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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02795
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-10-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02795

Full Text



Riches to Rags: Belmont gets winner in photo finish
I--MILI


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. Chance of
91 showers and thunder-
LOW storms in the afternoon.
72 PAGE A4
JUNE 10, 2012


I -- S o U NI D :


Gary Maidhof remembered


Day lilies
Each day lily flower
lasts but a day, adding
a burst of color to a
garden./Page E9
LOCAL NEWS:
Whooping
One case of whooping
cough confirmed in an
Inverness boy./Page A2


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO -An evening of hilarious sto-
rytelling and pure laughter many agreed
it was what Gary Maidhof would have
wanted.
"I'm looking at this as the retirement din-
ner he would have had in a couple of
years," Gary's wife of 31 years, Charlotte,
said Saturday
If there was one thing Charlotte said she
would want people to remember about her
husband, it would be his love for the county
where he lived and worked.
"Work with each other to preserve, con-
serve and keep our home, Citrus County, a
beautiful place to live," she said.
Maidhof, operations and projects officer
for Citrus County, died Sunday, May 27, in
Council, Idaho, while visiting with family


To honor him, a celebration of his life was
held at the College of Central Florida in
Lecanto.
More than 300 people gathered inside the
college's conference center to pay homage
to a man many in the county respected and
loved.
On two walls, a slideshow played showing
several personal photos of Maidhof doing
what he loved: spending time with family
and friends and interacting with nature. On
See -/Page A4
Gary Maidhof's wife, Charlotte Maidhof,
hugs Patricia Thomas before the memorial
Saturday at the Citrus County campus of
the College of Central Florida. Hundreds of
friends attended the memorial to celebrate
the life of their friend, who died May 27
after a nature hike in Idaho.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


COMMENTARY:


Mittens
How do you keep
underage children off
Facebook?/Page Cl


EXCURSIONS:


Off the grid
Travel columnist Neil
Sawyer advocates the
services of professional
travel agents./Page All
LOCAL NEWS:
Top farmer
Local dairyman to vie
for title of farmer of
the year./Page A3
OPINION:
The
county will
need more
economic
diversity to
fuel future
economic
growth.


Old tech?
Popularity of the
BlackBerry phone
declines./Page Dl


TOMORROW:
Boardwalk
Crystal River city
officials will ponder
the future of the
Environmental Science
Academy./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ............. D4
Crossword ............ A12
Editorial .......... ...C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A12
O bituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 11|||l84578 210107I o


JIM HUNTER/Special to the Chronicle
Amanda Whitelaw is a 27-year-old Citrus County native and Lecanto High School graduate who is playing an im-
portant role on the 2012 Tampa Bay Host Committee, which is preparing for the Republican National Convention
in August. Whitelaw, shown at the committee headquarters in Tampa, is the director of events and volunteers for
the host committee. Although only 27, she has already done similar jobs for two Super Bowls.



CCSO quietly making convention plans


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO Citrus County sher-
iff's officials are headed to the Re-
publican National Convention in
Tampa this summer.
Their role, however, is top secret.
"I'm not going to say what capac-
ity and I'm not going to say how
many people," said Capt. Mike
Richie, who heads up the agency's
patrol division.
Citrus is part of a contingent of
law enforcement officers headed
by the Hillsborough County Sher-
iff's Office and Tampa Police De-
partment to provide security for
the three-day convention.
The U.S. Secret Service and De-
partment of Homeland Security
oversee the entire operation.
"They are very hush-hush,"
Richie said. "We won't know the
final plans until two weeks prior to
the event."
In an interview Friday, Richie


We won't know the final plans until
two weeks prior to the event.

Capt. Mike Richie
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.


gave a few hints about his deputies'
involvement.
A series of regional task forces,
focusing on SWAT teams and bomb
squads, came into existence across
the county after the terrorist at-
tacks Sept. 11, 2001. There are
seven regions in Florida and Citrus
is part of an eight-county region.
Three of those counties Citrus,
Hillsborough and Pinellas had
bomb units already established,
which made those sheriff's agen-
cies responsible for the region.
Richie said Citrus' bomb unit
could be called to help with the
convention, though it isn't part of
the contingent now.
He said Hillsborough and Tampa


law enforcement officials have ex-
perience with large crowds of out-
siders, with Tampa having hosted
Super Bowls. Citrus County pro-
vided security assistance for Super
Bowls in Tampa and Jacksonville,
Richie said.
The big difference, he said, is
Super Bowls generally do not at-
tract thousands of protesters.
He said security organizers
learned plenty from the 2008 Re-
publican National Convention in
St. Paul, Minn., where anarchists
overran an undermanned law en-
forcement presence with rioting.
"They actually lost the city for a
See Page A7


Citrus native

playing big role

in committee

for Republican

convention
JIM HUNTER
Special to the Chronicle
TAMPA
ou probably
\ won't see this Cit-
rus County native
on TV at the Repub-
lican National
Convention in August, but
you will certainly see the
results of her work.
Lecanto High School
graduate Amanda
Whitelaw, 27, is one of the
dozen or so people, not
counting a few interns,
who are working diligently
to host the Republican
Party's presidential nomi-
nating convention in the
Tampa Bay Times Forum
and Tampa Convention
Center from Aug. 27 to 30.
The nonprofit, nonparti-
san Tampa Bay Host Com-
mittee this small,
energized group comprises
is working overtime, and at
an increasingly intense
pace, to prepare the way
for the Republican Party's
big event It coordinates
what happens outside the
convention walls.
Preparing to host a na-
tional political convention
is a daunting task by any
calculation. Whereas most
people need a vacation
after putting together a big
family wedding or local
charity ball, this event will
bring an estimated 50,000
people into Tampa Bay for
four days. It will draw
15,000 journalists from
around the world who
will be scrutinizing the
convention and, of course,
Tampa Bay
Imagine trying to coordi-
nate the communications,
volunteer helpers and
the transportation logistics
(as well as the signage
to steer conventioneers)
to accommodate that
See Page A7


Texas trial focusing on stand-your-ground law


JUAN A. LOZANO
Associated Press
HOUSTON When
music at a neighbor's
evening party got too loud
for his liking, Raul Ro-
driguez showed up to com-
plain, carrying a gun and a
video camera.
As a verbal confrontation
unfolded, the retired
Houston-area firefighter
told a police dispatcher by


phone that he feared for his
life and was "standing his
ground," a reference that
calls to mind the law at the
center of the Trayvon Mar-
tin slaying in Florida in
February
The incident involving
Rodriguez happened two
years before Martin's death
and will be decided under a
different kind of self-
defense doctrine. But it of-
fers another example of


how laws governing deadly
force are tested in the na-
tion's courtrooms and the
many complex legal issues
swirling around each case.
Prosecutors call Ro-
driguez an aggressor who
could have safely left his
neighbor's driveway any
time. His defense attorneys
insist Texas law still gave
him the right to defend him-
self, even if it meant taking
a life.


In a 22-minute video he
recorded that night, Ro-
driguez can be heard talk-
ing to a police dispatcher
after walking over to the
home of Kelly Danaher to
complain about the noise.
Both men lived in Huffman,
an unincorporated area
about 30 miles northeast of
Houston.
Rodriguez told the dis-
patcher he feared for his
life. He can also be heard


telling Danaher and two
other men to keep the noise
down. One of the men, who
had apparently seen Ro-
driguez's gun, cursed at Ro-
driguez and suggested he
was going to go inside
Danaher's home and re-
trieve his own weapon.
"Look, I will defend my-
self, sir. ... It's about to get
out of hand, sir. Please help

See Page A4


HOMEFRONT:


CITRUS COUNTY






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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Whooping cough alert


Inverness boy WHOOPING COUGH FACTS
ao In 2010, 27,550 cases of pertussis (whooping cough)
diagnosed were reported in the U.S., but many more go undiag-
nosed and unreported.
SHEMIR WILES 0 Pertussis is also known as "whooping cough" because
Staff Writer of the sound made when gasping for air after a fit of
coughing.
From Texas to North Car- 0 Coughing fits due to pertussis infection can last for up
olina to as close to home as to 10 weeks or more; known as the "100-day cough."
Hillsborough County, there Pertussis can cause serious illness in infants, children
has been a recent outbreak and adults and can even be life-threatening, especially
in whooping cough, in infants.
In early April, the Florida i .
Department of Hpealth re- The most effective way to prevent pertussis is through
ported it had identified 112 vaccination with DTaP for infants and children and
conrmtedithandikenycsewith Tdap for pre-teens, teens and adults.
confirmed and likely cases of
whooping cough, or pertussis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
since Jan. 1, with at least one
case in 22 Florida counties. seniors and people with receive the IVIG and, in a
In Citrus County, Judith compromised immune sys- matter of a couple days, she
Tear, spokeswoman for the teams. Such was the case for said, Archie was coughing
Citrus County Health De- 33-year-old Joni Naugler less.
apartment, said there has and her newborn son, He was released June 2
been one confirmed case Archie Mays III. and, besides a slight linger-
and five probable cases Ten weeks ago, Naugler ing cough, he's happy, smil-
where the person had al- gave birth to a happy, health ing and extremely hungry
ready started treatment for boy But the Inverness resi- The mother of five other
symptoms based on a clini- dent said a few weeks ago children said this was some-
cal diagnosis but had nega- he started showing symp- thing she never experi-
tive test results. toms for what she thought enced before, but was glad
According to the Centers was just a cold. nothing worse happened.
for Disease Control and She took him to the doc- She also said she didn't
Prevention (CDC), whoop- tor's office on a Friday, where know anything about the dan-
ing cough is a very conta- she was told he had bronchi- gers of whooping cough, be-
gious disease spread by tis, and she was sent home cause if she had, she would
people coughing or sneez- with a nebulizer However, have gotten vaccinated.
ing in close contact with oth- over the course of the week- The CDC suggests the
ers, who then breathe in the end, she said his coughing most effective way to pre-
bacteria. got worse, so she returned to vent whooping cough is
Craig McCurdy, director the doctor's office. The doc- through vaccination with
of pharmacy at Citrus Me- tor, after hearing Archie's DTaP for infants and chil-
morial Health System, said coughing, diagnosed him dren and with Tdap for pre-
whooping cough has a long with whooping cough. teens, teens and adults. The
incubation period. In some He was admitted to Citrus vaccination of preteens,
cases, it can take up to three Memorial, but was later teens and adults includ-
weeks for people to start transported to Shands hos- ing pregnant women is
displaying symptoms. After pital in Gainesville, where especially important for
that, the sickness moves in Naugler stayed 11 days in families with new infants.
phases, the hospital with her son. For people wanting the
In the beginning, Mc- Archie was on oxygen, she vaccination, Tear said, it's
Curdy said, people get a gen- said, and had to have a feed- b est to first talk with the
eral sick feeling runny ing tube because he would family doctor If a person
nose, cough, slight fever and get so exhausted from the doesn't have a family doctor,
an excessive amount of tear- coughing, he would pass out doecnvan
ing in the eyes. for hours and not eat peoplenic. Than visit depart-
Next, McCurdy said, peo- The spells were so bad, ment has clinics in Inver-
ple start experiencing vio- Naugler said, her son would nthandCr lRver
lent, uncontrollable turn blue, and it sounded ness and Crystal River
coughing spells. like his ribs were breaking To prevent the spread of
The coughing can last for from the force of all the whooping cough, Tear said
more than a minute and can coughing. people should practice
be so brutal people have "It sounded horrendous," healthy habits such as wash-
been known to faint or she said. "He was coughing ing hands and covering
vomit. At the end of the so bad, I didn't know if he one's mouth and nose when
spell, the person may make would take his last breath." coughing or sneezing.
a characteristic whooping Eventually, she said the However, most important,
sound when attempting to doctors suggested giving she said people who be-
breathe in. Archie intravenous im- come sick should stay home
If left untreated in adults munoglobulin (IVIG), a and not go to work.
and teens, the coughing, blood product made from For more information,
which gets less severe over human plasma that is often call the health department
time, can last for three given to bolster antibodies at 352-527-0068.
months. in people who have a weak
However, Tear said immune system.
whooping cough could Though Naugler said she
cause serious complications initially had objections, she
in unvaccinated infants, eventually allowed him to


HEALTH


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Inglis
depal
ageni


LOU ELLIOTT JONES/Chiefland Citizen
Police Chief Steve Dixon signs a contract to receive new radios that will allow his
rtment to communicate with the Citrus County Sheriff's Office and other regional
cies.


Grant brings cities,


county new connections


of Lt. Scott Finnen, to pur-
chase 47 radios at $3,795 each
- the first major upgrade in
communications equipment
in the field since the county
converted to the state's 800
megahertz system in 2007.
The P25 handheld radios are
dual band meaning they
have digital and analog com-
munications capabilities. It
can be used for wireless com-
munication on the Internet
for a laptop computer when
it is hooked up to a radio. And
it allows users to receive text
messages as well as voice
communications. All commu-
nications are encrypted for
security.
A Levy County Sheriff's
Office press release said
the new radios will be used


for communication in
emergency and natural dis-
aster situations.
Inglis Police Chief Steve
Dixon, who came to the
sheriff's office in the county
seat of Bronson on Monday
to pick up his department's
radios, said it would have
been handy during a recent
drug bust in his town be-
cause Citrus County sher-
iff's deputies were
participating.
"It would have made
things easier," he said.
Sheriff's Lt. Scott Tum-
mond said the radios send
a larger message to the
public. "We can show our
citizens that we are work-
ing as a combined unit,"
Tummond said.


Did you know that some heart attacks and strokes can be
caused by an irregular heart beat?
Sometimes your heart needs just a little help to stay in
rhythm. If you suffer from an irregular heart rate, known as
arrhythmia, let Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center get
you back on your feet without missing a beat. Our specialized
Cardiology team will quickly and safely decide if you need a
cardiac pacemaker, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator
(ICD), or another procedure to restore your heart's health.
See for yourself why HealthGrades, an independent healthcare
ratings organization, awarded their Patient Safety Excellence
Award and The Joint Commission for Hospital Accreditation
awarded their coveted Advanced Stroke Center Certification
to Citrus Memorial.


Learn more about us by visiting heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


CITRUS MEMORIAL


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& VASCULAR CENTER


502 WVest Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


I' l


























(Pirtu red Above Left to Rifht)
Stephen Stark, MD
Interventional Cardiology
Stanley Williams, MD
Invusive Cardioloqy
Suman Pasupuleti, MD
Invasive Cardiology


laREa


A2 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


LOCAL


Lou ELLIOTT JONES
Chiefland Citizen
It's a fact of life in Levy
County: Williston has its
own communications sys-
tem, and a "bridge" is
needed to keep the city's
police force in touch with
the sheriff's office. It's sim-
ilar in Inglis, where the
town on the border with
Citrus County must use a
"bridge" to reach out to the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice to coordinate events
like drug busts and chases.
On Monday, a $178,500
federal grant paved the
way for all of Levy County's
municipal police depart-
ments Chiefland, Cedar
Key, Inglis and Williston -
and the county's sheriff,
fire and emergency man-
agement departments to
communicate with each
other and similar agencies
outside the county. The
grant was part of $3.68 mil-
lion awarded to the Re-
gional Domestic Security
Task Force, which repre-
sents 13 Florida counties,
by the state's Division of
Emergency Management.
The money allowed Levy
County, under the guidance


_ a


II~~







Page A3 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE TY Dairyman to vie for Farmer of the Year


What is it
about oxycodone?
The Chronicle is working
on a news package about
oxycodone and would like to
hear stories from people who
have struggled or are strug-
gling with, addiction to the
pill; or those who may have
children born addicted to the
pill or are related to or friends
with someone struggling with
the substance.
Call reporterA.B. Sidibe at
352-564-2925 or email at
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.
Fingerprinting
volunteers needed
The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office's Emergency Opera-
tions Center has a need for
volunteers to conduct live
scan (electronic) fingerprint-
ing services for citizens who
stop by the facility at 3549
Saunders Way, across from
the Lecanto Government
Building.
The schedule includes 8
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Tuesday;
10 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. Wednes-
days; and noon to 3:45 p.m.
Thursday. However, adding
hours and/or days for provid-
ing this hands-on service at
the EOC would be beneficial.
If interested in this or other
volunteering opportunities
with the sheriff's office, call
Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-
4260.
Vets committee
convenes June 20
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will meet at 1:30
p.m. Wednesday, June 20, in
the conference room of the
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, to plan for Cit-
rus County's 20th annual Vet-
erans Appreciation Week.
All veterans' service organ-
izations are encouraged to
send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning
process. Individual veterans
are also welcome.
For more information, call
Chris Gregoriou at 352-
795-7000.

Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium in Inverness; and 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 18, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida in
Lecanto. Information: Mike
Wright, 352-563-3228.
Jimmie T. Smith, Re-
publican incumbent, and
Lynn Dostal, Democrat for
state House District 34, will
speak at the Citrus County
Tea Party Patriots meeting at
1 p.m. Saturday, June 16, at
the Women's Club, 1715 For-
est Drive, Inverness. The
group will have a forum June
30 for sheriff's candidates.
Life Care Center of Bev-
erly Hills is having a meet-
the-candidates event at 2:30
p.m. Friday, June 15. All can-
didates are invited to intro-
duce themselves and give a
short speech. Candidates
who want to attend should
call Melissa Dickinson at 352-
746-4434.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for su-
perintendent of schools, will
have a fundraiser from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 15,
at Shamrock Farms, 6105 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. In-
formation: Debbie Lattin, 352-
726-3181.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country


Club.
The Campaign Trail is a list-
ing of political happenings for
the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.com.


-From staff reports


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

LECANTO A Lecanto
dairy owner who has built his
family farm into a key sup-
plier of dairy products and
beverages for schools and
other institutions has been
named the 2012 Swisher
Sweets/Sunbelt Ag Expo
Florida Farmer of the Year
Dale McClellan, who
opened M & B Dairy Farm
in Lecanto about 10 years
ago, is Florida's recipient of
the award, allowing him to
compete against winners
from nine other states for
the Southeastern Farmer of
the Year award, to be an-
nounced in the fall.
McClellan said he was
born to be a farmer
"I hit the ground running,
and I never wanted to stop,"
he said. "It is one of the pas-
sions I have for life. I am so
thankful to have work I love
to do."
McClellan and his family
maintain farm businesses in
Citrus and Hillsborough
counties. His sons, Leon,


Bryan and Daniel, all work
in the businesses. McClel-
lan's wife previously was a
member of the processing
team at the plant. Daniel's
wife, Andrea, manages the
front office of the facility.
In addition to operating
the dairy, McClellan pro-
duces hay, corn and oats. He
and his family also operate
a state-of-the-art dairy pro-
cessing and packaging facil-
ity that serves institutional
customers. The plant em-
ploys 140 people.
The enterprises function
as mutually supportive pro-
duction systems. Feedstocks,
cultivated with attention to
cost and responsible envi-
ronmental management,
provide the dairy cattle with
a nourishing diet. The ani-
mals yield, in turn, a food
that is processed into seven
different types of milk prod-
ucts and distributed under
the family's own label.
All three components are
identified collectively as M
& B Products Inc.
"We efficiently maximize
land usage at our dairy farm


and leased lands to cultivate
crops that are the most cost-
effective to harvest," Mc-
Clellan said. "These crops
feed our dairy cattle to en-
sure that we produce the
most healthy, nutritious
milk possible. We work dili-
gently to make sure our
cows are comfortable."
The family's raw milk is
sold to Premier Milk, a co-
operative McClellan helped
establish, then purchased
by the packaging business
for processing. By this ap-
proach, he can control costs
while maintaining continu-
ous production.
The processing facility has
opened other markets for
the business. McClellan's en-
terprise also produces more
than 150 different sizes,
packages and flavors of fruit
juice fortified with vitamins,
for 19 Florida school dis-
tricts. Innovative packaging
and product development
have allowed the firm to
serve hospitals and prisons.
McClellan is one of the
founders of the Agricultural
Alliance of Citrus County, a


Special to the Chronicle
Lecanto dairyman Dale McClellan, center, has been named
Florida Farmer of the Year. He is flanked by two of his sons,
Daniel, left, holding Hailee, and Leon, right, who work in the


family businesses.

group open to all types of
food producers. A past pres-
ident of the Hillsborough
County Farm Bureau, Mc-
Clellan has represented
agricultural producers on
the Hillsborough County
Agricultural Economic De-
velopment Council, the Cit-
rus County Economic
Development Council and
the Greater Temple Terrace


Chamber of Commerce.
His statewide service in-
cludes duties as a member
of the Florida Department
of Agriculture's Animal In-
dustry Technical Council
and as a director of the Pre-
mier Milk Dairy Co-op.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916


Outdoors in the mall


DAVE SIGLERIChronicle
Mary Morgan talks to Nancy and
Bill Keilmann on Saturday at the Outdoor
Adventure Expo at Crystal River Mall. Pete
Ward and Bob Pur-
cell, seated left,
were on hand to tell i
people about the
Crystal River Sail and
Power Squadron. The
Outdoor Adventure
Expo continues from For more
noon to 5 p.m. today
at the mall. photos, click
: Love Motor- on this story at
sports had a huge www.chronicle
selection of water- online.com.
crafts, four-wheelers,
motorcycles and ac-
cessories on display Saturday at the Out-
door Adventure Expo. Frank Wells and
Cimaya Presley, left, talk to Chad Halleen,
owner of Love Motorsports. The expo also
has a large selection of boats, campers,
cars and other popular outdoor activities.


Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge plans to expand


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern


For outdoorsmen and women, the
Florida wilderness has long been a
source for exploring rugged terrain
and observing free-growing flora.
The backwoods and swamps are
home to strange, wondrous and
deadly creatures, attempting to co-
exist with mankind.
National wildlife refuges, such
as the Chassahowitzka, provide
sanctuaries for those animals
while allowing nature lovers to
enjoy recreational activities with-
out disturbing the natural
surroundings.
Since 1943, the Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge has pro-
vided shelter for waterfowl and en-
dangered whooping cranes with its


30,842 acres of saltwater bays and
marshes.
Now an effort is under way in a
span of 15 years to expand the Chas-
sahowitzka National Wildlife
Refuge's boundaries, replace the
headquarters there and develop
more animal research projects.
In their first 322-page draft of a
comprehensive conservation plan
to Congress, refuge officials lay out
potential goals with a price tag in
the tens of millions of dollars.
Attempting to acquire more land,
officials are considering buying
land surrounding the existing
acreage at an estimated cost of
$15 million.
That land would be the forefront
of new research projects for data
and population monitoring involv-
ing native and invasive animals and


plants and climate change meas-
ured by new hydrological
structures.
Because hurricanes are a threat
to the wildlife refuge buildings, the
plan advises replacing the refuge
complex office in Crystal River with
a new, elevated structure at a cost of
$2.5 million.
The refuge complex office head-
quarters not only manages the
Chassahowitzka wildlife refuge, but
also refuges in the Tampa Bay area
and the Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge.
With more land would come more
employees.
The proposal requests adding 16
more staffing position, with eight of
those in the Chassahowitzka refuge.
In addition to allowing the refuge
to continue previous uses, the draft


requires commercial fishermen,
photographers and guides to obtain
permits to conduct business within
the refuge.
As this plan is pricey, Congress
does not have to accept it in its
entirety.
The proposal explores ways the
refuge could maintain its primary
functions without any additional
funding, including partnerships
with volunteer organizations.
The public may share comments
on the plan until Tuesday, with the
acceptance of the plan scheduled
for some time in September
To read the Chassahowitzka
refuge proposal online, visit
fws.gov/southeast/planning/CCP/
Chass-DraftsinglePgDoc.html.
To comment on the plan, email
ChassCCP@fws.gov






A4 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


TEXAS
Continued from Page Al

me. Please help me, sir My
life is in danger now," Ro-
driguez can be heard saying
on the recording, which was
played for jurors this week.
The images are mostly dark
or in shadow.
"I'm standing my ground
here. Now these people are
going to go try and kill me."
Rodriguez, 47, eventually
tells the dispatcher, "Look
I'm not losing to these peo-
ple anymore." A loud cack-
ling laugh is then heard
before someone appears to
reach for the camera and a
gun goes off. That's when
the video abruptly ends.
Danaher, 36, who taught
physical education at an el-
ementary school, was killed.
Two other men were
wounded.
At trial
One of the wounded men,
a Houston firefighter
named Ricky Johnson, told
jurors Friday he and his
friends were not at fault,
saying Rodriguez "started
the process by coming with
a gun."
Prosecutor Kelli Johnson
has portrayed Rodriguez,
who fought fires in the
Houston suburb of Baytown,
as the one who was looking
for a fight.
Kenneth Ellis, who lived
across the street from Ro-
driguez, testified Friday that
on the night of the shooting,
he saw Rodriguez was "agi-
tated and angry"
As he left his home, he
was saying "Shut up. Shut
up."
Johnson attempted to in-
troduce evidence showing
Rodriguez had a history of
threatening neighbors by
brandishing his gun. But
state District Judge David


Mendoza did not allow the
evidence.
One of Rodriguez's attor-
neys, William Stradley, tried
to demonstrate his client
was in fear for his life when
one of the men lunged at
him, and he had less than a
second to respond.
The defense sought to put
the burden on the three
other men, saying they
caused the confrontation to
escalate.
"Do you take any respon-
sibility for what hap-
pened?" Stradley asked
Johnson.
"Of course I do," replied
Johnson, who on the video
can be seen being re-
strained by the two other
men before the shooting.
Texas law
Texas' version of a stand-
your-ground law, known as
the Castle Doctrine, was re-
vised in 2007 to expand the
right to use deadly force.
The new version allows
people to defend them-
selves not only in their
homes but also in work-
places or vehicles. It also
says a person using force
cannot provoke the attacker
or be involved in criminal
activity at the time.
While Rodriguez was not
in his own home or vehicle
or business when the shoot-
ing happened, Houston
criminal defense attorney
Grant Scheiner said he be-
lieves the law still applies
because the 2007 revision
gave people wider latitude
on when they can use
deadly force.
Rodriguez had a con-
cealed handgun permit.
"We are not questioning
his wisdom," Scheiner said.
"We are questioning
whether he followed the re-
striction of the law."
2007 precedent
Scheiner believes prose-
cutors will have a hard time


overcoming the precedent
of a 2007 case involving an-
other Houston-area resi-
dent, Joe Horn, who was not
charged by a grand jury for
fatally shooting two men he
suspected of burglarizing a
neighbor's home.
"Joe Horn didn't get in-
dicted. It's going to be hard
to convict somebody in these
circumstances," he said.
But Jimmy Ardoin, an-
other Houston criminal de-
fense lawyer, believes
Rodriguez's lawyers have
the tougher challenge -
convincing jurors that his
actions fit any of the excep-
tions for deadly force under
Texas law.
"I'm not sure that if the
jury believes he initiated
the confrontation, he will
get the protection of self-
defense laws," he said.
Vigilante justice
Sandra Guerra Thomp-
son, a criminal law profes-
sor at the University of
Houston Law Center, said
stand-your-ground laws are
encouraging more people to
take matters into their own
hands instead of waiting for
authorities.
"I guess under the law,
we've made a decision that
people can go out and do
this," she said.
"Do we really want to en-
courage people to use force
in this manner in these
kinds of situations, or do we
want to encourage them to
call the police?"
Scheiner acknowledged
there are examples in
which the use of deadly
force goes too far. But he
doesn't think that will
prompt lawmakers to revise
or pull back stand-your-
ground laws.
"The clear trend in Amer-
ican law is to expand the
rights of people to protect
themselves by using deadly
force," he said.


MAIDHOF
Continued from Page Al

another wall, another
slideshow displayed a few
of his "top tens," something
he was known for during
his time in county
government
Many stopped to place a
tie on the tie tree in the
room a tribute to Maid-
hof's love of unsightly
neckties.
The Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica also paid respects to
Maidhof, who was a Boy
Scout and Scoutmaster. In-
verness attorney Clifford
Travis, an Eagle Scout who
continues to be very in-
volved in scouting, said
Maidhof's death would be a
huge loss to the local scout-
ing community
Starting the evening,
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe welcomed every-
one and reminded every-
one the ceremony would a
celebration, so there would
be jokes.
"Some may be good,
some may not be good," he
said.
But because Maidhof
caused so many people
misery during his time in
Citrus County, Thorpe teas-
ingly said this was payback
time.


Thorpe read Maidhof's
"impressive and impossi-
ble" biography, highlighting
many of his personal
and professional
accomplishments.
He spoke of Maidhof's
love of books, nature and
his involvement in a num-
ber of local organizations.
He touched a lot of live,
Thorpe said, and through it
all, was always respected.
Josh Wooten, president
and CEO of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, marveled at the size
and mix of people in the
crowd.
Wooten also cracked a
few jokes about how he and
Maidhof were big on fash-
ion and nice cars.
After opening up the
floor, county information
systems director Darryl
Clouse decided to com-
pound on the laughs by first
sharing a few phrases syn-
onymous with Maidhof,
such as "smart and intelli-
gent," "friendly and nice
guy," "teacher and mentor,
"compassionate and car-
ing" and "comedian and
class clown."
However, Clouse said he
wanted to focus more on
phrases not associated with
Maidhof, starting with
"Nice car..."
From the 1988 Chevy
Caprice that spewed


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

enough toxic exhaust to
ward off potential tail-
gaters to the 1999 Chevy
Cavalier he bought from
some "used car salesman in
Hernando" that died a
week later; to his last car,
an enormous 1992 Buick
Roadmaster, Clouse as-
sured everyone Maidhof
had questionable taste
when it came to cars.
Clouse also poked fun at
Maidhof's taste in ties.
However, in a serious
moment, Clouse said it was
the first week in nine
weeks he hadn't had a
friend die.
Therefore, he said, peo-
ple must remember the last
thing they say to someone
could be the last thing they
ever say
And while people tend to
get caught up in politics
and their opinions and
agenda, he said everyone
should take a step back and
just be grateful for what
they have.
Gary Maidhof would say
that if he were here, he
added.
"Gary, thank you," Clouse
said. "He made me a better
person."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Bid Notices........................ ................... D7


S ...gMeeting Notices....................................D7


S IV Miscellaneous Notices......................... D7

i i.. Notice to Creditors/Administration.........D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
)PR HI LOpPR HI LO PR
0.00 NA NA NA -. 88 72 0.80


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts


ts
ts
PCts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


87 73 0.00 83 71 0.40


-Exclusive daily
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
SPartly sunny; 40% chance of
thunderstorms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 72
1 Partly cloudy; 30% chance of a thunderstorm

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 70
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of thunderstorms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 78/71
Record 97/60
Normal 92/69
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.47 in.
Total for the month 3.28 in.
Total for the year 17.88 in.
Normal for the year 17.18 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 2.4/12
Monday's count: 4.6
Tuesday's count: 4.5
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/10 SUNDAY 11:50 5:39 6:02
6/11 MONDAY 12:11 6:25 12:35 6:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S
JULY 3


SUNSET TONIGHT 8:29 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:31 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .........................12:45 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:51 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fied plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:21 a/6:37 a 11:02 p/7:02 p
Crystal River* 9:42 a/3:59 a 9:23 p/4:24 p
Withlacoochee* 7:29 a/1:47 a 7:10 p/2:12 p
Homosassa*** 10:31 a/5:36 a 10:12 p/6:01 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:06 p7:21 a /8:11 p
10:27 a/4:43 a 10:38 p/5:33 p
8:14 a/2:31 a 8:25 p/3:21 p
11:16 a/6:20 a 11:27 p/7:10 p


Gulf water
temperature


81
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.99 28.02 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.82 32.87 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 34.75 34.80 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.14 36.14 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Fra rIso 70s K,
So 70s e" 80 s '
ea, r n.. -
OS Ange 9 /9
100O,' 9, ,
r,r2 alo o
'-" Hosion i '
S .Is._o At .... '



"r FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


74 53 .01
95 64
80 58 .01
85 66
88 62
94 64
90 62
65 49 .18
80 67
63 43 .13
79 59
72 61 .12
78 48
84 62
87 53
87 55
90 65
86 54
88 62
89 62
88 58
79 47
91 69
95 61
91 63
90 62
101 69
90 57
88 59
77 60
92 71
86 60
81 71 .31
97 76
89 67
69 62
88 62
88 73
90 67
92 72
75 71 5.81
75 69 .23
88 61


85 65
90 59
75 61
77 68
76 66
98 75
92 66
65 46
80 71
68 44
77 60
83 67
82 58
85 70
90 65
83 66
93 77
90 68
85 64
83 69
90 68
83 53
96 77
79 49
92 64
87 69
100 72
84 69
87 66
84 58
95 77
90 68
84 72
91 69
86 72
74 61
84 70
83 72
88 68
91 64
85 74
82 72
80 68


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 85 74 .18 ts 85 76
New York City 78 68 ts 84 65
Norfolk 88 63 s 89 68
Oklahoma City 88 62 pc 91 71
Omaha 92 64 ts 86 60
Palm Springs 98 71 s 101 68
Philadelphia 89 63 s 90 68
Phoenix 10375 s 101 75
Pittsburgh 85 59 s 87 64
Portland, ME 77 51 s 77 53
Portland, Ore 64 47 pc 71 53
Providence, R.I. 76 59 .02 s 81 58
Raleigh 89 57 pc 90 66
Rapid City 83 59 pc 71 51
Reno 67 48 s 77 48
Rochester, NY 75 61 .37 pc 86 66
Sacramento 82 52 s 94 59
St. Louis 91 63 pc 87 72
St. Ste. Marie 81 61 .41 pc 86 62
Salt Lake City 71 56 s 67 46
San Antonio 93 66 pc 99 77
San Diego 65 60 pc 67 60
San Francisco 70 50 s 76 54
Savannah 83 62 ts 86 72
Seattle 63 47 pc 67 52
Spokane 51 39 .16 pc 66 46
Syracuse 70 60 .17 pc 84 64
Topeka 91 60 ts 91 67
Washington 91 67 s 92 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 107 Wink, Texas LOW 25 Truckee, Calif.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 91/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 62/51/sh Mexico City
Athens 91/69/s Montreal
Beijing 83/64/s Moscow
Berlin 65/53/sh Paris
Bermuda 76/71/pc Rio
Cairo 96/71/s Rome
Calgary 61/43/sh Sydney
Havana 89/77/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/82/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 91/68/s Warsaw


73/63/c
61/54/sh
85/57/c
79/54/pc
81/59/pc
73/54/pc
67/57/r
78/67/ts
80/63/pc
59/50/sh
78/64/sh
85/64/pc
70/58/pc


C I T R U S.


C U N TY


CHRONICLE
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e M Crystal River,
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N 1:1 :

I Inverness
Courthouse office
To m p kins St. q a 1 .squa re
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


JUNE11 JUNE 19 JUNE28


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LEGAL NOTICE


Medical Benefits Settlement
Providing Benefits to Clean-Up Workers and Certain Gulf Coast Residents


If you have a medical claim related to the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill, you could get benefits from a class
action settlement with BP Exploration & Production
Inc. and BP America Production Company ("BP").
Go to DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more
information, including information on how to file a
claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE MEDICAL
BENEFITS SETTLEMENT?
The Medical Class includes (1) clean-up workers
and (2) certain people who resided in specific
geographic areas in coastal and wetlands areas
along the Gulf Coast during specific periods in
2010. The website DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.
com has detailed descriptions and maps to help
you determine whether a geographic location may
be included in one of these zones. Additionally,
you can call 1-866-992-6174 or e-mail info@
DeepwaterHorizonMedicalSettlement.com to find
out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE MEDICAL BENEFITS
SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The benefits of the Medical Benefits Settlement
include: (1) payments to qualifying people for
certain acute (short-term) and chronic (ongoing)
medical conditions occurring after exposure to oil
or chemical dispersants; (2) provision of periodic
medical examinations to qualifying people; and
(3) creation of a Gulf Region Health Outreach
Program, consisting of projects to strengthen the
healthcare system. Benefits (1) and (2) will be
provided only after the Court grants final approval
and any appeals are resolved.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE
MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT
You need to submit a Claim Form to request
benefits. You can get a copy of the Claim Form by
visiting the website or by calling 1-866-992-6174.


Claims can be submitted by mail. If you have
questions about how to file your claim, you should
call the toll-free number for assistance.

The deadline for filing a Claim Form is one year
after the Medical Benefits Settlement becomes
effective (that is, after the Court grants "final
approval" and any appeals are resolved). The exact
date of the claim filing deadline will be posted
on the website. It is highly recommended that
Medical Class Members complete and submit their
claim forms promptly. Please read the Economic
and Property Damages Settlement notice because
you may also be eligible for a payment from that
settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS
If you do not want to be legally bound by the
Medical Benefits Settlement, you must Opt Out or
exclude yourself by October 1, 2012 or you won't
be able to sue BP over certain medical claims. If
you stay in the Medical Benefits Settlement, you
may object to it by August 31, 2012. The Detailed
Notice explains how to exclude yourself or object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8,2012
to consider whether to approve the Medical Benefits
Settlement. You or your own lawyer may ask to
appear and speak at the hearing at your own cost.
Class Counsel will ask the Court to consider an
award of fees, costs, and expenses of 6% of the
value of the benefits actually provided under the
Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement. Class
Counsel fees, costs, and expenses under the
Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement and the
Economic and Property Damages Settlement
Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million.
Class members' payments will not be reduced if the
Court approves the payment of Class Counsel fees,
costs, and expenses because BP will separately pay
these attorney fees, costs, and expenses.


Economic and Property Damages Settlement
Providing Money to Individuals and Businesses


If you have economic loss orproperty damagebecause
of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, you could get money
from a class action settlement with BP Exploration &
Production Inc. and BP America Production Company
("BP"). Go to DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for
more information, including information on how to
file a claim.


WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE ECONOMIC &
PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT?


The Economic and Property Damages ("E&PD")
Settlement Class includes people, businesses, and
other entities in the states of Louisiana, Alabama
and Mississippi, and certain counties in Texas
and Florida, that were harmed by the oil spill.
The website DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com
has detailed descriptions and maps to help you
determine whether a geographic location may be
included in the E&PD Settlement. Additionally,
you can call 1-866-992-6174 or e-mail questions@
DeepwaterHorizonEconomicSettlement.com to find
out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY
DAMAGES SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The E&PD Settlement makes payments for the
following types of claims: (1) Seafood Compensation,
(2) Economic Damage, (3) Loss of Subsistence,
(4) Vessel Physical Damage, (5) Vessels of Opportunity
Charter Payment, (6) Coastal Real Property Damage,
(7) Wetlands Real Property Damage, and (8) Real
Property Sales Damage. There is no limit on the total
dollar amount of the E&PD Settlement; all qualified
claims will be paid.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE ECONOMIC
& PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT
You need to submit a Claim Form to request a
payment. You can get a copy of the various Claim Forms
by visiting the website or by calling 1-866-992-6174.
Claims can be submitted online or by mail. If you have
questions about how to file your claim, you should call
the toll-free number for assistance.


The deadline to submit most E&PD claims will
be April 22, 2014 or six months after the E&PD
Settlement becomes effective (that is, after the Court
grants "final approval" and any appeals are resolved),
whichever is later. There will be an earlier deadline
to submit E&PD Seafood Compensation claims. The
earlier deadline to submit Seafood Compensation
claims will be 30 days after final approval of the
Settlement by the United States District Court for the
Eastern District of Louisiana (regardless of appeals).
Actual claim filing deadlines will be posted on the
website as they become available. Valid claims will be
paid as they are approved, beginning shortly after the
Court-Supervised Settlement Program commences. It
is highly recommended that E&PD Settlement Class
Members complete and submit their claim forms
promptly. Please read the Medical Benefits Settlement
notice because you may also be eligible for benefits
from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS
If you do not want to be legally bound by the E&PD
Settlement, you must Opt Out or exclude yourself by
October 1, 2012 or you won't be able to sue BP over
certain economic and property damage claims. If you
stay in the E&PD Settlement, you may object to it by
August 31, 2012. The Detailed Notice explains how
to exclude yourself or object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012
to consider whether to approve the E&PD Settlement.
You or your own lawyer may ask to appear and speak
at the hearing at your own cost. The Court will also
consider Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses
including an interim payment of $75 million and
additional awards equal to 6% of class claims and
benefits paid. Class Counsel fees, costs and expenses
under the Economic and Property Damages Settlement
Agreement and the Medical Benefits Settlement
Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million. Class
members' payments will not be reduced if the Court
approves the payment of Class Counsel fees, costs,
and expenses because BP will separately pay these
attorney fees, costs, and expenses.


I


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 A5


DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com m 1-866-992-6174





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Loretta
VanFossen, 95
STRASBURG,
OHIO
After a prolonged illness,
Loretta, 95, passed away
Friday, June 8, 2012, in

A- House at
Columbus,
Ohio.
Born
Sept. 19,
1916, in
Dover, Ohio,
she was the
Loretta youngest
VanFossen daughter of
Nicholas
and Mary Jane (nee Denoi)
Nigro. Loretta was married
to George Eugene "Gene"
VanFossen for 33 years prior
to his passing in 1978. They
made their home in Stras-
burg, Ohio, before retiring
to Inverness, Fla., in 1972.
Following Gene's death,
Loretta remained in Inver-
ness until 2007, when she re-
turned to Strasburg.
Loretta was a 1934 gradu-
ate of Dover High School
and always enjoyed her
many class reunions. She
was always active in the
communities where she
resided. Loretta loved to
dance, sing, travel and gen-
erally celebrated life with
family and friends. She was
a generous and caring soul
who will be remembered
with love.
She is survived by her two
daughters, Jane M. Davis
(Sam) of Huntington, WVa.,
and Paula VanFossen-
Brown (Tom) of Columbus;
her beloved grandchildren,
Rachel Kacmar (Tim) of
Chicago, Ill., Amelia Brown
of Cleveland, and Jacob
Brown, also of Chicago; her
older sister, Nora Gullo, of
Cleveland, Ohio; and many
other family members and
friends.
A Mass of Christian burial
will be celebrated at 10:30
a.m. Tuesday, June 12, in St.
Joseph Church, 613 N. Tus-
carawas Ave., Dover, with
the Rev Jeff Coning officiat-
ing. Burial will be in St.
Aloysius Cemetery at Stras-
burg. Family and friends are
invited to call from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday, June 11, at the
Toland-Herzig Funeral
Home & Crematory, 803
N.Wooster Ave., Dover A
Christian wake service will
be at 7:45 p.m. Monday in
the funeral home.
To sign an online guest-
book and share a fond mem-
ory of Loretta, please visit
the Obituaries & Flowers
link on the Toland-Herzig
website.
The family suggests con-
tributions in Loretta's mem-
ory be made to the
American Stroke Associa-


Celebration of Life


Violet Ardell
Gouldbourn
September 11, ', .'I 23, 2012
f'. ,, i, as we celebrate her
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Charles
Stobber, 85
FLORAL CITY
Charles T Stobber, 85, of
Floral City, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, June 6,
2012, at his residence.
He was born Oct. 3, 1926,
in Vernon, Wis., to the late
Fred and Ruth (Dyer) Stob-
ber. Charles was a mainte-
nance supervisor for B'nai
Br'ith. He arrived in this
area in 1992, coming from
Mukwonago, Wis. He was a
veteran of the U.S. Army Air
Force, World War II, and a
member of the American
Legion Post No. 375 in Muk-
wonago. Charles enjoyed
bowling, trap shooting,
hunting, boating and the
outdoors.
He is survived by his wife
of 39 years, Sandra Stobber
Other survivors include
three sons, Donald (Vicky)
Stobber of East Troy, Wis.,
Terry (Nancy) Stobber of
Castle Rock, Colo., and
Thomas Stobber of Indiana;
one sister, Joyce Hall, of
Fontana, Wis.; six grandchil-
dren; and many great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is scheduled for
noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday,
June 13, 2012, with the fu-
neral service at 1 p.m. at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness. Burial with mili-
tary honors will follow at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
U.S. flags denote military
service on local obituaries.


Donald
Tambasco, 89
HOMOSASSA
Donald A. Tambasco, 89,
of Homosassa, Fla., a man
with a very big heart,and a
loving husband, father and
grandfather, died June 8,
2012, at Sugar Mill Manor.
Donald was born Aug. 30,
1922, in Archibald, Pa., the
son of Daniel and Jennifer
Tambasco. He was the
owner of Don's Pizza in
Hauppauge, N.Y. He was
also a tractor-trailer driver
for Gilbert Carriers. Don
moved to Homosassa in
1993 from West Berne, N.Y
He was preceded in death
by his parents, son Thomas,
and 16 brothers and sisters.
Survivors include his wife of
45 years, Virginia; daugh-
ters, Annmarie Tambasco of
Cathedral, Calif, Thomasina
Tambasco of Voorheesville,
N.Y, Nanci Gaioni of Nas-
sau, N.Y, and Sharon Tam-
basco of Coram, N.Y; sons,
Brian Tambasco of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; and Daniel
Tambasco of Crystal River,
Fla.; sister Naomi Oates
of Flushing, N.Y; 21 grand-
children; 14 great-
grandchildren; and one
great-great-granddaughter
Mr. Tambasco's family
will receive friends from 6
to 8 p.m. Monday, June 11,
2012, at the Heinz Funeral
Home in Inverness. Funeral
services will be at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, June 12, 2012, at St
Timothy Lutheran Church
in Crystal River, Fla. The
family will receive friends
at the church beginning at 1
p.m. The Rev. David Brad-
ford will preside. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, is handling the
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.










a3D S
fil T I I
10 '"'IF -


Waldo
Wilson, 84
HOMOSASSA
Waldo Wilson, 84, of Ho-
mosassa, died Friday, June
8, 2012, at the Hospice
House of Citrus County in
Lecanto.
He was born May 28,1928,
to the late Alfred Ray and
Virda Lee Wilson in Cincin-
nati, Ohio, and came here 22
years ago from Brookville,
Ohio. Mr. Wilson was a re-
tired sergeant with the
Montgomery County Sher-
iff's Office in Dayton, Ohio,
with 25 years of service. He
was a U.S. Army veteran,
minister with the Assembly
of God Church, a Mason and
Shriner.
He is survived by his wife,
Betty Ann Wilson of Ho-
mosassa; son, Donald Ray
Wilson of Athens, Ga.;
daughter, Donna Kay Wilson
of North Carolina; and sis-
ter, Gertrude Johnson of
Kentucky.
The funeral service will
be conducted at 11 a.m.
Wednesday June 13, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River. Vis-
itation will be at the chapel
from 10 a.m. until the serv-
ice time. Burial will follow
at Fountains Memorial Park
Cemetery. Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crematory
is assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


John Melton, 85
FLORAL CITY
John L. Melton, 85, Floral
City, died Thursday, June 7,
2012, in Inverness.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
in charge of private
arrangements.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Charles
McKellar, 77
OCEAN SPRINGS,
MISS.
Charles F McKellar, the
former press secretary to
the late Gov Bill Waller Sr,
and longtime Mississippi
political consultant, has
died in Ocean Springs. He
was 77.
McKellar's son, Patrick,
said his father died Thurs-
day at Ocean Springs Hospi-
tal after a brief illness.
A memorial service is
Monday at 11 a.m. at St.
John's Episcopal Church in
Ocean Springs.
McKellar worked from
1972 to 1976 for Waller, who
died last November. McKel-
lar most recently served as
editor and publisher of the
weekly Ocean Springs
Record. McKellar left the
newspaper last year and re-
cently completed his first
work of fiction, "The Candi-
date Conspiracy," due out
this month. He was prepar-
ing a book tour when he be-
came ill.


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OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
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A6 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Want to help host the Republican convention?


Chronicle
Citrus residents wanting to be
volunteers for the 2012 Tampa Bay
Host Committee can sign up
online.
Go to 2012tampa.com and click
on "Volunteer Program" at the top
left to find out details about
volunteering.


WISDOM
Continued from Page Al

many out-of-towners at
once, and that's only part of
the planning and organiza-
tion that must happen to
make the convention a suc-
cess for the attendees and
Tampa Bay
While hosting the conven-
tion is the obvious basic
task, the committee is also
working with Tampa Bay
businesses, governments
and economic development
organizations to portray
Tampa Bay as a great place
to live and do business. Pro-
motions of all sorts, events,
trips and economic develop-
ment information will show-
case Tampa Bay for the
visitors.
Aileen Rodriguez, the
communications director
for the host committee, said
the convention will have a
huge impact on Tampa Bay
The last Florida convention
was 40 years ago in Miami.
This one is expected to
bring in $175 million in hard
cash, extrapolated by the
multiplier effect to about
$300 million, she said.
All this planning, coordi-
nating and promoting re-
quires a lot of money, and so
the committee has the goal
of raising $55 million to pay
for these tasks. (The conven-
tion got $50 million for secu-
rity from the federal
government.)
Crucial to the convention
will be a small army of vol-
unteers and that's where
Whitelaw comes in as the
director of events and vol-
unteers for the host commit-
tee. She oversees the
selection, training and ac-
tivities/management of what
will be about 7,500 volun-
teers, who will help visitors
in all sorts of ways from air-
port to hotel to street-side.
Volunteers won't be in the
convention itself but will be
involved in every other as-
pect of the visitors' experi-
ence while in Tampa Bay
Persons wishing to volun-
teer can contact the com-
mittee. Their political
affiliation does not matter.
People who have known
Whitelaw since her school



CCSO
Continued from Page Al

day," Richie said.
He said portions of down-
town Tampa will be blocked
off during the convention.


Committee staff is recruiting
and will train and manage about
7,500 volunteers to be the faces of
Tampa Bay during the week of the
2012 Republican National Con-
vention. They will welcome guests
at Tampa Bay airports and hotels
and will support host committee
programs and events up to and
during the convention.


days in Citrus County would
not be surprised she was
picked for the job, even
though she is only 27.
In truth, this vibrant
young woman is a veteran at
this kind of event. She's al-
ready done it for two Super
Bowls, in Dallas in 2011 and
in Tampa in 2009. She did
her first one at age 24.
It's the kind of activity she
has thrived on in her fairly
young life so far.
"I'm an overachiever," she
says with a laugh and then
gives her characteristic
wide smile.
Her involvement and this
kind of leadership started in
school where she excelled
in just about everything
from sports to student
activities.
She graduated from
Florida State University in
2007 with a double major in
business management and
human resources and a cer-
tification in special events.
When she says that at FSU
she was "very involved,"
take that as an understate-
ment. Among many other
activities she chaired or or-
ganized was coordinating
student volunteers.
During one summer
break, she was the summer
youth program coordinator
with Citrus County Parks
and Recreation, helping to
create the popular Camp
Fusion.
After graduating, she
went to the Tampa Sports
Authority at Raymond
James Stadium as a market-
ing and communications in-
tern for 11 months. There
she developed various
forms of public communica-
tion, conveyed NFL security
procedures, created an
Americans with Disabilities
Act pamphlet and acted as a
stadium guide.
She then became the
events staff supervisor at
the authority and super-
vised the operation of south
concourse stadium entities
(concessions, security, guest
services) during Tampa Bay
Buccaneers, University of
South Florida and Outback
Bowl games.
The next step, though it
might have been intimidat-
ing for many recent gradu-
ates, was a natural for her.


"I certainly wouldn't want
to go down there during that
time," Richie said.
And weather is always a
factor. With the convention
occurring during the height
of hurricane season, organ-
izers know Florida law en-
forcement officials may be


For types of volunteer work,
dates, times and orientation and
training information, go to the
committee's website, which is
where volunteers must first
register.
Volunteers are expected to sign
up for at least two four-hour shifts.
They will be issued a uniform to
wear during their shifts. Respon-


sibilities will include: event set-up
crew, airport greeters, distribution
center assistants, event way-
finders, hotel greeters, volunteer
office administrative assistants,
and on-call volunteers.
While in uniform, host commit-
tee volunteers must act in a non-
partisan way and should not
publicize personal political mis-


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas,
gestures April 5 while speaking at the University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley, Calif. Paul supporters are unhappy that Re-
publican National Convention organizers aren't letting them
throw a festival honoring the Texas congressman and pres-
idential candidate the weekend before the gathering.


