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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02822
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-08-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02822

Full Text


Baseball: Local teams battle for spot in title gamesQ


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
9 3 Rain chances remain
LOW low, at 30 percent, as
78 isolated storms likely.
PAGE A4


CITRUS


COUNTY


ONICLI
WVVJW.CcirliOw Cleoniinle.COml
SNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


LOCAL NEWS:


Disappearing Democrats


Get a cat
Shelter has special offer
to entice people to
adopt felines./Page A3
COMMENTARY:


7=H


Testing
Pat Deutschman writes
about the high-stakes
testing facing public
schools./Page C1
BUSINESS:


a





What's next
Guest columnist Avis
Craig reports on a
meeting she attended
discussing Florida's
future./Page D1


Public meetings this
week in Citrus County:
Monday:
Agricultural Alliance
of Citrus County, 8 a.m.
Monday at Citrus County
Extension Services, 3650
W. Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto.
Tuesday:
Citrus County Board
of County Commission-
ers, 1 p.m. Tuesday at
Citrus County Court-
house, 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness.
Citrus County
School Board, 3 p.m.
Tuesday at District
administrative offices,
corner of Montgomery
Avenue and State Road
44, Inverness.
Wednesday:
Citrus County
Council, 9 a.m.
Wednesday at Beverly
Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Thursday:
Citrus County
Transportation Planning
Organization, 5:15 p.m.
Thursday at Inverness
Government Center, City
Council Chambers, 212
W. Main St., Inverness.


TOMORROW:
Aftermath
County officials say
damage to homes and
businesses from
Tropical Storm Debby
was minor, with much
of the more serious
damage in Lecanto
where a suspected
tornado struck.
Homeowners are
still making
repairs./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ..............D4
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ..... ...........B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A12
Obituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 1|1184578121101 oI


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
Democrats once blanketed the
Citrus County political landscape
but they've all but faded from the
scene.


The evidence is no more obvious
than in three county commission
races that will be decided in the
Aug. 14 primary because all the
candidates are Republican.
The party that controlled local
political offices 20 years ago now


holds just two partisan offices, and
both incumbents face Republican
challengers this year.
Outside the U.S. Senate race, De-
mocrats have one primary race:
state House of Representatives Dis-
trict 34. Even so, one Democrat is


Scallop Jam


Cajun Dave and the Dixie Twisters perform live Cajun music
Sam Scallop Jam in Crystal River.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
in front of a live audience Saturday during the Uncle


Festival brings food,

fn to Crystal River
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
or the third year in a row,
shellfish and general party
lovers alike packed the Uncle
Sam Scallop Jam on Saturday af-
ternoon, despite a rainy start.
Put on at King's Bay Park in
downtown Crystal River, the event is a
fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Crystal
River.
"A hundred percent of the profits go right
back into the community," Crystal River Ro-
tary President Marc Shapot said Saturday
Historically, the scallop jam was pre-
sented in conjunction with Crystal River's
Fourth of July fireworks display However,
event chairman and Crystal River Rotary
president-elect Keith Taylor said the city
decided to have its fireworks on the actual
holiday, which was in the middle of the
week. Therefore, Crystal River Rotary
decided to move forward with the event
without it.
See SCALLOP/Page A7
Tristan Velleca, 5, slides down an inflatable
playground slide at the Kids Jam area of the
Uncle Sam Scallop Jam.


openly supporting another candi-
date in the same race, and the other
Democrat is virtually unseen on the
campaign trail.
Roz Odell, chairwoman of the


i/Page A2


News
ANALYSIS


GOP


hopes


economy


dooms


Obama

CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON His-
tory repeats itself, until it
doesn't.
That musty saw is worth
remembering as pundits
speculate on whether the
lumbering economy will
doom the re-election hopes
of President Barack Obama,
who has shown a knack for
beating odds and breaking
barriers.
Clearly, some important
trends are working against
him. The latest evidence
came Friday in a lackluster
jobs report that said the na-
tion's unemployment rate
was stuck at 8.2 percent.
Franklin D. Roosevelt
was the last president to
win re-election with so
much joblessness. Voters
ousted Presidents Jimmy
Carter and George H.W
Bush when the jobless rate
was well under 8 percent.
It's not as if Obama can
divert public attention from
the economy, which has
dominated the election
from the start His signature
domestic achievement, the
2010 health care overhaul,
is a mixed political blessing,
uniting Republicans against
him. Voters show little in-
terest in how his adminis-
tration wound down the
Iraq war and killed Osama
bin Laden.
Yet Obama runs even
with, or slightly ahead of,
Republican rival Mitt Rom-
ney in poll after poll. Cam-
paign strategists debate the
reasons.
They might include
Obama's personal likability,
gaps in Romney's strategy
or Americans' grudging
See DOOMS/Page A7


For Romney, big family at center of life, campaign


Associated Press
WOLFEBORO, N.H. -
Mitt Romney's large family
is at the center of his life and
his presidential campaign.
His five sons, five daugh-
ters-in-law and 18 grand-
children "a bevy of
Romneys," he's called them
- were front and center on
Independence Day as he pa-
raded his family down Main
Street in this resort town
where the family vacations.
"My family's so big, it takes
two risers!" Romney said
after he reached the end of
the parade route and con-
ducted a campaign event in
a field overlooking Lake
Winnipesaukee. As he spoke,
he was flanked on two raised
platforms by his sons and
many grandchildren.
While a few family mem-
bers sometimes accompany
Romney on the campaign,


the annual family vacation
provided a rare opportunity
for him to showcase all the
members of the group he in-
vokes so often. They num-
ber 30 in all, and his wife,
Ann, laments it's tough to
get them in one place at the
same time.
At a time when nontradi-
tional families have become
more common, and when
even the Romneys watch
"Modern Family," a popular
sitcom that centers on un- I
conventional family arrange-
ments, the Romney brood
stands out Mitt and Ann
Romney have been married
for more than 40 years.
It's an embodiment of the g
family values message that
resonates with Republicans
and Democrats, and it of-
fers a chance for Romney to Associated Press
portray himself as caring Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney plays with
and authentic. That's a family and friends Friday on a floating raft on Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro, N.H., as he
See ROMNEl/Page A5 continues his vacation from the campaign trail.


/B1l


117 ISSUE 336
117 ISSUE 336





A2 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


Democrats


indecline
Citrus County's Democrats have steadily
lost their political grip over the past 20 years.
Here are three snapshots illustrating the
party's decline in the county.

1992
Constitutional
officers:
Sheriff: *
Tax collector: *
Clerk of courts: *
Supervisor of elections: *
Property appraiser: *
Superintendent of schools: *
County commission:
Total registered
voters: 53,793
0 Democrats (53 percent)
0 Republicans (39 percent)
h Other (8 percent)


LOCAL


The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's political forums are: 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 31, at the Citrus
County Auditorium; and 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
The Nature Coast Republi-
can Club and Citrus Republican
Women's Club will host a forum
for all local Republican candi-
dates at 8:30 a.m. Saturday,
July 14, at the American Legion
Post 155 on S.R. 44 in Crystal
River. Information: Fred or
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County will
have a forum at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 17, at the Citrus
County Resource Center on
Marc Knighton Court, off C.R.
491, in Lecanto. The forum will
feature candidates for county
commission District 1, 3 and 5.
Information: Jeanne Mclntosh,
352-746-5660 evenings or 352-
484-9975.
Candidates for county
commission, public defender
and school board will be fea-


tured in a forum Thursday, July
19, sponsored by the Citrus
Hills Civic Association. The
7 p.m. forum is at the Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club.
Information: Cathi Smith, 352-
746-7532.
Candidates for county
commission and state repre-
sentative are invited to partici-
pate in the Save Our Waters
forum at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 1, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida in Lecanto. Informa-
tion: 352-860-5175.
Shannon Heathcock, Re-
publican for county commission
District 3, will greet the public
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, July
14, at Curry's Roofing, 1965 N.
Dunkenfield Ave., Crystal River.
Information: 352-302-0962.
Michael Smallridge, Re-
publican for county commission
District 5, has the following
events: 2 to 5 p.m. July 15
fundraiser at The Grove in In-
verness; 6 to 8 p.m. July 26
meet and greet at Citrus


Springs Community Center. In-
formation: 352-302-7406.
Hank Hemrick, Republi-
can for sheriff, will greet the
public from 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday, July 18, at the
Beverly Hills Lions Club. Infor-
mation: Bob, 352-527-1524.
Scott Adams, Republican
for county commission District
5, will have the following meet-
and-greet events: 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. July 14 at Point O'
Woods Club, Gospel Island
Road; 5:30 p.m. Saturday, July
21, at Carnahan's Supply, 4016
W. Southern St., Lecanto; 1
p.m. Friday, July 27, at Fat
Boy's BBQ in Crystal River;
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
July 28, at Frog Holler Antiques
and Collectibles, 7736 U.S. 41,
Floral City.
Charles Poliseno, Repub-
lican for county commission
District 4, will have a fundraiser
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 18, at The Grove
Downtown, 210 Tompkins St.,


Campaign TRAIL


2002
Constitutional
officers:
Sheriff: *
Tax collector: *
Clerk of courts: *
Supervisor of elections: *
Property appraiser: *
Superintendent of schools: *
County commission:
Total registered
voters: 83,759
0 Republicans (41.5 percent)
0 Democrats (40.5 percent)
6 Other (18 percent)


2012


Constitutional
officers:
Sheriff: *
Tax collector: *
Clerk of courts: *
Supervisor of elections: *
Property appraiser: *
Superintendent of schools: *
County commission: *
Total registered
voters: 95,794
0 Republicans (43-5 percent)
0 Democrats (33-5 percent)
0 Other (23 percent)

Note: Figures as of June
1992, 2002 and 2012.
BRAD BAUTISTA/Chronicle graphic


DEMOCRATS
Continued from Pag

Citrus County Democrat Party, is
loss to explain the general lack o:
terest among Democrats in 1
politics.
"We don't have a lot of active
Democrats in the county," she
said. "Why? I'm really not
sure."
The number of registered
Democrats has dropped in 20
years as the county has at-
tracted Republican-leaning
retirees to affluent areas such
as Sugarmill Woods, Citrus
Hills and Pine Ridge. su
"I think Citrus County is ob-


viously trending Republican
by sheer numbers," said Josh Wooten,
president and chief executive officer
of the Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce who 10 years ago was the last
Democrat on the county commission.
Twenty years ago, Democrats had 53
percent of the total number of regis-
tered voters. Today, the Democrat
share has dropped to 33.5 percent.
Meanwhile, more voters are register-
ing Republican, minor parties or no
party at all.
In 1992, Democrats held a 3-2 ma-
jority on the county commission and 4-
1 on the school board. Four of six
constitutional officers were
Democrats.
Today, the county commission is all
Republican and guaranteed to stay

















'V


that way since there are no Democrats
in any of the three commission races.
Of six constitutional offices, Super-
intendent of Schools Sandra "Sam"
Himmel and Sheriff Jeff Dawsy are
Democrats. Their Republican oppo-
nents will be decided in the GOP
primary.


Himmel, whose fa-
ther, Walt Connors, was
an ardent Democrat
who served 19 years as
Citrus County clerk of
courts, said she doesn't
see the same party line
in her position.
"I believe my posi-
Sandra tion is about the kids in
Himmel our district," she said.
superintendent "I've never been able
of schools. to walk into a class-


L
Je
Dav
Citrus (
she


room and see who's a
Republican and who's a Democrat No
matter what party I am, it's still me."
To an extent, the voters of Florida
agreed with that in 1998 when they
amended the state Constitution to
make school board races nonpartisan.
Superintendent, however, is still a
partisan race.
Aside from Himmel and Dawsy, few
Democrats will appear on the local
ballots this year:
Lynn Thomas Dostal and Robert
Goocher are in the Democrat primary
for state House District 34. Dostal,
however, said he actually supports In-
dependent Nancy Argenziano against
Republican incumbent Jimmie T.
Smith and is on the race only to defeat
Goocher, who Dostal claims is a decoy


to draw votes from Argenziano in the
general election.
Other than one brief interview a
month ago lasting less than five min-
utes, Goocher hasn't returned numer-
ous phone calls from the Chronicle.
Dostal said he hasn't seen him
campaigning.
0 There is no primary for
Citrus County clerk of court to
replace Betty Strifler, who is
retiring. Strifler's top deputy
S clerk, Angela Vick, is the Re-
I publican candidate. The De-
it; mocrat is Phillip Mulrain, who
has lost four times in cam-
paigns for county commission
iff and once for tax collector
vsy Democrat State Committee-
County man Mike Gudis, who also is a
riff. Crystal River councilman,
said the party should actively
recruit candidates.
"I think we should have gotten some
people to run," he said. "I don't think
we're encouraging people. You're not
going to have qualified candidates un-
less you show them some support, fi-
nancial and otherwise."
Wooten, who said he turned down
overtures to run again for county com-
mission this year, agreed that Democ-
rat leaders need to seek out
candidates.
"They need to recruit candidates
who are well known and established,"
he said. "They've obviously been un-
able to do that."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can
be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


CIf *


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Did you know that some heart attacks and strokes can be
caused by an irregular heart beat?
Sometimes your heart needs just a little help to stay in
rhythm. If you suffer from an irregular heart rate, known as
arrhythmia, let Citrus Memorial Heart and Vase ular Center get
you back on your feet without missing a beat. Our specialized
Cardiology team will quickly and safely decide if you need a
cardiac pacemaker, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator
(ICD), or another procedure to restore your heart's health.
See for yourself why HealthGrades, an independent healthcare
ratings organization, awarded their Patient Safety Excellence
Award and The Joint Commission for Hospital Accreditation
awarded their coveted Advanced Stroke Center Certification
to Citrus Memorial.


Learn more about us by visiting heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


rAw


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SCRart
& VASCULAR CENTER


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352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inverness. Information: Debbie
Poliseno, 352-302-5595.
Meet local candidates at
the Republican Party of Citrus
County rally from 4:30 to
7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 21, at
the Crystal River Mall.
The Ronald Reagan Re-
publican Assembly of West
Central Florida will have a fund-
raiser at 1 p.m. Saturday, July
28, in the South Square Plaza,
938 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River, for county commission
candidates Renee Christo-
pher-McPheeters, Shannon
Heathcock and Michael
Smallridge. Information: 352-
257-5381.
Nancy Argenziano, Inde-
pendent for state House District
34, will speak at 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 11, at the Citrus
County Tea Party Patriots
meeting at the Women's Club,
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season. Send
details to Mike Wright, mwright
@chronicleonline.com.


HEALTH


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IRR


ur


.


II O

II







Page A3 SUNDAY, JULY8, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Aviation Advisory
Board meets July 12
The Citrus County Aviation
Advisory Board will meet at
2 p.m. Thursday, July 12, in
Room 166 at the Lecanto
Government Building.
On the agenda to be dis-
cussed: Fixed Base Operator
(FBO) Lease at Crystal River
Airport; tower updates by Ge-
ographic Resources & Com-
munity Planner Joe Hochadel.
Engineering Project Manager
Quincy Wylupek will also give
a projects status report.
The next meeting will be
Thursday, Aug. 9.


Orlando


Little-known race for Republicans only


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER The
Aug. 14 primary ballot in-
cludes a campaign for Re-
publicans only.
Republicans will choose
between Gloria Fisher and
Michele Klemm for state
committeewoman, an
elected position that, along
with state committeeman,
serves as a liaison between
the state and local parties.
Although the contest is on
the ballot, the same cam-
paign finance rules that
apply to candidates for po-
litical offices such as county
commission and sheriff do
not apply to state commit-


teewoman, Supervisor of
Elections Susan Gill said.
There is no limit in con-
tributions, no requirement
to fill out a financial disclo-
sure form and there are no
spending reports.
Both candidates hope to
replace State Committee-
woman Debra Fredrick to
the unpaid four-year term.
Fredrick is not running this
year. The state committee-
man is Robert Hagaman.
Democrats also have state
committeemen and commit-
teewomen. However, they
are appointed within the
local party
Fisher, a retired civil engi-
neer, has lived in Citrus Hills
for six years. She is a member


of the Citrus County Republi-
can Executive Committee.
"I want to give to my party
as much as possible," she
said. "I want to expand our
party and elect Republicans."
Fisher has spent "a cou-
ple thousand dollars" on
her campaign with political
signs, palm cards and a web-
site. A consultant who sent a
news release to the Chroni-
cle last week announcing
her candidacy is a friend,
she said, working for free.
"I'm a campaigner I'm
used to doing campaigns,"
she said. "If you can't (get)
yourself elected, you can't
get anyone else elected."
Fisher said she has not
asked for any campaign con-


tributions and doesn't plan
to. "It's strictly my own
money," she said.
Fisher served as a mem-
ber of the Fairfax County,
Va., Soil and Water Conser-
vation District. She is a
member of the Citrus
County Water Authority.
Klemm, a paralegal for a
St. Petersburg attorney, is
chairwoman of the Citrus
County Republican Execu-
tive Committee, a position
she has had for nearly two
years. That position is ap-
pointed by members of the
executive committee, com-
prised of precinct commit-
teemen and women.
Klemm said she is active
in the party both in Citrus


and statewide.
"When I go to other coun-
ties, I'm known all over," she
said. "They listen to the
things I have to say"
Other than business
cards, flyers and a few signs,
Klemm isn't planning to de-
vote much financially to the
campaign. She said she is
surprised to see Fisher take
a higher campaign profile.
"This is a little extreme,"
she said. "If we were run-
ning for Congress or even
county commissioner, yeah.
I don't think it should go to
this extreme."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Orange County
launches registry
A Central Florida county
has opened a domestic part-
ner registry that will grant par-
ticipants some of the same
rights as married couples.
Couples began signing up
for Orange County's domestic
partner registry Friday. The reg-
istry extends the emergency
notification and visitation pro-
tections first permitted for cou-
ples in Orlando countywide.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported Phil Windsor and his
partner, GaryAshland, were
the first couple to sign up for
the registry. County commis-
sioners approved the measure
by a 6-1 vote.
Police: Man shot
fireworks at 3 officers
Orlando police said a man
shot fireworks at officers
clearing downtown bars after
Fourth of July festivities.
Police said three officers on
bicycles had to take cover be-
hind vehicles early Thursday
as "green fireballs" shot to-
ward them from the rear of a
parked van. According to a po-
lice report, Khasim Stephen-
son told investigators he never
meant to shoot the fireworks
at the officers, but he had lit
the explosives without having
anywhere to put them.
Stephenson was arrested
on several attempted second-
degree murder charges.
Stephenson was on house
arrest after posting $16,000
bond.

Hallandale

Beach

Fired lifeguard
to get key to city
The lifeguard who was
fired for leaving his post to
help rescue a man outside
his patrol area will be given a
key to the city of Hallandale
Beach in honor of his actions.
Tomas Lopez will be issued
a symbolic key at a ceremony
on Monday. The distressed
swimmer he assisted will also
be in attendance. Jeff Ellis Man-
agement, the firm that provides
lifeguarding services for the city,
has apologized for firing Lopez
and offered him his job back.

Miami

Judge quotes song
in appeals ruling
A federal appeals judge
took a lighthearted approach
in a new legal opinion, quot-
ing from a Jim Croce song in
upholding dismissal of a
lawsuit.
The case conceded a
mother who confronted her
daughter's boyfriend with a gun
when she caught them together
at her home. Because she was
a county corrections officer, the
boyfriend claimed in a lawsuit
she misused her position.
The case was dismissed
and the 11th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals upheld that ruling
Friday. Judge Ed Carnes
quoted the list of warnings
against tugging on Super-
man's cape and spitting into
the wind in the Croce song
'You Don't Mess Around With
Jim." The he added a fifth:
'You don't let a pistol-packing
mother catch you naked in her
daughter's closet."
-From staff and wire reports


July a fine time for felines


County animal

shelter offering

incentive to adopt

irresistible cats,

kittens

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

INVERNESS Young and in-
quisitive, five kittens peer be-
tween the cage bars Friday
morning at the county animal
shelter in Inverness.
One extends a welcoming paw.
Another one squeezes out a tiny
mew before getting distracted by
a dangling cat toy
Looking on, animal services
operations manager Pattie Amon
urges the frisky felines to pose
nicely for the camera, but they
would rather play
Every day, the shelter is inun-
dated with cats being turned in or
surrendered.
It's easy to see there is an over-
population of cats, not just in the
county but all over the U.S. Ac-
cording to the American Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals (ASPCA), the number of
feral cats in the U.S. is estimated
to be in the tens of millions. Many
communities opt to control pop-
ulations using methods such as
euthanasia or relocation.
Nevertheless, the People for
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA) states in seven years, one
female cat and her offspring can
produce 370,000 kittens. There-
fore, Amon strongly believes if
people keep using the same
methods that produce the same
results, then obviously something
different needs to be done, which
is why the shelter supports ways
to reduce the cat population and
works to give shelter cats good
homes.
In July, cats at the shelter are
available for adoption at half
price. The $17.50 fee includes
spay/neuter, vaccinations, mi-
crochipping, worming, flea pill
and blood test
Friends of Citrus County Ani-
mals Services (FOCCAS) volun-
teers also work to place shelter
cats with rescue groups when
they can. On Friday, one of the


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Debra Nicholson, a Citrus County Animal Services technician, pets one of the many cats available for adop-
tion at the county animal shelter in Inverness. July is Freedom Feline at the shelter, meaning cats are avail-
able for adoption at half price.


FOCCAS volunteers was looking
to place a pair of beautiful Bom-
bay cats that had been surren-
dered by their owner
Additionally, the shelter is a
fierce supporter of the local trap-
neuter-return (TNR) program.
The TNR program, approved
in April 2011 by county commis-
sioners and run by the nonprofit
Citrus County pet-protection
group Humanitarians of Florida
Inc., is aimed at reducing the
"community" cat population by
trapping stray and feral cats, ster-
ilizing them, providing rabies
shots and then returning them to
their colonies throughout the
county.
Amon said the program ad-
dresses the long-standing con-
cerns with feral and stray cats.
People will eventually see a
change in the population, but it
takes time, she said.
Donna Schmid, president of the
Humanitarians, said the program
so far has been successful. For ex-
ample, she said from April 2011 to
March 2012, 253 fewer cats were


TNR PROGRAM STTS
* Total colonies: 96.
* Total female cats spayed: 323.
* Total male cats neutered: 286.
* Total altered animals: 609.
* Total number of cats and kittens removed from colonies and
adopted out: 37.
* Total cost to run program so far: $31,294.69 (Clients and dona-
tions to the TNR program have covered $12,845.81, leaving the
Humanitarians $18,448.88 in the red. No government funds are
used for this program.)
Humanitarians of Florida Inc.


killed at the shelter She credits the
TNR program for the reduction.
However, running the program
with very little financial assis-
tance has been a struggle.
Schmid hopes other groups and
individuals will begin to back it.
Currently, the Humanitarians are
more than $18,000 in the red from
running the program, but Schmid
said her group would not stop be-
cause they know its importance.


"We need to serve them (cats)
better as a society," Amon said.
For more information on the
TNR program and how to donate,
call the Humanitarians at 352-
563-2370. For more information
about the cats at the animal shel-
ter, call 352-746-8400.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@chronicle
online, com.


Statewide task force predator stings result in many arrests


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The Florida Sheriffs Task
Force's Cyber Predator Ini-
tiative has struck again, this
time grabbing 119 would-be
pedophiles across the state,
according to a news release
from the group.
Tuesday, the task force
announced that through col-
laboration with the North,
Central and South Florida
Internet Crimes Against
Children (ICAC) task forces,
it had concluded a six-week
series of stings to identify
and arrest child predators
in Bay, Broward, Citrus,
Polk and Sarasota counties.
In Citrus, nine people
were arrested in an opera-
tion shortened by Tropical
Storm Debby
The stings resulted in the
arrest of, among others, an
elementary school teacher,


a health care professional
and a registered sex of-
fender Most predators
brought condoms and other
items ranging from Barbie
dolls to gallons of milk, ac-
cording to the release.
One of the men arrested
in Citrus' Operation Sum-
mer Knights is from the
Tampa area. He was ar-
rested after an alleged vic-
tim alerted police about the
man who had apparently
had sex with the 14-year-old
on two prior occasions. He
reportedly began threaten-
ing the girl, which led her to
report it to authorities.
Citrus County Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy said the man's arrest
should send a wake-up call to
all citizens that travelers re-
ally do come to the county to
victimize children.
Duringthe statewide opera-
tions, undercover detectives
posted fictitious ads or pro-


files on various websites, pos-
ing as children or as the care-
takers and guardians of
children. Detectives also
posed as children in online
chatrooms. Many men re-
sponded to the ads and pro-
ceeded to chat online, email,
text and talk on the phone
with the undercover detec-
tives posing as children. The
suspects solicited sex acts,
sent pornographic pictures
and live webcam images of
themselves and asked for
nude photos of the children to
be sent to them.
Florida's Sheriffs an-
nounced their "Cyber Sexual
Predator Initiative" to pro-
tect children and educate
Floridians about the dangers
of Internet predators in Sep-
tember 2011. Since then,
local, state and federal law
enforcement officers from
the ICAC task forces and
Florida Department of Law


Enforcement have arrested
more than 320 sex crimes of-
fenders in the state.
The Florida Sheriffs Task
Force has a long history of
service in Florida, as it
pools resources from the 67
sheriff's offices to address
specific areas of concern.
The first statewide task
force operation held in July
1989 was organized to ad-
dress the growing crack co-
caine problem. It involved
more than 1,500 law en-
forcement officers from var-
ious counties and resulted
in 2,224 arrests.
Since then, the Florida
Sheriffs Task Force opera-
tions have gained national
recognition, including an ef-
fort that removed $1.5 mil-
lion of prescription drugs
from the street, a crackdown
on "deadbeat dads," and
mass arrests of sexual
predators.


BY THE NUMBERS
* Operation Riptide (Bay
County) netted 12
arrests.
* Operation Southern
Sentinel (Broward
County) netted 28
arrests (primarily child
pornography- and
prostitution-related
crimes, rather than
traveling to meet
minors for sex).
* Operation Summer
Knights (Citrus County)
netted nine arrests
(operation was cut
short due to Tropical
Storm Debby).
* Operation Cyber Child
(Polk County) netted 38
arrests.
* Operation Intercept
(Sarasota County)
netted 32 arrests.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Immigrant lawyer: Obama



policy clears him for bar


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -An illegal immigrant
says an Obama administration change to
U.S. immigration policy means there are no
grounds to deny him a Florida law license.
President Barack Obama announced last
month that illegal immigrants no older than
30 who arrived as children, have no crimi-
nal history, and have high school degrees or
military service could stay and work in this
country
In a motion filed Thursday, Jose Godinez-
Samperio told the state Supreme Court that
the administration's order makes him eli-
gible for legal immigration status and work
authorization in the U.S.
"The significance of this action for
(Godinez-Samperio) and for the issues be-
fore this Court cannot be overstated," says
the motion filed in Tallahassee by Godinez-
Samperio's attorney, Talbot D'Alemberte.
"No grounds remain for denying or further
delaying his admission to the Florida Bar."
The motion asks the court to order the


Florida Board of Bar Examiners to either
conclude its investigation into Godinez-
Samperio's application or admit him.
Godinez-Samperio's parents brought him
to the U.S. from Mexico on a visitor's visa
when he was 9. His parents overstayed their
visas and never returned to Mexico. He grew
up in rural Hillsborough County. His father,
a veterinarian in Mexico, milked cows on a
dairy farm. His mother, a dentist, worked at
a factory that made sliding glass doors.
Godinez-Samperio, 25, graduated from
Florida's New College, earned a law degree
from Florida State Universityand passed
the bar exam. The Florida Board of Bar Ex-
aminers, though, declined to admit him, in-
stead asking the justices for an advisory
opinion on whether illegal immigrants can
be licensed as lawyers.
Earlier this year, seven U.S. representa-
tives and Puerto Rico's nonvoting resident
commissioner joined four former Ameri-
can Bar Association presidents in urging
the state Supreme Court to grant Godinez-
Samperio a law license.


Watch the weather, wait to water


Special to the Chronicle

The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
is encouraging residents
who irrigate their lawns to
take advantage of the sum-
mer rains and "watch the
weather, wait to water."
During the summer
months of June, July, August
and September, yards need
no more than three-quarters
of an inch of water every two
to three days. If your lawn
has received enough water
from rainfall, you can turn off
your irrigation system and
turn it back on when needed.
The simplest way to de-
termine if your yard needs


ON THE NET

* WaterMatters.org/WatchTheWeather/


water is to look for these vi-
sual clues:
Grass blades are folded
in half lengthwise on at least
one-third of your yard.
Grass blades appear
blue-gray
Grass blades do not
spring back, leaving foot-
prints on the lawn for several
minutes after walking on it.
Follow these tips when
you "watch the weather,
wait to water":
If your yard is showing
signs that it needs water,
check your local forecast to


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrest
David Paul Curtis, 50, of
3011 S. Buckley Point, Inver-
ness, at 11:16 a.m. Friday on a
felony charge of failure to re-
register as a sex offender and a
violation of probation on a felony
charge of failure to comply with
sex offender reporting require-
ments. No bond.
Burglaries
A residential burglary oc-
curred at 10:08 a.m. July 5 in
the 9200 block of E. Sandpiper
Drive, Invemess.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at 12:27 p.m. July 5 in
the 900 block of W. Art Camey
Place, Beverly Hills.
MA vehicle burglary occurred
at 1:48 p.m. July 5 in the 3800
block of S. Fernpark Terrace,
Inverness.
MA vehicle burglary occurred
at 3:51 p.m. July 5 in the 300
block of N.E. First Avenue, Crys-
tal River.
Thefts
An auto theft occurred at
6:36 a.m. July 5 in the 1700
block of W. Gardenia Drive,
Dunnellon.
An auto theft occurred at
7:28 a.m. July 5 in the area of
W. Main Street and N. Pine Av-
enue, Invemess.
A grand theft occurred at


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking volun-
teers to serve alongside paid staff at all stations. For
information, call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator,
at 352-527-5406.
* The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station WYKE,
digital channel 47 and Bright House cable channel
16. The show features interviews with sheriff's office
staff from all areas of the agency. It also features
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking live calls during the entire
show on the last Wednesday monthly.
* The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking
all registered sexual offenders and predators in the
county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link
on the CCSO website.


8:09 a.m. July 5 in the 1800 block
of S. Mooring Drive, Invemess.
A petit theft occurred at
1:39 p.m. July 5 in the 2200
block of W. Dunnellon Road,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft occurred at
2:18 p.m. July 5 in the 700 block
of Medical Court, Invemess.


Vandalisms
A vandalism occurred at
6:03 a.m. July 5 in the 6200
block of W. Sunrise Lane,
Homosassa.
A vandalism occurred at
3:13 p.m. July 5 in the 8900
block of W. Sugar Bush Path,
Homosassa.


see if rain is on the way
Use a rain gauge to de-
termine how much rain
your yard has received.
If you have a rain sen-
sor, make sure it is working
properly
Take full advantage of
the rain. Make sure gutter
downspouts are directed
into landscaped areas or
lawn.
Install a rain barrel to
capture excess rainwater.
For more information,
visit WaterMatters.org/
WatchTheWeather/.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR HI LOPR HI LO PR
0.10 -NA NA NA J94 73 0.00


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


94 75 000 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluseaily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 78
Rain chances remain low at 30% as
I isolated storms are predicted.
r MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 78
Scattered storms likely to develop as rain
chances increase slightly.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 77
Warm and humid, scattered storms expected.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 96/71
Record 99/67
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 84
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday trace
Total for the month 0.23 in.
Total for the year 27.85 in.
Normal for the year 25.35 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.9/12
Monday's count: 5.2
Tuesday's count: 4.9
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly articulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MA
(MORNING) (AFTERNO(
7/8 SUNDAY 10:22 4:11 10:44
7/9 MONDAY 11:10 4:59 11:32


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
S MOONRISE TODAY
JULY28 AUG. 1 MOONSET TODAY........


MAJOR
ON)
4:33
5:21

.8:32 P.M.
..6:39A.M.
11:51 PM.
11:35A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:50 a/5:20 a 9:38 p/5:37 p
Crystal River" 8:11 a/2:42 a 7:59 p/2:59 p
Withlacoochee* 5:58 a/12:30 a 5:46 p/12:47 p
Homosassa*** 9:00 a/4:19 a 8:48 p/4:36 p


***At Mason's
Monday
High/Low Hi
10:24 a/5:53 a 10:32
8:45 a/3:15 a 8:53
6:32 a/1:03a 6:4(
9:34 a/4:52 a 9:42


SCreek

gh/Low
2 p/6:28 p
3 p/3:50 p
Sp/1:38 p
2 p/5:27 p


Northeast winds around 5 knots, turn-
ing southwest this afternoon. Seas
around 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will be smooth. Expect partly cloudy
skies with an isolated thunderstorm or
two today.


Gulf water
temperature



87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.74 29.74 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.82 34.84 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.52 36.54 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.13 39.19 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Ban
. e- "
rY :rnw 90s





S 7 0 s I
L.ncnoragp Juneau
y, n ,7 .


bes


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 85 67 pc 84 56
Albuquerque 83 65 .08 ts 89 70
Asheville 93 66 ts 92 66
Atlanta 98 74 pc 93 74
Atlantic City 99 75 ts 90 73
Austin 10072 ts 95 72
Baltimore 10476 ts 96 72
Billings 96 60 pc 95 64
Birmingham 92 75 .14 pc 93 74
Boise 10068 pc 101 67
Boston 86 73 pc 88 64
Buffalo 83 68 .09 pc 80 59
Burlington, VT 85 71 pc 79 55
Charleston, SC 96 75 pc 97 76
Charleston, WV 10072 ts 96 70
Charlotte 99 73 pc 100 74
Chicago 98 75 pc 83 67
Cincinnati 10472 ts 95 69
Cleveland 98 76 pc 82 62
Columbia, SC 10075 pc 100 75
Columbus, OH 10176 ts 91 65
Concord, N.H. 83 65 pc 85 52
Dallas 10179 ts 96 76
Denver 84 61 .05 ts 76 58
Des Moines 10076 pc 86 67
Detroit 10078 pc 82 64
El Paso 89 69 ts 94 75
Evansville, IN 10575 ts 96 73
Harrisburg 10275 ts 91 68
Hartford 92 72 pc 89 59
Houston 95 75 ts 91 76
Indianapolis 10581 ts 90 67
Jackson 97 74 ts 92 74
Las Vegas 10681 s 107 86
Little Rock 101 78 ts 94 74
Los Angeles 67 59 s 72 65
Louisville 10680 ts 96 75
Memphis 99 76 .03 ts 95 76
Milwaukee 86 68 pc 77 66
Minneapolis 86 64 pc 87 65
Mobile 87 74 ts 91 74
Montgomery 93 76 pc 93 73
Nashville 10474 pc 96 74
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


= .. %. .


A-a

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 75 ts 90 75
New York City 97 79 pc 89 69
Norfolk 99 78 ts 104 76
Oklahoma City 98 74 ts 97 72
Omaha 89 73 ts 87 70
Palm Springs 11076 s 111 79
Philadelphia 101 79 ts 94 72
Phoenix 10986 pc 110 90
Pittsburgh 98 68 ts 86 62
Portland, ME 86 70 .02 pc 81 56
Portland, Ore 86 57 s 89 61
Providence, R.I. 89 72 pc 88 63
Raleigh 102 72 pc 102 76
Rapid City 70 60 .02 s 84 59
Reno 96 63 s 99 63
Rochester, NY 81 69 .07 pc 80 61
Sacramento 92 59 s 100 58
St. Louis 10783 ts 96 70
St. Ste. Marie 75 61 .37 pc 78 57
Salt Lake City 93 66 pc 97 71
San Antonio 97 77 ts 95 75
San Diego 72 64 s 75 65
San Francisco 75 53 pc 69 53
Savannah 92 72 .81 pc 96 75
Seattle 80 56 s 84 58
Spokane 93 58 s 98 67
Syracuse 82 71 .14 pc 81 58
Topeka 10873 ts 94 69
Washington 10582 ts 97 74
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Thermal, Calif. LOW 36 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/78/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 67/58/r Mexico City
Athens 96/78/s Montreal
Beijing 81/73/sh Moscow
Berlin 84/62/pc Paris
Bermuda 82/76/pc Rio
Cairo 95/74/s Rome
Calgary 84/59/s Sydney
Havana 92/72/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 90/80/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 86/64/s Warsaw


76/60/pc
73/55/r
91/63/s
72/55/sh
79/61/pc
80/62/pc
64/57/sh
75/59/sh
88/69/s
63/43/pc
72/65/sh
77/55/pc
87/69/s


C I T R U S


COUNTY T


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


LHRON1CLL
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kileadowlres t
N \ i- ":

I I Inverness
S Courthouse office
To pkins St. square
CID
S n 2 106 W. Main
41Inverness, FL
34450


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(10
JULY 10 JULY 19


....................
...................
...................


.......... ................................


A4 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


STATE/LOCAL


_





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROMNEY
Continued from Page Al

handy perception for him to
cultivate in the face of Dem-
ocratic attempts to paint
him as a heartless
millionaire.
Romney's two presiden-
tial campaigns he fell
short of winning the nomi-
nation in 2008 haven't
been easy on everyone,
though.
"The process is tough. It's
tough on the family," said
Tagg Romney, the eldest of
the Romney brothers. "The
issues that the media fo-
cuses on don't tend to be the
largest, most important is-
sues. The little things that
trip you up tend to be little
gaffes or slips of the tongue
that end up defining the
race, and life's too short for
that."
There are five Romney
sons: Tagg, Matt, Josh, Ben
and Craig. All tall and pho-
togenic, they range in age
from 31 to 42. Three work in
real estate, one is in private
equity, and the fifth is fin-
ishing his medical
residency
To hear them tell it, Mitt
Romney was a consistently
engaged father, regularly
talking to his boys about ca-
reer choices. The sons ac-
knowledge that Tagg
probably felt the most pres-
sure to follow in his father's
footsteps, and he has, at-
tending Harvard Business
School and founding a pri-
vate equity firm.
Even so, Tagg says his fa-
ther encouraged each son to
choose his own career path,
but he did push all of them
hard to get good grades and
continue their educations
beyond college. All five boys
attended the prestigious all-
boys Belmont Hill School
outside Boston, where they
were required to play three
sports. The private school
was so academically rigor-
ous, one son said, that it
made college easy
All five went to Brigham
Young University, the Mor-
mon college in Utah where
three met their wives. The
three oldest went on to Har-


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 A5


1^ '---

Associated Press
Mitt Romney watches as his
grandson Miles is tossed into
the lake Friday by Craig Rom-
ney, right, on Lake Win-
nipesaukee in Wolfeboro,
N.H., as he continues his va-
cation from the campaign
trail.

vard Business School. Ben
went to Tufts Medical
School, and Craig has a
graduate degree from
Columbia.
They all married in their
20s and have 18 children
total: Tagg has six kids, Matt
has five, Josh has four, Ben
has one and Craig has two.
The grandkids range in age
from just a few weeks -
Tagg and his wife, Jen, just
had twins that were born via
a surrogate to 16 years.
All five Romney daughters-
in-law are stay-at-home
moms.
Romney appears to be an
affectionate father, seen
easily putting his arm
around one of his sons as his
family relaxed on the lawn


behind their lake house. He
seems to relish his role as a
grandfather: During his va-
cation, he took some of them
around Lake Win-
nipesaukee on his boat and
was spotted on his lawn
mower with two grandchil-
dren on his lap, one wearing
a captain's hat.
During the church service
they attended a few days
earlier, Ben Romney sent
his preschool-age daughter,
Soleil, running down the
row of chairs to see her
grandfather. "Go say hi,"
Ben said quietly The elder
Romney opened his arms
and smiled, encouraging
her. Ann Romney pulled
Soleil up onto her lap as her
husband held out one of his
wife's bracelets for their
granddaughter to try on.
But his family plays a po-
litical role, too, as is tradi-
tion in the Romney clan.
Mitt Romney was close to
his father, George, who was
governor of Michigan and
ran for president in 1968.
George Romney was very
involved in his son's first po-
litical campaign against
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy,
D-Mass., in 1994. Mitt Rom-
ney's three oldest sons were
in college by then, so their
childhoods weren't shaped
by his political career, but
several have since become
close political advisers to
their father.
Tagg and Josh are the
most involved, while Matt
and Craig tend to hang back.
Ben is rarely seen on the
campaign trail, busy with
his medical residency and
less interested in politics
than the others. Tagg is the
only brother who gets the
emails that campaign aides
send out to staffers, but both
he and Josh follow the cam-
paign's traveling press corps
on Twitter.
But next summer, the
lakefront estate could be the
Wolfeboro White House.
Surrounded by his family on
Wednesday, Romney said he
and his wife woke up that
morning and marveled.
"We looked at each other,"
Romney said, "and said,
'Oh, gosh, our love really
started something, didn't
it?"'


Romney dives into Lake Winnipesaukee on Friday at Winter Harbor in Wolfeboro, N.H.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hal Conn, 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
It is with profound sad-
ness we announce the pass-
ing of our father, Hal Conn,
of Crystal River, beloved fa-
ther, grandfather, great-
grandfather, uncle and
friend to many
He passed away peace-
fully July 1, 2012, at 90 years
of age.
Dad was born March 7,
1922, in Harvard, Ill., to
Fred and Hattie (Schultz)
Conn. He
was raised
in Harvard
and at a
young age
discovered
two of his
lifelong pas-
sions, rais-
Hal ing and
Conn racing hom-
ing pigeons
and music. He joined the
Merchant Marine in World
War II. Dad often spoke of
his many memories of his
wartime service and his
contributions to the security
of our country During his
many crossings of the At-
lantic, he and his shipmates
were truly sitting ducks and
escaped with their lives
only through the grace of
God. In 1944, Dad married
the love of his life, Mary
Jane Waldo. They spent an
amazing 66 years together,
raising their two children,
Ted and Nancy When the
children were still very
young, they moved to Santa
Barbara, Calif. After several
years of working different
jobs, Dad went back to
school and obtained his B.A.
in Music Education. In 1978,
his very first teaching posi-
tion would take him to Crys-
tal River, Fla. Mom followed
just a few months later after
selling the house where
they spent the rest of their
lives with only a couple of
detours. They spent two
years in Arizona on the
Navajo Reservation, where
they made many lifelong
friends, and another two in
Lake Hamilton, Fla., before
returning to Crystal River
Also while in Crystal River,
Dad obtained his master's
degree from the University
of Florida. During his life-
time, Dad spent many hours
involved in his major pas-
sion of racing homing pi-
geons. His focus was on a
breed known as Gurnay He
was always active in a local
club, regardless of where he
lived at the time. Dad was
one of the original founders
of the national Gurnay Club.
which has the breed as its
focus. Later on, after a trip
with Ted in a small airplane,
Dad gained the desire to fly
He obtained his private
pilot's license, and with sev-
eral other partners, bought
and enjoyed flying a small
airplane around Florida. In
addition to teaching school,
Dad was the choir director
at Rainbow Lakes United
Methodist Church in Dun-
nellon for 30 years and had
many private guitar stu-
dents. Dad was also a mem-
ber of St. Timothy's
Lutheran Church in Crystal
River, the Citrus County Pi-
geon Flyers and the Citrus
County Retired Teachers
Association. Due to his serv-
ice in the Merchant Marine,
dad was also a member of
the Armed Guard, American
Legion Post 155, and the
Merchant Marine Veteran's
Organization. When visiting
family in California, he en-
joyed touring the restored
liberty ship the Jeremiah
O'Brien, which is moored in
San Francisco Bay and is
identical to the boat upon
which he served in World
War II.
Hal was preceded in
death by his wife, Mary
Jane, and his sister, Phyllis
Echternach. Survivors in-
clude his son, Ted (Dixie)
Conn of Georgetown, Calif.;
his daughter, Nancy (Mike)
Stevens of Richmond, Va.;
six grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren; and
seven nieces and nephews.
A celebration of life serv-
ice is scheduled for 11 a.m.


