<%BANNER%>
PAGE 1

S HEMIR W ILES Staff WriterBEVERLY HILLS The conventional American dream of homeownership felt like an unattainable and improbable aspiration to Stephanie Alberto. The 60-something-year-old spent most of her life moving from place to place, renting but never keen to make the full commitment of buying her own home. I was afraid, Alberto admitted. Beyond just the typical obligations of being a homeowner, she worried her credit wasnt good enough because of her financial debt, but the motivation to take a chance came when her landlord at the affordable rental housing complex she lives at in Inverness informed her she would be raising the rent from $668 to $1,300 next year. Though shes worked full-time at Wal-Mart for 12 years, Alberto said she wasnt making enough money to afford such a rent increase. As a result, her landlord told her about the countys Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP). The NSP program buys foreclosed and vacant homes owned by banks, rehabilitates them and resells or rents them to low to moderate-income households at or below 120 percent of the area median income, which is $57,720, adjusted for household size. In 2009, the county received roughly $3 million in federal grant money for the NSP program and used the funds to purchase 30 properties, mainly in the older section of Beverly Hills. The goal of the program is to reverse the negative effects foreclosed properties have had on the areas around them and make homeownership achievable, NSP grant administrator Jennifer Pollard explained. For instance, a one-person households annual income cannot MAY 27, 2012 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOLUME 117 ISSUE 294 $1 CITRUS COUNTY NBA playoffs: Celtics, 76ers battle for spot in East final /B1 www.chronicleonline.com SUNDAYHIGH 89 LOW 66 Scattered p.m. thunderstorms; 40 percent chance of rain. PAGE A4 TODAY & Monday morning TOMORROW: Memories Veteran talks about experiences in World War II./ Monday COMING UP Annies Mailbox......A14 Classifieds................D3 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........B6 Horoscope................B6 Lottery Numbers......B4 Lottery Payouts........B6 Movies....................A14 Obituaries................A5 INDEX C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff WriterNever mind the glut of houses for sale and the historically low mortgage rate. Some people just dont have the income to qualify for a loan, and struggle to pay rent. Through the countys Housing Services department, several programs offer help with a range of housing assistance for both buyers and renters. While the programs may be considered giveaways by some, they do have an unacknowledged benefit. All of these programs mean the hiring of contractors and helping job generation, said Heidi Blanchette, operations manager of housing services, about SHIP NSP and CDBG. The list could start with SHIP the State Housing Initiative Partnership. But funds are low. Right now, it is not funded for the future, Blanchette said. Our last allocation was a year ago and we got $350,000. SHIPs purpose is to offer assistance to very low, low and moderate income families to buy a home, repair or replace a home, repair emergency damage and help pay for mandatory water and sewer connections. CITRUS COUNTY QUALITY OF LIFE 2012 Chronicle project HOUSING: HOUSING STATISTICS County population in July 2009: 140,357. County owner-occupied houses and condos: 45,047 Renter-occupied apartments: 7,587 Percentage of renters in the county: 4 percent Percentage of renters in the state: 6 percentSource: City-Data.com Hospital hopes for influence M IKE W RIGHT Staff WriterINVERNESS The highstakes dispute for control of Citrus Memorial hospital has been on hold since late April. Thats when Gov. Rick Scott removed two members of the Citrus County Hospital Board, or CCHB, rendering it unable to do anything because it doesnt have enough members to conduct a meeting. A Scott spokesman said recently the governor is carefully considering applicants for three vacancies on the five-member board. One position had been vacant for more than a year. Hospital officials, who are in a threeyear battle with the CCHB, are not sitting by simply waiting like everyone else. Citrus Memorial Health System in April hired a Tallahassee lobbyist for $30,000 to lobby Scott in the hopes the three new replacements could mean an end to the legal wrangling that has already cost millions of dollars in attorneys fees. Hospital chief executive officer Ryan Beaty said the hospital wants business people on the hospital board who will seek solutions to the financial issues CMH faces. I would support any person who doesnt have an agenda, he said. The CMHS dispute involves two boards: the CCHB, comprised of members appointed by the governor, and the CMHS foundation, whose membership is self-appointing and includes some non-voting advisory members. The CMHS Foundation operates the hospital on a lease from the CCHB, which provides some funding from local property taxes. One of the many disputes is the CCHB has withheld $10 million in funding dating back to 2009. CCHB successfully convinced the state Legislature in 2011 to pass a law giving it controlling votes on the foundation board. The foundation sued, lost in circuit court, and now the matter is under review by a district court of appeal in Leon County. Scott initially recommended reappointments to the CCHB of trustees Dr. V. Upender Rao and Ed Lytton. But when the Senate adjourned in March without taking action on any of Scotts reappointments, the governor removed both members from his appointment list in late April. About 20 Citrus County residents have applied for the open positions. The list includes one current foundation board member and CMHS wants lobbyist to sway Scott on board appointments Ryan Beaty hospital CEO. See HOSPITAL / Page A2 FROM FIRST-TIME HOME BUYING TO ASSISTED LIVING MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Re/Max Realty One Realtor Cheryl Lambert answers questions Friday morning from new homeowner Stephanie Alberto. A dream comes trueA little help to keep a home Editors note: Today the Chronicle continues its monthly series on quality-of-life issues in Citrus County by focusing on housing around Citrus County. See HELP / Page A10 See DREAM / Page A10 Ashley Dickens, left, peeks through the front window of her mothers new home Friday morning as she, Stephanie Alberto, center, and her aunt Stephanie Alberto, prepare to tour the Beverly Hills home. The elder Alberto purchased the home through the federally-funded Neighborhood Stabilization Program in conjunction with the county. Pedestrian killed in crash A 24-year-old Floral City man was hit and killed early Saturday morning in Inverness. According to preliminary information from Florida Highway Patrol, a 1992 Honda Accord, driven by 20year-old Robert Merlina, of Inverness, was traveling north shortly before 5:30 a.m. on North Croft Avenue. At the same time, Justin Ghigliotty was reportedly walking in the northbound lane just right of the double center yellow line. Because of the lack of lighting on the road, FHP stated Merlina was unable to see Ghigliotty and struck him. Ghigliotty suffered fatal injuries and died at the scene of the crash, according to FHP. Merlina received minor injuries. No charges have been filed. The crash remains under investigation. Memorial Day event at cemeteryBUSHNELL The Florida National Cemetery Joint Veterans Committee (JVC) will sponsor the annual Memorial Day Ceremony at Florida National Cemetery at 11 a.m. Monday, May 28, with keynote speaker Maj. General Jeffrey E. Phillips, assistant deputy chief of staff, G-1. Steve Jerve, of WFLA TV News Channel 8, will be the Master of Ceremonies. The program includes patriotic music, rifle salute by Florida National Guard and posting of the colors. Ye Mystic Air Krewe will provide a flyover. Seating is limited. Those attending are encouraged to arrive early, wear comfortable clothing and bring a lawn chair or blanket. The ceremony will happen rain or shine. The Avenue of Flags consisting of 400 flags will be on display along the roadways of the cemetery. The flags were donated to the cemetery by the next of kin of deceased veterans and were once draped over the caskets or cremation urns of veterans. NEWS BRIEFS From staff reports MORE INSIDE Foreclosures in Citrus County./ Page A9 Senior citizens./ Page A9 Mortgage rates./ Page A9 Homeowners insurance. / Page A11 COMING NEXT MONTH: Personal budgets and how residents are managing their finances.

PAGE 2

two foundation advisory members. There are seven to 10 people I think are pretty good people, he said. Those names include: Bob Collins, a member of the CMHS Foundation board of directors who also chairs the hospitals philanthropic advisory council. Gene Davis, Inverness Realtor and property manager who is a member of the same council. Alida Langley, former member of the CCHB trustees prior to the 2009 dispute. John Siefert, executive director of the Citrus County Economic Development Council. Cliff Pierson, general manager of Bay Area Air Conditioning. Including the $30,000 allocated in April for lobbyist Brian Ballard, the hospital has spent about $90,000 in lobbying in 2011 and 2012, Beaty said. He blamed those allocations on the dispute with the hospital board. He said other than various Medicaid issues, CMHS did not hire lobbyists and didnt get involved with governor appointees to the CCHB. CCHB attorney Bill Grant, however, called the hospitals hiring of lobbyists a waste of resources. If the foundation is spending health care dollars to continue to lobby, that is of the utmost concern, Grant said. Theyre misplacing their values. Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352-563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. A2 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 0 0 0 B 6 P 1 000BLCC Express Yourself From Casual to Exotics 10% OFF 10% OFF EVERYTHING EVERYTHING Must present coupon at time of purchase. Not valid with other offers. From From Juniors to Juniors to Plus Sizes Plus Sizes 7763 W Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-794-6116 Just follow the girls doing Runway. Facebook Alice Watkins Something for everyone at one low price & All the Accessories Youll ever need. When it comes to your heart, you want the best. Dr. Potu, an experienced medical cardiologist, will make sure that your heart is healthy through stress testing and analysis. Hell also help you manage your blood pressure and work alongside an award-winning team to deliver life-saving care for each patients cardiovascular needs. Dr. Potu and the nationally recognized team at Munroe Heart are unmatched in clinical excellence for diagnostic, invasive and interventional cardiology. ats information you can positively take to heart. Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.R. Prasad Potu, M.D. Medical Cardiologist Positively experienced. Positively qualied. Positively great. Munroe Heart is#1 in Florida for Medical Excellence in Interventional Coronary Care 2012 in alliance with Positively HOSPITALContinued from Page A1 Contest voting nears end K INGS B AY R OTARY Special to the ChronicleCrystal River is on the heels of Cape Hatteras, N.C., for third place in the Ultimate Fishing Town contest sponsored by the World Fishing Network. The contest began in April and ends May 31. As voting nears the final week, a workshop and voting bank will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. at Plantation on Crystal River on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 29 and 30, so residents can vote in two time-block sessions. The final day of voting will be Thursday and will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Free wi-fi will be set up in the lobby and bar. Participants can bring their own laptops, smart phones or tablets and learn how to set up a Twitter account or add extra email addresses to double or triple their votes. Learn to turn one vote into two or three and keep Florida in the running. Crystal River is the only Florida town in the top 10 in the nationwide contest. Vote up to four times a day with each email address at www.wfnfishingtown.com/ town/crystalriver-fl. The Kings Bay Rotary entered Crystal River in the contest to win some money to help buy equipment for the volunteers who are doing the Lyngbya clean-up project. Removing Lyngbya from the water cleans it and slows down the future growth of the invasive, toxic algae. The project was started in September 2011 and is expected to last at least five years until it can evolve into a maintainable plan. Mechanical equipment is needed to help with the heavy lifting of the tonnage of Lyngbya being removed. Manatee and fish habitat will be restored as the project moves forward and native aquatic vegetation grows back. In the entry of Crystal River into the Ultimate Fishing Town contest, community involvement is important to show local people care about the waters they fish in. The people of Citrus County have proved they believe preserving and improving the waters for Kings Bay is worth the effort. The Kings Bay Rotary has posted videos on YouTube to show the project in action and the hundreds of people involved in the project. The group also has created an entry video. www.youtube.com/watch?v K8gaEp324OM Anyone who has questions or is interested in handing out fliers may call Art Jones at 727-642-7659. Troopers out in force for weekend Special to ChronicleThe Florida Highway Patrol will hit the highways and interstates during the Memorial Day holiday weekend, which extends through midnight Monday. Troopers will be out in full force this weekend and will be on the lookout for aggressive driving, speeding, red light running and driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs, to make the roadways as safe as possible for weekend travelers, FHP Director Col. David Brierton said. All uniformed FHP personnel, including those normally assigned to administrative duties, will patrol interstates and other major state roads throughout the four-day holiday period. FHP auxiliary and reserve troopers will volunteer to augment the patrols forces during the holiday enforcement period, too. Dial *FHP (*347) from a cell phone to contact FHP to report an aggressive driver or request roadside assistance. FHP has joined local and national law enforcement officers and highway safety advocates across the country for the national Click It or Ticket safety belt enforcement campaign, which ends June 3. Safety belt use saves thousands of lives across America each year. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics show that in 2010 alone, safety belts saved an estimated 12,546 lives nationwide. For more on Click It or Ticket, please visit NHTSAs website at www.nhtsa.gov/ PEAK. For additional details and statistics on the Sunshine States 2011 safety belt usage, to include county statistics, visit the Florida Department of Transportations website at www.dot.state.fl.us/safety/. Law enforcement efforts increase to reduce crashes

PAGE 3

M IKE W RIGHT Staff WriterLECANTO One things for sure: Seven Rivers Christian School graduates left with fond memories of their school and teachers. Speakers at Friday nights commencement ceremony at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church thanked teachers and family for providing them a faith-based educational foundation that will serve them well in years to come. When thinking of these qualities I want to pattern my life after, I remembered what I learned in philosophy this semester, valedictorian Blake Massullo said. You cant imagine an ideal, without there being an ideal. And I realized the ideal was surrounding me. Bagpipes played by Kathy Garlock greeted teachers, administrators and the 18 graduates entering the church. Honorarian Samantha Kauffmann was especially thankful for her father, who raised her following the death of her mother shortly before the second grade. Daddy, you are officially done raising children, but Ill always be your little girl, she said. Kauffmann also praised her teachers from her elementary grades to her senior year. I owe many of you so much thanks for treating me not just like a student, but like your own daughter during my 11 years here, she said. This hasnt just been a school; its been my second home where I have felt safe, valued and respected as an individual. Salutatorian Sam Jones encouraged graduates to follow the plan God has for each of them. I am genuinely thankful that we serve a Lord (who) has created a group of 18 people with such different skills and abilities, he said. God serves as the ultimate common denominator as we go out into the world to pursue a career. He added: While success is important, glorifying and giving thanks to our God for those successes is of utmost importance. Jones also was recipient of the schools senior swordsman award, presented by Principal Scott Jackson to the student who serves Christ with integrity in academics, athletics and relationships. Jackson noted Jones high academic and athletic achievements and his ability to support younger students and athletes. He also pointed out Jones unfailing love for his younger sister, Sashi, who has cerebral palsy. His plans will include caring for his sister, Jackson said. He draws strength from his older brother, Jesus Christ.Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352563-3228 or mwright@chronicle online.com. Around THE STATE Major road shift starts TuesdayMotorists who drive through the intersection of County Roads 486 and 491 will see a major traffic shift starting Tuesday, May 29. The contractor working on the road-widening project will shift traffic to a divided highway alignment. Traffic on C.R. 486 (Norvell Bryant Highway) and C.R. 491 (Lecanto Highway) will be shifted to the outside lanes of the divided highway. This will allow for work to be done in the median areas and the final layer of asphalt and striping to be completed. During the traffic shift, an off-duty sheriffs deputy will be present to assist with traffic control at the intersection. Motorists should expect delays for most of the day Tuesday. For information, call the Citrus County Engineering Department at 352-527-5446. Orlando Wildfire blows heavy smoke near Disney A wildfire burning in Orlando blew heavy smoke near the busy hotel and attractions district of Walt Disney World at the start of the busy Memorial Day weekend. The smoke also closed a section of Orlandos main highway briefly Friday. From staff and wire reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE For more photos, click on this story at www.chronicle online.com. Astronauts get groceries from Dragon Associated PressCAPE CANAVERAL Space station astronauts floated into the Dragon on Saturday, a day after its heralded arrival as the worlds first commercial supply ship. NASA astronaut Donald Pettit, the first one inside the docked capsule, said the Dragon looks like it carries about as much cargo as his pickup truck back home in Houston. It has the smell of a brand-new car, he added. I spent quite a bit of time poking around in here this morning, just looking at the engineering and the layout, and Im very pleased, Pettit said from the brilliant white compartment. To protect against possible debris, Pettit wore goggles, a mask and a cavers light as he slid open the hatch of the newest addition to the International Space Station. The complex sailed 250 miles above the Tasman Sea, just west of New Zealand, as he and his crewmates made their grand entrance. The atmosphere was clean; no dirt or other particles were floating around. This event isnt just a simple door opening between two spacecraft it opens the door to a future in which U.S. industry can and will deliver huge benefits for U.S. space exploration, the Space Frontier Foundation, an advocacy group, said in a statement. The six space station residents have until the middle of next week to unload Dragons groceries and refill the capsule with science experiments and equipment for return to Earth. Unlike all the other cargo ships that fly to the orbiting lab, the Dragon is designed for safe re-entry. It will be freed Thursday and aim for a Pacific splashdown. The Dragon contains 1,000 pounds of food, clothes, batteries and other provisions. It will bring back 1,400 pounds worth of gear. Associated Press In this image provided by NASA-TV, space station astronaut Donald Pettit, left, gives a thumbs-up Saturday after floating through the door of the Dragon, as other astronauts follow, a day after Dragons heralded arrival as the worlds first commercial supply ship. Family, faith, friends Special to the ChronicleHOMOSASSA The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park will offer two weeklong Nature Academy summer camps in June and July. The Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park will sponsor the programs. Junes Nature Academy is for children ages 8 and 9 years old and runs from June 11 though June 16. Julys Nature Academy program is for children ages 10 through 12 and runs from July 9 through July 14. Camp applications are available in the park office at the main entrance and Visitor Center off U.S. 19. Each program is limited to 20 campers and will be filled on a first-come basis with preference to those who have never attended. The extended deadline for receiving applications is June 4. Each Nature Academy program includes four, half-day camp sessions from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The Friday session starts at 4 p.m. with an overnight stay in the park. A graduation ceremony will be at 11 a.m. Saturday. The cost is $45 per child and includes a T-shirt and supplies. Applicants will be asked to write a short essay on Why I want to go to the Nature Academy, and what I hope to learn while I am there in their application. Parents and guardians may stop by the office to pick up an application. Camp topics include mammals, birds, reptiles, manatees, the ocean, sea turtles and saving energy through alternative sources. Indoor and outdoor activities for children include nature hunts, visiting the wildlife areas in the park and other scientific activities. For more information, call Allyssa Taylor at 352628-1508. Camp helps children learn about Florida wildlife Seven Rivers grads speak of memories, matriculation DAVE SIGLER /Chronicle ABOVE: Seven Rivers Christian School Valedictorian Blake Massullo addresses the audience attending the 2012 Commencement Exercise on Friday at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church. BELOW: The 2012 graduating class of Seven Rivers Christian School presented diplomas and special honors to 18 students. Seven Rivers Christian School Class of 2012 Salutatorian Sam Jones encouraged graduates to follow Gods plan for each of them. Principal Scott Jackson presented Jones with an award honoring the student who serves Christ with integrity in academics, athletics and relationships. Eighteen seniors graduated from the private school in a ceremony Friday evening in Lecanto. Campaign TRAIL The Citrus County Chronicles political forums are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31, at Citrus County Auditorium; and 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, at College of Central Florida. Information: Mike Wright, 352-563-3228. The Nature Coast Republican Club and Citrus Republican Womens Club is sponsoring the following forums at 9 a.m. at the American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River; Saturday, June 9, Shannon Heathcock and Joe Meek candidates for county commission District 3; Saturday, July 14, forum for all Republican primary candidates. Information: Fred or Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545. Jimmie T. Smith Republican incumbent for state House District 34, will speak at the Citrus County Tea Party Patriots meeting at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 16, at the Womens Club, 1715 Forest Drive, Inverness. The group will have a forum June 30 for sheriffs candidates. Angela Vick, Republican for clerk of court, will have a fundraiser from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the Realtors Association of Citrus County, 714 S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto. Information: 352-302-8319. Steve Burch Republican for sheriff, will have a fundraiser from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the American Legion Hall on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Information: Bob Milan, 352-527-9943 or Steve Burch, 352-464-4495. Sandra Sam Himmel Democrat incumbent for superintendent of schools, will have a fundraiser from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 15, at Shamrock Farms, 6105 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Information: Debbie Lattin, 352726-3181. The Beverly Hills Civic Association candidates forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Information: Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545. The Citrus Hills Civic Association is hosting a candidates forum at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club. The Campaign Trail is a listing of political happenings for the 2012 election season. Send events or campaign fundraisers to Mike Wright at mwright@chronicleonline. com.

PAGE 4

Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeArrests Kimesha Tanice Williams 23, of 773 N.E. 9th St., Crystal River, at 12:40 a.m. Friday on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance (cocaine) and a misdemeanor charge of possession of cannabis (less than 20 grams). Bond $5,500. David Charles Duncan Jr. 52, at large, at 4:30 a.m. Friday on active Citrus County warrants for felony charges of kidnapping, aggravated battery using a deadly weapon and burglary (becoming armed with explosive or other dangerous weapon) and for failures to appear on original misdemeanor charges of petit theft and failure to register a motor vehicle. No bond. Monique Elizabeth Quattromani 36, of 29 N. Bradshaw Terrace, Inverness, at 8:47 a.m. Friday on active Citrus County warrant for a violation of probation and a failure to appear on an original felony charge of driving with a suspended/revoked license (habitual traffic offender). No bond. Kelly Brosey 43, of 2555 E. Mary Lue St. Lot E., Inverness, at 12:33 p.m. Friday on a felony charge of driving with a suspended/revoked license (habitual traffic offender). Bond $2,000. Scott Allen Ziemendorf 42, of 1120 Betty Lane, Clearwater, at 3:10 p.m. Friday on an active Citrus County warrant for failure to appear for an original felony charge of battery. No bond. Jonathan Luke Treadway 34, of 211 Charity Court, Naples, at 3:24 p.m. Friday on misdemeanor charges of possession of cannabis (less than 20 grams) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond $750. Maxwell Lee Moranz 23, of 46 Jamaica St., Homosassa, at 3:22 a.m. Saturday on a misdemeanor charge of possession of cannabis (less than 20 grams). Bond $500. Sean Michael Bartlett 41, of 3621 E. Foxwood Lane, Inverness, at 10:04 a.m. Saturday on a misdemeanor charge of disorderly intoxication. Bond $150. Burglaries A commercial burglary occurred at about 8:53 a.m. May 24 in the 2500 block of State Road 44 West, Inverness. A vehicle burglary occurred at about 10:52 p.m. May 24 in the 400 block of E. Circlewood Street, Inverness. Thefts A larceny petit theft occurred at about 10:01 a.m. May 24 in the 300 block of S. Apopka Avenue, Inverness. A grand theft occurred at about 1:21 p.m. May 24 in the 7400 block of N. Spring Run Terrace, Hernando. An auto theft occurred at about 7:21 p.m. May 24 in the 200 block of S. Belle View Way, Inverness. A grand theft occurred at about 7:27 p.m. May 24 in the 6300 block of E. Malverne Street, Inverness. Vandalism A vandalism occurred at about 1:29 p.m. May 24 in the 100 block of W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Dunnellon. A4 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Charlie Brennan .................................................................................. Editor, 563-3225 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 Kathie Stewart....................................................Circulation Director, 563-5655 John Murphy................................................................Online Manager, 563-3255 John Murphy..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-3255 Jeff Gordon..............................................................Business Manager, 564-2908 Mike Arnold..........................................Human Resources Director, 564-2910 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660 News and feature stories..................................Sandra Frederick, 564-2930 Community/wire service content .......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Menus SENIOR DINING Monday: All sites closed for Memorial Day. Tuesday: Barbecued chicken thigh, mashed potatoes, green beans, graham crackers, slice whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Orange pineapple juice, breaded fish filet with tartar sauce, cheese grits, tomatoes and okra, oatmeal raisin cookie, slice wholegrain bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Thursday: Salisbury steak with brown gravy, rice pilaf, spinach, peaches, slice wholegrain bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Friday: Pork chop patty with brown gravy, black-eyed peas, country vegetable medley, mixed fruit, dinner roll with margarine, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. Todays active pollen:Ragweed, Grasses, Chenopods Todays count: 4.3/12 Mondays count: 2.5 Tuesdays count: 2.4 May 29 to June 1 For the RECORD ON THE NET For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriff citrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism. For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicleonline.com. The Citrus County Sheriffs Office Volunteer Unit is comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus County. Members come from all walks of life and bring with them many years of life experience. To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org. Associated PressSAVANNAH, Ga. A cluster of thunderstorms that stalled off the southeastern U.S. coast Saturday is expected to make for a sloppy, rainy Memorial Day on beaches and in tourist towns from Florida to South Carolina. Tropical storm warnings were in effect for the entire Georgia coastline, as well as parts of Florida and South Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Beryl was technically still considered a subtropical storm, but the system is expected to bring winds and rain to the area regardless of its official classification. Tropical storm conditions meaning maximum sustained winds of 45 mph could reach the coast as early as Saturday night. Three to 6 inches of rain are forecast for the area. Some coastal flooding is forecast, as the rain could cause high tides. As of 8 p.m. Saturday, Beryl was still centered about 220 miles eastsoutheast of Charleston, S.C. It had become stronger, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. It was moving southwest at 6 mph, with its center expected to be near the coast by late Sunday. Dangerous surf conditions are possible from northeast Florida to North Carolina over the holiday weekend, forecasters said. The southeastern coast is popular with tourists who visit the beaches and wilderness areas. A three-day thunderstorm is what its probably going to be, said Jay Wiggins, emergency management director for Glynn County, which is about 60 miles south of Savannah. Beryl to bring rain, winds to coast Legal notices in todays Citrus County Chronicle 000B8UM Bid Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D7 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . D7 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . D7

PAGE 5

Maner Dolly Daniel, 89 MILTONOur beloved Maner Odelia Dolly Plant Daniel, 89, went home to be with our Lord on May 23, 2012, in Milton, Fla. She was born May 6, 1923, in Pace, Fla., to loving parents Burel and Clara Plant. She was one of 14 children. She was preceded in death by her parents; her muchloved stepmother, Maebelle Gallops Plant; grandson, Robbi Daniel; four brothers, Burel Lemar Man Plant, Wayne Plant, Carl Plant, Orville Plant; and two sisters, Odessa Plant Myers and Clara Mae Plant Fowler. She is survived by her husband, George M. Daniel Sr., Inverness; two sons, George M. (Pat) Daniel Jr., Newark, Del.; Robert R. Randy Daniel, Philadelphia, Pa.; one granddaughter, Tyler Daniel; grandson, Anthony Boylan; and greatgrandson, Jeremiah Daniel; one sister, Dorothy Plant Hicks; five brothers, Buford Plant, J.E. (Christine) Plant and Kenneth (Liz) Plant, Clayton (Pauline) Plant and Ivan (Renate) Plant; 36 nieces and nephews; many great-nieces and -nephews; and many dear friends. A graveside committal service will be at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 30, at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Friends may join the procession to the cemetery at 1:45 p.m. at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.William Emberley, 85CRYSTAL RIVERWilliam H. Emberley, 85, of Crystal River, died at his home Saturday, May 12, 2012. A memorial service for Mr. Emberley will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, May 29, 2012, at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church. Inurnment with military honors for Mr. and Mrs. Emberley will follow at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. William King, 56 FLORAL CITYWilliam King, 56, of Floral City, died Tuesday, May 22, 2012. Private cremation will be under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Wesley Dill, 94 DANVILLE, IND. Wesley E. Dill, 94, of Danville, Ind., formerly of Floral City, died Wednesday, May 23. He was born May 15, 1918, in Indianapolis, Ind., to the late Clyde and Ruby Watkins Dill. Mr. Dill retired from Public Service Indiana after 27 years as a rubber material tester, and was a World War II U.S. Army veteran. His wife of 56 years, Dorothy, preceded him in death May 12, 2009. He is survived by three daughters, Jeanne (Mike) Smither, Angela Dill and Margaret Peggy Irwin; three grandchildren, Sarah J. (Matt) Holland, Michael W. Smither and Janice C. Smither. In addition to his parents and his wife, he was preceded in death by siblings, Webster Dill and Wilma Ramey. Graveside funeral services will be conducted at 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 29, from the Hills of Rest Cemetery in Floral City, with the Rev. Craig Davies, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Inverness, officiating. Friends may call from 1 to 2:45 p.m. at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home in Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Martin Mattes Jr. CLERMONT Martin George Mattes Jr., of Clermont, died Monday, May 21, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services at a later date in Wheeling, Ill. Anna Ross, 76 BROOKSVILLE Anna C. Ross, 76, of Brooksville, died Monday, May 21, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services at a later date in Pompton Plains, N.J. Janice Ryan, 75CITRUS SPRINGS Janice K. Ryan, 75, of Citrus Springs, died Friday, May 25, 2012, at Citrus Memorial hospital in Inverness. Funeral services for Mrs. Ryan will be at Tait Funeral Home in Syracuse, N.Y., with burial at St. James Cemetery in Cazenovia, N.Y. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. George Schleinkofer, 80 INVERNESS George N. Schleinkofer, 80, of Inverness, died Sunday, May 13, 2012, at the Hospice of Citrus County Care Unit in Inverness. Inurnment with military honors will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 30, 2012, at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Those who wish to attend a procession will leave from Heinz Funeral Home at 10 a.m. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Frank Ziegler, 87SUMMERFIELD Frank Ziegler, 87, of Summerfield, died Monday, May 21, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services at a later date in Milan, Mich. Sandy Dahl, 52, DENVER The 52-year-old widow of the man who captained a United Airlines flight that crashed into a Pennsylvania field after being taken over by terrorists on 9/11 has died of what the fundraising group she founded said was natural causes. The Captain Jason M. Dahl Scholarship Fund said on its website that Sandy Dahl died near Denver, and family friend David Dosch told the Denver Postshe passed away in her sleep. Her body was found Friday. Dahls husband was the captain of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001. Dahl, who lived in Colorado, became a public face for all grieving 9/11 families and founded a scholarship fund in her husbands honor to provide money for young pilots to receive their education. Sandys courage picked up where her husbands left off, Patrick White, president of Families of Flight 93, said in a statement Saturday. Her dedication to completing the Flight 93 National Memorial as a way to honor her husbands heroic actions on 9-11, and those of his fellow crew members and passengers, is a significant part of her legacy. In an interview with theDenver Postlast year, Dahl said she wanted to commemorate the passengers and crew of Flight 93 because they did what would almost never be asked of anyone. I want to make sure history is written, she said then. Jefferson County coroners officials have confirmed Dahls death, but the exact cause has not been released. Cale Miller, 23KANSAS CITY, MO.A 23-year-old soldier from suburban Kansas City has died of wounds suffered in Afghanistan. The Kansas City Star reported Pfc. Cale C. Miller, of Overland Park, Kan., died Thursday in Afghanistan when insurgent forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. He was in the Armys 2nd Infantry Division. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback said he will issue an order to lower flags in Kansas to half-staff on the day of Millers funeral. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A5 000BBM5 Call 795-5700 Crystal River Inverness Over 2000 participants have joined Gardner Audiologys research studies. Lend Your Ears Participants sought for hearing aid comparison study. Gardner Audiology invites you to join a field study that will compare conventional digital hearing aids with Spectral IQ. This new technology boosts speech recognition because it bypasses damaged inner ear hearing cells and diverts amplified speech to the useable cells. Starkey, the largest manufacturer of hearing aids in the U.S., is partnering with Gardner Audiology to perform this study. You will receive free services that include: candidate screenings, evaluation, lab services, and hearing aid fittings in exchange for sharing your experience on pre and post fitting questionnaires. At the end of 30 days you will return the study aids or purchase at a discount. Its your choice. Burial Cremation Pre-Planning 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000AAVW Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 0 0 0 B K 8 M These words have brought us so much comfort during the past five years without you. Even though we still cry tears of sorrow, we can hear your laughter, feel your love and relive all the wonderful times we shared together. These beautiful memories will never die. We love and miss you more than words can tell, Your loving parents, families and friends. In loving memory of Melissa Hess and Molly Paquin Id like the memory of me to be a happy one, Id like to leave an afterglow of smiles when life is done. Id like to leave an echo whispering softly down the ways, of happy times and laughing times and bright and sunny days. Id like the tears, of those who grieve, to dry before the sun of happy memories that I leave when life is done. Mon., May 28, 2012, 10:00 A.M. 0 0 0 B L 4 R Youre Invited To The 3 3 rd Anniversary Fero Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 352-746-4646 Special Services Provided by: American Legion Post 237 Veterans of Foreign War Post 10087 YES... Please provide me information on the following at no obligation: Free Consultation Mausoleum Crypts Free Personal Planning Guide Private Family Estates Burial at Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery Out of State Burial Burial at Florida National Cremation Services and Niches Patriotic Veteran packages Memorial Monument Estates NAME PHONE ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery (352) 746-4646 5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Memorial Day Service As we Honor our Veterans P r o u d l y S p o n s o r e d B y Dignity Memorial Providers Inverness Homosass a Beverly Hills (352) 726-2271 1-888-746-6737 000BB8P www.HooperFuneralHome.com To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917 sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 days prior to run date. 0 0 0 B C H K For Information and costs, call 726-8323 Burial Shipping Cremation Funeral Home With Crematory 0009YE4 Member of International Order of the 0 0 0 B H Z P PRE-PLANNING CEMETERY 5635 W. Green Acres Street, Homosassa, FL 34446 (352) 628-2555 Pre-Planning is the most loving gift you can give your family so come and let us help you do the responsible thing. We make it easy, with our payment plans and no credit check. A professional Family Service Counselor will be available to answer all questions you have regarding this matter. WE WILL BE: Serving FREE LUNCH Giving Away $25.00 GAS CARDS (For anyone with an R.S.V.P.) Drawings FOR SPECIAL PRIZES Please Join Us For Our OPEN HOUSE June 2, 2012 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. NO O BLIGA TION 000BCAJ Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods Obituaries SO YOU KNOW Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Deaths ELSEWHERE From wire reports OBITUARIES Email obits@chronicle online.com or fax 352563-3280. Phone 352-563-5660 for details. U.S. flags denote military service on local obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements.

PAGE 6

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A7 A6 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE VILLAGE VILLAGE TOYOTA 2431 SUNCOAST BLVD., US HWY 19, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448 352-628-5100 OF CRYSTAL RIVER T O Y O T A S A L E TOYOTA SALE S U N D A Y 1 1 A M 4 P M M O N D A Y 8 : 3 0 A M 5 P M SUNDAY 11AM-4PM MONDAY 8:30AM-5PM ALL NEW TOYOTAS WILL BE SOLD B E L O W D E A L E R C O S T BELOW DEALER COST 000BKMK SIMILAR SAVINGS ON MOST TOYOTAS IN STOCK 2012 TOYOTA TUNDRA SAVE $ 5,320 2012 TOYOTA CAMRY $ 1 9 9 0 0 $ 19,900 S A L E SALE P R I C E PRICE Was $22,795 SAVE $ 2,895 M E E M O R R I I A A L L D A A Y 2 D A A Y S S A A L L L E E MEMORIAL DAY 2 DAY SALE $ 2 2 9 9 5 $ 22,995 S A L E SALE P R I C E PRICE Was $28,315

PAGE 7

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A7 A6 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE VILLAGE VILLAGE TOYOTA 2431 SUNCOAST BLVD., US HWY 19, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448 352-628-5100 OF CRYSTAL RIVER T O Y O T A S A L E TOYOTA SALE S U N D A Y 1 1 A M 4 P M M O N D A Y 8 : 3 0 A M 5 P M SUNDAY 11AM-4PM MONDAY 8:30AM-5PM ALL NEW TOYOTAS WILL BE SOLD B E L O W D E A L E R C O S T BELOW DEALER COST 000BKMK SIMILAR SAVINGS ON MOST TOYOTAS IN STOCK 2012 TOYOTA TUNDRA SAVE $ 5,320 2012 TOYOTA CAMRY $ 1 9 9 0 0 $ 19,900 S A L E SALE P R I C E PRICE Was $22,795 SAVE $ 2,895 M E E M O R R I I A A L L D A A Y 2 D A A Y S S A A L L L E E MEMORIAL DAY 2 DAY SALE $ 2 2 9 9 5 $ 22,995 S A L E SALE P R I C E PRICE Was $28,315

PAGE 8

A8 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 0 0 0 B L 4 X

PAGE 9

C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff WriterCRYSTAL RIVER During later years, people especially need to make decisions about their quality of life. Heres my theory, Gloria Jeannotte, executive director of Cedar Creek Assisted Living Residence in Crystal River, recently told theChronicle Our whole goal for our elder generation is to give them the best quality of life at this time of their life. Very often, if they wait too long, they are too weak and they dont have choices any more. Just like us or people at any age: If we are active, if we eat well, if we get our hydration, if we are keeping our mind busy, our body will stay healthier. So quality is huge. Quality means caring for oneself and each other. Often time, if you live alone, you dont take care of yourself the way you should, Jeannotte said. This is quality of life: No matter what stage of life we are in, we should have the best quality of life at that time. Just because someone is old or has a disease or a disability, it doesnt mean they dont deserve a wonderful quality of life. We want them to have the life that they want to have. Sharing its hospitality, the 10-yearold assisted living facility invites the public to tea at 3 p.m. each Thursday. The complex has 60 apartments and is licensed for 72 residents. Currently, 69 people live there. They range in age from 64 to the high 90s. Jeannotte estimated her residents median age at 85 or 86. Most residents are local people. Some come from up north because they have families here. Senior citizens find their way to assisted living through several paths. Sometimes, its precipitated by a doctors urging to get some level of help or they may end up in a hospital or a nursing home and its a strong suggestion that they do not need to live alone, Jeannotte said. Many of our people actually come in on their own. They decide they like to have the choice before they have to have somebody make it for them, she continued. Sometimes family members see that their parents are declining, or (their) aunt or uncle. Its not always parents or a dear friend. Initially, potential clients may visit an assisted living facility to look around. Any assisted living should be able to help them even if they are not going to live in their environment, Jeannotte said. The assisted living facility should offer information to guide the person who is considering living there, even if the person goes to live elsewhere. A person needs to consider whether they want the benefits of assisted living. The greatest feature assisted living offers is peace of mind through 24-hour security. They have the ability to call somebody if they need anything any time night or day, Jeannotte said. Other features are comforts, such as having three meals a day prepared for them. Their housekeeping may be done for them if they like. They dont have to cook, although cooking facilities often are available for those who enjoy whipping up a meal or cake for friends. Laundry services may be offered. Or facilities may be offered for people who prefer to wash their own clothing. Assisted living offers healthy lifestyle help with such features as medication supervision and activities of live assistance: offering a hand with bathing and dressing if needed. Daily activities programs promote wellness. Transportation gets people to doctor appointments and out for shopping and pleasure trips. At the same time, many residents drive. Some even go on long trips. They all look out for each other. Congregate living is like one very large family if it is done right, Jeannotte said. Helping with quality of life choices after a medical event is a duty among many for Sue Bean, manager of case management at Citrus Memorial Health System. We look at whether they should be with a skilled nursing facility if they have an IV or are on antibiotics or need physical therapy, Bean said. Frequently, a patient spends time in a rehabilitation center to get stronger before going home. Once strength has returned, the choice for the next step rests with the patient and the patients family. Our long-range goal is for the patient to go home to a safe environment, Bean said. Home may then be a skilled nursing facility if the patient cant take care of their needs. Or it may be their own home that is modified with home health care staff assistance and perhaps equipment like a commode or hospital bed. This step also requires the presence of a family member or friend as caregiver. Or the patient may be a good candidate for assisted living. Other than contacting assisted living facilities through patient request, Bean said the hospital does not work out arrangements as it becomes a private matter between the facility, the patient and the patients family. Individual outcomes are different. Very often the patient just gets well and goes home, Bean said. Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer can be reached at cvanormer@chronicle online.com or 352-564-2916. Q UALITYOFL IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A9 CITRUS COUNTY QUALITY OF LIFE 2012 Chronicle project Foreclosure picture mixed A.B. SIDIBE Staff WriterDespite what looks to be a sudden spike in foreclosure filings in Citrus County in the first quarter of this year, real estate officials are pleased with the upward trend of the market. According to data from the Citrus County Clerk of Courts, from January to April, 510 foreclosures were filed. In all of 2011, only 960 foreclosures were filed. It unfortunately looks like it could double last years numbers if it continues like this, Deputy Clerk of Courts Angela Vick said. But it could also be a matter of process, the manner in which cases are being filed that is causing us to see a rise at the beginning of the year. Kevin Cunningham, president of ReMax Realty One and a spokesman for the Citrus County Realtors Association, said those foreclosure numbers definitely point to a process issue rather than a market downturn. The banks may have waited until the first quarter of this year to file some of their cases from the end of last year, because what we are seeing is everything trending up, Cunningham said. He said since January 2012, sales of homes in Citrus County are up 4.2 percent or 668 to 641 compared to the numbers from 2011 for the same period. Pending sales are also up 26.6 percent for the same period in 2011 compared to 2012 from 693 to 877. And overall inventory for the same period is down 21.8 from 2011 from 2,204 homes to 1,724, Cunningham said. Things are really looking up and improving, he said. Cunningham attributes the turnaround to banks realizing it is better to work with homeowners, either to sell their homes in a short sale or incentivizing an orderly exit for the homes residents without going through foreclosure. We are seeing banks actually give up to $30,000 to homeowners to help them transition to either a rental home or maybe get into a situation they can afford, Cunningham said. He said while it may seem like the banks are paying people to quit their homes, bank officials realize it can sometimes cost in excess of $50,000 to foreclose on a home. A short sale is one in which lien holders agree to release their lien on the property and accept less than the amount owed on the debt. While a persons credit may suffer slightly because of a short sale, it is not as onerous as a foreclosure. The Clerk of Court data shows a steady if not exponential rise in foreclosure filings in the county from 2007 when there were 916 cases. The numbers show foreclosures jumped to 1,640 in 2008 when the economy imploded. In 2009, the numbers climbed to 2,001 filed in the county. In 2010, things began to slow down, settling at 1,389. Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe can be reached at 352-563-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com. MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Foreclosure clerk Bobby Kirby conducts a foreclosure auction Thursday morning at the Citrus County Courthouse. Mortgage rates hit historic low S HEMIR W ILES Staff WriterFive years after the housing markets bubble burst, lower mortgage rates are helping boost home sales this year, spurring encouraging signs of an economic upturn. The average U.S. rate for the 30-year fixed mortgage fell to a record low for a fourth straight week. On Thursday, mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said the rate on the 30-year loan dipped to 3.78 percent, down from 3.79 percent last week and the lowest since long-term mortgages began in the 1950s. The average rate on 15year fixed mortgage, a popular option for refinancing, held steady at 3.04, matching the record low hit last week. (Mortgage rates) are quite low, historically low, said C.J. Dixon, owner/broker of ERA American Realty & Investments and ERA Suncoast Realty. Its a great time to buy a home. The low rates are contributing to an increase in the housing affordability index, Dixon explained. The index measures whether or not a typical family could qualify for a mortgage loan on a typical home by matching up the current average household income with what the typical family could spend on purchasing a home. Year-to-date in Citrus County, the index is up 10.5 percent over last year. Nevertheless, Sarah Spencer, president of the Realtors Association of Citrus County, stated Thursday many of the banks have tightened their restrictions and stepped up the necessary qualifications for issuing mortgages. The banks are asking buyers to produce paperwork that was never required before. Dixon said he recently had a client who made a nice income and had enough money to put 50 percent down on a home. However, the client owns at least 10 different businesses, and the banks want people to verify every transaction of a bank account with a balance of more than $250,000. Naturally, Dixon said the client didnt want to spend the hours gathering the information so he decided not to buy the home. It discouraged him even though he was perfectly qualified, he said. An easier loan would be a person who has one job, one bank account and a W-2. But, Dixon said the restrictions shouldnt prevent people from pursuing homeownership. Even if a person stays in their home for two years, he said there would be some appreciation in the homes value so it would be a good investment. This is the best time in history to buy a home, he said. Everything is lining up for the buyer. Information from the Associated Press was used in this report. Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@chronicle online.com. CITRUS COUNTY FORECLOSURE NUMBERS January to April 201220112010200920082007200620052004 Number of sales 1925741,054787615293103147250 Just their cup of tea Senior citizens choose life quality DAVE SIGLER /Chronicle Music and a tea party is the norm for residents at Cedar Creek Assisted Living in Crystal River. Assisted living offers residents the comfort of living in a safe facility with medical care, food services and an activities staff to make sure residents do not become isolated. This care is the answer to quality of life issues for some elderly residents who can afford the comfort of such amenities. Just because someone is old or has a disease or a disability, it doesnt mean they dont deserve a wonderful quality of life. Gloria Jeannotte executive director of Cedar Creek Assisted Living Residence. The 10-year-old assisted living facility invites the public to tea at 3 p.m. each Thursday. Currently, 69 people live there. They range in age from 64 to the high 90s.

PAGE 10

exceed $40,400. Im surprised people arent banging down the door to purchase these homes, Pollard said. I mean it doesnt necessarily have to be someone at poverty level. You and I can qualify for these homes. To find out more about NSP Alberto met with Cheryl Lambert, an agent with ReMax Realty One in Inverness. After a quick assessment, Lambert said she felt Alberto would be the perfect NSP applicant. So Alberto filed out the necessary paperwork to prequalify and overnight, she said, she found out the lender pre-approved her loan. However, the pre-approval was only the beginning of a long, arduous process to see if the lender would actually approve the loan for the home of her dreams. Alberto said she looked at a number of homes but fell in love with a quaint twobedroom home in Beverly Hills, which was listed at $60,000. It was really nice, she said. Before she even got out of the car to tour the property, Alberto had a feeling this would be her first home. Even her son noticed how enamored she was and told her to take this house. Naturally, Alberto said she felt some uncertainty and questioned whether she could really have her own home. But I put my foot forward. Its a process, she said. Theres a chance I could end up losing it, but you have to try. Lambert, who handles many NSP homes in Hernando County, said she champions programs such as these because it is a winwin-win situation because the buyers have an affordable place to live, the sellers are able to maintain property values and the local contractors get work because the county hires them to fix up the deserted homes. Moreover, she said it gives people who never thought they could own a home the opportunity to live out a dream. Lambert still vividly remembers the day Alberto received the news she had been approved for her loan it was her birthday. Lambert recalled meeting Alberto and her children at the house so they could all see it. While Alberto led the tour, Lamberts phone rang. It was the lender informing her Alberto got the loan. I looked at her and told her, Man, youre gonna have a good birthday, Lambert said. When I told her the loan was approved, she looked at me and started to cry. My legs was falling off, Alberto said with a laugh. I was so excited to be able to say this is mine. The closing on the sale could happen as early as Monday or as late as early June, but Alberto cant help making plans on how to decorate the home she will share with her daughter and new grandson. She already has boxes packed, she said, because she knew she was moving. One of her first projects once she settles into her home is plant a garden. Im gonna plant around the outside of the house and have a flower garden. And Im gonna have a vegetable garden in the back, she said. Gotta have my collard greens! When she moves in, there will be no concerns about buying appliance because every NSP comes with new, energy-efficient appliances. The home also comes with a sprinkler system, a remotecontrolled garage door system, a new roof and air conditioning unit as well as a fresh paint job and flooring. And her mortgage payment, she said, will be about $432, more than $200 less than what she was paying to rent. I recommend this to anyone. Why go into low-income housing when you can have something like this? she said. Youre afraid to go out to get your own, especially when youre low income, but you have to go out there ... Once you get started, get out there and just do it. Qualified applicants for the NSP program may be eligible for financial assistance through the program, depending on income level. Buyers must be able to secure a first mortgage loan through a traditional bank. Any assistance will depend on the buyers approved first mortgage loan amount based on income. The buyer must occupy the property as their primary residence and cannot currently own a home. However, the buyer does not have to be a first-time homebuyer. For more information about the NSP program, call 352-527-7520 or visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/ commserv/commrec/ housing/programs/nsp.htm. Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@chronicleonline. com. A10 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Q UALITYOFL IFE 000BLR9 000BIZL Wednesday, June 13 Linda Azwell, OD Please RSVP 352.795.3317 Crystal Eye Center 1124 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE* BLINDS LECANTO ~ TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. *Must present written estimate from competitor for this price 527-0012 1-877-746-0017 000BI8E FREE Valances Installation In Home Consulting www.72-hourblinds.com 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY Verticals Faux Wood Blinds Shutters Cellular Shades The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! 2011 2011 2011 2011 000BIB7Happy Birthday CITRUSCOUNTY!Come and join us on Saturday June 2nd for the Celebration of two major birthdays! Opening Ceremonies at 10:00am West steps of Historic Courthouse. Birthday Cake and Treats will be served following in the Museum Meet Robert Butler Highwaymen Artist, who created a painting of the 1912 Citrus County Courthouse, over 25 years ago. Former Inverness Primary School Students will open a time capsule from 25 years ago. Along with Many, Many More FunActivities.One Courthouse Square Inverness, FL For More Information, Please Call (352) 341-6436 or (352) 341-6427 000BIBD 000B1YI 352.746.4882 352.746.3636 Central Ridge Community Center At Beverly Hills 77 Civic Circle WE WANT YOU! MILITARY CARD PARTY Tuesday June 12th Doors open at 11:00 a.m. Lunch at Noon 1:00 p.m. games, doorprizes & raffles $12 per person at office Advance Reservations Required by June 9th SHARE THE WEALTH Beverly Hills Card Club 000B67A Irrigation Tune-up Special Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com Up to 5 zones Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 HOME SERVICES $ 49 99 Currently, the county is not offering SHIP funds for firsttime homebuyers, who are directed instead to the Neighborhood Stabilization Program described in another article. However, SHIP affects all the countys programs because it required the establishment of an Affordable Housing Advisory Committee, a group of residents who meet monthly to review the status of all the countys housing programs and make recommendations to the board of county commissioners. When SHIP funds were available for first-time homebuyers, the funds had to be repaid as a no-interest loan upon the change of ownership of the home. For the three other SHIP programs, the homeowner would not have to repay the loan if the home remained their primary residence for 10 years. In October 2010, the county was awarded a $750,000 Community Development Block Grant through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The funding assists very low and low to moderate income families with home repairs to get their home up to health and quality standards. We already have all our applicants, Blanchette said. We are not accepting applications. We have a ranking list and we are helping in order on that list. We will be applying again and when it becomes available again, we will advertise. Anyone who is unemployed or underemployed through no fault of their own, should look at a program called Hardest Hit. Its up to six months of mortgage payments paid directly to their lender, Blanchette said. It can also pay arrears. Hardest Hit is capped at $12,000. If someone was laid off due to a downsize and not able to make their mortgage payment, they could very well be eligible for Hardest Hit, Blanchette said. The banks should know its available and be directing people to it. The county does not have a direct allocation for the Hardest Hit program. Instead, it applies to the state for individuals, as the state has the allocation from the U.S. Treasury. The county receives fees for acting as the agent for status updates, such as meeting with the homeowner to find out if a job was found. Thirty-nine people have applied, but not all were funded. Were open for business on this one, Blanchette said. She also said the state has asked the Treasury to increase the assistance time to 12 months and increase the cap to $18,000. We expect to see that approved in July, Blanchette said. Rental assistance is offered through a program called Section 8. But, again, the program is filled. Its a Housing Choice Voucher Program, Blanchette said. Renters select their own unit from the Citrus County rental market. They pay a portion of their rent and we pay the remainder. It is prorated by income level. Right now we are serving close to 90 vouchers in Citrus County and about 100 in Sumter County, Blanchette said. Some time ago, Citrus County took over Sumter Countys voucher program. As those vouchers are freed up in Sumter, well be able to use them in Citrus, Blanchette said. Sumter does not want the program any more. Eventually, those vouchers will come to our community, which is of help. When a family is issued a voucher, it is theirs until such time as their income increases to where they dont need assistance or they move where the voucher cant be used. Thats the only way a voucher gets freed up for the next person on our waiting list, Blanchette said. Right now, we have a total of 257 people on our waiting list that demonstrates the need in this county. Section 8 also helps landlords get their income from their property. The programs title refers to a section of the Housing Act of 1937, which set up the rent payment assistance program during the Great Depression. When people hear Section 8, they think public housing projects and that is not what we have here, Blanchette said. People can live anywhere they want as long as the landlord is willing to accept our payment. Shelter Plus Care is another HUD voucher program, but has only 11 vouchers for families. Thats for homeless people with disabilities or substance abuse people, Blanchette said. They agree to a case management plan. We work in partnership with The Centers to have support services for them. Some people have been able to find employment and stabilize themselves mentally and not be homeless anymore. For other homeless people, the county has a case manager who works on their issues. The county uses an Emergency Solutions Grant. What we use those funds for is prevention to keep people from becoming homeless, Blanchette said. The grant provides onetime rent assistance. The case manager for homeless people first works to get them into a shelter. The goal, though, is to get the homeless person out of the shelter and into a real home. Weve been successful to a degree, but the amount of people is difficult, Blanchette said. The homeless caseload averages about 130 people for the case manager, with about 20 new people on average requesting help each week. The biggest trend hes seeing right now are a lot of people who are doubled up, Blanchette said. Theyve lost their house and they are staying with somebody. We still consider that homeless. Beyond the programs, Housing Services keeps a list to hand out of 17 affordable rental housing complexes in the county where potential renters can inquire. Some advertise rent as low as $530 a month. At least two complexes on the list are part of Florida Low Income Housing Associates (FLIHA), a nonprofit corporation started in 1989. It builds new housing developments and preserves existing ones using financing from local, state and federal sources in addition to grants and public donations. As a public-private partnership, its goal is to help low-income and very low-income families eventually own their homes through its own program. Applicants must meet criteria to rent. Then a portion of their rent is set aside to accumulate for a down payment on a house. Other affordable rental complexes are modified for elderly and handicapped tenants. DREAM Continued from Page A1 HELP Continued from Page A1

PAGE 11

SO YOU KNOW Homeowners insurance policies often provide replacement cost coverage for the dwelling in the event of a loss. As such, insurance companies require policyholders to purchase an amount of insurance equal to the cost to rebuild the home using current construction costs. This is very different from the market value of the home. The market value of a home is the amount the home is worth if you were to sell it today. The two amounts can be very different. During negative economic times, replacement values may continue to increase based on construction costs, while market values are decreasing due to lower resale demand. Remember, if a home is insured for replacement value, the insurer must pay the cost to rebuild the home, (up to the policy limit), not what a willing buyer would have paid for it prior to the loss. For this reason, an insurer may refuse coverage to a policyholder. In theory, risk is increased when a policyholder would benefit from the loss of the home and most insurers are not willing to accept the increased risk. During positive economic times, replacement values may be less than market values. Market values increase based on demand and availability, and market values include the cost of the land under a home. During such times, a home may sell or be appraised for more than the amount of coverage an insurance company is willing to provide. Remember, insurance covers only the cost to rebuild the building and not the value of the land. Most replacement cost policies require you to carry a certain percentage of the replacement value (normally 80 percent) at all times. If you fail to carry the correct amount of coverage, you may be responsible for a percentage of a partial loss. For instance, if you carried a $100,000 coverage limit when in fact the amount needed to meet the policy requirements is $200,000 and you have a partial loss of $50,000, the company would only pay $25,000 of the partial loss, which is 50 percent of the claim. The formula used in the example above is the amount of insurance carried divided by the amount of insurance needed, times the amount of loss, equals the amount p ayable for the claim by the insurance company.Source: Florida Department of Financial Services A.B. SIDIBE Staff WriterItem 12 on the Citizens Property Insurance Companys Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section on its website asks: How do I know whether my policy excludes sinkhole coverage? The answer is policies that exclude sinkhole coverage will have the following wording on the Declarations page: Your policy provides coverage for a catastrophic ground cover collapse that results in the property being condemned and uninhabitable. Otherwise, your policy does not provide coverage for sinkhole losses. You may purchase additional coverage for sinkhole losses for an additional premium. Everyone should ask questions like that and more if you are a homeowner or about to be one, Citrus County Realtor Kevin Cunningham said. Your agent or Realtor should have a pretty good understanding of what should be covered or not when it comes to buying homeowners insurance, he said. Citrus is one of 16 Florida counties where a sinkhole inspection is a prerequisite to add sinkhole coverage. The other counties are Alachua, Hamilton, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Manatee, Marion, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole, Sumter, Suwannee, Wakulla and Washington. Citizens Property Insurance Company describes itself as a not-for-profit, tax-exempt government corporation whose public purpose is to provide insurance protection to Florida property owners throughout the state. Due to the sometimes prickly nature of finding affordable insurance, the corporation said it insures homes, businesses and condominiums whose owners otherwise might not be able to find coverage. One of the biggest coverage issues for homeowners in counties such as Citrus is the issue of sinkhole coverage. The legal definition of a sinkhole is when a landform created by subsidence of soil, sediment or rock as underlying strata are dissolved by groundwater. A sinkhole may form by collapse into subterranean voids created by dissolution of limestone or dolostone or by subsidence as these strata are dissolved, according to the legislatures language on sinkholes. The same law describes sinkhole loss as structural damage to the building, including the foundation, caused by sinkhole activity. Contents coverage shall apply only if there is structural damage to the building caused by sinkhole activity. And it subsequently defines sinkhole activity as settlement or systematic weakening of the earth supporting such property only when such settlement or systematic weakening results from movement or raveling of soils, sediments or rock materials into subterranean voids created by the effect of water on a limestone or similar rock formation. Therefore, settling of a home due to previously unknown man-made fill-ins in a particular subdivision will not be covered by insurance, Cunningham explained. That is why it is important that, for example, if you know you live in a flood plain or your agent tells you that you are in a flood plain, it is important that you should think about getting flood insurance, he said. Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe can be reached at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com. Q UALITYOFL IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A11 000BJ00 000BIZH 000BLCA 867-8515 LIMITED OFFER! UNTIL 05/30/12 ONLY Bissi & Associates Disability Advocates, LLC 352-683-8903 Hernando and Citrus Counties www.bissiandassociates.com 000AZRC OVER 115 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE SERVING SINCE 1983 WE HELP YOU WIN! There is no substitute for experience! Call today for your FREE consultation! No Fees Upfront! We turn denials into Winners. Social Security Disability SSI Chronic Pain Back and Neck Diabetes Overweight Anxiety Depression Fibromyalgia COPD 000B9OD Homosassa 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd. 352-621-8000 Inverness 2036 Hwy. 44 West 352-586-7599 FREE HEARING TEST + EVALUATION The Hearing Aid Myth Busters! 000BDX4 Timing Belt In June With installation by Love Honda or Love Chevy. Prices may vary by model. Plus taxes and fees where applicable. Please present coupon during write up. Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 6/30/12. Valid at Love Chevy or Love Honda. Prices may vary by model. Plus taxes and fees where applicable. Please present coupon during write up. Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 6/30/12. Valid at Love Chevy or Love Honda. Prices may vary by model. Plus taxes and fees where applicable. Please present coupon during write up. Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 6/3012. Valid at Love Chevy or Love Honda. Prices may vary by model. Plus taxes and fees where applicable. Please present coupon during write up. Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 6/30/12. Handling the pitfalls of insurance INSURANCE QUESTIONS? The Department of Financial Services has a Consumer Services division to answer questions and take complaints from consumers. They can be contacted toll-free at 877-693-5236 (in Florida only) or 850-413-3089 (outside Florida). The website is http://www.my floridacfo.com/sitePages/ services/display. aspx?a=Consumer Protection.

PAGE 12

Associated Press Two-year-old Aliou Seyni Diallo eats dry couscous given to him by a neighbor, after he collapsed in tears of hunger May 1 in the village of Goudoude Diobe, in the Matam region of northeastern Senegal. Associated Press Nancy Sabin, executive director of the newly-renamed Jacob Wetterling Resource Center, middle, embraces Patty and Jerry Wetterling during the presentation of a bronze artwork depicting a small child reaching for a star Sept. 21, 2008, in St. Louis Park, Minn. The Wetterlings 11-year-old son, Jacob, was abducted near St. Cloud, Minn., in 1989. Hunger Hunger returns to Africa GOUDOUDE DIOBE, Senegal Its 10 a.m., and the 2-year-old is still waiting for breakfast. Aliou Seyni Diallo collapses to his knees in tears and plops his forehead down on the dirt outside his familys hut. Soon he is wailing inconsolably and writhing on his back in the sand. A neighbor spots him, picks him up easily by one arm, and gives him a little uncooked millet in a metal bowl. The toddler shovels it into his mouth with sticky fingers coated in tears and grime. The crying stops, for the moment. Here are the two most alarming things about Alious story: He lives in the richest country in the Sahel, and the worst is yet to come. More than 1 million children younger than 5 in this wide, arid swath of Africa below the Sahara are now at risk of a food shortage so severe it threatens their lives, UNICEF estimates. In Senegal, which is relatively stable and prosperous, malnutrition among children in the north has already surpassed 14 percent, just shy of the World Health Organization threshold for an emergency. Campaign Associated Press Egyptian presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq pays tribute Saturday to the glorious revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak, a dramatic turnaround for the former regime official who fought his way into the runoff elections by appealing to public disenchantment with last years uprising. Ex-Mubarak PM praises uprising CAIRO The two surviving candidates in Egypts presidential election appealed Saturday for support from voters who rejected them as polarizing extremists in the first round even as they faced a new challenge from the third-runner-up who contested the preliminary results. Hosni Mubaraks last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, vowed he wont revive the old authoritarian regime as he sought to cast off his image as an anti-revolution figure, while the Muslim Brotherhoods candidate, Mohammed Morsi, reached out to those fearful of hardline Islamic rule and the rise of a religious state. Many votes are up for grabs, but the two candidates will have a tough battle wooing the middle-ground voters amid calls from activists for a boycott of the divisive vote. From wire reports World BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A12 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Associated PressBEIRUT Gruesome video Saturday showed rows of dead Syrian children lying in a mosque in bloody shorts and T-shirts with gaping head wounds, haunting images of what activists called one of the deadliest regime attacks yet in Syrias 14-month-old uprising. The shelling attack on Houla, a group of villages northwest of the central city of Homs, killed more than 90 people, including 32 children younger than 10 years old, the head of the U.N. observer team in Syria said. The attacks sparked outrage from U.S. and other international leaders, and large protests in the suburbs of Syrias capital of Damascus and its largest city, Aleppo. It also renewed fears of the relevance of a month-old international peace plan that has not stopped almost daily violence. The U.N. denounced the attacks in a statement that appeared to hold President Bashar Assads regime responsible, and the White House called the violence acts of unspeakable and inhuman brutality. This appalling and brutal crime involving indiscriminate and disproportionate use of force is a flagrant violation of international law and of the commitments of the Syrian government to cease the use of heavy weapons in population centers and violence in all its forms, said U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon and international envoy Kofi Annan. Those responsible for perpetrating this crime must be held to account. More than a dozen amateur videos posted online Saturday gave glimpses of the carnage, showing lines of bodies laid out in simple rooms, many with bloody faces, torsos and limbs. In some places, residents put chunks of ice on the bodies to preserve them until burial. One two-minute video shows at least a dozen children lined up shoulder to shoulder on a checkered blanket on what appears to be the floor of a mosque. Blood trickled from one girls mouth. One boy, appearing to be no more than 8, had his jaw blown off. The video shows flowered blankets and rugs covering several rows of other bodies. Dozens of children killed in Syria Attack leaves 90 dead, including 32 kids under age 10 Vatican: Popes butler arrested Associated PressVATICAN CITY The Vatican confirmed Saturday the popes butler has been arrested in its embarrassing leaks scandal, adding a Hollywood twist to a sordid tale of power struggles, intrigue and corruption in the highest levels of Catholic Church governance. Paolo Gabriele, a layman and member of the papal household, was arrested Wednesday after secret documents were found in his Vatican City apartment and was still being held Saturday, Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi said in a statement. Gabriele is often seen by Pope Benedict XVIs side in public, riding in the front seat of his open-air jeep during Wednesday general audiences or shielding the pontiff from the rain. He has been the popes personal butler since 2006, one of the few members of the small papal household that includes the pontiffs private secretaries and four consecrated women who care for the papal apartment. His arrest followed another stunning development at the Vatican this week, the ouster of the president of the Vatican bank, Ettore Gotti Tedeschi, by his board. Sources close to the investigation said he, too, was found to have leaked documents, though the official reason for his ouster was he simply failed to do his job. The Vatileaks scandal has seriously embarrassed the Vatican at a time during which it is trying to show the world financial community it has turned a page and shed its reputation as a scandal-plagued tax haven. Vatican documents leaked to the press in recent months have undermined that effort, alleging corruption in Vatican finance as well as internal bickering over the Holy Sees efforts to show more transparency in its financial operations. But perhaps most critically, the leaks have seemed aimed at one main goal: to discredit Pope Benedict XVIs No. 2, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Vatican secretary of state. The scandal took on even greater weight last week with the publication of His Holiness, a book which reproduced confidential letters and memos to and from Benedict and his personal secretary. Documents found in his apartment Paolo Gabriele the popes butler was arrested Saturday. Associated PressAfter 33 years, someone has confessed to killing 6-year-old Etan Patz. And people immediately start speaking of closure. Patty Wetterling hates the word. Since 1989, she and her husband have writhed in the same hell as Stan and Julie Patz. Whatever path they might have been on, it was irrevocably altered October 1989, on an evening when a masked man walked away with their 11-year-old son, Jacob. Once youre a victim of a crime like this, your life takes a very different direction, the St. Joseph, Minn., woman said. It doesnt really close anything, because everything just became different from that point on. But it does provide answers. Thanks to the wonders of modern computer graphics, these parents can watch their children age digitally, at least. But no one can write a program capable of generating the milestones high school graduation, college, marriage, parenthood that come along with growing up. Some, like Mike and Maddi Misheloff of Dublin, Calif., exist in a kind of suspended animation, unwilling to move or even redecorate the lost ones bedroom. Many, like the Patzes, live with the what ifs. What if they hadnt given in to his please, hadnt let him make his first solo walk to the school bus stop that May day in 1979? A few suffer under a cloud of suspicion themselves like Judy Moore of Jackson, Ky., whose 6year-old son, Kelly, disappeared in 1982 while playing in the snow. Back when Etan vanished, authorities put the childrens faces on milk cartons. Today, their names and images flash across the Internet and digital highway signs. Signs of hope It is a horrifying truth that the best some families can hope for is their child is being held against their will, said activist John Walsh. Before her rescue in 2009, Jaycee Dugard was repeatedly raped and gave birth to two daughters during 18 years of captivity at the hands of a known sex offender in California. Still, her mother could eventually put her arms around her again, said Walsh, host of televisions Americas Most Wanted. Against all hope and reality, every now and then a child comes back alive, said Walsh, whose 6year-old son, Adam, was abducted from a Florida department store in July 1981 and murdered. So thats why these people keep their rooms and their phone numbers, because its part of the staying mentally sane. Its part of the being able to cope with the worst possible thing that could ever happen to you your beautiful, loving child disappears. Through his show, Walsh has helped capture more than 1,200 criminals and bring home about 60 missing children. He knows the Patzes and has shared their heartache each time a lead evaporated, and one breakthrough after another ended in disappointment. Wetterlings storyThe outgoing message on the Wetterlings answering machine says it all. Hope is an amazing force that we all need in our lives every day, Patty Wetterlings voice declares. The evening of Oct. 22, 1989, she and her chiropractor husband, Jerry, were going out to visit with friends. They asked Jacob, 11, to babysit his two younger siblings Trevor, 10, and Carmen, 8. They called home to give Jacob the phone number where they were, in case of an emergency. Not long afterward, the children called to say they were bored, and asked permission to ride their bikes to the video store about a mile away. No, their mother said instinctively. Find something to do at home. Trevor asked to speak to their dad. He promised they would take a flashlight; Jake would wear the fathers reflective jogging vest. The parents conferred, then acquiesced. When Jacob called back around 8:30 to say Carmen didnt want to come, the Wetterlings agreed with his solution to have the 13-year-old neighbor girl sit with her until they got back with the movie. It should have been OK, she said. The brothers and a friend made it to the store, where they chose their movie Leslie Nielsens cop comedy, The Naked Gun and bought some candy. They were about halfway home when, the other two boys told authorities, a masked gunman emerged from a driveway. He ordered them to throw their bikes into a ditch and lie down. After asking each boy his age, he told Trevor and the friend to run toward the nearby woods and not look back. But after a short distance, they turned around just in time to see the man leading Jacob away by the elbow. There have been many leads over the years. We have had leads in the last two weeks, Wetterling said. She takes heart in the fact that a relative turned in the man now charged with murdering Etan. We all need answers, she said of her family, the Patzes and all the others. We believe somebody else knows something ... Theyve also carried an awful heavy load, and its time to come forward. Still wondering Break in Patz missing child case brings hope to other families This combination of images provided by the Wetterling family and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children shows photos of Jacob Wetterling at the age of 11, left, and a computer-enhanced, ageprogressed simulation made available in 2007.

PAGE 13

E XCURSIONS Page A13 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Realizing her dream Kay Daniels of Crystal River had always wanted to visit the Hawaiian Islands. Her dream finally came true this month, only now when she is a senior citizen. Here, she sits on the lawn of a small island house on the Big Island of Hawaii, among orchids planted by the owner. We are never too old to follow our dreams, says Daniels. Special to the Chronicle The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office. DREAM VACATIONS Photo Contest Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15 of todays Chronicle B ETH J. HARPAZ AP Travel Editor NEW YORK P ity the War of 1812. Its bicentennial is at hand and events are planned for all over North America, from Canada and the Great Lakes to the Mid-Atlantic and the South. But good luck finding someone who can explain in 10 words or less what the war was about. Some historians see the war as a last gasp by England to control its former colonies, and its sometimes called the Second War of Independence. At the time, Americans viewed the war as an opportunity for us to throw off Britain once and for all, said Troy Bickham, author of a new book, out in June, called The Weight of Vengeance: The United States, the British Empire and the War of 1812. But in Canada, the War of 1812 is seen as an attempted land grab by the U.S. The U.S. invaded Canada and at one point controlled Toronto, but the British, seeking control of the Great Lakes, won Detroit and other important ports. The War of 1812 was also complicated by what Bickham calls parallel wars. The British were fighting the Napoleonic Wars in Europe at the time, while the U.S. battled Native Americans allied with Britain for control of frontier territories from Michigan to Alabama. Amid the muddle, a few important episodes stand out, from decisive battles to the burning of the White House. Some events are being commemorated with programs, exhibits and military re-enactments, from now through the bicentennial of the Battle of New Orleans, in 2015. Other key moments from the war involve important artifacts or historic sites that can be seen any time. Here are some details: The flag The War of 1812 inspired Francis Scott Key to write The Star-Spangled Banner after soldiers at Fort McHenry in Baltimore raised an American flag to mark a victory over the British on Sept. 14, 1814. The fort is now a National Park site, www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm. The original manuscript for the song will be part of a War of 1812 exhibit at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St., in Baltimore, opening June 10. Also in Baltimore, a June 13 to 19 StarSpangled Sailabration will include a parade of 40 tall ships and naval vessels, an airshow featuring the Blue Angels and other festivities, www.starspangled200.com. The flotilla is one of several organized by Operation Sail Inc., which has partnered with the U.S. Navy to mark the War of 1812 bicentennial, with additional tall ship events scheduled for May 23-30 in New York City, June 1 to 12 in Norfolk, Va., June 30 to July 5 in Boston and July 6 to 8 in New London, Conn. The OpSail and Navy commemorations started in New Orleans in April. In Washington, D.C., you can see the flag that inspired the national anthem, tattered with age and on display in a darkened room to help preserve it, at the Smithsonians National Museum of American History, http://americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/. At the Smithsonians National Portrait Gallery, paintings of key figures from the war will be part of a show called : A Nation Emerges, opening June 15. The White House When the British burned down the White House on Aug. 24, 1814, First Lady Dolley Madison famously refused to leave until the portrait of George Washington was saved. The painting, by Gilbert Stuart, hangs in the White House today, and there seem to be no lingering hard feelings against England. As President Obama joked during a recent visit by British Prime Minister David Cameron: Its now been 200 years since the British came here to the White House under somewhat different circumstances. They made quite an impression. They really lit the place up! But we moved on. USS Constitution Britain had 600 ships while the U.S. had just 17, including the USS Constitution, also known as Old Ironsides, which Bickham says was the most important ship in our fleet. You can visit the ship in Charlestown, Mass., a neighborhood of Boston, www.history.navy.mil/ussconstitution/hi story.html.Alabama One of the biggest U.S. victories of the war took place in Horseshoe Bend, now a National Park site in Alabama, about 100 miles southwest of Atlanta, www.nps.gov/hobe/index.htm. Here, Andrew Jackson led the slaughter of the Creek Red Sticks tribe, ending a longstanding conflict with the natives and securing 23 million acres of territory for the U.S.New Orleans Jackson also led the final American victory of the war at the Battle of New Orleans, which took place on the Chalmette Battlefield, now part of the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, www.nps.gov/jela/chalmettebattlefield.htm. Jacksons triumphs in Alabama and New Orleans made him a national hero and he was eventually elected U.S. president. Great LakesMany of the wars important battles were fought as Britain sought control of Great Lakes territories and states including parts of Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, New York and Pennsylvania. Fort Dearborn, where Chicago is now, was destroyed during the war. Fort Mackinac on Michigans Mackinac Island in Lake Huron, which was captured by the British early in the war, is still standing and is hosting a variety of programs for the bicentennial, www.mackinacparks.com/. The Americans retook Michigan after the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813 off the coast of Ohio, and a re-enactment is planned on the water next year. The reconstructed flagship Niagara, which was commanded by Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry during the battle, is The War of 1812 AMERICA REMEMBERS Associated Press This undated photo from Mackinac State Historic Park shows cannon-firing demonstrations by costumed interpreters at Fort Mackin ac on Mackinac Island, Mich., on Lake Huron, an important site in the War of 1812. The bicentennial of the war is being marked by events around the country. BELOW: The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Barque Eagle arrives April 17 in New Orleans as part of The War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Navy.) Bicentennial sites ready, events planned all across the U.S. See WAR / Page A15

PAGE 14

A14 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT D ear Annie: Last month, an old boyfriend contacted me. I hadnt seen Bud in 30 years. We had a wonderful conversation. I visited him at his home. He even sent me a large sum of money to help pay off a mortgage bill. We now talk at least twice a day and always say I love you. Bud speaks of a future together, but I told him that I want a commitment before I will sell my place and move to his town 300 miles away. Heres the problem: Bud has had a female companion for 20 years. He told me that there is no longer any physical intimacy with Jane, but they have a deep friendship. Bud is now going through some health issues that may prove to be quite serious. He asked Jane to go with him to an upcoming appointment for tests. I was disappointed that he didnt first ask me, even though I live out of state. I explained that I want to be there in good times and bad. He says he needs to get through this difficult time and then he will end the relationship with Jane. If Buds health deteriorates, I fear he never will be able to leave her and I will lose this loving man. Worse, he and Jane had arranged a weeks vacation before we reconnected, and hes still planning to go. Bud tries to reassure me, but I feel frustrated, depressed and helpless. I dont want to nag him or push him away. Should I give him a deadline? P .H. Dear P .H.: You have been with Bud for a month. Its not enough time to know his true motivations. Well assume he didnt break things off with Jane because he wanted to be certain you were interested first, and now he is reluctant to rock the boat because she will be a source of support. As much as youd like that role, you live too far away to be helpful. You need to step back. Send cards to wish him well, but understand that you are not his girlfriend. Jane is. Let him know that you might be amenable to rekindling your romance if he is ever a free man but not before. Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email annies mailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Treaties 6Dross 10Music maker 14Part of a birds bill 18Skilled 20If not 21Iridescent gem 22Sea 24Lazybones 25Wander 26Partly (prefix) 27From With Love 29Color 30Police action 32Certain sandwich, for short 34Melon, e.g. 36Mind 37Honest 38Old pleated collar 39Characteristic 41Flavoring plant 43Papa 44Kind of bowl or bunny 45Fought 47Whats more 49Fine-tune 52Silver dollar 53Redact 55Energy type 59Automobile part 60Expert 62Expensive 64City in Minnesota 65Innocent one 66Pucker 67Silos contents 69Cup rim 71Relative of an org. 72 tide 73Too quick 74Part of mph 75Fiery signal 77Pool-hall stick 78Noteworthy time 80Babble 82English university 84Candid 85Pennsylvania port 87Icy deposit 88Lane or Keaton 89Mark Twains Tom 90Ballerinas partner 92Scottish garments 93 bono 94Bit of information 96Seaman 97Pale color 99An article 102Paddy plant 104A twitching 105Distress cry 106Stomach 107Pitt or Paisley 108Leg joint 110Where Cuzco is 112Wraparound headgear 114Fry 115Fillmores predecessor 117Moist 119Midday 120Move uncontrolled 121Before long 123Combat vessel 125Ignoble 126Joke 129Set of clothes 131Pink color 132Desire 133Snake 136Designer Cassini 138Incandesce 140In favor of 141Liquid measure 142Department of Labor org. 143Pastry 145Yarn 147Edible portion 149French Foreign 151Flynn the actor 152Rara 153Give off 154Straying 155Circular current 156Dregs 157Properly 158Factors in heredity DOWN 1Spaghetti, ravioli, etc. 2Off-the-cuff (hyph.) 3Witch 4Ballyhoo 5 transit gloria mundi 6Letter stroke 7Clump 8 Today (newspaper) 9Tissue layer 10Unfriendly 11Mimic 12Sloping way 13Worked at 14Flowers petals 15Old coin 16Remainder 17Facilitated 19Driving force 23Foch or Simone 28Append 31Behind 33Statute 35Spot on a card 38Tricky maneuver 39Hackneyed 40Roosevelt or Pendergrass 42Stringed instrument 44Nobleman 45Domineering 46Expire 48Sal 49French cleric 50Lackluster 51Poem by Lewis Carroll 52Tumbrel 54Loftier 56Interpret wrongly 57Guarantee 58Hit with a stick 60Porridge 61Flightless bird 63Estuary 66Hoarder (2 wds.) 68Legendary king 70Gifted one 73Sharpened 74Magicians cry 75Neighbor of Ala. 76Banishment 79 as you go 80Brooch 81Rocky hill 83Obese 84Cooked cereal 85Inferred 86Farm animal 89Jack in a rhyme 91Orient 92Oven for bricks 95Extremity 97Early jazz 98 vital 100Detest 101Paradise 103Raines or Fitzgerald 105Rash-producing plant 106Cook 107Naked 109Years and years 111Crude 113Not damaged 114Obi 116Approximately 118Affirm openly 120Fortified place 122Nothing 124Marquee announcement, briefly 125Hopper 126Deity 127Winglike parts 128Literary category 130Complete 132Clever 133Chinese, e.g. 134Was radiant 135Trousers 137Encircle 139Word with shock or short 141Bucket 142Monster 144Turf 146Tell a tale 148Big bird 150Unit of work Sunday PUZZLER Back up for now with old flame (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers Wi c k e d T una Pi rate Problems (N) Wi c k e d T una Pi rate Problems (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Yes, DearYes, DearNick sGeorgeGeorgeFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 The Will: RevealedOprahs NextOprahs Next Chapter Lady Gaga. Oprahs NextOprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Law Order: CILaw Order: CI (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Powder (1995, Drama) Mary Steenburgen. (In Stereo) PG-13 Beastly (2011) Alex Pettyfer. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Mechanic (2011) Jason Statham. (In Stereo) R Botched (2007) Stephen Dorff. NR (SPEED) 732 112 732 SPEED Center (N) AMA Pro Racing Salt Lake City. My Classic Car Hard PartsHard PartsCar Warriors Nova (In Stereo) Car Warriors Thunderbird NASCAR Victory Lane (N) (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36 Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Mark Hamill. (In Stereo) PG Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) Mark Hamill. Luke and his allies have a confrontation with Darth Vader. (In Stereo) PG Jurassic Park III (STARZ) 370 271 370 Little Black Book (2004) Brittany Murphy. PG-13 Priest (2011) Paul Bettany. (In Stereo) PG-13 Magic City The Harder They Fall MA Magic City (In Stereo) MA View From the Top (2003) PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Captains TalesSportfishing TV Flats ClassShip Shape TV SportsmanFlorida Sport. Fishing the Flats Addictive Fishing Professional Tarpon Tournament Series Reel Animals G Israeli Bask. (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 Stealth (2005) Josh Lucas. Three pilots combat artificial intelligence. PG-13 Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) Harrison Ford. Indys hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail. Elektra (2005) PG-13 (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 The Longest Yard (2005) Meet the Fockers (2004) Robert De Niro. Meet the Fockers (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Merrills Marauders (1962, War) Jeff Chandler, Ty Hardin, Peter Brown. NR Sergeant York (1941, War) Gary Cooper, Walter Brennan, Joan Leslie. NR (DVS) Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) Martin Balsam. G (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings MythBusters Demolition Derby Special The team tests four automotive fables. PG MythBusters Gas mileage myth. PG MythBusters (In Stereo) PG (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Undercover BossUndercover BossUndercover BossSisterSisterGypsy WeddingSisterSister (TMC) 350 261 350 The Joy Luck Club (1993, Drama) Rosalind Chao. (In Stereo) R The Back-up Plan (2010) Jennifer Lopez. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Switch (2010) Jennifer Aniston. PG-13 The Ledge (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Braveheart (1995, Historical Drama) Mel Gibson. R Inglourious Basterds (2009, War) Brad Pitt, Mlanie Laurent. Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. R We Sldiers (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Planet 51 (2009, Comedy) PGAdvenAdvenVentureKing/HillKing/HillFam. GuyFam. GuyLoiter (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Extr. Terror RidesTop 5 GTop 5 GHotel Impossible GBggg Bggg Killer RV UpgradesExtreme Houseboats (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55JokersJokersJokersJokersJokersJokersJokersJokersClipaholicsForensicForensic (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Bad Boys II (2003, Action) Martin Lawrence. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. R G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. PG-13 Fast & Furious (2009) PG-13 (WE) 117 69 117 Bridezillas Natalie & Martina PG Bridezillas Martina is demanding. Bridezillas Michelle & Mia Bridezillas Michelle & Mia Bridezillas Mia & Maria Bridezillas Maria & Regina (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Law Order: CI30 RockMotherMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplayThe Unit PG SUNDAY EVENING MAY 27, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsDateline NBC PGHarrys Law PGAmericas Got TalentAmericas Got TalentNewsAccess # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6Medal of Honor (DVS) Hero From Bay Last Measure National Memorial Day Concert (2012) (N) G National Memorial Day Concert (2012) (In Stereo) G As Time Goes By As Time Goes By % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpAs Time...NOVA PGMemorial Day ConcertMemorial Day ConcertMI-5 Gas and Oil ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Dateline NBC (In Stereo) PG Harrys Law (Series Finale) (N) PG Americas Got Talent (In Stereo) Americas Got Talent (In Stereo) PG NewsPaid Program ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Duets The Superstars Greatest Hits The stars perform with their partners. PG Rookie Blue (In Stereo) NewsSports Night (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10Evening News 10 News (N) 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Blue Bloods Dedication The Good Wife Get a Room NYC 22 Self-Cleaning Oven 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N Subject to Blackout) (In Stereo Live) NewsThe Closer Search for a gang. 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosDuets The Superstars Greatest Hits PGRookie Blue NewsBrothers 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileStakel/ Terror Coral Ridge Hr Great AwakeningLove a Child G The Place for MiraclesDaniel Kolenda Jesse Duplantis Pastor Dayna Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Duets The Superstars Greatest Hits The stars perform with their partners. PG Rookie Blue (In Stereo) NewsGreys Anatomy @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order Black Tie Law & Order Pride and Joy PG Pretty in Pink (1986, RomanceComedy) Molly Ringwald, Jon Cryer. PG-13 F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Space Chimps (2008) G SeinfeldSeinfeldChrisChrisPaidWhackedBorn RideFaces H (WACX) TBN 21 21 In TouchRejoice in the LordPaidKingJourneyCreflo D.ConnecJim RaleyDaynaPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens Til Death PG Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Criminal Minds Solitary Man Without a Trace Rewind PG NUMB3RS Trust Metric PG The Unit Shadow Riders O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15The Comedy Shop The Comedy Shop Spy Games Crime Strike Your Citrus County CourtMusic Mix USA Music Mix USA The Cisco Kid G Black Beauty S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.NewsLaw & Order (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroNoche de EstrellasPremios TV y Novelas (SS)Sal y Pimienta Comed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 The Pelican Brief (1993) Julia Roberts. PG-13 The Open Road (2009) PG-13 Into the Blue (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Criminal Minds Hopeless Criminal Minds Mosley Lane Criminal Minds Memoriam Criminal Minds JJ (In Stereo) Criminal Minds Safe Haven Criminal Minds (In Stereo) (AMC) 55 64 55 Harts War (2002, War) Bruce Willis, Colin Farrell. Premiere. R The Killing Sayonara, Hiawatha The Killing Hours (N) Mad Men The Other Woman (N) The Pitch JDRF: Muse & Bozell (N) (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21River Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters (N) (In Stereo) PG Mermaids: The Body Found Half-man, half-fish, all conjecture. (N) (In Stereo) PG Mermaids: The Body Found PG (BET) 96 19 96 Why Did I Get Married? (2007) Tyler Perry. Why Did I Get Married? (2007, Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson. PG-13 The Game Lets Stay Together Lets Stay Together Lets Stay Together (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/OCDont BeDont BeDont BeDont BeDont BeDont BeHousewives/NJHousewives/NJ (CC) 27 61 27 33Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 South Park MA South Park MA (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 Son-inLaw Bio-Dome (1996, Comedy) Pauly Shore. (In Stereo) PG-13 In the Army Now (1994) Pauly Shore. A free-spirited slacker and his pal join the Army Reserve. PG Whiskey Business (2012) Pauly Shore. (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidInsanity!Sty Wall St.Dang. CubaThe FacebookJ. Crew andMarijuana: Industry (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Presents PGPiers MorganCNN Newsroom (N)CNN Presents PG (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Shake It Up! G Jessie G Jessie G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Shake It Up! G Austin & Ally G GoodCharlie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)Baseball Tonight (N)MLB Baseball Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves. (Live)SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49BaseballUpdateCollege SoftballUpdateCollege SoftballPoker (EWTN) 95 70 95 48Ben.CrossingSunday Night PrimeCatholic.SavoringG.K.RosaryD. HildebrandGod Bookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 The Princess and the Frog (2009, Comedy) Voices of Anika Noni Rose. G Beauty and the Beast (1991, Fantasy) Voices of Paige OHara. G Race to Witch Mountain (2009, Adventure) Dwayne Johnson. Premiere. PG (FLIX) 118 170 George Wash. Black and Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Cop (2005) R Scary Movie 2 (2001) Shawn Wayans. R Celtic Pride (1996) Damon Wayans. PG-13 Baadasssss! (2003) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee (N)Fox News SundayGeraldo at Large (N)Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersFood Network Star GCupcake ChampionsFood Network Star (N) GIron Chef AmericaMy. Din (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding CBR Hobbs. (Taped)RaceWorld Poker TourUFC Unleashed (N)Barfly (N)Game 365World Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Death at a Funeral (2010, Comedy) Keith David, Loretta Devine. R Hancock (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. PG-13 Hancock (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N)FehertyTop 10European PGA Tour Golf BMW PGA Championship, Final Round.Central (HALL) 39 68 39 45 54Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Bob Newhart Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 X-Men: First True Blood Hall Pass (2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis. (In Stereo) R Game of Thrones Blackwater MA Veep (N) MA Girls (N) MA Game of Thrones Blackwater MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 The Dilemma (2011) Vince Vaughn. Real Time With Bill Maher MA Taking Chance (2009, Drama) Kevin Bacon. NR Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011) Daniel Radcliffe. 24/7 Pacquiao (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHolmes on HomesBest of HolmesHolmes InspectionHolmes InspectionHolmes on Homes (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Murder in Greenwich (2002) Murder in the Hamptons (2005, Docudrama) Poppy Montgomery. Sex & Lies in Sin City: The Ted Binion Scandal (2008) Mena Suvari. NR Murder in the Hamptons (2005) (LMN) 50 119 The Quiet (2005, Suspense) Camilla Belle, Elisha Cuthbert. R Killshot (2009) Diane Lane. A couple flee a relentless assassin and his young partner. Carjacked (2011, Suspense) Maria Bello, Stephen Dorff, Catherine Dent. R (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Get Carter (2000, Suspense) Sylvester Stallone. (In Stereo) R Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. R American Wedding (2003) Jason Biggs. NR Dirty Blondes (MSNBC) 42 41 42 Caught on CameraCaught on CameraCaught on CameraTo Catch a PredatorPredator RawPredator Raw Puzzle answer is on Page A16. Todays MOVIES Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Men in Black (PG-13) 2:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. Men in Black (PG-13) In real 3D. 12 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. What To Expect When Youre Expecting (PG-13) 11:45 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Battleship (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. The Dictator (R) ID required. 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Dark Shadows (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Marvels The Avengers (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Men in Black (PG-13) In real 3D. 12 p.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 3:05 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 5:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 8:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m. 10:50 p.m. No passes. Men in Black (PG-13) 11:30 p.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes. Chernobyl Diaries (R) ID required. 11:45 p.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m. Battleship (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. What To Expect When Youre Expecting (PG-13) 11:50 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:05 p.m. The Dictator (R) ID required. 12:25 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Dark Shadows (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Marvels The Avengers (PG-13) Digital. 3 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Marvels The Avengers (PG-13) In real 3D. 11:40 a.m., 7 p.m. No passes. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information.

