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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02829
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-15-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02829

Full Text



Top ace: Rays send Price to mound against Red So:


TODAY
& next
morning


CITRUS


COUNTY


Expect numerous
showers and storms as
rain chances are 50%.
PAGE A4


County agent works with seniors


I 'II

Lawn chairs?
A duo takes off in a
homemade, tandem
lawn chair rig./Page A9


Shemir Wiles
A DAY IN
THE LIFE


Editor's note: Chronicle re-
porter Shemir Wiles shadows
members of the community
for a day in her new series, A
Day in the Life. This column
will run the third Sunday
monthly.
here's a feeling of
hopelessness when you
walk into the home of a
senior citizen who's function-
ally impaired.
They don't know where to
go or whom to turn to. Then


there's the painful realization
of not being able to do certain
things without help a loss
of independence. I can only
imagine it can feel dehuman-
izing, as if you're regressing
back to your childhood days.
CeCe Douglas sees this al-
most every day as a Senior
Care Services case manager
in Citrus County But her job
is to give those seniors hope.
She fights for them to stay in
their homes by offering serv-


ices such as homemaking,
personal care, home-deliv-
ered meals, emergency alert
products and respite care.
The start of a new budget
year means more seniors can
move off the waiting list for
services. But before anything
can be done, an in-home as-
sessment must be done to find
out what services (if any) are
needed to keep the person in
their home.
Our first client of the day


'Feels like home'


Key words
What best describes
the Key Training
Center?/Page Cl
ENTERTAINMENT:


Replacements
Several names being
batted around to fill
void left by Tyler and
Lopez./Page B6


HOMEFRONT:
FN-5S-


DAVID SIGLER/Chronicle
Key Training Center resident Regina Lynn, left, shares her lion face with resident manager Eileen Cannone, right,
during afternoon snack time at the James A. Burnes Cottage group home.

Group residences help Key Training Center clients learn skills


Old vase
Antiques expert John
Sikorski comments on
the value of this Nippon
vase./Page E4
BUSINESS:


Taste of ...
The longtime Taste of
Chicago food festival
shortens its days as
attendance dwindles.
/Page D1


TOMORROW:
For sale?
The Seminole Building
in Crystal River has a
storied history but is
it enough to keep city
officials from selling
it?/Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial............. ..... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope................ B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A12
O bituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 11||||84578 L2007I5 o


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
-LECANTO
inside the James A. Burnes
Cottage, it was snack time, but
Regina Lynn wanted to have
fun.
After devouring her cheese and
crackers, to the sofa she sauntered
with her photo album in hand.
Flipping through each page,
Lynn beamed, stopping occasion-
ally to share her best lion impres-
sion with resident manager
Eileen Cannone.
"It's a very positive environ-
ment for them," Melissa Walker,
assistant executive director at the
Key, explained.
The Key's group homes are de-
signed to promote a sense of inde-
pendence in Key's clients, while
still providing the structure and
supervision required.
In total, the Key owns 19 group


We become a
family. I enjoy it. I
love my girls.
Eileen Cannone
resident manager.
homes throughout Citrus County.
About three to 11 clients reside in
a home at one time. Each home
has at least two staff members
who oversee the residents'
well-being.
Sara Roberts, residential serv-
ices director for the Key, said
many of the clients get up in the
morning, have breakfast and head
to work or to the adult day train-
ing facility where they take
classes based on goals they have
set for themselves.
"We try to individualize every-
thing to their needs," Walker said.


Danny Hochadel walks with Carolyn Trammel to her apartment Thursday af-
ternoon. Sara Roberts, residential services director, said Hochadel helps
Trammel make the trip from the Key bus to her home every day.


"They're each their own person,
just like you and me."
Around 2:30 p.m., the clients re-
turn home. After snack time,
Roberts said everyone usually
participates in some type of recre-
ational activity in the evening,
such as bingo or bowling until it's
time for dinner and bed.
Cannone has been supervising
the five women of Burnes Cottage
since November.
She sees how the group home
setting helps clients become more
self-sufficient They take pride in
doing tasks for themselves and
being able to have a place they
know is their home.
"We become a family," she said.
"I enjoy it. I love my girls."
Across the cul-de-sac, Spooner
Cottage houses several non-ambu-
latory, mentally challenged resi-
dents who need significant
See HOME/Page A4


Clients talk

apartment living

at the Key Center
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Inquisitive eyes
peeked through the shrubbery as,
one by one, pairs of feet carefully
ambled down the walkway toward
the front of the apartment complex
on Zephyr Street in Inverness.
Any person who visits a Key
Training Center apartment com-
plex will be greeted with a great
deal of hospitality unless the
clients are not home because they
are out working.
The Key Training Center has four
apartment complexes throughout
Inverness for those who are able to
live semi-independently
See APARTMENT/Page A5


had a 10 a.m. appointment,
but wasn't answering her
phone. CeCe was concerned
something might be wrong
(the woman has a history of
falling and not being able to
get up) so we made the trip
over to the woman's trailer off
Homosassa Trail to make
sure she was OK After a few
knocks with no answer, CeCe
left her business card with a
See DAY/Page A8



Duke


Energy's


troubles


not over

EMERY P. DALESIO
AP Business Writer
RALEIGH, N.C. Busi-
ness experts who follow
Duke Energy Corp. say the
country's biggest electric
company has months of
problems ahead after oust-
ing the Progress Energy
CEO who had long been
promised the job as chief of
the post-merger giant.
Duke's
board of di-
never told
the North do
Carolina l
Utilities
Commis-
sion that of-
ficials were Jim Rogers
considering CEO of Duke
a change at Energy.
the top,
even as the
regulatory
agency
rushed to
meet the
timetable
for merging
the two util-
ity compa- Bill
n i es Johnson
Observers former CEO
say that of Progress
means reg- Energy.
ulators may
be less MORE
likely to OR
grant key INSIDE
approvals a Read
in the fu- editorial/
ture just Page C2
as a basket-
ball referee
might make up for a bad
foul call by making another
call in the other
direction.
Duke Energy's board sur-
prised the business world
July 2 by scrapping a year
and a half of promises to
make Progress Energy CEO
Bill Johnson the expanded
company's top executive,
dumping him within hours
of the deal's legal conclu-
sion in favor of Duke CEO
Jim Rogers.
The utilities commission
and state Attorney General
Roy Cooper launched sepa-
rate investigations to find
out what else the public was
not told.
Questions escalated after
Rogers testified under oath
at a utilities commission
hearing that Duke board
members had started to tell
him about their doubts
about Johnson in late May.
Then, over dinner five days
before the commission ap-
proved the merger and re-
moved the last major
obstacle, two Duke direc-
tors asked Rogers whether
he would consider staying
in control if Johnson was re-
placed. The companies had
pressed the commission to
approve the merger before
July 8, when either com-
pany could walk away with-
out penalty
The commission was
See DUKE/Page A8


HIGH
91
LOW
75


/B1


FLYING HIGH:


~iY~~s





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's political forums are: 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 31, at the Citrus
County Auditorium; and 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County will
have a forum at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 17, at the Citrus
County Resource Center on
Marc Knighton Court, off
County Road 491, in Lecanto.
The forum will feature candi-
dates for county commission
District 1, 3 and 5. Information:
Jeanne McIntosh, 352-746-
5660, evenings, or 352-484-
9975.
m Candidates for county
commission, public defender
and school board will be fea-
tured in a forum Thursday, July
19, sponsored by the Citrus
Hills Civic Association. The
7 p.m. forum is at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club. In-
formation: Cathi Smith, 352-
746-7532.
Candidates for county
commission and state repre-
sentative are invited to partici-
pate in the Save Our Waters
forum at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 1, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida in Lecanto. Informa-
tion: 352-860-5175.
Michael Smallridge, Re-
publican for county commission
District 5, has the following
events: 2 to 5 p.m. July 15,
fundraiser at The Grove in In-
verness; 6 to 8 p.m. July 26,
meet-and-greet at Citrus
Springs Community Center. In-
formation: 352-302-7406.
Theodora "Teddi" Rus-
nak, Republican for county
commission District 5, will have
a meet-and-greet from 5 to
7 p.m. Monday, July 16, at Oys-
ter's restaurant on U.S. 19 in
Crystal River.
Hank Hemrick, Republi-
can for sheriff, will greet the
public from 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, July 18, at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club. Infor-
mation: Bob, 352-527-1524.
Steven Burch, Republi-
can for sheriff, will have a
fundraiser at 5:30 p.m. Friday,
July 20, at the Grove, 201
Tompkins St., Inverness. Infor-
mation: Steve Burch at 352-
464-4495 or Bob Milan at
352-527-9943.
Charles Poliseno, Re-
publican for county commission
District 4, will have a fundraiser


from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 18, at The Grove
Downtown, 210 Tompkins St.,
Inverness. Information: Debbie
Poliseno, 352-302-5595
Scott Adams, Republican
for county commission District
5, will have the following meet-
and-greet events: 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 21, at Carna-
han's Supply, 4016 W. South-
ern St., Lecanto; 1 p.m. Friday,
July 27, at Fat Boy's BBQ in
Crystal River; 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at
Frog Holler Antiques and Col-
lectibles, 7736 U.S. 41, Floral
City.
The Citrus County Repub-
lican Party will open its cam-
paign headquarters at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, July 17, at 2456 N.
Essex, Citrus Hills. Information:
352-410-6125.
Meet local candidates at
the Republican Party of Citrus
County rally from 4:30 to 7:30
p.m. Saturday, July 21, at Crys-
tal River Mall.
The Ronald Reagan Re-
publican Assembly of West
Central Florida will have a fund-
raiser at 1 p.m. Saturday, July
28, in the South Square Plaza,
938 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River, for county commission
candidates Renee Christo-
pher-McPheeters, Shannon
Heathcock and Michael
Smallridge. Information: 352-
257-5381.
Nancy Argenziano, Inde-
pendent for state House District
34, will speak at 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 11, at the Citrus
County Tea Party Patriots
meeting at the Women's Club,
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for super-
intendent of schools, will have a
bowling fundraiser from 1 to
4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, at
Manatee Lanes on State Road
44 in Crystal River.
The Beverly Hills Civic As-
sociation candidates' forum is
at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, at
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. In-
formation: Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic Asso-
ciation is hosting a candidates'
forum at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct.
4, at the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season. Send
events or campaign fundraisers
to Mike Wright at mwright@
chronicleonline com.


Feds agree to allow access



to help with Fla. voter purge


The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE Sec-
retary of State Ken Detzner
said Saturday the state has
received access to a federal
database that could allow it
to move forward with a
voter purge aimed at re-
moving suspected non-
citizens from the rolls.
The announcement is
likely to reignite a battle
over the initiative, which
the state said will sweep in-
eligible voters off the rolls
but critics charge could in-
advertently cost some citi-
zens their right to vote.
"I am very pleased that
the federal government has
committed to giving us the
access necessary to identify
noncitizens on the voter
rolls and make sure these
ineligible voters cannot
cast a ballot," Detzner said
in a statement released Sat-
urday "Florida voters are
counting on their state and
federal governments to co-
operate in a way that en-
sures elections are fair,
beginning with ensuring


the voter rolls are current
and accurate."
Detzner almost immedi-
ately sent a letter to elec-
tions supervisors, many of
whom have so far resisted
the purge, suggesting ac-
cess to the federal database
would allow the program to
resume. The state had
stopped sending names be-
yond a random sample to
the supervisors after many
complained it was riddled
with inaccuracies.
In the letter, Detzner said
the state and federal gov-
ernments plan to sign an
agreement allowing the
state use the Systematic
Alien Verification for Enti-
tlements, or SAVE, data-
base "very soon."
"The first set of names we
intend to review using the
SAVE database will be the
names provided to supervi-
sors this past April," Det-
zner wrote. "The results
will be provided to you for
additional actions in accor-
dance with applicable
laws."
Detzner also reiterated
the state's argument the ini-


tial sample turned up ex-
amples of noncitizens who
were registered to vote,
some of whom had cast bal-
lots.
"These ineligible voters
must be removed to ensure
the integrity of our elec-
tions," Detzner said.
A federal court in June
rejected a request by the
U.S. Department of Justice
to bar the state from taking
any more steps toward car-
rying out its purge program,
saying concerns that eligi-
ble voters could be re-
moved from the list were
significant.
"But having an ineligible
voter on the list is not a so-
lution," U.S. District Court
Judge Robert Hinkle said.
At the same time, Hinkle
said the ruling was driven
in part by assurances from
the state it would not for-
ward any more names to
county elections supervi-
sors based on a list of po-
tentially ineligible voters
even the state concedes
is inaccurate. That list
is drawn from driver's
license and voter-


registration records.
Detzner said in his letter
the state-generated list
"should be considered
obsolete."
Overall, Hinkle's ruling
that the state could pursue
the removal of non-citizens
within 90 days of a federal
election seemed to pave the
way for some version of the
scrubbing to continue, es-
pecially if the state gained
access to SAVE and could
prove the effort isn't
discriminatory
The state and the U.S.
Department of Homeland
Security have battled over
the SAVE database for
months, with the state say-
ing it has the right to access
the list and DHS saying
Florida hasn't provided all
the necessary information
to use it. The state eventu-
ally sued the department
for access to SAVE.
Florida officials said in
recent weeks it now has
sent the information the
federal agency was looking
for, apparently clearing
the way for Saturday's
announcement.


State BRIEFS


FSU to bring
anthropology back
TALLAHASSEE Florida
State University trustees are
expected to reinstate the
school's anthropology program
after it was cut in 2009 during
campus-wide belt tightening.
The Tallahassee Democrat
reported the university's an-
thropology major could be
back on the books in time for
the spring 2013 semester.


The university stopped offer-
ing the major in the wake of
dramatic state funding cuts.
But FSU has continued to offer
anthropology courses and two
of the department's longstand-
ing tenured professors were
reinstated in 2010.
Gov. Rick Scott brought an-
thropology into the national
spotlight last year when he
quipped Florida didn't need
any more anthropology majors.
Trustees will vote on the de-


cision in September.
3 more counties
get storm help
TALLAHASSEE The fed-
eral government has approved
disaster unemployment assis-
tance for victims of Tropical
Storm Debby in three more
Florida counties. Disaster offi-
cials said Friday financial help is
now available to those dam-
aged by last month's storm in
Hillsborough, Manatee and Tay-


lor counties.
The unemployment assis-
tance for a period of a maxi-
mum of 28 weeks has also
been made available earlier to
more than a dozen other
counties.
President Barack Obama
declared a major disaster area
for Florida on July 3 as a result
of Tropical Storm Debby that
swept across the state in late
June.
-From wire reports


CARPE "JlJ IEIW_ OD-VN.'.o),MI.- 'IIT


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5pm
Sat. 9-1 om


I


CO _ORJ'


Ar P
CARET & ILE-


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CC-C-n7


SOUND OFF
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563-0579.
* Be prepared to leave a brief message write it out
before calling to make sure you remember everything
you want to say.
* After the beep, speak loudly, slowly and clearly.


Mark Stone/Scoff Bender
Your "HOME" town Agents!

KELLER WILLIAMS 3524767996
R E L T sellingcitrus@gmail.com
of Citrus County www.sellingcitrus.com
I W? et p AI UT


. *


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ADULTS &

CHILDREN

WELCOME
CHECK UP and
CLEANING


NEW PATIENTS
a EMERGENCIES



SAME DAY
Al APPOINTMENTS
DISCOUNT FOR
CASH PAYING


AKELI 352-596-9900
D E N T L Amir Akel, DMD
5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill WWW.akeldentai.com
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ON US 19
Most Insurances Accepted -
Accepting: Chase Health Advance And CareCredit
*D0150, D0274, D1110. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to
pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed
as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or
reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area
by the American Dental Association or the Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


r C',


(Pictured Above Left to Rigljt)
Stephen Stark, MD
Interventional Cardioloqqvy
Hari Kannam, MD
Iniwrventional Cardiology
Srinivas Attanti, MD
Intrrventional Cardiology


Getting to the heart of the matter doesn't always require complicated
surgery. The Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center Team are exceptional
at providing advanced minimally invasive procedures such as balloon angioplasty
and drug eluting stent placement. These procedures help restore blood flow by
opening blocked arteries in the heart that can cause heart attacks as well as other
blood vessels throughout the body.
For those eligible, our Radial Artery cardiac catheterization technique provides
a less invasive approach through the wrist. Thereby, reducing the chance of
complication and providing a faster recovery. Patients often go home within
hours of completing this procedure. Our advanced catheter based Carotid
Artery Stenting and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair procedures correct
narrowed arteries in the neck that provide blood flow to the brain and repair
weakened areas of the aorta located in the abdomen, avoiding open surgery and
resulting in less pain and quicker recovery.
With Citrus Memorial's expert team of interventional cardiologists, nurses and
technologists, coupled with their proven record of successful outcomes and
backed-up by the county's only open heart surgery program, you can have
peace of mind knowing that your heart is in the right place.


Learn more about us by visiting heartofcilrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.

CITRUS MEMORIAL




S & VASCULAR CENTER
502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


Campaign TRAIL


---- I


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A2 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


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Page A3 SUNDAY, JULY 15,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Tobacco-Free
Partnership to meet
Everyone is invited to the
next Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Citrus County meeting
at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, July
26, in the Community Room
of the Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
This meeting will kick off
the new 2012-13 fiscal year,
reviewing the goals and suc-
cesses of the partnership and
taking a look at the needs of
the community for future
activities.
The Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship's goals are to prevent
initiation of tobacco use
among youths and young
adults, create tobacco-free
policies to protect everyone
from secondhand smoke ex-
posure and to increase the
number of people who re-
ceive information about quit-
ting tobacco use.
For more, information call
Jillian Godwin at the Citrus
County Health Department,
352-726-1731, ext. 242, or
email jillian_godwin@doh.
state.fl.us.
Chronicle's Inverness
office hours change
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's office in Inverness has
changed the hours it will be
open to the public.
The new hours are 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through
Friday.

Tallahassee

Couple charged with
fraud in BP spill
A Tallahassee couple has
been charged with submitting
false claims to the fund cre-
ated to compensate victims
of the 2010 BP oil spill.
The U.S. Attorney's Office
reported Friday 46-year-old
Henry Clyde Barnes and 41-
year-old Nadine Barnes face
up to 20 years in prison if
convicted.
According to the indict-
ment, the pair sought reim-
bursement for work at a
property management com-
pany that never existed.
It wasn't immediately clear
if they had an attorney.

Tampa

One dead, one hurt
in bar shooting
Authorities say a 23-year-
old man is dead and another
person injured after being
shot outside of a bar in
Tampa.
The Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office said Pablo
Bonilla was inside the
Whiskey Park North Bar at 3
a.m. Saturday when he saw
a man speaking with his
girlfriend.
Bonilla and the man got
into a verbal confrontation,
but were separated before it
escalated.
When the bar closed,
Bonilla, his girlfriend and sev-
eral other people were stand-
ing in the parking lot. That's
when investigators said a car
pulled up and a gunman got
out and opened fire.
Bonilla and a second man
were struck. Bonilla was
taken to a local hospital
where he died.
The second victim is being
treated and expected to sur-
vive. The suspect fled the
scene.


Dems focus on Nelson re-election


Associated Press

HOLLYWOOD Sen.
Bill Nelson doesn't want
supporters to be fooled by
his fundraising advantage
over Republican frontrun-
ner Connie Mack the IV
While Nelson has about
$11 million in his campaign
account compared to more
than a $1 million for Mack,
he reminded Democratic
Party activists that outside
groups have already spent
millions attacking him.
"What we're going to have
to do about it is be smarter,
more efficient and we're
going to have to put the shoe


leather to the street," Nelson
told about 1,000 Democrats
Saturday at the state party's
annual fundraising dinner
While the presidential
election is grabbing all the
attention, Nelson's re-
election tops the list of state
races. He used much of his
time talking about the influ-
ence outside groups and
their money will have on the
election.
"This is a time of extraor-
dinary outside money com-
ing into Florida to try to buy
certain elections," Nelson
said before the dinner
"When this kind of money
can come in to influence -


and coming from billion-
aires it's obvious they're
not interested in Florida,
they're interested in their
own particular agenda. And
that is what is different
about this year, and we've
never seen it like this."
Pete Mitchell, Nelson's
Senate chief of staff who
will head the re-election
campaign beginning Mon-
day, estimates outside
groups already have spent
about $14 million attacking
Nelson.
"Citizens United has cre-
ated a whole new paradigm
in the political world,"
Mitchell said, referring to the


2010 U.S. Supreme Court de-
cision that allows limitless
political donations from cor-
porations, labor unions and
the wealthiest Americans.
Democratic National
Committee Chair Debbie
Wasserman Schultz, who
represents a South Florida
district in the U.S. House,
said Florida is a competi-
tive state and that's why
Nelson is a target.
"There's a handful of bil-
lionaires (who) are trying to
buy their way to power," she
said. "They're trying to buy
the White House, they're
trying to buy the Republi-
cans a majority in the


United States Senate. If they
can distort Senator Nelson's
record and do it in a way
that's opaque and unac-
countable and non-transpar-
ent, then democracy loses
and so will Floridians."
Nelson is seeking his third
term. Mack is considered a
shoo-in in the Republican
primary after most of the
major candidates have
dropped out. With about a
month to go before the Aug.
14 primary, he is far ahead
in polls and in fundraising
over former Congressman
Dave Weldon and Mike Mc-
Calister, who has never held
political office.


Gala galvanizes

fundraising

success

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO County residents
reached beyond the stars and
into their wallets Friday night
during Key Training Center's
30th "Reach for the Stars" dinner
auction.
Proceeds from the annual
event help provide scholarships
to more than 70 individuals who
receive no funding from the state
of Florida for needed services
and deliver year-round services
to roughly 300 developmentally
disabled adults at the Key
The dinner kicks off the Run
for the Money festivities, which
begin Monday
Melissa Walker, assistant exec-
utive director at the Key, esti-
mated 400 people attended the
dinner and helped raise a re-
markable $71,830.50 for the
organization.
Every year, Walker said, she is
always impressed to see how
strongly the community supports
the Key From business owners to
politicians to individual donors,
Walker said the mix of people in
the room illustrates how the Key
touches the hearts of all types of
people.
Following the social hour,
which featured live entertain-
ment from the Cool Corporate
Cats, WYKE station manager
Dennis Miller welcomed the
crowd before turning the micro-
phone to foundation director
Neale Brennan.
Brennan recognized the digni-
taries in the audience before giv-
ing a special thanks to everyone
who made the evening possible.
The Key Center Chorale by
means of video gave a touching
musical invocation.
"That's what it's all about,"
Brennan said.
Before dinner could begin, Bill
Elrod auctioned off the opportu-
nity to be the first table to eat. At
the end, two tables bid $650 to be
first and second in line for the
meal provided by Outback Steak-
house in Inverness.
Later in the evening, Walker
recognized Chris Moling as the
Citizen of the Year
In a short video, Moling was
lauded for his work in the com-
munity, especially when it comes
to the Key A longtime backer,
Moling has always been involved


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River artist Don
Mayo, right, and his wife, Sue,
present an image of a sea turtle to
be auctioned off at Friday night's
fundraiser. The artwork fetched
$1,100 for the Key Training Cen-
ter. : Citrus County Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays shows off
one of the items during the auc-
tion to raise funds for the Key
Training Center's unfunded con-
sumers. Bays, along with Amy
Meek, executive director of United
Way of Citrus County and wife of
Commissioner Joe Meek, played
"Vanna" for the special evening.

with a number of Key events,
most notably the annual Run for
the Money
"I'm deeply humbled," Moling
said while accepting the award,
"and I thank everybody"
Executive director Chet Cole
presented the Organization of the
Year award to the Citrus County
School District for all it does in
support of the Key and children
with developmental disabilities,
including their annual involve-
ment in the Key's Field Day
Superintendent of Schools
Sandra "Sam" Himmel accepted
the award.
"It's an easy partnership to
have," she said. "God bless you
all for what you do."
Walker also introduced a video
presentation illustrating this
year's Run for the Money theme:
"Feels like Home." Exploring life
at the Key, the video focused on
three extraordinary women:
Clancy Jones, Ruthie Farr and
Francine Tuzzolino. The women


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.
later joined Walker at the front of
the room as she urged people to
donate.
The live auction went into the


night as people bid hundreds of
dollars on various items such as
a Harley-Davidson corn hole
game, jewelry, artwork and an
autographed photo of Tim Tebow,
which netted $1,050.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-564-
2924 or swiles@chronicle
online.com.


Gambling group appears to be betting on ballot measure


Corre0

Due to incorre
tion provided to
Chronicle, a stoi
Al of Saturday's
"C.R. hotel launch
cam,'" contained
link to the Planta
tal River's webc
images from the
visit
http://www2.tbo.
tbo-webcams-pl
Chronicle regret
Readers can.
rus County Chro
errors in news a


action


The News Service of
Florida


ect intorma- TALLAHASSEE Fol-
the lowing unsuccessful at-
y on Page tempts in the Legislature to
edition, bring resort gambling to
ches 'river Florida, a newly formed
the wrong group backed by a huge
nation on Crys- casino interest appears to
am. To see be gearing up to take its bat-
webcam, tle to the ballot box in 2014.
Created in April, "New
com/weather/ Jobs and Revenues for
antation/. The Florida" has already spent
s the error. nearly $600,000 toward what
alert the Cit- appears to be an effort to
nicee to any put an initiative before vot-
rticle b canl ers, according to campaign
articles by call- finance records filed with
-From wire reports state election officials that


were made public Friday
A spokesman for New
Jobs, however, said the
group is in the planning
stages and has made no de-
finitive decision whether it
will try to circumvent the
Legislature and takes its
case directly to Florida vot-
ers as early as 2014. But a list
of expenditures filed with
state election officials gives
a relatively clear picture.
Most notably, National
Voter Outreach, a Nevada-
based petition gatherer, was
paid $50,000.
"National Voter Outreach
is a political consulting firm
specializing in organizing
signature drives to qualify


issues and candidates for
the ballot," the company
said on its website.
Another $150,000 has been
paid to Fort Lauderdale At-
torney Bruce Rogow for con-
sulting and legal services.
Rogow, a high-profile appel-
late lawyer, has argued a
number of cases before the
state Supreme Court, which
would have to approve any
ballot language.
The group's major initial
expenditures also include
$350,000 to Fabrizio,
McLaughlin and Associates,
an Alexandria, Va.-based
media and campaign con-
sulting group with strong
ties to Republicans includ-


ing Gov Rick Scott.
"There are some obvious
experts that are listed
there," said Brian Hughes, a
spokesman for the group.
"The key now is for the com-
mittee to determine which
path forward makes sense."
The group is backed almost
exclusively by companies af-
filiated with mega-resort de-
veloper, Malaysian-based
Genting Group. Together the
Bayfront 2011 Development
and Resorts Word have anted
up $605,500.
A spokesman for the com-
pany declined to comment
on the specific goals of the
New Jobs effort, saying only
the company continues to


target Florida as a "pre-
miere destination" for inter-
national travelers.
"Our contribution to 'New
Jobs and Revenue for
Florida is simply one more
example of our commitment
to exploring how to enhance
entertainment and hospital-
ity choices here," said
Genting spokesman Cory
Tilley "Job creation and ex-
panding economic opportu-
nity for the people of
Florida are goals we are
proud to support"
Hughes said he expects a
variety of business interests
and individuals to throw their
support behind the group's ef-
fort in the months to come.


Key event, key players






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money flows



to top races


The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE With
districts redrawn and qual-
ifying over, new campaign-
finance reports offer a
roadmap for many of this
year's top political races in
Florida.
Large chunks of money
flowed during the past three
months to House, Senate
and Supreme Court candi-
dates who are trying to win
high-profile campaigns or
capture empty seats.
A prime example is for-
mer Senate President Tom
Lee, a Brandon Republican
who collected $199,585 in
contributions as he tries to
return to the Senate in Dis-
trict 24.
Lee's is locked in a pri-
mary campaign against Rep.
Rachel Burgin, R-
Riverview, as they seek to
replace Sen. Ronda Storms,
who made a surprise an-
nouncement in May that she
would not seek re-election.
Burgin raised $50,248
during the year's second
quarter and, combined with
money she raised before
Storms' announcement, has
an overall total of $122,223.
Candidates faced a Friday
deadline for filing updated
campaign-finance reports.
Another example is a
South Florida Senate race
that pits two incumbents
whose districts were re-
drawn as part of the once-a-
decade reapportionment
process.
Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-
Fort Lauderdale, reported
raising $106,196 during the


quarter, giving her an overall
total of $366,767.
An updated report for
Democratic candidate
Maria Sachs of Boca Raton
had not been posted on the
state Division of Elections
website as of Friday
afternoon.
Both parties are targeting
the race in Senate District
34, which includes parts of
Broward and Palm Beach
counties.
The large infusions of
campaign cash, however,
went beyond the Legisla-
ture. Supreme Court Justice
Barbara Pariente reported
raising $157,957 during the
quarter, giving her a total of
$316,130.
Similarly, Justice R. Fred
Lewis reported collecting
$141,372 during the quarter,
giving him an overall total of
$303,010.
Pariente, Lewis and Jus-
tice Peggy Quince are trying
to win merit-retention elec-
tions this fall.
While those elections typ-
ically receive little atten-
tion, some conservative
groups are trying to knock
off Lewis, Pariente and
Quince because of com-
plaints they are too liberal.
The reports are the first
batch since courts resolved
questions about new legisla-
tive districts and candidates
formally qualified. They
also come as candidates
ramp up their campaigns
before the Aug. 12 primary
elections.
Large amounts of money
flowed to heavily contested
races in both the House and
the Senate.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Cayla Jeanne Coile, 20,
at large, Homosassa, at 1:58
p.m. Thursday on felony
charges of forgery with intent to
defraud and fraud/illegal use of
a credit card. According to
Coile's arrest report, she was
released on her own recogni-
zance due to her cooperation.
Unknown female, at 9:45
p.m. Thursday on a misde-
meanor charge of disorderly in-
toxication in public. According to
the arrest report, the woman re-
fused to identify herself after a
deputy found her walking north
in the middle of U.S. 41 in Her-
nando holding a beer can. No
bond.
George Edward Drewry,
47, of 4964 E. Stevenson
Court, Inverness, at 12:53 a.m.
Friday on a misdemeanor
charge of disorderly intoxication
in public. Bond $150.
Nancy Elaine West, 57, of
602 ConroyAve., Inverness, at
4:13 a.m. Friday on an active
Citrus County warrant for a
felony charge of obtaining prop-
erty by means of worthless
check. Bond $1,000.


ON THE NET
Go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on
the Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.


Brittany Danielle Stukes,
25, of 826 S.E. Eighth Ave.,
Crystal River, at 10:22 a.m. Fri-
day on a felony charge of
scheming to defraud (less than
$20,000). Bond $5,000.
Larry C. Smith, 69, of
1680 N.W. 112thAve., Ocala, at
1:30 p.m. Friday on an active
Citrus County warrant on mis-
demeanor charges of obtaining
property by means of worthless
check. Bond $450.
Thefts
A grand theft occurred at
3:59 p.m. July 12 in the 500
block of N.W. Eighth Avenue,
Crystal River.
A grand theft occurred at
4:46 p.m. July 12 in the 7400
block of N. Florida Avenue,
Dunnellon.
A grand theft occurred at
5:50 p.m. July 12 in the 300
block of Edison Street,
Inverness.


For the RECORD


HOME
Continued from PageAl

assistance.
Though many of the
clients appeared comfort-
ably engaged in the game
show on the television,
many belted out a jovial
hello and offered hugs to
both Walker and Roberts as
they made their rounds
around the residence
In each room, personal
items like stuffed animals,
colorful posters and photos
revealed a bit about each
residents unique
personality.
Many inside Spooner
Cottage tend to be the
Key's older clients. And as
more clients live longer,
Roberts said the Key is
working on making sure
the staff can handle the
chronic diseases that can
come with aging clients
like Alzheimer's.
For some parents or a
guardian, realizing a group
home may be what is best
for their loved one can be
tough. However, Roberts
said the Key does work
with the families through


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle






S Meeting Notices...................D8




IB:== 'Miscellaneous Notices........D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR OHI PLOPR HI LO PR
0.00 1- ,-76 0.0 J- 93 72 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Chance of thunder-
storms today.


92 7 trace 92 73 0.20

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 75
Expect numerous showers and storms
as rain chances are 50% today.O
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 76
Rain chances increase to 60% on Monday, so
count on some wet conditions.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 77
Numerous showers and storms are likely
despite rain chances decreasing to 50%.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 93/72
Record 97/64
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 83
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 2.05 in.
Total for the year 29.67 in.
Normal for the year 27.00 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 85%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grasses
Today's count: 3.1/12
Monday's count: 2.1
Tuesday's count: 3.9
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/15 SUNDAY 3:08 9:20 3:32 9:45
7/16 MONDAY 3:52 10:05 4:17 10:29
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
AUG. 1


AUG. 9


SUNSET TONIGHT 8:30 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:43 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................3:38 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ............................5:46 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:44 a/12:00 a 3:30 p/11:16 a
Crystal River** 3:05 a/8:38 a 1:51 p/10:10 p
Withlacoochee* 12:52 a/6:26 a 11:38 a/7:58 p
Homosassa*** 3:54 a/10:15 a 2:40 p/11:47 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:32 a/12:48 a 4:19 p/12:12 p
3:53 a/9:34 a 2:40 p/10:50 p
1:40 a/7:22 a 12:27 p/8:38 p
4:42 a/11:11 a 3:29 p/--


Gulf water
temperature


87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.93 29.98 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.97 34.98 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 36.66 36.67 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.65 39.73 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


66 .65
73
69 .12
74 .10
70
71
67 .26
72
74 .29
70
72
68
64
74 .03
66 .03
73 .16
70
73 .01
64
73 .03
69 .17
65
76
62
69
67
72
73 .34
68 .24
72
72
72
71 .50
71 .02
73 .16
62
72 1.13
75 .06
71 .02
68
73 .07
74
71 1.66


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 89 74 ts 87 75
New York City 85 73 ts 87 74
Norfolk 87 75 .05 pc 92 75
Oklahoma City 99 70 pc 93 70
Omaha 97 72 pc 97 74
Palm Springs 101 79 s 104 74
Philadelphia 81 68 .45 ts 91 75
Phoenix 97 76 .02 ts 101 83
Pittsburgh 81 64 .13 ts 87 69
Portland, ME 90 65 ts 83 68
Portland, Ore 82 59 pc 70 57
Providence, R.I. 92 70 ts 86 70
Raleigh 92 73 pc 93 72
Rapid City 10464 pc 98 73
Reno 94 59 s 92 65
Rochester, NY 90 67 ts 88 70
Sacramento 85 54 s 94 60
St. Louis 91 76 .03 pc 95 77
St. Ste. Marie 82 66 pc 81 62
Salt Lake City 83 69 .02 ts 84 68
San Antonio 94 74 ts 90 75
San Diego 73 67 pc 71 63
San Francisco 69 54 pc 69 53
Savannah 91 75 .01 pc 89 74
Seattle 74 59 sh 65 56
Spokane 86 69 pc 81 60
Syracuse 94 70 ts 85 66
Topeka 99 67 pc 99 74
Washington 88 71 .08 ts 92 74
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 104 Rapid City, S.D.
LOW 40 Fraser, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 66/54/sh Mexico City
Athens 100/79/s Montreal
Beijing 89/74/s Moscow
Berlin 65/51/sh Paris
Bermuda 84/78/ts Rio
Cairo 103/78/s Rome
Calgary 65/52/ts Sydney
Havana 84/72/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/80/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 93/72/s Warsaw


81/67/s
65/56/pc
90/70/pc
67/55/ts
88/71/ts
78/59/sh
65/51/sh
72/59/sh
89/69/s
63/46/s
87/75/pc
91/73/ts
71/52/sh


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T


ON THE NET
Key Training Center:
www.keytraining
center.org

any concerns.
"I equate it to sending off
a child to college," she
said. "We help alleviate
those anxieties."
The families are invited
to visit the homes. They get
to see the facilities and
meet the staff. Moreover,
the families are welcomed
to visit anytime.
"And I think that gives
them reassurance," she
said.
At times, the families
find their loved one be-
comes so independent they
don't want to leave the
group home for a visit.
Even during a short week-
end visit, Walker said many
of the residents are itching
to come back.
"It's their home,"
Roberts said, "and that's
where they want to be."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at swiles@
chronicleonline. com or
352-564-2924.


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S n 2 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
34450


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JULY19 JULY 26


A4 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


STATE/LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


APARTMENT
Continued from Page Al

Sara Roberts, residential
services director at the Key,
said a typical day for a client
begins around 6:30 a.m.
when the supported-living
coach arrives to help with
tasks like fixing breakfast or
picking out clothes for the
day Then the clients leave
for their respective jobs be-
fore returning later in the
afternoon.
Some work at the Key
Others have jobs in the
community.
Danny Hochadel works
three days a week in the
records department at the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice. He also volunteers in
the Crime Watch
department.
Seated comfortably in his
favorite chair inside his
apartment, Hochadel doesn't
say much, but when asked
about living on his own, he
smiles big.
When he's not on the job,
the 34-year-old likes to works
watch television and play on Health
his computer. But he also far from
likes to get out and enjoy the Inside
outdoors. lan disp
"I do horseback riding," he election c


said.
Barbara Whelan also has a
job outside of the Key She


aquariu
fish, alb
The 5


at Citrus Memorial to watch television, play on he said he likes his new
System, which is not her computer and sleep. But home.
a her apartment she looks forward to spend- "I don't have no com-
e her quarters, Whe- ing time with the other plaints," he said. "I just
lays an extensive col- clients in her complex. wanted to get in."
)f Barbie dolls and an "We hang out," she said. "I Davidson works at the in
m filled with colorful love it" the Key Store Processing
ino frogs and snails. Troy Davidson, 46, is one of Center. He moved from
1-year-old also likes the newest residents. So far, Ocala after he and his mom


DAVID SIGLER/Chronicle
Barbara Whelan shows off
her aquarium Thursday inside
her Inverness apartment. In-
side the tank, colorful fish
swim about along with albino
frogs and snails.

Now that he's in the
county, Davidson has aspira-
tions of becoming more in-
volved in the community and
sharing his story with others
as a way to advocate for the
Key and what it does for peo-
ple like him.
Roberts sees how the semi-
independent living gives
clients a sense of freedom.
They are also very social and
enjoy being out in the com-
munity whether it is taking a
late evening stroll or attend-
ing the local high school foot-
ball games.
Melissa Walker, assistant
executive director at the Key,
said there have been a num-
ber of success stories where
clients graduated from living
in a group home to semi-
independent living to owning
their own home.
"We're here to help them
decided Citrus County would reach their full potential,"
be a better fit for him. she said.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Deborah
Brown, 59
CITRUS SPRINGS
Deborah S. Brown, 59, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Friday, July 13, 2012, at In-
verness, Fla.
She was born Sept. 8,
1952, in Miami, Fla. Mrs.
Brown was a member of
RADS Kids.
She is survived by her
husband, James R. Brown,
of Citrus Springs, Fla.;
daughter, Angie (Shane)
Lee, of Atlanta, Ga.; father,
Carl Carroll, of Stein-
hatchee, Fla.; mother, Sue
McReynolds, of Hartwell,
Ga.; brothers, Steven Car-
roll of North Carolina, and
Greg Carroll, of Atlanta, Ga.;
and three grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her son, JJ.
A visitation will be from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Monday,
July 16, 2012, at the Purcell
Funeral Home Chapel,
Bushnell, Fla. Services will
follow at 1:30 p.m. with
Chuck Joy presiding. Inter-
ment will follow at the
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, Fla. In lieu of
flowers, a donation may be
made to the American Can-
cer Society, 3261 U.S. High-
way 441, Fruitland Park, FL
34731.
Online condolences may
be left at wwwpurcell
funeralhome.com. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Purcell
Funeral Home, Bushnell,
Fla.

Claire
Hildum, 83
BEVERLY HILLS
HILDUM, CLAIRE C., 83,
of Beverly Hills, died June
15, 2012.
Born in Great Neck, NY,
she came here in 1989 with
her beloved husband from
Westbury, NY She attended
Catholic University in Wash-
ington, DC and received a
Bachelor's Degree in
speech from Marymount
University in Terrytown,
NY She was an active mem-
ber in many clubs and civic
associations including Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church and the Pine Ridge
Golf and Country Club. She
was predeceased by her
husband of 51 years, George
W Hildum, Jr, her son,
William Hildum and her
daughter, Cynthia Smith.
Survivors include two sons,
George W Hildum, III, of
Concord, NH and Robert J.
Hildum of Washington, DC,
a daughter, Catherine H.
Siegel of New Orleans, LA.,
5 grandchildren and 1 great
grandchild. A memorial
service and mass will be
held on Saturday, July 21,
2012 at 9:00 am at Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.


Robert
Miller, 77
HOMOSASSA
Robert C. Miller, 77, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., (formerly of
Middlesboro) passed away
Saturday,
July 7, 2012,
at his home.
He was
t* born Jan.
i 10, 1935, in
Middles-
boro, Ky,
the son of
the late
Robert Robert H.
Miller and Viola
M a r s e e
Miller. In addition to his
parents, he was preceded in
death by a son, Brian South-
ern; a sister, Frances Wil-
son; and two brothers, Gene
and Charles Miller.
Bob began his collegiate
career at Western Kentucky
University in Bowling
Green, Ky., obtaining a
Bachelor of Science degree.
He earned a Master of Sci-
ence at the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville. Ad-
ditionally, he was a Ph.D.
candidate in geology at UT.
He also earned a Master of
Arts degree in education at
Union College in Bar-
bourville, Ky. He was a
member of Sigma Gamma
Epsilon Honor Society. He
was a veteran of the U.S. Air
Force specializing in air
weather service. Bob was
also an honorary Kentucky
colonel.
His geological career led
him to the United States Ge-
ological Survey, Mobile Oil,
and Exxon Oil. His educa-
tional career included
teaching and administra-
tion in Kentucky, Tennessee,
Texas, Saudi Arabia, In-
donesia and Kuwait
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife, Joan Pearman
Miller; daughter, Kimberly
Damron of Knoxville, Tenn.;
grandchildren, Brandon,
Sabrina and Ally Damron of
Knoxville, Tenn., and
Alexander Southern of
Avon, Ind.; brother, Tom
Miller of Middlesboro, Ky;
nieces, Pat Cawood of Mid-
dlesboro, Ky., and Missy
Bakies of Harrogate, Tenn.;
nephews, Charlie Miller
and David Wilson, both of
Clearwater, Fla.; brother-in-
laws, Gawain, Otto, Norman,
and Auburn Pearman;
and sister-in-law, Ramona
Tuttle.
Funeral services were
held at 3 p.m. Wednesday,
July 11, 2012, at Shumate
Funeral Home Chapel with
the Rev Wendall Stoneb-
urner officiating. Music was
provided by Steve Gulley
and Thomassa Risner. En-
tombment was at Green
Hills Memorial Gardens.
Pallbearers were his
nephews, Bob, Jim and John
Weaver, Auburn Pearman


Jr, David Wilson and Ron
Bakies.
Memorial contributions
are suggested to First
United Methodist Church,
8831 W Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa, FL 34448 or Moffitt
Cancer Center, 12902 Mag-
nolia Drive, Tampa, FL
33612.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Idella
Schmidt, 80
BUCKLAND, MASS.
Idella T (Schreiber)
Schmidt, 80, of Buckland,
Mass., died July 12 at home.
She was born Dec. 30,
1931, in New Haven, Conn.,
the daughter of William H.
and Alice (Osborn)
Schreiber. She attended
schools in Ansonia, Conn.
Following graduation, she
was employed by Hershey
Metal Products and later
was employed by CT Reg-
istry of Motor Vehicles in
New Haven. In 1965, she
and her husband, Glenn,
moved to Ashfield, Mass.,
and later to Buckland,
Mass., where they owned
and operated the Walnut
Hill Farm. She was affec-
tionately known as the "corn
lady," as she sold corn and
other produce at her farm
stand. Her love of flowers
showed in the landscaping
of the farm. She was espe-
cially proud of the Dairy of
Distinction Award each year
the farm was eligible. It was
given for good dairying
practices and the general
appearance of the farm. She
also enjoyed fishing and
wildlife in general.
Survivors besides her
husband of 58 years include
two sons, Duane Schmidt
and Garry Schmidt; her
daughter, Sharon Record;
two brothers, Tom and
Arthur Schreiber; four sis-
ters, Lucy Dischert, Nancy
Tuccio, Marie Denofrio and
Peggy Crowther; seven
grandchildren;and three
great-grandchildren.
A celebration of life serv-
ice will be at 1 p.m. July 21
at the Ashfield (Mass.) 1st
Congregational Church.
Calling hours are Friday
evening from 7 to 9 at Smith-
Kelleher Funeral Home, 40
Church St., Shelburne Falls,
MA 01370. Donations may
be made to either Hospice
of Franklin County, 329 Con-
way St., Greenfield, MA
01301 or to the 1st Congre-
gational Church, Main St.,
Ashfield, MA 01330.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

John
Singletary, 78
FLORAL CITY
John David Singletary, 78,
of Floral City, died Wednes-
day, July 11, 2012, in
Lecanto. Arrangements are
under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory


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JAY CONNER/The Tampa Tribune
Jean Riley opens a gate June 8 to allow an alpaca to move into another pasture at the
Alpaca Magic Farm in Homosassa.



Breeder learns



the joy of alpacas


MICHELLE BEARDEN
The Tampa Tribune

LARGO There she
was, sitting in a northern
Arizona restaurant, thumb-
ing through a local maga-
zine while waiting for her
meal to arrive.
That's when Jamie Flo-
res saw the article on al-
pacas. The wooly-headed
Huacayas that looked like
Muppets, and the Suris, re-
sembling Jamaican rock
stars with their pencil-thin
dreadlocks.
How adorable! she
thought. She talked her
husband, Bob, into visiting
a nearby ranch to see the
llama-like animals up
close.
"And that's how it all
began," Flores said.
The couple were so taken
with alpacas that when
they returned home to
Largo, they plowed their
one-acre property and
started shopping around to
add one or two to their
backyard menagerie. They
liked the idea of having
some exotic animals to join
their dogs, goats and minia-
ture donkey
Today, the Floreses -
she's a nurse manager at
Largo Medical Center Hos-
pital; he's a retired fire-
fighter and gun shop owner
own 31 alpacas. The fe-
males are boarded at two
other farms; the males live
with them. She lovingly
refers to them as "The Boys
in the Backyard."
"There's nothing like
coming home to my boys
after a stressful day at
work," she said.
Even though Flores has
great affection for some of
her favorites, she acknowl-
edges they're not sup-



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posed to be cuddly pets.
Bottom line, they're live-
stock, and they've become
potential money makers as
the demand for alpaca
fleece grows. For now, she
sells fiber goods made from
alpaca hearings at her
husband's store, 'Pacas and
Pistols.
The animals give the Flo-
reses something else: a
dream. The couple plan to
move one day to the 40
acres they bought in Ari-
zona and run a big alpaca
ranch. Raising livestock for
breeding, shearing and en-
joyment is far more palat-
able to them than raising
them for slaughter.
"They'll be our retire-
ment income," Flores said.
The love affair in Amer-
ica for alpacas is a rela-
tively new phenomenon.
It began in 1984, when
importers brought the first
alpacas here from South
America, the ancestral
home of these hardy, grace-
ful creatures from the
camelid family Inca tribes
that lived with them in the
Andes Mountains called
their dense, luxurious
fleece "the Fiber of the
Gods."
Because they're consid-
ered "easy keepers" and
provide a small-business
tax incentive, alpacas got
the attention of start-up
farmers. But as interest
heightened, so did prices,
with top stock fetching tens
of thousands of dollars.
The bubble burst when the
recession hit, sending costs

To Place Your
("In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
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scmiller @ chronicleonline .com
Scott Mason at 563-3273
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downward.
"A lot like the real-estate
market. And now it's lev-
eled off to where it should
be," said Jean Riley
She, her son and daugh-
ter-in-law are the owners of
Alpaca Magic USA in Ho-
mosassa, one of Florida's
first alpaca farms. Riley re-
members a time not so long
ago when well-bred fe-
males sold for upward of
$30,000; now she says you
can purchase one for as lit-
tle as $4,000.
Riley used to raise
miniature horses and don-
keys, different breeds of
cattle, zebras and llamas.
The gentle, easy nature of
alpacas won her heart after
she purchased two preg-
nant females in 1996, and
now that's the only live-
stock she has. The farm's
herd is more than 100, mak-
ing it among the largest in
the state.
As one of the founders of
the Florida Alpaca Breed-
ers Association, Riley en-
courages prospective
owners to educate them-
selves about the business
before taking the plunge.
The state group has about
60 members, coming from
all walks of life. Use them
as resources, she suggests.
Do your research and don't
be afraid to ask questions.