Saturday, July 14, 2012, at St.
Timothy's Lutheran Church
in Crystal River. Interment
will occur at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Fla., at 2 p.m. Monday, July
16, 2012. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464 or HPH
Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto
Hwy, Beverly Hills, FL
34465. Funeral arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis Fu-


neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Robert
McCarthy, 91
TIMONIUM, MD.
Dr. Robert Vincent Mc-
Carthy, 91, of Timonium,
Md., formerly of Worc-
ester, Mass.,
Needham,
Mass., and
1 Hernando,
-- --r Fla., died
July 4, 2012,
K at Stella
Maris Hos-
pice Center
after a short
Robert illness.
McCarthy He gradu-
ated from
Holy Cross College, class of
1943, and received his doc-
torate in education from the
University of Ottawa. Former
president of Boston State
College and professor of ed-
ucation, he held similar posi-
tions at Seton Hill College,
Greensburg, Pa., and Kings
College in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
He served as expert consult-
ant, panel member and
lecturer to several organiza-
tions on matters involving
collective bargaining in
higher education.
He served in the United
States Army during World
War II, participating in the
Battle of the Bulge with the
696th Artillery Battalion
from Normandy to the Elbe.
Dr. McCarthy was the son
of Thomas and Margaret
(Peg) McCarthy, brother of
Marguerite Couhig of
Worcester, Mass., and for-
mer spouse of Mary Carroll
of Worcester, Mass.
He is survived by his cur-
rent wife of 20 years, Mary
Dunphy Carroll of Timo-
nium, Md., Hernando, Fla.,
Falls Church, Va., and
Worcester, Mass.; three
stepchildren and their
spouses; five step-
grandchildren; 11 great-
step-grandchildren; 22
nieces and nephews; and
eight great-nieces and
-nephews.
A funeral Mass will be at
11 a.m. Thursday, July 12, at
St Peter's Catholic Church,
Worcester, Mass., followed
by burial at St John's Ceme-
tery, Worcester. Visitation
will be held at Callahan and
Fay Brothers Funeral Home
from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may be made
to Stella Maris Hospice Cen-
ter, or to the Mercy Ridge
Scholarship Fund, 2525 Pot
Spring Rd, Timonium, MD
21093.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE


Joseph
Kirsner, 102
CHICAGO, ILL.
Dr. Joseph Kirsner, a pio-
neer in the field of digestive
system disorders, died from
kidney failure at his home
in Chicago on Saturday He
was 102 years old.
University of Chicago
Medical Center spokesman
John Easton said the well-
known physician published
more than 750 research pa-
pers and 18 books, and was
the Louis Block Distin-
guished Service Professor of
Medicine at the university.
Kirsner was among the first
to show the increased risk of
colon cancer in patients with
ulcerative colitis. He broke
new ground in the under-
standing and treatment of in-
flammatory bowel disease.
"Few if any physicians
have had a broader and
more positive impact than
Joe Kirsner on thousands of
patients, students and pro-
fessional colleagues," Dr.
Kenneth Polonsky of the
university said in a state-
ment. "His legacy at the
University of Chicago will


persist for generations. We
are truly fortunate to have
been able to call Joe a
friend and colleague and a
member of our faculty."
A Boston native, Kirsner
arrived at the university in
1935 and helped change his
field from an art in his
words, "speculative, im-
pressionistic, anecdotal, al-
most mystical at times" -
into a science.
-From wire reports


Carolyn
Larneard, 72
INVERNESS
Carolyn May Larneard,
72, Inverness, died at home
July 6, 2012, from breast
cancer
Carolyn
was born
April 26,
1940, in
Scranton,
Pa., to the
late John
W and
Carolyn Charlotte
Larneard (Hampton)
Larneard,
the youngest of 12 children.
She moved to Staten Island
in 1943, attended PS 38 and
PS 11, and New Dorp High
School. In her early years,
she worked with her mother
doing home sewing. Later
she was employed at Wil-
lowbrook State School and
the Eger Nursing Home as a
certified nursing assistant.
She moved to Inverness,
Fla., in 1985. She enjoyed
bingo, traveling, crossword
puzzles and jumbles. Car-
olyn also enjoyed watching
soap operas. She was a de-
voted sister and aunt who
loved spending time with
her family and friends.
Survivors include her
lifelong partner, Nellie
Donovan; her sister, Con-
stance Vadola of Staten Is-
land; her brother, John
Larneard Jr, of Gouldsboro,
Pa.; several nieces and
nephews; and great-nieces
and -nephews.
She was preceded in
death by one brother and
eight sisters, Florence,
Charlotte, Emmeline,
Sarah, Elizabeth, Alice,
Tommy, Dorothy Lou and
Beverly
Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Sunday,
July 8, from the Chas. E
Davis Funeral Home. Burial
will follow at 3 p.m. Monday
in Hills of Rest Cemetery
Reposing hours will be from
1 to 3 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
Sunday
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Richard
Saari, 72
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Richard S.
Saari, age 72, of Beverly
Hills, Florida, will be held
11:00 AM, Wednesday, July
11, 2012 at the First Presby-
terian Church of Inverness
with Pastor Craig Davies of-
ficiating. Interment will fol-
low at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida. The family will re-
ceive friends from 4:00 6:00
PM, Tuesday at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes. The family re-
quests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to the
Leukemia & Lymphoma So-
ciety, Suncoast Chapter,
3507 E. Frontage Road,
Suite 300, Tampa, FL 33607.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com.
Mr. Saari was born Janu-
ary 22, 1940 in Wakefield,
MI, son of the late Jacob and
Ellen (Cousineau) Saari. He
died July 3, 2012 in Ocala,
FL. Mr. Saari was an Air
Force veteran. He worked
as the Manager of Computer
Integrated Manufacturing
for the Ford Motor Company
before his retirement. He
also, worked as an electrical
engineer for the Boeing
aerospace program. He
moved to Beverly Hills,
Florida from Wayne, MI in
1999. His hobbies included
golf and snow skiing and he
enjoyed participating in his
sons athletic programs. Mr.
Saari was a member and
Elder of the First Presbyte-
rian Church of Inverness,
where he enjoyed church
related functions, organized
fundraisers, concerts and
church programs and was a
member of the Elks Lodge,
Inverness.
Survivors include wife of
45 years, Sandra Saari of
Beverly Hills, FL, son, Keith
Farley of Oak Park, MI,
brother, Raymond (Dolores)
Saari of Muskegon, MI, and
2 sisters, Joyce (Albert)
Marusinec of Milwaukee,
WI, Carol (Jack) Tankka of
Milwaukee, WI.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits free and
paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of
deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place
of death; date, time and place of visitation and
funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors,
memorial contributions or other information are
included, this will be designated as a paid obituary
and a cost estimate provided to the sender.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U.S. military. (Please note this service when
submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries
will be posted online at www.chronicleonline.com.
* Paid obituaries may include the information permitted
in the free obituaries, as well as date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased and surviving family members;
year married and spouse's name (date of death, if
predeceased by spouse); religious affiliation;
biographical information, including education,
employment, military service, organizations and
hobbies; officiating clergy; interment/inurnment; and
memorial contributions.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are
required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is
$10 per column inch. Small photos of the
deceased's face can be included for an additional charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to errors
in submitted material are charged at the same rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.


To Place Your

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ERIC ERNST
Sarasota Herald-Tribune

TERRA CEIA- The Cit-
rus Place has been going out
of business for years. Or so
the stories go. They're not
hard to believe.
Old Florida has been dis-
appearing. And the Citrus
Place in Terra Ceia at the
foot of the Sunshine Skyway
Bridge is as Old Florida
as it gets. The roadside
business on
U.S. 19 has been selling
home-grown and home-
squeezed citrus for 37 years.
Its owner, Ben Tillett, 81,
was born in the house be-
hind the store and lived
there most of his life.
He thought he was get-
ting out of the business in
2005. As the real estate
market hummed, land
around him was going for
$100,000 an acre. Tillet was
ready to cash in. He had a
serious buyer. Someone
was going to open a storage
complex for boats and
motor homes. That deal
fell through, although he
has sold his childhood
home, and he and his wife,
Vera, have moved to a
newer house nearby
This week, as howling
winds closed the Skyway
bridge, the store was open
as usual. Well, maybe not
quite as usual. This is the
first year it's stayed open
past May. The Tilletts are
trying something different,
selling frozen juice they've
stored in six freezers.
"You'd be surprised how
business drops off when
the tourists leave. It's get-
ting hard to show a profit,"
Ben says. "What we're at-
tempting to do now is
something to stay alive."
Although his father
farmed, Tillett never really
intended to get into citrus.
He served in the Navy dur-
ing the Korean War, got a
business degree from
Florida State in 1958,
worked for an oil company
in Miami for a year, then re-
turned home and got a job
teaching English at Mana-
tee County High School.
He was a tough teacher,
big on grammar and
spelling. He quit in 1979,
partly because he felt the
administration cared
more about athletics than
academics.
And the U-pick grape-
fruit sideline business he
had started a few years
earlier had also picked up.
People seemed to like the
local oranges and grape-
fruits, which, Tillett claims,
have higher sugar content


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and thinner skins than fruit
from Florida's interior.
Tillett was more than a
retailer He also managed a
number of citrus groves in
the area in addition to his
own. He'd handle the fer-
tilizing, watering and the
spraying for insects and
weeds, then split the prof-
its with the owners. The six
or seven groves under his
care each year comprised
50 to 400 trees.
The arrangement kept
alive Terra Ceia's agricul-
tural tradition, which has
now all but vanished as land
prices have favored resi-
dential use. Tillett still over-
sees two groves, but they're
in Parrish and Ruskin.
The uncertainty of sup-
ply has undercut what
used to be a profitable
shipping business. At one
time, Tillett sent out as
many as 4,000 boxes of fruit
a season through an associ-
ation in Orlando. "We had
to give up gift fruit ship-
ping," he says. "We had to
know what we were going
to have. I was going 100
miles, trying to find fruit."
It's hard to pin down
cause and effect for the de-
cline of citrus in Florida.
Rising land prices, dis-
eases such as canker and
greening, government reg-
ulations to combat canker
and greening, permit fees,
the cost of testing, the un-
availability of labor and a
change in consumer habits
have all played a role.
The times change, surely
enough. Terra Ceia's truck
farms and citrus groves and
tomato packing houses and
gladiolus growers are gone.
But it's nice, every once
in a while, to get a glimpse
of how things used to be and
to cheer for folks like the
Tilletts, who bridge the gap.



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCALLOP
Continued from Page Al

"It's our thoughts and
hopes people will still come
out," Shapot said.
Though the scallop jam of-
ficially kicked off at 3 p.m.,
very few people had arrived
by then, thanks to an unex-
pected downpour that left
parts of the food and kids
zone in a muddy disarray
"All week, it looked like it
(the weather) was going to
be great," Taylor said.
But once the rain passed
over the area and the sun
began to break through the
clouds, a line outside the
event's entrance began to
swell.
Last year, Shapot said his
club raised approximately
$20,000. He hoped they
would be able to do just as
well, if not better, even with-
out the added draw of a fire-
works display
Bands on two separate
stages and a road rally pro-
vided some live entertain-
ment as children enjoyed
their own kind of fun in the
kids' zone hosted by Seven
Rivers Presbyterian
Church.
Arts, crafts and informa-



DOOMS
Continued from Page Al

acceptance of a new normal
in which millions of jobs are
gone for good and no single
person is responsible.
If high unemployment
"was a killer, he'd already
be dead," said Republican
pollster and consultant
Mike McKenna. "The survey
data tells you he's not dead."
There's a problem with
applying historical prece-
dents and conventional wis-
dom to Obama. He
sometimes defies them.
Before the 2008 campaign
took shape, how many peo-
ple thought the United
States would elect a black
president? Or that a man
four years removed from the
Illinois Legislature would
outmaneuver Bill and
Hillary Clinton's political
machine?
Besides, no senator had
been elected president in
more than four decades.
Obama's political re-
silience has left Republi-
cans quarreling over how
best to combat him.
Romney largely has fol-
lowed a play-it-safe ap-
proach. It suggests he and
his aides think the presi-
dent is on a slow but steady
decline and there's no need
to take big gambles.
The job report might bol-
ster that view. Economists
say a dramatic turnaround
before Election Day is
highly unlikely
But some Republican ac-
tivists are anxious and say
Romney is running an
overly cautious campaign
that doesn't spell out his dif-
ferences with Obama in
crisp, inspiring terms.
The Wall Street Journal's
editorial page, an important
forum for conservative
thought, just blasted Rom-
ney's campaign for "squan-
dering an historic
opportunity" and said the
campaign looked "con-
fused" and "politically
dumb."
McKenna agrees that
Romney must be more dar-
ing and aggressive. A strat-


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 A7


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Crowds funnel down the street Saturday in Crystal River, taking in the sights and sounds of the Uncle Sam Scallop Jam.


tional vendors lined the
street Northwest Third Av-
enue, while food vendors in-
side the park catered to a
hungry mob. The hot food
item of the day was, of
course, scallops.
"I'm hungry for scallops,"


egy of holding the ball, he
said, "never wins basketball
games that you're behind
in."
Campaign consultants
also differ about how much
Obama might be helped if
job creation accelerates in
the next few months. Some
strategists believe voters ce-
ment their views of the
economy several months be-
fore Election Day If true, it
could bode badly for Obama.
In 2010, jobs suddenly re-
bounded in October. In 2011,
another sharp rise began in
September, only to drop sig-
nificantly seven months
later. If that pattern repeats
itself this fall, then Obama
might enjoy a last-minute
bump before the Nov 6 elec-
tion, assuming enough vot-
ers remain persuadable.
Temple University politi-
cal scientist Christopher
Wlezien said research finds
voters' feelings about the
economy "come into focus
over time," chiefly during a
campaign's last six months
or seven months. He said
Obama doubtlessly would
like to swap this year's first
quarter, in which an average
of 225,000 jobs were added
each month, with the re-
cently ended second quar-
ter, which saw only 75,000
new monthly jobs on
average.
"It's not good news, but
it's not devastating news,"
Wlezien said of the slow-
down. "Voters seem to have
taken into account what
Obama inherited," he said,
referring to a monthly job-
loss rate of about 800,000 in
the months just before and
after Obama took office.
Come November, the bar-
rier-breaking president may
prove mortal indeed. He
might fall victim to voters'
fears and anger over an
economy that has left mil-
lions jobless and many oth-
ers underemployed.
But if there's a new nor-
mal in a brutal global econ-
omy, might there be a new
normal in U.S. politics that
has yet to be examined and
understood?
Blogs, Twitter and cable
outlets spew out political
tidbits and barbs at a dizzy-


Crystal River resident
Diane McCallum said.
McCallum was attending
the event with her friend,
Joann McCloud. It was their
first year attending and, de-
spite a few difficulties in
finding the event, both


ing pace. Minority voters
play bigger roles, especially
in pivotal states such as Ne-
vada and Florida. Public
opinion shifts dramatically
on issues such as gay rights.
Obama turned the politi-
cal world on its ear four
years ago. Republicans
hope Romney, a more con-
ventional candidate, will


women said they were look-
ing forward to having a
great time.
Relaxing under her tent,
Donna Cupal said the rain
did make for a chaotic start,
but once everything dried
out, she was confident there


prove that precedents and
conventional wisdom still
hold and that voters won't
reward an incumbent when
unemployment stays high,
month after month.


Charles Babington covers
politics for The Associated
Press.


would be a great attendance
as usual.
Running her candle art


I'm
hungry for
scallops.

Diane McCallum
Crystal River resident.

booth, the Summerfield
vendor said it was her sec-
ond year at the scallop jam.
"I enjoyed it last year. It
was fun. Good crowd," she
said.
Taylor, hoping for the
weather to stay agreeable
for the rest of the day, be-
lieved that because the
event goes late into the
night, the wet start wouldn't
cause too much of a setback
in attendance.
Both Taylor and Shapot
agreed the expectation was
still for an overwhelming
turnout.
Scallop season continues
until Sept. 25.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
con.


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Citrus County Support Services

Citrus I S N IOR A nonprofit organization dedicated to
generate funds to support the unmet
County FOUNDATION needs of Citrus County seniors.

Tampa Bay Rays Baseball Trips
Wednesday, July 18th Rays vs. Indians 3:30pm
Upcoming Games
Wednesday, Sept. 5th Rays vs. Yankees 3:30pm
Wednesday, Sept. 19th Rays vs. Red Sox 3:30pm
All tickets $45 per person
(make checks payable to The Senior Foundation of Citrus County).
Price includes admission & round-trip transportation via chartered bus.
Pick up and drop off location for the bus will be:
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct., Lecanto, FL
All ticket sales are final. Note:
Per the Tampa Bay Rays, game times are subject to change.
_.._.... For more information call 527-5975
lTRONICI, All proceeds from the Rays Baseball Trips go
000B23K towards Helping Seniors in Citrus County.


If you have a question you would like the panel to ask
at the forum, please fill out the form below and return
to:
Citrus County Chronicle N" i
Primary Election Forum
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Name:
Question:



Candidate to be asked:

or fill out the form online www.chronicleonline.com/primary

Forms must be received no later than noon Friday, July 20.
Questions from the floor will not be allowed at the forum.


.7


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With 'freedom' in fashion, is libertarianism back?


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS To begin:
This is not a story about Ron
Paul.
Not exactly, anyway And
yet to get where we want to
go, we will start at OPA!, a
Greek restaurant on the
edge of town where Clark
County Republicans and tea
party conservatives gath-
ered on Nevada primary
night for what looked unde-
niably like a Ron Paul rally
In one corner was Cindy
Lake, the acting chair of the
Clark County Republican
Party and a delegate to this
summer's Republican Na-
tional Convention. A self-de-
scribed "libertarian
Republican constitutional
conservative," Lake became
a Paul convert in 2007 after
she heard him advocate for
something she passionately
supports: the freedom to
buy raw milk.
Nearby stood Megan
Heryet, celebrating her
GOP primary victory in a
state Assembly race. Heryet,
a real estate agent, substi-
tute teacher and mom, is
hardly a Paul fanatic. But
she did back him in
Nevada's caucuses earlier
this year, primarily because
she is a big proponent of
being free to make deci-
sions such as choosing to
give birth to her second
child at home instead of a
hospital. "It's about being
left alone," she said.
But we promised this
wouldn't be about Ron Paul
and, in fact, it really isn't.
Rather it's about unpasteur-
ized milk and home births
and, yes, freedom.
Something's going on in
America this election year:
a renaissance of an ideal as
old as the nation itself -
that live-and-let-live, get-
out-of-my-business, individ-
ualism vs. paternalism
dogma that is the hallmark
of libertarianism.
Paul, the Texas congress-
man and GOP presidential
hopeful who champions
small government and indi-
vidual liberty, is one mani-
festation of it. We saw that
with his rising popularity


during the Republican pres-
idential primary season
and, now, the recent
"takeovers" of political con-
ventions in Nevada, Min-
nesota, Maine, Louisiana
and elsewhere that will re-
sult in a sizable faction of
Paul delegates at the GOP
convention come August.
There are questions ofhow
all of that might affect the
choice of a GOP vice presi-
dential candidate and the
Republican Party platform.
But what looms are far
larger questions about
whether an America fed up
with government bans and
government bailouts with
government, period is
seeing a return to its liber-
tarian roots. And, if so, what
that might mean in a poten-
tially close presidential race
and long after election 2012
is a mere memory
"There's this kind of
growing distrust of the insti-
tutions of government, and
so it leads folks to step back
and say, 'Well if they're not
working, then we ought to
have less of them in our
lives,"' said Wayne Lesper-
ance, director of the Center
for Civic Engagement at
New England College in the
"Live Free or Die" state of
New Hampshire.
Paul's libertarian mes-
sage joins people "who
probably under any other
circumstances would not
see the world the same way
and gets them politically in-
volved," Lesperance said.
"It is a challenge for the Re-
publicans to wrap their
arms around this and har-
ness this in a way that gets
them an electoral victory"
This will all be hotly de-
bated this week as thou-
sands converge on the Las
Vegas Strip for a libertarian
fete called FreedomFest.
U.S. Sen. Rand Paul -
Ron's son and the future
hope of many limited-gov-
ernment enthusiasts will
speak, along with a slew of
libertarian-leaning politi-
cians, scholars, economists
and entrepreneurs, from
Whole Foods CEO John
Mackey and publisher Steve
Forbes to Gary Johnson, the


Libertarian Party's nominee
for president.
When the festival first
began in 2002, some 850
people attended. Last year,
there were 2,400. Festival
founder and economist
Mark Skousen will tell you
this is a sign, albeit a small
one, that libertarianism -
or something an awful lot
like it is surging.
"Libertarian" at its
essence means an advocate
of the doctrine of free will
and individual liberty. Or, as
the Libertarian Party states
on the banner of its website:
"Minimum Government,
Maximum Freedom." Just
how many Americans actu-
ally endorse the philosophy
has never been easy to meas-
ure. The Libertarian Party
claims some 250,000 regis-
tered voters among the more
than 235 million voting-age
Americans.
While there are few capi-
tal "L' Libertarians, many
others clearly have libertar-
ian-like views that favor a fis-
cally conservative, socially
tolerant way of governing.
The philosophy reli-
gious freedom, self-gover-
nance, a representative
democracy that responds to
the will of the people in-
stead of ruling over the peo-
ple has been a part of the
fabric of America since the
13 colonies waged a war for
political independence
from Britain.
The Libertarian Party it-
self was formed in Colorado
in 1971 by a small group of
citizens fed up with the two
major political parties.
They were compelled not
only by their opposition to
the Vietnam War but also
President Richard Nixon's
imposition of a wage and
price freeze on America's
free-market economy as a
way to combat inflation.
In its annual governance
survey conducted last fall,
Gallup found a record-high
81 percent of Americans
were dissatisfied with the
way the country was being
governed. There were in-
creases, too, in the re-
sponses to questions that
gauge a more libertarian-


AIcON 1FIGUR E

10 Reasons Why Readers Vote and Voters Read

86% of voters who cast ballots in the last local
election read a newspaper in print or online in the past
week, or more often.


57% of voters rate newspapers more than any
other medium as reliable, accurate and in-depth for
local/civic issues.


51% of voters rate newspaper websites more than
any other type of local websites as reliable, accurate
and in-depth about local political/civic issues.

54% of voters rate local TV political ads as annoying,
followed closely by those on network TV. Newspaper
ads are rated least annoying.


40% of voters report that they are likely to read/look
at a candidate's newspaper ad.


91% of voters who contributed money to a campaign
read a newspaper in print or online in the past week, or
more often.


79% of voters in the 18- to 34-year-old age group
read a newspaper in print or online in the past week, or
more often.


83% of Republican, 81% of Independent and 84% of
Democratic voters read a newspaper in print or online
in the last week, or more often.


58% of voters who plan to use mobile devices for
news about campaigns and elections use newspaper
sources for that news.


62% of voters ages 18 to 34 who plan to use mobile
devices to check for campaign/election news rely on
newspaper sources.#


Newspaper advertising.
A destination, not a distraction.
www.newspapermedia.com

2 CITRUS- B COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.com

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL (352)563-5592
000BSKQ


view of governance: A
record 49 percent said they
believed government posed
"an immediate threat to the
rights and freedoms of ordi-
nary citizens"; 57 percent
believed the federal govern-
ment had too much power;
and 56 percent said they
would be willing to pay less
in taxes and accept fewer
services (a position advo-
cated during the campaign
by Paul).
The libertarian message
is especially attractive to


younger Americans who are
war-weary, socially liberal
and skeptical of government
interference in their lives.
They've grown up paying
into Medicare and Social
Security, but hearing end-
lessly- that they're unlikely
to receive the benefits of
those programs. They see
many government initiatives
as unnecessary evils, and
believe social issues such as
abortion and gay marriage
are matters of personal
choice, not political debate.


Many pondered why Ron
Paul, at 76 years old, at-
tracted throngs of 20-some-
things to his rallies and,
according to exit polls, con-
sistently won the 18-to-29
age bracket early in primary
season in states such as
New Hampshire and Iowa.
Twenty-six year-old
Alexander McCobin has a
response for that: "This is
the most libertarian genera-
tion that's ever existed, and
it's because libertarianism
is just correct."


Our "Back to School" special section will

be publishing soon.


This guide includes all the information to

get students on track for a new school year!


Publishing:

Saturday, July 21



Advertising Deadline:

Tuesday, July 10


To reserve your space call
352-563-5592


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A8 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LA schools superintendent shakes up district


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Faced
with a shocking case of a
teacher accused of playing
classroom sex games with
children for years, Los An-
geles schools Superinten-
dent John Deasy delivered
another jolt: He removed
the school's entire staff -
from custodians to the prin-
cipal to smash what he
called a "culture of silence."
"It was a quick, responsi-
ble, responsive action to a
heinous situation," he said.
"We're not going to spend a
long time debating student
safety."
The controversial deci-
sion underscores the 51-
year-old superintendent's
shake-up of the lethargic
bureaucracy at the nation's
second-largest school dis-
trict. His swift, bold moves
have rankled some and won
praise from others during
his first year of leadership.
Hired with a mandate to
boost achievement in the


660,000-pupil Los Angeles
Unified School District,
Deasy has become known for
18-hour days that involve
everything from surprise
classroom visits and picking
up playground litter to lob-
bying city elite for donations
and blasting Sacramento
politicians over funding cuts.
He's also gained a reputa-
tion for outspokenness and
a brisk decision-making
style some have criticized as
heavy-handed. Earlier this
year, for instance, Deasy or-
dered a substitute teacher
fired after finding students
doing busy work.
"I'm intolerant when it
comes to students being dis-
respected," he said in an in-
terview between school visits
and meetings. "I do what I
think is right, and everyone
has the right to criticize. You
appreciate the critics, but you
wouldn't get up in the morn-
ing if you listened to them."
Doing what he thinks is
right has put him in some
unusual positions, such as


siding with plaintiffs who
successfully sued the dis-
trict over closely protected
teachers' union tenets -
seniority-based layoff poli-
cies and leaving out student
test scores in teacher per-
formance evaluations.
"He acts on behalf of kids;
you can't fault him for that,"
said A.J. Duffy, the former
president of the teachers
union United Teachers Los
Angeles, who now runs a
charter school. "But there
are processes. People do de-
serve a fair and equitable
hearing."
As the school year was
ending last month, Deasy
was focused on hiring 80
new principals, particularly
at troubled urban high
schools some have called
"dropout factories." Deasy
pushed 50 current princi-
pals to retire or transferred
them, and he aims to inter-
view replacement candi-
dates himself. Developing
leadership is a cornerstone
of his reform strategy


Deasy moves at a rapid
clip, whether it's through
the candidate lists, his re-
form agenda or in striding
around school campuses.
"Keeping up with Dr.
Deasy" is a well-worn joke
around the district.
He is under a tight, self-
imposed deadline to get re-
forms in place in four years


and see higher test scores,
graduation rates and other
education metrics in eight
years.
"The culture in this dis-
trict has been talk, protest,
argue, not actually do," he
said. "This style has come
up against that."
School board President
Monica Garcia applauds


Deasy's speed. "People are
feeling very confident in his
leadership," she said.
Deasy gets advice on man-
aging an organization with a
$6 billion budget and 65,000
employees from his execu-
tive coach, Kevin Sharer,
the former chief executive
of Amgen, the world's
largest biotech company


DISCOVER PHOTO


We are looking for your exciting,
interesting and unique Citrus County
photos. Your photo could be among those
chosen to be displayed in the 2012-2013
Discover Magazine. Please submit only
photos taken in Citrus County and include
a brief description of the photo along with
your name, address and phone number.
Photos must be submitted before July 31,
2012.


I I





ONLY PHOTOS THAT THE PERSON SUBMITTING HAS TAKEN WILL BE ACCEPTED. ONCE THE
PHOTO IS SUBMITTED IT BECOMES THE SOLE PROPERTY OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.


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WORLD


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 A9







Page A I SUNDAY, 2012



ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF Solidifying Afghan relations
Triple digits


Associated Press
Brian Frandsen pours water
over his head in an effort to
cool off Saturday while
building a block wall in
Huntsville, Ala.
Extreme heat
bakes U.S.
PHILADELPHIA- High-
ways buckled across the coun-
try, the waters of Lake
Michigan were unusually warm
for this time of year and even a
minor train derailment outside
Washington was blamed on
heat as the hot weather grip-
ping much of the country only
worsened Saturday.
Temperatures of more than
100 degrees were forecast in
Philadelphia and excessive
heat warnings were issued
for several states in the Mid-
west as the days of smother-
ing heat piled on,
accompanied by severe
storms that have knocked out
power in spots from Michigan
to the East Coast. At least 24
deaths have been blamed on
the heat and several others
on the weather or a combina-
tion of the two. Hundreds of
thousands remained without
power Saturday, mostly in
West Virginia, Ohio and
Michigan.

WorldBRIEFS

Falling down


Associated Press
A young woman falls down
after crossing the finish
line in the Glamour high-
heels race Saturday in
downtown Moscow, Russia.
Participants of the high-
heel run were challenged to
race 50 meters in stilettos
of at least 2.54 inches.

UN: Children being
targeted in Mali
GENEVA- The level of vi-
olence against children and
cases of cholera in northern
Mali are rising at an alarming
rate since the area was seized
by al-Qaida-linked Islamist
fighters and Tuareg rebels fol-
lowing a March coup, U.N. of-
ficials said Friday.
At least 175 boys between
the ages of 12 and 18 have
been recruited into armed
groups, at least eight girls
were sexually assaulted and
two teenage boys were killed
by land mines and unex-
ploded ordnance since the
end of March, the U.N. chil-
dren's agency UNICEF
reported.
UNICEF spokeswoman
Marixie Mercado said school
closures in Mali have affected
300,000 children, making
them more vulnerable to vio-
lence and recruitment as
child soldiers.
"These numbers are rea-
son for alarm, especially be-
cause they represent only a
partial picture of the child pro-
tection context in the north -
an area where access for hu-
manitarian workers is limited,"
Mercado told reporters.
A spokesman for the U.N.'s
Office for the Coordination of
Humanitarian Affairs said
hospital officials in the north-
ern Mali city of Gao told U.N.
officials Thursday they had 24
cases of cholera.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
The U.S. designation Satur-
day of Afghanistan as its
newest "major non-NATO
ally" amounts to a political
statement of support for the
country's long-term stabil-
ity and solidifies close de-
fense cooperation after
American combat troops
withdraw in 2014.
"We see this as a power-
ful commitment to
Afghanistan's future," U.S.
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton said at a
news conference in the
Afghan capital. "We are not


even imagining abandoning
Afghanistan," she said in
the grand courtyard of the
presidential palace after
talks with President Hamid
Karzai.
From Kabul, she and
Karzai headed separately to
Japan for an international
conference on Afghan civil-
ian assistance. Donors
planned to pledge $16 bil-
lion over four years, with
the U.S. share not immedi-
ately clear, according to a
U.S. diplomatic official
speaking on condition of
anonymity ahead of the offi-
cial announcement Sunday
The non-NATO ally dec-


laration allows for stream-
lined defense cooperation,
including expedited pur-
chasing ability of American
equipment and easier ex-
port control regulations.
Afghanistan's military,
heavily dependent on
American and foreign assis-
tance, already enjoys many
of these benefits. The non-
NATO ally status guaran-
tees it will continue to do
so.
Afghanistan is the 15th
such country to receive the
designation.
Clinton insisted progress
was coming incrementally
but consistently to


Associated Press
U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
speaks during a press con-
ference Saturday with Presi-
dent of Afghanistan Hamid
Karzai, at the Presidential
Palace in Kabul.
Afghanistan after decades
of conflict.


Associated Press
Libyans hold up their ink-marked fingers that shows they have voted as they celebrate Saturday in Martyrs'
Square in Tripoli, Libya. Jubilant Libyan voters marked a major step toward democracy after decades of erratic
one-man rule.




Historic election


Libyans have 1st

nationwide vote in

decades

Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya Jubilant
Libyans chose a new parliament
Saturday in their first nationwide
vote in decades, but violence and
protests in the restive east under-
scored the challenges ahead as the
oil-rich North African nation strug-
gles to restore stability after the
ouster of longtime dictator Moam-
mar Gadhafi.
One person was killed and two
wounded in a gunbattle between se-
curity forces and anti-election pro-
testers in the eastern city ofAjdabiya,
according to the head of the election
commission. Nouri al-Abari said the
polling center targeted by the pro-
testers was later reopened and vot-
ing commenced normally
The shooting followed a spate of
attacks on polling centers in the
eastern half of the country, which
was the cradle of the revolution
against Gadhafi, but has become
increasingly angry over the per-
ceived domination of power by ri-
vals in Tripoli.
The vote capped a chaotic tran-
sition that has exposed major
fault lines ranging from the east-
west divide to efforts by Islamists


Associated Press
Libyan women hold up their ink-marked fingers that shows they have voted
Saturday as they drive in Tripoli, Libya.


to assert power
Lines formed outside polling cen-
ters more than an hour before they
opened in the capital, Tripoli, with
policemen and soldiers standing
guard and searching voters and elec-
tion workers before they entered.
"I have a strange but beautiful
feeling today," dentist Adam Tha-
bet said as he waited his turn to
cast a ballot. "We are free at last
after years of fear We knew this
day would come, but we were
afraid it would take a lot longer"
The election for a 200-seat par-
liament, which will be tasked with
forming a new government, was a


key milestone after a bitter civil
war that ended Gadhafi's four-
decade rule. It was the first time
Libyans have voted for a parlia-
ment since 1964, five years before
Gadhafi's military coup that top-
pled the monarchy
But the desert nation of 6 million
people has fallen into turmoil since
Gadhafi was killed by rebel forces
in his home city of Sirte in late Oc-
tober Armed militias operate inde-
pendently, refusing to be brought
under the umbrella of a national
army, and deepening regional and
tribal divisions erupt into violence
with alarming frequency


IRS at center of debate on health care law


Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court's decision to
uphold most of President
Barack Obama's health care
law will come home to roost
for most taxpayers in about
2 1/2 years, when they'll
have to start providing proof
on their tax returns that
they have health insurance.
That scenario puts the In-
ternal Revenue Service at
the center of the debate, re-
newing questions about
whether the agency is capa-
ble of policing the health
care decisions of millions of
people in the United States
while also collecting the


taxes needed to run the fed-
eral government.
Under the law, the IRS
will provide tax breaks and
incentives to help pay for
health insurance and im-
pose penalties on some peo-
ple who don't buy coverage
and on some businesses that
don't offer it to employees.
The changes will require
new regulations, forms and
publications, new computer
programs and a big new
outreach program to ex-
plain it all to taxpayers and
tax professionals. Busi-
nesses that don't claim an
exemption will have to
prove they offer health in-
surance to employees.


The health care law "in-
cludes the largest set of tax
law changes in more than
20 years," according to the
Treasury inspector general
who oversees the IRS. The
agency will have to hire
thousands of workers to
manage it, requiring signif-
icant budget increases.
Treasury spokeswoman
Sabrina Siddiqui said, "The
overwhelming majority of
funds used by the agency to
implement the Affordable
Care Act go to administer
the premium tax credits,
which will be a tax cut aver-
aging about $4,000 for more
than 20 million middle-class
people and families."


The Supreme Court, in its
5-4 ruling, upheld the man-
date that most Americans
get health insurance. The
majority said Congress has
the power to enforce the
mandate under its taxing
authority. The decision la-
beled the penalties a tax,
noting they will be col-
lected by the IRS.
Those who don't get qual-
ified health insurance will
be required to pay the
penalty or tax starting
for the 2014 tax year, unless
they are exempt because of
low income, religious be-
liefs, or because they are
members of American In-
dian tribes.


Russian


floods


kill 103

Associated Press
MOSCOW Intense
flooding in the Black Sea re-
gion of southern Russia
killed 103 people after tor-
rential rains dropped
nearly a foot of water, forc-
ing many to scramble out of
their beds for refuge in trees
and on roofs, officials said
Saturday
Many people were asleep
when the flooding hit
overnight in the Krasnodar
region, and the water rushed
into the area around the
hard-hit town of Krimsk with
such speed and volume ru-
mors emerged that local offi-
cials had opened a nearby
water reservoir Muddy
water coursed through
streets and homes, in some
cases high enough to flow
over the hoods of cars and
even as high as rooftops, ac-
cording to witnesses.
People waded through
waist-high water or maneu-
vered the streets in boats on
Saturday About 5,000 resi-
dences were flooded, the
Krasnodar governor was
quoted as telling the Inter-
fax news agency
"Nobody remembers such
a flood in all (of the area's)
history," Alexander
Tkachev said.
The Interior Ministry
gave the death toll as 103 on
Saturday evening, accord-
ing to Russian news agen-
cies; a regional ministry
spokesman said earlier that
at least 67 of the deaths
were around Krimsk, about
750 miles south of Moscow.
Five people were electro-
cuted in the Black Sea
coastal city of Gelendzhik
after a transformer fell into
the water, state news agency
RIA Novosti said.
Anna Kovalevskaya,
whose parents live in the
flooded area, described
water inundating their
home up to the roof.
"In the town, people are
saying that a reservoir in
the mountains above was
opened," she told the
Moscow-based radio station
Russian News Service. '"A
wave came from there.
There was 7 meters (22 feet)
of water in the town."
Tkachev reacted angrily
to the speculation, saying on
his Twitter account: "Stop
spreading stupid rumors ...
Now is the time to get
through things together, not
mock."
President Vladimir Putin
flew to the region Saturday
evening, viewing the dam-
age from a helicopter He
will also meet with regional
officials in Krimsk.
State news channel
Rossiya 24 showed video of
area residents rescuing peo-
ple in small, inflatable boats
and others slogging glumly
through flooded homes.
"It came so fast!" ex-
claimed one woman, whose
name was not given, waving
an arm in frustration at the
shin-deep water in her liv-
ing room, where a large
teddy bear sat on a sofa.
More than 11 inches of
rain had fallen in Ge-
lendzhik since the previous
evening, the state meteoro-
logical service said.
Gelendzhik is on the Black
Sea coast, and along with the
area around it, is a popular
summer vacation spot, in-
cluding many children's
camps. Vice-premier Olga
Golodets told RIA Novosti
that some 7,100 children
were at holiday camps in the
area, and that 459 children
had to be evacuated.
The area also includes
Novorossiisk, a major
Black Sea port. The
Transneft oil company said
Saturday it has suspended
loading oil onto tankers at


the port because of the se-
vere weather
More than 1,500 Emer-
gency Ministry officials
were working to aid flood
victims and clean up the
damage, state TV said.







EPage A 1 SUNDAY, JULY 8,2012



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


E Veterans Notes can be found on Page A13 of
today's Chronicle.
Ss1


-^C. '


e to 'Count Ncount'


Associated Press
Rowan Oak, the home of the late Nobel Prize laureate William Faulkner, in Oxford, Miss., is a prime tourist attraction in the community. Designated a National Historical
Landmark, the home is now owned and maintained by the University of Mississippi as a museum and is open to visitors year-round, allowing a glimpse into the writer's
complex life.



Mississippi hometown marks half century post-Faulkner


EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS
Associated Press
OXFORD, Miss.
Five decades after his
death, William
Faulkner still draws
literary pilgrims to his
Mississippi hometown,
the "little postage stamp
of native soil" he made
famous through his novels.
Oxford inspired the fictional town of
Jefferson that was a frequent setting
for his stories, and it commemorated
the 50th anniversary of the Nobel lau-
reate's death Friday with several
events that included a tag-team read-
ing of his novel, "The Reivers," begin-
ning about daybreak.
Roughly 25,000 people a year visit
Faulkner's antebellum home, Rowan
Oak, which is now owned by the Uni-
versity of Mississippi. The author's
meticulous handwriting appears on the
walls of his downstairs office. Using
pencil, he outlined events of his 1954
novel, "A Fable."
William Griffith, the Rowan Oak cu-
rator since 1999, said writing was a
"demon-driven" task for Faulkner.
"You're going to hear about the
agony and the sweat and the difficulty
and the compulsion," Griffith said.
"You're not going to hear anything
about how great it was, how relaxing
and beautiful it was. None of that. He
just did what he had to do to get it
done."
Oxford's lure is similar to that of Key
West for fans of Ernest Hemingway and
Salinas, Calif., for devotees of John
Steinbeck.
"I've just always wanted to see this,"
Lisa McDanels of Rocky River, Ohio,
said as she and her husband toured
Faulkner's home. "You think, 'Oh, he


A life-sized statue of the late Nobel Prize
laureate William Faulkner sits in front of
the Oxford, Miss., City Hall in the shadow
of the county courthouse.
walked here."'
The two-story Greek Revival home
was built in 1848, and Faulkner bought
it in 1930. It sits a mile from the town
square, but feels isolated because it's
encircled by woods oaks, magnolias,
cedars, dogwoods and honeysuckle.
Griffith said the home retains its char-
acter, with one important addition -
climate control.
Faulkner added central heating in
the 1930s but scorned air conditioning,
despite summer temperatures that
reach the 90s and stifling humidity. In
"The Reivers," a character groused,
"there are no seasons at all any more,
with interiors artificially contrived at
sixty degrees in summer and ninety de-
grees in winter, so that mossbacked re-
cidivists like me must go outside in
summer to escape cold and in winter to
escape heat"


The day after Faulkner died, his
wife, Estelle, had a window-unit air
conditioner installed in her upstairs
bedroom.
Ole Miss bought Rowan Oak in 1972
from the Faulkners' daughter, Jill. The
house was renovated from 2001 to 2003,
and central air conditioning was
added.
Faulkner was known for sitting on
the square to observe Oxford's small-
town comings and goings. In 1997, to
mark the 100th anniversary of his birth
in nearby New Albany, Oxford dedi-
cated a Faulkner statue in front of its
own City Hall. Now, tourists snap pho-
tos by the life-sized bronze.
Faulkner and his wife are buried in
St. Peter's Cemetery, north of the
square, and fans pay tribute by pouring
bourbon on the gravesite.
Donald Kartiganer, professor emeri-
tus of English who held the Faulkner
studies chair at Ole Miss, recalled tak-
ing Salman Rushdie on a private tour
of Rowan Oak in 2006. When Rushdie
saw Faulkner's writing table and type-
writer, his voice fell into hushed rever-
ence and he asked if he could sit there.
Kartiganer said yes.
"He sits down and he puts his hands,
not touching the keys, just sort of hover-
ing over them, the way you would if you
were in the vicinity of a holy relic,"
Kartiganer recalled. "Then he reaches
into his pocket and pulls out the small-
est digital camera I've ever seen and
says, 'Would you take my picture?"'
Mississippi Arts Commission director
Malcolm White compares Faulkner's
posthumous fame to that of another
north Mississippi native.
"He's like Elvis," White said. "He's
never been bigger than he is today"
English professor Jay Watson, Karti-
ganer's successor as Faulkner special-
ist, politely disagrees with White's
assessment. Even during Faulkner's
lifetime, he was recognized as one of
the most important literary figures of
the 20th Century But, Watson concedes
Faulkner is more appreciated in Ox-


ford these days.
"Oxford didn't start coming around to
him until after he won the Nobel Prize"
in 1949, Watson said. "Before then,
most people in Oxford just thought he
was somebody who was making Oxford
look bad. But after he won the Nobel,
all the sudden, he was kind of making
Oxford look good, because he was this
small-town native son who won the
most distinguished award in litera-
ture."
Locals saw Faulkner as an oddball
who'd be so wrapped up in his own
thoughts that he'd often walk past peo-
ple he knew without exchanging pleas-
antries. Faulkner went to Canada and
trained as a Royal Air Force aviator,
but never saw combat because World
War I ended before he completed train-
ing. Nonetheless, Watson said,
Faulkner would walk around Oxford in
a flight officer's uniform, complete with
a cane and sometimes with a limp, and
tell people he'd been wounded in a
plane crash, which wasn't true. Be-
cause he acted like a dandy, locals nick-
named him "Count No-Count."
The local newspaper, The Oxford
Eagle, is publishing essays this year
from people who remember Faulkner.
In one, J.W "Jay" Mitchell, who grew up
in Oxford, recalled being on the square
with friends and making fun of the
writer.
"I remember one day, 1952 or '53, me
and a few friends decided to walk by
Mr. Faulkner, one at a time, and holler,
'Good morning, Mr. Faulkner,' or 'How
are you?,' knowing that he would not
answer," Mitchell wrote. "After we
passed him, we would circle around
and get in front and repeat our taunting
again. He acted as if we were not even
there."
Griffith said he came into the cura-
tor's job with a respect for Faulkner's
prose but not as a "super fan." When he
was growing up in Illinois, an English
teacher assigned him to read "As I Lay
Dying," and he protested with an essay
called, "As I Die Reading."