PAGE 15

Veterans NOTES Due to space considerations, the Veterans Notes sometimes contain only basic information regarding each post. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post, call or email that post at the contact listed. Sunshine Gardens Crystal River will host a seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 5, conducted by Gary Marriage, CEO of Nature Coast Financial and Operation: Veteran Aid in Crystal River. All are welcome. The seminar will cover helping wartime veterans and their spouses in getting financial assistance from the V.A. for at-home and assisted-living expenses. Call 352-563-0235 to RSVP, as space is limited. Light refreshments will be offered. Sunshine Gardens Crystal River is at 311 N.E. Fourth Ave., Crystal River, behind the Walgreens on the corner of State Road 44 and U.S. 19. Warrior Bridge a program developed by nonprofit agency ServiceSource, to meet the needs of wounded veterans. Through the Warrior Bridge program, ServiceSource provides employment services and supports to enhance independence and improve quality of life for wounded veterans as they reintegrate into civilian life. For more information, call employment specialist Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, of email charles. lawrence@servicesource.org. Visit the website at www. servicesource.org. The local Service Source office is at 2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Inverness Elks Lodge No. 2522 invites the public to join them on Memorial Day, May 28, for a pig roast fundraiser to support local veterans in nursing homes in the community, many of whom have only Elks members to count on to visit them and take them needed items. The fundraiser will include games and fun on the lake, as well as delicious food. Food will be served from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Tickets are $13.50. Donations and in-kind supplies of food or beverages would be appreciated. Call Jack Rife, chairman of the event, at 352-302-4793. Space is still available for the annual trip to Hawaii for veterans their families and friends scheduled for Feb. 21 through March 9, 2013. The trip, organized and led annually by U.S. Navy veteran Don McLean, includes tours, events and memorials services. Islands to be visited include Oahu, Kauai, Hawaii and Maui. For information or to sign up, call McLean at 352-637-5131 or email dmclean8@tampa bay.rr.com. The Old Homosassa Veterans Memorial opened with great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and is gearing up for Phase III. Purple Heart recipients are sought to be honored with centerpieces with their names on them. Call Shona Cook at 352422-8092. Phase III is open to all veterans and consists of a marker that has 64 spaces for $100, plus $2 for additional letters. Many families are putting multiple family members on a marker. Volunteers are needed to ensure the memorial grounds look presentable at all times. To help, call Shona at 352422-8092 or scook94@ tampabay.rr.com. Ex-military and retired military personnel are needed to assist the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the Coast Guard with non-military and non-law enforcement programs such as public education, vessel safety checks, safety patrols search and rescue, maritime security and environmental protection. Wear the Auxiliary uniform with pride and your military ribbons. Criminal background check and membership are required. Email Vince Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597-6961. HPH Hospice as a partnering agency with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), provides tailored care for veterans and their families. The program is provided in private homes, assisted living facilities and nursing homes, and staff is trained to provide Hospice care specific to illnesses and conditions unique to each military era or war. It also provides caregiver education and a recognition program to honor veterans services and sacrifices. HPH Hospice care and programs do not affect veterans benefits. For more information, call the Citrus Team Office at 352527-4600. The U.S. Air Force is looking for prior enlisted men and women from all services interested in both direct duty assignments in previously obtained career fields or retraining into select career fields. Some of the careers include aircraft electronics/mechanical areas, cyber operation fields, and various other specialties. Enlisted career openings that include the opportunities to retrain consist of special operations positions and unmanned aerial vehicle. Assignment locations are based on Air Force needs. For more information, call 352476-4915. Citrus County Veterans Coalition has a new building holding freezers, refrigerators and all necessary requirements to provide food to veterans in need. Food donations and volunteers are always welcomed and needed. The CCVC is on the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-400-8952. CCVC general meetings are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday monthly at the DAV building in Inverness. All active duty and honorably discharged veterans, their spouses, widows and widowers, along with other veterans organizations and current coalition members are welcome. Members are encouraged to attend general meetings. Annual membership donation is $10 for a calendar year or $25 for three years. The CCVC is a nonprofit corporation, and your donations are tax deductible. Current members should check their membership card for expiration dates, and renew with Gary Williamson at 352-527-4537, or at the meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. AMVETS William Crow Post 447 Inglis, is on State Road 40 East. For more information about the post and its activities, call 352-447-1816; email Amvet447@comcast.net. BlantonThompson American Legion Post 155, is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Doors open at 4 p.m. with dinner available; entertainment at 7 p.m. Dinners are Wednesdays and Fridays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The post will have a Memorial Day ceremony at 10 a.m. Monday, May 28. The public is welcome. For more information about the post and its activities, call Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at 352-302-6096, or email him at mklyap@gmail.com. Call the post at 352-795-6526. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155 meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of every month at the post. The American Legion Auxiliary is the worlds largest womens patriotic service organization with nearly 1 million members in 10,100 communities. The principles of the American Legion Auxiliary are to serve veterans, their families and the community. Eligibility in the Auxiliary is open to mothers, wives, sisters, daughters, granddaughters, great-granddaughters or grandmothers of members of the American Legion and of deceased veterans who served during war time (also stepchildren); stepchildren; and female veterans who served during war time. Call Unit President Sandy White at 352-249-7663, or membership chairman Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233. H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 Beverly Hills, offers meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and pool. Review the monthly newsletter for activities and updates, and call the post at 352746-0440. The VFW Post 10087 is off County Road 491, directly behind Superior Bank. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now available at the post; bring your laptop or any other item that will access the Internet and enjoy the free service. Friday night (June1) dinner will be baked ham from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $8. Memorial Day Services will be conducted at 11 a.m. Monday, May 28, at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Edward W. Penno Post 4864. P icnic follows at 11:30 a.m. Canteen open 10 a.m. The post is now a nonsmoking facility; smoking is allowed on the porch. Information regarding events is available at the post or call 352-465-4864. based in Erie, Pa., though it sails to other ports during the summer; a schedule can be found at www.flagshipniagara.org/. Northwest Pennsylvania also just launched the Perry 200 Commemoration with flag-raisings at 150 sites in the region; 30 events are planned over the next 18 months, www.perry200.com. Ohio is home to a 352-foot monument, Perrys Victory and International Peace Memorial, which towers over Lake Erie on South Bass Island in Put-in-Bay, www.nps.gov/pevi/. Events there include education programs, May 22 to 24, a Re-Declaration of War, June 18, and a birthday party for Perry, Aug. 18 and 19. Fort Meigs, in nearby Perrysburg, Ohio, is a War of 1812 battlefield with a reconstructed fort; it marks the 199th anniversary of a siege from the war May 26 and 27. On Lake Ontario in New York, important locations connected to the War of 1812 include Sackets Harbor, N.Y., where a major U.S. naval base fended off a British attack in 1813, www.sacketsharborbattlefield.org/, and Old Fort Niagara, which was a base for the U.S. invasion of Canada but was captured by the British in 1813. A ceremony marking the bicentennial of the declaration of war is scheduled for F ort Niagara June 16, http://oldfortniagara.org/events. Lake Champlain The British also sought to control Lake Champlain, but they were thwarted by an unexpected American victory in Plattsburgh, N.Y., in September 1814. The town is scheduling re-enactments, lectures and other events starting later this year, www.champlain1812.com. For more information, the website at www.visit1812.com lists many events and historic sites connected to the War of 1812. Canada is also hosting major commemorations of the bicentennial, including a War of 1812 Heritage Trail, www.discover 1812.com, and ongoing living history programs at Fort Malden, in Amherstburg, Ontario, 20 miles from Detroit, www.pc.gc.ca/ lhn-nhs/on/malden/index.aspx. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 A15 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com ( 352 ) 726-6623 000BIAX ac cent travel SINCE 1972 Your Next Adventure Is Waiting For You! WARContinued from Page A13 See VETERANS / Page A16 000BLCV (352) 527-8855 3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.com ST 35415 DAY TRIP July 26, 2012 Tampa Aquarium & Dolphin Encounter Cruise Seniors $71.50 Adults $76.50 Child $68.50 3-12 yrs Las Vegas FREE Nights, Shows, Room Upgrades, and More in Las Vegas! Las Vegas Featured Hotel Offers Wynn Las Vegas One Night FREE!** 3-night minimum stay is required. The Mirage Up to 2 Complimentary Show Tickets!* 3-night minimum stay is required. Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Save 25% on the Hotel + Complimentary Room Upgrade + 2 Club Passes Per Night!** Room upgrade based on availability. Passes only valid Friday Sunday. Treasure Island TI One Night FREE + Over $100 in Added Values!** Only valid for arrivals Sunday through Friday. 3-night minimum stay is required. Mention promo code F4ALLSUM Save up to $125 ($25 per night) promotion code savings apply for Las Vegas flight + hotel vacation packages. Savings reflected in package price when using promotion code F4ALLSUM. Must stay 5 or more nights to get the full $125 savings. Promotion code intended for redemption by individual consumer only. Savings valid if booked 5/18/12 6/7/12 by 6:00 p.m. CT for travel 5/19/12 8/31/12 000B376 000BLBI Casino Tours Cruises Vacations Call for dates & details. 352-597-4822 Toll Free: 1-877-604-4822 4 Days, 3 Nights Sunday Departures Imperial Place $ 169 pp/dbl Visit 2 Casinos, $55 Free Play, 2 Meal Coupons Beau Rivage $ 179 pp/dbl BILOXI GAMBLING GETAWAY Cruise the Victory Ship $ 35 pp A Fun Day at Hard Rock-TPA $ 20 pp CASINO DAY TRIPS ESCAPE OVERNIGHT Immokalee Casino $ 99 pp/dbl CRUISE YOUR VALENTINE CARNIVAL DREAM Feb. 9-16, 2013 Taking Reservations Now Prices subject to change. Reservation Suggested 352-795-5797 www.crystalriverdivers.com 000BB3W S ummer S pecials Spectacular $ 125 Midweek Pontoon Special Full day rental 9am-4pm Monday Thru Friday SCENIC BOAT TOURS $15 Adults $10 Kids 12 & Under Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River GREAT GETAWAY 749295 000BLG9

PAGE 16

Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at the chapter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on the corner of Independence Highway and Paul Drive. We thank veterans for their service and welcome any disabled veteran to join us from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or Thursday at the chapter hall. This is also the time that we accept donated nonperishable foods for our continuing food drive. Our main function is to assist disabled veterans and their families when we are able. Anyone who knows a disabled veteran or their family who requires assistance is asked to call Commander Richard Floyd at 727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207, or 352344-3464. Service Officer Joe McClister is available to assist any veteran or dependents with their disability claim by appointment. Call 352-344-3464 and leave a message. For more information about chapter activities, veterans benefits or membership, Call Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave a message, if desired, should the machine answer. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70 meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month at the chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41 north, Independence Boulevard and Paul Drive, Inverness. Membership has expanded to include many more who are eligible to join. For more information or to donate items, call Commander Linda Brice at 352560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage at 352-341-5334. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Ladies Auxiliary is at 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call the post at 352-3443495 for information about all weekly post activities, or visit www.vfw4337.org. The American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Post and auxiliary meet the first Wednesday of the month. The next meeting will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 6. Dinner will not be served. Dunnellon Young Marines will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 5. The public is welcome at bingo at 6 p.m. Thursdays. The Memorial Day Service will be conducted at 11 a.m. Monday, May 28. A picnic will follow. The outdoor flea market and pancake breakfast will resume in September. For information about activities and the post, call Carl Boos at 352-489-3544. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets the second Saturday monthly at the DAV building at 1039 N. Paul Drive in Inverness. The next meeting is at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 9. All are welcome on July 7 at the sixth annual Independence Day Golf sponsored by Rolling Thunder. Visit the website at www.rollingthunderfl7.com for more information about the group, as well as information about past and future events. Rolling Thunder would be happy to provide a speaker for your next meeting or event. Call club President Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by email him at ultraray1997 @yahoo.com. A Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit meets at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday monthly at the VFW in Beverly Hills. New members are welcome. Membership fee is $30 a year. Female relatives ages 16 or older who are a wife, widow, mother, stepmother, sister, daughter, stepdaughter, grandmother, granddaughter, aunt or daughter-in-law of honorably discharged Marines and FMF Corpsmen are eligible to belong to the Marine Corps League. Female Marines (former, active and reserves) and associate members are eligible for MCLA membership. Call President Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400 or Secretary/Treasurer Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 for information. Hunger and Homeless Coalition Anyone who knows of a homeless veteran in need of food, haircut, voter ID, food stamps, medical assistance or more blankets is asked to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger and Homeless Coalition at 352-3820876, or pass along this phone number to the veteran. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send emails to vfw4252@ tampabay.rr.com. Everyone is welcome. Post and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m. every second Thursday. Post honor guard is available for funerals, flag raisings and nursing home visits. The public is welcome to the Friday night dinner and dance at 5 p.m. See our post activities: Google us as VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189 is on West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012 for information. VFW membership is open to men and women veterans who have participated in an overseas campaign, including service in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Korean Campaign medal remains open, as well. Call the post at the phone number above for information. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. For information about the post and its activities, call 352-637-0100. Friday is AUCE fish or threepiece chicken for $7. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza, invites all eligible veterans and their families to visit our post and consider joining our Legion family: American Legion, Sons of the American Legion (SAL), or American Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor Guard accepting volunteers. Visit the post for printed schedule or visit the website at www.post237.org. For information, call the post at 352746-5018. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at the VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly. Any veteran who has seen honorable service in any of the Armed Forces of the U.S. is eligible for membership if said service was within Korea, including territorial waters and airspace, at any time from Sept. 3, 1945, to the present or if said service was outside of Korea from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955. For information, call Hank Butler at 352-5632496, Neville Anderson at 352344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77 meet the first Thursday monthly at the Inverness Highlands Civic Center at 4375 Little Al Point Road, Inverness. Call Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at 352-860-2981 or Auxiliary president Marie Cain at 352-637-5915 for information about the post and auxiliary. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at the American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Visitors and interested parties are always welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-7265926. American Legion Post 166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Saturday monthly at the Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility on Veterans Drive, Homosassa, on the west side of U.S. 19 at Dixons Auto Sales across from HarleyDavidson. We meet in the small building to the left of the main building. All former and current post members, as well as all interested veterans, are cordially invited to be a part of American Legion Post 166. The post will meet Monday, June 4, at the Olive Tree Restaurant on U.S. 19 south of Crystal River. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7 p.m. Dinner consists of prime rib, mixed vegetables, soup or salad, and an appetizer. This meeting is open to all veterans. To attend, send your reservation along with a check of $12 made out to American Legion Post 166 and mail it to P.O. Box 767, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447-0767. For information about the post or the American Legion, call and leave a message for the post commander at 352697-1749. Your call will be returned within 24 to 48 hours. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 welcomes all Seabees and Honeybees to its monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Country Club, Rose and Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 conducts its meetings at 7 p.m. the second Thursday monthly at the American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For more information about the 40/8, call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-7461959; or visit us on the Web at www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of January, March, May, July, September and November. All combat-wounded veterans, lineal descendants, next of kin, spouses and siblings of Purple Heart recipients are cordially invited to attend and to join the ranks of Chapter 776. To learn more about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the chapters website at www. citruspurpleheart.org or call 352382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 will conduct its regular meeting at 7 p.m. the third Wednesday monthly at DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North. All Marines are welcome. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Superior Bank. Social hour follows. All Marines and FMF Corpsmen are welcome. Meet new friends and discuss past glories. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698 is at 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. The Mens Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday. LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and the membership meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday at the post. Call the post at 352-4473495 for information about the post and its activities. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the third Thursday monthly at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352344-0727. American Legion Herbert Surber Post 225 meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday monthly at the New Testament Baptist Church of Floral City, 9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral Park, southeast side. All eligible veterans are welcome to join. Landing Ship Dock (LSD) sailors meet at Dennys in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meetings for 2012 will be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill on the following dates: Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.A16 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE VETERANS Continued from Page A15 Sundays PUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A14. 000BI07 000BJ64

PAGE 17

Auto racing/ B2 Dr. Ron Joseph/ B2 Recreation briefs/ B3 Sports briefs/ B4 TV, lottery/ B4 Golf, tennis/ B5 NBA/ B5 Entertainment/ B6 Jason Dufner holds slim lead over Zach Johnson after Saturdays third round at the Colonial./ B5 S PORTS Section B SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Driver led for last 67 laps during Nationwide win Associated PressCONCORD, N.C. Brad Keselowski won the NASCAR Nationwide Series event at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday, leading the final 67 laps to give Penske Racing a winning start on auto racings biggest weekend. Keselowski raced to his first Nationwide victory of the year. Hell try to double up in Sprint Cups longest race of the season, the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday night. In between comes the Indy 500, a race that owner Roger Penskes cars have won 15 times. Penske driver Ryan Briscoe will start from the pole there Sunday. Penske Racing has three shots at winning races this weekend, Keselowski said. Were one for one. Dont bet against more Penske wins this weekend. The teams other drivers in Indianapolis, Will Power and Helio Castroneves, start fifth and sixth. Power has won three times already this year, and Castroneves is a threetime Indy winner. Im happy for Penske, Keselowski said. One way or another, the checkered flag at Penske Racing is going to fly this week. Keselowski led the way as Sprint Cup drivers took the top four spots. Denny Hamlin was second, followed by Kyle Busch and Kevin Harvick, last years Coca-Cola 600 champion. Nationwide points leader Ricky Stenhouse Jr. had driveshaft problems and finished 26th. Danica Patrick started the race in third, yet slid to 13th. Shell also race Sunday night after spending her past seven Memorial Day weekends driving in Indianapolis. For a while, it looked as if Keselowski might relive the last-lap, Keselowski starts weekend with victory for Penske Associated Press Kevin Harvick (33) and Brad Keselowski (22) chase then-leader Kasey Kahne (38) during the Nationwide Series History 300 auto race Saturday in Concord, N.C. See PENSKE / Page B4 Red Soxs comeback shocks Rays Rodney blows save as Tampa Bay loses 3-2 to Boston Associated PressBOSTON Jarrod Saltalamacchia had a pinch-hit, two-run homer off Fernando Rodney with one out in the ninth inning to lift the Boston Red Sox to a 3-2 win over the Tampa Bay Rays on Saturday night. Daniel Nava walked to open the ninth and Nick Punto sacrificed before Saltalamacchia lofted a high drive to right-center for Bostons 11th win in 15 games. Rodney (2-1) had converted his first 15 save chances. Rich Hill (1-0) worked one inning for the win. A night after the teams had a testy benches-clearing scrum in the ninth inning that turned into an exchange of words between the managers that lingered into Saturday, the teams played a taught game highlighted by the pitching of aces Josh Beckett and David Price and a throw by B.J. Upton. Bostons Beckett and Tampa Bays Price each pitched seven impressive innings. Ben Zobrist hit a sacrifice fly and Luke Scott then put the Rays up 2-1 in the seventh with an RBI single. Tampa Bay had its threegame winning streak snapped. Will Middlebrooks drove in Bostons first run with a sixth-inning single. But before that Upton made a strong throw home to nail Dustin Pedroia at the plate. Price scattered eight hits seven singles struck out five and walked three in a 115-pitch effort. Despite pregame accusations by Boston manager Bobby Valentine that the Rays coaches were unprofessional for their actions and that they were agitating, aggravating, and instigating the situation, this game had no sign of Associated Press Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price throws in the first inning Saturday against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. Pros converge on CR race Brockett gains PR at Memorial Day Triathlon L ARRYB UGG CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Bob Brockett was practically floating on air Saturday morning at Fort Island Gulf Beach. The 57-year-old Lecanto resident just finished the Crystal River Memorial Day Sprint 1 with a personal best time of 1:09.25.8. Considering Brockett helped start the local triathlon series years ago, this is a major achievement. The sun was at his back. If he had had a theme song playing, it would have been Oh What a Beautiful Morning. His wife, Claudia, and daughter, Calli, also raced. Calli is a student at the University of Florida. The weather was perfect, Bob Brockett said. It was great. The only sad part for him was that he couldnt use the time to beat his long-time friendly competitor, Dunnellons Robbie Stevens. Robbie Stevens is worthless and weak, Brockett jokingly said, quoting a line from the movie Animal House. Maybe next time, Stevens can run with Brockett and Brockett can get an even better time. The field featured several professional triathletes. Mitchell Kibby won the race with a time of 57:38.3. Kibby lives in Groveland and trains in Clermont but is originally from Australia. I absolutely loved the course, Kibby said. Its a good, hard course. John Hovius, who trains triathletes in Clermont, was the masters winner and third overall. He had a time of 1:02:11.7. One pro, Kaitlin Shiver, 22, of Melbourne, ran the race as an exhibition. She recently qualified for the Olympic See RACE / Page B4 Boston pushes past Philly to reach East finals Associated PressBOSTON Rajon Rondo had 18 points, 10 assists and 10 rebounds and the BostonCelticsbeat the Philadelphia 76ers 85-75 in Game 7 on Saturday night to advance to the Eastern Conference finals. TheCelticswill open the third round of the NBA playoffs in Miami against the Heat on Monday night. Rondo scored nine straight Boston points, helping theCelticsturn a three-point edge into a double-digit lead after Paul Pierce fouled out with 4:16 left in the game. Andre Iguodala scored 18 points, and Elton Brand and Jrue Holiday had 15 apiece for the 76ers, who eliminated the top-seeded Chicago Bulls in the first round but couldnt do the same with theCeltics. Kevin Garnett had 18 points and 13 rebounds, and Ray Allen hit a pair of fourth-quarter 3-pointers after missing his first five attempts. Pierce had 15 points and nine rebounds before fouling out. Thats when Rondo took over. The point guard, rebounding from his worst performance of the playoffs in Game 6, scored on a baseline drive and followed it up with a long 2pointer (originally scored a 3) with 2:47 left. Then he made a 3-pointer with a little more than 2 minutes left to make it a 10-pont game and, after Brand scored on a tip-in, Rondo went to the line as the crowd chanted M-V-P! M-V-P! and hit a pair of free throws to leave Boston with an 80-70 Associated Press Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce drives against Philadelphia 76ers forward Elton Brand during the first quarter of Game 7 in the NBA Eastern Conference semifinal playoff series Saturday in Boston. See SHOCK / Page B4 See NBA / Page B4 More baseball For the Rays box score, please see Page B4. For all of Saturdays other MLB action, please see Page B3.

PAGE 18

B2 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS An athletes salute on Memorial Day T he commitment to the military in defense of the United States has always been a long-standing and cherished part of the American athlete. Many have joined the armed forces at the pinnacle of their professional careers. John Napier, winner of gold and silver medals in the 2009 Bobsled World Cup, who has been bobsledding since he was eight and also competed at the 2010 Winter Olympics, decided after serving a tour of duty in Afghanistan to retire from sport and represent the country in another way as part of a special forces unit. I love it. I just love the military and the brotherhood and the camaraderie soldiers have for each other, Napier said. The world of athletics kind of gets a little selfish at times Although it was prideful, its also very, very humbling to know that I was there amongst the worlds best. Napier was a sergeant in the Vermont National Guard and was deeply affected after volunteering for a five-month tour in Afghanistan following the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. He will be joining a special operations unit. He notes, I never got the taste of selflessness that I did in Afghanistan. There is not a morning that I dont wake up and miss it. Among the most memorable was Pat Tillman, an Army Ranger who was killed in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004. Tillman had played safety for four seasons with the Arizona Cardinals, making Sports Illustateds firstteam all-pro team in 2000. After the 2001 season, he decided to enlist in the Army following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. Cleveland Indiana pitcher Bob Feller was the first major leaguer to volunteer for active duty on December 9, 1941, two days after Pearl Harbor. Boxer Joe Louis enlisted in 1942 and Yogi Berra was a Navy gunners mate. The Pittsburgh Steelers Rocky Bleier at the end of his 1968 rookie season, volunteered for service in Vietnam. After being hit by shrapnel from a grenade in his right leg, Bleier returned to the Steelers in 1971 and was an integral part of the Steelers four Super Bowl championship teams. Hank Greenberg was drafted in 1940, classified as 4F being listed as physically unfit for duty because of flat feet. Not taking no for an answer, he volunteered for the Air Force, where he served in China, Burma and India. He served in the prime of his career Greenberg, a first baseman, finished his Hall of Fame career with 331 home runs in just 5,193 at bats. Warren Spahn, the Braves pitcher, was awarded the Purple Heart and a Bronze Star for hisduty as a combat engineeer in World War II. Roger Staubach, the 1963 Heisman Trophy winner and quarterback of the U.S. Naval Academy team, volunteered to go to Vietnam after graduation. Ted Williams, considered by many to be baseballs greatest hitter ever, served a total of nearly five years in World War II and the Korean War during the prime of his major league career. Bob Kalsu had been an All-America tackle at the University of Oklahoma and an eighth-round draft pick by Buffalo in 1968. He started eight games at guard in 1968 and was the Bills top rookie. Kalsu was killed in action in Vietnam. Currently the same cannot be said of at least the major professional sports leagues, the NBA, NFL, PGA or MSL to name a few. Some recent graduates of military academies, Caleb Campbell of the Lions and Eric Kettni of New England, noted their need to play ball was greater than their obligation to the contract with their respective military services. Both eventually did serve and are the only two NFL players as of October 2011 to be in or have served in the military. The list is even shorter for the NBA. David Robinson, a star at the Naval Academy, spent a couple years in the service as a civil engineering officer at the Naval Submarine Base in Georgia before moving on to the NBA. Connie Norman played for Arizona and several NBA teams before joining the Army. Tomorrow, Memorial Day, we honor those Americans who have served and defended us, the American people. Thanks to three of my boys who have and are serving and especially to our one guy currently in Afghanistan. He notes it is easier to run a sub-four minute mile than be a Seal. Arf! Arf! Thank You!Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and shoulder orthopedic specialist at SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute can be reached at rbjhand@cox.net or 352-212-5359. Dr. Ron Joseph DOCTORS ORDERS Recreation BRIEFS Go to the game with squadronThe Crystal River Sail and Power Squadron, affiliated with the United States Sail and Power Squadron, will host a day trip Thursday, July 19, to Tropicana Field to support the Tampa Bay Rays in a game against the Cleveland Indians. The $45 price includes bus and ticket for Press Level seating. For more information, call Norm Overfield at 352-586-8620. The United States Sail and Power Squadrons and their local affiliates promote safer boating through education. Citrus Y expands group exerciseThe Citrus County YMCA now offers its Group Exercise program at First United Methodist Church in Homosassa, the Ys westside venue for health and wellness classes. Currently, there are Pilates, cardio interval, and stability and strength classes offered. For more information about the YMCA Group Exercise program, call the office at 352-637-0132. Financial assistance is available to all those who qualify. The YMCA office is in Beverly Hills at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway, and is open noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Whispering Pines Park offers tennis lessonsWhispering Pines Park offers tennis lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Preregistration and pre-payment are required at the park office. Fee for lessons is $100 for four hours, or $30 per hour. Times are arranged with the instructor. Call 352-726-3913 for registration and information. Whispering Pines also offers racquetball lessons. Call for information. Learn to stretch with Parks & Rec Citrus County Parks & Recreation offers a low-impact stretching class. This ongoing class will be from 10 to 11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Community Center. Cost is $5 per class. The low-impact class is easy, fun with good benefits. Stretching helps to make you more flexible and regular stretching will help mobility and balance. This helps to slow down the onset of common degenerative conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Stretching increases physical and mental relaxation and reduces the risk of joint sprain, muscle strain or back problems. Low-impact exercises can improve health and fitness without harming weight-bearing joints. Research suggests that moderate-intensity, low-impact activity is just as effective as high-impact activity in lowering the risk of heart disease. For more information, visit www.citruscountyparks.com and click on instructional classes, or call 352-465-7007. Jazzercise at West Citrus community center Citrus County Parks & Recreation offers Jazzercise at West Citrus Community Center. The 60-minute class includes a warm-up, high-energy aerobic routines, muscle toning and cool-down stretch segment. One-hour classes are offered at 5:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Unlimited monthly ticket is $25. Call 352-465-7007 or visit www.citruscountyparks.com. Zumba at Citrus SpringsCitrus County Parks & Recreation offers Zumba classes with instructor Lynn DaSilva at Citrus Springs Community Center. Zumba is a fitness program designed with exciting Latin and international dance rhythms. No membership or contracts. Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Cost is $5. For more information, visit www.citruscountyparks.com or call 352-465-7007. Zumba offered at Dunnellon churchZumba, the Latin-inspired dance-fitness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday afternoons at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St. Call 352-489-3021. Club offers Zumba lessons Yankeetown/Inglis Womans Club is offering Zumba classes in air-conditioned comfort from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Everyone is welcome. For information, call 352-447-2057. Yoga at canning centerCitrus County Parks & Recreation offers yoga with Laura Boetto from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays and Fridays at the Canning Center in Lecanto. Yoga improves flexibility and balance, increases energy, strengthens and tones muscles and reduces stress. Cost is $6 per class; $20 monthly. No pre-registration required. For more information, visit www.citruscountyparks.com or call 352-465-7007. Shuffleboard Club invites public Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Fridays and at 1 p.m. Wednesdays at Floral Park in Floral City. It is a great opportunity to meet people in the community, and get some light exercise. We welcome all newcomers. Yearly dues are $3 per person, and there is no need to purchase any equipment. Call the vice president of the Floral City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause, at 352-726-0670. Registration for Learn to Fish class openRegistration is open for the Learn To Fish class for boys and girls ages 10 through 18 taking place at the Crystal River Preserve State Park meeting room on Monday, June 4 and Tuesday, June 5, from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. both days. The cost is $20 per student, and kids age 10 and 11 must be accompanied by an older sibling or adult (no charge for the adult). This is a basic fishing class, intended to impart the knowledge to get a beginner starting in the sport of fishing, taught by the author of an award-winning book on fishing Floridas inshore waters. For more information, call 352-794-0414 or email rgschmidt@embarqmail.com. Panthers holding alumni flag football game Lecanto High School is hosting the Lecanto Alumni Flag Football game at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 8. The game will be 8-on-8 and is open to any Lecanto football varsity letterman who graduated from the high school. Teams will be odd graduation years vs. even graduation years. Players wishing to participate will be charged a $50 fee, which will include a jersey to play in and keep. For fans, admission is $2. Call Lecanto head football coach McKinley Rolle at 352-746-2344, ext. 4244 for more information. Nature Coast Soccer now accepting registrationThe Nature Coast Soccer Club, an official Florida Youth Soccer Association Region C League will have competitive travel league registration and tryouts for both Boys teams (Under 10 through Under 18) and Girls Teams (Under 10 through Under 18) on the following dates: Tuesday, May 29: 5:30-7:30 p.m. (boys and girls teams in all age groups except U-16 boys). Wednesday, May 30: 5:30-7:30 p.m. (girls teams only, all age groups). Thursday, May 31: 5:30-7:30 p.m. (boys and girls teams, all age groups). Friday, June 1: 5:30-7:30 p.m. (boys teams only, all age groups). Saturday, June 2: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (U-16 boys); 12-2 p.m. (U-12 & U-14 boys). Tryouts will be held at the NCSC Fields at the Central Ridge District Park. All prospective players must wear proper soccer attire, including shin guards and will need to bring their own supply of water. For more information, please call Mike Penn at 352-489-0160, Mike Deem at 352-302-0793 or go to www.naturecoastsoccer.com. Andrettis heartache Driver looks to wipe away bad Indy memories Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS Marco Andretti knows how much heartache his family has suffered at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He needs no reminders that IndyCar could use an American superstar, and with his famous last name, he is quite aware of the hope that maybe he can be the one to elevate this attention-starved series. None of that matters to Andretti as he heads into the Indianapolis 500. He believes he can win Sundays race its going to be our race to lose, he said and he wants it, badly. But Andretti wants it for himself, for his own career, and not because of what it would mean to his family or for IndyCar. Mario Andretti won in 1969, and no Andretti has done it again in 65 starts, and many of those races were devastating near-misses. Thats not my approach to the event. My approach is I want to win our Super Bowl, Andretti said. I put that pressure on myself. I dont want to do it because he did it and my dad didnt, thats all bonus. Do I think we can? Youre darn right. The 96th running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing is the most wide-open race in a very long time. Engine competition for the first time in six years and the introduction of a new car has widened the pool of potential winners, and theres no clear favorite. I think were going to see the best race weve had in at least a decade, said Roger Penske, winner of 15 Indy 500s and the team owner of pole-sitter Ryan Briscoe. Penske is undefeated this season, as Helio Castroneves and points leader Will Power have combined to win the first four races. And with Chevrolet power, Penske drivers have swept all five poles so far this season. So it seemed to be business as usual on pole day, when Chevrolet clearly had the edge. The team put nine drivers inside the top 10, and all six of the full-time entries were from Penske and Andretti Autosport. Then came Carb Day, and the Hondas came to life. Chip Ganassi teammates Dario Franchitti and Scott Dixon led the leaderboard, with Andretti landing third on the final speed chart as the fastest Chevy driver. Maybe some sandbagging? Franchitti wondered as Andretti slid into the seat next to him following their final on-track session before the race. Do you really think were all going to show what we can do? Associated Press IndyCar driver Marco Andretti, left, talks with a member of his crew as his grandfather and 1969 Indy 500 champion Mario Andretti, center, looks on following the final day of practice Friday for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The 96th running of the race is Sunday. Dale Jr. hopes for better result Racer wants strong finish at Sundays Coca-Cola 600 Associated PressCONCORD, N.C. At first Dale Earnhardt Jr. was relieved he didnt fall further back than seventh at last years Coca-Cola 600. Then he realized what he had lost for just about a gallon of gas. After a while, you start thinking about, Oh, yeah, we really came close to winning a race, Earnhardt said this week. It was really unfortunate there wasnt just a little bit more gas in the car. If there were, Earnhardt wouldnt have faced an additional years worth of questions about why he hasnt won a Sprint Cup race since 2008 at Michigan. The drought has grown to 140 races and is a focal point at every track or appearance by Earnhardt. Ive said it all year long, he says, that I think were a little bit better than we were last year. It looked like Earnhardt was the best at Charlotte Motor Speedway a year ago when he broke free on a late restart to take the lead. He got the white flag just fine, then ran out of gas on the front straightaway and coasted through he final turn before Kevin Harvick passed him for the win. Harvick said afterwards he felt so stinking bad for Earnhardt because he knew how much the Hendrick Motorsports driver wanted to win. The fans roared when Earnhardt, voted the sports most popular driver the past nine years, moved in front and were equally stunned when his tank ran dry. Earnhardt was grateful to hang on to seventh as he thought about his position in the year-end championship chase. Then the disappointment of what happened swept over him. I was really unfortunate there wasnt just a little bit more gas in the car or whatever to get us to victory lane because that wouldve been a great way to cap off a pretty good weekend, Earnhardt said. So it was a bit frustrating over time. Martin Truex Jr., who hasnt won since 2007, finished 26th in last years race and understood what his fellow driver was going through. It takes so much, Truex said, to get into position that to have it snatched away so close to the finish line is maddening. Coming off turn four and running out of gas is about the absolute worst way to lose a race, Truex said. I definitely felt for him there. Associated Press Dale Earnhardt Jr. watches from the garage during Thursdays practice for Sundays Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.

PAGE 19

B ASEBALLC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Yankees 9, Athletics 2New YorkOakland abrhbiabrhbi Jeter ss4122JWeeks 2b5120 Grndrs cf4000Crisp cf3000 AlRdrg dh3001Reddck rf4111 Cano 2b5331JGoms dh4011 Teixeir 1b5245Dnldsn 3b4000 Ibanez lf5000KSuzuk c2000 Wise lf0000Pnngtn ss4000 Swisher rf5120Rosales 1b3000 ErChvz 3b4120Cowgill lf4030 CStwrt c3110 Totals389149Totals33272 New York0111300129 Oakland1010000002 EPennington (5). DPOakland 1. LOB New York 7, Oakland 8. 2BCano (17), Swisher (13), Er.Chavez (4). HRCano (7), Teixeira 2 (8), Reddick (13). CSGranderson (3). SC.Stewart, Crisp. SFAl.Rodriguez. IPHRERBBSO New York Sabathia W,6-2772224 Wade100002 Eppley100010 Oakland Colon L,4-5696603 Norberto100020 Godfrey253201 HBPby Godfrey (Jeter). PBC.Stewart.White Sox 14, Indians 7 ClevelandChicago abrhbiabrhbi Choo rf3210De Aza cf5001 Brantly cf4113Bckhm 2b5110 Kipnis 2b4224A.Dunn dh5220 JoLopz dh4000Konerk 1b4342 Ktchm 1b4010Lillirdg pr-1b0100 Damon lf4000Rios rf5333 Hannhn 3b4000Przyns c5221 J.Diaz ss3100Viciedo lf5235 Marson c3110AlRmrz ss4020 OHudsn 3b4000 Totals33767Totals 42 14 17 12 Cleveland0050200007 Chicago40400042x14 EKotchman (2), J.Diaz (1). LOBCleveland 1, Chicago 5. 2BBrantley (15), A.Dunn (10), Konerko 3 (13), Rios (8), Pierzynski (7). HR Kipnis 2 (8), Rios (4), Viciedo (10). SB Al.Ramirez (4), O.Hudson (1). IPHRERBBSO Cleveland D.Lowe L,6-321-3108803 Accardo22-310003 Hagadone100001 J.Smith144311 Sipp122201 Chicago Peavy W,6-161-367719 Thornton H,72-300000 Crain100000 Ohman100001 HBPby Peavy (Choo).Tigers 6, Twins 3DetroitMinnesota abrhbiabrhbi Berry cf5111Span cf4221 Dirks lf4222Revere rf4030 MiCarr 3b4122Mauer dh4010 Fielder 1b4041Wlngh lf4000 DYong dh4000Mornea 1b4111 Boesch rf3000Dozier ss4000 Kelly rf0000ACasill 2b4000 JhPerlt ss4010Butera c3000 Avila c4110JCarrll 3b3010 RSantg 2b4110 Totals366126Totals34382 Detroit2000400006 Minnesota1100010003 EDozier (4). DPDetroit 1, Minnesota 4. LOBDetroit 4, Minnesota 4. 2BDirks 2 (9), Mi.Cabrera (9), Span (13). HRSpan (1), Morneau (9). IPHRERBBSO Detroit Scherzer W,4-351-363309 Dotel H,612-300004 Benoit H,11120002 Valverde S,8-10100001 Minnesota Pavano L,2-441-3106602 Duensing22-310013 Burton110001 Perkins100002Royals 4, Orioles 3 Kansas CityBaltimore abrhbiabrhbi Dyson cf1000Avery lf5000 Maier ph-cf4010Hardy ss5131 AEscor ss5000Markks rf4000 Butler dh5121AdJons cf4110 Mostks 3b5110Wieters c2001 Francr rf4020C.Davis 1b4121 AGordn lf3000Betemt 3b2010 Giavtll 2b3120NJhnsn dh4000 Hosmer 1b4132Andino 2b3010 Quinter c4011 Totals384124Totals33383 Kansas City0000111104 Baltimore0120000003 DPKansas City 1, Baltimore 1. LOBKansas City 9, Baltimore 9. 2BFrancoeur (12), Giavotella (2), Hosmer (7), Quintero (10). 3B Ad.Jones (2). HRButler (10), Hardy (10), C.Davis (8). SBAd.Jones (8). SFWieters. IPHRERBBSO Kansas City F.Paulino52-353355 Collins2-310002 G.Holland W,1-2100001 Mijares H,52-310000 Broxton S,9-11110000 Baltimore W.Chen662215 ODay BS,1-1131102 Strop L,3-2131111 Ayala100000Rangers 8, Blue Jays 7, 13 innings TorontoTexas abrhbiabrhbi YEscor ss7020Kinsler 2b5220 Rasms cf6112Andrus ss4211 Bautist rf6120Hamltn cf-lf6123 Encrnc dh6010Beltre 3b5021 Arencii c6011MYong dh6010 Thams lf5110DvMrp lf2010 RDavis lf1000Gentry ph-cf2000 Lawrie 3b6220N.Cruz rf6111 Cooper 1b5121Torreal c5111 YGoms 1b1000Morlnd 1b4131 Vizquel 2b6132Napoli ph-1b2000 Totals557156Totals478148 Toronto 000 022 100 000 2 7 Texas200 003 000 000 3 8 No outs when winning run scored. ELawrie (7), Thames (1), N.Cruz (1). DP Toronto 2, Texas 1. LOBToronto 10, Texas 13. 2BBautista (5), Thames (7), Kinsler (14), Andrus (10). HRRasmus (4), Hamilton (20), N.Cruz (6), Torrealba (2), Moreland (8). SBRasmus (3), Gentry (6). SAndrus 2. SFBeltre. IPHRERBBSO Toronto H.Alvarez52-395411 L.Perez11-310011 Cordero100001 Janssen12-300011 Oliver21-320011 Igarashi012210 Frasor L,0-1 011100 Texas Lewis51-3104406 Ogando12-321100 Mi.Adams100001 Nathan100001 Uehara200001 R.Ross12-332012 Tateyama W,1-01-300000 Igarashi pitched to 2 batters in the 13th. Frasor pitched to 1 batter in the 13th. HBPby Janssen (Kinsler, Gentry). WP Oliver. PBArencibia, Torrealba. Mets 9, Padres 0San DiegoNew York abrhbiabrhbi Maybin cf2000ATorrs cf3110 Tekotte ph-cf2010Turner 2b-ss4120 Denorfi rf4000DWrght 3b3100 Alonso 1b4010Hairstn lf3123 Guzmn lf3010I.Davis ph-1b1111 Headly 3b3010Duda rf4000 Hundly c3000DnMrp 2b0000 ECarer ss3000Rottino 1b-lf3221 Amarst 2b3000Cedeno ss2000 Richrd p2000Niwnhs pr-rf0100 Palmer p0000Nickes c4114 Parrino ph1000JSantn p3000 Thayer p0000 Totals30040Totals30999 San Diego0000000000 New York40000005x9 DPSan Diego 1, New York 1. LOBSan Diego 3, New York 3. 2BI.Davis (5). HR Hairston (4), Rottino (1), Nickeas (1). SJ.Santana. IPHRERBBSO San Diego Richard L,2-6654435 Palmer100011 Thayer145511 New York J.Santana W,2-2940007 BalkRichard. Marlins 5, Giants 3 San FranciscoMiami abrhbiabrhbi GBlanc rf5031Reyes ss4110 Theriot 2b4120Infante 2b4110 MeCarr lf4001HRmrz 3b4111 Posey c4000Stanton rf3220 Pagan cf4120Morrsn 1b4022 Pill 1b3000Solano lf4021 Belt ph1000H.Bell p0000 Arias 3b3010Choate p0000 Burriss ss3110Coghln cf-lf4000 A.Huff ph0000J.Buck c3000 BCrwfr pr0000Buehrle p3000 Bmgrn p2000Cishek p0000 HSnchz ph1000Petersn cf0000 Edlefsn p0000 Affeldt p0000 Schrhlt ph0001 Totals34393Totals33594 San Francisco0010000113 Miami01300100x5 EBurriss (4). DPMiami 1. LOBSan Francisco 7, Miami 6. 2BPagan (10), Burriss (1), Stanton 2 (13), Morrison (4). 3BTheriot (1). SBReyes (15), Infante (7). SFSchierholtz. IPHRERBBSO San Francisco Bumgarner L,5-4675427 Edlefsen11-300002 Affeldt2-320001 Miami Buehrle W,5-471-382203 Cishek2-300000 H.Bell H,21-311120 Choate S,1-12-300001Nationals 8, Braves 4 WashingtonAtlanta abrhbiabrhbi Espinos 2b5223Bourn cf5010 Harper cf-rf4121Pstrnck ss4000 Zmrmn 3b4110McCnn ph1000 LaRoch 1b4012Prado lf3110 Dsmnd ss4110Uggla 2b3112 Nady rf-lf4010Hinske 1b3100 TMoore lf2000Heywrd rf3110 Tracy ph1011JFrncs 3b4031 EJcksn pr0100Boscan c4011 Grzlny p1000Minor p2000 Stmmn p0000Medlen p0000 Clipprd p0000M.Diaz ph1000 Flores c4110Venters p0000 Strasrg p2110Durbin p0000 Ankiel ph-cf2011Kimrel p0000 JWilson ph0000 Totals378128Totals33484 Washington1300022008 Atlanta0200200004 EHinske (1), Heyward (1). DPWashington 2, Atlanta 1. LOBWashington 5, Atlanta 7. 2BEspinosa (8), LaRoche (11), Desmond (14), Nady (2), Tracy (3), J.Francisco (5). 3B Ankiel (2). HREspinosa (5), Harper (3), Uggla (7). SBPrado (7). SFLaRoche. IPHRERBBSO Washington Strasburg W,5-1564446 Gorzelanny H,4320004 Stammen1-300010 Clippard S,3-42-300001 Atlanta Minor564423 Medlen L,1-1132202 Venters132101 Durbin100002 Kimbrel100001 Gorzelanny pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.Phillies 4, Cardinals 0PhiladelphiaSt. Louis abrhbiabrhbi Rollins ss5000Schmkr cf4010 Polanc 3b4110Greene ss4010 Pence rf3220Hollidy lf4000 Wggntn 1b4000Beltran rf4010 Victorn cf3111Freese 3b4020 Mayrry lf4012MAdms 1b3010 Galvis 2b4001T.Cruz c3000 Schndr c4020Descals 2b3000 Kndrck p1000JGarci p1000 Chamrs ph1000 ESnchz p0000 Roinsn ph1010 Fick p0000 Totals32474Totals32070 Philadelphia0001030004 St. Louis0000000000 DPPhiladelphia 2. LOBPhiladelphia 6, St. Louis 5. 2BPolanco (9), Victorino (11), Mayberry (7), Schneider (2), Greene (7). S K.Kendrick 2. IPHRERBBSO Philadelphia K.Kendrick W,1-4970004 St. Louis J.Garcia L,3-3664426 E.Sanchez200012 Fick110000 WPJ.Garcia, E.Sanchez.Pirates 3, Cubs 2 ChicagoPittsburgh abrhbiabrhbi DeJess rf3110Tabata lf4210 SCastro ss4011JHrrsn rf3000 Mather cf4000AMcCt cf3120 LaHair 1b4010PAlvrz 3b5011 ASorin lf4111Walker 2b2011 IStewrt 3b3000Hague 1b3011 Barney 2b4000Barajs c2000 Lalli c3000Barmes ss4000 Mahlm p2010Correia p3000 CColmn p0000Watson p0000 Cardns ph1010Lincoln p0000 Camp p0000GJones ph1000 Dolis p0000Hanrhn p0000 Totals32262Totals30363 Chicago0001100002 Pittsburgh0020000013 Two outs when winning run scored. ECorreia (1). DPPittsburgh 1. LOB Chicago 6, Pittsburgh 13. 2BDeJesus (11), Cardenas (4). 3BS.Castro (4). HRA.Soriano (5). SBA.McCutchen 2 (10), Walker (2). SJ.Harrison. SFWalker. IPHRERBBSO Chicago Maholm542252 C.Coleman100002 Camp210012 Dolis L,2-42-311121 Pittsburgh Correia61-352222 Watson1-310010 Lincoln11-300001 Hanrahan W,2-0100002 HBPby Maholm (Tabata), by Dolis (Hague). WPMaholm. Braves lose sixth consecutive contest, this one to Nationals Associated PressOAKLAND, Calif. Mark Teixeira hit a two-run homer and a solo shot among his career high-tying four hits to back CC Sabathias sixth win of the year, and the New York Yankees beat the Oakland Athletics 9-2 on Saturday for their fourth straight win. Teixeira and Robinson Cano each homered for a second straight day as the Yankees added three more longballs to give them nine homers in the last three games. Teixeira hit a solo home run in the fourth, added a two-run single in the fifth when New York broke it open and had a two-run homer in the ninth, almost single handily sending Oakland to its season-worst fourth straight defeat. AMERICAN LEAGUE White Sox 14, Indians 7 CHICAGO Paul Konerko had four hits, Dayan Viciedo homered in his third straight game, and the Chicago White Sox pounded Derek Lowe and the shorthanded Cleveland Indians 14-7 for their eighth win in nine games. Chicago scored four in the first and four more while chasing Lowe in the third after Cleveland scored five in the top half. Viciedos two-run homer made it 8-5, and the White Sox pulled away late after Cleveland got within one, tying a season high with their fourth straight win. Rangers 8, Blue Jays 7, 13 innings ARLINGTON, Texas Josh Hamilton hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the 13th inning, lifting the Texas Rangers to an 8-7 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. Toronto had taken a 7-5 lead in the top half, but Elvis Andrus doubled in a run off Ryota Igarashi to start the comeback. Hamiltons third game-ending homer came off Jason Frasor (0-1) and was his 20th home run of the year. Ian Kinsler walked to start the inning the fifth-straight inning that the Rangers got their leadoff batter on base and Andrus doubled. Frasor relieved and gave up the home run. Tigers 6, Twins 3MINNEAPOLIS Max Scherzer struck out nine in a rain-shortened outing and Prince Fielder had his first four-hit game with the Tigers, leading Detroit to a 6-3 victory over the Minnesota Twins. Scherzer (4-3) gave up three runs and six hits in 5 1-3 innings before leaving due to a rain delay and Andy Dirks had two doubles and two RBIs for the Tigers. Miguel Cabrera added two hits and two RBIs and Jose Valverde picked up his eighth save in 10 chances. Carl Pavano (2-4) allowed six runs on 10 hits in 4 1-3 innings for the Twins, who have lost four straight. Royals 4, Orioles 3 BALTIMORE Eric Hosmer singled in the tiebreaking run in the eighth inning, Billy Butler homered and the Kansas City Royals rallied to beat the Baltimore Orioles 4-3. Hosmer went 3 for 4 with two RBIs to help the Royals make up a three-run deficit. Butlers 10th homer cut it to 3-2 in the sixth, Hosmer scored the tying run in the seventh and then put Kansas City ahead for the first time in the eighth. Chris Davis and J.J. Hardy hit solo home runs for the Orioles, and Adam Jones extended his career-best hitting streak to 17 with a third-inning triple. Angels 5, Mariners 3 SEATTLE Albert Pujols hit a home run in his third straight game and pinch hitter Alberto Callaspo came through with a grand slam in the sixth inning to give the Los Angeles Angels a 5-3 win over the Seattle Mariners. Callaspos slam came against Mariners starter Felix Hernandez (4-4) and was the first pinch grand slam for the Angels since Shane Halter hit one against Tampa Bay in 2004. Pujols, who now has seven homers after not hitting any in April, hit a 2-1 fastball from Hernandez over the left-center wall in the fourth inning. Pujols has homered in six of his last 11 games.NATIONAL LEAGUE Marlins 5, Giants 3 MIAMI Mark Buehrle pitched into the eighth inning and the Miami Marlins moved within a victory of tying the team record for the most in a month with a 5-3 win over the San Francisco Giants. Giancarlo Stanton hit two doubles and scored twice while Logan Morrison drove in two runs for the Marlins. Miami is a major league best 18-7 in May. The Marlins went 19-10 in August 1997. Buehrle (5-4) allowed two runs and eight hits while throwing 69 of 100 pitches for strikes. Nationals 8, Braves 4 ATLANTA Bryce Harper homered and Danny Espinosa added a three-run shot to help Washington strengthen its hold on first place in the NL East by beating the reeling Atlanta Braves 8-4. Stephen Strasburg (5-1) was not sharp but still won. He set a season high with four walks while giving up four runs and six hits in five innings. He had six strikeouts. Before the game, the Braves placed Chipper Jones on the 15-day disabled list Saturday with a bruised left leg. Dan Ugglas two-run, tying homer in the fifth was the big hit for the shorthanded Braves. Mets 9, Padres 0NEW YORK Johan Santana pitched a four-hitter for his first shutout since 2010 and the New York Mets backed him with three home runs in a 90 win over the San Diego Padres 9-0. Mike Nickeas hit New Yorks first grand slam of the season, and Scott Hairston and Vinny Rottino also homered for the Mets, who got it done without David Wright once again. The Mets won for the fifth time in seven games and have homered in three straight games and their last four at Citi Field. Phillies 4, Cardinals 0ST. LOUIS Kyle Kendrick threw a seven-hitter for his first career shutout, winning his first game of the season and putting the Philadelphia Phillies on the verge of their first four-game sweep in St. Louis in 26 years with a 4-0 victory. Shane Victorinos RBI double in the fourth was the only support Kendrick (14) needed and John Mayberry added a two-run double in a three-run sixth. Hunter Pence and Brian Schneider added two hits apiece for the Phillies, who have won four in a row. Kendrick entered with a 5.23 ERA and the Phillies were 1-9 in the games he pitched, five of them starts. But hes 5-1 against the Cardinals in eight games, all but two of them starts. Jaime Garcia (3-3) allowed four runs on six hits in six innings for the Cardinals. Pirates 3, Cubs 2 PITTSBURGH Matt Hague was hit by a pitch from Rafael Dolis with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth inning, and the Pittsburgh Pirates sent the Chicago Cubs to their 11th straight loss with a 3-2 victory. Hague took a 96 mph fastball from Dolis (2-4) in the back near the shoulder blade, scoring Jose Tabata and eliciting an incredulous look to the sky by the Cubs reliever. Dolis had hit Josh Harrison earlier in the inning after Tabata had singled to lead off the ninth. Dolis also walked Neil Walker with two outs. Alfonso Soriano homered and Starlin Castro had an RBI triple for the Cubs, who have scored eight runs in their past six games. East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Baltimore2918.6176-4L-114-1215-6 Tampa Bay2819.59615-5L-117-711-12 New York2521.54335-5W-414-1111-10 Toronto2423.511515-5L-412-1012-13 Boston2323.500526-4W-110-1213-11 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Cleveland2620.5656-4L-214-1212-8 Chicago2522.53218-2W-411-1314-9 Detroit2224.478434-6W-211-1211-12 Kan. City1827.400763-7W-15-1713-10 Minnesota1531.32611105-5L-46-169-15 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Texas2918.6176-4W-213-916-9 L. Angeles2325.479636-4W-511-1012-15 Oakland2225.468733-7L-410-1412-11 Seattle2128.429955-5L-39-1212-16 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Washington2818.6096-4W-215-813-10 Miami2621.55326-4W-213-913-12 New York2621.55326-4W-214-912-12 Atlanta2622.54233-7L-610-916-13 Philadelphia2523.521416-4W-411-1314-10 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Cincinnati2620.5657-3W-114-912-11 St. Louis2522.532113-7L-312-1113-11 Houston2223.489337-3W-416-106-13 Pittsburgh2224.478435-5W-213-109-14 Milwaukee1926.422664-6W-211-138-13 Chicago1531.32611100-10L-119-156-16 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway L. Angeles3015.6676-4L-219-511-10 San Fran.2423.511726-4L-212-1012-13 Arizona2026.4351055-5L-18-1512-11 Colorado1728.3781383-7L-19-148-14 San Diego1731.3541493-7L-212-165-15 AL NL AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE Associated Press New York Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira, right, celebrates with Eric Chavez after hitting a solo home run Saturday during the fourth inning in Oakland. The Yankees won 9-2 for their fourth straight victory. Yankees win fourth in a row AMERICAN LEAGUE Saturdays Games Detroit 6, Minnesota 3 Texas 8, Toronto 7, 13 innings Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3 N.Y. Yankees 9, Oakland 2 Chicago White Sox 14, Cleveland 7 L.A. Angels 5, Seattle 3 Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2 Sundays Games Kansas City (Hochevar 3-5) at Baltimore (Matusz 4-4), 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 4-1) at Boston (Buchholz 4-2), 1:35 p.m. Cleveland (Jimenez 5-3) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 3-5), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 3-4) at Minnesota (Walters 2-1), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Drabek 4-4) at Texas (Darvish 6-2), 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 3-6) at Oakland (Milone 6-3), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 5-4) at Seattle (Noesi 2-5), 4:10 p.m. Mondays Games Detroit at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Saturdays Games N.Y. Mets 9, San Diego 0 Washington 8, Atlanta 4 Miami 5, San Francisco 3 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Cincinnati 10, Colorado 3 Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 0 Houston at L.A. Dodgers, late. Milwaukee at Arizona, late Sundays Games Colorado (Moyer 2-4) at Cincinnati (Latos 3-2), 1:10 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 6-1), 1:10 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 4-2) at Miami (Nolasco 5-2), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-2) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 2-5), 1:35 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 4-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright 3-5), 2:15 p.m. Houston (Happ 4-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 6-1), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Wolf 2-4) at Arizona (D.Hudson 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 6-1) at Atlanta (Beachy 5-2), 8:05 p.m. Mondays Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 1:10 p.m. Washington at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 3:10 p.m., 1st game Arizona at San Francisco, 5:05 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8:10 p.m., 2nd game Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.For more box scores, see Page B4. S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 B3

PAGE 20

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 12 p.m. (ABC) 2012 Indianapolis 500 5:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600 COLLEGE BASEBALL 12 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament Final: 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament Final: MLB 1 p.m. (FSNFL) San Francisco Giants at Miami Marlins 1:30 p.m. (SUN, TBS) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox 1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates 8 p.m. (ESPN) Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves NBA Western Conference Finals 8:30 p.m. (TNT) Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs GOLF 9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA: BMW PGA Championship 3 p.m. (NBC) Senior PGA Championship 3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial OLYMPICS 3 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Water Polo Trials: USA vs. Hungary (Taped) RODEO 6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR Hobbs (Taped) SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (UNI) Mexico vs. Gales 4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: San Jose Earthquakes at Sporting Kansas City SOFTBALL NCAA Tournament 1 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia vs. Tennessee 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia vs. Tennessee (If necessary) 7 p.m. (ESPN2) California vs. Washington 9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) California vs. Washington (If necessary) TENNIS 5 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open First Round 9 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open First Round 12 p.m. (NBC) French Open First Round Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Red Sox 3, Rays 2 Tampa BayBoston abrhbiabrhbi C.Pena 1b4000Aviles ss4010 BUpton cf4110Pedroia 2b3020 Joyce lf4110Ortiz dh4110 Zobrist rf2001Youkils 1b3000 Scott dh4011AdGnzl rf3010 Sutton 3b4000Lin pr-rf0000 SRdrgz 2b3000Pdsdnk ph-cf1000 JMolin c3010Mdlrks 3b4021 EJhnsn ss3000Nava lf2100 Shppch c2010 Punto ph0000 Byrd cf-rf3000 Sltlmch ph1112 Totals31242Totals30393 Tampa Bay0000002002 Boston0000010023 One out when winning run scored. EMiddlebrooks (4). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 4, Boston 8. 2BShoppach (6). HRSaltalamacchia (8). SBZobrist (4), Scott (1). SShoppach, Punto. SFZobrist. IPHRERBBSO Tampa Bay Price781135 Jo.Peralta H,13100001 Rodney L,2-11-312210 Boston Beckett742205 A.Miller100001 R.Hill W,1-0100010Angels 5, Mariners 3 Los AngelesSeattle abrhbiabrhbi Trout cf-lf5020Ackley 2b5011 MIzturs 3b3000MSndrs cf4010 Hester c1000ISuzuki rf4000 Pujols 1b5121Seager 3b4010 KMorls dh4000Smoak 1b4111 Trumo rf4130Jaso dh3110 Bourjos cf0000Olivo c4100 HKndrc 2b4120Carp lf2011 Aybar ss3110Ryan ss3000 Calhon lf-rf4010 BoWlsn c2000 Callasp 3b2114 Totals375125Totals33363 Los Angeles0001040005 Seattle0000210003 DPLos Angeles 1, Seattle 1. LOBLos Angeles 7, Seattle 8. 2BPujols (10), Jaso (7). HRPujols (7), Callaspo (2), Smoak (7). SB Trumbo (3), Ackley (5), Carp (1). CSTrout (2). IPHRERBBSO Los Angeles Williams W,5-2653325 Walden H,32-300012 S.Downs H,8110012 Frieri S,2-211-300013 Seattle F.Hernandez L,4-46105517 Delabar220002 Kelley100001 HBPby F.Hernandez (M.Izturis). WP S.Downs.Reds 10, Rockies 3 ColoradoCincinnati abrhbiabrhbi Scutaro 2b5120Cozart ss5100 Colvin cf-lf4022Stubbs cf4110 CGnzlz lf4000Votto 1b3120 EYong cf0000BPhllps 2b4232 Tlwtzk ss4010Bruce rf3111 LeMahi ss0000Heisey lf3223 Helton 1b3010Cairo 3b2000 Cuddyr rf2000Hoover p0000 Pachec 3b4130Costanz ph1000 Nieves c4111LeCure p0000 Guthrie p2000Ludwck ph1113 Fowler ph1000Ondrsk p0000 Rogers p0000Marshll p0000 MtRynl p0000Mesorc c4111 WRosr ph1000Leake p1010 Frazier 3b3000 Totals343103Totals341012 10 Colorado1002000003 Cincinnati40110040x10 EPacheco (2), Cairo (2). DPColorado 2, Cincinnati 3. LOBColorado 8, Cincinnati 4. 2BPacheco (5), Nieves (1), Votto 2 (21), B.Phillips (6), Bruce (12), Leake (1). 3BScutaro (2). HRHeisey (1), Ludwick (5), Mesoraco (3). CSStubbs (3). IPHRERBBSO Colorado Guthrie L,2-35106215 Rogers112222 Mat.Reynolds212211 Cincinnati Leake32-393314 Hoover W,1-011-300012 LeCure H,2200013 Ondrusek110010 Marshall100002 Rogers pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. WPRogers, Leake.MLB leaders AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTINGKonerko, Chicago, .396; Hamilton, Texas, .376; Jeter, New York, .342; AJackson, Detroit, .331; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .326; Beltre, Texas, .319; Pierzynski, Chicago, .312. RUNSKinsler, Texas, 39; Hamilton, Texas, 37; De Aza, Chicago, 34; AdJones, Baltimore, 34; Andrus, Texas, 31; Cano, New York, 31; Kipnis, Cleveland, 31; Ortiz, Boston, 31. RBIHamilton, Texas, 53; Encarnacion, Toronto, 38; MiCabrera, Detroit, 37; ADunn, Chicago, 35; Butler, Kansas City, 33; NCruz, Texas, 32; Pierzynski, Chicago, 32; Scott, Tampa Bay, 32. HITSJeter, New York, 66; Hamilton, Texas, 64; Konerko, Chicago, 63; AdJones, Baltimore, 59; MiCabrera, Detroit, 57; Pedroia, Boston, 57; Kinsler, Texas, 56. HOME RUNSHamilton, Texas, 20; ADunn, Chicago, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 15; Granderson, New York, 14; AdJones, Baltimore, 14; Reddick, Oakland, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12. PITCHINGPeavy, Chicago, 6-1; Weaver, Los Angeles, 6-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 6-1; Sabathia, New York, 6-2; Darvish, Texas, 6-2; Shields, Tampa Bay, 6-2; Milone, Oakland, 6-3; Price, Tampa Bay, 6-3; DLowe, Cleveland, 6-3. STRIKEOUTSVerlander, Detroit, 75; FHernandez, Seattle, 75; Scherzer, Detroit, 72; Sabathia, New York, 69; Shields, Tampa Bay, 66; Peavy, Chicago, 64; Darvish, Texas, 63. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTINGDWright, New York, .390; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .362; MeCabrera, San Francisco, .356; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .343; Furcal, St. Louis, .339; Infante, Miami, .338; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .338. RUNSCGonzalez, Colorado, 35; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 33; Pence, Philadelphia, 33; Uggla, Atlanta, 33; Braun, Milwaukee, 32; Furcal, St. Louis, 32; Bourn, Atlanta, 31; JUpton, Arizona, 31; DWright, New York, 31. RBIEthier, Los Angeles, 40; Beltran, St. Louis, 38; LaRoche, Washington, 35; CGonzalez, Colorado, 34; Stanton, Miami, 34; Braun, Milwaukee, 33; Freese, St. Louis, 33. HITSMeCabrera, San Francisco, 69; Bourn, Atlanta, 63; Furcal, St. Louis, 61; DWright, New York, 60; SCastro, Chicago, 59; Prado, Atlanta, 59; Pagan, San Francisco, 56. HOME RUNSBeltran, St. Louis, 14; Braun, Milwaukee, 13; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12; Pence, Philadelphia, 11; Stanton, Miami, 11; Bruce, Cincinnati, 10; Freese, St. Louis, 10; Hart, Milwaukee, 10; Holliday, St. Louis, 10; LaHair, Chicago, 10. PITCHINGLynn, St. Louis, 7-1; Hamels, Philadelphia, 7-1; GGonzalez, Washington, 61; Dickey, New York, 6-1; Capuano, Los Angeles, 6-1; 12 tied at 5. STRIKEOUTSStrasburg, Washington, 70; GGonzalez, Washington, 69; Hamels, Philadelphia, 66; ASanchez, Miami, 62; MCain, San Francisco, 62; JSantana, New York, 60; Greinke, Milwaukee, 59. Indy 500 Lineup Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis (Car number in parentheses) 1. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9514 (226.484 mph). 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:38.9537 (226.481). 3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.1233 (226.240). 4. (26) Marco Andretti, DallaraChevrolet, 2:40.6766 (225.456). 5. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.7004 (225.422). 6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.8780 (225.172). 7. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.6879 (224.037). 8. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.1775 (224.751). 9. (5) EJ Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.4119 (224.422). 10. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.5253 (224.264). 11. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7144 (224.000). 12. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7437 (223.959). 13. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.7720 (223.920). 14. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.8093 (223.868). 15. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.9413 (223.684). 16. (50) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0144 (223.582). 17. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.0866 (223.482). 18. (4) JR Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.1299 (223.422). 19. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.1517 (223.392). 20. (99) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.3377 (223.134). 21. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.4865 (222.929). 22. (30) Michel Jourdain, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5124 (222.893). 23. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.5138 (222.891). 24. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.5720 (222.811). 25. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.8666 (223.760). 26. (41) Wade Cunningham, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.2484 (223.258). 27. (22) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.8754 (222.393). 28. (20T) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:41.9262 (222.324). 29. (14) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 2:41.9293 (222.319). 30. (6) Katherine Legge, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:42.4374 (221.624). 31. (39) Bryan Clauson, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:47.6671 (214.455). 32. (78) Simona De Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus, 2:47.9162 (214.393). 33. (64) Jean Alesi, Dallara-Lotus, 2:51.3516 (210.094). Sprint Cup Coca-Cola 600 Lineup After Thursday qualifying; race Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.94 mph. 2. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.598. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 191.374. 4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191.259. 5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.198. 6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 191.171. 7. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.13. 8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 190.887. 9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.597. 10. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 190.456. 11. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 190.328. 12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 190.302. 13. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.268. 14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.201. 15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 190.194. 16. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 190.054. 17. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 190.034. 18. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 189.987. 19. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.707. 20. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.607. 21. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 189.573. 22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.52. 23. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.076. 24. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188.871. 25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 188.363. 26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 188.344. 27. (74) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 188.324. 28. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188.206. 29. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 187.924. 30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 187.656. 31. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 187.526. 32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 187.487. 33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 187.259. 34. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 187.169. 35. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 186.143. 36. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 186.111. 37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 186.085. 38. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 185.976. 39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 185.81. 40. (10) D. Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 185.784. Failed to Qualify 44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 185.548. 45. (73) David Reutimann, Toyota, 185.338. 46. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 183.73. 47. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 183.63.Nationwide Series History 300 ResultsSaturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (10) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 134.2 rating, 0 points, $46,425. 2. (13) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 104.5, 0, $40,725. 3. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 112.7, 0, $31,150. 4. (7) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 139.2, 0, $29,925. 5. (6) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 102.1, 39, $29,793. 6. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 109.6, 0, $27,500. 7. (8) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 97.8, 0, $23,593. 8. (16) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 93.2, 37, $22,643. 9. (5) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 92.5, 35, $21,918. 10. (21) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 86, 0, $15,825. 11. (2) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 98.7, 33, $21,843. 12. (20) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 82.2, 32, $19,993. 13. (3) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 83.4, 31, $22,168. 14. (22) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 79.2, 30, $18,968. 15. (19) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 200, 77.3, 30, $19,793. 16. (23) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 200, 73.4, 28, $11,925. 17. (14) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 99.8, 0, $11,700. 18. (25) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 63.9, 26, $17,943. 19. (24) Timmy Hill, Ford, 199, 63.8, 25, $17,868. 20. (28) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 198, 68.5, 24, $18,393. 21. (34) Casey Roderick, Chevrolet, 198, 52.5, 23, $17,668. 22. (26) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 198, 49.6, Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 13 14 41 49 59 POWER BALL 14 CASH 3 (early) 7 0 6 CASH 3 (late) 8 9 8 PLAY 4 (early) 5 6 8 3 PLAY 4 (late) 7 4 3 7 B4 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 S COREBOARD 22, $17,618. 23. (31) Kyle Fowler, Ford, 196, 53.2, 21, $17,568. 24. (42) Travis Pastrana, Toyota, 195, 43.4, 20, $17,503. 25. (36) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 193, 40.9, 19, $11,475. 26. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 179, 105.9, 18, $18,533. 27. (37) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, accident, 176, 49, 17, $17,398. 28. (11) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 167, 75.4, 16, $17,363. 29. (29) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 157, 59.5, 15, $17,318. 30. (39) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, handling, 151, 41.1, 14, $11,105. 31. (9) Brian Scott, Toyota, accident, 146, 85.4, 13, $17,263. 32. (18) Jeff Green, Toyota, drive shaft, 141, 51.6, 12, $17,193. 33. (15) Jason Bowles, Toyota, accident, 137, 59.7, 12, $17,148. 34. (17) Josh Richards, Ford, accident, 134, 58.9, 10, $17,118. 35. (32) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, brakes, 103, 30.4, 9, $17,088. 36. (35) Angela Cope, Chevrolet, engine, 51, 39.7, 8, $10,600. 37. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, electrical, 39, 37.7, 7, $10,575. 38. (40) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, overheating, 30, 35.4, 6, $10,556. 39. (41) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, engine, 13, 36, 5, $10,435. 40. (38) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 10, 35.6, 4, $10,330. 41. (27) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, ignition, 8, 34.5, 0, $10,295. 42. (30) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, electrical, 5, 34.3, 0, $10,270. 43. (33) Kevin Lepage, Toyota, vibration, 3, 30.8, 1, $10,209. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 123.414 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 25 minutes, 51 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.838 seconds. Caution Flags: 7 for 38 laps. Lead Changes: 12 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-21; K.Harvick 22-54; J.Bowles 55; K.Harvick 56-58; K.Kahne 59-67; K.Harvick 68-110; J.Logano 111; J.Allgaier 112; M.Wallace 113-114; K.Harvick 115-127; J.Logano 128-131; K.Kahne 132-133; B.Keselowski 134-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Harvick, 4 times for 92 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 67 laps; J.Logano, 3 times for 26 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 11 laps; M.Wallace, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Allgaier, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Bowles, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 430; 2. E.Sadler, 417; 3. A.Dillon, 402; 4. S.Hornish Jr., 373; 5. C.Whitt, 336; 6. J.Allgaier, 336; 7. M.Annett, 331; 8. M.Bliss, 291; 9. D.Patrick, 264; 10. J.Nemechek, 262.NHL playoff glanceCONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE New Jersey 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Monday, May 14: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Wednesday, May 16: New Jersey 3, NY Rangers 2 Saturday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Monday, May 21: New Jersey 4, NY Rangers 1 Wednesday, May 23: New Jersey 5, NY Rangers 3 Friday, May 25: New Jersey 3, NY Rangers 2, OT WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 1 Sunday, May 13: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 2 Tuesday, May 15: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0 Thursday, May 17: Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 1 Sunday, May 20: Phoenix 2, Los Angeles 0 Tuesday, May 22: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 3, OT STANLEY CUP FINALS Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8 p.m. Monday, June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8 p.m.NBA playoff glanceCONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Philadelphia 3 Saturday, May 12: Boston 92, Philadelphia 91 Monday, May 14: Philadelphia 82, Boston 81 Wednesday, May 16: Boston 107, Philadelphia 91 Friday, May 18: Philadelphia 92, Boston 83 Monday, May 21: Boston 101, Philadelphia 85 Wednesday, May 23: Philadelphia 82, Boston 75 Saturday, May 26: Boston 85, Philadelphia 75 Miami 4, Indiana 2 Sunday, May 13: Miami 95, Indiana 86 Tuesday, May 15: Indiana 78, Miami 75 Thursday, May 17: Indiana 94, Miami 75 Sunday, May 20: Miami 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, May 22: Miami 115, Indiana 83 Thursday, May 24: Miami 105, Indiana 93 WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Lakers 1 Monday, May 14: Oklahoma City 119, L.A. Lakers 90 Wednesday, May 16: Oklahoma City 77, L.A. Lakers 75 Friday, May 18: L.A. Lakers 99, Oklahoma City 96 Saturday, May 19: Oklahoma City 103, L.A. Lakers 100 Monday, May 21: Oklahoma City 106, L.A. Lakers 90 San Antonio 4, L.A. Clippers 0 Tuesday, May 15: San Antonio 108, L.A. Clippers 92 Thursday, May 17: San Antonio 105, L.A. Clippers 88 Saturday, May 19: San Antonio 96, L.A. Clippers 86 Sunday, May 20: San Antonio 102, L.A. Clippers 99 CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Boston Monday, May 28: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 30: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Friday, June 1: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, June 3: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City vs. San Antonio Sunday, May 27: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sports BRIEFS Donovan hat trick leads US over Scotland 5-1 JACKSONVILLE Landon Donovan returned to the U.S. national team following an eightmonth absence and scored his first international hat trick in five years, leading the Americans over Scotland 5-1 in an exhibition game Saturday night. Donovan scored in the third minute, then added a pair of second-half goals for his third international hat trick, raising his career total to 49 goals. It was a record 125th start for Donovan, one more than the previous American mark set by defender Jeff Agoos. Michael Bradley scored on a 30-yard shot half-volley in the 10th minute and Jermaine Jones got his second international goal in the second half off an assist from Donovan, who had skipped eight matches because of injuries and commitments to the Los Angeles Galaxy. Scotland scored in the 15th minute when American defender Geoff Cameron chested Kenny Millers header past Tim Howard for an own goal. Vandy rides 5-run ninth to 8-6 win over Florida HOOVER, Ala. Anthony Gomez singled home the goahead run and then stole home and Vanderbilt rode a five-run ninth inning to an 8-6 victory over Florida Saturday in the SEC tournament. The Commodores (33-25), aiming for their first SEC tournament title since 2007, face Mississippi State in Sundays championship game. Vanderbilt fueled the comeback win over the Gators (4218) with a flurry of stolen bases, six in the ninth. That included a triple-steal with the bases loaded when Gomez made his dash to home plate. Florida scored two runs in the bottom of the ninth and had the bases loaded before Vanderbilt reliever Drew VerHagen got Justin Shafer to pop up to right field on his lone pitch to end the game. UVa rolls past FSU 7-0 in ACC tourneyGREENSBORO, N.C. Derek Fisher and Colin Harrington drove in two runs apiece and Virginia beat Florida State 7-0 on Saturday in the ACC baseball tournament. Artie Lewicki struck out four and allowed three hits in seven innings for the fourth-seeded Cavaliers (38-17-1). They finished pool play with a 2-1 record and sent the top-seeded Seminoles (43-15) to a surprising 0-3 finish in the tournament. Virginia led 1-0 in the fourth inning before breaking the game open by scoring six runs in the seventh inning. Devon Travis had two of Florida States five hits. From wire reports the testiness that came late in Fridays 7-4 win by the Rays when the benches cleared after Red Sox reliever Franklin Morales hit Scott in the right leg. Trailing 1-0 and with only one single against Beckett in the first six innings, the Rays collected three hits and grabbed a 2-1 lead in the seventh. Ben Zobrists sacrifice fly tied it after Upton singled and advanced on Matt Joyces single. Scott then followed with his run-scoring single through a shifted infield. Beckett did end the inning by striking out Jose Molina. Price got David Ortiz, the final batter he faced, on a bouncer to short with runners on first and third. Beckett gave up two runs, four hits, while striking out five and not walking anyone. He had won his last two starts, allowing just one run in 14 2-3 innings. Triathlon team. (The course) was fast, she said. I will come back. Another pro, Felipe Bastos of Tampa, was fourth with a time of 1:02:18.4. He said he has won this race two or three times. The 31year-old native Australian said he is busy setting up a law practice in Tampa. I love this course, Bastos said. Its my favorite race. Its flat. There are no hills. Malia Ellington of Cornelius, N.C. was the female winner. She had a time of 1:04:51 and was 12th overall. Tarpon Springs resident Celia Dubey was the female masters winner. She had a time of 1:07:54 and was 28th overall. Crystal River High School teacher Laura Wingate has now done five straight triathlons and loved this one. It was awesome, she said. The other day, I was training on my bike and an egret was flying just above me. Inverness resident Phil Royal was feeling like a triathlete prodigal child. He serves Citrus County faithfully as a captain in the Sheriffs Office but hasnt run a triathlon in a while. He finished 158th with a time of 1:26:22.7 and he was not happy about that. Im 43 and fat, Royal said. I have to get back into shape and run these. DRC sponsored a team of 14 area athletes including the physically challenged. Leif Stringer is the coach. Race director Chris Moling was happy to see all kinds of triathletes among the over 300 registered. He said they came from 17 states and three countries. What a way to start off the season, Moling said. We cant be happier. The weather was perfect and we sold out. We are looking forward to the upcoming races. Crystal River Memorial Day Sprint 1 Triathlon 2012 Results: Mens Overall winner: Mitchell Kibby, Groveland, 57:38 Womens Overall winner: Malia Ellington, Cornelius, N.C., 1:04.51.6 Mens Masters winner: John Hovius, Groveland, 1:02:11.7 Womens Masters winner: Celia DuBey, Tarpon Springs, 1:07.54.4 Top 10 Finishers 1. Mitchell Kibby, Groveland, 57:38; 2. Steven Mifflin, Leesburg, 1:01:40.9; 3. John Hovius, Groveland, 1:01:11.7; 4. Felipe Bastos, Tampa, 1:02:18.4; 5. Vincent Hahr, Orlando, 1:02:31.9.; 6. Tom Lowery, Gainesville, 1:02:39; 7. Dave Bracken, Tarpon Springs, 1:02:55.7; 8. Leif Stringer, Gainesville, 1:03:26.2; 9. Michael Pooley, Orlando, 1:03:28.3; 10. Danny Stevens Jr., Dunnellon, 1:04:08.2 out-of-gas experience that cost Dale Earnhardt Jr. a Coca-Cola 600 victory a year ago. Keselowski gassed up with 73 laps left, then chose to stay out during a caution period a few laps later instead of pitting like most of the field. That began a fuel mileage countdown that had Keselowski and his team guessing if they had enough to make it to the end, unlike Earnhardt, who went dry entering the final turn and was passed for the victory. Its going to be either really good or really bad, Keselowski said on his radio down the stretch. Turns out, it was perfect as Keselowski picked up his first Nationwide Series race of the year. It was Keselowskis 18th win in the series and his second at Charlotte. lead with 1:44 left. TheCelticswill now face the actual NBA MVP LeBron James along with Dwyane Wade and the rest of the Heat. Miami advanced to the conference finals by eliminating the Indiana Pacers in six games. Miami beat Boston in five games in the conference semifinals last year. In 2010, theCelticseliminated the Heat in the first round and then knocked James and the Cavaliers out in the second his final game with Cleveland before defecting to Miami. SHOCK Continued from Page B1 RACE Continued from Page B1 NBA Continued from Page B 1 PENSKE Continued from Page B1 Fantasy 5 and Florida Lottery numbers were unavailable at press time. Please see Mondays Chronicle for the results.

PAGE 21

S PORTSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 B5 Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial At Colonial Country Club, Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,204, Par: 70 Third Round Jason Dufner65-64-66 195-15 Zach Johnson64-67-65 196-14 Tom Gillis65-69-69 203-7 Bo Van Pelt69-64-71 204-6 John Huh70-66-69 205-5 Ryan Palmer68-67-70 205-5 Kelly Kraft71-71-64 206-4 Jonas Blixt73-67-66 206-4 Jim Furyk69-69-68 206-4 Louis Oosthuizen71-67-68 206-4 Ryan Moore67-69-70 206-4 Rickie Fowler68-68-70 206-4 Tommy Gainey66-67-73 206-4 Jonathan Byrd72-68-67 207-3 Kevin Chappell70-67-70 207-3 David Hearn71-72-65 208-2 Y.E. Yang73-69-66 208-2 Corey Pavin71-70-67 208-2 Matt Kuchar72-69-67 208-2 Hunter Mahan69-71-68 208-2 Sung Kang70-69-69 208-2 Charley Hoffman69-70-69 208-2 Greg Owen69-68-71 208-2 Harris English65-70-73 208-2 Ken Duke68-75-66 209-1 Chris Stroud69-73-67 209-1 Roberto Castro67-74-68 209-1 Ben Crane70-71-68 209-1 Brendon de Jonge67-74-68 209-1 John Daly70-69-70 209-1 Vijay Singh70-69-70 209-1 David Mathis71-67-71 209-1 Kyle Reifers65-72-72 209-1 Trevor Immelman70-71-69 210E Geoff Ogilvy70-70-70 210E Chris Kirk71-69-70 210E Sergio Garcia66-73-71 210E Tim Clark70-69-71 210E Carl Pettersson70-69-71 210E Bobby Gates71-67-72 210E Boo Weekley72-71-68 211+1 J.J. Killeen72-70-69 211+1 Jerry Kelly72-70-69 211+1 Chad Campbell71-71-69 211+1 Blake Adams69-72-70 211+1 Martin Flores68-73-70 211+1 Jason Bohn70-70-71 211+1 Michael Thompson69-71-71 211+1 Seung-Yul Noh70-69-72 211+1 Greg Chalmers70-69-72 211+1 Bryce Molder72-64-75 211+1 Brandt Jobe67-75-70 212+2 Will Claxton72-69-71 212+2 Kevin Na70-71-71 212+2 John Senden69-71-72 212+2 Charlie Wi68-69-75 212+2 Miguel Angel Carballo75-68-70 213+3 John Mallinger71-72-70 213+3 Bill Haas72-71-70 213+3 Pat Perez69-74-70 213+3 Rory Sabbatini71-71-71 213+3 Josh Teater70-71-72 213+3 George McNeill72-69-72 213+3 Chris DiMarco66-74-73 213+3 Mark Wilson71-71-72 214+4 Nick Watney71-71-72 214+4 William McGirt70-71-73 214+4 Aaron Baddeley71-70-73 214+4 Marc Leishman72-68-74 214+4 Gary Christian70-73-72 215+5 Kris Blanks73-69-73 215+5 Andres Romero66-71-78 215+5 Made cut, did not finish Hunter Haas71-72-73 216+6 Edward Loar72-71-73 216+6 Brendon Todd70-71-75 216+6 Gary Woodland70-70-76 216+6 Sang-Moon Bae70-70-77 217+7 Heath Slocum70-73-75 218+8 Justin Leonard69-73-77 219+9Senior PGA Champ. Saturday At The Golf Club at Harbor Shores, Benton Harbor, Mich. Purse: TBA Yardage: 6,861, Par: 71 Third Round Roger Chapman68-67-64 199-14 John Cook69-66-69 204-9 Steve Pate70-69-67 206-7 Hale Irwin71-66-69 206-7 Joel Edwards73-67-67 207-6 David Frost70-70-68 208-5 Michael Allen77-64-68 209-4 Jay Don Blake71-72-67 210-3 Bob Tway72-69-69 210-3 Bernhard Langer73-68-69 210-3 Loren Roberts72-67-71 210-3 Joe Daley73-72-66 211-2 Willie Wood72-72-67 211-2 Kirk Triplett73-70-68 211-2 Sandy Lyle74-71-66 211-2 Jim Carter70-71-70 211-2 Steve Jones74-70-68 212-1 Gene Jones71-71-70 212-1 Scott Simpson75-67-70 212-1 Boonchu Ruangkit72-69-71 212-1 Peter Senior74-67-71 212-1 Jeff Hart72-73-68 213E Bill Britton73-71-69 213E Christopher Williams74-71-68 213E Fred Couples76-67-70 213E Bill Glasson74-72-67 213E Bobby Clampett71-71-71 213E Lonnie Nielsen71-70-72 213E Jay Haas70-74-70 214+1 Kenny Perry75-70-69 214+1 Mark McNulty71-72-71 214+1 J.L. Lewis70-73-71 214+1 Andrew Oldcorn74-70-71 215+2 Tom Lehman76-69-70 215+2 Mark Brooks78-67-70 215+2 Paul Wesselingh71-72-72 215+2 John Huston73-70-72 215+2 Larry Mize74-69-72 215+2 Gary Wolstenholme79-67-69 215+2 Barry Lane74-73-68 215+2 Mark Calcavecchia73-68-74 215+2 Jeff Sluman70-75-71 216+3 Kiyoshi Murota73-70-73 216+3 Mark Mouland72-73-71 216+3 Wayne Levi73-70-73 216+3 Tom Pernice, Jr.76-70-70 216+3 Sonny Skinner77-70-69 216+3 Tom Jenkins75-70-72 217+4 Tim Thelen75-69-73 217+4 Rod Spittle75-72-70 217+4 Jim Gallagher, Jr.75-72-70 217+4 Dick Mast73-71-74 218+5 Russ Cochran73-74-71 218+5 Anders Forsbrand71-74-74 219+6 Mark James73-70-76 219+6 David J. Russell76-69-74 219+6 Jong-Duck Kim75-72-72 219+6 Jeff Freeman74-73-72 219+6 Tom Atchison76-71-72 219+6 Bobby Wadkins76-71-73 220+7 Blaine McCallister74-72-75 221+8 Ted Schulz73-73-75 221+8 Tom Purtzer77-70-74 221+8 Stan Utley73-74-74 221+8 Bruce Vaughan76-69-78 223+10 P.H. Horgan, III72-74-77 223+10 Andrew Magee73-74-76 223+10 Mike Hulbert77-70-76 223+10 Tom Wargo74-73-76 223+10 Peter Fowler75-71-78 224+11 Jeff Coston76-71-77 224+11BMW PGA Champ. Saturday At West Course at Wentworth, Virginia Water, England Purse: $5.76 million Yardage: 7,302, Par: 72 Third Round Luke Donald, England68-68-69 205 Justin Rose, England67-71-69 207 Peter Lawrie, Ireland66-71-72 209 Ernie Els, South Africa68-73-70 211 Richard Sterne, South Africa71-68-72 211 Branden Grace, South Africa69-69-73 211 Peter Hedblom, Sweden68-70-74 212 Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain68-70-74 212 Francesco Molinari, Italy68-70-74 212 Ian Poulter, England71-73-69 213 James Morrison, England68-64-81 213 Jeev Milka Singh, India70-74-70 214 Federico Colombo, Italy69-74-71 214 David Higgins, Ireland70-70-74 214 Marcel Siem, Germany71-67-76 214 Alvaro Quiros, Spain67-70-77 214 David Drysdale, Scotland66-70-78 214 Simon Khan, England71-74-70 215 Lee Westwood, England70-75-70 215 Pablo Martin, Spain69-70-76 215 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina71-67-77 215 Edoardo Molinari, Italy69-70-76 215 F. Andersson Hed, Sweden70-68-77 215 Also Martin Kaymer, Germany71-69-76 216 Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain70-72-76 218 Charl Schwartzel, S. Africa69-71-79 219 C. Montgomerie, Scotland69-74-78 221 Ben Curtis, United States70-75-81 226 The race is on Associated PressFORT WORTH, Texas Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson have set up what will basically be a matchplay final round for the winners plaid jacket at the Colonial. It will be Dufner, whose only two PGA Tour victories came in the past four weeks, against the 2007 Masters champion who got the last of his seven wins two years ago at Hogans Alley. It seems like one of us is either going to win or finish second, Dufner said after his 4-under 66 in the third round Saturday. After two bogeys the previous three holes, Dufner matched playing partner Johnsons birdie putt on the 17th hole and overcame a wayward final tee shot to save par and keep the lead. Dufners 15-under 195 total put him a stroke ahead of Johnson, who shot 65. Tom Gillis was a distant third at 7 under after a 69. I really wasnt aware of (the separation) until I looked at the board on 13. It was more than I anticipated, Johnson said. It seemed like I didnt hear too many roars in front of us, so thats a telling sign. ... I still have 18 holes and thats my focus. I totally anticipate Dufner to keep doing what hes doing. Theres not a whole lot going on thats wrong. Dufner, the winner last week in the Byron Nelson Championship about 30 miles away, is trying to win for the third time in his last four starts. He also is trying to do something only Ben Hogan has done. Hogan, Dufners hero, is the only player to win both PGA Tour events in the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the same year. When he did it in 1946, they werent played in consecutive weeks. The last player to win in consecutive weeks on the PGA Tour was Tiger Woods in 2009. Nobody won more than two tournaments last season. Like Johnson, who wore a plaid-collared shirt Saturday, the first time Dufner realized the gap from everyone else had widened was when he saw that scoreboard at 156-yard 13th hole. And he had a threestroke lead then. From that point on I kind of knew that ... we are going to be battling it out in kind of a unique situation, Dufner said. The leaderboards here most of the year have been pretty packed and you got a lot of guys having a chance to win the title the last nine holes. Dufner avoided a playoff at the Nelson with a 25-foot birdie on the 72nd hole. He has led or shared the lead after 12 of his last 35 rounds, including five of the last seven. Senior PGA Championship BENTON HARBOR, Mich. Roger Chapman shot a 7under 64 to take a five-stroke lead into the final round of the Senior PGA Championship. Chapman finished the day at 14-under par. John Cook began the round tied with Chapman for the lead, but couldnt keep pace with the Englishman and settled for a 69 to drop into second place at Harbor Shores. Chapmans 54-hole score of 199 tied the tournament record set by Sam Snead in 1973, although Snead was 17 under when he set the mark. Steve Pate had a 67 to join 66-year-old Hale Irwin at 7 under. Irwin made a triple bogey on the par-3 fourth, but played well on the back nine and shot 69. Chapman beat Padraig Harrington in a playoff to win a European Tour event in Brazil in 2000, and thats pretty much the highlight of his resume. He has never won on the Champions Tour. He made the cut in all 11 of his Champions Tour starts last year, but didnt have a top-10 finish. European PGA Championship VIRGINIA WATER, England Defending champion Luke Donald remained in position to regain the top spot in the world ranking, shooting a 3-under 69 to take a two-stroke lead in the BMW PGA Championship. The Englishman overcame windy conditions at Wentworth on a day when only three players broke 70, and Ernie Els criticized European Tour officials for the state of the greens on the course he redesigned. Donald had an 11-under 205 total. He needs to finish solo eighth or better to reclaim the No. 1 position from Rory McIlroy. McIlroy missed the cut. Englands Justin Rose was second after a 69. Associated Press Jason Dufner watches his tee shot on the second hole Saturday during the third round of the PGA Colonial golf tournament in Fort Worth, Texas. Dufner stays just ahead of Johnson to lead Colonial into final day Keeping the streak alive Djokovic bids for 4th straight Slam title Associated PressPARIS As daylight disappeared and wind whipped loose dirt around the court, Novak Djokovic watched one last ace fly off Roger Federers racket and end their thrill-a-minute semifinal at the 2011 French Open. Its been nearly a year since that evening, and Djokovic hasnt lost a Grand Slam match since. Hes won 21 in a row, earning championships at Wimbledon in July, the U.S. Open in September, and the Australian Open in January. If Djokovic can prolong that run on the red clay of Roland Garros over the next two weeks, he will become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to win four consecutive major tennis tournaments. A remarkable achievement, to be sure. And one the 25-year-old Serb is trying not to expend too much energy pondering before the French Open, which starts Sunday. It would definitely mean the world to me ... but I havent thought about that too much, because I do not want to put too much pressure on myself, the No. 1ranked Djokovic said, then added with a laugh: Pressure that I dont need at this moment, because I already have enough. He insists he wants to view this tournament the way he would any year. Federers take? Essentially: Good luck with that, pal. The hard part is (the) same for everyone: Every point you play, every game you play, the pressure you face, and just answering the questions time and time again, said Federer, who twice fell one match shy of four Grand Slam titles in a row, losing in the French Open final to Rafael Nadal in 2006 and 2007. Its fun, because youre talking about the highest of accomplishments, Federer continued. But at the end of the day, you just like to play the matches and not talk about it that much. Nadal also went on a three-major winning streak at the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open in 2010 but fell short of No. 4, losing in last years Australian Open quarterfinals while hampered by a left leg muscle injury. He dismissed the notion that he came close to equaling Laver, noting he was three matches away, and said his happiness quotient today doesnt depend on whether or not things went well in Melbourne 16 months ago. Life continues, Nadal said, and you keep working hard to try to be fit and be competitive for the next (match). Theres another way in which Nadal and Federer were far from matching Laver as Djokovic would be, even if he wins his next seven matches. Rocket Rod pulled off his Grand Slams within a calendar year (the Australian left-hander also did it in 1962; Don Budge is the only other man to go 4 for 4). Laver himself firmly believes theres a distinction to be made. People will say, Hes going for a Grand Slam. And I say, No, hes not doing that. That wasnt the way this whole thing was set up, Laver explained last year. It starts in January and ends in September starts with the Australian Open and ends with the U.S. Open. None of the top three men is in action in Paris on Day 1. The schedule includes seven-time major champion Venus Williams in her first Grand Slam match since revealing she was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease; past French Open champions Ana Ivanovic and Svetlana Kuznetsova; reigning U.S. Open champion Sam Stosur; and past U.S. Open title winners Andy Roddick and Juan Martin del Potro. Djokovic and No. 3 Federer will be on court Monday, while No. 2 Nadal is slated to begin his attempt for a record-breaking seventh French Open title on Tuesday. Associated Press Novak Djokovic reacts during a training session Friday for the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Djokovic will be going for his fourth consecutive Grand Slam title when French Open play begins Sunday. Associated Press Miami Heat forward LeBron James is not content with advancing to the Eastern Conference finals. The star will be satisfied with nothing less than an NBA title. NBA title or bust for James, Heat Associated PressMIAMI LeBron James shook a few hands, slapped a few fives, gave a few hugs. That was the extent of his celebrating after the Miami Heat ousted the Indiana Pacers. A return to the Eastern Conference finals no small achievement by any measure is nice, though its far from the oft-stated goal for the reigning NBA MVP and the Heat. Theyll host Game 1 of the East title series Monday night against either Philadelphia or Boston, both of those teams having been ousted from last years playoffs by Miami in five games. You cant just show up, no matter who youre playing against, James said Saturday, when the Heat resumed practice after taking one day off to rest up and recover from a grind against Indiana. We have to prepare the same way weve done the first two rounds and even prepare ourselves even more. As the rounds go, the competition grows, so we look forward to the challenge. The way James sees it, theres not a lot of reason for celebration yet. After all, hes not wearing the letters VIII across his upper teeth. Over the past couple seasons, James has worn mouthguards with fangs, others with the Heat logo, and some with no adornments whatsoever. For these playoffs, hes broken out something new: A mouthguard embossed XVI. It doesnt take much to decipher what those Roman numerals are supposed to signify. Its 16, the number of wins that the Heat would need to capture the NBA championship. Miami has the first eight of those out of the way, but in this all-ornothing season for the Heat, thats far from enough to satisfy anyone.

