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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02818
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-04-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02818

Full Text


Centennial: Historic courthouse celebrates 100 year


I ED ES A


Scattered PM storms;
rain chance
40 percent.
PAGE A4


CITR R-S CO U N TY





HRONICLE


Crystal River
fireworks today
Crystal River will have
its patriotic fireworks at
9 p.m. Wednesday, July
4. The display can be
seen from King's Bay
Park and Southeast Cut-
ler Spur Boulevard. Spec-
tators are advised to bring
lawn chairs and come out
early to find a good spot.
-From staff reports
DEATHS:


Griffith dies
Beloved actor who
portrayed Mayberry's
Sheriff Andy Taylor was
86./Page A6
AHOY:
Safety first
The Coast Guard urges
boaters to use caution
on the water/ Page A5

OUT OF HIS SHELL:


Dad of 1,781
Diego bringing species
back from the brink of
extinction./Page A12
ENTERTAINMENT:


Take three
Taylor Kitsch tries for
one more movie this
summer with 'Savages.'
/Page B6
STAYING' ALIVE:


Survivor
Serena Williams sur-
vives quarterfinals at
Wimbledon./Page B1


TOMORROW:
Hot topic
Learn rules about
burning yard trash and
what makes some burns
illegal./Thursday


Com ics ..........Cl1
Community ...... .Cl
Crossword ....... .C4
Editorial ........A10
Entertainment ... B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C5
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ........ C6
TV Listings .......C6


6 1 847811 20 U 02!u


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Colorful bursts of fireworks illuminate the sky Tuesday night
over Lake Henderson in Inverness as the pyrotechnic dis-
play in the 2012 Patriotic Evening gets under way Thousands
attended the annual Independence Day celebration in
downtown Inverness.




Transit chief rolls out new routes


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Routes will branch out
for Citrus County bus
service.
"I'm really happy with
where we're at right now to
present a program for Flo-
ral City, Inverness, Her-
nando, Beverly Hills,
Lecanto, Crystal River, Ho-
mosassa and Chassahow-
itzka," said Lon Frye,
transportation supervisor
for Citrus County Transit,
speaking Monday to the
Transportation Technical
Advisory Committee of the
Citrus County Transporta-
tion Planning
Organization.
Frye produced a map to
show routes along the east
and west sides of the
county in addition to the


current fixed route in the
middle of Citrus.
The first new route along
U.S. 19 should start some-
time in September.
"In the morning, the bus
will go from our office on
(County Road) 491 to (the
College of Central Florida)
across Grover Cleveland
(Boulevard) down to Chas-
sahowitzka, back as far
north as the mall in Crystal
River and over to Meadow-
crest," Frye explained.
Having highlighted the
route in yellow, Frye called
the western route the yel-
low corridor.
"We felt if we would con-
centrate on the yellow cor-
ridor, we have shopping,
we have medical, we have
connections to go other
places," Frye said. "I par-
ticularly wanted to present


this to Crystal River be-
cause the only way this is
going to be successful is
with partnerships. You
know where we need to go
better than we do."
The route in the central
part of the county was
highlighted in green and
represented a modification
of the current bus route.
Frye said the opening of
the Wal-Mart at the inter-
section of County Road 486
and C.R. 491 was an influ-
ence on this updated route.
The currently operating
route links Beverly Hills in
the north on C.R. 491 to the
College of Central Florida
in Lecanto. It also runs east
on State Road 44 (East Gulf
to Lake Highway) from
C.R. 491 to East Inverness
Boulevard.
The proposed central


route would start at the
transit center on C.R. 491,
travel north to State Road
44, go east on S.R. 44 to its
junction with C.R. 486,
travel west to C.R. 491 to go
north to Beverly Hills, then
travel south to meet up
with S.R. 44 to travel east to
Wal-Mart in Inverness.
The new transit center
should be operational by
April and will serve as a
transfer station.
Frye said the green route
would help riders get to
medical appointments,
Meadowcrest and the new
Wal-Mart. He anticipated
this route starting in
December.
On the east side of the
county, Frye highlighted a
new route in orange. It also
See BUS/PageA2


Happy Fourth!


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
91
LOW
72


Wild


bear


nabbed


at Busch


Gardens
Associated Press
TAMPA A wild black
bear that was nabbed in a
tree at the Busch Gardens
theme park Tuesday is the
same bear captured re-
cently on Sanibel Island,
wildlife officials say
This is the second time in
two weeks the young male
bear has been tranquilized.
Gary Morse, a spokesman
for the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, said the bear's
See BEAR/Page A2



Utilities

complete

merger;

Duke keeps

its CEO
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Progress Energy Inc., the
electricity utility that oper-
ates the Crystal River En-
ergy Complex, closed its
long-planned merger late
Tuesday with Duke Energy
Corporation.
With the merger, Duke
also announced the newly
constituted 18-member
board of di-
rectors has
named
SJames
Rogers, 64,
as presi-
dent and
chief execu-
tive officer
James of the com-
Rogers bined com-
Duke Energy's p a n y
CEO. Rogers,
who also will be the chair-
man of the board, has given
high priority to dealing with
the ongoing shutdown of
Crystal River's nuclear
reactor
The move was a last-
minute change. Rogers was
set to become executive
chairman in charge of
strategic matters, while
Progress Energy CEO Bill
Johnson, 58, was projected
to become chief executive
of the combined company.
Johnson, however, was an-
nounced to have resigned
"by mutual agreement."
Rogers on Saturday told
the Charlotte Observerthat
resolving the question
about returning Crystal
River's nuclear reactor to
service "ranked No. 1 on
the new Duke's to-do list."
The nuclear unit, known
as CR3, was shut down on
Sept. 26, 2009, for a planned
refueling outage that in-
cluded replacement of
steam generators in a con-
crete and steel containment
building. When a hole was
cut into the containment
building wall to remove the
old steam generators, staff
discovered a separation in
the concrete, called a delam-
ination, that required analy-
sis and repair. Two further
delaminations were found
later, and the unit has stayed
offline since that time.
In addition to CR3, the
complex includes four coal-
burning power-generating
plants that continue to pro-
duce electricity.
See MERG/PageA2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEF


WWII ship sunk in
Gulf of Mexico
SANIBEL ISLAND -A 165-
foot World War II Coast Guard
cutter has been sunk offshore
in the Gulf of Mexico and
county officials hope it attracts
fish, divers and dollars.On Mon-
day, Lee County's Marine Serv-



BEAR
Continued from Page Al

journey began a little more
than a year ago in Fort
Myers, more than 130 miles
south of Tampa.
The bear swam from Fort
Myers over to Sanibel Is-
land, Morse said. It lived
there in a wildlife preserve
for many months without a
problem.
"Then as young male
bears tend to do, it roamed,
probably looking for a
mate," said Morse.
The bear began to appear
in the more populated parts
of Sanibel, and on June 20
- after months of trying to
capture the creature -
state wildlife agents shot
him with a tranquilizer gun.



MERGE
Continued from Page Al

The repair cost, estimated
at $1.3 billion, is being nego-
tiated with insurers. If costs
increase to the point of af-
fecting 15 percent or more
of the new company's value,
the merger agreement gave
Duke the option to walk
away
"We don't perceive it as
being that big a problem, so
we don't perceive our right
to walk has been triggered,"
Rogers told the Charlotte
Observer "So the short an-
swer is, this is in the ordi-
nary course of business that
this has happened, and we'll
deal with it"
Rogers said he looked for-
ward to working with exec-
utives from Progress
Energy.
"Having served as CEO of
Duke and its predecessor
companies for more than 23
years, Jim Rogers is well
suited to lead the integra-


ices Program and Reefmakers
LLC a Key West company
that specializes in sinking ships
as artificial reefs scuttled the
USS Mohawk nearly 30 miles
off Sanibel Island.
Just before 1 p.m., explosives
aboard the stripped vessel were
detonated and it took three min-
utes for it to sink underwater.


The agents drove the bear
nearly 200 miles to the
north, to a wildlife preserve
in Hernando County.
"We thought we had taken
him far enough north that
he wouldn't want to come
back south," said Morse.
But when a bear with an
orange ear tag was spotted
in Spring Hill a city south
of the wildlife preserve -
last week, wildlife experts
knew who it was.
"We'd better get pre-
pared," Morse said at the
time.
Morse believes the bear
traveled through several
wildlife corridors and parks
and eventually ended up in
Tampa, just north of down-
town. Late Monday night or
early Tuesday morning, the
bear was spotted at the Uni-
versity of South Florida.


tion effort and to drive our
combined businesses for-
ward," said Ann Maynard
Gray, lead director of Duke
Energy's board of directors.
According to Duke's web-
site, Rogers became presi-
dent and CEO of Duke
Energy following the
merger between Duke En-
ergy and Cinergy in 2006. He
had served as Cinergy's
chairman and CEO for more
than 11 years. He joined PSI
Energy in 1988 as chairman,
president and CEO.
Rogers' background in-
cludes experience as an at-
torney at law with the
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission and as assis-
tant attorney general for the
Commonwealth of Ken-
tucky, where he advocated
for the state's consumers in
gas, electric and telephone
rate cases. For three years,
Rogers was a reporter for
the Lexington (Kentucky)
Herald-Leader
The new Duke Energy has
about $49 billion in market
capitalization, total assets of


NBC2 reported that six
charges were placed on the
USS Mohawk and detonated at
different times, allowing thou-
sands of gallons of water to
rush into the ship at once so
that it will sit right side up.Offi-
cials say the vessel will be a
magnet for divers.
-From wire reports


Then, at 5 a.m., local police
found the bear inside the
theme park.
"He had worked his way
through the property," said
Morse, noting the bear is shy
and avoids people and other
animals, which means he
didn't come into contact
with any of the park's zoo
animals.
Wildlife officers again
tranquilized the bear with a
dart gun and loaded him
into a truck. He's headed to
Apalachicola, which is 270
miles north of the park. The
region contains about a mil-
lion acres of bear habitat in
a wildlife management
area, said Morse.
"He's not likely to head
back this way," Morse
added. "This bear is simply
trying to find himself a mate
and a place to live."


more than $100 billion, and
7.1 million electric cus-
tomers in the Carolinas,
Florida, Indiana, Kentucky
and Ohio. The regulated
utilities will comprise a
higher proportion of Duke
Energy's post-merger busi-
ness mix.
Under the merger agree-
ment, Progress Energy Inc.
has become a wholly owned
direct subsidiary of Duke
Energy, creating the coun-
try's largest electric utility
as measured by enterprise
value, market capitaliza-
tion, generation assets, cus-
tomers and numerous other
criteria.
The new company will be
known as Duke Energy and
will remain headquartered
in Charlotte, with substan-
tial operations in Raleigh,
N.C. Duke Energy will trade
on the New York Stock Ex-
change under the symbol
DUK
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.


Special to the Chronicle


This map shows proposed bus routes in Citrus County.


BUS
Continued from Page Al

would begin operation in
December
"Starting in Floral City,
we can have service to In-
verness, to Hernando,"
Frye said. "Floral City and
Hernando are very under-
served communities.
They'll also have the con-
nection with Inverness and
the transfer point with Wal-
mart on (S.R.) 44."
Frye described the type
of transport service offered.
"This is what we call a
deviated fixed route, which
is if we have a request for a
pickup or a drop-off, within
three-quarters of a mile
from the route, then we will
make that request," Frye
said.
The transit system oper-
ates a demand-response,
door-to-door bus service for


residents, called a para-
transit service, for passen-
gers who are elderly or
handicapped, and as a po-
tential alternative to single-
occupancy vehicle driving.
Frye said the number of
paratransit trips was part
of the motivation to expand
the bus routes.
"A paratransit trip is in
excess of $20 a trip," Frye
said. "With fares now, we're
servicing passengers for
under $4 a trip. If we take
our transportation dollars
and allocate them into a
better system without
reservations that's depend-
able, that's pretty much our
goal. You'll never be able in
Citrus County to eliminate
the paratransit trip."
The current route oper-
ates from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday through Friday
The new routes would be
expected to cover similar
times. Currently, a loop on
a bus route has a two-hour


turnaround, meaning a bus
can offer six loops a day.
Current fares are around
50 cents.
The new bus routes have
yet to be presented to the
Transportation Planning
Organization board mem-
bers, who now meet quar-
terly. Then they will be
presented to the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners.
In the meantime, county
residents can offer their
reactions.
"This is a concept" Frye
said. "How can we get it
right (the) first time? We're
reaching out, we're sharing
the concept. And I'm very
interested in feedback."
The Office of Fleet and
Transportation Manage-
ment can be reached at 352-
527-7630.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or352-564-2916.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom
at 563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address
of the news event.
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Kennedy. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


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A2 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

County facilities
closed today
All county offices and facili-
ties including the Lecanto
Government Building, the
Courthouse, the Citrus
County Resource Center and
the county landfill will be
closed in observance of Inde-
pendence Day, Wednesday,
July 4.
All county facilities will re-
open Thursday, July 5, as
usual.
For more information on
landfill hours, call 352-527-
7670 or visit www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us.
Also, F.D.S. Disposal
Inc. will not be picking up
trash in Crystal River on
Wednesday, July 4, or Satur-
day, July 7. For more infor-
mation, call 352-746-0617.
Looking for a pet?
Shelter has discounts
Now is the "purrfect" time
to adopt that perfect pet. July
is half-price month at the Cit-
rus County Animal Shelter.
You can add another addition
to your family for only $17.50.
The adoption fee includes
spaying/neutering, vaccina-
tions, microchipping, de-
worming, flea treatment and
a blood test.
For more information on
pet adoption and to view pic-
tures of all the animals avail-
able for adoption, visit
www.citruscritters.com or call
352-746-8400. To learn more
about Friends of Citrus
County Animal Services
(FOCCAS), visit
http://www.friendsofccas.org
or call 352-201-8664.
Sheriff's 10-43 show
tonight
Sgt. Brad Smith and Com-
munity Crimes Detective
Craig Callahan are in the stu-
dio on the Sheriff's 10-43
show this week to discuss in-
telligence led policing (ILP),
the sheriff's office's strategy
for attacking crime. They will
discuss what ILP means, how
this method of policing is
unique and how it makes a
difference in Citrus County.
The show will air Wednesday,
July 4, from 7:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. on WYKE, channel 16
for cable customers.
The Sheriff's 10-43 can
also be viewed on Fridays at
11 a.m. For those with satel-
lite, prior Sheriff's 10-43
episodes can be seen at
www.sheriffcitrus.org.

Tallahassee

Obama declares Fla.
disaster area
President Barack Obama
has declared a major disaster
area for the state of Florida as
a result of the damage caused
by Tropical Storm Debby.
The president ordered fed-
eral aid to help residents in
Baker, Bradford, Columbia,
Pasco and Wakulla counties.
Assistance includes grants
for temporary housing and
home repairs and low-cost
loans to cover uninsured
property losses. Other pro-
grams will help individuals
and business owners recover
from the flooding that re-
sulted from the storm.

Orlando

SeaWorld raises ticket
prices at parks
SeaWorld Orlando is rais-
ing ticket prices.
The new ticket prices went
into effect Tuesday, bringing
the cost of a one-day adult
ticket to $84.99. That's an in-
crease of $3.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported multi-day passes pair-
ing admission to SeaWorld
and Busch Gardens in


Tampa will rise by $10 to
$134.99. Passes combining
visits to SeaWorld, Busch
Gardens and Aquatica will in-
crease by $10 to $144.99.
Orlando-based SeaWorld
Parks & Entertainment owns
all three parks.
-From staff and wire reports


The battle for superintendent


Candidates: Himmel disconnected fom schools

MIKE WRIGHT r
Staff Writer
LECANTO Citrus B
County's school district
boasts an "A" grade, but two ,
Republicans seeking the of-
fice of superintendent of
schools said it can be better Robert "Rob" Sandra "Sam" Sandy
Academy of Environmen- Cummins Himmel Balfour
tal Sciences teacher Sandy running for superintendent of running for
Balfour and newly named office, schools, office.
principal at Cypress Creek
Academy juvenile prison Challengers are hoping to
Robert "Rob" Cummins unseat Democratic incumbent
promised to close the gap
they said exists between the Sandra "Sam" Himmel.
current administration and
teachers. appointed to the College of Doug Connors, who is th
Balfour and Cummins Central Florida Board of Lecanto High School assist
squared off in a mini-forum Trustees, said Citrus County tant principal and Himmel'
Monday night during the graduates are not prepared brother Cummins said h
Citrus County Republican for college. has never discussed hi
Executive Committee meet- "We have many of our stu- campaign with Himmel.
ing at the Realtor's Associa- dents lacking basic skills ... Cummins, who was a lav
tion offices in Lecanto. in college," she said, adding clerk to his late brother, al
Both are hoping to unseat about 40 percent of Citrus torney Jim Cummins, sai
Democratic incumbent San- County graduates must take he sees the superinten
dra "Sam" Himmel, who remedial classes as fresh- dent's role this way
served on the school board men. "Leadership. It's not
prior to her election to su- Cummins is no stranger to pat-yourself-on-the-back
perintendent in 2004 and the incumbent His sister is 'look what I've done' posi
her re-election without op- Linda Connors, a Citrus tion," he said.
position in 2008. High School assistant prin- Both candidates sai
Balfour, who in 2009 was cipal who is married to Himmel doesn't spen


e
S-
s
e
s

t-
d
i-

a
i,
i-

d
d


SO YOU KNOW
What: Citrus County Su-
perintendent of Schools.
Who: Democrat incum-
bent Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel; Republicans Sandy
Balfour and Robert
"Rob" Cummins.

enough time in schools and
is disconnected from the
classroom.
Balfour said her 17 years
in Citrus County education
include teaching and ad-
ministration.
"I see how the pieces fit
together," she said. "I know
what needs to be ad-
dressed."
Cummins said he didn't
necessarily blame Himmel
for what he considers a poor
connection with the teach-
ing staff. He blamed too
many administrative layers
between the superinten-
dent's office and classroom.
"The teacher's voice is
not heard at the administra-
tive level," he said.
Balfour said Himmel has
lost touch with teachers.
"The superintendent
guides the ship. The super-


* Term: 4 years.
* Covers: All Citrus
County.
* Pay: $117,198.
* On the ballot: Republi-
can Aug. 14 primary;
Nov. 6 election.


intendent sets the bar," she
said. "The superintendent
needs to be visible. If you're
there, they know you care."
Candidates were asked
their views on the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment
Test, or FCAT
Balfour said the test
"needs to be repaired."
Cummins said the test
should be an assessment
tool for teachers and stu-
dents, not the final decision-
maker on students' grades
and bonuses for school
staffs.
"Once you assign a dollar
amount to something you're
corrupt," he said, "and
FCAT's corrupt"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Cleaning King's Bay


Volunteers

work to

remove

invasiveplant

from water

BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern

CRYSTAL RIVER -
Rakes dug through the
murky bottom of King's
Bay near Hunter's Spring
Park on Thursday as
members of King's Bay
Rotary Club, Nature
Coast Emergency Medical
Services and the YMCA
Citrus County chapter
pulled lyngbya from the
water
Art Jones, of the spon-
soring King's Bay Rotary
Club and coordinator of
the five-year cleanup
project, attributes the
water's cloudiness to the
invasive plant.
"Every time you take
out a rake full of lyngbya,
you're removing pollu-
tion," said Jones. "The
more of the lyngbya you
physically take out, you
take away its food
source, which is other
lyngbya."
Hurricanes and herbi-
cide use have killed bene-
ficial aquatic plants,
allowing the lyngbya to
spread.
Lyngbya is also the
cause of seaweed der-
matitis, a skin disease
that affects swimmers.
Since September, or-


-4 I k I 10
., .. .1-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: The Kings Bay Rotary club sponsored a lyngbya algae and park cleanup Tuesday morning at Hunter Springs
Park in Crystal River. Members of Nature Coast EMS, Rotary, community volunteers and counselors in training
from the Suncoast YMCA took part in the ongoing project designed to remove the invasive, aquatic algae from
the bottom of the bay. BELOW: Those working used tools to rake the bottom and remove the mushy growth. Once
collected and placed onto kayaks, it was moved to shore where it was removed permanently from the park.


ganizations from Citrus
County have piled up
more than 50 tons of the
algae to be recycled as
fertilizer for farmers and
residents.
By using kayaks as
barges for transport,
more than 30 volunteers
participated Thursday,
helping King's Bay get
back to a healthy balance
of algae.
Katie Lucas from Na-
ture Coast EMS and her
son, Corey, enjoyed their
day out in the water
"We're having fun,"
Katie Lucas said about
her first time in the


cleanup. "We don't know
we're dirty yet; we're
still playing in the
water"
Junior counselors from
the YMCA Citrus County
Chapter also gained an
invaluable sense of in-
volvement
"It's a great thing. We're
doing it to help the ani-
mals and Florida," said
Desirea Currier, 14.
For more information
about when the next
algae and park cleanup
will be, call Art Jones at
727-642-7659 or email
MrAWJones@aol.com.


Red Cross offers tips for safe Fourth


Special to the Chronicle

On Independence Day,
many people will visit the
beach, enjoy fireworks or
fire up the grill for a back-
yard barbecue.
The American Red Cross
wants everyone to have a
happy Fourth of July holi-
day by implementing a few
simple steps to stay safe,
said Karen Hagan, regional
executive officer of the
American Red Cross Mid-
Florida Region.
BEACH SAFETY: If
swimming is part of the
plan, check the weather and
water conditions before-
hand. And follow these
safety suggestions:
Avoid alcohol before


and during water activities.
Never swim alone.
Supervise children at
all times, even if a lifeguard
is present. Stay within an
arm's reach of young chil-
dren while they are in the
water
Weak swimmers should
wear a Coast Guard-ap-
proved life jacket Don't rely
on water wings or inflatable
toys.
Always enter shallow
water feet first Dive only in
areas marked safe for diving.
Additional water safety
tips are at redcross.org/
watersafetytips.
WATCH THE SUN: If
you plan to hit the beach, a
park or just relax in your
backyard, follow these tips:


Limit the amount of di-
rect sunlight between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Apply broad-spectrum
sunscreen with a protection
factor of at least 15 spf
throughout the day
Drink plenty of water
and avoid drinks with alco-
hol or caffeine in them.
Wear sunglasses that
will absorb UV sunlight to
protect one's eyes.
Wear some kind of
beach shoes to protect one's
feet.
FIREWORKS SAFETY:
Nothing says "Fourth of
July" like fireworks. To help
stay safe while enjoying
them, follow these safety
steps:
Never give fireworks to


small children.
Always follow the in-
structions on the packaging.
Keep a supply of water
close by as a precaution.
Always wear eye pro-
tection if lighting fireworks.
Light only one firework
at a time.
Never attempt to relight
"a dud."
Store fireworks in a
cool, dry place away from
children and pets.
Never throw or
point fireworks toward peo-
ple, animals, vehicles, struc-
tures or flammable
materials.
Stay at least 500 feet
away from professional fire-
works displays.
GRILLING SAFETY: If


a picnic and grilled goodies
are part of someone's holi-
day plans, they should fol-
low these steps:
Always watch the bar-
becue grill when in use.
Never grill indoors -
not in a house, camper, tent
or any enclosed area.
Keep children and pets
away from the grill.
Keep the grill out in the
open, away from the house,
the deck, tree branches or
anything that could catch
fire.
Use long-handled tools
made for cooking on the
grill.
Never add charcoal
starter fluid when coals
have already been ignited.










Jury splits verdict in battery on officer case


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

INVERNESS The de-
fense in Donald Carbary's
trial conceded this much
early in the game that
Carbary may have been in-
volved in a struggle with a
sheriff's deputy and a secu-
rity guard at the Crystal
River Mall.
Instead, Assistant Public
Defender Michael Lamberti
and Carbary's attorney fo-
cused on another element
in the case: the legality of
the police action that led to
the confrontation.
Prosecutors Melissa Pen-
dergrass and Jeff Foster
painted Carbary as a thief
who was told to stay away


from the mall and decided
to flee from a deputy who
was initially just trying to get
his attention to remind him
he was not welcome at the
mall.
Tuesday, the jury mostly
agreed with the defense and
acquitted Carbary, 34, of
Crystal River, of three of
four charges which included
battery on Detective Steve
Smith of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office and theft.
He was, however, convicted
of battery on mall security
supervisor Joseph Clement.
According to testimony by
Clement, Carbary was
among people his staff had
found to be stealing from
businesses in the mall and
sought to have them re-


moved from the facility. He
said on Jan. 27, he asked
Smith, who was moonlight-
ing as security at the mall, to
let Carbary know should he
run into him, he would be
unwelcome there.
Smith reportedly spotted
Carbary soon after and
called out to him, but in-
stead of stopping, Carbary
picked up his pace and
began running.
Smith testified he thought
Carbary must have had war-
rants to have immediately
run after being told to stop.
So Smith gave chase, with
Clement following. They re-
portedly caught Carbary,
and Smith had him facing
the wall. While Smith was
attempting to secure the


radio on his hip to check for
warrants, Carbary tried to
flee again. He reportedly
pushed Clement, and in the
process also pushed Smith.
He was chased, tackled and
began kicking and punching
while keeping an arm
tucked under his body so he
couldn't be handcuffed.
Smith said he was kicked in
the shins; Clement had pic-
tures of bruises and injuries
caused by Carbary
Deputies Adam Ferguson
and Paul Viggiano testified
they came to the scene as
backup. Viggiano said that
while patting down Carbary,
he found a sweater in Car-
bary's pants with a JC Pen-
ney tag he believed was
stolen from that store. Smith


also found a pocket
knife in the pocket
of Carbary's hoodie.
Lamberti dis-
puted the legality of
police's ability to
order someone to
stop for a "consen-
sual encounter" Do
without a good rea- Car
son for the deten- will b
tion of that person, tencec
Consensual encoun-
ters like the one involving
Carbary, Lamberti said, give
people the right to walk
away from an officer.
Pendergrass said Carbary
had already been identified
as someone who was com-
mitting crimes at the mall
and ran when Smith ap-
proached him.


1





n
rb
e
I


Lamberti tried
several times
through motions to
M- dismiss the case, but
Judge Ric Howard
denied each
attempt.
After the jury ver-
aid dict, it was revealed
ary Carbary has 15 pre-
sen- vious felony convic-
Friday. tions, making him
eligible for up to
12 1/2 years in prison,
though the maximum sen-
tence for the charge he was
currently convicted of is
five years.
Howard thanked the jury
and told them he "would
handle things from here."
Carbary's sentencing is
set for Friday at 9:30 a.m.


Teen credited with
saving mother
PAHOKEE -A teenage boy
is being credited with saving his
mother from a fire.
Fourteen-year-old Hyatt
Spriggs climbed out of his bed-
room window to escape an
early morning fire at his Paho-
kee home Monday. WPBF re-
ported when he realized his
mother was still inside, he
crawled back in and helped pull
her to safety. The teen, his
mother, and a third person were
taken to the hospital and
treated for minor injuries.
Feds Search under
way for bank exec
NEW YORK -An executive
from a southern Georgia bank
who disappeared after stealing
$17 million in bank funds re-
mains missing after starting ru-
mors that he wanted to kill


himself, federal authorities said
Tuesday.
A criminal complaint un-
sealed earlier this week in New
York charges Aubrey Lee Price
with embezzlement.
Price, 46, has been in charge
of investments for a subsidiary
of the undisclosed bank. After
telling upper management that
he was investing in U.S. Treas-
ury securities, he wired bank
funds to accounts he controlled
and prepared falsified state-
ments to cover his tracks, the
complaint said.
The banker has been miss-
ing at least since June 16. He
vanished after writing friends to
tell them he had lost a large
amount of money on trades
and wanted to kill himself,
authorities said.
Investigators say Price was
last seen boarding a ferry in
Key West bound for Fort Myers.
-From wire reports


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sherifcitrus.org and click
on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime
occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


r


Bid Notices............................................C8
SI IIIIIIIIIIIIII I I 1111111111111111111111111



Meeting Notices....................................C8



Notice to Creditors/Administration.....C8



Tax Deed Notices..................................C8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 foot or less. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly cloudy
skies with just a slight chance of thun-
derstorms today.


91 74 0.00 92 73 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eelu aly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Scattered PM storms, rain chance
S40%
Sr T THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 73
Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%

FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
Scattered PM storms, rain chance 40%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 90/72
Record 100/61
Normal 92/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday trace
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 27.62 in.
Normal for the year 24.30 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.06 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 54%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed,XGrasses, Palm
Today's count: 3.7/12
Thursday's count: 4.9
Friday's count: 4.2
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/4 WEDNESDAY 6:39 12:25 7:07 12:53
7/5 THURSDAY 7:38 1:25 8:05 1:52
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S
AUG. 1


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 8:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:37 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................9:20 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ............................7:31 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:35 a/2:49 a 6:29 p/2:32 p
Crystal River"* 5:56 a/12:11 a 4:50 p/11:54 a
Withlacoochee* 3:43 a/9:42 a 2:37 p/10:41 p
Homosassa*** 6:45 a/1:48 a 5:39 p/1:31 p


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
8:12 a/3:31 a 7:17 p/3:19 p
6:33 a/12:53 a 5:38 p/12:41 p
4:20 a/10:29 a 3:25 p/11:20 p
7:22 a/2:30 a 6:27 p/2:18 p


Gulf water
temperature


88
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.07 29.93 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.78 34.80 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.48 36.49 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.89 38.94 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday Wednesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


Albany 87 62 ts 90 67
Albuquerque 94 68 ts 92 72
Asheville 87 66 ts 89 66
Atlanta 93 73 ts 95 74
Atlantic City 88 79 ts 90 73
Austin 97 69 pc 97 75
Baltimore 96 67 ts 95 76
Billings 10361 s 88 62
Birmingham 97 75 ts 94 74
Boise 84 67 s 87 55
Boston 86 69 ts 82 70
Buffalo 88 62 .05 ts 83 67
Burlington, VT 84 57 ts 89 66
Charleston, SC 94 76 pc 93 77
Charleston, WV 95 70 .09 ts 93 70
Charlotte 97 70 ts 96 72
Chicago 96 77 pc 102 76
Cincinnati 95 71 pc 96 72
Cleveland 85 69 1.33 ts 90 75
Columbia, SC 10473 ts 97 76
Columbus, OH 95 71 ts 95 73
Concord, N.H. 84 55 ts 83 63
Dallas 97 77 pc 96 76
Denver 96 63 pc 95 67
Des Moines 99 76 s 99 77
Detroit 85 73 .41 ts 97 73
El Paso 96 78 ts 89 70
Evansville, IN 97 70 pc 102 75
Harrisburg 93 63 ts 92 70
Hartford 87 63 ts 89 69
Houston 93 74 pc 93 77
Indianapolis 98 72 pc 99 76
Jackson 99 71 ts 97 74
LasVegas 10481 pc 97 81
Little Rock 10378 pc 99 73
Los Angeles 71 63 s 71 62
Louisville 97 73 pc 100 78
Memphis 98 76 pc 99 80
Milwaukee 97 73 .07 pc 93 76
Minneapolis 97 68 .05 pc 100 81
Mobile 97 72 ts 94 74
Montgomery 10073 ts 95 74
Nashville 99 72 pc 96 73
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Tuesday Wednesday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 96 77 ts 92 80
New York City 89 71 ts 90 77
Norfolk 92 73 ts 94 74
Oklahoma City 97 76 pc 103 76
Omaha 99 77 s 101 77
Palm Springs 10076 pc 98 72
Philadelphia 94 70 ts 94 77
Phoenix 10086 ts 94 82
Pittsburgh 90 65 ts 90 69
Portland, ME 82 60 ts 77 63
Portland, Ore 68 55 s 76 53
Providence, R.I. 85 62 ts 84 71
Raleigh 101 74 ts 96 72
Rapid City 10361 pc 90 67
Reno 94 61 s 93 59
Rochester, NY 87 61 ts 88 69
Sacramento 92 56 s 96 58
St. Louis 101 76 pc 104 77
St. Ste. Marie 85 65 .28 s 84 62
Salt Lake City 10073 s 95 75
San Antonio 96 75 pc 95 75
San Diego 68 62 pc 68 63
San Francisco 69 55 s 74 54
Savannah 96 75 pc 94 76
Seattle 64 53 .23 pc 70 52
Spokane 68 55 s 72 51
Syracuse 90 62 ts 93 64
Topeka 101 79 s 101 77
Washington 98 76 ts 96 77
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 105 O'neill, Neb. LOW 37 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 77/63/sh Mexico City
Athens 93/72/s Montreal
Beijing 95/78/ts Moscow
Berlin 76/58/pc Paris
Bermuda 82/76/ts Rio
Cairo 94/72/s Rome
Calgary 70/44/s Sydney
Havana 89/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 89/80/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 83/65/s Warsaw


73/61/pc
71/59/r
92/64/pc
72/57/ts
87/63/ts
81/65/pc
75/61/ts
82/65/s
88/65/pc
61/46/pc
81/71/ts
91/63/ts
87/66/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY N


State BRIEFS


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TompkinsSt. square
,0 106 W. Main
S 41 44- Inverness, FL
34450


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A4 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.la


.% ~,:yP'





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Make a (safe) splash



on the Fourth of July


Special to the Chronicle

Planning to celebrate July
Fourth on the water? Here
are some tips that may save
you some headaches.
Getting under way:
With the Fourth of July on
a Wednesday this year,
more boaters may take at
least half the week off. This
means more wear and tear
on boats which may have
been recently launched
and not fully prepped for
the boating season. Now is
the time to double-check
the battery, charging sys-
tem, navigation lights and
fuel system, as well as the
trailer tires, wheel bear-
ings and brake and signal
lights.
Gettingprotected: Many


boating guests for the holi-
day are likely to be kids, but
some boats won't have the
right size life jackets
aboard.
Boaters can borrow a
kid's life jacket at no cost at
more than 500 locations. To
see a list of locations, visit
http://www.BoatUS.com/Fou
ndation/LJLP/map. Make
sure to avoid overloading
boats so that wakes and
waves don't wash over the
gunwales. Having extra
guests also means more so-
cializing and the potential
for less focus on safety. If al-
cohol must be part of your
holiday celebration, wait
until you're safe at home be-
fore you drink.
Getting home: What's
the best way to prevent


needing a tow after the fire-
works are over? Don't run
down the battery playing
music all day, and be careful
to avoid anchor line entan-
glements. On the way back
to the marina, post extra
lookouts, don't take short-
cuts, go slow, and be patient
at the launch ramp. Boating
at night is risky, so make
sure everyone is wearing a
life jacket.
With appropriate prepa-
rations and planning, boat-
ing this July Fourth can be a
safe and memorable experi-
ence for you and your fam-
ily and friends.
For more information on
safe boating, classes and
membership, call USCG
Auxiliary 15-01 of Crystal
River at 352-503-6199.


In Florida fight, Obama


and Romney scrap along 1-4


Associated Press

ORLANDO In the pres-
idential battleground with
the biggest prize, Democrat
Barack Obama is focused on
ratcheting up voter turnout
in Florida's university
towns, its Hispanic enclaves
around Orlando and its Jew-
ish communities in the
south. Republican chal-
lenger Mitt Romney is work-
ing to squeeze as many votes
as possible out of north
Florida's conservative mili-
tary bastions, the senior-
heavy Gulf Coast and
Miami's Cuban community.
But their strategies to en-
ergize core supporters over-
lap in the central Florida
swing-voting region that's
key to winning the state and
its 29 electoral votes. Voters
along Interstate 4, which
stretches from Tampa Bay
to Daytona Beach, will de-
termine the outcome if the
race remains close into the
fall, as expected. About 45
percent of the state's voters
live in that 17-county area.
"Neither party has
enough base alone, which is
why those persuadable
places, particularly along
the I-4 corridor, are so im-
portant," said Steve Schale,
a Democrat who ran
Obama's Florida campaign
four years ago.
It seems that's usually the
case, judging by Florida's
track record of hard-fought
races and narrow presiden-
tial outcomes since the 2000
race landed at the Supreme
Court, which then handed
the White House to Repub-
lican George W Bush.
Bush won the state again
four years later, 52 percent



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to 47 percent, over Democ-
rat John Kerry But in 2008,
the state sided with Democ-
rats when Obama defeated
Republican John McCain,
51 percent to 48 percent.
This year, the stakes are
hard to overstate: Obama's
re-election is nearly assured
should he repeat his 2008
victory in Florida, based on
how the states lean now. His
standing in Florida is far
more precarious than it is in
other contested states so
if he wins Florida, it's likely
that he's won in many other
states as he looks to cobble
together the 270 Electoral
College votes it takes to win.
Romney's state-by-state
routes to reaching the magic
number are more limited
than the president's, and a
Florida victory would make
it far more probable that he
could win the presidency
The electorate in Florida
is virtually unchanged from
2008 because the ailing
economy stifled the popula-
tion growth of the previous
decade. And in this cam-
paign, the economy
dominates.
The recession took a deep
toll on the state's recreation
industry, especially around
Orlando. A decline in foreign
trade hurt the Port of Tampa,
Florida's largest shipping
port. The housing crisis fu-
eled widespread home fore-
closures and severely
hampered the construction
industry on which much of
the region's immigrant-
heavy workforce relies.
Florida's unemployment
rate was 8.6 percent in May,
slightly higher than the na-
tional average and all other
presidential battleground


states except Nevada.
A little more than four
months before the Nov. 6
election, Obama narrowly
leads Romney in statewide
polls.
The president and his
Democratic allies spent
roughly $17 million in televi-
sion advertising in Florida
from April, when Romney
effectively became the GOP
presidential nominee,
through last week. Romney's
campaign hasn't been on the
air in the state since then,
but his allies have doled out
$12 million during that time.
The ads are heavily concen-
trated on the Tampa and Or-
lando media markets, which
are cheaper than Miami's.
Of the $2.8 million spent
on TV ads in the state last
week, $1.8 million was in
this region.
Obama is on defense in the
I-4 corridor, which he won by
a very slim majority in 2008
after Bush won it in 2000 and
2004.
In a close race where any-
thing could be determina-
tive, organization could
count hugely and, on this
point for now at least,
Obama has an advantage.
He never dismantled his
2008 campaign infrastruc-
ture in the state and has 36
campaign offices. Romney
has quickly opened 23, run
jointly with the Republican
National Committee.
"In a race like this, that is
so close and so hard-fought,
door-to-door, mail and tele-
phones could make the dif-
ference," said Republican
Sally Bradshaw, a top
Florida aide to Romney
during his failed 2008
presidential bid.


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i-You-Can-Eat All plan to stay after for the
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The pool is still -I and member's use only.
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Gov. Scott overstates cost


of health care overhaul


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -When
Florida Gov Rick Scott
took to the airwaves this
past weekend to criticize
President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul, he
said that it would cost
Florida taxpayers $1.9 bil-
lion a year.
"We can't pay for that,"
Scott told Greta Van Sus-
teren on Fox News.
But it turns out that he
overstated the costs while
explaining that despite a
U.S Supreme Court ruling
on the overhaul, the state
would not carry out certain
portions of the law, includ-
ing expanding Medicaid
coverage to those just
above the poverty level.
The court made it clear
that Congress could not pe-
nalize states that failed to
expand Medicaid.
The Republican gover-
nor used estimates combin-
ing both the federal and
state costs as well as in-
creased payments to doc-
tors unconnected to any
decision the state makes.
An analysis prepared by
the main state agency that
oversees Medicaid shows
that Florida's estimated
share of costs would grow
from $121 million in 2013 to
$1.47 billion a year a
decade from now.
The $1.9 billion yearly
figure was also included in
a press release sent out by
the governor's office on
Sunday saying the state
would save that much
money by refusing to ex-
pand Medicaid.
The governor's press of-
fice acknowledged the
overstated figure on Mon-
day, and by Tuesday, Scott
himself had dropped the
annual figure from his talk-
ing points. "It will cost bil-


lions of dollars," he said
during an interview with
America's Radio News
Network.
"There's a wide range of
what this is going to cost,"
Scott said, noting that an-
other analysis that showed
the state cost over five
years was $1.2 billion to
$2.5 billion.
Brian Burgess, a
spokesman for Scott, said
even if the governor did not
use the right numbers, he is
concerned that the cost will
continue to increase and
there will be "strings at-
tached" if the state goes
along with the expansion.
"We have yet to hear a
number that's good news
for the state," said Burgess.
"They are substantially
higher than what the state
can afford."
Medicaid is a $21 billion
safety net program for the
poor in Florida and cur-
rently the federal govern-
ment picks up about 58
percent of the cost.
President Obama's
health care law called for
states in 2014 to expand el-
igibility of Medicaid to
those making up to 133 per-
cent of the poverty level, or
$29,326 for a family of four
in Florida. The changes
would also require adding
people who are below the
poverty level but not eligi-
ble for Medicaid such as
childless adults.
While estimates vary, the
Florida Agency for Health
Care Administration has
concluded that as many as
1.95 million more people
would join Medicaid and
other state-subsidized
health insurance programs
over the next five years.
The Medicaid expansion
would not cost the state any-
thing until 2017 although
AHCA estimates that the


state would bear increased
costs because people al-
ready eligible for Medicaid
- and therefore paid under
the traditional federal-state
match- would start joining
the program. AHCA also es-
timates that people cur-
rently purchasing private
insurance would drop it and
switch to Medicaid.
While some groups con-
tend the state's figures are
"hyper-inflated," AHCA es-
timates that the overall cost
to the state due to the Med-
icaid expansion and other
insurance changes would
be $2.4 billion between
2013 and 2018, with the fed-
eral government picking up
nearly $26 billion.
Tony Carvalho, president
of the Safety Net Hospital
Alliance of Florida, said his
group hopes that state offi-
cials consider seriously
going ahead with the ex-
pansion since it would
cover about half of the
Floridians who now do not
have health insurance.
"I think any way you ana-
lyze the Affordable Care
Act and expansion of Med-
icaid, it's a very good in-
vestment on the state of
Florida whereby for every
dollar you put in, you get 9
dollars of federal money,"
Carvalho said.
So far Florida's legisla-
tive leaders have not
ruled out the Medicaid ex-
pansion. While Scott's op-
position would likely
scuttle any effort, state
legislators could still au-
thorize it and send it to
the governor.
"There's no lack of oppo-
sition to Obamacare among
Republican leadership in
the Senate," said incoming
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville. "... But
we are trying to understand
all the options."


Fundraising groups offer few clues


The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE With
little more than a month to
go before Senate primaries
in a handful of key districts
across the state, the
fundraising organizations
tied to different sides of a
Republican leadership bat-
tle are offering a few scant
hints about which side might
be able to count on which
lawmakers for support
So far, the funds adminis-
tered by Sen. Jack Latvala,
R-Clearwater, and Sen. Joe


Negron, R-Stuart, have
largely refrained from giv-
ing significant sums to their
supporters. Latvala has said
he believes he has enough
votes to lock up the Senate
presidency in 2016 depend-
ing on how the elections go.
But speculation that both
sides of the leadership bat-
tle would pour money into
contested primaries, sched-
uled for Aug. 14, has so far
not materialized in the form
of direct contributions.
The largest amount
raised in this election cycle
by any of the funds is the


$2.4 million reaped by
Florida Conservative Ma-
jority, which lists its pur-
pose as "to identify and
support issues and candi-
dates promoting conserva-
tive principles."
The fund is associated
with the next two Republi-
cans in line for the Senate
presidency Don Gaetz of
Niceville and Andy Gardiner
of Orlando and Negron.
But that fund has also
spent roughly $2 million on
services and contributions
to Liberty Foundation of
Florida, a super PAC.


Our "Back to School" special section will

be publishing soon.


This guide includes all the information to

get students on track for a new school year!




Publishing:
Saturday, July 21



Advertising Deadline:

Tuesday, July 10


To reserve your space call
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dell
Arrington, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
Dell Arrington, age 59, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away June 30, 2012, at his
home.
He was born on July 20,
1952, in Bassett, Va., to Mau-
rice and Doris (Belton) Ar-
rington. Dell moved to
Crystal River in 2005, com-
ing from St. Cloud, Fla. He
was a draftsman for Mid
State Glass in Inverness, Fla.
He is survived by his wife,
Charlyn K. Arrington of
Crystal River, Fla.; his fa-
ther, Maurice Arrington of
Bassett, VA; three children,
Melissa Arrington Guill of
Surf City, N.C., Michael
LeClerc of Orlando, Fla.,
and Nicole LeClerc of Osce-
ola County, Fla.; one
brother, Mark Arrington of
Bassett, Va.; seven grand-
children; and four great-
grandchildren.
Family will be receiving
friends on Friday, July 6,
from 3 until service time at
4 p.m. at the Brown Funeral
Home in Lecanto, Fla.
www.brownfuneralhome.
com.

Kenneth
Coatney, 96
CRYSTAL RIVER
Kenneth James Coatney,
96, of Crystal River, passed
away Tuesday, July 3, 2012,
at Hospice of Citrus County
in Lecanto. He was born on
Dec. 19, 1915, in Louisville,
Ill., to the late James R. and
Leona Mae (Sutton) Coatney
Kenneth was a salesman
for Youngstown Kitchens,
and in 1945 won the Na-
tional Salesperson Award.
He arrived in this area in
1985, coming from Kissim-
mee. Kenneth was a Baptist,
and held memberships in
Seven Rivers Golf & Coun-
try Club, charter member of
the Loyal Order of Moose,
Kissimmee, and loved to
play golf.
He was preceded in death
by his wife of 44 years, Julia;
one son, Dennis James Coat-
ney; one brother; and three
sisters. He is survived by his
daughter, Carole Lynn
Fisher of Homosassa, Fla.;
five grandchildren, eight
great-grandchildren, and
six great-great grandchil-
dren. The family has re-
quested donations be made
to Hospice of Citrus County,
PO Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, Fla., 34464. Chas E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Marion 'Slick'
Rankin, 75
INVERNESS
Mr. Marion Marshall
"Slick" Rankin, age 75 of In-
verness, Florida, died Sun-
day, July 1, 2012 in
Inverness, FL.
He was born December 7,
1936 in Lake City, FL, son of
the late Chase and Rose
(Thornton) Rankin. He was
a U. S. Marines veteran and
worked as a general line
foreman for Florida Power/
Progress Energy for 37 years
before his retirement. He
had a very strong work ethic
and was very dedicated to
his job. He often had Bar-B-
Qs for his co-workers at
Florida Power. His hobbies
included fishing, hunting,
the outdoors and spending
time with his family
Survivors include 2 sons,
Russell Chase Rankin of
Middleburg, FL and Bran-
don Marshall Rankin of In-
verness, FL, 2 daughters,
Marsha Oxford of Dunnel-
lon, FL and Victoria Regina
Weaver of Eastlake Weir,
FL, and 9 grandchildren.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
w w w. Hooper Fun eral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &


Crematory

CiL.. E. 2acrt
Funeral Home With Crematory
BRUCE DAVID
Private Arrangements
HAL CONN
Service: July 14,11:00AM
St. Timothy's Lutheran Church
RAYMOND MAGUIRE
Service: Wednesday, July 11,1:30PM
Florida National Cemetery
LEWIS ROMMEL
Viewing: Friday, 12:30PM
Graveside: Friday, 2:30PM
Florida National Cemetery
726-8323 000BMFG


Richard
Mozelewski, 82
HERNANDO
Mr. Richard J.
Mozelewski, age 82, of Her-
nando, Florida, died Satur-
day, June 30, in Inverness,
Fla. Arrangements are
under the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Home & Crematory

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Paid obituaries may
include the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if
predeceased by
spouse); religious
affiliation; biographical
information, including
education, military
service, employment,
organizations and hob-
bies; officiating clergy;
interment/inurnment;
and memorial
contributions.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
The U.S. military
consists of five active-
duty services and their
respective guard and
reserve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.
U.S. flags denote mili-
tary service on local
obituaries.





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Andy Griffith dies


Associated Press
ABOVE: This undated image originally released by Viacom shows cast members from "The Andy Griffith Show," from left,
Don Knotts as Deputy Barney Fife, Ron Howard as Opie Taylor and Andy Griffith as Sheriff Andy Taylor. BELOW: Actor
Andy Griffith sits in front of a bronze statue of Andy and Opie from the "Andy Griffith Show" on Oct. 28, 2003, after the
unveiling ceremony in Raleigh, N.C. Griffith, whose homespun mix of humor and wisdom made "The Andy Griffith Show"
an enduring TV favorite, died Tuesday in Manteo, N.C. He was 86.


Actor who portrayed Mayberry's SheriffAndy


MARTHA WAGONER
Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. It was
all too easy to confuse Andy
Griffith the actor with Sher-
iffAndy Taylor, his most fa-
mous character from "The
Andy Griffith Show."
After all, Griffith set his
namesake show in a make-
believe town based on his
hometown of Mount Airy,
N.C., and played his "aw,
shucks" persona to such
perfection that viewers eas-
ily believed the character
and the man were one.
Griffith, 86, died Tuesday
at his home along the coast,
according to Dare County
Sheriff Doug Doughtie.
"Mr Griffith passed away
this morning at his home
peacefully and has been
laid to rest on his beloved
Roanoke Island," Doughtie
told The Associated Press,
reading from a family
statement.
Although Griffith ac-
knowledged some similari-
ties between himself and
the wise sheriff who over-
saw a town of eccentrics,
they weren't the same. Grif-
fith was more complicated
than the role he played -
witnessed by his three mar-
riages if nothing else.
But that perception led
people to believe Griffith
was all that was good about
North Carolina and put
pressure on him to live up
to an impossible Hollywood
standard.
He protected his privacy
in the coastal town of Man-
teo, by building a circle of
friends who revealed little
to nothing about him.
Strangers who asked
where Griffith lived would
receive circular directions
that took them to the beach,
said William Ivey Long, the
Tony Award-winning cos-
tume designer whose par-
ents were friends with
Griffith and his first wife,
Barbara.
Craig Fincannon, who
runs a casting agency in
Wilmington, met Griffith in
1974. He described his
friend as the symbol of
North Carolina.
That role "put heavy
pressure on him because
everyone felt like he was
their best friend. With
great grace, he handled the
constant barrage of people
wanting to talk to Andy
Taylor," Fincannon said.

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Saralynne Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller @ chronicleonline com
Scott Mason at 563-3273
smason@ chronicleonline.com



D,


In a 2007 interview with
The Associated Press, Grif-
fith said he wasn't as wise
as the sheriff, nor as nice.
He described himself as
having the qualities of one
of his last roles, that of the
cranky diner owner in
"Waitress," and also of his
most manipulative charac-
ter, from the 1957 movie "A
Face in the Crowd."
"But I guess you could
say I created Andy Taylor,"
he said. "Andy Taylor's the
best part of my mind. The
best part of me."
Griffith had a career that
spanned more than a half-
century and included
Broadway, notably "No
Time for Sergeants;"
movies such as Elia Kazan's
"A Face in the Crowd"; and
records.
"No Time for Sergeants,"
released as a film in 1958,
cast Griffith as Will Stock-
dale, an over-eager young
hillbilly who, as a draftee in
the Air Force, overwhelms
the military with his rosy at-
titude. Establishing Grif-
fith's skill at playing a
lovable rube, this hit film
paved the way for his sitcom.
He was inducted into the
Academy of Television Arts
Hall of Fame in 1992 and in
2005, he received the Presi-
dential Medal of Freedom,
one of the country's highest
civilian honors.
"There is no doubt in my
mind why Andy Griffith and
the shows he starred in and
produced were so beloved
by Americans and people
around the world," Norman
Brokaw, who had been his
agent for more than 50
years, said in a statement.
"Behind his immense tal-
ent was simply a wonderful
person."
Griffith's television series
resumed in 1986 with "Mat-
lock," which aired through
1995.
On this light-hearted
legal drama, Griffith played
a cagey Harvard-educated
attorney who was South-
ern-bred and -mannered
with a leisurely law prac-
tice in Atlanta.
Decked out in his seer-
sucker suit in a steamy
courtroom (air condition-






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ing would have spoiled the
mood), Matlock could toy
with a witness and tease out
a confession like a folksy
Perry Mason.
This character law-
abiding, fatherly and lov-
able was like a latter-day
homage to Sheriff Andy
Taylor, updated with silver
hair and a shingle.
In short, Griffith would
always be best known as
Sheriff Taylor from the tel-
evision show set in a North
Carolina town not too dif-
ferent from Griffith's own
hometown of Mount Airy,
which is near the state line
with Virginia, about 120
miles northwest of
Raleigh.
In 2007, Griffith said "The
Andy Griffith Show," which
initially aired from 1960 to
1968, had never really left
and was seen somewhere in
the world every day A re-
union movie, "Return to
Mayberry," was the top-
rated TV movie of the 1985-
86 season.
Griffith set the show in
the fictional town of May-
berry, N.C., where Sheriff
Taylor was the dutiful
nephew who ate pickles


Taylor was 86


that tasted like kerosene be-
cause they were made by
his loving Aunt Bee, played
by the late Frances Bavier
His character was a wid-
owed father who offered
gentle guidance to son Opie,
played by little Ron
Howard, who grew up to be-
come the Oscar-winning di-
rector of "A Beautiful
Mind."
"His love of creating, the
joy he took in it whether it
was drama or comedy or his
music, was inspiring to
grow up around," Howard
said in a statement. "The
spirit he created on the set
of'The Andy Griffith Show'
was joyful and professional
all at once. It was an amaz-
ing environment."
Don Knotts was the goofy
Deputy Barney Fife, while
Jim Nabors joined the show
as Gomer Pyle, the corn-
pone gas pumper George
Lindsey, who played the
beanie-wearing Goober,
died in May
Griffith and Knotts had
become friends while per-
forming in "No Time for
Sergeants," and remained
so until Knotts' death in
2006 at 81.


Obituaries


We Salute Our Great Country

And All That It Symbolizes

This Fourth of July celebrate
and remember the brave men


and women who have
given so much
Sin the way of our
country's freedom.





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A6 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012


OBITUARIES


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*Associated Press ESSAY


In divi


Independence

Day filled with

sales, food and

fireworks

TED ANTHONY
AP National Writer

SMITHTOWN, N.Y In
the market for new designer
eyewear this Independence
Day? Look no further than
Wize Eyes on Long Island.
"So Proudly We Hail," the
chain advertised this week,
"With Fashion Eyewear... At
Half The Price."
Perhaps Competition
Subaru of Smithtown's flag-
themed "July 4th Blast of
Savings SALES EVENT" is
more up your alley this year
Or possibly you need some
last-minute hot dogs for
your Fourth of July cook-
out? Don't miss the Dietz &
Watson "Grill-a-bration."
Look around, and one
truth seems kind of self-evi-
dent. If you arrived in Amer-
ica with entirely fresh eyes,
it would be easy to conclude
the summer's day on which
we celebrate our hard-won
independence from Eng-
land is merely a pause to
blow up some colorful ex-
plosives, cook some meat
over an open flame and get
some good deals on major
appliances. And, of course,
drink beer
But that can't be all there
is. Can it?
In an era when everything
from health care policy to
immigration divides us
more than it unites us, when
the Internet allows us to
tear apart our fellow Amer-
icans' virtual throats from
the comfort of our key-
boards, what does a holiday
like Independence Day
mean? Is commercialism
the only thing that keeps us
together? Does this tribal-
feeling nation of niches and
special interest groups and
online communities still
have much use for a holiday
that, at its most elemental,
celebrates the societal-level
version of "Hey I'm sick
of you, so I'm leaving"?
After 11 score and 16
years, we certainly know
how the routine goes.
We gather in our groups,
with families and friends
and neighbors, and we put


ded era, what does July 4th mean?


Cole Danzker Epstein, 7, of Hoboken, N.J., does a cartwheel on the athletic field Tuesday
at Stevens Institute of Technology, where a large hot-air balloon draped with the colors of
the U.S. flag was displayed. The balloon, which is part of the Quick Chek New Jersey
Festival of Ballooning at the end of July at Solberg Airport in Readington, N.J., flew in honor
of the Fourth of July holiday.


politics aside. We cluster in
community streets and sit
upon community lawns to
take in parades, then gaze
up at the sky and see the
bombs bursting in air and
claim, for ourselves, some
kind of collective proof that
the flag is still there.
But how many of us (and
it would be a fair point to
suggest that even the very
term "us" is a bit ridiculous
in America these days) actu-
ally stop and think about
our political lot on Inde-
pendence Day? Cynical
though the notion may be,
it's hard to find a person
who says, "Well, yes, actu-
ally, I do engage in dis-


4 For Citrus Co. Comm. Dist. 1, on
August 14th you can vote for me
S no matter your party or district!
Pd. pol. adv. paid for and approved by Renee Christopher-McPheeters,
d o Republican, County Commissioner District 1



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course about the state of our
republic with my fellow
Americans between bites of
potato salad."
Independence Day can
seem like a bubble, neither
a unifier nor a divider The
American heroics discussed
are yesterday's, not today's.
Everything is torpid and
summery and more about
the pursuit of happiness
than life and liberty And in
that way, it's about as Amer-
ican as you can get. It's


about community in the
micro about getting to-
gether for the fireworks
show, not about where our
country is these days.
"It's a romantic idealism.
We remember what we
think America should be,"
said Tricia Quinn, an archi-
tect and a political inde-
pendent who lives in
Orlando, Fla.
"My idealism is that on
that day we agree we're a
wonderful nation of open-


Associated Press
ABOVE: Floyd Tennant Jr., 11, left, pours water over his
brother Lucus' head before the start of the annual
Independence Day celebrations Tuesday in Dubuque, Iowa.
The Dubuque area saw temperatures reach the mid 90s
Tuesday. BELOW: Scott Hendricks tries to keep cool with
his own shade before the start of the annual Independence
Day celebrations in Dubuque, Iowa.


I I
minded democratic people
who respect each other,"
she said. "On Independence
Day, we're trying to put
aside our differences and
hope that we all believe in
the same thing, that we're
playing from the same rule
book."
Rule book: an interesting
term. Think about it for a
moment. What do we cele-
brate Wednesday? A decla-
ration of independence a
conception, really, rather
than an actual birth. A deci-
sion that we will be a sepa-
rate nation. But the work -
most of the war to win it,
and the compromises nec-
essary to build it was still
ahead. Independence was
asserted in 1776, but the
rule book we're playing
from, the Constitution, was
still 11 years and countless
casualties away
It's the American instinct


to celebrate the big, epic,
unifying event rather than
the tortuous process of give
and take and, yes, rancor
that followed. Is it possible
that we should be celebrat-
ing the Constitution rather
than the declaration the
house that Americans actu-
ally built rather than merely
the idea to build the house?
"The Declaration is about
our aspirations and the Con-
stitution is about how we do
it. And how we do it is messy
and imperfect," said Brian
C. Mitchell, a longtime edu-
cator and historian who
was, most recently, the pres-
ident of Bucknell
University.
"The Constitution is what
precipitates and provokes
debate," Mitchell said. "But
I think the Declaration is
the right thing to celebrate.
Because it's about who we
want to be."


