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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02787
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-02-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02787

Full Text



Tiger tale: Woods lurks near top of Memorial leade


S CITRU-S COUNT Y4,-


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Decreasing clouds and
91 warm; 20 percent
LOW chance of showers.
65 PAGE A4
JUNE 2, 2012


Former deputy arrested in sex case


Maidhof
service June 9
A public service is
planned Saturday,
June 9, to honor the
life of Gary Maidhof,
the county's opera-
tions and projects offi-
cer who died Sunday,
May 27.
The service is from
7 to 9 p.m. at the
College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
There will be an
open house from 6 to
7 p.m., when a light-
hearted remem-
brance will take
place. At the end of
the program, there
will be an open-mic
opportunity for those
who wish to speak
about Mr. Maidhof.
Attendees may
donate to several
charities in Mr. Maid-
hof's memory, in-
cluding the American
Cancer Society, The
American Heart As-
sociation and the
Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica. A STEP schol-
arship, through the
College of Central
Florida, is being cre-
ated in his name and
donations will be ac-
cepted that night.
As a symbol of the
unusual ties he fre-
quently wore, there
will be a wild-tie tree
for anyone who
would like to donate
their most unusual
ties in his honor.
For more informa-
tion, call Lindsay Ubi-
nas at 352-527-5484.
Celebrations
happen today
The public is in-
vited to celebrate the
100th birthday of the
Citrus County Historic
Courthouse and the
125th birthday of Cit-
rus County beginning
at 10 a.m. Saturday.
The day's events
include remarks from
county officials, the
opening of a 25-
year-old time cap-
sule put together by
Inverness Primary
School students, a
tour of the court-
house and museum,
birthday cake and a
chance to meet
Robert Butler, one of
the Highwaymen
artists who painted a
rendition of the His-
toric Courthouse 25
years ago.
In conjunction with
the celebration, at
7 p.m., the Cool Cor-
porate Cats will be
featured at a Music
on the Square free
concert on the
streets of downtown
Inverness. Attendees
should bring lawn
-From staff reports


TOMORROW:
Anniversaries
Citrus County turns 125
and the Historic
Courthouse turns 100.
/Sunday

Com ics .......... C9
Community ..... .C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial . . . ... A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C9
Obituaries . . . .A5
Classifieds . . . .C10
TV Listings . . . .C8


l llllll 84578 2002


Man suspected ofsexual battery

was once sex crimes detective


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

BUSHNELL -A former
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice sex crimes detective
was arrested Friday morn-
ing on an active Fifth Judi-
cial Circuit warrant
charging him with two
counts of sexual battery on
a child older than 12 years
of age.
Lynn Tabb, 48, was ar-
rested by agents of the
Florida Department of


Law Enforcement (FDLE).
Alongside his attorney, Bill
Grant, Tabb who most
recently served as a
deputy turned himself
in to Sumter County
authorities.
The sheriff's office had
terminated Tabb's employ-
ment on Thursday on
agency policy violations of
absence from duty without
proper notification, offi-
cials with the agency said
in a news release.
Grant called the Chroni-


cle on Friday afternoon to
say his client is innocent.
Grant accused the sher-
iff's office of retribution
against his client for "hav-
ing material problems with
some of the sex cases the
agency was working.
"I think justice has been
prejudiced," Grant said.
But Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
called Grant's allegations
"absurd," and said his of-
fice and the prosecutor's
office sought to make sure
not a hint of impropriety
was present in pursuance
of the case against Tabb.
"We got FDLE involved
very quickly because we
wanted an independent


agency to examine the evi-
dence and ensure the in-
tegrity of not only our
agency to make sure the
truth came out independ-
ent of us. We wanted to
show no one is above the
law and if wrongdoing is
reported, it will be investi-
gated thoroughly and ar-
rests will be made if
necessary," Dawsy said.
He said the State Attor-


ney's Off
ferred inv
matter to i
Accordii
from the
about a n


Dreams become real


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lance LeDoux, recent graduate of Nature Coast Technical High School, packs boxes to take with him to college.
LeDoux is attending Bethel College in Newton, Kan., in the fall.

Paralyzed as a child teen now ready to play college football


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern

CITRUS SPRINGS Lance
Robert LeDoux, 17, has a history
unlike anyone and is an example of
a true marvel.
Like all children, Lance LeDoux
wanted to live an active and fulfill-
ing life. Unfortunately, that life be-
came a nightmare when he
contracted a disorder called
Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) at
the age of 7 and spent the next few
years in a wheelchair, unable to do
much for himself.
Friday night, he graduated from
high school and is heading to Bethel
College in Newton, Kansas, to play
football and major in medicine.


MEi
GBS is caused by an autoimmune
response to an infection. Instead of
attacking the intended infection,
the immune system attacks the pe-
ripheral nervous system and con-
necting neurons.
By attacking these neurons, the
body becomes progressively para-
lyzed, beginning in the hands and
feet.
In the case of LeDoux, his im-
mune system was attacking the flu,
and one day, LeDoux noticed that
he couldn't feel his feet As he tried
to walk, he kept falling over.
"Being too young to understand,"
Lance said about his paralysis, "I
thought it was funny that I was
falling over."


His parents, Lance and Mary
LeDoux, were much more con-
cerned.
After extensive testing for vari-
ous disorders, including brain can-
cer, doctors diagnosed LeDoux
with GBS with Miller Fisher Syn-
drome as a subtype.
Doctors said if LeDoux's immune
system kept working, it would have
attacked his heart and could have
killed him.
Being in the health care profes-
sion, the elder Lance DeDoux
knew what GBS could mean for his
son's life.
"Oh my God," he recalled saying
after finding out about his son's

See Page A2


County


tax roll


continues


decline
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer


ice also trans- INVERNESS The eco-
estigation of the nomic downturn that
ts Ocala office. plagued new construction
ng to the release and property sales is
sheriff's office, showing no signs of letting
month and half up.
Preliminary 2012 tax roll
See Page A2 figures from the Citrus
County Property Ap-

Office show
a 5 percent
decline in
taxable
ity property
S. vvalu es
across the
county, and
Geoff a 6 percent
Greene drop in the
property cities of
appraiser. Cry s ta


River and Inverness.
New construction also
took a significant hit from
2011. According to the re-
port, the taxable value on
new construction is down
25 percent countywide and
in Inverness alone, the drop
is 75 percent.
Property Appraiser Geoff
Greene said property sales
are on the rise, but at
nowhere near the price lev-
els seen since taxable val-
ues began their decent four
years ago.
"Property is moving," he
said. "We're having sales,
but it's still depressed."
The property appraiser
issues a tentative tax roll by
June 1, with the official tax
roll due by July 1. Greene
said some adjustments
could still occur because
larger corporate tangible
tax returns are not
finalized.
Greene said, however,
that he didn't expect any
significant changes.
Local governments re-
quire tax roll information
in setting their millage
rates. If taxable values
drop, governments must ei-
ther raise millage rates to
bring in the same amount of
money as this year or re-
duce budgets or a combi-
nation of both.
Earlier this year, Greene
had estimated a drop in tax-
able value at 3 percent to 6
percent.
The tentative roll values
include:
$8.8 billion countywide,
down 5 percent.
$9.6 billion for the
county school district. The
value is higher because the
second $25,000 homestead
exemption does not include
schools.
Crystal River's value is
$433 million. Its new tax-
able value dropped 74 per-
cent because the city last
year added value on the tax
roll due to annexation south
along U.S. 19.
Inverness' value is
$343.6 million, a 6 percent
drop from 2011.
Value for the Ho-
mosassa Special Water Dis-
trict is $439 million, off 3
percent from last year
The value of new con-
struction is $42 million and
includes a Wal-Mart in Ho-
mosassa and a Family Dol-
lar store near Crystal
River.
The tax roll is based on
sales up to Jan. 1, 2012.
Greene said he hasn't seen
much so far this year to in-
dicate the 2013 tax roll will
be much better.
"During the first quarter
of 2012, we're still seeing a
downward trend," he said.
"It's not as bad, but it's still
downward."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Investigation nets 17 drug-related arrests

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER A
six-month-long investiga- -
tion dubbed "Operation '
Spring Cleaning" yielded 174
drug-related arrests early
Thursday morning.
According to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
Tactical Impact Unit (TIU), ._6.
K-9 Unit, SWAT team mem-
bers, community crimes de-
tectives and patrol deputies
worked together to serve
two search warrants at a
residence at 8527 W
Dixieland St., in Ho-
mosassa, and the Siesta
Apartments at 440 N.E. 9th .-
St., in Crystal River
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said .j ~. .\
Friday evening his agency ... .. .
pulled together to make ..
sure the warrants were -
served without a problem. Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office SWAT team looks over a residence Thursday before
See Page A4 Tactical Impact Unit detectives enter to conduct a search and collect evidence.


/B1










;SUE 300
SUE 300


...L.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DREAMS
Continued from Page Al

diagnosis. "You've got to be
kidding me!"
Mary LeDoux, Lance's
mother, said it was a relief
knowing what it was, be-
cause once the doctors
know, it can be treated
immediately
MEN
From second to third
grade, Lance spent his time
in a wheelchair, accompa-
nied by a helper who as-
sisted him with daily tasks,
including getting dressed.
"It was embarrassing," the
teenager said. "Other kids
would bully me because I
was in a wheelchair"
Getting out of the wheel-
chair at the end of third
grade did not mean a full re-
covery for him; he still had
trouble with motor skills.
Lance underwent physical
therapy to learn how to walk
again. He also went to occu-
pational therapy to learn
how use his hands, hold pen-
cils and write again.
Two years after being di-
agnosed with GBS, Lance
was also diagnosed with Id-
iopathic Thrombocytopenic
Purpura (ITP).
ITP is when the immune
system attacks the blood
platelets. It can lead to
bleeding to death if the per-
son is hit while playing a
physical sport, for example.
His parents were deter-
mined to keep him away
from physical sports, but it
was "Robert," Mary
LeDoux's nickname for her
son, who "didn't want to sit
on the sidelines."
MEN
In fourth grade, Lance
played baseball in the Ted
Williams Little League, an
organization that allowed
children to play no matter
what their condition.
Jeff Gordon, LeDoux's
Little League coach, noticed
that he was no ordinary Lit-
tle Leaguer
"Even though it was hard
for him to field balls," Gor-
don said, "he always had the
heart." According to Gor-
don, Lance never wanted
his teammates to know
about his condition.
Lance played in the Ted
Williams League up to the
end of middle school.
He worked hard at receiv-
ing treatment for ITP which
went into remission during
the summer of 2006, be-
cause his goal in middle
school was to play on the
football team.
He didn't make the team,
but Lance never stopped
trying to get better


Special to the Chronicle
During his four years of football, Lance played as an offensive lineman, making the varsity
team after his freshman year. But his tireless efforts on the field were equally matched by
his community service off the field.


and healthier
MEN
GBS never goes into full
remission. Lance will always
have effects from nerves that
will never fully heal. He can-
not feel his fingertips or the
bottoms of his feet, and his
right eye is per-
manently blind. His fc
"It killed him
that he couldn't coach
make it," Mary Lan
LeDoux said
about her son try- some
ing out for mid-
dle school foug
football. Fortu-
nately, Lance was over
still able to play every
golf and partici-
pate in track and
field.
Though not able to play
football in middle school,
Lance still tried out for the
football team at Nature
Coast Technical High
School in Brooksville, and
ended up playing football
for four years.
Charles Liggett, former
coach at the school, saw
Lance as someone who
fought to overcome
everything.
"None of that was an
issue," Liggett said about
Lance's illness. "Lance al-
ways wanted to be a success
in football, and now that
he's graduating, we're going
to have some big shoes to
fill."
During his four years of
football, Lance played as an
offensive lineman, making
the varsity team after his
freshman year But his tire-
less efforts on the field were


(


t


f
C


A

r)
VI


equally matched by his com-
munity service off the field.
Lance has given up his
past five summers in order
to help out at Brooksville
Elementary School where
his mother works as the
principal. He has volun-
teered as a jani-
ormer tor and also
assisted stu-
h saw dents in the
pe as school's Excep-
tional Student
ne who Education Pro-
gram, encourag-
ht to ing students to
work hard every
come day and prevail
thin g. over every chal-
S lenge.
"Robert has
realized," his mother said,
"that he has (a) level of ma-
turity that other children
don't have, and wisdom ex-
pected out of teachers."
Recognized for his de-
voted work in school, sports
and in the community,
Lance was honored with nu-
merous awards, including
the Bright House Players
Scholarship award.
Lance also made it into
the top 50 of 400 applicants,
attempting to receive the
2011 Inspireum Football
Award, an award recogniz-
ing not only their play in
football, but also how they
inspire their fellow team-
mates, classmates and com-
munity members.
For the past summer,
LeDoux and his parents
have been traveling to nu-
merous football camps for
college, including Wofford
College in Spartanburg, S.C.


Coaches all over the na-
tion heard about Lance's
willingness to be the best
that he could be, no matter
what obstacles he faced.
His ability to help others
in selfless acts of devotion
and kindness was some-
thing that only exceptional
students and players had.
Lance "Robert" LeDoux
graduated with honors from
Nature Coast High School
and plans to attend Bethel
College in Newton, Kan., to
major in a medical profes-
sion and, of course, play
football.
If you want to watch
LeDoux's application for
the 2011 Inspireum Football
Award and know more
about his life, go to
www.youtube.com and
search: Lance LeDoux, 2011
Inspireum Football Awards
Semifinalist


CASE
Continued from Page Al

ago, a call was received by
the Florida abuse hotline
in which a third-party com-
plainant alleged Tabb had
physically abused a 5-year-
old boy
The complainant also
mentioned allegations
that Tabb had sexually
abused a young girl.
The sher-
iff's office's The rr
child protec- The m
tive investiga- invol
tors looked
into the al- alleged
leged physical
abuse, which abuse
turned out to mn
be un- minoi
founded, ac- turned
cording to
officials. the ag(
However,
the matter in- Special
evolving al- ni
leged sexual U it,
abuse of a Tabb pr
minor was
turned over to WOr ke
the agency's
Special Vic- folloV
tims Unit,
where Tabb previously
worked, for follow-up.
Dawsy said about four
weeks ago FDLE was en-
gaged to handle the case
because of transparency
and also because the case
was multi-jurisdictional -
with witnesses and alleged
sex acts occurring outside
of Citrus County as well as
within the county.
The alleged female vic-
tim of the abuse currently
is an adult in her early 20s
who no longer resides in
Citrus County, according to
the sheriff's office.
According to the arrest
warrant, the sexual abuse
occurred on multiple occa-
sions at different locations
between January 2003 and
December 2008.


Tabb is expected to be
transported from Sumter
County to the Citrus
County Detention Facility
to face the charges against
him.
Tabb was hired by the
sheriff's office in October
2003. He ended his em-
ployment in September
2006 and temporarily relo-
cated out West to be with
an ailing family member,
according to the agency He
eventually returned to Cit-


latter
ving
sexual
Sof a
rwas
over to
ency's
Victims
where
eviously
od, for
w-up.


rus County and
was rehired in
August 2007.
The sheriff's
office said
Tabb's prior
disciplinary
action in-
cluded one in-
stance of
conduct unbe-
coming an offi-
cer that
resulted from
an internal af-
fairs investiga-
tion in August
2010, when he
received a sus-
pension with-
out pay, plus
reassignment
to road patrol.


A second discipline in
September 2009 involved
his repeated failure to
properly follow up and
document cases or respond
to phone calls. He report-
edly received a
written reprimand and
probation.
"While I'm highly appre-
ciative of FDLE's thor-
ough efforts in conducting
this investigation, I'm both
disappointed and dis-
turbed that a deputy sher-
iff could even be
responsible for such a
heinous crime," Dawsy
said in the release.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


'~Tm


A2 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3- SATURDAY, JUNE 2,2012



TATE&


C LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


TATE Olsen off the hook for plaintiffs' fees


Citrus County
Citrus exceeds average
on end-of-course exam
Just under half of Florida's
high school freshmen passed
an algebra test needed to
graduate, but middle school
students who took it did much
better on the end-of-course
exam.
Results posted Friday
show 48 percent of ninth-
graders taking the Algebra 1
end-of-course exam for the
first time passed it. In Citrus
County, the pass rate was 54
percent. Students who failed
will have to retake the course
or get other remediation be-
fore taking the test again.
This year's freshman class
is the first that must pass the
test to graduate.
Eighty-seven percent of
students in grades six through
eight taking the test for the first
time passed it. In Citrus County,
100 percent of seventh-graders
and 97 percent of eighth-
graders passed the test.
State education officials said
the results across the board
were better than expected.
Got storm damage?
Help may be available
Any Citrus County resident
or business owner who sus-
tained property damage as a
result of recent Tropical
Storm Beryl, please call Bob
Wesch, deputy director of
emergency management, at
352-249-2708.
There may be a chance of
financial assistance coming
from the state of Florida;
however, there are no guar-
antees that Citrus County will
qualify for any kind of aid.
If you have insurance that
will cover the damage, still re-
port it to Wesch, but also con-
tact your insurance company.
Trails getting
new designation
National Trails Day is set
for Saturday, just in time for
the designation of eight
Florida recreational trails,
along with 46 other trails, as
national recreational trails.
The Florida trails bearing
the new designation include:
Aucilla River, Cross Seminole
Trail, Econfina River, Flagler
Trail, Foster's Hammock Loop
Trail, North Bay Trail, Seminole
Wekiva Trail and Wacissa Trail.
These trails will now be a
part of approximately 13,650
miles of existing trail that make
up the National Trails System.

Tampa
Citrus tract designated
important bird habitat
The National Audubon So-
ciety and BirdLife Interna-
tional have designated the
Citrus and Croom tracts of
Withlacoochee State Forest
along with Dry Tortugas Na-
tional Park as significant
areas for wild bird habitats.
The Withlacoochee State
Forest has a significant popu-
lation of red-cockaded wood-
peckers, Bachman's sparrow
and bobwhite quail and im-
portant sandhill crane habitat.

Coral Springs
Body of missing baby
found in trunk
A 1-month-old baby was
found dead Friday in the trunk
of a car in Florida, and the
boy's father has been taken
into custody, police said.
The infant was identified as
Josiah Saintil. The boy's father,
Janus Saintil, 24, was ar-
rested Friday outside a Coral
Springs apartment.
Saintil was with the child's
mother, another female and a
male adult Thursday night
driving to a North Lauderdale
Wal-Mart when he became
angry and pulled out a gun,
according to the Broward
Sheriff's Office. He kidnapped
the group and drove about 85
miles north to Port St. Lucie,
where he left the baby at a
house and forced the male to
take money from an ATM. The
elder Saintil fled the area after
the male victim yelled for help.


He apparently retrieved the
baby before returning to South
Florida, authorities said.
-From staff and wire reports


On the morning of
Dec. 31, 1983, the
bodies of sisters
Ethel Reynolds and Freda
DeMougin were discovered
in their home at 749 N.E.
12th Terrace in Crystal
River. The two sisters, both
in their 80s, had been
beaten and stabbed during
the night. Detectives first ar-
rived at approximately
7 a.m. on the morning the
bodies were discovered,
and what they found was
sheer carnage. Both victims
were brutally attacked in
their rooms while in bed or
getting ready for bed. The
house appeared to have


sued in 2003 over equity
memberships in the coveted
Black Diamond Golf Course
and clubhouse.
The ruling on attorney's
fees was expected, since the
appeals court in September
2011 reversed a circuit court
decision that favored the
plaintiffs.
At the time, Olsen's
attorneys said the ruling
would save Olsen about
$700,000 in attorney's fees to
the plaintiffs.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
A state district court for-
malized last month what it
set in motion nearly a year
ago in a false-advertising
lawsuit involving Black Dia-
mond Ranch and its former
developer, Stan Olsen.
The Fifth District Court of
Appeal ruled May 25 that
Olsen did not owe attorney's
fees to six current and for-
mer property owners who


Rainy morning doesn't stop


BUSTER THOMPSON
Chronicle Intern
BEVERLY HILLS
The shouts of shopkeepers
periodically echoed
throughout the overcast
sky, advertising to the morning
shoppers, while foldout tables
and huge tent canvasses sup-
ported and protected fresh prod-
ucts from the rain.
The Beverly Hills Civic Asso-
ciation hosted its second Beverly
Hills Arts, Crafts and Farmers
Market on Civic Circle in Bev-
erly Hills. The market is open
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the first
and third Friday of every month
at 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills,
regardless of weather.
Local growers, fishermen and
designers sold everything from
meat, seafood and produce to
garden plants, homemade salsa
and custom license plates.
Michael Wilmshurst, a vendor
for the Florida Fresh Meat Com-
pany, grilled his organic, 100 per-
cent grass-fed ground beef,
attracting customers with his
samples.
Wilmshurst, along with the
other vendors, fully support
what farmers' markets try to do
for their local communities and
distributors.
"These farmers' markets,"


The May 25 appeals court
ruling states that since the
plaintiffs are no longer the
prevailing parties, they are
not entitled to attorney's
fees.
Plaintiffs claimed Olsen
misled them into buying
equity memberships in the
golf course and clubhouse
in the belief that, in time,
members would own the
property Memberships cost
$30,000 to $75,000.
In reality, they were buy-


been ransacked, yet nothing liked by their friends and
of value seemed to be miss- neighbors and were active
ing. The house is in their church.
located near Detectives
Crystal River have developed
High School. On several persons
the weekend the I .. of interest, but
bodies were dis- _' no suspects have
covered, there been named. At
had been a bas- the time of these
ketball tourna- homicides, two
ment held at the similar murders
school. Lee Alexander occurred in Mar-
A look into the UNSOLVED ion County; how-
sisters' back- ever, detectives
grounds re- MYSTERIES were unable to
vealed no find any link be-
apparent enemies or any- tween the cases.
one with whom they had a Detectives need your help
quarrel. They were well in solving the murders of


ing memberships into a not-
for-profit corporation,
owned at the time by Olsen,
which had an option to buy
the golf course, which Olsen
also owned.
A jury in 2009 ruled par-
tially for the plaintiffs and
awarded them about $400,000
- the total cost of the mem-
berships plus interest.
An appeals court kept
some of the awards in place,
but plaintiffs filed their law-
suits more than four years


Ethel Reynolds and Freda
DeMougin. Any piece of in-
formation, no matter how
insignificant, may be the key
to solving these homicides.
Please contact CrimeStop-
pers of Citrus County by
calling 888-ANY-TIPS, tex-
ting the word CITRUS plus
your tip to 274637 or visiting
crimestopperscitrus.com.
You may be eligible to re-
ceive a cash reward and you
can remain anonymous.
The column is submitted
by the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office. Retired Sherff's
office Detective Lee Alexan-
der is a volunteer with the
CCSO Cold Case Unit.


after obtaining the equity
memberships and the
statute of limitations for
misleading advertising had
expired.
Olsen developed Black
Diamond in 1987 from an
abandoned rock quarry He
sold it in March 2011 to Es-
calante Golf Inc. of Fort
Worth, Texas, for $7.5 million.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


shoppers at Beverly Hills Farmers Market


Michael Ezell puts out some cantaloupes while Joy
to customers.


Wilmshurst said, "pro-
vide outlets for small
family-run businesses
who sell goods that are
harvested locally and
delivered locally, with a For
small carbon footprint." photos
In the seafood section, photohe fa
Thomas Cochran sold market
every imaginable on this
Florida catch, including www.
frog legs. His daughter, online.
Emily, watched in
amazement as he sold Bayport
shrimp as big as an adult's hand.


ire
From
mers'
t, click
story at
chronicle
com.


"We fish at night and
sell at day," Cochran
said.
The produce area,
owned by Missy Ezell and
run by her family and Joy
Wilson, was redolent of
fresh and ripe veggies
and fruits.
"We get good produce
and support our commu-
nity," Wilson said.
Every bit of produce


sold, including the spicy salsa
and pickled medley, was har-


vested and made from foods
grown by the farmers.
'After 93 days of no rain and the
sudden seven inches of rain, we
buy anything from local farmers
to help them out," Ezell said.
Mark Young of The Blooming
Landscape Company, with his
wife Ruby Young, who sells at
the Inverness market, has expert
knowledge of his rows upon
rows of gorgeous local and exotic
flowers. Mark gets his flowers
from botanical garden shows,
searching for any rare beauties
to sell at markets.
"It's a great market," Young
said.
Dave and Eileen Kulcsar, own-
ers of Out Front License Plates,
have been making custom tags
for individuals and organiza-
tions for five years. Their shop is
one of many craft shops at the
market.
"Being at the market," Eileen
said, "is a nice way to get to know
your neighbors in Beverly Hills."
Even shoppers like Karen
Smith and Ginger Recanzone
were not deterred by the morn-
ing rains.
"This was our first time com-
ing to the Beverly Hills farmers'
market," Smith said, "and even
though we were disappointed
about the rain, we're still coming
back on Friday"


UNSOLVED
MYSTERIES OF
CITRUS COUNTY
* VICTIMS: Ethel Lynch
Reynolds and Freda
Lynch DeMougin.
* AGES: 86 years old,
89 years old.
* CAUSE OF DEATH:
Homicide sharp
force trauma.
* DESCRIPTION: White
female, 5 feet, 4
inches; white female,
5 feet, 1 inch.


SCf~E -


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Emily Cochran, 7, keeps a lookout for shoppers Friday while her father Thomas Cochran, right, tries to stay dry during the Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Market on Civic Circle in Beverly Hills. The market is open the first and third Fridays of every month, rain or shine, and is
sponsored by the Beverly Hills Civic Association.





No sun? No problem


SUnsolved MYSTERIES


Trail cold in 1983 slaying of sisters in Crystal River






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gidget Demetrius
Bailey Bunch

1- '" .10 ^^^
10j^ 0."^^^f^^^^


Special to the Chronicle
Detectives serve a search warrant Thursday at the residence
in Homosassa.


DRUG
Continued from Page Al

About 45 people were as-
signed to the operation, he
said, and 16 to 18 hours went
into coordinating and exe-
cuting it.
A press release from the
sheriff's office stated the
warrants primarily focused
on subjects who frequently
engaged in illegal activities
at Copeland Park and two
local apartment complexes
and performed drug deals
in the parking lots of the
Siesta Apartments and
Courtyard Apartments,
which are also located in
Crystal River.
Dawsy said the investiga-
tion was prompted by sev-
eral complaints made by
residents in the area who
witnessed the activity Using
the intelligence-led policing
model, TIU members pur-
sued the identified suspects
and used a variety of inves-
tigative techniques such as
developing confidential in-
formants and conducting
numerous controlled drug
buys with many of the al-
leged dealers.
Sheriff's officials stated


many of the suspects ar-
rested have past criminal
histories dealing with nar-
cotics and illegal drug
sales.
"This operation not only
got the drug dealers off the
streets, it also made the
community safer," Sgt.
Justin Ferrara, leader of
TIU, said Friday in the press
release.
"The broad scope and
number of arrests in this
operation should also have
an impact on the crimes
that are occurring in parts
of the county," Ferrara
added, "so it's a win/win for
all of us."
Detectives seized several
items ranging from
crack/powder cocaine, mar-
ijuana, drug paraphernalia,
prescription pills, a vehicle,
a stolen firearm and cash.
The following individuals
were arrested:
Gidget May Bailey, 44, of
Crystal River; Demetruis
Anton Bunch, 35, of Crystal
River; Patricia Ann Clark,
41, of Inverness; Dwayne
Daniels, 42, of Crystal River;
Jon A. Esteves, 33, of Crystal
River; Steven A. Johnson,
38, of Crystal River; George
Lee Knight, 53, of Crystal
River; Terry D. Knight, 48,


George
Knight


Terry Marvin
Knight Leonard


Patricia Courtney
Roka Simmons


of Crystal River; Marvin
Leonard, 52, of Homosassa;
Eric Leon Lockley, 36, of
Crystal River; Cameron Z.
McCullough, 23, of Crystal
River; Andres A. Padron, 23,
of Crystal River; Patricia
Ann Cleveland Roka, 48, of
Crystal River; Courtney
Elizabeth Simmons, 37, of
Homosassa; Robert Ray-
mond John Wilder, 35, of
Crystal River; Christopher
Brian Wilson, 29, of Crystal
River; and Ira Demon
Young, 20, of Crystal River
All were arrested on mul-


Robert
Wilder


tiple drug charges ranging
from possession and sale of
cocaine to possession and
sale of oxycodone. Bonds to-
taled more than $1 million.
Dawsy said another 9 to
10 arrests could be made
in connection with the
operation.
Dawsy thanked the resi-
dents for their input While
serving the first arrest war-
rant, he said a guy came up
to him with tears in his eyes
and thanked him before giv-
ing the TIU and SWAT guys
high fives.


Irg
You


"That was all worth it," he
said. "That's what it's
all about."
In addition, Dawsy said
there will be some follow-up
with the owner of the Siesta
Apartments complex and he
will be held accountable for
allowing alleged criminals to
live in his building.
Though he realizes peo-
ple would like these kinds of
sweeping arrests to happen
more rapidly, it takes time to
gather the evidence needed
to make sure these cases
make it to court and pro-


Jon Steven
Esteves Johnson


Cameron Andres
McCullough Padron


ON THE NET
For more
about
arrests
made by the
Citrus
County
Sheriff's
Office, go to
www.sheriff
a citrus.org.
ing

duce convictions.
Dawsy said he hopes the
arrests send a message to
others in the community
that his agency isn't "fooling
around" when it comes to
cracking down on drugs in
Citrus County.
'We want to send a mes-
sage of paranoia," he said,
"because you never know
who you're talking to."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast

ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts

PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
PC
pc
s


PC
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Skies will be partly cloudy today.


88 72 2.50 81 70 1.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exc sive daily
B" TODAY & TOMORROW MORNINecast
) N High: 91 Low: 65
f Decreasing clouds and warm.
A 20% chance of a shower.
i SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 67
Mostly sunny and warm.

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 71
Mostly sunny, increasing humidity.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 93/71
Record 97/55
Normal 91/67
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.65 in.
Total for the month 0.65 in.
Total for the year 15.25 in.
Normal for the year 15.43 in.
'As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.91 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 67
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Grasses, Privet
Today's count: 3.6/12
Sunday's count: 4.9
Monday's count: 5.3
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/2 SATURDAY 3:56 10:11 4:26 10:41
6/3 SUNDAY 4:52 11:08 5:24 11:40
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 8:.... 8:25 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW 632 A.M
0 C *P 0 OC MOONHRISE TODAY4..........................6:43P.M.
14 11 J M11 II E MOlNSETTODAY............................4:42A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There Is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
httpJ/flamefl-do.conmfire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited to one-day-per-week irrigation, before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays; 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand watering or micro irigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional watering allowances for quali-
fled plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:12 a/12:29 a 4:19 p/12:21 p
Crystal River" 3:33 a/9:43 a 2:40 p/10:44 p
Withlacoochee* 1:20 a/7:31 a 12:27 p/8:32 p
Homosassa"" 4:22 all 1:20 a 3:29 p/--


"*At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
6:10 a/1:22 a 5:05 p/1:11 p
4:31 a/10:33 a 3:26 p/11:34 p
2:18 a/8:21 a 1:13 p/9:22 p
5:20 a/12:21 a 4:15 p/12:10 p


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.69 27.68 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.74 32.72 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 35.12 34.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.14 36.14 42.40
Levels reported In feet above sea level. Rood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year food, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
witl lhe Dritr,:.I@ [n Uniled Siti. GeologiLi S' be ii u lui any dam3aes aning out uf Ihe uwe of
"ni ata II you nave ,n iqueshIonso u snrlutO uoa icr.tfe h,IIcr.gical Data Seci-or. al 52 .% 7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPep. FestH L
Albany 73 50 r 69 52
Albuquerque 95 63 pc 95 65
Asheville 74 64 .13 pc 71 48
Atlanta 90 66 .10 pc 78 58
Atlantic City 74 62 pc 73 59
Austin 91 67 pc 95 71
Baltimore 80 60 .87 pc 76 58
Billings 79 54 ts 89 54
Birmingham 79 66 pc 82 62
Boise 89 57 ts 79 52
Boston 65 59 ts 60 57
Buffalo 63 54 .69 pc 64 53
Burlington. VT 73 46 r 62 54
Charleston, SC 87 70 .48 pc 82 63
Charleston, WV 69 61 1.00 pc 73 52
Charlotte 83 69 .05 pc 77 55
Chicago 65 51 .01 sh 73 58
Cincinnati 66 57 .66 pc 71 52
Cleveland 68 55 .87 sh 68 55
Columbia. SC 88 69 .62 pc 81 59
Columbus. OH 69 57 .36 sh 69 53
Concord. N.H. 73 47 r 60 55
Dallas 86 61 pc 90 71
Denver 83 50 ts 85 56
Des Moines 71 46 s 77 56
Detroit 62 50 39 sh 69 56
El Paso 95 69 s 100 74
Evansville, IN 66 54 pc 77 57
Harrisburg 73 58 .40 pc 72 54
Hartford 76 57 ts 68 58
Houston 93 71 s 91 73
Indianapolis 60 53 pc 71 55
Jackson 78 66 pc 86 64
U. Vegas 10678 s 104 78
Little Rock 82 59 pc 81 67
Los Angeles 72 61 pc 67 59
Louisville 67 57 .30 pc 73 57
Memphis 73 59 pc 80 66
Milwaukee 61 48 sh 71 54
Minneapolis 72 46 pc 73 56
Mobile 86 66 .35 pc 87 66
Montgomery 83 66 pc 85 62
Nashville 68 57 .02 pc 76 58
KEY TO CONDI NS:. c-cloudy; dr=drile;
f=fair h=hay; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs-ralibVnow mix; smoumy; sh-showers
sn.snow; tswthunderstorms; w=windy.
42012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 86 69 s 88 71
New York City 74 62 is 77 60
Norfolk 85 67 .01 pc 79 58
Oklahoma City 66 53 .10 pc 86 68
Omaha 67 45 .01 s 77 59
Palm Springs 11478 s 106 73
Philadelphia 80 64 pc 77 59
Phoenix 11179 s 106 74
Pittsburgh 70 61 .41 pc 69 49
Portland, ME 71 52 r 61 54
Portland, Ore 76 60 pc 64 49
Providence, R.I. 72 60 ts 67 59
Raleigh 88 67 .22 pc 78 55
Rapid City 76 51 .10 pc 82 58
Reno 97 60 pc 90 58
Rochester, NY 63 53 .46 pc 67 52
Sacramento 99 64 pc 92 58
St. Louis 71 49 pc 76 61
St.Ste. Marie 60 44 .11 sh 52 45
Salt Lake City 88 57 Is 89 67
San Antonio 91 70 pc 95 73
San Diego 66 60 pc 68 61
San Francisco 69 53 pc 66 50
Savannah 89 70 1.33 pc 83 63
Seattle 68 57 .20 pc 62 49
Spokane 78 54 .01 sh 70 45
Syracuse 65 49 .08 pc 68 52
Topeka 67 45 pc 81 61
Washington 82 70 .69 pc 76 57
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 115 Thermal, Calif. LOW 27 Kenton,
Mich.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/ISKY London
Acapulco 89/78/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 62/48/pc Mexico City
Athens 81/64/s Montreal
3eiing 85/64/pc Moscow
3erin 58/42/sh Paris
Bermuda 78172/sh Rio
Cairo 95/70/pc Rome
Calgary 66/39/pc Sydney
Havana 88/741ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 86/77/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 85/62/s Warsaw


73/57/sh
63/52/pc
89/62/pc
76/52/ts
61/53/r
67/42/pc
77/66/pc
82/66/pc
78/60/pc
64/52/sh
74/61/pc
59/51/c
55/44/sh


C I T R U S


COUNTY TY


Patricia Dwayne
Clark Daniels


Eric
Lockley


I
Christopher
Wilson


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


LHRKON1CLL
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S Courthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 Cn 106 W. Main
41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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A4 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


LOCAL


FA





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Elections supervisors advised to halt purge

U.S. DOJ. Florida effort may violate federal voting law


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE A lawyer for
Florida's local election officials on
Friday advised them to stop a state-di-
rected effort to identify and purge in-
eligible voters until its legality is
resolved.
The U.S. Justice Department, in a
letter Thursday night, demanded a
halt to the search for non-citizen vot-
ers, which began at the urging of Re-
publican Gov Rick Scott, because the
process appears to violate federal law.
State Association of Supervisors of
Elections president Vicki Davis, the
supervisor in Martin County, said she
believed all 67 supervisors will follow
the advice of their legal adviser, Ron
Labasky With the exception of Miami-
Dade County's appointed supervisor,
they are independently elected officials.
"It's illegal under federal law and
I'm going to follow the law," said Ion
Sancho, the supervisor in Leon County.
Hours before the Justice Depart-
ment letter arrived, a federal judge in
Tallahassee temporarily blocked new
state restrictions on voter registration
drives, saying it's likely opponents
would win a lawsuit claiming those
provisions are unconstitutional.


Both developments, just months be-
fore Florida is set to play a key role in
this year's presidential election, are
examples of what Democrats and voting
rights activists say are attempts by ruling
Republicans to suppress voter turnout
"There is no other explanation ex-
cept this is trying to gin up the con-
spiracy theory that the election's going
to be stolen," said University of
Florida political science professor
Dan Smith, a voting rights expert. "It's
definitely hardball politics."
Republicans say the only thing they're
trying to suppress is election fraud.
Scott said the Justice Department
letter was still under review, but in-
sisted his intent was apolitical.
"I was elected to enforce the laws of
the land, and when you vote, you want
to make sure it's a fair election," Scott
said in Miami, where he attended
events marking the start of the 2012
hurricane season.
The state's procedures for identifying
non-U.S. citizens have not been reviewed
by the Justice Department to make
sure they don't discriminate, wrote T
Christian Herren in the letter to Florida
Secretary of State Kenneth Detzner.
Herren is voting section chief in the
federal agency's Civil Rights Division.


Changes in Florida voting proce-
dures must get Justice Department
approval because five counties
are covered by the Voting Rights
Act of 1965 due to past racial
discrimination.
Herren also wrote that removing
voters from the rolls within 90 days of
an election appears to violate a fed-
eral voting law. Florida's primary
election is Aug. 14.
The letter gives Florida until June 6
to tell federal authorities if the state
plans to halt the purge.
Even before the Justice Depart-
ment's letter, the state's purge had
come under fire from elections super-
visors of both parties, as well as Dem-
ocratic members of Congress and
voting rights groups.
Earlier this year state officials gave
supervisors a smaller list of under
2,700 voters and asked them to begin
the removal process.
Supervisors, however, began finding
errors on the list. One GOP supervisor
went on Twitter to post a picture of
one listed voter's U.S. passport. Two
Democratic members of Congress this
week held a news conference with a
World War II veteran whose citizen-
ship had been questioned.


Around the world, Bloomberg's



crusade seen as no biggie


Associated Press

LONDON New York
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
has proposed a ban on the
sale of large sodas and other 1 .
sugary drinks in restau-
rants, delis and movie the- GI SIZE
aters in the hopes of S
combating obesity Under
his plan, sugary drinks B a
would be limited to 16 fluid
ounces almost half a liter.
Around the world, portion
sizes are generally smaller.
Perceptions of American
overconsumption have been
fueled by films such as
"Super Size Me" and the
spread of U.S. fast-food e.
chains. :
So while many global citi-
zens reacted with a mix of U;
incredulity, awe and disgust
when confronted with some -
of the sizes of sugary drinks. r [f
sold stateside, others were _
less surprised. -
"I know what American Associated Press
culture is like big por- Pearl Ganotisi sips from her 24-ounce soda on Friday as she has a meal in a Wendy's in
tions, not necessarily Manila, Philippines. Around the world, portion sizes are generally smaller. Perceptions of
health-conscious," Gordon American overconsumption have been fueled by films such as "Super Size Me" and the
Howard, who works in fi- spread of U.S. fast-food chains.
nance, said at a London
wine tasting. "They super- PARIS MANILA diner near her office to get
size everything." Cafe owner Mourad Rah- At Jolibee, a ubiquitous a grilled chicken sandwich.
Like Howard, many peo- mani, 30, said he can't imag- Filipino fast-food chain "But people don't like to be
ple around the world say the ine such a debate in France. that's more popular than
notion of a 44-ounce cola "The biggest size drink we McDonald's, call center JERUSALEM
doesn't hold much water for have here is 0.5 liter," Rah- manager Joy Jimenez
them but neither did a mani said, raising an empty agreed with Bloomberg's In Israel, Yair Foldes said
ban. pint glass he'd been wash- move. that the New York measure
LONDON ing. While he would never "Kids these days when might help address obesity
e k think of ordering such a 44 they see that soft drinks are "Here I don't thinkwe
The idea of drinking that ounce drink himself, Rah- available, they will just have that problem but there
much soda or liquid of mani said he's against the drink and drink," she said. it might help raise aware-
any kind is "excessive" to ban. "It's a question of free- "It is part of government's ness," he said while waiting
32-year-old Simon Robin- dom. What's next? Ban ham- responsibility to ensure the for a train.
son, but he said wouldn't burgers?" health of its citizens." SAO PAOLO
care about Bloomberg's ban
because he would never KAMPALA, Uganda JOHANNESBURG "It's so weird for us, the
drink that much in the first 'A person should have the Shazia Suffla suggested idea that a person would
place even during a right to decide what they that governments should in- drink more than a liter of
three-hour film. want to eat and how much," stead provide more infor- soda that's huge! Of
"I would probably have to said social worker Freder- mation about how to avoid course there should be a law
go to the bathroom and end ick Agaba. "This should not diseases like diabetes and to stop that," said Arthur
up missing half the movie," be the job of a mayor In any high blood pressure, and Trigo, a 19-year-old student
Robinson said. "It's the peo- case, this law would not encourage restaurants to standing outside a juice
ple that either want that make a big difference, as offer more healthy choices. stand in a shopping center.
drink or think it's their right elsewhere someone could "I'm actually adapting to "Americans are such exag-
that are going to kick up a still take whatever amount trying to eat healthily," she gerated consumers, they re-
fuss." of Coke he wants." said while hearing to a ally need to consume less."

To Place Your

Citizens looks to shrink its rolls ('In Memory" ad)


Associated Press

TAMPA Florida's
largest property insurer is
seeking ways to reduce the
number of homeowners it
covers.
Citizens Property Insur-
ance, the state-created in-
surer, held a summit Friday
to discuss how to shift some
of its 1.45 million policy-
holders to private insurers.
The ultimate decision could
impact insurance bills.
Some of the ideas discussed
at the summit included rais-


ing homeowner insurance
rates, creating a state-run
pool to handle claims from
hurricanes, and giving
homeowners more informa-
tion about private compa-
nies interested in assuming
policies now held by Citizens.
But several speakers
warned about taking steps
that could hurt the state's
economy since the real estate
market is dependent on
what happens to insurance.
Citizens officials are already
considering raising rates for
new customers, though some

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Dolores
Hurley, 77
HOMOSASSA
Dolores Cecil Jones Hur-
ley, 77, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Monday, May 28 at HPH
Care Center in Brooksville.
She was born Oct. 23, 1934,
in Monroe, Mich., daughter
of the late Vern B. Jones
and Emma Ruth Yentz
Jones. Dolores was a mem-
ber of St Paul Methodist
Church in Monroe and she
moved to Homosassa in
1990 from Holland, Mich.
She is survived by her
daughters, Melissa (Don)
Kaylor and Ruth (Jon) Van
Nortwick, both of Holland,
Mich.; grandchildren Jared
and Liam Kaylor, Jessi
Lynn and Jon Russell Van
Nortwick; and sisters Vir-
ginia Trisler of Jack-
sonville and Alice (Gene)
Wells of Crystal River, Fla.
She was preceded in death
by her husband Leonard R.
Hurley; sister Barbara Lar-
son; and brother Leo Jones.
Private family memorial
will be held at a later date.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




John
McGowan Jr., 82
HOMOSASSA
John R. McGowan Jr, 82,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Friday, May 11, while
under the loving care of
hospice. John was a mem-
ber of the Knights of
Columbus for 53 years.
John served in the United
States Marine Corps as a
sergeant and served during
the Korean War.
He is survived by sisters
Betty Brennan and Marge
Miller, both of New Jersey,
and Ruth (Bob) Urig of Ho-
mosassa, Fla. A funeral
mass will be held at 10 a.m.,
Tuesday, June 5 at St
Thomas the Apostle Catholic
Church in Homosassa with
Fr. Ronald Marecki offici-
ating. Inurnment will be in
Florida National Ceme-
tery In lieu of flowers, do-
nations may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County
Condolences may be given
at www.wilderfuneral.com.

Susan
Murray, 61
DUNNELLON
Susan Olson Murray, 61,
of Dunnellon, passed May
30. A memorial service will
be at 10 a.m., Wednesday,
June 6, at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church,
Dunnellon.


Mamie
Zizak, 85
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mamie Zizak, 85 of Citrus
Springs, Fla., died on
Wednesday, May 30. A Me-
morial Service of Remem-
brance will take place on
Sunday, June 3, at 3 p.m. at
the Zizak residence in Cit-
rus Springs.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

OBITUARIES
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permits both free
and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place
of death; date, time
and place of visitation
and funeral services.
If websites, photos,
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contributions or other
information are in-
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sender.
A flag will be included
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served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
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rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-563-5660 for
details.