PAGE 22

Associated Press American Idol runner-up Jessica Sanchez performs Wednesday at the American Idol finale in Los Angeles. She does not have a definite shot at producing an album and could be paid as little as $30,000 in advances. George Jones out of the hospital NASHVILLE, Tenn. Country music star George Jones has been released from the hospital. In a news release from Jones publicist on Saturday, Jones said he is improving, and I look forward to seeing everyone soon. Jones, regarded as the greatest voice in country music history, was hospitalized for the second time this year Monday in Nashville, Tenn., with an upper respiratory infection. The 80-year-old spent a week in the hospital in March as well. The White Lightning singer has canceled his live performances through the month of June and will reschedule shows where possible. Doc Watson still in critical condition WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Grammy-winning folk musician Doc Watson remains in critical condition at a North Carolina hospital after undergoing colon surgery this week. A spokeswoman at Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem said Watson remained in critical condition Saturday. The 89-year-old Watsons daughter, Nancy said the musician fell Monday. The blind singer and guitarist has won several Grammys, including a lifetime achievement award. He also received the National Medal of the Arts. Watson is known as a master of the flatpicking style of guitar playing. He also started Merlefest, an annual gathering of musicians in Wilkesboro named after his son, who died in a tractor accident in 1985. Britney Spears now on X FactorAUSTIN, Texas Britney Spears has been on the job just two days and shes already proving to be a popular judge on The X Factor. The pop queen is growing into her role as critic on the Fox singing contest show. Shes also showing shes not afraid to vote against contestants or disagree occasionally with show creator Simon Cowell and fellow judges Demi Lovato and L.A. Reid. I feel like your song was just in the wrong key, Spears told a contestant Friday. A NTHONY M C C ARTNEY AP Entertainment WriterLOS ANGELES Coming in second on American Idol may still be a path to superstardom, but it no longer offers guaranteed paychecks worthy of the next pop idol or rock star. Wednesday nights runner-up, 16year-old Jessica Sanchez, doesnt have a definite shot at producing an album and could be paid as little as $30,000 in advances for recording singles, according to the Idol contract she and other Season 11 contestants signed earlier this year. The agreement appears to be the first time in Idols history that producers are not offering the shows runner-up an album deal that in previous years came with a guaranteed advance of at least $175,000, an Associated Press review of the Fox shows contracts reveals. The analysis covers eight of Idols 11 seasons during which contracts filed for contestants under the age of 18 were available. The contracts were reviewed by judges in accordance with a California law that requires at least 15 percent of a minor entertainers earnings be set aside for their benefit once they reach adulthood. The reduced royalty advance covers the period immediately following the show. In addition to recording new music, the series winners and finalists are obligated to perform in a concert tour and lend their likeness to a Walt Disney World Resort attraction in Florida. If Sanchez is given an album deal following the show, she will receive the same $175,000 bonus Lauren Alaina was paid after placing second in the shows 10th season. But 19 Recordings Inc., which has the option to handle the albums and recordings of Idol contestants for several years after they appear on the show, has replaced a guaranteed album deal for the runner-up with a staggered Development Period that requires less music and pays out less in advances. Sanchez could be paid as little as $30,000 if she is asked to perform four single songs, or $60,000 if she records an EP of between four and 10 songs. Representatives for 19 Recordings Inc. and American Idol producer FremantleMedia declined comment. They also have not disclosed which recording deal would be offered to Sanchez. It makes sense. You cant continue to offer the same sorts of rewards and incentives when the program was averaging 25 to 30 million (viewers), and (now) the finale is barely breaking 20 million, said Northwestern University assistant professor Max Dawson, who teaches a course on reality television. Wednesdays finale was the lowest-rated final show for Idol in its history. These contracts dont pay off, he said, contrasting the long list of Idol alumni who have been dropped by record labels with those who have thriving careers. It seems like the successes that people like Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood have had are the flukes. He noted the recording industry has shifted toward single song sales in recent years, and even established artists are struggling to sell full albums. I wouldnt be surprised, quite frankly, if this is the direction they head with the winners, Dawson said. Buyers purchased nearly 1.3 billion single songs last year as opposed to 331 million albums, said Dave Bakula, Nielsens senior vice president of analytics for SoundScan. He noted some Idol runners-up have been successful, but producers appear to be giving themselves more flexibility with how they develop artists in different genres. Idol winner Phillip Phillips will receive the same $300,000 advance given to last years winner, Scotty McCreery, upon completion of his first album, according to the contracts. Finalists who placed third and lower could receive deals to record singles, EPs or full albums, with the lowest advance amounting to $24,000 if they complete their commitment to record up to four single songs. Higher advances are paid if 19 Recordings agrees to produce more albums, with Phillips eligible to receive up to $800,000 for a six-album deal. Advances are paid and later deducted from the singers song royalties. As the music industry is changing, it makes sense for Idol to change as well, Dawson said. Despite the contract reductions, more opportunities exist for recent Idol contestants to earn money than their predecessors. Phillips will be paid $200,000 for his Disney attraction work and Sanchez will rake in $50,000 for her appearances. Both are set to get a cut of merchandise profits. No matter what recording deal Sanchez is offered, she already has heavyweight Hollywood representation. In March, a judge approved a deal in which she will be represented by Creative Artists Agency for future television, personal appearance and other employment deals. No more big bucks Birthday Although you are likely to meet a lot of new, eventually close friends in the year ahead, you should continue to spend time with your old pals. They are the ones who stuck by you when you were less popular, and theyll always have your back. Gemini (May 21-June 20) It would be best not to boast about your intentions in advance of accomplishing them. What you believe you can get done and what you actually do complete may be two different things. Cancer (June 21-July 22) There is no reason why you shouldnt do as good of a job for another as you would for yourself. Anything less would be deemed unsuccessful and reflect adversely on your reputation. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You might think it is necessary for you to be all things to all people, even if you know its totally impossible. If you try, it will prove to be totally unproductive. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be careful not to get off on the wrong foot with anybody, because you could end up wasting the entire day doing nothing else but trying to remedy it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You only have a slight chance of coming out ahead of the competition, so dont bet the farm on doing so. If things dont go perfectly and they usually dont youll lose out. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even if a commercial or financial development comes off to your liking, the problem is once you have it in your hands, you might get careless and lose it again. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) The right answers are likely to be easily found in situations where you use cold, hard logic. However, if you put too much faith in your hunches, they arent likely to hold up. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Conditions are a bit topsyturvy inasmuch as you might be fortunate in matters that affect your material affairs, but not so lucky in keeping the goodwill of the people involved. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Social encounters with good friends will turn out to be pleasant experiences for you. Conversely, mingling with business associates might be a pain in the neck. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order to accomplish a major objective, a lot of assertiveness and boldness will be required on your part. If youre too faint-hearted to do so, itll turn out to be just another day. Aries (March 21-April 19) A close friend who is always tight-lipped about his or her personal affairs will resent it if you poke your nose where it doesnt belong. Dont create an incident. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Youll do an excellent job working on numerous projects but sadly, unless you speak up, others may get the credit for your accomplishments. If it matters to you, say something. From wire reports Britney Spears George Jones Doc Watson Today in HISTORY FRIDAY, MAY 25 Mega Money: 8 23 25 26 Mega Ball: 15 4-of-4 MB1 winner$800,000 4-of-46$1,226.50 3-of-4 MB54$298.50 3-of-41,105$43.50 2-of-4 MB1,559$21.50 1-of-4 MB11,984$2.50 2-of-431,587$2 Fantasy 5: 7 20 24 32 34 5-of-52 winners$122,937.16 4-of-5357$111 3-of-511,544$9.50 THURSDAY, MAY 24 Fantasy 5: 1 3 16 20 32 5-of-5No winners 4-of-5266$555 3-of-58,483$23.50 Today is Sunday, May 27, the 148th day of 2012. There are 218 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On May 27, 1937, the newly completed Golden Gate Bridge connecting San Francisco and Marin County, Calif., was opened to pedestrian traffic (vehicular traffic began crossing the bridge the next day). On this date: In 1861, Chief Justice Roger Taney, sitting as a federal circuit court judge in Baltimore, ruled President Abraham Lincoln lacked the authority to suspend the writ of habeas corpus (Lincoln disregarded the ruling). In 1912, golf legend Sam Snead was born in Ashwood, Va. In 1929, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. married Anne Morrow in Englewood, N.J. In 1935, the Supreme Court struck down the National Industrial Recovery Act. In 1941, the British Royal Navy sank the German battleship Bismarck off France, with a loss of some 2,000 lives, three days after the Bismarck sank the HMS Hood. In 1942, Navy Cook 3rd Class Doris Dorie Miller became the first African-American to receive the Navy Cross for his extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during Japans attack on Pearl Harbor. In 1962, a dump fire in Centralia, Pa., ignited a slowburning blaze in underground coal deposits that continues to smolder to this day. In 1985, in Beijing, representatives of Britain and China exchanged instruments of ratification on the pact returning Hong Kong to the Chinese in 1997. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush commemorated Memorial Day at Normandy American Cemetery in France, where he honored the 9,387 men and women buried there. Five years ago: American forces freed 42 kidnapped Iraqis in a raid on an al-Qaida hideout north of Baghdad. One year ago: Gil ScottHeron, 62, widely considered one of the godfathers of rap music, died in New York. Todays Birthdays: Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Herman Wouk is 97. Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is 89. Actress Lee Meriwether is 77. Actor Louis Gossett Jr. is 76. Motion Picture Association of America Chairman Christopher Dodd is 68. Thought for Today: Great wisdom is generous; petty wisdom is contentious. Great speech is impassioned, small speech cantankerous. Chuang-Tzu, Chinese essayist (c.369 B.C.E.-c.286 B.C.E.) INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www.flalottery.com, or call 850-487-7777. Spotlight on PEOPLE Florida LOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning numbers, Page B4 E NTERTAINMENT Page B6 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Todays HOROSCOPE American Idol moves toward lower payouts for runners-up American Idol winner Phillip Phillips performs Wednesday in Los Angeles.

PAGE 23

The season of change I n Ecclesiastes 3 we are told, To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven. In the big picture of things, its sometimes difficult to see the seasons change. But if you were paying attention this month in Citrus County, you witnessed some notable changing of the guard. One of the most significant retirements comes from Ralph Russo of Sugarmill Woods. Ralph is the founder and inspiration behind the Citrus County chapter of SCORE, the organization of retired executives. The SCORE volunteers donate their time and executive experience to assist Citrus County entrepreneurs and business owners. At no cost to the businesses, these volunteers help private companies navigate through the complexities of starting up and growing a business. Ralph helped build one of the best SCORE chapters in the nation right here in Citrus County. The SCORE national organization recently recognized the best chapters in America. Big-city organizations from San Diego and Chicago were given recognition right along with the small-town efforts of Citrus County. Ralph is the poster boy for retirees in our community. He moved here after a successful career up north and then contributed his skills to make his new home a better place. On the other side of the equation, in comes Amy Meek as the new executive at the United Way of Citrus County. Amy is the young, articulate woman who was just hired to run the countys largest nonprofit agency. United Way raises hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to fund 19 other nonprofit agencies in the county and to address the top issues of concern in our community. Amy is a graduate of Crystal River High School and the mother of two young boys. She happens to be the wife of County Commissioner Joe Meek. Amy is filled with enthusiasm, compassion and a vision for how the United Way can better use its resources to address the top problems that face Citrus County. She officially begins her new job on June 1. See WINDOW / Page C3 Gerry Mulligan OUT THE WINDOW Section C SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Paula Dockery FLORIDA VOICES I admit it: Im a social media junkie. It started innocently enough with a personal Facebook page and a couple hundred connections. I posted the usual: favorite foods, songs, events with friends, pictures. More and more friends emerged and, despite my belief that the masses were interested in my witty repartee, it seemed they were more interested in talking politics with a state senator. Soon I was up to the 5,000-friend maximum and I couldnt accept requests from people I actually knew. Plus, some friends were put off by the political debates on my Facebook page, which overshadowed issues like how do you make the perfect PBJ? There was only one solution: start a second, strictly political page. My new professional page had no friend limit, but users had to like you and you couldnt control who was your friend. This was a bit risky, but what the heck, I like a good argument and a healthy exchange of differing views. How to get the political folks to leave my personal page and sign on to the political page? First, I asked nicely. A few hundred joined the political page, but only a couple dozen dropped off the personal page. So I stopped posting on the personal page for a few days, as long as I could stand, to try to drive traffic to the political page. The political page was growing, but people werent leaving the personal page. My next move was a little odd. I announced that I would be defriending anyone who wasnt related or a close personal friend, but offered to keep anyone who asked to be kept. This opened the floodgates of desperate pleas and funny comments to earn a keep. After the tedious process of identifying those to be kept with a goal of reducing 5,000 to 500 I sent a final message that everyone is welcome on my political page and the defriending began. See DOCKERY / Page C3 To tweet or not to tweet? Theres no question Associated Press People walk through a portion of the Boston Common covered with American flags Wednesday in Boston. Relatives and volunteers pl anted the 33,000 flags in the historic park in advance of the Memorial Day weekend, in tribute to Massachusetts soldiers killed in co nflicts as far back as the Civil War. M emorial Day is our nations commemoration of the sacrifices made by those whose lives were on the line for the freedoms we hold sacred. Whether our veterans survived their military service or were lost on the field of battle, our country owes each of them, and their families, a debt of gratitude. I am not a veteran. In the summer of 1969, the year of the nations first draft lottery, my birthday, June 26, was drawn as No. 327. For those not aware of the significance of that, my birthday could have come up No. 1 or No. 365. I was fortunate to be so far down the list, and therefore assured by the luck of the draw to not be called up to serve in the Vietnam War. One of my closest friends drew No. 6, another in the low 20s. Both were ineligible for student deferment and were drafted. One was sent to duty at a NATO base in Europe because he had strong language skills; the other was deployed to Vietnam, where he was seriously wounded in 1970 and sent home. He never fully recovered from his neck, shoulder and arm wounds. As we look at the history of wars proposed by presidents, declared or otherwise funded by Congress, and supported to varying degrees by our citizens, lets remember that none of these conflicts were or, to this day, are immune from political and social controversy. But we should never confuse debate over military policy with the need to be respectful of those whose lives are at risk on the battlefield, in the air, or on the seas. Our nation has been the cherished destination for great waves of immigrants, many from the worlds most frightening and repressive nations. My father and maternal grandparents were three of those immigrants, and perhaps your family has its story of freedom-seeking relatives. Even for our black neighbors whose ancestors came shackled in the holds of slave ships, and Native Americans whose ancestors were slaughtered, subjected to racist cruelties or herded into reservations, the children of todays American families should enjoy the opportunity to be free from the threats of oppression and terror. That freedom was earned, bled for, and in so many cases, died for by our fighting forces. Memorial Day presents an important chance to focus our thoughts and honor the military service of our parents and grandparents, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins. Individuals who either volunteered or were drafted, wore the uniform of our armed forces, and gave all or a portion of their lives in service to our nation and its allies. In respect of those who fought and are fighting today, and especially in memory of those weve lost, lets not be passive about the importance of their sacrifice. In their honor, lets pledge to participate in the following advocacy activities: Register, vote and urge others to do the same. Democracy demands dedication. Actively communicate with candidates and elected officials about issues affecting families, including military families. Remember, our elected officials work for us, and elections are job interviews. Share your thoughts in the media by writing letters to the editor. Share opinions with editorial boards, columnists and reporters. Media is the most cost-effective megaphone. Motivate youth to exercise their voice in matters which affect them. Our next generation of advocates needs good role modeling. Confront those who think that complaining about problems is sufficient. Whining is not as productive as winning! Compliment community leadership and promote active involvement by friends, colleagues and neighbors as volunteers, whom I call time philanthropists. Support causes that focus on advocating positive change. Spectating doesnt produce progress. Our gifts of time and financial support are vital, no matter the cause. Lets exercise our rights and take our responsibilities seriously as we move forward to make our communities safer, more secure and worthy of the legacy our children and grandchildren deserve.Jack Levine is founder of the Tallahasseebased 4Generations Institute. He may be reached at Jack@4Gen.org. Air Force Major Terry Dutcher, of Hill Air Force Base, Utah, visits the grave of her son, Army Corporal Michael Avery Pursel, who died serving in Iraq in 2007 at age 19, on Thursday surrounded by flags placed by soldiers at each grave for the annual Flags-In in honor of Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Honor service and sacrifice Jack Levine GUEST COLUMN

PAGE 24

Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 Vote responsiblyIn America we have the wonderful privilege of being able to vote and select our most qualified representatives to work for us. However, what I am witnessing is extreme apathy and inadequate consideration of facts concerning candidates to base wise judgment so important in guiding our future. Our low voter turnout is historically an embarrassment, and with that a frustrating indicator supporting my appeal. Many who cast a ballot do so because their families always voted along this or that party line, or our union told us to do this, entitlement preservation, or some other misplaced justification. We absolutely must not vote with a casual, subjective, prejudiced basis of preference. Many dismiss their going to vote because they dont like any candidate. This inaction demonstrates a complete lack of respect for a bestowed honor with failure to become more involved and accept their inherent obligation. We are constantly bombarded by extensively biased news reporting, distortions by candidates, including proven lies, and so much else that alters and impairs a voters judgment through a well crafted design and intent. We, as American voters who have this deep commitment about reversing this countrys obvious declination, not only value the cherished right to vote, but also the inherent responsibility to do it by honestly understanding the actual credentials and capability of each candidate and looking through this manipulative smokescreen of misrepresentation and accusations. The campaign trail has become a negative, unproductive, overly competitive battlefield and a huge waste of resources. The voting public simply must see beyond all this conflict and extract the positive, factual, and unbiased messages that will lead us back to greatness through our making the correct choice in the voting booth. We will be making a vitally important decision in November, undoubtedly the most critical in the history of this great nation. I implore you to do it responsibly for all the right reasons so we may be represented by strong leaders of integrity, character, and love of country. The traditions that have made us excel as a free enterprise democracy must be preserved and defended. Bob Peacock Hernando Stand united With all the dissension, turmoil and unrest in our country, it may be difficult to be patriotic. Have we forgotten Sept. 11, our veterans and the men and women who gave their lives for our country? How about the ones serving today that we may have freedom? Lets fly the flag and be proud to be an American united and one nation under God. Margie Marcotte Beverly Hills WASHINGTON I n one of his characteristic conniptions about people who frustrated him, Theodore Roosevelt, progressivisms first president, said of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, I could carve out of a banana a judge with more backbone than that. TR was as mistaken about Holmes spine as are various progressives today about Chief Justice John Roberts. They are waging an embarrassingly obvious campaign, hoping he will buckle beneath the pressure of their disapproval and declare Obamacare constitutional. The crucial question is whether Congress exceeded its enumerated power to regulate interstate commerce when it mandated that individuals engage in commerce by purchasing health insurance. Justice Anthony Kennedy is generally considered todays swing vote, but his acerbic first question to the administrations lawyer during the second day of oral argument changed assumptions: Can you create commerce in order to regulate it? Concluding that Kennedy might be disposed to overturn the mandate, some Obamacare defenders decided that Roberts vote will be decisive. They hope to secure it by causing Roberts to worry about his reputation and that of his institution. Recently, for example, Vermonts Pat Leahy, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, delivered a Senate speech defending the constitutionality of what he calls the personal responsibility requirement. (This is his Orwellian appellation for the mandate, whereby government coercion nullifies personal choice regarding insurance.) After 37 years in the Senate, Leahy probably no longer knows when he sounds insufferably patronizing, as he did when he said that during oral argument he thought Roberts seemed well aware of the significance of (the Obamacare) decision. And I thought I saw a chief justice who understands the importance of this case to all Americans. And Roberts seemed to understand the deference owed to Congress. Leahy intimated that overturning Obamacare would be as momentous, as divisive of the nation and as damaging to the court as was Bush v. Gore, which he asserts shook the confidence of the American people in the Supreme Court. But surely a striking fact about that decision is how equably Americans accepted it. This testified to the courts durable prestige, which is a function of the courts immunity to pressures from politicians. Public approval of the court is above 50 percent; that of Congress below 20 percent. Leahy unsubtly intimated that to avoid another 5-4 decision Roberts should emulate the leadership that Chief Justice Warren provided in the unanimous decision in Brown v. Board of Education. It is, however, passing strange to compare the Obamacare case with Brown, implying that a less-thanunanimous decision would be dangerous. The school desegregation case overturned the social order of an entire region and accelerated the transformation of the nations cultural norms. Obamacare is just an unpopular law enacted by grotesque logrolling (securing three Democratic senators votes with the Louisiana Purchase, the Gator-aid and the Cornhusker Kickback). Furthermore, Obamacare passed because grossly corrupt conduct by Justice Department prosecutors in the trial of Republican Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska had cost him re-election. Leahy tutored Roberts about appropriate deference to the elected branch, vacuously admonished him to be a chief justice for all of us, and absurdly asserted that the mandate is consistent with the understanding of the Constitution that the American people have had for the better part of a century. Jeffrey Rosen of George Washington Law School, writing in The New Republic, topped Leahys rhetorical extravagance by saying this is Roberts moment of truth because if the court overturns Obamacare 5-4, Roberts stated goal of presiding over a less divisive court will be viewed as an irredeemable failure. Oh? Viewed by whom? Perhaps by people who consider it ideological and somehow reprehensible that in the last full term, conservative Justices John Roberts and Sam Alito voted together 96 percent of the time, but who consider it principled and admirable that Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan voted together 94 percent of the time. Like-minded justices agree. So? Why, exactly, would it be less divisive for the court to uphold the broadly disliked Obamacare 5-4 than to overturn it 5-4? But whether Obamacare is liked or detested is entirely irrelevant. The publics durable deference toward the Supreme Court derives from the publics recognition that the court is deferential not to Congress but to the Constitution. Concerning which, it is cheeky of Rosen, a liberal, to lecture Roberts about jurisprudential conservatism, which Rosen says requires restraint. Such clumsy attempts to bend the chief justice are apt to reveal his spine of steel. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. He who findeth fault meaneth to buy. Thomas Fuller, M.D., Gnomologia, 1732 A liberal squeeze play CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .......................................... publisherCharlie Brennan ............................................ editor Mike Arnold .......................................... HR directorSandra Frederick ............................ managing editor Curt Ebitz ........................................ citizen member Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member Rebecca Martin ................................ guest member Logic lost in SBDC decision H ad a majority of county commissioners understood the role of the Small Business Development Center, they might not have voted to kiss off an annual grant of $69,000 for a modest matching contribution of $32,500. The SBDC is not SCORE (the Service Corps of Retired Executives), which provides consultations to individuals looking to start up new businesses. The SBDC is not the Economic Development Council(EDC), which courts existing industries in hopes theyll relocate to Citrus County, along with other functions. The SBDC is not the business incubator a project of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and the EDC which seeks to nurture concepts of would-be entrepreneurs to create budding businesses. Yes, the SBDC shares an office with the incubator because the chamber had space available in Homosassa, but the two arent to be confused. Commissioner Dennis Damato with echoes from Commissioners Rebecca Bays and Winn Webb said the SBDC isnt doing what he thinks it should do. As a program of the federal Small Business Administration, the SBDC cant really re-create itself to meet the whims of county officials in all 50 states. Its primary function is to assist existing small businesses with free services ranging from financial and marketing advice to engineering and technical problems. In seeking county funding of $32,500 for the upcoming fiscal year, commissioners were presented with local data. While the SBDC only helped in the startup of one business, it assisted in the expansion of 18, resulting in the retention of 28 jobs and 19 new jobs in the county. I believe your focus should have been on local business retention, not startups, Commissioner Damato told the SBDC officials on Tuesday. Given the data provided, the skeptical commissioner failed to acknowledge that that was the case. Anybody should not go into business right now unless they have three to five years worth of capital and are willing to go ahead and do that, Commissioner Damato asserted. Thats fine but it has little to do with the function of the SBDC. The trio of commissioners voting against SBDC funding indicated they want to see cold, hard results. With its primary stated purpose being to strengthen existing businesses, cold, hard results arent as easily quantified as is the manufacturing of widgets. Its a bit baffling that little value was placed on the 174 individual counseling sessions provided to 72 businesses. Its perplexing that little value was placed on seven workshops over the past 12 months that attracted 146 advice-thirsty small-businesspeople, where they gained insight into social media, financial performance and business continuity. Rather than continuing to go down the path of educating our small-business owners, Commissioner Damato proposes taking the $32,500 in funds from business licenses to hire a full-time lobbyist. He also suggested that those funds be used as seed money for Port Citrus, under the direction of the county commission and port authority comprised of the same individuals but, in theory, separate bodies. And, he also suggested that the money be used to help existing businesses. Exactly. That is what the money was being used for along with the matching $69,000. When it comes to helping small businesses, the commissions vote was a clear-cut case of failing to see the forest for the trees. THE ISSUE: Pulling funds from Small Business Development Center.OUR OPINION: Ill-informed decision. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will be limited to three letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Meaningless deaths Another Memorial Day is coming up on us. Its a shame many men and women all throughout the country and the world, good Americans, have died for causes that didnt pan out to be anything. Look at our country. Foreigners are buying our corporations and putting good Americans on breadlines. I dont care what partys in office. This is a terrible and a crying shame. Men and women are sacrificing for this country.Local means local After years and years of everybody touting shop locally, Im consistently amazed by the number of businesses and people who go out of town to shop for deals. They assume they can get things online from out of town less expensively than they can get here. Havent they learned yet that they should practice what they preach? They go around and tell everybody, Shop local and they themselves go out of town. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE RETHINK THIS ONE George Will OTHER VOICES

PAGE 25

C OMMENTARYC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C3 C heryl and I have found there are always two prices to pay when we travel abroad: There is the cost of passage, including ship and land transportation as well as airfare; and there is the wear and tear on our bodies which comes while coming home. That always seems to be the hardest part coming home. Maybe one day we will become smart enough to fly to wherever it is we want to go and then sail back home, but that hasnt happened yet. As it pertains to our most recent trip, we finished up a delightful monthlong voyage while in Sydney, slept a restful night at a high-quality hotel, were transported to the airport via limousine and were met by a porter who took us and our luggage to the appropriate check-in line. So far so good, but then the good was over. We stopped being treated like pedigree poodles and pretty much became cattle in a herd heading to the stockyards of the eastern United States. Before I go further, let me stop em before they start and explain that our children always chide me when complaining about a little bit of inconvenience after completing a fabulous trip, but their definition of a little bit of inconvenience and mine differ. Having to wait in line to check your luggage is a little bit of inconvenience; flying 11,000 miles economy class from Sydney to Tampa with stops in Los Angeles and Dallas during a total period of 30 hours is not. Why, you might ask, do we not fly first class or at least business class? The answer is simple money. The cost of our flights would then be almost as much as the cost of the entire trip, so Cheryl and I pour ourselves into undersized seats, fasten the seatbelts, eat and drink whatever theyre inclined to provide and try to survive. It took eight columns to get us from San Francisco to Sydney, but, I promise, Ill only take just this one to bring us home. The first leg of the trip was unusual to say the least. Remember last week when I said remember my reference to March 1? Well, here goes. We left Sydney at noon on March 1 and we arrived in Los Angeles shortly before 7 a.m. on March 1. Thats right, we got there five hours before we left, but you must add 24 hours for crossing the international dateline and subtract the regular time zone changes, so, my best guess is that the flight took approximately 17 hours. We were then rushed through immigration and customs at the L.A. airport and waited. Eventually, we boarded a flight from Los Angeles to Dallas, which took something over four hours, then, again, we waited. Dallas wasnt really so bad. We found a restaurant in the airport with which we were familiar and which we both like very much, but while we were having a nice meal, I finally checked our tickets to confirm our projected arrival time in Tampa. Surprise! When we had boarded in Sydney, no one pointed out the change to our flight schedule. Our layover in Dallas was now only two hours instead of four, so we rushed through the first decent meal wed had in a day so as to scurry off and catch the final hop from Dallas to Tampa. Enough already. At about 1 a.m. on March 2, we arrived home. And, once more, after kissing the door, I told the same old lie I always tell, Im never leaving home again. But, I know I will. Cheryl and I enjoy traveling, and most of all, I enjoy watching her enjoy traveling. So, no doubt, we will do it again but next time, I hope were smart enough to make the coming-home part a little bit less stressful it will take some scheduling considerations, but nothing says we cant reverse the order of our goings and comings. Theres got to be a better way! Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. Fred Brannen A SLICE OF LIFE Coming home: Theres got to be a better way! So here comes the bad news: A wateruse permit application has recently been filed at the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) requesting an average withdrawal of more than 13 million gallons of water a day (MGD) from the Floridan Aquifer. The purpose of this water use will be to care for 30,000 head of cattle, and the associated slaughterhouse. Even more alarming, the request includes use of more than 26 MGD, maximum pumpage, from more than 100 wells located on 30,000 acres of land just north of Ocala. Gary Kuhl, environmental engineer, quoted in the Citrus County Chronicle.M r. Kuhls are the typical thoughts of environmental activists and regulators who stifle economic growth and trample upon private property rights. Many of them place more value on preserving the Earth, undisturbed, than upon permitting citizens to utilize the bounty of the Earth to earn a living. Lets put this into proper perspective. Thirteen million gallons of water per day are to be withdrawn to support 30,000 head of cattle, create jobs and provide food for millions of people. The Floridan Aquifer from which the water will be withdrawn is about 100,000 square miles in size, extending from southern Georgia throughout most of Florida. I could find no estimates, but it probably contains hundreds of trillions of gallons of water. Twelve million gallons per day is but a tiny fraction of that number and far less than is lost every day by evaporation from just a few of the lakes fed by that aquifer. The average thunderstorm is estimated to contain around 275 million gallons of water. One small storm dumping water on the aquifer every 10 days would easily replace the 13 million gallons requested to be withdrawn daily. But all 13 million gallons need not be replaced. Some water will evaporate and some will become part of the cows. Most of the water will be returned directly to the aquifer after it has been used for irrigation and as waste water, filtered by the soil. The impact of actual water loss upon the flow of water in nearby Silver Springs, something which alarms Mr. Kuhl, would be too small to measure. Silver Springs, indeed, has been flowing at lower rates in 10 of the last 20 years. Flows correlate best with the reduced average rainfall during that period something outside the control of regulators. Had rainfall been above average over the past decade, flows would have been above average despite what was withdrawn from the aquifer for human use. The effect of population growth in the area, assumed to reduce flows, is difficult to measure. But, again, keep in mind that water consumed by humans is returned to the aquifer, not forever lost. Our utilization of water most probably has little effect on flows in springs and on water table levels. However, it does affect water quality. Mr. Kuhl might better have expressed alarm about the increasing levels of nitrates in the springs. Nitrate pollution encourages the growth of algae and puts pressure on native plants and stream life. Nitrate pollution is directly affected by fertilizers used to grow food and by unavoidable human waste. The nitrate problem was many decades in the making and would take decades to eliminate, even if all humans were banned from Florida. It wont be solved by denying the commerce and economic growth which funds solutions to the problem. It cannot be solved by cutting off our food supply. Restoring the environment to the pristine state that existed when humans in Florida struggled to survive parasites, pestilence and heat is not a reasonable goal. A workable balance between human needs and a healthy environment is the best we can do. It seems, at times, that environmentalists lose sight of this. William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia University, New York Medical College and the USF College of Business Administration. He served in the Army as a surgeon and as a Special Forces Officer, achieving the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Georgia before entering private practice. Dr. Dixon can be reached at Wdixon16@yahoo.com. Water threat exaggerated Dr. William Dixon OTHER VOICES A word of warning: People do not like to be defriended. Despite the alternative site and the polite warnings, people youve never met are greatly offended when you remove them from your personal Facebook page. Once they realized they were no longer getting my feed, friend requests started coming in droves. Other Facebook friends informed me of my mistake in defriending so-and-so. Little by little, people were added back in and new folks joined. My status today? Im at the 5,000-friend limit on my personal page, with a couple thousand friend requests pending, and plenty of room on my political page, with around 4,500 tuning in. Apparently more folks are interested in my travels, my favorite songs, my new motor scooter and how much I saved with coupons at Publix. So now I keep two Facebook pages active. If you post anything political on my personal page, you get a gentle reminder that this page is a no politics zone. If you do it repeatedly, you are defriended. The only rule on my political page is that if you are rude to anyone else posting on my page, you will be blocked. You can argue, you can disagree, you can post your own links, but you cannot be disrespectful. The exchange of ideas, opinions, suggestions and information has been tremendous. As an elected official, I learn a great deal about what people are angry and concerned about. People seem to be very open on Facebook, much more so than in person or by email. My favorite thing is to throw out a controversial topic or news story, and step back and let others debate. True democracy and free speech at work. But then came my love for Twitter. At 3,350 followers, my account is pretty active. I was flattered to be contacted by reporters for stories about politicians who successfully use social media. The pluses: you are so much better informed, you get a good feel for shifts in the political tide and you get to get your message out quickly. The minuses: extremely time consuming, hard to accurately deliver a complex thought in 140 characters and the public nature of those who want to argue. Your Twitter effectiveness is officially measured by programs such as Klout, and Ive regularly made the Top Five List for Florida politicians who tweet, only deepening my addiction. My favorite time on Twitter happened the last day of session, when things were too hectic to keep an accurate account of the days activities. It was easy to send a quick tweet and later turn the collection into a column chronicling the inner workings of legislating, otherwise known as sausagemaking. The runner-up: organizing a pub crawl among four or five friends and ending up with an expanded and enthusiastic group. Not a day goes by that I dont run into someone I dont think I know, only to be told that we are friends on Facebook or that they follow me on Twitter. When they tell me their name, its like a reunion of old friends reminiscing about our conversations. For those of you who havent joined the world of social media, you are missing out on being connected in this less personal but oddly more personal world. A word of warning: Tweet responsibly. Your words will live in infamy.Paula Dockery is a term-limited Republican senator from Lakeland who is chronicling her final year in the Florida Senate. She can be reached at pdockery@floridavoices.com. DOCKERYContinued from Page C1 Not a day goes by that I dont run into someone I dont think I know, only to be told we are friends on Facebook or that they follow me on Twitter. This month we also saw the retirement of Don Irwin, a retiree who spent the last dozen years or so organizing the Our Lady of Grace Knights of Columbus blood drives. Don, 76, of Beverly Hills has been organizing blood drives since 1995 and has helped save countless lives through his efforts. While he has slowed down a little, he has left an incredible mark on our community. He is another retiree who has made really good things happen. Joanna Castle is another young woman who is on the other side of her journey. Joanna has taken over as the executive director of the Citrus County YMCA and shes making great things happen. Joanna is a graduate of Lecanto High School and the University of Florida. She moved to Miami, but came back to Citrus County with her husband and twin 4year-old daughters so they could raise their family. She has immersed herself in expanding the YMCA programs in Citrus County and will lead the effort to build the countys first YMCA facility. She is so enthusiastic and emotional about helping people improve their lives that you cant help but want to be involved. Its so great to see our local graduates come back to Citrus County and make a difference. And speaking of our county schools, you cant help but recognize Kelly Tyler, who just retired after 11 years at the helm of Lecanto High School. The principal spent 29 years in our county school system and impacted the lives of so many children. He kept a steady hand at the countys fastest growing high school and will be missed. Sticking with our school system, I have got to say that one of my favorite graduates this year is Adam Taylor of Crystal River. Lots of students have to overcome barriers to success, but Adam had to overcome a plane crash. He fought back from lifethreatening injuries he received in a plane crash and graduated last week. He is off to the University of Florida in the fall. His No. 1 cheerleader (and mom) is Fancy Taylor, and we hope she will pull him back to Citrus County after he graduates. And finally, Dr. Jim Harvey officially retires at the end of next month from his leadership role at the College of Central Florida. Jim helped grow the Citrus campus of the college and then went to the Ocala campus, where he used his incredible skills to expand the entire college. Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. His email address is gmulligan @chronicleonline.com. WINDOW Continued from Page C1 Letters to THE EDITOR Statistics, not anecdotes This letter is response to letter titled Obama not liked, dated May 11 and written by Harry Cooper. Mr. Cooper bashes statistics and claims he gives facts. In a previous letter, he presented three gas receipts with no price per gallon of gas on them when he was discussing gas prices. I wrote back the exact gas prices per gallon for those periods of time. I guess Mr. Cooper has a different definition of what a fact is. Once again, he blames President Obama for the price of fuel. This time he brings up the Keystone XL pipeline. When the pipeline goes through, it will have no impact on the price consumers pay, the reason being that the price of gasoline is controlled by the price of crude oil. As far as my comments in previous letters about Obamas approval ratings in Europe, he claims my figures are wrong. Mr. Cooper feels he is an expert on these ratings because he travels to Europe. My figures of 75 percent come from Transatlantic Trends and Gallup. Call this statistics or facts; either I will trust much more then Mr. Coopers opinions. Also, as I am writing this letter, gas prices are going down. As far as Obama being in bed with China, this is also not true; I retired 10 years ago and many of our jobs were already sent to China long before Obama was president. Those really responsible for jobs going to China is upper management, which would rather get cheap Chinese communist labor then provide a job with a living wage for a returning veteran who served his or her country. I close saying most statistics are facts. Chuck Weiler Crystal River The big picture Art Jones is absolutely correct, in his letter published May 9, when he says every ounce of lyngbya physically pulled out of the water is an ounce of gunk that doesnt remain in the water. A persistent effort will have a positive impact on the water quality in the bay. My concern is that such efforts have to be never-ending to be effective. Hence my concern about finding a long-term solution by reducing nutrients lyngbya feeds on. My intended focus was on having more central sewers installed, eliminating septic systems that let effluent flow into the soil and on into the water. The city and county are to be commended for the project installing central sewer out Fort Island Trail. Now we need to look forward to further expansion. The city of Crystal River has done an excellent job of getting most of its properties on central sewer. Citrus County, however, has more than 60,000 septic tanks in use. The Pine Ridge treatment plant is running at under 50 percent capacity. Every effort needs to be made to connectmore properties to the Pine Ridge plant. This is imperative for the quality of our water. A second source of pollution in the bay is nitrogen fertilizers. The land beneath us is typically sandy or karst, which is limestone pocked with interlacing cavities. Once water soaks into the ground, it easily finds its way into the caverns and underground rivers, which locally seem to flow into Kings Bay. Anyone using nitrogen fertilizers in our county can be adding nitrogen to the bay. My pleas are that: 1) the county spend money wisely, so funds can be earmarked for future sewer expansion; and 2) all residents restrict their use of fertilizers to those containing no nitrogen. Adele Jacobson Crystal River

PAGE 26

Women and policyIs it possible, now that women are 52 percent of the electorate, that we can put a halt to political and religious wars being fought on our bodies? Is it possible for women to evaluatepolicies that directly affect their lives and well-being and that of their families for themselves? Is it possible for women to speak up and stand up for their rights when they are told to shut up and sit down? I know a lot of women dont want to have anything to do with politics. But a lot of us dont like to sit in a dirty garage while our cars are being repaired, either. Both are uncomfortable and often hostile environments for women. But we need to have our cars repaired and we need to have our approach to public policy repaired as well. Is it possible for women to be fully participating citizens? Dont believe what you are told; do your own research on how these policies affect your lives. Do you think elected officials should impose their personal religious beliefs and idiosyncrasies on us via government? Do you think government has a right to tell you that you must have an abortion or a child? Should the government prioritize low taxes for corporations over programs that help women and children? Policies are being passed that regulate all of these things. Be careful who you vote for.Jo Darling Lecanto Remember service On Monday, May 28, our nation will be celebrating Memorial Day. This is a day to commemorate the sacrifices made by those who have served our country. Their sacrifices have given American families the opportunity to enjoy freedom from terror and threats of oppression. Whether our veterans survived their military service, or were less fortunate and did not return home, we owe each of them and their families a debt of gratitude. While we are celebrating this Memorial Day weekend, whether at a memorial service, a barbecue or picnic or relaxing with friends and family, please remember Memorial Day is a time to focus our thoughts on our armed forces and the freedoms we enjoy as a result of their sacrifices. God bless our veterans and God bless the USA, the greatest country in the world!Arnold Virgilio, Vietnam veteran Mary-Ann Virgilio, spouse Inverness C4 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMMENTARY 000BJXX 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2 3Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday May May www.chronicleonline.com The Chronicle is committed to supporting local businesses and organizations that provide all types of services, fundraisers and entertainment throughout our community. The Chronicle is committed to helping make Citrus County the best place to live and work. Dont hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all of your sponsorship needs! 194 SPONSORED EVENTS SO FAR THIS YEAR! Friday June 1st Beverly Hills Farmers Market Saturday June 2nd Happy Birthday Citrus County Movies in The Park: Happy Feet 2 Boat Drawing 25th Anniversarry Spanish American Dinner/Dance Music on the Square Friday June 3rd Beverly Hills Farmers Market Citrus Jazz Society Saturday June 9th Outdoor Adventure Expo Sunday June 10th Outdoor Adventure Expo Tuesday June 12th Military Card Party Wednesday June 13th Rays vs NY Mets Thursday June 14th Flag Day Ceremony Inverness Friday June 15th Beverly Hills Farmers Market Saturday June 16th Flag Day Celebration Fort Cooper Wednesday June 20th Bridal Show & Luncheon Friday June 22nd Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre Trash to Treasures Saturday June 23rd Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre Seminole Hard Rock Casino Trip Sunday June 24th Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre G O T C H A C O V E R E D 000BBOQ Getting Married? C ome to the Bridal Show at the Citrus County Builders AssociationJune 20, 2012 1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto A variety of vendors will be in attendance, Wedding Planners, Caterers, Florists, Makeup Artists, Hair Stylists, Dance Instruction, Bakers and more! Free Lunch For Brides 11am-12pmby Reservation Only Limited Seating AvailableDoor Prizes and Free Wedding Planning Guide Open To Public 1pm Sponsored by Event Solutions by Linda RSVP 352-464-0004 000BIB7 Happy Birthday CITRUSCOUNTY!Come and join us on Saturday June 2nd for the Celebration of two major birthdays! Opening Ceremonies at 10:00am West steps of Historic Courthouse. Birthday Cake and Treats will be served following in the Museum Meet Robert Butler Highwaymen Artist, who created a painting of the 1912 Citrus County Courthouse, over 25 years ago. Former Inverness Primary School Students will open a time capsule from 25 years ago. Along with Many, Many More FunActivities.One Courthouse Square Inverness, FL For More Information, Please Call (352) 341-6436 or (352) 341-6427 Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County superhero who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle. He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs. Letters to THE EDITOR Sidewalks not needed My comment is, the sidewalks on (State Road) 44 are a waste of money. I agree with Indefinite expense. Payers money, save the money. Taxpayers should not have to pay all this money. The money should be put towards the community, such as the pool, the libraries, (S.R.) 44 only. Stop wasting our money. I am a senior citizen. Stick to path Down by the grammar school on Citrus Springs Boulevard, you spent all kinds of money making a white line for a bike path, yet these bicyclers still want to ride five and six across instead of getting on the bike path that we spent all that money to build.College costs The well-to-do people who can afford to send their children to a good college or university will receive an excellent education while the people who are living paycheck to p aycheck are lucky if their children get into a college because they keep cutting the education budget and keep raising the tuition. Now that is truly class warfare.Couch crash This is for the (person) traveling east on (State Road) 44, probably going to the landfill on (May 17). Thank you so much for not tying down your stuff. You lost your couch. Unfortunately, we couldnt avoid it and ran over it and it cost us $150. Thank you so much.Only American I agree with Herman Cain and his friend that said its time to stop the labeling. No more labeling. We are a multicultural-color nation. So except if you are born in another country and have become a U.S. citizen, you are either a brown, red, white or black American thats it. No Mexican American, no Polish American, no French American, no African American, no English American, no Chinese American, no Asian American. Great clinicThis is a big shout-out to Countryside Animal Clinic. Id like to thank Mark and the vet tech and Dr. Jennifer Hooper. I had to take my little dog, Teddy, there for an emergency visit and they were just great. I just wanted everybody to know. Thank you, guys. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579

PAGE 27

Seniors can handle home maintenance D EAR BRUCE: I just read your column talking about the pros and cons of buying a home vs. renting, especially in regard to mowing the yard and house maintenance. As a woman in my 70s, I can attest to the fact that one can hire all those things done! When I got divorced back in the 1980s, my soon-to-be ex-husband said I should get a condo because you could never take care of a house. I rented a nice apartment for a few months before deciding to buy a home. I was so glad that I did rent for a while, because I really did not like condo living. I bought a house that needed quite a bit of work, but I was able to hire it done. Later, when the housing market took off in California (after a steep drop!), I sold it for a profit and moved to Oklahoma, where I now live in another newer house that I own ... and for which I hire all the yard and maintenance work done. Just my opinion, and I always enjoy reading your column. R.K., via email DEAR R.K.: Congratulations on handling things extremely well. Your former husband, it seems, had less confidence in you than you had in yourself, and that says a good deal about you. You make the point that there are things such as yard work, house maintenance, etc., that one can hire to have done. Obviously that is the case, but the problem for many people is that they either will not or cannot spend the money. The smartest thing that comes out of your letter is that you did rent a different type of housing for a time to see how you liked it. This is something I regularly recommend. Rather than jumping in the pond, put your toe in and see if you like the environment. You found out that you liked living in a house better, and you had the wherewithal and the willingness to spend money on the hard-labor chores that are beyond most people your age. All the way around, I congratulate you on the way you handled things. Im sure you will continue to do well. DEAR BRUCE: Our granddaughter started college last fall using student loans. Her father has been out of work for some time and couldnt help her with expenses. After two semesters, she is in debt about $10,000. We have paid $500, and her parents have paid $365. She should be able to get some scholarships for next semester, but she wants us to co-sign for a $4,600 student loan to finish paying off the school for the current semester. The $4,600 is included in the $10,000. I am aware that 75 percent of cosigned loans go bad and that it will tie up our credit line for a very long time. I have explained this and other consequences of her having five loans just from her first year. I am concerned she wont be able to pay on the loans if she quits or when she finishes with even more debt. It seems like a See MONEY / Page D3 Bruce Williams SMART MONEY Section D SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Y ouve probably noticed the recent plethora of red, white and blue advertisements, circulars and direct mail all in the name of Memorial Day. Walking into a store recently, I noticed a sign on the door urging shoppers to Get ready for Memorial Day backyard barbecues by buying the patriotic-themed outfits on sale. A colleague remarked the other day that Memorial Day is one of her favorite holidays because it kicks off the summer season and she enjoys the family picnic by the lake. All perfectly legitimate pursuits for an extended weekend. And all beside the point. Memorial Day is the time when Americans should unite in remembering our brave servicemen and women who gave their lives serving our country and protecting our freedoms. The nonprofit Florida Generation Web project lists 46 Citrus County casualties of war since World War I. Of those, 31 fell during World War II. Many more who served from Citrus County lost their lives to service-related disabilities. Memorial Day is also a time when we can renew our resolve to support our veterans, our troops and their families. Certainly one very real way we can do that is by ensuring our veterans are welcome once they come home. From a workforce perspective, that means jobs. Being out of work is difficult, financially and emotionally, for anyone. For military veterans, it is particularly difficult to transition from serving such an important job often, literally, in life-and-death situations to coming home and being unsure of what their new role is. For veterans of all generations, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics monthly economic situation report, the unemployment rate for April 2012 was 7.1 percent. For veterans who left the service after 2001, the unemployment rate was 9.2 percent. To be perfectly honest, its not easy to know how the numbers for Citrus Countys veterans compare. The most recent data available for Citrus County is the American Community Survey of 2010, which reported a veteran population of 19,550, of which slightly more than 60 percent were age 65 or older. That left a labor force of 4,472 working-age veterans those working or actively seeking employment of which 675, or 15 percent, were out of work. That compares to an unemployment rate of 13.8 percent for nonveterans, which equated to 5,882 jobless, but we dont know how many of those may have been veterans family members. Like I said, thats the most recent data, and it is two years old. Is it fair to say the unemployment rate for veterans here is trending downward, as were seeing nationally and, in terms of the general unemployment rate, statewide, regionally and in Citrus County? One could certainly make that case. But just because things may be improving doesnt mean we take our focus off our mission just as our veterans serve with equal diligence during times of peace as well as conflict. Since the beginning of the calendar year, Workforce Connection has placed 325 veterans in jobs, including 96 from Citrus County. We have held a Retooling and Refueling for Success threeday workshop for veterans in Lecanto to help them develop strategies to move from a military to civilian career. Workforce has also deployed a Veteran Team of Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists each member served with or retired from the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, National Guard and/or Reserve. It is a diverse team one was an officer, another was an avionics technician and a third was a drill sergeant. Kim Smith, lead LVER and US Navy veteran who also served in the Florida Army Reserve and National Guard, said, Our team prides itself in our genuine caring for our brother and sister veterans we serve. Among the teams efforts, Smith said, We are striving to promote the hire of veterans, work to assist veterans become more marketable and more competitive in the job market. We have performed outreach with area veteran organizations and the local Florida Army National Guard units as well as with employers. We work to develop strong networking bonds with area organizations including homeless veteran programs. Veterans Job Information services are available at the Citrus County Workforce Connection Center at 1103 E. Inverness Blvd. in Inverness. The LVER and DVOP personnel are tasked with providing priority workforce services to veterans, including job placement, information about the local job market, assessments and career-interest testing, referral to training programs and help securing funds to complete training or retraining. We also offer a program that allows veterans to see how their military skills may transfer to civilian occupations. You can set up an appointment by calling 352-637-2223 or 800-434JOBS. Additionally, the Vow to Hire Veterans Acts new Veterans Retraining Assistance Program (VRAP) gives unemployed veterans, ages 35 to 60, financial assistance to train for high demand occupations. The program started May 15, with applications reviewed on a firstcome, first-served basis. Information is available at http://benefits.va.gov/vow/ed ucation.htm. For employers, there is great advantage to hiring C ANDICE C HOI Associated Press NEW YORK M ONDEWHAAAAT? The sarcasm was palpable in the one-word headline that appeared in The New York Poston the day after Kraft Foods revealed that it planned to name its new global snack business Mondelez, an interpretation of a mash-up of the Latin words for world and delicious. But that wasnt the only dig. One blogger teased that she wouldve been stifling giggles if shed been in meetings to determine the name. A Forbes contributor suggested a trick for remembering how to say it: Just think Bush Administration Secretary of State. You know, Mon-de-leza Rice. Crains Business Chicago tittered that it bears close resemblance to a vulgar Russian term for a sexual act. Michael Mitchell, a Kraft spokesman, said executives took all the joking in stride, and hes quick to point out why the Crains observation didnt alarm the company: The name has to be mispronounced to get that unfortunate meaning. The made-up moniker, pronounced mon-dah-LEEZ, became a punch line after it was unveiled in March. On Wednesday, Kraft shareholders will decide whether to approve the name for the companys business that sells global snack brands such as Oreos, Fig Newton and Cadbury. The four-month odyssey of how Mondelez was picked and how it was received illustrates the great pains companies take to come up with powerful names for their businesses, products and services. For them, its akin to parents obsessing over a name for their newborn: its a moniker that sticks for better or worse, so it better be good. You have to generate thousands of ideas, even if its just for a cookie, said Nik Contis, the global director of naming at branding company Siegel+Gale. Thats just what Kraft did after it decided to split into two publicly-traded companies one for its North American grocery business that makes products like Oscar Mayer and Miracle Whip and the other a bigger company to focus on selling snacks worldwide. It was clear to executives at Krafts Northfield, Ill., headquarters that the name of the snack business would have to appeal to a global audience. So the worlds biggest maker of sweet snacks started the arduous process of picking a name in November by soliciting suggestions from its 126,000 employees. On its internal website, Kraft proclaimed that it would host a naming contest. The announcement included a mood video set to music and showing images of life milestones, such as a wedding and a babys birth. Employees were encouraged to make suggestions through an Idea Kitchen page, where they could see and build off of the suggestions of their peers. More than 1,000 employees submitted more than 1,700 entries. Discarded name candidates ranged from the cultivated (Panvoro, Latin for eating) to the not-so-cultivated (tfark, which is Kraft spelled backward) to the outright cryptic (Arrtx the employee who suggested it provided no explanation on what the letters signified). Once the suggestions started rolling in, Krafts global marketing team took the reins of the naming process. An outside branding firm from London was hired and a handful of top contenders were picked. (Kraft declined to reveal the finalists, noting that there may be some value in those names for other purposes down the road.) The names went through two rounds of testing with native speakers in 28 different languages. Consumers in small focus groups were asked again and again if any of the names conjured up negative associations. Mondelez, a favorite among Kraft executives from the get-go, didnt raise any big red flags. Still, the company discovered that there might be a problem. Consumer testers flagged the possible misinterpretation of Mondelez for a Russian term meaning oral sex. But the issue was referred to Krafts Russian business unit, which in turn deemed it to be low risk. So the name was given the thumbs up. Its not unusual for companies to take a calculated risk with names. Even though theyre aware that the names they introduce could elicit negative reactions at first, experts say the snide remarks often subside as the brand strengthens. After all, there were plenty of snickers when Apple Inc. unveiled the iPad, which critics said sounded like a high-tech feminine hygiene product. Now, the iPad is by far the No. 1 selling tablet worldwide. Then theres the classic example in the 1970s of the Chevrolet car called Nova, which means no go in Spanish. Despite urban legend, a Chevy spokesman said the model sold well in Latin America because the term is pronounced differently there. Thats what Conti, the branding expert, is guessing would happen if shareholders decide to vote in favor of naming Krafts global snacking business Mondelez. The sound and structure rolls off the tongue like a delicious treat, he said. The romance language is great because you want to eat the language itself because its so beautiful. If shareholders reject the name, the company will continue to be called Kraft Foods Inc. while the North American grocery businesswill be called Kraft Foods Group Inc. But it appears that Kraft is confident that Mondelez will pass muster; the company already reserved the ticker symbol MDLZ and website www.mondelez.com.The odyssey of Krafts new name, and how pink slime almost wasnt Discarded name candidates ranged from the cultivated (Panvoro) to the not-so-cultivated (tfark) to the outright cryptic (Arrtx). Associated PressP ink slime was almost pink paste or pink goo. The microbiologist who coined the term for lean finely textured beef ran through a few iterations in his head before he decided to send an email about the filler to a co-worker at the U.S. Department of Agriculture a decade ago. Then, the name hit him like heartburn after a juicy burger. Its pink. Its pasty. And its slimylooking. So I called it pink slime, said Gerald Zirnstein, the former meat inspector at the USDA. It resonates, doesnt it? The pithy description fueled an uproar that resulted in the main company behind the filler, Beef Products Inc., deciding to close three meat plants this month. The controversy over the filler, which is made of fatty bits of beef heated and treated with ammonium to kill bacteria, shows how a simple nickname can forever change an entire industry. In fact, the beef filler had been used for decades before the nickname came about. But most Americans didnt know or care about it before Zirnsteins vivid moniker was quoted in a 2009 article by The New York Timeson the safety of meat processing methods. Soon afterward, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver began railing against it. McDonalds and other fast food companies later discontinued their use of it. And major supermarket chains vowed to stop selling beef with the low-cost filler. Beef Products, which makes the filler, blames its plant closings on what it calls unfounded attacks. About 650 jobs will be lost when plants in Amarillo, Texas, Garden City, Kansas, and Waterloo, Iowa close on Friday. Another plant in South Sioux City, Neb., will remain open but run at reduced capacity. Still, the company, based in South Dakota, said its not considering changing the fillers name. Instead, Beef Products set up a website, beefisbeef.com, to combat what it calls media-perpetuated myths about the filler. Meanwhile, the author of the term pink slime makes no apologies about his creation. Zirnstein, who has since left the USDA, said he thinks pink slime is a better descriptor than lean finely textured beef. It says its lean. Great. But it doesnt describe what kind of lean it is, said Zirnstein, who doesnt think the product should be mixed into beef. Textured. What does that mean? Honoring vets by putting them back to work Laura Byrnes WORKFORCE CONNECTION See BYRNES / Page D3

PAGE 28

Linda Witter joins Chamber of Commerce Chamber ConnectionD2 SUNDAY M AY 27, 2012 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801 May 31 is the last day to vote for Crystal River! Crystal River holds onto a spot in top contention (last count we were No. 3!) for the title of Ultimate Fishing Town in the USA, recognized by the World Fishing Network. You can vote up to four times each day until the end of the contest on May 31. Simply log onto www.worldfishing network.com and click on Ultimate Fishing Town Contest. First prize is $25,000 and an exclusive cable network feature story covering the fishing and other local attractions. Second prize is $5,000 and third prize is $2,500 for a community project that benefits the area. Art Jones submitted Crystal River for the Kings Bay Rotary project that is cleaning lyngbya out of Kings Bays to restore fish habitat, water clarity and the aquatic ecosystem. Lyngbya is an invasive algae that crowds out more beneficial, submerged aquatic vegetation. Visit them at www.face book.com/savekingsbay. UPCOMING AT THE CHAMBER After Hours Business Networking Mixer. Citrus 95 and The Plantation Golf Resort have teamed up for an evening of networking at The Plantation Golf Resort, Thursday, June 7,5 to 7 p.m. June Chamber Luncheon at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, featuring guest speaker Don Skelton, Secretary for District 7, Florida Department of Transportation. Sponsored by Neck and Back Care Center, June 8, 11:30 a.m. REGISTER TODAY! Get Caught in the Chambers Web Open House, College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, June 14, 5 to 7 p.m. Business Womens Alliance June Lunch-Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club. Wednesday, June 20, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. SAVE THE DATE! Business Womens Alliance annual Health & Fitness Expo. Crystal River Armory, Sept. 20, 2012. Always check out our Events Calendar at www. citruscountychamber.com. After Hours Business Mixer High Octane Saloon hosted an After Hours Business Mixer from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, May 10. The Saloon provided free-play pool, corn hole and karaoke as well as food and drink to the more than 50 Chamber and community members who stopped in. Kim Baxter, vice president and branch manager of Cadence Bank, joined the ranks of the Chambers Ambassador team in 2010. Kim was born and raised in Ocala, and continues to live in Marion County while commuting to her job in Citrus County and playing an active role in the Ambassador program. She and her husband, Steve, are the parents of two lovely children, Kyle and Stephanie. Kim is very family-oriented, and says one of her favorite things to do is to spend time with her family in North Carolina. And just for fun? Theres nothing quite like going four-wheeling! Ambassador Spotlight: Kim Baxter Kim Baxter Citrus Enterprise Center wants you to consider their two newly remodeled office suites. Are you contemplating relocating your homebased business to a professional office as part of your effort to grow your business and increase your profits? Are you considering hiring an employee as part of your growth plan, but dont want to host the employee at your home office? Is the idea of turn-key simplicity for your new location attractive to you? Heres some of the features and amenities that are included in our below market rent rates: furnished office fax/copier/scanner one-year Chamber & EDC memberships visible location on US 19 with signage for your business high speed wireless internet/electric/water/maintenance shared kitchen shared conference room private mailbox publicity package to announce your new location A Business Incubator Project of the Citrus County Economic Development Council and Chamber of Commerce.For more information or to tour our recently remodeled facility, please contact Ardath Prendergast at 795-2000 email Ardath@ citrusedc.com or visit http://www.citrusedc.com/. NOW IS THE TIME TO ENTER THE CHAMBER CHAT PHOTO CONTEST Chamber Chat is having a photography contest open to ALL Citrus County residents! Time is running out to enter your beauty shot of somewhere in Citrus County. It could be anywhere our gorgeous rivers, springs, sunrise or sunset a field of flowers as long as its in Citrus County. The contest is open until May 31 to all Citrus County residents. The winning entry will be chosen on June 1 and will be the new background for Chamber Chat! Chamber Chat promotes your business on local TV station WYKE. Now YOUR photo can be the backdrop! While waiting for a new background, Chamber Chat kicks off a new format Monday, June 18, that includes local celebrity co-hosts and many new surprises, all designed to promote area chamber businesses and events in an improved manner. Get out those cameras and send your best shot of Citrus, with your name and contact information, to: Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. HAVE YOU EVER ...... left the office for a chamber event only to realize you didnt check WHERE the event was being held? ... wondered if the business you are shopping in/eating in is a Chamber member? ... needed the phone number of a chamber business while you were already out and about? The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is making ALL that and more accessible to you with new technology! GET DETAILS at our Get Caught in the Chambers Web Open House, June 14 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at College of Central Florida, Lecanto. Looking for office space? About a dozen people interested in growing their business in Citrus County attended the workshop Hire Your First Employee on Tuesday, May 15. The workshop, offered by the Citrus County Business Resource Alliance Partners, featured presenter Mike Orlito. Orlito is a Certified Business Analyst for the Small Business Development Center at UNF in Citrus County. The workshop content came from the book, HireYour First Employee, written by Rhonda Abrams. Abrams is the founder and CEO of The Planning Shop, a company focused on providing entrepreneurs with high quality information and tools for developing successful business plans. We thank our sponsors: HR Solutions in Tandem and Quick Books Assist. Learning how to grow your business in Citrus County Mike Orlito, Certified Business Anaylyst for the Small Business Development Center at UNF, coaches attendees on strategies to hire employees. Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your homes vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind. Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community. Determine escape routes from your home and places to meet. Have an out-of-state friend as a familycontact, so all your family members have a single point of contact Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate. Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make sure your children know how and when to call 911. Check your insurance coverage flood damage is usually not covered by homeowners insurance. Stock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster Supply Kit. Use a NOAA weather radio. Replace its battery every 6 months, as you do with your smoke detectors. Family Disaster Plan, reprinted from National Hurricane Center, NOAAJune is the start of hurricane season are you ready? Linda Witter, Independent Consultant with Arbonne International has joined the Chamber of Commerce. Witter, a licensed Esthetician for 33 years, recently relocated to Citrus County from Hilton Head Island, SC. Arbonne is an established beauty, health and wellness company offering products that are natural, gluten-free, vegan-certified and made in the United States. Witter is also a member of SunCoast Business Masters and volunteers at the Key Training Center. Schedule a one-on-one consultation or home party with her at 352-270-8231. Everhardt earns New Image Award Nicholas Everhardt, Taverna Manos co-owner with Deborah Manos, receives the New Image Award at the May Chamber of Commerce luncheon. The award recognizes the complete renovation done inside of the building and the creation of a nice outside dining area.

PAGE 29

veterans. Not only do veterans have worlds of knowledge and experience, but they come equipped with highly sought-after skills and qualities such as loyalty, maturity, leadership, integrity, focus, project and crisis management, motivation, initiative, respect, ability to be part of the team, and solution-oriented approaches to solving problems. Moreover, 60 percent of Citrus Countys veterans have some college, associate degree, bachelors degree or higher compared to 44 percent for the countys nonveteran population. As further incentive, there is also a federal Returning Heroes and Wounded Warriors Work Opportunity Tax Credit of up to $5,600 for hiring veterans and up to $9,600 for hiring disabled veterans. The tax credit is available for veterans hired between Nov. 22, 2011 and Dec. 31. Tomorrow, as befits Memorial Day, let us visit cemeteries and place flags or flowers on the graves of our fallen heroes, let us fly Old Glory at half-staff and pause during a moment of remembrance to reflect on the true meaning of the day during a National Moment of Remembrance, but lets also remember those who served and who have come home, ready to work. Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certified Workforce Professional and communications manager at Workforce Connection. Please contact her at (352) 2919559 or (800) 434-5627, ext. 1234 or lbyrnes@ clmworkforce.com. B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 D3 Classifieds Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time! TO ADVERTISE CALL:352-563-5966 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE ATwww.chronicleonline.comCONNECTING THE RIGHT BUYERS WITH YOUR MESSAGE BUSINESS HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY WE GLADLY ACCEPTPublication Days/Deadlines Chronicle / Daily.......................................1 PM, Daily Homefront / Sunday... .............................. 3 PM, Friday Chronicle / Sunday............... ....................4 PM, Friday Chronicle / Monday..................................4 PM, Friday Sumter County Times / Thursday. ..............11 AM, T uesday Riverland News / Thursday. ................. .....2 PM, Monday South Marion Citizen / Friday....................4 PM, Tuesday West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday 0008KWF Page C3 000BL17 Able to work early morning hours before 6am Must be 18 years old Florida drivers license and insuranceIf interested come to the Meadowcrest Plant between 1 and 2 am, drive around to the back and ask for a district manager.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal RiverIT REALLY PAYS TO WORK FOR THE R O U T E S R O U T E S S ROUTES A V A I L A B L E A V A I L A B L E AVAILABLE Great Part-time job for EXTRA CASH! N O W ! N O W ! NOW!! I N N H O M O S A S S A A A N D I N N H O M O S A S S A A A N D D IN HOMOSASSA AND N E E C I T R U S S C O U N T Y N E E C I T R U S S C O U N T Y NE CITRUS COUNTY Restaurant/ Lounge COOKS, SOUS CHEF, LINE COOK DISHWASHER,Apply in person Mango Grill 1305 Norvell Bryant Hernando,Florida Sales Help Career Opportunity No Exp. needed, will train.Strong personal skill req. (352)410-6927 Trades/ Skills 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks!! 888-374-7644 Professional ATTENTION Are You Currently Making $150/or More Per Day? Now You Can!Lic. or Unlicensed Agents Training Provided 3 Positions A vail Call or Fax 352-726-7722 Fax 352-726-6813 RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY APPRAISER obtain an app. at www.citruspa.org click on employment tab for info Professional Cypress CreekJuvenile Offender Correctional Center, a residential program for 96 maximum risk males committed to the Dept. of Juvenile Justice is recruiting for a School Principal Directs the overall educational program. Masters Degree and certification in educational leadership preferred. Make a difference in a teens life. Apply in person at: Cypress Creek 2855 W Woodland Ridge Dr. Lecanto, FL 34461 Or email r esume to sharon.facto @us.G4S.com Drug Free Workplace / EEO Engineer I Announcement #12-27 Management of engineering site development review, including inspection of public and private residential and nonresidential site development, road right-of-way utilization permits, slab elevation variances and subdivision construction. Graduate of four year college or university with Bachelors degree in Civil Engineering or directly related field. Must have 5-10 years of progressive civil engineering experience. Florida P.E. required. Pay range $1,815.75 -$2,723.63 B/W DOQ. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online. by Friday, June 1, 2012 EOE/ADA. Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! Medical FRONT DESK SPECIALIST Full/Part time, for Busy Office. Only those w/front desk, health care exp. considered. Computer & Insurance exp. needed. EMAIL RESUME TO: frontdesk@ nbccdro.com Home Health Looking For Medical Office Staff or CNA, RNs, LPNs, PT, OT (352) 794-6097 Hospital RNs Needed MS/Tele ICU ER Float www. nurse-temps.com 352-344-9828 MEDICAL ASSIST. Full time Position for Front/Back Office, Phlebotomy exper., for FP Office by CMH. FAX RESUME: (352) 726-2808 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional -an equal opportunity collegeFaculty Instrumental Music Commitment to the college objective of providing instruction for a diverse student population. View detailed job requirements on the CF Web site at www.CF.edu. Screening begins 6/27/12. Assistant Registrar -Bachelors degree required. Two years of work experience required, with academic preparation and training in student personnel services, higher education administration or a related field is preferred. Work a flexible schedule including evenings and/or weekends. Screening begins 6/07/12. How to apply: Go to www.CF.edu, click on Quick Links then Employment at CF. Submit unofficial transcripts with the online application at time of submission. Alternatively fax transcripts to 352-873-5885. 3001 SW College Rd. Ocala, FL 34474 CF is an Equal Opportunity Employer Personal/ Beauty Receptionist Massage therapist Nail Technician Esthetician Celestial Spa of Beverly Hills, 9 Regina Blvd. CALL352 527-0077 or Email Resume: celestialspa4u @yahoo.com Domestic Disable Vetneeds trustworthy, honest person to help with reminding of meds Live in-Room & Board Call to discuss position (352) 220-3983 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Medical #1 AffordableCNA Prep Course CPR-AED-Free Book Am & PM classes getyour cna.com 352-341-PREP (7737) CNA for Outpatient Surgery CenterLooking for a CNA that is personable, well-groomed and has excellent people-skills. Must be dependable and willing to be flexible in days, hours and duties. Excellent working environment. Days only with no weekends. Apply in person at: 110 N. Lecanto Highway Lecanto, Florida or fax resume to : 352-527-1827. CNA/HHAs Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Dental Assistant, FT w/ Exp Duties, Highly Motivated w/Computer Software Skills. Email resume: office@sierradental group.com Exp Live-in CNA or Nurse,Certification req, for wheelchair bound male, personal care, cooking, lite housekeeping, appoint transport. Room& Board+salary. Refs, background ck Send Resume to Citrus Co. Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Blind Box1767 P Crystal River, Fl 34429 Clerical/ Secretarial Program Systems TechnicianAnnouncement # 12-29 Maintains financial records which may include invoices, requisitions, accounts payable and receivable. Posts fund budgets, revenues and expenses to in-house accounting program. Minimum of one year related work experience. Works four10 hour days, Monday-Thursday, 6:30 AM 5:00 PM. Starting pay $9.99 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Visit our website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, June 1, 2012 EOE/ADA. SECRETARYAnnouncement #12-28 Moderately difficult secretarial work performing extensive clerical duties and tracks project costing in Road Maintenance. Maintains division budget, answers phones, takes messages, directs calls. Assists with customer service, inquiries and problem resolution. Minimum of one year experience performing secretarial/ clerical duties. Works four-10 hour days Monday-Thursday, 6:30 AM 5:00 PM. Working knowledge of the Microsoft Office Suite of Products. Starting pay $9.99 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online by Friday, June 1, 2012 EOE/ADA Personal/ Beauty HAIR STYLIST Fulltime $500 Cash Bonus after 90 days CallSue 352-628-0630 Kristy Salon Is expandingand seeking 2 Hair stylists cliente preferred Bev Hills (352) 527-9933 Lost GOLD CHAIN WITH RED FISH very sentimental pls call (352) 569-4268 or (352)303-8308 TOY POODLE female, 5 to 7lbs black & white shy, answers to Shiley lost in Beverly Hills (352) 362-8493 Found Beautiful Female German Shepherd Beverly Hills Area(352)746-7610 or Call Animal Control (352) 726-7660 Found Large Wolf Hound Black, Male, Floral City Area (352) 637-2448 Announcements A DVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 WE LOVE OUR VETS Consignment USA Frank Romanelli Situations Wanted Travel Travel NEEDED $3,000 or Less Working Condition House burned down (352) 287-5336 Cemetery Lots/Crypts 2 COUCH CR YPTS Includes 2 Caskets Fero Memorial Gardens in Beverly Hills 746-4646 At a Discount Price! (270) 543-8419 Child Care Personnel TEACHER Fulltime, Exp. Req. CDA Preferred TADPOLES EARLY LEARNING (352) 560-4222 Clerical/ Secretarial EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTBusiness owner looking for full or part-time executive assistant. Candidates must demonstrate strong organizational and communication skills and be able to work independently on various projects. Candidates must have sufficient accounting skills (QuickBooks preferred) necessary to maintain owners financial records. Send resumes to: Office Manager, P.O. Box 895, Inverness, FL 34451 Free Offers 7 KITTENS FOR FREE TO GOOD HOME cute, lovable, litter trained, (352) 419-4221 Free to Good Home 3 year male cat neutered and declawed. Must be one cat home. (352) 637-3553 FREE WOODEN PALLETSRear of CHRONICLE 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River Help Yourself But Be Neat. KEEPyour used auto parts in Citrus Co. Dales Auto Parts. & Savage Pays top $$$. 352-628-4144 KITTENS mixedspayed and neutered $25 dep. adoptions based on applications and home visit (352) 748-5260 Lab 1 year old Male, has all shots, full blood, no paper (352) 400-0312 Oak & Pine Firewood 25 peices, must be split (352) 364-1214 PITBULLS, 6 mos gray female, white male, housebroken good w/kids (352) 476-2411 Good Things to Eat NOW OPEN SWEET CORN @ BELLAMY GROVE 1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41 on Eden Dr., Inv. Catelopes, Squash & Watermelon 8:30-6p, 352-726-6378 Lost Australian Shepard with John Deere collar.Black with a little bit of white. Needs Meds Please call 352-212-5131 Black & White spots Miniature Pig last seen Crystal River off Citrus Ave. H e is a the childrens pet Local (410) 200-7022 Large completely white male cat, no other markings. Name is Snowy and he is 12 yrs old. Have had him since he was 6 weeks old and we are heartbroken. Last seen very early Sunday 5/13 in area of Dunnellon road and Northcut. Not wearing a collar or tag but has all his shots. He may not come to you so if you see him please contact 352-563-2504 or 352-422-7810. Lost Cat, small male Coon Mix in vicinity Almont Pl. & Sandree Dr. Medical Issues, answers Pudgie. need to find ASAP, Citrus Springs (352) 613-3894 Lost Sheltie Name (Codie) Black, white & Merle, Harley Colar, tags, microchipped Rainbow Springs Woodlands Area 352-895-0341 LOST: Beloved family poodle. White, old, answers to the name Cuddles. He is very deaf and has a hard time seeing. Wandered away in the Crystal Manor area near Basswood & Checkerberry. PLEASE contact Stephanie with any information: (352) 613-4728 Chronicle Connection SWF, looking for adventurous SWM 45-65 ,non smoker, financially stable to share varied interest, I.E. golf, theater, music, travel & all lifes exciting adventures Reply to Citrus Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd Blind Box 1778 M Crystal River, Fl 34429 Todays New Ads AIRSTREAM 30FT motorhome, 2005 Land Yacht, 1 owner, low miles, slide, all options $58,000 For full details (352) 637-3867seahawk@ta mpabay.rr.co m CRYSTAL RIVER, 2/1water, incld $500 mo + dep 352-464-2716 HERNANDO 2/1 Mobile Home total remodel, clean, great water $400 (352) 344-2201 HP Office Jet All in One Printer/fax/scans, like new condition $55.00 352-382-1154 LARSON 99 18FT open bow, 90 hsp Johnson outboard motor trailer incl. $4800 obo (352) 400-0719 LIFT CHAIR neutral colors like new $400 obo (352) 628-3995 MUSTANG CONV 97 V6 automatic $3000 b/o or tradefor Chevy Stepside (352) 400-0719 YOMOTO2005 Motorcycle175 CC, street legal, 4,000 mi., runs good, first $1,000 or trade for car or truck (352) 637-4011 Free Services $$ TOP DOLLAR $$ Paid for Junk Vehicles,J.W. 352-228-9645 $$ CASH PAID $$ For Junk or wrecked Cars/Trucks, $250 & UP $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOVAL A ppls. R idIng M owers, S crap M etal, L rg TVs cell -352-270-4087 Free Offers 1 Female 6 months 1 Male 4 months To Good Home (352) 794-7496 FREE TO GOOD HOME I AM ABEAUTIFUL FRIENDLYFEMALE RED NOSE/BULLDOG.I AM 8 MONTHS OLD I NEED AGOOD HOME.IM GOOD WITH ANIMALS AND OTHER DOGS AND I LOVE EVERYONE.PLEASE GIVE ME AGOOD HOME. CALLMELISSA@ 322-1778 OR 621-9898 catch-22 situation. Do you have any suggestions? Is it normal for students to have this kind of debt after the first year? A.H. in Oklahoma DEAR A.H.: Being in debt $5,000 after one semester seems pretty heavy to me. While many schools charge a great deal more than that, everyone doesnt belong in those schools, and thats the reality. It would appear, given your families combined lack of income, that she is going to have to consider going to a less expensive school. She ought to take a shot at a community college, where the expenses will be geometrically less. If she does well there, she can transfer to a four-year institution. As to the debts she has already incurred, shes on the hook. You might talk to the colleges finance office about arranging loans through her alone to get her at least through the semester. Beyond that, I would not advise you to co-sign. I know this is tough on the kid, but who said life shouldnt be difficult? Lots of kids have made it on their own. Theres no reason why she cannot. DEAR BRUCE: Awhile back, you had a question about parents putting their childrens names on the deeds to their homes, car titles, etc., so that there would be no problems when the parents pass. As I remember, you said it was a bad idea to do that. I just cant remember exactly why, and I need specifics to take to my husband who, of course, is on his mothers house and car, along with her and his brother. I apologize for having you revisit the subject, but I believe your answer had to do with credit, and I really do not want our 830 credit score to be in jeopardy. Thank you so much, and keep up the good work. Nancy in Pennsylvania DEAR NANCY: In my opinion, it is not wise to add the names of your adult children on the deed or actually convey the property. The problem is that when you put this in the kids names, it is treated like their asset. If they go out and get themselves in trouble because of excessive debts, that home of yours is now an asset that can be attached to pay those debts. As far as any advantages, I keep looking, but I dont see any. Unless you deed children the property through a trust, there will be a trip through probate. But unlike the horror stories you hear, in an ordinary persons life, going through probate will not be an expensive or difficult process. Im not sure why you are paranoid over a credit score of 830. It could drop to 790 and youre still as good as gold. Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com or to Smart Money, P .O. Box 7150, Hudson, FL 34674. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. BYRNES Continued from Page D1 Key center plans job fair June 30 The Key Training Center will host a job fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 30, at the business office at 5399 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Open positions include residential aides, residential manger assistants and instructor assistants. Applications and interviews will be conducted. For additional information, call 352-795-5541, ext. 309. Accountant Price attends conferencePhillip W. Price, MBA, CPA, with Price & Company, P.A., Crystal River, recently attended the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants FSU Spring Accounting Conference in Tallahassee, Florida on May 17 & 18. This seminar highlighted such topics as Tax Aspects of Foreclosures, Bankruptcy & Insolvency, Estate Planning and Finding Fraud in Financial Statements. Phil takes courses such as these to ensure a continued high level of service. SECO: Gas, power costs falling The Sumter Electric Cooperative Board of Trustees announced that due to the decrease in the cost of natural gas the cooperative is able to pass that savings on to SECO customers. Effective July 1, the power cost adjustment portion of each SECO members bill will drop the total cost for the first 1,000 residential kilowatt hours of electricity from $126.95 down to $119.95. Business DIGEST MONEY Continued from Page D1

PAGE 30

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 D5 D4 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000BFOP

PAGE 31

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 D5 D4 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000BFOP

PAGE 32

D6 S UNDAY,M AY 27,2012 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 0 0 0 A T I C POOL REPAIRS POOL-TEC R E P A I R S E Q U I P M E N T P U M P S F I L T E R S H E A T P U M P S S A L T S Y S T E M S RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 32 YEARS EXPERIENCE CALL ALAN 422-6956 STATE LICENSE #CPC051584 352-465-6631 PAINTING Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000B34Q BATH REMODELING BATHFITTER000B6SU 1-866-585-8827 BATHFITTER.COMOne Day Bath RemodelingIn Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Call now for a FREE In-Home Estimate 000B7OZ When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile CleanerShowers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Cleaning & Sealing Grout Painting Residential & Commercial 586-1816 746-9868 0 0 0 B 9 Y 4 WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES 352-683-0093Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill 000BAQM ROOFING AAA ROOFING Call the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411 Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $ 100 OFF Any Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed REMODELING Kitchens/Baths Additions/Garages Dryer Vent Cleaning Insurance Inspections Repairs 20 10 20 10 352-628-2291 www.BeautifulResultsNow.com14 Years000BAT6 W ILL C ONSTRUCTION 352-628-2291 PREVENT FIRE! 000BAWSDR YER VENT CLEANING $ 9 0 $ 90 W o r k e r s C o m p / L i a b i l i t y I n s W o r k e r s C o m p / L i a b i l i t y I n s Workers Comp/Liability Ins. PreventDryerFiresNow.com 0 0 0 B B 9 8 HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer Vents Affordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 000BD07 STONES & MULCH Decorative Mulch & Stones Top SoilDELIVERY AVAILABLE6658 W. GULF T O L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER, FL 34429WE HAVE SPECIAL PRICES AVAILABLE!(352) 302-6436 NEW LOCATION!! COMPUTER SERVICES 352-794-3384 1929 N.W. U.S. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL 34428 Laptop & Desktop Sales and Services Virus Removal 15% OFF with ad 000BDUE $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS O PTIONALSCREEN CHOICES CRC058138 000BFU6 (352) 465-4629 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R GARAGE SCREEN DOOR Acrylic & Glass WINDOWS Custom made for your screen room Starting at * *Installation may vary. ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248 Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator000BHJR 000BJ2M DOORS/LEADED GLASS Leaded Glass Installed in yourEXISTING DOOR!NO ROT Door Units Blinds Between the Glass Custom Carved Glass (Art Pieces/ Bath Glass) Perrys Custom Glass & Doors 352-726-61252780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza) www.perryscustomglass.com POOLS/PAVERS Lic. & Insured CPC1456565 352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALISTBuild your new pool now and be ready for next summer! Refinish your pool during the cooler months. 000BL26 Copes Pool & Pavers COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC Tree Service A TREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est.(352)860-1452 DAVIDS TREE SERVICE (352) 302-5641 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs Land Clearing & Tree Serv complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo& tractor work 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 R WRIGHT Tree Service Tree removal & trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS TreeServ Trim, Shape & Remove Lic/Ins Free Est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding $30 + $30 per hr.Call Steve 352-270-6800 Water 344-2556, Richard WATER PUMP SERVICE & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Sod SOD!SOD!SOD! FREE Estimates Circle T Sod Farms (.com) 400-2221 SPRINKLER, SOD & LANDSCAPE If its Broken or Ugly we can fix it! 212-2596 Sprinklers/ Irrigation SPRINKLER, SOD & LANDSCAPE If its Broken or Ugly we can fix it! 212-2596 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! Remodeling TOTALREMODELER 40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens, Baths,Additions, sl# crc058140 (352) 344-3536 Services Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. Moving/ Hauling A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS Everything from A to Z 352-628-6790 Painting Chris Satchell Painting ASAP 30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins. 352-464-1397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Pressure Cleaning CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Pic PICARDS Pressure Cleaning & Painting 352-341-3300 Pressure CleaningRepairs, Hauling, Odd Jobs(352) 726-9570 Landscaping Mainstr eet landscaping Co., Paver Patios, Pool Decks, Driveways, Sod, Irrigatin & plant Installation352 287 9896 SPRINKLER, SOD & LANDSCAPE If its Broken or Ugly we can fix it! 212-2596 Lawn Care A + LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPING Affordable & Reliable (352) 228-0421 AFFORDABLE Lawn care CUTS STARTING AT $20 WE DO IT ALL!!! 352-563-9824, 228-7320 Lawncare N More Floral City to Bev. Hills mow, trim haul $20 up (352) 726-9570 ZIEGLERS LAWN (Lic/Ins) Quality Dependable Service 628-9848 or 634-0554 Lawnmower Repair ATYOUR HOMEMower, Parts Service & Repair Visit our store@ 1332 SE Hy 19 220 4244 Handyman #1 A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. Plasma TV installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 Pressure CleaningRepairs, Hauling, Odd Jobs (352) 726-9570 Remodeling, Additions, Doors, Windows, Tile work. Lic.#CRC1330081 Free Est. (352)949-2292 Home/Office Cleaning MAID TO ORDER House Cleaning (352) 586-9125 have vacuum will travel MAIDS ON CALL Making Life Easier Monthly Specials CALL 352-726-8077 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 Kitchen & Bath The T ile Man Bathroom remodel Specializing in handicap. Lic/Ins. #2441. 352 634 1584 Landclearing/ Bushhogging All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing,HaulingSite Prep,Driveways Lic/Ins 352 795-5755 TRACTOR WORK $30 + $30 per hr.Call Steve 352-270-6800 Landscaping CURB APPEAL Yardscape, curbing, flocrete. River rock reseals & repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 Fencing BOB BROWNS Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 ROCKYS FENCING Free Est., Lic. & Ins., 352 422-7279 Gutters ALUMINUM STRUCTURES 5 & 6 Seamless Gutters Free Estimates, Lic & Ins. (352) 563-2977 Handyman Andrew Joehl Handyman. Gen/Maint/Repairs Pressure cleaning. Lawns/Gutters. No job too small!Reli able ,ins. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST AFFORDABLE RELIABLE HOME REP AIRS % Guar. Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST AFFORDABLE RELIABLE HOME REP AIRS % Guar. Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST AFFORDABLE RELIABLE HOME REP AIRS % Guar. Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST AFFORDABLE RELIABLE HOME REP AIRS % Guar. Free Est 352-257-9508 Carpentry, Decks, Docks, Remodeling Yard Work, Pressure Wash, Home Repair. CBC 1253431 (352) 464-3748 Concrete CURB APPEAL/ Lic Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River rock reseals & repairs. 352 364-2120/410-7383 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs Tractor work, Lic. #1476 726-6554 Dirt Service AllAROUND TRACTOR Landclearing,Hauling, Site Prep, Driveways. Lic. & Ins. 352-795-5755 Drywall COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL -25 ys exp lic2875. all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Electrical #1 A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. Plasma TV installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 ANNIES ELECTRIC Husband & Wife Team. (352) 341-5952 EC-13002696 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr.EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE Elect since / Free Est. licEC 13002699 352-726-2907 Fencing A 5 ST AR COMP ANY GO OWENS FENCING All Types. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Appliance Repair SMITTYS APPLIANCE REPAIR. Washer & Dryers, Free Pick Up 352-564-8179 Blinds Blind Factory by Joanne We custom make all types. Best prices anywhere! Hwy 44 & CR 491. 746-1998 Care For the Elderly Will Prepare Meals or Provide Transportation to store or Dr. Appts. (352) 344-9171 Carpentry/ Building ROGERS Construction All Construction sm jobs Free Est (352) 637-4373 CRC1326872 Canvas/ Awnings SHADY VIEW CANVASAwnings *Carports *Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 Clean Up/ Junk Removal THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 Computers DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Concrete Bianchi Concrete inc.com ins.lic #2579 Driveways-PatiosSidewalks. Pool deck repair/stain 257-0078 Garden/Lawn Supplies LAWNMOWERSNAPPER SELF PROPELLED HI-VACw/bagger starts first pull $140(352)613-8453 Wood Chipper Vac Troy built, New $760 Asking $275. (352) 201-1970 Garage/ Yard Sales CITRUS SPRINGS Fri Sat Sun 9a liquidation whole house, furn. appls. hsehld goods, antiques,military gear, 1909 Freeman Pl CRYSTAL RIVERFri Sat Sun 8-4p Too much to list!! 9580 W. Pimpernel Ln FLORAL CITY Sat. & Sun. 7am-4pm Tools & Hsehold. Goods 9659 S BUCKSKIN AVE. HUGE INVERNESSYARD SALE700 S Smith Avenue (@Angelic Air -corner of Smith and Thomas -rd behind Dunkin Donuts)Furniture, Tools, Clothing, Sporting Goods,other. Many with tags still on them. WANTED TOOLS OF ANY value, rods, reels, tackle, collectibles, hunt equip352 613-2944 General !!!!!!!!!!185/65 R14!!!!!!!!! Nice tread. Only asking $60 for the pair! (352)586-5485 *****35X12.50 R15***** Good tread! Only asking $70 for the pair! 352-586-5485 ~~~~~245/45 R18~~~~~ Nice tread! Only asking $100 for the set (4)! 352-586-5485 2 STORAGE SHEDS HD wood sheds well built, portable 10 x16 $2,500 obo & 11 x 32 $5,500 obo both w/ dbl swing doors, & overhead lofts. (352) 522-0723 Furniture OLD WALNUTDESK SECRETARYDrop front with 2/drawers. $65.00 726-2572 Oversize Recliner creme leather unmarked $150. Brown fabric recliner good cond. $100. (352) 746-7940 Preowned Mattress Sets from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN MATTRESS Queen mattress (only) in great shape $50.00 352-527-3177 RATTAN LOVE SEAT AND CHAIR Rattan love seat and chair set with floor and table lamp. $300.00 352 344-9483 SOFAAND CHAIR EXCELLENT CONDITION sofa and chair cloth sofa and microfiber chair also matching ottoman and area rug, all in excellent condition $235.00 for all or best offer please call 352-270-8611 STANLEY DINING TABLE 6 SIDE & 2 ARM CHAIRS, 44X66 plus 2 lvs, extends to 106 seats 8 to 10 exc. cond. cost 3k, asking $899 (352) 628-7604 for info Table w/4 chairs on wheels, 42x42, leaf 17.5W. $350. delivery avail. for fee (352) 341-0204 TODDLER HEADBOARD brand new, railings not included, gray metal. $45 (352)465-1616 UNIQUE GLASS DINING ROOM Table w/ 4 chairs $300 (352) 212-5844 VERYNICE COFFEE AND 2 END TABLES Glass tops, round edges, corners, stone bases. $100.00 352-409-6588 Garden/Lawn Supplies 2004 GARDEN TRACTOR HUSQVARNA GTH 2548 25hp Kohler Hydrastic, 48 mower, 48 blade $1500 (352) 601-2480 LAWN MOWER, GAS HEDGE TRIMMER & BLOWER NEED WORK $100 352-613-0529 Troy Built Self Propelled Mulching Mower, 21 cut, 7 HP, B & S Eng., $100 firm Coleman Powermate Generator, 1850 W B&S Engine $100 firm (352) 302-6069 Furniture Ashley Tiled/wood tables, DR w/6 chrs, LR coffee, sofa, 2 end tables $1200..Ent center & long dresser $150. (352) 364-1164 BAR STOOLS (2) White vinyl in good clean condition $35. pair 352-270-3909 BEAUTIFULANTIQUE HUTCH Near perfect condition,I have no room. 1st $100.00 takes it. 353-409-6588 China Cabinet, cherry wood, 2 pc. w/ glass doors $60. Oak Entertainment Center, glass doors $30 (352) 860-0632 DINETTE SET off white medal w/ formica top, and 4 upholstered chairs $125 (352) 860-2034 Dining Rm Table & China Cabinet, 6 chairs & leaf, real wood, dark brown, $250. (352) 726-9151 DINING TABLE Round wood dining table.No chairs.$35.00 726-2572 Down Sizing, Like New Coffee, end tables, nice wood/wrought iron $225. Dining Table & 4 Brown Leather Parsons chairs $395. 352-344-8553 Down Sizing, Like New Qn Pillowtop set, wood seashell motif headboard $225 2 Lazy boy Recliners, $100 for both 344-8553 DRESSER/MIRROR white dresser/matching mirror with 6 drawers...$35.00 726-2572 DUAL RECLINING SOFA 88 L moss green w/ 54x36 glass top coffee table 2 yr old like new $350 (352) 503-5470 FUTON SOFA wood frame multi pattern exc. condition $195 (352) 527-0347 High End Quality Resale Fur nitur e & Accessories, SECOND TIME AROUND FURNITURE 2165 N. Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803 LIFT CHAIR neutral colors like new $400 obo (352) 628-3995 LIVING ROOM & FAM. RM. FURNITURE 2 ultra suede sofas 2 chairs 1 caramel color leather love seat w/2 matching chairs & ottomans. $1400 for all. Will separate. 382-5596 OFFICE CHAIR Small old wooden office chair on rollers..$25.00 726-2572 Appliances WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable,clean, like new, excellent condition. Can deliver 352 263-7398 TVs/Stereos 27 SHARPTV In great shape, cable ready, with remote. $40.00 Call or Text Ron 352-746-0401 AIWASTEREO SYSTEM WITH CD PLAYER, DUALCASSETTE & REMOTE CONTROL$100 352-613-0529 Computers/ Video 15 FLAT SCREEN MONITOR perfect conditionk works great. new computer and dont need. $50.00 352-409-6588 COMPUTER POWER SUPPLYFORAUTO DC TOAC Converter, 12VDC to 120VAC works great $25 352 726 9983 Computer, Like New Win.7, 250 GB HD, 2GB Ram, dual core, delivered and set up $399 (352) 249-7670 Dell Printer, Copier, Scanner Model #V305W, cables, install CD included. $45.00 Call,Text Ron 352-746-0401 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Farm Equipment RHINO RX5 Bush-hog 5 ft, purchased last yr., used 4 times to cut pasture grass. No longer needed. Mint, New $1,250 Asking $950. (352) 746-7476 Machinery CEILING FAN White, 1 light, good condition, $20 (352)465-1616 Outdoor Furniture 5PC PATIO BAR SET $175 exc. condition (352) 527-0347 Furniture (3) Bedroom Sets Q set $400. Dbl.set $250. Twin set. $150 all sets come w/dressers & night stands. (352) 212-5844 Collectibles ASHTON DRAKE PRECIOUS MOMENTS DOLL collection. Very Nice.Sell for $100.00 352-409-6588 Spas/Hottubs 2 person lounger spa $400. good working cond. (352) 564-8726 Appliances Box FREEZER White, works great $70 (352) 228-1897 Chest Freezer, GE, 15cu ft. Excel. Condition $200. 352-746-4062 DRYER$100 Works great. Delivery extra. Includes warranty. 352-364-6504 FRONTLOAD WASHER/DRYER WITH PEDESTALS Kenmore Front Load Washer and Dryer both with Pedestal Stands -have storage drawers. $500.00 cash OBO Located in Beverly Hills 352-697-1630 GE DRYER Off White, Heavy Duty, Signals when done. $50.00 Chassahowitzka Ruth 352-382-1000 GE Profile Appliances side by side $400.obo cook top 4 burne r $300. obo Dishwasher $150 obo Conv. wall Oven, $300 In Wall micro $200 obo exc. cond off white (352) 503-6548 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR washers dryers,FREE pick up 352-564-8179 Ten Quart Globe Mixer w/cabinet & attachments, New cost $4500 sell for $2100 (352) 419-7386 WHIRLPOOLSxS REFRIGERATOR 25.2 cu/ft in excellent condition. Almond. Mod. ED25PQXFN01, manual on www.whirlpool.com $349 352-436-4089 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com NOW ENROLLING For All Programs COSMETOLOGY BARBER MASSAGE THERAPY NAIL TECH SKIN CARE TECH BENES International School of Beauty NPR/SPRING HILL Naccas Accedited 727-848-8415 Business Opportunities A26-year old company with $1 billion in sales last year eagerly seeking workers with computer-high speed Internet, F/T-P/Tfrom home, coachable, work at home. Schedule interview at: www.joinbigal.com Antiques DRAWER 34 X 20X 51 tall; 3 sm; 4 lg draw;$95. 352 503-7164 Collectibles Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 General Help POOL CLEANING TECHNICIAN Exp. Required, must have good dri. record Call 352-270-8221 SINGLE COPY ROUTES AVAILABLE.This is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. Must have two vehicles and be able to work early morning hours. Email: mgaouette@chr oni cleonline.com or come to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application SUMMER WORK GREAT PAY! Immed FT/PT openings, customer sales/serv, will train, conditions apply, all ages 17+, Call ASAP! 352-508-4577 Career Opportunities #1 AffordableCNA Prep Course CPR-AED-Free Book Am & PM classes getyour cna.com 352-341-PREP (7737) Financial Opportunity for fulltime professional.Must have accounting degree or equivalent & proficient in computers and spreadsheets. Able to multi-task & communicate well with others. FAX RESUME TO 352-746-9033 Schools/ Instruction #1 AffordableCNA Prep Course CPR-AED-Free Book Am & PM classes getyour cna.com 352-341-PREP (7737) General Help CUSTOMER RELATIONS*Call Now!* Looking to fill immediate positions. Training, 401(k), medical. No exp. necessary. $550-$800 a week. Call Lisa 352-436-4460 Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. melton truck.com/drive Key Training Center hosts JOB FAIRWed. 5/30/12 10:00a:00p At Business Office located @ 5399 W Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto. Applications & interviews on site. Residential Aides, Resident Manager Assistants, Instructor Assistants needed. LABORERS & Class A&B DRIVERS Needed for Moving Company Moving Exp. Required. 352-212-3031 P/T DELI HELP Sat. a must. No calls. Apply in person: Brooklyn Deli 300 NW Hwy 19 Crystal River Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips Trades/ Skills ASPHALT POSITIONSAsphalt Paver, Operator Roller Operator, CDL Dump Truck Driver, & Exp. Stripper for parking lot, 5 yrs. exp. nec. (352) 303-2525 Drivers-New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lines. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXP FRAMERS H.S Diploma/GED Transp. Hand Tools Beverly Hills Area (352) 212-9092 EXPERIENCED CABINET/MILLWORK person able to read prints, make cut-sheets and fabricate, apply at Built-Rite, 438 E. Hwy 40 Inglis, no calls please NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help 1 TEMPORARYFARM LABORERfor Lydell Steiner Dalton, OHcare of sheep & heifers & crop/hay farming using tractors. Must be available from 6/18/12-4/15/13. Wage $11.25/hr. Tools provided at no charge. Employment guaranteed for at least 3/4 of the work hrs of the total period in which the work order is in effect. Housing is available (including U.S. workers) at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence. Transportation & subsistence expenses to the worksite will be paid upon completion of 50% of the work contract. Apply at your nearest State Workforce Agency or contact the SWA in Wooster, OH 330-264-5060 job order #OH542475