Pyramid at Costa Maya

While they were on a Western Caribbean cruise with the Carnival Legend,
these friends took time to have a photo made at the pyramid at Costa Maya.
They are: Donna Hynes, Judi Teusher, Frank Strafer and Lillian Kennedy.

Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wife won't explain


her grudge


SUNDAY EVENING JULY 8, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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S 340 241 340 4 Translation" (2003) 'MA' MA' Things" MA' Stereo) '14' MA (N)'MA 'MA'
) 732 112 732 MotoGP Racing SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Lane Wind Tunnel With Dave TwoGuys CarCrazy Formula 1 Formula 1
SPEE] 732 112 732(Live) ___ Despain (N) Garage (N)'G' Pre-Race Racing
7 43 3 2 3 *** "A BronxTale" ***t "Casino" (1995, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci. A mob employ- ***t "A Few Good
SP 37 43 37 27 36 (1993)'R' ee makes a play for power in 1970s Las Vegas. (In Stereo) 'R' Men"(1992)
*** "Peter Pan" ** "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (2010) ** "Jumping the Broom" (2011) Angela "The Girl With the
5AI 370 271 370 (2003) Jason Isaacs. Nicolas Cage. (In Stereo) 'PG' Bassett. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Dragon Tattoo"'R'
S 1 nto the Saltwater Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Saltwater Intothe
(]SJ 36 31 36 Blue'G' Exp. Shape TV Sports. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Exp. Blue 'G'
*** 'Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" 1989) Harrison Ford. *** "War of the Worlds"(2005) Tom Cruise. A man and ***
(51Y) 31 59 31 26 29 Indy's hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail. his children try to survive an alien invasion.'PG-13' "Signs"
(BS) 49 23 49 16 19 t** "TheLongestYard"(2005) c *** "Ocean's Thirteen"(2007) George Clooney. *** "Ocean's Thirteen"
S 19 *** "My Favorite Year" (1982, Comedy) ** "The Bank Dick" (1940, ** "The Steel Trap" (1952) "Crime Wave"
PTCMJ 169 53 169 30 35 Peter O'Toole.'PG' Comedy) W.C. Fields.'NR' Joseph Cotten.'NR' (1954) Premiere.'NR'
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350 261 350 ** "Dr. T & the Women" (2000) Richard Gere, *** "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless *** "As Good as It Gets" (1997) Jack
ITC 350 261 350 Helen Hunt. (In Stereo)'R' Mind" (2004, Romance) Jim Carrey 'R' Nicholson. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
"Bourne *** "The Bourne Ultimatum" (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Falling Skies (N) '14' The Great Escape (N) Falling Skies'14' c
N 48 33 48 31 34 Suprm." Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. PG-13' '14'm
t( N) 38 58 38 33 -** "Hoodwinked!"(2005)'PG' Level Up Level Up Venture King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy |Loiter
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IWGNA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30Rock Mother Mother MotherMothMer other IMother News IReplay The Unit'PG' m


Dear Annie: I have
been married for 24
years to my high
school sweetheart, and we
have two sons. For most of
this time, I have put up with
my wife not al-
lowing any men-
tion of my family
or involvement
whatsoever in
any activities. I
don't know why
this is so, and she
won't tell me. Al-
though I can see
my family on my
own, I am not al-
lowed to invite
them to our home ANN
for a holiday, and
my parents are MAIL
permitted to see
our kids only on rare occa-
sion. Of course, when it's
about her family, she ex-
pects me to jump.
I know my father was less
than perfect 30 years ago,
but I have forgiven him, and
he has righted his wrongs.
He is a good grandfather to
my two boys. My mother and
sisters have done absolutely
nothing to deserve such
poor treatment. But anytime
I bring up the issue, my wife
shuts down all communica-
tion for about a month.
My dad is remarried, and
his new wife has two chil-
dren my age, and I like them
and want my wife to get to
know them. They are good,
wholesome people. But I'm
not even permitted to men-
tion their names. I once de-
cided to simply bring them


STodays MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" (PG) 12
p.m.
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" In 3D.
(PG) 2:35 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Brave" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
No passes.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire
Hunter" (R) Digital. 4:30 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire
Hunter" (R) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20
p.m. No passes.
"That's My Boy" (R) 4 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) 4:45 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In 3D. 1:45
p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Prometheus" (R) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" (PG)


12:15 p.m.
"Katy Perry: Part of Me" In 3D.
(PG) 2:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:35
p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-
13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:50
p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" In
3D. (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Savages" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness
Protection" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:40
p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"People Like Us" (PG-13) 12:50
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50
p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:25 p.m., 2:55 p.m.,
5:30 p.m., 8:05 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
No passes.
"Brave" (PG) 12 p.m., 5 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Monastery
6 Ignoble
10 Render holy
15 Retired jet letters
18 Bend
19 Kind of skate
21 Scoundrel
22 Small case
23 Poem by Kilmer
24 Black-and-yellow bird
25 Benefit
26 Part of speech
27 Mineral
28 Post
29 Daunted
31 Come into view
33 Traveled on
35 Congressional aide
36 Brilliant
37 Copy machine part
38 Quantity of paper
40 Board
41 To be, in Boulogne
42 Watery clay
mixture
44 Tightwad
45 Little bit
47 Small drink
51 Long seat
52 Card game
53 Harangue
55 Stop-- dime
56 "- Doone"
57 Donate
58 Toy dog, for short
60 Annoying ones
62 Press
63 Stubborn
65 Multicolored
66 Pesters playfully
67 A letter
68 African plant
69 The Buckeye State
71 Old anesthetic
73 Lanka
75 Rodent
76 Aches
77 Like a wallflower
78 Calendar abbr.
81 Stable sound
83 Gaelic
84 Fraudulent scheme
85 Irate
87 Prophet
90 Items for scullers


Cancel 12
Sandwich store, for short 13


Supple
Red gems
Part of YMCA
Genus of cats
Sense of self
Cheat
Chirping sound
Least
Openings
Like hand-
me-downs
Grouch
Well-mannered
Big book
Beet variety
As luck have it
Neighbor of Peru
Shrimp
Acid
Abbr. in citations
Feed trough
Bicuspid
Prickle
Black cuckoo
A single time
Eye (comb. form)
Wear away
Footnote abbr.
Related
Citified
Went sightseeing
Racket
Opp. of W.S.W.
Flies high
Garden problem
Water mammal


DOWN
1 Thespian
2 Small donkey
3 Engender
4 "All About -
5 Indeed!
6 Plant used
in salads
7 Equally
8 Gin flavoring
9 Snakyfish
10 Another neighbor of
Peru
11 Adored


Mild oath
- generis
Chose
From stem to -
Increase
Rome's river
Revolving
Industrial plant
Made level
Tapering tower
Declare
Damage
Of horses
Decorative
container
Plant bristles
- Minor
Rocky Mountains' -
Peak
Coasts
More roomy
Flick
Wallace or Myers
Colorfully lustrous
Betsy or Diana
Stake
Bulk
Kind of sandwich
Helmsman's place
Threesomes
Sword
USSR prison camp
Thought
Merit


63 One of the
Osmonds
64 Throaty
66 Flavoring plant
70 That man's
72 life!
74 Linear measure
76 Danger
79 Breakfast fare
80 Suitcase
82 Energy type (abbr.)
84 Glossy
86 Region (abbr.)
87 Designer
Cassini
88 City in Latvia
89 Surmounting
91 Under the covers
93 Correct a text
94 Disparage
96 Stair part


Boater (2 wds.)
Tumbled
Causing laughter
Caution
Grieve
Put on, as a play
Converse
Rained hard
Work in verse
Sings


Filled with trees
Overact
Church dogma
Family member
Kind of bear
Portion
Implied but unsaid
Cordial flavoring
Metric measure
Sousaphone


126 Faithful
130 --Magnon
132 Package
adornment
133 Yoko -
134 Kitchen item


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


over to the house, but my
wife's behavior was so rude
and embarrassing that I
won't do that again. And
then she didn't speak to me
for a month.
I want to spend
time with my
family, and I'd
like my kids to
know their grand-
parents, aunts
and uncles. My
oldest son re-
cently graduated
high school, and
my wife wouldn't
allow him to have
a graduation
IE'S party because I
insisted my fam-
BOX ily be invited.
Please help. -
Stuck in the Middle
Dear Stuck: Unless your
family did something unfor-
givable to your wife, there is
no excuse for her control-
ling behavior. Since she re-
fuses to explain her grudge,
it's impossible to determine
whether it has merit, and
you are apparently disin-
clined to tolerate the conse-
quences of putting your foot
down. Ask your wife to come
with you for counseling, and
if (when) she refuses, please
get some for yourself. Feel
free to spend as much time
with your family as you like,
and take the kids along
whenever possible. They
can develop a relationship
with their grandparents in-
dependent of their mother.
If she objects, she should
explain why


A12 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


4I
Ll





CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will host a buffet breakfast
and program at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 7, commemorating the
230th anniversary of the Pur-
ple Heart and honoring all Pur-
ple Heart recipients.
The families of those who fell
in combat and all combat-
wounded veterans and their
guests are invited. Attendees
are requested to register for the
free breakfast by mailing car-
riejenetteclemons@yahoo.com
or calling Carrie at 352-628-
1633. Indicate the number in
your party.
General George Washington
established the Purple Heart,
originally known as the Badge
of Military Merit, on Aug. 7,
1782. The first American award
made available to the common
soldier, it is the oldest military
decoration in the world in pres-
ent use.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service-
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-422-
8092 or
scook94@tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH


Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.


Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. Call
352-476-4915.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom has announced her asso-
ciation with the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom will offer four free
classes to combat veterans at
several locations:
Pure Elements Yoga and
Wellness, 1925 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. All levels of yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Gentle yoga
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Highway, Crystal River. Chair
yoga from noon to 12:45 p.m.
Monday.
Yoga and More, 5494 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Meditation group from 4 to 5
p.m. Tuesday.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans Way,
Homosassa. Gentle (senior)
yoga from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Sporting Health Club,
3808 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. All levels of yoga from 10
to 11:15 a.m. Friday.
Inverness Yoga, 118 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. Yoga
classes or private instruction;
times/dates to be determined.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-
7397.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60thAve., Ocala. All
are welcome. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328 for more infor-
mation.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
e-mail Amvet447@comcast.net.
Sons of AMVETS meet at
5:30 p.m. Ladies Auxiliary
meets at 4:30 p.m. Thursday,
July 12; post meeting follows at
5:30 p.m.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The


American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the commu-
nity.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-


ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Join the post for a roast pork
dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, July 13; cost is $8 and chil-
dren younger than 6 eat for $4.
Other dinners coming up are
TBA on July 20 and baked ham
for July 27.
Sunday have been desig-
nated as "Sports Days" with
canteen specials and hot dogs.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-
3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
July and August, but will re-
sume meeting in September.
There will be luncheons during
the summer months. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.The
DAV Auxiliary continues ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. We still need clean
cotton materials, yarn, lap
robes, etc., as well as toiletry
articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For information or to
donate items, call Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month. No
dinner will be served at the July
11 meeting.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume
in September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for from all
wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-
erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF


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Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for infor-
mation.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.


Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-726-
5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-344-
4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.




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SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Meryl K. Weber of Crystal
River and Ryan Reynolds of
Crystal River exchanged
nuptial vows in an after-
noon ceremony June 1, 2012,
at The Plantation on Crystal
River. The ceremony was of-
ficiated by the Rev Thomas
Beaverson.
The bride is the daughter
of Glenn and Kathleen
Weber of Crystal River, and
the groom is the son of Gary
and Karen Reynolds.
Given in marriage by her
father, the bride was at-
tended by her best friend,
Kalyn McGarvey, as the ma-
tron of honor. Bridesmaids
were sisters-in-law Trisha
Weber and Rebecca Weber
Her niece, Adison Weber,
was the flower girl and
nephew, Cole Weber, served
as ring-bearer.


Divorces 6/25/12 to 7/1/12
Patricia A. Baker, Citrus Springs
vs. Jason A. Baker, Inverness
Ronald A. Bishop Jr., Inverness
vs. Alison L. Bishop, Inverness
David Allen Brightman,
Homosassa vs. Teresa Lea
Brightman, Inverness
Christopher K. Edney, Inglis vs.
Kenn Thornton, Hernando
Freddie Lee Harvey Jr., Crystal
Rivervs. EricaAnderson, Crystal River
Marilyn Kay Marler, Inverness
vs. Henry Van Marler, Inverness
Christopher H. Morin, Beverly
Hills vs. Tara K. Morin, Beverly Hills
Justin Palmer, Spring Hill vs.
Veronica Palmer, Beverly Hills
Derek W. Patterson, Floral City vs.
April L. Patterson, Fort Lauderdale
Daniel Edward Romero, Ho-
mosassa vs. Jennifer Edith
Romero, Homosassa
Lissette C. Scwieterman, Clermont


Tyran Reynolds, son of
groom, attended his father
as the best man. Gary
Reynolds stood by his son as
groomsman. Ushers were
brothers Grant Weber and
Graham Weber


vs. James Christopher Scwieterman
Indar Sidoo, Queens, N.Y. vs.
Zanipha Sidoo, Citrus Springs
Gregory Dean Spafford Sr.,
Dunnellon vs. Belinda Morado
Spafford, Citrus Springs
Victor H. Worsham, Beverly
Hills vs. Valeria G. Worsham,
Crystal River
Erica Lyn Zieler, Beverly Hills
vs. Jeremy Michael Zieler, Beverly
Hills
Marriages 6/25/12 to 7/1/12
David Lynn Foley, Inverness/
ReginaAnn Mast, Inverness
Maurice Roy Hudson Sr., Crys-
tal River/Ashley Marie Biles, Crys-
tal River
Vincent Michael Mullen, St.
Louis, Mo./Bethanne Ruth Nichols,
St. Louis, Mo.
Raymond Dennis Nightengale,
Citrus Springs/Lisa Ann Amburgey,
Winter Park


25th ANNIVERSARY

The Sergents


Reid and Anita Sergent The couple were wed
of Citrus Springs cele- June 19, 1987, in Franklin
brated their 25th wedding Park Conservatory, Colum-
anniversary June 19, 2012, bus, Ohio. They have lived
with a renewal of vows in in Citrus County for 13
Runaway Bay, Jamaica, years. Anita is in the med-
with their son Kyle and ical field and Reid is a foot-
daughter Lauren. ball and basketball official.


60th ANNIVERSARY:

The Magoteaus


Doyle and Joyce
Magoteau will celebrate
their 60th wedding an-
niversary on July 19, 2012.
The couple were wed in
Tampa in 1952, and lived
there for a few months be-
fore moving to Riverview
in east Hillsborough
County, where Doyle was
employed at what is now
Mosaic. They are both
avid fishermen, so when
Doyle retired, they moved
to Apollo Beach, then En-
glewood. They moved to
Crystal River seven years
ago.
They have three girls:
Charmaine in Tennessee,
Lizbeth in Texas/Braden-
ton and Marlene in


Bradenton. They have two
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
A small anniversary
party and a big fishing trip,
plus a trip to the Seminole
Hard Rock Casino in
Tampa are planned for
celebration.


= Engagement

Boltin/Embree


Christopher and Gloria
Boltin of Dunnellon an-
nounce the engagement
and forthcoming marriage
of their daughter, Jacque-
lyn Boltin, to Timothy Em-
bree of Crystal River, son
of Wayne and Deborah Em-
bree of Crystal River.
The bride-elect, who is
self-employed, studied cos-
metology Her fiance re-
ceived his bachelor's
degree in business from
Missouri Valley College,
where he played baseball.
He is a safety engineer for
Day & Zimmermann NPS.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed at 4:30 p.m. Nov 3,
2012, at Julliette Falls in
Dunnellon.


V
,7~

.


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A14 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jessica and Adam Hard-
ing of Dunnellon announce
the birth of a son, Frank
Micheal Harding, on May
29, 2012, at Munroe General
Hospital. The baby weighed
7 pounds, 5 ounces and was
22 V2 inches long.
Maternal grandparents
are Clarence and Joyce


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Flame-broiled beef
patty with brown gravy, mashed
potatoes, corn with red peppers,
applesauce, whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Birthday celebra-
tion: Noodles Romanoff with
chicken, green beans, carrot
coins, birthday cake, dinner roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad, let-
tuce with carrot and tomato,
marinated broccoli salad, fresh
orange, two slices whole-grain
bread, low-fat milk.


Haggerty Paternal grand-
parents are Peter Harding
and Cathy Harding.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Jody and Thomas
Richardson.
Paternal great-granpar-
ents are Edith Harding and
Carol Bayles and Arthur
Harding.


thigh with coq au vin sauce,
herb mashed potatoes, country
vegetable medley, pineapple,
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Hot dog with mus-
tard and bun, baked beans with
tomato, mixed vegetables,
coleslaw, mixed fruit, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Jotting down the un-bucket list


New ARRIVAL

Frank Harding


There are so many things I don't showoffs in uniforms who keep dis-
want to do before I die that I tracting the camera operators' atten-
have started a list of them that tion from the fans who put in the time
you can stick in my coffin when I pass. and effort to take off their shirts.
Oh, I forgot; I'm not having a coffin. 0 Appear on a reality show. Unless
I'm leaving my body to sci- it's about lottery winners.
ence astronomy. Visit any spring-break
Here is myun-bucketlist: town during spring break.
Visit North Korea. In Yes, I can see you're wear-
these days of extreme ing a hat that lets you
everything, the goal of ex- V drink from two cans of
treme travel is to go some- beer at once. It also ex-
place none of your friends plains why you think
will ever go, even if they are you're going to pay off
world travelers some- $80,000 in student loans
place that will dominate JIM once you get your B.A. in
the dinner conversation, a MULLEN remedial finger painting.
trip that no one can top. Live in a gated com-
It's not easy to find such a place. A munity. Those gates, senor I don't
few years ago, a headline in the travel think they will keep Zorro out. He is
section of The New York Times very clever, you know.
asked, "Why Is Everyone Going to 0 Eat disgusting food on purpose. A
Bhutan?" It was all the sillier when friend told me he was visiting a dis-
you realized that many of the New tant land with different customs, and
Yorkers going to Bhutan had never at a feast one night he was offered a
been to Brooklyn. sheep's eyeball. Not wanting to of-
Paint my body and go shirtless to fend, he ate it. Later in the meal, he
a football game. It seems that fewer asked one of his seatmates why he
and fewer people go to football games had been offered the sheep's eyeball.
to watch football. They go so they can "Is it because I am an honored
be on TV instead of those overpaid guest?"


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You just got engaged, and already friends are asking you when the big day is, where
the wedding will take place, who is going to be your best man and maid of honor, and
so forth. You have so many decisions ahead of you, including the food you serve at
your reception.
There are many factors that could influence the menu choices for your wedding from
your cultural heritage to your budget. Some cultures have traditional wedding foods.
Some don't. Some brides have more to spend than others and can afford to hire a
world-famous caterer to host a seven-course meal for their family and friends.
In addition to culture and budget, the tone of the wedding venue will play a role in your
decision as well. Formal venues like banquet halls and hotel ballrooms might call for a
formal meal, whereas a more casual affair on the beach might call for a clambake or
barbecue. Are you planning to get married in blue jeans in a local park? Then sub
sandwiches or fried chicken might do the trick.
Timing is also a factor. A late morning wedding might call for a brunch buffet, whereas
an evening wedding might call for a sit-down dinner. A wedding at 1 p.m. might not call
for anything but wedding cake and punch, while a wedding at 8 p.m. might call for
drinks and hors-d'oeuvres. If you're not serving a meal, make sure you make that clear
on the invitations. You don't want guests to have to leave early just to fill up their
empty tummies.
What you serve may also be dictated by who is doing the serving. If you have the funds
for a caterer, then you might have more choices available as to what you serve. Just
make sure you select a reputable caterer and get all the details in writing. If you are
planning to do most of the cooking yourself, then you will have to choose foods you
can make within the time frame you have. You may want to enlist the help of others to
ensure you have great food for your big day.
As you are reviewing your options, don't forget about your own preferences. If you're
not one for formality and your groom isn't either, then by all means, skip the formal sit-
down dinner and opt for a buffet instead. If you thirst for adventure, make sure you
reflect that in your food selections. Go ahead and serve squid along with the usual
seafood fare.
The sky is the limit when it comes to reception food. You can serve practically anything
you want, whether your grandma's chicken and dumplings or a local caterer's seafood
faves. Just make sure you take your budget, tastes and other factors into
consideration. And yes, it may be your wedding, but you will not be the only one eating
at your reception. Remember your guests too and try to choose foods that will
accommodate a wide range of tastes.


Contact us to discuss special occasions.
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"No," said his new friend. "They
gave it to you because we don't like
them."
Skydive. There has to be an eas-
ier way to get more legroom than
jumping out of the plane. I'm sure
that if you upgrade to first class, you'll
be allowed to stay for the landing. The
only way skydiving could possibly be
fun is if they make you wear one of
those "I've fallen and I can't get up"
medical alarms when you hit the
ground.
Climb rocks. Inline skating looks
as if it would be fun. Bowling looks as
if it would be fun. Skiing looks as if it
would be fun. Rock climbing, like
bullfighting, does not look like it
would be fun. It looks like a good way
to get hurt.
Do time in a country-club prison.
I watch the news, and all the guys who
are sentenced to life terms in country-
club prisons seem to be about my age.
Now I cross to the other side of the
street when I see a white-haired man
in a business suit walking toward me.
Make a bucket list. I've made a
Happy List. I may not do everything
on it, but it won't matter, will it? I'll
still be happy


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TfI


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 A15





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In SERVICE

Patrick C.
Henry-Alexander
Air Force Airman Patrick C.
Henry-Alexander graduated
from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness,
and basic warfare principles and
skills. Airmen who complete
basic training earn four credits
toward an associate in applied
science degree with the Com-
munity College of the Air Force.
Henry-Alexander is the son of
Johnell Alexander and nephew
of Lynda Simmons, both of Her-
nando. He is a 2009 graduate of
Citrus High School.


Thousands

of veterans

sign up for

retraining
Associated Press
ATLANTA Unem-
ployed veterans may be
heading back to school en
mass under a federal pro-
gram to get out-of-work vet-
erans trained and back in
the job market.
Officials at the U.S. De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
say there has been an enor-
mous response to a new
skills-based program that
pays for up to a year of edu-
cation toward an associate
degree or a non-college-
degree or certificate.
In fewer than seven
weeks since the VA began
accepting applications for
the Veteran Retraining As-
sistance Program (VRAP),
27,080 unemployed veterans
have applied. That's more
than half the maximum
amount the VRAP program
will allow in its first year, VA
spokesman Randal Noller
said this week.
The program is first-
come, first-serve for qualify-
ing veterans between the
ages of 35 and 60 who are
unemployed at the time of
the application. Veterans
who are currently receiving
unemployment benefits or
are enrolled in a federal or
state job training program
do not qualify.
This clause disqualifies most
veterans recently returned
from Iraq and Afghanistan
because they qualify for
other forms of relief.
Veterans who do qualify
can receive up to 12 months
of education assistance in
high demand areas includ-
ing health care, management
and legal services. The VA
will approve up to 45,000
veterans through Septem-
ber 30 of this year and up to
54,000 veterans in the next
fiscal year beginning Octo-
ber 1. The program runs
through March 2014.
So far, 13,083 applications
have been approved and
thousands more pour in
every week.
One recent applicant was
Chester Dixon, who served
in the Army's 82nd Airborne
Division in the 1970s.
Dixon, 60, barely made
the cutoff age. The veteran,
just a month shy of his 61st
birthday, said age isn't a fac-
tor when it comes to return-
ing to school, especially
when it could result in full-
time work something he
hasn't had in five years.
Dixon lost his job in 2007
and said things have been
tough. Despite spotty part-
time work in warehousing,
finances have been strained
and his wife has had to
carry the burden of support-
ing them. A few weeks ago,
she retired after 42 years in
teaching.
If approved for VRAP
Dixon said he plans to study


"water waste" or "sales,"
two categories listed as
high-demand fields.
The program is funded
through the VA. The amount
is equal to the monthly full-
time payment rate under
the Montgomery GI Bill-Ac-
tive Duty program, $1423 a
month. In two years, The VA
will spend a little above $76
million to fund the program.
The total is about $17,000 for
every veteran, of the 99,000
set to be in the program.
The amount will skew lower
if some veterans opt for pro-
grams for that take less than
a year to complete.


Fundraisers important, but donate smart


Many of us can recall a time when we
could donate to a cause or entity with-
out a second thought. Somewhere
along the line, probably when we weren't look-
ing, someone decided to impersonate fund col-
lectors, keeping the money for
themselves, and the new crime
caught on.
Today, a good many smaller
groups and causes suffer due to not
being known well enough for their
fundraisers to be recognized as
genuine, so here are some tips to
help you be smart about who you're
donating to.
You'd think the first way would Barbara
be the most simple. Ask them who VETER
they are representing. But, what if
they lie? Ask for credentials. They
should have a membership or busi-
ness card, but that could be falsified, too. Or,
maybe you're not familiar with what the mem-
bership card should look like. If you ask for a
phone number to verify who they are, it could
be a number to someone set up to falsely
vouch for them. If you've heard of their organ-
ization, if it's nationally recognized, or they
have a uniform that you recognize as being
genuine, you're one step closer.
If the organization is large or easily recog-
nized, such as the Citrus County Veterans
Coalition, Disabled American Veterans (DAV),
American Legion or its Auxiliary, Veterans of
Foreign Wars (VFW), American Veterans
(AMVETS), or your local firemen collecting for
Muscular Dystrophy over the Labor Day week-
end with their boots in hand, it should be safe.
Otherwise, pull up their website, look for the


name as an officer or board member, or get the
phone number and call the membership di-
rector and verify this person's membership.
Don't be shy about it! If the person is genuine,
they won't mind.
If you're approached at a store-
front, first go inside and ask the
S store manager if they are verifiable
Representatives. If yes, then you
should be OK. If no, have the man-
ager call the police to have them
removed.
Some groups collect for a good
cause, but part of your donation
goes to their own salaries. Be
Corcoran aware of this and ask fundraisers if
FANS' they are paid or if they are volun-
teers. Make a well-informed deci-
sion. Ask for a receipt. No matter
what, never give your credit card
number over the phone for anyone seeking a
donation.
In some cases, a non-member will want to
collect donations for an entity they feel
strongly about. This happened to me a few
years ago. I was holding a huge estate sale and
had just had a lengthy, heartwarming experi-
ence with a local group that I wanted to show
my appreciation to. So, not thinking anything
of it, I set up a coffee can with a taped lid on it
and a slit in the lid large enough for paper
money as well as coins, and labeled it accord-
ingly. I was proud and excited just thinking
about walking into their office with a can (or
two!) of donations. What better way to show my
thanks?
Before the first day was over, I was ap-
proached by someone I recognized from that


group. She smiled wide and thanked me for
the thought, then gently asked if I had gotten a
form filled out to establish myself as author-
ized to collect on their behalf a permit, if
you will. It quickly reminded me of Peter Sell-
ers' character, Inspector Clouseau, in the
movie, "A Shot in the Dark," setting up sur-
veillance as a balloon salesman and then as an
artist, only to be arrested twice in quick suc-
cession for not having a permit.
I scratched my head in surprise and replied
that, no I hadn't even thought of that, and that
I had wanted this donation to be a surprise
gift. She explained that many people falsely
collect for entities such as theirs and the pa-
perwork protects the entity, the person col-
lecting donations and those donating, as well.
She also said that until I got the paperwork, I
could still collect, but not "in their name." I
was disappointed, but I could certainly un-
derstand their point, especially in these days
and times. At least I didn't get arrested!
So, for those of you who are iof like mind
and want to collect on the behalf of your fa-
vorite charity, please check with them first to
see if you need any paperwork filled out, and
make sure to have that paperwork and a con-
tact name at the charity for those you ap-
proach, so they in turn can call and verify your
intentions. After all, you want them to "donate
smart," too!

Barbara L. Corcoran is the public information
officer of the Citrus County Veterans Coalition
Inc. She maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More information about
this group may be found at www ccvcfl. org


Ten of the most admired women of Citrus County will be featured in the
special section on Wednesday, September 12,2012



NOMINATION BALLOT


Sponsored by:
S I U ."' e o---. o r

h www. -rideonhne.com


/


f Citrus County's


MOST ADMIRED




MMOMEN


Join the Citrus County Chronicle and Altrusa International of Citrus County to choose the

10 Most Admired Women in Citrus County


Most Admired in the Arts
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


Most Admired in Government
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


Most Admired Mother
Name:
Work or home phone:_
Admired attributes:


Most Admired Athlete
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired Leader
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


PLEASE INCLUDE A SUMMARY OF


Most Admired in Education
Name:
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Admired attributes:




Most Admired in Business
Name:
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Most Admired Up and Coming Youth
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:




Most Admired in Community Involvement
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


Most Admired in the Health Field
Name:
Work or home phone:
Admired attributes:


QUALIFICATION/REASONS ON AN ATTACHED SHEET


RULES AND REGULATIONS


1. Nominees must be a Citrus County resident.
2. All nominations must be received at the Chronicle
business office no later than 5 p.m. on July 25, 2012.
These may be delivered to the Meadowcrest or
Inverness office, or mailed to 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Envelopes must be
marked 10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN.
You may also fax your entry form to the Citrus County

SSubmitted by:


Chronicle at 352-563-5665.
3. Only one nomination per category will be
accepted.
4. Additional information for each nominee may be
attached.
5. Only one nomination entry form per person will be
accepted.
6. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY


Phone:


A16 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


(
R








PS n S, JULY 2012



.PORTS


Tampa Bay pitcher
Matt Moore and the
Rays battle the
Cleveland Indians on
Saturday night./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Coke Zero 400/B2
0 Adult recreation/B2
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Golf/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


Kidd's still got it


Former CRHS golfer

shines in first season

at Florida Atlantic

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER Suspicions are
beginning to take shape concerning Brad
Kidd. Is he more than the perception?
His coach at Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity said as much: "He's very soft-spo-
ken," Angelo Sands said of Kidd. "He's
not really that outgoing. Very reserved,
very quiet.
"But put him on the golf course and he
just kills (the ball). It's as if he went into
a phone booth and came out Superman."
Such were the comments raised by


Kidd following his un-
likely first year of col- Put
legiate golf. The
Crystal River High golf course
School graduate cer-
tainly had high cre- kills (the
dentials when he
arrived at FAU. He
was all-county four Florida Atlanti
times and all-district coach said of c
and all-state his senior
year with a 34.1 stroke average en route
to winning the Chronicle's Boys Golfer of
the Year award.
But he was facing an uphill battle to
make an impact his freshman season at
FAU. He was one of six freshmen on the
team, which also had two seniors, two
juniors and a sophomore.
In addition, Kidd would miss the fall
part of his first collegiate season. Kidd
underwent foot surgery in January and
April of 2011 to help correct a problem


h


b

Al
c U
curu


that had bothered him
im on the since birth, what he
referred to as club
and he just feet.
Kidd was out of ac-
all). tion until November of
his freshman year "It
ngelo Sands was awful," he said. "I
University men's golf was finally healthy in
rent Owl Brad Kidd. November. In Novem-
ber, I started doing
things I usually could do."
Including playing golf. The surgeries
were aimed at helping him, but Kidd

See KIDDPage B4
Brad Kidd, a Crystal River High School
graduate in 2011, finished third for his
Florida Atlantic University men's golf
team at the Sun Belt Conference
Championship in May.
Special to the Chronicle


District 15 Little League
All-Stars Tournament
Major Baseball
Pool A at Crystal River
Crystal River 3 0
Inverness 2 1
Central Citrus 1 2
Lady Lake 0 3
Saturday, June 30
Crystal River 11, Central Citrus 1
Inverness 14, Lady Lake 4
Tuesday, July 3
Crystal River 4, Inverness 2
Central Citrus 10, Lady Lake 0
Thursday, July 5
Crystal River 11, Lady Lake 6
Friday, July 6
Inverness 9, Central Citrus 5
Pool B at Crystal River
Dunnellon 3 0
West Hernando 2 1
Greater Hudson 1 2
Dixie County 0 3
Sunday, July 1
West Hernando 28, Dixie County 2
Dunnellon 7, Greater Hudson 2
Monday, July 2
Greater Hudson 21, Dixie County 3
Dunnellon 7, West Hernando 1
Thursday, July 5
Dunnellon 10, Dixie County 0
Friday, July 6
West Hernando 2, Greater Hudson 1
Saturday, July 7
Semifinals
Crystal River 7, West Hernando 2
Dunnellon 11, Inverness 5
Sunday, July 8
Championships
11 a.m. Crystal River vs. Dunnellon
Senior Baseball
At Crystal River
W L
Crystal River 4 0
Shady Hills 2 2
West Hernando 2 2
Central Citrus 1 3
Inverness 1 3
Monday, July 2
Crystal River 11, West Hernando 0
Tuesday, July 3
Central Citrus 23, Inverness 4
Thursday, July 5
Crystal River 14, Central Citrus 5
Friday, July 6
Shady Hills 10, West Hernando 3
Saturday, July 7
Inverness 14, Shady Hills 7
West Hernando 6, Central Citrus 0
Sunday, July 8
Championship
10 a.m. Crystal River vs. Shady Hills
9-10 Baseball
Champions: Dunnellon
10-11 Baseball
Champions: Inverness
Junior Baseball
Champions: Dunnellon
9-10 Softball
Champions: Dunnellon
Major Softball
Champions: Inverness
Junior Softball
Champions: South Sumter
Senior Softball
Champions: South Sumter


Sizzling semifinals


Dunnellon, CR


to meetfor Major i
Baseball title


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER Blister-
ing summer temperatures did
nothing to stop District 15 Lit-
tle League All-Stars Baseball
Tournament games from bring-
ing more heat to Bicentennial
Park on Saturday as Pool A
runner-up Inverness and Pool
B winner Dunnellon came face
to face for the chance to play in
the champi-
onship game.
Inverness
earned the ma-
jority of its
For more runs in the first
photos, click inning as Dun-
on this story at nellon strug-
www.chronicle gled to find its
online.com. legs; but big
hits in the
third, fifth, and sixth innings
put Dunnellon firmly in the
lead when the game finished as
Dunnellon beat Inverness 11-5,
earning a spot in today's cham-
pionship game against the un-
defeated Pool A winner Crystal
River, who defeated West Her-
nando 7-2 in the other semifi-
nal.
"We played very hard for the
first three innings," Inverness
head coach Jason Shepherd
said of the loss. "We were up
three to nothing and some bad
errors gave them some base
hits to tie us up in the fourth.
And it seemed that our kids got
down a little bit and stopped
hitting (while Dunnellon's)
pitcher kept us down. He's a
really good pitcher"
Dunnellon's Christian Rey
dominated from the mound
after coming on during the first
inning to relieve starter Mau-
rice Goolsby Rey struck out 12
Inverness batters throughout
the course of the game and
made his mark at the plate as
well by going 2 for 4 with two
doubles and two RBIs.
On the mound for Inverness,
Allen Bullweg pitched five
strong innings and struck out


I -- -
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Inverness Majors All-Star second baseman Chase Johnston readies the ball for a double play Saturday
morning after tagging second base as Dunnellon All-Stars base runner Steven Penn is called out
during the District 15 Little League All-Stars Tournament's semifinals at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.


seven batters.
"(Bullweg) did an excellent
job," Shepherd said of his
pitcher "And then Broderick
Paul came in at the end and
shut (Dunnellon) down in the
sixth.
"It is what it is but I'm proud


of them. I think they did an ex-
cellent job this season and we
made it to the semifinals,"
Shepherd added.
Dunnellon hitters proved too
much for Inverness to handle as
Goolsby knocked a two-run
homer in the top of third to even


the score. Goolsby was just a
single short of the cycle, adding
a double and triple in a 3-for-4
performance at the plate.
Goolsby's teammate
Matthew Webb (4 for 4 with two

See SIZZLING/Page B4


Serena Williams claims fifth Wimbledon championship


Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England For
Serena Williams, the low point
came in early 2011, when she spent
hours laying around her home,
overwhelmed by a depressing se-
ries of health scares that sent her
to the hospital repeatedly and kept
her away from tennis for 10
months.
The high point came Saturday
on Centre Court at Wimbledon,
when William dropped down to
the grass, hands covering her face.
She was all the way back, a Grand
Slam champion yet again.
Her serve as good as there is,
her grit as good as ever, Williams
was dominant at the start and fin-


ish, beating Agnieszka Radwanska
of Poland 6-1, 5-7, 6-2 to win a fifth
championship at the All England
Club and 14th major title overall,
ending a two-year drought.
"I just remember, I was on the
couch and I didn't leave the whole
day, for two days. I was just over it
I was praying, like, 'I can't take any
more. I've endured enough. Let me
be able to get through this,"' re-
called Williams, a former No. 1
whose ranking slid to 175th after a
fourth-round loss at the All Eng-
land Club last year, her second
tournament back.
"Coming here and winning today
is amazing," she said. "It's been an
unbelievable journey for me."
Certainly has.


That's why tears flowed during
the on-court trophy ceremony And
why Williams squeezed tight dur-
ing post-victory hugs with her par-
ents and older sister Venus, who
has five Wimbledon titles of her
own meaning that one pair of
siblings who learned to play tennis
on public courts in Compton,
Calif., now accounts for 10 of the
past 13 singles trophies. They
added their fifth Wimbledon dou-
bles championship Saturday night,
teaming to beat Andrea Hlavack-
ova and Lucie Hradecka of the
Czech Republic 7-5, 6-4.
"She hasn't had an easy road.
Things have happened in her life

See SEEA/Page B2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ahead of the wreck


Stewart crosses finish

line beforepack to

win Coke Zero 400

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. There
was no fire or rain. Still, another fran-
tic finish at Daytona International
Speedway.
Tony Stewart emerged the winner,
charging past Daytona 500 winner
Matt Kenseth on the last lap and hold-
ing on as the challengers stacked up
behind him Saturday night in one of
Daytona's trademark wrecks.
"I don't even remember what hap-
pened that last lap," Stewart said.
He has 18 victories at Daytona, sec-
ond only to the late Dale Earnhardt.
Stewart qualified second but started
near the back of the field because his
time was thrown out by NASCAR
when his Chevrolet failed inspection.
He rode around in the back for much
of the event, letting Roush Fenway
Racing teammates Kenseth and Greg
Biffle control the front
The Roush drivers thought they
had the field covered, and probably
still liked their chances on the final
green-white-checkered restart.
Kenseth was the leader with Biffle on
his bumper, as second-place Stewart


hi..,.


Associated Press
Tony Stewart beats Jeff Burton to the checkered flag to win the Sprint Cup's Coke
Zero 400 race Saturday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Ha.


was lined up with Kasey Kahne.
Kenseth and Biffle pulled away for
a lap, but Stewart came quick on the
outside, moved to the front, then
crossed down the track in front of
Kenseth for the lead. Seconds later,
Biffle seemed to wiggle in traffic and
cars began wrecking all over the track.
"I'm not really sure what happened,
they just started wrecking behind us,"
said Kenseth, who started from the
pole in his bid to become the first
driver since 1982 to sweep the two
Daytona races in the same season.
"It seems like we always end these
things in green-white-checkers, and
whenever you do, really anybody
that's in the front few tandems has a


NASCAR embraces


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer

DAYTONA BEACH -
Blog, blog, blog.
Tweet Tweet. Tweet.
Daytona International
Speedway was a twitter as
drivers, media and fans
turned to social media to
keep abreast of the goings-
on inside and outside -
of the race track before the
start of Sprint Cup's Coke
Zero 400 race Saturday
Vendors handed out pam-
phlets and cards in the Fan
Zone promoting everything
from headsets to listen to
the race to joining fan
clubs. Even the speedway
itself pushed for a way to
get instant news via texting.
"What we learned from a
survey we did after the Day-
tona 500 was that fans
wanted to receive updates
about the race schedule,
traffic and parking via text,"
Andrew Booth, spokesman
from DIS, said Saturday
prior to the race. "The fans
have to sign up for it so we
are putting messages
around the track so they
know about it. It is another
way to get race information."
And walking around the
track, it is not uncommon to
see fans taking pictures
with their iPhones and in-
stantly posting them online.
J.T Diaz and his friend,
Chase Cashion, took a
guided tour through the
garage given to fans prior to
the dropping of the green
flag, a place few fans with-


RIC BUSH/Special to
Anthony DeLoreto, left, meets Speed Channel
Rutledge Wood during a guided tour of the garage
ing Saturday's Coke Zero 400.


out connections get to go.
And, Diaz didn't waste
time sharing his experience
with family and friends.
"I have already tweeted
messages and posted pho-
tos on Facebook," the 19-
year-old Orlando man said.
Cashion, 17, said he is
happy to see NASCAR is
making the effort to keep
the fans posted instantly
"It is a great way to stay
connected," he added.


Andrea Clevelai
munications man;
Richard Petty Racil
is almost a full-tim
the two-person n
team to send tweets
ing from the track e
for the team's there(
Marcos Ambros
Almirola and Mike
from the Nationwic
She posts qualify
and post-race rep
constant messages


shot to win the thing. It's so unpre-
dictable. You do things those last two
laps that you'd never do the rest of the
race. It's really hard to figure. You sit
out there and ride around and be
leading the whole race and come
down to one of the green-white-
checkers and have no idea where
you're going to finish."
The final results showed Jeff Bur-
ton came from nowhere to finish sec-
ond in a Richard Childress Racing
Chevrolet, followed by Kenseth in a
Ford and Joey Logano in a Toyota.
Stewart teammate Ryan Newman,
who was involved in a pit road inci-
dent with Kahne and Jeff Gordon, fin-
ished fifth.




technology

16,795 Twitter followers.
RPR has 40,000,000 friends
on Facebook
Cleveland also blast
quotes from the drivers
during the race, like a re-
cent one from Ambrose, the
driver of No. 9 DeWalt Ford.
"He said that he thought
he saw a carcass on the
track," she said with a laugh.
"The drivers can be humor-
ous and the fans don't hear
that part of it on television."
When asked if it has
made the sport better, she
said "Yes.
"It is very important and
fans rely on it," Cleveland
said inside the Fan Zone.
"If we are slow in sending
something out, they get re-
ally mad."
Joe DeLoreto and his
son, Anthony, 13, spent an
hour walking the sacred
ground of the garage.
"My son is autistic and he
knows all kinds of stats
about NASCAR," he said as
the Chronicle he snapped a photo with
reporter Rutledge Wood, an on-per-
area dur- sonality with the Speed
Channel. "He is so excited
nd, com- about being here today, so I
ager for am taking lots of photos."
ng, said it However, for him, they
[e job for are memories for the future.
marketing "No, I am going to email
and post- them or text them," the
ach week proud father from Orlando
e drivers: said. "They are for him to
e, Aric look at for years to come."
Linette, Chronicle Managing
le Series. Editor Sandra Frederick
ing, pre- can be reached at 352-564-
orts and 2930 or sfrederick@
s to the chronicleonline.com


Never know what


will inspire kids


~Ltl


WASHINGTON Bryce
Harper and Michael Bourn
are headed to the All-Star
game after all.
Harper and Bourn were
added to the NL roster for
Tuesday's game in Kansas
City after two players
dropped out due to injuries.
Both outfielders had lost to
David Freese in online voting
for one of the final spots.
The 19-year-old Harper, a


budding star with the Wash-
ington Nationals, becomes
the youngest position player
in the history of the game and
third youngest All-Star ever.
Bourn, Atlanta's dynamic
leadoff hitter, made the NLAII-
Star team for the second time.
He entered Saturday's game
at Philadelphia with a .305 bat-
ting average, seven homers,
32 RBIs and 23 stolen bases.
From wire reports


Recreation BRIEF
Co-ed kickball signups ongoing
The next season of Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's coed kickball league is coming up.
Kickball is an exciting game that can be
played by people of all ages. It's a way to meet
new people and get a little exercise while hav-
ing fun. You must be 18 years old to partici-
pate. Game times will be at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., and 8:30 p.m. Wednesday nights. Games
will last one hour or nine innings, whichever
Occurs first.
So if you're ready for a great combination of fun
and exercise kickball is what you're looking for.
For more information contact Andy Smith,
Special to the Chronicle Parks & Recreation Supervisor at
Co-ed kickball is currently accepting signups. 352-400-0960.