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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Resignations, scandal, campaign bucks flood capital


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE Fire-
works hit the capital city the
week after the Fourth of
July, with sparks flying over
the resignation of a be-
sieged university president,
allegations of inappropriate
behavior in the lieutenant
governor's office and a high-
profile court case upholding
a tough Florida drug law.
Lawmakers from both
sides of the aisle filed a
flurry of financial disclo-
sures, giving the public a
good first look at campaign
contributions following the
redrawing of political
boundaries.
Gov Rick Scott spent the
week at the Farnborough
International Air Show in
London, flying the Florida
flag as he met with aviation
executives and tourism offi-
cials as part of his continu-
ing mission to attract
businesses and tourists to
the state and bring jobs, jobs
and jobs.
FAMU'S AMMONS
RESIGNS
Florida A&M University
President James Ammons
was the latest school official
to pay a price for the Novem-
ber hazing death of "March-
ing 100" drum major Robert
Champion.
Ammons, who makes up-
ward of $325,000 a year, re-
signed mid-week amid
continuing fallout from
Champion's death and a lin-
gering list of other concerns
at the historically black uni-
versity ranging from poor
student-retention rates and
sexual abuse to budget
deficits and accounting
fraud.
Ammon's resignation
came a month after receiving
a vote of no-confidence from
the FAMU Board of Trustees
and nearly eight months
after Champion's death. The
resignation was tendered the
same day Champion's family
filed a lawsuit in Orlando
against FAMU and the com-
pany that operated the char-
ter bus in which the hazing
allegedly occurred.
Ammons said he would
stay as president until Oct 11
and remain on campus after
that time as a tenured pro-
fessor. Trustees will meet
Monday by telephone to dis-


cuss his resignation.
Champion died on a char-
ter bus in November after
the university's renowned
marching band performed at
the annual Florida Classic
football game in Orlando.
Thirteen band members
have been charged in Cham-
pion's death. Of those, 11 face
felony hazing charges and
could face up to six years in
prison. Two others were
charged with misdemeanors.
LAWSUIT: CARROLL
COMPROMISED
Controversy swirled
within Lt. Gov Jennifer Car-
roll's office this week as a
former aide said she caught
Carroll in "a compromising
position" with another aide
shortly before getting fired.
Former aide Carletha
Cole, who faces criminal
charges for sharing a
recorded conversation of
Carroll's chief of staff with a
reporter for The Florida
Times-Union, made the ac-
cusations of sexual impro-
priety as part of her defense.
The allegations were in-
cluded in response to a re-
quest by prosecutors to seal
some of the court documents
in Cole's upcoming trial.
The lieutenant governor
has vehemently denied the
accusations.
"Unfortunately, as an
elected official character de-
formation that is totally fab-
ricated can occur like this
and there is not much I can
do," Carroll wrote in re-
sponse to an email from
Mary Jane and George
Duryea of Lake Mary "The
media loves to put out sensa-
tional stories without doing
due diligence to verify the
authenticity."
Cole's motion portrays a
dysfunctional office where
Carroll's aides frequently
recorded conversations and
the lieutenant governor
pushed for a website where
fans could follow her It also
says Steve MacNamara, for-
mer chief of staff for Gov.
Rick Scott, viewed Carroll as
a "loose cannon," in the
words of the filing.
But its most sensational
anecdote concerns Cole in-
advertently walking in on
what she believed to be a
sexual encounter between
Carroll and a female
employee.
"When she entered the of-
fice, she found the Lieu-


tenant Governor and her
Travel Aide, Beatriz Ramos,
in what can only be de-
scribed as a compromising
position," according to a mo-
tion filed by Cole's lawyer.
Cole passed a polygraph
late last year concerning her
claim. Polygraphs are not
admissible in court, but de-
tails of the test were in-
cluded in the court file.
According a report from
the polygraph expert, a re-
tired FDLE chief polygraph
examiner, Cole answered
"yes" to questions about the
incident, including "Did you
ever observe Lt. Governor
Jennifer Carroll and Ramos
in a sexually compromising
position in the Capitol?"
DRUG LAW UPHELD
IN STATE COURT
The Florida Supreme
Court ruled a state drug pos-
session statute can force
some defendants to prove
their innocence, in one of
the most closely watched
drug cases decided in recent
years.
In a 5-2 ruling, the court
upheld a 2002 Florida law
that states defendants ar-
rested with drugs are pre-
sumed to have known the
substance they were holding
was illegal. And if they claim
they didn't, the law requires
them to prove that to a jury
The provision puts
Florida at odds with at least
48 other states that require
prosecutors to convince a
jury that defendants knew
they were carrying illegal
drugs.
Under the Florida law up-
held Thursday, the state still
must prove defendants knew
they were in possession of
something. For example, if
drugs are found in the trunk
of a car, the state would have
to prove the defendant knew
some substance was there.
The high court was asked
to weigh in on the case after
a state circuit judge in Man-
atee County last year threw
out 46 drug possession cases,
saying they conflicted with a
recent federal court opinion
that found the law unconsti-
tutional. Lower federal court
decisions aren't binding on
state courts, but some state
judges have dismissed cases
based on the federal ruling.
That led to the Manatee
case being sent directly to


the state's highest court
STATE TO RELEASE
VOTER LIST
State officials will release
a list of 180,000 names at the
center of a controversy over
attempts to remove non-
citizens from the voting
rolls, after determining that
the information is a public
record, according to the De-
partment of State.
The collection is essen-
tially the master list that the
Secretary of State's office
used to come up with a sam-
pling of 2,700 names of sus-
pected non-citizens that was
then sent to county elections
supervisors. Supervisors
have since said many of the
names either belong to citi-
zens or to people who can't
be contacted.
Some non-citizens have
been removed from the rolls
as part of the voter purge.
In late June, U.S. District
Judge Robert Hinkle re-
buffed a request by the U.S.
Department of Justice to
issue a restraining order
blocking the state from con-
tinuing its purge efforts, but
only after receiving assur-
ance from the state that it
was no longer actively pur-
suing the initiative.
At least two other lawsuits
have been filed against the
state, which is in turn suing
the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security to gain
access to a federal database
officials say would make fu-
ture efforts more accurate.


Week in REVIEW


CAMPAIGNS/GROUPS
LIST Q2 FINANCES
Large chunks of money
flowed during the past three
months to House, Senate
and Supreme Court candi-
dates who are trying to win
high-profile campaigns or
capture vacant seats. The
campaign numbers were the
first round to be seen since
new maps for legislative and
congressional districts were
approved.
A prime example is former
Senate President Tom Lee, a
Brandon Republican who
collected $199,585 in contri-
butions as he tries to return
to the Senate in District 24.
Lee is locked in a primary
campaign against Rep.
Rachel Burgin, R-Riverview,
as they seek to replace Sen.
Ronda Storms, who made a
surprise announcement in
May that she would not seek
re-election.
Burgin raised $50,248 dur-
ing the year's second quarter
and, combined with money
she raised before Storms' an-
nouncement, has an overall
total of $122,223. Candidates
faced a Friday deadline for
filing updated campaign-
finance reports.
Another example is a
South Florida Senate race
that pits two incumbents
whose districts were re-
drawn as part of the once-a-
decade reapportionment
process. Sen. Ellyn Bog-
danoff, R-Fort Lauderdale,
reported raising $106,196
during the quarter, giving her
an overall total of $366,767.


I inn

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Candidates weren't the
only ones raising money A
committee closely aligned
with Gov Rick Scott col-
lected $2.85 million in contri-
butions during the past three
months.
The Let's Get to Work
Committee has hauled in a
total of nearly $3.8 million in
2012 more than two years
before Scott is expected to
seek re-election.
Between April 4 and July
3, the committee collected
nine contributions of
$100,000 or more, as money
came from companies and
people with interests in is-
sues such as energy, health
care and gambling.
The biggest contributors
during the second quarter
were Florida Power & Light
Co., casino magnate Sheldon
Adelson and prominent in-
vestor H. Wayne Huizenga,
with each giving $250,000 to
the committee.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: FAMU President
James Ammons steps down.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "We've got the
FAMU students on trial this
fall in the Champion case,
we have no band this fall,
we've got a drop in enroll-
ment coming, and I read the
other day the Florida Sen-
ate's (considering) investi-
gating the school. I mean,
come on, you all, we need to
deal with this." -FAMU
Trustee Rufus Montgomery
expressing his frustration
over the slow pace of re-
forms at the university.


STATE


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 A7









Is it just the economy? Other issues may play role


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -As the econ-
omy colors and polarizes voters'
attitudes, the Election Day out-
come for President Barack Obama
and Republican challenger Mitt
Romney may be decided on the
margins by narrower issues that
energize small but crucial slivers
of the population.
For three months, the economy
by most measures has faltered. Yet
the White House contest has re-
mained locked in place, with the
incumbent holding on to a slight
national lead or in a virtual tie with
his rival. Analysts from both par-
ties have no doubt that absent a
defining, unpredictable moment,
the race will remain neck and neck
until November
That, several strategists say,
means secondary issues such as
health care, immigration, educa-
tion, even little mentioned social
issues such as abortion, guns or gay
rights could make a difference
when targeted to the right audi-
ences. Under those conditions, the
advantage, these strategists say,
rests with Obama.
"Part of the power of the presi-
dency, part of the power of incum-
bency, is having the ability with an


executive order to make rules,
make effective law that is deeply
satisfying to a large group of sup-
porters," said Steve Schmidt, Re-
publican John McCain's
presidential campaign manager in
2008 and top aide in President
George W Bush's re-election oper-
ation. "Being able to deliver if
you're an incumbent president for
really important parts of the Dem-
ocratic party coalition, that's an
enormously important thing."
Obama already has moved to
shore up his support with certain
voting blocs, with directives on
birth control and immigration.
He's given his backing to gay mar-
riage and brawled with congres-
sional Republicans on behalf of
lower student loan rates. Each
issue won praise from disparate
groups of voters, many of whom
had voiced frustration with the
president or whose enthusiasm for
Obama had been waning.
"In every single state there will
be micro-targeted advertisement,
direct mail, or online campaign to
get voters out there to kind of hit
them on those personal issues that
are important to them," said
Rodell Mollineau, president of a
pro-Obama political organization,
American Bridge. "Whether you're


pro-choice or anti-choice, pro-
immigration or anti-immigration,
you will be touched one way or the
other"
The role of these secondary is-
sues is similar to the part that gay
marriage ballot initiatives played
in the 2004 contest between Presi-
dent George W Bush and Demo-
cratic nominee John Kerry That
election was dominated by the war
in Iraq and national security is-
sues. Though the extent to which
11 ballot issues, especially ones in
Michigan and Ohio, helped turn
out Bush voters eight years ago is a
matter of debate, many analysts be-
lieve the initiatives at least primed
the vote for the incumbent
As for Romney and Obama, "nei-
ther of them seems to be delivering
a knockout blow on the economy,
and that's what does raise these is-
sues and their salience," said
Daniel Smith, a political scientist
at the University of Florida who re-
searched the role ballot initiatives
played in the 2004 election.
For three months, the economy
has created jobs at a snail's pace
and the unemployment rate has
inched up from 8.1 percent to 8.2
percent Economic growth has
slowed, consumer confidence is
down and a strong majority of the


public views the country heading
in the wrong track.
For all that, an Associated
Press/GfK poll last month had
Romney and Obama in a statisti-
cal tie and a Washington Post-ABC
poll this week had them even at 47
percent each. More remarkable, a
majority in both polls 56 per-
cent in the AP poll and 58 percent
in the Post-ABC survey said
they believed Obama would win
re-election.
The Romney camp says the con-
test is still taking shape and Rom-
ney is just now beginning to garner
a national profile.
"You still have a president who
is enjoying the benefits of incum-
bency," said Kevin Madden, a sen-
ior Romney adviser "He gets a lot
more attention, and has a higher
profile with voters."
Ever disciplined, Romney has
kept his campaign message exclu-
sively on economic themes, casting
the election as a referendum on
Obama's economic stewardship.
Even when he has strayed into side
issues such as health care and the
Supreme Court's decision to up-
hold Obama's signature law, Rom-
ney has kept his argument focused
on the economics of the law.
At Obama campaign headquar-


ters in Chicago, the election is
being framed as one of choices be-
tween Romney and Obama on eco-
nomic themes.
"The fact that Romney hasn't
gotten traction is not a reflection
that there is stasis on economic is-
sues," said Obama senior political
adviser David Axelrod. "It's a re-
flection of the fact he hasn't of-
fered a plausible alternative. I
think that's why he's running into
problems."
Still, Axelrod said: "There's no
doubt that people will consider
other things, and if it's a close call
for them I think some of these
other things matter."
Axelrod cited education as an
important factor, particularly with
women, and he contrasted
Obama's desire to finance educa-
tion programs with Romney's wish
to cut taxes for millionaires. "For
these folks, it's part of the eco-
nomic discussion, not separate
from it," Axelrod said.
Axelrod also mentioned Rom-
ney's position on immigration and
his pledge to defund Planned Par-
enthood as issues that are impor-
tant to certain groups of voters.
"How Romney has handled him-
self on those issues is meaningful,"
he said.


DAY
Continued from Page Al

note scribbled on the back
on the woman's door
Beside falling frequently,
the woman also has some
memory loss, so her doctors
want her to move into an as-
sisted living facility. But the
woman doesn't want to.
It isn't uncommon for
many seniors to feel that
way, CeCe explained to me.
In some cases, seniors
who could benefit from
services may refuse those,
too, because they are too
proud to admit they need
assistance. Thankfully, such
wasn't the case with the
next home we visited. The



DUKE
Continued from Page Al

showered last week with
criticism from North Car-
olina electricity consumers
angry the regulator seemed
too cozy with companies
they're supposed to watch-
dog, and that Johnson's de-
parture comes with nearly
$45 million in severance,
pension, deferred compen-
sation and stock.
"Forget about being in-
dustry insiders or corporate
players. Duke spit in your
face," Todd Singleton of
Wendell, the information
technology director at an in-
dustrial supplies company,
said in one email to the
commission. "You gonna sit
there and take it or do your
job on behalf of consumers?
Show some stones and
regulate."
State law allows the com-
mission to rescind or
change its decision approv-
ing the merger.
The regulatory board also
approves electricity rate in-
crease requests. Both Duke
Energy and Progress En-
ergy, which remain separate


couple inside the Beverly
Hills home already had
services they were paying
for out of pocket.
The husband can't get
around very well. The wife
has a host of physical and
mental aliments that leaves
her pretty much confined to
a recliner set in front of the
window in the living room.
The wife didn't talk much,
but her husband wanted to
know if there was a way they
could be reimbursed for the
money they're paying for
their home health care aide.
Unfortunately, CeCe po-
litely explained, there was
not. The only option would
be to provide what they're
already getting, but it would
be a different home health
care agency


operating companies in the
Carolinas, are expected to
seek rate increases later
this year
So what's likely to come of
the state investigations?
Despite public demands
the utilities commission
break up the companies
again, that's inconceivable
to people who make a living
observing Duke Energy.
"They would be stupid to
do that. That would be an ir-
responsible thing to do at
this point," said Daniel
Fogel, a former oil company
executive and professor of
executive strategy at Wake
Forest University.
The bigger company can
save fuel and staffing costs
and borrow money more
cheaply as decades-old coal
and nuclear plants are up-
graded for its more than 7
million customers in North
Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio,
Indiana, Florida and South
Carolina, Fogel said.
But state regulators indi-
cated while questioning
Rogers last week that
they've lost trust in Duke ex-
ecutives. That's certain to
mean increased skepticism
if Duke Energy and
Progress Energy seek rate


Plus, there was no guar-
antee the same aide would
show up all the time.
Though it seemed there
wasn't much she could do,
CeCe promised to talk with
her supervisor just to make
sure there wasn't anything
else they could provide.
In cases like that, it feels
good to know the people are
at least receiving services.
But every once in a while,
an emergency will come
across CeCe's desk.
These cases usually in-
volve the Department of
Children & Families, which
means services have to be
placed in the home within
72 hours.
The next day, I went with
CeCe to another trailer in
Homosassa. CeCe knew the


increases later this year as
expected, Fogel said.
"I think they're worried
about their own butts,"
Fogel said of the commis-
sion. "What I really am con-
cerned about is that the
utilities commission bends
over the other way and gets
so involved in the opera-
tions of the company that it
screws up the company
also."
The utilities commission
is unlikely to try telling
Duke Energy who should
run the company or "un-
scramble the omelet of the
Duke-Progress merger,"
Bernstein Research analyst
Hugh Wynne said.
But what's likely most im-
portant to the commission is
it be taken seriously, so "it
seems highly probable that
the commission will seek to
impose a substantial fine,"
Wynne wrote in a note to in-
vestors. Duke Energy's stock
price is likely to suffer as it
copes with "a months-long
legal and regulatory quag-
mire," Wynne and other an-
alysts said.
BMO Capital Markets an-
alyst Michael Worms and
Citi Research's Brian Chin
doubt state regulators will


*Working to Reduce Government
Spending and Improve Efficiency
County Budget Down $44 Million since I took
office; largest reduction in history of county

*Working to Grow and Diversify our
Economy
Changed county policies to promote strong
economic growth

*Bringing Long Term Plans
to our County
Worked to Develop First County Strategic Plan


couple from her days as a
home-delivered meals vol-
unteer; therefore, she had a
good understanding of what
she was walking into. At
times, the case managers
aren't that lucky.
The woman was an obvi-
ous emotional wreck. Be-
tween health problems and
personal problems involv-
ing shady tenants and thiev-
ery, she couldn't care for
herself or her household.
Her companion her ex-
husband whom she di-
vorced years ago only has
one good leg and a whole
list of health issues.
What impressed me most
was watching CeCe handle
her job with resolve and
compassion. Many times the
seniors don't get a lot of vis-


impose a fine or other major
penalties. But peers at
Deutsche Bank, UBS and
Wells Fargo expect trust will
be an issue in the back-
ground when Duke Energy
seeks future rate increases.
Public statements by for-
mer Progress Energy board
members John Mullin and
Alfred Tollison Jr. that they
felt misled by the last-
minute CEO switch could
encourage former share-
holders of Progress to file
lawsuits for failing to re-
spect the terms of the
merger agreement, Wynne
said.
Progress Energy directors
agreed to a relatively low
sale price to Duke Energy
due in part to being assured
their top executive would
lead the expanded company
for three years.
Rogers, 64, said until he
was asked to stay as chief
executive he'd been prepar-
ing for reduced demands as
post-merger Duke Energy's
strategic planner and exec-
utive chairman.
He had joined the boards
of high-profile nonprofit or-
ganizations, including the
Brookings Institution, the
Nature Conservancy and


itors, so they want to
socialize.
CeCe has a great way of
making sure she doesn't
treat people like just an-
other case by letting them
tell stories and crack jokes.
The woman's companion
was obsessed with the mul-
ticolored nail polish on my
toes and kept shamelessly
flirting with CeCe and me -
though the woman told us to
ignore him because he's
"nothing but just trouble."
It made us laugh.
In addition, CeCe does it
all while still getting her pa-
perwork filled out And the
paperwork is daunting. The
assessment is detailed.
Two hours later, we were
done, and though I was tired


the Aspen Institute. Rogers
said his board hosted a re-
tirement dinner in Decem-
ber and gave him a parting
gift, which a spokesman
said was a chess set for the
avid player.
Fogel said he expects
Rogers to give up the CEO
position after six months,
and for the company to re-
place some directors with
business executives with na-
tional reputations for
integrity.
Meanwhile, Cooper is
mum on what his investiga-
tion might accomplish. He's
challenging the utility com-
mission's approval last year
of a 7 percent rate increase
for Duke Energy's North
Carolina customers.
He's appealing to the
state Supreme Court that
bad economic times should
be a consideration when the
commission approves rate
increases, which translate
into profits that please
shareholders.
"Our ultimate goal is rea-
sonable rates and quality
service for consumers,"
Cooper said.
Emery Dalesio can be
reached at http://twitter.
com/emerydalesio.


As a father to a young family, a small
business owner, and a Citrus County native, I
deeply care about the success of Citrus County.
That is why I have worked so hard to
reduce your local government spending, bring
long term plans to our county, and focus on
growing our economy and promoting job creation
for the future of our great county.
We must continue to move forward as a
county and focus on our budget, our quality of
life, and on promoting a strong economy and job
creation for the future of our community.

Joe Meek


and hungry, I enjoyed my
time with CeCe. She has one
of those jobs that's impor-
tant, but many people don't
know about.
On the ride back to the of-
fice, we shared our fears of
getting older and reaching a
point where we can't care
for ourselves. But if I'm
lucky to get a case manager
half as good as CeCe, I think
I'd be OK with it.
For more information of
Senior Care Services, call
352-527-5930.

Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at
swiles@chronicleonline.
corn or 352-564-2924.



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A8 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mail, email of the species


very week, it seems, so-
cial scientists find an-
other way in which we O
divide ourselves into groups.
There's the Generation Gap,
the Gender Gap, the Education
Gap, people who shop at the
Gap and those who don't, omni-
vores and vegans, liberals and
conservatives, book readers
and Kindle readers, rock JI
climbers and normal people, MUL
texters and grown-ups, gay and
straight, rich and poor, black
and white, boxer/briefs and a million
other splits.
The one that has been bothering me
most recently is the gap between the peo-
ple who read and respond to their email
instantly and those who don't.
"Did you get that thing I sent you about
that TV show?" I asked my friend Barbara
as we were waiting in line at the Stop and
Go Away gas station.
"Oh, I didn't read my email yet this
week," Barbara said.
"How can you not read your email for a
week?" I said a little louder than I had in-
tended.
Other people in the line with smart
phones in their hands were staring at her
as if she'd said clubbing baby seals was a
good idea.
They were probably tweeting our con-
versation. Or recording it on video, hop-
ing we'd say or do something so
incredibly stupid it would get 12 million
hits in the next five minutes and get them
a three-picture deal with some Holly-
wood movie company.
But really, what kind of person doesn't
check their email at least every 10 sec-
onds? What is wrong with her? Is she just
anti-social or a menace to society? What
on earth could possibly be more impor-
tant than reading her email? Her chil-
dren? Her husband? Her parents in the
nursing home? Where are her priorities?
I, who took the time to send her an
email, am the injured party here. I sent
her a note yesterday asking if she would
record a show for me on a premium chan-
nel she gets but I don't because, well, why


M
LLEN


should we both pay? And then
today I learn she hasn't even
read it. What is wrong with her?
What does she do all day long if
not answer her email? Cook?
Clean?
I've been to her house, it's
just as filthy as mine. Plus, she
has a premium channel that
she has time to watch while I'm
stuck with basic cable.
I hope someday my friend
Barbara will start reading her


email every day and not turn
into the Technical Amish. Unlike the reli-
gious Amish, the Technical Amish can
drive cars and use electricity and phones,
but they draw the line at email, Facebook,
texting and tweeting.
It's all very quaint and soon, no doubt,
tourists will start searching them out so
they can show their children how people
used to live.
"Oh look, Daddy, that one's putting a
letter in a mailbox!"
"Don't point, honey, it's not polite. But
that's how it was when I was a little boy If
you wanted to send someone a message..."
"A message like 'R U L8?"'
"Actually, no, I mean a long, written
message about what you've been doing
and what the people they know have been
up to and ..." Just then Dad's cell phone
will ring and he'll read, "I'm bored. Can
we go home now?"
Barbara asked me what I had emailed
her about. I told her about recording the
TV show.
"I couldn't have done it anyway," she
said. "I'm down to basic cable. Why
should I pay for 600 channels I never
watch? It's like going to the grocery store
and paying for a bunch of food I don't like
and will never eat. That's crazy. I don't
have time for it anyway. I spend most of
my time on Skype with my grandkids."

Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to Lose
Money in Your Spare Time-At Home,"
is available at amazon.com. You can follow
him on Pinterest at pinterest.com/
jimmullen.


June 16 to 20 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Chunky barbecued chicken, Lyon-
naise potatoes, California-blend vegetables,
sugar cookie, whole-grain wheat bun with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean beef chili, parslied rice,
carrot coins, peaches, wheat crackers with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sausage and bean casserole,
buttered spinach, yellow corn, citrus fruit, whole-
grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.


Thursday: Sliced meatloaf, tomato gravy,
mashed potatoes, green peas, graham crackers,
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chef salad (with ham, cheese, whole
boiled egg, tomato), French dressing, carrot-
raisin salad, mixed fruit, whole grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Cit-
rus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inver-
ness and South Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 352-527-5975.


Associated Press
Iraqi adventurer Fareed Lafta, right, and Bend, Ore., gas station owner Kent Couch lift off
Saturday from Couch's gas station as they attempt to fly some 360 miles to Montana.
The flight is a warm-up for a future flight planned in Iraq.


Flying lawn chairs?


Pair lifts off in Oregon
Associated Press
BEND, Ore. An Oregon man and an
Iraqi adventurer have taken to the sky in a
pair of lawn chairs suspended from he-
lium-filled party balloons.
Cheered by several hundred supporters,
Kent Couch and Fareed Lafta lifted off
Saturday morning from a Shell gas station
in Bend, Ore.


Earlier, volunteers filled 350 5-foot-
diameter balloons with helium and tied
them to Couch's homemade tandem lawn
chair rig.
The two men hope to fly through the
night across Idaho and touch down Sun-
day morning somewhere in southwestern
Montana. But winds were carrying them in
a southeastern direction shortly after the
10:20 a.m. takeoff.
The flight is a warm-up for plans to fly a
tandem lawn chair balloon rig in Baghdad
sometime in the future.


WORKFORCE

- J b Fair
CITRUS LEVY -MARION 0 ;l l p

Thursday, July 19th

lCol

S3001

"(I'y


For information, call 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1141
or visit the Calendar of Events at www.clmworkforce.com

Workforce Connection s an equalopporuniy employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to
persons with disabilities. Voice telephone numbers may be reached using TTY/TDD via the Florida Relay Service at 711. If you
need accommodations, call 800-840-5700, ext 7878 or email accommodatlons@clmworkforcecom. Please make request at
least three business days in advance.
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SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 A9


0


- - - - - - - - - -







AT IJULY 15,2012



NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Clinton to Morsi: Find way out of crisis


Associated Press
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton meets with
Egyptian President Mohammed
Morsi on Saturday at the
presidential palace in Cairo.


Meeting kicks off

Associated Press
CAIRO U.S. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton
used her first meeting with
Egypt's new Islamist president to
press Mohammed Morsi to start a
dialogue with military leaders as
a way of preserving the country's
transition to democracy
Clinton voiced support for the
"full transition" to civilian rule at
a time when Morsi's backers are
in a political standoff with the
generals who have ruled since
President Hosni Mubarak was
ousted last year
Resolving the impasse "requires
dialogue and compromise, real


'series ofsessions to stabilize democracy


politics," Clinton said. She said the
United States is doing all it can to
"support the democratically
elected government and to help
make it a success in delivering re-
sults for the people of Egypt"
The meeting at the presidential
palace kicked off a series of high-
level sessions aimed at stabilizing
Egypt's fledgling democracy and
its alliance with the United States,
once rock-solid but now increas-
ingly shaky.
"Things change (at) kind of warp
speed," Clinton told Morsi as they
began their meeting.
Clinton and Morsi didn't shake
hands, at least when they first ap-
peared before reporters a sub-


ject of much speculation because
of Morsi's Muslim faith. But the
president shook hands with Clin-
ton and the entire U.S. delegation
behind closed doors, according to
a U.S. official.
The president, speaking in Eng-
lish, said, "We are very, very keen
to meet you and happy that you
are here." Clinton and Morsi were
seated perpendicular to one an-
other, the American on a sofa and
the Egyptian on a chair.
Morsi is in a showdown with the
generals since at least ceremonially
gaining power June 30. Right before
his inauguration, the generals
stripped him of many powers and
kept them for themselves.


Associated Press
Egyptian President Mohammed
Morsi meets with U.S. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets
Saturday at the presidential palace
in Cairo.


World BRIEFS

Honored


Associated Press
A new statue of President
Ronald Reagan and Pope
John Paul II was unveiled
Saturday in Gdansk, Poland.

John Paul II and
Reagan honored
GDANSK, Poland Pol-
ish officials unveiled a statue
of former President Ronald
Reagan and Pope John Paul
II on Saturday, honoring two
men widely credited in this
Eastern European country
with helping to topple com-
munism 23 years ago.
The statue was unveiled in
Gdansk, the birthplace of
Lech Walesa's Solidarity
movement, in the presence of
about 120 former Solidarity
activists, many of whom were
imprisoned in the 1980s for
their roles in organizing or
taking part in strikes against
the communist regime.

Discovery


Associated Press
An unearthed skeleton
dating back about 700
years is seen at a recently
discovered archeological
site Friday in Mexico City.
According to Mexico's
National Institute of
Anthropology and History,
INAH, the site is 700 years
old and a neighborhood of
Tepaneca merchants.
Protest
I U .


Associated Press
Demonstrators show a
banner during a protest
Friday against the recent
austerity measures an-
nounced by the Spanish
government, in front of the
Popular Party in Madrid,
Spain. Thousands protested
their second wave of wage
cuts in as many years.
-From wire reports


Fact or fiction?


Associated Press
Jewell Wilson, great-grandson of former slave Jordan Anderson, is flanked by photos of family members as he sits
with his wife, Estella Wilson, at their home in Dayton, Ohio. Anderson, who wrote a remarkable letter to his
ex-master, was freed from a Tennessee plantation by Union troops in 1864 and spent his remaining 40 years in Ohio.

How did former slave's letter to master come to be?


ALLEN G. BREED
AP National Writer
NEW YORK The
photograph, scratched
and undated, is captioned
"Brother Jordan Ander-
son." He is a
middle-aged black man
with a long beard and a
righteous stare, as if he
were a preacher locking
eyes with a sinner, or a
judge about to dispatch a
thief to the gallows.
Anderson was a former
slave who was freed from
a Tennessee plantation by
Union troops in 1864 and
spent his remaining 40
years in Ohio. He lived
quietly and likely would
have been forgotten, if not
for a remarkable letter to
his former master pub-
lished in a Cincinnati
newspaper shortly after
the Civil War
Treasured as a social
document, praised as a
masterpiece of satire, An-
derson's letter has been
anthologized and pub-
lished all over the world.
Historians teach it, and
the letter turns up occa-
sionally on a blog or on
Facebook. HumoristAndy
Borowitz read the letter
recently and called it, in
an email to The Associ-
ated Press, "something
Twain would have been
proud to have written."
Letter to a colonel
Addressed to one Col.
Patrick Henry Anderson,
who apparently wanted
Jordan to come back to
the plantation east of
Nashville, the letter be-
gins cheerfully, with the
former slave expressing
relief "you had not forgot-
ten Jordon" (there are var-
ious spellings of the name)
and were "promising to do
better for me than any-


Latterr frmW a Vrecdmaa to hia Old
Matter.
[The followingdis apoulnn-doae.-m ot
a d. i *ettd by theoU l at n
TO my Old M. Coioe. l 0 . I t.1, A. l
So--I got your ltateri and wu ~d find
Stht you habd no forgottea Jordan, ml tihat
y.a wsted me t. cme back and e wiith
you. .j.-pra.]i.ing to do better r me
that ay nbody eb C1 I Ib ot-a felt
-y about y ou. I thought the Ylk'
omlud h-ve hang yoe EIg bheonre tho for
bhlriona l the rbs. they o. fI at your heou .
I pm..e l.they neer rout, Out lboxyotr
ngog to1 Ciolonel Mdia'. t. kill the Uvio.
Wing b urt, a seeglad st yo l l at li i


This combination picture shows an undated image of
Jordon Anderson, left, and the beginning of a letter dated
Aug. 7, 1865, from Anderson to his former master,
Patrick H. Anderson, published in the Cincinnati
Commercial newspaper.


body else can." But, he
adds, "I have often felt un-
easy about you."
He informs the colonel
he's now making a re-
spectable wage in Day-
ton, Ohio, and his
children are going to
school. He tallies the
monetary value of his
services while on Ander-
son's plantation -
$11,608 then adds, "we
have concluded to test
your sincerity by asking
you to send us our wages
for the time we served
you."
Turning serious, he al-
ludes to violence commit-
ted against women back in
Tennessee and wonders
what would happen to his
family members.
"I would rather stay
here and starve and
die, if it come to that -
than have my girls
brought to shame by the
violence and wickedness
of their young masters."
Then he signs off with a
swift, unforgettable kick.
"Say howdy to George
Carter," he said "and
thank him for taking the
pistol from you when you
were shooting at me."


Authenticity
Anderson's words, a
timeless kiss-off to a hated
boss, are also a puzzle:
How could an illiterate
man, newly released from
bondage, produce such a
work of sophisticated
satire?
After the letter resur-
faced online earlier this
year, along with questions
about its authenticity, The
Associated Press sought
answers.
From documents com-
piled by the AP and in in-
terviews with scholars,
Anderson emerges as a
very real person and the
very real author of his
story though, from the
beginning, it was reported
to have been "dictated."
His letter is an outstand-
ing, but not unique, testa-
ment to the ability of
slaves to turn horror into
humor.
Reality
According to available
records, Jordan Anderson
was born somewhere in
Tennessee in 1825 and by
age 7 or 8 had been sold to
a plantation owned by


Gen. Paulding Anderson in
Big Spring, Tenn. Patrick
Henry Anderson was one
of the general's sons and,
by the mid-1840s owned
Jordan and other slaves.
Jordan Anderson married
Amanda McGregor in 1848
and they apparently, had
11 children.
Union troops camped
on the plantation, and Jor-
dan was freed in 1864 by
the Provost-Marshall-
General of the Depart-
ment of Nashville.
Roy E. Finkenbine, a
professor at the Univer-
sity of Detroit-Mercy who
is planning a biography of
Anderson, thinks it's likely
Jordan was given to
Patrick as a playmate and
personal servant when
they were young.
Collaborator
Jordan Anderson's col-
laborator to whom he
reportedly dictated the
letter was a Dayton
banker named Valentine
Winters. An abolitionist
who once hosted Abra-
ham Lincoln at his man-
sion, Winters regarded the
letter as excellent propa-
ganda, according to
Finkenbine. It was origi-
nally published in August
1865 by the Cincinnati
Commercial, a paper with
Republican leanings.
Regarding questions
about whether the letter
was really Anderson's,
Finkenbine said: "It's kind
of a racist assumption ...
that when someone is illit-
erate, we make the as-
sumption they're stupid."
Enslaved people had
deep folk wisdom and a
rich oral culture, he adds.
"Why would we think
that he hadn't been think-
ing about these things and
couldn't dictate them to
willing abolitionists?"


Suicide


bomber


kills 23

Bomb explodes

at Aghan

wedding

Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan -
A suicide bomber blew
himself up among guests
at a wedding hall Saturday
in northern Afghanistan,
killing 23 people including
a prominent ex-Uzbek
warlord turned lawmaker
who was the father of the
bride.
The attack was the latest
to target top figures from
the country's minority
groups and dealt a blow to
efforts to unify ethnic fac-
tions amid growing con-
cerns the country could
descend into civil war
after foreign combat
troops withdraw in 2014.
Ahmad Khan Saman-
gani, an ethnic Uzbek who
commanded forces fight-
ing the Soviets in the 1980s
and later became a mem-
ber of parliament, was
welcoming guests to his
daughter's wedding Satur-
day morning when the
blast ripped through the
building in Aybak, the cap-
ital of Samangan province.
Three Afghan security
force officials were among
those killed. About 60
other people, including
government officials, were
wounded in the attack,
which left the wedding
hall's black-and-white tile
floor covered with shat-
tered glass, blood and
other debris.
Chairs adorned with
pink fabric lay strewn
across the site. Dead bod-
ies were piled into the
back of Afghan security
force vehicles. Afghan
Army helicopters ferried
some of the wounded from
the wedding hall, which
has a facade of pillars
painted a festive light
green and pink.
The bride and groom
survived, but never got the
chance to exchange vows.
An eyewitness de-
scribed a gruesome scene
after the explosion.
"I came out and saw 40
to 50 people everywhere
on the ground wounded
and killed," said Salahud-
din, who uses one name,
which is common in
Afghanistan. "I could not
exactly count the number
of people killed. I could
see people with missing
legs and body parts all
around me."
It was the latest in a
string of deadly attacks
around the country that
threaten to undermine in-
ternational hopes of an or-
derly handover to Afghan
forces by the end of 2014.
In one of the worst, Tal-
iban fighters attacked a
lakeside hotel north of
Kabul on June 22, killing
18 people.











SUN JULY 15,2012
EXCURSIONS


* Veterans
Notes can be
found on
Page A13
of today's
Chronicle.


I"


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Parking by the Hudson


Associated Press
Kayakers paddle in the Hudson River July 5 at the Hudson River Park in New York. Hudson River Park is between Chambers Street in Lower Manhattan and 59th Street,
with a bike path, green spaces, playgrounds and recreation ranging from mini-golf and skateboarding to kayaking and even stand-up paddleboarding.


Manhattan's West Side transformed to waterside destination


BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor
-NEW YORK
In the past decade,
the decrepit piers
and industrial zones
along five miles of
the Hudson River on
Manhattan's West Side
have been utterly
transformed.
Hudson River Park is now a destina-
tion that gets 17 million visits annually,
with a bike path, green spaces, play-
grounds and recreation ranging from
mini-golf and skateboarding to kayak-
ing and even stand-up paddleboarding.
Melissa Lopez rented a bike a few
weeks ago from Bike and Roll at Pier
84, near 44th Street and 12th Avenue,
and was amazed at what she saw as she
rode downtown through the park.
"It was gorgeous, like a little nature
haven, beautiful flowers, trees, and
only when you looked over to your left
(at the buildings), did you realize you
were in between a concrete jungle and
this beautiful river," said Lopez, 29,
who came in from her home in subur-
ban Westchester for the day "Everyone
was doing something active sun-
bathing, rollerblading, bike riding.
There was one pier with a volleyball
court with sand. I kept telling my
boyfriend, 'Are we really in New York
City?"'
Lopez's reaction is proof of just how
much things have changed along the
river For much of New York City's his-
tory, "the waterfront was where the in-
dustrial areas were," said Madelyn


Wils, president and CEO of the Hudson
River Park Trust "Then in the 1960s,
the port business went away and the
waterfront areas became so derelict
they were an embarrassment. If you
saw pictures of what this looked like
even 10 years ago, you'd say, 'How
could anyone let that happen?"'
Looking at the ribbon of spotless
walkways, plantings and creative play
areas along the river today between
Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan
and 59th Street, it's hard to imagine
what Wils is describing. But when she
and other New Yorkers began working
to create the park in the late 1990s, one
of her goals as a mother of three living
in Lower Manhattan was simply to
make more places where kids could
play In 1998, the city and state pro-
vided land for the park, and construc-
tion began in 2001. Last year's opening
of Pier 25 in Tribeca, now one of the
park's most popular areas with mini-
golf and volleyball, was a crowning
achievement.
There are still small sections along
the water awaiting redevelopment a
pound for towed cars, a facility for San-
itation Department trucks but the
walkways and bike path are uninter-
rupted. (Wils says the park has "more
bikes on the bike paths than anywhere
else in the country 6 million a year")
Between playgrounds, lawns, sports fa-
cilities, boating options and other
amenities, the park's attractions num-
ber in the dozens.
"There are so many different boating
opportunities in the park now," said
Nancy Brous, metropolitan region di-
rector for the Hudson River Watertrail.
Many of the programs are run by volun-
teers to educate New Yorkers who may
never have been in a kayak or out on
the river before, Brous said, but the
walk-up kayaking programs also get "a


lot of out-of-town visitors. This is some-
thing that's really going to be driving
the tourist trade as time goes on and
more people seek it out."
Another aspect of the recreational
boating programs is teaching the pub-
lic about the river It's a tidal estuary,
so the currents are strong, and the
water can be murky as the tidal flow
stirs up silt "It's not crystal clear and
you can't see that deep into it, but it's
not pollution," Brous said. "People are
very surprised when they learn about
the water quality. Just by the birds you
can tell it's clean they're out there
and they're catching fish."
Hudson River Park is also home to
historic vessels that can be toured;
public art like the AIDS memorial at
11th Street; yoga and other fitness pro-
grams; concerts, walks and talks, in-
cluding a Sunday morning nature tour
where participants learn about the
park's 85 species of birds. Little won-
der the park has started turning up in
travel guides to New York City as an
option for visitors looking for some-
thing to do besides shopping, theater
and museums.

The park is also near
several of New York's
biggest attractions: the
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space
Museum at 46th Street
and the High Line, the
stunning urban park built
atop an old elevated
freight rail line between
Gansevoort Street
and 30th Street.


Visitors to the Hudson River Park in New York relax July 5 on Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama's sculpture "Guidepost to the New
Space" on the lawn at Pier 45.


IF YOU GO
* Hudson River Park: Battery
Park City to 59th Street.Walk-
way, bike path, playgrounds,
sports, boating. Detailed
information on activities and
calendar of events including
fitness classes and concerts,
www.hudsonriverpark.org.
* Mini-golf, volleyball, skate
park: Pier 25, North Moore
Street.
* Guided nature walk: Sundays,
9 a.m., through Aug. 26, at
Pier 40, Houston Street.
* Carousel and skate park:
Pier 62, 22nd Street.
* Bike rental: Bike and Roll, Pier
84, 44th Street, and at Battery
Park, www.bikeandroll.com
* Sunbathing: Pier 45, Christo-
pher Street; 14th Street Park;
Pier 63-64, 24th Street; Pier
84, 44th Street; Pier 96, 55th
Street.
BOATING OPTIONS
* Sightseeing Circle Line cruise
and The Beast speed boat at
42nd Street,
www.circleline42.com
* New York Water Taxis, which
have a hop-on, hop-off
combination ticket that
includes a bike rental and
timed pass to the World Trade
Center Memorial Park,
www.nywatertaxi.com, with
boarding at 44th Street,
Christopher Street and
Battery Park.
* Party cruises, http://
affairsafloat.com at Pier 40,
Houston Street.
* Dinner cruises including Horn-
blower, www.hornblower.com at
Pier 40, Houston Street, and
World Yacht, www.worldyacht.
com at Pier 81, 42nd Street.
* Stand-up paddleboarding and
kayaking at Pier 40, Houston
Street; kayaking and outrigger
(six-person) canoeing, Pier 66,
26th Street; and kayaking at
Pier 96, 55th Street. Some
activities are free, walk-up
programs run by volunteers for
visitors to sample, but you can
also sign up and pay for longer
classes and scheduled outings.
Details at www.nykayak.com
and www.downtown boathouse.
org and http://pier66nyc.org


Touring Alaska
Mothers Jane Meek and daughter Gail Dawsy, mother Judy Casper and daughter
Cathy Eckstein, and mother Lane Vick and daughter Cameron Haeseker spent a
week in June aboard the Diamond Princess touring Alaska. Among glaciers and
whale watching excursions, the six visited a camp for sled dogs, where they met
Iditarod participants, petted puppies in training and went for a practice run behind
16 ready-to-go, blue-eyed canines.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Examine relationships

with other women


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 15, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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** "Edward *** "Mean Girls"(2004, Comedy) Lindsay *** "Mean Girls" (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Beverly Hills Nannies
29 52 29 20 28 Scissorhands"(1990) Lohan, Rachel McAdams. PG-13' Lohan, Rachel McAdams. PG-13 (In Stereo)'14'
S*** "Sophie's Choice" (1982, Drama) Meryl **** "Cinema Paradiso"(1988) Salvatore **** "The Discreet Charm of the
118 170 Streep, Kevin Kline. 'R' Cascio. (Subtitled-English) 'PG' Bourgeoisie" (1972) Fernando Rey 'PG'
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Food Network Star Cupcake Wars (N) Food Network Star Bobby Flay Anne Burrell
FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding |Boysin World Poker Tour The Best of Pride (N) UFC |Game 365 World PokerTour
S 3 6 51 ** "ce Age: The Meltdown" (2006, Comedy) **"ce Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009) *"ce Age: Dawn of theDinosaurs"(2009)
S 30 60 30 51Voices of Ray Romano.'PG' Voices of Ray Romano.'PG' Voices of Ray Romano.'PG'
GOLF 72767 727 Golf Central(N) PGATour Golf IEuropeanPGATour Golf Central
*** "Moonlight and Mistletoe" (2008, "The Christmas Card" (2006, Romance) Ed Frasier PGFrasierPGFrasier PGPFrasier PG'
HALL 39 68 39 45 54 Drama) Candace Cameron Bure.'NR' N Asner, John Newton, Alice Evans.'NR'
*** "Rio"(2011) (In **' 'In Time" (2011, Science Fiction) Justin True Blood "Hopeless" The Newsroom "I'llTry True Blood "Hopeless"
i 302 201 302 2 2 Stereo)'G' Timberlake. (In Stereo) PG-13' (N)'MA' to Fix You"'MA' 'MA'
Boxing Danny Garcia vs. Amir Khan, Super ** "Final Destination 5" (2011) George Lopez: It's Not Adrien *** "Crus" (2010)
S 303 202 303 Lightweights. (Taped) (In Stereo) B Nicholas D'Agosto. 'R Me, IsYou Broner John C.Reilly
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers (N) Shark Wranglers (N) Mountain Men "The
(HISG 51 25 51 32 42 PG 'PG PG 'PG' 'PG '14'0 Final Stand"'PG'
1 "Blue-Eyed Butcher" ** "Derailed" (2005) Clive Owen. Adulterous Drop Dead Diva Army Wives "Hello ** "Derailed" (2005)
LIE 24 38 24 31 (2012) Sara Paxton. lovers face a violent blackmailer'R' "Crushed" (N) 'PG' Stranger' (N)PG' Clive Owen.
"Christie's Revenge"(2007 Drama) Danielle "My Neighbor's Keeper" (2007, Drama) Laura "A Face to Die For" (1996, Romance) Yasmine
IN 50 119 Kind, John WesleyShipp. 'N' B Harring, inden Ashby 'NR' Bleeth, James Wilder. N
"Stakeout" "Sniper 2" (2002) Tom ** "Green Lantern" (2011, Action) Ryan ** Faii F.e 12011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul
iAX 320 221 320 3 3 R' Berenger. (In Stereo) R' Reynolds. (In Stereo) PG-13' o ill.-, :...-1..., 'PG-13'A
(MiSNBC 42 41 42 1 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera CaseyAnthony To Catch a Predator |Lockup: Raw
SJourney to the Edge of America's Lost Down to the Earth's Core Explore the hidden Taboo "EAtr m Taboo "Extreme
(W) 109 65 109 44 the Universe G' Treasures 'PG' world beneath our feet. (N) 'G'Collector II ii Collectors" '14'
(Iil 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. Hollywood Heights George |George Yes, Dear |Yes, Dear Friends |Friends
lWN) 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah Builds Oprah Builds Oprah's Next Oprah Builds
) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
n 340 241 340 4o(1998 "Primary Colors" Weeds Episodes Dexter "Once Upon a Homeland "Grace" (In Weeds (N) Episodes Weeds Episodes
S W 340 241 340 4 (1998) R *MA' *MA' Time" MA'" Stereo) 14' *MA (N) MA *MA' A'
SEEDl 732 112 732 MotoGP Supercars SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Lane Wind Tunnel With Dave Two Guys Car Crazy AMA Pro Racing Mid-
732 112 732 Racing (Live) Despain (N) Garage (N) 'G' Ohio.
Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to Ways to
37 43 37 27 36 Die Die Die Die Die Die Die Die Die Die Die Die
S "The Roommate" (2011) *** "EasyA" (2010) Emma "Jackand Jill" (2011) Adam ** "Bad Teacher" (2011, Comedy)
370 271 370 Leighton Meester. 'PG-13' Stone. (In Stereo) PG-13' Sandier. (In Stereo) 'PG' Cameron Diaz. R'
(IcIu 36 31 36 Into the Saltwater Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Blue'G' Exp. Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue'G'
** "Underworld: Rise of the Lycans" (2009, ** "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" (2007, Action) Johnny Depp. Jack "Underworld"
31 59 31 26 29 Horror) Michael Sheen. R' B Sparrow's friends join forces to save him. PG-13'
(1BS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Old School"(2003) Luke Wilson. 'R' *** "The Hangover" (2009) Bradley Cooper. 'R' "Harold & Kumar Go"
S 169 53 169 *** "Promise Her Anything" (1966, **** "The Thief of Bagdad" (1940, Fantasy) "The Boy and the Pirates" (1960, Fantasy)
M 169 53 169 30 35 Romance-Comedy) Warren Beatty'NR' Sabu, John Justin. NR' Charles Herbert. NR '
Killing bin Laden (In Secrets of Bin Laden's Secrets of the Secret America's Most Secret: Bounty Wars "Down to America's Most Secret:
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14, V' Lair'PG, L,V' Service 'PG,V Structures 'PG' the Wire" (N) 14' Structures 'PG'
TI ) 50 46 50 29 30 Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Hoard-Buried Hoard-Buried Strange |Strange Hoard-Buried
ti "j 350 261 350 'Consultants' "Messages Deleted" (2009) "Tactical Force" (2011, Action) **W "Trespass" 1992, Action) Bill Paxton, Ice- "shRumble
350 261 350 Matthew Lillard.'NR' B Steve Austin.'R' T William Sadler. 'R' Fish"'R'
i** "Shooter" (2007, Suspense) Mark Leverage The team Falling Skies The Great Escape (N) Falling Skies
(W) 48 33 48 31 34 Wahlberg, Michael Pena. 'R' cons a CEO.'PG' "Homecoming" (N) 14'14 '14' "Homecoming"'14'm
(iTIN 38 58 38 33 ** "Eragon" (2006) Ed Speleers. 'PG' Level Up Level Up Venture King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy |Dynamite
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Extreme RV's 'G' Extreme RV's 'G' Wat Wat Coaster Coaster Homes Homes RV 2011 'G'
fQiiV) 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Combat Forensic Forensic
(TVD 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
NCIS The bodies of two NCIS A Navy lieutenant NCIS "Corporal NCIS Senator asks Political Animals "Pilot" A journalist White
USAJ 47 32 47 17 18 assassins.'PG' is poisoned.'PG' Punishment"'PG' Gibbs for help.'PG' follows Elaine Barries.PG' Collar
S 117 117 ridezillasJeanine's Bridezillas Callie's Bridezillas"Jeanine & Bridezillas "Rochelle & Bridezillas"Ashanti & Bridezillas"Jeanine &
(WI ) 117 69 117 temperflairs. '14' imaginary feud. '14' Rochelle" 14' MAshanti" 14' h Liza" (N) 14' Rochelle" '14'
WGN '18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30Rock Mother Mother Mother Mother IMother News IReplay The Unit'PG'


D earAnnie: I'm a mid-
dle-aged man who
has been divorced
for four years. I am cur-
rently a caregiver for my
mother, so I don't get out
much. I've taken to many so-
cial media sites as a way to
meet people with similar in-
terests and have developed
several relationships,
purely platonic,
with women I've
met online. I also
started an on- 40
again, off-again
romance with an
old flame. We live
two hours apart.
Six months ago,
we decided to be-
come exclusive
and work on a fu-
ture together.
The problem
started when one AN N
of my female MAIL
Facebook friends
posted on my
page and my girlfriend
wanted to know who she
was. From there, the flood-
gates opened. When I told
her that many of my Face-
book friends are women,
she flipped out and said it
was inappropriate for a guy
in a committed relationship
to have female Facebook
friends. I tried to reassure
her that she had nothing to
worry about, and frankly, I
resent being told who my
friends can be. After several
days of this endless argu-
ment, I tried to be more sen-
sitive to her needs and
unfriended several of these
women, hoping that would
be the end of it. It wasn't.