PAGE 33

S UNDAY,M AY 27,2012D7 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 351-0527 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID ITB No. 023-12 Citrus County Roadway Microsurfacing FY 2011/2012 Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a Bid to provide roadway restoration services including but not limited to microsurfacing, leveling, replacement of temporary and permanent striping, edging, redressing, and filling and sodding areas adjacent to the edge of the pavement and other items specified in the bid documents. See the Specifications Section of the Invitation to Bid for more information. Minimum Requirement to Submit a Bid -Bidder shall be licensed by the State of Florida, be properly licensed in Citrus County, and have performed 5 projects of similar scope and size in the last three years. SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 19, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461. A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 19, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280 Lecanto, Florida 34461. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312. To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select BIDS/PURCHASING on the left hand side of the Home Page. Then click on BIDS. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457. CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Winn Webb, Chairman May 27, 2012. 352-0527 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID ITB No. 017-12 Inverness Village Unit IV Road Improvement Project Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a Bid to provide roadway improvement services, the project involves earthwork, concrete placement, construction of roadways and drainage facilities, signage and pavement markings; and utility construction associated with the Inverness Village Unit 4 subdivision, and other items specified in the bid documents. See the Specifications Section of the Invitation to Bid for more information. Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a responsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal: 1. Five years experience in road and site development. 2. Underground Utility Contractors license. SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 22, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461. A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 22, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280 Lecanto, Florida 34461. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312. To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select BIDS/PURCHASING on the left hand side of the Home Page. Then click on BIDS. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457. CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Winn Webb, Chairman May 27, 2012. Bid Notices Bid Notices Bid Notices 354-0527 SUCRN 6/6 Meeting CC Economic Development Council, Inc. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc. will meet on Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 5:00 pm, at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, Crystal River, Florida. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days before the meeting. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. BY: John Siefert, Executive Director May 27, 2012. Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 349-0527 SUCRN 6/12 Hearing on Ordinance (Floodplain) -CC BOCC PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance entitled: AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, CREATING AND ESTABLISHING A NEW ARTICLE VI, CHAPTER 18, CODE OF ORDINANCES OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, RELATING TO FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS; PROVIDING FOR THE FINDING OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR A TITLE; PROVIDING FOR APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION OF STATE LAW BY GENERAL REFERENCE; PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING FOR FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT; PROVIDING FOR ESTABLISHING FLOOD HAZARD AREA; PROVIDING FOR DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE FLOOD PLAIN ADMINISTRATOR; PROVIDING FOR PERMITS; PROVIDING FOR SITE PLANS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS; PROVIDING FOR INSPECTIONS; PROVIDING FOR FLOOD RESISTANT DEVELOPMENT BUILDING AND STRUCTURES; 350-0527 SUCRN 6/12 Hearing on Ordinance (Allen Plantation) -CC BOCC PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR THE DISSOLUTION OF THE ALLEN PLANTATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT PURSUANT TO SECTION 190.046(9), FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING FOR THE DISSOLUTION OF ALL THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SERVICES OF THE ALLEN PLANTATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT IN ACCORD WITH A PLAN OF DISSOLUTION; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 12th day of June, 2012, at 2:30 PM, at which time and place any and all interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Commission. Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for public inspection at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580. WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY: COUNTY ATTORNEY May 27, 2012. 353-0527 SUCRN Elig. To Vote-Padilla PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address: Lisa C. Padilla 6102 W Grover Cleveland Blvd Homosass, FL 34446 You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747. Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections 120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450 May 27, 2012. 355-0527 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE HOMOSASSA SPECIAL WATER DISTRICT REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Continuing Contract for Engineering Consulting Services RFQ-12-1 Citrus County, Florida The Homosassa Special Water District, a Florida Independent Special District, (District), is soliciting statements of qualifications for the following project: RFQ-12-1 Continuing Contract for Engineering Consulting Services Qualification Packages must be received at the Districts Offices, 7922 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, Florida no later than 5:30 p.m., June 14, 2012 Qualification Packages received after that time will not be accepted under any circumstances. No Pre-Submittal conference will be scheduled. Qualification packages may be obtained at the District office or may be obtained electronically by making a written request via email to hswd@tampabay.rr .com. Qualification Packages may be submitted electronically in .pdf format to hswd@tampabay.rr .com or may delivered to the District by submitting one (1) original package and two (7) copies. May 27, 2012. Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices PROVIDING FOR SITE IMPROVEMENTS, UTILITIES, AND LIMITATIONS; PROVIDING FOR MANUFACTURED HOMES; PROVIDING FOR RECREATIONAL VEHICLES AND PARK TRAILERS; PROVIDING FOR TANKS; PROVIDING FOR OTHER DEVELOPMENT; PROVIDING FOR APPEALS, PROVIDING FOR VIOLATIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 12th day of June, 2012, at 2:00 PM, at which time and place any and all interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Commission. Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for public inspection at the Department of Planning and Development, Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580. WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY: COUNTY ATTORNEY May 27, 2012. Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices NEED CASH? SINGLE COPY NEWSPAPER ROUTE AVAILABLE. There is an immediate opportunity for a single copy independent contractor to service racks and businesses in the Citrus County area. Early Morning Hours Need reliable vehicle Must be 18 years old The Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL Email: kstewart@chronicleonline.com 000BK7I Classic Vehicles Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Trucks BIG SALE! Consignment USA WE DO IT ALL! BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV AUTOS FROM $1,500. US 19 BY AIRPORT US 44, BY NAPA Low Payments 461-4518 & 795-4440 consignmentusa.org FORD F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4, 6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd. Pkg., Hard Bed Cover $21,500 (352) 586-8576 Sport/Utility Vehicles 2010 FORD ESCAPECREAM PUFF, LOADED 14K miles, Lmtd Edition, Sunroof, Sync system, GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy Wheel Covers, Michelin Tires, Rear Hitch, Heated Leather Seats, Spcl side mirrors, Sirius Radio, Warranty $24,500 (352) 509-7533 CADILLAC 2006 SRX Sport Excellent condition crossover, pearl essence paint, 2 row seating with storage underneath. Sunroof, Onstar, and sat. radio. 29,000 miles. $20,000 OBO. For more Info and pictures, send inquiries to : cadillac_srx_sport@live.com or Call or Text Jason at 352-228-7661 ATVs TOP LINE #4-W for a child, like new 110cc Panther, camo w-racks & remote cntrl $675 352-212-4600 Motorcycles 90 HARLEY SPORTSTER. XL 1200, Custom Paint, lots chrome, S &S carb. Beautiful Bike! $3000. (352) 503-2792 CAN-AM Low miles, less than 1,700 mi, red & black, $13,000 firm(352) 564-0130 or 634-0883 Harley Road King, black, lots of chrome & extras gar.kept $11,000 obo (352) 344-9810 Harley Davidson 03 Super Road King, fuel inj. $48K up grades with receipts, too much to list $8,000 (727)207-1619 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic, runs great, $10,500 obo + Mens ridng gear avail (352) 601 4722 HARLEY DAVIDSON08 Night Train, flat blk, 11,500 mis. lots of extras $14K obo Jeff (407) 712-0803 Harley Davidson 09 Sportster 1200 L, mint cond. 800 miles, dark red, windshield, sissy bar, $6500 obo (352) 503-6525 Harley Davidson 2011 street glide, Xtras, ext. warranty, 2200. miles $19,50 0 (352) 465-3668 HONDA Goldwing 1800 low miles, well maint. all service records avail $10,900 (352) 697-2760 Lucky U Cycles (352) 330-00471996 HONDA GOLDWING RUNS GREAT $4,100.00 2005 YAMAHA V-STAR1100 SUPER CLEAN $4,800.00 2006 H-D ROAD KING LOW MILES $11,500.00 1996 HONDA SHADOW 600 CLEAN $2,800.00 2007 SUZUKI M109R LOW MILES $8,500.00 2009 H-D 1200C EXTRAS $7,250.00 GOOD CREDIT BAD CREDIT FINANCE AVAILABLE Suzuki 09 Boulevard C50very low miles, accessories $4,900 or best offer. (352) 422-4528 YOMOTO2005 Motorcycle175 CC, street legal, 4,000 mi., runs good, first $1,000 or trade for car or truck (352) 637-4011 Recreation Vehicles Trail-Liteby Revision B+ LE, 23 self contained, too much to list. 33K mis $38,500 (352) 419-6825 Campers/ Travel Trailers I BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes call me 352-201-6945 KZ toy haule r,07 32 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $17,800. 352-795-2975 RV CRUISER, Fun Finder X, 18 x 9 bath w/ shower, & pull out awning much more $6,500 (352) 628-0554 Vehicles Wanted $$ CASH PAID $$ For Junk or Wrecked Cars/Trucks.$250 & UP $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYSAUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 CASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS Any Condition Up to $500., Free Towing 352-445-3909 KEEPyour used auto parts in Citrus Co. DalesAuto Parts. & Salvage Pays top $$$ 352-628-4144 VER Y VER Y BIG SALE! Consignment USA consignmentusa.or g WE DO IT ALL! BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV US 19 BY AIRPORT Low Payments 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANY VEHICLE Perfect Cond. or Not Titled,No title, No problem. Paying up to $25K any make, any model Call A.J. 813-335-3794/ 531-4298 Cars AFFORDABLE AUTOS & VANS Everybody Rides $495 DOWN $49 PER WEEK BUY HERE PAY HERE.. Lots of clean-safedependable rides CALL DAN TODAY (352) 5 6 3 -1 9 0 2WE BUYS CARS DEAD OR ALIVE 1675 Suncoast Hwy. Homosassa Fl. BIG SALE! Consignment USA WE DO IT ALL! BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV AUTOS FROM $1,500. US 19 BY AIRPORT US 44, BY NAPA Low Payments 461-4518 & 795-4440 consignmentusa.org BUICK Le Sabre Custom, Leather, Canvas Top, Chrome pkg. New Tires, Loaded, Like New, 70K $7,450 (352) 634-3806 Cadillac 01 Seville, SLS, 74K mi. load, pearl white $5500 Must see!! 352-422-6863 CHEVY Crysler, $600 (352) 586-6206 CHEVY Impala V6, auto, ice cold AC, non smokers 100K mi $8,500 (352) 726-3093 CHEVY 2000 Lumina 4dr, sedan,exc. cond.dependable 64k mi. $4600 352-212-7762 FORD Mustang GT Red Convertible, fully loaded shaker audio 6 CD changer, chrome rims, 43K mi, $16,000 (352) 637-2244 FORD TAURUS 2001AUTO 75K, new tires, brakes $4200 o/b/o One owner 352-302-9217 HONDA 05 Accord XL, cold air, 4 dr. good cond. 96Kmiles, $8,350. obo (352) 257-9866 MERCURY96, Grand Marquis LS, org. paint, immaculate gold bottom w/ red carrage top. 382-9097 MUSTANG CONV 97 V6 automatic $3000 b/o or tradefor Chevy Stepside (352) 400-0719 SAND RAIL project $400. (352) 228-1897 Classic Vehicles CHEVROLET Camaro, Z28 Org. 9000 miles, Pristine show car frozen in time. Loaded black/black leather Flawless rare find! $12950(352) 513-4257 CHEVY 1955 4 Door Sedan good shape, $9,000 (352) 621-1207 Mercedes Benz 89560-SL 2 tops exc. cond 58K mis. gray/gray, top rack incl $12,500 (352) 527-8288 TC by Maserati ,16 valve, 5spd, turbo, conv. hd top, 30k 1own,exc.cond$12,500 Call 352-220-3883 Pets Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA 1 yr nuet 9lb male $300 Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.net Toy Poodle Pups AKC, red, 9 wks, champion bloodline, shots, H/C $450 & up (352) 564-2865 YORKIE PUPPIES1 Male, 1 Tea cup Female, AKC health cert $650 ea (352) 726-5217 YORKIES $450 & UP MALTESE $500. Health certs, CKC registered, home raised, come visit parents & puppies 352 212-4504,212-1258 Livestock Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Boat Accessories OB Motor 6hp Johnson Seahorse good cond. $425 ( 352) 344-5069 352-586-8938 Boats 88 BAYLINERCapri, project boat stripped hull, 85hp Force o/b, tilt/trim, trailer, wiring harness $500 352-563-5524 BENTLY20 Ft. Pontoon 60HP, Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini, new trlr. much more. $11,500 (352) 341-4949 KAYAK 14ftAQUA TERRAPRISM lots of storage $485 352-447-5560 LARSON 99 18FT open bow, 90 hsp Johnson outboard motor trailer incl. $4800 obo (352) 400-0719 Palm Beach 99 201 white cap C.C. 150hp merc. v. low hrs. hydro steering, hi end 2 rail T-Top, elect box, T bag, alum triler, radial tires, outrigger, down rigger ready. True off/Inshore boat 8 30 free board & more exc con d.Steal $8495 (352) 563-5628 Pontoon 17 with trailer, Johnson 40 hp motor $3500 (352) 419-4026 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com WE NEED BOATSSOLDAT NO FEEWORLD WIDE INTERNET EXPOSURE 352-795-1119MercuryAuth Parts and Service US 19 Crystal River (just north of the Mall) Recreation Vehicles AIRSTREAM 30FT motorhome, 2005 Land Yacht, 1 owner, low miles, slide, all options $58,000 For full details (352) 637-3867 seahawk@ta mpabay.rr.co m BT CRUISER2004-26mdl 5250 32k miles Ford E450, V10 Triton gas engine, sleeps 4, 3 burner stove, micro/conv oven, full rear kitchen, full bath, tv, dvd, 4kw gen, to many extras to name. $28950. 352 489-4129 GULF STREAM 08 32 3 slides, rear. kit. K bed,50amp, like new extras $31,500 (352) 726-1906 HITCHHIKER II LS 2008, 3 slides, excel cond. heat pump, deluxe pkg. too many extras to list $32,000. Dodge Truck also avail (636) 209-0308 Holiday Rambler ,38 7.5 gen.super slide, air lever, a/c susp. loaded call for details $41K (352) 746-9211 JAYCO 40 5th whl toy hauler, generator. slide, fuel staion $17,400. like new Truck Avail For Sale Local (502) 345-0285 Utility Trailers 5 X 8 UTILITYTRAILER 2011 -Loadstar -Heavy Duty / 24 Steel Sides /Ramp / 16 Tires Wood Deck -Lock System -Used Once / $750.00 Ph. 352-637-5131 Don 9 x 5 ft. /10, Open Trailer drive on ramp, spare, set up for large mower, or full size motor cycle $450 obo, cash (352) 586-0510 EZ PULL TRAILERS, New & Used Utility & Enclosed BUY, SELL, TRADE Custom Built, Parts, Tires, Whls, Repairs, Trailer Hitches NEW 16X8.5 V nose encl. car hauler $3995 USED 7X18 Goose neck, 6 ton Equip. hauler w/mesh sides & ramp gate $2895 Trailer Tires from $34.49 Hwy 44 Crystal River 352-564-1299 GULF TO LAKE TRAILER SALES Largest Selection & Lowest Prices. Offering New & Used Cargo & utility trailers Triple Crown Utility TRL 6 x 12 w/new spare $1050. 6 x 12 Enclosed w/ V nose, rear ramp door, $1995. Trailer Tires starting at $69.95 352-527-0555 Hwy 44, Lecanto Baby Items Like NewHIGH Chair $100 C@Move sale. SAT1455 w. Japonica pl,Citrus springs 352-897-4678 TANDUM STROLLER sacrafice $100.c@ move sale Sat. 1455 W. Japonica pl citrus Springs 352-897-4678 Sell or Swap Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Wanted to Buy TOOLS OF ANY value, rods, reels, tackle, collectibles, hunt equip352 613-2944 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE AnyAr ea Condition orSituation. Call (352) 726-9369 Pets AKC ENGLISH BULL DOG PUPS, 4 male 2 female avail 7/1/12 taking dep$1200 (352) 341-7732 Beagle Puppies 8wks. old, tri colors $125. Cash. (352) 447-2018 HEMINGWAY KITTENS for adoption (352) 726-1006 Humane Society of Florida We have many wonderful Dogs Fully Vetted that needs loving homes Stop By 11a-4p 7 days a week 9211 S. Florida Ave. Floral City (352) 419-7900 hsflorida@ymail.com Koi and Gold Fish FOR SALE Great Prices ALL SIZES.Call Jean(352) 634-1783 Shih Tzu Puppies Lovely Tri colors ,Reg, APR, CKC, non allergenic, non shed, H/C $500. 352 341-2380 Medical Equipment EM WAVE PERSONAL STRESS RELIEVER BY HEARTMATH, Like new $65 352 726 9983 Pride Maximum Scooter racing green, good working condition, new battery, $375 (352) 746-7940 RASCAL SCOOTER 300, 4 WHEELS, like new heavy duty many extras $995 firm (352) 637-6216 Coins BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. WeAlso Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 Musical Instruments FULL DRUM SET with extra 16 Sabian crash, 10 Sabian splash 16 Zildjian crash with stands $250. (352) 794-7647 Organ Easy Play Technics E 33 good cond, $450. (352) 344-5069 352-568-8938 ORGAN Estey, Like new, $600 (352) 419-6186 Household Full Set Crystal Glassware, water, wine, champagne $200. obo Moving Must Sell (352) 746-4028 GRAND FATHER CLOCK Pendulum, 3 chain weights, moon face, 3 tunes $900 (352) 746-9342 Nortaki China, service for 12, gold edging $250 Mikasa China service for 12, silver edging $250. Moving Must Sell (352) 746-4028 Fitness Equipment BODYSMITH WEIGHT EQUIPMENT Home fitness center, over 400# free weights, lifting bars, butterfly, storage rack for weights. Must see! Will deliver for small fee or pickup $300.00 352-560-7869 Electric TreadmillSears, lifestyler, folds up, all electronics, nearly new hardly used ONLY $195 (352) 464-0316 TOTAL GYM Like new, comes with book of instructions and video $250. (352) 746-2356 TreadmillNordic Track C1800 $100 (352) 746-1547 Sporting Goods CABIN ON 40 ACRES Hunting recreational in Gulf Hammock Mgt.. Area, well, pond, ATV trails Price Reduced 352 795-2027/ 634-4745 CLEVELAND GOLF CLUBS CG-4 irons 3-PW, very good condition; new grips; S-300 Lite shafts; owner deceased. $250 OBO; Bob 352-228-9413 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 RAY Welcomes you to Your Headquaters for GUNS, AMMO, & Reloading Supplies NEW HOURS TUES. & WED. 7A-2P SAT. 8A-3P STOKES FLEA MARKET Rt 44 E. of Crys. River SMITH & WESSON .38 Special, 6 shot, 6? barrel, Pachmayr Decelerator grips-$325. 4 Speed Loaders-$4 ea. 1500 Copperhead BB??s-$3. Adapter to convert lower to upper rail-$15. Speed loader for Ruger 9mm auto & other models-$4. 527-6709 WE BUYGUNSOn Site Gun Smithing (352) 726-5238 General 5 Gal. Gas Can $5. ea A/C Unit 8K BTU $100.ea Pool Pump/Filters $100. Lg. Oak Bdrm. Set $250. Lawn sweeper+cart $75 Oak Ent. Center. $125. 27 Color TV $35. Dresser $25. 212-9171 20 Sago Palms $8 ea. or all for $140 (352) 628-5222 24 GAL RUBBERMAID, Action Packer Storage Box New $15 (352) 382-1154 48 Qt. RUBBERMAID, Ice Chest, NEW $18 (352) 382-1154 460 MOTOR,TRANNY ALLNEED REBUILTINCLUDES HOIST $100.00 352-628-6277 2-Small Pigeon Coops...Wire floors, Nicely Made...$50.00 352-503-2792 36 CEILING FAN W/LITE 6 Blades. White or Multi. Home Depot sells@$60, asking $25. Ruth 352-382-1000 AIWASTEREO SYSTEM WITH CD PLAYER, DUALCASSETTE & REMOTE CONTROL$100 352-613-0529 AQUARIUM 25 GALLON HIGH INCLUDES STAND, LIGHT, FILTER & GRAVEL$75 352-613-0529 BARBIE JEEP pink, working radio, has charger, like new $100 (352) 503-6952 BLACK HALF HELMENTS 2 NICE HELMENTS,ONE SMALL,ONE LARGE $100.00 352-621-0142 Black Leather single Hide a Bed $198. obo Great Shape, Midar Saw New in Box $125 obo (352) 795-7513 BREAD MAKER breadman, good condition, hardly used, 1.5 lb. $30 (352)465-1616 GENERATOR TROY BUILT portable, 120-220v 12v electric start, 8000 running watts, 13,500 starting watts, will do whole house, bought after Katrina, never used. pd $1400. sell for $975( 352) 489-3914 GOLF ORGANIZER RACK Holds two bags and accessories (one bag included) $10. 352-270-3909 HARLEYTHANDLEBARS CHROME,6INCH RISERS WITH CONTROLS, $100.00 352-621-0142 Heavy Duty Whirlpool Dryer, $150 Entertainment Center $50. (352) 795-7254 LIGHTED CURIO CABINETGlass shelves. Tall. Brown. $80.00 Located Chassahowitzka Ruth 352-382-1000 MATTRESS queen mattress 7years old like new lady Diana by sterners and fosterexceptional buy 100.00 352 344 3485 Men 9 1/2 black. $70. obo. Call Bill 352-212-1053. Har.Dav. POOL TABLEFat Cat, style 2 pool sticks, excel. condition no stains, $350. (352) 634-1697 QUIK SHADE ROLLERBAG Fits 10by10 popup canopy Never use.$40.00 Call Ray@464-0573 SANDBOX & WATERTABLE $100 C@movesale Sat. 1455 w.Japonica pl Citrus Springs 352-897-4678 SEVERAL BEDS & TVS for sale/various sizes starting at $25 (352)634-0129 SLIDING GLASS DOOR slider/w screen door 150.00 o/bo 1508-314-4660 TABLE LAMPGLASS SHADE WITH ROSE DESIGN CAN E-MAIL PHOTO $40 INVERNESS 419-5981 VACUME CLEANER eureka! needs some repair, blue color, works 1st 5 mins then stops. $10 (352)465-1616 VACUME CLEANER Eureka!, needs some repair, works in first 5 minutes then stops and restarts. $10 (352)465-1616 XXLDIRTBIKE HELMENTSTILLNICE SOME SCRATCHES $30.00 352-628-6277 Business Equipment SALON EQUIPMENT Pedi tub w/chair form, stool, rolling cart $400 Manicure table, 2 chairs, 6-row plexzi polish rack & extras $250 Styling chair & floor mat $100. Avail June 2nd Call Marie 352-697-3151 352-795-6933

PAGE 34

D8 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000BDZQ

PAGE 35

E12 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 0 0 0 B K 0 6 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscounty.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 352-726-9010 SERVING CITRUS COUNT Y FOR O VER 37 YEARS 20 20 10 10 20 20 10 10 OPEN SUND AY FLORAL CITY HUGE PRICE REDUCTION OF $29,000 Great location on busy Highway 41 South. 200 ft. frontage. GNC zoning allows over 100 uses. Net leasable sq. ft. 1450. City water on 3.1 acres. $110,000 David Kurtz Cell 954-383-8786 Office 352-726-6668 MAKE THIS YOUR NEXT HOME! Canterbury Lake Estates 4 Bdrm, 3 bath home built in 20 09 Over 2,400 sq. ft. liv area Near pool & tennis courts MLS #351573 ONLY $149,000 Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072 CUL-DE-SAC LOT 3.5 AC PINE RIDGE Private, flat, nice lots in this equestrian & golf community, MLS #347743, 347751 Call Nilda, cell 352-270-0202 Perfect family home, newer 4BR, 2 bath, pool 1/2 Acre on cul-de-sac Fenced backyard MLS #352524 $140,000 www .CitrusCountySold.com Jeanne & Willard Pickrel 212-3410 FAMILY SIZE AND COUNTRY STYLE 4/2.5, oversized 2 car detached garage situated on 9.74 (MOL) ACRE SITE ABUTTING STATE FOREST. Bring the horses. Miles and miles of forest riding trails. Perfect home for buyer seeking the equestrian/country lifestyle. MLS #355347 ASKING $325,000 Pat Davis 352-212-7280 View listing @ www.c21patdavis.com ENTIRELY MANAGEABLE! A not-too big yard, and a just-right 3/2/2 home. Original owner has updated with attractive flooring in kitchen, great room and bedrooms. Touches you will like such as plant ledges and bay-windowed kitchen dining area. Split bedroom plan, of course! Cool off in the back screened porch. MLS #353813 $89,000 Ask for Marilyn Booth 637-4904 HERNANDO LAKE CHAIN 3/2/2cp has open floor plan, fireplace, fenced yard, city water and sewer, 2 docks on the lake, comes furnished. ASKING $67,900 Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866 WATERFRONT COTTAGE FLORAL CITY G randfather oaks D ecks & dock G reat kitchen & formal dining 2/2 P lus carport MLS #354320 $49,000 C all D oris M iner @ 352-422-4627 Great place to raise a family 3BR, 2BA, MH on 1 acre Inground pool, plus hot tub Workshop, large shed Pole barn and carport MLS #354742 $119,000 www .CitrusCountySold.com Jeanne & Willard Pickrel 212-3410 INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY HOME 3/2/2 + Office and Florida room. City water. 2,100 SF of living space. New hardwood floors make this home shine! MLS #354607 PRICED TO SELL $143,000 Call Quade 352-302-7699 NEW. 1ST TIME OFFERED, ORIGINAL OWNER. HOME NEEDS A NEW OWNER Come see this lovely neat and clean 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage, shed and more. All on a nice corner lot in homes only area. MLS #355579 $64,900 Call Martha Snyder 476-8727 4 BED/2.5 BATH/4 CAR GARAGE Pool home on 1 acre in Inverness. Gorgeous kitchen with new granite tops throughout the home. MLS #355309 CANT BE BEAT FOR $224,900! Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 YOULL LOVE THE ROOM SIZES HERE No wasted space. 2/2 with oversized garage plus extra finished room downstairs. Beautiful backyard. Dock. Nice trees gentle slope to lake. Rails to Trails a block away. MLS #355419 ASKING $114,900 Pat Davis 352-212-7280 View complete listing @ www.c21patdavis.com POOL HOME, spotless 3BR, 2 bath 2 car gar Privacy fenced backyard C orner lot, public water MLS #352923 $114,500 Willard Pickrel 201-9871 www.CitrusCountySold.com ARROWHEAD Renovated 3/1 home is just like new, kitchen is awesome, real fireplace, fenced yard, dock on channel a short distance to the Withlacoochee River. GREAT PRICE FOR THIS HOME $69,900 Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866 MOBILES IN PARKS FROM $8,300 TO $49,900 55+ P arks I nverness, C rystal R iver H omosassa S ome doublewides, singles, waterfront Newer. Older. Call Doris Miner @ 352-422-4627 INVERNESS 3/2/2 HOME New Carpet and Paint. Remodeled Kitchen with Nook. New Roof 2008. Move-In Ready. MLS# 353778 Only $79,900 Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387 INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!! 2 Baths and a garage Large kitchen with dining room Spacious living room Corner lot close to shopping MLS #352641 ONLY $63,000 Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387 WARM & INVITING IS THIS WELL KEPT HOME Featuring an extra large Florida room, 16x30 under heat & air. Hardwood floors and a beautiful backyard with trees & flowerswith partial privacy fence. MLS #355296 $59,900 Lorraine ORegan 352-586-0075 WOW! Come see this 4 bedroom, 2 bath waterfront home in Inverness chain of lakes! Home has been well-maintained and has a ton of square footage RV parking, city water, split-plan with beautiful sun room overlooking water Call today for showing! Bring offers! $67,900 Call Mary Parsons 352-634-1273 BLDG. FOR SALE Approx. 5,000 sq. ft. main bldg. Also doublewide mobile included, presently used as a classroom. Bldg. has comm. kitchen, 2 offices, large meeting room, newer roof, newer air conditioners. Drainfields are also newer. $239,500 Call Martha Snyder today 352-476-8727 ask for file #349332. WORKSHOP 4 BR, POOL POOL JUST LISTED BE YOUR OWN BOSS This GNC-zoned property on a busy Crystal River roadway features a turnkey seafood retail and a small restaurant. Please call for an appointment to see this great opportunity. MLS #353737 Isaac S. Baylon 352-697-2493 WATERFRONT This image shows how Sarah Reiss sourced reclaimed wood to make custom wall art. She used gymnasium flooring, bowling alleys, barn wood and shiplap to craft her wall art and smaller-scaled tables. R & R Designworks/Associated Press H OME F RONT Section E SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE R EAL E STATEG UIDE INSIDE Sikorskis Attic PAGE E6 ON THE COVER: WOOD WONDERS, E8 HOME AND GARDEN: CORAL BEAN, E7 REAL ESTATE: SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS ON THE COVER: WOOD WONDERS, E8 HOME AND GARDEN: CORAL BEAN, E7 REAL ESTATE: SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS

PAGE 36

C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 E11 E2 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1100 W. Main St., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com 000BK0F REALTY ONE 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Already! Over $2 million SOLD in 2012! PRIVATE GATED ACREAGE! Very Tasteful Decor Great Room w/FP Kit./Wood Cab./Island MBR w/Walk-In Elec. Hurr. Shutters 2/2/2 Car. Garage Steele Frame Const. Secluded Area! KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Already! Over $2 million SOLD in 2012! CHECK THIS!!! Bank-Approved!! Short Sale!! Great Price for Home! Wood Floors/Cpt. SS Appliances 2/2/2 w/Fam. Rm. Nice Porch! 6 Nevada! KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Already! Over $2 million SOLD in 2012! LOVELY PLAN ON TEN ACRES!! Cooks Kit. w/Bar MBR w/Slider to Lanai Great Well Water 3/2.5/2 Car Gar. + Office Room for Pool Family Room w/FP 36x72 Barn w/Elec. 2,570 SQ. FT. of Liv.!! E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net E-MAIL: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com THE KELLY / ELLIE TEAM @ RE/MAX THE KELLY / ELLIE TEAM @ RE/MAX THE KELLY / ELLIE TEAM @ RE/MAX PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200 Email: Info@CitrusCountyHomes.com www.CitrusCountyHomes.com DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 Email: djmfl@yahoo.com CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 Email: cheryllambert@remax.net 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre Hardwood Floors Throughout Home Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan Security System Fully Enclosed Screen Room for Pool and More Close to Schools Must See!!! MLS #351402 $ 1 2 2 9 0 0 $ 1 2 2 9 0 0 $122,900 REDUCED!!!! JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: team@citrusrealty.com GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441 Email: garyaltman@remax.net LOU NALLEY (352) 257-9016 Email: lounalley@tampabay.rr.com MARTHA SATHER ( 352) 212-3929 Email: martha.sather@remax.net VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martha.sather.remax.com MLS #354678 $ 2 9 9 9 0 0 $ 2 9 9 9 0 0 $299,900 CITRUS SPRINGS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1990 INVERNESS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5366 MLS #352164 $ 1 7 9 9 0 0 $ 1 7 9 9 0 0 $179,900 CITRUS HILLS MEMBERSHIP! Looking for lots of storage?? This large home has room for it all. Family room, gourmet eat-in kitchen and nice open floor plan. Caged pool with pool bath. One acre manicured like a park. Master suite has bonus room for office, workout room or turn into awesome closet space. Current owner has maintained it to top-notch condition. 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths and big 3-car garage w/workshop and built-in cabinets. Dream utility area. 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1313 MLS #354977 $ 2 6 2 9 0 0 $ 2 6 2 9 0 0 $262,900 5989 N. ORCHIS TER. PINE RIDGE 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath Office or Den Many Extras $ 3 2 9 9 0 0 $ 3 2 9 9 0 0 $329,900 MLS #352656 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5989 6279 W. GLYNBORNE LOOP FOX HOLLOW/MEADOWCREST 2BD/2BA/2-Car Garage Maintenance-Free Villa Lanai with Vinyl Windows Activity Center + Park 2 Community Pools Beautiful Landscaping MLS #355507 $ 6 9 9 0 0 $ 6 9 9 0 0 $69,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #6279 9 BONNIE CT. S. SUGARMILL WOODS Phenomenal 3 BR, 2 BTH home. Meticulously maintained and has room for everything! Vaulted ceilings, 3 exposures onto the screened lanai (Veranda) overlooking the greenbelt and tons of shade and privacy galore, and a slightly oversized garage is a nice little perk as well for any buyer. $ 1 5 0 0 0 0 $ 1 5 0 0 0 0 $150,000 MLS #354799 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #9 SUGARMILL WOODS HOMOSASSA!! 3 B edroom 2 bath home on 1 acre, completely fenced, remodeled, fireplace, not in flood zone, paved road, shed, L ecanto schools. MLS #343462 $ 7 5 0 0 0 $ 7 5 0 0 0 $75,000 16 ASTERS COURT SUGARMILL WOODS 4BR/2BA/2 Car Grg. Built 2005 2,165 SF Large Family Room Wood Cabinets Throughout Formal LR/DR Master BR w/2 Walk-Ins Kitchen w/Brkfst Nook Stainless Steel Appl. Large Screened Porch Extr. Brick Paver Patio $ 1 5 9 0 0 0 $ 1 5 9 0 0 0 $159,000 MLS #353039 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #16 CRYSTAL RIVER Immaculate 3/2/2 Split Bedroom Plan Lots of Ceramic Tile Eat-In Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar Superior Grade Appliances Master Bath Dual Vanities, Garden Tub Walk-In Closets Large Tiled Screened Lanai New A/C 2012, New Roof 2009 A Feel of Country, Close to Town Move-In Condition MLS #353041 $ 1 4 9 9 0 0 $ 1 4 9 9 0 0 $149,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #9249 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net Custom Built 4/3/2 2,932 Sq. Ft. L/A Custom Built-Ins in Living Room Tiled Thru-Out All Traffic Areas Plush Carpet in Bedroom, Office, Great Room & Dining Master Suite w/Walk-Ins, Jetted Tub, Double Sinks Gourmet Kitchen w/Morning Room Formal Dining Outside Summer Kitchen Plus Too Many Upgrades to Mention Here Dont miss this gorgeous home. Call me for your private showing. REDUCED to sell. ELEGANCE AND BEAUTY $ 2 6 5 0 0 0 $ 2 6 5 0 0 0 $265,000 MLS #352515 CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES 2/2/2 beautiful home on private lot in a good community with nice trees and great views. L ocated on a cul-de-sac road, with green space in the rear and along one side, great privacy. home comes with appliances and washer and dryer. C lose to the community clubhouse, with pool and tennis courts. $ 1 0 0 0 0 0 $ 1 0 0 0 0 0 $100,000 MLS #355571 WATERFRONT POOL HOME E xceptional quality. T his distinctive home features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, a waterside office, solar-heated pool, and situated on a deep water canal with boat house & 10,000# boat lift. T his home has too many features including engineered piling system, 6 exterior walls, hurricane panels for doors and windows, T rex wood dock and decking. 3+ car garage with extra storage and workshop. $ 4 9 3 5 0 0 $ 4 9 3 5 0 0 $493,500 OVER 2,000 S.F. of luxury low maintenance living on deep canal w/Gulf access in Riverhaven. 2/2/2, plus family room offering ships view of water. Lots of tile, new shower in master, kit. cabinets redone & your own dock. $ 2 0 9 0 0 0 $ 2 0 9 0 0 0 $209,000 PRICE REDUCTION LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net 1823 S. GLENEAGLE TERRACE LECANTO Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Florida Room Screened Lanai Area Fenced Backyard 22x14 Detached Garage/Workshop Adjacent Lot Included MLS #353836 $ 9 9 9 0 0 $ 9 9 9 0 0 $99,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1823 REDUCED LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net 780 W. SKYVIEW CROSSING DR. TERRA VISTA Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Villa Open Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar Den/Office Built-In Entertainment Center Screened Lanai Private Backyard Maintenance-Free MLS #354534 $ 1 7 9 5 0 0 $ 1 7 9 5 0 0 $179,500 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #780 BEVERLY HILLS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #6 MLS #352770 $ 5 9 9 0 0 $ 5 9 9 0 0 $59,900 Rent: Houses Furnished Kristi Bortz Let our property mangement team help you with your short or long term rentals. See all our rentals in Citrus Co. www.plantation r entals.com 352-795-0782 or 866-795-0784 Rent: Houses Unfurnished BEVERLY HILLSRENT TO OWN, 2/1/1 $2,000 Down, $475. mo. (352) 726-9369 C ITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/2, appls $795/mo 1st/lst sec no smoke 352-812-1414 CITRUS COUNTYLake front, spacious 3/2/2, $800. Rent or Sale (908) 322-6529 CITRUS SPRINGS RENT OR RENT TO OWN $699 Move in Special 3Bed 2Bath, Garage Lovely Home, spotless tiled, fenced, Pets ok 352-527-0493 CRYSTALRIVER2/2 Plantation Golf. Spac. Clean $800/mo+dep. 352-795-6282 CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2Newly Remodeled, AC, $750. 352-220-3005 HERNANDO 2/1 Mobile Home total remodel, clean, great water $400 (352) 344-2201 HOMOSASSA 3/2 home 3/2 DW no pets (352) 637-1142 HOMOSASSA Rent to Own 3/1/1 very clean, ceramic tile carpet, dbl lot. $650.rent. 1st lst sec. 813 908-5550 INVERNESS 2 bedrm.1 1/2 bath, garage, lanai ,near town $650 813-973-7237 INVERNESS 2/2/1 New paint & flooring $675 mo. Inclds. trash, 352-637-0765, 352-267-9941 INVERNESS 2/2/2,Gospel Is., Dock, carpet, appls, $750 1st, last sec. (352) 464-0316 INVERNESS 3/2/2,Highlands Starting @ $750. 3/2/2 w/pool. 352601-2615/201-9427 INVERNESS Highlands close to downtown 3/2/2, Immaculate (352) 400-5723 Rent: Houses Unfurnished SUGARMILL 3/2/2 $800 (352) 400-0230 Waterfront Rentals CRYSTAL RIVER3/1 Home WF $550 mo 352-228-0257/795-9633 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 HOMOSASSA Just Rennovated 1/1 scrn. por., deck, boat slip, dock, no smoke or pets, incls water, garbage & lawn $525 +sec. (941) 730-2359 INVERNESS East Cove Waterfront, furn., 2/2, C/A carport, shed, $600 352-476-4964 Rentals to Share C ITRUS HILLS 2 master suites. $600/m incls ALL (352) 419-5481 Rent or Sale CRYSTAL RIVER4/2/1, CHA, new wall to wall carpet, new roof, near Manatee Lanes. $750 to rent$850lease/opt to buy call Paul 352-746-9585 Rooms For Rent CRYSTALRIVERFurnished,Clean House, cable, w/d, $115wkly/430mo. No hidden cost. 563-6428 Seasonal Rental C.R/Homosassa 1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park Util. incl. clean, shrt/long term 352 220-2077 Real Estate For Sale AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Get Results in the homefront classifieds! Real Estate For Sale FARMS, LAND, COMMERCIAL UNIQUE & HISTORIC HOMES, SMALL TOWN COUNTRY LIFESTYLE OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989 LIFE IS BETTER WITH A PORCHwww. crosslandrealty.com (352) 726-6644 Crossland Realty Inc. PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & CommercialRichard (Rick) Couch, BrokerCouch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com Open House OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-4pm 4/3/3 Pool Home 1276 Tacoma St. HERNANDO Commercial Real Estate For Sale By AUCTION 1,250 SF Bldg. on .7 acresZoning: CH High Intensity Commercial Permitted uses include restaurant, retail, hotel, motel, office, gas station, c-store, plus much more! Auction held on site 16 NE HWY 19, Crystal River, FLJUNE 12 @ 12 PMOPEN from 11 AM sale day Call 352-519-3130 for more info For Details Visit our Website AmericanHeritage Auctioneers.com Citrus Springs Homes By Owner New 3/2 Custom Built, Lease Option Owner Financing w/dn pmt 407-739-2646/442-3597 Beverly Hills Homes Beverly Hills 1 bedroom. 1 bath. 25 E. Golden St. $19,900 or best offer Call 746-1017 Lecanto Homes Timberlane Estates Pool Home w/ 3/2/2 1 Acre, Fenced, Needs some TLC, possible owner finance $125,000 (352)795-6024 Hernando Homes ARBOR LAKES Fantastic Dream Home In Active Senior Community $175,900 2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA Pool Home. Split floor. plan w/ seperate family rm., master suite & guest wing open to lanai/ pool. New wood flooring in Liv/Din. area dbl. garage, beautifully landscapped yard. Call (352) 726-6564 Hernando Homes OPEN HOUSE 2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR Lowest Priced Home in Arbor Lakes Sat & Sun. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 Inverness Homes 2/2/1 VillaWhispering Pines ,new carpet, paint & tile, will sell furn or unf. $69,900 (352) 726-8712 For Sale By Owner $105,000, 4/3/2, Pool Home, 3,400 sf total OPEN HOUSE Sat. May 19th 12-3P (352) 726-3798 HIGHLANDS Lrg.2/2-4 car garage pool, game room, mud room, on triple lot fenced. price to sell $65,500(352) 564-4598 Inver/Highlands. Large 1 Family -2.8 acs fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A 4 BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool, costly updates asking $ 220K make offer if you can offer a quick closing 352-419-7017 OPEN HOUSE Sat. 12 & Sun. 13, 12-5 6094 E. Loring Lane 2/1/1 Move In Ready, w/ 2 Additional Lots, $58,500. (352)697-2884 Crystal River Homes AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Country Club Road 3 bedroom. 1 bath. Home for Sale: $105,000 Country Club Road, Crystal River Florida. Location, Location, Location!!!!!!!!!! Across the street from the famous Plantation Golf and Resort. 3 bedroom, Privacy, this is private large lot but close to all that Crystal River has to offer! Fenced in yard with storage shed in the back yard. Also plenty of room for boat/trailer storage.Updated with newer ac/furnace, roof, interior totally professionally updated, tile and carpet thru out. Rental history is great with tenant in place. Check it out! Seller says Sell! REaltors, I will pay a generous bonus if you bring me a buyer! Homosassa Homes 3/2/2, Built 2007 Newly Remodeled $88,000 100% Financing Avail. (352) 400-0230 AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Homosassa/Riverhaven On water, Grand canal 3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG Formal. Living Rm. Formal Din. Rm., Lanai front & rear. River View Room. Dock, many Upgrades, $243,900 Call 352-628-9647 or 727-647-2372 Sugarmill Woods 3/2/3 pool home move in ready $165K Largo Fl condo. wheel chair access 2/1.5 remodeled, new appl walking distance ALL conv. 1 mi to Ind. Rocks Bch 55+ comm.$80K (727) 266-7356 Buying or Selling REAL ESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTY HUNT, REALTOR ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. Citrus County Homes Best Time To Buy! I have lease options, owner financing Waterfront and foreclosures call Phyllis Strickland (352) 613-3503 TROPIC SHORES REALTY. HOLDER 3/2/2 blk/stucco home w/enclosed lanai. 1350 sf. near clubhouse w/pool & recreation, beautiful oaks & mature Citrus trees $84K,352-603-2202 Citrus County Homes DEB INFANTINE 4 HOMES SOLD Closing in April I Need Listings! Real Estate!... its what I do. ERA American Realty Phone:(352) 726-5855 Cell:(352) 302-8046 Fax:(352) 726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com OWN TODAY!NO CREDIT CHECK!OFFER INCLUDES : Home, water, sewer, trash, Wi-Fi, Clubhouse & Pool Relax on your large spacious lot with your family and friends AURORA ACRES, a MUST SEE COMMUNITY is located on 28 acres of beautiful mature oak trees, scattered hammocks, picnic tables and gazebos. Your NEW house is remodeled and waiting for YOU to call it HOME!Just $595 a Mo. AURORA ACRES Mobile Home & RV Community 11240 N Northwood Dr. Inglis, FL 34449352-447-2759 www. aur oraacr esfl.com Need a JOB? www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Employment source is... Levy County Homes OWN TODAY!NO CREDIT CHECK! OFFER INCLUDES : Home, water, sewer, trash, Wi-Fi, Clubhouse & Pool Relax on your large spacious lot with your family and friends AURORA ACRES, a MUST SEE COMMUNITY is located on 28 acres of beautiful mature oak trees, scattered hammocks, picnic tables and gazebos. Your NEW house is remodeled and waiting for YOU to call it HOME!Just $595 a Mo. AURORA ACRES Mobile Home & RV Community 11240 N Northwood Dr. Inglis, FL 34449352-447-2759 www. aur oraacr esfl.com Waterfront Homes FREE foreclosure and short sale lists Office Open 7 Days a Week Lisa VanDeboe Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Vacant Property CABIN ON 40 ACRES Hunting recreational in Gulf Hammock Mgt.. Area, well, pond,ATV trails Price Reduced 352 795-2027/ 634-4745 Citrus County Land FLORALCITY1.33 acre nice lot on dead end.Have survey and clear title.listed 10k below county land value.Zoned rural residential.See at 8678 s greenhouse ter.$16500.o.b.o. 813-792-1355 Levy County Land CABIN ON 40 ACRES Hunting recreational in Gulf Hammock Mgt.. Area, well, pond,ATV trails Price Reduced 352 795-2027/ 634-4745 Lots For Sale HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr has Wetlands, River access, $6,000. 352-621-1664 (352) 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Car Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! 640984A Get Results in the homefront classifieds!

PAGE 37

D enture tablets are made to clean stains, which makes them useful for more than just cleaning dentures. If you come across a sale, pick up a box to add to your cleaning supply cabinet. The generic version will be cheaper and give you great results, too. Here are a few ways to use the tablets around your home: Clean vases: One reader, Ellise from South Carolina, shares: Denture tablets work well to clean stains from coffee pots, ceramics, teacups, mugs, tea pots, thermoses and other objects with hard-to-reach insides. Some vases are narrow, making it difficult to reach the bottom to clean them. Try putting hot water in the vase and adding a denture tablet, then let the vase soak or rub petroleum jelly inside it and leave it for a few days. Then wash it as usual. Besides using denture-cleaning tablets, you can also use dry rice to clean vases. Add vinegar and water or a squirt of dishwashing liquid and water and swish the rice around the vase. You can use a baby-bottle brush, too. A quick wipe with nail polish remover sometimes works. Afterward, wash the vase thoroughly with dish soap and water. You can use a toothbrush and scrub the vase with white toothpaste and rinse, too. Nail whitener: Soak your fingers for five minutes in a bowl that contains a mixture of one cup of warm water and a denture tablet. Unclog drain: Drop a couple of broken-up tablets into your sink or tub drain and pour hot water or vinegar down the drain to clear it. A denture tablet and hot water soak can clean your entire tub, too. Another reader, Michelle from Texas, shares: To clean a showerhead, dissolve a denture-cleaning tablet in a plastic bag of T he skilled arborist learns how a tree grows in order to care for and maintain it in a way that supports its growth and development. Pruning is the most common tree maintenance procedure. Forest trees grow quite well with little or no pruning. However, in urban landscaping situations, pruning is necessary to remove dead branches, rubbing branches, improve tree structure and to maintain safety. Pruning cuts must be made with an understanding of how the tree will respond. Improper pruning can cause damage to the tree for the life of the tree. Removing too much foliage from a tree may reduce overall growth. Never remove all interior or sucker branches. Each cut has the potential to change the growth of a tree. No branch should be removed without reason. Thinning trees eliminates undesirable branches and allows air, light penetration and reduces weight. A thinning cut removes a branch at its point of attachment. Crown reduction is a method used to reduce the size of a tree without topping or making a heading cut. Epicormic growth develops profusely following a topped or headed tree. The epicormic growth becomes potentially hazardous when it becomes large and heavy, making a bad situation even worse. Kerry Kreider is a practicing arborist and a member of the International Society of Arboriculture, a tree preservationist and president of Action Tree Service. Reach him at 352-726-9724 or actionproarborist@ yahoo.com. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 E3 E10 S UNDAY, M AY 27, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE CITRUS RIDGE REALTY 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 www.citrusbestbuy.com Tom Balfour REALTOR Amanda & Kirk Johnson BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI Art Paty REALTOR Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner REALTOR BROKER 746-9000 0 0 0 B K K G 3 CLIFFORD 2/2/2 355613 $59,900 510 W. PLAYER PATH 2/2/1 352984 $91,500 LAUREL RIDGE 822 W. DEACON 3/2/2 353982 $89,900 2003 CITRUS SPRINGS 21 TRUMAN BLVD. 2/2/2 351656 $59,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 7768 N. SARAZEN 3/2/2 354564 $144,900 POOL 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 4/2/2 350502 $129,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 1945 W. OLIVER 2/2/2 355628 $74,900 CITRUS SPRINGS PINE RIDGE 4889 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 3/2/2 354938 $149,900 2002 2667 FLAME LP 3/3/2 354963 $139,900 CITRUS SPRINGS GOLF COURSE POOL 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS 348850 $176,900 O W N E R F I N A N C I N G O W N E R F I N A N C I N G OWNER FINANCING GNC 45 S. MELBOURNE 354341 $84,900 O W N E R F I N A N C I N G O W N E R F I N A N C I N G OWNER FINANCING 15 S. FILLMORE 2/2 354359 $49,900 O W N E R F I N A N C I N G O W N E R F I N A N C I N G OWNER FINANCING 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 2/2/2 354334 $64,900 O W N E R F I N A N C I N G O W N E R F I N A N C I N G OWNER FINANCING 311 S. TYLER 2/1.5/1 354946 $49,900 FURNISHED 6560 N. DELTONA 3/2/2 355155 $139,900 CITRUS SPRINGS POOL BEVERLY HILLS 1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN LP 4/3/3 353329 $365,000 POOL 9005 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 4/3/3 353901 $164,500 2006 2173 W. TACOMA 4/3/3 353801 $149,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 2005 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 2/2/2 354530 $118,500 BRENTWOOD CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS HILLS BEVERLY HILLS BEVERLY HILLS BEVERLY HILLS BEVERLY HILLS COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL O W N E R F I N A N C I N G O W N E R F I N A N C I N G OWNER FINANCING Norm Overfield Realtor 352-586-8620 Email:normoverfield@kw.com www.normoverfield.homesandland.com 352-746-7113 699 S. Adolph point, Lecanto 000BKCF 3822 E. Arbor Lakes Drive Popular Sanibel floor plan with extra living area and expanded garage. Backs to community property, no close backyard neighbors. Ceramic Tile and carpeted floors. Covered lanai with vinyl windows. In Ground heated spa in screened area. Recent SEER 15 A/C unit. Two ovens and 2 Refrigerators. Located in Arbor Lakes, a gated lakeside 55+ community with lots of activities and amenities. And, there is a One-year warranty, too! ONLY $154,400. Call Norm Today! OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4PM The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. 746-6700 Jason Gaffney Realtor 287-9022 302-3179 Jackie Gaffney Realtor A HOUSE SOLD Name! 000BL58 47 S. DESOTO ST. BEVERLY HILLS Home w/3 full baths, 2BR (easily converted to 3), above ground pool with deck, updated appliances, roof in A/C few years old, fenced backyard. wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com 40 S. DAVIS ST. BEVERLY HILLS Princess model, 2/1/1, LR & family room, newer flooring throughout. New heat & AC in Move right in and enjoy. GREAT HOMES GREAT PRICES! $49,900 BEVERLY HILLS $44,900 BEVERL Y HILL S Mobile Homes For Rent C.R/Homosassa 1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park Util. incl. clean, shrt/long term 352 220-2077 FLORAL CITY 3/2 Fenced, Pool $600 + dep,726-7417 FLORAL CITY Small 2/1 3 acres, ideal for single or couple $450m.352-560-7837 INVERNESS 2/1 Scrn. Prch. Fencd yrd, No pets First. & Security negotiable $425.mo (352) 726-4842 LECANTO 3/2, 1st Mo. Rent FREE $600 mo+sec wtr/garb. incl.d (352) 628-5990 OWN TODAY!NO CREDIT CHECK! OFFER INCLUDES : Home, water, sewer, trash, Wi-Fi, Clubhouse & Pool Relax on your large spacious lot with your family and friends AURORA ACRES, a MUST SEE COMMUNITY is located on 28 acres of beautiful mature oak trees, scattered hammocks, picnic tables and gazebos. Your NEW house is remodeled and waiting for YOU to call it HOME!Just $595 a Mo. AURORA ACRES Mobile Home & RV Community 11240 N Northwood Dr. Inglis, FL 34449352-447-2759 www. aur oraacr esfl.com Mobile Homes For Sale BOOM!! New 3/2 Jacobsen home 5 yr. Warranty $2,650 down, Only $297.44/mo. Fixed rate! W.A.C, Come & view 352-621-9182 For Sale By Owner MH, 16 x 80, excel. cond., located on corner lot, acre +, lots of trees, corner of Rosedale and Corona Way, Homosassa Must See to appreciate. Priced to sell $37,500 (352) 364-3242 (478) 569-9685 INVERNESS 55+ Comm. 2/1.5, carport, screen rm. shed $3995 ( 352) 586-7962 NEED A NEW HOME? Over 30 homes on display. Bad credit O.K. I fiance anybody, good rates. Use your land as your down or trade anything of value, trade cars, boats, jewelery, guns, etc. Call for private interview 352-621-3807 After hours 352-613-0587 ONLY $284.42 PER MONTH A New 2/2 Home On your lot, Only $500 down. This is a purchase W.A.C Call to See352-621-9181 USED HOME/REPOS Doublewides from $8,500. Singwides from $3,500. New Inventory Daily 352-621-9183 Waterfront Mobile For Rent Homossassa 2/2 carport nicely furn. MH on Homosassa River,dock shed, f/l/s sht/long term $850 352-220-2077 Waterfront Mobile For Sale Lake Rousseau 1/1, enclosedFlorida porch, tiled inside & out furnished $9500. very nice(352) 362-7681 Mobile Homes and Land 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath on Approx 1/2 Acre $29,900 owner finan. with $3,000 down and payment of $475. or cash price of $25,000 (352) 687-3030 CRYSTALRIVER 4/2, on 5 Acres, 15 X 30 family room, w/wet bar, fireplace. Reduced $139,500. (352) 465-8346 HOMOSASSA 3/2, Fenced Yard, NEW Flooring, $5000 Down, $435 (352) 302-9217 Inglis Bargain 5BR/2BA, Fully Furn. DW. large eat-in Kit, opens to den w/ FP, separate Liv./Din. on 1 Acre Lot, Near Goethe Forest. UrgentSale $22,500obo (407) 398-9759 Mobile Homes In Park SINGLEWIDE 1/1, 55 + Park on Lake, 5 piers to fish from, must be approved $1500 (352) 344-9705 SINGLEWIDE 1/1, 55 + Park on Lake, 5 piers to fish from, must be approved $1500 (352) 344-9705 CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE SUMMER SPECIAL 2BR 2Bath $15,000. (352) 795-7161 HOMOSASSAS Best Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $139/mo. $800.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Mobile Homes In Park INVERNESS RENT SPECIAL : Security deposit, pro-rated over 3 mo. period 55+ Park on the water w/5 piers for fishing & enjoyment, clubhouse, onsite shuffleboard, and much more! 2 BR, 1.5 BA for $2,900 352-476-4964 Inverness Sr. Park, 1984 Fleetwood 2/2 14 x 60, fully furnished with everything, scrnd Fl. Rm., Shed w/ elec., rf over, Cen Air., gas heat & range, cent. isl. kitchen, Wash/Dry Used Very Little Needs Nothing, very good condition $18,000 obo Call Doris Inverness Park Resales 352-344-1002 Stonebrook 2/2, 1,150 sf on corner lot, partially furn., inclds lrg attached storage rm. New Roof, $14,000 (352) 563-5931 Stoneridge Landing 55+ Comm. Resales starting @$13,500 Financing avail 1-800-779-1226 (352) 637-1400 WESTWIND VILLAGE55+ Park. Updated 2/2 DWs for sale. Reasonable (352) 628-2090 Mobile Home Lots For Sale OWN TODAY!NO CREDIT CHECK! OFFER INCLUDES : Home, water, sewer, trash, Wi-Fi, Clubhouse & Pool, Relax on your large spacious lot with your family and friends AURORA ACRES, a MUST SEE COMMUNITY is located on 28 acres of beautiful mature oak trees, scattered hammocks, picnic tables and gazebos. Your NEW houseis remodeled and waiting for YOU to call it HOME!Just $595 a mo. AURORA ACRES Mobile Home & RV Community 11240 N Northwood Dr. Inglis, FL 34449352-447-2759 www. aur oraacr esfl.com RV/Campers For Rent OWN TODAY!NO CREDIT CHECK! OFFER INCLUDES : Home, water, sewer, trash, Wi-Fi, Clubhouse & Pool, Relax on your large spacious lot with your family and friends AURORA ACRES, a MUST SEE COMMUNITY is located on 28 acres of beautiful mature oak trees, scattered hammocks, picnic tables and gazebos. Your NEW houseis remodeled and waiting for YOU to call it HOME!Just $595 a mo. AURORA ACRES Mobile Home & RV Community 11240 N Northwood Dr. Inglis, FL 34449352-447-2759 www. aur oraacr esfl.com Real Estate For Rent 835 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, Fl (352) 795-0021 View our website C21NatureCoast.com Real Estate For Rent RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368 000BKIV www .CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com BEVERLY HILLS 2430 W. Tall Oaks Dr. . $13003/3/2 Pool Home CRYSTAL RIVER 2271 N. Crede . . . . .$4502/1 mobile, furnished 8560 W.Basilico St. . .$8503/2/2 Roomy kit. open floor plan HOMOSASSA / CHASSAHOWITZKA 6437 W. Akazian (H) . . .$500 2/1 Mobile2021 S. Comforter Pt. (H). $6503/1/1 Cute and Comfortable8355 W. Periwinkle (H) $11004/2/2 Newer Home INVERNESS/HERNANDO 3441 E. Chappel Ct. . . $6502/1/Carport, Close To Lake 944 E. Winnetka St. . . $6752/1-1/2, SW on 1 acre! J.W.MORTON REAL ESTATE, INC.1645 W. MAIN ST INVERNESS, FL 000BK18 Jennifer Fudge, PropertyManager Cheryl Scruggs, Realtor-Associate 352-726-9010 PropertyManagement3/2/2 Pest control included . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 3/2/1 Available June . . . $750 2/Bonus Room/2/2 . . . . $650 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650 INVERNESS FLORAL CITY 2/2/1 Waterfront . . . . . . $750 CALLING ALL OWNERS Need a Good Tenant?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! BEVERLY HILLS 2/1.5/1 New Kitchen Flooring . . . . . . . . . . . . $625 CASTRO REALTY and Property Management Inc.333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL 34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS All AreasCall For Details 352-341-4663 Real Estate For Rent CHASSAHOWITZKA 3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600. 3/2 Furnished DW., $600 Agent (352) 382-1000 Apartments Furnished CRYSTAL RIVER2 BR. $550. Near Town 352-563-9857 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 Inglis compl. furn. direct TV, country setting, off hwy 19 N. of Inglis, no smoke $675/m ( 352) 586-9598 Apartments Unfurnished CRYSTAL RIVER2/1 incl water sewer, Washer/Dry$425 (352)212-9205 INVERNESS 1/1 $400 near hosp 352-422-2393 Inverness Homosassa Government Subsidized Apts available. Must meet eligibility requirements. Equal Housing Opportunity. Homossassa (352) 628-6073 Inverness (352) 726-4397 TTY-800-233-6694 Ventura Village Apartments 3580 E. Wood Knoll Lane Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-6349 Now Accepting Applications Central H/A Storage;Carpet Laundry Facilities; On Site Mgmt Elderly (62+) Handicap/Disabled with or without children 1Bds $396 ; 2 Bds $ 436 TDD# 800-955-8771 This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer. Business Locations CRYSTAL RIVERAppealing Professional Office Space for Rent 800 sf, down town, CR W. of US 19 Avail. May 1 Furnishing Available (352) 422-6579 Business Locations FLORAL CITY STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft Ideal location, corner Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo. 813-310-5391 Condos/Villas For Rent HOMOSASSA Sugarmill Woods Villa on Golf course, 2/2 oversize
Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02781
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 05-27-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02781

Full Text



NBA playoffs: Celtics, 76ers battle for spot in Ea,


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Scattered p.m.
89 thunderstorms; 40
LOW percent chance of rain.
66 PAGE A4
MAY 27, 2012


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 294


Pedestrian
killed in
crash
A 24-year-old Flo-
ral City man was hit
and killed early Sat-
urday morning in
Inverness.
According to pre-
liminary information
from Florida Highway
Patrol, a 1992 Honda
Accord, driven by 20-
year-old Robert Mer-
lina, of Inverness,
was traveling north
shortly before 5:30
a.m. on North Croft
Avenue. At the same
time, Justin Ghigliotty
was reportedly walk-
ing in the northbound
lane just right of the
double center yellow
line. Because of the
lack of lighting on the
road, FHP stated
Merlina was unable
to see Ghigliotty and
struck him.
Ghigliotty suffered
fatal injuries and died
at the scene of the
crash, according to
FHP. Merlina re-
ceived minor injuries.
No charges have
been filed. The crash
remains under
investigation.
Memorial
Day event at
cemetery
BUSHNELL-
The Florida National
Cemetery Joint Veter-
ans Committee (JVC)
will sponsor the an-
nual Memorial Day
Ceremony at Florida
National Cemetery at
11 a.m. Monday, May
28, with keynote
speaker Maj. General
Jeffrey E. Phillips, as-
sistant deputy chief of
staff, G-1.
Steve Jerve, of
WFLATV News
Channel 8, will be
the Master of
Ceremonies.
The program in-
cludes patriotic
music, rifle salute by
Florida National
Guard and posting of
the colors. Ye Mystic
Air Krewe will pro-
vide a flyover.
Seating is limited.
Those attending are
encouraged to arrive
early, wear comfort-
able clothing and
bring a lawn chair or
blanket. The cere-
mony will happen
rain or shine.
The Avenue of
Flags consisting of
400 flags will be on
display along the
roadways of the
cemetery. The flags
were donated to the
cemetery by the next
of kin of deceased
veterans and were
once draped over the
caskets or cremation
urns of veterans.
-From staff reports


TOMORROW:
Memories
Veteran talks about
experiences in World
War II./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds .............D3
Crossword ..............A14
Editorial.................. C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ... .............. A14
Obituaries ................A5


6 I IJLL 5 2 !I o


Hospital hopes for influence


CMHS wants lobbyist to sway Scott on board appointments


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS The high-
stakes dispute for
control of Citrus Me-
morial hospital has
been on hold since
late April.
That's when Gov
Rick Scott removed
two members of the
Citrus County Hos-
pital Board, or Ry
CCHB, rendering it Be
unable to do any- hospite
thing because it
doesn't have enough mem-
bers to conduct a meeting.


a
ya
al


A Scott spokesman said
recently the governor is
carefully considering appli-
cants for three vacancies on
the five-member
board. One position
had been vacant for
more than a year.
Hospital officials,
who are in a three-
year battle with the
CCHB, are not sitting
by simply waiting
an like everyone else.
ity Citrus Memorial
CEO. Health System in
April hired a Talla-
hassee lobbyist for $30,000
to lobby Scott in the hopes


the three new replacements
could mean an end to the
legal wrangling that has al-
ready cost millions of dol-
lars in attorneys' fees.
Hospital chief executive
officer Ryan Beaty said the
hospital wants "business
people" on the hospital
board who will seek solu-
tions to the financial issues
CMH faces.
"I would support any per-
son who doesn't have an
agenda," he said.
The CMHS dispute in-
volves two boards: the
CCHB, comprised of mem-
bers appointed by the gov-


ernor, and the CMHS foun-
dation, whose membership
is self-appointing and in-
cludes some non-voting ad-
visory members.
The CMHS Foundation
operates the hospital on a
lease from the CCHB,
which provides some fund-
ing from local property
taxes. One of the many dis-
putes is the CCHB has with-
held $10 million in funding
dating back to 2009.
CCHB successfully con-
vinced the state Legislature
in 2011 to pass a law giving
it controlling votes on the
foundation board. The


FROM FIRST-TIME HOME BUYING TO ASSISTED LIVING


foundation sued, lost in cir-
cuit court, and now the mat-
ter is under review by a
district court of appeal in
Leon County.
Scott initially recom-
mended reappointments to
the CCHB of trustees Dr. V
Upender Rao and Ed Lyt-
ton. But when the Senate
adjourned in March with-
out taking action on any of
Scott's reappointments, the
governor removed both
members from his appoint-
ment list in late April.
About 20 Citrus County
residents have applied for
the open positions. The list
includes one current foun-
dation board member and
See Page A2



CITRUS COUNTY



SIFOF




2012 Chronicle project



A little


help to


keep a


home

Editor's note: Today
the Chronicle contin-
ues its monthly series
on quality-of-life is-
sues in Citrus County
by focusing on hous-
ing around Citrus
County
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Never mind the glut
of houses for sale and
the historically low
mortgage rate. Some
people just don't have
the income to qualify
for a loan, and strug-
gle to pay rent.
Through the
county's Housing
Services department,
several programs
offer help with a
range of housing as-
sistance for both buy-
ers and renters.
While the programs
may be considered
giveaways by some,
they do have an unac-
knowledged benefit.
"All of these pro-
grams mean the hir-
ing of contractors and
helping job genera-
tion," said Heidi
Blanchette, opera-
tions manager of
housing services,
about SHIP, NSP and
CDBG.
The list could start
with SHIP, the State
Housing Initiative
Partnership. But
funds are low
"Right now, it is not
funded for the future,"
Blanchette said. "Our
last allocation was a
year ago and we got
$350,000."
SHIP's purpose is to
offer assistance to
very low, low and
moderate income
families to buy a
home, repair or re-
place a home, repair
emergency damage
and help pay for
mandatory water and
sewer connections.
See '/Rage A10


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Re/Max Realty One Realtor Cheryl Lambert answers questions Friday morning from new homeowner Stephanie Alberto.




A dream comes true


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
BEVERLY HILLS The conven-
tional American dream of home-
ownership felt like an unattainable
and improbable aspiration to
Stephanie Alberto.
The 60-something-year-old spent
most of her life moving from place
to place, renting but never keen to
make the full commitment of buying
her own home.
"I was afraid," Alberto admitted.
Beyond just the typical obliga-
tions of being a homeowner, she
worried her credit wasn't good
enough because of her financial
debt, but the motivation to take a
chance came when her landlord at
the affordable rental housing com-
plex she lives at in Inverness in-
formed her she would be raising the
rent from $668 to $1,300 next year
Though she's worked full-time at
Wal-Mart for 12 years, Alberto said
she wasn't making enough money to
afford such a rent increase. As a re-
sult, her landlord told her about the
county's Neighborhood Stabiliza-
tion Program (NSP).
The NSP program buys fore-
closed and vacant homes owned by
banks, rehabilitates them and re-
sells or rents them to low to moder-
ate-income households at or below
120 percent of the area median in-
come, which is $57,720, adjusted for
household size.
In 2009, the county received
roughly $3 million in federal grant
money for the NSP program and
used the funds to purchase 30 prop-


1 .,f m ,,
Ashley Dickens, left, peeks through the front window of her mother's new
home Friday morning as she, Stephanie Alberto, center, and her aunt
Stephanie Alberto, prepare to tour the Beverly Hills home. The elder Alberto
purchased the home through the federally-funded Neighborhood Stabilization
Program in conjunction with the county.


MORE INSIDE
Foreclosures in Citrus
County./Page A9
Senior citizens./Page A9
Mortgage rates./Page A9
Homeowners insurance.
/Page All
COMING NEXT MONTH:
Personal budgets and how
residents are managing their
finances.

erties, mainly in the older section of
Beverly Hills.
The goal of the program is to re-
verse the negative effects foreclosed
properties have had on the areas
around them and make homeowner-
ship achievable, NSP grant adminis-


HOUSING STATISTICS
County population in July
2009: 140,357.
County owner-occupied houses
and condos: 45,047
Renter-occupied apartments:
7,587
Percentage of renters in the
county: 4 percent
Percentage of renters in the
state: 6 percent
Source: City-Data.comrn

trator Jennifer Pollard explained.
For instance, a one-person house-
hold's annual income cannot
See Page A10


/131


I-- S o IU I N D '





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Contest
KINGS BAY ROTARY
Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River is on the
heels of Cape Hatteras,
N.C., for third place in the
Ultimate Fishing Town con-
test sponsored by the World
Fishing Network. The con-
test began in April and ends
May 31.
As voting nears the final
week, a workshop and voting
bank will take place from 11
a.m. to 1p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. at
Plantation on Crystal River
on Tuesday and Wednesday,
May 29 and 30, so residents
can vote in two time-block
sessions. The final day of vot-
ing will be Thursday and will
take place from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.
Free wi-fi will be set up in
the lobby and bar. Partici-
pants can bring their own
laptops, smart phones or
tablets and learn how to set
up a Twitter account or add
extra email addresses to


HOSPITAL
Continued from Page Al

two foundation advisory
members.
"There are seven to 10
people I think are pretty
good people," he said.
Those names include:
Bob Collins, a member
of the CMHS Foundation
board of directors who also
chairs the hospital's philan-
thropic advisory council.
Gene Davis, Inverness
Realtor and property man-
ager who is a member of the
same council.
Alida Langley, former
member of the CCHB trustees
prior to the 2009 dispute.
John Siefert, executive
director of the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council.
Cliff Pierson, general
manager of Bay Area Air
Conditioning.
Including the $30,000 allo-
cated in April for lobbyist
Brian Ballard, the hospital
has spent about $90,000 in
lobbying in 2011 and 2012,
Beaty said. He blamed those
allocations on the dispute
with the hospital board. He
said other than various
Medicaid issues, CMHS did
not hire lobbyists and didn't
get involved with governor


voting nears end
double or triple their votes. Manatee and fish habitat
Learn to turn one vote into will be restored as the proj-
two or three and keep ect moves forward and na-
Florida in the running. tive aquatic vegetation
Crystal River is the only grows back.
Florida town in the top 10 in In the entry of Crystal
the nationwide contest. Vote River into the Ultimate
up to four times a day with Fishing Town contest, com-
each email address at munity involvement is im-
www.wfnfishingtown.com/ portant to show local
town/crystalriver-fl. people care about the wa-
The Kings Bay Rotary en- ters they fish in. The people
tered Crystal River in the of Citrus County have
contest to win some money proved they believe pre-
to help buy equipment for serving and improving the
the volunteers who are doing waters for Kings Bay is
the Lyngbya clean-up proj- worth the effort.
ect. Removing Lyngbya from The Kings Bay Rotary has
the water cleans it and slows posted videos on YouTube
down the future growth of to show the project in action
the invasive, toxic algae. The and the hundreds of people
project was started in Sep- involved in the project. The
tember 2011 and is expected group also has created an
to last at least five years until entry video.
it can evolve into a main- www.youtube.com/watch?v
tainable plan. K8gaEp3240M
Mechanical equipment is Anyone who has ques-
needed to help with the tions or is interested in
heavy lifting of the tonnage handing out fliers may call
of Lyngbya being removed. Art Jones at 727-642-7659.


appointees to the CCHB.
CCHB attorney Bill Grant,
however, called the hospi-
tal's hiring of lobbyists a
waste of resources.


1


10% OFT

'EVERYTMKG' 1
Something for everyone at
one low price
& All the Accessories
You'll ever need.

lust priest i coupon tit lime
of piiichase.
,|ol valid with other 'ffers.


"If the foundation is
spending health care dol-
lars to continue to lobby,
that is of the utmost con-
cern," Grant said. "They're


Special to Chronicle
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol will hit the highways
and interstates during the
Memorial Day holiday
weekend, which extends
through midnight Monday
"Troopers will be out in
full force this weekend and
will be on the lookout for
aggressive driving, speed-
ing, red light running and
driving under the influence
of alcohol and drugs, to
make the roadways as safe
as possible for weekend
travelers," FHP Director
Col. David Brierton said.

misplacing their values."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Troopers out in



force for weekend


safety advocates across the
country for the national
Click It or Ticket safety
belt enforcement cam-
paign, which ends June 3.
Safety belt use saves thou-
sands of lives across Amer-
ica each year The National
Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration statistics show
that in 2010 alone, safety
belts saved an estimated
12,546 lives nationwide.
For more on Click It or
Ticket, please visit NHTSA's
website at www.nhtsa.gov/
PEAK. For additional de-
tails and statistics on the
Sunshine State's 2011 safety
belt usage, to include county
statistics, visit the Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion's website at
www.dot.state.fl.us/safety/.


U-'1


Just follow the girls
doing Runway.

Facebook
Alice Watkins


7763 W Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-794-6116


All uniformed FHP per-
sonnel, including those nor-
mally assigned to
administrative duties, will
patrol interstates and other
major state roads through-
out the four-day holiday pe-
riod. FHP auxiliary and
reserve troopers will volun-
teer to augment the patrol's
forces during the holiday
enforcement period, too.
Dial *FHP (*347) from a cell
phone to contact FHP to re-
port an aggressive driver or
request roadside assistance.
FHP has joined local
and national law enforce-
ment officers and highway


Wdg


9,99
Pinnacle
Vodka
.11 nT.1C-1
Wolfschmidt
Vodka
1,41 i


2499

Grants
WScotch
Hendrick's -DRI


lv -. -S


32,99
I Jack Daniel's
Black
Jim Beam
Black Label
17"1.


I -g



a Positively ,great.








R P"
R. Prasad Po u

I,, +,


Fe


When it comes to your heart, you want the best. Dr. Potu, an experienced medical cardiologist, will
make sure that your heart is healthy through stress testing and analysis. He'll also help you manage
your blood pressure and work alongside an award-winning team to deliver life-saving care for each
patient's cardiovascular needs. Dr. Potu and the nationally recognized team at Munroe Heart
are unmatched in clinical excellence for diagnostic, invasive and interventional cardiology. That's
information you can positively take to heart.

Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.




Positively =- SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


in alliance with


Munroe
Heart


ary Care 2012 CARECHE)(
_______________ A Rating Service of The Delta Grop


Unbelievablelprices! IeldytoIDlnkHCocldilsMIifu meNr!
Dewar's White Label i.75L...........27.99 Chi Chi's Cocktails............7.99'14.99
Crown Royal 750ml....................... 19.99 Bacardi Ready to Drink i.7_....... 10.99


Svedka Vodka 1.75L..................... 1699
Platinum 7x Vodka 1.75 L ............15.99
Coconut Jack Rum 1.75L ............ 13.99
Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum 1.75.......19.99
Sauza Gold or
Silver Tequila 1.75L.....................19.99


1800 Ultimate
Margarita RID 1.75L..................13.99
Captain Morgan Long
Island Tea 1.75L .................. 15.99
Malibu Cocktails 1.75L.................. 12.99
Jose Cuervo Authentics 1.75L......14.99


5 99 WIINIE'S
Barefoot
Wines a

Yellow Tail Schmlt
Wines a Sonne
."- ",--, '-'- "' RIesilng
Liberty Sutter Ho
Creek I .Oa,, e

I L


S aHeineke
K-12i P.O:


9
ft


ome
IE,


Pfcm ave Sw Mow 27 wflV Sotnot xnwe 2012
- Zjrnot neer C' o4i o al 2' heeen. n. r FaC'0.,ur.rfor
- ,'j ,'I i-SfTW.J j mI l Mif tAp m*i M-x..tu, .T~i '*Ofl '^fiW


Law enforcement efforts

increase to reduce crashes


-t


Express Yourself
From Casual to Exotics


SSAVE $1.M Instantly
ImilnIl f
------------iMr---
hdudesMTt-1.75 L "I
VS--=AVE2 II - -I a I

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIM IIIH IIIII III IIII II II ii ,


Munroe Heart is #1 in Florida for Medical Excellence in Interventional Corona


I


A2 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


r







Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


AroundTE Astronauts get 'groceries' from Dragon
THE STATE


Major road shift
starts Tuesday
Motorists who drive
through the intersection of
County Roads 486 and 491
will see a major traffic shift
starting Tuesday, May 29.
The contractor working on
the road-widening project will
shift traffic to a divided high-
way alignment.
Traffic on C.R. 486 (Norvell
Bryant Highway) and C.R.
491 (Lecanto Highway) will
be shifted to the outside
lanes of the divided highway.
This will allow for work to be
done in the median areas
and the final layer of asphalt
and striping to be completed.
During the traffic shift, an
off-duty sheriff's deputy will
be present to assist with traf-
fic control at the intersection.
Motorists should expect de-
lays for most of the day Tues-
day. For information, call the
Citrus County Engineering
Department at 352-527-5446.

Orlando
Wildfire blows heavy
smoke near Disney
A wildfire burning in Or-
lando blew heavy smoke
near the busy hotel and at-
tractions district of Walt Dis-
ney World at the start of the
busy Memorial Day weekend.
The smoke also closed a
section of Orlando's main
highway briefly Friday.

Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at Citrus County Auditorium;
and 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18,
at College of Central Florida.
Information: Mike Wright,
352-563-3228.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club and Citrus Re-
publican Women's Club is
sponsoring the following fo-
rums at 9 a.m. at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River;
Saturday, June 9, Shannon
Heathcock and Joe Meek,
candidates for county com-
mission District 3; Saturday,
July 14, forum for all Republi-
can primary candidates. In-
formation: Fred or Rosella
Hale, 352-746-2545.
Jimmie T. Smith, Re-
publican incumbent for state
House District 34, will speak
at the Citrus County Tea
Party Patriots meeting at 1
p.m. Saturday, June 16, at
the Women's Club, 1715 For-
est Drive, Inverness. The
group will have a forum June
30 for sheriff's candidates.
Angela Vick, Republi-
can for clerk of court, will
have a fundraiser from 3 to 7
p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the
Realtors Association of Citrus
County, 714 S. Scarboro
Ave., Lecanto. Information:
352-302-8319.
Steve Burch, Republi-
can for sheriff, will have a
fundraiser from 5:30 to 8 p.m.
Saturday, June 9, at the
American Legion Hall on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Information: Bob Milan,
352-527-9943 or Steve
Burch, 352-464-4495.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat incumbent for su-
perintendent of schools, will
have a fundraiser from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 15,
at Shamrock Farms, 6105 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. In-
formation: Debbie Lattin, 352-
726-3181.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at


mwright@chronicleonline.
conm.
-From staff and wire reports


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL -
Space station astronauts
floated into the Dragon on
Saturday, a day after its her-
alded arrival as the world's
first commercial supply
ship.
NASA astronaut Donald
Pettit, the first one inside
the docked capsule, said the
Dragon looks like it carries
about as much cargo as his
pickup truck back home in
Houston. It has the smell of
a brand-new car, he added.
"I spent quite a bit of time
poking around in here this
morning, just looking at the
engineering and the layout,
and I'm very pleased," Pet-
tit said from the brilliant


white compartment.
To protect against possi-
ble debris, Pettit wore gog-
gles, a mask and a caver's
light as he slid open the
hatch of the newest addition
to the International Space
Station.
The complex sailed 250
miles above the Tasman
Sea, just west of New
Zealand, as he and his crew-
mates made their grand
entrance.
The atmosphere was
clean; no dirt or other parti-
cles were floating around.
"This event isn't just a
simple door opening be-
tween two spacecraft it
opens the door to a future in
which U.S. industry can and
will deliver huge benefits


for U.S. space exploration,"
the Space Frontier Founda-
tion, an advocacy group,
said in a statement.
The six space station res-
idents have until the middle
of next week to unload
Dragon's groceries and refill
the capsule with science ex-
periments and equipment
for return to Earth.
Unlike all the other cargo
ships that fly to the orbiting
lab, the Dragon is designed
for safe re-entry It will be
freed Thursday and aim for
a Pacific splashdown.
The Dragon contains
1,000 pounds of food,
clothes, batteries and other
provisions.
It will bring back 1,400
pounds' worth of gear


Associated Press
In this image provided by NASA-TV, space station astronaut
Donald Pettit, left, gives a "thumbs-up" Saturday after
floating through the door of the Dragon, as other astronauts
follow, a day after Dragon's heralded arrival as the world's
first commercial supply ship.


Family, faith, friends


Seven Rivers

grads speak

of memories,

matriculation
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO One thing's for
sure: Seven Rivers Christian
School graduates left with fond
memories of
their school and
teachers.
Speakers at
Friday night's
....."""" commencement
For more ceremony at
photos, click Seven Rivers
on this story at Presbyterian
www.chronicle Church thanked
online.com. teachers and
family for pro-
viding them a faith-based educa-
tional foundation that will serve
them well in years to come.
"When thinking of these quali-
ties I want to pattern my life after,
I remembered what I learned in
philosophy this semester," vale-
dictorian Blake Massullo said.
"You can't imagine an ideal, with-
out there being an ideal. And I re-
alized the ideal was surrounding
me."
Bagpipes played by Kathy Gar-
lock greeted teachers, adminis-
trators and the 18 graduates
entering the church.
Honorarian Samantha Kauff-
mann was especially thankful for
her father, who raised her follow-
ing the death of her mother
shortly before the second grade.
"Daddy, you are officially done
raising children, but I'll always
be your little girl," she said.
Kauffmann also praised her
teachers from her elementary
grades to her senior year
"I owe many of you so much -
thanks for treating me not just
like a student, but like your own
daughter during my 11 years
here," she said. "This hasn't just
been a school; it's been my sec-
ond home where I have felt safe,
valued and respected as an
individual."
Salutatorian Sam Jones en-
couraged graduates to follow the
plan God has for each of them.
"I am genuinely thankful that
we serve a Lord (who) has cre-
ated a group of 18 people with
such different skills and abili-
ties," he said.
"God serves as the ultimate
common denominator as we go
out into the world to pursue a
career"
He added: "While success is
important, glorifying and giving
thanks to our God for those suc-
cesses is of utmost importance."
Jones also was recipient of the


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian School Valedictorian Blake Massullo addresses the audience attending the
2012 Commencement Exercise on Friday at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church.
The 2012 graduating class of Seven Rivers Christian School presented diplomas and special
honors to 18 students.


Seven Rivers Christian School Class of 2012 Salutatorian Sam
Jones encouraged graduates to follow God's plan for each of them.
Principal Scott Jackson presented Jones with an award honoring
the student who serves Christ with integrity in academics,
athletics and relationships. Eighteen seniors graduated from the
private school in a ceremony Friday evening in Lecanto.


school's "senior swordsman"
award, presented by Principal
Scott Jackson to the student who
serves Christ with integrity in ac-
ademics, athletics and
relationships.
Jackson noted Jones' high aca-


demic and athletic achievements
and his ability to support younger
students and athletes.
He also pointed out Jones' un-
failing love for his younger sister,
Sashi, who has cerebral palsy
"His plans will include caring


for his sister," Jackson said. "He
draws strength from his older
brother, Jesus Christ."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@chronicle
online.com.