She was picked to be vol-
unteer services coordinator
for the Tampa Bay Super
Bowl Host Committee from
March 2008 to February
2009. She led a 6,400-person
volunteer program recruit-
ing, training and managing
volunteers to represent
Tampa Bay at hotels, air-
ports and at sanctioned
events, including NFLX and
DirectTV's Celebrity Beach
Bowl. Her job included sup-
porting all local business
and community outreach
programs.
The nature of this kind of
work is that it is short-lived,
if not intense, so it's eventu-
ally on to the next event.
Then there were two
short stints.
First, she was a produc-
tion assistant for U.S. Davis
Cup Team at Michael T Fiur
Productions in Birming-
ham, Ala., where she sup-
ported on-site coordination
of event productions, per-
formers, youth groups and
entertainment acts for the
USA vs. Switzerland at the
Davis Cup.
Next, she worked for a
short time as a consultant
for Fiur, managing the vol-
unteers system, producing
volunteer-related materials
and assisting on-site opera-
tions for the GoNewark
HoopFest during the NCAA


needed elsewhere on the
spur of the moment
"If we get a hurricane,"
Richie said, "our sheriff will
call our people home."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Men's Basketball East
Regionals.
Then she stepped up to
the bigtime events, to be di-
rector of volunteer services
for the North Texas Super
Bowl XLV Host Committee,
whose job it was to make
sure North Texas was ready
to host the first Super Bowl
in the Cowboys' new sta-
dium on Feb. 6, 2011.
She recruited, trained
and scheduled 10,000-plus
volunteers to serve as am-
bassadors throughout North
Texas at hotels, airports, the
Volunteer Headquarters,
NFL Experience and other
ancillary events. She cre-
ated outreach programs and
philanthropic efforts, man-
aged all operations of a 16-
person internship program,
and supported NFL and
contracted entities with
staffing and volunteer
needs.
So, picking her for the
Tampa convention job prob-
ably wasn't that tough.
Whitelaw says she knew a
convention was big-bigger
than a Super Bowl but


says, "I had no idea how
big."
While most might be un-
nerved by the enormity of
the task, not her. It's all
about "seeing opportunities
rather than challenges and
barriers," she says.
Yes, it's a million details
and yes, it is exhausting, she
says, but it's plain she was
made for it
Organizing and leading is
in her blood. It's all about
organization, details and
creative vision, she says.
Plus, you have to have a
good team, and they do, she
says of the host committee.
Rodriguez says Whitelaw
is a standout
"We're thrilled about her,"
Rodriguez said, adding that
host committee chairman
Ken Jones likes to brag
about her.
Whitelaw said though she


sions or affiliations. The mission
of the Host Committee Volunteer
Program is to represent Tampa
Bay
Volunteers will not be deployed
inside the convention and will not
receive any convention creden-
tials or tickets. There will be a cel-
ebratory event for volunteers after
the convention.


left Citrus after graduating,
she returns frequently and
loves the county for its
unique character. Her par-
ents are David and Karen
Whilelaw. He is the director
of road maintenance for the
county and she works for
Progress Energy
Asked about what's next
after the convention- what
does one do to follow that
one she chuckles, that
wide smile lighting up her
face, and says she's not sure
yet what it will be. But you
can see she's already look-
ing forward to whatever the
next adventure turns out to
be.
Then she adds, there is
one thing coming up: she
will do her class
reunion.
Jim Hunter can be
reached at jimhunter
chronicle@gmail. com.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Fatima Munshi, mother of Saroo, holds up a photo May 10 from their reunion in February
2012 at her home in Khandwa, India. Living in Australia, Saroo Brierley, 30, was reunited
with his biological mother, Munshi, 25 years after an ill-fated train ride left him an orphan
on the streets of Calcutta.


Mother, son separated


25 years later,
family fin

one another

Editor's Note: This is the
first in a two-part series.
Associated Press

KHANDWA, India -
Saroo's eyes snapped open
and everything was sud-
denly, horribly wrong.
The 5-year-old's tiny body
was still curled up on the
hard wooden seat of the In-
dian train, just as it was
when he'd drifted off to
sleep. The rattle of the train
was loud and steady, just as
it always was when he rode
home with his big brother,
Guddu.
But Guddu was not there.
And the alien landscape
flashing past the window
looked nothing like home.
Saroo's heart began to
pound. The train car was
empty. His brother should
have been there, sweeping
under the seats for loose
change. Where was Guddu?
Where was Saroo?
It was 1987, and Saroo
only knew he was alone on
the train.
A mother's life
Fatima Munshi was fran-
tic. When she returned to
her cramped house after a
hard day of work on a con-
struction site, her two young
sons still hadn't arrived.
They should have been back
hours earlier
Fatima lived for her chil-
dren. She had little else to
live for
She was born to landless
Hindu peasants and an or-
phan at age 10. But the little
girl had grit. She waded into
fieldwork, harvesting crops
to survive. As a teenager,
she moved into a construc-
tion job.
She caught the eye of her
supervisor, an orphan him-
self. In a whirlwind ro-
mance rare in tradition-
bound India, they fell in
love and got married. She
converted to Islam and
changed her name from
Kamla to Fatima.
They moved to the town of
Khandwa and found a home
in Ganesh Talai.
She bore three sons in
quick succession, Guddu,
Kallu, and her baby boy,
Saroo. When they grew up,
she dreamed, they would
live in big homes nearby and
each give her 20 cents a day
so she wouldn't have to work
and could look after her
grandchildren.
Then the life she had
worked so hard to rebuild
collapsed.
Another beginning
As Fatima grew pregnant
with their daughter, her
husband took a second wife.
One Sunday, a desperate
Fatima, with her baby girl
on her hip, confronted him.
She beat him with a shoe.
He beat her with a stick.
Soon the whole neighbor-
hood gathered, and in front
of the village elders, they in-
stantly divorced.
She went back to work in
construction. Guddu, who
was about 7, and Saroo, four
years younger, took to beg-
ging for food and change.
A boy's ride
Saroo remembered how
he and Guddu had taken the
train from their local sta-
tion, Khandwa, to Burhan-


pur, about 40 miles away, to
hunt for change. When they
arrived, a weary Saroo had
collapsed into a seat on the
platform. Guddu had prom-
ised to be back in a minute
and walked off.
When Saroo next opened
his eyes, a train was waiting
at the platform. Guddu must
be on board, he thought, still
in a sleepy fog. So Saroo
boarded the train and
drifted off again, thinking
his brother would wake him
at Khandwa.
But now the train was
stopping. There was no
Guddu, and this was not
Khandwa.
Frantic, he boarded an-
other train, hoping it would
take him home. It looped
back to Calcutta. He hopped
another train, and another,
praying he would be carried
back to his family They all
returned to this strange,
frightening place.
Saroo did this for days,
begging passengers for food.
At night, he slept under-
neath the train station's
seats. Eventually, he ven-
tured into the streets.
A search
When night fell and her
boys still weren't home, Fa-
tima panicked. She took a
neighbor she called Uncle
Akbar to the station to look
for them, but most of the
trains had already come
and gone. They searched
the nearby market where
the boys would beg. She
went to the fountain where
they liked to play
She had never been on a
train before, but she and
Uncle Akbar rode to
Burhanpur and Bhusawal,
asking police if they had
seen her sons.
Then she ran into a police
officer she knew.
Guddu was dead, he said.
The boy had either fallen
off the train or been pushed.
Police took photos of the
mangled but still identifiable
body found by the tracks,
and then cremated him.
A new journey
A Hindi man met Saroo
and took him to a govern-
ment center for abandoned
children. Weeks later, he
was transported to the In-
dian Society for Sponsor-
ship and Adoption.
The staff hunted for his
family, using the scraps of
information Saroo remem-
bered. But it wasn't enough.
The government declared
him a lost child.
Then one day, a worker
approached him with news
A new family wanted him.
And they lived in Australia.
More searching
She and Uncle Akbar, a
Muslim holy man, took to
the rails again. He begged
for food for their survival.
They searched the train
stations of Bhopal and
Sikanderabad, the police
stations in Hyderabad, the
jails in Bombay They visited
cities three or four times,
talking to anyone who might
have seen her missing son.
But she never went as far
as Calcutta. She couldn't
imagine he had gone so far.
A new life
Saroo was zooming
through the clouds toward
an island called Tasmania.
He was given a new last
name: Brierley He went to
school, learned English,
made friends.
But the questions about
his past still simmered. The
map of India hanging on his


bedroom wall, a certain
song or something learned
in school could ignite a
blaze of images from his old
life so vivid it felt like he
was still there.
On restless nights, he
thought about his mother.
Was she OK? Was Guddu?
A family's prayers
After three months riding
trains, Fatima was ex-
hausted. She abandoned
her physical search for a
mystical one.
She visited a holy man
who pointed to the horizon
and said her son was there
with a good Hindu family
Every Thursday she
walked an hour to a Sufi
tomb to offer incense and
rose petals in prayer for
Saroo's return.
Her son Kallu refused to
pray; he blamed God for de-
stroying his family
Her daughter Shakila
prayed to every god she
could find. She went with
neighbors to church to ask
Jesus to bring her brother
back. She prayed for Saroo
at the local Hindu temple.
She fasted for Allah and
bowed at the shrines of Sufi
saints.
An Internet search
Saroo was grown now, a
university student studying
business and hospitality. His
classmates were friendly,
and he found himself drawn
to the students from India.
He had recently used
Google's satellite feature to
get a bird's eye view of his
Australian house. He sat
down at a computer and
called up a map of India. He
randomly zoomed in on a
train track and followed it,
scrutinizing stations he
passed, searching for some-
thing familiar He zeroed in
on Calcutta, since that was
where he'd ended up, and
worked backwards. He nar-
rowed down the search area
by multiplying the approxi-
mate time he'd been on the
train by an estimate of how
fast an Indian train could
have traveled.
A predictions
In Ganesh Talai, Fatima
refused to stop as well. She
remained a regular visitor
to fortunetellers.
Your Saroo, he said, is
coming home. He will be
back in 40 days.
A home remembered
Saroo's eyes drifted
across an image of yet an-
other train station and froze.
The walkover bridge, the
water tank exactly as he
remembered. He scrolled
further The waterfall where
he used to swim. A familiar
tunnel. The fountain.
The map listed the town
as "Khandwa." He plugged
the name into Facebook.
Bam a group called
'"Khandwa' My Home
Town."
On March 31, 2011, he
wrote:
"can anyone help me, i
think im from Khandwa. i
haven't seen or been back to
the place for 24 years. Just
wandering if there is a big
fountain near the Cinema?"
The administrator's re-
sponse was vague. On April
3, 2011, Saroo tried again:
"Can anyone tell me, the
name of the town or suburb
on the top right hand side of
Khandwa? I think it starts
with G..."
The administrator an-
swered the next day:
"Ganesh Talai."
Ganesh Talai. Home.


Call 352-563-5655

after 5pm 352-563-3295

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52 week pre-paid subscriptions only. Ask For Code HP






orJoin mA


A8 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


WORLD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Americans lack action to save energy


Poll: Citizens

know how but

balk at doing it

Associated Press
WASHINGTON -When it
comes to saving energy, peo-
ple in the United States
know driving a fuel-efficient
car accomplishes more than
turning off the lights at home.
But that doesn't mean
they'll do it.
A new poll shows while
most of those questioned
understand effective ways
to save energy, they have a
hard time adopting them.
Six in 10 surveyed said
driving a more fuel-efficient
car would save a large
amount of energy, but only 1
in 4 said that's easy to do, ac-
cording to the poll by the AP-
NORC Center for Public
Affairs Research. People
also are skeptical of carpool-
ing or installing better home
insulation, rating them as ef-
fective but impractical.
On the other end of spec-
trum, 8 in 10 said they easily
can turn off the lights when


they leave a room,
and 6 in 10 have no
problem turning up
the thermostat in
summer or down in
winter, although
fewer than half
think those easy
steps save large
amounts of energy.
Even those who
support conserva-
tion don't always
practice it.
Cindy Shriner, a
retired teacher


Cin(
Shrii
says er
consenrv
saves m
but do
always p
it.


from Lafayette,
Ind., buys energy-efficient
light bulbs and her 2009
Subaru Impreza gets nearly
30 miles per gallon on the
highway
Still, she keeps her house
at 73 degrees year-round,
despite government recom-
mendations to turn thermo-
stats to 68 degrees in winter
and 78 degrees in summer.
"I'm terrible," Shriner, 60,
said in an interview. "In all
honesty we have extreme
weather in all seasons" in
Indiana, she said, and her
thermostat settings keep
her comfortable.
Her parents recently
qualified for a grant under
the economic stimulus law


that paid for a new
furnace and insula-
tion, Shriner said.
She said such pro-
grams are important
* Tto improve energy
_** conservation.
The public looks to
dy large institutions for
rer leadership in saving
nergy energy, believing in-
nation dividuals alone can't
honey, make much of a dif-
esn't ference. Nearly two-
ractice thirds look to the
energy industry to
show the way toward
energy conservation, and
nearly 6 in 10 said the gov-
ernment should play a lead-
ing role. Democrats, college
graduates and people under
50 are the most likely to hold
industry is responsible for
increasing energy savings.
The poll, paid for by a
grant to the AP-NORC Cen-
ter from the Joyce Founda-
tion, shows just 4 in 10
questioned think their own
actions can significantly af-
fect the country's energy
problems. Some 15 percent
said individual actions
make "a very large differ-
ence," while 7 percent said
individual action makes no
difference at all.


On some energy topics,
people are in the dark.
Only 1 in 3 reported know-
ing a lot or a great deal
about the government's En-
ergy Star product labels,
which are meant to help
consumers choose energy-
efficient appliances and
other products. Even fewer,
25 percent, reported de-
tailed knowledge about
fuel-efficiency standards for
cars. Not even 20 percent
know a lot or a great deal
about rebates for energy-
saving products, home ren-
ovation tax credits or home
energy audits.
About 6 in 10 people cite
lack of knowledge about
energy-saving products as a
major reason they don't do
more to conserve.


Challenges to changing energy use
Many Americans say they are taking steps to consume less
energy but see obstacles to changing some habits, according
to an AP-NORC Center poll.
How difficult would it be for you and your family to make the fol-
lowing changes in the next twelve months?


*Very
difficult


Moderately U Not Already doing
difficult difficult this


Buying more fue
efficient car
Carpooling 15 -


Installing more/better
insulation in your home 17


Replacing old appliances 20
Turning up thermostat to 16
78 degrees in summer


Turning down thermostat 12
to 65 degrees in winter 12
Turning lights off when
you leave the room j 6


NOTE: Poll of 1,008 adults conducted March 29-April 25; margin of error
3.1 percentage points; may not equal 100 percent due to rounding
SOURCE: AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research AP


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NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Rebels battle Assad forces in Damascus


Associated Press
BEIRUT Bullets and
shrapnel shells smashed
into homes in the Syrian
capital of Damascus
overnight as troops battled
rebels in the streets, a show
of boldness for rebels taking
their fight against President
Bashar Assad to the center
of his power.
For nearly 12 hours of
fighting that lasted into the
early hours Saturday, rebels
armed mainly with assault
rifles fought Syrian forces in
the heaviest fighting in the


Nation BRIEF

Arrested


Associated Press
Pastor Creflo Dollar Jr.
has been arrested after
authorities say he slightly
hurt his 15-year-old daugh-
ter in a fight at his metro
Atlanta home.
Police: Pastor
choked daughter
ATLANTA-A police re-
port said a teenage daughter
of Atlanta-area megachurch
pastor Creflo Dollar told au-
thorities her father choked
and punched her after an
argument.
The report said Dollar
claimed he tried to restrain his
daughter, wrestled her to the
floor and spanked her after
she became disrespectful.
The father and daughter ar-
gued early Friday over whether
she could go to a party.
The 15-year-old told a
Fayette County sheriff's
deputy she went into the
kitchen and her father came
in and asked why she was
crying. She said when she
said she didn't want to talk,
her father choked her, threw
her to the ground and hit her.
Her 19-year-old sister corrob-
orated most of that account.
Dollar faces misdemeanor
charges of simple battery and
cruelty to children.


World BRIEF


Crossing


Associated Press
Blair Marquis holds the
Olympic Torch as it crosses
Loch Ness, Scotland,
during Day 22 of the Torch
Relay on Saturday. The
Olympic torch crossed
Loch Ness, home of the
legendary monster, as part
of its cross-country trek,
which ends at London's
Olympic Park next month.
-From wire reports


Assad stronghold since the
15-month-old uprising
began. U.N. observers said
rebels fired a rocket-
propelled grenade at the
local power plant, damaging
parts of it and reducing six
buses to charred shells, ac-
cording to video the ob-
servers took of the scene.
Syrian forces showed the
regime's willingness to un-
leash such firepower in the
capital: At least three tank
shells slammed into resi-
dential areas in the central
Damascus neighborhood of
Qaboun, an activist said. In-


tense exchanges of assault-
rifle fire marked the clash,
according to residents and
amateur video posted on-
line.
At least 52 civilians were
killed around the country
outside Damascus on Satur-
day, according to the Syrian
Observatory for Human
Rights, a Britain-based ac-
tivist group. Among them
were 20, including nine
women and children, who
died in heavy, pre-dawn
shelling in the southern city
of Daraa, where the upris-
ing against Assad began in
March 2011. Six children
were among 10 killed by a
shell that exploded in a
house they took cover in
during fierce fighting in the


coastal region of Latakia,
the group said.
The group's figures could
not be confirmed.
In a Daraa mosque, a fa-
ther stood over his son
killed in the shelling, swad-
dled in a blanket in a
hooded sweater, amateur
video showed.
"I will become a suicide
bomber!" the father shouted
in grief.
Another video showed
tens of thousands of Daraa
residents burying their slain
victims later Saturday -
singing, dancing and parad-
ing the dead in coffins
around a large square and
giving the mass funeral the
appearance of a mass wed-
ding party.


Associated Press
This UN observer mission in Syria photo shows destroyed
buses after overnight fighting in Damascus, Syria. In
Damascus, residents spoke about a night of shooting and
explosions in the worst violence Syria's capital has seen
since the uprising against President Bashar Assad's regime
began 15 months ago.


Costly cutbacks


Associated Press
Library clerk Jane Stahl helps a customer June 8 at a San Diego Public Library in San Diego. Stahl has worked for
the city as a librarian for seven years. Voters in San Diego and San Jose overwhelmingly approved ballot measures
last week to roll back municipal retirement benefits and not just for future hires but for current employees.

Public-employee pensions face a rollback in California


Associated Press
SAN DIEGO For years, compa-
nies have been chipping away at
workers' pensions. Now, two Cali-
fornia cities may help pave the way
for governments to follow suit.
Voters in San Diego and San Jose,
the nation's eighth- and 10th-largest
cities, overwhelmingly approved
ballot measures last week to roll
back municipal retirement benefits
- and not just for future hires but
for current employees.
From coast to coast, the pensions
of current public employees have
long been generally considered un-
touchable. But now, some politi-
cians are saying those obligations
are trumped by the need to provide
for the public's health and safety.
The two California cases could
put that argument to the test in a
legal battle that could resonate in
cash-strapped state capitols and
city halls across the country Law-
suits have already been filed in
both cities.
"Other states are going to have to
pay attention," said Amy Monahan,
a law professor at University of
Minnesota.
The court battles are playing out
as lawmakers across the U.S. grap-
ple with ballooning pension obliga-
tions that increasingly threaten
schools, police, health clinics and
other basic services.
State and local governments may
have $3 trillion in unfunded pen-
sion liabilities, and seven states and
six large cities will be unable to
cover their obligations beyond 2020,
Northwestern University finance
professor Joshua Rauh estimated
last year.
In San Jose, current employees
face salary cuts of up to 16 percent
to fund the city's pension plan. If
they choose, they can instead accept
a lower benefit and see the current
retirement age of 55 raised to 57 for
police officers and firefighters, and
to 62 for other employees.
The voter-approved measure in
San Diego imposes a six-year freeze
on the pay levels used to determine
pension benefits for current em-


V


San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed, right, high-fives former San Jose Vice Mayor
Pat Dando as they arrive at a campaign party. Reed said the rising pensions
is a problem that threatens the city.


ployees, a move expected to save
nearly $1 billion over 30 years. Pub-
lic employee unions have sued to
block the measure, saying city hall
failed to negotiate the ballot's word-
ing as required by state law.
Legal experts expect the cities to
argue their obligations to provide
basic services such as police pro-
tection and garbage removal over-
ride promises made to employees.
In San Diego, the city's payments
to its retirement fund soared from
$43 million in 1999 to $231.2 million
this year, equal to 20 percent of the
operating budget. At the same time,
the 1.3 million residents saw roads
deteriorate and libraries cut hours.
For a while, fire stations had to
share engines and trucks. The city
has cut its workforce 14 percent
since 2005.
San Jose's pension payments
jumped from $73 million in 2001 to
$245 million this year, or 27 percent
of its operating budget. Four li-
braries and a police station built
during the past decade have never
even opened because the city can-
not afford to operate them. The city
of 960,000 cut its workforce 27 per-
cent over the past 10 years.


"It's a problem that threatens our
ability to remain a city and provide
services to our people," Mayor
Chuck Reed said. "It's a huge dollar
amount and has a huge impact on
services."
Unions representing police offi-
cers and firefighters in San Jose
claimed in lawsuits filed last week
in state court the measure violates
their vested rights.
"What they've done in San Jose is
patently unlawful under existing
court precedent," said Steve Kreis-
berg, national collective bargaining
director for the American Federa-
tion of State, County and Municipal
Employees. "We know of no other
places where this has survived legal
scrutiny ... There is no justification
for essentially seizing the property
of employees."
Michael Lotito, a San Francisco
labor lawyer who has represented
governments, predicted dire fiscal
straits may carry weight with
judges.
"It's a horrible, horrible story for
the taxpayer. But (the) worse off the
city is, the more they have to lay off,
the stronger legal argument they
have," he said.


Spain


bailout


may cost


$125B

Fourth rescue

for Europe

Associated Press
MADRID Europe is
to offer Spain a bailout
package of up to $125 bil-
lion to help rescue the
country's banks and keep
the 17-country eurozone
from breaking apart
After months offierce de-
nials, Spain admitted it
would tap the fund as it
moved faster than expected
to stem the economic crisis
that has ravaged Europe for
two years.
Spain becomes the
fourth and largest -
European economy to ask
for help and its admission
of help comes after
months of market concern
about its ability to pay its
way In recent weeks in-
vestors have demanded
higher costs to lend to
Spain, and it became
clear it would be too ex-
pensive for the country to
borrow the money neces-
sary for a bank rescue
from the markets.
The three countries that
have received rescues thus
far Greece, Ireland and
Portugal are fairly small,
and many have worried
bailing out much-larger
Spain could call the entire
euro project into question.
Cyprus, also a small econ-
omy, could be forced to
seek a bailout soon.
Economy Minister Luis
de Guindos said Saturday
the aid will go to the bank-
ing sector only and would
not come with new auster-
ity conditions attached for
the economy in general -
conditions that have been
an integral part of previ-
ous bailouts to Portugal,
Ireland and Greece.
A statement from the fi-
nance ministers of the 17
countries using the euro
explained the money
would be fed directly into
a fund Spain set up to re-
capitalize its banks, but
underscored the Spanish
government is ultimately
responsible for the loan.
Still, that plan allows
Spain to avoid making the
onerous commitments
Greece, Ireland and Por-
tugal were forced to when
they sought their rescues.
Instead, the eurogroup
statement said it expected
Spain's banking sector to
implement reforms and
Spain would be held to its
previous commitments to
reform its labor market
and manage its deficit
The exact figure of the
bailout, however, has not
yet been decided. De
Guindos said the country
is waiting until independ-
ent audits of the country's
banking sector have been
carried out before asking
for a specific amount


At least 52 civilians killed

Saturday in violent attacks






* Veterans Notes can be
found on Page A15 of
today's Chronicle.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
A typical street scene in Shanghai, China; Canals lace the entire city of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; bikes are a major mode of transportation in


Freedom off the grid



Working with travel agents can make vacation better, less structured


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle


Hidden gems,
friendly people,
sumptuous food
and off-the-grid
travel surprises lie in
wait for the curious
independent traveler. The
essence of foreign travel
is vividly revealed and
enjoyable when
wandering behind the
scenes in foreign cities.
I am a major advocate of the services
of professional travel agents. In other
words, often it's best not to "go it
alone." For example: In the United
States, many casual travelers do not
utilize travel agents for domestic travel
and I think the reason is we are in "fa-
miliar" territory However, when in a
foreign country, my belief is that the
only real differences are the language
and customs. Ob-
servation alone
indicates that
most travelers are
intimidated by
the language bar-
rier Don't be a
victim of "lan-
guage differ-
ences."
Travel agents
Neil Sawyer can be a valuable
SPONTANEOUS advantage when
TRAVELER traveling any-
place, domestic
or foreign.
Whether you're going to Boston, San
Francisco, Paris or Timbuktu, a travel
agent can arrange transportation, ho-
tels, tickets for plays, local tour guides
at destinations and a host of other serv-
ices and the beauty is that it costs
you no more, and often less, than if
you did it yourself Travel agents
"know the territory" and usually earn
a commission directly from the ven-
dors.
So, what do you get for going "off
the grid" with a travel agent versus an
all-inclusive tour? Freedom! Freedom


Karyn and Neil Sawyer near Sandringham, England, the queen's country home.
View from the hotel in Puerto del Sol, downtown Madrid, Spain.


to go at your own pace; sleep until 10
a.m. if you wish, rather than getting
up at 6:30 a.m. to catch the tour bus.
I've talked to many people who are
afraid of foreign travel because of
perceived danger due to media re-
ports about other countries. If you
have any doubts, go to
www.travel.state.gov/travel.com to
see countries on the "do not visit list."
Please do not equate foreign cities
with United States' cities. I have trav-


eled independently to the cities of
Buenos Aires, Stockholm, Istanbul
and numerous cities in Europe, Aus-
tralia and China, and never once have
I felt threatened. I feel safer in most
foreign cities than I would under sim-
ilar circumstances in the United
States, where I wouldn't wander off
Main Street. There are many signifi-
cant cultural differences between
home and abroad: abroad they only
want your "stuff," whereas here, you


might get hurt before or after they
take your stuff.
Before you go on any trip or tour,
read up on the area best done on
the Internet -buy a guidebook and
have your travel agent furnish rele-
vant information. For travel in Eu-
rope, I suggest purchasing Rick
Steves' tour guides about your desti-
nation www.ricksteves.com. Espe-
cially, look at the hotels he
recommends and you cannot go
wrong. I've stayed in "his" hotels,
which are all boutique with up-to-
date amenities and in excellent loca-
tions.
Before your first adventure "on the
street," get a city map and talk to the
hotel concierge, as they are knowl-
edgeable and helpful, take a couple of
cards with hotel name/location so you
can find your way back, get some local
currency in small denominations and
start walking.
On the street, and this applies
worldwide, do not(1) stand on a street
corner reading a map, (2) go with any-
one claiming to be a tour guide, or of-
fering to take you to a place that has
the best __ (fill in the blank), or (3)
slow down or even look at merchan-
dise offered by anyone on the street
(like the guy with an arm wrapped in
wrist watches). Be alert to purse
snatchers and pick-pockets, often re-
ally nice guys offering to help you
(they may work in pairs).
One of the first things to do is board
a city bus or trolley that the locals use
and go full- circle, or take one of the
hop-on-hop-off buses that are becom-
ing more popular in large cities. It's
surprising what you will see and
learn in a couple of hours, and you
will observe things that you won't see
on a tour. You may want to go back
and take a closer look later!
Most destination cities around the
globe are more cosmopolitan than
cities in the United States, and are
user-friendly to tourists, as tourism is
often their major industry Most hotel
desk employees speak English, as do
many merchants, as their financial
survival relies on tourism. The "lo-
cals," wherever you are, are very ap-
preciative of and helpful to
independent travelers, as compared
to tour groups and for good reason -
an individual going into a store is
See Page A15


Bounty of blooms

Shirley Perregaux celebrated a special birthday this year at the spectacular
Walt Disney World Epcot Rower and Garden Festival in March. She found that the
topiaries, gardens of the International World Showcase and the butterfly
house and gardens were creative and colorful just amazing.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Amsterdam.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mom worries about


daughter suing her


SUNDAY EVENING JUNE 10, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: OakForest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
SWESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (In Stereo)'PG' America's Got Talent America's Got Talent News Access
Idina II Volo Takes Flight Italian teen vocal Oscar Hammerstein II -- Out of My Barbra Streisand: One Night Only at Ed Slott's Retirement
0 EDUPBS 3 3 14 6 Menzel group. G' B Dreams (In Stereo) 'G' the Village Vanguard'G' Rescue! 'G'
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Momentsto Remember: My Music Number Alfie Boe: Live- London The British Beat (My Music) G' Ribbon
S NC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' America's Got Talent America's Got Talent News Paid
Q WFB 8 8 8 8 8 News (In Stereo)'PG' (In Stereo) B Program
WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' (In Stereo) 'PG' woman works to reclaim her life. (N) 'PG' Night
S 10 10 10 10 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The 66th Annual Tony Awards Honoring excellence on Broadway (N) (In 10 News, Paid
D [WTP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) N Stereo Live)'PG, L N 11pm(N) Program
S T FX 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) American Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News (N) TheCloser "Cherry
SWTT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) B Dad'14' Show Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) BNBomb"'14'B]
S[WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover:Weight Loss Edition News Brothers
SN 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
S IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror RidgeHr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
SABC 11 1 ews World America's Funniest Secret Millionaire (N) Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition A News Grey's
NeWTS ABC 11 11 1ws Home Videos'PG' (In Stereo) 'PG' woman works to reclaim her life. (N) 'PG' Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Genetic Law & Order (In ** "Random Hearts" (1999, Drama) Harrison
IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory predisposition.'PG' Stereo) PG Ford, Charles S. Dutton. R'
@ WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *** "Die Hard2"(1990, Action)Bruce Willis.R' Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Faces
D [WACX TBN 21 21 InTouch Rejoice in the Lord Paid King Journey CrefloD. Connec JimRaley Dayna Paid
King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds (In Without a Trace (In NUMB3RS "Hollywood The Unit Secret
I CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men Stereo)'14' Stereo) 'PG' Homicide"'PG' reunion.'14'
The Comedy The Comedy Spy Crime Your Citrus County Court Music Mix Music Mix The Cisco Black
SNWYE FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
D CWO FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang American Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers Fam.Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Law & Order'PG'
A WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Coned. Noticiero La Familia P. Luche Pequenos Gigantes(SS)Saly Pimienta'14' Coed. Noticiero
SXPX7 IO1N 17 Flashpoint'14' Flashpoint'14'0 Flashpoint'14' Flashpoint'PG' Flashpoint'PG' Flashpoint'PG'
Criminal Minds "Safe Criminal Minds"25 to Criminal Minds"Sense The Glades"Poseidon Longmire"A Damn Longmire "A Damn
E 54 48 54 25 27 Haven" 14' Life"'14' Memory"'14' Adventure" 14' Shame" (N)'14' Shame"'14'
*6 "The Reaping"2007, Horror) Hilary Swank, The Killing "Bulldog" (In The Killing The killer is Mad Men "The The Pitch (N) B
IAMj 55 64 55 David Morrissey Premiere.'R'B Stereo)'14'B within reach.'14' Phantom"'14'
Tanked: Unfiltered Feng Tanked (In Stereo) 'PG' Call o f all of Gator Boys (In Stereo) Call of Call of Gator Boys (In Stereo)
52 35 52 19 21 shuitank.'PG' Wildman Wildman PG' Wildman Wildman PG'
** "Meet the Browns" (2008) Steve Harvey: Still Trippin' Stand-up routine. 14' TheGame Let's Stay Let's Stay Let'sStay
96 19 96 TylerPerry'PG-13' 14' Together Together Together
RiA0 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Don't Be Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ
Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Arguing Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Arguing Tosh.0 Workaholics
S27 61 27 33 '14' With Myself '14' 0With Myself 14'0
S 98 45 98 28 37 Redneck Redneck Island "WelcomeTo Redneck Island" 2012 CMT Music Awards From the Bridgestone Arena in My Big Redneck
98 45 98 28 37 Vacation (In Stereo) 'PG' B Nashville. (In Stereo) 'PG' Vacation'PG'
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid nsanity Greed WallSt. Biographyon CNBC The Coffee Addiction American Greed Filthy Rich
(IM 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG'
Jessie Jessie Jessie Shake It Shake It Shake It Shake It Jessie Good- Austin & Jessie A.N.T
(ISNJ 46 40 46 6 5 G' 'G'Q G Up! G' Up!'G' Up! (N) Up!'G' 'G' Charlie Ally G' G' Farm G'
(ESPNI 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Cincinnati Reds. (Live)SportsCenter (N)
(ESPNI 34 28 34 43 49 College Baseball College Baseball NCAATournament, Suer Regional:TeamsTBA. College Baseball
EWTN 95 70 95 48 Solemnity of Corpus Christi Faith Catholic. Savoring G.K. Rosary Roundtable 50th Intl. Eucharist
i 29 52 29 20 28 "Finding Nemo" (2003) *** "Aladdin" (1992 Fantasy) Voices of *** "Ratatouille" (2007, Comedy) Voices of Patton
29 52 29 20 28 Voices of Albert Brooks. 'G' Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. 'G' Oswalt, an Holm, Lou Romano. G
*** "Stage Beauty" 2004, Historical Drama) *** "Dirty Deeds" (2002) Bryan *** "Sirens"(1994, Comedy) **2 "Enigma" (1982)
LIX 118 170 Billy Crudup. (In Stereo 'R' Brown.'R' Hugh Grant. (In Stereo)'R' Martin Sheen.
FNCI 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOO) 26 56 26 Diners Diners Food Network Star Cupcake Champions Food Network Star (N) G' Diners Chopped
FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding Barfly World PokerTour UFC Unleashed (N) Barfly(N) Game 365 World PokerTour
S** "Alvin and the Chipmunks: The *** "Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa" (2008, ** "Alvin and the Chipmunks: The
() 30 60 30 51 Squeakquel" (2009) Zachary Levi. 'PG' Comedy) Voices of Ben Stiller. 'PG' Squeakquel" (2009) Zachary Levi. 'PG'
GOLF 72767 727 LPGATourGolf Central IPGATourGolf ILPGATour Golf
*** "The Parent *** "The Parent Trap" (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. Reunited twin FrasierPG Frasier Frasier PGFrasier'PG
HALL 39 68 39 45 54 Trap"(1998)'PG' girls try to get their parents back together. 'PG' 'G'B
"Hemingwa & ** "The Hangover Part l" (2011) Bradley True Blood "Turn! Turn! Veep'MA' Girls(N) TrueBlood "Turn! Turn!
302 201 302 2 2 Gehorn 012) Cooper, Ed Helms. (In Stereo) 'R' Turn!"'MA'MA Turn!" MA'
"D.O.A.: Dead or RealTime With Bill *** "Kung Fu Panda 2" (2011) ** "Paul" (2011, Comedy) Simon 247 "Hall
303 202 303 Alive"(2006) 'PG-13' MaherMA' Voices of Jack Black. Pegg. (In Stereo) 'R' Pacquiao Pass" R
HGTVl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Holmeson Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
1 25 51 32 4 Ancient Aliens'PG' Ancient Aliens'PG' Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers (N) Swamp Peole "Never Mountain Men
S 51 25 51 324214' 'PG' Say Die"PG "Mayhem"'PG'
E 24 3 2 ** "The Stepfather" Who Killed Allison Parks?" (2011, Drop Dead Diva The Client List "Acting "Who Killed Allison
24 38 24 31 (2009) B Suspense) Sean Patrick Flanery.'R' "Home" (N) 'PG' Up" (N)'14' Parks?" (2011)'R'
"Framed for Murder" (2007 Drama) Elisa "The Kane Files"(2010 Action) Drew Fuller, ** "Trapped"(2002, Suspense) Charlize
N 50 119 Donovan, Susan Walters. NR' B Ethan Embry Premiere.'R Theron, ourtney Love. R'
i X 30 21 30 3 "2 Days in the Valley" (1996) "Bridesmaids" (2011) Kristen Wiig.A maid of honor's**** "Titanic" (1997, Drama) Leonardo
D320 221 320 3 3 anny Aiello.'R' B life unravels as the big day approaches.'NR' DiCaprio. (In Stereo)'PG-13'"
(MSNBC 42 41 42 -Caught on Camera [Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Bunker |Inside the Box
Wicked Tuna "Good to The Whale That The Whale That Ate Untamed Americas Untamed Americas Untamed Americas
(W B 109 65 109 44 53 the Last Bite" '14' Exploded 'PG' Jaws 'PG, V' "Mountains" 'PG' "Deserts" (N)'PG' "Mountains" 'PG'
(iR 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. MyWife |MyWife George |George Yes, Dear |Yes, Dear Friends |Friends
(IWi 103 62 103 OurAmerica Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Our America Oprah's Next
OXYD 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
"No Look Pass" The Borgias"Truth and The Big C Nurse Nurse The Big C The Borgias' World of Nurse The Big C
340 241 340 4 (2011) 'NR' Lies"MA' NMA' Jackie Jackie (N) (N) MA' Wonders' (N) 'MA' Jackie 'MA'
(SEE 732 112 732 -Hard Parts Hard Parts SPEED Center (N) NASCAR Victory Lane Wind Tunnel With Dave Two Guys Car Crazy Formula 1 Formula 1
[SPEED] 732 112 732 1 (Live) Despain (N) Garage 'G' Pre-Race Racing
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(ali 37 43 37 27 36 De Niro. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' becomes the embodiment of a terrible curse. Del Toro. (In Stereo) R'
*** "As Good as It Gets"(1997) *** "13 Going on 30" (2004) ** "The Karate Kid" 2010, Drama) Jaden Smith, Jackie "Jumping
370 271 370 Jack Nicholson.'PG-13' Jennifer Garner. 'PG-13' Chan, Taraji P Henson. In Stereo) PG Broom"
Captain's S/ortfishing Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Insidethe
$J 36 31 36 Tales T Shape TV Sport. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals G' Rays
Y 31 59 31 26 2o ** "Angels & Demons" (2009, Suspense) Tom Hanks. Robert Langdon **2 "The Devil's Advocate" (1997, Suspense) Keanu Reeves. An attor-
31 59 31 26 29 confronts an ancient brotherhood. PG-13' B ney goes to work at a law firm run by Satan. R'
(1BS) 49 23 49 16 19 *2 "Rush Hour 3" (2007) Jackie Chan. ** "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" (2009) 'PG' ** "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" (2009) 'PG'
(Tin 169 53 169 30 35 **** "A Star Is Wizard of Oz: 50 Years **** "The Wizard of Oz" (1939, Fantasy) ***G "Meet Me in St. Louis" (1944, Musical)
M 169 53 169 30 35 Born" (1954)'PG' of Magic Judy Garland.'G' (DVS) Judy Garland.'NR'B (DVS)
MythBusters "Blind MythBusters "Duct MythBusters "Bubble MythBusters "Duel Head Games "Morality" MythBusters "Duel
53 34 53 24 26 Driving" 'PG' Tape Island"'PG' Pack Plunge"'PG' Diemmas" (N)'PG' (N)'PG'" Di emmas" 'PG'
(TIL 50 46 50 29 30 Little People Little People Amy's 50th Birthday Sister Sister Gypsy Wedding Sister Sister
riiij 350 26 "Daydream Nation" (2010, Comedy-Drama) ** "Beastly" (2011) Alex Pettyfer. *** "The Italian Job" (2003) MarkWahlberg. "Pinata:
350 261 350 Kat Dennings. (In Stereo) 'R' B (In Stereo)'PG-13'" (In Stereo)'PG-13' B "Island"
*** "Die Hard With a **+ "The Book of Eli" (2010, Action) Denzel Washington, **2 "The Book of Eli" (2010, Action) Denzel Washington,
48 33 48 31 34 Vengeance" Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis.'R'B Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis.'R'B
) 38 58 38 33 ** "Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over" 'PG' Level Up |Level Up Venture King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Loiter
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Toy Hunters'G' Sand M. Sand M. Hotel Impossible G' Bggg Bggg Sandwich Sandwich Food Food
(iiTV) 25 55 25 98 55 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Forensic Forensic
(TVL 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H'PG' IM*A*S*H Raymond Raymond King King King King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special *2 "Couples Retreat" (2009) Vince Vaughn. Four "Couples Retreat" (2009)
47S13 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Midwestern couples descend on an island resort. Vince Vaughn.'PG-13'
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1W 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30 Rock IMother Mother |Mother Mother IMother News IReplay The Unit '14'


Dear Annie: My 54-
year-old daughter,
"Susan," has been
angry with me since she was
a teenager I have tried to
question her about why she
hates me so much, but she
won't discuss it. She is mar-
ried to a controlling man
who shares her feelings and
recently told the family to
"go to hell." Susan has a
sweet daughter
who appears to
be a special
needs child, al-
though we've
never been told
what the prob-
lem is.
My husband
recently died,
and it devastated
me. On the day of
the funeral, the
entire family ANNI
came to my
house. Several MAIL
people were
bothered by our dog, so I
confined him to the porch
and told the children to
leave the dog alone.
I was sitting in the parlor
when I heard the commotion
in my kitchen. My grand-
daughter had unlocked the
door and put her face next to
the dog's nose, and he bit
her. The parents were not
watching the child. After a
trip to the hospital for
stitches, I was assured that
she would totally heal.
Susan told me to file a
claim with my insurance
company because she plans
to sue me. I have had many
sleepless nights dealing with


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Madagascar 3" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In real 3D.
5 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Prometheus" (R) ID required.
1 p.m. No passes.
"Prometheus" (R) ID required. In
real 3D. 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Snow White and the Hunts-
man" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real
3D. 4:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-
13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Madagascar 3" (PG) 1 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 5:40 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:20 p.m.


No passes.
"Madagascar 3" (PG) In real 3D.
12:30 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Prometheus" (R) ID required.
3:35 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Prometheus" (R) ID required. In
real 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Snow White and the Hunts-
man" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
1:15 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) 12:40
p.m., 3:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real
3D. 1:10 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:55
p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers"
(PG-13) Digital. 4 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers"
(PG-13) In real 3D. 12:35 p.m.,
7:10 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Massage sore
muscles
6 Angered
11 Become void
16 Outdo
20 Main artery
21 Outrageous
interest
22 Violin maker
23 Knight's protection
25 Yearns
26 Code name
27 Destructive insect
28 Trap
29 Greek letter
30 Village
32 Old fighters on horse-
back
34 Itinerary (abbr.)
35 Some votes
37 Cottony masses
38 Chili con -
39 Intimated
41 River in Missouri
43 French painter
44 Waterfowl
46 Divine
49 Diced
50 Agreeable to the taste
54 For one
55 Take as given
56 Unhappy
57 Crucifix
58 Blend
59 Place of refuge
60 Dallas suburb
61 Garlic piece
62 Squadron
64 Destined
65 Make impure
66 Nonprofessional ones
67 Letters
68 Defunct alliance
69 Edge
70 Swab
71 Upperclassmen (abbr.)
72 Social gathering
74 Animal sound
75 Mature
77 Cloth for cleaning
80 American poet and au-
thor
81 Source
82 Weathercock
83 Far East nurse


87 Schoolroom item
89 Courage
90 Macadamized
91 Ali -
92 "Odd Couple" character
93 Strand
94 Pied of
Hamelin
95 Run hither and-
96 English school
97 An amphibian
98 Something
poisonous
99 Fearful
102 Remorseful
105 Made fun
106 Without a doubt
107 Tired
108 Stair post
109 Fractional part
110 Kind of meeting
113 Arbor
114 Animal in a race
115 Punta del-
119 Steal from
120 Abandoned
123 Transfer, as a prisoner
125 Triumph
126 Island
128 Benefit
129 "- Marner"
130 Occurrence
132 Film
133 Chop finely
134 Like a
contortionist
135 Medieval lord
136 Foxx of TV
137 Kind of statesman
138 Strained
139 Delayer's motto



DOWN
1 Phi Beta -
2 Raucous
3 A Muppet
4 Had a snack
5 Recipe amount
6 Search
7 "Tristan and -"
8 Enticements
9 Formerly, of old
10 Tint
11 Toiled


Sum
Analyze
grammatically
Let it stand!
Ireland
Certain musician
Sea eagle
Hurt
Rich cake
Marsh plant
Conscious
Leigh or Jackson
Running bird
Only
Simple dwelling
Almost
- passim
Pondered
Haggard
Sailors' saint
Complete range
Express a belief
The South
Lid
Board
Sounds loudly
Paramour
Perfect places
Fall guy
Flash of light
Great speed
Enamel
- Canaveral
Recipe amt.
Hullabaloo
Footlocker
Went at an easy pace
Lee or Willis
Underground worker
Summit
Calabash
Black bird
Seize
Allude
Mountain ridge
Lively old dance
Parade attraction
Spiritless
Of a Mexican
Indian
Seething
Useful
Thin and strong
Hypocrite
Computer-image ele-
ment


Headliner
Metal stick
Pulled
Man from Mars
Distant
Travel on
Goaded
Counterweight
Gemologist
Expressed a


certain way
Observe
Tijuana snack
Baby buggy
Machine part
Higher up
Label
Spiral
Short and -
Bit of color


Stage direction
Identical
Badness
Latvia's capital
Valley
Hat
Perched
By way of


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


this and fearing I might lose
my house. I've also lost my
granddaughter because
Susan and her husband will
have nothing to do with the
family any longer
Is there a chance of saving
any part of this relationship?
Hurting Mother
Dear Hurting: Our condo-
lences on the loss of your
husband. We know you are
still grieving, and
that undoubtedly
explains why you
confined the dog
to the porch but
neglected to lock
access. This, un-
fortunately, con-
tributed to the
accident. Even
closely supervised
children can get
into all kinds of
E'S mischief. We are
relieved that your
BOX granddaughter
will heal com-
pletely, but her parents are
upset and angry (with them-
selves as well as with you).
Your insurance company
should be able to cover any
claim Susan makes, so
please stop worrying about
your home.
As for the relationship,
Susan sounds difficult, and
you may not be able to sal-
vage much. But it might go a
long way if you sincerely
apologize and ask them to
forgive you for not being
more careful.


Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcast. net.


A12 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chelsie Robin Barton
and John "Zackery"
Bacon, together with their
parents, announce their
engagement and upcom-
ing wedding.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Robin and
Barbara Barton of North
Myrtle Beach, S.C. Her fi-
anc6 is the son of John and
Lori Bacon of Lake City.
Maternal grandparents
of the prospective groom
are John and Sharon Eich-
horn of Hernando, and his
paternal grandparents are
Kathy Bacon and the late
Michael Bacon, also of
Hernando.
The bride-elect was for-
merly of Myrtle Beach and
moved to Lake City as a
child. She is a 2010 gradu-
ate of Colombia High
School in Lake City and is
employed by TIMCO Avia-
tion as an interiors me-
chanic.
The prospective groom,
formerly of Inverness, at-
tended Citrus County
schools before moving to
Lake City. He is a 2011
graduate of Colombia High
School and is employed by


TIMCO Aviation as an air-
craft mechanic.
A July 14, 2012, wedding
is planned in Colombia
County. The couple plan to
honeymoon in Daytona
Beach.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Moores


James Clinton Moore
and Nora Anne Livesay
celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary on March
23, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried March 23, 1962, in
Rogersville, Tenn. She was
a public health nurse; he
was a printing instructor at
Pressmans Home (now a
historic landmark.)
They moved to Bloom-
ington, Ind., in 1966, where
she was a registered nurse
at Bloomington Hospital
for 23 years. He was with
Metropolitan Printing.


They moved to Beverly
Hills in December 1962.
He was an active mem-
ber of the Beverly Hills
Horseshoe Club and she
was active in the Beverly
Hills Recreation Associa-
tion. They enjoyed fre-
quent trips to Tennessee
and Indiana, and annual
trips to LHS family re-
unions in Tennessee, Indi-
ana, Illinois, Virginia, West
Virginia and Pennsylvania.
Still residing in Beverly
Hills, they now enjoy their
frequent winter visitors to
Florida.


70th ANNIVERSARY

The Snooks


Fred and Sara Snook of
Homosassa celebrated their
70th wedding anniversary
May 27, 2012.
They married May 27,
1942, while Fred was in the
U.S. Army Air Corps. He is
originally from Painterville,
Pa., and Sara is originally
from Burnham, Pa.
They were residents of
Clearwater for approxi-
mately 40 years, and have
been in Homosassa since
2008.
Fred was a real estate
broker and developer in
Clearwater, as well as a vol-
unteer for Meals on Wheels
and Hospice. Sara was a
stay-at-home mother and
grandmother, while volun-
teering at church and The
Barn, a Christian thrift
store. They are members of
Faith Lutheran Church in


Lecanto.
Their children are Fred of
Homosassa, Daniel of
Crofton, Md., Karen of St.
Petersburg, Christine of
Clearwater and Lauren of
Statesville, N.C. They have
10 grandchildren and 10
great-grandchildren.
A June celebration will
occur with approximately
40 family members in
Tennessee for weeklong
festivities.


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in
another county, contact the clerk in that area.


CITRUS COUNTY'S





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Handle With Care
By Ronda Addy

Fine jewelry like engagement and wedding rings are an investment. To maintain them, you
need to care for them properly. Here are some tips on how to keep your jewelry looking like
new.
Diamonds are popular, and even though they are one of the hardest materials around, they
still need regular maintenance. In order for a diamond to shine, the maximum amount of light
possible needs to enter the stone and be reflected. Residue from lotions, soaps and powders
and natural skin oils can dull the surface of a diamond and reduce its brilliance. To keep your
diamonds shiny and looking their best, clean them regularly with a commercial cleaner, a
mix of ammonia and water, or a mild detergent. Just dip the piece in the solution and use a
soft brush to get rid of any dirt in the setting. Don't wear your diamonds when doing rough
work. You could chip them. Don't expose your diamonds to chlorine or household cleaners.
The products could damage the setting. Don't mix your diamonds with other jewelry. The
diamonds could scratch it. Store your diamonds in a box with divided compartments or a
fabric-lined jewelry box. Have them cleaned and checked once a year by a professional.
Whether a grade or a finish covered with a shiny coat of rhodium, silver can tarnish. To
prevent this from happening, clean your silver jewelry regularly and store it in a cloth pouch
or a plastic bag. You may use a silver clean cloth available at most jewelry stores or a flannel
or cotton t-shirt and some lukewarm, soapy water. Don't use tissue, which can scratch silver,
and make sure you dry your silver completely before storing it. Silver is very pliable, so
when polishing it, rub against it. Don't pull. If you see any tarnish, use a mild tarnish remover
made specifically for silver. Don't expose your silver to chlorine or soak it unless you are
using tarnish remover.
Gold is designed to last a long time, but like all other jewelry, it requires proper care. Clean
your gold jewelry regularly with an ultrasonic cleaner. Rinse, dry and polish it with a soft
cloth. Store your gold in a soft cloth away from dust, makeup, moisture and perspiration,
and inspect it often for damage. Take it to a jeweler for repair. Don't expose your gold to
chlorine. It can weaken the structure.
More delicate than other gemstones, pearls require special care. Don't clean them with an
ultrasonic cleaner. Instead, wipe them off with a soft, damp cloth and wash them
occasionally in mild soap. Store pearls in a soft pouch away from other jewelry. Body oils
can damage silk or nylon thread easily, so if you have any pearl necklaces, have them
restrung once a year with a knot between each pearl so if the string breaks, your pearls
won't get lost.
If you do not feel comfortable cleaning your jewelry yourself, take it to a jeweler and have it
done by a professional. Remember, fine jewelry is an investment. You want it to last a while,
so take care of it properly. With the right care, your diamond wedding ring or strand of pearls
could become a family heirloom.


SEngagement

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TOGETHER


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 A13





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hearing bells?