..J


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DG619 Comm. Lot, Trustee Ordered Sale, Crystal River
DG620 Commercial Office Bldg, Hwy 441, Ocala


Will Sell Regardless of Price: DG618 & DG619
Will Sell Over Min. Bid of $199,000: DG620


Please see website for full details.
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III, Lic. Real
Estate Broker, FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP


/ -d TRWANZ M 877-374-44 37


Obituaries


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SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 A5


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A6 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HwToS EA'HEMRTINREI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active onthe Ameri-
BkofAm 2291308 7.02 -.33 CheniereEn 89734 12.60 -1.44 PwShsQQQ640186 60.41 -1.65 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF2154076128.16 -3.31 PhrmAth 48333 1.56 +.34 Microsoft 543045 28.45 -.74 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 952331 13.49 -.52 GoldStrg 45797 1.16 +.10 Cisco 469859 15.96 -.37 tion). Names consisting of initials appear atthe beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 764825 36.69 -1.01 Vringo 42974 4.10 +.31 Facebookn 398960 27.72 -1.88 Last: Price stock was trading atwhen exchange closed fortheday
BariPVix 728927 22.58 +1.76 NovaGldg 40033 5.84 +.18 Intel 395563 25.14 -.70 Chg: Loss orgain fortheday No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d New 52-week
low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amenrican Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
DirDGIdBII 12.62 +2.04 +19.3 Accelr8 3.48 +.81 +30.3 BeaconFed 19.23 +5.93 +44.6 ing qualification. n Stockwasa new issue in te last year.The 52-week high and lowfig-
PrUVxST rs 23.47 +3.45 +17.2 IntTowerg 3.64 +.40 +12.3 SunshHrtn 6.99 +1.98 +39.4 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf-Preferred stock issue. pr-Preferences.pp-
DrDNGBear29.69 +3.68 +14.1 ExeterR gs 2.04 +.22 +12.1 PrimaBio n 5.76 +1.13 +24.4 Holder owes installments of purchase prce. rt-Right to buy securityata specified pce. s-
CSVS2xVxS10.36 +1.25 +13.7 AlexcoRg 5.11 +.51 +11.1 PointrTel 2.75 +.43 +18.5 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
BarcShtC 36.31 +4.35 +13.6 MAG SIv g 8.50 +.80 +10.4 ParkerVsn 2.20 +.31 +16.4 stock is issued. wd- When distributed wt- Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
DirDGIdBr 43.49 -10.33 -19.2 ElephTalk 2.00 -.25 -11.1 QuickLog 2.27 -.71 -23.8
DrxDNGBuII18.17 -3.04 -14.3 CheniereEn 12.60 -1.44 -10.3 Ambientrs 7.78 -1.96 -20.1
ETr2xSSD 20.02 -3.24 -13.9 Suprmlnd 3.51 -.39 -10.0 Synacorn 11.95 -2.75 -18.7
CSVLgBrnt 30.65 -4.68 -13.2 GrahamCp 17.56 -1.70 -8.8 OmniVisn 13.40 -2.79 -17.2 52-Week Net % YT[
SwiftTrans 9.29 -1.32 -12.4 AdmRsc 32.66 -2.79 -7.9 Splunkn 27.24 -5.32 -16.3 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


443 Advanced
2,625 Declined
63 Unchanged
3,131 Total issues
26 New Highs
162 New Lows
4,576,570,401 Volume


DIARY


169 Advanced
289 Declined
34 Unchanged
492 Total issues
6 New Highs
36 New Lows
101,336,710 Volume


404
2,159
77
2,640
11
150
1,937,248,800


13,338.66 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
474.18 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,496.42 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P 500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
860.37 601.71 Russell 2000


12,118.57
4,911.87
464.31
7,292.23
2,175.92
2,747.48
1,278.04
13,383.24
737.42


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-274.88 -2.22 -.81 -.27
-162.83 -3.21 -2.15 -5.91
-3.73 -.80 -.08 +8.68
-171.73 -2.30 -2.47-11.31
-24.60 -1.12 -4.50 -8.58
-79.86 -2.82 +5.46 +.54
-32.29 -2.46 +1.63 -1.70
-357.13 -2.60 +1.47 -2.97
-24.40 -3.20 -.47 -8.75


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkNYMel 19.65 -.71
Barday 10.71 -.34
BariPVix 22.58 +1.76
BarrickG 41.91 +2.85
ABBLtd 15.63 -.18 Baxter 50.17 -.45
AES Corp 11.84 -.25 Beam Inc 59.35 -1.21
AFLAC 38.65 -1.43 BeazerHm 2.46 -.15
AGCO 39.25 -.96 BectDck 72.20 -.93
AGL Res 36.94 -.54 BerkHaAll9845.00 +995.00
AK Steel 5.95 -.08 BerkH B 79.02 -.34
ASAGold 23.12 +.69 BestBuy 18.30 -.42
AT&T Inc 33.90 -.27 BBarrett 18.09 -1.22
AbtLab 60.52 -1.27 BioMedR 17.65 -.40
AberFitc 32.14 -1.40 BIkHillsCp 31.81 -.37
Accenture 55.28 -1.82 BIkDebtStr 4.11
AdamsEx 10.12 -.24 BlkEnhC&l 12.40 -.23
AMD 5.73 -.35 BIkGlbOp 12.47 -.33
AdvSemi 4.45 -.18 Blackstone 11.88 -.16
Aeroposfi 17.98 -.52 BlockHR 15.06 -.21
Aetna 40.49 -.40 Boeing 67.24 -2.37
Agilent 38.22 -2.44 BorgWarn 66.59 -5.16
Agnio g 40.66 +3.32 BostBeer 104.58 -.27
AlcatelLuc 1.49 -.08 BostProp 101.31 -1.62
Alcoa 8.30 -.25 BostonSci 5.61 -.13
AllegTch 30.33 -1.79 BoydGm 6.99 -.63
Allete 39.11 +.06 Brandyw 10.99 -.24
AlliBGIbHi 14.68 -.20 BrMySq 33.33 -.01
AlliBInco 8.27 +.04 Brookdale 15.49 -1.00
AlliBern 12.43 -.47 Brunswick 20.41 -1.49
Allstate 33.07 -.87 Buckeye 46.75 -.77
AlphaNRs 10.43 -.05 CBLAsc 17.10 -.36
AIpAlerMLP 15.46 -.27 CBREGrp 15.59 -.86
Altria 31.69 -.50 CBSB 30.33 -1.59
AmBev 36.09 -2.26 CHEngy 65.49 -.14
Ameren 32.04 -.27 CIT Grp 32.57 -1.62
AMovilLs 22.72 -.84 MS Eng 23.07 -.23
AEagleOut 18.56 -.75 CSS Inds 18.43 -.61
AEP 38.39 -.12 CSXs 20.32 -.57
AmExp 53.43 -2.40 CVSCare 43.60 -1.34
AmlnfiGrp 27.21 -1.97 CblvsNYs 10.97 -.47
AmSIP3 6.86 -.06 CabotOGs 31.15 -1.39
AmTower 63.15 -1.73 CallGolf 5.35 -.17
Amerigas 37.59 -.96 Calpine 16.71 -.09
Ameriprise 45.81 -2.11 Cameron 44.54 -1.15
AmeriBrgn 36.28 -.71 CampSp 31.33 -.37
Anadarko 58.13 -2.87 CdnNRsgs 27.42 -1.16
AnglogldA 36.86 +.80 CapOne 48.40 -2.97
ABInBev 65.57 -2.13 CapifiSrce 6.04 -.29
Ann Inc 25.75 -1.14 CapM pfB 14.85 +.01
Annaly 16.33 -.29 CardnlHIth 40.53 -.85
Aonplc 45.11 -1.39 CareFusion 24.01 -.23
Apache 79.37 -2.01 CarMax 27.33 -.88
Aptlnv 26.23 -.84 Carnival 31.08 -1.01
AquaAm 23.16 +.06 Caterpillar 85.52 -2.10
ArcelorMit 13.49 -.40 Celanese 37.73 -2.08
ArchCoal 6.23 -.11 Cemex 5.08 -.46
ArchDan 30.92 -.96 Cemigpfs 16.99 -.24
ArmosDor 12.67 -.85 CenovusE 29.81 -1.62
ArmourRsd 6.94 -.04 CenterPnt 19.97 -.26
Ashland 61.04 -2.89 CntyLink 37.05 -1.44
AsdEstat 15.42 -.39 Checkpnt 7.67 -.14
AssuredG 11.75 -.19 ChesEng 15.58 -1.32
ATMOS 33.04 -.10 ChesUfi 42.18 -.08
AuRicog 7.75 +33 Chevron 96.41 -1.90
Avon 15.67 -.88 Chifos 14.18 -.43
BB&T Cp 28.35 -1.87 Chimera 2.75 -.05
BHP BilLt 61.05 -.48 Chubb 69.99 -2.08
BP PLC 36.76 +.30 Cigna 42.58 -1.33
BPZ Res 2.84 -.25 CindBell 3.36 -.18
BRFBrasil 14.92 -.65 Cifgroup 25.39 -1.12
BRT 7.00 -.08 CleanH s 59.07 -3.00
BakrHu 40.74 -.99 CiffsNRs 46.08 -1.70
BallCorp 39.33 -.64 Clorox 69.36 +.56
BcBilVArg 5.71 -.01 Coach 63.13 -4.32
BeoBradpf 14.46 -.18 CobaltlEn 21.08 -1.57
BeoSantSA 5.33 +.01 CCFemsa 116.99 +1.95
BeoSBrasil 7.84 -.11 CocaCola 73.09 -1.64
BkofAm 7.02 -.33 CocaCE 26.35 -1.01
BkMontg 52.02 -1.36 Coeur 18.35 +1.45


CohStlnfra 15.88 -.29
Colfax 27.07 -1.26
ColgPal 96.48 -1.82
CollctvBrd 21.07 -.20
Comerica 28.68 -1.74
CmwREIT 17.52 -.13
ComstkRs 13.65 -1.30
Con-Way 33.20 -2.15
ConAgra 24.59 -.56
ConocPhils 51.19 -.97
ConsolEngy 28.15 +.07
ConEd 60.29 -.07
ConstellA 18.76 -.53
ContlRes 66.49 -6.37
Cnvrgys 13.76 -.19
Cooper Ind 68.50 -2.00
Coring 12.61 -.38
CorrecOnCp 25.22 -.85
CottCp 7.44 -.12
CovenryH 30.05 -.35
Covidien 50.67 -1.11
Crane 36.91 -.98
CSVS2xVxS 10.36 +1.25
CSVellVSts 8.15 -.74
CredSuiss 18.98 -.15
CrwnCsfie 53.08 -1.52
CubeSmart 11.00 -.31
Cummins 93.56 -3.39
CurEuro 123.55 +.52

DCT Indl 5.57 -.25
DDRCorp 13.53 -.36
DNPSelct 10.89 +.10
DRHorbton 15.21 -1.39
DSW Inc 57.26 -2.42
DTE 56.36 -.47
DanaHldg 12.61 -.71
Danaher 49.82 -2.15
Darden 49.87 -1.86
DeanFds 15.36 -.28
Deere 71.52 -2.35
DelphiAu n 28.24 -.79
DeltaAir 11.51 -.59
DenburyR 14.44 -.68
DeutschBk 33.41 -1.65
DBGoldDS 4.81 -.41
DevonE 57.99 -1.53
DiaOffs 57.74 -.44
DicksSptg 44.58 -1.92
Dx30TBrrs 49.26 -3.76
DxFnBullrs 70.55 -8.13
DirSCBear 23.82 +1.91
DirFnBear 29.82 +2.81
DirLCBear 26.11 +1.89
DirDGIdBII 12.62 +2.04
DrxEnBear 14.39 +.94
DirEMBear 19.27 +1.37
DirxSCBull 43.07 -4.19
DirxEnBull 32.68 -2.36
Discover 30.72 -2.39
Disney 44.40 -1.31
DoleFood 8.55 -.33
DollarGen 48.62 -.29
DomRescs 51.63 -.43
Dover 54.68 -1.88
DowChm 30.36 -.70
DrPepSnap 40.63 -.63
DuPont 47.21 -1.05
DukeEngy 22.35 +.37
DukeRlty 13.41 -.43
Dynegy .54 +.06
EMCCp 23.18 -.67
EOG Res 91.67 -7.63
EastChm s 43.61 -2.95
Eaton 40.24 -2.42
EVEnEq 10.19 -.22
Ecolab 61.92 -1.29
Elan 13.39 -.57


BdorGldg 11.43
EmersonEl 45.63
EmpDist 19.94
EnbrdgEPt 28.47
EnCanag 19.17
Endvrlnfi 9.54
EndvSilvg 9.39
Enerplsg 13.36
EnPro 37.15
ENSCO 44.19
Entergy 64.35
EntPrPt 47.53


EqtyRsd 59.60
EsteeLdrs 52.43
ExeoRes 6.90
Exelon 36.70
Express 17.73
ExxonMbl 77.92
FMC Tech 38.71
FTI Cnslt 29.91
FairchldS 12.43
FedExCp 85.25
FedSignl 4.75
Ferrellgs 16.75
Ferro 4.14
RdlNRn 18.60
RdNatlnfo 31.37
Rfiflh&Pac 11.38
FstHorizon 8.05
FTActDiv 7.41
FtTrEnEq 11.22
RFirstEngy 46.51
Rotek 10.35
RowrsFd s 22.86
Ruor 46.49
FootLockr 30.37
FbrdM 10.12
FbrdMwt 1.70
ForestLab 34.29
ForestOil s 7.80
Fortress 3.06
FBHmScn 21.13
FranceTel 12.60
FrankRes 102.05
FMCG 32.07


Fusion-ion 19.57 -1.31

GATX 37.09 -1.20
GNC 36.59 -1.94
GabelliET 5.19 -.13
GabHIthW 7.90 -.15
GabUIl 7.94 -.04
GafisaSA 2.32 -.17
GameStop 19.20 +.02
Gannett 12.33 -.73
Gap 25.26 -1.24
GaylrdEnt 37.72 -.23


GenDynam 62.72
GenElec 18.54
GenGrPrp 16.15
GenMills 37.90
GenMobtrs 22.01
GenOn En 1.70
Genworth 5.13
Gerdau 7.71
GlaxoSKIn 43.45
GlimchRt 9.04
GolLinhas 4.00
GoldFLtd 13.85
Goldcrpg 39.40
GoldmanS 92.64
Goodrichd 125.52
Goodyear 9.87
Grafrech 10.01
GtPlainEn 19.93
Griffon 7.54
GuangRy 16.00
HCA Hldg 24.74
HCP Inc 39.61
HSBC 38.69
HSBC Cap 26.03
Hallibrtn 29.97
HanJS 15.80
HanPrmDv 13.22
Hanesbrds 27.06
Hanoverlns 38.01
HarleyD 46.27
HarmonyG 10.33
HartfdFn 16.18


HawaiiEl 27.46 -.15 iShB20T 130.36 +3.02
HItCrREIT 54.24 -1.23 iShB7-10T 109.31 +.93
HItMgmt 6.10 -.31 iShBl1-3T 84.46 +.01
HIthcrRlty 22.00 +.12 iS Eafe 46.55 -1.21
Heckmann 3.19 -.19 iShiBxHYB 86.47 -.76
HeclaM 4.39 +.14 iSR1KG 60.13 -1.63
Heinz 52.51 -.57 iSRuslK 70.95 -1.84
HelixEn 15.90 -1.23 iShR2K 73.82 -2.29
HeimPayne 44.32 -.98 iShREst 59.67 -1.55
Hertz 12.43 -1.18 iShDJHm 14.32 -.95
Hess 42.65 -1.05 iShSPSm 68.57 -1.99
HewlettP 21.25 -1.43 iStar 5.58 -.09


HighwdPrp 31.56 -.70
HollyFrts 29.68 +.20
HomeDp 47.96 -1.38
HonwIllnfi 53.94 -1.72
HospPT 22.55 -.96
HostHofis 14.43 -.83
HovnanE 1.73 -.14
Humana 75.90 -.49
Huntsmn 11.84 -.96
IAMGId g 11.65 +.98
ING 5.56 -.24
ION Geoph 5.78 -.28
iShGold 15.81 +.60
iSAsfia 20.37 -.39
iShBraz 50.74 -1.30
iSFrnce 18.05 -.51
iShGer 18.82 -.67
iSh HK 15.61 -.31
iShJapn 8.65 -.24
iSh Kor 51.42 -1.20
iSMalas 13.61 -.27
iShMex 53.65 -.83
iShSing 11.33 -.32
iSTaiwn 11.60 -.47
iSh UK 15.28 -.27
iShSilver 27.62 +.66
iShDJDv 53.83 -1.07
iShBTips 121.01 +.50
iShChina25 32.69 -.80
iSSP500 128.76 -3.09
iShEMkts 36.69 -1.01
iShiBxB 117.29 +.72
iShEMBd 108.50 -1.74


Idacorp 39.00 -.29
ITW 54.85 -1.30
Imafon 5.62 -.06
IngerRd 39.90 -1.41
IntegrysE 53.66 -.44
IntcnfiEx 118.47 -3.98
IBM 189.08 -3.82
InfiGame 13.41 -.89
IntPap 28.13 -1.07
Interpublic 10.07 -.32
InvenSen n 9.41 -.53
Invesco 20.85 -.90
InvMtgCap 17.57 -.57
IronMtn 27.53 -.82
ItauUnibH 13.94 -.52
Wf19hM 927 12

JPMorgCh 31.93 -1.22
Jabil 18.19 -.94
Jaguar g 1.28 +.08
JanusCap 6.90 -.40
Jefferies 12.92 -.44
JohnJn 61.78 -.65
JohnsnCt 29.03 -1.11
JoyGIbl 55.69 -.17
JnprNtwk 16.82 -.38
KB Home 6.94 -.31
KBRInc 24.11 -1.36
KTCorp 11.81 +.16
KCSouthn 63.26 -2.72
Kaydons 21.79 -.52
KAEngTR 25.01 -.88


Kellogg 48.22 -.56 MKors n 37.76 -1.62 PepBoy 8.96 -.32 RedHat 49.90 -1.48
KeyEngy 9.56 -.35 MidAApt 66.41 -.98 PepcoHold 19.24 +.18 RegalEnt 13.09 -.45
Keycorp 7.14 -.36 MobileTele 16.38 -.26 PepsiCo 67.51 -.34 RegionsFn 5.88 -.41
KimbClk 78.28 -1.07 Molycorp 19.86 +.18 PerkElm 25.80 -.80 Renren 4.48 -.27
Kimco 17.45 -.50 MoneyGrs 13.81 -.12 Prmian 17.06 -.58 RepubSvc 26.05 -.31
KindME 76.72 -1.61 Monsanto 76.17 -1.03 PetrbrsA 18.45 -.45 Revlon 14.76 -.13
KindMorg 32.35 -1.84 MonstrWw 8.02 -.58 Petrobras 19.16 -.40 ReynAmer 41.06 -.78
KindrMwt 2.19 -.09 Moodys 35.37 -1.22 Pfizer 21.64 -.23 Riolnto 42.70 -.52
Kinross g 8.53 +.56 MorgStan 12.73 -.63 PhilipMor 82.79 -1.72 RiteAid 1.22 -.08
KodiakOg 7.36 -.75 MSEmMkt 12.97 -.28 Phillips66n 29.92 -.11 RobtHalf 26.60 -1.82
Kohls 44.70 -1.12 Mosaic 45.97 -1.71 PiedNG 29.91 -.41 RockwAut 68.80 -3.71
Kraft 37.57 -.70 MotrlaSolu 46.96 -1.12 Pier 1 15.24 -1.06 RockColl 49.27 -1.10
KrispKrm 6.00 -.29 MurphO 45.20 -1.42 PimoStrat 11.26 -.04 Rowan 29.49 -.51
Kroger 21.64 -.37 NCRCorp 20.63 -.79 PinWst 49.43 +.05 RylCarb 22.53 -1.02
LSI Corp 6.33 -.32 NRG Egy 14.84 -.48 PioNtrl 88.30 -8.40 RoyDShllIA 61.16 -1.02
LTCPrp 31.71 -.56 NVEnergy 16.97 -.16 PitnyBw 13.50 -.14 Royce 12.27 -.37
LaZBoy 13.04 -1.07 NYSEEur 23.72 -.59 PlainsEx 32.66 -3.13 RoycepfB 25.89 +.10
Laclede 37.55 -.56 Nabors 13.01 -.54 PlumCrk 36.00 -.50 R and 20.45 -1.91
LVSands 42.97 -3.21 NatFuGas 43.14 -.09 Polariss 71.97 -4.00
LeggMason 24.27 -1.18 NatGrid 50.09 -.20 PostPrp 47.66 -.75
LeggPlat 20.30 -.49 NOilVarco 65.00 -1.75 Potash 37.53 -2.00 SAIC 10.88 -.23
LennarA 25.02 -2.27 Navistar 27.01 -.93 PwshDB 24.72 -.52 SAPAG 55.24 -2.08
LeucNati 19.99 -.33 NewAmHi 10.48 -.03 PSUSDBull 22.92 -.07 SCANA 46.76 .19
Leved3rs 19.75 -1.48 NJRscs 41.63 -.35 Praxair 103.51 -2.73 SKTIcm 11.58 +.44
LbtyASG 3.87 -.12 NYCmtyB 11.80 -.55 PrinFnd 23.30 -1.26 SpdrDJIA 121.01 -2.69
LillyEli 40.16 -.79 Newcasbe 6.26 -.38 ProLogis 30.56 -1.42 SpdrGold 157.50 +5.88
Limited 42.89 -1.47 NewellRub 17.66 -.74 ProShtDow 38.32 +.83 SPMid 163.34 -5.23
LincNat 19.40 -1.27 NewfidExp 28.33 -1.63 ProShtS&P 39.05 +.94 S&P500ETF128.16 -3.31
Lindsay 54.77 -.88 NewmtM 50.30 +3.14 PrUShS&P 17.96 +.86 SpdrHome 19.54 -1.17
Linkedln 91.51 -4.59 NewpkRes 5.53 -.26 PrUItQQQs 47.19 -2.68 SpdrS&PBk 20.63 -1.07
LionsGtg 12.66 -.66 Nexeng 15.34 -.29 PrUShQQQ 37.12 +1.86 SpdrLehHY 37.59 -.28
LloydBkg 1.57 +.02 NextEraEn 64.59 -.75 ProUltSP 48.07 -2.82 SpdrS&P RB 25.38 -1.25
LockhdM 81.22 -1.58 NiSource 24.72 -.37 ProUShL20 14.74 -.71 SpdrRefi 56.53 -1.88
LaPac 8.92 -.50 NielsenH 27.35 -.39 ProShtR2K 28.96 +.83 SpdrOGEx 45.47 -2.46
Lowes 26.36 -.36 NikeB 10460 -3.58 ProSht20Tr 28.23 -.67 SpdrMetM 39.57 +.17
onBasA 37.26 -2.20 NipponTT 21.40 PrUItSP500 63.22 -5.19 STMicro 4.86 -.26
NobleCorp 30.59 -.68 PrUVxSTrs 23.47 +3.45 Safeway 18.49 -.53
68. Noen 0. 51 PrUltCrude 27.20 -2.11 StJoe 15.18 -.79
M&TBk 78.57 -2.75 NobleEn 80.95 -3.51 PrUShCrde 53.27 +3.62 Stude 37.63 -.79
MBIA 8.76 -.21 NokiaCp 2.64 -.03 ProUItSGId 17.39 -1.41 Saks 9.73 -.13
MDURes 22.00 -.47 Norandal 7.14 -.55 ProUltSIvs 41.43 +1.93 Salesforce 130.99 -7.63
MEMC 1.72 +.05 Nordsfrm 46.80 -.57 ProUShEuro 21.76 -.22 SJuanB 13.25 -.53
MFAFnc 7.58 -.04 NorflkSo 6429 -1.23 ProctGam 61.55 -.74 SandRdge 5.96 -.39
MGIC 2.30 -.24 NortropG 57.42 -1.33 ProgrssEn 55.50 +.68 Sanofi 33.44 -.59
MGICM Rsts 10.37 -.46 Nuorth 3pG 57.42 -1.33 ProgsvCp 21.27 -.46 SaraLee 20.44 -.46
MGM Rsts 10.3 -.4 Nus 350.73 1.48 PUShDowrs 59.66 +2.59 Sdchlmbrg 62.07 -1.18
MSCI Inc 33.38 -.43 NusrEn 5073 -48 ProUSR2K 36.39 +2.08 Sdichwab 12.10 -.36
Macquarie 32.56 -.67 NuvMuOpp 14.87 +.03 PUSSP500rs58.60 +4.10 SeadrillLtd 32.20 -1.24
Macys 36.85 -1.20 NvPfdlno2 8.8360 .03 Prudent 44.74 -1.71 SealAir 15.26 -.39
MageMPtr 67.85 -.96 NOGEQP2 8.60 -.03 PSEG 31.20 +.01 SensataT 30.05 -.66
Magnalgs 37.94 -2.36 OGEEasisPngy 53.20 -1.90 PubStrg 132.00 -1.47 Sensient 35.68 -.84
MagHRes 3.66 -.37 OasisPet 23.79 -1.90 PulteGrp 8.26 -1.10 Sherwin 124.61 -5.03
Manitwoc 9.98 -.42 OcciPet 78.57 -.70 PPrlT 5.44 -.01 SiderurNac 6.22 -.26
Manulifeg 10.11 -.61 OfficeDpt 2.05 -.10 QEPRes 25.32 -1.00 SilvWhtng 26.64 +1.16
MarathnOs 23.89 -1.02 OldRepub 9.63 -.06 QuanexBld 15.95 -.56 SilvrcpMg 6.20 +.14
MarathPn 35.24 -.83 Olin 19.00 -.17 QuantaSvc 21.60 -.98 SimonProp 143.51 -4.01
MktVGold 46.58 +2.80 OmegaHIt 20.82 -.29 Questar 19.77 -.30 Skechers 16.25 -.74
MVOilSvs 34.48 -.78 Omniom 46.37 -1.31 QksilvRes 4.02 -.45 SmithAO 44.62 -1.54
MVSemin 29.91 -1.16 ONEOK 79.80 -3.19 RPM 25.07 -1.29 Smucker 74.82 -1.74
MktVRus 23.24 -.69 OneokPts 53.29 -1.31 Rackspace 48.08 -1.39 SonyCp 12.65 -.59
MktVJrGId 20.66 +1.34 OpkoHIth 4.49 -.11 RadianGrp 2.22 -.26 SoJerInd 48.75 +.34
MarlntA 36.49 -2.22 OshkoshCp 19.39 -1.08 RdioShk 4.59 -.05 SouthnCo 45.95 +.04
MarshM 31.54 -.44 OwensCorn 2830 -2.56 Racorp 61.94 -1.61 SthnCopper 28.51 +.06
MStewrt 3.00 +.01 RangeRs 54.57 -2.87 SwstAirl 8.95 -.08
Masco 12.04 -.63 RJamesFn 32.80 -1.8 SwstnErgy 27.43 -.60
McDrmlnt 9.59 -.56 PG&ECp 43.61 -.09 Rayoniers 42.18 -.79 SpectraEn 27.88 -.83
McDnlds 86.71 -2.63 PHH Corp 15.99 .58 4.8 Spca 2. .
McrwH 42.76 -.62 PNC 58.07 -3.35 Raytheon 49.48 -.84 SprintNex 2.51 -.06
McKesson 86.70 -.58 PNM Res 18.22 -.43 Rtyn 37.80 .53 SproGold 13.91 +59
McMoRn 8.82 -.91 PPG 98.96 -4.48
McEwenM 2.43 +.07 PPL Corp 27.47 +10
MeadiJohn 78.15 -2.59 PalICorp 54.39 -1.27 S S S
MeadWvco 26.34 -1.16 Pandoran 9.96 -.78
Mechel 5.27 -.04 ParkerHan 77.87 -3.87 The remainder of the
Medtrnic 36.11 -.73 PatriotCoal 2.44 +.07
Merck 37.18 -.40 PeabdyE 22.94 -.42 NYSE listings can be
MetLife 27.83 -1.38 Pengrthg 6.86 -.23
MetroPCS 6.19 -.21 PennVaRs 22.80 -.41 found on the next page
MetroHIth 8.32 -.38 PennWstg 12.70 -.60 p
Penney 25.83 -.40


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.35 +.01
AbdnEMTel 17.36 -.53
AdmRsc 32.66 -2.79
Adventrx .52 -.01
AlexeoRg 5.11 +.51
AlldNevG 27.63 +1.69
AlmadnMg 2.04 +.13
AmAppared .86
AntaresP 2.76 +.04
Aurizong 4.99 +.18
AvalnRare 1.42 -.08
Bacterin 1.32 -.14


Banrog 4.27 +.10 ComstkMn 2.18 +.16
BarcUBS36 37.60 -.42 CornstProg 5.53
BarcGSOil 20.43 -.84 CrSuiHiY 3.07 +.01
BioTlme 4.22 +.20
BrigusGg .90 +.08 DeourEg .23 -.01
BritATob 93.07 -1.01 Dlour g 23 01
BrMA En 93. -1.0 DenisnM g 1.44 -.06
CAMAC En .68 -.05 EVLtdDur 16.04 -.01
Carderog .75 +.04 EVMuniBd 13.24 -.11
CardiumTh .24 -.01 EVMuni2 14.03 -.12
CelSd .40 +.01 ElephTalk 2.00 -.25
CFCdag 19.91 +1.04 EllieMae 15.65 -.60
CheniereEn 12.60 -1.44 EllswthFd 6.72 -.13
CheniereE 22.90 -.48 EntGaming .86 -.01
ClaudeRg .66 +.02 ExeterRgs 2.04 +.22
ClghGlbOp 10.35 -.24 ExtorreGg 2.95 +.15


GamGldNR 13.75 +.06
GascoEngy .18 -.01
Gastargrs 1.72 -.08
GenMoly 2.56 +.08
GeoMnefcs .43 +.02
GoldResrc 25.77 -.73
GoldenMin 3.71 +.23
GoldStrg 1.16 +.10
GIdFId 1.42 -.08
GranTrrag 4.75 -.30
GrtBasGg .62 +.09
GtPanSilvg 1.89 +.11
Hemisphrx .27


HstnAEn 1.54 -.01
iBb .95 +.01
ImmunoCII 3.88 +.17
ImpOilgs 38.88 -1.27
IndiaGC .21 -.01
InovioPhm .42
IntellgSys 1.64
IntTower g 3.64 +.40


KeeganRg 3.60 +.32
LadThalFn 1.41 -.05
LkShrGldg .89 +.07
LongweiPI 1.04 -.12
LucasEngy 1.48 +.05


Senesco
SilverBull
ParaG&S 2.24 +.07 Talbots wt
Metalieo 2.42 -.11 PhrmAth 1.56 +.34 TanzRyg
MdwGoldg 1.21 +.02 PonDrill 7.04 -.40 Taseko
NavideaBio 2.66 -.04 Protalix 6.28 -.18 Tas
NeoStem .42 -.01 PyramidOil 4.65 -.01 Timminsg
Nevsung 3.70 +.15 Quepasa 2.72 -.21 TrnsafiPet
NwGoldg 9.48 +.72 QuestRMg 1.58 -.13 TriValley
NAPallg 2.27 RareEleg 4.07 ... TriangPet
NDynMng 2.60 -.03 Rentedh 1.73 -.15 Tueowsg
NthnO&G 16.63 -1.30 Richmntg 6.28 +.41 UQMTech
NovaCppn 2.35 -.10 Ur-Energy
NovaGld g 5.84 +.18 Uranerz
NvTxAdFlt 2.58 -.01 SamsO&G 1.89 +.01 UraniumEn


VangTotW 42.45 -.99
VantageDrl 1.44 -.06
VirnetX 32.01 -1.33
VistaGold 3.09 +.20
VoyagerOG 1.74 -.13
Vringo 4.10 +.31
Vringowt 1.10 +10
Walterlnv 19.75 +.82
WFAdvlnco 9.43 -.11
WTDrfChn 25.11
XPOLogrs 17.10 -.76
YMBiog 1.96 -.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACIWwde 36.94 -1.25
AMCNetn 37.08 -1.51
ASML HId 43.80 -2.01
ATP O&G 5.25 -.03
AVI Bio .62 -.03
Abiomed 18.91 -1.42
Abraxas 2.56 -.20
AcadiaHIn 17.92 +.02
AcadiaPh 1.31 -.07
Accuray 6.17 -.10
Achillion 6.89 -.29
AcmePkt 22.60 -.28
AcfvsBliz 11.65 -.09
Acxiom 13.70 -.37
AdobeSy 29.82 -1.23
Adtran 28.32 -.91
AdvEnld 13.04 -.61
AeroViron 22.20 -.08
AEternagh .47 -.01
Affymax 13.35 -.79
Afymerix 4.57 -.17
AkamaiT 28.20 -1.14
Akorn 13.30 -.35
Alexion 87.60 -2.97
Alexzah .36 -.01
AlignTech 29.57 -1.66
Alkermes 15.12 -.50
AllosThera 1.77 -.01
AllotComm 24.74 -1.28
AllscriptH 10.45 -.37
AlnylamP 10.09 -.15
Alphatec h 1.58 -.07
AlteraCplf 32.28 -1.13
AlterraCap 21.93 -.28
Amarin 10.79 -1.07
Amazon 208.22 -4.69
Amedisys 10.56 -.41
AFTxE 5.05 +.01
ACapAgy 32.30 -.37
AmCapLd 8.84 -.42
ACapMign 23.42 -.37
AmPubEd 28.55 +.12
ARItyCTn 10.55 -.13
AmSupr 3.84 -.10
Amrign 11.84 -.14
Amgen 67.75 -1.77
AmkorTIf 4.64 -.09
Amylin 26.73 +.22
Amyris 2.54 -.17
AnalogDev 35.74 -.63
Anlogic 64.24 -1.70
Analystlnt 3.77 -.08
Ancestry 21.35 -.19
AngiesLn 12.54 -.23
Ansys 59.93 -1.95
AntheraPh 2.05 +.08
A123Sys .95 -.07
ApolloGrp 31.60 -.22
Apollolnv 7.27 -.17
Apple Inc 560.99 -16.74
ApldMafi 10.01 -.33
AMCC 5.48 +.14
Approach 25.66 -2.37
ArQule 5.53 -.41
ArchCap 37.61 -.62
ArenaPhm 6.40 -.29
AresCap 14.99 -.10
AriadP 15.71 -.86
Ariba Inc 44.80 -.13
ArmHId 22.67 -.82
ArrayBio 3.42 +.17
Arris 12.00 -.33
ArubaNet 12.93 -.21
AscenaRts 18.34 -.59
AsialnfoL 10.25 -.35
AspenTech 20.74 -1.36
AssodBanc 11.92 -.74
Astronics 24.65 -.87
athenahlth 71.47 -1.22
Atmel 6.70 -.30
AuthenTec 4.23 +.01
Autodesk 30.84 -1.18
AutoData 50.92 -1.23
AvagoTch 30.98 -2.12


AvanirPhm 2.82 -.15 CommSys 10.43 -.21
AvisBudg 13.38 -1.47 CommVIt 45.77 -1.10
Aware 5.70 +.01 CmplGnom 2.19 -.14
Axcelis 1.09 -.02 Compuwre 8.64 -.36
BEAero 40.70 -2.62 Comverse 6.00 -.11
BGCPtrs 5.78 -.18 ConcurTch 58.38 -3.47
BJsRest 41.72 -2.07 Conmed 26.09 -.70
BMCSft 41.89 -.43 Conns 17.71 +.22
Baidu 113.35 -4.42 ConslCm h 14.56 -.19
BeaconFed 19.23 +5.93 ConstantC 19.03 -1.22
BeacnRfg 23.49 -1.36 CopanoEn 25.93 -.87
BeasleyB 6.05 +.04 Coparts 25.94 -1.17
BebeStrs 6.26 -.12 CorinthC 2.61 -.13
BedBath 70.78 -1.47 Costeo 85.49 -.90
Benihana 16.07 -.04 Creelnc 23.62 -1.45
BerkHBcp 20.75 -1.07 Crocs 16.17 -.74
Biocryst 2.92 -.18 CrosstxLP 15.44 -.15
Biogenldc 126.73 -4.02 Ctrip.eom 17.84 -.56
BioMarin 35.53 -.11 CubistPh 39.67 -.45
BioSanteh .39 -.07 Curis 4.50 -.18
BlueNile 29.75 -2.54 Cymer 52.75 -1.42
BobEvans 39.11 -1.43 CypSemi 12.55 -.64
BodyCentrl 14.47 -.18 CytRxrs 3.88 +.07
BonTon 4.85 -.41 C ori 2.08 -.14
BostPrv 8.71 -.31
BreitBurn 16.46 -.14
Brightpnt 4.59 -.28 DFCGIbl 16.03 -.45
Broadcom 31.74 -.61 DealrTrk 25.75 -1.55
BroadSoft 26.54 -.77 DeckrlsOut 53.03 -2.64
Broadwd h .27 -.03 Delcath 1.44 -.05
BrcdeCm 4.46 -.19 Dell Inc 12.07 -.26
BrukerCp 14.35 -.48 Dndreon 6.76 -.24
BuffabWW 81.03 -4.08 Dennys 4.20 -.11
CA Inc 24.39 -.48 Dentsply 36.26 -.74
CBOE 25.10 -.15 DexCom 10.77 +.01
CEVAInc 17.05 -.33 DiamndFlf 20.15 -.95
CH Robins 56.89 -1.37 DigitalGen 9.66 +.15
CMEGrp 257.01 -.56 DigRiver 14.84 +.24
CTC Media 8.84 -.04 Diodes 18.93 -.64
CVBFnd 10.37 -.52 DirecTVA 43.92 -.53
Cadence 9.79 -.41 DiscCmA 48.64 -1.46
Caesars n 11.57 -.57 DiscCmC 45.20 -1.39
CdnSolar 3.08 +.15 DishNetwk 26.97 -1.07
CapCtyBk 6.71 -.01 DollarTree 99.94 -3.24
CapProd 7.04 -.27 DonlleyRR 10.33 -.43
CapFedFn 11.33 -.32 DrmWksA 17.15 -.64
CpstnTrbh 1.00 -.03 DryShips 2.12 -.09
CareerEd 6.54 ... Dunkinn 31.28 -1.19
CaribouC 11.76 -.14 Dynavax 3.61 -.16
CarlyleG n 21.02 -.10 E-Trade 8.05 -.44
Carrizo 20.41 -1.70 eBay 38.82 -.37
CarrolsR s 5.85 -.25 eResrch 7.87 -.03
CarverBrs 4.51 +.05 EVEngy 50.35 -.93
CatalystH 86.08 -.79 EagleBu rs 2.75 -.26
Cavium 23.46 -.75 EaglRkEn 8.40 -.35
Celgene 65.33 -2.92 ErthLink 7.86 -.21
CellTherrsh .87 -.04 EstWstBcp 21.14 -1.25
CelldexTh 3.99 -.18 EasyLkSInt 7.17 -.02
CentEuro 3.89 -.03 Ebixlnc 16.86 -.54
CentAI 7.10 +.01 EdelmanFn 8.41 -.18
Cepheid 35.13 -2.70 EducMgmt 7.06 -.76
Cerner s 76.37 -1.59 EducDev 4.64 +.23
CerusCp 3.20 -.18 8x8 Inc 3.88 -.16
ChrmSh 7.32 -.02 ElectSd 10.96 -.07
Chartlnds 60.67 -1.79 ElectArts 13.12 -.50
ChkPoint 50.46 -.78 ElizArden 34.09 -.37
Cheesecake 31.35 -1.09 EndoPhrm 31.32 -1.20
ChelseaTh 1.35 +.01 Endocyte 6.30 -.13
ChildPlace 44.61 -1.36 Endobgix 13.23 -.36
ChrchllD 58.66 -1.34 EngyXXI 28.39 -2.66
CienaCorp 12.68 -.87 Entegris 7.48 -.23
CinnFin 35.15 -.93 EntropCom 3.75 -.27
Cintas 35.76 -1.14 Equinix 155.26 -7.85
Cirrus 25.93 -2.79 Ericsson 8.29 -.19
Cisco 15.96 -.37 ExactScih 9.65 -.23
CitzRpBrs 15.13 -1.13 Exelids 4.48 -.16
CitrixSys 70.79 -2.29 EddeTc 2.29 -.03
CleanEngy 12.86 -.75 Expedias 44.65 -1.24
Clearwire 1.16 -.06 Expdlni 37.45 -.80
CognizTech 56.90 -1.35 ExpScripts 50.67 -1.52
CogoGrp 1.91 -.05 ExtmNet 3.53 -.20
Coinstar 58.65 -2.78 Ezcorp 22.40 -1.20
ColdwtrCrk .78 -.05 F5Netwks 97.31 -6.17
ColBnkg 17.39 -.73 FEI Co 44.26 -1.51
Comcast 28.63 -.28 FLIRSys 21.22 -.11
Comcspcl 28.40 -.32 FSI Infi 3.16 -.32
CmcBMO 36.98 -1.76 Facebookn 27.72 -1.88
CmclVehd 8.33 -.40 FairptCom 5.31 -.13


Fastenal 43.18 -1.05 ImunoGn 13.89 -.12
FifthStRn 9.43 -.08 ImpaxLabs 20.18 -.55
FifthThird 12.52 -.83 ImperlSgr 6.32 +.01
FindEngin 20.00 -.98 Incyte 20.52 -.79
Fndlnst 16.13 -.21 Infinera 6.16 -.25
Finisar 13.50 -.85 InfinityPh 11.95 -1.06
FinLine 19.74 -.88 Informat 40.03 -1.40
FstCashFn 34.98 -2.48 Infosys 42.18 +.08
FFnclOH 14.92 -.44 Insulet 17.75 -.67
FMidBc 9.56 -.53 IntgDv 5.30 -.19
FstNiagara 7.74 -.33 Intel 25.14 -.70
FstSolar 11.77 -.79 Interact IBlf 14.07 -.19
FstMerit 15.12 -.78 InterDig 23.82 -.87
Fiserv 65.58 -1.85 Intrface 12.18 -.51
Flextrn 6.14 -.28 InterMune 10.01 -.42
FocusMda 19.22 -1.58 InfiSpdw 23.69 -.35
ForcePro 5.55 ... Intersil 10.33 -.22
FormFac 5.71 -.28 Intuit 54.80 -1.43
Forfnet 20.41 -.84 IntSurg 503.01 -20.09
Fossil Inc 69.59 -3.57 IridiumCm 8.28 -.21
FosterWhl 17.52 -.37 IronwdPh 11.89 -.03
Francescn 22.87 -.59 Isis 9.72 -.17
FreshMkt 56.04 -2.08 IstaPh 9.08 -.01
FronterCm 3.52 -.22 IvanhoeEn .73
FudeCell 1.29 -.06
FultonFncl 9.70 -.43
j2Global 24.06 -.13
JA Solar .90 -.01
GSV Cap 10.04 -.50 JDS Uniph 9.65 -.50
GTAdvTc 4.05 -.15 JackHenry 32.48 -.53
GalenaBio 1.29 -.11 JacklnBox 24.77 -1.08
Garmin 41.60 -1.36 Jamba 1.84 -.06
GenProbe 80.77 -.14 JamesRiv 2.42 -.09
GenetfcTh 4.48 -.11 JazzPhrm 42.10 -1.10
Gentex 21.19 -1.11 JetBlue 5.15 -.08
Genfivah 5.42 -.19 JiveSoftn 15.42 -1.33
GeronCp 1.28 -.03 JoesJeans .97 -.03
GileadSd 48.67 -1.28 JosABank 42.38 -1.98
GladerBc 13.80 -.55 KITDigit 2.95 -.31
GIbSpcMet 11.76 +.04 KLATnc 44.56 -1.27
GluMobile 4.27 -.35 KeryxBio 1.69 -.07
GolLNGLtd 33.94 -1.09 Knology 19.47 -.04
Golfsmith 6.06 +.01 Kulicke 9.94 -.58
Google 570.98 -9.88 LKQ Corp 34.59 -1.85
GrCanyEd 18.17 +.05 LPL Inv 31.68 -.70
GreenMtC 22.42 -1.18 LSI IndIf 5.86 -.26
GrifolsSA 8.35 -.12 LamResrch 36.13 -1.17
Groupon n 9.69 -.95 LamarAdv 23.91 -.70
GulfportE 16.82 -1.66 Landstar 50.97 -1.73
H&EEq 14.81 -1.06 Lattce 4.29 -.28
HMN Fn 3.18 +.03 LeCroy 14.16 -.03
HMS Hd s 26.48 -.31 LeapWirlss 5.06 -.71
HSN Inc 37.69 -1.21 LegacyRes 23.90 -.80
HainCel 53.76 -1.73 LedxPhrm 1.57 -.03
Halozyme 7.40 -.24 LibGlobA 45.21 -.99
HancHId 28.60 -1.65 LibGlobC 43.54 -1.15
HanwhaSol .86 -.03 LibCapA 82.34 -2.43
Harmonic 4.16 -.23 LibtylntA 16.23 -.53
Hasbro 34.96 -.46 LifeTech 39.85 -1.06
HawHold 5.64 -.14 LimelghtN 2.63 -.09
HrfindEx 13.86 -.38 Lincare 22.55 -.38
HSchein 72.38 -1.93 LincElec 45.15 -2.43
HercOffsh 3.03 -.28 LinearTch 28.31 -.71
Hibbett 54.34 -1.69 LinnEngy 35.00 -.53
Hoku Cp h .21 +.05 Liquidity 59.87 -4.02
Hologic 16.32 -.44 LivePrsn 16.62 -.64
Home Inns 20.75 -.67 LodgeNet 1.42 -.13
HomeAwn 21.91 -1.59 Logitech 9.90 -.33
HorsehdH 9.01 +.15 LookSmart .85 +.02
HotTopic 9.49 -.42 Lulkin 53.92 -3.55
HudsCity 5.88 -.32 lululemnas 6930 334
HumGen 13.53 -.09 i= IB
HuntJB 54.66 -2.47
HuntBnk 6.11 -.43 MAPPhm 11.46 -.31
IAC Inter 44.07 -.85 MCG Cap 4.32 -.09
iGateCorp 15.89 -.50 MELASci 2.81 +.15
II-VI s 18.29 -.61 MGE 44.90 -.23
IPG Photon 39.69 -3.11 MIPSTech 6.05 -.34
iPass 2.44 -.08 MKS Inst 25.89 -.26
iRobot 19.83 -1.35 MTS 37.94 -.72
iShAsiaexJ 49.46 -1.25 MagicJcks 13.64 -.75
iShACWI 41.27 -1.06 MAKOSrg 21.62 -1.09
iShsSOX 48.07 -2.15 ManTech 21.88 +.08
iShNsdqBio 119.47 -3.74 MannKd 1.78 -.04
IconixBr 14.98 ... MktAxess 30.64 -1.65
IdenixPh 9.04 ... MarvellT 11.97 -.56
iGo Inch .51 -.06 Masimo 18.49 -.32
Illumina 41.91 -1.15 Mattel 30.56 -.57


MattrssFn 34.35 +.12 PSSWrld 20.11 -.12
Mattson 1.67 -.10 Paccar 36.49 -1.08
Maximlnig 24.41 -.75 PacBbsd 2.14 -.22
MaxvwlT 6.91 -.02 PacEth rs .64
MedAssets 10.92 -.40 PacSunwr 1.47 +.04
MedicAcn 4.06 -.25 PanASIv 17.18 +.60
Medivafon 82.68 -1.55 PaneraBrd 141.89 -5.06
MeleoCrwn 10.95 -.80 ParamTch 19.01 -1.19
Mellanox 57.70 -2.75 Parexel 25.75 -1.01
MentorGr 13.80 -.30 ParkerVsn 2.20 +.31
MercadoL 68.17 -2.07 Patterson 32.60 -.64
MergeHIth 2.22 -.13 PattUTI 14.71 -.41
Methanx 26.86 -1.11 Paychex 29.28 -.69
Microchp 30.40 -.62 Pendrell 1.12 -.04
MicronT 5.45 -.39 PnnNGm 43.95 -2.00
MicrosSys 49.96 -2.80 PennantPk 9.49 -.26
MicroSemi 16.75 -.91 PensonWh .20 -.10
Microsoft 28.45 -.74 PeopUtdF 11.39 -.24
Micrvisrsh 2.99 +.34 PeregrinP h .54 -.02
Mindspeed 2.90 -.20 PerfectWd 9.60 -.59
Misonix 2.05 -.08 Perrigo 101.44 -2.45
MitekSys 1.98 -.14 PetSmart 62.85 -1.59
Molex 22.31 -.76 PetroDev 21.89 -2.95
MolexA 18.98 -.76 Pharmacyc 30.46 -.96
Momenta 13.81 +.02 PhotoMdx 11.89 -.68
MonPwSys 17.89 -.90 Polyomms 10.72 -.72
MonroMuf 32.84 -.95 Popular rs 14.27 -1.00
MonstrBvs 70.54 -2.06 Power-One 4.06 -.09
Motricity .60 -.04 PwShs QQQ 60.41 -1.65
MulimGm 12.00 -.61 Presstekh .54 +.02
Mylan 20.98 -.69 PriceTR 55.21 -2.38
MyriadG 22.98 -1.15 priceline 610.50 -14.99
NABIBio 1.57 -.01 Primoris 11.98 -.01
NCI Inc 4.15 -.12 PrivateB 13.70 -1.03
NETgear 30.20 -1.19 PrUPQQQs 41.96 -3.58
NIl HIdg 10.92 -.60 ProceraN 19.39 -1.51
NPS Phm 7.95 +.06 PrognicsPh 8.21 -.45
NXPSemi 19.41 -1.70 PUShQQQrs58.14 +4.35
NasdOMX 21.38 -.50 ProspctCap 10.71 -.06
Natlnstrm 25.03 -1.01 PureCycle 2.21
NatPenn 8.60 -.31 QIAGEN 15.86 -.14
NektarTh 6.53 -.17 QlikTech 21.49 -1.24
Neonode 5.33 -.41 Qlogic 13.51 -.10
NetApp 29.44 -.32 Qualeom 55.12 -2.19
NetEase 60.04 -2.32 QualityS s 28.17 -.44
Netfiix 62.95 -.49 QuantFu h .60 -.02
NtScout 19.31 -.74 QuestSft 23.74 -1.26
Neurcrine 6.55 -.14 Questeor 40.55 -.85
NewsCpA 18.55 -.65 QuickLog 2.27 -.71
NewsCpB 18.73 -.67 RFMicD 3.52 -.25
NobltyH If 7.01 +.51 Rambus 4.82 +.01
Nordson 51.88 -1.73 Randgold 87.26 +7.91
NorTrst 41.72 -1.46 Regenrn 123.93 -11.72
Novavax 1.23 -.04 RentACt 33.27 -.40
Novlus 40.58 -1.25 RepubAir 5.40 -.02
NuVasive 19.22 -.54 RschMotn 10.26 -.07
NuanceCm 19.99 -.70 RexEnergy 9.32 -.74
NutriSyst 10.26 +.01 RiverbedT 15.82 -.58
Nvidia 11.98 -.45 RosttaGrs 14.39 +.64
NxStageMd 15.12 -.07 RosettaR 36.51 -2.18
OCZTech 4.26 -.22 RossStrss 61.59 -1.50
OReillyAu 93.05 -2.74 Rovi Corp 23.48 -.95
OceanRign 14.33 -.62 RoyGId 74.75 +7.11
Oclaro 2.37 -.18 RubieonTc 8.90 +.08
OdysMar 3.10 -.13 rue21 25.25 -1.23
OldDomFrt 41.79 -1.77
OmniVisn 13.40 -2.79
OnAssign 15.24 -1.42 SBACom 51.33 -.62
OnSmcnd 6.38 -.36 SEI Inv 17.22 -.69
Oneothyr 3.51 -.12 SLM Cp 13.69 -.29
OnyxPh 44.93 -.85 STEC 6.95 -.11
OpenTxt 47.01 -1.34 SVB FnGp 55.60 -4.06
OpenTable 39.56 -.16 SXC HIth 88.56 -1.15
OpbmerPh 14.96 +.02 SabaSftwIf 7.98 -.37
Oracle 26.00 -.47 SalixPhm 51.43 -.38
OraSure 10.08 -.27 SanderFm 53.91 -1.03
Orexigen 3.26 -.08 SanDisk 31.23 -1.47
Oritani 13.28 -.41 SangBio 4.24 -.20
Orthfx 36.95 -.95 Sanmina 6.78 -.33
Osiris 6.10 -.23 Sanofirt 1.37 +.01
OtterTail 21.26 +.13 Santarus 6.68 +.02
Overstk 6.52 -.13 Sapient 10.81 -.19
Satcon h .32 -.02
SavientPh .71 -.01
PDLBio 6.32 -.17 Schnitzer 25.68 -.40
PFChng 50.87 -.40 SdClone 6.29 -.01
PLXTch 6.15 -.18 SdGames 8.18 -.36
PMCSra 6.13 -.25 SeagateT 21.74 -1.69


SearsHIdgs 48.45
SeattGen 19.11
SelCmfrt 25.99
Selectvlns 16.57
Semtech 23.17
Sequenom 3.56
SvcSource 11.57
SvArtsrsh .05
Shire 82.68
ShuffiMstr 14.81
Shutterfly 25.57
SigaTech h 2.50
SigmaAld 67.53
SignatBk 58.70
SilicGrln 5.60
Silinmlmg 4.24
SilcnLab 33.07
SilicnMotn 13.16
Slcnware 5.01
SilvStd g 11.59
Sina 50.98
Sindair 8.10
SiriusXM 1.84
SironaDent 41.16
Skulledyn 13.19
SkyWest 6.70
SkywksSol 25.23
SmartBal 6.07
SmithWes 6.52
SodaStrm 30.24
Sohu.cm 42.70
Solazyme 10.48
SonicCorp 8.12
Sonus 2.29
SouMoBc 24.64
Sourcefire 49.86
SpectPh 11.01
SpiritAir 18.87
Splunkn 27.24
Spreadtrm 17.04
Stamps.cm 22.82
Staples 12.76
StarSdent 3.70
Starbucks 52.15
SiDynam 10.41
StemCll rsh .68
Stericyde 85.76
SMadden 38.99
Stratasys 44.10
SunPower 4.74
SusqBnc 9.16
SwisherH If 1.87
SycamrNt 13.07
Symantec 14.37
Symetricm 5.38
Synaeorn 11.95
Synapfcs 26.08
Synchron 17.34
Synergetc 3.66
SynrgyP rs 4.54
Synopsys 28.65
SyntaPhm 5.10
Syntrolm h .61
TFS Fncl 9.19
THQh .65
TPCGrp 30.85
tw teleom 22.66
TakeTwo 11.06
Tangoen 17.86
Targacept 4.14
TASER 5.25
TechData 47.14
TICmSys 1.43
Tellabs 3.57
TeslaMot 28.15
TesseraTch 12.77
TxCapBsh 37.49
Texlnst 27.00
TexRdhse 17.38
Theravnce 18.79
Thoratec 29.96
ThrshdPhm 6.92
TibcoSft 25.38
TitanMach 29.63
TiVo Inc 8.07
TowerSm h .74
Towerstm 3.52
TractSupp 89.59


TrimbleN 44.90 -2.27
TripAdvn 41.02 -1.86
TriQuint 5.10 -.11
TrueRelig 28.48 -.85
TrstNY 5.02 -.16
Trustmk 23.70 -.72
21Vianet 11.00 -.58
USA Mobl 11.64 -.78
UllWrldwd 14.90 -.74
Ubiquiti n 17.66 -.99
UltaSalon 86.55 -2.82
Umpqua 12.17 -.66
UBWV 24.40 -1.22
UtdNtrIF 48.26 -2.44
UtdOnln 4.00 +.05
US Enr 2.22 -.03
UtdStatn 25.01 -.24
UtdTherap 43.01 -1.23
UnivDisp 27.35 -.80
UnivFor 35.75 -1.90
UnwiredP 2.37 +.01
UranmRs h .65 -.05
UrbanOut 26.69 -1.28
Uroplasty 4.07 -.57


VCAAnt 20.85 -.69
VOXX Inf 9.56 -.30
ValueClick 16.80 -.74
VanSTCpB 78.82 -.13
Veeeolnst 33.40 -1.28
Velti 6.77 -.53
VBradley 19.81 -2.06
Verisign 37.73 -.50
Verisk 46.75 -1.15
Vermillion 1.97 -.07
VertxPh 59.56 -.48
ViacomB 46.26 -1.47
Vical 2.80 -.12
VirgnMdah 21.66 -.37
ViroPhrm 19.95 -.19
VistaPrt 31.55 -2.33
Vivus 23.58 -1.21
Vocus 15.72 -.41
Vodafone 26.78 -.01
Volcano 28.21 -.38
WarnerCh 18.05 -.81
Web.com 15.27 -.65
WebMD 22.82 -.21
Websense 17.97 -.61
Wendys Co 4.67 +.08
WDigital 30.11 -1.28
Westmrld 7.30 -.18
Wstptlnng 23.30 -1.11
WetSeal 2.74 -.11
WholeFd 85.68 -2.93
WillsL pfA 11.21 +.04
WilshBcp 4.81 -.20
Windstrm 9.19 -.17
WisdomTr 6.56 -.12
Woodward 36.06 -1.65
Wynn 97.38 -5.66
XOMA 2.36 -.03
XenoPort 5.38 -.50
Xilinx 31.00 -.97
YRCrs 5.89 -.16
Yahoo 14.92 -.32
Yandex 18.49 -1.44
Zagg 10.42 -.19
Zalicus .92 -.03
ZeliqAes n 4.33 -.15
Zhongpin 9.35 -.10
Zllown 36.65 -2.53
ZonBcp 18.22 -.81
Zopharm 4.84 -.30
Zpcar 9.66 -1.09
Zoltek 7.95 -.40
Zumiez 35.06 -1.73
Zyngan 6.01 -.25