Camp helps children learn about Florida wildlife


Special to the Chronicle
HOMOSASSA The
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection's
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
will offer two weeklong Na-
ture Academy summer
camps in June and July The
Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park will
sponsor the programs.


June's Nature Academy is
for children ages 8 and 9
years old and runs from
June 11 though June 16.
July's Nature Academy pro-
gram is for children ages 10
through 12 and runs from
July 9 through July 14.
Camp applications are
available in the park office at
the main entrance and Visi-
tor Center off U.S. 19. Each
program is limited to 20


campers and will be filled on
a first-come basis with pref-
erence to those who have
never attended. The ex-
tended deadline for receiv-
ing applications is June 4.
Each Nature Academy pro-
gram includes four, half-day
camp sessions from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Monday through
Thursday The Friday session
starts at 4 p.m. with an
overnight stay in the park. A


graduation ceremony will be
at 11 a.m. Saturday The cost
is $45 per child and includes a
T-shirt and supplies.
Applicants will be asked
to write a short essay on
"Why I want to go to the Na-
ture Academy, and what I
hope to learn while I am
there" in their application.
Parents and guardians may
stop by the office to pick up
an application.


Camp topics include mam-
mals, birds, reptiles, mana-
tees, the ocean, sea turtles
and saving energy through
alternative sources. Indoor
and outdoor activities for
children include nature
hunts, visiting the wildlife
areas in the park and other
scientific activities.
For more information,
call Allyssa Taylor at 352-
628-1508.


*






A4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Kimesha Tanice Williams,
23, of 773 N.E. 9th St., Crystal
River, at 12:40 a.m. Friday on a
felony charge of possession of a
controlled substance (cocaine)
and a misdemeanor charge of
possession of cannabis (less
than 20 grams). Bond $5,500.
David Charles Duncan Jr.,
52, at large, at 4:30 a.m. Friday
on active Citrus County warrants
for felony charges of kidnapping,
aggravated battery using a
deadly weapon and burglary (be-
coming armed with explosive or
other dangerous weapon) and
for failures to appear on original
misdemeanor charges of petit
theft and failure to register a
motor vehicle. No bond.
Monique Elizabeth Quat-
tromani, 36, of 29 N. Bradshaw
Terrace, Inverness, at 8:47 a.m.
Friday on active Citrus County
warrant for a violation of proba-
tion and a failure to appear on an
original felony charge of driving
with a suspended/revoked li-
cense (habitual traffic offender).
No bond.
Kelly Brosey, 43, of 2555
E. Mary Lue St. Lot E., Inver-
ness, at 12:33 p.m. Friday on a
felony charge of driving with a
suspended/revoked license (ha-
bitual traffic offender). Bond
$2,000.
Scott Allen Ziemendorf,
42, of 1120 Betty Lane, Clearwa-
ter, at 3:10 p.m. Friday on an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for
failure to appear for an original
felony charge of battery. No
bond.
Jonathan Luke Treadway,
34, of 211 Charity Court, Naples,
at 3:24 p.m. Friday on misde-
meanor charges of possession
of cannabis (less than 20 grams)
and possession of drug para-
phemalia. Bond $750.
Maxwell Lee Moranz, 23,
of 46 Jamaica St., Homosassa,
at 3:22 a.m. Saturday on a mis-


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.

* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.

* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.

* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. Members come from all walks of life and
bring with them many years of life experience.

* To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or
email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


demeanor charge of possession
of cannabis (less than 20 grams).
Bond $500.
Sean Michael Bartlett, 41,
of 3621 E. Foxwood Lane, Inver-
ness, at 10:04 a.m. Saturday on
a misdemeanor charge of disor-
derly intoxication. Bond $150.
Burglaries
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 8:53 a.m. May 24
in the 2500 block of State Road
44 West, Inverness.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 10:52 p.m. May 24 in
the 400 block of E. Circlewood
Street, Inverness.
Thefts
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 10:01 a.m. May 24 in
the 300 block of S. Apopka Av-
enue, Inverness.
A grand theft occurred at
about 1:21 p.m. May 24 in the
7400 block of N. Spring Run Ter-
race, Hemando.
An auto theft occurred at
about 7:21 p.m. May 24 in the
200 block of S. Belle View Way,
Inverness.
A grand theft occurred at


about 7:27 p.m. May 24 in the
6300 block of E. Malveme Street,
Inverness.
Vandalism

A vandalism occurred at
about 1:29 p.m. May 24 in the
100 block of W. Citrus Springs
Boulevard, Dunnellon.


Beryl to bring rain,


winds to coast


Associated Press

SAVANNAH, Ga. A
cluster of thunderstorms
that stalled off the south-
eastern U.S. coast Satur-
day is expected to make
for a sloppy, rainy Memo-
rial Day on beaches and
in tourist towns from
Florida to South Carolina.
Tropical storm warnings
were in effect for the entire
Georgia coastline, as well
as parts of Florida and
South Carolina, according
to the National Hurricane
Center in Miami.
Beryl was technically
still considered a "sub-
tropical storm," but the
system is expected to
bring winds and rain to
the area regardless of its
official classification.
Tropical storm condi-
tions meaning maxi-
mum sustained winds of
45 mph could reach the
coast as early as Saturday
night. Three to 6 inches of


rain are forecast for the
area. Some coastal flood-
ing is forecast, as the rain
could cause high tides.
As of 8 p.m. Saturday,
Beryl was still centered
about 220 miles east-
southeast of Charleston,
S.C. It had become
stronger, with maximum
sustained winds of 50
mph. It was moving south-
west at 6 mph, with its cen-
ter expected to be near the
coast by late Sunday
Dangerous surf condi-
tions are possible from
northeast Florida to North
Carolina over the holiday
weekend, forecasters said.
The southeastern coast
is popular with tourists
who visit the beaches and
wilderness areas.
"A three-day thunder-
storm is what it's probably
going to be," said Jay Wig-
gins, emergency manage-
ment director for Glynn
County, which is about 60
miles south of Savannah.


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Bid N otices..............................D7



Meeting Notices......................D7



Miscellaneous Notices...........D7
.:.:- :~;....'


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PRR iHI LOPR L H LI
96 64 0.00 A MA hA uI _L fi '


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
S
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters wIll have
a moderate chop. Chance of thunder-
storms today.


94 66 000 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daiy
W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 66
Scattered PM and evening
thunderstorms, rain chance 40%.
r ^*MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 67
Showers and thunderstorms, rain chance 70%.

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
S = High: 86 Low: 67
Showers and thunderstorms, rain chance 60%.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
Saturday 101/62 Saturday at 3 p.m. 58
Record 97/52
Normal 91/65 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 82 Saturday at 3 p.m. 31%
Departure from mean +4 POLLEN COUNT**
SaturdCIPITATION* 0.00 in. Today's active pollen:
Total for the month 1.67 in. Ragweed, Grasses, Chenopods
Total for the year 8.14 in. Today's count: 4.3/12
Normal for the year 14.56 in. Monday's count: 2.5
'As of 6 pm nat Inverness Monday's count: 2.5
UV INDEX: 11 Tuesday's count: 2.4
0-2 minimal. 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high. 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday was moderate with
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in. pollutants mainly particulates.
SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNJOONi
5/27 SUNDAY 11:33 5:21 11:56 5:45
5/28 MONDAY 6:10 12:22 6:34


JINIE4 O


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONRISE TODAY
J0M11t JIE1S MOONSET TODAY......


........... 8:22 PM.
......... 633 kM
I2 ;. PM
..........12:43 AM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
htip:/fflame.fl-dot.cornfire_weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
All water sources are limited 10 one-day-per.week irrgarton. before 8 a rr or after
6 p.m., as follows: Addresses ending in 0 or 1 may water Mondays; 2 or 3 on
Tuesday; 4 or 5 on Wednesdays: 6 or 7 on Thursdays; and 8 or 9 (and common
areas) on Fridays.
Hand altering or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens,
flowers and shrubs, can take place any day before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Please CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material, 352-527-7669 Citrus
County Water Conservation can explain additional arering allowances for qualil
fled plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-
726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 Ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus
County @ 352-527-7669.


TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 11:13 a/6:23 a u) 30 ri, 11)1
Crystal River* 9:34 a/3:45 a 8:51 p/4:02 p
Withlacoochee' 7:21 a/1:33 a 6 38 p i 50 0
Homosassa'" 10:23 a/5:22 a 40 u '9 0C


""At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:04 p/7:14 a 11:51 p/7:51 p
10:25 a/4:36 a 10 12 , I S p
8:12 a/2:24a 7:59 p/3:01 p
11:14 a/6:13 a 11:01 p/6:50 p


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.69 26.68 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.12 32.09 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.59 34.56 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.15 36.14 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood. the mean-
annual flood which hias a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This dala is
,'ti ,r, I ., i. r j u11, ,, :I H :, .i ,ii P .4 ,ilj. .,l. r i, r. j, : .. J ,| .. (, r .i..,,r, nI .. ,'
.,ll Ir LI| iF,, I n in ,,f r, -l C r,',l ,jk jl :,,,,. L- h'",r'l I ji j,,, j1JFTjq ^ ,',,,] i,,I j I(..1 11" i f
this data. It you have any questions you should contact life Hydrological Dala Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


City


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 84 67 01 ts 80 64
Albuquerque 89 58 s 77 49
Asheville 86 60 pc 84 63
Atlanta 90 70 pc 88 70
Atlantic City 84 64 pc 70 66
Austin 93 73 pc 92 70
Baltimore 89 86 pc 91 68
Billings 43 31 24 r 54 39
Birmingham 94 67 pc 93 72
Boise 57 43 .35 sh 67 45
Boston 86 66 pc 73 59
Buffalo 81 61 ts 84 69
Burlington, VT 82 67 sh 71 54
Charleston, SC 90 69 ts 83 70
Charleston, WV 92 63 pc 92 69
Charlotte 89 64 pc 85 68
Chicago 86 60 s 93 70
Cincinnati 91 63 pc 95 72
Cleveland 83 66 ts 90 72
Columbia. SC 93 66 pc 87 70
Columbus. OH 91 69 pc 93 71
Concord. N H. 88 63 sh 79 54
Dallas 93 75 pc 91 72
Denver 92 54 pc 73 45
Des Monmes 91 61 s 93 67
Detroit 74 61 .38 pc 90 74
El Paso 97 69 pc 90 64
Evansville, IN 94 67 pc 98 72
Harrisburg 89 66 .02 ts 85 67
Hartford 85 68 ts 79 62
Houston 91 75 s 90 74
Indianapolis 90 70 pc 97 74
Jackson 94 64 pc 97 71
Las Vegas 75 52 s 83 65
Little Rock 91 67 pc 95 73
Los Angeles 64 55 pc 69 58
Louisville 91 70 pc 95 74
Memphis 92 71 pc 96 76
Milwaukee 66 57 .72 s 89 68
Minneapolis 63 59 62 is 91 65
Mobile 95 68 pc 95 71
Montgomery 96 69 pc 93 71
Nashville 95 63 pc 95 71
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drlzzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs-raintsnow mix; s-sunny; sh-showers;
sn-snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
I2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 93 69 pc 93 74
New York City 84 67 .02 pc 79 66
Norfolk 81 67 pc 84 69
Oklahoma City 88 73 pc 90 68
Omaha 95 64 pc 91 64
Palm Springs 79 54 s 90 64
Philadelphia 86 66 pc 86 70
Phoenix 82 66 s 88 63
Pittsburgh 88 67 Is 90 69
Portland, ME 80 62 sh 70 53
Portland,. Ore 68 53 .01 c 65 53
Providence, R.I. 82 63 pc 76 59
Raleigh 86 66 pc 85 69
Rapid City 50 46 .25 pc 68 46
Reno 58 45 pc 68 47
Rochester, NY 80 61 ts 84 67
Sacramento 75 51 pc 79 53
St Louis 95 75 pc 99 77
St Ste. Marie 74 41 Is 72 55
Sail Lake City 62 49 .14 sh 63 45
San Antonio 92 75 pc 92 74
San Diego 66 57 trace pc 68 59
San Francisco 61 50 pc 64 50
Savannah 92 68 ts 83 71
Seattle 72 48 c 63 51
Spokane 66 47 c 69 46
Syracuse 84 68 Is 82 64
Topeka 92 76 pc 91 69
Washington 86 71 pc 90 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 102 Mc Cook, Neb.
LOW 27 Stanley. Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HWL/SKY
Acapulco 89/79/ts
Amsterdam 80/52/s
Athens 77/60/pc
3?1.ij ) 87/65/s
Berlin 751541pc
Bermuda 74/68/pc
Cairo 91/75/c
Calgary 57/39/s
Havana 84/73/ts
-hi:.ng ijl 86/80/sh
Jerusalem 83169/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


69/53/pc
78/54/s
79/57/s
78/54/ts
66/55/sh
63/51/c
80/61/s
80/67/pc
S5 56 ,:
64 4.
72/58/s
66/59/sh
68/53/sh


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


LHRKON1CLL
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
fl44 office
Norvell Brani Hwi 1624 N.
D-nkenteld I Meadowcrest
Dnkenleld _- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
Ave Crystal River,
S \ Mrdowcrest FL 34429
kileadowlres t

S I I Inverness
S Courthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 Cn 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
S > 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ............................ ..................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4FS Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Menus
May 29 to June 1
SENIOR DINING
Monday: All sites closed for
Memorial Day.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, graham
crackers, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Orange
pineapple juice, breaded fish
filet with tartar sauce, cheese
grits, tomatoes and okra, oat-
meal raisin cookie, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
spinach, peaches, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Pork chop patty with
brown gravy, black-eyed peas,
country vegetable medley,
mixed fruit, dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


*..I.;.'.;...





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Maner 'Dolly'
Daniel, 89
MILTON
Our beloved Maner
Odelia "Dolly" Plant Daniel,
89, went home to be with our
Lord on May 23,2012, in Mil-
ton, Fla.
She was born May 6,1923,
in Pace, Fla., to loving par-
ents Burel and Clara Plant.
She was one of 14 children.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; her much-
loved stepmother, Maebelle
Gallops Plant; grandson,
Robbi Daniel; four brothers,
Burel Lemar "Man" Plant,
Wayne Plant, Carl Plant,
Orville Plant; and two sis-
ters, Odessa Plant Myers
and Clara Mae Plant Fowler
She is survived by her
husband, George M. Daniel
Sr, Inverness; two sons,
George M. (Pat) Daniel Jr.,
Newark, Del.; Robert R.
"Randy" Daniel, Philadel-
phia, Pa.; one granddaugh-
ter, Tyler Daniel; grandson,
Anthony Boylan; and great-
grandson, Jeremiah Daniel;
one sister, Dorothy Plant
Hicks; five brothers, Buford
Plant, J.E. (Christine) Plant
and Kenneth (Liz) Plant,
Clayton (Pauline) Plant and
Ivan (Renate) Plant; 36
nieces and nephews; many
great-nieces and -nephews;
and many dear friends.
A graveside committal
service will be at 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 30, at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. Friends may
join the procession to the
cemetery at 1:45 p.m. at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.





William
Emberley, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
William H. Emberley, 85,
of Crystal River, died at his
home Saturday, May 12,
2012.
A memorial service for
Mr Emberley will be at 10
a.m. Tuesday, May 29, 2012,
at Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church. Inurnment
with military honors for Mr
and Mrs. Emberley will fol-
low at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness.
William
King, 56
FLORAL CITY
William King, 56, of Floral
City, died Tuesday, May 22,
2012.
Private cremation will be
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto.


OFHOMOSASSAInc.
www.vertucalblindsofhomosassa.com


IThan Just
Lorrie Verticals

2" Faux Wood
Woven Woods
* Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments-
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to SugrmillFamily Rest.)

CALL


Wesley Dill, 94
DANVILLE, IND.
Wesley E. Dill, 94, of
Danville, Ind., formerly of
Floral City, died Wednesday,
May 23.
He was born May 15,1918,
in Indianapolis, Ind., to the
late Clyde and Ruby
Watkins Dill. Mr. Dill retired
from Public Service Indiana
after 27 years as a rubber
material tester, and was a
World War II U.S. Army
veteran.
His wife of 56 years,
Dorothy, preceded him in
death May 12, 2009. He is
survived by three daugh-
ters, Jeanne (Mike) Smither,
Angela Dill and Margaret
Peggy Irwin; three grand-
children, Sarah J. (Matt)
Holland, Michael W
Smither and Janice C.
Smither.
In addition to his parents
and his wife, he was pre-
ceded in death by siblings,
Webster Dill and Wilma
Ramey
Graveside funeral serv-
ices will be conducted at 3
p.m. Tuesday, May 29, from
the Hills of Rest Cemetery
in Floral City, with the Rev.
Craig Davies, pastor of the
First Presbyterian Church
of Inverness, officiating.
Friends may call from 1 to
2:45 p.m. at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home in
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Martin
Mattes Jr.
CLERMONT
Martin George Mattes Jr,
of Clermont, died Monday,
May 21,2012.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services at a later date in
Wheeling, Ill.
Anna Ross, 76
BROOKSVILLE
Anna C. Ross, 76, of
Brooksville, died Monday,
May 21,2012.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services at a later date in
Pompton Plains, N.J.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.



C 4. E. 6ai
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Member of

Ge$LDEN S
.a -
For Information and costs,
.000,Y4 call 726-8323




Saralynne
Schlumberger
at 564-2917
sschlumberger @ chronicleonline.com


Janice Ryan, 75
CITRUS SPRINGS
Janice K. Ryan, 75, of Cit-
rus Springs, died Friday,
May 25, 2012, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital in
Inverness.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Ryan will be at Tait Funeral
Home in Syracuse, N.Y,
with burial at St. James
Cemetery in Cazenovia, N.Y
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness.





George
Schleinkofer,
80
INVERNESS
George N. Schleinkofer,
80, of Inverness, died Sun-
day, May 13, 2012, at the
Hospice of Citrus County
Care Unit in Inverness.
Inurnment with military
honors will be at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, May 30, 2012, at
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. Those who
wish to attend a procession
will leave from Heinz Fu-
neral Home at 10 a.m. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.


Frank
Ziegler, 87
SUMMERFIELD
Frank Ziegler, 87, of Sum-
merfield, died Monday, May
21, 2012.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services at a later date in
Milan, Mich.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Sandy Dahl, 52,
DENVER
The 52-year-old widow of
the man who captained a
United Airlines flight that
crashed into a Pennsylvania
field after being taken over
by terrorists on 9/11 has died
of what the fundraising
group she founded said was
natural causes.
The Captain Jason M.
Dahl Scholarship Fund said
on its website that Sandy
Dahl died near Denver, and
family friend David Dosch
told the Denver Post she
passed away in her sleep.
Her body was found Friday
Dahl's husband was the
captain of United Flight 93
on Sept 11, 2001.
Dahl, who lived in Col-
orado, became a public face
for all grieving 9/11 families
and founded a scholarship
fund in her husband's honor
to provide money for young
pilots to receive their
education.
"Sandy's courage picked
up where her husband's left
off," Patrick White, presi-


.-H F.. oo e- m. Inverness
-o p fu-Yvo Homosassa
00 IYD" Ir Beverly Hills
i IHFUNERAu HOMES (352) 726-2271
U..BBP & CREMATORY 1-888-746-6737)


Mon., May 28,

Special Services Pro-
American Legion Po
Veterans of Foreign War


dent of Families of Flight
93, said in a statement Sat-
urday. "Her dedication to
completing the Flight 93
National Memorial as a way
to honor her husband's
heroic actions on 9-11, and
those of his fellow crew
members and passengers, is
a significant part of her
legacy"
In an interview with the
Denver Post last year, Dahl
said she wanted to com-
memorate the passengers
and crew of Flight 93 be-
cause "they did what would
almost never be asked of
anyone.
"I want to make sure his-
tory is written," she said
then.
Jefferson County coro-
ner's officials have con-
firmed Dahl's death, but the
exact cause has not been
released.
Cale Miller, 23
KANSAS CITY, MO.
A 23-year-old soldier from
suburban Kansas City has
died of wounds suffered in
Afghanistan.
The Kansas City Star re-
ported Pfc. Cale C. Miller, of




"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"




Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


2012, 10:00 A.M.

Iided by: Sps
)st 237 Dignity

Post 10087 DignityMemorialProviders
Dignity Memorial Providers


Fero Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home i
5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 352-746-4646

YES ... Please provide me information on the following at no obligation:
[] Free Consultation U Mausoleum Crypts
I Free Personal Planning Guide UL Private Family Estates
O Burial at Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery J Out of State Burial
U Burial at Florida National LI Cremation Services and Niches
O Patriotic Veteran packages L Memorial Monument Estates


NAME


PHONE


ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP_
Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery (352) 746-4646 5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Overland Park, Kan., died
Thursday in Afghanistan
when insurgent forces at-
tacked his unit with an im-
provised explosive device.
He was in the Army's 2nd
Infantry Division.
Kansas Gov Sam Brown-
back said he will issue an
order to lower flags in
Kansas to half-staff on the
day of Miller's funeral.
-From wire reports

OBITUARIES
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
U.S. flags denote
military service on local
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.




Lend

Your

Ears


Participants sought
for hearing aid
comparison study.

Gardner Audiology
invites you to join a field
study that will compare
conventional digital
hearing aids with Spectral
10. This new technology
boosts speech recognition
because it bypasses
damaged inner ear
hearing cells and diverts
amplified speech to the
useable cells. Starkey, the
largest manufacturer of
hearing aids in the U.S.,
is partnering with
Gardner Audiology to
perform this study.
You will receive free
services that include:
candidate screenings,
evaluation, lab services,
and hearing aid fittings in
exchange for sharing your
experience on pre and
post fitting questionnaires.
At the end of 30 days you
will return the study aids
or purchase at a discount.
It's your choice.

Call 795-5700
Crystal River Inverness
Over 2000 participants
have joined
Gardner Audiology's
research studies.
S[ Gardner
Audiology


Memorial


Day
S 0






Service


As we
Honor our

Veterans


PRE-PLANNING CEMETERY
5635 W. Green Acres Street, Homosassa, FL 34446
(352) 628-2555
Please Join Us For Our
OPEN HOUSE
June 2, 2012 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Serving FREE LUNCH
Giving Away $25.00 GAS CARDS
WE WILLBE: (Foranyone with an R.S.V.P.)
Drawings FOR SPECIAL PRIZES
Pre-Planning is the most loving gift you can give your family so come and let us
help you do the responsible thing. We make it easy, with our payment plans and
no credit check.
A professional Family Service Counselor will be available to answer all
questions you have regarding this matter.000HZP


In loving memory of
Melissa Hess and Molly Paquin
"I'd like the memory of me
to be a happy one,
I'd like to leave an afterglow
of smiles when life is done.
I'd like to leave an echo
whispering softly down the ways,
of happy times and laughing times
and bright and sunny days.
I'd like the tears, of those who
grieve, to dry before the sun
of happy memories that I leave
when life is done."


T h1i .. '\\ *i. 1, i i l. .r 'li t
E \-.in tli. ,.ur l-i U.% till \ -
,ll th,. \\ ,li., i h.I l tuin,.-. \\


1We love and miss \'ou more than words can tell,
SYour loving parents, families and friends.


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 A5


1. .. I .1ucl lC *1 *it .h l. ili th, t l t fi\\ ,,. ,l \\ it1 i *.t .I
. t I .\\ \ \ . C 1 1 1 Il,. 1 ', ,. I l II it.I. I .... I '. ,. l I ,\ n. i I l I \ %.
4 1 I r.I t, ,,_,. tlh .I T h,... I'. I..irtu l Inm Inll,.* \\ Ill n,. \ .i ,.I h .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


iA


It


c(f


I A


A


0


0


I


0


*


v-i


E 5,320


E 2,89


~7~a


H


2431 SUNCOAST BLVD.


US HWY 19


HOMOSASSA


FL 34448 *


352


-628-5100


I \


000BKMK


A6 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 A7


M1


%I


1.WW




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


iA


It


c(f


I A


A


0


0


I


0


*


v-i


E 5,320


E 2,89


~7~a


H


2431 SUNCOAST BLVD.


US HWY 19


HOMOSASSA


FL 34448 *


352


-628-5100


I \


000BKMK


A6 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 A7


M1


%I


1.WW





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Annual Coin Show Opens to Public


BY DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

This year the annual Interna-
tional Coin Collectors Association
will open it's doors to the general
public. The five day coin show is
a unique opportunity for anyone
that has coins, whether it's a single
coin or an entire collection. They
can meet with and sell directly to
the International Coin Collectors
Association. Admission is free and
there is no obligation to sell. The
types of coins the collectors are


looking for include silver dollars,
half dollars, quarters and dimes
dated 1964 and before. Actually,
the half dollars can date all the
way to 1970. The government used
silver to make most U. S. coinage
until 1965 when they started using
cheaper clad. Silver coins made be-
fore 1965 are made with 90 percent
silver and are worth many times
their face value because of today's
high silver market. Recently, silver
has been trading for about $32 per
oz. Five years ago, silver was just
over $4 per oz. This dramatic in-


crease has raised the price of these
silver coins dramatically. There-
fore, people that have these coins
are selling them to take advantage
of the record high prices. During
this five day event, those who have
coins they wish to sell will be able
to do just that. This show isn't just
for silver coins either. They are
also interested in gold coins, pa-
per currency, nickels and pennies
too. The United States government
started minting coins in 1792. If
those early coins are in good condi-
tion, they can be worth big money.


For instance, a 1792 silver dollar
could be worth as much as $20,000
if it's the right one. Compare that
to a common wheat back penny
from the 1960's- still collectible
but only worth a few cents. Old
paper currency can be worth a lot
too. A common silver certificate is
only worth a couple of bucks but
an 1890's $20 bill in excellent con-
dition could be worth thousands.


WE WANT TO DO BUSINESS WITH YOU! 5 DAY COLLECTOR'S SHOW
WE WILL TREAT YOU FAIRLY AND HONESTLY J LA LLLCI



TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-6PM SATURDAY 9AM-4PM

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
1203 NE 5TH ST., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429


DIRECTIONS 352.563.1 111
INFORMATION 217.787.7767


WE BUY



GOLD MARKETS ARE OVER
$1,600 PER OZ.

CASH IN NOW!


Gold Jewelry

Gold Coins

Gold Bullion


\ ', y ** ^


WE BUY POCKET
WATCHES &
WRISTWATCHES
MARTIN BRAUN, BREITLING,
CARTIER, LECOULTRE, ROLEX,
OMEGA, HAMILTON, PATEK
PHILIPPE, ELGIN, ILLINOIS,
TIFFANY & CO.
EVEN BROKEN WATCHES


Q


WE BUY STERLING SILVER
JEWELRY, TEA SETS, BULLION, FLATWARE, ETC.
f-lA. l A s 7T--_ A.,a- ._


WE BUY VINTAGE JEWELRY
BRACELETS, NECKLACES, DIAMOND RINGS, EARRINGS, WATCHES, ETC.


A.0

AIL .


BUYING ALL SILVER AND GOLD COINS


JEFFERSON "WAR" NICKEL


MERCURY DIME


STANDING LIBERTY WASHINGTON QUARTER
QUARTER


KENNEDY HALF


FRANKLIN HALF


PEACE DOLLAR $20 LIBERTY HEAD
DOUBLE EAGLE


WE BUY DIAMONDS PAPER CURRENCY


0a DFph crs


s.: .A^

,. 9 "-
: - "*** '
",,, ^ "4 *S^J: li ,.*^


S I n r ame ,,.4 -ddie and I bu, .irrn ge gt -
lors [cr :ic. ller :l,-ra I 'pe a i'ze i r, ibsor, /..r-
iin Noihoni.l, R,-.:kenb cker Fender -.'rec.:h i rd
GuilId tro c-m ihe I 9188 ic. ihe 19601 \ I -,ou hn e
a ironqe 1g ulor I ..orn I I.. ee ,it I pa Ioir pri..e
Plea'e come see nm. during his c enl I I-.-. bu,
.,iCIin- .ih.l- ard all IIl'er rlusi.c l irilriurerits


, '.-". -


ROOSEVELT DIME


WALKING LIBERTY HALF


MORGAN DOLLAR


$20 ST. GAUDENS
DOUBLE EAGLE


WANTED













L i


NEWS IN BRIEF
STAFF REPORT

Mary Childs was amazed at the
value of the coin collection she
had taken to the local coin collec-
tors' show. Mary's uncle had col-
lected coins throughout his entire
life. Harry was 12 years old in
1965 when he took an interest in
coin collecting. Going through his
father's pocket change became a
daily ritual.
That's around the time when
the government stopped using sil-
ver to make coins and started using
the much cheaper clad. Harry was
intrigued by the silver coins-they
were colder to the touch than the
newer clad coins and they sounded
different when they clanked to-
gether. Harry thought these silver
coins would eventually be taken
out of circulation and may be worth
something more than face value
some day. He was right. Through
the sixties and much of the seven-
ties it was not uncommon to find
these silver coins in pocket change.
However, when they made their
way back to the mint, they would
be replaced with the newer clad
coins. The silver coins would be
melted down and gone forever.
Harry accumulated quite a col-
lection over the years. The silver
coins he collected were not very
rare-in fact, they were mostly
heavily circulated and had common
dates. But in the past 4 years, silver
has risen to record high prices. Cur-
rently, silver is trading for around
$33 per oz. That makes coins dated
1964 and earlier worth many times
their face value.
Uncle Harry was right-these
coins were worth keeping. Harry
enjoyed collecting these coins
throughout his life and now he
could do something special for
someone close to him. Harry never
had children of his own, but was
very close to his brother's only
child, Mary. Mary had worked
hard and was very independent.
She took out student loans to get
through college and had recently
graduated. She had just landed her
first job and was starting to build
a life for herself. Harry decided
to give his coin collection to Mary
and have her sell it to pay down her
student loans. At first, Mary didn't
accept the offer because she wanted
to do things on her own, but Uncle
Harry was pretty persistent.
After separating the coins by
denomination and type, Mary load-
ed up the coins and headed to our
coin show. After a short registra-
tion, Mary was seated in front of
one of the coin experts. The volume
of coins Mary brought in prompted
the collector to summon the help
of two additional collectors. Af-
ter counting all the coins and to-
taling them up, ($2374.75 in face
value alone) the offer was made:
$37,996.00. Mary had to ask the
collector to repeat the offer again.
She started crying tears of joy and
said "SOLD!" Neither she nor her
uncle had any idea that his col-
lection was worth that much. The
student loans would be paid in full,
with money left over. It was a good
day for Mary...a very good day!


WE WANT ANY
& ALL COSTUME
JEWELRY


,.


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


"=W. "


V ,l


YWww





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUALITY OF LIFE


QUAL Foreclosure picture mixed


2012 Chronicle project



Mortgage


rates hit


historic


low

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

Five years after the
housing market's bubble
burst, lower mortgage
rates are helping boost
home sales this year,
spurring encouraging
signs of an economic up-
turn.
The average U.S. rate
for the 30-year fixed mort-
gage fell to a record low
for a fourth straight week.
On Thursday, mortgage
buyer Freddie Mac said
the rate on the 30-year
loan dipped to 3.78 per-
cent, down from 3.79 per-
cent last week and the
lowest since long-term
mortgages began in the
1950s.
The average rate on 15-
year fixed mortgage, a
popular option for refi-
nancing, held steady at
3.04, matching the record
low hit last week.
"(Mortgage rates) are
quite low, historically
low," said C.J. Dixon,
owner/broker of ERA
American Realty & In-
vestments and ERA Sun-
coast Realty. "It's a great
time to buy a home."
The low rates are con-
tributing to an increase in
the housing affordability
index, Dixon explained.
The index measures
whether or not a typical
family could qualify for a
mortgage loan on a typical
home by matching up the
current average house-
hold income with what
the typical family could
spend on purchasing a
home.
Year-to-date in Citrus
County, the index is up
10.5 percent over last
year.
Nevertheless, Sarah
Spencer, president of the
Realtors Association of
Citrus County, stated
Thursday many of the
banks have tightened
their restrictions and
stepped up the necessary
qualifications for issuing
mortgages.
The banks are asking
buyers to produce paper-
work that was never re-
quired before.
Dixon said he recently
had a client who made a
nice income and had
enough money to put 50
percent down on a home.
However, the client owns
at least 10 different busi-
nesses, and the banks
want people to verify
every transaction of a
bank account with a bal-
ance of more than
$250,000.
Naturally, Dixon said
the client didn't want to
spend the hours gathering
the information so he de-
cided not to buy the home.
"It discouraged him
even though he was per-
fectly qualified," he said.
An easier loan would be
a person who has one job,
one bank account and a
W-2. But, Dixon said the
restrictions shouldn't pre-
vent people from pursu-
ing homeownership.
Even if a person stays
in their home for two
years, he said there would
be some appreciation in
the home's value so it
would be a good invest-
ment.
"This is the best time in


history to buy a home," he
said. "Everything is lining
up for the buyer."
Information from the
Associated Press was
used in this report.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924
or swiles@chronicle
online.com.


A.B. IDIBE
Staff Writer


Despite what looks to be a
sudden spike in foreclosure
filings in Citrus County in
the first quarter of this year,
real estate officials are
pleased with the upward
trend of the market.
According to data from
the Citrus County Clerk of
Courts, from January to
April, 510 foreclosures were
filed. In all of 2011, only 960
foreclosures were filed.
"It unfortunately looks
like it could double last
year's numbers if it contin-
ues like this," Deputy Clerk
of Courts Angela Vick said.
"But it could also be a mat-
ter of process, the manner
in which cases are being
filed that is causing us to see
a rise at the beginning of the
year."
Kevin Cunningham, pres-
ident of ReMax Realty One
and a spokesman for the Cit-
rus County Realtors Associ-
ation, said those foreclosure
numbers definitely point to
a process issue rather than
a market downturn.
"The banks may have
waited until the first quar-
ter of this year to file some
of their cases from the end
of last year, because what
we are seeing is everything
trending up," Cunningham
said.
He said since January
2012, sales of homes in Cit-
rus County are up 4.2 per-
cent or 668 to 641 compared
to the numbers from 2011
for the same period.
Pending sales are also up
26.6 percent for the same


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Foreclosure clerk Bobby Kirby conducts a foreclosure auction Thursday morning at the Citrus County Courthouse.


CITRUS COUNTY FORECLOSURE NUMBERS
January to April 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004


Number of sales

period in 2011 compared to
2012 from 693 to 877. And
overall inventory for the
same period is down 21.8
from 2011 from 2,204
homes to 1,724, Cunning-
ham said.
"Things are really looking
up and improving," he said.
Cunningham attributes
the turnaround to banks re-
alizing it is better to work
with homeowners, either to
sell their homes in a short
sale or incentivizing an or-


192 574 1,054 787

derly exit for the home's exces
residents without going close
through foreclosure. A
"We are seeing banks ac- which
tually give up to $30,000 to relea
homeowners to help them proper
transition to either a rental than
home or maybe get into a the d
situation they can afford," credit
Cunningham said. becau
He said while it may not as
seem like the banks are sure.
paying people to quit their Th(
homes, bank officials real- shows
ize it can sometimes cost in nenti


615 293 103 147 250


ss of $50,000 to fore-
on a home.
short sale is one in
h lien holders agree to
se their lien on the
erty and accept less
the amount owed on
ebt. While a person's
t may suffer slightly
ise of a short sale, it is
s onerous as a foreclo-

e Clerk of Court data
s a steady if not expo-
al rise in foreclosure


filings in the county from
2007 when there were 916
cases.
The numbers show fore-
closures jumped to 1,640 in
2008 when the economy im-
ploded. In 2009, the num-
bers climbed to 2,001 filed
in the county.
In 2010, things began to
slow down, settling at 1,389.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-563-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Just their cup of tea


Senior citizens

choose life

quality

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Dur-
ing later years, people espe-
cially need to make
decisions about their qual-
ity of life.
"Here's my theory," Gloria
Jeannotte, executive direc-
tor of Cedar Creek Assisted
Living Residence in Crystal
River, recently told the
Chronicle. "Our whole goal
for our elder generation is to
give them the best quality of
life at this time of their life.
Very often, if they wait too
long, they are too weak and
they don't have choices any
more. Just like us or people
at any age: If we are active,
if we eat well, if we get our
hydration, if we are keeping
our mind busy, our body will
stay healthier. So quality is
huge."
Quality means caring for
oneself and each other.
"Often time, if you live
alone, you don't take care of
yourself the way you
should," Jeannotte said.
"This is quality of life: No
matter what stage of life we
are in, we should have the
best quality of life at that
time. Just because someone
is old or has a disease or a
disability, it doesn't mean
they don't de-
serve a won- The 10
derful quality The 10-
of life. We assist(
want them to
have the life facility iI
that they want
to have." public t
Sharing its 3 m
hospitality,
the 10-year- Thur
old assisted
living facility Currer
invites the
public to tea people lR
at 3 p.m. each They ran
Thursday. The
complex has from 6,
60 apartments
and is li- high
censed for 72
residents. Currently, 69 peo-
ple live there. They range in
age from 64 to the high 90s.
Jeannotte estimated her res-
idents' median age at 85 or
86. Most residents are local
people. Some come from up
north because they have
families here.
Senior citizens find their
way to assisted living
through several paths.


e

n
t


n


14
1

i


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Music and a tea party is the norm for residents at Cedar Creek Assisted Living in Crystal River. Assisted living offers
residents the comfort of living in a safe facility with medical care, food services and an activities staff to make sure
residents do not become isolated. This care is the answer to quality of life issues for some elderly residents who can af-


ford the comfort of such amen

"Sometimes, it's precipi-
tated by a doctor's urging to
get some level of help or
they may end up in a hospi-
tal or a nursing home and
it's a strong suggestion that
they do not need to live
alone," Jeannotte said.
"Many of
year-old our people
actually
1d living come in on
their own.
vites the They decide
they like to
o tea at have the
each choice be-
fore they
sday. have to have
somebody
itly, 69 make it for
them," she
ve there. continued.
ge in age "Sometimes
family mem-
4 to the bers see that
their par-
90s. ents are de-
clining, or
(their) aunt or uncle. It's not
always parents or a dear
friend."
Initially, potential clients
may visit an assisted living
facility to look around.
"Any assisted living
should be able to help them
even if they are not going to
live in their environment,"
Jeannotte said.
The assisted living facility


Just because someone is old or
has a disease or a disability, it doesn't
mean they don't deserve a wonderful
quality of life.
Gloria Jeannotte
executive director of Cedar Creek Assisted Living Residence.


should offer information to
guide the person who is con-
sidering living there, even if
the person goes to live else-
where.
A person needs to con-
sider whether they want the
benefits of assisted living.
The greatest feature as-
sisted living offers is peace
of mind through 24-hour
security.
"They have the ability to
call somebody if they need
anything any time night or
day," Jeannotte said.
Other features are com-
forts, such as having three
meals a day prepared for
them. Their housekeeping
may be done for them if they
like. They don't have to cook,
although cooking facilities
often are available for those
who enjoy whipping up a
meal or cake for friends.
Laundry services may be
offered. Or facilities may be
offered for people who prefer
to wash their own clothing.
Assisted living offers
healthy lifestyle help with


such features as medication
supervision and activities of
live assistance: offering a
hand with bathing and
dressing if needed.
Daily activities programs
promote wellness. Trans-
portation gets people to doc-
tor appointments and out
for shopping and pleasure
trips.
At the same time, many
residents drive. Some even
go on long trips. They all
look out for each other.
"Congregate living is like
one very large family if it is
done right," Jeannotte said.
Helping with quality of
life choices after a medical
event is a duty among many
for Sue Bean, manager of
case management at Citrus
Memorial Health System.
"We look at whether they
should be with a skilled
nursing facility if they have
an IV or are on antibiotics
or need physical therapy,"
Bean said.
Frequently, a patient
spends time in a rehabilita-


tion center to get stronger
before going home. Once
strength has returned, the
choice for the next step
rests with the patient and
the patient's family
"Our long-range goal is for
the patient to go home to a
safe environment," Bean
said.
"Home" may then be a
skilled nursing facility if the
patient can't take care of
their needs. Or it may be
their own home that is mod-
ified with home health care
staff assistance and perhaps
equipment like a commode
or hospital bed. This step
also requires the presence
of a family member or
friend as caregiver.
Or the patient may be a
good candidate for assisted
living. Other than contacting
assisted living facilities
through patient request,
Bean said the hospital does
not work out arrangements
as it becomes a private mat-
ter between the facility, the
patient and the patient's
family Individual outcomes
are different.
"Very often the patient
just gets well and goes
home," Bean said.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 A9





A10 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


HELP
Continued from Page Al

Currently, the county is not
offering SHIP funds for first-
time homebuyers, who are
directed instead to the
Neighborhood Stabilization
Program described in an-
other article.
However, SHIP affects all
the county's programs be-
cause it required the estab-
lishment of an Affordable
Housing Advisory Commit-
tee, a group of residents who
meet monthly to review the
status of all the county's
housing programs and make
recommendations to the
board of county commission-
ers.
When SHIP funds were
available for first-time home-
buyers, the funds had to be
repaid as a no-interest loan
upon the change of owner-
ship of the home. For the
three other SHIP programs,
the homeowner would not
have to repay the loan if the
home remained their pri-
mary residence for 10 years.
In October 2010, the county
was awarded a $750,000
Community Development
Block Grant through the U.S.
Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD).



DREAM
Continued from Page Al

exceed $40,400.
"I'm surprised people
aren't banging down the
door to purchase these
homes," Pollard said. "I
mean it doesn't necessarily
have to be someone at
poverty level. You and I can
qualify for these homes."
To find out more about
NSP, Alberto met with
Cheryl Lambert, an agent
with ReMax Realty One in
Inverness. After a quick as-
sessment, Lambert said she
felt Alberto would be the
perfect NSP applicant. So
Alberto filed out the neces-
sary paperwork to pre-
qualify and overnight, she
said, she found out the
lender pre-approved her
loan.
However, the pre-ap-
proval was only the begin-
ning of a long, arduous
process to see if the lender
would actually approve the
loan for the home of her
dreams.
Alberto said she looked at
a number of homes but fell
in love with a quaint two-
bedroom home in Beverly
Hills, which was listed at
$60,000.
"It was really nice," she
said.
Before she even got out
of the car to tour the prop-
erty, Alberto had a feeling
this would be her first
home. Even her son no-
ticed how enamored she
was and told her to "take
this house."
Naturally, Alberto said
she felt some uncertainty
and questioned whether she
could really have her own
home.
"But I put my foot for-
ward. It's a process," she
said. "There's a chance I
could end up losing it, but
you have to try"
Lambert, who handles
many NSP homes in Her-
nando County, said she
champions programs such
as these because it is a win-
win-win situation because
the buyers have an afford-
able place to live, the sellers
are able to maintain prop-
erty values and the local
contractors get work be-
cause the county hires them
to fix up the deserted
homes.
Moreover, she said it gives
people who never thought
they could own a home the
opportunity to live out a
dream.
Lambert still vividly re-
members the day Alberto
received the news she had
been approved for her loan
-it was her birthday Lam-


bert recalled meeting Al-
berto and her children at
the house so they could all
see it. While Alberto led
the tour, Lambert's phone
rang. It was the lender in-
forming her Alberto got the
loan.
"I looked at her and told
her, 'Man, you're gonna have
a good birthday,"' Lambert
said. "When I told her the
loan was approved, she
looked at me and started to
cry."
"My legs was falling off,"
Alberto said with a laugh. "I
was so excited to be able to
say this is mine."


The funding assists very low
and low to moderate income
families with home repairs
to get their home up to health
and quality standards.
"We already have all our
applicants," Blanchette said.
"We are not accepting appli-
cations. We have a ranking
list and we are helping in
order on that list We will be
applying again and when it
becomes available again, we
will advertise."
Anyone who is unem-
ployed or underemployed
through no fault of their own,
should look at a program
called Hardest Hit
"It's up to six months of
mortgage payments paid di-
rectly to their lender,"
Blanchette said.
It can also pay arrears.
Hardest Hit is capped at
$12,000.
"If someone was laid off
due to a downsize and not
able to make their mortgage
payment, they could very
well be eligible for Hardest
Hit," Blanchette said. "The
banks should know it's avail-
able and be directing people
to it"
The county does not have a
direct allocation for the
Hardest Hit program. In-
stead, it applies to the state
for individuals, as the state
has the allocation from the


The closing on the sale
could happen as early as
Monday or as late as early
June, but Alberto can't help
making plans on how to dec-
orate the home she will
share with her daughter and
new grandson. She already
has boxes packed, she said,
because she knew she was
moving.
One of her first projects
once she settles into her
home is plant a garden.
"I'm gonna plant around
the outside of the house and
have a flower garden. And
I'm gonna have a vegetable
garden in the back," she
said. "Gotta have my collard
greens!"
When she moves in, there
will be no concerns about
buying appliance because
every NSP comes with new,
energy-efficient appliances.
The home also comes with a
sprinkler system, a remote-
controlled garage door sys-
tem, a new roof and air
conditioning unit as well as
a fresh paint job and
flooring.
And her mortgage pay-
ment, she said, will be about
$432, more than $200 less
than what she was paying to
rent.
"I recommend this to any-
one. Why go into low-in-
come housing when you can


U.S. Treasury The county re-
ceives fees for acting as the
agent for status updates,
such as meeting with the
homeowner to find out if a
job was found.
Thirty-nine people have
applied, but not all were
funded.
"We're open for business
on this one," Blanchette said.
She also said the state has
asked the Treasury to in-
crease the assistance time to
12 months and increase the
cap to $18,000.
"We expect to see that ap-
proved in July," Blanchette
said.
Rental assistance is of-
fered through a program
called Section 8. But, again,
the program is filled.
"It's a Housing Choice
Voucher Program,"
Blanchette said. "Renters se-
lect their own unit from the
Citrus County rental
market They pay a portion of
their rent and we pay the
remainder."
It is prorated by income
level.
"Right now we are serving
close to 90 vouchers in Citrus
County and about 100 in
Sumter County," Blanchette
said.
Some time ago, Citrus
County took over Sumter
County's voucher program.


have something like this?"
she said. "You're afraid to go
out to get your own, espe-
cially when you're low in-
come, but you have to go out
there ... Once you get
started, get out there and
just do it."
Qualified applicants for
the NSP program may be el-
igible for financial assis-
tance through the program,


Please RSVP
352.7953317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


'As those vouchers are
freed up in Sumter, we'll be
able to use them in Citrus,"
Blanchette said. "Sumter
does not want the program
any more. Eventually, those
vouchers will come to our
community, which is of help."
When a family is issued a
voucher, it is theirs until such
time as their income in-
creases to where they don't
need assistance or they move
where the voucher can't be
used.
"That's the only way a
voucher gets freed up for the
next person on our waiting
list," Blanchette said. "Right
now, we have a total of 257
people on our waiting list -
that demonstrates the need
in this county."
Section 8 also helps land-
lords get their income from
their property.
The program's title refers
to a section of the Housing
Act of 1937, which set up the
rent payment assistance pro-
gram during the Great
Depression.
"When people hear Sec-
tion 8, they think public
housing projects and that is
not what we have here,"
Blanchette said. "People can
live anywhere they want as
long as the landlord is willing
to accept our payment"
Shelter Plus Care is an-


depending on income level.
Buyers must be able to se-
cure a first mortgage loan
through a traditional bank.
Any assistance will depend
on the buyer's approved
first mortgage loan amount
based on income.
The buyer must occupy
the property as their pri-
mary residence and cannot
currently own a home. How-


In association with:


Cj; ,CATARACT&
k.I- LASER INSTITUTE
S7 "Excellence...with love"
- StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


other HUD voucher pro-
gram, but has only 11 vouch-
ers for families.
"That's for homeless peo-
ple with disabilities or sub-
stance abuse people,"
Blanchette said. "They agree
to a case management plan.
We work in partnership with
The Centers to have support
services for them. Some peo-
ple have been able to find
employment and stabilize
themselves mentally and not
be homeless anymore."
For other homeless peo-
ple, the county has a case
manager who works on their
issues. The county uses an
Emergency Solutions Grant
"What we use those funds
for is prevention to keep peo-
ple from becoming home-
less," Blanchette said.
The grant provides one-
time rent assistance.
The case manager for
homeless people first works
to get them into a shelter The
goal, though, is to get the
homeless person out of the
shelter and into a real home.
"We've been successful to
a degree, but the amount of
people is difficult,"
Blanchette said.
The homeless caseload av-
erages about 130 people for
the case manager, with about
20 new people on average re-
questing help each week


ever, the buyer does
not have to be a first-time
homebuyer.
For more information
about the NSP program, call
352-527-7520 or visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/


QUALITY OF LIFE


$nz per person at orrice
Advance Reservations Required
by June 9th

WE WANT YOU!
352.746.4882 352.746.3636
Central Ridge Community Center At Beverly Hills
77 Civic Circle

7Ciii ,ie)Ni



Happy Birthday

M CITRUS COUNTY!


"- - -- i


CITRUS COUNTY

HISTORIC
COURTHOUSE


100 YEARS
1 9 1 2 2 0 1 2


Celebratig 125 year
1 2 2 7 2 0 1 2
One Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL
For More Information, Please Call
(352) 341-6436 or (352) 341-6427


Come and join us on
Saturday
June 2nd for the
Celebration of two
major birthdays!
* Opening Ceremonies at
10:00am West steps
of Historic Courthouse.
* Birthday Cake and
Treats will be served
following in the Museum
* Meet Robert Butler
Highwaymen Artist, who
created a painting of the
1912 Citrus County
Courthouse, over
25 years ago.
* Former Inverness
Primary School Students


will open a time capsule
from 25 years ago.
* Along with Many, Many
More Fun Activities.

Ciiink umI 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

"The biggest trend he's
seeing right now are a lot of
people who are doubled up,"
Blanchette said. "They've
lost their house and they are
staying with somebody We
still consider that homeless."
Beyond the programs,
Housing Services keeps a list
to hand out of 17 affordable
rental housing complexes in
the county where potential
renters can inquire. Some
advertise rent as low as $530
a month.
At least two complexes on
the list are part of Florida
Low Income HousingAssoci-
ates (FLIHA), a nonprofit
corporation started in 1989.
It builds new housing devel-
opments and preserves ex-
isting ones using financing
from local, state and federal
sources in addition to grants
and public donations.
As a public-private part-
nership, its goal is to help
low-income and very low-in-
come families eventually
own their homes through its
own program. Applicants
must meet criteria to rent.
Then a portion of their rent
is set aside to accumulate
for a down payment on a
house.
Other affordable rental
complexes are modified for
elderly and handicapped
tenants.


commserv/commrec/
housing/programs/nsp.htm.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


Irrigation Tune-up Special "
$4999


HOME SERVICES) Uup 5 zone .7
Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH Crystal River 795-8600
www.bushhomeservices.com Inverness 860-1 037


HEALTH-


SCREENING


Wednesday, June 13

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Linda Azwell, OD


We're Opening the Doors to the Area's

Newest & Greatest Collection of Furnished Models!

Visit and Experience.... Oal
Thie Most Cutting Edge Designs on the Market VOW 41
Single-Family & Convenient Detached Villa Homes
E)e-Opening Interior Dlcor & Specialty Features
Creative Swimming Pool & Patio Designs I.,II
Citrus County's most Spectacular Club Facilities including
BellaVita Spa & Fitness Center and Skyview Restaurant


itrus Ils 0e a 4
to OF CITRUS HILLS

352-746-6121 Models Open Each Day from 9 AM to 5 PM


OBLR9


OBIBD


L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Handling the pitfalls of insurance


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Item 12 on the Citizens
Property Insurance Com-
pany's Frequently Asked
Questions (FAQ) section on
its website asks: How do I
know whether my policy ex-
cludes sinkhole coverage?
The answer is policies
that exclude sinkhole
coverage will have the fol-
lowing wording on the Dec-
larations page: Your policy
provides coverage for a cat-
astrophic ground cover col-
lapse that results in the
property being condemned
and uninhabitable.
Otherwise, your policy
does not provide coverage
for sinkhole losses. You may
purchase additional cover-
age for sinkhole losses for
an additional premium.
Everyone should ask
questions like that and more
if you are a homeowner or
about to be one, Citrus
County Realtor Kevin Cun-
ningham said.
"Your agent or Realtor
should have a pretty good
understanding of what
should be covered or not
when it comes to buying
homeowner's insurance,"
he said.
Citrus is one of 16 Florida
counties where a sinkhole
inspection is a prerequisite


to add sinkhole coverage.
The other counties are
Alachua, Hamilton, Her-
nando, Hillsborough, Lake,
Manatee, Marion, Pasco,
Pinellas, Polk, Seminole,
Sumter, Suwannee, Wakulla
and Washington.
Citizens Property Insur-
ance Company describes it-
self as a not-for-profit,
tax-exempt government cor-
poration whose public pur-
pose is to provide insurance
protection to Florida prop-
erty owners throughout the
state.
Due to the sometimes
prickly nature of finding af-
fordable insurance, the cor-
poration said it insures
homes, businesses and con-
dominiums whose owners
otherwise might not be able
to find coverage.
One of the biggest cover-
age issues for homeowners
in counties such as Citrus is
the issue of sinkhole cover-
age.
The legal definition of a
sinkhole is when a landform
created by subsidence of
soil, sediment or rock as un-
derlying strata are dissolved
by groundwater.
A sinkhole may form by
collapse into subterranean
voids created by dissolution
of limestone ordolostone or
by subsidence as these
strata are dissolved, accord-
ing to the legislature's lan-


guage on sinkholes.
The same law describes
"sinkhole loss" as structural
damage to the building, in-
cluding the foundation,
caused by sinkhole activity.
Contents coverage shall
apply only if there is struc-
tural damage to the building
caused by sinkhole activity.
And it subsequently defines
"sinkhole activity" as settle-
ment or systematic weaken-
ing of the earth supporting
such property only when
such settlement or system-
atic weakening results from
movement or traveling of
soils, sediments or rock ma-
terials into subterranean
voids created by the effect of
water on a limestone or sim-
ilar rock formation.
Therefore, settling of a
home due to previously un-
known man-made fill-ins in
a particular subdivision will
not be covered by insur-
ance, Cunningham
explained.
"That is why it is impor-
tant that, for example, if
you know you live in a flood
plain or your agent tells you
that you are in a flood
plain, it is important that
you should think about get-
ting flood insurance," he
said.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


INSURANCE
QUESTIONS?
* The Department of
Financial Services has a
Consumer Services


SO YOU KNOW
* Homeowners' insurance
policies often provide re-
placement cost coverage
for the dwelling in the
event of a loss. As such,
insurance companies re-
quire policyholders to
purchase an amount of
insurance equal to the
cost to rebuild the home
using current construc-
tion costs. This is very
different from the market
value of the home. The
market value of a home
is the amount the home
is worth if you were to
sell it today. The two
amounts can be very dif-
ferent.
During negative eco-
nomic times, replace-
ment values may
continue to increase
based on construction
costs, while market val-
ues are decreasing due
to lower resale demand.
Remember, if a home is
insured for replacement
value, the insurer must
pay the cost to rebuild


division to answer ques-
tions and take complaints
from consumers. They can
be contacted toll-free at
877-693-5236 (in Florida
only) or 850-413-3089

the home, (up to the pol-
icy limit), not what a will-
ing buyer would have
paid for it prior to the
loss. For this reason, an
insurer may refuse cover-
age to a policyholder. In
theory, risk is increased
when a policyholder
would benefit from the
loss of the home and
most insurers are not
willing to accept the in-
creased risk.
* During positive economic
times, replacement val-
ues may be less than
market values. Market
values increase based on
demand and availability,
and market values in-
clude the cost of the
land under a home. Dur-
ing such times, a home
may sell or be appraised
for more than the
amount of coverage an
insurance company is
willing to provide. Re-
member, insurance cov-
ers only the cost to
rebuild the building and
not the value of the land.


(outside Florida). The web-
site is http://www.my
floridacfo.com/sitePages/
services/display.
aspx?a=Consumer
Protection.

Most replacement cost
policies require you to
carry a certain percent-
age of the replacement
value (normally 80 per-
cent) at all times. If you
fail to carry the correct
amount of coverage, you
may be responsible for a
percentage of a partial
loss. For instance, if you
carried a $100,000 cov-
erage limit when in fact
the amount needed to
meet the policy require-
ments is $200,000 and
you have a partial loss of
$50,000, the company
would only pay $25,000
of the partial loss, which
is 50 percent of the
claim.
* The formula used in the
example above is the
amount of insurance car-
ried divided by the
amount of insurance
needed, times the
amount of loss, equals
the amount payable for
the claim by the insur-
ance company.
Source: Florida Department of
Financial Services


FREE HEARING TEST
+ EVALUATION
The Hearing Aid


AUDIBEL


I 52-621-80Homosassa


Inverness
352-586-7599


DISABLED?

S WE HELP YOU WIN!

social Security Disability *SSI
Chronic Pain 'Back and Neck' Diabetes
Overweight, Anxiety 'Depression
Fibromyalgia, COPD
There is no substitute for experience! Call today for your FREE consultation!
No Fees Upfront! We turn denials into Winners.


APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED --


Urology Institute
crNc l rin n wii n, r i
Accepting new patients


Dr. Thomas Kathileen Pam Dr. Kenneth
Alderson Crisp LPN Jacobson MA A. Son

The Urology Institute of Central Florida
invites you to a community open house for
Kenneth Son, MD and Thomas Alderson, MD

June 23rd, 9am 1lam

605 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness FL 34452
For more information 352 341.6338


: Check & AlttwlFluids
* Check Ti Pssure on Al 4 Tires '

SBaffeiy Test

U sNO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! L1
All makes & m models. Vjii ,',11 vt i i i if pur h rti ;i +i I


'FREE
Alignment
Ch-.eck .






I eg. $ 16e5
I In s
| mm m -d


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453 2219 S. Suncoast Bid. Homosassc, FL34448
Lf 352.341.0018 U 352.628.9444
loveehevysales.com auS lovehonda.com
CIE ILETI HOURS OF OPERATION: C E LET HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL; 9AM-6PM Sat Sles 9AM-8PM1 Mon-Fri_: 9AM-6PM Sal.; 11AM-4PM Sun
Service 8AM-5PM MoN. -Frt 8AM-Noon Sat Sence 8AM-5PM Mon--FrL: 8AM-2PM Sat-


HERE

WHEN YOU

NEED

CITR
When it comes to outstanding cardiovascular care, trust
your heart to Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center.
With nearly a decade of experience, our expert team of
surgeons, physicians and nurses offer the most advanced
expertise when you need it most, right here at home.

From advanced heart surgery such as coronary artery
bypass (CABG) and heart valve repairs to the implantation
of pacemakers and automatic defibrillators, Citrus
Memorial is at the heart of it. Our minimally invasive
abdominal aneurysm surgery, carotid artery procedures
and lung surgery techniques help in reducing the risks and
complications associated with more traditional methods
and promote improved healing that helps speed you back to
normal daily living.

So when it comes to matters of the heart, coupled with
our proven record for compassionate care and excellent
outcomes, you can depend on Citrus County's most
comprehensive heart and vascular center.

Learn more about us by visitingg heartofcitrus.com
For a free Heart and Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.


U


PETER YOUNG KIAI, NI D.
Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery


CITRUS MEMORIAL

5 H Heart

& VASCULAR CENTER
502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 All


ol_,,'j k :EI O i1 1











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BRIEFS Dozens of children killed in Syria

Hunger


Associated Press
Two-year-old Aliou Seyni
Diallo eats dry couscous
given to him by a neighbor,
after he collapsed in tears
of hunger May 1 in the
village of Goudoude Diobe,
in the Matam region of
northeastern Senegal.
Hunger returns
to Africa
GOUDOUDE DIOBE,
Senegal It's 10 a.m., and
the 2-year-old is still waiting
for breakfast. Aliou Seyni Di-
allo collapses to his knees in
tears and plops his forehead
down on the dirt outside his
family's hut.
Soon he is wailing incon-
solably and writhing on his
back in the sand. A neighbor
spots him, picks him up easily
by one arm, and gives him a
little uncooked millet in a
metal bowl. The toddler shov-
els it into his mouth with
sticky fingers coated in tears
and grime. The crying stops,
for the moment.
Here are the two most
alarming things about Aliou's
story: He lives in the richest
country in the Sahel, and the
worst is yet to come.
More than 1 million chil-
dren younger than 5 in this
wide, arid swath of Africa
below the Sahara are now at
risk of a food shortage so se-
vere it threatens their lives,
UNICEF estimates. In Sene-
gal, which is relatively stable
and prosperous, malnutrition
among children in the north
has already surpassed 14
percent, just shy of the World
Health Organization threshold
for an emergency.

Campaign


Associated Press
Egyptian presidential
candidate Ahmed Shafiq
pays tribute Saturday to
the "glorious revolution"
that toppled Hosni
Mubarak, a dramatic turn-
around for the former
regime official who fought
his way into the runoff elec-
tions by appealing to public
disenchantment with last
year's uprising.
Ex-Mubarak PM
praises uprising
CAIRO The two surviv-
ing candidates in Egypt's
presidential election appealed
Saturday for support from
voters who rejected them as
polarizing extremists in the
first round even as they faced
a new challenge from the
third-runner-up who con-
tested the preliminary results.
Hosni Mubarak's last prime
minister, Ahmed Shafiq,
vowed he won't revive the old
authoritarian regime as he
sought to cast off his image
as an anti-revolution figure,
while the Muslim Brother-
hood's candidate, Mo-
hammed Morsi, reached out
to those fearful of hardline Is-
lamic rule and the rise of a re-
ligious state.
Many votes are up for
grabs, but the two candidates
will have a tough battle woo-
ing the middle-ground voters
amid calls from activists for a
boycott of the divisive vote.
-From wire reports


Attack leaves 90

dead including32

kids under age 10

Associated Press
BEIRUT Gruesome video Sat-
urday showed rows of dead Syrian
children lying in a mosque in
bloody shorts and T-shirts with gap-
ing head wounds, haunting images
of what activists called one of the
deadliest regime attacks yet in


Syria's 14-month-old uprising.
The shelling attack on Houla, a
group ofvillages northwest of the cen-
tral city of Homs, killed more than 90
people, including 32 children younger
than 10 years old, the head of the U.N.
observer team in Syria said.
The attacks sparked outrage from
U.S. and other international leaders,
and large protests in the suburbs of
Syria's capital of Damascus and its
largest city, Aleppo. It also renewed
fears of the relevance of a month-old
international peace plan that has
not stopped almost daily violence.
The U.N. denounced the attacks
in a statement that appeared to hold


President BasharAssad's regime re-
sponsible, and the White House
called the violence acts of "un-
speakable and inhuman brutality"
"This appalling and brutal crime
involving indiscriminate and dispro-
portionate use of force is a flagrant
violation of international law and of
the commitments of the Syrian gov-
ernment to cease the use of heavy
weapons in population centers and
violence in all its forms," said U.N.
Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon and
international envoy Kofi Annan.
"Those responsible for perpetrating
this crime must be held to account"
More than a dozen amateur videos


Still wondering


Associated Press
Nancy Sabin, executive director of the newly-renamed Jacob Wetterling Resource Center, middle, embraces
Patty and Jerry Wetterling during the presentation of a bronze artwork depicting a small child reaching for a star
Sept. 21, 2008, in St. Louis Park, Minn. The Wetterling's 11-year-old son, Jacob, was abducted near St. Cloud,
Minn., in 1989.

Break in Patz missing child case brings hope to other families
Associated Press


After 33 years, someone has con-
fessed to killing 6-year-old Etan
Patz. And people immediately start
speaking of "closure."
Patty Wetterling hates the word.
Since 1989, she and her husband
have writhed in the same hell as Stan
and Julie Patz. Whatever path they
might have been on, it was irrevocably
altered October 1989, on an evening
when a masked man walked away
with their 11-year-old son, Jacob.
"Once you're a victim of a crime
like this, your life takes a very dif-
ferent direction," the St Joseph,
Minn., woman said. "It doesn't really
close anything, because everything
just became different from that point
on. But it does provide answers."
Thanks to the wonders of modern
computer graphics, these parents can
watch their children "age" digi-
tally, at least But no one can write a
program capable of generating the
milestones- high school graduation,
college, marriage, parenthood -that
come along with growing up.
Some, like Mike and Maddi
Misheloff of Dublin, Calif., exist in
a kind of suspended animation, un-
willing to move or even redecorate
the lost one's bedroom.
Many, like the Patzes, live with the
"what ifs." What if they hadn't given
in to his "please," hadn't let him
make his first solo walk to the school
bus stop that May day in 1979?
A few suffer under a cloud of sus-
picion themselves like Judy
Moore of Jackson, Ky., whose 6-
year-old son, Kelly, disappeared in
1982 while playing in the snow.
Back when Etan vanished, au-
thorities put the children's faces on
milk cartons. Today, their names
and images flash across the Inter-
net and digital highway signs.
Signs of hope
It is a horrifying truth that the
best some families can hope for is
their child is being held against
their will, said activist John Walsh.
Before her rescue in 2009, Jaycee
Dugard was repeatedly raped and
gave birth to two daughters during
18 years of captivity at the hands of
a known sex offender in California.
Still, her mother could eventually
put her arms around her again, said
Walsh, host of television's "Amer-
ica's Most Wanted."
"Against all hope and reality,
every now and then a child comes


This combination of images provided by the Wetterling family and the
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children shows photos of Jacob
Wetterling at the age of 11, left, and a computer-enhanced, age-
progressed simulation made available in 2007.


back alive," said Walsh, whose 6-
year-old son, Adam, was abducted
from a Florida department store in
July 1981 and murdered. "So that's
why these people keep their rooms
and their phone numbers, because
it's part of the staying mentally sane.
It's part of the being able to cope
with the worst possible thing that
could ever happen to you your
beautiful, loving child disappears."
Through his show, Walsh has
helped capture more than 1,200
criminals and bring home about 60
missing children. He knows the
Patzes and has shared their
heartache each time a lead evapo-
rated, and one "breakthrough" after
another ended in disappointment.
Wetterlings' story
The outgoing message on the
Wetterlings' answering machine
says it all.
"Hope is an amazing force that
we all need in our lives every day,"
Patty Wetterling's voice declares.
The evening of Oct. 22, 1989, she
and her chiropractor husband,
Jerry, were going out to visit with
friends. They asked Jacob, 11, to
babysit his two younger siblings -
Trevor, 10, and Carmen, 8.
They called home to give Jacob
the phone number where they
were, in case of an emergency Not
long afterward, the children called
to say they were bored, and asked
permission to ride their bikes to the
video store about a mile away
"No," their mother said instinc-
tively "Find something to do at
home."
Trevor asked to speak to their


dad. He promised they would take
a flashlight; Jake would wear the
father's reflective jogging vest.
The parents conferred, then ac-
quiesced. When Jacob called back
around 8:30 to say Carmen didn't
want to come, the Wetterlings
agreed with his solution to have the
13-year-old neighbor girl sit with her
until they got back with the movie.
"It should have been OK," she
said.
The brothers and a friend made
it to the store, where they chose
their movie Leslie Nielsen's cop
comedy, "The Naked Gun" and
bought some candy They were
about halfway home when, the
other two boys told authorities, a
masked gunman emerged from a
driveway
He ordered them to throw their
bikes into a ditch and lie down.
After asking each boy his age, he
told Trevor and the friend to run
toward the nearby woods and not
look back.
But after a short distance, they
turned around -just in time to see
the man leading Jacob away by the
elbow.
There have been many leads
over the years.
"We have had leads in the last
two weeks," Wetterling said.
She takes heart in the fact that a
relative turned in the man now
charged with murdering Etan.
"We all need answers," she said
of her family, the Patzes and all the
others. "We believe somebody else
knows something ... They've also
carried an awful heavy load, and
it's time to come forward."


posted online Saturday gave
glimpses of the carnage, showing
lines of bodies laid out in simple
rooms, many with bloody faces, tor-
sos and limbs. In some places, resi-
dents put chunks of ice on the bodies
to preserve them until burial.
One two-minute video shows at
least a dozen children lined up
shoulder to shoulder on a check-
ered blanket on what appears to be
the floor of a mosque. Blood trick-
led from one girl's mouth. One boy,
appearing to be no more than 8, had
his jaw blown off. The video shows
flowered blankets and rugs cover-
ing several rows of other bodies.



Vatican:


Pope's


butler


arrested

Documents

found in his

apartment
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY The
Vatican confirmed Saturday
the pope's butler has been
arrested in its embarrassing
leaks scandal, adding a Hol-
lywood twist to a sordid tale
of power struggles, intrigue
and corruption in the high-
est levels of Catholic Church
governance.
Paolo
Gabriele, a
layman and
member of
household,
was arrested
Wednesday
after secret Paolo
documents Gabriele
were found the pope's
in his Vati- butler was
can City arrested
apartment Saturday.
and was still
being held Saturday, Vatican
spokesman the Rev Federico
Lombardi said in a state-
ment
Gabriele is often seen by
Pope Benedict XVI's side in
public, riding in the front
seat of his open-air jeep
during Wednesday general
audiences or shielding the
pontiff from the rain. He has
been the pope's personal
butler since 2006, one of the
few members of the small
papal household that in-
cludes the pontiff's private
secretaries and four conse-
crated women who care for
the papal apartment.
His arrest followed an-
other stunning development
at the Vatican this week, the
ouster of the president of
the Vatican bank, Ettore
Gotti Tedeschi, by his board.
Sources close to the investi-
gation said he, too, was
found to have leaked docu-
ments, though the official
reason for his ouster was he
simply failed to do his job.
The "Vatileaks" scandal
has seriously embarrassed
the Vatican at a time during
which it is trying to show the
world financial community
it has turned a page and
shed its reputation as a
scandal-plagued tax haven.
Vatican documents leaked
to the press in recent
months have undermined
that effort, alleging corrup-
tion in Vatican finance as
well as internal bickering
over the Holy See's efforts to
show more transparency in
its financial operations. But
perhaps most critically, the
leaks have seemed aimed at
one main goal: to discredit
Pope Benedict XVI's No. 2,
Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone,
the Vatican secretary of
state.
The scandal took on even
greater weight last week
with the publication of "His
Holiness," a book which re-
produced confidential let-
ters and memos to and from


Benedict and his personal
secretary












EXCURSIIRONSCLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE A-CL


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A15 of
today's Chronicle.


~LLiiii~


AMERICA REMEMBERS





. The .. ...


Associated Press
This undated photo from Mackinac State Historic Park shows cannon-firing demonstrations by costumed interpreters at Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island, Mich., on Lake
Huron, an important site in the War of 1812. The bicentennial of the war is being marked by events around the country. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter
Barque Eagle arrives April 17 in New Orleans as part of The War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Navy.)



Bicentennial sites ready, events planned all across the U.S.


BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor

NEW YORK
Pity the War of 1812.
Its bicentennial is at
hand and events are
planned for all over
North America, from
Canada and the Great
Lakes to the Mid-Atlantic
and the South. But good
luck finding someone
who can explain in 10
words or less what the
war was about.

Some historians see the war as a last
gasp by England to control its former
colonies, and it's sometimes called the
Second War of Independence. At the
time, Americans viewed the war "as an
opportunity for us to throw off Britain
once and for all," said Troy Bickham,
author of a new book, out in June,
called "The Weight of Vengeance: The
United States, the British Empire and
the War of 1812."
But in Canada, the War of 1812 is
seen as an attempted land grab by the
U.S. The U.S. invaded Canada and at
one point controlled Toronto, but the
British, seeking control of the Great
Lakes, won Detroit and other impor-
tant ports.
The War of 1812 was also compli-
cated by what Bickham calls "parallel
wars." The British were fighting the
Napoleonic Wars in Europe at the
time, while the U.S. battled Native
Americans allied with Britain for con-
trol of frontier territories from Michi-
gan to Alabama.
Amid the muddle, a few important
episodes stand out, from decisive bat-
tles to the burning of the White House.
Some events are being commemorated


with programs, exhibits and military
re-enactments, from now through the
bicentennial of the Battle of New Or-
leans, in 2015. Other key moments from
the war involve important artifacts or
historic sites that can be seen any time.
Here are some details:

The flag
The War of 1812 inspired Francis
Scott Key to write "The Star-Spangled
Banner" after soldiers at Fort
McHenry in Baltimore raised an Amer-
ican flag to mark a victory over the
British on Sept. 14, 1814. The fort is
now a National Park site,
www.nps.gov/fomc/index.htm. The orig-
inal manuscript for the song will be
part of a War of 1812 exhibit at the
Maryland Historical Society,
201 W Monument St.,
in Baltimore, open-
ing June 10.
Also in Bal-
timore, a
June 13 to
19 "Star-
Spangled
Sailabra-
tion" will
include
a parade
of 40 tall
ships and
naval ves-
sels, an
airshow
featuring the ,
Blue Angels -
and other festi\ -
ties, wwwstarsp.in-
gled200.com. The flotilld
is one of several organized by
Operation Sail Inc., which has part-
nered with the U.S. Navy to mark the
War of 1812 bicentennial, with addi-
tional tall ship events scheduled for
May 23-30 in New York City, June 1 to
12 in Norfolk, Va., June 30 to July 5 in
Boston and July 6 to 8 in New London,
Conn. The OpSail and Navy commemo-
rations started in New Orleans in
April.


In Washington, D.C., you can see the
flag that inspired the national anthem,
tattered with age and on display in a
darkened room to help preserve it, at
the Smithsonian's National Museum of
American History, http://americanhis-
tory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/. At the
Smithsonian's National Portrait
Gallery, paintings of key figures from
the war will be part of a show called
"1812: A Nation Emerges," opening
June 15.

The White House
When the British burned down the
White House on Aug. 24, 1814, First
Lady Dolley Madison famously refused
to leave until the portrait of George
Washington was saved. The painting,
by Gilbert Stuart, hangs in the
White House today, and
there seem to be no
linering hard feel-
Si ngs against Eng-
land. As
President
Obama joked
during a re-
cent visit by
I / tBritish
Prime Min-
sisterr David
Cameron:
S .. ....... "It's now
-been 200
years since
S the British
c- ame here to
the White House
i lnder somewhat
ditterent circum-
stances. They made quite
an impression. They really lit the
place up! But we moved on."

USS Constitution
Britain had 600 ships while the U.S.
had just 17, including the USS Consti-
tution, also known as Old Ironsides,
which Bickham says was the most im-
portant ship in our fleet. You can visit
the ship in Charlestown, Mass., a


neighborhood of Boston,
wwwhistorynavy.mil/ussconstitution/hi
storyhtml.

Alabama
One of the biggest U.S. victories of
the war took place in Horseshoe Bend,
now a National Park site in Alabama,
about 100 miles southwest of Atlanta,
www.nps.gov/hobe/index.htm. Here,
Andrew Jackson led the slaughter of
the Creek Red Sticks tribe, ending a
longstanding conflict with the natives
and securing 23 million acres of terri-
tory for the U.S.

New Orleans
Jackson also led the final American
victory of the war at the Battle of New
Orleans, which took place on the Chal-
mette Battlefield, now part of the Jean
Lafitte National Historical Park and
Preserve, www.nps.gov/jela/chalmette-
battlefield.htm. Jackson's triumphs in
Alabama and New Orleans made him a
national hero and he was eventually
elected U.S. president.

Great Lakes
Many of the war's important battles
were fought as Britain sought control
of Great Lakes territories and states in-
cluding parts of Michigan, Indiana, Illi-
nois, Ohio, New York and
Pennsylvania.
Fort Dearborn, where Chicago is
now, was destroyed during the war.
Fort Mackinac on Michigan's Mackinac
Island in Lake Huron, which was cap-
tured by the British early in the war, is
still standing and is hosting a variety of
programs for the bicentennial,
www.mackinacparks.com/.
The Americans retook Michigan
after the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813 off
the coast of Ohio, and a re-enactment
is planned on the water next year. The
reconstructed flagship Niagara, which
was commanded by Commodore Oliver
Hazard Perry during the battle, is
See Page A15


Realizing her dream

Kay Daniels of Crystal River had always wanted to visit the Hawaiian Islands.
Her dream finally came true this month, only now when she is "a senior citizen."
Here, she sits on the lawn of a small island house on the "Big Island" of
Hawaii, among orchids planted by the owner. We are never too old to follow our
dreams, says Daniels.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Back up for now


with old flame


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 27, 2012 C:Comcast,Citrus B:Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 I8:30 9:00 19:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
1 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC 'PG' Harry's Law 'PG' America's Got Talent America's Got Talent News Access
Medal of Honor '14' Hero From Last National Memorial Day Concert National Memorial Day Concert As Time As Time
0 WEDUPBS 3 3 14 6 (DVS) Bay Measure (2012) (N)'G' (2012) (In Stereo)'G' Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 KeepUp AsTime... NOVA'PG' Memorial Day Concert Memorial Day Concert MI-5 "Gas and Oil"
WA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Harry's Law (Series America's Got Talent America's Got Talent News Paid
S WF NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) 'PG' Finale) (N)'PG' (In Stereo)'14 c (In Stereo)'PG' c Program
WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Duets 'The Superstars Greatest Hits" The stars Rookie Blue (In Stereo) News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' perform with their partners. 'PG' '14' m Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) Blue Bloods The Good Wife "Get a NYC 22 "Self-Cleaning 10 News, Paid
S[WT])CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) a "Dedication"'14' Room"'14' W Oven"'14' 11pm(N) Program
S 1 NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N Subject to News The Closer Search for
0 WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 Blackout) (In Stereo Live) N a gang.'14'm
D [WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos |Duets' The Superstars Greatest Hits"'PG' Rookie Blue 14' News Brothers
WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
E WCIF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
WFTS AC 11 1 11 ews World America's Funniest Duets 'The Superstars Greatest Hits" The stars Rookie Blue (In Stereo) News Grey's
W ABNews Home Videos'PG' perform with their partners. 'PG' '14 m Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Black Law & Order "Pride and *** "Pretty in Pink" (1986, Romance-
B [Wo IND 12 12 1614' 14' Theory Theory Tie" 14' Joy" PG Comedy) Molly Ringwald, Jon Cryer. PG-13'
S[WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "Space Chimps" (2008) 'G' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Faces
f WACX TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Paid King Journey Creflo D. Connec JimRaey Dayna Paid
W TOGCW 4 4 1 2 King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds "Solitary Withouta Trace NUMB3RS "Trust The Unit "Shadow
S W cw 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men Man"'14c' "Rewind"'PG' Metric" 'PG' Riders"'14'm
S WYET FAM 16 16 16 15 he Comedy The Comedy py Crime Your Citrus County Court Music Mix MusicMix TheCisco Black
MiCWi FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
ED CWOOX FOX 13 7 7 NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. News Law & Order'14'
( WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. |Noticiero Nochede Estrellas IPremiosTV y Novelas (SS) ISalyPimienta'14' Comed. |Noticiero
I PX ION 17 *** "The Pelican Brief"(1993) Julia Roberts. 'PG-13' ** "The Open Road"(2009) 'PG-13' ** "Into the Blue"
Criminal Minds Criminal Minds "Mosley Criminal Minds Criminal Minds"JJ"(In Criminal Minds"Safe Criminal Minds (In
54 48 54 25 27 "Hopeless"'14' Lane"'14' "Memoriam"'14' Stereo)'14' Haven"'14' Stereo)'14'm
S**55 64 55 "Hart's War" (2002, War) Bruce Willis, The Killing "Sayonara, The Killing "72 Hours" Mad Men "The Other ThePitch "JDRF: Muse
55 64 55 Colin Farrell. Premiere.'R Hiawatha'14' (N)'14'm cWoman" (N) '14' &Bozell"(N)
River Monsters: River Monsters: River Monsters (N) (In Mermaids: The Body Found Half-man, half-fish, Mermaids: The Body
52 35 52 19 21 Unhooked'PG' Unhooked'PG' Stereo)'PG' all conjecture. (N) (In Stereo) PG Found 'PG'
S** "Why Did IGet Married?" ** "Why Did I Get Married?" (2007, Comedy-Drama) The Game Let's Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 (2007) Tyler Perry. N Tyler Perry Janet Jackson. 'PG-13' N 14 Together Together Together
FiAVt) 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Don't Be Don't Be Don't Be Don't Be Don't Be Don't Be Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ
Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 South Park South Park
ICC 27 61 27 33 '14' '14' 14 m 14 14' '1144' '144' 144' '14' '14 14' 'MA MA
"So 98 45 98 28 37 n-in- "Bio-Dome" (1996, Comedy) Pauly Shore. ** "In theArmy Now" (1,994) Pauly Shore. A free-spirited "Whiskey Business"
98 45 98 28 37 Law" (In Stereo)'PG-13'B slacker and his pal join the Army Reserve. 'PG' (2012) Pauly Shore.
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Insanity! Sty |Wall St. Dang. Cuba The Facebook J. Crew and Marijuana: Industry
IMNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Shake It Jessie Jessie Austin & Austin & Austin & Austin & Austin & A.N.T Shake It Austin & Good-
iS 46 40 46 6 5 Up!'G' 'G', 'G' Ally G' Ally'G' AllyG' Ally'G' Ally'G' Farm'G' Up!'G' Ally'G' Charlie
(ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves. (Live) SportsCenter (N)
[ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 Baseball Update College Softball Update College Softball Poker
(EWTNJ 95 70 95 48 Ben. Crossing Sunday Night Prime Catholic. |Savoring G.K. Rosary D. Hildebrand |God Bookmark
rM) 29 52 29 20 28 t** "The Princess and the Frog" (2009, *** "Beauty and the Beast" (1991, Fantasy) ** "Race to Witch Mountain" (2009,
S2 52 29 20 28 Comedy) Voices of Anika Noni Rose. G' Voices of Paige O'Hara. G' Adventure) Dwayne Johnson. Premiere. PG
"George "Black and Blue: Legends of the "Scary Movie 2" (2001) Shawn "Celtic Pride"(1996) Damon *** "Baadasssss!"
C 118 170 Wash" Hip-Hop Cop" (2005)'R' Wayans.'R'Wayans. 'PG-13' (2003) 'R
FNC 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday |FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday |Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOO) 26 56 26 Diners Food Network Star 'G' Cupcake Champions Food Network Star (N) 'G' Iron Chef America | My Din
FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding CBR Hobbs. (Taped) |Race World PokerTour UFC Unleashed (N) Barfly (N) Game 365 |World PokerTour
** "Death at a Funeral" (2010, Comedy) Keith **2 "Hancock" (2008, Action) Will Smith, **2 "Hancock" (2008, Action) Will Smith,
0) 30 60 30 51 David, Loretta Devine. 'R' CharlizeTheron.'PG-13' CharlizeTheron.'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) Feherty Top 10 European PGA Tour Golf BMW PGA Championship, Final Round. Central
SBob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Frasier'PG Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
HfiL 39 68 39 45 54 Newhart Newhart Newhart Newhart Newhart Newhart Newhart Newhart
"X-Men: True Blood ** "Hall Pass" 2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Game of Thrones Veep (N) Girls (N) Game of Thrones
302 201 302 2 2 First" Jason Sudeikis. (In Stereo) R' c "Blackwater' MA' 'MA" MA "Blackwater"'MA'
** "The Dilemma" Real Time With Bill *** "Taking Chance" (2009, ***t "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: 24/7
303 202 303 (2011) VinceVaughn. Maher'MA' Drama) Kevin Bacon. 'NR' I Part2"(2011) Daniel Radcliffe. Pacquiao
HGTi 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Holmes on Homes Best of Holmes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
[IST 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' PG' PG' PG 'PG'PGPG' PG' 'PG' PG' PG' *PG' 'PG'
24 38 24 31 "Murder in ** "Murder in the Hamptons" (2005, ** "Sex & Lies in Sin City: The Ted Binion ** "Murder in the
24 38 24 31 Greenwich" (2002) Docudrama) Poppy Montgomery cN Scandal" (2008) Mena Suvari.'NR' Hamptons"(2005)
S *2 "The Quiet" (2005, Suspense) Camilla "Killshot" (2009) Diane Lane. A couple flee a "Carjacked" (2011, Suspense) Maria Bello,
50 119 Belle, Elisha Cuthbert. R' c relentless assassin and his young partner. Stephen Dorff, Catherine Dent. 'R' c
S 1 "Get Carter" (2000, Suspense) Sylvester *** "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" ** "American Wedding" (2003) "Dirty
( i__) 320 221 320 3 3 Stallone. (In Stereo) R R (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. 'R Jason Biggs. 'NR' cN Blondes"
(M SNBC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |To Catch a Predator Predator Raw predator Raw
Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Wicked Tuna "Pirate Wicked Tuna "Pirate
( 109 65 109 44 53 14' 14' '14' 14' Problems" (N) '14' Problems" '14'
C( j 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. Yes, Dear Yes, Dear INick '70s George George Friends |Friends
tDWM) 103 62 103 The Will: Revealed Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Chapter Lady Gaga. '14' Oprah's Next Oprah's Next
(IXYJ 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped PG Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
n**0 "Powder" (1995, Drama) Mary ** "Beastly" (2011) Alex Pettyfer. ** "The Mechanic"(2011) Jason "Botched" (2007)
340 241 340 4 Steenburgen. (In Stereo) PG-13' c (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Statham. (In Stereo) 'R' Stephen Dorff.'NR
SPEED AMA Pro Racing Salt My Classic Hard Parts Hard Parts CarWarriors"Nova" (In CarWarriors NASCAR Victory
SPEE 732 112 732 Center (N) Lake City Car Stereo) N' Thunderbird" a Lane (N)
**** "Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes *** "Star Wars Vl: Return of the Jedi"(1983) Mark Hamill. Luke and his allies "Jurassic
(PIIKliJ 37 43 37 27 36 Back" (1980) Mark Hamill. (In Stereo) 'PG' have a confrontation with Darth Vader. (In Stereo) 'PG Park Ill"
** "Little Black Book" (2004) ** "Priest" (2011) Paul Bettany Magic City "The Harder Magic City (In Stereo) ** "View From the
370 271 370 Brittany Murphy PG-13' (In Stereo)'PG-13' c They Fall' MA 'MA Top" (2003)'PG-13'
Captain's S/ortfishing Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Israeli
SNJ 36 31 36 Tales TVi Shape TV Sport. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals G' Bask.
** "Stealth" (2005) Josh Lucas. Three pilots ***t "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" 1989) Harrison Ford. ** "Elektra"(2005)
SYFY 31 59 31 26 29 combat artificial intelligence. PG-13' Indy's hunt for his missing father leads to the Hoy Grail. 'PG-13'
(JBS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "The Longest Yard" (2005) c ** "Meet the Fockers"(2004) Robert De Niro. ** "Meet the Fockers"
i *** "Merrill's Marauders" (1962, War) Jeff **** "Sergeant York" (1941, War) Gary Cooper, Walter *** "Tora!Tora!Tora!"(1970)
tMJ 169 53 169 30 35 Chandler, Ty Hardin, Peter Brown. NR' Brennan, Joan Leslie. 'NR' c (DVS) Martin Balsam.'G'c
Auction Auction Auction Auction MythBusters "Demolition Derby Special"The MythBusters Gas mile- MythBusters (In Stereo)
(M) 53 34 53 24 26 Kings Kings Kings Kings team tests four automotive fables.'PG' age myth.'PG' 'PG'
TIC 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss |Sister |Sister Gypsy Wedding Sister Sister
i 350 261 350 ***"'The Joy LuckClub" (1993, Drama) "The Back-up Plan" (2010) Jennifer Lopez. ** "TheSwitch"(2010)Jennifer "The
350 261 350 Rosalind Chao. (In Stereo) 'R' c (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Aniston.'PG-13' cc Ledge"
***' "Braveheart"(1995, Historical Drama) ***+ "Inglourious Basterds" (2009, War) Brad Pitt, Melanie Laurent. Soldiers seek "We
48 33 48 31 34 Mel Gibson. 'R' Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. 'R' N Sldiers"
TIOJ 38 58 38 33 ** "Planet51"(2009, Comedy) 'PG' Adven |Adven Venture King/Hill King/Hill |Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Loiter
(TRAV) 9 54 9 44 Extr. Terror Rides Top 5 G' Top 5 G' Hotel Impossible 'G' Bggg Bggg Killer RV Upgrades Extreme Houseboats
QjiiTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Clipaholics Forensic Forensic
(TVL 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond |Raymond Raymond King
** "Bad Boys 11"(2003, Action) Martin Lawrence. Two *2 "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009, Action) Channing ** "Fast & Furious"
tUSA) 47 32 47 17 18 detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. 'R' Tatum, Dennis Quaid. 'PG-13' c (2009)'PG-13'
Bridezillas "Natalie & Bridezillas Martina is Bridezillas "Michelle & Bridezillas "Michelle & Bridezillas"Mia & Bridezillas"Maria &
LJ 117 69 117 Martina"'PG' c demanding. 14 Mia"'14' c Mia" '14' c Maria" 14' Regina"'14' c
(W 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30 Rock IMother Mother |Mother Mother IMother News |Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: Last
month, an old
boyfriend contacted
me. I hadn't seen "Bud" in
30 years. We had a wonder-
ful conversation. I visited
him at his home. He even
sent me a large sum of
money to help pay off a
mortgage bill. We now talk
at least twice a day and al-
ways say "I love you." Bud
speaks of a future together,
but I told him that I want a
commitment be-
fore I will sell my
place and move
to his town 300
miles away
Here's the
problem: Bud has
had a female
companion for 20
years. He told me
that there is no .
longer any physi-
cal intimacy with
"Jane," but they
have a deep AN N
friendship. Bud MAIL
is now going
through some
health issues that may prove
to be quite serious. He
asked Jane to go with him to
an upcoming appointment
for tests. I was disappointed
that he didn't first ask me,
even though I live out of
state. I explained that I want
to be there in good times
and bad. He says he needs
to get through this difficult
time and then he will end
the relationship with Jane.
If Bud's health deterio-
rates, I fear he never will be
able to leave her and I will
lose this loving man. Worse,
he and Jane had arranged a


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Men in Black" (PG-13) 2:35
p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real
3D. 12 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"What To Expect When You're
Expecting" (PG-13) 11:45 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"The Dictator" (R) ID required.
12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Dark Shadows" (PG-13)
11:50 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 5:05 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Marvel's The Avengers"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Men in Black" (PG-13) In real
3D. 12 p.m., 12:30 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 3:05 p.m., 5:10 p.m.,
5:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 8:15 p.m.,


10:20 p.m. 10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Men in Black" (PG-13)
11:30 p.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Chernobyl Diaries" (R) ID
required. 11:45 p.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Battleship" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
3:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
No passes.
"What To Expect When You're
Expecting" (PG-13) 11:50 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"The Dictator" (R) ID required.
12:25 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Dark Shadows" (PG-13)
12:10 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers"
(PG-13) Digital. 3 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Marvel's The Avengers"
(PG-13) In real 3D. 11:40 a.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Treaties
6 Dross
10 Music maker
14 Part of a bird's bill
18 Skilled
20 If not
21 Iridescent gem
22 Sea
24 Lazybones
25 Wander
26 Partly (prefix)
27 "From With Love"
29 Color
30 Police action
32 Certain sandwich, for
short
34 Melon, e.g.
36 Mind
37 Honest -
38 Old pleated collar
39 Characteristic
41 Flavoring plant
43 Papa
44 Kind of bowl
or bunny
45 Fought
47 What's more
49 Fine-tune
52 Silver dollar
53 Redact
55 Energy type
59 Automobile part
60 Expert
62 Expensive
64 City in Minnesota
65 Innocent one
66 Pucker
67 Silo's contents
69 Cup rim
71 Relative of an org.
72 tide
73 Too quick
74 Part of mph
75 Fiery signal
77 Pool-hall stick
78 Noteworthy time
80 Babble
82 English university
84 Candid
85 Pennsylvania port
87 Icy deposit
88 Lane or Keaton
89 Mark Twain's
Tom -
90 Ballerina's partner
92 Scottish garments
93 bono
94 Bit of information


96 Seaman
97 Pale color
99 An article
102 Paddy plant
104 A twitching
105 Distress cry
106 Stomach
107 Pitt or Paisley
108 Leg joint
110 Where Cuzco is
112 Wraparound headgear
114 Fry
115 Fillmore's
predecessor
117 Moist
119 Midday
120 Move uncontrolled
121 Before long
123 Combat vessel
125 Ignoble
126 Joke
129 Set of clothes
131 Pink color
132 Desire
133 Snake
136 Designer
Cassini
138 Incandesce
140 In favor of
141 Liquid measure
142 Department of Labor org.
143 Pastry
145 Yarn
147 Edible portion
149 French Foreign -
151 Flynn the actor
152 Rara -
153 Give off
154 Straying
155 Circular current
156 Dregs
157 Properly
158 Factors in
heredity


DOWN
1 Spaghetti,
ravioli, etc.
2 Off-the-cuff (hyph.)
3 Witch
4 Ballyhoo
5 transit gloria mundi
6 Letter stroke
7 Clump
8 Today
(newspaper)
9 Tissue layer
10 Unfriendly


11 Mimic
12 Sloping way
13 Worked at
14 Flower's petals
15 Old coin
16 Remainder
17 Facilitated
19 Driving force
23 Foch or Simone
28 Append
31 Behind
33 Statute
35 Spot on a card
38 Tricky maneuver
39 Hackneyed
40 Roosevelt or
Pendergrass
42 Stringed
instrument
44 Nobleman
45 Domineering
46 Expire
48 Sal-
49 French cleric
50 Lackluster
51 Poem by
Lewis Carroll
52 Tumbrel
54 Loftier
56 Interpret wrongly
57 Guarantee
58 Hit with a stick
60 Porridge
61 Flightless bird
63 Estuary
66 Hoarder (2 wds.)
68 Legendary king
70 Gifted one
73 Sharpened
74 Magician's cry
75 Neighbor of Ala.
76 Banishment
79 as you go
80 Brooch
81 Rocky hill
83 Obese
84 Cooked cereal
85 Inferred
86 Farm animal
89 Jack in a rhyme
91 Orient
92 Oven for bricks
95 Extremity
97 Early jazz
98 vital
100 Detest
101 Paradise
103 Raines or
Fitzgerald


Rash-producing plant
Cook
Naked
Years and years
Crude
Not damaged
Obi
Approximately
Affirm openly
Fortified place


122 Nothing
124 Marquee
announcement, briefly
125 Hopper
126 Deity
127 Winglike parts
128 Literary category
130 Complete
132 Clever
133 Chinese, e.g.


