 2012


CIRCUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


Furniture & Accessories,
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy.270-8803
House full of furniture
Lots of items, All must go!
Doe rat $112 ob, e
full size beds $500 ea
(352) 527-6879
KING CANOPY FRAME
Headboard,footboard
Canopy,metal
$75.00 Call
352-628-4271
King Size Bed frame,
cherry finih,

$300
(352) 382-3682
KING SIZE SERTA
mattress bo spring &

$1,000~sacrifice for
ONLY $150.
352-637-3636
Kitchen Table
with 4 chairs, white
$100 (352) 382-4891
Kitchen wood table 50"
round bar high w/ extra
glass top 4 bar high
stools 1 yr old
$150 (352) 795-4372
LEATHER RECLINER
SOFA Light beige,
leather, 84",- 2 reclining
seats. Good cond/no
3sta ns $19 9
Marble Top
Dining Rm. table w/6
high back leather
chairs, (buffet) server
used twice
$ ,20 r32 58 6 6 4
king bd. w/ mattress 2
night stands, 2 lamps, 2
db| dressers. Matching
$500.
Full Bedroom Set, w/
mattress & headboard,
Broyhill, triple dresser,
Irg. mirror, 1 night stand
$500. (352) 563-6327
Mattress, Box spring
and maple

S Oad(3 )a 32 n891
Moving Sale
Lots of fuirniture and

(352) 344-2903
(352) 860-1768
Preowned Mattress
Fulets from Tiri g305.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS
Queen mattress and
boxspring$40.00 Call
352-586-1970
RATTAN ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER great
shape natural finish $75.
call 352-257-3870
Sofa and Love Seat
LIKE NEW! $450
(352)344-5734
Sofa multi colored,

(352) lr3e8 -91
Teal Wicker Set, love
sets 2 chadrrsedof e
ions, like new $195. obo
KingbMai ress & spring
(352)302-9507



Craftsman Rider,
18 Horse,
42" cut
$400
(352) 220-7301
John Deer Tractor
with bagger
good condition
Asking $600
(352) 795-7398
John tEeer Tractor
good condition
Asking $600

Joh Der 5s9 8F9315


Ready for work $4,800


MTD Riding Mower
38 Deck,
brand new condition
$600
(352) 746-7357
Murry Riding Mowing
12 HP. 40 in. cut $300
Firm, MTD High
wheeled push mower
5hp 221n cut $80 firm
(352) 302-6069




BIG SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Frl, & Sat 8am to 2pm
Antiques, collectible
glaSS & pottery,
jewlry, colns, tools
& More behind
Ollve Tree Rest. US 19,
storage units 80 & 81


CRYSTAL RIVER
RosellakCou~rt Re~ntals off

BR mobiles. $450/month
and up, plus utilities. No
pets. 1 yr. lease. 1st &
sec. Call 352-325-1799.

DUNNELLON
2 BR/2 BA, Near Prog-
ress Energy, Citrus Co.
Dunnellon352-465-l6l

FLORAL CITY
Small 2/1, Includes All
Appl's ideal for singles
or couples, $400/mo



Hernando

Sath nice qe3 meh-2
borhood,Ig. yard
wlfence, semi-fu nished
o opems .bk d chkc '
(352) 419-5603


OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
fail sI nwfrienodusr
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE




pcic cm le and
hgaze~b s Yourd NW
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
JUSt $582 a










AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
D~r. Ins FL375 9

aurora fesl.com


HOMOSASSA
3/2, D/W, 2 AC, $650.
1st Ist sec 207-651-0923

Brlng yoVr rsNln pole!
55+ parke on lakte. Fur-
nished I bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1, Senlors Welcome.
(352) 628-2312
YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Frn.,

+ $300 dep. 15 min.
from power plant Paul
(407) 579-6123
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre Addition
Partly furn, Huge Deck
$525.mo 352-628-5244




BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
imposed homes
He ado
2/2 Dbl. w denreot cond.
1026sq ft, carport & sm.
shed corner lot, $29900

HOMEq ON 3 5NnD

Y ace.i Hornehin ew

ac nructon. New
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

For Sak%.4~l
Inybe ness 3 be~drom. 2
28'x60'Home Lived in
three years.
1680sq.ft.Custom blinds
in 12'x28'Florida room,
new carpet,windows and
screens in 18 x12'Lanai,
55+community low lot!
rent. Call 352-419-6247
INVERNESS
Brlng your flshing pole!
55+ parke on
lakte. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


not included
1) 295-3055




RATS
cle, frm raise

y available.
2) 445-3681


WEIGHT BENCH. Good "r Y!?' VUI )
coniton.Babel & with a classified ad cage
Dumbells. 140 pounds of under apy(5
weights. $25. Local de- Onl $2.50
lhiery for $10. 5 7 c"0 inclu es a photo
uoens 6 iylued 2 weeks Call our Classified
$100 Dept for details
(352) 586-6746 352-563-5966 Whl,

liver
;T; TC~I, ,,, 1 (35;

99' Club Car
full curtains fan new ti- Wne utg qi.
res, charge r $1 00 obo aihn eEqup tnColE i ,
(352) 795-5122 Tools, Knives, swords &
Bike Gary Fischer War items 352 613-2944 1
Men's Napa Model Wanted to Buy
$250 & Schwinn 4-bike 2-3Bedroom /2 Bath .
car hitch carrier $50 House in
(352)209-7257 Crystal River Area
Billiad Iale ert 8 Ty ( ) 16 0

4ft, new apperiance, .
with combinati et
hnging triple ligh st
mud psehqrt stan ardt 3 MALTESE, Available *
stylish wooded que 2 females $600. ea
stick holder and I male $500. Health Sfr
decrotive "pool ball" certs & CKC registered, Tell tl
clock for further pool 3 Morkies & 5 Shorkies
room AVAILABLE SOON
atmosphere, $650 352-212-4504, 212-1258 HapF
(352) 220-0134 BOBYCT rod with a
BOMBY CAS 3yr od ,d
CABIN ON 40 ACRES Bombay sisters, beauti- u
Hunting recreational ful sweet girls. Up to On
in Gulf Hammock Mgt. date on all shots, lICu
Area, well, pond, ATV spayed, worm and flea Ic
trails Price Reduced treated. 1/2 price in July Call o
352 795-2027/ 634-4745 $17.5! Id's 16650822 Det
CONCEALED WEAPONS C ir1 1t 5
COURSE 746 8400, Tues-Sat Qf
at the Inverness105m