,





41



















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j


NATION


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 A7












ASE W J 2KSTYINR)VCHROIC


IHowToS E'THEMRTINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF722838 137.41 +.90 CheniereEn 37461 15.56 +.76 SiriusXM 529507 2.04 +.06 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 544442 8.06 +.01 YMBiog 24864 2.14 +.12 MicronT 461864 6.89 +.34 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 489977 9.60 +.21 NwGoldg 23103 10.07 +.60 Amylin 250393 30.73 +.03 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 349746 39.91 +.79 NovaGldg 19614 5.70 +.32 Microsoft 202983 30.76 +.20 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
iShR2K 293459 81.53 +1.05 Rubicong 17972 3.30 +.19 ArenaPhm 155466 10.02 +.08 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cd Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
Xerium 3.52 +.50 +16.6 PernixTh 8.90 +1.40 +18.7 LiveDeal 15.34 +3.61 +30.8 ng qualification n- Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
CSVLgCrde29.94 +3.74 +14.3 BovieMed 2.78 +.36 +14.9 MediciNova 2.05 +.41 +25.0 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferredstock ssue.pr Preferences.pp-
McEwenM 3.29 +.36 +12.3 MAG Sly g 9.38 +.94 +11.1 HeliosMIT 3.65 +.66 +22.0 Holder owes Installments of purchase pnce. rt- Right to buy security ata specified pnce. s-
FortunaSlv 3.85 +.41 +11.9 GoldenMin 5.26 +.50 +10.5 Nanosphere 2.98 +.46 +18.3 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -Trades will be settled when the
Pzenalnv 5.08 +.53 +11.6 IntTowerg 3.06 +.29 +10.5 XOMA 3.44 +.44 +14.7 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVlnvCrd 61.70 -9.89 -13.8 Richmntg 4.14 -.64 -13.4 PlumasBc 2.80 -.86 -23.5
BiP GCrb 10.73 -1.67 -13.5 MGTCaprs 5.35 -.70 -11.6 Tegal 4.52 -.66 -12.7
DirDGIdBr 41.36 -5.34 -11.4 Servotr 8.14 -.41 -4.8 ValleyFin 8.05 -.88 -9.9
DrDNGBear17.27 -1.87 -9.8 TellnstEl 3.51 -.17 -4.6 Astealntl 3.12 -.34 -9.8 52-Week Net % YT[
CSVS3xlnSIv39.51 -4.09 -9.4 WisPpf 105.02 -4.78 -4.4 InnerWkgs 12.76 -1.16 -8.3 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


2,385 Advanced
615 Declined
130 Unchanged
3,130 Total issues
297 New Highs
4 New Lows
2,047,257,930 Volume


DIARY


322 Advanced
106 Declined
37 Unchanged
465 Total issues
21 New Highs
1 New Lows
52,647,945 Volume


1,757
651
144
2,552
185
16
1,002,549,928


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
486.39 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,496.42 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
860.37 601.71 Russell 200


I NYSE


) % 52-wk
ig %Chg


12,943.82 +72.43 +.56 +5.94 +2.97
5,237.57 +30.77 +.59 +4.34 -4.75
482.89 -1.61 -.33 +3.92+10.66
7,901.67 +69.44 +.89 +5.68 -5.98
2,400.48 +33.81 +1.43 +5.36 +.27
2,976.08 +24.85 +.84+14.24 +5.32
1,374.02 +8.51 +.62 +9.26 +2.70
14,417.90 +107.13 +.75 +9.31 +1.40
818.49 +10.55 +1.31 +10.47 -2.75


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BcBilVArg 7.13 +.03
BmBradpf 15.43 +.31
BmSantSA 6.66 +.02
BmSBrasil 7.85 -.04
ABBLtd 16.64 +.22 BkofAm 8.06 +01
AESCorp 12.81 +.09 BkMontg 56.62 +1.26
AFLAC 43.37 +.54 BkNYMel 22.35 +.17
AGCO 45.89 +1.38 Barday 10.54 -.23
AGLRes 39.15 +.14 BariPVix 13.90 -.32
AK Steel 6.05 +.26 BarrickG 38.71 +1.26
AOL 28.71 +.30 BasicEnSv 10.81 +.51
ASAGold 22.92 +.72 Baxter 54.22 +.36
AT&TInc 36.00 -.20 Beam Inc 62.71 -.50
AUOpton 4.07 +.05 BeazerHm 3.32 -.01
AbtLab 64.83 +.20 BectDck 75.69 +.32
AberFitc 34.63 +.61 BerkHaA125500.00 +5.00
Accenture 61.09 +.60 BerkHB 83.78 +.13
AdamsEx 10.63 +.07 BestBuy 21.75 -.45
AdvAuto 69.20 +1.53 BBarrett 22.23 +1.13
AMD 6.03 +.28 BioMedR 19.01 +.29
Aeropost 18.54 +.70 BIkHillsCp 32.66 +.53
Aetna 38.15 -.42 BlkDebtStr 4.27 +.02
Agilent 39.54 +.63 BlkEnhC&l 12.94 +.15
Agniog 42.01 +1.45 BIkGlbOp 13.25 +.02
Agriumg 90.82 +2.03 Blackstone 13.39 +.06
AirProd 80.23 +.61 BlockHR 15.98 -.01
AlcatelLuc 1.64 -.01 Boeing 74.27 +1.09
Alma 8.90 +.28 BorgWarn 66.26 +1.03
AllegTch 32.97 +1.23 BostBeer 127.01 +3.59
Allergan 95.65 +.88 BostProp 110.25 +.68
Allete 42.37 +.04 BostnSci 5.80
AlliBGIbHi 15.06 +.04 BoydGm 7.25 +.05
AlliBInco 8.36 +.06 Brandyw 12.16 +.03
AlliBern 12.78 -.02 BrMySq 34.91 -.80
Allstate 35.32 +.10 BrkfidAsg 34.23 +.86
AlphaNRs 9.32 +.56 Brunswidc 22.85 +.44
AlpAlerMLP 16.09 -.01 Buckeye 52.63 -.12
Altia 34.99 +.03 CBREGrp 16.37 +.21
AmBev 38.68 +.46 CBSB 32.82 -.18
Ameren 33.58 -.01 FlInds 199.35 +5.91
AMovilL 26.31 +.14 CH Engy 65.72 +.02
AmAle 10.75 +.33 CMSEng 23.64 +.05
AEagleOut 20.05 +.11 CNO Find 8.09 +.09
AEP 41.01 +.59 CSS Inds 20.90 +.11
AEqlnvLf 11.36 +.19 CSX 22.22 +.04
AmExp 59.41 +.56 CVSCare 47.83 +.02
AmlntGrp 32.39 +.55 CYS Invest 14.04 +.09
AmSIP3 6.98 +.02 CblvsnNY 13.75 +.19
AmTower 71.43 -.07 CabotOGs 40.14 +.41
Amerigas 41.40 -.41 CallGolf 6.21 +.08
Ameriprise 52.34 +.35 Calpine 16.69 +.19
AmeriBrgn 39.78 -.07 Camecog 22.64 +.86
Anadarko 69.05 +3.39 Cameron 44.55 +1.76
AnglogldA 34.29 +.75 CampSp 33.43 +.04
ABlnBev 79.51 +.21 CdnNRsgs 28.10 +1.29
Annaly 16.97 +.02 CapOne 55.10 +.35
Anworth 6.93 -.08 CapM pB 15.25 +.11
Apache 90.19 +2.90 CardnlHIth 42.89 +.49
Aptlnv 27.55 +.20 CarMax 26.33 +.23
AquaAm 25.79 +.18 Carnival 34.29 -.13
ArcelorMit 16.06 +.65 Caterpillar 86.46 +2.78
ArchCoal 7.36 +.27 Celanese 34.46 +.92
ArchDan 28.99 -.05 Cellomm 6.25 +.23
ArmourRsd 7.28 +.06 Cemex 6.75 +.03
Ashland 69.19 +.19 Cemigpfs 19.03 -.03
AsdEstat 15.12 -.01 CenovusE 33.74 +1.32
AssuredG 14.48 +.40 CenterPnt 20.65 -.11
AstaZen 46.14 +.47 Cntylink 39.69 +.03
ATMOS 35.87 -.01 Checkpnt 9.25 +.44
AuRicog 8.46 +.35 ChesEng 19.36 +.63
Avon 15.95 +.20 ChesUfi 44.59 +.21
BB&TCp 31.15 +.24 Chevron 107.37 +1.51
BHPBiILt 66.60 +1.06 Chimos 14.88 +.05
BP PLC 40.81 +.12 Chimera 2.40
BPZRes 2.69 +.14 ChinaUni 12.78 +.19
BRFBrasil 15.20 +.04 Cigna 42.75 -.23
BRT 6.37 ... CindBell 3.77 -.03
BakrHu 42.11 +1.20 Cinemark 23.42 +.45
BallCorp 41.05 +.53 Cifgroup 27.65 +.19


CleanHs 58.55 +1.22
CliffsNRs 50.43 +1.44
Clorox 72.67 +.36
CloudPeak 17.97 +.33
Coach 58.35 -.22
CobaltlEn 25.44 +1.06
CCFemsa 133.32 +1.39
CocaCola 79.16 +.24
CocaCE 28.76 +.44
Coeur 18.17 +.82
CohStlnfra 17.46 +.08
ColgPal 104.61 +.89
CollctvBrd 21.46
Comerica 31.55 +.45
CmclMis 13.18 +.39
CmwREIT 19.19 -.02
CmtyHIt 27.44 -.52
CompSci 25.09 +.28
ComskRs 17.16 +.97
Con-Way 36.18 +.56
ConAgra 25.86 +.05
ConocPhil s 56.41 +.68
ConsolEngy 31.19 +.75
ConEd 62.57 -.15
ConstellA 28.25 -.56
ContlRes 71.08 +4.36
Cnvrgys 14.95 +.09
Corning 13.08 +.17
CorrecInCp 29.78 +.11
CottCp 8.45 +.19
CoventyH 31.08 -.04
Covidien 54.24 +.12
Crane 36.98 +1.16
CSVS3xSIv 23.84 +1.98
CSVS2xVxS 4.06 -.16
CSVellVSt 12.21 +.24
CrwnCsfe 60.33 +.32
CrownHold 34.27 +.33
Cummins 100.14 +4.06

DCT Indl 6.27 -.05
DDRCorp 14.82 +10
DNPSelct 11.21 +.03
DR Horton 18.28 -.23
DSW Inc 55.21 -.07
DTE 59.55 +.17
DanaHldg 12.91 +.51
Danaher 52.66 +.57
Darden 51.26 +.55
DeanFds 16.98 +.21
Deere 81.72 +1.27
DelphiAun 26.31 +1.02
DeltaAir 10.76 -.36
DenburyR 15.75 +.78
DeutschBk 37.21 +.32
DevonE 58.48 +1.35
DiaOffs 60.76 +1.44
DicksSptg 49.73 +.74
DxFnBullrs 92.72 +1.56
DirSCBear 16.82 -.72
DirFnBear 21.77 -.38
DirDGIdBII 12.16 +1.22
DrxEnBear 10.25 -.82
DirEMBear 13.85 -.85
DirxSCBull 57.91 +2.23
DirxEnBull 42.92 +2.93
Discover 35.45 +.56
Disney 48.59 -.13
DollarGen 53.76 -.97
DomRescs 54.23 -.16
DEmmett 23.61 +.23
Dover 54.23 +1.05
DowChm 31.69 +.18
DuPont 49.59 +.16
DukeEnrs 68.69 -1.15
DukeRlty 14.82
Dynegy .59 +.01
EMC Cp 25.63 +.40


EOG Res 94.89 +5.95
EQTCorp 54.59 +.80
EastChm s 50.89 +1.17
Eaton 40.49 +1.28
EVEnEq 10.59 +.02
Ban 14.13
BdorGldg 12.94 +.27
BsterGrp 20.38
EmersonEl 45.54 +.14
EmpDist 21.46 +.06
EnbrdgEPt 30.14 -.85
EnCanag 20.98 +.51
EndvSilvg 8.64 +.34


EngyTsfr 44.56 +.16
EnergySol 1.81 +.07
Enerplsg 13.13 +.29
EnPro 37.46 +.56
ENSCO 48.73 +1.66
Entergy 68.53 -.05
EntPrPt 51.76 +.01
EqtyRsd 63.46 +.52
EsteeLdrs 55.19 +.49
ExoRes 7.70 +.05
Exelon 37.41 -.28
ExterranH 14.22 +.86
ExxonMbl 86.28 +.94
FMCTech 41.67 +1.51
FairchldS 14.17 +.16
FamilyDIr 67.28 -.67
FedExCp 92.60 +1.06
FedSignl 6.02 -.02
Ferrellgs 19.00 -.07
Ferro 4.92 +.12
FibriaCelu 7.73 +.10
FidNatlnfo 34.80 +.34
Fifh&Pac 10.92 +.11
FstHorizon 8.74 +.02
FTActDiv 7.86 +.04
FtTrEnEq 11.75 -.02
FirstEngy 49.84 -.06
Ruor 49.98 +.81
FordM 9.60 +.21
FordMwt 1.10 +.10
ForestLab 36.13 +.34
ForestOil s 7.22 +.27
Fortess 3.51 +.02


FBHmScn 23.43 +.06
FMCG 35.21 +1.33
Fusion-io 21.30 +.42

GATX 39.28 +.29
GNC 41.64 +.56
GabelliET 5.45 -.02
GabHIthW 8.52 +.07
GabUIl 8.10 +.02
GameStop 18.37 +.39
Gannett 14.82 -.03
Gap 27.69 +.17


GenDynam 66.17 +.62
GenElec 20.43 -.06
GenGrPrp 18.30 -.06
GenMills 39.02 +.04
GenMotors 20.67 +1.10
GenOnEn 1.70 -.04
Genworth 5.89 +.18
Gerdau 9.10 +.18
GlaxoSKln 46.05 -.31
GlimchRt 10.58 +.30
GoldFLd 12.77 +.17
Goldarpg 39.19 +1.85
GoldmanS 98.60 +1.47
Goodrich 127.04 +.04
GoodrPet 15.12 +.70
Goodyear 11.44 +.02
GrafTech 9.65 +.11
GtPlainEn 21.73 +.07
Griffon 8.65 +.07
GpTelevisa 21.79 +.26
GuangRy 15.27 +.39
HCA HIdg 29.50 -.49
HCP Inc 44.65 +.10
HSBC 44.82 -.09
HSBCCap 26.33 -.12
Hallibrth 29.94 +1.34
HanJS 15.69 +.25
HanPrmDv 14.44 -.08
Hanesbrds 28.48 +.39
Hanoverlns 39.69 +.47
HarleyD 46.47 +.66
HarmonyG 9.40 +.18


HartfdFn 17.79 +.34
HawaiiEl 28.79 -.05
HItCrREIT 59.18 +.11
HItMgmt 7.57 -.11
HlthcrRlty 24.00 -.03
HealthNet 24.32 +.61
Heckmann 3.38 +.01
HeclaM 4.94 +.15
Heinz 54.98 +.26
HedmPayne 45.75 +2.52
Herbalife 50.41 +1.01
Hershey 72.58 +.49
Hertz 13.44 +.63


Hess 45.30 +1.84
HewlettP 20.36 +.20
HighwdPrp 34.48 +.38
Hillshiren 29.99 +.24
HollyFrts 36.97 +1.28
HomeDp 51.65 -1.36
HonwIllnf 55.59 +.43
Hormel 30.57 -.11
HospPT 25.25 +.27
HostHofs 16.18 +.27
HovnanE 2.86 +.03
Humana 77.03 +.05
Huntsmn 13.19 +.62
IAMGIdg 12.25 +.39
ICICI Bk 33.25 +.84
ING 6.78 +.11
iShGold 15.80 +.24
iSAsfia 22.18 +.15
iShBraz 53.40 +.82
iSCan 26.59 +.65
iShEMU 27.87 +.26
iShGer 20.18 +.21
iShHK 16.67 +.22
iShJapn 9.50 +.12
iShKor 55.36 +1.12
iSMalas 14.32 +.12
iShMex 62.29 +.57
iShSing 12.61 +.22
iSTaiwn 12.47 +.24
iSh UK 16.57 +.05
iShSilver 27.49 +.76
iShDJDv 56.75 +.29
iShChina25 34.20 +.56


iSSP500 137.97
iShBAgB 111.21
iShEMkts 39.91
iShiBxB 117.92
iShB20T 125.25
iShB1-3T 84.35
iS Eafe 50.75
iSRusMCV 46.92
iSSPMid 95.79
iShiBxHYB 91.20
iSR1KV 68.84
iSR1KG 63.94
iSR2KV 71.96


iSR2KG 93.87 +1.29
iShR2K 81.53 +1.05
iShUSPfd 39.10 +13
iShREst 64.98 +.36
iShDJHm 16.90 -.05
iShSPSm 74.80 +.93
iSMsdG 54.49 +.58
iStar 6.72 +.04
Idacorp 42.89 +.17
ITW 52.52 +.46
Imafon 5.97 +.06
ImaxCorp 24.27 +.38
IngerRd 43.01 +.60
IngrmM 17.27 -.28
IntegrysE 57.67 -.05
IntcnfiEx 134.90 -.92
IBM 195.93 +10
InfiGame 16.00 +.37
IntPap 29.57 +.61
Interpublic 11.38 +.34
Invesco 22.88 +.32
InvMtgCap 18.66 -.07
IronMth 32.39 -.16
ItauUnibH 14.59 +.41
IvanhMg 10.28 +18
Ivanhoe rt 1.22 +.07

JPMorgCh 35.88 -.10
JPMAlerian 39.25 +.03
Jabil 20.48 +.44
Jaguar g 1.22 +.07
JanusCap 7.90 +.03


JohnJn 68.04 +.04 Merck 41.81 -.04
JohnsnCft 27.81 +.77 Meritor 5.48 +.26
JoyGlbl 56.21 +1.86 MetLife 31.21 +.55
JnprNtwk 16.14 +.29 MetoPCS 6.57 +.21
KBHome 9.81 +.14 MetoHIth 9.99 +.07
KCSouthn 69.27 +.68 MKorsn 42.67 -.22
Kaydons 21.52 +.41 MidAApt 69.42 +.44
KAEngTR 26.11 +.43 MitsuUFJ 4.91 +.16
Kellogg 49.54 +.09 MobileTele 17.72 +.27
KeyEngy 7.47 +.27 Molyorp 21.81 +.67
Keycorp 7.80 +.08 MoneyGrs 15.08 +.06
KimbClk 84.00 +.10 Monsanto 83.58 +.40
Kimco 19.07 +.09 MonstrWw 8.43 +.13
KindME 80.41 -.25 MorgStan 15.11 +.17
KindMorg 33.16 +.42 MSEmMkt 14.33 +.30
KindrMwt 2.22 +.01 Mosaic 55.67 +.79
Kinrossg 8.82 +.43 MorlaSolu 48.34 +.99
KodiakOg 8.80 +.46 MurphO 51.59 +1.23
Kohls 44.26 -1.12 NCRCorp 23.35 +.53
KrispKrm 6.48 +.07 NRG Egy 17.67 +.41
Kroger 22.91 +.10 NVEnergy 17.76 -.02
KronosWw 15.57 +.33 Nabors 14.80 +.57
LANAir 26.10 +.35 NatFuGas 47.97 +1.01
LSICorp 6.54 +.15 NatGrid 53.25 -.33
LTCPrp 37.00 -.20 NOilVarco 67.65 +3.25
LaZBoy 12.44 +.11 Navistar 29.04 +1.95
Ladede 40.30 +.20 NewAmHi 10.33 +.04
LVSands 43.18 +.21 NJRscs 44.35 +.17
LennarA 31.05 -.05 NYCmtyB 12.72 +.02
Lexmark 27.75 +1.27 NYTimes 7.98 +.02
LbtyASG 4.01 ... Newcastle 6.93
LillyEli 43.16 +.17 NewellRub 18.12 -.04
Limited 44.14 +.19 NewfidExp 29.97 +.56
LincNat 21.73 +.31 NewmtM 49.73 +1.24
Lindsay 68.00 +2.05 NewpkRes 6.30
Linkedln 108.54 +.91 Nexeng 17.81 +.80
LloydBkg 1.96 +.02 NextEraEn 68.57 -.27
LockhdM 87.51 +.35 NiSource 24.81 -.01
Loews 41.34 +.33 NikeB 90.48 +1.63
LaPac 11.13 +18 NobleCorp 33.67 +1.26
Lowes 27.62 -1.00 NobleEn 88.10 +3.98
LnB A 41.94 1.09 NokiaCp 2.13 -.01
Nordstm 50.56 +.08
NorfikSo 71.91 +.49
M&TBk 84.40 +.96 NoestUt 39.26 +.16
MBIA 11.05 +.14 NorthropG 63.94 +.40
MDU Res 22.09 +.21 Novarts 56.33 +.18
MEMC 2.58 -.06 Nucor 38.90 +1.03
MFAFnd 8.07 +.08 NustarEn 54.68 +.40
MCR 9.80 -.04 NuvMuOpp 15.14 +.09
MGIC 3.08 +.13 NvPfdlnco 9.19 +.07
MGMRsts 11.13 +.08 NuvQPf2 9.10 +.06
Macquarie 34.77 +.55 OGEEngy 52.19 +.03
Macys 33.36 -.53 OasisPet 26.14 +1.71
MagelMPtr 71.32 -.43 OcciPet 88.04 +2.10
Magnalntg 41.01 +1.68 Oceaneerg 49.81 +1.43
MagHRes 4.42 +.22 OfficeDpt 2.24 +.02
Manitowoc 11.65 +.42 OfficeMax 5.27 +.07
Manulifeg 11.28 +.36 OiSA 13.27 +.39
MarahnO 26.01 +.71 OldRepub 8.17
MarahPet 45.36 .71 Olin 20.74 -.27
MkVGold 46.45 +1.69 OmegaHIt 23.03 +.02
MVOilSvs 37.06 +1.36 Omnicom 48.96 -.19
MV Semin 32.55 +.36 ONEOKs 43.00 +.27
MktVRus 27.34 +.88 Oneok Pts 55.70 +.74
MktVJrGId 20.10 +.97 Oshkoshp 21.53 +1.01
MarlntA 39.25 OwensCorn 29.27 +.54
MarshM 32.40 -.07 Owenslll 19.70 +.56
MStewrt 3.46 +.07
Masm 13.97 -.12
McDrmlnt 11.70 +.55 PG&ECp 45.24 -.28
McDnlds 88.58 +.50 PNC 62.14 +.65
McGrwH 45.69 +.51 PNM Res 20.01 +.04
McKesson 95.67 +.64 PPG 104.88 +.18
McMoRn 13.86 +.12 PPLCorp 28.12 -.05
McEwenM 3.29 +.36 PallCorp 54.77 +.60
MeadJohn 81.73 +.90 Pandora 10.64 -.06
Mechel 6.66 +.23 ParkerHan 77.18 +1.49
Medtnic 39.05 +.14 PariotCoal 1.84 +.46


PeabdyE 26.21 +1.35 RegionsFn 6.86 +.01
Pengrthg 6.56 +.20 ReneSola 1.46 +.16
PennVa 7.26 +.26 Renren 4.40 -.01
PennVaRs 24.54 -.03 RepubSvc 26.10 -.04
PennWstg 14.18 +.37 Revlon 14.56 +.11
Penney 21.88 -.84 ReynAmer 45.68 +.16
PepBoy 9.97 +.01 Riointo 49.47 +1.28
PepsiCo 70.76 ... RiteAid 1.45
Prmian 18.36 +.45 RockwAut 65.09 +.63
PetrbrsA 19.01 +.46 RockColl 49.47 +.29
Petrobras 19.67 +.60 Rowan 33.97 +1.26
Pfizer 22.87 -.13 RylCarb 26.31 +.03
PhilipMor 89.49 +.49 RoyDShllA 68.46 +.67
Phillips66n 34.24 +.24 Royce 12.75 +.09
PiedNG 32.55 +.09 RoycepfB 25.74 -.09
Pier1 17.17 +.45 Ryder 35.26 -.05
PimcoStrat 11.65 +.11 Ryland 26.04 +.06
PinWst 52.13 -.12
PioNtrl 91.05 +4.33
PitnyBw 14.61 -.08 SAIC 12.16 +.06
PlainsEx 38.17 +2.04 SCANA 48.38 -.08
PlumCrk 40.34 +.42 SKTIcm 12.52 +.29
Polariss 73.52 +1.83 SpdrDJIA 129.15 +.79
PostPrp 50.40 +.99 SpdrGold 157.46 +2.37
Potash 45.07 +1.10 SPMid 174.47 +1.98
PwshDB 26.42 +.72 S&P500ETF137.41 +.90
PSHYCpBd 18.84 +.06 SpdrHome 21.61 +.08
Praxair 109.62 +1.28 SpdrLehHY 39.48 +.18
PrecDrill 7.05 +.21 SpdrS&P RB 27.78 +.19
PrinFnd 26.63 +.48 SpdrRetl 59.89 +.40
ProLogis 33.51 +.16 SpdrOGEx 52.38 +1.76
ProShtS&P 36.11 -.25 SpdrMetM 43.06 +1.50
PrUShS&P 15.32 -.23 Safeway 17.97 +.12
PrUItQQQs 54.46 +.88 StJoe 15.86 -.07
PrUShQQQ 31.60 -.53 StJude 39.84 -.19
ProUItSP 55.60 +.75 Saks 10.92 -.09
ProUShL20 15.73 +.22 Salesforce 141.35 +2.28
PrUltSP500 78.33 +1.55 SallyBty 26.17 +.04
PrUVxSTrs 8.16 -.39 SJuanB 15.74 +.46
PrUltCrude 29.40 +2.50 SandRdge 6.72 +.18
PrUShCrde 45.93 -4.73 Sanofi 38.24 +.22
ProUItSIvs 40.50 +2.26 Schlmbrg 67.34 +2.40
ProUShEuro 21.04 -.10 Schwab 13.03 +.10
ProctGam 61.36 +.17 SeadrillLd 37.00 +1.00
ProgsvCp 20.75 +.06 SealAir 15.95 +.41
ProUSR2K 29.00 -.83 Sensient 37.37 +.34
PUSSP500rs45.97 -.97 SiderurNac 6.10 +.27
Prudent 49.00 +.74 SilvWhtng 28.41 +1.48
PSEG 32.50 -.10 SimonProp 158.51 +.43
PubStrg 145.11 -.03 Skechers 20.45 -.05
PulteGrp 10.85 -.06 SmithAO 49.22 +.15
PPrlT 5.42 +.03 SmithfF 21.58 -.04
QEPRes 30.00 +.63 Smucker 76.02 -.37
Qihoo360 16.82 +.82 SoJerlnd 52.92 +.92
QuanexBld 18.06 +.14 SouthnCo 46.49 -.22
QuantaSvc 23.65 -.24 SthnCopper 32.10 +.61
Questar 21.26 +.09 SwstAirl 9.28 -.03
QksilvRes 5.76 +.33 SwstnEngy 32.75 +.85
RPM 27.85 +.44 SpectraEn 29.15 +.05
RadianGrp 3.46 +.07 SprintNex 3.47 +.07
RadioShk 3.86 +.05 SP Mais 35.61 +.50
Ralcorp 67.79 -.24 SPHIthC 38.12 -.01
RangeRs 62.69 +1.80 SPCnSt 35.13 +17
RJamesFn 34.69 +.19 SPConsum 43.87 -.04
Rayonier s 45.61 +.23 SP Engy 67.99 +1.59
Raytheon 56.49 +.51 SPDRFncl 14.81 +.09
Rltylnmo 42.09 +.05 SP Inds 35.73 +.37
RegalEnt 14.03 +.08 SPTech 29.12 +.23




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.75 +.06
AbdnEMTel 19.08 +.14
AdmRsc 43.00 +.90
Adventx .50 +.01
AlexoRg 4.77 +.26
AlldNevG 29.71 +1.48
AmApparel .90 +.00
Armourwt .03 +.01
Augustag 1.89 +.19
Aurizong 4.74 +.24
AvalnRare 1.55 +.08
Banrog 3.94 +.19


BarcUBS36 41.36 +1.07 CrSuiHiY 3.13 -.01
BarcGSOil 21.53 +1.04 Crosshrg .21 +.01
BrigusGg .88 +.01
BritATob 105.14 +1.05
CAMACEn .65 +.01 DejourEg .23 +.01
CardiumTh .24 -.01 DenisnMg 1.31 +.08
CelSd .38 +.00 EVLtdDur 16.37 +.06
CFCdag 20.13 +.62 EVMuniBd 13.49 +.05
CheniereEn 15.56 +.76 EVMuni2 13.19 -.09
CheniereE 23.43 +.47 EllswthFd 7.12 +.02
ClaudeRg .66 +.02 EnovaSys .06 -.01
ClghGlbOp 10.92 +. 11 y .
ComstkMn 2.49 -.01 ExeterRgs 1.71 +.04
ConsEP 1.55 -.02 ExtorreGg 4.19 +.07
CornstProg 5.41 +.02 FrkStPrp 10.85 +.16


GamGldNR 13.69 +.23
GascoEngy .18 +.00
Gastargrs 2.04 -.01
GenMoly 3.25 +.03
GigOpDcs 2.64 +.03
GoldResrc 26.96 +.46
GoldStdVg 1.90 -.05
GoldenMin 5.26 +.50
GoldStrg 1.20 +.04
GIdFId 2.40 -.05
GranTrrag 4.98 +.10
GrtBasGg .70 +.02
GtPanSilvg 1.81 +.07


HstnAEn 1.47 +.29
iBb .74 -.01
ImmunoCII 3.84 +.14
ImpOilgs 43.37 +.79
InovioPhm .47 +.01
IntellgSys 1.58 -.05
IntTowerg 3.06 +.29
IsoRay .97 -.02
Iteris 1.54 +.03

KeeganRg 3.09 +.06
LadThalFn 1.65 +.04
LkShrGldg .93 +.05
LongweiPI 1.63 +.16
LucasEngy 1.48 +.06


NthnO&G 17.06 +.87 Rubicon 3.30 +.19
NovaGldg 5.70 +.32
MAGShg 9.38 +.94 nE SamsO&G 1.24 +04
MadCatzg .56 +.02 SaratogaRs 5.53 -.03
MeetMe 2.40 +.05 ParaG&S 2.50 +.05 SondeRgrs 1.72 +.01
Metalio 2.28 +.08 PhrmAth 1.46 +.08 SynergyRs 3.03 +.07
MdwGoldg 1.56 +.04 PlatGpMet .94 +.04 TanzRyg 4.38 +.24
NavideaBio 4.21 +.12 PolyMetg .86 +.03 Taseko 2.76 +.09
NeoStem .55 +.05 Protalix 5.90 +.09 TimberlnR .28
NBRESec 4.50 +.05 PyramidOil 4.46 -.02 TrnsafiPet 1.12 +.05
Neuralstem 1.00 +.05 RareEleg 5.06 +.04 TravelCts 5.10 -.09
Nevsung 3.33 -.01 ReavesUtl 27.97 +.18 TriangPet 5.89 +.35
NwGoldg 10.07 +.60 Rentech 2.14 ... Tuowsg 1.11 +.05
NAPallg 2.18 +.11 RexahnPh .42 +.07 UQMTech .91 +.05
NDynMng 2.52 +.07 Richmntg 4.14 -.64 Univlnsur 3.49 +.10


Ur-Energy .78 +.03
Uranerz 1.50 +.09
UraniumEn 2.27 +.09


VangMega 47.15 +.31
VantageDrl 1.48 -.01
VirnetX 38.20 +.10
VistaGold 3.02 +.07
VoyagerOG 1.90 +.18
Vringo 3.85 -.03
WFAdvlnco 10.02 -.11
YMBiog 2.14 +.12
ZBBEngy .38 -.01


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 38.99 -.21
ASML HId 52.62 +.43
ATP O&G 3.80 -.21
AVI Bio h .63 +.02
Abiomed 23.53 +.07
Abraxas 3.35 +.13
AcadaTc 40.00 +.28
AcadiaH n 19.37 +1.02
AcadiaPh 1.86 +.05
Accuray 6.73 -.01
Achillion 6.89 +.23
AcmePkt 18.41 +.21
AordaTh 25.77 +.72
AcivsBliz 12.46 +.52
Acxiom 15.89 +.30
AdobeSy 32.51 +.32
Adtan 29.52 -.03
AdvEnld 13.94 +.10
AeroViron 26.10 +.11
AEternagh .51
Aftymax 13.41 +.13
Aftymetix 4.69 +.04
AkamaiT 32.16 +.62
Akorn 16.38 +.15
AlaskCom 2.33 -.09
Alexion 103.74 -.09
AlignTech 35.04 -.18
Alkermes 17.88 +.32
AllosThera 1.78 -.01
AllscriptH 10.79 +.07
AlteraCplf 34.21 +.48
AlterraCap 23.65 +.01
AltaHldgs 16.37 +.17
Amarin 15.46 +.22
Amazon 229.53 +.21
ACapAgy 33.94 +.38
AmCapLd 10.20 +.05
ACapMtgn 24.35 +.36
ARItyCTn 10.91 +.08
AmSupr 4.73 +.05
Amerigon 11.68 +.28
Amgen 75.16 +.80
AmicusTh 6.20 +.20
AmkorTch 4.78 -.01
AmpioPhm 5.39 -.04
Amtech 3.96 +.17
Amylin 30.73 +.03
Amyris 4.01 -.33
Anadigc 1.76 +.03
AnalogDev 37.28 +.04
Anlogic 64.34 +1.13
Analystlnt 4.31 +.03
Ancestry 28.46 +.18
AntaresP 3.76 -.02
AntheraPh .74 +.05
A123Sys 1.31 +.01
ApogeeE 16.25 -.05
ApolloGrp 36.62 +.28
Apollolnv 7.75 -.02
Apple Inc 599.41 +6.89
ApldMaf 11.47 +.19
AMCC 6.11 +.47
Approach 28.58 +2.79
ArQule 6.30 +.08
ArchCap 40.41 +.43
ArcicCat 38.30 +.41
ArenaPhm 10.02 +.08
AresCap 16.15 +.01
AriadP 18.10 +.11
AribaInc 44.56 -.21
ArmHId 24.31 +.33
ArrayBio 3.39 -.11
Arris 13.98 -.02
ArubaNet 15.03 +.13
AscenaRts 18.64 +.03
AsialnfoL 12.49 +.83
AspenTech 23.61 +.18
AssodBanc 13.37 +.05
AstexPhm 2.07 -.01
Atmel 6.73 +.09
Autodesk 34.70 +.19
AutoData 56.00 +.24
Auxilium 27.52 +.35
AvagoTch 35.74 +.25


AvanirPhm 3.99 -.01 CmplGnom 1.97 -.10
AVEOPh 13.04 +.24 Compuwre 9.45 +.08
AvisBudg 16.20 +.83 Comverse 5.92 +.09
Aware 6.82 +.08 Concepts 19.97 -.25
BEAero 44.32 +.74 Conmed 28.22 +.25
BGCPtrs 6.17 +.01 Conns 15.95 +.05
BMCSft 42.29 -.29 ConslCmh 15.97 +.65
Baidu 114.72 +2.03 ConstantC 18.62 +.78
BeacnRfg 25.89 +.60 CopanoEn 28.09 +.19
BeasleyB 6.00 ... Coparts 24.36 +.18
BebeSts 5.93 -.09 Corcept 4.30 +.02
BedBath 62.36 +.75 CorinthC 3.17 -.04
BioDlvrylf 4.67 +.17 Coronadon 5.75 +.41
Bioryst 3.99 -.07 Costo 94.42 +.02
Biogenldc 145.63 +.02 CowenGp 2.69 +.02
BioMarin 41.64 -.05 CrayInc 12.75 +.28
BioSanters 2.33 -.01 Creelnc 25.21 +.23
BioScrip 7.45 -.11 Crocs 15.86 +.32
BIkRKelso 9.94 -.06 CrosstxLP 15.86 -.20
BobEvans 40.27 +.27 Ctip.om 16.32 -.18
BodyCentrl 10.62 +.80 CubistPh 39.78 +.81
BonTon 8.33 +.08 Curis 5.35 -.15
BttnlnT 18.20 +.26 Cyberonics 47.14 +.18
BreitBurn 16.99 +.10 CypSemi 13.61 +.25
Brighpnt 8.87 -.14 Cytolneth .64 +.01
Broadcom 33.85 +.32 1ti 2.87 -.09
BroadVisn 10.78 -.82
Broadwdh .31 +.03
BrcdeCm 4.95 +.10 DeckrsOut 44.18 +.46
BrukerCp 13.56 -.08 Delcath 1.72 +.06
BuffabWW 87.22 +.84 Dell Inc 12.68 +.29
BldrFstSrc 5.39 +.22 Dndreon 7.31 -.14
CAInc 27.18 +.20 Dennys 4.76 +.01
CBOE 27.92 +.02 Dentsply 37.72 -.19
CH Robins 61.86 +1.01 DexCom 13.06 +.08
CMEGrp 269.90 -1.34 DirecTVA 50.29 +.60
CTCMedia 7.42 -.56 DiscCmAh 54.55 -.31
CVBFnd 11.80 +.10 DiscCmCh 51.01 -.03
CadencePh 3.75 +.12 DiscovLab 2.51 +.11
Cadence 11.52 +.29 DishNetwk 28.85 +.13
CalaStTR 9.80 +.11 DollarTrs 52.02 -.11
CalAmp 7.54 -.13 DonlleyRR 11.95 +.28
Callidus 4.95 -.01 DrmWksA 19.49 -.01
CdnSolar 3.78 +.16 DryShips 2.31 +.06
CapCtyBk 7.56 +.15 Dunkinn 34.30 +.11
CapFedFn 11.96 -.02 DurectCph 1.03 +.11
CpstnTrb h 1.05 +.03 Dynavax 4.35 -.03
Carboniten 8.95 -.10 E-Trade 8.14 +.11
Cardiomgh .51 -.00 eBay 41.20 -.03
CareerEd 6.58 -.09 eResrch 7.98 -.02
Carrizo 24.62 +1.10 EVEngy 53.16 +2.36
CarverBrs 3.26 +.26 EagleBurs 3.26 +.15
CasualMal 3.43 -.08 EaglRkEn 9.34 +.20
CathayGen 16.63 -.02 ErthLink 7.49 +.01
Cavium 28.29 +.57 EstWstBcp 23.71 +.18
Celgene 65.76 +.88 EbixInc 20.51 +.21
CellTherrsh .62 +.01 EchoGLog 18.40 -1.05
CelldexTh 5.61 +.14 EducMgmt 6.68 -.50
Celsion 3.55 +.26 EducDevh 4.03 -.07
CentEuro 3.02 +.01 ElectSd 11.76 +.21
CentAI 7.72 +.33 ElectArts 12.59 +.31
Cepheid 45.64 -.36 EmmisCm 1.73 +.03
CeragonN 8.53 -.03 EndoPhrm 30.48 +.08
Cerner 83.56 +.84 Endocyte 8.26 +.01
CerusCp 3.52 +.08 EngyXXI 33.43 +1.05
ChkPoint 49.53 +1.07 EnsignGp 28.73 -.27
Cheesecake 32.19 +.17 Entegris 8.58 -.06
ChelseaTh .87 -.60 EntopCom 5.67 -.02
ChildPlace 51.04 +.97 EnzonPhar 6.99 -.04
ChrchllD 60.05 +.47 Equinix 177.38 +.85
CienaCorp 16.81 +.23 Ericsson 9.24 +.16
CinnFin 38.42 +.08 ExactScih 11.18 +.10
Cintas 39.42 +.11 Exelids 5.89 -.13
Cirrus 29.11 +.42 EddeTc 3.43 +.04
Ciso 17.15 +.07 Eqxedias 48.67 -.52
CitixSys 85.62 +1.63 Expdlni 39.26 +.48
CleanEngy 16.35 +.09 EqxScripts 55.01 -.38
Clearwire 1.13 +.01 ExtmNet 3.60 +.16
CogentC 19.60 +.18 EZchip 39.70 +.78
CognizTech 59.75 +.36 Ezcorp 24.15 +.77
CogoGrp 1.67 ... F5Netwks 100.64 +2.63
Coinstar 70.46 +1.81 FLIRSys 19.71 +.30
ColdwCrkh .53 +.02 FSIlInf 3.83 +.11
ColumLbh .73 +.05 FXEner 6.07 +.06
Comcast 32.03 -.23 Facebookn 31.20 +.43
Comcspcl 31.44 -.21 Fastenal 40.80 +1.77
CmcBMO 38.22 +.22 FiestaRn 13.87 +.71
CommSys 11.43 +.13 FifthStFin 10.24 +.10


FiftlhTird 13.50 +.01 ImunoGn 17.67 +.22
Fndlnst 17.40 +.24 Imunmd 3.55 -.04
Finisar 14.71 +.35 ImpaxLabs 20.45 +.33
FinLine 20.69 +.24 Incyte 24.65 -.19
FstCashFn 41.16 +.64 Infinera 7.00 +.10
FFnclOH 16.51 +.25 InfinityPh 14.37 +.38
FMidBc 11.09 +.09 Informat 43.01 +1.11
FstNiagara 7.73 +.18 Infosys 46.05 +.63
FstSolar 15.67 +.39 InnerWkgs 12.76 -1.16
FstMerit 16.76 +.13 Insulet 21.74 -.10
Fiserv 72.86 +.26 IntgDv 5.66 +.11
Flextn 6.50 +.31 Intel 26.86 +.20
FocusMda 23.42 +.01 InteractBlf 14.73 +.14
ForcePro 5.55 ... InterDig 29.33 -.21
FormFac 6.79 +.22 Intrface 13.75 +.10
Forfnet 24.20 +.59 InterMune 12.77 +.51
Fossil Inc 72.00 -2.88 InflSpdw 26.25 -.19
FosterWhl 17.50 +.83 Intersil 10.65 +.04
Francescn 28.81 +1.36 Intuit 60.15 +.47
FreshMkt 55.87 +1.27 InvRIEst 8.09 +.11
FronterCm 3.99 +.04 IridiumCm 9.18 +.06
FuelSysSol 17.72 +.45 Isis 12.92 -.02
FuelCell 1.07 +.04 Itron 43.44 +2.03
FultonFncl 10.14 +.09 IvanhoeEh .63 -.09

JASolar 1.13 +.05
GSVCap 9.51 +.07 JDASoft 29.90 +.13
GTAdvTc 5.49 +.13 JDSUniph 11.24 +.33
GalenaBio 1.58 -.05 JacklnBox 27.75 -.27
Garmin 38.64 +.33 Jamba 2.10 +.06
GenProbe 82.35 +.13 JamesRiv 3.14 +.28
Gentex 21.29 +.39 JazzPhrm 46.24 +.81
Genivah 7.18 -.06 JetBlue 5.50 +.07
GeoEye 16.32 +.02 JiveSoftn 21.33 +.68
GeronCp 1.76 -.01 JoesJeans 1.09 +.04
Gevo 4.88 -.07 JosABank 42.81 -.06
GileadSd 52.08 +.45 KITDigit 4.44 -.06
GlbSpcMet 13.67 +.49 KLATnc 48.96 +.01
GluMobile 5.75 +.06 KeryxBio 2.00 +.18
GolLNGLd 37.87 -.21 KiOR 9.95 +.45
Google 587.83 +7.36 KnightT 8.36 -.05
GrCanyEd 21.34 +.21 KohlbergC 7.42 +.09
GrLkDrge 7.34 +.07 Kraft 39.21 +.33
GreenMtC 22.48 +1.08 KratosDef 5.97 +.03
GreenPlns 6.20 -.09 Kulicke 9.07 +.17
GrifolsSA 9.76 +.08 LKQ Corp 34.43 +.68
Grouponn 8.79 -.72 LSI Indlf 7.38 +.29
Grpoin 4.70 +.02 LamResrch 37.82 +.19
GulfportE 21.15 +1.02 LamarAdv 29.04 +.26
HMNFn 3.00 -.23 Landstar 52.37 +.52
HMS Hds 33.78 +.17 Lattce 3.87
HSN Inc 41.23 +.57 LeCroy 14.26 +.01
HainCel 55.39 -.34 LeapWirlss 6.68
Halozyme 9.72 +.21 LexPhrm 2.48 +.15
HancHId 31.44 +.32 LibGlobA 50.64 +.15
HansenMed 2.44 +.14 LibGlobC 48.96 +.23
HanwhaSol 1.28 +.03 LibCapA 91.03 +1.03
Harmonic 4.31 -.06 LibtylntA 17.93 +.09
Hasbro 33.86 -.27 LifeTech 44.45 +.60
HawHold 6.63 -.09 LifePtH 39.86 -.96
HIthCSvc 19.51 -.03 LimelghtN 3.08 +.09
HrfindEx 14.49 +.18 Lincare 41.31 -.03
HSchein 79.50 +.59 LincElec 43.78 +.47
HercOffsh 3.72 +.01 LinearTch 31.66 +.31
Hoku Cph .10 -.02 LinnEngy 38.91 +.41
Hologic 18.53 +.09 Liquidity 40.17 +1.73
Homelnns 20.62 -.93 LiveDeal 15.34 +3.61
HomeAway 22.04 +.17 LivePrsn 19.29 +.39
HomeownC 18.09 -.30 LodgeNet 1.38 +.05
HorizPhn 8.25 -.05 LogMeln 31.00 +.50
HubGroup 36.38 +.64 LookSmth .95 +.06
HudsCity 6.39 +.07 Lulkin 55.66 +2.79
HumGen 13.53 -.03 lululemns 57.93 -.17
HuntJB 59.00 -.13
HuntBnk 6.51 +.04
IAC Inter 46.62 +1.17 MAPPhm 16.21 +.44
ICGGrp 9.43 +.15 MELASci 3.31 -.14
IdexxLabs 97.54 -.48 MGE 48.05 +.11
II-VI 16.97 +.36 MIPSTech 6.70 -.02
IPG Photon 45.30 +2.11 MTS 40.58 +1.20
iShAsiaexJ 53.64 +1.06 MAKOSrg 25.96 -.20
iShACWI 44.56 +.43 MannKd 2.57 +.11
iShsSOX 52.88 +.64 MktAxess 27.10 +.22
iShNsdqBio 134.06 +1.05 MarvellT 11.12 -.05
IconixBr 17.80 +.35 Masimo 23.50 +.15
IdenixPh 10.95 -.03 Mattel 32.74 +.23
Illumina 41.10 -.07 Mattson 1.75


Maximlntg 25.77 +.28 PDLBio 6.78 +.06
MaxwlT 7.10 +.08 PLXTch 6.35 +.05
MedCath 7.49 +.02 PMCSra 6.10 +.04
MedicAcIn 3.69 +.04 PSSWrld 21.58 -.06
MediCo 23.81 +.80 Paccar 38.81 +.50
Medivafon 95.00 +.39 PacEthanh .34 -.01
MeloCrwn 11.15 +.07 PacSunwr 1.86 +.02
Mellanox 75.02 +2.70 PaciraPhm 16.13 -.11
MentorGr 15.55 +.06 PanASIv 16.79 +.56
MercadoL 80.63 +1.37 PaneraBrd 138.96 +1.42
MergeHIth 3.09 +.13 ParamTch 20.54 +1.11
Microchp 33.06 +.25 Parexel 29.14 +.39
MicronT 6.89 +.34 ParkerVsn 2.79 +.06
MicrosSys 51.34 +.04 PrtnrCm 3.79 -.11
MicroSemi 19.18 +.61 Patterson 35.17 +.28
Microsoft 30.76 +.20 PattUTI 14.79 +.67
MillerHer 19.50 +1.04 Paychex 31.40 +.02
Mindspeed 2.61 +.04 Pendrell 1.10 -.02
Misonix 2.21 -.12 PnnNGm 44.46 -.02
MitekSys 4.16 +.31 PennantPk 10.66 +.14
MModal 14.02 +1.09 PeopUdF 11.86 +.05
Molex 24.30 +.43 PeregrinPh .66 +.08
Momenta 14.28 +.33 PerfectWd 10.13 +.16
MonstBvs 74.88 +.10 Perrigo 118.74 +.16
Movers 9.31 +.04 PetSmart 68.05 -.01
MulimGm 15.11 +.11 Pharmacyc 57.82 -1.46
Mylan 22.07 +.33 Photrn 6.60 +.30
MyriadG 25.64 +.36 Pbtelwrks 2.44 +.04
NABIBio 1.64 -.03 Polymms 10.75 +.35
NETgear 36.95 +1.80 Popularrs 16.74 +.15
NICInc 13.22 +.12 Power-One 4.76 +.17
NIlHIdg 10.55 +.05 PSSCEgy 32.80 +1.33
NPSPhm 9.00 +.10 PwShs QQQ64.89 +.54
NXPSemi 23.57 +.46 Pwrwvrsh .79 +.02
Nanosphere 2.98 +.46 Presstekh .42 +.01
NasdOMX 22.76 -.13 PriceTR 63.12 +.09
NatCineM 15.52 +.17 priceline 690.55 +9.69
NatPenn 9.79 +.07 PrimoWt 1.30 +.12
NatusMed 12.26 +.12 PrUPQQQs 51.60 +1.20
NektarTh 8.21 +.02 ProceraN 25.26 +.16
Neonode 6.50 +.22 PrognicsPh 10.47 +.29
NeptuneTg 4.92 -.02 ProgrsSoft 20.90 +.16
NetApp 31.10 +.15 PUShQQQrs45.35 -1.10
NetEase 58.67 -.34 ProspctCap 11.70 +.08
Netiix 72.04 +4.19 PureCycle 2.08 +.02
NetSpend 9.45 -.05 QIAGEN 17.21 +.11
NetwEngh 1.41 ... QlikTech 20.63 -.02
NetworkEq 1.31 -.01 Qlogic 14.00 +.27
Neurcrine 8.20 -.07 Qualom 56.26 +.60
NewsCpA 22.73 -.12 QualitySs 28.01 +.16
NewsCpB 22.90 -.05 QuantFuh .77 +.01
NobltyHIf 5.61 -.08 QuestSft 27.83 +.01
NorTrst 46.62 +.27 Questor 51.68 -.03
NwstBcsh 11.94 +.07 QuinStreet 9.71 +.26
NovaMeas 8.43 -.06 RFMicD 4.33 +.08
Novavax 1.71 ... Rambus 5.82 +.06
NuVasive 25.69 +.06 Randgold 93.70 +2.87
NuanceCm 24.00 +.68 RaptorPhm 5.57 +.02
Nvidia 13.80 +.36 RealPage 22.92 -.18
NxStageMd 17.04 +.48 Regenrn 122.30 +1.54
OCZTech 6.27 +.42 RentACt 34.47 +.59
OReillyAu 84.36 -.74 RepubAir 5.57 -.14
ObagiMed 15.00 -.12 RschMotn 7.35 -.14
Oclaro 3.00 ... ResConn 12.23 +.07
Oculus .75 +.01 Responsys 12.16 +.01
OdysMar 3.92 +.03 RexEnergy 11.99 +.37
OmniVisn 13.61 +.15 RigelPh 9.88 +.17
OnAssign 16.46 +.63 RiverbedT 16.18 +.36
OnSmcnd 7.11 +.16 RosttaGrs 11.98 +.23
Onolytg 3.57 +.22 RosettaR 39.32 +2.83
Onothyr 4.87 -.10 RossStrss 62.78 -.44
OnyxPh 68.09 +.18 RoviCorp 18.91 +.11
OpenTxt 52.02 +1.18 RoyGId 79.78 +1.23
OpenTbleh 41.02 +.21 RubionTc 11.16 +.52
Opnext 1.27 +.01 rue21 25.75 +.02
Oracle 29.97 +.18 Ranair 3044 +.31
OraSure 12.10 +.60
Orbotch 7.50 -.22
Orexigen 5.78 +.46 SBACom 58.19 +.40
Orthfx 42.19 +.41 SEIInv 19.92 +.05
Osiris 10.47 -.40 SLM Cp 16.02 +.04
Oteloun 7.40 -.08 STEC 8.34 +.14
OtterTail 23.17 +01 SXCHIth 96.86 -.12
Overstk 7.31 +.03 SabaSftwlf 9.92 +.16

SanDisk 37.12 +.21
PDCEngy 26.17 +1.09 Sanfilp 18.98 +.17


Sanmina 8.18 +.14 TiVoInc 8.44 +.19
Sanofirt 1.38 TractSupp 83.25 -.65
Santarus 7.15 -.08 TransceptP 6.15 +.04
Sapient 10.41 +.33 TransGlb 9.67 +.87
Saton h .23 +.01 TrimbleN 47.28 +.36
SavientPh .50 -.02
Schnitzer 29.21 +.87 TripAdvn 46.05 +.05
SciClone 7.22 -.04 TriQuint 5.54 +.11
SciGames 8.56 +.18 TrstNY 5.60 +.03
SeagateT 25.13 +.58 Trusbmk 25.28 +.33
SearsHldgs 60.23 +.26 UTiWrldwd 15.08 +.09
SeattGen 25.83 -.44 Ubiquifin 14.91 +1.31
SelCmfrt 21.76 +.66 UltaSalon 93.59 +1.52
Selectvlns 18.00 +.22 Umpqua 13.55 +19
Semtech 24.73 +.27 mpqu 5 +
Sequenom 4.18 +.03 Unilife 3.49 +01
SvcSource 13.70 +.24 UdNlF 55.43 -33
SvArtsrsh .04 +.00 UtdOnln 4.31 +.04
Shire 86.32 -1.16 USEnr 2.46 +.07
ShuffiMstr 14.17 +.33 UtdTherap 51.48 +.74
Shutterfly 30.69 +.02 UnivDisp 36.27 +1.00
SigaTechh 3.10 +.14 UnivFor 39.38 +.28
SigmaAld 74.34 +.81 UnwiredP 2.45 +.01
SilicGrln 6.75 +.17 UranmRsh 62 00
Silicnlmg 4.40 +.10 an 7
SilcnLab 38.28 +.54 Ub 263
SilicnMoh 14.69 +.31 a
Slcnware 5.47 +.13
SilvStdg 12.02 +.61 VCAAnt 21.69 -.11
Sina 50.49 +.42 VOXX Int 9.19 +.15
Sindair 10.07 +.66 ValueClick 16.76 +.19
SiriusXM 2.04 +.06 Veeolnst 36.41 +.85
SironaDent 44.54 -.23 Vel 6 6.67 +.42
Skullcdyn 14.83 +.27 VBradley 20.30 +.57
SkyWest 6.74 +.01 Verisign
SkywksSol 27.68 +.44 Veri 44.29 +.91
SmartBal 10.38 +.38 esk 50.07 .08
SmithWes 8.95 +.07 VertxPh 55.46 -.10
SodaStrm 42.12 +1.71 ViacomB 48.60 +.81
Sohu.cm 43.26 +.50 Vcal 3.70 -.02
Solazyme 14.18 +.35 VirgnMdah 25.09 +.26
Somaxonh .27 -.01 ViroPhrm 23.79 +.09
SonicCorp 10.33 -.02 VisnChina .93
Sons 2.19 +.06 VistaPrt 32.64 +.64
SouMoBc 23.80 +2.30 ivu 29.93 60
Sourcefire 50.43 -1.97 us
SpectPh 15.75 -.25 Vodafone 28.24 -.05
SpiritAir 20.49 +.18 Volcano 30.50 +1.10
Spreadtrm 17.61 +.20 Volterra 23.84 +.26
Staples 13.17 +.15 WarnerCh 18.25 +.23
StarSdent 4.99 +.03 WarrenRs 2.58 +.15
Starbucks 51.94 -.85 Web.com 18.71 -.04
SfDynam 12.54 +.45 WebMD 20.78 +.42
StemCllrsh .82 Wend Co 4.74 +.05
Stereotaxh .18 -.02 end o 4.4
Stericyde 92.93 +.37 WernerEnt 24.34 +.42
SMadden 31.88 +.19 WDigital 30.98 +1.14
StewEnt 7.40 +.01 Wesimrd 9.22 +.59
Stratasys 51.24 +1.74 Wstptlnng 38.19 +.24
SunHIth 8.36 +.01 WetSeal 3.16 -.03
SunesisPh 3.07 -.03 WholeFd 95.79 +1.16
SunPower 5.30 +.15 WillsLpfA 11.10
SusqBnc 10.49 +.08 WshBcp 5.50 +.01
Symantec 14.80 +.31 ndsm 9.78 .04
Symetricm 6.11 +.11
Synamrn 14.33 +.15 Woodward 40.21 +.64
SynrgyPrs 4.75 -.05 Wynn 101.55 -.60
Synopsys 30.01 +.54 XOMA 3.44 +.44
SyntaPhm 6.32 +.55 XenoPort 6.50 +.43
TFSFncl 9.58 -.03 Xilinx 33.50 +.30
THQ h .56 -.02 Xyratex 11.53 +.44
twteleom 25.50 -.46 YRCrs 7.39 -.07
TakeTwo 9.78 +.38 Yahoo 15.98 +14
Tangoen 22.52 +.96
TASER 5.32 +.03 Yandex 19.27 +.30
TechData 49.09 +.78 ZaZaEgylf 4.83 +.24
Tegal 4.52 -.66 Zagg 11.45 +.25
TICmSys 1.48 +.09 Zalicus 1.19 -.01
Tellabs 3.41 +.06 hongpin 9.85 +.13
TeslaMot 30.66 +.26 Zllown 39.11 +.51
TetaTc 27.07 +.64 ZonO&G 1.82 +.16
TxCapBsh 41.65 +.60 ZonBcp 19.70 +.07
Texlnst 28.56 +.28
TexRdhse 18.35 +.04 opharm 6.09 -.01
Theravnce 27.10 +2.39 Zogenix 2.46 -.09
ThrshdPhm 7.76 +.25 Zoltek 9.33 +.15
TibcoSft 30.65 +.03 Zumiez 40.19 +.20
TitanMach 31.61 +1.48 Zyngan 5.40 -.17