Clerk's office can do weddings


Special to the Chronicle
Most people know that
the clerk of the court issues
marriage licenses, but did
you know that the clerk
also performs marriage
ceremonies?
Many of the deputy
clerks at the Citrus County
Clerk's Office are roman-
tics at heart and love to
perform the ceremonies or
snap photos of a happy
couple.
A variety of venues are
available. The marriage
chapel area at the new
courthouse in Inverness
contains light and cheerful
"hearts of love"-themed
wedding decor. The tradi-
tionalists may find they
prefer the picturesque sec-
ond-floor courtroom at the
restored 1912 Historic
Courthouse. Both of these
venues offer handsome


backgrounds for pictures.
Simple civil ceremonies
can also be performed at
the West Citrus Govern-
ment Center in the Mead-
owcrest subdivision in
Crystal River.
The fee for performing a
marriage ceremony is $30
and ceremonies are by ap-
pointment at all three loca-
tions Monday through
Friday, excluding holidays.
The clerk also offers three
photo packages.
It is interesting to note
that some couples select
their wedding date based
on "once in a lifetime"
dates. Coming up in this
year are 10/11/12 and
12/12/12.
For more information or
to schedule a wedding cer-
emony, call the clerk of the
court's office at 352-341-
6424 or visit www.clerk.
citrus.fl.us.


97th BIRTHDAY

Nettie Busto
Nettie Busto of Mead-
owcrest will celebrate
her 97th birthday on
June 13, 2012. She is the .
mother of daughters
Carole (Russ) Albert of
Rochester, N.H., and
Ginny (Paul) Owen of
Crystal River She has
three granddaughters,
Laura (Brian) Horta of
Bristol, R.I., Diane
(Eddie) Mason of Crystal
River and Morgan t
(Aaron) Brown of Crystal
River.
Her great-grandchil- p ".
dren are Aaron Brown, r
Liam Brown and Audrey .
Brown of Crystal River -'

Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Brooklyn
Brooklyn is the all-American .
family dog and is just as
sweet as she looks. She
appears to be a Beagle mix
and is about 4 years old.
She is fun loving and gets f
along great with people,
loves to go for walks and is
housebroken. She is
inclined to want to be the
"alpha" dog, so she will do
best as an only pet. Her
medical is up to date. To
access the adoption
application or to view addi-
tional adoptable pets, visit
the website at www.roomfor
onemore.net or call Karron
at 352-586-9699 for more
information.
Special to the Chronicle


Marriages 5/21/12 to 6/3/12
Richard Lawrence Blatter,
Maud, Texas/Pamela Murray
Maloy, Maud, Texas
Garrett William Cooey,
Crystal River/Mackenzie
Logan Howard, Crystal River
Thomas Arnold Reed,
Homosassa/Mihaeja A.
Nakata, Homosassa
Stephen Craig Shaffer,
Citrus Springs/Maria Marlene
Alomia y Enciso Torres,
Citrus Springs
Brian Eugene Allender,
Inverness/Christina Grace
Hensley, Inverness
Andre Frederick
Christensen, Homosassa/
Katharine Ann Rickett,
Homosassa
Steven Clark Gaither,
Dunnellon/Jessica Renee
Maldonado, Dunnellon
Nicholas Charles Holmes,
Crystal River/Caroline Beth
Prestidge, Crystal River
Gregory Michael Lamb,
Fostoria, Ohio/Dawn Marie
Goddard, Fostoria, Ohio
Mathew Silas Taylor,
Inverness/Jennifer Jean
Altman, Inverness
Dominic Roland Thompson,
Crystal River/Kelly Nicole
McGee, Crystal River
Levi Dale Wall,
Homosassa/Bobbi-Jo Marie
Pinkham, Homosassa
Divorces 5/28/12 to 6/3/12
Warren Bradley Bunts Jr.,
Homosassa vs. Heather
Nicole Kline, Crystal River
Scott Chmura, Inverness
vs. Katie Chmura, Inverness
Jeffrey Michael Hickey,
Cross City vs. Elizabeth Anne


Rollason, Inverness
Michael Louis Keddy Jr.,
Beverly Hills vs. Tina Marie
Keddy, Beverly Hills
Robert Alan Kempton,
Homosassa Springs vs.
Wendy L Kempton,
Homosassa
Charles Phillip Kofmehl,
Crystal River vs. Lisa T.
Kofmehl, Crystal River
CathyA. Petty, Crystal
River vs. Mark Steven Petty,
Lecanto
Cherie J. Pickering,
Homosassa vs. Robert W.
Pickering, Homosassa
Stanley Shyner, Inverness
vs. Brenda L. Shyner,
Inverness
Timothy Gene Siirtola,
Gillette, W.Va. vs. Jessica
Riddle Siirtola, Citrus Springs
Jeffrey Glen Tupper,
Inverness vs. Karen Lucille
Tupper, Crystal River
Ashley Walter Pimentel,
Citrus Springs vs. Carlos
Pimentel, Citrus Springs
James Warren Washburn,
Beverly Hills vs. Cynthia
Kay Washburn, Powder
Springs, Ga.
William R. White, Crystal
River vs. Ginette M. White,
Lecanto
Victor H. Worsham, Beverly
Hills vs. Valeria G. Worsham,
Crystal River
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit
www. clerk, citrus. fl. us.


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A14 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


TOGETHER





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
For more information, call em-
ployment specialist Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. Visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.
The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Inverness Elks Lodge
No. 2522 invites the public to
join them on Memorial Day,
May 28, for a pig roast
fundraiser to support local vet-
erans in nursing homes in the
community, many of whom
have only Elks members to
count on to visit them and take
them needed items.
The fundraiser will include
games and fun on the lake, as
well as delicious food. Food will
be served from 1:30 to 3 p.m.
Tickets are $13.50.
Donations and in-kind sup-
plies of food or beverages
would be appreciated. Call Jack
Rife, chairman of the event, at
352-302-4793.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorial services. Islands
to be visited include Oahu,
Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on
a marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@
tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care




GRID
Continued from Page All

much more likely to engage
and buy something,
whereas groups are more
often just looking.


Cost-wise, it's difficult to
equate expenditures for
different modes of travel
because of the wide range
of personal preferences
and options for transporta-
tion, food and entertain-
ment, as well as the amount
of money an individual is
willing to spend. The gain
in group travel is that vir-
tually every detail, includ-
ing transportation, hotel
and food, is handled for
you, as well as the schedul-


specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-
527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation will meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday, June 21, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administration
Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave.,
Ocala. All are welcome. Call
Mike Emig at 352-854-8328 for
more information.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcome
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Beef stroganoff dinner will be
2 to 6 p.m. Sunday, June 10.
Fried chicken is on the menu
for June 24. Cost is $6.
A Father's Day steak dinner
will be served from 2 to 5 p.m.
June 17; cost is $8.
Everyone is welcome to the
jam session Sunday, June 24,
at 2 p.m.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m.
American Legion Day at
Tropicana Field is Sunday, July
15. The Tampa Bay Rays are
hosting the Boston Red Sox for
a game beginning at 1:40 p.m.
and American Legion Post 155
in Crystal River is participating.
A chartered bus will leave the


ing. Independent travel can
be more time consuming in
arranging all the details
(this is where a travel agent
is indispensable), but you
are "free" as to scheduling,
when and where you eat
and what you choose to see.


I wish you safe and
happy adventuring. Please
email me at
gobuddy@tampabay. rr.
corn, if you have any
questions.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer
have been residents of
Crystal River for 27years.
They travel frequently,
having been to 48 states, 64
countries and seven
continents. Contact Neil
via email to gobuddy@
tampabayrrcom.


post at 10:30 a.m., with an ap-
proximate return at 6 p.m.
Price includes bus trip, game
ticket and liquid refreshments.
The trip is open to the public,
including children accompanied
by an adult. Seating is limited.
For cost and other information
or reservations, call Cindy
Heather at 352-563-9926.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
There will be no Friday night
dinner on June 15.
Memorial Day Services were
conducted at 11 a.m. Monday,
May 28, at the Veterans of For-
eign Wars Edward W. Penno
Post 4864. A picnic will follow at
11:30 a.m. Canteen opens at
10a.m.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist


disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
at 727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
will not have its regular monthly
meeting during the months of
June, July and August, but will
resume meeting in September.
Instead, there will be luncheons
during the summer months.
Phone Commander Linda Brice
at 352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-5334
for details.The DAV Auxiliary
continues ongoing projects to
help needy veterans. We still
need clean cotton materials,
yarn, lap robes, etc., as well as
toiletry articles.
Membership has expanded
to include more families and
members. For more information
or to donate items, call Brice at
352-560-3867 or Armitage at
352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume
in September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness.
This is an advocacy group
for current and future veterans,
as well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help promote
public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help veter-
ans in need of help. More than
88,000 combat veterans are
still unaccounted for from all
wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a vet-


In SERVICE


U.S. Army Command Sgt. Major Aaron L. Prater was tapped
March 15 at a change-of-responsibility ceremony for the
63rd Signal Battalion (Expeditionary), 35th Theater Tacti-
cal Signal Brigade at Fort Gordon, Ga. "Command Sgt. Major
Prater comes to us well qualified for the job," said Command
Sgt. Major Angel J. Ramos of the 35th TTSB. "He has held
every leadership position and has served in some of the most
demanding assignments throughout his military career."
Prater and his wife, Theresa, are 1985 graduates of Crystal
River High School.


erans group or a motorcycle
club. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause.
All are welcome on July 7 at
the sixth annual Independence
Day Golf sponsored by Rolling
Thunder. Visit the website at


www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event.

See VETERANS/Page A16


Your j
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YOf l^ ^


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SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 A15










1 box, 2 box, red box, blue box Looking at divorce,


Tips for moving day can help make military relocation easier Facebook style


Just the word "relocation" makes
my eyes cross. I love a change of
scenery, learning new customs,
and meeting new friends. I've looked
forward to each move with the ex-
citement of a child awaiting the time
to open a birthday gift. However, my
standing total of 25 moves in 25 years
makes me expert enough to offer a
few tips and tricks while waving an
index finger and swearing I'll never
do it again.
A military move is fairly
simple. The detailer (in
Navy terms) calls and ad-
vises your next destina-
tion, which may or may not .
have been one of your
choices. Sometimes you'll
have time to complete
change-of-address cards
and get them in the mail
within a comfortable 30
day's notice. More often, Barbara
you'll have two weeks or VETE
less to scramble in prepa-
ration of the transfer. Ad- VIE
dress can be changed
online in many cases, saving time.
Catalogs and other third-class mail
doesn't typically follow you, so plan
on signing up for those again once
you've reached your destination.
Don't forget to close out bank ac-
counts and return library books.
For some moves, your vehicle must
be cleaned out of all items and taken
to a designated yard from where it
will be shipped to your new location.
Your personal goods should be sepa-
rated into an "Express" shipment that
will include what you'll need to func-
tion until your household goods ar-
rive, and a "General" shipment that
the military will have wrapped,
boxed, crated and shipped for you. I'll
never forget my first military move, or


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or by email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. New members
are welcome. Membership fee
is $30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to be-
long to the Marine Corps
League. Female Marines (for-
mer, active and reserves) and
associate members are eligible
for MCLA membership. Call
President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 or
Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to the
veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is avail-
able for funerals, flag raising
and nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-


the look on the moving team leader's
face when he realized I had perfected
the art of space utilization to the point
where I've been nicknamed "Mary
Poppins," referring to the size of the
items she pulled from her magical
carpetbag.
The team leader called for help.
The office he called asked him to re-
peat himself since the assignment
was to pack the contents of a 273-
square-foot apartment in Hawaii. A
crew of five healthy
Samoan men were soon
fast at work, singing Hawai-
ian songs to the radio and
.'f nodding approval to the
pizza and sodas I had
gladly provided (for I knew
just how much work they
had ahead of them).
A few hours later, 6,000
pounds of household goods
Corcoran were crated and ready to
,ANS begin the journey Five
boxes of "express" items
were shipped via UPS to
the sponsor awaiting our
arrival in Anchorage, Alaska.
Approach civilian moves with the
same plan an "express" shipment
to live off of until the remainder of
your items arrive, or, if you've moved
yourself, are unpacked. Contact the
Chamber of Commerce or Veterans
Coalition in your new neighborhood
for information on local goods and
services.
Start packing as early as possible,
and pack items to withstand a tumble
off a rack or truck. U-Haul allows un-
used boxes to be returned, with re-
ceipt, for a full refund.
The one tip that has ultimately
made moving the easiest for me is in-
dexing in a notebook every item in
every box as it's packed, with a corre-


ice in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City.
For information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all el-
igible veterans and their fami-
lies to visit our post and
consider joining our Legion
family: American Legion, Sons
of the American Legion (SAL),
or American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. For informa-
tion, call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of the
U.S. is eligible for membership
if said service was within
Korea, including territorial wa-
ters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was out-
side of Korea from June 25,
1950, to Jan. 31, 1955. For in-
formation, call Hank Butler at
352-563-2496, Neville Ander-
son at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for informa-
tion about the post and
auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
N American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-


spending number on the box and on
the list. Write the number on all four
corners of all four sides plus the top,
so no matter where the box is within
the stack, you stand a better chance of
seeing the number. This indexing
method will allow you to quickly and
easily pull any desired item from its
box without spending precious time
hunting. I learned this tip from a good
friend of mine who had already en-
dured several moves when I was just
beginning. Thank you, Lisa you've
been a lifesaver!
I've also found that providing de-
livered pizza, carbonated refresh-
ments and a radio tuned to the
workers' choice of station works won-
ders, as I've never had an item broken
or missing. I make sure to advise the
moving company supervisor ahead of
time that I will be providing lunch.
Everyone arrives happy, works hard
and goes home full. In fact, several
have offered to work for me again!
Keep this plan in mind for other proj-
ects requiring day-labor as well.
Waiting until after the move to sell
lightweight tools, furnishings and so
on has actually kept my overall mov-
ing costs down. Replacement prices
have gone up since you bought that
thingy-doodle three years ago, and
even at 99 cents per pound, it's prob-
ably less expensive to include it in the
move. Not only that, but having a mov-
ing-in sale is a great way to meet your
new neighbors!


Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition Inc.
She maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may be
found at www.ccvcfl.org.


urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189
Ladies Auxiliary facility on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley-Davidson. We meet in
the small building to the left of
the main building. All former
and current post members, as
well as all interested veterans,
are cordially invited to be a part
of American Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Amer-
ican Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially
invited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776.
To learn more about Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the chapter's web-
site at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League


Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Superior Bank.
Social hour follows. All Marines
and FMF Corpsmen are wel-
come. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call Mor-
gan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW
meets at 5 p.m. and the mem-
bership meeting is at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday at the
post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at
the Embassy Suites Hotel,
1445 Lake Cook Road, Deer-
field, Ill. Group reservation
code is CGN. Call 847-945-
4500 for reservations. Ask for
the USS Long Beach reunion
rate of $99.68, which includes
all taxes on rooms.
Cutoff date is Aug. 13.
For more information, con-
tact Don Shade, 299 Kiantone
Road Lot 92, Jamestown, NY
14701-9370, or email
lbcgn9@aol.com or visit
www.usslongbeach-assoc.org.


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEED A REPORTER?


* The Chronicle welcomes tips from
readers about breaking news. Call
the newsroom at 563-5660, and
be prepared to give your name,
phone number, and the address
of the news event.


* To submit story ideas for feature
sections, call 563-5660 and
ask for features editor Cheri
Harris. Again, be prepared to
leave a detailed message.


* Approval for story ideas must be
granted by the Chronicle's editors
before a reporter is assigned. Call
Sandra Frederick, managing
editor, at 563-5660. Be prepared
to leave a message.


recent report states
that Facebook was
mentioned in one-
third of all divorce cases in
2011. Oddly, the story didn't
say what was mentioned in
the other two-thirds of di-
vorces. I would guess drink-
ing, drugs, cheating,
gambling and violence
popped up quite a bit, with
an occasional mention of
man caves, tattoos, topless
bars, video games, secret
second families, unemploy-
ment, child endangerment,
immaturity, de-
sertion and "ir-
reconcilable
differences" (as if
all the other rea-
sons are reconcil-
able).
So, obviously,
Facebook is the
No. 1 problem.
Say you learn that
your husband is J
cheating on you MUI
from a "friend" on
Facebook. Is
Facebook really the prob-
lem? Of course it is. Your
husband wouldn't have
cheated if he knew you
would find out about it so
soon. He was hoping you
would find out years from
now, after the affair was
over, so he could say: "Stop
digging up the past It's over;
it's time to move on. That
was years ago. I have a com-
pletely new girlfriend now.
Why is Facebook trying to
wreck our happy home?"
Trashing Facebook is a
story that almost writes it-
self, whereas writing about
people who should never
have gotten married in the
first place is a little more
difficult
Married and pregnant at
16 and it didn't work out?
Blame Facebook. Life didn't
become a fairy tale after
marrying the boss, who still
treats you like an em-
ployee? Blame Facebook.
Writing about the evils of
Facebook is easy, especially
for those people who can
see no earthly reason to be
on Facebook. "I already
have plenty of friends," is an
oft-heard comment
I, too, have a problem
with Facebook, even though
I use it and even though I
suffer from OCD (obsessive
computer disorder), a mal-
ady that makes me check
the balance of my IRA 10
times a day and my email 10
times an hour. But if my
marriage ever goes south, it
will be because I am a jerk
and not because I started
posting pictures of cute cats
on Facebook.
There's plenty to criticize
FB for its huge invasion
of privacy, for one. If your


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Flame-broiled beef
patty with brown gravy, mashed
potatoes, corn with red pep-
pers, applesauce, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Birthday celebra-
tion: Noodles Romanoff with
chicken, green beans, carrot
coins, piece of cake, dinner roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad, let-
tuce with carrots and tomato,
marinated broccoli salad, fresh
orange, two slices whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.


friends don't already know
your birthday, are they re-
ally your friends? Or are
they identity thieves?
Why would you broadcast
this kind of information to
strangers on the Internet? If
Facebook asked for moth-
ers' maiden names and So-
cial Security numbers, there
is no doubt most users
would willingly provide
them.
The hype over Facebook's
initial public offering was
also disturbing. "Facebook
already has 900
million mem-
bers. Look how
fast it has
grown," my
stock-buying
friends say. But
d do you really
t think there is
someone out
there who wants
M to be on Face-
book but just
CLEN hasn't had time
to sign up?
Facebook has all the
members (within a few hun-
dred million) it is ever going
to get. It is not going to grow.
As a matter of fact, it is going
to shrink as other, more dis-
criminating social networks
proliferate.
You may already have
plenty of friends, but do you
have the right friends? Even
with the iffy IPO, Facebook
will make scads of money. It
has only 3,500 employees.
Compare that to the 200,000
at General Motors or the
500,000 at the U.S. Post
Office. Facebook lets its
computers do all the work;
it's not the kind of business
that needs a lot of hot bod-
ies. It will make a ton of
money on advertising, but
that doesn't mean the
Johnny-come-lately IPO in-
vestors will make any
money It's Apples and
Googles.
So does Facebook cause
divorce? The spouses who
mention Facebook in their
filings would have gotten di-
vorced anyway, I'm sure. But
I wonder how many people
have caught up with old
flames on Facebook and got-
ten married?
How many weddings have
taken place because of
Facebook and other social
networks? Should there be
two sides to this story?
No, of course not. What-
ever was I thinking?


Jim Mullen's newest book,
"How to Lose Money in
Your Spare Time -At
Home," is available at
amazon.com. You can
follow him on Pinterest at
interest com/jimmullen.


Thursday: Baked chicken
thigh with coq au vin sauce,
herb mashed potatoes, country
vegetable medley, pineapple,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Hot dog with bun
and mustard, baked beans with
tomato, mixed vegetables,
coleslaw, Father's Day special
dessert, low-fat milk.

Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Sunday'S PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.

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June 11 to 15 MENUS


A16 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


c


I


6-10


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS











SPORTS


Gators
breeze past
N.C. State,
but wind and
rain postpone
Stanford vs.
FSU/B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


* Tennis, soccer/B2
* Baseball/B3
* Scoreboard, NASCAR/B4
* Golf, college baseball/B5
* Entertainment/B6


Riches to Rags: No Crown, but Belmont a jewel


Tyson Gay returns
to competition
with 10.0 100
NEW YORK Tyson
Gay joked his agent tricked
him, promising a "low-key"
race for his long-awaited
return to competition, not
the throng of TV cameras
that greeted him at the Adidas
Grand Prix on Saturday.
But the former world
champion knew he needed
the pressure of a big stage
before he goes to the U.S.
Olympic trials at the end of
the month.
The 29-year-old Gay
hadn't raced since hip sur-
gery last July. He entered
the "B" 100 Saturday, more
than two hours before
reigning world champion
Yohan Blake was scheduled
to compete. Gay finished in
10.0 seconds running into
a headwind, but success
was measured in sprinting
without pain and getting "all
the jitters out."
The American-record
holder in the 100 won three
gold medals at the 2007
world championships. But
since then, he's been over-
taken by Usain Bolt and
beset by injuries.
Ryan Dungey nabs
second straight
motocross victory


MOUNT MORRIS, Pa.
- Ryan Dungey raced to
his second straight AMA
Pro Motocross victory,
sweeping both 450 Class
motos at High Point Raceway.
Dungey, the Red Bull
KTM rider from Belle
Plaine, Minn., beat Mike
Alessi in both motos.
Dungey extended his lead
in the 450 Class standings
to 42 points over Alessi,
the MotoConcepts Suzuki
rider from Victorville, Calif.
In the 250 Class, GEICO
Honda's Eli Tomac, from
Cortez, Colo., also won for
the second time this year.
In the Women's Mo-
tocross Championship,
Rockstar Energy Racing
Suzuki's Jessica Patterson,
from Tallahassee, Fla.,
took the overall win.
Wife of Steelers
QB Roethlisberger
expecting baby
PITTSBURGH Big
Ben's going to be a big daddy.
Steelers quarterback
Ben Roethlisberger and
wife Ashley are expecting a
son later this year. Roeth-
lisberger released the
news on his official website
Saturday afternoon.
Roethlisberger posted:
"It is truly a blessing and
we are so excited!"
The Roethlisbergers
were married just over a
year ago in a small enclave
north of Pittsburgh in a
quiet ceremony attended
by a sizable contingent
from the organization.
It's been a busy offsea-
son for Roethlisberger, who
turned 30 in March and
graduated from Miami
(Ohio) last month with a
bachelor's degree in edu-
cation. He is expected to
join the team for mandatory
minicamp next week.
Mariners' Montero
savors combined
no-hitter


SEATTLE -
catcher Jesus
wasted little til
for keepsakes
tIe's unlikely n
The rookie
printed picture
pitchers involve
day's combine
against the Lo
Dodgers, plus
shots of the or
bration. He ha
photos with a
asked for a sic
phrase "no-hit
date.
He says the
"so special" fo
wants to reme


Associated Press
NEW YORK Union Rags
picked up where I'll Have An-
other left off coming from be-
hind to catch at Bob
Baffert-trained horse at the finish
in a Triple Crown race.
In Saturday's Belmont Stakes, it
was even a photo finish.
Union Rags rallied through an
opening on the rail to edge Payn-
ter by a neck, dealing Baffert a
third loss in this year's Triple
Crown series.
I'll Have Another won the Ken-
tucky Derby and Preakness with
stirring stretch drives over Baffert's
Bodemeister. But the champion
was scratched from the Belmont
on Friday and retired due to a ten-
don injury, relinquishing a shot at
a Triple Crown sweep.
His absence opened up the race
for Union Rags, who finished a
troubled seventh in the Derby


A crowd of 85,811 cheered as
Paynter and Union Rags battled
down the stretch, and Union Rags
barely caught the front-runner at
the end to win by a neck.
Trained by Michael Matz,
Union Rags skipped the Preak-
ness and was for the Belmont
jockey John Velazquez replaced
Julien Leparoux aboard the
horse.
Union Rags was along the in-
side in the middle of the pack
until it was time to make a move
for the lead. Velazquez guided
Union Rags to the inside of the
front-running Paynter and relent-
lessly closed the gap and won by a
neck.
Union Rags, the 5-2 second
choice behind Dullahan, covered
the 1 1/2 miles in 2:30.42. The colt
owned by Phyllis Wyeth returned
$7.50, $4.20 and $3.40. Paynter
paid $5.10 and $3.90. Atigun was
third and paid $10.60.


Associated Press
Union Rags, with jockey John Velazquez up, holds off Paynter with jockey
Mike Smith on Saturday to win the 144th Belmont Stakes in Elmont, N.Y.


Celtics can't hang


Down at the

half tied at the

fourth, Heat

rue to occasion

and advance to

NBAfinas

Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
finally got a Game 7 victory,
on his third try
Next up, the NBA finals
and his third try at that
elusive first championship.
James had 31 points and
12 rebounds, Chris Bosh hit
a career-best three 3-pointers
the last sparking the run
that put it away and the
Miami Heat won their sec-
ond straight Eastern Con-
ference title by beating the
Boston Celtics 101-88 in
Game 7 on Saturday night.
Miami opens the title se-
ries in Oklahoma City on
Tuesday night.
SDwyane Wade scored and
..... 1 Shane Battier added 12 for
the Heat, who won a Game 7
for the first time since 2004
-Wade's rookie season.
Rajon Rondo finished
with 22 points, 14 assists
and 10 rebounds for Boston,
which got 19 points from
Paul Pierce in what might
be the last game of the "Big
Four" era for the Celtics.
Boston took out its
starters with 28.3 seconds
left. By then, workers al-
ready had a rope around
See Page B4
Miami Heat forward
LeBron James dunks over
Boston Celtics point guard
Rajon Rondo on Saturday
during the first half of Game
7 of the Eastern Conference
finals in Miami.
Associated Press


Kings
Associated Press
NEWARK N.J.


- Mariners Bryce Salvador sco
Montero on a deflection off a
me searching fenseman and the N
from Seat- Jersey Devils derai
o-hitter. Los Angeles' Stanley C
catcher coronation for a secc
s of the six time, beating the King
ed in Fri- 1 in Game 5 of the fin
ed no-hitter Saturday night
d no-hglter Zach Parise ende(
s Angeles five-game goal drou
a couple on a rare mistake
n-field cele- goalie Jonathan Qu
handed out the and Martin Brod
Sharpie and stopped 25 shots to h
nature, the the Devils end the Kiu
ter" and the 10-game postseason v
ning streak on the r
game was and 12-game run over
r him and he past two years, both N
mber it. records.
-From wire reports "That's how a goz
wins the game for yo


bedeviled again as series
Parise said about and won. Three years
Brodeur later, the Detroit Red
Justin Williams scored Wings rallied from a 3-0
red for the Kings, whose deficit to tie the series,
de- once seemingly insur- but they lost Game 7 to
qew mountable 3-0 series Toronto.
led lead has been cut to 3-2. The Kings haven't
Cup Game 6 is Monday night played terribly in losing
ond in Los Angeles. the last two games, but C
's 2- More importantly, the the Devils have made the
nals Devils have the Kings plays when it counted or
wondering what's going gotten the breaks when
d a on for the first time in the they needed them. 1
ght postseason. Take Salvador's win- '
by This marks the first ner, his first goal in seven -.-.
ick, time they have lost con- games. His shot from the .k
eur secutive games this post- left point was deflected
.elp season, and the Devils right in front of Quick, hit '_
ngs' are halfway up a moun- off the chest of Kings de- -:
win- tain that only one other fenseman Slava Voynov
oad NHL team has climbed and rebounded into the
the in the finals after losing net at 9:05 of the second
HL the first three games. period. It was the second
Only the 1942 Toronto time in this series that a Los Angeles Kings goalie J


alie
DU,"


Maple Leafs came back
in a best-of-seven finals


goes to 3-2


Associated Press
onathan Quick watches a goal e


New Jersey Devils' Bryce Salvador score Saturday in the second
See Page B4 period during Game 5 of the Stanley Cup finals in Newark, N.J.


m










For some, skeeters more than a summer nuisance


Despite news reports
regarding a drought,
last week while
going from work to kids'
sporting activities and try-
ing to work out in the rain, I
realized I was constantly get-
ting soaked and had more
bug bites than ever
Every local redneck will
tell you them skeeters come
out with the big rains, even
in a drought
I have always been jealous
of my next-door neighbor,
who gets on his John Deere
mower without a shirt, or
the guys fishing in a cloud of
flying bugs. If I or my daugh-
ter go out for a second, we
get mosquito bites all over.
Everybody reacts differ-
ently to mosquito bites, and
this can seriously interfere
with workouts and the
sports we play this time of
year. Mosquitoes are the
carriers of a wide variety of


diseases. In much of the
world, mosquitoes are a
major health menace, trans-
mitting disease to more than
69 million people a year
While mosquitoes can't
give you the HIV virus, kids
can get skeeter syndrome
and everyone can get the
West Nile virus from mos-
quito bites.
Other diseases you can
catch from a mosquito bite
can potentially cause seri-
ous chronic diseases. These
are yellow fever, dengue
fever, polyarthritis, Rift Val-
ley fever, Ross River fever
and malaria.
Malaria has always been
linked to mosquitoes. When
the Panama Canal was being
built, a malaria outbreak
contributed to the 27,000
deaths. Mosquito bites asso-
ciated with malaria and yel-
low fever have historically
been a scourge of humans


and have decimated
populations.
People have a variety of
reactions to mosquito bites.
Depending on the number
of bites a person receives at
one time, reac-
tions can include g
both immediate
and delayed
swelling, moder-
ate to severe
redness and
itching around
the bite area.
These reactions
tend to decrease Dr. Ron
in frequency and DOCT
severity after
being bitten over ORD
many years.
Skeeter syndrome is a lo-
calized, much more severe
reaction to mosquito bites
exhibiting itself as red, in-
flamed, hard swollen
patches around the bite,
which frequently has a blis-


a
rv
M1


tery rash. Fever is com-
monly associated. People
with extremely large areas
of swelling after a mosquito
bite have skeeter syndrome.
The process can progress
to cellulitis, an
infection of the
skin and under-
lying tissues,
over the course
of a few days.
Skeeter syn-
drome alone
without cellulitis
will improve
Joseph over several
OR'S hours. The se-
vere response is
ERS to the saliva of
the mosquito.
Rarely, there are people
bitten by mosquitoes who
experience anaphylaxis, the
swelling of the throat and
windpipe resulting in respi-
ratory failure.
Other people may have


experienced hives all over
the body and swelling or
worsening of their asthma.
These symptoms occur within
minutes after a mosquito
bite, compared to skeeter
syndrome, which may take
hours to days to develop.
Treatment for most is
avoidance of standing bodies
of water, especially in your
backyard. Wear light running
pants and long-sleeved shirts.
Why do you think clothing
manufacturer Columbia can
afford to sponsor a Tour de
France bike team?
Even though I hate the
smell and taste of mosquito
repellant, it is better than
the itching and scratching
after a great run, kayak or
paddleboard workout
With more severe reac-
tions, especially with skeeter
syndrome, the use of extra-
strength cortisone cream or
antihistamines such as Be-


nadryl by mouth are used to
treat the local reaction.
If cellulitis develops, it is
a medical emergency and
the need for antibiotics is
urgent.
In fact, the drug Zyrtec re-
duces local reactions to
mosquito bites when taken
before being bitten. It is sug-
gested, if you have significant
reactions to mosquitoes, to
use Zyrtec on a daily basis
during the summertime if
anticipating being outdoors
when mosquito bites are
most common.
Don't let the skeeters
spoil your workouts and
sports this summer.

Ron Joseph, M.D, hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute, can
be reached atrbjhand@
cox.net or 352-212-5359.


Associated Press
Russia's Maria Sharapova reacts after defeating Italy's Sara Errani on Saturday during their women's final match in the
French Open tennis tournament at Roland Garros stadium in Paris.


Sharapova needs only two sets to


Associated Press

PARIS Sidelined in
2008 by a right shoulder that
needed surgery, putting her
tennis future suddenly in
doubt, Maria Sharapova de-
cided to use the free time to
study a new language, the
one spoken at the only
Grand Slam tournament she
had yet to win.
"I found a French school
close to my house," she re-
called, "and I did private
lessons every single day for
three months."
Sharapova cut short those
classes when it was time to
begin the slow, painful
rehab process and get her
shoulder back in shape.
About 3 1/2 years later, on
Saturday at Roland Garros,
Sharapova put all of that
hard work to good use on
the most important clay
court there is and even
trotted out a little French
during the victory speech
she often wondered if she'd
ever get a chance to deliver.
Whipping big serves with
that rebuilt shoulder, put-
ting forehands and back-
hands right on lines, and
even moving well on the red
surface she once worried
made her look like a "cow
on ice," Sharapova beat sur-
prise finalist Sara Errani of
Italy 6-3, 6-2 to win her first
French Open title and be-
come the 10th woman with a
career Grand Slam.


Ie


cement her place in tennis history


Sharapova kisses her championship trophy on Saturday.
She won in two sets, 6-3, 6-2.


"It's a wonderful moment
in my career," the 25-year-old
told the crowd in French,
before switching to English
to add: "I'm really speech-
less. It's been such a journey
for me to get to this stage."
Truly has.
So much came so easily for
Sharapova at the start: Wim-
bledon champion at age 17;
No. 1 in the rankings at 18;
U.S. Open champion at 19;
Australian Open champion
at 20. But a shoulder opera-
tion in October 2008 made
everything tougher. She did-
n't play singles from August
2008 until the following May,
when her ranking fell to 126th.
"It wasn't getting better as
soon as everyone thought it
would," she said of her shoul-
der "That was the frustrat-
ing thing, because it was like,
'When is this going to end?'"


It took until her 10th post-
surgery Grand Slam tourna-
ment for Sharapova to get
back to a major final, at
Wimbledon last July, but she
lost. She also reached the
Australian Open final in
January, but lost again.
Errani, for her part, never
paid attention to those who
said a 5-foot-4 1/2 woman
couldn't possibly compete
against the very best in ten-
nis. Posing at the net before
the match, the 6-foot-2
Sharapova towered over
her opponent then was
head-and-shoulders above
Errani when play began, too.
The second-seeded
Sharapova raced to a 4-0
lead within 14 minutes. She
produced 12 of the match's
first 13 winners. Errani was
able to make things more in-
teresting when she man-


aged to stretch points, con-
sistently coming out on top
when exchanges lasted
more than 10 strokes.
As lopsided as the even-
tual result was, Errani made
Sharapova earn it with win-
ner after winner, and a 37-12
edge in that category
Serving for the champi-
onship, Sharapova faced
one last gut-check.
She frittered away one
match point by shoving a
forehand long, and Errani
took the next point with a
bold drop shot. Facing
break point, Sharapova hit a
backhand winner. Moments
later, Errani saved Shara-
pova's second match point,
with yet another superb
drop shot.
The French fans eager
for more tennis, and always
ones to back an underdog -
began chanting, "Sa-ra! Sa-ra!"
That turned out to be
Sharapova's cue. She got
her third match point with a
110 mph ace, No. 6 of the af-
ternoon what shoulder
injury? and this time con-
verted when Errani's sliced
backhand hit the net.
Sharapova dropped her
racket, covered her face
with her hands and fell to
her knees, muddying them
with clay Soon enough, she
was cradling the silver
champion's cup and biting
her lower lip while listening
to the Russian national
anthem.


Associated Press
Max Mirnyi of Belarus, left, and Daniel Nestor of
Canada, right, return Saturday in the men's doubles
final match against Bob and Mike Bryan of the
U.S. at the French Open tennis tournament at Roland
Garros stadium in Paris.


Nestor, Mirnyi beat


Bryan twins to win


men's doubles title


Associated Press

PARIS Top-seeded
Max Mirnyi of Belarus
and Daniel Nestor of
Canada won a second
consecutive French
Open doubles title by
beating American twins
Bob and Mike Bryan 6-4,
6-4 on Saturday
"Beating the best
team, probably, of all
time in the finals is a
good feeling," Nestor
said.
The second-seeded
Bryans were bidding to
win their 12th Grand
Slam doubles champi-
onship. That would have
set a record for most in
the Open era, which
began in 1968.
"We wanted it proba-
bly a little too bad," Mike
Bryan said. "When it's
not going your way early,
it's tough to stay really
positive."
The Bryans won the
French Open in 2003.
They were the runners-
up in 2005 and 2006, both
times against Mirnyi and
Jonas Bjorkman.
"For us, it's probably
been the toughest one to
win," Mike Bryan said.


"You've got to be really
tough mentally to win
this one. You're not going
to get the easy holds that
we're accustomed to. It's
been elusive for the last
nine years now."
Nestor and Mirnyi
combined to hit eight
aces, seven more than
the Bryans. The winners
also saved all four break
points they faced.
"They hit some great
serves when they needed
it," Bob Bryan said.
It's the sixth Grand
Slam men's doubles title
overall for Mirnyi, who
in addition to his four at
the French Open also
won the U.S. Open in
2000 with Lleyton Hewitt
and in 2002 with Mahesh
Bhupathi.
For Nestor, the total is
eight major champi-
onships in men's dou-
bles: four at the French
Open, including with
Mark Knowles in 2007
and Nenad Zimonjic in
2010; two at Wimbledon,
with Zimonjic in 2008
and 2009; one at the Aus-
tralian Open, with
Knowles in 2002; and
one at the U.S. Open,
with Knowles in 2004.


Euro 2012:
Associated Press
LVIV, Ukraine Moments be-
fore he was supposed to be taken
off, Mario Gomez headed in the
winning goal for Germany
The Bayern Munich striker
made a surprise start Saturday
against Portugal at the European
Championship and knocked in a
deflected cross from Sami Khedira
in the 72nd minute to give the
Germans a 1-0 victory in Group B.
Gomez, who had created little
before the goal, was due to be re-
placed by Miroslav Klose, who was
already waiting on the touchline
on his 34th birthday And Gomez


Germany top
nearly got another goal before
Klose finally came on in 80th.
Although Cristiano Ronaldo
did little until late in the match,
Portugal had a chance to equal-
ize in the 84th when Nani hit the
crossbar with a misdirected
cross. And Silvestre Varela had
another opportunity in the 89th,
but he shot straight at Germany
goalkeeper Manuel Neuer from
close range.
The Germans, seeking their first
title since 1996, are considered one
of the favorites of the tournament
despite being in the toughest group
along with the Netherlands and
Denmark.


Portugal; Denmark stuns Netherlands
Denmark 1, It was something Premier League i-.r l, i:
Netherlands 0 top scorer Robin van Persie never .-


KHARKIV, Ukraine Denmark
pulled off the first big surprise of the
European Championship with a 1-0
victory over the Netherlands on Sat-
urday in Group B.
Michael Krohn-Dehli provided the
finishing touch the Dutch inexplica-
bly lacked. He scored against the
run of play when he picked up a
loose ball close to the penalty area
in the 24th minute, left two defend-
ers standing and shot through the
legs of Maarten Stekelenburg from a
tight angle.


got close to as he came to symbolize
Dutch futility with a couple of bad
mistakes. Denmark goalkeeper
Stephan Andersen made several
clutch saves to secure the most im-
portant Danish victory over the
Netherlands since the Euro 1992
semifinals.
The Dutch had their best chance
of the match when Andersen gave
away the ball to Arjen Robben just
outside the area in the 36th minute,
but the Bayern Munich winger curled
his left-footer onto the far post and
out of danger.


Associated Press
Germany's Mario Gomez heads the ball
to score a goal past, from the left, Por-
tuguese goalkeeper Rui Patricio, Ger-
many's Lukas Podolski and Portugal's
Joao Pereira on Saturday during the Euro
2012 soccer championship.


'and final


B2 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Interleague

Twins 11, Cubs 3
Chicago Minnesota
ab rh bi ab rh bi
RJhnsn If 5 0 2 1 Span cf 5 2 2 1
SCastro ss 3 0 0 0 Revere rf 5 1 2 1
Crdnsph-2b2 0 0 0 Mauerc 4 1 3 2
DeJessrf 3 00 0 Buterac 1 0 0 0
K.Hillc 1 1 1 0 Wlnghlf 4 1 2 1
ASorin dh 4 1 2 2 Mstrnn If 1 0 1 0
JeBakr1b-rf4 0 1 0 Mornealb 2 2 2 0
Mathercf 4 0 1 0 Parmelib 1 0 0 0
Clvngrc-lb 4 0 0 0 Doumitdh 5 1 1 1
Brny 2b-ss 4 1 2 0 Plouffe 3b 4 2 2 4
IStewrt 3b 4 0 2 0 Dozier ss 4 0 1 1
JCarrll 2b 2 1 0 0
Totals 38 3113 Totals 381116
11
Chicago 000 000 120 3
Minnesota 020 612 00x 11
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Chicago 8, Minnesota
7. 2B-Re.Johnson (4), Span (15), Mauer (13),
Doumit (7), Plouffe (6). HR-A.Soriano (12),
Plouffe (9). CS-Dozier (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Samardzija L,5-4 32-39 8 8 1 1
C.Coleman 12-36 3 3 2 1
Asencio 12-30 0 0 1 0
Corpas 1 1 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
Diamond W,5-1 6 7 0 0 0 5
Gray 2 3 3 3 0 1
Manship 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Samardzija 2, Gray.
T-3:00. A-39,309 (39,500).

Braves 5, Blue Jays 2
Toronto Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Lawrie3b 4 0 0 0 Bourncf 4 1 3 1
Rasmscf 4 1 1 0 Prado3b 4 00 0
Bautist rf 3 1 1 2 McCnnc 3 1 0 0
Encrnclb 4 0 1 0 Uggla2b 3 1 1 3
KJhnsn 2b 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0
YEscorss 3 0 1 0 FFrmnib 4 0 1 0
RDavis If 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 1 1 1
McCoy If 1 0 0 0 Constnz If 3 1 2 0
L.Perezp 0 00 0 Hansonp 2 0 0 0
Mathis c 3 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Htchsnp 2 00 0
YGoms If 1 00 0
Totals 31 25 2 Totals 31 5 8 5
Toronto 000 002 000 2
Atlanta 003 000 20x 5
LOB-Toronto 3, Atlanta 5. 2B-Bourn (13).
HR-Bautista (17), Uggla (11), Simmons (1).
SB-Bourn (16). CS-K.Johnson (1). S-Han-
son.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Hutchison L,5-3 61-37 5 5 1 7
L.Perez 12-31 0 0 1 2
Atlanta
HansonW,7-4 8 5 2 2 1 4
KimbrelS,18-19 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Hanson.
T-2:34. A-32,819 (49,586).

Giants 5, Rangers 2
Texas San Francisco
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 4 0 0 0 GBlanc If 5 1 2 0
Andrus ss 3 0 1 0 Theriot2b 4 0 1 2
Hamltnl If 3 01 0 Sandovl3b 4 1 1 1
Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 Posey c 4 0 1 0
MiYongIb 4 000 Pagan cf 3 1 2 1
N.Cruzrf 3 0 0 0 Beltib 4 0 0 0
DvMrprf 1 00 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 2 1
Napolic 3 1 1 1 BCrwfrss 4 1 0 0
Gentry cf 2 00 0 Vglsng p 3 1 1 0
Feldmn p 1 00 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
R.Rossp 0 00 0 Romop 0 00 0
Ueharap 0 0 0 0 A.Huffph 1 0 0 0
Morlnd ph 1 1 1 1 Hensly p 0 0 0 0
Schprsp 0 00 0 SCasill p 0 0 0 0
BSnydrph 1 000
Totals 30 25 2 Totals 36510 5
Texas 000 000 011 2
San Francisco 001 011 20x 5
E-Hamilton (3), Kinsler (7), Uehara (1). DP-
San Francisco 1. LOB-Texas 7, San Francisco
8. 2B-Hamilton (13), Pagan (12), Schierholtz
(2). 3B-Schierholtz (4). HR-Napoli (11),
Moreland (9). SB-Theriot (4). CS-Andrus (2).
S-Feldman.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Feldman L,0-5 51-34 3 2 1 7
R.Ross 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Uehara 1 4 2 2 0 1
Scheppers 1 1 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
VogelsongW,5-2 72-33 1 1 3 3
Ja.Lopez 0 1 0 0 0 0
Romo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Hensley 2-3 1 1 1 1 0
S.CasillaS,16-17 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Vogelsong (Gentry). WP-R.Ross.
PB-Napoli. Balk-Feldman.
T-3:00. A-41,704 (41,915).

Nationals 4, Red Sox 2
Washington Boston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Lmrdzz If 3 00 0 Nava If 4 0 0 0
TMore ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0
Berndn If 0 00 0 AdGnzl rf 4 0 0 0
Harper rf 3 1 0 Ortizdh 4 0 1 0
Zmrmn3b 4 1 1 0 Youkilslb 4 0 0 0
LaRochIb 4 1 1 1 Mdlrks3b 3 1 0 0
Morse dh 4 1 1 1 Avilesss 4 1 1 0
Dsmnd ss 3 01 2 DMcDn cf 1 0 0 0
Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 Sweeny ph-cf 1 0 1 0
Ankielcf 3 01 0 Shppchc 2 0 0 0
Floresc 3 00 0 Sltlmchph-c 2 0 1 2
Totals 31 45 4 Totals 33 2 5 2
Washington 010 300 000 4
Boston 000 000 200 2
E-LaRoche (4), G.Gonzalez (1), Harper (4).
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Washington 1, Boston 7.
2B-Morse (3), Ankiel (9), Ortiz (19), Sweeney
(17). HR-LaRoche (10). SB-Aviles (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
G.Gonzalez W,8-2 61-33 2 2 2 5
Stammen 0 0 0 0 1 0
Mic.GonzalezH,1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
S.BurnettH,10 1 0 0 0 0 0
ClippardS,7-8 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
MatsuzakaL,0-1 5 5 4 4 1 8
EFMorales 3 0 0 0 0 3
Aceves 1 0 0 0 0 2
Stammen pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-G.Gonzalez.
T-2:53. A-37,534 (37,067).

Orioles 6, Phillies 4
(12 innings)
Philadelphia Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Rollinsss 6 1 1 1 EnChvz If-rf 6 01 0
Pierrelf 6 1 2 0 Hardyss 5 1 0 0
Pencerf 5 04 0 C.Davisdh 4 1 1 1
Thomedh 4 1 2 2 AdJonscf 6 1 2 2
Myrrypr-dh 1 00 0 Wietersc 5 01 1
Victorncf 5 01 0 NJhnsnilb 3 1 2 0
Wggntn3b 5 0 1 0 MrRynlph-1b1 0 0 0
Fontent2b 5 00 0 Betemt3b 5 1 0 0


Lunalb 4 1 2 1 Flahrtyrf 3 0 1 1
Schndrc 3 0 0 0 Pearceph-lf 2 0 0 0
Ruizph-c 2 0 0 0 Andino2b 5 1 1 0
Totals 46 4134 Totals 45 6 9 5
Phila. 001 110 010 000 4
Baltimore 001 200 100 002 6
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Rollins (4), Fontenot (2), Worley (1),
Andino (9). DP-Baltimore 4. LOB-Philadel-
phia 7, Baltimore 10. HR-Rollins (4), Thome
(1), Luna (2), Ad.Jones (17).
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Worley 6 5 3 1 1 5
Diekman 1 2 1 1 1 0
Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 2
Quails 2 1 0 0 0 2
Rosenberg L,0-1 1 1 2 2 1 1
Baltimore
Tom.Hunter 7 8 3 3 0 2
Strop BS,3-6 1 3 1 1 0 0
Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 1 0
O'Day 2 1 0 0 0 1
AyalaW,2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Rosenberg pitched to 2 batters in the 12th.
HBP-by Diekman (Mar.Reynolds).
T-3:20. A-46,611 (45,971).


W
Tampa Bay 34
NewYork 33
Baltimore 33
Toronto 30
Boston 29



W
Washington 34
Atlanta 34
New York 32
Miami 31
Philadelphia29


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
25 .576-- 5-5
25 .569 Y2 7-3
26 .559 1 4-6
29 .508 4 3 5-5
30 .492 5 4 4-6


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
23 .596-- 5-5
25 .576 1 8-2
28 .533 3Y2 2 4-6
28 .525 4 2Y2 4-6
32 .475 7 5Y2 3-7


BASEBALL


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
26 .552 - 5-5 L-1 17-12 15-14
27 .534 1 2 7-3 W-3 18-11 13-16
29 .517 2 3 4-6 W-1 14-12 17-17
32 .458 5Y2 6Y2 6-4 L-1 15-17 12-15
34 .424 7/2 8/2 3-7 L-1 18-14 7-20
40 .322 13Y214Y2 2-8 L-4 12-15 7-25


Dodgers
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-2 18-10 16-13
W-6 14-11 20-14
L-2 19-12 13-16
L-5 16-15 15-13
L-1 12-19 17-13


Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago


Str Home
W-3 19-11
W-2 18-12
W-1 15-14
L-3 16-12
L-2 14-18


Away W
15-14 Chicago 33
15-13 Cleveland 31
18-12 Detroit 27
14-17 Kansas City24
15-12 Minnesota 24


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
26 .559 - 6-4 W-1 16-17 17-9
27 .534 1Y2 1Y2 4-6 L-1 16-16 15-11
32 .458 6 6 4-6 W-1 13-16 14-16
33 .421 8 8 5-5 L-3 8-20 16-13
34 .414 8Y2 8Y2 8-2 W-3 11-17 13-17


Texas
Angels
Seattle
Oakland


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
26 .567 - 3-7 L-1 15-11 19-15
29 .517 3 2Y2 6-4 W-2 16-14 15-15
34 .443 7Y2 7 6-4 L-1 10-14 17-20
33 .441 7Y2 7 4-6 L-1 13-16 13-17



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
22 .633 - 6-4 W-1 21-9 17-13
26 .567 4 7-3 W-1 19-12 15-14
30 .483 9 5 6-4 W-3 13-16 15-14
34 .414 13 9 5-5 L-4 15-17 9-17
40 .333 18 14 3-7 W-1 14-20 6-20


Associated Press
Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen center, speaks with pitcher Carlos Zambrano on Saturday after Zambrano gave
up five runs to the Tampa Bay Rays in the third inning in Miami.



Rays send Marlins reeling 13-4


Associated Press

MIAMI Ben Zobrist homered
twice and drove in four runs to lead
the Tampa Bay Rays to a 13-4 victory
over the Miami Marlins.
Jose Molina and Elliot Johnson
had three RBIs each for the Rays,
who have won three straight.
Tampa Bay starter Matt Moore
(3-5) struck out nine and allowed four
runs in six innings.
Zobrist homered in the third and
fifth innings for the second multi-
home run game of his career He hit
two at Detroit on Sept. 25, 2008.
Carlos Zambrano (4-4) allowed
seven runs in 2 1-3 innings before
leaving with lower back stiffness.
Twins 11, Cubs 3
MINNEAPOLIS Trevor Plouffe had a
double, a homer and four RBIs and Scott
Diamond pitched six scoreless innings to
lead the Minnesota Twins to an 11-3
victory over the Chicago Cubs.
Diamond (5-1) allowed seven hits and
struck out five and Joe Mauer added
three hits and two RBIs in his return from
a sprained right thumb for the Twins.
Jeff Samardzija (5-4) gave up eight runs
and nine hits in 3 2-3 innings, tying his
shortest outing of the season for the Cubs.
Alfonso Soriano hit a two-run homer in
the eighth for the Cubs, his 12th long ball
in the past 24 games.

Braves 5, Blue Jays 2
ATLANTA Tommy Hanson shut down
another AL East team, Dan Uggla hit a
three-run homer and the Atlanta Braves
beat the Toronto Blue Jays 5-2.
Braves rookie shortstop Andrelton Sim-
mons hit his first career homer off Drew
Hutchison (5-3) in the seventh. Michael
Bourn had three hits.
Jose Bautista hit a two-run homer in
the sixth, the only inning the Blue Jays
had a runner reach third base.
Hanson (7-4) improved to 6-0 in six career
starts against teams from the AL East. He
gave up two runs and five hits.

Giants 5, Rangers 2
SAN FRANCISCO Ryan Vogelsong
pitched a season-high 7 2-3 innings and
won his fifth straight decision, Nate
Schierholtz hit an RBI triple and the San
Francisco Giants bounced back from their
first shutout of the season to beat the
Texas Rangers 5-2 on Saturday.
Ryan Theriot added an RBI single off
Scott Feldman (0-5).