.10 m $555 2h ost Poe ain Mi

tvr!Cal3e5 t2-4 (352) 628-2483 Bring
for info & reservations ENGLIS BUeLk DOGS ,

Concealed Weapons 3 males, 2 females
Permit Course BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
DAN'S GUN ROOM Health certs & shots,
(352) 726-5238 $1,200 (352) 613-3778
.(352) 341-7732
M1a-30 1a. Carbine Fml okePo
4/1943 flip sight/bu ton 20 wks, 4 lbs, IN1
safety, orig. stock, initial shots, cage, etc. 55+ pa
sling&oiler $950 firm $350. piers, c
(352) 563-5387 (352) 746-7815 much r
RACKET BALL RACKET MaltiPoo grass c~
Leach, "Charles Teacups, 2 male $500, 1 b
Brumfield" with cover, I female $550 @
$25.00. 513-4027 8 weeks, Fluffy and 2 :
Adorable, have Ist @
RAY Welcomes you to shots (352)794-3081 Pets cc
Your Headquarters Rottweiler Pups 1 male section
for GUNS, AMMO, & ($700), 5 Female ($850) call 3
Reloading Supplles Pure German AKC fo
NElilHQ.1RS 7wks 352-302-3735
STUE. & ED A-2P SHIH-TZU MIX Young FE C.H
SAT. A-3P good natured, smart. Up 1& 2 Br.
STOKS FLA MAKET to date shots. Can't keep. Util. inc
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River $250. (352) 563-1265 long terl


o'UMU,
lb12y


KIDS BEDROOM SET
BRooms taobGoteK s3
twin bookcase bed,
mattmess dresser x_ -
ro, niesand pi
Ec laennt Cosncd ion
Real wood not plastic
racecar bed! Email
jamar1021@yahoo.com
for pics.
$675 352-613-2794
Dinning Room.
Table oval, 6 chis,

$100 (352) 560-3519
Dinning Room Table,
Itallan glass octagon,
seats 8, 5x 5ft.S600

u6mu3 ft $500n,
(352) 382-4891
END TABLE Beautiful


"T do a vle !! Co n-

Entertainment center
hLtf I, s2ft H, 27' Dee~p
$200
(352) 382-7473
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER light color
4 itx 3.5 ft $35
352-212-2266 Lv Mesg
Entertainment center
w/ doors, solid oak
$150. Kitchen Table
47" round, w/ 4
upolhstered Chairs
$250 (352) 860-1647
FOUR PIECE COUCH
25.00 /good
condition/needs cleaning
Linda 341-4449
Heavy Wicker
Entertainment center
w/ 5 glass shelves
$ 150 Walnut Desk 56Y2X
19%/ File drawer + 5
drawers, w/ brown
leather chair $160
352-503-2123, 212-6453


hat spcal
person
py Birthday "
classified ad


Iv $28.50
es ap hoto
ur Classified
for details
-563-5966
rf A A tf





your fishing
pole!


le*Vue3, rL.
rk on lake w/5
:lubhouse and
morel Rent inc.
cutting and your
water. sat

325 OTcH20
bedrooms start
450 inc H20
considered and
n accepted.
152-476-4964
,r details!

~omosassa
furn, quiet park
cl. clean, shrtl
m 352 220-2077


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881

I I

SMITTYS APPLIANCE






Adult family care home




Nees (30652) 249-7451






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visal MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730




BIANCHI CONCRETE
IN.O insllic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
wals nPoo d k r~e~pair

C~ai r) n 700


352 364-21201410-7383

De TavR &oSnONee
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining'
driveways, pool decks'
Liclins 352-527-1097

C' EMEASDOi wys
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBCO57405, 427-5775



~m
All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Pmep, Driveways
Licilns 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ciig& WallRear.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 +HTECHN LOIES
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team13532) 32461 952



DUNRIGTE ELECTRIC L

352-726-2907








All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
Sr 352 422-7279 S



~m~m
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters

Is. (32m 532 7c7





1eC LL e8oRELX 25 vr
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Rob 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
LiPI 586 35-4 d77

Adew coh



Affodabe andyan
GnMainyi t Repairs
VFAwSiuTes *o 10% ua

0 562L1 *dr Et 920

Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
JFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
A 352-257-9508 A
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
JFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
$r 352-257-9508 A


Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. otaor
Many Fix It Repairs
JF SFTFO0 LGuar.
V RELIABLE* Free Est
A 352-257-9508 A
CONCRETE


Paintn 5 nid Out

Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352-726-9570
R modelig Addit ons,

FreEs ( C 0 9229





WCl. Niky 8Nthly.
A GREAT RATES A
352-503-7800, 476-3820
MAID TO ORDER
A House Cleaning A
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum wili travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
35-3-54


All Tractor Work Serylce
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Pmep, Driveways
Licilns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120






~nn.



JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985


Floa it rteoNBeM. ills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


NCl dn~ cxt PI E



J. Hupchick Lic.11ns.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE

HaTd 352) 586-299

OeaiS, Hauliano, Od
Jopar (52) 726 9570




"APPRAISALS"
Jewelry, Art, Antiques
Family Bus.Since 1932
GIA Diamond Graduate
GIA Equipment, Lic.,Ins.
Fast, Dependable
352-266-6884 or
Tscudder@gcon.me


TOTAL REMODELER
40 ys Tile Kitchyr, ens'
B ths A dti ns'

(352) 344-3536





MAC'S MOBILE RV

RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Liclins.