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.5230 4.5270
Australia .9724 .9748
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 2.0101 1.9885
Britain 1.5693 1.5692
Canada 1.0125 1.0167
Chile 500.75 500.75
China 6.3535 6.3514
Colombia 1780.50 1778.50
Czech Rep 20.23 20.30
Denmark 5.8957 5.9086
Dominican Rep 39.12 39.10
Egypt 6.0571 6.0583
Euro .7930 .7947
Hong Kong 7.7552 7.7581
Hungary 225.95 226.75
India 54.215 55.385
Indnsia 9380.00 9390.00
Israel 3.9226 3.9241
Japan 79.87 79.49
Jordan .7085 .7081
Lebanon 1501.00 1501.00
Malaysia 3.1500 3.1615
Mexico 13.3281 13.3040
N. Zealand 1.2431 1.2434
Norway 5.9610 5.9773
Peru 2.649 2.653
Poland 3.33 3.35
Russia 32.1826 32.5906
Singapore 1.2622 1.2675
So. Africa 8.0778 8.1626
So. Korea 1138.40 1144.73
Sweden 6.9296 6.9270
Switzerlnd .9525 .9545
Taiwan 29.86 29.91
Thailand 31.42 31.54
Turkey 1.7978 1.8055
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 21.7499 21.7499
Venzuel 4.2949 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.09
6-month 0.15 0.16
5-year 0.70 0.72
10-year 1.63 1.63
30-year 2.74 2.70



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug 12 87.66 +3.91
Corn CBOT Dec 12 67412 +184
Wheat CBOT Sep 12 79914 +2634
Soybeans CBOT Nov12 14743/4 +36/4
Cattle CME Aug12 119.47 +.20
Sugar (world) ICE Oct12 21.98 +.58
Orange Juice ICE Sep12 120.75 +3.40


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1621.30 $1574.00
Silver (troy oz., spot) $28.243 $2/.03/
Copper(pound) $3.b34b $3.31bb
Platinum (troy oz., spot) $1488./0 $1426.80

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AKSteel .20 3.3 ... 6.05 +.26-26.8 McDnlds 2.80 3.2 17 88.58 +.50-11.7
AT&TInc 1.76 4.9 52 36.00 -.20+19.0 Microsoft .80 2.6 11 30.76 +.20 +18.5
Ameteks .24 .7 21 34.12 +.61 +21.6 MotrlaSolu .88 1.8 20 48.34 +.99 +4.4
ABlnBev 1.57 2.0 ... 79.51 +.21 +30.4 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 14 68.57 -.27 +12.6
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 8.06 +.01 +45.0 Penney ... ... ...21.88 -.84-37.8
CapCtyBk ......54 7.56 +.15-20.8 PiedmOfc .80 4.6 13 17.46 +.06 +2.5
CntryLink 2.90 7.3 32 39.69 +.03 +6.7 RegionsFn .04 .6 25 6.86 +.01 +59.5
Citigroup .04 .1 8 27.65 +.19 +5.1 SearsHldgs .33 ... ... 60.23 +.26 +89.5
CmwREIT 2.00 10.4 23 19.19 -.02 +15.3 Smucker 1.92 2.5 19 76.02 -.37 -2.8
Disney .60 1.2 17 48.59 -.13 +29.6 SprintNex ... ... ... 3.47 +.07 +48.3
EnterPT 3.00 7.2 30 41.95 +.16 -4.0 Texlnst .68 2.4 18 28.56 +.28 -1.9
ExxonMbl 2.28 2.6 10 86.28 +.94 +1.8 TimeWarn 1.04 2.7 14 38.84 +.09 +7.5
FordM .20 2.1 6 9.60 +.21-10.8 UniFirst .15 .2 15 66.92 +1.04 +17.9
GenElec .68 3.3 17 20.43 -.06 +14.1 VerizonCm 2.00 4.4 48 44.95 +.02 +12.0
HomeDp 1.16 2.2 19 51.65 -1.36 +22.9 Vodafone 1.99 7.0 ... 28.24 -.05 +.7
Intel .90 3.4 11 26.86 +.20+10.8 WalMart 1.59 2.2 15 70.75 +1.40 +18.4
IBM 3.40 1.7 14195.93 +.10 +6.6 Walgrn 1.10 3.7 10 29.61 -.25-10.4
Lowes .64 2.318 27.62 -1.00 +8.8 YRC rs..... 7.39 -.07-25.9


A8 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I M^BUUlFlS IIS


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: Eaton Vance A:
Balancp 16.67 +.06 ChinaAp 16.27 +.20
Retlnc 8.90 -.01 AMTFMulnc10.16 +.01
Alger Funds B: MulDCGrA 8.42 +.08
SmCapGr 6.94 +.11 InBosA 5.81
AllianceBern A: LgCpVal 18.54 +.10
BalanAp 16.63 +.10 NatlMunlnc 9.88 +.03
GlbThGrAp61.56 +1.05 SpEqtA 15.89 +.17
SmCpGrA 38.63 +.62 TradGvA 7.43
AllianceBern Adv: Eaton Vance B:
LgCpGrAd 28.40 +.32 HlthSBt 10.44 +.04
AllianceBern B: NatlMulnc 9.88 +.03
GlbThGrBt 52.87 +91 Eaton Vance C:
GrowthBt 26.67 +.28 GovtCp 7.41 -.01
SCpGrBt 30.84 +.49 NatMunlnc 9.88 +.03
AllianceBern C: Eaton Vance I:
SCpGrCt 31.00 +.49 FltgRt 8.97
Allianz Fds Instl: GblMacAbR 9.81 +.02
NFJDvVI 12.09 +.11 LgCapVal 18.59 +.11
SmCpVI 30.27 +.40 FBR Funds:
Allianz Funds C: Focuslnvtn49.22 +.18
AGICGrthC 25.62 +.16 FMI Funds:
Amer Beacon Insti: LgCappn 16.75 +.11
LgCaplnst 20.55 +.15 FPA Funds:
Amer Beacon Inv: Nwlnc 10.61
LgCaplnv 19.48 +.14 FPACres 27.74 +.19
Ameri Century 1st: Fairholme 29.12 +.27
Growth 27.61 +.20 Federated A:
Amer CenturyAdv: MidGrStA 34.45 +.39
EqGroAp 23.55 +.17 MuSecA 10.56
EqlncAp 7.67 +.03 Federated Instl:
Amer Century Inv: KaufmnR 5.24 +.04
AIICapGr 30.15 +.23 TotRetBd 11.47 -.01
Balanced 17.06 +.07 StrValDvlS 5.06
DivBnd 11.17 -.02 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Eqlnc 7.67 +.03 EnergyT 33.75 +.88
Growthl 27.35 +.19 HItCarT 23.81 +.08
Heritagel 22.34 +.21 Fidelity Advisor A:
IncGro 26.56 +.17 Nwlnsghp 22.04 +.15
InfAdjBd 13.17 -.01 StlnA 12.41 +.01
IntDisc 9.33 +.12 Fidelity Advisor C:
InfiGrol 10.23 +.13 Nwlnsghtn 20.82 +.14
NewOpp 7.91 +.12 Fidelity Advisor l:
OneChAg 12.71 +.08 EqGrln 64.27 +.66
OneChMd 12.25 +.06 Eqlnin 25.25 +.12
RealEstl 23.46 +.12 IntBdln 11.62 -.01
Ultra 25.20 +.22 Nwlnsgtln 22.34 +.16
Valuelnv 6.06 +.03 Strlnln 12.56 +.01
American Funds A: Fidelity AdvisorT:
AmcpAp 20.56 +.17 BalancT 16.13 +.07
AMufAp 27.52 +.09 DivGrTp 12.56 +.13
BalAp 19.53 +.08 EqGrTp 60.04 +.62
BondAp 12.81 -.01 EqlnT 24.83 +.11
CaplBAp 51.62 +.20 GrOppT 40.40 +.39
CapWGAp 34.24 +.25 HilnAdTp 9.97 +.02
CapWAp 20.96 +.01 IntBdT 11.59 -.01
EupacAp 37.54 +.48 MulncTp 13.55
FdlnvAp 38.18 +.29 OvrseaT 16.42 +.20
GIblBalA 25.49 +.10 STFiT 9.30
GovtAp 14.56 -.01 StkSelAIICp 19.45 +.16
GwthAp 31.92 +.28 Fidelity Freedom:
HITrAp 10.93 +.02 FF2010n 13.85 +.07
IncoAp 17.46 +.06 FF2010K 12.69 +.07
IntBdAp 13.72 -.01 FF2015n 11.57 +.05
IntlGrlncAp 28.21 +.32 FF2015K 12.74 +.06
ICAAp 29.41 +.19 FF2020n 13.97 +.08
LtTEBAp 16.26 ... FF2020K 13.12 +.08
NEcoAp 27.11 +.17 FF2025n 11.59 +.08
NPerAp 28.85 +.27 FF2025K 13.21 +.09
NwWrldA 49.57 +.61 FF2030n 13.79 +.10
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2030K 13.34 +.10
SmCpAp 37.29 +.43 FF2035n 11.39 +.10
TxExAp 12.90 ... FF2035K 13.38 +.11
WshAp 30.27 +.13 FF2040n 7.94 +.06
Ariel Investments: FF2040K 13.42 +.12
Apprec 42.66 +.40 FF2045 n 9.39 +.08
Ariel 47.33 +.42 FF2045K 13.55 +.12
Artisan Funds: Fidelity Invest:
Infl 22.22 +.30 AIISectEq 12.42 +.08
Inllnst 22.35 +.30 AMgr50n 15.96 +.06
InfiVal r 26.85 +.27 AMgr70r n 16.67 +.09
MidCap 37.30 +.38 AMgr20rn 13.17 +.02
MidCapVal 20.57 +.22 Balancn 19.56 +.08
SCapVal 15.63 +.24 BalancedK 19.57 +.09
Baron Funds: BlueChGrn 47.55 +.44
Asset 49.88 +.47 BluChpGrK 47.62 +.44
Growth 55.86 +.48 CAMunn 12.73
SmallCap 25.42 +.23 Canadan 51.41 +1.06
Bernstein Fds: CapApn 28.66 +.12
IntDur 14.06 -.02 CapDevOn11.28 +.11
DivMu 14.83 ... Cplncrn 9.09 +.02
TxMgdlnt 12.80 +.13 ChinaRgr 26.64 +.23
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 19.43 +.09 CTMunrn 11.99
GIAIAr 18.98 +.13 Contran 75.65 +.54
HiYlnvA 7.74 +.02 ContraK 75.65 +.55
InflOpAp 29.52 +.31 CnvScn 24.14 +.28
BlackRock B&C: DisEqn 23.48 +.14
GIAICt 17.62 +.12 DiscEqF 23.47 +.14
BlackRock Instl: Divlntln 27.45 +.30
EquityDv 19.48 +.09 DivrslntKr 27.43 +.30
GIbAllocr 19.09 +13 DivSkOn 16.37 +.13
HiYldBd 7.74 +.02 DivGth n 28.61 +.31
Brinson FundsY: EmergAs r n26.69 +.39
HiYdlY 6.15 EmrMkn 21.16 +.26
BruceFund 396.58 +2.31 Eqlncn 44.94 +.21
Buffalo Funds: EQIIn 18.98 +.08
SmCapn 29.11 +.41 ECapAp 16.67 +16
CGM Funds: Europe 27.70 +.27
Focusn 26.31 +.02 Exch 323.88
MutIn 26.40 -.02 Exportn 23.02 +19
Realty n 30.37 +.23 Fidel n 34.89 +20
Calamos Funds: Fiftyrn 19.21 +.06
GrwthAp 50.40 +.66 FtRateHin 9.80 +01
FrlnOnen 28.06 +.19
Calvert Invest: G n
Incop 16.14 -.01 GNMAn 11.94
InfiEqAp 12.87 +.13 Govtlnc 10.89 -.01
Sn ap oQ GroCon 92.96 +.90
SocialAp 29.91 +.14
SocBdp 16.19 02 Grolncn 20.12 +.09
SocBdp 16.19 -.02
SocEqAp 36.79 +.29 GrowoF 92.94 +.90
T gp 16.18 + GrowthCoK 92.93 +.89
Cohen& Steers: + GrSbratrn 19.74 +.18
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 69.24 +.34 Highlncrn 9.02 +.01
ColumbiaClassA: n
Columbia Class A: InProBdn 13.27 -.02
Acornt 29.24 +34 IntBdn 11.03 -.01
DivEqlnc 10.15 +.06 IntGovn 11.05
DivOpptyA 8.50 +.05 In un 10.5
LgCapGrAt25.53 +.18 Infiscn 29.79 +.28
LgCorQAp 6.32 +.05 InfSCprn 18.70 +.18
MdCpGrOp 9.96 +.10 InvGrBdn 11.92 -.02
MidCVlOpp 7.84 +.07 InvGBn 7.89 -.01
PBModAp 10.91 +.04 Japan 9.80 10
JpnSm n 8.77 +.05
SelComm A 44.35 +.65 Jp
FrontierA 10.74 +.12 LaA 49.45 +.55
GlobTech 21.11+.32 LevSn 285 +.
Columbia CII,T&G: LowPrn 38.89 +.31
EmMktOpln7.91 +.12 LowPriKr 38.88 +.30
Columbia Class Z: Magellnn 70.11 +.51
AcornZ 30.31 +.35 MagellanK 70.05 +.50
AcornlntZ 37.68 +.45 MDMurn 11.56
DivlncoZ 14.59 +.05 MAMunn 12.59
IntBdZ 9.43 -.01 MegaCpStknll.21 +.06
IntTEBd 10.91 MI Munn 12.43
LgCapGr 12.93 +.11 MidCan 28.95 +.30
ValRestr 46.86 +.40 MNMunn 11.95
Credit Suisse Comm: MtgSecn 11.31 -.01
ComRett 8.03 +.20 Munilncn 13.35
DFA Funds: NJMunrn 12.18
InflCorEqn 9.52 +09 NwMktrn 16.80 +.08
USCorEql nll.73 +.11 NwMilln 31.96 +.24
USCorEq2nll.53 +.11 NYMunn 13.54
DWS Invest A: OTC n 58.98 +.56
CommAp 18.55 OhMunn 12.21 -.01
DWS InvestS: 100ndex 9.81 +.05
CoreEqtyS 17.18 +.13 Ovrsean 29.23 +.31
CorPlslnc 11.02 -.01 PcBasn 23.06 +.23
EmMkGrr 15.35 +.21 PAMunrn 11.33
EnhEmMk 10.54 +.04 Puritnn 19.19 +.07
EnhGbBdr 10.11 ... PuritanK 19.19 +.07
GIbSmCGr 36.47 +.44 RealEn 32.11 +.19
GlblThem 21.30 +.30 SAllSecEqF 12.44 +.09
Gold&Prc 13.46 +.46 SCmdtyStrtn8.84 +.22
HiYldTx 12.77 +.01 SCmdtyStrFn8.86 +.22
IntTxAMT 12.02 ... rEmrgMkt 15.46 +.23
Infl FdS 39.27 +.19 SrslntGrw 11.07 +.12
LgCpFoGr 32.08 +.40 SerlniGrF 11.10 +.12
LatAmrEq 38.68 +.43 SrslntVal 8.54 +07
MgdMuniS 9.37 +.01 SerlnfiValF 8.56 +.07
MATFS 14.98 +.01 SrlnvGrdF 11.93 -.01
SP500S 18.29 +.11 StlntMun 10.86
WorldDiv 22.72 +.19 STBFn 8.55
Davis Funds A: SmCapDiscn21.97 +.32
NWYVenA 35.10 +.30 SmllCpSrn 17.39 +.22
Davis Funds B: SCpValur 15.54 +.20
NYVenB 33.45 +.29 SkSelLCVrnll.17 +.08
Davis Funds C: SkSlcACapn26.98 +.22
NYVenC 33.76 +.29 StkSelSmCp19.43 +.26
Davis Funds : Sbratlncn 11.11 +.01
NYVenY 35.51 +.31 SrReRtr 9.58 +.06
Delaware Invest A: TaxFrB r n 11.51
Diverlncp 9.33 -.02 TotalBdn 11.16 -.01
SMIDCapG 24.59 +.20 Trendn 75.16 +.49
TxUSAp 12.05 ... USBIn 11.93 -.02
Delaware Invest B: Utilityn 18.66
SelGrBt 34.47 +.37 ValStratn 28.56 +.31
Dimensional Fds: Valuen 70.03 +.79
EmMCrEqnl8.36 +.29 Wrldwn 18.89 +.12
EmMktV 27.37 +.46 Fidelity Selects:
IntSmVan 14.14 +.11 Aim 38.67 +.16
LargeCo 10.84 +.07 Bankingn 18.91 +.10
TAUSCorE2n9.38 +.08 Biotchn 108.26 +.96
USLgVan 20.79 +.16 Brokrn 44.81 +.22
USMicron 14.62 +.19 Chemn 109.89 +1.26
USTgdVal 16.57 +.22 ComEquipn20.78 +.26
USSmalln 22.64 +.30 Compn 62.27 +.91
USSmVa 25.60 +.37 ConDisn 26.34 -.05
IntSmCon 14.37 +.12 ConsuFnn 13.43 +.06
EmMktSCnl9.42 +.24 ConStapn 79.11 +.43
EmgMktn 25.11 +.40 CstHon 42.08 -.25
Fixd n 10.34 ... DfAern 82.19 +.98
IntGFxlnn 13.07 -.02 Elecbrn 47.06 +.68
IntVan 14.75 +.14 Enrgyn 48.23 +1.26
Glb5Fxlncnll.16 -.01 EngSvn 61.74 +2.26
2YGIFxdn 10.11 ... EnvAltEnrnl5.48 +.12
DFARIEn 26.76 +.14 FinSvn 57.19 +.30


Dodge&Cox: Goldrn 37.23 +1.22
Balanced 72.74 +.33 Healthn 136.24 +.42
Income 13.64 -.02 Insur n 48.50 +.37
InfStk 30.67 +.28 Leisrn 102.93 -.09
Stock 111.52 +.70 Materialn 66.40 +1.00
DoubleUne Funds: MedDIn 60.18 -.38
TRBdln 11.20 MdEqSysn 28.27 +.07
TRBdNpn11.19 -.01 Mulntdn 51.46 +.13
Dreyfus: NtGasn 30.28 +.68
Aprec 43.34 +.37 Pharmn 14.91 +.06
CTA 12.25 Retail n 59.68 -.25
CorVA .. Softwrn 84.35 +.73
Dreyf 9.38 +08 Techn 98.71 +1.05
DryMid r 28.37 +.33 Telcmn 48.49 +.03
Dr5001nt 37.88 +.25 Transn 53.09 +.19
GNMA 16.11 UtilGrn 57.24 -.07
GrChinaAr 30.49 +.37 Wirelessn 7.53 +.06
HiYldAp 6.42 +.01 Fidelity Spartan:
StratValA 28.15 +.22 5001dxlnvn 48.96 +.31
TechGroA 33.60 +.38 5001dx I 48.97 +.32
DreihsAclnc 10.37 +.01 Infilnxlnvn 31.28 +.30
Driehaus Funds: TotMktlnv n 39.83 +.30
EMktGr 27.22 +.27 USBondl 11.93 -.01
EVPTxMEmI 44.79 +.61 Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n39.00 +.47


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxAdv n48.97 +.32
IntAdrn 31.29 +.30
TotMktAdrn39.83 +.30
USBondl 11.93 -.01
First Eagle:
GIbIA 47.80 +.33
OverseasA 21.42 +.18
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.46 +.06
GovtAp 11.52 -.01
GrolnAp 15.88 +.15
IncoAp 2.54
MATFAp 12.32
MITFAp 12.68
NJTFAp 13.59 -.01
NYTFA p 15.08
OppAp 28.15 +.39
PATFAp 13.58
SpSitAp 23.96 +.28
TxExAp 10.14
TotRtAp 16.25 +.09
ValueBp 7.42 +.05
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.16 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.89 -.01
ALTFAp 11.78 -.01
AZTFAp 11.35
CallnsAp 12.72
CAIntAp 12.04
CalTFAp 7.40
COTFAp 12.30
CTTFAp 11.37
CvtScAp 14.64 +.10
DblTFA 12.24
DynTchA 32.75 +.35
EqlncAp 17.47 +.10
Fedlntp 12.41
FedTFAp 12.50
FLTFAp 11.89 -.01
FoundAlp 10.40 +.06
GATFA p 12.56
GoldPrMA 29.77 +.96
GrwthAp 48.47 +.39
HYTFAp 10.71
HilncA 2.00
IncomAp 2.16 +.01
InsTFAp 12.43
NYITFp 11.79
LATFAp 11.88
LMGvScA 10.35
MDTFAp 11.93
MATFAp 12.00
MITFAp 12.22
MNInsA 12.81
MOTFAp 12.62
NJTFAp 12.53
NYTFAp 12.01
NCTFA p 12.82
OhiolAp 12.94
ORTFAp 12.46

PATFAp 10.80
ReEScAp 16.94 +.09
RisDvAp 36.62 +.32
SMCpGrA 36.21 +.45
Sbratlncp 10.42 +.02
TtlRtnAp 10.32
USGovAp 6.88
UllsAp 14.08 -.01
VATFAp 12.11
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvnl2.91 +.07
IncmeAd 2.14
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
Income t 2.18 +.01
USGvCt 6.84
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.35 +.16
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 21.70 +.36
ForgnAp 6.03 +.08
GIBdAp 12.95 +.07
GrwthAp 17.34 +.19
WorldAp 14.53 +.15
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.12 +.35
ForgnC p 5.89 +.07
GIBdCp 12.97 +.07
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.08 +.09
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.96 -.01
US Eqty 42.61 +.26
GMOTrust IIl:
CHIE 21.94 +.16
Quality 24.02 +.14
GMOTrust IV:
InflntrV 19.30 +.14
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.77 +.18
Quality 24.03 +.14
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.20 +.50
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.27 +.33
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.97 +.22
HiYield 7.16 +.01
HYMunin 9.13
MidCapV 36.58 +.33
ShtDrTF n 10.63
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.68 -.01
CapAplnst 41.34 +.28
Inllnvt 56.04 +.61
Infl r 56.64 +.62
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 31.30 +.27
DivGthAp 20.19 +.10
IntOpAp 13.86 +.12
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 31.34 +.27
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 40.52 +.38
Div&Gr 20.90 +.11
Balanced 20.64 +.07
TotRetBd 12.07 -.02
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SrTotRetr 12.41 +.03
StrGrowth 11.39 -.05
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 17.92 +.43
HIhcareS 16.43 +.02
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.96 -.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.67 +.12
Wldwidelr 15.68 +.11
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.90 +.05
Invesco Funds:
Energy 35.88 +1.02
Ubliies 17.64 -.01
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.54 +.11
Chartp 17.00 +.10
CmstkA 16.52 +.09
Constp 23.15 +.18
DivrsDivp 12.91 +.05
EqlncA 8.84 +.03
GrlncAp 19.92 +.07
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.23 +.01
HYMuA 9.89
InfiGrow 26.74 +.23
MunilnA 13.74
PATFA 16.81
USMortgA 12.99
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.71
US Mortg 12.93
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 12.62 +.11
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 23.14 +.23
AssetStAp 23.90 +.23
AssetSblr 24.13 +.23
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.02 -.02
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.08 -.01
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpValn 26.56 +.13
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondn 12.02 -.01
ShtDurBd 10.99
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.83 +.08
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.01 -.02
HighYldn 7.90 +.02
IntmTFBdn 11.31
LgCpGr 23.96 +.21
ShtDurBdn 10.98 -.01
USLCCrPlsn21.62 +.16
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.98 +.12
ContrarnT 13.85 +.10
EnterprT 63.74 +.67
FIxBndT 10.87 -.02
GlUfeSciTr 29.14 +.14
GIbSelT 9.45 +.14
GITechTr 17.99 +.16
Grw&lncT 32.50 +.22
Janus T 30.26 +.22
OvrseasTr 32.09 +.46
PrkMCValT21.17 +.20
ResearchT 30.63 +.30
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 58.94 +.41
VentureT 59.79 +.77
WrldWTr 42.22 +.42


Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn28.47 +.16
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.96
RgBkA 14.24 +.08
StlnAp 6.56 +.01
John Hancock B:
StlncB 6.57 +.02
John Hancock CI 1:
LSAggr 12.20 +.10
LSBalanc 13.02 +.06
LSConsrv 13.13 +.02
LSGrwth 12.89 +.09


Name NAV Chg
LSModer 12.92 +.05
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.54 +.30
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 18.95 +.31
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 123.94 +1.20
CBApprp 15.25 +.06
CBLCGrp 22.60 +.17
GCIAIICOp 7.91 +.09
WAHilncAt 5.96 +.01
WAMgMup 16.87 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.56 +.15
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.17 +.26
CMValTrp 39.60 +.11
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 28.89 +.27
SmCap 29.00 +.19
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.56 +.04
SblncC 15.01 +.05
LSBondR 14.50 +.04
SblncA 14.92 +.04
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.35 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.36 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.33 +.08
FundlEq 12.65 +.10
BdDebAp 7.87 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.59
MidCpAp 16.57 +.19
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.62
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.59
MFS Funds A:
MITA 20.47 +.17
MIGA 16.80 +.17
EmGA 45.96 +.41
HilnA 3.47 +.01
MFLA
TotRA 14.69 +.05
UtilA 17.72 +.06
ValueA 24.20 +.15
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.07 +.15
GvScBn 10.53 -.01
HilnBn 3.48 +.01
MulnBn 8.82
TotRBn 14.70 +.05
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 24.31 +.15
MFS Funds Instl:
InlfEqn 17.15 +.16
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.94 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.87 +.13
GovtBt 8.96 -.01
HYIdBBt 5.91 +.01
IncmBldr 17.02 +.07
IniEqB 10.10 +.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.97 +.26
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 79.08 +.62
Managers Funds:
Yackmanpnl8.60 +.05
YacktFocn 19.99 +.04
Bondn 26.90
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.08 +.09
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.57 +.20
Indialnvr 15.91 +.36
PacTgrlnv 21.92 +.27
MergerFdn 15.81 +.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.65 +.47
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.69 -.01
TotRtBdl 10.69 -.01
Midas Funds:
MidasFdt 2.44 +.09
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.21 +.13
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.38 +.11
MorganStanley Inst:
InfEqlx 13.24 +.15
MCapGrl 35.39 +.25
Muhlenkn 54.91 +.41
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.12 +.29
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 31.16 +.32
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.69 +.10
GblDiscA 28.84 +.24
GIbDiscZ 29.24 +.25
QuestZ 17.24 +.09
SharesZ 21.54 +.17
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 20.60 +.19
Geneslnst 49.04 +.65
Inl r 16.03 +.16
LgCapV Inv 25.82 +.21
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.84 +.67
Nicholas Group:
Hilncln 9.81 +.01
Nicholasn 45.15 +.47
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.03 -.02
HiYFxlnc 7.25 +.01
SmCpldx 9.07 +.12
Stkldx 17.04 +.11
Technly 15.53 +.18
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.49 +.01
LtMBAp 11.20
Nuveen CI R:
IntDMBd 9.28
HYMunBd 16.48
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.88 +.12
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 40.59 +.30
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.37 +.21
Globall 21.43 +.23
Infllr 17.66 +.17
Oakmark 46.49 +.29
Select 30.98 +.24
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.16 +.03
GIbSMdCap 14.20 +.17
LgCapStrat 9.44 +.12
RealRet 9.28 +.16
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.01 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.01
CAMuniAp 8.58
CapApAp 46.81 +.45
CaplncAp 8.99 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.82 +.01
DvMktAp 32.22 +.42
Discp 62.00 +.70
EquityA 9.13 +.07
GlobAp 57.35 +.56
GIbOppA 29.21 +.25
GblStrlncA 4.21 +.01
Goldp 30.57 +1.23
IntBdA p 6.34 +.02
LtdTmMu 14.96
MnStFdA 35.37 +.27
PAMuniAp 11.34
SenFltRtA 8.17
USGv p 9.78 -.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.97
AMTFrNY 12.02
CplncBt 8.81 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.82 +.01
EquityB 8.39 +.06
GblSfrlncB 4.22 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.38
RoMuAp 16.76
RcNtMuA 7.35
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 31.89 +.41
InfiBdY 6.34 +.02
IntGrowY 27.43 +.17
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.50 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.81
TotRtAd 11.33 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.67 +.08
AIIAsset 12.11 +.08
ComodRR 6.62 +.18
Divlnc 11.85 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.24 +.05
EmMkBd 11.81 +.04
Fltlncr 8.60 +.02
ForBdUnr 10.94
FrgnBd 10.89 +.01
HiYld 9.31 +.01
InvGrCp 10.94
LowDu 10.50
ModDur 10.93
RealRhil 12.33
ShortT 9.81
TotRt 11.33 -.01
TRII 10.91
TRIll 9.97 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.60 +.08
LwDurA 10.50
RealRtAp 12.33
TotRtA 11.33 -.01


PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.48 +.07
RealRtCp 12.33
TotRtCt 11.33 -.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRitp 12.33
TRhtp 11.33 -.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.65 +.07
TotRtnP 11.33 -.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 28.23 +.22


Name NAV Chg
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 47.53 +.43
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.75 -.01
InfiValA 17.54 +.20
PionFdAp 40.48 +.28
ValueAp 11.55 +.06
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.99 +.05
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 10.10 +.06
Pioneer Fds Y:
StratlncYp 10.94 +.01
Price Funds:
Balance 20.11 +.10
BIChip n 43.89 +.34
CABondn 11.33
CapAppn 22.19 +.11
DivGron 25.23 +.14
EmMktBn 13.38 +.06
EmEurop 17.34 +.34
EmMktSn 30.23 +.43
Eqlncn 24.87 +.15
Eqlndexn 37.02 +.24
Europen 14.33 +.10
GNMAn 10.13
Growth n 36.47 +.26
Gr&lnn 21.58 +.09
HIthScin 41.52 +.17
HiYield n 6.72 +.01
InsfCpG 18.13 +.15
InstHiYId n 9.47 +.02
MCEqGrn 29.38 +.31
InfiBondn 9.78
IntDisn 41.94 +.31
IntlG&l 12.03 +.08
InlStkn 13.18 +.15
Japann 7.80 +.08
LatAm n 38.44 +.40
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.96
MidCapn 57.52 +.59
MCapValn 23.40 +.21
NAmern 34.41 +.29
NAsian 15.43 +.25
New Era n 40.86 +.92
NHorizn 35.32 +.34
Nlncn 9.81 -.01
NYBondn 11.71
OverSSFn 7.76 +.05
PSIncn 16.57 +.06
RealAssetrnlO.69 +.16
RealEstn 21.26 +.13
R2010n 16.03 +.08
R2015n 12.43 +.07
R2020n 17.19 +.11
R2025n 12.56 +.08
R2030n 18.02 +.13
R2035n 12.73 +.10
R2040n 18.10 +.14
R2045n 12.05 +.09
SciTecn 26.88 +.35
ShtBdn 4.84
SmCpStk n 35.25 +.40
SmCapVal n37.92 +.48
SpecGrn 18.49 +.15
Speclnn 12.67 +.01
TFIncn 10.40
TxFrHn 11.57
TxFrSIn 5.70
USTIntn 6.32 -.01
USTLgn 14.15 -.10
VABondn 12.16
Valuen 24.44 +.16
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 9.38 +.10
LgCGI In 9.88 +.09
LT20201n 12.19 +.07
LT20301n 12.00 +.08
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.63 +.20
HiYldAp 5.53 +.01
MuHilncA 10.10
UllityA 11.47 +.04
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.78 +.13
HiYldBt 5.52 +.01
Prudential Fds Z&I:
MadCapGrZ 32.35 +.36
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.22 -.02
AZTE 9.44
ConvSec 19.36 +.13
DvrlnAp 7.43 +.01
EqlnAp 15.97 +.11
EuEq 17.75 +.14
GeoBalA 12.76 +.04
GlbEqtyp 8.73 +.08
GrlnAp 13.71 +.10
GIblHIthA 44.44 +.13
HiYdAp 7.64 +.01
HiYld In 5.95 +.01
IncmAp 7.01 -.02
IntGrln p 8.67 +.09
InvAp 13.86 +.10
NJTxAp 9.75
MulTCpGr 52.96 +.65
PATE 9.44
TxExA p 8.94
TFInAp 15.51 -.01
TFHYA 12.46 -.01
USGvAp 13.68 -.01
GlblUtilA 10.48 -.01
VoyAp 21.23 +.32
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.53
DvrlnBt 7.37 +.01
Eqlnct 15.83 +.10
EuEq 17.00 +.13
GeoBalB 12.62 +.03
GlbEqt 7.87 +.07
GINtRst 16.64 +.38
GrlnBt 13.47 +.10
GIblHIthB 35.44 +.10
HiYldBt 7.63 +.01
HYAdBt 5.83
IncmBt 6.95 -.01
IntGrlnt 8.59 +.09
InfiGrtht 13.11 +.15
InvBt 12.46 +.09
NJTxBt 9.74
MultCpGr 45.29 +.56
TxExBt 8.94
TFHYBt 12.48 -.01
USGvBt 13.61 -.01
GlblUtilB 10.45 -.01
VoyBt 17.84 +.27
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.28 +.19
LgCAlphaA 41.80 +.48
Value 23.91 +.35
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkApll1.27 +.11
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.26 +.24
PennMulr 11.44 +.18
Premierl r 19.42 +.28
TotRetlr 13.38 +.17
ValSvct 10.97 +.20
Russell Funds S:
StratBdx 11.22 -.04
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.04 +.12
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.85 +.28
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 19.37 +.07
l0001nvr 38.97 +.28
S&PSel 21.62 +.14
SmCpSI 21.15 +.27
TSMSelr 25.00 +.18
Scout Funds:
Infl 29.68 +.28
Selected Funds:
AmShD 42.62 +.38
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.35 +.26
Sequoia 155.05 +1.36
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 46.05 +.36
SoSunSClnv tn20.51+.27
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.85 +.41
Stratton Funds:
Mull-Cap 34.85 +.45
RealEstate 30.82 +.16
SmCap 53.26 +.74
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.26 -.02
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.79 +.05
TotRetBdl 9.88 -.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.95 -.01
Eqldxlnst 10.50 +.08
IniEqllnst 14.83 +.12
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.51 +.24
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 15.01 +.20
REVallnstr 24.34 +.07
Valuelnst 45.29 +.43
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.09 +.28
IncBuildAt 18.35 +.06
IncBuildCp 18.35 +.06
IntValue I 25.64 +.28
LtTMul 14.61
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.88
Incom 9.07 -.02
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.30 +.01
Flexlncp 9.09
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.96 +.47


Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.77 +.23
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.60 +.11
ChinaReg 6.85 .02
GIbRs 9.36 +.19
Gld&Mtls 11.10 +.29
WdPrcMn 11.12 +.34
USAA Group:
AgvGt 35.35 +.24
CABd 10.88
CrnstStr 22.19 +.13
GovSec 10.38 -.01
GrTxStr 14.24 +.04


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 15.67 +.11
Gr&lnc 15.49 +.14
IncStk 13.23 +08
Inco 13.32 -.01
Int 23.24 +.28
NYBd 12.34
PrecMM 27.25 +1.01
SciTech 14.37 +.12
ShtTBnd 9.20
SmCpStk 14.62 +.18
TxElt 13.57
TxELT 13.69 -.01
TxESh 10.83
VABd 11.53
WldGr 19.42 +.18
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.48 +.24
Stkldx 25.73 +.16
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 18.86 +.14
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.16 +.10
CAITAdm n 11.58
CALTAdmn11.77
CpOpAdl n 73.61 +.56
EMAdmr r n 33.65 +.53
Energy 108.41 +2.47
EqlnAdm n n48.95 +.20
ExplAdml n 72.50 +.89
ExtdAdm n 43.68 +.53
500Adml n 126.67 +.81
GNMAAdn 11.07 -.01
GrwAdm n 35.41 +.30
HlthCrn 59.63 +.14
HiYldCp n 5.89 +.01
InfProAd n 28.79
ITBdAdml n 12.02 -.02
ITsryAdml n 11.78 -.01
IntGrAdm n 55.56 +.67
ITAdmln 14.22
ITGrAdmn 10.23 -.01
LtdTrAdn 11.16
LTGrAdml n 10.67 -.04
LTAdmln 11.61
MCpAdml n 96.90 +1.03
MorgAdm n 60.25 +.47
MuHYAdm nl1.06
NYLTAdn 11.63
PrmCap rn 69.09 +.62
PALTAdm n11.59
ReitAdm rn 94.26 +.50
STsyAdmln 10.76 -.01
STBdAdml nlO.63 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.92
STFdAdn 10.85 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.76
SmCAdmn 37.25 +.46
TxMCaprn 68.82 +.51
TUBAdmln 11.12 -.01
TStkAdm n 34.29 +.26
ValAdmln 21.98 +.12
WellslAdmn57.78 +.06
WelltnAdrmn57.18 +.18
Windsor n 47.03 +.36
WdsrllAdn 49.80 +.25
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.77
CapOppn 31.87 +.25
Convrtn 12.54 +.08
DivdGron 16.34 +.08
Energyn 57.73 +1.31
Eqlncn 23.35 +.09
Explr n 77.88 +.96
FLLTn 12.04
GNMAn 11.07 -.01
GlobEqn 17.38 +.17
Grolncn 29.17 +.16
GrthEqn 12.05 +.09
HYCorpn 5.89 +.01
HlthCren 141.32 +.33
InflaPron 14.66
InlExplrn 13.66 +.12
IntlGrn 17.46 +.21
InfiValn 28.02 +.28
ITIGraden 10.23 -.01
ITTsryn 11.78 -.01
LifeConn 16.90 +.05
LifeGron 22.57 +.15
Lifelncn 14.53 +.02
LifeModn 20.23 +.10
LTIGraden 10.67 -.04
LTTsryn 13.63 -.08
Morg n 19.42 +.15
MuHYn 11.06
Mulntn 14.22
MuLtdn 11.16
MuLongn 11.61
MuShrtn 15.92
NJLTn 12.20
NYLTn 11.63
OHLTTEn 12.53
PALTn 11.59
PrecMtlsrn 15.91 +.36
PrmcpCorn 14.33 +.12
Prmcp rn 66.58 +.61
SelValurn 19.94 +.16
STARn 19.89 +.10
STIGraden 10.76
STFedn 10.85 -.01
STTsryn 10.76 -.01
StratEqn 20.10 +.26
TgtRetlncn 11.99 +.02
TgRe2010n23.73 +.08
TgtRe2015n13.08 +.06
TgRe2020n23.17 +.12
TgtRe2025 n13.16 +.07
TgRe2030n22.54 +.15
TgtRe2035n13.53 +.10
TgtRe2040 n22.21 +.17
TgtRe2050n22.11 +.17
TgtRe2045n13.95 +.11
USGron 20.29 +.18
USValuen 11.22 +.08
Wellsly n 23.85 +.02
Welltnn 33.11 +.10
Wndsrn 13.94 +.10
Wndslln 28.06 +.14
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n92.53 +.77
ExtMktIn 107.81 +1.32
MidCplstPI n105.58+1.12
TotlntAdm r 23.01 +.26
Totlntllnst r n92.03 +1.03
TotlntllP rn 92.05 +1.03
TotlntSig r n 27.60 +.31
500n 126.67 +.81
Balancedn 23.16 +.10
EMktn 25.60 +.40
Europen 23.27 +.18
Extend n 43.65 +.54
Growth n 35.41 +.29
LgCaplxn 25.33 +.18
LTBndn 14.36 -.07
MidCapn 21.34 +.22
Pacific 9.62 +.09
REITr n 22.09 +.12
SmCapn 37.21 +.47
SmlCpGthn24.08 +.33
STBndn 10.63 -.01
TotBndn 11.12 -.01
TotllntlIn 13.75 +.15
TotStkn 34.28 +.26
Valuen 21.98 +.12
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.16 +.09
DevMklnstn 8.88 +.07
Extln n 43.68 +.54
FTAIIWIdl rn81.88 +.93
Grwthlstn 35.41 +.30
InfProlnstn 11.73
Instldxn 125.86 +.81
InsPIn 125.86 +.80
lnstTStldxn31.03 +.24
InsTStPlus n31.03 +.23
MidCplstn 21.41 +.23
REITInstrn 14.59 +.08
STIGrlnstn 10.76
SClnstn 37.25 +.46
TBIstn 11.12 -.01
TSInstn 34.29 +.26
Valuelstn 21.98 +.12
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 104.63 +.67
GroSig n 32.79 +.28
ITBdSign 12.02 -.02
MidCpldx n 30.58 +.33
STBdlbdxn 10.63 -.01
SmCpSig n 33.56 +.42
TotBdSgln 11.12 -.01
TotStkSgln 33.09 +.25
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.51 +.11
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.83
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.04 +.08
CorelnvA 6.36 +.04
DivOppAp 14.97 +.08
DivOppCt 14.82 +.09
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.63 +.44
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.03 +.06
Wells Fargo Adv :
CmStklnv 20.30 +.25
Opptylnv 38.45 +.37
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 40.52 +.41
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.46 -.01
CorePlusl 11.46 -.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.83 +12


Stocks rise as oil prices,




factory orders climb


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks
climbed Tuesday in an ab-
breviated holiday trading
session after an encourag-
ing report about manufac-
turing. Energy stocks rose
the most because of in-
creased tension over oil-
rich Iran.
Major stock indexes wa-
vered in early trading, then
moved decisively higher
after the government re-
ported that factory orders
rose in May. Caterpillar,
Alcoa, Boeing and other
stocks that depend on man-
ufacturing rose.
The report was welcome
after a trade group reported
on Monday that U.S. manu-
facturing shrank in June for
the first time since July
2009, the first month after
the Great Recession ended.
The price of oil climbed
more than 4 percent after
Iran threatened to block a
critical Persian Gulf shipping
route. On Sunday, Europe en-
acted stricter rules against
buying oil from Iran, trying to
force it to be more open
about its nuclear program.
New York crude rose
$3.91 per barrel to $87.66.
The supply fears drove en-
ergy stocks up more than 2
percent, more than any
other industry in the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500. Chevron
rose $1.51, or 1.4 percent, to
$107.37.
The Dow Jones industrial
average finished 72.43
points higher at 12,943.82.
The S&P 500 index rose 8.51
to 1,374.02. The Nasdaq
composite index rose 24.85
to 2,976.08.
Brian Jacobsen, chief
portfolio strategist at Wells
Fargo Fund Management,
was investing in energy


companies -not just oil but
also natural gas. He figures
that as the price of oil rises,


Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500


+24.85

2,976.08

+8.51

1,374.02


Russell +8.55
2000 816.49

NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,385

Declined: 615

Unchanged: 130

Volume: 2.0 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,757

Declined: 651

Unchanged: 144

Volume: 1.0b
AP



more businesses will ex-
plore natural gas as an
alternative.
"Like it or not," Jacobsen
said, "we're dependent on a
variety of energy sources."
Ford and General Motors
both jumped after they and
other car companies re-
ported higher sales for
June. Overall car sales still
came in slightly below what
analysts polled by FactSet
were expecting.
Factory orders increased
0.7 percent in May from
April, the Commerce De-
partment said. Core capital
goods, which include ma-
chinery and computers,
rose 2.1 percent. That was
better than the 1.6 percent


Carmakers report strong




June sales, easing worries


Associated Press


DETROIT From mini
cars to monster pickups,
sales of new cars and trucks
surged in June and eased
concerns that Americans
would be turned off by
slower hiring and other
scary headlines.
Automakers sold nearly
1.3 million cars and trucks
in June, up 22 percent from
the same month last year.
Chrysler posted its best
June in five years. Sales
soared at Volkswagen,
which is on track for its best
year in the U.S. since 1973.
The results allayed fears
that the car market's mo-
mentum had stalled. U.S.
sales were on track to reach
14.5 million after the first
four months of the year But
the annual pace dropped to
13.8 million in May, as the
stock market plunged and
hiring slowed. June brought
more worrisome news about
jobs growth and consumer
confidence.
But buyers didn't go away
last month. In fact, June's
sales pace rose to 14.1 mil-
lion, according to Autodata
Corp. And if sales stay at
that level for all of 2012, it
will be the industry's best
year since 2007.
Falling gas prices,
cheaper loans and new
models like the Ford Es-
cape and Dodge Dart drew
buyers. A revived housing
market lifted sales of pick-
ups. And there was still
plenty of demand from peo-
ple who bought cars in the
middle of the last decade
and needed to replace
them. Annual sales hit a
high of 17 million in 2005,
and those cars and trucks


are now seven years old.
"If a family in Iowa's only
mode of transportation is on
the fritz, they are going to
buy a replacement vehicle,
even if Spain's economy is
on the brink of collapse,"
says Alec Gutierrez, a senior
market analyst at Kelley
Blue Book.
Automakers also started
their Independence Day
promotions a little early and
that juiced sales at the end
of the month.
"In the last two weeks we
really went all-out" says Bill
Underriner, who sells Volvo,
Buick, Honda and Hyundai
cars in Billings, Mont.
Colorful ads with holiday
deals excited buyers, says
Jessica Caldwell, a senior
analyst with pricing site Ed-
munds.com. The Buick Ver-
ano small car one of
Underriner's big sellers last
month is now $239 per
month for a two-year lease.
That's $50 less than usual.
Low interest rates are
making deals like the Ver-
ano's more attractive. The
average interest rate on a
60-month new-car loan is 4.5
percent, down from 6.98
percent two years ago, ac-
cording to Bankrate.com.
Credit availability is also
improving.
"The affordability of cars is
probably at an all-time high,"
Chrysler Group sales chief
Reid Bigland said last week
Falling gas prices meant
buyers were more likely to
consider bigger cars and
SUVs in June, not just the
small cars that sold well at
the beginning of the year.
Jeep Liberty SUV sales rose
50 percent and the Ford Ex-
plorer jumped 35 percent.
Gas averaged $3.43 per gallon


at the end of June, down 41
cents from the end of March.
Pickup truck sales also
improved as home building
perked up. Chrysler's Ram
pickup sales rose 12 percent
and sales of the Ford F-Se-
ries which has long been
the country's best-selling ve-
hicle rose 11 percent.
At Chrysler, sales of the
tiny Fiat 500 and Chrysler
300 large sedan more than
doubled from a year earlier,
helping the company to a 20-
percent gain for the month.
General Motors' sales
rose 16 percent, with strong
demand for the Chevy Mal-
ibu midsize sedan and Volt
electric car.
Ford's overall sales rose 7
percent. The Escape small
SUV posted its best month
ever after a new version of
the popular vehicle went on
sale.
The sales were welcome
news to investors, who have
beaten down GM and Ford
shares in recent days over
losses in Europe. Fbrd's stock
climbed 2 percent to close at
$9.60, while GM's stock
jumped 6 percent to $20.67.
Toyota's sales rose 60 per-
cent for the month while
Honda's climbed 49 percent,
but that wasn't surprising.
Last year, both companies
had little inventory at U.S.
dealerships because of the
earthquake in Japan. Now,
they're taking back sales
that their rivals gained last
year. The Chevrolet Cruze,
for example, was the top-
selling car in the country
June 2011, but its sales
dropped 24 percent last
month. Sales of its Japanese
rivals, the Honda Civic and
Toyota Corolla, jumped
more than 40 percent each.


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
SP UI 37.13 -.09
StdPac 6.30 +.01
Standex 43.00 +.11
StanBlkDk 63.40 +.39
StarwdHf 53.90 +.38
StateStr 44.91 +.19
StatoilASA 24.64 +.38
Steris 32.16 +.51
SillwfrM 8.97 +.40
Styker 54.68 +.01
SturmRug 40.70 +.46
SubPpne 43.28 +.50
Suncmts 45.68 +.49
Suncorgs 30.30 +1.34
Suntech 1.99 +.08
SunTrst 24.67 -.02
SupEnrgy 21.17 +.74
Supvalu 5.17 -.08
SwftEng 19.39 +.87
Synovus 2.03 -.01
Sysco 29.51 -.10
TCFFncl 11.75 +.01
TDAmeritr 17.05 +.05
TECO 18.30 +.08
TJXs 42.50 -.72
TaiwSemi 14.44 +.17
Talbots 2.51 -.03
TalismEg 12.03 +.55
Target 57.78 -.49
TataMotors 22.42 +.45


TeckRes g
TelcmNZs
TelefBrasil
TelefEsp
TempurP
Tenaris
TenetHlth
Tenneco
Teradata
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TebaTech
TevaPhrm
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
Thomcrkg
3DSys
3MCo
Tiffany
TW Cable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Trchmrk s
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys


Transocn 46.77
Travelers 64.13
Tredgar 15.34
TriConfi 15.53
TrinaSolar 6.65
TwoHrblnv 10.67
Tycolnf 54.34
Tyson 18.44
UBSAG 11.85
UDR 26.24
UIL Hold 36.63
UNS Engy 39.26
USAirwy 13.21
USEC 1.02
USG 20.27
UlfraPtg 22.78
UniFirst 66.92
UnilevNV 34.09
Unilever 34.39
UnionPac 118.95
UtdConfl 24.08
UtMicro 2.23
UPSB 79.47
UtdRentals 35.84
USBancrp 32.58
USNGsrs 19.58
US OilFd 32.94
USSteel 21.64
UtdTech 75.75
UtdhlthGp 54.88
UnumGrp 19.58


VFCp 131.32 -.58
ValeSA 20.59 +.49
ValeSApf 20.11 +.44
ValeantPh 46.99 +2.03
ValeroE 25.01 +.82
VangTotBd 84.25 -.12
VangTSM 70.46 +.57
VangREIT 66.54 +.39
VangEmg 40.70 +.73
VangEur 43.50 +.37
VangEAFE 32.12 +.33
VarianMed 61.50 +.85
Vecken 29.82 +.02
Ventas 63.85 +.50
VeoliaEnv 12.75 +.02
VerizonCm 44.95 +.02
VersoPap 1.73 +.56
VimpelCm 8.19 +.23
Visa 126.34 -.28
VMware 91.85 +1.34
Vonage 1.99 -.01
Vornado 84.76 +.27
WGL Hod 40.42 +.20
WPXEnn 15.69 -.21
Wabash 6.70 +.19
WalMart 70.75 +1.40
Walgrn 29.61 -.25
WalterEn 45.71 +1.40
WsteMlnc 33.45 +.18
WatsnPh 75.39 +.56


Weathflnf 13.02
WeinRIt 26.87
WellPoint 61.28
WellsFargo 33.48
WestarEn 30.36
WAstEMkt 14.56
WstAMgdHi 6.32
WAstlnfOpp 13.13
WstnRefin 23.92
WstnUnion 17.13
Weyerhsr 22.67
Whrlpl 62.94
WhilngPet 43.58
WmsCos 29.28
WmsPtrs 53.05
WmsSon 36.42
Winnbgo 10.84
WiscEngy 39.94
WT India 17.75
Worthgn 21.43
Wyndham 53.00
XLGrp 21.17
XcelEngy 28.72
Xerox 7.94
Yamanag 16.24
YingliGrn 2.96
Youku 20.82
YumBrnds 63.19


Market watch
July 3, 2012

Dow Jones +72.43
industrials 12,943.82


estimated last week.
"Not much was expected,
and it managed to come in
just above 'not much,"' said
Patrick O'Keefe, director of
economic research at J.H.
Cohn.
O'Keefe said he keeps
waiting for the U.S. econ-
omy to turn a corner but
hasn't seen it yet "We're still
getting growth, and that was
expected," he said, "but it's
growth that is both weak
and erratic."
Mostly, investors were in a
holding pattern, waiting for
the government's Friday re-
port on June employment,
and for companies to start
reporting second-quarter
earnings next week.
Trading volume was light.
The market closed three
hours early, at 1 p.m., and
many traders had already
taken off for the Fourth of
July holiday
Europe was relatively
quiet, though with underpin-
nings of discord. A Greek gov-
ernment spokesman said the
government was preparing
an "alarming" report on its
recession in a bid to renego-
tiate the terms of its bailout
Slovakia's prime minister
said his country was run-
ning out of patience for bail-
ing out its more
free-spending neighbors.
Cyprus opened talks with
the European Union and
the International Monetary
Fund on a bailout for its
troubled banks.
The European Central
Bank will announce later
this week whether it will cut
interest rates, a move that
would likely drive markets
higher but also signal that
Europe's economy is still
weak. Major indexes in
France, Britain, Germany,
Spain and Greece rose.


BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 A9







Page A10 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4,2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ..................... .................. editor
S Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


HAPPY FOURTH




Celebrate



freedom,



independence


Americans should never
lose the spirit of
our country's early colo-
nial settlers who knew a great
nation could emerge if we
freed ourselves from British


rule.
It was that thirst
for freedom and a
healthy dose of
bravery that ulti-
mately resulted in
the creation of an
independent na-
tion, with rights
for all as a goal.
The challenges
have been im-
mense and fail-


THE IS
Independe

OUR OP
Celebra
apprec


ures are easily documented,
but the momentum initiated by
those colonists back in 1776 to
embrace a broad swath of hu-
manity inclusive of those of
varying races, religions and na-
tional origins remains a rally-
ing point for all Americans
today.
Current issues of immigra-
tion policies, fear of Islamic ex-
tremism and the balance
between separation of church
and state pull at the fiber of the
country. Regardless, our con-
stitutional freedoms allow for


healthy debate, and our repre-
sentative form of democracy
allows for citizens to guide the
course of our society through
the ever-changing landscape of
our nation and world.
Americans are afforded
rights, protections
and opportunities
;SUE: that are envied
around the globe.
Ence Day. As our divisive is-
sues play out, all
INION: should acknowl-
te and edge and embrace
ciate. the ability to be
heard and to af-
fect change.
The United
States is and should always
be a work in progress.
Differences among Ameri-
cans are extreme but it is that
very patchwork that serves to
strengthen the nation as we
confront ever-unfolding chal-
lenges.
As holiday barbecues, fire-
works and celebrations are en-
joyed today, let's not forget
those pioneering colonists who
dared to stand up for freedom
and independence freedom
and independence that make
our nation great.


Hot Corner: CAT NAPPER


Catching cats cruel
To the person who traps cats in
Sugarmill Woods: Do you know the
heartbreak and the anguish that
you've caused to those three pet
owners? You are mean, wicked,
nasty and cruel. If I find out who
you are, those traps will be re-
moved and your name and address
and phone number will be sent to
the entire Sugarmill Woods direc-
tory so that everyone will know of
your meanness. Count on it.
Cat missing
To the "Catnapper": I am miss-
ing a little peach-and-white-col-
ored cat, declawed in the front
and she's female. If you have her,


Controlled burn
They call it controlled burning
and it's supposed to be beneficial
to the ecology, when in fact, the
earth took care of itself for billions
of years without the so-called ben-
efit of humans setting fires to kill
the baby birds, squirrels,
snakes, moles, mice and
all the rest of the wildlife,
in the name of conserva-
tion. What a cruel joke.


Set example
I hope that the person
that complained or re-
marked about "Give back
to the USA" donates their


CALL
563-0


time and their money to
the people in this country because,
yeah, it's great to complain about
someone else, but set an example.
Start work later
This is for the code enforce-
ment officer. Hey, they're doing
construction down here on (State
Road) 200 in the Tanglewood area
and Millwood Lane. It's 7:20
(a.m.) right now and these people
down here are starting up these
big tractors and bulldozers and
people can't even get no sleep.


please call 352-503-6703.
Trap cats
This call is in regards to the
loose cats in my neighborhood,
too. I just saw today in Sound Off
that people are trapping cats.
Well, guess what? I bought a cat
trap, too, and I'm trapping them,
too ... Just trap them and take
them over to Inverness to the Ani-
mal Control people. I can't even
walk my dogs in my neighbor-
hood. They yank my arms out of
my sockets when they see a cat.
If I have to have my dogs on
leashes, those cats need to be on
leashes, too. I'm just totally dis-
gusted with the cat situation in
this town.

Can't the code enforcement offi-
cer tell these people to start work
after 8 o'clock? Isn't there a time
limit for people to start waking up
people around with these heavy
pieces of equipment? I'd appreci-
ate it very much. I'm a taxpayer.
Change Congress
JND This is to the gentleman
FF who wrote the article in the
Sound Off, "Congressional
goal," that the Republicans
in Congress won't pass
Obama's jobs bill because,
in their own words, they
don't want him to succeed.
)57Q The people just don't let
) 5 him do anything in Con-
gress and he says, "It
seems to me we don't need a
change in the president, we need a
change in Congress." Well, for that
gentleman's information, we al-
ready just got a change in Congress
in the last election when all the De-
mocrats were ousted and Republi-
cans were put in charge. Obviously
at that time, the American people
did not like what President Obama
was doing and the fact that he was
able to get everything he wanted to
through Congress, so they voted
Republicans in control.