SERENA
Continued from Page B1

that you can't predict or con-
trol, so it's hard to be in that
situation. Things happen
that you didn't deserve," said
Venus, who is dealing with an
autoimmune disease that
can cause fatigue. "For her to
fight through that and come
back and be a champion.... It
was definitely emotional."
A few days after winning
Wimbledon in 2010, Serena
Williams cut both feet on
broken glass while leaving a
restaurant in Germany She
needed two operations on
her right foot. Then she got
blood clots in her lungs, for
which she needed to inject
herself with a blood thinner
Those shots led to a pool of
blood gathering under her
stomach's skin, requiring


another procedure.
"That made her realize
where her life was, really,
and where she really be-
longed and that she really
loved the game," said
Williams' mother, Oracene
Price. "You never appreci-
ate anything until you al-
most lose it."
Against Radwanska, who
was trying to be the first Pol-
ish Grand Slam singles
champion, Williams was
streaky at times, but also su-
perb. She won the first five
games and the last five. She
compiled a 58-13 landslide
of winners. She swatted 17
aces, including four at 114
mph, 107 mph, 115 mph, 111
mph in one marvelous game
to pull even at 2-all in the
third set. That was part of a
momentum-swinging run
when Williams claimed 15
of 18 points, and that quar-
tet of aces raised her total


for the fortnight to a tourna-
ment-record 102, surpassing
her own mark of 89 in 2010;
it's also more than the top
number for any man this
year at Wimbledon.
"So many aces," said Rad-
wanska, whose two-week
total was 16, "and I couldn't
do much about it."
There had been a mo-
ment, ever so brief, when it
appeared Williams might let
Saturday's match slip away
After she breezed through
the first set on a day when
the wind whipped and the
temperature was in the mid-
50s, rain arrived, causing a
delay of about 20 minutes
between sets.
Radwanska, who has
been fighting a respiratory
illness and blew her nose at
a changeover, quickly fell
behind 3-1 in the second set
Right there is where she
made a stand.


Citrus Publishing employees and their families are not eligible to enter. Email


B2 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


SPORTS


remember taking skat- guy" running in the dee
ing lessons so I could sand over and over again.
beat the bully at the an- That runner was Olympia
nual winter carnival skating George Young who event
race at the elementary ally signed her running
school. In the process I be- shoes. He was known as on
came reasonably of the gutsie,
good, but most distance runner
importantly and in the annals (
most inspiring, I U.S. track an
met NHL hockey was a four-tim
stars Bobby Hull T Olympian an
and Red Kelly. I P bronze medal
watched the c steeplechase:
Olympics on TV He was training
and knew I to do it again a
would be on the Dr. Ron Joseph well as beS
Olympic team. I DOCTOR'S archrival Stev
was inspired by Prefontaine.
those world- ORDERS My wife sti
class athletes to has those shoe
train, endure and compete. given to her by that Olympia
What is great about or- who inspired her go on an
ganizations such as the become Arizona state char
YMCA, school sports pro- pion, one of the first women
grams, AAU, USA Wrestling, marathon runners at age 13,
USA Field Hockey, USA great college runner and, ju,
Boxing, USA Track and as important, raise four kid
many more is they give chil- to become great competitive
dren the opportunity to athletes.
taste and experience and You never know what wi
inspire in them athletically motivate a child. He or sh
On Olympic Day last mayfindasportoreventtha
week, I visited the YMCA they like and that is all the
summer camp program and want to do.
brought my Olympic medal, We have a babysitter wh
the Olympic torch and some knows every detail about
pictures from the Olympics. hockey Her aunt was ir
I really didn't want to go. I spired later in life and i
was tired and just wanted to currently trying out for th
hang with my 7-year-old Tampa adult women'
daughter. My wife gave me hockey team. She has ir
one of those looks and asked ed her niece and I a
who had inspired me and sure her niece will also b
said if I would somehow be there someday
able to inspire just one re o rs was a
child, it would be a great school wrestler and now ha
day and the best experience hs elementary
for my daughter. It was! his elementary school ag
Several of the many kids daughter wrestling in th
at the "Y" summer camp USA Wrestling program
asked the most amazing Olympic wrestling is a pur
questions. We also discov- test of skill and strength be
ered every child in the room tween two competitors, an
was involved in an Olympic a reminder of the origin c
sport. Some of the sports the Olympic Games.
were sports not commonly Therefore, if you loo
seen on the sports page or around in your own family
TV such as shooting, taek- you may see someone wit
wondo, wrestling, and the drive and interest t
archery. While swimming, work toward a goal in sport
baseball, tennis, track and and possibly one of those 3
field and golf were the most Olympic sports. The be,
frequently-noted sports, it thing a friend or parent ca
was decided scalloping was do is to support the idea an
not an Olympic sport! include kids' sports activ:
My wife, a noted high ties into their lives.
school and college distance Ron Joseph, M.D., a han
runner, remembers being 9 and shoulder orthopedic
years old and on one of her surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho
family car trips to Mexico at pedic Institute, may b
the beach watching a "crazy reachedatrbjhand@cox.ne


Nats' Harper, Braves' Bourn added to NL roster


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Indians 7, Rays 3
Tampa Bay Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DJnngsIf 4 00 0 Choorf 4 01 0
C.Penalb 4 00 0 ACarerss 3 1 0 0
Zobristrf 3 1 1 0 JoLopz2b 4 1 1 0
BUptoncf 4 1 2 1 Brantlycf 4 11 1
Kppngr3b 4 00 0 CSantnlb 2 1 1 1
Scott dh 4 1 2 2 Ktchm b 0 0 0 0
JMolinc 4 00 0 Duncandh 3 2 1 2
Conrad 2b 3 00 0 Marson c 3 1 1 1
SRdrgzss 2 01 0 Hannhn3b 4 01 1
EJhnsnss 0 00 0 Cnghm If 3 0 1 1
Totals 32 36 3 Totals 30 7 8 7
Tampa Bay 000 200 001 3
Cleveland 032 000 02x 7
E-S.Rodriguez (11). DP-Tampa Bay 2,
Cleveland 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 5.
2B-Zobrist (18), Jo.Lopez (13), Brantley (23),
C.Santana (13), Marson (6), Cunningham (4).
HR-B.Upton (7), Scott (11), Duncan (8). CS-
Choo (4), Cunningham (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore L,5-6 42-3 5 5 5 5 3
Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 0
Howell 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
W.Davis 1 1 2 2 1 1
Cleveland
JimenezW,8-7 6 5 2 2 1 8
SippH,9 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pestano H,22 1 0 0 0 1 1
Rogers 1 1 1 1 0 2

Yankees 6, Red Sox 1,
first game
NewYork Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeter dh 5 1 3 0 Nava If 4 0 1 0
Teixeirlb 4 0 0 0 Ciriaco2b 4 0 0 0
AIRdrg 3b 5 0 1 0 Ortiz dh 1 1 1 0
Cano2b 4 1 1 0 AdGnzlb 4 0 1 0
Swisherrf 3 1 2 3 MGomz3b 4 0 2 1
Grndrscf 0 00 0 Kalishcf 4 00 0
AnJonslf 5 22 2 Avilesss 4 0 0 0
J.Nixss 3 1 1 1 Shppchc 3 0 1 0
DMcDncf 2 00 0 Lillirdg rf 3 0 1 0
Wisecf-rf 2 00 0
CStwrtc 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 6116 Totals 311 7 1
NewYork 400 200 000 6
Boston 000 100 000 1
E-M.Gomez (1). DP-NewYork 3. LOB-New
York 9, Boston 6. 2B-Cano (25), Shoppach
(10). HR-Swisher (13), An.Jones 2 (9), J.Nix
(3). SB-Jeter (7).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
FGarciaW,3-2 62-36 1 1 2 5
Eppley 11-3 0 0 0 1 1
Quails 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
FMorales L,1-2 31-3 6 6 6 2 2
Germano 52-3 5 0 0 2 7

Red Sox 9, Yankees 5,
second game
NewYork Boston


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Jeter ss 5 1 0 0 Nava If 5 01 0
Grndrscf 4 1 1 0 Punto2b-3b 3 02 1
Teixeirdh 4 1 1 3 Ortizdh 4 02 0
Cano2b 4 01 0 Sltlmchc 5 00 0
Swis.lb-rf 2 00 0 AdGnzllb 5 2 3 0
AnJonslf-rf 4 1 1 1 C.Rossrf 4 1 00
J.Nix3b 3 0 0 0 Sweenycf 5 1 1 1
Ibanezph-lf 1 0 0 0 MGomz3b 4 2 3 1
RMartnc 2 01 0 Avilespr-ss 1 1 1 0
AIRdrgph 1 000 0 Ciriacoss-2b 5 2 3 3
DMcDnrf 2 000
ErChvz lb-3b 21 1 1
Totals 34 56 5 Totals 41 916 6
NewYork 300 000 101 5
Boston 001 013 40x 9
E-Jeter (7), D.McDonald (2), J.Nix (2), R.Mar-
tin (5), Mitchell (1), M.Gomez 2 (3). DP-New
York 2. LOB-New York 6, Boston 12. 2B-
R.Martin (11), Punto (5), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (27),
M.Gomez 2 (3), Aviles (21), Ciriaco (1). 3B-
Sweeney (2). HR-Teixeira (15), An.Jones (10),
Er.Chavez (7). SB-Ciriaco (1). SF-Punto.


New York
PHughes L,9-7
Logan
Wade
Rapada
Mitchell
Boston
Doubront W,9-4
Albers H,5
Mortensen
Padilla H,19
Aceves


IP H RERBBSO


51-310
2-3 1
2-3 3
1-3 1
1 1


3 1
1 2
1 0
3 0
3 0

3 1
0 1
3 2
3 0
1 0


Tigers 8, Royals 7
Kansas City Detroit
ab r h bi ab r
AGordnlf 4 1 2 0 AJcksncf 5 1
AEscorss 4 3 3 0 Berry If 4 0
Hosmerlb 3 21 0 MiCarr3b 31
Butler dh 5 0 3 3 Fielder 1b 2 1
Bourgspr 0 00 0 DYongdh 4 1
YBtncr2b 4 0 0 1 Raburn rf 4 0
Mostks3b 4 1 2 3 D.Kelly rf 0 0
Francrrf 4 0 0 0 JhPerltss 4 1
S.Perezc 4 00 0 RSantg2b 3 2
JDysoncf 4 00 0 Lairdc 3 1
Totals 36 7117 Totals 328
Kansas City 200 010 103 -
Detroit 230 100 20x -


3
1
0
0
1

6
1
1
0
1




h bi
3 1
1 0
0 1
1 2
1 2
00
00
1 0
20
31
12 7
S7
- 8


E-J.Dyson (6), Moustakas (9). DP-Kansas
City 1. LOB-Kansas City 9, Detroit 6. 2B-
A.Gordon (26), A.Escobar (21), R.Santiago 2
(7), Laird 2 (6). HR-Moustakas (15), Fielder
(14), D.Young (9). SB-A.Escobar (13), Bour-
geois (2). CS-A.Jackson (3). S-Berry SF-
YBetancourt, Moustakas, Mi.Cabrera.


Kansas City
B.Chen L,7-8
Adcock
Collins
Detroit
FisterW,2-6
D.Downs H,1
Villarreal H,5
Coke H,15
Benoit
Valverde


IP H RERBBSO


White Sox 2, Blue Jays 0
Toronto Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Lawrie3b 3 01 0 DeAzacf 4 00 0
KJhnsn2b 1 00 0 Youkils3b 3 1 1 2
Rasmscf 3 00 0 A.Dunndh 3 01 0
Bautistrf 4 01 0 Konerklb 4 01 0
Encrnc dh 3 0 1 0 Rios rf 2 00 0
Lindlb 3 00 0 Przynsc 2 00 0
YEscorss 3 0 1 0 Viciedo If 3 0 0 0
RDavislf 3 00 0 AIRmrzss 3 1 1 0
Vizquel2b 3 00 0 OHudsn2b 2 00 0
Arenciic 3 01 0
Totals 29 05 0 Totals 26 2 4 2
Toronto 000 000 000 0
Chicago 000 020 OOx 2
DP-Toronto 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Toronto 4,
Chicago 5.2B-Bautista (11). HR-Youkilis (7).
SB-Encarnacion (9). S-O.Hudson.
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
R.Romero L,8-4
Frasor
Oliver
Chicago
Floyd W,7-8
Thornton S,2-5


72-3 4 0 0 2 3
11-3 1 0 0 0 2


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
NewYork 51
Baltimore 45
Tampa Bay 44
Boston 43
Toronto 42


Wash.
NewYork
Atlanta
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
33.607 5-5
38 .542 5/2 4-6
41 .518 7/2 2 4-6
42 .506 8/2 3 3-7
43 .494 9/2 4 4-6



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
33 .598 - 7-3
39 .541 4Y2 7-3
39 .536 5 /2 5-5
43 .488 9 4/2 7-3
49 .430 14 9/2 1-9


Home Away
25-16 26-17 Chicago
22-20 23-18 Cleveland
24-19 20-22 Detroit
22-23 21-19 Kan.City
23-19 19-24 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
37.560 8-2
40 .524 3 1/2 7-3
42 .506 4/2 3 7-3
46 .446 9/2 8 3-7
48 .429 11 9/2 6-4


Home Away
24-21 23-16
24-20 20-20
21-20 22-22
14-23 23-23
17-25 19-23


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-1 24-15 25-18
W-1 26-19 20-20
W-3 20-22 25-17
L-1 22-22 19-21
L-3 17-26 20-23


Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
37.560 8-2
38 .542 1'/2 4-6
40 .529 22 1 5-5
45 .464 8 6/2 6-4
52 .388 14/213 1-9
52 .381 15 13Y2 6-4


Home Away
28-14 19-23
23-16 22-22
22-20 23-20
22-21 17-24
24-20 9-32
19-20 13-32


L. Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona
San Diego
Colorado


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
34 .600 - 5-5
38 .548 4/2 5-5
42 .500 8/2 3/2 6-4
50 .412 16 11 4-6




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
38 .553 - 4-6
39 .541 1 4-6
43 .482 6 5 3-7
51 .400 13 12 7-3
52 .381 14/213/2 4-6


Home Away
28-16 23-18
23-18 23-20
23-19 19-23
16-25 19-25


Home Away
27-16 20-22
26-16 20-23
21-21 19-22
17-25 17-26
18-25 14-27


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Matt Moore, second from right, adjusts his cap as players meet at the mound in the
third inning Saturday against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland. The Rays lost 7-3 to the Indians.



Rays can't cope with Indians


Clevelandjumps on


TB starter Moore

Associated Press

CLEVELAND Ubaldo Jimenez
struck out eight over six innings and
Shelley Duncan hit a two-run homer
to help the Cleveland Indians beat
the Tampa Bay Rays 7-3 Saturday
The Indians got three doubles in the
second inning off rookie Matt Moore
(5-6) as they jumped to a 3-0 lead.
Jimenez (8-7) allowed a two-run
homer to Luke Scott in the fourth,
but otherwise was in command. The
right-hander gave up five hits and
walked only one.
Duncan's homer his fourth in
his past six games came off re-
liever Wade Davis and made it 7-2 in
the eighth.
Cleveland's fourth win in five
games kept the second-place Indians
three games behind the Chicago
White Sox in the AL Central. The
Rays have lost nine of 13.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 6, Red Sox 1, Game 1
BOSTON -Andruw Jones hit two of
New York's four homers, Freddy Garcia
pitched 6 2-3 solid innings in muggy
conditions and the Yankees beat the
Boston Red Sox 6-1 in the opener of a
split doubleheader.
Nick Swisher belted a three-run shot in
the first and Jayson Nix added a solo
drive in the fourth as the Yankees im-
proved to 4-0 against the Red Sox this
season. Swisher snapped an 0-for-17
slide with his 13th homer.
Derek Jeter had three singles for New
York, which won its third straight.
The Red Sox have lost five in a row
and seven of nine.

Red Sox 9, Yankees 5, Game 2
BOSTON Newcomers Pedro Ciri-
aco and Mauro Gomez had three hits
each and the Boston Red Sox gained a
split of their day-night doubleheader with
a 9-5 win over the New York Yankees.
Ciriaco drove in three runs with a
bases-clearing double one day after being
called up from Pawtucket. Gomez is 8 for
17 in five games since being promoted
from the Triple-A team Tuesday night.
Andruw Jones hit three homers in the
doubleheader, including two of the Yan-
kees' four in their 6-1 win in the opener in
which Freddy Garcia pitched 6 2-3 solid
innings in muggy conditions. They added
three homers in the nightcap, running
their baseball-high total to 133. They're
on a pace for a club-record 255. The
1997 Seattle Mariners hold the major
league record with 264.

Tigers 8, Royals 7
DETROIT Prince Fielder hit a two-
run, game-tying homer in the first, Del-
mon Young had a two-run home run to
pad the lead in the seventh inning and
the Detroit Tigers held on to beat the
Kansas City Royals 8-7.
Detroit closer Jose Valverde started the
ninth with a four-run lead and almost lost it.
Valverde walked Alex Gordon on four
pitches to lead off the inning, gave up a
double to Alcides Escobar and walked
Eric Hosmer to load the bases. All-Star
Billy Butler hit a two-run single to pull
Kansas City within two runs.
Yuniesky Betancourt nearly hit a go-
ahead, three-run homer on a fly center
fielder Austin Jackson tracked down near
the wall in left-center.

White Sox 2, Blue Jays 0
CHICAGO Gavin Floyd pitched 7 2-
3 innings of four-hit ball and Kevin Youk-
ilis hit a two-run homer to lead the


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Detroit 4, Kansas City 2
Tampa Bay 10, Cleveland 3
N.Y Yankees 10, Boston 8
Minnesota 5, Texas 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 2
Baltimore 3, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 4, Seattle 1, 11 innings
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 6, Boston 1, 1 st game
Detroit 8, Kansas City 7
Chicago White Sox 2, Toronto 0
Cleveland 7, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 4, Minnesota 3, 10 innings
Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 5, 2nd game
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, late
Seattle at Oakland, late
Sunday's Games
Kansas City (Teaford 1-1) at Detroit (Scherzer7-5), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5) at Cleveland (McAllister 3-1),
1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1),
2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 7-4) at L.A. Angels (Mills 0-0), 3:35 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 6-5) at Oakland (B.Colon 6-7), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (De Vries 2-1) at Texas (Oswalt 2-1), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Nova 9-3) at Boston (Lester 5-5), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Kansas City MO, 8:15 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 0
Colorado 5, Washington 1
San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 5
Chicago Cubs 8, N.Y Mets 7
Milwaukee 7, Houston 1
Miami 3, St. Louis 2
Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Cincinnati 6, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, Colorado 1
Houston 6, Milwaukee 3
Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 1
N.Y Mets 3, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 3, Miami 2
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati at San Diego, late
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
Sunday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 3-3) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-3),
1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Jurrjens 2-2) at Philadelphia (Worley 4-5), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Guthrie 3-8) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-6),
1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 3-9) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett
9-2), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 0-3) at Houston (Lyles 2-5), 2:05 p.m.
Miami (A.Sanchez 4-6) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-1), 2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5) at San Diego (Marquis 1-4), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 9-3) atArizona (Bauer 0-1), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Kansas City MO, 8:15 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B4.


Chicago White Sox to a 2-0 victory over
the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday.
Floyd (7-8) struck out three and walked
two while improving to 3-1 with a 1.37
ERA in his last four starts. The 6-foot-6
right-hander received a standing ovation
when he left in the eighth.
The White Sox have won five straight to
move a season-high 10 games over .500.
The AL Central leaders also have won a
season-high seven straight at home.

Rangers 4, Twins 3
ARLINGTON, Texas Nelson Cruz hit
an RBI double in the 10th inning to lead
the Texas Rangers to a 4-3 victory over
the Minnesota Twins, snapping their five-
game losing streak.
Texas' Josh Hamilton had a home run,
walk and a run scored as the designated
hitter one night after leaving in the fifth in-
ning with back spasms.
Cruz finished 3 for 5 with two doubles
and two RBIs, and Adrian Beltre hit a
home run that tied the game in the sixth
as the Rangers improved to 41-5 the
past two years in games in which Beltre
has homered.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 3, Marlins 2
ST. LOUIS Kyle Lohse beat the
Miami Marlins with seven innings of
three-hit ball in 106-degree heat and Tony
Cruz hit a go-ahead two-run triple in the


St. Louis Cardinals' 3-2 victory.
Allen Craig had three hits and Skip
Schumaker added an RBI single in the
fourth for the Cardinals, who have won
five of seven and snapped the Marlins'
three-game winning streak.
David Freese was hit by a pitch twice,
walked and singled to reach base safely
in all four trips.
Justin Ruggiano hit a two-run home
run for the Marlins, who missed a chance
to climb back to .500.

Mets 3, Cubs 1
NEWYORK Ike Davis homered, Jor-
dany Valdespin hit one out for the second
day in a row and Dillon Gee pitched one-
run ball for eight innings to help the New
York Mets beat the Chicago Cubs 3-1.
Gee (6-7) gave up seven hits without a
walk and struck out four to keep up a run
of strong starts by Mets pitchers. They've
gone at least six innings in 19 of the past
21 games, and have an ERA of 3.16.
Bobby Parnell allowed a leadoff double
to Anthony Rizzo, but retired the final
three batters for his second save, striking
out Steve Clevenger on a 101 mph fast-
ball to end it.

Pirates 3, Giants 1
PITTSBURGH James McDonald
scattered four hits over seven innings,
Mike McKenry homered and the Pitts-
burgh Pirates edged the San Francisco
Giants 3-1.
Neil Walker doubled twice and drove in
a run while extending his hitting streak to
11 games and Joel Hanrahan worked the
ninth to pick up his 23rd save.
McDonald (9-3) struck out 10 and
walked none, winning his fourth
straight start and lowering his sparkling
ERA to 2.37.

Nationals 4, Rockies 1
WASHINGTON Gio Gonzalez
pitched six innings of three-hit ball to earn
his 12th win, lan Desmond homered, and
the Washington Nationals used a three-
run sixth to beat the Colorado Rockies 4-1.
Gonzalez (12-3) won his fourth straight
start to move into a tie with R.A. Dickey of
the New York Mets for the major league
lead in wins. Gonzalez allowed one run,
walked three and struck out six.
It was the fifth victory in six games for
the Nationals, who own the best record
in the NL.

Astros 6, Brewers 3
HOUSTON Scott Moore homered
for the second straight day and J.D. Mar-
tinez and Jose Altuve had three hits each
as the Houston Astros took advantage of
the first-inning ejection of Zack Greinke to
get a 6-3 win over Milwaukee and break a
season-long nine-game losing streak.
Greinke (9-3) entered the game looking
for his 10th win; instead he was gone after
four pitches ejected after spiking the
ball following a close play at first base.
Manager Ron Roenicke was also
tossed for arguing the call and the Brew-
ers were forced to piece together the
game with six relievers.

Braves 6, Phillies 3
PHILADELPHIA- Tommy Hanson
pitched effectively into the eighth, Brian Mc-
Cann homered and the Atlanta Braves beat
the struggling Philadelphia Phillies 6-3.
The five-time defending NL East cham-
pions are freefalling since Chase Utley re-
turned to the lineup, losing nine of 10.
They just got Ryan Howard back on Friday
night and have lost two in a row, though
the former NL MVP didn't play in this loss.
Hanson (10-5) allowed three runs and
six hits, striking out six in seven-plus in-
nings. Eric O'Flaherty worked the rest of
the eighth and Craig Kimbrel finished for
his 24th save in 25 tries.


NL


Chicago


Mets 3, Cubs 1
SNewYork
ab r h bi ab


r h bi


DeJesscf 4 01 1 Tejadass 4 1 2 0
SCastross 4 01 0 DnMrp2b 4 01 0
Rizzolb 4 020 DWrght3b 3 01 0
ASorinlf 4 0 0 0 I.Davislb 4 11 2
LaHairrf 4 0 1 0 Dudarf 3 01 0
Clevngrc 4 0 0 0 Vldspn If 3 12 1
Barney2b 3 01 0 Hairstnph-lf 1 00 0
Valuen3b 3 12 0 Tholec 3 00 0
Smrdzjp 2 00 0 Niwnhscf 3 01 0
RJhnsn ph 1 00 0 Gee p 3 00 0
Mainep 00 Parnellp 0 00 0
Corpasp 0 000
Totals 33 181 Totals 31 39 3
Chicago 000 001 000 1
NewYork 012 000 00x 3
DP-Chicago 2, NewYork 1. LOB-Chicago 5,
NewYork 6. 2B-Rizzo (4), Valbuena (7). HR-
I.Davis (12), Valdespin (4). SB-D.Wright (9).
CS-S.Castro (10).
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Samardzija L,6-8
Maine
Corpas
NewYork
Gee W,6-7
Parnell S,2-5


7 7 3 3 2 4
773324
2-32 0 0 0 0
1-30 0 0 0 0

8 7 1 1 0 4
1 1 0 0 0 1
871104
110001


Cardinals 3, Marlins 2
Miami St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Reyesss 4 00 0 Furcalss 4 00 0
HRmrz3b 4 00 0 Jay cf 4 01 0
Ca.Leelb 3 00 0 Hollidylf 3 01 0
Stantonrf 1 1 1 0 Beltranrf 4 00 0
Cousinscf 2 00 0 Craiglb 4 13 0
LeBlncp 0 00 0 Freese3b 1 1 1 0
Kearnsph 1 0 0 0 Schmkr2b 3 1 1 1
Morrsnlf 4 0 1 0 Descals2b 1 00 0
Ruggin cf-rf 4 1 2 2 T.Cruzc 4 01 2
DSolan2b 4 00 0 Lohsep 3 00 0
Hayesc 3 0 1 0 Boggsp 0 00 0
Zamrnp 2 00 0 SRonsnph 1 00 0
Dobbsrf 1 0 1 0 Mottep 0 00 0
Totals 33 26 2 Totals 323 8 3
Miami 020 000 000 2
St. Louis 000 300 00x 3
E-Zambrano (2), Craig (3). LOB-Miami 5, St.
Louis 9. 2B-Dobbs (4), Craig 2 (13). 3B-
TCruz (1). HR-Ruggiano (6).
IP H RERBBSO


Miami
Zambrano L,4-7
LeBlanc
St. Louis
Lohse W,9-2
Boggs H,13
Motte S,20-24


5 7 3 3 2 4


7 3 2 2 1 4
573324
310004

732214
110001
120001


Pirates 3, Giants 1
San Francisco Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GBlancrf 412 1 0 Sutton If 4 01 0
Theriot2b 4 02 1 Grillip 0 00 0
MeCarrlf 4 00 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
Poseyc 4 000 Walker2b 4021
Sandovl3b 3 00 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 0
Pagan cf 3 00 0 GJonesrf 4 00 0
Beltib 3 00 McGehIb 4 00 0
BCrwfrss 3 0 1 0 PAIvrz3b 3 01 1
Vglsngp 1 00 0 McKnrc 3 1 2 1
Schrhltph 1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0
Henslyp 0 00 0 JMcDnlp 1 1 1 0
GHrndz ph-lf 1 00 0
Totals 30 151 Totals 3138 3
San Francisco 000 001 000 1
Pittsburgh 001 101 00x 3
E-McKenry (1). DP-San Francisco 1, Pitts-
burgh 1. LOB-San Francisco 3, Pittsburgh 5.
2B-Sutton (6), Walker 2 (20), PAlvarez (15),
McKenry (7). HR-McKenry (7). S-Vogelsong.
IP H RERBBSO


San Francisco
Vogelsong L,7-4
Hensley
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald W,9-3
Grilli H,21
Hanrahan S,23-26


7 8 3 3 1 5
783315
100000

7 4 1 1 0 10
1 0 0 0 0 3
1 1 0 0 0 0
100003
110000


Nationals 4, Rockies 1


Colorado

Fowler cf
Scutaro 2b
CGnzlz If
Cuddyrlb
Colvin rf
Pachec 3b
Roenck p
MtRynl p
Ottavin p
EYong ph
WRosr c
JHerrr ss
Giambi ph
Francis p
Nelson 3b
Totals
Colorado


ab r h bi
4030
3000
4000
3110
3000
2 0 0 1
2001
0000
0000
0000
1 0 1 0
1010
4010
3000
1 0 0 0
1000
2000
2000
32 16 1
000


Washington
a
Espinos 2b
Harper cf
Zmrmn 3b
Morse rf
LaRoch lb
Dsmnd ss
TMoore If
Matths p
SBurntt p
Clipprd p
Flores c
GGnzlz p
Berndn If
Lmrdzz ph-lf


ab rh bi
4 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
4110
4110
3 1 1 1
4010
3000
3 1 2 1
3 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3121
3010


0000
0000
0000
3000
2000
0000
0000


Totals 29 4 7 2
100 000 1


Washington 010 003 OOx 4
E-Cuddyer (5), Nelson (7), Roenicke (1),
W.Rosario (9). DP-Colorado 3. LOB-Col-
orado 8, Washington 4. 2B-Fowler (11), Cud-
dyer (25), Espinosa (20). HR-Desmond (16).
SB-Scutaro (7). S-Lombardozzi. SF-
Pacheco.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
FrancisL,2-2 5 6 3 3 1 5
Roenicke 1 1 1 0 1 0
Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 3
Washington
G.GonzalezW,12-3 6 3 1 1 3 6
MattheusH,8 1 0 0 0 0 3
S.BurnettH,17 1 1 0 0 0 1
ClippardS,14-15 1 2 0 0 0 2

Astros 6, Brewers 3


Milwaukee Houston
ab r h bi


CGomzcf 4 00 0
Ishikawlb 1 0 0 0
Aokirf-cf 5 01 0
Braun If 4 1 1 0
ArRmr3b 5 1 2 0
Hartb-rf 3 11 01
RWeks2b 3 00 1
Mldnd c 4 00 0
Clztursss 4 0 1 0
Greinkp 0 00 0
LHrndzp 1 00 0
Verasp 0 00 0
Morgan ph 1 00 0
Wolf p 0 00 0
Greenph 0 00 0
Dillardp 0 00 0
MParrp 0 0 0 0
Kottars ph 0 0 00
Ransm ph 1 0 1 1
Loe p 0 000
Totals 36 37 2
Milwaukee 000
Houston 103


Schafer cf
Altuve 2b
SMoore 3b
Lyon p
MDwns lb
JDMrtn If
Lowrie ss
CJhnsn lb
Abad p
DelRsr p
Myers p
JCastro c
Bogsvc rf
WRdrg p
FRdrgz p
Wrght p
Dmngz 3b


ab rh bi


Totals 33613 5
002 010 3
110 OOx 6


E-R.Weeks (11), M.Maldonado (2), S.Moore
2 (2). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Milwaukee 10,
Houston 8. 2B-Ransom (8), Lowrie (16),
C.Johnson (15). 3B-Schafer (2). HR-S.Moore
(3). SB-Schafer (20), Altuve (15). S-Schafer.
SF-J.Castro 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Greinke L,9-3 0 2 1 1 0 0
L.Hernandez 3 5 3 3 1 2
Veras 1 1 1 0 1 1
Wolf 2 3 1 1 0 1
Dillard 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
M.Parra 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Loe 1 1 0 0 0 1
Houston
RodriguezW,7-6 51-3 4 2 0 2 5
FRodriguez H,8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
W.Wright 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Lyon 1 2 1 1 0 1
Abad 0 1 0 0 0 0
Del Rosario H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MyersS,18-20 1 0 0 0 0 0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Braves 6, Phillies 3
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourncf 4 2 3 0 Rollins ss 4 0 0 1
Prado If 5 0 2 2 Victorncf 4 0 0 0
Heywrdrf 4 0 0 0Utley2b 4 0 0 0
C.Jones 3b 3 1 1 0 Ruizc 4 0 1 0
FFrmnlb 4 1 1 0 Pencerf 3 1 2 0
McCnnc 4 1 2 2 Polanc3b 3 1 0 0
Uggla2b 4 0 0 0 Pierrelf 3 1 1 1
Smmnsss 3 1 1 1 Mayrrylb 2 01 0
Hansonp 2 00 0 Blantonp 2 01 1
OFIhrtp 0 0 0 0 Diekmnp 0 0 0 0
M.Diaz ph 1 0 0 0 Pridie ph 0 00 0
Kimrelp 0 0 0 0 Wggntnph 1 00 0
Horst p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 6105 Totals 30 3 6 3
Atlanta 011 200 200 6
Philadelphia 030 000 000 3
E-Pence (5). DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Atlanta 5,
Philadelphia 1. 2B-Prado (23), Ruiz (21),
Pierre (6). HR-McCann (12). SB-Bourn 2
(25), Prado 2 (11). CS-Bourn (8), Rollins (4).
S-Hanson. SF-Simmons.
IP H R ER BBSO


Atlanta
Hanson W,10-5
O'Flaherty H,15
Kimbrel S,24-25
Philadelphia
Blanton L,7-8
Diekman
Horst


6 3 3 1 6
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2
63316
00000
00002


61-3 9 6 5 1 6
12-3 0 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 0 2


Rangers 4, Twins 3,
10 innings


Minnesota


Texas


ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 5 0 1 0 Kinsler2b 5 0 1 0
Revererf 5 0 1 0 Andrusss 5 0 1 0
Mauerc 2 0 0 0 Hamltndh 4 1 1 1
Wlngh If 4 1 1 1 Beltre 3b 5 33 1
Mornealb 4 1 2 0 N.Cruzrf 5 0 3 2
Doumitdh 4 1 2 0 MiYonglb 4 0 0 0
Mstrnn pr-dh0 0 0 DvMrp If 3 0 1 0
Plouffe 3b 4 0 1 1 Napoli c 1 0 0 0
Dozierss 4 0 1 1 Gentrycf 2 00 0
JCarrll2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 36 3103 Totals 34410 4
Minnesota 020 001 000 0 3
Texas 010 101 000 1 4
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Plouffe (9). DP-Minnesota 2, Texas 3.
LOB-Minnesota 7, Texas 10. 2B-Doumit 2
(16), J.Carroll (10), N.Cruz 2 (21). HR-Will-
ingham (19), Hamilton (27), Beltre (15). SB-
Revere (18), Mastroianni (9), DavMurphy (7).
CS-Revere (5). S-Gentry.
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Deduno 51-3 6 3 3 3 3
Gray 11-3 2 0 0 0 0
TRobertson 0 0 0 0 1 0
AI.Burnett 11-3 0 0 0 2 1
Burton 1 0 0 0 0 2
Waldrop L,0-1 0 2 1 1 0 0
Texas
D.Holland 6 6 3 3 2 4
Scheppers 2-3 2 0 0 0 0
R.Ross 11-3 0 0 0 2 1
NathanW,1-2 2 2 0 0 0 2



LPGA Tour

U.S. Women's Open
Saturday
At Blackwolf Run Championship Course,
Kohler,Wis.
Purse: $3.25 million
Yardage: 6,954, Par 72
Third Round
a-denotes amateur
Na Yeon Choi 71-72-65--208 -8
Amy Yang 73-72-69-214 -2
LexiThompson 70-73-72-215 -1
Mika Miyazato 71-71-73-215 -1
Sandra Gal 71-70-74--215 -1
Vicky Hurst 71-70-75 -216 E
Paula Creamer 73-73-71 -217 +1
Nicole Castrale 73-70-74--217 +1
Lizette Salas 69-73-75-217 +1
Inbee Park 71-70-76--217 +1
Cristie Kerr 69-71-77-217 +1
Suzann Pettersen 71-68-78-217 +1
Giulia Sergas 74-71-73-218 +2
Michelle Wie 74-66-78--218 +2
Shanshan Feng 74-74-71 -219 +3
Danielle Kang 78-70-71 --219 +3
Azahara Munoz 73-73-73-219 +3
SoYeonRyu 74-71-74-219 +3
Ai Miyazato 70-74-75-219 +3
Jeong Jang 73-72-75-220 +4
Alison Walshe 74-71-75--220 +4
Jessica Korda 74-71-75-220 +4
SakuraYokomine 75-70-75--220 +4
IIHee Lee 72-71-77-220 +4
Cindy LaCrosse 73-74-74--221 +5
Se Ri Pak 72-73-76--221 +5
Beatriz Recari 70-75-76-221 +5
Pornanong Phatlum 76-69-76--221 +5
Numa Gulyanamitta 73-76-73-222 +6
Katie Futcher 73-75-74--222 +6
Jennifer Johnson 76-70-76--222 +6
Jimin Kang 72-72-78--222 +6
Brittany Lincicome 69-80-74--223 +7
Mina Harigae 77-71-75--223 +7
Melissa Reid 79-69-75--223 +7
Jenny Shin 76-71-76--223 +7
Jennie Lee 70-74-79--223 +7
Diana Luna 76-72-76--224 +8
Brittany Lang 73-74-77- 224 +8
YaniTseng 74-72-78--224 +8
Meena Lee 71-78-76-225 +9
Carlota Ciganda 76-72-77--225 +9
Heather Bowie Young 75-73-77--225 +9
Anna Nordqvist 72-74-79--225 +9
a-Lydia Ko 74-72-79--225 +9
Hee Kyung Seo 72-73-80 -225 +9
Jinyoung Pak 73-72-80--225 +9
Gerina Piller 73-71-81 -225 +9
PGA Tour

The Greenbrier Classic
Saturday
At The Old White TPC,
White Sulphur Springs,W.Va.
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 7,274, Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Webb Simpson 65-66-65-196 -14
Troy Kelly 69-67-62 -198 -12
Ken Duke 66-68-65-199 -11
J.B. Holmes 65-68-66 -199 -11
Charlie Beljan 70-62-67-199 -11
Ted Potter, Jr. 69-67-64-200 -10
Blake Adams 67-70-64 -201 -9
Graham DeLaet 67-70-64-201 -9
CharlieWi 67-66-68-201 -9
Martin Flores 64-68-69--201 -9
Bill Haas 68-69-65--202 -8
Keegan Bradley 68-68-66--202 -8
Carl Pettersson 71-65-66-202 -8
Seung-Yul Noh 68-67-67-202 -8
JeffOverton 70-65-67-202 -8
Steve Wheatcroft 70-68-64 -202 -8
Scott Piercy 66-68-68-202 -8
Billy Mayfair 69-65-68 --202 -8
Bob Estes 69-65-68--202 -8
Jerry Kelly 66-66-70 -202 -8
Jonathan Byrd 64-68-70 -202 -8
Billy Horschel 66-70-67-203 -7
Daniel Summerhays 68-67-68--203 -7
Davis Love III 69-66-68--203 -7
Sean O'Hair 66-68-69--203 -7
Johnson Wagner 68-69-67-204 -6
Patrick Cantlay 67-70-67--204 -6
Steve Stricker 69-67-68-204 -6
Kevin Na 69-67-68--204 -6


FOr the record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
... CASH 3 (early)
1-8-6
CASH 3 (late)
J 0-8-1

PLAY 4 (early)
S9-3-5-8
PLAY 4 (late)
8-0-2-3

FANTASY 5
Floida LOtty 5-14-21-23-29

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3-5-29-39-59 2-6-17-26-31-40
POWER BALL XTRA
29 3


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (FOX) Formula One: British Grand Prix (Same-day
Tape)
12:30 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar: Honda Indy Toronto
2 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Summit Racing Equipment
Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BADMINTON
3 a.m. (47 FAM) BWF Indonesian Open Premier
Superseries semifinals (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Cleveland Indians
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at St. Louis Cardinals
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Toronto Blue Jays at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBC) 2012 Tour de France Stage 8
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 8
(Same-day Tape)
BOWLING
2 p.m. (ESPN2) PBA Summer Shootout (Taped)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Alstom Open de
France Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Women's Open Championship Final
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Greenbrier Classic Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Nature Valley First Tee
Open Final Round
MOTORCYCLE RACING
1:30 p.m. (NBC) AMA Motocross Series (Taped)
OLYMPICS
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Olympic Trials Women's Water Polo:
USAvs. Hungary
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR South Point Vegas
Challenge (Taped)
SOCCER
3 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Galaxy at Chicago Fire
TENNIS
9 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 Wimbledon Championships Men's
Final: Roger Federer vs. Andy Murray
3 p.m. (ABC) 2012 Wimbledon Championships Men's Final
Highlights (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


David Hearn
a-Justin Thomas
Kevin Chappell
Vijay Singh
Ricky Barnes
Gavin Coles
John Daly
Brian Harman
Pat Perez
Tim Petrovic
Edward Loar
Richard H. Lee
Rod Pampling
Dustin Johnson
Roberto Castro
Brendon de Jonge
Ryuji Imada
Garth Mulroy
Jeff Maggert
Scott Stallings
Kenny Perry
Ben Curtis
Will Claxton
Scott Brown
John Merrick
John Huh
Brendon Todd
Hunter Haas
Troy Matteson
Cameron Tringale
Chris Couch
D.A. Points
Brandt Snedeker
Spencer Levin
Kris Blanks
Kyle Reifers
Fran Quinn
D.J.Trahan
Tom Watson
Kevin Streelman


69-68-67-
67-71-66-
69-66-69-
63-74-68-
69-67-69-
68-68-69-
68-67-70-
69-68-69-
71-66-69-
69-68-69-
73-64-69-
67-70-69-
69-67-70-
71-67-68-
71-64-71
74-64-68-
71-68-67-
65-74-67-
64-68-74-
67-70-70-
70-66-71
70-68-69-
73-65-69-
67-71-69-
69-70-68-
71-68-68-
70-69-68-
69-67-72-
70-67-71
71-67-70-
68-68-72-
69-69-70-
71-68-69-
73-64-72-
72-66-71
68-70-71
68-67-74-
69-69-71 -
70-68-71
67-68-74-


Wimbledon Results
Saturday
At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club, Wimbledon, England
Purse: $25.03 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Championship
Serena Williams (6), United States, def.
Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, 1-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Jonathan Marray Britain, and Frederik Nielsen,
Denmark, def. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and
Horia Tecau (5), Romania, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-7
(5), 6-3.
Women
Championship
Serena andVenusWilliams, United States, def.
Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Hradecka (6),
Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-4.
Mixed
Semifinals
Mike Bryan and Lisa Raymond (2), United
States, def. Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, and Katarina
Srebotnik (3), Slovenia, 6-3, 6-4.
Leader Paes, India, and Elena Vesnina (4),
Russia, def. Bob Bryan and Liezel Huber (1),
United States, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.