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.4710 4.4710
Australia 1.0319 1.0267
Bahrain .3769 .3769
Brazil 2.0380 2.0201
Britain 1.5375 1.5414
Canada 1.0395 1.0329
Chile 516.95 520.85
China 6.3706 6.3713
Colombia 1842.50 1827.80
Czech Rep 20.79 20.79
Denmark 5.9849 6.0088
Dominican Rep 39.15 39.10
Egypt 6.0411 6.0424
Euro .8054 .8086
Hong Kong 7.7609 7.7620
Hungary 245.79 243.18
India 55.585 56.090
Indnsia 9385.00 9395.00
Israel 3.9076 3.9073
Japan 78.11 78.33
Jordan .7095 .7086
Lebanon 1503.00 1503.50
Malaysia 3.1985 3.1717
Mexico 14.3084 14.3118
N. Zealand 1.3268 1.3275
Norway 6.1342 6.1122
Peru 2.708 2.708
Poland 3.56 3.55
Russia 33.6825 33.4105
Singapore 1.2928 1.2883
So. Africa 8.5880 8.5025
So. Korea 1179.45 1182.25
Sweden 7.2662 7.2676
Switzerlnd .9673 .9711
Taiwan 29.92 29.86
Thailand 31.62 31.82
Turkey 1.8589 1.8646
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 20.5499 20.5499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.07 0.09
6-month 0.12 0.14
5-year 0.62 0.76
10-year 1.45 1.74
30-year 2.52 2.85



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jul 12 83.23 -3.30
Corn CBOT Jul 12 5511/2 -3/4
Wheat CBOT Jul 12 6121/4 -311/2
Soybeans CBOT Jul 12 13441/4 +41/4
Cattle CME Aug12 119.60 +.70
Sugar (world) ICE Jul 12 19.09 -.33
Orange Juice ICE Jul 12 111.70 -.35


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1620.50 $1568.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $2/./41 28.3/O
Copper (pound) $3.362b $3.4480
Platinum (troy oz., spot)141/.60b $142b.bO

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE= New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 3.4 ... 5.95 -.08-28.0 Microsoft .80 2.8 10 28.45 -.74 +9.6
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.2 49 33.90 -.27+12.1 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 19 46.96 -1.12 +1.4
Ametek .36 .7 20 48.72 -1.99 +15.7 NextEraEn 2.40 3.7 13 64.59 -.75 +6.1
ABInBev 1.57 2.4 ... 65.57 -2.13 +7.5 Penney 25.83 -.40-26.5
BkofAm .04 .6 ... 7.02 -.33 +26.3 PiedmOfc .80 4.9 12 16.35 -.16 -4.0
CapCtyBk ...... 48 6.71 -.01 -29.7 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.5 31 55.50 +.68 -.9
CntryLink 2.90 7.8 30 37.05 -1.44 .4 RegionsFn .04 .7 22 5.88 -.41 +36.7
Citigroup .04 .2 7 25.39 -1.12 -3.5 SearsHldgs .33 48.45 -.95 +525
CmwREIT 2.00 11.4 21 17.52 -.13 +5.3 Smucker 1.92 2.6 19 74.82 -1.74 -4.3
Disney .60 1.4 16 44.40 -1.31 +18.4 u e 2 .6 +3
EnterPT 3.00 7.3 29 41.00 .27 -6. SpntNex ... ... ... 2.51 -.06 +7.3
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.9 9 77.92 -.71 -8.1 Texlnst .68 2.5 17 27.00 -1.48 -7.2
FordM .20 2.0 7 10.12 -.44 -5.9 TimeWarn 1.04 3.1 12 33.76 -.71 -6.6
GenElec .68 3.7 15 18.54 -.55 +3.5 UniFirst .15 .3 14 56.24 -.98 -.9
HomeDp 1.16 2.4 18 47.96 -1.38 +14.1 VerizonCm 2.00 4.9 44 41.03 -.61 +2.3
Intel .90 3.6 11 25.14 -.70 +3.7 Vodafone 1.99 7.4 ... 26.78 -.01 -4.5
IBM 3.40 1.8 14189.08 -3.82 +2.8 WalMart 1.59 2.4 14 65.55 -.27 +9.7
Lowes .64 2.4 17 26.36 -.36 +3.9 Walgrn .90 3.0 10 29.93 -.59 -9.5
McDnlds 2.80 3.2 16 86.71 -2.63 -13.6 YRC rs ......... 5.89 -.16 -40.9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: AMTFMuInc 10.23 +.02
Balancp 16.05 -.22 MulbCGrA 7.90 -.27
RetInc 8.88 +.01 InBosA 5.72 -.03
Alger Funds B: LgCpVal 17.21 -.44
SmCapGr 6.31 -.24 NatlMunlnc 9.87 -.04
AllianceBern A: SpEqtA 14.83 -.48
BalanAp 15.80 -.26 TradGvA 7.45 +.01
GIbThGrAp56.36 -1.76 EatonVance B:
SmCpGrA 34.79 -1.37 HIthSBt 9.44 -.17
AllianceBern Adv: NatlMulnc 9.87 -.04
LgCpGrAd 26.64 -.84 Eaton Vance C:
AllianceBern B: GovtC p 7.44 +.01
GIbThGrBt 48.43 -1.52 NatMunlnc 9.87 -.04
GrowthBt 24.98 -.72 Eaton Vancel :
SCpGrBt 27.79 -1.10 FItgRt 8.93 -.01
AllianceBern C: GblMacAbR 9.73 -.02
SCpGrCt 27.94 -1.10 LgCapVal 17.27 -.44
Allianz Fds Insti: FBR Funds:
NFJDvVI 11.20 -.23 Focuslnv t n 46.90 -1.29
SmCpVi 28.28 -.63 FMI Funds:
Allianz Funds C: LgCappn 15.64 -.33
AGICGrthC 23.92 -.75 FPA Funds:
Amer Beacon Insti: Nwlnc 10.67 +.01
LgCaplnst 18.94 -.51 FPACres 26.62 -.41
Amer Beacon Inv: Fairholme 25.56 -1.14
LgCaplnv 17.96 -.48 Federated A:
AmeriCentury 1st: MidGrStA 32.24 -1.11
Growth 25.90 -.74 MuSecA 10.61 +.02
Amer Century Adv: Federated Instl:
EqGroAp 21.79 -.58 KaufmnR 4.88 -.16
EqlncAp 7.25 -.11 TotRetBd 11.45 +.01
Amer Century Inv: StrValDvlS 4.71 -.06
AIICapGr 28.23 -.86 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Balanced 16.34 -.23 EnergyT 30.44 -.97
DivBnd 11.20 +.03 HItCarT 22.01 -.47
Eqlnc 7.25 -.11 Fidelity Advisor A:
Growthl 25.67 -.73 Nwlnsghp 20.74 -.56
Heritagel 20.77 -.74 StrlnA 12.25 -.01
IncGro 24.74 -.62 Fidelity Advisor C:
InfAdjBd 13.40 +.08 Nwlnsghtn 19.60 -.54
IntDisc 8.49 -.29 Fidelity Advisor I:
InfiGrol 9.28 -.25 EqGrln 60.12 -1.84
NewOpp 7.31 -.29 Eqlnin 23.36 -.49
OneChAg 11.92 -.26 IntBdlIn 11.62 +.02
OneChMd 11.69 -.18 NwlnsgtIn 21.01 -.57
RealEstl 21.38 -.58 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 23.73 -.64 BalancT 15.35 -.25
Valuelnv 5.65 -.13 DivGrTp 11.59 -.34
American Funds A: EqGrTp 56.18 -1.72
AmcpAp 19.36 -.50 EqInT 22.99 -.48
AMufAp 26.06 -.50 GrOppT 37.21 -1.31
BalAp 18.55 -.30 HilnAdTp 9.64 -.08
BondAp 12.81 +.02 IntBdT 11.60 +.02
CaplBAp 49.03 -.60 MulncTp 13.63 +.02
CapWGAp 31.88 -.66 OvrseaT 14.98 -.37
CapWAp 20.84 +.04 STFiT 9.29
EupacAp 34.46 -.81 StkSelAIICp 18.01 -.49
FdlnvA p 35.56 -.93 Fidelity Freedom:
GIblBalA 24.41 -.26 FF2010n 13.28 -.16
GovtAp 14.59 +.03 FF2010K 12.17 -.14
GwthAp 29.81 -.78 FF2015n 11.09 -.13
HITrAp 10.72 -.06 FF2015K 12.21 -.14
IncoAp 16.63 -.22 FF2020n 13.31 -.18
IntBdAp 13.74 +.01 FF2020K 12.49 -.17
InfiGrlncAp 26.11 -.57 FF2025n 10.93 -.19
ICAAp 27.50 -.59 FF2025K 12.46 -.21
LtTEBAp 16.32 +.01 FF2030n 12.97 -.23
NEcoAp 25.19 -.60 FF2030K 12.55 -.21
NPerAp 26.69 -.62 FF2035n 10.61 -.22
NwWrldA 46.05 -.97 FF2035K 12.47 -.26
STBFAp 10.09 ... FF2040n 7.40 -.15
SmCpAp 34.82-1.00 FF2040K 12.49 -.26
TxExAp 12.95 +.02 Incomexn 11.39 -.06
WshAp 28.28 -.65 Fidelity Invest:
Ariel Investments: AIISectEq 11.51 -.32
Apprec 38.78 -1.29 AMgr50n 15.35 -.17
Ariel 42.72 -1.38 AMgr70rn 15.78 -.26
Artisan Funds: AMgr20rxn12.98 -.05
Infl 20.32 -.48 Balancn 18.60 -.30
Infilnsti 20.44 -.48 BalancedK 18.60 -.30
InfiVal r 24.59 -.49 BlueChGr n 44.31 -1.41
MidCap 35.03 -1.45 CAMunn 12.80 +.02
MidCapVal 19.37 -.42 Canadan 48.09 -1.13
SCapVal 14.46 -.42 CapApn 27.05 -.83
Baron Funds: CapDevOn 10.50 -.26
Asset 46.55 -1.55 Cplncr n 8.88 -.08
Growth 51.58 -1.63 ChinaRgr 25.08 -.70
SmallCap 23.43 -.79 CngS 465.09
Bernstein Fds: CTMunrn 12.08 +.03
IntDur 14.08 +.05 Contran 71.17 -1.93
DivMu 14.89 +.01 ContraK 71.16 -1.92
TxMgdlnI 11.62 -.26 CnvSc n 23.25 -.38
BlackRock A: DisEqn 21.42 -.69
EqtyDiv 18.07 -.40 DiscEqF 21.41 -.69
GIAIAr 18.08 -.22 Divlntin 25.06 -.58
HiYlnvA 7.57 -.04 DivrslntKr 25.04 -.58
InfiOpAp 26.74 -.66 DivStkOn 14.98 -.41
BlackRock B&C: DivGth n 26.38 -.77
GIAICt 16.80 -.20 EmergAs r n24.75 -.59
BlackRock InstI: EmrMkn 19.73 -.52
EquityDv 18.12 -.39 Eqlncn 41.60 -.86
GlbAllocr 18.18 -.21 EQIIn 17.61 -.42
HiYldBd 7.57 -.04 ECapAp 14.89 -.40
Brinson FundsY: Europe 24.87 -.50
HiYldlYn 6.05 -.03 Exch 323.88
BruceFund387.13 -1.55 Exportn 21.29 -.59
Buffalo Funds: Fidel n 32.29 -.88
SmCapn 26.40 -.90 Fifty r n 17.76 -.64
CGM Funds: FItRateHi r n 9.72 -.01
Focusn 24.58 -1.20 FrlnOnen 26.11 -.54
Mutln 25.03 -.91 GNMAn 11.94 +.02
Realty n 27.72 -.88 Govtlnc 10.95 +.04
Calamos Funds: GroCon 86.14 -3.02
GrwthAp 47.03 -1.21 Grolncn 18.60 -.48
Calvert Invest: GrowCoK 86.11 -3.02
Inc p 16.07 +.01 GrowthCoK 86.11 -3.02
Incop 16.07 +.01 Grctratrn
InfiEAp 11.82 -.30 GrStatrn 18.49 -.58
SocialAp 28.94 -.47 Highlncrn 8.79 -.05
SocBdp 16.18 +.05 Indepnn 22.59 -.94
SocEqAp 34.30 -.93 nProBdn 13.38 +06
TxF Lg p 16.25 +.01 IntBd n 11.04 +.02
Cohen&Steers IntGovn 11.08 +.02
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 63.58 -1.82 IntmMun 10.62 +.01
ColumbiaClass A: InfDiscn 27.05 -.63
Acornt 27.43 -.94 InSCrdn 17.40 .45
DivEqlnc 9.54 -.22 InvGBn 1.94 +.03
DivOpptyA 7.97 -.17 Japanr 887 .27
LgCapGrA t23.82 -.77 Japanr .n 7 -.27
LgCorQAp 5.82 -.14 JpnSn 7.89 -.27
M Gr 9.28 .32 LgCapVal 10.10 -26
MdCpGrOp 9.28 -.32 LatAm 45.95 -.92
MidCVlOpp 7.35 -.25 LevCoStkn 2637 .82
PBModAp 10.54 -.12 LowPrn 364 -.8
TxEAp 14.14 +.02 LowPriKr 3614 .88
SelCommA41.61 -1.28 Magellnn 65.17 -1.91
FrontierA 9.54 -.40 MagellnKn6511 1.91
G cih 19 -.61 MagellanK 65.11 -1.91
GlobTech 19.77 .61 MDMurn 11.62 +.02
Columt bia lT&G: MAMunn 12.66 +.02
EmMktOpln7.30 -.15 MegaCpStknlO.39 -.26
Columbia Class Z: MIMunn 12.49 +.01
AcornZ 28.42 -.97 MidCapn 27.10 -.86
AcornlntZ 34.98 -.82 MNMunn 12.02 +.01
DivlncoZ 13.68 -.29 MtgSecn 11.31 +.02
IntBdZ 9.42 +.03 Munilncn 13.42 +.02
IntTEBd 10.96 +.01 NJMunrn 12.25 +.02
LgCapGr 12.11 -.47 NwMktr n 16.18 -.01
ValRestr 44.31 -1.17 NwMilln 29.37 -.77
Credit Suisse Comm: NYMun 13.60 +.02
ComRett 7.37 -.10 OTCn 54.58 -1.67
DFA Funds: OhMunn 12.28 +.02
InfiCorEqn 8.77 -.21 100ndex 9.10 -.21
USCorEql nl0.90 -.31 Ovrsean 26.58 -.62
USCorEq2nl10.67 -.32 PcBasn 21.42 -.56
DWS Invest A: PAMunr n 11.39 +.02
CommAp 17.09 -.25 Puritnn 18.27 -.30
DWS InvestS: PuritanK 18.27 -.30
CoreEqtyS 15.90 -.50 RealExn 29.22 -.91
CorPIslnc 11.02 +.04 SAIISecEqF 11.52 -.32
EmMkGrr 14.14 -.31 SCmdtyStrtn8.06 -.10
EnhEmMk 10.24 -.03 SCmdtyStrFn8.08 -.10
EnhGlbBdr 10.09 +.04 SrEmrgMkt 14.31 -.32
GIbSmCGr 33.85 -1.01 SrslntGrw 10.16 -.22
GIblThem 19.55 -.43 SerlnfGrF 10.18 -.22
Gold&Prc 13.33 +.54 SrslntVal 7.64 -.15
HiYldTx 12.80 +.01 SerlnfiValF 7.66 -.15
IntTxAMT 12.09 +.02 SrlnvGrdF 11.95 +.05
InflFdS 36.07 .93 StlntMun 10.88 +.01
LgCpFoGr 30.27 -1.02 STBFn 8.53
LatAmrEq 35.35 .80 SmCapDiscn20.45 .73
MgdMuniS 9.42 +.01 SmllCpSrn 16.54 -.54
MATFS 15.06 +.01 SCpValur 14.18 -.50
SP500S 17.05 -.43 StkSelLCVrn10.31 -.26
WorldDiv 21.57 -.33 StkSlcACapn24.98 -.67
Davis Funds A: S- SelSmCp 17.89 .62
NYVenA 32.75 -.87 Sfratlncn 10.96 -.01
Davis Funds B: StrReRtr 9.23 -.05
NYVenB 31.23 -.83 TaxFrBrn 11.58 +.02
Davis Funds C: TotalBdn 11.15 +.03
NYVenC 31.52 -.84 Trendn 70.09 -2.04
Davis Funds Y: USBI n 11.96 +.04
NYVenY 33.11 -.89 Utilityn 17.45 .25
Delaware Invest A: ValStratn 26.16 .93
Diver Inc p 9.30 +.01 Value n 64.56 -1.87
SMIDCapG 22.83 -.64 Wrldwn 17.36 -.50
TxUSAp 12.10 +.02 Fidelity Selects:
Delaware Invest B: Air n 36.95 -.94
SelGrBt 32.18 -.83 Bankingn 17.20 .83
Dimensional Fds: Biotch n 93.95 -3.03
EmMCrEqnl6.97 -.39 Brokrn 40.92 -1.02
EmMktV 25.21 -.61 Chemn 100.88 -3.56
IntSmVan 13.09 -.36 ComEquipnl9.76 -.62
LargeCo 10.12 -.25 Compn 57.56 -1.95
TAUSCorE2 n8.68 -.26 ConDis n 25.05 .84
USLgVan 19.09 .53 ConsuFnn 12.09 -.46
USMicron 13.20 -.41 ConStapn 72.44 -1.31
USTgdVal 15.16 -.47 CstHon 38.30 -1.38
USSmalln 20.64 -.67 DfAern 77.16 -2.16
USSmVa 23.24 -.76 Electrn 43.40 -1.93
IntlSmCon 13.48 -.34 Enrgyn 43.46 -1.38
EmMktSCnl8.11 -.42 EngSvn 58.16 -1.50
EmgMktn 23.15 -.51 EnvAltEnrnl4.55 -.40
Fixdn 10.34 +.01 FinSvn 52.56 -1.52
IntGFxlnn 13.22 +.06 Goldrn 37.38 +1.87
IntVan 13.54 -.30 Healthn 126.06 -2.64
Glb5Fxlncn11.20 +.02 Insurn 45.13 -1.16
2YGIFxdn 10.13 Leisrn 99.82 -4.61
DFARIEn 24.45 -.62 Materialn 61.39 -1.45


Dodge&Cox: MedDI n 57.69 -1.39
Balanced 68.28 -1.42 MdEqSysn 26.02 -.54
Income 13.69 +.02 Mulrndn 46.14 -1.20
IntStk 27.70 -.71 NtGasn 27.77 -.69
Stock 102.39 -2.89 Pharmn 13.66 -.24
DoubleUne Funds: Retailnn 57.13 -1.49
TRBdIx 11.19 Softwrn 77.55 -2.09
TRBdNpx 11.19 ... Techn 91.42 -3.04
Dreyfus: Telcm n 44.29 -.82
Aprec 40.27 -.81 Transn 49.91 -1.49
CTA 12.33 +.02 UtilGrn 54.53 -.46
CorVA Wirelessn 6.91 -.15
Dreyf 8.72 -.26 Fidelity Spartan:
DryMidr 26.48 -.90 5001dxlnvn 45.46 -1.15
GNMAx 16.10 -.02 5001dxl 45.46 -1.15
GrChinaAr 29.37 -.79 IntlnxInvn 28.16 -.60
HiYIdAp 6.27 -.03 TotMktlnv n 36.91 -.98
StratValA 26.10 -.89 USBondl 11.96 +.04
TechGroA 30.87 -1.12 Fidelity Spart Adv:
DreihsAclnc 10.41 -.03 ExMktAdrn35.88 -1.16
Driehaus Funds: 5001dxcAdvn45.46 -1.15
EMktGr 25.38 -.53 IntAdrn 28.17 -.60
EVPTxMEmI41.31 -.74 TotMktAd r n36.91 -.98
EatonVance A: USBondl 11.96 +.04
ChinaAp 15.23 -.40


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAVY
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 44.54 -.64
OverseasA 19.98 -.23
First Investors A
BlChpAp
GloblAp 5.99 -.15
GovtAp 11.55
GrolnAp 14.76 -.43
IncoAp 2.49 -.01
MATFAp 12.43 +.02
MITFAp 12.79 +.02
NJTFAp 13.69 +.02
NYTFAp 15.16 +.02
OppA p 26.28 -.88
PATFAp 13.68 +.02
SpSitAp 22.81 -.63
TxExAp 10.21 +.01
TotRtAp 15.63 -.25
ValueBp 6.96 -.15
Forum Funds:
AbsStrl r 11.20 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.90
ALTFAp 11.84 +.02
AZTFAp 11.42 +.02
CallnsAp 12.80 +.02
CAIntAp 12.12 +.02
CalTFApx 7.43 -.01
COTFAp 12.38 +.02
CTTFAp 11.45 +.03
CvtScAp 13.99 -.23
Dbl TFA 12.33 +.02
DynTchA 30.38 -.89
EqlncAp 16.39 -.32
Fedlntp 12.49 +.03
FedTFApx 12.57 -.01
FLTFAp 11.96 +.02
FoundAlp 9.79 -.14
GATFAp 12.63 +.03
GoldPrMA 29.88 +.97
GrwthAp 45.73 -1.12
HYTFAp 10.78 +.03
HilncAx 1.95 -.02
IncomApx 2.05 -.03
InsTFAp 12.49 +.02
NYITF p 11.88 +.03
LATFAp 11.96 +.02
LMGvScA 10.36
MDTFAp 11.99 +.02
MATFAp 12.10 +.03
MITFAp 12.27 +.01
MNInsA 12.88 +.02
MOTFAp 12.70 +.02
NJTFAp 12.62 +.02
NYTFApx 12.07 -.02
NCTFAp 12.88 +.03
OhiolAp 13.03 +.02
ORTFAp 12.53 +.02
PATFAp 10.87 +.02
ReEScAp 15.54 -.41
RisDvAp 34.97 -.76
SMCpGrA 34.01 -1.28
Stratlncp 10.18 -.03
TtlRtnAp 10.24 +.01
USGovApx 6.89 -.02
UblsApx 13.40 -.20
VATFAp 12.19 +.03
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.20 -.08
IncmeAdx 2.04 -.03
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC tx 2.07 -.03
USGvC tx 6.85 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 19.79 -.39
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 19.98 -.40
ForgnAp 5.48 -.09
GIBdAp 12.23 -.08
GrwthAp 15.64 -.26
WorldAp 13.23 -.24
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 15.64 -.26
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 19.46 -.39
ForgnC p 5.36 -.09
GIBdCp 12.26 -.08
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.04 -.23
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.95 +.03
US Eqty 39.82 -1.03
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
Quality 22.32 -.42
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 20.63 -.44
InfilntrM 17.26 -.32
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 9.78 -.21
Quality 22.33 -.42
StrFxinc 16.77
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 47.56 -1.13
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 33.94 -1.02
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 23.34 -.80
HiYield 6.99 -.04
HYMunin 9.15 +.02
MidCapV 34.23 -1.02
ShtDrTFn 10.66 +.01
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.70 +.04
CapAplnst 38.98-1.29
Infillnvt 51.28 -1.34
Infir 51.82 -1.34
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 29.33 -.92
DivGthAp 18.82 -.42
IntOpA p 12.84 -.29
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 29.35 -.93
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 37.72 -1.14
Div&Gr 19.39 -.44
Advisers 19.66 -.30
TotRetBd 12.02 +.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.48 +.10
StrGrowth 11.97 +.15
ICON Fds:
Energy S 16.24 -.31
HIthcareS 15.16 -.28
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.92 +.03
IVA Funds:
WAdwideAt 14.78 -.20
WldwideIr 14.79 -.20
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.13 -.29
Invesco Funds:
Energy 33.00 -.88
Utliies 16.83 -.09
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.22 -.01
Chartp 16.21 -.29
CmstkA 15.35 -.37
Const p 21.73 -.66
EqlncA 8.43 -.14
GrlncAp 18.68 -.43
HilncMup
HiYldp 4.15 -.01
HYMuA 9.90 +.02
InfiGrow 24.54 -.54
MunilnA 13.80 +.02
PATFA 16.87 +.02
US MortgA 13.00
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 12.98 -.52
MunilnB 13.77 +.02
USMortg 12.94 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 22.24 -.40
AssetStAp 22.96 .41
AssetSbilr 23.17 -.42
JPMorgan AClass:
CoreBdA 12.06 +.03
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.12 +.04
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpVal n 24.89 -.67
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.06 +.04
ShtDurBd 10.99 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.12 -.28
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.05 +.04
HighYIdn 7.72 -.04
IntmTFBd n 11.37 +.01
LgCpGr 22.50 -.74
ShtDurBdn 10.99 +.01
USLCCrPIsn20.16 .55
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.05 -.38
ContrarnT 12.92 -.40
EnterprT 59.62 -1.66
FIxBndT 10.87 +.03
GlUfeSciTr 27.01 -.65
GIbSel T 8.97 -.25
GITechTr 16.56 -.52
Grw&lncT 30.51 -.84
Janus T 28.62 -.82
OvrseasTr 29.52 -1.03
PrkMCValT 19.97 -.41
ResearchT 28.78 -.95
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 55.19 -1.75
VentureT 54.65 -1.73
WrldWTr 38.75 -1.15
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJ n26.69 -.64


John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.88 +.02
RgBkA 13.04 -.54
StrlnAp 6.46 -.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.46 -.01
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 11.34 -.29
LSBalanc 12.45 -.19
LSConsrv 12.94 -.06
LSGrwth 12.10 -.26
LSModer 12.56 -.11


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 16.83 -.27
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 17.21 -.27
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 113.54 -3.24
CBApprp 14.18 -.33
CBLCGrp 21.13 -.55
GCIAIICOp 7.32 -.12
WAHilncAt 5.85 -.03
WAMgMup 16.97 +.03
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 19.23 -.51
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 27.25 -.93
CMValTrp 37.52 -1.09
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 25.89 -.87
SmCap 25.96 -.65
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.21 -.05
StrlncC 14.52 -.09
LSBondR 14.15 -.05
StrlncA 14.43 -.09
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdApx 12.18 -.05
InvGrBdYx 12.19 -.05
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 10.50 -.29
FundlEq 11.84 -.36
BdDebAp 7.72 -.04
ShDurlncAp 4.57
MidCpAp 15.53 -.48
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.60
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.57
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.10 -.50
MIGA 15.81 -.39
EmGA 43.07 -1.35
HilnA 3.40 -.01
MFLA
TotRA 14.11 -.19
UtilA 16.44 -.23
ValueA 22.64 -.56
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.19 -.35
GvScBn 10.58 +.03
HilnBn 3.40 -.02
MulnBn 8.87 +.01
TotRBn 14.12 -.19
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 13.08 -.29
Valuel 22.75 -.56
MFS Funds Instl:
InfiEqn 15.58 -.39
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.84 -.03
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.09 -.22
GovtBt 8.96 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.82 -.02
IncmBldr 16.11 -.26
InfiEqB 9.35 -.23
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 33.60 -.83
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 75.03 -2.00
Managers Funds:
Bond n 26.74 +.03
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.42 -.15
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.54 -.20
Indialnvr 14.23 -.16
PacTgrlnv 20.32 -.25
MergerFdn 15.65 -.09
Meridian Funds:
Growth 42.78 -1.43
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.69 +.03
TotRtBdl 10.68 +.02
Midas Funds:
MidasFdt 2.60 +.11
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 13.31 -.43
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.51 -.20
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 11.94 -.25
MCapGrl 33.57 -.96
Muhlenkn 51.04 -1.30
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 26.21 -.73
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn28.95 -.95
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.73 -.21
GblDiscA 26.65 -.46
GIbDiscC 26.38 -.46
GIbDiscZ 27.00 -.47
QuestZ 16.18 -.23
SharesZ 19.96 -.39
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 19.13 -.58
Geneslnst 45.92 -1.10
Inftl r 14.76 -.30
LgCapV Inv 23.93 -.59
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 47.61 -1.15
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.51 -.05
Nicholasn 43.70 -1.24
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 11.07 +.04
HiYFxlnc 7.11 -.04
SmCpldx 8.16 -.26
Stkldx 15.90 -.40
Technly 14.38 -.46
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 16.45 +.02
LtMBAp 11.23 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.31 +.01
HYMunBd 16.45 +.02
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 20.04 -.51
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 37.98 -.94
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 27.03 -.55
Globall 19.46 -.52
Inftllr 16.09 -.25
Oakmark 42.83 -1.20
Select 28.57 -.85
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.90 -.06
GIbSMdCap 13.49 -.31
LgCapStrat 8.76 -.19
RealRet 8.79 +.01
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.01 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.09 +.02
CAMuniAp 8.58 +.01
CapApAp 44.26 -1.19
CaplncAp 8.84 -.05
ChmplncAp 1.77 -.01
DvMktAp 29.30 -.68
Discp 57.09 -2.28
EquityA 8.61 -.22
GlobAp 52.52 -1.50
GIbOppA 26.52 -.89
GblStrlncA 4.11 -.01
Goldp 30.25 +1.62
IntBdAp 6.19 -.01
LtdTmMu 15.00 +.02
MnStFdA 33.20 -.88
PAMuniAp 11.38 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.15 -.01
USGv p 9.82 +.04
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.97 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.10 +.02
CplncBt 8.65 -.05
ChmplncBt 1.77 -.01
EquityB 7.92 -.21
GblSfrlncB 4.13 -.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.38
RoMuAp 16.85 +.02
RcNtMuA 7.37 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 28.99 -.67
InfiBdY 6.19
IntGrowY 25.16 -.64
Osterweis Funds:
Stklncon 11.54 -.03
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.81
TotRtAd 11.31 +.03
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.24 -.04
AIIAsset 11.68 -.06
ComodRR 6.09 -.08
Divlnc 11.68
EmgMkCur 9.87 -.01
EmMkBd 11.43 -.03
Fltlnc r 8.40 -.04
ForBdUnr 10.93 +.06
FrgnBd 10.87 +.02
HiYId 9.09 -.04
InvGrCp 10.83 +.02
LowDu 10.47
ModDur 10.89 +.01
RealRtnl 12.45 +.08
ShortT 9.81
TotRt 11.31 +.03
TRII 10.92 +02
TRIll 9.96 +.03
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.17 -.03
LwDurA 10.47
RealRtAp 12.45 +.08
TotRtA 11.31 +.03
PIMCO Funds C:


AllAstAutt 10.05 -.04
RealRtCp 12.45 +.08
TotRtCt 11.31 +.03
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.45 +.08
TRtnp 11.31 +.03
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.23 -.04
TotRtnP 11.31 +.03
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.61 -.56
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 46.27 +.11


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.74 +.01
InfiValA 16.06 -.32
PionFdAp 37.79 -1.04
ValueAp 10.69 -.29
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.70 -.12
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 9.80 -.12
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 10.82
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.20 -.32
BIChip n 41.18 -1.41
CABondn 11.40 +.02
CapAppn 21.32 -.35
DivGro n 23.63 -.59
EmMktBn 12.87 -.04
EmEurop 15.12 -.41
EmMktSn 28.00 -.61
Eqlncn 23.25 -.57
Eqlndexn 34.57 -.87
Europe n 12.94 -.34
GNMAn 10.12
Growthn 34.19 -1.12
Gr&ln n 20.27 -.53
HIthSci n 36.79 -.94
HiYieldn 6.57 -.04
InsfiCpG 16.91 -.56
InstHiYId n 9.27 -.04
MCEqGr n 27.49 -.82
IntlfiBond n 9.72 +.04
IntDis n 39.08 -.86
Intl G&l 10.95 -.25
InfiStkn 12.08 -.29
Japan n 7.05 -.20
LatAm n 35.47 -.86
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 11.01 +.02
MidCapn 53.95 -1.56
MCapValn 21.60 -.49
NAmern 32.18 -.84
N Asian 14.42 -.26
New Eran 37.26 -1.06
NHorizn 32.67 -1.13
NIncn 9.82 +.02
NYBond n 11.77 +.02
OverSSFn 7.04 -.17
PSIncn 16.01 -.20
RealAsset r n 9.85 -.15
RealEstn 19.55 -.50
R2010n 15.30 -.20
R2015n 11.79 -.19
R2020n 16.20 -.31
R2025 n 11.79 -.24
R2030n 16.84 -.38
R2035 n 11.86 -.28
R2040n 16.84 -.42
R2045n 11.21 -.28
SciTecn 24.96 -.82
ShtBd n 4.84
SmCpStkn 32.28 -1.09
SmCapVal n34.78 -.97
SpecGrn 17.14 -.47
Speclnn 12.45 -.05
TFIncn 10.45 +.01
TxFrHn 11.59 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.71 +.01
USTIntn 6.37 +.03
USTLgn 14.64 +.29
VABondn 12.22 +.02
Value n 22.60 -.61
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.23 -.29
LT20201n 11.53 -.19
LT20301n 11.28 -.21
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 16.40 -.51
HiYldAp 5.41 -.03
MuHilncA 10.11 +.01
UtilityA 10.85 -.20
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.80 -.56
HiYIdB t 5.40 -.03
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.30 +.04
AZ TE 9.49 +.02
ConvSec 18.60 -.24
DvrlnAp 7.39 -.03
EqlnAp 14.74 -.39
EuEq 16.03 -.43
GeoBalA 12.20 -.15
GIbEqtyp 8.01 -.29
GrInAp 12.71 -.34
GIblHIthA 40.11 -.79
HiYdAp 7.46 -.04
HiYld In 5.81 -.03
IncmA p 7.02 +.03
IntGrln p 7.82 -.22
InvAp 12.87 -.35
NJTxAp 9.81 +.02
MutiCpGr 49.72 -1.67
PATE 9.49 +.01
TxExA p 8.99 +.02
TFInAp 15.60 +.03
TFHYA 12.50 +.02
USGvAp 13.71 +.02
GIblUtilA 9.93 -.09
VoyAp 19.83 -.74
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.61 +.02
DvrlnBt 7.33 -.03
Eqlnct 14.60 -.39
EuEq 15.36 -.42
GeoBalB 12.08 -.15
GIbEq t 7.23 -.25
GINtRst 15.31 -.41
GrInBt 12.47 -.34
GIblHIthB 32.01 -.62
HiYIdBt 7.45 -.04
HYAdBt 5.70 -.03
IncmBt 6.95 +.02
IntGrln t 7.75 -.22
InfiNopt 12.00 -.35
InvBt 11.58 -.31
NJTxB t 9.80 +.02
MultCpGr 42.54 -1.44
TxExB t 8.99 +.01
TFHYBt 12.52 +.02
USGvBt 13.64 +.02
GlblUtilB 9.89 -.09
VoyBt 16.67 -.63
RS Funds:
IntGrA 14.86 -.43
LgCAIphaA 38.52 -.82
Value 22.36 -.59
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.61 -.34
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 13.57 -.29
MicroCapl 14.05 -.25
PennMulr 10.64 -.31
Premierl r 18.23 -.53
TotRetlr 12.50 -.30
ValSvct 10.34 -.26
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.26 +.03
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.92 -.40
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 17.38 -.39
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 17.82 -.37
10001nvr 36.22 -.94
S&P Sel 20.07 -.50
SmCpSI 19.03 -.63
TSMSelr 23.18 -.61
Scout Funds:
Infl 27.47 -.70
Selected Funds:
AmShD 39.78 -1.06
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 31.09 -.76
Sequoia 149.87 -3.28
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 43.01 -1.10
SoSunSClnvt20.16 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwlh 51.73 -1.12
Stratton Funds:
MulI-Cap 32.30 -1.00
RealEstate 28.58 -.70
SmCap 48.93 -1.62
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.35 +.04
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn 8.49 -.02
TotRetBdl 9.89 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.97 +03
Eqldxlnst 9.73 -.26
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 15.96 -.23
Third Avenue Fds:
InfiValnstr 13.77 -.25
REVallnstr 22.36 -.34
Valuelnst 41.03 -.72
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 23.43 -.48
IncBuildAt 17.25 -.19
IncBuildCp 17.24 -.20
IntValue I 23.96 -.50
LtTMul 14.65 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.77 -.02
Incom 9.03 +.02
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.03 -.06
Flexincp 9.00 -.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 31.69 -1.36
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 22.10 -.30
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 22.97 -.67
ChinaReg 6.64 -.08
GIbRs 8.68 -.17


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 12.40 +.01
PrecMM 27.12 +1.32
SciTech 13.19 -.40
ShtTBnd 9.18
SmCpStk 13.25 -.39
TxElt 13.61 +.01
TxELT 13.74 +.02
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.56 +.01
WldGr 17.94 -.47
VALIC :
MdCpldx 19.12 -.62
Stkldx 23.90 -.60
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 17.73 -.47
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmlIn 22.27 -.31
CAITAdmn 11.64 +.01
CALTAdmn11.83 +.01
CpOpAdl n 67.88 -1.84
EMAdmr r n 30.86 -.68
Energy n 97.55 -2.44
EqlnAdm n n45.79 -.94
EuroAdml n 48.41 -1.05
ExplAdmln 67.10 -2.41
ExtdAdmn 40.19 -1.31
500Adml n 118.23 -2.98
GNMA Adn 11.09 +.02
GrwAdmn 33.17 -.94
HlthCr n 55.39 -.87
HiYldCp n 5.76 -.02
InfProAdn 29.09 +.18
ITBdAdml n 12.07 +.05
ITsryAdml n 11.84 +.04
IntGrAdm n 50.72 -1.32
ITAdmI n 14.29 +.02
ITGrAdm n 10.22 +.03
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmI n 10.79 +.12
LTAdmln 11.67 +.02
MCpAdml n 90.31 -2.93
MorgAdm n 56.67 -1.72
MuHYAdmn1l1.11 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.68 +.02
PrmCap r n 63.79 -1.74
PALTAdmnll.64 +.01
ReitAdm r n 86.38 -2.23
STsyAdmln 10.78
STBdAdmlnlO.64
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.86 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.74
SmCAdmn 33.74 -1.10
TxMCap r n 63.91 -1.67
TflBAdmln 11.16 +.04
TStkAdmn 31.94 -.85
ValAdmI n 20.48 -.49
WellslAdm n56.62 -.22
WelltnAdm n54.74 -.74
Windsor n 43.81 -1.30
WdsrllAdn 46.64 -1.13
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.83 +.01
CapOppn 29.38 -.80
Convrtn 12.03 -.17
DivApplnn 21.82 -.49
DivdGron 15.43 -.32
Energy n 51.96 -1.29
Eqlncn 21.84 -.45
Explr n 72.08 -2.60
FLLTn 12.10 +.02
GNMAn 11.09 +.02
GlobEqn 15.89 -.43
Grolnc n 27.26 -.68
GrthEqn 11.41 -.36
HYCorpn 5.76 -.02
HlthCren 131.27 -2.07
InflaPron 14.81 +.09
InflExplrn 12.62 -.34
InlGr n 15.94 -.42
InfiVal n 25.34 -.57
ITIGraden 10.22 +.03
ITTsryn 11.84 +.04
LifeConn 16.45 -.13
LifeGron 21.31 -.41
Lifelncn 14.39 -.03
LifeModn 19.44 -.26
LTIGraden 10.79 +.12
LTTsryn 14.10 +.29
Morg n 18.27 -.56
MuHYn 11.11 +.02
Mulntn 14.29 +.02
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.67 +.02
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.27 +.02
NYLTn 11.68 +.02
OHLTTEn 12.57 +.01
PALTn 11.64 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 15.42 -.13
PrmcpCorn 13.37 -.33
Prmcpr n 61.47 -1.68
SelValurn 18.53 -.54
STARn 19.08 -.28
STIGraden 10.74
STFedn 10.86 +.01
STTsryn 10.78
StratEqn 18.60 -.65
TgtRetlncn 11.77 -.06
TgRe2010n22.93 -.19
TgtRe2015nl2.51 -.15
TgRe2020n21.99 -.32
TgtRe2025 nl2.42 -.21
TgRe2030n2l.13 -.40
TgtRe2035 nl2.61 -.27
TgtRe204 n20.64 -.46
TgtRe2050 n20.54 -.46
TgtRe2045 nl2.96 -.29
USGron 18.94 -.56
USValuen 10.32 -.29
Wellsly n 23.37 -.09
Welltnn 31.69 -.43
Wndsrn 12.98 -.38
Wndsll n 26.27 -.64
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl rn83.12 -1.87
ExtMktln 99.19 -3.23
MidCplstPI n98.40 -3.19
TotlntAdm r r20.89 -.47
Totlntllnst r n83.53 -1.90
TotlntllP r n 83.55 -1.90
TotlntSig r n 25.05 -.57
500n 118.21 -2.98
Balancedn 22.26 -.32
EMktn 23.48 -.52
Europe n 20.78 -.45
Extendn 40.16 -1.31
Growthin 33.17 -.93
LgCaplxn 23.66 -.62
LTBnd n 14.64 +.21
MidCapn 19.89 -.65
Pacific n 8.73 -.21
REITr n 20.24 -.52
SmCapn 33.70 -1.10
SmlCpGthn21.69 -.77
STBndn 10.64
TotBndn 11.16 +.04
Totllntl n 12.49 -.28
TotStk n 31.93 -.85
Value n 20.48 -.49
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.27 -.31
DevMklnstn 7.98 -.18
Extlnn 40.19 -1.31
FTAIIWIdl r n74.19 -1.66
Grwthlstn 33.17 -.94
InfProlnstn 11.85 +.07
Instldxn 117.46 -2.97
InsPIn 117.47 -2.97
InstTStldxn 28.91 -.77
lnsTStPlus r28.91 -.77
MidCplstn 19.95 -.65
REITInstrn 13.37 -.34
STIGrlnstn 10.74
SClnstn 33.74 -1.10
TBIstn 11.16 +.04
TSInstn 31.95 -.85
Valuelstn 20.48 -.49
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 97.66 -2.47
GroSig n 30.72 -.86
ITBdSign 12.07 +.05
MidCpldx n 28.50 -.92
STBdldxn 10.64
SmCpSig n 30.40 -.99
TotBdSglIn 11.16 +04
TotStkSgl n 30.83 -.82
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 8.85 -.12
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.78 -.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 8.69 -.16
CorelnvA 5.92 -.17
DivOppAp 13.87 -.36
DivOppCt 13.72 -.35
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 39.53 -1.39
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.37 -.13
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 18.80 -.60
Opptylnv 35.97 -1.16
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 37.81 -1.28
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.41 +.02
CorePlusl 11.41 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.01 -.31
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 17.61 -.32
Focusedn 18.84 -.31


Gld&Mtls 11.17 +.55
WdPrcMn 11.34 +.46
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.16 -.95
CABd 10.93 +.01
CrnstStr 21.31 -.17
GovSec 10.40
GrTxStr 13.88 -.14
Growth 14.66 -.41
Gr&lnc 14.46 -.43
IncStk 12.38 -.28
Inco 13.33 +.02
Inf 21.09 -.50


Dismal jobs report sends




Dow into 275-point dive


Associated Press

Alarmed by an ominously
weak U.S. jobs report, in-
vestors ran for safety Friday
from new worries about a
global slowdown, sending
the Dow Jones industrial av-
erage to its biggest loss since
November.
The nearly 275-point dive
wiped out the last of the
index's gains for the year.
Across Wall Street, fearful
investors snapped up safer
investments such as bonds,
dragging the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treas-
ury note to a record low.
Gold spiked $50 an ounce,
and oil fell to its lowest
since October.
"The big worry now is that
this economic slowdown is
widening and accelerating,"
said Sam Stovall, chief equ-
ity strategist at S&P Capital
IQ, a market research firm.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index and Nasdaq com-
posite index both fell more
than 2 percent. The Nasdaq
has dropped more than 10
percent since its peak -
what traders call a market
correction. And the S&P 500
is just a point above correc-
tion territory
American employers
added just 69,000 jobs in
May, the fewest in a year,
and the unemployment rate
increased to 8.2 percent
from 8.1 percent. Econo-
mists had forecast a gain of
158,000 jobs.
The report, considered
the most important eco-
nomic indicator each
month, also said that hiring
in March and April was con-
siderably weaker than orig-
inally thought
Earlier data showed weak
economic conditions in Eu-
rope and Asia, too. Unem-
ployment in the 17 countries
that use the euro currency
stayed at a record-high 11
percent in April, and unem-
ployment spiked to almost
25 percent in Spain.
There were signs that
growth in China, which
helped sustain the global
economy through the reces-
sion, is slowing significantly
China's manufacturing sec-
tor weakened in May, ac-


Market watch
June 1,2012

Dow Jones -274.88
industrials 12,118.57

Nasdaq -79.86
composite 2,747.48


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-32.29

1,278.04

-24.40

737.42


NYSE diary
Advanced: 443

Declined: 2,625

Unchanged: 63

Volume: 4.6 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 404

Declined: 2,159

Unchanged: 77

Volume: 1.9 b
AP

cording to surveys released
Friday
The Dow closed down
274.88 points, or 2.2 percent,
at 12,118.57. The Dow is off
0.8 percent for the year; two
months ago, it was up more
than 8 percent for the year.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 32.29 points,
or 2.5 percent, to 1,278.04.
The Nasdaq dropped 79.86,
or 2.8 percent, to 2,747.48.
Both indexes are still up for
the year 1.6 percent for
the S&P 500 and 5.5 percent
for the Nasdaq.
The yield on the bench-
mark 10-year U.S. Treasury
note briefly fell to 1.44 per-
cent, the lowest on record. It
ended the day at 1.46 per-
cent Gold for August deliv-
ery climbed $57.90, nearly 4
percent, to $1,622.10 per
ounce.
"Everybody's looking for a
safe haven," said Adam Patti,
CEO of IndexIQ, an asset
management firm. He's skep-
tical of that strategy, believ-
ing the swing was driven by
short-term traders "looking
to flip in and out of things,"
rather than long-term in-
vestors willing to ride out a
few bumps in the market
May was the worst month
for the stock market in two
years by some measures. In-


vestors' worries about Eu-
rope's debt crisis intensified
as the month wore on.
Greece's political future is
uncertain, and it appears in-
creasingly likely to stop
using the euro currency.
That could rattle financial
markets and make Greece's
economy already hobbled
- even weaker.
Friday's jobs report drew
traders' attention back to
the weakening U.S. econ-
omy, said Todd Salamone,
director of research for
Schaeffer's Investment Re-
search in Cincinnati.
"The weaker jobs report
translates into anticipation
of slower growth ahead and
weaker corporate earnings,
and that ratchets stock
prices lower," Salamone
said.
The record-low yield on
the 10-year Treasury note
reflected rapid buying by
traders with the biggest
portfolios, including central
banks, endowments and
pension funds, said Ira Jer-
sey, U.S. interest rate strate-
gist at Credit Suisse. He said
money managers were sell-
ing investments priced in
euros and stashing their
money in U.S. securities.
Several analysts raised
the possibility that the
weakening economy will
prompt more action by gov-
ernments and central banks
seeking to juice global eco-
nomic activity. Anticipation
of some policy response
prevented even deeper
losses, Stovall said.
The Federal Reserve un-
dertook programs in 2009
and 2010 to buy U.S. govern-
ment bonds. Its goal was to
lower interest rates and en-
courage people to buy
riskier investments like
stocks. At least in public, the
central bank so far has re-
sisted a third round of pur-
chases, known as
quantitative easing.
Anticipation of bond-buy-
ing by the Fed "might put in
a little bit of a floor to the
market, but the overall eco-
nomic picture is still bad,"
said Bob Gelfond, CEO of
MQS Asset Management, a
New York hedge fund.
The dollar fell and gold


Business HIGHLIGHTS


But in May, they were strong,
even though confidence was
wobbly and the stock market
had its worst month in two
years.

Wal-Mart CEO

claims integrity

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Wal-
Mart Stores Inc. CEO Mike
Duke said Friday that the re-
tailer is committed to integrity in
the wake of recent bribery alle-
gations in Mexico.
Duke joined other execu-
tives, including chairman Rob-
son Walton, the son of founder
Sam Walton, at the company's
annual meeting on Friday in
pledging that Wal-Mart will get
to the bottom of the allegations.
This comes after the world's
largest retailer said that it will
overhaul its compliance pro-
gram and expand its internal in-
vestigation into the accusations
to other countries.

April spending

up 0.3 percent

WASHINGTON Con-
sumer spending edged up
modestly in April but personal
income growth was the slowest
in five months, raising concerns
about the ability of Americans
to keep spending in the future.
Consumer spending in-
creased 0.3 percent in April fol-
lowing a revised 0.2 percent
gain in March, the Commerce
Department said Friday.


Americans' income grew 0.2
percent in April, the poorest
showing since incomes fell 0.1
percent in November. The April
gain was just half the 0.4 per-
cent in March rise.

US factory activity

grew slowly in May

WASHINGTON U.S. man-
ufacturing grew more slowly in
May, hampered by weaker hir-
ing and declining production.
But a measure of new orders
rose to a 13-month high, sug-
gesting factory activity will pick
up in June. The Institute for
Supply Management, a trade
group of purchasing managers,
said Friday that its index of
manufacturing activity fell to
53.5 in May, down from a read-
ing of 54.8 in April. A reading
above 50 indicates expansion.

GM shifting

some pensions

DETROIT General Motors
Co. will change the way it makes
pension payments to white-collar
retirees, shoring up its finances
by offering buyouts and shifting
liabilities to an annuity.
The moves will unload $26
billion in pension liabilities from
the Detroit automaker's books,
and experts say the changes
are likely the start of a trend as
companies with defined benefit
pension plans try to cut risk and
administrative costs.

-From wire reports


I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Name Last Chg
SPMafs 33.10 -.72
SP HIthC 35.51 -.64
SPCnSt 33.16 -.62
SPconsum 41.74 -1.36
SP Engy 62.04 -1.59
SPDRFncl 13.49 -.52
SP Inds 33.71 -.96
SPTech 27.20 -.73
SP UnI 35.71 -.15
StdPac 4.70 -.46
Standex 38.95 -1.74
StanBlkDk 63.68 -2.57
StarwdHfil 49.13 -3.72
StateSt 39.88 -1.33
Steris 29.01 -.68
STIlwr1M 8.49
Sbyker 50.01 -1.44
SturmRug 37.63 -1.34
SubPpne 36.11 -.71
SunCmts 39.89 -1.32
Suncorgs 26.41 -.58
Sunoco 45.97 -.48
Suntedich 1.58 -.07
SunTrst 21.86 -1.06
SupEnrgy 20.29 -1.35
Supvalu 4.29 -.23
SwiftTrans 9.29 -1.32
Synovus 1.74 -.17
Sysoo 27.55 -.36
TCFFncI 10.99 -.80


TDAmeritr 16.47
TE Connect 30.51
TECO 17.20
TJX s 40.90
TaiwSemi 13.06
Talbots 2.40
TalismEg 10.27
Target 57.20
TataMotors 20.11
TeckRes g 29.56
TelcmNZs 9.49
TeleBrasil 23.69
TelefEsp 11.17
TempurP 43.14
Tenaris 30.50
TenetHlth 4.49
Teradata 64.64
Teradyn 13.61
Terex 15.79
TerraNitro 202.10
Tesoro 22.49
TetraTech 6.17
TevaPhrm 39.01
Textron 22.69
Theragen 1.90
ThermoFis 49.13
ThomCrkg 3.44
3M Co 82.85
Tiffany 54.34
TimeWarn 33.76
Timken 45.95
TitanMet 11.07


TollBros 25.24
TorchEngy 1.87
Trchmrks 45.56
TorDBkg 73.85
Total SA 42.17
TotalSys 22.51
Transom 40.51
Travelers 60.58
Tredgar 14.06
TriConfi 14.62
TrinaSolar 6.35
TwoHrblnv 10.13
TycolntI 51.48
Tyson 18.68
UBSAG 11.24
UDR 25.35
UIL Hold 33.54
UNS Engy 37.22
US Airwy 12.64
USG 13.96
UltraPtg 18.03
UniFirst 56.24
UnilevNV 30.79
Unilever 31.04
UnionPac 108.11
UtdContI 24.36
UtdMicro 2.08
UPSB 73.25
UtdRentals 31.11
US Bancrp 29.60
USNGsrs 16.18
USOilFd 31.43


USSteel 19.31 -.99 WsteMInc 32.16
UtdTech 72.02 -2.09 WatsnPh 69.75
UtdhlthGp 55.04 -.73 Weathflnfi 11.75
19.30 -.65 WenRlt 24.43
SWellPoint 66.36
ValeSA 18.06 -.25 WellsFargo 30.16
ValeSApf 17.67 -.45 WestarEn 28.64
ValeantPh 47.00 -1.66 WAstEMkt 13.65
ValeroE 20.68 -.42 WstAMgdHi 6.04
VangTSM 65.60 -1.73 WAstlnfOpp 13.04
VangREIT 60.99 -1.53 WstnRefin 18.76
VangAIIW 37.65 -.82 WstnUnion 15.97
VangEmg 37.08 -.94 Weyerhsr 19.11
VangEur 38.64 -.92 Whrlpl 57.81
VangEAFE 28.77 -.74 Whi2ngPet 40.24
VarianMed 57.57 -1.09 WmsCos 29.01
Vectren 29.06 -.26 WmsPtrs 51.88
Ventas 56.89 -1.93 WmsSon 34.15
VeoliaEnv 11.20 -.26 Winnbgo 8.63
VeriFone 35.23 -.88 WiscEngy 37.79
VerizonCm 41.03 -.61 WTIndia 15.62
VimpelCm 7.23 -.14 W 1.
Visa 112.25 -2.95 Worfttn 15.88
Vishaylnt 10.20 -.42 Wyndham 47.35
Vornado 80.03 -1.89 XLGrp 19.70
WGL Hold 38.85 -.10 XcelEngy 27.96
WPXEnn 14.10 -.57 Xerox 7.12
Wabash 6.50 -.46 Yamanag 15.59
WalMart 65.55 -.27 YingliGrn 2.68
Walgrn 29.93 -.59 YumBrnds 64.70
WalterEn 47.58 -.87 ZweigTI 3.01


Gas prices are

economic highlight

There's some good news be-
hind the discouraging headlines
on the economy: Gas is getting
cheaper. It's dropped to $2.99
in some parts of South Carolina
and could soon fall below $3 in
a handful of other Southern
states. A plunge in oil prices
has knocked more than 30
cents off the price of a gallon of
gas in most parts of the U.S.
since early April. The national
average is now $3.61. Experts
say it could drop to at least
$3.40 before Labor Day.
If Americans spend less fill-
ing their tanks, they'll have
more money for discretionary
purchases. The downside?
Lower oil and gas prices are
symptoms of weakening eco-
nomic conditions in the U.S.
and around the globe.