Was radiant
Trousers
Encircle
Word with shock or short
Bucket
Monster
Turf
Tell a tale
Big bird
Unit of work


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


week's vacation before we
reconnected, and he's still
planning to go.
Bud tries to reassure me,
but I feel frustrated, de-
pressed and helpless. I don't
want to nag him or push him
away Should I give him a
deadline? -PH.
Dear P.: You have been
with Bud for a month. It's
not enough time to know his
true motivations. We'll as-
sume he didn't break things
off with Jane be-
cause he wanted
to be certain you
were interested
first, and now he
is reluctant to
rock the boat be-
cause she will be
a source of sup-
port. As much as
you'd like that
role, you live too
far away to be
helpful. You need
IE'S to step back.
.BOX Send cards to
wish him well,
but understand
that you are not his girl-
friend. Jane is. Let him
know that you might be
amenable to rekindling your
romance if he is ever a free
man but not before.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A14 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


|
L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Sunshine Gardens Crys-
tal River will host a seminar
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
June 5, conducted by Gary
Marriage, CEO of Nature Coast
Financial and Operation: Vet-
eran Aid in Crystal River.
All are welcome. The semi-
nar will cover helping wartime
veterans and their spouses in
getting financial assistance
from the V.A. for at-home and
assisted-living expenses. Call
352-563-0235 to RSVP, as
space is limited.
Light refreshments will be of-
fered. Sunshine Gardens Crys-
tal River is at 311 N.E. Fourth
Ave., Crystal River, behind the
Walgreens on the corner of
State Road 44 and U.S. 19.
Warrior Bridge, a pro-
gram developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. Through the Warrior
Bridge program, ServiceSource
provides employment services
and supports to enhance inde-
pendence and improve quality
of life for wounded veterans as
they reintegrate into civilian life.
For more information, call em-
ployment specialist Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, of email charles.
lawrence@servicesource.org.
Visit the website at www.
servicesource.org.


The local Service Source of-
fice is at 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
Inverness Elks Lodge
No. 2522 invites the public to
join them on Memorial Day,
May 28, for a pig roast
fundraiser to support local vet-
erans in nursing homes in the
community, many of whom
have only Elks members to
count on to visit them and take
them needed items.
The fundraiser will include
games and fun on the lake, as
well as delicious food. Food will
be served from 1:30 to 3 p.m.
Tickets are $13.50.
Donations and in-kind sup-
plies of food or beverages
would be appreciated. Call Jack
Rife, chairman of the event, at
352-302-4793.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorials services. Is-
lands to be visited include
Oahu, Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a


marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a
marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-
422-8092 or scook94@
tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597-6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-
527-4600.


The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.


Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
0 AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
Dinners are Wednesdays
and Fridays from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
The post will have a Memo-
rial Day ceremony at 10 a.m.
Monday, May 28. The public is
welcome. For more information
about the post and its activities,
call Cmdr. Michael Klyap Jr. at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.


Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Friday night (Junel) dinner
will be baked ham from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Cost is $8.
Memorial Day Services will
be conducted at 11 a.m. Mon-
day, May 28, at the Veterans of
Foreign Wars Edward W.
Penno Post 4864. Picnic follows
at 11:30 a.m. Canteen open 10
a.m.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch. Information regard-
ing events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.

See VETERANS/Page A16


WAR
Continued from Page A13

based in Erie, Pa., though it sails
to other ports during the summer;
a schedule can be found at
www.flagshipniagara.org/. North-
west Pennsylvania also just
launched the Perry 200 Commem-
oration with flag-raisings at 150
sites in the region; 30 events are
planned over the next 18 months,


www.perry200.com.
Ohio is home to a 352-foot mon-
ument, Perry's Victory and Inter-
national Peace Memorial, which
towers over Lake Erie on South
Bass Island in Put-in-Bay,
www.nps.gov/pevi/. Events there
include education programs, May
22 to 24, a "Re-Declaration of
War," June 18, and a birthday
party for Perry, Aug. 18 and 19.
Fort Meigs, in nearby Perrysburg,
Ohio, is a War of 1812 battlefield
with a reconstructed fort; it marks


the 199th anniversary of a siege
from the war May 26 and 27.
On Lake Ontario in New York,
important locations connected to
the War of 1812 include Sackets
Harbor, N.Y, where a major U.S.
naval base fended off a British at-
tack in 1813, wwwsacketsharbor-
battlefield.org/, and Old Fort
Niagara, which was a base for the
U.S. invasion of Canada but was
captured by the British in 1813.
A ceremony marking the bicen-
tennial of the declaration of war is


scheduled for Fort Niagara June
16, http://oldfortniagara.org/events.


Lake Champlain
The British also sought to con-
trol Lake Champlain, but they
were thwarted by an unexpected
American victory in Plattsburgh,
N.Y, in September 1814.
The town is scheduling re-en-
actments, lectures and other
events starting later this year,


www.champlainl812.com.
For more information, the web-
site at www.visitl812.com lists
many events and historic sites
connected to the War of 1812.
Canada is also hosting major
commemorations of the bicenten-
nial, including a War of 1812 Her-
itage Trail, wwwdiscover
1812.com, and ongoing living his-
tory programs at Fort Malden, in
Amherstburg, Ontario, 20 miles
from Detroit, www.pc.gc.ca/
lhn-nhs/on/malden/index.aspx.


Shutter & Blind

Manufacturing Company

SHUTTERS VERTICALS FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS
CELLULAR SHADES WOVEN WOODS SUNSCREEN SHADES PRIVACY SHADINGS MORE


Plantation Shutt B 2" FAL


IX BLINDS


1395 Our blinds
q, t 0 are built with
Sq. Ft a STEEL
Measured HEADRAIL.
&________ In Unlike the
LI M Flimsy Plastic
-l WRAT fi1'Headrail
like the
MADE IN AMERICA HomeCenter's
24" W x 36" H $84 Inst EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36" W x 50" H $175 Inst 36" W x 48" H $39 Inst.
48" W x 48" H $224 Inst 52" W x 62" H $68 Inst.
48" W x 60" H $280 Inst 60" W x 62" H $75 Inst
72" W x 62" H $434 Inst 72" W x 72" H $93 Inst.


36" W x 48" H $39 Inst
52" W x 48" H $49 Inst.
60" W x 48" H $69 Inst.
72" W x 72" H $86 Inst.


Exam.le of 6Our SunSceenPices


ISUNSCREENS -


SAVE ENERGY

24" Wx36'H$49Inst


SAVE ENERGY

52" W x 48" H $93 Inst


36"W x 48"H$62Inst 72"W x 6Q'H$131Inst


OCALA DUNNELLON THE VILLAGES CITRUS GAINESVILLE


(352) 610-3018 =

shutterandblindmanufacturing.com


Fo a FRE i-hoeetmtclstdy


Go to www.chronicleonline.com/subscribercontest,
or fill out the form below and mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
-., to enter for your chance to win!


Reservation Suggested

352-795-5797
wwwM rutanlivardiaers mM


E .t .i r. .l-,,,~- i yj U, *W .W l l. ui i l l i E l .l w m
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
S Spectacular
ummer Specials
I~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 4 0,I t"l


IT IHITV YIP TV A YL L -
Casino Tours I Cruises I Vacations
Call for dates & details. 352-597-4822* Toll Free: 1-877-604-4822

4 Days, 3 Nights Cruise the Victory Ship $35 pp
Sunday Departures A Fun Day at Hard Rock-TPA $20 pp
Imperial Place S169 pp/dbl ES P l!2VRIG H
Visit 2 Casinos, $55 Free Play, Immokalee Casino $99 pp/dbl
2Meal Coupons 01
Beau Rivage s179 pp/dblFeb. 9-16, 2013 Taking Reservations Now
Prics"uj ect" to change.


Your
Next
Adventure,
is Waitin For !







Las Vegas FREE Nights, Shows, Room Upgrades, and More inLas Vegas!
Las Vegas Featured Hotel Offers
Becky's Travel Wynn Las Vegas One Night FREE!"
-- ..... 3y night minimumt stay is required
The Mirage Up to 2 Complimentary Show Tickets!*
DAY TRIP 3-night minimumt stay is required
DAY TRI P Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Save 25% on the Hotel + Complimentary
July 26, 2012 Room Upgrade + 2 Club Passes Per Night!*Room upgrade based on
Tampa Aquarium & avalability Passes onlyvalid Friday Sunday
Dolh nEncounter rise Treasuresland- TI OneNight FREE + Over $100 in Added Values"
Dolphinrs 7nco0uner Cruise r r n to Friy nh inu s i r
Senior $71.50o code F4LSUM
Adults $76.50avngapprLaegaght vacat
Child $68.50 3-12 yrs
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 3441165 5 5 78 5
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352) 527-8855
,iv -8855
www ]beckysta ve.l service."g .com[ ill[ l


PLANTATION


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 A15





A16 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Paul
Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran
or their family who requires as-
sistance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd at
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disabil-
ity claim by appointment. Call
352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' ben-
efits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should
the machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
Membership has expanded to
include many more who are eli-
gible to join. For more informa-
tion or to donate items, call
Commander Linda Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
The next meeting will be at 7
p.m. Wednesday, June 6.
Dinner will not be served.


Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
June 5.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The Memorial Day Service
will be conducted at 11 a.m.
Monday, May 28. A picnic will
follow.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will resume in
September.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive in
Inverness. The next meeting is
at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 9.
All are welcome on July 7 at
the sixth annual Independence
Day Golf sponsored by Rolling
Thunder. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or by
email him at ultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year.
Female relatives ages 16 or
older who are a wife, widow,
mother, stepmother, sister,
daughter, stepdaughter, grand-
mother, granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of honorably
discharged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League. Fe-
male Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834
for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call
Ed Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-382-
0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose High-


way, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above
for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honor-
able service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.


Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain at
352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-726-
5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Satur-
day monthly at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
The post will meet Monday,
June 4, at the Olive Tree
Restaurant on U.S. 19 south of
Crystal River. Dinner will be
served at 6 p.m. and the meet-
ing starts at 7 p.m. Dinner con-
sists of prime rib, mixed
vegetables, soup or salad, and
an appetizer.
This meeting is open to all
veterans. To attend, send your
reservation along with a check
of $12 made out to American
Legion Post 166 and mail it to
P.O. Box 767, Homosassa
Springs, FL 34447-0767.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
- "0l0llIW7 .' h' I ---S;--;. ;l-


Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, Septem-
ber and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Sept. 8, Oct.
13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


AD RANK1T ERLISIE HOPAR L OCTEANE
SL O U C H ROAM S EM i RUSS I A
T I N T R I D B L T E PE N
A RI D U F F B R R II E DD I L U D A D
O LE G FOR PIN O S L
D J U S T C I N E I T ATOM I C
BR A K EL AA S T E R ID E A IR D I N A
A B E RS E Y L IlP AS S N
E B B H ASTY P E R L AR R C U E
E P IO IP R A T ETnT rB L OX R D|
FiRAN E i E H E N E
SA W Y E R DA N S E U RsK I L T S
R O DA- UM T AR B E G-E- T H E
R I C E ET IC 0SO UB E L LY B R A D
A N K LE P E R TU U R B N A U T E
A Y LOR DIAIMIP NOON CARE E N
A N WI R H I P T IA oE
E L EG 0 F R P I N T OS H A
A N I S H TA L E M EA T L EG I ON
E RR L AV I S E M I T E RRAN T


5-27


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTER










SPORTS


Jason Dufner
holds slim lead
over Zach Johnson
after Saturday's
third round at the
Colonial./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Auto racing/B2
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B2
0 Recreation briefs/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, tennis/B5
0 NBA/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Red Sox's comeback shocks Rays


Rodney blows save

as Tampa Bay

loses 3-2 to Boston
Associated Press
BOSTON-Jarrod Saltalamac-
chia had a pinch-hit, two-run
homer off Fernando Rodney with
one out in the ninth inning to lift
the Boston Red Sox to a 3-2 win
over the Tampa Bay Rays on
Saturday night
Daniel Nava walked to open
the ninth and Nick Punto sacri-
ficed before Saltalamacchia
lofted a high drive to right-center
for Boston's 11th win in 15 games.
Rodney (2-1) had converted his


More baseball
For the Rays box score,
please see Page B4.
For all of Saturday's other
MLB action, please see
Page B3.

first 15 save chances.
Rich Hill (1-0) worked one in-
ning for the win.
A night after the teams had a
testy benches-clearing scrum in
the ninth inning that turned into
an exchange of words between the
managers that lingered into Satur-
day, the teams played a taught
game highlighted by the pitching
of aces Josh Beckett and David
Price and a throw by B.J. Upton.
Boston's Beckett and Tampa
Bay's Price each pitched seven


impressive innings.
Ben Zobrist hit a sacrifice fly
and Luke Scott then put the Rays
up 2-1 in the seventh with an RBI
single. Tampa Bay had its three-
game winning streak snapped.
Will Middlebrooks drove in
Boston's first run with a sixth-in-
ning single. But before that Upton
made a strong throw home to nail
Dustin Pedroia at the plate.
Price scattered eight hits -
seven singles struck out five and
walked three in a 115-pitch effort.
Despite pregame accusations
by Boston manager Bobby Valen-
tine that the Rays' coaches were
"unprofessional" for their actions
and that they "were agitating, ag-
gravating, and instigating the sit-
uation," this game had no sign of
See Page B4


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price throws in the first inning
Saturday against the Boston Red Sox in Boston.


0I
POl


Bostonpushes

past Philly to

reach Eastfinals
Associated Press
BOSTON Rajon Rondo
had 18 points, 10 assists and 10
rebounds and the
Boston Celticsbeat the
Philadelphia 76ers 85-75 in
Game 7 on Saturday night to
advance to the Eastern Confer-
ence finals.
The Celtics will open the
third round of the NBA play-
offs in Miami against the Heat
on Monday night
Rondo scored nine straight
Boston points, helping
the Celtics turn a three-point
edge into a double-digit lead
after Paul Pierce fouled out
with 4:16 left in the game.
Andre Iguodala scored 18
points, and Elton Brand and-
Jrue Holiday had 15 apiece for
the 76ers, who eliminated the
top-seeded Chicago Bulls in
the first round but couldn't do
the same with the Celtics.
Kevin Garnett had 18 points .
and 13 rebounds, and Ray
Allen hit a pair of fourth-quar-
ter 3-pointers after missing his -..
first five attempts. Pierce had
15 points and nine rebounds
before fouling out.
That's when Rondo took
over
The point guard, rebounding
from his worst performance of
the playoffs in Game 6, scored
on a baseline drive and fol-
lowed it up with a long 2-
pointer (originally scored a 3)
with 2:47 left. Then he made a
3-pointer with a little more
than 2 minutes left to make it a
10-pont game and, after Brand
scored on a tip-in, Rondo went
to the line as the crowd
chanted "M-V-P! M-V-P!" and
hit a pair of free throws to Associated Press
leave Boston with an 80-70 Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce drives against Philadelphia 76ers forward Elton Brand during
the first quarter of Game 7 in the NBA Eastern Conference semifinal playoff series Saturday in
See Page B4 Boston.


Pros

converge

on CR race

Brockett gains

PR at Memorial

Day Triathlon
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Bob
Brockett was practically float-
ing on air Saturday morning
at Fort Island Gulf Beach.
The 57-year-old Lecanto
resident just finished the
Crystal River Memorial Day
Sprint 1 with a personal best
time of 1:09.25.8.
Considering Brockett
helped start the local
triathlon series years ago, this
is a major achievement.
The sun was at his back. If
he had had a theme song play-
ing, it would have been "Oh
What a Beautiful Morning."
His wife, Claudia, and
daughter, Calli, also raced.
Calli is a student at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
"The weather was perfect,"
Bob Brockett said. "It was
great."
The only sad part for him
was that he couldn't use the
time to beat his long-time
friendly competitor, Dunnel-
lon's Robbie Stevens.
"Robbie Stevens is worth-
less and weak," Brockett jok-
ingly said, quoting a line from
the movie "Animal House."
Maybe next time, Stevens
can run with Brockett and
Brockett can get an even bet-
ter time.
The field featured several
professional triathletes.
Mitchell Kibby won the race
with a time of 57:38.3. Kibby
lives in Groveland and trains
in Clermont but is originally
from Australia.
"I absolutely loved the
course," Kibby said. "It's a
good, hard course."
John Hovius, who trains
triathletes in Clermont, was the
masters winner and third over-
all. He had a time of 1:02:11.7.
One pro, Kaitlin Shiver, 22,
of Melbourne, ran the race as
an exhibition. She recently
qualified for the Olympic
See Page B4


Keselowski starts weekend with victory for Penske


Associated Press
Kevin Harvick (33) and Brad Keselowski (22) chase then-leader Kasey
Kahne (38) during the Nationwide Series' History 300 auto race
Saturday in Concord, N.C.


Driver led for last

67 laps during

Nationwide win

Associated Press
CONCORD, N.C. Brad Ke-
selowski won the NASCAR Na-
tionwide Series event at Charlotte
Motor Speedway on Saturday,
leading the final 67 laps to give
Penske Racing a winning start on
auto racing's biggest weekend.
Keselowski raced to his first
Nationwide victory of the year.
He'll try to double up in Sprint
Cup's longest race of the season,


the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday
night. In between comes the Indy
500, a race that owner Roger
Penske's cars have won 15 times.
Penske driver Ryan Briscoe will
start from the pole there Sunday
Penske Racing has "three
shots at winning races this week-
end," Keselowski said. "We're
one for one."
Don't bet against more Penske
wins this weekend. The team's
other drivers in Indianapolis,
Will Power and Helio Castron-
eves, start fifth and sixth. Power
has won three times already this
year, and Castroneves is a three-
time Indy winner
"I'm happy for" Penske, Ke-
selowski said. "One way or an-
other, the checkered flag at


Penske Racing is going to fly this
week.
Keselowski led the way as
Sprint Cup drivers took the top
four spots. Denny Hamlin was
second, followed by Kyle Busch
and Kevin Harvick, last year's
Coca-Cola 600 champion.
Nationwide points leader
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. had drive-
shaft problems and finished 26th.
Danica Patrick started the race
in third, yet slid to 13th. She'll
also race Sunday night after
spending her past seven Memo-
rial Day weekends driving in
Indianapolis.
For a while, it looked as if Ke-
selowski might relive the last-lap,

See Page B4


tippi





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Andretti's heartache


Driver looks to

wipe away bad

Indy memories

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Marco Andretti knows how
much heartache his family
has suffered at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway He needs
no reminders that IndyCar
could use an American su-
perstar, and with his famous
last name, he is quite aware
of the hope that maybe he
can be the one to elevate
this attention-starved series.
None of that matters to
Andretti as he heads into
the Indianapolis 500.
He believes he can win
Sunday's race "it's going
to be our race to lose," he
said and he wants it,
badly But Andretti wants it
for himself, for his own ca-
reer, and not because of
what it would mean to his
family or for IndyCar. Mario
Andretti won in 1969, and
no Andretti has done it
again in 65 starts, and many
of those races were devas-
tating near-misses.
"That's not my approach
to the event. My approach is
I want to win our Super
Bowl," Andretti said. "I put
that pressure on myself. I
don't want to do it because
he did it and my dad didn't,


Associated Press
IndyCar driver Marco Andretti, left, talks with a member of his crew as his grandfather and
1969 Indy 500 champion Mario Andretti, center, looks on following the final day of
practice Friday for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
The 96th running of the race is Sunday.


that's all bonus. Do I think
we can? You're darn right."
The 96th running of the
"Greatest Spectacle in Rac-
ing" is the most wide-open
race in a very long time. En-
gine competition for the
first time in six years and
the introduction of a new
car has widened the pool of
potential winners, and
there's no clear favorite.
"I think we're going to see
the best race we've had in
at least a decade," said
Roger Penske, winner of 15
Indy 500s and the team


owner of pole-sitter Ryan
Briscoe.
Penske is undefeated this
season, as Helio Castroneves
and points leader Will
Power have combined to win
the first four races. And with
Chevrolet power, Penske
drivers have swept all five
poles so far this season.
So it seemed to be busi-
ness as usual on pole day,
when Chevrolet clearly had
the edge. The team put nine
drivers inside the top 10,
and all six of the full-time
entries were from Penske


and Andretti Autosport.
Then came Carb Day, and
the Hondas came to life.
Chip Ganassi teammates
Dario Franchitti and Scott
Dixon led the leaderboard,
with Andretti landing third
on the final speed chart as
the fastest Chevy driver.
"Maybe some sandbag-
ging?" Franchitti wondered
as Andretti slid into the seat
next to him following their
final on-track session be-
fore the race. "Do you really
think we're all going to
show what we can do?"


Dale Jr. hopes for better result


Racer wants strong

finish at Sunday's

Coca-Cola 600

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. At first Dale
Earnhardt Jr. was relieved he didn't
fall further back than seventh at last
year's Coca-Cola 600. Then he real-
ized what he had lost for just about a
gallon of gas.
"After a while, you start thinking
about, 'Oh, yeah, we really came close
to winning a race,"' Earnhardt said
this week. "It was really unfortunate
there wasn't just a little bit more gas
in the car."
If there were, Earnhardt wouldn't
have faced an additional year's worth
of questions about why he hasn't won
a Sprint Cup race since 2008 at Michi-
gan. The drought has grown to 140
races and is a focal point at every
track or appearance by Earnhardt
"I've said it all year long," he says,
"that I think we're a little bit better
than we were last year."
It looked like Earnhardt was the
best at Charlotte Motor Speedway a
year ago when he broke free on a late
restart to take the lead. He got the
white flag just fine, then ran out of gas
on the front straightaway and coasted
through he final turn before Kevin
Harvick passed him for the win.


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. watches from the garage during Thursday's practice for
Sunday's Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.


Harvick said afterwards he "felt so
stinking bad" for Earnhardt because
he knew how much the Hendrick Mo-
torsports driver wanted to win. The
fans roared when Earnhardt, voted
the sport's most popular driver the
past nine years, moved in front and
were equally stunned when his tank
ran dry
Earnhardt was grateful to hang on
to seventh as he thought about his po-
sition in the year-end championship
chase. Then the disappointment of
what happened swept over him.
"I was really unfortunate there
wasn't just a little bit more gas in the


car or whatever to get us to victory
lane because that would've been a
great way to cap off a pretty good
weekend," Earnhardt said. "So it was
a bit frustrating over time."
Martin Truex Jr, who hasn't won
since 2007, finished 26th in last year's
race and understood what his fellow
driver was going through. It takes so
much, Truex said, to get into position
that to have it snatched away so close
to the finish line is maddening. "Com-
ing off turn four and running out of
gas is about the absolute worst way to
lose a race," Truex said. "I definitely
felt for him there."


An athlete's salute


on Memorial Day


he commitment to the
military in defense of
the United States has
always been a long-standing
and cherished part of the
American athlete. Many
have joined the armed
forces at the pinnacle of
their professional careers.
John Napier, winner of
gold and silver medals in
the 2009 Bobsled
World Cup, who
has been bob-
sledding since
he was eight and
also competed at
the 2010 Winter f-.
Olympics, de-
cided after serv-
ing a tour of duty
in Afghanistan to Dr. Ron
retire from sport DOCT
and represent ORD
the country in
another way as
part of a special forces unit.
"I love it. I just love the
military and the brother-
hood and the camaraderie
soldiers have for each
other," Napier said. "The
world of athletics kind of
gets a little selfish at times
.... Although it was prideful,
it's also very, very humbling
to know that I was there
amongst the world's best."
Napier was a sergeant in
the Vermont National
Guard and was deeply af-
fected after volunteering for
a five-month tour in
Afghanistan following the
2010 Vancouver Winter
Olympics. He will be joining
a special operations unit.
He notes, "I never got the
taste of selflessness that I
did in Afghanistan. There is
not a morning that I don't
wake up and miss it"
Among the most memo-
rable was Pat Tillman, an
Army Ranger who was killed
in Afghanistan on April 22,
2004. Tillman had played
safety for four seasons with
the Arizona Cardinals, mak-
ing Sports Illustated's first-
team all-pro team in 2000.
After the 2001 season, he de-
cided to enlist in the Army
following the September 11,
2001 attacks on the United
States.
Cleveland Indiana
pitcher Bob Feller was the
first major leaguer to volun-
teer for active duty on De-
cember 9, 1941, two days
after Pearl Harbor. Boxer
Joe Louis enlisted in 1942
and Yogi Berra was a Navy
gunner's mate.
The Pittsburgh Steelers'
Rocky Bleier at the end of
his 1968 rookie season, vol-
unteered for service in Viet-
nam. After being hit by
shrapnel from a grenade in
his right leg, Bleier returned
to the Steelers in 1971 and
was an integral part of the
Steelers' four Super Bowl
championship teams.
Hank Greenberg was
drafted in 1940, classified as
4F being listed as physically
unfit for duty because of flat


feet Not taking no for an an-
swer, he volunteered for the
Air Force, where he served
in China, Burma and India.
He served in the prime of his
career Greenberg, a first
baseman, finished his Hall of
Fame career with 331 home
runs in just 5,193 at bats.
Warren Spahn, the Braves
pitcher, was awarded the
Purple Heart
and a Bronze
Star for his duty
as a combat en-
gineeer in World
War II. Roger
Staubach, the
1963 Heisman
Trophy winner
and quarterback
Joseph of the U.S. Naval
OR'S Academy team,
volunteered to
go to Vietnam
after graduation.
Ted Williams, considered
by many to be baseball's
greatest hitter ever, served a
total of nearly five years in
World War II and the Korean
War during the prime of his
major league career
Bob Kalsu had been an
All-America tackle at the
University of Oklahoma and
an eighth-round draft pick
by Buffalo in 1968. He
started eight games at guard
in 1968 and was the Bills'
top rookie. Kalsu was killed
in action in Vietnam.
Currently the same can-
not be said of at least the
major professional sports
leagues, the NBA, NFL,
PGA or MSL to name a few.
Some recent graduates of
military academies, Caleb
Campbell of the Lions and
Eric Kettni of New England,
noted their need to play ball
was greater than their obli-
gation to the contract with
their respective military
services. Both eventually
did serve and are the only
two NFL players as of Octo-
ber 2011 to be in or have
served in the military
The list is even shorter for
the NBA. David Robinson, a
star at the Naval Academy,
spent a couple years in the
service as a civil engineer-
ing officer at the Naval Sub-
marine Base in Georgia
before moving on to the
NBA. Connie Norman
played for Arizona and sev-
eral NBA teams before join-
ing the Army
Tomorrow, Memorial Day,
we honor those Americans
who have served and de-
fended us, the American peo-
ple. Thanks to three of my
boys who have and are serv-
ing and especially to our one
guy currently in Afghanistan.
He notes it is easier to run a
sub-four minute mile than be
a Seal. Arf. Arfi
Thank You!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist at SeaSpine Or-
thopedic Institute can be
reached at rbjhand@cox.net
or 352-212-5359.


Recreation BRIEFS


Go to the game
with squadron
The Crystal River Sail and Power
Squadron, affiliated with the United
States Sail and Power Squadron, will
host a day trip Thursday, July 19, to
Tropicana Field to support the Tampa
Bay Rays in a game against the
Cleveland Indians.
The $45 price includes bus and
ticket for Press Level seating. For
more information, call Norm Overfield
at 352-586-8620. The United States
Sail and Power Squadrons and their
local affiliates promote safer boating
through education.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA now offers
its Group Exercise program at First
United Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, the Y's westside venue for
health and wellness classes.
Currently, there are Pilates, cardio
interval, and stability and strength
classes offered.
For more information about the
YMCA Group Exercise program, call
the office at 352-637-0132. Financial
assistance is available to all those who
qualify. The YMCA office is in Beverly
Hills at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway, and
is open noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Whispering Pines Park
offers tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers tennis
lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-
registration and pre-payment are re-
quired at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for four
hours, or $30 per hour. Times are
arranged with the instructor.


Call 352-726-3913 for registration
and information. Whispering Pines
also offers racquetball lessons. Call
for information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers a low-impact stretching class.
This ongoing class will be from 10 to
11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy, fun
with good benefits. Stretching helps to
make you more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and bal-
ance. This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative condi-
tions, such as osteoarthritis. Stretching
increases physical and mental relax-
ation and reduces the risk of joint
sprain, muscle strain or back prob-
lems. Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints. Re-
search suggests that moderate-inten-
sity, low-impact activity is just as
effective as high-impact activity in low-
ering the risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com and click
on instructional classes, or call
352-465-7007.
Jazzercise at West Citrus
community center
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers Jazzercise at West Citrus Com-
munity Center. The 60-minute class in-
cludes a warm-up, high-energy
aerobic routines, muscle toning and
cool-down stretch segment.
One-hour classes are offered at 5:30
p.m. Monday, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. Unlimited monthly ticket is $25.


Call 352-465-7007 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers Zumba classes with instructor
Lynn DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fitness pro-
gram designed with exciting Latin and
international dance rhythms. No mem-
bership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or call
352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired dance-fit-
ness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursday afternoons at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's Club is
offering Zumba classes in air-condi-
tioned comfort from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-447-2057.
Yoga at canning center
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers yoga with Laura Boetto from 10
to 11 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays at
the Canning Center in Lecanto. Yoga
improves flexibility and balance, in-
creases energy, strengthens and
tones muscles and reduces stress.
Cost is $6 per class; $20 monthly.
No pre-registration required.


For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or call
352-465-7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays
at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays
and at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Floral
Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet peo-
ple in the community, and get some
light exercise. We welcome all new-
comers. Yearly dues are $3 per per-
son, and there is no need to purchase
any equipment.
Call the vice president of the Floral
City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause,
at 352-726-0670.
Registration for
'Learn to Fish' class open
Registration is open for the "Learn To
Fish" class for boys and girls ages 10
through 18 taking place at the Crystal
River Preserve State Park meeting room
on Monday, June 4 and Tuesday, June
5, from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. both days.
The cost is $20 per student, and
kids age 10 and 11 must be accompa-
nied by an older sibling or adult (no
charge for the adult). This is a basic
fishing class, intended to impart the
knowledge to get a beginner starting
in the sport of fishing, taught by the
author of an award-winning book on
fishing Florida's inshore waters.
For more information, call
352-794-0414 or email
rgschmidt@embarqmail.com.
Panthers holding alumni
flag football game
Lecanto High School is hosting the
Lecanto Alumni Flag Football game at
7:30 p.m. Friday, June 8.


The game will be 8-on-8 and is
open to any Lecanto football varsity
letterman who graduated from the
high school. Teams will be odd gradu-
ation years vs. even graduation years.
Players wishing to participate will be
charged a $50 fee, which will include a
jersey to play in and keep. For fans,
admission is $2.
Call Lecanto head football coach
McKinley Rolle at 352-746-2344, ext.
4244 for more information.
Nature Coast Soccer now
accepting registration
The Nature Coast Soccer Club, an
official Florida Youth Soccer Associa-
tion Region "C" League will have com-
petitive travel league registration and
tryouts for both Boys teams (Under 10
through Under 18) and Girls Teams
(Under 10 through Under 18) on the
following dates:
Tuesday, May 29: 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(boys and girls teams in all age groups
except U-16 boys).
Wednesday, May 30: 5:30-7:30
p.m. (girls teams only, all age groups).
Thursday, May 31: 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(boys and girls teams, all age groups).
Friday, June 1: 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(boys teams only, all age groups).
Saturday, June 2: 10 a.m. to 12
p.m. (U-16 boys); 12-2 p.m. (U-12 &
U-14 boys).
Tryouts will be held at the NCSC
Fields at the Central Ridge District
Park. All prospective players must
wear proper soccer attire, including
shin guards and will need to bring their
own supply of water.
For more information, please call
Mike Penn at 352-489-0160, Mike
Deem at 352-302-0793 or go to
www.naturecoastsoccer.com.


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SPORTS


1
rl
MI






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Yankees 9, Athletics 2
New York Oakland
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Jeter ss
Grndrs cf
AIRdrg dh
Cano 2b
Teixeir lb
Ibanez If
Wise If
Swisher rf
ErChvz 3b
CStwrt c
Totals
New York
Oakland


4 1 2 2 JWeeks2b
4 0 0 0 Crispcf
3 0 0 1 Reddck rf
5 3 3 1 JGomsdh
5 2 4 5 Dnldsn 3b
5 00 0 KSuzuk c
0 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss
5 1 2 0 Rosales lb
4 1 2 0 Cowgill If
3 1 1 0
38 9149 Totals
011 130 012
101 000 000


332 7 2
9
2


E-Pennington (5). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-
New York 7, Oakland 8. 2B-Cano (17),
Swisher (13), Er.Chavez (4). HR-Cano (7),
Teixeira 2 (8), Reddick (13). CS-Granderson
(3). S-C.Stewart, Crisp. SF-AI.Rodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
SabathiaW,6-2 7 7 2 2 2 4
Wade 1 0 0 0 0 2
Eppley 1 0 0 0 1 0
Oakland
Colon L,4-5 6 9 6 6 0 3
Norberto 1 0 0 0 2 0
Godfrey 2 5 3 2 0 1
HBP-by Godfrey (Jeter). PB-C.Stewart.

White Sox 14, Indians 7
Cleveland Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo rf 3 2 1 0 De Aza cf 5 0 0 1
Brantlycf 4 1 1 3 Bckhm2b 5 1 1 0
Kipnis 2b 4 22 4 A.Dunn dh 5 2 2 0
JoLopzdh 4 00 0 Konerklb 4 3 4 2
Ktchmlb 4 0 1 0 Lillirdgpr-lb 0 1 0 0
Damon If 4 0 0 0 Rios rf 5 3 3 3
Hannhn 3b 4 0 0 0 Przyns c 5 2 2 1
J.Diazss 3 1 0 0 Viciedo If 5 2 3 5
Marson c 3 1 1 0 AIRmrz ss 4 0 2 0
OHudsn3b 4 0 0 0
Totals 33 76 7 Totals 42141712
Cleveland 005 020 000 7
Chicago 404 000 42x 14
E-Kotchman (2), J.Diaz (1). LOB-Cleveland
1, Chicago 5. 2B-Brantley (15), A.Dunn (10),
Konerko 3 (13), Rios (8), Pierzynski (7). HR-
Kipnis 2 (8), Rios (4), Viciedo (10). SB-
AI.Ramirez (4), O.Hudson (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
D.LoweL,6-3 21-310 8 8 0 3
Accardo 22-3 1 0 0 0 3
Hagadone 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.Smith 1 4 4 3 1 1
Sipp 1 2 2 2 0 1
Chicago
PeavyW,6-1 61-3 6 7 7 1 9
ThorntonH,7 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Crain 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ohman 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Peavy (Choo).


Tigers 6, Twins 3


Detroit Minnesota
ab r h bi
Berrycf 5 1 1 1 Spancf
Dirks If 4 2 2 2 Revere rf
MiCarr3b 4 1 2 2 Mauer dh
Fielder lb 4 0 4 1 Wlngh If
DYongdh 4 00 0 Mornealb
Boesch rf 3 0 0 0 Dozier ss
Kelly rf 0 0 0 0 ACasill 2b
JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 Butera c
Avila c 4 1 1 0 JCarrll 3b
RSantg2b 4 1 1 0
Totals 36 6126 Totals
Detroit 200 040 000
Minnesota 110 001 000
E-Dozier (4). DP-Detroit 1, M
LOB-Detroit 4, Minnesota 4. 2B-
Mi.Cabrera (9), Span (13). HR-
Morneau (9).
IP H R E
Detroit
ScherzerW,4-3 51-3 6 3
DotelH,6 12-3 0 0
BenoitH,11 1 2 0
Valverde S,8-10 1 0 0
Minnesota
Pavano L,2-4 41-310 6
Duensing 22-3 1 0
Burton 1 1 0
Perkins 1 0 0


ab r h bi
4221


4 00 0


34 000
3 0 0 0
3 0 1 0

343 8 2
6
3
innesota 4.
-Dirks 2 (9),
-Span (1),

R BB SO


Royals 4, Orioles 3
Kansas City Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Dyson cf 1 0 0 0 Avery If 5 0 0 0
Maierph-cf 4 0 1 0 Hardy ss 5 1 3 1
AEscorss 5 00 0 Markksrf 4 0 0 0
Butler dh 5 1 2 1 AdJonscf 4 1 1 0
Mostks3b 5 1 1 0 Wietersc 2 0 0 1
Francrrf 4 02 0 C.Davislb 4 1 2 1
AGordn If 3 00 0 Betemt 3b 2 0 1 0
Giavtll 2b 3 1 2 0 NJhnsn dh 4 0 0 0
Hosmerlb 4 1 3 2 Andino2b 3 0 1 0
Quinterc 4 01 1
Totals 38 4124 Totals 33 3 8 3
Kansas City 000 011 110 4
Baltimore 012 000 000 3
DP-Kansas City 1, Baltimore 1. LOB-Kansas
City 9, Baltimore 9. 2B-Francoeur (12), Gi-
avotella (2), Hosmer (7), Quintero (10). 3B-
Ad.Jones (2). HR-Butler (10), Hardy (10),
C.Davis (8). SB-Ad.Jones (8). SF-Wieters.
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
FPaulino
Collins
G.Holland W,1-2
Mijares H,5
Broxton S,9-11
Baltimore
W.Chen
O'Day BS,1-1
Strop L,3-2
Ayala


52-3 5
2-3 1
1 0
2-3 1
1 1


Rangers 8, Blue Jays 7,
13 innings


Toronto


Texas
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


YEscor ss 7 0 2 0 Kinsler 2b 5 2 2 0
Rasms cf 6 1 1 2 Andrus ss 4 2 1 1
Bautistrf 6 1 2 0 Hamltncf-lf 6 1 2 3
Encrncdh 6 01 0 Beltre3b 5 0 2 1
Arencii c 6 0 1 1 MYong dh 6 0 1 0
Thams If 5 1 1 0 DvMrp If 2 0 1 0
RDavis If 1 0 0 0 Gentry ph-cf 2 0 0 0
Lawrie 3b 6 22 0 N.Cruzrf 6 1 1 1
Cooperlb 5 1 2 1 Torrealc 5 1 1 1
YGomslb 1 00 0 Morlndlb 4 1 3 1
Vizquel2b 6 1 3 2 Napoliph-lb 2 0 0 0
Totals 55 7156 Totals 47814 8
Toronto 000 022 100 000 2 7
Texas 200 003 000 000 3 8
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Lawrie (7), Thames (1), N.Cruz (1). DP-
Toronto 2, Texas 1. LOB-Toronto 10, Texas
13.2B-Bautista (5), Thames (7), Kinsler
(14), Andrus (10). HR-Rasmus (4), Hamilton
(20), N.Cruz (6), Torrealba (2), Moreland (8).
SB-Rasmus (3), Gentry (6). S-Andrus 2.
SF-Beltre.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
H.Alvarez 52-3 9 5 4 1 1
L.Perez 11-3 1 0 0 1 1
Cordero 1 0 0 0 0 1
Janssen 12-3 0 0 0 1 1
Oliver 21-3 2 0 0 1 1
Igarashi 0 1 2 2 1 0
FrasorL,0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0
Texas
Lewis 51-3 10 4 4 0 6
Ogando 12-3 2 1 1 0 0
Mi.Adams 1 0 0 0 0 1
Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1
Uehara 2 0 0 0 0 1
R.Ross 12-3 3 2 0 1 2
TateyamaW,1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Igarashi pitched to 2 batters in the 13th.
Frasor pitched to 1 batter in the 13th.
HBP-iby Janssen (Kinsler, Gentry). WP-
Oliver. PB-Arencibia, Torrealba.


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 29
Tampa Bay 28
New York 25
Toronto 24
Boston 23



W
Washington 28
Miami 26
New York 26
Atlanta 26
Philadelphia25


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
18 .617 - 6-4
19 .596 1 5-5
21 .543 3Y2 5-5
23 .511 5 1Y2 5-5
23 .500 5Y2 2 6-4


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
18 .609 - 6-4
21 .553 2Y2 6-4
21 .553 2Y2 6-4
22 .542 3 Y2 3-7
23 .521 4 1Y2 6-4


Home Away
14-12 15-6 Cleveland
17-7 11-12 Chicago
14-11 11-10 Detroit
12-10 12-13 Kan.City
10-12 13-11 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
20 .565-- 6-4
22 .532 1Y2 Y2 8-2
24 .478 4 3 4-6
27 .400 7Y2 6Y2 3-7
31 .326 11 10 5-5


Home Away
14-12 12-8
11-13 14-9
11-12 11-12
5-17 13-10
6-16 9-15


Texas
L. Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-2 15-8 13-10
W-2 13-9 13-12
W-2 14-9 12-12
L-6 10-9 16-13
W-4 11-13 14-10


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Houston
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
20 .565 - 7-3
22 .532 1Y2 1 3-7
23 .489 3Y2 3 7-3
24 .478 4 3Y2 5-5
26 .422 6Y2 6 4-6
31 .326 11 101/2 0-10


Str Home Away
W-1 14-9 12-11
L-3 12-11 13-11
W-4 16-10 6-13
W-2 13-10 9-14
W-2 11-13 8-13
L-11 9-15 6-16


L. Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
18.617-- 6-4
25 .479 6Y2 3 6-4
25 .468 7 3Y2 3-7
28 .429 9 5Y2 5-5



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
15 .667 - 6-4
23 .511 7 2 6-4
26 .435 10Y25Y2 5-5
28 .378 13 8 3-7
31 .354 14Y29Y2 3-7


Home Away
13-9 16-9
11-10 12-15
10-14 12-11
9-12 12-16


Home Away
19-5 11-10
12-10 12-13
8-15 12-11
9-14 8-14
12-16 5-15


Associated Press
New York Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira, right, celebrates with Eric Chavez after hitting a solo home run
Saturday during the fourth inning in Oakland. The Yankees won 9-2 for their fourth straight victory.




Yankees win fourth in a row


Braves lose sixth


consecutive contest,


this one to Nationals

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. -Mark Teixeira
hit a two-run homer and a solo shot
among his career high-tying four hits
to back CC Sabathia's sixth win of the
year, and the New York Yankees beat
the Oakland Athletics 9-2 on Satur-
day for their fourth straight win.
Teixeira and Robinson Cano each
homered for a second straight day as
the Yankees added three more long-
balls to give them nine homers in the
last three games.
Teixeira hit a solo home run in the
fourth, added a two-run single in the
fifth when New York broke it open and
had a two-run homer in the ninth, al-
most single handily sending Oakland to
its season-worst fourth straight defeat
AMERICAN LEAGUE

White Sox 14, Indians 7
CHICAGO Paul Konerko had four
hits, Dayan Viciedo homered in his third
straight game, and the Chicago White
Sox pounded Derek Lowe and the short-
handed Cleveland Indians 14-7 for their
eighth win in nine games.
Chicago scored four in the first and
four more while chasing Lowe in the third
after Cleveland scored five in the top half.
Viciedo's two-run homer made it 8-5, and
the White Sox pulled away late after
Cleveland got within one, tying a season
high with their fourth straight win.

Rangers 8, Blue Jays 7,
13 innings
ARLINGTON, Texas Josh Hamilton
hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the
13th inning, lifting the Texas Rangers to
an 8-7 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays.
Toronto had taken a 7-5 lead in the top
half, but Elvis Andrus doubled in a run off
Ryota Igarashi to start the comeback.
Hamilton's third game-ending homer
came off Jason Frasor (0-1) and was his
20th home run of the year.
lan Kinsler walked to start the inning -
the fifth-straight inning that the Rangers
got their leadoff batter on base and
Andrus doubled. Frasor relieved and
gave up the home run.

Tigers 6, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS Max Scherzer
struck out nine in a rain-shortened outing
and Prince Fielder had his first four-hit
game with the Tigers, leading Detroit to a
6-3 victory over the Minnesota Twins.
Scherzer (4-3) gave up three runs and
six hits in 5 1-3 innings before leaving
due to a rain delay and Andy Dirks had
two doubles and two RBIs for the Tigers.
Miguel Cabrera added two hits and two
RBIs and Jose Valverde picked up his
eighth save in 10 chances.
Carl Pavano (2-4) allowed six runs on
10 hits in 4 1-3 innings for the Twins, who
have lost four straight.

Royals 4, Orioles 3
BALTIMORE Eric Hosmer singled
in the tiebreaking run in the eighth in-
ning, Billy Butler homered and the
Kansas City Royals rallied to beat the
Baltimore Orioles 4-3.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Detroit 6, Minnesota 3
Texas 8, Toronto 7, 13 innings
Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 14, Cleveland 7
L.A. Angels 5, Seattle 3
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2
Sunday's Games
Kansas City (Hochevar3-5) at Baltimore (Matusz 4-4), 1:35p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 4-1) at Boston (Buchholz 4-2), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 5-3) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 3-5),
2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 3-4) at Minnesota (Walters 2-1), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Drabek 4-4) at Texas (Darvish 6-2), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 3-6) at Oakland (Milone 6-3), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 5-4) at Seattle (Noesi 2-5), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 9, San Diego 0
Washington 8, Atlanta 4
Miami 5, San Francisco 3
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Cincinnati 10, Colorado 3
Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 0
Houston at L.A. Dodgers, late.
Milwaukee at Arizona, late
Sunday's Games
Colorado (Moyer 2-4) at Cincinnati (Latos 3-2), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y Mets (Dickey 6-1), 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 4-2) at Miami (Nolasco 5-2), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-2) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 2-5), 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 4-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright 3-5),
2:15 p.m.
Houston (Happ 4-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 6-1), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 2-4) at Arizona (D.Hudson 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 6-1) atAtlanta (Beachy 5-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Houston at Colorado, 3:10 p.m., 1st game
Arizona at San Francisco, 5:05 p.m.
Houston at Colorado, 8:10 p.m., 2nd game
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.


Hosmer went 3 for 4 with two RBIs to
help the Royals make up a three-run
deficit. Butler's 10th homer cut it to 3-2 in
the sixth, Hosmer scored the tying run in
the seventh and then put Kansas City
ahead for the first time in the eighth.
Chris Davis and J.J. Hardy hit solo
home runs for the Orioles, and Adam
Jones extended his career-best hitting
streak to 17 with a third-inning triple.
Angels 5, Mariners 3
SEATTLE Albert Pujols hit a home
run in his third straight game and pinch
hitter Alberto Callaspo came through with
a grand slam in the sixth inning to give
the Los Angeles Angels a 5-3 win over
the Seattle Mariners.
Callaspo's slam came against Mariners
starter Felix Hernandez (4-4) and was the
first pinch grand slam for the Angels since
Shane Halter hit one against Tampa Bay
in 2004.
Pujols, who now has seven homers
after not hitting any in April, hit a 2-1 fast-
ball from Hernandez over the left-center
wall in the fourth inning. Pujols has home-
red in six of his last 11 games.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Marlins 5, Giants 3
MIAMI Mark Buehrle pitched into
the eighth inning and the Miami Marlins
moved within a victory of tying the team
record for the most in a month with a 5-3


win over the San Francisco Giants.
Giancarlo Stanton hit two doubles and
scored twice while Logan Morrison drove
in two runs for the Marlins. Miami is a
major league best 18-7 in May. The Mar-
lins went 19-10 in August 1997.
Buehrle (5-4) allowed two runs and
eight hits while throwing 69 of 100
pitches for strikes.

Nationals 8, Braves 4
ATLANTA- Bryce Harper homered
and Danny Espinosa added a three-run
shot to help Washington strengthen its
hold on first place in the NL East by beat-
ing the reeling Atlanta Braves 8-4.
Stephen Strasburg (5-1) was not sharp
but still won. He set a season high with
four walks while giving up four runs and
six hits in five innings. He had six
strikeouts.
Before the game, the Braves placed
Chipper Jones on the 15-day disabled
list Saturday with a bruised left leg.
Dan Uggla's two-run, tying homer in
the fifth was the big hit for the short-
handed Braves.

Mets 9, Padres 0
NEW YORK Johan Santana
pitched a four-hitter for his first shutout
since 2010 and the New York Mets
backed him with three home runs in a 9-
0 win over the San Diego Padres 9-0.
Mike Nickeas hit New York's first grand
slam of the season, and Scott Hairston
and Vinny Rottino also homered for the
Mets, who got it done without David
Wright once again.
The Mets won for the fifth time in seven
games and have homered in three
straight games and their last four at Citi
Field.

Phillies 4, Cardinals 0
ST. LOUIS Kyle Kendrick threw a
seven-hitter for his first career shutout,
winning his first game of the season and
putting the Philadelphia Phillies on the
verge of their first four-game sweep in St.
Louis in 26 years with a 4-0 victory.
Shane Victorino's RBI double in the
fourth was the only support Kendrick (1-
4) needed and John Mayberry added a
two-run double in a three-run sixth.
Hunter Pence and Brian Schneider
added two hits apiece for the Phillies,
who have won four in a row.
Kendrick entered with a 5.23 ERA and
the Phillies were 1-9 in the games he
pitched, five of them starts. But he's 5-1
against the Cardinals in eight games, all
but two of them starts.
Jaime Garcia (3-3) allowed four runs
on six hits in six innings for the Cardinals.

Pirates 3, Cubs 2
PITTSBURGH Matt Hague was hit
by a pitch from Rafael Dolis with the
bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth
inning, and the Pittsburgh Pirates sent
the Chicago Cubs to their 11th straight
loss with a 3-2 victory.
Hague took a 96 mph fastball from
Dolis (2-4) in the back near the shoulder
blade, scoring Jose Tabata and eliciting
an incredulous look to the sky by the
Cubs reliever.
Dolis had hit Josh Harrison earlier in
the inning after Tabata had singled to
lead off the ninth. Dolis also walked Neil
Walker with two outs.
Alfonso Soriano homered and Starlin
Castro had an RBI triple for the Cubs,
who have scored eight runs in their past
six games.


NL

Mets 9, Padres 0
San Diego New York
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Maybin cf 2 0 0 0 ATorrs cf 3 1 1 0
Tekotte ph-cf2 0 1 0 Turner2b-ss 4 1 2 0
Denorfi rf 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 3 1 0 0
Alonsolb 4 0 1 0 Hairstn If 3 1 2 3
Guzmnlf 3 0 1 0 I.Davisph-lb 1 1 1 1
Headly 3b 3 0 1 0 Duda rf 4 00 0
Hundlyc 3 0 0 0 DnMrp2b 0 0 0 0
ECarerss 3 0 0 0 Rottinolb-lf 3 2 2 1
Amarst 2b 3 0 0 0 Cedeno ss 2 00 0
Richrdp 2 0 0 0 Niwnhspr-rf 0 1 0 0
Palmer p 0 0 0 0 Nickesc 4 1 1 4
Parrino ph 1 0 0 0 JSantn p 3 0 0 0
Thayerp 0 0 00
Totals 30 04 0 Totals 30 9 9 9
San Diego 000 000 000 0
NewYork 400 000 05x 9
DP-San Diego 1, New York 1. LOB-San
Diego 3, New York 3. 2B-I.Davis (5). HR-
Hairston (4), Rottino (1), Nickeas (1). S-J.San-
tana.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
Richard L,2-6 6 5 4 4 3 5
Palmer 1 0 0 0 1 1
Thayer 1 4 5 5 1 1
NewYork
J.SantanaW,2-2 9 4 0 0 0 7
Balk-Richard.

Marlins 5, Giants 3
San Francisco Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GBlanc rf 5 0 3 1 Reyes ss 4 1 1 0
Theriot2b 4 1 2 0 Infante 2b 4 1 1 0
MeCarrIf 4 0 0 1 HRmrz3b 4 1 1 1
Posey c 4 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 2 2 0
Pagan cf 4 1 2 0 Morrsn 1 b 4 0 2 2
Pill1b 3 0 0 0 Solano If 4 0 2 1
Belt ph 1 0 0 0 H.Bellp 0 0 0 0
Arias 3b 3 0 1 0 Choate p 0 00 0
Burriss ss 3 1 1 0 Coghln cf-lf 4 0 0 0
A.Huffph 0 0 0 0 J.Buckc 3 0 0 0
BCrwfrpr 0 0 0 0 Buehrlep 3 0 0 0
Bmgrnp 2 0 0 0 Cishekp 0 00 0
HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Petersn cf 0 0 0 0
Edlefsn p 0 0 0 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Schrhltph 0 0 0 1
Totals 34 39 3 Totals 33 5 9 4
San Francisco 001 000 011 3
Miami 013 001 00x 5
E-Burriss (4). DP-Miami 1. LOB-San Fran-
cisco 7, Miami 6. 2B-Pagan (10), Burriss (1),
Stanton 2 (13), Morrison (4). 3B-Theriot (1).
SB-Reyes (15), Infante (7). SF-Schierholtz.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,5-4 6 7 5 4 2 7
Edlefsen 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
Affeldt 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
Miami
BuehrleW,5-4 71-38 2 2 0 3
Cishek 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
H.BellH,2 1-3 1 1 1 2 0
Choate S,1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1

Nationals 8, Braves 4
Washington Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Espinos 2b 5 2 2 3 Bourn cf 5 0 1 0
Harper cf-rf 4 1 2 1 Pstrnck ss 4 0 0 0
Zmrmn3b 4 1 1 0 McCnnph 1 00 0
LaRochlb 4 0 1 2 Prado If 3 1 1 0
Dsmndss 4 1 1 0 Uggla2b 3 1 1 2
Nadyrf-lf 4 0 1 0 Hinskelb 3 1 0 0
TMoore If 2 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 1 1 0
Tracy ph 1 0 1 1 JFrncs3b 4 0 3 1
EJcksnpr 0 1 0 0 Boscanc 4 0 1 1
Grzlnyp 1 0 0 0 Minor p 2 0 0 0
Stmmn p 0 00 0 Medlen p 0 00 0
Clipprdp 0 0 0 0 M.Diazph 1 0 0 0
Flores c 4 1 1 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0
Strasrg p 2 1 1 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0
Ankiel ph-cf 2 0 1 1 Kimrelp 0 00 0
JWilson ph 0 00 0
Totals 37 8128 Totals 33 4 8 4
Washington 130 002 200 8
Atlanta 020 020 000 4
E-Hinske (1), Heyward (1). DP-Washington
2, Atlanta 1. LOB-Washington 5, Atlanta 7.
2B-Espinosa (8), LaRoche (11), Desmond
(14), Nady (2), Tracy (3), J.Francisco (5). 3B-
Ankiel (2). HR-Espinosa (5), Harper (3), Uggla
(7). SB-Prado (7). SF-LaRoche.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Strasburg W,5-1 5 6 4 4 4 6
Gorzelanny H,4 3 2 0 0 0 4
Stammen 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Clippard S,3-4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Minor 5 6 4 4 2 3
Medlen L,1-1 1 3 2 2 0 2
Venters 1 3 2 1 0 1
Durbin 1 0 0 0 0 2
Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gorzelanny pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.

Phillies 4, Cardinals 0
Philadelphia St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollinsss 5 0 0 0 Schmkrcf 4 0 1 0
Polanc3b 4 1 1 0 Greeness 4 01 0
Pence rf 3 2 2 0 Hollidy If 4 0 0 0
Wggntnib 4 0 0 0 Beltranrf 4 01 0
Victorn cf 3 1 1 1 Freese 3b 4 0 2 0
Mayrrylf 4 0 1 2 MAdmslb 3 0 1 0
Galvis 2b 4 0 0 1 T.Cruz c 3 0 0 0
Schndrc 4 0 2 0 Descals 2b 3 00 0
Kndrck p 1 0 0 0 JGarci p 1 0 0 0


Chamrs ph
ESnchzp
Roinsn ph
Fickp
Totals 32 47 4 Totals


1 0 0 0
0000
1 0 1 0
000 0
320 7 0


Philadelphia 000 103 000 4
St. Louis 000 000 000 0
DP-Philadelphia 2. LOB-Philadelphia 6, St.
Louis 5. 2B-Polanco (9), Victorino (11), May-
berry (7), Schneider (2), Greene (7). S-
K. Kendrick 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
K.KendrickW, 1-4 9 7 0 0 0 4
St. Louis
J.GarciaL,3-3 6 6 4 4 2 6
E.Sanchez 2 0 0 0 1 2
Fick 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-J.Garcia, E.Sanchez.

Pirates 3, Cubs 2
Chicago Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeJessrf 3 1 1 0 Tabata If 4 21 0
SCastross 4 01 1 JHrrsnrf 3 00 0
Mathercf 4 0 0 0 AMcCtcf 3 1 2 0
LaHairlb 4 0 1 0 PAIvrz3b 5 0 1 1
ASorin If 4 1 1 1 Walker 2b 2 0 1 1
IStewrt3b 3 0 0 0 Hague 1b 3 01 1
Barney2b 4 00 0 Barajsc 2 00 0
Lalli c 3 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0
Mahlmp 2 0 1 0 Correiap 3 00 0
CColmnp 0 00 0 Watsonp 0 00 0
Cardnsph 1 0 1 0 Lincoln p 0 0 0 0
Campp 0 00 0 GJonesph 1 00 0
Dolis p 0 0 0 0 Hanrhnp 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 26 2 Totals 30 3 6 3
Chicago 000 110 000 2
Pittsburgh 002 000 001 3
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Correia (1). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-
Chicago 6, Pittsburgh 13.2B-DeJesus (11),
Cardenas (4). 3B-S.Castro (4). HR-A.Sori-
ano (5). SB-A.McCutchen 2 (10), Walker (2).
S-J.Harrison. SF-Walker.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Maholm
C.Coleman
Camp
Dolis L,2-4
Pittsburgh
Correia
Watson
Lincoln


61-3 5 2 2 2 2
1-3 1 0 0 1 0
11-3 0 0 0 0 1


HanrahanW,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Maholm (Tabata), by Dolis (Hague).
WP-Maholm.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Red Sox 3, Rays 2
Tampa Bay Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
C.Penalb 4 0 0 0 Avilesss 4 0 1 0
BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 Pedroia 2b 3 0 2 0
Joyce If 4 1 1 0 Ortizdh 4 1 1 0
Zobristrf 2 0 0 1 Youkilslb 3 0 0 0
Scott dh 4 0 1 1 AdGnzl rf 3 0 1 0
Sutton 3b 4 0 0 0 Lin pr-rf 0 0 0 0
SRdrgz2b 3 0 0 0 Pdsdnkph-cf 1 0 0 0
JMolinc 3 0 1 0 Mdlrks3b 4 0 2 1
EJhnsn ss 3 0 0 0 Nava If 2 1 0 0
Shppch c 2 0 1 0
Punto ph 0 0 0 0
Byrd cf-rf 3 0 0 0
Sltlmch ph 1 1 1 2
Totals 31 24 2 Totals 30 3 9 3
Tampa Bay 000 000 200 2
Boston 000 001 002 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-Middlebrooks (4). DP-Tampa Bay 1.
LOB-Tampa Bay 4, Boston 8.2B-Shoppach
(6). HR-Saltalamacchia (8). SB-Zobrist (4),
Scott (1). S-Shoppach, Punto. SF-Zobrist.
IP H RERBBSO


Tampa Bay
Price
Jo.Peralta H,13
Rodney L,2-1
Boston
Beckett
A.Miller
R.HillW,1-0


7 8 1 1 3 5
1 0 0 0 0 1
1-3 1 2 2 1 0

7 4 2 2 0 5
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 0


Angels 5, Mariners 3
Los Angeles Seattle
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout cf-lf 5 0 2 0 Ackley 2b 5 0 1 1
MIzturs 3b 3 0 0 0 MSndrs cf 4 0 1 0
Hester c 1 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0
Pujolslb 5 1 2 1 Seager3b 4 0 1 0
KMorlsdh 4 0 0 0 Smoaklb 4 1 1 1
Trumo rf 4 1 3 0 Jaso dh 3 1 1 0
Bourjos cf 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 1 0 0
HKndrc2b 4 1 2 0 Carp If 2 0 1 1
Aybarss 3 1 1 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0
Calhon If-rf 4 0 1 0
BoWlsnc 2 00 0
Callasp3b 2 1 1 4
Totals 37 5125 Totals 33 3 6 3
Los Angeles 000 104 000 5
Seattle 000 021 000 3
DP-Los Angeles 1, Seattle 1. LOB-Los An-
geles 7, Seattle 8. 2B-Pujols (10), Jaso (7).
HR-Pujols (7), Callaspo (2), Smoak (7). SB-
Trumbo (3), Ackley (5), Carp (1). CS-Trout (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Williams W,5-2 6
Walden H,3 2-3
S. Downs H,8 1
Frieri S,2-2 11-3
Seattle
FHernandez L,4-4 6
Delabar 2
Kelley 1
HBP-by FHernandez


(0 5 5 1 7
2 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 1
(M.Izturis). WP-


S.Downs.
Reds 10, Rockies 3
Colorado Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Scutaro 2b 5 1 2 0 Cozartss 5 1 0 0
Colvincf-lf 4 0 2 2 Stubbs cf 4 1 1 0
CGnzlzlf 4 0 0 0 Vottolb 3 1 2 0
EYong cf 0 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 4 2 3 2
Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 Bruce rf 3 1 1 1
LeMahi ss 0 0 0 0 Heisey If 3 2 2 3
Heltonib 3 0 1 0 Cairo3b 2 0 0 0
Cuddyrrf 2 0 0 0 Hooverp 0 0 0 0
Pachec3b 4 1 3 0 Costanz ph 1 0 0 0
Nievesc 4 1 1 1 LeCurep 0 0 0 0
Guthrie p 2 0 0 0 Ludwck ph 1 1 1 3
Fowler ph 1 0 0 0 Ondrskp 0 0 0 0
Rogers p 0 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
MtRynlp 0 0 0 0 Mesorcc 4 1 1 1
WRosrph 1 0 0 0 Leakep 1 0 1 0
Frazier3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 34 3103 Totals 341012
10
Colorado 100 200 000 3
Cincinnati 401 100 40x 10
E-Pacheco (2), Cairo (2). DP-Colorado 2,
Cincinnati 3. LOB-Colorado 8, Cincinnati 4.
2B-Pacheco (5), Nieves (1), Votto 2 (21),
B.Phillips (6), Bruce (12), Leake (1). 3B-Scu-
taro (2). HR-Heisey (1), Ludwick (5), Meso-
raco (3). CS-Stubbs (3).
IP H R ER BBSO


Colorado
Guthrie L,2-3
Rogers
Mat.Reynolds
Cincinnati
Leake
Hoover W,1-0
LeCure H,2
Ondrusek
Marshall


10 6 2 1 5

1 2 2 1 1


Rogers pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP-Rogers, Leake.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Konerko, Chicago, .396; Hamil-
ton, Texas, .376; Jeter, New York, .342; AJack-
son, Detroit, .331; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .326;
Beltre, Texas, .319; Pierzynski, Chicago, .312.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 39; Hamilton, Texas,
37; De Aza, Chicago, 34; AdJones, Baltimore,
34; Andrus, Texas, 31; Cano, New York, 31; Kip-
nis, Cleveland, 31; Ortiz, Boston, 31.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 53; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 38; MiCabrera, Detroit, 37; ADunn,
Chicago, 35; Butler, Kansas City, 33; NCruz,
Texas, 32; Pierzynski, Chicago, 32; Scott,
Tampa Bay 32.
HITS-Jeter, New York, 66; Hamilton, Texas,
64; Konerko, Chicago, 63; AdJones, Baltimore,
59; MiCabrera, Detroit, 57; Pedroia, Boston, 57;
Kinsler, Texas, 56.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 20; ADunn,
Chicago, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 15;
Granderson, New York, 14; AdJones, Baltimore,
14; Reddick, Oakland, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12.
PITCHING-Peavy, Chicago, 6-1; Weaver,
Los Angeles, 6-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 6-1;
Sabathia, New York, 6-2; Darvish, Texas, 6-2;
Shields, Tampa Bay, 6-2; Milone, Oakland, 6-3;
Price, Tampa Bay, 6-3; DLowe, Cleveland, 6-3.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 75; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 75; Scherzer, Detroit, 72;
Sabathia, NewYork, 69; Shields, Tampa Bay 66;
Peavy, Chicago, 64; Darvish, Texas, 63.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DWright, New York, .390; Ruiz,
Philadelphia, .362; MeCabrera, San Francisco,
.356; Lucroy Milwaukee, .343; Furcal, St. Louis,
.339; Infante, Miami, .338; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, .338.
RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 35; MeCabr-
era, San Francisco, 33; Pence, Philadelphia, 33;
Uggla, Atlanta, 33; Braun, Milwaukee, 32; Fur-
cal, St. Louis, 32; Bourn, Atlanta, 31; JUpton,
Arizona, 31; DWright, New York, 31.
RBI-Ethier, Los Angeles, 40; Beltran, St.
Louis, 38; LaRoche, Washington, 35; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 34; Stanton, Miami, 34; Braun,
Milwaukee, 33; Freese, St. Louis, 33.
HITS-MeCabrera, San Francisco, 69;
Bourn, Atlanta, 63; Furcal, St. Louis, 61;
DWright, New York, 60; SCastro, Chicago, 59;
Prado, Atlanta, 59; Pagan, San Francisco, 56.
HOME RUNS-Beltran, St. Louis, 14; Braun,
Milwaukee, 13; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12; Pence,
Philadelphia, 11; Stanton, Miami, 11; Bruce, Cincin-
nati, 10; Freese, St. Louis, 10; Hart, Mihwaukee, 10;
Holliday, St. Louis, 10; LaHair, Chicago, 10.
PITCHING-Lynn, St. Louis, 7-1; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 7-1; GGonzalez, Washington, 6-
1; Dickey, New York, 6-1; Capuano, Los Ange-
les, 6-1; 12 tied at 5.
STRIKEOUTS-Strasburg, Washington, 70;
GGonzalez, Washington, 69; Hamels, Philadel-
phia, 66; ASanchez, Miami, 62; MCain, San
Francisco, 62; JSantana, NewYork, 60; Greinke,
Milwaukee, 59.


FrOT the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
7-0-6
CASH 3 (late)
8-9-8

S PLAY 4 (early)
S5-6-8-3
PLAY 4 (late)
7 -4-3-7


-L-ot- y Fantasy 5 and Florida

POWERBALL Lottery numbers were
13 14 41 49 59 unavailable at press time.
POWER BALL Please see Monday's
14 Chronicle for the results.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (ABC) 2012 Indianapolis 500
5:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2)ACC Tournament Final:
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament Final:
MLB
1 p.m. (FSNFL) San Francisco Giants at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (SUN, TBS) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates
8 p.m. (ESPN) Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves
NBA
Western Conference Finals
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA: BMW PGA Championship
3 p.m. (NBC) Senior PGA Championship
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial
OLYMPICS
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Water Polo Trials: USAvs. Hungary
(Taped)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding CBR Hobbs (Taped)
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (UNI) Mexico vs. Gales
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: San Jose Earthquakes at
Sporting Kansas City
SOFTBALL
NCAA Tournament
1 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia vs. Tennessee
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia vs. Tennessee (If necessary)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) California vs. Washington
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) California vs. Washington (If necessary)
TENNIS
5 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open First Round
9 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open First Round
12 p.m. (NBC) French Open First Round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Indy 500 Lineup
Sunday
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:38.9514 (226.484 mph).
2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:38.9537 (226.481).
3. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:39.1233 (226.240).
4. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara- Chevrolet,
2:40.6766 (225.456).
5. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:39.7004
(225.422).
6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:39.8780 (225.172).
7. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda,
2:40.6879 (224.037).
8. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:40.1775 (224.751).
9. (5) EJ Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 2:40.4119
(224.422).
10. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:40.5253 (224.264).
11. (98) AlexTagliani, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.7144
(224.000).
12. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda,
2:40.7437 (223.959).
13. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:40.7720 (223.920).
14. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda,
2:40.8093 (223.868).
15. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 2:40.9413
(223.684).
16. (50) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.0144 (223.582).
17. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.0866 (223.482).
18. (4) JR Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:41.1299 (223.422).
19. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.1517 (223.392).
20. (99) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.3377 (223.134).
21. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.4865 (222.929).
22. (30) Michel Jourdain, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.5124 (222.893).
23. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.5138 (222.891).
24. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevro-
let, 2:41.5720 (222.811).
25. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:40.8666 (223.760).
26. (41) Wade Cunningham, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.2484 (223.258).
27. (22) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:41.8754 (222.393).
28. (20T) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:41.9262 (222.324).
29. (14) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda,
2:41.9293 (222.319).
30. (6) Katherine Legge, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:42.4374 (221.624).
31. (39) Bryan Clauson, Dallara-Chevrolet,
2:47.6671 (214.455).
32. (78) Simona De Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus,
2:47.9162 (214.393).
33. (64) Jean Alesi, Dallara-Lotus, 2:51.3516
(210.094).
Sprint Cup

Coca-Cola 600 Lineup
After Thursday qualifying; race Sunday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.94 mph.
2. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.598.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 191.374.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191.259.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.198.
6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 191.171.
7. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.13.
8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 190.887.


9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.597.
10. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 190.456.
11. (22) A J AllIImendinger, Dodge, 190.328.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 190.302.
13. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.268.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.201.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 190.194.
16. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 190.054.
17. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 190.034.
18. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 189.987.
19. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.707.
20. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.607.
21. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 189.573.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.52.
23. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.076.
24. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188.871.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 188.363.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 188.344.
27. (74) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 188.324.
28. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188.206.
29. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 187.924.
30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 187.656.
31. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 187.526.
32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 187.487.
33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 187.259.
34. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 187.169.
35. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 186.143.
36. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 186.111.
37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 186.085.
38. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 185.976.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 185.81.
40. (10) D. Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (32) TJ. Bell, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 185.784.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 185.548.
45. (73) David Reutimann, Toyota, 185.338.
46. (49) J.J.Yeley, Toyota, 183.73.
47. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 183.63.
Nationwide Series

History 300 Results
Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (10) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 134.2
rating, 0 points, $46,425.
2. (13) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 104.5, 0,
$40,725.
3. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 112.7, 0,
$31,150.
4. (7) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 139.2, 0,
$29,925.
5. (6) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 102.1, 39,
$29,793.
6. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 109.6, 0,
$27,500.
7. (8) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 97.8, 0,
$23,593.
8. (16) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 93.2, 37,
$22,643.
9. (5) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 92.5, 35,
$21,918.
10. (21) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 86, 0,
$15,825.
11. (2) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 98.7, 33,
$21,843.
12. (20) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 82.2, 32,
$19,993.
13. (3) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 83.4, 31,
$22,168.
14. (22) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 79.2, 30,
$18,968.
15. (19) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 200, 77.3, 30,
$19,793.
16. (23) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 200, 73.4, 28,
$11,925.
17. (14) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 99.8, 0,
$11,700.
18. (25) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 63.9,
26, $17,943.
19. (24) Timmy Hill, Ford, 199, 63.8, 25,
$17,868.
20. (28) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 198, 68.5, 24,
$18,393.
21. (34) Casey Roderick, Chevrolet, 198, 52.5,
23, $17,668.
22. (26) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 198, 49.6,


22, $17,618.
23. (31) Kyle Fowler, Ford, 196, 53.2, 21,
$17,568.
24. (42) Travis Pastrana, Toyota, 195, 43.4, 20,
$17,503.
25. (36) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 193, 40.9, 19,
$11,475.
26. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 179, 105.9,
18, $18,533.
27. (37) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, accident, 176,
49, 17, $17,398.
28. (11) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 167, 75.4, 16,
$17,363.
29. (29) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 157, 59.5, 15,
$17,318.
30. (39) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, handling, 151,41.1,
14, $11,105.
31. (9) Brian Scott, Toyota, accident, 146, 85.4,
13, $17,263.
32. (18) Jeff Green, Toyota, drive shaft, 141,
51.6, 12, $17,193.
33. (15) Jason Bowles, Toyota, accident, 137,
59.7, 12, $17,148.
34. (17) Josh Richards, Ford, accident, 134,
58.9, 10, $17,118.
35. (32) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, brakes, 103,
30.4,9, $17,088.
36. (35) Angela Cope, Chevrolet, engine, 51,
39.7, 8, $10,600.
37. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, electri-
cal, 39, 37.7, 7, $10,575.
38. (40) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, overheating,
30, 35.4, 6, $10,556.
39. (41) Robert Richardson Jr, Chevrolet, en-
gine, 13, 36, 5, $10,435.
40. (38) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 10,
35.6, 4, $10,330.
41. (27) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, ignition, 8, 34.5,
0, $10,295.
42. (30) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, electrical, 5,
34.3, 0, $10,270.
43. (33) Kevin Lepage, Toyota, vibration, 3, 30.8,
1, $10,209.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 123.414 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 25 minutes, 51 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.838 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 38 laps.
Lead Changes: 12 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-21; K.Harvick 22-54;
J.Bowles 55; K.Harvick 56-58; K.Kahne 59-67;
K.Harvick 68-110; J.Logano 111; J.AlIIgaier 112;
M.Wallace 113-114; K.Harvick 115-127;
J.Logano 128-131; K.Kahne 132-133; B.Ke-
selowski 134-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 4 times for 92 laps; B.Ke-
selowski, 1 time for 67 laps; J.Logano, 3 times
for 26 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 11 laps; M.Wal-
lace, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Allgaier, 1 time for 1 lap;
J.Bowles, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 430; 2.
E.Sadler, 417; 3. A.Dillon, 402; 4. S.Hornish Jr.,
373; 5. C.Whitt, 336; 6. J.Allgaier, 336; 7. M.An-
nett, 331; 8. M.Bliss, 291; 9. D.Patrick, 264; 10.
J.Nemechek, 262.



NHL playoff glance
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
New Jersey 4, N.Y. Rangers 2
Monday, May 14: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0
Wednesday, May 16: New Jersey 3, NY
Rangers 2
Saturday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, New Jersey 0
Monday, May 21: New Jersey 4, NY Rangers 1
Wednesday, May 23: New Jersey 5, NY
Rangers 3
Friday, May 25: New Jersey 3, NY Rangers
2, OT
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 1
Sunday May 13: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 2
Tuesday, May 15: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0
Thursday, May 17: Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 1
Sunday May 20: Phoenix 2, Los Angeles 0
Tuesday, May 22: Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 3, OT
STANLEY CUP FINALS
Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles at New
Jersey, 8 p.m.
Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New
Jersey, 8 p.m.
Monday June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles,
8p.m.
Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los
Angeles, 8 p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New
Jersey, 8 p.m.
x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los
Angeles, 8p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New
Jersey, 8 p.m.



NBA playoff glance
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Boston 4, Philadelphia 3
Saturday May 12: Boston 92, Philadelphia 91
Monday May 14: Philadelphia 82, Boston 81
Wednesday, May 16: Boston 107, Philadel-
phia 91
Friday, May 18: Philadelphia 92, Boston 83
Monday, May 21: Boston 101, Philadelphia 85
Wednesday, May 23: Philadelphia 82, Boston 75
Saturday May 26: Boston 85, Philadelphia 75
Miami 4, Indiana 2
Sunday, May 13: Miami 95 Indiana 86
Tuesday, May 15: Indiana 78, Miami 75
Thursday, May 17: Indiana 94, Miami 75
Sunday May 20: Miami 101, Indiana 93
Tuesday, May 22: Miami 115, Indiana 83
Thursday, May 24: Miami 105, Indiana 93
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Lakers 1
Monday, May 14: Oklahoma City 119, L.A.
Lakers 90
Wednesday, May 16: Oklahoma City 77, L.A.
Lakers 75
Friday, May 18: L.A. Lakers 99, Oklahoma
City 96
Saturday, May 19: Oklahoma City 103, L.A.
Lakers 100
Monday, May 21: Oklahoma City 106, L.A.
Lakers 90
San Antonio 4, L.A. Clippers 0
Tuesday, May 15: San Antonio 108, L.A. Clip-
pers 92
Thursday, May 17: San Antonio 105, L.A.
Clippers 88
Saturday, May 19: San Antonio 96, L.A. Clip-
pers 86
Sunday May 20: San Antonio 102, L.A. Clip-
pers 99
CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami vs. Boston
Monday May 28: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday May 30: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.


Friday, June 1: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 3: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Oklahoma City vs. San Antonio
Sunday May 27: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma
City, 9 p.m.
Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma
City, 8:30 p.m.
x-Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 9 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Okla-
homa City, 9p.m.
x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San An-
tonio, 9 p.m.


Donovan hat trick leads
US over Scotland 5-1
JACKSONVILLE Landon
Donovan returned to the U.S.
national team following an eight-
month absence and scored his
first international hat trick in five
years, leading the Americans
over Scotland 5-1 in an exhibi-
tion game Saturday night.
Donovan scored in the third
minute, then added a pair of
second-half goals for his third
international hat trick, raising
his career total to 49 goals. It
was a record 125th start for
Donovan, one more than the
previous American mark set by
defender Jeff Agoos.
Michael Bradley scored on a
30-yard shot half-volley in the
10th minute and Jermaine Jones
got his second international goal
in the second half off an assist
from Donovan, who had skipped
eight matches because of in-
juries and commitments to the
Los Angeles Galaxy.
Scotland scored in the 15th
minute when American de-
fender Geoff Cameron chested
Kenny Miller's header past Tim
Howard for an own goal.
Vandy rides 5-run ninth
to 8-6 win over Florida
HOOVER, Ala. -Anthony
Gomez singled home the go-
ahead run and then stole
home and Vanderbilt rode a
five-run ninth inning to an 8-6
victory over Florida Saturday in
the SEC tournament.



SHOCK
Continued from Page B1

the testiness that came late in
Friday's 7-4 win by the Rays
when the benches cleared
after Red Sox reliever
Franklin Morales hit Scott in
the right leg.
Trailing 1-0 and with only
one single against Beckett in
the first six innings, the Rays
collected three hits and
grabbed a 2-1 lead in the sev-
enth. Ben Zobrist's sacrifice



NBA
Continued from Page B1

lead with 1:44 left.
The Celtics will now face
the actual NBA MVP Le-
Bron James along with
Dwyane Wade and the rest
of the Heat. Miami ad-
vanced to the conference fi-



PENSKE
Continued from Page B1

out-of-gas experience that
cost Dale Earnhardt Jr a
Coca-Cola 600 victory a year
ago.
Keselowski gassed up with
73 laps left, then chose to stay
out during a caution period a
few laps later instead of pit-
ting like most of the field.
That began a fuel mileage
countdown that had Ke-




RACE
Continued from Page BI

Triathlon team.
"(The course) was fast,"
she said. "I will come back."
Another pro, Felipe Bas-
tos of Tampa, was fourth
with a time of 1:02:18.4. He
said he has won this race
two or three times. The 31-
year-old native Australian
said he is busy setting up a
law practice in Tampa.
"I love this course," Bastos
said. "It's my favorite race.
It's flat There are no hills."
Malia Ellington of Cor-
nelius, N.C. was the female
winner. She had a time of
1:04:51 and was 12th overall.
Tarpon Springs resident
Celia Dubey was the female
masters winner. She had a
time of 1:07:54 and was 28th
overall.
Crystal River High School
teacher Laura Wingate has
now done five straight
triathlons and loved this
one.


"It was awesome," she
said. "The other day, I was
training on my bike and an
egret was flying just above
me."
Inverness resident Phil
Royal was feeling like a
triathlete prodigal child. He
serves Citrus County faith-
fully as a captain in the
Sheriff's Office but hasn't
run a triathlon in a while.
He finished 158th with a
time of 1:26:22.7 and he was
not happy about that.
"I'm 43 and fat," Royal


The Commodores (33-25),
aiming for their first SEC tour-
nament title since 2007, face
Mississippi State in Sunday's
championship game.
Vanderbilt fueled the come-
back win over the Gators (42-
18) with a flurry of stolen bases,
six in the ninth. That included a
triple-steal with the bases
loaded when Gomez made his
dash to home plate.
Florida scored two runs in
the bottom of the ninth and had
the bases loaded before Van-
derbilt reliever Drew VerHagen
got Justin Shafer to pop up to
right field on his lone pitch to
end the game.
UVa rolls past FSU
7-0 in ACC tourney
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Derek Fisher and Colin Harring-
ton drove in two runs apiece
and Virginia beat Florida State
7-0 on Saturday in the ACC
baseball tournament.
Artie Lewicki struck out four
and allowed three hits in seven
innings for the fourth-seeded
Cavaliers (38-17-1). They fin-
ished pool play with a 2-1
record and sent the top-seeded
Seminoles (43-15) to a surpris-
ing 0-3 finish in the tournament.
Virginia led 1-0 in the fourth
inning before breaking the
game open by scoring six runs
in the seventh inning.
Devon Travis had two of
Florida State's five hits.
From wire reports


fly tied it after Upton singled
and advanced on Matt Joyce's
single. Scott then followed
with his run-scoring single
through a shifted infield.
Beckett did end the inning by
striking out Jose Molina.
Price got David Ortiz, the
final batter he faced, on a
bouncer to short with run-
ners on first and third.
Beckett gave up two runs,
four hits, while striking out
five and not walking anyone.
He had won his last two
starts, allowing just one run
in 14 2-3 innings.


nals by eliminating the Indi-
ana Pacers in six games.
Miami beat Boston in five
games in the conference
semifinals last year In 2010,
the Celticseliminated the
Heat in the first round and
then knocked James and the
Cavaliers out in the second
-his final game with Cleve-
land before defecting to
Miami.


selowski and his team guess-
ing if they had enough to
make it to the end, unlike
Earnhardt, who went dry en-
tering the final turn and was
passed for the victory
"It's going to be either re-
ally good or really bad," Ke-
selowski said on his radio
down the stretch.
Turns out, it was perfect as
Keselowski picked up his first
Nationwide Series race of the
year It was Keselowski's 18th
win in the series and his
second at Charlotte.


said. "I have to get back into
shape and run these."
DRC sponsored a team of
14 area athletes including
the physically challenged.
Leif Stringer is the coach.
Race director Chris Mol-
ing was happy to see all
kinds of triathletes among
the over 300 registered. He
said they came from 17
states and three countries.
"What a way to start off
the season," Moling said.
"We can't be happier. The
weather was perfect and we
sold out We are looking for-
ward to the upcoming
races."
Crystal River Memorial Day
Sprint 1 Triathlon 2012
Results:
Men's Overall winner:
Mitchell Kibby, Groveland,
57:38
Women's Overall winner:
Malia Ellington, Cornelius, N.C.,
1:04.51.6
Men's Masters winner: John
Hovius, Groveland, 1:02:11.7
Women's Masters winner:
Celia DuBey, Tarpon Springs,
1:07.54.4


Top 10 Finishers
1. Mitchell Kibby, Groveland,
57:38; 2. Steven Mifflin, Lees-
burg, 1:01:40.9; 3. John Hovius,
Groveland, 1:01:11.7; 4. Felipe
Bastos, Tampa, 1:02:18.4; 5.
Vincent Hahr, Orlando,
1:02:31.9.; 6. Tom Lowery,
Gainesville, 1:02:39; 7. Dave
Bracken, Tarpon Springs,
1:02:55.7; 8. Leif Stringer,
Gainesville, 1:03:26.2; 9.
Michael Pooley, Orlando,
1:03:28.3; 10. Danny Stevens
Jr., Dunnellon, 1:04:08.2


Sports BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Crowne Plaza
Invitational at Colonial
At Colonial Country Club, Fort Worth,
Texas
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,204, Par: 70
Third Round
Jason Dufner 65-64-66-195 -15
ZachJohnson 64-67-65-196 -14
Tom Gillis 65-69-69 203 -7
Bo Van Pelt 69-64-71 204 -6
John Huh 70-66-69 -205 -5
Ryan Palmer 68-67-70 -205 -5
Kelly Kraft 71-71-64 -206 -4
Jonas Blixt 73-67-66 -206 -4
Jim Furyk 69-69-68-206 -4
Louis Oosthuizen 71-67-68-206 -4
Ryan Moore 67-69-70 206 -4
Rickie Fowler 68-68-70 -206 -4
Tommy Gainey 66-67-73-206 -4
Jonathan Byrd 72-68-67 207 -3
Kevin Chappell 70-67-70 -207 -3
David Hearn 71-72-65-208 -2
Y.E.Yang 73-69-66 -208 -2
Corey Pavin 71-70-67-208 -2
Matt Kuchar 72-69-67 208 -2
Hunter Mahan 69-71-68-208 -2
Sung Kang 70-69-69-208 -2
Charley Hoffman 69-70-69-208 -2
Greg Owen 69-68-71-208 -2
Harris English 65-70-73-208 -2
Ken Duke 68-75-66 -209 -1
Chris Stroud 69-73-67 -209 -1
Roberto Castro 67-74-68 209 -1
Ben Crane 70-71-68-209 -1
Brendon de Jonge 67-74-68-209 -1
John Daly 70-69-70 -209 -1
Vijay Singh 70-69-70-209 -1
David Mathis 71-67-71 -209 -1
Kyle Reifers 65-72-72 209 -1
Trevor Immelman 70-71-69-210 E
Geoff Ogilvy 70-70-70 210 E
Chris Kirk 71-69-70 -210 E
Sergio Garcia 66-73-71-210 E
Tim Clark 70-69-71 -210 E
Carl Pettersson 70-69-71 -210 E
Bobby Gates 71-67-72 -210 E
Boo Weekley 72-71-68 -211 +1
J.J. Killeen 72-70-69-- 211 +1
Jerry Kelly 72-70-69-211 +1
Chad Campbell 71-71-69-211 +1
Blake Adams 69-72-70- 211 +1
Martin Flores 68-73-70-- 211 +1
Jason Bohn 70-70-71 -211 +1
Michael Thompson 69-71-71-211 +1
Seung-YulNoh 70-69-72- 211 +1
Greg Chalmers 70-69-72-211 +1
Bryce Molder 72-64-75-211 +1
BrandtJobe 67-75-70-212 +2
Will Claxton 72-69-71 -212 +2
Kevin Na 70-71-71 -212 +2
John Senden 69-71-72 -212 +2
Charlie Wi 68-69-75 -212 +2
Miguel Angel Carballo 75-68-70-213 +3
John Mallinger 71-72-70-213 +3
Bill Haas 72-71-70 -213 +3
Pat Perez 69-74-70 -213 +3
Rory Sabbatini 71-71-71 -213 +3
Josh Teater 70-71-72-213 +3
George McNeill 72-69-72-213 +3
Chris DiMarco 66-74-73 -213 +3
MarkWilson 71-71-72-214 +4
Nick Watney 71-71-72-214 +4
William McGirt 70-71-73-214 +4
Aaron Baddeley 71-70-73-214 +4
Marc Leishman 72-68-74 -214 +4
Gary Christian 70-73-72-215 +5
Kris Blanks 73-69-73-215 +5
Andres Romero 66-71-78 -215 +5
Made cut, did not finish
Hunter Haas 71-72-73-216 +6
Edward Loar 72-71-73-216 +6
Brendon Todd 70-71-75-216 +6
Gary Woodland 70-70-76 -216 +6
Sang-Moon Bae 70-70-77-217 +7
Heath Slocum 70-73-75-218 +8
Justin Leonard 69-73-77-219 +9
Senior PGA Champ.
Saturday
At The Golf Club at Harbor Shores,
Benton Harbor, Mich.
Purse: TBA
Yardage: 6,861, Par: 71
Third Round
Roger Chapman 68-67-64-199 -14
John Cook 69-66-69-204 -9
Steve Pate 70-69-67- 206 -7
Hale Irwin 71-66-69-206 -7
Joel Edwards 73-67-67-207 -6
David Frost 70-70-68 208 -5


SPORTS


Michael Allen
Jay Don Blake
Bob Tway
Bernhard Langer
Loren Roberts
Joe Daley
Willie Wood
KirkTriplett
Sandy Lyle
Jim Carter
Steve Jones
Gene Jones
Scott Simpson
Boonchu Ruangkit
Peter Senior
Jeff Hart
Bill Britton
Christopher Williams
Fred Couples
Bill Glasson
Bobby Clampett
Lonnie Nielsen
Jay Haas
Kenny Perry
Mark McNulty
J.L. Lewis
Andrew Oldcorn
Tom Lehman
Mark Brooks
Paul Wesselingh
John Huston
Larry Mize
Gary Wolstenholme
Barry Lane
Mark Calcavecchia
Jeff Sluman
Kiyoshi Murota
Mark Mouland
Wayne Levi
Tom Pernice, Jr.
Sonny Skinner
Tom Jenkins
Tim Thelen
Rod Spittle
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
Dick Mast
Russ Cochran
Anders Forsbrand
Mark James
David J. Russell
Jong-Duck Kim
Jeff Freeman
Tom Atchison
Bobby Wadkins
Blaine McCallister
Ted Schulz
Tom Purtzer
Stan Utley
Bruce Vaughan
PH. Horgan, IIl
Andrew Magee
Mike Hulbert
Tom Wargo
Peter Fowler
Jeff Coston


77-64-68-
71-72-67-
72-69-69-
73-68-69-
72-67-71 -
73-72-66
72-72-67
73-70-68-
74-71-66-
70-71-70-
74-70-68
71-71-70-
75-67-70
72-69-71 -
74-67-71 -
72-73-68
73-71-69-
74-71-68-
76-67-70
74-72-67-
71-71-71 -
71-70-72-
70-74-70
75-70-69-
71-72-71 -
70-73-71 -
74-70-71 -
76-69-70-
78-67-70-
71-72-72-
73-70-72-
74-69-72-
79-67-69
74-73-68
73-68-74
70-75-71 -
73-70-73-
72-73-71 -
73-70-73-
76-70-70
77-70-69-
75-70-72-
75-69-73
75-72-70-
75-72-70-
73-71-74-
73-74-71 -
71-74-74-
73-70-76-
76-69-74
75-72-72-
74-73-72-
76-71-72-
76-71-73-
74-72-75-
73-73-75-
77-70-74-
73-74-74-
76-69-78-
72-74-77-
73-74-76-
77-70-76-
74-73-76
75-71-78-
76-71-77-


- 209 -4
-210 -3
-210 -3
-210 -3
-210 -3
-211 -2
-211 -2
-211 -2
-211 -2
-211 -2
-212 -1
-212 -1
-212 -1
-212 -1
-212 -1
-213 E
-213 E
-213 E
-213 E
-213 E
-213 E
-213 E
-214 +1
-214 +1
-214 +1
-214 +1
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-215 +2
-216 +3
-216 +3
-216 +3
-216 +3
-216 +3
-216 +3
-217 +4
-217 +4
-217 +4
-217 +4
-218 +5
-218 +5
-219 +6
-219 +6
-219 +6
-219 +6
-219 +6
-219 +6
-220 +7
-221 +8
-221 +8
-221 +8
-221 +8
-223 +10
-223 +10
-223 +10
-223 +10
-223 +10
-224 +11
-224 +11


BMW PGA Champ.
Saturday
At West Course at Wentworth,
VirginiaWater, England
Purse: $5.76 million
Yardage: 7,302, Par: 72
Third Round
Luke Donald, England 68-68-69 -
Justin Rose, England 67-71-69-
Peter Lawrie, Ireland 66-71-72-
Ernie Els, South Africa 68-73-70-
Richard Sterne, South Africa 71-68-72 -
Branden Grace, South Africa 69-69-73 -
Peter Hedblom, Sweden 68-70-74 -
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain 68-70-74 -
Francesco Molinari, Italy 68-70-74-
lan Poulter, England 71-73-69-
James Morrison, England 68-64-81 -
Jeev Milka Singh, India 70-74-70-
Federico Colombo, Italy 69-74-71 -
David Higgins, Ireland 70-70-74-
Marcel Siem, Germany 71-67-76 -
Alvaro Quiros, Spain 67-70-77-
David Drysdale, Scotland 66-70-78-
Simon Khan, England 71-74-70 -
Lee Westwood, England 70-75-70-
Pablo Martin, Spain 69-70-76 -
Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 71-67-77-
Edoardo Molinari, Italy 69-70-76-
F Andersson Hed, Sweden 70-68-77 -
Also
Martin Kaymer, Germany 71-69-76 -
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 70-72-76 -
Charl Schwartzel, S. Africa 69-71-79 -
C. Montgomerie, Scotland 69-74-78 -
Ben Curtis, United States 70-75-81 -


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 B5


The race is on


Associated Press
Jason Dufner watches his tee shot on the second hole Saturday during the third round of the PGA Colonial golf tournament
in Fort Worth, Texas.