Pr sn a lcne
and ins red service


sreur b tt laaV
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
s~houbde snue absotuhtc
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


rite estimaTes
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221



A TREE SURGEON
Li.ic 5s 6Lrowest


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Serylce

secilzn tn cen




R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. &2Uc4# 025879

REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


1 III ,ul IJ lrst




Classifreds


Tell that special

HaClnn RithdlvL


~a~s;~J





CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 C13


~t ~


I"


Jr,
_i


With $2,999
Doe AtSigin g3


*Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. $2,999 down, cash or trade equity. Excludes tax, tag, title, Dealer Fee of $599.50. Lease is 24 months, 24,000 miles. $0 15 per mile over. With approved
credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior Sales may restrict stock.


THIE ALLNEWIVV2013NFISSANU
A~LTI M A


OUR MOST INNOVATIVE ALTIMA EVER!
WE CHANGED EVERYTHING EXCEPT THE NAME


BLOW THE DOORS OFF... ALL FOUR OF THEM. THE 2013 ALTIMA SV HAS
BETTER OVERALL ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE THAN THE HONDA
ACCORD SE, HYUNDAI SONATA AND TOYOTA CAM\IRY SE


o~a


$


)STARTING
MSRP


$


PER MONTH
24 MONTH LEASE


CRYSTALNISSAN.COM




014 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 FUSION SE 2012 ESCAPE XLT


2012 FOCUS SE


All Ford Certified
Pre-Owned
Vehicles
come With:


*172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
*7-year/1 00,000-mile powertrai n warranty coverage**
*12-month/1 2,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
.Vehicle history report
*24/7 Roadside Assistance


ii~L~ I-~bS~B


2009 FORD ESCAPE 2011 FORD RANGiIR LT SUPil CAB
Just reduced. NP5613 1290 miles and better than new. NP5719
$2 1,968 $22,668


2UUU FORD FOULU 5E5 2UUI MERCURI MILAN PREMIER 2UUU FORD E50APE ALT
Loaded SES. N2C226A This one is loaded. N2TO93B Just the right size. N2Cl 98A
$ 1s,6aa $ 16,s68 $ 1a,66a


2010 FORD EDGE SE 2011 FORD Fl50 STX 2008 FORD EDGE 2011 MERCURY MARINER 2011 FORD TAURUS 2009 FORD MUSTANG OT 2009 FORD EDGE SPORT
Warranty till 2017. N2TI56A OnIy Sk miles. NP5717 Come see this loaded limited. N1C153DI Great sized SUV. NP5648 You need to try this one out. NP5642 This GT has only 10k miles. NP5729 Loaded with nav & a vista roof. N2CO35A
$23,668 2s5,468 $25,668 $26,488 $26,968 $26,968 $31,668


~) rl~


r rrl


2012 EDGE SEL


+~6 $ o +0 $ CASH CASH


or $4,000 Cash Back or $4,000 Cash BackBAKAC


Certified P~re-Owvned


2011 FORD Crown VICTORIA LI 2010 FORD RANGER XLT
Three to choose from. NP5713 Like new and low miles too. NP5621
$21 ava $21,968






CITRUS COUNTY(FO)CHRONICLE


CIASSIFIEDS





3/2 Carport washed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land

d a c on i e t 0

(603) 860-6660
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, ver
clean, ceramic tile carpet,
db| lot. $750.rent. 1st Ist


Minor children)
NOTICE OF ACTION.


ouivilvivive AND NOTICE OF A G


FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: MICHAEL FUNK
L/K/A 225 E. STANTON AVENUE
COLUMBUS, OHIO 43214
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath has been filed in the
above-styled court for the termination of your parental rights as to C.M.F. a male
child born on June 22, 2001 in Ohio; A.R.F. a female child born on the October 6,
2002 in Ohio; J.A.F., a male child born August 17, 2006 in Citrus County, Florida; and
A.R.F., a male child born on June 12, 2008 in Ohio; and for placement of the children
with the Florida Department of Children and Families for subsequent adoption, and
you are hereby commanded to be and appear before General Magistrate Keith
Schenck of the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the above cause, at the
Advisory Hearing on August 13, 2012 at 1:30 P.M. and before the Honorable Sandy
Kautz for the Pre-Trial Conference Hearing on September 11, 2012 at 4:00 PM; and, at
the Adjudicatory Trial for the Termination of Parental Rights before Honorable Sandy
Kautz on September 27, 2012 at 9:00 A.M., at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATES AND TIMES SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT
TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN, IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE
CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST NOTIFY THE
COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO
BEAPPOINTE f ou r oe r itO a diabiyM T oneedsaony accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial
Court Administrator. Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700 within seven (7) working days of your receipt of this
notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771, Florida Relay Service
te THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in
Citrus County Chronicle s Classified Section.
Dated this 29th day of June, 2012 at Inverness, citrus County, Florida
(SEAL)


'89, Colt, Mitsubishi
engine, 110K mi.,
5 spd. runs great
REDUCED TO $1,000


2008 6ars- engSm
Only 19,000 miles!
Warranty for another 18
months or until 36,000
miles. Lt blue exterior.
Tan leather interior.
Sunroof. Great shape.
$13,495 OBO Call Keith
(813)-493-2326
HONDA
2006 Accord Hybrid
Th power when yolu
when you don't. Low
Mileage and clean stock

( 1 528-6000
HONDA
2009 FIT WITH
AUTOMATIC AND A/C
AND WARRANTY UP TO
100,000 MILES STOCK
#PH7403 REDUCED TO
$12,989
352-628-4600
JAGUAR
1987 XJ6
$200E0 ONBo
352-634-4207
LINCOLN
'00, Towncar, signature
series, w/ all opt., white
tan leather uphol.
$4,999. (352) 527-3151

'99, 4MEoORC Gand Mar.,
cl II, 72,0 0 i sr o n.
same body style 2009
$4,800 (352) 860-1106,
MERCURY SABLE GS




Mitsubushi
2011 GALANT FE LIKE
NEW AND ONLY 15,000
ONE OWNER MILES
WITH ALL THE LUXURY

O 0,00, MNT $18,0
352-628-4600
MUSTANG
1995 GT 5.0 HO 69K
miles. Cool Air, elec
windows,seat, mirrors.
IColor P NKOBIac~kO
352 628-3485
Pontiac Fiero
'88, Red, needs motor.
$750. 586-0084
VERY! VERY!
A BIG SALE! A
Consignment USA


CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT

4 o Pa mns 0





'65 GTO
BI, 454, mint cond.,
$24K OBO. 302-8265
'66 Nova
Custom, 327, mint,

(352) 302-B826
CHEVROLET
'77, Corvette, numbers
matching, 350,4 spd.,
restored, excel cond.
many trophies, many
receipts, same owner
last 17 yrs. asking
$16,500 352- 560-7377
FORD
1931, Model A, restored
in Arizona, 5 window
deluxe coupe, rumble
seat, leather seats
23,195 miles $17,500.
(352) 628-1734







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
With a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
OnIy $28.50
inclu es a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
QAS AA tQ


1930, Model A, Sport
Coupe, runs well, great
cond., storage cover,
$15,000 (352) 465-9186



CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555

'09 F350 CreRDCab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $22,900 OBO
637-2258or 634-2798









TOYOTA TOCOMA
'07, $8,995, Incld. warr
Fin. avail. bad credit ok
352-322-1299 the
lastfrontierautos.com
VERY! VERY!
A BIG SALE! A
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV

A Lw Py~ment s
4 nacn Fo A 0







MSIZ TSU ON LMRC
AND REDUCED TO
CESRET IEDOMEDANS
WARRANTY UNTIL 2016
OR 100,000 MILES
STOCK #H7359AND
32 62 -460

2007 X-7 UVV
Lots of room for the kids
and the toys and priced
to move stock #H7400
now only $8,995
352-628-4600




DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN
2001 Grand Caravan
Sport 3.3 V6, 150k miles,
A/C, tinted windows, tilt,
pw, pd, cruise. $2,950
(352) 527-3894



CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley '02
Road King, black, lots of
chrome, senior owned
15k miles, gar~kept
$9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gr. kept
all r aint. rcpts.

(904)1t230- 902
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
'6SvHronda60c
26K mi.,Taller wlnd-

s d00r (32) 4r -2 e
HONDA 2007
70S ha ow. Wa2, p te
clean 8200 mi., $3,850
(352) 860-1106, Bob
SUNL SCOOTER 07
150 cc, red, looks &
runs great, rejet carb,
$295. UNtitlable, Grt for
farm, long drway, priv
rds. 637-6046
SUZUKI
'09, S40, 652CC, with
706 miles, w/ extras
$3,000
(352) 795-0150


2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn Ia-
nai, shed f/1/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
Bdrm w/priv bth, furn
w/TV. All incl plus Cb| &
WiFi. Country setting,
near town~S4oomo. +
dep 794-3295/209-5012




Bevell29Hills

(352) 270-7420


own 3D2 n2 5 ac.1t370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10 d5Tn.S 9157mo.

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES
SMALL TOWN '
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE


2007 EXC. COND.
$2500 neg. Blue
wlall-terr. tires 4pas-
senger w/grab bar


31ft ercan 0 mi-

great, all new tires $19k
(352) 447-0968
MAC'S MOBILE RV
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Liclins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides
kg bd,1ike new, 60amp
sev 3NKA3D 3289K asking




T aBUYTRa 1s
5th Wheels '
Motor Ho '
Call Me 352-2mes6945
R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,

ref /riifezr fl bth
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500 .
Call (352) 419-6825




Ford 4 speed
Transmission
w/ Granny Gear



0-6 in 4e5. 450 BHP 20

$14.400 727-207-1619



BUYINGiJUNK CARS

CASH PAID -$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES'
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in citrus co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144

VEY VR!
A BIG SALE! A


WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
A Low Payments*
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Tltled,No fltle,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




CADILLAC DEVILLE
`03 78K mi, Carriage
roof, Mint, Lthrl Clean
Auto ck. $5950.
257-4251, 352-794-6069
Chevrolet

exceln 00nd umi,500
obo


200 aCama~roC 3th b ni
White wlTan leather Inte-
t tre adi woAut5m~a i
les. All power options,
18" Ruff Racing Wheels,
however, price negotiable
if buyer would like original
16" wheels with new tires.
Definitely destined to be
a collector $122d00 OBO

Chevrolet
'83 Monte Carlo V-6
body off re-build $2500
(352) 400-2020


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR
ERA KY518 01ay Inc.
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
11 40CNNomomu od
D3r52g s4-23 9

auroraacresfl.com




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


F1UDAY, UIY 20, 2012 C15


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a prh~ase W.C



Palm Harbor Village
New 2012 Models
Doubles & Singles
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210


Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 312 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
Fixed a! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182


I I
Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH,
carport, dock scrn Ia-
nai, shed f/1/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077










HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition
$2 9e0d ks i
352-628-5244


NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,00 5 wn $942357 mo






CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900

CR3 )TAL R V
VILLAGE
BSUM2 th$1E5 r
(352) 795-7161




INVERNESS
3 mnths fre lot

1 B E hoehst rtng
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964

OWN TODAY






NO CREDIT CHECKS

Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house 8 Pool, Relax
clous lot eit yur
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic

gaz ebs YurdNEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOMEl
Jus $582. a

mo.


NO CREDIT CHECKS
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer
trash, Wi-Fi, Club- '
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
fcious lot wi enodur
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
locateMMU7 8 a res
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered


house is remodeled
and waiting forMYOU
to cal .t H
Jus $U82 a

MO.