SToday's MOVIES_


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
12 p.m., 5 p.m., 10 p.m. No
passes.
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" (PG)
In 3D. 12:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No
passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
5:05 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In 3D.
2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)
2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Ice Age: Continental Drift" (PG)


In 3D. 12 p.m., 5 p.m., 10 p.m.
No passes.
"Savages" (R) ID required.
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" (PG)
In 3D. 7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" (PG)
10:05 p.m.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness
Protection" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m.,
3:55 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) 12:05 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Figure
6 Wide
11 Kind of engine
16 Man of great wealth
21 Refuge
22 Very slowly, in music
23 Handbag
24 Fat
25 Howe the inventor
26 Earthy pigment
27 Heron
28 Faith (abbr.)
29 Gabor or Longoria
30 Calendar abbr.
31 Palm tree
33 Saharan
35 Pasture
36 Part of TLC
39 Something to
unlock a door
43 Sash
44 Eagle
45 Gaseous element
47 French painter
49 Rime
51 Latin American dance
54 Enlighten
57 Wealth
59 Turbine blade
63 Environment (pref.)
64 Wire measure
66 Frond
68 Boutique
69 Gelatin
70 By the token
72 Bill
74 Outer garment
76 Fling
78 Extinct bird
79 Stone for
sculptures
82 Long river
84 Walked unsteadily
86 Radioactive gas
87 Eskers
89 Leonine cry
91 Damage
92 Have being
93 Opposite of SSE

95 Row
97 "Star-"
99 Napkin of a kind
101 Dernier-
104 Black gold
106 Unhearing
108 Email button
110 Not widespread


Melon variety
Scot's skirt
Unencumbered
Giant-screen film format
Exude
Burden
New Deal org.
Stratagem
Time of fasting
Colorful stone
Metric measure
"--Yankee Doodle ...
For each
Busy one
Weak
Wrong
Religious devotion
Beard of wheat
Lean
Austrian composer
Depot (abbr.)
Yoko -
Sweet-smelling
Fit for tillage
Central airport
The two together
Red color
J-N link
Jogged
Powerful weapon (hyph.)
A flower
Indian federation
Order
Take pleasure in
Gladden
Boredom
Modest restaurant
Liable
Appraised
Fender mishaps
Rundown


DOWN
1 White-sale item
2 Split
3 Of birds
4 Toy-gun projectile
5 Print measures
6 Melancholy
7 Wandered
8 Sphere
9 G-man or T-man
10 Type of column
11 of the House
12 Yank
13 Be mistaken


14
15
16
17
18
19
20
30
32
34
37
38
40
41
42
46
48
50
51
52
53
55
56
58
60

61
62
65
) 67
71
73

75
77

80
81
83
85
88
90
94
96
98
100
101
102
103
105
107
109
111
112
113
115
116
118
120


On the ocean
The subway in Paris
Of Scandinavians
Honest -
Girl at a ball
Willow rod
Commenced
Cook
Advanced degree
Wading bird
Hound
Test
Indigo dye
Sponsorship
Boat for racing
Frozen dessert
Photo session
Sidestep
Millan or Chavez
City in Florida
Wanderer
Not many
Story
- salts
Where Greeks once as-
sembled
Consumerist Ralph -
Undermine
"- a boy!"
Equitable
Black
Kind of man
or seller
Tract
Wound with
a dagger
Irk
Police action
Cup handles
Warbling sound
Smell
Navigation hazard
Extensive
Track
Tie, in a way
Uncouth fellow
Youngster
Tragic lover
Pointless
Juicy fruit
Whip
Opposed to war
Sporty car
Something of value
Wary
Part of ESP
Dries
Scarlett's home
- -o'-shanter


St. Pete neighbor
Weir
Fibber
Role in
"La Boheme"
Mimic
Part of A.D.
Cut short
Medieval instrument
Writer Levin
Teeter


Flightless bird
On the -
Keen
A potato, e.g.
From the beginning, to Livy
Mink relative
Performed
Lead and tin alloy
Seawater
Spiked
Contestant


163 Expressive dance
166 Flower necklaces
169 Males
171 Dead lang.
172 Native of (suffix)
174 Hotel
175 Bradley and
Begley
176 Expire


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFc


The other day, I greeted a
lady friend with the nick-
name "Sunshine." It's a
name I use frequently, and it
has no romantic overtones.
We've been fighting about it
ever since. She says she
should be the only female
friend I need. When I sug-
gest this is about her inse-
curities, she says I'm
seeking attention
from other
women.
She's a great
girl, but I'm hav-
ing serious reser-
vations about
committing to
someone who is
determined to
find smoke so she
can accuse me of
starting fires. I
have no history of
IE'S cheating and zero
BOX interest. Any ad-
vice? Faithful
and Upset
Dear Faithful: We agree
that your girlfriend seems
insecure and controlling
and will likely demand that
you give up all of your fe-
male friends at some point.
However, we believe she
also is responding to the ap-
parent fact that the majority
of your friends are women.
Your girlfriend attributes it
to your desire for female at-
tention. Please examine
your behavior and ask your-
self whether she has a point.


Send questions to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third SL,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A12 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


al





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the
Purple Heart and honoring all
Purple Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing
carriejenetteclemons@yahoo.
com or calling Carrie at 352-
628-1633. Indicate the number
in your party.
General George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782. The first American award
made available to the common
soldier, it is the oldest military
decoration in the world in
present use.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@ser-
viceource.org. Visit the website
at www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampabay.
rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast


Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597-6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at
several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m.Tuesdays.
0 St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m.Thurs-
days.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from
10 to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-
382-7397.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.


In SERVICE


Special to the Chronicle
Christopher Shier graduated from The Great Lakes Naval Training Center in Illinois on June
29. He is now at Naval Special Operations training in Pensacola. Shier is a graduate of
Lecanto High School, and is the son of Marie and Michael Shier Sr. He was joined at grad-
uation by several members of his family. The celebratory group are, from left: Marie Shier,
mother; Dallas Bowman, grandfather; Michael Shier II, brother; Lucretia Bowman, grand-
mother; Christopher Shier; Jaclyn-Marie Shier, sister; Michael Shier Sr., father; Brittany
Shier, sister; and Kayla Beemer, a friend.


Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.


American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Join the post for dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 20;
cost is $8 and children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Baked ham is
on the menu for July 27.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-


ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The


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DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume
in September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for from all
wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
See VETERANS/Page A14


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Need a passport?


Special to the Chronicle

Will you need a U.S.
Passport for your summer
travels? The Citrus County
Clerk of Courts office can
help. As a U.S. Passport ac-
ceptance facility, the
clerk's office accepts appli-
cations for new U.S. Pass-
ports and can also take the
photo required for submis-
sion with your application.
An adult (age 16 or older)
applying for his or her first
U.S. Passport will need to
apply in person at the
clerk's office or a passport
agency. Application DS-11
should be completed in its
entirety using black ink
only The application is
available at the office or
can be accessed on the
clerk's website at



VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to the
veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is avail-
able for funerals, flag raising
and nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and
its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all el-
igible veterans and their fami-
lies to visit our post and
consider joining our Legion
family: American Legion, Sons
of the American Legion (SAL),
or American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.



Humane Society
OF CITRUS CO.


Fanny


Special to the Chronicle
If you are looking for person-
ality-plus, you need to look
no further. Miss Fanny is all
that and more. She is 7 to 8
years old, but as far as this
girl is concerned, age is just
a number; she certainly acts
much younger. She is a real
love, with all that pug per-
sonality that can't help but
win you over. She is spayed
and up to date on all med-
ical. An approved adoption
application and adoption fee
are required. To access an
adoption application or view
additional pets for adoption,
visit the website at www.
roomforonemore.net; for
more information, call Karron
at 352-586-9699.


www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. Do
not sign the application
until asked to do so at the
acceptance facility
In addition to the appli-
cation, it is essential to
bring a certified copy of
your birth certificate and
valid photo identification,
such as a driver's license.
It is currently taking ap-
proximately four to six
weeks to process routine
service applications, while
requests for expedited
service are processed in
about half the time. The
status of an application can
be tracked online at the
U.S. Department of State's
website, http://travel.
state.gov.
For more information,
call the clerk's Office at
352-341-6424.


Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of the
U.S. is eligible for membership
if said service was within
Korea, including territorial wa-
ters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was out-
side of Korea from June 25,
1950, to Jan. 31, 1955. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for informa-
tion about the post and
auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189
Ladies Auxiliary facility on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley-Davidson. We meet in
the small building to the left of
the main building. All former
and current post members, as
well as all interested veterans,
are cordially invited to be a
part of American Legion
Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Lanzanos


Carmela and Gabe Lan-
zano were married on July
26, 1952, at St Simon & Jude
Catholic Church in Brook-
lyn, N.Y The couple are cel-
ebrating their 60th
anniversary July 26, 2012.
Carmela and Gabe lived
in Brooklyn for 25 years be-
fore moving to West Islip,
N.Y, for 30 years. They have
been residents of Inverness
for the past 27 years.
The couple have three
children. Son Paul works at
the Key Training Center in
Inverness and resides with
them. Daughter Karen Sam-
pogne and husband Gerald
(and their children, Melissa
and Alex) reside in West
Islip, N.Y Daughter Lenore
Salvato and husband Vin-
cent (and their children,
Michael and Rachel) live in


returned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Amer-
ican Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially
invited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social
hour follows. All Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are welcome.
Meet new friends and discuss
past glories. Call Morgan Pat-
terson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.


FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at (352) 341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in an-
other county, contact the clerk in that area.



Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.

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Spring Hill.
Carmela is a former
schoolteacher in the North
Babylon School District on
Long Island. Gabe owned a
printing and advertising
firm in Islip, Long Island.
The Lanzanos will cele-
brate their anniversary with
a family cruise.


Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW
meets at 5 p.m. and the mem-
bership meeting is at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday at the
post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at
the Embassy Suites Hotel,
1445 Lake Cook Road, Deer-
field, Ill. Group reservation
code is CGN. Call 847-945-
4500 for reservations. Ask for
the USS Long Beach reunion
rate of $99.68, which includes
all taxes on rooms. Cutoff date
is Aug. 13.
Contact Don Shade, 299
Kiantone Road Lot 92,
Jamestown, NY 14701-9370,
or email lbcgn9@aol.com or
visit www.usslongbeach-
assoc.org.


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45th ANNIVERSARY

The Ecks

Harry and Christine Eck
of Crystal River celebrated
their 45th wedding an-
niversary on July 1, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried July 1, 1967, in Balti-
more, Md., and have lived
in Citrus County for 39
years.
They have two children,
Karen Stukes of Crystal ganville, Ga., and five
River and Tim Eck of Lo- grandchildren.


Engagement

Heckerman/Pepito


Michael and Nancy
Heckerman of Plant City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Kara
Elyse Heckerman of
Tampa, to Matthew Scott
Pepito of Tampa.
The prospective groom
is the son of Tas and Mar-
ilee Pepito of Lecanto. He
is a 2005 graduate of Crys-
tal River High School and
a 2011 graduate of the Uni-
versity of South Florida
with a degree in health
care administration. He is
now a human resources
generalist with Seminole
Hard Rock Hotel & Casino
in Tampa.
The bride-elect is a 2006
graduate of Plant City High
School and a 2009 graduate
of USF with a bachelor's


degree in anthropology
and communication disor-
ders. She is a speech
pathologist in Tampa.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed in June 2013.


SEngagement

Fambri/Mclnnis


Jessica and Ennio Fam-
bri of Largo announce the
engagement and forthcom-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Robin Fambri, to
Matthew McInnis.
The bride-elect is the
granddaughter of Janine
Rashinsky and the late
John Rashinsky of Crystal
River. She is completing
her master's degree at the
University of South
Florida and is a case man-
ager for Neuro Restorative
in Clearwater
The prospective groom
is the son of Terri and
James McInnis of Luding-
ton, Mich., formerly of Ti-
tusville. He is completing
his Ph.D. at the University


of Central Florida in Or-
lando.
Wedding bells will ring
in the spring.


For the RECORD


Divorces 7/2/12 to 7/8/12
Bernard L. Bostick,
Homosassa vs. Debra M.
Bostick, Homosassa
Garry H. Bradford, Crystal
River vs. Jay Nea K. Bradford,
Lecanto
Joseph Fagundo, Inverness
vs. Alethea F. Fagundo,
Inverness
Marriages 7/2/12 to 7/8/12
Andrew Lee Dupree II,
Inverness/Tanika Lashee


Clayton, Inverness
Brian Glenn Bloom
Ferrigno, Lecanto/Lataysha
Reatina Davis, Lecanto
Clifton James Greenup,
Hernando/Barrie Ann
Mayfield, Hernando
Christopher Michael
Rayborn, Dunnellon/Felicia
Maxine Solomon, Dunnellon
William Henry Roland Jr.,
Hernando/Suzanne Smolenski
Golden, Hernando


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SePion BS U LY 1, 2012



.PORTS


The Atlanta
Braves stage a
comeback against
the New York Mets
on Saturday./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


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Dunnellon 9-10 baseball suffers narrow defeat


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Section 7 tournament play con-
tinued Saturday afternoon be-
tween 9-10 baseball District 15
champions Dunnellon and Dis-
trict 6 champs Citrus Park in
Clearwater
Citrus Park got out front early
in the game, holding Dunnellon
at bay for a while with a narrow
2-0 lead. Dunnellon was unable to
catch up in the game as Citrus
Park held off for the 3-1 win.
Kayme Hickey pitched five in-
nings for Dunnellon, helping to
stymie Citrus Park's offense.


Hickey had 10 strikeouts in the
game.
Dale Michaud had two singles
while teammate Jay
Fraziars' double
knocked in Dunnel-
lon's lone run of the
game in the sixth
inning.
"I'm very proud
of them," Dunnel-
lon head coach Mike
Michaud said. "The
kids played a lot better
today"
Dunnellon meets up with tour-
nament host Countryside today at
1p.m.


10-11 Baseball
Keystone 13, Inverness 2
The 10-11 sectional cham-
pionships held in
Tampa continued
today as District 15
champs Inverness
faced off against
District 6 champs
Keystone.
Keystone struck
hard in the first and
,ec ond innings, scoring 11
runs.
Inverness answered with a run


Inverness, Dunnellon softball both lose


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
The District 15 Little League
softball representatives in the
Section 7 tournament had some
humbling experiences Saturday.
The Inverness Major All-
Stars lost 9-0 to the Keystone
All-Stars at Pinellas Park while
the Dunnellon 9-10 All-Stars
lost 16-6 to Citrus Park at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River


Faith Alexander was the los-
ing pitcher for Inverness.
Inverness is now 1-1 and will
play today against Pinellas
Park at 11 a.m.
Inverness had three hits.
Stephanie Lovell had two hits
and Jessica Newberry had the
other one.
The Inverness team ex-
pected Keystone to be strong
and they didn't disappoint.
See /Page B4


See ARRO/Page B4


Call it a comeback

Rays claw past

Red Sox to win

5-3 at home

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG, Fla. -
David Price outpitched Clay
Buchholz and the Tampa Bay
Rays scored twice in the sev-
enth inning without getting a
hit to rally for a 5-3 victory
over the Boston Red Sox on
Saturday night.
Price (12-4) allowed three
runs and six hits in 7 1-3 in-
nings to become the first 12-
game winner in the American
League. The
Rays All-Star left-
box score h a n d e r
walked two
0 For the and struck
statistics out eight to
from the move ahead
TB-Boston ofMattHarri-
contest, son for the
see Page AL wins lead.
B4. Buchholz
(8-3) pitched \
well in his first start in more ... ,
than three weeks, taking a 3-2 .... .
lead into the seventh before
walking the first batter of in-
ning and hitting the next.
Hideki Matsui was walked in-
tentionally to load the bases ..
with one out, and the Rays
pulled even when pinch-hitter
Jose Lobaton drew a walk from
Matt Albers.
Elliot Johnson's sacrifice fly
gave Tampa Bay a 4-3 lead, and
B.J. Upton's solo homer offAn-
drew Miller provided a two-
run cushion in the eighth.
Joel Peralta got the final two
outs of the eighth for the Rays.
All-Star Fernando Rodney
worked the ninth for his 26th
save in 27 opportunities.
Will Middlebrooks hit a two-
run homer off Price in the
See CALU/Page B4
Tampa Bay Rays base runner
Desmond Jennings advances to
third base from first base on a
single by Jose Molina during the
third inning Saturday against the
Boston Red Sox at Trpoicana
Field in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Associated Press


Wenger


wins


Citrus 5K

Rozario takes

women s race

at Summer

Showdown
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS There
were two very familiar faces
at the finish line of Saturday's
11th Citrus Summer Show-
down 5K race at Whispering
Pines Park.
Tim Wenger, who recently
graduated from Citrus High
School, won the male race
with a time of 16:40. The 2011
Chronicle Cross Country Run-
ner of the Year battled pneu-
monia during the track season
and was running his first race
since April.
Nicole Rozario won the
race for the third time. She
had clocked in at 18:58.
Wenger beat high school
rival Geremy DeWitt of Crys-
tal River High. DeWitt had a
16:45 time. Third place went
to Sam Hippely, a recent grad-
uate of Wiregrass Ranch High
School. He had a 17:18 time.
"It felt good," Wenger said.
"I took the lead on an uphill.
Geremy and I are old rivals.
This is the first time I have
won this race."
Wenger will run on an ath-
letic scholarship at the Univer-
sity of West Florida, a Division
I program in Pensacola.
Rozario also won in 2009
and 2011. She is formerly
from the Buffalo, N.Y area,
but now claims Tampa as
home and runs cross country
for the University of South
Florida in Tampa.
She competed nationally
in the steeplechase colle-
giate competition in 2011.
She finished 21st in national
competition.
Rozario ran an 18:58. She
beat Ocala's Elizabeth Milford
who completed the course in
20 minutes flat.
When she is finished at
South Florida, Rozario plans
to study veterinary science at
Cornell University.
"I don't run all out," said
See TRUS/Page B4


Despite injuries, US men thinking basketball gold


Bryant among few

back from 2008

winning team

Associated Press
Not quite a Dream Team, still
the Olympic favorite.
The U.S. men's basketball team
heading to London isn't the power-
house it could have been, a squad
that might have been so stacked
that its only worthy rival would
have been history
Injuries have cost the Americans
three top players, along with prob-
Kobe Bryant is one of four returning
members from the 2008 gold-medal-
winning U.S. men's basketball team.
Associated Press


ably any notion they could have
won a mythical matchup against
the famed 1992 champions.
What remains is good enough to
make the Americans golden again.
"I think this team will be a
stronger team than we had in '08,"
USA Basketball
chairman Jerry I thin
Colangelo said.
"If we do what will be a
we're capable of
doing and we stay team tha
focused and have
the mental tough- had in "
ness, then we
should prevail. I Je
believe that in my U.S. Basketball chain
heart of hearts,
but we have to go out and do it."
The Americans always face com-
parisons to the Dream Team, and
Colangelo even invited the connec-
tion when he named a 20-man ros-
ter pool in January


But Dwight Howard, Derrick
Rose, Dwyane Wade and Blake Grif-
fin have since been lost to injuries,
removing four players who started
in the All-Star game. What's left is
still potent how about LeBron
James and Kevin Durant in the same


k this team
stronger
n we
08.
rry Colangelo
man said of'12 squad.


frontcourt? but
probably not good
enough to beat
Michael Jordan,
Magic Johnson,
Larry Bird and
the rest of their
Hall of Fame
predecessors.
That's no big
deal for this U.S.
team, which is


more worried about Pau Gasol,
Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker
"It's possible now that some will
say with those losses, well then any
See MEN/Page B4















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS





EEDWAY HITTING THE LINK OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS
Q Q


'EEDWAY HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


iET


IN


THE


jAME


Flag football final set


Pink, Blue win

sem final games,

will meet for title
COREY EDWARDS
For the Chronicle
Anyone that is familiar with Cit-
rus County's adult flag football
program knows to never count out
last seed Camo, even when going
against the top seed. The Pink
team knows from firsthand expe-
rience after last season's loss in
the playoffs. It was the taste of fail-
ure in the past that allowed Pink
to get the victory Thursday night
against Camo.
Pink started the game with the
ball and scored with ease. It
seemed like it was going to be a
quick blowout when Pink pulled
ahead 13-0 in the first three min-
utes. Quarterback J.J White put on
a show rushing for 60 yards and
connecting with Matt Simmons for
two touchdowns to tie the game up
at 13. Pink went into halftime with
all the momentum after scoring 13
quick points in the final two min-
utes off of Camo mistakes.
Pink's defense was just too
strong for the Camo offense. Two
big-time interceptions by Johnny
MacDonald and Darrell Patrick in
the final minutes helped close the
game out. Patrick returned his
pick 65 yards for a touchdown to
seal a 26-point victory for Pink.
Pink quarterback Mike Skjefte
threw for an impressive 245 yards
and five touchdowns.


Special to the Chronicle
After resounding semifinals victories in the men's adult flag football league, the Blue and Pink teams will
meet in the final at 7 p.m. Thursday.


"We came out very slow and
sloppy in the first half. At halftime
I reminded my teammates of last
season when we went undefeated
and lost in the first round," Skjefte
said. "We all still have that painful
feeling in our gut and it showed by
the way we played in the second
half, especially in Joey Calcagino."
Calcagino recorded three
touchdowns and was a weapon in
the red zone. Logan Skjefte also
showed up in a huge way with
both of his touchdowns adding up
to 90 yards. Logan Skjefte said, "It
hurt to lose the way we did last
season. I've won three champi-


onships and I can't wait for the
chance next week to make it four."
Blue 31, Grey 12
This was a classic rivalry game:
both teams dislike each other but
have a great deal of respect for the
other's athleticism and competi-
tiveness. It was Blue team's youth
and determination that helped
them prevail over Grey team's
experience.
Blue team's offense exploded
early, lighting up the scoreboard
with 25 first-half points. Leading the
way at quarterback, Chris Bunch
threw for 235 yards and five touch-


downs, with 180 of those yards and
four of the scores in the first half
thanks to his wide variety of veteran
receivers Arlando Madison, Will
Bunch, KJ Atkins, Jason Weeks and
Patrick Rash. The Cramer brothers
on the Grey team helped keep the
score close by recording two touch-
downs in the first half. The first half
came to an end with the Blue team
ahead 25-12.
The Blue team played lockdown
defense in the second half to end
any hope of a Grey comeback.
Leading Blue's defense were Josh
Hall and Joe Bertine, who com-
bined to cause all sorts of prob-


lems for Grey quarterbacks Lon-
nie and Steve Connor
Blue team's defense did not
allow the Grey team to score a sin-
gle point in the second half, which
is something no other team can
say in the league. In the long run,
the Grey team's defense played
well only allowing six second-half
points but the offense had 12
dropped passes.
The game came to an end with
an interception by Bertine.
"There has been a lot of pres-
sure on our team to come back
and repeat a championship,"
Chris Bunch said. "If we play like
we did today next week against
Pink, well can you say back to
back champions!"
Will Bunch, who had two inter-
ceptions, two touchdowns and 118
yards receiving, said, "It feels good
to be back in rhythm. Our teams
know it's crunch time, and we're
hungry for another championship!"
Basketball
With the season winding down,
competition is fierce. The current
standings are as follow:
Tied for First: Red (8-2), Black (8-2)
Third: Orange (7-2)
Fourth: Blue (7-3)
Fifth: White (2-6)
Sixth: Camo (1-8)
Seventh: Pink (0-10)
The league currently plays at
Lecanto High School on Monday and
Wednesday with games at 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Come out and
enjoy the fun and intensity that the
men's league brings!


Real athletes don'tdope


A s I sit here on a few days of
vacation, I am completely
wed by the media's com-
plete fixation on athletes' doping in
the build-up to the Olympics and
during the Tour de France. Several
different papers and news chan-
nels deal ad nausem about the Tour
stage victory of ex-doper bike racer
David Millar
Lance Armstrong, seven-time win-
ner of the Tour de
France, continues to be
vilified by the U.S. and
World Anti-Doping
Agency despite hun-
dreds of negative tests in
and out of competition. ,
U.S. Olympic soccer
team goalkeeper Hope
Solo tested positive for
an ingredient of a di- Dr. Ron
uretic prescribed by
her personal physician DOCI
for menstrual purposes. ORD
The U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency noted the drug is classified
as a specified substance and is pro-
hibited under the protocol for
Olympic and the International Fed-
eration of Association Football
(FIFA) anti-doping rules. In this
case, the specific drug was an in-
gredient of a compounded drug for
menstruation and not enhancing
athletic performance.
Justin Gatlin, U.S. Olympic team
100-meter sprinter, was banned
from competition for several years
because he tested positive for
testosterone, a definite muscle and
performance-enhancing drug.
He noted at the time that he
could not account for the positive
test results. He stated he had never
"knowingly used any banned sub-
stance or authorized anyone to ad-
minister" a banned substance.
The specific drug was testos-
terone and was labeled deceptively
Again, testosterone is one of several
ingredients in a sexual function
medication. In this case, the ban
stood and with hard work, tears and
effort, he has made the Olympic
team. He is definitely much older,
hopefully wiser and more humble.
On Friday, Millar won the
longest stage of the Tour de France
and is slated to represent Great
Britain in the Olympics in London.
Millar is an admitted blood doper,
admitting in 2003 to using EPO to
raise the volume of circulating red
blood cells. By coincidence, he


won this arduous stage on the an-
niversary of the death of Tom
Simpson. Simpson was the first
athlete to die due to drugs on the
Tour exactly 45 years ago. The
drugs were a combination of am-
phetamines and alcohol.
The problem with the rampant
doping that is present in sports
today is many athletes are not tak-
ing drugs but even the slightest
misstep may lead to a
S nasty inquiry and possi-
ble ban from competi-
tion ranging from
months to life.
Solo started immedi-
ately cooperating with
USADA and they con-
cluded that she had
P made an honest mistake
Joseph and the medication did
not enhance her per-
OR'S formance in any way
ERS Gatlin was banned for
several years as was
Millar. Armstrong is still battling
years after
In the next few weeks during the
Olympics and in the lead-up to it,
you will see and hear about many
great athletes; the vast majority are
not taking drugs to enhance their
performance. These are kids who
have trained forever for their brief
performances on the world stage.
In the only words of wisdom ever
uttered by former NBA basketball
player Charles Barkley, he said he's
not out there to be a role model. The
Olympic athlete's goal is competing
and competing as well as he or she
can. The athletes are human and
make the same mistakes we all do.
In the words of Millar, the Tour
de France and soon-to-be Olympic
bike racer, "I am an ex-doper who
is now clean and there is never any
point in hiding that.... I have a duty
to remind people where our sport
has been. I am very representative
of our sport as whole... in a much
better place now although we must
not forget the past. But it is always
important to show that you can win
races clean."
In the end the question is one of
how do you want to compete and be
known. Most of the athletes com-
pete clean and within the rules.
Shame on the dopers.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute, may
be reached at rbjhand@cox.net


Recreation BRIEFS


Co-ed summer
kickball starting soon
Co-ed summer softball is back
again and hosted by Citrus County
Parks and Recreation. This league
is designed for levels of all play;
however, if there are enough teams,
there will be divisions set up for this
summer season.
The league plays on Tuesday and
Thursday nights at Bicentenial Park in
Crystal River with games at 6:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Each
team is required to have a minimum
of four females each game. Each
team may roster up to 25 participants.
The last chance to register will be
Monday, July 23 at the Citrus
County Resource Center in Lecanto.
There is a registration fee required
to sign a team up.
For more information, call Corey
Edwards at 352-527-7540. If you
are a single player wanting to play,
call and Parks and Recreation will
aid you in finding a team.
Day at the Swamp
Celebration in Inverness
All Gator fans are invited to join
the Citrus County Gator Club at the
2012 Day at the Swamp Celebration
from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25,
at the Citrus County Fairgrounds in
Inverness.
Come join fellow Gators for an
evening of fun, food and beverages,
games, raffles, a silent auction and
giveaways. Former Gator Football
player Travis McGriff will be the spe-
cial guest speaker.
Tickets are $10 for alumni club
members; $15 or two for $25 for non-
alumni club members, or $15 at the
door, if available. Kids younger than
5 will be admitted free. Tickets may
be purchased from any club officer or
at Fancy's Pets in Crystal River or
Brannen Banks in Inverness.
Citrus County Gator Club is a
nonprofit organization affiliated with
the University of Florida, raising
scholarship funds for Citrus County
students. For more information, call
352-634-0867. Also look for the Cit-
rus County Gator Club page on
Facebook or visit on the Web at
http://citruscounty.gatorclub.com.
Bike a bit for Key Center
Bikers for the Key Charity Ride is
slated for Saturday, July 21, in con-
junction with the grand finale for this
year's Key Training Center Run For
The Money.
Registration begins at 9 a.m. at the
Key Training Center's Lecanto cam-


pus at the Chet Cole Life Enrichment
Center parking lot; $25 per bike. A
free breakfast will be served at High
Octane Saloon and Castaway's. All
bikers will then meet up with the run-
ners returning from their 180-mile
trek from Tallahassee and join them
as they enter the Lecanto center for
the welcome-home celebrations.
For more information, call
352-422-3710.
Disc golf tourney
set for August
The Whispering Pines Open will
be presented by the city of Inver-
ness, Whispering Pines Park and
the Citrus Disc Golf Club on Friday
and Saturday, Aug. 17 and 18, at
Whispering Pines Park, 1700 Forest
Drive, Inverness.
This first tournament at Whisper-
ing Pines is dedicated to Jason Put-
ney. A portion of the proceeds will be
donated to Citrus United Basket.
Activities are:
Friday at 4 p.m. ($10)-- Dou-
bles, random draw and payout to
top two (2/3 and 1/3).
Saturday Two rounds with 9
a.m. signup, 9:45 a.m. players
meeting and play beginning at 10
a.m. There will be a one-hour break
for lunch. Lunch will not be provided,
but is available in the park or
nearby. Picnic tables are available.
Water from coolers or bottled water
will be provided.
Ace Pot is $5. There will be tro-
phies for all divisions with three or
more players. There will be a 100
percent cash payout to the top 1/3
for all Pro divisions. Entry fee is $50.
Disc golf dealer vouchers are
prizes for Advanced and Intermedi-
ate AMs with payout to the top 50
percent. All Advanced divisions -
$35 entry fee. Intermediate $25
entry fee. Recreational, Novice and
Junior $15 entry fee (trophy only).
For information, call Bob Theis at
352-895-6097 or email
rollertheis@yahoo.com.
Come play disc golf at park
Whispering Pines Park in Inver-
ness, the city of Inverness and Cit-
rus Disc Golf Club will host
Community Disc Golf day from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, at
the park, 1700 Forest Drive.
The event is for all disc golf
novices who have never entered a
disc golf competition. Start times,
number of holes played and divisions
will be as flexible as possible to en-
courage maximum participation.
Loaner discs will be available and


certificates will be awarded as prizes.
Learn to play disc golf with the
members of the Citrus Disc Golf
Club. If you have never played
disc golf, this is your opportunity to
learn the game. It is played with
flying discs similar to a Frisbee,
but with differing aerodynamics.
Bottled water will be provided or
you may bring your own.
Participants are encouraged to
bring a nonperishable food item to
be donated to CUB (Citrus United
Basket).
The course at Whispering Pines
Park is free to play and you can bor-
row discs for your playing pleasure
when the park is open. Discs may be
checked out at the pool during open
swim hours or at the administration
office at Whispering Pines.
For more information, call Bob
Theis at 352-895-6097, or email
rollertheis@yahoo.com.
Register now for annual
veterans tourney
The eighth annual Citrus County
Veterans Golf Tournament will be
Sept. 8 at the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club Course for the benefit
of the Citrus County Veterans
Foundation Inc.
The foundation is a non profit entity
that has provided more than $100,000
in emergency financial assistance to
local needy, honorably discharged
veterans and their surviving spouses
since its inception in 2004.
Check-in for the four-person
scramble will be at 7:30 a.m. with a
shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Individu-
als and groups short of four persons
will be combined to make four-per-
son teams. You do not need to be a
veteran to participate.
Registration form and donation of
$55 per person must be received no
later than Aug. 28. Each participant's
donation includes golf and cart, bev-
erages on the course and lunch at
the country club. Prizes will be given
for first, second and last places, clos-
est to the pin, hole in one (to include
a car), plus door prizes.
Participating golfers should make
a check or money order payable to
Citrus County Veterans Foundation
and send it with their registration
form to: Citrus County Veterans
Foundation, Attn: Dan Birstler, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court, Key #13,
Lecanto, FL 34461-7718.
For more information, visit the Cit-
rus County Veterans Foundation
website at www.citrusvf.org or call
Dan Birstler at 352-601-8051.


)1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Yankees 5, Angels 3
Los Angeles NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout If 5 1 3 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 0
Aybarss 4 1 1 0 Grndrscf 4 1 1 2
Pujols b 4 0 0 0 AIRdrgdh 4 1 2 0
KMorlsdh 3 00 0 Cano2b 4 1 2 3
Trumo rf 3 0 0 0 Teixeirib 3 0 0 0
Callasp 3b 4 0 1 2 Swisher rf 2 0 0 0
HKndrc 2b 3 1 0 0 Ibanez If 3 0 1 0
Bourjos cf 4 0 1 0 Wise If 0 0 0 0
BoWlsn c 3 0 1 1 ErChvz 3b 3 0 0 0
MIzturs ph 1 0 0 0 CStwrt c 3 1 1 0
Hesterc 0 00 0
Totals 34 37 3 Totals 30 5 8 5
Los Angeles 200 100 000 3
NewYork 202 001 00x 5
DP-Los Angeles 2. LOB-Los Angeles 9,
New York 2.2B-Trout (17), AI.Rodriguez (11).
HR-Granderson (24), Cano (21). SB-Trout 2
(30), H.Kendrick (6), AI.Rodriguez (10). CS-
Swisher (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Williams L,6-6 6 7 5 5 1 4
Takahashi 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hawkins 1 1 0 0 0 1
New York
FGarciaW,4-2 5 5 3 3 5 4
EppleyH,7 2 1 0 0 0 0
D.Robertson H,10 1 1 0 0 0 2
R.Soriano S,22-23 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP-Williams, FGarcia.

Blue Jays 11, Indians 9
Cleveland Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo rf 4 0 1 0 Lawrie 3b 4 1 2 1
ACarerss 4 1 0 0 Rasmscf 4 1 0 0
Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Bautist rf 3 3 1 0
JoLopz3b 4 1 1 0 Encrnclb 4 2 2 3
Hafnerph 1 0 1 1 Linddh 5 1 4 4
Hannhn3b 0 0 0 0 YEscorss 5 1 1 2
CSantn dh 3 20 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 1 0
Brantly cf 4 2 3 2 RDavis If 4 0 0 0
Duncan If 4 2 3 3 Arencii c 4 1 2 1
Ktchmib 5 1 1 2
Marson c 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 9128 Totals 3711 1311
Cleveland 020 200 050 9
Toronto 208 010 00x 11
DP-Toronto 1. LOB-Cleveland 8, Toronto 8.
2B-Choo (27), Lawrie (17), Bautista (13),
Lind (9), K.Johnson (9), Arencibia 2 (13).
HR-Brantley (4), Duncan (9), Kotchman (9),
Encarnacion 2 (25), Y.Escobar (6). SB-
Lawrie (12), K.Johnson 2 (9).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
JimenezL,8-8 21-3 7 8 8 4 2
Barnes 12-3 3 2 2 2 2
Accardo 2 2 1 1 0 0
Rogers 2 1 0 0 0 1
Toronto
LaffeyW,1-1 5 8 4 4 3 4
Loup 2 0 0 0 0 0
J.Chavez 0 3 4 4 1 0
A.Carpenter H,1 2-3 0 1 1 2 1
Janssen S,13-14 11-3 1 0 0 0 0
J.Chavez pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Laffey (Duncan).

Orioles 8, Tigers 6,
13 innings
Detroit Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksncf 6 1 0 0 Markksrf 6 2 3 0
Santg 2b-ss 5 0 0 0 Hardy ss 6 1 1 1
MiCarr3b 6 1 3 0 Thomedh 6 0 1 1
Fielder lb 6 0 2 1 AdJonscf 6 2 3 1
DYong dh 6 2 1 0 Wieters c 4 0 2 0
JhPerlt ss 4 0 2 1 Pearce pr 0 0 0 0
Worth2b 2 21 0 Tegrdnc 2 1 1 2
Raburn rf 2 0 0 0 C.Davis If 4 1 2 1
Boesch rf 3 0 1 1 EnChvz If 0 0 0 0
D.Kellyrf 1 0 0 0 MrRynllb 3 0 0 0
Laird c 3 0 0 0 Betemt 3b 3 0 0 0
Avila ph-c 2 0 1 1 Flahrty pr-3b 0 0 0 0
Berry If 6 0 3 2 StTllsn ph-3b 2 0 0 0
Andino2b 5 1 1 2
Totals 52 6146 Totals 47814 8
Detroit 100 000 003 010 1 6
Baltimore 121 000 000 010 3 8
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Flaherty (2). DP-Detroit 3, Baltimore 1.
LOB-Detroit 10, Baltimore 13. 2B-Fielder
(20), Jh.Peralta (19), Worth (2), Boesch (14),
Markakis 3 (17), Thome (1). HR-Hardy (13),
Teagarden (1), Andino (5). SB-En.Chavez
(2). S-Hardy, En.Chavez.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Scherzer 5 9 4 4 2 4
Below 2 1 0 0 0 0
D.Downs 1 0 0 0 3 0
L.Marte 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Coke 12-3 0 0 0 2 0
Valverde BS,4-20 1 2 1 1 1 2

BenoitL,1-2 2-3 2 3 3 0 1
Baltimore
W.Chen 6 2 1 1 2 5
O'DayH,5 1 1 0 0 0 1
StropH,14 1 1 0 0 0 0
Johnson BS,2-28 1 4 3 1 0 1
Socolovich 12-3 2 1 1 0 1
Patton 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Lindstrom 12-3 3 1 1 1 1
GreggW,3-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Benoit (Ad.Jones).WP-Strop, Lind-
strom.

Royals 6, White Sox 3
Chicago Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
De Azacf 4 02 1 AGordn If 5 1 1 1
Youkils3b 4 00 0 AEscorss 4 2 2 3
A.DunnIlb 3 1 1 1 Hosmerlb 4 0 0 0
Konerkdh 4 1 1 0 Butlerdh 4 02 0
Riosrf 3 01 0 Bourgspr-dh 0 1 0 0
AIRmrzss 4 01 0 Mostks3b 4 1 2 0
Viciedo If 4 01 1 Francrrf 3 0 2 1
Flowrsc 3 00 0 Getz2b 3 0 2 0
Przynsph-c 00 0 S.Perezc 3 00 0
Bckhm2b 3 1 1 0 JDysoncf 3 1 1 0
L.Cainph-cf 0 00 1


Totals 33 38 3 Totals 33612 6
Chicago 001 002 000 3
Kansas City 003 000 12x 6
LOB-Chicago 8, Kansas City 7. 2B-De Aza
(17), Rios (21), Getz (6). 3B-De Aza (5), Vi-
ciedo (1). HR-A.Dunn (27), A.Escobar 2 (4).
SB-J.Dyson (17). CS-Rios (4), Moustakas
(2). S-De Aza, Getz. SF-L.Cain.
IP H R ERBBSO


Chicago
Peavy L,7-6
H.Santiago
Kansas City
Hochevar
Crow BS,3-4
Mijares
G.Holland W,3-2
Broxton S,22-26


7 12 6 6 1 5
1 0 0 0 1 0


Hochevar pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Crow pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Peavy pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WP-Hochevar, Crow.


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 54
Baltimore 46
Tampa Bay 46
Boston 44
Toronto 44


Wash.
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
33 .621 - 7-3
41 .529 8 4-6
42 .523 8Y2 Y2 5-5
44 .500 10Y22Y2 3-7
44 .500 10Y22Y2 4-6


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
35 .588-- 6-4
39 .552 3 1 7-3
42 .523 5Y2 3Y2 4-6
45 .483 9 7 5-5
51 .420 14Y2 12Y2 1-9


Str Home Away
W-3 27-16 27-17 Chicago
W-1 23-21 23-20 Cleveland
W-1 25-20 21-22 Detroit
L-1 22-24 22-20 Kan. City
W-1 24-20 20-24 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
39 .552 - 6-4
42 .517 3 1 6-4
43 .511 3Y2 1Y2 7-3
48 .442 9Y2 7Y2 3-7
51 .414 12 10 4-6


Home Away
24-22 24-17
24-21 21-21
22-20 23-23
15-24 23-24
17-27 19-24


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-1 24-16 26-19
W-6 22-22 26-17
L-3 26-20 20-22
W-1 23-23 19-22
L-5 17-27 20-24


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
38 .563 - 6-4
38 .563 - 7-3
42 .523 3Y2 3Y2 6-4
46 .471 8 8 6-4
52 .402 14 14 7-3
54 .379 16 16 1-9


Str Home Away
W-5 25-16 24-22
W-1 29-14 20-24
L-2 23-20 23-22
L-1 23-22 18-24
W-3 21-20 14-32
L-2 24-21 9-33


L. Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
34 .609 - 5-5
40 .545 5Y2 5-5
43 .511 8Y2 1Y2 8-2
52 .409 17Y210Y2 3-7



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
40 .545 - 5-5
40 .540 Y2 2 3-7
45 .483 5Y2 7 3-7
52 .395 13 14Y2 4-6
54 .386 14 15Y2 6-4


Home Away
29-16 24-18
25-18 23-22
24-20 21-23
16-26 20-26


Str Home Away
W-1 28-16 20-24
W-1 27-16 20-24
L-2 23-21 19-24
W-2 19-25 15-27
L-4 17-27 17-27


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves outfielder Jason Heyward follows through on an RBI single to give the Braves the lead in the eighth
inning Saturday in Atlanta. Atlanta held on to win 8-7.



Braves rally to beat Mets 8-7


Associated Press

ATLANTA- Jason Heyward sin-
gled to cap a three-run rally and the
Atlanta Braves took advantage after
the umpires reversed a call, beating
the New York Mets 8-7 Saturday for
their sixth straight win.
The Braves' comeback prevented a
shaky R.A. Dickey from getting his
11th win in a row.
Mets manager Terry Collins was
ejected while disputing a call in At-
lanta's two-run fifth.
Third base umpire Dale Scott, the
crew chief, initially ruled left fielder
Jordany Valdespin made a diving
catch on Heyward's liner, with Mar-
tin Prado trapped while returning to
first base for an apparent inning-
ending double play
But after the umpires conferred,
they ruled correctly, as replays
showed that Heyward's ball
bounced. The umpires then placed
Prado safely on second.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Marlins 2, Nationals 1
MIAMI Mark Buehrle pitched seven
innings for the Miami Marlins in a 2-1 win
over the Washington Nationals.
Carlos Lee and John Buck drove in the
runs for Miami, which snapped a three-
game losing streak.
Buehrle (9-8) won his fourth consecu-
tive start by allowing one run and six hits.
He struck out seven and walked two.
Steve Cishek pitched the final 1 2-3 in-
nings to earn his second save, and first
since May 25 against San Francisco. It
was the first save opportunity for the Mar-
lins after manager Ozzie Guillen an-
nounced Heath Bell had been removed
from the closer role.

Reds 3, Cardinals 2, 10 innings
CINCINNATI Ryan Ludwick home-
red in the 10th inning and the Cincinnati
Reds beat the St. Louis Cardinals 3-2 for
their fifth straight win.
Cincinnati's surge has moved it back
into first place in the NL Central. The
Reds have matched their season high at
11 games over .500.
Ludwick, a former Cardinal, got two
strikes to start his at-bat against Victor
Marte (2-2), fouled off three pitches, then
worked the count full. He connected for
his 13th homer, flinging his helmet away
before jumping into the pile of team-
mates at home.
Yadier Molina homered for St. Louis,
which left the bases full in the eighth.
Sam LeCure (3-2) pitched the 10th to
get the win.
Cubs 4, Diamondbacks 1
CHICAGO Ryan Dempster tied the
Cubs' record with a 33-inning scoreless
streak, pitching six solid frames and
leading Chicago over the Arizona
Diamondbacks 4-1.
Dempster matched the club shutout
streak set by Ken Holtzman in 1969.
Dempster (5-3) allowed four hits and
set a career best by winning his fifth
straight start. He leads the majors with a
1.86 ERA.
The right-hander struck out five and
walked three. With the Cubs far back in
the playoff race and Dempster in the last
season of a four-year contract, he has


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 5, LA. Angels 3
Toronto 11, Cleveland 9
Baltimore 8, Detroit 6, 13 innings
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3
Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 3
Oakland 9, Minnesota 3
Texas at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
L.A. Angels (Weaver 10-1) at N.Y Yankees (Nova 10-3),
1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Lowe 8-6) atToronto (Villanueva 3-0), 1:07 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 9-5) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 1-0),
1:35 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 4-7) at Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5), 1:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 10-2) at Kansas City (Mendoza
3-5), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker5-4) at Minnesota (Duensing 1-5), 2:10p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 11 -4) at Seattle (Iwakuma 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Angels at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Tampa Bay 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Arizona 1
Atlanta 8, N.Y. Mets 7
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 4
Miami 2, Washington 1
Philadelphia at Colorado, late
Houston at San Francisco, late
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
Washington (Strasburg 9-4) at Miami (Nolasco 8-6), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (J.Santana 6-5) at Atlanta (Sheets 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 10-2) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 7-6),
2:10 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 7-7) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-7), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 10-4) at Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-3),
3:10 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 5-6) at San Francisco (M.Cain 9-3),
4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 1-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 4-9),
4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook7-7) at Cincinnati (Cueto 10-5), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B4.


become a possible trade option for con-
tending teams.
Darwin Barney hit an RBI double for
the Cubs, who have won 11 of their last
15 games.
Pirates 6, Brewers 4
MILWAUKEE -Andrew McCutchen
hit a two-run shot for his fourth homer in
the last three games and the Pittsburgh
Pirates beat the Milwaukee Brewers 6-4.
Casey McGehee also went deep and
Kevin Correia pitched six effective innings
as the Pirates remained tied with the
Cincinnati Reds for the NL Central lead.
Correia (6-6) allowed four runs, two
earned, and four hits while improving to
4-0 with a 3.81 ERA in his last five starts.
McCutchen hit his 20th homer in the
third and also made a nice sliding catch
on a sinking line drive by Martin Maldon-
aldo with two runners on to end the
eighth. The All-Star center fielder is bat-
ting .447 with 10 homers and 30 RBIs in
his last 28 games.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 5, Angels 3
NEW YORK Robinson Cano and
Curtis Granderson each hit two-run


homers off Jerome Williams, leading the
New York Yankees to a 5-3 victory over
the Los Angeles Angels.
Freddy Garcia and three relievers kept
Mark Trumbo in the ballpark, denying him a
homer in a record sixth straight game
against the Yankees.
Nick Swisher, who appeared to rob
Trumbo of a second long ball Friday
night in helping New York rally late for a
win, made another leaping catch at the
right-field wall. His flashy grab of Howie
Kendrick's drive to end the fifth inning,
however, would have landed on the
warning track.
Blue Jays 11, Indians 9
TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion hit
two home runs, Yunel Escobar also went
deep and the Toronto Blue Jays used an
eight-run third inning to beat the Cleve-
land Indians 11-9.
Encarnacion and Escobar both hit two-
run shots in Toronto's highest-scoring in-
ning of the season. The Blue Jays had
eight hits in the inning, six of them for
extra bases.
Shelley Duncan, Michael Brantley and
Casey Kotchman homered for the Indi-
ans. Down 10-2 early, Cleveland made it
close with a five-run eighth.
Orioles 8, Tigers 6, 13 innings
BALTIMORE Taylor Teagarden
ended his first game with the Baltimore
Orioles in stunning fashion, hitting a two-
run homer in the 13th inning that sealed
an 8-6 victory over the Detroit Tigers.
In a crazy, back-and-forth duel that
lasted 4 hours, 43 minutes, Baltimore
scored three runs in the 13th for its 10th
straight extra-inning win and snapped De-
troit's six-game winning streak.
The Orioles scored in the 11th after
the Tigers scored in the top half, then
rallied again in the 13th after Quintin
Berry put Detroit ahead 6-5 with a two-
out RBI single.
In the bottom half, J.J. Hardy ended an
0-for-28 skid with a tying solo homer off
Joaquin Benoit (1-2). After Adam Jones
was hit by a pitch with two outs, Teagar-
den homered over the right-field wall.
Royals 6, White Sox 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -Alcides Escobar
hit a pair of homers off Jake Peavy, the
second a go-ahead shot with two outs in
the seventh inning, and the Kansas City
Royals beat the Chicago White Sox 6-3.
The 25-year-old shortstop had just two
homers all season and 11 in his career
before he connected for a two-run shot
off Chicago's All-Star right-hander in the
third inning.
White Sox slugger Adam Dunn home-
red and Dayan Viciedo hit an RBI triple in
the sixth to tie it at 3, but Escobar dou-
bled up against Peavy (7-6) in the sev-
enth inning. His solo shot to left gave him
the first multihomer game of his career.
Athletics 9, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS Chris Carter and
Yoenis Cespedes each homered and
drove in three runs, powering the Oakland
Athletics past the Minnesota Twins 9-3.
Seth Smith and Brandon Moss also
homered to beat Cole De Vries (2-2) and
back Tommy Milone (9-6). The A's won
for the eighth time in nine games to move
two games above the .500 mark for the
first time in two months.