Sprint Cup

Coke Zero 400 results
Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (42) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 160 laps, 86.3
rating, 47 points.
2. (20) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 160, 78.4, 42.
3. (1) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 160, 133, 43.
4. (19) Joey Logano, Toyota, 160, 86, 40.
5. (2) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 160,106.9, 39.
6. (12) Carl Edwards, Ford, 160, 108.8, 38.
7. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 160, 103.9, 37.
8. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 160, 74.7, 36.
9. (28) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 160, 77, 35.
10. (41) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 160, 54, 34.
11. (39) David Reutimann, Chevy, 160, 74.3, 33.
12. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160, 90.5, 32.
13. (30) Jamie McMurray, Chevy, 160, 95.8, 31.
14. (13) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160, 66.6, 30.
15. (24) D. Earnhardt Jr, Chevy 160, 93.5, 29.
16. (40) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 160, 66.9, 28.
17. (18) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 160, 93.5, 28.
18. (7) Casey Mears, Ford, 160, 60.6, 27.
19. (17) Aric Almirola, Ford, 160, 78.2, 25.
20. (34) Terry Labonte, Ford, 160, 48.4, 24.
21. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 160, 111.7, 24.
22. (33) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 160, 50.6, 22.
23. (11) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 159, 64.6, 21.
24. (22) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 159, 99.5, 21.
25. (23) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 156, 80, 19.
26. (27) D. Ragan, Ford, accident, 154, 55.2, 19.
27. (15) T Bayne, Ford, accident, 152, 68.2, 0.
28. (14) J. Montoya, Chevy, accident, 152,62.7,16.
29. (29) C. Bowyer, Toyota, accident, 152, 58.7,15.
30. (10) M.Ambrose, Ford, accident, 152, 75.4,14.
31. (32) D.Gilliland, Ford, accident, 152, 56.2,14.
32. (38) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 151, 45.8, 12.
33. (8) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 149, 50.4, 0.
34. (25) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 133, 60, 10.
35. (35) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 132, 64.7, 9.
36. (16) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, accident,
123, 71.4, 8.
37. (6) Bill Elliott, Chevy, accident, 123, 71.2, 7.
38. (31) Josh Wise, Ford, transmission, 47,
39.8, 7.
39. (26) D.Stremme, Toyota, rear gear, 25, 30, 5.
40. (43) J. Yeley, Toyota, overheating, 16, 24.9, 4.
41. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, overheating,
10,29,0.
42. (37) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, overheat-
ing, 4, 27.9, 2.
43. (21) Michael McDowell, Ford, overheating,
3, 27.3, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 157.653 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 32 minutes, 14 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 6 for 23 laps.
Lead Changes: 12 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: M.Kenseth 1-41; D.Ragan 42;
J.Wise 43-45; M.Truex Jr. 46-47; G.Biffle 48-82;
C.Mears 83; M.Kenseth 84-123; Ky.Busch 124-
126; D.Gilliland 127; Ky.Busch 128-130; TStew-
art 131-151; M.Kenseth 152-159; TStewart 160.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): M.Kenseth, 3 times for 89 laps; G.Biffle, 1
time for 35 laps; TStewart, 2 times for 22 laps;
KyBusch, 2 times for 6 laps; J.Wise, 1 time for
3 laps; M.Truex Jr., 1 time for 2 laps; C.Mears,
1 time for 1 lap; D.Ragan, 1 time for 1 lap;
D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap.


Choi's great round grabs



U.S. Women's Open lead


Simpson takes

two-stroke lead

into final round

ofPGA event

Associated Press

KOHLER, Wis. Na Yeon
Choi had one of the best
rounds in U.S. Women's Open
history, taking control of the
tournament with a 7-under 65
in the third round at Black-
wolf Run on Saturday
The fifth-ranked South
Korean star's remarkable
round put her at 8 under for
the tournament, giving her a
six-stroke lead over Amy
Yang. Only four players ever
have posted a lower round
in the Open, and the 65 tied
the lowest third-round score
in the event's history
Michelle Wie faded,
shooting a 6-over 78 to fall to
2 over. Wie shot a 66 on Fri-
day, putting her a stroke be-
hind leader Suzann
Pettersen. Pettersen also
shot a 78 and slid to 1 over.
Yang had a 69. Choi and
Yang were the only players
to break 70 in the round.
Lexi Thompson, Mika
Miyazato and Sandra Gal
were tied for third at 1 under
The 17-year-old Thompson
had a 72, Miyazato shot 73,
and Gal had a 74.
Top-ranked Yani Tseng
struggled, shooting a 78 and
fading to 8 over.
PGA Tour
WHITE SULPHUR
SPRINGS, W.Va. U.S. Open
champion Webb Simpson shot




SIZZLING
Continued from Page B1

RBIs) knocked in the first
run of the fifth-inning rally
that took the game safely out
of Inverness' hands.
Standouts for Inverness
during the game include
George McKenzie (2 for 3
with a double and two
RBIs), catcher Michael Van-
DerTulip (2 for 3 with a dou-
ble), and Chase Johnston (2
for 3).
"The kids played great
today They were phenome-
nal," Dunnellon head coach
Timothy Tyson said of his
team's win. "I'm just so
proud of my kids. It's been
unbelievable and (so many)
hit the ball well."
Major Baseball
Semifinal

Crystal River 7,
West Hernando 2
The undefeated Pool A win-
ner Crystal River gave nothing
away to Pool B runner-up West
Hernando as the two teams
met up in its semifinal game
Saturday.




KIDD
Continued from Page B1

went into the winter and
spring parts of his season
apprehensive. In high
school, Kidd had about 50
cortisone shots to ease the
pain in his feet.
That was no longer neces-
sary Indeed, when Kidd
started playing again, even
he was surprised by the
results.
"It went a lot better than I
thought," he said. "Going
into that (winter) semester, I
was just hoping to play two
or three events. Playing in
all seven, including the con-
ference tournament, was
something I didn't expect."
Kidd didn't just play, he
excelled. "It was a very
pleasant surprise," said
Sands of Kidd and two other
freshmen who excelled,
Pablo Gerboles-Parilla and
Chip Hoch. Kidd shot 77-80-
79 236 at the Sun Belt
Conference Championship,


finishing third for the Owls
at Muscle Shoals, Ala. His
best showing of the season
may have come at the FAU
Spring Break Champi-
onship at Fountains Coun-
try Club, when he carded a
77-74-73 224.
Such a showing may be
anticipated from a fresh-
man who's had the benefit


Associated Press
Na Yeon Choi watches her tee shot Saturday on the 14th
hole during the third round of the U.S. Women's Open golf
tournament in Kohler, Wis. Choi shot a 7-under 65, which
was the third-lowest score in the event's history.


a 5-under 65 to take a two-
stroke lead into the final round
of the Greenbrier Classic.
Simpson had his second
straight bogey-free round to
reach 14 under on The Green-
brier Resort's Old White TPC
course. Last year in the event,
he briefly led entering the final
nine holes, but faded to a tie
for ninth.
Troy Kelly was second after
a 62. He had hip-replacement
surgery in September 2010
after being diagnosed with
arthritis.
Rookie Charlie Beljan, J.B.
Holmes and Ken Duke were 11
under. Beljan had a 67, Holmes
a 66, and Duke a 65.
Holmes had part of his skull
removed in September 2011,
four months after he started
having vertigo symptoms. He
returned to the tour in January.
Champions Tour
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -


"(A) great team effort, this
was the performance I've
waited to see them (put to-
gether) as a team," Crystal
River head coach Mike Lemar
said. "We had some great help
at the plate. (It was) just an all-
around solid (day) of team
baseball."
Crystal River's Zach
O'Callaghan pitched four solid
innings while hitting two dou-
bles at the plate. Kyle Mitchell
closed out the game from the
mound for Crystal River. Caleb
Dix went 2 for 2 while team-
mate TJ Keefer made impres-
sive plays from first base and
went 3 for 3 at bat, participating
in the vast majority of Crystal
River's seven runs.
West Hernando standouts in-
cluded pitcher Nick Scarangella
faring well from the mound for
five innings, while Johnny Ball
hit well from the plate. Team-
mate Jaylon Fuzz hit a solo
home run in the game.
Senior Baseball

Inverness 14,
Shady Hills 7
Starting pitcher Tyler Pills-
bury worked hard for four in-
nings, keeping Inverness safe


of collegiate golf in the fall.
Kidd didn't, and the adjust-
ment wasn't simple.
"I was used to one little
season in the fall," Kidd
said, referring to his nine-
hole matches with the Pi-
rates. At FAU, he would
play 54-hole tournaments
twice a week, which in-
cluded 36 holes in one day
combined with a lot of
travel.
Still, Kidd adjusted.
Sands found few technical
problems in Kidd's game:
"There weren't many weak-
nesses in his game mechan-
ically He just needs to
understand golf course
management and playing to
his strengths and weak-
nesses.
"Those guys on the PGA
Tour know how, but younger
players need to learn it.
That's the skill most young
golfers need to learn, golf
course management."
His deficiencies in that
area did not take Kidd long
to realize. "He knows," he
said of his coach. "He's been
around.
"He's one of the reasons I
went to FAU. He's a great
coach. He helps me with the
mental part of my game. He
knows how to make the
game simpler.
"I walked in there think-
ing I could play college golf.
I would just say, 'I already
know that' and then hit a


Tom Kite shot a 3-under 69 at
Pebble Beach for a share of
the lead with Brad Bryant after
the second round of the First
Tee Open.
The 62-year-old Kite won the
1983 Bing Crosby National Pro-
Am and 1992 U.S. Open at
Pebble Beach, the site of the
final round Sunday in the
Champions Tour event.
Bryant, winless since the
2007 U.S. Senior Open, had a
67 at Del Monte to match Kite
at 8 under.
Bobby Clampett, Peter Sen-
ior and Mark McNulty were tied
for third at 5 under. Clampett
had a 67, Senior shot a 70, and
McNulty a 71 all at Pebble
Beach.
Cook withdrew after nine
holes Saturday because of a
lingering neck injury. He was 5
over for the round and even
par overall when he stopped
playing.


and out in front of Shady Hills
with 14 runs for most the game.
Alex Delgado Jr. came in to es-
cape a bases-loaded jam, as-
sisting in a double play before
striking out the last batter.
Hunter Zuppinger went 3 for
4 and proved a reliable clutch
hitter in the game and his
brother, Michael Zuppinger,
performed well defensively at
third base.
Shady Hills plays Crystal
River in the Senior Division
championships today.
West Hernando 6,
Central Citrus 0
West Hernando rebounded
after Friday's loss to Shady
Hills, shutting out Central Citrus
for the win. Dominick Broccoli
came in late in the game to re-
lieve Tyler Forcone on the
mound, giving up only one run
to Central Citrus. Charles
Guardino led the team in RBIs.
Standouts for Central Citrus
include John Edwards with
two singles, Cody Anderson
with a double, and pitcher
Derrick Schenk who pitched
well for his team, silencing
West Hernando's bats in the
latter innings.


ball into the rough. And
(Sands) would come up to
me and say, 'What did we
talk about earlier?' He
wouldn't yell or anything.
"After the first couple of
tournaments, I started lis-
tening to him."
The corrective surgeries
allowed Kidd to play pain-
free and, he said, he gained
about 20 yards on his long
game. Still, Kidd considers
his short game his greatest
strength.
"I didn't hit it as far as
everyone out there, and the
only way I could catch up
was with my short game," he
said.
While others were going
for the green on their sec-
ond shot on par fours, Kidd
would lay up. And that's
where Sands advice became
more valuable.
It also showed that, while
Kidd's recuperative powers
were certainly remarkable,
he did have his weaknesses
- and he knew how to deal
with them.
"Coming down to the final
nine holes on that last day
(of a tournament), I was
huffing and puffing," he said
of his adjustment to colle-
giate golf. "This year I won't
have that problem.
"I can't wait to see (our
team) in a couple of years."
If all progress like Kidd
did, they'll need more
phone booths at FAU.


B4 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Don


O Art


"FREEDOM" Flying For Fundraiser

To Benefit the Key Training Center


$' o l


t/


Donate $25 or more to the Key Training Center
during the month of July and receive a custom
11x14 photo print of "FREEDOM" by Artist
Don Mayo. Larger photo prints up to 20x25
are available by calling 352-795-DUCK(3825).
All contributions are accepted by CHECK ONLY
made out to the Key Training Center and are
gratefully appreciated. Mail orders can be sent to
P.O. Box 1209, Crystal River, FL 34423*.


Custom photo prints are available at the Citrus County
Chronicle in Crystal River. Please watch this ad all month for
ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS to make your donation and receive
the Don Mayo "FREEDOM" print.

Special thanks to VisualSports.org for their printing the custom
photo for the Key Training Center.


*To help defer additional
costs for shipping and handling
please add $5.00.


C I T R U S *0C U 0 T Y
CHROpNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 B5


OBZE27







Page B6 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012




-NTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Khan celebrates
with graduates
NEW ORLEANS -
More than three dozen
women who have been on
a year-
long jour-
ney of
introspec-
tion and
achieve-
ment,
with help
from
Chaka Grammy
Khan Award-
winning
singer Chaka Khan, pre-
pare to celebrate their
transformations in a cer-
emony at the Essence
Music Festival.
Last year, the Chaka
Khan Foundation part-
nered with the Institute
of Women and Ethnic
Studies and Essence to
help the women through
an in-depth, life-altering
process that has resulted
in some of them finishing
their high school educa-
tions and others starting
their own businesses.
Khan said the women
being recognized Satur-
day are not the same peo-
ple she met a year ago.
Khan will deliver the
commencement address
and perform for the
"graduates."

Jolie visits Bosnia
for film festival
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-
Herzegovina -Angelina
Jolie has arrived in
Bosnia to
attend the
Sarajevo
Film Fes-
tival, this
time as
the city's
honorary
citizen.
Jolie
Angelina has previ-
Jolie ously vis-
ited the
country as a UNHCR am-
bassador, which inspired
her to make her own
movie about the 1992-95
Bosnia war
"In the Land of Blood
and Honey" was released
last year In April, author-
ities in Sarajevo named
the actress-director an
honorary citizen in recog-
nition of her directorial
debut.
Jolie landed in
Bosnia's capital Satur-
day with three of her
children and will appear
on the red carpet at the
film festival in the
evening.

Actor to throw
out first pitch
DETROIT Actor
Dax Shepard will throw
out the first pitch Sun-
day before the Kansas
City Royals-Detroit
Tigers game at Comerica
Park.
Shepard grew up in the
Detroit area.
He is in town promot-
ing the upcoming film
"Hit and Run," which he
wrote, directed and stars
in.
The movie also fea-
tures Shepard's signifi-
cant other, Kristen Bell,
known for her starring
role in The CW's "Veron-
ica Mars."
Shepard will host a
question-and-answer ses-
sion later in the day
about "Hit and Run" at
an area movie theater
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Rich Maxham wipes off the first violin he made before putting it back in its case June 20 in Lynchburg, Va. It took
Maxham nine months to build the instrument. Piece by piece, he carved it from tiger maple and Italian spruce, a
near-replica of the "Cannon," an 18th century violin by Italian master Giuseppe Guarneri.





Music in the blood


Liz BARRY
The News & Advance

LYNCHBURG, Va. It took Rich
Maxham nine months to build his
first violin.
Piece by piece, he carved it from
tiger maple and Italian spruce. The
elegant instrument is a near-replica
of the "Cannon," an 18th-century vi-
olin by Italian master Giuseppe
Guarneri.
Maxham will not play it without
washing his hands first.
"I had a feeling that it was some-
thing I'd enjoy, but it was so much
more satisfying than I could have
ever imagined," the 23-year-old
said.
Violin making is in Maxham's
blood. His great-great-grandfather
made violins in Pennsylvania
around the turn of the century,
drawing business from orchestras
that travelled through New York
and Cleveland.
"We figure he made about 200 vi-
olins or so. I'm fortunate to have a
few of them," he said.
The craft was passed down
through four generations. The
chain broke only once, with Max-
ham's father, who became a music
critic instead.
Maxham started playing the vio-
lin at age 3. Growing up, he spent
hours in his grandfather's work-
shop, watching him build violins.
After graduating from E.C. Glass
High School, he enrolled at St.
John's College, where he played
first chair violin in the orchestra.
During college, Maxham dabbled
in violin repair work. He had some
success, but with his grandfather
gone, he had no mentor to help him
advance.
"I've always had it in my mind
that I've wanted to make a violin,"
he said. "But it always seemed it
was such a high pinnacle for me to
try and reach."
Maxham looked to the experts.
He joined the Violin Society of
America and began attending work-
shops at the University of New
Hampshire. He was accepted to the
prestigious Chicago School of Vio-
lin Making.
But Maxham wasn't sure he was
ready for violin school and the
three to four year commitment it
entailed.
In May 2011, while living in
Lynchburg, he found an unex-
pected mentor in Danny Smith, a
professional violin maker from
Campbell County. He discovered
Smith randomly while surfing the
Internet.
Smith, who had never taken an
apprentice before, agreed to give
Maxham woodcarving lessons.


Birthday Two huge hopes you've been unable to fulfill in
the past several years might finally be in your reach in com-
ing months. Don't be so quick to give up on your dreams -
they haven't been denied, just delayed.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although you'll handle most
everything that comes along very well, your greatest suc-
cesses lie in situations that permit you to use the full scope
of your imagination.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Even if your logic tells you other-
wise, it might be smart to follow your intuitive perceptions,
especially in your commercial dealings. Your instincts will
be right on the money.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) When dealing with someone
who is difficult to figure out, it might be smart for you to try
to appeal to his or her emotions, which might give you a
clue to understanding what you're dealing with.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you have to perform an ardu-


Today's HOROSCOPE

ous task, try to do it out of the range of kibitzers and advis-
ers. They may mean well, but left to your own devices, you
can do a good job.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There is nothing wrong with
being in love with love. In fact, if that's how you want to play
it, know that there is ample room in this world for an opti-
mistic romantic.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) When it comes to several
critical assignments involving deadlines, unless you disci-
pline yourself, you might have trouble finishing them all on
time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) There is a strong possibil-
ity that both your computer and telephone will be be very
busy, either with you trying to reach others or them trying to
touch base with you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your instincts for spotting
excellent bargains are especially sharp. If you have the in-


clination, opportunity and money, it's a good time to get out
and go shopping.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't let anyone put you in
a position where your flexibility is limited. The more inde-
pendently you are able to operate, the more effective you
are likely to be.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's kind of you to be respon-
sive to someone in need, and the person who requires help
isn't likely to forget it. In fact, down the line she or he is
likely to make a sacrifice for you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) The world will see you as a
friend because, much to your credit, you'll not only give a
hoot, but you'll go out of your way to help in every situation.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Things that appear difficult at
first will turn out to be a breeze once you get into them,
mostly because you'll look at the obstacles involved as
stepping stones.


Within weeks, some casual lessons
turned into a steady partnership.
"With Rich, we just kind of
clicked," said Smith, a retired
Lynchburg firefighter who took up
violin making in the 1970s.
Smith has built 54 violins. Some
sell for more than $10,000 at spe-
cialty shops. They have been played
by professional musicians in Rich-
mond, Norfolk, Roanoke and Char-
lotte, and the National Youth
Orchestra.
"It's been very rewarding for me
to do this, because when I'm dead, I
know I can't build any more violins
but I know I'll have an effect on the
violin after I've passed through
Rich."
Maxham was a quick study
Within nine months, he completed
his first violin and was hooked.
"Violin making, I would say, is a
perfect blend of craftsmanship and


artistry because it allows you to
make something that's functional.
Violins are, in essence, a tool. But at
the same time, they're supposed to
be beautiful."
Maxham's violin received glow-
ing reviews. During an acoustics
workshop this summer, it received
praise from Joseph Curtin, one of
the "big guns" in the violin world.
"He told me it was very well in
keeping with the old Cremonese in-
struments. He said it was very close
with his own goals as a maker," he
said. "So I've had a very good re-
ception to the violin. Players, espe-
cially, have been happy with it."
That first violin helped Maxham
land a job with the Potter Violin
Company in Bethesda, Md., one of
the biggest violin shops on the East
Coast. The company hired him to
refurb a collection of 2,800 instru-
ments in need of TLC.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JULY 6
Mega Money: 6 11 32 36
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,473.50
3-of-4 MB 44 $367
3-of-4 868 $55.50
2-of-4 MB 1,324 $25
1-of-4 MB 11,463 $2.50
2-of-4 28,284 $2
Fantasy 5: 2 17 22 27 33
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 333 $555
3-of-5 9,982 $18.50
THURSDAY, JULY 5
Fantasy 5: 7 20 29 31 36
5-of-5 2 winners $104,588.42
4-of-5 256 $131.50
3-of-5 7,934 $11.50
WEDNESDAY, JULY 4
Powerball: 14 -19- 35 -39- 56
Powerball: 33
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 No winners
No Florida winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 8,
the 190th day of 2012. There
are 176 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 8, 1962, the
United States conducted
Starfish Prime, a nuclear test
in which a 1.44 megaton war-
head was detonated 250
miles above the Pacific
Ocean; the resulting electro-
magnetic pulse caused lim-
ited electrical disruptions in
parts of Hawaii.
On this date:
In 1663, King Charles II of
England granted a Royal
Charter to Rhode Island.
In 1776, Col. John Nixon
gave the first public reading
of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, in Philadelphia.
In 1994, Kim II Sung, North
Korea's communist leader
since 1948, died at age 82.
Ten years ago: WorldCom
and its former auditors
clashed over responsibility
for nearly $4 billion in ac-
counting improprieties as
WorldCom's former CEO,
Bernard J. Ebbers, and fi-
nance chief Scott Sullivan re-
fused to testify before a
House panel investigating the
debacle.
Five years ago: Pennsyl-
vania Gov. Ed Rendell or-
dered a range of state
government services shut
down and placed about a third
of the state work force on in-
definite unpaid furlough after
last-minute negotiations failed
to break a budget stalemate.
(A budget deal was ham-
mered out the following night.)
One year ago: Former
first lady Betty Ford died in
Rancho Mirage, Calif., at age
93.
Today's Birthdays:
Singer Jerry Vale is 80.
Singer Steve Lawrence is 77.
Actor Jeffrey Tambor is 68.
Ballerina Cynthia Gregory is
66. Actress Kim Darby is 65.
Children's performer Raffi is
64. Actress Anjelica Huston is
61. Actor Kevin Bacon is 54.
Rock musician Andy Fletcher
(Depeche Mode) is 51. Coun-
try singer Toby Keith is 51.
Rock singer Joan Osborne is
50. Writer-producer Rob Bur-
nett is 50. Actor Billy Crudup
is 44. Actor Michael Weath-
erly is 44. Singer Beck is 42.
Christian rock musician
Stephen Mason (Jars of Clay)
is 37. Actress Sophia Bush is
30. Rock musician Jamie
Cook (Arctic Monkeys) is 27.
Actor Jake McDorman is 26.


Actor Jaden Smith is 14.
Thought for Today:
"America is not just a power,
it is a promise." Nelson A.
Rockefeller, American politi-
cian and businessman (born
this date in 1908, died 1979).


Associated Press
Rich Maxham, foreground, works on his second violin June 20 under the
supervision of his teacher, violin maker Danny Smith, at Smith's shop in
Lynchburg, Va.







I C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012



COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


High-stakes testing


Resolve to reverse

the trend
here is a great deal of mis-
conception about why some
people (including me) are
becoming increasingly critical of
the whole standardized testing
regime.
I was first
elected to
the Citrus
County
S 4 School
Board in
1998, usher-
ing in the ac-
countability
movement I
Pat Deutschman understand
the need to
GUEST know and
COLUMN monitor stu-
dent per-
formance and often insist on
making decisions based on the
value of data.
So why am I advocating joining
other school boards in Florida by
approving a "Resolution on High
Stakes Testing" requesting that the
standardized testing in Florida be
re-evaluated?
I am not against testing or ac-
countability I am opposed to the
overuse and misuse of test scores.
This is a simple distinction.
There has been much written re-
cently listing all of the problems
with the current over-reliance on
tests that were never designed to
determine: readiness to graduate
from high school; teacher effec-
tiveness or performance pay;
school funding; school district
ranking; declaring the test as di-
agnostic when the teachers are for-
bidden from seeing the questions
or answers!
The system of accountability is
completely over-weighted on the
FCAT and now also the End of
Course Exams. Soon we will add to
the mix the Common Core Assess-
ments and thousands of teacher
evaluation exams!
The issue for you, the voter and
taxpayer, is much more personal.
You elected me and four other
school board members and a su-
perintendent of schools to deter-
mine what is best for students in
Citrus County schools. But our
hands are now being tied by peo-
ple who are not accountable to you
or any voter of Florida. You should
be angry I am.
The educational reform move-
ment that supports the growing list
of mandated tests is led by people
who are not elected. Private cor-
porations and foundations are dic-
tating the educational standards -
readily adopted by state legisla-
tors, most of whom are not educa-
tors nor do they seem willing to
listen to them. The mission and fu-
ture of public education has been
dramatically changed by their ef-
forts and hinges now 100 percent
on test scores.
The rules for testing and scoring
in public schools are set by the
commissioner of education and a
six-member state Board of Educa-
tion. These people are all political
appointees, most holdovers from
the Jeb Bush administration. They


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Special to the Chronicle
The rules for testing and scoring in Florida's public schools are set by the commissioner of education and a six-
member state Board of Education.


are accountable to no one except
perhaps the governor who has not
interceded in their controversial
decisions. They are also the ones
responsible for the recent debacle
of test scores plummeting, chang-
ing the passing rates, and now
sending letters to parents declar-
ing the lower scores are simply a
reflection of new assessment pro-
cedures and not a reflection of stu-
dent performance.
Really? That is their response to
50 percent of high school students
who are now at risk of not earning
a high school diploma? When a
non-elected group of people ma-
nipulate test scores, change pass
rates at will, arbitrarily "raise the
bar" and dictate the standards,


they are essentially controlling the
outcomes of public education. It is
not a coincidence and you need to
be aware that these same efforts
are supporting the growing charter
school movement.
A lot of chest-thumping has gone
on recently by those claiming the
tests are the sole factor in im-
provements to student perform-
ance and graduation rates. If that
were so, all schools in Florida
would be performing at the same
level. The truth is teaching matters
and tests don't teach. School su-
perintendents and school boards
have been the ones to create edu-
cational policy, hire the best teach-
ers, provide effective training,
develop evaluation and assess-


ment systems to track student per-
formance all year long, and finally
to analyze data to set priorities and
be accountable for results.
We are also the ones who must
deal with the ramifications of the
test scores. To undermine those very
people who have actually and daily
provided the environment and abil-
ity for students to thrive is a gross in-
justice. To give credit to a test for
student learning is a deception.
So the question to you, the voters
and the taxpayers, is this: Who do
you ultimately trust to make the
decisions that impact our public
schools? Is it the locally elected
boards and superintendents who
will meet with you face to face,
See TESTNGCPage C4


Book REVIEW


Book a balanced analysis of Obama's foreign policy


David E. Sanger, "Con-
front and Conceal: Obama's
Secret Wars and Surprising
Use of American Power"
(New York, Crown Publish-
ers, 2012, 497 pages)- $28.
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
his volume by a
prominent political
journalist gives an in-
sider's view of what he calls
"the foreign policy educa-
tion of a President." The
main sections of the book
deal with (1) Afghanistan
and Pakistan, (2) drones and
cyber-warfare, (3) the "Arab
Spring" and (4) policy toward
China and North Korea. For
reasons to be explained
below, the book has ignited a
good deal of controversy
When Obama took office,
he had won a campaign that
criticized the Republicans
for America's economic
downturn. On foreign policy,
he promised to get out of
Iraq and improve the situa-


tion in Afghanistan. But dur-
ing the first year of his pres-
idency he decided that the
wise option was to get out of
Afghanistan by the end of
2014. That venture had be-
come too costly in terms of
dollars and lives plus
public opinion polling indi-
cated that the American
people are negative on our
involvement.
On the other hand, he sur-
prised many of his advisers
by substantially increasing
the use of drones in the area
and by his focus on tracking
down Osama bin Laden.
There is an excellent 45-
page account of the plan-
ning that went into the
successful raid on the ter-
rorist leader. Sanger also
has an interesting analysis
of why public opinion in
Pakistan so strongly ob-
jected to the raid.
The second section of the
book deals with Iran's ef-
forts to master the process
of enriching uranium -


There is an excellent 45-page
account of the planning that went
into the successful raid on terrorist
leader Osama bin Laden.


supposedly for peaceful
uses. The issue was compli-
cated because Israel's lead-
ers believe the enrichment
program is aimed at devel-
oping nuclear weapons that
could threaten if not de-
stroy- the state of Israel.
Prime Minister Ne-
tanyahu has stated publicly
that the Iran nuclear facili-
ties may justify the raids. If
the international commu-
nity refuses to take steps to
halt the nuclear program,
the Israelis will explore the
option of dropping bombs
on the facilities. The Is-
raelis have already engaged
in various plots (often suc-
cessful) to kill or discourage
those Iranian nuclear
researchers.


Frustrated by the limited
alternatives, the Bush and
then Obama administrations
had been desperate to find a
path between negotiations
(which have been frustrat-
ing) and attacking Iran.
The discussions eventu-
ally led Obama to approve a
plan to ruin the hundreds of
Iranian enrichment cen-
trifuges by infiltrating the
centrifuges with a code that
would cause them to self-
destruct. It was an enor-
mously difficult project, but
eventually it drastically cur-
tailed Iran's nuclear
progress for at least a year.
Even the Iranians admitted
what had happened.
However, regardless of
this clandestine success,


there is little evidence to
suggest that Iran is ceasing
its nuclear research and
development.
The chapters on the "Arab
Spring" begin by recounting
the dilemmas presented by
the popular uprising against
Libya's leader Muammar
Qaddafi, infamous as a
sponsor of terrorism.
The Europeans, who are
dependent on Libya's oil,
wanted to take actions to re-
move the controversial dic-
tator Washington co-
operated in this effort, but
refused to provide much
military support. Eventu-
ally, the NATO-led effort
toppled Qaddafi although it
remains unclear what will
develop there.
More important to U.S. in-
terests is Egypt. When the
Arab Spring movement in-
tensified against Hosni
Mubarak, it caused much
soul-searching as to dilem-
mas between geo-political
See REVW/Page C3


Important

choices in

county

government

elections

The dynamics of
county government
will change later
this year when voters get a
chance to select three
members to the Citrus
County Commission.
We are guaranteed at
least one new commis-
sioner because first-term
board member Winn
Webb is now running for
the Republican nomina-
tion for sheriff.
Four candidates are
seeking Webb's Inverness-
based commission seat
and because it's an open
primary, all voters will get
to select the winner in the
August primary
In fact, all county com-
mission races only at-
tracted Republican
candidates, so the new
open primary rules in
Florida dictate that all
Citrus County voters will
get to participate in the
Aug. 14 primary
Candidates include
Charles Poliseno, the re-
tired public safety direc-
tor for the county; Scott
Adams, a small business
owner and frequent news-
maker; Mike Smallridge,
the current chair of the
embattled county hospital
board; and Teddi Rusnak,
a retired business execu-
tive who was the leader of
the Citrus County Council.
The problem is that this
field of candidates has
really just come together,
and three of the four can-
didates have pretty low
name recognition. Scott
Adams of Hernando has
the highest name recogni-
tion, but the headlines
about his issues have not
always been positive.
Adams has had run-ins
with county officials over
development projects and
he is the one long respon-
sible for the billboard on
C.R. 486 that talks about
Eternity in Hell being a
very long time.
Eternity in Hell can also
be being caught in a
county commission meet-
ing that goes on for eight
hours, but that's another
story
Mike Smallridge has
long wanted to be in-
volved in politics and he
might have thought that
getting a gubernatorial
appointment to the Citrus
County Hospital Board
would help him get some
name recognition. Unfor-
tunately for Smallridge,
being associated with the
governing board is like
being an LSU fan living in
Gainesville.
Citizens are pretty
angry about the mess
See WIDOW/Page C4

POLITICAL PLANS
The Chronicle will
publish a special
electiction section July
28 to inform voters
about the primary
candidates. A special
online election
section will also
examine the
candidates and their
positions at www.
ChronicleOnline.com.
The Chronicle will
host its annual
political forum at
7 p.m. Tuesday, July
31, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in
Inverness.


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012



PINION


"What the country needs are afew
labor-making inventions."

Arnold Glasgow, 1905-1998


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ..................... .................editor
S Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
S Curt Ebitz........................................citizen m em ber
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


KEEP MOMENTUM





Duke now




major player




in Citrus


Duke Energy has now of-
ficially merged with
Progress Energy, the
Florida utility that serves Cit-
rus County.
The Charlotte, N.C.,-based
company is now the largest
electric power holding com-
pany in the United States.
Duke, through
the merger, now THE I
becomes the
largest private The me
employer in Cit- Duke En
rus County and Progress
the largest prop-
erty tax payer. OUR 01
The company
owns five power Time t
plants in Crystal for
River- including
the nuclear plant that has been
in the headlines so much dur-
ing the past two years.
The finality of the merger is
good news for our community.
Because of the uncertainty of
the merger, Progress Energy
was moving ahead slowly with
the plans to repair the long-
idle nuclear plant at the Crys-
tal River area site. Now that
Duke has finalized the merger,
the new utility instantly be-
comes one the largest players
in the power industry With
that standing come deeper
pockets and $100 billion of
total assets. We hope that posi-
tion helps the company move
forward with the Crystal River
plant repairs and build the two
new nuclear plants proposed
for southern Levy County.
Citrus County's economic en-
gine has always been powered


Honest thanks
I'm calling to thank the person
who found my license plate in the
Hernando area and turned it in to
the sheriff's department, then the
sheriff's department delivered it
to my house. Thank you. It's nice
to know there's still good, honest
people around. Thanks again.
Noisy trucks
I live in a residential
section off of (U.S.) 41 in
Hernando, and I'd like to
know why some tractor-
trailer trucks are allowed
to unhitch their trailers
and leave them running
24 hours a day, seven
days a week, for days on
end. This is a residential CAL
section. It's close to the
people's homes and 563.
makes the homes vibrate
and then they're noisy. I
thought it was illegal to leave
these trucks running. And is it
legal for them to do this in a resi-
dential section? Can anybody
please answer this question?
Climate alarmists
On the back page of Monday
morning's paper (June 25), I see
where scientists attribute higher
waters to global warming. They
must be trying to cut the U.S. Ge-
ological Survey scientists' budget,
because now the alarmists are
out again. "Oh my gosh, the East
Coast is going to flood and we're
all going to die." I get tired of the
alarmists. And you notice the arti-
cle is out of Washington.


S
er
e
s

P
o
C


I,


by the legacy of Florida Power,
then Progress Energy, and now
Duke Energy.
There is some fear on the
local level that Duke as the
largest electricity producer in
the nation will overlook the
uniqueness of Citrus County.
Fortunately, Progress Energy's
Vincent Dolan
SUE*: will remain as the
S state president of
rger of the company's
rgy and holdings in
Energy. Florida. Dolan is
very familiar with
INION: the economic and
community needs
move in Citrus County.
ard. The importance
of Duke Energy
continuing the leadership car-
ried by Progress Energy in this
region cannot be overstated.
Progress employees have
been deeply involved in many
community and economic is-
sues. And the company has
been aggressively involved in
recruiting new businesses to
move to this region. Over the
past 10 years, Progress Energy
has helped attract 167 new
companies to Florida, result-
ing in 26,000 jobs.
Duke has an outstanding rep-
utation and we urge the new
merged company to continue
to emphasize its leadership
role.
Citrus County is unique be-
cause it is the home of five of
the Progress Energy power
plants. We urge Duke to recog-
nize that position and stay very
involved and invested.



No big deal
The older lady that got heckled
on the bus, I think she should do-
nate all that money to charity. She
should have considered the
source. They were kids. Ignore
them. Two wrongs don't make a
right. She made a big deal out of
nothing.
Remember Korea
My husband was a
JND civilian employee at Mc-
SCord Air Force Base,
1 south of Tacoma, Wash.,
during the Korean con-
S fflict. When he came
home after 4 to 12 mid-
night, the look on his
face told me they had
S brought in the baskets
)579 and body bags of the
9 dead from Korea and
there was no one, offi-
cers and such, to meet
them. It was like the casualties
didn't matter. It wasn't much dif-
ferent during Vietnam. Politicians
do these wars and then sit in their
plush offices as if to say, "For
what?"
Mystery lady
I was shopping at Dollar Tree
store in Crystal River when I hap-
pened to be short of some
money. When I went outside to re-
trieve some more money, I found
out that the lady in back of me
paid my bill. In doing so, she was
gone before I had a chance and I
would like to thank this young
lady very much. God bless her.
Thank you very much.


Dubious environmental crusade


PHOENIX
The federal government is a
bull that has found yet an-
other china shop, this time
in Arizona. It seems determined
to inflict, for angelic motives and
progressive goals, economic dam-
age on this state. And
economic and social
damage on Native
Americans, who over
the years have experi-
enced quite enough of
that at Washington's
hands.
The gain from this
pain? The most fre-
quently cited study
says "research to date Georg
... is inconclusive as to OTI
whether" there would VOI
be "any perceptible
improvement in visi-
bility at the Grand Canyon and
other areas of concern." The En-
vironmental Protection Agency
says the Navajo Generating Sta-
tion is "near" 11 national parks,
several of which are 175 miles
distant.
The NGS on Navajo land in
northern Arizona burns coal from
the Kayenta Mine, which is co-
owned by the Navajo and Hopi
nations. The EPA is pondering
whether all three units of the
NGS should be required to install
the "best available" emission con-
trol technologies, perhaps costing
more than $1.1 billion. More than
80 percent of the power plant's
employees are Navajo, many of
whom speak Navajo to help pre-
serve the nation's culture. In 2007,
the percentage of the Navajo Na-
tion's population living in poverty
was 36.7.
But the Navajos, the plant and
the mine that powers it may be
sacrificed to this dubious envi-
ronmental crusade. The new
technology would reduce nitrate
aerosols. They, however, are re-
sponsible for just 4 percent of
what is called "light extinction"
over the Grand Canyon.
Water falls unbidden from the


H
4


sky but must be pumped to Arizo-
nans Tucson is 2,500 feet above
sea level. The NGS provides 95
percent of the power for the
pumps of the Central Arizona
Project (CAP), which made
Phoenix and most of modern Ari-
zona possible. A study
sponsored by the Inte-
rior Department esti-
mates the EPA's
mandate might in-
crease the cost of water
by as much as 32 per-
cent, hitting agriculture
users especially hard.
They might be driven
back to using scarce
e Will ground water which
IER was supposed to be pro-
CES tected by the CAP That
is why many environ-
mentalists supported
the CAP one of the largest recla-
mation projects in U.S. history
An Arizona State University
study estimates that between now
and 2044, the NGS and the mine
will contribute $20 billion to the
state's economy and provide
3,000 jobs each year If there is an
NGS. Its site lease expires in
2019. If the EPA mandates the
most expensive technologies,
each of the NGS owners would
have to weigh whether it is sensi-
ble to make large capital invest-
ments in a plant that might not
operate after that. Furthermore,
one of the six owners of the NGS
is the Los Angeles Department of
Water and Power, which may be
prohibited by California law -
the state may be destitute, but it
is determined to fix the climate
from making investments that
will extend the life of coal-fired
plants.
Testifying to Congress last Feb-
ruary, an EPA official uttered the
six-word incantation that sum-
marizes Obama administration
policies and progressivism gen-
erally: "We do not have to
choose." It is, the official said
quoting President Obama, a
"false debate" that we have to


choose between the "public
health benefits from reducing air
pollution from power plants" and
"growing this economy in a ro-
bust way"
But benefits usually have costs.
And in reality which is the re-
gion contiguous to Washington -
two pertinent questions usually
are: How much government do
you want, and how much are you
willing to pay for it in diminished
economic growth? The Obama
administration consistently fa-
vors more government and, be-
lieving that "we do not have to
choose," is mystified by stub-
bornly sluggish growth.
In 1990, Congress passed the
Clean Air Act Amendments,
which high-mindedly mandated
restoration of visibility in parks
and wilderness areas to natural
conditions. "Natural" meaning
what? Before humanity? Anyway,
the EPA is empowered to make
this happen, so it empowers its
professional writers of regula-
tions sometimes 26-year-olds
fresh from law school to maxi-
mize regulations to that end.
These are regulations that others
must live with while minimizing
the damage the regulations
cause.
The Navajo have been here be-
fore. EPA regulations caused the
closure of the Mohave Generat-
ing Station near Laughlin, Nev,
which was the sole buyer of coal
from the Black Mesa Mine, lead-
ing it to cease operations. The
mine's land is co-owned by the
Navajo and Hopi nations.
This story has become as
American as "The Great Gatsby,"
wherein Tom and Daisy
Buchanan "smashed up things
and creatures and then retreated
back into their money or their
vast carelessness ... and let other
people clean up the mess they
had made."

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


S----, --F-- -
"so iFYoU OW(T Wi4r R0MTi$ Alig 1Ir,$WTIoI WHAtS 114 F0P6AW
ALTT RNAS to


_LETTERS to the Editor r


Stolen valor
Members of the Vietnam Vet-
erans of America call me asking,
"...what are we (VVA) going to
do"? This director is more than
"disappointed" but what was
truly to be expected in this era
of our country
Only one justice on the
Supreme Court has served in the
armed forces, and that was in
the California National Guard.
"It caused no harm" wrote one
judge. Perhaps if that was the
issue, we could have marched a
million combat veterans into the
court to explain "harm" of
Stolen Valor
But as the nation attempts to
move forward under the politi-
cal correctness (not exactly the
truth) of our era, it seems those
interpreting our laws have lost
all sight of "common sense." The
spirit of the First Amendment
was written by men at war, their
unnamed country at war
Today, for justice to say that
lying about serving one's country
in war, wearing decorations un-
earned, is protected free speech
is a disgrace an abominable
decision that harms each and
every one who has served.


OPINIONS INVITED

The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.

Worse, it desecrates those killed
in action.
For those of us who take this
issue personally, as I do, the
Supreme Court leaves us little
choice when we identify the
slime of the earth wannabes. But
thatwould be a crime.
I understand the law, both its
intent and spirit But as to the
decision, I'm outraged. The only
place in Washington I can find,
"Honor God Country" is chiseled
in the granite above the en-
trances into the mausoleum of
justice.
Bob Barry
VVA director, Region 4 (Florida,
Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi,
Puerto Rico)


Thomas Jefferson
Quotation No. 37700 from
Classic Quotes:
"I believe that banking institu-
tions are more dangerous to our
liberties than standing armies. If
the American people ever allow
private banks to control the
issue of their currency first by
inflation, then by deflation, the
banks and corporations that will
grow up around (the banks) will
deprive the people of all
property until their children
wake up homeless on the conti-
nent their fathers conquered.
The issuing power should be
taken from the banks and
restored to the people, to whom
it properly belongs."
Thomas Jefferson, third
president of the United States
(1743-1826)
It is my sincere belief that for-
mer President Thomas Jefferson
had it right and I will not sup-
port any politician who thinks
otherwise. The Federal Reserve
Bank is the biggest scam ever
perpetrated on the American
public!
Earl W. Herring
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Maybe I should try writing song lyrics


"I can't remember when you
weren't there, when I didn't care,
for anyone butyou....I swear we've
been through everything there is,
can't imagine anything we've
missed, can't imagine anything the
two of us can't do....."
"Through the Years," Marty
Panzer and Stephen Dorff,
c. 1981
MEN
I'm of the very firm opinion
that ofttimes, more can be said
in three stanzas of song lyrics
totaling 75 words than can be said
in a book containing 300 pages and
75,000 words.
The above, which was sung by
Kenny Rogers in 1982, is a perfect
example.


My, my, my
There's just no
better way to express
oneness and lasting I
love.
It is not uncommon
for Cheryl or me,
without any specific
provocation whatso-
ever other than that
they were written and Fred B
we are us, to sing these A Sl
words to each other OF I
On the other hand,
some lyrics can drive
you nuts, for instance:
Back in 1955, singing about
being stuck in Folsom prison,
Johnny Cash moaned that "..time
keeps dragging on...." while he


1

1
I
L


went into details as to
why his protagonist
was in prison, that is,
"..I shot a man in
Reno, just to watch
him die."
Yuck.
Nonetheless, the
song has stayed in my
head since I was 10
rannen years old. With this in
LICE mind, a few mornings
LIFE ago, I found myself
singing "...I shot a man
in Reno..." and it
finally occurred to me that the
only Reno I knew about was in
Nevada and Folsom prison is in
California, so the burning
question then became how did


Johnny's doer wind up in a
California prison for killing a man
in Nevada?
Murder is prosecuted under
state law, so was Johnny's guy a
mass murderer?
Yuck times two.
I researched the matter and
found that there is indeed a place
in California called Reno, it's
formally Reno Junction and is
northeast of Sacramento as is
Folsom. Close enough.
Whew!
Mystery solved.
I feel better knowing that
Johnny wasn't necessarily singing
about a serial killer!
Song lyrics.
I love 'em.