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Llke New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
1,& 2 BR. Furn./Unfurn.
Like New, 352-302-1370
INVERNESS
Country Llvlng on large
1/2 acre lot. 3 bd. 2 ba
home. Garden area,
fenced area. Well &
Septic-so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964

Sugarmill Woods
2 master bedrooms!
Ig garage, updated, SS
appl., $875/Mo.
352-302-4057

Su armill Woods
Rent Special for 2/2
Upscale House in a quiet
area. Call for Details
(352) 564-0314




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, qet park
Until. incl. clean, ihrt/long
term 352 220-2077
FLORAL CITY
Share a home w/ 5
acres, non-smoker,
non-drinker, 700
month Available Aug. 1
(352) 726-4049


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

crossland e Ity.com
Cro la d7 4elt nc *


~~we


Nature Coast Landings
LVResor e TT
wheel RV with slides
gated stora e lot, golf
cartifishing equipment'

www.delailsbyownerscom for
pictures and info.
$89,500. 352-843-5441
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of or livn with tpoadr
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




AOULRHTOUS N


Specializing in
Acreage
FarmosmRanche &









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Idustri~al Bu ldnb

door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa




2/1 with CARPORT,
FI. rm. New roof,
New appl s, irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must se $429, 99 firm

ATTENTION INVES-
TORS! $525/mo cash
flow. 2 BED/2 BATH/1
CAR. Tenant occupied
2+ yrs-wants to stay.
$49,900. 527-1239




Why Rent When You
Can Buy This Cozy
2Bd. 1 Bath, Home with
only $,3500 down
paymoc td in. mo
APACHE SHORES
352-228-0876, 419-0041




HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
poIl game rom,ot
fenced. price to sell
$@5,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newe r of & CHA, scr

neighborhood. Reduced
for quc sale atu $9,900.






INVERNESS
Bring yourfihingpoe!
55+ park. Lo rn

200(352)476-4964


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I havenO nner
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Renter
Sale (908) 322-6529


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
clous lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Jus $582 O

mo *


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistin s.com
SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZE LO KES CYS-
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Ar is Pric a dc
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



SUGARMINLG WODS.
IN OAK VILLAGE

352 07K-9587
352-228-0357



Evinrude
2 Propellers, 70hp, 1
re-built, 1 used both $50
(352) 726-9708



20 ft Hydra Sports
CC, 150hp Yamaha Salt-
water serie I 1w/trailer

(352) 634-1140
BOAT DOCK RENT
Deep water canal off
Crystal River, Wood-
lands Est. 352-795-4925
BOBS WATERTOY'S
Rent Jet Skis w/trlr.
Kayaks/Canoes com-
ing soon! Iny 341-4949
CANOE
16 ALUMINUM, $99.
352-563-0166
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003@Hotmail.com
Gheenoe
13.5 ft on trailer wl5hp 4
stroke eng., swivel seats,
elec. troller wlacc., mint
cond. $1700
(352) 489-8271
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pa CASH F r

PoUtn rDe kB& Fi h-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Kayak Current Design
Fiberglass, 13 ft
w/rudder, sit-in $750
(352) 344-2161
PONTOON
20~ with trailer. 60hp
Johnson Nice and

(35 36 7 669
Tandem Boat Trailer
22 ft., galy. $1275.
Si gle axle Boat trlr
352-794-3603
813-244-3945
WANTED
2UsedaTrallerr or

8132434 c l.




m99 ALER AY
generator. 2 AC s, 2
new batteries, on BR
sleeps 5, TV, excel.
cond. Can be seen at
Dan s Clam Stand
Hwy 44 Crystal River,
Ask for Dan $8,500 obo
(352) 302-8561


Gail Steans
RealtOf

Tropic Shores
Realt
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
FOreclOSUres
Owner financing
available











L IrL A I
M chele Rose Realtor
harder 352-212-5097
isell irscutv@

Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

SOWN TODAY I -


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759










(RENTAL MANAGOEMEHr

352 79-7368


146 W Seymeria Dr. (BH)....$S675
629713 GodslneD ( 1....$825
3/2/2 newer home,open floor plan
1635 Greendale (CS)..........$1200
3/2/2 pool,f ireplace,tlose to school
CRYSTAL RIVER
240N.u Ind e ol es ....100
pool
HOMOSASSA
6944 W. Grant St. .......$725
2/2/1 nw h m
6139 5. Ioo er ........$875



2/1. sw on 1 acre
32529/ c fophre Al 1.....S25


2// tnl e AAL U I!



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $sso., Near Town
352-563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, fully furnished,
WID, dishwahser, big
scree 2nty 695 mo.
352-212-9337

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efflclency +
K e Incldl fl15 m .
pet oke 352- 228-2644

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all util. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218





Comimd gial




mint cond. Lrg overhead
door, Entry door, back
door, % bath, lighted
parking lot, perfect for
business or storage
$450 mo.
To view please
Call (352) 628-4066


trsh tiF ub
house & Pool Relax
o yu la ge sa
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picn c tables andW
gazebs Yu E
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME.
Jus $582. a
MO *


Michael8 Fn Ntice f Action,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2010-DP-300
IN THE INTEREST OF:


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 1/1 cor-
ner lot $525
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Room, C/HIA
$675 1st mo. FREE
(352) 422-7794
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747

A Nice 3/2/2, close to
schools $800. mo.+ sec.
(352) 628-0731
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile flrs
nice area, across rails
to trails $845. mo.No
pets (352) 598-0235
CRYSTAL RIVER
Energy Efficient 2/2
$750/mo+dep. Lease
352-795-6282
Homosassa
3/2/2 Meadows $695 up
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Llke New no smok/pets


INVERNESS
JR/ICBII 5Pa75
(352) 895-0744 Cell


site, many upgrades,
$9iont
352-628-1616




CRYSTAL RIVER

fl orsdci $4K
Steve Latiff, Realtor
352-634-0101

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225


C.M.F.
A.R.F.
J.A.F.
A.R.F.


06/22/2001
10/06/2002
08/17/2006
06/12/2008


*Lln LlhTlr~ h~ *n\llChMI Il~*nlllC


AURORA

ACRES
mobleomn t
11240 N Northwood

www.
auroraacresfl.com

Sellers I have
SOLD 13 Homes
in 6 mo's!
I need LISTINGS!