"The price offreedom of religion or of
speech or of the press is that we must
put up with, and even pay for, a good
deal of rubbish."
Justice Robert Jackson


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ruling: Shrewd yet retrogressive


hief Justice John
Roberts is learn-
ing what Harry
Truman meant when
he said, "If you want a
friend in Washington,
get a dog." Some of the
same crowd that rel-
ished Citizens United
foamed at the mouth
when his vote saved
the critical sections of
the Affordable Care
Act
One of the bottom-


Martin Dyckman
FLORIDA
VOICES


feeders even raged that his mind
must have been fogged by anti-
seizure medications. Aside from
the fact that Roberts has never
acknowledged taking any, the ac-
cusation was not merely vile and
cruel; it was dumb.
Roberts's strategy to reject
the health insurance mandate as
valid under the commerce
clause, but accept it as an exer-
cise of Congress's taxing power -
was one of the shrewdest strokes
in the Supreme Court's history
On the one hand, it saved him
- and the court from taking
the blame for killing a law that
will benefit most Americans and
prolong the lives of many
On the other, it gave him the op-
portunity to adopt what Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg properly
called a "stunningly retrogres-
sive" interpretation of Congress's
power to regulate interstate
commerce.
"The chief justice's crabbed
reading of the Commerce Clause
harks back to the era in which the
Court routinely thwarted Con-
gress' efforts to regulate the na-
tional economy in the interest of
those who labor to sustain it," she
wrote. But of course she had no
choice but to support his applica-
tion of the taxing power
Roberts's strategy brings to


mind that of Chief Jus-
tice John Marshall in
the court's first great
decision, Marbury vs.
Madison in 1803. In
giving his enemy,
Thomas Jefferson, the
outcome Jefferson
wanted in that particu-
lar case, Marshall also
established the court's
power to set aside acts
of Congress the
same power it flexed
on June 28, 2012, when


it struck down the mandatory
Medicaid expansion that was one
provision of Obamacare.
The outcome that Roberts or-
chestrated was timely, given that
a recent poll found that only 44
percent of Americans approve of
the Supreme Court a historic
low and three out of four be-
lieve that justices are sometimes
persuaded by their personal
opinions and politics.
His former professor,
Lawrence Tribe, alluded to that
when he said Roberts "saved the
day, and perhaps the court"
That's saying a bit much.
Roberts' strategy was political
even if the outcome saving
Obamacare was the right one.
His discussion of the Commerce
Clause delved deeply into
sophistry when he argued that if
it were mandatory health insur-
ance today, it could be mandatory
broccoli tomorrow. Congress -
even this Congress can be pre-
sumed to know the difference.
There's even a cynical school of
thought which crossed my
mind briefly, but which I do not
share that Roberts did Mitt
Romney a favor in preserving the
Affordable Health Care Act as a
campaign issue and in defining it
as a tax issue, the very ground
upon which the administration


did not want to rely
This case aside, the Roberts
court had earned the low regard
in which Americans seem to hold
it It did so most deplorably in Cit-
izens United, in which Roberts
transformed a technical question
about a video attacking Hillary
Clinton into a pretext for prosti-
tuting American democracy to
the bottomless pockets of corpo-
rations.
It was a memorable moment in
the history of hypocrisy when
Justice Anthony Kennedy, who
did Roberts's dirty work in Citi-
zens, accused him of a "vast judi-
cial overreach" in justifying the
insurance mandate under the
taxing power There has never
been a vaster judicial overreach
than Citizens United.
But constitutional jurispru-
dence has something in common
with all wars and all politics.
Your adversary today may be
your ally tomorrow Roberts was
my ally today
The Affordable Care Act is not
perfect legislation. Far from it.
Millions will remain uninsured
and costs will not be constrained
as they would be under a single-
payer system, which Obama and
Congress rejected in favor of pre-
serving a market for insurance
companies.
It is, however, the most signifi-
cant and compassionate im-
provement in the national
interest in half a century, and the
justices who have upheld it -
Roberts, Ginsburg, Kagan, Breyer
and Sotomayor deserve credit
for doing so.


Martin Dyckman is a retired
associate editor of the
newspaper formerly known as
the StPetersburg Times.


LETTERS to the Editor


Cemetery compromise
I have been researching the
Priest family that is buried
here in the Red Level Ceme-
tery. Nature Coast Develop-
ment plans on changing the
area around the cemetery from
its peaceful scenic view. I have
spent a good bit of time there
and see a way to leave the
cemetery and its view alone.
Instead of destroying the
cemetery road and those tun-
nel-like trees that you don't see
a lot of, Nature Coast Develop-
ment can put in another road
parallel with the cemetery road
behind the trees to the north.
Then if the company just
moves back its mining just a
little more, say another 100
feet behind some of the trees
all around the cemetery, just
leave the trees alone, it won't
have to plant pine trees and
put up a privacy fence. Then
the scenery will be intact for
future generations.
The Priest family buried
there has three connections
back to the Mayflower in 1620.
Their namesake, Degory
Priest, is one. Then there are
two other connections tied di-
rectly to this family: one line to
Isaac Allerton and another to


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
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William Brewster and his wife
Mary. William Brewster was
once the governor of the Ply-
mouth Colony and preacher.
There are not a lot of families
that have that many ties to the
Mayflower This should be a good
reason to keep the cemetery like
it is as much as possible.
Isaac Allerton's sister Sarah
was married to Degory Priest.
So this family is not only one of
our pioneer families, it also
has historic ancestors from the


very beginnings of our country.

Bob Hickinbotham
Dunnellon

When did we change?
As one male to another, when
did we change? From a learned
student to a control freak.
From the time we first enter
this world we were nurtured by
a woman and for the first five or
six years we were taught right
from wrong. Then the big day
came. We turned our children
over to women teachers to train
and mold our children into lov-
ing and respected adults.
Then off to college where
again we are taught to go forth
into the world as adults and
become people of knowledge
to run the world. Then and
only then we turn our backs on
the female race and tell them
to go back in the kitchen
where they belong. They can
no longer teach us as adults.
Am I missing something here?
Is that what God had
planned for us? He gave us a
woman prophet to teach us. I
guess he knew what He was
doing. We should use Him for
an example. Think about it.
Ernie Porter
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D.C. dealings a plus
Mitt Romney states political expe-
rience in Washington is the worst
background for the presidency
Dwight Eisenhower, a decent man,
was experienced only in the mili-
tary The Dulles brothers, one secre-
tary of state, the other a Central
Intelligence Agency chief, were for-
merly partners in the law firm of
Sullivan and Cromwell, which repre-
sented BE Mohammed Mossadeh,
Iran's secular president, was re-
placed by the Shah and ultimately a
fundamentally religious government
in Iran. The law firm also repre-
sented United Fruit. Eisenhower op-
posed unhorsing duly elected Jocoby
Arbenz, but Dulles prevailed and
Guatemala never recovered from the
mayhem.
Secretary John Foster Dulles
pushed SEATO, the South East Asia
Treaty Organization, made the
United States a signatory, and used
it to assure we were embroiled in
Vietnam.
Fidel Castro defeated the mafia in
Cuba in 1959. Young men from U.S.
churches fought with him in the
mountains alongside celebrities like
Errol Flynn. Fidel got a ticker-tape
parade in New York and was feted
on the Edward R. Murrow show. Al-
though Raul Castro, Che Guevara's
friend, was communist, Fidel was
not. But when the United States
turned against him, Castro sought
Soviet aid. The Bay of Pigs fiasco
planned by CIA Chief Allen Dulles


Letters to THE EDITOR
happened right after President John
E Kennedy was inaugurated and he
accepted blame.
Author Norman Cousins, a close
friend of Eisenhower, wrote that Ike
was so frustrated by the Dulles
brothers he blamed John Foster
Dulles for his heart attack.
A president without a Washington
background would rely on the hard-
core party people like Grover
Norquist rather than his own knowl-
edge and instincts in forming a cabi-
net and appointing judges. George
W Bush's MBA did not serve him
well. President Hoover, a business-
man, couldn't get his Republican
Congress to address the Depression.
President Truman, formerly a ward
heeler and senator, dealt well with
Congress.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa
Money 101
The secondary education system,
high school, is not offering a course
in financial matters after high
school graduation. The students
leaving the secondary school system
should know about the financial
matters they will encounter
They should know the difference
between a credit card and a debit
card, what an annual charge is and
what an annual percentage rate is.
They should have a basic under-
standing of the stock market and
how they can start a traditional or
Roth IRA account and the difference


between them. They should under-
stand what a stockbroker is and does
and how much they charge for their
services.
They should understand what a
mutual fund is and the difference
between a load fund and a no-load
fund. They should understand the
difference between a bond and a
note is and whether it is offered by a
government or a corporation.
Basically, when a student leaves
the secondary school system, they
should understand the financial
world that they are getting into and
how they can start saving for their
future, immediate and distant. They
should understand the options they
have to put their money to work for
them so they can prepare to buy a
home or a car in a responsible man-
ner They should know the differ-
ence between speculating and
long-term investment.
You might say this is something
that should be taught at home by the
parents. I submit to you that there
are a lot of parents who don't know
this information, and that their chil-
dren will in fact be teaching them as
well as learning themselves.
The basic difference here is to
teach young people how to become
self-sufficient financially now and in
their future and retirement years
and not become dependent on the
government for their retirement
years.
Alfred Mason
Crystal River


Nicknames
Someone called in and
complained about the hippo
being called Lu instead of
Lucifer. Well, then I suppose
we shouldn't be allowed to
call Roberts "Bob" or Richards
"Dick" or Donalds "Don" or
Elizabeths "Betty" or
Katherines "Kathy," etc. Get
a life and stop griping about
such simple things
as that. Go volun-
teer there and then k
you can call him
Lucifer every day.
Obey laws
I see where a
tour-boat captain
was bitten by a
gator and lost his CA
hand. He knew it Q
was against the law tU3-
to feed the crea-
tures, but he wanted bigger
tips from his customers so
he did something to excite
them. Well, too bad. Obey the
laws or take the consequences.
It's a shame they had to kill
the gator. He was only doing
what comes naturally.
Mitt's wits
Gov. Romney is a very
smart, intelligent man. He
knows how to talk without
giving out information. He is
super good. He's a quiet
businessman. He's not a
showoff. He knows how, and
he's not telling who he's going
to choose for vice president
because he can vet them
all. He can vet 20 of them.
Look for solution
It's interesting to read
that people are complaining
about the barriers on
(County Road) 491 in front
of Winn-Dixie in Beverly
Hills, claiming that traffic is
backing up because they
can't make a turn here and
there. If they took as much
time as they did to call this
Sound Off in, to see that
there are multiple ways of
getting in to Winn-Dixie and
getting in and around Mus-
tang Boulevard, they could
be ingenious enough to fig-
ure that out rather than sit
there and complain about
what's up there. If you can
talk about an article, you
can certainly look for a solu-
tion to the problem. That's a
lot easier than complaining.


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 All

Thanks, ma'am
I want to thank the kind
woman at the civic associa-
tion for responding to my
plea, for the fast attention
that was given to the empty
house which was much in
need for not only a mowing,
but also needed a (weed)
whacking first. The weeds
were three-quarters-of-the-
house tall. The
D house looks great.
My neighbors also
thank you.
Lost billfold
To the person
who turned it in to
(a) Bealls em-
ployee: Thank you.
The employee left a
57 message on my
)7 phone saying to tell
me that they had it
at Bealls. And thanks to all,
nothing was missing. Hon-
esty at its highest.
Appalling behavior
I, too, am appalled by the
June 16 tirade of a Sugarmill
Wood resident who traps
outdoor cats. They won't be
tolerated here, he claims.
Where is his humanity?
What is he doing with them?
I strongly support spay-
neuter-release programs.
It's the kindest way and it
works. If he is harming
these innocent creatures, I
surely hope residents who
know about him will speak up
and stop this cruel assault.
I wish I knew who he was.
We must not tolerate him.
Flying the flag
(June 14) was Flag Day
and, yes, I have the flag in
front of my house 365 days
a year. But driving around
Citrus County, I only saw a
few homes that put flags
out for Flag Day. Two weeks
ago, I went to Vermont for a
week's vacation. Driving
around all the little, small
towns, the small towns had
more flags displayed than
all of Citrus County. These
flags were on just about
every other street pole, peo-
ple's homes, and they were
on permanently mounted
brackets. Those people are
patriotic. I guess people in
Citrus County just aren't pa-
triotic enough to fly the flag
the way it should be flown.







e 2 ENES JLY 4, 2012



ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Easy fix eludes power outage problems


Debate on bu ying lines resurfaces


Associated Press
WASHINGTON In the
aftermath of storms that
knocked out power to mil-
lions, sweltering residents
and elected officials are de-
manding to know why it's
taking so long to restring
power lines and why they're
not more resilient in the
first place.
The answer, it turns out,
is complicated: Above-
ground lines are vulnerable
to lashing winds and falling
trees, but relocating them
underground incurs huge
costs as much as $15 mil-
lion per mile of buried line


Nation BIEFS

Picky eater


Associated Press
Spectators and contestants
watch as New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg chomps
down on a Nathan's
Famous hot dog following a
weigh-in for contestants in
the annual Coney Island
Fourth of July international
hot dog-eating contest
Tuesday in New York.

FDA approves first
home HIV test
WASHINGTON -The
Food and Drug Administration
has approved the first over-
the-counter HIV test, allowing
Americans to test themselves
for the virus that causes AIDS
in the privacy of their homes.
The OraQuick test from Ora-
sure is designed to detect the
presence of HIV using a mouth
swab within 20 minutes.

World BRIEF

Waiting


Associated Press
A Hindu holy man looks on
as he waits under the roof
of a green sheet to register
for the annual pilgrimage to
the Amarnath cave shrine
Tuesday in Jammu, India.
Hundreds of thousands of
pilgrims flock each year to
the Amarnath shrine, which
contains a large icicle
revered by Hindus as an in-
carnation of Lord Shiva, the
Hindu god of destruction
and regeneration.


- and that gets passed onto
consumers.
With memories of other
extended outages fresh in
the minds of many of the
1.26 million customers who
still lack electricity, some
question whether the deliv-
ery of power is more pre-
carious than it used to be.
"It's a system that from an
infrastructure point of view
is beginning to age, has been
aging," said Gregory Reed, a
professor of electric power
engineering at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh. "We
haven't expanded and mod-
ernized the bulk of the
transmission and distribu-


tion network."
The powerful winds that
swept from the Midwest to
the Mid-Atlantic late Friday,
toppling trees onto power
lines and knocking out
transmission towers and
electrical substations, have
renewed debate about
whether to bury lines. Dis-
trict of Columbia Mayor Vin-
cent Gray was seeking to
meet with the chief execu-
tive of Pepco, the city's dom-
inant utility, to discuss what
he called a slow and frus-
trating response.
"They obviously need to
invest more in preparing for
getting the power back on,"
said Maryland state Sen.
James Rosapepe, who is
among those advocating for


moving lines underground.
Though the newest com-
munities do bury their
power lines, many older
ones have found it's too ex-
pensive to replace existing
networks.
To bury power lines, utili-
ties need to take over city
streets so they can cut
trenches into the asphalt,
lay down plastic conduits
and then the power lines.
Manholes must be created
to connect the lines to-
gether The overall cost is
between $5 million and $15
million per mile, according
to the Electric Power Re-
search Institute, Inc., a non-
profit research and
development group funded
by electric utilities.


Associated Press
Gulf Power lineman Tommy Williams, of Pensacola, Fla., in-
stalls a bolt on a power line pole as his crew repairs downed
power lines Tuesday in Middleburg, Va. Severe storms swept
through the area leaving many homes and businesses with-
out electricity.


New way to think


Associated Press
Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns work to solve a mathematical problem during their class on June 7, 2012, at
an educational complex in Sarah, India.

Tibetan monks and nuns tackle science in the Indian hills


Associated Press
SARAH, India The shouts of
more than a dozen Tibetan monks
echo through the small classroom.
Fingers are pointed. Voices collide.
When an important point is made,
the men smack their hands together
and stomp the floor, their robes bil-
lowing around them.
It's the way Tibetan Buddhist
scholars have traded ideas for cen-
turies. Among them, the debate-as-
shouting match is a discipline and
a joy
But this is something different
Evolutionary theory is mentioned
- loudly One monk invokes
Heisenberg's Uncertainty Princi-
ple. Another shouts about the sub-
atomic nature of neutrinos.
In an educational complex
perched on the edge of a small river
valley, in a place where the Hi-
malayan foothills descend into the
Indian plains, a group of about 65 Ti-
betan monks and nuns are working
with American scientists to tie their
ancient culture to the modem world.
"I'd like to go back to my
monastery ... to pass on my knowl-
edge to other monks so that they
might bring the (scientific) process to
others," said Tenzin Choegyal, a 29-
year-old monk born in exile in India.
If that seems a modest goal, it re-


A Tibetan Buddhist monk uses a
smart phone to solve a mathematical
problem.
flects an immense change in Ti-
betan culture, where change has
traditionally come at a glacial pace.
Isolated for centuries atop the high
Himalayan plateau, and refusing
entry to nearly all outsiders, Tibet
long saw little of value in modernity
Education was almost completely
limited to monastic schools. Magic
and mysticism were and are -
important parts of life to many peo-
ple. New technologies were some-
thing to be feared: Eyeglasses were
largely forbidden until well into the
20th centuries.
No longer. Pushed by the Dalai
Lama, a fierce proponent of mod-
em schooling, a series of programs
were created in exile to teach sci-


entific education to monks, the tra-
ditional core of Tibetan culture.
At the forefront is an intensive
summer program, stretched over five
years, that brings professors from
Emory University in Atlanta. For six
days a week, six hours a day, the pro-
fessors teach everything from basic
math to advanced neuroscience.
"The Buddhist religion has a
deep concept of the mind that goes
back thousands of years," said
Larry Young, an Emory psychiatry
professor and prominent neurosci-
entist. "Now they're learning some-
thing different about the mind: the
mind-body interface, how the brain
controls the body"
For a few dozen monks and nuns,
there is science.
The first group from the Emory
program 26 monks and two nuns
- have just finished their five years
of summer classes. While they
earned no degrees, they are ex-
pected to help introduce a science
curriculum into the monastic acad-
emies, and will take with them Ti-
betan-language science textbooks
the program has developed.
The Dalai Lama realizes "preser-
vation of the culture will occur
through change," said Carol Worth-
man, a professor of anthropology in
Emory's Laboratory for Compara-
tive Human Biology.


Paper


maps


extinct?

Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Used to be, Dad would stuff
a half-dozen maps in the
glove box before setting out
with the family on a road
trip to see the waterfalls at
Yosemite or the granite
faces of Mount Rushmore.
Colorful maps bearing the
logos of the oil companies
that printed them names
like Texaco, Gulf, Esso -
once brimmed from dis-
plays at filling stations, free
for the taking.
But of the more than 35
million Americans ex-
pected to travel by car this
Fourth of July, a good
chunk will probably reach
for technology before
they're tempted to unfold
a paper road map.
Websites like MapQuest
and Google Maps simpli-
fied trip planning. Afford-
able GPS devices and
built-in navigation on
smartphones downright
transformed it and
transportation agencies
around the country are
noticing, printing fewer
maps to cut department
costs or acknowledging
public demand is down.
The drop in sales began
around 2003, when afford-
able GPS units became the
go-to Christmas present,
said Pat Carrier, former
owner of a travel book-
store in Cambridge, Mass.
"Suddenly, everyone
was buying a Garmin or a
TomTom," he said. "That's
the year I thought, 'Oh, it's
finally happened."'
Transportation depart-
ments around the country
are in the middle ofrepri-
oritizing their spending
amid times of falling rev-
enue, and paper maps
could be on the chopping
block, said Bob Cullen,
spokesman for the Ameri-
can Association of State
Highway and Transporta-
tion Officials.
"Just based on the cur-
rent climate, there have
been some cuts," he said.
"I would expect map
printing to be one area
that's been targeted."


Galapagos tortoise a proud pop of 1,781


Reptile keeps species

from extinction
Associated Press
QUITO, Ecuador Lonesome
George's inability to reproduce made
him a global symbol of efforts to halt the
disappearance of species. And while
his kind died with him, that doesn't
mean the famed giant tortoise leaves no
heir apparent
The Galapagos Islands have another
centenarian who fills a shell pretty
well. He's Diego, a prolific, bossy,
macho reptile.
Unlike Lonesome George, who died
June 24, Diego symbolizes not a dying


breed, but one resurrected.
Having sired hundreds of offspring,
Diego has been central to bringing the
Espanola Island type of tortoise back
from near extinction, rangers at Gala-
pagos National Park say
Diego was plucked from Espanola
by expeditioners sometime between
1900 and 1930 and wound up in the
San Diego Zoo in California, said the
head of the park's conservation pro-
gram, Washington Tapia.
When the U.S. zoo returned him to
the Galapagos in 1975, the only other
known living members of his species
were two males and 12 females.
Chelonoidis hoodensis had been all
but destroyed, mostly by domestic an-
imals introduced by humans that ate
their eggs.


So Diego and the others were
placed in a corral at the park's breed-
ing center on Santa Cruz, the main
island in the isolated archipelago.
Diego was so dominant and aggres-
sive, bullying other males with bites
and shoves, that he had to be moved
eight years later to his own pen, with
five of the females. Reptiles are not
monogamous.
A U.S.-based herpetologist for the
Galapagos Conservancy, Linda Cayot,
said Diego is the most sexually active
of the bunch because he's the biggest
and the oldest of the males.
Tapia said it is impossible to know
Diego's age, but he is well over 100. He
estimates Diego is the father of 40 to
45 percent of the 1,781 tortoises born
in the breeding program


Associated Press
Tortoise Diego is another centenarian reptile, but unlike
Lonesome George, who was not able to reproduce, Diego
has sired hundreds of offspring.








n B ES Y, JULY 4, 2012



.PORTS


Deron
Williams
takes five-
year, $98M
deal with
Nets./B4


* Golf/B2
* Cycling/B3
* Scoreboard/B4
* Baseball/B5
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


C.R. pulls out win over Inverness


District 15 Little League
All-Star Tournament
9-10 Baseball
Champions: Dunnellon
10-11 Baseball
Champions: Inverness
Major Baseball
Pool A at Crystal River
Crystal River 2 0
Inverness 1 1
Central Citrus 1 1
Lady Lake 0 2
Saturday, June 30
Crystal River 11, Central Citrus 1
Inverness 14, Lady Lake 4
Tuesday, July 3
Crystal River 4, Inverness 2
Central Citrus 10, Lady Lake 0
Thursday, July 5
6:30 p.m. Crystal River vs. Lady Lake
Friday, July 6
6:30 p.m. Central Citrus vs. Inverness
Pool B at Crystal River
Dunnellon 2 0
West Hernando 1 1
Greater Hudson 2 1
Dixie County 0 2
Sunday, July 1
West Hernando 28, Dixie County 2
Dunnellon 7, Greater Hudson 2
Monday, July 2
Greater Hudson 21, Dixie County 3
Dunnellon 7, West Hernando 1
Thursday, July 5
6:30 p.m. Dixie County vs. Dunnellon
Friday, July 6
6:30 p.m. West Hernando vs. Greater Hudson
Saturday, July 7
Semifinals
11 a.m. Pool A winner vs. Pool B runner-up
11 a.m. Pool B winner vs. Pool A runner-up
Sunday, July 8
Championships
11 a.m. Semifinal winners
Junior Baseball
Champions: Dunnellon
Senior Baseball
At Crystal River
W L
Crystal River 3 0
Shady Hills 1 1
West Hernando 1 1
Central Citrus 1 2
Inverness 0 2
Saturday, June 30
Crystal River 16, Inverness 1
Shady Hills 14, Central Citrus 8
Sunday, July 1
Crystal River 12, Shady Hills 1
West Hernando 17, Inverness 9
Monday, July 2
Crystal River 11, West Hernando 0
Tuesday, July 3
Central Citrus 23, Inverness 4
Thursday, July 5
6:30 p.m. Crystal River vs. Central Citrus
Friday, July 6
6:30 p.m. Shady Hills vs. West Hernando
Saturday, July 7
10 a.m. Inverness vs. Shady Hills
1 p.m. Central Citrus vs. West Hernando
Sunday, July 8
Championship
10 a.m. Pool winner vs. Pool runner-up
9-10 Softball
At Crystal River
W L
Crystal River 3 1
Dunnellon 3 1
South Sumter 3 1
Inverness 1 3
Dixie County 0 4
Tuesday, June 26
South Sumter 10, Inverness 1
Wednesday, June 27
Crystal River 5, South Sumter 4
Thursday, June 28
Dunnellon 16, Dixie County 0
Friday, June 29
Crystal River 14, Dixie County 0
Saturday, June 30
Dunnellon 16, Crystal River 6
Inverness 13, Dixie County 3
Sunday, July 1
Crystal River 10, Inverness 6
South Sumter 5, Dunnellon 2 (7 innings)
Monday, July 2
Dunnellon 12, Inverness 4
South Sumter 11, Dixie County 4
Tuesday, July 3
Championship Game
Dunnellon 8, South Sumter 6
Champions: Dunnellon
Major Softball
Champions: Inverness
Junior Softball
Champions: South Sumter
Senior Softball
Champions: South Sumter


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The Crystal River and In-
verness teams were unde-
feated prior to their
meeting Tuesday night at
Bicentennial Park.
The outcome would go
a long way in determining
the winner of Pool A of
the District 15 Little


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG -
Sean Rodriguez hit a go-
ahead two-run homer,
helping the Tampa Bay
Rays continue their home
dominance over the New
York Yankees in a 7-4 vic-
tory over the AL East lead-
ers on Tuesday night.
Rodriguez, mired in a 17
for 100 slump dating back to
May 21, finished with 3 for 4.
After blowing a three-run
lead, New York went ahead
4-3 on Eric Chavez's RBI
single during the fourth.
Tampa Bay responded in
the bottom half and
grabbed a 5-4 lead on Ro-
driguez's first homer since
May 27 off Ivan Nova (9-3).


League All-Stars Major
Baseball Tournament.
Both teams showed in-
credible poise defen-
sively and from the
mound especially as Crys-
tal River slid by Inverness
with a narrow 4-2 victory
"Well the bats weren't
as good as they were the
other day but the pitching


S/Page B4


James Shields (8-5) gave
up four runs and 10 hits
over seven innings for the
Rays, who have won nine
straight at Tropicana
Field over the Yankees.
Tampa Bay extended its
lead to 7-4 with a two-run
seventh. After Desmond
Jennings stole home on a
play that had catcher Rus-
sell Martin make a bad
throw to second on B.J.
Upton's stolen base at-
tempt, Ben Zobrist had a
run-scoring single.
Nova, who entered 5-0
in his past seven starts, al-
lowed six runs and seven
hits in six-plus innings.
The right-hander had won
his previous four starts
against Tampa Bay


Dunnellon girls snag softball title


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
Dunnellon pitcher Grace
Thompson scored two runs
and held South Sumter to
five hits as Dunnellon's 9-


10 softball team downed
South Sumter 8-6 to win
the District 15 Little
League All-Stars Tourna-
ment title Tuesday at
Harley Levins Softball
Complex.
Thompson had six


Tampa tops Yanks


Fernando Rodney, the
Rays' third reliever,
pitched the ninth for his
24th save.
New York took a 2-0 lead
in the first when Curtis
Granderson had an RBI
double and Robinson Cano
hit a run-scoring single.
Cano, who has driven in
at least one run in a career-
high seven consecutive
games, was then doubled off
first on Nick Swisher's one-
out fly to center Cano was
also thrown out at the plate
on a strong relay throw from
Rodriguez on Raul Ibanez's
sixth-inning double.
Dewayne Wise made it
3-0 on a third-inning solo
homer.
Wise nearly threw out


Elliot Johnson out at the
plate from left field on
Upton's two-out single
later in the third, but a
sliding Johnson was called
safe when Martin juggled
the ball during the tag try
Jeff Keppinger then tied it
at 3 on a two-run single.
Yankees first baseman
Mark Teixeira was out of
the lineup on a planned
day off that was set up
about a week ago. The
break came one day after
Teixeira made his first
error in 94 games, a mis-
played two-out grounder in
the seventh inning that al-
lowed the eventual win-
ning run to score in New
York's 4-3 loss to Tampa
Bay


Serena survives again in Wimbledon quarterfinals


Associated Press
Serena Williams plays a return to Petra Kvitova on Tuesday during a quarterfinals match at
the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England.


Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
- Thanks to a bit of advice
from her big sister and a
bunch of aces from her big
serve, Serena Williams is
back in the Wimbledon
semifinals.
With two more victories,
Williams will be holding a
Grand Slam trophy for the
first time in two years.
The thud of racket-
against-ball reverberating
under the closed Centre
Court roof, Williams
smacked 13 aces at up to
120 mph and overpowered
defending champion Petra
Kvitova 6-3, 7-5 in the quar-
terfinals Tuesday at the All
England Club.
Beforehand, Williams'
father and coach, Richard,


asked his other title-win-
ning daughter to relay
some suggestions.
"I went and had Venus
talk to her, because Venus
can get (through) to Serena
better than anyone in the
world. So I told Venus, 'I'm
not going to talk to her. You
talk to her.' So Venus went
and talked to her When the
match was over, I told her,
'Venus: Good coaching!
Good coaching!"' Dad said
after snapping photos of
Serena's victory from his
front-row perch in the
guest box above a score-
board.
"I wanted Serena to
move her feet a little bit
more and to not concen-
trate on what the girl's


4/Page B4


strikeouts and walked five
for the victory
The Dunnellon manager
was happy and relieved to
take the win.
"It feels great," said

See GIRLS/Page B4




Dragon


boaters


aiming


high


Local team

defies the odds

JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent

A bulbous dragon head
breaks the fog bank with a
roar you could almost swear
you heard. Percussive
thumps emerge from some-
where in that fog the
heartbeat of the massive an-
imal's engine, you might
think. A sound like mighty
wings cutting the surface of
the water follows in be-
tween the beats; the crea-
ture seems to be taking
flight along the channel.
The saurian head pushes
further out of the early
morning river mist, reveal-
ing a crew of 20 paddlers, all
synchronized like the pis-
tons of an engine, the
"heart" of the dragon boat,
driven by its "pulse," a lone
caller positioned just be-
hind the dragon's head, hit-
ting a large drum
repeatedly, keeping the pad-
dlers on pace.
A "steerer" acts as the
dragon boat's tail at the rear,
keeping the motion on line
with the fast-approaching
finish.
Dragon boat racing has a
long and cherished history,
springing from the Pearl
River Delta region of South-
ern China. The sport has
been internationally sup-
ported, and competitions
have been held for more
than 2,000 years. In 1998,
dragon boat racing was first
brought to Florida, pre-
sented at Walt Disney World
in Orlando.
The Nature Coast Dragon
Boat, Canoe and Kayak Club
has been launching its pair
of 22-crew dragon boats out
of Old Homosassa by the
Riverside Inn for the better
part of three years. Started
by club president Terry
Johnson, a 60-year veteran
of the sport, along with Vice-
President George Foley and
Captain Mike Mondrall, the
trio has brought the club
from very humble begin-
nings to one of the top five
crews in Florida.
"Our motto is to be the lit-
tle engine that could," John-
son said. "Our little Citrus
County team, mostly retired,
has set out to be the best
team in Florida. There are
only four or five teams in
Florida who may be faster
than us and we are (going)
after them."
Johnson came to Florida
in the winter of 2008 and im-
mediately joined up with
local kayak and canoe
groups, further participat-
ing in a sport he has dedi-
cated most of his life to.
Johnson was a professional
rower in his youth and a
one-time captain of the U.S.
Olympic dragon boat team
in the 1980s.
When word got out about
Johnson's experience in the
sport, he was immediately
approached by many inter-
ested paddlers to start up a
dragon boat club.
A team of expert builders
(Marven Phelps, Anchor
See DRAGON/Page B4


"Si
^EB-t


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Elliot Johnson slides into New York Yankees catcher Russell Martin on Tuesday, knocking the ball
free to score on a single by B.J. Upton during the third inning.


Rays continue streak ofat-home victories over New York


















OUTDOORS








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CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO GOLF
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YOUTH SPORTS ADULT LEAGUE I








IN THE


SPORTS


GAM


No. 18 hole at Skyview


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Special to the Chronicle
The No. 18 at Skyview is a tricky dogleg to the right; the distance fools many players, who make the mistake of
approaching the hole too aggressively.

Patient, conservative approach is best for this devious dogleg


The final hole at the beautiful is often a mistake.
Skyview at Terra Vista is a rela- Because the hole is straight uphill,
tively short par 4 that players misjudge how far it
appears harmless enough is to the topside of the fair-
from the tee box. way. Any tee shot on this
Measuring only 364 yards line that does not reach the
from the back tees, many fairway will find either a
players hope this hole may steep fairway bunker or
bring the birdie that has ,, some of the deepest rough
eluded them on Skyview's ,.1' on the golf course.
tough back nine. However, The best course of action
as we will see, this hole is is to give some distance and
no gimme birdie, try to find the fairway Re-
Tee shot Wayne Larsen sist the temptation to over-
LINKS WITH power this short hole.
The tee shot at the 18th is
harder than it appears. LARSEN Approach shot
Standing on the tee, players Even assuming the player
cannot see the green as the hole is a plays prudently off the tee and hits the
slight dogleg to the right and uphill, fairway, getting the approach shot
The tee box sets up left to a wide fair- close to the hole is still no easy task.
way and almost makes the hole look The player must factor in the uphill
too easy lie when choosing a club, because just
Often players will try to shorten the playing the yardage will almost assure
hole by aiming right and trying to cut the ball will be short of the target. The
off some of the dogleg. This line of play uphill lie not only affects the distance


the ball will fly, but the direction as
well. It is easy to hit the ball either left
or right of your target off an uphill lie.
Pro tip: Weight transfer is key to
playing off an uphill lie. Think Gary
Player Take a practice swing and walk
up the hill as you finish your swing.
On the green
Once on the putting green, the
player must take into account the sub-
tle slope toward the front, although the
green appears flat. Any putts coming
from past the hole will be faster than
they appear. Putts from short off the
pin will have to be struck more firmly
Although those who try to over-
power this shortish hole often make
bogey or worse, if played correctly, the
18th at Skyview will allow you to end
your day with a birdie opportunity.


Wayne Larsen is a golfprofessional
at Skyview He can be reached at
golf@citrushills. com.


Any way you


slice it, Tiger


has a lot of wins


DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

BETHESDA, Md. In a
rush to announce a mile-
stone for Tiger Woods -
not that his record needs
any embellishment the
PGA Tour revealed that the
AT&T National was the
100th professional win of
his career.
Woods took to Twitter
and said he found that to
be "pretty cool."
It's also a little compli-
cated.
Woods moved past Jack
Nicklaus into second place
on the PGA Tour's career
list of official wins at 74.
Nicklaus, however, is cred-
ited with two wins at the
National Four-ball Cham-
pionship, a better-ball com-
petition at Laurel Valley in
1970 and 1971 with none
other than Arnold Palmer
as his partner
Sam Snead holds the
PGA Tour record with 82
wins. For years, he was
listed at 81 until the PGA
Tour finally decided to rec-
ognize the British Open
(also known as the oldest
championship in golf) that
Snead won in 1946 on the
Old Course at St. Andrews
(also known as the home of


golf). Snead also is credited
with four official wins in
the Inverness Interna-
tional Four-Ball, which he
won with Vic Ghezzi, Ralph
Guldahl and twice with Jim
Ferrier; and the Miami
Biltmore International
Four-Ball that he won with
Guldahl.
And get this -he is cred-
ited with winning the Bing
Crosby National Pro-Am in
1950, which was a tie
among Snead, Dave Dou-
glas, Jack Burke Jr and
Smiley Quick.
So where did the PGA
Tour come up with 100
wins for Woods?
By counting two wins
from one tournament (1999
World Cup). By counting
seven wins from the PGA
Grand Slam of Golf, a 36-
hole exhibition for major
champions. And by count-
ing a World Cup with David
Duval that featured alter-
nate shot for two of the
rounds.
The most peculiar deci-
sion is the World Cup. Be-
fore the PGA Tour took it
over and tried making it a
World Golf Championship,
it was stroke play in which
both scores counted.

See WINS/Page B3


Associated Press
Tiger Woods holds the Wanamaker Trophy on Aug. 20,
2006, after winning the 88th PGA Championship golf tour-
nament at Medinah Country Club, in Medinah, III. No matter
how you count his wins, one thing is clear: Woods has a lot.


Local LEADERS


HOLE-IN-ONE
U Indalicio Ortiz made a hole-in-one Thurs-
day June 28, at the 161-yard No. 4 using a 7
wood at Twisted Oaks Golf Club in Beverly
Hills. Witnesses were Bob Switzer, Sal Cina
and George Angerson.

BRENTWOOD
June 27 -Wednesday Afternoon Point
Quota Group (last of the month scamble)
results.
First 7 under
Kenny McCabe, Ron Cart,
Angie Deyeso and Glenn Connelly
Second 6 under
Sue Bauerle, C.W. Goschen,
Fred Mitchell and Jeff Mc Donald
Third S under
(MOC) Birdie No. 5
Chuck Curtis, Rolf Kettenberg
and Jay Hylemon
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Ron Cart
No. 4 Vaughn Thornton
50/50 winner Lou DeGenarro
June 28 -Thursday Evening Scramble re-
sults.
First 7 under
Dave Gollbin, Maggie Cart,
Chuck Lamar and Vaughn Thornton
Second 4 under
Ron Cart, Lou DeGennaro,
Paul Roy and Jennie Diaz
Closest to the Pin:
No.2 Paul Roy
No. 4 Dave Gollbin
June 30 Saturday Morning Handicap
Scramble results.
First
Dick Emberly Frank Hughes,
John Schott and Jerry Krause
Second
Lou DeGennaro, Steve Arena,
Jennie Diaz and C.W. Goschen III


Third
Pete lacobelli, Gene Moff,
Art Miller and Morris Frank
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 C.W. Goschen
No. 4 Dick Sherman
July 1 Sunday Morning Scramble re-
sults.
First 7 under
Chuck Curtis, Sue Bauerle
and Lou DeGennaro
Second 4 under
Steve Leonard, Mona Evans,
Jennie Diaz and Pete Bauerle
Third 3 under
Malcolm Hollop, Don Oslance,
Jerry Gillespy and Larry Holcomb
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Malcolm Hollop
No.4 Paul Roy
50/50 winner Anita McCabe
July 2 Monday Morning Mens Group re-
sults.
First +11
Bob Staker
Second +7
Lou DeGennaro
"Honorable Mention"
Bob Goyette
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Bob Goyette
CITRUS HILLS
MEN
June 27 -The Citrus Hills Men's Golf As-
sociation played on the Oak's Golf Course
"2 Best Balls Net- Old School."
First -26
Vince Pavilionis, Rod Pavilionis,
John Balais and Bob Fabrie
Second -24 (MOC)
Jerry Czack, Bob Palmer,
Randy Robertson and George Lowell
Third -24 (MOC)
Bill Lindsey Ed Ryan,


and Bob Jones
Fourth -24 (MOC)
Don Morrison, Vic Jamnik
and Dave Obrien
CITRUS SPRINGS
MEN
July 3 -The Citrus Springs Men's Associ-
ation played 2 best balls.
First 111
Rick Hancock, Glen Robertson,
Leon Smith and Dave Balas
Second 119
Bob Manecky, Emil Colletti,
Lloyd Manning and Mike Feltner (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Dave Balas
No. 8 Harvy Jenkins
No.11 Bob Manecky
No. 14 Woody Miner
No. 16 Walt Norton
July 1 Citrus Springs Golf & Country
Club played the "Divorce Open." Two-player
teams played alternate shot after selecting
the tee shot. Teams received 50 percent of
the combined handicaps and scoring was
on a net basis.
First 66
Annie Slick and Tom Slick
Second 68.5
Janet Lillvik and Walt Norton
Third 70
Marge Sibley and Len Sibley
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 (all players) Annie Slick
No. 11 (men) Ron Cart
No. 16 (women) Sherrie Hammond
No. 4 (all players) Don "Pops" Voss
June 28 The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played 3 best balls on front and 2
on back.
First 152
Feltner, Murphy
Manecky and Rocky (blind)
Second 157


Clutter, Marston,
Colletti and Jenkins (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Norton
No. 8 Carry over
No. 11 Hancock
No.14 Sirmons
No. 16 Jenkins
June 19-The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played 2 best balls.
First 124
Doug Sirmons, John Lycke,
Leon Smith and Emil Colletti (blind)
Second 125
Harvy Jenkins, Jack Williamson,
Emil Colletti and Leon Smith (blind)
Closest to the Pin:
No. 8 Don Gonczi
No. 11 JackWilliamson
No. 16 Bill Curry
WOMEN
June 29 Points Quota "Chicks with
Sticks" results.
Bev McGonnigal +9
Essie McLane +5
Char Kimpel +1
Roberta Gendron +1
Lois Bump +1
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Marj Sibley
No. 11 Essie McLane
No. 16 Marj Sibley
"Chicks with Sticks," a ladies points quota
league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus
Springs. Interested players with GHIN handi-
caps should call Jan at 352-344-9550 or Car-
ole at 352-746-2082.
PINE RIDGE
July 3 Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
Winning scores:
Frank Hughes 38
Dick Emberley 37
Gene St. Don 37


OTG winners:
Gene St. Don, Dick Emberley
and Rick Mazzacua
The OTH Award won by Jim Graham on the
No. 8 hole on June 26 was mistakenly omitted.
Golfers of any age or ability are welcome to
join in for a friendly round of nine holes of
competitive golf every Tuesday morning at
Pine Ridge The group alternates weekly front
nine and back nine with tee time at 7:30 a.m.
For information, call Frank Hughes at 352-
746-4800 or email new216@tampabayrr.com.
WOMEN
June 27 -Wednesday Little Pine Ladies
Association played a scramble.
First 25
Barb Schmidt, Lisa Wahba
and Ann Riach
Chip-ins:
No. 3 Barb Schmidt
Birdies:
No. 5 Althea Mooney
No. 8 Joe Steele
No. 4 Lisa Wahba
Closest to the Pin:
No.1 Lisa Wahba
No. 6 Kay Krieger
No. 7 Lisa Wahba
No. 9 Lisa Wahba
SOUTHERN WOODS
MEN
June 27 Southern Woods Men's Golf As-
sociation played best 2 net balls of a three-
some.
First -18
(Tie) Hank Povinelli, Brian Hadler
and Rich Galasso
(Tie) Carl Pedersen, Ben Lee
and Gene Askins
Third 12
(Tie) Doug Martin, Mike Theodore
and Kyle Muzina
(Tie) Steve Ley Richard Johnson
and Barry Turska


Closest to the Pin:
No. 8 Doug Martin 17'-1"
No. 17 Rich Galasso 21'-10"
Correction
On June 23 Closest to the Pin:
No. 8 Steve Ley 4'-11"
No. 17 Steve Ley 8'-8"
SUGARMILL WOODS
MEN
June 28 SugarmillWoods Country Club
Men's Golf Association played one gross,
one net.
Flight 1
First -10
Mike Howard, Tony Schmid,
Rick Wehrheim and AITurska
Flight 2
First Even
Mike Theodore, George Lentowicz,
Al Skinner and Tom Jones
Flight 3
First -5
Ed Koch, Bob Carriveau,
Dick Henry and Blind draw
Second -1
Bill Engelbrecht, Zane Megos,
Charles McCreery and Rod Woodbury
Golfers of the Week:
Low Gross Carl Pedersen 78
Low Net Al Turska 65
Low Senior NetStan Fleming 68
(Tie) Tony Corso 68
Closest to the Pin:
Oak No.3 Sid Kaplowitz 6'2"
Oak No.6 Art Anderson 4'3"
Pine No.4 Barry Turska 5'11"
June 26 Sand Blasters Men's Group
played Team Point Quota.
First +2
Mike Schwabek, Tony Valente,
Zane Megos and Alex Law
Second -6
Sam Hunt, Gus Calleri,
Frank Vanzin and Ken Eckhardt


/

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sagan wins stage; Cancellara



retains lead in Tour de France


Associated Press

BOULOGNE-SUR-MER,
France Once upon a time
in Hollywood, the cry was
"Run, Forrest, Run!" The
message was not lost on Peter
Sagan at the Tour de France.
The 22-year-old Slovakian
won Tuesday's ride toward
the English Channel in dra-
matic fashion, and then
went cinematic pumping
his arms in the running style
of fictional antihero Forrest
Gump at the behest of his
Liquigas teammates.
Competing in his first
Tour, Sagan earned his sec-
ond victory in the three full
stages so far He is picking
up where he left off in May
at the Tour of California,
where he won a stunning
five of eight stages.
On Tuesday, he mastered a
tricky uphill finish and
schooled many older riders
on the last of five small
climbs over the 122-mile ride
from Orchies to the fishing
port of Boulogne-sur-Mer
With the pack split up be-
cause of crashes, Sagan
bolted ahead with less than
300 meters left. He crossed
the line several lengths -
and one second ahead of
46 other riders in his wake.
Switzerland's Fabian
Cancellara was one of them,
and he retained the leader's
yellow jersey for a fourth
straight day after winning
the opening-day prologue
on Saturday
Tuesday's ride marked
the first crash-related with-
drawals from this 99th Tour,
which ends July 22 on Paris'
Champs-Elysees.
The race remains wide
open. After flat early stages,
the Swiss rider has 43 rivals
within a minute of his over-
all time, and that's likely to
change when the pack
heads to the Alps in the sec-
ond week and the Pyrenees
in the third, if not sooner
Overall, Cancellara leads
runner-up Bradley Wiggins,
who is hoping to become
Britain's first Tour winner,
and third-place Sylvain
Chavanel both seven sec-
onds back. Defending
champ Cadel Evans of Aus-
tralia rose one spot to sev-
enth, 17 seconds behind.
Sagan was 15th, another six
seconds slower
With Sagan's Stage 1 vic-
tory Sunday, he became the
youngest rider to win a Tour
stage since Lance Armstrong
in 1993 at 21. Even leaders of
rival teams were marveling
at his skill and potential
after Tuesday's victory
"You've got to give Sagan
credit for the way he's rid-
ing at the minute. When you
see something like that you
just have to stand back and
admire it, and smile and say
well done," Team Sky man-
ager Dave Brailsford said.
"It's a bit like watching
Messi playing football or
something isn't it?" he said,
referring to Barcelona's Li-
onel Messi. "He's winning
with such apparent ease at
the moment that it's pretty
phenomenal."
Sagan enjoys putting on a
show for fans. To that end,
he churned his arms, as a
runner might, in a nod to the
title character in the movie
"Forrest Gump."




WINS
Continued from Page B2

Woods was medalist in 1999
in Malaysia (one win), and
he and O'Meara won the
team total (another win).
Woods and Duval won the
next year in Argentina when
it was truly a team format
But then, why stop at the
World Cup?
Woods played on one win-
ning Ryder Cup team in
1999 at The Country Club.
He picked up five more
wins in the Presidents Cup.
That doesn't include the fa-
mous tie in South Africa in
2003, so you might as well
include it. After all, the
Americans were the defend-
ing champions, and Snead
was able to count a tie for


one of his wins.
Besides, Woods consid-
ered it a win. When he won
the Australian Masters six
years later for his first tro-
phy from Down Under, he
said he was proud to have
won on every continent
where golf is played.


Associated Press
The pack climbs toward the finish line Tuesday in the last kilometer of the third stage of
the Tour de France, in Boulogne-sur-Mer, northern France.


TUESDAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
* STAGE: A 122-mile trek from Orchies to Boulogne-
sur-Mer on the English Channel, featuring five small
climbs in the last 35 kilometers.
* WINNER: Peter Sagan of Slovakia bolted from the
pack along the uphill finish and won ahead of Ed-
vald Boasson Hagen of Norway in second and Peter
Velits of Slovakia in third.
* YELLOW JERSEY: Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland.
The Swiss rider leads Bradley Wiggins of Britain by
7 seconds overall. Defending champ Cadel Evans of
Australia is seventh, 17 seconds off the pace.
* STAT OF THE DAY: 3 The number of riders who
dropped out because of crashes on Tuesday: Jose
Joaquin Rojas of Spain, Kanstantsin Sivtsov of Be-
larus and Maarten Tjallingii of the Netherlands.
* QUOTE OF THE DAY: "Everybody said, 'Do a Forrest
Gump' because when he was told to run, he ran,
and when I'm told to win, I win" Sagan on his cel-
ebratory gesture, as requested by his Liquigas-Can-
nondale team.
* WEDNESDAY'S FOURTH STAGE: Riders set off on
another bumpy ride along several hills, a 132-mile
jaunt from Abbeville to Rouen in the heart of
Normandy.


"It's a thing I'd discussed
with my teammates about
what kind of gesture I'd do
on the line," Sagan said.
"Everybody said, 'Do a For-
rest Gump' because when he
was told to run, he ran. And
when I'm told to win, I win."
Sagan also showed a hum-
bler side, saying he felt hon-
ored to ride alongside the
likes ofVincenzo Nibali and
two-time Giro d'Italia win-
ner Ivan Basso on the Ital-
ian squad.
"With Basso, I feel like I'm
on the level of someone who
would shine his shoes,"
Sagan said.
The top standings didn't
change much on Tuesday
But Belgium's Philippe


"I haven't played the
Antarctica Four-Ball yet,"
he said. "But to have won on
every playable continent,
it's something I've always
wanted to do. And now I've
done that."
To the best of anyone's
knowledge, neither Snead
nor Nicklaus won the
Antarctica Four-Ball, either
Anyway, to keep track of
wins outside the parame-
ters of a home tour can get a
little messy
This much we know:
Woods has 74 wins on the
PGA Tour and is closing in
on Slammin' Sammy And he
will try to add to his total
this week at The Greenbrier
Classic, where Snead was
the first emeritus head pro-
fessional.
Perhaps the best measure
of Woods' worldwide wins is
to include any tournament
that belongs to a recognized
tour, or any tournament that
offers world-ranking points.
That would give him 12 more
and bring the total to 86.
He won the Johnnie
Walker twice, including the
time he made up an eight-


Gilbert, who last year had 18
victories in all competitions
and was the top-ranked
rider in the standings, went
tumbling after getting hit
from behind. He clambered
back onto his bike with
scrapes on his left leg and
arm and kept going, but lost
more time to change a shoe
damaged in the crash, said
his BMC team manager,
John Lelangue.
Gilbert straggled across
the finish line 7:46 after
Sagan, plunging to 104th
place overall. The Belgian
began the day in seventh
place, 13 seconds behind
Cancellara. Gilbert's slide
meant Evans rose a notch.
It was one of at least four


shot deficit and beat Ernie
Els in a playoff in Thailand.
He won the Deutsche Bank-
SAP Open in Germany three
times. He won the Dunlop
Phoenix in Japan twice. He
won the Dubai Desert Clas-
sic twice, most recently in
2008 with birdies on five of
the last seven holes to hold
off a young German named
Martin Kaymer
His victory in the Aus-
tralian Masters at Kingston
Heath in 2009 came at the
end of a very good year that
was about to go very bad.
Woods didn't collect another
trophy for two years, at the
Chevron World Challenge
last December And in his
first full year as a pro, he
skipped one of his favorite
playgrounds Torrey Pines
- to play in the Asian
Honda Classic. That was
part of the Omega Tour,
which featured 21 tourna-
ments and included win-
ners such as Frank Nobilo,
Craig Parry and Ted Purdy
Want more?
Add to that total every
tournament in which he left
with the only trophy avail-


crashes that marred the
stage as riders jostled to get
up front for climbs near the
finish, including one within
the last mile. Some riders
also had mechanical trou-
bles and flat tires.
"The group was nervous.
Everyone wanted to be up
front," Sagan told France-2
television. "There were a lot
of crashes. ... It was a very
dangerous stage."
Five riders broke out early
through northern France's
wheat fields and former steel
industry hubs, speeding
through medieval villages
like Isbergues named for a
sister of Charlemagne who,
legend has it, could cure skin
and eye illnesses. But the
pack of contenders overcame
them near the end.
With about 30 miles to go,
several riders crashed in a
flat portion of road through
a wheat field in a slight turn.
Sky's Kanstantsin Sivtsov
of Belarus became the first
competitor to drop out this
year A Tour medical report
said he broke his left shin
and was facing surgery
Rabobank's Maarten
Tjallingii broke his left hip
in the same accident but fin-
ished the stage. Team
spokesman Richard Plugge
said the Dutch rider was
taken to a hospital in the
Netherlands for surgery
And some 18 miles later,
another crash sent riders
flying off the shoulder of the
road on both sides. One flew
into a wire fence. Spain's
Jose Joaquin Rojas of Mo-
vistar got into an ambulance
and was hospitalized with a
broken collarbone, the med-
ical report said.


able. You can count the '99
World Cup for his individual
medal, and the seven wins
at the PGA Grand Slam of
Golf (he won in 2002 by 14
shots, a staggering display of
separation, even if Rich
Beem might not remember
being there). He won four
times at his own tournament
(Williams World Challenge,
Target World Challenge) be-
fore the tournament
awarded ranking points.
And how can anyone for-
get the historic "Showdown
at Sherwood" in 1999, the
Monday night exhibition on
ABC when he beat Duval?
That night was memo-
rable for two things. Duval
aimed for the rock in the
middle of the 16th fairway
(now the seventh fairway)
because he figured no one
ever hits it dead straight.
Except for him. On that shot
And caddie Steve Williams
refused to wear long pants
in the heat When a rules of-
ficial told Williams he
would no longer caddie on
the PGA Tour, Woods leaned
into the conversation and
said, "Guess I'll be playing


SGoIfSTATISTICS


PGA Tour
Through July 1
FedExCup Regular Season Points
1, TigerWoods, 1,951.563.2, Jason Dufner,
1,849.300. 3, Hunter Mahan, 1,654.300. 4,
Bubba Watson, 1,617.214. 5, Matt Kuchar,
1,423.150. 6, Zach Johnson, 1,419.660. 7,
Rory Mcllroy, 1,372.000. 8, Phil Mickelson,
1,312.750.9, Webb Simpson, 1,297.900. 10,
Carl Pettersson, 1,257.750.
Scoring Average
1, Tiger Woods, 69.04. 2, Matt Kuchar,
69.16. 3, Jim Furyk, 69.43. 4, Jason Dufner,
69.46. 5, Padraig Harrington, 69.48. 6, Rory
Mcllroy 69.49. 7, Justin Rose, 69.54. 8, Lee
Westwood, 69.60. 9, Adam Scott, 69.65. 10,
Bubba Watson, 69.71.
Driving Distance
1, Bubba Watson, 316.3. 2, Jamie Love-
mark, 310.4.3, Robert Garrigus, 308.9.4, J.B.
Holmes, 307.1. 5, Charlie Beljan, 307.0. 6,
Kyle Stanley, 306.2. 7, Jason Day, 304.4. 8
(tie), Rory Mcllroy and Jason Kokrak, 304.2.
10, 2 tied with 303.2.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, Graeme McDowell, 70.98%. 2, Ben Cur-
tis, 70.05%. 3, Jerry Kelly, 69.80%. 4, Heath
Slocum, 69.69%. 5, Jim Furyk, 69.35%. 6, Tim
Clark, 68.90%. 7, David Toms 68.43%. 8,
Hunter Mahan, 68.34%. 9, Mark Wilson,
68.32%. 10, John Huh, 68.27%.
Greens in Regulation Percentage
1, Bubba Watson, 72.36%. 2, Lee West-
wood, 71.63%. 3, Hunter Mahan, 70.37%. 4,
Justin Rose, 70.33%. 5, John Senden,
69.81%. 6 (tie), Ben Curtis and Jason Dufner,
69.44%. 8, Greg Owen, 68.89%. 9, Martin
Laird, 68.41%. 10, Tiger Woods, 68.02%.
Total Driving
1, John Rollins, 57. 2, Boo Weekley, 68. 3,
Brandt Jobe, 76.4, Hunter Mahan, 78.5 (tie),
Tiger Woods and Bo Van Pelt, 80. 7, Jason
Dufner, 84. 8, Rickie Fowler, 88. 9, Keegan
Bradley 95.10, 2 tied with 98.
Strokes Gained Putting
1, Ben Curtis, .872. 2, Aaron Baddeley,
.808.3, Luke Donald, .758. 4, Derek Lamely,
.719. 5, Zach Johnson, .709. 6, Bo Van Pelt,
.691.7, Bryce Molder, .681. 8, Ryan Palmer,
.619.9, Carl Pettersson, .615. 10, Brian Gay,
.612.
Birdie Average
1, Webb Simpson, 4.13. 2, Jason Dufner,
4.11.3 (tie), Bubba Watson and Rory Mcllroy,
4.08.5, Martin Laird, 4.04.6, Keegan Bradley,
4.00.7, Phil Mickelson, 3.96.8 (tie), Lee West-
wood and Brandt Snedeker, 3.93.10, Bo Van
Pelt, 3.92.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Bubba Watson, 80.0.2, Jonas Blixt, 81.0.
3, Garth Mulroy 93.0.4, Rory Mcllroy, 93.6.5,
Gary Woodland, 94.0. 6, Ben Crane, 97.2. 7,
Nick Watney, 100.8.8, Luke Donald, 102.0.9,
Charles Howell III, 104.7. 10, Arjun Atwal,
105.8.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Jonas Blixt, 65.59%. 2, Brian Gay,
64.21%. 3, Lee Westwood, 64.15%. 4, Greg
Chalmers, 63.56%. 5, Martin Flores, 62.63%.
6, Aaron Baddeley, 62.50%. 7, Jim Furyk,
62.14%. 8, Chris DiMarco, 62.10%. 9, Rocco
Mediate, 61.54%. 10, David Toms, 61.02%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Keegan Bradley, 221. 2, Lee Westwood,
237.3, Jason Dufner, 248.4, BoVan Pelt, 257.
5, Justin Rose, 282. 6, Rory Mcllroy 304. 7,
Bubba Watson, 307. 8, Matt Kuchar, 308. 9,
TigerWoods, 349.10, Zach Johnson, 352.
Champions Tour
Through July 1
Charles Schwab Cup
1, Tom Lehman, 1,522 Points. 2, Michael
Allen, 1,266. 3, Bernhard Langer, 1,115. 4,
Joe Daley, 958.5, Fred Couples, 898.6, Mark
Calcavecchia, 844. 7, John Cook, 789. 8,
Roger Chapman, 756. 9, Kenny Perry, 719.
10, Brad Bryant, 662.
Scoring Average (Actual)
1, Fred Couples, 68.81. 2, Michael Allen,
68.89. 3, Bernhard Langer, 69.09. 4, Tom
Lehman, 69.15.5, Kenny Perry, 69.20.6, Mark
Calcavecchia, 69.69. 7, Jay Haas, 69.77. 8,
Brad Bryant, 69.86.9, Peter Senior, 70.00.10,
Jeff Sluman, 70.03.
Driving Distance
1, Kenny Perry, 297.7. 2, Fred Couples,
297.6.3, John Huston, 296.2.4, Tom Lehman,
289.8.5, Sandy Lyle, 289.5.6, Steve Lowery,
289.1. 7, Mark Calcavecchia, 287.9. 8 (tie),
Michael Allen and Jeff Freeman, 287.4. 10,
Eduardo Romero, 287.0.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, Fred Funk, 78.94%. 2, Jeff Hart, 77.64%.
3, Bernhard Langer, 77.25%. 4, Bob Gilder,
76.55%. 5, Corey Pavin, 76.34%. 6, John


Cook, 75.65%. 7, Mark McNulty, 75.20%. 8,
Wayne Levi, 75.00%. 9, Joel Edwards,
74.84%. 10, Hale Irwin, 74.80%.
Greens in Regulation Percentage
1, Tom Lehman, 78.62%. 2, Fred Couples,
75.66%. 3, Kenny Perry, 75.56%. 4, David
Eger, 74.47%. 5, Jeff Sluman, 74.07%. 6, Brad
Bryant, 73.65%. 7, Mike Goodes, 73.37%. 8,
Bill Glasson, 73.15%. 9, Dan Forsman,
73.12%. 10, Jim Rutledge, 72.96%.
Total Driving
1, Tom Lehman, 16.2, Joel Edwards, 31.3
(tie), Russ Cochran and Jim Rutledge, 34.5,
Bernhard Langer, 36. 6, David Eger, 41. 7,
Michael Allen, 43. 8 (tie), Mark Calcavecchia
and John Cook, 49.10, Kenny Perry, 50.
Putting Average
1, Bernhard Langer, 1.735.2, Michael Allen,
1.737. 3, David Frost, 1.742. 4, Corey Pavin,
1.743.5, Jay Haas, 1.749.6, Mark Calcavec-
chia, 1.750.7, Tom PerniceJr., 1.753.8, Peter
Senior, 1.755. 9, Fred Couples, 1.762. 10,
Kenny Perry, 1.765.
Birdie Average
1, Mark Calcavecchia, 4.72. 2, Michael
Allen, 4.61. 3, Fred Couples, 4.57. 4, Brad
Bryant, 4.40. 5, Kenny Perry, 4.30. 6, Tom
Lehman, 4.21.7, Fred Funk, 4.10.8, Tom Per-
nice Jr., 4.07. 9, John Huston, 4.03. 10, Jay
Haas, 3.97.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Kenny Perry, 77.1. 2, Andrew Magee,
81.0.3, Jay Haas, 100.3.4, Hal Sutton, 100.8.
5, Jerry Pate, 102.0.6, Gary Hallberg, 111.0.
7, Bernhard Langer, 115.2. 8, Tom Lehman,
118.8. 9, Tommy Armour Ill, 120.0.10, 2 tied
with 129.6.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Curtis Strange, 64.52%. 2, Willie Wood,
60.00%. 3, David Frost, 57.14%. 4 (tie), Gil
Morgan and Michael Allen, 56.10%. 6, Gary
Hallberg, 55.93%. 7, Bernhard Langer,
54.55%. 8, Sandy Lyle, 54.29%. 9, Vicente
Fernandez, 54.17%. 10, Tom Pernice Jr.,
53.85%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Michael Allen, 80. 2, Bernhard Langer,
83.3, Tom Lehman, 91.4, Mark Calcavecchia,
109.5, Kenny Perry 116.6, Jay Haas, 127. 7,
Russ Cochran, 139. 8, Mike Goodes, 161.9,
Peter Senior, 171.10, Fred Couples, 178.
LPGA Tour
Through July 1
Scoring
1, Ai Miyazato, 69.94.2, Stacy Lewis, 70.18.
3, Shanshan Feng, 70.39. 4, Yani Tseng,
70.41. 5, Na Yeon Choi, 70.56. 6, Jiyai Shin,
70.68.7, So Yeon Ryu, 70.76.8, Suzann Pet-
tersen, 70.91. 9, Amy Yang, 70.97. 10, Inbee
Park, 71.05.
Driving Distance
1, Maude-Aimee Leblanc, 282.0.2, Brittany
Lincicome, 279.0. 3, Vicky Hurst, 275.0. 4,
Lexi Thompson, 274.0.5, YaniTseng, 271.0.6,
Gerina Piller, 271.0.7, Karin Sjodin, 269.0.8,
Jessica Korda, 268.0. 9, Maria Hjorth, 267.0.
10, Sydnee Michaels, 267.0.
Greens in Regulation Pct.
1, Sun Young Yoo, 75.90%. 2, Karin Sjodin,
75.00%. 3, Paula Creamer, 74.20%. 4, Stacy
Lewis, 73.90%. 5, Lexi Thompson, 73.80%. 6,
Suzann Pettersen, 73.40%. 7, Azahara
Munoz, 72.40%. 8, Shanshan Feng, 71.50%.
9, Karrie Webb, 71.10%. 10, Anna Nordqvist,
71.10%.
Putting Average
1, Inbee Park, 1.731.2, JinYoung Pak, 1.738.
3, Stacy Lewis, 1.745.4, Ai Miyazato, 1.754.5,
So Yeon Ryu, 1.757.6, M.J. Hur, 1.759.7, Yani
Tseng, 1.759. 8, Na Yeon Choi, 1.770. 9, I.K.
Kim, 1.781.10, Eun-Hee Ji, 1.781.
Birdie Average
1, Stacy Lewis, 4.11.2, Suzann Pettersen,
3.67. 3, So Yeon Ryu, 3.93. 4, Hee Young
Park, 3.72. 5, Yani Tseng, 4.30. 6, Anna
Nordqvist, 3.35.7 (tie), Brittany Lang and Sun
Young Yoo, 3.26. 9 (tie), Inbee Park and Na
Yeon Choi, 3.70.
Eagle Average
1, Jodi Ewart, 0.18. 2 (tie), Na Yeon Choi,
Pornanong Phatlum, Stacy Lewis and Tiffany
Joh, 0.11.6, 7tied with 0.18.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Hee Kyung Seo, 65.63%. 2, Jiyai Shin,
65.00%. 3, Jenny Shin, 62.07%. 4, Leta Lind-
ley, 61.54%. 5, Sun Young Yoo, 61.22%. 6, Se
Ri Pak, 59.26%. 7, M.J. Hur, 58.82%. 8, Danah
Bordner, 58.33%. 9, Ai Miyazato, 58.06%. 10,
Morgan Pressel, 58.00%.
Rounds Under Par
1, Ai Miyazato, .750. 2, Shanshan Feng,
.684.3, Jiyai Shin, .679.4, Stacy Lewis, .659.
5, Suzann Pettersen, .652. 6, So Yeon Ryu,
.643. 7, Yani Tseng, .595. 8, Na Yeon Choi,
.585. 9, Karrie Webb, .558. 10, Jenny Shin,
.550.