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 B3



NL

Cubs 4, D-backs 1


Arizona


Chicago


ab rh bi ab rh bi
GParra If 4 0 1 0 RJhnsn cf-rf 4 0 2 0
A.Hill2b 4 0 1 0 SCastro ss 3 0 0 1
J.Uptonrf 2 0 0 0 Rizzolb 4 0 1 0
MMntr c 4 0 0 0 ASorin If 4 1 1 0
Gldschlb 4 0 2 0 JeBakrrf 3 1 0 0
Drew ss 4 0 1 0 Camp p 0 00 0
CYoungcf 2 1 1 1 LaHairph 1 0 0 0
Blum3b 4 0 0 0 Marmlp 0 00 0
JSndrs p 1 0 0 0 Soto c 4 02 0
RRorts ph 1 0 1 0 Barney 2b 3 1 1 1
Shawp 0 0 0 0 Valuen3b 3 1 2 1
DHrndzp 0 0 0 0 Dmpstrp 1 00 0
Kubel ph 1 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
DeJess ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 17 1 Totals 31 4 9 3
Arizona 000 000 100 1
Chicago 001 201 00x 4
E-Drew (2). DP-Arizona 1, Chicago 3. LOB-
Arizona 8, Chicago 5. 2B-Goldschmidt (26),
Drew (3), Re.Johnson (8), Barney (18). HR-
C.Young (9). S-Dempster.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
J.Saunders L,4-6 6 8 4 3 0 4
Shaw 1 1 0 0 1 0
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
DempsterW,5-3 6 4 0 0 3 5
Russell 1 2 1 1 0 1
Camp H,10 1 0 0 0 1 1
MarmolS,9-11 1 1 0 0 1 0
WP-J.Saunders, Shaw.


Reds 3, Cardinals 2,
10 innings
St. Louis Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Furcalss 4 0 2 1 Cozart ss 3 0 0 1
Jay cf 5 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 5 0 1 0
Hollidylf 5 0 1 0 Vottolb 4 0 0 0
Beltran rf 5 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 5 1 2 0
Craig lb 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 5 0 2 1
YMolinc 4 1 1 1 Ludwcklf 5 1 1 1
Freese3b 5 1 2 0 Rolen3b 4 1 2 0
VMarte p 0 00 0 Mesorc c 3 01 0
Schmkr2b 2 0 2 0 Leakep 2 0 1 0
Lohse p 1 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
Brkmnph 1 0 0 0 Ondrskp 0 00 0
Brwnng p 0 00 0 Bray p 0 00 0
Boggs p 0 0 0 0 Frazier ph 1 0 0 0
MCrpntph 0 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Greene ph 1 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 00 0
Salas p 0 0 0 0
Rzpczy p 0 000
Descals 3b 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 28 2 Totals 37310 3
St. Louis 000 000 200 0 2
Cincinnati 000 011 000 1 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-Furcal (8), Bruce (4). LOB-St. Louis 11,
Cincinnati 11. 2B-Schumaker (10), Bruce 2
(22). HR-Y.Molina (14), Ludwick (13). SB-
Furcal (11). S-Lohse, Leake. SF-Cozart.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Lohse 6 8 2 2 1 3
Browning 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Boggs 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Salas 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 1
V.Marte L,2-2 0 1 1 1 0 0
Cincinnati
Leake 6 7 2 2 1 3
Marshall BS,3-12 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 3 0
Bray 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chapman 1 0 0 0 1 2
LeCureW,3-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Leake pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
V.Marte pitched to 1 batter in the 10th.
HBP-by Lohse (Votto), by Salas (Cozart).
PB-Mesoraco.

Braves 8, Mets 7


NewYork


ab r h bi
Tejada ss 5 0 2 2
Parnell p 0 0 0 0
Vldspn If 5 0 2 1
DWrght 3b 5 00 0
I.Davis lb 4 2 2 1
DnMrp2b 5 1 1 0
Niwnhsrf 2 0 0 0
Byrdakp 0 0 0 0
Beato p 0 0 0 0
RCeden ss 0 0 0 0
Duda ph 1 0 0 0
Thole c 4 1 2 1
AnTrrs cf 4 2 3 1
Dickey p 1 0 0 0
JuTrnrph 1 1 1 1
Edgin p 0 0 0 0
Rauch p 0 00 0
Hairstn rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 7137
NewYork 010
Atlanta 030


Atlanta


ab rh bi
Bourn cf 5 1 2 2
Prado ss-lf 5 1 2 1
Heywrdrf 4 1 2 1
C.Jones 3b 5 0 0 0
FFrmn b 4 1 3 2
McCnnc 3 21 0
Uggla2b 3 21 0
Hinske If 2 0 1 2
CMrtnz p 0 00 0
Varvar p 0 00 0
Pstrnck ph-ss 1 0 0 0
Hansonp 2 00 0
Durbinp 0 00 0
Avilan p 0 0 0 0
M.Diazph-lf 0 0 0 0
JFrncsph 1 0 0 0
Kimrelp 0 00 0

Totals 35812 8
203 010 7
020 03x 8


LOB-New York 8, Atlanta 8. 2B-I.Davis (15),
Thole (7), An.Torres (8), FEFreeman (19), Hinske
(4). HR-I.Davis (13). CS-Nieuwenhuis (4).
S-Dickey.
IP H R ER BB SO
NewYork
Dickey 5 8 5 5 2 4
Edgin H,1 1 0 0 0 1 3
Rauch H,9 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
ByrdakH,15 1-3 0 1 1 1 0
BeatoH,1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Parnell L,2-2 2-3 3 1 1 0 1
Atlanta
Hanson 51-3 9 6 6 2 5
Durbin BS,1-1 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
C.Martinez 1 1 1 1 0 2
VarvaroW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 2
Kimbrel S,27-28 1 0 0 0 0 3
C.Martinez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Byrdak pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Hanson (Nieuwenhuis). PB-Thole.

Marlins 2, Nationals 1


Washington Miami
ab r h bi


ab r hbi


Espinos2b 4 0 0 0 Reyes ss 4 1 1 0
Harper cf 3 0 0 0 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0
Zmrmn3b 4 0 1 0 Ca.Leelb 3 01 1
Morserf 4 0 0 0 Rugginrf 4 0 1 0
LaRochlb 4 0 1 0 HRmrz3b 3 00 0
Dsmndss 4 1 1 0 Bonifaccf 3 1 1 0
TMoore If 2 0 1 0 DSolan If 1 0 0 0
Berndn pr-lf 1 0 1 0 Cousins ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Floresc 3 0 2 1 J.Buckc 2 0 1 1
GGnzlzp 1 00 0 Buehrlep 2 00 0
DeRosa ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0
Stmmn p 0 00 0 Choatep 0 00 0
Cishekp 0 00 0
Totals 31 17 1 Totals 27 2 6 2
Washington 000 010 000 1
Miami 000 110 00x 2
DP-Washington 1, Miami 1. LOB-Washing-
ton 7, Miami 7. 2B-Zimmerman (17), Rug-
giano (11). SB-Desmond (13), Bernadina (9),
Infante 2 (10), Ca.Lee (2), Bonifacio (21). S-
Flores, G.Gonzalez, Infante, D.Solano.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
GonzalezL,12-4 6 5 2 2 0 9
Stammen 2 1 0 0 3 1
Miami
BuehrleW,9-8 7 6 1 1 2 7
Choate H,13 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
CishekS,2-5 12-3 1 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Stammen (J.Buck).


A






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays 5, Red Sox 3
Boston Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ellsury cf 4 0 2 0 EJhnsn ss 3 0 0 1
Ciriaco2b 4 0 0 0 C.Penalb 4 0 0 0
Ortizdh 3 1 1 0 Zobristrf 4 00 0
C.Rossrf 3 1 0 0 BUptoncf 4 1 1 1
Mdlrks3b 4 1 1 2 Scott dh 3 1 0 0
Avilesss 4 0 2 0 Kppngr3b 3 2 2 0
Shppch c 2 0 0 0 DJnngs If 2 1 1 0
Sltlmch ph 1 0 0 0 JMolin c 2 0 1 1
Lillirdglb 4 0 1 0 Matsuiph 0 0 0 0
Nava If 4 0 0 0 Rhyms pr-2b 0 0 0 0
SRdrgz2b 1 0 0 1
Loaton ph-c 0 00 1
Totals 33 37 2 Totals 26 5 5 5
Boston 000 201 000 3
Tampa Bay 001 010 21x 5
E-Aviles (9), Price (2). DP-Tampa Bay 1.
LOB-Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5. 2B-Ellsbury
(3), Keppinger 2 (6). HR-Middlebrooks (11),
B.Upton (8). S-De.Jennings 2. SF-E.John-
son, S.Rodriguez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Buchholz L,8-3 61-3 3 4 4 1 8
AlbersBS,4-4 1-3 0 0 0 2 0
A.Miller 1 2 1 1 0 2
Melancon 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
PriceW,12-4 71-3 6 3 2 3 8
Jo.Peralta H,19 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Rodney S,26-27 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP--by Buchholz (Keppinger). PB-J.Molina.
Athletics 9, Twins 3


Oakland


Minnesota


ab rh bi ab rh bi
JWeeks2b 5 00 0 Spancf 5 03 0
S.Smithlf 5 1 2 2 Revererf 5 0 2 0
Reddckcf 5 2 3 0 Mauerc 4 1 1 0
Cespds dh 5 2 2 3 Wlngh If 4 1 2 1
Moss rf 3 2 1 1 Mornealb 4 0 1 1
Carter 1b 4 1 1 3 Plouffe3b 4 0 1 0
Inge3b 4 0 1 0 Doumitdh 4 0 2 0
Pnngtn ss 4 0 0 0 Dozier ss 3 1 1 1
KSuzuk c 4 1 2 0 JCarrll 2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 39 9129 Totals 37314 3
Oakland 402 011 001 9
Minnesota 001 001 010 3
E-Span (3). DP-Oakland 2. LOB-Oakland
4, Minnesota 9. 2B-Cespedes (12), K.Suzuki
(12), Revere (7), Doumit (17). 3B-S.Smith (2).
HR-S.Smith (9), Cespedes (10), Moss (11),
Carter (4), Willingham (22), Dozier (4).
IP H R ERBBSO


Oakland
Milone W,9-6
Norberto
Scribner
Blevins
Minnesota
De Vries L,2-2
Swarzak
T.Robertson
Capps
Gray


6 10
11-3 3
2-3 1
1 0


HBP-by De Vries (Moss).WP-TRobertson.
Pirates 6, Brewers 4


Pittsburgh Milwaukee
ab r h bi
Sutton If-rf 4 0 0 0 Aoki cf
Walker 2b 4 2 2 0 Ishikawlb
AMcCtcf 4 1 1 2 Braun If
GJonesrf 3 0 2 0 ArRmr3b
Hague ph 1 0 0 0 Hart rf
Resop p 0 0 0 0 RWeks 2b
Grillip 0 0 0 0 Mldndc
Barajs ph 0 0 0 0 Clzturs ss
Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0 Estrad p
McGehlb 5 1 3 2 Loep
PAIvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 MParr p
McKnr c 3 0 0 0 Kottars ph
Barmes ss 4 1 1 0 Thrnrg p
Correia p 2 0 0 0 Morgan ph
JHrrsn ph 0 1 0 0
GHrndzl If 1 000
Totals 35 69 4 Totals
Pittsburgh 002 001 210
Milwaukee 022 000 000


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
5 2100
2 1 0 0
4 1 1 0
3 1 2 2
4 0 0 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
2 00 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


324 6 3
6
4


E-PAIvarez (14), Loe (1), Braun (5). LOB-
Pittsburgh 8, Milwaukee 7. 2B-Ar.Ramirez
(28), C.Izturis (3). 3B-Hart (4). HR-A.Mc-
Cutchen (20), McGehee (7). CS-Walker (3).
S-J.Harrison, C.Izturis. SF-Hart.
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
Correia W,6-6 6 4 4 2 1 6
Resop H,4 1 1 0 0 1 0
Grilli H,22 1 1 0 0 1 1
Hanrahan S,24-27 1 0 0 0 1 1
Milwaukee
Estrada 52-3 6 3 3 1 11
Loe L,4-3BS,4-4 2-3 2 2 1 1 1
M.Parra 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornburg 2 1 1 1 2 3
HBP-byThornburg (Barajas). PB-M.Maldonado.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Trout, Los Angeles, .348; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .329; Mauer, Minnesota, .328;
Beltre, Texas, .325; Konerko, Chicago, .324;
AJackson, Detroit, .323; Rios, Chicago, .317.
RUNS-Ortiz, Boston, 64; Granderson, New
York, 63; Kinsler, Texas, 63; Bautista, Toronto,
62; De Aza, Chicago, 59; Trout, Los Angeles,
59; Cano, New York, 58.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 75; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 72; Bautista, Toronto, 65; ADunn, Chicago,
64; Fielder, Detroit, 64; Willingham, Minnesota,
64; Encarnacion, Toronto, 61.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 116; Jeter, New
York, 114; Cano, New York, 107; Beltre, Texas,
105; Rios, Chicago, 104; Kinsler, Texas, 103;
AdJones, Baltimore, 101.
DOUBLES-Choo, Cleveland, 27; AdGonza-
lez, Boston, 27; AGordon, Kansas City, 27; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 26; Cano, New York, 26;
Kinsler, Texas, 26; Brantley, Cleveland, 25;
Ortiz, Boston, 25.
TRIPLES-Andrus, Texas, 5; Berry, Detroit,
5; De Aza, Chicago, 5; AJackson, Detroit, 5;
Rios, Chicago, 5; JWeeks, Oakland, 5; Reddick,
Oakland, 4; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 4.
HOME RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 27; ADunn,
Chicago, 27; Hamilton, Texas, 27; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 25; Granderson, New York, 24; Ortiz,
Boston, 23; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 23.
STOLEN BASES-Trout, Los Angeles, 30;
RDavis, Toronto, 23; Kipnis, Cleveland, 20; Re-
vere, Minnesota, 18; JDyson, Kansas City, 17;
Andrus, Texas, 16; Crisp, Oakland, 16.
PITCHING-Price, Tampa Bay, 12-4; MHarri-
son, Texas, 11-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 10-1;
Sale, Chicago, 10-2; Nova, New York, 10-3;
Darvish, Texas, 10-5; 6 tied at 9.
STRIKEOUTS--FHernandez, Seattle, 128;
Verlander, Detroit, 128; Scherzer, Detroit, 125;
Darvish, Texas, 117; Price, Tampa Bay, 113;
Peavy, Chicago, 113; Shields, Tampa Bay 109.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 26; JiJohnson,
Baltimore, 26; CPerez, Cleveland, 25; RSoriano,
NewYork, 22; Broxton, Kansas City 22; Aceves,
Boston, 20; Nathan, Texas, 19.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .366;
Ruiz, Philadelphia, .352; MeCabrera, San Fran-
cisco, .352; DWright, New York, .347; Votto,
Cincinnati, .339; CGonzalez, Colorado, .334;
Prado, Atlanta, .317.
RUNS-Bourn, Atlanta, 62; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 62; Braun, Milwaukee, 60; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 60; Pence, Philadelphia, 58;
DWright, New York, 57; Holliday, St. Louis, 56.
RBI-Beltran, St. Louis, 65; Braun, Miwaukee,
64; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 63; Kubel, Arizona,
60; DWright, NewYork, 59; CGonzalez, Colorado,
58; Bruce, Cincinnati, 57; Holliday, St. Louis, 57.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 120; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 116; Bourn, Atlanta, 114;
DWright, NewYork, 108; CGonzalez, Colorado,
107; Prado, Atlanta, 106; Holliday St. Louis, 103.
DOUBLES-Votto, Cincinnati, 35; ArRamirez,
Milwaukee, 28; DWright, NewYork, 28; Cuddyer,
Colorado, 26; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 26;
Desmond, Washington, 24; Hart, Milwaukee, 24.
TRIPLES-Fowler, Colorado, 9; MeCabrera,


Faor the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
.. -0-7-5
CASH 3 (late)
1-2-1

^. PLAY 4 (early)
S6-8-7-2
PLAY 4 (late)
8-6-0-9


SLo y Fantasy 5 and Florida Lot-
tery numbers were unavail-
POWERBALL able at press time. Please go
4 16 32 37 46 to www.flalottery.com or see
POWER BALL Monday's Chronicle for the
13 results of each draw.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup: LENOX Industrial Tools 301 race
BADMINTON
3 a.m. (47 FAM) BWF Indonesian Open Premier Super
series finals (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at New York
Yankees
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Arizona Diamondbacks at Chicago
Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds)
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 14 High
Mountains
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) WPBA U.S. Open semifinal (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN2) WPBA U.S. Open final (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Summer Shootout (Taped)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Aberdeen Asset
Management Scottish Open Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Senior Open Championship Final
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: John Deere Classic Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Web.com Utah Championship -
Final Round
BULL RIDING
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR Eldorado Shootout (Taped)
SOCCER
4 p.m. (ESPN) Seattle Sounders FC at New York Red Bulls
TENNIS
4 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA U.S. Open Series: Bank of the West
Classic final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


San Francisco, 7; SCastro, Chicago, 7; Bourn,
Atlanta, 6; Reyes, Miami, 6; 10 tied at 5.
HOME RUNS-Braun, Milwaukee, 26; Bel-
tran, St. Louis, 20; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 20;
Stanton, Miami, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 18; PAI-
varez, Pittsburgh, 17; Desmond, Washington,
17; CGonzalez, Colorado, 17; ASoriano,
Chicago, 17.
STOLEN BASES-DGordon, Los Angeles,
30; Bourn, Atlanta, 25; Campana, Chicago, 25;
Bonifacio, Miami, 21; Pierre, Philadelphia, 20;
Reyes, Miami, 20; Schafer, Houston, 20.
PITCHING-Dickey New York, 12-1; GGon-
zalez, Washington, 12-4; Lynn, St. Louis, 11-4;
Bumgarner, San Francisco, 11-5; AJBurnett,
Pittsburgh, 10-2; Hamels, Philadelphia, 10-4;
Hanson, Atlanta, 10-5; Cueto, Cincinnati, 10-5.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 128;
GGonzalez, Washington, 127; Dickey, New
York, 127; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 125; MCain,
San Francisco, 118; Hamels, Philadelphia, 118;
Greinke, Milwaukee, 117.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27; Hanrahan,
Pittsburgh, 24; SCasilla, San Francisco, 22;
Motte, St. Louis, 20; HBell, Miami, 19; FFran-
cisco, NewYork, 18; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 18;
Myers, Houston, 18.



Nationwide Series

F.W. Webb 200 Results
Saturday
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 147.6
rating, 0 points, $38,700.
2. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 126.4, 0,
$31,375.
3. (12) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 115.5, 42,
$31,643.
4. (6) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 114, 40,
$23,118.
5. (3) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 111, 39,
$26,418.
6. (2) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 119.7, 0,
$17,425.
7. (7) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 99.3, 37,
$19,343.
8. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 102.7, 36,
$18,943.
9. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 99.9, 0,
$12,350.
10. (11) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 200, 94.2, 34,
$19,668.
11. (14) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 90.5, 33,
$18,768.
12. (8) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 88.5, 32,
$18,443.
13. (15) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 84.8, 31,
$18,293.
14. (18) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 85.9,
30, $18,068.
15. (27) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 200, 79.1, 29,
$21,718.
16. (16) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 199, 76.7, 29,
$17,818.
17. (25) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 73.5,
27, $17,693.
18. (10) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 199, 83.3, 26,
$17,543.
19. (19) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 197, 65.3, 25,
$17,493.
20. (22) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 196, 69.6, 24,
$18,118.
21. (28) Timmy Hill, Ford, 196, 65.3, 23,
$17,343.
22. (37) Eric McClure, Toyota, 196, 52.9, 22,
$17,293.
23. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 196, 50.4, 0,
$17,243.
24. (32) Josh Richards, Ford, 194, 50.6, 20,
$17,178.


25. (21) Matt Frahm, Ford, 194, 52.5, 19,
$17,618.
26. (42) Amber Cope, Chevrolet, 167, 37.3, 18,
$17,108.
27. (40) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, vibration, 130,
44.4, 17, $17,073.
28. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, fuel pressure, 121,
75.5, 0, $10,570.
29. (36) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, accident, 116,
52.9, 15, $17,003.
30. (17) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, sway bar, 79,
54.5, 14, $10,800.
31. (20) Travis Pastrana, Toyota, accident, 77,
63.4, 13, $10,465.
32. (34) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, handling,
47, 47.6, 12, $10,430.
33. (30) Kevin Lepage, Ford, wheel bearing, 19,
43.9, 11, $10,410.
34. (29) Scott Riggs, Ford, ignition, 9, 47, 0,
$10,390.
35. (38) T.J. Bell, Toyota, brakes, 6, 43.2, 9,
$10,365.
36. (43) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, overheating,
6, 39.6, 8, $10,345.
37. (39) Matt Carter, Chevrolet, vibration, 5,
39.7, 7, $10,325.
38. (35) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, brakes, 5,
39.1, 6, $10,311.
39. (41) Charles Lewandoski, Chevrolet, brakes,
4, 34.9, 5, $10,190.
40. (26) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, engine, 3, 34.4,
4, $16,573.
41. (24) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, rear gear, 3,
35.5, 0, $10,075.
42. (31) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, transmis-
sion, 3, 34.8, 0, $10,060.
43. (23) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 2, 33.5,
1, $10,018.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 106.899 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 58 minutes, 46 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.717 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 23 laps.
Lead Changes: 7 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: B.Keselowski 1-38; K.Kahne 39-
81; A.Dillon 82; B.Keselowski 83-123; J.Bowles
124; B.Keselowski 125-154; K.Harvick 155-178;
B.Keselowski 179-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): B.Keselowski, 4 times for 131 laps;
K.Kahne, 1 time for 43 laps; K.Harvick, 1 time
for 24 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Bowles,
1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 628; 2. A.Dillon,
625; 3. R.Stenhouse Jr., 612; 4. S.Hornish Jr.,
596; 5. J.Allgaier, 555; 6. M.Annett, 529; 7.
CWhitt, 514; 8. M.Bliss, 458; 9. D.Patrick, 413;
10. B. Scott, 397.
Sprint Cup

Lenox Industrial
Tools 301 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 133.417 mph.
2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 133.403.
3. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 133.399.
4. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 133.338.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 133.319.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 133.277.
7. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 133.254.
8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 133.198.
9. (88) D. Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 133.045.
10. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 132.938.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 132.873.
12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 132.868.
13. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 132.572.
14. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 132.549.
15. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 132.425.
16. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 132.425.
17. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 132.393.
18. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 132.333.


19. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 132.264.
20. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 132.2.
21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 132.186.
22. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 132.085.
23. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 131.833.
24. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 131.556.
25. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 131.465.
26. (10) D. Reutimann, Chevrolet, 131.266.
27. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 131.234.
28. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 131.234.
29. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 131.184.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 130.833.
31. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 130.662.
32. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 130.14.
33. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 129.834.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 129.807.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 129.679.
36. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 129.525.
37. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 129.318.
38. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 129.274.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 129.156.
40. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 129.094.
41. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 128.863.
42. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 128.515.
43. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 128.182.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 128.07.



Tour de France results
Saturday
At Le Cap d'Agde, France
13th Stage
A 134.8-mile, mostly flat ride from Saint-
Paul-Trois-Chateaux to the Mediterranean
resort of Le Cap d'Agde with a single
1. Andre Greipel, Germany, Lotto Belisol, 4
hours, 57 minutes, 59 seconds.
2. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, same time.
3. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway Sky Pro-
cycling, same time.
4. Sebastien Hinault, France, France, AG2R
La Mondiale,
5. Daryl Impey, South Africa, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
6. Julien Simon, France, Saur-Sojasun, same
time.
7. Marco Marcato, Italy Vacansoleil-DCM,
same time.
8. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, BMC Racing,
same time.
9. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, same time.
10. Danilo Hondo, Germany, Lampre-ISD,
same time.
11. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, same time.
12. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling,
same time.
13. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same
time.
14. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, same time.
15. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
same time.
16. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing,
same time.
17. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, same time.
18. Andreas Kloeden, Germany Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, same time.
19. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
20.Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, same time.
Also
30. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, same time.
39. Christian Vande Velde, United States,
Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, same time.
96. George Hincapie, United States, BMC
Racing, 12 minutes, 31 seconds behind.
97. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, same time.
140. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, 14:04.
151. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, same time.
Overall Standings
(After 13 stages)
1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling,
59 hours, 32 minutes, 32 seconds.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
2:05.
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, 2:23.
4. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 3:19.
5. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto
Belisol, 4:48.
6. HaimarZubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nis-
san, 6:15.
7. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, 6:57.
8. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 7:30.
9. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar,
8:31.
10.Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 8:51.
11. Andreas Kloeden, Germany Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 9:29.
12. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 9:45.
13. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 10:49.
14. Jerome Coppel, France, Saur-Sojasun,
11:27.
15. Christopher Horner, United States, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, 12:41.


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES- Reinstated CTaylor
Teagarden from the 60-day DL. Selected the con-
tract of RHP Miguel Socolovich from Norfolk (IL).
Assigned C Ronny Paulino outright to Norfolk.
Designated LHP Dana Eveland for assignment.
BOSTON RED SOX Reinstated RHP Clay
Buchholz from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF
Mauro Gomezto Pawtucket (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS Placed LHP Drew
Smyly on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 7.
Recalled RHP Luis Marte and Danny Worth
from Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Assigned OF
Mitch Maier outright to Omaha (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS -Reinstated RHP
Jerome Williams from the 15-day DL. Optioned
LHP Brad Mills to Salt Lake (PCL).
SEATTLE MARINERS -Placed OF Franklin
Gutierrez on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Stephen Pryor to Tacoma (PCL).
TEXAS RANGERS-Recalled C Luis Mar-
tinez from Round Rock (PCL). Optioned RHP
YoshinoriTateyama to Round Rock.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Reinstated
LHP Joe Saunders from the 15-day DL. Op-
tioned LHP Patrick Corbin to Reno (PCL).
ATLANTA BRAVES Reinstated C Brian
McCann from paternity leave. Recalled SS Tyler
Pastornicky from Gwinnett (IL). Optioned C J.C.
Boscan to Gwinnett.
CINCINNATI REDS -Traded INF Paul Jan-
ish to Atlanta for RHPTodd Redmond, and op-


tioned him to Louisville (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS Reinstated OF
Justin Maxwell from the 15-day DL.
MIAMI MARLINS Placed OF Giancarlo
Stanton on the 15-day DL. Agreed to terms with
C Humberto Quintero on a minor league contract.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Placed RHP
Javy Guerra on the bereavement list. Recalled
RHP Josh Wall from Albuquerque (PCL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Reinstated 1B
Lance Berkman from the 15-day DL. Optioned
OF Shane Robinson to Memphis (PCL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
BOSTON CELTICS Re-signed F Kevin
Garnett, F Brandon Bass and C-F Chris Wilcox.
DETROIT PISTONS- Signed CVyacheslav
Kravtsov to a multiyear contract.
NEW ORLEANS HORNETS Matched the
Phoenix Suns' four-year offer sheet to G Eric
Gordon.


Peters wins NASCAR
trucks race in Iowa
NEWTON, Iowa Timothy
Peters won the NASCAR trucks
series race at Iowa Speedway
on Saturday night, notching his
first victory of the season.
It's the fourth career win for
Peters, who overtook Ron Hor-
naday Jr. with 10 laps left to
become the third pole-sitter to
win a trucks race in four events
in Iowa.
Peters gave his lead up to
Hornaday on a restart with just
over 30 laps left. But the series
points leader got another shot
at Hornaday on a later restart
and used the low inside line to
take the lead for good.
Hornaday was second, fol-
lowed by Matt Crafton, Johnny
Sauter and Justin Lofton.
Top seed Isner
reaches Newport final
NEWPORT, R.I. Top seed
and defending champ John
Isner advanced to the final at



CALL
Continued from Page BI

fourth. The Tampa Bay
starter's errant pickoff
throw to third base allowed
the Red Sox to take a 3-2
lead in the sixth.
Buchholz was activated
from the disabled list before
the game and made his first
start since working six in-
nings in a 7-5 win over Miami
on June 19. He was placed
on the DL with what the Red
Sox described as a stomach


MEN
Continued from Page B1

discussion about compari-
son is probably out the win-
dow, and you know it's really
not that important or signif-
icant," Colangelo said.
"That was then, this is now.
That was them, and this is
us. You know, let's go out
and do the job we have to do
and then people can make
any comparisons they wish
after the fact."
Kobe Bryant, Carmelo An-
thony, Chris Paul and Deron
Williams are all back for the
reigning gold medalists. Du-



CITRUS
Continued from Page BI

Rozario. "It (the race) gets
me away from Tampa."
Running for the fun of it
was Kerri Kitchen. She is a
former Seven Rivers Chris-
tian cross country coach.
She is handling a fitness
boot camp at the YMCA and
is a personal fitness trainer.
She is also helping her hus-
band, Ron, to run for Citrus
County Commissioner.
"It was a great run," she
said. "It was fun. It was fast"
The race was run in ideal



NARROW
Continued from Page BI

of its own in the first inning
but was unable to put much
of a dent in Keystone's large
lead.
Kevin Parker started on
the mound for Inverness
with Evan Badger coming in
early to close the game.
Noah Cino got a key base
hit, following with Badger's
RBI to give Inverness a run
on the board.
Cody Cyr's solo homer in
the third inning gave Inver-



BOTH
Continued from Page B1

"They were a good team,"
said Inverness manager
Jason Newberry "They
were very talented. Most of
the team has lost one game
in three years. They should
go deep in the state tourna-
ment. They are deep in
pitching. They look good.


They do everything well.
They are a better team.
They are going to be tough
to beat. We did what we
could. Sometimes, you run
across a team that is a little
bit better.
"You can't win them all. I
think we played like cham-
pions. I think we did great.
These girls are 11 and 12
years old. They are going to
make mistakes. It is part of
the growing process."
Keystone had 12 hits.
Inverness pitchers gave


the Hall of Fame Tennis Cham-
pionships by beating fellow
American Ryan Harrison 7-6
(4), 6-3 on Saturday.
Isner, ranked 11th, will face
Australia's Lleyton Hewitt in the
title match Sunday. Hewitt, a for-
mer world No. 1, defeated Amer-
ican Rajeev Ram 6-4, 5-7, 6-2.
The matches were held after
Jennifer Capriati and four oth-
ers were enshrined into the In-
ternational Tennis Hall of Fame.
Vandeweghe reaches
Bank of West final
STANFORD, Calif. Lucky
loser Coco Vandeweghe has
reached her first WTA Tour final
with a 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 victory
against Belgium's Yanina Wick-
mayer on Saturday at the Bank
of the West Classic.
Wickmayer double-faulted to
hand Vandeweghe a service
break to go ahead 3-1 in the final
set. Vandeweghe saved four
break points in the next game
and watched Wickmayer double
fault again on match point.


illness, and the team later
announced that he had
esophagitis, which led to the
erosion of his esophagus and
internal bleeding.
Price pitched one score-
less inning in last Tuesday's
All-Star game in Kansas City,
throwing seven pitches. He
limited Boston to Mike
Aviles' second-inning single
until David Ortiz singled
with one out and scored
ahead of Middlebrooks
when the third baseman hit
an 0-2, two-out pitch over the
left-centerfield wall for his
11th homer of the season.

rant, who had the best tour-
nament ever by an Ameri-
can player two years ago at
the world basketball cham-
pionship, headlines the re-
turnees from that team.
As for the notion that the
Americans are so weakened
they could actually gasp
- lose?
"They got to get the rat-
ings up, don't they? They got
to ask something, it can't be
all good things," Anthony
said.
Turning serious, Anthony
added: "If we go out there
and do what we have to do,
and prepare for this
Olympics like we did in '08,
we'll be fine."


sunny conditions.
There were about 460
runners signed up for the
11th running.
Race director Milton
Lyons began the race as a
school project when he was
a cross country runner at
Citrus High School. Now, an
operations manager at Fit-
niche, he is surprised the
race has prospered.
"I'm amazed it has
grown," Lyons said. "It was
a smooth race. Chris Moling
makes it work. I can't give
him enough credit. He do-
nates almost everything. It's
a free race. A lot of quality
runners come out."

ness its second and final run
of the game.
Kobe Key once again
turned in some impressive
defensive plays for Inver-
ness in the outfield, but ulti-
mately too many errors
came to hurt Inverness'
chances of mounting a
comeback.
"We scored a run and
looked to be getting some-
thing going," Inverness head
coach Billy Cyr said. "But
we just felt flat and had too
many errors."
Inverness plays against
the District 5 champs today
at 10 a.m.


up three walks. Keystone
had two walks.
9-10 Softball

Citrus Park 16,
Dunnellon 6
CRYSTAL RIVER Grace
Thompson took the pitching
loss as Citrus Park beat Dun-
nellon at Harley Levins Softball
Complex.
Kristin Kopp was the winning
pitcher for Citrus Park.


Citrus Park's Raquel Zapata
blasted a three-run triple to key
the victory for Citrus Park.
Dunnellon had just three
hits and accepted 11 bases
on balls.
Dunnellon is 1-1 in Section 7
play.
"They are a good hitting
team," said Dunnellon manager
Raymond Prescott of Citrus
Park. "They did what they had
to do. We hung in there."
Dunnellon will play their final
game today at 11 a.m.


SSports BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Langer vaults into top spot


Golfer leads U.S.

Senior Open by

four shots

Associated Press

LAKE ORION, Mich. Fred Cou-
ples joked that someone will have to
close with a 60 to catch Bernhard
Langer at the U.S. Senior Open.
That might not be low enough.
Langer shot a 6-under 64 on Sat-
urday to move to 10 under for the
tournament, putting him ahead of a
big-name field by four strokes.
"That's not a huge lead," he in-
sisted. "That can disappear in no
time. I'm going to have to get out
there and shoot under par. That's
my goal.
"If I go 2 under or 3 under, it will
be very difficult for anyone to
catch me. And if they do, they de-
serve to win."
The two-time Masters champion
opened with three straight birdies
and eight in 12 holes at Indian-
wood, a course with tight and un-
forgiving fairways and undulating
greens.
"He didn't win two Masters by
luck," said Corey Pavin, who was in
a five-way tie for second place.
"He's an exceptionally good player,
very methodical."
Langer didn't miss a green in reg-
ulation during the third round until
the par-3 No. 13, where a double
bogey cut his cushion to three
shots. He bounced back with a
birdie at 15 before giving that
stroke back with a bogey at 18.
Pavin, Tom Lehman, Roger
Chapman, John Huston and Tom
Pernice Jr. were at 6-under 204.
Couples surged up the leader-
board with a 65 after starting the day
tied for 25th place. He was part of a
pack along with Fred FRink and
Jay Haas that was five shots back
in a tie for seventh at the Champion
Tour's fourth of five majors.
What did Couples think it would
take to get into contention with
Langer in the final round?
"Sixty," he said. "How does that
sound? Does that sound pretty
good? Not really realistic.


Associated Press
Bernhard Langer watches his drive on the ninth hole during the third round at the U.S. Senior Open golf
tournament Saturday at the Indianwood Golf and Country Club in Lake Orion, Mich.


"He's not going to come back.
Corey and whoever is going to have
to play a remarkable round to win.
I'm at least inching closer."
While Langer was in his sensa-
tional stretch Saturday, first-round
leader Tom Kite and second-round
leader Lance Ten Broeck were
struggling in the final group.
Kite finished with a 74 to drop into
a tie for 17th, nine shots back. Since
opening with a U.S. Senior Open
nine-hole record 28, Kite is 6 over
Ten Broeck, a full-time caddie
for Tim Herron and occasional
player, shot a 72 with three birdies
and five bogeys. He is alone in 11th
place, six shots back, after starting
the round with a one-shot lead over
Kite and a two-stroke edge on a
group that included Langer.
Pavin was tied with Langer com-
ing in and finished the third round
four shots back, insisting he only
thought about a two-stroke penalty
from Thursday when a reporter
asked about it. After pulling into a
first-round tie for the lead, Pavin
was docked two shots for hitting a
ball that moved a fraction of an
inch when he grounded his club to
prepare for a chip.


Matteson shoots 66, leads
by 3 shots at John Deere
SILVIS, III. Troy Matteson shot a
5-under 66 Saturday to take a three-
shot lead into the final round at the
John Deere Classic.
Steve Stricker, who also shot a 66,
sits in second place at 15 under in his
quest for a fourth straight tournament
title. Stricker birdied four straight holes
beginning at the 14th, but bogeyed the
par-4 18th, stubbing a chip shot and
missing a 15-footer for par.
Both Matteson and Stricker bogeyed
the last hole, setting up their final-round
pairing together at TPC Deere Run,
where Stricker, a Wisconsin native who
was an all-American at Illinois, has be-
come a local favorite by winning the last
three years.
Former Masters champion Zach
Johnson also carded a 66 to climb into
contention at 14 under, along with left-
hander Brian Harman.
Billy Hurley, J.J. Henry and 2006
champion John Senden are tied for
fifth, five strokes behind. Hurley's 64
matched the best round of the day,
while Senden eagled the par-5 second
hole en route to a bogey-free 67.


"It's great for me if I win," said Mat-
teson. "If Stricker wins, it's a really
big story."
Stricker is attempting to join Tom Mor-
ris Jr., Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen
and Tiger Woods as a winner four
straight times in the same tournament.
Woods has accomplished the feat twice.
"I can't even believe three years
have gone by," said Stricker, who was
five strokes behind Matteson at one
point during the back nine.
His 76-yard wedge shot to the par-4
14th green landed two feet from the
hole to set up the first of four straight
birdies. He sank a 5-footer at the 15th,
a 6-footer at the 16th, and an 11-footer
at the par-5 17th after missing the fair-
way with his tee shot and sending his
approach into a greenside bunker.
"Those were four nice birdies in a row,
which I really needed," Stricker said.
The final one made up for the bogey
on the last hole, set up by shoving his
tee shot into a grove of trees to the right
of the fairway. Nonetheless, he posted
his 37th under-par round at Deere Run
in 39 attempts, and is 109 under par at
the course since the tournament moved
here in 2000.


Germany's Greipel

wins Stage 13 of

Tour de France

Associated Press

LE CAP D'AGDE, France -
Andre Greipel of Germany led a
photo-finish sprint to win the 13th
stage of the Tour de France on Sat-
urday, while Britain's Bradley Wig-
gins retained the overall leader's
yellow jersey as the race headed
south to the Mediterranean.
The windy and flat 134.8-mile
run, with one major climb from
Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux to Le
Cap d'Agde, was tailored for a win
by one of the race's sprinters.
Greipel's ability to get over the
super-steep Mont Saint-Clair climb,
in the picturesque port town of Sete
about 14 miles from the finish,
helped pave the way for his victory
Several other top sprinters such
as Britain's Mark Cavendish -
struggled up the hill and fell back
Greipel, who turns 30 on Monday,
earned his third stage victory of
this year's Tour after winning the
fourth and fifth stages in sprint fin-
ishes. Still-photo imagery showed
he won by half a wheel's length
ahead of Slovakian rider Peter
Sagan. Edvald Boasson Hagen of
Norway was third.
Wiggins trailed close behind in
the main pack. Overall, he leads his
second-place Sky teammate and
fellow Briton Christopher Froome
by 2 minutes, 5 seconds. Vincenzo
Nibali of Italy is third, 2:23 back,
and defending champion Cadel
Evans of Australia is 3:19 off the
pace in fourth.
Saturday's route was known as a


transitional stage because it was
mostly flat, and guided riders away
from their last big test the Alps -
and toward their next, the Pyrenees.
Greipel's Lotto Belisol team did
the hard work of leading the pack
through a wind-swept ride along
the shore in pursuit of breakaway
riders Michael Albasini and
Alexandre Vinokourov, ultimately
catching them.
In a bold move, with less than a
mile left, Wiggins powered up to
the front of the pack with Sky team-
mate Boasson Hagen on his back
wheel, trying to set up the Norwe-
gian for the stage win.
Greipel said he "speculated" that
such a plot was being hatched. He
pulled up just behind Hagen, then
whizzed around him after a final
bend and held on to the line.
"I'm really happy with this vic-
tory ... it was once again a team ef-
fort," said Greipel, who has four
career Tour stage wins. "The sprint
was very long. I was just on the
wheel of Boasson Hagen, and I saw
that I could win if I just gave a little
extra at the end."
Wiggins said he led the late
surge because he wanted to stay in
front and out of possible trouble in
a big final bend in the road. He
also wanted to help Boasson
Hagen to return a favor for his sup-
port in the Alps.
"Once we knew that Cavendish
wasn't going to come back, every-
body said we'd try to do the job for
Edvald," Wiggins said. "Sometimes
it's just good to get on the front and
try to repay a friend of mine back."
Still, Spain's Luis Leon Sanchez,
who had been leading in a two-man
breakaway that was overtaken by
Wiggins, showed his frustration
with an angry hand gesture against
the man in the yellow jersey


Associated Press
Germany's Andre Greipel crosses the finish line to win the 134.8-mile-long
13th stage of the Tour de France cycling race, which began Saturday in
Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux and finished in Le Cap D'Agde, France.


L f


Bobby Gates
Scott Piercy
Chris DiMarco
Gary Christian
Scott Brown
Ryan Moore
Stuart Appleby
Robert Garrigus
Ricky Barnes
Jeff Maggert
Billy Horschel
Erik Compton
Seung-Yul Noh
Brendon de Jonge
Tim Clark
Y.E.Yang
Tommy Biershenk
Lee Janzen
Jonathan Byrd
Chad Campbell
K.J. Choi
Chris Kirk
Matt Every
Tom Gillis
Tommy Gainey
Duffy Waldorf
John Merrick
Chris Couch
Luke Guthrie
Jimmy Walker
Kevin Streelman
NickWatney
Blake Adams
Scott Dunlap
Spencer Levin
Jeff Overton
Mark Wilson
Steve Wheatcroft
CamiloVillegas
Kyle Stanley
Alex Cejka
Martin Flores
Ben Crane
Matt Bettencourt
Mathias Gronberg
JoshTeater
Jerry Kelly
Chez Reavie
Randall Hutchison
Rory Sabbatini
Ted Potter, Jr.
Vaughn Taylor
Bill Lunde
Danny Lee
Chris Stroud
Carl Pettersson
J.J. Killeen
Nathan Green
Dicky Pride
Chris Riley
a-Jordan Spieth
Roland Thatcher
Mark Anderson
Charley Hoffman
Hunter Haas
Alexandre Rocha
Kevin Chappell
Marco Dawson
Bud Cauley


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Keselowski emerges victorious


Driver wins

Nationwide race

with late charge

Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Brad Ke-
selowski slipped in front when
Kevin Harvick got into a traffic
jam. Then Harvick got mad.


Keselowski took the check-
ered flag in Saturday's Nation-
wide race at New Hampshire
Motor Speedway while Harvick
fumed about the inexperienced
driver who got in his way even
though she had been lapped.
"It's somebody who shouldn't
be on the racetrack, who has no
clue what they're doing in the
race car," Harvick said, direct-
ing his anger at Amber Cope.
"She wants to be Danica Patrick,
but she can't hold her helmet."


Brad Keselowski, front, won the Nationwide Series' F.W. Webb 200
auto race Saturday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H.
Associated Press


Keselowski capitalized when
Harvick was forced to slow
down with about 21 laps left in
the 200-mile race at the one-mile
oval, pulling ahead and winning
by about six car lengths.
The pole-sitter had lost the lead
to Harvick at about the 150th lap
when Patrick's Chevrolet bumped
Jason Bowles' Toyota, bringing
out the yellow flag.
Would Keselowski have won if
Harvick and Cope hadn't slowed
down like a pair of rush-hour
commuters?
"There's no way of really know-
ing that The odds were probably
not in my favor," Keselowski said.


Photo-finish sprint for riders


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 B5


U.S. Senior Open
Saturday
At Indianwood Golf and Country Club,
Lake Orion, Mich.
Purse: $2.75 million
Yardage: 6,862, Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Bernhard Langer 66-70-64-200 -10
Tom Pernice Jr. 67-71-66-204 -6
Corey Pavin 67-69-68-204 -6
Roger Chapman 68-68-68-204 -6
Tom Lehman 70-66-68-204 -6
John Huston 69-67-68-204 -6
Fred Couples 72-68-65-205 -5
Fred Funk 67-71-67-205 -5
Jay Haas 69-68-68-205 -5
Dick Mast 68-68-69-205 -5
Lance Ten Broeck 66-68-72-206 -4
Mark Calcavecchia 68-70-69-207 -3
Steve Lowery 70-68-69-207 -3
Mark Wiebe 69-68-70-207 -3
John Cook 69-72-67-208 -2
Peter Jacobsen 70-70-68-208 -2
Peter Senior 71-72-66-209 -1
Tom Kite 65-70-74-209 -1
Peter Fowler 70-74-66-210 E
Mike Goodes 71-73-66-210 E
Joey Sindelar 70-72-68-210 E
Rod Spittle 70-69-71-210 E
KirkTriplett 69-69-72-210 E
Rick Lewallen 70-68-72-210 E
Chien-Soon Lu 69-68-73-210 E
Andrew Magee 74-70-67-211 +1
Brad Faxon 69-71-71-211 +1
Jeff Sluman 67-71-73-211 +1
Michael Allen 74-70-68-212 +2
Jerry Pate 69-75-68-212 +2
Gary Hallberg 70-74-68-212 +2
Tom Watson 70-72-70-212 +2
Steve Jones 69-72-71-212 +2
Kiyoshi Murota 71-70-71-212 +2
Damon Green 68-72-72-212 +2
Dan Forsman 69-71-72-212 +2
Brad Bryant 70-68-74-212 +2
Fuzzy Zoeller 70-74-69-213 +3
Joel Edwards 72-71-70-213 +3
Fulton Allem 68-75-70-213 +3
Olin Browne 69-74-70-213 +3
Robert Thompson 70-72-71-213 +3
Gary Wolstenholme 70-70-73-213 +3
David Eger 69-70-74-213 +3
Tommy Armour III 69-69-75-213 +3
Jay Don Blake 73-65-75-213 +3
Jong-Duck Kim 73-71-70-214 +4
T.C. Chen 71-72-71-214 +4
a-Doug Hanzel 71-72-71-214 +4
Loren Roberts 71-69-74-214 +4
Andrew Oldcorn 70-69-75-214 +4
BobTway 72-71-72-215 +5
Mike Reid 71-72-72-215 +5
Ted Schulz 70-73-72-215 +5
Mikael Hogberg 67-75-73-215 +5
Tom Byrum 70-74-72-216 +6
Andy Bean 70-73-73-216 +6
Barry Lane 70-74-73-217 +7
Jim Rutledge 72-72-73-217 +7
Mark Brooks 72-71-74-217 +7
Bob Gilder 72-72-74-218 +8
Larry Mize 71-72-75-218 +8
a-Sean Knapp 70-72-76-218 +8
Jim Chancey 73-69-78-220 +10
Dave Eichelberger 70-74-78-222 +12
John Deere Classic
Saturday
At TPC Deere Run, Silvis, Ill.
Purse: $4.6 million
Yardage: 7,268, Par: 71
Third Round
a-amateur
Troy Matteson 61-68-66-195 -18
Steve Stricker 65-67-66 -198 -15
Zach Johnson 68-65-66-199 -14
Brian Harman 65-65-69 -199 -14
Billy Hurley III 68-68-64-200 -13
John Senden 69-64-67-200 -13
J.J. Henry 67-64-69-200 -13
Jamie Lovemark 71-66-64-201 -12







EE A, JULY 15,2012




-S NTE-RTAINMENT
-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Grammy


winner


to host


TV show


ConnickJr. to

honor sounds

from Louisiana

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Grammy-winning jazz
singer Harry Connick Jr.
will host and perform in a
television show that pays
tribute to the music of
Louisiana and the indus-
tries that have shaped its
culture and history
The one-hour show, a
Louisiana Public Broad-
casting special set to air in
December, will be avail-
able to PBS affiliates na-
tionwide next year It will
include performances of
"You Are My Sunshine" by
many of Louisiana's most
famous musicians -
among them Tim McGraw,
Irma Thomas, Zachary
Richard, Better Than
Ezra, Jerry Lee Lewis and
Buddy Guy The produc-
tion will cross many
Louisiana musical genres
such as Cajun, zydeco, jazz,
blues, gospel and rock.
"This is the fun part, as-
sembling a bunch of
Louisiana musicians,"
Connick said Friday
"There's not a lot of states
that can pull from that
many genres. If you think
about it, it's amazing."
The as-yet-untitled show
will mix music, interviews
and video snapshots of
Louisiana's economic driv-
ers such as tourism and oil
and gas.
Connick, a New Orleans
native, and Lt Gov Jay Dar-
denne unveiled the project
Friday at the Old U.S. Mint
in the French Quarter
BP PLC is paying for the
TV production and its pro-
motion with $1 million in
funds. After its massive oil
spill in the Gulf of Mexico
in 2010, BP gave tourism
officials in Louisiana $30
million to help the state
win tourists back Funding
for this new TV produc-
tion comes on top of that
money, said Jacques
Berry, a spokesman for
the lieutenant governor
For the show, Connick
and roughly a dozen other
musicians will perform
"You Are My Sunshine" -
one of two state songs
most notably associated
with former Gov Jimmie
Davis.
Dardenne said Connick
was the "obvious and logi-
cal choice" to host the
show.


www.google.com
Harry Connick Jr. will host
and perform in a television
show that pays tribute to
the music of Louisiana.