BETTYBSTRIFLER, C ek of C URTS
Deputy Clerk


DEB INFANTINE


Ras h at I do

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
7 ahoo.com


June 29, July 6, 13 & 20, 2012


AAUROESA

Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-~447-2759
****
auroraacresfl.com


813-0810
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY. FLORIDA Case No. 2009 DR 3979
NANCY HUGGINS,
Petitioner


1 _



II OWN TODAY! II


1. Cincinnati ballplayers' bunks (1) rey answer is a rhyming
II I I Ipair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and

2. Coer abaseall at i gif papr (1 n h ion mbe iter the


3. Hopscotch board marker lecture (1) syllables in each word.

I I I I I I 2012 UFS Dist by Univ Udcicfor UFS



5. Putting the kibosh on repairing (2)


6. Below Oklahoma's NBA team (2)

7. Inin Joe aco' miltr pot (3 I



SNOSINEVD SNOSIBRI~I'L H3G(NIIHL BHGNnl'9 DNIXId DNIXIN'S
SHHDP SBWVII'P BITVI gITVHO 'G dV3 dVHM S(InB SGHB'I
7-20-12 SMSM~SNV


I~IF~Fi~RII


I~iF~i~iic~






C16 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE





AT OR BELOWV


36 Months with $2500 down, including $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year.
200: per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 7/22/2012.



B MW

ofOcala
3949 College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just W~est Of 1-75
877-22l~;17-1 655
BMII Vi n ocala~com r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JULx 20, 2012 017


If It Boasts
Zero Manean


. nuh


Cos s Fo Fur Yars... .
During Mac~hine
If It's T'he Ultimate
Driving Machine...

Then it must be a BMW
from BMW of Ocala.

B3MW Ultimate Service'"":
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Total Maintenance Charges: $0


Loaded Air Power Windlows Power Locks



$ e *** A A
it 0 PAR


New 2012


~% d Air Power WindowNs Power Locks


40 A W-HIS ;-.
-PRi~CE


Loaded Air Power Windows Powler Locks


New 2012 B3MW


New 2012 BMW


New 2012


R 2012 t.olks;.-.aen p ~
aI PASSAT S
All offers exclude tax, tag, title rreg~stration & daaler rees. Prices include credits from VW lease cash, holdback
cash, voucher credit & VBP money Leae a 20127 Jetta S witrh aular yaim tran mission for $89 a month. 39-month
lease. $5450 due at signing Lease a 2012 Pajsal S with aulomallc transmission for $109 a month. 36-month
lease, $5450 due at signing Leasea a 20i12 BeEetle othn J1uomalic trans mcs~son for $141 a month. 39-month lease,
$5450 due at signing. All leases are 10j 000 mile= per year allowed. 20sJ per mile Ihereatler. *0%3 APR is $16.67
per $1000 borrowesd per month, w.1h 50 dowvn ror Yuell qualitled buyers A~ll offers on approval of creJIl
Prices not compatible with neantivZ rlte See dealer lor detls31 AllCnII olielrs super end o ly 7i22-2012


BMW 328i Sedan


Lease For $3 9Per Month
36 Months with $3999 down, Incluen~g $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
20d per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 7/22/2012.


328i Convertible


Lease For s49Per Mllonth
36 Months with $3200 down, including $0 secrityll deporsit 10k miles per year,
200 per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 7/22/2012.


528si Sedan


Lease For $5 9Per Mlonth
36 Months with $1900 down, aiuainolg $0 security deposit. 10k miles per year,
200: per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and $799 dealer fee.
See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 7/22/2012.


BMW X5 xl~rive35id


Volk~swagen

ofOcala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SWV College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
877-227-1655
vw~ofocola. com














If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against
the above named defendantss, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the property herein described.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described
property incitrus County, Florida:

Tract 1 being further described as: The Northe 1/2 1/2 of the NW 114 of the SE 114 of
Section 14, Township 19 South, Range 19 East, Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida. Together with non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress over lands
as described in O.R. Book 597, Page 516, Public Parcel Identification Number:
2309628
Street Address: 2086 South Ambridge Point, Inverness, FL 34452

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Clarfield,0kon,Salomone & Pincus, P.L. Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after
the date of the first publication of this notice on or before August 6, 2012 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.

DATED onJuly 3, 2012
Betty Strifler, Clerk of said Court
(SEAL)
By: 1s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

Published two (2) times in The Citrus County Chronicle July 13 and 20, 2012 .



Vs. Russo, Denise Case No.03 220N1 --000801 Notice of Action

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No: 09-2012-CA-000801
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC DBA CHAMPION
MORTGAGE COMPANY
Plaintiff,
vs.
DENISE RUSSO, ET AL,

Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Denise Russo

Last Known Address: 5579 E Arthur St, Inverness, FL 34452-7802
Current Address. Unknown

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS

Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown

scri p E eN nFFItrthatoan acFo dto foreclose a mortgage on the following de-

THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 11 IN BLOCK 445-A OF A RE-PLAT OF A PORTION OF
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST, FIRST ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 116 THROUGH 122, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

A/K/A 5579 E Arthur St, Inverness, FL 34452-7802

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on, Albertelli Law, Plaintiff s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box
23028, Talmpa, FL ,33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on
Plaintiff s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwies, a default will be entered
against ynou fr th~e0 lief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
(SEAL)

July 13 &20, 2012


TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Helen E. Smith, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-343, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent s date of death
was March 23, 2012: that the total value of the estate is $NONE and that the names
and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Pamela Mae Klitzka, 1320 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34453

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 20, 2012
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Pamela Mae Klitzka
1320 N Paul Drive, inverness, FL 34453
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
July 20 & 27, 2012



O ~Neal,. Spence8,2102 C -4 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012 CP 424
IN RE: ESTATE OF SPENCER B. O'NEAL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of SPENCER B. O NEAL, deceased, whose date of
death was February 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative s attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
TCHE FIRST PBLNCATUDENOOF HEIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
()YNRS FM RTNE NFG TH TIE PECNODSD SE FOT HAAOE ANEDCLAIM FILED TWO
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 20, 2012.


Attorney for the estate: sercRe n

PO To45. Homoso Srins Floridlrdar 04707P 7235A) e87934 ea: (3t2 )82-7936
July 20 & 27, 2012


811-0727 FCRN
Veljacic Shelley Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 372 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF SHELLEY VELJACIC
A/K/A SHELLEY J. VELJACIC
Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Shelley Veljacic a/k/a Shelley J. Veljacic, de-
ceased whose date of death was May 11, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Av-
enue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative s attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is July 20, 2012.