In just a very few words, they
can say a lot.
Me?
I'm still working on that 300-
page, 75,000-word, novel.
But, if and when it's published, I
can't imagine 'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay" causing folks to
sing love songs or making them
unable to rest until they find out
for sure if there's more than one
town known as Reno.
Maybe I should try writing song
lyrics.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Roberts loses credibility


o, what exactly did U.S. Supreme
Court Chief Justice John Roberts do
when he sided with the liberals on
the court to decide Obamacare was permit-
ted by the Constitution?
He got a unanimous decision
(begrudgingly from the court lib-
erals) that Congress could not
force citizens to buy a commer-
cial product (health insurance)
under Congress' power to regu-
late interstate commerce. The
justices all agreed Congress
could not force citizens to buy in-
surance under the "necessary
and proper" clause either He got Dr. Willi
seven of the nine justices to OTH
agree Congress could not force VOl
states to give up some of their
sovereign powers guaranteed
by the Constitution by threatening to
withhold federal money owed the states
under existing programs, if they failed to
expand Medicaid to citizens above the
poverty line. All good.
Roberts angered conservative and inde-
pendent voters with his decision to levels
last seen in 2010, when they turned out in
great numbers and voted out Democrat
senators and congressmen. If this anger
were to persist to November elections, the
consequences for Obama and the Democ-
rats could be very bad.
Justice Roberts, by his siding with the lib-
erals, spared the Supreme Court from
harsh criticism and disparagement. The
leftist mainstream media, the president
and the Democratic Party would have la-
beled a decision striking down Obamacare
as judicial activism based upon partisan
politics in the same manner as they dispar-
aged the court for the Bush v Gore deci-
sion. All of the really "smart" people would
have discredited the court as corrupt and
incapable of honest jurisprudence.
Whether intentionally or not (only Justice
Roberts knows) his decision, that the penalty
for not buying health insurance was a tax,
gave Republicans and Romney ammunition
to claim Obama raised taxes on everyone,
not just the "rich." And it gave Republicans
an opportunity to overturn portions of the
law, newly declared as taxes, by a simple ma-
jority vote under Senate budget reconcilia-
tion rules, which prohibit filibusters.
Taken all together, if one is a conserva-
tive, Robert's decisions could be seen as a
shrewd political move furthering limited
government and restraining Congress' pow-
ers to control citizens' every activity under
the commerce clause of our Constitution.
As a conservative, I find his decisions
deplorable.


H
(


'Keep America strong'
It sickens me when Americans stoop so
low they forget their heritage, they forget
we're the greatest nation in the world. We
fought for that with our own blood to have
a U.S. Constitution, to have manufacturing,
to have natural resources, to have freedom.
Low energy costs is one of the things that


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

interests (Egypt has been
important in terms of keep-
ing the lid on the Palestin-
ian situation) and our public
commitment to Israel. Even-
tually, Obama helped push
Mubarak out although the
future of democracy re-
mains uncertain. It is felt
that the administration was
helpful in easing Mubarak
out of power, but the situa-
tion there remains
unsettled.
The other country that is
in the process of exploding
is Syria, but trying to use
military force there against
a large and well-disciplined
army suggests a potential
quagmire.
In the final section of the
book (China and North
Korea) the author observes
that Obama seems to have
accepted the idea that in the
long run, Washington's
major foreign policy con-
cern is not Russia or the
Middle East but China.
We have become closely
linked on trade issues, but
China has its own set of se-


makes a family free free to travel. When
you compare us to Europe, I throw up. I
don't care what they do in Europe. Keep
America strong. Keep American No. 1.
Keep energy prices low. Don't tell me to
drive an unsafe little beer can with a rub-
ber-band motor. I don't like it and it's not
safe for my family. Give us the energy that's
already here.


Washington officials. Since
those officials are the ones
with "inside information,"
of course they provide a lot
of the fodder for the insider
books.
I found "Confront and
Conceal" reasonably well
balanced. His conclusion
makes two important criti-
cisms: First, he feels the
president has "walked away
from many of the issues he
emphasized when he ran for
the Presidency" (energy pol-
icy, global warming, deficit
problems). Secondly, he ar-
gues that Obama has not
made his long-term priori-
ties and actions clear to the
American public. He wants
a "lighter footprint" for the
United States in global poli-
tics but who knows what
that means in practice?
Verdict: A thorough and
largely balanced analysis of
Obama's foreign policy over
the last three years.


Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and U.S. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring.


curity considerations and
seems to be getting tougher
with its neighbors regarding
border disputes.
The president has an-
nounced he will increase
our military commitment by
basing a contingent of sol-
diers in Australia. As for
North Korea, Sanger de-
scribes it as acting "like an
organized crime syndicate."
Even China seems to have
little control over the rogue
government in Pyongyang.
Back to the question of
the controversial nature of
the book: Some have criti-
cized the author for using
leaked classified informa-
tion regarding the cyber-at-
tack on Iran that might help
the Iranians to protect
themselves from future at-
tacks. Frankly, it is impossi-
ble to judge such a claim
although I tend to be dubi-
ous about claims of leaked
information that will hurt
our country
The second criticism is
the author presents a one-
sidedly favorable picture of
Obama's presidency This is
a common charge against
books by authors like Bob
Woodward who base their
volumes on interviews with


Justice Roberts has destroyed his own
credibility and done severe damage to the
court He took it upon himself to rewrite the
Obamacare legislation so that what Obama
and the Democratic Congress
called a "penalty" and not a tax
became, for the purposes of
making a judgment, a tax. Hav-
ing declared the penalty a tax,
Roberts then realized the court
could not pass judgment on the
law until someone paid the tax.
Since the mandate, now called a
tax, was not yet in effect, no one
could have paid the tax and have
am Dixon the legal standing to file a
IER lawsuit
CES Roberts was not deterred by
federal law. In his statement, he
declared that, as to whether the
court could review Obamacare lawsuits,
the mandate to buy insurance would be
considered a penalty. As to whether it
passed constitutional standards, the man-
date was to be judged as tax.
By declaring Congress had the right,
under its taxing authority, to force us to fol-
low its guidelines, Roberts opened up a
new, powerful avenue for government to
deprive citizens of their freedoms.
This is judicial activism of the worst sort
The chief justice of our highest court used
legal trickery to get the result he wanted.
Whether or not Roberts did this for politi-
cal reasons, as some conservative pundits
claim, he damaged the credibility of the
Supreme Court as a defender of constitu-
tional rights.
Regardless of the outcome of the No-
vember elections, no matter the limitations
placed on use of the commerce clause by
Congress, the Roberts decision will go
down in history as one of the court's worst
Justice Roberts will still be considered a
conservative ideologue and dismissed by
the liberals who applaud this decision. His
reputation will be tainted for the rest of his
tenure as chief justice, his credibility lost
forever.


William Dixon graduated from Columbia
College in New York City from New York
Medical College and from the College of
Business Administration at the University
of South Florida. He was an assistant
professor at the University of Georgia and
he has worked in the veterans
administration system. He served 11 years
in the Army as a surgeon and as special
forces officer achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. Dr Dixon can be
reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Court ruling applauded

Many of us, knowing the intentions health insurance plans to choose from.
of our president, but not familiar Each state will take the lead in designing
with the 906-page Patient Protec- their own menu of options, and if states
tion and Affordable Health Care Act of can come up with even better ways of cov-
2010, were elated at the ering more people at the same
Supreme Court decision on quality and cost, this law allows
June 28 making it constitutional them to do that, too. Congress
under Congress' taxing author- ,. was asked to help speed up that
ity Whether familiar with it or ,- process, giving states flexibility
not, those opposed continue I Co-payments for preventive
their opposition, because of I care are eliminated. Starting
party ideology and mainly be- - 2014 almost everyone must be
cause of lack of knowledge and insured or pay a tax. Again,
concern with the social justice companies employing 50 or
involved. It was a congressional more will pay a fine if they don't
act that our president signed eorge arbin offer coverage for their work-
into law. It is not Obamacare. GUEST ers. There will be some, an es-
The tax is a blessing for all of us COLUMN timated 23 million, such as
as a future column will explain, illegal immigrants, who will re-
Health insurance's primary main uncovered.
purpose is for low- and medium-income Once states set up these health insur-
families, now using their income for hous- ance marketplaces, insurance companies
ing, food, transportation, heat, air condi- cannot discriminate against anyAmerican
tioning, and other bare necessities, with a preexisting health condition;
leaving little to nothing for health care, charge you more just because you're a
preventative or otherwise. The median woman; or bill you into bankruptcy. If
family income nationwide is less than you're sick, you'll have the same chance to
$50,000 and considerably less in Citrus get quality, affordable health care as
County everyone else. And if you can't afford the
What does the Health Care Act mean to premiums, you'll receive a credit that
you? helps pay for it.
First, if you're one of the more than 250 Americans must be thankful to the
million Americans who already have Obama Administration, Congress and the
health insurance, you will keep it, but it Supreme Court for our health care system
will be more secure and more affordable. created after years of opposition from our
Insurance companies can no longer im- legislators, governors, and past presidents
pose lifetime limits on the care you re- whose health care decisions were con-
ceive; discriminate against children with trolled by corporate campaign financing
pre-existing conditions; drop your cover- intended to increase profits.
age if you get sick; or jack up your premi- We now have a national system, though
ums without reason. They are required to not the single-payer system President
provide free preventive care such as Obama asked for, though single-payer is
check-ups and mammograms. Co-pay- the law in 16 other nations, all enacted
ments for preventive care are eliminated, prior to 1996. There are seven other na-
And by August 2012, nearly 13 million of tions with insurance mandates like ours.
you will receive a rebate from your in-
surer, having spent too much on adminis-
trative costs and CEO bonuses, and not George Harbin is a retired Homosassa
enough on your health care. resident who has been appointed Citrus
Young adults under the age of 26 are County Democratic Executive Committee
able to stay on their parents' health care public information officer and has
plans. And now seniors will receive a dis- served on the committee since 2000. He
count on their prescription drugs. was a contracting officer for the
Companies with less than 50 employees Department ofDefense, including 13
are exempt. Those with 50 or more em- years in the Pentagon, writingand
ployees will pay a fine if they do not offer awarding contracts for construction,
coverage, research, other services and products for
If you're one of the 30 million Ameri- 25years, most with the Corps of
cans who doesn't yet have health insur- Engineers and finally in the Office of the
ance, starting in 2014 this law will offer Secretary of the Army Email him at
you an array of quality, affordable, private gharbinl4@gmail.com.

Political LETTER


Vote Balfour
In most elections, we
voters witness the vicious
divisiveness and often-
cannibalistic nature of pol-
itics. We hear candidates
beat their drums in an at-
tempt to get the partisan
soldiers within each politi-
cal spectrum to vote the
party line. However, there
are some elective offices,
many could strongly argue,
that should not succumb to
partisan banter or
rhetoric.
These positions demand
that we voters transcend
our proverbial ideological
boxes and not just select
the best political candi-
date for the office, but the
best person for the job.


This year Citrus County
voters will be faced with
such a decision when they
cast a vote for superinten-
dent of schools. We could
stay with the incumbent
and continue down the
same tired, well-worn
road, or we could dare to
aim higher and embrace a
less traveled road that of-
fers a bold new approach
to the problems facing our
school district: A woman
with a can-do and will-do
spirit toward the task at
hand. A caring teacher
with the knowledge and
ability to help our school
system not only achieve all
our expectations, but ex-
ceed them in every con-
ceivable way The woman
that offers this tangible


change and new beginning
for our schools is Sandy
Balfour, your candidate for
superintendent of schools.
Kim Morrison
Homosassa

LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
See Page C2 for
guidelines about
writing a letter to the
editor.
Political letters may
endorse candidates or
address specific
issues. They may not
attack candidates.
Letter writers are
limited to three letters
a month.


Sound OFF


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TESTING
Continued from Page C1

answer your questions, talk with
you in the grocery store, lose sleep
over our students and be willingly
accountable for student perform-
ance or the corporations, big-
money contributors and political
appointees who may never have
stepped foot in a classroom and
don't answer to you?
This is also the heart of the res-
olution and efforts by Florida's
school boards to push back against
unreasonable mandates that
make no sense for our students,
are punitive and cause more prob-
lems than they solve.
When the Florida commis-
sioner of education, who is ap-
pointed, not elected, tells a room
full of hundreds of elected school
board members to basically stop
questioning the testing regime
and to do as we are told, some-
thing is terribly wrong with the


balance of power and I honestly
feel is a significant challenge to
democracy
Not all the school boards in
Florida, nor the 300,000-plus
membership of the PTA and vari-
ous other grassroots educational
support groups in Florida, can be
wrong. We are at a crucial cross-
roads in public education and the
time to speak up has come. I and
others have recognized and ac-
cepted the challenge.
Your voice should not be si-
lenced. Please support us in our
efforts to act on our students' be-
half in determining what is best
for them, our schools, our teach-
ers, our community, and being
held accountable to you for our
decisions. You elected us to do
what is best for students and that
is what we are aiming to do.

Pat Deutschman is a member of
the Citrus County School Board.
She can be reached at:
deutschmanp@citrus.k12.fl.us.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

made at Citrus Memorial.
Teddi Rusnak of Citrus
Hills jumped into the race
at the last minute. She has
been a frequent visitor to
county commission meet-
ings in Inverness because
she has been the spokesper-
son for the Citrus County
Council. She knows the is-
sues very well, but outside
of the citizens group she is
not that well known.


Charles Poliseno is also
very familiar with the issues
because he came from in-
side of county government.
But he has been out of the
picture for a few years and
will have to rebuild rela-
tionships quickly
We are just five weeks
away from the Aug. 14 pri-
mary and these folks all
need to get their individual
messages out fast. Very fast
Voters need to spend
some extra time listening to
what they have to say
In the District 1 county
commission race, two Crys-


tal River residents are trying
to independently displace
incumbent Dennis Damato.
Crystal River City Council-
man Ron Kitchen and citi-
zen activist Renee
Christopher-McPheeters are
both running for the job.
Kitchen and Christopher-
McPheeters are well known
on the west side of the
county, but have very low
name recognition on the east
side where people really
don't care that much about
Crystal River city politics.
It should be noted Christo-
pher-McPheeters actually


had her name officially
changed to add the Christo-
pher so her name could ap-
pear before Damato's on the
official voting ballot.
I have a little more confi-
dence voters won't just
make their decision based
on where your name ap-
pears on the ballot, but I
guess every strategy de-
serves some play
East-side voters are going
to make a big difference in
this race.
The biggest GOP voting
block will inevitably come
from Sugarmill Woods in all


of the commission races.
It used to be that you
could not get elected in Cit-
rus County if you did not
win Beverly Hills. Now that
claim to power rests in Sug-
armill Woods where voters
consistently pick the win-
ners by a large margin.
The final commission
race is the District 3 contest
between incumbent com-
missioner Joe Meek and
challenger Shannon
Heathcock.
Meek has strong name
recognition from his four
years on the board, but he is


probably the hardest work-
ing candidate on the cam-
paign trail. Every spare
hour he is out walking the
streets and meeting voters.
It's hot this July and diffi-
cult to pay attention to local
politics, but these three
races are a big deal for the
future of Citrus County.
Take the time out to get to
know these candidates.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


JOIN US FOR
A DAY AT THE RAILWAY MUSEUM
IN PARRISH AND VISIT TO THE
"SHOPS AT WIREGRASS" WESLEY CHAPEL
SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 2012
q -









COST PER PERSON $45
Which includes bus ride, admission to the
museum and a ride on a train, visit to the
mall for shopping and/or lunch
(food not included in the price)
BUS PICK-UP AND RETURN WILL BE:
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness
8:00 am-6:00 pm
STickels available from Sue on 352-527-5959

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St. Benedict's Catholic Church
455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


A Lunch
at noon

$ 12 per person
Playing begins
at 12:30 p.m.

Door Prizes
"Share The Wealth"

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hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
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~1 II I II III II I II II I II I II Il


Wednesday, August 22


C4 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


COMMENTARY


al







BS SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012




BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


What's next for Florida


Holmes


/4P Gadsden
Bay Go Leon Madiso
Wakulla
Liberty
Gulf


Urban Land Institute Florida Summit

recently conducted in St. Petersburg


Avis MARIE CRAIG
Special to the Chronicle

The Urban Land Institute
(ULI) recently held its
first-ever Florida Sum-
mit, as part of the world-
wide organization's
anniversary, celebrating 75
years of building communities.
Florida's 5 ULI District Coun-
cils organized this event to look
out into the future of Florida in
the context of our rapidly chang-
ing world and the current econ-
omy The summit emphasized
the importance of regional ap-
proaches and focused on key
transportation and infrastruc-
ture investments taking place
throughout Florida.
More than 350 top decision-
makers and industry leaders of
real estate and land use, includ-
ing representatives of business
and elected and government of-
ficials from throughout the state
gathered to see "What's Next for
Florida." Like most such events,
there were keynote and general
sessions along with small-group
breakout sessions addressing a
variety of topics and showcasing
successful projects from around
the state.
Generally, I find if I learn one
or two new things, it was worth
attending.
The summit delivered.
The first was the generational
population characteristics and
shifts and size of each genera-
tion population surprised me.
The second was the rapid re-
tooling of jobs, and where and
how the workplace is changing
and how that affects retail and
office space needs.
The mayors of four of our
largest cities Miami-Dade, Or-
lando, Tampa and Jacksonville
- participated in a two-hour
round table and offered their in-
sights into what they see and ex-
pect for Florida. These mayors
probably gave us the best news
at the summit the worst of the
past four years appears to be
over
The panel was moderated by
Peter Rummel, with ULI who is
also CEO of the Panhandle's St.
Joe Company All cited signifi-
cant investments starting to take
place again throughout the
state, as well as significant ab-
sorption of distressed proper-
ties, and an improving property
value picture. Former St. Peters-
burg mayor Rick Baker's new
book, "Seamless Cities," was
also distributed to those attend-


ing, and looks to be worth read-
ing. If the trends hold, areas
such as Citrus generally lag
slightly behind the cities.
A highlight of the two-day
summit was the keynote address
given by Jeb Bush, former gover-
nor of Florida. Despite his open-
ing statement that he would not
be discussing politics, Bush in-
dicated he was reading the New
York Times bestselling book in a
series by Robert Caro, "The Pas-
sage of Power"
This book is about the days of
President Lyndon B. Johnson
presidency, and Jeb couldn't re-
sist sharing one story from that
book. He described how the
President needed support from
the other side of the aisle on a
new program he wanted to ac-
complish. As the story went, the
president called in a senator
from the other party, and then
politicians understood the im-
portance of working together In
those days, so long as they got
the President's support on
something from their side -
they would agree to support the
President and both won. The re-
sult, the nation moved forward
and you did not have the grid-
lock between parties as exists
today As a nation, Jeb Bush's
point was we must be able to
work together regardless of par-
tisanship, if the United States is
to hold its leadership role in the
world of the future.
The former governor chal-
lenged Florida to be on the fore-
front of welcoming and
embracing change. He finds that
to be the norm in Europe and
Asia, but less so in the U.S.
Jeb spoke about two such ex-
amples of futurist technology
that already exist that could
have far-reaching effects on our
transportation mobility in the
future. Those examples were
shared fleets, and now the re-
cently unveiled technology of
driverless vehicles developed by
Google. Imagine for young or
old, the benefits that could
mean. Better yet, no more wor-
ries about texting and talking on
iPhones while in the car Young
families would not have to own
a second car or perhaps even
one at all (ULI reports that
equals $100,000 of saving per ve-
hicle). Under the shared fleet
concept, the vehicle is rented
rather than owned, and is only
used when needed. With the dri-
verless vehicle, you would sim-
ply phone for a car, it would
drive you to the appointed desti-


nation, (
servatio
imagine
for senior
longer a
drive).
Jeb
went
to chal-
lenge at
tendees
focus or
structure
spoke al
critical
structure
portatio
care and
which a
quality o
minded
ment ca


Baker Duval

% i Clay




Levy

Volusis

(my ob- Lake
)n,
That emole
ors no Hernando
able to
Osceola
Pinellas Polk sc
Po- l

to Indian
infra- River
i infra- Manatee
re, and
bout Hardee
infra- Highlands Lucie

n, health Martir
d education
effect our Charlotte Glades
of life. He re-
us that govern- Palm Bes
n't do it alone. Lee


The former governor
made it clear there was
still much work to do and we
need to tackle these hard is-
sues. He concluded on a posi-
tive note, encouraging leaders of
Florida to not ignore such facts,
not back away from or eliminate
standards because they are
hard.
Former Gov Bush closed his
remarks on the subject of lead-
ership, and urged those present
to support leaders who are will-
ing to lead. Encourage political
leaders who are not afraid to
tackle the difficult issues of
our state and nation. He con- *4
cluded that the courage to do
so will dictate the brightness of
Florida's future.
From ULI's headquarter,
noted speaker and senior re-
search fellow, Maureen McAvey,
outlined the finding of a report
titled "What's Next? Real Estate
in the New Economy" The re-
port was issued in the fall of
2011 to kick off ULI 75th birth-
day, to challenge readers to bet-
ter understand the new real
estate marketplace to be served
by looking forward to 2020.
McAvey covered the changing
demographics of our world and,
in particular, the United States,
and where people will work,
live, connect, power their lives,
move, and invest. One of her key
observations was that the eco-
nomic trends since 2008 should
not be viewed as just another
cycle. She repeated that several
times and that the current trend
is the new reality.
The remainder of the Summit
focused on understanding cur-
rent trends, and the investment
needs for capital for Florida to
remain competitive and improve


Collier



*.

*0


Special to the Chronicle
its quality of life. From an ear-
lier report specific to Florida is-
sued in 2005 by ULI, it focuses
on stronger regional strategies
and initiatives. Granted, that was
before the 2008 economic melt-
down. It reported that 90 percent
of Florida's population lives in
urban areas, and that trend is
expected to continue or acceler-
ate especially given the prefer-
ences of the younger
generations. The lifestyle
choices for those in the younger
generations, especially Gen Y
show a strong preference for
urban environments and ameni-
ties. In my personal view and ob-
servation that continues to be
true, until it is time to raise their
families.
Demographics from the
"What's Next" report also
backed this up by categorizing
the number of people in the
United States that belong to
each group. The numbers show:
There are 40 million people
older than 66.
The Boomers (age 47 to 65)
See NEXT/Page D3


One L of a name: LL Bean's initials get scrutiny


Associated Press

FREEPORT, Maine He's arguably
Maine's best-known native son, right up
there with Civil War general Joshua Cham-
berlain, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
and horror writer Stephen King. To his cus-
tomers, he was simply known as "L.L."
But as outdoors outfitter L.L. Bean cele-
brates its 100th anniversary, it's still not 100
percent clear what the famous founder's
initials stood for. Was it Leon
Leonwood Bean, as the com- ON TH
pany claimed for decades, or
was it Leon Linwood Bean, as www.llt
his grandson suggests?
The answer appears to be
both.
Leon Gorman, L.L.'s grandson, said he
was told that his grandfather was born
Leon Linwood Bean and that it somehow
morphed into Leon Leonwood Bean.
"There was some incident that happened
years ago. I can't remember what it was.
They misspelled Leon's name from Lin-
wood to Leonwood," Gorman, the com-
pany's chairman, said. "L.L. was so taken by
the new version of his middle name that he
adopted it."
His grave marker sheds no light on his
middle-name preference; it says simply,
"Leon L. Bean." There's no birth certifi-
cate, either


In his autobiography, L.L. Bean talked
about having a birth certificate, but no one
knows where it is. Kim Sparks, town man-
ager in Greenwood, where Bean was born,
said a birth certificate can't be located. And
the state archives don't have a copy, either
"The town has lost it somewhere, along
with quite a few other records," said Blaine
Mills, president of the historical society in
Greenwood. "I've never seen it."
In 1872, when Bean was born, only about
half of Maine's births were
E NET recorded, and the records were
IE NE often kept in homes of the town
bean.com clerks, and transferred from
home to home, said Art Dostie,
of the Maine State Archives. It
wasn't until 20 years after Bean's birth that
the state began keeping birth records in Au-
gusta, Dostie said.
There is some documentation, however

See INITAL/Page D3
A grave marker at Webster Cemetery for
Leon L. Bean, the founder of the famous
outdoors outfitter, is seen July 3 in
Freeport, Maine. As the company
celebrates a century in business, it's not
totally clear whether his middle name was
Leonwood, as the company claimed for
decades, or if it was Linwood, as his
grandson suggests.
Associated Press


F i 8


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


L


f/Page D3


Does a


PoA


ever


expire?

EAR BRUCE: I
went to a seminar
that I saw adver-
tised on TY mostly about
investing your money in
their product. But one
thing they said that scared
me was that a power of at-
torney is good for only
three years. I have never
heard that. I hold the
power of attorney for my
mother, and it has been at
least four years. Do I need
to get this renewed? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Pow-
ers of attorney and their
rights and responsibilities
vary from jurisdiction to
jurisdiction. I know of
none where they automat-
ically expire at the end of
three years, but then
again, I've seen stranger
things.
At the seminar, they
may have been referring
to conditions that may
change in an individual's
circumstances, and they
may have been referring
to a durable power of
attorney
By all means, this
should be of concern to
you. Consult an attorney
in your jurisdiction and
have him or her explain
the difference between a
general power and a
durable power, as well as
the important role they
play in your financial life.
DEAR BRUCE: Re-
cently, I discovered that
there seem to be several
names associated with my
Social Security number I
have contacted all of the
credit reporting agencies
to see if I can figure out
what's going on. I'm afraid
of what this could lead to.
Do you have any sugges-
tions on how I might pro-
tect myself? Reader in
Colorado
DEAR READER: It
sounds as if you're a vic-
tim of identity theft, which
is definitely a growing
problem.
The first thing I would
do is to track down every
way that your name has
been used and then go to
the business source
where the name was used.
I also would file com-
plaints with the district at-
torney's office in each of
the cities where this has
taken place and suggest
possible identity theft.
Unfortunately, without
knowing the extent to
which the numbers were
used, credit extended,
etc., it's difficult to tell you
what road to take.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are consider-
ing long-term insurance.
Can you suggest a place
that we can call or contact
on the Internet for infor-
mation? We don't know
much about it. R., via
email
DEAR RIP: For anyone
who is computer-literate,
there is a wealth of infor-
mation available on the
Internet. I would not limit
my research to the Inter-
net, however. You should
also contact insurance
agents who specialize in
long-term insurance.
In essence, the very
wealthy don't need long-
term insurance because
they can pay for their
care, and the very poor










D2

SUNDAY
JULY 8, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


News You CAN USE


REGISTRATION DEADLINES
Chamber Member Breakfast -
Register prior to noon Monday, July 16 for
the Chamber Breakfast on Tuesday, July
17. County Commissioner J.J. Kenney
updates attendees on county
commissioner activities and Ed
Turschmann, chairman of the Stone Crab
Jam, will also speak. This event is spon-
sored by Land Title of Citrus County.
Voting July 16 at 5 p.m. is the
deadline to register to vote in the Aug. 14
primary election. It is also the deadline to
change party affiliation for the primary.
Voter registration forms are available at the
supervisor of elections offices in Inverness
and in Crystal River as well as any library,
driver's license offices, state agencies that
provide public assistance and county gov-
ernment offices. Visit www.votecitrus.com
to download a version you may print, sign
and return to the elections office.
Habitat for Humanity people inter-
ested in becoming Habitat homeowners
must attend a mandatory orientation
course from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday,


0- ---mmq



CITRUS COUNTY
Economic Development
Council, Inc.


Aug. 11. The workshop will be at the Real-
tors Association of Citrus County building
at 714 S. Scarboro Ave. in Lecanto. For
more information, call the Habitat Office at
352-563-2744. Please note: children can
NOT be accommodated at the meeting.
Parks & Recreation Don't forget
the youths this summer/fall. Please be sure
to visit www.citruscountyparks.com to
check out all the exciting programs
available and their specific registration
pricing and cutoff dates.


SAVE THE DATE
August NAMI offers a nationally
sanctioned NAMI study/support class
called "Family to Family" this August. The
course is invaluable for those with a family
member dealing with "biological brain-
disorder," commonly referred to as mental
illness. Stay tuned for more details.
September The Business
Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo at
the National Guard Armory takes place
Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 22.
November The 35th annual Home
& Outdoor Show has been set for Nov. 10
and 11 at the Crystal River National Guard
Armory. Hours will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 10, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 11. A Chamber Mixer from
5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at the Armory
kicks off the show.
This is a FREE to the public event!
Booth space is only open to CCBA
members at this time. Unsold booths after
Aug. 27 will be opened up to nonmember
businesses. For more information, contact
the CCBA at 352-746-9028.


Important updates:



Skills gap forum rescheduled


The Skills Gap Forum for Citrus County will be
Wednesday, July 18, at the College of Central Florida,
Lecanto. If you have questions, please contact: 800-746-
9950, ext 2230. New session times are as follows:


* 8:30 to 10:30 -
* 10:30 to 12:30
* 1:30 to 3:30 -
* 3:30 to 5:30 -


- Manufacturing
- Business and Financial Services
Health care
Information Technology


Gov. Scott activates Small Business


Emergency Bridge Loan Program


Citrus County is one of 13 eligible counties for emer-
gency, short-term, interest-free loans to small businesses
to assist in reestablishing business during the interim pe-
riod before other aid and insurance claims are
processed.
The Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan
Program provides an expedient cash flow to businesses
physically damaged by a disaster. The short-term loans
help bridge the gap between the time of damage and
when a business secures other financial resources. Gov
Scott has allocated up to $10 million from the state's Gen-
eral Revenue fund for the program.
Owners of small businesses with two to 100 employees
impacted by Tropical Storm Debby may apply for short-


term loans for $1,000 to $25,000 from Thursday, July 5, to
Wednesday, Aug. 15.
Loans are granted in terms of 90 or 180 days and are
interest-free for that time period. To be eligible, a busi-
ness must have been established prior to the issue of Ex-
ecutive Order 12-140, signed by Gov Scott on June 25, and
demonstrate physical damage as a result of Tropical
Storm Debby
To complete an application, or for more information,
visit www.floridadisasterloan.org. For questions regard-
ing local administration of the Emergency Bridge Loan
Program, contact the Florida Small Business Develop-
ment Center Network State Office at 850-473-7800, or toll-
free at 866-737-7232.


A scalloping we shall go in Citrus County


Time to get out your snorkels and
masks... scallop season is in full swing
in Citrus County For a family summer
activity unlike any other, there's noth-
ing like bagging the adventure of scal-
loping in Citrus County, one of the
state's most beloved scalloping desti-
nations. The recreational season has
been extended two weeks and now
runs July 1 through Sept. 25.
Known as Scallop Country, Citrus
County has some of the best recre-


national scalloping in the world. Citrus
County's bay scallops sit in seagrass
beds under five or six feet of water on
the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Scal-
loping requires a boat, a snorkel and a
desire for a seafood dinner. Profes-
sional licensed guides are also avail-
able for hire, for those visitors without
their own boat.
State regulations allow each person
to collect 2 gallons of whole bay scal-
lops or 1 pint of meat, with no more


than 10 gallons of whole scallops on
any vessel at any time. Scallops may
only be taken by hand or with a land-
ing or dip net. Scallopers over the age
of 16 also need a Florida fishing
license.
For more information on scallop
season, or to receive a free Citrus
County Scalloping Guide, visit
www.visitcitrus.com, or call the
Citrus County Visitor's Bureau at
800-587-6667.


A selection of Chamber members offering scalloping services follows:


GEAR/SUPPLIES ONLY
* FLORIDA MANATEE TOURS/
CRYSTAL RIVER WATERSPORTS,
www.floridamanateetours.com,
352-795-7033
* MAC RAE'S OF HOMOSASSA INC.,
www.macraesofhomosassa.com,
352-628-2602
PORT HOTEL & MARINA,
www.porthotelandmarina.com,
352-795-3111
CHARTERS AVAILABLE
* ADVENTURE DIVING, 352-794-
7227, daily scalloping tours 3-6
people. Cleaning is available.
Reservations required.
* CAPT. DAN CLYMER, www.crystal-
river-fishing.com, 352-382-1313.
Does scalloping if date is open
(4-5 people).
SCAPT. FRANK'S PRIVATE CHARTER
GUIDES, www.captfrank.com, 352-
875-8384. Charters up to 6 people,
15 people certain days with notice.
He supplies license and Ice. He
currently has about 3 days per
week availability.


* CRYSTAL LODGE DIVE CENTER
INC., www.manatee-central.com,
352-795-6798. Three charter
guides NO rental boats. You can
bring your own boat and dock
there.
* HOMOSASSA AIRBOAT TOURS,
www.homosassaairboat.com,
352-628-1197. Charter tours (by
appointment) 4 people (up to 6),
$50 additional person.
* MANATEE CONNECTION,
www.manateeconnection.com,
352-697-0220. Scalloping- up
to 6 per boat. They pick up at
different locations. Training and
cleaning.
* MANATEE TOUR & DIVE/
AQUAMARINE IMAGES, www.
manateetoursusa.com, 352-
732-2692. "Anywhere" until August
2 captains 2 boats up to 6
people. Lasts 5-6 hours. He pro-
vides license and cleans them.
* NATURE COAST CHARTERS,
www.grampyscat.net, 352-
746-9067. Charter guides -
in-shore fishing. Currently booked


all weekends for scalloping -
available only weekdays.
* PLANTATION GOLF RESORT &
SPA, www. plantationoncrysta river.
com, 352-795-4211. Only charter
fishing with captains $300
(4 people).
* RIVER SAFARIS & GULF CHARTERS
INC., www.riversafaris.com, 352-
628-5222 Private scalloping
charters, open scalloping charters,
maps pontoon tours, how-to
training.
* SOUTHERN FISHING GUIDE
SERVICE, www.southernfishing
guide.net, 352-422-6838. Charters
of 4 people ($250), additional
($50 per person) max 6 people.
Cleans scallops.
If you are a Chamber Member
offering scalloping services and
missing from the list, please call us
at 352-795-3149 so that we may
add you.
If you offer scalloping services and
would like to join the Chamber to
be included in this listing, please
call Keith Pullias at 352-795-3149.


UPCOMING CHAMBER EVENTS
July 17 Chamber Member's Breakfast Networking REGISTER NOW.
July 19-After Hours Business Networking Mixer-VERIZON WIRELESS. %' l
Aug. 2- After Hours Business Networking Mixer- SUPERIOR RESIDENCES.
Aug. 10 August Chamber Lunch at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club.
Aug. 16 After Hours Business Networking Mixer COMFORT KEEPERS/LIFE CARE CENTER. I
Aug. 17 Next Generation Professionals workshop: "The How of Wow!"
Check out complete events calendar at www.citruscountychamber.com or SCAN THE QR code:


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


...ON THE MOVE










: . .
( i..






Jefflnglehart now events

coordinator for Chamber
Say HELLO and WELCOME to Jeff Inglehart, our
new Events and Community Outreach Coordinator
Jeff, excited about working with The Citrus County
Chamber, says he looks forward to "making the
(chamber member) experience better for busi-
nesses."
While some might run from running two major fes-
tivals in addition to monthly luncheons, mixers and
various other projects, not Jeff He shares part of his
philosophy saying, "Ilike the mission of the chamber;
times are tough and anything we can do to help busi-
nesses is important." Jeffjoins the chamber staff in
lookingforward to new and exciting ways to reach out
and include members, acknowledging that it won't
happen overnight. "How do you eat a pie? One bite at
a time," Jeff says, "and I am looking forward to the
opportunity to be creative, and get people involved."
Jeff, a retired Marine (proudly serving21 years) re-
cently served as an ambassador for the Marion
County Chamber He and his wife, Anne, live in The
Villages and are proud grandparents of four almost
five. In his spare time he plays guitar in the band
"The Sixties" and improves his sculpting techniques.
Ifyou have questions orjust want to say hello, you can
reach him at jeff@citruscountychambercom or at
352-795-3149.
Welcome Jeff


a


Dave Martin, Sharon

Garrettjoin River Safaris
Checking the radar at River Safaris are new hires
Dave Martin and Sharon Garrett. Martin joins the
company as a boat rental specialist and Garrettis the
behind the counter/greeter/assistant to folks to book
their airboat rides, pontoon tours, scalloping trips
and gift sales.
Always reasonably priced, River Safaris no longer
accepts credit cards; however they do have an on-site
ATM supplied by a local company
Alicia Lowe, VP secretary treasurer and Captain,
acknowledges that eliminating the credit card fees
enables her to hire new staff, bolstering local em-
ployment and making the all-around experience at
River Safaris even more personable.
Contact River Safaris at 352-628-5222 or at
wwwriversafaris. com.


YOU

CAUGHT

MY EYE ...


BARBARA
WASHBURN
Isaiah Foundation,
Lecanto

JIM DRAKE
Drake Carpet Cleaning,
Crystal River


LINDAJONES
Sweetbay Deli,
Inverness

MAUREEN
NURSICK
Home Depot, Crystal
River


FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2 paths forward for uninsured, 1 clouded by ruling


RICARDO
ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Really? The
Supreme Court's big health care
decision means 30 million or more
uninsured Americans are soon
going to have coverage? It's far
from that simple.
The ruling does point a way for-
ward for millions who can't get af-
fordable coverage because they've
been sick, they're self-employed or
they are otherwise shut out of the
insurance plans that most Ameri-
cans get in the workplace. But the
path is clouded for millions more:
the people on the bottom rungs of
the economic ladder who are sup-
posed to be reached by a major ex-
pansion of Medicaid.
Thanks to last week's ruling on
President Barack Obama's over-
haul, states can opt out of the ex-
pansion without fear that
Washington will shut down all their
federal Medicaid financing. And if
some states do opt out, a lot of their
residents are going to have to find
another way to get coverage, or
continue to go without.
Roughly 15 million uninsured
are expected to get private insur-
ance through new exchanges -
marketplaces to be set up in each
state by 2014 that will be shored
up by the individual coverage re-


quirement that helps create a big
pool of consumers. That mandate,
vital to the law, was upheld by the
court
Another 15 million people or so
- mainly adults with incomes just
above the poverty line are ex-
pected to be reached through Med-
icaid, and the federal government
has generous subsidies to entice
the states to come on board. That's
not to say all of them will; Florida
Gov Rick Scott announced over the
weekend that his state will opt out,
and others will probably follow.
It's unclear how many of these
low-income people would be able
to get private health insurance in
states that decide not to expand
Medicaid. Even modest copay-
ments may be a barrier for some
of them.
"We're talking about individuals
making less than $15,000 a year
who do not qualify for Medicaid
today and who cannot afford to pay
for private health insurance," said
Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-WVa.
About 60 percent of the more than
265,000 uninsured people in his
state are potentially eligible for
the Medicaid expansion, also
scheduled for 2014.
The Congressional Budget Of-
fice, the nonpartisan budgetary
scorekeeper for lawmakers, is re-
assessing its estimate of the cover-
age impact of the law in light of the


court's Medicaid ruling.
"I'm very worried that the
court's decision makes coverage
for these very low-income individ-
uals optional for the states," said
Rockefeller
Officials at the Health and
Human Services department say
they are not particularly con-
cerned. They may have lost the
stick, but they still have carrots.
The law calls for Washington to
cover the full cost of the first three
years of the expansion, eventually
dropping to a 90 percent share.
That's still far above the average 60
percent federal share of Medicaid
costs the federal government cur-
rently is paying.
"We believe that states will in
fact take advantage of the coverage
for these individuals because of
many factors," said Mike Hash, di-
rector of the HHS office responsi-
ble for the health overhaul. "One is
the available federal funding."
Not every state took part when
the Children's Health Insurance
Program was launched in the
1990s, Hash noted. But within two
years they were all aboard.
Jonathon Turley, a constitutional
law scholar at George Washington
University, says the ruling on Med-
icaid could go a long way toward
undermining the overall law, in
giving states a possible exit option.
"I look at this law and I see po-


tential chaos if states start opting
out," he said. "In the end," he said
of the law's standing after the
court decision, "it can be viewed
as a success only to the extent a
crash landing is still considered a
landing."
Many uninsured people still
don't know what to make of
Obama's law. Polls have found
much skepticism that it will make
much difference, even though ex-
panding coverage is its central
goal.
"Those of us who are uninsured
have been getting the short end of
the stick for so long we don't figure
the stick will get any longer," said
Casey Quinlan, a self-employed
consultant and breast cancer sur-
vivor who has been uninsured
more than three years. She lives
near Richmond, Va.
Going without health insurance
has long been seen as a personal
issue, a misfortune for many and a
choice for some. Of those who lose
coverage, half get it back in a mat-
ter of months, usually by landing a
new job. Others face years of
uncertainty.
After the Supreme Court deci-
sion, Quinlan says she's hopeful for
two reasons. Starting in 2014, peo-
ple like her with a history of med-
ical problems cannot be turned
down for coverage by health insur-
ance companies. And federal sub-


sidies will make premiums more
affordable.
Quinlan makes too much money
to be eligible for Medicaid, so she
plans to pick insurance through
the Virginia exchange. The first
open enrollment sign-up period is
only 16 months away, October 2013.
If all goes smoothly, Quinlan will
be able to pick from a range of pri-
vate insurance offerings with dif-
ferent levels of cost sharing, from
"platinum" coverage that features
higher monthly premiums but low
copays to a "bronze" plan that
comes with lower premiums but a
high annual deductible. That's the
dollar amount of medical expenses
consumers themselves pay each
year before insurance kicks in.
The hospitalization, outpatient
and prescription benefits will be
fairly standard, keyed to plans now
available to people with employer
coverage. Quinlan said she thinks
she will pick low-cost "cata-
strophic" coverage to keep her
monthly premiums manageable.
She's a little uneasy about hav-
ing to wait until 2014. What if Re-
publicans deliver on their vow to
repeal what they scorn as
"Obamacare?"
"People are going to be ex-
hausted by the idea that we're
going to have to slog forward an-
other two years until the market
opens up," she said.