'American Idol'?


Associated Press
'American Idol' judges, from left, Steven Tyler, Jennifer Lopez and Randy Jackson are shown on the set of the
singing competition series in Los Angeles. Tyler and Lopez will not return as judges next season.


Several musical superstar

LYNN ELBER
AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES Mariah
Carey, Celine Dion and Mary J.
Blige are among the heady -
names being tossed around as
potential judges for "American
Idol" after Steven Tyler and eline
Jennifer Lopez skipped out on Dion
next season.
Star power, after all, is what concentr
judges add to TV talent shows that smith's f
otherwise feature unknowns whose for two se
performances can range from sur- "I hone
prisingly good to stunningly awful. come tha
But Fox's "American Idol," trying the othel
to right itself after shedding view- put kind
ers in its 11th season, may also need 'Idol' so n
to play a numbers game as in the tress-sing
age of the judges brought in to revi- Ryan Sew
talize a show whose audience is get- Fox ma
ting smaller and older, neither a tirely new
plus for advertisers. suggestir
"They need judges who will res- RandyJa
onate with young people," said other ro.
media analyst Brad Adgate. manages
Carey, Dion and Blige, undeni- son's and
ably winning stars, all are in their responds
early 40s. The ma
The median age for the "'American time. In
Idol" audience rose above 50 last sea- posted it
son, the first time ever, and Adgate after a se
suggests it take a page from "The X est show:
Factor" playbook, as devised by its viewers
creator and producer, Simon Cowell. overall d
"Cowell beat them to the punch" by tinued fo
hiring Britney Spears and Demi Lo- the No. 1
vato after "X Factor," the Fox version the 2005-
of Cowell's British hit, stumbled in its to NBC's
debut last season. Spears, 30, and Lo- "Idol"
vato, 19, replaced Paula Abdul, 50, losses ar
and Nicole Scherzinger, 34. which wo
(Worth noting: The male judges, Top 10 p:
Cowell, 52, and producer Antonio reckoned
"L.A." Reid, 56, are staying put for Among
season two.) who mig!
Lopez announced her departure Cyrus fit
Friday, a day after Tyler (an un- lation al:
likely senior statesman at 64) said "Idol" w:
he was leaving "American Idol" to 29, and i


Birthday Enterprises you have a strong hand in launch-
ing in the year ahead are likely to turn out to be quite favor-
able, if you don't lose control. You'd be smart to keep your
hands on the wheel instead of letting others do the
steering.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Perhaps unbeknownst to
you, there is likely to be a lot of activity stirring behind the
scenes on your behalf. One influential friend in particular
might be at the heart of it.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -An old friend might offer to pair
you with someone who could be of enormous help in an
endeavor you're trying to launch in the near future. Take
him or her up on it.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Listen attentively when some-
one wants to tell you his or her thoughts about making
some improvements on something meaningful to you.
Sometimes, good ideas can come from strange places.


names tossed about as replacements


Marian
Carey


'ate on his role as Aero-
frontman. Both appeared
seasons.
estly feel like the time has
t I have to get back to doing
r things that I do that I've
of on hold because I love
much," the 42-year-old ac-
ger-dancer told "Idol" host
crest on his radio show.
ay be scouting for an en-
w panel, with some reports
ig original "Idol" judge
ackson, 56, could shift to an-
le while Carey, whom he
, becomes a judge. Jack-
1 Carey's publicists did not
to requests for comment.
takeover comes at a critical
a May, "American Idol"
s lowest-rated finale ever
*ason that marked its poor-
ing yet among young adult
age 18 to 49. A pattern of
declining viewership con-
r the show, which fell from
spot for the first time since
06 season, placing second
"Sunday Night Football."
needs to stem its audience
id level out, Adgate said,
)uld be enough to keep it a
program and a "force to be
d with."
the younger possibilities
ht help, 19-year-old Miley
s the Lovato mold. Specu-
so has focused on former
inner Carrie Underwood,
finalists Jennifer Hudson


Today's HOROSCOPE
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something you've learned the
hard way from a tricky past experience is likely to prove to
be of immense value in keeping you from harm's way.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't be resistant to changes
taking place over which you have little or no control. If you
use your head and make the right adjustments, what tran-
spires will be to your advantage.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Find out what your mate
has to say before seeking counsel from friends and associ-
ates. She or he might have a greater depth of understand-
ing on how to deal with the matter.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Because you're likely to
be extremely imaginative as well as practical, your chances
for having a successful day are excellent. It's a winning
combination that gets it done.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't despair if your social
calendar hasn't been what you're used to. Some major


and Adam Lambert, both 30.
Lambert addressed the possi-
bility this week in an interview
in London, where he appeared
in concert with Queen.
"Well, nothing's been con-
firmed yet. If I were to be
asked, I'd love the job. I think
that would be great That's 'if,'
because nothing's been asked
yet," he said.
Nigel Lythgoe, an "Idol" ex-
ecutive producer who recently
joked about hiring Jerry Lewis and
Charlie Sheen as judges, was cir-
cumspect about Lambert.
"The minute 'American Idol' is
discussed and judges are discussed,
there's gonna be a lot of names fly-
ing around, and this is an interest-
ing one," he said. "I happen to like
Adam Lambert a great deal, but I'm
not sure where this has come from
probably from Adam Lambert's fan
club. We'll wait and see."
Youth isn't all, of course. Other
factors at play involve the fan base
that judges bring or develop, their
skill on live TV and their chemistry
with fellow panelists.
Casting a talent show judge, while
less daunting than making a
Supreme Court pick, can be tricky.
The right person has enough
celebrity cachet and success to be
desirable, but not so much to be un-
attainable. It's unlikely that Ri-
hanna, at least for now, sees a
judgeship as a career ambition.
Predicting who will flourish in a
reality TV setting is another hurdle.
Who would have guessed, for in-
stance, that the hard-living Tyler
would display such impish charm?
Conversely, popular daytime host
Ellen DeGeneres was a short-lived
"Idol" judge, appearing ill-at-ease
and timid in her contestant cri-
tiques. Songwriter Kara DioGuardi
had serious music credentials but
wasn't ready for prime-time.


changes socially are in the wings, waiting to be released to
create some fun happenings.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A new opportunity of sub-
stantial proportions will manifest through an individual with
whom you've shared previous success. It looks like a winner.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Do not discount any urges
you get to do something different. Once you get into it, you
might find it to be one of the more enjoyable things you've
undertaken in a long time.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You're in a cycle at present
where most things in which you want to engage will be fi-
nancially feasible, so take advantage of this as much as
you can. It could give you some things you want.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't be surprised if you start
to notice you suddenly have a stronger influence over your
friends than usual. It behooves you to use this to
strengthen friendships, not abuse them.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JULY 13
Mega Money: 4 18 20 26
Mega Ball: 12
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $832
3-of-4 MB 39 $374
3-of-4 862 $50.50
2-of-4 MB 1,295 $23
1-of-4 MB 10,867 $2.50
2-of-4 27,118 $2
Fantasy 5:3 7 17 19 23
5-of-5 4 $58,337.35
4-of-5 602 $62.50
3-of-5 13,859 $7.50
THURSDAY, JULY 12
Fantasy 5: 5 11 -19 27 36
5-of-5 4 winners $51,705.05
4-of-5 319 $104.50
3-of-5 9,468 $9.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 15,
the 197th day of 2012. There
are 169 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 15, 1912, Britain's
National Insurance Act, which
provided the British working
class with its first contributory
system of insurance against
illness and unemployment,
went into effect.
On this date:
In 1870, Georgia became
the last Confederate state to
be readmitted to the Union.
In 1932, President Herbert
Hoover announced he was
slashing his own salary by 20
percent, from $75,000 to
$60,000 a year; he also cut
Cabinet members' salaries
by 15 percent, from $15,000
to $12,750 a year.
In 1948, President Harry S.
Truman was nominated for
another term of office by the
Democratic national conven-
tion in Philadelphia.
In 1976, a 36-hour kidnap
ordeal began for 26 school-
children and their bus driver
as they were abducted near
Chowchilla, Calif., by three
gunmen and imprisoned in an
underground cell. (The cap-
tives escaped unharmed.)
In 1985, a gaunt-looking
Rock Hudson appeared at a
news conference with actress
Doris Day (it was later re-
vealed Hudson was suffering
from AIDS).
In 1997, fashion designer
Gianni Versace, 50, was shot
dead outside his Miami
home; suspected gunman
Andrew Phillip Cunanan was
found dead eight days later, a
suicide.
In 2010, after 85 days, BP
stopped the flow of oil from a
blown-out well in the Gulf of
Mexico using a 75-ton cap
lowered onto the wellhead
earlier in the week.
Ten years ago: John
Walker Lindh, an American
who'd fought alongside the Tal-
iban in Afghanistan, pleaded
guilty to two felonies in a deal
sparing him life in prison.
Five years ago: The
Philadelphia Phillies lost their
10,000th game, 10-2, to the
visiting St. Louis Cardinals.
One year ago: The Atlanta
Braves earned their 10,000th
win in franchise history with
an 11-1 rout of the Washing-
ton Nationals.
Today's Birthdays: Author
Clive Cussler is 81. Actor Alex
Karras is 77. Former Sen.
George V. Voinovich, R-Ohio,
is 76. Singer Linda Ronstadt
is 66. Model Kim Alexis is 52.
Actor-director Forest
Whitaker is 51. Actress
Brigitte Nielsen is 49. Actor-
comedian Eddie Griffin is 44.


Actress Diane Kruger is 36.
Thought for Today: "If
you have knowledge, let oth-
ers light their candles with it."
- Margaret Fuller, American
journalist and social critic
(1810-1850).


mi '


I







C- SUNDAY JULY 15,2012



COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Chronicle file
A highlight of the Key Training Center's annual Run for the Money week is when a group of Key clients meets up with runners to cross the Suwan-
nee River bridge, about two-thirds of the way home. The trek, in which runners take shifts in covering the 180 miles between the capital and
the Lecanto campus, begins early Monday morning and concludes Saturday. Run for the Money week festivities began Friday with the dinner-
auction fundraiser.

Solitude, excitement, kindness, entrepreneurial all describe Key Center


MELISSA WALKER
Special to the Chronicle
S olitude, sacrifice and suf-
ferizng- These are some of
the words runners partici-
pating in the Run for the
Money use to describe the
weeklong, 180-mile journey from Tal-
lahassee to Lecanto. Why are these
volunteer runners subjecting their
bodies to the agony of U.S. 19's hard,
hot, and lonely stretches of roadside
miles in 90-plus-degree heat?
Each year the runners help the Key
Training Center tell the story not in
words, but in a way much more mean-
ingful, by showing that each step of
this grueling run is small in compari-
son to the challenges faced each day
by clients of the Key
The effort required for each leg-
pounding step is likened to the effort
required for developmentally dis-
abled adults to do things that most of
us take for granted walking, dress-
ing oneself, and brushing one's teeth.
These runners are not running for
personal glory or satisfaction. The run
is about a community coming together
as one, sharing love, concern, and sup-
port for our neighbors who need a
helping hand to lead meaningful and
productive lives with kindness, love,
dignity and respect.
This message becomes clearer and
more meaningful as we trace this sym-
bolic journey
The annual run originated in July of
1976 by Key Executive Director Chet
Cole as a personal mission to bring
awareness to both the battle the men-


Andy

ANTHONY SCHEME
Special to the Chronic
Andy Taylor the sh
of Mayberry is g
a simple man
a common sense that
"book learning" any day
"The Andy Griffith Sh
was originally aired in pi
time on CBS from 1960-1
It is still syndicated all
the world and is one of
most successful TV shove
history It is especially n
for its wholesome na
and teaching of strong fa
values, honor, integrity
cency and honesty
I especially liked the
Andy raised Opie. Wh
look at television tod;
don't see Mayberry, I
mayhem. As Charlene ]
ling would say: "That ma
me cry"
I watched the show e
night with my son, Anth
I raised my son on
show. The lyrics of the so
are raising kids today F
our weekly visits to I
berry, my son and I lean


RUN FOR THE MONEY
Run for the Money festivities
began Friday with a dinner auction
fundraiser.
Runners will begin the 180-mile
trek from Tallahassee to the Key
campus in Lecanto on Monday
morning, arriving Saturday.
At the Key Training Center campus
in Lecanto on Saturday morning,
the public is invited to join in wel-
coming the runners home and
enjoy related festivities.

tally challenged face, and the Key's ef-
fort to ensure that its special friends
are guaranteed the dignity and oppor-
tunities that all people deserve.
After 24 years, Chet who logged
in over 4,000 road miles had to re-
tire his running shoes in response to
the community's overwhelming con-
cern for his health. This year is the
36th run, topping the 6,480-mile mark
due to the dedication and endurance
of many runners.
Excitement, anxiety and celebration
- These are some of the words used
throughout the run to describe the
emotions among the developmentally
disabled men and women who turn to
the Key for learning, working and liv-
ing. These special people understand
in their simplistic, peaceful way that
the run and its runners are doing
something significant for them. They
know somehow the run is a victory for
them where the community celebrates
See KEY/Page C4


KEY FACTS
* Where the money comes from
* 68 percent from government grants.
* 14 percent from earned income from thrift stores
and investments.
* 18 percent from the public support (donations, spe-
cial events, Citrus County United Way and bequests).
* How the funds are spent
* 71 percent on program services.
* 23 percent on general services and administration.
* 5 percent on thrift retail stores.
* 1 percent on fundraising.
* Average cost per day for a residential client
* $26 a day for a supported living environment (apart-
ments).
* $75 a day for a group home environment.
* Average cost per day for an adult day training pro-
gram client
* $27 a day for adult day training program client.
* $19 a day for supported employment client.
* Key Training is licensed by:
* Agency for Persons with Disabilities.
* Agency for Health Care Administration.
* Florida Department of Children and Family Services.
* Key faculties and programs comply with:
* Local and state fire marshals.
* Citrus County Health Department.
* Florida Department of Children and Families.
* U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reg-
ulations under Title VI and VII of the civil Rights Act
of 1964 Florida Bill of Rights for Developmentally
Disabled Persons Section 504, Rehabilitation Act,
title IX Educational Amendments, ADA Fair Housing
Laws Equal Opportunity Employer.


- Anthony and I will miss you

BRI tolerance for Otis Camp-
cle bell's weakness and for
Aunt Bee's pickles. My fa-
eriff vorite episode is "Opie The
gone Bird Man." We learned com-
with passion from Opie's mis- I
beat used slingshot and we were
y. introduced to soft love at
low" Myers Lake.
rime The bumbling Goobers
1968. among us learned we still
over may be smarter than any-
f the body when it comes to
vs in "fixin"' cars. Barney Fife
oted taking himself so very seri-
ture ously was a mirror reflec-
mily tion of most of us.
, de- And Sheriff Andy Taylor
understood. Mayberry -
way where are you now when we
en I need you so?!? I said that to
ay, I Andy Griffith at a restaurant
see in New York's Chinatown.
Dar- As we drove over the Brook-
akes lyn Bridge during a hectic
day, I said to my partner,
very "I'm ready for a Mayberry"
lony We sat down in a Chinese
that restaurant and who comes Special to the Chronicle
ongs in Griffith, with a small Anthony Schembri, former Citrus County administrator, and his son Anthony stand by the
om crowd. I couldn't believe it. squad car from "The Andy Griffith Show," on display at the International Association of


May-
rned


Chiefs of Police conference in New Orleans several years ago. The elder Schembri had pre-
See GUEST/Page C3 viously met Andy Griffith.


Numbers


tell the


story in


Citrus


County

In 2007, all of the prop-
erty in Citrus County
had a collective value
of $12.4 billion.
Today, that same prop-
erty has a collective tax-
able value of $9 billion.
We have lost $3.4 billion
and no one has even
called together a search
party to go looking for it.
We are collectively
worth about 25 percent
less than we were just a
short five years ago.
Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene released
those figures earlier this
month and it has left a lot
of folks scratching their
heads wondering when
this recession will finally
be over
While the fancy-pants
economists tell us we are
no longer in a recession, it
still feels like one. Our un-
employment rate is still
twice what it should be,
and the value of property
keeps declining.
Until the cost of real es-
tate bottoms out, most of
us are not going to start
feeling better. The single-
family home is the major
investment that most
Americans make in their
lifetime. The traditional
belief that an investment
in a home is the best thing
you can do with your
money has been turned on
its head.
If you purchased the av-
erage home in Beverly
Hills in 2007 for $200,000,
that home today is valued
at $94,000. Eh gads! If you
took a mortgage out on the
home, you have lost 53 per-
cent of the value since the
market reached its peak.
Beverly Hills has suf-
fered the greatest loss, but
the average single-family
home in the county is now
valued 39 percent less
than it was in 2007. Sug-
armill Woods and Ho-
mosassa held up the best
- those areas only lost an
average of 34 percent in
value.
Inverness lost 43 per-
cent and Citrus Springs 46
percent But Beverly Hills
has been the hardest hit.
In 2007, the average
home sold in the county
went for $168,350. In 2012,
the average is down to
$104,600.
In 2007, when things
were booming, we advised
our kids to buy homes be-
cause it was such a great
investment. Our children
have not believed much
we've told them since.
The good news is that
now is a really good time
to buy a home. The de-
pressed values have to be
near the bottom and will
soon begin to creep back
up. Slowly
The employment side of
the housing market can be
seen by looking at the
number of permits pulled
to build new single-family
homes. With more than
3,500 homes in one stage
or another of the foreclo-
sure process, the excess
inventory is making it dif-
ficult to justify building
anything.
The construction busi-
ness was the largest em-
ployer in the county back
in 2007.
See WINDOW/Page C3


e







OPage C2 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012



PINION


"As for the men in power, they are so
anxious to establish the myth of
infallibility that they do their
utmost to ignore truth."
Boris Pasternak, 1890-1960


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
ll- Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................ ...........citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


UNCERTAIN FUTURE





Duke should




keep nuke




in the mix


When the Duke-Progress
Energy merger was an-
nounced, one of the
benefits to Citrus County was
the expectation the larger post-
merger company would be bet-
ter positioned to
raise the capital THE I
needed to repair
the Crystal River Duke
nuclear plant lukewarrr
(CR3) and return it of (
to service.
Further, in an- OUR 01
bouncing the Don't pre
merger, the two Don't pre
companies said the plan
Progress Energy repa
CEO Bill Johnson
would become CEO of the new
company. This offered some
measure of assurance that com-
mitments made by Progress En-
ergy would be carried out by the
new company.
However, within minutes of
the merger being signed July 2,
the new board with a major-
ity of former Duke directors -
first hired Johnson and, on a
split vote within the board, re-
moved him as CEO and installed
former Duke CEO Jim Rogers as
chief executive of the merged
company.
The boardroom coup led to
questions and criticism of the
company from several quarters,
including former Progress En-
ergy directors and the North
Carolina Utilities commission,
which had been repeatedly as-
sured in company filings and
hearings that Johnson would be
CEO of the merged company.
The commission immediately
set a hearing to question Rogers
about the sudden change in
leadership. During that hearing,
Rogers told the commission
Duke directors had lost confi-
dence in Johnson. One specific
issue he mentioned was the de-
cision by Progress Energy to re-
pair- rather than to potentially
retire the Crystal River nu-
clear plant. Rogers said Duke
directors had read stories criti-
cal of Progress Energy pub-
lished in Florida media outlets.
On the day of Rogers' testi-
mony before the utilities com-
mission, three former Progress
Energy executives who had
been selected for executive
leadership roles in the merged
company resigned, leading to
questions about turmoil within
leadership of the new company.
Since that time, the North Car-


S


C

P
-
t
ir


olina commission has asked for-
mer CEO Johnson to testify, and
has directed four Duke directors
to testify, including two former
Progress Energy directors and
the two directors who were
named by Rogers
;SUE: as having been the
ones to tell him
CEO they had lost confi-
on future dence in Johnson.
R3. Given the regula-
tory issues facing
DINION: the company and
decide if possible conflicts
decide if within Duke's ex-
is worth ecutive leadership
ri ng. and board of direc-
tors, our concern is
whether the company will fully
evaluate the long-term benefits
of repairing the plant and make
the long-term commitment to
fund the work, or make a short-
term decision to simply get past
the CR3 issue by closing the
plant and assigning that cost to
the cost of the merger
We hope that even with a de-
sire to move past the post-
merger drama of the executive
leadership changes, Duke will
look at the long-term benefits of
the Crystal River nuclear plant
for Florida's energy supply
Today, natural gas is relatively
cheap and available, and the
easy short-term choice for elec-
tric power generation is to build
natural gas plants rather than
make the investment in nuclear
plants that cost more to build
but have more stable long-term
fuel costs.
However, short-term decisions
often have negative long-term
impacts, as companies learned
years ago when oil was cheap
and oil-burning plants were
being built across the country.
When oil prices skyrocketed,
these plants became expensive
dinosaurs.
All of the electric-generating
facilities Progress Energy has
built in the past few years have
been fueled by natural gas. With
two of the coal-fired units at
Crystal River slated for closing
within the next few years,
should CR3 be retired, Duke's
only non-gas-fueled electric
generation in Florida would be
the two newer coal units at
Crystal River. This places
Duke's Florida customers at the
mercy of natural gas prices that
historically have fluctuated
widely. This is not good long-
term planning.


Exploitation epidemic think I'll throw a tea party.


As I was reading "Internet a
hunting ground for children," I've
been thinking for the last
couple weeks, every day in (
our paper there's people
sexually exploiting chil-
dren. It is epidemic.
Congress first
This is about Oba- CAL
macare. I will finally accept r
it when Congress, includ- 563
ing Nancy Pelosi, the Sen-
ate and the Obama family, put
themselves under the same care
that they're going to put us, the
Americans, under. Until then, I


The costs of care
Every once in a while, my
wife asks me a question
JND that totally stumps me and
OFF I just can't answer it. The
question is: If the United
States quit giving foreign
aid, could we afford to give
free health care to all of
o our own citizens?
59Q Editor's note: In short, no.
5U 1 Total federal foreign aid for
fiscal year 2010, the most re-
cent year reported, was $52.7 bil-
lion. By comparison, the 2010
budget for Medicare was $510 bil-
lion; for Medicaid, $290 billion.


Hey Gov., can you spare $14 billion?


When debating the proper
role of government, many
fiscal conservatives say
government should collect fewer
taxes and provide limited serv-
ices. What those functions are is a
matter of great divergence.
It's also often said
that government does-
n't create jobs, that peo-
ple do. But government
does, indeed, create
jobs such as teachers,
police officers, correc-
tions officers, firemen
and other public em-
ployees who provide
valuable public serv-
ices to taxpayers.
The point, really, is Paula
about generating jobs FLOI
in the private sector VOI
Fiscal conservatives,
like me, believe government
should be limited and private-sec-
tor jobs should be created by indi-
viduals and companies. Neither
should government pick winners
and losers in the free market by
redistributing your tax dollars to
favored businesses.
But in their zeal to improve the
economy, Florida's elected lead-
ers are violating the principles of
less spending, limited government
and redistribution of wealth by of-
fering tax breaks and cash incen-
tives for the promise of jobs.
Florida has at least seven job-
incentive programs that offer tax
refunds, tax credits or tax exemp-
tions. The state also has at least
six programs that offer cash grants
to spur investment and create or
retain jobs.
Before examining the results of
these incentives, the first question
should be, is this a legitimate use
of tax dollars? Personally, I don't
believe it is. If Florida offers a
well-trained workforce, a wonder-
ful quality of life, and a safe and
affordable place to live with a bal-
anced regulatory environment,
people should want to live, work
and create opportunities here. In
survey after survey, businesses
put these qualities first in deter-
mining whether to relocate to
Florida.
Besides, Florida's track record
with these incentives has been a
mystery for many years. Recently,
legislators have begun to demand


D


accountability for outcomes. In
other words, are we getting the
bang for our buck?
Getting the straight scoop has
proved challenging. Information
can and has been manipulated to
show desired results. As vice
chair of the Senate
Commerce Commit-
tee, I had several
chances to question
top officials in the De-
Sp apartment of Economic
Opportunity and En-
terprise Florida, the
f agency that keeps the
data and produces re-
ports. While fascinat-
ing to delve into the
)ockery numbers, it's impor-
RI DA tant to understand that
CES a report can be
-- skewed by using a dif-
ferent date as a baseline or by ex-
cluding some information. For
example, in its 2011 annual re-
port, Enterprise Florida ex-
cluded at least 10 companies that
had failed to meet performance
targets. The devil is in the details.
The Tampa Tribune conducted
a three-month investigation of
the state's economic-incentive
programs with an emphasis on
the cash-grant incentives. It
found Florida takes big risks to
lure jobs and four of 10 times, it's
a losing bet
The report found 36 of the 82
corporate-expansion projects in
Enterprise Florida's database -
44 percent failed to create the
promised jobs, spend the agreed-
upon capital or hit their
timetables.
A few examples:
Piper Aircraft was given $6.6
million in incentives to deliver 454
jobs. In reality, we lost 200 jobs.
Redpine received $400,000 in
tax incentives to create 410 jobs
and created zero jobs.
Dayjet received $2 million in
incentives to create 595 jobs and
initially created 142, but later
went bankrupt for the end result
of zero jobs.
Over the past five years, the
largest of the state's six cash-grant
incentive programs, the Quick Ac-
tion Closing Fund, "in-
vested" $200 million to create
10,176 jobs, falling short of the
17,059 promised. At that rate, it


would take $14 billion to create
the 700,000 jobs Gov Rick Scott
promised during his cam-
paign. Since taking office a year
and a half ago, the governor has
tapped the fund 41 times, pledg-
ing $45 million to companies.
Of the 10,176 jobs created, an-
other question arises, would
these businesses have done the
project anyway?
I believe companies invest
when there is a need or demand,
and build or expand to capitalize
on that demand. Critics have
pointed to deals that would have
happened anyway as "photo op-
portunities" that allow elected of-
ficials to take credit for projects
already in the works. Why, then,
should they be given dwindling
tax dollars needed elsewhere?
And if the state enters into a
bidding war to attract companies
to Florida, are those tax dollars
creating net new jobs or just
transferring them from one com-
munity to another?
There seems to be a destructive
and vicious cycle of escalating tax
incentives with no net benefit -
like family members bidding
against each other at an auction.
The winning bidders are the com-
panies; the losers, the taxpayers
and those whose jobs disappeared
in the other community
While some success stories
exist, history shows that when
promises are not kept, the state
does not always hold companies
responsible for their contractual
obligations.
And while important to improve
the state's record-keeping, trans-
parency, accountability and en-
forcement of contracts, I keep
going back to my original nagging
thought.
Is it really the function of gov-
ernment to spend your tax dollars
to pick winners and losers in the
free market? Investing in our
workforce, infrastructure and
quality of life would be a stronger
magnet for job growth.
--in--
Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from
Lakeland who is chronicling her
final year in the Florida Senate.
She can be reached atpdockery
@iloridavoices. com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Embarrassing
I am shocked by the verdict in
the Kane's Ace Hardware case.
Based on what the Chronicle re-
ported I am totally amazed the
court system would even hear
such a lame case.
I would be embarrassed to tell
anyone I bought a gun seven
years ago, failed to ask how to
operate it, failed to ask for an
owner's manual and it fell out of
my pocket and shot me. Is this a
responsible gun owner? Well six
of the finest in the county
thought so, and that is the real
embarrassment.
James Mitcheson
Lecanto

Lacking coverage
While your reporters did a de-
cent job of covering District 15
Little League championship
games, they neglected to men-
tion two games played by the
now District 15 Champions in
the 9- and 10-year old division -
the Dunnellon Tigers.


Those games were Dunnellon
vs. Lady Lake, which Dunnellon
won 14-0. The next game neg-
lected to be recognized was Dun-
nellon's win over Shady Hill, in
which Dunnellon won 14-1 due
to the outstanding pitching of
James Weber, and strong batting
from Richie Fox and Jay
Fraziars, not to mention the en-


tire team's defense which al-
lowed only five runs in five
games throughout the champi-
onship series, while scoring 54.
Give these dedicated champi-
ons the recognition they have
earned and deserve.
Tom Weber
Dunnellon


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should
call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown,
including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email letters@chronicleonline.com.


;-0


)l





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Becoming ill-prepared enough to run for office


W e all make
promises we
don't keep,
especially promises to
ourselves.
I've promised not to
write about politics.
That's not to say I'll
keep my personal
convictions private,
but I will try not to Fred B
become involved in A SI
things such as where OF I
President Obama
might or might not have been
born.
I've also committed to avoid
writing about what other
columnists write.
Even so, sometimes I just can't
seem to help myself and such
subject matter will creep onto the
page when I'm drafting one of my
"slices."


3r
I

L
L


Today, I'm going to
transgress on both
counts politics and
things other writers
have written.
On Sunday, July 1,
the Chronicle
included what I
considered to be two
classical statements:
rannen First, Bill Cotterell,
-ICE a retired member of
IFE the Florida Capitol
__ press corps, offered a
discussion of the sad
circumstances regarding former
Penn State assistant coach Jerry
Sandusky.
In his column, Mr. Cotterell
recalled a nonsensical event when
40 sensible state senators debated
at length whether or not to have
Florida law contain a provision
whereby murderers would be put


to death in the same manner
they'd killed their victims.
I found the column compelling
except for one part the "40 sen-
sible state senators" part. During
the years I spent working in the
state Capitol, I'm not sure I ever
saw as many as four, and certainly
not 40, state senators accumulated
who were all sensible at the same
time, regardless of the subject
matter
Next, there was Gerry Mulligan.
Gerry discussed a circumstance
involving hiking boots during
which proper prior planning blew
up in his face. He closed out by al-
lowing as to how, "If I get really
good at being less prepared, I
might even consider running for
public office."
Mr. Cotterell made me
remember my experiences
working in the Capitol,


experiences that included being
an officially registered lobbyist for
my employer, the State
Comptroller, and the incredible
aggravations that could come
while trying to massage a piece of
"good" legislation until it passed,
or on the other side, fighting with
one last breath to kill a "bad" bill.
Gerry made me remember the
extended period of time when I
thought one day I would run for
public office; specifically, I'd run
for a seat in the Florida House of
Representatives.
I never ran, and now, at my age
and with what I believe to be
wisdom gained over the years, I
have absolutely no intention of
doing so.
Sadly, during my lifetime, I've
watched many good people go to
Tallahassee, not just from Citrus
County, but from various locales.


All of these folks actually intended
to make positive changes to the
political maelstrom, but
unfortunately, what most
consistently happened is that the
system changed them rather than
them changing the system.
Please understand, I'm not
saying that the right person has no
chance of making changes, this
hope is what makes elections so
crucial but I no longer believe
I'm that person.
On the other hand, Gerry
managed to survive the hiking
boots fiasco, and if he gets to the
point he believes he is ill-
prepared enough to run for office,
he's got my vote!
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Facts about firehouse
Why is the disposition of the Ho- wanted the building to lease it to the pantry,
mosassa Firehouse becoming a which violated the intent of the public do-
countywide issue? It is a simple nation criteria. It is my understanding that
matter; however, the facts are not being re- the Civic Club has now come up with an al-
ported correctly ternate planned usage, which I
There are three groups peti- believe is a veterinary clinic,
tioning the Board of County but I am not privy to the details.
Commissioners for ownership The third party, Mr. Kevin
of the building, not two. The pe- Jenkins, along with a backer
titioners are the Homosassa who has offered $20,000 for ren-
Civic Club, the We Care Food ovations, is the person who pro-
Pantry, and Mr. Kevin Jenkins. posed a learning center. I will
The BOCC has set up criteria for be meeting with Mr. Jenkins to
donating public property and all discuss his plan.
three parties have made pre- Diane Toto The firehouse will require an
sentations to the BOCC. GUEST expenditure of money to make
Five years ago, the firehouse it serviceable and both Mr.
was leased to the Homosassa COLUMN Jenkins and the We Care Food
Civic Club; however, the We Pantry have donors willing to
Care Food Pantry had total occupancy and fund the necessary repairs. The county rec-
paid all the bills since the inception of the ognized the merits of both petitioners and
lease. The pantry never shared occupancy mediation has already been set up between
with the Homosassa Civic Club. the We Care Food Pantry, Mr Jenkins and
The We Care Food Pantry currently uses county representatives.
the firehouse as a storage and distribution At the conclusion of mediation, the issue
center and distributes food to 2,600 people of ownership will be decided by the BOCC.
every month. Since the pantry must vacate It will then be up to the commissioners to
the clubhouse of the Homosassa Civic Club exercise their fiduciary responsibility and
this month, the pantry plans to move that determine which agency they believe will
part of their distribution directly into the better serve the community and meet the
firehouse. Without the firehouse as a dis- criteria for the donation of public property.
tribution point, needy people will not be
able to pick up their food in Homosassa.
The Homosassa Civic Club made a pres- Diane Toto founded and operates
entation to the BOCC and stated they We Care Food Pantry.

Letter to the EDITOR


Government control
The Supreme Court's decision to up-
hold the Affordable Care Act is deeply dis-
turbing. By compelling citizens to
purchase insurance or face the penalty
tax, the court did a great injustice to the
personal freedom of every American.
The court not only forced Americans to


GUEST
Continued from Page C1

We introduced ourselves
- New York detectives.
He's a good listener. We
made each other laugh.
We exchanged child-
hoods. He told me about his
swimming hole in North
Carolina. I told him my
swimming hole was a fire
hydrant on Franklin Avenue
in Brooklyn. He had a smile
that could dome a stadium.
He was making a picture
at the New York courts and
had a problem. I made some
calls for him and fixed it. A
week later, I got an auto-
graphed picture. It says,
"Thanks for your help in
New York."
Years later in New Or-
leans at the International
Association of Chiefs of Po-
lice Conference, my son and
I took a picture with the
Mayberry police car.
Might television ever find
its way back to Mayberry? I
don't think so. Now we
watch strangers marry for
money and it's a hit.
Is the image of father and
son, hand-in-hand, going
fishing too trite, too provin-
cial for contemporary plau-
sibility? One might think so
- except the episodes re-
main evergreen in re-runs.
After all these years, the
bullet in Barney's pocket
still evokes a smile.
Buddy Ebsen as a hobo
was helped to discover his
own conscience in
Mayberry
Remember the impatient
city visitor with no time to
spare? But he ended up in
the porch swing singing
"Church in the Wildwood."
Opie slept on the ironing
board that night Adventure
sleeping, he called it.
Today, we laugh at one
another
In Mayberry, we cared
about one another. That was
confirmed even in the way


the writers v
Floyd's incap
servation tha
sional pe
considers mos
Everybody t
berry was hon
been assume
be play-actors
of us with ti
memory of M
yet, each in re
out real good!
mained in ch
death did us p
Whatever i
that small tow
to have become
influence on
lived there -a
visited.
Television o
that accruing
amortized, at 1
it keeps Ma
against the da
have yourself
your neighbor
into style.
Andy's very
Lincoln of M
small town. Tl
ter of the cou
small towns.
And so mai
ask, "What wo
How would h
situation?"
Andy used
wisdom in an
situations. He
the town drun
sheriff's depu
visiting relative
When an e:
accepted Andy
Barney, Andy
ney to come t
sion that it w
way around.
When Bar
singing threat
cess of the Ma
Andy went to
to hide the tri
ney and save t
When Barne
manhunt to
and girlfriend
cave from wh
ready escaped
went back int
prevent Barne


pay $500 billion in new taxes, but set the
benchmark for future government control
of our personal lives. The idea the govern-
ment can force any agenda upon its citi-
zens through a tax is even more disturbing
than Obamacare itself.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


wrote around a laughingstock.
iacity, an ob- Andy was particularly
t this profes- kind and gracious to his
ople-watcher Aunt Bee. Andy and Barney
t impressive, ate batches of her "kerosene
to whom May- cucumbers" to spare her
ne might have feelings.
d by cynics to Andy and Opie intention-
Not to those ally made a mess of the
he collective house when Aunt Bee was
Iayberry. And out of town, to make her feel
*al life turned needed.
Aunt Bee re- Andy traded his prize fish-
aracter until ing rod for a bed jacket for
art. Aunt Bee's birthday, explain-
t was about ing to Opie, "I said I kept it
vn, it appears because it gave me such en-
e an indelible joyment that I wouldn't sell it
those who for money And I didn't sell it
and on us who for money I just kind of
swapped it for a different
wes us and kind of enjoyment"
debt will be The program does not
east in part, if merely reflect society, but
yberry alive suggests values.
ay when "be- Richard Kelly, an English
f" and "love professor at the University
r" come back of Tennessee, says. "At a
time when a lot of standards
wise; he's the have broken down, it repre-
layberry the sents a kind of lost paradise
he moral cen- founded on the best hopes
intry lives in of people."
A parent in Colorado
ny of us will Springs put it this way: "I
tuld Andy do? want my child to be like
e handle this Opie, not Bart Simpson."
Bill Idelson, one of the
that famous show's writers, explained its
iy number of success: "You know why
allowed Otis, everybody loves it? It's
k, to pose as a about man's humanity to
ity to impress man rather than man's in-
'es. humanity to man.
exclusive club "He's a sheriff, the police
y and rejected -the symbol of oppression,
allowed Bar- brutality, and ignorance -
o the conclu- and here's a guy who treats
vas the other his neighbors and the peo-
ple on the street as if they
ney's awful were human beings. I think
ened the suc- people hunger for that so
ayberry choir, much it transcends all of
great lengths culture."
uth from Bar- Andy Griffith once said
he choir, that Andy Taylor was a bet-
ey organized a ter man than he was. Not by
rescue Andy much, I'm thinking.
Helen from a Andy my son and I will
ich they'd al- miss you. You helped bring-
d, the couple ing us together.
to the cave to RIP, Sheriff Andy Taylor
ey from being of Mayberry


SLetters to the EDITOR


'PM' problem
Our county commissioners are not col-
lege-educated administrators, and most
lack the administrative skills needed in
the development of a strong progressive
community
Now the main reason of this letter is
"PM," which stands for Particle Matter
and is a pollutant of dust particles so small
they pass through our nasal passages, then
enter into our lungs. The health problems
from constantly breathing in these pollu-
tants are numerous, such as asthma, pneu-
monia and bronchitis, to name a few.
Swirling dust clouds are created from
the aftereffects of vehicles driving up and
down dry unpaved roadways including
windy conditions. These fine mists of
slowly creeping particles can travel for
miles affecting the entire unsuspecting
community. Young children waiting at
school bus stops or playing outside, eld-
erly couples out for a sidewalk stroll, open
car windows and parents gardening are all
victims of this "silent deadly" unknown
"PM" problem.
Homeowners living on unpaved roads
(incorporated or not) are not "supported"
(working on a solution to rectify the prob-
lem) by our county commissioners who are
more interested in spending tax money on
frivolous projects like Port Citrus or buy-
ing roads they could have received freely
by the developer
If the Chronicle had not printed a story
about arsenic in the wells in northwest
Citrus County, I would never have known
of this serious, life-threatening condition.
The failure of Commissioner (Dennis)
Damato to alert his constituents of this
health hazard is unconscionable
leadership.
Is this how our county commissioners
protect their constituents?
Recycling asphalt from road repaving
could be the long awaited solution to solv-
ing the "PM" problem. Our leaders should
encourage the construction in Citrus
County, of an asphalt recycling plant
which would create jobs within our own
infrastructure. Grants are given to projects


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

In 2005, the absolute
peak of the house construc-
tion boom, there were 3,309
permits pulled for new sin-
gle family homes. Last year,
there were only 55 permits
pulled.
I'm not smart enough to
figure out how much of a
percent drop that is, but
trust me, it's huge.
Year-to-date, 49 permits
for new homes were pulled,
so we will most likely top
the 55 number from last
year. That's a small sign of
improvement.
A startling statistic re-
leased by Greene's office is
the population estimate.
From the 1960s through
2009, our county's popula-
tion grew every year. In the
decade of the 1970s, Citrus
County saw a population
increase of 177 percent, the
largest increase experi-
enced anywhere in the
nation.


Well, over 1
years, our coi
population. It'
drop down f
142,609 to 14
end of last ye
more than f
since our pop
down.
The nun
sobering.
The current
at the Duke
merly Progres:
near Crystal I
be of deep
everyone. If D
to shutter
plant, hundre
paid utility
would lose the
Furthermor
plant closes,
that property
pulled from o
Duke Energy
cent of our pr
and asks for
services in ret
If they clo;
plant, a good pc
tax dollars wo
and the rest of
faced with the (


such as sewers, manatees, enlarging air-
ports and new streets so why not a grant
for a needed asphalt recycling plant Has
anybody wondered who profits from the
shavings of county repaved roads!
George F. Shea
Crystal River

America deserves better
This should not come as any surprise to
anyone who remembers growth and pros-
perity in our great nation. We Americans
have allowed our politicians to bankrupt
the ideals of our founders by slowly taking
away our wealth and liberties. Unbridled
taxation has taken our wealth and bur-
densome laws have taken our freedoms.
Our government has grown into a wasteful
enterprise through greed, lies and deceit
We are lambs being led to the slaughter
How can anyone refute the failure of
every major government program insti-
tuted for our "betterment?" We are taking
the path to failure despite the clear evi-
dence we see here and worldwide. Is
there a better example than California, so
overburdened by government spending
they are on the doorstep of going bank-
rupt Many other states face similar con-
sequences.
Worldwide, almost all European coun-
tries face dire economic problems due to
an intrusive and overspending govern-
ment Two major countries, Russia and
China, have finally realized the American
way works better than their past over op-
pressiveness. They are moving forward,
we are regressing.
With evidence so clear, why are so many
of our well-meaning friends and neigh-
bors still willing to support the "change"
that is taking place?
Our current administration's actions
have proved ineffective and are slowly
but surely putting us deeper in debt,
while simultaneously dismantling our
freedoms.
The cure is less government, not more!
Joe Matt
Hernando


the past two ing higher taxes or slashing
unty has lost local spending.
s just a small That's not a pretty
from a high of thought.
0,956 at the U In a column last week, I
ar. It's been discussed the billboard on
ive decades County Road 486 that reads
ulation went "Eternity in Hell is a Long
Time" and said county
nbers are commission candidate
Scott Adams was responsi-
t controversy ble. Adams once owned the
Energy (for- property, but since then
s Energy) site sold it to his friend Charlie
River should Strange. Strange, through
concern to his attorney, told the Chron-
)uke decides icle he is responsible for
our nuclear the sign. Adams said he
*ds of highly could not remember if the
employees sign went up on the prop-
Mir jobs. erty when he owned it, but
e, if the nuke said Strange is the guy be-
the value of hind it
y would be Wouldn't it be nice that,
)ur tax rolls. as a result of this election,
pays 26 per- someone showed the good
property taxes judgment to take the sign
hardly any down? Time will tell.
turn.
se the nuke
portion of those Gerry Mulligan is the
)uld go away publisher of the Chronicle.
f us would be Email him atgmulligan
choice of pay- @chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


KEY
Continued from Page Cl

and recognizes their
accomplishments.
Most understand that the
run is a time when money is
raised for the Key Center so
it will always be there for
them. Many of them will
take their place, as they do
each year, in the hot sun,
awaiting the runners to
make their final stretch into
the campus with cheers and
hugs.
Kindness, love, dignity
and respect These are
some of the words used by
parents, guardians, and the
community at large when
describing the services pro-
vided by the Key
Established in 1966, the
Key opened its doors of op-
portunity serving seven
clients. Today, the Key con-
tinues to be recognized as a
leader and innovator in ini-
tiatives associated with im-
proving the quality of life for
people with developmental
disabilities and has grown
to serve about 1,300 clients
since it began. Historically,
expansion of Key programs
and services was driven by
a consistently increasing
need within the local com-
munity and by the agency's
fundamental belief that
services should be available
to all people with develop-
mental disabilities.
FaithIfl, stewards, re-
sourcefulnessand entrepre-
neurial spirit These are


some of the words used to
describe the Key by commu-
nity partners to include po-
litical leaders, members of
Legislature, government
regulatory agencies, private
foundations, corporate
sponsors, volunteers, and
family/individuals donors.
In ten year's time, federal
and state funding to the Key
has decreased from 84 per-
cent to 68 percent, which
equates to about an $8 mil-
lion loss to the Key With a
proven track record of not
being able to rely on state
funding, the Key must be in-
novative to subsidize its an-
nual funding shortfall to
provide year-round quality
services.
With a little over a $9 mil-
lion annual operating
budget, the Key continues to
build on its successes and
finds new and creative ways
to generate self-supporting
revenue in conjunction with
steadfast community
support
At this time, the Key gen-
erates 14 percent of its
budget through its thrift re-
tail stores and investments.
The faithful 18 percent of its
budget comes from public
donations. If it were not for
Key's pioneering spirit and
dedicated donors, today's
current service delivery to
over 300 clients and the pro-
viding of 70 scholarships to
individuals who are on the
state's waiting list for serv-
ices would be nonexistent.
With great public support
comes great responsibility
and public accountability


In anticipation of future funding
cuts, the Key tries to stay one step
ahead of the game.


The Key believes that ethical
behavior and program qual-
ity must be synonymous with
their name and reputation.
Thus, ethical policies and
practices are an integral part
of the organization's bylaws,
board polices, and personnel
policies. The Key adheres to
the highest level of accounta-
bility and responsiveness in
all aspects of the organiza-
tion. The Key was awarded
by the state's quality assur-
ance surveyors with the high
honor of '"Achieving" status
in 2009/2010 and most re-
cently with another high
honor of "Deemed" status in
2011/2012. A yearly audit by a
certified public accounting


firm completes an in-depth
review of the Key's financial
operations to ensure that all
required accounting stan-
dards pertaining to not-for-
profits are adhered. As an
agency receiving funding
through the United Way of
Citrus County, each year a
thorough review of the Key's
financial, programs, and
program outcomes are
reviewed.
The Key will continue to
weather financial funding
storms, evident by the
state's I-Budget that will be
implemented July 2012,
which at this time is esti-
mated to be an annual
$100,000 or more loss for


Come Meet

'HANK HEMRICK

For Sheriff
July 18th at 10am-12pm
Beverly Hills Lions Club
72 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, FL 34465




y ^ For more information, Call 527-1524
Paid Political Advertisement. Paid for and Approved by "
P. Hank Hemrick, Republican, Sheriff.


Key client services.
In anticipation of future
funding cuts, the Key tries to
stay one step ahead of the
game to include the opening
of a junior's clothing resale
store, renegotiating service
contracts to save money, and
establishing a single-stream
recycling program.
One thing is absolutely
clear: the Key would not be
where it is today without the
community's support. So
many people have blessed
the Key with generous be-
quests and gifts that are
vital to clients' year-round
services.
Citrus County residents


COMMENTARY


The Crystal River Mall
has invited the Citrus County Republican
Executive Committee to sponsor a
Meet and Greet
for Republican primary candidates on
July 21, 2012 from 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm
This is a great opportunity to meet and speak with
candidates prior to the August 14 primary and to
support our small businesses in the Mall.

Visit our candidates, sign the volunteer list, receive a
discount food voucher for use in the Mall food court.
Get involved!
See you at "The Event."
Contacts: Committee Chairman,
Bob Hagaman @ 382-2631 or Committee Member,
Connie Martin Carter @ 746-7249
OOOC12Y


Wednesday, August22
St. Benedict's Catholic Church\
455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


A Lunch -
+ at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.

Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"

All proceeds to benefit
the Pregnancy &
Family Life Center V

For more information "
call us at 344-3030 iii _)Ni'LE
O00OBVYH e n n.