Bowling SCORES


Parkview Lanes League and tournament
scores for the week ending June 30:
MONDAY SUMMER SPECIAL: Handicap:
Sy Leiner 267,762; Joe Barrera 261,762; Lou
Hiller739; Sherry Hiller 296,722; Saad Bouve
287,778. Scratch: Joe Barrera 231,672; Wes
Foley 207,566; Saad Bouve 214,559; Sherry
Hiller210,464.
SUNCOAST SENIORS 9-PIN NOTAP:
Handicap: Bob Desmeules 317,845; Pete
Mavros 306; Allan Gobbi 849; Pat Tutewohl
335; Wanda Klik 317,907; Ruth Delvecchio
838. Scratch: Pete Mavros 243; Jerry Ness
230; Richard Fendenheim 636; Les Beiner-
man 619; Pat Tutewohl 248; Reda Portnoy
241,608; Wanda Klik 628.
YOUNG & RESTLESS: Handicap Adults:
Charlie Stein 286,829; Vito Porta 257; Liz Rol-
lason 702. Handicap Juniors: John Rogers
252,687; Andrew Allen 252; Matt Allen


in Europe next year" And
that was that.
So that brings the total to
99 wins.
To include all trophies,
throw in the World Cup with
Duval, and the team part of
the World Cup win with
O'Meara. Add one Ryder
Cup and six Presidents
Cups. And because team
competitions count, it would
be wrong to leave out the
two titles at the illustrious


252,725. Scratch Adults: Charlie Stein
268,775; Brian Carney 222,601. Scratch Jun-
iors: Matt Allen 223,644; Dalton Gruzdas
182,511.
* WEDNESDAY NIGHT SCRATCH: Sam
Bass 289,680; Mike Pozzi 279; Matt O'Brien
698; Stephanie Flory 226,602; Dorine Fugere
215,603.
* HOLDER HOTSHOTS: Handicap: Bob
Desmeules 317,845; Pete Mavros 306; Allan
Gobbi 849; Pat Tutewohl 335; Wanda Klik
317,907; Ruth Delvecchio 838. Scratch: Pete
Mavros 243; Jerry Ness 230; Richard Fend-
enheim 636; Les Beinerman 619; Pat Tute-
wohl 248; Reda Portnoy 241,608; Wanda Klik
628.
* BOWLERS OFTHEWEEK: Matt Allen, 44
pins over her average, Wanda Klik, 157 pins
over her average, and Charlie Stein, 158 pins
over his average.


Battle at Bighorn (with An-
nika Sorenstam in 2001 and
Nicklaus in 2002), and then
the Battle at the Bridges
(with Hank Kuehne in 2004).
And don't forget those epic
battles at the Tavistock Cup.
Woods was on the Isleworth
team that won it three
times.
That brings the grand
total to 114 wins, which is
still "pretty cool."
Or pretty silly


1st Annual

FIRECRACKER GOLF

TOURNAMENT

PLNTATION Golf Course
onCCystalRiver Friday, July 6, 2012
9 am Shotgun Start
4 Person Scramble $50 Per player
Includes green fees, cart, lunch, prizes, on course Contests.
*Prizes for Longest/Straightest drive, Longest putt, Closest to
the hole/all par 3 holes, Closest to the hole/second shot.
fsApprox. 30% of the field will share in the prize purse.
Must sign up by July 4, 2012 call the Pro Shop
352-795-7211
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SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 B3






B4 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012



Wimbledon results
Tuesday at The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club, Wimbledon, England
Purse: $25.03 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Juan Martin del
Potro (9), Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Marin Cilic (16),
Croatia, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3.
Florian Mayer (31), Germany, def. Richard
Gasquet (18), France, 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-2.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (27), Germany, def.
Brian Baker, United States, 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Mardy
Fish (10), United States, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4.
Women
Quarterfinals
Serena Williams (6), United States, def. Petra
Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5.
Angelique Kerber (8), Germany def. Sabine
Lisicki (15), Germany, 6-3, 6-7 (7), 7-5.
Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Tamira
Paszek, Austria, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Maria
Kirilenko (17), Russia, 7-5, 4-6, 7-5.
Doubles
Men
Second Round
Mikhail Elgin, Russia, and Denis Istomin,
Uzbekistan, def. Mahesh Bhupathi and Rohan
Bopanna (7), India, 7-5, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Third Round
Jonathan Marray, Britain, and Frederik
Nielsen, Denmark, def. Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi,
Pakistan, and Jean-Julien Rojer (8), Nether-
lands, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4), 6-7 (4), 5-7, 7-5.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (15),
Brazil, lead Leander Paes, India, and Radek
Stepanek (4), Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-
7 (2), 7-6 (30-30), susp., rain.
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia Tecau
(5), Romania, lead Steve Darcis and Olivier
Rochus, Belgium, 6-4, susp., rain.
Scott Lipsky and Rajeev Ram, United States,
lead Chris Guccione and Lleyton Hewitt, Aus-
tralia, 6-4, 2-2, susp., rain.
Bob and Mike Bryan (2), United States, lead
Arnaud Clement and Michael Llodra, France, 7-
6 (5), 6-4, 2-2, susp., rain.
Women
Third Round
Nuria Llagostera Vives and Maria Jose Mar-
tinez Sanchez (9), Spain, def. Olga Govortsova,
Belarus, and Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 7-6
(5), 6-4.
Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina (5),
Russia, def. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand,
and Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-3, 2-6,
7-5.
Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Hradecka (6),
Czech Republic, def. Natalie Grandin, South
Africa, and Vladimira Uhlirova (11), Czech Re-
public, 5-7, 6-3, 6-3.
Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (10),
United States, def. Yaroslava Shvedova and
Galina Voskoboeva (7), Kazakhstan, 7-5, 2-6,
6-4.
Mixed
Second Round
Julian Knowle and Tamira Paszek, Austria,
def. James Cerretani, United States, and Petra
Martic, Croatia, walkover.
Bruno Soares, Brazil, and Jarmila Gaj-
dosova, Australia, lead Alexander Peya, Aus-
tria, and Anna-Lena Groenefeld (16), Germany,
4-6, 7-5, 1-0, susp., rain.
Colin Fleming, Britain, and Hsieh Su-wei, Tai-
wan, lead Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and
Andrea Hlavackova (7), Czech Republic, 4-3
(15-15), susp., rain.
Invitational Doubles
Round Robin
Gentlemen
Thomas Enqvist, Sweden, and Mark Philip-
poussis, Australia, def. Richard Krajicek,
Netherlands, and Mark Petchey, Britain, 6-3, 6-
4.
Senior Gentlemen
Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Henri Leconte
(1), France, def. Peter McNamara and Paul Mc-
Namee, Australia, 7-6 (2), 6-4.
Ladies
Martina Navratilova, United States, and Jana
Novotna, Czech Republic, def. Tracy Austin and
Kathy Rinaldi, United States, 6-2, 6-2.
Junior Singles
Boys
First Round
Stefano Napolitano (11), Italy, def. Maxime
Hamou, France, 6-1, 6-1.
Thai-Son Kwiatkowski, United States, def.
Max de Vroome, Netherlands, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
Elias Ymer, Sweden, def. Joshua Ward-Hib-
bert (12), Britain, 6-0, 2-0, retired.
Stefan Vinti, Romania, def. Daniel Santos,
Peru, 6-0, 6-2.
Frederico Ferre Silva (16), Portugal, def.
Marek Routa, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4.
Second Round
Enzo Couacaud, France, def. Karim Hossam,
Egypt, 6-3, 6-4.
Gianluigi Quinzi (3), Italy def. Christian Garin,
Chile, 6-1, 6-7 (9), 8-6.
Liam Broady (5), Britain, def. Stefan Kozlov,
United States, 6-7 (3), 6-0, 6-4.
Kaichi Uchida (7), Japan, def. Pol Toledo
Bague, Spain, 6-4, 6-1.
Julien Cagnina (13), Belgium, def. Mathias
Bourgue, France, 6-4, 6-7 (2), 6-3.
Thai-Son Kwiatkowski, United States, def.
EliasYmer, Sweden, 6-4, 6-2.
Filip Peliwo (4), Canada, def.Yoshihito Nish-
ioka, Japan, 6-2, 6-1.
Nick Kyrgios, Australia, def. Mateo Nicolas
Martinez (10), Argentina, 7-6 (6), 6-4.
Herkko Pollanen, Finland, leads Pietro Lic-
ciardi, Italy, 2-1, susp., rain.
Mitchell Krueger (8), United States, leads
Borna Coric, Croatia, 6-3,6-6 (1-2), susp., rain.
Anton Desyatnik, Russia, vs. Stefano Napoli-
tano (11), Italy, 6-6 (4-4), susp., rain.
Nikola Milojevic (6), Serbia, leads Matteo Do-
nati, Italy, 7-5, susp., rain.
Girls
First Round
Elizaveta Kulichkova (2), Russia, def. Jennifer
Brady, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Ipek Soylu, Turkey, def. Maria Ines Deheza
(15), Bolivia, 6-1,7-5.
Nigina Abduraimova, Uzbekistan, def. Petra
Uberalova, Slovakia, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4.
Oleksandra Korashvili, Ukraine, def. Cather-
ine Harrison, United States, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4.
Ellen Allgurin, Sweden, def. Victoria Bosio,
Argentina, 6-3, 6-2.
Kyle S. McPhillips, United States, def. Aliak-
sandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 7-5, 6-1.
Barbora Krejcikova, Czech Republic, def. Iva
Mekovec, Croatia, 7-5, 6-2.
Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada, def. Anas-
tasiya Komardina, Russia, 6-3, 6-3.


Second Round
Alexandra Kiick (13), United States, def.
Aldila Sutjiadi, Indonesia, 6-3, 6-4.
Ana Konjuh (16), Croatia, leads Oleksandra
Korashvili, Ukraine, 7-5, 1-1(30-15), susp., rain.
Montserrat Gonzalez, Paraguay vs. Anna
Danilina (4), Kazakhstan, 6-6 (7-7), susp., rain.
Zuzanna Maciejewska, Poland, leads Elina
Svitolina (3), Ukraine, 7-6 (5), 2-2, susp., rain.
Ellen Allgurin, Sweden, leads Ipek Soylu,
Turkey 4-2, susp., rain.
Sabina Sharipova, Uzbekistan, leads
Marcela Zacarias, Mexico, 2-0, susp., rain.
Katerina Siniakova (6), Czech Republic,
leads Kyle S. McPhillips, United States, 6-1, 6-
6 (2-4), susp., rain.


Tour de France results
Tuesday at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France
Third Stage a 122.4-mile medium-moun-
tain ride through the Monts du Boulonnais
from Orchies, France to


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
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S- -. CASH 3 (late)
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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
3 p.m. (SUN) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Milwaukee Brewers
7 p.m. (ESPN) Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs atAtlanta Braves
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de France Stage 4. From
Abbeville to Rouen
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) 2012 Wimbledon Championships Men's
Quarterfinals
8 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 Wimbledon Championships Men's
Quarterfinals
VOLLEYBALL
6:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) FIVB World League. (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


GIRLS
Continued from Page B1

Dunnellon manager Ray-
mond Prescott. "They
worked hard. Grace was
outstanding. Our coaches,
Rob Ford and Rich Black,
and our parents were out-
standing."
Haley Kadur allowed
three hits, struck out seven,
walked 10 and took the
pitching loss for South
Sumter
Both teams committed
two errors.
Dunnellon erupted for
five runs in the second in-
ning as the team had three
walks and took advantage of
two errors. Destiny Taylor
reached on an error. Kaley
Collins walked and Taylor
scored on an error. London
Sweat singled and would
later scored on a wild pitch.
Lauren Ford and Thompson



ALL-STARS
Continued from Page B1

was shut down again and
that's all we had was funda-
mental baseball and strong
pitching," Crystal River
coach Harvey Keefer said.
"We're really proud of them
all."
Crystal River's Lane
Ewing and Zach
O'Callaghan each had RBI
singles in the first inning to
take the early lead.
O'Callaghan (two strikeouts)
pitched the first two innings
before Kyle Mitchell
stepped in, recording five
strikeouts of his own.
Inverness' Mike Vander-
tulip (2-for-3 with two sin-
gles) pitched four innings
and struck out five. Vander-
tulip's line drive down the
third base line set up the
two runs Inverness scored
in the top of the second,
pulling dead even with
Crystal River briefly
From the mound, Crystal
River relief pitcher Caleb
Dix impressed while strik-
ing out five batters in the
final two innings, denying
Inverness the much needed
chance to earn precious
runs late in the game.
Holding onto the two-run
lead, Dix struck out the side
in the final inning to pre-
serve the victory for Crystal
River.
"We just had a rough day
with some errors," Inver-
ness head coach Jason
Shepherd said of the loss. "A
rough day with our batting.

1. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, 4 hours, 42 minutes, 58 seconds.
2. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Pro-
cycling, 1 second behind.
3. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, same time.
4. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, same time.
5. Michael Albasini, Switzerland, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
6. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing,
same time.
7. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
8. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Eu-
skadi, same time.
9. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Rabobank,


both walked. Thompson
drew a bases-loaded walk to
drive in a run. Mady Black
drove in a run on a ground-
out and Courtney Desena
walked to drive in another
run.
Dunnellon added three
runs in the third inning with
Cara Hardy's two-run single
doing most of the damage.
South Sumter threatened
with three runs in the fifth
inning. Kadur drove in two
runs with a single and Leah
Zachary scored on an error.
Thompson pitched a per-
fect sixth inning and fin-
ished with a strikeout for
the victory
The South Sumter team
finished with a 3-2 record.
"Tough loss," said South
Sumter manager Logan
Law. "Haley Kadur did well
as a pitcher and hitter and
Tanner Sponaugle did well
as a hitter We have a lot of
nine-year-olds who will be
back next year."


It was a good game from
both sides; Crystal River
brought it when they
needed (to) and we couldn't
bring the bat to the ball
when we needed to.
We just lacked on hitting
the ball tonight," Shepherd
continued. "Total opposite
of Saturday, so hopefully
Friday we'll come out and
we'll have our heads in the
game and be ready to play
against Central Citrus and
make it into the semifinals."
MAJOR BASEBALL

Central Citrus 10,
Lady Lake 0
Central Citrus' John
Fiorenza and Coby Howiti-
neck combined to pitch a
no-hitter against Lady Lake.
Alex Weber was catcher for
the entire game and went 2-
for-3 at the plate with a dou-
ble and four RBIs. Weber's
double came at a key point
in the game, adding several
runs to an already formida-
ble lead for Central Citrus.
SENIOR BASEBALL

Central Citrus 23,
Inverness 4
Justin Mills and Troy
Singh each went 5-for-6 for
Central Citrus during a
dominating offensive per-
formance.
For Inverness, Alex Del-
gado Jr. homered in the first
inning. Tyler Pillsbury home-
red as well, giving Inverness
a slight boost. Kane Ander-
son went 1-for-3 with a single
and helped keep Inverness
alive from the mound for a
bit before Central Citrus
pulled decisively away.

same time.
10. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, same time.
11. Ryder Hesjedal, Canada, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, same time.
12. Wouter Poels, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
13. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Ra-
dioShack-Nissan, same time.
14. Robert Kiserlovski, Croatia, Astana, same
time.
15. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Lotto Belisol,
same time.
16.Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC
Racing, same time.
17. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same
time.


Williams accepts



Nets' $98 million offer


Associated Press

NEW YORK Deron
Williams is staying with the
Nets.
The All-Star point guard
said on his Twitter page
Tuesday night that he "made
a very tough decision today"
and posted a picture of the
new team logo that accom-
panies the Nets' move from
New Jersey to Brooklyn.
A person with knowledge
of the decision said
Williams told the team he
was accepting their five-
year contract worth $98
million.
Williams, the top free
agent available, chose to
stay with the Nets over sign-
ing with his hometown
team, the Dallas Mavericks.
It's a huge triumph for the
Nets as they prepare to
move into the new Barclays
Center to start the 2012-13
season. They gave up an
enormous package to get
Williams in a surprising
February 2011 trade, send-
ing promising forward Der- New Jersey Ne
rick Favors, point guard of a game ag
Devin Harris, two first- Newark, N.J.
round draft picks and cash accepting their
to the Utah Jazz.
But it was worth it for the team announce
Nets, who needed a fran- Orlando gene
chise player with them to Rob Hennigan
build buzz for their move to move on Tuesd.
New York. 6-foot-9 forward
Magic sign Bonaventure,
overall selection
Nicholson draft and was th
ORLANDO The Magic conference play
have signed first-round draft as a senior last
pick Andrew Nicholson, the Nicholson wil


club all of hi
DRAG N edge toward
overall fitness
Continued from Page B1 credited with
the crew into
Dan Nelson, Ken Norquist, racing machil
and Johnson) proceeded to "Mike as th
craft two professional brought the
dragon boats, and over the group that use
next several months, the together, par
Nature Coast Dragon Boat into a real
Racing Club was born. said Foley. "1
With approximately 60 to (build) a ci
current members, Nature (them) togeth
Coast is looking for more in- how to (bet
terested paddlers to help fill durance for r;
spots on its other racing "I run ea
boat during the summer Mondrall sai(
"This team is a very close- get there, I
knit bunch of people work- Things that
ing together as a team, and (prepare for)
that's what makes it so spe- on which di
cial. Everybody is fighting to racing, th
be the best and keep in changes."
shape." Johnson said. The team is
"People hate to miss a members froi
practice; it's (that) much life and age
fun." he added. club sets no r
In a recent Tampa re- who can com
gatta, Johnson's club took Wednesday n
fifth place out of more than tices, only i
50 teams. Consistently over comes brings
the past season (which runs of commitme:
from early January through attitude.
the summer), Nature Coast "Besides th
has placed mostly in the top fits, it's still
five at regattas it has en- and we have f
tered. practicing," B
The typical race distance "It's not like it
for dragon boat racing is 200 no fun. Anyon
meters although the club it's all
placed fourth at a February commitment.
regatta at the 7.3-mile race "Our team
distance with a time of 1 more than 6
hour and 3 minutes. The Johnson said
club has defied expecta- peting against
tions for such a small and 30-year o
organization. still one of the
Competing against the in allofFlorid
much larger and better-fi- Vast cross-se
nanced clubs out of Miami ple come to
and Tampa, Johnson leaves join the club
no room for doubt for where ties, racing
he wants the club to be in just paddling
the future. tices and enjc
"We want to be the top cise.
team in the state of "We come f
Florida," Johnson said con- of life,"
fidently. "Foresters, wi
Captain Mondrall, a for- we have peo]
mer triathlete, has given the automobile ir



WIMBLEDON
Continued from Page B1

doing, but concentrate exactly on what she
wished to do," he continued. "And that was
the only message."
Consider it delivered.
The 30-year-old Williams, bidding to be-
come the first woman at least that age to win
a major title since Martina Navratilova at
Wimbledon in 1990, turned in her best per-
formance of the tournament against her most
difficult opponent. After being stretched to
9-7 and 7-5 third sets against less-accom-


polished women in the two previous rounds,
the No. 6-seeded Williams was on top of
things from the get-go against No. 4 Kvitova.
"You can't play a defending Wimbledon
champion or Grand Slam champion and
not elevate your game," said Williams, who
produced 27 winners and only 10 unforced
errors. "I had to weed out the riffraff and
just get serious."
Kvitova had won 16 of her last 17 matches


Associated Press
ets' Deron Williams shoots during the first half
ainst the Washington Wizards on April 6 in
Williams told the Nets Tuesday he was
ir five-year contract worth $98 million.


d.
eral manager
announced the
ay. Nicholson, a
out of St.
as the 19th
I in last week's
he Atlantic 10
yer of the year
season.
I join Magic sec-


ds vast knowl-
the crew's
s; he has been
helping hone
a lean, mean
ne.
he captain has
team from a
ed to just meet
'ty and drink
racing team,"
Ie knows how
rew and work
.er He knows
ter our) en-
aces."
ch practice,"
d, "so before I
have a plan.
I want us to
... depending
stance we're
e strategy

Comprised of
n all walks of
groups. The
restrictions on
e to one of its
morning prac-
;hat whoever
a strong sense
nt and a good

e health bene-
a social thing
un when we're
Mondrall said.
:'s all work and
e can do it, but
about the

i average is
0 years old,"
. "We're com-
t all those 20-
'lds and we're
top five teams
da."
sections ofpeo-
the sport and
in its festivi-
at regattas or
Sat the prac-
oying the exer-

'rom all walks
Foley said.
e have nurses,
ple (from) the
idustry, teach-


ond-round pick Kyle O'Quinn
from Norfolk State on Orlando's
summer league team, which
will compete July 9-13 at
Amway Center.
Current Magic players Justin
Harper, DeAndre Liggins and
Ish Smith will also play on Or-
lando's 15-man summer league
roster. Liggins and Smith are
both unrestricted free agents.


ers, psychologists. Anything
you can think of, we have."
Club member John 'Jack"
Rademaker is more than 80
years old, but looks 20 years
younger. His late wife,
Sperry Rademaker, was a
U.S. Olympic cancer She
placed seventh in the K-2
500 meter event at the 1968
Summer Games in Mexico
City.
Maggie Neuhaus, a breast
cancer survivor, has raised
$1.5 million to date over the
past three years with her
native Ottawa, Canada
dragon boat team.
Future goals for the club
include a women's team to
compete separately from
the men.
"I'd like to start an all-fe-
male team," Mondrall said.
"My last count of paddlers is
about 16, so we're still short.
"Actually the strength of
our team is, I'd have to say,
our females," Mondrall
added.
Ultimately, the club's
goals are to build a group
that puts dragon boat racing
on the local map, earning a
reputation for Homosassa
as a racer's town.
"My hopes are that we can
get more people from the
local area. Especially those
who live (in Citrus County),
so we can practice and go to
races all season long," John-
son said.
"My goal is to get us to be
right there with the best
teams in the state," Mon-
drall said. "Now we're just a
little beneath that level.
"I have confidence that
we can do it; I mean we are
close. I think this year peo-
ple were surprised at how
well we did and got really
fired up about it," Mondrall
said.
Interested parties who
would like to contact the
club for more information
can visit www.meetup.
com/nature-coast-dragon-
boat-canoe-and-kayak.


at Wimbledon, including 11 in a row since a
loss to Williams in the 2010 semifinals. Two
days later, Williams went on to win the
championship her fourth at Wimbledon,
her 13th at a Grand Slam tournament and
her most recent to date.
Within a week, Williams cut her feet on
glass at a restaurant, leading to a series of
health problems, including being hospital-
ized for clots in her lungs, then the removal
of a pocket of blood under the skin on her
stomach.
"No one tries to have ups and downs.
Some things happen sometimes, and you
have absolutely no control over it," said
Williams, whose only first-round loss in 48
Grand Slam tournaments came at the
French Open in late May "So I think it's
how you recover from that, and how you
handle the downs even more than the ups
can really (reveal your) character."
On Thursday, Williams will play No. 2
Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, the reigning
Australian Open champion, who defeated
unseeded Tamira Paszek 6-3, 7-6 (4) under
the roof at night to reach the Wimbledon
semifinals for the second straight year.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 7, Yankees 4
NewYork Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeterss 3 1 2 0 DJnngs If 3 2 1 0
Grndrscf 4 1 1 1 C.Penalb 4 0 0 0
AIRdrg3b 4 00 0 BUptoncf 4 2 2 0
Cano2b 4 02 1 Kppngr3b 4 0 1 2
Swisher rf 4 0 0 0 Zobrist rf 3 0 1 1
Ibanezdh 4 1 2 0 Scottdh 4 00 0
ErChvzlb 4 0 1 1 JMolinc 4 1 1 0
RMartnc 4 00 0 SRdrgz2b 4 1 3 2
Wise If 3 1 2 1 EJhnsnss 4 1 1 0
Totals 34 4104 Totals 34710 5
NewYork 201 100 000 4
Tampa Bay 003 200 20x 7
E-Er.Chavez (3), R.Martin 2 (4). DP-New
York 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOB-New York 4, Tampa
Bay 6.2B-Jeter (15), Granderson (10), Ibanez
2 (12), De.Jennings (7), S.Rodriguez (10). HR-
Wise (3), S.Rodriguez (6). SB-De.Jennings 2
(15), B.Upton (15), S.Rodriguez (4), E.Johnson
(14). S-Jeter.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
NovaL,9-3 6 7 6 3 2 5
Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Quails 12-33 1 1 0 0
Tampa Bay
ShieldsW,8-5 7 10 4 4 0 5
Badenhop H,4 1-3 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta H,18 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
RodneyS,24-25 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Nova (De.Jennings).
Umpires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Mike Es-
tabrook; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West.
T-2:56. A-26,453 (34,078).

Indians 9, Angels 5
Los Angeles Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Trout cf 5 1 2 3 Choo rf 5 2 2 0
TrHntr rf 4 00 0 ACarerss 5 0 0 0
Pujolslb 4 1 1 1 Kipnis2b 4 2 2 1
KMorlsdh 4 02 0 JoLopzdh 4 1 3 1
Trumo If 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 1 1 2
Callasp 3b 4 1 2 0 CSantn c 3 0 0 0
HKndrc2b 4 1 1 0 Ktchmlb 4 2 2 0
Aybarss 4 0 2 0 Duncan If 2 1 1 2
Hesterc 4 1 0 0 Cnghm If 1 0 1 1
Hannhn3b 4 0 2 1
Totals 37 5104 Totals 36914 8
Los Angeles 000 050 000 5
Cleveland 120 130 11x 9
E-Pujols (4), Hannahan (7). DP-Los Angeles
1, Cleveland 1. LOB-Los Angeles 5, Cleveland
6. 2B-K.Morales (11), Aybar (16), Choo (25),
Jo.Lopez (11), Kotchman (10), Hannahan 2 (8).
3B-Choo (2). HR-Trout (10), Pujols (13),
Duncan (7). SB-Brantley (10). SF-Duncan.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Haren L,6-8
Takahashi
Hawkins
Walden
Cleveland
McAllisterW,3-1
J.Smith H,12
Pestano H,20
Rogers


41-39 7
12-30 0
1 2 1
1 3 1


Blue Jays 6, Royals 3
Kansas City Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AGordnlf 3 00 1 Lawrie3b 4 1 2 0
AEscorss 4 00 0 Rasmscf 3 1 1 0
Hosmerlb 4 00 0 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0
Butlerdh 3 00 0 Encrnclb 3 1 2 1
YBtncr2b 4 0 1 0 KJhnsn2b 4 0 1 0
Mostks3b 4 01 0 YEscorss 4 1 1 0
Francrrf 3 1 1 0 RDavislf 4 1 2 2
S.Perezc 3 1 1 0 Linddh 4 1 2 3
Bourgscf 2 1 1 2 Mathis c 4 0 1 0
Dysoncf 1 0 1 0
Totals 31 36 3 Totals 34613 6
Kansas City 003 000 000 3
Toronto 000 600 OOx 6
DP-Kansas City 2, Toronto 1. LOB-Kansas
City 3, Toronto 6. 2B-Moustakas (19), Dyson
(4). 3B-Bourgeois (1). HR-Lind (6). SB-
Dyson (14). CS-R.Davis (6). SF-A.Gordon.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
MazzaroL,3-3 51-313 6 6 0 3
G.Holland 12-30 0 0 2 2
Mijares 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
CecilW,2-1 6 5 3 3 1 3
FrasorH,10 1 0 0 0 0 0
OliverH,8 1 1 0 0 0 2
JanssenS,10-11 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cecil pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Mazzaro.

White Sox 19, Rangers 2
Texas Chicago
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Kinsler2b 3 010 DeAza cf 63 2 0
Alb.Gonzalez 2b 10 0 OYoukilis
3b-1b 6 334
Andrusss 4 012 A.Dunndh 23 2 2
Hamilton If 2 010 Flowersph-dh 11 0 0
L.Martin If 1 000 Konerkolb 41 2 2
Beltre3b 3 010 E.Escobar3b 21 1 0
Snyderpr-3b 010 Rios rf 43 3 3
Mi.Youngdh4 000 Jor.Danksrf 00 0 1
N.Cruzrf 3 010 Pierzynskic 51 3 3
Murphy rf 1 010 Viciedo If 4 2 2 0
Napolilb 4 110 AI.Ramirez ss 51 3 2
Torrealbac 4000 Beckham2b 30 0 0
Gentry cf 3 110 O.Hudson ph-2b20 0 0
Totals 34 2 92 Totals 441921 17
Texas 000 000 020 2
Chicago 430 090 30x 19
E-Kinsler (12). DP-Texas 1, Chicago 2.
LOB-Texas 6, Chicago 6. 2B-Andrus (20),
Gentry (7), A.Dunn (11), E.Escobar (2),
Pierzynski (9), Viciedo (6), AI.Ramirez (11).
3B-De Aza (4). HR-Youkilis (5), A.Dunn (25),
Rios (11), Pierzynski (15). SF-Jor.Danks.
IP H R ER BBSO
Texas
OswaltL,2-1 4 2-3 1311 9 1 4
Tateyama 1-3 5 5 5 1 0
Grimm 3 3 3 3 2 3
Chicago
SaleW,10-2 71-3 5 1 1 1 4
Omogrosso 1 2-3 4 1 1 0 1
WP-Oswalt, Grimm 2, Sale.

NL

Braves 10, Cubs 3

Chicago Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeJesscf 4 1 2 0 Bourncf 3 3 1 3
Campnph 1 01 0 Pradolf 3 1 1 2
SCastross 5 1 1 0 Heywrdrf 5 1 1 1
Rizzolb 4 1 1 0 C.Jones3b 5 0 5 4
ASorinlf 4 01 0 JFrncspr-3b 0 00 0
LaHairrf 4 02 1 FFrmnib 3 0 0 0
Clevngrc 4 01 1 Uggla2b 3 0 0
Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 McCnnc 3 1 1 0
Valuen3b 4 00 0 Smmnsss 4 2 1 0
Volstadp 2 00 0 Jurrjnsp 1 00 0
Corpasp 0 00 0 Hinskeph 0 1 0 0
Matherph 1 00 0 Medlenp 1 1 0 0
Dolisp 0 0 0 0 Ventersp 0 0 0 0
Asenciop 0 00 0
JeBakrph 1 000
Totals 38 3102 Totals 311010
10
Chicago 003 000 000 3
Atlanta 100 054 00x 10
E-Uggla (9). DP-Chicago 2, Atlanta 1. LOB-
Chicago 8, Atlanta 7. 2B-Rizzo (3), C.Jones 2
(10). 3B--Bourn (5). HR-Heyward (13). SB-
A.Soriano (2), C.Jones (1). SF-Prado.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Volstad L,0-7
Corpas
Dolis
Asencio
Atlanta
JurrjensW,2-2
Medlen H,4
Venters


41-37 6
2-3 1 0
1-3 0 3
22-32 1


5 9 3 0 0 2
3 0 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 1
593002
300002
110001


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
NewYork 48
Baltimore 42
Tampa Bay 43
Boston 42
Toronto 41


Wash.
New York
Atlanta
Miami
Philly


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
32.600 6-4
37 .532 5/2 3-7
38 .531 5/2 4-6
38 .525 6 /2 6-4
40 .506 7/2 2 4-6



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
32 .590 - 6-4
37 .543 3/2 5-5
38 .525 5 1/2 4-6
42 .475 9 5/2 5-5
46 .439 12 8/2 2-8


Str Home
L-2 25-16
L-3 22-20
W-2 24-18
L-1 21-21
W-1 22-18


Away
23-16 Chicago
20-17 Cleveland
19-20 Detroit
21-17 Kan.City
19-22 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
37.538 7-3
39 .513 2 1/2 4-6
41 .488 4 3/2 5-5
43 .456 6/2 6 5-5
45 .430 8/2 8 6-4


Home Away
20-21 23-16
21-19 20-20
17-19 22-22
14-23 22-20
17-25 17-20


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-221-14 25-18
W-124-17 20-20
W-119-21 23-17
L-2 22-22 16-20
L-6 17-24 19-22


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
35 .557 - 6-4
36 .550 '2 6-4
39 .519 3 2 6-4
42 .475 6/2 5/2 5-5
49 .395 13 12 3-7
50 .375 14/213/2 6-4


Str Home Away
W-1 23-16 21-19
W-2 25-13 19-23
L-1 19-19 23-20
W-4 22-19 16-23
L-6 23-19 9-30
L-1 19-20 11-30


San Fran.
L. Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
31 .617 - 6-4
36 .556 5 6-4
42 .481 11 4 5-5
47 .427 15128/2 5-5




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
36 .556 - 6-4
37.543 1 2-8
40 .494 5 4 5-5
49 .388 13/212/2 4-6
50 .383 14 13 6-4


Home Away
27-15 23-16
22-17 23-19
20-19 19-23
16-23 19-24


Str Home Away
L-1 26-16 19-20
L-1 25-16 19-21
L-3 20-18 19-22
W-1 18-25 13-24
W-3 16-24 15-26


Game of the Day


Associated Press
Milwaukee Brewers' Aramis Ramirez watches his two-run walk off home run off of Miami Marlins' Heath Bell during
the 10th inning Tuesday in Milwaukee. The Brewers won 13-12.




Brewers cook Marlins, 13-12


Associated Press

MILWAUKEE Aramis Ramirez
hit a two-run homer off Heath Bell in
the bottom of the 10th inning to lift
the Milwaukee Brewers to a 13-12
win over the Miami Marlins on Tues-
day.
Livan Hernandez (2-1) pitched the
10th and picked up the win. He
struck out John Buck, got Scott
Cousins to fly out to center, but Jose
Reyes connected on a 3-1 pitch and
homered into the second tier above
the Marlins bullpen in right. Dono-
van Solano struck out to end the in-
ning.
Bell (2-4) came on in the bottom of
the 10th. Carlos Gomez walked.
Norichika Aoki sent a 3-2 pitch to the
warning track in center, but Cousins
caught it.
Ryan Braun, who hit a three-run
homer in the sixth, struck out and on
the play Gomez stole second.
Ramirez hit a 0-1 pitch off the wall in
center. His offense lifted the Brew-
ers, who had blown a seven-run lead.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Mets 11, Phillies 1
NEW YORK Jonathon Niese had a
two-run single to back his fine perform-
ance on the mound Tuesday night and
David Wright hit a three-run homer to
break open the New York Mets' 11-1
romp over the reeling Philadelphia
Phillies.
Niese (5-3) pitched a season-high
eight innings and gave up three hits, one
a homer to Carlos Ruiz. His hit in the sec-
ond inning put New York up for good.
The Mets put on a clinic of clutch hit-
ting and slick fielding in handing the
Phillies their sixth straight loss. The only
thing they did wrong was run into two
outs on the basepaths.

Pirates 8, Astros 7
PITTSBURGH Drew Sutton hit a
one-out solo homer in the bottom of the
ninth and the Pittsburgh Pirates improved
to eight games over .500 for the first time
in 20 years with an 8-7 win over the
Houston Astros on Tuesday night.
Acquired via waivers last week, Sutton
homered for the first time since Oct. 3,
2010, lifting the Pirates to their sixth
walkoff win of the season, the first via a
home run.
The Pirates rallied from deficits of 4-0
and 6-2 to take a 7-6 lead on a Garrett
Jones two-run homer in the seventh. But
with Houston down to its last strike in the
ninth, pinch-hitter Jason Castro drove in
Jed Lowrie with a double.
Andrew McCutchen continued his re-
cent torrid pace by going 3 for 4 with a
home run, taking over the National
League batting lead at .360.

Nationals 9, Giants 3
WASHINGTON -All-Star shortstop
lan Desmond hit his 14th home run, and
the Washington Nationals became the
latest team to beat up on Tim Lincecum,
pounding the struggling right-hander hard
early and often Tuesday night in a 9-3
victory.
The opener of the three-game series
between first-place teams was barely a
contest. Jordan Zimmermann (5-6)
pitched a rain-shortened six innings and
again enjoyed the generous run support


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
L.A. Angels 3, Cleveland 0
Minnesota 6, Detroit 4
Kansas City 11, Toronto 3
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Oakland 6, Boston 1
Seattle 6, Baltimore 3
Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 9, L.A. Angels 5
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto 6, Kansas City 3
Tampa Bay 7, N.Y.Yankees 4
Chicago White Sox 19, Texas 2
Boston at Oakland, late
Baltimore at Seattle, late
Wednesday's Games
N.Y.Yankees (Phelps 1-3) atTampa Bay (Price 11-4), 3:10
p.m.
Boston (FMorales 1-1) at Oakland (Griffin 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-8) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 7-6),
4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Seattle (Noesi 2-10), 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 1-4) at Detroit (Verlander 8-5), 7:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 3-4) at Toronto (Villanueva 2-0),
7:07 p.m.
Texas (Feldman 2-6) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1),
7:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Minnesota at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 11, Houston 2
Chicago Cubs 4, Atlanta 1
Milwaukee 6, Miami 5
St. Louis 9, Colorado 3
San Diego 6, Arizona 2
Cincinnati 8, L.A. Dodgers 2
Tuesday's Games
Milwaukee 13, Miami 12, 10 innings
Washington 9, San Francisco 3
Pittsburgh 8, Houston 7
Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 3
N.Y. Mets 11, Philadelphia 1
Colorado 3, St. Louis 2
San Diego at Arizona, late
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, late
Wednesday's Games
San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-4) at Washington (E.Jack-
son 4-4), 11:05 a.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 0-5) at N.Y Mets (C.Young 2-1), 1:10
p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Correia 4-6), 1:35
p.m.
Miami (Jo.Johnson 5-5) at Milwaukee (Wolf 2-6), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Maholm 5-6) at Atlanta (Delgado 4-8), 7:10
p.m.
Colorado (Guthrie 3-7) at St. Louis (Wainwright 6-8), 7:15
p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 3-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 5-5), 9:10
p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 1-4) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 6-7), 9:40
p.m.
Thursday's Games
Miami at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


that had evaded him for so long, ensuring
the Nationals would wake up on the
Fourth of July with a 3%-game cushion
over the New York Mets atop the NL
East.
Lincecum (3-9) allowed eight runs and
nine hits in 3 1-3 innings. Seven runs
were earned, making it the worst start
ERA-wise in his major league career.

Braves 10, Cubs 3
ATLANTA Newly chosen All-Star
Chipper Jones delivered his first five-hit
game in a decade, driving in four runs
Tuesday night and leading the Atlanta
Braves over the Chicago Cubs 10-3.
Jones was added to the NLAll-Star
roster before the game. The 40-year-old
third baseman replaced injured Dodgers
outfielder Matt Kemp.
Jones, who plans to retire after this


season, went 5 for 5 for his third career
five-hit performance and first since Aug.
11,2002.
After singling in the eighth inning,
Jones was lifted for pinch runner Juan
Francisco. Jones tipped his batting hel-
met as he received an ovation on his way
to the dugout. He emerged from the
dugout for another wave to the fans as
the cheers continued.

Rockies 3, Cardinals 2
ST. LOUIS Jeff Francis worked five
solid innings before the Colorado bullpen
took over and Tyler Colvin hit a three-run
homer as the Rockies beat the St. Louis
Cardinals 3-2 on Tuesday night.
Matt Holliday hit his 14th homer for the
Cardinals. Carlos Beltran was 0 for 3 with
a walk to end a nine-game RBI streak in
which he drove in 15 runs.
Matt Belisle retired four in a row to end
the eighth, the biggest out coming on Hol-
liday's groundout with two runners on.


AMERICAN LEAGUE

Indians 9, Angels 5
CLEVELAND Rookie Zach McAllis-
ter lasted six innings, overcoming a
throwing error and two home runs in the
fifth, and Shelley Duncan homered to
lead the Cleveland Indians to a 9-5 win
over the Los Angeles Angels on Tuesday
night.
McAllister (3-1) allowed three earned
runs and eight hits, and he and the Indians
recovered after blowing a four-run lead.
Duncan homered in the fourth off an in-
effective Dan Haren (6-8). Jose Lopez
had three hits and Michael Brantley two
RBIs for Cleveland.
Rookie Mike Trout hit a three-run
homer and Albert Pujols had a solo shot
but also made a crucial error in the fifth
for the Angels, who lost for just the fourth
time in 13 games.

Blue Jays 6, Royals 3
TORONTO -Adam Lind hit a three-
run homer, Brett Cecil won for the first
time in three starts and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat the Kansas City Royals 6-3 on
Tuesday night.
Lind's sixth homer was the big blow in
Toronto's six-run fourth inning. The win
put the Blue Jays over .500 at 41-40 at
the midpoint of the season.
The Royals lost for the fourth time in
five games since matching their season
high with a four-game winning streak.

White Sox 19, Rangers 2
CHICAGO Kevin Youkilis, Adam
Dunn and Alex Rios homered in the first
inning off Roy Oswalt and All-Star Chris
Sale won his 10th game Tuesday night
and the Chicago White Sox routed the
Texas Rangers 19-2.
Playing in his first home game with the
White Sox since his trade from Boston on
June 24, Youkilis had three hits and drove
in four runs in a meeting of division lead-
ers that saw Chicago score its most runs
this season.
A.J. Pierzynski, not chosen for the AL
All-Star team managed by Texas' skipper
Ron Washington, hit a three-run homer
off reliever Yoshinori Tateyama- his 15th
of the season to cap a nine-run fifth in-
ning and make it 16-0. Seven of the runs
in the inning were unearned, thanks to an
error on Rangers second baseman lan
Kinsler.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 B5




NL

Brewers 13, Marlins 12
Miami Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Reyesss 6232 C.Gomezcf 52 2 1
Solano3b-lf5 1 21 Aoki rf 51 1 2
Dobbsrf 4011 Braun If 62 2 3
Choatep 0000 Ar.Ramirez 3b 61 2 4
Cishekp 0000 Hartlb 52 3 1
H.Ramirez3b0000 R.Weeks2b 52 3 1
Morrisonlf-1b5222 Ransom ss 41 2 0
Rugg.cf-rf 4 221 M.Maldonado c4 0 1 1
Infante2b 5 112 Estradap 21 1 0
Sanchezlb5 110 Ishikawaph 01 0 0
M.Dunnp 0000 Verasp 00 0 0
H.Bellp 0 000 M.Parrap 00 0 0
J.Buckc 4 212 Green ph 10 0 0
A.Sanchezp2 000 Loep 00 0 0
Gaudinp 0 000 Fr.Rodriguezp 00 0 0
Kearnsph 0000 Axfordp 00 0 0
Webbp 0 000 Kottarasph 10 0 0
LeBlancp 0 000 L.Hernandezp 00 0 0
Cousins ph-cf21 11
Totals 42121412 Totals 441317 13
Miami 200 000 360 1 12
Milwaukee 003 006 200 2 13
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Reyes 2 (9), D.Solano (1), R.Weeks (10).
DP-Miami 1, Milwaukee 1. LOB-Miami 5, Mil-
waukee 7. 2B-Reyes (18), D.Solano (4), Mor-
rison (14), Ruggiano (10), Ar.Ramirez (24), Hart
(22), R.Weeks (14), Estrada (2). HR-Reyes
(3), Morrison (9), Ruggiano (4), J.Buck (8),
Cousins (1), Braun (23), Ar.Ramirez (10), Hart
(16). SB-Dobbs (4), C.Gomez 2 (11). S-
M.Maldonado. SF-Dobbs, Aoki.
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
A.Sanchez 5 11 6 5 1 5
Gaudin 1 1 3 0 1 0
Webb 1-3 3 2 2 0 1
LeBlanc 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Cishek 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
M.Dunn 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
H.BellL,2-4BS,5-22 2-3 1 2 2 1 1
Milwaukee
Estrada 6 4 2 2 0 6
Veras 1-3 3 3 3 1 0
M.ParraH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Loe 1-3 4 4 4 0 0
Fr.Rodriguez 2-3 2 2 1 1 0
Axford 1 0 0 0 1 1
L.HernandezW,2-11 1 1 1 0 2



Pirates 8, Astros 7
Houston Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Schafercf 5 022 Presley If 20 0 0
Altuve2b 31 11 G.Hernandez If 30 0 0
Lowriess 3 122 Suttonrf 52 3 1
Ca.Leelb 5 1 20 A.McCutchencf42 3 2
S.Moore3b 4011 G.Joneslb 42 2 2
Lyonp 0 000 Walker2b 41 1 0
J.Castroph 1 011 McGehee 3b 41 2 1
W.Wrightp 0 000 Barajasc 40 1 0
Martinez If 5 000 Barmesss 20 0 0
Bogusevic rf4 110 PAlvarezph 1 0 1 2
C.Snyderc 2 2 10 Ja.McDonald prO 0 0 0
Harrellp 3 1 20 J.Cruzp 00 0 0
Rodriguez p 0000 Grillip 00 0 0
M.Downs3bl 000 Fryerph 10 0 0
Hanrahanp 00 0 0
A.J.Burnettp 20 0 0
Resopp 00 0 0
J.Harrison ph-ss20 0 0
Totals 36 7137 Totals 38 813 8
Houston 021 102 001 7
Pittsburgh 000 203 201 8
One out when winning run scored.
DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Houston 8, Pitts-
burgh 5. 2B-Altuve (19), Ca.Lee 2 (15),
S.Moore (2), J.Castro (11), C.Snyder (5). HR-
Sutton (1), A.McCutchen (16), G.Jones (12).
SB-Schafer (19), Bogusevic (8). S-Altuve.
SF-Altuve, Lowrie.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Harrell 5 9 5 5 0 9
Fe.Rodriguez H,7 1 1 0 0 0 1
LyonBS,1-1 2 2 2 2 0 2
W.Wright L,0-2 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett 5 12 6 6 2 5
Resop 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.Cruz 1 0 0 0 0 2
GrilliH,19 1 0 0 0 0 2
HanrahanW4-0 1 1 1 1 1 0

Mets 11, Phillies 1
Philadelphia New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Rollins ss
Polanc 3b
Utley 2b
Ruiz c
Pence rf
Victorn cf
Wggntn ib
Mayrry If
Worley p
Luna ph
Valdes p
Sanchs p
Pierre ph
Diekmn p
Totals
11


4 0 0 0 Tejada
3 0 0 0 DnMrp
4 0 0 0 DWrgh
4 1 1 1 I.Davis
3 0 1 0 Duda r
4 0 0 0 Hairstr
2 0 1 0 AnTrrs
3 0 0 0 Thole
1 0 0 0 Niese
1 0 0 0 JuTrnr
0 00 0 Rauch
0000
1 000
0000
30 1 3 1 Totals


ss
2b
t 3b
lb
f
M If
cf

p
ph
p


371115


Philadelphia 010 000 000 1
NewYork 130 203 02x 11
E-Polanco (3). LOB-Philadelphia 5, New York
5. 2B-Dan.Murphy 2 (23). 3B-Dan.Murphy
(2). HR-Ruiz (12), D.Wright (10). S-Niese.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia


Worley L,4-5
Valdes
Sanches
Diekman
NewYork
Niese W,7-3
Rauch


4 10 6
12-32 2
11-31 1
1 2 2


831123
100001
1 0 0 0 0 1


Nationals 9, Giants 3
San Francisco Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GBlanc rf-cf 5 0 3 2 Lmrdzz If 4 2 1 0
Theriot2b 5 0 0 0 Harpercf-rf 5 1 2 1
MeCarrlf 3 0 1 0 Zmrmn3b 4 21 0
Christnlf 1 00 0 Ankielcf 0 00 0
Poseylb 3 0 0 0 Morserf 5012
Henslyp 0 0 0 0 McGnzlp 0 00 0
Pennyp 0 00 0 HRdrgzp 0 00 0
Ariasph-3b 0 1 0 0 LaRochlb 3 1 1 2
Sandovl3b 2 0 1 0 Dsmndss 4 22 2
Burriss3b 2 0 1 0 Espinos2b 4 1 3 1
JaLopzp 0 00 0 Floresc 4 00 0
Pagancf 200 0 Zmrmnp 3 01 1
Kontosp 0 0 0 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Beltph-lb 1 0 0 1 DeRosaph-3bl 0 1 0
HSnchzc 4 1 0 0
BCrwfrss 4 1 30
Linccmp 1 000
Schrhltrf 3 01 0
Totals 36 3103 Totals 37913 9
San Francisco 000 020 010 3
Washington 023 300 01x 9
E-G.Blanco (2), Posey (8), Zimmerman (6).
DP-Washington 1. LOB-San Francisco 8,
Washington 7. 2B-Me.Cabrera (17), Sandoval
(12), Harper 2 (14), LaRoche (19), Espinosa
(19), Zimmermann (2), DeRosa (2). HR-
Desmond (14). SB-G.Blanco (15), Lombar-
dozzi (2), Espinosa 2 (13). SF-Belt, LaRoche.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Lincecum L,3-9 31-39 8 7 2 2
Kontos 12-31 0 0 0 2
Hensley 1 0 0 0 0 1
Penny 1 1 0 0 0 1
Ja.Lopez 1 2 1 1 0 0
Washington
ZimmermannW,5-6 6 7 2 1 0 7
Mattheus 2 2 1 1 1 2
Mic.Gonzalez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
H.Rodriguez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Zimmermann pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.


-:-I-







g B6 EDNESA JULY 4, 2012




-NTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
The cover of 'The Casual
Vacancy,' is J.K. Rowling's
first novel for adults.

Check cover of
new Rowling novel
LONDON Publish-
ers have released the
cover of the J.K Rowling
novel set for worldwide
release in September
"The Casual Vacancy"
will be the Harry Potter
author's first offering
aimed primarily at adults.
The novel is set in the
fictional English town of
Pagford and deals with
the unexplained death of
a village resident.
Little, Brown Book
Group said film and stage
actor Tom Hollander will
record the audio version
of the book.
Rowling's series about
Potter, the boy wizard,
made her one of the most
successful authors in the
world.

'Spider-Man'
snares $7.5M
LOS ANGELES The
new Spider-Man has
launched with the same
midnight magic as the old
one.
"The Amazing Spider-
Man" pulled in $7.5 mil-
lion from its debut
screenings Tuesday just
after midnight. According
to distributor Sony Pic-
tures, that matches the
amount "Spider-Man 3"
took in from its first mid-
night screenings in 2007
on the way to what was
then a record $151.1 mil-
lion opening weekend.
"The Amazing Spider-
Man" midnight debut
hints at strong box office
through the Fourth of
July weekend, with in-
dustry expectations as
high as $120 million in its
first six days.

Battistelli has a
new baby girl
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
It's a girl for Grammy-
nominated Christian
singer Francesca
Battistelli.
The 27-year-old and
her hus-
band,
Matthew
Goodwin,
welcomed
their sec-
ond child,
Audrey
Jane
Francesca Goodwin,
Battistelli at their
Atlanta
area home early Tuesday
morning. The family then
went to a hospital.
Her publicist told The
Associated Press the
baby weighs 8 pounds, 11
ounces and is 20 inches
long. The couple have a
son, Matthew Elijah, who
was born in September
2010.
-From wire reports


Taylor tries again


Associated Pr
Actors John Travolta, left, and Taylor Kitsch, center, talk with director Oliver Stone during the filming of "Savages


Kitsch moves on from pair of blockbusterflops to 'Savages


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES Taylor Kitsch
struck out twice this year in the
failed films "John Carter" and "Bat-
tleship," spoiling the "Friday Night
Lights" actor's hopes to leap from
TV to big-screen star
Now, Kitsch has a third time at
bat with Oliver Stone's drug-war
thriller "Savages," opening Friday
While the actor regrets the two
previous movies flopped, he's actu-
ally a bit relieved he can take jobs
as they come without having to
work around sequel schedules had
those films developed into
franchises.
"Maybe it's a blessing in disguise
that it died, and I'm not tied to these
things for the next 10 years," said
Kitsch, 31. "I'm free to do whatever
I want now. If I want to do some-
thing in January, February, March,
April, I don't have to go through two
studios to be greenlit."
With a bloated budget and fan in-
difference that resulted in feeble
domestic box office of $73 million,
"John Carter" inflicted a $200 mil-
lion loss on distributor Disney and
helped precipitate the departure of
the studio's chairman, Rich Ross.
Universal's "Battleship" did fair
business overseas ahead of its do-
mestic debut, but it floundered at
U.S. theaters in the wake of the
blockbuster receipts hauled in by
"The Avengers."
Yet Kitsch doesn't regard the
films as wasted efforts.
"I feel I grew an immense amount
as an actor On so many levels, it
tested me. I wouldn't change a
thing. I wouldn't take any of those
choices back," Kitsch said. "I love
what I'm doing. I've started to get
excited again, and I think, obviously,
it was hard on me that they didn't
work. You have bosses, we all have
bosses, you want to do well for
them. But I gave everything I had."
That dedicated work wasn't lost
on Stone, who had seen Kitsch on
"Friday Night Lights" and cast him
in "Savages" after catching an early
cut of "Battleship."
Adapted from the novel by Don
Winslow, "Savages" features Kitsch
as a take-no-prisoners U.S. veteran
of the war on terror, who partners
with his best pal (Aaron Johnson) to
run a Southern California mari-
juana business growing and selling
the world's finest weed.
Kitsch and Johnson's characters
are hurled into a bloody battle with
a Mexican drug cartel in "Savages,"
whose cast includes Blake Lively,
John Travolta, Salma Hayek and
Benicio Del Toro.