Dufher stays just ahead ofJohnson to lead Colonial into final day


Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas -
Jason Dufner and Zach
Johnson have set up what
will basically be a match-
play final round for the
winner's plaid jacket at the
Colonial.
It will be Dufner, whose
only two PGA Tour victories
came in the past four weeks,
against the 2007 Masters
champion who got the last of
his seven wins two years ago
at Hogan's Alley
"It seems like one of us is
either going to win or finish
second," Dufner said after
his 4-under 66 in the third
round Saturday
After two bogeys the pre-
vious three holes, Dufner
matched playing partner
Johnson's birdie putt on the
17th hole and overcame a
wayward final tee shot to
save par and keep the lead.
Dufner's 15-under 195
total put him a stroke
ahead of Johnson, who shot
65. Tom Gillis was a distant
third at 7 under after a 69.
"I really wasn't aware of
(the separation) until I
looked at the board on 13. It
was more than I antici-
pated," Johnson said. "It
seemed like I didn't hear


too many roars in front of
us, so that's a telling sign.....
I still have 18 holes and
that's my focus. I totally an-
ticipate Dufner to keep
doing what he's doing.
There's not a whole lot
going on that's wrong."
Dufner, the winner last
week in the Byron Nelson
Championship about 30
miles away, is trying to win
for the third time in his last
four starts. He also is trying
to do something only Ben
Hogan has done.
Hogan, Dufner's hero, is
the only player to win both
PGA Tour events in the Dal-
las-Fort Worth area in the
same year. When he did it
in 1946, they weren't played
in consecutive weeks.
The last player to win in
consecutive weeks on the
PGA Tour was Tiger Woods
in 2009. Nobody won more
than two tournaments last
season.
Like Johnson, who wore
a plaid-collared shirt Satur-
day, the first time Dufner
realized the gap from
everyone else had widened
was when he saw that
scoreboard at 156-yard 13th
hole. And he had a three-
stroke lead then.
"From that point on I kind
of knew that... we are going


to be battling it out in kind
of a unique situation,"
Dufner said. "The leader-
boards here most of the
year have been pretty
packed and you got a lot of
guys having a chance to win
the title the last nine holes."
Dufner avoided a playoff
at the Nelson with a 25-foot
birdie on the 72nd hole. He
has led or shared the lead
after 12 of his last 35
rounds, including five of
the last seven.
Senior PGA
Championship
BENTON HARBOR, Mich.
- Roger Chapman shot a 7-
under 64 to take a five-stroke
lead into the final round of the
Senior PGA Championship.
Chapman finished the day at
14-under par. John Cook
began the round tied with
Chapman for the lead, but
couldn't keep pace with the
Englishman and settled for a
69 to drop into second place at
Harbor Shores.
Chapman's 54-hole score of
199 tied the tournament record
set by Sam Snead in 1973, al-
though Snead was 17 under
when he set the mark.
Steve Pate had a 67 to join
66-year-old Hale Irwin at 7


under. Irwin made a triple
bogey on the par-3 fourth, but
played well on the back nine
and shot 69.
Chapman beat Padraig Har-
rington in a playoff to win a Eu-
ropean Tour event in Brazil in
2000, and that's pretty much
the highlight of his resume. He
has never won on the Champi-
ons Tour. He made the cut in
all 11 of his Champions Tour
starts last year, but didn't have
a top-10 finish.
European PGA
Championship
VIRGINIA WATER, England
- Defending champion Luke
Donald remained in position to
regain the top spot in the world
ranking, shooting a 3-under 69
to take a two-stroke lead in the
BMW PGA Championship.
The Englishman overcame
windy conditions at Wentworth
on a day when only three play-
ers broke 70, and Ernie Els
criticized European Tour offi-
cials for the state of the greens
on the course he redesigned.
Donald had an 11-under 205
total. He needs to finish solo
eighth or better to reclaim the
No. 1 position from Rory Mcll-
roy. Mcllroy missed the cut.
England's Justin Rose was
second after a 69.


Keeping the streak alive NBA title or bust
0 T TT


Djokovic bids

for 4th straight

Slam title

Associated Press

PARIS -As daylight dis-
appeared and wind whipped
loose dirt around the court,
Novak Djokovic watched
one last ace fly off Roger
Federer's racket and end
their thrill-a-minute semifi-
nal at the 2011 French Open.
It's been nearly a year
since that evening, and
Djokovic hasn't lost a Grand
Slam match since.
He's won 21 in a row, earn-
ing championships at Wim-
bledon in July, the U.S. Open
in September, and the Aus-
tralian Open in January If
Djokovic can prolong that
run on the red clay of Roland
Garros over the next two
weeks, he will become the
first man since Rod Laver in
1969 to win four consecutive
major tennis tournaments.
A remarkable achieve-
ment, to be sure. And one
the 25-year-old Serb is try-
ing not to expend too much
energy pondering before
the French Open, which
starts Sunday
"It would definitely mean
the world to me ... but I
haven't thought about that
too much, because I do not
want to put too much pres-
sure on myself," the No. 1-
ranked Djokovic said, then
added with a laugh: "Pres-
sure that I don't need at this
moment, because I already
have enough."
He insists he wants to
view this tournament the
way he would any year.
Federer's take? Essen-


Associated Press
Novak Djokovic reacts during a training session Friday for the French Open tennis tourna-
ment at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Djokovic will be going for his fourth consecu-
tive Grand Slam title when French Open play begins Sunday.


tially: Good luck with
that, pal.
"The hard part is (the)
same for everyone: Every
point you play, every game
you play, the pressure you
face, and just answering the
questions time and time
again," said Federer, who
twice fell one match shy of
four Grand Slam titles in a
row, losing in the French
Open final to Rafael Nadal
in 2006 and 2007.
"It's fun, because you're
talking about the highest of
accomplishments," Federer
continued. "But at the end
of the day, you just like to
play the matches and not
talk about it that much."
Nadal also went on a
three-major winning streak
- at the French Open, Wim-
bledon and U.S. Open in
2010 but fell short of No.
4, losing in last year's Aus-
tralian Open quarterfinals
while hampered by a left leg
muscle injury


He dismissed the notion
that he came close to equal-
ing Laver, noting he was
three matches away, and said
his happiness quotient today
doesn't depend on whether
or not things went well in
Melbourne 16 months ago.
"Life continues," Nadal
said, "and you keep working
hard to try to be fit and be
competitive for the next
(match)."
There's another way in
which Nadal and Federer
were far from matching
Laver- as Djokovic would
be, even if he wins his next
seven matches. Rocket Rod
pulled off his Grand Slams
within a calendar year (the
Australian left-hander also
did it in 1962; Don Budge is
the only other man to go
4 for 4).
Laver himself firmly be-
lieves there's a distinction
to be made.
"People will say, 'He's
going for a Grand Slam.' And


I say, 'No, he's not doing that'
That wasn't the way this
whole thing was set up,"
Laver explained last year "It
starts in January and ends in
September- starts with the
Australian Open and ends
with the U.S. Open."
None of the top three men
is in action in Paris on Day 1.
The schedule includes
seven-time major champion
Venus Williams in her first
Grand Slam match since re-
vealing she was diagnosed
with an autoimmune dis-
ease; past French Open
champions Ana Ivanovic and
Svetlana Kuznetsova; reign-
ing U.S. Open champion Sam
Stosur; and past U.S. Open
title winners Andy Roddick
and Juan Martin del Potro.
Djokovic and No. 3 Fed-
erer will be on court Mon-
day, while No. 2 Nadal is
slated to begin his attempt
for a record-breaking sev-
enth French Open title on
Tuesday


tor James, Heat


rounds and even pre-
pare ourselves even more.
As the rounds go, the com-
petition grows, so we look
forward to the challenge."
The way James sees it,
there's not a lot of reason
for celebration yet After all,
he's not wearing the letters
VIII across his upper teeth.
Over the past couple sea-
sons, James has worn
mouthguards with fangs,
others with the Heat logo,
and some with no adorn-
ments whatsoever For
these playoffs, he's broken
out something new: A
mouthguard embossed
"XVI."
It doesn't take much to
decipher what those
Roman numerals are sup-
posed to signify. It's 16, the
number of wins that the
Heat would need to cap-
ture the NBA champi-
onship. Miami has the first
eight of those out of the
way, but in this all-or-
nothing season for the
Heat, that's far from
enough to satisfy anyone.


Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
shook a few hands, slapped
a few fives, gave a few hugs.
That was the extent of
his celebrating after the
Miami Heat ousted the
Indiana Pacers.
A return to the Eastern
Conference finals no
small achievement by any
measure is nice, though
it's far from the oft-stated
goal for the reigning NBA
MVP and the Heat They'll
host Game 1 of the East title
series Monday night
against either Philadelphia
or Boston, both of those
teams having been ousted
from last year's playoffs by
Miami in five games.
"You can't just show up,
no matter who you're play-
ing against," James said
Saturday, when the Heat
resumed practice after tak-
ing one day off to rest up
and recover from a grind
against Indiana. "We have
to prepare the same way
we've done the first two


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James is not content with
advancing to the Eastern Conference finals. The star will
be satisfied with nothing less than an NBA title.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

George Jones out
of the hospital
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Country music star
George Jones has been re-
leased from the hospital.
In a news release from
Jones'
publicist
on Satur-
day, Jones
said he is
improv-
ing, and
"I look
forward
George to seeing
Jones everyone
soon."
Jones, regarded as the
greatest voice in country
music history, was hospi-
talized for the second
time this year Monday in
Nashville, Tenn., with an
upper respiratory infec-
tion. The 80-year-old
spent a week in the hos-
pital in March as well.
The "White Lightning"
singer has canceled his
live performances
through the month of
June and will reschedule
shows where possible.

Doc Watson still in
critical condition
WINSTON-SALEM,
N.C. Grammy-winning
folk musician Doc Watson
remains in critical condi-
tion at a
North
Carolina
hospital
I after un-
dergoing
colon sur-
gery this
week.
Doc A
Watson spokes-
woman at
Baptist Hospital in Win-
ston-Salem said Watson
remained in critical con-
dition Saturday
The 89-year-old Wat-
son's daughter, Nancy,
said the musician fell
Monday
The blind singer and
guitarist has won several
Grammys, including a
lifetime achievement
award. He also received
the National Medal of
the Arts.
Watson is known as a
master of the flatpicking
style of guitar playing. He
also started Merlefest, an
annual gathering of musi-
cians in Wilkesboro named
after his son, who died in a
tractor accident in 1985.

Britney Spears
now on X Factor'
AUSTIN, Texas Brit-
ney Spears has been on
the job
just two
days and
she's al-
ready
i proving to
be a pop-
Sular
judge on
Britney "The X
Spears Factor."
The pop
queen is growing into her
role as critic on the Fox
singing contest show.
She's also showing
she's not afraid to vote
against contestants or
disagree occasionally
with show creator Simon
Cowell and fellow judges
Demi Lovato and LA
Reid.
"I feel like your song
was just in the wrong
key," Spears told a con-
testant Friday
-From wire reports


No more big bucks


Associated Press
'American Idol' runner-up Jessica Sanchez performs Wednesday at the "American Idol" finale in Los Angeles. She
does not have a definite shot at producing an album and could be paid as little as $30,000 in advances.

American Idol' moves toward lower payouts for runners-up


ANTHONY MCCARTNEY
AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES Coming in sec-
ond on "American Idol" may still be
a path to superstardom, but it no
longer offers guaranteed paychecks
worthy of the next pop idol or rock
star.
Wednesday night's runner-up, 16-
year-old Jessica Sanchez, doesn't
have a definite shot at producing an
album and could be paid as little as
$30,000 in advances for recording
singles, according to the "Idol" con-
tract she and other Season 11 con-
testants signed earlier this year
The agreement appears to be the
first time in "Idol's" history that
producers are not offering the
show's runner-up an album deal
that in previous years came with a
guaranteed advance of at least
$175,000, an Associated Press re-
view of the Fox show's contracts re-
veals.
The analysis covers eight of
"Idol's" 11 seasons during which
contracts filed for contestants
under the age of 18 were available.
The contracts were reviewed by
judges in accordance with a Cali-
fornia law that requires at least 15
percent of a minor entertainer's
earnings be set aside for their ben-
efit once they reach adulthood.
The reduced royalty advance cov-
ers the period immediately follow-
ing the show. In addition to
recording new music, the series'
winners and finalists are obligated
to perform in a concert tour and
lend their likeness to a Walt Disney
World Resort attraction in Florida.
If Sanchez is given an album deal
following the show, she will receive
the same $175,000 bonus Lauren
Alaina was paid after placing sec-
ond in the show's 10th season. But
19 Recordings Inc., which has the
option to handle the albums and
recordings of Idol contestants for
several years after they appear on
the show, has replaced a guaran-
teed album deal for the runner-up
with a staggered "Development Pe-
riod" that requires less music and
pays out less in advances.
Sanchez could be paid as little as
$30,000 if she is asked to perform
four single songs, or $60,000 if she
records an "EP" of between four
and 10 songs.
Representatives for 19 Record-
ings Inc. and "American Idol" pro-
ducer FremantleMedia declined
comment. They also have not dis-
closed which recording deal would
be offered to Sanchez.
"It makes sense. You can't con-
tinue to offer the same sorts of re-
wards and incentives when the
program was averaging 25 to 30 mil-
lion (viewers), and (now) the finale


Birthday Although you are likely to meet a lot of new,
eventually close friends in the year ahead, you should con-
tinue to spend time with your old pals. They are the ones
who stuck by you when you were less popular, and they'll
always have your back.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It would be best not to boast
about your intentions in advance of accomplishing them.
What you believe you can get done and what you actually
do complete may be two different things.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) There is no reason why you
shouldn't do as good of a job for another as you would for
yourself. Anything less would be deemed unsuccessful and
reflect adversely on your reputation.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You might think it is necessary for
you to be all things to all people, even if you know it's totally
impossible. If you try, it will prove to be totally unproductive.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be careful not to get off on the


Today's HOROSCOPE
wrong foot with anybody, because you could end up wast-
ing the entire day doing nothing else but trying to remedy it.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You only have a slight chance
of coming out ahead of the competition, so don't bet the
farm on doing so. If things don't go perfectly and they
usually don't you'll lose out.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even if a commercial or fi-
nancial development comes off to your liking, the problem
is once you have it in your hands, you might get careless
and lose it again.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) The right answers are
likely to be easily found in situations where you use cold,
hard logic. However, if you put too much faith in your
hunches, they aren't likely to hold up.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Conditions are a bit topsy-
turvy inasmuch as you might be fortunate in matters that af-
fect your material affairs, but not so lucky in keeping the


is barely breaking 20 million," said
Northwestern University assistant
professor Max Dawson, who
teaches a course on reality televi-
sion.
Wednesday's finale was the low-
est-rated final show for "Idol" in its
history
"These contracts don't pay off,"
he said, contrasting the long list of
"Idol" alumni who have been
dropped by record labels with those
who have thriving careers. "It
seems like the successes that peo-
ple like Kelly Clarkson and Carrie
Underwood have had are the
flukes."
He noted the recording industry
has shifted toward single song sales
in recent years, and even estab-
lished artists are struggling to sell
full albums.
"I wouldn't be surprised, quite
frankly, if this is the direction they
head with the winners," Dawson
said.
Buyers purchased nearly 1.3 bil-
lion single songs last year as op-
posed to 331 million albums, said
Dave Bakula, Nielsen's senior vice
president of analytics for Sound-
Scan. He noted some "Idol" run-
ners-up have been successful, but
producers appear to be giving
themselves more flexibility with
how they develop artists in differ-
ent genres.
"Idol" winner Phillip Phillips will
receive the same $300,000 advance


given to last year's winner, Scotty
McCreery, upon completion of his
first album, according to the con-
tracts. Finalists who placed third
and lower could receive deals to
record singles, EPs or full albums,
with the lowest advance amounting
to $24,000 if they complete their
commitment to record up to four
single songs.
Higher advances are paid if 19
Recordings agrees to produce more
albums, with Phillips eligible to re-
ceive up to $800,000 for a six-album
deal.
Advances are paid and later de-
ducted from the singer's song royal-
ties.
"As the music industry is chang-
ing, it makes sense for 'Idol' to
change as well," Dawson said.
Despite the contract reductions,
more opportunities exist for recent
"Idol" contestants to earn money
than their predecessors. Phillips
will be paid $200,000 for his Disney
attraction work and Sanchez will
rake in $50,000 for her appear-
ances. Both are set to get a cut of
merchandise profits.
No matter what recording deal
Sanchez is offered, she already has
heavyweight Hollywood represen-
tation. In March, a judge approved
a deal in which she will be repre-
sented by Creative Artists Agency
for future television, personal ap-
pearance and other employment
deals.


goodwill of the people involved.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Social encounters with
good friends will turn out to be pleasant experiences for
you. Conversely, mingling with business associates might
be a pain in the neck.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order to accomplish a
major objective, a lot of assertiveness and boldness will be
required on your part. If you're too faint-hearted to do so,
it'll turn out to be just another day.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -A close friend who is always
tight-lipped about his or her personal affairs will resent it if
you poke your nose where it doesn't belong. Don't create
an incident.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You'll do an excellent job
working on numerous projects but sadly, unless you speak
up, others may get the credit for your accomplishments. If it
matters to you, say something.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MAY 25
Mega Money: 8 23 25 26
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $800,000
4-of-4 6 $1,226.50
3-of-4 MB 54 $298.50
3-of-4 1,105 $43.50
2-of-4 MB 1,559 $21.50
1-of-4 MB 11,984 $2.50
2-of-4 31,587 $2
Fantasy 5: 7 20 24 32 34
5-of-5 2 winners $122,937.16
4-of-5 357 $111
3-of-5 11,544 $9.50
THURSDAY, MAY 24
Fantasy 5:1 3 16 20 32
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 266 $555
3-of-5 8,483 $23.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 27,
the 148th day of 2012. There
are 218 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 27, 1937, the
newly completed Golden
Gate Bridge connecting San
Francisco and Marin County,
Calif., was opened to pedes-
trian traffic (vehicular traffic
began crossing the bridge
the next day).
On this date:
In 1861, Chief Justice
Roger Taney, sitting as a fed-
eral circuit court judge in Bal-
timore, ruled President
Abraham Lincoln lacked the
authority to suspend the writ
of habeas corpus (Lincoln
disregarded the ruling).
In 1912, golf legend Sam
Snead was born in Ashwood,
Va.
In 1929, Charles A. Lind-
bergh Jr. married Anne Mor-
row in Englewood, N.J.
In 1935, the Supreme
Court struck down the Na-
tional Industrial Recovery Act.
In 1941, the British Royal
Navy sank the German bat-
tleship Bismarck off France,
with a loss of some 2,000
lives, three days after the Bis-
marck sank the HMS Hood.
In 1942, Navy Cook 3rd
Class Doris "Dorie" Miller be-
came the first African-American
to receive the Navy Cross for
his "extraordinary courage and
disregard for his own personal
safety" during Japan's attack
on Pearl Harbor.
In 1962, a dump fire in
Centralia, Pa., ignited a slow-
burning blaze in underground
coal deposits that continues
to smolder to this day.
In 1985, in Beijing, repre-
sentatives of Britain and
China exchanged instru-
ments of ratification on the
pact returning Hong Kong to
the Chinese in 1997.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush commemo-
rated Memorial Day at Nor-
mandy American Cemetery
in France, where he honored
the 9,387 men and women
buried there.
Five years ago: American
forces freed 42 kidnapped
Iraqis in a raid on an al-Qaida
hideout north of Baghdad.
One year ago: Gil Scott-
Heron, 62, widely considered
one of the godfathers of rap
music, died in New York.
Today's Birthdays: Pulitzer
Prize-winning novelist Herman
Wouk is 97. Former Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger is 89.
Actress Lee Meriwether is 77.
Actor Louis Gossett Jr. is 76.
Motion Picture Association of
America Chairman Christo-
pher Dodd is 68.


Thought for Today:
"Great wisdom is generous;
petty wisdom is contentious.
Great speech is impas-
sioned, small speech cantan-
kerous." Chuang-Tzu,
Chinese essayist (c.369
B.C.E.-c.286 B.C.E.)


'American Idol' winner Phillip Phillips performs Wednesday in Los Angeles.












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 /.I.IV' ,."
^ ^^*lop.;e.

s<^^?UP


Associated Press
People walk through a portion of the Boston Common covered with American flags Wednesday in Boston. Relatives and volunteers planted
the 33,000 flags in the historic park in advance of the Memorial Day weekend, in tribute to Massachusetts soldiers killed in conflicts as far
back as the Civil War.



Honor service and sacrifice


Memorial Day is our nation's com-
memoration of the sacrifices made
by those whose lives were on the
line for the freedoms we hold sacred.
Whether our veterans survived their mili-
tary service or were lost on the field of battle,
our country owes each of them, and their
families, a debt of gratitude.
I am not a veteran. In the summer of 1969,
the year of the nation's first draft lottery, my
birthday, June 26, was drawn as No. 327. For
those not aware of the significance of that, my
birthday could have come up No. 1 or No.
365. I was fortunate to be so far down the list,
and therefore assured by the luck of the draw
to not be called up to serve in the Vietnam War
One of my closest friends drew No. 6, an-
other in the low 20s. Both were ineligible for
student deferment and were drafted. One
was sent to duty at a NATO base in Europe
because he had strong language skills; the
other was deployed to Vietnam, where he
was seriously wounded in 1970 and sent
home. He never fully recovered from his
neck, shoulder and arm wounds.
As we look at the history of wars proposed
by presidents, declared or otherwise funded
by Congress, and supported to varying de-
grees by our citizens, let's remember that
none of these conflicts were or, to this day, are
immune from political and social contro-
versy. But we should never confuse debate
over military policy with the need to be re-
spectful of those whose lives are at risk on
the battlefield, in the air, or on the seas.
Our nation has been the cherished desti-


nation for great waves
of immigrants, many
from the world's most
frightening and re-
pressive nations. My
S\ father and maternal
grandparents were
three of those immi-
grants, and perhaps
Jack Levine your family has its
GUEST story of freedom-seek-
ing relatives.
COLUMN Even for our black
neighbors whose an-
cestors came shackled in the holds of slave
ships, and Native Americans whose ances-
tors were slaughtered, subjected to racist
cruelties or herded into reservations, the
children of today's American families should
enjoy the opportunity to be free from the
threats of oppression and terror. That free-
dom was earned, bled for, and in so many
cases, died for by our fighting forces.
Memorial Day presents an important chance
to focus our thoughts and honor the military
service of our parents and grandparents, sons
and daughters, brothers and sisters, aunts,
uncles and cousins. Individuals who either
volunteered or were drafted, wore the uniform
of our armed forces, and gave all or a portion of
their lives in service to our nation and its allies.
In respect of those who fought and are
fighting today, and especially in memory of
those we've lost, let's not be passive about the
importance of their sacrifice.
In their honor, let's pledge to participate in


the following advocacy activities:
Register, vote and urge others to do the
same. Democracy demands dedication.
Actively communicate with candidates
and elected officials about issues affecting
families, including military families. Re-
member, our elected officials work for us,
and elections are job interviews.
Share your thoughts in the media by
writing letters to the editor. Share opinions
with editorial boards, columnists and reporters.
Media is the most cost-effective megaphone.
Motivate youth to exercise their voice in
matters which affect them. Our next genera-
tion of advocates needs good role modeling.
Confront those who think that complain-
ing about problems is sufficient Whining is
not as productive as winning!
Compliment community leadership and
promote active involvement by friends, col-
leagues and neighbors as volunteers, whom I
call "time philanthropists."
Support causes that focus on advocating
positive change. Spectating doesn't produce
progress. Our gifts of time and financial sup-
port are vital, no matter the cause.
Let's exercise our rights and take our re-
sponsibilities seriously as we move forward
to make our communities safer, more secure
and worthy of the legacy our children and
grandchildren deserve.

Jack Levine is founder of the Tallahassee-
based 4Generations Institute. He maybe
reached at Jack@4Gen.org.

Air Force
Major Terry
Dutcher,
of Hill Air
Force Base,
Utah, visits
the grave
S. of her son,
*Army Corpo-
...* ral Michael
-- Avery Pursel,
r, who died
serving in
Iraq in 2007
at age 19,
on Thursday
N I surrounded
by flags
placed by
soldiers at
each grave
for the
"Flags-In"
.in honor of
Memorial Day
S at Arlington
National
, *, Cemetery in
Arlington, Va.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The


season


of change

In Ecclesiastes 3 we
are told, "To every-
thing there is a sea-
son, and a time to every
purpose under the
heaven."
In the big picture of
things, it's sometimes dif-
ficult to see the seasons
change. But if you were
paying attention this
month in Citrus County,
you witnessed some no-
table changing of the
guard.
One of the most sig-
nificant retirements comes
from Ralph Russo of Sug-
armill Woods. Ralph is the
founder and inspiration
behind the Citrus County
chapter of SCORE, the
organization of retired
executives.
The SCORE volunteers
donate their time and ex-
ecutive experience to as-
sist Citrus County
entrepreneurs and busi-
ness owners. At no cost to
the businesses, these vol-
unteers help private com-
panies navigate through
the complexities of
starting up and growing a
business.
Ralph helped build one
of the best SCORE chap-
ters in the nation right
here in Citrus County. The
SCORE national organiza-
tion recently recognized
the best chapters in Amer-
ica. Big-city organizations
from San Diego and
Chicago were given recog-
nition right along with the
small-town efforts of
Citrus County.
Ralph is the poster boy
for retirees in our commu-
nity. He moved here after
a successful career up
north and then con-
tributed his skills to make
his new home a better
place.
On the other side of
the equation, in comes
Amy Meek as the new ex-
ecutive at the United Way
of Citrus County. Amy is
the young, articulate
woman who was just
hired to run the county's
largest nonprofit agency
United Way raises hun-
dreds of thousands of dol-
lars each year to fund 19
other nonprofit agencies
in the county and to
address the top issues
of concern in our
community.
Amy is a graduate of
Crystal River High School
and the mother of two
young boys. She happens
to be the wife of County
Commissioner Joe Meek.
Amy is filled with en-
thusiasm, compassion and
a vision for how the
United Way can better use
its resources to address
the top problems that face
Citrus County. She offi-
cially begins her new job
on June 1.

See Page C3


To tweet or not to tweet? There's no question


I admit it: I'm a social media
junkie.
It started innocently enough
with a personal Facebook page and a
couple hundred connections. I posted
the usual: favorite foods, songs,
events with friends, pictures.
More and more friends emerged
and, despite my belief that the masses
were interested in my witty repartee,
it seemed they were more interested
in talking politics with a state senator
Soon I was up to the 5,000-friend max-
imum and I couldn't accept requests


from people I actually knew.
Plus, some friends were put off by
the political debates on my Facebook
page, which overshadowed issues
like "how do you make the perfect
PBJ?"
There was only one solution: start
a second, strictly political page. My
new professional page had no friend
limit, but users had to "like" you and
you couldn't control who was your
friend. This was a bit risky, but what
the heck, I like a good argument and
a healthy exchange of differing views.


How to get the political folks to
leave my personal page and sign on to
the political page? First, I asked
nicely A few hundred joined the po-
litical page, but only a couple dozen
dropped off the personal page. So I
stopped posting on the personal page
for a few days, as long as I could
stand, to try to drive traffic to the po-
litical page. The political page was
growing, but people weren't leaving
the personal page.
My next move was a little odd. I an-
nounced that I would be "defriend-


ing" anyone who wasn't related or a
close personal friend, but offered to
keep anyone who asked to be kept.
This opened the floodgates of des-
perate pleas and funny comments to
earn a keep.
After the tedious process of identi-
fying those to be kept with a goal of
reducing 5,000 to 500 I sent a final
message that everyone is welcome on
my political page and the defriending
began.


Page C3


Paula Dockery
FLORIDA
VOICES







Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012



PINION


"He who findeth fault meaneth to buy."
Thomas Fuller, M.D., "Gnomologia," 1732


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
J EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z..Ifl Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

RETHINK THIS ONE





Logic lost





in SBDC





decision


ad a majority of county
commissioners under-
stood the role of the
Small Business Development
Center, they might not have
voted to kiss off an annual
grant of $69,000 for a modest
matching contribution of
$32,500.
The SBDC is not SCORE
(the Service Corps of Retired
Executives), which provides
consultations to
individuals look- THE IS
ing to start up new
businesses. Pulling fu
The SBDC is Small E
not the Economic Developm
Development Coun-
cil (EDC), which OUR 01
courts existing in-
dustries in hopes Ill-inf
they'll relocate to deci
Citrus County,
along with other functions.
The SBDC is not the busi-
ness "incubator" a project of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the EDC -
which seeks to nurture con-
cepts of would-be entrepre-
neurs to create budding
businesses.
Yes, the SBDC shares an of-
fice with the incubator because
the chamber had space avail-
able in Homosassa, but the two
aren't to be confused.
Commissioner Dennis Dam-
ato with echoes from Com-
missioners Rebecca Bays and
Winn Webb said the SBDC
isn't doing what he thinks it
should do. As a program of the
federal Small Business Admin-
istration, the SBDC can't really
re-create itself to meet the
whims of county officials in all
50 states.
Its primary function is to as-
sist existing small businesses
with free services ranging from
financial and marketing advice
to engineering and technical
problems.
In seeking county funding of
$32,500 for the upcoming fiscal
year, commissioners were pre-
sented with local data. While
the SBDC only helped in the
startup of one business, it as-
sisted in the expansion of 18,
resulting in the retention of 28
jobs and 19 new jobs in the
county.
"I believe your focus should
have been on local business re-
tention, not startups," Commis-


Meaningless deaths
Another Memorial Day is coming


e

P
or
s


sioner Damato told the SBDC
officials on Tuesday
Given the data provided, the
skeptical commissioner failed
to acknowledge that that was
the case.
"Anybody should not go into
business right now unless they
have three to five years' worth
of capital and are willing to go
ahead and do that," Commis-
sioner Damato asserted.
That's fine -
;SUE: but it has little to
SUE do with the func-
nds from tion of the SBDC.
business The trio of com-
nt Center. missioners voting
against SBDC
INION: funding indicated
rmed they want to see
rmed cold, hard results.
ion. With its primary
stated purpose
being to strengthen existing
businesses, cold, hard results
aren't as easily quantified as is
the manufacturing of widgets.
It's a bit baffling that little
value was placed on the 174 in-
dividual counseling sessions
provided to 72 businesses.
It's perplexing that little
value was placed on seven
workshops over the past 12
months that attracted 146 ad-
vice-thirsty small-businesspeo-
ple, where they gained insight
into social media, financial
performance and business con-
tinuity.
Rather than continuing to go
down the path of educating our
small-business owners, Com-
missioner Damato proposes
taking the $32,500 in funds
from business licenses to hire
a full-time lobbyist.
He also suggested that those
funds be used as seed money
for Port Citrus, under the di-
rection of the county commis-
sion and port authority -
comprised of the same individ-
uals but, in theory, separate
bodies.
And, he also suggested that
the money be used to help ex-
isting businesses.
Exactly
That is what the money was
being used for along with the
matching $69,000.
When it comes to helping
small businesses, the commis-
sion's vote was a clear-cut case
of failing to see the forest for
the trees.


Local means local


After years and years of every-


up on us. It's a shame body touting "shop lo-
many men and women all OUND cally" I'm consistently
throughout the country amazed by the number
and the world, good of businesses and people
Americans, have died for who go out of town to
causes that didn't pan shop for deals. They as-
out to be anything. Look sume they can get things
at our country. Foreigners online from out of town
are buying our corpora- less expensively than they
tions and putting good CA. can get here. Haven't
Americans on breadlines. 56 05 they learned yet that they
I don't care what party's 563-0579 should practice what they
in office. This is a terrible preach? They go around
and a crying shame. Men and women and tell everybody, "Shop local"
are sacrificing for this country. and they themselves go out of town.


A liberal squee


WASHINGTON
n one of his characteristic
conniptions about people
who frustrated him,
Theodore Roosevelt, progres-
sivism's first president, said of
Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, "I
could carve out of a banana a
judge with more backbone than
that." TR was as mistaken about
Holmes' spine as are
various progressives 1
today about Chief Jus-
tice John Roberts'.
They are waging an
embarrassingly obvi- I
ous campaign, hoping I
he will buckle be-
neath the pressure of
their disapproval and
declare Obamacare Georg
constitutional. The OTI
crucial question is
whether Congress ex- V014
ceeded its enumer-
ated power to regulate interstate
commerce when it mandated that
individuals engage in commerce
by purchasing health insurance.
Justice Anthony Kennedy is
generally considered today's
swing vote, but his acerbic first
question to the administration's
lawyer during the second day of
oral argument changed assump-
tions: "Can you create commerce
in order to regulate it?"
Concluding that Kennedy
might be disposed to overturn the
mandate, some Obamacare de-
fenders decided that Roberts'
vote will be decisive. They hope
to secure it by causing Roberts to
worry about his reputation and
that of his institution.
Recently, for example, Ver-
mont's Pat Leahy, chairman of
the Judiciary Committee, deliv-
ered a Senate speech defending
the constitutionality of what he
calls the "personal responsibility
requirement" (This is his Orwellian
appellation for the mandate,
whereby government coercion
nullifies personal choice regard-
ing insurance.) After 37 years in
the Senate, Leahy probably no
longer knows when he sounds in-


sufferably patronizing, as he did
when he said that during oral ar-
gument he thought Roberts
"seemed well aware of the signif-
icance of (the Obamacare) deci-
sion." And "I thought I saw a chief
justice who understands the im-
portance of this case to all Amer-
icans." And Roberts "seemed to
understand" the deference owed
to Congress.
Leahy intimated
that overturning Oba-
T. macare would be as
0 momentous, as divi-
sive of the nation and
as damaging to the
* court as was Bush v.
Gore, which he asserts
S "shook the confidence
e Will of the American peo-
IER ple in the Supreme
Court." But surely a
DES striking fact about that
decision is how
equably Americans accepted it.
This testified to the court's
durable prestige, which is a func-
tion of the court's immunity to
pressures from politicians. Pub-
lic approval of the court is above
50 percent; that of Congress
below 20 percent.
Leahy unsubtly intimated that
to avoid "another 5-4 decision"
Roberts should emulate "the
leadership that Chief Justice
Warren provided in the unani-
mous decision in Brown v Board
of Education." It is, however,
passing strange to compare the
Obamacare case with Brown, im-
plying that a less-than-
unanimous decision would be
dangerous.
The school desegregation case
overturned the social order of an
entire region and accelerated the
transformation of the nation's
cultural norms. Obamacare is
just an unpopular law enacted by
grotesque logrolling (securing
three Democratic senators' votes
with the "Louisiana Purchase,"
the "Gator-aid" and the "Corn-
husker Kickback"). Furthermore,
Obamacare passed because grossly
corrupt conduct by Justice De-


ze play

apartment prosecutors in the trial
of Republican Sen. Ted Stevens
ofAlaska had cost him re-election.
Leahy tutored Roberts about
"appropriate deference" to "the
elected branch," vacuously ad-
monished him to be "a chief jus-
tice for all of us," and absurdly
asserted that the mandate is
"consistent with the understand-
ing of the Constitution" that "the
American people have had for
the better part of a century" Jef-
frey Rosen of George Washington
Law School, writing in The New
Republic, topped Leahy's rhetor-
ical extravagance by saying this is
Roberts' "moment of truth" be-
cause if the court overturns Oba-
macare 5-4, Roberts' "stated goal
of presiding over a less divisive
court will be viewed as an irre-
deemable failure."
Oh? Viewed by whom? Perhaps
by people who consider it "ideo-
logical" and somehow reprehen-
sible that in the last full term,
conservative Justices John
Roberts and Sam Alito voted to-
gether 96 percent of the time, but
who consider it principled and
admirable that Justices Sonia So-
tomayor and Elena Kagan voted
together 94 percent of the time.
Like-minded justices agree. So?
Why, exactly, would it be less
"divisive" for the court to uphold
the broadly disliked Obamacare
5-4 than to overturn it 5-4? But
whether Obamacare is liked or
detested is entirely irrelevant.
The public's durable deference
toward the Supreme Court derives
from the public's recognition that
the court is deferential not to
Congress but to the Constitution.
Concerning which, it is cheeky
of Rosen, a liberal, to lecture
Roberts about jurisprudential
conservatism, which Rosen says
requires "restraint." Such clumsy
attempts to bend the chief justice
are apt to reveal his spine of
steel.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Vote responsibly
In America we have the won-
derful privilege of being able to
vote and select our most quali-
fied representatives to work for
us. However, what I am witness-
ing is extreme apathy and inade-
quate consideration of facts
concerning candidates to base
wise judgment so important in
guiding our future.
Our low voter turnout is histor-
ically an embarrassment, and
with that a frustrating indicator
supporting my appeal. Many
who cast a ballot do so because
their families always voted along
this or that party line, or our
union told us to do this, entitle-
ment preservation, or some
other misplaced justification.
We absolutely must not vote
with a casual, subjective, preju-
diced basis of preference. Many
dismiss their going to vote be-
cause they don't like any candi-
date. This inaction demonstrates
a complete lack of respect for a
bestowed honor with failure to
become more involved and ac-
cept their inherent obligation.
We are constantly bombarded
by extensively biased news re-
porting, distortions by candi-
dates, including proven lies, and
so much else that alters and im-
pairs a voter's judgment through
a well crafted design and intent.
We, as American voters who


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

have this deep commitment
about reversing this country's
obvious declination, not only
value the cherished right to vote,
but also the inherent responsi-
bility to do it by honestly under-
standing the actual credentials
and capability of each candidate
and looking through this manip-
ulative smokescreen of misrep-
resentation and accusations.
The campaign trail has be-
come a negative, unproductive,
overly competitive battlefield
and a huge waste of resources.


The voting public simply must
see beyond all this conflict and
extract the positive, factual, and
unbiased messages that will lead
us back to greatness through our
making the correct choice in the
voting booth.
We will be making a vitally im-
portant decision in November,
undoubtedly the most critical in
the history of this great nation. I
implore you to do it responsibly
for all the right reasons so we
may be represented by strong
leaders of integrity, character,
and love of country The tradi-
tions that have made us excel as
a free enterprise democracy
must be preserved and defended.
Bob Peacock
Hernando

Stand united
With all the dissension, tur-
moil and unrest in our country, it
may be difficult to be patriotic.
Have we forgotten Sept. 11,
our veterans and the men and
women who gave their lives for
our country? How about the
ones serving today that we may
have freedom?
Let's fly the flag and be proud
to be an American united and
one nation under God.
Margie Marcotte
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


-I
H





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Coming home: There's got to be a better way!


Cheryl and I have
found there are al-
ways two prices to
pay when we travel abroad:
There is the cost of passage,
including ship and land
transportation as well as
airfare; and there is the
wear and tear on our bod-
ies which comes while com-
ing home. That always
seems to be the hardest
part coming home.
Maybe one day we will be-
come smart enough to fly to
wherever it is we want to go
and then sail back home,
but that hasn't happened
yet.
As it pertains to our most
recent trip, we finished up
a delightful monthlong voy-
age while in Sydney, slept a
restful night at a high-qual-
ity hotel, were transported
to the airport via limousine
and were met by a porter


who took us and our lug-
gage to the appropriate
check-in line.
So far so good, but then
the good was over
We stopped being treated
like pedigree poodles and
pretty much became cattle
in a herd heading to the
stockyards of the eastern
United States.
Before I go further, let me
stop 'em before they start
and explain that our chil-
dren always chide me when
complaining about a little
bit of inconvenience after
completing a fabulous trip,
but their definition of a "lit-
tle bit of inconvenience"
and mine differ. Having to
wait in line to check your
luggage is a little bit of in-
convenience; flying 11,000
miles economy class from
Sydney to Tampa with stops
in Los Angeles and Dallas


during a total period of 30 was unusual to say the least.
hours is not. Remember last week when
Why, you might ask, do we I said remember my refer-
not fly first class or at least ence to March 1? Well, here
business class? goes. We left
The answer is Sydney at noon
simple-money on March 1 and
The cost of our we arrived in
flights would Los Angeles
then be almost shortly before 7
as much as the a.m. on March 1.
cost of the entire That's right, we
trip, so Cheryl got there five
and I pour our- hours before we
selves into un- Fred Brannen left, but you
dersized seats, A SLICE must add 24
fasten the seat- hours for cross-
belts, eat and OF LIFE ing the interna-
drink whatever tional dateline
they're inclined to provide and subtract the regular
and try to survive, time zone changes, so, my
It took eight columns to best guess is that the flight
get us from San Francisco to took approximately 17 hours.
Sydney, but, I promise, I'll We were then rushed
only take just this one to through immigration and
bring us home. customs at the L.A. airport
The first leg of the trip and waited.


Eventually, we boarded a
flight from Los Angeles to
Dallas, which took some-
thing over four hours, then,
again, we waited.
Dallas wasn't really so
bad. We found a restaurant
in the airport with which we
were familiar and which we
both like very much, but
while we were having a nice
meal, I finally checked our
tickets to confirm our pro-
jected arrival time in
Tampa.
Surprise!
When we had boarded in
Sydney, no one pointed out
the change to our flight
schedule. Our layover in
Dallas was now only two
hours instead of four, so we
rushed through the first de-
cent meal we'd had in a day
so as to scurry off and catch
the final hop from Dallas to
Tampa.


Enough already
At about 1 a.m. on March
2, we arrived home. And,
once more, after kissing the
door, I told the same old lie I
always tell, "I'm never leav-
ing home again." But, I
know I will. Cheryl and I
enjoy traveling, and most of
all, I enjoy watching her
enjoy traveling. So, no
doubt, we will do it again -
but next time, I hope we're
smart enough to make the
coming-home part a little bit
less stressful it will take
some scheduling considera-
tions, but nothing says we
can't reverse the order of
our goings and comings.
There's got to be a better
way!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Water threat ex

"So here comes the 'bad'news: A water- which al
use permit application has recently been to measu
filed at the St. Johns River Water Manage- Silver
ment District (SJRWMD) requesting an av- at lower
erage withdrawal ofmore than 13 million Flows co:
gallons of water a day (MGD) from the erage rai
Floridan Aquifer The purpose of this thing outs
water use will be to care for 30,000 head of rainfall b
cattle, and the associated slaughterhouse. decade, f
Even more alarming, the request includes age despi
use of more than 26 MGD, maximum aquifer f(
pumpage, from more than 100 wells lo- The eff
cated on 30,000 acres of land just north of area, assi
Ocala." to measu
Gary Kuhl, environmental engineer, water coi
quoted in the Citrus County Chronicle. the aquif
of water
r. Kuhl's are the typical thoughts of flows in s
environmental activists and regu- However,
lators who stifle economic growth Mr. Ku
and trample upon private property rights, alarm ab(
Many of them place more value
on preserving the Earth, undis-
turbed, than upon permitting
citizens to utilize the bounty of
the Earth to earn a living.
Let's put this into proper per-
spective. Thirteen million gal-
lons of water per day are to be
withdrawn to support 30,000 head
of cattle, create jobs and pro-
vide food for millions of people. Dr. William Dixon
The Floridan Aquifer from OTHER
which the water will be with- OTHER
drawn is about 100,000 square VOICES
miles in size, extending from
southern Georgia throughout most of be solved
Florida. I could find no estimates, but it Restor:
probably contains hundreds of trillions of tine stat
gallons of water. Twelve million gallons per Florida
day is but a tiny fraction of that number and pestilenc
far less than is lost every day by evaporation goal. A w
from just a few of the lakes fed by that aquifer needs an
The average thunderstorm is estimated best we c
to contain around 275 million gallons of vironmer
water One small storm dumping water on
the aquifer every 10 days would easily re-
place the 13 million gallons requested to be William
withdrawn daily Universi
But all 13 million gallons need not be re- the USF
placed. Some water will evaporate and tion. He
some will become part of the cows. Most of and as a
the water will be returned directly to the the rank
aquifer after it has been used for irrigation assistant
and as waste water, filtered by the soil. The versity o
impact of actual water loss upon the flow of practih
water in nearby Silver Springs, something


OCD KERY I was flat
for store
fully use
Continued from Page C1 The ph
formed, y
A word of warning: People do not like to political
be defriended. Despite the alternative site sage out (
and the polite warnings, people you've The mi:
never met are greatly offended when you hard to
remove them from your personal Facebook thought i
page. Once they realized they were no nature of
longer getting my feed, friend requests Twitter el
started coming in droves, by progr
Other Facebook friends informed me of larly mac
my mistake in defriending so-and-so. Little politician
by little, people were added
back in and new folks joined. Not a day goes
My status today? I'm at the by that I don't ru
5,000-friend limit on my per- into someone I
sonal page, with a couple into someone
thousand friend requests don't think I knov
pending, and plenty of room only to be told w
on my political page, with nly e old w
around 4,500 tuning in. are friends on
Apparently more folks are Facebook or tha
interested in my travels, my
favorite songs, my new motor they follow me
scooter and how much I saved on Twitter.
with coupons at Publix. So
now I keep two Facebook pages active. If ing up wi
you post anything political on my personal group.
page, you get a gentle reminder that this Not a
page is a "no politics zone." If you do it re- into somE
peatedly, you are defriended. be told tI
The only rule on my political page is that or that tl
if you are rude to anyone else posting on my they tell r
page, you will be blocked. You can argue, of old i
you can disagree, you can post your own conversai
links, but you cannot be disrespectful. For tho
The exchange of ideas, opinions, sugges- world ofE
tions and information has been tremen- on being
dous. As an elected official, I learn a great oddly mo
deal about what people are angry and con- A wore
cerned about. People seem to be very open Your wor
on Facebook, much more so than in person
or by email. My favorite thing is to throw out
a controversial topic or news story, and step Pau
back and let others debate. True democ- Repu
racy and free speech at work. who is
But then came my love for Twitter. At Flori
3,350 followers, my account is pretty active, atp


aggerated

arms Mr Kuhl, would be too small
re.
Springs, indeed, has been flowing
rates in 10 of the last 20 years.
rrelate best with the reduced av-
nfall during that period some-
side the control of regulators. Had
been above average over the past
lows would have been above aver-
ite what was withdrawn from the
or human use.
fect of population growth in the
umed to reduce flows, is difficult
re. But, again, keep in mind that
nsumed by humans is returned to
er, not forever lost. Our utilization
most probably has little effect on
springs and on water table levels.
it does affect water quality
hl might better have expressed
out the increasing levels of nitrates
in the springs. Nitrate pollution
encourages the growth of algae
and puts pressure on native
plants and stream life. Nitrate
pollution is directly affected by
fertilizers used to grow food and
by unavoidable human waste.
The nitrate problem was many
decades in the making and would
take decades to eliminate, even
if all humans were banned from
Florida. It won't be solved by
denying the commerce and eco-
nomic growth which funds solu-
tions to the problem. It cannot
d by cutting off our food supply
ing the environment to the pris-
e that existed when humans in
struggled to survive parasites,
;e and heat is not a reasonable
orkable balance between human
Ld a healthy environment is the
an do. It seems, at times, that en-
italists lose sight of this.


Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
ty, New York Medical College and
College ofBusiness Administra-
served in the Army as a surgeon
Special Forces Officer, achieving
ofLieutenant Colonel. He was an
t professor of surgery at the Uni-
)f Georgia before entering private
ce. Dr Dixon can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


tered to be contacted by reporters
es about politicians who success-
social media.
uses: you are so much better in-
'ou get a good feel for shifts in the
tide and you get to get your mes-
quickly
nuses: extremely time consuming,
accurately deliver a complex
n 140 characters and the public
f those who want to argue. Your
effectiveness is officially measured
ams such as Klout, and I've regu-
le the "Top Five List" for Florida
is who tweet, only deepening my
addiction.
My favorite time on Twitter
n happened the last day of ses-
sion, when things were too
hectic to keep an accurate ac-
W, count of the day's activities. It
e was easy to send a quick tweet
and later turn the collection
into a column chronicling the
t inner workings of legislating,
otherwise known as sausage-
making. The runner-up: or-
ganizing a pub crawl among
four or five friends and end-
th an expanded and enthusiastic

day goes by that I don't run
eone I don't think I know, only to
hat we are friends on Facebook
hey follow me on Twitter. When
me their name, it's like a reunion
friends reminiscing about our
tions.
ose of you who haven't joined the
social media, you are missing out
connected in this less personal but
re personal world.
1 of warning: Tweet responsibly
ds will live in infamy

la Dockery is a term-limited
blican senator from Lakeland
chronicling her final year in the
da Senate. She can be reached
dockery@floridavoices, com.


Statistics, not anecdotes
This letter is response to letter titled
"Obama not liked," dated May 11 and
written by Harry Cooper. Mr Cooper
bashes statistics and claims he gives
facts.
In a previous letter, he presented
three gas receipts with no price per gal-
lon of gas on them when he was dis-
cussing gas prices. I wrote back the
exact gas prices per gallon for those pe-
riods of time. I guess Mr. Cooper has a
different definition of what a fact is.
Once again, he blames President
Obama for the price of fuel. This time he
brings up the Keystone XL pipeline.
When the pipeline goes through, it will
have no impact on the price consumers
pay, the reason being that the price of
gasoline is controlled by the price of
crude oil.
As far as my comments in previous let-
ters about Obama's approval ratings in
Europe, he claims my figures are wrong.
Mr Cooper feels he is an expert on these
ratings because he travels to Europe. My
figures of 75 percent come from Transat-
lantic Trends and Gallup. Call this sta-
tistics or facts; either I will trust much
more then Mr Cooper's opinions.
Also, as I am writing this letter, gas
prices are going down. As far as Obama
being in bed with China, this is also not
true; I retired 10 years ago and many of
our jobs were already sent to China long
before Obama was president. Those re-
ally responsible for jobs going to China
is upper management, which would
rather get cheap Chinese communist
labor then provide a job with a living
wage for a returning veteran who served
his or her country I close saying most
statistics are facts.


Chuck Weiler
Crystal River


The big picture
Art Jones is absolutely correct, in his
letter published May 9, when he says
every ounce of lyngbya physically pulled
out of the water is an ounce of gunk that
doesn't remain in the water. A persistent
effort will have a positive impact on the
water quality in the bay
My concern is that such efforts have to
be never-ending to be effective. Hence
my concern about finding a long-term
solution by reducing nutrients lyngbya
feeds on. My intended focus was on hav-
ing more central sewers installed, elimi-
nating septic systems that let effluent flow
into the soil and on into the water. The
city and county are to be commended
for the project installing central sewer
out Fort Island Trail. Now we need to
look forward to further expansion.
The city of Crystal River has done an
excellent job of getting most of its prop-
erties on central sewer. Citrus County,
however, has more than 60,000 septic tanks
in use. The Pine Ridge treatment plant is
running at under 50 percent capacity Every
effort needs to be made to connect more
properties to the Pine Ridge plant This
is imperative for the quality of our water
A second source of pollution in the
bay is nitrogen fertilizers. The land be-
neath us is typically sandy or karst,
which is limestone pocked with interlac-
ing cavities. Once water soaks into the
ground, it easily finds its way into the
caverns and underground rivers, which
locally seem to flow into King's Bay
Anyone using nitrogen fertilizers in our
county can be adding nitrogen to the bay
My pleas are that: 1) the county spend
money wisely, so funds can be ear-
marked for future sewer expansion; and
2) all residents restrict their use of fertil-
izers to those containing no nitrogen.
Adele Jacobson
Crystal River


K .. ..-,-4 i. -j .


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

This month we also
saw the retirement of Don
Irwin, a retiree who spent
the last dozen years or so
organizing the Our Lady of
Grace Knights of Colum-
bus blood drives. Don, 76,
of Beverly Hills has been
organizing blood drives
since 1995 and has helped
save countless lives
through his efforts.
While he has slowed
down a little, he has left an
incredible mark on our
community He is another
retiree who has made re-
ally good things happen.
Joanna Castle is an-
other young woman who is
on the other side of her
journey Joanna has taken
over as the executive di-
rector of the Citrus County
YMCA and she's making
great things happen. Joanna
is a graduate of Lecanto
High School and the Uni-
versity of Florida. She
moved to Miami, but came


4


back to Citrus County with
her husband and twin 4-
year-old daughters so they
could raise their family
She has immersed her-
self in expanding the
YMCA programs in Citrus
County and will lead the
effort to build the county's
first YMCA facility She is
so enthusiastic and emo-
tional about helping peo-
ple improve their lives that
you can't help but want to
be involved.
It's so great to see our
local graduates come back
to Citrus County and make
a difference.
And speaking of our
county schools, you can't
help but recognize Kelly
Tyler, who just retired
after 11 years at the helm
of Lecanto High School. The
principal spent 29 years in
our county school system
and impacted the lives of
so many children. He kept a
steady hand at the county's
fastest growing high school
and will be missed.
Sticking with our
school system, I have got to
say that one of my favorite


graduates this year is
Adam Taylor of Crystal
River. Lots of students
have to overcome barriers
to success, but Adam had
to overcome a plane crash.
He fought back from life-
threatening injuries he re-
ceived in a plane crash
and graduated last week.
He is off to the University
of Florida in the fall. His
No. 1 cheerleader (and
mom) is Fancy Taylor, and
we hope she will pull him
back to Citrus County after
he graduates.
And finally, Dr. Jim
Harvey officially retires at
the end of next month from
his leadership role at the
College of Central Florida.
Jim helped grow the Citrus
campus of the college and
then went to the Ocala
campus, where he used his
incredible skills to expand
the entire college.


Gerry Mulligan
is the publisher of the
Chronicle. His email
address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Letters to THE EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LITL OM YTUKR YTO OGR


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "superhero" who will guide you to a healthier
lifestyle. He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco
and prescription drugs.


Sidewalks not needed
My comment is, the sidewalks on (State
Road) 44 are a waste of money. I agree
with "Indefinite expense." Payers' money,
save the money. Taxpayers should not
have to pay all this money. The money
should be put towards the community,
such as the pool, the libraries, (S.R.) 44
only. Stop wasting our money. I
am a senior citizen. 01
Stick to path


Down by the grammar school
on Citrus Springs Boulevard, you
spent all kinds of money making
a white line for a bike path, yet
these bicyclers still want to ride
five and six across instead of get-
ting on the bike path that we
spent all that money to build.
College costs


5^
CAL
563-(


The well-to-do people who can afford to
send their children to a good college or
university will receive an excellent educa-
tion while the people who are living pay-
check to paycheck are lucky if their
children get into a college because they
keep cutting the education budget and
keep raising the tuition. Now that is truly
class warfare.


Couch crash
This is for the (person) traveling east on
(State Road) 44, probably going to the
landfill on (May 17). Thank you so much
for not tying down your stuff. You lost
your couch. Unfortunately, we couldn't
avoid it and ran over it and it cost us
$150. Thank you so much.

JND Only American
I agree with Herman Cain and
Ships friend that said it's time to
stop the labeling. No more label-
ing. We are a multicultural-color
nation. So except if you are born
in another country and have be-
come a U.S. citizen, you are ei-
SOO their a brown, red, white or black
American that's it. No Mexican
0579 American, no Polish American,
no French American, no African
American, no English American,
no Chinese American, no Asian American.
Great clinic
This is a big shout-out to Countryside
Animal Clinic. I'd like to thank Mark and the
vet tech and Dr. Jennifer Hooper. I had to take
my little dog, Teddy, there for an emergency
visit and they were just great. I just wanted
everybody to know. Thank you, guys.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Women and policy
Is it possible, now that women
are 52 percent of the electorate,
that we can put a halt to political
and religious wars being fought
on our bodies?
Is it possible for women to eval-
uate policies that directly affect
their lives and well-being and that
of their families for themselves?
Is it possible for women to
speak up and stand up for their
rights when they are told to shut
up and sit down?


I know a lot of women don't want
to have anything to do with politics.
But a lot of us don't like to sit in a
dirty garage while our cars are
being repaired, either Both are
uncomfortable and often hostile
environments for women. But we
need to have our cars repaired
and we need to have our approach
to public policy repaired as well.
Is it possible for women to be
fully participating citizens? Don't
believe what you are told; do
your own research on how these
policies affect your lives.


Do you think elected officials
should impose their personal re-
ligious beliefs and idiosyncrasies
on us via government? Do you
think government has a right to tell
you that you must have an abor-
tion or a child? Should the gov-
ernment prioritize low taxes for
corporations over programs that
help women and children?
Policies are being passed that
regulate all of these things. Be
careful who you vote for.
Jo Darling
Lecanto


Remember service
On Monday, May 28, our nation
will be celebrating Memorial Day
This is a day to commemorate the
sacrifices made by those who have
served our country Their sacrifices
have given American families the
opportunity to enjoy freedom from
terror and threats of oppression.
Whether our veterans survived
their military service, or were
less fortunate and did not return
home, we owe each of them and
their families a debt of gratitude.


While we are celebrating this
Memorial Day weekend, whether
at a memorial service, a barbecue
or picnic or relaxing with friends
and family, please remember Me-
morial Day is a time to focus our
thoughts on our armed forces and
the freedoms we enjoy as a result
of their sacrifices. God bless our
veterans and God bless the USA,
the greatest country in the world!
Arnold Virgilio, Vietnam veteran
Mary-Ann Virgilio, spouse
Inverness


-~


LHR$iWLE


t in'/ri 1h /hidul/l I 2(itali 1 ( t//liu
( .IIII l'illlt.l i\ (I IPtaim./
hi 2n11. 20212


../. /. ......

1 I .. .. 1 I
' I. I. . I .I %. I


F/r. t.i/- Il

( /iWl I nI/


1111.1Wn (,in/c.
f'l L an/ k


. . . . . 1


~\ l:~\l'::.~ lii '"I'll


- -


.Outdoor

Adventure

.:. Sounlday, June 9th I
!X O ~Sunday, June IMh I


% 40


f


Hi

CIT


--. .*--- --, ,.,



CITRUS COUNTY
HISTORIC



100 YEARS
1 9 1 2 2 0 1 2


Cldeiatitg 125 ytArs4
1 9 9 7 2 0 1 2
One Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL
For More Information, Please Call
(352) 341-6436 or (352) 341-6427


happy Birthday

RUS COUNTY!
Come and join us on
Saturday
June 2nd for the
Celebration of two
major birthdays!
Opening Ceremonies at
10:00am West steps
of Historic Courthouse.
Birthday Cake and
Treats will be served
following in the Museum
Meet Robert Butler
Highwaymen Artist, who
created a painting of the
1912 Citrus County
Courthouse, over
25 years ago.
Former Inverness
Primary School Students
will open a time capsule
from 25 years ago.
Along with Many, Many
More Fun Activities.
**** ***E


r 0



SENIORS

ON THE MOVE

ARE HOLDING A
TRASH TO TREASURES

^1 ,SALE
FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2012 4
FROM 10:00 am TIL 2:00 pm
On the Patio at -


2804 W Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
For more information please call 352-527-5959


SnFOUNDATION C, C .RpNC .E


4,

















%z


Friday June 1st
Beverly Hills Farmers Market
Saturday June 2nd
Happy Birthday Citrus County
Movies in The Park: Happy Feet 2
Boat Drawing
25th Anniversarry Spanish American
Dinner/Dance
Music on the Square
Friday June 3rd
Beverly Hills Farmers Market
Citrus Jazz Society
Saturday June 9th
Outdoor Adventure Expo
Sunday June 10th
Outdoor Adventure Expo
Tuesday June 12th
Military Card Party
Wednesday June 13th
Rays vs NY Mets
Thursday June 14th
Flag Day Ceremony Inverness
Friday June 15th
Beverly Hills Farmers Market
Saturday June 16th
Flag Day Celebration Fort Cooper
Wednesday June 20th
Bridal Show & Luncheon
Friday June 22nd
Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre
Trash to Treasures
Saturday June 23rd
Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre
Seminole Hard Rock Casino Trip
Sunday June 24th
Murder Mystery Comedy Music Dinner Theatre


SPONSORED
EVENTS SO
FAR THIS YEAR!
The Chronicle is committed to suppoi ting local
businesses and organizations that provide all types of
services, fundraisers and entei tainment throughout our
community. The Chionicle is committed to helping make
Citrus County the best place to live and work. Don't
hesitate to contact The Chronicle at 352-563-3226 for all
of your sponsorship needs!


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSIN, ESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SAY WHA

The odyssey of Kraft's new name, and how 'pink slime' almost wasn't


CANDICE CHOI
Associated Press

NEW YORK
M (I ONDEWHAAAAT?"
The sarcasm was palpable in
the one-word headline that ap-
peared in The New York Post on the day
after Kraft Foods revealed that it planned to
name its new global snack business "Mon-
delez," an interpretation of a mash-up of the
Latin words for "world" and "delicious." But
that wasn't the only dig.
One blogger teased that she would've been
"stifling giggles" if she'd been in meetings to
determine the name. A Forbes contributor
suggested a trick for remembering how to
say it: '"Just think Bush Administration Sec-
retary of State. You know, Mon-de-leza Rice."
Crain's Business Chicago tittered that it
bears close resemblance to a
vulgar Russian term for a sex- Discard
ual act
Michael Mitchell, a Kraft candidate
spokesman, said executives
took all the joking in stride, from the
and he's quick to point out "Dpanonr
why the Crain's observation
didn't alarm the company: not-so-c
"The name has to be mispro-
nounced to get that unfortu- ("tfark'
nate meaning." Outrigh
The made-up moniker, pro- UUIgi
nounced "mon-dah-LEEZ," ("Ar
became a punch line after it
was unveiled in March. On
Wednesday, Kraft shareholders will decide
whether to approve the name for the com-
pany's business that sells global snack brands
such as Oreos, Fig Newton and Cadbury
The four-month odyssey of how "Mon-
delez" was picked and how it was re-
ceived illustrates the great pains
companies take to come up with powerful
names for their businesses, products and
services. For them, it's akin to parents ob-
sessing over a name for their newborn: it's a
moniker that sticks for better or worse, so it
better be good.
"You have to generate thousands of ideas,
even if it's just for a cookie," said Nik Con-
tis, the global director of naming at branding
company Siegel+ Gale.
That's just what Kraft did after it decided
to split into two publicly-traded companies
- one for its North American grocery busi-
ness that makes products like Oscar Mayer
and Miracle Whip and the other a
bigger company to focus on selling snacks
worldwide.
It was clear to executives at Kraft's North-
field, Ill., headquarters that the name of the
snack business would have to appeal to a
global audience. So the world's biggest
maker of sweet snacks started the arduous
process of picking a name in November by
soliciting suggestions from its 126,000
employees.
On its internal website, Kraft proclaimed
that it would host a naming contest. The an-
nouncement included a "mood video" set to
music and showing images of life milestones,
such as a wedding and a baby's birth. Em-
ployees were encouraged to make sugges-


e
e
c


'U


t
ri


tions through an "Idea Kitchen" page, where
they could see and build off of the sugges-
tions of their peers.
More than 1,000 employees submitted
more than 1,700 entries.
Discarded name candidates ranged from
the cultivated ("Panvoro," Latin for eating)
to the not-so-cultivated ("tfark," which is
Kraft spelled backward) to the outright cryp-
tic ("Arrtx" -the employee who suggested it
provided no explanation on what the letters
signified).
Once the suggestions started rolling in,
Kraft's global marketing team took the reins
of the naming process. An outside branding
firm from London was hired and a handful
of top contenders were picked. (Kraft de-
clined to reveal the finalists, noting that
"there may be some value in those names"
for other purposes down the road.)
The names went through
3d name two rounds of testing with na-
tive speakers in 28 different
s ranged languages. Consumers in
small focus groups were asked
cultivatedd again and again if any of the
") to the names conjured up negative
associations. "Mondelez," a fa-
Itivated vorite among Kraft executives
from the get-go, didn't raise
) to the any big red flags.
Still, the company discov-
cryptic ered that there might be a
t \ problem. Consumer testers
flagged the possible misinter-
pretation of "Mondelez" for a
Russian term meaning "oral sex." But the
issue was referred to Kraft's Russian busi-
ness unit, which in turn deemed it to be "low
risk." So the name was given the thumbs up.
It's not unusual for companies to take a
calculated risk with names. Even though
they're aware that the names they introduce
could elicit negative reactions at first, ex-
perts say the snide remarks often subside as
the brand strengthens.
After all, there were plenty of snickers
when Apple Inc. unveiled the iPad, which
critics said sounded like a high-tech femi-
nine hygiene product. Now, the iPad is by far
the No. 1 selling tablet worldwide. Then
there's the classic example in the 1970s of
the Chevrolet car called Nova, which means
"no go" in Spanish. Despite urban legend, a
Chevy spokesman said the model sold well
in Latin America because the term is pro-
nounced differently there.
That's what Conti, the branding expert, is
guessing would happen if shareholders de-
cide to vote in favor of naming Kraft's global
snacking business "Mondelez."
"The sound and structure rolls off the
tongue like a delicious treat," he said. "The
romance language is great because you want
to eat the language itself because it's so
beautiful."
If shareholders reject the name, the com-
pany will continue to be called "Kraft Foods
Inc." while the North American grocery busi-
ness will be called "Kraft Foods Group Inc."
But it appears that Kraft is confident that
Mondelez will pass muster; the company al-
ready reserved the ticker symbol "MDLZ"
and website www.mondelez.com.


Associated Press

4 4D ink slime" was almost "pink
Spaste" or "pink goo."
The microbiologist who coined the
term for lean finely textured beef
ran through a few iterations in his
head before he decided to send an
email about the filler to a co-worker
at the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture a decade ago. Then, the name
hit him like heartburn after a juicy
burger.
"It's pink. It's pasty. And it's slimy-
looking. So I called it 'pink slime,"'
said Gerald Zirnstein, the former
meat inspector at the USDA. "It
resonates, doesn't it?"
The pithy description fueled an
uproar that resulted in the main
company behind the filler, Beef
Products Inc., deciding to close three
meat plants this month. The contro-
versy over the filler, which is made of
fatty bits of beef heated and treated
with ammonium to kill bacteria,
shows how a simple nickname can
forever change an entire industry.
In fact, the beef filler had been
used for decades before the nick-
name came about. But most Ameri-
cans didn't know or care about
it before Zirnstein's vivid moniker
was quoted in a 2009 article by The
New York Times on the safety of
meat processing methods.
Soon afterward, celebrity chef
Jamie Oliver began railing against it.
McDonald's and other fast food com-
panies later discontinued their use
of it. And major supermarket chains
vowed to stop selling beef with the
low-cost filler.
Beef Products, which makes the
filler, blames its plant closings on
what it calls unfounded attacks.
About 650 jobs will be lost when
plants in Amarillo, Texas, Garden
City, Kansas, and Waterloo, Iowa
close on Friday Another plant in
South Sioux City, Neb., will remain
open but run at reduced capacity.
Still, the company, based in South
Dakota, said it's not considering
changing the filler's name. Instead,
Beef Products set up a website,
beefisbeef.com, to combat what it
calls "media-perpetuated myths"
about the filler.
Meanwhile, the author of the term
"pink slime" makes no apologies
about his creation. Zirnstein, who
has since left the USDA, said he
thinks "pink slime" is a better de-
scriptor than "lean finely textured
beef."
"It says it's lean. Great. But it does-
n't describe what kind of lean it is,"
said Zirnstein, who doesn't think the
product should be mixed into beef.
"Textured. What does that mean?"


Honoring vets by putting them back to work


You've probably no-
ticed the recent
plethora of red,
white and blue advertise-
ments, circulars and direct
mail all in the name of
Memorial Day Walking into
a store recently, I noticed a
sign on the door urging
shoppers to "Get ready for
Memorial Day backyard
barbecues" by buying the
patriotic-themed outfits on
sale. A colleague remarked
the other day that Memorial
Day is one of her favorite
holidays because it kicks off
the summer season and she
enjoys the family picnic by
the lake.
All perfectly legitimate
pursuits for an extended
weekend. And all beside the
point.
Memorial Day is the time
when Americans should
unite in remembering our
brave servicemen and -
women who gave their lives
serving our country and
protecting our freedoms.
The nonprofit Florida Gen-
eration Web project lists 46
Citrus County casualties of
war since World War I. Of
those, 31 fell during World
War II. Many more who
served from Citrus County
lost their lives to service-re-
lated disabilities.
Memorial Day is also a
time when we can renew
our resolve to support our
veterans, our troops and


their families. Certainly one
very real way we can do that
is by ensuring our veterans
are welcome once they
come home. From a work-
force perspective, that
means jobs.
Being out of work is diffi-
cult, financially and emo-
tionally, for anyone. For
military veter-
ans, it is particu- -
larly difficult to
transition from
serving such an
important job -
often, literally,
in life-and-death
situations to
coming home
and being un- LauraI
sure of what WORKI
their new role is. CONN
For veterans CONNE
of all genera-
tions, according to the Bu-
reau of Labor Statistics'
monthly economic situation
report, the unemployment
rate for April 2012 was 7.1
percent. For veterans who
left the service after 2001,
the unemployment rate was
9.2 percent
To be perfectly honest, it's
not easy to know how the
numbers for Citrus County's
veterans compare. The most
recent data available for
Citrus County is the Ameri-
can Community Survey of
2010, which reported a vet-
eran population of 19,550, of
which slightly more than 60


I

I

I
LF
E


percent were age 65 or
older That left a labor force
of 4,472 working-age veter-
ans those working or ac-
tively seeking employment
- of which 675, or 15 per-
cent, were out of work. That
compares to an unemploy-
ment rate of 13.8 percent for
nonveterans, which equated
to 5,882 jobless,
but we don't
know how many
of those may
have been veter-
ans'family mem-
bers.
Like I said,
that's the most
recent data, and
Byrnes it is two years
FORCE old. Is it fair to
CTIONn t say the unem-
CTION ployment rate
for veterans here
is trending downward, as
we're seeing nationally and,
in terms of the general un-
employment rate, statewide,
regionally and in Citrus
County? One could certainly
make that case.
But just because things
may be improving doesn't
mean we take our focus off
our mission just as our
veterans serve with equal
diligence during times of
peace as well as conflict.
Since the beginning of the
calendar year, Workforce
Connection has placed 325
veterans in jobs, including
96 from Citrus County. We


have held a Retooling and
Refueling for Success three-
day workshop for veterans
in Lecanto to help them de-
velop strategies to move
from a military to civilian
career
Workforce has also de-
ployed a Veteran Team of
Local Veteran Employment
Representatives (LVER)
and Disabled Veterans Out-
reach Program (DVOP) spe-
cialists each member
served with or retired from
the United States Army,
Navy, Air Force, National
Guard and/or Reserve. It is
a diverse team one was
an officer, another was an
avionics technician and a
third was a drill sergeant.
Kim Smith, lead LVER
and US Navy veteran who
also served in the Florida
Army Reserve and National
Guard, said, "Our team
prides itself in our genuine
caring for our brother and
sister veterans we serve."
Among the team's efforts,
Smith said, "We are striving
to promote the hire of veter-
ans, work to assist veterans
become more marketable
and more competitive in the
job market. We have per-
formed outreach with area
veteran organizations and
the local Florida Army Na-
tional Guard units as well as
with employers. We work to
develop strong networking
bonds with area organiza-


tions including homeless
veteran programs."
Veterans Job Information
services are available at the
Citrus County Workforce
Connection Center at 1103
E. Inverness Blvd. in Inver-
ness. The LVER and DVOP
personnel are tasked with
providing priority work-
force services to veterans,
including job placement, in-
formation about the local
job market, assessments
and career-interest testing,
referral to training pro-
grams and help securing
funds to complete training
or retraining. We also offer
a program that allows veter-
ans to see how their military
skills may transfer to civil-
ian occupations. You can set
up an appointment by call-
ing 352-637-2223 or 800-434-
JOBS.
Additionally, the Vow to
Hire Veterans Act's new Vet-
erans Retraining Assistance
Program (VRAP) gives un-
employed veterans, ages 35
to 60, financial assistance to
train for high demand occu-
pations. The program
started May 15, with appli-
cations reviewed on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Information is available at
http://benefits.va.gov/vow/ed
ucation.htm.
For employers, there is
great advantage to hiring

See Page D3


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Seniors can

handle home

maintenance
DEAR BRUCE: I
just read your col-
umn talking about
the pros and cons of buy-
ing a home vs. renting, es-
pecially in regard to
mowing the yard and house
maintenance. As a woman
in my 70s, I can attest to
the fact that one can hire
all those things done!
When I got divorced back
in the 1980s, my soon-to-be
ex-husband said I should
get a condo because "you
could never take care of a
house." I rented a nice
apartment for a few
months before deciding to
buy a home. I was so glad
that I did rent for a while,
because I really did not
like condo living.
I bought a house that
needed quite a bit of work,
but I was able to hire it
done. Later, when the
housing market took off in
California (after a steep
drop!), I sold it for a profit
and moved to Oklahoma,
where I now live in an-
other newer house that I
own ... and for which I hire
all the yard and mainte-
nance work done. Just my
opinion, and I always
enjoy reading your col-
umn.-R.K, via email
DEAR R.K.: Congratu-
lations on handling things
extremely well. Your for-
mer husband, it seems,
had less confidence in you
than you had in yourself,
and that says a good deal
about you.
You make the point that
there are things such as
yard work, house mainte-
nance, etc., that one can
hire to have done. Obvi-
ously that is the case, but
the problem for many
people is that they either
will not or cannot spend
the money
The smartest thing that
comes out of your letter is
that you did rent a differ-
ent type of housing for a
time to see how you liked
it. This is something I reg-
ularly recommend.
Rather than jumping in
the pond, put your toe in
and see if you like the en-
vironment. You found out
that you liked living in a
house better, and you had
the wherewithal and the
willingness to spend
money on the hard-labor
chores that are beyond
most people your age.
All the way around, I
congratulate you on the
way you handled things.
I'm sure you will continue
to do well.
DEAR BRUCE: Our
granddaughter started
college last fall using stu-
dent loans. Her father has
been out of work for some
time and couldn't help her
with expenses. After two
semesters, she is in debt
about $10,000. We have
paid $500, and her parents
have paid $365.
She should be able to
get some scholarships for
next semester, but she
wants us to co-sign for a
$4,600 student loan to fin-
ish paying off the school
for the current semester.
The $4,600 is included in
the $10,000. I am aware
that 75 percent of co-
signed loans go bad and
that it will tie up our
credit line for a very long
time. I have explained
this and other conse-
quences of her having five
loans just from her first
year. I am concerned she
won't be able to pay on the
loans if she quits or when
she finishes with even
more debt. It seems like a


Page D3









D2

SUNDAY
MAY 27, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


office:

Citrus Enterprise Center
wants you to consider their
two newly remodeled of-
fice suites.
Are you contemplating
relocating your home-
based business to a profes-
sional office as part of your
effort to grow your busi-
ness and increase your
profits?
Are you considering hir-
ing an employee as part of
your growth plan, but don't
want to host the employee
at your home office?
Is the idea of "turn-key"
simplicity for your new lo-
cation attractive to you?
Here's some of the fea-
tures and amenities that
are included in our below
market rent rates:
furnished office
fax/copier/scanner
one-year Chamber &


space?

EDC memberships
visible location on US
19 with signage for your
business
high speed wireless in-
ternet/electric/water/main-
tenance
shared kitchen
shared conference
room
private mailbox
publicity package
to announce your new
location
A Business Incubator
Project of the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council and Cham-
ber of Commerce. For more
information or to tour our
recently remodeled facility,
please contact Ardath
Prendergast at 795-2000
email Ardath@
citrusedc.com or visit
http://www.citrusedc.com/.


Learning how to grow your


business in Citrus County


About a dozen peo-
ple interested in grow-
ing their business in
Citrus County at-
tended the workshop
"Hire Your First Em-
ployee" on Tuesday,
May 15. The workshop,
offered by the Citrus
County Business Re-
source Alliance Part-
ners, featured


presenter Mike Orlito.
Orlito is a Certified
Business Analyst for
the Small Business De-
velopment Center at
UNF in Citrus County.
The workshop con-
tent came from the
book, HireYour First
Employee, written by
Rhonda Abrams.
Abrams is the founder


and CEO of The Plan-
ning Shop, a company
focused on providing
entrepreneurs with
high quality informa-
tion and tools for de-
veloping successful
business plans.
We thank our spon-
sors: HR Solutions in
Tandem and Quick
Books Assist.


Linda Witter joins Chamber of Commerce


:QLI A .V/L 9 / 1 \ C -iZLf l Cl


NOW IS THE TIME TO ENTER THE
CHAMBER CHAT PHOTO CONTEST
"Chamber Chat" is having a photography contest-
open to ALL Citrus County residents!
Time is running out to enter your
"beauty shot" of somewhere in Cit-
rus County. It could be anywhere -
our gorgeous rivers, springs, sunrise
or sunset a field of flowers as long
as it's in Citrus County.
The contest is open until May 31 to all Citrus County
residents. The winning entry will be chosen on June 1
and will be the new background for Chamber Chat!
"Chamber Chat" promotes your business on local
TV station WYKE. Now YOUR photo can be the back-
drop! While waiting for a new background, "Cham-
ber Chat" kicks off a new format Monday, June 18,
that includes local celebrity co-hosts and many new
surprises, all designed to promote area chamber
businesses and events in an improved manner.
Get out those cameras and send your best "shot" of
Citrus, with your name and contact information, to:
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.



Ambassador Spotlight:

Kim Baxter
Kim Baxter, vice presi- program. She and her hus-
dent and branch manager band, Steve, are the par-
of Cadence Bank, ents of two lovely
joined the ranks of children, Kyle and
the Chamber's Am- Stephanie. Kim is
bassador team in very family-ori-
2010. Kim was born ented, and says one
and raised in of her favorite
Ocala, and contin- things to do is to
ues to live in Mar- spend time with
ion County while her family in North
commuting to her Kim Carolina. And just
job in Citrus Baxter for fun? There's
County and playing an ac- nothing quite like going
tive role in the Ambassador four-wheeling!


May 31 is the last day to

vote for Crystal River!
V~te F TRII~ea/


Crystal River holds onto
a spot in top contention
(last count we were No. 3!)
for the title of Ultimate
Fishing Town in the USA,
recognized by the World
Fishing Network. You can
vote up to four times each
day until the end of the
contest on May 31. Simply
log onto wwwworldfishing
network.com and click on
Ultimate Fishing Town
Contest.
First prize is $25,000 and
an exclusive cable network
feature story covering the
fishing and other local at-


tractions. Second prize is
$5,000 and third prize is
$2,500 for a community
project that benefits the
area.
Art Jones submitted
Crystal River for the King's
Bay Rotary project that is
cleaning lyngbya out of
King's Bays to restore fish
habitat, water clarity and
the aquatic ecosystem.
Lyngbya is an invasive
algae that crowds out more
beneficial, submerged
aquatic vegetation.
Visit them at wwwface
book.com/savekingsbay


Linda Witter, Independent Consultant with Arbonne International has joined the Chamber of Commerce. Witter, a licensed
Esthetician for 33 years, recently relocated to Citrus County from Hilton Head Island, SC. Arbonne is an established beauty,
health and wellness company offering products that are natural, gluten-free, vegan-certified and made in the United States.
Witter is also a member of SunCoast Business Masters and volunteers at the Key Training Center. Schedule a one-on-one
consultation or home party with her at 352-270-8231.


Everhardt earns New Image Award





i


Nicholas Everhardt, Taverna Manos co-owner with Deborah Manos, Ll,%
receives the New Image Award at the May Chamber of Commerce Jun(
luncheon. The award recognizes the complete renovation done in- lege
side of the building and the creation of a nice outside dining area.



June is the start of hurricane season


* Discuss the type of hazards that
could affect your family. Know your
home's vulnerability to storm
surge, flooding and wind.
* Locate a safe room or the safest
areas in your home for each hurricane
hazard. In certain circumstances
the safest areas may not be your
home but within your community.
* Determine escape routes from your


home and places to meet.
* Have an out-of-state friend as a fam-
ily contact, so all your family mem-
bers have a single point of contact
* Make a plan now for what to do with
your pets if you need to evacuate.
* Post emergency telephone num-
bers by your phones and make sure
your children know how and when
to call 911.


VE YOU EVER ...
eft the office for a chamber event
to realize you didn't check
ERE the event was being held?
wondered if the business you are
pping in/eating in is a Chamber
nber?
needed the phone number of a
mber business while you were al-
dy out and about?
Citrus County Chamber of Com-
ce is making ALL that and more
essible to you with new technology!
[ DETAILS at our "Get Caught in
Chamber's Web" Open House,
e 14 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Col-
of Central Florida, Lecanto.




L are you ready?
Check your insurance coverage -
flood damage is usually not cov-
ered by homeowners insurance.
Stock non-perishable emergency
supplies and a Disaster Supply Kit.
Use a NOAA weather radio. Replace
its battery every 6 months, as you
do with your smoke detectors.
Family Disaster Plan, reprinted
from National Hurricane Center, NOAA


UPCOMING AT THE CHAMBER
* After Hours Business Networking Mixer. Citrus 95
and The Plantation Golf Resort have teamed up for
an evening of networking at The Plantation Golf Re-
sort, Thursday, June 7,5 to 7 p.m.
* June Chamber Luncheon at Citrus Hills Golf & Coun-
try Club, featuring guest speaker Don Skelton, Sec-
retary for District 7, Florida Department of
Transportation. Sponsored by Neck and Back Care
Center, June 8, 11:30 a.m. REGISTER TODAY!
* 'Get Caught in the Chamber's Web' Open House,
College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto, June 14, 5 to 7 p.m.
* Business Women's Alliance June Lunch-Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club. Wednesday, June 20, 11
a.m. to 1 p.m.
* SAVE THE DATE! Business Women's Alliance annual
Health & Fitness Expo. Crystal River Armory, Sept.
20, 2012.
* Always check out our Events Calendar at www.
citruscountychamber.com.


After
Hours
Business
Mixer
High Octane Sa-
loon hosted an
After Hours Busi-
ness Mixer from
5 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, May
10. The Saloon
provided free-play
pool, corn hole
and karaoke as
well as food and
drink to the more
than 50 Chamber
and community
members who
stopped in.


Looking for


Mike Orlito,
Certified
Business
Analyst for
the Small
Business
Development
Center at UNF,
coaches at-
tendees on
strategies
to hire
employees.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Key center plans job
fair June 30
The Key Training Center will
host a job fair from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Wednesday, June 30, at
the business office at 5399 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Open positions include residen-
tial aides, residential manger as-
sistants and instructor assistants.
Applications and interviews will
be conducted. For additional in-
formation, call 352-795-5541,
ext. 309.

Accountant Price
attends conference
Phillip W. Price, MBA, CPA,
with Price & Company, P.A.,
Crystal River, recently attended
the Florida Institute of Certified
Public Accountants' FSU Spring
Accounting Conference in Talla-




BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

veterans. Not only do veter-
ans have worlds of knowl-
edge and experience, but
they come equipped with
highly sought-after skills


hassee, Florida on May 17 & 18.
This seminar highlighted such
topics as "Tax Aspects of Fore-
closures, Bankruptcy & Insol-
vency," "Estate Planning" and
"Finding Fraud in Financial
Statements." Phil takes courses
such as these to ensure a con-
tinued high level of service.

SECO: Gas, power
costs falling
The Sumter Electric Coopera-
tive Board of Trustees announced
that due to the decrease in the
cost of natural gas the coopera-
tive is able to pass that savings
on to SECO customers. Effec-
tive July 1, the power cost ad-
justment portion of each SECO
member's bill will drop the total
cost for the first 1,000 residential
kilowatt hours of electricity from
$126.95 down to $119.95.


and qualities such as loyalty,
maturity, leadership, integrity,
focus, project and crisis
management, motivation,
initiative, respect, ability to
be part of the team, and so-
lution-oriented approaches
to solving problems.
Moreover, 60 percent of
Citrus County's veterans


Business DIGEST


have some college, associ-
ate degree, bachelor's de-
gree or higher compared to
44 percent for the county's
nonveteran population.
As further incentive, there
is also a federal Returning
Heroes and Wounded War-
riors Work Opportunity Tax
Credit of up to $5,600 for hir-


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

catch-22 situation.
Do you have any sugges-
tions? Is it normal for stu-
dents to have this kind of
debt after the first year? -
A.I in Oklahoma
DEAR A.H.: Being in
debt $5,000 after one se-
mester seems pretty heavy
to me. While many schools
charge a great deal more
than that, everyone doesn't
belong in those schools,
and that's the reality.
It would appear, given
your families' combined
lack of income, that she is
going to have to consider
going to a less expensive
school. She ought to take a
shot at a community col-
lege, where the expenses
will be geometrically less.


ing veterans and up to
$9,600 for hiring disabled
veterans. The tax credit is
available for veterans hired
between Nov. 22, 2011 and
Dec. 31.
Tomorrow, as befits Me-
morial Day, let us visit
cemeteries and place flags
or flowers on the graves of


If she does well there, she
can transfer to a four-year
institution.
As to the debts she has
already incurred, she's on
the hook. You might talk to
the college's finance office
about arranging loans
through her alone to get
her at least through the se-
mester Beyond that, I would
not advise you to co-sign.
I know this is tough on
the kid, but who said life
shouldn't be difficult? Lots
of kids have made it on
their own. There's no rea-
son why she cannot.
DEAR BRUCE: Awhile
back, you had a question
about parents putting their
children's names on the deeds
to their homes, car titles, etc.,
so that there would be no
problems when the parents
pass. As I remember, you said
it was a bad idea to do that.
I just can't remember ex-


our fallen heroes, let us fly
Old Glory at half-staff and
pause during a moment of
remembrance to reflect on
the true meaning of the day
during a National Moment
of Remembrance, but let's
also remember those who
served and who have come
home, ready to work.


actly why, and I need specifics
to take to my husband who,
of course, is on his mother's
house and car, along with
her and his brother.
I apologize for having
you revisit the subject, but
I believe your answer had
to do with credit, and I re-
ally do not want our 830
credit score to be in jeop-
ardy Thank you so much,
and keep up the good work.
- Nancy in Pennsylvania
DEAR NANCY: In my
opinion, it is not wise to
add the names of your adult
children on the deed or ac-
tually convey the property.
The problem is that when
you put this in the kids'
names, it is treated like
their asset. If they go out
and get themselves in trou-
ble because of excessive
debts, that home of yours is
now an asset that can be at-
tached to pay those debts.