SPONSORED
EVENTS SO N
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chronicle is committed to supporting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraisers and entertainment throughout our
community. The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and work. Don't
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
of your sponsorship needs!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

and businesses have a rich
history in embracing with
compassion our develop-
mentally disabled friends as
full-citizen neighbors.
As the Run for the Money
events are upon us, we sin-
cerely thank Citrus County
for its never-ending support
of the life-changing services
that take place each day at
the Key

Melissa Walker is the
assistant executive director
of the Key Training Center,
5399 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461.


9am-3pm

77 Civic Circle

1st and 3rd Fridays
Beverly Hills Civic Association, Sponsor
(3521 746-2657


OOOB8FF \ amN l-


~~~~~~~~~11~11~~1~~11~~~1







B S ND CONTJULY 15,C2012





CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Workforce Connection reschedules 'Skills Gap' forums


Special to the Chronicle

OCALA The Skills Gap
Forums postponed last
month due to threat of a
tropical storm will now take
place July 16 and July 18 in
Marion and Citrus counties.
Workforce Connection
and its economic develop-
ment and education part-
ners are hosting the forums
to identify the difference
between the critical skills
needed on the job and those
possessed by applicants.


The feedback will be used to
develop local and regional
strategies and curricula to
help close the gaps.
Across the country, an es-
timated 3 million jobs are
currently unfilled because
employers report they can-
not find qualified workers,
according to the National
Skills Coalition, formerly
Workforce Alliance.
The forums, conducted by
the Chicago-based firm of
Thomas P Miller and Asso-
ciates, were scheduled last


SARAH KUTA
Associated Press
CHICAGO
C hicago's showcase summer festi-
val, Taste of Chicago, is strug-
gling to find a new identity amid
dwindling revenues and more
choices for cash-strapped resi-
dents and visitors.
The 32-year-old food festival, which draws
millions of people to Grant Park each July,
used to be Chicago's premiere event bring-
ing together restaurants from around the
city. But after financial losses the past three
years, organizers made the Taste shorter
and smaller, and are charging for concerts.
The moves come even as new events pop up
across the U.S. and other festivals report
record attendance.
It's not yet clear how the changes will af-
fect the Taste's success. But for Kathy Davis,
who has been attending for 20 years, this
year's event lacked the large crowds, fire-
works and high-profile entertainment she
remembered.
"It's a little disheartening," said 44-year-


month in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties, but several
had to be rescheduled when
Tropical Storm Debby
threatened the area.
Employers and/or their
representatives are invited
to take part in any or all of
the industry sector forums:
Monday, July 16, at the
College of Central Florida's
Klein Conference Center,
3001 S.W College Road, in
Ocala.
Information Technology
- 1:30 p.m.


old Davis of Bartlett, Ill.
Meanwhile, other festivals across the
country are doing well. Los Angeles and
Austin had successful inaugural food and
wine festivals last year. The Taste of
Philadelphia has expanded, adding more
space, food trucks and another stage for en-
tertainment. The Hawaii Food & Wine Fes-
tival donated $250,000 to charities after the
event in 2011.
Taste of Chicago has lost $2.7 million in
the past three years, officials said. This
year, the city tried to cut some losses by sell-
ing 15,000 concert tickets at $25 each; more
than 7,000 tickets still were available on
opening day The festival moved from July
Fourth weekend to a week later and was cut
from 10 days to five. It features 40 vendors,
down from nearly 60.
The Taste's well-established brand is one
of its greatest assets, but that might also be
holding it back, experts said.
"Chicago is the granddaddy of them all,"
said Ira Rosen, North American director of
the International Festivals and Events Asso-
ciation. "Maybe it has suffered from its suc-
cess. People say, 'Been there, done that.


Business and Financial
Services -3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 18, at
the College of Central
Florida's Learning and Con-
ference Center, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, in Lecanto.
Manufacturing 8:30
a.m.
Business and Financial
Services -10:30 a.m.
Health care (regional
forum) 1:30 p.m.
Information Technology
- 3:30 p.m.
The forums are spon-


scored by Workforce Connec-
tion, the College of Central
Florida, Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil, Citrus County Schools,
Marion County Public
Schools, Nature Coast Busi-
ness Development Council,
Ocala/Marion County Eco-
nomic Development Corpo-
ration and the School Board
of Levy County.
Those interested in par-
ticipating are asked to call
352-873-7939, ext. 2230, or
800-746-9950, ext 2230.


What's new? What's different?' If they've
not kept that cutting edge, it's going to hurt"
At its peak in 2006 and 2007, the event saw
3.6 million visitors. But last year, it drew 2.3
million visitors, down 11 percent from 2010.
In addition to the most recent adjustments,
the expensive annual fireworks show was
axed two years ago, something officials cite
as one reason attendance dropped.
City officials don't yet have a tally for this
year's opening day, which was Wednesday,
though they said they hoped to make the
event more cost-effective. They won't know
how the changes have impacted the festival
until after it's over and five-day attendance
and revenue numbers are calculated.
The city, with a budget deficit of more
than $600 million, spends $6.8 million on
the Taste of Chicago, though it has some cor-
porate sponsorships and hopes to make all
its money back. The festival also leads to
more than $80 million in additional spend-
ing in the city, said city spokeswoman Cindy
Gatziolis.
In other cities, nonprofit organizations or

See TASTE/Page D5


Facts about unemployment compensation


recently, a video producer for employment compensation" show.
About.com called and Our brief exchange, however, un-
started off the derscored what has been
conversation with a bit of long suspected: when it
misplaced flattery in the comes to unemployment
hopes of getting what he compensation, what we
wanted. In this case, think we know far out-
what he wanted was for weighs the facts. It also
Workforce Connection to presented a perfect op-
go on camera as the portunity to try to distin-
"undisputed experts on / guish between what
unemployment compen- regional workforce
station The idea was to boards, such as Work-
produce an informa- Laura Byrnes force Connection, do and
tional video that would WORKFORCE do not do when it comes
explain the complexities, CONNECTION to unemployment
and demise, of extended compensation.
benefits. The first thing we do
Good idea, wrong spokesperson. I not do is refer to anything to do with
explained while Workforce Con- unemployment compensation as un-
nection indeed provides re- employment compensation. Such a
employment services for unem- thing no longer exists, at least not by
ployment compensation claimants, that name. As of July 1, Florida be-
we do not control or administer the came the first, and thus far only,
benefits program. I quickly got him state to rename its Unemployment
in touch with the deputy chief of Compensation Benefits Program the
communications for the Florida De- Re-employment Assistance Pro-
partment of Economic Opportunity, gram. Instead of claiming Unem-
since DEO actually runs the "un- ployment Insurance (UI) benefits, it


is now Re-employment Insurance
(RI).
Simply put, the rebranding is in-
tended to more accurately reflect
the emphasis on job-search activi-
ties and re-employment services of-
fered by Florida's workforce
partners, such as Workforce Con-
nection, to jobless claimants receiv-
ing benefits.
The Unemployment Insurance
system, established in 1935, pro-
vides income support to workers
who have lost a job through no fault
of their own. A joint federal-state
program, it remains essentially as it
was nearly 80 years ago, despite
major changes in the economy
Changing the name of the pro-
gram from unemployment to re-
employment does not change ac-
cess to benefits or benefits provided
by the state or federal government.
Florida provides up to 26 weeks
of regular RI benefits contingent,
among other factors, on claimants'
continued search for work.
Extended and emergency bene-
fits, which provided additional ben-


efits for up to a combined maximum
of 99 weeks in Florida, were trig-
gered by the state's high unemploy-
ment rate. Those extraordinary
benefits were always destined to
sunset once the state's unemploy-
ment rate dropped below the
agreed-upon 8.6 percent threshold,
which it did.
One of the lingering misconcep-
tions about the system is only those
filing claims and receiving benefits
are counted as unemployed. I often
hear or read in letters to the editor
that dips in the unemployment rate
are merely a reflection of claimants
exhausting their benefits and
falling off the radar.
In reality, you are considered un-
employed, regardless of your RI sta-
tus, if you (1) do not have a job, (2)
have actively looked for work in the
prior four weeks and (3) are cur-
rently available for work. So while
those receiving benefits are indeed
counted as unemployed, not all
those who are unemployed receive

See WORKFORCE/Page D5


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
ASK SCORE


Taste of change


Maximize


customer


service
reat customer serv-
ice maximizes the
value of your busi-
ness. Customers who ex-
perience value return.
Repeat business is the
stepping stone to growth.
Financial experts preach
the importance of repeat
business as a critical com-
ponent of profitability and
business longevity.
In economically stressed
times, customer service
represents the most effec-
tive way to maintain exist-
ing clients and build a base
of new ones. This impacts
the short- and long-term
earning goals.
In the Short Term
In the short term cus-
tomers tend to value bet-
ter service and accept
reasonable pricing. Great
service minimizes com-
plaints about pricing that
might otherwise result in
delayed payments.
On-time payments im-
prove cash flow and allow
businesses to pay ex-
penses within terms and
generate profit. Most cus-
tomers are willing to pay a
little extra when they ex-
perience the value of good
customer service. They
decide the good service is
more valuable.
In the Long Term
When owners decide to
sell a business, buyers
look at more than just the
bottom line. They also
consider continued cus-
tomer loyalty This
equates to keeping the
customers who are being
served by the business
after the sale to new own-
ers is complete.
It is common practice for
the sale price of a business
to be based on continued
sales levels, which usually
means customer retention.
Simple steps for good
customer service:
Never compare good
service with servitude
that will eventually create
a negative attitude on
your part.
Place customer needs
first in every decision.
Honest and accurate
communications with your
customer is paramount
Return all calls quickly
... delays will send the mes-
sage the call is not impor-
tant or you're too busy
Never over commit If
you fail, it becomes a bro-
ken promise.
Lame excuses are re-
ally lies that customers
see right through.
Don't just do the min-
imum, add a little extra,
customers will remember
that when you present
your bill.
Although these appear
to be common sense ideas,
experience has shown
they carry small business
through the good and dif-
ficult times.
SCORE is in the admin-
istrative office building at
College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. Office hours
are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
day through Thursday
Call 352-249-1236.
If you call during non-
office hours, leave enough
information (phone num-
ber or email address). You
may register your request
for counseling via our
website citrusscore.org
There are no fees for
counseling, and literature
is available at no charge.

Dr Frederick J. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County
SCORE Email
therzog@tampabayrr.com.


Associated Press
Pedestrians enter the Taste of Chicago in Grant Park. Once a 10-day affair that wrapped around July 4, the event has been shortened to five.

Lengthy, annual Chicago food festival struggles as revenues dwindle









D2

SUNDAY
Xxx xx, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan IaI
this:
HS1~-r


[humber Lonnection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Commissioner Kenney speaks


Tuesday at Chamber Breakfast


Don't miss the opportunity to
join us this Tuesday morning, July
17, at 7:30 a.m. for our Members'
Breakfast meeting at Pepper
Creek Terrace banquet hall, up-
stairs at the Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park.
Our host, Land Title of Citrus,
presents our keynote speaker
John "J.J." Kenney. Kenney,
elected to the Board of County


Commissioners in November
2010, currently serves as second
vice chairman. He is also the chair
of the Public Safety Coordinating
Council; co-chair of the Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Coordi-
nating Council; member of the
Small County Coalition Board of
Directors; member of the Withla-
coochee Regional Planning Coun-
cil; veterans representative to the
Citrus/Levy/Marion County Work-


force Board; past president and
member of the Citrus County Mil-
itary Officers Association; mem-
ber VFW Post 8189; member
American Legion Post 155; mem-
ber Marine Corps League Detach-
ment 819; member DAV Chapter
70; member AMVETS; and mem-
ber Florida Chapter 7 Rolling
Thunder.
Ed Turschmann, chairman of
the Stone Crab Jam, will also join


us at the breakfast meeting.
Register online at www.citr-
uscountychamber.com, or through
the Mobile website. Be sure to log
in to the Members Only section to
sign up for the prepay price of $6.
Even if you are paying $ 8 at the
door or asking to be invoiced,
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.
Log on now while you are thinking
about it, remember: Registration
ends at noon Monday, July 16.


Commissioner John "J.J." Kenney
will speak Tuesday at the Mem-
bers' Breakfast at Pepper Creek
Terrace banquet hall in Homosassa.


Home Again Resale Shop


Associates of Home Again Resale Shop and Chamber Ambassadors join in cutting
the ribbon at the new upscale resale shop at 5362 W. Yearling Drive, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465. Proceeds from the Pine Ridge store benefit the Central Ridge
Boys & Girls Club. Store hours are 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday
and from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.


Exhibitor space available for the BWA

Women's HEALTH and FITNESS Expo


Are you in a health-, fitness- or wellness-
related business? Act now to reserve your
exhibit space for the Women's HEALTH
and FITNESS Expo, hosted by the Busi-
ness Women's Alliance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.
This year's Expo will be from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Help keep Citrus County healthier! This
is a great opportunity to reach women, the
primary health and wellness decision-mak-
ers. Nearly 1,000 attendees at previous
Women's HEALTH and FITNESS Expos
have enjoyed the information, screenings
and demonstrations provided. Exhibit space
is on a first-come, first-served basis, with dis-
counts for Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce members.
There are also sponsorship opportunities
available at several levels of investment.
Join our major sponsors in supporting
health and education: presenting sponsor


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center;
plus Citrus Memorial Health System, Gen-
esis Women's Center & Medical Spa, Ad-
vanced Urology Association; Publix
Supermarket; and media sponsors the Cit-
rus County Chronicle and Citrus 95/Classic
Hits the Fox.
The Expo's purpose is to educate women
and those around them about their health,
fitness and wellness. Proceeds fund schol-
arships for students from Citrus, Crystal
River and Lecanto high schools and With-
lacoochee Technical Institute for health-
care and business studies and careers.
Details on exhibit registration, the popu-
lar Spa Zone area, and sponsorship oppor-
tunities are available from the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce's Crystal
River office at 28 N.W U.S. 19, phone 352-
795-3149, or from any Business Women's Al-
liance member. Also, find us on Facebook
as Business Women's Alliance Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce.


Local firm ventures nationwide with adaptive equipment


Army veteran Terry Beene turns off
his light, changes the television chan-
nel, lowers the head of his bed and
calls for the nurse.
Surprising movements since
Beene, paralyzed from the neck down
from a drive-by shooting, is recover-
ing at the VA Memphis Medical Cen-
ter's Spinal Cord Injury Unit. He is
one of the first in the hospital to use
the Autonome, a tool that lets him
control his environment by blowing
or sucking on a straw.
The tool was developed by Florida-
based Accessibility Services Inc., but
its idea came from a team at VA Mem-
phis. "We talked to (the company)


REGISTRATIONS
Chamber Activities Be
sure to visit us at www.citr-
uscountychamber.com to reg-
ister for our Monthly Members'
Luncheon on Aug. 10 at Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club as
well as for the After Hours
Business Networking Mixer on
Aug. 16, hosted by Comfort
Keepers and LifeCare Center.
Business Women's Al-
liance is now accepting appli-
cations for vendors at their 6th
Annual Health and Fitness


about what we were looking for in a
product and our frustrations in trying
to find things," said Sheena House,
chief biomedical engineer for VA
Memphis. "He developed a product
that met every one of our needs and
then some."
The Autonome system holds a
small, flat-panel television screen
and a small tablet computer close to a
patient from a long arm anchored in a
wall. The tablet screen has columns
of selection windows that lets the pa-
tient make phone calls, browse the In-
ternet, control the bed and lights and
more with a touch of a finger, a sip or
puff into a straw, their voice or a

= News You CAN USE


Expo on Sept. 22. Again at the
National Guard Armory in
Crystal River, this Expo fea-
tures something for everyone!
There will be health screen-
ings, flu shots, Spa Zone, door
prizes and much more! For
vendor information, contact
Catherine Holder at
laser@tampabay.rr.com.
EDC/Chamber Industry
Appreciation Month Make
your reservations for the Sep-
tember events by calling
Matthew at 352-795-2500 or
visiting www.citrusedc.com.


movement of their eye.
Fred Thompson, project engineer
for Accessibility Services, said VA
Memphis is the first in the country to
get Autonome, but many hospitals
have heard of it and many hospitals
already want it.
"This is definitely the future (for
the company) and (VA Memphis) is
the genesis of the whole thing,"
Thompson said. "It's also fluid. Now
that we've busted into the computer
side, there's really not much of a lid
anymore. It's just getting the software
written to do the next thing."
Hats off to Chamber Member Ac-
cessibility Services!


SAVE THE DATE
November The 35th an-
nual Home & Outdoor Show
has been set at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Hours will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 10, and 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11. A
Chamber Mixer from 5 to 7p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 8, at the Ar-
mory kicks off the show. Call
the CCBA at 352-746-9028.
December Citrus
County's two Christmas pa-
rades take place in early De-


cember. Join us in Crystal
River on Saturday, Dec. 1; and
then again in Inverness on Sat-
urday, Dec. 8.
January The annual
Florida Manatee Festival takes
place Jan. 19 and 20, 2013.
Keep an eye on our website at
www.citruscountychamber.com
for more information as it be-
comes available.
March The annual Floral
City Strawberry Festival kicks
off March 2 and 3, 2013. De-
tails will be listed at www.
citruscountychamber.com.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...

Terri Adams \ /
Susanne Church ~ -A
Lori Deboskey
Deborah Skrovanek
Krysta White
Staff members at Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation at
Citrus Memorial Health System
... FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!






CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce new pro-
gram, "You Caught My Eye,"
allows residents and visitors
to recognize employees who
go beyond in their attention
to Customer Service.
In addition to the em-
ployee's name appearing in
the newspaper, the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce sends a letter to the


employee's manager noting
the recognition. We are ex-
cited to offer such interac-
tion between businesses
and community residents.
So, go ahead, give a shout
out to someone in Citrus
County who gave you excep-
tional customer service.
Contact the Chamber for
more information at 352-
795-3149.


Calling all Golfers


Perfect your swing while
improving your business
connections at the Chamber
of Commerce/EDC Tourna-
ment. Network with your
peers and other business and
industry professionals for an
afternoon of golfing fun at
the beautiful Terra Vista Golf
Course. Begin your outing
with lunch at Skyview Ter-
race before the game.
Presented by: (Presenting
Sponsorship available con-
tact Keith Pullias, keith@
citruscountychamber.com)


When: Friday, Sept. 14;
lunch at 11:30 a.m.; shotgun
start at 1 p.m.
Where: Skyview at Terra
Vista, 2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL 34442
Cost: $75 per person (in-
cludes lunch); $300 per four-
some (includes lunch)
To purchase: Contact
Matthew McGuffin at 352-
795-2000 or i.itthelvie
citruscountychamber.com,
or pay online through Pay-
Pal at http://www.citrusedc.
com/events.html.


EDC UPCOMING EVENTS


Sponsorships are available for the EDC
luncheon, Golf Outing and BBQ. Con-
tact Keith Pullias at 352-795-3149 or --
keith@citruscountychamber.com.
* Sept. 6- Industry Appreciation Mixer-
Crystal Chevrolet
* Sept. 7 EDC Industry Appreciation Lunch
* Sept. 13 EDC Annual Board Meeting
* Sept. 14- Celebrate Industry Appreciation Month
Golf Outing
* Sept. 20 Industry Appreciation BBQ-EDC


f: -B1 "(ike" us on
KU facebook


It's back to school time! Join Melissa
Benefield and co-host Sam Himmel as
we prepare you for August 8th-- the
first day of school. We will also talk to
two Citrus County students about
earning the Silver Award- the highest
Girl Scout award a Cadette can
achieve! In our final segment you can
meet your new best friend! Mary
Napolitano brings in two dogs
available for adoption from FOCCAS.
Be sure to watch the newly
reformatted Chamber Chat every
Monday night at 6pm.


T'f&vilJ grTu''-r- YOU
VOTE '12

2012 Election Dates


Register by: July16, 2012
for the
Primary Election
August 14, 2012

Register by: October 9, 2012
for the
GENERAL ELECTION
November 6, 2012

To request a mail ballot
contact the elections office

Susan Gill
Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450

352-341-6740
www.votecitius.conm


A-Uh


5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Scholarship presentation


Schlabach Security Team certified


Special to the Chronicle
David Heinz presents Patrick Martin the Heinz Funeral Home 2012 Scholarship Award.


Ang named director Barbaron to redo
of trauma services Timber Pines course


OCALA- Darwin Noel Ang,
M.D., Ph.D., FACS, has been
appointed medical director of
the new
Trauma Serv-
ices at Ocala
Regional
Medical Cen-
ter, part of
Ocala Health
System.
Ang will be Dr. Darwin
responsible Ang
for the ongo- Ocala Health
ing develop- System.
ment, growth
and oversight of the medical
center's newly established
trauma program. He will start in
this new role Aug. 1.
Ang most recently served as
assistant professor of trauma
surgery and critical care at the
University of Florida/Shands
Medical Center, a Level I
trauma center. He was principle
investigator and coordinator of
the department of surgery for
quality and clinical outcomes
database at the University of
Florida, and chief executive offi-
cer and chairman of the board
of U.S. Biomedical Information
Systems.
Ang earned his master's de-
gree in public health from the
University of Washington
(2008), his medical doctor de-
gree from the University of
Florida (2001), his doctor of phi-
losophy degree from the Uni-
versity of Florida (1998), and
his undergraduate degree in
chemistry from Florida State
University (1994). He is board-
certified in surgery and surgical
critical care and is a fellow of
the American College of Sur-
geons. Ang is trained in ad-
vance trauma life support,
advance cardiac life support,
advance operative manage-
ment and advanced surgical
skills for exposure in trauma.
Ocala Regional Medical Cen-
ter is one of eight HCA hospi-
tals affiliated with the USF-HCA
Trauma Network. As part of that
affiliation, Ang will hold a posi-
tion as associate professor of
surgery with the University of
South Florida College of Medi-
cine as well as director of re-
search for the USF-HCA
Trauma Network.
"Dr. Ang is widely respected
in the trauma community, and
brings with him a wealth of
trauma and surgical critical care
experience. We welcome Dr.
Ang and look forward to work-
ing with him to make trauma
services at Ocala Regional
Medical Center a reality," said
Randy McVay, chief executive
officer of Ocala Health System.
Trauma services at Ocala
Regional Medical Center are
set to launch in early 2013.
Ocala Health System (OHS)
encompasses Ocala Regional
Medical Center, a 200-bed facil-
ity in the heart of Ocala, and
West Marion Community Hos-
pital, a 70-bed hospital in West
Marion County. OHS has the
only Commission on Cancer-
approved cancer center in Mar-
ion County and is directly
affiliated with the Moffitt Cancer
Center. The hospitals offer a
host of other services, including
bariatric surgery, orthopedic
care and joint replacement, ro-
botic surgery, cardiac and vas-
cular services including open
heart surgery and interventional
procedures, emergency, neuro-
logical and rehabilitation serv-
ices. Ocala Health's outpatient
facilities include Family Care
Specialists, a primary care net-
work of seven locations
throughout Marion County; Ad-
vanced Imaging Centers with
two locations; a freestanding
Wound Center with Hyperbaric
Therapy; and a Senior Well-
ness Community Center.


Ronald Kitchen Jr., president
and CEO of Crystal River-
based Barbaron Inc., an-
nounced the company has
been selected by Timber Pines
Country Club to redesign and
renovate its practice area.
The renovation will include a
total rebuild and expansion of
the practice putting and chip-
ping area as well as the No. 1
tee. Timber Pines County Club
is in Spring Hill.
Visit www.barbaron.com.
Oak Hill Hospital
appoints Norris
SPRING HILL- Holly Norris
has been appointed director of
environmen-
tal services at
Oak Hill Hos-
pital. Norris
comes from
another HCA
facility, Re-
ston Hospital
Center in Re-
ston, Va., Holly Norris
where she Oak Hill
served as di- Hospital.
rector of envi-
ronmental services since 2000.
While at Reston, she also
served as sustainability coordi-
nator for two years and she cur-
rently sits on the HCA corporate
waste task force, where she will
continue to serve.
"Sustainability is very impor-
tant to me," Norris said. "I im-
plemented the hazardous
waste RCRA, recycling and re-
furbishing equipment at Reston
Hospital Center before even the
corporate initiatives. Before
leaving Reston I made sure re-
cycling was available for all pa-
tients. I feel that we have an
obligation to keep the environ-
ment safe for the community
we serve and our staff."
Norris is OSHA Hazmat
trained. She served on numer-
ous community boards and re-
ceived the "Best of Reston
Community Award" in 2010.
Norris served active duty in
the U.S. Army for 10 years and
served an additional three
years as a reservist. She is a
jump master, air assault and


airborne. While in the service,
she received several military
awards.
She is the mother of a 22-
year-old daughter, and two
stepdaughters (23 and 22), all
of whom reside in Nashville,
Tenn.
Norris holds a B.S. in man-
agement from George Mason.
She and her husband are for-
mer Special Forces. Mr. Norris
works for the government and
is now assigned to MacDill Air
Force Base. She is returning to
the Tampa Bay area where she
grew up.
Oak Hill Hospital is at 11375
Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9
miles east of U.S. 19 on State
Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.
com.
Kennedy joins New
Horizons Village
New Horizons Village, a
Lecanto facility that serves 48
developmentally disabled
adults, has named Thomas J.
Kennedy as its new social
worker.
Kennedy replaces Zorida
Perez, who is leaving New
Horizons after 20 years of
service.
"Zorida has been a wonderful
asset to us and we couldn't be
more grateful to her for accom-
plishments and friendship," said
Scott Greiner, MGRM of New
Horizons Village. "Our social
worker has an indispensable
role to play at New Horizons
Village. Tom Kennedy im-
pressed us with his academic
achievements, his experience
and his desire to be a part of
what we're doing here for peo-
ple who are among the most
vulnerable members of our
society."
In 1972, Kennedy earned his
bachelor's degree in special ed-
ucation with a minor in psychol-
ogy from Jersey City State
College, Jersey City, N.J. He
followed that with a master's
degree in special education
from the Bank Street College of
Education in New York City. In
1986, he received a master's
degree in social work from Co-
lumbia University in New York.
Kennedy holds permanent
New York certifications for spe-


Special to the Chronicle
Staf at Schlabach Security and Sound in Lecanto from left, Paul Jordan, Jim Loos and Ken
Van Houten II have received certification in advanced custom integration of the Denon
audio video product line. "Your smartphone is now the remote," said Jordan, lead tech for
Schlabach. The Denon training certifies that authorized dealers have completed the courses
to professionally sell, integrate and calibrate all Denon Cl products. Schlabach has been an
authorized dealer in Citrus County since 1995. Call Schlabach at 352-527-3201.


cial classes for the emotionally
handicapped and for the ortho-
pedically and similarly handi-
capped and for kindergarten
and grades one to six. He has
permanent New Jersey certifi-
cation as a teacher of the
handicapped.
He began his professional
career in 1972. Even while
earning his degrees and certifi-
cations, he has been employed
continuously as a counselor in
the fields of education and
health care, working with chil-
dren, adults and families deal-
ing with various emotional,
physical or psychological
issues.
New Horizons Village is on a
13-acre campus on North Rain-
bow Loop in Lecanto. Its six
group homes and medical staff
provide the village's 48 resi-
dents with round-the-clock
care. Residents attend educa-
tion and personal growth
classes at New Horizons' re-
cently completed 9,000-square-
foot adult learning center. A
recreation program, field trips,
volunteering in the community
and other activities are all part
of New Horizon Village's care
efforts for the developmentally
disabled.
Visit www.newhorizons
village.us.
Extension Service
offers mentoring
To assist people with their
personal finances during tough
economic times, the University
of Florida/IFAS Citrus County
Extension office has volunteer
Master Money Mentors avail-
able who can provide one-on-
one financial mentoring.
There is no cost to work with
a Master Money Mentor and all
information provided is dealt
with in a nonjudgmental and
confidential manner.
For more information or to
work with a mentor, call Monica
Payne at the Citrus County Ex-
tension office at 352-527-5713.


Travel conference


Special to the Chronicle
Gerry Jones of The Travel Club, left, recently returned from
The Phoenician Resort at Camelback Mountain, Scottsdale,
Ariz. Travel agents attended a two-day Well-Being & Med-
ical Travel Conference discussing global health care and the
growing trend of travel to spas specifically for health and
wellness. Following was a two-day travel sellers conference
hosted by the popular Travel Channel star Samantha Brown,
right. She opened the session with a humorous but encour-
aging take on the state of travel and those who sell it.

BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos will be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with most cellphone cameras and
images lifted from websites do not reproduce well.
Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
Submissions about specific prices of products or
sales events are considered advertising and are not eli-
gible for Business Digest.


If you have a question you would like the panel to ask
at the forum, please fill out the form below and return
to:
Citrus County Chronicle EMi "
Primary Election Forum
1 624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. =
Crystal River, FL 34429
Name:
Question:




or fill out the form online www.chronicleonline.com/primary

Forms must be received no later than noon Friday, July 20.
Questions from the floor will not be allowed at the forum.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 D3









Homeowners association lacks teeth to enforce guidelines


DEAR BRUCE: When I pur-
chased my home several
years ago, I had to sign all
kinds of papers ac-
knowledging we were
buying a home in a
deed restricted commu-
nity, and we would fol-
low all the guidelines in
a packet we received -
from the homeowners V-
association.
I have since found
out while we have a
homeowners associa- Bruce
tion, no one is assigned SM
to enforce the MO
covenants.
What is the point of
signing all of this paperwork when
there is no way to enforce every-
thing? We have neighbors who are
not following the rules and guide-
lines, and there's no one to follow
up. Reader in Florida
DEAR READER: Here in
Florida, where you and I both re-
side, deed restrictions are a big
part of the lifestyle. I know of a
community that has people who
drive around in homeowners as-
sociation cars and write down in-
fractions. Then letters go out to
those homeowners. It is written in
the association's covenants if you
don't take care of these infractions
in a certain amount of time, you
can actually lose your house to the
homeowners association through
a legal process.
There are many subdivisions
that go far and beyond to enforce
their covenants, and then there
are some that don't do anything.
These restrictions can be en-
forced by going to court, but there
are expenses involved that fall
back to the homeowners'
responsibility.


W
IN


I think if you push the home-
owners association enough with
complaints, it will be forced to do
something. Deed re-
strictions are simply a
contract among a group
of people who have
purchased in a given
area. Without an en-
forcement agency such
as a deed restriction
committee of the home-
owners association,
nothing will happen
Villiams unless an individual or
ART a group of individuals
NEY takes the bull by the
horns.
DEAR BRUCE: I
have an opportunity to purchase a
house at a very good price. The
house is being offered way below
market value and is a great deal.
My quandary is, should I pay
cash, which I can afford, or get a
mortgage, which won't be a prob-
lem as I have excellent credit and
the income to back a mortgage.
Which way would you recom-
mend we go? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The easiest
thing for you to do is to figure out
the math. Say the house costs you
$100,000, and it will cost you 4 per-
cent for the mortgage. Now say
you can invest that same $100,000
and earn 5 percent a year. If that's
the case, keep the money invested
and get a mortgage. Not only will
you be earning 5 percent, but you
can deduct the mortgage costs on
your taxes every year.
This doesn't have to be rocket
science; it's simple math. It's a
matter of what is the least expen-
sive way to go, and which way will
give you the most for your money
DEAR BRUCE: We have a regu-
lar handyman we have used for


years. Recently, my husband fell
ill, which happened to coincide
with a rather large hailstorm that
came through and did some dam-
age. We had not used the handy-
man for a while, but called him to
do this cleanup/repair work and
he came promptly
I paid him for his services, and
then he asked if we could advance
him some money as he was having
a few financial problems. It was
only $300 and he was going to
work it off, so that wasn't a prob-
lem. We lent him the money and
called for him to come back and
work off the loan. We have not
heard from him again.
I am very annoyed and disap-
pointed, as we have been good to
him over the years. Is there any-
thing I can do to get this money
back? Can he file for bankruptcy,
and can I attach onto that bank-
ruptcy? What about small claims
court? Linda, via email
DEAR LINDA: If I were you, I
would move on. I know $300 is a
lot of money to lose, but you will
most likely spend more than that
in time and effort to get your
money back, if you are ever able
to.
If he does declare bankruptcy
and lists you as one of his credi-
tors, you still may never recover
that money I somehow don't think
he's going to list the $300 among
his creditors.
Unfortunately, these things do
happen, and as you know, many
people have fallen on hard times.
Learn from your lesson. Money
you cannot afford to lose, should
not be lent.
DEAR BRUCE: I have the op-
portunity to add my property taxes
into my monthly mortgage pay-
ments, and I'm not sure if I should


do that. Right now, I pay it in one
lump sum.
Everyone tells us to have it
come out every month as part of
the mortgage payment, but I think
saving the money up, earning a lit-
tle interest and then paying when
due might be the better way to go.
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Convenience
definitely has a value. With re-
turns being so low, how much
could you possibly earn by making
the payments as you are now?
The convenience of including
the taxes in your mortgage pay-
ment where you don't have to
worry about setting the amount
aside every month certainly has
some merit.
I would far prefer to have the
money taken out on a monthly
basis and let someone else have
the responsibility for paying the
bill. This way, you don't have to
worry about making sure you set
that money aside, and it requires
no discipline on your part.
DEAR BRUCE: I have been
hearing and seeing ads on TV for
Internet banks. Are these scams or
do they really exist?
Do you think these are safe to
put money into?
In doing some research, their
fees are far less than the tradi-
tional brick-and-mortar bank. -
T.P, in Missouri
DEAR T.P: The No. 1 thing you
need to ask is whether or not these
banks are FDIC-insured. A bank
that is covered by FDIC insurance
is perfectly legitimate and your
money is safeguarded. That's all
you need to find out.
If these banks are FDIC-
insured, then I would not hesitate
to open an account, if that's the
way you are leaning.


DEAR BRUCE: What do you
think of franchises? My husband
and I have some extra money and
we were thinking of investing in
one. How do we go about finding
the best franchise to invest in, and
do they walk you through from be-
ginning to end? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: When looking
for a franchise to invest in, brand
identification is very important. If
you are looking at a regional fran-
chise that is starting up new in an
area not familiar with it, you may
have some difficulty getting
customers.
Successful franchises that have
been around for a while have a far
lower failure rate than brand-new
startups. When you order french
fries at McDonald's, you know ex-
actly what you're going to get.
When you drive up to an un-
known, you have no idea if you're
going to like their food or not.
The downside is you will have a
partner for life. You are not al-
lowed the individuality you would
have in your own stand-alone en-
terprise, for the obvious reasons.
What makes a franchise success-
ful is uniformity. You can search
out franchising online and do your
research there. Just do your
homework.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com or to
Smart Money, PO. Box 7150, Hud-
son, FL 34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be answered in
future columns. Owing to the vol-
ume ofmail, personal replies
cannot be provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can now be
heard 24/7 via iTunes and at
www taeradio. com.


In Calif., more Latinos


among strawberry growers


8 *
& 'Ik


Associated Press

SALINAS, Calif. Ale-
jandro Ramirez was 15
when he crossed the U.S.-
Mexico border to work
alongside his father and
brother in California's
strawberry fields.
He spent 12 years toiling
for a large grower, living
with his wife and child in a
garage, learning everything
from pulling weeds to plant-
ing to driving a tractor. Now,
Ramirez is a U.S. citizen
who employs about 80 work-
ers all of them fellow
Latinos and grows his
own strawberries on more
than 100 acres in Salinas,
one of California's key berry
growing regions.
"This is my pride,"
Ramirez said on a recent af-
ternoon, gazing over the
rolling fields filled with neat
rows of plants. "Twenty
years ago, I had nothing.
The strawberry is my life."
And not just his. Straw-
berries have given Latinos
more ownership opportuni-
ties than any other major
crop. Latinos now comprise
two-thirds of strawberry
growers in California,
where 90 percent of the na-
tion's strawberries are
grown. Most growers of
other major crops are white.
For the $2.3 billion straw-
berry industry, it's the sec-
ond time a minority group
has emerged from the fields
in such a profound way
Japanese immigrants took
over the industry as they
grew in numbers after the
turn of the 20th century
Like the Japanese, many
Latino growers are former
pickers or the children of
field workers who worked
their way up to rent or own
land.
Because strawberries can
be grown on small plots
nearly year-round and can
yield more fruit and rev-
enue per acre than most
other agricultural crops, it's
easier for immigrants to get
into the business, said Hal
Johnson, who has devel-
oped varieties of strawber-
ries since 1955 for
California's largest berry
shipper-growers.
"There's hardly ever been
a crop where an average
picker who is aggressive
and works hard can become
a grower," Johnson said.
"If he (a strawberry
picker) is a hustler and
brings along other pickers,
he can develop his own lit-
tle empire."
Before World War II,
Japanese immigrants grew
more than 90 percent of Cal-
ifornia's strawberries. But
plant and soil diseases de-
pleted their profits and the


war brought the industry to
a near-halt when Japanese
growers were forced into in-
ternment camps by the U.S.
government.
After the war, as pesti-
cides helped eliminate dis-
eases and researchers like
Johnson came up with im-
proved varieties, Califor-
nia's strawberry industry
boomed. More recently, in-
creased consumer demand
for fresh fruit and organic
led to farmers expanding
the berry acreage.
Many of the post-war
growers were Hispanic
braceros, agricultural labor-
ers who arrived under gov-
ernment contract, and other
migrant Mexican workers,
Johnson said.
"They saw the potential
and grabbed on as hard as
they could," he said.
Francisco Ponce migrated
to California from Mexico in
the 1950s to harvest grapes
and vegetables. He soon
began growing strawberries
as a sharecropper on four
acres in Watsonville.
His son, Rogelio Ponce
Sr, grew up among the
berries and later worked for
a large grower, climbing the
ranks to manager. Twenty
years ago, he sold the family
home and with a partner
started growing strawber-
ries on 25 acres.
Now his two sons, Rogelio
Ponce Jr. and Steven Ponce
- both college-educated -
work alongside their father
The family farms 80 acres of
conventional and 20 acres of
organic strawberries, as
well as 50 acres of raspber-
ries on land where their
mother's father, a bracero,
once worked as a supervisor
in an apple orchard.
The sons also head a
strawberry partnership,
where they grow an addi-
tional 90 acres of berries.
Between the two compa-
nies, the Ponces employ
more than 300 workers. The
family sells its berries to
one of California's largest
shipper-growers.
"The first thing our father
taught us is that strawber-
ries can be a good business,"
Steven Ponce said. "He has-
n't made a ton of money, but
he's been consistent all
these years. He chipped at it
little by little, and that's
where we get our work ethic
from. We look back on what
our father established and
realize we're very fortunate.
It was a huge risk."
Not all Latino strawberry
growers prosper Some actu-
ally are sharecroppers, en-
snared in financial
relationships that plunge
them deep into debt, said
Mike Meuter, an attorney at
California Rural Legal As-


distance in Salinas.
And despite the influx of
Latino growers, he said,
Latino farmworkers most
of them illegal immigrants
from Mexico continue to
pick strawberries just as
they had decades ago, many
of them overworked and
underpaid.
Some are attracted to be-
coming growers by straw-
berry companies that
traditionally cool, market,
sell and ship the strawber-
ries. Some of these compa-
nies also lease land to
farmworkers or lend them
money for operating costs,
often at very high interest
rates. In return, the farm-
workers-turned-growers
must sell their berries to the
companies that sponsored
them, often at below-market
prices.
Many of the growers do
not speak English and don't
understand their contracts
until it's too late.
Ramirez, who farms
berries in Salinas, nearly
lost his business after being
financed by one such
company.
His father grew strawber-
ries in Mexico, but fell on
hard times and smuggled
Ramirez over the border so
his son could help pay off
the family's debts.
In 1986, Ramirez quali-
fied for amnesty as an agri-
cultural worker. Employed
by a large strawberry
grower for over 12 years, he
amassed different skills.
"I never settled for an
easy job," Ramirez said.
"When I cut weeds, I
dreamed of harvesting
strawberries. When I har-
vested, I dreamed of driving
a tractor. I constantly asked
my supervisors for new op-
portunities. I had the ambi-
tion to do something better."
With help from two broth-
ers, who also worked in Cal-
ifornia, Ramirez started
growing strawberries on a
few acres in 1995. He was fi-
nanced by a strawberry
company, obligated to make
payments and hand over his
entire crop.
He quickly fell into debt
and had to borrow money
from family, friends and the
banks to stay afloat.
"The first few years were
extremely difficult," he said.
"I was fighting just to pay
my rent."
Eventually he quit the
company, started to grow
berries for a large coopera-
tive and paid off debts. His
son, Alejandro Jr, is in col-
lege studying agriculture
and plans to join his father
in the berry business.
Latino growers said having
roots in the same country and
speaking the same language


--4- -




Associated Press
Rogelio Ponce Sr., center, and his two sons, Rogelio Ponce Jr., left, and Steven Ponce
pose for a photo July 9 at the family's ranch in Watsonville, Calif., where the Ponces grow
nearly 200 acres of strawberries.

as their field workers helps. 1950s and started growing tions in Mexico," Navarro
"It's a lot easier to relate berries on 10 acres. Navarro said. "My father was also
to my workers," said Peter now grows on 140 acres in very poor. His humble be-
Navarro, whose father mi- Watsonville. innings always remind me
grated from Mexico in the "I know their living condi- to treat the workers well."


S-I


DISCOVER PHOTO (


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interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among those
chosen to be displayed in the 2012-2013
Discover Magazine. Please submit only
photos taken in Citrus County and include
a brief description of the photo along with
your name, address and phone num11ber.
Photos must be submitted before July 31,
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I *.I It I

a .I S E l
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PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


I


D4 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl

benefits. Nationally, slightly less than
one-third of those unemployed re-
ceive re-employment insurance ben-
efits. Florida has the lowest
recipiency rate in the country; last
year, only 17 percent of the state's un-
employed received state RI benefits.
That said, what role does Work-
force Connection have in all this?
Again, and I can't stress this enough,
our staff is not employed by
Florida's Re-employment Assis-
tance system and cannot determine
or offer opinions on eligibility for
benefits. However, we can provide
computer, Internet, phone and fax
access so you may apply for and
make inquiries about eligibility/
receipt of re-employment assistance
benefits.
If you are a new claimant, after
registering for re-employment in-
surance (RI) with DEO, you may be
contacted by Workforce Connection
to complete a work registration, cre-
ate and post an electronic resume
and set up your own Virtual Re-
cruiter in the Employ Florida Mar-
ketplace at www.employflorida.com.
Doing so enhances your job-search
efforts and provides you with addi-
tional free resources as well as es-


tablishes a valuable relationship
with workforce staff. All job seekers,
regardless of whether you file an RI
claim or not, are encouraged to reg-
ister with Workforce Connection
through EFM and visit one of our
Workforce Connection Resources
Centers in Inverness, Chiefland and
Ocala where you can receive one-
on-one assistance, at no charge.
When filing your initial RI claim,
you'll be asked to complete an Indi-
vidual Skills Review (ISR) designed
to measure mastery of workplace
skills.
There are up to 45 questions on
the online test covering applied
mathematics, reading for informa-
tion and locating information. Eligi-
bility for RI benefits is not
contingent on your score; however,
failure to take or complete the as-
sessment may jeopardize or delay
your benefits.
Likewise, failure to take advan-
tage of re-employment services,
once you have been contacted by
our staff to do so, could jeopardize
or delay your benefits, so why take
that risk? Especially when the
whole focus of our re-employment
services is your re-employment.
During our fiscal year ending
June 30, we served nearly 50,000 job
seekers throughout our three-
county region and more than 2,200
local businesses. Workforce Connec-


tion placed 5,982 individuals in jobs
and we are working hard to beat that
each and every day Since March,
Workforce Connection has ranked
among the top 10 regional workforce
boards in the state, averaging nearly
800 job placements each month.
If you have questions, concerns or
need more information about Re-
employment Insurance, visit DEO at
www.FloridaJobs.org or call the RI
hotline at 800-204-2418. You can also
find more Re-employment Assis-
tance Resources by visiting the Job
Candidates section of our website at
www.clmworkforce. com.
If you'd like to explore the re-em-
ployment services we can provide,
again at no charge, call or visit our
resource center at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd. in Inverness at 352-237-2223 or
800-434-JOBS.
The bottom line is we'll work hard
for you if you work with us. The re-
employment services we offer aren't
designed to ensnare you in bureau-
cratic red tape, they're intended to
help you develop a smart job-search
strategy.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certified
Workforce Professional and com-
munications manager at Workforce
Connection. Contact her at 352-291-
9559 or 800-434-5627, ext 1234 or
lbyrnes@clm workforce., com.


TASTE
Continued from Page Dl

event management companies
run similar festivals. But when
Chicago asked for private bids
in 2010, just one company of-
fered a plan.
Taste also faces competition
from numerous other Chicago
festivals, ranging from neigh-
borhood events to big music
festivals such as Lollapalooza,
which is funded and produced
by a private company
Gatziolis declined to com-
ment on the possibility of the
city handing the reins to some-
one else, adding the city works
hard to preserve the free ad-
mission and low prices.
Charging admission might
make Chicago's event safer,
some festival-goers said. In
2008, one person was killed
and three people were injured
during a shooting after the
July 3 fireworks show. Though
crowds might be smaller, they
would be easier to manage.
"I would pay a small one,
like $5 or $10 maybe," said
Scott Reierstad, a 34-year-old
from Rolling Meadows, Ill.
Funding for Pig Out in the


Park, a comparable festival in
Spokane, Wash., comes from
sponsorships, restaurant booth
fees and commission on
restaurant profits, but not from
the city, said Bill Burke, who
owns Burke Marketing and
founded the event 33 years
ago. The festival has grown
about 5 percent every year,
and saw about 95,000 visitors
last summer
Other food festivals are more
upscale. Los Angeles, Austin
and Atlanta hosted inaugural
food and wine festivals in 2011
and 2012. Admission ranges
from $75 to more than $1000,
but includes free food and
wine tasting, classes, seminars
and celebrity chefs.
David Bernahl, co-founder
of the Los Angeles Food &
Wine Festival, lived in
Chicago for most of his child-
hood. He remembers Taste
fondly but said organizers
should consider a partnership
with a full-time events man-
agement company or non-
profit organization.
"Taste is the same as it's
been for a really long time,"
Bernahl said. "Sometimes it
takes a risk, which is very dif-
ficult for government
agencies."


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I ax 35) 6-56 1TolFre (88. 52240 1 m il lasiidsa roice*ln .m ebi-:ww hrnclonie0o


Petite SWF looking for
SWM Average Weight
wants to enjoy a little
traveling, dinner, movie,
etc. non-smoker, social
drinker. Looking forward
to meeting you.
Blind Box 1790P
c/o Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

Very Athletic
Old Man, seeks
Female Traveling
companion for Skiing
Kayak, Mountain bik-
ing Etc. 352-589-2362

WHERE IS SHE?
Friendly widower in
good health, socially
active, fun to be with.
Everyone I know says
she's out there some-
where, you will find her
one of these days, but
frankly I'm dubious. I
hope I'm not asking too
much when I'm seeking
to meet a happy, at-
tractive, intelligent, gra-
cious humorous, extra-
verted Christian lady
between 65-75+ in
aood health, with a
warm personalim
or average build for
meaningful conversa-
tion & other social
activities & perhaps a
loving personal
relationship. If you
somehow fit the bill,
please don't be afraid
to call me at 527-0591.
I would love to hear
from you.




'65 GTO
BI, 454, mint cond.,
$24K OBO. 302-8265

'66 Nova
Custom, 327, mint,
$28K OBO
(352) 302-8265

Experienced