Nationals 4, Red Sox 2
BOSTON Gio Gonzalez pitched 6 1-3
effective innings, Adam LaRoche hit a solo
homer and the Washington Nationals
spoiled Daisuke Matsuzaka's return from
reconstructive elbow surgery by beating
the Boston Red Sox 4-2 on Saturday.
lan Desmond had a two-run single and
Michael Morse added an RBI double dur-
ing a three-run fourth for Washington.
Matsuzaka (0-1) gave up four runs and
five hits over five innings.

Orioles 6, Phillies 4 (12 innings)
BALTIMORE -Adam Jones hit a two-
run homer in the 12th and the Baltimore
Orioles won their eighth straight extra-
inning game, beating the Philadelphia
Phillies 6-4 Saturday and spoiling B.J.
Rosenberg's major-league debut.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's games
N.Y Mets (Niese 4-2) at N.Y Yankees (Pettitte 3-2), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 6-4) at Miami (A.Sanchez 3-4), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 5-5) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Bumett 5-2), 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 0-3) at Baltimore (Hammel 6-2), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 7-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 3-5) at Boston (Lester 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-3) at Minnesota (Liriano 1-6),
2:10 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 5-4) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 2-3),
2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 6-4) at St. Louis (Kelly 0-0), 2:15 p.m.
L.A.Angels (E.Santana 2-7) at Colorado (Friedrich 4-1), 3:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 1-0) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-6), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 3-4) at Seattle (Beavan 3-5), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Blackley 0-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 3-4), 4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Smyly 2-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's games
N.Y Mets (Niese 4-2) at N.YYankees (Pettitte 3-2), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 6-4) at Miami (A.Sanchez 3-4), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 5-5) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Bumett 5-2), 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 0-3) at Baltimore (Hammel 6-2), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 7-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 3-5) at Boston (Lester 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-3) at Minnesota (Liriano 1-6),
2:10 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 5-4) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 2-3),
2:10 p.m.
San Diego (Bass 2-5) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 4-5), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 6-4) at St. Louis (Kelly 0-0), 2:15 p.m.
L.A.Angels (E.Santana 2-7) at Colorado (Friedrich 4-1), 3:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 1-0) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-6), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 3-4) at Seattle (Beavan 3-5), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Blackley 0-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 3-4), 4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Smyly 2-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
For more box scores,
see Page B4.

Jim Thome, Jimmy Rollins and Hector
Luna hit solo home runs for the Phillies,
who have lost seven of eight. Hunter
Pence added four hits for the Philadelphia.

Angels 11, Rockies 5
DENVER -Albert Pujols homered and
singled to drive in four runs, Mike Trout
had three hits, including a two-run single,
and Dan Haren pitched effectively into the
sixth inning to lead the Los Angeles Angels
to their eighth straight road win, 11-5 over
the Colorado Rockies on Saturday.
Torii Hunter, who homered twice and
drove in six runs in Friday's series
opener, had three singles and scored
three times.
The Rockies hit five home runs, two by
Tyler Colvin, but lost their fourth straight
overall and fell to 0-5 this season in inter-
league play.

Tigers 3, Reds 2
CINCINNATI Prince Fielder home-
red before driving in the tie-breaking run
with a two-out single in the eighth inning
to lift the Detroit Tigers to a 3-2 victory
over the Cincinnati Reds on Saturday.
Brennan Boesch started Detroit's two-
out rally against Sean Marshall (1-3) with
a double off the wall in center field. After
Miguel Cabrera was intentionally walked,
Fielder softly lined a single to center and
Boesch slid across the plate just ahead of
Chris Heisey's strong throw.
Brayan Villareal (2-1) pitched a score-
less seventh inning to earn the win before
a crowd of 42,443, the largest non-Open-
ing Day, regular-season crowd in the 10-
year history of Great American Ball Park.

White Sox 10, Astros 1
CHICAGO Chris Sale pitched eight
shutout innings to earn his fifth straight
win and Adam Dunn had a grand slam
and five RBIs Saturday to lead the
Chicago White Sox to a 10-1 victory over
the Houston Astros.


Sale (8-2) sailed through Houston's
lineup on an 87-degree afternoon. The 6-
foot-6 left-hander allowed four singles,
struck out seven and walked none while
throwing 101 pitches.

Cardinals 2, Indians 0
ST. LOUIS Kyle Lohse allowed three
hits in 7 2-3 innings to outduel Justin
Masterson, and Carlos Beltran hit his Na-
tional League-leading 17th home run in
the St. Louis Cardinals' 2-0 victory over
the Cleveland Indians on Saturday night.
Michael Brantley had two singles to
extend his hitting streak to 17 games for
Cleveland. But the Indians had only three
runners in scoring position against Lohse
(6-1).

Yankees 4, Mets 2
NEW YORK Mark Teixeira hit a go-
ahead homer and Phil Hughes won his
third straight decision, sending the New
York Yankees to a 4-2 victory over the
Mets on Saturday night.
Curtis Granderson also connected and
Alex Rodriguez had an early RBI single
for the surging Yankees (33-25), who go
for a Subway Series sweep Sunday with
Andy Pettitte on the mound against
Jonathon Niese. They have won seven of
nine and 12 of 16 to move a season-high
eight games over .500.
With runners at the corners in the ninth
inning, Rafael Soriano retired pinch-hitter
Jordany Valdespin on a routine fly to end it.

Pirates 5, Royals 3
PITTSBURGH Neil Walker drove in
the go-ahead run with a groundout during
a wacky fourth inning and the Pittsburgh
Pirates rallied to beat the Kansas City
Royals 5-3 on Saturday night.
The Pirates have won three straight
and are 11-3 since May 25, the best
record in the major leagues in that span.
Pittsburgh also moved four games over
.500 at 31-27.
Clint Barmes drove in Pedro Alvarez
with an infield hit as the Pirates scored
five times in the fourth on three singles,
only one of which made it to the outfield.

Dodgers 8, Mariners 3
SEATTLE -A day after getting no-hit
by the Mariners, the Los Angeles
Dodgers rebounded to beat Seattle 8-3
Saturday as Jerry Hairston Jr. had a ca-
reer-best five RBIs and Clayton Kershaw
struck out a season-high 12.
Hairston had three of the Dodgers' 14
hits, putting Los Angeles ahead with a
three-run homer in the first against Jason
Vargas (7-5). He added RBI doubles in
the third off Vargas and in the eighth
against Lucas Luetge.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Padres 5, Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE Ross Ohlendorf had a
string relief outing and the San Diego
Padres strung together four consecutive
singles in a sixth-inning rally to beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 5-2 on Saturday.
The game followed a Friday-night
slugfest when the teams combined for six
home runs. None were hit on a sweltering
day in front of a capacity crowd.
Ohlendorf (1-0), signed by the Padres
on June 4, pitched 4 1-3 innings to earn
the victory. He gave up five hits, one
earned run and struck out four.


NATIONAL LEAGUE


A.Dunn.
Houston
LylesL,1-2
X.Cedeno
D.Carpenter
R.Cruz
Lyon
Chicago
Sale W,8-2
Z.Stewart


IP H RERBBSO


8 4 0 0 0 7
1 2 1 1 0 2
121102


HBP-bySale (Altuve).
T-2:44. A-22,880 (40,615).


Cardinals 2, Indians 0
Cleveland St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo rf 4 0 0 0 Furcal ss 3 0 0 1
ACarer ss 4 0 1 0 Beltran rf 4 1 3 1
Kipnis2b 4 0 0 0 YMolinc 3 0 1 0
CSantn c 3 00 0 Craig If 4 00 0
Brantlycf 4 0 2 0 MAdmslb 3 00 0
Damon If 3 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0
Ktchmlb 2 0 0 0 Descals2b 3 0 1 0
Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 SRonsn cf 3 1 1 0
Mstrsn p 2 0 0 0 Lohse p 2 0 1 0
Duncan ph 1 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 00 0
Accardp 0 00 0 Chamrsph 0 00 0
Motte p 0 00 0
Totals 30 03 0 Totals 282 7 2
Cleveland 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 001 000 01x 2
E-Freese (4). LOB-Cleveland 5, St. Louis 5.
2B-Beltran (7), Descalso (3), S.Robinson (5).
HR-Beltran (17). CS-A.Cabrera (3), YMolina
(1). S-Chambers. SF-Furcal.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Masterson L,2-6 7 5 1 1 0 6
Accardo 1 2 1 1 1 0
St. Louis
LohseW,6-1 72-33 0 0 2 4
Rzepczynski H,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Motte S,11-14 1 0 0 0 0 0
T-2:14.A-41,694 (43,975).


NL

Padres 5, Brewers 2
San Diego Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Venalerf 4 0 1 1 Hartib 5 0 0 0
Forsyth 2b 5 0 2 1 Aoki rf 5 1 1 0
Kotsay If 3 0 0 0 Braun If 5 0 1 0
Denorfiph-lf2 1 1 0 ArRmr3b 4 0 2 0
Headly3b 4 1 3 0 RWeks2b 4 01 1
Alonsolb 4 1 2 1 Ransm ss 2 1 0 0
Maybin cf 4 0 1 0 Morgan cf 3 0 1 0
JoBakrc 4 1 2 2 Mldndc 2 0 1 1
ECarer ss 4 1 1 0 Kottars ph-c 1 0 0 0
Cashnrp 1 0 0 0 Fiersp 0 0 0 0
Ohlndrfp 2 0 0 0 Conrad ph 1 00 0
Grgrsnp 1 0 0 0 MParrp 0 00 0
Thtchrp 0 0 0 Greenph 0 0 0 0
Thayerp 0 00 0 CGomzph 1 01 0
Streetp 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 5135 Totals 33 2 8 2
San Diego 001 012 100 5
Milwaukee 100 100 000 2
DP-Milwaukee 2. LOB-San Diego 8, Mil-
waukee 11. 2B-Venable (13), Denorfia (10),
Ar.Ramirez (17), R.Weeks (9). SB-E.Cabrera
(5), Aoki (4). S-Fiers 2.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Cashner 21-32 1 1 2 5
OhlendorfW, 1-0 41-35 1 1 2 4
GregersonH,7 1 0 0 0 0 2
Thatcher 0 1 0 0 0 0
ThayerH,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
StreetS,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
FiersL,1-2 6 10 4 4 1 6
M.Parra 2 2 1 1 1 2
Fr.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 2
Thatcher pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Gregerson (Morgan). WP-Cashner
2, Fiers, Fr.Rodriguez.
T-3:16. A-41,604 (41,900).


Interleague

Angels 11, Rockies 5
Los Angeles Colorado
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout cf-lf 5 3 3 2 Fowler cf 4 0 0 0
TrHntr rf 4 3 3 0 Scutaro ss 5 1 2 1
Pujolslb 3 2 2 4 CGnzlzlf 5 1 2 1
Trumolf 5 0 0 2 Giambilb 4 0 1 0
Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 Pachec 3b 2 00 0
HKndrc2b 5 1 3 1 Moscosp 1 0 1 0
Callasp 3b 3 1 3 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0
Aybarss 5 0 0 1 EYong ph 1 0 0 0
Hester c 5 1 1 0 Ottavinp 0 0 0 0
Haren p 2 0 0 0 MtRynlp 0 00 0
Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Cuddyr ph 1 0 0 0
Calhon ph 1 0 0 0 Colvin rf 4 2 3 2
Takhshp 0 0 0 0 Nievesc 4 01 0
Isrnghs p 0 0 0 0 LeMahi2b 4 01 0
Frieri p 0 0 0 0 Francis p 0 0 0 0
Nelson 3b 3 1 2 1
Totals 38111510 Totals 38513 5
Los Angeles 231 202 010 11
Colorado 110 011 100 5
DP-Los Angeles 1, Colorado 1. LOB-Los An-
geles 6, Colorado 9. 2B-Giambi (4), Moscoso
(1). HR-Pujols (9), Scutaro (3), C.Gonzalez
(15), Colvin 2 (5), Nelson (2). SB-Trout 2 (13),
Tor.Hunter (2), H.Kendrick (4). S-Haren, Fran-
cis. SF-Pujols.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Haren W,4-6 51-310 4 4 1 4
Hawkins 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Takahashi 1 1 1 1 0 1
Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 1 0
Frieri 1 1 0 0 0 1
Colorado
Francis L,0-1 31-310 8 8 1 1
Moscoso 22-34 2 2 2 2
Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2
Ottavino 1 0 1 1 1 0
Mat.Reynolds 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-Francis.
T-3:21. A-37,801 (50,398).

Tigers 3, Reds 2
Detroit Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 4 0 0 0 Cozart ss 5 00 0
Boesch rf 4 1 1 0 Heisey cf 4 1 2 0
Berry If 0 0 0 0 Vottolb 2 1 1 0
MiCarr3b 3 0 0 0 BPhllps2b 3 0 0 0
Fielder lb 4 1 2 2 Bruce rf 4 0 1 0
DYong If 4 0 0 0 Ludwckl If 3 00 0
Benoitp 0 0 0 0 Frazier3b 4 0 1 2
Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 0 0 0
RSantg ss 4 1 2 1 Arroyo p 2 01 0
Lairdc 4 0 1 0 Negronph 0 00 0
Worth2b 3 0 1 0 Marshll p 0 00 0
Verlndr p 1 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Villarrl p 0 0 0 0 Cairo ph 1 0 0 0
HPerezph 1 0 0 0
D.Kelly If-rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 37 3 Totals 32 2 6 2
Detroit 010 100 010 3
Cincinnati 000 200 000 2
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 6, Cincinnati 8.
2B-Boesch (11), Heisey (7), Votto (26), Bruce
(15). HR-Fielder (10), R.Santiago (2). S-Ver-
lander.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Verlander 6 6 2 2 3 9
VillarrealW,2-1 1 0 0 0 2 1
BenoitH,15 1 0 0 0 0 2
ValverdeS,11-14 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
Arroyo 7 5 2 2 0 4
MarshallL,1-3 2-3 2 1 1 1 0
Ondrusek 11-30 0 0 1 0
WP-Villarreal 2, Ondrusek.
T-3:06. A-42,443 (42,319).

White Sox 10, Astros 1
Houston Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Altuve 2b 3 0 1 0 De Aza cf 5 24 1
Bixler If 4 0 1 0 Bckhm 2b 5 2 3 3
Lowriess 4 1 2 1 A.Dunndh 4 1 2 5
JDMrtndh 4 0 1 0 Konerklb 2 01 0
Maxwllcf 4 0 0 0 Lillirdglb 1 0 0 0
Wallaclb 4 0 1 0 Riosrf 5 02 1
CSnydrc 4 0 0 0 Przynsc 500 0
MDwns 3b 3 0 0 0 AIRmrz ss 5 1 2 0
Bogsvc rf 3 0 0 0 JrDnks If 5 22 0
EEscor3b 3 2 1 0
Totals 33 16 1 Totals 401017
10
Houston 000 000 001 1
Chicago 000 051 04x 10
E-M.Downs (2), Altuve (8). LOB-Houston 6,
Chicago 10. HR-Lowrie (12), A.Dunn (19).
SB-Jor.Danks (1). CS-De Aza (5). SF-






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pocono 400 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday at
Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 179.598 mph.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 178.866.
3. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 178.582.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 178.575.
5. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 178.543.
6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 178.228.
7. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 178.158.
8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 177.939.
9. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 177.862.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 177.823.
11. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 177.658.
12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 177.536.
13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 177.518.
14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 177.501.
15. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 177.204.
16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 177.026.
17. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
176.988.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 176.852.
19. (22) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 176.803.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 176.658.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 176.543.
22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 176.419.
23. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 176.16.
24. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 176.149.
25. (51) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 176.074.
26. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 175.596.
27. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 175.575.
28. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 175.387.
29. (43) AricAlmirola, Ford, 175.159.
30. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 175.073.
31. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 174.88.
32. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 173.943.
33. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 173.869.
34. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 173.853.
35. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 173.497.
36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 173.24.
37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 171.854.
38. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 171.52.
39. (74) Stacy Compton, Chevrolet, 171.155.
40. (36) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 167.411.
41. (32) Reed Sorenson, Ford, owner points.
42. (10) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, owner points.
43. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 170.345.
Failed to Qualify
44. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 170.004.


Yankees 4, Mets 2
New York (N) NewYork (A)
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Nwnhsrf 2010 Jeterss 31 1 0
Hrstnph-rf 1 010 Grndrsncf 32 1 1
Vldspnph 1 000 Rdrgzdh 40 1 1
A.Torres cf 4 000 Cano2b 40 1 0
D.Wright3b 4 111 Teixeira lb 21 1 2
Duda dh 4 010 Ibanez If 30 1 0
Murphy2b 4 000 Wisel If 00 0 0
I.Davislb 2 010 Swisherrf 30 0 0
Bay If 4 000 Chavez3b 30 0 0
Thole c 4 010 Martin c 30 0 0
Quintanilla ss41 21
Totals 34 2 82 Totals 28 4 6 4
New York (N) 001 001 000 2
New York (A) 100 002 01x 4
DP-New York (N) 2. LOB-New York (N) 8,
New York (A) 4. 2B-Nieuwenhuis (9). HR-
D.Wright (8), Quintanilla (1), Granderson (18),
Teixeira (11). SB-Hairston (3). CS-Nieuwen-
huis (2).
IP H RER BB SO
New York (N)
Gee L,4-4 7 5 3 3 3 5
Parnell 1 1 1 1 0 2
New York (A)
PHughesW,6-5 6 1-3 6 2 2 2 6
LoganH,6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Wade H,7 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
RapadaH,3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano S,9-9 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Gee (Teixeira). Balk-Gee.
T-2:48. A-48,575 (50,291).
Rays 13, Marlins 4
Tampa Bay Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Rhyms3b 4 0 0 0 Reyesss 4 1 1 0
CRamsp 0 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0
DJnngs If-cf 5 0 1 1 HRmrz 3b 3 0 1 0
Joyce rf 5 0 0 0 DMrph pr-3b 1 1 0 0
BUptoncf 4 1 1 0 Stantonrf 4 1 2 1
Matsui ph-lf 1 1 1 0 Ruggin cf 3 1 2 3
C.Penalb 2 3 1 0 Kearnslb 4 0 1 0
Suttonph-1lbl 0 0 0 DSolanl If 4 0 1 0
Zobrist2b 3 4 3 4 J.Buckc 4 0 0 0
EJhnsn ss 5 24 3 Zamrnp 0 00 0
JMolinc 4 2 2 3 Gaudinp 2 0 0 0
MMoorp 2 0 0 1 Coghlnph 1 0 0 0
WDavis p 1 0 1 0 SRosari p 0 0 0 0
SRdrgz pr-3b1 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Cishekp 0 0 0 0
Hayes ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 38131412 Totals 35 4 8 4
Tampa Bay 052 020 031 13
Miami 000 004 000 4
DP-Tampa Bay 1, Miami 2. LOB-Tampa Bay
5, Miami 6.2B-Matsui (1), J.Molina (5), Stan-
ton (17), Ruggiano (3). HR-Zobrist 2 (8), Rug-
giano (2). S-M.Moore.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.MooreW,3-5 6 5 4 4 2 9
W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 0
C.Ramos 2 2 0 0 0 2
Miami
Zambrano L,4-4 21-35 7 7 3 1
Gaudin 42-33 2 2 0 2
S.Rosario 0 4 3 3 0 0
Choate 1 0 0 0 1 0
Cishek 1 2 1 1 2 0
S.Rosario pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
T-3:11. A-30,963 (37,442).
Pirates 5, Royals 3
Kansas City Pittsburgh


ab r h bi


ab rh bi


AGordn If 3 1 0 0 Presley If 5 0 2 1
YBtncr2b 5 1 1 2 Walker2b 3 0 0 1
Butler 1b 5 0 2 0 AMcCtcf 3 0 0 0
Mostks3b 4 0 1 0 GJoneslb 3 0 0 1
Francr cf 4 0 1 0 Resop p 0 0 0 0
Hosmerrf 4 1 2 0 Slaten p 0 0 0 0
B.Penac 4 0 0 0 McGehlb 1 0 1 0
AEscorss 40 0 PAIvrz 3b 2 1 0 0
Mazzar p 2 0 1 1 Tabata rf 3 1 0 0
KHerrrp 0 0 0 0 Barajsc 3 1 2 0
CRonsnph 1 0 0 0 Barmesss 4 1 1 1
Crow p 0 00 0 JMcDnl p 1 00 0
LColmnp 0 0 0 0 Hagueph-lb2 1 0 0
Giavtllph 1 00 0 JHughsp 0 00 0
GHIIndp 0 0 0 0 Mercer ph 0 0 0 0
Hanrhnp 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 39 3 Totals 30 5 6 4
Kansas City 002 100 000 3
Pittsburgh 000 500 00x 5
E-B.Pena (2), Resop (2). LOB-Kansas City
9, Pittsburgh 8.2B-Hosmer 2 (11), McGehee
(6). HR-Y.Betancourt (3). SB-A.Gordon (2),
Butler (1), Presley 2 (5), Walker (5). CS-Mer-


cer (1).

Kansas City
Mazzaro L,2-1
K.Herrera
Crow
L.Coleman
G.Holland
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald
Resop
Slaten H,2
J.Hughes W,2-0H,5
Hanrahan S,17-19


IP H RERBBSO


Resop pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Mazzaro pitched to 4 batters in the 4th.
HBP-by Mazzaro (Tabata).
T-3:14. A-39,312 (38,362).


FOr the record


F== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S. CASH 3 (early)
.. .. 1-9-7
CASH 3 (late)
Vs -So 4-4-0

B PLAY 4 (early)
7-1-1-2
PLAY 4 (late)
5-8-4-8

--d ~ LOTTERY
Fo ERa Lottey 13-22-27-36-43-52
XTRA
POWERBALL 5
18 22 45 56 57 Fantasy 5 numbers were unavailable
POWER BALL at press time. For those numbers,
27 see Monday's Entertainment page.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (TNT) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Pocono 400. From
Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pa.
2 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing From San
Bernardino, Calif. (taped)
2 p.m. (FOX) Formula One Racing Canadian Grand Prix.
From Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, Super Regional -
LSU vs. Stony Brook. From Baton Rouge, La.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, Super Regional -
Florida State vs. Stanford. From Tallahassee, Fla.
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, Super Regional -
Texas Christian vs. UCLA. From Los Angeles. (If necessary)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) New York Mets at New York Yankees
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Minnesota Twins
8 p.m. (ESPN) Detroit Tigers at Cincinnati Reds
BICYCLING
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Criterium du Dauphine, Stage 7. From
Morzine to ChAtel (same-day tape)
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour de Suisse, Stage 2. From Verbania to
Verbier (same-day tape)
GOLF
2 p.m. (GOLF) Wegmans LPGA Championship, final round.
From Pittsford, N.Y.
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour FedEx St. Jude Classic, final round.
From Tournament Players Club at Southwind in Memphis, Tenn.
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Regions Tradition,
final round. From Shoal Creek, Ala. (same-day tape)
GYMNASTICS
4 p.m. (NBC) 2012 Visa Championships. From St. Louis
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) CBR West Texas Shootout. Coverage from
El Paso, Texas (taped)
SOCCER
5:30 a.m. (ESPN2) 2012 UEFA European Championship
Germany vs. Portugal. From Lviv, Ukraine (same-day tape)
11:45 a.m. (ESPN) 2012 UEFA European Championship
Spain vs. Italy. From Gdansk, Poland
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2012 UEFA European Championship Re-
public of Ireland vs. Croatia. From Poznan, Poland
1 a.m. (ESPN2) 2012 UEFA European Championship Spain
vs. Italy. From Gdansk, Poland (same-day tape)
TABLE TENNIS
3 a.m. (FAM) Asian Championships: Men's finals (taped)
TENNIS
9 a.m. (NBC) French Open Men's final
VOLLEYBALL
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Beach volleyball (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Dodgers 8, Mariners 3


Los Angeles Seattle
ab r h bi
DGordn ss 5 2 2 0 ISuzuki rf
EHerrr3b 5 1 2 1 Figgins If
JRiverlf 4 1 1 1 Carpph-lf
Coffey p 0 0 0 0 JMontr dh
Ethierdh-rf 4 1 0 0 Smoaklb
HrstnJr2b 4 2 3 5 Seager2b
Loneylb 3 0 1 1 Olivoc
A.Ellis c 4 0 2 0 MSndrs cf
GwynJ cf 4 1 2 0 Liddi3b
Cstllns rf-lf 4 0 1 0 Ryan ss
Totals 37 8148 Totals
Los Angeles 302 000 012
Seattle 000 300 000


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
3 000
0000
3 0 1 0
4 1 1 0
4 1 1 3
3 00 0
34 000
3 0 0 0
303 4 3
8
3


DP-Seattle 3. LOB-Los Angeles 5, Seattle 5.
2B-Hairston Jr. 2 (8), J.Montero (11). HR-
Hairston Jr. (2), Olivo (5). SB-D.Gordon 2 (16),
E.Herrera (3), Gwynn Jr. (9). CS-Loney (3),
J.Montero (2). SF-J.Rivera.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
KershawW,5-3 7 4 3 3 2 12
BelisarioH,6 1 0 0 0 1 1
Coffey 1 0 0 0 1 1
Seattle
VargasL,7-5 6 9 5 5 1 3
Iwakuma 11-32 1 1 0 1
Luetge 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kelley 2-3 3 2 2 1 1
Pryor 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Kershaw (J.Montero).
T-3:09. A-30,287 (47,860).
Major league leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Konerko, Chicago, .363; Hamil-
ton, Texas, .338;Trumbo, Los Angeles, .321; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .317; Fielder, Detroit, .316;
Jeter, New York, .314; De Aza, Chicago, .310.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 46; De Aza, Chicago,
43; Granderson, NewYork, 42; Hamilton, Texas,
42; Kipnis, Cleveland, 42; Cano, New York, 40;
AdJones, Baltimore, 40.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 59; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 51; ADunn, Chicago, 45; Bautista, Toronto,
43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 43; Willingham, Min-
nesota, 41; Fielder, Detroit, 39.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 76; Jeter, New
York, 76; Hamilton, Texas, 74; Fielder, Detroit,
71; AdJones, Baltimore, 71; De Aza, Chicago,
70; Konerko, Chicago, 70.
DOUBLES-AdGonzalez, Boston, 22; Cano,
NewYork, 20; Kinsler, Texas, 20; Ortiz, Boston,
19; Willingham, Minnesota, 18; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 17; AGordon, Kansas City, 17; Seager,
Seattle, 17; Sweeney, Boston, 17.
TRIPLES-JWeeks, Oakland, 4; 12 tied at 3.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 22; ADunn,
Chicago, 19; Granderson, New York, 18;
Bautista, Toronto, 17; Encarnacion, Toronto, 17;
AdJones, Baltimore, 17; Reddick, Oakland, 14.
STOLEN BASES-RDavis, Toronto, 14; Kip-
nis, Cleveland, 14; De Aza, Chicago, 13; Trout,
Los Angeles, 13; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 11;
Dyson, Kansas City, 10; MIzturis, Los Angeles,
10; JWeeks, Oakland, 10.
PITCHING-Sale, Chicago, 8-2; Price, Tampa
Bay 8-3; MHarrison, Texas, 8-3; 8 tied at 7.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 95;
Sabathia, New York, 86; FHernandez, Seattle,
81; Scherzer, Detroit, 80; Darvish, Texas, 77;
Shields, Tampa Bay, 76; Sale, Chicago, 76.
SAVES-CPerez, Cleveland, 19; JiJohnson,
Baltimore, 18; Rodney, Tampa Bay 17; Capps,
Minnesota, 14; Broxton, Kansas City, 14;
Aceves, Boston, 14; Nathan, Texas, 12.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-MeCabrera, San Francisco, .364;
Votto, Cincinnati, .362; DWright, NewYork, .355;
YMolina, St. Louis, .337; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, .325; Altuve, Houston, .325; Pagan, San
Francisco, .320; CGonzalez, Colorado, .320;
Prado, Atlanta, .320.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 46; MeCabr-
era, San Francisco, 44; Pence, Philadelphia, 43;
Uggla, Atlanta, 43; Bourn, Atlanta, 42; Furcal,
St. Louis, 41; DWright, NewYork, 40.
RBI-Ethier, Los Angeles, 48; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 46; Beltran, St. Louis, 45; Stanton,
Miami, 41; Uggla, Atlanta, 41; Freese, St. Louis,
40; LaRoche, Washington, 40.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 87;
Bourn, Atlanta, 80; Altuve, Houston, 76; Pagan,
San Francisco, 74; SCastro, Chicago, 73; Fur-
cal, St. Louis, 73; Votto, Cincinnati, 72; DWright,
New York, 72.
DOUBLES-Votto, Cincinnati, 26; Cuddyer,
Colorado, 20; Ethier, Los Angeles, 19; DWright,
New York, 19; Altuve, Houston, 17; Prado, At-
lanta, 17; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 17.
TRIPLES-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 7;
Fowler, Colorado, 6; SCastro, Chicago, 5;
OHudson, San Diego, 5; 8 tied at 4.
HOME RUNS-Beltran, St. Louis, 17; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 15; Braun, Milwaukee, 14;
Stanton, Miami, 14; Bruce, Cincinnati, 13; Hart,
Milwaukee, 13; Pence, Philadelphia, 13.
STOLEN BASES-Bonifacio, Miami, 20;
Campana, Chicago, 18; Bourn, Atlanta, 16;
DGordon, Los Angeles, 16; Reyes, Miami, 16;
SCastro, Chicago, 15; Maybin, San Diego, 14;
Schafer, Houston, 14.
PITCHING-Dickey NewYork, 9-1; Lynn, St.
Louis, 9-2; Capuano, Los Angeles, 8-2; GGon-
zalez, Washington, 8-2; Hamels, Philadelphia,
8-3; 6 tied at 7.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 92;
GGonzalez, Washington, 89; Hamels, Philadel-
phia, 86; MCain, San Francisco, 82; Greinke,
Milwaukee, 81; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 81;
Dickey NewYork, 78.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 18; Hanrahan,
Pittsburgh, 16; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 16;
SCasilla, San Francisco, 16; FFrancisco, New
York, 15; Myers, Houston, 14; Putz, Arizona, 12;
HBell, Miami, 12.

BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Recalled RHP
Tommy Hunterfrom Norfolk (IL). Optioned RHP
Miguel Gonzalez from Norfolk.
BOSTON RED SOX Designated OF Mar-
Ion Byrd for assignment. Transferred OF Jason
Repko to the 60-day DL.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Placed RHP Fe-
lipe Paulino on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP
Nate Adcock from Omaha (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Activated RHP
LaTroy Hawkins from the 15-day DL. Optioned
RHP Bobby Cassevah to Salt Lake City (PCL).
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES Agreed to terms
with LHP Jeff Francis on a one-year contract.
Designated RHP Esmil Rogers for assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS Recalled INF Matt
Downs from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed OF
Fernando Martinez on the 7-day concussion DL.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS- Activated 3B
Pablo Sandoval from the 15-day DL.


Associated Press
Joey Logano, with Home Depot Toyota Camry, left, is congratulated Saturday by his Crew
Chief Jason Ratcliff after winning the pole position for the Sprint Cup Series Pocono 400 at
Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pa.



Logano sets track record



at Pocono Raceway


Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. -
Thanks to a repave that led
to blistering speeds, Pocono
Raceway's track record was
topped 36 times.
Joey Logano had the
fastest speed of them all.
Logano turned a lap of
179.598 mph on Saturday to
set the track record during
qualifying for the NASCAR
Sprint Cup race at Pocono.
Logano won his first pole of
the season and fourth in 125
career Sprint Cup starts.
He drove the No. 20 Toy-
ota around the 2 1/2-mile
track in 50.112 seconds.
"It's cool to get a pole
here," Logano said. "A new
track record, too."
Logano went out 18th out
of 44 cars and waited for
about 45 minutes until the
final qualifying lap was
turned and he could cele-
brate. Kasey Kahne held the
record of 172.533 mph set on
June 11, 2004. Consider this:
Kahne starts 10th Sunday
and went 177.823 mph.
Carl Edwards joins
Logano on the front row for
Sunday's 400-mile race.
Paul Menard, Kyle Busch
and Denny Hamlin round
out the top five.
Joe Gibbs Racing put
Logano, Busch and Hamlin
in the top five.
Drivers have raved about
a repave that points leader
Greg Biffle said was "glass
smooth at 200 mph."
Pocono had absorbed
decades of criticism from
drivers who said the race
was too long, outdated, and



HOCKEY
Continued from Page B1

point shot by a Devils de-
fenseman hit off Voynov and
caromed past his goal-
tender.
This one turned out to be
a winner because Brodeur
stood tall the rest of the way
and had one shot hit off the
goalpost and had a goal by
Jarret Stoll on a second-pe-
riod power play waved off
because he hit the rebound
with his stick too high.
Brodeur's biggest save
might have been with 7.6
seconds to go in regulation
when he stopped a slap shot
by Mike Richards from the
right circle.
The Kings, overtime win-
ners in the first two games
in the series in New Jersey,
never got another shot and
Brodeur took a patented
victory swig of the Gatorade
bottle on top of his net, as he
has done for 18 years.
However, there was no
overwhelming celebration
from the home team. Slaps
on the pads, a few head
nods, then it was off to the



HEAT
Continued from Page B1

the perimeter of the court,
preparing for the East tro-
phy presentation.
Down by seven at the half
and eight early in the third
quarter, Miami started claw-
ing back. An 8-0 run tied it at
59, capped by Wade hitting a
jumper.
There were six lead
changes and five more ties
in the final 7 minutes of the
third. Bosh scored with 29
seconds left for the last of
those ties, and it was 73-all
going into the fourth.


unsafe. Pocono cut the race
to 400 miles for the two Cup
races this season and recent
safety upgrades have driv-
ers suddenly raving about
the track.
It's a new era at Pocono.
Logano and the rest of the
field posted the speeds to
prove it.
The pole continues a re-
cent uptick of solid results
for Logano. Only 22, Logano
is entering a make-or-break
season at JGR in the final
year of a four-year deal.
He's insisted in the past his
contract status has not
added pressure to him. Con-
sidered a phenom when he
broke into NASCAR, Logano's
lone Cup win came in 2009.
He's fared much better on
the second-tier Nationwide
Series. Logano has 13 ca-
reer Nationwide wins, four
this season, including last
week at Dover International
Speedway
"Every time we've been in
position to win a race, we've
won that race," Logano said.
Logano finished a season-
high eighth in the Cup race
at Dover and has two top-10s
in his last three starts. It
could be a sign that things
are finally falling into place
in his first season with crew
chief Jason Ratcliff.
"I think Jason and I are
starting to get stuff figured
out," Logano said. "It's the
first year Jason's worked
with Sprint Cup cars.
There's little things that are
different, obviously Work-
ing with me, he's got to learn
kind of what I think. It takes
a while to figure each other


locker room.
The Kings meanwhile,
heads down, made a bee
line for their locker room.
As the crowd filed out,
again to the 1984 Bruce
Springsteen hit, "Glory Days,"
the chants of "Mar-tee! Mar-
tee! were loud and long.
The Kings seemingly had
the territorial advantage in the
opening period but they also
made the biggest mistake.
And it came from a guy
who has been almost flaw-
less in the postseason -
Quick.
With Willie Mitchell serv-
ing the final 20 seconds of a
penalty for interference,
Quick played a puck in front
of his net and tried to send
it around the net into the
corner The puck slid off his
stick, went around the net
and barely made it to the
right edge of the crease.
Parise, who had not
scored in five games, darted
to the edge of the net and
stuffed it home a split sec-
ond before Quick could
cover the corner of the net.
Earlier in the penalty,
Quick made a stop on a
point-blank blast by Travis
Zajac. The puck momentar-


Six games decided noth-
ing, and nothing was decided
in Game 7 until the very last
moments, neither team
yielding much of anything.
Batter's 3-pointer with 8:06
left in the third cut Boston's
lead at the time to 59-57.
And back and forth they
went.
For the next 13 minutes, a
span of 46 dizzying posses-
sions, neither team led by
more than two points.
That changed when Bosh
his third 3-pointer with 7:17
left. James made a runner,
and suddenly the Heat had
their biggest lead of the
night to that point, 88-82 with
6:54 remaining.


out. I think we're getting
there. It still takes time."
Logano also posted the
fastest lap in Friday's prac-
tice. NASCAR has camped
out in the Poconos for most
of the week with an added
two days for testing because
of the new surface.
"Joey had to go show off
for everybody and go do
what he did in practice,"
Edwards said.
The early returns show it
could be a unique race at
Pocono that depends more
on speed than fuel mileage.
Mark Martin is sixth,
Regan Smith seventh, and
Dale Earnhardt Jr, Marcos
Ambrose and Kahne com-
plete the top 10.
"We've been here for four
days and everybody's tails is
whupped and everybody is
about tired of each other,"
Earnhardt said. "But we're
trying to do the best we can.
I feel good about our car.
We're just ready to get the
race started and we're
ready to race since we've
been here so long. It's been
a lot longer than necessary
to get ready for this race and
get this track ready"
Maybe an extra day
tacked on to the end might
have helped Martin Truex
Jr Truex, who starts 22nd, is
without crew chief Chad
Johnston. Johnston is home
waiting for the birth of his
child and was not expected
at the track Sunday
"It's never the same when
they're not here," Truex
said. "You can't see exactly
what's going on and kind of
feel things out."


ily got through his pads and
lay in the crease, but Drew
Doughty quickly cleared it.
While Quick made the
bad play that led to the goal,
he also made a big stop on a
point-blank shot by Zajac in
the opening seconds of the
power play that kept the
Devils off the scoreboard.
The Kings were unlucky
not to have the lead in the
opening minutes. Williams
picked up a loose puck in
the Devils' zone and hit the
right goalpost dead on with
a blast that could be heard
throughout the sold-out
Prudential Center.
Williams tied it early in
the second period, with a
great individual effort. He
avoided a check skating into
the Devils' zone, cut to the
center of the ice and ripped
a 30-foot shot into the upper
corner of the net past a
screened Brodeur.
Minutes later, Brodeur
stopped Stoll with a sliding
save on a breakaway
Quick, who was outstand-
ing making 17 saves,
stopped Zajac on a back-
hander in close before Sal-
vador gave the Devils the
lead with his fluky goal.


They were on their way
James made a 3-pointer
as the shot clock was expir-
ing with just under 6 min-
utes left, making it 91-84.
James lost a behind-the-
back dribble, only to have
the ball skip right into Bat-
tier's hands.
Bosh scored from inside
the lane to end that posses-
sion. Wade scored on the
next one, the lead was 95-86
with 3:23 left, Boston called
time and the building was
simply rocking.
A three-point play by
Wade with 2:53 left all but
sealed it, the Heat were up
12, and Oklahoma City
beckoned.


B4 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


After three rounds,


Associated Press


MEMPHIS, Tenn. U.S. Ryder
Cup captain Davis Love III shot
his third straight 2-under 68 on
Saturday to join Nick O'Hern and
John Merrick atop the leaderboard
at the windy St. Jude Classic.
Love only committed to play in
Memphis recently, waiting to
make sure he was healthy enough
to use this event as a final tuneup
for the U.S. Open after qualifying
Monday in Columbus, Ohio. Love,
who hasn't won since 2008, had
three birdies and only one bogey
Saturday to match O'Hern and
Merrick at 6 under 204. O'Hern
had a 67, and Merrick shot 69.
Rory McIlroy, who will try to de-
fend his U.S. Open title next week
at The Olympic Club in San Fran-
cisco, had a one-stroke lead when
he teed off. He shot a 2-over 72 in
a round that featured six bogeys
and four birdies to drop in a tie at
5 under
Dustin Johnson, making his sec-
ond start after a 2 1/2-month layoff
recovering from back pain, also
was in the group at 5 under after a
67. J.B. Holmes was in that knot
atop the leaderboard going to No.
18, but hit his tee shot into a
bunker and three-putted for a
double bogey to finish at 4 under.
Conditions got tougher Saturday
as the greens firmed up at the TPC
Southwind course along with the
wind picking up through the day
and gusting up to 23 mph at times.


Love heads up three-way tie

S Britain, Ireland cut US
f lead to I in Curtis Cup


PGA Tour officials already have
pushed up tee times Sunday
morning and will use threesomes
off both tees hoping to squeeze in
the final round before thunder-
storms expected in the afternoon.
It was a wild day Saturday with
eight players having at least a
share of the lead at some point
starting with McIlroy, who teed off
with six just a stroke behind. McIl-
roy bogeyed two of his first five
holes to fall off the pace. He tied
Kevin Stadler at 7 under only to
bogey No. 9 and fall back again.
The 48-year-old Love took ad-
vantage of his experience and 20
PGA Tour wins to keep his ball out
of the rough, giving himself better
chances to score. He said he only
hit driver a couple times, instead
using his 3-wood or irons for strong
tee shots, leaving him plenty of wedge
shots in hitting 14 of 18 greens.
Love birdied No. 6 after hitting
a wedge from 94 yards to 5 feet for
his first. He rolled in a 10-footer
for birdie on the par-3 11th, and
he grabbed a piece of the lead
with a 3-foot birdie putt on the
par-5 No. 16.
Stadler birdied three of his first
six holes and had a 3-stroke lead
when he got to 9 under through
eight. But he hit his approach on
the par-4 No. 9 into the water
fronting the green and bogeyed
Nos. 14 and 15. He finished with a
71 and was tied at 5 under.
The leaderboard just kept
changing up and down.


When Stadler hit into the water
fronting the green at the par-3 No. 14,
he wound up with a bogey dropping
him into a four-way tie 6 under for
the lead. Love made that a five-
way tie when he birdied No. 16
just as Stadler yanked his tee shot
on No. 15 so left past a cart path he
had to take a drop and a penalty
stroke on his way to a second
straight bogey
Kevin Kisner had a piece of the
lead when he tried chipping onto the
green with his third shot on the
par-4 17th only to see the ball go
only a few feet That led to bogey


Lehman takes 1-stroke
lead in Regions Tradition
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Defending
champion Tom Lehman shot a 4-under
68 on Saturday to take a two-stroke
lead after the third round of the Regions
Tradition, a Champions Tour major.
Lehman had a 10-under 206 total.
Peter Senior and Jeff Sluman were
tied for second.
Bill Glasson fell three shots back
with a 74. He was tied with Russ
Cochran, Brad Bryant and Fred Funk.
Bryant and Funk shot 71, and
Cochran had a 72.


NAIRN, Scotland Britain and Ire-
land moved within a point of the
United States in the Curtis Cup on
Saturday, taking 2 1/2 of three points
in the afternoon fourball matches.
The United States led 6 1/2-5 1/2
entering the eight singles matches
Sunday. The Americans need 10 points
to retain the Cup, while Britain and
Ireland needs 10 1/2 to regain it. The
United States has won the biennial
amateur competition the last seven
times and leads the series 27-6-3.
"It is absolutely fantastic and I could
not have asked more from the girls,"
B&I captain Tegwen Matthews said.
"The Curtis Cup is all I have thought
about for the last two years and to be
now just a point behind is so exciting."
Brooke Pancake and Austin Ernst
earned a half-point for the United
States in the afternoon matches, halv-
ing with Leona Maguire and Bronte
Law. Britain and Ireland's Holly
Clyburn and Kelly Tidy beat Emily Tu-
bert and Amy Anderson 1-up, and
Stephanie Meadow and Pamela
Pretswell topped Erica Popson and
Tiffany Lua 2-up.
In the morning foursomes, Ander-
son and Lua beat Pretswell and
Charley Hull 3 and 2, and Ernst and
Pancake edged Clyburn and Amy
Boulden 2-up. For Britain and Ireland,
Meadow and Maguire topped Lindy
Duncan and Lisa McCloskey 3 and 1.


FedEx St. Jude Classic
par scores
Saturday atTPC Southwind,
Memphis, Tenn.
Purse: $5.6 million,Yardage: 7,239, Par: 70.
Third round:
NickO'Hern 70-67-67-204 -6
Davis Love III 68-68-68 -204 -6
John Merrick 66-69-69-204 -6
Dustin Johnson 70-68-67-205 -5
Robert Allenby 68-70-67-205 -5
Kevin Kisner 69-66-70-205 -5
Chad Campbell 68-67-70-205 -5
Kevin Stadler 69-65-71 -205 -5
Rory Mcllroy 68-65-72-205 -5
J.B. Holmes 70-64-72-206 -4
FredrikJacobson 69-72-66-207 -3
Roberto Castro 73-68-66 -207 -3
Luke Guthrie 69-71-67-207 -3
Dustin Morris 71-69-67-207 -3
Ryan Palmer 74-66-67-207 -3
Woody Austin 72-68-67-207 -3
Jeff Overton 67-72-68 207 -3
Padraig Harrington 68-68-71 -207 -3
Jeff Maggert 66-68-73 207 -3
William McGirt 71-69-68 -208 -2
Henrik Stenson 72-66-70-208 -2
Daniel Chopra 72-65-71 -208 -2
Seung-Yul Noh 67-69-72-208 -2
Martin Laird 72-70-67-209 -1
Shaun Micheel 71-70-68-209 -1
Tim Clark 69-71-69-209 -1
Bryce Molder 69-71-69-209 -1
Duffy Waldorf 71-69-69 -209 -1
Chris Couch 70-70-69-209 -1
Ken Duke 68-68-73 -209 -1
Cameron Beckman 72-70-68-210 E
Brendon de Jonge 71-68-71 -210 E
Danny Lee 69-70-71 -210 E
Bill Lunde 71-68-71 -210 E
Greg Owen 72-67-71 -210 E
Sean O'Hair 70-69-71 210 E
John Peterson 72-65-73-210 E
Boo Weekley 70-67-73 210 E
Martin Flores 72-70-69 -211 +1
Billy Horschel 72-69-70-- 211 +1
Arjun Atwal 67-74-70 -211 +1
David Hearn 72-69-70-211 +1
Bob Estes 72-68-71 -211 +1
Charles Howell III 69-71-71 -211 +1
J.J. Killeen 68-69-74-- 211 +1
Bart Bryant 72-70-70 -212 +2
Patrick Sheehan 71-70-71-212 +2
Gary Christian 70-71-71 -212 +2
Craig Barlow 72-68-72-212 +2
George McNeill 72-68-72-212 +2
Ryo Ishikawa 72-67-73-212 +2
Shane Bertsch 71-68-73-212 +2
Lee Janzen 68-71-73-212 +2
Y.E.Yang 68-71-73 -212 +2
Robert Garrigus 74-65-73-- 212 +2
Paul Stankowski 69-69-74 -212 +2
Brett Wetterich 71-71-71 -213 +3
Gavin Coles 70-72-71 -213 +3
Tommy Gainey 72-70-71-213 +3
J.J. Henry 67-74-72-213 +3
Steven Bowditch 74-66-73-213 +3
Stuart Appleby 72-68-73-213 +3
Kent Jones 72-68-73-213 +3
Troy Kelly 68-71-74 -213 +3
John Daly 68-69-76 -213 +3
Troy Matteson 70-72-72 -214 +4
Kyle Stanley 71-70-73-214 +4
Mathew Goggin 70-71-73-214 +4
OmarUresti 70-72-73-215 +5
Chris Riley 70-71-74 -215 +5
Robert Gamez 72-69-74 -215 +5
Neal Lancaster 72-70-74-216 +6
Will Claxton 72-70-74-216 +6
Matt McQuillan 71-69-76 -216 +6
Jonathan Fly 78-64-75 -217 +7
Zack Miller 70-70-77-217 +7
Wegmans LPGA
Championship
par scores
Saturday at Locust Hill Country Club,
Pittsford, N.Y.
Purse: $2.5 million; Yardage: 6,534; Par: 72
Third round
Eun-HeeJi 75-68-69-212 -4
Karrie Webb 74-71-68-213 -3
Giulia Sergas 69-76-69-214 -2
Stacy Lewis 72-72-70-214 -2
Suzann Pettersen 71-72-71-214 -2
Inbee Park 72-70-72-214 -2
ShanshanFeng 72-73-70-215 -1
Jeong Jang 70-74-71-215 -1
Jennifer Johnson 73-71-71-215 -1
Sun Young Yoo 72-72-71-215 -1
Sydnee Michaels 72-71-72-215 -1
Paula Creamer 70-72-73-215 -1
MikaMiyazato 70-72-73-215 -1
Cristie Kerr 70-76-70-216 E
Jenny Shin 71-75-71-217 +1
Gerina Piller 74-71-72-217 +1
AiMiyazato 70-74-73-217 +1
Lizette Salas 74-70-73-217 +1
Karin Sjodin 75-69-73-217 +1
So Yeon Ryu 73-70-74-217 +1
Sandra Gal 71-71-75-217 +1
Se Ri Pak 70-71-76-217 +1
Morgan Pressel 74-75-69-218 +2
Na Yeon Choi 70-73-75-218 +2
Jodi Ewart 75-72-72-219 +3
I.K. Kim 73-73-73-219 +3
Sophie Gustafson 73-72-74-219 +3
Nicole Castrale 76-74-70-220 +4
Marcy Hart 72-75-73-220 +4
Hee Young Park 77-70-73-220 +4
Mina Harigae 74-72-74-220 +4


Lexi Thompson
Maude-Aimee Leblanc
Ryann O'Toole
Mi Jung Hur
Haru Nomura
Mariajo Uribe
Pornanong Phatlum
Christel Boeljon
Hee-Won Han
Brittany Lincicome
Beatriz Recari
Leta Lindley
Anna Nordqvist
Meaghan Francella
Haeji Kang
Alison Walshe
Chella Choi
JiYoung Oh
Candle Kung
Brittany Lang
Catriona Matthew
Katherine Hull
Amy Hung
Ilhee Lee
Karine Icher
Taylor Coutu
Sarah Jane Smith
Karen Stupples
Yani Tseng
Pat Hurst
Belen Mozo
Amelia Lewis
Mo Martin
Becky Morgan
Grace Park
Alena Sharp
Katie Futcher
Jessica Korda
Jennifer Rosales
Kris Tamulis
Stephanie Louden
Dewi Claire Schreefel


74-72-74-220
72-73-75-220
69-76-75-220
74-69-77-220
74-77-70-221
74-76-71-221
75-74-72-221
74-74-73-221
74-74-73-221
76-73-73-222
69-78-75-222
78-73-72-223
74-77-72-223
76-74-73-223
77-73-73-223
73-77-73-223
75-74-74-223
77-72-74-223
71-77-75-223
72-75-76-223
75-72-76-223
75-76-73-224
76-75-73-224
76-75-73-224
75-75-74-224
73-74-77-224
75-72-77-224
76-75-74-225
76-75-74-225
74-76-75-225
74-76-75-225
73-75-77-225
71-77-77-225
75-73-77-225
75-75-76-226
77-71-78-226
74-77-76-227
7474-74-79-227
73-77-78-228
74-74-80-228
73-78-80-231
76-74-81-231


Regions Tradition
par scores
Saturday at Shoal Creek, Birmingham, Ala.
Purse: $2.2 million, Yardage: 7,197, Par: 72.
Third round:
Tom Lehman 69-69-68-206 -10
Peter Senior 71-71-66- 208 -8
Jeff Sluman 70-68-70 -208 -8
Fred Funk 67-71-71 --209 -7
Brad Bryant 69-69-71 -209 -7
Bill Glasson 66-69-74-209 -7
Russ Cochran 69-68-72-209 -7
Chien Soon Lu 72-69-69-210 -6
Dan Forsman 66-73-71-210 -6
Bernhard Langer 68-71-71 -210 -6
Steve Pate 73-70-69-212 -4
Kenny Perry 74-67-71 -212 -4
Fred Couples 73-72-68 -213 -3
Jay Haas 73-72-68 -213 -3
Morris Hatalsky 70-73-70 -213 -3
Rod Spittle 73-70-70 -213 -3
Larry Mize 70-70-73-213 -3
David Frost 74-71-69-214 -2
Michael Allen 73-72-69-214 -2
Wayne Levi 70-71-73 -214 -2
Mark Calcavecchia 73-69-73-215 -1
Bob Tway 74-67-74 -215 -1
Mike Goodes 70-70-75-215 -1
Bruce Fleisher 69-72-75 -216 E
Jay Don Blake 74-74-69 -217 +1
Peter Jacobsen 74-71-72-217 +1
Tom Jenkins 71-73-73-217 +1
KirkTriplett 70-73-74-217 +1
Scott Simpson 73-75-70- 218 +2
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 73-74-71 -218 +2
Hal Sutton 73-72-73-218 +2
Steve Jones 77-71-71 -219 +3
Tom Pernice Jr. 77-70-72- 219 +3
Gary Hallberg 70-75-74- 219 +3
Corey Pavin 72-73-74 -219 +3
Joey Sindelar 70-75-74 -219 +3
Fulton Allem 72-71-76 219 +3
Loren Roberts 72-75-73-220 +4
Andrew Magee 72-74-74-220 +4
Jerry Pate 76-70-74 220 +4
Hale Irwin 72-71-77-220 +4
D.A.Weibring 76-73-72-221 +5
Larry Nelson 73-76-72-221 +5
Sandy Lyle 75-73-73 221 +5
Jim Thorpe 73-75-73-221 +5
Bruce Vaughan 74-73-74-221 +5
David Peoples 78-69-74 -221 +5
Mark Brooks 73-74-74-221 +5
David Eger 75-77-70 -222 +6
Tom Kite 80-71-71 222 +6
Mark McNulty 73-77-72-222 +6
Steve Lowery 76-74-72 222 +6
MarkWiebe 75-74-73-222 +6
Denis Watson 74-74-74-222 +6
John Cook 74-73-75-222 +6
Eduardo Romero 72-75-75-222 +6
Brad Faxon 73-70-79-222 +6
Chip Beck 76-72-75-223 +7
Roger Chapman 74-73-76 -223 +7
Craig Stadler 76-71-76 223 +7
Allen Doyle 79-77-68-224 +8
Olin Browne 71-81-72 -224 +8
Dana Quigley 78-71-75-224 +8
Gil Morgan 75-72-77-224 +8
Andy Bean 74-78-73-225 +9
Bobby Clampett 74-76-75-225 +9
Bob Gilder 75-71-79-225 +9
Ted Schulz 75-74-78-227 +11
Tom Purtzer 79-77-72-228 +12
Mike Reid 71-78-79-228 +12
Vicente Fernandez 77-77-75 229 +13
Keith Fergus 72-79-78 -229 +13
Fuzzy Zoeller 73-78-80-231 +15
Bobby Wadkins 82-76-77-235 +19
Mike McCullough 81-81-89-251 +35


LPGA Championship: Ji by 1


Associated Press

PITTSFORD, N.Y. -
Eun-Hee Ji shot a 3-under
69 on Saturday to take a
one-shot lead over Karrie
Webb after the third round
of the LPGA Championship.
Ji was 4 under at Locust
Hill. Webb had a 68, match-
ing Ji for the best round of
the tournament.
Giulia Sergas, who
shared the first-round lead
but had a 76 on Friday in the
wind-swept second round,
moved back near the top with
four birdies on the front nine
and also finished with a 69.
Sergas was tied at 2 under
with Stacy Lewis, Suzann
Pettersen and Inbee Park.
Lewis, a two-time winner in
her last three events, had a
70, Pettersen shot a 71, and
Park had a 72.
Paula Creamer was at or
near the top most of the day,
but faltered at the end and
finished with a 73. She was
in a seven-way tie at 1 under
Defending champion Yani
Tseng had her best round of
the three days, finishing with
at 74 after a 76 and a 75.
There were 24 players
within four shots of the lead
at the start of play. When
the day ended, there were
13, including 2010 cham-
pion Cristie Kerr, within
four shots of the top head-
ing to the final round.
Jennifer Johnson was
one of them after a 71. She
hit her first six fairways and
sank a pair of birdies on the
front nine, eagled the par-5
17th hole to reach 3 under,
then gave it back with a
double bogey at the closing
hole.
Still, Johnson was among
five Americans Sydnee
Michaels was the other -
in the hunt for the second
major of the year.
Over the first two days,
only 28 players broke par
and only six scored below
70. Webb added her name
to the latter list, matching Ji
for the best round of the
tournament as the course
played a lot easier than it
had the first two days.
The start of play on Sat-
urday was delayed 2 1/2
hours by rain, adding ten-
sion to the moment, but the
predicted storms held off.
That allowed the players,


Associated Press
Eun-Hee Ji reacts to her birdie on the sixth hole Saturday in the third round of the LPGA
Championship at Locust Hill Country Club in Pittsford, N.Y.


who went in threesomes off
both the first and 10th tees,
to finish without delay
Ji, who shot a 68 in the
second round, was in a six-
way tie two shots off the lead
to start the day She made
four birdies and a bogey on
the front nine and made the
turn tied for the lead at 3
under.
Ji, who won here at the
Wegmans LPGA in 2008, took
sole possession of the top spot
with a birdie at the par-5
11th hole. Creamer tied her
at 4 under with a birdie at
No. 12, but bogeyed the next
hole and two of her final
three to fall back.