Birthday If you are willing to work hard for what you
hope to get, steady financial growth is indicated in the year
ahead. Once you get on a roll, things will become easier
and easier for you, especially in terms of acquisitions.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Be prepared to work a bit
harder and much longer to get what you want. It'll be worth
all the effort you give to fulfill an ambitious endeavor
whose rewards will likely last a lifetime.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) What makes you such a good
promoter is the fact that you can take what is likely to be
an overwhelming idea to others and turn it into something
that is light and enticing.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Someone who feels obligated
to you for a past consideration is likely to be quietly work-
ing behind the scenes doing something to balance the ac-
counts. What goes around comes around.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you and your mate have a


Del Toro,
left, and
Salma
Hayek in a
scene from
S"Savages."
"a Hayek
plays a
stylish,
ruthless
leader of a
Mexican
drug
L L cartel.
Associated
s wIh m a -.h n Press

Oliver Stone picks 5 films about strong women
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Some of Oliver Stone's best-known and most-celebrated
films including "Platoon," "Wall Street," and "Born on the Fourth of July" -
focus on complicated men. But his latest, the violent drug thriller "Savages," has
a couple of formidable females at its center: Salma Hayek as the stylish, ruth-
less leader of a Mexican drug cartel and Blake Lively as an Orange County
princess who must find a resourcefulness she never knew she had.
In that spirit, Stone was kind enough to pick five of his favorite examples of
strong women throughout film history. Here he is, in his own words:
To begin with, that is quite a reduction from the dozens of screen roles that
are still living in my memory, including the evil queen/witch in the original "Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) that truly affected me. I thought Charlize
Theron was terrific in the latest version and chilled me to the bone. Nor can I for
get, for that matter, Cruella De Vil.
In these selections, I'm going to exclude every movie that Meryl Streep has
ever done, because whatever she does rivets my attention.
1. In an equally larger-than-life fashion, I would like to cite Marlene Dietrich in
several roles, but particularly for one of her first roles with Josef von Sternberg
in "Dishonored" (1931). She plays a withering Mata Hari opposite several men,
among them her nemesis Victor McLaglen (of all people!) in an early role as
the Russian spymaster who figures out her act. It is essentially Dietrich's long
looks, even more than her dialogue, that make the point. She talks with her
eyes, undresses men and makes them give her what she wants.
2. In the same vein, Dietrich again for her role as a young Catherine the Great in
von Sternberg's 'The Scarlet Empress" (1934). This is a masterpiece of Dietrich's
power. She is a pristine, almost elegant young maiden sent off on an arranged mar-
riage to a madman. As the movie goes into its extremes (with a surprising Sam Jaffe
as the mad emperor), she grows into a true empress, and ultimately destroys him.
3. Faye Dunaway in "Network" (1976) is certainly one of the coldest bitches o
all time, but is hilarious to watch in her mannerisms, Paddy Chayefsky's dia-
logue, and her cool toying with William Holden's love and marriage. I thought
Dunaway was equally effective in "Mommie Dearest" (1981). She was a better
Joan Crawford than even Joan Crawford. That film rips me up. Dunaway was
priceless because she was not looking to gain the audience's love or sympathy
in any way. Actually, it works that way better.
4. I know I'm leaning toward excess, but if you want a little bit of heart in this
thing, I would point to Crawford herself in the great melodrama Michael Curtiz
directed, "Mildred Pierce" (1945), which I equate with that dark, post-war period
Crawford is unbelievably good, and won the Oscar opposite Zachary Scott and
Jack Carson as a woman determined to provide a better life for her daughter.
Unfortunately, the daughter turns out to be a rotten apple. In the same vein, let's
not forget Barbara Stanwyck in "Stella Dallas" (1937), or in "Double Indemnity"
(1944) and a dozen other roles.
5. To go in a completely different direction, Hailee Steinfeld in "True Grit"
(2010). She plays a 14-year-old girl with a great moral center and moves moun-
tains in her quest. She grows into the heart and soul of a wonderful movie by the
Coen brothers, who have also compiled a long list of wonderful female heroines.


Today's HOROSCOPE
yen to celebrate today's festivities, instead of going out on
the town with the masses, invite some folks over to your
place to spend some fun times together.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Rather than spend your time
simply coasting along, try to find a project or endeavor
where you can express your creative urges. Busying your
mind and hands will prove to be quite rewarding.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't be surprised if you
catch someone's eye and love's arrows begin to fly.
There's a strong probability that Dan Cupid has singled
you out for special attention.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The efforts you expend
for beautifying your surroundings will turn out to be ex-
tremely pleasing to you and everyone else who sees your
place. It's work that will stand the test of time, as well.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Your putting the concerns
and needs of your mate and/or family above your own will


not only be appreciated, it will be cherished and ultir
rewarded.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Start stirring things u
cause conditions that will help improve your material
life are waiting in the wings, and want to go to work
you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Now is the time wh
your leadership qualities are at a high point to be
assertive and audacious. Take control of situations i
that can advance your interests.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Because your nobler i
stincts are so pronounced, chances are you will mal
some sacrifices on behalf of others without worrying
what's in it for you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If the opportunity press
self to tighten bonds that already bind you to a value
friend, take the initiative. You can't ever be too close


Florida
S LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
0 Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

MONDAY, JULY 2
Fantasy 5:20 23 27 28 36
5-of-5 1 winner $207,233.45
4-of-5 240 $139
3-of-5 8,343 $11
SUNDAY, JULY 1
Fantasy 5:12 19 21 23 31
5-of-5 1 winner $182,232.26
4-of-5 298 $98.50
3-of-5 8,804 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
0 To verify the accuracy
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bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, July 4,
the 186th day of 2012. There
are 180 days left in the year.
S This is Independence Day.
Today's Highlight:
On July 4, 1776, the Dec-
laration of Independence was
adopted by delegates to the
Second Continental Con-
gress in Philadelphia.
On this date:
In 1802, the U.S. Military
Academy officially opened at
West Point, N.Y.
In 1862, English mathe-
matician and clergyman
Charles L. Dodgson ("Lewis
Carroll") began devising the
story of Alice in Wonderland
for his young friend Alice
Pleasance Liddell and her
sisters during a boating trip.
In 1912, the 48-star Ameri-
can flag, recognizing New
Mexico statehood, was
adopted.
In 1939, Lou Gehrig of the
New York Yankees delivered
his famous farewell speech in
which he called himself "the
luckiest man on the face of
the earth."
In 1959, America's 49-star
flag, recognizing Alaskan
statehood, was officially un-
furled.
In 1960, America's 50-star
flag, recognizing Hawaiian
statehood, was officially un-
furled.
In 1976, Israeli commandos
raided Entebbe airport in
Uganda, rescuing almost all
of the passengers and crew of
an Air France jetliner seized
by pro-Palestinian hijackers.
In 1982, the space shuttle
Columbia concluded its
fourth and final test flight with
a smooth landing at Edwards
Air Force Base in California.
Ten years ago: Benjamin
O. Davis Jr., leader of the
famed all-black Tuskegee Air-
men during World War II and
the first black general in the
Air Force, died in Washington
if D.C. at age 89.
Five years ago: The Black
Sea resort of Sochi was
elected the host city of the
2014 Winter Olympics, taking
the Winter Games to Russia
for the first time.
One year ago: Venezue-
lan President Hugo Chavez
made a surprise return to his
country after undergoing can-
cer treatment in Cuba.
Today's Birthdays: Advice
columnist Pauline Phillips (the
original "Dear Abby") is 94.
Actress Eva Marie Saint is
88. Actress Gina Lollobrigida
is 85. Playwright Neil Simon
is 85. Country singer Ray Pil-
low is 75. Singer Bill Withers
is 74. Actor Ed Bernard is 73.
Broadcast journalist Geraldo
Rivera is 69. Rhythm-and-
nately blues musician Ralph John-
son (Earth, Wind and Fire) is
ip, be- 61. Rock musician Domingo
I lot in Ortiz (Widespread Panic) is
for 60. Tennis Hall of Famer Pam
Shriver is 50. Christian rock


ile singer Michael Sweet is 49.
more Actress Becki Newton (TV:
n ways "Ugly Betty") is 34. Presiden-
n tial daughter Malia Obama is
ke 14.
about Thought for Today:
"Where liberty dwells, there is
sents it- my country." Attributed to
id Benjamin Franklin (1706-
.1790).






Happy
Fo AtVn,. wn un y JULY 4A 2012


Fi# COMMUNITY
to __


-" fIt CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
fJ ;


* Summer Chalk Talk/Page C2
0 Mini Page/Page C3


News NOTES

Quilters Guild
to gather July 5
The Citrus Friendship Quil-
ters Guild will meet at 1 p.m.
Thursday, July 5, at Lakes
Region Library on Druid
Road in Inverness.
The topic will be on
"Prayer Flags."
There will be a short meet-
ing at 1:30 p.m., followed by
show and tell by the mem-
bers. The group donates
many quilts to different
organizations.
Visitors are welcome.
There is always a workshop
or two going on.
Eagles invite folks
to Saturday party
Citrus Eagles 3992 will
have an Independence Day
Celebration beginning at 2
p.m. Saturday, July 7. In
honor of the Fourth of July, a
meal of hamburgers, hot
dogs and salads will be
served for a donation of $4.
The Eagles Lodge is at on
State Road 44 east in Inver-
ness. All are welcome.
CHS reunion
this weekend
Citrus High School Class
of 1982 is having its reunion
Friday, July 6, and Saturday,
July 7.
There will a mixer at
Stumpknockers on the
Square Friday night at 7
p.m., and Saturday's event is
at The Plantation on Crystal
River. There will be a deejay
at the pool area Saturday,
starting at noon. At the
evening's event from 6 p.m.
to midnight, there will be din-
ner and entertainment, door
prizes and lots of fun.
Cost is $50 per person.
Call Danny Buchanan at 352-
476-1598 by Friday, July 6.


Collector; wdecose!
WILDLIFE PARK TO HOST SHOW SATURDAY
SPECIAL TO THE CHRONICLE


I I


Ellie Schiller Homosassa
SSprings Wildlife State Park is
extending an invitation to area
collectors of all ages to attend
', "its first Collectors' Day
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
July 7, inside the Visitor Center
on U.S. 19.
This will be a great

antiques, spoons, trains, coins, books,
maps, utensils, and so forth.
Exhibitors can share their knowledge and enthusiasm with event
visitors. There will be no fee to exhibit and there is no admission to


I


attend the Collectors' Day
event. Regular park admission
will apply for entrance into the
Wildlife Park. Tables
and chairs will be provided
for exhibitors.
If you have a collection and
would like to display it at the
Collectors' Day at the Wildlife
Park, stop by the park office or /
call Susan Strawbridge at 352- -
628-5445, ext. 1002, Monday through
Friday. Applications and guidelines are available at the park office.
Reservations should be made soon, as space is limited, and can be
returned to the park office, sent in by fax, or emailed.


Knights help
Hospice

Knights of Columbus Abbot
Francis Sadlier Council No.
6168 had its annual Awards
Banquet June 16 at the Knights
of Columbus Hall, 2389 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto. The Knights presented
Hospice of Citrus County with a
donation of $500. Pictured
(right) is Grand Knight Les
Magyar, as he presents the
donation to Hospice of Citrus
County Public Relations
Manager Joe Foster. According
to Magyar, "Hospice of Citrus
County is committed to
alleviating physical, emotional
and spiritual discomfort so that
life may be enjoyed to the
fullest, permitting the
culmination of life events to
come together in a most
profound way." Charity is the
first principle of the Knights of
Columbus, and the group's
charitable activities encompass
a variety of local, national and
international projects. Visit the
Knights of Columbus on the
Web at www.kofc.org.


Special to the Chronicle


Bring home kitty
for half price
Citrus County Animal Shel-
ter offers half-price adoptions
during July for cats and
kittens. The $17.50 adoption
fee includes: spay/neuter,
vaccinations, microchipping,
worming, flea pill and blood
test.
For more information about
pet adoption from the shelter
and to view pictures of all the
animals available for adop-
tion, visit www.citruscritters.
com, or call 352-746-8400.
And to learn more about the
nonprofit volunteer organiza-
tion Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services (FOCCAS),
visit www.friendsofccas.org,
or call 352-201-8664.
Mended Hearts
to take a break
Mended Hearts of Citrus
County meetings for July and
August will be suspended.
The next meeting will be at
10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 13, in
the Gulf Room at the Historic
Citrus High School (old red
brick building)
Parking is available in Lot
"A" across from the main en-
trance of Citrus Memorial
hospital; the shuttle service is
available.
Meetings are open to the
public. For more information,
call Millie King, president, at
352-637-5525 or Cardio-
Vascular Services at 352-
344-6416. Visit at www.
mendedheartsofcitrus.org.


Knights have class -

The St. Scholastica Council No. 14485 recently had a training
session for its newer members. Ron Kornatowski, representative for
the council, said that too often many clubs, organizations and other
groups do not follow up with the new members. This, in turn, causes
those members to lose interest and become nonfunctional within
that group or to leave it altogether. New members join for a reason,
said Kornatowski, they want to be part of something and have a lot
to offer. The council decided to hold a training session for all its
new members to show them the organizational structure,
what the Knights are all about and the many fields available to
them to improve the community, church and families. Also
discussed were the benefits given and available to all Knights of
Columbus. Instructors for the class were Bill Fischer, program
Director (standing), Vic Jamnik, council director (seated on right)
and Kornatowski, church director and council lecturer (not
pictured). Attendees are George Fanning, Wayne Pulsifer, Ben
DiVona, Bill Matos, Ray Perkins, Armand Goulet and Austin
Johnson, their youngest member at age 18. If you are a practicing
Catholic 18 years or older and would like to join the Knights of
Columbus or just want more information, '
call Kornatowski at 352-563-5994.
Special to the Chronicle



Celebrating milestones with education, entertainment


ummer is in full swing. In re-
cent years, more people have
remained in town during the
summer and we are delighted to
provide opportunities for all to
enjoy
On July 6, from 6 to 8 p.m., the
Floral City Heritage Coun-
cil will present the "Sum-
mer Whites Book
Presentation and Signing,"
celebrating the new book
"Floral City" This is the
newest book in Arcadia
Publishing's "Images of
America" series Coral
Gables, Jacksonville, San
Diego and many others
have been chosen in the Mary.
past. CITR
These are historical HIST4
photograph books: 128 SO
pages with two photos per
page; cost is $21.99; all pro-
ceeds go to the Heritage 0 Reac
Council. Authors Tom about
Ritchie, Paulette Lash Histc
Ritchie and Frank Peters Cour
will be at the event to sign the F
copies. Wine and refresh- Whe
ments will be available. in to
Cost is $10. Chro
On Aug. 4, from 10 a.m.


to 2 p.m., the Floral City Friends of


I
K





d
n
)n


other books.
Big news! In 2011, Floral City
Friends were able to donate $15,000
to the county library system. This is
a large amount of money and we are
working on the 2012 donation.
All the efforts by so many people
sure have paid a boun-
tiful dividend for our li-
braries. Thank you, to
all.
e, The recent "Floral
City Garden Tour with
SL Historical Overtones -
Art, Music and Choco-
Slate Tasting" was a
Huge success, with
more than 240 folks
\nn Lynn coming out to discover
US CO. Floral City shops, the
ORICAL museum, gardens and
CIETY chocolate. Thanks to all
the Garden Club and
Heritage Council mem-
more bers who made this a
t the huge success. Next tour
ric is 2014.
house in The 100-year celebra-
emember tion of the Historical
Section Courthouse and the
day's 125-year anniversary of
nicle. the formation of Citrus
County was a huge suc-
cess with more than 450 people


the Library will have a mini book showing up for great speeches,
sale at the library featuring opening of the time capsule, tours
children's and a large variety of of the museum galleries and great


cake pops (thanks to Janine Burns).
Thanks to all who made it possible.
As we approach mid-year, the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum is
looking forward to the future with
anticipation and excitement. We
have been very encouraged by the
past six months, chock-full of activ-
ities and events such as the Con-
certs at the Courthouse, Jazz at the
Museum and the "When Elvis Came
to Town" production.
Highlights also included the
Florida Humanities Council-spon-
sored presenter J.D. Sutton (por-
traying in first person William
Bartram), Jack Davis presenting on
"Florida and the Gulf of Mexico:
Wisdom, History and Hope," and an
art exhibition created by the Citrus
County School District art teachers
titled "Art Teachers Making Art."
Another display interpreted 100
years of Girl Scouting in Florida
and was titled "Sisters All, Scouts
Forever" and was just one of the
many events, activities and exhibi-
tions to receive resounding good
reviews.
We will continue to produce valu-
able educational and cultural pro-
grams and to maintain the grounds
and lovely facilities here at the his-
toric courthouse, as the cultural
icon of the county, area and state for
which we have become known.
Despite the slow local economy,


we are making financial progress,
as well. Because of our fundraising
events, the Citrus County Historical
Society is on track to make another
monetary contribution to the Citrus
County Board of County Commis-
sioners for the continued mainte-
nance and preservation efforts to
the 1912 Citrus County Courthouse.
Did you know that our courthouse
houses administrative offices of the
society, the Citrus County Historical
Resources Office and the museum
itself, as well as the Citrus County
Archives and Library used exten-
sively by folks searching out history
of family members?
Also, did you know that in the
archives you can check out the
handwritten ledger from the Sher-
iff's Office from the 1880s? If noth-
ing else, the beautiful penmanship
is great to see.
My grandson once told me it was
lovely, but he was more of an instant
messaging type of guy well, I
tried.
Next month we will have a pre-
view of what is coming up in the fall.
Look for information about the
Dead People's Prom event. It could
prove very interesting.

MaryAnn Lynn is corresponding
secretary for the
Citrus County Historical Society


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed, community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


II'





C2 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012

HONORS
Dylan T. Davis, of Crystal
River, has been named to the
President's List for spring se-
mester at Northwood University
in Midland, Mich. To make the
President's List, students must
earn a 3.85 grade point aver-
age on a 4.0 scale.
FUNDRAISERS
Scholarships and contests
Crystal River Woman's
Club Education Department
awards two $1,000 scholar-
ships to women who wish to
change their lives by increasing
their education.
Applicants must reside in
Citrus County. The scholarships
are not for students presently
enrolled in high school.
Applications may be re-
quested by calling Jo Ann
Ryan, CRWC Education De-
partment chairman, at 352-382-
1138. Applications must be
completed before July 18.
The College of Central
Florida is now awarding
dozens of scholarships to
qualifying students interested in
taking honors classes at the
Citrus campus this fall semes-
ter. A major component of CF's
Honors Institute, the Commu-
nity of Scholars Honors Pro-
gram offers incoming high
school graduates two-year tu-
ition scholarships, currently val-
ued at $3,000 per academic
year, while offering partial
scholarships to those who are
currently attending CF.
Students in the honors pro-
gram are free to pursue the de-
gree option of their choosing at
CF, with the scholarship re-
quirement being successful
participation in a limited number
of honors-level classes that
also serve to fulfill degree re-
quirements. Students may also
take classes at any of the CF
locations each term, and are
not bound to enrolling only in
classes offered at the Citrus
campus. Besides financial ben-
efits, the Community of Schol-
ars offers members priority
registration each term.
Typically, a cumulative high
school GPA of 3.75 is needed
to qualify for the Community of
Scholars, although applications
for those with a slightly lower
GPA may be considered in
some cases. Students wishing
to be considered for scholar-
ships should call Dr. June Hall
at 352-746-6721.
CLASSES AND COURSES
For information about out-
doors and recreational classes
in Citrus County, see the Sun-
day Sports section of the
Chronicle.
A new addition is coming
for the Adult Literacy Pro-
gram offered at Coastal Re-
gional Library in Crystal River.
During July and August, Pre-
GED Math and Pre-GED Lan-


guage Arts Part I will be
offered.
The library's Adult Literacy
Education Program assists
learners studying for and work-
ing toward their GEDs on a
one-on-one tutoring basis. The
library's Adult Literacy Educa-
tion Program provides them
with direct instruction, new skills
and the self-confidence to
eventually take the GED exam.
In order to meet the learning
demands of the community, the
library system will soon be of-
fering the group Pre-GED
classes at the Coastal Region
Library in Crystal River.
All class times will be from
5 to 6:45 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call Charlyn at 352-
795-3716.
The Art of Calligraphy art
class is offered every Thursday
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at The Gar-
den Shed, 2423 S. Rock-
crusher Road., Homosassa.
Call Louise at 352-503-7063 for
more information.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute would like input from
community members regarding
what classes they would like to
see offered at the school. To
offer suggestions, log on to
www.wtionline.cc, then click on
"Community Education" and fill
out a suggestion form.
The Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute is accepting appli-
cations for various programs
and classes. Classes start
Aug. 8, unless otherwise noted.
Air Conditioning, Refriger-
ation and Heating Technology.
Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays. The class is
three sessions. The cost per
session is about $1,440; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. NCCER certification is
available.
Automotive Collision Re-
pair and Refinishing. Classes
meet at 7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.
weekdays. The class is three
sessions. The cost is about
$1,560 per session; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. Program is NATEF/ASE
certified.
Automotive Service Tech-
nology I & II. Classes meet 7:45
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays.
The class is four sessions. The
cost per session is about
$1,560; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional. Program is
NATEF/ASE certified.
Commercial Foods and
Culinary Arts. Classes meet
7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. week-
days. The course is three ses-
sions. The cost per session is
about $1,560; books, supplies


and lab fees are additional.
Food preparation and serving
activities are an integral part of
the course. ServSafe certifica-
tion is available.
Corrections Officer.
Classes meet 5 to 10 p.m.
Monday to Thursday for 420
hours approximately five
months. The cost is approxi-
mately $1,300 and does not in-
clude lab fees, books and
uniforms. The state certification
exam fee is an additional cost.
For more information, visit the
website www.ccpstc.
Cosmetology. Classes
meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.
weekdays. The course is ap-
proximately 11 months and pre-
pares students for the licensing
exam. The cost per session is
about $1,600; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. Stu-
dents must attend an orienta-
tion session before the start of
the program.
Early Childhood Educa-
tion. Classes meet 7:45 a.m. to
2:45 p.m. weekdays. The pro-
gram length is 600 hours. Stu-
dents receive part I and part II
state-mandated child care train-
ing in order to prepare for the
state competency examina-
tions. Tuition is about $1,600;
books, supplies and lab fees
are additional.
Electricity. Classes meet
7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. week-
days. The course is two ses-
sions. The cost per session is
about $1,560; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. The
program is NCCER-certified.
Firefighter I. Classes meet
two days per week from 5 until
10 p.m. and every other Satur-
day for 225 hours approxi-
mately 16 weeks. The cost is
approximately $720 and does
not include books, lab fees, uni-
forms or bunker gear.
For more information, visit
the website www.ccpstc.com
Industrial Machinery Main-
tenance. Classes meet 7:45
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays.
The course is three sessions.
The cost per session is about
$1,560; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional. The pro-
gram is NCCER-certified.
Law Enforcement Officer.
Classes meet 5 to 10 p.m.
Monday to Thursday for 770
hours approximately 10
months. The cost is about
$2,200 and does not include
lab fees, books and uniforms.
The state certification exam fee
is an additional cost. Financial
assistance is available for quali-
fied students. Some Saturday
classes are required.


For more information, visit
the website www.ccpstc.com.
Massage Therapy.
Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays. The program
length is 750 hours. Tuition is
about $1,995; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. This
program is designed to prepare
students for employment as Li-
censed Massage Therapists.
Upon completion of the pro-
gram graduates must take the
board-approved examination to
practice as massage therapists.
Medical Administrative
Specialist. Classes meet 8:15
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. weekdays.
The course is two sessions.
The cost per session is about
$1,400; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional. Certified
Medical Administrative Assis-
tant (CMAA) certification is
available.
Network Systems Adminis-
tration. Classes meet 8:15 a.m.
to 2:45 p.m. weekdays. The
course is two sessions. The
cost per session is about
$1,400; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional. This is a vi-
able career path with multiple
opportunities for advancement.
Workers generally start out in
support positions and then ad-
vance as they become more
knowledgeable about the com-
puter systems. There are sev-
eral industry certifications
offered through Microsoft,
Cisco, Red Hat and CompTIA
Network +.
Nursing Assistant. Classes
meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.
weekdays, and are four weeks
long and will begin August 8.
The cost is about $320; books,
supplies and lab fees are addi-
tional. CPR certification is in-
cluded. Licensing exam is
available upon successful com-
pletion of the program.
Patient Care Assistant.
Classes meet 8:15 a.m. to 2:45
p.m. weekdays, for 11 weeks.
This course includes Nursing
Assistant and Home Health
Aide certifications and will begin
September 10. The cost is
about $772; books, supplies
and lab fees are additional. Li-
censing exam is available upon
successful completion of the
program.
Applied Welding Technol-
ogy. Classes meet 7:45 a.m. to
2:45 p.m. weekdays. The
course is two sessions. The
cost per session is about
$1,560; books, supplies and lab
fees are additional. AWS certifi-
cation is available.
Financial assistance is avail-
able for qualified students. Most


programs are approved for vet-
erans' training. For information,
call Student Services at 352-
726-2430, ext. 4326; or visit the
website at www.wtionline.cc.
Join the excitement as the
Homosassa Public Library be-
gins a new Celebrate Reading
program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.
Celebrate Reading is a ses-
sion consisting of two programs
geared toward helping pre-
school and elementary school-
age children develop literacy
skills, improve their reading and
gain a love of books.
The first program, PAWS to
Read, gives children the oppor-
tunity to build confidence in
their reading ability by reading
aloud to a certified therapist.
The second program, Read-
ing Pals, pairs teens and
younger children together.
Teens read storybooks aloud to
one or two younger children at
a time. Children may wish to
draw or write about a story they
like.
Listening to stories, talking
about stories and reading aloud
are great ways to improve liter-
acy skills while having a good
time. For information, call 352-
628-5626.
MISCELLANEOUS
The Citrus County School
Board is accepting applications
for charter schools for the
2013-14 school year. Applica-
tions and instructions will be
provided to all requestors. All
completed applications must be
received by the superintendent
on or before 4:30 p.m. Aug. 1.
Call 352-726-1931, ext. 2235.
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Central Ridge
and Robert Halleen clubs seek
mentors to work with their
members. The two clubs have
received federal grants through


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Boys & Girls Clubs of America,
allowing mentors to come into
the clubs to serve as tutors and
special friends of members. All
mentors will undergo complete
background security checks
with fingerprinting. Cost of
background checks will be cov-
ered in most cases through
grant funding by the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Mentors may be assigned
more than one child. A training
session will be done prior to
mentoring. All mentoring will be
done at the club sites. Those
who are interested may call
Amy Stonestreet at 352-
270-8841 or Lane Vick at
352-621-9225.
Take Stock in Children is
a mentoring program that offers
a college scholarship and the
promise of hope to deserving
youths in Citrus County. Take
Stock scholars join the program
in the sixth, seventh, or eighth
grades and are assigned a
mentor who meets with their
student once a week, during
regular school hours, and helps
the student achieve their goal
of a graduating from high
school and going to college.
The mentor commitment in-
volves working with scholars
each week during regular
school hours, believing in the
student, and helping the stu-
dent believe in themselves.
The program is actively
seeking male and female role
models to help support active
student scholars, as well as
new students.
Call Pat Lancaster at 352-
422-2348 or 352-344-0855 for
more information and to sign up
for the next mentor training.
Girl Scouts of West Cen-
tral Florida (GSWCF) is seek-
ing troop leaders, both men
and women over age 18, to vol-
unteer as positive adult role
models for girls. In addition to
troop leaders, GSWCF is seek-
ing volunteers to fill a variety of
other positions. For more infor-
mation on volunteering with
GSWCF, visit www.gswcf.org or
contact Kristie Wiley at
813-262-1765 or
volunteer@gswcf.org.


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Mon-Sat 11-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SThe Mini ?Pae
Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large
2012Universal Uclick


from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick
225th Anniversary


Our Country's Supreme Law


Last week, Mini Page readers
learned about the Magna Carta,
an English document that assured
"freemen" their rights.
Did you know that America's
"Charters of Freedom" the
Declaration of Independence,
Constitution and Bill of Rights -
inherited some ideas from the Magna
Carta?
This year is the 225th anniversary
of the U.S. Constitution. The Mini Page
celebrates with an issue exploring the
document that outlines the United
States' supreme law of the land.
Our Constitution
The U.S. Constitution is a set of
basic laws that organize, grant and
limit the powers of our government. It
applies to every U.S. citizen.
The Constitution is handwritten on
four parchment pages. Each page is
about 29 inches high and 24 inches
wide.
Visitors to
Washington,
D.C., can see the
Constitution at the
National Archives. The National
An archive is Archives in
a place where Washington, D.C.
important documents are preserved.


This is the first page of the U.S. Constitution.
It starts with the famous words, "We the
people." In 1787, when the Constitution
was written, there were almost 4 million
people living in the United States. Today
there are more than 300 million.
Constitution fact-a-roonies
It was created in Philadelphia ...
during the summer of 1787 ...
in secret...
in about 100 days.
It has 39 signers ...
and is made up of a preamble,
seven articles and 27 amendments,
which were added later.


Connection to the Magna Carta
Article VI (6) of the Constitution
establishes it as the "Supreme Law of
the Land." This idea of a higher law
that cannot be overruled, even by a
king, comes from the Magna Carta.
Rights for people
The Fifth Amendment guarantees
that "No person shall ... be deprived of
life, liberty,
or property,
without
due process
of law."
This echoes
the Magna
Carta
provision that says, "No freeman
shall be taken, imprisoned ... or in
any other way destroyed ... except by
the lawful judgment of his peers, or
by the law of the land. To no one will
we sell, to none will we deny or delay,
right or justice." This means that
people have the right to a fair trial
to determine their guilt before being
punished.
The Colonists' demands for "life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness"
are similar to the barons' demands for
their rights in the Magna Carta.


Mini Spy...
Mini Spy and her friends are visiting the Constitution at the
National Archives in Washington, D.C. See if you can find:
* arrow ring peanut mushroom heart fish
* ladder mug book number 3 word MINI
* ice cream umbrella eyeglasses letter E
cone letter J letter D fish hook


Meet Paul Watson
N Paul Watson is captain of a ship, the Steve Irwin.
He is also the founder and head of the nonprofit
group Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. The
group tries to make sure people follow laws
protecting marine animals and their habitats.
SOne of the group's main actions is to put
themselves between harpooners and the whales
that harpooners are illegally trying to kill. The
team's exciting efforts to help the whales are shown
in a documentary, or real-life, series on Animal Planet called "Whale Wars."
Before beginning his career as an environmentalist about 30 years
ago, Paul served in the merchant marines and in the Canadian Coast
Guard. He co-founded a branch of the environmental group Greenpeace
in Canada. He led Greenpeace expeditions to save harp seals from
hunters.
Paul has written six books and lectures throughout the world about
conservation.
from Th Mini Pag 2012 Un.esal Udk

SGs 0oodsport's aepat
Supersport: Bernard Lagat
EnHeight: 5-8 Birthdate: 12-12-74 Weight: 134
Birthplace: Kapsabet, Kenya Residence: Tucson, Ariz.
Imagine getting up early in the morning and having to
run a mile and a half to school. Then, in the afternoon,
running a mile and a halfback home!
Bernard Kipchirchir Lagat, raised on a farm in Kenya, did
that growing up. That's how he began developing into a world-class runner.
Lagat, now a U.S. citizen, has set seven American distance-running
records, ranging from a mile to 5,000 meters. His resume also includes
eight USA titles, five world championships and two NCAA titles at
Washington State, where he earned his college degree.
Lagat, married with two children, is still running at age 37. Twice an
Olympic medalist, his goal now is to win an elusive gold medal in London
this summer. Don't count him out.


The Preamble
The Preamble to the U.S.
Constitution presents six goals for
our new government. (A preamble is
an introduction.) It begins with these
important words:
We the People of the United
States, (1) in Order to form a more
perfect Union, (2) establish Justice,
(3) insure domestic Tranquility,
(4) provide for the common defence,
(5) promote the general Welfare,
and (6) secure the Blessings
of Liberty to ourselves and our
Posterity, do ordain and establish
this Constitution for the United
States ofAmerica.
What do these goals mean?


(1) In Order to form a more (4) Provide for the common
perfect Union: There were many defence: The Revolutionary War had
problems with the Articles of been difficult for the states. This goal
Confederation, the first laws of the would provide a stronger national
land. military.

(2) Establish (5) Promote the general
Justice: The laws of the Welfare: State governments needed
land had to be fair to all to work together for the well-being of
citizens. .' all citizens.


(3) Insure domestic
Tranquility: The
states had been
quarreling among
themselves. This goal
promised peace.


(6) And secure the Blessings
of Liberty to ourselves and our
Posterity (descendants), do ordain
(order) and establish (set up) this
Constitution for the United
States of America.


Framers ensure that no one branch has complete power
Separation of powers is another The executive branch is headed The judicial branch
big idea within the Constitution. by the president. Among his jobs is is headed by the Supreme
Delegates to the Constitutional making sure laws are carried out. Court. It decides whether
Convention created three branches, The legislative branch is the laws passed by Congress are
or parts, of government: executive, Congress, which makes laws, constitutional, or agree with our
legislative and judicial. imposes taxes and borrows money. Constitution.


fmm The Mini Page 2012 Unienal Uclck


Making the Constitution


Before the Constitution
The Articles of Confederation,
adopted in 1781, were our new
country's first laws.
A confederation is a group united
together for a purpose. The Articles of
Confederation joined our original 13
states.
After the Revolutionary War was
over, the states became interested
only in themselves. There was no
strong central government.
There was no power to collect taxes.
This had made it hard to supply the
troops during the war. And each state
had its own form of money.
Relations with other countries
were difficult because Congress could
not speak for all states.
A new idea
In 1785 and 1786, representatives
from individual states met. They
decided to meet again in 1787 and
rewrite the Articles of Confederation.
Instead, they wrote the Constitution.
On Sept. 17, 1787, the U.S.
Constitution was signed by 39
representatives. It G
became law in 1788 after
nine states ratified,
or agreed to, it. In
April 1789, George
Washington became the
first president of the George
United States. Washington
The Mini Page thanks Miriam Kleiman,
public affairs specialist, and Lee Ann
Potter, director of education and volunteer
programs, U.S. National Archives, for help
with this issue.


The fifth page of
the Constitution
is the resolution
of the convention.
The location of the
original letter of
transmittal is not
known.


The fifth page
The U.S. Constitution was
handwritten on four pages. But
this summer, to celebrate the 225th
anniversary, the National Archives
will display the so-called fifth page of
the Constitution. What is this about?
Along with the four pages of the
Constitution, the delegates presented
to Congress a resolution of the
convention, written on a single
parchment page, and a letter of
transmittal written by George
Washington. The documents were
delivered to the Congress, which was
meeting in New York City.
The resolution called for the
Congress to present the Constitution
to the states for their approval.
It laid out a plan for electing a
president and state representatives.
In his letter, Washington explained
to the Congress how the delegates
had decided on the final Constitution.
He explained why they wrote it
instead of rewriting the Articles of
Confederation. Washington also noted
that while the document might not
completely satisfy each individual
state, the delegates hoped that it
would preserve the country as a whole.


A perfect plan?
Delegates to the Constitutional
Convention worked on the document
for almost four months. But even
when it was finished, there was
disagreement about it. Three
delegates would not sign it.
Benjamin Franklin presented a
speech at the meeting. He said he
did not agree with everything in the
Constitution. But he didn't think
another convention would write a
better one.










P ..:.-.' -


,"& -&-

The signers' signatures are on the
fourth page of the Constitution.
A model for others
The U.S. Constitution has inspired
many other national constitutions.
It is the longest-lasting written
national constitution in the world.

Next week, The Mini Page is all about sea
shells.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


The Mini Page

Guide to the Constitution
The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in
collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a
colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers:
* the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments
* the "big ideas" of the document
* the history of its making and the signers


from Th Mini Page 2012 Unienal Udick
ZaTM MIGHTY Tir
CZ P FUNNY'S AVItll 11VQ
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?
Pete: Where do you hang up an idea?
Paul: Inside a frame of mind!


i Pierre: What is the saddest
picture?
Patty: A blueprint!
Perry: Where does a sea lion hang pictures?
Piper: On the living room wal-rus!

from The Min Page o 2012 U..nl..al U.,.k
B/iSMasse ^ TRY 'N
-The e7ss Constitution FIND
Words that remind us of the Constitution are hidden in the block below. Some words
are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you
can find: AMENDMENT, ARCHIVE, ARTICLE, CHARTER, CONFEDERATION,
CONSTITUTION, GOAL, GOVERNMENT, GRANT, IDEA, LAW, LIMIT,
ORGANIZE, PREAMBLE, RATIFY, SIGNER, SUPREME, TRANSMITTAL.
LONO NO I T U T I T S N OC W J T
LIVEOUR X R C U E G O V E R N M E N T
FREEOMS1 R G B E L B M A E R P M E T I
E A A RCH I V ED EM N GM
T N Z S I G N E R R DAO K I
S R I R A T I F Y P N R A R D L
SA Z V U RC Q U E G L N E J M
S H E T R AN S M I T T A LAW
C V N O I T A R E D E F N OC
from The Min Page 2012 Universal Ucllck

Ready Resources Q
The Mini Page provides ideas for websites,
books or other resources that will help you learn
more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution.html
bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/documents/constitution/index.html
At the library:
"The U.S. Constitution and You" by Syl Sobel
"Who Wrote the Constitution? And Other Questions
About the Constitutional Convention of 1787" by Candice F.
Ransom


To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money
order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood,
KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at
$13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com
Name:
I Address:
City: State: Zip:


I I
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eTM Rookie Cookie's Recipe
Raspberry Peach Dessert
You'll need:
* 1 (16-ounce) package frozen 1 tablespoon light brown sugar
sliced peaches 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
* 3/4 cup raspberry spread or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
preserves (no seeds) vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt
* 1/4 cup water
What to do:
1. Microwave peaches for 3 minutes on high in microwave oven until
thawed.
2. Combine raspberry spread, water, sugar, cinnamon and vanilla in a
medium saucepan.
3. Add peaches and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 5
minutes, uncovered.
4. Divide peach mixture among 4 dessert dishes and top with vanilla ice
cream or frozen yogurt.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe. fi, oP.,M.,2012 un.... u.n.e


from The Mini Page 0 2012 Unversal Uclck


The Big Ideas


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 C3


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --


r o






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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302 201 32 2 2 John Adams'14'E Jim McKay: My World *** "Dolphin Tale" 2011, Drama) Harry True Blood "We'll Meet Real Time With Bill
S 302 201 302 2 2 in My Words Connick Jr. (In Stereo) 'PG' Again"'MA' Maher'MA' c
303 202 303 "Liar Liar" **, "Exporting Raymond" (2010) *** "Marina Abramovic: The "One Nation Under Dog: Stories TheNewsroom (In
02 303 202 303 (In Stereo)'PG cc Artist Is Present" (2012) 'NR' of Fear, Loss & Betrayal" (2012) Stereo)'MA'E
flGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters-Esc. Hunt Intl Hunters Income Kitchen PropertyBrothers'G' Hunters Hunt Intl PropertyBrothers'G'
S2 1 3 4 The Revolution'PG' c The Revolution'PG' c Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun Cajun
(HIST 51 25 51 32 42 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Coming Home "Daddy's Coming Home'PG'
F 24 38 24 31 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Little Dancer"
**5 "Little Girl Lost: The Delimar Vera Story" "Burden of Evil" (2012, Suspense) Natalie "Cariacked" (2011, Suspense) Maria Bello,
LMN 50 119 (2008) Judy Reyes.'NR'E Zea, Michael Ironside, Ron Lea.'NR' E Stephen Dorff, Catherine Dent.'R' c
** "The Rite" (2011, Horror) Anthony Hopkins. **" "Water for Elephants" (2011, Drama) *** "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone"
MAX 320 221 320 3 3 (In Stereo)'PG-13'Ec Reese Witherspoon. 'PG-13' cc (2001) Daniel Radcliffe.'PG'E
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word IThe Ed Show
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IJ) 109 65 109 44 53 Washington'PG' 'PG, L Treasures'PG' Treasures'PG' Treasures'PG'
(iiiDI 28 36 28 35 25 Victorious IVictorious Figure It Victorious Friends Friends Hollywood Heights Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Friends Friends
(WI 103 62 103 Disappeared 'PG' Disappeared 'PG' 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
OXYJ 44 123 America's Got Talent Next Big Thing America's Got Talent Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI
*** "Fri3ht Night" (2011, Horror) Anton ***Y "The Help" (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer Weeds Episodes "Division
S 340 241 340 4 Yelchin, olin Farrell. (In Stereo) 'R' captures the experiences of black women. c 'MA' MA' III"
$PEEU) 732 112 732 (NASCAR Race Hub Pass Time Pass Time Supercars Supercars 101 Cars- 101 Cars- Barrett-Jackson Special Supercars Supercars
(SPEED 732112 732 (N) 'PG' Drive Drive Edition 'PG'
Pii7 **** "Star WarsIV: A New Hope" (1977) Mark Hamill. Young Luke **** "StarWars lV A New Hope"(1977) Mark Hamill. Young Luke
SPKE 37 43 37 27 36 Skywalker battles evil Darth Vader. (In Stereo) 'PG' Skywalker battles evil Darth Vader. (In Stereo) 'PG'
** "Bad Teacher" **h "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (2010) ** "Colombiana"(2011 Action) Zoe Saldana, *** "Moneyball"
(S I 370 271 370 (2011) Cameron Diaz. Nicolas Cage. (In Stereo)'PG' c Jordi Molla. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c (2011) Brad Pitt.
I 36 3o 1 36 Rays Live! Inside the Rays Best of 3 Wide Life The Game Boxing in 60 From Boxing in 60 From May :58 Flat
(S 36 31 36 Ry Gator 'PG' 365 Sept.18, 1998. 6, 2006.
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*** "1776"(1972, Musical Comedy) William **** "Yankee Doodle Dandy" 1942, *** "Stars and Stripes Forever" (1952,
(M ) 169 53 169 30 35 Daniels, Howard da Silva.'PG' c Musical) James Cagney 'NR' c (DVS) Biography) Clifton Webb, Debra Paget. 'NR
American Guns (In American Guns (In American Guns (In American Guns (N) (In Fast N' Loud (N) (In American Guns (In
(0I 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) cc Stereo) c Stereo) c Stereo) c Stereo) c Stereo) c
(TLCI 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Four Houses'14' Undercover Boss
"Love's "Fatal Secrets" (2009) Dina Meyer. ** "I Am Number Four" (2011, Action) Alex "The Howling: Reborn" (2011, "Jackass:
350 261 350 Kitchen" (In Stereo)'R' Pettyfer. (In Stereo)'PG-13 cc Horror) Lindsey Shaw.'R' Movie"
The Mentalist "Redline" The Mentalist "The Red Dallas'PG' c Dallas A plot begins to Dallas "The Price You Dallas "The Last
TT 48 33 48 31 34 14'E Ponies"'14' unravel.'14' c Pay"'14'E Hurrah"'14'E
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(RAV 9 54 9 44 Steak Paradise Food Food Food Food Sandwich Sandwich Food Food Food Food
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TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Home Im Home Raymond Raymond Soul Man The Exes King King
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UA 47 32 47 17 18 Kort.'14' (DVS) ICE agent.'14' c reunion.'14'c the middle.'PG'
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(WGN1ii 18 18 18 18 20 30 Rock 30 Rock MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. (N) (Live) WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RHOON

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
LUTAF



LAGNOL



GRYNUH /
T~S I I~ ^^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I will have it 1
S This looks rinted up for I-1
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ON JULY 3,1776, TH
FOUNPING FATH-RS
PDCIDPD THAT
THEY 5HOUL-P --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Printyour I "
answer here: ,L X ,
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CLOUT PERCH ACCORD FEEBLE
I Answer: She didn't like the coffee because it wasn't
this HER CUP OF TEA


ACROSS
1 Photo
4 Bakers' means.
8 Lantern part
12 Tooth-fillers'
org.
13 Own
14 Movie part
15 Of necessity
17 Prolific auth.
18 Fuse unit
19 Part of REM
21 Cartoon
shrieks
23 Tampa Bay
gridders
24 Comic strip
queen
27 Latch
29 Dead heat
30 Salt Lake state
32 Beauty parlor
sound
36 Poet Pound
38 Mr. Sharif
40 Funny
Charlotte -
41 Dine's
companion


43 Fridge maker Answer to Previous Puzzle
45 River source
47 Knight's wife YO
49 Not quite right HUE R K E
51 Stretched AH|S NEST OL I0
to see L 0 SE F AC DE RN
55 Suggestion
box opening TH I E RES KS
56 Kind of stand DIAB M I L
58 Carryall
59 Treated a 01 O SE I IN F A}B
sprain HA IR CAD OR 0
60 Highchair MG R K D S U E Y
attire
61 Secondhand SOS FELL ALAS
62 Velvety plant Al I R E L L
63 Congeal KL INE OLD IE


DOWN
1 Hemingway
nickname
2 Footnote
word
3 Complain
4 "Walden"
author
5 Spock's father
in "Star Trek"


E U RO LOW LY I N G
EGAD AN IL G
L EE S MYOTS ST Y
6 Garden hose 11 Mammoth
plastic Cave loc.
7 Tarot reader 16 Socks warm
8 Summaries these
(hyph.) 20 Pumper's
9 Column type pride
10 Lumps of clay 22 In disgrace
so 24 Lunched
I Puzzles" books 25 Ms. Taylor
nm 26 Poet's
S11 I "always"
28 Gleeful cry
-14 31 Freight unit
33 Gun lobby
17 34 Golfer
Woosnam
35 Pod content
37 Held off for
39 Muzzle
loaders
42 Certain tags
44 Stingy
32 334 35 45 Moon rings
46 Chew the
scenery
48 Pinnacles
50 Not chubby
52 Snatches
53 McClurg or
Brickell
53 54 54 Car loan
55 R-V connector
57 Kind of
60system


D ear Readers: Happy
Fourth of July! While you
are enjoying the outdoor
barbecue, here's a lit-
tle history to go with
the day:
The United States
has a Great Seal that is
used to authenticate
certain documents is-
sued by the federal
government. The
Great Seal has a pic-
ture of a bald eagle
with its wings out-
stretched, holding a
bundle of 13 arrows in ANN
one talon and an olive MAIL
branch in the other
The arrows refer to the
13 original states, and the olive
branch symbolizes a desire for
peace. The olive branch is usu-
ally depicted with 13 leaves and
13 olives, going back to the origi-
nal states.
In its beak, the eagle has a
scroll with the motto "E pluribus
unum," which means "out of
many, one." Over its head is a
blue field (called a "glory") with
13 stars. In front of the eagle is a
shield with a blue top (called a
"chief") and red and white
stripes (called "pales"). The
stripes represent the states
joined together, supporting a
chief, which unites the whole and
represents Congress. The reverse
side of the Great Seal has the fa-
miliar pyramid.
The Great Seal was first used
publicly in 1782. The front of the
Great Seal is also our national
coat of arms and is used on U.S.
passports, military insignia, etc.
Since 1935, both sides of the
Great Seal have appeared on our


$1 bill, although not in color
While the colors of the Ameri-
can flag do not have specific
meanings, the colors
S of the Great Seal do.
Charles Thomson, sec-
retary of the Continen-
tal Congress, stated
that the white signifies
purity and innocence.
The red stands for
hardiness and valor
S Blue, which is the
color of the chief, sig-
nifies vigilance, perse-
verance and justice.
IE'S We hope you've
BOX learned something
today We certainly
did.
DearAnnie: I saw your column
about Taps on Memorial Day As a
Southern-born woman, I heard
the story differently
Captain Robert Ellicombe, a
Union soldier, was at Harrison's
Landing in Virginia with the Con-
federate Army on the other side
of the narrow strip of sand. Dur-
ing the night, Ellicombe heard
the moans of a severely wounded
soldier and decided to risk his
life to bring the stricken man
back for medical attention.
Crawling on his stomach through
the gunfire, the captain reached
the soldier and began pulling
him toward his encampment.
When the captain finally reached
his own lines, he discovered it
was a Confederate soldier, but
the soldier was dead. The captain
lit a lantern and caught his
breath and went numb with
shock In the dim light, he saw the
face of the soldier It was his son.
The boy had been studying music
in the South when the war broke


out. Without telling his father, he
had enlisted in the Confederate
Army
The following morning, heart-
broken, the father asked for per-
mission from his superiors to
give his son a full military burial,
despite his enemy status. The re-
quest for an Army band to play a
funeral dirge was turned down,
but out of respect for the father,
they said he could have one mu-
sician. He chose a bugler and
asked him to play a series of mu-
sical notes that he found on a
piece of paper in the pocket of
his dead son's uniform. It was the
haunting melody we now know as
Taps.
I'm thinking the version I just
gave you is more authentic. -
Saranac, Mich.
Dear Michigan: The version
you sent was lovely, and we've
heard it before. As much as the
tragic sentiment makes for an ex-
quisite story, it is an urban legend
and has never been verified to
have any basis in fact. But how
poignant to believe in this sweet,
sad, albeit apocryphal tale.
0-

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please email
your questions to anniesmail-
box@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators.com.


Bridge

North 07-04-12
4 Q 7 2
4Q72
V 10 5
S83
AK Q 10 6 4
West East
4943 46
VAK86 VQJ432
S A 7 5 4 Q J10 9
S85 9 3 2
South
4 A K J 10 8 5


+ K 6 2
4K62
J 7

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
14 Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 4 4 All pass


Opening lead: V A

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Basketball player Michael Jordan said, "To be
successful, you have to be selfish, or else you never
achieve. And once you get to your highest level,
then you have to be unselfish. Stay reachable. Stay
in touch. Don't isolate."
To be successful on defense at the bridge table,
you have to be selfish, to analyze. Then, though, be
unselfish by thinking about partner. Stay in touch
with his problems and try to help him.
In this example, South is in four spades. West
leads the heart ace. How should East analyze the
deal, and what should he do?
South's two-spade rebid shows a minimum
opening, 12 to 14 points, and at least a six-card suit.
From the dummy, it should be obvious to West
that his side needs to take four red-suit tricks. East
will think similarly, except that his partner might
have a trump trick.
Then East needs to help his partner by dropping
the heart queen at trick one. This shows the queen
and the jack. (It cannot be a singleton queen, be-
cause then South would have six hearts and would
have rebid two hearts.) It suggests to West that he
might like to underlead his heart king at trick two.
Perhaps East can do something from his side of
the table attack diamonds successfully that
West cannot do himself.
As you can see, this is the only way to defeat four
spades.
The rule is that when you cannot win the trick
because either someone has already played a
higher card in the suit led than your best or you
are discarding, play the top of touching honors (if
you can afford to do so, of course).


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C4 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts

6RAMMA 5AYS WE LEARN
FROM OUR MISTAKES..







'Pickles

Pickles


Garfield


Sally Forth

I SAID I'D HELP YOU WITH
YOUR WEDDING, JACKIE.
NOT DO IT.
ALWAYS
SAY I'M NO. NO, NO. YOU DON'T GE
N GO G TO USE YOUR FAULTS AS AN
'j A- BHING EXCUSE AND MY WORDS
THINGS. AS PIT


DO YOU FEEL
THAT, JACKIE? MAKE HER STOP.
-I'Ms T'5JU LOOK
THOUGHT UP AT THE
U.... FIREWORKS
WAVES TO FIREWORKS
BLOW UP rAN GO
YOUR BRAIN!OOOO


Dilbert


The Born Loser

EME5 DAD'5 GORAk BLOW)
OFF A, BUtCH OF
FIRE.CAJ\CKE-R5
CAR I VA(CR, tF rI
PROAVSE -OT TO GEA
tCEk-l (73/
TIAF-A7 \:


. TRUST E.b\ES ~ATO KEEP A, WRT FU RE
COU 5AFE.'OU CA \ FIRECRACKCER5IF
&, GO,IFYOU WEN Z YOU CWA'T AFR
I 'ARPLUCG TO T O(
I PROTCT(upOUR
I E&ARS, ? -'f


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


2012 UFS, Inc. "Good afternoon, ma'am. Would you be so
Distributed by Universal Ucick for UFS kind as to sign this petition to ban paper
grocery bags?"


Doonesbury


Big Nate
WHAT'S ALL THIS? I
THOUGHT YOU WEREN'T
GOING To HAVE A
YARD SALE' --
T r [ CHANGEi
MY MIND,
1 I JTEDiDY.






Arlo and Janis -


S1 t











I'M HANGING ON To
ALL MY GOOD STUFF,
BUT I REALIZED THAT
THERE ARE SOME
THINGS I'VE SIMPLY
OUTGROWN 1
k."" 7X


.. ANDW NThR
THE' MI LE CLASS,
PROMISIA6 A BETTER
WFE FOR THEIR CHIwREA!







,/.tj
/ ~ 1^-^--^ ^.i~-i


wow... THAfKS. We
5OUNp5 CALL IT THE
ORE AT! CHINESE
DREAM.


For Better or For Worse

C.FKy-OBiaGGRGEl CPRRV-Ot
THRNKYOBORKDIG UHi
JPRSS?-MOVEON








ai i -

Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


NO THANKS, MR. B....
S > TAT SOUNDS A
S ( LITTLE ~OO TAME
FOR ME


, ,' .


MAVBE IF I
TRIED LIGHTING
THE WHOLE
q- OX...







7-4


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"You get to be our crowd!"


" WIH DENNIS AROL5NP, IT- FIREWORKS
ALL-YEAR LONG."
Betty


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) In real 3D.
12:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) 3:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Magic Mike" (R) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" (R) In 3D.
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Brave" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 5 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In 3D. 12:15 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) In real 3D.
1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10 p.m.


"Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection" (PG-13)
12:05 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Magic Mike" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"People Like Us" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Ted" (R) 12:25 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 8:05 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Brave" (PG) 12 p.m., 5 p.m. 10:10 p.m.
"Brave" (PG) In 3D. 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" (R) Digital.
12:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" (R) In 3D.
2:50 p.m., 5:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m. No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) 3:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 5:25 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenba E


"VWOZKPOKGX KG JPO GNPZO, SZLJTKLU


PEOMEZGOG PS LXPOKPJ, MEO ONL


OZWJYEKD WJU GOLWUB ULUKHWOKPJ


PS W DKSLOKXL." WUDWK GOLCLJGPJ

Previous Solution: "I've always defended Shania (Twain). She not only opened doors;
she knocked several down." Faith Hill
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-4


WANT TO ONE SPARKLER
LIGHT A IN THE MIDDLE OF
SPARKLER, THE DAY WITH
ELMO? NO NOISE?



u ', .-: _.':.,


Frank & Ernest


Today MOVIES


COMICS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 C5









C6 WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012


CLASSIFIED



To place an ad, call 563-5966



.. Classifieds


I -Fax: (352) 563-5665 1 .. l re:(88 5-24 I Email:-classifi s i c Iw c l i o


SWM, 56, Seeking, slim,
mature, financially
secure, true equal aged
lady. Non drinker,
Non smoker, LET TALK
Maybe dinner, lunch
movies or more.
Family man, honest old
fashion, Italian Are you
trapped in your home.
Call 352-563-6428




2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2 Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700sf,
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660
12 Gun
Oak Gun Case
Holds up to 12 guns
lighted, 2 glass doors &
bottom drawers $200
(352) 746-6199
'--- --- q1


CAFE
216 N. E. Hwy 19
Crystal River
Old Jones
Restaurant

(352)
794-3899
OPEN
THURSDAY
6:00 AM

I *********,,
Thursday
S Only
Opening
SSpecial
6AM to 11:00 AM
*%* *U* **t i
50% Discount
with copy
of this Ad

Bank Must Sell! $49,959
4/2, Huge Lot,
Workshop, Pool,
6079 E. Malverne St.
Jessica Wood, Realtor,
352-401-5622, 625-5544
JRW Properties, Inc.