Cook
Must possess long
term care experience
ability to bake, read
menus and work in-
dependently, must be
able to work flexible
hours. Apply in
person at
Woodland Terrace of
Citrus County 124 W
Norvell Bryant Hwy
Hernando FL 34442

Homosassa
3/2/2 Meadows $695 up
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

Sugarmill Woods
2 master bedrooms!
Ig garage, updated,
SS appl., $875/Mo.
352-302-4057

Sugarmill Woods
Emaculate 3/2/2, private
site, many upgrades,
$795/month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191


2 young crested
Geckos free to a knowl-
edgeable keeper
352-746-1017
FREE
8 wks. old kitten for
a loving home.
Black w/White
paws and chest.
Real cute/playful.
(352) 344-4909
FREE
Dryer & 52" TV
Both Needs Work
(352) 400-0312
Free Female
Healthy Cat
Gray with blk spots
Spayed & Chip lyr old
very affectionate
(352) 637-4731
FREE FIREWOOD
You Pick Up
(352) 341-1143
Free Furniture
(352) 560-7132
(352) 419-6625
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
Free Large Chair
Needs cleaning
(352) 613-0529
FREE LARGE CHAIR
needs cleaning but in
good shape
352-613-0529
FREE WOOD
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS
3, free kittens to a
good home, all female.
(352) 364-7069


-I
FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 lb,
13ct@$6 lb 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262



Beach bag at Weeki
Wachee park Wed
striped with flip flop deco-
ration on handle has
towel, keys (lexington
house key), brush,
glasses, med bottle etc
please call
(617)640-3863
LOST CAT
gray & whitelong hair
house cat, has a chip,
vicinity of 5500 Corral
Place, Pine Ridge
$100 REWARD
(352) 746-0362
Lost Cat
Young Male, black &
Gray Tiger
Area of Regal Lilly &
Homosassa Trail
(352) 476-8587
Lost Gray
Domestic Short Cat.
Neutered, male,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 527-9050
Lost Male Bangle Cat
Light Golden Brown
green eyes. Contrast-
ing Strips and spots
Off Hampshire Street
Inverness
352-601-5362



FOUND Male Puggle and
Male Pekingese Mixes on
Gobbler in Floral City on
July 11th. Please contact
Citrus County Animal
Services, Animal
IDs#A16693519 and
#A16693082,
352/746-8400, 4030 S.
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com


PUB MIX, Male
Found 491 halfway
btw 200 & Holder
(352) 860-1509




FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 lb,
13ct@$6 lb 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

MEDICAL
BILLING
ASSISTANT
Full-time position
available for
Patient
Checkout/billing
assistant should
be familiar with
CPT and ICD cod-
ing and data en-
try. Experienced
in medical man-
ager programs a
plus.
Please Fax Resume To
746-9320


Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus Co
Accepting applica-
tions. Exp. working
school Age Youth,
public Relations,
Communication Skills
supervisory/training
Download app. from
www.citrusbgc.com
Fax
Resume/Application
to 352-621-4679

Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an
Experienced Agent
with active 220 lic.
Salary commiserates
experience. Call
Mlchelle, 746-7008


BARTENDER
For Bar in Back
Applv in Person in at
Front SABINA'S DINER
Hernando, after 2pm


*EXP. COOKS
& SERVERS
Apply in person
Mon-Fri. 9am-11am
COACH'S
114 W. Main St.
Inverness EOE


Sugarmill Woods
Country Club
Looking For
EXP LINE COOK
& FOOD RUNNER
Apply in Person
I Douglas Street
9am- 11am
Ask for James






WANTED
Highly self motivated
SALES PEOPLE
Company truck is pro-
vided. Paid
vacation & Holidays.
Benefits available. Ap-
ply in Person ONLY
from 9 am to 4 pm
Mon-Fri, At
Brays
Pest Control,
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP


WHAT'S
IMPORTANT?
FUTURE
CAREER
INCOME
A local established
and respected
company has
prestige positions
available. Duties will
require an experi-
enced, compassion-
ate, and caring
person to provide
a genuine service
to the people of the
community. This is a
sales oriented
position with a secure
income potential.
Strong prospecting
skills required.
Women do excep-
tionally well.
Company benefits
and training.
This is a solid Career
position, don't
miss this opportunity.
Fax Resume to
352-746-2875 or call
1-352-746-4646
Email
letty.howard@dignity
memorial.corn






Carpet Cleaners
Positions open now at
Stanley Steemer.
Clean Fl MVR record
21 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
include Paid training,
401k, holiday pay
and morell!
Apply at 911 Eden Dr.
Inverness, or email
toni.aronert@
steemer.com


B



Credit and
Collections
Coordinator
Citrus County
Chronicle
Crystal River, Florida
The Citrus County
Chronicle,
a 23,000-daily,
28,000-Sunday
circulation daily
newspaper in Crystal
River is seeking an
organized, team
-oriented candidate
with exceptional
customer service,
accounting and
administrative skills
to fill the role of credit
and collections
coordinator.
The ideal candidate
will have a minimum
two years account-
ing experience.
Experience with a
newspaper company
is a plus, but not
required. They must
be proficient with
Microsoft Excel,
Microsoft Word and
basic Window
operating system
skills; and be able to
process transactions
through the Internet.
The position assists
the Business Office
Supervisor in manag-
ing the accounts
receivable, classified
receivable aging
accounts. The ideal
candidate must have
the ability to effec-
tively communicate
with the external
customer base,
maintain a profes-
sional manner with
internal departments,
communicate with
members of the USA
Credit Collections
vendor and have
expert knowledge
of the corporate
collection laws and
bankruptcy protocol.
Normal work hours
are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through
Friday, though some
nights and weekends
may be necessary.
The position requires
sitting and/or walking
on a variety of sur-
faces up to 8-10 hours
per day. Finger
dexterity is required.
Wrist movement is
requirequired. Lifting a
minimum of 15 Ibs.
and climbing stairs is
required. Position is
routinely exposed to
glare (VDT).
EOE employer.
Send resume to
marnold@
chronicleonline.com
or fax to
352- 563-5665.

Exp. Shirt Presser
W/ at least 2 yrs. exp.
Beverly Hills Cleaners
(352) 527-3140

RV TECH
Fulltlme, Certified
References Required
352-601-0936




Y tUI \\IIILIl lrl'St.



CIv)yICLE


B

PROPERTY
MANAGER
Must possess Realtor's License,
perform all aspects of property
management.Varied Hours/OnCall.
Base plus Commission
fax352-7951667
call 352-302-8088


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa Fl.

Drivers
New Refrigerated and
Dry Van freight.
Daily or Weekly pay!
Quarterly Safety
Bonus! Flexible
Hometime. CDL-A, 3
months current OTR
experience.
(800)414-9569 www.
driveknight.com

Experienced
Cook
Must possess long
term care experience
ability to bake, read



person at
Woodland Terrace of
Norvell Bryant Hwy
Hernando FL 34442

RESIDENT CARE
SPECIALISTS
New Horizons
Village is a premier
residential care
facility for develop-
mentally disabled
adults. We are
currentlyseeking
Full-Time
Habilitative Training
Instructors to provide
care and training to
these individuals
through direct care.
Basic qualifications
required:
I HS diploma or
equivalency.
I Ability to pass
a post-offer
physical exam,
drug test, mandatory
criminal background
investigation, and
reference inquiry.
I Demonstrated oral
and written com-
munication skills
New Horizon Village
offers:
I Competitive
wages, excellent
benefits, & a tobacco
-free campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at 1275 N.
Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
(352) 746-3262.





MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance, thru SC
Training.HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



'Lili 11. 1 1 t S


Classtfieds


Almond Side by side
22 cu. ft.
w/ ice & water
3 month old
$800 (352) 586-6746


GE Refrigerator
$150 obo
GE Stove $75.
Excel. Condition
(352) 400-8646


Kitchenaid
side by side, 25 cu. ft.
indoor ice maker
RO filter, white $500.
(352) 527-0936


Refrigerator
Clean & cold
looks like New
$225.
(352) 527-2757


Refrigerator/Freezer,
side by side
excel. shape, ice cold
$175.
(352) 563-2385


DRYER w/stand
2yrs old,$200 call Mary
(352) 344-8067
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WID Front Load
$650 ea. Like NEW!
(352)344-5734
Washer & Dryer
Excel. Condition
$275. Samsung
Stainless Steel Side by
Side Refrigerator $500
(352) 400-8646
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Can de-
liver 352 263-7398



RIGID DRAIN CLEAN-
ING MACHINE Rigid
Motorized Drain cleaning
machine. 3/8 by 75 foot
cable. Used once. Sells
at local stores for $500.
Asking $275 cash.
Call 757-617-2285
and leave message.


ROUTES




AVAILABLE




1--t->-


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

VI Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance

If interested come to the Meadowcrest
Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to
the back and ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River


IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE
SC I T R U 0 chronicleonline.com



M V www.chronicleonline.com


I Cm


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 D5









D6 SUNDAY,JULY 15, 2012


MEMOREX AM/FM
RADIO/CD PLAYER $20
BOOMBOX STYLE LIKE
NEW 352-419-5981



32X80 SOLID WOOD
DOOR hinges, threshold,
no other hardware $25
352-513-4614
WANTED
T- 111 &/or, OC Siding
Board, foil board &/or
styrofoaam sheets Up to
40 sheet ea.
352-794-3603 or
813-244-3945 cell.
Com utrs


Deluxe Playstation 3
w/8 games $400 for all,
retails for >$1000
(352)795-7513
DESKTOP COMPUTER
w/monitor & mouse;
works GREAT $100 o/b/o
352-637-3636
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
E Machine, W260
w/ dell keyboard
and screen
$100
(352) 563-2896
Single Hide-a-bed
leather $100 obo
(352)795-7513



Generator Never Been
Used $800 firm
(352)344-5734



1 SMALL SOFA
Excellent Cond.
$125. obo
(352) 527-9071
4 WROUGHT IRON PA-
TIO CHAIRS 4 wrought
iron patio chairs, ivory
color, need touch up. $80
OBO. 352-746-1832
8 ft. SLEEPER SOFA
Excellent cond.
light fabric with, swirl
color pattern
Come and get It!
$350.(352) 513-4507
42" Round Wooden
Dining Room Table
4 chairs
$200 obo
(352) 726-1059
Chest of Drawers,
Dresser, set of box
springs $150.
Glider Rocker,
w/ foot stool $50.
(352) 795-7254


DINNIN TABL FR 8areop
Brand New with tag Dining Rm. table w/6
wood, excellent condi- high back leather
tion, No chairs, just ta- chairs, (buffet) server
ble, $100 (352)465-1616 used twice
Entertainment Center $1,200 (352) 586-6746
9ft L, 61/2ft H, 27" Deep Preowned Mattress
White, fits up to 50" TV Sets from Twin $30;
$200 Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
(352) 382-7473 352-628-0808
ENTERTAINMENT Sofa and Love Seat
CENTER LIKE NEW! $450
Blonde Wood (352)344-5734
$500. (352) 726-9587 Sumter Cabinet Co.
352-228-0357 bereau & night stand
Entertainment Center $250. obo
w/ doors, solid oak Queen Mattress &
$150. Kitchen Table boxspring & frame $75.
47" round, w/ 4 obo (352) 746-9352
upolhstered Chairs TABLE Drop leaf wood
$250 (352) 860-1647 painted white closed
Ethan Allen Dining 28x22open 28x62 Good
Room Table w/ leaf and condon $100 352
4 chairs
$200 Teal Wicker Set, love
(352) 726-1059 seat, 2 chairs, coffee
FURNITURE Solid Oak table. Flowered cush-
E2 nternme erazy ions, like new $195. obo
holds 32 Flat TV $199. King Mattress & spring
box $175. obo
Glass top 42" dining set (352)302-9507
w/4 chairs -$150. (352)302-9507
352-382-5555 G n
Hand Made Pine Hope

2 Contemporary Lazy 2 Rider Mowers
Boy Lamps Wheelhorse, $450.
$70 obo John Deere $450.
(352) 746-9352 Price Firm.
High End Quality Resale (352) 341-1569
Furniture & Accessories Craftsman Rider,
SECOND TIME AROUND 18 Horse,
FURNITURE 2165 N. 42 cut
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803 $400
House full of furniture (352) 220-7301
Lots of items, All must go! Riding Lawn Mower
loveseat $100obo, O'Troy Built, 42 cut
Desk+chair $125, queen/ $300
full size beds $500 ea. High wheel Trimmer,
(352) 527-6879 Sears model $150
Indoor/Outdr. Furniture (352) 249-7221
1 glider $50. Kitchen
wood table 50" round
bar high w/ extra glass
top 4 bar high stools 1 HUGH GOLDEN BAR-
yr old $150 795-4372 REL CACTUS MEAS-
King Size Bed frame, URES 5'DIA. X 15"TALL
cherry finish, IN TERRA COTTA POT.
excel. cond. $100FIRM 586-7222
$300 -
(352) 382-3682
Lazy Boy pull out couch
$250. Lrg. Recliner $50.
Qn. Ann Chair $50. 2 GUN SHOW
white wicker couches GUN S HOW
$75 g.Lg wood coffee INVERNESS/
table $100.2 marble CITRUS COUNTY
top end tables $100.
Glass tables & more Fairgrounds
(352) 563-6327 3610 S Florida Ave
Master Bedroom Set, July 14, Sat 9-5,
king bd. w/ mattress 2 July 15, Sun 9-4
night stands, 2 lamps, 2 Concealed Weapons
dbl dressers. Matching Classes Dail
$500. wtBring your GUNS &
Full Bedroom Set, w/ GOLD to sell or trade
mattress & headboard, GunTrader
Broyhill, triple dresser GunShows.com
Irg. mirror, 1 night stand 352-359-0134
$500. (352) 563-6327 3 59 4


HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET
352-628-4656


INGLIS
Sat. & Sun. 9a-2pm
HUGE SALE*
Antiques, collectibles,
furniture, toys & MORE
55 N. Inglis Ave.

Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944





MENS CLOTHING
(LARGE)
Jeans,Pants,Shorts &
Shirts$25
352-613-0529

PANT AND SHORT
BOYS SIZES $2 or $3
pullover $1 and $2
352-777-1256





!!!!!!!245/45 R18!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485

::::::::::245/65 R17::::::::::
Good tread!! Only $60 for
the pair! (352)586-5485

----~~~~~215/65 R17--~~~~~---
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485

1HP, Submersible
pump, $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485

26"/28" BIKE NTX brand
has many speeds mans
can be used for lady $45
352-419-5549

Apple Collection
bakers rack, dishes,
cups plates, etc.
44 pcs.
$60. obo.
(352) 344-5283

BBE Sonic Maximizer
for extra soundquality
$40. CTS 600 Crown
Ampliphier, excel.
cond. great for DJ
or Home use $350.
352-287-9073


ARDMITYRETPEoM-
PUTER STAND$ 20 Bev-
erly hills 912-509-5566
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,$20
(352)465-1616
BREADMAKER Oster
company, white color, ex-
cellent condition, $20
(352)465-1616
DOG CRATES
(PETMART-metal) 1
XLARGE 42X28X30 dog
crate;1 Medium dog crate
$65/$45 352-637-3636
DOG DOOR for sliding
glass door for small pet
like new $50.00
(352) 794-3422
DOGGIE RIDE
STROLLER & can con-
nect to a bike $20 beverly
hills 912-509-5566
Entertainment center $20
3-in-1 table on wheels $20
Kitchen island wheels $20
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
EXERCISE RE-
BOUNDER $20.00 bev-
erly hills 912-509-5566
FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 lb,
13ct@$6 lb 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262
GERBIL CAGE $35
Good Condition
352-613-7064
Haywood Star Clear
+ filtering system
w/ 2 hepa filters
Power flow LX 3 HP
pump w/ basket filter
1 14" Hoses included
$350 obo
(352) 489-2823
HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok
condition, Heats up to
180 sq. ft. area, $20.
(352)465-1616
HUGH GOLDEN BAR-
REL CACTUS
YELLOW FLOWERS
5ft diameter x 15"tall
$100FIRM 586-7222
IN HOME CHILD CARE
Do you need affordable
child care in the Forest
Ridge School District?
This stay at home Mom is
here to help!
352-249-7681
Large armoire $50
Metal love-seat swing $25
Large chais-lounge $25
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
Lot of Geo Trax train set.
With push trains,remote
control trains. $100.
352-897-4562red neck-
woman2124@yahoo.com
Medium armoire $20
Girls 10-spd bike $40
Exer. bike $20
352-419-6625
352-560-7132


MINI FOOTBALL HEL-
METS Ko-Lecto mini foot-
ball helmet set, 1975,
Gino's restaurants promo
$99.00 746-6931
Moving Sale
Contents of shed $50
Bar w/4 stools $50
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
Moving Sale
Elec. Treadmill $50
Lg 2pc. dress/mirr set $50
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
Moving Sale
Good Used Fridge $50
Washer $50
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
Outside Bar Table & 4
stools black rod iron ex-
cellent condition $100
Beverly Hills
(912)509-5566
Portable Generator
Never used, manual
start, 5250 Watt, Briggs
& Stratton Eng. $450
obo (352) 527-7443
QUIK SHADE
ROLLERBAG
Fits 10'by10' canopy
Never used $40.00 Call
Ray@352-464-0573
RAIN GUARDS brand
new 4 piece nissan path-
finder fits 90/95 25.00
352 302 7451
SAMSONITE
HANGING/FOLDING
TRAVEL BAG $15 LUG-
GAGE CARRIER/DOLLY
$10 352-419-5981
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal Head-
board, $20, price re-
duced. (352)465-1616
VACUUM CLEANER
Eureka!, needs some
repair, Blue colored, big
vacuum with hose, $20
(352)465-1616
WATER SOFTENER
Do not Need
Was Just Disconnected
$250
Call (352) 382-1424
wicker love-seat $20
twin roll-away bed $20
sewing machine+cab.$20
port.sew machine $20
352-419-6625
352-560-7132
X BOX and KENECTS
With 4 Games
Like New, In Box
$150
352-628-7251,586-8503



3 WHEELED ALUMINUM
WALKER WITH
BRAKES FOLDS UP
FOR EASY TRANSPORT
ONLY $50 352 464 0316


m I=-= I -= I


I emer


ALUMINUM FOLD UP
WALKER & BEDSIDE
COMMODE ONLY 20.00
EACH 352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
bedside commode, ad-
justable for use in bath-
room. never used. $100
OBO. 352-746-1832
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH
FOOTRESTS,GOOD
CONDITION ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
WALKER AND WHEEL-
CHAIR Hugo 4 wheel
walker with seat $40, Ex-
tra Large Wheelchair $60
352-637-3156



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676







Spinet Piano
with padded storage
bench. Also has heater
cinnamon color
$600. 352- 795-4372



HOOVER SELF PRO-
PELLED VACUUM
CLEANER $35 VERY
GOOD CONDITION
352-419-5981
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
Queen bed w
mattress/box spring 2
night stands 5 drawer
chest very good condition
$375.00 call Tim
@352-400-8787
WALLPAPER 3 DOUBLE
ROLLS $30 NEWAND
UNOPENED 165 SQ FT
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
352-419-5981





NORDIC TRACK EXER-
CISE CYCLE Model C3si.
20 programs. Easy en-
trance. Like new. Paid
$500.00. Asking $150.00.
352-746-5658
RECUMBANT
EXERCISE BICYCLE
BETTER ON THE BACK
LOSE THOSE POUNDS
ONLY 100 352 464 0316


Standard Exercise
Bike
Excellent condition $25
(352) 287-6497
Women's 26" Bicycle
used 2 weeks
$100
(352) 586-6746




Bike Gary Fischer
Men's Napa Model
$250 & Schwinn 4-bike
car hitch carrier $50
(352)209-7257
Browning A-Bolt
Rifle
22 mag caliber, with
scope, excel. cond.
$500
(352) 441-0645
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GUN SHOW
INVERNESS/
CITRUS COUNTY
Fairgrounds
3610 S Florida Ave
July 14, Sat 9-5,
July 15, Sun 9-4
Concealed Weaoons
Classes Daily
r'Bring your GUNS &

GuniS Iws.com
352-359-U 134

GUNS FOR SALE NEW
GLOCK 22 GEN 4
$525.00
NEW HI-POINT CAR-
BINE 45 AUTO 318.00
CALL 352-447-5595

RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquarters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River

S/W Model 5906, Auto,
9mm, ANIB -$450
S/W Model 60, s/steel,
.38spcl, As New-$300
S/W Model 18, Target,
.22S, L,LR, V.Good -$300
S/W Model460,.460,
.454, .45LC, NIB $1250.
Hi-Std Victor, Target
Auto, .22 LR, Hartford
Mfg, As New $875
(352) 356-0124


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881






SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179






Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia
Incontinency No Prob .
(SL 6906450) 503-7052


LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451







SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,584-3730





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL/Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-21201 410-7383

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROOFING


AAA ROOFING
Call the "4 eak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 oO BVPX


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366


I DR ERV C A


WILL CONSTRUCTION -
S352-628-2291 eM
SPreventDryerFiresNow.com E


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '781 Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BARN MASTERS
We Build, Horse Stalls
Barns, Fences, Pastures.
(352) 257-5677
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *k




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Rob 352-476-2285


WINDO /

We Clean Windows and a Whol Lot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringh ill


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
Not A Lic. Contractor
Many Fix It Repairs
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Handyman Dave
Press Cleaning,
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs 352- 726-9570


Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
C*' Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
I "4 0 Residential &
,' Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

S Green Valley
Landscape & Design
Complete lawn maint.
(352)280-0269




JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
WE PAINT
Houses inside & out,
Decorative concrete
Handyman, house
cleaning (352) 476-0680


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570



TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT. LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


o !UiS o !UiS o i!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.corn) 400-2221



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!










Employment
SI source is...






1www chronlcleonlhne cor


S I *1


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000B6SU


"Repaint
Specialist"

2 Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES -
352-465-6631







QB000280 & SUPPLY I C.
Family Owned And Operated
In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
$'125 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF:
1 One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
Dm, FREE ESTIMATES.
& (352) 628-5079


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
S* mall Carpentry
Fencing
,* Screening
w* Clean Dryer
V Vents
P..' AAffordalwle & Dependable
S "Experence lifelong
S352 344-0905
cell. 400-1722


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


J.*
3^,^f ---.J,.3i lLL




Acrylic & Glass WINDOWS
Custom made for your screen room

SAV CRC058138
( .-r I- TF iJ"-TI--,r
(352)465-4629
*Installation may vary.
















1500
OFF:
with ad


GENERAL -
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
ESTATE LICENSE #CPCO51584




Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
. "NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
* Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 "
2780 florida Ave, Hernando, FLHernando Plaza)


Fins


*.




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A **A *


_


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352)726-5238




5x8 heavy Duty until
trailer $600.
4x8 Alum trlr. $450. Or
Best offers. 794-3603
ENCLOSED TRAILER
5 X 12 Transport 6 ft.
High Inside, round top,
3 new tires & rims,
Good cond. $1,195.
352-628-7251,586-8503
UTILITY TRAILER 12x7
heavy duty, wide gate,
hardly used pd $1600
$1000 (352) 201-5505
1-607-438-8129




GYM DELUXE $ 20
MUSICALBOUNCE
BEAR $10, car seat in-
fant $25, car seat toddle
$30 352-777-1256

Been used for 2 1/2 years
and is still in good condi-


STROLLER EXC.
COND. PINKAND
BROWN $40 and play-
pen $40,bounce $20 de-
luxe 352-777-1256
White Baby Crib
& Car Seat
$60.
(352) 795-4394


Sell r Swa


JdIMMMk




1 &5,6


-I


d


I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom /2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916



1 MALE YORKIE
10 weeks $450
MALTESE, 3 females
2 males available soon
$600. & $650 Health
certs, CKC registered,
352-212-4504,212-1258
3 MALTESE, Available
2 females $600. ea
I male $500. Health
certs & CKC registered,
3 Morkies & 5 Shorkies
AVAILABLE SOON
352-212-4504, 212-1258
DOG 3 year old female
Havanese, brown/white,
very sweet, house bro-
ken, all shots. $300.
call 382-9981
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Thurs. July 26th, 7PM
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039






O




DOG
TAS Is a 3 year old,
male red/black
hound mix,
weighs about 571bs
He is a good, obedi-
ent dog who gets
along fine with cats
and small dogs.
Does'nt like big dogs.
Love people and is
very affectionate.
In desperate need
of a Home.
Please Call Joanne
At (352) 795-1288
ENGLISH BULL DOGS
PUPS 10 weeks Old
3 males, 2 females
BEAUTIFUL, AKC,
Health certs & shots,
$1,200 (352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPS
AKC,champ,bloodlines
,8wks ,hlth cert.shots,
wormed,family
raised,1800&
up.352-503-7803,cell
2121808
hm352-503-7803,cell
212-1808
Female Yorkie-Poo
20 wks, 4 lbs,
initial shots, cage, etc.
$350.
(352) 746-7815
Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 1 la-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com
Miniature Schnauzers
2 Males,
1 black & silver
1 salt & Pepper
$600 ea.
(352) 419-4517


MORREY
1-year-old female
shepherd/hound mix,
Very affectionate
and friendly, loves to
play. Would be great
with children.
Gets along with other
dogs. Urgently needs
a home. Joanne
352-795-1288.



RATS
Wholesale, farm raised
rats/mice, all sizes, de-
livery available.
(352) 445-3681



BARN MASTERS
We Build, Horse Stalls
Barns, Fences, Pastures.
(352) 257-5677

Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


BOAT DOCK RENT
Deep water canal off
Crystal River, Wood-
lands Est. 352-795-4925
BOBS WATERTOY'S
Rent Jet Skis w/trlr.
Kayaks/Canoes com-
ing soon! Inv 341-4949
CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(@Hotmail.com
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Tandem Boat Trailer
22 ft., galv. $1275.
Single axle Boat trlr
22 ft. $880. obo
352-794-3603
813-244-3945
WANTED
Used Trailer for
27ft. Cabin Cruiser
352-794-3603 or
813-244-3945 cell.



1994 ALLEGRO BAY
32ft MH. 47K miles,,
generator, 2 AC's, 2
new batteries, Qn BR
sleeps 5, TV, excel.
cond. Can be seen at
Dan's Clam Stand
Hwy 44 Crystal River,
Ask for Dan $8,500 obo
(352) 302-8561
Club Car
2007 EXC. COND.
$2500 neg. Blue
w/all-terr. tires 4 pas-
senger w/ grab bar
(352) 795-1887
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR& MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd like new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825
SUNNYBROOK
'02, 26ft, Very good
cond., alumn. frame
work, new tires, $8,250.
obo, May finance part
352-726-9369



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


4V-


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
v mnodel Carll A. I


98" Chevy
Needs work but driva-
ble, good condition
$800 OBO
(352) 897-4253
BUICK 97
LaSaber, clean, light
beige, low miles, 79K
$3,250
352 527-3509/270-4928
CHEVROLET
2002 Camaro 35th Anni-
versary Z28 Convertible
White w/Tan leather Inte-
nor and top. Automatic,
tinted windows, 45K mi-
les. All power options,
18" Ruff Racing Wheels,
however, price negotiable
if buyer would like original
16" wheels with new tires.
Definitely destined to be
a collector.$12,500 OBO
352-212-8155
CHEVY
2005 Colorado, auto,
ac. 4cyl. 27mpg. ready
to work, 97K m $6.950.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2006 Corvette, auto,
coupe, ready to run!,
black on black, only
29K mi $27,850
352-341-0018
DODGE
'89, Colt, Mitsubishi
engine, 11OK mi.,
5 spd. runs great $1,300
(352) 563-0166
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
Honda
2006 Accord Hybrid
The power when you
need it, the ecomony
when you don't. Low Mil-
age and clean stock
#H7412 now only
$10,995
628-4600
HYUNDAI ELANTRA
2003, white
51,402k miles
exc cond. $5350.
352-344-4882
LINCOLN
'00, Towncar, signature
series, w/ all opt., white
tan leather uphol.
$4,999. (352) 527-3151
LINCOLN
2005, Towncar
42K miles,
$9,000 OBO
(352) 746-9649
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 72,000 mi. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$4,800 (352) 860-1106,
Pontiac Fiero
'88, Red, needs motor
$750. 586-0084
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments t
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440


'65 GTO
BI, 454, mint cond.,
$24K OBO. 302-8265
'66 Nova
Custom,327, mint,
$28K OBO
(352) 302-8265
CHEVROLET
'77, Corvette, numbers
matching, 350, 4 spd.,
restored, excel cond.
many trophies, many
receipts, same owner
last 17 yrs. asking
$16,500 352- 560-7377
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
FORD
1931, Model A, restored
in Arizona, 5 window
deluxe coupe, rumble
seat, leather seats
23,195 miles $17,500.
(352) 628-1734






Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


1930, Model A, Sport
Coupe, runs well, great
cond., storage cover,
$15,000 (352) 465-9186
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883



CHEVY
'05, Silverado, ext. cab,
12,000 miles, work trucd
pkg. excel. cond.
$13, 300 (352) 465-0812
352-322-5555
CHEVY
2003 Silverado, clean-
est in the county, auto,
V8, fiberglass topper,
$9875. 352-341-0018
CHEVY
2006 silverado 3500,
dually, diesel, 4x4, auto,
ext cab, only 82K miles,
$25,875. (352) 341-0018
FORD
'05, Sports Trac, Explorer
shortbed 6 cyl. 4 dr
excel. cond., 83K mi.
1 owner, tonneau cvr,
$7,900 (352)613-4958
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $22,900 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798








TOYOTA TOCOMA
'07, $8,995, Incld. warr.
Fin. avail. bad credit ok
352-322-1299 the
lastfrontierautos.com
TOYOTA TUNDRA
2010 CREWMAX SR5,
5.7 V8 engine, sunroof,
towing pck, 6sp trans
$26000352-586-8784
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440



Honda
2009 FIT WITH AUTO-
MATIC AND A/C AND
WARRANTY UP TO
100,000 MILES STOCK
#PH7403 REDUCED TO
$12989
628-4600
Honda
2009CR-V EXL THE
MOST POPULAR
SMALL SIZE SUV IN
AMERICAAND RE-
DUCED TO SELL.
HONDA CERTIFIED
MEANS WARRANTY
UNTIL 2016 OR 100,000
MILES STOCK #H7359
AND ONLY $17995
628-4600
Mitsubushi
2011 GALANT FE LIKE
NEW AND ONLY 15,000
ONE OWNER MILES
WITH ALL THE LUXURY
EQUIPMENT, NOT
$20,000, NOT $18,000
NOW ONLY $15888
628-4600
PONTIAC
2005 Montana, SV6,
4dr ext, in great condi-
tion, red, seats 7 $6,950.
352-341-0018
Suzuki
2007 XL-7 SUV
Lots of room for the kids
and the toys and priced
to move stock #H7400
now only $8995
628-4600


CHEVY
2000 TRACKER 4X4
AUTO AIR H-TOP
SET-UP FOR FLAT
TOWING EXTRAS
352-527-4319
JEEP
'07, Grand Cherokee
4 wheel drive
68k Miles
Call (352) 503-7217



HONDA ATV 04
TRX-400-FGA-Rancher
2 or 4 wd, auto or shift
New Tires, Good Cond.
$2400 (352) 726-8005



CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1.700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley '02
Road King, black, lots
of chrome & extra's
gar.kept $9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810


All the lifestyle advantages of a unique Florida location and
all the career satisfaction of a key role-you'll find both at
Munroe Regional Medical Center. A leader in cutting-edge
medical care and designated a Top 50 Hospital for 6 years in
a row (2007-2012) by HealthGrades, we currently seek:


Registered Nurses

All Areas All Shifts
Must Possess Current FL RN Licensure

We offer a very competitive salary and comprehensive benefits.

Apply online at:
www.MunroeRegional.com






Medical Center


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CRYSTAL



AUTOMOTIVE










































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RE T iO IT
EXPERIENCED T TECHNICIANS


SALE S PROFESSIONALS
PLAN^^^^fTAT^^r^iThION^^^^^^




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I .r. I


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 D7


B


zd









D8 SUNDAY,JULY 15, 2012


Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722



HD ROAD GLIDE
Fire Red Pearl,
Customized,Low mi.$30K
invested, Sell for
$11,500,For details call
352-527-0074


Misc. Not


HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
HONDA 2007
750 Shadow. WS, pipes,
SB, Rack, C bars, extra
clean 8200 mi., $3,850
(352) 860-1106, Bob


Misc Noti


SUNL SCOOTER 07
150 cc, red, looks &
runs great, rejet carb,
$295. UNtitlable, Grt for
farm, long drway, priv
rds. 637-6046



SUZUKI
2006 Boulevard C50T
15k mi. EXCELLENT
CONDITION! Custom op-
tions. $4250. 527-1239


MiscNoice


378-0715 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Ammons, Eubanks
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Michael D. Ammons Ricky Eubanks
5885 W. Keremar Ct. 5267 W. State St.
Homosassa, FL 34448 Homosassa, FL 34446
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Superviso r and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


377-0715 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
PN 12- 04
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING
ON JULY 25, 2012, at 9:00 A.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING, ROOM 166,
3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.
The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the proposed new Planning and Develop-
ment Fee Schedule for unincorporated Citrus County, and any other business which
may be brought before the Board.
The title of the Resolution is as follows:
RESOLUTION NO. 2012 -
A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING AND ESTABLISHING A
FEE SCHEDULE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT; ESTABLISH-
ING A TABLE OF CONTENTS; INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE BUILDING DIVISION, EX-
HIBIT "A"; INCORPORATING FEES FOR THE CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION, EXHIBIT "B"; IN-
CORPORATING FEES FOR THE LAND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, EXHIBIT "C"; INCORPO-
RATING FEES FOR THE GEOGRAPHIC RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY PLANNING DIVI-
SION, EXHIBIT "D"; INCORPORATING PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATIVE
FEES, EXHIBIT "E"; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
THE PROPOSED FEE SCHEDULE MAY BE REVIEWED IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING
AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 3600 WEST SOVEREIGN PATH, LECANTO,
FL BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8:00 AM AND 5:00 PM, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY.

ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CODE REVIEW AND
APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC MEET-
ING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560
AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IM-
PAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING
(352-527-5310).

GASTON HALL, CHAIRMAN
CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD
OF CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY:
COUNTY ATTORNEY
JULY 15, 2012


384-0715 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will hold a public hearing on the 14th day of August, 2012, at 1:45
pm in the Commission Chambers, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida 34450, to consider adopting a Resolution approving PV-12-01
for R&R Construction, Inc. on behalf of Chris Wieland to determine the advisability of
vacating, abandoning, discontinuing and closing a portion of the drainage and util-
ity easements lying on Lots 23 and 24, Block 64, Pine Ridge Unit 3, as recorded in Plat
Book 8, Pages 51 through 67, public records of Citrus County, Florida, as described in
the attached Exhibit "A", renouncing and disclaiming any right of Citrus County and
the public in and to any land described in the attached Exhibit "A".
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida
EXHIBIT A

THE 10-FOOT DRAINAGE AND UTILITY EASEMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LOT
23, BLOCK 64, PINE RIDGE UNIT 3, AND THE 10-FOOT DRAINAGE AND UTILITY EASEMENT
LYING ON THE NORTHEAST SIDE OF LOT 24, BLOCK 64, PINE RIDGE UNIT 3, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 51 THROUGH 67, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
ALL LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTHWESTERLY 20 FEET LYING ADJACENT TO AND ABUTT-
ING THE RIGHT-OF-WAY KNOWN AS WEST VILLANOVA COURT
Publish one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


346-0715 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on
Wednesday, July 18, 2012 @ 9:00AM in the Lecanto Government Building, Multi pur-
pose Room 166, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons
interested are invited to attend. The
following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Special Master; however
cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you
have questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Axtell, John A.
6464 N Cherrytree Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junkdebris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed
buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and
which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recy-
clable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling
such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard,
garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of
vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property,
pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To
Wit: Car tires, broken lawnequipment, metal, plastic debris, household items, and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Axtell, John A. & Axtell, Michael Jay
6580 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; ex-
cept for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfuly established and maintahed junk yrd, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary
landfill; and exceptfor accumulndations of vegetative waste on agricutlual
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car tires, bed mattresses, household furniture,
old boat hull, metal, plastic, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Axtell, John A. & Axtell, Michael Jay
6580 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One (1) four door car parked in the front of the residence with no visible tag
or decal and appears inoperable.
Barnes, Stephen & Mary Ann

6498 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Beach, Tami H.
4962 N Windy Gap Pt, Crystal River, FI 34428
Violation of the Citrus County Land Development Code Section 2020; Construction
without a valid Development Order. To Wit: Porch roof built over existing deck at
the front of the home.

Beamesderfer, Dawson E. & Sandra
1509 N Florida Ave, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, lawn mower parts, bicycle parts, plastic
containers, toilet, television and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Carithers, Bernadette P. & Wilder, Joseph


10909 W Grybek Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448 Violation of the Land Development Code
Section 4420A; Accessory uses are not permitted on lots that do not contain a princi-
pal structure.

Carithers, Bernadette P. & Wilder, Joseph
10909 W Grybek Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Clothing, old stairs,furniture, mattresses, lumber
and misc. junk.
Crisp, Donald & Vianna
8168 W Ferwerda Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; ex-
cept for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recydable mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car fires, tree debris, broken car parts, broken
lawn equipment, household items outside, metal, wooden, plastic debris, and other
miscellaneous trash and debris.
Crisp, Donald & Vianna
8168 W Ferwerda Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain the neces-
sary and appropriate Development Orders for an open metal roofed carport, an
8x12 pre fab shed and a smaller 3 sided shed in poor condition being used for stor-
age.
Foster, Roscoe G. & Paula S.
6029 S Lima Ave, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Three (3) boats; all white in color, all different sizes and shapes located all
around the property.

Goodman, Gary & Maria
11061 W Concord Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain the appro-
priate and necessaryDevelopment Orders for 9x10 garage to living area conversion
(expired permit #201009221).
Hufford, Robert W. & Carolyn J.

5289 N Summerwind Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Multiple boats, trailers, and school bus.
Hufford, Robert W. & Carolyn J.
5289 N Summerwind Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provded for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Broken boat hulls, carpet remnants, large
amounts of tree debris, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash.
Konitzer, Ruby L.

6327 W Cherrywood St, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provded for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, sinks, toilets, large num-
bers of tires and miscellaneous junk.
Lange, William C.
5671 S Suelynn Pt, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk,debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provded for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, household items, and large
amounts of debris from the demolition of the mobile home.
Leland U. Livengood Family Trust
7355 S Rudolph Pt, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain a Develop-
ment Order for the installation of doors in one (1) mobile home and setting up a sec-
ond mobile home on the property.

Leland U. Livengood Family Trust
7355 S Rudolph Pt, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One (1) travel trailer, one (1) boat trailer, one (1) utility trailer, four (4) boats
with trailers and three (3) boat hulls.

Leland U. Livengood Family Trust
7355 S Rudolph Pt, Homosassa, Fl 34446 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of
any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish
and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or com-
pletely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter
receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal;
except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such ma-
terials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, gar-
bage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of
vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III,
Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household
garbage,tires, car parts, plastic containers, furniture, and miscellaneous junk.
Linda S. Peebles & Katherines Bay Inc.
10565 W Halls River Rd, Homosassa, Fl 34448 Failure to connect to an available sew-
age treatment utility within a specified period of time after receiving written notifica-
tion of the utility's availability, pursuant to Section 42 163 of the Citrus County Code
of Ordinances.
Manko Co. / Camp R.A., Kevin B.
86 W Withlacoochee Trl, Dunnellon, Fl 34434 Failed driveway apron inspection: Citrus
County Land Development Code Section 4221(J) "(Driveway) aprons shall be con-
structed pursuant to the standards of Appendix A. Section 6 of Appendix A: "any
damage to the County right of way as a result of apron constructions shall be
re-
paired in conjunction with the permit, prior to final release." This includes restoration
of sod and other vegetation to pre construction condition.

Meehan, Maurice & Lisa
9322 E Beech Cir, Inverness, Fl 34450 It shall be a violation of this article for any per-
son, firm or corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unli-
censed, inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehi-
cles on any property, street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the
Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tan Chrysler van (expired tag), green
pickup truck (no tag), pontoon boat (no registration).
Miller, Cricket L.
1257 E Cermak St, Hernando, FI 34442. It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of
any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish
and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or com-
pletely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter
receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and
removal;
except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such ma-
terials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, gar-
bage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumula-
tions of
vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III,
Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household gar-
bage, tree debris, appliances, old fire hoses, and other miscellaneous trash and
debris.
Murphy, Diane
4241 E Scott Ln, Dunnellon, FI 34434 Violation of the Land Development Code Sec-
tion 2020; Failure to obtain the appropriate and necessary permits for a single wide
mobile home.Natteal ET AL, Elizabeth AUTN: Della L Rice 8280 W Balloon Ln, Crystal
River, Fl 34428 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit,
cause or have thereon any accumulation of junkdebris, rubbish and vegetative
matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed
buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and
which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except
for recy-
clable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except
junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste dis-
posal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste
on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20
31(a)
of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Miscellaneous debris,
including but not limited to, chairs, tables, barbeque set, basketball pole, sofa, and
area of debris on right side of property.
Natteal ET AL, Elizabeth ATTN: Della L. Rice


8280 W Balloon Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34428 Violation of the Land Development Code
Section 4420A; Accessory uses are not permitted on lots that do not contain a princi-
pal structure.
Neff Knight Holcomb, Evelyn W.
4935 N Dewey Way, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be a violation of this article for any
person, firm or corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unli-
censed, inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehi-
cles on any property, street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the
Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Yellow Chevrolet box truck and a boat
and trailer.
Neff Knight Holcomb, Evelyn W.
4935 N Dewey Way, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except


for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; ex-
cept for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable
mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of rubble from the demolition,
2 refrigerators, gas cans, furniture, plastic buckets and miscellaneous junk.
Northcut, Rupert
1138 S Elmwood Dr, Inverness, Fl 34450Violation of Land Development Code Section
2020; Failure to obtain a Development Order for the construction of a carport.
Rauch, Douglas W. & Della E.
8947 W Basilico St, Crystal River, Fl 34428 Violation of the Land Development Code
Section 2020; Construction of an accessory structure without a valid Development
Order. To Wit: expired permit #200906711 for a 8 x 14.5 well house with electric.

Roberts, Michael A.
2670 N Lakefront Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be a violation of this article for any
person, firm or corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unli-
censed, inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehi-
cles on any property, street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the
Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Multiple cars, trucks, motor home and
motorcycles.
Stout, Matthew L. & Angela Marie
6589 N Sourgum Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Taromino Jr., Samuel R. & Buset, Margaret J.
4212 N Carl G Rose Hwy, Hernando, Fl 34442 Violation of the Land Development
Code Section 4631; Storage of vehicles is not allowed unless they are being
repaired.
Torres, Hector
7533 W Turkeyneck Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448 It shall be unlawful for the owner or ten-
ant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris,
rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles
or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard
sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and
removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling
such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard,
garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of
vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property,pursuant to Article III,
Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Many bags of
household trash and miscellaneous junk and debris.
Torres, Hector
7533 W Turkeyneck Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448 Violation of the Land Development
Code Section 2030(C)(1)(c); Temporary use or occupancy of a recreational
vehicles on improved property for a period not to exceed two weeks in any 12
month period.
Wainwright, Joseph C. & Pamela M.
3580 S Oakdale Ter, Inverness, Fl 34452 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leas-
ing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this arti-
cle to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accu-
mulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances.
Yates, James & Patty *REPEAT VIOLATION"
6588 W Gannet PI, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; ex-
cept for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable
mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage, car
parts, mattresses, broken motorcycle frames, metal and plastic debris and other
miscellaneous trash and debris.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code
Compli-
ance Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone: (352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.



MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


380-0715 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 119104
Description of property: AK: 1052106 and legally described as W1/2 OF SW1/4 OF
SW1/4 OF NW1/4 LESS 1/2 AC SQ IN NW COR DESC IN OR BK 252 PG 27 & W 30 FT OF
N 295 FT OF SW1/4 FU RATHER DESC IN OR BK578 PG 973, OR BK 596 PG 100, OR BK 7 52
PG 1059, OR BK 756 PG 2160 LESS: OR BK 576 PG 498(2), OR BK 578 PG 974(3)OR BK
2145 PG 1129
WILLIE J SMITH JR EST; CLAMFORD WOODLEY;
ROOSEVELT WOODLEY & FANNIE LEE
4545 N LENETHE PT

CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
On February 29, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Of-
ficial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 4545 N. Lenethe Pt.;
Crystal River, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code
Compliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


381-0715 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 117762
Description of property: AK: 1150876 and legally described as TOWN OF HOMOSASSA
PB 1 PG 6 LOTS 10 & 11 BLK 111 DESC IN OR BK 767 PG 1335
SHANNON C KELLY
10429 W BROCADE ST
HOMOSASSA, FL

On January 10,2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 10429 W. Brocade St.;
Homosassa, FL If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.

Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


382-0715 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 118831
Description of property: AK: 1522145 and legally described as TRACT 19-E $1/2 OF
SW1/4 OF NE1/4 OF SW1/4 SEC 12-20-18 EXC E &W 31.5 FT FOR RD R/W DESC IN OR
BK 1319 PG 591 & OR BK 1720 PG 850 OR BK 2269 PG 718

GRADY A LAMBERT & KEVIN GRADY LAMBERT
7226 S RHODER PT
LECANTO, FL
On February 20, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Of-
ficial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 7226 S. Rhoder Pt.;
Lecanto, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compli-
ance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) lime in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


383-0715 SUNCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH


CASE NUMBER: 120444
Description of property: AK: 1118441 and legally described as CRYSTAL ACRES 1ST
ADD PB2PG 153LOT5 EXCW 186 FTBLK30 DESC IN OR BK761 PG 1962

JOAN M DEITZ
1182 S CANDLENUT AVE
HOMOSASSA, FL
On April 13, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Official
to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 1182 S. Candlenut Ave.;
Homosassa, FL If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.

Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle July 15, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Metn


m


m


u


m


m


Metn


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL UNE:

800-440-9054


CRYSTAL


J.eep
TENT EVENT BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA INVERNESS


1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613 2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL 34453
^INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC *PRICE EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND
INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY WAC. +$50 GIFT CARD REQUIRES A CRYSTAL 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL, LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
O00BXAX


D10 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012






H Section E SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE
fl ma Ia -mw im iinge a a mwn ina atn iumm


j fl,'It


fl Sikorski's
SAttic GE E4
mVPAGEE4


'MU


*~~~~~~1


- ,


V


.f 4


The Purple Top
White Globe may
be old. but it's
still "tops" with
turnip growers.


- S


Fri









E2 SUNDA'I~ JULY 15, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


LU;AIIUN, LU;AIIUN, LU;AIIUrl 504 PALMA CEIA PT. CITHUI HILL PUUOOL HUMEI! 1iGZ b. ULtNtAULt ItKiliAt
* Quiet Dead End St. On the Horse Trail LANDINGS AT INVERNESS Great opportunity to own a nice 3/2/2 home LECANTO
* Relaxing Master Hurricane Shutters 2BD/2BN20G+Dok 1,524 SF Living Area in Fairview Estates. Heated caged in-ground Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* FPin GR/Lots of Tile Lg. Scrn. LanaiPool Ready Kitchen and Baths Wood & Tile Flo pool' Top-notch area with PUBLIC WATER. Florida Room Screened Lanai Area
Flo* Well for Irrigation *4/3/3 Car Garage prida Roomen anors ide-entry garage. Landscaped one acre lot. 22x14 Detached Garage/Workshop
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 Needs little to move right in! Fenced Backyard Vacant Lot Included
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL jENNIFER STOLTI(352) 037-0200 A
(352) 527-7842 Email: Info@CitrusCountyHomes.co LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
E-MAIL: elliesutton remax.net (352) 422-3875 www.CitrusCountyHomes.com Email: enplmer@remax.nelt


Enter hOuse#3674-






UPGRADES GALORE 3674 N. LAURELWOOD LOOP SUPER HICE BRENTWOOD 3/3/2 ON
* Granite/Wood in Kit. *Plantation Shutters!! LAKESIDE VILLAGE iA PRIVATE CORNER LOT. All prettied up
* Large Master Bath Pergo Wood Floors 2BD/2BA/1CG Community pool td mve-n rea Split plan; great cooks
* Nice Lanai/Patio Area 3/2/2 Car Gar. Cozy over 55 villa All appliances l kitchen w/breakfast bar. Living and dining
CS has 2 Golf Courses A Must See!! y Fe e paco s at l I rooms have sliders to large screened-in lanai;
KELL GODDARD 352-476-853 Maintenance Free Spacious atio inside laundry, large side-entry garage.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL Priced right to sell.
r352) 527-7842 63 -2 2 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
www.FlouidaLislinglnlo.com (352) 422-3875 Emai cnadal@remax.net
H imWWWW1'll'9WAE R 1i
2) ,637 VACANT
If PROPERTY

6372 2 CRYSTAL RIVER
S663 Acres platted for 75 half acre
executive gated community homesites