Se Ri Pak, still not fully
recovered from a left shoul-
der injury suffered in April,
had been the picture of con-
sistency the first two
rounds, shooting 70 and 71,
and began the day with a
one-shot lead.
The magic was gone, though,
on this day, and it was evi-
dent after her first swing.
Pak drove the right rough
at the opening hole and was
unable to get up and down,
making bogey to fall out of
the lead. She followed that
by making three more bo-
geys before the turn and
added another at No. 10 to
fall to 2 over, six shots be-


hind Ji. Pak finished with a
76 and was five shots back.
Just how difficult were
the conditions at Locust
Hill over the first two
rounds? For Tseng, they
were insurmountable.
In winning the LPGA
Championship by 10 shots a
year ago, she set a tournament
record for most birdies with
26 and came in to defend her
title leading the tour in birdie
average (4.64). She managed
only five over the first 42
holes to go with a whopping
14 bogeys as the narrow
course proved the toughest
of challenges with its thick
rough and swirling winds.


homered and drove in three runs,
Hudson Randall pitched seven score-
less innings and Florida beat North
Carolina State 7-1 in the opener of
their best-of-three NCAA super re-
gional series Saturday
The top-seeded Gators (46-18) im-
proved to 9-0 against Atlantic Coast
Conference teams this season and
need one more win to advance to the
College World Series in Omaha, Neb.,
for the third consecutive year.
Florida and North Carolina State
play Game 2 on Sunday
Not even two rain delays totaling


TALLAHASSEE Saturday 's sched-
uled second game in the NCAA super re-
gionals between Florida State and
Stanford was postponed Saturday night
because of rain.
-____ It has been rescheduled for 7 p.m. Sunday.
Associated Press The Seminoles (47-16) have a 1-0 lead
North Carolina State players and staff in the best-of-three series. Stanford (41-
try to dry a bat in the eight inning 17) needs to win the second game to
Saturday in Gainesville. force a deciding third game on Monday.
nearly 3 hours slowed Florida. The NCAA officials waited roughly 90 min-
Gators led 5-0 behind Randall's gem utes Saturday as a steady rain fell and the
when heavy rain halted the game in weather radar showed little letup for the
the bottom of the seventh, next several hours.


Florida beats N.C. State 7-1 in opener

Associated Press Stanford-Florida State

(IAN.ESVILLE Mike 7Zunino rained out Saturday night


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 B5


Associated Press
Davis Love III hits from a bunker on the 18th fairway Saturday at the
St. Jude Classic in Memphis, Tenn. Love finished the day at 6-under-par 204.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Fire at De Niro's
NYC apartment
NEW YORK-A fire
that broke out in Robert
De Niro's Manhattan
apartment has been
extinguished.
A fire department
spokesman said no resi-
dents were injured in the
Friday af-
ternoon
fire on
Central
Park
West. The
fire was
contained
within an
Robert hour, and
De Niro
was
under investigation.
A spokesman for De
Niro confirmed the actor
lives in the building. The
spokesman, Stan Rosen-
field, said De Niro is out
of the country
Residents of the build-
ing told The New York
Times the fire started in
the laundry room of De
Niro's apartment The
newspaper said 95-year-
old actress Celeste Holm
and her husband, flank
Basile, who live in the
building, were in their
apartment as firefighters
fought to contain the
flames.

Hill responds to tax
evasion charges
NEWARK, N.J. -
Reclusive singer Lauryn
Hill said in an Internet
posting
Friday
she hasn't
paid taxes
since she
withdrew
from soci-
ety to
SN guarantee
Lauryn the safety
Hill and well-
being of
herself and her family
The eight-time Grammy
Award winner and South
Orange, N.J., resident was
charged this week with
willfully failing to file in-
come tax returns with the
Internal Revenue Serv-
ice. Federal prosecutors
said she didn't pay taxes
on more than $1.5 million
earned in 2005, 2006 and
2007 from recording and
film royalties.
Hill responded to the
federal charges in a
lengthy post on her Tum-
blr page Friday She de-
scribed how she has
rejected pop culture's
"climate of hostility, false
entitlement, manipula-
tion, racial prejudice,
sexism and ageism."


Influence abounds


Smith spreads her

words through

music and books
DAVID BAUDER
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK The success of
Patti Smith's memoir "Just Kids,"
about her friendship with Robert
Mapplethorpe, sealed her reputation
as a wide-ranging artist and writer at
the heartbeat of New York City.
The 2010 best-seller about grow-
ing up in New York's art scene won
the National Book Award for non-
fiction and is her most successful
project yet in any format. But
whether her new literary fans will
translate into more buyers of her
music is a question Smith has been
asking herself of late.
While making her new album
"Banga," out this week, Smith said
she "had more of a sense that I had
people I was speaking to in Amer-
ica, because I haven't felt that in a
long time."
She knows her audience. It's why
the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
member will be far from home this
summer supporting the release of
"Banga," her first album of original
music in eight years.
Three-quarters of Smith's music
sales are from outside of the United
States. At home, she's a niche artist
best remembered for the 1978 hit
"Because the Night" Overseas, she's
a star, with her biggest markets in
Germany and France, said Jenifer
Mallory, Columbia's vice president
of international marketing.
She's in Europe all summer, start-
ing a tour in Norway on June 23 and
ending in London in September
Smith said she thinks a European
audience responds better to a
multi-disciplinary artist She's got a
rock 'n' roll growl with the best of
them, but Smith considers herself
primarily a writer and also exhibits
her photography
"They can understand that I'm a
visual artist and a poet," said Smith,
who's 65. "They're more friendly to-
ward activism and strong political
stances against one's government.
When I would be banned and ques-
tioned in America, they're more
embracing in Europe."
Smith works hard to seed her suc-
cess in Europe, Mallory said. She
traveled to Paris and London in
April for several events and inter-
views previewing "Banga." It's a
disc of wide-ranging intellectual
heft, with songs inspired by the late
French actress Maria Schneider,
singer Amy Winehouse and novelist
Mikel Bulgakov She wrote during a
cruise on the Costa Concordia (be-


Assoaated Press
Patti Smith, a 2010 best-selling author, has a new album, "Banga," which
is out this week.


fore the sail where it ran aground
off Tuscany), and wrote "Nine" as a
birthday present for Johnny Depp
(they became friendly after spend-
ing time together in Puerto Rico,
where Depp was filming "Rum
Diary" and Smith interviewed him
for a magazine).
"Banga" is also a good bet to be
the only disc this year with a song
about explorer Amerigo Vespucci.
Smith takes natural pride in two
of the disc's musicians her son
Jackson, who plays guitar and
daughter Jesse, a pianist.
Jackson, who's 30 and married to
musician Meg White, picked up his
father's guitar and taught himself to
play after Fred "Sonic" Smith died
in 1994. Jesse, 25, is featured on the
album-closing version of Neil
Young's "After the Gold Rush."
"It's for their father," said Smith,
who lived in Detroit for many years
while married but is now back in
New York. "When we all play to-
gether, we really have him with us.


I'm just so happy that they have so
much of him within them. I just
want my kids to be healthy and
happy They can do whatever they
want. But they're musicians,
through and through."
Smith's maternal instincts partly
inspired "This is the Girl" about
Winehouse, who died last year It
was originally written as a poem, but
as the album was coming to a close,
bass player Tony Shanahan offered
some music that matched the lyric.
Smith was drawn to Winehouse
as a singer who had "one of the
most unique voices I had ever
heard," she said.
"I was amazed at this girl and
equally worried about her," she
said. "I thought, 'This poor girl is
going to ruin this tremendous gift,'
and of course it turned out much
worse than that. But I worried
about her I used to daydream about
talking to her and trying to inspire
her to take better care of herself.
But I never got that opportunity."


Video mashup honors Mister Rogers


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES Mister Rogers is
Girl Scouts gather making it a beautiful day in the neigh-
for 100th birthday borhood again.
Fred Rogers, the late host of "Mister
WASHINGTON Girl Rogers' Neighborhood," is featured in
Scouts from across the a PBS Digital Studios video mashup
country gathered on the that celebrates the power of imagina-
National Mall to cele- tion. The piece posted online Friday
brate the organization's turns clips from Rogers' PBS show
100th anniversary with into a sweetly inspiring music video,
celebrities including "Garden of Your Mind."
Mandy Moore. "Did you ever grow anything in the
Organizers said they garden of your mind? You can grow
expected 200,000 partici- ideas in the garden of your mind,"
pants Saturday for what Rogers said, his autotuned voice given
would be the largest gath- a gentle backbeat.
ering of Girl Scouts in his- The salute to the treasured chil-
tory They were hoping to dren's TV host drew reaction from the
set a Guinness World public and celebrities, with Neil
Record. Girls from every Patrick Harris calling it a "groovy"
state were expected to tribute in a Twitter posting, and Alyssa
attend. Milano tweeting the mashup will
Other activities included "make you cry tears of joy"
yoga, a fashion show and a Rogers' widow, Joanne, is among the
news quiz game show from video's "biggest fans," said Kevin Mor-
the Newseum. rison, COO of the Fred Rogers
-From wire reports Company


Birthday Your possibilities for greater material growth
and accumulation look to be much stronger in the year
ahead than they've ever been. However, it will be up to you
to make the most of all the opportunities coming your way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because your image is a tri-
fle fragile, be extra careful of how you conduct yourself in
public. Even minor infractions that are usually forgiven
won't be tolerated.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) One of your more attractive
assets is your insatiable curiosity about almost everything,
which is fine and good. However, if you ask too many prob-
ing questions, it might rub others the wrong way.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Immediately nip in the bud any
misunderstanding that might arise between you and a
close friend. Left unresolved, it could fester, get out of hand
and leave a lasting scar.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If someone you think very highly


ONLINE
http://www.youtube.com/pbs
digitalstudios
http://www.youtube.com/melody
sheep

"It's a very creative piece, and we
think it gives appropriate recognition
to the fact that Fred was ahead of his
time in so many ways," Morrison said.
The PBS Digital Studios' video
posted on YouTube and elsewhere is
intended to get people talking about
public television, and more such trib-
ute mashups to PBS figures are
planned, spokesman Kevin Dando
said.
The video also encourages those
who like it to "please support your
local PBS station." PBS and its sta-
tions rely on viewer and corporate
contributions.
John Boswell, an artist also known
as Melodysheep, created the Rogers
tribute. He's also done autotuned
video pieces featuring prominent sci-
entists including Neil DeGrasse Tyson


Today's HOROSCOPE
of disappoints you, don't let it affect the friendship. No one is
perfect, not even you, so be sure to turn the other cheek.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When you resent being made
to undertake a certain task, the results aren't likely to be up
to your usual standards. If you're smart, you'll put your
heart in your work and keep your temperament out of it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Unless you're extremely
mindful of your social graces, you could easily do some-
thing that would be tasteless or offensive to others. Don't
let yourself make any egregious blunders.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You might have to use
plenty of tolerance when dealing with family members, es-
pecially your mate, but it'll be worth it. Even if you have
plenty of ammunition, don't fire it.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) That critical eye of yours
could be urging you to make comments to others that you
should keep to yourself. Even if you're not obviously rude,


Fred Rogers, the late host of "Mister
Rogers Neighborhood," is featured in a
PBS Digital Studios video mashup that
celebrates the power of imagination.
and the late Carl Sagan.
Rogers became familiar to genera-
tions of viewers as the soft-spoken,
cardigan-wearing guide of "Mister
Rogers' Neighborhood," which he
filmed from 1968 to 2001 and contin-
ues to air in reruns. Rogers died in
2003 at age 74.


don't condemn others, even with faint praise.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even though you could be
rather lucky in many areas, your financial dealings aren't
likely to be among them. Be extremely careful in monetary
transactions of all types.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Of course you have your
rights, but so does everybody else. If you become too fo-
cused on your own affairs, it isn't likely you'll respect the in-
terests of others.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Usually you are extremely
practical and realistic about most things in life, but today
you could find yourself getting emotional over the least little
thing that doesn't go your way. Get a grip.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's fun to meet like-minded
new people, but guard against an inclination to give prefer-
ential treatment to a fresh pal over your old friends. You'd
be inviting trouble.


Kate Flannery is 48. Model-
actress Elizabeth Hurley is 47.
Thought for Today: "Al-
ways be a first-rate version of
yourself, instead of a second-
rate version of somebody
else." Judy Garland (1922-
1969).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JUNE 8
Mega Money: 2 5 9 34
Mega Ball: 6
4-of-4 MB No winner $550,000
4-of-4 4 $1,698
3-of-4 MB 51 $291.50
3-of-4 1,236 $35.50
2-of-4 MB 1,177 $26
1-of-4 MB 10,109 $3
2-of-4 30,610 $2
Fantasy 5: 2 24 27 29 30
5-of-5 2 winners $116,525.12
4-of-5 252 $149
3-of-5 8,992 $11.50
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Fantasy 5: 3- 10- 11 13-27
5-of-5 3 winners $70,185.24
4-of-5 374 $90.50
3-of-5 11,081 $8.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, June 10,
the 162nd day of 2012. There
are 204 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 10, 1942, during
World War II, German forces
massacred 173 male residents
of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, in
retaliation for the killing of Nazi
official Reinhard Heydrich.
On this date:
In 1692, the first official ex-
ecution resulting from the
Salem witch trials in Massa-
chusetts took place as Brid-
get Bishop was hanged.
In 1922, singer-actress
Judy Garland was born
Frances Ethel Gumm in
Grand Rapids, Minn.
In 1935, Alcoholics Anony-
mous was founded in Akron,
Ohio by Dr. Robert Holbrook
Smith and William Griffith
Wilson.
In 1967, the Middle East
War ended as Israel and
Syria agreed to observe a
United Nations-mediated
cease-fire.
In 1971, President Richard
M. Nixon lifted a two-decades-
old trade embargo on China.
In 1991, 11-year-old
Jaycee Dugard of South Lake
Tahoe, Calif. was abducted
by Phillip and Nancy Garrido;
Jaycee was held by the cou-
ple for 18 years before she
was found by authorities.
Ten years ago: Organized
crime figure John Gotti died
at a prison hospital in Spring-
field, Mo., at age 61.
Five years ago: The
crews of Atlantis and the in-
ternational space station
greeted each other after the
space shuttle arrived at the
orbiting outpost.
One year ago: Tony La
Russa managed his 5,000th
game as his St. Louis Cardi-
nals lost to the Milwaukee
Brewers 8-0.
Today's Birthdays:
Britain's Prince Philip is 91.
Columnist Nat Hentoff is 87.
Attorney F. Lee Bailey is 79.
Actress Alexandra Stewart is
73. Singer Shirley Alston
Reeves (The Shirelles) is 71.
Actor Jurgen Prochnow is 71.
Media commentator Jeff
Greenfield is 69. Country
singer-songwriter Thom
Schuyler is 60. Former Sen.
John Edwards, D-N.C., is 59.
Actor Andrew Stevens is 57.
Singer Barrington Henderson
is 56. Former New York Gov-
ernor-turned-media commen-
tator Eliot Spitzer is 53. Rock
musician Kim Deal is 51.
Singer Maxi Priest is 51. Ac-
tress Gina Gershon is 50. Ac-
tress Jeanne Tripplehorn is
49. Rock musician Jimmy
Chamberlin is 48. Actress











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Social media 'alias'


Associated Press
An unidentified 11-year-old girl looks at Facebook on her computer June 4 at her home in Palo Alto, Calif. Though Facebook bans children under
13, millions of them have profiles on the site by lying about their age. The company is now testing ways to allow those kids to participate with-
out needing to lie. This would likely be under parental supervision, such as by connecting children's accounts to their parents' accounts.

One solution to keep youthful hands off 13-and-older Facebook: Mittens


I read with amusement the other day that
Facebook is developing new technology
"to let" children under the age of 13 use
the site with parental supervision.
When I told my 13-
year-old daughter that
Facebook would offi-
cially let her have a
page, she laughed, too.
Hannah has had a
Facebook page for
years.
She also has at least
one other "alias" FB
page that she has told
me about. I am her Steven Kurlander
"friend" on both, so I FLORIDA
can monitor her VOICES
Hannah also has at
least one Twitter ac-
count that I know of, where she observes and
communicates with the singing sensation,
One Direction, as well as movie stars and
celebrities.
Like most teenagers, she texts her friends
incessantly when she is not in school, from
the minute she gets up until she goes to bed.
Hannah can access these social media sites
from a number of sources, including the
desktop computers in our home, her laptop
computer, her iPhone, even game devices.
HELLO! Millions of kids like Hannah are
already on Facebook and other social media
sites. At this point, trying to limit their access
is a joke.
According to a 2011 Consumer Reports
study, 7.5 million children under the age of 13
- including five million under age 10 use
Facebook, many with the knowledge and con-
sent of their parents.
Facebook has spawned a young generation
of deceitful Americans who lie about their
age, their sex, their sexual preference, their


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Connection

has been

broken
I lost my cellphone this
past week, and it was
like my thread to the
world had been
disconnected.
No phone calls, no text
messages, no emails, no
nothing.
This iPhone bit the dust
while I was playing golf
with Dr Tom Stringer, now
of Gainesville and for-
merly of Inverness. We to-
gether are such bad
golfers that we don't
spend much time on the
smooth and manicured
fairways. Most of our golf
hours are spent driving in
the rough, bouncing over
tree roots and using lan-
guage that can't be pub-
lished in the newspaper
We pay for this and call
it recreation.
Somewhere on the Cit-
rus Springs golf course,
while spending most of
our time in the woods
looking for lost balls, my
phone decided to jump
out of the golf cart.
I went back to look, but
to no avail. The world's
fanciest cellphone was
now just one more piece of
junk dragged into a gopher
See Page C4


Rusty Skinner
GUEST
COLUMN


The 11-year-old girl logs into Facebook on her iPhone at her home in Palo Alto, Calif.


marital status just about everything to
become a user.
These kids make up names, insert pictures
of others, allege that friends are sisters,
brothers, aunts, uncles and other family
members. If they have any trouble setting up
an alias, they have a friend do it for them and
share the password.
Ask any parent or school disciplinarian
about the downside to kids being on Face-
book. They'll tell you that person-to-person
interactions are down, making our kids al-
most anti-social. And all too often, the drama
that occurs online plays out in fights or bul-
lying at school.
Once, you could limit a child's use of the
phone. But with computers enveloping our


existence, there are just too many ways out-
side the control of parents for kids to con-
tinue tweeting, texting and Facebooking.
While Facebook is reportedly developing
technology that allows children under 13 to
use the site under parental supervision, it's
too little, too late. The "alias" generation is
just too technologically sophisticated to be
held back now.
At this point, the only way to keep them off
Facebook is to make them wear mittens, 24-7.
--0
Steven Kurlander blogs at Kurly's
Kommentary, writes a weekly column for
Fort Lauderdale's Sun-Sentinel and is a
South Florida communications strategist.


Book REVIEW


Kissinger book covers U.S./China relationship


Henry Kissinger, "On China"
(Penguin Books, paperback edition,
2012, 604 pages) $18.
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
I would argue that the 1972 deci-
sion to open relations with com-
munist China was the best
American foreign policy decision
made during the 20th century It
split China away from Russian in-
fluence, it helped end the Cold War,
and it opened up direct communi-
cations between the two superpow-
ers. Most foreign policy experts
anticipate that over the next several
decades, the United States will in-
creasingly have interactions with
an ever-stronger China.
This was not an easy decision to
make at the time, because Washing-
ton was deeply committed to the
Chinese forces that had fled the
mainland for the safety of Taiwan.
This book is an excellent guide to
the U.S./China relationship written
by an official on the inside. It is both
a history of the period since 1972
and an overview of China's role in
world affairs.


President Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger
were of the "political realist" school of global
politics, which asserts that no matter how
corrupt or brutal a government is, if it has
control of the country, those leaders should be
negotiated with.


The first three chapters of the
book deal with the history of China
prior to the takeover by the commu-
nists after World War II. He ex-
plains that the glue which held
Chinese society together was Con-
fucianism- a guide to how citizens
should live and cooperate.
History records various kingdoms
rising and falling since before the
birth of Jesus. In the 18th and 19th
centuries, the country was increas-
ingly disrupted by outside powers
wanting to trade with, and/or ex-
ploit the Chinese. This led to bitter
struggles such as the Opium Wars
that left China greatly weakened by
the early 20th century It was only
with the rise of communism under
the leadership of Mao Zedong after


World War II that drew China slowly
and brutally back together.
Then-President Richard Nixon
and Henry Kissinger felt as long as
China remained friendly to commu-
nist Russia, global politics and nu-
clear war were a possibility Despite
the U.S. refusal to recognize the Mao
government, it was obvious that
Peking and Moscow were divided by
personal antagonism between
Nikita Khrushchev and Mao. The
White House sent secret feelers to
Peking suggesting talks.
So in early 1972, Kissinger (HK)
and a small group of foreign policy
specialists quietly went to Peking.
This opened up talks and, by the
end of 1972, amid much publicity,
Nixon flew (with HK) to negotiate


with Chinese officials.
Quickly recognizing that reports of
Mao's dislike of the Russians were
accurate was important but, on the
other hand, the Chinese leader crit-
icized Washington for insisting that
the small group of Chinese who fled
the mainland could represent or
speak for the Chinese people in fo-
rums such as the United Nations.
Before going further, it may be
helpful to explain the thinking of
Nixon and HK on global politics:
they were of the "political realist"
school of global politics, which as-
serts that no matter how corrupt or
brutal a government is, if it has con-
trol of the country, those leaders
should be negotiated with. What is
important is the size of its military,
its economic power, and geographi-
cal position. This meant that re-
gardless of the brutality and
anti-Americanism of Mao, it would
be in the U.S. national interest to
convince Mao to break his alliance
with Russia.
Over the first years of the rela-
tionship, Peking was difficult to ne-
gotiate with because Mao was
See Page C4


Why


don't job


seekers


work?
With thousands of
our neighbors re-
maining out of
work, Workforce Connec-
tion and our economic de-
velopment and education
partners are undertaking
a series of meetings with
businesses across our
three counties to define
the "skills gap" we hear
about so often.
What is meant by the
"skills gap"? Do we mean
specific skill set training,
such as learning Microsoft
Excel or do we mean all of
the courses necessary to
be a paramedic? As we
look toward a rebounding
economy that will expand
employment, we need to
get the anecdotal com-
ment of "skills gap" into
clearly defined specifics.
This communication is
essential if we are to hone
in on the exact skills issues
that employers face. Can
the issues be addressed
through single courses, or
do they involve a full edu-
cational curriculum?
When a job seeker with 15
years in manufacturing
comes into our offices
seeking employment, the
answer to these and other
questions are critical.
We have established a
series of industry meetings

See Page C3


I







O page C2 SUNDAY, JUNE 10,2012



PINION


"Prosperity doth best discover vice; but
adversity doth best discover virtue."

Francis Bacon, 1561-1626


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
.JJ Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LOCAL ECONOMY





Recovery





will be a





long road


While property values in
Citrus County have de-
clined for the fifth
straight year, there are some in-
dications they may have bot-
tomed out, and a
handful of new
housing starts cre- THE I
ate glimmers of Propert
hope for the mori- have dc
bund construction but rece
industry, raise
If this trend con-
tinues, it is good OUR 01
news for everyone
in the county, be- County
cause the stagnant economic
real estate market stabilize
has been a drag on
the overall economy, and the
decline in construction activity
has been a major contributor to
the county's high unemploy-
ment rate.
Recent data from the Real-
tors Association of Citrus
County gives some hope that
the worst of the decline in prop-
erty values may be behind us.
According to the Realtors Asso-
ciation, the median price of de-
tached homes rose 5.4 percent
during March as compared to a
year earlier, and the inventory
of homes on the market is down
to 9.8 months, as compared with
14.5 months in April of 2011.
However, even with a modest
increase in prices for homes
being sold, overall prices for
real estate are far below the
heights reached during the real
estate boom that crested in
2006, and much of the present
real estate market is in lower-
priced properties.
Given the weak overall econ-
omy and still-high inventory of
unsold properties, prices are
likely to remain below previous
levels for some time to come.
While a few new homes are
being built, overall construction
activity in the county is unlikely
to return to previous levels any
time in the foreseeable future.
The 2012 tax roll is based on
sales figures from 2011, and ac-
cording to preliminary statistics
from Property Appraiser Geof-


S


n


P


frey Greene, the taxable value
of property in the county de-
clined an average of 5 percent
during 2011.
The taxable value of new con-
struction in 2011
was down almost
iSUE: 25 percent from
values the previous year,
lined, which to that point
it events had been the low-
hope. est level of new
construction in the
INION: county since 1997.
For example, dur-
needs ing 2011, fewer
growth to than 200 new con-
values. struction permits
were issued, com-
pared with over 3,000 permits
issued during the peak new
permit year of 2005.
None of these are encourag-
ing numbers, and they under-
score both continuing weakness
in the construction sector and
the need for the county to focus
on economic development and
bringing in new jobs.
For many years, our growth
was driven by the residential
housing market and the com-
mercial development created
by this market. With the previ-
ous levels of new construction
not expected to return in the
foreseeable future, if ever, the
county will need more eco-
nomic diversity to fuel future
economic growth and stabilize
real estate prices.
For long-term prosperity, and
for real estate values to re-
bound, we need more good jobs.
These will both offer the oppor-
tunity for our young people to
stay in the county, and will bring
in new residents with the in-
come to purchase homes and
support local businesses.
While construction will be a
part of the mix of new jobs, as a
county we cannot depend on
new construction to drive our
economic growth. We need to
continue developing a more di-
verse economy that will both
provide economic opportunity
and will help restore value to
real estate in the county.


Let them stay home
In response to restaurants
(being) closed during the Memorial
Day three-day weekend: Give me a
break. Let people enjoy the holi-
days with their families for once.
Pull out your grill and eat at home.
Why should restaurants be open -
so the waitresses can get your 25-
cent tip? Let the waitresses stay
home at least for the holidays to
take care of their families.
Go to service instead
This is to the person who wrote
in they couldn't find a restaurant
open over Memorial Day. Well, Me-
morial Day is not for eating. It's for
thanking thanking those who
helped. Maybe you should have
gone out with the veterans' organi-
zations or people and put flags on
the graves. Maybe you should have
attended a memorial service some-


where and then maybe you could
have gone to some of these places
that have free food because you
were so kind to go out and do the
honorable thing on Memorial Day.
Thank God we had veterans. Thank
God we have soldiers. We are so
sorry they lost their lives. We
should not be worrying about food.

Right to celebrate
For the person who wrote in
Sound Off complaining a lot of
the restaurants were closed on
Memorial Day: I'd just like to
know what country they're from. I
guess they don't feel anybody has
the right to have off to celebrate
Memorial Day, only them. Here we
do celebrate Memorial Day and
we allow the people and a lot of
these places to have the day off
to be with their families and not
work 24/7.


Subprime college educations


any parents and the chil-
dren they send to college
are paying rapidly rising
prices for something of declining
quality. This is because "quality"
is not synonymous with "value."
Glenn Harlan
Reynolds, University -
of Tennessee law pro-
fessor, believes college
has become, for many,
merely a "status ( 1
marker" signaling
membership in the ed- /
ucated caste, and a
place to meet spouses
of similar status-"as-
sociative mating." Georg
Since 1961, the time OTI
students spend read- VOI
ing, writing and other-
wise studying has
fallen from 24 hours a week to
about 15 enough for a degree
often desired only as an expen-
sive signifier of rudimentary
qualities (e.g., the ability to follow
instructions). Employers value
this signifier as an alternative to
aptitude tests when evaluating
potential employees because
such tests can provoke lawsuits
by having a "disparate impact" on
this or that racial or ethnic group.
In his Encounter Books Broad-
side "The Higher Education Bub-
ble," Reynolds says this bubble
exists for the same reasons the
housing bubble did. The govern-
ment decided too few people
owned homes/went to college, so
government money was poured
into subsidized and sometimes
subprime mortgages/student
loans, with the predictable result
that housing prices/college tu-
itions soared and many borrow-
ers went bust. Tuitions and fees
have risen more than 440 percent
in 30 years as schools happily
raised prices and lowered
standards to siphon up federal
money A recent Wall Street Jour-
nal headline: "Student Debt
Rises by 8% as College Tuitions
Climb."
Richard Vedder, an Ohio Uni-
versity economist, writes in the
Chronicle of Higher Education
that as many people perhaps


H
Ic


more have student loan debts
as have college degrees. Have
you seen those T-shirts that pro-
claim "College: The Best Seven
Years of My Life"? Twenty-nine
percent of borrowers nevergrad-
uate, and many who do
graduate take decades
to repay their loans.
In 2010, The New
York Times reported
on Cortney Munna,
then 26, a New York
University graduate
with almost $100,000 in
debt. If her repay-
ments were not then
e Will being deferred be-
IER cause she was enrolled
DES in night school, she
would have been pay-
ing $700 monthly from
her $2,300 monthly after-tax in-
come as a photographer's assis-
tant. She says she is toiling "to
pay for an education I got for four
years and would happily give
back." Her degree is in religious
and women's studies.
The budgets of California's uni-
versities are being cut, so re-
cently Cal State Northridge
students conducted an almost-
hunger strike (sustained by a
blend of kale, apple and celery
juices) to protest, as usual, tuition
increases and, unusually and
properly, administrators'
salaries. For example, in 2009 the
base salary of UC Berkeley's Vice
Chancellor for Equity and Inclu-
sion was $194,000, almost four
times that of starting assistant
professors. And by 2006, aca-
demic administrators outnum-
bered faculty.
The Manhattan Institute's
Heather Mac Donald notes that
sinecures in academia's diversity
industry are expanding as aca-
demic offerings contract. UC San
Diego, while eliminating master's
programs in electrical and com-
puter engineering and compara-
tive literature, and eliminating
courses in French, German,
Spanish and English literature,
added a diversity requirement
for graduation to cultivate "a stu-
dent's understanding of her or his


identity." So, rather than study
computer science and Cervantes,
students can study their identi-
ties -themselves. Says Mac Don-
ald, "'Diversity,' it turns out, is
simply a code word for
narcissism."
She reports UCSD lost three
cancer researchers to Rice Uni-
versity, which offered them 40
percent pay increases. But UCSD
found money to create a Vice
Chancellorship for Equity, Diver-
sity and Inclusion.
UC Davis has a Diversity Train-
ers Institute under an Adminis-
trator of Diversity Education,
who presumably coordinates
with the Cross-Cultural Center. It
also has: a Lesbian, Gay, Bisex-
ual, Transgender Resource Cen-
ter; a Sexual Harassment
Education Program; a Diversity
Program Coordinator; an Early
Resolution Discrimination Coor-
dinator; a Diversity Education
Series that awards Understand-
ing Diversity Certificates in "Un-
packing Oppression"; and
Cross-Cultural Competency Cer-
tificates in "Understanding Di-
versity and Social Justice."
California's budget crisis has
not prevented UC San Francisco
from creating a new Vice Chan-
cellor for Diversity and Outreach
to supplement UCSF's Office of
Affirmative Action, Equal Oppor-
tunity and Diversity, and the Di-
versity Learning Center (which
teaches how to become "a Diver-
sity Change Agent"), and the Cen-
ter for LGBT Health and Equity,
and the Office of Sexual Harass-
ment Prevention & Resolution,
and the Chancellor's Advisory
Committees on Diversity, and on
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and
Transgender Issues, and on the
Status of Women.
So taxpayers should pay more
and parents and students should
borrow more to fund administra-
tive sprawl in the service of stale
political agendas? Perhaps they
will, until "pop!" goes the bubble.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


NMIA NUNSA
-.- -=- --- ^J

- *-.1 ea ? "-' -<"


VATICA TO CACK W ON AM ICAN NUNG


LETTER > to the Editor


Heart-breaking story
In (Saturday, June 2) Chronicle
was an article about another
drug roundup by the (Citrus
County) Sheriff's Office. After
reading the names of the ar-
rested people, I could not help
thinking of the movie
Casablanca, where Capt. Re-
nault directed his police to
"Round up the usual suspects."
Several names were familiar
to me from my police chief days
in Crystal River in the 1990s. We
were arresting these people
when they were young and they
are still being arrested for drugs.
I found one name very disturb-
ing. This man had a troubled
youth and was exposed to a lot of
drugs through his family In his
teen years, he got a great break.
He met Brian Sullivan.
Brian worked for the Depart-
ment of Juvenile Justice and he
and his wife, Mattie, were foster
parents for challenged kids. A kid
in need could always find a bed
and meal at the Sullivans'. Brian
realized what this boy was deal-
ing with and took him into his
home. He worked with the school
authorities to get him transferred


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cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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to another school, where he was
a noted football player.
Sadly, the boy rejected this op-


portunity to get out and returned
back to the drug environment.
Brian always felt he had failed
the kid, but in reality the kid
failed himself
I have come to the conclusion
like alcoholics, kids living in bad
situations have to want to
change and all anybody can do is
give them the opportunity. Un-
fortunately, this kid made a bad
decision that will affect him the
rest of his life.
Brian went on to become the
executive director of the Boys &
Girls Clubs and established
lacrosse. He used the sport to
redirect kids with behavioral
problems into a positive
direction.
Brian's successes are well
known. Many kids did seize the
opportunity he offered and have
gone on to be productive citi-
zens. Sadly, we lost Brian way
too soon. He was a big man with
a big heart. (Editor's note: Brian
F Sullivan, 58, died from cancer
July28, 1998.)
Today's headlines would have
truly broken that giant heart.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


SHot Corner: RESTAURANTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Karen Rhoden Mistretta: It's gonna be all right


*0.


ne of my greatest pleasures
is to watch our children
and our grandchildren
interact, most especially,
observing the
relationships the
grandchildren share.
They proudly refer
to themselves as "the
cousins."
There are seven of
them, and they now
range in age from 8 to
15.
Because of Fred B
circumstances in our A SI
family's history,
including widowhood OF I
followed by a second
marriage and because both of our
parents were children within
some rather large broods, my good
brother William and I were
blessed with a ton of first cousins.
According to my best
calculation, the total was 30 or
more, including some who were as


r
L
L


old as, if not older than, our
parents. Of this multitude, we
have maintained a close
relationship with about half of
'em, a more distant
*- relationship with some
:.,.: of the others, and there
are a few I never
remember meeting.
Today, my thoughts
are of a very special
cousin, Karen, one
who was very much a
part of my life,
rannen particularly while we
ICE were growing up.
As briefly as I can,
-IFE I'll try to explain our
genealogical kinship:
Our fathers were brothers, but
it's a little bit more complicated
than that.
Lydia Coleman was born in
1877. In the mid-1890s, she
married Mr. Rhoden and they had
several children. About 1910, Mr.
Rhoden died. In 1912, Lydia


married John Brannen and they
had three more children, but, then
in 1919, John died.
Karen's father, Ardel Rhoden,
and my father, Fred Brannen,
were technically half-brothers, but
as far as Lydia and her children
were concerned, they were a
family, there was nothing halfway
about it, the siblings were simply
siblings, not half-siblings.
In the late 1930s, as a young
married man, Ardel gained
employment at a gun factory in
Massachusetts and moved his
family up north, where, in 1945,
the same year I arrived, his
youngest daughter, Karen, was
born.
Then, in 1953, when Karen and I
were both in second grade, they
moved back to Lacoochee and we
became a part of each other's
world but more than that she
and I became comrades,
confidants and constant
companions, more than cousins -


we became the closest of friends.
There are many stories I could
tell about Karen, but, today, I'll
limit myself to just one:
One day, when we were in third
grade, I had the misfortune of
ripping the seat of my pants. It's
true you really do find out who
your friends are when you rip
your pants.
Standing there in a state of
seemingly unbearable embarrass-
ment, I felt the gentle arm of a
little girl slip around my shoulder,
and while she stood in a position
to give me cover, Karen
whispered, "It's gonna be all right,
you have your panties on and no
one can see anything."
Soon enough, the teacher found
a needle and thread and a place of
refuge for me while she fixed my
britches.
But what I've never ever
forgotten is how Karen quickly
came to me in my time of need.
Some of the other kids did what


most third-graders would
naturally do they laughed; but
not her, she covered me and she
encouraged me.
On May 20, 2012, Karen Rhoden
Mistretta died.
From that unfortunate day in
the third grade forward, I
remained confident that Karen
had my back; her commitment
was unconditional; if she said
everything would all be all right, it
would be; and, even now I know
that it's gonna be all right.
In God's great plan, those who
loved Karen will have the
opportunity to see her again.
'Jesus said .... I am the
resurrection and the life, he that
believeth in me, though he were
dead, yet shall he live."-John 11:
25, KJV


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Unions or bankruptcy mou]
6 W L-h CTAOT C


here is a link between Wisconsin
Gov Scott Walker, Gov Andrew
Cuomo of New York and President
Obama's former chief of staff, Rahm Em-
manuel, mayor of Chicago: Public em-
ployee unions, collective bargaining and
huge deficits.
Wisconsin faced a $3 billion
deficit when Walker took office.
He identified the source of the
problem as excessive wages and
benefits paid to public employ-
ees as the result of collective
bargaining. His choices were to
attempt to raise state taxes in a
down economy, cut services and
employees or cut benefits and
salaries of existing employees. Dr.Willi
He chose to cut benefits and OTH
salaries. VOI
To reduce salaries and bene-
fits, he removed them from col-
lective bargaining and returned them to
the control of elected officials. As a result
employees were forced to fund some of
their health care and pension expenses
out of their wages. No one was laid off, and
services were maintained. The $3 billion
deficit was eliminated and, for the first
time ever, property taxes were reduced.
As expected, the unions, the leftists, ig-
norant university students and Democrats
went nuts. Money poured in from national
unions and interest groups to recall Gov.
Walker and several Republican state sen-
ators who supported the changes. Conser-
vative organizations campaigned
nationwide to generate millions in support
of Gov Walker. On Tuesday, June 5, Gov.
Walker was returned to office by a 7 per-
cent victory in a state that went to Obama
in 2008 by 14 percent.
New York has cash shortfalls in the
multibillions. Its taxes are already some of
the highest in the nation. Wealthy citizens
and corporations have been fleeing the
state to escape these confiscatory taxes.
Gov Cuomo, a Democrat. has had to come
to grips with the same problems as did Re-
publican Gov Walker:
Salaries, benefits and pensions negoti-
ated by public employee unions have run
the state out of money; Cuomo has tried to
educate union representatives as to the se-
riousness of the problem, the impossibil-
ity of making up shortfalls with additional
taxes and the necessity to cut back bene-
fits to no avail. As a Democrat, Cuomo can
ill afford to offend the union cash cows of
the Democratic Party His is an unenviable
position.
Just so "Rhambo" Emmanuel, former


Obama "enforcer" and now mayor of
Chicago. Ill., is broke and Chicago more so.
Too many employees underproducing, too
much in wages, benefits and pension ex-
penses. He is locked in a battle with his
union supporters, and they have refused
to budge on their demands.
They actually want a substan-
tial pay increase over the next
several years and are demand-
ing taxes be raised on the filthy
rich and corporations head-
quartered in Chicago.
President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt and New York City Mayor
Fiorello H. La Guardia warned
long ago against permitting
am Dixon pubic employees to unionize
IER and bargain collectively
CES They knew that politicians
spending tax money would not
bargain effectively for the tax-
payers. They understood also that public
employee unions were not limited in their
demands because governments, unlike
private employers, don't go out of business
when they pay wages and benefits that are
above the going rate. President Kennedy,
needing union support, acted in crass po-
litical self interest when he permitted col-
lective bargaining.
As a direct result, the 50 states have a
combined deficit of more than $1 trillion
in obligations they cannot meet. Their cit-
izens will not accept further tax increases.
Several state courts have ruled that pub-
lic employee wages and benefits resulting
from collective bargaining are contracts
that cannot be altered. Choices are lim-
ited.
Gov Walker's support, even by some De-
mocrats, suggests the public will approve
reductions in pay and benefits for public
employees and elimination of their collec-
tive bargaining rights to bring expenses
back into line. The alternative may be
Chapter 8 bankruptcy proceedings for
scores of cities like Stockton, Calif., and
Birmingham, Ala., that are unable to meet
their obligations.


William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University, New York Medical College
and the USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces Officer,
achieving the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
He was an assistant professor ofsurgery
at the University of Georgia before
entering private practice. Dr Dixon can
be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Gary a stand-up guy
There is no doubt Gary Maidhof repre-
sented what was good and right in Citrus
County When discussing things with him,
you knew he was truly listening and trying
to work out an approach or resolution
with a full understanding of both sides of
the issue. You could almost see the wheels
turning in his head!
Over the last 10 years, Gary has assisted
Technology Conservation Group on a
number of projects, including providing
assistance with Economic Development
Council incentive programs and guidance
in land development matters, enabling
TCG to expand its footprint and provide
more jobs in Citrus County
Always the environmentalist, Gary most
recently was working with us on an alter-
native energy project that would benefit
the county and TCG, bringing both his
ideas and the major players to the table.
Gary also made time to help with activi-
ties that were less obvious, but no less im-
portant, like being a judge for our TCG
Community Outreach annual essay
contest
All-in-all Gary was a stand-up guy with
an unrivaled knowledge of all things Cit-
rus County, a love of the environment and
a great sense of humor who treated every-
one with respect. We can only repeat what
everyone else has said he will be sorely
missed for a very long time.
Hamilton Rice
president and CEO
Technology Conservation Group


Gary was royalty
It was with great sorrow I recently read
of the passing of longtime Citrus County
employee Gary Maidhof at the early age of
54. My and my husband's condolences
to his family and friends.
This man, as many others have written,
was one of a kind, unafraid to stand his
ground on issues, and I cringed one time
when I heard the way one former commis-
sioner spoke down to him at a BOCC meet-
ing. He took a lot and I know it was
because he really cared for us citizens!
I always told him to take care of himself,
since his weight appeared to be on the
lighter side (maybe I could learn from
him!).
Mr. Maidhof, with the BOCC of Citrus
County, stood behind my husband and my-
self against the charges of the city of Crys-
tal River that we were not legal
residents/voters during the time of the
2004 Crystal River invalid annexation.
Gary insisted to the media we had all of
the needed permitting to live on commer-
cial property I appreciate that!
More recently, he was receptive to my
idea for the county to give an official invi-
tation to Queen Elizabeth II of the U.K to
visit Citrus County he gave me the nec-
essary contact info to obtain this and
agreed that a royal visit to Florida would
be good for tourism!
Gary was a "possibility thinker," that is
why people liked him Gary was royalty!
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River


Letters to the EDITOR


Water is precious
After reading Gary
Kuhl's article 'Alarmists
needed" in Sunday's paper
June 3, 2012,1 I am moved to
write something also.
As any old Navy veteran
can tell you; fresh potable
water is precious. After
years on a diesel-electric
submarine, three years on
WWII submarine tenders, I
can tell you firsthand that
"water hours" aren't any fun
(freshwater is cut off for 3 1/2
hours at a time to conserve
that precious commodity).
On a submarine you
could use one cup of water
to shave, wash up and
brush your teeth twice
each day We were allowed
to take a "Navy" shower
once a week (one minute to



GUEST
Continued from Page C1

or forums to gain industry
input We need businesses to
help us.
The forums are structured
around industry sectors that
are the stalwarts of our cur-
rent economy and those that
our economic development
leaders, both private sector
and governmental, have tar-
geted for business growth


rinse, soap up, two minutes
to get the soap off). This
was normally timed by the
"cob" (chief of the boat). If
these privileges were
abused, you were awarded
with four extra hours of
"still watch" monitoring
the 2,000 gallon-per-day
stilling plant. The diesel
engines took 600 gallons
per day The cooks and
mess cooks used 400 gal-
lons per day It took a week
to get enough fresh water
so we could take our
"Navy" showers.
I still take a "Navy
shower." If we all did the
same, we could save quite a
bit of this precious
commodity.
Please limit the use of
fertilizers for your lawns
and gardens. As Gary tells


and recruitment. The fo-
rums begin June 18 in Levy
County and take place June
19 and June 29 in Marion
County and June 28 in Citrus
County.
Workforce and our educa-
tional partners the Col-
lege of Central Florida,
Community Technical and
Adult Education and With-
lacoochee Technical Insti-
tute are ready to help, we
just need businesses to help
us get it right.
If, in your view, job appli-


you, it does get to the
aquifer. Nitrate/nitrites
from fertilizers grow algae
almost instantly, as any
swimming pool owner
/technician can tell you.
Robert Wilson
TMCS (ss) USN retired
Beverly Hills

Good letters
Amazing! Monday's
Chronicle (May 25) con-
tained several good letters,
and two in particular were
outstanding.
John Cassell's letter was
on the mark about Presi-
dent Obama's total disre-
gard for the safety and
security of this country He
accurately pointed out that
these policies are going to


cants don't possess the over-
all or specific training that
you need, please attend one
of the forums and let us
know your needs.
Visit www.clmworkforce.
com to see the complete
schedule of Skills Gap Fo-
rums and RSVP for any and
all you and/or your represen-
tatives may wish to attend.
If you do not see your "in-
dustry" represented, select
a forum that you can attend
and come tell us. We want to
hear from you.


drive the United States into
a bankruptcy from which
we will never recover and,
further, Mr. Cassell also
correctly stated that less-
than-intelligent people
(known as sheeple) will
blindly follow empty prom-
ises and hollow slogans
while closing their eyes to
facts. Incidentally, as we
near the election, we see
gas prices dropping rapidly
as I predicted. What a
coincidence.
The letter by Catherine
Whynot was equally excel-
lent in that she, like so
many others, saw through
the blatant free publicity
given by the Chronicle to
Jeff Dawsy in this upcom-
ing election, thinly dis-
guised as news reporting. A
blind man could see this



Rusty Skinner is the CEO
of the Citrus, Levy and
Marion Workforce
Development Board and is
immediate past president
of the Florida Workforce
Development Association,
a coalition of Florida's 24
regional Workforce
Development boards. For
more information about
Workforce Connection
initiatives, call 800-434-
JOBS, ext 1234 or visit
www elm workforce. com.


and as Catherine points
out, it is just not fair and it
is bordering on dishonest.
Were any of your editorial
staff trained in Chicago?
I'm waiting for Dawsy to
bring in the Fifth Armored
Division to bust drunks -


with the obligatory Chroni-
cle photographer on scene
to lay it all over the front
page as if it were real news
rather than free re-election
ink for Jeff Dawsy
Harry Cooper
Hernando


SLetters to the EDITOR


Tribute to Gary Maidhof
From Friends and Colleagues on the Board of Directors, Advisory
Council, and Board of Trustees of which he was an outstanding
member of the Citrus County Center Theater for the Performing
Arts Foundation, an International Cultural Arts Center.
"A Minister"
Every Man a Minister
What does it mean to be a minister?
It means to make yourself small so that others may feel large.
It means to make yourself a servant so that others may feel their
mastery.
It means to give so that those who lack may receive.
It means to love so that those who feel unloved may have someone
who never rejects them, someone with whom they can always
identify themselves.
It means to hold out your help to those who ask and deserve help,
and also to those who do not ask or deserve it. It means always to be
there when you are needed, yet never to press yourself on another
when you are not wanted.
It means to stay at peace so that those who are contentious will
have someone to whom they can turn to stabilize themselves.
It means to keep a cheerful outlook so that those who are easily
cast down may have someone to lift them up.
It means to keep faith, and to keep on keeping faith even when you
yourself find little reason for believing, so that those who
have no faith can find the courage to live.
It means not merely to live a life of prayer, but to turn your prayers
into life-more for you, more Life for those to whom you minister.
It means to be God-centered and human-hearted, to involve
yourself in humanity and to keep your vision on divinity-and so
draw forth in all around you the human form divine.
It means to share in the great moments of life-in birth and sickness
and marriage and death-and at all these times, whether of crisis or
of celebration, to bring comfort and a blessing, and above all a sense
of a Presence that sometimes we cannot see and of a meaning that
often we overlook.
That is what it means to be a minister of God and a minister to man.
Thank you Gary for ministering to us,
You are forever present.... BQEF


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 C3


I,,-
.. '
__ ______C__r______1__* <*


a
H
14





C4 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

tortoise hole.
The loss of immediate contact
with the world had me scared.
I waited for 24 hours, hoping the
phone would be found, but that
was not to happen.
For a full day, I did not get a sin-
gle call from a subscriber about a
missing newspaper.
No employee was able to tell me
they hated their job via email.
My operations director was un-
able to remind me via text that she
needs more resources to get the
job done.