Auto sales solid

with easy credit

DETROIT Easier credit,
hot new cars and falling gas
prices kept Americans buying
cars at a solid pace in May de-
spite bad economic news.
But sales could stumble in
June as people weigh troubling
headlines, like Friday's report
that U.S. unemployment rose
for the first time in 11 months.
Car sales usually hew
closely to the performance of
the stock market and to con-
sumer confidence numbers.







OPage A8 SATURDAY, JUNE 2,2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold .................................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z.. Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen mem ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SPEED IT UP




High time to



get things



moving at ER


or a very long time, the
emergency room at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital
has not been known for its effi-
ciency. And that's putting it
nicely.
Over the last three or four
years, the complaints about
waiting in the emergency room
for care or admittance to the
hospital have been numerous.
Average wait time
in April was more
than five hours, THE I
but we have docu-
mented com- ER wait
plaints from Citrus MI
consumers about
waiting seven, OUR 01
eight and nine
hours on busy Waytc
days.
There are many
good reasons for the delays, but
there is no good excuse for not
figuring out how to make im-
provements.
Well, help may finally be on
the way.
Ryan Beaty, the CEO of the
county hospital, announced
last week that he has put to-
gether two separate task forces
to analyze the problem and
make improvements. Beaty's
goal is to cut the ER time from
the current five-hour experi-
ence to two and one-half hours.
That would be a good start.
Admittedly, the county hospi-
tal's ER attracts a wide variety
of patients, many of whom re-
ally don't need emergency
care. But county hospital ER's
end up being the location
where people without their
own physician or those with-
out health insurance go for
routine medical care.
Expanding nearby outpatient
clinics and locating the county
health department on the Inver-
ness hospital's campus would
be two good steps in screening
out the non-emergency cases.


P
IC


But even with that said, there
are internal processes at the
hospital dealing with admis-
sions and discharge that are bu-
reaucratic barriers to providing
better emergency service to the
community.
Beaty is serious enough
about finding solutions that he
has taken the leadership role
of the task force dealing with
the admission
problem. It can
;SUE: often take an ad-
SUE: ditional three
time at hours for an ER
memorial. patient to be
processed and
INION: moved to a hospi-
tal room even
o long. after the attend-
ing physician has
made the decision
that the patient should be
admitted.
The other task force will
focus on the average one hour
it takes a patient to see a physi-
cian after they first enter the
ER.
An overriding goal of both
groups will be ways to improve
communication with patients
in the ER or waiting room. It is
often the lack of information
that drives up the collective
blood pressure of all those
waiting.
The focus on cutting times in
half is good news.
If those in the community
want to measure the negative
impact that the current gover-
nance fight going on at the hos-
pital has caused for
consumers, you need look no
further than the emergency
room. This issue should have
been dealt with years ago, but
the top brains at the hospital
have been focused on lawsuits
and strategy sessions.
We look forward to reporting
in the near future that progress
has been made.


We want to help
I read in Thursday's paper (May
24), an article in the Sound Off
with regard to volunteers for Sher-
iff Dawsy. Well, my wife and I both
volunteer for Sheriff Dawsy and
we also volunteer at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital and we
enjoy doing it. We appre- 01
ciate being able to help
out others that need
help.
We finish our daily
work at both locations V
and we are tired after-
wards. However, we enjoy
doing it. It is a pleasure CALI
to be able to help and we C
don't expect to be paid 563i
for this sort of thing. It's
ridiculous to even ask
that.
Room for employment
I'm calling the Chronicle in ref-
erence to your article, "We don't
want jobs," the volunteers for the
sheriff's department. Why don't
they turn around and give those
jobs to people who need money?
And those people who want to
give back to the community, they
can give back to the community.
They can help pick up trash along-
side the roads, the cigarette butts


0


that's all over the place. There's
other ways of giving back to the
community. Make those paying
jobs and give them to people who
need work, the younger people.
Help seniors, not sheriff
I'd just like to let you
JND volunteers know that I ap-
IND preciate all you volun-
D teers, but I don't
appreciate you for the
Sheriff's department be-
cause he gets enough
money.
And you people that
want to volunteer, there
are plenty of senior citi-
)579 zens out there who need
'05 9 somebody to drive to the
stores to do different
things.
Do it for the senior citizens who
really need it. Sheriff Dawsy does
not need it and I know you volun-
teers like to do it. Yes, I'm proud
of you volunteers, but do it (for)
who really needs it, not Sheriff
Dawsy.
He does not need it and he's
taking over this whole county. He's
taken over the fire department and
everything else and then he tells
his (deputies) they can take their
cars home and everything else.


"Even weak men when united are
powerful."
Friedrich Schiller, 1729-1805


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Debate loses to partisanship


A although nearly all mem- they say it.
bers of Congress are col- In his day, members debated to
lege graduates, you inform, impress and persuade
wouldn't know it from hearing each other, a process indispensa-
their debate on the House and ble to compromise. When com-
Senate floors. According to a re- promise finally failed, the Civil
cent study, they speak like high War resulted.
school sophomores. That's nearly What passes for debate today is
a full grade lower than in 1995. a cacophony of sound bites in-
The Sunlight Foundation, a tended for the cameras and the
public interest group campaign commer-
dedicated to govern- cials. Compromise is
ment transparency, L not the object; win-
noted that "it's the ning elections is.
most moderate mem- Perhaps this ex-
bers of both parties plains why they seem
who speak at the to say so many stupid
highest grade levels, things, both on and off
and the most extreme the floors of Congress.
members who speak Two Floridians
at the lowest grade made that kind of
levels." Interestingly, Martin Dyckman news recently
this was most obvious FLORIDA Sen. Marco Rubio
among first- and VOICES did it when he called
second-termers. President Obama the
The question is most "divisive" presi-


whether they're deliberately
talking down to the average
American, who reads some-
where between the ninth and
tenth grade, or whether Con-
gress is simply becoming less
educated.
If the latter, it explains their ap-
parent trouble in understanding
the Constitution or the Federalist
Papers, which promoted its pas-
sage. James Madison and Alexan-
der Hamilton wrote like the
college men they had been, in an
age when higher education pretty
much guaranteed erudition.
The ghost of Daniel Webster,
the senator legendary for his elo-
quence, is surely weeping at
what's happened to Congress
since his death in 1852. But his
tears would be shed more over
why they speak than over how


dent in "modern political his-
tory" Granted, Rubio was unborn
when Lyndon Johnson polarized
the nation over Vietnam and in
diapers during Richard Nixon's
Watergate crisis, but someone in
his position ought to have
learned enough history to know
who the divisive presidents truly
were and that Obama is not one
of them.
It may be, of course, that Rubio
is shrewder than he sounds. Stu-
dents of propaganda will recog-
nize his tactic as that of the
criminal transferring his own
crimes to the victim. Since before
Obama's inauguration "I hope
he fails!" Rush Limbaugh said -
our president has been bedeviled
by a rigid Republican bloc unwill-
ing to compromise on anything,
devoted to defeating him above


everything else. Rubio wants you
to think it's all Obama's fault.
Moreover, by the qualifier
"modern," Rubio conveniently
overlooked Abraham Lincoln, the
first and greatest Republican
president, whose election di-
vided the nation quite literally
The other Floridian with re-
cent foot-in-mouth disease is
Rep. Daniel Webster, who is not
to be confused with the original.
He's the sponsor of a House-
passed bill to abolish the Census
Bureau's American Community
Survey The survey is the basic
and often only source of demo-
graphic data earnings, health
care, occupations, education and
so on that are as vital to indus-
try as to government. More than
$400 billion in federal money is
distributed according to the sur-
vey, but Webster probably figures
on stopping all that, too.
Webster's dumbest remark in
debate was to say the survey is
not scientific because it's ran-
dom. The randomness of it is pre-
cisely what makes it scientific.
He objected also that it is a
"program that intrudes on peo-
ple's lives." This is the same
Daniel Webster who as a state
legislator thumped for legislation
to intrude into the lives of the
brain-dead Terri Schiavo and the
husband who had won a pro-
longed court fight to let her die in
peace.
The courts set Webster right on
that occasion. Perhaps some day
the voters will.
--In--
Martin Dyckman is a retired
associate editor of the
newspaper formerly known as
the St Petersburg Times.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Missing Gary Maidhof
I write this note in memory of
Gary Maidhof with deep sad-
ness, for myself, because he was
so helpful anytime I asked, and
for Citrus County, which now has
a huge hole that will be impossi-
ble to fill.
One of my downfalls is pro-
crastination from time to time.
Gary helped the newly founded
Crystal River Tree Board obtain
trees to have our first Arbor Day
celebration last month, a re-
quired criteria in order for Crys-
tal River to apply for a Tree City
USA status.
I procrastinated in writing a
public "Thank you, Gary," think-
ing I had plenty of time to recog-
nize his unselfish sharing of
time and his willingness to help
when we needed it, and with an
exuberance that was contagious.
Therefore, I write this with
sorrow and joy I am sorry he is
not here to recognize my grati-
tude, but on the other hand, I am
so blessed to have known Gary
and been able to be a small part
of his busy life, whether it was
for the tree board, or help with
the Jeopardy questions for the
Citrus 20/20 fundraiser and the
High School Jeopardy for Save


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


Our Waters Week, or working to-
gether on silent auctions, or
spending time together in
meetings.


I will miss you, Gary, as will
most of Citrus County. Godspeed,
my friend.
Dee Atkins
Crystal River

Proper recognition
How come the lead article in
the "State & Local" news page of
the May 28 Chronicle about the
Grand du Florida of La Societe
des Quarante Hommes et Huit
Chevaux's naming Captain
Buddy Grant as Florida's Law
Enforcement Officer of the Year
starts out by first mentioning
Sheriff Dawsy's prior winning of
that award?
Then the second paragraph
reiterates Dawsy's wins. Then
again, in the last paragraph be-
fore the humble response by
this year's recipient is another
reminder that Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy won it the previous two
years.
I know there is an election on
the horizon (and the sheriff will
have my vote) but shouldn't this
article have highlighted the re-
cipient of this year's award?
Ellen Bass
Floral City


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


- Hot Corner: VOLUNTEERS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get out of my schoolhouse


GREG BIANCE
Special to the Chronicle

Know that asking questions is easier
than finding any solutions. As a science
teacher, I explore both aspects with ac-
ademic scrutiny. So this question is simple
and hits the core of teacher's confusion: If
we can separate church and state in edu-
cation, then why can we not sep-
arate politics from education?
Why must the people of least .
knowledge in the educational
arena dictate a methodology that
reflects a crap shoot in the busi- d
ness world, but is now rolling the
dice across our academic desk?
I just don't get it
When accountability hit the
educational world in the early
1990s, the business powers to be Greg F
were biting at their bit to start a GUI
revolution. No one wanted to at- COL
tack the real problem of family
values or academic drive as the culprit. It
was assumed that the poor management
skills of educators created our dilemma. So
the lobbyists lined up with dollars in their
eyes and possible profits to tap into. Op-
portunity with the growing technology in-
terest and virtual online programs to sell
was their bottom line. In business, it is al-
ways about the bottom line.
But wait, I am manufacturing moving
parts with varied brain capacities and in-
terest. Yet they saw capitalistic profits and
the chance to save the teachers from the
mess they, so called, created. So the on-
slaught has exploded and the educators are
on the stainless steel table being bled of
their creative juices, which should be an
essential part of the equation in education.
The formula does not use this factor, and so
it does not add up. It is a failure, but the
public lemmings are stepping off the steep
cliff with political rhetoric. Kids and teach-
ers are getting a blood bath from the in-
coming numbers and soldiers.
That sounds a little graphic, but we have
been mute for years. We are so used to fol-
lowing different orders each year as we roll
our eyes on another mandate. Our politi-
cally correct approach of covering up an-
other state of Florida dysfunctional plan
must be derailed. Teachers always wanted
the kids to try harder, get parental aca-
demic support, while staying focused on
the importance of an education in their im-
mediate future.
At high school, we are ending another
year with massive amounts of time inter-
ruptions cutting valuable teaching time for
excessive testing demands. It was a logisti-
cal nightmare challenge for our testing spe-
cialist that pulled all available teachers and
teacher aides to proctor and administer lay-
ers of test. Now understand, with employee
cutbacks, there are fewer personnel needed
to do more because of lack of funding.
Yes, this has been the reality for the last
several years from our budget cuts. End-of-
course exam (EOC) scheduling has stripped
critical hours out of most days in the last
four to five weeks. Now understand, the
year was not over yet. Biology students
were testing a month before the end of the
year.
The state of Florida has mandated the
dates to give algebra, biology and other
tests. Should we not test after the nine
weeks are over? The kids are getting tested
on all of the standards they are expected to
know and we are expected to teach. The
state's immediate plan is to weigh each test
at 30 percent of their actual grade. Seems a
little heavy, since kids will have to take
classes over. More dollars to teach them the
second time should add millions of dollars
out of the budget allocated. The other side
is the students' and teachers' time and work
only counts 70 percent. Well, that sounds
like a perfect plan.
Wait a minute I gave tests as well, so
additional test time cuts into teaching. Do I
cut my tests because EOC's test is better?
Can you see that the politics has now
trickled down, but the tsunami is really
here? The faith in our educational system
often gets weakened again. The appear-
ance that teachers-educators don't know
what they are doing has been outsiders' at-


[
I
I


tack. When the state law creates an action,
the answer we get is to follow the mandate
or write your politicians. Great, that should
take years to readjust another blunder. In
my last five years before retirement, the
massive wave has crashed.
Another concern is politicians walking a
line with a conflict of interest. Pearson, a
large global corporation, generates 60 per-
cent of the sales in the United
States. They are our testing com-
pany, and our former Gov Jeb
Bush is heavily invested. He also
has been the force behind this
testing reform. I am sure a re-
porter can investigate and trace
whether there was a conflict of
interest during his
administration.
The computers needed for on-
Biance line testing of a large student
EST population have drained our fi-
UMN nancial resources and, again,
our time. This company gets mil-
lions of dollars for its testing service from
the state of Florida and billions from across
the country I have history in Citrus County,
and I always felt (Jeb Bush's) lack of love for
teachers. Unfortunately, I voted for him be-
fore I knew his intent was to dismantle pub-
lic education and promote charter schools
that draw additional millions of dollars
away from local school districts.
How do we stop this mess? The bottom
line is we cannot do it alone. Thank God we
have leaders in our school district. School
board member Pat Deutschman has always
been a passionate voice to confront the at-
tack on our public schools. She has been an
advocate for students and teachers for many
years. I know because she volunteered her
science experience with my kids in labs
years ago. Board member Thomas Kennedy
has children in school, and he is well vested
in what is the best delivery system.
I could go through every school board
member, district office leader and school
administrator to note that they have simi-
lar concerns. The bottom line is everyone
needs to get involved and educate the pub-
lic about the negatives of this business
model. Waiting and hoping in the past five
years has not yielded great educational re-
wards. The kids are tested to death and
teachers are treated like we cannot write
tests to measure content. I beg to differ, but
I was not asked to help direct the future. I
am just a teacher in the trenches who looks
at the faces of children. I read a lack of
hope and some lack of faith that education
is the way to go.
Strong parents used to sell these ideas
and beliefs. Some still do, when our IB (In-
ternational Baccalaureate) programs, AP
(Advanced Placement) classes and various
academies represent our district strengths
extremely well. But many other kids do not
understand adults pushing a test as very
valuable. So as their confidence has waned,
they lose hope. The hope would be that
enough teachers, parents and retired
adults get behind a solution, then it will get
fixed.
A common-sense approach should be
used in getting families on board with di-
recting their kids. The separation of poli-
tics and education should be implemented.
We could form committees using people
who do not seek personal gains. People
who want vertical movement sometimes
slow down an honest voice. People with fi-
nancial gains should stay home. People
who get the big picture should get behind
our school board leaders, and it will get
done.
I cannot wait, because my passion for ed-
ucation believes there is a better solution
and strategy to develop. The numbers do
not add up. I am just a teacher, but what do
I know!

GregBiance has been a teacher in Citrus
County for 28 years. He started at the
Marine Science station and is currently
teaching biology and biomed at Crystal
River High School. He has worked as a
naturalist in expedition travel and earned
his master's degree from Florida State
University He is a former district Teacher
of the Year


WATERING FINES
* Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
County has stopped
issuing warnings for
first offenders of local
watering rules.
* The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.
* See current watering
rules on Page A4.


Call 352-563-5655

after 5pm 352-563-3295

*Newsstand Prices. Can not have subscribed in 60 days.
52 week pre-paid subscriptions only. Ask For Code HP









or oi E~pA





andGe


OPINION


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 A9












NATION


Associated Press
Gunners mate Steven
Joyce kisses the hand of
his wife, Damara, as he
says goodbye Friday as his
ship, the USS Carr, pre-
pares to depart Naval Sta-
tion Norfolk in Norfolk, Va.
The ship is part of the
group leaving with the
floating special operations
base ship USS Ponce for
deployment to the Persian
Gulf.


Feds to rule on
WTC cancer aid
NEW YORK-Afederal
health official is expected to
decide within days whether to
expand an aid program for
anyone sickened by World
Trade Center dust to cover
cancer, a move that would be
cheered by many former
ground zero workers, but could
also prove costly and come at
the expense of people with ail-
ments more conclusively linked
to 9/11's toxic fallout.
An advisory committee rec-
ommended in March that the
government open up the $4.3
billion program to people with
cancers in 14 different broad
categories, including nearly all
of the most common forms of
the disease. The panel, made
up of occupational health spe-
cialists, toxicologists, union of-
ficials and health advocates,
said there were enough car-
cinogens present at the site to
create a plausible risk.
National Institute for Occu-
pational Safety and Health di-
rector Dr. John Howard is
scheduled to make a determi-
nation by Saturday, though
his decision might not be an-
nounced until Monday.

World BRIEFS

Iconic


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NOBRIEFS US employers wait for sales to pick up

Farewell


Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO One of the
world's largest open-air landfills, a
vast, seaside mountain of trash
where thousands of people have
made a living sorting through the
debris by hand, will close this
weekend after 34 years in mal-
odorous service.
Long a symbol of ill-conceived
urban planning and environmental
negligence, Rio de Janeiro's
Jardim Gramacho dump is being
transformed into a vast facility that
will harness the greenhouse gases
generated by the rotting rubbish
and turn them into fuel capable of
heating homes and powering cars.
Environmentalists had blamed
Gramacho for the high levels of pol-
lution in Rio's once pristine Guan-
abara Bay, where tons of runoff
from the garbage had leaked.
Less clear is what will happen to
the more than 1,700 people who
worked at the site, scaling hills of
fresh, fly- and vulture-covered trash
to pluck recyclable plastic, paper
and metal from the 9,000 tons of de-
tritus once dumped there daily
Known as "catadores" in Por-
tuguese, the trash pickers will re-
ceive a lump-sum payout from the
city, but there's no place for them at


Associated Press
An Indian Sikh poses Friday
for a photograph on a
street near the Sheesh
Ganj Gurudwara in New
Delhi, India. The man is a
member of the Nihang
Order, an armed group that
played a crucial role in Sikh
history.


Irish
'yes' to I
DUBLIN Ir
have agreed to r
ropean Union's (
treaty with a res
percent "yes," re
showed, but gov
leaders and pro-
paigners alike e:
lief rather than jc
the stark econor
lenges ahead.
The treaty's a
weeks of nervous
Dublin and Brus
some pressure c
cial chiefs as the
contain the euro
crisis.
But critics saic
deficit rules wou
to stimulate desl
needed growth i
Ireland, Portuga
nor stop Spain o
requiring aid, toc


say
EU pact
eland's voters
ratify the Eu-
deficit-fighting
wounding 60.3
sults Friday
veminent
-treaty cam-
xpressed re-
oy because of


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy suddenly
looks a lot weaker
Only 69,000 jobs were
added in May, the fewest in
a year, and the unemploy-
ment rate rose from 8.1 per-
cent to 8.2 percent.
The dismal jobs data will
heighten fears that the econ-
omy is sputtering. It also puts
President Barack Obama on
the defensive five months
before his re-election bid.
The Labor Department
also said Friday that the
economy added far fewer
jobs in the previous two
months than first thought -
11,000 fewer in March and
38,000 fewer in April. And the


increase in unemployment
was the first in 11 months.
Job creation is the fuel for
the nation's economic
growth. When more people
have jobs, more consumers
have money to spend and
consumer spending drives
about 70 of the economy
In related news, the AP
reports:
Political gridlock
Democrats and Republi-
cans talk a lot about job cre-
ation. But a sharply divided
Congress could end up being
a job killer Unless lawmak-
ers intervene by the end of
the year, income tax cuts will
expire and $100 billion in
spending cuts will kick in.
The Congressional Bud-
get Office estimates that


would cause the economy to
shrink in the first half of
2013. That would meet the
traditional definition of a
recession: when the econ-
omy shrinks for two consec-
utive quarters.
The conventional wisdom
is that at the last minute,
lawmakers will prevent the
country from falling off the
so-called fiscal cliff. But
until they do, economists
say many businesses will re-
main reluctant to hire.
Recession risk?
The jobs report led some
economists to lower their
growth forecasts for this
year Yet few foresee a drop
back into another recession.
Mark Vitner, an economist
at Wells Fargo Securities,


said the economy remains
stronger than it was in Au-
gust, when a downgrade of
the United States' long-term
credit rating led some ana-
lysts to warn that another
recession could occur
"The odds of recession
today are considerably less
than they were last August,"
Vitner said. "More states are
seeing improvement and
more industries are recov-
ering that at any time since
the recession ended."
Brian Bethune, an eco-
nomics professor at Gordon
College in Massachusetts,
says either of two events
would make a recession
more likely: If the 17 nations
that use the euro were to
end their currency alliance.


Or if Congress failed to
reach a compromise to ex-
tend income tax cuts set to
expire at year's end and
avoid across-the-board gov-
ernment spending cuts.
A penny here, there
A slowdown in hiring hurts
even those who do have jobs
because employers have less
incentive to give raises.
That trend continued in
May The average hourly
wage rose just two pennies,
to $23.41.
Pay has risen 1.7 percent
in the past year That's the
smaller 12-month gain since
December 2010. It's even
slower than the rate of in-
flation, which means many
people can afford less on
what they are earning.



Jurors


talking on


TV about


Edwards


trial
Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Jurors in John Edwards' cam-
paign corruption trial said
Friday they were deadlocked
on most charges because the
former presidential con-
tender never actually re-
ceived any money from two
wealthy donors to hide his
pregnant mistress, and they
didn't believe the star wit-
ness' account of the cover-up.
On network talk shows,
even jurors who thought Ed-
wards was guilty on at least
some of the six counts of
campaign finance fraud
said the prosecution simply
didn't have enough evi-
dence. The jurors did not
say what the split was, in
terms of guilty votes.
"We tried to put our feel-
ings aside and what we were
doing was just looking at the
facts to come up with a ver-
dict," juror Cindy Aquaro
said on NBC's "Today" show.
Juror Jonathan Nunn said
he thought the money from
the two wealthy donors
were personal gifts, not
campaign donations.
The jurors acquitted Ed-
wards on one count of ac-
cepting illegal campaign
contributions and dead-
locked on the other five.
"Everybody's got their
own beliefs based off of
what they saw," Nunn told
ABC's "Good Morning
America." "They stood their
ground. They stood by their
decision and I respect that."
Trial observers said the
jury's decision bore out criti-
cism from the earliest stages
of the case that it was a
reach, that prosecutors went
after the ex-U.S. senator
without the kind of evidence
that justified the charges that
he masterminded a scheme
to use campaign donations to
hide his pregnant mistress
from the public and his ter-
minally ill wife.
"As noted by nearly every
campaign finance lawyer
who considered the matter,
this was a lousy case," said
Melanie Sloan, executive di-
rector for the campaign fi-
nance watchdog group
Citizens for Responsibility
and Ethics in Washington.
Edwards faced six felony
charges involving nearly $1
million provided by two
wealthy political donors
that was used to help hide
the Democrat's mistress,
Rielle Hunter, as he sought
the White House in 2008. He
faced a maximum sentence
of up to 30 years in prison if
convicted on all counts.
To convict Edwards, pros-
ecutors needed to show not
only that the candidate
knew about the secret pay-
ments, which he denied, but
that he knew he was violat-
ing federal law by accepting
them. But the government
was unable to produce any


witness who said Edwards
knowingly violated the law.


Gramacho's replacement, the high-
tech Seropedica dump, where most
of the Marvelous City's garbage is
already being sent
"When you first get here, you're
like, 'Ick, I don't know if I can do
this,' but then you get used to it
and you make friends and you find
it's good work," said Lorival Fran-
cisco dos Santos, a 46-year-old
from Brazil's impoverished north-
east who spent 13 years at the
landfill.
In the works for years, Grama-
cho's closure was postponed several
times, and was slated to finally take
place just weeks before the United
Nations' Rio+20 megaconference
on sustainable development here. It
also comes as the city gears up to
host the 2014 World Cup soccer tour-
nament and the 2016 Olympics.
"We've been telling the cata-
dores about it for years, but some-
how they never believed it would
really happen," said Gramacho di-
rector Lucio Alves Vianna.
Gramacho sprang up on unsta-
ble, ecologically sensitive marsh-
land overlooking the bay in 1978
and, for nearly 20 years, functioned
with little or no oversight.
There was no lining on the mas-
sive landfill's floor to prevent leaks
of the toxic waste that was rou-


tinely dumped there, and the fetid
juices produced by the rot of or-
ganic materials drained directly
into the water, helping make much
of the bay unsafe for swimming.
In 1996, Rio authorities stepped
in, ending child labor at the site,
registering the catadores and re-
stricting the kinds of trash the
dump took in to just household
waste from Rio and four outlying
cities.
Bulldozers started covering the
picked-over trash with thick layers
of earth. Now, with 12 layers each
about 15 feet high, the 321-acre fa-
cility has grown into a literal
mountain of garbage overlooking
the Guanabara Bay
Contamination concerns
spurred plans to close the dump
and tap into the energy created by
the decomposition of its estimated
60 million tons of trash.
More than 200 wells will capture
the carbon dioxide and methane
that emanate from the decompos-
ing rubbish and pipe the gases to a
facility run by Brazil's state-con-
trolled energy company Petrobras.
Sales of carbon credits and bio-
gas are expected to generate about
$232 million over 15 years, a per-
centage of which will go to pay-
ments to the catadores.


Diamond jubilee: Britain marks queen's reign


Associated Press


nic chal- LONDON The patri-
otic bunting is ready, the
approval, after golden carriage on standby,
isness in the boats freshly painted,
sels, relieves the shops filled with royal
on EU finan- souvenirs.
ey battle to Britain is marking Queen
zone's debt Elizabeth II's 60 years on
the throne with a four-day
d the tougher holiday weekend of cere-
Id do nothing mony, symbolism and street
perately parties.
n bailed-out The queen will celebrate
I and Greece, Saturday at the Epsom
r Italy from Derby, a highlight of the
>r Italy from horseracing calendar, and
o. on Sunday she will lead a
-From wire reports 1,000-boat flotilla on the


River Thames. Monday's
festivities include a pop
concert in front of Bucking-
ham Palace with Paul Mc-
Cartney and Elton John,
and festivities climax Tues-
day with a religious serv-
ice, a procession through
the streets of London and
the royal family's appear-
ance on the palace balcony
The pageantry is very
grand and very British. But
at the heart of the Diamond
Jubilee celebration is a
nearly universal sense of
appreciation for the queen,
who acceded to the throne
in 1952 on the death of her
father, King George VI.


Associated Press
Racegoers are seen with a cardboard cutout of Queen Elizabeth
II during Investec Ladies' Day of the Investec Derby Festival on
Friday at Epsom Racecourse, Epsom, southern England.


Rio trashing dump


Associated Press
People collect recyclable materials Tuesday at Jardim Gramacho, one of the world's largest open-air landfills, in
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Jardim Gramacho, a vast, seaside mountain of trash where thousands of people made a
living sorting through the debris by hand, is closing after three decades in service.

Massive Jardim Gramacho open-air landfill to close











SPORTS


The Boston
Celtics try to
climb out of a
2-0 hole against
the Miami
Heat./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Youth recreation/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 College softball/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 College baseball/B5
0 Auto racing, golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Federer advances, but it's not easy


Player to face

'lucky loser'who

keeps winning

Associated Press
PARIS If it seems Roger
Federer breaks one record or an-
other every time he wins a match,
that's because he does these days.
Then again, good as Federer is,
he can't top this: His next oppo-
nent at the French Open, Bel-
gium's David Goffin, is unbeaten
in Grand Slam main-draw
matches. (OK, so the kid's only
3-0, but still.)
Yes, before Federer can take on
Novak Djokovic or Rafael Nadal at


More on French Open
For all of Friday's singles
results, plus Saturday's show
court schedule, please see
Page B4.

Roland Garros this year, he'll need
to defeat Goffin, the first "lucky
loser" a player beaten in quali-
fying who sneaks into the field via
someone's withdrawal to reach
the fourth round at any Grand
Slam tournament in 17 years, and
only the seventh to make it that far
"Now I'm playing against
Roger," the 109th-ranked Goffin
said after beating Lukasz Kubot
of Poland 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-1 on Fri-
day, "and I can't believe it."
A fresh-faced 21-year-old whose
voice was barely a whisper and


whose hands fidgeted during an
extended interview session with UL
reporters, the slender, 5-foot-11
Goffin matter-of-factly discussed
displaying photos and posters of
16-time Grand Slam champion
Federer in his bedroom as a child.
"Since I was little, I've watched
Roger play on TV To me, he plays
almost perfect tennis. His tech- -
nique is perfect. I also like him at
the human level; he's a very good
person on and off the court," said
Goffin, who was able to make his
Grand Slam debut because
France's Gael Monfils pulled out
with a knee injury "I expect a ,
very tough match on Sunday, of
course. I don't really know how
I'll prepare for it, but I'll try to Associated Press
have fun." Roger Federer returns in his third-round match Friday against Nicolas
Mahut during the French Open tennis tournament at Roland Garros
See Page B4 stadium in Paris.


C[


*|


I~JI


P .





/- l


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Schrade's Tae Kwon Do instructor Brian Sargent puts Joshua Reynolds through some drills recently at the Crystal River-based studio.
Reynolds, an 11-year-old blue belt, won a state title and was one of 18 students who competed in the Florida State Championships.


Studentsfrom
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Schrade's Tae Kwon Do
Kumbo School located of
rus Avenue in Crystal F
made big waves on May 1
18 of its students compete
the Florida Tae Kwon
State Championships in
Beach Gardens.
Of the 18 students ran
between the ages of 5 an
years old, 10 brought h
medals and one 11-yea
blue belt Josh Reynolds -
his belt division for a state
Brian Sargent, owner
head instructor at
Schrade's School, could
prouder of his students
what was achieved at the
tournament.
"It was fun. These kids
courageous if you think a
what they all went and


Crystal River Tae Kwon Do school excel at state tournament
Sargent said. "They walked9m *7
into a competition where you I..
know you're going to be actu-
and ally sparring and fighting (op-
SfCit- ponents). Some of these kids
liver have never even been in those *
19 as (kinds) of situations. And I just
ed in think it takes a lot of courage.
Do "It's very hard work on their
Palm part," Sargent continued. "It
took a huge commitment for
iging them to get ready They went in "
id 24 there and nobody gave up and o Ua
lome they did all of their stuff and
r-old didn't let the pressure of the
-won tournament get to them. I'm "
title. very proud of them."
and Sargent started out as a stu-
the dent at Schrade's back in 1996
't be and has enjoyed 16 years asso-
and ciated with the school, includ-
state ing his taking over of Some of the students who attended the Florida State Tae Kwon
ownership in August 2011. The Do Championship (pictured from left front) are: Robby Fowler,
s are school itself opened in 1990 Hunter Clabaugh, Tanner Ledsom and Shane Keim. In the back row,


bout
did,"


from left are Hunter Roessler, Isaac Nye, Danielle Reinertsen, Kent
See Page B4 Coble, Joshua Reynolds and Brandon Strickland.


Mets'


Santana


no-hits


Cardinals


Feat is first ever

for the NL team

Associated Press
NEW YORK Johan San-
tana pitched the first no-hitter
in New York Mets' history,
helped by an umpire's missed
call and an outstanding catch
in left field in an 8-0 victory
over the St. Louis Cardinals
on Friday night.
After a string of close calls
in their 51-season history, San-
tana finally finished the job in
the Mets' 8,020th game since
the team was born in 1962.
"Finally, the first one," San-
tana said. "That is the greatest
feeling ever."
He needed a couple of key
assists to pull it off.
Carlos Beltran, back at Citi
Field for the first time since
the Mets traded him last July,
hit a line drive over third base
in the sixth inning that hit the
foul line and should have
been called fair. But third
base umpire Adrian Johnson
ruled it foul and the no-hitter
was intact even though a
replay clearly showed a mark
where the ball landed on the
chalk line.
See Page B3


Associated Press
New York Mets starting pitcher
Johan Santana throws against
the St. Louis Cardinals in the
second inning Friday at Citi Field
in New York.


Tiger lurks at Memorial tourney


Associated Press
Tiger Woods watches his tee shot Friday on the first hole during the
second round of the Memorial golf tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Woods
birdied the hole and finished the day tied for second at 5-under par.


Woods one shot

behind leader

Sabbatini

Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ohio That other
Rory Rory Sabbatini played
his best golf in the worst weather
Friday at the Memorial and made
a surprising appearance atop the
leaderboard. Right behind him
was a Tiger Woods that looked all
too familiar
Sabbatini played bogey-free


More golf news
For the rest of Friday's golf
action, plus the Memorial
scores, please see Page B5.

over his final 12 holes, and de-
spite missing a 5-foot birdie putt
on the 18th hole, put together a
3-under 69 in the cool, blustery
conditions at Muirfield Village to
take a one-shot lead going into
the weekend.
Woods looked strong for the
second straight day, though he
also had another double bogey
that slowed his progress. What
pleased him was controlling his


ball in the wind for plenty of
birdie chances that led to a 69.
"I hit the ball well all day, and it
was a day that I needed to,"
Woods said. "The wind was blow-
ing out there, swirling in those
trees, and it was just a tough day"
It was plenty tough for Rory
McIlroy
The U.S. Open champion, who
returned to No. 1 in the world
only four weeks ago, missed the
cut in his third straight tourna-
ment. McIlroy was in good shape
until a shot just outside a creek
hit the bank and went backward
into the water, leading to the first
See Page B4






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS


WAA
AU LE-AE -, O T
ADULT LEAGUE SPORTS


LLI

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0
0


CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


(A
I

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LU

3:


HITTING THE


LINKS OUTDOORS '






GAME


SATURDAY, JUNE 2,2012


GET IN THE


Camp Fusion a success so far


Signups still open

for youth camp

Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's summer youth camp pro-
gram, Camp Fusion, is under way
Attendance has broken records
with more than 110 campers per
day, and their are still plenty of
openings. Activities include every-
thing from arts and crafts to weekly
field trips and athletic programs.
Camp uRsion is for children
ages 6 to 10 years; 6-year-olds must
have attended kindergarten be-
fore the start of summer and 10-
year-olds cannot have started
middle school.
Camp Fusion will run 10 weeks
and accepts weekly as well as
daily registrations. Camp Fusion
offers a variety of activities
throughout the week to keep
campers on their toes and enter-
tained. The flow of each week will
include sports, games, movies at
the mall and swimming at Bicen-
tennial Park Pool. There will also
be field trips, guest speakers, and
many other activities. Some of this
year's field trips include to the
Museum of Science and Industry
(MOSI), Lowry Park Zoo, a Tampa
Bay Rays game and more.
All staff are trained in CPR and
first aid, and have been back-
ground checked. Camp Fusion
will participate in the free meal
program through July 27. Free
breakfast and lunch are offered on
site at the Renaissance Center,
Monday through Thursday Break-
fast is provided each morning and
lunch is provided on specified
dates to be determined. This free
meal program is sponsored by the
Citrus County School System.
The weekly fees are $60 per
child for regular care and $75 per
child per week for extended care;
daily drop-off is available for $20.
Regular care hours are 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m.; extended hours are 7:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
For more information about
Camp Fusion, call 352-527-7540 or
visit www.citruscountyparks.com.
Citrus Hills slates golf camp
The 17th annual Citrus Hills Junior
Golf Camp starts Wednesday, June 6,
for youths from 4 to 17 years old.
Participants have a choice to play
from 9 to 11 a.m. on five consecutive
Wednesday, or from 5:30 to 8 p.m.
on five consecutive Thursdays. The
camp costs $100 and includes free
summer membership at Citrus Hills.
Citrus Hills' PGA professionals, with
67 years of experience, are dedicated
to giving the juniors the best instruc-
tion on golf fundamentals and having
fun in the process. In addition to the
lessons, junior golfers will be provided
pizza and soda at each lesson.
Classes fill up quickly. Call Citrus
Hills golf shop at 352-746-4425 for in-
formation or to register.
Youth golf clinics
coming Wednesday
Randy Robbins, who has more than
11 years of experience with junior golf
instruction along with his support staff,
will instruct two five-week clinics for


Special to the Chronicle
Campers smile during a swimming expedition at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River recently. The outing was
a part of Camp Fusion.


youths, offered by Citrus County Parks
& Recreation.
The morning clinic will begin June 6
and will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday. The evening clinic will
begin June 7 will be from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Both clinics will be at Pine Ridge
Community Golf and Country Club.
The clinics are open to girls and boys
ages 6 to 15. Cost is $80 per child
($15 off for additional siblings). Instruc-
tion will include; chipping, putting, full
swing, golf etiquette and on-course
experience.
For more information, call
352-527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Inverness offers
lifeguard camp
Whispering Pines Park and the city
of Inverness will offer Junior Lifeguard
Camp 2012 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July
9 to 14 and July 30 to Aug. 4. Cost is
$50 for a six-day session.
The camp is to give young people
(ages 11 to 14) the opportunity to expe-


rience the role of a professional life-
guard in a fun learning environment.
Participants will learn the fundamentals
of lifeguarding, gain basic knowledge of
CPR and first aid, and learn basic water-
rescue techniques. On the final day of
the camp, participants will present a
demonstration to parents with skills
learned over the course of the week.
Junior lifeguards can expect to par-
ticipate in fun and challenging leader-
ship and team-building activities as
well as physical fitness.
In order to become a city of Inverness
junior lifeguard, candidates must pass
three prerequisites: swim front crawl for
25 yards; submerge to a depth of 10
feet; and tread water for one minute.
Space is limited. Call 352-726-3913.
Register now for
swimming lessons
Swim lesson registrations are ongo-
ing for June and July lessons at Whis-
pering Pines Pool.
Red Cross lessons incorporate im-
portant safety talks into each lesson
and bring an extra element of fun and


safety into the mix. Cost for an eight-
class session is $35.
Call Inverness Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-726-3913.
Register now for YMCA
camp, swim lessons
Citrus County YMCA is counting
down to the start of the 2012 Summer
Adventure Camp. With a bit more than
two weeks left before the start of the
summer, camp registration is begin-
ning to increase rapidly as Citrus
County residents make their summer
plans.
Adventure Camp "Where
Learning & Fun Come Together"
Camp will be at two locations: Whis-
pering Pines Park in Inverness and the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park in Homosassa. Each
week of camp has a separate theme
and will incorporate activities such as
sports, arts/crafts and field trips, but will
also focus on literacy, as well.
Field trips planned for the campers
this summer include the Museum of
Science and Industry, Lowry Park Zoo,


The Florida Aquarium and a Tampa
Bay Rays game.
Campers may choose the weeks
they want to attend based on the
unique theme of each week. Camp is
open for ages 5 to 12, with a counselor-
in-training program for ages 13 to 15.
The Y's Summer Day Camp will run 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 3, with ex-
tended care from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. for
no extra charge. Financial assistance is
available to those who qualify.
Swim lessons
Group swim lessons are offered at
Central Ridge Community Pool in Bev-
erly Hills. There are a variety of
classes available including preschool,
youth and adult. There are also in-
fant/toddler classes offered for infants
age 6 months and older. Swim ses-
sions generally consist of eight les-
sons; several sessions are offered
throughout the summer until Aug. 4.
Registration forms for camp and swim
lessons are available at www.ymca
suncoast.org under Locations/Citrus
County. Online registration is available
for those who have an active member-
ship with the Citrus County YMCA.
Registration packets may also be
picked up at the YMCA office, 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, Whis-
pering Pines Park and Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park. For more
information, call 352-637-0132.
Summer tennis at
Whispering Pines Park
David Waterman, USPTA tennis
professional, returns again this year to
Whispering Pines Park to provide a
tennis camp for children in kindergarten
through eighth grade. The camp weeks
are: June 11 to 15, June 18 to 22, June
25 to 29, July 9 to 13 and July 23 to 27.
The camp takes place 9 to 10:30
a.m. Monday through Thursday at the
Whispering Pines Tennis Courts. Cost
is $75 per week; a $50 deposit is re-
quired at the time of registration and
the remaining $25 must be paid on or
before the first day of camp. Cash or
check only.
Register at Whispering Pines Park
administration office, 1700 Forest
Drive, Inverness, or call 352-425-8160
or 352-726-3913 for more information.
Summer camp at
Boys & Girls Clubs
Enrollment for the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County Summer Camp
is still being taken for all three sites,
the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club in
Beverly Hills, the Evelyn Waters Boys
& Girls Club in Inverness and the
Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club
halfway between Homosassa and
Crystal River.
Camp will run through Aug. 3.
Camp begins at 7 a.m. and closes
each day at 6 p.m. Cost for camp at
$80 per week includes swimming,
bowling and skating.
Businesses or individuals wanting to
sponsor scholarships for summer
campers may call the administrative
office at 352-621-9225.
For more information or to enroll a
child, parents may call club directors at
their sites. Call Amy Stonestreet at the
Central Ridge B&GC at 352-270-8841,
Amber Mekelburg at the Inverness
Evelyn Waters B&GC at 352-341-
2507, or Beth Klein at the Robert
Halleen B&GC at 352-795-8624.


Recreation BRIEFS


Panther basketball
camp accepting signups
Lecanto High School is host-
ing its 18th annual Panther
Basketball Camp from June 18
to 21. The camp is open to both
boys and girls who are currently
in grades K-8.
The camp will run 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. each day. The campers
will receive quality instruction in
all the basketball fundamentals,
participate in various basketball
competitions and play games
each day.
The cost of the camp is $75
with multiple sibling discounts
available. Each camper will re-
ceive a camp T-shirt. For more
information contact Frank
Vilardi at 352-362-0011.
Registration for "Learn
to Fish" class open
Registration is open for the
"Learn To Fish" class for boys


and girls ages 10 through 18
being held at the Crystal River
Preserve State Park meeting
room on Monday, June 4 and
Tuesday, June 5, from 9 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. both days.
The cost is $20 per student,
and kids age 10 and 11 must
be accompanied by an older
sibling or adult (no charge for
the adult). This is a basic fish-
ing class, intended to impart the
knowledge to get a beginner
starting in the sport of fishing,
taught by the author of an
award-winning book on fishing
Florida's inshore waters.
For more information, call
352-794-0414 or email
rgschmidt@embarqmail.com.
Sharks youth football
signups in June
The Crystal River Sharks
youth football program is
holding signups.


Sign-up times, dates and
places are:
June 2, 9, 16 and 23 -
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Crystal
River Mall food court.
Volleyball camp serving
up next week
The Crystal River Volleyball
Camp will be from 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. June 4 through June 8
at Citrus Springs Middle School.
The camp is open to girls ages
11 to 16 who attend any county
schools and are of any skill level.
Training will be offered on im-
proving volleyball skills such as
setting, hitting, serving, defense
and team play. T-shirts will be
provided to all campers. Camp
cost is $55.
Camp applications are avail-
able at Crystal River High
School and Crystal River
Middle School.
For more information, call


Mike Ridley at 352-566-7789 or
email at ridleym@citrus.k12.fl.us.
Fourth annual CR hoops
camp coming soon
The Crystal River 2012
Hoops Camp will hold two more
sessions at Crystal River High
School, led by Pirates boys bas-
ketball coach Steve Feldman.
The sessions take place from
June 4 to 7 and June 11 to 14
from 9 a.m. to noon each day.
Attendance cost $49 for one
session or $79 for two sessions.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a T-shirt and a
"Basketball + Books" camp
booklet.
For more information, contact
Steve Feldman at feldmans@
citrus.k12.fl.us or 352-601-0870.
CRHS hosting girls
basketball camp
On June 18-22, the CRHS
girls basketball summer camp


will be from 4 to 6 p.m. each
day. Girls in grades 4 to 12 can
participate and the cost of the
camp is $25 per camper.
Players are asked to wear
basketball-appropriate attire.
For more information, contact
coach Jason Rodgers at
rodgersj@citrus.k12.fl.us or call
Crystal River High School at
352-795-4641 during normal
business hours.
CF holding basketball
camp in Ocala
Coach Tim Ryan, the men's
basketball coach at the College
of Central Florida, is hosting
Camp Patriot Basketball Camp
for the ninth straight year.
The camp is for boys and
girls ages 8 to 18 and is located
at the Ocala Campus of CF.
Four sessions are offered: June
18 to 21, June 25 to 28, July 9
to 12, and July 23 to 26. The


hours each day are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The cost is $150. Please visit
www.camppatriotbasketball.com
or call Coach Ryan at 352-427-
7435 if you have any questions.
Panthers holding alumni
flag football game
Lecanto High School is host-
ing the Lecanto Alumni Flag
Football game at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, June 8.
The game will be 8-on-8 and
is open to any Lecanto football
varsity letterman who graduated
from the high school. Teams will
be odd graduation years vs.
even graduation years.
Players wishing to participate
will be charged a $50 fee,
which will include a jersey to
play in and keep. For fans, ad-
mission is $2.
Call Lecanto head football
coach McKinley Rolle at 352-
746-2344, ext. 4244 for more
information.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL

Rays 5, Orioles 0


Baltimore


Tampa Bay


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Andino2b 3 00 0 C.Penalb 4 0 1 0
Tollesn If 3 0 1 0 BUpton cf 4 1 0 0
EnChvz ph 1 00 0 Joyce rf 3 1 2 0
Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 0
AdJons cf 4 0 2 0 Scott dh 4 1 1 2
Wieters c 4 02 0 SRdrgz 3b 2 0 0 1
MrRynlib 4 0 0 0 Matsui If 3 1 1 2
C.Davisdh 4 0 0 0 Thmps If 1 0 0 0
Betemt3b 3 0 0 0 JMolinc 2 0 1 0
Hall rf 2 0 0 0 EJhnsn ss 2 0 1 0
Totals 32 06 0 Totals 295 8 5
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 500 000 00x 5
E-Zobrist (5). DP-Baltimore 2, Tampa Bay 2.
LOB-Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 5.2B-eC.Pena
(9). HR-Matsui (2). S-S.Rodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
W.Chen L,4-2
Gregg
Patton
Ji.Johnson
Tampa Bay
Price W,7-3
McGee
Badenhop
Rodney S,17-18
WP-W.Chen.


52-3 5 5
1-3 2 0
11-3 1 0
2-3 0 0

71-3 3 0
2-3 0 0
1-3 3 0
2-3 0 0


Indians 7, Twins 1


Minnesota

Span cf
Revere rf
Mauer dh
Wlngh If
Mornea 1 b
Doumit c
Dozier ss
ACasill 2b
JCarrll 3b

Totals
Minnesota
Cleveland


a Cleveland
ab r h bi
4 01 0 Choo rf
4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b
4 0 0 0 ACarer ss
3 1 1 0 JoLopzdh
4 0 0 0 Brantly cf
4 03 0 Ktchmlb
3 0 1 1 Damon If
3 0 0 0 Cnghm If
3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b
Marson c
32 16 1 Totals
a 000 000 100
021 400 00x


ab r h bi
5220
5 1 2 4
5 0 1 0
5 02 0
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
4 1 2 0
0 00 0
4 23 2
3 1 1 0
39714 7
1
7


E-J.Carroll (3), Damon (1), Chisenhall (1).
DP-Cleveland 2. LOB-Minnesota 5, Cleve-
land 9. 2B-Brantley (16). HR-Kipnis (9),
Chisenhall (2). SB-Kipnis (12), Chisenhall (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
Pavano L,2-5
Swarzak
Duensing
Cleveland
D.LoweW,7-3
Hagadone
Accardo


62-3 5 1 1 1 2
11-3 1 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 2


Toronto


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Pdsdnkcf 5 1 1 1 KJhnsn2b 4 0 0 0
Nava If 5 3 4 1 YEscor ss 4 1 1 1
AdGnzlib 5 1 3 2 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0
Ortiz dh 3 1 2 2 Encrnc dh 4 0 1 0
Stlmchc 4 00 1 Rasmscf 3 0 1 0
Mdlrks3b 4 01 0 Lawrie3b 4 0 0 0
Sweeny rf 4 1 2 0 Arencii c 4 0 0 0
Avilesss 4 0 1 0 Cooperlb 4 1 2 1
Punto 2b 4 0 1 0 RDavis If 2 0 1 0
Totals 38 7157 Totals 332 7 2
Boston 011 001 400 7
Toronto 001 000 100 2
E-Aviles (4), Saltalamacchia (6). DP-Boston
2, Toronto 2. LOB-Boston 5, Toronto 8. 2B-
Nava 3 (10), Ad.Gonzalez (19), Sweeney (16),
Cooper (2). HR-Ortiz (13), Y.Escobar (3),
Cooper (1). SB-R.Davis 2 (10).
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Buchholz W,5-2 8 6 2 2 2 7
Atchison 1 1 0 0 0 1
Toronto
H.Alvarez L,3-5 61-3 8 4 4 1 2
L.Perez 2-3 4 3 3 0 0
Coello 2 3 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Buchholz (Rasmus).