Nic B K i WATEFRONT building lot, direct Gulf access
ENJOY THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE PINE RIDGE
* 2/2/2 Split Plan *Lg. Lanai w/Hot Tub PIN E AD A, ae O fr )
*Master Bath ilse T le n OH oor 2.75 AC S42,900 (Make Offer)
Nice Bright Kitchen Enclosed FL Rm. 1 Acre $17,000
*Modest Fees *Rec. Hall/Comm. PoolSV is t INVERNESS
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 Sales Volum e p uq 3 Lots at $7,000 EACH (2 Side-by-Side)
FiTN35i2'L 'l- il7l i Y iear-to-Dote I CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
www.FloIidalislinglnlo.com Email: cnadal@remax.net

Se #37 j-a. 37-28 a






3747 S. MISSOURI, HOMOSASSA CRYSTAL MANOR!! 8960 N. ATHENS DR., CITRUS SPRINGS 9 BONNIE CT. S
1946 FL Cracker House & Morel Stop your search here Need a large Citrus
Meiculous dates Custom built 3 bedroom with den 2 bath, Spngs home that is price ed well and NOT a short Come one, come all. Open House in
3 Bedrooms 1 Full Bath w/Dual Sinks & Shower Heads 2-car garage block home, located on over sale9? This one is for youl Large, possible Sugarmill Woods. Phenomenal 3 BR,
Plumbed for Additonal 1/2 Bath 2 acres, avd road, split plan, great 4 bedroom, 2-story home in peaceful Citrus BTi hWom that has 3Ben
inside Lad acres, paved road, split plan, great Springs ready for new owner today Interior 2 BTH home that has been
Larie Open eck Off Dining Area room, SS appliances, large screen porch, features large functional kitchen, family room, living meticulously maintained!! Too much to
Ad tonal Private Shower Off Screened Porch 3 sheds, front porch. room formal dining and huge loft area Large list...see it for yourself!!!
CHRIS GRANT (352) 238-3516 fei ed backyard for boat or RV parking .. see i or yourself!!!
REAL ESTATE WISHES GRANTED DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
chris@chrisgratswishes.com www.ChrisGrtWishes.com Email: dimfl@yahoo.com R Email: davidsivory@holmail.com Email: garyallman@remax.net


* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot
* Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 .
Email: cheryllamberi@remax.net


242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
8375 S. Iucos Bld. Honssa6870 w.*ueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


L---^ *^jiTr


OWNERS WANT OFFERS!
Dont miss this gorgeous home Call me for your private showing Pricedtosell
ustom Built 4/3/2 2,932 Sq Ft L/A
Custom Built-Ins in Living Room Tiled Thru-Out All Traffic Areas
Plush arpet in Bedroom, Office, Great Room & Dining
Master Suite wfWalk-lns, Jetted Tub, Double Sinks
Gourmet Kitchen w/Morning Room :
Outside Summer Kitchen
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Signs a tree might


be in trouble


he hiring
of a pro-
fessional
arborist to care ,
for the trees on
your property is
a very important
decision.
Consult a tree
care profes-
sional; ask the Kerry
arborist to eval- Tm
uate the prob- ARB
lems. He will ARE(
evaluate the sit-
uation and prioritize treat-
ment or solutions.
You should also ask the
arborist to look for signs of
potential hazards.


HI
O


Here are
often warning
signs that a
homeowner or
business owner
should look for:
U Wires in
contact with tree
branches. Trees
may become en-
reider ergized if con-
E tacted by
RIST electric wires.
REIST U Dead or
partially at-
tached limbs hung up in
the higher branches that
could fall and cause

See ARBORIST/Page E9


McNeil signs with
Top Performance


Top Per-
formance
Real Estate
Consultants
are proud to
welcome C.J.
McNeil to the
company.
C.J. runs her
real estate
business with
a strong work
ethic and cus-


C.J. McNeil
Top
Performance
Real Estate.


tomer service motto. Call her at
352-697-0398
Garcia going strong
for 2012
EXIT Realty Leaders wishes
to congratulate Lili Garcia for
closing more than


$1 million in
2012.
Lili is com-
mitted to pro- i
viding beyond .
excellent
service in all
your real
estate needs. Lili Garcia
Lili can be EXIT Realty
reached at Leaders.
352-527-
1112, or you can visit her web-
site at www.exitrealty
leaders.com.
Ruiz hits
new milestone
Coldwell Banker Investors
Realty is pleased to announce
that Realtor Cinda Ruiz re-
cently topped the $1 million
mark for closed sales volume
for 2012.


She is a dedicated, hard
working agent who is consis-
tently among the top agents in
the office. Cinda can be
reached at the office at 352-
726-9533 or directly on her cell
phone at 352-634-3897.
RE/MAX agents
continue to soar
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Re-
alty One are
proud to rec-
ognize two i '
more associ-
ates who
have qualified
for the 2012 .
Million Dollar Leo Smith
Club. Leo Smith
Leo Smith RE/MAX
and Cheryl Realty One.
Lambert have both closed


more than $1 .
million in
sales volume
this year,
which places
them in this
elite club.
Leo is an
agent in the Cheryl
Crystal River Lambert
office of RE/MAX
RE/MAX lo- Realty One.
cated on
Highway 19. Cheryl works in
the Inverness office, located
downtown on Main Street.
All of the RE/MAX associates
congratulate these two on their
accomplishment.

* Email newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com,
attn: HomeFront.


Terra Vsta
REALTY GROUP
2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL 34442
352-746-6121 1-800-323-7703
www.TerraVistaRealtyGroup.com


DETACHED VILLA 3BD 2 BATH 2 CAR
This attractive 3/2/2 maintenance-free villa sits directly on the golf
course on a beautifully landscaped lot Lots oftile, eat-in kitchen, formal
dining room, blinds through-out and much more Sit, relax and enjoy the
MLS 356273 ....................................... $293,000


Arentwood
REALTY
1624 W. Caroline Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0210






SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3BR 2 BATH 2 CAR BRENTWOOD

fiLS 355615 .................................. $160,000


DETACHED VILLA 2 Bed, 2 Bath, Den, 2 Car, BRENTWOOD
An immaculate former Builder's Showcase Home built in 2009
Golf Course Start living the Citrus Hills Lifestyle ASAP
M LS 355720 ............................................... $209,900


T-.ra Vis &efBo..R. tals
Terms3HB -B rship inew


ILUAUIIUUK IUWNII1UM7 "
Partially furnished, 3Bd, 25 baths, eat-in
enjoy the view of the pond surrounded by
#1226


IN BRENTWOOD. SPACIOUS LIVING, GREAT LOCATION 3 bedroom 25 bath
kitchen Sit on the lanai and unfurnished end unit in Brentwood Townhomes Enjoy the amenities of Terra
large Southern Oaks
$1 10 10 11.9 $1 t oo


4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1 Office: 352-746-3600
PINE RIDGE
POOL
In-law suite,
on golf course, 4 bed,
3 bath, 3 car gar.
Loaded!
- -. MLS #355285
$349,900

,F J


U -


Real Estate DIGEST


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .... I
#1226


S .... -5---


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information.................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci fikNcI EJ


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Food shopping on a budget


W hen someone has trouble Plan your menus for the week and
staying within their budget, it create a list to buy the foods that you
is usually flexible will need. You can also use
expenses that cause the h http ://recipefinder.
problem, not fixed nal.usda.gov to find low-
expenses. cost, nutritious,
Flexible expenses vary in and delicious Bel
amount from month to recipes in both B
month, and some examples English and shop
include food, clothing, and Spanish. Plan to
personal items. shop less often, ail
Many people believe that so that you will
it costs more money to eat be less likely to make
healthy foods. There is help Monica Payne go over your and
available to stretch food CONSUMER food budget.
dollars by budgeting, food CONSUMER The following to
selection, and low-cost SCIENCE tips will help
recipes. Some may find that you save at the
they can save money for healthy foods grocery store:
by not purchasing as much candy, U Before shopping, always make a
chips, soda, and other high-calorie, list and stick to it.
low-nutrient foods. U Plan your meals and plan new
The most important way to save dishes for any leftovers.
money at the grocery store is to have a U Look for coupons, sales, and use
written food budget. You should know rewards cards for your favorite store.
how much you are planning to spend U Never shop when you are hungry
on food for the month. Make a grocery U Store brands usually cost less, so
list based on how much you will spend try them.
at the store on each trip. By knowing m Compare the unit prices ofthe same
what foods you already have on hand products. They are listed on the shelf
at home, you can plan meals using below the product This makes it easier
these ingredients. to compare products of different sizes.


f




E


Always check sell-by dates. Buy
the freshest food possible, as it will
last longer.
Store food properly right away to
preserve freshness.
Use foods with the ear-
ore list expiration dates first.
Freeze food that won't
ping, be eaten right away to pre-
vent spoiling.
ays Call Monica Payne at the
Extension office at 352-527-
a list 5713. Citrus County Exten-
stick sion links the public with
the University of
it. Florida/IFAS' knowledge,
research, and resources to
address youth, family, com-
munity, and agricultural needs. All pro-
grams and related activities sponsored
for, or assisted by, the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences are open to
all persons with non-discrimination
with respect to race, creed, color, reli-
gion, age, disability, sex, sexual orien-
tation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions, or affiliations.

Monica Payne is the family and con-
sumer sciences agent for Citrus
County Extension.


'Nippon' items are collectible; a'Mutt and Jeff' drawing


Dear John: We have a hand-
painted Nippon vase that
has been in the family for
many years. It is in good
condition with no obvi-
ous marks or defects. It is
approximately 8 inches
high and 6 inches in di-
ameter at its widest
point. I am wondering if
you can give me an eval-
uation. L.H., Internet
Dear L.H.: You have a
good looking hand- John S
painted porcelain vase SIKOF
that was made in Japan.
The word Nippon was in Al
use by Japan from 1891
until 1921, when the word Nippon
was dropped and replaced with the
English word Japan.
Nippon has been a specific cate-
gory of collecting for decades. New
collectors should be aware of re-
productions that have flooded the
market; always ask for a written re-
ceipt stating your item was made
during the original period.


i

I


I think your Nippon vase was
produced prior to World War I. Po-
tential dollar value is $150 to $300.
Dear John: I read your
column in the Citrus
County Chronicle, and
have a chair I was given
about 40 years ago. The
person was going to trash
it. I am sending pictures.
S The label on the bot-
tom of the chair reads
"Piano Shop, B & S Com-
korski pany" There is a small
SKI'S storage area under the
seat. If there is any value,
IC I would like to know. I
may give it to my
youngest daughter, who is now 49.
- PB.M., Inverness
Dear PB.M.: The style of your
piano chair is Federal, circa 1800.
It was made in America in the 20th
century, likely before World War II.
There is no specific collector inter-
est. Potential dollar value is below
$50.
Dear John: I have a drawing in


ink, I believe, by H.C. Fisher. It is
dated 1916 and has the number 235
on it. It is a cartoon of Mutt and Jeff
on the railroad tracks trying to
jump the train to Chicago. The size
of the picture is 10 by 30 inches. -
D. W, Internet
Dear D.W: Harry Conway Fisher,
1885-1954, was a New York artist
whose specialty was illustration art.
Bud Fisher, as he was known, pro-
duced the first successful cartoon
strip, "Mutt & Jeff," in 1916. Current
potential dollar value is in the $500
range.

See ATTIC/Page E5
"Nippon" was the original name
used on Japanese exports
from 1891 to 1921. Authentic Nip-
pon products are a category of col-
lector interest, though collectors
should be wary of reproductions.
This apparently authentic hand-
painted Nippon vase might fetch
$150 to $300.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Install ceiling fans


for energy efficiency
4-it/ t


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle
Many people think that a
ceiling fan in a room circu-
lates air and cools the
room. Both of these per-
ceptions are incorrect. The
ceiling fan does not have
the physical or mechanical
capabilities to do either.
But a ceiling fan can give
the illusion of cooling and
providing air movement.
That illusion can help you
save money on your
monthly utility bill.
The reason we "feel"
cooler under a ceiling fan
is because of the design of
the human body to main-
tain temperature. When
the body begins to develop
heat or when we "feel"
warm, perspiration, or
moisture, begins to form on
our skin.
The air from the ceiling


fan, blowing down on us,
begins to evaporate the
moisture, or perspiration,
on our skin and through
that evaporation we begin
to "feel" cooler. When we
move away from where the
ceiling fan is located, there
is no air moving past our
bodies to evaporate the
moisture off our skin.
When that evaporation
stops, we no longer feel
cooler and the ceiling fan
is no longer cooling our
body
The ceiling fan cannot
cool a room because there
is no refrigeration equip-
ment associated with the
fan. However, with the bio-
physics of our body's cool-
ing system, with a ceiling
fan on, we can allow the air
conditioning system to let
the temperature in a room
See FANS/Page E9


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear John: Being an 88-year-old
sailor who is now a widower, I have re-
placed my wife's favorite painting
with some marine paintings. My prob-
lem is that I want to sell the replaced
painting, but I do not know what to ask
for it. Let me describe it for you.
It is an acrylic on canvas, 4 feet by 5
feet, with a metal and wood frame, and
was purchased in Arizona 15 to 20
years ago.
The closest I can describe it is pos-
sibly an Arizona sunset with a variety
of horizontal colors, and it is signed by
"Jaspero," if that has any significance.
The condition of the painting and
frame is excellent.
Any information you could share
with me would be greatly appreciated,
and if you have none, perhaps you
could point me in the right direction
in my pricing endeavors. D.H.R.,
Beverly Hills
Dear D.H.R: I would be glad to help
with an opinion of market interest in


your painting. In order to do that I
need a couple of good, clear photo-
graphs. Make sure to open the back of
the painting, if necessary, and look for
notations about the artist. Then I will
finish the story

John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic,
c/o The Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or
asksikorski@aol. com.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
Fora FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6.7 million already closed by June 29, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
B To Learn More
(352) 746-9924 PT-s.a.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms avail-
able for wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth announce-
ments and first birthdays.


Sasser Oaks, Green Acres, 3 bdrm,
2 1/2 bath 1.2 acres. Garage with sm.
shop, xtra work shed, covered RV park-
ing. Very clean, ready to move in, fire-
place, bonus room, recently painted as
well. Call Wayne 352-422-0751.
MLS 356314


Ih p tUPV I I I 1 ph, I IA &f



4 5 ^ 746-9000
Amianda i& Kirk Jol Tom Balfour Ul Avenus & Hal Stner Art Paty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROiER/ASSOCR.PEAL 1 REALTOR EATOR- BROKE REALTOR






E9005 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 10953 N. TARTAN TERRY. 2372 W SNOWY EGRET PL. 4275 N. MODELWOOD DR.
$359,5 $154,900 4/2/2 $104,900189,900 3/2.5/2 356464 $149,900




656 ON 7768 N SARAZEN 4889 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 745 E. SAVOY 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR.
355155354564$144,900 3/2/2 35438 $149,900 4/2/2 350502 $128,900 3/2/2 356292 $159,900 2/2 354530 $128,000




ANBLVD. W. DEACON 521 N HARRISON 1945 W. OLIVER 3 CLIFFORD 10923 N. AIRWAY LP.






3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
l ~ 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
IENl (352) 634-2371 Cell
*E 1KA bob@bjdavis.com
For a VisualTour of our listings and all MLS:bidavis.co
A :F, I I 27 *11 77


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 E5













The tasty, terrific turnip


Vegetable holds

its own against

glamorous cousins

LAWRENCE
DAVIS-HOLLANDER
GRIT magazine
For millennia, the turnip was
one of the most popular veg-
etables out there, and for
good reason. While potatoes have
more or less cornered the market
in the last hundred years, the de-
lightful turnip's versatility, hardi-
ness and nutritional value are
worthy of consideration.
Turnips are a member of the
Brassicaceae family, a fairly
large group populated by many
well-known edible plants includ-
ing mustard, cabbage, kale, broc-
coli, Chinese cabbage, Brussels
sprouts, rutabaga, radish and
canola (rapeseed) in addition to
flowers such as alyssum, stocks
and wallflowers.
In addition to being cultivated
as vegetables, specialty turnips
are raised for animal fodder and
oil seed.
Turnips can form swollen,
rounded, somewhat flattened, or
long, cylindrical taproots, with
compound (indented) hairy
leaves. A true biennial, the
turnip requires a vernalization,
or cooling period, before produc-
ing blooms and seeds in its sec-
ond year. It's uncommon that
humans consume an entire plant,
but these are one of the few, with
both roots and greens finding
homes in dishes all over the
world.
Turnips originated in the
Mediterranean region and
spread to the Middle East and
western Asia, with European cul-
tivation predating the Middle
Ages. They still grow wild in
parts of eastern Europe and
western Russia. First described
by Theophrastus in 400 B.C. and
later by Pliny in 100 B.C., turnip
cultivation was well established
in Greek and Roman times and
likely predates these civiliza-
tions. Ancient writers indicate


-






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. i -J -l
". 1 .' .,
-. .
- - -' Y.

-. - - *


BRIAN DUNNE/Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds
An early variety, the White Egg Turnip is extremely fast growing with a mild white flesh. It has a rich history and is great for the backyard grower
or in bunches for the market gardener.


that folks living in the country,
particularly the poor, often uti-
lized this vegetable.
Turnips were first cultivated in
Colonial America in 1622 and
were widely consumed through-
out the 18th century By 1750, the
new lands south of Boston rep-
utably grew the best turnips, and
this tradition carries on today
near Cape Cod in the cultivation
of the Eastham Turnip, which is
actually a white rutabaga.
Turnips are truly one of the
easiest vegetables to grow. If
planted in fertile, consistently
moist soil, they grow fairly rap-
idly, producing "baby" turnips in
five weeks or less and full-sized
turnips in two months. Soils sub-
ject to drying out will interrupt


growth and produce inferior
turnips.
Depending on your climate,
turnips can be direct-sown from
early spring to late summer, but
they grow most rapidly during
cool periods. In areas with hot
summers, they are best sown in
March or April. Fall-harvested
turnips should be seeded from
about mid-July to the end of
August.
Turnips can remain unpro-
tected before the ground freezes.
In milder climates, they can be
left in the ground during the win-
ter and, with additional protec-
tion, can sometimes over-winter
as far north as Zone 5. While sub-
ject to a wide range of diseases
and some insect predation,


turnips generally require very lit-
tle care. Don't want to take the
chance on them freezing or being
consumed by rodents? They store
well in a damp root cellar and
will keep in the refrigerator for
months.
Turnips are an excellent
source of nutrients including vi-
tamin C, as well as vitamin B6,
calcium and other minerals. The
greens are especially rich in
nutrients.
The slight bitterness associ-
ated with these plants comes
from glucosinolates, a naturally
occurring class of organic com-
pounds that can be toxic and are
associated with antithyroid activ-
ity in some individuals. Most peo-
ple would have to eat a vast


quantity of turnips to produce
any ill effects. These compounds
help prevent insect predation;
however, many insects have
evolved along with these plants
and have developed mechanisms
that render these chemicals non-
toxic to them.
One of the most recognized
heirloom varieties is the Purple
Top White Globe. It is rounded in
shape, with purple above, white
below and white flesh. Large
specimens can grow up to 6
inches in diameter. This plant
has remained fairly unchanged
since 1880, when it also was
known as Red Top White Globe
and considered an improvement

See TURN /Page E8


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE












Care and feeding of the Loblolly Bay tree


here are about 70
species in the Gordo-
nia genus. All but one
originated in Southeast
Asia. Closely related to
Camellias, native Loblolly
Bay, Gordonialassianthus is
an evergreen tree ranging
from south-central Florida
north to Virginia and west
to Louisiana in cold Zones 7
to 9.
Usually found in wet-
lands, roadside ditches and
where the water table is
high, Gordonia adapts to
gardens with amended soil.
It is useful as an understory
tree, a lawn specimen, and
as part of an evergreen
buffer screen.


In a garden,
Gordonia be-
comes a small
tree up to 30 feet
tall with a spread
of 15 feet. An an-
cient one in an
acidic bayhead
could reach to 60
feet by 20 to 30
foot in diameter Jane
The dark, lus-
trous leathery JAIN
leaves are oppo- GAR
site along the
twigs, 2 to 5 inches long,
with bluntly toothed edges
(margins). Individual leaves
last up to three years. Older
ones can turn reddish.
Leaves are shed and re-


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
S Realtor AA OUSE Realtor
302.3179 SoLD Nanr 287.9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
746-6700 .......
3540 N. WOODGATE DR.
THE GLEN
Cute as a button, move-in ready, 2/2/1,
Easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
interior paint, furniture is negotiable with
sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.
735 W. COLBERT CT.
BEVERLY HILLS
I'1-t pass up the Morrison built 3/2/2 with
-. interior paint, tile floors, new carpeting,




Great Location! Recently
updated
888-303-6405 Code 9416 for
more details.
MLS #355913 $64,900


[' ..- Spectacular 4 bedroom
home.
'l 888-303-6405 Code 9415
S.- for more details.
.A ,. MLS#354406 $132,777


W" O. .


i. S Elegant & lovingly
. '-,L.a- maintained home.
S" p 1888-303-6405 Code 9413
_- l for more details.
S. MLS#352793 $145,900


placed through-
out the year
The single
trunk naturally
branches low and
can be pruned
while young to
encourage faster
growth in height
and branching
Weber above head-
height. Un-
E'S pruned Gordonia
DEN makes a dense vi-
sual screen.
Overall shape is a dense, py-
ramidal cone. Bark is dark
grayish-brown smooth


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM




S535 E. Charleston Ct.
.iiUS MLS #342358 $294,900
Beautiful 2007 nearly new
Sanderson Bay built home
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to
right on Charleston to home on right.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM




C '. i ML 82 E. Ray SI.
4 ilUS MLS #352070 $99,900
Cozy 3/2/2 located on an acre in Citrus Hills
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to
home on the cornerofRaySt.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING
IL ^l


when young, becoming fur-
rowed and rough when
older.
The best feature is the
abundant fragrant flowers
borne from July through to
early September locally
Five white petals surround
a center of yellow stamens
tipped with ample pollen.
Flowers are about 3 inches
in diameter, resembling sin-
gle camellia blossoms. No
colored varieties have been
developed from the original
Gordonialassianthus.
In home landscapes, Gor-
donia must have ample or-


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


staUi S MLS7354139 $279,7
Comfortable 4/3/3 Custom Built home
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd to left on Liberty to right on
Man-O-War to #444 on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-568-0478


P,, 01'5 UL_ -: ="..- S75.000
Very Clean 2/1/1 home in a quiet area
being sold w/extra lot
Directions: From Hwy44 turn south on Rock Crusher
Rdpass Rock Crusher elementary to right on
Potomac to first left on Casey to home on left.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


ganic humus in the soil to
replicate its natural habitat.
Soil must be acidic. Gordo-
nia needs deep hand-water-
ing weekly in Florida's dry
months from late March
until the rains arrive in
June. It needs deeper wa-
tering than a surrounding
lawn until established.
After a year, it should de-
velop deeper roots in a gar-
den setting. Top-dress with
an inch of fine mulch or
well-rotted compost under
the canopy before winter
annually to supply nutrients
for the following growth sea-


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM OPEN HO


. ,
4l l, Wittg 1206 E. Triple Crown Lp.
Ei- MLS #355676 $199,900 i t
Well built and so well kept 3/2/2 beauty. 3/2/2 home on a c
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills Directions: East
Blvd. to left on Hartford to left on Glen (Crystal G
Triple Crown to home on right. Ct
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Florence
NEW LISTING NE


MLS #356404 '$224,
Spacious 3/3/2.5 home with
heated caged-in pool.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


son. Full sun exposure is
OK, but it also grows natu-
rally in part shade.
In my sandhill garden, I
amended a big pocket of soil
beneath deciduous turkey
oaks and shaded by mature
longleaf pines. Flanked by
property line red cedars
about 12 feet on either side
of the Gordonia and toward
the interior about 8 feet, it
fills the gap between the
screening cedars nicely To
widen the screen, I planted
evergreen shrubs: Encore

See JANE/Page E9


SERVI0 AL OF CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


i Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


USE SUN. 1-3PM


314Z W. Northcrest (t.
MLS #352588 $170,000
ul-de-sac offers spacious indoor
on Rte 44 to right into Crystal
len Dr) to right on Northcrest
to home on left.
Cleary 352-634-5523


J7Coge MLS #356456 $194:
English Tudor two story.
3 bdrm,3 bath.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING


S8r1 W Cocl,.elLp 810 E. Gilchrisl C. 28 5A .j 3117 N. Woolflower Terr. .te1Vitl Z ..- '.- ...
S MLS #356365 $91,900 MLS #356430 $65,900 vMLS #356403 $68,900 C..naS 9540 N. Davy Way
Freshly Painted 3/2/2 villa with new EASY, BREEZY FLORIDA LIVING. Windsor model offers 2 bedroom, ,f'f"t MLS #355233 $52,875
driveway. 2/2 second floor condo. 1.5 baths, 1-car garage. Newer pool, 3/2/1 needs some TLC.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Brian Murray 352-212-5913
1 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
V."u Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


F a V S Situal S S SToru le Photos,
Sww6.FloridaShowcaseropSrtiesco


m


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1
\
i
l







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TURNIPS
Continued from Page E6

over flat types such as Purple Top
Milan and the "strap-leaved" vari-
eties. While sweet, the flavor has a
hint of bitterness, which is caused by
this variety's higher concentrations of
glucosinolates.
The White Egg Turnip was intro-
duced around 1880. Contemporary il-
lustrations indicate a more or less
egg-shaped root, considerably longer
than it is wide.
Today, the variety has a slightly flat-
tened round shape, but its pure white
skin and flesh are still reminiscent of
an egg. It is a rapid grower, with baby
turnips appearing in about five weeks
and reaching maturity in about seven
weeks.
In the late 19th century, it was con-
sidered one of the best bunching
turnips for market, and it still holds
that status today
When quickly cooked in the


steamer, this variety's sweet taste does
not require any amendments. White
Egg Turnips are tender enough to eat
raw.
Orange Jelly or Golden Ball is a
round turnip with yellow skin below-
ground and a greenish tint where ex-
posed.
It has pale yellow flesh that is tasty,
with a pleasant dose of turnip bitter-
ness, though it is not as fine-grained as
White Egg. The roots may reach 3 or 4
inches across and weigh a half-pound
or more. In 1855, an English company
distributed it to the U.S. Patent Office
as Robertson's Golden Ball for trial-
ing.
While turnips have lost some of
their status over the centuries, there
is little doubt they are one of the
healthiest vegetables we can add to
our diet.
Their simplicity of growth, good
yields, nutritional properties, hardi-
ness and long storage ability make
them an ideal garden crop.
The latter part of the summer is an
ideal time to think turnips. So turn up


some turnips!
Excerpted from GRIT Celebrating
Rural America Since 1882. To read
more articles from GRIT please visit
wwww.Grit.com or call (866) 624-9388 to
subscribe. Copyright 2012 by Ogden
Publications Inc.


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDELINES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests
to take photos of community events. Call
352-563-5660 for details.


311 W. Main St., Inverness

LANDMARK 352-726-5263 "
LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSwww.andmarkinverness.comUNTY


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


-000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com
I I'l-


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


TREE COVERED STREET iIi .,,. i,,, i .. .n.., i GOT A BOAT .. , ,, ,, ,,, i . ........
D L Wlu Iu ',", l bulI t lu Ju, ut i du u .. Id u u,, u lu.ad, Lu a ud l lul al u, ,, ,,,,, I ,1....1 1...,, , I
office, and new roof. Home has too many details to share in a simple ad. featuring living room with fireplace, ,...n .i ., ,,, .. 1,,,,,, II LOOK ONLY $70,000! 10015 S. Pleasant Grove Rd, Inverness.
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, inground pool, covered I. ,, i. ,d,. .. room, French doors and a private dc I .... ,.,I, i.. H i....i i ,,. es w/ mobile that you can use or save on county fees.
SBARGAIN PRICED AT $215,000. MLS .11 ill tis one yours ONLY $179,000. MLS #352486 506 Turner Bring your livestock or hobby Old Florida at its best! Julie Van Ness
IP.... F, IV ,n ... -..... IE 7 It 1 nl 1il 1 -lTg -K [ W01K7 AAIC40AW9 70


L. 3Ut -. L... J ." Vtt LMF IlL I VWU Un. IAJ-Il V I,
ARBOR LAKES SMW
NATURE LOVERS Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open space, open floor plan, all neutral colors
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S ... .... Take the spacious patio and the yard even has space Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
... ... . ... ... room for a pool! Parkway
MLS #353046 $400,000 MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #355830 $119,000





115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and LIVING ON THE WATER!
nice 1...1 ., ... in beautiful Citrus This classic contemporary pool home is 3686 N. PALOMINO TERR.
Hills ... .. a one acre comer lot, the right setting for living the Florida
this 313BR, 3BA home with screened in lifestyle. Open and airy with the PINE RIDGE
pool and patio area offers you the privacy plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. Nice flat wooded 5 . .. 1 .. .1.
S...." F l.:... : well 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of riding trails in th ...
.. bring room to dock all the water toys Pine Ridge Gives you direct access to up
;... imaginable! to 28 miles of trails
, 175,000 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS #355271 $109,000


DANDY DERBY OAKS DEAL! 1997 4/2 doublewide built in Woods! 3/2/2 custom pool home with features galore! Gorgeous pool
1997 w/ 2,052 Iving for $69,900! Home boasts interior laundry, pavers on large landi, split & open floor plans, wood burning fireplace,
split & open floor plans, fireplace, fenced yard, two sheds, I ..... ,,, ,,... ...l. i 1.., i ,i l. I ..I ... SUPER CHEAP SUPER DEAL! Beverly Hills 2/1 home with carport
.i 1 .... 1 il 1. I i 11 ... I r d. I ..1. L .1. i.. .I i .r ... featuring u real patio, living & fami rooms, interior laundry, and front
.. ll i. l I,,,,, H .. .. l,,, r ,l .....,I . ,,i ".I 11 11 ,, I1I.1 covered porch FOR ONLY $29,900! MLS #355264 74 Fillmore.
,., .. .. .. l. .li..I ,,,,l .. . .. i ,,,h,,, ,I . I.. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


E8 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E7

Azaleas that will mature
about 5 feet tall and as wide
in diameter, flowering from
September to March; native
Simpson's Stopper for May
flower fragrance and August-
September edible orange
fruit; Walter's Viburnum for
white February flowers, low
twiggy bird nest sites and
summer black-fruit bird
food; then herbaceous flow-
ers underneath everything.
To plant Gordonia as a
lawn specimen, first kill with
glyphosate a 10 foot diame-
ter circle (about 80 square
feet) in a lawn. Wait two
weeks for a sure kill, then dig
in the dead grass. Mix in at
least a half cubic yard (14
cubic feet) of decayed humus
or free fine mulch from Cen-
tral Landfill on State Road
44 west of Inverness.
Dig a hole in the amended
soil and be sure there will


ARBORIST
Continued from Page E3

damage or injury
Cracked stems and
branch forks that could
cause catastrophic failure of
a tree section.
Hollow or decayed
areas on the trunk or main
limbs, or mushrooms grow-
ing from the bark that indi-
cate a decayed and
weakened stem.


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 E9


be humus-rich soil at least
2.5 feet down. Tamp the bot-
tom, then climb out and
hose with water before plac-
ing the tree.
Don't damage its feeder
roots. The root crown below
the trunk should be at origi-
nal ground level or higher if
you are making a raised bed.
Backfill with amended
soil and re-water deeply All
roots must be covered or
they will die off. Do not
stamp on the delicate roots.
Sprinkle on a pre-emergent
herbicide like FreeHand or
Ronstar-G. Top with 2 or 3
inches of pine needle mulch
or leaf litter.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.

Peeling bark, or gaping
wounds in the trunk, also in-
dicating structural weak-
ness.
Fallen or uprooted trees
putting pressure on other
trees beneath them.
Tight, V-shaped forks,
which are much more prone
to failure than open, U-
shaped ones.
Heaving soil at the tree
base is an indicator of a po-
tentially unsound root sys-
tem.
Remember that a tree is a


FANS
Continued from Page E5

rise two to three degrees.
With that temperature rise,
your utility bill could be
seven to 10 percent lower
per degree.
When your air condition-
ing system is on and there
seems to be better air circu-
lation when your ceiling fan
is also on at the same time,
your air conditioning system
may need to be serviced and
your air delivery duct sys-
tem may have some serious
leakage problems. Consider
calling your local utility for
an energy audit and ask for
a blower door and duct blast
test as part of the audit
There are many excellent
ceiling fan manufacturers
producing equipment today
In order for you to find a
good, reliable fan, choose
one that has a lengthy war-
ranty and performs as you'd
expect a fan to, i.e., it's en-

living thing, and that its in-
tegrity and stability changes
over time. Don't assume that
because a tree has survived
10 severe storms, that it will
survive an 11th.


Kerry Kreider is a practic-


For energy efficiency and comfort,
seriously consider installing and,
when necessary, using a ceiling
fan in each room in your home.
ergy efficient; has large re- local utility or county e
versible blades; the blade tension office.
diameter is large enough to
move the quantity of air for
the size of the room the fan Bert Henderson, M.Ed.,
is mounted in; can accept a consultant for sustain
an aftermarket lighting fix- ability, renewable energi
ture; and the speed can be and is involved in cutting
varied with remote or wall edge "green" building
mount controls,. product research with A
If you have a low ceiling, Consulting in Gainesvill
some fans have the capabil-
ity of directly mounting to GET TH
the ceiling and do not need
the standard pole mounting U Nonprofit organization
equipment, releases about upcon
For energy efficiency and U Write the name of th
comfort, seriously consider and where it will take
installing and, when neces-
sary, using a ceiling fan in U Call 352-563-5660 fc
each room in your home. If
you have any questions or
need further information LD
on ceiling fans, contact your
REAL
5569 W.
ing arborist and a member IF CRYS A
of the International Society OWWWAIERCOM
ofArboriculture, a tree l ll l
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach him at
352-726-9724 or by email at
actionproarborist@ k.
yahoo. com. CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5


ONE KEYS Office 382-1700
E RA REALTY INC.

17 1 aelII.-


x-



is

es,
eg
ZS
e.


He is also a national
speaker in sustainability
and writes and delivers
professional training pro-
grams in sustainability, re-
newable energies, energy
efficient design, and
"green" construction. He
has been a Sugarmill
Woods resident for 23
years, a Florida resident
for 53 years, and is a re-
tired faculty member with
the Programs for Resource
Efficient Communities at
the University of Florida
and building science fac-
ulty for the Bushnell Cen-
ter for Sustainability


E WORD OUT
ns are invited to submit news
ning community events.
e event, who sponsors it, when
place and other details.
r details.


ESTATE, INC.
GULF TO LAKE HWY.
L RIVER, FL 34429
52) 795-6633
I E-Mr: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


' ST


Realtor


'EN l Y A I


bath 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car garage home w/circular


/H by Skyline on 4 5 acres of land driveway, large workshop, inground pool,
kitchen, dining rm, family rm, wood solarium, living, family & dining rm on
fireplace, Ig master suite w/dbl 2 acres of land Woodburning fireplace in
shower, garden tub #356265 family rm w/heatolator Reduced #356390
$165,000


I "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'
NANCY .
SNANCY Cell: 352-634.4225
PONTICOS .
Multi-Million $$$ Producer V KEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382.1700






PRIVATE GREENBELT! FABULOUS 30 x 15 HEATED POOL w/ FOUNTAIN! "'
III R c AfC UAW!i I lIDERiT DDI iKDAVIIED IAAIr TA


imily Room w/ Fireplace Granite Island Kitchen w/ NEW Stainless Appliances
& Beautiful Landscaping Gorgeous Master w/ Tub + Shower & Dual Vanities
Double Pane Windows 4 Bed / 3 Bath / 3 CAR Garage 2011 Heat Pump
00 MLS#356458 $244,900 MLS#353057
Wwwsnanqknm


SOUTHERN WOODS
$275,000
The treed views are wonderful
over 2 par 3 holes. This Driftwood
by Sweetwater was their model
home. 3 bedrm, 2 bath. Many
unique features: glass block 4x6
shower, spill over pool, tiled lanai
w/30' buffet w/sink, etc...
MLS 356078


SUGARMILL WOODS
$210,000
The location in the Enclave is
primary. The home features 3
bdrms, 3 full baths, office + a
family room with fireplace. The
33 x 10 ft Florida room overlooks
the 8th hole of Oak. Fabulous
price for 2846 sq ft living area.
MLS 356254


Tony & 'Louise Schmid 3 S52-255


-: HISTORICAL MT. DORA totally
?INE RIDGE short sale, gorgeous remodeled, new everything, 3 bedrooms,
1 bedroom, 3 bath home w/inground heated 3 5 bath, 2 car garage w/work area Private
I i 11 -.. acres of land Gourmet fenced back yard, screen porch Custom
S. ..., .... r tops, wood cabinets, made closets, natural gas cooking, heat & hot
island, all GE appliances, family rm water Close to festivals, craft & antique


U BEAUTIFUL,
() TERRIFIC
Open Kitchen to
Well for Irrigati
LOTS of Extras
S $124,
lakemyvf~iItu


Fa
on
,5
U,


I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate
Classifieds


Bring your fishing
pole!
Fl'


55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water.
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
2 BR/2 BA, Near Prog-
ress Energy, Citrus Co.
Dunnellon352-465-1651
DUNNELLON/488
3/2 ,2'2 Acres
Extra Clean! $750/mo.
No Pets. (352) 795-6970
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on lake. Fur-
nished 1 bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1 & 2/2, Seniors Wel-
come. (352) 628-2312
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre Addition
Partly turn, Huge Deck
$525.mo 352-628-5244



-- -






#I Employment

source is,,,









Fw.chronicieonmne.com


Classifieds
In Print
and
Online

All
The Time


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a Mo.


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com





2/2 MOBILE, on corner
of 2 Lots, Sold for$100K
AS IS Will Sell for $25K
352-560-7132419-6625

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Village
New 2012 Models
Doubles & Singles
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077









HOMOSASSA 2/1
quiet country setting,
fenced acre, shed,
partly furn, addition,
huge deck,
$29,900 as is
352-628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217


JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL -
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161



INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582. a mo.


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


Home e Finder
www. honicl nonmfinder.com


^ Chronicle


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com








J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?



4/3/Carport, Pool.....$875
2/1.5/1.................. $650
2/1..................... $550
2/1.5 Townhome ..... $550

2/1.5/1................. $600

2/2 Villa............... $700
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010



CITRSOUT


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a mo.


Fr( s6-561T llF:8 0m il:se r ii E I wwro c
obi- Homes Mobfle Home MobilefH' Homef MobilefHome Mobi^fle^ HomeE
ax.Fo Ren H~I Fr ent 1 jFor ESSSal ndLn EILosFrSalen


M

ACTION
( RENTAL MANAGEMENT
[ REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.ilrusCounlyHomeRenlals.com
CITRUS SPRINGS
6973 Gladstone Dr.... $825
3/2/2 Avail. July 1st
7635 Greendale .... $1,200
3/2/2 Pool Home
CRYSTAL RIVER
22 1 N. rede ................ 450
Furn., 2/1 mobile
11435 W. Dixie Shores $900
3/1, New Floors
HOMOSASSA
7843 W. Solar PI...... $725
2/2, Newer Duplexes
2304 & 06 S. Sandburg Pt... $500
2/1, Duplexes
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
994 E. Winnetka ....... $675
2/1% SW on 1 acre!
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. $700
2/1 Waterfront




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen. All Utilities, Ca-
ble included $525 mo.
pet ok 352- 228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499
HOMOSASSA
Clean 2/2, Quiet, CHA,
Screen. Porch $550. mo.
352-257-6461
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218



INDUSTRIAL
WAREHOUSE
For Rent, located in
Rooks Industrial Park
Homosassa 900 sf
interior is light, bright,
mint cond. Lrg overhead
door, Entry door, back
door, % bath, lighted
parking lot, perfect for
business or storage
$500 mo. 1 yr. lease.
To view please
Call (352) 628-4066



CITRUS HILLS
2/2V2, Extra Clean $825
mo. (352) 613-5655




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743


R
CRYSTAL RIVER
1,& 2 BR. Furn./Unfurn.
Like New, 352-302-1370
Homosassa
3/1/1$650/mo
Ist/last/sec. Pets OK
(352)434-1235
INVERNESS
Country Living on large
1/2 acre lot. 3 bd. 2 ba
home. Garden area,
fenced area. Well &
Septic-so no water bill!
$595. 352-476-4964



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


Homosassa River
2/2 nicely turn. MH,
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/l/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077





BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & w/d
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

LECANTO
Rooms to rent, furnished
or not.2 Master Suites
w/bath.$500 a month. No
deposit, no bills, incd
linens,wifi,heated pool, tv
room, laundry, kitchen
privs. NO DEPOSIT
sandys4uf@aol.com
352.860.3259





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Dunnellon
Owner Fin., rent to
own, 3/2, 2.5 ac., 1,370
s.f., DDWD, very rural,
10K down $495/mo.



COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 1/1 cor-
ner lot $525
352-302-4057
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, 8373 Bolder Dr.
$750 mo $1,000. dep
352-212-9566
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2. tile firs.
nice area across rails
to trails $845. mo.No
pets (352) 598-0235
CRYSTAL RIVER
Energy Efficient 2/2
$750/mo+dep. Lease
352-795-6282
HERNANDO
2/1'2, 1 475Sf. $650.
No smoke/pets.
352-419-0074, 464-4346
4195 E. Benthal Ct.
Homosassa
3/2/2 Meadows $695 up
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 2/2/2, Inground
Pool, 1st &Sec.
$850/mo. 352-302-6633
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$650/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
Sugarmill Woods
Emaculate 3/2/2, private
site, many upgrades,
$795/month
River Links Realty
352-628-1616


E10 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

KEYI i '"Always There For You"

T EGAIL COOPER.
MAh* multimillion Dollar Realtor
!R *Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


CONVENIENT TO SUNCOAST PARKWAY!
Family size home with 4/3/2 2006
Over 3000 sq ft of living area
Huge island kitchen walk-in pantry
Staggered wood cabinetry crown molding
All appliances remain with home
* Furnishings available separately
#350344 $169,900


CUSTOM GOLF COURSE HOME!
* 4+office/2/3 2880 sq ft living
* Overlooks #1 fairway on Pine
* Newly remodeled kitchen
Freshly painted Great Room
SMaster suite has large sifting room
* New roof 2011 newAC/heat 2006
#354992 $159,000


OWNER FINANCING-FLORAL CITY, FL
Spiffy waterfront 2BR/2BA mobile in Withlapopka BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Islands. Great for weekender, winter or year round Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
living. $39,900 MLS#355787 1300 sq. ft building. $64,500 MLS#354972
A :-^a S--


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
5 acres in Citronelle/Mini Farms/Citrus Springs area. Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
Out in the country. $20,900 MLS#356452 sq. ft. situated on 100 x 212 lot. $399,999

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours a52 302-6714 "


SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012 Ell


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS I


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY


Industrial Buildings
Over 2,000 sf Lg. bay
door, showroom + of-
fices. signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084
6330+ 6332 S. Tex Pt.
Homosassa


must sell!
3620 N. Stirrup Dr.LOT
Pine Ridge LOT.2.78
ac.Level, wooded, con-
nects to horse trail.
Make reasonable offer.
Must sell by Aug. 1. For
sale by owner.
478.957.0211



2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$52,900. 352 746-6050
2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof,
New appl's, irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must see $29,995 firm
(352) 345-6499
ATTENTION INVES-
TORS! $525/mo cash
flow. 2 BED/2 BATH/1
CAR. Tenant occupied
2+ yrs-wants to stay.
$49,900. 527-1239
BY OWNER
A Must To See!!
Beautiful Laurel Ridge,
Built 2007, 3/2/2 over-
sized garage with work
area, Lots of extras.
(352) 527-4488



Why Rent When You
Can Buy This Cozy
2Bd. 1 Bath, Home with
only $,3500 down
payment $223. mo
Located in
APACHE SHORES
352-228-0876, 419-0041



$99,500, 4/3/2, Great
4 BR Home, w/ Screen
Pool & porches, aprrox.
1,740 sq. ft. Living
3400 sq. ft Total
Call Lyn (352)726-3798
Inverness Highlands
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


Homes
Bank Must Sell!
$49,959 4/2, Huge Lot,
Workshop, Pool,
6079 E. Malverne St.
Jessica Wood, Realtor,
352-401-5622, 625-5544
JRW Properties, Inc.
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newer roof & CHA, scrn
porch, fenced, gar, good
neighborhood. Reduced
for quick sale at $49,900.
Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964

ONLY$108K!
LOVELY 1 Acre HOME
3 BED/ 2 BATHS
1985 Beauty New Roof!
Many new Upgrades!
Loved & Well
Maintained!
Seller Motivated
MLS# 355975
Teri Paduano
(352)212-1446
www.FLRealty
Connect.comrn
URGENT SALE
Whispering Pine Villa
Inverness 2/2, 2
parking spaces,
& tiled, $48,000
(352) 613-6496




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MAIK
REALTY ONE


2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2 Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile carpet,
dbl lot. $750.rent. 1st 1st
sec. 813 908-5550




IMMACULATE
26 stokesia ct. 3/3/3
+office+bonus Pool
235k 352-422-1662


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
2 master bedrooms!
Ig garage, updated,
SS appl., $875/Mo.
352-302-4057


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $582 a Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com








SUGARMILL WOODS.
BUILDING LOT
IN OAK VILLAGE
$20K Firm
352- 726-9587
352-228-0357


"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


-. m
Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


30/
Complete Package


1 s199,800
6 Month Build Time


BUILDING CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST





&, Of Citrus
I Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


flE~j~


I[See ,Virtual Iur @ I vwi iiam B


Hme


oHme


Hm~s








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HORSE LOVERS WANTED!
20 total acres in Williston. Fully-fenced
pasture, doublewide home, pole barn,
pens, and workshops.
MLS #356478 $154,900
Call Isaac S. Baylon 352-697-2493


$110,000
David Kurtz
Cell 954-383-8786 Office 352-726-6668


CHARMING & INVITING!
Beverly Hills 2/1/1 with extra large
Florida room (16x30) under heat & air and
hardwood floors. Backyard features trees,
flowers & privacy fence.
MLS #355296 $59,900
Call Lorraine O'Regan 352-586-0075


INVtw NtbUM
WATERFRONT HOME!
Just reduced! Totally remodeled! 2/1/1
everything is new in the home. Priced to
sell quick.
MLS #354285 $66,900
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


"FIRE SALE"
ON 10 ACRE EQUESTRIAN HOME SITES
PRICES REDUCED FROM $220,000 TO $95,000!!!
1/2 Mile to 40,000 acre Withlacoochee State Forest. Gated
community only minutes to downtown Inverness, this NEW
deed restricted community has dropped prices for next few
buyers. Prices will then adjust upward. Homes only. Paved
roads. Coded entry gate. Don't miss this opportunity.
MLS #326559 $95,000
Call Jim Morton 352-726-6668


THIS CANVAS IS READY!
This immaculate 3/2/2, with original
owner; well-kept, quiet W. Highlands
neighborhood, is waiting for your artistic
palette! Details you will like: plant
shelves, new flooring throughout.
Manageable 80x120 lot.
MLS #353813 $89,900
Ask For Marilyn Booth 352-637-4904


ALMOST 7 ACRES
OFF HWY. 200
Ready for your mobile, septic, well, no
impact fees, slab on site, electric pole,
surveyed, no restrictions, some fruit trees.
MLS #332898 $69,900
Call Nilda Cano 352-270-0202


WATERFRONT 2/2 ON DOUBLE LOT
P* SPOTLE & PE CT BA -O D S PPI CET property overlooks nature preserve guaranteeing
SPOTLESS f PERFECT BANK-OWNED SHOPPING CENTER additional privacy. Enjoy bird and small wildlife
* 2BR, 2 BATH, 2-Car Garage TORTOISE RUN SQUARE watching. Home has been updated and offers
* Fenced Yard in IGCC Area 5,000 Square Feet CBS large, open living area. Split plan, wrap around,
* New Roof, New Paint, New Appliances 4 Units screened porch. New storage/utility. Being sold
* MOVE-IN READY Buile Pn2010 partially furnished to make your move even easier.
MLS #356405 $95,000 Price Reduced S85K MLS #352521 ASKING $69,900
www.citruscountysold.com OFFERED AT $262,000! Pat Davis 352-212-7280
Jeanne ft Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410 Call Elias G. Kirallah at 352-400-2635 View listing at www.c21patdavis.com








RETURN TO THE FARM
LOCATION, LOCATION 24320 SW Shorewood Dr., N. Dunnellon
3/2/2 close to everything! Shopping 3BR, 3BA, pool, 18.2 acres, 40 x 30 workshop, 25 x 12 HERNANDO LAKE FRONT
dining, schools, hospital. Right around the pole barn, fireplace, family rm., 33 x 26 game rm., lake This 3/2/2 CP furnished mobile is on a
corner from Ft. Cooper State Park. Enjoy the on baca of property, low taxes. This is a great family fenced waterfront lot with 2 docks, the
place. You will love the upgrades and the amenities!
Florida outdoors at the park or on your lanai, This will be a comfortable place to call home. boat and canoe come also. The seller is
screen room or deck. MLS #354782 PRICE AT $499,500 very motivated so call me.
MLS #353116 $89,500 Call Casey Kearse to preview at 352476-6549 PRICED AT $67,900
Call Jim Morton at 352-422-2173 cell This may be your chance to move to the country! Call Ruth Frederick 352-563-6866


KENSINGTON ESTATES
3/2/2 ON FULL ACRE HOME SITE. Convenient
middle of county locations makes this home just
minutes to schools, shopping, fishing. Community
reflects pride of ownership, but permits parking of
RV or boat on site. Additional detached garage,
etc. also permitted.
MLS #353600 ASKING $154,900
Pat Davis 352-212-7280
View listing at www.c21patdavis.com


Newer doublewide on acre, boasting detached
garage/workshop, shed, dock, nice
landscaped property. Home is a 3 bdrm,
2 bath, inside laundry room, deck off of dining
area. Very light, bright and clean. Extra lot
available for sale to buyer of house.
ASKING $99,900
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727
Ask for file #356357


HIr- -- -t__
*A
THIS MAKES HOUSE SENSE
3/2/2 with 12x30 Fla. room. Oak cabinets-
Lots of new ceramic tile, no HOA. Ok to park
motorhome, RV, boat, city water.
MLS #355337 ASKING $113,900
Pat Davis 352-212-7280
View listing at www.c21patdavis.com


AN ARTFUL PRIVATE POOL
is a classy detail in this 3/2/2 free-
standing waterfront. Home in
maintenance-free community. Pool has
fountain, Jacuzzi, solar heat and elegant
brick surround, and all through the home
has elegance and upscale details.
NY owner says bring us an offer!
MLS #353024 $165,000
Call Tim Donovan 352-726-6668


PILOTS DREAM HOME
* 12 Oaks Air Estates, Hernando
* 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath on 4+ Acres
* 40x50' Airplane Hanger
* 2,800' Lighted Grass Runway
MLS #356394 $369,500
Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072
www.sellingcitruscountyflhomes.comn


INVERNESS
GOLF & COUNTRY HOME
3/2/2 + office and Florida room *City
water* 2,100 SF of living space. New
hardwood floors make this home shine!
MLS #354607 PRICED TO SELL $139,900
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


NEED LAND AND A BIG HOUSE?
Have a huge spread (39.5 acres M.O.L.) fix up
this rustic style ranch house and have them
both. 3 Bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, fireplace, big
detached garage and not far from town.
MLS #351274 $300,000
Call Vicki Root Realtor-Associate
352.212.1926 or housescitrusegmail.com


E12 SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2012


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