COMMENTARY


I was unable to immediately
check to see how far the stock
market had fallen.
No one could email me to say
the Mets had lost two in a row to
Washington.
I was in a technological vacuum
- and it was beginning to feel
pretty good.
But I knew this joyful lack of
communication could not go on in-
definitely I called my cellphone
provider to explain about the lost
phone. After going through the
complicated customer service sys-
tem of pressing buttons and lis-
tening to my options, I finally got
fed up and just kept pressing 0
and hoped for a live operator
I am not known for having a lot


Ironically, even
though I pay $8 a
month for cellphone
insurance, my
deductible turned
out to be the same
price I originally paid
for the cellphone.
of patience.
When the operator finally came
on, she was extremely pleasant
and helpful. She made all of the
sympathetic sounds about how in-


convenient things are without a
cellphone and how she would do
everything in her power to get me
a new phone as soon as I justified
my ignorance to the cellphone
company's insurance company
Ironically, even though I pay $8
a month for cellphone insurance,
my deductible turned out to be the
same price I originally paid for
the cellphone.
Hmmm. That's a good business
model.
When I asked for some addi-
tional information, the pleasant
customer service representative
said she needed to go get it and
she would call me back.
She then hung up.
The only phone number the cell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

company had for me was attached
to the cellphone that had recently
found a new home as an end table
in a gopher tortoise hole on the
north side of the 15th fairway at
the Citrus Springs golf course.
I took this as a sign from God
that life might be easier without
being attached to the world's best
cellphone.
If you would like to contact me,
you can now do so by dropping me
a letter at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
It was meant to be.
0]
Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


REVIEW
Continued from Page Cl

continually making at-
tempts to purify his brand of
communism. This led at
times to mass starvation and
at other times student
groups (the Red Guards)
closed down educational in-
stitutions and forced gov-
ernment bureaucrats to
work on collective farms
under brutal conditions.
This was followed by the
rise of the "gang of four"
who wanted to further radi-
calize the regime and which
had some influence until
Mao's death in 1976. As HK
puts it: "Mao destroyed tra-
ditional China and left its
rubble as building blocks for
ultimate modernization"
(page 321).


Because the Chinese
leadership valued HK's
opinions and insights, he
was frequently asked to
come to China and offer his
insights. This went on for 40
years. His summations of
those talks give the reader
many insights into how
Peking saw the world as the
Soviet Empire crumbled.
President Reagan's eight
years focused primarily on
relations with Russia. Al-
though a strong supporter of
the Republic of China gov-
ernment on Taiwan, he took
HK's advice and did not em-
phasize the Far East in his
foreign policy forays.
Chapter 15 is particularly
interesting because it gives
Kisssinger's interpretation
of the Tiananmen Square
protests in 1989.
The government in power
(by this point Mao is dead)


a


mismanaged and misunder-
stood the impact of global
television monitoring the
brutality of the Chinese gov-
ernment in squashing
protests.
Consistent with his belief
that foreign calculations
should be based on econom-
ics, military strength and ge-
ographical location, HK
feels that such repressive
actions by the Peking gov-
ernment should be criti-
cized but should not
undermine the basic rela-
tionship. He praises Presi-


ob.


2012


dent George Bush I for not
allowing this Chinese do-
mestic problem to torpedo
relations with Washington.
He handled the issue with
"grace and elegance" ac-
cording to HK. To have al-
lowed the protesters to
escalate their cause, HK be-
lieves, it could have led to a
civil war.
In summarizing his opin-
ion of Bill Clinton's China
policy, he calls it "satisfac-
tory," but felt he was too
sympathetic to domestic
American opinion.


HK is also deeply con-
cerned about the impact of
nuclear proliferation (North
Korea, Pakistan, Iran) be-
cause as proliferation accel-
erates, the "calculus of
deterrence grows increas-
ingly abstract. It becomes
ever more difficult to decide
who is deterring whom and
by what calculations"
(page 495).
The paperback edition in-
cludes an "afterword"
based on events since the
hardback version of the
book was issued early this
year. In the paperback edi-
tion, he again expresses his
fears that domestic Ameri-
can politics may make rela-
tions with Peking
increasingly difficult. In
particular he worries that
economic sanctions against
various Chinese economic
practices could torpedo the


political agreements of the
two countries over the last
four decades. "On China"
does not dwell on the recent
Chinese economic suc-
cesses nor does it men-
tion the corruption by those
with political power which
have been publicized in the
American media recently
Because of the complex-
ity of the events and person-
alities that the book
describes, it is not an easy
read. But it would make a
good summer project for
anyone interested in global
politics.

Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and US. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring.
Friday Saturday


fag 'Day


Ceremony


June 14, 2012 ~ 7:00pm
Inverness Government Center
212 WMain St., Inverness


The City of Inverness invites you to celebrate
National Flag Day
Thursday June 14, 21 12. The ceremony will
begin at 7:00 pm at the Inverness Government
Center and will feature local veterann Color
Guard displays, musical and vocal patriotic
tributes, and a keynote speaker. You are
encioura2.ed to bring your family, your friends
and lawn chairs!


RIBO CTTN


DONATIONS
501 (3


gome Aga,>E





AS AE STO


CONSIGNMENTS


1980 N. Future Terrace
Across from the Chc-r.ron \rjIion on 486

Smaller Furniture Home Accessories
Quality Jewelry Special Books


AH Sale BIoneft


BOS s & Imw CLUBS
of citrus County


Callusat (352) 270-8861
Or visit us online!
HomeAgainResaleStore.com
Hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m.- 12 p.m.

CRipOWid


SENIORS

ON THE MOVE

ARE HOLDING A
L( TRASH TO TREASURES

SALE
FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2012
FROM 10:00 am TIL 2:00 pm
On the Patio at -
Central Citrus Resource Center
S2804 W Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto N


For more Information pleue all 352-527-959


IEr zr-z f CNiE


C


SPONSORED
EVENTS SO
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chronicle is committed to supporting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraisers and entertainment throughout our
community. The Chronicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and work. Don't
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
of your sponsorship needs! de


IR AN


0O


In the paperback edition, Kissinger
again expresses his fears that
domestic American politics may
make relations with Peking
increasingly difficult.


c CITRU -- COUNT Y Sunday Monday Tuesday


www.chrON icleonline.com
www.chronicleonline.com ---- -- -












BUSINESS UN
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Downwardly mobile


Associated Press
This May 9 photo shows the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Research in Motion co-founders Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis have
together donated more than $400 million to the community. Lazaridis has donated $150 million to the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,
which he founded in 2000.

Canadian tech town feels decline ofResearch In Motion's BlackBerry phones


ROB GILLIES
Associated Press

WATERLOO, Ontario Presi-
dent Barack Obama couldn't bear
to part with his BlackBerry Oprah
Winfrey declared it one of her "fa-
vorite things." It could be so addic-
tive that it was nicknamed "the
CrackBerry"
Then came a new generation of
competing smartphones, and sud-
denly the BlackBerry, that game-
changing breakthrough in personal
connectedness, looks ancient.
There is even talk that the fate of
Research In Motion, the company
that fathered the BlackBerry in
1999, is no longer certain as its flag-
ship property rapidly loses market
share to flashier phones like
Apple's iPhone and Google's An-
droid-driven models.
With more than $2 billion in
cash, bankruptcy for RIM seems
highly unlikely in the near term,
but these are troubling times for
Waterloo, Ontario, the town of
100,000 that was transformed by the
BlackBerry into Canada's Silicon
Valley RIM is Canada's most valu-
able technology company, an inter-
national icon so prestigious that
founder Mike Lazaridis and its
other driving force, Jim Balsillie,
are on an official government list of
national heroes, alongside the likes
of Alexander Graham Bell.


Three people on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange display their
Blackberry smartphones May 30. Research In Motion Ltd., the maker of
the BlackBerry, is in steep decline. The company, once the crown jewel
of the Canadian technology industry, is now worth a fraction of Apple's
market capitalization.


RIM's U.S. share of the smart-
phone market belly-flopped from
44 percent in 2009 to 10 percent in
2011 according to market re-
searcher NPD Group. The com-
pany still has 78 million active
subscribers across the globe, but
last month RIM issued a warning
that it will lose money for the sec-
ond consecutive quarter, will lay
off workers this year, and has hired
a team of bankers to help it weigh


its options. Last July it slashed
2,000 jobs.
Of RIM's 16,500 remaining em-
ployees, 7,500 live in Waterloo, a
university town 90 minutes' drive
from Toronto, where everyone
seems to know someone who
works for RIM.
John Lind says RIM's impact on
his field, commercial real estate, is
enormous. "We talk about RIM in
hushed tones in this region be-


cause no one wants to be negative
about it, no one wants to be seen as
not on their side," he said. "But
people are saying, 'What would this
region look like without RIM?"'
The decline of the BlackBerry
has come shockingly fast. Just five
years ago, when the first iPhone
came out, few thought it could
threaten the BlackBerry Now
Chief Executive Thorsten Heins
says his employees "are getting
asked all the time, 'What's going on
with you guys? What happened? I
mean RIM is the star of Canada
and what happened to you guys?
And how bad is it going to go?"'
RIM's software is still focused on
email, and is less user-friendly and
agile than iPhone or Android. Its
attempt at touch screens was a
flop, and it lacks the apps that
power other smartphones. Its
tablet, the PlayBook, registered
just 500,000 sales to Apple's 11.8
million in the last quarter despite
a price cut from $500 to $200, well
below cost.
RIM's hopes now hang on Black-
Berry 10, a new operating system
set to debut later this year. It's thor-
oughly redesigned for the new
multimedia, Internet browsing and
apps experience that customers
are now demanding.
Heins, formerly RIM's chief op-
erating officer, says he can turn
See .Page D2


Businesses invited to Citrus County Skills Gap Forums


Reporter recently asked how
many jobs go unfilled in our
region because of the "skills
gap" that is to say, the difference
or gap between the critical skills
needed on the job and those pos-
sessed by applicants.
Talk about a $64,000 *
question, and it is cer-
tainly a valid one after
all, if we want to solve a
problem, it's important to
know how big it is.
Across the country, an
estimated 3 million jobs /
are currently unfilled be- V A
cause employers cannot Laura
find qualified workers. Laura
About 51 percent of WORK
Florida's jobs in 2009 CONNI
were in middle-skill oc-


cupations, but only 43
percent of the state's workers likely
had the appropriate training.
This doesn't mean that our talent
pool is unskilled; rather that the
skills job seekers have may not sync
up with critical skills needed in the
current or emerging job market. A
critical skill is one that, if not pres-
ent, results in a task not being com-
pleted satisfactorily, if at all. The
lack of a critical skill causes prob-
lems, but the possession of it allows
work to continue.
Out of a regional labor force of
203,007, there were 19,495 unem-


I

IE
E


played residents in April (May's em-
ployment numbers will be released
Friday). According to the Florida
Department of Economic Opportu-
nity, online advertised vacancies
were 4,711 jobs for Workforce Con-
nection in May, repre-
senting a 27 percent
increase of 1,005 jobs
since May 2011 and a 2.5
percent increase in job
demand over the month.
This spring, Workforce
Connection has averaged
772 job placements per
month, which is one of
the top placement rates
Byrnes among the state's re-
FORCE gional workforce boards.
:CTION The difference between
placements and vacan-
cies is not exclusively in-
dicative of a skills gap. We do,
however, hear concerns from local
employers that echo what's hap-
pening nationally and globally
That's why we have collaborated
with economic development and
education partners throughout our
region to host a series of "Skills Gap
Forums." In Citrus County, we're
proud to partner with the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council, College of Central Florida
and Citrus County Schools.
These forums are designed to
move us beyond the anecdotal and


ELSEWHERE
See a related column by
Workforce Connection CEO
Rusty Skinner./Page Cl

drill down to the specifics, deter-
mine how pervasive the "skills gap"
is in our own backyard, and identify
which critical skills are needed in
key industries.
Business owners and/or their rep-
resentatives are invited no, urged
- to attend at least one of Skills
Gap Forums. The forums will be
conducted by the Chicago-based
firm, Thomas P Miller and Associ-
ates. Input gleaned from the fo-
rums, as well as subsequent
surveys, will be presented in a re-
port later this summer.
Clearly, your involvement is key;
what you have to say will guide
local economic development, work-
force and education partners in de-
veloping strategies and curricula to
help close skills gaps.
The Citrus County Skills Gap Fo-
rums take place Thursday, June 28,
at CF's Learning and Conference
Center in Lecanto. County-based in-
dustry forums are Manufacturing
(8:30 to 10 a.m.), Business and Fi-
nancial Services (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.)
and Information Technology (4-6
p.m.). The Regional Healthcare


Forum is set for 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.,
also at the college's Citrus County
campus.
You may also be interested in at-
tending the Regional Agribusiness
forum from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday, June
18, at CF's Levy Center in Chiefland
and/or the Regional Transporta-
tion/Distribution/Warehousing/Ma-
rine from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, June
19, at CF's Klein Conference Center
in Ocala.
If you can't make it to one of the
forums in Citrus County, please feel
free to attend any of those in Levy
or Marion counties. You'll find the
full schedule of forums, as well as
RSVP online, by visiting our web-
site at www.clmworkforce.com.
For more information or to sign
up, you may also call 800-746-9950,
ext. 2230.
Here's the bottom line: if you
have jobs but don't feel you can find
qualified applicants, we want to
help. But first we need to know
what you need. This is your oppor-
tunity to tell us.
-
Laura Byrnes, APR, is a certified
workforce professional and
communications manager a t
Workforce Connection. Contact her
at 352-291-9559, 800-434-5627,
ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce. com.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Can't


say 'no'


to son
DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I
have been married
for 10 years. Until two
years ago, his 18-year-old
son lived with us. He has
since moved back in with
his mom in another state.
When he lived with us,
his dad got him a cell-
phone and he still uses it,
with my husband paying
for it. Last month he ran
up the bill to $600. He
works a couple of hours a
week, and my husband
says his son "can't afford
the bill," so he's not mak-
ing him pay it back. There
have been other instances
of my husband giving his
son money for various
things instead of telling
him to either get more
hours at his current job or
get a new job.
We have a lot of argu-
ments over this, as I be-
lieve an 18-year-old
should pay his own cell-
phone bill, as well as save
his money to pay his other
expenses. Am I wrong and
being too harsh on him?
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: How
can anyone justify a $600
cell bill under any cir-
cumstances? Your hus-
band is doing this boy no
favors. Your husband is on
a guilt trip because he is
separated from his son,
and he is exacerbating
what might have been a
bad situation by spoiling
his son rotten.
If the boy is out of high
school and is not going to
pursue further education,
he should be encouraged
to get a real job. As long as
the old man is there every
time the kid holds out his
hand, this boy is never
going to grow up. You are
in a difficult position as
the stepmother, but it
sounds as if you are the
responsible person in this
family Hopefully, you can
persuade your husband to
see the error of his ways.
DEAR BRUCE: For rea-
sons that I would prefer
not to go into, I would like
to keep my daughter from
inheriting anything from
me. How can I go about
doing this? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: You
have every right to deter-
mine how and to whom
your assets ultimately will
be dispersed.
Write a will that specifi-
cally names your benefici-
aries and specifically
states that your daughter
will inherit nothing, or $1
or something similar. The
reason people often leave
a dollar to an individual is
to eliminate any argu-
ments that the person was
overlooked inadvertently
If there are substantial
monies in your estate,
there may be other ver-
biage that the attorney
preparing your will may
wish to insert.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are in our 50s,
are both employed and
have no mortgage. We are
doing pretty well. I re-
ceived an inheritance of
$150,000. Our investment
adviser is suggesting we
keep $50,000 in savings for
liquidity, place $50,000 in
municipal bonds and put
$50,000 in utilities. Be-
cause of the beating taken
by our 401(k), which is
maxed out at $170,000, I'm
wondering about CDs.
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Oak Hill Hospital Ambassador Class


Oak Hill Hospital graduates


Special to the Chronicle
SPRING HILL Another Ambassador class was graduated in May 2012 from Oak Hill Hos-
pital. From left are: Theresa Eatough, Ambassador Program Facilitator, Sara Siegel, Eliza-
beth Scavuzzo, Cheryl Whitman, Jennifer McMurray, Pamela Prunty, Debra Bray, Carolyn
Mooney, Kristin Baker and Brenda Skoglund. The program is designed to promote a global
understanding of hospital operations and enhances teamwork in cooperation across all in-
ternal departments. Modeled after the Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Hernando pro-
gram, the Ambassador class meets once a month for the entire day and the program takes
six months to complete. During class time, participants visit various departments and re-
ceive an overview presented by the department director: departmental goals and outcomes,
financial information, strengths and challenges. Participants also receive a departmental
tour with hands-on involvement. The program began at Oak Hill in 2004. Ambassador grad-
uates are expected to use their knowledge to assume leader roles in projects, become ac-
tive in community involvement and serve on committees and process involvement teams.
Not pictured are Gall Werner and Laura Kriener.


V -i

Special to the Chronicle
SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital has graduated a class from its Introduction to Healthcare
Supervision class. From left are: Valerie Rabideau, Linda Campo, Mickey Smith, Elizabeth
Jennings, Sarah Siegel, Mark Ordeman, Kristen Baker and Mary Jo Paige, Diane Eggert,
Greg Zeaman, Carmel Worrell, Carlos Cardona. Introduction to Healthcare Supervision is a
course designed and taught by Oak Hill Hospital's CEO, Mickey Smith. It is a two-hour
weekly class based on the book "The Indispensable Healthcare Manager" by Leebov &
Scott. Topics covered in the class include: customer obsession, the organization perspec-
tive, getting results, relationships, leadership and management tools.


Chamber to debut
smartphone app
The Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce is putting Citrus
County in YOUR hands with a
mobile smartphone application.
Watch for the scan code on
the Sunday, June 17, Chamber
Connection page and learn how
to support your local Chamber
of Commerce businesses.
2 go to conference
for Raymond James
Greg Perrone, registered in-
vestment adviser representa-
tive/financial
adviser
/branch
owner, and
Dayna Mid-
dlebrooks, -
registered in-
vestment ad-
viser Greg
G reg
representa- Perrone
tive/financial Raymond
adviser, re- James
cently at- Financial.
tended the
National Con-
ference for
Professional
Development,
hosted by
Raymond
James Finan- -
cial Services, Dayna
member Middlebrooks
FINRA/SIPC. Raymond
The annual James
conference Financial.
offers inde-
pendent financial advisers the
opportunity to participate in a
broad range of educational ses-
sions and presentations made
by subject matter experts and
industry leaders, and also gives
them a forum for networking
and sharing best practices with
their peers.
Perrone and Middlebrooks,
whose office is at The Shoppes
of Citrus Hills, 2657 N. Forest
Ridge Blvd. in Hernando, found
the content of this year's meet-
ing to be of particular value.
After returning from Orlando,
the site of the 2012 meeting,
they have plans to implement
several of the ideas offered up
at the conference.


"This was a valuable experi-
ence for us, and we look for-
ward to sharing what we
learned with clients and with
professionals throughout the
community," Perrone said.
Raymond James Financial
(NYSE-RJF) is a Florida-based
diversified holding company
providing financial services to
individuals, corporations and
municipalities through its sub-
sidiary companies. Its three
principal wholly owned
broker/dealers, Raymond
James & Associates, Raymond
James Financial Services and
Raymond James Ltd., have
more than 5,400 financial ad-
visers serving 2 million ac-
counts in 2,400 locations
throughout the United States,
Canada and overseas.
Seven Rivers
appoints leaders
CRYSTAL RIVER Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
announces new medical staff
leadership appointments.
William V.
Harrer Ill, .
M.D., has
been ap- M
pointed to
serve a two-
year term as
chief of staff;
Bhadresh William
Patel, M.D., Harrer III
has been ap- Seven Rivers
pointed to Regional
serve a one- Medical Center.
year term as
chief of medi-
cine; and
Udaya
Kumar, M.D.,
has been ap-
pointed to
serve a one-
year term as Bhadresh
chief of Patel
surgery. Seven Rivers
Dr. Harrer, Regional
board- Medical Center.
certified in in-
ternal medicine, hematology
and medical oncology, has
been on staff at Seven Rivers
Regional since 2002. He re-
ceived his medical degree from
Jefferson Medical College in
Philadelphia, Pa., and com-


pleted an in-
ternal medi-
cine
internship
and resi-
dency at
Cooper Uni-
versity Med-
ical Center in Udaya
Camden, N.J. Kumar
He also com- Seven Rivers
pleted a fel- Regional
lowship in Medical Center.
hematology and oncology at
Cooper University.
Dr. Patel has been on staff at
Seven Rivers Regional since
1995. He received his medical
degree from Smt. NHL Munici-
pal Medical College in Ahemed-
abad, India, and completed a
residency in internal medicine
at Hahnemann University Hos-
pital in Philadelphia, Pa.
Dr. Kumar, board-certified in
urology, received his medical
degree and his post-graduate
diploma in general surgery from
Madras University in India. He
completed his urological resi-
dency in England and is certi-
fied by the Intercollegiate Board
of the Surgical Royal Colleges
in urology. He holds a diploma
in urology from the Institute of
Urology in London and com-
pleted fellowships in renal
transplantation and renovascu-
lar surgery at the Cleveland
Clinic, and endourology and ur-
ological laparoscopy at Loyola
University in Chicago.
The hospital would like to ex-
tend its gratitude to outgoing
leaders Fernando Esclopis,
M.D., past chief of staff; Mario
A. Mendizabal, M.D., past chief
of medicine; and Aparna Chun-
duri, M.D., past chief of surgery.
Seven Rivers Regional appreci-
ates the hard work and dedica-
tion of these doctors.
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, a 128-bed general,
medical/surgical acute care fa-
cility serving Citrus, Levy and
south Marion counties, opened
its doors in 1978. Visit Seven
RiversRegional.com.
Doctors join Access
Healthcare
SPRING HILL-Access
Healthcare Physicians LLC an-


ounces
Syed Wajahat
Ali, M.D.,
FACP, MRO
(Fellow Amer-
ican College
of Physicians,
Medical Re-
view Office Syed
Certification) Wajahat Ali
and Seema Access
Nishat, M.D., Healthcare.

joined Access
Healthcare
and have re-
located their
practice to
11451 Cortez
Blvd.,
Brooksville.
Drs. Ali and Seema
Nishat previ- Access
ously prac- Healthcare.
ticed at
Brooksville Primary Care,
14540 Cortez Blvd., Suite 16,
Brooksville.
Ali is board-certified in inter-
nal medicine and certified as a
medical review officer. He relo-
cated to Florida in 2002 from
Rockford, Ill. He completed res-
idency in internal medicine at
Cook County Hospital in
Chicago, Ill., and received his
MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine,
Bachelor of Surgery) at the
prestigious Osmania Medical
College, Hyderabad, India.
Nishat also relocated to
Brooksville from Rockford, Ill.,
where she served as chairman
for the department of medicine
in the in-patient practice at
Swedish American Hospital in
Rockford, Ill. Dr. Nishat is
board-certified in internal medi-
cine. She completed her resi-
dency at Cook County Hospital
in Chicago, Ill., and received
her MBBS at the prestigious
Osmania Medical College, Hy-
derabad, India.
Ali and Nishat can be
reached at 352-797-9677
Access Healthcare, LLC is a
multiservice medical practice
consisting of more than 95
health care providers, almost
500 employees in more than 50
locations throughout Florida.
Access Healthcare LLC's main
office is at 5350 Spring Hill


Drive, Spring Hill, FL 34606.
For information, call 352-688-
8116 or go to www.Access
HealthcareLLC.net.
Dr. Mohiuddin
opens practice
SPRING HILL--Access
Healthcare LLC announces the
opening of
the practice
of Mo-
hammed Mo-
hiuddin, M.D.,
at his new lo-
cation at
5429 Com-
mercial Way,
Spring Hill Mohammed
Dr. Mohi- Mohiuddin
uddin com- Access
pleted his Healthcare.
residency at
the University of Arkansas Med-
ical Sciences (UAMS). He re-
ceived his medical degree from
St. Christopher lba Mar Diop in
Dakar, Senegal.
Mohiuddin holds the follow-
ing accreditations: BCLS
(Basic Cardiac Life Support),
ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life
Support), PALS PediatricAd-
vanced Life Support), NRP,
ATLS and he speaks English,
Spanish and Hindi. Dr. Mohiud-
din is a member of the Ameri-
can Medical Association,
Arkansas Medical Society and
the American Academy of Fam-
ily Physicians.
For information or an ap-
pointment, call 352-835-7968.
Key center plans
job fair June 30
The Key Training Center will
host a job fair from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Wednesday, June 30, at
the business office at 5399 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Open positions include residen-
tial aides, residential manager
assistants and instructor assis-
tants. Applications and inter-
views will be conducted on site.
For additional information,
call 352-795-5541, ext. 309.
Business group
plans women's expo
The original Women's Health
& Fitness Expo, hosted by the
Business Women's Alliance of


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, will return from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
22, at the National Guard Ar-
mory in Crystal River.
Firms that participated last
year may take advantage of
paid pre-registration until June
15, and choose their preferred
exhibit space. After June 15,
registration will be open to
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Chamber members receive a
discount.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, excellent sponsorship op-
portunities, and the popular
Spa Zone are available from
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's Crystal River of-
fice at 28 N.W. U.S. 19, phone
352-795-3149, or from any
Business Women's Alliance
member.
The expo's purpose is to ed-
ucate women and those around
them about health, fitness and
wellness. Proceeds are dedi-
cated to furthering the educa-
tion of students from Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. Proceeds
from last year's expo helped to
fund nine scholarships in health
care and business careers.


BLACKBERRY
Continued from Page Dl

things around with BlackBerry
He took over in January after the
company lost tens of billions in
market value and founder
Lazaridis stepped down along
with co-CEO Balsillie.
RIM was once Canada's most
valuable company with a market
value of $83 billion in June 2008,
but the stock has plummeted
since, from over $140 share to
around $10. Its decline is evoking
memories of Nortel, another
Canadian tech giant, which ended
up declaring bankruptcy in 2009.
"It has to be very sad," BGC Fi-
nancial Partners analyst Colin
Gillis said from New York. "I feel
for those people up there because
what else are you going to do -
work at the Apple store that just
opened in the mall?"
But Waterloo is home to more
than 800 tech companies and is
certainly no company town, many
here insist. Smaller firms like e-
learning company Desire2Learn
have doubled their head count in
the last year, and Google has
opened an office here.
Tad Homer-Dixon, chairman of
the Center for International Gov-
ernance and Innovation, a Water-
loo-based think tank, likens
Waterloo to Rochester, New York,
where the blow of Kodak's bank-
ruptcy filing is cushioned by the
network of startups the company


Associated Press
Thorsten Heins, president and CEO of Research In Motion, delivers the keynote speech May I during the Black-
Berry world conference in Orlando.


helped to spawn.
"They've taken an enormous hit
because of the collapse of Kodak,
and Waterloo will take an enor-
mous hit assuming that RIM ulti-
mately vanishes from the scene,
but I think the overall economy
and region has been so funda-
mentally changed by RIM that it
will actually do very well," Homer-
Dixon said.


Homer-Dixon says RIM's impact
on the city has been staggering.
His think tank was created by
RIM's Balsillie, and he also is a
professor at the Balsillie School of
International Affairs at the Uni-
versity of Waterloo. Balsillie and
Lazaridis have together donated
more than $400 million to the com-
munity. Lazaridis has donated
$150 million to the Perimeter In-


stitute for Theoretical Physics,
which he founded in 2000 and
which attracts the involvement of
such giants of physics as Stephen
Hawking.
"Ten years from now, BlackBer-
rys will be in the Smithsonian but
these institutions will hopefully
still be thriving," Homer-Dixon
said.
Lazaridis, 51, remains on RIM's


board. Canadian billionaire Prem
Watsa, a fellow board member,
calls the Turkish-born Greek im-
migrant a genius who pioneered
the smartphone.
"It really would be unfortunate
if anything happened to RIM, and
I'd like to do whatever I can to
help," Watsa said.
In an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press at RIM headquarters
in Waterloo, Heins said he won't
try to compete head-to-head with
Apple but will try to build on
RIM's strengths, such as its domi-
nance of the corporate smart-
phone market. RIM says more
than 90 percent of Fortune 500
companies use BlackBerry and
that more than a million North
American government workers
rely on BlackBerry's software se-
curity.
But Heins acknowledges RIM
failed to quickly adapt to the
emerging "bring your own device"
trend, in which employees bring
their personal iPhones or Android
devices to work instead of relying
on BlackBerrys issued by their
employers.
That's where BlackBerry 10
comes in delayed but not too
late to vie with the new Apple
iPhone expected this fall, or so
Heins hopes.
"At the end of the day, if the
product is good you can always
come back," Heins said. "There's
many examples of how that has
happened. I'm not that scared
about this, frankly"


D2 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


BUSINESS


r.


r.





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
JUNE 10, 2012


'You Caught My Eye' -

nominate someone today


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ... for OUTSTANDING Customer Service!
PERSON you are nominating
BUSINESS they work for


ADDRESS of business
DATE of contact


City
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?


The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce is proud to launch its "You Caught
My Eye" program.
The program allows residents and visi-
tors to recognize employees who provide
superior Customer Service.
In addition to the employee's name ap-
pearing in the newspaper, the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce sends a let-


ter to the employee's manager, noting the
recognition.
We are excited to offer such interaction
between businesses and community resi-
dents. So, go ahead, give a shout out to
someone who gave you exceptional cus-
tomer service.
Please note: The business must be lo-
cated within Citrus County


Your Name
Your Phone Number Date Submitted
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO:
CINDI FEIN, CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 N.W. U.S. 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428


NatureCoast Spherion Staffing


Teri Nichols owns the NatureCoast Spherion Staffing office. They offer staffing with a personal touch backed by resources of a $2 billion dol-
lar workforce leader, but owned and operated by a team of staffing specialists who are known throughout the local community. They provide
recruiting and staffing solutions for Citrus employers. If local companies are struggling to find the right skill sets and work ethics in employees
... Spherion can help. Call them at 352-796-6000.


What to do after a disaster plan now


You may be without power, water, food or any
of the services and businesses we rely on. Im-
mediate response may not be possible, so res-
idents must be prepared to be self-reliant for
several weeks. Here are some basic safety tips.
For more detail, go to http://wwwbocc.citrus.
fl.us/disaster/returning_home.htm
Re-Entry
Having your evacuation re-entry sticker and
a valid ID will expedite operations in letting
you back into your neighborhood.
Re-entry stickers are available at both
Chamber of Commerce offices: 28 N.W U.S. 19,
Crystal River, and 401 W Tompkins Ave., In-
verness; Citrus County Sheriff's Office in In-
verness (and all substations), Department of
Development Services in Lecanto (Lecanto
Government Building), Tax Collector's Office
in Inverness and Tax Collector's Office in Crys-
tal River.
Be patient. Access to affected areas will be
controlled. You won't be able to return to your
home until search and rescue operations are
complete and safety hazards such as downed
trees and power lines are cleared. It may take




I usinevs O omen 's inHffi

wedcomes new members


Of is'y 1 measure to announce mtat
Theresa Zatou0h, PaientAccess Director at
Oak 7-il-osiitafandAnnemarie .Sayer,
Community Liaison at Y-orizon R7-omecare,
are t1e newest members offte Citrus Couny
Chamber ofCommerce business fWomen's
Afiance. Pfease welcome 6em wi open
arms tme negtime jousee eac of fem,.
9 ttan4 eact ofyou for supportiny our mission
and for making QA t6e evel est6itfcan 6c.

0orothy,
chair, )QA


up to three days for emergency crews to reach
your neighborhood. It may take two to four
weeks before utilities are restored.
Stay tuned to your local radio station for ad-
vice and instructions about emergency med-
ical aid, food, and other forms of assistance.
For Your Safety
Avoid downed or dangling utility wires.
Metal fences may have been energized by
fallen wires. Be especially careful when cut-
ting or clearing fallen trees. They may have
power lines tangled in them.
Enter your home with caution, being aware
of snakes, insects or animals driven to higher
ground by floods. Open windows and doors to
ventilate and dry your home.
If there has been flooding, have an electri-
cian inspect your home or office before turn-
ing on the breaker.
Be careful with fire. Do not strike a match
until you are sure there are no breaks in gas
lines. Avoid candles. Use battery-operated
flashlights and lanterns instead. When using a
grill, keep it outdoors in a well-ventilated area.
Repairs and Precautions


Make temporary repairs to correct safety
hazards and minimize further damage. This
may include covering holes in the roof, walls
or windows and debris removal.
Protect yourself from contractor fraud. Take
photographs of all damage before repairs and
keep receipts for insurance purposes. After as-
sessing damage to your home, contact your
local building department for information on
required building permits.
Call professionals to remove large, uprooted
trees, etc. Remember the rule: If you can't
identify it, don't touch it and don't burn trash.
Disinfect any tap water you drink or use for
cooking or cleaning. You must purify the tap
water until officials notify you of its safety
Bring water to a rolling boil for a full 10 min-
utes or use chemicals (eight drops of chlorine
bleach or iodine per gallon) or water purifica-
tion tables, as directed. Let the water sit at
least 10 minutes before using.
Water you saved in clean containers before
the storm will be fine for two to three weeks.
To be sure, add two drops of chlorine or iodine
per gallon before drinking.


REMEMBER DAD FATHER'S DAY IS JUNE 17


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce
We encourage you to shop locally.


June 14 "Get Caught in the Cham-
ber's Web" Open House College of
Central Florida, 5 to 7 p.m.
June 28 After Hours Business
Networking Mixer @ Avante, Inver-
ness. 5 to 7 p.m.
June 30 Homosassa Fireworks.


July 3 Inverness Fireworks.
July 4 Crystal River Fireworks.
July 17 Chamber Member Break-
fast @ Creekside Grill, Homosassa.
7:30 a.m. Registration.
July 19 After Hours Business
Mixer @ Verizon, Inverness. 5 to 7 p.m.


Gov.

Rick

Scott

remains

positive

about

business

In our effort to secure
Florida's future, the Florida
Chamber of Commerce
works closely with elected
leaders like Gov Rick Scott
to reduce burdensome reg-
ulations on employers,
lower the cost of doing busi-
ness and improve Florida's
business climate.
After the second consecu-
tive year in which Governor
Scott signed every Florida
Chamber-backed bill passed
during the legislative ses-
sion into law, it is important
for Florida Chamber mem-
bers and Florida's business
community
to continue
advocating
for our ag-
gressive
multi-year
agenda for
jobs.
In a re-
cent letter Rick Scott
to Florida governor of
Chamber of Florida asks
Commerce businesses to
members, contact him.
Gov Scott
cited a drop in the statewide
unemployment figures and
thanked business owners
for "playing an important
role in helping our economy
prosper."
Reflecting on the past 17
months, Scott comments,
"Florida is getting a lot of
positive attention. CEO
Magazine ranked Florida as
the second best state for
business and Florida's
workforce and job training
ranks No. 1 in the country
according to the U.S. Cham-
ber of Commerce and Na-
tional Chamber
Foundation."
Below is Scott's invitation
to business owners to con-
tinue to assist with improv-
ing the economic climate in
the state of Florida:
I invite you to contact my
office directly at 850-488-
5603 to give me your ideas
on how we can make
Florida the best state for
business. I would appreci-
ate your help in the follow-
ing areas:
1. Let every non-Florida
business owner know what
a great place Florida is to
build a company.
2. Let me know of any
company I should call to ex-
pand in Florida.
3. Let me know of any reg-
ulation we should review
4. Let me know how I can
improve state government.
5. Let me know how you
think businesses can grow
and prosper in Florida.


Check out our calendar of events
at www citruscountychamber com.
Members are now posting enter-
tainment functions as well networking
events.
We hope to see you out and about in
Citrus County!


Upcoming Chamber Calendar of Events






D4 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

We'd like your opinion,
please. RP, via email
DEAR RB: Your invest-
ment adviser seems to have
a decent spread. I don't know
if I would suggest $50,000 in
savings that seems a little
high but the $50,000 in
well-chosen municipals and
$50,000 in utilities doesn't
sound bad to me.
I feel constrained to point
out that money invested in
CDs is, at the very best, in a
holding pattern. The interest
your money would generate
in CDs likely would barely
cover inflation and taxes. If
you are interested in setting
up this type of account, I
have no quarrel with that,
but it is not a productive way
to invest money On the other
hand, if it's money that you
want to be absolutely, 100
percent certain is there, CDs
are not a bad choice. You
have to determine your tol-
erance for risk
There is little risk in mu-
nicipals. As for bonds, I pre-
fer general obligation bonds
as contrasted with revenue
bonds. General obligation
bonds are paid off out of
taxes. Revenue bonds are
paid off with income gener-
ated from the project, such
as a hospital, sports arena,
etc. Most would consider the
general obligation bonds a
sounder investment.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 61


BUSINESS


years old and my husband is
64. We recently had a home
built. Our mortgage is only
$58,000, which is small com-
pared with the one we had.
Our monthly payments are
small, and the mortgage is
for 30 years. We can afford to
double up on the payments,
but does it make sense at our
age to pay extra and pay it off
in 10 or 15 years? Or would it
be smarter just to save that
money? The house is valued
at more than $250,000. -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The one
important ingredient that
you failed to include is the
interest rate on the mort-
gage. If the rate is in the
neighborhood of 5 percent or
less, my inclination would be
not to pay off the mortgage
early I believe that interest
rates are going to creep up-
ward, and your current rate,
if it's a good one, will look
like money from home.
If you are more comfort-
able with a home that's paid
for, by all means, belly up to
the bar and pay off as much
as you can so that by the time
you are fully retired, the
house will be paid for That
is more of a warm-and-fuzzy-
feeling solution than a solid
financial one.
DEAR BRUCE: What is
the best way to protect one-
self in an unmarried, long-
term relationship? Does a
cohabitation contract out-
weigh a will? Should one
have both? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: There


have been many court cases
concerning palimony, and
the best thing you can do is
to find a competent attorney
Whether one could give a
right to assets by contract
and then take them away
with a will is something I
would not consider trying to
resolve. You should have on-
the-spot legal advice and, if
necessary, update your
arrangement with your
"live-in."
It is difficult enough to sort
these things out when peo-
ple are married. For the un-
married, it can become a
legal morass.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band recently passed away
and left me about $70,000 in
life insurance proceeds. I
have an IRA mutual fund ac-
count for $100,000 from
which I take a minimum
yearly distribution. I also
have about $7,000 in stock.
I am 78 years old and re-
ceive $1,500 net in Social Se-
curity benefits and $1,700 net
from my pension. I have
about $5,000 in savings, own
my home free and clear and
have no other debts.
I am disillusioned with
my investment adviser. I
have asked her advice re-
garding what to do with the
insurance proceeds, with
little or no response. I con-
tacted a broker online, who
put me in touch with an-
other financial adviser. He
is suggesting I put $50,000
into a fixed annuity, keep
$20,000 for an emergency
fund and continue with the


IRA mutual fund, albeit
with his company. I have
checked his credentials and
am meeting with him in two
weeks. Do you think fixed
annuities are the way to go?
- EG., via email
DEAR PG.: While $70,000
is a great deal of money to
some folks, it is not very
much when talking to an in-
vestment adviser. If the
money is invested appropri-
ately, there is little commis-
sion to be earned. She
should, however, have the
courtesy to respond to you.
If you put the $70,000 into
a money market fund, it will
earn you well under 1 per-
cent. CDs? About the same,
maybe a tad more. As for mu-
tual funds, there are some
good ones these days, but
you have to be more selec-
tive than you did five or six
years ago.
As for the adviser who
right away wants to sell you
a $50,000 annuity, I wouldn't
even answer his phone calls.
Certainly there are worth-
while annuities, but for most
78-year-olds, annuities are
not appropriate due to early
cancellation fees, extra ex-
penses, etc. This is not to
condemn the entire annuity
field but, on balance, there's
little out there that would
interest me.
You're going to have to get
used to the idea that $70,000
is going to earn very little in-
terest. The Federal Reserve
has depressed interest rates
to supposedly control infla-
tion. The beneficiaries are


younger people getting
mortgages, home equity
loans, etc. But for every ben-
eficiary, there's someone
who is losing and, unhappily,
it is you.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are in our early
80s, and we have enjoyed lis-
tening to you on the radio
and reading your columns.
To make a long story short,
we have had three pipes
break in our walls and are
now faced with replacing all
pipes under the house. If we
don't, of course, our home in-
surance will be dropped. If
an insurance company does
want to pick us up, it may
run $3,000 to $4,000 per year,
so we want to have the pipes
replaced. The house is about
23 years old. They were
faulty pipes and did have a
warranty for replacement,
however, we did not fall
under that warranty.
We have $1,821 per month
from Social Security, about
$7,000 in government bonds,
a $20,000 annuity and about
$125,000 in stock. I know this
isn't much, but it's all we
have. The repairs will run
anywhere from $6,000 to
$9,000.
My question is, where do
you think it would be best to
take the money from? By the
way, our house is paid for,
and our only bills are the
utilities, food, etc. Thank you
for whatever the answer may
be. Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I don't
understand what is going
wrong in the wall that is re-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

quiring you to replace the
pipes under the house. But
let us assume that is an ac-
curate evaluation, and that's
what has to happen. I also
don't believe your insurance
company is going to charge
you as much as you said on a
renewal. This, too, has to be
explored.
So from what investment
do you take this money? I'm
assuming the money in the
stock market is doing as well
as the market has been
doing, and if that is the case,
I wouldn't disturb it.
The annuities are a possi-
bility only if you can with-
draw the funds without any
penalties.
From the scant informa-
tion you have given me, the
government bonds may be
the best source to tap. I don't
know the interest rate you
are earning; if the bonds are
older, it may be a decent in-
terest rate.
If they are relatively new
bonds, though, this is proba-
bly the best source.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can
now be heard 24/7 via
iTunes and at www
taeradio.com.


CITRUS COUNTY




CHRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

1 04 .B7 .
VM ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Area Tours
Enthusiastic, energetic
and personable driver
to conduct area tours
for visitors to country
club community. Sales
support function. Clean
driving record a must.
Wednesday through
Saturday schedule.
Please email resume to
nancyv()citrushills.com
or call Nancy Kuzel at
352-746-6121
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sunday 8am to 4pm
men & women new
athletic shoes, + misc
5460 W Woodside Drive
FULL TIME
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT &
RECEPTIONIST
good benefits,
Apply in Person
Have resume avail
508 N. Lecanto Hwy
Allen Ridge Complex
Fax 352- 746-3305
INVERNESS Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washer/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087


1 Yea old
Lcbmbc
spayed
female
free to good home.
Because she bonds
strongly with her
owner, her ideal
home would be with
someone who is
home most of the
time. She is a good
medium sized dog at
40 pounds. For more
information
Call 352-573-7821.


eWea s


2 Declawed, spayed,
each needs to be an
only pet. Free to good
home with no children
(352) 621-0248
3 KITTENS FOR FREE
TO GOOD HOME
cute, lovable,
litter trained,
(352) 419-4221
Free 2 Mixed Breed
Chihuahua's,
4 yrs. old
Male & Female
Must Stay together
(352) 794-3724
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE KITTENS
8 weeks old,
darling, many colors
Needs good homes
(352) 341-2219


Free Kitties... adorable
boys and girls. Litter
box trained and ready
to go! Sweet personali-
ties. 352.476.2609.
Located in Inverness.
Free to Good Home
3 year male cat
neutered and
declawed. Must be
one cat home.
(352) 637-3553
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Kittens
need good homes
(352) 503-2412



GOOD THINGS
TO EAT
u pick or we pick
Blackberries
(352)643-0717
SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41
on Eden Dr. Inv.
Catelopes, Squash &
Watermelon, Conch,
Black Eye Peas
8:30-6p, 352-726-6378



Lost Cat
Black with white, under
courage, 8 yrs. old ,
81b Vicinity Alabama
Ave and Cedar Terr.
Homosassa
(352) 302-2255
Lost Cat, Female
Russian blue, pure gray
with silver, green eyes,
no collar, very friendly
off State Park Drive
Crystal River
(352) 446-0783


#1 Employment source is



www.chronicleonline.com


light tan, male,
name nugget
(352) 513-4722
Lost White Bichon
12 yrs., Name Snowie
Inverness Area
East of the trail
(352) 637-9685
LOST, Black & White
Great Dane Mix,Male
Floral City Area
Name Hank
Please Call
(352) 201-5459
MALE BOXER
brown, missing since
5/31 in vicinity of
Crystal Manor Please
call with any info/
$200 reward offered
No questions
(352) 613-4510
MINI AUSTRALIAN
SHEPHERD
answers to name Piper,
tri-colored. lost in vicinity
of Malverne and S. World
Way (352) 302-7670
or work# 746-3336
TURQUOISE & SILVER
LINK BRACELET
sentimental value
Lost on Sat, June 2nd in
Inverness @ the Blues
concert on the square
REWARD, pls call
(352) 419-7829



Chihuahua
Female, Tan
Highlands Area
(352) 637-5256
(352) 344-4373
FEMALE GOLD &
WHITE PUPPY
found 6/6 in Beverly Hills


Terrier/Poodle
Fishbowl, Homosassa
(352) 628-4005
SML PUPPY
Male, brown/white
approx 4 mos old
and 18 lbs, pis call
(352) 465-1007
WHITE POODLE MIX

Rd. near FT Cooper pk
on 6/6 (352) 792-4250



ADVERTISE YOUR WAY
TO SUCCESS!!
Call now to grow
your business. Get
your classified ad in
119 newspapers with
one order.
Advertising Networks
of Florida.
866-742-1373
IF YOU WITNESSED
an accident, car vs. mini
van, on Fnrid, 5/25@
8.50a.m at BIk Diamond &
491 Please Call
(352) 287-9744 or
Deputy Russ Howard
CC Sheriff Office



Looking For Professional
Chef to Assist
with a small business
Taking Interviews Call
Diane (352) 249-8443


^C W H ^. |^JI^
TO A DVERTISCL L:^ B

352i56 9 11 T



ORPAC OU DN INE
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2 COUCH CRYPTS
Includes 2 Caskets
Fero Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills 746-4646
At a Discount Price!
(270) 543-8419

BURIAL PLOT
Fountain Memorial
Pkwy, Garden of
Rosary, Lot 54,
space # 3, $1800
pls call for details
(727) 458-4001




HAIRSTYLIST
PT Time
For Multiple Senior
Facilities
Min 10yrs Exp.
No Sat's or Sun's
reliable transp. reqd.
only kind and
compassionate
individuals
please call
1-866-740-0947








*A k ^-- A- -k *

Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aevourcna.com
352-34 1-PREP (7737)

ACTIVITY
ASSISTANT/C.N.A.
Join our fun
and exciting team iII
ArborTrail
is accepting
applications for a
fulltime Activities Asst.
If you are an ener-
getic, creative and
customer service
oriented individual,
we are looking for
you. Must be able to
work weekends and
evenings. C.N.A.
license and CPR cer-
tification is required
for this position.
Email resume to:
athrc@southern
LTC.com
or fax: 352-637-1921
Or apply in person at:
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512

SEVEN RIVERS

Employment
Opportunities
In the following areas:
* RN-Med/Surg Tele
Comp Rehab
Surgery ICU
ED. OB/L&D
* Nurse Manager
OB/L&D
* RN Charge -ICU
nights ED
* RN -Core Measures
Coordinator
* OT COTA PT.
PTA. Med Tech II
* Network Analyst
* Warehouse
Supervisor

APPLY AT:
www.SRRMC.com
phone 352-795-8462
fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

Exp. Front Desk
Needed for busy
office Email Resume
Info@Dedim
healthcare.com

F/T
RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

FULL TIME
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT &
RECEPTIONIST
good benefits,
Apply in Person
Have resume avail
508 N. Lecanto Hwy
Alien Ridge Complex
Fax 352- 746-3305

HOME HEALTH
CLINICIANIRN
Full Time

BayCare HomeCare
provides high-quality,
compassionate care
right at home. Join
us for great career
opportunities, a
special way to work,
and the chance to be
the kind of profes-
sional you want to be.
One year home care
experience preferred.
Contact Amy Wright
at 727-519-1768 or
apply online to posi-
tion # 122053 at:
BavCareJobs.com

,r BayCare
HomeCare
EOE/AA/MIFIDIV
DF/TFWP


Home Health
Looking For

RN's, LPN's,
PT, OUT'S
(352) 794-6097

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST

Busy Family Medical
Practice seeking medi-
cal receptionist 2+
years recent experi-
ence in medical front
office required. Must
know Medicare & nsur-
ance basics with
eClinical experience a
plus! Position requires
a "people person"
working with the public
in a fast paced environ-
ment. Looking for a
motivated team player;
a quick learner who
pays attention to detail,
maintains a personable
demeanor and profes-
sional phone manner.
Excellent data entry
skills, appointment
scheduling, patient au-
thorizations and cus-
tomer service skills a
must. call Michelle @
352-257-5662

Ophthalmic Tech
Exp. a must, premium
salary potential. ben-
efits include. Health
ins. Pd Vac./Holiday.
IRA plan, bonuses.
No nights or wkends.
Fax Resume:
352-527-1358
See website
drsnewcomer.com
also interviewing
Optitian Candidtes

OT/COTA
FT or PT, pediatrics &
Adults. Immediate
need Call for Info.
(352) 795-4114

P/T Office/
Therapy Assist.
Holistic, Crystal River
Must be able to work
well as a team mem-
ber. Literacy person-
ality and IQ testing in-
terview will be held
Tuesday, June 12,
Call to Register
352-564-0285

RN Unit Manager
Full Time
Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive customer
service oriented
team. Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and manage-
ment abilities, great
organizational
skills and effective
delegation and mon-
itoring of clinical
systems. Excellent
benefits
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
ATDON@Southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


RESIDENT
CARE GIVER
Looking for reliable
staff. Must be availa-
ble any shift any day
of the week. FT or PT
Staff. Nursing experi-
ence preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP




P/T SITE MANAGER
59 Unit Apt complex
Brooksville area.
Management exp
preferred & Govern-
ment assistance a plus
30 hours wk $9.hr
Email resume: aullman
@franklinasset.net
EEO/Equal housing opp




SOFTWARE
SALES

CHAMPS Software,
Inc. has openings for
experienced Sales Per-
sons to develop and
close large enterprise
accounts. Experience
in software sales not a
must, but preferred.
Must be highly moti-
vated and willing to
travel 70% of the time.
Send resume to
jobs5champsinc.com


Career Opportunity
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927




CARPENTERS
Minimum 5 yrs Exp
Must be experienced in
setting trusses, sheeting,
dryin, fascia, interior fram-
ing, exterior hardie sid-
ings & trims. We offer
major medical & are a
DFWP (352) 690-6334
EXP. ROOFERS
Able to pass drug test,
must have own hand
tools, Hise Roofing,
(352) 344-2442
Pro Drivers Wanted
Call for Details on our
New Pay Package
2 mos. CDL Class A Exp
877-258-8782
wwwmeltontruck.com/dr
ive




ACTION

352-795-KENT
352-795736- 8
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Must possess Realtor's License,
performall aspectsof property
management. Varied Hours/On (all.
Base plus Commission
fax352 791667
call 352-302-808


ACCOUNTING
CLERK
Announcement
#12-32
Responsible for per-
forming accounting
and clerical support
functions at the
Central Ridge Library
in Beverly Hills. Three
years financial ac-
counting experience.
$10.77 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE
SUBMITTED ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
to view the complete
job posting and
to apply online by
Friday, June 15, 2012.
EOE/ADA

Area Tours
Enthusiastic, energetic
and personable driver
to conduct area tours
for visitors to country
club community. Sales
support function. Clean
driving record a must.
Wednesday through
Saturday schedule.
Please email resume to
nancv()citrushills.com
or call Nancy Kuzel at
352-746-6121

Cleaner Wanted
Energetic & positive.
Must pass back-
ground check.
Transportation
needed. 302-6418


SINGLE COPY

NEWSPAPER ROUTE

AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning

Hours

V Need reliable

vehicle


&V Must be 18

years old



162 N.ITl Meaowret Blvd Crystal;River, F


i


MMMM






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m
1 -




DELIVER
PHONE BOOKS
CITRUS COUNTY
rWork your own hrs
rwHave Ins. Vehicle
r'Must Be At Least
18 yrs Old
lrNo Exp. Necessary
352-212-5305
www.sdds
delivery.com


Exp. AC Installers
Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Barb
(352) 726-1002


NOW HIRING

Class A Drivers
(352) 621-1220


Recreation Pro-
gram Specialist
Announcement
# 12-33
Assists in park
programming and
coordination of
game fields, special
events, programs
and rentals; evalu-
ates events. Performs
office and/or clerical
work when neces-
sary. H.S. diploma,
GED or specialized
vocational training.
Requires at least six
months experience in
a related field. Must
have a current valid
Florida Driver License.
Must successfully pass
an employment ref-
erence check, level II
background check,
physical examination
and drug screen.
$9.99 hourly to start.
Excellent Benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the Citrus County
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path,Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, June 15, 2012
EOE/ADA


Genal
Office Assistant
P/T, M-Friday 29/hrs
wk $10.50/hr & bonus
Email Resume:
lplouff@esamjones
.corn 352-476-2498

Promotions
NOW HIRING!!