Royals 2, Athletics 0


Kansas City


ab rhbi ab rhbi
JWeeks 2b 4 0 2 0 AGordn If 3 1 1 0
S.Smith dh 3 0 0 0 YBtncr2b 4 1 1 1
Reddckrf 4 0 1 0 Butler dh 4 0 1 0
Cespds If 4 00 0 Mostks 3b 2 0 1 1
Kaaihulb 3 0 0 0 Francrrf 4 0 1 0
Inge3b 2 00 0 Hosmerlb 4 0 1 0
Crisp cf 3 00 0 AEscor ss 3 01 0
KSuzukc 2 00 0 Dysoncf 3 00 0
Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0 Quinter c 3 0 1 0
Totals 28 03 0 Totals 302 8 2
Oakland 000 000 000 0
Kansas City 200 000 00x 2
DP-Oakland 2. LOB-Oakland 5, Kansas City
7. 2B-J.Weeks (7), A.Gordon (14), Y.Betan-
court (5). CS-J.Weeks (5).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Colon L,4-6
Carignan
Blevins
Kansas City
FPaulino W,3-1
K.Herrera H,8
G.Holland H,3
Broxton S,12-14


7 8 2
2-3 0 0
1-3 0 0

6 3 0
1 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0


Yankees 9, Tigers 4


New York


Detroit


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeter ss 4 1 2 1 Berry cf 5 2 3 0
Grndrscf 5 2 2 4 Worth 2b 4 0 1 1
Teixeirlb 5 0 1 0 MiCarr3b 5 1 1 0
AIRdrg3b 5 1 1 2 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 1
Cano 2b 4 1 0 0 DYong If 4 0 3 0
Swisher rf 2 2 0 0 Laird dh 2 0 1 0
AnJons dh 4 0 1 1 Kelly pr-dh 0 0 0 0
J.Nixlf 2 2 1 0 JhPerltph-dh 0 0 0 1
Wise If 0 0 0 0 Boesch rf 4 0 0 0
CStwrt c 4 0 1 OSants c 3 0 0 0
Avila ph 0 0 0 0
RSantgss 4 1 1 1
Totals 35 99 9 Totals 34411 4
NewYork 050 100 012 9
Detroit 102 000 010 4
DP-New York 3, Detroit 1. LOB-New York 5,
Detroit 8.2B-An.Jones (2), J.Nix (2), Berry (3),
Mi.Cabrera (14), D.Young (11). 3B-Berry (2).
HR-Granderson (17), AI.Rodriguez (8),
R.Santiago (1). SB-Granderson (2), J.Nix (1).
SF-Jh.Peralta.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Sabathia W,7-2 7 8 3 3 2 5
Eppley 0 1 1 1 0 0
Logan 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
WadeH,6 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Rapada 1-3 1 0 0 2 0
R.Soriano S,7-7 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Crosby L,0-1 31-34 6 6 4 3
L.Marte 32-32 0 0 0 3
Villarreal 1 1 1 1 2 2
Dotel 1 2 2 2 0 2
Eppley pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Rapada. PB-O.Santos.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Tampa Bay 30
Baltimore 29
NewYork 28
Boston 27
Toronto 27



W
Washington 29
Miami 29
New York 29
Atlanta 28
Philadelphia28


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
22 .577 - 5-5
23 .558 1 2-8
23 .549 1Y2 7-3
25 .519 3 1Y2 6-4
25 .519 3 1Y2 4-6


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
21 .580 - 6-4
23 .558 1 6-4
23 .558 1 7-3
24 .538 2 1 2-8
25 .528 2Y2 1Y2 7-3


Str Home
W-1 18-10
L-6 14-13
W-2 14-11
W-1 13-14
L-1 15-11


Away W
12-12 Chicago 30
15-10 Cleveland 28
14-12 Detroit 24
14-11 Kansas City 22
12-14 Minnesota 18


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
22 .577 - 9-1 W-9 13-13 17-9
23 .549 1Y2 5-5 W-1 16-14 12-9
28 .462 6 4Y2 4-6 L-1 11-13 13-15
28 .440 7 5Y2 6-4 W-3 6-17 16-11
33 .353 11Y210 4-6 L-1 9-17 9-16


Texas
Angels
Seattle
Oakland


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-3 15-8 14-13
L-1 16-10 13-13
W-1 17-11 12-12
W-2 12-11 16-13
W-2 12-13 16-12


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
22 .569 - 7-3 W-1 15-9 14-13
25 .519 2Y2 2 4-6 L-3 13-11 14-14
25 .500 3Y2 3 6-4 W-1 16-11 9-14
28 .451 6 5Y2 6-4 W-4 11-13 12-15
30 .423 7Y2 7 3-7 L-7 16-11 6-19
32 .360 10Y210 3-7 W-3 12-15 6-17


Dodgers
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str
20 .608 - 6-4 L-2
26 .500 5Y2 2Y2 8-2 L-1
31 .426 9Y2 6Y2 3-7 L-1
30 .423 9Y2 6Y2 1-9 L-9



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str
19 .627 - 4-6 L-4
24 .529 5 1Y2 6-4 L-1
28 .451 9 512 5-5 W-1
29 .420 10127 6-4 W-4
35 .327 151212 1-9 L-6


Home Away
15-11 16-9
13-11 13-15
9-13 14-18
10-15 12-15


Home Away
21-9 11-10
14-11 13-13
10-15 13-13
13-14 8-15
12-16 5-19


Price, Rays shut out Orioles


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG, Fla. David
Price scattered four hits over 7 1-3 in-
nings, Hideki Matsui homered and
the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Balti-
more Orioles 5-0 on Friday night.
Price (7-3), who struck out five and
walked two, retired his first 13 bat-
ters. He got some defensive help
when right fielder Matt Joyce made
a full-extension, tumbling back-
handed catch on J.J. Hardy's drive to
end the fourth.
Price was charged with a fourth hit
after a postgame scoring change that
gave Wilson Betemit the left-han-
der's final batter a single on a
grounder first called an error on sec-
ond baseman Ben Zobrist.
After Luke Scott hit a two-run sin-
gle and Sean Rodriguez added a run-
scoring bunt, Matsui belted a two-run
homer off Wei-Yin Chen (4-2) to make
it 5-0 in the first. Matsui, who was
promoted from Triple-A Durham on
Tuesday, has homered in two of his
three games with Tampa Bay
Jake McGee replaced Price and
struck out both batters he faced in
the eighth. The Orioles loaded the
bases with one out in the ninth on
three singles against Burke Baden-
hop, but Fernando Rodney struck out
Mark Reynolds and got a grounder
from Chris Davis for his 17th save.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 9, Tigers 4
DETROIT Curtis Granderson hit a
grand slam against his former team in the
second inning, and CC Sabathia made
the lead hold up after a shaky start, help-
ing the New York Yankees to a 9-4 win
over the Detroit Tigers.
Alex Rodriguez added a two-run homer
in the ninth for New York.
It was tied at 1 when Granderson
cleared the bases with a drive just inside
the pole in right field off left-hander Casey
Crosby (0-1), who was making his major
league debut.
Sabathia (7-2) allowed three runs and
eight hits in seven innings. New York
used five relievers. Rafael Soriano came
on with the bases loaded and one out in
the ninth. He got Miguel Cabrera to
ground into a double play for his seventh
save.

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO David Ortiz homered,
Clay Buchholz won his sixth straight start
in Toronto and the Boston Red Sox beat
the Blue Jays 7-2, their fourth victory in
five games.
Daniel Nava had three doubles and
Adrian Gonzalez had three hits for the
Red Sox, who have not lost consecutive
games since May 8 and 9 at Kansas City.
Buchholz (5-2) won for the first time in
four starts, giving up two runs, both on
solo homers, and six hits in a season-
high eight innings. The right-hander im-
proved to 6-2 with a 1.72 ERA in eight
career starts at Rogers Centre. His six
consecutive wins in Toronto are the most
ever by a Red Sox pitcher.
Scott Atchison finished in the ninth for
the Red Sox.
Henderson Alvarez (3-5) took the loss.

Royals 2, Athletics 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Felipe Paulino
kept the scuffling Athletics at bay for six
innings, and the Kansas City Royals'
bullpen handled the rest in a 2-0 victory
that gave Oakland its season-worst ninth
straight loss.
Yuniesky Betancourt came off the dis-
abled list to provide an RBI double in the
first, and Mike Moustakas added an RBI
blooper to left later in the inning, helping
Kansas City win for only the sixth time in
23 games at Kauffman Stadium this
season.
Paulino (3-1) has emerged as the ace
of the Royals' haphazard starting rotation,
holding the opposition off the scoreboard
through six innings for the fourth time in
six starts.
Indians 7, Twins 1
CLEVELAND Derek Lowe shut
down Minnesota's lineup with ease for
the second time this season and Jason
Kipnis hit a grand slam, leading the
Cleveland Indians to a 7-1 win over the
Minnesota Twins.
Lowe (7-3) carried a two-hit shutout




Makir
missing
Continued from Page BI should
(3-2) thr
Hometown kid Mike Baxter pitches.
then made a tremendous and wall
catch in left field to rob third nc
YadierMolina of extra bases "Ama:
in the seventh, crashing into "Comin
the wall and getting injured was ju


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price delivers in the first inning Friday to
the Baltimore Orioles in St. Petersburg.


into the seventh before the Twins
scratched out a run on three hits. The
right-hander pitched a complete game
shutout against the Twins on May 15.
Kipnis connected for his slam in the
fourth off Carl Pavano (2-5) as the Indi-
ans, who have been rocked by injuries
lately, won for just the second time in
seven games,
Lonnie Chisenhall hit a two-run homer
in the second for Cleveland, which has
won 11 of 12 over Minnesota.
The Twins had their winning streak
stopped at three and fell to an AL-worst
18-33.

White Sox 7, Mariners 4
CHICAGO Alexei Ramirez drove in
the go-ahead run with a two-out infield
single in the eighth inning Friday night and
the Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle
Mariners 7-4 for their ninth straight win.
The White Sox scored three times in
the eighth, helped by a Mariners misplay.
Paul Konerko led off with a fly and the
ball glanced off center fielder Michael
Saunders' glove and then hit him for a
two-base error.
Jesse Crain (1-0) got the win. Shawn
Kelly (0-2) took the loss.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Reds 4, Astros 1
HOUSTON Jay Bruce homered and
drove in two runs to back a solid perform-
ance by Mike Leake and the Cincinnati
Reds beat the sliding Houston Astros 4-1.
Leake (2-5) had a season-high seven
strikeouts in seven innings, yielding just
one run and four hits.
Houston has dropped seven straight in
its longest skid since it lost seven in a row
last August.
Joey Votto hit a two-out single in the
first and scored on Brandon Phillips' dou-
ble off the wall in center, putting Cincin-
nati up 1-0. Bruce then singled in Phillips.

Phillies 6, Marlins 4
PHILADELPHIA- Hunter Pence hit a
two-run homer, Hector Luna had three
RBIs and the Philadelphia Phillies beat
the Miami Marlins 6-4 on Friday night.
Pence, Carlos Ruiz and Placido
Polanco each had three hits as the
Phillies won for the seventh time in nine
games. Jonathan Papelbon got five outs
for his 15th save in 15 chances.
Logan Morrison and Justin Ruggiano
homered for the Marlins, who had won
three straight.


process.
g his llth start since
last season following
er surgery, Santana
ew a career-high 134
He struck out eight
ked five in the majors'
o-hitter this season.
zing," Santana said.
g into this season I
st hoping to come


back and stay hea
help this team, an
am in this situation
greatest city for ba:
Phil Humber p
perfect game for the
White Sox at Se
April 21 and Jered
of the Los Angele
no-hit Minnesota o
Santana got a wa


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 1
N.Y. Yankees 9, Detroit 4
Boston 7, Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 2, Oakland 0
Chicago White Sox 7, Seattle 4
Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Boston (Doubront 5-2) at Toronto (Drabek 4-5), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 3-3) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-5),
2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 4-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 4-1),
4:10 p.m.
Seattle (Noesi 2-6) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-5),
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Walters 2-1) at Cleveland (Tomlin 2-2), 7:15 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 4-6) at Detroit (Porcello 3-4), 7:15 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 7-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-4), 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Yankees at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 3:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Miami 4
Atlanta at Washington, ppd., rain
N.Y. Mets 8, St. Louis 0
Cincinnati 4, Houston 1
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta (Beachy 5-3) at Washington (Strasburg 5-1),
4:05 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 8-1),
4:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Harang 3-3) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-2), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 8-1) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 7-1), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Bedard 3-5) at Milwaukee (Marcum 3-3),
7:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 1-1) at San Diego (Volquez 2-5), 7:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-3) at San Francisco (M.Cain 5-2),
7:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 4-2) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 4-4),
7:15 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 6:35 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 8:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.


For more box scores,
see Page B4.



dthy and tion as he headed out to the
id now I mound for the ninth inning,
)n in the and the two-time Cy Young
seball." winner quickly retired Matt
itched a Holliday and Allen Craig on
e Chicago shallow fly balls.
attle on With the crowd of 27,069
I Weaver on its feet in a frenzy, World
s Angels Series MVP David Freese went
n May 2. to a 3-2 count before his foul
arm ova- tip was caught by Josh Thole,


BASEBALL


St. Louis

Furcal ss
Beltran cf
Hollidy If
Craig rf
Freese 3b
YMolin c
MAdms lb
Greene 2b
Wnwrg p
SFrmn p
Roinsn ph
Cleto p
Totals
St. Louis
NewYork


ab r h bi
3 00 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
2 00 0
2 00 0
3 00 0
2 00 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0
0000
27 00 0
000
000


New York

Baxter If
ATorrs cf
Niwnhs cf-lf
DWrght 3b
Duda rf
DnMrp 2b
I.Davis lb
Thole c
Quntnll ss
JSantn p


ab rhbi


Totals 308 8 8
000 000 0
203 30x 8


LOB-St. Louis 5, New York 5. 2B-D.Wright
(18). 3B-Dan.Murphy (1). HR-Duda (8). S-
J.Santana. SF-Duda.
IP H RERBBSO


St. Louis
Wainwright L,4-6
S.Freeman
Cleto
New York
J.Santana W,3-2


61-3 6 7 7 3 6
2-3 1 1 1 2 1
1 1 0 0 02

9 0 0 0 5 8


Reds 4, Astros 1
Cincinnati Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Cozartss 3 1 0 0 Schafercf 4 0 1 0
Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0
Vottolb 4 1 2 1 Lowriess 2 0 1 0
BPhllps2b 4 1 1 1 Ca.Lee lb 4 0 1 0
Bruce rf 4 1 2 2 Wrght p 0 00 0
Ludwcklf 3 0 1 0 CJhnsn3b-1b4 0 0 0
Frazier3b 3 0 0 0 Bogsvcrf 2 0 0 0
Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 MDwns ph 1 00 0
Leakep 2 0 0 0 JDMrtnl If 3 0 1 0
Costanzph 1 0 0 0 CSnydrc 3 0 0 0
Ondrskp 0 00 0 Happp 2 00 0
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Maxwll ph 1 00 0
WLopez p 0 00 0
MGnzlz 3b 0 00 0
Totals 31 46 4 Totals 30 1 5 0
Cincinnati 201 000 001 4
Houston 000 001 000 1
DP-Cincinnati 2, Houston 2. LOB-Cincinnati
2, Houston 6. 2B-B.Phillips (7). HR-Bruce
(12).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
LeakeW,2-5 7 4 1 1 3 7
OndrusekH,7 1 1 0 0 1 0
Chapman S,4-5 1 0 0 0 0 3
Houston
HappL,4-5 7 5 3 3 2 7
W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 1
W.Wright 1 1 1 1 0 1


Phillies 6, Marlins 4
Miami Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Reyes ss 4 0 3 0 Rollins ss 5 0 1 1
Infante 2b 4 1 1 0 Polanc 3b 5 2 3 0
HRmrz3b 5 0 1 0 Pence rf 4 33 2
Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 Ruiz c 4 0 3 0
Morrsnib 5 1 1 1 Wggntnib 3 0 1 0
Petersn cf 2 0 0 0 Luna f 4 02 3
Rugginph-lf2 1 2 1 Victorncf 0 0 0 0
J.Buckc 3 0 0 0 Papelnp 0 0 0 0
Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Mayrry cf-lf-cf4 0 0 0
Coghln If-cf 3 1 2 0 Galvis 2b 4 1 1 0
Buehrlep 2 00 0 Kndrckp 2 00 0
DMrphph 1 0 1 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Gaudinp 0 000 Orrph 0 00 0
DSolanph 1 0 1 0 Contrrs p 0 0 0 0
Choatep 0 00 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Webbp 0 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
Pierre If 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 4133 Totals 36614 6
Miami 100 001 020 4
Philadelphia 200 021 10x 6
E-K.Kendrick (1). DP-Miami 1, Philadelphia
2. LOB-Miami 12, Philadelphia 8.2B-Reyes
(10), H.Ramirez (14), Stanton (15), Polanco
(10), Ruiz (12), Luna (2), Galvis (14). HR-Mor-
rison (4), Ruggiano (1), Pence (12). SB-Pe-
tersen (1). S-Infante, Orr.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Buehrle L,5-5 5 11 4 4 0 2
Gaudin 2 3 2 2 1 1
Choate 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Webb 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
K.KendrickW,2-4 51-38 2 2 3 4
QuallsH,10 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Contreras 0 0 0 0 0 0
BastardoH,11 1 2 2 2 1 0
DiekmanH,2 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
PapelbonS,15-15 12-31 0 0 0 1
Bastardo pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by K.Kendrick (Petersen).WP-Gaudin.
Balk-Gaudin.
T-3:10 (Rain delay: 0:48). A-44,497 (43,651).

NATIONAL LEAGUE
LEADERS
BATTING-Ruiz, Philadelphia, .381; MeCabrera,
San Frandsco, .373; DWright, NewYork, .366; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, .332; Prado, Atlanta, .332; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, .331;YMolina, St. Louis, .330.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 44; Pence,
Philadelphia, 39; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 38;
Bourn, Atlanta, 37; Furcal, St. Louis, 37; Uggla, At-
lanta, 36; Holliday, St. Louis, 35.
RBI-Ethier, Los Angeles, 44; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 44; Beltran, St. Louis, 42; Stanton, Miami, 40;
Braun, Milwaukee, 36; Cuddyer, Colorado, 35; Free-
man, Atlanta, 35; LaRoche, Washington, 35.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Frandsco, 78; Bourn, At-
lanta, 66; Furcal, St. Louis, 66; SCastro, Chicago, 65;
Altuve, Houston, 64; CGonzalez, Colorado, 63;
Prado, Atlanta, 63; DWright, New York, 63.
DOUBLES-Votto, Cincinnati, 22; DWright, New
York, 18; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Ethier, Los Ange-
les, 17; Alonso, San Diego, 16; Prado, Atlanta, 16;
ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 15; Stanton, Miami, 15.
TRIPLES-MeCabrera, San Frandsco, 6; OHud-
son, San Diego, 5; Altuve, Houston, 4; Bloomquist,
Arizona, 4; SCastro, Chicago, 4; DeJesus, Chicago,
4; Fowler, Colorado, 4; Harper, Washington, 4; Lu-
croy, Milwaukee, 4; Pagan, San Frandsco, 4.
HOME RUNS-Beltran, St. Louis, 15; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 14; CGonzalez, Colorado, 14; Stanton,
Miami, 13; Bruce, Cincinnati, 12; Kemp, Los Ange-
les, 12; Pence, Philadelphia, 12.
STOLEN BASES-Bonifacio, Miami, 20; Cam-
pana, Chicago, 15; SCastro, Chicago, 15; Reyes,
Miami, 15; Bourn, Atlanta, 14; DGordon, Los Ange-
les, 14; Maybin, San Diego, 14; Schafer, Houston, 14.
PITCHING-Hamels, Philadelphia, 8-1; Lynn, St.
Louis, 8-1; Dickey, New York, 7-1; Capuano, Los An-
geles, 7-1; GGonzalez, Washington, 7-1; Miley, Ari-
zona, 6-1; Greinke, Milwaukee, 6-2.
STRIKEOUTS-GGonzalez, Washington, 79;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 72; Strasburg, Washington, 70;
Greinke, Milwaukee, 69; JSantana, New York, 68;
ASanchez, Miami, 67; MCain, San Francisco, 66.
SAVES- Papelbon, Philadelphia, 15; Kimbrel, At-
lanta, 15; SCasilla, San Francisco, 14; FFrancisco,
New York, 14; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 13; Myers,
Houston, 12; Putz, Arizona, 11.


just activated from the dis-
abled list earlier in the day.
The Mets rushed out of
the dugout and mobbed
Santana in a raucous dog-
pile as security tackled a
fan who ran onto the field
near home plate. Moments
later, the big scoreboard in
center flashed his picture
and read "No-Han."


Boston


Oakland


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 B3



NL

Mets 8, Cardinals 0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W. Sox 7, Mariners 4
Seattle Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
ISuzukirf 5 1 1 0 DeAzacf 3 1 2 2
Ackley2b 2 2 1 0 Bckhm2b 5 2 2 3
Seager3b 4 1 2 3 A.Dunndh 3 1 1 1
JMontrdh 4 0 0 0 Konerklb 2 0 0 0
Smoaklb 3 0 2 1 Lillirdgpr-lb 0 1 0 0
Carp If 3 01 0 Riosrf 4 01 0
Olivoc 4 0 1 0 Przynsc 3 1 0 0
MSndrscf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo f 4 0 0 0
Ryan ss 3 0 0 0 AIRmrz ss 4 1 1 1
Jasoph 1 0 00 OHudsn3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 33 48 4 Totals 31 7 8 7
Seattle 000 000 220 4
Chicago 200 020 03x 7
E-M.Saunders (2). DP-Seattle 1, Chicago 2.
LOB-Seattle 6, Chicago 7. 2B-Ackley (11),
Olivo (3). HR-Seager (6), Beckham 2 (7),
A.Dunn (17). SB-I.Suzuki (8), De Aza (12).
CS-O.Hudson (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHernandez 5 5 4 4 4 6
League 12-3 1 0 0 0 0
Furbush 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Kelley L,0-2 1 2 3 0 2 1
Chicago
Peavy 61-3 3 2 2 3 4
ThorntonH,9 1 3 2 2 1 1
CrainW,1-0 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Reed S,7-7 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by FHernandez (De Aza).
2012 No-Hitters List
American League
Phil Humber, Chicago at Seattle, 4-0, April 21
(pefect game).
Jered Weaver, L.A. Angels vs. Minnesota, 9-
0, May 2.
National League
Johan Santana, N.Y Mets vs. St. Louis, 8-0,
June 1.



French Open Results
Friday
At Stade Roland Garros, Paris
Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
Marcel Granollers (20), Spain, def. Malek
Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 7-5.
Third Round
Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def.
Kevin Anderson (31), South Africa, 6-4, 3-6, 6-
7 (4), 6-4, 6-4.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Fabio
Fognini, Italy 7-5, 6-4, 6-4.
Andreas Seppi (22), Italy def. Fernando Ver-
dasco (14), Spain, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.
Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, def.
Gilles Simon (11), France, 7-5, 6-7 (5), 6-7 (3),
6-3, 6-2.
Juan Martin del Potro (9), Argentina, def.
Marin Cilic (21), Croatia, 6-3, 7-6 (7), 6-1.
David Goffin, Belgium, def. Lukasz Kubot,
Poland, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-1.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Nicolas
Mahut, France, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5.
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Nicolas Dev-
ilder, France, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2.
Women
Second Round
Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Ayumi
Morita, Japan, 6-1, 6-1.
Third Round
Sloane Stephens, United States, def.
Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-3, 6-2.
Sara Errani (21), Italy def. Ana Ivanovic (13),
Serbia, 1-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Dominika Cibulkova (15), Slovakia, def. Maria
Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 6-2, 6-1.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (26), Russia, def. Ag-
nieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, 6-1, 6-2.
Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Anabel Medina
Garrigues (29), Spain, 6-2, 6-1.
Sam Stosur (6), Australia, def. Nadia Petrova
(27), Russia, 6-3, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Aleksan-
dra Wozniak, Canada, 6-4, 6-4.
Angelique Kerber (10), Germany def. Flavia
Pennetta (18), Italy 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.
French Open show
court schedules
Saturday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Play begins at 5 a.m. EDT
Court Philippe Chatrier
Nina Bratchikova, Russia, vs. Petra Kvitova
(4), Czech Republic
Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, vs. Julien Ben-
neteau, France
Peng Shuai (28), China, vs. Maria Sharapova
(2), Russia
Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, vs. Rafael
Nadal (2), Spain
Court Suzanne Lenglen
David Ferrer (6), Spain, vs. Mikhail Youzhny
(27), Russia
Li Na (7), China, vs. Christina McHale, United
States
Tommy Haas, Germany, vs. Richard Gasquet
(17), France
Kaia Kanepi (23), Estonia, vs. Caroline Woz-
niacki (9), Denmark
Court 1
Francesca Schiavone (14), Italy, vs. Varvara
Lepchenko, United States
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, vs. Andy Murray
(4), Britain
Marcel Granollers (20), Spain, vs. Paul-Henri
Mathieu, France
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, vs. Julia Goerges
(25), Germany



NCAA Division I Softball
World Series glance
At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
Thursday, May 31
Oklahoma 5, South Florida 1
California 5, LSU 3
Alabama 5, Tennessee 3
Arizona State 3, Oregon 1
Friday, June 1
Oklahoma 3, California 0
Game 6 -Alabama (56-7) vs. Arizona State
(52-9), late
Saturday, June 2
Game 7 South Florida (50-13) vs. LSU
(39-24), Noon
Game 8 Tennessee (52-13) vs. Oregon
(44-17), 2:30 p.m.


Game 9 California (57-6) vs. Game 7 win-
ner, 7p.m.
Game 10 Game 6 loser vs. Game 8 win-
ner, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 3
Game 11 Oklahoma (52-8) vs. Game 9
winner, 1 p.m.
Game 12 Game 6 winner vs. Game 10
winner, 3:30 p.m.
x-Game 13- Game 11 winner vs. Game 11
loser, 7 p.m.
x-Game 14 Game 12 winner vs. Game 12
loser, 9:30 p.m.
NOTE: If only one game is necessary it will
be played at 7 p.m.
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 4: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 5: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday June 6: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
f O 4-7-3
CASH 3 (late)
8-0-8
PLAY 4 (early)
': 0-7-0-4
PLAY 4 (late)
S 3-1-1-5


Fantasy 5 and Mega
Money were unavailable
FIOda at press time.


Rondo, Boston

beat Heat

Associated Press

BOSTON Kevin Gar-
nett had 24 points and 11
rebounds and Rajon Rondo


Ricketts strikes


On the AIRWAVES= out 16as OU


NHL playoff glance
All Times EDT
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
STANLEY CUP FINALS
Los Angeles 1, New Jersey 0
Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles 2, New
Jersey 1, OT
Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New Jer-
sey 8 p.m.
Monday, June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles,
8p.m.
Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los An-
geles, 8 p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jer-
sey, 8 p.m.
x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los An-
geles, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday June 13: Los Angeles at New
Jersey, 8 p.m.



Camping World Truck

Lucas Oil 200 Results
Friday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (13) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 147 laps, 100.4 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (11) Parker Kligerman, Ram, 147, 90.6, 43.
3. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 147, 143.7, 0.
4. (18) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevy, 147, 90.6, 40.
5. (5) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 147, 80, 39.
6. (6) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 147, 101.7, 38.
7. (15) James Buescher, Chevy, 147,111.2, 37.
8. (10) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 147, 85.5, 36.
9. (8) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 147, 104.5, 35.
10. (16) Justin Lofton, Chevy, 147, 119.1, 35.
11. (2) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 147, 95.9, 33.
12. (9) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 147, 93.8, 33.
13. (17) Brian Scott, Toyota, 147, 77.4, 0.
14. (24) David Starr, Toyota, 147, 69.9, 31.
15. (12) Ross Chastain, Toyota, 147, 76.3, 29.
16. (21) JohnWesTownley, Toyota, 147, 58, 28.
17. (25) Paulie Harraka, Ford, 147, 57.9, 27.
18. (30) Caleb Holman, Chevy, 147, 50.5, 26.
19. (7) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 146, 63, 25.
20. (19) D. Armstrong, Toyota, 145, 59.8, 24.
21. (27) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, 145, 52, 23.
22. (23) Bryan Silas, Ford, 145, 43.1, 22.
23. (29) Chris Fontaine, Chevrolet, 144, 43, 21.
24. (4) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 143, 88.5, 20.
25. (35) Norm Benning, Chevy, 142, 35.6, 19.
26. (33) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, 137, 37.1, 18.
27. (3) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, accident,
136, 84.9, 17.
28. (31)W. Burton, Ford, accident, 108, 44,16.
29. (22) R. Sieg, Chevy, accident, 95, 60.9, 15.
30. (14) M. Gresham, Chevy, accident, 88, 48.9,14.
31. (28) Chris Jones, Toyota, overheating, 17,
32.5, 13.
32. (32) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, ignition,
14, 30.1, 12.
33. (20) J. White, Ford, engine, 11, 36.6, 11.
34. (34) M. Harmon, Chevy, ignition, 3, 31.1, 0.
35. (26) D. Setzer, Chevy, vibration, 2, 29.3, 0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 81.667 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 48 minutes, 0 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.


Caution Flags: 9 for 46 laps.
Lead Changes: 7 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-29; D.Starr 30-32;
J.Lofton 33-54; K.Harvick 55-121; M.Paludo
122-126; T.Bodine 127-139; PKligerman 140;
T.Bodine 141-147.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 2 times for 96 laps; J.Lofton, 1
time for 22 laps; T.Bodine, 2 times for 20 laps;
M.Paludo, 1 time for 5 laps; D.Starr, 1 time for3
laps; PKligerman, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Lofton, 235; 2. T.Peters,
234; 3. TDillon, 222; 4. J.Buescher, 219; 5.
PKligerman, 213; 6.T.Bodine, 198; 7. N.Piquet
Jr., 195; 8. R.Hornaday Jr., 186; 9. M.Crafton,
180; 10. J.Coulter, 178.



NBA Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami 2, Boston 1
Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79
Wednesday, May 30: Miami 115, Boston
111, OT
Friday, June 1: Boston 101, Miami 91
Sunday June 3: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1
Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma
City 98
Tuesday, May 29: San Antonio 120, Okla-
homa City 111
Thursday, May 31: Oklahoma City 102, San
Antonio 82
Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma
City, 8:30 p.m.
Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 9 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Okla-
homa City, 9p.m.
x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 9 p.m.


BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended retired RHP James Ehlert
50 games after a second violation of drug abuse
under the minor league drug prevention and
treatment program.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Placed OF Nick
Markakis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May
30. Selected the contract of INF-OF Bill Hall
from Norfolk (IL).
BOSTON RED SOX-Assigned RHP Mark
Prior to Pawtucket (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Activated INF Yu-
niesky Betancourt from the 15-day DL. Op-
tioned INF Irving Falu to Omaha.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Reinstated OF
Yoenis Cespedes from the 15-day DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS-Selected the contract
of RHP Stephen PryorfromTacoma (PCL).Trans-
ferred LHP George Sherrill to the 60-day DL.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Assigned OF-DH
Vladimir Guerrero to Las Vegas (PCL).


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: 5-hour Energy 200
qualifying
2 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: 5-hour Energy 200 race
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) NHRA Toyota SuperNationals qualifying
(Taped)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: 5-hour Energy 200 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
4 p.m. (SUN) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Seattle Mariners at Chicago White Sox
7 p.m. (FOX) New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament Regional
BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (TNT) San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City
Thunder. Western Conference Final, game 4
BOXING
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Beibut Shumenov vs. Enrique Ornelas
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: ISPS Handa Wales
Open
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Memorial Tournament
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: ShopRite LPGA Classic
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Memorial Tournament
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Principal Charity
Classic (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
8 p.m. (NBC) 2012 Stanley Cup: Los Angeles Kings at New
Jersey Devils. Game 2
MOTORCYCLE RACING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) AMA Motocross: Moto 2
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) AMA Motocross: Thunder Valley (Taped)
RUGBY
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) College USA Sevens Championship
4:30 p.m. (NBC) College USA Sevens Championship
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
NCAA World Series
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 7: USF vs. LSU
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 8: Tennessee vs. Oregon
7 p.m. (ESPN) Game 9: Teams TBA
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Game 10: Teams TBA
TENNIS
12 p.m. (NBC) 2012 French Open: Men's and Women's
Third Round
TRACKAND FIELD
3 p.m. (NBC) Prefontaine Classic

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


scored 21 points with 10 as-
sists to lead the Boston
Celtics to a 101-91 victory
over the Heat in Game 3 of
the Eastern Conference fi-
nals on Friday night, cut-
ting Miami's lead in the
series to 2-1.
Game 4 is Sunday night in
Boston.
LeBron James scored 34


beats Cal3-0

Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY Na-
tional player of the year
Keilani Ricketts struck out
16 in a two-hit shutout,
Georgia Casey homered and



GOLF
Continued from Page B1

of two double bogeys on the
back nine. He shot 79 and
missed the cut by three
shots.
"I'm definitely hitting the
ball better than I did last
week, so I can see an im-
provement there," he said.
"But I've still got a long way
to go."



KICKIN'
Continued from Page B1

and has a current roster of
close to 50 students.
The competition that took
place on the Palm Beach
Gardens Community High
School campus was broken
into belt divisions where ath-
letes are asked to compete in
both forms and sparring.
In order for a student who
is attending classes at
Schrade's to compete at the
elite tournament level, this
student must attend special
classes every Friday, includ-
ing the regular weekday
training sessions with the
rest of the class. These Fri-
day classes aim to test the
students in their commit-
ment to sparring and form
in order to make an impact
at the state level and possi-
bly even further.
Coming up next for the
school on June 23 is the Sun-
shine State Games. Sargent
aims to take all 18 of his stu-
dents (and hopefully a few
more) to the Amateur Ath-
letic Union event where ath-
letes are provided a chance
to medal and qualify for pos-
sible future Olympic Games.



FEDERER
Continued from Page B1

Informed that his next op-
ponent is an unabashed fan,
Federer grinned and replied,
"Not the first time it hap-
pens."
Probably so. After all, the
30-year-old Fbderer has been
winning major titles since
2003, when Goffin was 12.
He's been winning Grand
Slam matches since 2000,
and Friday's 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5
victory over Nicolas Mahut
was Federer's 235th, adding
to his Open era record.
Federer happened to
catch a bit of Goffin's second-
round matchup against Ar-
naud Clement, the 2001
Australian Open runner-up
who said this would be his
final French Open.
The condensed scouting
report?
"Nice game. Smooth ball-
striker And talented, obvi-
ously," Federer said.
"Otherwise, he wouldn't be
coming that far in this tour-
nament"
That match against
Clement went five sets, as did
Goffin's first-round victory
over 23rd-seeded Radek
Stepanek- the only five-set-
ters of his career. Against
Kubot at intimate, 1,559-seat
Court 7, Goffin was raucously
cheered by flag-waving, cho-
rus-singing supporters who
made the short trip from Bel-
gium.
"It gave me wings," Goffin
said. "I felt as if I was playing
at home."
Coincidentally, the last
"lucky loser" to make it this


points but the NBA MVP
and the rest of the Heat
went cold during a 7-minute
stretch at the end of the first
quarter and the beginning
of the second, when Boston
outscored them 15-0 to turn
a six-point deficit into a
nine-point lead.
Paul Pierce scored 23
points for Boston.


Oklahoma beat top-seeded
California 3-0 on Friday
night in the winners'
bracket at the Women's Col-
lege World Series
Lauren Chamberlain
drove in the first two runs
with a double in the third in-
ning and a single in the
fourth. Casey's drive to
straightaway center for Okla-
homa's NCAA-best 97th
home run of the season made
it 3-0 in the sixth inning.
Ricketts (35-7) dazzled

It was tough for everyone
on a day that began with a
two-hour rain delay in the
morning. That softened the
course, but the wind featured
gusts strong enough that it
was difficult to attack the
pins. It showed in the scores.
Sabbatini was at 6-under
138, the highest score to
lead the Memorial in 22
years.
"We basically just kept
the ball in play all day, and
that's the challenge out


"That actual tournament
is kind of a gateway for some
people to end up in the
Olympics," said Sargent of
the Sunshine Games. "And
yes, we are going there."
Sargent continues to be in
awe of how steely his stu-
dents' resolve is when faced
with the prospect of combat
and competition.
"The nerve (it takes)," Sar-
gent said. "You can imagine
walking into a tournament
from my own experience
and you know you're going
to be sparring and compet-
ing on that level. That's a
scary thing. For kids six to 11
years old to be able to sit
there and handle that kind
of pressure really says a lot
about their upbringing and
(who) they are as people."
The Schrade's School
promotes a strong sense of
family with the students and
their parents who bring
them to classes.
"Their parents are awe-
some. They're there every
step of the way The things
I've noticed about Tae Kwon
Do parents are that they are
involved. Every parent that
I have that has a child on
those teams is in there and
is 100 percent encouraging
those kids the whole way"


far at a major tournament
was also Belgian, Dick Nor-
man, who did it at Wimble-
don in 1995.
Now comes by far the
toughest test of Goffin's
young career
Or, looked at another way,
a "bonus," as he put it: the
thrill of standing across the
net from his favorite player
and seeing how he stacks up.
Asked whether he believes
he can defeat Federer, Goffin
said, "If I say yes, it might
sound pretentious. And if I
say no, it will look like a lack
of ambition. We'll see. I'll
prepare like I do for other
matches. I'll try to go for my
shots and have fun on a big
court"
Whichever man advances
will stay on course for a pos-
sible semifinal showdown
against Djokovic, who
stretched his Grand Slam
winning streak to 24 matches
with a lickety-split 6-1, 6-2, 6-
2 win over Nicolas Devilder
of France. Heading on court
after No. 18 Stanislas
Wawrinka's five-set victory
over No. 11 Gilles Simon,
Djokovic and Devilder didn't
get started until 7:48 p.m. But
Djokovic was efficient as
could be, wrapping things up
at 9:32 p.m., just as the sun
was about to set
The top-seeded woman,
Victoria Azarenka, also
barely beat darkness while
beating her foe, Aleksandra
Wozniak of Canada, 6-4, 6-4.
Maria Sharapova isn't
wasting any time, either, in
pursuit of a career Grand
Slam at least once she
manages to get on court, any-
way
The No. 2-seeded Shara-


Celtics close gap to 2-1


Sooners blank Bears in CWS


with a sharp fastball and a
biting changeup, keeping
the Golden Bears (57-6) off
balance throughout the
night. She finished three
strikeouts shy of Cat Oster-
man's World Series record of
19 strikeouts in a seven-in-
ning game.
The fourth-seeded Soon-
ers (52-8) are off until Sun-
day, needing one more win
to reach the finals. Califor-
nia will face an elimination
game Saturday

there," Sabbatini said. "And
we did that very well, and
I'm very, very excited, very
content with the way that
things went."
Woods has 72 wins on the
PGA Tour, one away from
tying Jack Nicklaus for sec-
ond on the career list. What
better place to catch him
than on the course Jack
built, though Woods wasn't
ready to entertain such
thoughts only halfway
through the tournament.


Currently the school is
open for enrollment and
willing to take on new stu-
dents. You can reach the
school by calling 352-422-
7311 for more information.
Tae Kwon Do State
Tournament Results
Joshua Reynolds sparring
1st Place blue belt 11yr old
Hunter Clabaugh sparring
3rd Place blue belt 12yr old
Hannah Shewbart sparring
2nd Place blue belt 11yr old
Shane Keim sparring 2nd
Place yellow belt 5yr old
Isaac Nye sparring 2nd
Place orange belt 11 yr old
Danielle Reinertsen sparring
2nd Place yellow belt 10yr old
Brandon Strickland 3rd Place
black belt 15yr old
Hunter Roessler no metal
black belt 16yr old
Kent Coble sparring 2nd
Place yellow belt 11 yr old
Tanner Ledsom sparring 2nd
Place yellow belt 9yr old
Nathan Sargent no metal
black belt 24yr old
Catherine Morgan no metal
black belt 14yr old
Nathan Retzlaff no metal yel-
low belt 9yr old
Alexis Wolcott sparring 3rd
Place yellow belt 8yr old


pova has dropped a grand
total of two games so far, in-
cluding a 6-1, 6-1 victory over
Ayumi Morita of Japan in a
second-round match delayed
a day because John Isner
and Paul-Henri Mathieu did-
n't finish their 18-16 fifth set
until after 9 p.m. on Thurs-
day.
"Pretty long day yesterday.
I feel like I warmed up, like,
20 times for this match,"
Sharapova said. "Yeah, it was
one of those days where you
just want to get on the court
and then you're at the courts
all day and sitting, waiting
around, eating, sleeping. It's,
like, a good way to put some-
one into retirement"
She's scheduled to be back
on court Saturday in the
third round against No. 28
Peng Shuai of China. The
past two French Open win-
ners will play Americans:
2011 champion Li Na of
China against Christina
McHale of Englewood Cliffs,
N.J., and 2010 champion
Francesca Schiavone of Italy
against Varvara Lepchenko
ofAllentown, Pa.
McHale and Lepchenko
might derive inspiration
from 19-year-old Sloane
Stephens of Coral Springs,
Fla.
Stephens eliminated
Mathilde Johansson of
France 6-3, 6-2 Friday to
reach the fourth round at a
Grand Slam tournament for
the first time, then rejoiced
at the thought of what counts
for success in this day and
age.
"I'm excited," Stephens
said, "because now I'm going
to have more Twitter follow-
ers."


B4 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bodine claims soaked race


Camping World

shortened by rain

Associated Press

DOVER, Del. Todd Bodine
thinks he would have beat Kevin Har-
vick to the finish line.
He was glad he didn't have to find out
Bodine took advantage of being in the
lead when the rain came, winning the
shortened Trucks Series race at Dover
International Speedway on Friday
He celebrated in a makeshift Vic-
tory Lane after the race was called
with 147 of 200 laps completed on the
1-mile track.
Harvick had the dominant truck and
led most of the race until the first rain
delay Bodine took the lead shortly
after racing resumed and posted his
third straight top-five finish.
Parker Kligerman was second and
Harvick was third.
Rain prevented what might have
been a fun showdown down the
stretch between two of the best driv-
ers in the circuit.
"From what I saw in the mirror, I
don't know if he could have done it,"
Bodine said. "Parker and myself both
would have had to make mistakes and
get out of the groove. It would have
been interesting to see."
Kligerman was thankful for the
rain because a damaged front end
meant his truck might not have lasted
much longer.
"We were really bottoming the truck


Associated Press
Todd Bodine poses with the checkered flag after winning the rain-shortened
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series auto race Friday in Dover, Del.


out and the splitter was taking a beat-
ing," he said. "That's why we couldn't
get by Todd. I'd get a good restart and
I just couldn't hold it up on the high
side of the track without feeling like I
was going to stuff it into the wall."
Bodine survived a spin because of a
tire issue midway through the race
that briefly threatened his first win
since 2010.
He rallied and was all smiles once
the skies opened up.
"Heck yeah, I'm going to claim it,"
he said. "You don't like to win them
this way, but we lost them this way, so


I'll take one."
Nelson Piquet Jr. and Cale Gale
rounded out the top five. Points
leader Justin Lofton, who led 22 laps,
was 10th.
Harvick was aiming for his first win
at Dover in any series when rain
forced a red flag with 80 laps left in
the race.
He refused to consider himself the
winner as he sat in his truck waiting
to return to racing.
"I don't think the track ever got
wet," Harvick said. "It was dry the
whole first time."


Associated Press
Florida's Jonathan Crawford takes off his cap after he pitched a no-hitter against Bethune-Cookman during an NCAA
college baseball tournament regional game Friday in Gainesville, Fla. Florida defeated Bethune-Cookman 4-0.





Gators get no-hitter


UF's Crawford


throws game

vs. Bethune-

Cookman

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -
Jonathan Crawford threw
the seventh no-hitter in
NCAA tournament history,
shutting down Bethune-
Cookman in a 4-0 victory in
the opener of the
Gainesville Regional.
Crawford, a sophomore
who wasn't even part of the
Gators' three-man weekend
rotation this season, was
nearly perfect and faced the


minimum 27 batters. The
only player to reach base
was Bethune-Cookman's
Jake Welch on a walk in the
third inning, and Florida
catcher Mike Zunino threw
him out trying to steal.
Crawford (6-2) struck out
five and walked one for the
Gators' first no-hitter since
1991, by John Burke also
the last one thrown in the
NCAA tournament in a
2-0 win over Firman. Craw-
ford needed just 98 pitches,
including 70 strikes, for
Florida (43-18).
Florida State 2, UAB 1
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
James Ramsey drove in both
of Florida State's runs and the
Seminoles snapped a three-
game losing streak with a 2-1
win over UAB on Friday in the


NCAA tournament.
Ramsey singled in Sherman
Johnson in the third inning, and
then doubled Johnson home in
the fifth.
Ryan Prinzing scored UAB's
lone run in the top of the fifth
on John Frost's groundout to
short. The Blazers left a dozen
runners on base, including the
potential tying run at third when
the game ended.
Gage Smith (4-0) picked up
the win after replacing Semi-
noles starter Scott Sitz with
one out in the fifth.
Florida State (48-15) meets
Samford (40-21) in Saturday's
winners' bracket, and Missis-
sippi State (39-23) plays UAB
(31-29) in an elimination game.
UCF 2, Missouri St. 1
CORAL GABLES, Fla. -


Ronny Richardson homered
and scored the go-ahead run
in the eighth inning to lead
Central Florida to a 2-1 win
over Missouri State in the
Coral Gables Regional.
UCF (44-15) will await the
winner of the Miami-Stony
Brook game. Missouri State
(39-21) will face the loser.
Nick Petree (10-4), Colle-
giate Baseball newspaper's Di-
vision I national player of the
year, took the loss for the
Bears allowing two runs in
eight innings.
Chris Taladay hit a bloop sin-
gle to right field to break a 1-1
tie scoring Richardson.
Richardson led off the first
with a home run, the first of the
season given up by Petree.
Kevin Medrano hit an RBI
single in the seventh to tie it.


Lewis, Miyazato knotted at LPGA


Associated Press

GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. -
Stacy Lewis and Mika Miyazato are
tied for the lead after the opening
round of the ShopRite LPGA Classic.
Lewis and Miyazato each shot a
6-under 65 on Friday at the Bay
Course at the Stockton Seaview Hotel
and Golf Club.
Paula Creamer and Mariajo Uribe
are tied for third at 4 under. Maude-
Aimee Leblanc is at 3 under, while
seven players are another shot back,
including Lexi Thompson and
Christina Kim.
Yani Tseng shot an even-par 71
while defending champion Brittany
Lincicome finished with a 72.
The morning half of the field had
the better of the weather, as skies


darkened and the winds picked up
around mid-day
Uribe was the only one of the lead-
ers with an afternoon tee time.
Miyazato, who is seeking her first
LPGA title, played in the first group
and got off to a fast start She birdied
Nos. 3 and 5, then took advantage of
the wind to reach the par-5 ninth in
two. She drained a 20-foot eagle putt
with a left-to-right break to make the
turn in 3 under.
She birdied two par 3s on the back,
Nos. 11 and 17.
Lewis, who won her second LPGA
title in Mobile in April, was in the
middle of her round when the condi-
tions started to change. Playing the
back nine first, she made the turn in 2
under before starting her second nine
with a birdie, a double bogey and an


eagle.
Goodes takes two-shot lead
on Champions Tour in Iowa
WEST DES MOINES, Iowa Mike
Goodes shot a 7-under 64 to take a two-
shot lead after the first round of the Princi-
pal Charity Classic on Friday.
Goodes opened the Champions Tour
event with four straight birdies and closed
with birdies on the 17th and 18th holes.
Goodes shot a 30 on the front nine and
tied his lowest overall round on the
Champions Tour.
Jay Haas, who won in Iowa in 2007 and
2008, leads a group at 5-under 66 that in-
cludes South African David Frost and for-
mer Masters champion Larry Mize.
Mark Brooks heads a group three
strokes behind Goodes.