China Cabinet
2 Dressers
Antiques
$150. ea
(352) 637-6587
Craftsman
Air Compressor
33Gal. 6HP w/regulator
& gadges, like new
$225.
(352) 527-2292
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730

NEW TRAILER
4X6
$550
(352) 503-2956

SUNNYBROOK
'02, 26ft, Very good
cond., alumn. frame
work, new tires, $8,250.
obo, May finance part
352-726-9369
TOOLS FOR SALE
10"Craftsman Table saw
w/ stand carbide blade
$160. 10" Makita Chop
Saw Carbide blade,
and Other Tools
(352)795-1546 212-6211




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




2 Abandoned Kittens
Free to good home
Gray & White
Females
(352) 364-1504
3 KITTENS FOR FREE
TO GOOD HOME
9 weeks,
litter trained,
(352) 419-4221
3 SMALL KITTENS
Free to good home
URGENT
(352) 564-8585
Free black Lab Mixed
Puppies
6 weeks old
352-464-0871
FREE FIREWOOD
You Pick Up
(352)341-1143
FREE Horse Manure
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE KITTENS
To Good Home
(352) 613-6126
Free Kittens,
Tabby color, 1 black
8 weeks old
(352) 637-3988
Free to good home
18 week old
Female,
Black Pitt Mix
(352) 634-2153
Free to Good Home
Cat 1 12 years old
Black w/ white spot
under neck, neutered
(352) 533-8774
Free to Good Home
Male Cat,
less than 1 yr old.
comes with catching
post and Litter box
(352) 746-1956
Free to Good Home
Two 3 /2 year Old
Kitties, Sisters,
spayed & declawed
(352) 382-4250
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Refrigerator/Freezer,
Ice machine not
working
352-628-3829
TV Tower & Antenna
You take down
you haul
(352) 228-3040






CAFE
216 N. E. Hwy 19
Crystal River
Old Jones
Restaurant

(352)
794-3899
OPEN
THURSDAY
6:00 AM

I ********* I
Thursday
Only
Opening
Special
6AM to 11:00 AM

50% Discount
with copy
S of thisAd
Ikii ii=I


FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 Ib,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
lb (772)781-1262




LOST BABY GOAT
6/30/12 Dunklin & Tokyo
Pt. 352-795-1549
Lost Cat, Female
gray tiger
w/ gold marking on
head, W. Holiday St.
(352) 601-6202
LOST SET OF KEYS
Between
Hemlock
& S. Apopka
Ave.
If found please call
(352) 637-2039



Found Small Kitten
Approx 6 weeks, gray
Rivergarden Drive.
Dunnellon
(352) 465-4357
Little Brown dog,
female, found by the
VFW in Hernando
(352) 476-5645



From Homosassa, need
escort for medical clinic
procedure in Lake City.
Will pick up and deliver.
Lucrative pay for simply
going along, being avail-
able in waiting room, and
returning. No driving nec-
essary. Trustworthy only
apply.
Please call 352-584-7238




FL JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct@$5 Ib,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262




TEACHER

Fulltme, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 5604222




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
FIT Clinical Lab
Technologist

For physicians office
with benefits and
competitive salary
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1786M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^*{(** *


Sudoku ***** 4puz.com


3 9


12 3 8


6 74


863_ 5 __1


_72 13_


9 8 456


15 7


4 __8 ___12


_8 35

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

AII of our
structures
withstand
. .. 120m- h
Installations b Brian CBC12538s3 wia. .I"

442-628-7519
-------* ^^31?t

\ FREE- rOsT- isI'ika
Permit And i. iTi
I Engineering Fees i
Up to $200 value -

*Siding Soffit *Fascia Skirting *Roofavers *Carports Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Dental Hygienist

Fax Resume to:
(352) 465-3009


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

Granny Nannies

CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately
For 1-2 Hr. Visits.
(352) 794-3811

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Busy Cardiology
Practice. Exp. required
Email resume to:
cvsllc10@gmail.com

Medical Assistant

Wanted for Busy
Family Practice. F/T.
Experience needed.
Must be a self starter.
Excellent salary
& benefits.
Fax Resume to:
352-489-9400
Atten: Kandi

MEDICAL
CAREERS

begin here Train
ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical
Management. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.c
om

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

STAFFING
SCHEDULER

Computer, Phone and
insurance experience
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
Fax Resume
(352) 637-1176





WEBSITE
DEVELOPER

CHAMPS Software,
Inc. has an opening for
a WebSite Developer.
Must have at least 2
yrs. exp. in developing
complex websites.
Expertise in HTML5
and graph p design
preferred.
Please send resume
and links to:
Portolios.
jobs@champsinc.com





Construction
Carpenter
Drywall, metal studs,
concrete finish work,
all around general
construction
knowledge.
Send Resume to:
ecombee
@mtacfl.com

DRIVER
OTR, Flatbed,
Stepdeck, RGN

2 Yrs Experience
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

EXP. ROOFERS

Truck &Tools, 489-0360

ROOFING
REPAIR PERSON

Experience.Must
have tools & truck
Apply in Person
AAA ROOFING
1000 NE 5th Street





$300.
IS A BAD DAY!
Fortune 500 Co.

Security equipment
distribution. Entry
Level to Mgmt. Great
Pay/full benefits. We
Train. Advancement
Opportunity.
H.S. Diploma or GED
req'd. No Felonies.
352-597-2227

ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!

Drive 4 Us Top Pay &
CSA Friendly Equip
401K & Great
Insurance 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782

ATTENTION:
DRIVERS!

Drive 4 Us Top Pay &
CSA Friendly Equip
401K& Great
Insurance 2 Mos CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782


DIESEL Mechanic

Full time, CDL Lic.
needed, (352) 726-7440

Drivers

100% Owner Opera-
tor Co. Regional &
Dedicated Home
weekly Class A C.D.L.
lyr. exp. in last 3
Call (800)695-9643

Drivers

Class A Flatbed -$-
Home Weekends,
Run Southeast US,
Requires 1 Yr OTR
Flatbed experience,
& Pay UP TO
.39c/ mile
Call (800)572-5489
x 227,
SunBelt Transport, LLC

Drivers

Steady Refrigerated
and Dry Van freight.
Daily or Weekly pay.
Hometime Choices!
Modern equipment,
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rent OTR experience.
(800)414-9569
www.
driveknight.com

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS
earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 /
bulldoghiway.com
EOE

House Cleaner/
Farm Worker

Needed Call After
5pm (352) 302-3038

Need live-in Help

Room & Board only.
Want retired Lady
(352) 489-2694

SECURITY

Fulltime, night Secu-
rity/ Light Mainte-
nance, Benefits,
Apply in Person
BEST WESTERN
Crystal River
614 NW Hwy 19.




AIRLINES
ARE HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Mainte-
nance Career FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available
CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train online to
become a Medical
Office Assistant! No
Experience needed!
Training & Local
Job Placement
assistance, thru SC
Training.HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Meet singles
right now!

No paid operators,
just real people like
you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange mes-
sages and connect
live. Try it free.
Call now
(888)744-4426




Pool Supply Store
#1 Franchise In State!
Available Now!
Beverly Hills, Fla.
Call Pat (813) 230-7177




China Cabinet
2 Dressers
Antiques
$150. ea
(352) 637-6587



NASCAR TRADING
CARDS Large collection
$90.00 Call or Text Ron
352-746-0401




Disassembled Bronze
Sunroom, 7 windows &
I door with locks &
Keys $400 obo
4 Person Hot tub,
good cond. replaced
mtr. needs reset button
$200 obo
Bob (352) 795-9187




2 Refrigerators
9.6 cu. ft. $150
16 cu ft. $200
Both Like New
(352) 228-0659
GE Refrigerator
Side by side, 25 cu. ft.
looks new,
$250
(352) 634-2528
GE TRITON XL DISH-
WASHER -white Does a
great job! 100.00 FIRM
352-650-0180.


Kenmore Refrigerator,
side by side 25 cu ft.
ice & water in door.
Like New
$400 (352) 341-5020
352-476-4340 cell
Maytag Performa
Washer & Dryer
Model PAVT444AWW
$400 for set obo
Must Sell by July 4
(352) 212-6490
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition. Can
Deliver (352) 263-7398



AUCTION

DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
Thursday, 7/5
Estate Adventure
Auction
Preview 12pm
Walkabout 3-6
Inside 6-10
2011 BULLDOG Utility
Vehicle w/dump bed
Quality furniture inc.
leather & household,
commercial office &
shop furniture,
2 swamp cooler fans,
collectibles &antiques,
great value& fun!
Watch the web for
photos & list.
www.dudlevsauction
.com 10%bp cash/chk
(352)637-9588 AB1667-
AU2246



Craftsman
Air Compressor
33Gal. 6HP, w/regulator
& gadges, like new
$225.
(352) 527-2292
Lincoln Welder
AC 225Amps
$250
(352) 563-2896
TOOLS FOR SALE
10"Craftsman Table saw
w/ stand carbide blade
$160. 10" Makita Chop
Saw Carbide blade,
and Other Tools
(352)795-1546212-6211



52' INCH TELEVISION
Floor ModelWorks
great,very nice $50
others available inquire
within 352419-5102



DELL PRINTER SCAN-
NER COPIER Model
V305W in G.C. cd, ca-
bles incl $25 Call/Text
Ron 352-746-0401
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP COMPUTER
with flat screen
$150
352-586-6891



AUCTION

DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
Thursday, 7/5 *
Estate Adventure
Auction
Preview 12pm
Walkabout 3-6
Inside 6-10
2011 BULLDOG Utility
Vehicle w/dump bed
Quality furniture inc.
leather&household,
commercial office &
shop furniture,
2 swamp cooler fans,
collectibles &antiques,
great value & fun!
Watch the web for
photos & list.
www.dudlevsauction
.com 10%bp cash/chk
(352)637-9588 AB1667-
AU2246



5 WHITE GROSFILLEX
RESIN CHAIRS sturdy
heavy duty $35.all
560-7857/862-324-2723
ROUND 42" DIAMOND
CUT BEIGE TABLE
WITH 2 CHAIRS flowers
on backs sturdy 35. obo
560-7857/862-324-2723



Antique secretary desk,
4 ft x 2ft, $45
Cherry Bookcase,
6ft x 2 1/2 ft. $100
Both in Excel Cond.
(352) 489-9986
BOYS BUNK BEDS Nat-
ural wood stain, solid
construction, built in
North Carolina, $150.
352-476-7547
High End Quality Resale
Furniture & Accessories.
S10% OFF all furniture
NOW til the 4th of July
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER CHAIR Blue
tweed, good cond. com-
fortable $40.00 513-4473
Serta King Mattress Set,
includes mattress,
boxspring, & mattress
protector pad excel.
cond. less than 1 yr. old
$400 (352) 637-6108


OFA LVE-EATb
Microfiber, taupe
Like New, good cond.
Recliners on both ends of
sofa & loveseat.
$750 (352) 586-8713
WICKER HEAD BOARD
this is a double bed size,
Good condition $40.00
513-4473



Black Kow Compost
compostcowmanure
.com for Vegetable
Gardens Lawns *
Topdressing, $35. per
cu. yd. (352) 342-1384
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRAILER / CART 10 cu
ft, dumps $40.00 Call or
Text Ron 352-746-0401
CUB CADET
LAWN TRACTOR
54" Cut, Always
Garaged and well
maintained, $,1,350
(352) 489-8803
JOHN DEER Lawn cart
trailer 10cu ft $50.00
Call or Text Ron
352-746-0401
Troy Built Riding
Mower
17/2 HP
42" Deck $500
(352) 746-7357




CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE*
Tue 3 & Wed. 4, marble
din. room set glass top
6 chairs, TV console
marble, end tables, 3
panel gas heater, sofa
bed & loveseat, full sz.
bed, wash/Dry & More
976 Amelia Earhart Pt.
(228) 365-4464 Cell
l HOWARD'S J
FLEA MARKET
352-628-4656
Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944



!!!!!!!235/65 R17!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****215/65 R17****
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
-----215/60 R15 -----
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
3 Wicker Shoes Stands
$10 ea
foldable 31" L
(352) 795-7652
4 Volume Set C/K Truck
1998 Serive Manuals
Chevy/GMC $40.
Wire/Wicker Pet Cage
List $240. Asking $100
(352) 795-7652
BREAD MAKER
Good condition,
Breadman. $25
(352)465-1616
BREADMAKER Foster
company, white color,
excellent condition. $25
(352)465-1616
Charcoal Grill, gas
fired, Paid over $100
New, never used
Asking $80.
(352) 465-6830
COMPUTER DESK
WOOD DESK
$20.00 352-621-0142
DINNING TABLE FOR 8
Brand New with butterfly,
excellent Condition. No
chairs, just table. $100
(352)465-1616
EGYPTIAN RUG NICE
5X8 RUG
$30.00 352-621-0142
ENTERTAINMENT


352-621-0142
FETEL JUMBO SHRIMP
l@$2
15ct@$5 lb,
13ct@$6 Ib 10ct@$7
Ib (772)781-1262
GARBAGE DISPOSAL
used does work. $7.00
352-513-4473
Gas Grill Stainless
518inc cooking area
Bnrnkman w/ 2 tanks,
Bikes 2 adults men's
$150 for everything
(352) 382-3933
HOLMES AIR 1500W
HEATER/FAN Ok
condition, Heats up to
180 sq. ft. area. $10
(352)465-1616
Kenwood 450S
4 parts $50.
K4IYU
(352) 795-3764
KIDS ELECTRIC DIRT
BIKE/MISC dirt bike 15
mph $50,Chnstmas
Tree,and other misc
352-419-5102
LEATHER JACKET 5XL
BIG MANSNICE
JACKET
$100.00 352-628-6277
POLICE SCANNER,
Radio Shack hyperscan.
pro-2030
$25
352-322-1154
ROUGH SAWN LUM-
BER. 300 board feet of
cherry, maple, oak. Size
varies from 1x6 to 1x12.
$3.50/board foot.
352-382-5951
SHOTGUN 20 GAUGE
NEW ENGLAND SINGLE
SHOT 21 INCH BARREL.
$90.00 352-628-6277
Singer Interlock Serger
Sewing Machine
$50.
(352) 637-6838
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard. $30
(352)465-1616
VACUUM CLEANER
Eureka!, needs some
repair. Blue colored, big
vacuum with hose. $10
(352)465-1616


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





5 4 7 26. 1 3 8 9


547261389
9123874456
2964158317
435879612

781 632 9145


WOOD FLOORING NEW
25 Sq Ft Med Oak Great
for a foyer, hallway or
closet $55 email pic
352-382-3650



OAK DESK small office
desk ,or student style ,4
drawers sturdy, looks
good.$40.00
352-513-4473



2 Electric Scooters
1 small, 1 large
Small $300. obo
Large $500 obo
(352) 746-6499
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL
BED WITH RAILS.
GOOD CONDITION,
CLEAN.
$250. 352-637-3156
Reading Viewing Table
Xerox Outlook TM, CC
TV, slide table w/ black
white letters
all adjustments $575
352-563-6428



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



9VGUITAR (fender)
AMP,PLENTY OF TUBE
CRUNCH GREAT FOR
LAP STEEL! $75
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
DREDNAUGHT
W/GIGBAGTUNERSTRAP
AND MORE! $60
352-601-6625
LAP STEEL GUITAR
"LAPSTRAT" MINI
STRAT SOUNDS
GREAT! EASY LEARN
$90 352-601-6625
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
wood and padded,
sturdy, place to stow mu-
sic $35.00 352-513-4473



Royal Palace
Wool rugs floral design.
6x6 green,
5x7 burgandy.
$75.00. ea
352-564-4214





NORDIC TRACK ELITE
SKI MACHINE Top of the
Line! Great Condition!
Paid $1300. Asking $350.
Tom 352-228-3661
Nordic Track
Treadmill,
A2350, Like New
$350.
(352) 746-9644



12 Gun
Oak Gun Case
Holds up to 12 guns
lighted, 2 glass doors &
bottom drawers $200
(352) 746-6199
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
POOL TABLE 6 ft pool
table, great for smaller
space like new, no
damage,rarely used. Has
all the accessones.You
move it, $250.00 call
257-2097

RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquarters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




'09 Enclosed, Interior
20' 5"L, W 8', Hgt 6'7".
less than 700 mi.
$4,750. 352- 419-4066.
352-228-7670
EZ PULL
TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whls, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
Used 7x20 equip
$2450
Used 7X16, 5 ton
equip. $1895
Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

NEW TRAILER
4X6
$550
(352) 503-2956



Wanted Hunting Equip.,
Fishing Equip. Collect.
Tools, Knives, swords &
War items 352 613-2944
Wanted to Buy
2-3Bedroom /2 Bath
House in
Crystal River Area
$35,000-$40,000
(703) 220-5916


Wanted to Buy
HAM RADIO
All bands, K41YU
(352) 795-3764


1 MALE YORKIE
10 weeks $450
MALTESE, 3 females
2 males available soon
$600. & $650 Health
certs, CKC registered,
352-212-4504,212-1258
Cock A Poo,
Puppy
Male, Papers
$250
(352) 601-3174
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 628-2483


PUPPIES AKC, champi-
onship bloodlines english
bulldog puppies. 5 wks
old will be ready to go
July 14. Taking deposits
3 females 1 solid white, 1
dark bridle & white,fawn &
white. 4males, Fawn
bnnde ,fawn & white all
have black masks beauti-
ful. 2000.00 will consider
a trade for something ,but
only serous trades. call
352-503-7803,cell
352-212-1808
Free to Good Home
Two 3 /2 year Old
Kitties, Sisters,
spayed & declawed
(352) 382-4250
MOVING SALE
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Pet Sitter for 3 Small
Dogs, In my Home Only
for Vacations or Occa-
sional Day Trips
$20 short days $30.
All Day $40 overnight,
shrt walks, Mature adult
only. 352-697-1776
....


POODLE Jax is a pure
bred black toy male
born on 10/14/11.
He is very smart and
friendly. He is looking
for a loving home.
Included in the price
arhethe crate, food &
water bowls, retractable
leash, an assortment of
toys, & his bed.
I am asking for what I
paid for him, everything
else is a bonus. All
offers considered.
Jax has had all of his
vaccinations. I have his
complete health rec-
ords. Included is the pa-
perwork to register him
with the CKC if you
wish.Call 516 449 5369


If s .


Tas Dog
male red/black
hound mix,
3 y/o obdedient,
good dog. Loves
people. Needs to
be only dog.
Needs good home
(352) 795-1288

YORKIE PUPP
1 Male, health cert.
$500.
(352) 726-5217




Bring your fishing
pole!


INVEKNEOO, PL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent inc.
grass cutting and your
water.
1 bedrooms start
@$325 inc. H20
2 bedrooms start
@$450 inc H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
call 352-476-4964
for details!
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/
long term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
2 BR/2 BA, Near Prog-
ress Energy, Citrus Co.
Dunnellon352-465-1651
FLORAL CITY
Small 2BR, Includes All
Appl's ideal for singles,
$450. mo 352-560-7837

INVERNESS
2/1, $300. 1st, Ist sec.
4095C Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385

INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on lake. Fur-
nished 1 bdrm home
w/central AC $550
352-476-4964




3 BR, 2 BATH mobile
home, Owner will
finance, zero interest
3133 Holiday Drive,
Crystal River, $25,000.
(352) 564-8057 5-8pm,
2/2 Furnished
Adult 55+ Community,
well maintained,
First One who sees
will Buy $73,900.
(352) 419-4474









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Beautiful 3/2 DW on 5
AC .12 x 26 RV Port
with electric, 20 x 20
carport, Listed $112,900
Patty Sargent Trotter
Realty (352) 613-6500

BEST OF THE
BEST
9 TIME WINNER
TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
39 homes in inventory
MUST SELL!
All Homes discounted
& being sold at cost.
Come by or call
(352) 621-9181
Also used &
reposed homes

HOME ON LAND
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 on
'/2 acre. Home in new
condition with 2 x 6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks & tile
flooring. I can finance,
must have 620 credit
score. $3,500 down
$394.80/mo P&I,
W.A.C. Call
352-621-3807

Hurricane Season
Is Here!
Is Your Home Safe?
Releveled/Tie down
check. Free Est. Lic
/Ins., Tom 746-5912
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Village
New Homes Start @
$39,900. $5K for your
used mobile home.
Any condition
800-622-2832 x 210

REPO'S
SAVE THOUSANDS
Trpwd./Dbwd. Palm
arbor, Homes of
Merit & Fleetwood
Bob 352-746-5912

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily/
We buy used homes.
352-621-9183

YES!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed Rate! W.A.C,
Come & View
352-621-9182


HOMOSSASA 2/2
carport nicely furn. MH on
Homosassa River,dock
shed, f/l/s sht/long term
$850. 352-220-2077




2 Bd, 2 Bth, Completely
Remodeled,
new baths, all floor
coverings, paint, fans,
well MUCH MORE, Ride
by then call for more in
info. 881 N. Maynard
Ave. Lecanto $33,000
(603) 860-6660
EL Dorado
Estates-Lecanto 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Mobile on
acre-plus-Large Screen
room-Carport-PooShedSpnnmkl
er system-New
Carpet-Ceramic Tile in
kitchen and baths.New
Refrigerator-New master
shower-Nice quiet
neighborhood-Central
Air-30 year roofing-only 3
years old-MUST SEE
Primary-352-341-5194-Se
condary-352-503-6969
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 2/2 Split Plan
w/double roof over on
fenced 1 acre, Nice
Priced Reduced
352-464-0680

JUST REDUCED!
4/2 w/ Family Room
Spacious Home on 5
acres, mostly wooded.
Convient to shopping
schools & churches
$135,000 (352) 465-8346
Owner Finance
2 BR 14 x 60
Fleetwood 1/3 Acre
$25,000 Call Bob
(352) 746-5912





MLeHok
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $34,900
(352)419-6926
PARK MODEL
1 BR, Enclosed. Sun Rm.
CHA, waterfront on
Lake Rousseau, Boat
parking $9,700 obo
(352) 447-6119




INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, all until. incl'd. $575
mo+Sec.,352-634-5499

Floral Oaks Apts
352-860-0829
62 + OR DISABLED
RD Property
With or Without
Children.
Central heat /air
Water, & Sewer Incl
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Management
1 &2BdRM Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks Cr
Floral City, Fl 34436
TDD #771



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
EOE/Provider

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218





FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq
Ft Ideal location, crnr
Hwy 41 & 48. $595
mo. 813-310-5391

GAINESVILLE-ALACHUA
FLORIDA-
22+Expandable
Commercial Acre
Campus/Church/
School Sealed Bid
(Bank-WorkOut) Sale
14000 sqft Bldg. SITE
is NEAR WALMART!
Contact:Jconnelly
@lpc.com /
(855)811-3737

INDUSTRIAL
WAREHOUSE
For Rent, located in
Rooks Industrial Park
Homosassa 900 sf
interior is light, bright,
mint cond. Lrg overhead
door, Entry door, back
door, bath, lighted
parking lot, perfect for
business or storage
$500 mo. 1 yr. lease.
To view please
Call (352) 6284066




CITRUS HILLS
2/2'/2, Extra Clean $825
mo. (352) 613-5655


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Cracked liberty ringer casing (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. U.S. flag red or white sort (1) they will fit in the letter
_ squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. U.S. uncle's metric weights (1) syllables in each word.
1 2012 UFS,Dist byUniv UclickforUFS
4. Stately U.S. bald bird (2)


5. Rushmore's adding up of noses (1)


6. U.S. currency academician (2)


7. Star-spangled flag's designers (2)


7-4-12


SH NVId SHHNNV *L HVOHOS HVTIIO '9 SIm(lOD SINIONw
H'IOV W'IVH I' SIAvO SKVS '*g dA 3adlTIS '7g T131S Tf "T
SHHASNV


-St-W rrx


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2, 3, BR. Furn./Unfurn.
Like New, 352-302-1370




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
INVERNESS
Furnished
Waterfront Home
2bd, 1.5 bth w/central
AC, $595 352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA $525, 3/1 CHA
$675. 352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
IBD/w Fl. Rm. C/H/A
Move in for only $1,150
EXTRA CLEAN
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Plus FL. Room
19 S. Harrison St.$550.
Call 352-422-2798
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Priv, near Hwy 44. $825
Ist/Sec. (305) 975-5121




HOMOSSASA 2/2
carport nicely furn. MH on
Homosassa River,dock
shed, f/Il/s sht/long term
$850. 352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn., Clean cable, w/d,
$115wkly/430mo. No
hidden cost. 563-6428




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


CLASSIFIED




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989








WITH A PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial




9



Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

Summer Lake
Sale!

Dockable lakefront
only $234/month.
Prime waterfront lot
in spectacular all wa-
terfront community.
Wooded, paved
roads, power, phone.
Perfect for vacation
home/weekend
getaway.
Call now
(866)952-5336, x 525
Price: $36,900, 25%
down, balance
financed 15 years
fixed, 6%, OAC




Commercial Industrial
Building Over 2,000 sf
Large, bay door, tiled
showroom + offices.
signage on US 19,
$62,000 obo, 628-2084





must sell!
3620 N. Stirrup Dr.LOT
Pine Ridge LOT.2.78
ac.Level, wooded, con-
nects to horse trail.
Make reasonable offer.
Must sell by Aug. 1. For
sale by owner.
478.957.0211




2/1/1, Fenced & Private
Owner Financing
Newer Roof, AC, & tile.
New hot water heater,
44 S J Kellner Blvd.
$61,900. 352 746-6050
2/1 with CARPORT,
Fl. rm. New roof,
New appl's, irrigation
sys. great investment.
Must see $29,995 firm
(352) 345-6499
BY OWNER
A Must To See!!
Beautiful Laurel Ridge,
Built 2007, 3/2/2 over-
sized garage with work
area, Lots of extras.
(352) 527-4488




Why Rent When You
Can Buy This Cozy
2Bd. 1 Bath, Home with
only $,3500 down
payment $223. mo
Located in
APACHE SHORES
352-228-0876, 419-0041


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 C7


$99,500, 4/3/2, Great
4 BR Home, w/ Screen
Pool & porches, aprrox.
1,740 sq. ft. Living
3,400 sq. ft Total
Call Lyn (352)726-3798
Inverness Highlands
3/2/2, Ivn. Gf & CC
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf crse
$119,900 make offer
No Realtors 726-0652
Bank Must Sell!
$49,959 4/2, Huge Lot,
Workshop, Pool,
6079 E. Malverne St.
Jessica Wood, Realtor,
352-401-5622, 625-5544
JRW Properties, Inc.
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Inverness 2 bedroom.
1 bath. Nice brick hm,
newer roof & CHA, scrn
porch, fenced, gar, good
neighborhood. Reduced
for quick sale at $49,900.
Serious inquiries.
904-887-8940
INVERNESS
3 months free lot
rent w/purchase!
1 & 2 Bd homes starting
@ $6900 Located in a
55+ park. Lot rent
$276/month. Water in-
cluded.
(352)476-4964
INVERNESS
Bring your fishing pole!
55+ park on
lake. 2br, 1.5 bth
$2000 (352)476-4964

JUST LISTED!
Lovely Home
on Acre Lot!
3 bdrms, 2 baths
w/2,161 SF
Quick Sale@$114,900
MLS# 355975
Call 800-811-1787
Ext 9104 Free
Property Recording
Realty Connect
T. Paduano
(352)212-1446
Whispering Pine Villa
Inverness 2/2, 2
parking spaces, fully
furnished & tiled,
$59,000 All included
(352) 613-6496




2 STORY Farmers Porch,
3/2 Carport w/shed,
porch off din. room,
Fireplace 1,700 sf
over 1 Acre of Land
Recently Remodeled
May consider owner
financing with $25,000
down, Asking $69,900
(603) 860-6660
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile car-
pet, dbl lot. $650.rent.
1st Ist sec. 813 908-5550





IMMACULATE
26 stokesia ct. 3/3/3
+office+bonus Pool
235k 352-422-1662


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


DEB INFANTINE

BUYERS ARE OUT!
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvU
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


STILT HOME $159,900
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH-
ROOM
OZELLO KEYS, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL
OWNER FINANCE, 3%
DOWN
PRIVATE BOAT RAMP
AND DOCK
1000 SQ FT UPSTAIRS
1000 SQ FT SCREENED
DOWNSTAIRS CALL
CRAIG 352-422-1011
CALL DEBRA
352-634-3872



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



HUNTERS DREAM
CITRUS COUNTY
59.5 mol.acres adjoining
thousands of e.p.a acres,
Ig oak, hickory and mag-
nolia deer, hog and tur-
key abound near Crystal
River, frest water spring
never drys up adjoining
land available $3900. per
acre call for more info or
viewing. Jerry
(352)257-9520



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




INVERNESS
80'x120' backs to Ft.
Cooper Park, Faces Old
Floral City Rd. No Fill
required, within site of
Rails to Trails, $6900
352-697-2292









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAr^^AA^-f


18 ft. STARLINE
'87, w/ walk thru, W/S,
inbd/outbd, mtr. Boat,
needs battery & Inter.
work, Alum trlr. is worth
asking price $795 obo
(352) 345-6499

CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(Hotmail.com

GAME FISHER
12 ft., fiberglass boat &
trailer, Boat has no title,
needs work $185
(352) 746-7969

LIFE BOAT
Revere, 4 man-Ocean
Master, commercial, in
container, USCG/SOLAS
service and repacked
6/12, $2,000. 447-5171



OMC SUNCRUISER
1993 PONTOON BOAT
1993 Pontoon, Evinrude
48 spl, trailer. Motor runs
great boat needs TLC.
$1850.00 OBO
(352)-634-0457

PONTOON
MUST SELL, 22 ft., '03,
w/ '04, Johnson 50HP
mtr. & Trir., excel cond.,
Lots of Extras $12,800
(352) 860-3293

PROCRAFT
'01, Bass Boat, with 90H
Merc., & trolling motor
$6,000
(352) 302-8886

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

RV Refrigerator Dometic
2Dr., top freezer, gas &
Electric New never used
Orig. $1,575 asking
$1,300 (352) 560-4292

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298


~ws


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Adult family care home
Alzheimer/Dementia
Incontinency No Prob.
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic. Bonded Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
352 364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
40 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Slabs, Driveway, Patios,
Foundation Repair, Crack
Corners (352) 427-5775




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licilns 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Handyman Dave Press
Clean Repairs, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570


HANDYMAN
will do bartering
for services, Int/Ext.
Painting, etc.. What do
you have to barter,
Call Mark 352-419-8032
JACK OF ALL TRADES
Painting, Ceramic Tile
Carpentry, Yard Clean Up
No Job too Sm-364-3815
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES*
352-503-7800, 476-3820
STHE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Green Valley Land-
scape & Design Inc
complete lawn mainte-
nance (352)280-0269




AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim, haul, $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Generator,
Service & Repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

McClellan Painting
2/1 bath as low as
$300.00
(352)220-0590
WE PAINT
Houses inside & out,
Decorative concrete
Handyman, house
cleaning (352) 476-0680




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570


TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR &MAINT. LLC
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SOD! SOD! SOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221




D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
Professional
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 220-7418

RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Stump Grinding
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ci&us County
Homes I


EI










C8 WEDNESDAY,JULY 4, 2012


I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Me 352-201-6945
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778

KZ toyhauler, 07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living area
separate cargo $17,800.
352-795-2975

R-Vision B+ LE
'04, mint condition,
Chevy cab, Trail Lite
body. walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825
SUNNYBROOK
'02, 26ft, Very good
cond., alumn. frame
work, new tires, $8,250.
obo, May finance part
352-726-9369




1993 4.3 V6,
Chevy Engine
700 R Transmission
low miles $450 both
305 Chevy Engine,
Alum, Edelbrock intake
650 Holly Carb./SS
headers, $450. Bob or
Willie (352) 795-9187




BUYING JUNK CARS
*Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to$500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




'08 SUZUKI
'Forenza Sedan, 4 cyl.,
$7,500, 28K, black.
Mark 352-556-8768, or
(352) 447-2736 (good)
FORD ESCORT LX
1997 good on gas, good
condition, low mileage
$1800 (352) 634-0897

FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K. new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
LEXUS
'99, ES300,
$8,000, 52K miles
Excel. condition
(352) 527-7207
MERCURY
'99, 4 door, Grand Mar.,
LS, with vinyl rf., extra
clean, 7,200 mi. sr. own.
same body style 2009
$5,500 (352) 860-1106,

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440





CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
Mercedes Benz 89
560-SL 2 tops exc. cond
58K mis. gray/gray, top
rack ncl $12,500
(352) 527-8288

TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
1lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883




CHEVY
'97, S10. good cond.
runs great, 4 cyl. 5 spd.
100k mi,.$2.200.
(352) 302-7451
FORD
'09 F350 Crew Cab, Die-
sel Dually 50K Excellent
cond. $25,000 OBO
637-2258 or 634-2798

TOYOTA TUNDRA
2010 CREWMAX SR5,
5.7 V8 engine, sunroof,
towing pck, 6sp trans
$26000352-586-8784


VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.or
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
Financing For ALL
461-4518 & 795-4440





2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3. USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires. Rear Hitch.
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio. Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533


SpEri
AUCTION

DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S Florida Ave
Inverness 34450
Thursday, 7/5 *
Estate Adventure
Auction
Preview 12pm
Walkabout 3-6
Inside 6-10
2011 BULLDOG Utility
Vehicle w/dump bed
Quality furniture inc.
leather & household,
commercial office &
shop furniture,
2 swamp cooler fans,
collectibles &antiques,
great value & fun!
Watch the web for
photos & list.
www.dudlevsauction
.com 10%bp cash/chk
(352)637-9588 AB1667-
AU2246





FORD
2011, EXT CARGO VAN
E150, Under 17k mi., ex-
cel. cond. Gold, AC.
PW, PL $20K, 628-0104





YAMAHA
2010, Raptor ATV,
249 motor 2 yr. war-
rant left $1,999
(35 ) 746-9644





CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883

Harley '02
Road King, black, lots
of chrome & extra's
gar.kept $9,500 obo
(352) 344-9810

Harley Davidson 03
Super Road King, fuel inj.
$48K up grades with
receipts, too much to list
$7,000 (727)207-1619

Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ndng gear avail
(352) 601-4722

HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902

HD ROAD GLIDE
Fire Red Pearl,
Customized,Low mi.$30K
invested, Sell for
$11,500,For details call
352-527-0074

HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760

HONDA
'02, VTX 1800. Retro
2,883 Org. Miles,
like New $6,995 obo
(352) 465-7930

HONDA 2007
750 Shadow. WS, pipes,
SB, Rack, C bars, extra
clean 8200 mi., $4,275
(352) 860-1106, Bob

HONDA
'71, CB500-4, 5,457 org.
miles, excel. cond.
$2,900
(352) 621-0987

KAWASAKI
2010, Vulcan 900
Classic, 8,438 miles
2 new tires, $6,500
(352) 270-3662




2294-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-216
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
TOADJA ENTERPRISES LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO:
10-10524 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: PINE LAKE PB 4 PG
67 LOTS 9 & 10 BLK B
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: LESTER E NORELL
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4 1118&25, 2012
2295-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-194
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MACWCP II LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 06-5336
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2006
DESCRIPTION OF PROP
ERTY: GOLDEN VLG PB 8
PG 15 LOT 44
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: MARY ANN FROST,
JOHN P ROGERS
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate


shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2296-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-212
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
JUSTIN K HOLCOMBE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed


said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0732
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
SHADY LANE RIVER ROAD
AREA UNREC SUB LOT 70:
COM AT SW COR OF
SE1/4 OF SEC 29-17-20, TN
N 89 DEG 20M 35S E AL S
LN OF S D SEC 29 129.50
FT TN N 0 DEG 58M 11S W
389.94 FT, TN S 89 DEG
01M 49S W 171.37 FT TN N
52 DEG 30M OOS W 231.69
FT TN N 71 DEG 07M OOS
W 194.14 FT TO POB, TN
CONT N 71 DEG 07M 0 OS
W 80 FT TN N 18 DEG 53M
00S E 120 FT, TN S 71 DEG
07M 00 S E 80 FT, TN S 18
DEG 53M OOS W 120 FT TO
POB. SUBJ TO EAS M OF
REC DESC IN OR BK 339
PG 304 & OR BK 1952 PG
818
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: RON DALFONSO
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2297-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-195 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
ICARUS LGF 1 LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO:
10-10862
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:HAMPSHIRE
HILLS PB 12 PG 28W 1/2
LOT 27
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: REGIONS BANK
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2298-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-200 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
TEFLA INVESTMENTS
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8726
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: INVERNESS HGLDS
UNIT 3 LOTS 49,50,51 &52
BLK 116 DESC IN OR BK
152 PG 481
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: JOHN H BRITTO
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4 11,18 & 25 2012
2299-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-202 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
TEFLA INVESTMENTS
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8677
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: INVERNESS HGLDS
UNIT 3 LOTS 85, 86, 87 & 88
BLK94 NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
CLAYTON STUART
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2012
2300-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-203 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
TEFLA INVESTMENTS
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:


CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8635
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: INVERNESS HGLDS
UNIT 2 LOTS 16, 17, 18, 19
& 20 BLK 52 DESC IN O R
BK 126 PG 345
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
CRYSTAL I LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court


Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2301-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-204 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
TEFLA INVESTMENTS
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-8634
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: INVERNESS HGLDS
UNIT2 LOTS 13,14,15 & 16
BLK51 DESC IN OR BK 85
PG 104
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
CRYSTAL I LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2302-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-205 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
DEBRA HILL
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-9864
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: LAKESIDE PARK UN-
REC SUB LOTS 3 & 4 BLK C
DESC IN OR BK678 PG
1341
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
ESTATE OF EDWARD J
CHICARDY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2303-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-206 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
FCPG RE FUND 09 03 LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-2503
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY: CITRUS SPRINGS
UNIT 1 PLAT BK5 PG 89
LOT 2 BLK 40 DESCR IN 0 R
BK606PG 1161
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
TOROSCO REALTY CORP
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.


CLASSIFIED




citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4 1118 & 25, 2012
2304-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-207 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
FCPG RE FUND 09 03 LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
SHAMROCK ACRES OF
CRYSTAL RIVER PHASE 1
UNREC SUB LOT 18 DESC
AS: COM AT SW COR OF
SE 1/4 OF SEC 4-18-17 TH
N 89DEG 13M E AL S LN
OF SD SEC 4 68.18 FT TH N
24DEG 15M 54S E 144.78
FT TH N 65DEG 44M 08S W
50 FT THN 24DEG 15M 54S
E 1463.22 FT TH N 45DEG
06M 56S W 2530.66 FT TO
POB TH CONT N 45DEG
06M 56S W 302.63 FT TO A
PT THAT IS 50 FT FROM
MEASURED AT A RIGHT
ANGLE TO W LN OF E 1/2
OF NW 1/4 OF SD SEC 4
TH N ODEG 51M 41S W
PAR TO SD W LN 39.03 FT
TH N 44DEG 53M 04S E
632.76 FT TO A PT THAT IS
50 FT FROM MEASURED AT
A RIGHT ANGLE OT SW'LY
R/W LN OF FLA POWER
CORP POWER LN TH S
45DEG 06M 56S E PAR TO
SD R/W LN 330.58 FT TH S
44DEG 53M 04S W 660 FT
TO POB SUB TO 15 FT EASE
AL EACH SIDE AND REAR
LT LN FOR DRAINAGE R/W
DESC IN OR BK 1388 PG
1141 TITLE OR BK 2000 PG
424
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
DANNYJOHNSON
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4 1118 & 25, 2012
2305-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-208 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERRITS CITRUS INC.
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
SHAMROCK ACRES OF
CRYSTAL RIVER PHASE 1
UNREC SUB LOT 18 DESC
AS: COM AT SW COR OF
SE 1/4 OF SEC 4-18-17 TH
N 89DEG 13M E AL S LN
OF SD SEC 4 68.18 FT TH N
24DEG 15M 54S E 144.78
FT TH N 65DEG 44M 08S W
50 FT THN 24DEG 15M 54S
E 1463.22 FT TH N 45DEG
06M 56S W 2530.66 FT TO
POB TH CONT N 45DEG
06M 56S W 302.63 FT TO A
PT THAT IS 50 FT FROM
MEASURED AT A RIGHT
ANGLE TO W LN OF E 1/2
OF NW 1/4 OF SD SEC 4
TH N ODEG 51M 41S W
PAR TO SD W LN 39.03 FT
TH N 44DEG 53M 04S E
632.76 FT TO A PT THAT IS
50 FT FROM MEASURED AT
A RIGHT ANGLE OT SW'LY
R/W LN OF FLA POWER
CORP POWER LN TH S
45DEG 06M 56S E PAR TO
SD R/W LN 330.58 FT TH S
44DEG 53M 04S W 660 FT
TO POB SUB TO 15 FT EASE
AL EACH SIDE AND REAR
LT LN FOR DRAINAGE R/W
DESC IN OR BK 1388 PG
1141 TITLE OR BK 2000 PG
424
NAME IN WHICH AS-


SESSED:
THE AFFORDABLE HOME
COMPANY
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11,18 & 25, 2012
2306-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-209 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
GERRITS CITRUS INC.
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0800
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
N1/2 OF SE1/4 E OF MAR-
QUETTE VLG UNIT 1 PB 3
PG 42 & S OF W MAR-
QUETTE LN (PER OR BK 689
PG 1166) & W OF LTS 4-5
MARQUETTE ACRES UN-
REC SUB & SE1/4 OF SE1/4
W OF LTS 1-4 MARQUETTE
ACRES UNREC SUB & E1/2
OF SW1/4 OF SE1/4 TITLE
IN OR BK 80 PG 538, OR
BK 536 PG 1402, OR BK
580 PG 29 & OR BK 724
PG 1009 & OR BK 1883 PG
1805


NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
DANNY L. JOHNSON,
DANNY LEE JOHNSON
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
July 4, 11 18 & 25, 2012





2308-0725 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION NO:
2012-211 NOTICE OF AP-
PLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
JUSTIN K HOLCOMBE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-9004
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:INVERNESS AC-
RES UNIT 2 AKA INVERNESS
VLG UNIT2 PB6 PG 52
LOT 19 BLK 7
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
BAYVIEW FINANCIAL
PROPERTY TRUST 5TH FLR
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on August 8, 2012 at
9:30 A.M. at www.
citrus.realtaxdeed.com.
Dated June 28, 2012
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
S 4 11 18&25 2012


775-0704 WCRN
Hunter, Beverly E Notice to Creditors (Summ, Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-266
IN RE: ESTATE OF BEVERLY E. HUNTER
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Beverly E. Hunter, deceased. File Number 2012-CP-266, by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was FEBRUARY 26, 2012: that the total value of the estate is SNONE and that
the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
James N. Harriman, 12010 Lagoon Lane, Apt. B, Treasure Island, FL 33706
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 27, 2012
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ James N. Harriman
12010 Lagoon Lane, Apt. B Treasure Island, FL 33713
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, PA.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
June 27 and July 4, 2012


776-0704 WCRN
Beahan, James T. 2012-CP-378 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-378
IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES TIMOTHY BEAHAN
a/k/a James T. Beahan,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of JAMES TIMOTHY BEAHAN a/k/a JAMES T. BEAHAN,
deceased, File Number 2012-CP-378, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of death was January 9,
2012: that the total value of the estate is $30,000.00and that the names and
address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:

DOUGLAS TESSIER, 1658 Buckingham Drive, Windsor, Ontario N8T 2A6
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 27. 2012.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ DOUGLAS TESSIER.
1658 Buckingham Drive, Windsor. Ontario N8T 2A6
/s/ MARCEL LABELLE
330 Elm, Box 61, Stoney Point, Ontario, NOR 1NO
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
GLEN C. ABBOTT. Florida Bar No. 235911
Post Office Box 2019. Crystal River, FL 34423-2019
Telephone (352)795-5699


777-0704 WCRN
Brandt, Harvey R Notice to Creditors (Summ, Admin,)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-353
IN RE: ESTATE OF HARVEY R. BRANDT
A/K/A HARVEY ROLFE BRANDT,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


entered in the Estate of Harvey R. Brandt, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-353, by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was March 9, 2012: that the total value of the estate is $19,822.60 and that
the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Valerie A. Brandt, 3644 W. Giraffe Drive, Citrus Springs, FL 34434
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 27, 2012
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Valerie A. Brandt
3644 W. Giraffe Drive, Citrus Springs, FL 34434
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, PA.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
June 27 and July 4, 2012


778-0704 WCRN
Acevedo, Ramona Diaz Notice to Creditors (Summ, Admin,)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-365
IN RE: ESTATE OF RAMONA DIAZ ACEVEDO,
a/k/a RAMONA ACEVEDO
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Ramona Diaz Acevedo, deceased, File Number
2012-CP-365, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the
decedent's date of death was May 11, 2012: that the total value of the estate is
SNONE and that the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
Eddy M. Acevedo, 3325 East Deal Street, Inverness, FL 34453

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 27, 2012
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Eddy M. Acevedo
3325 East Deal Street, Inverness, FL 34453
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, PA.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
June 27 and July 4,2012


779-0704 WCRN
Kostige, Gloria F. 2012-CP-200 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-200
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLORIA F. KOSTIGE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gloria F. Kostige, deceased, whose date of
death was February 11,2012,is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 27, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Russell P. Kostige
9101 N. Akola Way, Citrus Springs, Florida 34434
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Megan T. Fitzpatrick Florida Bar No. 84987 352-726-1821
FITZPATRICK& FITZPATRICK, PA. 213 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
June 27 and July 4, 2012


1256-0621 THCRN
6/26 Regular Session CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
meet in Regular Session on July 10, 2012, at 1:00 P.M., in the Citrus County Court-
house, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of conducting
the regular business of Citrus County.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.

Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
ings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes).

July 4, 2012.


780-0704 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE

A Budget workshop of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Friday, July
20, 2012 at 9:00am in the Masonic Business Center, Third floor Ballroom located at
111 West Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450 to discuss:

Ad-valorem Property Taxes.
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Budget.
Citrus County Hospital Board Budget.
Property Appraiser Fees.
Tax Collector Commissions
Other.


Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-419-6566. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566.

July 4, 2012


781-0704 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE

Finance Committee meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Fri-
day, July 20, 2012 at 12:00pm in the Masonic Business Center, Third floor Ballroom lo-
cated at 111 West Main St, Inverness, FL 34450 to discuss:

Approval of Minutes.
Finance Report.
Other.

A regular meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Friday, July 20,
2012 at 12:30pm in the Masonic Business Center, Third floor Ballroom located at 111
West Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450 to discuss:

Approval of Minutes.
Citrus County Hospital Board Finance Committee Report.
Foundation Governance Issues.
Citrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
Other.

Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-419-6566. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566.

July 4, 2012


783-0704 WCRN
7/ 1 meeting Beverly Hills Advisory Council
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus Springs Advisory Council will meet on
Wednesday, July 11, 2012 at 9:00 o'clock A.M., at the Citrus Springs Community Cen-
ter, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Building "B", Citrus Springs, Florida, to conduct
business of the Citrus Springs Municipal Service Benefit Unit.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
By: Joan Dias, Chairwoman
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
July, 2012


524-0703 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid #2013-04 MOWING SERVICES-3 LOCATIONS
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING
TUESDAYJULY 10. 2012@7:00a.m.
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB
VendorBid website; Automated Vendor Application & Bidder
Notification System: www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board

July 3, 4, and 5, 2012


NdetCrio


Nocst rqos


NocstoCek


Metn


Metn


Medn


I Bi NoiM


I Bid Notic


I BidNotic




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I :16


1


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TITLE TRANSFER SALE


PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE FOR JUST AN


TITLE

TRANSFER

FEE*


SALE PRICE


$5999


YOU CANNOT BE REFUSED

REGARDLESS OF CREDIT

REGARDLESS OF EMPLOYMENT

REGARDLESS OF INCOME


201 1
Regal 10,895
Sebring 21,215
200 22,249
Cruze 8,300
Equinox 8,266
Tahoe 5,715
HHR 16,009
Impala 4,215
Malibu 23,578
Silverado 10,659
Avenger 22,845
Charger 10,791
Durango 12,595
Ram 1500 19,196
Ram 3500 8,366
Terrain 1,406
Nitro 21,038
Civic 14,130
Compass 21,158
Grand Charokee 24,103
Wrangler 3,993
Tacoma 16,871
Altima 2,236
Armada 233,386
Versa 2,603
2010
Lacrosse 8,723
300 28,570
Town & Country 7,710
PT Cruiser 8,950
Aveo 17,515
Cobalt 22,322
Malibu 4,744
Traverse 33,753
Terrain 34,341
Charger 23,549


Journey 28,412
Dakota 10,920
Nitro 52,253
Ram 3500 30,125
F150 29,462
Santa Fe 29,162
Civic 52,852
Commander 33,109
Pathfinder 14,665
Liberty 48,060
Wrangler 7,823
Lancer 11,897
Altima 41,265
Sentra 21,811
Murano 15,826
2009
300 44,865
Town & County 43,903
Aveo 25,739
Cobalt 35,810
Equinox 62,583
Malibu 36,916
Tahoe 47,425
Caliber 6,049
Challenger 22,306
Charger 57,756
Ram 1500 84,592
Journey 9,888
Ram 1500 42,615
Civic 27,801
Camry 107,095
Spectra 36,279
G6 34,099
2008 m
535i 39,246
Equinox 20,129
Silverado 3500 17,925


300 61,269
Town & Country 71,194
PT Cruiser 22,713
Sebring 27,986
Caliber 37,982
Charger 35,865
Magnum 43,729
Ram 1500 32,881
F150 54,735
Elantra 63,466
Grand Cherokee 41,534
Grand Marquis 27,783
XL7 40,132
2007
Sebring 75,217
Town & Country 76,565
Aveo 34,401
HHR 44,434
Monte Carlo 85,873
Caliber 92,759
Charger 45,129
Nitro 60,450
Ram 1500 28,459
F150 85,752
Sierra 1500 47,498
Commander 70,235
Wrangler 49,315
Tucson 76,805
Rondo 60,933
Camry 42,823
Matrix 98,342
RX7 89,630
Altima 48,837
Vue 80,304
2006
Lacrosse 31,732
Silverado 1500 82,707


300 63,474
Pacifica 64,193
PT Cruiser 69,834
Town & Country 63,580
Charger 48,352
Ram 1500 48,115
Escape 66,319
Expedition 97,025
Explorer 70,120
F150 60,370
F250 73,272
Elantra 29,650
Sante Fe 71,110
Commander 93,783
Sentra 42,000
Titan 42,940
Torrent 65,180
2005
Monte Carlo 88,036
300 77,106
Pacifica 88,309
Town & Country 62,048
Caravan 80,701
Ram 1500 70,222
Explorer Sportrac 63,955
F150 64,782
Accent 62,750
Sante Fe 39,265
Rio 75,192
Xterra 92,221
'2004
300M 50,769
PT Cruiser 88,759
Ram 1500 86,806
F150 73,547
Optima 87,764
Sedona 52,224


U I h~ I


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with approved credit Severity of credit may require substantial down payment and affect selection. See dealer for complete details. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 2012 C9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS
AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!
THERE WILL BE
NO SALES PEOPLE MANAGERS OR
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(NO ONE WILL EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)



Because new models are arriving daily, management has been ordered to eliminate excess
inventory. All prices will be slashed and will be clearly posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and paper.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Old Historic Courthouse


1912-2012


Each year in early July, to
coincide with the Fourth of
July holiday, the Citrus
County Chronicle in partner-
ship with the Citrus County
Historical Society and the
Citrus County Old Court-
house Heritage Museum pro-
duces the history section.
The purpose of the annual
section is to take readers
back to an earlier time in
Citrus County. And over the
years the section has focused
on churches, cemeteries,
communities, families,
places and events that have
shaped the lives of Citrus
County residents. Last year
the edition was all about the
50th anniversary of the film-
ing of the movie "Follow
That Dream," when Elvis
Presley came to town.


The partnership between
the newspaper, historical so-
ciety and the museum takes
on an even greater signifi-
cance this year because this
year's Remember When is a
tribute to the Old Historic
Courthouse as it celebrates
its 100th anniversary -
1912-2012.
The building serves as
home to both the museum
and the historical society and
also is the depository of hun-
dreds of bound volumes of
the early days of the
Chronicle.
Built in the heyday of the
phosphate boom, the Old
Courthouse is the crowning
glory of the county's past.
The phosphate boom,
combined with thriving tim-
ber, turpentine and cattle in-


dustries fueled a prosperous
time and a growth rate that
made it clear a new and
larger courthouse would be
needed.
So, at the Citrus County
Commission meeting on
May 1, 1911, a resolution to
build a new facility was
passed and work started the
next year 1912.
Along with excerpts de-
tailing the building's history
from the book "The Citrus
County Courthouse: A Short
History of Citrus County,
Florida and its Seat of Gov-
ernment," the section con-
tains numerous photos of
architectural elements of the
restored facility skillfully
photographed by Chronicle
photographer Dave Sigler.
Enjoy!


III I IReasons Why Soudeou r ii


Time for a very

special courthouse
An economic boom fueled by the
phosphate industry created the
need for a new courthouse.
Page 6


Interim Citrus County
courthouses
Numerous buildings served as a
seat of government prior to the
construction of the Historic Old
Courthouse.
Page 4


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An effort by many people with a
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the past ended with the Old
Courthouse restored.
Page 16


Today, it's a museum
The Old Courthouse houses the
main county historical museum
which contains many items of
local significance as well as the
historical archives of the county.
Page 22


What's inside


F


G2 Wednesday July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE REMEMBER WHEN Wednesday july 4, 2012 G3


Sharing memories


with friends!
IJoe and Rose Carino are originally
r from Buffalo, New York. They recently
moved to Cedar Creek and quickly fell
in love with their new home, the
people, the meals and the receptive
audience of Joe's banjo playing!
Joe remembers buying the banjo
after his service with the U.S.
Army. He recalls visiting his
"sweetheart" Rose with banjo in
tow. He would play and they
FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF WHAT would sing together. They still do,
MAKES CEDAR CREEK EVERYTHING to the delight of the other
ASSISTED LIVING WAS MEANT TO BEl residents, families and friends.
Visit us any Thursday
S for Tea at 3!
It's Free! No appointmed necsay.
231 NW Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FLC"Ae/
(352) 564-2446 Lic. #AL10230 AT KINGS BAY
www.CedarCreekLife.com ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE *


Gerry Mulligan Publisher

Ken Melton Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly Community Affairs Graphic Artist

Sarah Gatling Community Editor

Trista Stokes -Advertising Sales Manager


Citrus Publishing Inc.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

352-563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


Wednesday, July 4, 2012 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Interim Citrus County courthouses


Excerpted from the Citrus
County Historical Society
publication "The Citrus
County Courthouse: A Ni,. t
History of Citrus County,
Florida and its Seat of Gov-
ernment" by Tom Ritchie.


Master Politician
Takes Charge
When Citrus County was
separated from Hernando
County in 1887, a movement
was spearheaded by Senator
Mann to make the little set-
tlement of Mannfield the in-
terim county seat. Mannfield
was situated in the center of
the county (just south of
present-day Lecanto) in what
is now the Withlacoochee
State Forest. Senator Mann,
who was an extremely im-
portant personage in the early
history of Citrus County,
helped plan and lay out this
village in 1883 and it was
named in his honor.
He was a gregarious and
outspoken lawyer who
moved to the area from New
Jersey six years after the War
Between the States. He soon
established an orange grove
near Crystal River and got
involved with land develop-
ment (in addition to Mann-
field, he helped establish the
town of Floral City in 1884).
His political career began
as a Hernando County Com-
missioner in 1874, and he
later represented Hernando
County (before the split) and
the 22nd District in the
Florida State Senate for three
successive terms from 1883
through 1888.

The Moffat House:
First Citrus County
Courthouse (1887-91)
Within a few days of the
official formation of Citrus
County, Governor Perry ap-
pointed a county sheriff, tax
assessor, tax collector, judge,
clerk of court, attorney, treas-


urer, surveyor, and four com-
missioners. It was under-
stood that these people were
only interim county officials
until public elections could
be held.
The first Citrus County
Commission meeting was
held in the Mannfield Church
on August 1st, 1887, and it
was decided that an election
to determine a permanent
county seat would take place
within two years.
Through Senator Mann's
urging, the interim court-
house was established in the
C.W. Moffat house in Mann-
field at a rental cost of $10
per month.
Various improvements
were necessary, however, so
the courthouse was repainted
and a small addition was
built. A local man was hired
to keep the hogs from bed-
ding under the house. On
May 3rd, 1888, the first Cit-
rus County election was held
to determine the permanent
location of the county seat
and elect county commis-
sioners. It is interesting that
only one of the governor's
appointees was retained. No
town received a majority of
votes to be the county seat,
so that question was
deferred.
Mann wanted his growing
town to remain the county
seat, and already had plans in
the works to bring in the new
South Florida Railroad, part
of the Henry B. Plant System
which was in competition
with Henry Flagler's Florida
East Coast Railroad. The rail-
road right of way was al-
ready established by this
time. Mannfield seemed a
logical choice because it al-
ready boasted a population of
more than 250 people and
contained two churches
(Methodist and Baptist), a
school, a general store, a
wagon workshop, a real es-
tate office, and a newspaper
called the Citrus County
Star, established in 1887.


The first Courthouse in Inverness, 1892.


Unfortunately for Senator
Mann, there was a prominent
group of businessmen and
financiers who had other
plans. They felt Mannfield
was too isolated and that
some other place with access
to the Withlacoochee River
and the Tsala Apopka Lakes
system would be more ap-
propriate as the county seat.
Several of these individu-
als had gotten together in the
early 1880s and formed the
Florida Orange, Canal and
Transit Company (FO.C.&T.
Co.), a development corpora-
tion also concerned with boat
transportation on the local
lakes and rivers.
They purchased 160 acres
of land near the shore of Big
Lake Henderson (part of the
Tsala Apopka Lakes chain)
from Daniel "Af' Tompkins.


Inverness
is founded
Mr. Mason of the F.O.C.&
T. Co. surveyed their new
land acquisition and John E.
King, the Tax Collector for
Hernando County, platted it
for a new township. Francis
M. Dampier cleared the land
and helped lay out the streets
and avenues. This property
was adjacent to the tiny ham-
let of Tompkinsville, a com-
munity established by
Tompkins in about 1868,
which now consisted of a
sawmill, a general store, a
post office, a Presbyterian
Church, and a school.
It had a population of
about 30 people, most of
whom belonged to about a
half dozen extended families.
The new development was
given the name Inverness by


the local school teacher, Miss
Mattie Baker, who was of
Scottish descent.
The F.O.C. & T. Co. exca-
vated numerous canals and
dredged many miles of navi-
gational routes through re-
gional waterways in the
1880s and 1890s. The exca-
vation of these canals proved
to be very difficult work, and
the workmen used the tech-
nique of dragging large
scoops by teams of mules.
Many workers suffered
from dysentery and malaria
during the projects. A com-
plex series of canals now
connected the lake towns of
Inverness, Floral City, and
Hernando with the Withla-
coochee River, thereby giv-
ing them easy access to the
gulf coast via a water route.
This allowed citrus grow-
ers in the eastern part of the
county to send their fruit by
way of small paddle wheel
steamboats and avoid the tra-
ditional long and difficult
overland wagon hauls.

Inverness is chosen as
the County Seat
The F.O.C.& T. Co. devel-
oped Inverness, so it was not
surprising that the company
promoted Inverness as the
best place for the permanent
Citrus County seat of gov-
ernment.
During 1889 and 1890, six
elections were organized to
determine the location for the
courthouse, but all the pro-
posed townships failed to
gain a majority of votes. The
politics were very volatile at
this time because many peo-
ple had vested interests in
where the county seat would
be established.
As a matter of interest, it
was during this intense pe-
riod of 1890 that the Citrus
County Chronicle was
founded, so we have good
records of the events sur-
rounding the search for a
county seat of government.


Inverness, Lecanto (in asso-
ciation with nearby Mann-
field), Crystal River, Floral
City, and Gulf Junction were
all in the running. The sev-
enth countywide election was
onApril 4th, 1891, and the
official count was completed
and announced five days
later at the county commis-
sion meeting. A majority of
voters had chosen Inverness
with 267 votes out of a total
of 526 votes cast.
Lecanto/Mannfield came in
second with 258 votes and
Gulf Junction received one.
Colonel Robert L. Ander-
son, the attorney for the inter-
ested parties, announced that
Inverness had been chosen
legally and suggested that all
county property, records, and
papers should be moved im-
mediately to a building in In-
verness already designated as
the new temporary court-
house.