Business DIGEST


Nelson interns at
Vanni & Associates
Spring Hill Vince Vanni &
Associates, Inc. has an-
nounced the appointment of
Kelly Nelson as communica-
tions intern.
Nelson is a
student at
Pasco-Her-
nando Com-
munity
College and a
former stu-
dent at Talla-
hassee Kelly
Community Neson
Collmmuniy Vince Vanni &
College. Her Associates.
special inter-
ests are
mass communications and
marketing. While in high school,
Nelson placed in the top three
at district competitions for Dis-
tributive Education Clubs of
America (DECA) and her per-
formance earned her an invita-
tion to the DECA Leadership
Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.
As a communications intern
for Vince Vanni & Associates,
Nelson has been and will con-
tinue to produce copy for news
releases for nonprofit and pro-
prietary clients. In addition, Nel-
son will assist in maintaining
social media outlets for Vince
Vanni & Associates.
For more information about
Vince Vanni & Associates, call
352-797-9199 or email
vincevanni@tampabay.rr.com.
Parent company
moves up in ranking
Medical Center of Trinity,
Oak Hill Hospital and Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point



NEXT
Continued from Page D1

number 81 million.
a The Generation X (34-
46) group is at 41 million.
The largest group is the
Generation Y (16-33) at 90
million.
With Gen Y being the
largest age group to date,
followed by Baby Boomers,
we need to begin preparing
now for the next generation
bulge, which will follow Gen



INITIALS
Continued from Page D1

There's a birth announce-
ment written by L.L.'s wife
in 1900 for another son that
lists the proud papa as Leon
Linwood Bean, but he's
listed as Leon Leonwood on
his draft registration in
1918.
Leon Leonwood was ap-
parently a name of his own
invention. "He liked the
ring of it. Everyone called
him L.L., anyway," Gorman
said.
This much is known:
Bean was born in the west-
ern Maine town of Green-
wood, where he lived for a
time before the family
moved to a farm in Bethel,
Mills said. His parents died
when he was young.
Like many Mainers, Bean
took an interest in hunting


announce that for a fourth con-
secutive year, their parent com-
pany, HCA, has earned national
recognition as one of the best
workplaces for information
technology professionals. The
company has ranked No. 25 on
Computerworld's 2012 "Best
Places to Work in Information
Technology" list of 100 compa-
nies, moving up from its No. 32-
ranking last year.
"Being on Computerworld's
Best Places to Work list is
recognition of HCA's efforts to
develop and deploy technology
to support a dynamic, patients-
first culture that makes the
company a great place to work
not only for our IT profession-
als, but for all our approximately
199,000 employees," said
Marty Paslick, HCA's senior
vice president and chief infor-
mation officer. "We are honored
that we have been named to
this prestigious list for a fourth
year in a row."
HCA's Information Technol-
ogy & Services department
(IT&S) has more than 3,000
employees across the United
States and includes four data
centers and 14 division support
centers responsible for deliver-
ing IT services to HCA, as well
as more than 80 non-HCAfacil-
ities. The department's array of
services includes business
analysis, systems develop-
ment, systems integration, in-
formation security, customer
support, training and education,
and infrastructure support.
IT&S is fully engaged in the de-
sign and implementation of
hCare, the company's new
electronic health record, and
several other large scale tech-


X. According to the latest
census, while Gen Y is the
largest yet, the next genera-
tion beyond that is expected
to be even larger In Florida,
and especially counties like
Citrus, we tend to forget
facts like these.
Other trends discussed
were the decreasing size of
the average single family
home. According to the Na-
tional Association of Home
Builders, What's Next re-
ports that the home size was
on the rise and peaked in
2008 at more than 2,500


Associated Press
This 1941 file photo provided
by the L.L. Bean Archive
shows Leon Leonwood Bean,
the founder in Freeport,
Maine. L.L, Bean sold his
first pair of boots in 1912
and as outdoors outfitter the
company is celebrating its
100th anniversary.

and fishing, and he parlayed
his enthusiasm for the out-
doors into a business with


nology projects.
Computerworld's Best
Places to Work in Information
Technology (IT) list is an annual
ranking of the top 100 work en-
vironments for technology pro-
fessionals by IDG's
Computerworld. The list is com-
piled based on a comprehen-
sive questionnaire regarding
company offerings in categories
such as benefits, diversity, ca-
reer development, training and
retention. In addition, Comput-
erworld conducts extensive sur-
veys of IT workers, and their
responses factor heavily in de-
termining the rankings.
HCA has several employee-
focused programs that help
make the company an attractive
place to work. HCA promotes
employee health by providing a
number of educational programs
and incentives for participating
in several wellness programs. In
2005, the company established
the HCA Hope Fund, an em-
ployee-run, employee-supported
nonprofit charity that provides fi-
nancial relief to thousands of
HCA employees every year. In
addition, HCA offers many pro-
fessional development opportu-
nities for its employees. More
than 1,500 courses are offered
across a variety of learning plat-
forms to support professional
development.
Extension Service
offers mentoring
To assist people with their
personal finances during tough
economic times, the University
of Florida/IFAS Citrus County
Extension office has volunteer
Master Money Mentors avail-
able who can provide one-on-


square feet, but is now pro-
jected to drop to below 2,200
square feet by 2015 and con-
tinue dropping, the smallest
since the '90s. It was also re-
ported that trends suggest
less mobility around the
country, which could be bad
news for retirement states
like Florida, except for the
fact that Mom and Dad may
already be here and kids
often follow. The last census
in 2010 reported more
growth in multi-genera-
tional homes as parents are
staying closer to and actu-


projected sales of $1.5 bil-
lion this year
Bean's business is cele-
brating its 100th anniver-
sary with a giant Fourth of
July celebration this week
with fireworks, music and a
parade, for which Gorman
is the grand marshal.
The company got its start
in 1912 when L.L. Bean ob-
tained the state's list of out-
of-staters with hunting
licenses, and sent mailings
touting his rubber-soled
hunting boot
Ninety of the first 100
pairs sold were returned by
customers after the leather
separated from the rubber.
But Bean managed to win
goodwill by returning cus-
tomers' money Then he bor-
rowed more money, made
improvements and sold
more. He opened his store
five years later in Freeport.
Over the years, Bean's
Yankee sense of values


one financial mentoring.
The program is similar to the
popular UF/IFAS Master Gar-
dener program, but instead of
dealing with plants, the Master
Money Mentor program seeks
to help low- to moderate-in-
come families who are strug-
gling financially.
Bank of America made a gift
to the University of Florida to
support the project, so that the
Florida Master Money Mentors
are now in 29 counties in
Florida. Master Money Mentors
have received approximately
20 hours of intensive training
and have been background
screened. They are ready to
give back to the community by
working with people to help
them get financially organized,
create a spending and savings
plan, assist them to analyze
their credit behavior and limit
debt, and find money to save.
Every situation is different
and the Master Money Mentors
are committed to empowering
people to discover their options
to improve their financial situa-
tions. There is no cost to work
with a Master Money Mentor
and all information provided is
dealt with in a nonjudgmental
and confidential manner.
For more information or to
work with a mentor, call Monica
Payne at the Citrus County Ex-
tension office at 352-527-5713.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.


ally living with kids and
grandchildren out of neces-
sity from both ends of the
age spectrum.
This suggests a positive
trend for the family
These trends make for
considerable thought for all
involved for both the public
and private sectors and all
involved in the delivery of
housing, goods and services.


Avis Marie Craig, AICP, is
employed by Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene.


came through in his cata-
logs, in which he sold only
items that he personally
tested. His oddball choice of
items reflected his tastes,
like wooden duck decoys,
Underwood Deviled Ham,
horseshoes, and pipes and
pipe tobacco.
After his death in 1967 in
Florida, Bean was buried in
Freeport's Webster
Cemetery
As for Maine shoppers,
they're more likely to be in-
terested in the inventory
than the initials.
"Lawrence Leon Bean?"
guessed shopper Rick
Biskup, a Freeport resident,
as he stood next to a giant
L.L. Bean boot outside the
store on Tuesday
His wife, Dru Sullivan,
said she knew it was Leon
something.
"I don't know the rest of
it," she said. "We refer to it
going to Bean's, not L.L.'s."


22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Registration is open to
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities, and the popular
Spa Zone are available from
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's Crystal River of-
fice at 28 N.W. U.S. 19, phone
352-795-3149, or from any
Business Women's Alliance
member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. Proceeds
from last year's expo helped to
fund nine scholarships in health
care and business careers.
Veterans may apply
for fee waiver
TALLAHASSEE The De-
partment of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation (DBPR)
encourages military veterans
who have been honorably dis-
charged within the past 24
months to apply for a new licen-
sure fee waiver available
through the department.
As of July 1, the DBPR will
have the ability to waive initial
licensure fees for military veter-
ans under a new law that
passed during the 2012 Leg-
islative session. The waivers
could save veterans anywhere


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

don't need it because the
government will pay for
theirs. The information
that's available is some-
what subjective, but, on
balance, you can estimate
that long-term care will
cost between $40,000 and
$50,000 a year per person.
Once you figure out what
your income from retire-
ment and investments will
be, you can easily calculate
the shortfall, if any That is
the amount you can cover
with insurance.
DEAR BRUCE: We are a
retired couple. Our money
market, savings and check-
ing are all in our son's
name. We also have our
children's names on the
title to our condo, as well
as other assets. Is it there-
fore necessary for us to
have a will to avoid pro-
bate? We would not like to
have our children go
through probate if we can
avoid it. Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: Every-
one needs a will. Simple
reciprocal wills are not an


from a few hundred dollars to
more than a thousand dollars,
depending on the license type.
"We want to encourage vet-
erans who may be thinking
about starting a business or
getting a professional license in
Florida to apply for this waiver,"
said Secretary Ken Lawson.
"This is our way of saying
'thank you' to the veterans who
have already sacrificed so
much to protect and defend our
nation."
Through HB 517, the initial li-
cense fee, initial application fee
and initial unlicensed activity
fee will be waived for veterans
returning from service, provided
the veteran applies for licen-
sure within 24 months of being
honorably discharged. The law
will apply to new licenses
granted after July 1 for more
than 20 professions under
DBPR's jurisdiction, including
construction, real estate, certi-
fied public accountants and
cosmetologists. The waiver can
be downloaded from the de-
partment's military services
webpage at www.myflorida
license.com/dbpr/dbprmilitary.
html and should be included in
applications for professional
licensure.
The Department of Business
and Professional Regulation's
mission is to license efficiently
and regulate fairly. The depart-
ment licenses and regulates
more than 1 million businesses
and professionals ranging from
hotels and restaurants, real es-
tate agents and certified public
accountants to veterinarians,
contractors and cosmetologists.
For more informaiton, visit
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.


expensive proposition.
Wills must be probated to
be executed.
I don't necessarily be-
lieve that putting every-
thing in your children's
names is a smart move. I
suspect you were advised
that it would be a good way
to protect your assets
should you require a great
deal of intensive care, such
as a nursing home. You
could then go on Medicaid
and preserve your assets.
However, you should be
aware that if one of your
children gets into trouble,
perhaps with the IRS or
with excessive debt, your
assets can be attached be-
cause, in fact, they are no
longer yours but theirs.
Thus, I would seriously re-
view the advisability of
having all of your assets in
your children's names.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m or to Smart Money PO.
Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions ofgen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest. The Chronicle reserves the right to
edit notices. Publication on a specific date or in
color cannot be guaranteed.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 D3









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Classifieds


*'~- ."

-.


To place an ad, call 563-5966





Classifieds

In Print



and


Online


All


AAThe Time


Very Athletic
Old Man, seeks
Female Traveling
companion for Skiing
Kayak, Mountain bik-
ing Etc. 352-589-2362




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




2 FREE KITTENS Female,
white w/ blue eyes
Male black w/ white
Female 4 mo.,claico
long hair, Inside only,
Litter trained
(352) 637-6967
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
leave message
if no answer
Free Kittens
to good home,
13 weeks
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free to Good Home
Male Cat,
less than 1 yr old.
comes with catching
post and Litter box
(352) 746-1956
FREE WOOD
FREE
LIVING ROOM SET
(352) 419-6625
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Shih-Tzu
Male, 6 yrs. old,
charcoal, healthy,
up to dater on shots
(352) 287-3731




FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 Ib,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262




Lost Cat
Female, long hair,
mixed color
Last seen in
Rainbow Springs Estate
(859) 432-2284
(352) 362-5885
Lost Chihuahua
Male, brindle & white
Cardinal Lane &
Solo Lane Area
Homosassa
(352) 364-1734
Lost Grey
Domestic Short Cat.
Neutered, male, Pine
Ridge Area
(352) 527-9050
Lost Set of Ramps
Beverly Hills,
Citrus Springs Area
Old man needs
for Business
(352) 522-0775




Found neutered male
dachshund mix, tan and
white, Monroe St, Beverly
Hills, on Tues July 3rd.
Please contact Citrus
County Animal Services,
Animal ID#A16636356,
352/746-8400, 4030 S
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com
Found senior neutered
male Labrador Retriever
Mix, cream, Crystal River,
on Tues July 3rd.
Please contact Citrus
County Animal Services,
Animal ID#A16637127,
352/746-8400, 4030 S
Airport Rd, Inverness,
www.citruscritters.com



From Homosassa, need
escort for medical clinic
procedure in Lake City.
Will pick up and deliver.
Lucrative pay for simply
going along, being avail-
able in waiting room, and
returning. No driving nec-
essary. Trustworthy only
apply.
Please call 352-584-7238




FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 Ib,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






LPN

The Centers is seeking
Florida LPN for Citrus
County Med Clinic in
Lecanto, FL. Provides
quality client care in
accordance with
acceptable nursing
practice and focuses
on reducing or mini
mizing the effects of
substance abuse &
mental illness.
Full-time position with
experience red.
$17.00/hr Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
obs@thecenters.us
For more info visit


* Full Time RN MDS
* RN Wound Nurse,
* RN 3-11 Supervisor

Please apply online
avantecenters.com
Or feel free to call
352-726-3141


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:


Full Time
Lab Technologist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.


The Centers is seeking
Licensed or Masters
Level Outpatient
Therapists for posi-
tions in Lecanto.
Must have exp work-
ing with adolescents
in a therapeutic envi-
ronment, & MH/SA
Co-occurring popula-
tions. Exp with
not-for-profit, com-
munity mental health
desired. Licensed
positions require
active Medicare &/
or Medicaid #, pro-
vider credentialing
(Cigna, BC/BS) de-
sired. Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. NHSC ap-
proved site. For more
info visit
http://nhsc.hrsa.aov/
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters. us
For more info visit
www. thecenters.us


Medical Assistant
Full Time

Working Knowledge
EMR a plus
Send Resumes to:
wfmarick
@yahoo.com
A Non Smoking
Facility. EOE/DFWP


Medical Assistant

Wanted for Busy
Family Practice. F/T.
Experience needed.
Must be a self starter.
Excellent salary
& benefits.
Fax Resume to:
352-489-9400
Atten: Kandi


Dental Hygienist

Fax Resume to:
(352) 465-3009

MEDICAL
CAREERS

begin here Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.c
om

NEEDEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

Residential SA
Tech Pool
The Centers is
seeking Pool (PRN)
Residential
Substance Abuse
Techs for our
Citrus County
Adolescent
Residential program
in Lecanto, FL. Duties
focus on reducing or
minimizing the effects
of substance abuse, a
12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in
the assurance of
quality client care &
transporting clients.
Exp with troubled
adolescents reqd.
Must be available for
shift work & week-
ends. Background
screenings reqd.
Salary $9.25-$9.75/hr
plus 10% shift diff for
2nd/3rd shifts.
(no benefits)
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 29 1-5580,
iobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

STAFFING
SCHEDULER

Computer, Phone and
insurance experience
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
Fax Resume
(352) 637-1176
or Call (352) 637-3111





WEBSITE
DEVELOPER

CHAMPS Software,
Inc. has an opening for
a WebSite Developer.
Must have at least 2
yrs. exp. in developing
complex websites.
Expertise in HTML5
and graphip design
preferred.
Please send resume
and links to:
Portolios.
jobs@champsinc.com




EXP. ROOFERS

Truck &Tools, 489-0360

HELP WANTED
LOCAL CHURCH

Looking for an
experienced
youth coordinator
Email resumes to
umcchristianed@
tampabay.rrcom

ROOFING
REPAIR PERSON

Experience.Must
have tools & truck
Apply in Person
AAA ROOFING
1000 NE 5th Street





$300.
IS A BAD DAY!
Fortune 500 Co.

Security equipment
distribution. Entry
Level to Mgmt. Great
Pay/full benefits. We
Train. Advancement
Opportunity.
H.S. Diploma or GED
req'd. No Felonies.
352-597-2227

ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!

Drive 4 Us Top Pay &
CSA Friendly Equip
401K& Great
Insurance 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782

ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!

Drive 4 Us Top Pay &
CSA Friendly Equip
401K & Great
Insurance 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782


100% Owner Opera-
tor Co. Regional &
Dedicated Home
weekly Class A C.D.L.
lyr. exp. in last 3
Call (800)695-9643

Drivers

Class A Flatbed -$-
Home Weekends,
Run Southeast US,
Requires 1 Yr OTR
Flatbed experience,
& Pay UP TO
.39c/ mile
Call (800)572-5489
x 227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

Drivers
Steady Refrigerated
and Dry Van freight.
Daily or Weekly pay.
Hometime Choices!
Modern equipment,
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rent OTR experience.
(800)414-9569
www.
driveknight.com

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS

earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE

FUEL TRANSPORT
DRIVER

Part Time, CDL,CLASS
A, w/HAZMAT. TWICE
card preferred. Call
Jamie (352) 795-3469

Grass Roots Lawn

Full/Partime LABORER
Exp. & dri. lic a must.
352-382-2287

House Cleaner/
Farm Worker

Needed Call After
5pm (352) 302-3038

Need live-in Help

Room & Board only.
Want retired Lady
(352) 489-2694

SECURITY

Fulltime, night Secu-
rity/ Light Mainte-
nance, Benefits,
Apply in Person
BEST WESTERN
Crystal River
614 NW Hwy 19.

UTILITIES SERVICE
WORKER PUBLIC
SERVICES

The City of Dunnellon
is accepting
applications for the
position of Utilities
Service Worker.
Duties include, but
not limited to,
inspecting and
servicing lift stations,
performing mainte-
nance and repair on
water distribution
and sewer collection
systems. Eligible
candidates must
have a valid Florida
driver license.
Must obtain a job de-
scription and submit
a City of Dunnellon
Employment
Application package
to the City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500. Apps
can be downloaded
at
www.dunnellon.org.
Electronic applica-
tions/ resumes not
accepted.
Salary range
($19,074 $28,621).
Application deadline
07/23/2012.
Position will remain
opened untfi lled.
E.O.E., D.F.W.P.





CLEANERS
CR/Homosassa Area
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555 E.O.E





AIRLINES
ARE HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance, thru SC
Training.HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


IvietI aI si gle
right now!

No paid operators,
just real people like
you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange mes-
sages and connect
live. Try it free.
Call now
(888)744-4426




China Cabinet
2 Dressers
Antiques
$150. ea
(352) 637-6587



MODEL TRAINS &
ACCESSORIES HO & N
Scale Track & Control-
lers Call after 6pr
(352) 341-4690

'A


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
S* ** * *



Disassembled Bronze
Sunroom, 7 windows &
1 door with locks &
Keys $400 obo
4 Person Hot tub,
good cond. replaced
mtr. needs reset button
$200 obo
Bob (352) 795-9187



GE Profile Refrigerator
25 cu. ft. side by side
water, ice in door
white, clean, works well
$400
(352) 527-9449
GE Refrigerator
Side by side, 25 cu. ft.
looks new,
$250
(352) 634-2528
Kenmore Refrigerator,
side by side 25 cu ft.
ice & water in door.
Like New
$400 (352) 341-5020
352-476-4340 cell
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer, GE,
less than 2 yrs. old,
like new, Matching Set
$250.
(352) 895-8244




'Yt \\k Idl Ilirst.





< C .


$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver (352) 263-7398



BENCH GRINDER 5"
ASHLAND, INDUSTRIAL
RATED, MADE IN USA.
$30.00 FIRM
352-527-7840
Lincoln Welder
AC 225Amps
$250
(352) 563-2896
RIGID DRAIN CLEAN-
ING MACHINE Rigid
Motorized Drain cleaning
machine. 3/8 by 75 foot
cable. Used once. Sells
at local stores for $500.
Asking $275 cash.
Call 757-617-2285
and leave message.
TOOLS FOR SALE
10"Craftsman Table saw
w/ stand carbide blade
$160. 10" Makita Chop
Saw Carbide blade,
and Other Tools
(352)795-1546 212-6211



AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH 2 SPEAKERS, CD
PLAYER, & DUAL CAS-
SETTES $100
352-613-0529



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP COMPUTER
with flat screen
$150
352-586-6891



PVC Patio Set
Table, 4 chairs
$50.
(352) 794-3925



1 SMALL SOFA
Excellent Cond.
$125. obo
(352) 527-9071
42" Round Wooden
Dining Room Table
4 chairs
$200 obo
(352) 726-1059
FURNITURE Solid Oak
Entertainment Center,
holds 32" Flat TV -$199.
Glass top 42" dining set
w/4 chairs $150.
352-382-5555
Hand Made $125 obo
2 Contemporary Lazy
Boy Lamps
$70 obo
(352) 746-9352
High End Quality Resale
Furniture & Accessories.
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803
Indoor/Outdr. Furniture
2 chairs w/ foot stools,
1 glider $50. Kitchen
wood table 50" round
bar high w/ extra glass
top 4 bar high stools 1
yr old $150 795-4372
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Rocking Chair,
beautiful, heavy old
solid wood $65.
Antique Lamp Rayo
converted electric $60.
(352) 341-5978


OJ.V kL
Serta King Mattress Set,
includes mattress,
boxspring, & mattress
protector pad excel.
cond. less than 1 yr. old
$400
Sumter Cabinet Co.
bereau & night stand
$250. obo
Queen Mattress &
boxspring & frame $75.
obo (352) 746-9352



2 Rider Mowers
Wheelhorse, $450.
John Deere $450.
Price Firm.
(352) 341-1569
CUB CADET
LAWN TRACTOR
54" Cut, Always
Garaged and well
maintained, $,1,350
(352) 489-8803



EVERYTHING MUST GO
Sat & Sun 9am to 4pm
Furniture Sale
no antiques
at 411 Hemlock St
Inverness
(352) 344-1541
HOWARD'S
FLEA MARKET
352-628-4656

INVERNESS
MOVING SALE*
Mon. 9 thru. Wed 11 &
Fri/13 thru. Sun. 8-12N
3440 E. Foxwood Ct.
Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944



MENS CLOTHING
LARGE SHORTS,
PANTS, JEANS &
SHIRTS 14 PIECES $25
352-613-0529




3 Wicker Shoes Stands
$10 ea
foldable 31" L
(352) 795-7652
4 Volume Set C/K Truck
1998 Serive Manuals
Chevy/GMC $40.
Wire/Wicker Pet Cage
List $240. Asking $100
(352) 795-7652
1 HP, Submersible
pump, $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH 2 SPEAKERS, CD
PLAYER & DUAL
CASSETTES $100
352-613-0529
AM/FM RADIO CD
PLAYER LIKE NEW $20
BOOMBOX BY
MEMOREX E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
AQUARIUM 25 GALLON
INCLUDES STAND, FIL-
TER, HOOD WITH
LIGHT, & GRAVEL $80
352-613-0529
ARDMORE COMPUTER
STAND $25.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
Charcoal Grill, gas
fired, Paid over $100
New, never used
Asking $80.
(352) 465-6830
CLOTHING MENS
LARGE SHORTS,
PANTS, JEANS, &
SHIRTS 14 PIECES $25
352-613-0529


Amplipher, excel.
cond. great for DJ or
Home use $350.
BBE Sonic Maximizer
for extra soundquality
$40. (352) 287-9073
DOGGIE RIDE
STROLLER & CAN
HOOK ON BIKE $20.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
EXERCISE
REBOUNDER $20.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5Ib,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262
HOOVER VACUUM $35
GREAT CONDITION
SELF PROPELLED-CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
352-419-5981
LUGGAGE CARRIER
$10 SAMSONITE
TRAVEL BAG $15 BOTH
LIKE NEW 352-419-5981
INVERNESS
PIANO
$100 Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
QUIK SHADE
ROLLERBAG
Fits 10'bylO'canopy.
Never use.$40.00 Call
Ray@352-464-0573
SHED 10x12 double loft
cook shed 800.00 call n
ask for jeremey or
dominique or pat
3522708412
Singer Interlock Serger
Sewing Machine
$50.
(352) 637-6838
SOFA TABLE
$10.00
Beverly Hills
912-509-5566
STAIN GLASS TABLE
LAMP $45 TELEPHONE
ANSWERING MACHINE
$10 CALL 352-419-5981
X BOX and KENECTS
With 4 Games
Like New, In Box
$150
352-628-7251,586-8503



ELECTRIC HOSPITAL
BED WITH RAILS.
GOOD CONDITION,
CLEAN.
$250. 352-637-3156



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



9VGUITAR (fender)
AMP,PLENTY OF TUBE
CRUNCH GREAT FOR
LAP STEEL! $75
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
DREDNAUGHT
W/GIGBAQTUNER,STRAP
AND MORE! $60
352-601-6625
LAP STEEL GUITAR
"LAPSTRAT" MINI
STRAT SOUNDS
GREAT! EASY LEARN
$90 352-601-6625
Spinet Piano
with padded storage
bench. Also has heater
cinnamon color
$600. 352- 795-4372



ARTTIC KING WINDOW
AIR CONDITIONER 8000
BTU excellent condition
/75.00 lnda 341-4449


Queen bed w
mattress/box spring 2
night stands 5 drawer
chest very good condition
$375.00 call Tim
@352-400-8787
SM WINDOW AIR CON-
DITIONER 5000 BTU
works/fair condition 25.00
linda 341-4449
SM. WINDOW AIR
CONDITIONER 5000
BTU good cond. 50.00
Linda 341-4449
SOURING EAGLE
FIGURINE NEW WAS
59.95/SELLING FOR
20.00 LINDA 341-4449




Golds Gym
Treadmill
timer, pulse, weight
control $100
(352) 344-8003


NORDIC TRACK ELITE
SKI MACHINE Top of the
Line! Great Condition!
Paid $1300. Asking $350.
Tom 352-228-3661


NORDIC TRACK EXER-
CISE CYCLE Model C3si.
20 programs. Easy en-
trance. Like new. Paid
$500.00. Asking $150.00.
352-746-5658
Nordic Track
Treadmill,
A2350, Like New
$350.
(352) 746-9644



12 Gun
Light Pine Gun Case
Holds up to 12 guns
lighted, 2 glass doors &
bottom drawers $200
(352) 746-6199
Bersa Thunder
9 MM Never fired, Box
w/ matching series
numbers $450
(269) 838-5076
Inverness
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
POOL TABLE 6 ft pool
table, great for smaller
space like new, no
damage,rarely used. Has
all the accessones.You
move it, $250.00 call
257-2097
RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquarters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River
Ruger Black Hawk,
new model 357,
excel. cond.
$450 obo
(352) 422-1589
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




'09 Enclosed, Interior
20' 5"L, W 8', Hgt 6'7".
less than 700 mi.
$4,750. 352- 419-4066.
352-228-7670


Junk today



S... is not always


STreasure tomorrow.

This message brought to you by the
Division of Solid Waste Management
C 527-7670 and TDD Telephone 527-5303
email: landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us

Instead of donating that broken, run down TV, sofa, or table and chairs to

the many nonprofit thrift stores and agencies across Citrus County, why

not take it to the landfill. It's free! For residential self-haulers.

Your good quality donations help fund these agencies and make these items available to

those less fortunate than you. Donations made after hours hurt more than help.


Don't make them pay to haul off your old junk.

Annie Johnson Thrift Stores 465-7957

Habitat Home Store 341-1800

Hospice of Citrus County Thrift & Gift Store 341-2220

Key Training Center Thrift Stores 726-0271

Florida Sheriff's Youth Ranches 795-8886

Citrus United Basket 344-2242

The Path of Citrus County Inc. 527-6500

Humanitarians of Florida 563-2370 563-2311

Citrus County Family Resource Center 344-1001

The Salvation Army 341-2448 Call to verify
acceptable items.


D4 SUNDAY,JULY 8, 2012


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENCLOSED TRAILER
5 X 12 Transport 6 ft.
High Inside, round top,
3 new tires & rims,
Good cond. $1,195.
352-628-7251,586-8503

EZ PULL
TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
Used 7x20 equip
$2450
Used 7X16, 5 ton
equip. $1895
Trailer Tires from
$34.49
Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

NEW TRAILER
4X6
$550
(352) 503-2956




BOUNCES EXCL COND
$20 CAR SEAT $30
SWING SMALL $20 baby
clothing boy and girls
(352)777-1256
CARS TOYS $10 ,GYM
FOR BABY $20 DELUXE
car seat toddle $30 chairs
for eat $10 352-777-1256
GIRL NURSERY White
changing table, crib
mattress pink bedding
and decor ALL $100
3526342122
STROLLER EXCELLENT
CONDITION $40 PINK
AND BROWN and
playpen brown and pink
$45 (352)777-1256


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAA ^^ ^<


Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom /2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916



1 MALE YORKIE
10 weeks $450
MALTESE, 3 females
2 males available soon
$600. & $650 Health
certs, CKC registered,
352-212-4504,212-1258
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 628-2483
DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS
Thurs. July 26th, 7PM
crittersandcanines.com
(352) 634-5039
Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymall.com








PURE BRED MALE TOY
POODLE Jax is a pure
bred black toy male
born on 10/14/11.
He is very smart and
friendly. He is looking
for a loving home.
Included in the price
are the crate, food &
water bowls, retractable
leash, an assortment of
toys, & his bed.
I am asking for what I
paid for him, everything
else is a bonus. All
offers considered.
Jax has had all of his
vaccinations. I have his
complete health rec-
ords. Included is the pa-
perwork to register him
with the CKC if you
wish.Call 516 449 5369


ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPS
AKC,champ,bloodlines
,8wks ,hlth cert.shots,
wormed,family
raised,1800&
up.352-503-7803,cell
2121808
hm352-503-7803,cell
212-1808
Miniature Schnauzers
2 Males,
1 black & silver
I salt & Pepper
$600 ea.
(352) 419-4517
MOVING SALE
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
n a -


Tas Dog
male red/black
hound mix,
3 y/o obdedient,
good dog. Loves
people. Needs to
be only dog.
Needs good home
(352) 795-1288

YORKIE PUPP
1 Male, health cert.
$500.
(352) 726-5217




BARN MASTERS
We Build, Horse Stalls
Barns, Fences, Pastures.
(352) 257-5677


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
i^fA AAA


MIRROCRAFT
16 FT., equipped to fish,
Mercury, 40H, Non Tilt
$2,500
(352) 341-1569
SOLD
18 ft. STARLINE
'87 w/ walk thru, W/S,
inbd/outbd, mtr. Boat,
needs battery & Inter.
work, Alum trlr. is worth
asking price $795 obo
SOLD
GAME FISHER
12 ft., fiberglass boat &
trailer, Boat has no title,
needs work $185
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
RV Refrigerator Dometic
2Dr., top freezer, gas &
Electric New never used
Ong. $1,575 asking
$1,300 (352) 560-4292
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298



R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825
SUNNYBROOK
'02, 26ft, Very good
cond., alumn. frame
work, new tires, $8,250.
obo, May finance part
352-726-9369



Your World







CHkIONIC LE


CLASSIFIED




Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945



1993 4.3 V6,
Chevy Engine
700 R Transmission
low miles $450 both
305 Chevy Engine,
Alum, Edelbrock intake
650 Holly Carb./SS
headers, $450. Bob or
Willie (352) 795-9187



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consignmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298



'08 SUZUKI
'Forenza Sedan, 4 cyl.,
$7,500, 28K, black.
Mark 352-556-8768, or
(352) 447-2736 (good)
BUICK 97
LaSaber, clean, light
beige, low miles, 79K
$3,250
352 527-3509/270-4928
CHEVROLET
2002 Camaro 35th Anni-
versary Z28 Convertible
White w/Tan leather Inte-
nor and top. Automatic,
tinted windows, 45K mi-
les. All power options,
18" Ruff Racing Wheels,
however, price negotiable
if buyer would like original
16" wheels with new tires.
Definitely destined to be
a collector.$12,500 OBO
352-212-8155


SUNDAY,JULY 8, 2012 D5


Ula/ good on gas, good
condition, low mileage
$1800 (352) 634-0897
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
LINCOLN
2005, Towncar
42K miles,
$10,000 OBO
(352) 746-9649
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 72,000 mi. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$5,500 (352) 860-1106,

SOLD
DATSUN
'83, 280 ZX, T top,
leather interior,
As is Runs, $2,300

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
FORD
1930, Model A, Sport
Coupe, runs well, great
cond., storage cover,
$15,000 (352) 465-9186
LINCOLN
'00, Towncar, signature
series, w/ all opt., white
tan leather uphol.
$4,999. (352) 527-3151

SOLD
Mercedes Benz 89
560-SL 2 tops exc. cond
58K mis. gray/gray, top
rack mcl $12,500







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"#A ^-Cr ^


'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
I own,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883



CHEVY
'97, S10, good cond.
runs great, 4 cyl. 5 spd.
100k mi,.$2,200.
(352) 302-7451
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $25,000 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533



216-0708 SCRN
7/9, 7/10,7/11 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Sale:
D & D TOWING OF OCALA
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles) at
4125 NE Jacksonville Rd.,
Ocala, FL 34479-2427


JEEP
'07, Grand Cherokee
4 wheel drive
68k Miles
Call (352) 503-7217




DODGE
'91 Caravan runs
good A/C good,
moving must sell asking
$600 (352) 382-5351

FORD
2011, EXT CARGO VAN
E150, Under 17k mi., ex-
cel. cond. Gold, AC,
PW, PL $20K, 628-0104




HONDA ATV 04
TRX-400-FGA-Rancher
2 or 4 wd, auto or shift
New Tires, Good Cond.
$2400 (352) 726-8005




CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883

Harley '02
Road King, black, lots
of chrome & extra's
gar.kept $9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810



pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
ues. D & D TOWING OF
OCALA reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
Sale Date:09 July 2012@
9:00AM 1995 TOYT


Harley Davidson 03
Super Road King, fuel inj.
$48K up grades with
receipts, too much to list
$7,000 (727)207-1619
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ndng gear avail
(352) 601-4722

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HD ROAD GLIDE
Fire Red Pearl,
Customized,Low mi.$30K
invested, Sell for
$11,500,For details call
352-527-0074
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
HONDA
'02, VTX 1800 Retro
2,883 Org. Miles,
like New $6,995 obo
(352) 465-7930

HONDA 2007
750 Shadow. WS, pipes,
SB, Rack, C bars, extra
clean 8200 mi., $4,275
(352) 860-1106, Bob

KAWASAKI
2010, Vulcan 900
Classic, 8,438 miles
2 new tires, $6,500
(352) 270-3662



VIN#4T1GB10E7SU062562
Sale Date: 10 July 2012@
9:00AM 1990 CADI
VIN#1G6VR3384LU100410
Sale Date: 11 July 2012@
9:00 AM 1993 JEEP
VIN#J4FY19PXPP241794
July 7 and 8, 2012.


376-0708 SUCRN
7/8 Meeting Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 12, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
July 8, 2012.


fl St


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia
Incontinency No Prob.
(SL 6906450) 503-7052

LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation/ Crack Repair
#CBC057405, 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic. 5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


AAA ROOFING
Call the "% ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
ic./Ins. CCC057537 OO~BVPX


BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARN MASTERS
We Build, Horse Stalls
Barns, Fences, Pastures.
(352) 257-5677
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *k



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Rob 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
GenlMaint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
All Home
1 Repairs
S/ Small Carpentry

.I, Screening
W Clean Dryer

Affordab le & Dependable
S Experience lifelong
352 344-0905







POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
A STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584


Handman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
se RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Handyman Dave Press
Clean Repairs, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



SBat

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Green Valley Land-
scape & Design Inc
complete lawn mainte-
nance (352)280-0269



AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570


ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


-~r., /l ,
COMPUTERSER








Crtal F3 a


Boulerice

B00021s0 & SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned And Operated
In Citrus County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
S$125 OFF
'ANY RE-ROOF :
SOne coupon per household Expires 123112 I
ryi FREE ESTIMATES.
(352) 628-5079





WIiN JDOV,
GENIE."
We (ean Windows nd o Whole Lot More'
Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
0 Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


"Repaint
Specialist"
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631












Acrylic & Glass WIHDOWS
Custom made for your screen room

("J/,if CRC058138


(352)465-462l9
Installation may vary. __


WE PAINT
Houses inside & out,
Decorative concrete
Handyman, house
cleaning (352) 476-0680




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT. LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old Oneu!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000B6SU


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


rKRtt Estimares
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
R e lGrout Painting
IJ, ? -" T Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-1248


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free
est.(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


W CPC14G65G65'

COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188




Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
"NO ROT"
Door Units
Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 i
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


)


'12 IMPALA


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800440-9054


S'12 FIAT 500 1


.R6I62HRROE M ITF S P
1-0-5"5 BE'IKAB23 35 ^l


$19,985 $17,985
OR$31 pO OR$28 MO.


'11 CRUZE


:IRUE :24H E DMESG M M A CIA I


'11 ALTIMA


'11 TOWN & COUNTRY -


s19,985
0.R313.PER
OR $ 3 13Mo.)


'11 EQUINOX I r


S'12 JOURNEY
1 TA


$17,985*
PER
OR$281 MO
'11 IMPALA -

: se .


'11 200


'11 CIVIC
^ iW^t~Z4


$15,985*
PER
OR$250 ME
r '11 RANGER 1


$15,985
oR$250 'M.
( '11 TACOMA


I :II111 0&:I
b : 11N:'.jb I:u^:


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$20,985 $15,985* $24,985
OR,328 oRS250 a. OR391 EO


'11 AVENGER


:R:IE24 R H R E :IA r INFDM R


'11 HHR


66 .6


4,985 1 $13,985*


F :HIR . I6H I
1b-800-58:755 Ed.1 50


352-564-1971
WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL
*PRICES AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1,000 CRYSTAL TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE, SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXCLUDES TAX, TITLE TAG, AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS @3.99% APR. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
OOOBYUR


\~ 1 1~ 1111111; ~l/~ ~I ~l I'/lljI I-.9


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'11 CARAVAN


$16,985
oR$266OE.


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


D6 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


AdWAM.. 4*ms





INSIDE
1 Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


I OME I RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


These starfish-shaped mini
bowls from Pottery Barn can
be filled with sweet or savory
treats on a beach-themed
buffet, as shown here.
Associated Press/Pottery Barn


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E2 SUNDA'I~ JULY 8, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


FAMILY ROOM RULES!
*FIREPLACE HUGE 24 X 31 GARAGE
*3/2.5 baths Caged pool & lanai
* Lots of cabinets CORIAN counters
* 1 ACRE LOT GREAT CURB APPEAL!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997

E-MAIL: elliesutton@remax.net


* HEATED POOL HOT TUB
* Wood cabinets GRANITE counters
*3338 sq. ft. LIVING 1.92 ACRES
* Xtra big 3 Car gar Executive MBR w/studio
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
i n. i.-r.r r ... .i ,


099U N. UKnINf I tn.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ?
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11985 H. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
* 2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel C
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


Canal short distance to the
Hernando Lake. 2BR/2BA,
carport, fenced-in areas for pets,
hot tub and workshop with power.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.net I


* Beautiful 2BR/2BA/2CG Villa
* Open Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar
*Den/Office Screened Lanai
* Private Backyard Maintenance Free
* Built-in-Entertainment Center
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 I
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


HOMOSASSA LOCATION
2/2 on 1/2 acre.
Nicely furnished with huge lanai
and screened porch.
A BARGAIN!
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


: I THKLLI E E.I T RA.l ]


ABSOLUTELY CHARMING!
*HUGEGREATROOM -FIREPLACE
* Kitchen with DR His /Her baths in Master
S3 BR/3baths ABG pool with decking
* Screen porch & deck DOUBLE lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
wwwI Flo idltr silllliiIo. col L
www.FlolidaLislinglnlo.conl


Beautiful hilltop home with inground
pool. 3-3-2 Home with many upgrades
and large rooms.
Call for more details
LINDA BARNES (352) 239-4844
Email: Ibarnes@remax.net


AFFORDABLE GOLF COURSE HOME ON THE 8TH HOLE
Nice split plan home, with court yard like entry Formal dining
area, formal living area, Large family rm w/wood burning
fireplace, pretty wood floors & sky lights Kitchen w/breakfast
bar, pantry, built in wall oven and range, lots of cabinets and
counter top space, & pass through window Unique master suite
w/sep dressing rm that has sink& vanity just before master bath
area Home has lots of closets & storage throughout Nice lanai
with mew of the golf course A Must see Homel
RICHARD VENTICINQUE (352) 795-2441
Email: richardv@remax.net
www.citruscounty-florida-realestate.com


WATERFRONT HOME ON DEEP CANAL
Good size home on seawalled lot with
floating dock and good access to the
river. 2 bedrooms and 3 baths along
with family room and 2 car garage.
Screened porch and shed
too. Call anytime 627-2828. n
STEVE VARHADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


countertops, hardwood floors, insulated glass & doors, new
200 Amp service and much more Brand new lanai could
be easily glassed in 10,000 Lb boat lift plus room for
2 other large boats and a Jet Ski ramp 88 ft wide deep
water canal wIh plenty of room for all your toys
Call to see this one TODAYI
LEO SMITH 352-697-2771
Email: leosmith@remax.net


BEAUTIFUL CONDO FOR ONLY $59,900!!!
This Regency Park unit absolutely sparkles Fresh paint
inside and brand new carpeting (including the porches front &
rear It's been professionally ceaned so all you have to do is
move in Great location within easy walking distance of
Whispering Pines Park Near shopping, medical, .1I
downtown Rails to trails is close too Vaulted -...
spacious garage & community pool See it today
JOHN HOLLOWAY SR. (352) 212-6002
CRS. GRI. ABR. e-PRO
E-mail: johnHolloway@ftmpubay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com &


* I o3 rear DUlI sollz on .o3 acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


2421 N. H e H s -w .


COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS BEST
with this 5/2.5/2 situated on 2.39 AC in
Homosassa. This 2-story 2,400+ sq. ft.
charmer has formal living/dining, Ig. kitchen,
20x24 fam. rm. w/woodburning FP, plus tons
of hidden storage. Call for your personal
showing.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


DESIRABLE CITRUS HILLS
S3/2/2 Pool Home Oak Hardwood Floors
* Large Dining Area Split Bedroom Plan
* Cathedral Ceiling Greatroom* Master Bath Walk-In Shower
* Inside Laundry Covered Lanai To Caged Pool
* Nicely Treed Backyard Close to Dining & Theater
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email mailhasalhei iemno nel r 'j
VIRTUAL TOURS l ..... inardh salhel ienn. coin


umm~ ~P~aur~


5338 PARKLAND TERRACE
HOMOSASSA
* Fisherman's Paradise 2BR/2BA/2CG
* Beautiful Remodeled Kitchen Ceramic Tile & Carpet
* Freshly Painted *2 Utility Sheds
* Boat & RV Parking Close to Water & Boat Ramps
* Owner Financing Possible
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net











KEI &m KINGHA
(2 06337-0828








EXQUISITE BLACK DIAMOND RANCH HOME
3/3/3 2699 sq. ft. of living area, located on
.08 acres on the 5 of the Quarry Course -
this home has been completely remodeled -
cherry cabinetry, marble flooring, granite
though out, large screened patio 52 x 23 -
new roof, A/C and water heater in past 3 yrs.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Great way to


'tackle' clutter


T ackle boxes are
durable cases that
don't take up a lot of
space, and you
can take them
with you from
room to room or
whenever you're
on the go. They're
built for organi-
zation, with mul-
tiple trays and
compartments
designed for easy
sorting and selec- ara
tion. So even if FRU
you aren't a fish- LIVI
ing enthusiast,
you can still use a tackle box
around your home as a
handy storage case, or per-
haps as a unique gift con-
tainer for a themed gift
Here are a few ideas:
Garden container: Place
soil directly into the com-
partments (add gravel at the


I


bottom, if desired) and plant
herbs, tropical plants, annu-
als or succulents. It will
make a pretty
conversation
piece inside your
home, or outside
on your porch or
patio.
Electronics:
Keep backup bat-
teries and cords
out of the junk
drawer, where
Noel they're hard to
GAL find.
NG For the home
office: Store Post-
it notes, staple removers,
tacks, paper clips, rubber
bands, etc. inside a tackle
box. If you're having a
garage sale, a tackle box
works as a makeshift cash
box. Or use one to make a

See FRUGAl/Page E5


Marvia Peter
Korol Korol
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
RE/MAX Realtors
deliver the goods
Marvia and Peter Korol
have succeeded in passing the
multi-million dollar mark in
sales volume this year. This
qualifies the husband and wife
team as multi-million dollar pro-
ducers.
Marvia and Peter work out of
the Central Ridge office of
RE/MAX Realty One located
on State Road 491 in Lecanto.
The pair have been Realtors in


Cheryl Chris
Nadal Grant
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
the area for more than a
decade and have a great repu-
tation with their coworkers and
clients.
Cheryl Nadal and Chris
Grant have both passed the
$1 million mark in sales volume
this year. Both Cheryl and
Chris are consistent top pro-
ducers in the local market.
Cheryl is an agent in the Crys-
tal River office and Chris works
out of the Homosassa
RE/MAX office.
The brokers and staff of


RE/MAX congratulate these
agents on their success.
ERA agent passes
new milestone


ERA Ameri-
can Realty &
Investments
is proud to an-
nounce the lat-
est production
level achieved
by one of its
Inverness of-
fice agents for
2012.
Sandi Hart


Sandi Hart
ERA
American
Realty.


has surpassed the $1 million
mark in closed sales volume in
2012.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievement of this fine real
estate professional.
Sandi Hart can be reached
at the Inverness office of ERA


American Realty at 352-
726-5855.
Rector team hits
new high
Top Performance Real Es-
tate Consultants is proud to
congratulate Debbie Rector's
Team for
closing
$6.7 mil-
lion in
business
so far
this year.
Rector
and her
team
have Debbie
Rector's
consis- Team
gently Top Performance
been top Real Estate.
among
the county's top producers for
more than 18 years.
Call them at 352-746-9924.


rk hiLUII U l1IIV L1REA


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
0U 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
ENE (352) 634-2371 Cell
ERX bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:bidavis.cor


* 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths Eat-in kitchen
* Interior laundry Screened lanai
* On the 9th tee of Twisted Oaks Lawn care provided
$99,750 MLS 353490


A hnda & irk Jonson Tom Ballour li Ave.s & H Stiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC.t REALTOR C REACTOR REALR-BROKER REALTOR


4506 N. TUMBLEWEED


15 5. FILLMORE


746-9000


0I 0vilr ~ ir s a t u ~ a I


Real Estate DIGEST


I


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomelFont is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..........................352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Five ways to attract wildlife


Citrus County is home to a dazzling
array of wildlife, from birds and
butterflies to gopher tortoises
and manatees. Whether you
live on a quarter-acre lot or 4
several acres, there are
many ways to create a I
wildlife haven in your yard. '
1. Use plants that provide
flowers and fruit for
wildlife. Butterflies can't re-
sist firebush, golden dew-
drop, lantana, milkweed,
passionflower, pentas or
salvia. For our feathered Audre
friends, add fruiting shrubs F1
and trees such as beauty-
berry, crabapples, firebush, golden
dewdrop, oaks and sparkleberry Nat-
ural food sources from plants are al-
ways better than artificial food
sources, such as prepared humming-
bird nectar
For an exhaustive list of plants for
this area, visit www.FloridaYards.org.
The interactive plant database selects
plants that will thrive in your yard
with minimal maintenance. Many of
the plants provide flowers and fruit
for wildlife, and all of the plants pro-
vide some wildlife benefit in the form
of nesting sites or cover.


i
3


"Vertical layering" of plants will create
more wildlife habitat in your yard. Sim-
ply use plants with varying heights and
forms (vines, shrubs, trees,
\ etc.) to create more layers.
2. Provide clean water.
All animals need a fresh
. water supply Whether it's a
S small dish of water, a man-
made water feature or a
natural water body, wildlife
will use it, especially dur-
ing dry times.
3. Provide shelter and
y Durr feeders for wildlife.Many
'N species will happily use
nesting boxes, from blue-
birds and flycatchers to red-bellied
woodpeckers and flying squirrels. If
you do provide food, be consistent, es-
pecially in the winter months, because
animals may become dependent on it.
4. Reduce your pesticide use. Insects
are the "building blocks" of a healthy,
diverse yard. Almost all wildlife de-
pends on insects in some way Most
birds, reptiles, amphibians and mam-
mals eat insects. Animals that do not
eat insects directly often prey upon an-
imals that eat insects. If pesticides are
necessary, use less-toxic options such
as horticultural oil, insecticidal soap,


neem oil and spinosad.
5. Keep cats and dogs indoors. Cats
are naturally excellent hunters, esti-
mated to kill millions of birds and
small mammals each year.
Learn more by attending a free class
on "Attracting Birds, Butterflies and
Wildlife to Your Yard" on from 6 to 7:30
p.m. Wednesday or from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 20. The class will be at the
Citrus County UF/IFAS Extension, 3650
W Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Space is
limited, and preregistration is required.
Call Gina Hamilton at 352-527-5707.
For more information on attracting
wildlife and other Florida-friendly
Landscaping topics, call 352-527-5708
or email Audrey Durr@bocc. citrus.
fl.us. Visit Citrus County's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District's
(SWFWMD) website at wwwWater
Matters.org and the University of
Florida's website at www.Solutions
ForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District.