PGA The Memorial
Friday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club, Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,352, Par 72
Second Round


Rory Sabbatini 69-69
Spencer Levin 67-72
Scott Stallings 66-73-
Tiger Woods 70-69-
Daniel Summerhays 69-71 -
Jim Furyk 72-68-
Troy Matteson 72-69-
Jonathan Byrd 71-70-
Trevor Immelman 71-70-
Aaron Baddeley 69-72-
Kyle Reifers 71-70-
Henrik Stenson 74-68-
Lucas Glover 74-68-
Dustin Johnson 71-71 -
Adam Scott 70-72-
Rickie Fowler 71-71 -
Ryo Ishikawa 72-70-
Erik Compton 67-75-
Greg Chalmers 71-71 -
Andres Romero 69-73-
Bo Van Pelt 73-69-
David Mathis 71-71 -
Ryan Moore 70-73-
Greg Owen 72-71 -
Brandt Snedeker 69-74-
Steve Stricker 73-70-
Ricky Barnes 72-72-
Johnson Wagner 72-72-
Stewart Cink 71-73-
Matt Every 69-75-
Jeff Overton 72-72 -
Brendon de Jonge 73-71 -
Luke Donald 71-73-
Kevin Stadler 72-73-
David Hearn 70-75-
Jimmy Walker 72-73-
Brian Davis 73-72-
Geoff Ogilvy 71-74-
Hunter Mahan 72-73-
Justin Rose 73-72-
John Huh 71-74-
Scott Piercy 70-75-
K.J. Choi 74-71 -
Ernie Els 70-75-
Chris DiMarco 73-72-
Vijay Singh 72-73-
Charl Schwartzel 73-72-
Chris Kirk 75-70-
Seung-Yul Noh 72-73-
Cameron Tringale 72-74-
Nicolas Colsaerts 72-74-
Harris English 71-75-
Branden Grace 74-72-
Blake Adams 69-77-
Bud Cauley 70-76-
Rod Pampling 72-74-
Davis Lovel III 74-72-
MarkWilson 70-76-
Charlie Wi 71-75-
Brandt Jobe 73-74-
NickO'Hern 74-73-
J.B. Holmes 72-75-
Ben Crane 72-75-
Jhonattan Vegas 74-73-
Marc Leishman 72-75-
Ryuji Imada 75-72-
Brendan Steele 72-75-
Fred Couples 74-73-
CamiloVillegas 73-74-
Robert Garrigus 71-76-
Robert Allenby 73-74-
Pat Perez 74-73-
Failed to qualify
George McNeill 72-76
NickWatney 73-75-
Bill Haas 73-75-
Kevin Chappell 74-74-
Will Claxton 74-75-
Bubba Watson 75-74-
Ben Curtis 70-79-
Bryden Macpherson 79-70
James Driscoll 73-76-
Kevin Streelman 73-76-
Steve Marino 74-75-
John Senden 77-72-
Kyle Stanley 75-74
Angel Cabrera 75-74
Martin Flores 74-75-
Stuart Appleby 77-73 -
RoryMcllroy 71-79-
Keegan Bradley 76-74
Jason Day 74-76 -
Kelly Kraft 73-77-
Charley Hoffman 75-76 -
Jonas Blixt 74-77-
Carl Pettersson 76-75 -
Kevin Na 76-75 -
D.A. Points 76-75 -
Ken Duke 75-76 -
Chris Couch 75-77-
Chris Stroud 74-78
Billy Mayfair 74-78
Kris Blanks 76-76-
Michael Thompson 74-79-
Jerry Kelly 75-78 -
Garth Mulroy 77-76-
Webb Simpson 78-75 -
J.J. Killeen 76-77-
Colt Knost 78-76 -
Louis Oosthuizen 75-80-
Billy Hurley III 84-71 -
Tommy Gainey 79-77-
Gary Woodland 77-79-
Bo Hoag 80-77 -
Bryce Molder 75-83
Brian Harman 77-82-
Mike Weir 83-81 -


LPGA Classic
Friday
At Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf
Club, Bay Course, Galloway, N.J.
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,155, Par 71 (37-34
First Round
a-denotes amateur
Stacy Lewis 33-32 65
Mika Miyazato 33-32-65 -
Paula Creamer 34-33-67 -
Mariajo Uribe 36-31 -67 -
Maude-Aimee Leblanc 35-33 -68 -
Anna Grzebien 36-33-69 -
Christina Kim 36-33-69 -
Mo Martin 35-34 69 -
Azahara Munoz 37-32- 69 -
Anna Nordqvist 36-33 69 -
Karin Sjodin 35-34-69 -
Lexi Thompson 38-31 -69 -
NaYeon Choi 36-34-70 -
Taylor Coutu 35-35 70
Shanshan Feng 35-35- 70 -
Mindy Kim 35-35-70 -
Seon Hwa Lee 36-34- 70 -
Ai Miyazato 36-34 70 -
Haru Nomura 35-35-70 -
Grace Park 35-35- 70 -
Jane Park 35-35- 70 -
So Yeon Ryu 37-33 -70 -
Heather Bowie Young 35-35- 70 -
Nicole Castrale 35-36-71
Sandra Changkija 38-33 -71
Sophie Gustafson 37-34 -71
Hee-Won Han 39-32- 71
Katherine Hull 36-35- 71
Karine Icher 36-35 -71
Eun-Hee Ji 41-30 -71
Jee Young Lee 38-33-71
Becky Morgan 40-31 -71
Reilley Rankin 40-31 -71
Sarah Jane Smith 38-33- 71
Angela Stanford 37-34 -71
YaniTseng 39-32-71
Sun Young Yoo 39-32 -71
Beth Bader 37-35 -72 4
Irene Cho 38-34-72 4+
Jodi Ewart 37-35 -72 4
Courtney Harter 37-35- 72 4+
Caroline Hedwall 38-34 -72 4-
I.K.Kim 38-34-72 4-
Brittany Lincicome 36-36 -72 4
Leta Lindley 38-34 72 4
Beatriz Recari 39-33 -72 4
Karrie Webb 39-33-72 4-
Karlin Beck 36-37-73 4+
Meredith Duncan 39-34- 73 4+
Kathleen Ekey 39-34 -73 4-
JenniferGleason 36-37-73 4+


-138 -6
-139 -5
-139 -5
-139 -5
-140 -4
-140 -4
-141 -3
-141 -3
-141 -3
-141 -3
-141 -3
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3
-147 +3

-148 +4
-148 +4
-148 +4
-148 +4
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-149 +5
-150 +6
-150 +6
-150 +6
-150 +6
-150 +6
-151 +7
-151 +7
-151 +7
-151 +7
-151 +7
-151 +7
-152 +8
-152 +8
-152 +8
-152 +8
-153 +9
-153 +9
-153 +9
-153 +9
-153 +9
-154 +10
-155 +11
-155 +11
-156 +12
-156 +12
-157 +13
-158 +14
-159 +15
-164 +20


Mike Reid 34-39-73 +2
Loren Roberts 35-38 -73 +2
Keith Fergus 35-38-73 +2
Blaine McCallister 37-36-73 +2
Hal Sutton 35-38-73 +2
Chien Soon Lu 35-38-73 +2
Tom Jenkins 37-36-73 +2
Joey Sindelar 36-37-73 +2
Damon Green 34-39-73 +2
Jay Don Blake 36-38-74 +3
Bobby Clampett 36-38- 74 +3
Scott Simpson 36-39-75 +4
Tom Kite 39-36-75 +4
Wayne Levi 38-37-75 +4
BobTway 37-38-75 +4
Vicente Fernandez 35-41 -76 +5
Gil Morgan 40-36-76 +5
Mike McCullough 36-40-76 +5
Jim Colbert 37-41 -78 +7
Bobby Wadkins 36-44-80 +9


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 B5


Marcy Hart 37-36-73 +2
Maria Hernandez 40-33-73 +2
Tiffany Joh 40-33-73 +2
Lorie Kane 39-34 73 +2
Cristie Kerr 40-33-73 +2
Jessica Korda 36-37-73 +2
Cindy LaCrosse 38-35-73 +2
llhee Lee 38-35-73 +2
Rebecca Lee-Bentham 37-36-73 +2
Catriona Matthew 38-35-73 +2
JiYoung Oh 36-37-73 +2
Inbee Park 38-35-73 +2
Hee Kyung Seo 37-36-73 +2
Jenny Shin 37-36-73 +2
KrisTamulis 38-35- 73 +2
Alison Walshe 39-34-73 +2
Danah Bordner 39-35-74 +3
Diana D'Alessio 39-35-74 +3
Wendy Doolan 39-35-74 +3
Lisa Ferrero 37-37-74 +3
Mina Harigae 39-35-74 +3
Amy Hung 40-34-74 +3
Jeong Jang 36-38-74 +3
Paige Mackenzie 39-35-74 +3
NaOnMin 37-37-74 +3
Belen Mozo 36-38-74 +3
Ryann O'Toole 38-36-74 +3
HeeYoung Park 37-37-74 +3
Suzann Pettersen 36-38 -74 +3
Gerina Piller 39-35-74 +3
Morgan Pressel 36-38-74 +3
Lizette Salas 38-36- 74 +3
Christine Song 40-34-74 +3
Momoko Ueda 39-35-74 +3
AmyYang 40-34-74 +3
Laura Davies 35-40 -75 +4
Sandra Gal 39-36-75 +4
Natalie Gulbis 38-37-75 +4
Maria Hjorth 39-36-75 +4
MiJungHur 38-37-75 +4
Pat Hurst 38-37-75 +4
Danielle Kang 39-36-75 +4
Meena Lee 37-38-75 +4
Pernilla Lindberg 37-38-75 +4
Kristy McPherson 40-35-75 +4
JinYoung Pak 39-36-75 +4
Pornanong Phatlum 40-35-75 +4
Stacy Prammanasudh 37-38-75 +4
Jennifer Rosales 38-37-75 +4
Alena Sharp 37-38-75 +4
a-Meghan Stasi 39-36-75 +4
HannahYun 39-36-75 +4
Ashli Bunch 40-36-76 +5
Cydney Clanton 38-38-76 +5
Moira Dunn 39-37-76 +5
Katie Futcher 38-38-76 +5
Ayaka Kaneko 42-34-76 +5
Haeji Kang 40-36-76 +5
Stephanie Louden 37-39-76 +5
Janice Moodie 39-37-76 +5
Karen Stupples 40-36-76 +5
Victoria Tanco 39-37-76 +5
Marina Alex 40-37-77 +6
Chella Choi 40-37-77 +6
Meaghan Francella 42-35-77 +6
Julieta Granada 39-38- 77 +6
Numa Gulyanamitta 39-38-77 +6
Jennifer Johnson 39-38-77 +6
Stephanie Kono 42-35-77 +6
Candle Kung 42-35-77 +6
Sydnee Michaels 39-38-77 +6
Jessica Shepley 38-39-77 +6
Stephanie Sherlock 41-36-77 +6
JenniferSong 38-39-77 +6
Vicky Hurst 43-35-78 +7
Brittany Lang 41-37-78 +7
Jennie Lee 39-39-78 +7
Jane Rah 43-35-78 +7
Samantha Richdale 41-37-78 +7
MichelleWie 39-39-78 +7
Amanda Blumenherst 39-40-79 +8
Jacqui Concolino 42-37-79 +8
Laura Diaz 40-39-79 +8
Jimin Kang 43-36-79 +8
Giulia Sergas 38-41 -79 +8
WendyWard 44-35-79 +8
Minea Blomqvist 40-40-80 +9
Dori Carter 40-40-80 +9
Veronica Felibert 40-40-80 +9
Song-Hee Kim 42-39- 81 +10
Elisa Serramia 42-39-81 +10
Angela Oh 45-37- 82 +11
Tanya Dergal 42-41 -83 +12

Champions Tour
Prin. Charity Classic
Friday
At Glen Oaks CC,West Des Moines, Iowa
Purse: $1,750,000
Yardage: 6,879, Par: 71 (35-36)
First Round
Mike Goodes 30-34-64 -7
Larry Nelson 31-35- 66 -5
Larry Mize 31-35- 66 -5
Jay Haas 32-34- 66 -5
Tom Pernice Jr. 32-34- 66 -5
David Frost 33-33- 66 -5
Gary Koch 34-33- 67 -4
Mark Brooks 34-33-67 -4
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 34-33- 67 -4
Dan Forsman 32-35-67 -4
Jeff Sluman 33-34-67 -4
Russ Cochran 34-33-67 -4
Eduardo Romero 33-34-67 -4
Peter Senior 31-36-67 -4
Kirk Triplett 33-34- 67 -4
Dick Mast 34-34-68 -3
Jeff Freeman 35-33-68 -3
Andrew Magee 32-36- 68 -3
Mark McNulty 33-35-68 -3
Rod Spittle 34-34- 68 -3
Tom Lehman 36-32-68 -3
Mark Calcavecchia 32-36-68 -3
Kenny Perry 34-34-68 -3
Steve Lowery 34-35-69 -2
Joel Edwards 33-36 -69 -2
Morris Hatalsky 35-34-69 -2
David Eger 33-36 -69 -2
Brad Bryant 33-36-69 -2
Lonnie Nielsen 33-36-69 -2
Jim Carter 34-35-69 -2
Mark W. Johnson 33-36- 69 -2
Fuzzy Zoeller 36-33-69 -2
Chip Beck 36-33-69 -2
Jim Rutledge 32-37-69 -2
Craig Stadler 32-38-70 -1
Brad Faxon 35-35 -70 -1
Fred Funk 33-37-70 -1
Bob Gilder 35-35-70 -1
Hale Irwin 33-37-70 -1
Sandy Lyle 34-36-70 -1
Bernhard Langer 5 5-35 -70 -1
Jeff Hart 34-36-70 -1
LanceTen Broeck 34-36-- 70 -1
PH. Horgan III 35-36- 71 E
Fulton Allem 33-38 -71 E
Jim Thorpe 35-36 -71 E
Gary Hallberg 36-35 -71 E
D.A.Weibring 35-36 -71 E
Olin Browne 35-36 -71 E
John Cook 34-37- 71 E
Mark Wiebe 34-37 -71 E
Willie Wood 35-36 -71 E
J.L. Lewis 35-37- 72 +1
Tommy Armour III 35-37- 72 +1
Bill Glasson 35-37- 72 +1
John Huston 35-37-72 +1
Steve Pate 37-35- 72 +1
Andy Bean 33-39 -72 +1
Dana Quigley 35-37-72 +1
Graham Marsh 32-41 --73 +2
Ted Schulz 37-36-73 +2












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Oprah updates
book club
NEW YORK-Oprah
Winfrey is back in the
book club business, up-
dated for the digital age.
"Oprah's Book Club
2.0," a joint project of
Winfrey's OWN network
and her O
magazine,
begins
Monday
with
Cheryl
Strayed's
popular
memoir
Oprah "Wild."
Winfrey Along
with the
traditional paper version,
featuring the circular
Oprah book club logo,
special e-editions will be
made available that in-
clude Winfrey's com-
ments and a reader's
guide.
An interview with
Strayed will air July 22
on OWN's "Super Soul
Sunday" and on Oprah
Radio. Readers will be
able to share opinions
through Facebook and
Twitter and Winfrey's
website, www.oprah.com.
"This is way different
from the old book club,"
Winfrey said in an online
video announcement,
taped in her Chicago of-
fice and posted Friday on
her website. "This time
it's an interactive, online
club for our digital world."
The new club will test
whether Winfrey still has
clout with the reading
public, especially when
her network audience is
far smaller than what she
enjoyed before. Starting
in the mid-1990s, Winfrey
made hits out of countless
books through her previ-
ous club, featured on her
syndicated talk show.
But sales had fallen off
by the time her show
ended, in 2011. One of
her last picks, a com-
bined edition of Charles
Dickens' '"A Tale of Two
Cities" and "Great Ex-
pectations," was in part a
victim of the e-book mar-
ket as many readers sim-
ply downloaded free,
public-domain versions
of the novels.

Andy Samberg
leaving SNL
LOS ANGELES -
Andy Samberg has
wrapped his seven-sea-
son run

day Night
Live," a
spokes-
woman
for the
actor-co-
median
Andy said
Samberg Friday
Sam-
berg won't return as a
cast member next season,
according to his publicist,
Carrie Byalick Samberg's
exit follows that of "SNE'
cast member Kristen
Wig.
Like other "Saturday
Night Live" alumni, Sam-
berg will be seen on the
big screen. His new
movie with Adam Sand-
ler, "That's My Boy," is
out this month.
Wiig, Samberg and
Jason Sudeikis, all of
whom became cast mem-
bers in the 2005-06 sea-
son, have been rumored
to be leaving.
-From wire reports


Green Lantern reboot


Super hero

relaunched as

brave, mighty, gay

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Green
Lantern, one of DC Comics' oldest
and most enduring heroes, is serv-
ing as a beacon for the publisher
again, this time as a proud, mighty
and openly gay hero.
The change is revealed in the
pages of the second issue of "Earth
2" out next week, and comes on the
heels of what has been an expan-
sive year for gay and lesbian char-
acters in the pages of comic books
from Archie to Marvel and others.
But purists and fans note: This
Green Lantern is not the emerald
galactic space cop Hal Jordan who
was, and is, part of the Justice
League and has had a history rich
in triumph and tragedy
Instead, he's a parallel Earth
Green Lantern. James Robinson,
who writes the new series, said
Alan Scott is the retooled version of
the classic Lantern whose first ap-
pearance came in the pages of "All-
American Comics" No. 16 in July
1940.
And his being gay is not part of
some wider storyline meant to be
exploited or undone down the road,
either.
"This was my idea," Robinson ex-
plained this week, noting that be-
fore DC relaunched all its titles last
summer, Alan Scott had a son who
was gay
But given "Earth 2" features re-
tooled and rebooted characters,
Scott is not old enough to have a
grown son.
"By making him younger, that son
was not going to exist anymore,"
Robinson said.
"He doesn't come out. He's gay
when we see him in issue two,"
which is due out Wednesday "He's
fearless and he's honest to the point
where he realized he was gay and
he said, 'I'm gay"'
It's another example of gay and
lesbian characters taking more
prominent roles in the medium.
In May, Marvel Entertainment said
super speedster Northstar will marry
his longtime boyfriend in the pages of
'Astonishing X-Men." DC comics has
other gay characters, too, including
Kate Kane, the current Batwoman,
The Question, and married charac-
ters Apollo and the Midnighter


Associated Press
This image provided by DC Entertainment shows a page from the second
issue of the company's "Earth 2" comic book series featuring Alan Scott,
the alter ego of its Green Lantern character, who is revealed to be gay. The
revelation is the latest example of how comics publishers big and small are
making their characters just as diverse as the people who read their books.
The issue will be available June 6.


And in the pages of Archie
Comics, Kevin Keller is one of the
gang at Riverdale High School and
gay, too.
DC has been a leader in incorpo-
rating gay characters into its comics
- they had one of the first male gay
kisses back in 1988.
Since then, numerous comic book
heroes and villains have been writ-
ten as gay, lesbian or transgender -
from Batwoman to Hulkling and
Wiccan in the pages of "Young
Avengers."
Green Lantern would be the
highest-profile openly gay hero -


even the parallel earth verse
"It was just meant to be
Scott being a gay member oft
the Justice Society, that I'll be
in the pages of 'Earth 2,"' R
said. "He's just meant to be
this big tapestry of character
Some groups have prote:
inclusion of gay character
Robinson isn't discouraged
that being gay is just one a
Scott.
"This guy, he's a media n
hero, a dynamic type-A per
and he's gay," Robinson sai
a complex character."


Chesney, McGraw begin 22-city summer


Associated Press


TAMPA- This is no ordi-
nary friendship or con-
cert tour.
When country superstars
Kenny Chesney and Tim
McGraw kick off their highly
anticipated 22-city stadium
tour Saturday in Tampa, it
will be the high point of
their careers and friend-
ship.
The two men met at a bar
in Nashville more than 20
years ago. Chesney had just
moved to the city and didn't
know anyone. McGraw had
a record contract but had
yet to put out a single.
McGraw joked in an in-
terview at Raymond James
Stadium on Friday that they
would hang out at each
other's apartments "de-
pending on who had paid
the electric bill that month."
"That's not a lie," Chesney
added.
Neither dreamed they
would ever headline a tour,
much less enter territory at-
tempted by very few music
acts of any genre as they co-
headline this tour together.
Today they are two of coun-


Birthday Your social life could turn out to be much more
exciting in the year ahead than it's been for quite some
time. This is likely to be due in part to some great new
friends you'll make who not only are fun to be with, but are
well connected, too.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) A great sense of accomplish-
ment can be achieved by attending to all those little tasks
and duties that you've been neglecting. Get them out of the
way once and for all.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although you're entitled to
have some fun with your friends, don't overindulge in game
playing. You can enjoy yourself in a variety of ways without
going overboard.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You might not be the first one out
of the starting block, but once you get out there, you'll be
bound and determined to run a good race. You'll show your
stuff to one and all.


try music's top draws and by
combining forces on "The
Brothers of the Sun" tour
they're launching what
some are calling country
music's biggest tour ever.
"You don't dream that,"
said Chesney, pointing at
the enormous stage inside
the stadium. "I just wanted
a song on the radio."
Added McGraw: "We
wanted to have big careers.
We wanted to go out and set
the world on fire. But you
know, in the back of your
mind, you always think, 'If I
could just get a hit song, I'd
be ]l1pp"'
The tour, which also in-
cludes Grace Potter & The
Nocturnals and Jake Owen,
is so much more than a hit
song or even your usual
arena show. It's comprised
of three complete stage sys-
tems, 85 tractor-trailers, 240
roadies and two culinary
staffs, according to tour
manager Ed Wannebo, who
spoke to the media Friday
as McGraw and Chesney
joked and whispered in
each other's ears nearby
like schoolboys.
The tour- and especially


Country singers Kenny Chesney, left, and Tim
pear at a news conference Friday in Tampa to p
"Brothers of the Sun" concert tour. The pair will I
tour Saturday, June 2, in Tampa.


the stage set "consumed"
Chesney
It started with ideas
scrawled on "a pen and nap-
kin" and planning and
preparation began months
ago.
"Building that," Chesney
said while pointing to the
stage, "There's a lot that
goes into it. I have my hands
on basically everything on
that stage, the way it looks,
the way it moves, every-


Today's HOROSCOPE
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Participation that requires
more brainpower than physical exertion will be your cup of
tea. Rest your aching back and give your noggin a big
workout instead.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something unusual could sud-
denly develop that you may want to respond to immedi-
ately. It's likely to have to do with a financial investment that
you'll want to be part of.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Matters that had been taken
over by others could once again revert back into your capa-
ble hands. Make sure to substantially alter the dynamics
this time around.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Make sure you work in
surroundings that are devoid of negative influences. If you
don't, you might get a few things done, but not anywhere
near what you wanted.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If a significant relationship


thing. That's jus
am. I'm very 1
care what it
because I want
fans the bes
experience."
McGraw said
Chesney initially
do just a coup
shows, but the p
The first show
is sure to be a
when Chesney p
in 2011, he drew


needs a bit of mending or tender loving care, now is the
time to get together with that person and shore up those
old bonds.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're well suited for com-
petitive matters of any nature. It isn't likely that you'll delib-
erately seek one out, but somehow one is apt to find you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Having a positive and opti-
mistic attitude will enable you to accomplish just about any-
thing you set your mind to. Your key to success is a strong
belief in yourself.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you take your involvement
seriously, there's no reason why you shouldn't do well,
whether you're conducting business or playing a game. It's
indifference that leads to defeat.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although you might not be
able to function as independently as you'd like, you can
placate others by yielding a bit of ground.


sion.
- Alan
he team,
forming
tobinson
part of
s."
sted the
ers, but
i, noting
spect to


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MAY 31
Fantasy 5:1 3 21 24 33
5-of-5 1 winner $214,411.81
4-of-5 274 $126
3-of-5 9,291 $10
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30
Powerball: 9 10 24 52 56
Powerball: 14
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 4 6 19 20 38 48
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 32 $4,091
4-of-6 1,718 $64
3-of-6 34,076 $5
Fantasy 5: 5 13 21 27 31
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 310 $555
3-of-5 10,391 $20
TUESDAY, MAY 29
Mega Money: 21 35 39 43
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 3 winners $2,033

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, June 2,
the 154th day of 2012. There
are 212 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 2,1953, Queen
Elizabeth II was crowned in
Westminster Abbey, 16
months after the death of her
father, King George VI; it was
the first such ceremony to be
televised.
On this date:
In 1886, President Grover
Cleveland, 49, married
Frances Folsom, 21, in the
Blue Room of the White
House. (To date, Cleveland is


mogul, a the only president to marry in
'sonality the executive mansion.)
d. "He's In 1897, Mark Twain, 61,
was quoted by the New York
Journal as saying from Lon-
don that "the report of my
death was an exaggeration."
u In 1961, during a state visit
oto France, President John F.
Kennedy, noting the warm re-
ception his wife was receiv-
ing, jocularly described
himself as "the man who ac-
companied Jacqueline
y Kennedy to Paris, and I have
enjoyed it." Playwright and di-
rector George S. Kaufman,
71, died in New York.
.- In 1966, the U.S. space
probe Surveyor 1 landed on
the moon and began trans-
mitting detailed photographs
of the lunar surface.
In 1987, President Ronald
Reagan announced he was
nominating economist Alan
Associated Press Greenspan to succeed Paul
McGraw ap- Volcker as chairman of the
remote their Federal Reserve Board.
kick off their Ten years ago: Palestin-
ian leader Yasser Arafat of-
;t the way I fered cabinet posts to militant
hands-on. I groups as part of a govern-
looks like, ment reshuffle.
to give the Five years ago: U.S. au-
t possible thorities said four Muslim men
had been prevented from car-
d he and trying out a plot to destroy
y wanted to John F. Kennedy International
le of large Airport, kill thousands of peo-
lan grew. pie and trigger an economic
w in Tampa catastrophe by blowing up a
large one; jet fuel artery running through
played there populous New York residen-
50,548 fans. tial neighborhoods. (Three of
the men were later sentenced
to life in prison; the fourth was
sentenced to 15 years behind


bars.)
One year ago: Former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney announced his bid
for the Republican presiden-
tial nomination during an ap-
pearance in New Hampshire.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Milo O'Shea is 87. Actress-
singer Sally Kellerman is 75.
Actor Ron Ely is 74.
Thought for Today: "We
are minor in everything but
our passions." Elizabeth
Bowen, Irish author (1899-
1973).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ERICA


IDOL


LANCE TRAWEEK
American Press

WESTLAKE, La.
Since Joshua Ledet went to
Hollywood for "'American
Idol," his aunt Cynthia
Ledet said, she missed him most
on Sunday at the House of
Prayer Holiness Church.
"On a Sunday like this Joshua
would run through the church
singing to the top of his lungs,"
she said. "I miss him so much -
that I can't reach out and touch
him. That's the hardest part for
me."
And, though he's been elimi-
nated from the competition, his
aunt said his singing is a min-
istry to the congregation not a
contest.
"Just like they say on 'Ameri-
can Idol' how he gives them
'gooseys'- well that's nothing
compared to what we get in
here," she said at church on the
Sunday after Josh was voted off.
"My brother has been a pastor


Summer fun
Kids in kindergarten
through sixth grade are invited
to "Bug Zone" VBS from 6 to
8 p.m. Monday through Friday,
June 11-15, at Heritage Baptist
Church, 2 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-6171.
The Summer Book Club
at St. Timothy Lutheran Church
meets at 1 p.m. Wednesday in
the fellowship hall. Men and
women and friends from the
community are invited to join.
The first book is "The Ragamuf-
fin Gospel," by Brennan Man-
ning. Call Gail Sirak at
352-795-1618 or email
ssirak778@tampabay.rr.com.
Summer camp at North
Oak Baptist Church is in its
20th year and ready to serve
your family. Camp runs the en-
tire summer. For $14 per day,
children receive breakfast,
lunch and a snack, as well as
games, crafts and Bible study.
Field trips to places like Chuck
E Cheese, Don Garlits Racing
Museum and the Butterfly Farm
are planned for the summer. All
children K through 5th grade
are welcome to attend. Camp
hours are 6:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Monday through Friday and
there are discounts for multiple
children from the same family.
All workers are background-
screened and fingerprinted.
Call 352-489-3359 or 352-228-
2422 for more information. The
church is at the corner of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard in Cit-
rus Springs.


for going on 27 years and Joshua
has been singing gospel since he
was 3.
"I knew that God had his hand
upon Joshua, and it was a God-
given talent and that he loved
people feeling his music. The
emotions Joshua gets when he
sings he wants everyone to
feel it."
The congregation continues to
pray that God keeps taking him
higher and higher, she said.
Chris Wilrye, a church mem-
ber, said Ledet is a very humble
and down-to-earth young man.
"Just what they see on the
stage is what we see at church,"
Wilrye said. 'And I'm glad the
world finally got to see what we
see every Sunday Josh knows
how to bring a crowd up. He
knows how to set the atmos-
phere. He'll keep you laughing
and keep you smiling. He always
knows how to brighten your day
If you're down or anything is
wrong with you, be around Josh
for five minutes and you're back


Summer day camp for
children ages 6 through 12 con-
tinues all summer from 6:30
a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday at First United
Methodist Church of Inverness,
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness. Camp includes ac-
tivities and trips not just
babysitting in a safe, accred-
ited setting. Breakfast, lunch
and an afternoon snack served
daily. Cost is $50 per week. For
information and/or reservations,
call Pam at 352-344-4331.
Space is limited.
First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa on W.
Bradshaw Street will offer Va-
cation Bible School from 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Children will
learn about the fruit of the spirit
at "Big Heart Farms." Activities
include stories, games, crafts,
drama and music. Breakfast
and lunch provided at no cost.
Applications available at the
church or call 352-628-4083.
A summer event called
Sky for kids in preschool to
sixth grade will be hosted from
9 a.m. to noon Monday through
Friday at First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness. Kids will
participate in Bible-learning ac-
tivities, songs, games, treats,
Bible adventures. Each day
concludes with "Fly Away Fi-
nale." Register online at
www.groupvbspro.com/vbs/
ez/fpcinv.
Bring your kids to Baby-
lon, where Daniel had courage
in captivity. They will travel back
into Bible times at VBS from


smiling and you're back laughing
and cutting up. He just knows
hows to get that out of you."
Wilrye said Ledet's success is
no surprise at all.
"We've been seeing him sing
since he was a little boy," he
said. "He has just grown by
leaps and bounds in such a short
amount of time."
Wilrye said Ledet will be all
over billboards and all over the
world ministering through his
music like he always wanted to
do.
"I just wish him the best of
luck in all of his endeavors from
his House of Prayer family," he
said. "We'll keep praying to God
and keep lifting him up."
Assistant Pastor Robert Mc-
Craney described Ledet as "a
guy that really loves God and
has grown up in the Lord."
McCraney said Ledet is not
only a soulful singer, but one
who knows how to preach too.
"God called him to speak the
word," McCraney said before


Religion NOTES
9:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Saturday at Ho-
mosassa Seventh Day Adven-
tist Church, 5863 W. Cardinal
St., Homosassa. Children can
become part of history as they
see, hear, touch and even taste
what it was like to be in Baby-
lon. They will explore the mar-
ketplace shops, visit Daniel,
take part in games, dance to
lively Bible songs, and sample
tasty tidbits as they discover
more about Daniel's adventures
in Babylon. To register children
for VBS, call 352-382-7753.
Crystal River United
Methodist Church will host
"Summer Camp 2012" for
grades K-5 from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. weekdays through Aug. 3.
Free VBS is included from 9
a.m. to noon. Nonrefundable
costs include a one-time activi-
ties fee of $25 due at registra-
tion and the $85 weekly camp
fee due two weeks prior to each
session. Preregister now to
hold your spot. Camp themes
are as follows: June 4-8 -
Wacky Water Week; June 11-
15 Fun & Fitness Week;
June 18-22 Down On the
Farm; June 25-29 Living
Storybook Week; July 2-6 -
Happy Holidaze Week; July 9-
13 Starry Starry Nights; July
16-20 Beach Week; July 23-
27 Pirate Adventure Week;
July 30- Aug. 3 -Final Fling
Week. The church is at 4802 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Call
352-795-1240.
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County


Road 490 in Lecanto, will host
VBS with theme, "BUG ZONE,
Transformed By Our Big
God," for children ages 3
through sixth grade from 9 to
11:50 a.m. Monday through Fri-
day, June 11-15. This is a
Thrivent Financial for Luther-
ans-sponsored event. Register
at faithlecanto.com or call 352-
527-3325 or visit the church at
935 S. Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto.
Cornerstone Baptist
Church invites children ages 4
through fifth grade to VBS with
theme, "Amazing Wonders
Aviation," from 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Monday through Friday,
June 11 to 15. Register kids at
the church office, 1100 W. High-
land Blvd., Inverness. Preregis-
tration is encouraged. Call the
church office at 352-726-7335.
All kids in kindergarten
through fifth grade are invited to
come and be part of an amaz-
ing journey as we explore
"God's Amazing Wonders" in
VBS from 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Monday through Friday, June
11-15, at First Baptist Church of
Hernando, 3790 E. Parsons
Point Road, Hernando (across
from the post office). To prereg-
ister, call 352-726-6734.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, at 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. in Crystal River, will host
Vacation Bible School from
8:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, June 18-22.
This year's theme is Group's
"Sky" ... where everything is
possible with God. This ecu-
menical outreach offers a pre-


worship last Sunday "Every day
- when he was real young he
would get up and sing. He would
act the part as a minister as a
young man. I am very proud of
him that God has used him."
He said Ledet "stepped out in
faith."
"He wants to do something
from his heart and when you do
something from your heart and
you really love God God will
back you up 100 percent," he
said. "That door just opened -
for the world to see somebody
that really cares and really loves
to sing."
McCraney said he asks God to
keep encouraging Ledet be-
cause his talent is so powerful.
"I've seen him even as a young
man, someone with no fear, who
really loved to do things for God.
You can notice it when he sings,
when he preaches, when he
teaches and when he acts," Mc-
Craney said. "There was no fear
there because God backed him
up even as a young child."


school crew and an outstanding
program for ages 3 through
adults. There is no fee. Call
352-795-5325 to register. St.
Anne's Episcopal, First Presby-
terian and St. Timothy Lutheran
churches in Crystal River spon-
sor VBS.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites all
children to dive into fun at "Op-
eration Overboard: Dare to
go Deep With God" VBS from
9 a.m. to noon Tuesday
through Friday, June 26-29. Ex-
plore and experience God's un-
derwater universe.
Preregistration is from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Monday, June 25, or on-
line at http://overboard.cokes
buryvbs.com/hernandoumc.
Adventures include regular
deep-sea voyages into Bible
fun and creative crafts, hands-
on mission work, water science,
and music. Call Carl or Barbara
at 352-726-7245.
Soquili Stables at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center
in Crystal River is hosting
Camp Soquili. During June
and July, eight one-week ses-
sions are offered from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Learn to groom, tack,
and care for your equine part-
ner's daily needs. Learn to ride
Western using quiet hands and
soft legs or polish your Western
skills. Space is limited and fill-
ing quickly.
Call Merlyn or Diane at 352-
206-2990, email fiathhaven
crc@gmail.com or visit
www.faithhavencrc.org.

See Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Wash



day

It was a good day for a
baptism, a warm
Wednesday evening
about two years ago.
Her name was Minnie
and she lived by a lake.
She had invited her
Methodist pastor and all
her friends to come to her
baptism, right there at the
lake where she lived.
She joked that she had
a pile of rocks at the
water's edge to throw at
the alligators in case they
got too curious or hungry
Thankfully, she didn't
need them.
Normally, Methodists
baptize by sprinkling so
do Presbyterians but
Minnie wanted her bap-
tism to be like the ones
she remembered as a girl
growing up in a small
town in West Virginia
where people were
dunked in the river.
She couldn't remember
being baptized and could-
n't find a record of it, al-
though she found records
of everything else. Just in
case she hadn't been bap-
tized, at 67 she wanted to
make sure.
So, on that warm
See .Page C6


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL



Wall of


tears,


wall of


triumph

t was an event that
rocked the world and
sent Jewish pride up
to a new level. The event
established the State of Is-
rael as a military force to
be reckoned with and set
the stage for other victo-
ries to follow. Its military
and political implications
were extraordinary, but
not to be neglected was
the impact it had on Jew-
ish religious theology, for
in six days the Lord cre-
ated heaven and Earth
and all it contained, and
in six days the Israel De-
fense Forces conquered
all their enemies, and on
June 7, 1967, 45 years ago,
liberated the City of
Jerusalem and freed the
Temple Mount.
The historic event was
described in a radio
broadcast heard on Israeli
airwaves. In a cry that
stirred the Jewish nation,
Colonel Motta Gur
shouted, "The Temple
Mount is in our hands"!
Brigadier General
Shlomo Goren, who later
became Chief Rabbi of Is-
rael, approached the sa-
cred mount, recited the El
Molay Rachamin prayer
See Page C6


MICHELLE HIGGINBOTHAM/Associated Press
"American Idol" 2012 third runner-up Joshua Ledet and family members roll down the streets for a parade in his honor, Saturday, May 12, in
Westlake, La. Southwest Louisiana has "American Idol" fever, thanks to Westlake native Joshua Ledet's signature gospel voice propelling
him into the Fox TV singing competition's Top 3.

Congregation a source of constant support and encouragement for runner-up


MAI----A





C2 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church's "Adventures on
Promise Island" VBS for ages
5 through fifth grade is from 9
a.m. to noon Monday through
Friday, July 23-27. Cost is $12
per child; scholarships avail-
able. Amid the swaying palm
trees, exotic wildlife and wel-
coming sunshine, students will
learn about God's promises
through games, songs, crafts,
and Bible stories while enjoying
tasty snacks. Registration avail-
able during June from 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day at the church office, 7045
S.W. 83rd Place at State Road
200, Ocala. Students in the
sixth grade and older and
adults are invited to volunteer
and assist the teachers. Call
Joan Greve at 352-304-8711 or
the church office at 352-854-
4509, Ext. 221.
Come enjoy the "Adven-
tures on Promise Island"
where kids discover God's life-
saving love, from 5:15 to 8 p.m.
Sunday through Thursday, July
29 through Aug. 2, at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church, 114
N. Osceola Ave, downtown In-
verness. VBS includes games,
crafts, music and Bible stories
for children ages 3 through
adulthood. Supper served at
5:15 p.m. at no charge
Food & fellowship
The Men's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Men of Pur-
pose, will meet at 8:30 a.m.
today at Oyster's Restaurant on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The
breakfast is open to all men in
the community.
Men of Purpose is focused
on developing the whole man
- spirit, soul and body while
providing opportunities to wor-
ship, fellowship and participate


in teachings from the Scrip-
tures. Call the church at 352-
795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Calling all men! Come for
a free breakfast of eggs, bacon
and all the trimmings, catered
by Capers in Catering, at 9 a.m.
today at Calvary Chapel Inver-
ness, 960 S. U.S. 41 Inverness.
Call 352-726-1480 or visit
www.calvaryinv.com.
The Knights of Columbus
Council 8510 in Dunnellon will
sponsor a Hawaiian luau din-
ner dance Saturday, June 9, at
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church's parish hall, 7525 S.
U.S. 41. Doors open at 5:30
and dinner is served at 6:30
p.m. Dinner is genuine imitation
island cuisine. Teriyaki chicken
and sweet and sour pork are
the entrees with several side
dishes. Pina coladas available
at the Tiki Hut from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m. Tickets ($15) are available
from the church office, in the
parish hall after Sunday Mass
or from any Knight. Music pro-
vided by "The Carriers." To re-
serve a table (for 10) or Call
352-489-6221.
Third Saturday supper is
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Satur-
day, June 16, in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Com-
munity Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes pork chops and
stuffing with mushroom gravy,
applesauce, green beans, rolls,
marble cake, coffee and tea for
$10 for adults and $5 for chil-
dren. Tickets can be purchased
at the door. Take outs available.
Call the church at 352-
489-1260.
All-you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts, with sausage, cof-
fee and orange juice, are
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa.


RELIGION


Sale away
Red Level Baptist Church
will have a yard sale, bake
sale, car wash and free
breakfast from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, June 9. All of these
are to help support missions, so
come out and support this com-
munity event. The church is at
11025 W. Dunnellon Road,
Crystal River. Call 352-
795-2086.
Cornerstone Christian
Supply has available for pur-
chase the newly released biog-
raphy of Tim Tebow, "Playing
With Purpose," by Mike Yorkey.
Cost is $9.99. The bookstore is
an excellent source for all your
Christian needs: Bibles, greet-
ing cards, books, T-shirts, gifts,
etc. Cornerstone Christian Sup-
ply is at 416 U.S. 41 South, In-
verness. Call the bookstore at
352-344-2470.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call 352-726-1707.

Special events
The public is invited to the
4th annual "Body, Mind and
Soul Health Fair" from 9 a.m.
to noon Thursday, June 14, at
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. More
than 50 local businesses and
health organizations will pro-
vide health screenings and
valuable information on serv-
ices available to the local com-
munity. Free door prizes, free


gifts and promotional items.
Call 352-628-4083.
The Heirborne Drama
team will present "Undone" for
the final time at 6 p.m. Sunday
at North Oak Baptist Church in
Citrus Springs. This combina-
tion of mime, interpretive move-
ment and sign language set to
contemporary Christian music
will stir your heart and revitalize
your faith. These high-school-
ers are finalizing their regular
season and getting ready for a
mission trip to South Dakota. All
are invited to attend. The
church is at the intersection of
N. Citrus Springs Blvd. and N.
Elkcam Blvd. in Citrus Springs.
Call 352-489-1688 for more
information.
Genesis Community
Church will host four speakers
from River City Church in Jack-
sonville during June. "We are
calling this the Haggai Experi-
ence," says Pastor Brian
Baggs. Twenty-five centuries
ago, the prophet Haggai called
men and women to the right pri-
orities. The speakers are as fol-
lows: Tomorrow Byron
Jarvis, retired pastor; June 10
- Chris Keller, college pastor;
June 17 Church Planter and
Pastor Will Morgan; and June
24 Josh Franklin, Bible
teacher. The community is in-
vited. Genesis Community
Church is nondenominational
and meets at the Knights of
Columbus building on County
Road 486 in Lecanto. Worship
services are at 10 a.m. Sun-
days. Call 352-464-4686 for
information.
Mary and Martha's, the
Women's Ministry of Abun-
dant Life, will meet from 6:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday at the
church, 4515 N. Tallahassee
Road, Crystal River. All women
in the community are invited to
attend this time with other
Christian women. Bring a cov-
ered dish and come out and
enjoy this time together. Mary


and Martha's helps women
grow spiritually and provides
opportunities for fellowship with
other women. Women's groups
from all churches in the com-
munity are invited. Call the
church at 352-795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
The public is invited for an
evening of inspiration featur-
ing Nuris Lemire and Dr. James
Lemire at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 13, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. The theme of the
evening is "Living in Harmony
and Coherence." Call 352-
746-1270.
Tickets are on sale for the
"Murder Mystery Party" spon-
sored by the players of the
Dunnellon Depot and the Altar
and Rosary Society of St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church.
The party will take place Satur-
day, June 16, in the parish hall,
7525 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Doors open at 6:30 and "Death
is a Cabaret 01' Chum" starts at
7 p.m. Tickets are a $10 dona-
tion, which includes light re-
freshments. Tickets are
available in the church office.
Call 352-489-3166.
Join with women of Citrus
County who share in the desire
to serve their community.
Women In Christ (WIC) meet
at 3 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at First Christian
Church of Inverness, 2018
Colonade, Inverness. Call Bon-
nie at 352-726-2854 for more
information. Planning in
progress for local mission proj-
ects. All women are welcome.
Crystal River of Life Cof-
fee House meets from 7 to
9:30 p.m. Friday at the Village
Cafe, 789 N.W. 5th St. (West
State Road 44). Enjoy Christian
fellowship, conversation and
music.
"Saturday Night Gospel
Jubilee" at 6 p.m. the last Sat-
urday monthly at First Church
of God, Inverness. Anyone in-


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA .. .


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

terested in participating is in-
vited to come prepared to be in-
cluded in the program. Food
and fellowship follow. No
charge.
Pastor Tom Walker invites
the public to attend. Directions:
Go one mile north of Kmart on
U.S. 41, turn right on Jasmine
Lane (at the corner where Cit-
rus Sew & Vac is).
The church is a block or two
down on the right side. Call
352-344-3700.
Citrus Zen Group, Bud-
dhist meditation, meets at 3
p.m. Sunday at the Unitarian
Universalists Fellowship, 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41 north of
the Holder intersection). Call
352-464-4955 for information.
Abundant Life conducts an
"Hour of Prayer" from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Sunday. These
times of prayer are open to
everyone who wants to see a
spiritual awakening sweep Cit-
rus County and the surrounding
areas.
Join us as we pray for the
government, the nation, the
church, the city and the world.
Abundant Life can also receive
prayer requests through its
website at www.abun-
dantlifecitrus.org. Call the
church for more information at
352-795-LIFE.
Worship
Pastor Brian Kinker and
his wife, Kim Kinker, have
started a new church,
Covenant Love Ministry, in
building 11 at Shamrock Acres
Industrial Park, 6843 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. The church
is a spirit-filled, word-of-faith
family ministry that plays tradi-
tional and contemporary music.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday, which gives the com-
munity and children a safe,
positive place to come to on
Friday nights. Regular church

See NOTES/Page C3


0 rCrystal
F River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


: ": West

Citrus
HEKE, YOU'LL FIND Church of Christ
SCPKIJNG FAMILY
IN CH KI M 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
------ -- VT Ae Aif


CKYSTXL


UNITED
-A ETHODIST
CH U KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
. A Stephen Ministry Provider


Crystal niver, r L 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00


EVANGELIST


SBob Dickey


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church


Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ


Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 10:00 am
Sunday School
9:00 am
Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


STEPHEN I TRiJ y


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
S. I . r tI
' l, i I i. HI . .

-MiS


IASMUSOF GODI


Come
grow
with us!


The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study,
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M. -6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE -
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
CORPS.
nam usop S.
SUNDAY:

Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






^ Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
00A93J


0 Crystal Qiver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
IProvided


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


C ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River I mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


*
a p

"The
Church
in the
Cr -Hu-

-,

S D S rI


I


I
0o


Q


*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

services are at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
days. Follow us on Facebook:
@Covenant Love Ministry or
@Kinker Family Worship. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Brian Kinker at
352-601-4868.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's men and women's
club breakfast and workday is
today. Bishop Gregory Brewer
will be at the church for the
deanery-wide Confirmation
service at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Feed My Sheep Ministry will
host a hot lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday for those in need.
Following at 12:30 p.m. is the
healing and Holy Eucharist
service celebrating "The First
Book of Common Prayer." The
food pantry is open from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate Trinity Sunday
with Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and 10:30
a.m. Sunday. There is a healing
service and Eucharist at 10
a.m. Wednesday. SOS is at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church with summer hours
from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. through
September. Evening Bible


RELIGION


study is at 7 Thursday in the
parish hall.
A come-as-you-are service
will take place at 5 p.m. today
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River.
Sunday worship services in-
clude the early service with
communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. with coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services are
announced. Nursery provided.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
"Holy, Holy, Holy," from
Isaiah 6:1-8, is theme by Pastor
Stephen Lane at Faith
Lutheran Church in Crystal
Glen Subdivision, off State
Road 44 and County Road 490
in Lecanto. The church is
wheelchair accessible, offers
assistance for the hearing im-
paired, and has a cry room for
children where the parents can
hear and see the service in
progress. Services are at 6
p.m. Saturday and 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. Following the Sunday
service is a time of fellowship.
Bible study for adults and Sun-
day school for children begins
at 11 a.m. Everyone is invited to
all activities. Due to VBS from
June 11-15, "Fellowship and
Games" will be at noon


Wednesday. Call 352-527-3325
or visit faithlecanto.com.
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
Gulf Ridge Park Baptist
Church invites everyone to
worship Sunday as the church
celebrates its 63rd homecom-
ing. The Rev. Richard Martin
will preach in the morning wor-
ship service followed by dinner
on the grounds. The church is
at 20200 Manecke Road,
Brooksville. Call 352-796-4710.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered. A midweek worship
service for adults is offered at 6
p.m. Wednesday. For the
youths, we offer "Ignite," and for


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 C3


children, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
Floral City United
Methodist Church conducts
Sunday services at 8 a.m. in
the 1884 church and 10:30
a.m. in the main sanctuary.
Bible studies are at 10 a.m.
Tuesday and 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. Call the church office at
352-344-1771.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's
(an Episcopal Church in the An-
glican Communion) will cele-
brate the first Sunday after
Pentecost (Trinity Sunday) at
the 8 and 10:15 a.m. services.
St. Anne's will host Our Fathers
Table today from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Overeaters Anony-
mous meets at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the parish li-
brary. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library. St.
Anne's will suspend the
monthly sing-alongs for sum-
mer and will resume in the fall.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship services at
8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Cof-
fee hour follows both services.
The church is barrier free and
offers a free CD ministry, large-


print service helps and hearing
devices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.
The church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills Boule-
vard in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
Room 102. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. The church has
many Christian education op-
portunities at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. Missionettes and Royal
Rangers Clubs meet for chil-
dren from the age of 3. The
adult class meets in rooms 105
and 106 at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The youth group, "Define Grav-
ity," meets at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Youth Ministries
Building with Youth Pastor Jon
Uncle. The church is at 416
U.S. 41 South, Inverness. Call
the church at 352-726-4524.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. Come as you are and
experience a casual and
friendly atmosphere. A coffee
fellowship follows the service.
The church meets at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club, 1715 For-
est Ridge Drive, across from
the Whispering Pines Park en-


trance. The "Faith Lessons"
home group meets for fellow-
ship once monthly during the
summer months and will re-
sume in September. Call Ken-
nie Berger at 352-302-5813.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday
and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All residents of the
area are welcome. Sunday
morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, begins its
summer worship schedule this
Sunday with worship at 9:30
a.m. Bible class/Sunday school
will resume in July. Kingsway
Retirement Community will
have an "Open House" Satur-
day and Sunday, June 9 and
10, with an update and more in-
formation. A voters' meeting will
immediately follow worship
Sunday, June 10. St. Paul's
Soccer Camp is Tuesday
through Saturday, June 5-9.
Registration is $45. Call now for

See NOTES/Page C5


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM ..................Discovery Time
11:00AM-................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM-..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1Y2mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Homosassa Springs
S EVNT-DAYADVENi STCHURCHI






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Littil! Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

OpM
tHeart,
OMpe


Voorws

.- . ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1P miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
wwwhJernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Robert Martin
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


Glory to Glory
Ministries
A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL A


Come as you are!

COMMUNITY CHURCH
z *
.- -<^y ^


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253



SHernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.. Floral City, FL.


St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 pm
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


IA Faith
Lutheran

Church (L.CM.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

&"atgrm omremw.


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Floral City
United Methodist
S Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams,Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org
._......


Hernando FL 34"2
352-726-6734

2 3790 E Parson's Point Rd.
Vlsit us on the Web at
www.fbchermnde.com
Z,





C4 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


Calif. approves
more protection for
religious freedom
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -
The state Assembly has ap-
proved a bill that would add
more protections for religious
freedom in the workplace,
specifying that California dis-
crimination laws also should
apply to religious clothing, hair-
styles and the right to carry reli-
gious objects.
The bill's author, Assembly-
woman Mariko Yamada, D-
Davis, said she was upset to
learn that Sikh and Muslim
workers continue to face dis-
crimination at work despite laws
prohibiting it.
AB1964, which passed Tues-
day on a 59-3 vote, also clari-
fies that segregating an
employee from other workers or
the public because of their ap-
pearance is not an acceptable
accommodation under the law.
"This bill is a little bit like the
Rosa Parks issue of the 21st
century for me," Yamada said.
"To know that there are Sikhs
and Muslims relegated to the
back of the store in order to
continue their employment is
particularly heinous."
Some lawmakers noted that
the law could save the state
from costly legal cases, such as
a lawsuit the Department of
Corrections settled last year
with a Sikh man who was
barred from becoming a prison
guard because he refused to
shave the beard required by his
Sikh religion so he could be fit-
ted for a gas mask. The state
agreed to pay the man
$295,000 in damages and give
him a managerial job.
Assemblywoman Shannon
Grove, R-Bakersfield, said she
was concerned the changes
could endanger employees and
their co-workers, such as if oil-
field workers were unable to
don respirators in the event of a
gas leak.


Assemblyman Donald Wag-
ner, R-Irvine, an attorney, said
he has represented an em-
ployee who was terminated for
wearing a head scarf.
"The federal law doesn't go
far enough to accommodate
the issues that are important in
the modern workforce," said
Wagner, who supported the bill.
The legislation now moves to
the state Senate.
I lw.,mmw itfml M


RELIGION


Liquor reguiorS vi -
refuse to stock Groups: 10,000
'Five Wives Vodka' signatures against


SALT LAKE CITY-- Five
Wives Vodka was named in
bad taste and won't be stocked
or special ordered at stores op-
erated by the state of Idaho,
regulators said.
The middle-shelf vodka is
made by Ogden's Own Distill-
ery in Utah, where the Mormon
church is based. Its label car-
ries the name and an image of
five women, an apparent refer-
ence to polygamy, a practice
abandoned in 1890 by The
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints.
Idaho State Liquor Division
administrator Jeff Anderson
said the brand is offensive to
Mormons who make up over a
quarter of Idaho's population.
"It's masterful marketing on
their part. But it doesn't play
here," Anderson said.
Ogden's Own Distillery is try-
ing to make the most of the re-
jection with a media campaign
and sale of "Free the Five
Wives" T-shirts.
Five Wives Vodka has been
approved for sale in Utah,
whose residents are predomi-
nantly Latter-day Saints. It's also
available in Wyoming, another
state that regulates liquor sales.
Nobody in Utah is raising a
fuss over the brand, said Vickie
Ashby, a spokeswoman for the
Utah Department of Alcoholic
Beverage Control. Utah regu-
lates all sales of hard liquor,
wine and heavy beer, making


UIIcoUin oruinanc
LINCOLN, Neb. -A petition
drive to force a vote on Lin-
coln's anti-discrimination rule
for gay and transgendered peo-
ple has garnered more than
10,000 signatures, four times
the number needed to place
the issue on the ballot, organiz-
ers said.
Family First and the Ne-
braska Family Council an-
nounced Tuesday that they
submitted 10,092 signatures
before the filing deadline.
Roughly 2,500 signatures were
needed from registered voters
in Lincoln.
City officials in Lincoln, the
state's second-largest city, have
said they'll need one to two
weeks to verify signatures.
The groups tapped a network
of 310 volunteer petition circula-
tors in the days after a vote by
the Lincoln City Council. Ap-
proved earlier this month, the
city ordinance adds sexual ori-
entation and gender preference
to a list of factors that are
legally protected against dis-
crimination for matters that in-
volve housing, employment and
public accommodations.
The city's charter requires
the council to either repeal the
ordinance which appears
unlikely, given the 5-0 vote to
enact it or place the issue to
a referendum that would let Lin-
coln voters decide whether it
should go in to effect.


Religion BRIEFS

the products available only at
state-owned stores. Idaho and
Wyoming control liquor sales
with a mix of state-owned and
privately-operated stores.
Ogden's Own Distillery says
the snub is unfair because a
Utah beer named Polygamy
Porter is available in Idaho. An-
derson said Idaho doesn't de-
cide what beer brands can be
sold in grocery and conven-
ience stores.