Promotions dept.
No exp. necessary,
training provided.
401(k), medical,
advancement
opportunity.
$600-$1000/wk.
Ask for
Mrs. Marshall
352-436-4460


CmOMCHLE

Single Copy
Manager
Needed for the over-
sight of newspaper
delivery to racks and
stores in Citrus and
Marion Counties.
Responsible for sales
performance of inde-
pendent contractors.
Must be able to work
all shifts, weekends, in
the late night/early
morning hours. Full
time position with
benefits.
Send resume to
kstewart@
chronicleonline.com


CH1koNidE



CH1-oNILdE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be
able to work early
morning hours.
Email: maaouette@
chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CRPONidE


* Promotions*
NOW HIRING!!
Promotions dept.
No exp. necessary,
training provided.
401(k), medical,
advancement
opportunity.
$600-$1000/wk.
Ask for
Mrs. Marshall
352-436-4460

Small Boat Mfg.

Full Time
Experience Pref.
w/fiberlass, sand,
buff, grinding.
Apply in person
131 Hwy. 19N Inglis

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577





HOUSEKEEPER

flexible hrs, housing
consideration
(352) 503-3103

PTITIME
HOUSEKEEPER
apply in person for
application Tues, June
12, between 10 -2 at
Camp 'n' Water Resort
11465 W.Priest Ln,
Homosassa, FL 34448.
No phone calls. Hrs will
vary, weekends may be
required.





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


ENROLLING
For All Programs
COSMETOLOGYY
*BARBER
I MASSAGE THERAPY
*NAlIlECH
*SKIN CARETECH

I BENE'S
SInternational
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accredited I
727-848-8415d





BUSINESS FOR SALE
$130,000
Community Shop of
Withlapopka Islands
6595 S Withlapopka Dr.
Floral City, FL 34436
Est. community business,
w/longstanding commu-
nity relationships & ven-
dors
All equipment and mer-
chandise
434-944-3648
communityshopl972
@gmail.com





FURNITURE
Large Selection
Pvt Collection
352-464-0680



Colectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


CLASSIFIED




CHINA PLATE "The
Lighthouse Keeper's
Daughter". $25.
Call 352-634-4906.
NORMAN ROCKWELL
CHINA PLATE "The Ship
Builder". $25.
Call 352-634-4906.



SOFTSIDE HOTTUB
4 Person, 110 V,
$2,000.
(352) 746-4911



KENMORE WASHER
GE DRYER
exc. cond. $75 ea.
BOTH for $140
(352) 382-0741
REFRIGERATOR
top freezer, stainless,
Whirlpool, 33X65 $125
SML UPR. FREEZER
$75(352) 419-8006
Refrigerator. Samsung
26" Black 2 Door Ice &
Water Maker $700
GE Electric Stove
glass top White $250.
(352) 489-7813
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Like New, Excellent
Condition. Can Deliver
352-263-7398
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
White, large capacity,
clean, work's great.
$100.00 352-220-2519



RIDGID 6" Jointer/Planer
Model JP06101. Like new
never used. $250.
352-489-3931



20" FLAT PANEL LCD
TV Sharp not HD, with
remote & stand
$40 Inverness 341-0316
Big Screen TV
$89.
3021 S. Jean Ave.
Inv. Golf & Cntry Club
(352) 637-1173



'-I tL \I > 1 I I 'st.
Lb i) b)y


CpONCLE
( ,r .*


-.5
32"X80" solid wood door,
primer white, hinges, no
hardware. $45.00
352-513-4614



ASUS NETBOOK com-
puter with Intel Processor
N270& Windows
XRWorks great $100.00
Call 352-650-0180
COMPUTER MONITOR
AND PRINTER
$125
call (352) 746-5562
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP A1430N PC dual-core
1GB 250GB fresh 24x
DVD 9way card readers
HD audio no monitor.
$100 352-341-0450
HP COMPUTER
complete system $120
and tower $80
352-586-6891
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax/scans, like
new condition $55.00
352-382-1154
SCANNER Visioneer
One-Touch 9420 USB
scanner. For XP [not Win
7] so must sell. $35 Call
726-7517, days.
VIEWSONIC LCD DIS-
PLAY 19inch widescreen
PC monitor internal
speakers +DVI input
$100 341-0450



3 Blade Finish
Mow Deck, well main-
tained standard 3
point hitch $1,200 New
Asking $600.
(352) 795-4259



1500W HEATER/FAN
good condition, Holmes
air, 2 fan-forced heat set-
tings,$5 (352)465-1616



4 large cushioned patio
/porch chairs, with
sturdy metal frames
cushions beige &
green. about 1 yr old.
Can email photo $175
(352) 344-2246



BIG LAZBOY RECLINER
Fabric, clean,
non-smoker-$75.00
352-257-5722


CHERRY WOOD AR-
MOIRE. In great condi-
tion. $100 firm includes
free 33" TV. Cost $700
Tel 352-527-9264
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
urniture.om. 795-0121
Craftsman high wheel
weed trimmer, 5.0HP,
like new $150. Poulan
Pro Gas grass trimmer,
like new, $50. Homelite
gas 16" chain saw, like
new with carry case,
$50. Briggs & Stratton
5550 watts 8550 starting
watts, brand new in
box, $500. Generator
kit $50. Sears diehard
trolling motor, $50.
Portable dog kennel
cage, 28Lx21Wx22H,
$20. metal pet gate, $5.
twin bed frame and
box spring & mattress,
like new, used 5 times,
$125. All items are exc.
cond. have manuals on
most. Cash only
352-586-5016
LEATHER COUCH but-
ternut color good condi-
tion $50.00 Lazy Boy re-
clinerwith broken lever
352 447 1189 FREE
LEATHER RECLINER
Brown leather recliner
with small tear. Still in
good shape. $45 call
352-257-3870
ORIENTAL TABLE six
sides six shelves beauti-
ful carved pictures 23H x
23 inch and glass top
$100 341-0450
Outdoor Furniture
wrought iron table & 4
chairs, like new $400.
4 Captain chairs, solid
wood, custom built
$100 (352) 795-4259
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINING SOFA Bur-
gundy fabric-$100.00
352-257-5722
Sage green w/ black &
tan accents, Couch,
love seat (2) 5 x7 rugs,
very Irg. picture,exc.
cond all matching,
$450. (352) 447-4720
SOFA & LOVESEAT
microfiber, Cindy Craw-
ford, like new, taupe,
$400 set
(352) 433-9843
TABLE AND 4 CHAIRS
Round kitchen table with
four chairs in great
shape. $60
call 352-257-3870
TRUNDLE BED AND
MATTRESS Dark Cherry
wood trundle bed with
mattress excellent condi-
tion. Cost $1600 will sell
for $325. 527-3187


BED, head & foot
adj. & massaging
electric bed.
like new $100
(352) 637-6993
TWIN MATT AND BOX
Extra Clean-$75.00
352-257-5722



CUB CADET COMMER-
CIAL Line Trimmer
CC3000 25cc strait shaft
barely used + extras $45
Inverness 341-0316
LAWN MOWER
Torro recycler, high
wheel variable speed
self propelled, 22" cut,
6.5HP, bagger, used 5
times, like new $175.
(352) 270-8475
SCAG 481NCH
walk behind
mower/hyrdro 17hp,
o turn,Kawasaki 322
hrs.perfect cond. $2500
(352) 270-3117
Sears Variable speed
self propelled mulching
mower $100 firm
Garden Tractor Murry
20hp V-twin B&Seng.










Sat, Sun 10 to 3
furniture, household
goods
2380 N Watersedge Dr







4 StPaulia St
CRYSTAL RIVER















!!!!!!!225/65 R17ehush
Sunday 8am to 4pm
men & women new
athletic shoes, + misc
5460 W Woodside Drive
SUGARMILL WOODS
Sat, 10 to 4 Sun, 12to 4
4 StPaulia St
(352) 422-6329
WANTED TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944



!!!!!!!225/65 R17!!!!!!!
Nice tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
352-586-5485
!!!!!!!255/55 R18!!!!!!!
Good tread!! Only asking
$100 for the set of (4)!
(352)586-5485
.....255/70 R16....
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485


SUNDAY,JUNE 10, 2012 D5


223 WEATHERBY
RIFLE STOCK Black/
Synthetic..$40.00..NEW
Condition..352-503-2792
-----215/65 R17-~~--
Good tread!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
2 ANTIQUE WOOD
IRONING BOARDS
CRAFTS/PAINT $20.00
each 352-382-4911
4 ANTIQUE CHEESE
BOXES
CRAFT/PAINTING
$15.00 each
352-382-4911
24 GAL RUBBERMAID,
Action Packer Storage
Box New $15
(352) 382-1154
48 Qt. RUBBERMAID,
Ice Chest, NEW $18
(352) 382-1154
16X8 ROLL-UP
GARAGE DOOR
exc cond. all hardware
$300, WINDOW AIR
CONDITIONER 17,500
BTU, 220v, all hardware
inc. $200 (352) 527-0024
AIR CONDITIONER
portable by NewAir
on wheels, window
vented, remote control
runs 110, 10,000 btu,
room to room, like new
$225. (352) 270-8475
ART PRINT Whilhelm
Gloebel "Rising Marsh"
Hand Signed $100
563-1073
ATLANTIC LUGGAGE
29" Dark green color
expendable-Never used
Excellent condition
$45.00 527-1399
Automatic Pool
Cleaner Barracuda by
Zodiac, excel. condi-
tion w/ hoses $135.
(352) 270-8475
BICYCLE Murry coaster
brakes Womans? $25
563-1073
BOOTS Harley Davision
men boots.9/12
$60 obo.call
Bill 352-212-1053
BOY'S 14" BICYCLE
BMX Stinger; like new
condition with training
wheels. Green & blue.
$40. Call 352-634-4906.
Commercial Heat
Pump Trane Model
2TWA2060A3000AB
Manuf date 10/03
$550(352) 793-6922
COMPUTER DESK
COMPUTER DESK.
$50.00 352-621-0142
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK 5' wide 40" deep
file drawer printer shelf.
$100 563-1073
DRYER NICE CLOTHES
DRYER.$75.00
352-621-0142


AWL



-A


-U
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR491.746-1998



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






Your'world firsi


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



Classifieds


MS. KELL'S DAYCARE
* Fun, Safe & Loving *
Open 7a-6p, 422-7056
Summer Proaram Avail.
WILL SIT FOR CHILDREN
Parttime/Fulltime, Days
Over Nites, Ref's, Active
Granny (352) 621-0863




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DESK/LAPTOP that's
running slow or clut-
tered? Will clean, call
Theresa,352-287-1184

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems








Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals& repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383

Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




A AROUND TRACTOR
Landcearing, Hauing,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lie. & Ins. 352 795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling& Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

DUN-RITE Elect
since '781 Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352-726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
e AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
V AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
S100% Guar. .Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Hom


WILL CLEAN
Garages, Attics
& Haul Off
(352) 621-0982


SBat


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584





All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRACTOR
-1* 1 .III : IW:
352-795-5755

TRACTOR WORK
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800







CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596


m
A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985

Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN (LIc/lns)
Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
McClellan Painting
2/1 bath as low as
$300.00
(352)220-0590




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570




TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over" Your Old OneT
Tub to Shower Conversions Too.!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000B6SU


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




SODISODISODI
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221

SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596


SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Stump Grinding
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


& SUPPLY INC.

County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
------------ -
S '125 OFF *
'ANY RE-ROOF:
One coupon per household Expires 12/31/12 I
FREE ESTIMATES,
, (352) 628-5079



DRER ENCEAIN


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
"*J Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
hI" '4 Residential &
--7" Commercial

586-1816 746-9868



REMODELI


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
S Small Carpentry
Fencing

SScreening
Clean Dryer
D Ui Vents
S Affordale & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S 35 2-344-0905
cell: 400-1722




Leaded Glass Installed inyour
EXISTING DOOR!
* "NO ROT"

* Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved
Glass (Art Pieces/
Bath Glass)
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors
352-726-6125 "Lirsnd
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza)


WINDOW,,_

We dean Windowsando Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill





AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakA6use&"f
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
ic./Ins. CCC057537 BNIT

111 1 mlEmu


1- -




Acrylic & Glass WIHDOWS
Custom made for your screen room

f( p/ CRC058138


(352)465-4629
Installation may vary.


Carpet Repair -

352-282-1480 ce
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


.u 1"- 11

WILL CONSTRUCTION
I 352-628-2291
E PreventDryerFiresNow.com E






POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584


l l CPC14.565'

COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
"Often imitated, never duplicated"
Refinish your pool
Quality work at a fair price!

352-400-3188


l- FREE ESTIMATES-
M -352-/65-6631







D6 SUNDAY,JUNE 10, 2012


ELECTRIC OVEN Whirl-
pool self-cleaning White
$75 563-1073
END TABLES Two- ce-
ramic base glass top
Florida style $100
563-1073
FRENCH STYLE TELE-
PHONE FROM THE 50'S
VERY ORNATE GOLD
ETCHINGS 100.00
464 0316
GENERATOR Troy Built
3550-5250watt.w/wheel
kit, 4 gal .gas tank ,easy
pull start, gar. kept, run
10 hrs .at half load
$225. (352) 795-7474
HELMET XXL DIRT BIKE
HELMET $40.00
352-628-6277
HOOVER VACUUM
CLEANER $40
SELF-PROPELLED,
WORKS GREAT
419-5981 INVERNESS
KOBALT TRUCK BOX
Diamond plate,
mid-size truck $98.00
cell 352 287 1145
LAWN BUDDY yard cart
by Ames. In excellent
condition. $22. 527-8276.
LEATHER JACKET 5XL
BIG MANS LEATHER
JACKET,VERY
NICE.$100.00
352-628-6277
Light Table, 38"x49" $50.
Moisture Meter $15,
100 Ib spring scale $15.
(352) 628-6874
LOST, VW BLACK FLIP
KEY Lost in
area
A2"x l"x1/2" flip VW key
w/a tubular pill storage at-
tached. Could be any-
where, dropped out of
pocket.
50$ reward.Lost w/in last
two weeks. Call John
Raspante, 925 918-0424
MEMOREX CD PLAYER
AM/FM RADIO $20 LIKE
NEW CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981 IN-
VERNESS
MOVING SALE, 3 pc.
wicker set, peach &
green, extra pcs. avail.
Bedroom set, white oak
king sz. 4 pc., Bakers

tools, lazy boy wine
color sec. sofa, genu-
ine leather 382-4389
NINTENDO DSI Like new
w/ box. $75.00
352-563-5206
OFFICE TRAILER
Certified DCA Office
Trailer-2BR, 12'x60'
kitchen and bath-can be
put on Commercial prop-
erty. $3500.00 you move
it. Phone 352 447 2111
POOL TABLE
2 pool sticks, excel.
condition, no stains,
$225. (352) 563-5217
PRESSURE WASHER
Excel 1500 PSI, 5hp,
Brigs IC comm. eng.
$100 352-476-7973
RED TALON GO KART
6HP,brand new tires,runs
great.Lecanto area.
$400 (561)236-1051
SAW SHARPENING MA-
CHINE Foley automatic
commercial business big
and heavy. $100
352-563-1073
SEWING MACHINE
Singer Still in box $30
C Sat 8-12 @ 1455
W.Japonica pl citrus
springs or 352-897-4678
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID Like New
Hardly used in org. pkg.
Include batteries
Paid $825. Asking $375
(352) 382-3879
Swimming Pool Slide
7FT tall $400 obo
Referigerator 24 cu ft
side by side, ice maker
water in door $400 obo
(352) 628-7633
THOMAS TRAIN SETS
Die-cast & battery w/ ac-
cessories..
All for $$75.00
352-563-5206
TV CONSOLE NICE
WOOD TV
ENTERTAINMENT
CONSOLE.$50.00
352-621-0142
TWO DOLLS
look and feel like real
babies, $150 & up
(352) 795-7513



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT RED ONLY
60.00 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM FOLD UP
WALKER ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
CATHETERS FRENCH
14 NEW IN BOX NEW
30.00 ONLY 15.00 30 IN
THE BOX 464 0316
DISPOSABLE BLUE
PADS FOR
INCONTINANCE IN BED
OR CHAIR 36 COUNT
ONLY $9.00 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
GOOD CONDITION
WITH FOOTRESTS
100.00 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
TIME TO WORK IT OFF
GET ON ITAND GO
ONLY 75.00 464 0316
SCOOTER CARRIER
new condition
$500 obo
(352) 503-2272
SHOWER CHAIR SIT
AND SAFELY TAKE A
SHOWER SAFELY
ONLY 30.00 464 0316
TWO ELECTRIC
SCOOTERS
1 SML $600
1 LG $800
pls call (352) 746-6499
TWO WALKERS
good condition $50ea.
pls call (352) 746-6499
WHEELCHAIR MANUAL
Breezy Ultra light-weight
removable wheels &
arms like new


$100 Inverness 341-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



CRATE AMP Model GX
15. Excellent condition.
$50.00 352-650-0180.
Hammond
E143 Organ with Bench
$300
(352) 628-7633
Hunter 12 Read Chro-
matic Harmonica
Cost $95. Sell for $35
Cash firm, 2 mo. old
(352) 795-3764
LG KEYBOARD AND
STAND MD 1700
multi func. great cond.
w/synthesizer $200
(352) 795-7513


LIKE NEW 7PC DRUM
SET DDrum $450.00
new, also, Proform tread-
mill $50 Palates equip
$50 352-563-1518
MONTANA
ACOUSTIC/ELECTRIC
GUITAR Model 105C CS
Cherrywood.Gorgeous.
$85.00 352-650-0180.
PIANO/ORGAN BENCH
brown wood/padded
bench,with place for mu-
sic under seat $40.00,
good cond. 5134473






MISC ITEMS MEN'S
14K GOLD WRIST
WATCHES (3) 14K Gold
antique men's wrist
watches $1,050. Like
new Rocker/Recliner
Beige Micro-suede $125,
Ridge 3000 PSI pressure
cleaner used once $425.
352-200-9089 Beverly
Hills area



4 PIECE GYM EQUIP-
MENT Gazel, stair
climber, stair stepper and
inversion table.$50 takes
them all. 564-0059
AB LOUNGER NEARLY
NEW ONLY 40.00
464 0316
Electric Treadmill
Proform 2500
Excellent Condition
Fold Up Paid $500
Asking $175
(352) 382-4511
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE AND
STABLE DOESN'T FOLD
UP ONLY 100.00
4640316
GAZELLE LIKE
MACHINE POWER
WALKER GET IN
SHAPE NOW ONLY
40.00 464 0316
ROWING MACHINE SIT
ON IT AND GO OK
SHAPE ONLY $50.00
464 0316
TREADMILL
Folds up, Image 10.0




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/634-4745
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
PAINTBALL GUNS &
GOOGLE 2 paintball
guns, 1 Scott google
mask. all for $75
352419-5549
RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquaters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




6x 12
Tandem Axle Trailer
$550
(352) 220-8326
18FT ENCLOSED
cargo, 4whl, electric
brakes, $2175
(352) 860-1106
EZ PULL TRAIL-
ERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

Used 7x20 equip
$2450
Used 7X16, 5 ton
equip. $1895
Trailer Tires from
$34.49
Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

EZ PULL
TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
Used 7x20 equip
$2450
Used 7X16, 5 ton
equip. $1895
Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299




DOUBLE STROLLER
Like New.$100 pd $400
can C Sat 8-12 1455
W.Japonica pl citrus
springs or 352-897-4678
HIGH CHAIR Like
New. sacrifice $50 can C
Sat 8-12 1455
W.Japonica pl. Citrus
Springs or 352-897-4678
Toddler Bed conv. fm
crib style with Mattress
& side rail, all like new,
medium brown wood,
excel, cond. $135.
(352)563-5217


\- f



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^AAAA-^A-^AA


TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




HY-LINE RV PARK
MODEL TRAILER
needs work, good for
hunting cabin
$1000 obo
(352) 628-2000
betw. 9am & 3pm.




Beagle Puppies
9 wks. old, tri colors
$100. Cash.
(352) 447-2018








DOG Maxis a hound/border
collie
mk, appx3 years old, male,
weghs 55 Ibs. Gentle, quiet
dog,
getsalong wdthdogsand
loves
people.Desperateneeds a
lov-
ing home. Call
352-795-1288

Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com

Shih Tzu Puppies
Lovely Tri colors ,Reg.
APR, CKC, non aller-
genic. non shed. H/C
$500. 352 341-2380
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Toy Poodle & Chihua-
hua 6 yr old males, neut.
shots, house trained,
sleep in crates, must stay
together $400 for both
(352) 503-7270
YORKIES $450 & UP
MALTESE $500. Health
certs, CKC registered,
home raised, come
visit parents & puppies
352 -212-4504,212-1258




BARN MASTERS
We Build..Horse Stalls
Barns, Fences. Decks..
Pastures.(352) 257-5677


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


'03, Tohatsu
115HP, 20" shaft, still on
boat, can test run.
Low hrs. $2,500
352-613-8453



CATALINA, 27
83, nicely equipt. West-
erbeke 18hp diesel, roller
furling,Crystal River $15K
email Mike at succeed
2003(aHotmail.com
Dock space for rent,
deep water canal in
Crystal River, Call
(407) 221-4299
HURRICANE DECK
BOAT 20FT
115 HSP Yamaha Trailer,
$4300, will swap for Pon-
toon Boat complete
352-476-1113
KEY LARGO
'01, 16ft Center console
50HP Merc Eng. F/F, live
well, coolers, magic tilt
trailer, Excel. Cond.
$4,000 (352) 897-5250
Wanted to Rent
Covered Boat Slip
for 20' Pontoon boat on
Homosassa River
(352) 527-4953























'05 Diesel Motorhome
36 ft, 2 slides, Itasca
-Meridian caterpillar
C-5 Turbo charge,
diesel in rear quiet
while running.
Call Bill (352) 527-9867
for details $81,500.
JAYCO '04
40', 5th whi toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
stalon $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
R-Vision B+ LE
'04 mint condition
Chevy cab Trail Lite
body, walk on roof,
ladder, self contained
Corian counters,
convection oven,
refrig./freezer, full bath
slide out, 33K mi. dual
wheels, new battery,
many extras, Greatly
reduced $34,500.
Call (352) 419-6825




Your World
Conan counters


CII-"cL


ROUTES



AVAILABLE






IN HOMOSASSA AND


NE ITRUSCOUNTY



















V Able to work early

morning hours before

6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance


If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE


C C ITRoUS C oUNI conV

RQwww.chronicleonline.com


MOI


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


"lMOI


MOI







SUNDAY,JUNE 10, 2012 D7


KZ toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,800.352-795-2975
Wanted Used
Casita Travel Trailer
(352) 746-7610



Tonneau Cover
for Dodge Dakota
Silver fiberglass $350
(352) 489-4761



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
k Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298







2008 MAZDA
Miata Conv't Sport
33k original miles!
Showroom condition
$16,988
2000 TOYOTA
Camry LE V6
w/leather 65k miles!
$7,988
2002 TOYOTA
Corolla S only 49k
Miles! Better Hurry
Wont Last $7,988
2004 LINCOLN LS
Premium package
97k Cherry Red!
$7,988
2011 HYUNDAI
Sonata SE Sunroof,
Alloy wheels, 72k mi.!
$13,988
2010 HONDA
Element LX 40k miles!
Certified W/100k
warranty $17,988
2003 CADILLAC
Deville 52k original
miles! A rare find!
$8,988
2006 FORD
Explorer XLT Leather
Loaded! 50k miles!
$13,988
2006 HONDA
Civic Coupe Lx
65k miles! Good
Condition $11,988
2006 CHRYSLER
Town N County
Touring 66k miles.
Great cond. $9,988
888-874-5524
CHRYSLER SEBRING
JX CONV. 97
106k, $3500
(352) 419-4026
CORVETTE
'91 Roadster converti-
ble, White, red leather,
auto, 5.7 V8. loaded,
bose sys. 49K mi. runs,
drive perfect, needs
nothing. First $11,750
firm. (352) 513-4257
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
KIA
'01, Spectra GS,
4 Door, Auto, Air, extra
clean 58K mi. $3,700.
(352) 257-4251
NISSAN ALTIMA
2007, 2.5S, tan
LOADED 40k miles
$11,500 (352) 465-7638
VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! i*
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
Mercedes Benz 89
560-SL 2 tops exc. cond
58K mis. gray/gray, top
rack incl $12,500
(352) 527-8288
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883







Tell that special


person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DODGE
'98, 4 x4, lifted
40" ground hawgs w/
mags, $3,500 obo poss.
owner fin. or trade. See
on craigs list 726-9369
FORD
'03, F150, 4 x 4, 7700
series, 4 WD, quad cab,
5.4 triton V8, $7,800
(352) 257-4251


TOYOTA TUNDRA
2010 CREWMAX SR5,
5.7 V8 engine, sunroof,
towing pck, 6sp trans
$26000352-586-8784

VERY! VERY!
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
k Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440





2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533

FORD
'01, Escape XLT,
Excellent Condition
$6,000.
(352) 503-2956




CHEVY
1996 BLAZER. MOTOR
RUNS GOOD, TRANS
SLIPPING IN OD
$1,200 OBO
352 726 5712




CHEVY VAN 87
Starcraft sl series 20
clean, runs great
$2000 obo
(352) 563-2896

Noice t .reitl


FORD
'03, E250, Cargo Van,
white, 112K mi. auto,
Runs 100% $3,995.
352-461-4518







Beautiful Bike! $3000.
(352) 503-2792
CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley '02
Road King, black, lots
of chrome & extra's
gar.kept $10,500 obo
(352) 344-9810
Harley Davidson 03
Super Road King, fuel
inj. $48K up grades with
receipts, too much to
list $8,000 (727)207-1619
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's riding gear avail
(352) 601-4722
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 1958
XLH show bike
$6000 firm
352-697-1902
Harley Davidson
2011 street glide,
Xtras, ext. warranty,
2200. miles
$19,500 (352) 465-3668
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HD ROAD GLIDE
Fire Red Pearl,
Customized,Low mi.$30K
invested, Sell for
$11,500,For details call
352-527-0074



359-0610 SUCRN


HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
HONDA 1984
Sabre 1100, only 12k
miles, $1500
352-697-1902
HONDA 2007
750 Shadow
8261 miles, Black,
$1k in extras, Bob $4500
(352) 860-1106

Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
1996 HONDA
GOLDWING
RUNS GREAT
$4,100.00
2005 YAMAHA
V-STAR1100
SUPER CLEAN
$4,800.00
2006 H-D ROAD KING
LOW MILES
$11,500.00
1996 HONDA
SHADOW 600
CLEAN
$2,800.00
2007 SUZUKI M 109R
LOW MILES
$8,500.00
2009 H-D 1200C
EXTRAS
$7,250.00
GOOD CREDIT BAD
CREDIT
FINANCE AVAILABLE

SUZUKI
'04, 800 CC, Marauder,
Only 6,500 miles
$3,250
(352) 220-8326
Suzuki 09
Boulevard C50
very low miles, acces-
sories $4,900 or best
offer. (352) 422-4528


Naser, Harriet H. 2012-CP-000290 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2012 CP 000290
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF HARRIET H. NASER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Harriet H. Naser, deceased, whose date of
death was April 14, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, File Number 2012 CP 000290; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 3, 2012.
Personal Representatives:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr.
1205 North Meeting Tree Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429
J. Stephen Pullum
1330 West Citizens Boulevard, Suite 701, Leesburg, Florida 34748
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 1-352-795-1444
VanNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 N. Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
June 3 and 10, 2012.


363-0610 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Skates, Mandat, Piemontesi
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Charlotte E. Skates Nichole M. Mandat Daniel J. Piemontesi
1080 N. Beach Park Dr. PO Box 2292 PO Box 811
Inverness, FL 34453 Inverness, FL 34451 Inverness, Fl 34451
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450


June 10,2012.
Metn


361-0610 SUCRN
6/14 Meeting Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 14, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
June 10,2012.


362-0610 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 026-12
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM
NSP3 B-11-UN-12-0020
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate two (2) single family homes for its
Neighborhood Stabilization Program. The two (2) homes are as follows:
23 S. Adams Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
37 S. Adams Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for June 15th @ 10:00 am. Additional in-
formation concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below.
Additional information concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below. All
prices shall include all labor, supervision, materials, equipment and services neces-
sary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to
bid submittal. Contact Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., Phone (866)
484-1975 (Toll Free) or Fax (352) 381-8270 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on June 15,
2012 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a Man-
datory Walk through of each location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 29, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 29, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
June 10,2012.


FREE HR R M S IF
53.-i5


FE HR R M S I .N C
11-M54-75:6.116


FR:EE: 2A HRRCRE ESG rr AC N .C


I Misc. Noti


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


Meeting
I Notices I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Meeting
I Notices I


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r 4 r





J,-







YuOURow
I i -got


~~';t iiii


* On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. ** Based on 2012 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain yourvehicle.
1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20 cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price.
Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plustax, tag, state fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. ,


D8 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


J ^fl ) o^ '... ....... ...







I, [0OMEv PRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


e- Energy Star-qualified
ee. 'venting skylights with decor
enhancing blinds, are a cost effective
and attractive home upgrade that
provide natural light and
passive ventilation.
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E2 SUNDA~~ JUNE 10, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


THEKELYif ELIETEA s


f 24TW OLINE
(3s2) 637.2828
Enter house #3674






3674 N. LAURELWOOD LOOP
LAKESIDE VILLAGE
* 2BD/2BA/1CG Community pool
* Cozy over 55 villa All appliances
* Maintenance Free Spacious atio
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


UPGRADED DREAM CUSTOM HOME!
SKitchen wGranite/SS Relaxing Pool w/Waterfall
* On 1 Acre of Land 4/3/3 Car Gar. + Den
SUltra Nice MBR/Bath Gr. Rm. w/FP &Wet Bar
SGorgeous Landscaping One Year Home Warr.!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E-MAIL. elliesullonlelmax.inel


'637.282







WELCOME TO HORSE COUNTRY
*Almost 10 Acres Fully Fenced/Gated
Open Pastures Large Screen Pool
Close to Town Amazing Views
Nice Size Kitchen A Must See!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 r I
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
S1- lT ITn i lfTIi,i |I 1
wwW.Flolidulisliligliillo.colll










FAMILY FRIENDLY HOME!
* 4/3/4 Split Plan Kit. w/Cab./Granite
* GR + Formal Din. Beautiful Pool/Spa
* Golf/Equest. Trails Relaxing Lanai
* Close to Gulf/Rivers Short Sale!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EtMAIL kellyg, i iemant nel


EVERYBODY IN THE POOL!
2/2/2 Sugarmill home. New kitchen
cab. and Corian counters. Updated
bathrooms. Laminate wood floors
throughout. FP in fam. rm.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800 FI I
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.lvydtruscount.com


PINE RIDGE ESTATES
SSpacious 4/2/2 Split Bedroom Plan GR Built-in Ent. Center
* Ceramic Tiled Kitchen, Baths, & Laundry Large Breakfast Nook
*Separate Formal Dining Walk-In Closets
* Dual Vanity Master Bath 30 Ft. Covered Lanai
*Caged WaterfalPool Pool Beautiful Live Oaks
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email mailha salhei .mlemna nel I
VIRTUAL TOURS al ... nmarha salhei leina, coin l ",I


MOVE-IN
CONDITION HOME
1,440 sq. ft. of living area plus Florida
room. Beautiful landscaping, fenced
backyard and out-building. 3BR/2BA
and garage. New roof. Call now.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 [
Email: barbaraimills@earthlink.net


STUNNING WATERFRONT BEAUTY
with all the WOW factors.....near
3 Sister's Springs. A "MUST SEE"
3/2/2 with floating dock and
separate boat lift 1 6k.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


*1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
*Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
*Security System *Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
*Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberf@remax.nel


o 2421 NHw.BeelHls5774ww.EI 00 W. Man S., Inernes 63-620
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionsas 62-80w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


*4/4/2 w/Sep. Office Light & Open Split FL/Plan
* Landscaped 1 Acre *3,000+ Sq. R. of Living Space
* Central Vac, Security Solar Heated Pool & Sauna Rm.
* New Roof, A/C, Windows Detached Workshop w/Electric
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net l
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


5311 W. RIVERBEND RD.
LAKE ROUSSEAU
* 2BR/1 BA/2CG Home w/Beautful View
* 24x20 Detached Garage/Workshop
* Lg Updated Kitchen *Woodburning Fireplace
* Double Lot Solar Heated Caged Pool
* Covered Boat Slip/Dock Nice Deck Overlooking Lake

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenaplmer@remax.net J


6489 W. CANNONDALE DR.
MEADOWCREST
* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot
* Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 I,
Email: lenaplmer@remax.net


I MILS #353852 1


E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frugal uses for old sheets


Threadbare sheets can money: Reader K. Jarrett
still be used around from Alabama writes in
y o u r with lots of little
home. Cut out a things that add
portion to make up to big money-
a new ironing wasters:
board cover, cut 1. Fridge run-
a sheet into ning ineffi-
small squares to ciently. Watch
make drawer sa- out for buildup
chets/pouches, of dust on the
use one as a tarp coils next to the
to rake leaves on motor or ice be-
and drag the Sara Noel tween the
sheet to your FRUGAL freezer and
leaf pile, or sim- LIVING fridge. Both
ply let kids play cause the motor
with one to make a fort or to work harder, wasting
tent. You can find addi- more electricity. I remove
tional ideas at frugal the fridge grill and use an
village.com/2010/10/13/new- old toothbrush to clean off
uses-for-old-sheets. the dust. Also, lowering
The first reader tip your fridge settings will dis-
shares another idea: courage ice build-up.
New use for old sheets: I 2. Empty fridge. Food is
use them as quilt squares an insulator, so stock up
for rag quilts. Use them on your fridge and it won't
the front and back, and add have to run so often. I nor-
solid flannel in the middle. mally put my cans and jars
They look very antique! in the fridge, even if they
Two full-size sheets make are unopened, to keep
more than enough for a more of the cool in.
double-sized quilt. I made 3. Car tires not properly
mine using cotton Pottery inflated. To help maximize
Barn sheets I found at the your car's mpg, make sure
thrift shop for $1. I love to your tires are inflated
upcycle! -Kelly email to the manufacturer's
Little things that waste specifications.


Ask a Veteran
Norm
Overfield KELLER
Realtor WILLIAMS
(352)586-8620 R E A L QDD


l Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor ealtorr, t
302.3179 souLD.no' 287-9022
The Gode G WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700
6340 N. WHISPERING OAK IP.
OAK RIDGE ESTATES




3540 N. WOODGATE DR.
THE GLEN
S_ Cute as a button, move-in ready, 2/2/1,
S easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
interior paint, furniture is negotiable with
sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.


4. Driving. Aggressive
driving usually burns more
fuel.
5. Air conditioner in the
car. To burn less fuel, I put
my air conditioner on low
and crack the windows for
air circulation. The A/C
should only be used when
going over 55 mph; it's
more efficient to open a
window at lower speeds.
6. Stove. Boiling water on
the stove is a waste. Invest
in an electric kettle, which
uses less electricity than a

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Real Estate DIGEST


Wayne Dianne
Hemmerich MacDonald
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
RE/MAX agents
hit milestone
Two more RE/MAX Realty
One agents passed the $1 mil-
lion mark in sales volume this
week.
Wayne Hemmerich and Di-


anne MacDonald each passed
this important milestone.
They join a small group of
local agents who have qualified
for the million dollar club this
year.
Both Wayne and Dianne
work out of the Crystal River of-
fice of RE/MAX on U.S. 19. The
associates and staff of RE/MAX
congratulate Wayne and Di-
anne on their continued suc-
cess.
Miele joins million
dollar club
ERA American Realty & In-
vestments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production


level achieved
by an agent of
ZI its Beverly
Hills office for
2012.
Lou Miele
has surpassed
Lou Miele the $1 million
ERA mark in closed
American sales volume
Realty. in 2012.
ERAAmeri-
can Realty is proud to recog-
nize the achievement of this
fine real estate professional.
Lou Miele can be reached at
the Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling 352-
746-3600.


1 :INI _L OF C COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM




4-UW 15W.Ipswich Ln.
MLS #351855 $299,900
Beautiful 4/2.5/3 plus office on a corner lot.
Directions: Hwy. 486 to Right on Essex
Ave., to Right on Ipswich Lane.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING


Customer 3/3.5/3 home in a
community of large homes.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136
*?'^1g.~. 1


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING


,.o- MLS #355794 $357
Custom built4/3/3 pool home.
Numerous upgrades. 3+ acres.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


l' 187-5 W. Pearson Sl.
S MLS #351889 $214,900
Unique 3/2/2 plus den
on a wooded 1 acre lot.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


1 ,ta1 g 4394 N. Indianhead Rd. 'Ai i 3842 W. Northcrest Ct.
SMLS#353960 $229,900 MLS #352588 $170,000
Elegantly 3/3/2 Sweetwater custom home 3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac
on 1.30 acres, offers spacious indoor living.
Directions: Rte 486 to north on Annapolis, to Directions: East on Rte. 44, to rightinto Crystal Glen
end of road, right on Indianhead to #4394. (Cystal Glen Dr.), to right on Notthcrest Ct, to home on left.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


1011W. Sun Valley Ct. ,4Sfl4S 4311W. Banner Cir.
10i MLS #348240 $465,000 MLS #355399 $239,900
One-of-a-kind 2/2.5/2 3000+ sq. ft. custom pool home
gorgeous custom villa, on an acre.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Brian Murray 352-212-5913

r^ _;^^3~Litif^


1-1 4481 N. Beach PI. 2684N.Brentwood Cir. 1910 W.SlaliordSI. 781 W.Slarlasmmine PI.
MLS#355022 $199,900 MLS#347113 $129,000 MLS#351024 $114,000 MLS#354323 $113,900
Cozy 3/2/2 home with caged One owner 3/2/2 pool home Very nice 3/2/2 home on a great Bright 2/2/1 pool home
inground pool on corner lot. on a lot with lots of trees. wooded 1 acre lot. in a nice community.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Matt Robinson 937-219-6949 Tami Mayer 352-476-1507
' t 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the iI
Ms"M Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


( Prudential
Florida Showcase

Properties


F a V S S irtu -Tou r orSMultiplePhoos,
www.FloridaShwcaseropertieso


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Old metal gets new lease on life as furniture


This image re-
leased by Work
and Design
shows Rafael
Avramovich's
"Positive
Space/Coffee
Table," made
of blackened
steel finish
with a circular
glass top.
Work and Design/Asso-
ciated Press


ReEAgLTY G RO UP
& Brenwood esale


Detached Villa 3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car/Woodview Villa
Beautiful maintenance free home, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath 2 car
garage,open floor plan design with -
with plantation shutters, Superior
MLS 355853 $223,900






Detached Villa 2 bedroom 2 baths 2 car/Hillside Villas
Luxurious Lantana Model This open floor plan has a beautifully
mirrored formal dining room with butler pantry Large eat in
kitchen Spacious great room overlooks the private screened
Lanai 2 Bedrooms plus a den/office complete this lovely home
MLS 352909 $199,000


Detached Villa 3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car/Hillside Villas
Excellent view of the 5th hole of the Skyview Golf Course this 3/2/2
maintenance free villa is a fantastic buy at this price The villa has a
T' P

MLS 354569 $224,900






Single Family 4 bedroom 3 bath 2 car/Hillside South
Beautiful Home in Terra Vista with a picturesque view of the Skyview
Golf Course Popular Cordova model with 4 bedrooms plus a den/office
MLS 354012 $395,000


s- 6 h o;


Iro150 sis1o | |.I-.. il. I
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center i


GOT A NEWS TIP?


* The Chronicle welcomes tips from
readers about breaking news. Call
the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your
name, phone number, and the ad-
dress of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature
sections, call 352-563-5660 and
ask for Nancy Kennedy. Be pre-
pared to leave a message.


Waterfront & Commercial Properties
Crystal River & Ocala June 19 & 20
Crystal River
DG618 Waterfront Lot, Trustee Ordered Sale
DG619 Comm. Lot, Trustee Ordered Sale
Ocala
DG620 Commercial Office Bldg, Hwy 441
Will Sell Regardless of Price: DG618 & DG619
Will Sell Over Min. Bid of $199,000: DG620


Please see website for full details.
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
Lic. Real Estate Broker,
FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP


IEi~t4i


)


0 0RNO.O 773443'


KnIM COOK
For The Associated Press

To meld a hefty hunk of
steel, brass or iron into any-
thing at all requires heat,
brawny machines and dan-
gerous tools. To turn it into
a beautiful piece of furni-
ture requires a real
craftsman.
One of metal's advantages
is its longevity, so sourcing
recycled materials is some-
thing many of these design-
ers do. The appeal of their
modern pieces is the link
they forge between a sweaty,
gritty, centuries-old craft
skill and sophisticated con-
temporary design.
Furniture designer Flo-
rian Roeper is one of a
group of design crafters who
work out of the decommis-
sioned Alameda, Calif.,
Naval Station where World
War II airmen once tested
and repaired jet engines.
"The Naval Station's been
a wonderful place for arti-
sans like me. It gives me a
lot of actual and mental
space," Roeper says. "It's
peaceful and inspiring to
look out over San Francisco
Bay, and we don't have any
of the city hustle and bustle.
I've always had a physical
and cultural interest in
landscapes, especially be-
cause of my background."
Roeper's parents are Ger-
man and Italian, and he
spent his childhood criss-
crossing the continents.
"Many of my pieces hint at
the cultural divide in my
life," he says.
Roeper has a studio full of
cast-iron machines from
decades past, and some of
the latest high-tech equip-
ment With a graphic design
background and an appren-
ticeship with a door maker,
he learned to etch patterns
on and give patina to metal-
work, which led him to fur-
niture making. His tables of
brass and bamboo, etched
zinc and charred wood, have
a heft and character that


drew visitors at the latest Ar-
chitectural Digest Home De-
sign show in New York.
Rafael Avramovich of
Brooklyn, N.Y., uses geo-
metric motifs to craft mir-
rors and cage-like lights.
"What fascinates me
about metals is the endless
possibility in terms of creat-
ing a shape, getting the tex-
ture I want, the finish color,"
he says. His "Living in Har-
mony" collection uses
blackened iron, bronze, and
rusted steel to create sculp-
tural, armillary-style light-
ing fixtures and edgy
furniture. He plays with di-
mension in a Mondrian-
esque mirror and a side
table perched on staggered
metal shapes.
London-based furniture
designer Jonathan Kraw-
czuk experiments with the
molecular composition of
steel through a bowl that
represents carbon and iron
atoms in a 3-D visual that's
especially striking in bright
primary colors. His Taran-
tula collection of powder-
coated-steel, spider-legged
tea lights is startling, and his
Op-Art-inspired Cubic Bowl
is functional sculpture.
Copper will be taking the
stage through summer and
into fall. Designers like the
crossover aspect of the ma-
terial; it's at home in a tra-
ditional living space as well
as a modern one.
Dutch designer David
Derksen of Rotterdam uses
copper foil to craft a deli-
cate, quilted-face cabinet
perched on high legs, and
faceted pendant lights.
David Shefa goes in a dif-
ferent direction: He uses
galvanized iron and zinc-
coated steel plumbing pipes
to craft industrial-vibe
table, desk and floor lamps.
"By using an unexpected
material, we achieve a new
'out of the box' design and
get a chance to tell a differ-
ent story," Shefa says of his
lamps, which are whimsical,
functional art.


E4 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Got the watering-restriction blues? Try cacti


Succulents need little moisture


DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Landscaping with cactus
has been an acquired taste
for many gardeners, but it
appears the appetite for the
robust plants is growing.
Lingering drought, watering
bans and low-maintenance
requirements are making
cacti more popular.
Their striking flowers, un-
usual shapes and longevity
add to the appeal."There's a
high reward ratio with cac-
tus," said Scott Calhoun, au-
thor of "The Gardener's
Guide to Cactus" (Timber
Press, 2012). "Take the aes-
thetics alone. They're ex-
traordinarily beautiful.
Even when they're out of
flower, they have graceful
patterns on them."
Calhoun, who lives in
Tucson, Ariz., said he has
encountered enthusiasm for
cacti even in areas where
people can't easily grow
them, such as Japan, Thai-
land and the Czech
Republic.
"They simply put them in
pots and haul them in and
out," he said.
Cacti can live for decades,
a real value, Calhoun said.
"Some of these plants you
can pass down to your kids
and your kids can pass them
down to their kids."
They also are durable,
surviving in temperatures


ranging from 100 degrees
above zero to 40 below.
"They're known to grow
above the 14,000-foot level
on mountains in Colorado
and as far north as Canada's
Northwest Territories," Cal-
houn said. "There's a great
diversity of cold-hardy cac-
tus to be had."
Cacti are succulents, na-
tive to the New World. Ap-
proximately 250 of the
recognized 3,000 species are
found in North America.
If you're going to plant
cacti, put temperature-
tested plants, cuttings or
seeds preferably those na-
tive to your area in places
with Southern exposures, if
possible. Give them at least
six hours of sun per day
Provide a bed of 8 to 12
inches of sandy soil, supple-
mented by granite or gravel
mulch. Be stingy about wa-
tering, particularly in au-
tumn when the plants are
evaporating away any sur-
plus moisture.
"Once cacti are estab-
lished, they don't need any
extra watering and only a
little supplemental water-
ing when it's extremely hot
and dry," said David
Salman, founder and chief
horticulturist for High
Country Gardens, an online
and mail-order company in
Santa Fe, N.M. "I do give

See CACTI/Page E7


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SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E5







E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Give the 'pinch' to



pesky chinch bugs


S i luhinch bugs" are perhaps the
| .two most dreaded words to the
owner of a St. Augustine grass
lawn. Chinch bugs are the most damaging
and difficult-to-control pest of St Augus-
tine grass. -
Chinch bug damage occurs ..1
from March through November
Their damage can resemble
drought stress. It is a myth, -
however, that chinch bugs are
attracted to drought-stressed
grass. Chinch bugs and other C>
bugs are more attracted to over-
fertilized and over-watered
plants because the growth is
more tender Audre
Proper identification is nec- Fy
essary before treating for any
insect or disease problem. The easiest way
to determine whether chinch bugs are the
problem is to part the grass near a yel-
lowed area, pull out individual grass
plants and look inside the bottom leaf
sheath for the bugs; examine several areas
this way A hand-held vacuum cleaner can
also be used to find chinch bugs.


If chinch bugs are the problem, the first
step should be to switch to a slow-release
nitrogen fertilizer Frequent applications
of quick-release fertilizer can increase the
survival rates, development and number
of eggs laid by chinch bugs.
Slow-release fertilizer has the
additional benefit of providing
a prolonged supply of nutrients
to plants, rather than a quick
burst that's soon gone.
The next step is to raise the
lawnmower blade to a height of
three to four inches; the grass
will be more vigorous and bet-
ter able to cope with pests, as
y Durr well as drought "Scalping" can
'N stress the grass and make it
more susceptible to chinch bug


damage.
If insecticides must be used, the type
should be rotated each time so that chinch
bug populations are unable to develop re-
sistance to the chemicals. It is important
to rotate the chemical class (pyrethroid,
neonicotinoid, carbamate and
See BUGS/Page E12


5
f


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside...


Versa-tile

Real Estate


PAGE E12
Digest
PAGE E3


For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


French art prints don't have specific interest for collectors


Dear John: I caught your radio
show on returning home from
a week in Panama City and en-
joyed it very
much, as I am a
fan of Antiques
Roadshow and
anything dealing p .
with art and an-
tiques. I have a e a
collection of f -
photo engrav-
ings of "Master-
pieces of French John Sikorski
Art," printed in SIKORSKI'S
1884 by Gebbie
and Co., Pub- ATTIC
l i s h e r s,
Philadelphia, Pa. The prints I have
are from volume one. See sample at-
tached. On Google, I have seen them at
$175 to $250 each. I have a large quan-
tity and would like to know the best
way to sell them.
Each print is accompanied by a de-
scription of the artist's painting. The
prints cover art in France from the
earliest period up to and including the


Salon of 1882. -L.S., Internet
Dear L.S.: There is no specific col-
lector interest in prints like the ones
you ask about. They were produced in
large quantities by numerous publish-
ers. There is decorative interest, es-
pecially when the prints are
hand-colored by dealers. They are
often matted, framed, and sold by in-
dividuals for whatever they think they
can get.
Dear John: A family member owns
this chair and is wondering if you have
any information on it? Also, what it is
worth, if anything? Thank you for any
light you can shed on it. S.A.,
Internet
Dear S.A.: You have an American-
made platform rocker. First, a curved
See ATTIC/Page Ell
Though there is no collector interest
in antique "art prints" such as the one
shown at right, they may have value
for decorative purposes. Prints that
were hand-colored by dealers are es-
pecially noteworthy.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man builds greenhouse


from recycled bottles


GINNA PARSONS
Northeast Mississippi
Daily Journal

WEST POINT, Miss. -
Justin Estes says he's not
happy unless he's knee-
deep in a new project. His
latest venture has him grin-
ning from ear-to-ear.
In December, not long
after purchasing his first
home in West Point, the 24-
year-old came up with an
idea to build a greenhouse
in his backyard. As the proj-
ects coordinator for City
Hall, he oversees the city's
recycling program, so he
knew he wanted a structure
that was environmentally
friendly
What he came up with
was a greenhouse made of
glass, shredded paper, mud
and a bit of Portland cement
"I had everyone in
Starkville, Columbus and
West Point collecting wine
bottles for me," said Estes,
the son of Tim and Angie
Estes. "I got most of them
from a recycling center,
though, probably eight or
nine truckloads."
The greenhouse isn't just
made from wine bottles.
There are also beer bottles,
mayonnaise, pasta and
pickle jars, canning and
jelly jars, glass jugs, candle
holders and even Starbucks
frappuccino bottles.
The effect is like walking
into a life-size kaleidoscope.
'"At night, I come out here
and put a light on and it
looks like a Lite-Brite,"
Estes said, referring to the
children's toy "Photos don't
do it justice."
Try, fail,
try again
Estes started building the
greenhouse just before
Christmas as soon as he got
his first truckload of bottles.
He made a frame out of
some cedar logs from a cu-
tover that were destined for
the burn pile. Next, he had
to find a mortar mix that


would hold glass.
He finally came up with a
mixture of 10 percent to 15
percent of Portland cement
mixed with good old Missis-
sippi mud. Shredded paper
donated from area office
buildings rounded out the
mortar.
"I really didn't know what
I was doing at first," he said.
"So I did a test wall to see
how well everything held to-
gether, how high I could go
before the wall started
falling, whether the labels
needed to come off the bot-
tles. I built one wall and saw
what I did wrong and then I
took it down and started
over."
Every afternoon, the
neighborhood kids would
get off the school bus and
head straight to Estes'
house to work on the proj-
ect. Two boys, TJ. Haughton
and Joseph Salmon, were
especially loyal.
"They just wanted to help
out," he said. "They couldn't
do much, but they could
hand me bottles and the
paper and mud mixture and
move dirt piles. They'd go
home covered in mud from
head to toe."
Estes put two old win-
dows out of homes in West
Point in the greenhouse,
and used a door from his
own home as the main
opening.
Estes figures the green-
house, which he completed
mid-April, cost less than
$350 to build: $44 for ce-
ment, $20 for brackets and
$280 for the new roof.
"This is the first time I've
really ever built anything,"
Estes said. "Before, I
wouldn't even trust myself
to build a bookshelf."
Recycler
at heart
Estes has filled his 12-by-
12-foot greenhouse with or-
chids and bromeliads, all
purchased at rock-bottom
prices.
"I buy the orchids on sale


at Lowe's when they're
about to throw them out," he
said. "I usually pay about $1
each. I really stock up."
He has about 50 orchids
in the greenhouse and at
least a half-dozen bromeli-
ads hanging from the ceil-
ing. Pots peek out from
glass ledges with breathtak-
ing blooms hanging from
them.
"I don't consider myself
cheap, but I am frugal," he
said. "My grandfather, who
passed away a couple of
years ago, had a great im-
pact on my life. When he
had something that broke,
he fixed it, instead of re-
placing it I try not to throw
anything away I can always
find some use for it"
When Estes wasn't busy
with his greenhouse, he was
working on his yard. He's
built a large fish pond, a
deck, two cedar arbors,
fences, and several flower
beds filled with pass-along
daylilies and hostas, and
"Knock Out" roses he bought
on clearance for $2 each.
"Since I've been here, I've
seen several neighbors
begin to clean up their
yards," he said. "People are
coming into the neighbor-
hood and buying old houses
and fixing them up. It's look-
ing up, for sure."