The Night the
Courthouse was
'Stolen'- April 9, 1891
As soon as the announce-
ment was made, there were
objections and accusations of
fraud by the Mannfield pro-
ponents. The attorney for the
Mannfield group, Colonel
E.M. Dupree, immediately
tried to get an injunction
against any quick moves of
courthouse records by going
to see the nearest judge, for-
mer Governor H.L. Mitchell.
Although Judge Mitchell
normally presided in Tampa,
at this time he was thought to
be holding court in
Brooksville.
Dupree rode his horse to
Brooksville, but when he got
there he learned the judge
had already gone to Dade
City to hold court. He then
continued on to Dade City
and reached the judge just as
he was about to leave on a
train for Tampa.

see Interim Page 5


G4 Wednesday July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Interim
from Page 4
Dupree boarded that train
with Judge Mitchell and rode
it all the way to Tampa, argu-
ing his case along the way. In
the end, Judge Mitchell re-
fused to give the injunction on
the advice of state attorney
Tom Palmer, who had already
been contacted by wire and
was advised of the situation
by Citrus County Sheriff
James Priest.
In the meantime, the pro-In-
verness people wasted no time
in making the move. Their
lawyers, Bob and Hub Ander-
son of Ocala, knew the Mann-
field lawyer had gone to
Tampa for the injunction and
they advised their clients to
move the official records, fur-
niture, and fixtures as soon as
possible.
Their cause was helped im-
mensely by the fact that Sher-
iff Priest was on the board of
the F.O.C.& T. Co. and was
also its official spokesman.
The sheriff oversaw the im-
mediate collection and move-
ment of courthouse material
from the rented Mannfield
house to Inverness, about six
miles to the northeast. There
was one major snag in this
move, however.
The Clerk of the Court,
Captain W.E. Zimmerman,
objected to the way the elec-
tion had been handled and
was of the opinion the court-
house should remain in Man-
nfield. He refused to vacate
his office before Dupree re-
turned.
He sat in his chair and con-
tinued copying the minutes of
the meeting and would not
move even when requested
directly by the sheriff. The
movers were then ordered by
the sheriff to physically pick
up Zimmerman, still in his
chair, put him onto the wagon
along with his desk and pa-
pers and transport him
to Inverness.
As the wagon bumped its
way to Inverness, Zimmer-
man continued doing official
business still seated in his
chair, at his desk. When he
was placed in his new room at
the new courthouse, the sher-
iff coerced him to officially
announce that the courthouse
had been legally moved


to Inverness.
In just a few hours the new
Citrus County Courthouse
was in operation. Included in
the minutes recorded by Zim-
merman on that fateful day of
April 9, 1891 was the follow-
ing: "Immediately upon this
announcement a hundred
hands began the tearing down
of walls of the Circuit Court
Clerk's office, and loading up
of county property and
records for removal. It being
impossible to transact busi-
ness, a motion was made to
adjourn and meet at Inverness
on the 20th ofApril A.D.
1891 was unanimously
passed."

The Gaffney Store:
Second Citrus County
Courthouse (1891-92)
The move was orchestrated
by citizens who offered to
transport the material free of
charge, under the supervision
of the county sheriff. As the
courthouse material was being
transported to its new home in
Inverness, the movers were in
high spirits. The men report-
edly gave out whoops and
Rebel yells all along the way,
and as they neared Inverness
both men and women began
singing and dancing their way
down to a small,wood-frame
building opposite the present
site of the Old Courthouse.
This building was originally a
general store belonging to
James Gaffney, but he will-
ingly rented it to the county as
its new courthouse for $19 per
month. Improvements had to
be made to this structure as
well, including a new coat of
paint and the repair and en-
largement of the front en-
trance.
Inverness and Tompkins-
ville at this time were sepa-


rated only by a single street,
and problems resulted from
the local post office operating
under the name Tompkins-
ville. A petition was organized
by residents to change the
name of the post office to the
same address name as that of
the county courthouse, the
newspaper, and various busi-
nesses associated with the
government and court system.
The petitioners were ulti-
mately successful, and this re-
sulted in the name of the
Tompkinsville post office
being changed to Inverness.
Henceforth, the two adjacent
communities were known as
Inverness.

Mannfield Becomes
a Ghost Town
Three events occurred one
right after the other in the
early 1890s which taken to-
gether proved disastrous for
Mannfield. First, Inverness
was chosen as the county seat
in 1891; second, the Plant
Railroad System was diverted
to the eastern part of the
county in 1893 (because of
the recently discovered phos-
phate deposits); and third, a
disastrous freeze killed all the
local orange groves in 1895.
The Mannfield-based Citrus
County Star went broke about
the same time the courthouse
was moved to Inverness in
1891 (it was in competition
with the Inverness-based
Citrus County Chronicle). By
the middle of the decade, peo-
ple began moving away from
Mannfield to take advantage
of the economic growth
around Inverness and else-
where. The village of Mann-
field was abandoned several
years later and no longer ex-
ists. the site has been com-
pletely reclaimed by the
forest. It is worth noting that


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numerous other towns besides
Mannfield and Lecanto ex-
isted in the central and south-
ern regions of the county by
the early 1890s. Arlington,
Bradleys, Bridgers, Cordeal,
Fairmount, Mallards Mill,
Mount Lee, Oakdale, Orleans,
Pinola, Rose Hill, Stage Pond,
and Vianna all had significant
populations of 50 to 200 peo-
ple with churches, stores,
cemeteries, etc., and several
even had schools, sawmills,
turpentine stills, and post of-
fices (one even had a prison).
Like Mannfield, none of these
towns survived more than a
few years into the 20th
century, and only Lecanto still
exists today.

The Victorian
Courthouse
(1892-1913)
The day Inverness was
made the official county seat,
Henry Martin, president of the
F.O.C.&T. Co., offered an
acre of land in the center of
town to the Board of County
Commissioners for "one dol-
lar and other valuable consid-
erations." The express


purpose for turning over the
property to the county was to
provide a site for the construc-
tion of a permanent court-
house. Martin's proposition
was unanimously accepted. A
large building was needed be-
cause Citrus County was now
experiencing tremendous
growth.

Finally, a
Real Courthouse
The Courthouse Square was
laid out and construction bids
were requested for the new
courthouse. The building con-
tract was awarded to R.B.
McGechin in October, 1891,
and construction was begun
almost immediately on what
would become the centerpiece
of the Citrus County govern-
ment.
Before the end of 1892, the
beautiful wooden, two-story,
Victorian-style courthouse
was completed. It was basi-
cally square in floor shape
with a steep roof, an ornate
gabled entrance facade with
four parapets, and a large cen-
tral clock tower capped by a
pointed roof, not unlike an


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enormous church steeple. The
siding of the building was
painted white and the trim
around the sliding windows,
tower, and entrance were dark
red. It sat upon short brick pil-
lars and did not have a base-
ment. The building measured
about 45 feet on each side,
plus an additional 16 by 20
feet for the entrance, giving a
total floor space area of about
4,500 square feet.
Records show that the
courthouse initially remained
open to the public 24 hours a
day until an incident of van-
dalism occurred in February,
1893, which led to the com-
mission instructing the sheriff
to install locks on all the
doors. An indoor bathroom
was installed in the rear of the
building in 1894. In 1902, a
galvanized wire fence over
four feet tall was erected on
wooden fence posts around
Courthouse Square. Entry was
gained to the courthouse only
through a driveway gate at the
main entrance on the north-
west side and through two
small gates along sidewalks
on the northeast and
southwest sides.


*~,-J



/1C







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Time for very special courthouse


Excerpted from the Citrus County
Historical Society publication "The
Citrus County Courthouse: A \it,. i t
History of Citrus County, Florida
and its Seat of Government" by
Tom Ritchie.

The Citrus-based
Economy Goes Bust
The local prosperity was fueled
primarily by the citrus-based econ-
omy.
The eastern region of Citrus
County was found to have nearly
perfect soil conditions for citrus
trees and many groves were estab-
lished here during the 30 years fol-
lowing the war.
Near the end of the 19th century,
vast amounts of citrus fruit were
being shipped to the markets of
northern cities by way of river pad-
dleboats, steamships, and railways.
Unfortunately, the citrus boom was
ended suddenly by the Big Freeze
in the winter of 1894-1895.
This was the worst freeze on
record to that date and it destroyed
virtually all the citrus groves in Cit-
rus County, along with most of the


local prosperity.

Phosphate Gets
Things Going Again
Fortunately, there was an eco-
nomic upswing on the horizon. In
1889, a geologist named Charles
Pinkney Savary did some prospect-
ing in the area and found a signifi-
cant deposit of hard rock phosphate
near Dunnellon, on the north side of
the Withlacoochee River. He went
on to locate several more deposits
in Citrus County during the ensuing
years. When the Big Freeze devas-
tated the citrus-dependent economy,
it took less than a decade for the
local economy to get moving again
with the mining and export of phos-
phate for use in fertilizers.
Initially, the mining was done
with picks and shovels, but in later
days excavations were done by
huge steam shovels. Many black
workers and their families flocked
to the area looking I' ,I cinpl, ,i. I!lc'n
and the population t, tli c Iuntr.
soared to more thin 11 I c11111I -
ple. A significant ulimi L
ber of Italian .


men also came to work in the
mines. Much of the work inside the
processing plants was done with
convict labor, but recruiters went as
far as Georgia and South Carolina
to hire laborers for the mines. A ver-
itable tent city was established near
Floral City to house many of the
transient workers who continued to
stream in and out


4.

JgR


of the area searching for temporary
employment.
The phosphate boom, along with
the profitable timber, turpentine,
and cattle industries, once again
brought great prosperity to the re-
gion. In fact, the incredible rate of
growth was much greater than had
been anticipated.
At the County Commission meet-
ing of May 1st, 1911, they decided
to deal with the need for expanding
the government by passing a resolu-
tion to build a new and larger court-
house.

The Victorian
Courthouse is Sold
Since it was decided the new
courthouse would stand on Court-
house Square at the same site as the
existing one, the Victorian Court-
house was put up for sale on the
condition that the buyer would
move it to make room for the new
hlllJnl;' The conuiin.ioners were
nii ,I I1.111. i'. ili tlic rc.i offers they
icccivlcd .' thlc. icscindedthe
.,I: Instead, they
paid the


Read-Parker Construction Com-
pany $875 in January 1912, to
move the building a short distance
to the north in order to clear the site
for construction. The commission-
ers gave the building to Robert O.
Hicks of Inverness in July, 1913,
for him to sell it or tear it down for
salvage on partial behalf of the
county. The deal made with Hicks
was that half the proceeds obtained
from selling the building or its parts
would be given to the county and
Hicks could keep the rest. FM.
Dampier purchased the Clerk's Of-
fice for $300 and moved it to a lot
by the old Potter Livery Stable. The
remaining part of the building was
about to be torn down for scrap
when I. Frank Graham, a black bar-
ber, purchased it for $1,250. He
moved the remaining building sec-
tion to his property near the railroad
and placed it on brick pillars adja-
cent to his residence in order to en-
large a boarding house. The large
courtroom was reportedly used
as a dance hall and for other
entertainment.
see Courthouse Page 8


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G6 Wednesday July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Old Chronicles mention 'new' courthouse


By John Grannan
Special to the Chronicle

We are very fortunate that the Citrus
County Historical Society has in its collection
so many copies of old Citrus County
Chronicles. Former Chronicle owner, David
Arthurs, donated many of the newspapers dat-
ing back to the 1890s. When you read one of
those newspapers, it is like taking a trip back
in time and similar to the old TV show, "You
Are There."
A look at the Chronicles from the month of
January in 1912 gives the reader a slice of life
as it was a hundred years ago. Like most
newspapers of that time the front pages fea-
ture a large advertisement along with smaller
ads and some news stories from other parts of
the country and the world. There was also a
serialization of a popular novel "Miss
Minerva and William Green Hill" by Frances
Boyd Calhoun.
Coincidentally, when I was in fifth grade
over 50 years ago, my teacher at Crystal
River Elementary read the book aloud to my
class.
Inside on Pages 2 and 3 were more ads and
local news with snippets of information about
individuals and businesses. There were arti-
cles from other state newspapers. Page 4 was
usually legal notices and even more advertise-
ments. The most intriguing ad was for "Hair -
Bought, Sold and Exchanged. We have now


on hand a large assortment of Human Hair
switches and would be pleased to have you
come in and see our beautiful line."
There were two timely references to the
building of the new courthouse which would
begin in 1912.
Some citizens had been opposed to it but
the County Commissioners decided to move
forward with their plans. In early January,
George Butler, Chronicle editor, expressed his
displeasure. "The old courthouse is being
moved this week to make room for the new
structure." The building was not even 20
years old but was already a sentimental fa-
vorite of some. It was moved to the north of
the square by the Read-Parker Construction
Company for $875.
The removal of the trees upset many resi-
dents. "Monday morning the work of clearing
the old courthouse grounds of the beautiful
shade trees began, to make room for the new
and modern structure. Hundreds of our peo-
ple regret the removal of the beautiful shade
trees, which have so long nestled around our
county building, and many a man expressed
regret over the destruction. Whatever may be
the result, we will always cherish remem-
brances of the past, and the old courthouse,
will ever be in our memory." The trees
would be replaced by new ones once the new
building was completed, and many years later
see Chronicles Page 11


(j

S ^ .,, t


Wednesday, July 4, 2012 G7


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Later records show that I. 1
Frank Graham had trouble m. I,-
ing payments on the Victorian
Courthouse, so the County C cl 1
delivered up Graham's mortpc.cic
with orders to foreclose on tlic
property. Before the foreclosure
was enacted, however, a deal was
reached in which county officials
accepted another offer from
Graham of $1,200 for the old build-
ing and the lot. It was to be paid
with $400 cash and $100 per quar-
ter for eight quarters. County
records show that payments were
made as required.

Making Plans for a Very
Special Courthouse
The commissioners decreed the
new building would have to be of
fireproof construction, and could
not cost more than $50,000. It was
to be designed in such a way as to
allow for the expected continued fu-
ture growth and increasing govern-
mental needs. The new building


establishing a building tax
of five mills on the dollar per year.
A Courthouse Building Committee
was established in July, 1911, and
commissioners Stephens and
Barnes were sent all around Florida
and southern Georgia on a fact-
finding mission to view some of the
existing courthouses and interview
various governmental employees
for ideas. They returned in late July
and reported to the committee they
failed to find anything appropriate
to pattern the new courthouse after,
although it was mentioned they
were very impressed by the magnif-
icent Polk County Courthouse in
Bartow built in 1908. Unfortu-
nately, the budget would not allow
for such a building in Citrus
County.
As of midsummer, 1911, no one


yet knew what the new courthouse
would look like, so the commission
hired architect J .R. MacEachron to
come up with a design. Not every-
one was happy about this project,
however, because a petition signed
by 246 voters was brought before
the County Commission meeting of
August, 1911. The petitioners felt
the existing courthouse was ade-
quate for their needs and would
continue to be so for the foreseeable
future. After discussing the issue at
considerable length with the board
of commissioners, the citizens fi-
nally agreed with them and with-
drew their petition. Unfortunately,
MacEachron was unable to meet
the time requirements for producing
design plans and specifications by


the appointed octobci
County Commission meeting. He
failed to show up for the meeting
and was subsequently fired. Archi-
tect Willis R. Biggers of Tampa was
hired in November, 1911, to take
over the project. He agreed to de-
sign the courthouse for a fee of 5
percent of the cost of construction.
It should be noted that over the next
six years, Biggers also designed the
Manatee County Courthouse, and
several schools in Hillsborough
County including Plant City High
School, Springhead Public School,
and Old Seffuer School. Also in
November, 1911, advertisements
were placed in the Citrus County
( i ........ /L the Daily Times Journal,
and the Atlanta Journal to get bids
from interested construction com-
panies. Six companies responded,


.IJI oln [i cciinber
4th. I' ! tc ( ,th urt-
SIu.c BLIIllIn-' ( OIln-
nu4 in.tl''C 1pCL1rcd nlc h 1id of
$.4 ',a 5 lhInImurtd l', thc Read-

iRP( ( ( 'eiK1 htioJ. I.iin 'Jd fhl n
I R ( (n i n l 11ni 11c I 1 .II. iiu
$ l II.II t $ I, II II I I l I e
Tlilc ic I. l,, 1.h tlhl lll .it B I,_',_'H.
'.\ Ini-p ll.' IIi I 'll .\ i ,I,, h .'k-'.iil e
he made an ingenious design to fit
the building to the Courthouse
Square property and relate it to the
odd configuration of the surround-
ing streets.
"Courthouse Square is situated so
that the comers face the main com-
pass directions and is like a hub in
that each comer is aligned with a
street." Biggers decided to set the
courthouse in the center of the
square so that its four sides, each
with an entrance, faced into the
streets radiating out from each cor-
ner of the square. This brilliant lay-
out meant that there need not be a
single main entrance, but instead
there could be four entrances all
leading in to a central lobby.

see Courthouse Page 9


G8 Wednesday July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Wednesday, July 4, 2012 G9


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Courthouse
from Page 9
wood floor would be utilized on the
upper level. Although fireplaces had
been called for in the plans and RPCC
figured their bid with fireplaces as part
of the construction, several commis-
sioners expressed second thoughts at
the May, 1912, meeting and wanted to
change to a more modem steam-heat
system. They now wanted to increase
the height of the courthouse to make
room for installing a low pressure
steam heating system and add a base-
ment to the structure to house the
steam generating plant. A new pay-
ment scheme was worked out to try to
offset costs and PRCC came up with a
new costing, but a month later the
commission voted to stick with the
originally called for fireplaces and
chimneys.
In early May, 1913, about a month
before the courthouse was finished, the
firm of Graham and Stage was
awarded the contract to complete the
surrounding land of Courthouse
Square. They graded the land, put in
the concrete walks, and erected a low
ornamental iron fence and eight gas
lampposts around the perimeter at a
cost of $2,000. The furnishing contract
was given to Fielder & Allen Com-
pany of Atlanta for the amount of
$1,891. PRCC announced the court-
house was ready on June 2nd, 1913
(exactly 26 years to the day from when
Citrus County was officially formed),
and gave the county a final bill that in-
cluded $11,534 over the contractual
amount for extra work. The Board of
Commissioners refused to accept the
building or discuss the matter further
until an itemized statement was filed.
This was done by the next day and an
agreement was made in which RPCC
accepted only $5,700 as payment in
full for all extra work. Therefore, the
actual cost of construction totaled
$55,885, making it about 11 percent
over the original budget. The Citrus
County Courthouse was formally ac-
cepted on June 3rd, 1913, and virtually
everyone agreed it was a magnificent
building that made an impressive
showpiece for the county.

Design Details
The Old Courthouse can briefly be
described as a large, classical, two-
story, square-shaped edifice built of
brick, granite, and concrete with a cen-
tral attic clock tower (showing four
large clock faces) that is capped by a
domed cupola. The building measures
roughly 90 feet wide by 80 feet deep,
giving more than 14,000 square feet of
floor spacemore than three times the


area of the Victorian Courthouse. The
design is known as the Eclectic Style
of architecture, because it includes as-
pects of Italian Renaissance, Neo-
Classical, Spanish Mission, and Prairie
School styles. The Italian Renaissance
style is represented by the main central
block of the building with its low-
pitched, hipped roof with wide boxed
eaves (all covered by clay barrel tiles),
the curved, octagon-shaped cupola
topped with a rounded belvedere (a
miniature cupola), and the heavy,
squared lintels and sills framing the
doors and windows. The Neo-Classical
part of the architecture includes the
porticoes with their colossal Tuscan
columns, as well as the grill work at
the attic level, and the miniature Tus-
can columns of the cupola. The Span-
ish Mission aspects include the four
parapets (with their small inlaid qua-
trefoils) over the porticoes that encircle
the entire building at the roofline. The
Prairie School style is made obvious
by the light-colored bricks, the curved
brackets that support the eave over-
hangs, and the rectangular flagstaff
windows with their diagonal braces
within the glass sections. This ornate
building was certainly a highly un-
usual design for the time, especially
considering the rural nature of Citrus
County.
The main entrance to the building is
on the west side, because this side of
the building faces the main downtown
area of Inverness. The west entrance
has a double door portal, wide granite
steps with flared side walls, and is
framed with two pairs of widely
spaced columns. The other three en-
trances each have (or had) single
doors, and narrower, straight granite
steps and side walls. The east entrance
also has two pairs of columns, but they
are closer together because of the nar-
rower portico and single door. Both the
north and south entrances have only a
single pair of columns. The dedication
plaque, flag pole, and monuments to
the local residents who served during
World War I, World War II, the Korean
War, and the Persian Gulf War, and a
general monument to the veterans of
Citrus County, are all located near the
west entrance. Both the west and east
side entrances have balconies over
them, and all four entrances lead to
hallways that intersect at the central
lobby where there is a color mosaic of
the Great Seal of Florida set in the ter-
razzo floor. It is interesting to note that
this version of the great seal depicts a
male Indian rather than the Indian
maiden who is seen in the official state
seal. The stairways just inside the
north and south entrances consist of
see Courthouse Page 12


G10 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chronicles
from Page 7
people would also lament their
passing when they were re-
moved for either street widening
or the restoration of the old
courthouse.
With 1912 being an election
year, politics was also on the
mind of the editor, who was
sounding the alarm about the
threat of a Republican takeover.
"Not since the administration of
George Drew, when Radicalism
and carpetbaggism was
squelched, have the Republi-
cans put in such a bold front as
this year. The only way to do is
to sit down on every last
mother's son of them. No Re-
publican holding office in the
South is a friend to the South,
and it becomes necessary to ed-
ucate our people to this line of
belief. Personally, we have
some friends in the Republican
party, but politically, damn
'em." Several comments were
made about local Republicans
holding federal offices including
the Inverness Postmaster who
was evidently appointed by


REMEMBER WHEN


President Taft.
After the Florida Supreme
Court ruled in 1911 that women
could hold public office, even
though they couldn't vote, the
editor encouraged the male vot-
ers to support women in holding
elected offices in the county and
city.
He didn't mention them being
in the Legislature or Congress,
however.
He wrote that "during the
next decade, we shall expect to
see women occupying many of
those important offices, nor
shall we expect to see the public
service suffer the least injury by
this extremely radical change.
Indeed in many instances we
shall expect to see it improve
immensely."
The beginning of the Rock
Crusher mine is also docu-
mented with a reference to the
spur line from the existing line
to Homosassa. "A railroad is
being built from the navigable
waters of Crystal river, 4 1/2
miles southeast to Lee's Mount,
a huge mound of solid rock suit-
able for concrete or jetty work
construction on the entire west
coast.


The mound or ledge has long
been one of the places of inter-
est in that section, It is the high-
est point in the county and from
its summit with a pair of
glasses, vessels can be seen out
in the Gulf beyond the outer
bars. The supply of rock is suffi-
cient for years. One hundred
men are at work on the railroad
and fifty more are wanted."
The editor of the paper real-
ized the importance of visitors to
the county, probably hoping that
some of them would become
permanent residents. "It is next
to impossible for us to get the
names of visitors to Inverness,
especially during the winter sea-
son, and we urgently urge our
readers to send or give us the
names of such visitors. The
Chronicle will not knowingly
slight any one." Even if they
were Republicans I wonder.
As one can see from this look
at the past, there have been many
changes in our culture and socie-
tal norms.
In some ways the times have
certainly changed, but in others it
seems to me that we are not that
different from the Citrus County
residents of a hundred years ago.


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and John, Sherri and JT Stitzel on the west side.
Please stop in and shop our showrooms located at


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Inverness
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Crystal River
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Wednesday July 4, 2012 Gil







G12 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


Courthouse
from Page 10
marble steps with cast iron banisters
and give access to the second floor
level. Initially, there were two
squared spiral stairways near the
east and west entrances made of
cast iron, which led to the court-
room Observers Balcony and the
Judge's Chamber.

Hard Times, Again
The Old Courthouse had only
been in use for about one year when
the unparalleled growth and pros-
perity of the Citrus County was
suddenly terminated this time by
the outbreak of war in Europe. In
late 1914, British and French mili-
tary forces established an economic
blockade around Germany, which
was the principal importer of our
phosphate. The demand for the
phosphate was finished and the
boom was over, and there was no
other significant economic en-
deavor to take its place at this time.
Tihc rilhlci .mld riiilll'ii ri ic l. IiL -
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about 5,000 people by 1920 and re-
mained near this level for many
years.

Interesting Details in the
Life of the Old Courthouse
Reading through the Citrus
County Board of County Commis-
sioners minutes from years past can
be very enlightening and entertain-
ing, especially as pertaining to
historical aspects of the Old Court-
house itself. After county personnel
had moved into the building, the
commissioners decided to rent the
unused rooms on the second floor
for $5 per month. Several lawyers
quickly took the advantage of the
offer and set up their businesses in
the courthouse. The rental rate for
these rooms was increased to $10
per month in January, 1914, in
order to include electric lights. The
use of the courthouse by govern-


REMEMBER WHEN


ment officials continued to grow,
and one after another of the private
businesses were notified to vacate
their rented offices as more space
was needed for county offices and
record storage. One renter, M.C.
Scofield, refused to leave and had
to be evicted by the sheriff. The
policy of renting office space was
finally abolished in May, 1917, and
by this time all the offices were
now occupied by county
employees.
The internal layout included the
offices of the County Judge, Clerk
of Circuit Court, Sheriff, Tax Asses-
sor, Tax Collector, tecords storage,
and the Board of Public Instruction
on the first floor. The second floor
consisted mostly of the Courtroom
itself, but also included the Jury
Room and Judge's Chambers, and
the offices of the Board of County
Commissioners, the Veterans Ad-
ministration, County Welfare, and


County Elections.
Electricity was brought into In-
verness in 1913, and in August of
that same year the Inverness Power
Company furnished all the neces-
sary fixtures and labor at cost for
wiring both the County Courthouse
and the nearby County Jail for elec-
tric lights (the county had to furnish
the electric meters). Electricity was
provided to the county buildings at
10 cents per kilowatt hour, with a
minimum charge of $10 per month.
By the end of the year, electric pa-
trons included the courthouse and
jail, the Seaboard Depot, the
Thompson and Savary stores, and
the Greek Stand.
In July, 1913, a full-time janitor
was hired at $35 per month to look
after the courthouse building. The
janitor's salary was raised to $60
per month in 1926, but in 1929, the
janitorial service was changed when
the sheriff was allowed $48 to use


-- -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

convict labor to care for the court-
house. This set an important prece-
dent because four years later, in
1933, two black convicts were sen-
tenced to serve one year in the
County Jail as janitors for the court-
house. Then in 1934, a motion was
passed in which the sheriff was
given permission to care for the
courthouse with convict labor at
$100 per month, to be paid by the
Farm and Feed Bill, but he had to
furnish all guards and transporta-
tion. The convict janitorial labor
was rescinded in 1942 and a full-
time janitor was again hired at
$65 per month (this was raised to
$75 the next year, $100 in 1945,
$130 in 1947, $150 in 1950, etc.).
Paired date palms were planted
early on at each of the four en-
trances, but several of them have
been lost to storm damage or dis-
ease over the years. Only three of
them remain now (one at the east
entrance and two at the north en-
trance) and they are enormous, as
should he expected.


.ee Courthouse Page 13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Courthouse
from Page 12
A single red cedar was planted in
the southwest comer of Courthouse
Square and it has become a large,
beautiful specimen. Its low, massive
branches provided local children with
good climbing for many decades, but
recent pruning has curtailed that ac-
tivity. Two live oaks in the west and
north comers of the square have also
grown quite large and are doing well.
Although the Old Courthouse was
supposed to be a fireproof structure, a
fire erupted in the building in April,
1916. The damage was minor, but
several windows were destroyed.
Apparently, children were no dif-
ferent in the 1920s as they are today,
because in January, 1925, the sheriff
was instructed by the Board of
County Commissioners to keep chil-
dren from skating on the walks
within the Courthouse Square. A
beautification project was started the
following year and shrubbery was
planted around the courthouse. Al-
most immediately, the sheriff was in-
structed to stop boys from playing on
the grass.
Beautiful cast iron street lamps
were installed in the downtown re-
gion of Inverness as well as at Court-
house Square in 1927. These replaced
the gas lamps already in place around
the courthouse. This came about dur-
ing the famed Land Boom of Florida
and was probably pushed by develop-
ers trying to spruce up the county seat
for the sake of inducing northerners


to buy land and settle in the area.
It is interesting that the Inverness
Ministerial Association was author-
ized by the commissioners to hold
evangelical services in the courthouse
in 1936.
In 1937, the county agreed to dis-
mantle and sell most of the beautiful
ornamental iron fence surrounding
the courthouse to D.A. Tooke in Flo-
ral City for $30 and a smaller length
to R.L. DeMuro in Inverness for $10.
A Coca-Cola vending machine was
installed in the courthouse by the Ki-
wanis Club in 1940, with all proceeds
going toward charitable purposes.
Some sections of copper and brass
were removed from the roof and else-
where, and were sold to M.M. Smoak
for $6.
Hand railings were added to the
steps "to assist older people" in 1942.
The Honor Roll Memorial for all
county servicemen was erected in
1943 the memorials to county
servicemen have since been increased
to four monuments.
In 1946, it was decided that a base-
ment should be constructed to allow
for more storage. A notice was run in
the Chronicle asking for bids to re-
move approximately 1,500 yards of
earth from under the building to facil-
itate the basement. A.M. Lisk won
the contract by offering to excavate
the required amount of soil at a cost to
the county of $1.40 per yard. An ac-
cess opening was made below grade
adjacent to the south entrance. Ini-
tially, Lisk removed the earth by hand
and the project quickly got behind


schedule, so a local farmer brought in
his tractor to help with the effort. A
short time later, Lisk was awarded an-
other county contract for local road
repairs and he reportedly used the ex-
cavated material for fill in that project.
Therefore, the county paid for the dirt
twice! The basement construction was
completed the following year using
granite blocks to build the base.
There are many references on a reg-
ular basis in the commission meet-
ings' minutes (no pun intended) for
clock maintenance and repair. The
original clock was driven by a system
of weights and cables that had to be
wound by hand every few days. A
separate system of weights and cables
operated the bell clapper. The tower
design is especially impressive be-
cause it had to support the tremendous
combined weight of the bell (about
7,000 pounds) and the clock mecha-
nism (about 1,000 pounds). It is com-
posed of huge wooden beams up to
15 feet long and about 12 feet square
in cross-section. The original clock
faces were made of pine wood and
had to be repainted every few years
because of sun damage. Light poles
were added several years after con-
struction in order to illuminate the
clock faces at night.
In 1952, the commission authorized
changing the courthouse clock to an
electric mechanism and at some later
date the wood faces were replaced
with translucent plastic faces and
backlit with fluorescent lights.

see Courthouse Page 14


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SSorvine Citrus 4eunv
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Wednesday July 4, 2012 G13


REMEMBER WHEN


,J ,







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


!-

i -^f!

" | .'


j .

4


Courthouse
from Page 13
When the original clock
faces were removed, it was
discovered that many locals
had sneaked up into the clock
tower over the years and
written names and dates on
the backs. This graffiti has
definite historic value.
Air conditioning was first
brought up in official busi-
ness in September, 1955.
Discussions ensued as to
whether the entire building
should be climate controlled
or just the first floor. It was
suggested that individual
units could be installed in the
various rooms at a lowered
overall cost. The costs of in-
stallation in some other
courthouses in central Florida
were compared and discussed
and the consensus at the time
was it would be too expen-


sive, so the matter was
deferred until later.
In 1961, the commission-
ers gave permission for a
Hollywood movie crew to
film the final scenes of the
movie "Follow that Dream,"
starring Elvis Presley, in the
upstairs courtroom of the
courthouse. Interestingly, this
movie would provide valu-
able historical footage 30
years later to aid in the
restoration efforts of the same
courtroom. This movie was
based on the bestseller "Pio-
neer, Go Home" and was
filmed in Inverness, Crystal
River, Yankeetown, Ocala,
and Tampa.
The 1960s saw consider-
able physical changes take
place inside the courthouse.
After much debate, a central
air conditioning unit was fi-
nally installed in the mid-
1960s. The first floor air


conditioning air handlers and
air ducts in were placed in
the basement, making the
head clearance there only
about five feet. At about this
same time, a small elevator
was installed in the northwest
quadrant of the building. The
courtroom was remodeled
extensively at about this time.
The observers' balcony at
the back of the courtroom
was originally used by blacks
who wished to view the court
proceedings. It is composed
of a concrete slab that is sup-
ported by steel posts and is
about nine feet above the
floor of the courtroom and
extends nearly the full width
of the building on the north
side, giving it an area of
about 735 square feet. This
was reached by way of a cast
iron, squared spiral stairway
see Courthouse Page 15


Board of County Commissioners 1911-12


John Y. Barnes, Lecanto

John H. Gerock, Homosassa

James A. Hampton, Floral City

James D. Stephens, Inverness

David J. Turner, Red Level


G14 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Courthouse
from Page 14

and probably seated about 70 people.
During the 1960s' remodeling the en-
tire appearance of the courtroom was
changed. The stairway was removed
and a drop ceiling was installed at the
same level as the balcony floor.
The balcony then ceased to be used,
except as a place for more air condi-
tioner units and as an access point to the
clock tower and roof. Also, walls were
erected inside from the original walls
on all four sides. The original wall be-
hind the judge's bench had windows in
it, but this was replaced with a solid
wall.


The Beginning of the End
or a New Beginning?
By the early 1970s, the Board of
County Commissioners felt that county
government had nearly outgrown the Old
Courthouse. There was talk of building a
new, larger courthouse, but no one really
wanted to tear down the beautiful Old
Courthouse and by nature of its construc-
tion, it could not be moved. Therefore,
any new courthouse would have to be
placed outside of Courthouse Square. By


the end of the decade, Citrus County had
a new courthouse which was located one
block north of Courthouse Square. The
Old Courthouse had served the needs of
county well for more than 66 years, and
in fact continued to do so for several
more years as the building still housed a
few county offices up until the late
1980s.
The Old Courthouse is the oldest and
most important public building in Citrus
County, and is generally accepted as the
area's most architecturally outstanding
building.
It is one of only about 25 original
courthouses remaining in Florida, and of
these, it is the 11th oldest. More impor-
tantly, it is one of only four courthouses
that has not been irreversibly altered. For
these reasons, the Old Courthouse was
placed on the National Register of His-
toric Places in 1992.
Unfortunately, by the 1970s the build-
ing was really showing its age and was
in great need of renovation. A grassroots
movement was started locally to save the
Old Courthouse, and as things got going
it was decided that a complete restoration
to its original grandeur was much more
appropriate than a renovation.
This eventually led to the formation of
the Old Courthouse Restoration Com-
mittee in 1992 and the effort was soon
under way.


Wednesday July 4, 2012 G15


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The restoration of the courthouse


Excerpted from the Citrus County
Historical Society publication "The
Citrus County Courthouse: A \i/,. t
History of Citrus County, Florida
and its Seat of Government" by
Tom Ritchie

The Old Courthouse Restoration
Committee was organized by
members of the Citrus County
Historical Society and was headed
by Beverly Drinkhouse. The
biggest obstacle ahead of the


restoration was, of course, fund-
ing, but the fact that the court-
house was now listed on the
National Register of Historic
Places helped greatly in obtaining
grants. In December, 1992, a dele-
gation of 54 people headed by
Deborah Scott, Citrus County His-
toric Resources Officer, went by
bus to Tallahassee to present a
proposal to the Department of His-
toric Preservation State Advisory
Council and show community sup-


port. The importance of the project
was revealed by Scott's presenta-
tion, and the large turnout of sup-
porters helped demonstrate to the
authorities the strong desire of the
people of Citrus County to save
this historic landmark. The delega-
tion was a huge success. Of the
112 applications received for aid
in state funding that year, the Old
Courthouse project was placed
near the top of the list. George
Percy, Director of the Bureau of


Historic Preservation, became
very interested in the Old Court-
house and came to Inverness to
see the building and give valuable
advice to the restoration commit-
tee regarding grant applications.
The total amount for the restora-
tion project was about $2.5 mil-
lion, of which more than half ($1.3
million) came from the State of
Florida Department of Historic
Preservation. The Florida Legisla-
ture provided about $600,000 for


the cause. Florida Governor Jeb
Bush considered the Old Court-
house restoration a priority and
continued funding it even when a
majority of such grants were cur-
tailed in the late 1990s. The Citrus
County government provided
about $409,000, the Citrus County
Historical Society raised nearly
$150,000, the City of Inverness
donated more than $30,000, and
see Restoration Page 17


G16 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Restoration
from Page 16
the rest of the money came
from private donations, in-
cluding a significant amount
given by the Brannen
family.
From the moment the
restoration project began in
1993, it was primarily a
community effort. The
Board of County Commis-
sioners gave great support to
the project, and agreed to
lease the courthouse to the
Citrus County Historical So-
ciety so that their personnel
could control what was done
for the restoration and they
could then use it for their
own purposes primarily as
The Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum. The building
lease held by the Historical
Society stipulates that the
county judicial system may
still use the upstairs court-
room for various purposes
such as Teen Court or Small
Claims Court. It is also a
place where schools, service
clubs, businesses, social or-
ganizations, and religious
groups can use the restored
courtroom for their events.
It has a seating capacity for
150 and can also be used for
civic functions, lectures, ex-
hibits, and theatrical
performances.
The Citrus County Histor-
ical Society used a lot of
imagination for their fund-
raisers. Several raffles were
organized with prizes that
included an auto provided to
the society at a reduced
price by Roy Brown
Suncoast Lincoln Mercury,
a week-long cruise aboard
the Mississippi Queen on
the Ohio River, a cruise to
the Bahamas aboard the
Sovereign of the Seas, and a
Jon Boat complete with
motor and trailer. In addi-
tion, society members
arranged local guided tours
and flea markets, partici-
pated in community events
such as the Heritage Days
celebration in Floral City,
and produced outdoor bar-
becues, fashion shows, art
shows, dances, etc. They


REMEMBER WHEN


Wednesday July 4, 2012 G17


Ic<


..- ,.


mo


-A


even invented a popular new
board game called Citru-
sopoly which was sold in
local stores. And, let us not
forget to mention the many
supporters who gave cash
donations. The courthouse
restoration took place at the
same time as a major reno-
vation in Downtown Inver-
ness especially the historic
buildings that line the old
Main Street west of Court-
house Square. The two proj-
ects were unrelated, even
though they occurred simul-
taneously. For a compari-
son, the Downtown
Inverness restoration project
cost about $850,000.

The Restoration Begins
The first step in the court-
house restoration project
was formulating an architec-
tural master plan. John T.
Parks, a noted and very ex-
perienced restoration archi-
tect, was contracted for the
job. He is part of the firm
Renker, Erich, and Parks Ar-
chitects of St. Petersburg,


Florida. Parks had previ-
ously restored the Federal
Courthouse in Tampa, the
1912 Plant City Union City
Depot, the 1915 Tarpon
Springs City Hall, the 1882
Baker House in Pasco
County, and other important
historic buildings. The
restoration work was begun
by Butera Restoration, Inc.,
but the work was later
turned over to Concept En-
terprises, Inc. out of Odessa,
Florida, which completed
the project. The basic plan
was to return the appearance
of the Old Courthouse to the
way it looked in 1913, but
creating an architectural
master plan was not as easy
as it sounded. It required
considerable research,
sleuthing, scraping, and
even dismantling in some
places. In fact, the State Di-
vision of Historical Re-
sources insists that buildings
for which they provide
grants should be restored to
meet the Secretary of the In-
terior's Standards for Reha-


bilitation. The actual work
of restoration was done in
five phases and took nearly
eight years and required
much more than just repair-
ing or replacing damaged
and worn-out parts. A con-
siderable amount of remod-
eling had occurred through
the years, especially in the
1960s, so almost all of these
changes had to be removed
in order to recapture the
original configuration of the
building.

Concessions to
the Times
There were, however, a few
exceptions made in restoring
the building to its original de-
sign. It was decided to retain
both an air conditioning sys-
tem and an elevator (although
both had to be upgraded) and
new public restrooms were in-
stalled on the first floor. The
air conditioning system was
replaced with a newer, more
efficient model that was set in
the basement. This re-
see Restoration Page 18


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REMEMBER WHEN


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Restoration
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quired cutting register holes
through the 12-inch-thick
concrete floor to make way
for ductwork to supply
cooled or heated air to the
first level through cast iron
grills set in the floor.
Many new government
regulations and safety codes
had come into play in recent
years and had to be incorpo-
rated into the restoration ef-
fort. A steel fire stairway
was placed in the southwest
corer of the building, and it
is completely closed off
from the rest of the building
by metal doors and fireproof
walls. It must be illuminated
at all times (the light cannot
be turned off, but window
covers prevent light from
being seen from outside the
building). Fire detectors
were installed throughout
the building. Right next to
the fire stairs is the new ele-
vator. The American Dis-
ability Act (ADA)
requirements dictated that
the elevator shaft had to be
enlarged and the elevator car
replaced. It takes the place
of a small steel stairway ad-
jacent to the west entrance
that was formerly used to
reach the bench in the court-
room.
The history of restrooms
in the building is quite con-
fusing. Early on, there were
numerous small restrooms
scattered about on the sec-
ond floor and balcony level
of the building. It is uncer-
tain whether these were in-
stalled when the building
was constructed or added
sometime later. Several of
them had been removed dur-
ing the ensuing years and
were forgotten, but evidence
for these lost restrooms was
discovered during the
restoration effort. There
were at one time three small
restrooms on the east side of
the second floor, mostly as-
sociated with the courtroom
and jury rooms, as well as
an additional, segregated


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


one on the east side up be-
hind the Observers Balcony.
All four of these restrooms
are now gone, but the one
opposite them on the west
side has been restored to
use. Two restrooms were
added to the landings of the
north and south stairs in the
1960s. They were both re-
moved during the restoration
and have been converted
into closets. The main rest-
rooms today are located on
the first floor in the north-
west corer of the building.
They were built in accor-
dance to ADA requirements,
except the presence of a
large safe in the men's room
left it with too little floor
space, so an additional small
men's restroom was in-
stalled on the south side near
the entrance in order to
make up the required space.

Original Features
are Restored
Fortunately, many of the
original features and finishes
were still in place when the
restoration took place, in-
cluding most of the window
openings, doorways, fire-
places, safes, and plumbing
fixtures. The bronze bell
cast by E. Howard and
Company in Massachusetts
has remained in use since it
was installed in 1913. The
fireplaces had been covered
over, but were easily re-
stored to their original ap-
pearance. They were not put
back into working order,
however, because the out-
side chimneys had been re-
moved when the air
conditioning unit was in-
stalled and it was decided
not to replace the chimneys.
The vaults were kept in-
tact all along and the main
vault is still being used as a
storage unit for the old Clerk
of Court records and
Chronicle newspaper issues
from the 1890s.
A drop ceiling was re-
moved on the first floor to
reveal the former grandeur
see Restoration Page 19


- -*00S







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Restoration
from Page 18

of the rotunda. Several internal walls had
been added subsequently and many opaque
windows had been boarded over with gray
paneling in the same region. These walls and
panels were removed to reveal that the win-
dow panes had also been painted black.
They had to be stripped of their paint, as
well. Most of the stained woodwork of the
window frames and trimmings had been
covered over with thick layers of green
paint, which had to be painstakingly re-
moved and the wood refinished to its origi-
nal beauty.
Needless to say, much of the interior plas-
ter work on the walls and ceilings had to be
repaired or replaced. Most of the electric
work and plumbing had to be modernized,
meaning some walls had to be completely
tom out and rebuilt. The extensive marble
paneling on the lower walls of the hallway
which surrounds the courtroom was re-
moved in 1967, so it all had to be replaced
with matching marble panels.
The beautiful hardwood maple floors of
the upstairs level were refinished to their
original conditions and color. This floor
restoration was very involved in three


rooms a two-inch layer of concrete had to be
removed first and the floors rebuilt, and in
some of the other rooms linoleum tiles and
carpeting had to be removed to expose the
wood. The floor tile mastic had to be re-
moved carefully because it contained as-
bestos. This was a relatively minor project,
but required stopping all other work during
one weekend. Unfortunately, there was con-
siderable water damage to some areas of the
hardwood flooring and these spots had
to be replaced.
The courtroom required extensive restora-
tion. A drop ceiling, which was described
earlier, was removed to re-expose the beauti-
ful amber glass windows high on the east
and west walls of the courtroom. They cast a
wonderful amber glow over the room, espe-
cially in the morning and late afternoon sun-
shine. Acoustical plaster panels similar to
the originals were installed on the courtroom
ceiling (the originals were removed before
the drop ceiling was put in place). All the
walls of the courtroom had to be removed to
restore the original configuration and then
the original walls and doors had to be re-
paired or replaced at the correct locations
farther back. False columns were again put
back in place against the walls to give
see Restoration Page 20


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Wednesday July 4, 2012 G19


REMEMBER WHEN


u







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Restoration
from Page 19
the interior of the room the look of a typical
courthouse.
The Observers Balcony and its staircase
were restored, although the balcony is no
longer usable by the public because it fails to
meet ADA and various code requirements.
However, the balcony is now a convenient
platform for audio and visual presentations.
The cast iron squared spiral staircase,
which extends from the basement level to
the balcony, had to be replicated by the
Robinson Iron Company in Alexander City,
Ala. This company has done renowned
restoration work in the French Quarter of
New Orleans. A free-standing wood railing
was made to replace the original one which
separated the judge's bench, witness stand,
jury box, and lawyers' tables from the
spectators.

Exterior
The outside appearance of the building re-
quired considerable restoration. Layers of
paint had to be removed and some surfaces
had to be sandblasted. Some of the upper
brick work and stone work had to be re-
paired or replaced. The roof had fallen into
considerable disrepair and had several seri-
ous leaks. Because of these leaks and the
fact that the tiles contained asbestos, the en-
tire roof was replaced. Amazingly, the
Ludowici Tile Company in Galion, Ohio,
which made the original tiles was still in
business 84 years later and the original pat-
tern was still available (without asbestos).
All the exterior windows and doors had to
be replicated and replaced. Parts of the para-
pet facade had to be dismantled and re-
cemented.
The foundation on the north side required
considerable work, because it was damaged
by water penetration. The footing was ex-
posed by excavating the surrounding earth
and the wall was then resealed. The concrete
walkway system which surrounds Court-
house Square as well as the inner region


about the courthouse was completely
replaced.
The clock tower had been infested with
termites and this required tenting and fumi-
gation. The copper plates of the clock tower
and cupola had to be cleaned, treated and re-
paired in several places. The curved roofs of
the cupola and belvedere now have a differ-
ent appearance than the vertical walls sup-
porting them, but they are all constructed of
the same sheet copper materials.
These apparent differences have resulted
because the walls were covered with layers
of paint for a long time while the metal roofs
were exposed all along. Also, the relative ex-
posure to the sun and rain differs for the
roofs and the walls, thereby causing different
rates of oxidation and tarnishing. Perhaps the
colors will equalize as more time passes.
The balustrades and urns around the base
of the cupola were taken down years ago
when the clock mechanism was modernized
and they have now been replaced with
replicas.
A handicapped ramp was put in at the
north entrance in the 1980s, but during the
restoration project it was reconverted to
steps similar to their original appearance, ex-
cept they extend several feet farther out from
the building and are built of concrete rather
than granite like the originals.
A handicap lift has been installed just be-
side the steps so that wheelchair access
is assured.
Fortunately, one of the 1927 outside street
lamps was in the possession of Inverness
resident Mel Boyce and he donated it to the
Historical Society so replicas could be made
and installed around the courthouse.
The compressors for the new air condi-
tioning system had to be placed outside on
the courthouse grounds near the southeast
corer of the building because there was no
way to install them on the roof (which would
have been too far from the evaporators) or
anywhere else out of sight.
It was felt that setting them any closer to
the foundation of the building would have
detracted from the overall appearance.


Building's restoration made dream come true


By John Grannan
Special to the Chronicle

It is most fitting that a movie
staring Elvis Presley filmed in the
courtroom of our historic court-
house in 1961 was given the title of
"Follow That Dream."
Our long-awaited dual celebra-


tion of the 100th birthday of the
Historic Courthouse and 125th an-
niversary of the county's creation
on June 2 was a culmination of the
dreams of many individuals for
more than several generations.
Over 175 yeas ago the first set-
tlers who came to what is now Cit-
rus County dreamed of a new life


for themselves and their families.
They cleared land, built homes,
churches and schools and estab-
lished little communities. In the
1880s, some of the early settlers
had a dream of forming their own
county out of the northern portion
of Hernando County. That dream
was realized on June 2, 1887, when


the Florida Legislature created
Citrus County.
Four years later in 1891, the
dreams of investors in the Florida
Orange Canal and Transit Com-
pany paid off when the newly-plat-
ted town of Inverness, where they
owned all the land, was chosen the
permanent county seat. The first


courthouse erected in Inverness
was a two-story wooden Victorian-
style structure located on Court-
house Square. Twenty years later,
there were those who dreamed of a
larger, more impressive fireproof
building that would not burn like

see Dream Page 21


G20 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- "" V


Dream
from Page 20

the one did in Brooksville in
1877. That dream came true in
1912 when the County Com-
missioners began building a
new courthouse over the objec-
tions of some citizens.
In the 1960s there were those
who dreamed of having a
county historical museum with
the formation of the Citrus
County Historical Commission
which became the Citrus
County Historical Society in
1979. They opened their first
office in 1985 in the old court-
house where they began collect-
ing artifacts which
hopefully could be displayed
and preserved in a museum
someday.
Some Society members had a
dream of preserving the old
courthouse replaced in 1978 by


a new one. They went before
the Board of County Commis-
sioners in 1989 to ask that a cu-
rator/archivist be hired. That
dream was realized with the hir-
ing of Deborah Scott who began
a program of organizing the
archives and making plans for
the future, one that included a
restoration of the old court-
house.
In 1991, the Society members
went before the County Com-
missioners to authorize an ar-
chitectural review of the
building. The review was done
and the Society began a nine-
year fundraising campaign to
pay for the restoration. An ar-
chitect was hired and four
preservation grants totaling
&1.5 million were awarded
from the state in addition to the
$400,000 raised by the Society
and the $400,000 allocated by
the County Commission. Thou-
sands of hours of manual labor


were also spent by volunteers as
they contributed to the restora-
tion work.
The dream of a professionally
managed historical museum in a
beautiful restored historic court-
house became a reality with the
grand opening of the Old Court-
house Heritage Museum in Oc-
tober, 2000. Many of those who
had helped make this dream
come true were there for that
celebration and were recognized
for their work.
At the celebration this year,
we especially wanted to remem-
ber and honor some of those
Society members and commu-
nity supporters who made it
possible for us to celebrate the
100th birthday of the Historic
Courthouse. If it hadn't been for
their dedication and commit-
ment, it is entirely possible that
the building might not have
reached the 100-year mark.
It is safe to say that without


the efforts and years of work by
the Historical Society, the build-
ing would not have been re-
stored. But they could not have
accomplished that goal, if it had
been for the cooperation and ap-
proval of the Board of County
Commissioners. The partner-
ship between the Historical So-
ciety and the BOCC which
dates from 1985 has been a suc-
cessful one that has benefitted
the residents of our county.
Some of the individuals who
should be honored are Allen and
Marcia Beasley, Ron and
Beverly Drinkhouse, Bob and
Margaret Roberts, Russ and
Mary Dorsey, Wayne and
Sherry Dean, Richard and San-
dra Dixon, the Rev. James
Hoge, Gerry Mulligan, Mar-
garet Brannen Hagar, George
Brannen II, Joseph Brannen,
Dale Hughes, Dan Quick, Jean
Grant, Pauline Lansden, Sophia
Diaz-Fonseca, Deborah Scott,


and Kathy Turner Thompson.
We are also thankful for the
support of the restoration by
those County Commissioners
who were in office during the
years from 1992 to 2000. They
are Gary Bartell, Roger
Batchelor, Jim Fowler, Vicki
Phillips, Frank Schiraldi, Brad
Thorpe, and Chester White.
The success of the celebration
on June 2 is due to the work of
the planning committee, which
included Eric Head, County
Library System Director;
Lindsey Ubinas, County Public
Information Officer; Pati Smith,
City of Inverness; Renna
Jablonskis, Partners for a Sub-
stance-free Citrus; Deb Kamlot,
Citrus County Chronicle; and
Kathy Turner Thompson,
County Historical Resources
Officer.
Thanks to them, the dream of
a great history-making event
came true.


Wednesday July 4, 2012 G21


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today, it's a museum


Excerpted from the Citrus
County Historical Society
publication "The Citrus
County Courthouse: A \i,. t
History of Citrus County,
Florida and its Seat of Gov-
ernment" by Tom Ritchie.

The Citrus County Histori-
cal Society now uses the
courthouse to promote civic
education and has a network
of community support in-
volving local schools, busi-
nesses, and government. The
Old Courthouse houses the
main county historical mu-
seum which contains many
interesting items of local sig-
nificance as well as the his-
torical archives of the county.
In 1998, the consultant
firm Guglielmo & Associates


was hired to help convert the
Old Courthouse into a first-
class museum. Deborah
Guglielmo is well known
throughout the state for her
success in helping to estab-
lish numerous historical mu-
seums, including the St.
Augustine Lighthouse &
Museum, Museum of r \ Au-
gustine History-Goveinmincit
House, St. Augustine \p.,mli
Quarter Museum, St. P'crci -
burg Museum ofHiste, '. n iJ
the Ah Tha Thi Ki Muscium
Seminole Tribe ofFlonid., It
has been a very succe:-. ruI
partnership and the ci 17c en
of Citrus County are pi iuJ rt
have one of the best small
museums and cultural cc'lir'n
in the U.S.A.
The museum contain .


series of exhibits and dis-
plays that reflect the remark-
able history and growth of
this area. It also contains dis-
plays depicting the regional
natural history and ecology.
The overall concept features
a timeline beginning with the
Pre-History phase that de-
'C 1nliiC tihe m mm.i ctih c .iit I,

'.hM J' l l cr l cA im l'li' I t It
hI0lmed heeI'l IlIin CI', 1. 11

i. cll .' '. i.'p .
ii Iic A.' a d effect
,,n rhl kiJ., Tlihe 1,cmin iIc In-
Jl.n Iinh.' .lIl,| pl.,', J .1 I. h
l.111 in 1the Iil.'l'r, o f( IIIn1-
( ,IInri .11nd i .111i iMI '11 In.tllt
sIultl- e t in i
thc .


seum. Another section is de-
voted to the historical events
and particulars that have
shaped local society, includ-
ing the early settlements, the
citrus and phosphate indus-
tries, cattle ranching, pencil
manufacture, turpentine dis-
tilleries, "moss pickers", the

ipl" ii- cTim .' 1 'k c TIl-'ici
.Ii.' miln.n, Ik'nC ,rt in CI.''t IC'-

i l'., |\l Ilf' II nI .~Ic.'.
t1n dlupl'., The miul i'lm
I'h'. iJl luk I'n l ur .ll-

.l IL IC LIa.' .\ I i 0ll t li -

T.LI jc thE
.Ilud' E (
\ .i',


Gallery, the Mary Isabel
MacRae Gallery, the John
Murray Davis Gallery, and
the Brannen Family Gallery,
each of which displays a


wall-mounted dedication
plaque.
The Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum is also called
the TOUCH Museum, be-
cause its slogan is:
"The Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum: where we
put you in touch with us."
TIn' i' .1 i.Ci flliindl', In1l-
T-.' iii L\ li r, ii n. 'l li.il' i.'
ilik.'.1 1 Al l1.' CIlll andL
htlkch-.cln.' i.' c ml ll 1'llk.'l and

1I.1 11P', h .11, | .i|lln I 111.ikii
tli .111m l, C'. i t l ,i .11C t tl1h1
( ,il, ( ,ullltihoui.


Old Courthouse


Heritage Museum

Where History Comes Alive!

One Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
352-341-6429
www.citruscountyhistoricalsociety.org

Museum Hours:
Monday Friday, 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
Admission is free,
but donations are always welcome.

Heritage Museum Exhibits and Store
Permanent exhibits in the Old Court-
house Heritage Museum include displays
and artifacts devoted to Citrus County's pre-
history and its pioneer days, and to more
recent developments, such as the impact of
the citrus and film industries on Central
Florida. Traveling exhibits, such as Florida
Cowboys: The Last Frontier, come to the
museum on a regular basis. The Museum
Store offers hard-to-find books about
Florida history, ecology, and geology, as
well as gift items.


G22 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Covering Citrus County Since 1894


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE.
*,n ., Ii.Lla err ilTk a a% unn Ii A uIf- . 1 p


CISOCn StUCK D51 I Muips lERil

-.*









**-.
.4.
-mm -c
-~~~~I pa -mu ma -


I:;
r.







I,









A-
II.,


1910, first brick jail is built
on block north of courthouse.


1926


1894. the Citrus County inete c
Chronicle is founded. featu


1903, Crystal River becomes first
incorporated community in county
1914. while the w
was raging in Euro
became editor and o\
....... .. --.* .


1957. Citrus Memorial
Hospital opens


the Chronicle causes a flurry of talk
community by running comic pages
ring Jiggs and Maggie, and others.


1949, Second Florida Fence Law requires
ranchers to fence cattle off all roads.


ar with Germany
pe, Albert W. Butler
owner of the Chronicle


AT JA ICiOVei ]


-.K.
SIm1 c e. -' -----'-i--- --
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S ll ------ M--




F. AL. ROUX I .



JL II- CHRONICLE
mm r lramans*"|^1,1 Nd NWSBW $1.00
= - -- I Nflu lOMO
The C"hronll -.-





I Pm al las U-cO D OS iAoVAN
The Curonille K DER Per v,


1981. the Florida Press Association
names the Chronicle. Florida's
best weekly newspaper
2000. restoration completed
1965. Citrus County schools on the Old Courthouse
become integrated Heritage Museum.


1961.Elvis Presley makes a movie in
Citrus County titled "Folow That Dream'


1978 new Citrus County
Courthouse completed.


1990. the Chronicle
relocates to Meadowcrest
in Crystal River.


I


FLORIDA
CITRUS COUNTY-









, ,... ... ,:.. .., 1," ,


ti'es -=-=


(I





r;


2012. the Chronicle
continues to cover
Florida's best community.

.i4





Wednesday July 4, 2012 G23


REMEMBER WHEN




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fs The


We're


Cou


rthouse Celebrates 100


Proud To Be Celebrating


Over


Years


30


Years


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G24 Wednesday, July 4, 2012


REMEMBER WHEN


N I C K N Igm ,i a ;


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