The vote could take place in
a special election called by the
city or in November's general
election. When the city council
approved the measure on May
14, two members abstained.
City spokeswoman Diane Gon-
zalez said officials were "still
looking at all the options" and
would release more details at a
news conference Thursday.
Supporters argue that the
measure is needed to protect
the civil rights of gays, lesbians,
bisexuals and transsexuals.
Lincoln Mayor Chris Beutler
has called the ordinance a
basic matter of fairness and in-
voked the state motto, "Equality
before the law." Opponents
claim that any change to the
city's charter requires direct
voter approval.
The Omaha City Council nar-
rowly approved an ordinance in
March that bans employers,
job-training programs, labor
groups and other organizations
from discriminating based on
sexual orientation. The meas-
ure included exemptions for re-
ligious organizations.
The Nebraska Attorney Gen-
eral's office, headed by Republi-
can Jon Bruning, said in a legal
opinion this month that cities
can't adopt such ordinances be-
cause no such protections exist
in state law. Gov. Dave Heine-
man has also said voters
should get to decide on Omaha
and Lincoln's ordinances.
The attorney general's opin-
ion said voters have the power
to extend anti-discrimination
protections to those not cov-
ered by state law, but city gov-
ernments cannot. Critics have
said the opinion would not
stand up in court.
Israel to fund
non-Orthodox rabbis
for first time
JERUSALEM Israel's attor-
ney general has announced that
non-Orthodox rabbis serving
their communities will receive


The Traveler
He has put on invisibility.
Dear Lord, I cannot see-
But this I know, although the
road ascends
And passes from my sight,
That there will be no night;
That You will take him gently
by the hand
And lead him on.
Along the road of life that
never ends,
And he will find it is not death,
but dawn.
I do not doubt that You are there
as here,
And You will hold him dear.
Our life did not begin with birth,
It is not of the earth;
And this that we call death,
if is no more
Than the opening and closing
of a door-
And in Your house how many
rooms must be
Beyond this one where we rest
momentarily.
Dear Lord, I thank You for the
faith that frees,
The love that knows it cannot lose
its own;
The love that,looking through the
shadows, sees
That You and he and I are ever one!
James Dillet Freeman
000BN8F


state funding for the first time.
Up to now, the state has rec-
ognized and supported only Or-
thodox rabbis, leaving the more
liberal clergy and their congre-
gations without state funding.
The decision was in re-
sponse to a 2005 appeal by the
Reform movement for one of its
rabbis, Miri Gold. She wel-
comed the decision in an inter-
view on Army Radio Tuesday.
"This is a historic move of jus-
tice in our country," she said.
The Justice Ministry said reli-
gious councils could employ lib-
eral rabbis, but they would be
called "community leaders," not
rabbis.
Unlike in North America, the
two liberal streams of Judaism
in Israel are tiny compared to
the stricter Orthodox.
From wire reports


A TRIBUTE TO
OUR BELOVED
GARY MAIDHOF
From the Citrus County Center Theater
for the Performing Arts Foundation
an International Cultural Arts Center
Gary Maidhof our most beloved
mentor, advisory Council member,
partner in love for Life, God, T1ruth,
Goodness and all of His creations.
Dear Gary:
Along with us we know that death is an
experience in the heart of Life, not a
finality. It is an eternal experience. In this
race we call Life; VICTORY became yours
as you manifested your highest potential.
You came into this world to bless and be
blessed. In perfect honesty you could say
dressed up with your characteristic
humility "today I am a better person than I
was yesterday". It was your true
transcendental experience. Commanded by
compassion, propelled by FAITH,
cognizant of spiritual consciousness,
supporting us and all who seek to get under
your wings of unparalleled understanding;
we run the race set before us.
We are grateful and most thankful for the
assurance of the transcendental experience
that from the other side of Light where Life
finds you and this other side where we are
you will continue in the race. Together we
will learn the Master craft of VICTORY.
Until we meet again in the ever present
Presence of our Creator.
God speed in your new Life's journey. The
Father, you and all of us who love you are
one! FOREVER! "Dear Lord,thank You
for the faith that frees, and the love that
knows it cannot lose its own".
Sal and Nora Cina


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday

Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


COMMUNITY
CO0NGREGATIONAL.J
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
5!


GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249-7211
000AOKH


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School..............9:00
W orship .....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call / '
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


- fJj


First United


Methodist


- Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
--------- Ark


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260




First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 i


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! -

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!





E fn iniCo t


r ,









VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:00 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PM to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
:. .catholicweb.com .:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication
on the Community
page each weekday.
Include the name of
the organization, the
time, day and place
of the meeting,
whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom
to call for details.
Send in information
attn: Community
Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to
(352) 563-3280,
attention: Club
meetings.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

remaining space at camp. Call
352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Summer Sun-
day worship schedule: Casual
praise and worship at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school from 9:30
to 10:30 a.m., and traditional
worship at 11 a.m. For Trinity
Sunday, Holy Communion will
be observed and the Rev. Craig
S. Davies will preach on "Table
Manners." The youths will serve
a pancake breakfast from 9 to
11 a.m. Sunday in the fellow-
ship hall. Suggested donation is
$3. Proceeds will benefit the
youth summer mission trip.
Register for SKY VBS at the in-
formation desk or at
www.groupvbspro.com/vbs/ez/f
pciinv. Free ice cream social at
3 p.m. Sunday, June 10, in the
fellowship hall. Come try the
10-foot hot fudge sundae. Call
352-637-0770.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs, at 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Sunday school and at 10:30 for
morning worship. Sunday
evening services begin at 6.
Wednesday night Bible studies
are at 7. We are a nondenomi-
national church that preaches
the Word of God from the Bible,
believing that the entire Bible is
true. Call the church at 352-
628-5556.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45.
The evening service begins
at 6. Midweek services are at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Young
Musicians/Puppeteers meet at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The
church is on East Parsons
Point Road in Hernando (di-
rectly across from the Her-
nando Post Office).
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
For new friends and fellow-
ship, come to Parsons Memo-
rial Presbyterian Church at
5850 Riverside Drive in Yan-
keetown. Enjoy coffee and
sweets at 10 a.m. Sunday in
the fellowship hall followed by
the worship service at 11 a.m.
Communion is served the first
Sunday monthly. After church,
return to the fellowship hall to
visit and eat. Call 352-
447-2506.
Reflections Church
meets at Citrus Springs Middle
School. Sunday morning wor-
ship service begins at 10:17
a.m. Children's church and
nursery is available. Bible study
is at 8:45 a.m. for adults.
The Potter's House
Church has Sunday worship
services at 10:30 a.m. Come
early for Sunday school. Join
us on Wednesday evening for
Dr. and Mrs. Paul and Kathy
Hall's "Discipleship Class." Visit
www.potterhousechurch.com
for all events and activities. For
prayer, call 352-249-8980.
First Church of God of
Inverness, a nondenomina-
tional church which meets at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, invites
the public to Sunday morning
worship services at 10:30 and
an old-fashioned Sunday
evening service at 6 filled with
singing, testimonies and the
Word, including a Christian ed-
ucation hour for children. The
ladies "Joy-Belles" meet the
second Tuesday monthly. A
men's breakfast is enjoyed the


last Saturday monthly and at 6
p.m. the last Saturday monthly
is "The Saturday Night Gospel
Jubilee" (with groups from the
area participating). Refresh-
ments and fellowship follow and
there is no charge. The church
has a once-monthly fellowship
carry-in meal, followed by
"theme-planned" programs.
Bible study and prayer time is
at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Call
352-344-3700.
Rediscover church at
Gravity Church at 11 a.m.
Sunday. Come early to Grav-
ity Church Cafe for coffee, pas-
tries and fellowship. The church
is at 801 S.E. U.S. 19 Crystal


RELIGION


River. Visit www.gravity
church.org.
First Christian Church of
Inverness has discontinued
Wednesday evening meals
through August and will resume
in September. Church services
will remain with Sunday school
at 9 a.m. with worship services
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday.
Wednesday evening choir prac-
tice is at 5 followed by Bible
study and prayer meeting at 6
p.m. Everyone is invited. The
church is at 2018 Colonade St.,
behind the new RaceTrac gas
station on State Road 44.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 352-795-
4943 or 352-563-0056 for
information.
Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonnade Street. Sunday
services are at 10:30 a.m.
Home groups meet in Inver-
ness and Beverly Hills on Tues-
days. Call the church at
352-637-0923.
New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway
in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. A fellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often\.Childcare provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer
ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Childcare provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
352-726-8333.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W.
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call 352-382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call 352-489-7515.
Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal


ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at 352-212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call 352-
746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House, 4929


Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at 352-726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. at North Lecanto High-
way and North Dawson Drive,
Hernando. Wednesday Bible
studies and youth meeting at
7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call 352-621-7260.
House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call 352-796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-1270.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a tra-
ditional Anglican mission with
ancient roots. The 1928 Prayer
Book is used. The church is at
1023 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Hernando. Call 352-
637-5922.
Live & learn
A unique new study/dis-
cussion group will have its first
meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday
at First Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River. Called "The
Forum," the new exchange of
ideas has no set curriculum, no
study book other than one cho-


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033

S43 Years of
RST Bringing Christ
F I F I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.

726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson



8 |
"First For Christ"...lohn 1:41
FIRST ||
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS 1
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Terry Allcorn
Interim Minister


Sunday:
9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
Wednesday:


Sunday School
Worship Service


6:00U P M. Bible Stud

wwwlfccIinvco


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 C5


sen by its members, and no
course of study except one se-
lected by majority vote of its
members, and may range from
study of a particular part of the
Bible to modern social issues
as affected by current religious
trends .The first meeting will be
led by the church's pastor, the
Rev. Dr. Jack Alwood. Persons
of all ages are welcome. "The
Forum" will meet regularly as
often as the group wishes; pos-
sibly on a weekly basis. Light
refreshments will be served at
the organizational meeting. It is
not necessary to be a member
of the church to join the group.
Tired? Overweight? Con-
cerned about high blood pres-
sure, diabetes, high cholesterol,
osteoporosis, heart disease,
cancer or your health in gen-
eral? Dr. Hans Diehl, director of
Lifestyle Medicine of Loma
Linda, Calif., will continue a
nine-week seminar about
lifestyle adjustments from 6 to
8 p.m. Tuesday through June
26 at Glad Tiding Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 520 N.E. 3rd
Ave., Crystal River (next to the
BP station). Seating is limited
for this free seminar. Register
early by calling 352-628-1743.
Nature Coast Community
Bible Study (CBS) will begin a
30-week study of the books of
Amos and Isaiah on Thursday,
Sept. 6, from 9:45 to 11:45 a.m.
at First Baptist Church of Bev-
erly Hills, at the intersection of
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491) and Forest Ridge Boule-
vard. This class is open to men
and women and includes a pro-
gram for children ages 5 and
younger. CBS is part of an inter-
national organization that pro-
vides interdenominational Bible
study for people who desire an
in-depth study of God's word
along with opportunities for fel-
lowship. Preregistration is nec-
essary. To register or for more
information, call Terry at 352-
382-2365, Lori or Ron at 352-
746-7581, or Linda at
352-746-1698.
Men, women and children


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH





SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
Meeting at the Inverness Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
WEDNESDAY
Home Group
Bible Study & Prayer
Call for details
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
MNun



Sunday
10:30 AvM.I& 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALL ARE WELCOME


E o PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos! z
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


ages 10 and older are invited to
learn hand and machine
sewing, quilting, garment mak-
ing, etc., in an informal setting
where you can learn at your
own speed. The "Sewing
Workshop" is an outreach pro-
gram of the Crystal River
United Methodist Church, 4801
Citrus Avenue. Classes are
from 9 a.m. to noon the second
and the fourth Tuesday monthly
and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the sec-
ond and fourth Saturdays. Any-
one interested in sharing their
talents in teaching sewing or a
special sewing project is en-
couraged. Call 352-563-1586.
Reflections Church leads a
small group study for adults
from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Chil-
dren's activities will available at
this time. Reflections Church
meets at Citrus Springs Middle
School.
Trusting Heart Ministries
Bible Study group meets at 6
p.m. the second and fourth
Thursday monthly at 176 N.
Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all denomina-
tions. Call 352-860-0052 or
352-586-5174 or email trusting-
heartministry@yahoocom.
Congregation Beth Israel of
Ocala offers open registration of
its religious school, Congrega-
tion Beth Israel School of
Jewish Education. The school
meets Sunday mornings at vari-
ous places in the community.
The curriculum consists of Jew-
ish lifecycle and history, Hebrew,
Bible, holidays and traditions, as
well as courses on Israel and
pre-bar and bat mitzvah and
confirmation classes. The
school caters to the individual
needs of the students and par-
ent participation is encouraged.
The staff consists of caring, ex-
perienced teachers. Suzanne
Boetger is educational director.
For more information and enroll-
ment, contact Suzanne at the
boetgers@yahoo.com or Judi at
352-237-8277.
Celebrate Recovery
Celebrate Recovery, a


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Attend

the worship

service ofh


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
/ Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions Saturday Only
\ 2:30 3:30 P.M. J

726-1670


Christ-centered 12-step fellow-
ship, meets at 6 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. Meetings
begin with dinner and fellow-
ship, followed by worship and
gender-based, small-group
meetings, concluding with Cof-
fee House fellowship at 9 p.m.
Call 352-453-5501.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fri-
days at Christian Recovery
Fellowship Church, 2242 W.
State Road 44. Call 352-726-
2800.
Celebrate Recovery meets
at 6 p.m. Friday at the Gulf to
Lake Ministry Complex in
Meadowcrest, left of SunTrust
Bank. A meal for a minimum
amount is served, followed by
praise, worship and a lesson or
testimony, then gender-specific
small groups. The evening
ends with fellowship, coffee and
dessert. The step studies, an
extremely important extension
of the program's healing
process, take place on a differ-
ent night. Call 352-586-4709 or
email celebrate.recovery
@gulftolake.com. A locator for
groups throughout the United
States is found at the website
www.celebraterecovery.com.
Announcements
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheart
ministry@yahoocom.
Bereavement support
group Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. The group is com-
posed of men and women who
are experiencing grief and are
convinced that "life can be good
again."
Open to all. Come or call
Anne at 352-212-0632.


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sird.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and A


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS .


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev.I.arrvPower

Sunday Services:
Traditional Service....................8:30
Sunday School.........................9:30
Contemporary Service...........10:30
Evening Service......................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 ,
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens............................... 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South 2
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"










Franciscan files tell story of abuse


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Robert Van
Handel was a 15-year-old semi-
narian at St. Anthony's, a presti-
gious Franciscan boarding school,
when, he said, a priest slipped
into the infirmary where he was
recovering from a fever and began
to molest him. The priest told him
it would help draw the fever out.
More than a decade later, Van
Handel himself was molesting
children while working as a Fran-
ciscan priest at the same Santa
Barbara boarding school. Van
Handel formed a boys' choir for
local children and chose his vic-
tims from among its ranks for
eight years.
The sexual abuse at St An-
thony's, including Van Handel's
own account of his crimes, is in-
cluded in more than 4,000 pages
from the confidential files of nine
Franciscan religious brothers who
were accused of abuse. The inter-
nal files, coupled with an addi-
tional 4,000 pages of sworn
testimony obtained by The Associ-
ated Press, are the largest release
of a religious order's files to date
and paint one of the fullest pic-
tures yet of a pervasive culture of
abuse that affected generations of
students at the seminary dedicated
to training future Franciscans.
The religious order settled for
$28 million in 2006 with plaintiffs
who alleged abuse by the nine
Franciscans, but Van Handel and
other defendants fought the re-
lease of their private files for six
years in a legal battle that reached
the California Supreme Court.
The files were obtained by The
Associated Press from a plaintiff's
attorney ahead of them being
made public Wednesday
The documents show how abuse
in a religious order can be closely
tied to the formation of children
who grow up to become brothers
and priests, said Terence McKier-
nan, founder and co-director of
Bishop Accountability.org, which
collects documents on clergy sex


Paul Palecek, who was molested as
in the 1960s, poses May 21 at his hi
of two dozen former students who
marrusti of molestation while they
boarding school for young boys v
Catholic order.
abuse and posted the Franciscan
files online Wednesday
"One offender bringing kids in
can set them up to be abused by
another offender and those kids in
turn grow up to become a member
of the order and themselves begin
abusing children," he said. "The
generational phenomenon of
abuse is really, really clear in
these documents and it's a heart-
breaking story"
Brian Brosnahan, an attorney
representing the Franciscans, said
the files do not show that the Fran-
ciscans knew of the abuse at the
school or by other Franciscans in-
cluded in the settlement. The reli-
gious order was quicker than most
to address concerns about sexual
abuse and launched an investiga-
tion into the abuse at St Anthony's
in 1992, years before other Roman
Catholic institutions took up the
issue, Brosnahan said.
Two plaintiffs have alleged sex-
ual abuse since then, but an Orange
County jury rejected their claims
last year There have been no other


I his home address in Boulder
Creek, Calif., and at his em-
ployer's office Tuesday weren't
immediately returned.
Van Handel, who graduated
from St. Anthony's in 1965 and
later taught there for a decade,
has been accused of molesting 19
people, many of them young boys
he met while directing the com-
munity choir he founded while at
the school. The choir drew young
children from outside the semi-
nary and toured Europe.
Van Handel would choose his
victims from the choir- often pre-
ferring vulnerable and lost-looking
children- and would photograph
them nude, sometimes covered in
oil, dressed in pauper's clothing or
Associated Press tied up with rope in the seminary's
a Franciscan seminary student back tower He also would play tickling
ome in Folsom, Calif. Palecek is one and touching games, according to
have accused the Rev. Mario Cim- his files.
attended St. Anthony's, a seminary He abused at least one victim at
who hoped to join the close-knit the seminary, where the child
would spend the night with Van
Handel because his mother
allegations since 1993, he said. worked odd hours as a chef
"In general, if you look at it, One of his alleged victims, Bob
you'll find the Franciscans were Eckert, said he never thought at
among the most progressive," the time what Van Handel was
Brosnahan said. doing was wrong. The priest
The Franciscans played a piv- helped the 10-year-old Eckert
otal role in bringing Christianity shower with other boys while the
to California. Its members choir was touring Europe and then
known for wearing brown, hooded photographed him, Eckert said.
cloaks emphasize the poverty "I completely looked up to him.
and humility of their founder, St. He was the one who determined
Francis of Assisi. who was going to be in and who
The soft-spoken, bespectacled was going to be out," said Eckert,
priest Van Handel, who is now 65 who is now a 42-year-old general
and living as a registered sex of- contractor living in Santa Barbara.
fender in Santa Cruz County, ad- "My mom had total faith in him,
mitted his crimes and is the only and I had no question that any-
priest of the nine Franciscans to be thing was wrong with being there."
criminally convicted. He detailed Another priest, the Rev Mario
his actions in a "sexual autobiog- Cimmarrusti, has also been ac-
raphy" and in court papers that are caused of abusing multiple stu-
included in his confidential files. dents while he held the dual roles
He said his biggest concern was of head disciplinarian and head of
"the actual and potential damage the infirmary at St. Anthony's in
I've caused to young men, the Fri- the late 1960s. Cimmarrusti, who
ars and the Catholic Church," he also attended the school as a
told a probation officer in 1994, ac- teenager, took over as prefect of
cording to his file. discipline the year Van Handel
Messages left for Van Handel at graduated.


His confidential files show that
in an evaluation by a sex offender
therapist, the priest estimated he
had molested between 30 and 40
boys. On another occasion, Cim-
marrusti said he may have mo-
lested as many as 250 boys,
according to the evaluation in-
cluded in his personnel file.
He is not the priest who Van
Handel said molested him in the
infirmary
Cimmarrusti, who is now 82,
could not be reached for com-
ment. His attorney, Robert "Skip"
Howie, said Cimmarrusti vehe-
mently denies all the allegations
against him.
"As an attorney, I can tell you
that records can be deceptive and
misleading," he said. "I'm really
not here to argue the case, but all
I can say is that he denies it."
The priest has been accused by
24 former students who alleged in
lawsuits that Cimmarrusti per-
formed hernia checks on the in-
coming freshman class as an
excuse to fondle them; delivered
violent, sexually charged beatings
for minor disciplinary infractions;
and molested students who were
sick in the infirmary
One student, Paul Palecek, quit
the seminary because of the
abuse, he said, and gave up on his
dream of becoming a Franciscan
priest. He remains active in the
church and with missionary work
overseas. Now 62, the semi-retired
former contractor is studying to
become a nurse.
Palecek testified that he told the
school's rector about the abuse
but nothing was done. In a deposi-
tion, the Rev Xavier Harris said
he didn't recall the conversation
and there is no record of it in the
priest's internal files. Bosnahan,
the Franciscans' attorney, said he
had no further information.
"I was really mad at God for a
long time, but it wasn't God's fault.
Mario chose to do evil," Palecek
said. "Someone should have caught
it Someone should have caught it
and done something about it"


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

Wednesday evening, Minnie
went under the water and
came up smiling. Jesus had
washed her sins away
I remember another bap-
tism, also about two years
ago, at my church. Among
those being baptized was a
blond-haired little boy who
looked to be about 3.
Before it was his turn, he
sat next to me in the pew,
"sat" being a relative, opti-
mistic word. It's more like
he bounced and kicked and
pounded on the pew. He ob-
viously did not want to be
there, waiting his turn.
The more his mom whis-
pered frustrated threats to
behave himself just a little
while longer, the more he
didn't want to behave and
kicked harder.
I felt for the kid. It's not
easy when you're 3 and you
would rather do anything
other than sit in church and
behave, even for just a little
bit


WALL
Continued from Page C1

for the fallen soldiers and
blew a triumphant blast on
the shofar. Soldiers who
were not even religious
wept at the emotional cap-
ture of the very center of
Jewish worship from an-
cient times and recited the
Shecheianu, the prayer for
thanksgiving for joyful
events. General Goren re-
cited: "Blessed are You who
comforts Zion and builds
Jerusalem." The Old and
New City of Jerusalem were
now united, and the Jews,
denied access to the most
holy site in Judaism for 19
years, The Western Wall,
were now able to visit the
sacred spot.
The Western Wall, or Hako-
tel Hama'aravi, is the last re-
maining remnant of the
Second Temple built by
Herod. In 70 C.E. the Temple
was destroyed by the Romans,
and the Jews were forced into
exile and were without a
homeland until 1948.
In 1948, Jerusalem was
captured by the Jordanians
and the city was divided
into the Old and New cities,
with the Western Wall in
Arab hands. Jews were de-
nied access to the holy site
until June 7, 1967, when the
Israeli Army liberated the
area during what would be
called the SixDay War
For centuries, the West-


I felt for the mom. It's not
easy raising a sinner when
you're a sinner yourself.
She looked at me, embar-
rassed, and I whispered to
her, "This is a good day for a
baptism." She smiled.
Some churches view bap-
tism as a profession of faith,
a public sign that a person
vows to follow Jesus. Chil-
dren can be baptized, but
only if they've come to their
own knowledge of faith.
At my church, we baptize
adults and kids and babies.
We believe baptism isn't
about us making a promise
to follow Jesus, but God
making a promise to us.
Adult believers are bap-
tized, but also kids and ba-
bies before they believe.
Parents bring their children
for baptism, saying, in
essence, '"As parents we are
foul and dirty and in des-
perate need of the cleansing
power of Jesus and so are
our children."
That's our promise to God
- we promise to come dirty
and needy
God's promise is to wash
us and never leave us, de-

ern Wall has been a focus of
prayer and emotion. In the
Middle Ages, it became
known as the Wailing Wall,
because so many Jews came
there to weep over the loss
of their Temple and their
sovereignty as a people.
Since the unification of
Jerusalem, the term has had
negative connotations and
its use is discouraged.
The Wall itself actually
has three layers, because
like many sites in Israel, it
was built on top of an exist-
ing structure. The Wall ex-
tends some 60 feet below. It
was actually a retaining wall
to the Second Temple, and
legend has it that it was
built by the poor people. Ex-
cavations around the area
have revealed valuable arti-
facts dating back centuries.
Today people visit the
Western Wall, as I have
done, to pray and meditate.
It is a site sacred to the
three Abrahamic faiths, and
I have stood side by side
with Christians who have
worshipped at this sacred
place. I have also witnessed
bar mitzvah ceremonies
taken place there. As in tra-
ditional circles, a separa-
tion divides men from
women worshippers. In re-
cent years, a courageous
group of women, called the
Women of the Wall, have
sought and received per-
mission for holding all-fe-
male Torah services at the
Temple Mount. Sadly, this
has been received with


spite our sin and weakness,
to provide for us, to be faith-
ful when we're not and to
bring us safely through life
and death and unto life
again.
In our catechism a
fancy word for questions
and answers about biblical
principles we ask: What
is baptism?
The answer: Baptism is a
sacrament whereby "wash-
ing with water in the name
of the Father and of the Son
and of the Holy Ghost" is to
be a "sign and seal" that we
belong to Jesus, wholly and
forever.
It's no guarantee that our
babies and children will
want to follow Jesus; they
have to make that decision
on their own. But God prom-
ises to set them apart for his
special favor throughout
their lives.
This week we're having a
baptism at my church. It's
one of my favorite things. I
like watching little boys who
misbehave and then wince
as the pastor pours a hand-
ful of water on top of their
heads. I like watching ba-

anger by some conservative
Orthodox Jewish groups,
and scrapes and violence
have erupted.
Visitors to the Wall often
leave little prayer petitions
in the cracks. Symbolically,
I believe that is what keeps
this 2,000-plus-year-old wall
from falling down. It is be-
lieved that God answers
prayers left at the Wall. The
former governor of Florida,
Charlie Crist, had one of his
aides leave a prayer for our
state at the holy site. I be-
lieve we escaped serious
hurricanes that year!
Legend says that on the
fast day of Tishah B'Av, the
Ninth of Av, the day the
Temple was destroyed, the
dew that clings to the Wall is
actually tears she is shed-
ding. Even as Jerusalem lay
in ruins, the rabbis of the
Talmud taught that the Tem-
ple was not destroyed, for
the Shekhinah (the Divine
Presence) still dwells
within.
May the Shekhinah,
whose Presence has never
left the sacred site, continue
to watch over Jerusalem
and may she lead all the
people of this holy city to a
new era of peace and un-
derstanding.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


bies who coo or howl -
shy little girls who hold onto
a mother's leg, grown men
who kneel and wipe away
tears because it's so good to
be washed clean.
Life gets grimy and some-
times I think the dirt and sin
are winning, but then we
have a baptism and I'm re-
minded once again that I've
been washed. Not washed
when I was baptized, but


washed at the moment I first
believed.
I've been washed and God
has promised to never leave
me nor forsake me no mat-
ter what, whether I'm lolly-
gagging around, stalled in
my faith or whether I'm
doing well; whether I'm
prayerful or prayerless, full
of faith or filled with doubt
For those whom God has
washed, God accepts.


It's a good day for a baptism.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
- I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at(352) 564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


ENTER


C6 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page C7 -SATURDAY, JUNE 2,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Skillbank needs
more drivers
Skillbank, a volunteer or-
ganization that has served
Beverly Hills for more than 30
years, is seeking volunteer
drivers.
Volunteers drive elderly
people residing in Beverly
Hills proper to doctor visits,
grocery shopping, trips to the
pharmacy and for hair ap-
pointments in Beverly Hills.
There is a small gas stipend
given out every two months,
to assist those who volunteer
their time.
If you can help, call 352-
746-5001 on any Monday,
Wednesday or Friday, be-
tween the hours of 9 a.m.
and noon.
Summer 'Jam'
coming up June 2
It's time to plan summer
fun and activities. The Spot
Family Jam will be at 5:30
p.m. Saturday, June 2, at
405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River.
The event is entirely free of
charge and at the end of the
evening bags of groceries will
be given away. Registration
for the giveaways closes at 7
p.m. There will be prizes, free
clothing, household items,
games, bounce houses, hot
dinner, cold drinks, life skill
messages and more.
The Spot Family Center
has served more than 1,800
families in Citrus County by
providing food, clothing, jobs
and resources. For more in-
formation on donating, volun-
teering or attending the
event, call 352-794-3870.
Visit the website at
www.TheSpotFamily
Center.org.
Post 166 to meet
at Olive Tree
The American Legion Post
166 of Homosassa Springs
will meet Monday, June 4, at
the Olive Tree Restaurant on
U.S. 19 south of Crystal
River. Dinner will be served
at 6 p.m. and the meeting
starts at 7 p.m. Dinner con-
sists of prime rib, mixed veg-
etables, soup or salad, and
an appetizer.
This meeting is open to all
veterans. To attend, send
your reservation along with a
check of $12 made out to
American Legion Post 166
and mail it to P.O. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Cee Lo


Special to the Chronicle
Cee Lo is an adorable and
cuddly 9-week-old kitten.
He is prepared for any oc-
casion in a black and white
tuxedo, and is ready to go
home. We also have many
other adoptable felines and
all fully vetted. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday at
the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Musicians garner honors


Community chorus awards scholarships


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus Community Concert
Choir announces that for the first time
in the history of its annual scholarship
award, two outstanding young musi-
cians have each been awarded a
$1,000 scholarship.
The co-recipients for 2012 are Crys-
tal River High School senior Virginia
Lane and Dominic Muzzi, a freshman
at Florida State University
Lane, who is a member of the choir,


is an accomplished cellist and has
been accepted at the University of
Florida, where she will pursue a dou-
ble major in chemical engineering
and music.
Muzzi, a concert pianist who has
given several concerts in Citrus
County, is a music major at FSU and is
already teaching several piano stu-
dents and has accompanied the Cen-
tral Florida Master Chorale.
Both are superior musicians, and
even though there was no precedent


Annual Mayfest


for multiple scholarships, it was im-
possible for the choir's selection com-
mittee to choose one over the other.
The formal scholarship presentations
will be made during the choir's Rogers
and Hammerstein summer concert on
Sunday, Aug. 5.
Applications for the 2013 scholar-
ship will be accepted until April 30.
Scholarship information and applica-
tion forms are available at the Citrus
Community Choir website, www.citrus
choircom.
The scholarship program is possible
through attendance at the choir's con-
certs, donations and sponsors.


Special to the Chronicle
Recently, New Horizons Village had its sixth annual Mayfest celebration. Once again, everyone chipped in to make the day
a success for residents, families, friends and staff. Close to 250 people were served a Cinco de Mayo luncheon. Some of
the activities included tie-dyed T-shirts, water slides, games and face and arm painting. Deejay Kenny Rorix provided en-
tertainment to keep everyone dancing. The pool was open and Citrus County Fire Rescue was on hand to give out fire hats
and tours of a fire truck. New Horizons Village is an intermediate care facility for 48 developmentally disabled adults
(ICF/DD) situated on a 13-acre campus in Lecanto. For more information, call 352-746-3262 or visit the website at
www.newhorizonsvillage.us.



Gardeners will look at Florida's reptiles


Special to the Chronicle

The June topic of the Cit-
rus County Extension Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinics
is "The Good, the Bad, and
the Ugly" otherwise
known as "Florida's Fabu-
lous Reptiles."


These creatures are vital
to our ecological system, but
are sometimes greatly mis-
understood. Come to one of
the free clinics to learn
more about reptiles and
how to beneficially co-exist
with them.
The schedule for June is:


Wednesday, June 6: 2
p.m. at Floral City Library
Friday, June 8: 1:30 p.m.
at Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River.
Tuesday, June 12:1 p.m.
at Lakes Region Library, In-
verness.
Wednesday, June 13:


1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Wednesday, June 20: 1
p.m. at Citrus Springs Li-
brary
Tuesday, June 26: 2 p.m.
at Homosassa Library
For more information,
call 352-527-5700.


Club's latest survey reveals satisfaction


Each year, we survey parents and
kids to see if we are doing
things the way they should be
done at our Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County facilities.
Parents rate our programs and em-
ployees and tell us what they like and
sometimes what they don't like. The
kids spend a little more
time with their questions,
which are more personal
than the ones in the parent
survey All are anonymous
and they are encouraged
to speak their minds. If we
are not doing something
right, we want to know
what it is so we can im-
prove.
In this year's end of the LaneN
school year survey, 97 per- BOY!
cent of parents felt the GIRLS C
clubs were a safe place for
their children to be and
(not always the same peo-
ple) 97 percent were happy with the
overall programs. Ninety percent said
they believed our clubs helped their
children to maintain or improve
school grades. Ninety-four percent felt
we had helped their children main-
tain or improve behavior. Some made
comments and singled out staff mem-
bers by name, praising them for taking
an interest in their child or grand-
child. One comment was "Wonderful


I


place for my daughter to get her
schoolwork done and have fun at the
same time." Another said, "I am very
grateful for my child to have a caring
staff and safe environment for my
child to go and be a part of."
Sometimes we have single dads
raising daughters who say things like:
"....it's hard to give her the
type of girl time she needs."
He also said, "I would like to
see more programs to teach
girls about becoming a girl."
Others recognize the impor-
tance we place on commu-
nity service and helping
youths develop leadership
skills and applaud us for it.
Some mention that we need
Vick larger parking areas (we
5 & agree) and others want a
uLUBS beautiful, brand-new build-
ing in Inverness. (Maybe,
one day in the future.)
Our kids say 45 percent of
their parents don't help them with
homework. Parents might be sur-
prised to hear this. "Help" with home-
work may be viewed differently,
depending on the perspective of the
parent or the child. Ninety-five per-
cent said they would like to be in the
BGCCC afterschool program next year.
What did they like best? Kids like
being with their friends, working with
computers in the tech labs, playing


pool, going on field trips, having fun,
playing outside, playing basketball
and kickball, being in Torch Club (a
leadership program for young teens,)
and learning about money in the pro-
gram "Money Matters," taught by per-
sonnel from TD Bank. They like art,
math, the X-Box 360 and helping the
staff.
Not many would admit they had
learned something new (only 37 per-
cent) but those who did said they had
learned about manners, math, to be
nice to others, Spanish, respect for
others, new websites, to draw, how to
be safe, to stay away from drugs and
how to have fun.
Perhaps you understand, reading
this, why we believe Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County are good for
kids. We believe our clubs are places
where kids can be strong and smart
and where they can get a head start on
great futures.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County are funded by United Way of
Citrus County, through partnerships,
donations and grants. With the help of
the Citrus County community, we
promise to keep working to make our
clubs even better

Lane Vick is past executive
director of the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County


News NOTES

New Jerseyans,
friends to gather
New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will
meet at 1 p.m. Monday, June
4, at the VFW Post 4252 on
State Road 200 in Hernando.
The highlight for June is
sub sandwiches. Other activi-
ties for June include lunch at
Little Joey's in Holder at 3
p.m. June 6, and at Ruby
Tuesday's in Inverness at 3
p.m. June 26. For more infor-
mation, call Mary Anne at
352-746-3386.
The club bowls Thursdays
at 10 a.m. at Beverly Hills
Bowl. Being from New Jersey
is not a requirement to join.
For more information, call
352-527-3568.
Club slates
Military Card Party
Beverly Hills Card Club in-
vites all to its Military Card
Party on Tuesday, June 12,
at Central Ridge Community
Center, 77 Civic Circle Bev-
erly Hills. Reservations are
required by Friday, June 9.
Doors open at 11 a.m. and
lunch is served at noon, with
games beginning at 1 p.m.
Tickets are $12.
For information or reserva-
tions, call Central Ridge
Community Center at 352-
746-4882, from 7:30 a.m. to
7 p.m. Monday through
Friday, or 352-746-3636
anytime.
Model railroaders
meet June 5
Citrus Model Railroad Club
will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day, June 5, at the Robinson
Horticulture Building of the
Citrus County Fairgrounds.
The program for the
evening will be a presenta-
tion by Stu Donnelly on one
of America's forgotten rail-
road tunnels, how it impacted
the Civil War and aided
the growth of railroads in
Virginia.
All are welcome. For more
information, call Stu Donnelly
at 352-690-6635.
Model A club
gathers June 5
Citrus A's Model A meeting
will be at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
June 5, at the Floral City
Lion's Club.
For more information, call
Patti Tompkins, secretary, at
352-688-3931 or visit the
website at www.citrusas.com.
All are welcome and new
members are encouraged.
Seminar to cover
veterans' aid
Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River will host a seminar from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
June 5, conducted by Gary
Marriage, CEO of Nature
Coast Financial and Opera-
tion: Veteran Aid in Crystal
River.
All are welcome. The sem-
inar will cover helping
wartime veterans and their
spouses in getting financial
assistance from the V.A. for
at-home and assisted-living
expenses. Call 352-563-0235
to RSVP, as space is limited.
Light refreshments will be
offered. Sunshine Gardens
Crystal River is at 311 N.E.
Fourth Ave., Crystal River,
behind the Walgreens on the
corner of State Road 44 and
U.S. 19.
PTO hosts 'End of
the Year Bash'
Rachel Reilly, "Big Brother"
all-star winner and finalist in
"Amazing Race," will work as
celebrity bartender for
Lecanto Primary School
PTO's "End of the Year Black
and White Bash" from 9 p.m.
to 2 a.m. Saturday, June 2, at
The Grove Downtown in
Inverness.
All money raised at the
event benefits the school and
Lecanto Primary School Par-
ent Teacher Organization


programs.
For more information, call
352-746-2220.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


North
4 87
V 6 5


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South

2 NT


06-02-12


+ Q 10 6
* A K Q J 10 8
East
4 J 9 5
V A 10 7 3
+ 7 4 2
4 6 5 3


South
4 AK2
V Q 9 4
+ KJ983
492

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South


West North
14' 2,*
Pass 3 NT


East
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: 4 4


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Loretta Young, who won the best actress
Oscar in 1948, said, "If you have enthusi-
asm, you have a very dynamic, effective
companion to travel with you on the road to
Somewhere."
This deal is a companion for yesterday's
- or an antithesis, if you prefer.
How should East and West play to defeat
three no-trump after West leads the spade
four: seven, jack, king?
Some players make a takeout double
when 5-4 in the majors, but I prefer to show
the five-card suit immediately (especially
when, as here, West is so short in clubs, the
third unbid suit).
North should raise to three no-trump,
hoping that his six winners will be suffi-
cient.
South should take the first trick with his
king. When you are in no-trump, winning
immediately with the ace is usually an in-
dication that you are very strong in the
suit; otherwise, you would have made a
holdup play.
South starts with eight top tricks: two
spades and six clubs. So, at trick two, he
leads a low diamond toward the dummy,
hoping West is an advocate of second hand
low.
However, West knows that declarer has
eight winners in the black suits. (If East
had the spade ace, he would have won the
first trick, not put in his jack.)
So West must dive in with the diamond
ace, then shift to the heart two. When you
lead a low card during a deal, you are say-
ing that you have honors in this suit and
are trying to take tricks in it. East ought to
win with his ace and return the heart
three, not go back to spades.
F 4 T0 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
rjMTH U by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, You keep forgetting the
one letter to each square, conditionson which l agreed
to form four ordinary words. to stay on living with you.
SLELP ''

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc ,
AllRg Rght served '
CROUC
I ra ..,. r. o


TRIEVDI

THE L-EAP ACTRP55
WAS THIS TO THE
MTOICM UNPEF-STUvY.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer A
here: s
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FORGO MIGHT OUTAGE DOLLAR
I Answer: When he started his new plant nursery,
everyone ROOTED FOR HIM


ACROSS
1 Deluge
5 Ms. Arthur
8 Ax or awl
12 Argue for
13 Maj. ocean
14 Lahore
language
15 Plod along
16 Suave
18 Symbol
20 Sleep
phenom.
21 Gypsy
Rose -
22 Nail polish
25 Dell wares
28 Ode writer
29 Holy terrors
33 Isolated
35 Eminent
36 Missouri
tributary
37 Kitchen
whistler
38 Family
member
39 Foul mood
41 Unmoving


42 Political thaw
45 Get a loan
48 First gear
49 New Mexico's
flower
53 Luxury car
56 Highway
57 Small combo
58 Ryan's stat
59 Green pod
60 Black cat,
maybe
61 Moon's place
62 Thin stratum

DOWN
1 Jalopy woe
2 Alice's
chronicler
3 Have -
news for you!
4 Mideast
desert
5 One-star
6 Forever, to
Keats
7 Even though
8 Winery cask
9 PhD exam


10 Comic-strip
pooch
11 Fisherman's
fly
17 Mantra chants
19 Sugarbush
tree


23 Judge
Bean
24 Trumpeter Al
25 Sit down
quickly
26 Nostra
27 Ginger cookie
30 New York
team
31 Bleached-out
32 Proofer's
word
34 By Jove!
35 Museum near
Malibu
37 Reunion
crowd
39 Elegant wraps
40 La Guardia
alternative
43 Building wing
44 Mark
replacers
45 Eight, in
combos
46 Slow oven
47 Falco or
Sedgwick
50 Blast furnace
fuel
51 Irene of
"Fame"
52 Not know
from -
54 Charged
particle
55 Low-lying
island


Dear Annie: My husband
and I have five adult chil-
dren between us, all mak-
ing a good living. Some
of our children expect
us to pay their airfare -
to come visit us, in addi-
tion to picking them up
at the airport, being
their taxi service so they
can go out drinking at
night and letting them
use our car At no time
does anyone put gas in
the car or even treat us
to a cheap breakfast
During a recent visit, AN IN
we made reservations MAIL
for dinner with one son,
his girlfriend, their
daughter (who lives nearby) and
the daughter's boyfriend. That
morning, my husband drove them
to the beach (10 miles away). They
then called to say they ate a late
lunch and asked that we push back
the reservation and that my hus-
band pick them up from the daugh-
ter's house and bring them home to
change. It seems the daughter did-
n't want to drive the 10 miles to our
house.
I adamantly said no to my 74-
year-old husband. These "kids" are
so self-absorbed that they think
nothing of forcing us to accommo-
date their schedules with no
thought to ours. I have told my hus-
band that from now on, the kids
must rent their own car when visit-
ing. I'm tired of being their private
chauffeur Am I overreacting? -
Selfish Guests No Longer Welcome
Dear Guests: Of course not If
your children are old enough to
have kids of their own, they should
not need to be driven around by
their parents. But we recommend


a tactful approach. For the next
visit, simply say, "We wish we could
pick you up at the airport, but it
won't be possible. We
suggestyou rent a car so
you can have your inde-
pendence." You also
can mention how nice it
would be if they treated
their folks to a meal
once in a while to thank
them for their
hospitality.
Dear Annie: I am a
divorced woman in my
50s and the mother of
HE'S two beautiful daugh-
BOX ters. When they were
born, we chose to pass
on my first name to
both girls as a middle name. It's
been a family tradition for the past
four generations.
Recently, my eldest daughter in-
formed me that she legally re-
placed her middle name with her
maiden name. I was stunned that
the name I passed on to her with
pride was cut out entirely and for-
ever We are on good terms, and I
don't believe she intended to hurt
me. And I don't have a problem
with her choosing her father's sur-
name. Normally, I'm pretty laid
back, but this one stings.
I'd like to ask why she made this
choice, but I'm afraid it might
make her think I'm too sensitive
and she won't share future deci-
sions with me. I keep hoping
there is a sensible, rational rea-
son that would relieve some of
the hurt. Perhaps if I get it out in
the open, I can let it go. Any
thoughts? Name-Dropped
Dear Name-Dropped: It's OK to
ask, as long as you don't get teary-
eyed and make her feel guilty. Or


perhaps she confided her reasons
to her sister and you would feel
more comfortable asking your
younger child. But be prepared to
accept with equanimity an an-
swer you may not like.
Dear Annie: "Wondering"
wanted to know how to ask his
parents about his inheritance so
he could plan his retirement
accordingly.
Recently, our son demanded
his share of his "inheritance."
The ramifications of this have
been heartbreaking. Because of
money already given to him, we
made the difficult decision to ex-
clude him from any further in-
heritance at our death. He
received a paid-in-full statement
that said, "This is your share that
you demanded via an attorney,
notarized and recorded through
the courts."
So, "Wondering," let sleeping
dogs lie. You will get yours (if any-
thing is left) at your parents'
death. Prepare and plan for your
future yourself. Sadder and
Wiser


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


West
* Q 10 6 4 3
V K J 8 2
SA 5
S7 4


Answer to Previous Puzzle


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


GU N S L OmK I
AN HOH E V
OP S TONEDEAF
P T SmT O NANE A
L GE SR I I


GER RAA TI E


PREEN BUD ETS
OASITIER EL H
A mE R L E S L AP
HE RE A RmT A-W


C8 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


YSEA4,l A\AE SORfOF
ANAR (S6ric VisIoM\OF
CREA"1frG A A "-
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YOU KMOl "OI~ SOME
PEOPLE HAVE 6EAY1riFtUL
MAMICUREP 6ARPESS?
I WA"IT1o "E4
OffoGsTE oF THAT A
WILV, FREE AREA OF
II916ElOLS FLORA,

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The Grizzwells

Do YOU TNHK l)L
EVER 5TTLE MDOWR
AID 6FS MARRIED,


No WA, AY RoTW1R.
I IAVE A FEAR o
COMMITf-ENT ANP
OTHER


The Born Loser

WELL, i'E. GOTT TO 7 I1'Nt> SE.E\ NLN B^'( A FUT I'VE SEER. N.C
kAN> IT TO YOU, IOKE $A\& AT AWOMEEL. T fc
TkNA~PPLE-1'VE { f PtTCRES mAto\m55, AT e| T P\TITCRk N
S 5E. PL'ERS7 TI KIN6 OU\ 5T IKEL OUT

l UCLA,> P >VH! .-7 *


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"File this under 'Embarrassing Moments in
Natural Selection.'"


Doonesbury


Big Nate

Big Nate


50, JUST TALK ABOUT
THE REXJARP5 OF BFIA6
A MILTARYPROFE6-
10AIAL I

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Blondie


I KNOW IT'S KINDA LATE, COOKIE,
BUT I'D LIKE TO TALK TO ...,
ODA SOME MORE ABOUT V. ;II H


WHEN I MET HIM EARLIER, HE MA/5E SOME ISN'T THAT
SOUND LIKE A PRETTY OTHER TIME LATE, COOKIE

.'U IT'S I"1=
I, ,' ) P oBA8LV f -' .. ~.|- ....
'-. > WAY TOO
LATE OR-
!OW f F "C
'y.-^ ^ .S/^Y"HE.


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


www lamilycircus cor
"Wow! I'm growing' fingernails
on my feet, too!"


S IT UP STRAIGHT! ELSOWG OFF THE TABLES
WIPE 'OUR MOUTH! EATIN' OUT tIN'T "AUCH FUN!"
Betty


Frank & Ernest


T END UP
SMUDGING EVERY
DRAWING' EVERY
-SINGLE TIME!


IVP STER CLEAR OF
MeWST, COMBAT, CA-
5UAnTl55OR XAR.









I'LL NEVER BE ABLE
TO DRAW LIKE BRAD
LINSKY' WHY EVEN
TRY?


GOOD
QUESTION.
CAREFUL.
DAD
THAT
SC ) STUFF'S
ERMANEMT.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Snow White and the Huntsman" (PG-13) 12:45
p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real 3D. 4:20 p.m., 10:25
p.m. No passes.
"What To Expect When You're Expecting" (PG-
13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Dark Shadows" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40
p.m., 7 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Snow White and the Huntsman" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m., 1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.


"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 1:50
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Chernobyl Diaries" (R) ID required. 4:40 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"What To Expect When You're Expecting" (PG-
13) 2 p.m.
"The Dictator" (R) ID required. 10:15 p.m.
"Dark Shadows" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40
p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13) Digital. 4:10
p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1
p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: sienbe n

"SNR TXZV JRXEHXR RZHSR HO SNR


RZHSR TU SNTOR YRX KXC PTYRX PNT


JKWR SNRHM ZHWRO ST DEOSHFR KXC


FNKMHSV." OKMJRXS ONMHWRM
Previous Solution: "I don't believe in e-mail. I'm an old-fashioned girl. I prefer calling
and hanging up." Sarah Jessica Parker
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-2


THE POET WHICH DAY ? Y OU
T 1S 50 RARE /L/ I DON'T KNOW (t DIDN'T LIKE
SIN JUNE ?" WHA)ICH PAY..YSTE A
S__?WHOCARES?

L Y T,,r
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Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


Arlo and Janis


Today MOVIES


COMICS


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 C9






C10 SATURDAY,JUNE 2, 2012


C ITRUS COUNTY





H. ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


vim^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
Big Screen TV
$89.
3021 S. Jean Ave.
Inv. Golf & Cntry Club
(352) 637-1173
FLEETWOOD
'04, Sodona, Pop up
Sleeps 6, AC, Heater.
$3,000
(352) 503-3961
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
KINDLE
keyboard 3G
built in wifi w/ physical
keyboard, cover, pwr,
cord & adaptor, holds
1000 books, bat. lasts 1
mo. (352) 419-5362
LIKE NEW 7PC DRUM
SET DDrum $450.00
new, also, Proform tread-
mill $50 Palates equip
$50 352-563-1518
OFFICE
COORDINATOR
FOR REAL ESTATE
OFFICE

Must have Exc.
Customer Service
Skills, Be Computer
Literate, Organized
& Be Able to
Multi-Task. Fax
resume To:
(352) 746-3685



L~Iu 1 ~ 1'.~ l' l II st.
L,iy DL-y


CHpONIaE
Classifieds


l youv ge oa

)1ARNLErd







U ~dE


Must be dependable &
love animals. $350. mo.
REF. 352-322-1913
MS. KELLY'S DAYCARE
* Fun, Safe & Loving *
Open 7a-6p, 422-7056
Summer Proaram Avail.
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID Like New
Hardly used in org. pkg.
Include batteries
Paid $825. Asking $375
(352) 382-3879



2 YR OLD MALE CAT
neutered, orange &
white, gentle, likes
outdoors, needs loving
home pls call
(352) 257-8893
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $250 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washer/Dryers/ W/H
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



1 Female Cat 6 months
1 Male Cat 4 months
To Good Home
(352) 794-7496
3 DOGS, 2 CATS
Need a Good Home
dedicated dogs,
would like to keep cats
together if psbl.
pis call (352) 586-3231
3 Female Cats
2 Declawed, spayed,
each needs to be an
only pet. Free to good
home with no children
(352) 503-7666
FREE 3 kittens, playful &
cute. Also need home for
mommy cat. 419-6199


What is ez?
It's the 24-hour, -
do-it-yourself website
for creating ads that will
appear in the Chronicle's


Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
Ive mess if no answer
FREE KITTENS
(352) 860-0964
FREE KITTENS
8 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
Free Kittens
to good home,
weeks
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free to Good Home
Female Black
Vietnamese Potbelly
(352) 287-0767
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Kittens
need good homes
(352) 503-2412
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372




SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41
n Eden Dr., Inv.
Catelopes, Squash &
Watermelon, Conch,
Black Eye Peas
8:30-6p, 352-726-6378



3 y.o
ChiHUAHUA/Shut-Tuz
mix male, Black white,
31bs, last seen 5/29
Cardinal Ln area
(352) 503-6448
Australian Shepard
with John Deere
collar.Black with a little bit
of white. Needs Meds
Please call 352-212-5131
BROWN BOXER
picked up by SUV on
Truman Blvd.
Please Return
(352) 287-5336
LOST CAT
12 yrs. old, Gray with
Black strips, neutered
Male Tiger, Between
N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
& Paradise
(352) 489-8516
Lost Cat MaineCoon
Mix in vicinity Almont
PI. Medical Issues, an-
swers Pudgie. has sig.
Coon grayish tan tuft
around his neck,
Citrus Springs
(352) 613-3894
Lost Female Cat
Peach & White color
Name Peaches
Sugarmill Woods
last seen midnight on
5/30 (352) 503-6703
MALE BOXER
tan, lost yesterday in
vicinity of
Crystal Manor
(352) 613-4510



Cat found Citrus Springs:
Orange/Tan medium hair
with bushy tail. Vicinity of
Citrus Springs Blvd and
Deltona. 352-601-6310
Found long hair
chiuahua in inverness
near s apopka and e
tremont st. Call to iden-
tify 422-7664
Found Shepherd
Rotweiller Mix Female
Near 491 &l486
Call Animal Shelter
746-8400


000BMU5

Sudoku ****** 4puz.oom


5 74 2


6 4 9


5 6


9 1 4


3 5


4 8 2


1 8


3 2 6


_5 29 _8
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9_

AAll' of our'
~4 aceemW w ~structures
withstand
S. -: 120mph
Installations by Brian CaC12sssa 53 ,,wincls .