O ur office has received
quite a few calls with
concerns of losing the
valuable shade, beauty and .--
many other benefits that trees
provide. It seems a lot of re-
movals are inevitable due to the
stress from drought.
My No. 1 answer to these con-
cerns is: A tree can be removed
only if the tree is first diagnosed Kerry I
by a professional arborist who TI-
says, without a doubt, it cannot ARBC
be saved.
After that, pick a suitable tree
for replacement. Before planting, evaluate
a site for your new tree. Since every tree
will not suit every site, a little detective
work will pay off in this situation.
After losing a large tree, the shade will
be greatly missed. In this case, a couple of
fast-growing shade trees may be an option.
The key to successful tree replacement is
quality workmanship performed by an ar-
borist, and in this situation, the quality of
the tree to be installed is also important.


CACTI
Continued from Page E5

them some organic fertilizers particu-
larly if I'm trying to optimize their flower-
ing and accelerate their growth. Cacti
don't react well to chemicals that people
commonly use throughout their
landscapes."
Calhoun also recommends integrating
cacti with other plants. "That's the way
they grow in nature," he said.


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ftLyait


Kreider
IE
)RIST


Like children, the first few
years of a tree's life will have a
big impact on its health and
structure for adulthood, so it is
important to start these little
guys off on the right foot or the
right root. Proper tree installa-
tion requires more than a tree
and a hole in the ground.
With a little time, care and ef-
fort, we can help to shade and
beautify our neighborhoods.
I recommend replacement
after any removal, because
trees are a renewable resource.


Replacing trees is also essential to pro-
viding habitat for wildlife.

Kerry Kreider is a practicing arborist
and a member of the International
Society ofArboriculture, a tree preserva-
tionist and president ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach him a 352-726-9724
or by email at actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com.

Cacti may be stuck with a prickly repu-
tation, but there are spineless, scented
and edible varieties, he said: "The hardy
Beehive has fragrant flowers followed by
edible fruit that tastes like strawberries."
Cactus is the clever gardener's alterna-
tive, said Richard Ward, owner of The Dry
Garden Nursery in Oakland, Calif.
"Water loving plants (like roses) are the
dinosaurs of the past," Ward said. "They're
like gas-guzzlers on the road. People are
pretty much going for water-wise gardens
they can install and pretty much forget
about."


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SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E7


)











Best choices for kitchen upgrades


Smart choices

add beauty

as well as value

ARAcontent

Nowhere else in the home must
design and function marry as har-
moniously as in the kitchen. The
most-used room in the house is
also the one where we spend the
most work and leisure time, the
one that gets the most scrutiny
from potential buyers and the spot
where most renovation dollars get
spent
A minor kitchen remodel costs
around $21,000 and has the poten-
tial to recoup nearly 73 percent of
that expense at the time of resale,
according to Remodeling Maga-
zine's Cost vs. Value Report. A
major job averages around $58,000
and can recoup about 68 percent
of the renovation costs.
"When you're spending that
kind of money on a remodel, you
want to choose upgrades that ac-
complish multiple objectives, in-
cluding improving efficiency,
functionality and beauty," says
Ross Vandermar, national product
manager with skylight manufac-
turer Velux.
"Sometimes that type of up-
grade will warrant a greater ex-
penditure, but others are easy
and relatively low-cost to make."
So what are some of the top
kitchen upgrades that provide the
most beauty and functionality for
your investment? Here are five:
1. Countertops: In any kitchen,
the countertops are both a signifi-
cant design element and a func-
tional necessity. Countertops act
as work and storage areas, provide
staging and serving space, and
have a major impact on the over-
all look of the room. Replacing
lower-cost countertops such as
laminate with higher-end materi-
als like granite can enhance the
usability and look of your work
surface. Even if you opt to replace
older laminate with the same ma-
terial, your kitchen can benefit
from a fresh face and improved
material quality.
2. Lighting and ventilation: Illu-
mination and fresh air in a
kitchen not only allow you to ap-


preciate the beauty of the room,
they ensure a safer, more comfort-
able work environment. Under-
cabinet task lighting, pendants
over a breakfast bar and upgrad-
ing an old box-style fluorescent
with a more attractive, energy-ef-
ficient style can enhance the us-
ability and look of a kitchen.
Adding Energy Star-qualified sky-
lights can also boost the appear-
ance, appeal and efficiency of a
kitchen. If you opt for venting sky-
lights, they can help release hot
air, moisture and odors while ad-
mitting additional light.
Accessories like decorator
blinds with remote control ensure
you can adjust the amount of light
that enters your kitchen from a
skylight while dressing up your


decor If a traditional skylight isn't
right for your needs, you can still
enhance the room with natural
light; tubular models like Velux's
Sun Tunnel skylights use reflec-
tive tunnels to deliver light from
above and are usually less expen-
sive. Add an optional light kit and
the units provide light at night, as
well as during the day
3. Cabinets: Improving cabinets
can be a costly prospect, but one
worth the investment since they
are not only a major design ele-
ment in the kitchen, but essential
to the room's efficiency and usabil-
ity. You can find a range of options
for upgrading cabinets, from total
replacement with custom-made
cabinetry to simply resurfacing or
repainting existing cabinets.


4. Hardware and fixtures: Think
of cabinet hardware and faucets as
the jewelry of your kitchen. Swap-
ping out dated or worn hardware
- including knobs, handles and
hinges is a fast, easy and cost-ef-
fective way to change the look of
the entire room. Plus, you can im-
prove functionality by choosing
larger handles that are easier to
grasp and replacing old-style
hinges with modem varieties that
close silently and smoothly or are
completely hidden behind the cab-
inet door. Replacing the kitchen
faucet is also an easy, relatively
low-cost upgrade. Opt for a pull-out
spray head or touch-free model
and you can also enhance the us-
ability of this key kitchen feature.
5. Appliances: Your car couldn't


function without tires and a steer-
ing wheel and no kitchen can
serve its purpose without the right
appliances. If your appliances are
more than 10 years old, chances
are they're starting to look worn
and dated. They're also likely less
energy efficient than newer mod-
els, many of which are now made
to meet Energy Star standards.
Appliances account for nearly 20
percent of the energy consumed
by an average home, according to
Energystar.gov
Upgrading a kitchen is a great
way to enhance the value and your
enjoyment of the most-used room
in your house. Choosing improve-
ments that add beauty and effi-
ciency can help ensure you get the
most for your renovation dollars.


1


E8 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Day lilies: Garden favorites for millenia


All cultivated, named varieties of
day lilies are bred for size,
shape, color and/or
form. There are many spe-
cialty day lily plant growers
around the world, includ-
ing in Florida. Each variety
looks best when grown in
mass plantings rather than
different ones mixed to-
gether in a perennial
herbaceous border or
flower bed.
The Hemerocallis genus Jane
originated in temperate JAI
Asia and has been a garden
favorite for millennia. GAR
None are native to North
America, although some species natu-
ralize in the wild.
Each day lily flower lasts but a day
Flower spikes rise above the grass-
like foliage. Several flower buds clus-
ter at the top each, blooming on
successive days. Cut back spent stems
to avoid seed set. If spent stems are re-
moved, many day lilies repeat bloom
in a few weeks.Propagate by division
every three or four years in late fall or
early spring.


There are five categories of flower
types: circular, double, spider-shaped,
star-shaped and triangular.
Most popular varieties have
single-form flowers with six
petals. Each flower follows
the sun during its one day of
life, so site plants where
you can view their faces.
They prefer full sun of more
than six hours a day. Many
tolerate afternoon shade in
Central Florida and pro-
Veber duce richer colors.
E'S Plants grow better and
fuller if sandy soil is
DEN amended with ample de-
composed organic material
to hold moisture and provide nutri-
ents. Roots are tuberous and fleshy.
Day Lilies can be planted on a bank to
hold the soil and help prevent erosion.
Dwarf forms have been developed
for the smaller gardens many homes
now have. The foliage is semi-ever-
green in most winters locally Leaves
average 10 to 12 inches long and grow
in grass-like clumps. Each leaf lasts up

See Page E10


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
The day lily originated in temperate Asia and has been a garden favorite for millennia. None are na-
tive to North America, although some species naturalize in the wild. Each day lily flower lasts but a
single day, hence the name.


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END OF YOUR ROPE?
Wanting to sell your property...











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SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1
.<
\
Il







E10 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E9

to six months, then dies off
naturally beneath newer
leaves. Many hybrids
flower again a few weeks
after the first flush in
spring, Choose several va-
rieties with different
bloom times for a longer
flowering season.
"Stella d'Oro" is a peren-
nial favorite, with leaves
up to 12 inches high and
clumps maturing about 18
inches diameter after sev-
eral years. It starts to
flower early in April or
even in mid-March after a
short, mild winter. Flowers
are a bright lemon yellow,
about 2.5 inches diameter.
"Mac the Knife" has simi-
lar leaves and orange-red
flowers up to 3 inches in di-
ameter later in May It is a
repeat bloomer without
deadheading spent flower
stems. "Charlime" has
slightly taller foliage and a
greenish-yellow flower.
"Clara'"has dusky pink
flowers.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Day lilies look best in
mass plantings of the same
variety. A grouping of five
to seven young plants
planted 6 to 10 inches apart
will grow together in a few
years. New plants must be
watered regularly for a
month or two, but are
drought-tolerant once es-
tablished. Weekly watering
until the summer rains
start in June produces
more prolific flowering in
spring. In humus-rich soil,
supplemental fertilizer is
not required; however, day
lilies benefit from a time-
released ornamental fertil-
izer like 12-2-14 in
mid-March after the last
winter frost. This promotes
lusher, stronger growth and
more flowers in spring.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden.
For an appointment call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


Jacklde & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
~ 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
E N E (352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidavis.cor
S^KTTfTTyBTic^^


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

stovetop. One cup is more efficient in
the microwave; two cups are more ef-
ficient in an electric kettle.
7. House A/C. Close your shades!
With your shades open, you're cooling
the air while letting in heat.
Use for butter wrappers: In one of
your previous articles, there was a
reader tip about saving wrappers from
butter or margarine and using them to
grease pans before baking. You might
want to try this yourself. I did this for
the longest time, but my poundcakes
kept sticking to the tube pans. When I
told my daughter's mother-in-law I
greased my pans with butter papers,
she said, "There's your problem. You
have to use the old-fashioned pan
sprays." She was right! No more stick-
ing poundcakes! However, those same
butter papers wrapped around a po-
tato for baking make the scrubbed
skin delectable. -Jerrie 0., email
Utensil organizer: I use one in my
bathroom to hold toothpaste, floss,
toothbrushes, razors, combs, etc. Much
better than having everything on the
vanity or shoved in a drawer. -Karen,
Florida
MEN
Dear Sara: Our little bathroom has
no window and just the exhaust fan to
move the air around. It has nice
shelves lining half of one wall, where

GET THE WORD OUT
Nonprofit organizations are in-
vited to submit news releases
about upcoming events. Write the
name of the event, who sponsors
it, when and where it will take
place and other details.


we store our towels, linens and vari-
ous bathroom items, but we have no
linen closet. The trouble is that the
linens pick up a mildew smell after
about a week, even with consistent use
of the exhaust fan during showers. Do
you have any suggestions for keeping
the mildew smell at bay? AL.,
Missouri
Dear A.L.: I would store the towels
in another place. I understand you
don't have a linen closet, but perhaps
you can find space elsewhere to store
a few towels. At the very least, make
sure the bathroom door stays open
when you run your exhaust fan, so
there's more air circulating. While not
exactly frugal, a heated towel rack
could help, too. Your bathroom does-
n't have a window to allow sunlight or
fresh air in, so the moisture from
showers and darkness will continue to
make your clean towels smell. To re-
move the odor, I suggest you run your
towels through the washer in hot
water, at the highest water level and
use baking soda, washing soda, Borax
or Charlie's Soap (charliesoap.com)
instead of your usual laundry deter-
gent. Use vinegar in a double rinse
cycle. Make sure the towels dry thor-
oughly, too.
Dear Sara: I am starting a nutri-
tion/weight loss program and am look-
ing to find a cheaper source for
OhYeah! and Supreme brand protein
bars. I can find them locally for $2 and
$2.25 each. Any help would be greatly
appreciated! -Kim, Alabama
Dear Kim: Without getting preachy
over protein alternatives and the fact
that these bars are relatively high in
calories and carbs (Chocolate?
Caramel? Peanut butter?) and are not
to be considered a meal replacement
or a complete nutrition bar, I'll stick to
what you're asking and simply give
you a source. Amazon offers the
OhYeah! brand in 12-count packages


and the Supreme brand in 9- and 12-
count packages that are substantially
cheaper per bar than what you are
currently finding locally
Dear Sara: I replaced the blinds in
my bedroom. Do you know of any ways
I could re-use the old mini-blinds? -
Lisa, Pennsylvania
Dear Lisa: You can cut the slats and
make plant ID markers. You can use
them in your seedling pots or in your
actual garden. I suppose you could get
creative and make some bookmarks,
or cut them into small gift tags. Or you
can simply donate them.
Dear Sara: Any suggestions on a way
to store extra rolls of toilet paper in a
small bathroom? -Paula, Illinois
Dear Paula: You can store a roll in a
square facial tissue box, or in a basket,
cylindrical vase, plastic coffee con-
tainer or popcorn tin. Or try an up-
right, stand-alone paper towel rack for
toilet-paper storage.
Dear Sara: My toddler opened and
spilled a box of cake mix. There's still
some in the box, but it's not full. Any
ideas on how I could use it? Lori,
New York
Dear Lori: You can use it in pan-
cakes (lilmissbossycom/a-very-cutie-
breakfast), waffles, cookies or Rice
Krispies treats (gimmesome
oven.com/cake-batter-rice-crispy-
treats). You can also find numerous
recipes for cake mixes on the Pills-
bury, Betty Crocker and Duncan Hines
websites.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


I OWNER FINANCING-FLORAL CITY, FL
Spiffy 2BR/2BA mobile in Withlapopka Islands. BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Great for weekender, winter or year round living. Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx
$39,900 MLS#355787 1300 sq. ft building. $71,900 MLS#354972


^*- = ""- -^ ^ "W k
OAKS GOLF COURSE-HERNANDO, FL
Best buy for 1/2 acre on the 3rd tee.
$29,900 MLS#321216


BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
sq. ft. situated on 100 x 212 lot. $450,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybssqtampaboy.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 52)302-6714 "


91 W. FOREST OAK PL.
AVery lovely 3 BR 2.5 BA home with solar heated
pool and spa. Over 2500 sf of living space,
oversized kitchen 40-year roof and much, much
more. $178,900
6329 N. MISTY OAK TER.
3 BR 2 BA on an oversized lot that look like a
park. High grade wood flooring and neutral 18"
tile flooring. Expanded screened Lanai, roof, heat
pump and driveway all installed last year
$160,000
105 W. FOREST OAK PL
Almost 2500 Sf of living space, this home is a
great buy 3BR, 2.5 bath home with screened
lanai. Spacious kitchen and large breakfast nook.
Wet bar, as fireplace, and guest bath. You will be
su rise hen ou see this home. $145,900
Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129 A







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

slat was fastened to the legs of a chair,
permitting the chair to rock. By the
early 19th century, rocking chairs
were mass-produced. The platform
rocker was a new invention during the
mid 19th century that was touted as a
revolutionary idea. The rockers arms
no longer made contact with the floor-
ing and carpets and causing wear, be-
cause the rocker sat on a platform off
the floor.
Your platform rocker was likely
made about 100 years ago. Potential
dollar value is below $100.
Dear John: I bought these plates at
an estate sale. The stack of six plates
cost me $5. What do you think they are
worth? They are marked Haviland &
Co., Limoges, H & Co., France. -M.G.,
Internet
Dear M.G.: Wow, how can you go
wrong, $5 for six Haviland plates?
Fantastic!
Haviland & Company is probably
one of the most recognized names for
household china in America. The dol-
lar value is relative to interest in the
pattern. Replacements Ltd. in Greens-
boro, North Carolina buys Haviland
and can establish what pattern you
have. The phone number is 800-RE-
PLACE (737-5223), and the website is
www.replacements.com.
Dear John: I want to say I find your
show fascinating. I often travel on Sat-
urdays and it is so much fun listening
during the long drive to Orlando. I am
hoping you can provide some guid-
ance. I do not have pictures now, I can
try to get some this coming week.
I am a volunteer at our parish li-
brary, and we recently received a do-
nation of an old Catholic sick box. It is
a small wooden box with two swing-
out doors that have a picture of Jesus
on the interior of one door and Mary
on the other Inside were seven relics
with proof of authenticity from the
Holy Church. In addition, there are
several silver items: Two silver can-
dleholders, a small plate for the host
and a chalice. The box also had a
drawer which held candles.
I do not know the age of this item,


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 Ell


but the dates on the relics were from
the late 1950s to early 1970s, so I am
assuming it might be from the same
timeframe.
It was not difficult to figure out that
the relics were of great value, so we
are in the process of getting those set
in a frame with the certificates of au-
thenticity. My focus now is on the box
and silver items. I would like to polish
them up before putting them in one of
our display cabinets. If I polish them,
do I change their value? And if I can
polish them, is there a recommended
product that I should use?
Also, the pictures are very faded, is
there a way to restore them? Whom
could I contact? D.P, Internet
Dear D.P: Sick boxes were used for
anointing the sick and Last Rites.
They were produced in large quanti-
ties. Although there is no specific col-
lector interest, they are bought and
sold in the marketplace. Those like
the one you have generally sell in the
$100 to $200 range.
I would not expect the silver items
to be sterling silver. If they are, there
will be hallmarks indicating sterling
content or the word "sterling" im-
pressed on the backside of the items.
Polishing them will not affect poten-
tial dollar value.
Simichrome polish is an excellent
product for polishing silver and other
metals. To get advice on restoration of
picture fading, contact John Freund at
the University of Florida at 352-
273-2835.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular meetings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
* Email community@chronicleonline.com. Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.
* For special events or fundraisers, submit a separate news release.


BUYERS LOSS YOUR GAIN -. .. .., . 7. 1w... -
BEVERLY HILLS BARGAIN' . ONLY I ... I H..11.1 I .:, I", MOVE RIGHT IN" Ikd d. A I I -.II.,
S 4 9 9 0 0 .,- L, 1 ..... I .. .. .......... ,, 1 i........ . i u ,,,, ,:, ,, i ,,,, i
porch, breakfast bar, dining aea, large hen w/ea n area, garage- could also make a great workshop for that crafty person. ..I ,,, .. .. ,,, , ,,, ,, 1,
fenced yard. 3081 N. Maidencane Dr. MLS #355820. Call ONLY ASKING $66,900 325 Red Rose Lane, Inverness .. ONLY $8700 .1 111 II .......l hi i I
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or im 352-212-5752. MLS #355222. Kathy Chapman 352-476-4988. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586598 or Kim 352-212-5752.
ROOM GOT ACREAGE??
TO ROAM!! --- home built in
I , ,,,, ,. ,- n 12.9 acres
I Home has
'.(an) ItI seen better
ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE WATERFRONT p I I ",,, is paver dtk
I .. I.... ... , I ,,, 1 .. 1,.1 1 , ,.,,n I,... .. .... .h good ,n e... es. Hom e features den, split floor plan, living room ,
,,,,,,,,, .... ... I,,,, ,, ...... .... ,,.I i O NLY 6 000 l .1n.. ... rear screened porch, eat in kitchen, interior laundry and vaulted
MLS #355821. 516 Tuck Pt. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen C., Hernando. MLS #355867. ONLY $214,900. Call Tomika ceilings. ASKING $161,000. MLS #355822. Call Tomika
352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
DANDY DERBY
OAKS BUY!!
1 1 iblewide built
-, 'with 2,052
I,,,_ I split and
FLORAL CITY FINDI R I ,,, ,,I,, EDUCED" I. .... .. .. fencedyard,
WI I I d I I. I g iIm P k h. I,,,i, I, ,d,. ,c
le ules i ew linellu l u ll i6 I lingn wood wbund es, dew oru u, form ;;,,, ,,,,,, living room, eat in kitchen, two master rwu Ihed wulel slin, liwel V1L, welkin closets,
lights, lminte flooring, dining area, interior laundry, newer A suites screen porch, shed, partial fencing, nd appliances, rear screen porch, and nestled on r,, tl,
and more!! ONLY $96,600.9081 S. Waterview Dr. Call Tomika more. ONLY $65,900. MLS #354927. Call Tomika Spires- one acre! ONLY $69,900. MLS #355478 ..ll i.,,,,i
Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


WATERFRO I :i







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUGS
Continued from Page E6

organophosphate) rather than just
the active ingredient.
Chinch bug populations are usually
concentrated in certain areas rather
than spread out throughout the yard.
Only affected areas should be spot-
treated, rather than applying a blan-
ket treatment to the entire yard.
For more information on chinch
bugs and care of St. Augustine grass,
refer to the University of Florida ar-
ticles "Southern Chinch Bug Man-
agement on St. Augustine grass" and
"St. Augustine grass for Florida
Lawns."
Both articles are available at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.orgor by
calling the Citrus County Florida
Yards & Neighborhoods (FYN) pro-
gram at 352-527-5708.
If you've had enough of the battle
with chinch bugs, bahia grass offers


BO00BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


superior drought tolerance, lower
maintenance requirements and is
unbothered by chinch bugs.
Perennial peanut is another low-
maintenance groundcover that only
grows to 6 inches tall, offers superior
drought resistance and has no major
insect or disease problems.
For more information on Florida-
friendly landscaping topics, call 352-
527-5708, or send an email to
Audrey.Durr@bocc.citrus.fl.us. For
more information online, visit Citrus
County's website at wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us, the Southwest Florida
Water Management District's
(SWFWMD) website at www.Water
Matters.org and the University of
Florida's website at www.Solutions
ForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free
public education program that is
funded jointly by the Citrus County
Department of Water Resources and
the Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
(352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house. com


Ji I!d .I]


Versatile tile


ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
In the equestrian section of
Pine Ridge next to riding trails.
MLS #355468. $410,000


1432 SEATTLE SLEW
INVERNESS
Positioned to enjoy the stunning sunsets
and catch the breezes this 3/2 5/2 home in
the prestigious gated community of
Belmont Hills comes with upgrades like
hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an
impressive porch for entertaining It can be
yours
MLS #351012 $215,000





115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and
nice landscaping in beautiful Citrus
Hillsil Situated on a one acre corner lot,
this 3BR, 3BA home with screened in
pool and patio area offers you the privacy
you want I Everything is very well
maintamed New roof 5/2009 Just bring
your suitcase and move nght inI
ooBOSILS #346203 $175,000


Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5
Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a
360 interactive virtual tour at
wwwmycountrydreamhome corn
MLS #350369 $525,000


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very secluded and
private setting perfect retreat Rolling
pasture and mature oaks Take the tour at
www myflonda-ranch corn
MLS #353046 $400,000


3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. 3 GAZANIA CT.
ARBOR LAKES SMW
Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ Nice 3/2/2, Adams home, built 2006,
community on Lake Tsala Apopka Open space, open floor plan, all neutral colors
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a Quiet cul-de-sac street w/lots of green
spacious patio and the yard even has space Easy access to Tampa via Suncoast
room for a pool' Parkway
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #355830 $119,000


This classic contemporary pool home is 3686 N. PALOMINO TERR.
the nght setting for living the Florida
lifestyle Open and airy with the PINE RIDGE
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight Nice flat wooded 5+ acre parcel night at the
190 ft of seawall gives you plenty of ending trails in the equestrian section of
room to dock all the water toys Pine Ridge Gives you direct access to up
imaginable to 28 miles of trails
MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS #355271 $109,000


Associated Press
A modern kitchen by Brian Patrick Flynn. The design demonstrates Flynn's preference of carrying the
same tile used on a backsplash throughout all walls of a kitchen.

Designers give tips for maximizing material's impact


MELISSA RAYWORTH
For The Associated Press

Choosing tile for your home
once meant picking from
among a handful of pastel ce-
ramic squares. Would it be
dusty pink or dusty blue? If you


were feeling bold, maybe mint
green or pale yellow?
Today, we're surrounded -
some might say overwhelmed
- by choices.
Porcelain tile is now made to
realistically look like every-
thing from aged wood and


rough fieldstones to sleek Ital-
ian marble. Tiles made of glass,
cork, mirror and even leather
are taking the place
of traditional ceramics. All
shapes and sizes are

See TILE/Page E13


E12 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



TILE
Continued from Page E12

being used not just in
kitchens and baths, but also
in entryways, mudrooms
and more.
High style can be had for
an increasingly reasonable
cost, with mass-market re-
tailers offering trendy glass
tile for as little as a few dol-
lars per square foot.
Amid all these possibili-
ties, the biggest challenge is
to choose something you'll
continue loving for a decade
or more.
"There's so much decora-
tive tile out there now," says
Matthew Quinn, principal of
Design Galleria Kitchen
and Bath Studio in Atlanta.
But "some of it," he says,
"you can just tell in three or
four years this is not some-
thing you're going to want to
see every day"
Unlike paint and wallpa-
per, tile isn't something eas-
ily and affordably changed
every few years.
Here, Quinn and interior
designers Brian Patrick
Flynn and Mallory Mathi-
son share ideas on embrac-
ing tile's new possibilities
while still creating a time-
less effect.
Floor to ceiling
All three designers are
fans of using tile all the way
up to the ceiling, rather than
the more old-fashioned ap-
proach of doing partial tile
walls with a snub-nosed
edge.
"It makes the entire room
more cohesive, and it can
also give the illusion that a
space is larger than it actu-
ally is," says Flynn. "One of
the easiest ways to shrink a
room visually is by chopping
it up; many times, for me,
tile used in just one area
quickly chops up a space."
Flynn has done kitchen
walls in floor-to-ceiling tile,
and Mathison recommends
tiling a single wall from top
to bottom in an entryway for
a striking effect.
"You think of tile more in
utilitarian applications,"
she says, "but it can be a
beautiful accent." A full wall
of tortoise-shell mosaic tile,


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E13


she says, feels "almost like
your whole wall is covered
in jewelry"
Clients sometimes as-
sume full walls of tile will
make a project expensive,
says Quinn. But the cost de-
pends entirely on your
choice of tile: "You can find
a fabulous white crackled
subway tile for less than $3
a square foot," he says. "For
about $1,000, you can cover
every wall of a bathroom,
floor to ceiling, and it's ex-
tremely durable."
Beyond ceramics
Flynn loves using tiles
made of "unexpected mate-
rials, such as leather, cork
and wood. Leather tiles can
be used on walls and ceil-
ings, but in lower-traffic
areas. Cork is a dream be-
cause it helps soundproof a
space, plus it offers a really
warm, organic texture in-
stead of the sleek ceramic
surfaces we're used to
seeing."
"Wooden tiles are rather
pricey," Flynn says, but
Quinn points out that manu-
facturers such as Porce-
lanosa now offer porcelain
tiles that look strikingly like
real wood. They are
durable, resistant to mois-
ture and need no
maintenance.
Mirrored tiles are another
option, and Mathison prom-
ises they don't have to evoke
the 1970s. She uses large
mirrored tiles mounted only
with mastic, not grout, with
no visible lines between
them. Many glass and mir-
ror stores will cut them in
custom sizes for you, she
says.
Alternating sizes
and colors
Traditionally, a home-
owner chose a particular
tile and used it throughout a
space. Quinn says clients
love the effect when he al-
ternates large and small
tiles in various patterns.
Simple changes like using
"two different size subway
tiles 2-by-4 and 3-by-6 -
alternating stripes of one
and then the other," can
make a bathroom more styl-
ish and interesting, without
becoming outdated quickly
Another option, he says, is


using different thicknesses
of the same tiles, so that
some rows of tile jut out fur-
ther than others, creating
"really cool, undulating pat-
terns."
In his own kitchen, Flynn
recently used 2-foot-by-6-
inch rectangular tiles in a
muted mix of grays and
browns. But "instead of in-
stalling them in a staggered
manner, I had them in-
stalled stacked directly on
top of one another for a lin-
ear look," he says. The effect
is very Mid-Century Mod-
em, "similar to the exterior
of a Palm Springs home."
You can also get creative
with grout: Simple white or
beige tiles can be installed
with thin, barely visible
lines of grout, or thick lines
of grout in bold or dark col-
ors that contrast with the
tile.
Mathison often uses "as
close to a zero grout line as
possible," which can make
smaller baths or kitchens
seem larger. But some
clients want "a strong,
graphic statement that re-
ally defines the edges of the
tile." In those cases, she'll
use a charcoal gray or blue-
green grout against white
tile for a bold look that still
feels clean and classic.
The question
of glass
Glass tile has become
popular. Because it's
translucent, Mathison some-
times uses it in smaller
bathrooms: "Your eye kind
of looks through it, so it


I '.-


doesn't create a boundary,"
she says. "It's an almost lim-
itless look" that can make a
small shower area feel
larger
But glass tile can be ex-
pensive, Flynn says, and it's
gotten trendy One fresh op-
tion is "using extra-large,
extra-wide, back-painted
glass panels on walls,"
rather than small glass tiles,
"to bring contemporary ar-
chitectural interest into a
space."
'"Although I do actually
love it, glass tile has become
so popular and embraced by
builders and developers
that I fear it will be associ-
ated with 'early millen-
nium,' similar to how
flocked wallpaper is
thought of as 1970s or
mauve being indicative of
the 1980s," he said.
Don't do it yourself
It's possible to remove old
tile and install new on your
own. But all three designers
recommend hiring profes-
sionals.
Even the highest quality
tile will look unattractive if
it's been installed incor-
rectly And demolition and
tile cutting can be danger-
ous.
"When clients ask me
where to spend and where
to save in bathrooms and
kitchens," says Flynn, "I al-
ways say, 'We can save on
materials, we can save on
fixtures, but the one place
we always must splurge is
on hiring the right tile in-
stallation professional."


KE 1 "Always There For You"
REALA GAIL COOPER
im multimillion Dollar Realtor
EA Cell: (352) 634-4346
Fathe'Day! Office : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


CUSTOM HOME ON HALF ACRE!
* 3/2 home has 3-car detached garages
* Corian kitchen has raised panel cabinetry
* New roof in 2006- Laminate flooring
* Glassed Florida room with 16" tile
* Garage workshop has 30 amp & 220 wiring
* Home warranty for the buyers
#355719 $149,900


CLOSE TO EVERYTHING!
3+office/2/3 built in 2006
Corian with 42" cabinetry
Upgraded fans Surround sound
Neutral carpeting 18" tile
Third bay set up as storage room
Nicely wooded with private greenbelt
#353023 $189,700


Associated Press
A master bathroom designed by Brian Patrick Flynn, with
large 24X6 porcelain tiles on all walls.


SI NT O D S S AW K I


See Vffirtua Tour 11 wwwA.I.resalehoTmesg~Tu1'com









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E14 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


IR Estte I


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR. 1BA. Fridge, Stove,
Wash-Dryr, Water-Trash
$495 352-587-2555
HOMOSASSA
Nice 3/1/2, CHA, 14 AC
$500mo 828-541-9781
INVERNESS
2/1 SW, Inverness Park.
Unfurn., w/stove & ref.
Cent. AC, shed $375+
dep. 352-344-1002
INVERNESS
2/2, $550/mo. $550 dep
No Pets (352) 726-8354
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period. 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and enjoy-
ment, clubhouse, onsite
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
2BR home $450,
includes H20.2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $595.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $550.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

Mo.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


3 BR, 2 BATH mobile
home, Owner will
finance, zero interest
3133 Holiday Drive,
Crystal River, $25,000.
(352) 564-8057 5-8pm,

2/2 Furnished
Adult 55+ Community,
well maintained,
First One who sees
will Buy $73,900.
(352) 419-4474

BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182

Hernando.
Handyman MHNice
lot. $15K Owner/Agent
352-220-4355

Hurricane Season
Is Here!
Is Your Home Safe?
Releveled/Tie down
check. Free Est. Lic
/Ins., Tom 746-5912

NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Village
New Homes Start @
$39,900. $5K for your
used mobile home.
Any condition
800-622-2832 x 210

Palm Harbor Village
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units
Must Go. New Homes
Start @ $39,900.
800-622-2832 x 210

REPO'S
SAVE THOUSANDS
Trpwd.IDbwd. Palm
Harbor, Homes of
Merit & Fleetwood
Bob 352-746-5912


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183


Homossassa 2/2
carport nicely furn. MH
on Homosassa
Riverdock shed, f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. MANU-
FACTURED HOME ON
TWO WATERFRONT
LOTS ON CUL-DE-SAC
WITH BOAT RAMP ON
BLACK CREEK IN
OZELLO.
$79900.00 CALL FOR
SHOWING
352-212-0460




2 Bd, 2 Bth. Completely
Remodeled,
new baths, all floor
coverings, paint, fans,
well MUCH MORE, Ride
by then call for more in
info. 881 N. Maynard
Ave. Lecanto $33,000
(603) 860-6660
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
on Approx 1/2 Acre
$29,900 owner finan.
with $3,000 down and
payment of $475. or
cash price of $25,000
(352) 687-3030
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
Dunnellon, Fl Jacobsen
Mobile Home (DW-built in
2000). Owner Financing
w/$20,000 down & low
interest-will pay closing
costs. This is a 3/2 all
bedrooms have carpet &
walk-in closets. 2
bedrooms measure
12x14 and Master is
14x20 w/bath 10x15
w/jetted tub, double van-
ity, separate toilet &
shower. 2nd bath is on
other end of home by the
2 bedrooms. Living rm. is
14x16 has wood laminate
flooring. Sunken Family
rm is 15x14 has fireplace
& tile floors. Dining rm. is
14x12 has wood laminate
floors, bar sink
w/cabinents, glass doors
which lead to 10x24 pres-
sure treated 2 level deck.
Kitchen 16x16 w/38 cabi-
nents, wall oven, island
cooktop & tile floor. Laun-
dry Rm. w/rear access to
backyard. 2 storage Bldg.
12x24 & 10x14, Carport
22x25. Low taxes
$650.00 for 2011.
352-682-0266. Price is
$135,000, open to offers.

FLORAL CITY
Buy Owner,2/2 Split Plan
w/double roof over on
fenced 1 acre, nice
$55,000 352-464-0680


HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/month
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
Owner Finance
2 BR 14 x 60
Fleetwood 113 Acre
$25,000 Call Bob
(352) 746-5912




55+ Palm Terrace
Village-Lecanto
3/2 part furn.screened
porch $5K 212-6804
(352) 527-0800



SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55+ Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL *
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $169/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent
at Evanridge Commu-
nity
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period 55+ Park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing & enjoyment,
clubhouse, onsite shuf-
fleboard, and much
more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2,900. 352-476-4964


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifiedsl


- Home Finder -
www.chroniclehomnefinder.com


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com













CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
Agent (352) 382-1000


1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?





3/2/1 large fenced
back yard......................$750
2 bedroom Apts....starting at $450
2/1 screen room...................$550

22/2/2 lawncare included..$800

2/1.5/1 New Kitchen Flooring
......................... $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


ACTION-






LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS
635 GreendaleS)..... 1200
3/2/2 POOL home
CRYSTAL RIVER/ANKEETOWN
8560 W. Basilico St (CR)..... $850
3/2/2 Roomy kit., open fl pln
1586 N. Endicott Pt. (CR). .$1300
2/2/2 Fur he evll iMe own t
1460 N. Endicott Pt. ((R)...$S1200
2/2 2Medowre VillE fur.
HOMOSASSA/CHASSAHOWTZKA
2021 S.(omforter Pt.(H).. REDIKEDm600
3/1/1 Cute end cofo rtble
6441 W. Rosedale (H)...... 125
3/1/1 Newer spacious
355 W. Periwinkle Ln (H) $1100
4/2/2 newer hoe


2/2/Furnishednv lw
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INGLIS
Compl. turn. direct TV,
country setting, off hwy
19 N. of Inglis, no smoke
$675/m (352) 586-9598


- I

Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious, nice 2/1,
incls water sewer, lawn
garb.wsh/dry $500/m
352-212-9205
INVERNESS
2/1.5, Townhouse,
w/d. $550 Mo. FILlS.
(352)746-4108
(352) 302-6988


LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218





CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Available
(352) 422-6579

FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391

HOMOSASSA
900 Square feet of light
industrial/commercial unit
for rent. Includes 10' x 12'
roll-up entry/ front and
back locked entry/1/2
bath ( no shower)/ condi-
tioned loft office/ 4 park-
ing spaces in lighted
parking lot in a safe and
friendly complex just off
US 19 across from
Howard's Flea Market.
$477 per
mo.(450+27(tax))= a
place to have your busi-
ness or securely store your
stuff!!! 352-302-4579
or
amhalum@earthlink.net

TWO NEWLY
REMODELED OFFICE
SUITES AVAILABLE

Are you contemplating
relocating your
home-based business to
a professional office as
part of your effort to grow
your business and in-
crease your profits?

Is the idea of "turn-key"
simplicity for your new lo-
cation attractive to you?
The features and ameni-
ties that are included in
our below market rent
rates at the new Citrus
EDC business incubator
include:
furnished office
high speed wireless
internet/electric
water/maintenance
fax/copier/scanner
one year Chamber
& EDC memberships
visible location on
US 19 with signage
for your business
shared kitchen
shared conference
room
competitively priced
at $200 -$260/month
For more information or
to tour our recently re-
modeled facility, please
contact Ardath
Prendergast at 795-2000
or email
Ardath(@citrusedc.com
or visit website
htto://www.citrusedc
.corn/





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn Condo Clean
Pool, short or long term
352-476-4242, 527-8002


HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & gar-
bage incl. No pets,
$550mo. (352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
1,2,3, BR. Furn./Unfurn.
Like New, 352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, 3 blks. from
Progress Energy training
Cntr. Fenc'd yrd. $750+
mo.+Util (352) 220-6032
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 CHA $575
PINE RIDGE 3/2/2 POOL
HOME $900
1st dep P & R Realty
Gloria Bonner 697-0375
BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN,2/12/1 ,
$2,000 Down, $427. mo.
(352) 726-9369
C ITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, appls $775/mo
st/Ist sec, no smoking
352-812-1414
Cit. Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 backs to golf crse
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 2/2 with Fam. Rm.
$550 mo. Ist&sec.
352-489-4844 evenings
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Plantation Golf Vista
$800/mo+dep. Lease
352-795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/1 CP House
with large yard $675
Call Nancy Wilson
352-422-4137
Waybright Real Estate
HERNANDO
3/1.5, fenced yard,
deck, washer & dryer,
well & septic, private,
near lake $695.
352-382-1373
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2, $700.00/month
No pets 352-513-4061
Homosassa Springs
3/1 No Pets,Clean $800
mo. (305)619-0282, Cell








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMOSASSA
3/2 Newer DW, 1600
sq ft on 1 acre $750
Call Nancy Wilson
352-422-4137
Waybright Real Estate

INVERNESS
2-1-1 fireplace pets OK
Lease f/l/s $650/mo.
Jim 828 898 5758

INVERNESS
3BR/2BA, $800 mo
306 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 Cell

Inverness. 2/1
New carpet & paint. $650
mo.Owner/Agent
352-220-4355

SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $800 month
(352) 400-0230
Sugarmill Woods Villa
on Golf course, 1842 SF
2/2/2 plus large
den/office, encl lanai,
Sr. Section, Maint free,
like new $1000/m (352)
382-7920 no answer,
please leave message.





Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964




2/2/1 Villa
Whispering Pines new
carpet, paint & tilefurn
or unf. $69.900 Rent
$750(352) 726-8712

CITRUS SPRINGS
Immediate Possession
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997

HOMOSASSA
Lease to Own,
lovely 3/2 MH,
abve grd pool. EZ
Terms 352-220-0480




INVERNESS
1 BR w/bath, furn, in-
cludes all facilities.
Quiet neighborhood,
nice place, Good refs.
$375 (352) 726-5999
813-270-4598

INVERNESS
Must be dependable &
love animals. $350. mo.
REF. 352-322-1913




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


OLD HOMOSASSA
SCALLOP SEASON RV
LOTS AVAILABLE
Stay with us at
Cedars Lake Park
(352)628-4441







AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M
REALTY ONE



FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in vtiation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




(2) Public Mac hine
Shop Auctions Online
Bidding!
#1- Swaim Machine
Co. Inc. Scottsboro
Alabama. #2 Golden
Seal Services, Inc.
Marianna Fl.. CNC
Machines-Lathes-
Shears-Welders, MORE!
bid now @ www.
HortonAuctions.com or
www.SoldAlabama
.com Pete Horton
AL#213 (800) 548-0130
Absolute Auction
2 Story Log Home
Cullman Al. 5/5 equip-
ment barn, 11 + acres
GT Auctions .com,
2205-326-0833
Granger, Thagard & As-
sociates, Jack F
Granger #873



COMMERCIAL OFFICE
BUILDING 3,945 Sq. Ft.,
175' on Hwy 44, 1 AC
Central Water/Septic
DAVID G. GRIFFIN
Lic. Real Estate Broker
(352) 795-0330








Abb


For Sale By
AUCTION
1,250 SF Bldg.
on .7 acres
Zoning: CH High
Intensity Commercial
Permitted uses
include restaurant,
retail, hotel, motel,
office, gas station,
c-store, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
16 NE HWY 19,
Crystal River, FL
JUNE 12@ 12PM
OPEN from 11 AM
sale day
Call 352-519-3130
for more info
For Details Visit our
Website
AmericanHeritaae
Auctioneers.com











By Owner
New 3/2 Custom Built,
'07 Lease Option Owner
Financing w/dn pmt
407-739-2646/442-3597



ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream Home
In Active Senior
Community $175,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA Pool
Home. Split floor, plan
w/ separate family rm.,
master suite & guest
wing open to lanai/
pool. New wood floor-
ing in Liv/Din. area
dbl. garage, beautifully
landscapped yard.
Call (352) 726-6564
OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418



HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified I


m
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Country Club Road 3
bedroom. 1 bath. Home
for Sale: $105,000 Coun-
try Club Road, Crystal
River Florida. Location,
Location, Location!!!!!!!!!!
Across the street from the
famous Plantation Golf
and Resort. 3 bedroom,
Privacy, this is private
large lo t close to all
that Crystal River has to
offer! Fenced in yard with
storage shed in the back
yard. Also plenty of room
for boat/trailer
storage.Updated with
newer ac/furnace, roof,
interior totally profession-
ally updated, tile and car-
pet thru out. Rental his-
tory is great with tenant in
place. Check it out! Seller
says Sell! REaltors, I will
pay a bonus if you bring
me a buyer!(352)
228-9691




3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


- I 11


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


DEB INFANTINE
BUYERS ARE OUT!
I Need Listings!
Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
HOLDER
3/2/2 blk/stucco home
w/enclosed lanai.
1350 sf. near club-
house w/pool & recre-
ation, beautiful oaks &
mature Citrus trees
$84K, 352-603-2202


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv! )
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




Your World










CFmkNcLE
I h 1,


SOWN TODAY!


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com






C03 ,





How To
Make
Your
Car Disappear...
Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly'

(352) 563-5966
(352) 563-5966


Cim14 Ui.E
www.chronicleonline.com


Hme


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com





"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


CHRONILE


SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 E15


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745






OFF CARDINAL,
END OF THE
RAINBOW
nice little pot of gold,
great live oaks at each
end. 5 acres.
$80,000. day time num-
ber 352-382-7911



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



2.2 AC RE LOT FOR SALE
By Owner Gated.
still rustic, off Fishbowl
on Shell. Homosassa
Can be found @ Citrus
County. Acct #1139988
$18,000 (727) 271-0297
Crystal River Beautiful
1.5ac lot in Crystal
Manor. Well & septic in-
cluded. Must sell. $14K
OBO c: 941-539-9961
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Dr has
Wetlands, River
access, $6,000.
352-621-1664
INVERNESS
80'x120' backs to Ft.
Cooper Park, Faces Old
Floral City Rd. No Fill
required, within site of
Rails to Trails, $6900
352-697-2292



Your World

06#4496441e4









E16 SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012


$ERVING

>CuRUS cOUlNT A
FOR OVEB OPT
37REA yEAFO sINC 1


^_---I
3 LOTS


* I d.. .. I,, | l.:.. l h1.. 1 1 ,
$74,500 = "' '.:
tnt','. CiliusCountSold. con
Jeanne f Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


NEW TO MARKET






w ll .. 'i.L ''iall., $195,000
Call Maitha Snydei 352 476 8727
to pevieiw lile = 355667


HEATHERWOOD 2
VVI. l 3 I. $ .ha l in '1 111.. l.f, rIoil
i.'. im .i :ii i mi .l H. i i6 .]. ... i iiii
b.ilhi i phI pli i ll l hll pl.I I .l .l l .l
116.6. n ll ih lll ,I :I :l I.n.. I ...1

... l... i .i .lI.h I...l $220,000
Call Ruth Fiedeick 1-352 563 6866


BRENTWOOD BEAUTY!



lonaine 0 Renan 352 586 0075


* 1*k. 'BA l.k I .Ik a' F k

I -, Ix i : .ll A l. .l ..
* I- "1161ll 4.
Mi I = i,"i ONLY $134,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


CRAZY CHEAP!
POOL HOME ON 5.8 ACRES!
I -. -. j. illil i ,. 'ilf 6. III.II.I _I 1 l ivin .l
;p .. Pp8 n. I lh h ., l i ,in .] .-.p ll .1 .h l.;
hi.l. M il .l. fl l lh. l 11 l,
pil.l ,I h. Ill 1' $289,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


LAKE HOME & ADJACENT VACANT HOMESITE
A p l i, [111 lil I I l i :i. > >


l 1 1 .. ...... l. .. .

I'-. = '..'.I $274,.500
Patl Datis f352/ 2127280
Iieiz' listing 1'f'f' c21paldauvs corn


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









3/2 1990 MOBILEHOME

I..m I'lll I hI fl 1 f..ii.il' .ill'..i l Ih lh ,i I
i in i. ,iii .i... li ill, i h ll i n ..i l ,i. Ii, n
Ihl _'/r l h... .. l ia 11fll, l ... l.. ll II. I

,UlP... I .l. 1. I h.. I .l l l Il. ..&.I I6I

.. il .,, $20,000
Call Teniti R. Blanco 352 419 9252








5 ACRES

* '...l i . illi. A I
* I LI,,,jII a.: irl.| il P Ila,
1 i:0 iih | i_ ,ll .1.1.
*1 I-I. I ,,,gs 1 1i -,
* Bp aililil VI,.- I I. .ii.,l I ..in.I
Pi:.., i $105,000 = : .:i
Jeanne it Wilaid Pickiel 212 3410
Cw'ii' it'u. CIsCounlySold. corn






TURN-KEY PROPERTY!
Al IIP[[IAT [I' lIIIII S III r,| ,1 I fAM ii.
ai l i H.1 1 :. ,I in I I fti i ip. l.I .a.i f in





Mi 5. 3i.': $119,900
Call DORIS MINER at 352 726-6668
oi 422 .4627


POOL
* 3BR 2 Bath 2 cal Gaai
* PI Ivacy In:ncl ba hackyal iI
* C.ini L| Puhliil Vlal,:i
$114,500 =I *' 'I
Willaid Pickiel 201 9871
wiw'i'W. CiliusCounlt Sold. corn


-WORK OR
LIVE IN
UNIQUE,
VICTORIAN
ERA HOME






r= i ASKING $168.900
Pit D,,s,352 2/27280
I -.. 'eo tn I ilo ec pirdi, p4 elim


COME SEE THIS BEAUTIFUL
COUNTRY CHARMER!
~.. l:. .ill I : ., : | v l .., l I..,,


i1..l il ..11I '$269,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


HANDYMAN SPECIAL
,I i : ,: II all a1 ,I :hl 'I a' a ll i lli: II
in ll al. .ill ll. l ,: . I .i :l
nll -l nI Al 11II ... I..ill, 1,,h ,

MIL = .1-.1 $49,900
ini:'i'. sellingcitiuscountlllhomes. coin
Call Nancr Jenks 352-400 8072


8525 E. SKYE DRIVE
INVERNESS
_il h l ill .lii i l ..hI ,:aln h:.l Il..1 ,:IaII.
1 I:II :I In...1 1 Ih l. i -l. l.-p l
Mi = 11:111 $69,900
Call Isaac S. Ba lon 352 697 2493


BRIGHT & READY
l: a ml. I 1 .,ll al I. ,ni HI ll il ill: : i





l. ll 11: :. 1 .I ,: I: .. ln ; p ..l l .: ill .. I
r..l.i l .v i l i :l II .. lh .h i wl ll ,:
,i, I:I .. $59,900
Call: Ndda 352 270 0202


1.I I n i.al .l .... I: .j l:.l I 1I 21 1I21 I L r.i
.:,r .i j,: :.iij, l.hil i ,: :.ill .ii _| .:, i d ,:.i .:i
H Ia lh .hll ii.:II I a:hllal 1.- I a' I L I I.I


.:.,,,., l l,,:,,. h,., .,. $77,000
David Ku Ili Cell 954 383 8786
O/hice 352 726 6668


LECANTO, EXCLUSIVE
N l -. 11- i i 1 i I .' .' .' ..I I ,

hll"n, In I i li, l 1 i Iiii Ii iin l li

1111111 Ill II 111 I II IIi I II- 111 1 II

i.... ,n ,i ,,,,, ni i ,I m.,J 4. $229,900
Ca//ll Nilda 3522700202 loi shoring


RELAX ON YOUR COVERED PATIO,
DOWN BY THE OPEN LAKE!

I:I. l.i ........ ._ .h.*l.. ..| I:l....... :m l .hl..nin
i.nii iii i h h.i .. d I o. i ,ll iii llli l

r. II...... r.ij u. A i l i 111 h ... I
MI = ".1:11. $189,900
Call DORIS MINER, 352 726-6668
oi 422 4627


dMaNF!