/s/Sean J. S oveknB Stoetw n

Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John A. Nelson,, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0727032
Slaymaker & Nelson, P.A. 2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352)726-61 29 Fax: (352) 726-0223 E-Mail:john aslaymakerlaw~com
July 20 & 27, 2012


805-0720 FCRN
07/20 Citrus County School Boarod
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold a Special Meeting and Workshop; 1:00 p.m.
and a Public Hearing; 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 in the Board Room of the
District Services Center located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Special Meeting is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come bef ore the Board. The Workshop is to review the 201 2-20 13 Student
PorsionHPla fri oiElementatrythaendeSec eday and ditscsh tehe 2012-201F3 esdet.
Work Program and the Tentative 2012-2013 Budget.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

/s/ Sandra Himmel

ScnctalHimmal
Superintendent

Citrus County School Board

Publish one time (1) in the Citrus County Chronicle
Friday, July 20, 2012


807-0720
sec. storage & gdn view apts
PUBLIC NOTICE-NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal
property under the Florida Self Storage Act statutes (Sections 83.801-83.809).
The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on Friday, the
third (3rd) day of August, 2012, scheduled to begin at 1:30pm, on the prem-
ises where said property has been stored and which is located at security
Storage and Gardenview Apts, 9673 W Audobon Lane, Crystal River. county
of Citrus, State of Florida, the following:
Name: Unit# Name: Unit#

Holmes W-12 Richard Sullivan E-6
3390 N Bay Ave. 1151 N Circle Drive
crystal River, FL 3M429 Crystal River, FL 3M429

Holmes E-12 George Boria E-3
Address same as above 2880 W Seabreeze Point


ch shedtsems ar copd ds is here s en m b remye ad haotn e of
the sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between
owner and obligated party.
Published in the Citrus county Chronicle, July 20th & 27th


1~


800-0720 FCRN
Finnegan, Kevin, P Case No. 2012CP165 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012 CP165
IN R:cTHE ESTATE OF KEVIN PATRICK FINNEGAN,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the ESTATE OF KEVIN PATRICK FINNEGAN, deceased, File
Number 2012 C165, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative s attorney are set forth below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this Notice is served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 13, 2012.
Perssonaat Rpe~sne tie
6 Garvey Farm Rd., Hinesburg, VT 05461-3155
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ BRUCE CARNEY, ESQUIRE Carney & Associates, P.A. 7655 W Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Suite 2, Crystal River, Florida 34429 352-795-8888
Counsel to Personal Representative
Julyl3 &20, 2012


808-0727 FCRN
Pagano Rose File No. 2012CP416 Notice To Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2012-CP-416
IN RE: ESTATE of ROSE PAGANO
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

dTahe adm nitra~t ond ofeestate cif RSEC PAANO dc e eds whose dat oeiPr-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative s attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 20, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Marie T. Blume
209 CourthouseSquare, InvernessFL 34450
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Fla. Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone:(352) 726-1211
July 20 & 27, 2012

809-0727 FCRN
Smith Helen, E Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-343
IN RDE- EESWAEDOF HELEN E. SMITH
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)


CLASSIFIED


803-0720 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION
FOR CONDITIONAL USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on Auaust 2. 2012 at 9:00 AM in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please
note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a particular item
is discussed will vary dependina on how fast the PDC moves through the aaenda.

CU-19-04 Mike Scott Plumbina for Flla and John Thomas A Conditional Use to allow
for land application of treated domestic septage and sanitary waste in an Agricul-
ture District, pursuant to Section 2419 Aar~icEulleetiEureDitrct(AR of the Citrus County
Land Development Code, and Section 42-145, Permittina of a domestic sentaae
land application site, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances..

Property is located in Section 6. Township 20 South. Ranae 20 East; more specifically,
a portion of Parcels 23000 and 34000, which address is 6091 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness, Florida. A complete legal description of the property is on file with the
Land Development Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 141, Lecanto, FL, 34461,
telephone (352) 527-5239.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ins prndor eedih ipur~poose he orhshe may neeuddto in ure that a verbcti nre ord of
which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator s Office, cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida

July 20, 2012


804-0720 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE
REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on Auaust 2. 2012 at 9:00 AM in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please
note that the PDC meeting begins at 9-00 AM. The actual time that a narticular item
is discussed will vary donendina on how fast the PDC moves through the aaenda.

SV-1-02- Frmo 8 il~rt mineri fo EoestcmdJoyGolion- To vacate a
portion of N. Gulf Avenue (aka S. Gulf Street) lying south of S.R. 44 and north of N.
Marion Way in the plat of Mayfair Garden Acres First Addition, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 172, public records of Citrus County, Florida.

Property is located in Section 25. Township 18 South. Ranae 17 East. A complete legal
description of the property is on file with the Land Development Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 141, Lecanto, FL, 34461, telephone (352) 527-5239.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made. which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator s Office, cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planningoand development Commission


July 20, 2012


812-0727FCRN
Vs. Amellio Joseph Case No. 092011CA00401 7XXXXXX Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTY JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.092011CA00401 7XXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSEPH AMELLIO A/KlA JOSEPH M. AMELLIO; JOSE JAREL;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH AMELLIO A/KlA
JOSEPH M. AMELLIO; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSE JAREL; et al,.

Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: JOSE JAREL, deceased; ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED.
RESIDENCES UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following de-
scribed property in Citrus County, Florida:

LT 10 BLOCKK B- A TRES V AG5, SARML 1O S ACSORDNG


THROUGH 16, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED
IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAE 87-a, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiff's attorneys, whose address is PO BOX
11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of
oulcain and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
DATED ON July 12, 2012
(SEAL)
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By: 1s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk
Pulse I wo (2) times in The Citrus County Chronicle July 20 & 27, 2012




Vs. Amellio Joseph Case No. 071CFACORN01 7XXXXXX Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTY JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.092011CA00401 7XXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSEPH AMELLIO A/KlA JOSEPH M. AMELLIO; JOSE JAREL;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH AMELLIO A/KlA
JOSEPH M. AMELLIO; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSE JAREL; et al,.

Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: JOSE JAREL, deceased; ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED.
RESIDENCES UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following de-
scribed property in Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 10 & 11, BLOCK B-L CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH
150, PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1
THROUGH 16, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED
IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAE 87-a, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiff's attorneys, whose address is PO BOX
11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of

Plitf tt dney Ise im ditel th refer othehisi Co defal uilb ent r against
you for the relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
DATED ON July 12, 2012
(SEAL)
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By: 1s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in The Citrus County Chronicle July 20 & 27, 2012
1183-92392



Vs. Aragunde, Rolande 21-A-84 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS

CAC UNo OF1L2 C-8

HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST AND FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ACE SECURITIES
CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-HE4, ASSET BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,

Plaintiff,
vs.
Roland Aragunde, Unknown Spouse of Roland Aragunde, Unknown Tenant #1, and Un-
known Tenant #2,

Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION


L"ii~iii~i~


C8 FRIDAY,JULY 20, 2012


CITus COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


and
PETER HUGGINS,
Respondent,
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: PETER HUGGINS
(Respondent's last known address) 620 N CORBIN AVE, INVERNESS, FL 34453

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on NANCY HUGGINS,
whose address is 620 N CORBIN AVE, INVERNESS, FL 34453, ON OR BEFORE August 20,
2012 and file with the original with the clerk of the Court at CITRUS COUNTY CLERK OF
COURTS, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL, 34450, before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided:
INVERNESS HGLDS UNIT 4 PG 109 LOTS 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11 BLK 130
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these doc-
uments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of PRocedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
July 20, 27, August 3 & 10, 2012


888-0727 FCrn

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTTHU 5T JDCA CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR

Case No. 2012 DR 756
Diviin Famil


SONIA R. SHARP
Petitioner '
and
PAUL A. SHARP
Respondent


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)


TO: PAUL A. SHARP
(Respondent s last known address): UNKNOWN

agOU ARE NOTItFIEa that an ac nonfdor disssdutianc pymarrig cha bene f les
if any, to it on SONIA A. SHARP, whose address is 941 Palm Ave, Inverness, Florida
s452on orbeforel A gustO6t 2012a~nd fil Ut original wh the clrkI df tiourt at
FLORIDA 34450 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.

The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided: NONE

Clkop es ofC oI court docur rts in thima r se, iutin oeo s eme available atethe


dr'ou must keep tetl erk of the Cir uit Co rt's office no ified of o ur currrentdad-
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated June 21, 2012
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By; /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle July 6,13,20,27, 2012


L"ii~iii~i~F~


2307-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-210 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
JUSTIN K HOLCOMBE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-

sEse aUe C1E 0 lo

DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:SUGARMILL
WOODS OAK VLG LOT 31
BLK 194 PB 9 PG 86
NAME IN WHICH AS-

SHEILA FREIDMAN
Said property being in the
County of citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.


citrus, realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2012
2296-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-212
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY


The hEC BroJ th Iollowing
certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be
issued thereon. The certifi-
cate number and year of is-
tshueanpe pet description o
in which it was assessed
are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO:
10-9325 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
SHADY LANE RIVER
ROAD AREA UNREC SUB
LOT 70: COM AT SW COR
OF SE1/4 OF SEC
29-17-20, TN N 89 DEG


Mm

20M 35S E AL S LN OF S D
SEC 29 129.50 FT, TN N 0
DEG 58M 11S W 389.94
FT, TN S 89 DEG 01M 49S
W 171.37 FT, TN N 52 DEG
30M 00S W 231.69 FT, TN
N 71 DEG 07M 00S W
194.14 FT TO POB, TN
CONT N 71 DEG 07M 0 OS
W 80 FT, TN N 18 DEG
53M 00S E 120 FT, TN S 71
DEG 07M 00 S E 80 FT, TN
S 18 DEG 53M 00S W 120
FT TO POB. SUBJ TO EAS
M OF REC DESC IN OR BK
339 PG 304 & OR BK 1952


WESD ON CDHAONSO
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate shall
bew rdemed accordinbteod
in such certificate shall be
sold to the highest bidder
on line, on August 8, 2012
at 9:30 A.M. at www
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2012


814-0727 FCRN
8/7sale, Units 237,220,2 10- Kings Bay Self Storalge
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF LIEN

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property de-
scribed below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Florida Self Stor-
age Facility Act Statutes (Section 83.80183.809). The undersigned will sell at Public
Auction by competitive bidding on Tuesday, August 7th @ 2:30pm on the premises
where said property has been stored.
Kingsbay Self Storage, 7957 W W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River, FL 34429, Citrus
County, State of Florida:



Ni"ol : Wcllc Ui 1 e:sHe Dsyr Misc.
Purchase must be paid in full a the time of Sale in cash. All items are sold as-is
and must be removed at the time of the sale.
July 20 & 27, 2012


TO: Unknown Tenant #1
2086rSosusthFAmbnidge Point


Unknown Tenant#2
2086eSoulb Ambid52e Point


1E


m


m










CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL. LINE:
800-440-9054


352-564- 1971
1005 South Sunceast Blvd. Homosessa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613 2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453
^lNCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC *PRICE EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND
INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL Q1UALIFY WAC. +$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRAfl0N
PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 019


~eB~~"


TENT EVENT BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA INVERNESS


CRYSTAL





CALLI THE INSTANT APPRAISL LINE

S800-440-9054


CRYST
CH)-EVRO LET


CrystalAutos.com 1035 South Suncoast 131vd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515
*PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBAfES, INCENTIVES AND $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $2,999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY, $1,000 CHEVROLET TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. EXCLUDES
TAX, TAG;, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 3.65% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES
ooosx.,MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


020 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVY'S
LOVE IT" OR RETURNIT"
G GUARANTEE"


~r~C~*


--


THEii PRICE YOUl SIEE IS
THIE PRIICE YOU PA4Y


- 1-


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CON FIDE NCE
PRICING












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cIfRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012 D1


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FR E:E T;
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fCIRU COUNTYk~ II F -


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CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


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D4 FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012


CITRUS Co~vn (FL) CHRONICLE
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