Permit And rI r
I Engineering Fees
(Up to $200 value J

*Siding* Soffit Fascia Skirting* Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms* Decks Windows Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


^CwH ^. |^jT



^ ^ T A T T 1 i 1 Er 1 [ j1 1 | | i I ^ k n 'J l ^



ORfPLACE YR A DO NE A0 fl


friendly Found 5/28/2012
around 7:30PM.
No collar. Seems healthy
just nedeed a bath.
Please call 352-419-2265



Not Looking for
Someone just trying to
help people. If you
are Bored. Lonely,
Need Answers,Call
someone who
cares 24-7
(352) 464-2390




OFFICE
COORDINATOR
FOR REAL ESTATE
OFFICE

Must have Exc.
Customer Service
Skills, Be Computer
Literate, Organized
& Be Able to
Multi-Task. Fax
resume To:
(352) 746-3685




















if it ifr i prit i i
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Avante
At Inverness
is currently looking for
INTERNAL ADMISSION
COORDINATOR
Qualified Candidates
must have
Knowledge of
Medicare ,Medicaid
and other Insurances
Must have a
Associate Degree
and a minimum of
3 years experience
in long term care.
Knowledge of health-
care regulatory
standards is preferred
Please apply online:
Avantecenters.com
or e-mail Resume to:
mdaniels@
avantecenters.com

CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512

F/T
RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

F/T RN

Oncology Experience
a plus, but not
required. Excellent
P ay & benefits.
Fax Resume to:
352-637-3987

MEDICAL BILLING
Supervisor

TMC is accepting
resumes for a
Medical Billing
Supervisor. This
position will lead
the billing team in
Homosassa, FL
We are looking
for 5+ years med-
ical billing exp
and 2 + yrs super-
visory exp. If you
are looking fo
work in a high
performance
team env. for a
growing com-
pany, please
send resume to
mprzepasniak@lhera-
pymgmt.com
or appla online
www.thera-
pymgmt.com

RN/LPN

Citrus Health and Re-
hab Center, a five star
skilled nursing facility,
has one posltlon
available on our
11 to 7 shlft. New
graduates are wel-
come. We offer an
excellent salary and
benefit package with
a liberal paid time off
program. Our facility
Is staffed well above
State requirements.
Please apply In per-
son for an Immediate
Interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetfvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Granny Nannies
CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately.
Must be Certified.
(352) 794-3811

MEDICAL ASSIST.
Full time Position
for Front/Back Office,
Phlebotomy expert ,
for FP Office by CMH.
FAX RESUME:
(352) 726-2808




RESIDENTIAL
PROPERTY
APPRAISER
obtain an app. at
www.citruspa.org
click on employment
tab for info

Single Copy
Manager
Applications being
accepted for Single
Copy Manager for
the Citrus County
Chronicle. This
position manages
sales and
distribution of the
Chronicle and other
publications in racks
and stores in Citrus
and Marion Counties.
Excellent opportunity
for a highly organ-
ized, performance
based person with
some level of
management. Sales
experience a plus.
Must have computer
and people skills.
Must be able to work
any shift and be
available late nights
and early mornings.
Send resume to
kstewart@chronicleon-
line.com




Career Opportunity
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927




Exp. Automotive
Technician
Full time position +
benefits. ASE certi-
fied a plus but not a
requirement. Apply
at Beasley Tire Co.,
Inglis, 352-447-3174.




APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa Fl.

NOW HIRING

Class A Drivers
(352)621-1220

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be
able to work early
morning hours.
Email:
maaouette@chroni-
cleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.
Wanted
Need Someone to
create me a Web-Site.
call Phil (352) 220-9435



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
I NOW
ENROLLING
I For All Programs
I rCOSMETOLOGY

*-MASSAGE THERAPY
erNAIL TECH

BENE'S
SInternational
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
I Naccas Accredlted
727-848-8415
iL ..... =l


TWO NEWLY
REMODELED OFFICE
SUITES AVAILABLE
Are you contemplat-
ing relocating your
home-based business
to a professional office
as part of your effort to
grow your business and
increase your profits?
Are you considering
hiring an employee as
part of your growth
plan, but don't want to
host the employee at
your home office?
Is the idea of "turn-key"
simplicity for your new
location attractive to
you?
Here's a sampling of
the features and
amenities that are
included in or below
market rent rates at the
new Citrus EDC
business incubator:
furnished office
high speed wireless
internet/electric
water/maintenance
fax/copier/scanner
one year Chamber
& EDC memberships
visible location on
US 19 with signage
for your business
shared kitchen
shared conference
room
private mailbox
publicity package
to announce your
new location
For more information or
to tour our recently re-
modeled facility,
please contact Ardath
Prendergast at
795-2000 or email
Ardath@citrusedc.com
or visit website
http://www.citrusedc
.com/




LG BOX ELMO'S
Mechanical $75
352-897-4678
TACO BELL TALKING
CHIHUAHUA'S Three
dogs, all new in pack-
age, all working. $10 for
all. 352-601-0067












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





FRONT LOAD
WASHER/DRYER WITH
PEDESTALS Kenmore
Front Load Washer and
Dryer both with Pedestal
Stands have storage
drawers. $500.00 cash
OBO Located in Beverly
Hills 352-697-1630
GE DRYER, off White,
Clean, Work's and look's
great, $100.00.
352-220-2519 or
352-287-6840
KITCHEN STOVE white
electric kitchen stove.
good condition. Whirl-
pool. $100.00
352-746-7040
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WHIRLPOOL SxS RE-
FRIGERATOR 25.2 cu/ft
in excellent condition. Al-
mond. Mod.
ED25PQXFN01, manual
on www.whirlpool.com
$349 352-436-4089




THURS. MAY 31
Walk About Sale
3pm till... Plenty of
treasures from Antique
Glass to furniture.
Household + fill your
truck with value
SUN. JUNE 3
Antlaue Auction
1 pm Estate jewelry,
furniture, Victorian-
press & Art Glass,
sterling, Art, Hummel,
rugs, Lots of estate
colns, firearms,
advertising 400+ lots
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.




BAND SAW 12 inch
Band Saw with stand on
wheels. 50.00
352-628-9136
SHOP FOX 141N
BANDSAW $350.00
WHOLE SHOP 2HP
DUST COLLECTOR
$150.00 352-621-0314


Big Screen TV
$89.
3021 S. Jean Ave.
Inv. Golf & Cntry Club
(352) 637-1173



COMPUTER DESK
w/WORKSTATION
like new
(352) 860-0670
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax/scans, like
new condition $55.00
352-382-1154
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax/scans, like
new condition $55.00
352-382-1154
KINDLE
keyboard 3G
built in wifi w/ physical
keyboard, cover, pwr,
cord & adaptor, holds
1000 books, bat. lasts 1
mo. (352) 419-5362
SLIK U212 Universal
Deluxe Tripod, heavy
duty, like new, in the box.
$125.00 new, sell for
$35.00 352 382 4037



RHINO RX5 Bush-hog
5 ft, purchased last yr.,
used 4 times to cut
pasture grass. No
longer needed. Mint,
New $1,250 Asking
$950. (352) 746-7476



4 large cushioned patio
/porch chairs, with
sturdy metal frames
cushions beige &
green. about 1 yr old.
Can email photo $175
(352) 344-2246



(3) Bedroom Sets
Q set $400. Dbl.set
$250. Twin set. $150
all sets come
w/dressers & night
stands. (352) 212-5844
ANTIQUE VANITY
Beautiful vanity, with tri
fold mirror. $100.00 OBO
352-409-6588
Bar stool, all wood
swivel seat $20.
(352) 563-5634
a< ea *i iW lSt
Butcher block dining table
with 4 chairs, $175. Fern
green ultra suede sofa,
loveseat, ottoman, $600.
Computer desk with
shelves, drawer, cabinet,
$125, leather computer
chair $50. Papasan
loveseat with footstool,
$125. Cream/green
striped cloth sofa, $100.
352-220-2244
CHEST-DRAWERS
maple wood,51 in high
$70.00 352-212-2266

COFFEE & END TA-
BLES beveled glass
tops, stone type bottoms.
Very nice, retail $350, sell
for $100.00352-409-6588
COFFEE Tbl & 2 END
TABLES with GLASS
tops on wrought iron.
Good condition. $50.00
352-795-1321
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.


Din. Table w/4 chairs
on wheels, 42x42, + leaf
17.5W. Reduced $250
delivery avail, for fee
(352) 341-0204
Dining Rm Table &
China Cabinet, 6 chairs
& leaf, real wood, dark
brown, $250.
(352) 726-9151

mahogany color, brand
new, chairs not included,
all wood, Land's end
$100 (352)465-1616
Down Sizing, Like New
Coffee, end tables,
nice wood/wrought
iron $225. Dning Table
& 4 Brown Leather
Parsons chairs $395.
352-344-8553
Down Sizing, Like New
Qn Pillowtop set,
wood seashell motif
headboard $225
2 Lazy boy Recliners,
$100 for both 344-8553
DRESSER
W/MIRROR,CHEST OF
DRAWERS, NIGHT TA-
BLE cream/tan.$70
Inverness 207-385-9322
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
light wood, w/50inch
television, glass doors/
storage compartment
exc. cond $400
(352) 628-5058
Hiah End Quality Resale
Furniture & Accessories.
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803
KING HEADBOARD
w/detachable folding
lighted mirrors w/storage
Oak $100. 352 249.9164
e-mail for pictures
rpfau@tampabay.rr.com
Lg.Oak Ent center
$125.
excel, cond
Brown Sofa $50.
(352) 212-9171
LIFT CHAIR
neutral colors
like new $400 obo
(352) 628-3995


LIKE NEW USED
FURNITURE
Lazboy leather re-
cliner-$250.00
Lazboy reclining
sofa-$250.00
Sealy King Mattress
set-$250.00
352-257-5722
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Sage green w/ black &
tan accents, Couch,
love seat (2) 5 x7 rugs,
very Irg. picture,exc.
cond all matching,
$450. (352) 447-4720
SEVERAL BEDS & TV'S
for sale/various sizes
tv's from $25, beds from
$100,(352) 634-0129
THOMASVLLE TABLES
Solid wood end tables.
Pristine condition!!!!
99.00 EA 352-726-9132
THURS. MAY 31
Walk About Sale
3pm till... Plenty of
treasures from Antique
Glass to furniture.
Household + fill your
truck with value
*******

1 pm Estate jewelry,
furniture, Victorian-
press & Art Glass,
sterling, Art, Hummel,
rugs, Lots of estate
coins, firearms,
advertising 400+ lots
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.
TWIN ADJUST MAGIC
BED, head & foot
adj. & massaging
electric bed.
like new $100
(352) 637-6993
UNIQUE GLASS
DINING
ROOM Table
w/ 4 chairs $300
(352) 212-5844



2004 GARDEN TRACTOR
HUSQVARNA GTH 2548
25hp Kohler Hydrastic,
48" mower, 48" blade
$1500 (352) 601-2480


LAWN MOWER
Torro recycler, high
wheel veriable speed
self propelled, 22" cut,
6.5HP, bagger, used 5
times, like new $175.
(352) 270-8475
LAWNMOWER-
SNAPPER
SELF PROPELLED
HI-VACw/bagger
starts first pull
$140(352)613-8453
Pony Troy Bilt mower
42" cut, exc. cond.,
$400 obo.
(352) 637-4718
ROLLING STORAGE
SEAT $10.352-897-4678
Wood Chipper Vac
Troy built,
New $760
Asking $275.
(352) 201-1970




CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday. & Sat 7am -12
Fenton, Crystal, Fosto-
ria, Carnival Glass, Hull
& McCoy Pottery,
Jewlery, engine hoist, &
More Airport Storage
Units, 80 & 81, behind
Olive Tree, Hwy 19







CRYSTAL RIVER
SAT, SUN, 8am to 3pm
Bob Bell estate of
fishing equip,
yard equip. tools, and
power tools, artwork,
and much more
1081 N Stoney Point

HERNANDO
Going Out of Business
Sale Bait & Tackle
Shop Friday & Sat.
8a-3p. Rain or Shine
Fishing Tackle, Boat
Parts, Antiques,
canoes, Kayaks, col-
lectibles, furniture.
IT ALL GOES THIS
WEEKEND
2727 N. Florida Av
at US 41 & Hwy 200
Next Slow Pokes BBQ


ROUTES










IN HOMOSASSA AND


NE CITRUS COUNTY



















V Able to work early
morning hours before

6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license
and insurance


If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE

H wI wrIRUS -o nicleonn co


wwwchronicleonline.com


5 67498321|
2 18673459
49325 1786
9131 8 2 77 6 4 5
8,21345 197
7 4 516 9,8 3 2
1 7 9584 263
3 829 16574
6 547 3 2 918


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CIRCUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-U< LM3WLI


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE 2006 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS 2007 HYUNDAI SONATA SE V-6 2007 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS 2003
#C2S098J #C382480 #C2S159B #C382150A
&a Ma- a F


*10,986
-$3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUfTY
$7,986
2007 CADILLAC DTS
#C382440A


13,o986
-'3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
s10,986


$12,596
-*3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$9,596
2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE ROADSTER
#C382070A


*14,686
-*3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
p11,986


*12,686
-3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$9,686
2008 CADILLAC DTS
#2T445A


*17,386
-'3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$14,986


*12,686
-*3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUrTY
$9,686
2004 PONTIAC GTO
#C382410



*18,896
-'3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUrTY
s15,896


LOYALTY


-jEI1FW


! CADILLAC CTS
#C382320A


*12,986
-$3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUfTY
$9,986
2007 CADILLAC CTS
#C2T171A



*19,996
-'3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUrTY
$16,996


$13,986
-*3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$10,986
2010 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE
#C28115A


622,386
-'3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY
$19,386


2005 FORD THUNDERBIRD 2009 CADILLAC CTS 2011 MERCEDES BENZ C300 '
#0382190,50TH ANNIVERSARY #C2T168A #C382220
\0 _$500 OFF Ts^

$23,796 *26,998 31,998
-3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY -$3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY -$3,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY Bring this coupon for up to an additional
$20,796 $23,998 528,988 S $500 discount, after working your best deal.
BUY WITH CONRDENCE FROM SULLIVAN'S PRE-OWHED INVENTORY WITH lHEIR EXCLUSIVE 3YEARI/10OIll.O-MILE WARRANT


COLLEGE RD
Sullivan le cc

1-888-449-9890 352-732-4700 4W
SERVICE HOURS MON-FRI 7:30-6PM SATURDAY 8-5PM STORE HOURS MON-FRI 8:30-8PM SATURDAY 8:30-7PM SUNDAY NOON-5PM


Come S-e -ThD f m ence!A sT m'pa Wit h mDou gP -Trga -s M -


0 -A^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 Cll


A


i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Save big

now on

America's

favorite

brand.

Test-drive a Ford during the
Swap Your Ride Sales
Event and find out why
Ford is the best-selling
brand in America1.


2012 FUSION SE 2012 F-150


60Mo

+ $1,000 or
$1,500 Cash Back


60Mo

or $3,000
Cash Back


2012 ESCAPE XLT



60Mo

+ $1,000 or
$2,500 Cash Back


1111 1111 S A p S Iiiijliliil


$7,950


'99 LINCOLN TOWNCAR '01 BUICK CENTURY CUSTOM
47,000 miles
$7,950 $7,950


'04 MITZIBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS
Loaded
$9,950


'06 FORD ESCAPE XLT '04 LINCOLN TOWN CAR SIGNATURE
V6
$10,950 $11,950


'05 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
Limited, loaded
$11,950


'05 GRAND MARQUIS LS '09 FORD FOCUS SE
$11,950 $12,950


'08 FORD FUSION SEL
Loaded
$13,950


'09 MERCURY MILAN
V6
$13,950


'09 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$15,950


'10 FORD FOCUS SEL '04 COBRA MUSTANG
Loaded
$15,950 $16,950
I A -A.


109 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Loaded
$17,950
'.,- 7 ..


'08 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER SR5 '07 FORD SPORT TRAC
I Limited, 4x4 1
$19 950 $21,950


'07 PONTIAC G6 H2 CONVT GT '06 LINCOLN MARK LT 4X4
22,000 miles
$17,950 $18,950



'10 FORD FUSION HYBRID '08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
40 MPG All Wheel Drive, loaded.
$21,950 $21,950


Nicholas


C


rysta


R


ive


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1Based on CYTD sales, 11/11. 2Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory
rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit
Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible
for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good
through 7/2/12.


'O9 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
$18,950
L


'11 DODGE DAKOTA
Super Cab "Big Horn
$18,950


'08 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE '10 FORD MUSTANG
Loaded 1 owner, 46,000 miles 29,000 miles
|$23,950 $23,950


- LINCOLN


ta Rie Mi


Nick


Call Toll Free
877-795-7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


C12 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 2 & Sun. 3, 8:30-4p
ESTATE SALE/
OPEN HOUSE *
222 S. Tyler Street
INVERNESS
Saturday 2, 7:30am
Tools, Golf equip.
Housewares, & More
1087 E. Allegrie Dr.

ALL84f f
Inverness..Sat Sun
"Semi Annual Bia Sale"
9072 E. Moccassin
Slough (EDEN Dr)
LECANTO
Saturday. 2 & Sun. 3
*Downsizing Sale*
36 W. Gulf to Lake Hw
PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 7am-3p
MOVING SALE *
Tools, clothes, excer.
Equip., kitchen items.
Hunting & Fishing
5371 N. Red Ribbon Pt.
Riverhaven
6/2 Sat
4600 Sawgrass Circle
WANTED TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles.
hunt equip352 613-2944



LG BOX MS.SZ4-8
Dresses,suits.$50
352-897-4678



!!!!!!!!!!225170 R15!!!!!!!!!!
Nice tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*******225/65 R16*******
Nice tread!! Only asking
$60 for pair!
(352)586-5485
-----275/60 R20---
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
24 GAL RUBBERMAID,
Action Packer Storage
Box New $15
(352) 382-1154
12Vlt JEEP WRANGLER
$100 like new
352-897-4678
AIR CONDITIONER
portable by NewAir
on wheels, window
vented, remote control
runs 110, 10000 btu,
room to room, like new
$225. (352) 270-8475
BARBIE BIGWHEEL
$10 352-897-4678
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
WALKER TOILET AND
FOLD UP ALUMINUM
WALKER ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
BROTHER FAX $40
352-897-4678
BUBBLE WRAP ROLL
130 FT. X 12 IN. Large
bubbles, never used.
$15 352-601-0067
CIr PRINTER W/Sw $50.
352-897-4678
Commercial Heat
Pump Trane Model
2TWA2060A3000AB
Manuf date 10/03
$550(352) 793-6922
FRENCH STYLE TELE-
PHONE FROM THE 50'S
VERY ORNATE GOLD
COLORED ETCHINGS
ONLY 100.00 464-0316
GENERATOR Troy Built
3550-5250watt.w/wheel
kit, 4 gal .gas tank easy
pull start, gar. kept, run
10hrs .at half load
$225. (352) 795-7474
GENERATOR TROY BUILT
portable, 120-220v
12v electric start, 8000
running watts, 13,500
starting watts, will do
whole house, bought
after Katrina, never
used. pd $1400. sell for
$975(352) 489-3914
Generator, $400. Casio
keyboard, $100. Stereo
Player, $75. Fertilizer
spreader, $20. Crock
pot, $20. Bike exerciser,
$100. 2 metal cabinets,
$20 & $30. 2 wood fold-
ing chairs, $5 ea.
1 cabinet, $50.
(352) 344-9668
GIFT BAGS&WRAP
$20.352-897-4678
HOOVER VACUUM
CLEANER $40 SELF
PROPELLED INVER-
NESS 419-5981
LG BOX CHRISTMAS
DECOR
$30352-897-4678
LG BOX ELMO'S
Mechanical.$75.
352-897-4678
LG SAND BOX &
WATER TABLE $75.
352-897-4678


AND AM/FM RADIO $20
USE WITH BATTERIES
OR ELECTRICITY LIKE
NEW 419-5981
MULTI GAME TABLE
48"x28"-pol,socer,hockey,table
tennis etc.
$50.00 352-794-3020
NEW 12VLT PWRWhLS
Rechg BATT $30
352-897-4678
PET CARRIER $10.
Med size. 352-897-4678
Pet Door-standard or
screen door. For pets up
to 40#. New with video in-
structions.$40.00 Joe @
352-270-8475
PETSAFE PET DOOR
for up to 15#.Fits stand-
ard or screen door. New
in box-$25. Joe @
352-270-8475
QUIK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fit's 10'bylO'popup
canopy
Never used.$40.00 Call
Ray@464-0573
RED TALON GO KART
6HP,brand new tires,runs
great.Lecanto area.
$400 (561)236-1051
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID Like New
Hardly used in org. pkg.
Include batteries
Paid $825. Asking $375
(352) 382-3879
SLIDING GLASS DOOR
slider/w screen door
150.00 o/bo
1-508-314-4660
Timberlake Luggage
$75, 1 Harley Davis
Leather Back Pack, $75.
Binoculars, Red head,
$75, 1 older shop smith
$500, 1 Maple corner
china Cab $295
(352) 344-2932
TWO DOLLS
look and feel like real
babies, $150 &up
(352) 795-7513




SALON EQUIPMENT
Pedi tub w/chair form,
stool, rolling cart $400
Manicure table, 2
chairs, 6-row plexzi pol-
ish rack & extras $250
Styling chair & floor mat
$100. Avail June 2nd
Call Marie
352-697-3151
352-795-6933



BLOOD PRESSURE
MONITOR Reli On Digital
Monitor, battery or A/C
operated, memory, excel-
lent. $20 352-601-0067
CATHETERS FRENCH
14 NEW IN BOX NEW
30.00 ONLY 15.00 30 IN
THE BOX 464 0316
DISPOSABLE BLUE
PADS FOR INCON-
TENANCE IN BED OR
CHAIR 36 COUNT 9.00
464 0316

TIME TO WORK IT OFF
GET ON ITAND GO
ONLY 75.00 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
GOOD CONDITION
WITH FOOTRESTS
100.00 464-0316
RASCAL SCOOTER
300, 4 WHEELS, like new
heavy duty many
extras $995 firm
(352) 637-6216
SHOWER CHAIR SIT &
take a shower safely only
30.00 464 0316
WALKER WITH SEAT
AND WHEELS RED
WALKER WITH SEAT
HAS 6 WHEELS 2 FT 4
REAR 60.00 464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
THURS. MAY 31
Walk About Sale
3pm till... Plenty of
treasures from Antique
Glass to furniture.
Household + fill your

SUN. JUNE 3
Antique Auction
1 pm Estate jewelry,
furniture, Victorian-
press & Art Glass,
sterling, Art, Hummel,
rugs, Lots of estate
coins, firearms,
advertising 400+ lots
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.


LG KEYBOARD AND
STAND MD 1700
multi func. great cond.
w/synthesizer $200
(352) 795-7513
LIKE NEW 7PC DRUM
SET DDrum $450.00
new, also, Preform tread-
mill $50 Palates equip
$50 352-563-1518
Organ Easy Play
Technics E 33 good
cond, $450.
(352) 344-5069
352-568-8938


Househol


Full Set
Crystal Glassware,
water, wine, cham-
pagne $200. obo
Moving Must Sell
(352) 746-4028
HUMIDIFIER
W/box $10.
352-897-4678
LG BOX MISC DECOR
$25 352-897-4678
LG BOX MISC FAMILY
DVDS/VHS $20.
352-897-4678
LIGHT BULBS 65W reg
flood 26 used & working
$60. changed to Halo-
gena bright & white 352
249.9164
NEW LG GEORGE
FORMAN GRILL $50.
352-897-4678
Nortaki China, service
for 12, gold edging
$250 Mikasa China
service for 12, silver
edging $250. Moving
Must Sell (352) 746-4028




AB-LOUNGER NEARLY
NEW ONLY 40.00
464-0316
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE AND
STURDY DOESN'T
FOLD UP ONLY 100.00
464 0316
Exercise Equipment
Wanted Home Gym
w/ min. 150 lb. weight
stack, w/ bench.
butterfly attach and
preacher curl. Will pick
Up Call 352-586-6805
GAZELL LIKE MACHINE
POWER WALKER GET
IN SHAPE NOW ONLY
40.00 464-0316
ROWING MACHINE SIT
ON IT AND GO FAIR
CONDITION ONLY 50.00
464-0316
Treadmill
Nordic Track C1800
$100
(352) 746-1547




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well pond ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



CLEVELAND GOLF
CLUBS CG-4 irons
3-PW, very good condi-
tion; new grips; S-300
Lite shafts; owner de-
ceased. $250 OBO; Bob
352-228-9413
Colt 45 Gold Cup
national match,
MK, IV series, rare
2 tone finished N.I.B.
$1200
(352) 441-0645
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART 36 volt with
charger. excellent cond.
$975 OBO
(352) 563-1265
MEN'S MOUNTAIN BIKE
Little used in great condi-
tion. Dark Red frame.
$75 or best offer.
352-527-9264
MONGOOSE BIKE 28"
titanium Shimano
multi/speed $55 bad hip
obo 352-419-5549
RAY Welcomes you to
Your Headquaters
for GUNS, AMMO, &
Reloading Supplies
NEW HOURS
TUES. & WED. 7A-2P
SAT. 8A-3P
STOKES FLEA MARKET
Rt 44 E. of Crys. River
Taurus PT-1911 blued,
3 clips, ITAC holster
leather holster, orig box
match grade
barrel,trigger,hammer.
$550 321-652-1677


WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whls, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

NEW 16X8.5 V nose
encl. car hauler
$3995
USED 7X18 Goose
neck, 6 ton Equip.
hauler w/mesh sides
& ramp gate $2895

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto

Utility Trailer
4x9
$500.
(352) 746-7357




LG BOX 2T-4T GIRLS
Like new outfits.$10.
352-897-4678
LIKE NEW HIGH CHAIR
Adjustable, neutral $50
352-897-4678
LIKE NEW TANDUM
STROLLER $100
352-897-4678
SLINGS
ntl or blk/wht.
pd$125.$30.
352-897-4678




TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




AKC ENGLISH BULL DOG
PUPS, 4 male
2 female avail 7/1/12
taking dep$1200
(352) 341-7732
Beagle Puppies
9 wks. old, tri colors
$100. Cash.
(352) 447-2018
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Shih Tzu Puppies
Lovely Tri colors ,Reg,
APR, CKC, non aller-
genic, non shed, H/C
$500. 352 341-2380
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
1 yr nuet 91b male $300
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Toy Poodle Pups
AKC, red, 9 wks, cham-
pion bloodline, shots,
H/C $450 & up(352)
564-2865
YORKIE PUPPIES
1 Male, 1 Tea cup
Female, AKC
health cert $650 ea
(352) 726-5217
YORKIES $450 & UP
MALTESE $500. Health
certs, CKC registered,
home raised, come
visit parents & puppies
352-212-4504,212-1258



w


CLASSIFIED




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
HERNANDO
3BR 2BA, fenced yard,
$500 + $500 sec.
352-341-2255 302-6415
INVERNESS
3/2, very nice, Jungle
Camp Rd. $500/mo
Melanie 813-365-6040
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period. 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and enjoy-
ment, clubhouse, onslte
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
2BR home $450,
Includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $595.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $550.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964

OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

Mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com





BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Flxed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182

Family Home Center

3 bedroom/2 bath on
1.2 acres, $2,000
down, payments $250
a month or cash
purchase for $43,000
call MARLON
@ 386-590-0971

3bedroom/2 bath set
up on your property
for 36,500
call MARLON @
386- 590- 0971
For Sale By Owner
'97, MH, 16 x 80, excel.
cond., located on cor-
ner lot, /2 acre +, lots of
trees, corner of
Rosedale and Corona
Way, Homosassa Must
See to appreciate.
Priced to sell $37,500
(352) 364-3242
(478) 569-9685
Hernando.
Handyman MHNice
lot. $15K Owner/Agent
352-220-4355
INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5
carport, screen rm.
shed $3995
(352) 586-7962
NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private Interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587


SATURDAY,JUNE 2, 2012 C13


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Village
New Homes Start @
$39,900. $5K for your
used mobile home.
Any condition
800-622-2832 x 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183




Homossassa 2/2
carport nicely furn. MH
on Homosassa
River dock shed, f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. MANU-
FACTURED HOME ON
TWO WATERFRONT
LOTS ON CUL-DE-SAC
WITH BOAT RAMP ON
BLACK CREEK IN
OZELLO.
$79900.00 CALL FOR
SHOWING
352-212-0460




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
on Approx 1/2 Acre
$29,900 owner finan.
with $3,000 down and
payment of $475. or
cash price of $25,000
(352) 687-3030
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
Dunnellon, Fl Jacobsen
Mobile Home (DW-built in
2000). Owner Financing
w/$20,000 down & low
interest-will pay closing
costs. This is a 3/2 all
bedrooms have carpet &
walk-in closets. 2
bedrooms measure
12x14 and Master is
14x20 w/ bath 10x15
w/jetted tub, double van-
ity, separate toilet &
shower. 2nd bath is on
other end of home by the
2 bedrooms. Living rm. is
14x16 has wood laminate
flooring. Sunken Family
rm is 15x14 has fireplace
& tile floors. Dining rm. is
14x12 has wood laminate
floors, bar sink
w/cabinents, glass doors
which lead to 10x24 pres-
sure treated 2 level deck.
Kitchen 16x16 w/38 cabi-
nents, wall oven, island
cooktop & tile floor. Laun-
dry Rm. w/rear access to
backyard. 2 storage Bldg.
12x24 & 10x14, Carport
22x25. Low taxes
$650.00 for 2011.
352-682-0266. Price is
$135,000, open to offers.
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719




55+ Palm Terrace
Village-Lecanto
3/2 part furn.screened
porch, $5K 212-6804
(352) 527-0800

Leak

SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 + Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $169/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent
at Evanrldge Commu-
nity
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period 55+ Park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing & enjoyment,
clubhouse, onslte shuf-
fleboard, and much
more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.900. 352-476-4964

Stonebrook 2/2,
1,150sfon corner lot,
partially furn., incl'ds Irg
attached storage rm.
New Roof, $14,000
(352) 563-5931

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Updated DW's
reasonable, rent or buy
1st month lot rent
waived during June to
qualified renters or
buyers (352) 628-2090






I OWN TODAY! I


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com


OWN TODAY!







NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a

mo.








AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com


#I Employmentfsource is






lww chronicleonhne cor


-AMON-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC.

352-795-7368
www.(itrusCountyHonmeRentals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
959 Mayo Dr............. $650
1/1 studio, Fully Furnished, Heated Pool.
11435 Dixie Shores....... $900
3/1 Carport. Stilt Home w/Dck & Gulf
Access
HOMOSASSA/CHASSAHOWITZKA
8140 MissMaggie Dr. #2 ((Chas).. $650
2/1
6139 S. Royal Dr.(H)...........$875
2/2/2(anal Side, with Lanai
6782 S. Pine Branch..........$1500
5/3/2Roomy Home w/FP Waerfront
1843 W. Solar PI.................$125
2/2 newer duplex
CITRUS SPRINGS
1635 Greenidale............... $1300
3/2/2 pool, RV parking

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

INGLIS
Compl. turn. direct TV,
country setting, off hwy
19 N. of Inglis, no smoke
$675/m (352) 586-9598

INVERNESS *
WHISPERING
PINES
*+*+*+*+ VILLA *+*+*+*+
2 BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH,
LANAI, 1 CAR GARAGE,
CLEAN, QUIET,
55+N.S.ADULT ONLY,
COMMUNITY POOL,
SEC.DEP./REF.RQ.
$600/mo. 727 862 3264
aft. 4pm. or Iv. msg.





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 incl water sewer,
Washer/Dry $425
(352)212-9205


An DewaftNr'yk


-U
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR 491. 746-1998



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



Your World

%^ l449644&4


C ONIi :LE


,. 1, l l ,',h ,'iii


MS. KELL'S DAYCARE
* Fun, Safe & Loving *
Open 7a-6p, 422-7056
Summer Proaram Avail.




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling& Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366

DUN-RITE Elect
since '781 Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907





A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
V AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V" FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
P AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


Handyman Dave Press
Clean Repairs, Hauling,









MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning ,
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel

MAIDS ON CALL
Making Life Easier
SMonthly Specials *
CALL 352-726-8077

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
FTHELEEE IFA






352-634-15847




All Tractor Work ServiceMan
cap -Li Ins4 12441.





specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
-,. I:
352-795-5755


TRACTOR WORK
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock

Lic. (352) 364-2120
Mainstreet landscaping
Co.. Paver Patios, Pool
Decks, Driveways, Sod,
Irrigatin & plant Installa-
tion 352-287-9896
SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO ITALLII!
352-563-9824, 228-7320
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
ZIEGLER'S LAWN (LIc/Ins)
Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE



J. Hupchick Lic./ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting

352-341-3300
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570


TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
sl# crc058140
(352) 344-3536




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SODISODISOD!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.com) 400-2221


Lirer igns iwes tes
& LANDSCAPE









All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal sGeneral
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Li/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Stump Grinding
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


"Dad, we nearly caught a fish this big!"







C14 SATURDAY,JUNE 2, 2012


@000BMU4

WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Burlap bags to hold paraffin (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Smacks Kenny G's instrument (1) they will fit in the letter
S squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Low-in-fat high schooler by age (1) syllables in each word.

I I 2012 UFS Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS
4. Safari leader cooked food in oil (1)


5. Deteriorating banister (2)


6. Bible strongman's purple plums (2)


7. Frame of mind about a line on a globe (3)


KIflUlV 3 (11fIVI'L SNSNOSWVU SNOSIVS *9 DNIIVI 9NITIVAd "
2 fl 2IAd KfIllD *t NHI NVI 'T XVS SIDVHM SIJVS XVA "1
6-2-12 SMSNV


Residential
Commercial
Cleaning Service
VCT Stripping
Wax
LIc./Ins. Carpet & Tile

-----------------------
S SUPER SPECIAL
3-Roomsoo $ 00 *-
I (Up to 250 sq. ft. each)
Deep Cleaned Nol vad wany olner other.
& Deodorized .xp..ie 626/12. Coupon Required
First Room Of ScotchgardrM is Free! I '..


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious, nice 2/1,
,incls water sewer, lawn
garb.wsh/dry $500/m
352-212-9205
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/270-2218




CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May I
Furnishing Available
(352) 422-6579
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391
HOMOSASSA
900 Square feet of light
industrial/commercial unit
for rent. Includes 10' x 12'
roll-up entry/ front and
back locked entry/1/2
bath ( no shower)/ condi-
tioned loft office/ 4 park-
ing spaces in lighted
parking lot in a safe and
friendly complex just off
US 19 across from
Howard's Flea Market.
$477 per
mo.(450+27(tax))= a
place to have your busi-
ness or securly store your
stuff!!! 352-302-4579
or
amhalum@earthlink.net
Small Deli

Crystal River, great buz
location.Must Sell due
to Family Emergency
$8K obo (352) 795-1180




CRYSTAL RIVER, 2/1
water, incl'd $500mo.
+ dep 352-464-2716
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & gar-
bage incl. No pets,
$550mo. (352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
2/2 Spacious, Tiled,
Lg. patio, Quiet, W/D
Hkup. No Pets.$575/mo




HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $125/wk.
$300 sec $425 Moves In.
352-206-4913, 465-0871
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
Small Older 2 BR House
on Lake w/ detached
garage $400 mo.
352-362-5019




INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed,$600
352-476-4964
RIVERHAVEN
Direct Riverfront
2 Story 3/3
beautiful, home, new
dock & dry front
$1300 pr mnth
352-598-8340


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, CHA, very clean
good neighbors, $525.
1st/m Free352 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 CHA $575
PINE RIDGE 3/2/2 POOL
HOME $900
1st dep P & R Realty
Gloria Bonner 697-0375


BEVERLY HILLS




(352) 726-9369
C ITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, appls $795/mo
1 st/st sec no smoke
352-812-1414
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2 $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 (4TO 6 mo. term)
$600/Mo credit check
(352) 804-5008
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Plantation Golf. Spac.
Clean $800/mo+dep.
352-795-6282
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/2 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
2 bedrm.1 1/2 bath,
garage, lanai ,near town
$650.813-973-7237
INVERNESS
3/2/2,Highlands
Starting @ $750.
3/2/2 w/pool. 352-
601-2615/201-9427
INVERNESS Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723
Inverness. 2/1
New carpet & paint.
$650 mo.Owner/Agent
352-330-4355
LECANTO
1 bedroom. 1 bath. brand
new, ceramic floors, ce-
ramic bath, large shaded
deck, wooded loc. must
$625 app rqd.
352-628-2312
RAINBOW LAKES
ESTATES
3/2 Ig house on 1 acre.
$750 f/I/s no pets
(352) 489-1977
SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $800 month
(352) 400-0230
Sugarmill Woods Villa
on Golf course, 1842 SF
2/2/2 plus Irg
den/office, enl lanai,
like new $1000/m (352)
382-7920 no answer,
please leave message.



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Home WF $550 mo
352-228-0257/795-9633
CRYSTAL RIVER
Pristine, 2/2 deep
water, pool, dock,
no smoking $1000
352-586-9741
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furnished effic/
cottage all util. incl'd $645
no sinking 352422-2994
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964



CITRUS HILLS
2 master suites. $600/m
incis ALL (352) 419-5481



CITRUS SPRINGS
Immediate Possession
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
HOMOSASSA
Lease to Own,
lovely 3/2 MH,
abve grd pool. EZ
Terms 352-220-0480



CRYSTAL RIVER
Furnished,Clean
House, cable, w/d,
$115wkly/430mo. No
hidden cost. 563-6428



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long




OLD HOMOSASSA
SCALLOP SEASON RV
LOTS AVAILABLE
Stay with us at
Cedars Lake Park
(352)628-4441


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





-U







For Sale By
AUCTION
1,250 SF Bldg.
on .7 acres
Zoning: CH High
Intensity Commercial
Permitted uses
include restaurant,
retail, hotel, motel,
office, gas station,
c-store, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
16 NE HWY 19,
Crystal River, FL
JUNE 12 @12PM
OPEN from 11 AM
sale day
Call 352-519-3130
for more info
For Details Visit our
Website
AmericanHeritaae
Auctioneers.com













By Owner
New 3/2 Custom Built,
'07 Lease Option Owner
Financing w/dn pmt
407-739-2646/442-3597


ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream Home
In Active Senior
Community $175,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA Pool
Home. Split floor, plan
w/ separate family rm.,
master suite & guest
wing open to lanai/
pool. New wood floor-
ing in Liv/Din. area
dbl. garage, beautifully
landscaped yard.
Call (352) 726-6564

OPEN HOUSE
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




For Sale By Owner
INV HIGHLANDS
$105,000, 4/3/2, Pool
Home, 3,400 sf total
call for details
(352) 726-3798

HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
OPEN HOUSE
Sat. 12 &Sun. 13, 12-5
6094 E. Loring Lane
2/1/1 Move In Ready,
w/ 2 Additional Lots,
$58,500. (352)697-2884

Cr^ystl Rive
Homes^^


country uIub Road j
bedroom. 1 bath. Home
for Sale: $105,000 Coun-
try Club Road, Crystal
River Florida. Location,
Location, Location!!!!!!!!!!
Across the street from the
famous Plantation Golf
and Resort. 3 bedroom,
Privacy, this is private
large lot but close to all
that Crystal River has to
offer! Fenced in yard with
storage shed in the back
yard. Also plenty of room
for boat/trailer
storage.Updated with
newer ac/furnace, roof,
interior totally profession-
ally updated, tile and car-
pet thru out. Rental his-
tory is great with tenant in
place. Check it out! Seller
says Sell! REaltors, I will
pay a bonus if you bring
me a buyer!(352)
795-3668




3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230
Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $243,900
Call 352-628-9647
or 727-647-2372


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


DEB INFANTINE
4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com




HOLDER
3/2/2 blk/stucco home
w/enclosed lanai.
1350sf. near club-
house w/pool & recre-
ation, beautiful oaks &
mature Citrus trees
$84K, 352-603-2202




OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Ingis FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com










SOWN TODAY!


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.


AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/634-4745






OFF CARDINAL,
END OF THE
RAINBOW
nice little pot of gold
great live oaks at each
end. 5 acres.
$80,000. day time num-
ber 352-382-7911




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/634-4745




2.2 AC RE LOT FOR SALE
By Owner Gated,
still rustic, off Fishbowl
on Shell. Homosassa
Can be found @ Citrus
County. Acct #1139988
$18,000 (727) 271-0297
Crystal River Beautiful
Manor. Well & septic in-
cluded. Must sell. $14K
OBO c: 941-539-9961
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Dr has
Wetlands, River
access, $6,000.
352-621-1664




'03, Tohatsu
115HP 20" shaft, still on
boat, can test run.
Low hrs. $2,500
352-613-8453
OB Motor
6hp Johnson Seahorse
good cond. $425
(352) 344-5069
352-586-8938




KAYAK 14ft AQUA
TERRA PRISM
lots of storage
$385 352-447-5560
LARSON 99 18FT
open bow, 90 hsp
Johnson outboard
motor, trailer incl.
$4800 obo
(352) 400-0719
Pontoon 17'
with trailer,
Johnson 40 hp motor
$3500
(352) 419-4026
SEA BREEZE
Boat & Trailer, w 50H
Mercury engine
$1,000
(352) 746-7357
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com






WJEr NEnED


SINGLE COPY


NEWSPAPER ROUTE


AVAILABLE.

There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning

Hours


V Need reliable

vehicle


V Must be 18

years old


Th0irs onyChoil
1624 N. Meadowcre~~~stBv.CrsaRieF

I E al s ewat 0 *0 0enlneco


CLASSIFIED


I


am0


WaEt ero
Homes^^^


Man =covereoa
slip for 20 Pontoon
boat on Homosassa
River (352) 527-4953



'05 Diesel Motorhome
36 ft, 2 slides, Itasca
-Meridian caterpillar
C-5 Turbo charge,
diesel in rear quiet
while running.
Call Bill (352) 527-9867
for details $81,500.
AIRSTREAM
30FT motorhome, 2005
Land Yacht, 1 owner,
low miles, slide, all op-
tions $58,000 For full de-
tails (352) 637-3867
seahawk@ta

mpabay.rr.co
m
BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450, V10 Tri-
ton gas engine, sleeps 4,
3 burner stove,
micro/cony oven, full rear
kitchen, full bath, tv, dvd,
4kw gen, to many extras
to name. $28950. 352
489-4129
GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
JAYCO '04
40', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
stalon $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$23K 352-382-3298
Trail-Lite
by Revision B+ LE, 04
23' self contained, too
much to list. 33K mis
$38,500(352) 419-6825



18 FT PROWLER 90
full bath, loaded, sofa
bed, dinette, upper
bunkexc. cond. must
see. $4000
(352) 422-1026
FLEETWOOD
'04, Sodona, Pop up
Sleeps 6, AC, Heater,
$3,000
(352) 503-3961
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,800.352-795-2975
RV CRUISER
'07, Fun Finder X, 18 x 9
Sbath w/ shower & pull
out awning much more
$6,500 (352) 628-0554



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$250 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

VERY VERY
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.


"That your contribution to Take Stock In Children
will go far and so will these children."

MKIMARltOOiPRESIDENT&COO
AUTONAnON



SICH.ICLE

352-746-9121ext d148 *www.takestockinchildren.org Helpgood kids
STaStc nCNIeolIncAll4ret sred became great.


KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144




k BIG SALE! k
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK
'05, Le Sabre Custom,
Leather, Canvas Top,
Chrome pkg. New Tires,
Loaded, Like New, 70K
$7,450 (352) 634-3806
CHEVY 2000
Lumina 4dr, sedanexc.
cond.dependable 64k
mi. $4600 352- 212-7762
CORVETTE
'91 Roadster converti-
ble, White, red leather,
auto, 5.7 V8, loaded,
bose sys. 49K mi. runs,
drive perfect, needs
nothing. First $11,750
firm. (352) 513-4257
FORD
'00, Crown, Victoria
Police Interceptor
Model, 82,000 mi.
$3,400 obo
352-256-7256
FORD
'06, Mustang GT
Red Convertible, fully
loaded shaker audio
6 CD changer,
chrome rims, 43K mi,
$16,000 (352)637-2244
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
HONDA 05
Accord XL, cold air,
4 dr. good cond.
96Kmiles, $8,350. obo
(352) 257-9866
MUSTANG CONV 97
V6, automatic
$3000 b/o or tradefor
Chevy Stepside
(352) 400-0719




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JUNE 3. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$12950 (352) 513-4257
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
Mercedes Benz 89
560-SL 2 tops exc. cond
58K mis. gray/gray, top
rack incl $12,500
(352) 527-8288
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883




BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty


Sporeet/Utilt









CADILLAC
2006 SRX Sport Excel-
lent condition crossover,
pearl essence paint, 2
row seating with storage
underneath. Sunroof,
Onstar, and sat. radio.
29,000 miles. $20,000
OBO. For more Info and
pictures, send inquiries to
cadillac srx sport@lve.com, or
Call orText Jason
at 352-228-7661




FORD AEROSTAR
SPORT 97 6 cyl,
clean in & out cold air
no wrecks, must see
$2500 (352) 527-9133




4 Wheeler for a child,
like new 10cc Pan-
ther, camo w-racks &
remote cntrl $675
352-212-4600




90 HARLEY SPORTSTER.
lots chrome, S &S carb.
Beautiful Bike! $3000.
(352) 503-2792
CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley '02
Road King black, lots
gar.kept $11000 obo

Harley Davidson 03
Super Road King, fuel
inj. $48K up grades with
receipts, too much to
list $8,000 (727)207-1619
Harley Davidson
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722
Harley Davidson
2011 street glide,
Xtras, ext. warranty,
2200. miles
$19,500 (352) 465-3668
HARLEY FAT BOY
'02, 26kmiles gar. kept
all maint. rcpts.
$12,200.
(904) 923-2902
HD ROAD GLIDE
Fire Red Pearl,
Customized,Low mi.$30K
invested, Sell for
$11,500,For details call
352-527-0074
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352)697-2760

Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
1996 HONDA
GOLDWING
RUNS GREAT
$4,100.00
2005 YAMAHA
V-STAR1100
SUPER CLEAN
$4,800.00
2006 H-D ROAD KING
LOW MILES
$11,500.00
1996 HONDA
SHADOW 600
CLEAN
$2,800.00
2007 SUZUKI M 109R
LOW MILES
$8,500.00
2009 H-D 1200C
EXTRAS
$7,250.00
GOOD CREDIT BAD
CREDIT
FINANCE AVAILABLE

Suzuki 09
Boulevard C50
very low miles, acces-
sories $4,900 or best
offer. (352) 422-4528
YOMOTO 2005
Motorcycle 175 CC,
street legal, 4,000 mi.,
runs good, first $1,000
or trade for car or truck


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Pay Only N,
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S RECEIVE --
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7" JUST FOR STOPPING BY!
%f


Come See
What LOVE
For YouLOVEHONDACOM


* On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. ** Based on 2012 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and mjin in your vehicle
1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash ortrade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20 cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options ale arddirtionai ri ce
Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles suDje to prior sa Applies tu in toik uni Oners valid f 6/312


SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012 C15


l\i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ii:1


[ ll L I


SFLORIDA STATE VEHICLE

TITLE TRANSFER SALE


PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE FOR JUST AN


TITLE

TRANSFER

FEE*


SALE PRICE


$5999


YOU CANNOT BE REFUSED

REGARDLESS OF CREDIT

REGARDLESS OF EMPLOYMENT

REGARDLESS OF INCOME


M 2011 1
Regal 10,895
Sebring 21,215
200 22,249
Cruze 8,300
Equinox 8,266
Tahoe 5,715
HHR 16,009
Impala 4,215
Malibu 23,578
Silverado 10,659
Avenger 22,845
Charger 10,791
Durango 12,595
Ram 1500 19,196
Ram 3500 8,366
Terrain 1,406
Nitro 21,038
Civic 14,130
Compass 21,158
Grand Charokee 24,103
Wrangler 3,993
Tacoma 16,871
Altima 2,236
Armada 233,386
Versa 2,603
2010
Lacrosse 8,723
300 28,570
Town & Country 7,710
PT Cruiser 8,950
Aveo 17,515
Cobalt 22,322
Malibu 4,744
Traverse 33,753
Terrain 34,341
Charger 23,549


Journey 28,412
Dakota 10,920
Nitro 52,253
Ram 3500 30,125
F150 29,462
Santa Fe 29,162
Civic 52,852
Commander 33,109
Pathfinder 14,665
Liberty 48,060
Wrangler 7,823
Lancer 11,897
Altima 41,265
Sentra 21,811
Murano 15,826
m ,2009
300 44,865
Town & County 43,903
Aveo 25,739
Cobalt 35,810
Equinox 62,583
Malibu 36,916
Tahoe 47,425
Caliber 6,049
Challenger 22,306
Charger 57,756
Ram 1500 84,592
Journey 9,888
Ram 1500 42,615
Civic 27,801
Camry 107,095
Spectra 36,279
G6 34,099
S 2008
535i 39,246
Equinox 20,129
Silverado 3500 17,925


300 61,269
Town & Country 71,194
PT Cruiser 22,713
Sebring 27,986
Caliber 37,982
Charger 35,865
Magnum 43,729
Ram 1500 32,881
F150 54,735
Elantra 63,466
Grand Cherokee 41,534
Grand Marquis 27,783
XL7 40,132
m 2007
Sebring 75,217
Town & Country 76,565
Aveo 34,401
HHR 44,434
Monte Carlo 85,873
Caliber 92,759
Charger 45,129
Nitro 60,450
Ram 1500 28,459
F150 85,752
Sierra 1500 47,498
Commander 70,235
Wrangler 49,315
Tucson 76,805
Rondo 60,933
Camry 42,823
Matrix 98,342
RX7 89,630
Altima 48,837
Vue 80,304
S 2006
Lacrosse 31,732
Silverado 1500 82,707


300 63,474
Pacifica 64,193
PT Cruiser 69,834
Town & Country 63,580
Charger 48,352
Ram 1500 48,115
Escape 66,319
Expedition 97,025
Explorer 70,120
F150 60,370
F250 73,272
Elantra 29,650
Sante Fe 71,110
Commander 93,783
Sentra 42,000
Titan 42,940
Torrent 65,180
m ,2005
Monte Carlo 88,036
300 77,106
Pacifica 88,309
Town & Country 62,048
Caravan 80,701
Ram 1500 70,222
Explorer Sportrac 63,955
F150 64,782
Accent 62,750
Sante Fe 39,265
Rio 75,192
Xterra 92,221
@2004
300M 50,769
PT Cruiser 88,759
Ram 1500 86,806
F150 73,547
Optima 87,764
Sedona 52,224


I -0


CRYSTAL


AUTOMOTIVE

CRYSTALAUTOS.COM 352-564-1971


/



A Li ~


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd
Brooksville, FL


*All prices plus tax, tag, title and dealer fee of $599.50. Down payment will vary by vehicle with approved credit ** Ex Based on a 2005 Kia Rio. Sale price $5,999 for 66 months at 5.99%/ APR excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50
with approved credit Severity of credit may require substantial down payment and affect selection. See dealer for complete details. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.


C16 SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012