Vase is example of Moriage; hall bench looks excellent


Dear John: You once ap-
praised this vase for my
mom, but I have someone
who wants to buy it for
$150. I cannot make out
what you appraised it for
Do you remember?
Someone wants it from
India, my mom passed,
and no one wanted to
take her things, and I
have them- lots and lots
of china, Waterford, and
Lenox. S.P, Internet John S
Dear S.P: I am glad SIKOF
you included photo-
graphs of the vase be-
cause that was over a
decade ago. The vase is in the Nip-
pon collecting category The type of
decoration on the porcelain vase is
called Moriage. The technique has
been used since ancient times and
in England is often called squeeze
bag decoration, since it is very sim-
ilar to decorating a cake. Based on
current potential dollar value, the
offer of $150 is good. I think it would


i
I
I


be difficult to get more than that.
DearJohn: I listened to your pro-
gram with great interest this winter
while visiting Florida. I
wonder if you would tell
me anything about this
piece. The seat lifts up
and has a storage area
1. beneath. The arms and
legs have paws. The fin-
ish is original. This item
has been in my husband's
family for a few genera-
korski tions. I have often won-
'SKI'S dered what date and
country of origin. Also
S the proper name for it. -
M.KG., Internet
Dear M.KG.: You have a hall
bench. I think it was manufactured
in England prior to World War I. It
appears to be made of oak, and the
overall quality looks to be of a high
standard. Potential dollar value is
$600 to $1,200.
Dear John: My late husband
drove race cars midgets, sprints,
and championship in the late 1940s


and early 50s. He had a collection
of crystal glassware from Tiffany's
that Indianapolis Speedway sent
him for Christmas every year. The
earliest is 1960 with the winners
from 1911 to 1960 etched on the
back. I have 19 sets; the latest is
2008. The 1990 one commemorates
their 75th anniversary I am inter-
ested in selling them. Could you di-
rect me to a collector? M.,
Internet
Dear M.: I wish you had included
a photograph. I was not able to find
any specific collector interest.
Tiffany is a highly recognized name
in the art glass collecting category
In order to help you I need good
clear photographs of the glassware.
Dear John: I have my grand-
mother's original Franciscan Poppy
pattern dinnerware the whole
set with service pieces. Is it valu-
able and if so, how can I tell? I
enjoy your Sunday column. -
L.McN., Crystal River

See ATTIC/Page E5


Special to the Chronicle
This outstanding-looking hall bench was likely manufactured in Eng-
land prior to World War II. It could potentially sell for between $600
and $1,200.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eight reasons not to top your tree


ne of our readers more than one-quarter to
from Homosassa one-half of the crown which,
called our office with in turn, does not interfere
a concern about with the ability of
tree topping. She a tree's leafy
has some tall crown to manu-
trees on her ,. facture food. Top-
property and 2,. f ping removes so
would like to much of the
know the pros crown that it up-
and cons of this sets an older
practice. This is a tree's well-devel-
good question. oped crown-to-
There are root ratio, and
other methods to Kerry Kreider temporarily cuts
reduce the size of THE off its food-mak-
your trees to ARBORIST ing ability.
make them less 2. Shock. A


wind-resistant.
This is a topic we talked
about in one of our articles
last year. Here are some
facts on why trees should
not be topped.
1. Starvation. Good prun-
ing practices rarely remove


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear L.McN.: The dollar
value of your Franciscan
Poppy pattern dinnerware
is relative to interest in the
pattern. There is no specific
collector interest. I suggest
you contact Replacements
Ltd. in Greensboro, North
Carolina at either 800-737-
5223 (REPLACE) or online
at www.replace.com and see
what they are willing to pay


tree's crown is
like an umbrella that shades
much of the tree from the
direct rays of the sun. By
suddenly removing this pro-
tection, the remaining bark
tissue is exposed, which
may result in scaling. There

for your pieces. This will es-
tablish its cash value.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River FL 34429 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


SI




OWNER FINANCING-FLORAL CITY, FL
Spiffy waterfront 2BR/2BA mobile in Withlapopka BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Islands. Great for weekender, winter or year round Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
living. $39,900 MLS#355787 1300 sq. ft building. $64,500 MLS#354972




1 ACRE WITH 4" WELL-INVERNESS, FL BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Save on impact fee Zoned for mobile or single Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
family. $17,900 MLS#353317 s. ft. situated on 100 x 212 lot. $399,999
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@0tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302 02-6714


may also be a dramatic ef-
fect on neighboring trees
and shrubs. If these plants
thrive in the shade, and the
shade is removed, poor
health or death may result.
3. Insects and disease.
The large stubs of a tipped
tree have a difficult time
forming callus. The termi-
nal location of these cuts, as
well as their large diameter,
prevent the tree's chemi-
cally based natural defense
system from doing its job.
The stubs are highly vulner-
able to insect invasion and
the scores of decay fungi. If


decay is already present in
the limb, opening the limb
will speed the spread of the
disease.
4. Weak limbs. At best, the
wood of a new limb that
sprouts after a large limb is
truncated is more weakly at-
tached than a limb that de-
velops more normally If rot
exists, or develops at the
severed end of the limb, the
weight of the sprout makes
a bud situation even worse.
5. Rapid new growth. The
goal of topping is usually to

See TREES/Page E11


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

stationery kit, filling it with
greeting cards, paper,
stamps, pens and
envelopes.
Crafting and games: Use
it to create a sewing box. It
can hold all types of craft
and school supplies, such
as crochet hooks, brads,
thread, needles, colored
pencils, rulers, crayons,
scissors, glue sticks, ribbon,
markers, pipe cleaners,
pompoms, pencils, chalk,
Silly Putty, playing cards,
Matchbox cars, stickers,
bubbles and paints. It's
easy for kids to carry, so let


them use it to bring fun ac-
tivity items with them in
the car for road trips, to the
dining room table for
homework or fun, or out-
side to play with. Use a
tackle box to hold small
game pieces and toys such
as dice, Legos or Barbie ac-
cessories.
Garage storage box: For
easy access to small hand
tools, garden gloves, nails,
screws and garden seeds.
First-aid kit Create a kit
for your car, boat, camper
or home. Add items such as
antibiotic ointment, adhe-
sive bandages, cotton balls,
antiseptic wipes, calamine
lotion, ChapStick, eye

See FRUGAL/Page E7


-E"VIN ALL O CNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM NEW LISTING


.'jIrc.ieW ... ,a53geB~I~ l

"'"".. ii is Rd '""F' " ., Iuell, , u ,,,,
#lu6 $2'29',9"' 00a,) Al d 23u2 Colb S. 1052W. Rollingwood Ct.
Elegant 3/3/2 Sweetwater custom home Elegant 2/2/2+den pool home in MLS #356263 $13Ci b9 SMI.2 LS#35592 o oo 000
on 1.30 acres immaculate condition. .1 139,900 355938 $424,000
Directions: Rte 486 to north on Annapolis, to Directions: Rte. 486 to Canterbury Lakes Dr., TRIPLEX, GREAT INVESTMENT Stunning decorated 4/2.5/3 home in
end of road, right on Indianhead. to right on Folkstone, to home on corner. OPPORTUNITY Each unit 2 bdrm/1.5 bath. gated community.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146






-.td #14S. PolestarPt. rd8 3422 N. Buckhorn DR 5248 N. Bronco Terr. en o 1787 W. Shanelle Path
i1 MLS #352140 $348,000 MLS #355561 $299,000 MLS#355458 $165,000 MLS#356066 $129,000
TWO master suites, a 3rd full guest Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on BEST PRICED 4/3/2 pool home Beautifully maintained 3/2/2
suite, an office, 3.5 baths 2.75 acres. Bring your horses! in Pine Ridge! move in ready.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Tami Mayer352-476-1507 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
PENDING PENDING




.l ''1 18e6E Gl. .OlI 1 3 Moniana SI. 6328 W. Glory Hill SI. 652 E. Falconry CI.
MLS#355997 $70,000 -i t *ii J.11 $1 S77.900 MLS #355794 $349,900 44L. MLS #354814 $149,000
2/2.5 townhouse with carport, MOVE-IN-READY 2/2/2 Custom built 4/3/3 pool home. Immaculate 3/2/2
wood & tile flooring throughout. Imperial Executive II. Numerous upgrades. 3+ acres. Meadows Golf Course Pool Home.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Teresa Boozer352-634-0213 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the E
S Prudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SPrudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 E5











Theme parties for summer


Put some sparkle

in alfresco

entertaining

KIM COOK
For The Associated Press
Ah, summer. There's something
about these warm and languid days
and nights that makes many of us
want to throw together a little
gathering. I
Picking a cocktail party theme
makes planning the menu and decor
more fun. Here are just a few to get
your creative wheels turning. Invite
your favorite people, add some fairy
lights and lanterns, and get the party
started. *
1960s South Beach!
Showtime's new "Magic City" TV
series, set in mid-century Miami, is
inspiration for party d~cor and music
with a retro vibe, served with Cuban-
influenced canapes.
At Pottery Barn, you'll find a col-
lection of melamine plates, serve-
ware and coordinating linens in
muted vintage tropical prints.
Palm-leaf-patterned ceramic serve-
ware in deep blues and olive greens
are part of Cindy Crawford Style's
Eden collection at JC Penney. *"y '
And even if you're land-bound,, "
craft stores offer shells, coral and
starfish you can add to baskets and L
trays filled with store-bought play
sand to create table decor Or place
one dramatic tropical flower or frond- "
in a tall slim vase.
Serve appetizers with Latin flair,
such as Cuban shrimp skewers, mini
empanadas and spicy popcorn. Play
the Rat Pack music that was popular .
in the era at Miami's big hotels -
Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy
Davis Jr.
Cocktails in Cortona! r .
You may not be under the Tuscan .
sun this summer, but you can still set
a similar scene for your guests. Fill a

See SUMMER/Page Ell
These Luau plates are part of a collec- -
tion of vintage tropical tableware from -. -
Pottery Barn that would be perfect for
a retro Miami cocktail party.
Associated Press/Pottery Barn - -


E6 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

drops, sunscreen, instant cold com-
presses, tweezers, a thermometer,
gauze and pain relieving medication.
If you're into sports, it can hold items
such as hand sanitizer, packaged en-
ergy and nutrition bars, bug spray,
drinks and blister guard. Or use a
tackle box to make a power-outage kit
that holds items such as candles, a
lighter, batteries, water, a manual can
opener, a portable radio, a wind-up
clock, canned goods and flashlights.
Cosmetics: It makes a great carry-
case for when you travel or if you're
looking to organize your makeup at
home. Add a hairbrush, comb, hair ac-
cessories and products, cosmetics, etc.
Snacks: A clear plastic tackle box
works well as a gift container Fill the
compartments with candy, money,
books, CDs, DVDs, magazines or pop.
Or use it to divide various snacks, such
as raisins, pretzels, candies, crackers,


fruit, nuts, mini-marshmallows, pop-
corn and raw veggies.
Bathroom supplies: Organize health
and beauty items, such as deodorant,
razors, static guard, nail polish re-
mover, hand wipes, a lint brush, nail
clippers, nail files, cotton swabs,
mouthwash, spare toothbrushes and
soap. Or create your own "spa at
home" pamper kit by adding scented
candles, reading material, a bath
puff/loofah, bath oils, scrubs, salts,
body lotions, a pedicure paddle, a cool
gel eye mask and more.
MEN
Metal spoons have multiple uses.
You can use several to make a wind
chime or garden markers, or use one
as a little shovel for houseplants or
small digging jobs in your garden.
Chilled (refrigerated) spoons can help
reduce puffy eyes, too. Apply the
rounded side to your closed eyes. The
handles can be bent and made into
spoon rings or bracelets. You can
make resin spoon pendants or

See FRGL/Page E10


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.



S311 W. Main St., Inverness

LANDMARK 352-726-5263
www.landmarkinverness.com ,,


3rentwoo r
REALTY
1624 W. Caroline Path, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0210


This attractive 3/2/2 maintenance-free villa sits directly on the golf DETACHED VILLA
course on a beautifully landscaped lot Lots of tile, eating kitchen, formal MAINTENANCE FRI
S plantation shutters,
sky lights in both b
close to club pool
MLS 356273 ....................................... $293,000 MLS 355457


DETACHED VILLA- 2 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
IIh I I,
lana Close to the Brentwood Golf & Pro Shop
#309831 ... ................................... $1,100


7






SPACIOUS LIVING, GREAT LOCATION 3 bedroom, 25 bath
unurnished end unit in Brentwood Townhomes Enjoy the amenities of Terra
,1149 $1,1001


POOL HOME Canerbury ake EsaesONLY $134500 FINALLY Just a Good Deal o hoops to ump through, no bank HIGHLANDS HOME $57,000 2/2/2 1,521 living
Breakfast bar, firei .l.. .... I .I.. ........1 .....I , II ,II *,Ih , I I. 1 . 1 ..... A little il ....., , ,,,,,
.... , ,
louse for so little. 2919 N Churchill Way. on. ONLY ASKING $64,500. 352 Red Rose Place, Inverness. starter. Make this one your own. 6301 E. Morley St.
MLS #353288. Call Jean Cssese 352-201-7034. MLS #355222. Kathy Chapman 352476-4988 MLS #356089. Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034.

VSWt
***HBIK*IB-f


S- CIIORMOUS SUCARMIIL WOODS HOME I -
POPULAR PINE RIDGE HOM' I .. . E, i i .., ,1, .... .. i, I 'I',, I i, i.,,,.,,I HIAIHIRWOOD HOnl1I i .. .. i . l, ,,, I.
ues MOL w/2205 ivingl Home boss a double-sided .....,,.... 1 , .. I 2006 with I o,,,,,. I. i .. .. i .i .. ,,,.,,, i i1 1
i 1" 1. .1 . .I.I. .. ..... ..... .1 .. 1 1 1... A ,,L ,. ,,, ., .I Al IHIS FOR ONI Y shelves, rear deck, covered patio, partial appliances, and more
andmorel I ......... ISO 0,, .1 1. .1 .. 511 9 ,, I ., i....,. .. MLS #356252. 8573 Vision ircle. ASKING $144,000.
Hanssen 352-586-6598 / Km Fuller 352-212-5752 Hanssen 352-5866598 / Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 Call Tomka Spires-Hanssen 352-5866598 / Kim Fuller 352-212-5752


Terra VistaY
REALTY GROUP
2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL 34442
352-746-6121 1-800-323-7703
www.TerraVistaRealtyG roup.com


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 E7









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*^ Chronicle I


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I x 3 5 5 1 o r ( 8 2 4 E ll i d r c n c I e e w h c n e


Bring your fishing
pole!


55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
2 BR/2 BA, Near Prog-
ress Energy. Citrus Co.
Dunnellon352-465-1651
INVERNESS
2/1, $300. 1st, Ist sec.
4095C Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on lake. Fur-
nished 1 bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964



Beautiful 3/2 DW on 5
AC .12 x 26 RV Port.
with electric, 20 x 20
carport, Listed $112,900
Patty Sargent Trotter
Realty (352) 613-6500

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes


HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
% acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&l,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964
LECANTO
2/1 & 2/2, Seniors Wel-
come. (352) 628-2312
ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Village
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 stock Units
Must go
New Homes Start at
$39,900
800-622-2832 x 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH.
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai. shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077


EL Dorado
Estates-Lecanto 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Mobile on
acre-plus-Large Screen
room-CarportPool-Shed-Sprin
ersystem-New
Carpet-Ceramic Tile in
kitchen and baths.New
Refrigerator-New master
shower-Nice quiet
neighborhood-Central
Air-30 year roofing-only 3
years old-MUST SEE
Primary-352-341-5194-S
econdary-352-503-6969

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 2/2 Split Plan
w/double roof over on
fenced 1 acre, Nice
Priced Reduced
352-464-0680

HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, NEW AC
$5,000 Down, $435. mo
(352) 302-9217

JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346






oolk
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit
all appliances, carport.
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*SUMMER SPECIAL
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161

PARK MODEL
1 BR, Enclosed. Sun Rm.
CHA. waterfront on
Lake Rousseau, Boat
parking $9,700 obo
(352) 447-6119


INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
(352)476-4964











RENTAL MANAGEMENrT

352-795-7368
ww.(itrus(ounlyHomeRentals.conm
CITRUS SPRINGS
6973 Gladstone Dr..... $825
3/2/2 Avail. July 1st
7635 Greendale ...... $1,200
3/2/2 Pool Home
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 .Crede ............... $450
Fur, 2/1 mobile
11435 W.Dixie Shores $900
3/1, New Floors
HOMOSASSA
7843 W. Solar PI ....... $725
2/2, Newer Duplexes
2304 & 06S. Sandburg Pt.. $500
2/1, Duplexes
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
994 E. Winnetka ....... $675
2/1/ SW on 1 acre
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. $700
2/1 Waterfront




CASTRO REALT
and Property^^


33 N' ro-ftcAvenue
InvenessFIfL 34453
352-341-4663fl^^
CIR US COUNTYfii^
R^cyfciENTALS


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?


3/3/2 Pool................$1000
2/2/1
Pritchard Island..... $800
2/1 Screen Room........ $550
Apartments
starting at.............$375

2/1.5/1 Lakeview..... $750

2/1.5/1...................... $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Assoc ate
352-726-9010


-INN

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all util. incl',d. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499

Floral Oaks Apts
352-860-0829
62 + OR DISABLED
RD Property
With or Without
Children.
Central heat /air
Water, & Sewer Incl
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Management
1 & 2 Bd RM Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks Cr
Floral City, FI 34436
TDD #771




EOE/Provider


LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218




FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000Sq
Ft deal location, crnr
Hwy 41 & 48. $595
mo. 813-310-5391

GAINESVILLE-ALACHU
A FLORIDA-
22+Expandable
Commercial Acre
Campus/Church/
School Sealed Bid
(Bank-WorkOut) Sale
14.000 sqft Bldg. SITE
is NEAR WALMART!
Contact:Jconnelly
@Ilpc.com /
(855)811-3737
INDUSTRIAL
WAREHOUSE
For Rent, located in
Rooks Industrial Park
Homosassa 900 sf
interior is light, bright,
mint cond. Lrg overhead
door, Entry door, back
door, % bath, lighted
parking lot, perfect for
business or storage
$500 mo. 1 yr. lease.
To view please
Call (352) 628-4066




CRYSTAL RIVER
Office Bldg. for Rent
Busy Hwy. 44 1,700 sf. all
modern 352 302-8265




INVERNESS*
WHISPERING
PINES
2 BDRM., 1.5 BATH
FURNISHED VILLA
screened lanai, quiet,
one car garage, 55+N.S.
ADULT ONLY
sec.dep./ref.rq. $600/mo.
727 862 3264

CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, Extra Clean $825
mo. (352) 613-5655


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 1st/last/sec.
352-628-1062




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl.clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
INVERNESS
Furnished
Waterfront Home
2bd, 1.5 bth w/central
AC, $595 352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 3/1 CHA
$675. 352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
IBD/w Fl. Rm. C/H/A
Move in for only $1,150
EXTRA CLEAN
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spac. Cool+Clean 2/2 +
view Extras! $750. mo. +
Deposit. 352-795-6282
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo. 1st +sec
(352) 628-4210
INV. S. HIGHLANDS
Cute 2/2/2, Inground
Pool, 1st &Sec.
$850/mo. 352-302-6633
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
3/2/1 newly remodeled
w/Ig fenced yard. conv
locationnear shopping
easy access to Invern.
$700 (352) 409-1900
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Priv, near Hwy 44. $800
1st/Sec. (305) 975-5121




Homosassa River
2/2 nicely furn. MH.
carport, dock scrn. la-
nai, shed f/I/s sht/long
term $850. 352-220-2077




BEVERLY HILLS
Someone to share my
home. $50 wkly + 1/2 of
elect, bill 352-527-7246
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv. Rm./Ba.
share kit. $400 everything
Included 352-613-1304





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REALTY
REALTY ONE


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com



Summer Lake
Sale!
Dockable lakefront
only $234/month.
Prime waterfront lot
in spectacular all wa-
terfront community.
Wooded, paved
roads, power, phone.
Perfect for vacation
home/weekend
getaway.
Call now
(866)952-5336, x 525
Price: $36,900, 25%
down, balance
financed 15 years
fixed, 6%, OAC


--- '
--
--
--


E8 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use plants to attract hummingbirds to garden


R udy-tl
Humm
arrive
north part of
Central
Florida early
in spring, usu-
ally in March.
Some remain
until fall and
breed and
raise young in
flower gar-
dens. Up to 75
percent of
their diet is
sweet nectar
from flowers.


iroated
ingbirds
in the


Jane
JAN
GAR


Small insects
comprise the rest.
Hummingbirds have
long bills and a longer
tongue. They can hover
at trumpet-shaped, tubu-


lar flowers while sipping
nectar Insects are ap-
proached in flight with a
gaping bill.
When the un-
suspecting in-
sect is well
down toward
the base the
bill snaps
shut to cap-
ture the nour-
ishing morsel.
Hummers do
Weber not use their
IE'S bill like
tweezers or
DEN chopsticks.
To attract
these tiny birds to a gar-
den, simply plant flower-
ing plants with the right
features tube- or
trumpet-shaped flowers,


bright, attractive petal
colors and the ability to
supply and quickly re-
plenish nectar Such
flowers will also lure in-
sect pollinators.
A tray of ripe, cut-up
fruit attracts butterflies
and fruit flies. Pretty
butterflies delight gar-
deners. Tiny flies can be-
come food for resident
hummingbirds and their
nestlings in spring.
Since hummingbirds
need insect protein, es-
pecially for their
nestlings, it is critical to
use no insecticides.
Caterpillars may be lar-
vae of butterflies which
would also be killed by

See JANE/Page E10


Coral honeysuckle is
an evergreen native
vine that is in full
bloom when humming-
birds arrive in March
and April. Flower clus-
ters dangle at the tips
of stems. Individual
flowers are narrow
tubes about 2 inches
long. It flowers continu-
ously through summer
until late fall.
JANE WEBER/
Special to the Chronicle


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Commercial Industrial
Building Over 2,000 sf
Large, bay door, tiled
showroom + offices.
signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084






must sell!
3620 N. Stirrup Dr.LOT
Pine Ridge LOT.2.78
ac.Level, wooded, con-
nects to horse trail.
Make reasonable offer.
Must sell by Aug. 1. For
sale by owner.
478.957.0211





2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$61,900. 352 746-6050


2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof.
New appl's. irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must see $29,995 firm
(352) 345-6499


BY OWNER
A Must To See!!
Beautiful Laurel Ridge,
Built 2007 3/2/2 over-
sized garage with work
area, Lots of extras.
(352) 527-4488


-ena do-
Why Rent When You
Can Buy This Cozy
2Bd. 1 Bath, Home with
only $,3500 down
payment $223. mo
Located in
APACHE SHORES
352-228-0876, 419-0041




$99,500, 4/3/2, Great
4 BR Home w/ Screen
Pool & porches, aprrox.
1.740 sq. ft. Living
3.400 sq. ft Total
Call Lyn (352)726-3798
Inverness Highlands
3/2/2, Ivn. Gf & CC
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf crse
$119,900 make offer
No Realtors 726-0652
Bank Must Sell!
$49,959 4/2, Huge Lot,
Workshop. Pool.
6079 E. Malverne St.
Jessica Wood, Realtor,
352-401-5622, 625-5544
JRW Properties, Inc.
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newer roof & CHA, scrn
porch, fenced, gar, good
neighborhood. Reduced
for quick sale at $49,900.
Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940

INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964


INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located In a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water In-
cluded.
(352)476-4964


ONLY$ 108K!
LOVELY 1 Acre HOME
3 BEDI 2 BATHS
1985 Beauty New Roof!
Many new Upgrades!
Loved & Well
Maintained!
Seller Motivated
MLS# 355975
Teri Paduano
(352)212-1446
www.FLRealty
Connect.comr


URGENT SALE
Whispering Pine Villa
Inverness 2/2, 2
parking spaces,
& tiled, $48,000
(352) 613-6496






AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MIK
REALTY ONE


H
2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2, Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down. Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile car-
pet, dbl lot. $650.rent.
Ist Ist sec. 813 908-5550


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond.ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/634-4745





IMMACULATE
26 stokesia ct. 31313
+office+bonus Pool
235k 352-422-1662


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
















Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


I
Gail Stearns
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available








SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872


"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




HUNTERS DREAM
CITRUS COUNTY
59.5 mol.acres adjoining
thousands of e.p.a acres,
Ig oak, hickory and mag-
nolia deer, hog and tur-
key abound near Crystal
River, frest water spring
never drys up adjoining
land available $3900. per
acre call for more info or
viewing. Jerry
(352)257-9520


Rel stt


Hme


Hme


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 E9


I S=1 I
rILISjC







E10 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E9

pesticides. Birds that eat insects sick-
ened or killed by pesticides would be
eating the toxins and become sick, too.
Spiders produce silk that is used by
hummingbirds in building their ex-
pandable nests.
Another feature to consider is a
hummingbird feeding station. It is
usually an inexpensive clear plastic
container with small feeding holes
surrounded by colorful red plastic
flowers. Be sure to clean the feeder
weekly and refill with fresh sugar
water. Artificial dyes in the sugar
water should be avoided. Boil a cup of
water with a quarter cup of sugar to
make your own sterilized mix weekly
Hummingbirds stay hydrated with
nectar, but like water in a shallow tray
to bathe.
Coral honeysuckle, Lonicerasem-
pervirens is an evergreen native vine
that is in full bloom when the hummers


- 000EBOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com
I. I


arrive in March and April. Flower clus-
ters dangle at the tips of stems. Indi-
vidual flowers are narrow tubes about
2 inches long. It flowers continuously
through summer until late fall, al-
though not as abundantly when it is
maturing seeds for wildlife food.
This vine grows happily on a fence
or trellis, but equally as well along the
ground. As soon as it encounters a tree
or suitable prop, it will twine upward
and flower more in full sun. Ranging
in Zones 4 to 11 from South Florida
north to Connecticut and west to
Texas, coral honeysuckle grows on
roadside fences, in sandhills and open
woods in fertile, humus-rich, moist
soil that is neutral to a bit acidic or
alkaline.
The twining stems can become
woody after several years. If thick,
woody stems are pruned to the ground
in fall (after the hummers have mi-
grated south), the vine will produce
new stems from the healthy roots and
begin to flower in time to welcome the
hummingbirds next year.
To attract hummingbirds, include


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


these perennial plants in your flower
garden: Rain Lily, Atamasco; Cross
vine, Bignonia capriolata; Trumpet
creeper, Campsisradicans; Fire Lily,
Crocosmia; Firebush, Hamelia
patens; Blazing Star, Liatris; Four
O'Clock, Miribilisjalapa; Annual gar-
den Phlox; Red Salvia, Salvia coc-
cinea; Spiderwort, Tradescantia
virginiana; and Verbena.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeber12385@gmail.com.


ARE YOU AT THE
END OF YOUR ROPE?
Wanting to sell your property...


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

ornaments, too. For a tuto-
rial, visit wwwtamedraven
.com/2012/03/tutorial-how-
to-make-spoon-
pendants.html.
I was taught to peel an or-
ange by cutting into the top
with a spoon and sliding the
spoon around the orange.
The first reader tip uses a
spoon in a similar way:
Peel a hard-boiled egg:
Roll the hard-boiled egg
around on the counter, and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

then pinch the top of the
shell off. Gently slide the
spoon down the side be-
tween the egg and shell. -
S.H.P, Louisiana.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfrugal
village.com), a website
that offers practical,
money-savingstrategies
for everyday living.
Write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas
City MO 64106, or
email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


AU


3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. 3 GAZANIA CT.
ARBOR LAKES SMW
NATURE LOVERS Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open space, open floor plan, all neutral colors
and private setting -perfect retreat! floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a Quiet cul-de-sac street w/lots of green
II,. I ... i ..... T ake the spacious patio and the yard even has space Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
.... i ... room for a pool! Parkway
MLS #353046 $400,000 MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #355830 $119,000




115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and LIVING ON THE WATER!
nice 1.1 .,.. in beautiful Citrus This classic contemporary pool home is 3686 N. PALOMINO TERR.
Hills!! .. ..a one acre comer lot, the right setting for living the Florida
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in lifestyle. Open and airy with the PINE RIDGE
pool and patio area offers you the privacy plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight. Nice flat wooded E. .. 1 :.1 .A. 1.
S...." F 1.. : well 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of riding trails in th .. .
i .. i bring room to dock all the water toys Pine Ridge Gives you direct access to up
...... .. imaginable! to 28 miles of trails
175.000 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS #355271 $109,000


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS

'm 3/2/2
SComplete Package
.-..--- 199,800

6 Month Blild Time
BUILDING CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST




-e^ Of Citrus
21 Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4/ miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


Ir$I&







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUMMER
Continued from Page E6

large glass vase with water,
lemons and sunflowers. Or
take a cue from London-
based stylist Sania Pell and
fill clear vessels with
untrimmed vegetables such
as radishes, celery and car-
rots for a rustic look. Pottery
Barn has melamine versions
of the iconic Talavera pot-
tery, while Williams-Sonoma
has unbreakable dishware
in Mediterranean patterns.
Small bites are the way to
go with any cocktail party;
they're easy for guests to han-
dle, and your food trays will
be easier to refresh. For this
one, consider tiny tomato
tarts, a sampler of Italian
ices, and shot glasses filled
with cold soups like cucum-
ber dill or tomato basil.


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 Ell


Tokyo terrace!
A city balcony's the per-
fect place for a chic, Asian-
inspired cocktail party. Set
up the Zen zone with baby
conifer pots or moss nestled
into interesting dishes. Wrap
votives in origami paper.
Branchhome.com has
Wasara's elegant bamboo
and sugarcane-fiber dispos-
able tableware that's great
looking and eco-friendly
CB2's Format orange
enamel tray and an array of
colorful, user-friendly,
clothespin-style chopsticks
would be stylish options.
Mini crabcakes, salmon
satays and melon ball lol-
lipops, along with bowls of
Japanese crackers and
wasabi nuts, will satisfy
snacking guests.
Cabin fever!
Bring the woodsy cabin
vibe home to the city or sub-


KEY1 "Always There For You"
REAY GAIL COOPER
multimillion Dollar Realtor
0' A Cell: (352) 634-4346
1 Office: (352) 382-1700x309
F-mnil msr* homes duS(Dmindcnrinar.cm


S I r.


* 3+office/2/2 with heated pool
* Corian kitchen w/maple cabinetry
* New pool motor/filter for salt system pool
* Gas fireplace 18" tile in Great Room
* Built-in entertainment center
* Dual paned windows electronic air filter
#351881 $229,900


FREE FORM 34
SSPECTACULAR
* Granite & Cherry W
3 Bed + Office / 3
Double Insulated W
ML


rE.nrr.L I ri .l nf L LU%,MI Iun
* 3/2 custom home on 1/2 acre
* Park your RV or boat on your property
* Corian kitchen has raised panel cabinetry
* Detached 30'x30' 3-car garage w/220 electric
* New roof in 2006 well for the yard
* Room to add a pool
#355719 $149,900


) "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

NANCY
Cell: 352-634-4225
PONTICOS a
Multi-Million $$$ Producer i' KEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700






X 15 POOL +7' SPA! UNBELIEVABLE VALUE!
GOLF COURSE VIEW! YOU GET SO MUCH IN UPDATES!
'ood Island Kitchen 2009 Roof Shingles Split Floor Plan
Baths / 31 x 24 Garage BRAND NEW Well for Lawn Sprinklers
windows Custom Built Updated Oak Cabinets w/ Drawers
S#353340 S109.000 MLS#352463


Faike m1y vlva1 on


I


urbia with a few playful ac-
cessories, and a comfort food
menu. A few inexpensive
bandanas, a plaid blanket, or
an old quilt make colorful
table coverings; a wind-
downed branch or group of
interesting rocks wrapped in
lights would look wonderful
as a rustic centerpiece.
Homegoods has a canoe-
shaped condiment server
complete with "paddle"
spoons. You'll find patch-
work-patterned acrylic
plates here too, as well as
coordinating drink pitchers
and utensils.
Set out mini sliders,
roasted vegetable skewers
and paper cups filled with
seasoned fries. Consider a
flavored water or gourmet
soda bar; it's a unique idea
for any cocktail soiree, and
keeps things just as much
fun for teetotalers or desig-
nated drivers.


TREES
Continued from Page E5

control the height and
spread of a tree. Actually, it
has the opposite effect.
The resulting sprouts
(often called water
sprouts, or epicormic
growth) are far more nu-
merous than normal new
growth, and they elongate
so rapidly that the tree re-
turns to its original height
in a short time, and with a
far denser crown.
6. Tree death. Some older
trees are less tolerant than
others. Beeches, for exam-
ple, do not sprout rapidly
after severe pruning and
the reduced foliage most
surely will lead to the death
of the tree.
7. Ugliness. A topped tree
is a disfigured tree. Even


with its re-growth, it never
regains the grace and char-
acter of its species. The
landscape and community
are robbed of a valuable
asset.
8. Cost To a worker with
a saw, topping a tree is
much easier than applying
the skill and judgment of a
good pruning. Therefore,
topping may cost less in
the short run; however, the
true costs of topping are
hidden. These include re-
duced property value, the
expense and removal of
replacement if the tree


dies, the loss of other trees
and shrubs, if they suc-
cumb to changed-light con-
ditions, and the risk of
liability of weakened
branches and increased
maintenance.


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist and a member
of the International Soci-
ety ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach him at
352-726-9724 or action
proarborist@yahoo.com.


Norm Overfield
Realtor KELLERWILUAMS,
S 352-586-8620 R E A L T Y
Ema.I rc.rc.rmc. .ri a l ir ,c.r. 352-746-7113
rC n, r.c. .erind, l hc.fr.c andclIanc rcom 699 S. Adolnh noint. Lecanto


3822 E. Arbor Lakes Drive
Popular Sanibel floor plan with extra living area and
expanded garage. Backs to community property, no
close backyard neighbors. Ceramic Tile and carpeted
floors. Covered lanai with vinyl windows. In Ground
heated spa in screened area. Recent SEER 15A/C unit.
Two ovens and 2 Refngerators. Located in Arbor Lakes,
a gated lakeside 55+ community with lots of activities
and amendies. And, there is a One-year warranty, too!
ONLY $143,200. Call Norm Today!


OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 Realtor
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
*GENT *Nl mI l SNi S A WEEK Realtor,& US Realtor@
g__ r 302-3179 soLDNan"e! 287-9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
oi, The Golde.Girl ,746
wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com
DUNNELLON-MINI FARMS 1995, 3
BDRM, 2 BATH Fleetwood M/H on 75 g ng ab nc al 6 T f
acres, 3 buildable lots, fenced, split plan, HERNANDO 1974 2 BDRM, 15 BATH (.
excellent water, bring your horses & cattle M/H one block from Tsala Apopka Lake for P'
cathedral ceilings & fa 1 1. .... great fishing. Nearby to Dunnellon Ocala&
Privacy, extra land available 1',-"' Inverness. Estate Sale. Lg eat in kitchen. I, .-
$115000 #355716 $26000 From Jackie, John & Jason I

Great Location! Recently

888-303-6405 Code 9416 for
BEVERLY HILLS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
garage home w/office and caged in-ground HOMOSASSA on corer of Ficthen and more details.
1 1 ;... .. .. ..1 de-sac,newer Cardinal is this D/W M/H w/3 bedrooms, MLS #355913 564.900
i : Blvd. 18 x 1 1.5 baths, carport and shed. Covered rear
ft. deck adjacent to pool area. #354383 porch, gas for cooking, being sold "as is".
ail 't MENEMP`ILoo


~~SE~-- -~Lr
cul de sac. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage CRYSTAL RIVER S/W M/H on just over 1
home w/huge window enclosed lanai. acre of land w/2 bedrooms, 2 baths. Has in
Breakfast nook, family room, dining area, ground pool and spa. Front and rear screened
living rm and greenbelt out back. #355544 porches, rear carport, fully fenced w/lg


SeeVirtualT @w ma s m


SENJS


I'








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY OFFICE/RETAIL
ON HWY. 41S AND
PINE LAKE LANE
1872 sq. ft. of office/warehouse space
on .74 acre that is zoned GNC.
MLS #356235 $165,000
Call Jim Morton at 352-422-2173 cell


LVlll llU, M %.v ll
Light & bright home in great area. Just
enough space for a pool. Home boasts
2 bedrooms, 2 baths, garage, screen porch,
shed. All appliances included.
Call Martha Snyder 352476-8727 to view
this lovely home ask for file #355579


* Great place to raise a family
* 3BR, 2 bath MH on 1 acre
* Inground pool plus hot tub
* Workshop, large shed
* Pole barn and carport
MLS #354742 $119,000
www.CitrusCountySold.com
.IAannA f Willard PirkrAIl 717-241n


PRIME COMMERCIAL BUILDING
1,233 SF brick building
.18 Acres zoned C commercial
MLS #356205 ONLY $130,000
Cal Elias G. Kirallah, Broker
at 352-400-2635


IMMACULATE, LIGHT & BRIGHT END UNIT
2/2/1. Cathedral ceiling plus large windows
in living/dining area add to spacious feeling.
Kitchen features newer appliances, double
pantries, breakfast bar. Active community with
lots of amenities for low HOA fee.
MLS #355952 ASKING $64,900
Pat Davis (352) 212-7258
View listing & pictures: www.c21patdavis.com


* jDn, LDM, Ln, Un dilU rn
* Beautiful kitchen w/wood cabinets
S13 X 18 glassed-in AC porch
* Carport and 2 workshops
MLS #352399 ONLY $134,900
Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


OH, WHAT A VIEW!
*10 acres, 2005 custom home.
* Riding distance to state forest.
*All wood cabinets b granite. 12' brick fireplace.
*MUCH, MUCH MORE!!!
MLS #345058 $480,000
Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


NEED A BUILDING LOT?

9.5 ACRES MOL ON MANSFIELD
$99,000 MLS #335898

5 ACRES MOL ON TURNER AVE.
$105,000 MLS #319410

2 LOTS SIDE BY SIDE ON VANGOGH
$10,000 FOR BOTH
MLS #355653

Call Ruth Frederick
1-352-563-6866


FACILITY ON HOMOSASSA TRAIL
1400 sq. ft. office plus 520 sq. ft. garage/warehouse
on a 108x142 fenced corner lot with landscaping.
MLS #355798 $3265,000
Call Jim Morton at 352-422-2173 cell


..-h .-
FOUR BEDROOM, THREE BATH HOME
Formal dining. Full summer kitchen in extra
large lanai. Great home for large family or
group home. City water & sewer. Large
kitchen with like new appliances. Newer roof
and A/C. Needs some TLC. Extra large lanai.
Close to shopping, schools & shopping.
MLS #356257 $132,500
Call Doris Miner e 422-4627 for more info.


LOCATION, LOCATION
Close to schools, park, hospital, etc. 3/2/2,
Fla. room and enclosed porch, eat-in kitchen.
Large in town lot. City water & sewer make
FHA/VA/USDA financing easy. No HOA
fees. RV pad in backyard.
MLS #354106 $78,900
Pat Davis 352-212-7280
View listing at www.c21patdavis.com


CALL TO PREVIEW THIS 10.5 ACRE PROPERTY
WITH 3 FENCED PASTURES AND 2 PONDS
Home includes gas-remote fireplace, large
master with dual closets, garden tub and
separate shower. 2 additional bedrooms plus a
bonus room, screen porch, ADT security
system, all appliances and more.
MLS #355313 $275,000
Casey Kearse 352-476-6549


GREAT
INCOME
PRODUCING
ON
U.S. HWY. 41
IN INVERNESS
172 Storage Units
plus
6 leaseable stores
on 9.53 acres.
Zoned GNC.
MLS #354458
$990,000
Call Jim Morton at
352-422-2173 cell


PRICE REDUCED $10,000
* 1825 Kimberly Ln., (Inverness)
* 3 Bdrm / 2 bath / 2 car garage
* Move-in condition
* 1 Acre lot backs up to forest
MLS #355953 $115,000
Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072
www.sellinqcitruscountvflhomes.com


WATERFRONT!
Ever dream of your own cabin on the river?
Adorable 2/2 with a huge 30x40 detached garage.
This home has been completely renovated inside b
out. On a canal only 100 yards from the main river.
Call today, it won't last!
$89,900
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


BEAUTIFUL
INVERNESS POOL HOME!
Close to everything in town,
3/2/2, built in 2002.
Almost 1,850 SF living, located on a
nice corner lot with a private pool
MLS #343147 PRICED TO SELL $153,500
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


BEAUTIFUL OPEN FLOOR PLAN
WITH KITCHEN FOR TWO COOKS
Two large bedrooms, two baths, family
room and screened porch. Lovely low
maintenance yard. City water. Oversized one
car garage. Must see!
MLS #350553 ONLY $79,900
Call Doris Miner 352-422-4627


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH
2BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. City limits, city water.
Situated on large lot (120x120). Large 2 car garage
plus attached 2 car carport. House features large
rooms with eat-in kitchen, oak cabinets. Thermo pane
windows. Reroof in 2006. Home warranty included.
Pride of ownership shows thru out. $77,000
David Kurtz
Cell 954-383-8786 Office 352-726-6668


ioialiy remoaelea!
2/1/1 everything is new in the home
MLS #354285
PRICED TO SELL QUICK $66,900
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


*


E12 SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012


0ODBYTZ


~ -i