C CITRUS COUNTY




HKONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

-


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


SWF, looking for
adventurous SWM
45-65 non smoker,
financially stable to
share varied interest,
I.E. golf, theater,
music, travel & all
life's exciting
adventures
Reply to Citrus
Chronicle 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Blind Box 1778 M
Crystal River, Fl 34429




AIRSTREAM
30FT motorhome, 2005
Land Yacht, 1 owner,
low miles, slide, all op-
tions $58,000 For full de-
tails (352) 637-3867
seahawk@ta
mpabay.rr.co
m
CRYSTAL RIVER, 2/1
water, incl'd $500 mo
+ dep 352-464-2716
HERNANDO
2/1 Mobile Home
total remodel, clean,
great water $400
(352) 344-2201
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax/scans, like
new condition $55.00
352-382-1154
LARSON 99 18FT
open bow, 90 hsp
Johnson outboard
motor, trailer incl.
$4800 obo
(352) 400-0719
LIFT CHAIR
neutral colors
like new $400 obo
(352) 628-3995
MUSTANG CONV 97
V6, automatic
$3000 b/o or tradefor
Chevy Stepside
(352) 400-0719
YOMOTO 2005
Motorcycle 175 CC,
street legal, 4,000 mi.,
runs good, first $1,000
or trade for car or truck
(352) 637-4011



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $250 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, Lrg TV's
cell -352-270-4087



1 Female 6 months
1 Male 4 months
To Good Home
(352) 794-7496
FREE TO GOOD HOME
I AM A BEAUTIFUL
FRIENDLY FEMALE
RED NOSE/BULL DOG.I
AM 8 MONTHS OLD I
NEED A GOOD
HOME.I'M GOOD WITH
ANIMALS AND OTHER
DOGS AND I LOVE
EVERYONE.PLEASE
GIVE ME A GOOD
HOME.
CALL MELISSA @
322-1778 OR 621-9898


7 KITTENS FOR FREE
TO GOOD HOME
cute, lovable,
lifter trained,
(352) 419-4221
Free to Good Home
3 year male cat
neutered and
declawed. Must be
one cat home.
(352) 637-3553
FREE
WOODEN PALLETS
Rear of CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Help Yourself
But Be Neat.
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS
mixedspayed and
neutered $25 dep.
adoptions based on
applications and home
visit (352) 748-5260
Lab 1 year old Male,
has all shots,
full blood, no paper
(352) 400-0312
Oak & Pine Firewood
25 peices,
must be split
(352) 364-1214
PITBULLS, 6 mo's
gray female, white
male, housebroken
good w/kids
(352) 476-2411



NOW OPEN
SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
1.5 mi. E. from Hwy 41
on Eden Dr, Inv.
Catelopes, Squash
& Watermelon
8:30-6p, 352-726-6378



Australian Shepard
with John Deere
collar.Black with a little bit
of white. Needs Meds
Please call 352-212-5131
Black & White spots
Miniature Pig last seen
Crystal River off Citrus
Ave. H e is a the
children's pet
Local (410) 200-7022
Large completely white
male cat, no other mark-
ings. Name is Snowy and
he is 12 yrs old. Have
had him since he was 6
weeks old and we are
heartbroken. Last seen
very early Sunday 5/13 in
area of Dunnellon road
and Northcut. Not wear-
ing a collar or tag but has
all his shots. He may not
come to you so if you see
him please contact
352-563-2504 or
352-422-7810.
Lost Cat, small male
Coon Mix in vicinity
Almont PI. &
Sandree Dr.
Medical Issues, answers
Pudgie. need to find
ASAP, Citrus Springs
(352) 613-3894
Lost Sheltie
Name (Codie) Black,
white & Merle, Harley
Colar, tags, microchip-
ped Rainbow Springs
Woodlands Area
352-895-0341
LOST: Beloved family
poodle. White, old,
answers to the name
"Cuddles". He is very
deaf and has a hard time
seeing. Wandered away
in the Crystal Manor area
near Basswood & Check-
erberry. PLEASE contact
Stephanie with any infor-
mation: (352) 613-4728


GOULD CHAIN
WITH RED FISH
very sentimental
pls call (352) 569-4268
or (352)303-8308
TOY POODLE
female, 5 to 71bs
black & white
shy, answers to Shiley
lost in Beverly Hills
(352) 362-8493



Beautiful Female
German Shepherd
Beverly Hills
Area(352)746-7610 or
Call Animal Control
(352) 726-7660
Found
Large Wolf Hound
Black, Male,
Floral City Area
(352) 637-2448



ADVERTISE YOUR WAY
TO SUCCESS!!
Call now to grow
your business. Get
your classified ad in
119 newspapers with
one order.
Advertising Networks
of Florida.
866-742-1373

WE
LOVE
OUR
VETS


Consignment USA
Frank Romanelli



Travel Travel NEEDED
$3,000 or Less
Working Condition
House burned down
(352) 287-5336



2 COUCH CRYPTS
Includes 2 Caskets
Fero Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills 746-4646
At a Discount Price!
(270) 543-8419



TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




EXECUTIVE
ASSISTANT
Business owner
looking for full or
part-time executive
assistant. Candidates
must demonstrate
strong organizational
and communication
skills and be able to
work independently
on various projects.
Candidates must
have sufficient
accounting skills
(QuickBooks pre-
ferred) necessary to
maintain owner's
financial records.
Send resumes to:
Office Manager,
P.O. Box 895,
Inverness, FL 34451


Program Systems
Technician
Announcement
# 12-29
Maintains financial
records which may
include invoices,
requisitions, accounts
payable and receiv-
able. Posts fund
budgets, revenues
and expenses to
in-house accounting
program. Minimum of
one year related
work experience.
Works four-
10 hour days,
Monday-Thursday,
6:30 AM 5:00 PM.
Starting pay $9.99
hourly. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Visit our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, June 1, 2012
EOE/ADA.


SECRETARY
Announcement
#12-28
Moderately difficult
secretarial work
performing extensive
clerical duties and
tracks project costing
in Road Mainte-
nance. Maintains
division budget,
answers phones,
takes messages,
directs calls. Assists
with customer
service, inquiries and
problem resolution.
Minimum of one year
experience perform-
ing secretarial/
clerical duties. Works
four-10 hour days
Monday-Thursday,
6:30 AM 5:00 PM.
Working knowledge
of the Microsoft Of-
fice Suite of Products.
Starting pay
$9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, June 1,2012
EOE/ADA






HAIR STYLIST
Fulltime $500 Cash
Bonus after 90 days
Call Sue 352-628-0630


Kristy Salon
Is expanding
and seeking
2 Hair stylists
client preferred
Bev Hills (352) 527-9933


Receptionist
Massage therapist
Nail Technician
Esthetician
Celestial Spa of Beverly
Hills, 9 Regina Blvd.
CALL352 527-0077
or Email Resume:
celestialspa4u
@vahoo.com



Disable Vet
needs trustworthy,
honest person to help
with reminding of meds
Live in- Room & Board
Call to discuss position
(352) 220-3983






Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA
for Outpatient
Surgery Center
Looking for a CNA
that is personable,
well-groomed and
has excellent
people-skills.
Must be dependa-
ble and willing to be
flexible in days,
hours and duties.
Excellent working
environment.
Days only with
no weekends.
Apply in person at:
110 N. Lecanto
Highway Lecanto,
Florida or fax resume
to: 352-527-1827.

CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Dental Assistant,
FT w/ Exp Duties,
Highly Motivated
w/Computer Software
Skills. Email resume:
office@sierradental
group.com

Exp Live-in CNA
or Nurse,
Certification req, for
wheelchair bound
male, personal care,
cooking, lite
housekeeping,
appoint transport.
Room& Board+salary.
Ref's, background ck
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Blind Box1767 P
Crystal River, Fl 34429


FRONT DESK
SPECIALIST
Full/Part time, for Busy
Office. Only those
w/front desk, health
care exp. considered.
Computer & Insur-
ance exp. needed.
E-MAIL RESUME TO:
frontdesk@
nbccdro.com

Home Health
Looking For

Medical Office
Staff or CNA, RN's,
LPN's, PT, OT
(352) 794-6097

Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

MEDICAL ASSIST.
Full time Position
for Front/Back Office,
Phlebotomy exper.,
for FP Office by CMH.
FAX RESUME:
(352) 726-2808

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294



SCOLLEGEf

CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
Faculty Instru-
mental Music
Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for a diverse student
population.
View detailed job
requirements on the
CF Web site at
www.CF.edu.
Screening begins
6/27/12.
Assistant Registrar
- Bachelor's degree
required. Two years
of work experience
required, with aca-
demic preparation
and training in stu-
dent personnel ser-
vices, higher educa-
tion administration
or a related field is
preferred. Work a
flexible schedule
including evenings
and/or weekends.
Screening begins
6/07/12.
How to apply:
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on
Quick Links then
Employment at CF.
Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application
at time of submission.
Alternatively
fax transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd.
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal
Opportunity Employer


TO*ADVERTISE CALL:

352y^563q596.

OR PLACE YOURAD OLINE ATB^

wwwchronicl* o ln e* om


. TERIH


BURIY MS


ATTENTION
Are You Currently
Making $150/or
More Per Day?
Now You Can!
Lic. or Unlicensed
Agents
Training Provided
3 Positions Avail

Call or Fax
352-726-7722
Fax 352-726-6813



RESIDENTIAL
PROPERTY
APPRAISER
obtain an app. at
www.citruspa.org
click on employment
tab for info


COOKS, SOUS
CHEF, LINE COOK
DISHWASHER,
Apply in person
Mango Grill
1305 Norvell Bryant
Hernando,Florida



Career Opportunity
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927



25 Driver Trainee's
Needed Now!
Become a driver for
Schneider National!
Earn $800 per week! No
experience needed!
CDL & Job Ready in just
3 weeks!! 888-374-7644


ROUTES



AVAILABLE






IN HOMOSASSA AND

NE CITRUS COUNTY
Ie. U..il _


















V Able to work early
morning hours before
6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license
and insurance

If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE




Swwwchronicleonline.com


As far as any advantages,
I keep looking, but I don't
see any Unless you deed
children the property through
a trust, there will be a trip
through probate. But un-
like the horror stories you
hear, in an ordinary per-
son's life, going through
probate will not be an ex-
pensive or difficult process.
I'm not sure why you are
paranoid over a credit
score of 830. It could drop
to 790 and you're still as
good as gold.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO.
Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions ofgen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.




Laura Byrnes, APR
is a Certified Workforce
Professional and communi-
cations manager at Work-
force Connection. Please
contact her at (352) 291-
9559 or (800) 434-5627,
ext 1234 or lbyrnes@
elm workforce., com.


The Time!


Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting
for a
School Principal
Directs the overall
educational
program. Masters
Degree and certifica-
tion in educational
leadership preferred.
Make a difference in
a teen's life.
Applv in person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or email resume to
sharon.facto
@us.G4S.com
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO
Engineer I
Announcement
#12-27
Management of
engineering site
development review,
including inspection
of public and private
residential and
nonresidential site
development, road
right-of-way utilization
permits, slab eleva-
tion variances and
subdivision construc-
tion. Graduate of
four year college or
university with Bache-
lor's degree in Civil
Engineering or
directly related field.
Must have 5-10 years
of progressive civil
engineering experi-
ence. Florida P.E.
required. Pay range
$1,815.75- $2,723.63
B/W DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online, by
Friday, June 1,2012
EOE/ADA.


rl i





Need a job
or a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1

employment

source!



Classifieds
41--41-W- $


M


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 D3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DOUBLED MILITARY
DISCO UNTS &


NO PAYMENTS


UNTIL SEPTEMBER!


- ~- ~


Chevy Runs Deep


.-C->34-- Jeep


CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
EVENT


G NISSAN


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE
i


$16,800IR
$229 PER MO.
Wih $199M cash rtradeeqP ty


2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU


$19,800"R
$269 PER MO.
Wih $2M cash ortradeequbi


2012 CHRYSLER 200


$15,48601R
$189PER MO.
H8 9 *F ^ Wih $29W cash orbtradeeqty


2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


$24,674t',R
$299*PER MO.
W 9Wioh cashortraeeqa ty


2012 NISSAN VERSA HATCHBACK


t I
13,990OR
119'PER MO.
fltEASES ARE 39 MOtIHs, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE. LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY VIN# 245801, MODEL# 11412,1 AT THIS PRICE


2012 NISSAN SENTRA


$15,10401R
$1 09'PER MO.
ttifASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$299 CASH OR TRADE EQUY, $51100 NMAC CASH VIN# 674397, MODEL# 12012,1 AT THIS PRICE


2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


2012 CHRYSLER 300


2012 RAM QUAD CAB


2012 NISSAN ALTIMA


$22,800O'1R
$2QQPER MO.
With $299cash ortade eq


2012 CHEVROLET TAHOE


$23,289"0R
$299PER MO.
Wih $29M cash ortraleeqAly


$21,800'
$9Q9 PER MO.
Wih $2M cash or trade equWb


2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO


2012 JEEP WRANGLER


$20,985'0 R
$299 PER MO.
Wilh$29M9cash orbtradeeqy


2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE


$1 69PER MO.
tEIASES ARE 3 MONTHS, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,99M CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. VIN# 546458, MODEL# 13112,1 AT THIS PRICE
2012 NISSAN FRONTIER


$19,840 R
$149PER MO.
ftlEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 3K MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. VIN# 252188, MODEL# 22112,5 AT THIS PRICE


2012 NISSAN QUEST


, T,/. -i A -


$35,8001R
$299PER MO.
Wth $2999 cash ortalde eqy


FPM 24H:RCRDMME"EVW NF ND eN


$19.800


OR


SAVE $6000
Wih $2999 cash or trade eqty


$19,98701R
$299PER MO.
Wh $2999 cash or tradeeq


E24HRECORDEMI NFOANDPIC
SBI>IK -^ 8n W -[R 1.-85 Et61


$23,937t0 1
$39 PER MO.
3 2 9 Wt h$2999 cashorAdeeqiy


FREE 24H ECRE MSAE: rHINOAD*RCN


$17,898 R $23,990 "
$ 179PER MO. $279PER MO.
ttfASES ARE 39 MONHS 3K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE EASEPAYMENTS REFLECT fASES ARE MONIS3K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQJlY. VIN# 442695, MODEL# 31012,1 AT THIS PRICE $2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUIY. VIN 041077, MODEL# 5511Z2,1 AT THIS PRICE


1035


S.


Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937


S.


Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL


RECEIVE A


-^ r- -L__-


CRYSTALAUTOS.CO M


Jeep


DODGES
MA~,CLM 4v


CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


EVENT


*Lease payments reflect $2,999 cash or trade equity. Lease 36-months with 36K miles for the life of the lease and $.20 per mile over. Leases exclude tax, tag, and title and dealer fee of $599.50. tPrices include $2,999 down cash or trade equity plus all rebates and incentives, not
all will qualify with approved credit. excludes tax, tag, title, registration and dealer fee of $599.50. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock. ^Doubled military discounts on select years, makes and models. Proof of military service required.
^^Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. **No payments until September 2012 on select years makes and models. With approved credit.


$50 GIFT CARD WITH 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL
18 MINUTE PROPOSAL INCLUDES TEST DRIVE, TRADE
APPRAISAL, AND WRITTEN BEST PRICE.
*Promotional Gift Card credit to be used at your choice of GiftCardRack.com Store retailers. Gift card is $50 value, and may applied
toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from the specific websites noted on the gift cards. Only one (1) gift
card may be used/redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with
credits from other store gift cards. Other terms and conditions may apply see GiftCardRack.com for full details and restrictions.


A


U


T


0


M


0


T


V


E


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 D5


a


Ei


b6L




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DOUBLED MILITARY
DISCO UNTS &


NO PAYMENTS


UNTIL SEPTEMBER!


- ~- ~


Chevy Runs Deep


.-C->34-- Jeep


CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
EVENT


G NISSAN


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE
i


$16,800IR
$229 PER MO.
Wih $199M cash rtradeeqP ty


2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU


$19,800"R
$269 PER MO.
Wih $2M cash ortradeequbi


2012 CHRYSLER 200


$15,48601R
$189PER MO.
H8 9 *F ^ Wih $29W cash orbtradeeqty


2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


$24,674t',R
$299*PER MO.
W 9Wioh cashortraeeqa ty


2012 NISSAN VERSA HATCHBACK


t I
13,990OR
119'PER MO.
fltEASES ARE 39 MOtIHs, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE. LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY VIN# 245801, MODEL# 11412,1 AT THIS PRICE


2012 NISSAN SENTRA


$15,10401R
$1 09'PER MO.
ttifASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$299 CASH OR TRADE EQUY, $51100 NMAC CASH VIN# 674397, MODEL# 12012,1 AT THIS PRICE


2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


2012 CHRYSLER 300


2012 RAM QUAD CAB


2012 NISSAN ALTIMA


$22,800O',R
$2QQPER MO.
With $299cash ortade eq


2012 CHEVROLET TAHOE


$23,289",R
$299PER MO.
Wih $29M cash ortraleeqAly


$21,800'
$9Q9 PER MO.
Wih $2M cash or trade equWb


2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO


2012 JEEP WRANGLER


$20,985'0 R
$299 PER MO.
Wilh$29M9cash orbtradeeqy


2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE


$1 69PER MO.
tEIASES ARE 3 MONTHS, 39K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,99M CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. VIN# 546458, MODEL# 13112,1 AT THIS PRICE
2012 NISSAN FRONTIER


$19,840 R
$149PER MO.
ftlEASES ARE 39 MONTHS, 3K MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. VIN# 252188, MODEL# 22112,5 AT THIS PRICE


2012 NISSAN QUEST


, T,/. -i A -


$35,8001R
$299PER MO.
Wth $2999 cash ortalde eqy


FPM 24H:RCRDMME"EVW NF ND eN


$19,800


OR


SAVE $6000
Wih $2999 cash or trade eqty


$19,98701R
$299PER MO.
Wh $2999 cash or tradeeq


E24HRECORDEMI NFOANDPIC
SBI>IK -^ 8n W -[R 1.-85 Et61


$23,937t0 1
$329r PER MO.
$*^i Wtih$2999cashorVAdufeeiy


FREE 24H ECRE MSAE: rHINOAD*RCN


$17,898 R $23,990 "
$ 179PER MO. $279PER MO.
ttfASES ARE 39 MONHS 3K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE EASEPAYMENTS REFLECT fASES ARE MONIS3K MILES FOR THE UFE OF THE LEASE LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQJlY. VIN# 442695, MODEL# 31012,1 AT THIS PRICE $2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUIY. VIN 041077, MODEL# 5511Z2,1 AT THIS PRICE


1035


S.


Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937


S.


Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL


RECEIVE A


-^ r- -L__-


CRYSTALAUTOS.CO M


Jeep


DODGES
MA~,CLM 4v


CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


EVENT


*Lease payments reflect $2,999 cash or trade equity. Lease 36-months with 36K miles for the life of the lease and $.20 per mile over. Leases exclude tax, tag, and title and dealer fee of $599.50. tPrices include $2,999 down cash or trade equity plus all rebates and incentives, not
all will qualify with approved credit. excludes tax, tag, title, registration and dealer fee of $599.50. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock. ^Doubled military discounts on select years, makes and models. Proof of military service required.
^^Includes all rebates and incentives. Not everyone will qualify. **No payments until September 2012 on select years makes and models. With approved credit.


$50 GIFT CARD WITH 18 MINUTE PROPOSAL
18 MINUTE PROPOSAL INCLUDES TEST DRIVE, TRADE
APPRAISAL, AND WRITTEN BEST PRICE.
*Promotional Gift Card credit to be used at your choice of GiftCardRack.com Store retailers. Gift card is $50 value, and may applied
toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from the specific websites noted on the gift cards. Only one (1) gift
card may be used/redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with
credits from other store gift cards. Other terms and conditions may apply see GiftCardRack.com for full details and restrictions.


A


U


T


0


M


0


T


V


E


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 D5


a


Ei


b6L







D6 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


ASPHALT POSITIONS

Asphalt Paver, Operator
Roller Operator, CDL
Dump Truck Driver, &
Exp. Stripper for park-
ing lot, 5 yrs. exp. nec.
(352) 303-2525
Drivers New Freight
for Refrigerated & Dry
Van lines. Annual Sal-
ary $45k to $60k. Flexi-
ble hometime. CDL-A,
3 months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
EXP FRAMERS
H.S Diploma/GED
Transp. Hand Tools
Beverly Hills Area
(352) 212-9092
EXPERIENCED
CABINET/MILLWORK
person able to read
prints, make cut-sheets
and fabricate, apply at
Built-Rite, 438 E. Hwy 40
Inglis, no calls please
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com




1 TEMPORARY
FARM LABORER
for Lydell Steiner
Dalton, OH-
care of sheep &
heifers & crop/hay
farming using
tractors. Must be
available from
6/18/12- 4/15/13.
Wage $11.25/hr.
Tools provided at no
charge. Employment
guaranteed for at
least 3/4 of the work
hrs of the total period
in which the work
order is in effect.
Housing is available
(including U.S.
workers) at no cost to
workers who cannot
reasonably return to
their permanent
residence. Transpor-
tation & subsistence
expenses to the
worksite will be paid
upon completion of
50% of the work
contract. Apply at
your nearest State
Workforce Agency or
contact the SWA in
Wooster, OH
330-264-5060
job order #OH542475


CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Lisa
352-436-4460

Freight Up
= More $ 2 Mos.
CDL Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782
www. melton
truck.com/drive

Key Training
Center hosts
JOB FAIR
Wed. 5/30/12
10:00a-2:00p
At Business Office
located @
5399 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto.
Applications &
interviews on site.
Residential Aides,
Resident Manager
Assistants,
Instructor
Assistants needed.

LABORERS &
Class A&B DRIVERS
Needed for Moving
Company Moving Exp.
Required. 352-212-3031
P/T DELI HELP
Sat. a must. No calls.
Apply in person:
Brooklyn Deli 300 NW
Hwy 19 Crystal River


POOL CLEANING
TECHNICIAN
Exp. Required, must
have good dri. record
Call 352-270-8221

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be
able to work early
morning hours.
Email:
maaouette@chroni-
cleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will traln,
condltlons apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




Opportunity for
fulltime
professional.

Must have
accounting degree
or equivalent & profi-
cient in computers
and spreadsheets.
Able to multi-task
& communicate
well with others.
FAX RESUME TO
352-746-9033


Schoos/
Instructio


Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline
.com

NOW
ENROLLING
For All Programs
*-COSMETOLOGY
I-BARBER
MASSAGE THERAPY
*NAIL TECH
"SKIN CARE TECH

BENE'S
SInternational
School of Beauty
NPR/SPRING HILL
Naccas Accedlted
727-848-8415




A 26-year old company
with $1 billion in sales last
year eagerly seeking
workers with
computer-high speed
Internet, F/T-P/T from
home, coachable, work at
home. Schedule interview
at: www.joinbigal.com



DRAWER 34 X 20X 51
tall; 3 sm; 4 Ig draw;$95.
352 503-7164


Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50


#1 Affordable inciuaes a pnoto
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book Call our Classified
Am & PM classes Dept for details
aetvourcna.com 352-563-5966


352-


CLASSIFIED




PRECIOUS MOMENTS
DOLL collection. Very
Nice.Sell for $100.00
352-409-6588



2 person lounger spa
$400. good working
cond.(352) 564-8726



Box FREEZER
White, works great
$70 (352) 228-1897
Chest Freezer,
GE, 15cu ft.
Excel. Condition
$200.
352-746-4062
DRYER$100 Works
great. Delivery extra.
Includes warranty.
352-364-6504
FRONT LOAD
WASHER/DRYER WITH
PEDESTALS Kenmore
Front Load Washer and
Dryer both with Pedestal
Stands have storage
drawers. $500.00 cash
OBO Located in Beverly
Hills 352-697-1630
GE DRYER Off White,
Heavy Duty, Signals
when done. $50.00
Chassahowitzka Ruth
352-382-1000
GE Profile Appliances
side by side $400.obo
cook top 4 burner $300.
obo Dishwasher $150
obo Conv. wall Oven,
$300 In Wall micro $200
obo exc. cond
off white(352) 503-6548
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
Ten Quart Globe
Mixer w/cabinet &
attachments, New
cost $4500 sell for $2100
(352) 419-7386
WHIRLPOOL SxS RE-
FRIGERATOR 25.2 cu/ft
in excellent condition. Al-
mond. Mod.
ED25PQXFN01, manual
on www.whirlpool.com
$349 352-436-4089


Your World







COpNICLE
4~~44e


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each.
Reliable,clean, like new,
excellent condition. Can
deliver 352 263-7398



27" SHARP TV In great
shape, cable ready, with
remote. $40.00 Call or
Text Ron 352-746-0401
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & RE-
MOTE CONTROL $100
352-613-0529



15" FLAT SCREEN
MONITOR perfect condi-
tionk works great, new
computer and don't need.
$50.00 352-409-6588
COMPUTER POWER
SUPPLY FOR AUTO DC
TO AC Converter,
12VDC to 120VAC works
great $25 352 726 9983
Computer, Like New
Win.7, 250 GB HD, 2GB
Ram, dual core,
delivered and set up
$399
(352) 249-7670
Dell Printer, Copier,
Scanner Model #V305W,
cables, install CD in-
cluded. $45.00 Call,Text
Ron 352-746-0401
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



RHINO RX5 Bush-hog
5 ft, purchased last yr.,
used 4 times to cut
pasture grass. No
longer needed. Mint,
New $1,250 Asking
$950. (352) 746-7476



CEILING FAN White, 1
light, good condition, $20
(352)465-1616



5PC PATIO
BAR SET $175
exc. condition
(352) 527-0347



(3) Bedroom Sets
Q set $400. Dbl.set
$250. Twin set. $150
all sets come
w/dressers & night


tables, DR w/6 chrs, LR
coffee, sofa, 2 end
tables $1200..Ent center
& long dresser $150.
(352) 364-1164
BAR STOOLS (2) White
vinyl in good clean
condition $35. pair
352-270-3909
BEAUTIFUL ANTIQUE
HUTCH Near perfect
condition,I have no room.
1st $100.00 takes it.
353-409-6588
China Cabinet, cherry
wood, 2 pc. w/ glass
doors $60.
Oak Entertainment
Center, glass doors $30
(352) 860-0632
DINETTE SET
off white medal
w/ formica top,
and 4 upholstered
chairs $125
(352) 860-2034
Dining Rm Table &
China Cabinet, 6 chairs
& leaf, real wood, dark
brown, $250.
(352) 726-9151
DINING TABLE Round
wood dining table.No
chairs.$35.00 726-2572
Down Sizing, Like New
Coffee, end tables,
nice wood/wrought
iron $225. Dning Table
& 4 Brown Leather
Parsons chairs $395.
352-344-8553
Down Sizing, Like New
Qn Pillowtop set,
wood seashell motif
headboard $225
2 Lazy boy Recliners,
$100 for both 344-8553
DRESSER/MIRROR
white dresser/matching
mirror with 6 draw-
ers...$35.00 726-2572
DUAL RECLINING SOFA
88" L moss green
w/54x36 glass top
coffee table 2 yr old
like new $350
(352) 503-5470
FUTON SOFA
wood frame
multi pattern
exc. condition $195
(352) 527-0347
High End Quality Resale
Furniture & Accessories.
SECOND TIME AROUND
FURNITURE 2165 N.
Lecanto Hwy. 270-8803
LIFT CHAIR
neutral colors
like new $400 obo
(352) 628-3995
LIVING ROOM & FAM.
RM. FURNITURE 2 ultra
suede sofas 2 chairs 1
caramel color leather love
seat w/2 matching chairs
& ottomans. $1400 for all.
Will separate. 382-5596
OFFICE CHAIR Small old
wooden office chair on


OLD WALNUT DESK
SECRETARY Drop front
with 2/drawers. $65.00
726-2572
Oversize Recliner
creme leather
unmarked $150. Brown
fabric recliner, good
cond. $100.
(352) 746-7940
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS
Queen mattress (only) in
great shape $50.00
352-527-3177
RATTAN LOVE SEAT
AND CHAIR Rattan love
seat and chair set with
floor and table lamp.
$300.00 352 344-9483
SOFA AND CHAIR EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
sofa and chair cloth sofa
and microfiber chair also
matching ottoman and
area rug, all in excellent
condition $235.00 for all
or best offer please call
352-270-8611
STANLEY DINING TABLE
6 SIDE & 2 ARM CHAIRS,
44X66 plus 2 Ivs,
extends to 106" seats 8
to 10 exc. cond. cost
3k, asking $899
(352) 628-7604 for info
Table w/4 chairs on
wheels, 42x42, leaf
17.5W. $350. delivery
avail, for fee
(352) 341-0204
TODDLER HEADBOARD
brand new, railings not in-
cluded, gray metal. $45
(352)465-1616
UNIQUE GLASS
DINING
ROOM Table
w/ 4 chairs $300
(352) 212-5844
VERY NICE COFFEE
AND 2 END TABLES
Glass tops, round edges,
corners, stone bases.
$100.00 352-409-6588



2004 GARDEN TRACTOR
HUSQVARNA GTH 2548
25hp Kohler Hydrastic,
48" mower, 48" blade
$1500 (352) 601-2480
LAWN MOWER, GAS
HEDGE TRIMMER &
BLOWER NEED WORK
$100 352-613-0529
Troy Built Self Propelled
Mulching Mower,
21" cut, 7 HP, B &S Eng.,
$100 firm
Coleman Powermate
Generator, 1850 W
B&S Engine $100 firm


LAWNMOWER-
SNAPPER
SELF PROPELLED
HI-VACw/bagger
starts first pull
$140(352)613-8453
Wood Chipper Vac
Troy built,
New $760
Asking $275.
(352) 201-1970





MO VItRG
SALE

CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri Sat Sun 9a liquida-
tion whole house, furn.
appls. hsehld goods,
antiques military gear,
1909 Freeman PI

MO VI G
SALE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri Sat Sun 8-4p
Too much to list!!
9580 W. Pimpernel Ln
FLORAL CITY
Sat. & Sun. 7am-4pm
Tools & Hsehold. Goods
9659 S BUCKSKIN AVE.



HUGE INVER-
NESS YARD SALE
700 S Smith Avenue -
(@Angelic Air -corner
of Smith and Thomas
-rd behind Dunkin
Donuts)Furniture,
Tools, Clothing, Sport-
ing Goods,other. Many
with tags still on them.
WANTED TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944



!!!!!!!!!!185/65 R14!!!!!!!!!
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)586-5485
*****35X12.50 R15*****
Good tread! Only asking
$70 for the pair!
352-586-5485
-----245/45 R18~~~~~
Nice tread! Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
352-586-5485
2 STORAGE SHEDS
HD wood sheds well
built, portable 10 x16
$2,500 obo & 11 x 32
$5,500 obo both w/
dbl swing doors, &
overhead lofts.


-34 1-PREP (7737) .. n ta'nds. (352)22-584 roles.$2.0)76-572(32)30-6693


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 &CR 491. 746-1998




Will Prepare
Meals or Provide Trans-
portation to store or Dr.
Appts. (352) 344-9171




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic ., Bonded Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Licl/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907


Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579 A 5 STA COMPANYG
Driveways-Patios- GO OWENS ENCING
Sidewalks. Pool deck AllTypes. Free Est.
repair/stain 257-0078 Comm/Res. 628-4002


I REMODE


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lie &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handvman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *t
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


WINPO_
GE-NIE-."
We lean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill




U Decorative Mulch
NEW & Stones
OC10 Top Soil
tOCT1,DELIVERYAVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!
1g,0 SHIj4
NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436


All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
MAIDS ON CALL
Making Life Easier
,* Monthly Specials *
CALL 352-726-8077

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


anseeascapina
Co.. Paver Patios, Pool
Decks, Driveways, Sod,
Irrigatin & plant Installa-
tion 352-287-9896

SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421

AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
352-563-9824, 228-7320

Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570

ZIEGLER'S LAWN (LIc/Ins)
Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0554




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244


AAA ROOFING
Call the "/.sak sl "
Free Written Estimate

'$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic/Ins CCC57537 000BAQM


Acrylic & Glass WIHDOWS
Custom made for your screen room

1(7 -f ,T'A CRC058138
( rrrr rTr fj(CTrrcr4
(352)465-4629
Installation may vary. J


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Paintitng
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300

Pressure Cleaning
Repairs, Hauling, Odd
Jobs (352) 726-9570


-I
TOTAL REMODELER
40+ yrs, Tile Kitchens,
Baths, Additions,
si# crc058140
(352) 344-3536








Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPC051584


IDYE VEN CLANGI


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Ce Caning & Sealing
."^ Grout Painting
Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868





GENERACC
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
EROO15377

352-621a124


OUvi!U u!i U!
FREE Estimates
Circle T Sod Farms
(.corn) 400-2221
SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596



SPRINKLER. SOD
& LANDSCAPE
If it's Broken or Ugly
we can fix it! 212-2596





our world tfirs

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


C NClassifieds
Classic eds


J


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Stump Grinding
$30 + $30 per hr.Call
Steve 352-270-6800




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM





Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
SFencing
Screening
A = *Clean Dryer
Af' Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
ceLl 400-1722


Leaded Glass Installed in your
EXISTING DOOR!
"NO ROT"
Door Units
* Blinds Between
the Glass
Custom Carved COPES POOL
Glass (Art Pieces/ AND PAVER LLC
Bath Glass) YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Perry's Custom Glass & Doors Build your new pool now and
352-726-6125 ilbe ready for next summer!
2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL (Hernando Plaza) Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
780FloriAveHernan352-400-3188






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



aan.ea
A/C Unit 8K BTU $100.ea EM WA
Pool Pump/Filters $100. STRESS
Lg. Oak Bdrm. Set $250. HEARTI
Lawn sweeper+cart $75 $65:
Oak Ent. Center. $125. Prid
27" Color TV $35.
Dresser $25. 212-9171 racing
20 Sago Palms working
$8 ea. or all for $140 ba
(352) 628-5222 (35:
24 GAL RUBBERMAID, RASC
Action Packer Storage 300, 4 W
Box New $15 heav
(352) 382-1154 extr
48 Qt. RUBBERMAID, Ice (35:
Chest, NEW $18
(352) 382-1154
460 MOTOR,TRANNY
ALL NEED REBUILT IN-
CLUDES HOIST BUYII
$100.00 352-628-6277 Top $$$
2-Small Pigeon Buy
Coops...Wire floor's, Beatin
Nicely Made...$50.00 Offers.
352-503-2792
36" CEILING FAN US COI.'
W/LITE 6 Blades. White (352
or Multi. Home Depot 3
sells@$60, asking $25.
Ruth 352-382-1000
AIWA STEREO SYSTEM iE
WITH CD PLAYER,
DUAL CASSETTE & RE- FUL
MOTE CONTROL $100 with e)
352-613-0529 crash, 10
AQUARIUM 25 GALLON 16ith
HIGH INCLUDES
STAND, LIGHT, FILTER (35
& GRAVEL $75 Orga
352-613-0529 Techn
BARBIE JEEP cc
pink, working radio, (35:
has charger, like new 352
$100 (352) 503-6952 0
BLACK HALF Este
HELMETS 2 NICE
HELMENTS,ONE (352
SMALL,ONE LARGE
$100.00 352-621-0142
Black Leather single
Hide a Bed $198. obo
Great Shape,
Midar Saw New in Box Cryst
$125 obo Cryst
(352) 795-7513 water
pagr
BREAD MAKER Mov
breadman, good condi- (35
tion, hardly used, 1.5 lb.
$30 (352)465-1616 GRA
GENERATOR TROY BUILT P
portable, 120-220v Pendi
12v electric start, 8000 weight
running watts, 13,500
starting watts, will do
whole house, bought (35:
after Katrina, never
used. pd $1400. sell for Nortak
$975(352) 489-3914 for 12
$250
GOLF ORGANIZER service
RACK Holds two bags edging
and accessories (one Must Sel
bag included) $10.
352-270-3909
HARLEY T HANDLE-
BARS CHROME,61NCH
RISERS WITH CON-
TROLS, BODY
$100.00 352-621-0142 EQUIPh
Heavy Duty Whirlpool nrse '
Dryer, $150 bfree b
Entertainment Center rack
$50. rack
(352) 795-7254 Will deli
LIGHTED CURIO CABI- c
NET Glass shelves. Tall. $300.01
Brown. $80.00 -
Located Chassahowitzka Electi
Ruth 352-382-1000 Sears, lif
MATTRESS queen mat- all elec
tress years old like new new
lady Diana by sterners ; O
and fosterexceptional buy (352
100.00 352 344 3485 T(
Men 9 1/2 black. $70. Like ne
obo. Call Bill book,
352-212-1053. Har.Dav. a
POOL TABLE (352
Fat Cat, style 2 pool 3
sticks, excel. condition Tr
no stains, $350. Nordi
(352) 634-1697
QUIK SHADE ROLL- (35:
ERBAG Fit's 10'by10'
popup canopy
Never use.$40.00 Call
Ray@464-0573
SANDBOX & WATER- CABIN
TABLE $100 Huntin
C@movesale Sat. 1455 in Gulf
w.Japonica pl Citrus Area, W
Springs 352-897-4678 trails I
SEVERAL BEDS & TV'S 352 795-
for sale/various sizes
starting at $25
(352)634-0129
SLIDING GLASS DOOR CLEV
slider/w screen door CLUB
150.00 o/bo 3-PW, v
1-508-314-4660 tion; n
TABLE LAMP GLASS Lite sh
SHADE WITH ROSE ceased.
DESIGN CAN E-MAIL 35;
PHOTO $40 INVER-
NESS 419-5981 Conce
VACUME CLEANER eu- Per
reka! needs some repair, DAN',
blue color, works 1st 5 (35.
mins then stops. $10
(352)465-1616 RAY WE
VACUME CLEANER Eu- Your
reka!, needs some repair, for GL
works in first 5 minutes Reloa
then stops and restarts. NI
$10 (352)465-1616 TUES.,
XXL DIRT BIKE S,
HELMENT STILL NICE STOKES
SOME SCRATCHES Rt 44 E
$30.00 352-628-6277
^ SMITH
Specia
barrel, F
erator
SALON EQUIPMENT Speed
Pedi tub w/chair form, BBa??e
stool, rolling cart $400 convert
Manicure table, 2 rail-$15.
chairs, 6-row plexzi pol- Ruger 9
ish rack & extras $250 model
Styling chair & floor mat
$100. Avail June 2nd -W I
Call Marie I W
352-697-3151 n (35t
352-795-6933


S
VE PERSONAL
S RELIEVER BY
MATH, Like new
352 726 9983
e Maximum
Scooter
green, good
condition, new
ttery, $375
2) 746-7940
:AL SCOOTER
WHEELS, like new
y duty many
ras $995 firm
2) 637-6216




NG US COINS
$ Paid. We Also
Gold Jewelry
ng ALL Written
(352) 228-7676
WE BUY
NS & CURRENCY
) 628-0477




L DRUM SET
extra 16" Sabian
0" Sabian splash
Zildjian crash
stands $250.
2) 794-7647
an Easy Play
ics E 33 good
nd, $450.
2) 344-5069
2-568-8938
ORGAN
y, Like new,
$600
2) 419-6186




Full Set
al Glassware,
, wine, cham-
ne $200. obo
ing Must Sell
2) 746-4028
ND FATHER
CLOCK
Jlum 3 chain
*s, moon face,
3 tunes
$900
2) 746-9342
i China, service
gold edging
Mikasa China
e for 12, silver
) $250. Moving
I (352) 746-4028




SMITH WEIGHT
IMENT Home fit-
enter, over 400#
weights, lifting
butterfly, storage
for weights.
Must see!
ver for small fee
ir pickup
0 352-560-7869
ric Treadmill
estyler, folds up,
ctronics, nearly
hardly used
ONLY $195
2) 464-0316
TOTAL GYM
,w, comes with
of instructions
nd video
$250.
2) 746-2356
eadmill
c Track C 1800
$100
2) 746-1547




ON 40 ACRES
g recreational
Hlammock Mgt..
/ell, pond, ATV
Price Reduced
-2027/ 634-4745



ELAND GOLF
IS CG-4 irons
ery good condi-
ew grips; S-300
afts; owner de-
$250 OBO; Bob
2-228-9413

aled Weapons
mit Course
S GUN ROOM
2) 726-5238

becomes you to
Headquaters
UNS, AMMO, &
ding Supplies
EW HOURS
& WED. 7A-2P
AT. 8A-3P
S FLEA MARKET
. of Crys. River

& WESSON .38
il, 6 shot, 6a?D
'achmayr Decel-
Sgrips-$325. 4
Loaders-$4 ea.
Copperhead
-$3. Adapter to
t lower to upper
Speed loader for
mm auto & other
s-$4. 527-6709

BUY GUNS
SGun Smithing
2) 726-5238


5 X 8 UTILITY TRAILER
2011 Loadstar Heavy
Duty / 24" Steel Sides
/Ramp /16" Tires
Wood Deck Lock Sys-
tem -Used Once /
$750.00
Ph. 352-637-5131 Don
9x5 ft./10", Open
Trailer drive on ramp,
spare, set up for large
mower, or full size
motor cycle $450 obo,
cash (352) 586-0510
EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
NEW 16X8.5 V nose
encl. car hauler
$3995
USED 7X18 Goose
neck, 6 ton Equip.
hauler w/mesh sides
& ramp gate $2895
Trailer Tires from
$34.49
Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers
Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




"Like New"HIGH Chair
$100
C@Move sale. SAT 1455
w. Japonica pl,Citrus
springs 352-897-4678
TANDUM STROLLER
sacrifice $100.c@ move
sale Sat. 1455 W. Japon-
ica pl citrus Springs
352-897-4678


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



AKC ENGLISH BULL DOG
PUPS, 4 male
2 female avail 7/1/12
taking dep$1200
(352) 341-7732
Beagle Puppies
8wks. old, tri colors
$125. Cash.
(352) 447-2018
HEMINGWAY
KITTENS
for adoption
(352) 726-1006
Humane Society
of Florida
We have many
wonderful Dogs
Fully Vetted that
needs loving homes
Stop By 11 a-4p
7 days a week
9211 S. Florida Ave.
Floral City
(352) 419-7900
hsflorida@ymail.com
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Shih Tzu Puppies
Lovely Tri colors ,Reg,
APR, CKC, non aller-
genic, non shed, H/C
$500. 352 341-2380


SINGLE COPY


NEWSPAPER ROUTE


AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning

Hours


V Need reliable

vehicle


V Must be 18

years old


Th0irs onyChoil
1624N. eadocret Bvd.,Crytal ive, F
emil stwat ch *0 0olieco


i yr nuei 1uI male 3uu
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Toy Poodle Pups
AKC, red9 wks
champion bloodline,
shots, H/C $450 &
up(352) 564-2865
YORKIE PUPPIES
1 Male, 1 Tea cup
Female, AKC
health cert $650 ea
(352) 726-5217
YORKIES $450 & UP
MALTESE $500. Health
certs, CKC registered,
home raised, come
visit parents & puppies
352-212-4504,212-1258

^^^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





OB Motor
6hp Johnson Seahorse
good cond. $425
(352) 344-5069
352-586-8938




88 BAYLINER
Capri, project boat strip-
ped hull, 85hp Force o/b,
tilt/trim, trailer, wiring har-
ness $500 352-563-5524
'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini,
new trlr. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
KAYAK 14ft AQUA
TERRA PRISM
lots of storage
$485 352-447-5560
LARSON 99 18FT
open bow, 90 hsp
Johnson outboard
motor trailer incl.
$4800 obo
(352) 400-0719
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8495
(352) 563-5628
Pontoon 17'
with trailer,
Johnson 40 hp motor
$3500
(352) 419-4026
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com























AIRSTREAM
30FT motorhome, 2005
Land Yacht, I owner,
low miles, slide, all op-
tions $58,000 For full de-
tails (352) 637-3867
seahawk@ta

mpabay.rr.co
m
BT CRUISER
2004-26' mdl 5250 32k
miles Ford E450, V10 Tr
ton gas engine, sleeps 4,
3 burner stove,
micro/cony oven, full rear
kitchen, full bath, tv, dvd,
4kw gen, to many extras
to name. $28950. 352
489-4129
GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-




slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
JAYCO '04
40', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
stalon $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285

Holda Ramb


CLASSIFIED




by Revision B+ LE, '04
23' self contained, too
much to list. 33K mis
$38,500(352) 419-6825



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,800. 352-795-2975
RV CRUISER
'07, Fun Finder X, 18 x 9
, bath w/ shower, & pull
out awning much more
$6,500 (352) 628-0554



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$250 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
VERY VERY
BIG SALE! *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE! *A
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUICK
'05, Le Sabre Custom,
Leather, Canvas Top,
Chrome pkg. New Tires,
Loaded, Like New, 70K
$7,450 (352) 634-3806
Cadillac 01
Seville, SLS, 74K mi.
load, pearl white $5500
Must see! 352-422-6863
CHEVY
'00, Crysler,
$600
(352) 586-6206
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093
CHEVY 2000
Lumina 4dr, sedan,exc.
cond.dependable 64k
mi. $4600 352- 212-7762
FORD
'06, Mustang GT
Red Convertible, fully
loaded shaker audio
6 CD changer,
chrome rims, 43K mi
$16,000 (352) 637-2244
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
HONDA 05
Accord XL, cold air,
4dr. good cond.
96Kmiles, $8,350. obo
(352) 257-9866
MERCURY
96, Grand Marquis LS,
org. paint, immaculate
gold bottom w/red
carrage top. 382-9097
MUSTANG CONV 97
V6, automatic
$3000 b/o or tradefor
Chevy Stepside
(352) 400-0719
SAND RAIL
project $400.
(352) 228-1897



CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$12950 (352) 513-4257
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
Mercedes Benz 89
560-SL 2 tops exc. cond


58K mis. gray/gray, top
rack incl $12,500
(352) 527-8288
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883

Misc Notic


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 D7


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576



2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533








CADILLAC
2006 SRX Sport Excel-
lent condition crossover,
pearl essence paint, 2
row seating with storage
underneath. Sunroof,
Onstar, and sat. radio.
29,000 miles. $20,000
OBO. For more Info and
pictures, send inquiries to
cadilbcsrx spor@lie.com, or
Call orText Jason
at 352-228-7661



TOP LINE #4-W for a
child, like new 110cc
Panther, camo w-racks
& remote cntrl $675
352-212-4600



90 HARLEY SPORTSTER.
XL 1200, Custom Paint,
lots chrome, S &S carb.
Beautiful Bike! $3000.
(352) 503-2792
CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley '02
Road King, black, lots
of chrome & extra's
garkept $11,000 obo
(352) 344-9810
Harley Davidson 03
Super Road King, fuel
inj. $48K up grades with
receipts, too much to
list $8,000 (727)207-1619
Harley Davidson
'04 Ultra Classic, runs
great, $10,500 obo +
Men's ridng gear avail
(352) 601-4722
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
Harley Davidson
09 Sportster 1200 L,
mint cond. 800 miles,
dark red, windshield,
sissy bar, $6500 obo
(352) 503-6525
Harley Davidson
2011 street glide,
Xtras, ext. warranty,
2200. miles
$19,500 (352) 465-3668
HONDA '01
Goldwing 1800 low
miles, well maint. all
service records avail
$10,900 (352) 697-2760
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

1996 HONDA
GOLDWING
RUNS GREAT
$4,100.00

2005 YAMAHA
V-STAR1100
SUPER CLEAN
$4,800.00
2006 H-D ROAD KING
LOW MILES
$11,500.00
1996 HONDA
SHADOW 600
CLEAN
$2,800.00
2007 SUZUKI M109R
LOW MILES
$8,500.00
2009 H-D 1200C
EXTRAS
$7,250.00

GOOD CREDIT BAD
CREDIT
FINANCE AVAILABLE
Suzuki 09
Boulevard C50
very low miles, acces-
sories $4,900 or best
offer. (352) 422-4528
YOMOTO 2005


Motorcycle 175 CC,
street legal, 4,000 mi.,
runs good, first $1,000
or trade for car or truck
(352) 637-4011

Misc.otice


349-0527 SUCRN
6/12 Hearing on Ordinance (Floodplain) CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tled:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, CREATING AND ESTABLISHING A NEW ARTICLE VI, CHAPTER 18, CODE OF ORDI-
NANCES OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, RELATING TO FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT
REGULATIONS; PROVIDING FOR THE FINDING OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR A TITLE; PRO-
VIDING FOR APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION OF STATE LAW BY GEN-
ERAL REFERENCE; PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING FOR FISCAL IMPACT STATE-
MENT; PROVIDING FOR ESTABLISHING FLOOD HAZARD AREA; PROVIDING FOR DUTIES
AND POWERS OF THE FLOOD PLAIN ADMINISTRATOR; PROVIDING FOR PERMITS; PRO-
VIDING FOR SITE PLANS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS; PROVIDING FOR INSPEC-
TIONS; PROVIDING FOR FLOOD RESISTANT DEVELOPMENT BUILDING AND STRUCTURES;


PROVIDING FOR SITE IMPROVEMENTS, UTILITIES, AND LIMITATIONS; PROVIDING FOR
MANUFACTURED HOMES; PROVIDING FOR RECREATIONAL VEHICLES AND PARK TRAIL-
ERS; PROVIDING FOR TANKS; PROVIDING FOR OTHER DEVELOPMENT; PROVIDING FOR
APPEALS, PROVIDING FOR VIOLATIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVID-
ING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 12th day of June, 2012, at 2:00
PM, at which time and place any and all interested parties may appear at the
meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance for consideration of
the County Commission. Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for public
inspection at the Department of Planning and Development, Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY:
COUNTY ATTORNEY
May 27, 2012.


350-0527 SUCRN
6/12 Hearing on Ordinance (Allen Plantation) CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tled:
ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
PROVIDING FOR THE DISSOLUTION OF THE ALLEN PLANTATION COMMUNITY DEVELOP-
MENT DISTRICT PURSUANT TO SECTION 190.046(9), FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING FOR
THE DISSOLUTION OF ALL THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SERVICES OF THE ALLEN
PLANTATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT IN ACCORD WITH A PLAN OF DISSO-
LUTION; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 12th day of June, 2012, at 2:30
PM, at which time and place any and all interested parties may appear at the
meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance for consideration of
the County Commission. Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for public
inspection at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto,
FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
APPROVED AS TO FORM FOR THE RELIANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY ONLY:
COUNTY ATTORNEY
May 27, 2012.

353-0527 SUCRN
Elig To Vote- Padilla
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Lisa C. Padilla
6102 W Grover Cleveland Blvd
Homosass, FL 34446
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
May 27, 2012.

355-0527 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
HOMOSASSA SPECIAL WATER DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
Continuing Contract for Engineering Consulting Services
RFQ-12-1
Citrus County, Florida
The Homosassa Special Water District, a Florida Independent Special District,
("District"), is soliciting statements of qualifications for the following project: RFQ-12-1
Continuing Contract for Engineering Consulting Services. Qualification Packages
must be received at the District's Offices, 7922 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, Florida no later than 5:30 p.m., June 14, 2012. Qualification Packages re-
ceived after that time will not be accepted under any circumstances. No
Pre-Submittal conference will be scheduled. Qualification packages may be ob-
tained at the District office or may be obtained electronically by making a written
request via email to hswd@tampabay.rr.com. Qualification Packages may be sub-
mitted electronically in .pdf format to hswd@tampabav.rrcom or may delivered to
the District by submitting one (1) original package and two (7) copies.
May 27, 2012.


354-0527 SUCRN
6/6 Meeting CC Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 5:00 pm, at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Crystal River, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
May 27, 2012.


351-0527 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 023-12
Citrus County Roadway Microsurfacing FY 2011/2012
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide roadway restoration services including but not limited to microsurfac-
ing, leveling, replacement of temporary and permanent striping, edging, redressing,
and filling and sodding areas adjacent to the edge of the pavement and other
items specified in the bid documents. See the Specifications Section of the Invitation
to Bid for more information.
Minimum Requirement to Submit a Bid Bidder shall be licensed by the State of Flor-
ida, be properly licensed in Citrus County, and have performed 5 projects of similar
scope and size in the last three years.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 19, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 19, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Then click on "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
May 27,2012.

352-0527 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 017-12
Inverness Village Unit IV Road Improvement Project
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide roadway improvement services, the project involves earthwork, con-
crete placement, construction of roadways and drainage facilities, signage and
pavement markings; and utility construction associated with the Inverness Village
Unit 4 subdivision, and other items specified in the bid documents. See the Specifi-
cations Section of the Invitation to Bid for more information.
Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Five years experience in road and site development.
2. Underground Utility Contractor's license.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 22, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 22, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Then click on "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
May 27, 2012.


IMisc. Nod


IMisc. Nod


IMiscNtics


Meeting^f
I Ntics


Meeting
I Notices :1


Metn


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-' L-
Pay Only '-t-eOiPlarI


Sy Ht HadMl
reff1D
^I ^ ^y IIIIIl I 'm FTI ^ P ^^ T lr'II F ^Plf 'W !ll|llll~q1|rl!'I


jrlrrJ

p-ap






S -_


U... t .
.-lt j 4 .


r, RECYCLE
YOUR OLD CAR


A RECEIVE O-

>A GIFT
7r JUST FOR STOPPING BY!
IT "-ig 1'


Come See
What LOVE
Can Do
For You!


i : : .


.=,.


=J ..


LOVEHONDA.COM


* On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. ** Based on 2012 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and m3inuin your enicle
1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per yearwith approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash ortrade equityand lease fees excess milage penalty is 20 cents per mile. Limited toin stock vehicles only, all options ae atr.jdoriora ince
Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles suDject to prior sal Apples t) in istk units iers valid inu 5/29/12.


D8 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


jo"










FR IOME RONT
,CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
! Sikorski's
t Attic
PAGE E6


ESTATE GUIDE


..I I"I I-- "-


This image shows how Sarah
Reiss sourced reclaimed wood
to make custom wall art. She
used gymnasium flooring, bowl-
ing alleys, barn wood and
shiplap to craft her wall art and
smaller-scaled tables.
I- *.I- 1 I. *1- : ... 1 .


~: r~


. *-


iiJ~


*-~~*
~ -2


.. .. -.





!)j IT I ,jj .-

-~~7 1-^ ^iiii


kiWi l


if ISTIN


Ar-










E2 SUNDA',~ MAY27, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


LUVELI PLAn Un I1 AHtn RcE:
* Cooks Kit. w/Bar MBR w/Slider to Lanai
* Great Well Water 3/2.5/2 Car Gar + Office
SRoom for Pool Family Room w/FP
36x72 Barn w/Elec. 2,570 SQ. FT of Liv.!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E-MAIL: elliesutton@remax.net


637-282







PRIVATE GATED ACREAGE!
* Very Tasteful Decor Great Room w/FP
* Kit./Wood Cab./Island MBR w/Walk-In
* Elec. Hurr Shutters 2/2/2 Car Garage
* Steele Frame Const. Secluded Area!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www. Floidatisliuiglinlo.com u


6iZ .282-,,







CHECK THIS!!!
*Bank-Approved!! *Short Sale!!
* Great Price for Home! Wood Floors/Cpt.
* SS Appliances 2/2/2 w/Fam. Rm.
* Nice Porch! 6 Nevada!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E MAIL kelly fl. l e a nelr L
E M Il kell g, i iq Ien nel


OUUU N. UKLNDI IHK.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3 Bedroom 2 bath home on 1 acre,
completely fenced, remodeled,
fireplace, not in flood zone, paved
road, shed, Lecanto schools.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmufl@yahoo.com A


* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Villa
* Open Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar
* Built-In Entertainment Center
* Private Backyard

LEN PALMER (352) 212
Email: lenpalmer@remax.ni


* Den/Office
* Screened Lanai
* Maintenance-Free

-2611


CRYSTAL RIVER
* Immaculte 3/2/2 Splt Bedroom Plan Lots of Ceramic Tile
* Eat-In Ktchen w/Breakfast Bar *Superior Grade Appliances
* Master Bath Dual Vanines, Garden Tub Walk-In Closets
* Large Tied Screened Lanai New NO 2012, New Roof 2009
* A Feel of Country, Close to Town Move-In Condition
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 S
Email mailha solhei remain nel r J
VIRTUAL TOURS al td tmailha salhei lemin. co I


I UZ3 5. ULtNLAULt I LKKAUt
LECANTO
* Nice 3BR/2BA/20G Home Florida Room
* Screened Lanai Area W Fenced Backyard
* 22x14 Detached Garage/Workshop
* Adjacent Lot Included
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net I


CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES
2/2/2 beautiful home on private lot in a good
community with nice trees and great views. Located on
a cul-de-sac road, with green space in the rear and
along one side, great privacy, home comes with
appliances and washer and dryer. Close to the
community clubhouse, with pool and tennis courts.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


ELEGANCE AND BEAUTY

Don't miss this gorgeous home.

Call me for your private showing. REDUCED to sell.
Custom Built 4/3/2
Custom Built-Ins in Living Room
S Tiled Thru-Out All Traffic Areas
Plush Carpet in Bedroom, Office, Great Room & Dining
Master Suite w/Walk-Ins, Jetted Tub, Double Sinks
SGourmet Kitchen w/Morning Room
SFormal Dining
.",-- Outside Summer Kitchen
Plus Too Many Upgrades to Mention Here
"A 1;ii CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Ernail: cnadal@remax.net


Looking for lots of storage?? This large home has room for
it all Family room, gourmet eat-in kitchen and nice open
floor plan Caged pool with pool bath One acre manicured
like a park Master suite has bonus room for office, workout
room or turn into awesome closet space Current owner has
maintained it to top-notch condition 3 bedroom, 2 5 baths
and big 3-car garage w/workshop and built-in cabinets
Dream utility area
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 I
Email: Info@CitrusCountyHomes.com
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


UVtn z,uuu a.r. OT luxury low
maintenance living on deep canal w/Gulf
access in Riverhaven. 2/2/2, plus family
room offering ship's view of water. Lots
of tile, new shower in master, kit.
cabinets redone & your own dock.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Emai: toom@citrusrealty.com PC


r o24. INFO LINE
47183728,

I~ --
En.er house #16





6; 't-1hni IT


ifid, u k u.I I I II


WATERFRONT POOL HOME
Exceptional quality Ts distinctive home features
4 bedrooms,3 baths, a waterside office, solar-heated
pool, and situated on a deep water canal with boat
house & 10,000# boat lift This home has too many
features including engineered piling system, 6' exterior
walls, hurricane panels for doors and windows, Trex
"wood" dock and decking 3+ car garage with extra
storage and workshop
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 [ 1
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerih.com


* I U0 lear DUIl 0o z Z on / ure
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
*Close to Schools -Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


- 42 N. Ie i Hwy. Beel il*2-82w wRMXcmI 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
837 S. Iucos BldHro*s 2-80w wHlr~nielsuecm54N w.1,Cy lRvr7524


16 ASTERS COURT
SUGARMILL WOODS
* 4BR/2BA/2 Car Grg. Built 2005 2,165 SF
* Large Family Room Wood Cabinets Throughout
* Formal LR/DR Master BR w/2 Walk-Ins
* Kitchen w/Brkfst Nook Stainless Steel AppI.
* Large Screened Porch Extr. Brick Paver Patio

LOU NALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: lounaolley@tampabay.rr.com -a


E2 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Denture-cleaning tablets have Pruning trees takes skill


variety of household uses


Denture tablets are
made to clean stains,
which makes them
useful for more than just
cleaning dentures. If you
come across a sale, pick up
a box to add to your cleaning
supply cabinet The generic
version will be cheaper and
give you great results, too.
Here are a few ways to
use the tablets around your
home:
Clean vases: One reader,
Ellise from South Carolina,
shares: "Denture tablets
work well to clean stains
from coffee pots, ceramics,
teacups, mugs, tea pots,
thermoses and other objects
with hard-to-reach insides."
Some vases are narrow,
making it difficult to reach
the bottom to clean them.
Try putting hot water in the
vase and adding a denture
tablet, then let the vase soak


or rub petroleum
jelly inside it and
leave it for a few
days. Then wash
it as usual.
Besides using
denture-cleaning
tablets, you can
also use dry rice
to clean vases.
Add vinegar and
water or a squirt
of dishwashing
liquid and water


Sara ANoel
FRUGAL
LIVING


and swish the rice around
the vase. You can use a
baby-bottle brush, too. A
quick wipe with nail polish
remover sometimes works.
Afterward, wash the vase
thoroughly with dish soap
and water. You can use a
toothbrush and scrub the
vase with white toothpaste
and rinse, too.
Nail whitener: Soak your
fingers for five minutes in a


bowl that con-
tains a mixture of
one cup of warm
water and a den-
ture tablet
Unclog drain:
Drop a couple of
broken-up tablets
into your sink or
tub drain and
pour hot water or
vinegar down the
drain to clear it.
A denture tablet


and hot water soak can
clean your entire tub, too.
Another reader, Michelle
from Texas, shares: "To
clean a showerhead, dis-
solve a denture-cleaning
tablet in a plastic bag of

See FRUGAL/Page E4


The skilled
arborist
learns
how a tree grows
in order to care
for and maintain
it in a way that
supports its
growth and de-
velopment.
Pruning is the
most common
tree mainte-
nance proce-
dure. Forest


Kerry Kreider
THE
ARBORIST


trees grow quite well with
little or no pruning. How-
ever, in urban landscaping
situations, pruning is nec-
essary to remove dead
branches, rubbing
branches, improve tree
structure and to maintain
safety.
Pruning cuts must be
made with an understand-


ing of how the
tree will re-
spond. Improper
pruning can
cause damage to
the tree for the
life of the tree.
Removing too
much foliage
from a tree may
reduce overall
growth. Never
remove all inte-
rior or sucker
branches. Each


cut has the potential to
change the growth of a tree.
No branch should be re-
moved without reason.
Thinning trees elimi-
nates undesirable
branches and allows air,
light penetration and re-
duces weight. A thinning
cut removes a branch at its
point of attachment.


Crown reduction is a
method used to reduce the
size of a tree without top-
ping or making a heading
cut.
Epicormic growth devel-
ops profusely following a
topped or headed tree. The
epicormic growth becomes
potentially hazardous
when it becomes large and
heavy, making a bad situa-
tion even worse.

Kerry Kreider is a
practicing arborist and
a member of the
International Society
ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and
president ofAction Tree
Service. Reach him at
352-726-9724 or
actionproarborist@
yahoo.com.


rk hILJ11 RID L1 REA


Norm Overfield ,..
52Realtor KELLER WILLIAMS ,
352-586-8620 R E A L T Y
Emrl r,.:.,r...:. dh ',_+ lo, .:.rr. 352-746-7113
I J r,:, rr,:,n l h.:,:rr .- 3rd rn r rd.,',mrl 699 S. Adolph point, Lecanto

S3822 E. Arbor Lakes Drive
Popular Sanibel floor plan with extra living area and
expanded garage. Backs to community property, no
close backyard neighbors. Ceramic Tile and carpeted
. ....floors. Covered lanai with vinyl windows. In Ground
heated spa in screened area. Recent SEER 15 A/C unit.
Two ovens and 2 Refrigerators. Located in Arbor Lakes,
a gated lakeside 55+ community with lots of activities
and amenities. And, there is a One-year warranty, too!
ONLY $154,400. Call Norm Today!


F7 Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor,.- A HOUSE Realtor@
302.3179 SOLDNan, 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.0 000BL


.47 S. DESOTO ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
Home w/3 full baths, 2BR (easily
converted to 3), above ground pool with
deck, updated appliances, roof in '05,
A/C few years old, fenced backyard.
40 S. DAVIS ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
Princess model, 2/1/1, LR & family
W room, newer flooring throughout. New
S heat & AC in '09. Move right in and
enjoy.


Amanda & Kirk Jolhns Tom Balfour li Awnis & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASS, CIEALTDOR REACTOR REALR-BROKER REALTOR


746-9000


I~ 0vv~irs atu~a I


CIRSSPIG


PINERIDG


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 E3


BEVERLY HILLS


OWNER FINANCING







E4 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

water. Tie the bag over the
showerhead, so that it is
completely immersed in the
cleaning mixture. Attach
with a rubber band and
allow it to sit for several
hours. Or remove the show-
erhead and let it soak in the
mixture."
Clean toilet: Drop a tablet
or two into your toilet and
let it do its magic. It takes
about 20 minutes. Another
reader, Tricia B. from North
Carolina, shares: I only buy
toilet bowl cleaner if I get a


good deal on it. Otherwise, I
use bleach or vinegar I have
also used denture-cleaning
tablets when I've found
them on sale or purchased
them with a coupon."
Spaghetti stains on plas-
tic: Have stubborn sauce
stains on a plastic bowl or
sink liner? Try a vinegar
and baking soda paste, or
use salt and lemon juice,
then set the bowl or liner
outside in the sun. Windex,
liquid automatic dish-
washer cleaner or a couple
of denture-cleaning tablets
and water sometimes work,
too.
Food stains: Have food
stains on white clothing or a


OPEN THE DOOR-YOU WILL WANT TO STAY! STYLE AND SPACE ARE YOURS!
* 3+office/3/2 by Rusaw 2007 2700 sq. ft. *4+ office, 3/3 custom pool home
* Expanded garage is 21'3" x 33'5" Built on 2 lots in south oak village
* Set in Laurel Ridge on .33 acres Granite kitchen opens to family room
* Large island kitchen w/42" maple cabinetry Well for irrigation security system
* Prewired and room to add a pool Living room has fireplace
| 10' pocketing sliders out to spacious lanai Home warranty for the buyers
#352827 $249,900 #351467 $285,000


SAmerican AW BARBARAyo
ER Realy wens r BANKS
117 S. Hwy. 41 Realtor
Inverness, FL s e
800-476-2590 cell: 352-476-3232
352-726-5855 Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
2/2 POOL HOME
Lots of room here for the family,
FR w/stone fireplace, formal LR,


microwave. Roof 3 yrs. old, pool
liner & screening 2 yrs. Extra
room in garage used as third
bedroom. All on approx. 1 acre.
ASKING $119,000
MLS #352853
ATTENTION INVESTORS OPPORTUNITY TO OWN
4 PLEX IN LOVELY ROYAL
OAKS. INVERNESS
Each unit has 2 bedrooms and
2 baths and is a legal condo
a which can be owned separately.
Community offers pool, tennis,
I ---i clubhouse, RV parking & more.
Reasonable community fee
ML includes water, sewer, ground
maint., pool & clubhouse.
ASKING $189,000
MLS #355416
Zechariah 4:6 00BKDE


tablecloth? Try a denture-
cleaning tablet or two to
clean it Combine water and
tablet(s) and let the garment
or tablecloth soak overnight.
Then launder as usual. In
some cases, it will work on
dingy white curtains/sheers,
too.
Clean hairbrushes and
combs: Fill a small sink with
hot water and add a few
squirts of shampoo, perox-
ide or a denture-cleaning
tablet to it. Soak brushes
and combs in it. Swish the
comb and brushes a few
times. Use the comb to
scrub the hairbrush to re-
move any hair, hair product
build-up, hair oil, dirt or
lint, and continue to swish
until clean.
MEN
Dear Sara: Can you freeze
onions whole? Tanya,
Illinois


Dear Tanya: Yes, you can
freeze a whole (or even
quartered) onion. You'll
have to peel, wash and core
it beforehand. I prefer to
chop my onions, freeze
them flat on a baking sheet
(to prevent them from stick-
ing and clumping together)
and then transfer them to a
freezer storage bag. I chop
or even dice them because
that's how I use onions
when cooking. Thaw them
in the refrigerator or use
frozen and straight from the
bag. The texture changes
when onions are frozen, so
use them for cooked dishes.
Dear Sara: Do you have a
frugal way to soften cuti-
cles? -Anna, Ohio
Dear Anna: Try a cup of
warm water and a teaspoon
of dishwashing liquid. Soak
fingers in the solution for 10
minutes. A vinegar soak or


L Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
* 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 0


- Spacious Golf Course Home Priced To Buy!
M P3/2/2 Pool & Lanai, 1927/2809 sq. ft. with a popular floor plan.
- Take CR 486 to Essex to Eureka to end on tight, 410 E Eureka Court, Hernando, FL34442
Buj~~~~~~i~~~i~~~imOOBO I]jiiijaii~~~it^ MI;!.I^H JCH


Over acre on the lke. Cozy and updated 2BR BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
coteo Wooded, boat dock & house. Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
$174,900 MLS#349699 1300 sq. ft building. $71,900 MLS#354972
ONE OF
A KIND
WATERFRONT
5 acres that uts

SHenderson Well BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
built 60's vintage Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
home and pool. $695,000 MLS#351372 sq. ft. situated on 100 x 212 lot. $450,000
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471 ,
Email: roybasstampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (i52302-6714 "l


simply applying lotion will
work, too.
Dear Sara: How do you
select a good pineapple? -
Dee H., Wisconsin
Dear Dee: Look for a
plump, firm pineapple with
green crown leaves. While
pineapples do not ripen like
bananas once they're
picked, you can be fairly
confident that a pineapple
at your local store is ripe
and delicious, even if it
looks green. I look for green
and golden yellow tones.
You don't want a pineapple
that shows any sign of dete-
rioration, such as bruising,
leakage, wrinkles, softness
or wilted or brown leaves.
There's no need to tug on
the crown to check for
ripeness.
Dear Sara: Are there
plants I can add to my gar-
den to help deter mosqui-
toes? -Pauline, Michigan


000BLJK


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Dear Pauline: You can try
lemon balm, lemongrass,
ageratum, citronella plants,
marigolds, horsemint, cat-
nip, rosemary, garlic, euca-
lyptus or peppermint.
Dear Sara: I love the
homemade laundry soap. I
do have a question. I make
the liquid for my high-effi-
ciency machine, but I'm not
sure what amount to use.
I've been putting in 1/4 to 1/2
cup depending on the size of
the load. Is this the proper
amount? Also, the last time
I made a batch, after letting
it sit overnight, it separated.
Did I not cook it long
enough? Is it okay to shake
it up and use, or should I re-
heat it? -KathyB., email
Dear Kathy: Half a cup is
typically the amount used.
It's not uncommon for it to
separate. You can shake,

See FRUGAL/Page E5


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


RE[ST

Rcaltor


AwGEN 3UY SmN DAsYS A WEEK


l IA HUMUSASSA; Lg 3 bdrm, 2 bath 1998
D/W Md H on 1+ acre just off Rockcrusher
Road; new carpet, new interior paint, A/C
HOMOSASSA; 3 bdrms, 15 baths, carport, works, no thermostat; total privacy, paved
workshop with water & electric; shed,nearby road, huge fam. rm with wood burn
to new super Wal-mart; #355143 $38,000 fireplace. #352950 $59,900




CRYSTAL RIVER NORTH; 2 bdrm, LECANTO 2003 Palm Harbor D/W M/H on
2 bath, 2 car gar home & 2 acres & huge over 5 acres w/pool, 4 bedrms, 2 baths,
4,900 sq. ft. workshop; if you are a car buff family rm, fenced & x-fenced. Circular drive,
or just have lots of hobbies; this is the place 4 car detached garage, 20 x 40 metal drive
for you; can be used commercially under thru barn, 40 x 12 workshop. #353359
conditions. #355006 $200,000 $185,000







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

mix or whisk it prior to
each use and it will be fine.
You'll notice it doesn't cre-
ate a lot of suds, but it still
works just fine. During the
cooling process, using an
electric mixer (low setting)
every 20 minutes or so until
it's completely cooled often
prevents lumps and
separation.
Dear Sara: I'm getting a
bunch of sour cream later
this week at $.19 for 16
ounces, with coupon. Aside
from beef stroganoff, baked
potato topping and nachos,
what can I do with it? I'm
looking for dinner or snack
ideas. Khaski, New
Hampshire
Dear Khaski: I have a few
recipes on my blog.


Investors Realty
of Citrus Count:
Visit my website at: www.m


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 E5


Visit frugalvillage.
com/2009/10/07/uses-for-
leftover-sour-cream. You
can use it in homemade
salad dressings, waffles,
cake batter, dips, casseroles,
sauces, cookies, tacos and
quick breads such as ba-
nana bread.
As a treat, you might
enjoy strawberries dipped
in sour cream and brown
sugar, too.


Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage. com), a
website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living To send tips, com-
ments or questions, write
to Sara Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street,
Kansas City MO, 64106,
or email sara@frugal
village. com.


BIBM GITTA BARTH
9M04 REALTOR

y, Inc. (352) 220-0466
yflorida-house.com gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


AA


Ornamental or edible? Try both


DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Sweet potato vines decorating win-
dow boxes? Blueberry plants prized
more for their foliage than their
fruit?
Some flowers and vegetables are as
appealing in the home garden as they
are on the menu.
"We generally are interested in
something to eat when we grow veg-
etables. In some cases, however, cer-
tain vegetable cultivars have been
bred and selected for their ornamen-
tal characteristics rather than their
food quality," said Dan Gill, a
Louisiana State University AgCenter
horticulturist.


Ornamental sweet potatoes are a
prime example, he said.
"They've been really popular in the
last 15 or 20 years," Gill said. "The
early ones can easily cover 5 square
feet. Plant a few in a container and
they will fill it in."
Sweet potatoes are vining plants,
members of the morning glory family,
so they work equally well as low-
growing bedding plants, as ground
cover, on climbing arbors or trailing
from hanging baskets, he said.
"They can be aggressive, however.
Breeders are developing hybrids that
are less vigorous and that play well in
mixed beds with other plants," Gill
said. "They do produce an edible
crop but they're not that tasty. Gar-


deners like them more for their col-
ored foliage."
Blueberries are another great
multi-use option, said Scott NeSmith,
a research horticulturist at the Uni-
versity of Georgia-Griffin campus.
"We're seeking a variety of novel
blueberry types, with (an) emphasis
on berry colors, plant shape and form,
fall color, dwarfness and other inter-
esting traits," he said. "We want con-
sumers to surround themselves with
flavorful beauty"
Some other appetizing
ornamentals:
Kale, Swiss chard, parsley,
chives, rosemary, sage and mustards.

See EDIBLE/Page E8


AIN[_O ALL O CITRUS COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


k Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


ELEGANT GRAB THIS BARGAIN!
CUSTOM BUILT HOME Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5 Country
In the equestrian section of Pine Ridge next to Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360 interactive
riding trails virtual tour at wwwrnycountrydrearnhome corn
MLS #355468 $410,000 MLS# 350369.$565,000






1432 SEATTLE SLEW
INVERNESS 3644 E. LAKE TODD DR.
Positioned to enjoy the ......... sunsets and 3644 E. LAKE TODD DR
catch the breezes this . home in the ARBOR LAKES
prestigious gated community of Belmont Hills Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ community
comes with upgrades like hardwood floors, on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open floor plan,
gourmet kitchen and an impressive porch for vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a spacious patio
S....... T ... 1 urs and the yard even has room for a pool!
1 I-,. $215,000 MLS #353089 $116,000


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and nice LIVING ON THE WATER!
landscaping in beautiful Citrus Hills!! Situated This classic contemporary pool home is the
on a one acre corner lot, this 3BR, 3BA home right setting for living the Florida lifestyle.
with screened in pool and patio area offers you Open and airy with the plantation shutters
the privacy you ...... very well diffusing the sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives
maintained Nev _- ... bring your you plenty of room to dock all the water toys
S. ... 1 ... imaginable!
$175,000 MLS #354435 $489,000


7 e' 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr.
MLS #355561 S315,000
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on
2.75 acres. Bring your horses!
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
PENDING




"l.111i N L.,6 e. Vo .,g D DO
SMLS #349062 $29,900
Newly painted 1/1.5/1 close to pool
in a 55+ community.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


NEW LISTING PENDING





7.20 E GIchi-sl C 25 3a 4815 W. Gypsum Dr
MLS #355589 $67,900 MLS #355299 $234,900
Furnished 2/2 ground floor unit Magnificent horse property!
close to community pool. 3/3/2 well-maintained pool home. Immac
Matt Robinson 937-219-6949 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Ma


cis . s
532 E. Jenkins CI. 165 E. Ireland Cl.
S,/ .:: S. 2 259.900 t MLS#354308 $199,000
Private 3/3/2 plus den located
on the "Oaks" Golf Course. Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course home.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Mike McHale 352-302-3203

*iraga < 'ss- -


i .- f A$ l > -Afl -. -e .
1015 S. Softwind Lp. At ?ell _.' 9850 E Pebble Cdeek CI
4Ui MLS #352259 $139,000 fe)d MLS #354468 $71,900
Spacious 3/2/3 home on corner lot
in a friendly neighborhood. Bright 2/2/1 furnished villa.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Matt Robinson 937-219-6949


SI Iu L. UIU5UUFU Ut. It
MLS #353672 $66,
2/2 fully furnished
w/attached carport.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


C
Breni
Joh


PENDING





S 845 W. Cockatiel Lp.
MLS #352943 $86,890
late maintenance-free villa.
tt Robinson 937-219-6949






;0001770W. Shanelle Path
MLS #354810 $164,900
Charming 2/2/2 on the
twood Farms Golf Course.
n Lombard 352-422-6887


" ,v401IV 17 W. Lemon Street
41ills MLS #355045 $29,900
Cute, well maintained home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


@12 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
LMu Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


For a* VirtualTu o MStle Pots
Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


H.OMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiioNICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Truth about Spanish Moss


One of the many things that I love (due to disease, stress or naturally in
about Citrus County is the "old the winter) than in a young, vigorous
Florida" look that Spanish tree. Air plants are most often a symp-
moss gives to the cypress, tom of old, diseased or
live oak and other trees, es- stressed trees losing their
pecially the canopy of leaves, rather than the
Spanish moss on Orange cause.
Avenue in Floral City Sadly, 4- ', Large accumulations of
I've spoken to several peo- Spanish moss may cause
ple who are convinced that o- ld, diseased limbs to break
Spanish moss is killing > off, but this should be
their tree and that it must thought of as a "natural
be removed. This is simply pruning service." In more
not the truth. northern climates, ice and
Spanish moss is an epi- Audrey Durr snow provide this same
phyte (also called an air FYN service by removing weak
plant). Air plants get all of branches that shouldn't be
their water and nutrients from rain- on the tree anyway Large accumula-
fall, the air, dust, etc. They only use tions of Spanish moss that are causing
their host plant for support and they limb breakage or over-shading the
do not parasitize it in any way This is leaves can be removed manually, if de-
supported by the fact that Spanish sired; however, I strongly suggest leav-
moss can grow on power lines and ing the Spanish moss whenever
other inanimate objects. Common air possible.
plants of Florida include Spanish Spanish moss provides a number of
moss, ball moss, resurrection fern and benefits to wildlife:
lichens. Flying squirrels, hummingbirds and
Air plants require sunlight to grow, several species of songbirds use it to
so they develop in trees with sparse build their nests.
canopies. They are much more likely The Northern Yellow Bat and the
to develop in a tree that is nearing the Seminole Bat roost in the moss, as
end of its lifespan or has lost leaves well as reptiles and amphibians, all of


which provide natural pest control in
your yard.
Finally, chiggers do not infest Span-
ish moss when it's still in the tree,only
after it has fallen to the ground.
Spanish moss is just one of the many
plants that make this area so unique
and different from the rest of the
country Vive la difference!
To attend a free "Florida-friendly
Plants" class, call 352-527-5707 to re-
serve a spot.The class will be from 6 to
7:30 p.m.Wednesday, May 30, in the Ex-
tension classroom at 3650 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, FL.
Come learn how to choose the best
native and exotic trees, shrubs and
lawn types that will thrive with mini-
mal watering, fertilization and pest
management
For questions about Spanish moss
or other Florida-friendly landscaping
topics, call 352-527-5708, or send
an email to Audrey.Durr@bocc.
citrus.fl.us.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District.


Hand-carved picture is connected to famous lightship


Dear John: I would like any
input that you might offer
about this whale plaque. It
was given to my father in
1954 by a fellow Coast
Guardsman. There is a
typed description affixed to
the back which reads, in
part: "This plaque was
made by Captain Joline of
the Stone Horse Lightship
located in Nantucket
Sound. Prior to the opening
of the Cape Cod Canal, this John S
lightship was a very impor- SIKOF
tant vessel guiding numer-
ous ships daily over the AT
dangerous shoals, since
Vineyard Sound and Nantucket Sound
was the artery of New England traf-
fic." I am sending two photos of the
plaque. Perhaps you might know
where I can receive an honest ap-
praisal of this piece? It is entirely
hand-carved and hand-decorated. Do
you have any idea of its value? Thank
you for your help on this. G.S., Ho-
mosassa


i


Dear G.S.: There is a lot of informa-
tion about the Stonehorse Lightship
available via the Internet. The Stone-
horse was in use in the area
from 1937 until 1954; it has
a rich history I was not able
to find any mention a Cap-
F tain Joline in the listings of
the ship's crew. Are you
sure you have spelled the
captain's name correctly?
Relative to potential dollar
value, assuming the Cap-
korski tain's name is unlisted, it
'SKI'S would likely sell below $500.
For further research about
rIC the captain, contact the
Kendall Whaling Museum
in New Bedford, Massachusetts.
Dear John: I would appreciate any
information you can give me on this
table. -E.B., Inverness
Dear E.B.: I think your hall table
was made in America between World
War I and II, so it is close to 100 years
old. This type of furniture is often
called Depression Era furniture and
was manufactured in large quantities


in Chicago and Grand Rapids, Michi-
gan. Current potential dollar value is
below $100.
Dear John: I inherited a salt and
pepper set that I always loved when
visiting my mother-in-law. Regretfully,
I broke one, and would like to see if I
can replace it. The problem is there
are so many styles of salt and pepper
shakers that I have had a hard time
narrowing down the search online. I
am pretty sure they are from the 1950s
to 60s. Could you aim me in the right
direction to find out the style and re-
sources where I can look for a re-
placement? I have attached some
photos. -N.S., Internet
Dear N.S.: Here are two resources
that may be able to help. One is
See Page E7
This hand-carved picture
depicting different types of whales
was allegedly created by a "Captain
Joline" of the Stone Horse Lightship,
located in Nantucket Sound from
1937 to 1954.
Special to the Chronicle


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Coral bean a hardy, colorful Florida favorite


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Coral Bean, Erythrinaherbacea, is a perennial native that
thrives throughout Florida up to North Carolina and west to
Texas. Flower spikes emerge by April, each lasting about


three weeks.


ATTIC


Continued from Page E6


Replacements Ltd. in Greensboro, NC,
at 1-800-REPLACE (737-5223), or
www.replacements.com. The other re-
source is Sparkle Plenty Glass at
www.spglass.com. Good luck.
Dear John: Many months ago, I
called requesting the name of a per-
son to repair my Lladro pieces. You
told me about Leak Enterprises. It
took me a while to get an appointment,
but was well worth the wait I was told
it would be almost a year before the
restoration will be finished. I am look-
ing forward to hearing from them. I
could not believe that they found one
of the pieces had been previously re-
paired. I had no idea, it must have
been repaired prior to my owning it -
it was bought in St. Croix. I was
shocked to learn of the previous re-
pair, as I never noticed it before.
I really enjoy your program and ar-
ticles. I was disappointed that I
missed the road show you did in
Gainesville, I was out of town that
weekend and could not change my
plans. I am looking forward to this
year's event. Again, thanks so much -
I am a dedicated fan! -M.N, Internet
Dear M.N.: Thank you for the kind


A fun part of having a
garden is choosing
which species to
plant. Perennials can live
for years without
much mainte-
nance provided
the plant has the
right soil and sun
exposure. Those
that are native to ,
a particular area
are well-adapted
to local soil and
climate condi-
tions, tolerate in- Jane
sect pests and are J
more resistant to JAN
diseases that GAR
occur in their en-
vironment. Plants that are
useful to wildlife and have
attractive flowers have uni-
versal appeal.
Coral Bean, Erythrina-
herbacea, is a perennial na-
tive that thrives throughout
Florida up to North Car-
olina and west to Texas in
cold zones 8 to 10 and heat


words. I am glad you contacted the
folks at Leak Enterprises. The wait
will be worthwhile. They do fine-qual-
ity restoration. For those who need
any kind of ceramics repaired, the
phone number is 352-245-8862.

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send




S Please remember

our Fallen Heroes

on Memorial Day

and every day!




"s $ Of Citrus Inc.
-e ^
^^(. -
| ~~ 7/(W'-


zones 11 to 9. The Citrus-
Levy-Marion County area is
in heat zone 10. Marion and
Levy have colder winters
with more frosty
mornings, and
are in cold zone
8B once several
miles north of the
Withlacoochee
River and Rain-
bow Springs. Cit-
rus is in cold
zone 9A, with
warmer microcli-
VWeber mates near the
Gulf and lakes.
E'S Freezing tem-
DEN peratures will
kill Coral Bean
top growth right to the
ground. Each spring more
stems than last year emerge
from the deep-rooted, un-
derground tuber to form a
multi-stemmed shrub by
mid-May In frost-free zones,
Coral Bean remains green
all winter and can reach 20
feet tall and up to 10 feet in


questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


diameter in South Florida.
Locally it is a renewed little
bush, up to 3 feet wide by 3
feet tall by the fall. Garden-
ers can snip off frost-killed
stems for a tidy look, but
stems will fall off by them-
selves before spring. There
are some 180 species of
tropical Erythrinias, mostly
from the Americas and
Africa. E. herbaceais the
most hardy
Attractive leaves are


bright green divided into
three heart-shaped triangu-
lar leaflets. Tips are
pointed. Stems on fresh
yearly plants are smooth
and green with little prick-
les which deter foot traffic
but do not detach easily on
clothing or skin. Farther
south, stems become woody,
with light brown bark.
Flower spikes emerge by

See Page E8


m L! '1*1ia_3-


SPECTACULAR FOUR BEDROOM HOME
in lovely Crystal Oaks subdivision. Inviting, open floor plan with a view of the pool
from nearly every room! Home boasts two master suites, an eat-in kitchen, formal
dining area, living room, and family room. This home has been lovingly
maintained and is move-in ready! Lots of storage and plenty of room to
grow. Come live the Florida lifestyle! Seller provided Home Warranty!
Call 888-303-6405 Property Code 9415 for more details.
WWW.467NTurkeypineloop.info
Gene Wade
EXIT Realty Leaders
i 352-794-0888
352-527-1112


finET JUST KAREN
AROUND Hall of Fan
HIL CORNER E-mail ker
Il'I and rear (352) 726-6668 (3
porches bring the living area outdoors. Enjoy quiet TOLL FREE 1 -E
country living in this 2BR, 2 that custom home. Open
great room, all upgraded appls. included, inside
laundry PLUS det. pole barn and oversized gar. All J .W
fenced w/road access in front and rear. Lots of cIUf an d
room to build add'l home.2 \
PRICED TO SELL AT $158,900 I INDEPE





INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST MAINTENANCE FREE WATERFRONT COMMUNITY
Rocking-chair front porch, 3BRs, 2BAs, 2BR/2BA, cathedral ceiling.
screen lanai, eat-in kitchen with inside Fla. room, eat-in kitchen.
laundry. Split bedrooms, carpet like new, Community pool, boat launch and dock.
fenced yard. MLS #353043. City water and sewer.
NOW ONLY $79,900 MLS#345863 $55,900



CITRUS HILLS


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 E7


V
|


[







E8 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


JANE
Continued from Page E7

April, each lasting about
three weeks. Flowering
season lasts into summer
but is generally finished
by mid-June locally.
Flower spikes are coni-
cal, with up to 10 rings of
narrow tubular flowers to
2 inches long. Color is
brilliant scarlet red.
Coral bean is a heavy
nectar producer, attract-
ing hummingbirds and
the bigger swallowtail
butterflies, which have a
long proboscis to polli-
nate the blossoms.
After fertilization, long
green seed pods develop
over the summer By fall,
they dry to dark brown or
black, then split open to
reveal bright red beans
with a black spot. Hard
seeds remain in the pods
dangling from the plant
all winter if not eaten by
wildlife and birds. Even
after 5 years the seed are
still attractive and viable,


EDIBLE
Continued from Page E5

Black peppers, chili,
sweet peppers and hops.
The latter "beautifully
and vigorously cover an
arbor or fence, and the
young strings taste quite
good," said Rose Marie
Nichols McGee, owner of
Nichols Garden Nursery
in Albany, Ore.
Elderberries and
strawberries.
Eggplants, squash
and zucchini, cabbages,
artichokes and beets.
Just as there are orna-
mental fruits and vegeta-
bles, so, too, are there
edible flowers, garden
beauties that provide
culinary treats. Some
nominees:
Hostas (blooms),
daylilies (tubers, buds),
dandelions (flowers
when picked young),
marigolds ("poor man's
saffron"), begonias.
Sunflowers (buds),


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


able to sprout and pro-
duce a new plant. A sec-
ond common name,
Cherokee Bean, is pre-
ferred further north. Nat-
uralist Gil Nelson reports
the seeds are toxic and
used as rat bait in Mexico.
Mature plants are
readily available from
native nurseries. Plant
Cherokee Bean in sandy,
well-drained soil with
some humus to retain
moisture and provide nu-
trients. Exposure is part
shade to full sun. Irriga-
tion is unnecessary after
establishment. No fertil-
izer or pesticides are
needed on this xeric na-
tive species.

Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and
Consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thou-
sands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an
appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact JWe-
berl2385@gmail. com.

yucca (petals, fruit),
lavender (blooms), nas-
turtium (leaves, petals).
A couple of cautions,
however, about adding
flowers to the menu:
"Never use flowers for
garnishing unless you
know for certain they are
edible," said Gill, adding,
"Some flowers, like the
plants that produce them,
are poisonous."
Also, do not eat flowers
that may have been
sprayed with pesticides
or picked along road-
sides. Wash flowers thor-
oughly before plating up,
and eat them in small
quantities.
"If you're buying a
plant off the shelf, wait a
month before you use it
for culinary reasons,"
McGee said. "By then, it's
probably OK. If you've
been growing it yourself
and know how it's been
handled, there should be
no risk. The same goes
for anything organic. But
if its background is un-
known, be careful."


Wood, with a twist


Clever furnishings 0-1

use material in ,-. A,.W *A W t

surprising ways : "0;)

KIM COOK )-_0
For The Associated Press 0

industrial designer Robert Hen- 0 O|
drick was on a tech career track out' **O**
of college until two things hap- O i ,'
opened that changed his trajectory 'SS *OO@
First, he bought a company that '
maintains and rebuilds railroad tracks. -'
Then he started spending Saturdays
building stuff with his father, Jim. O g g
"I'd always been fascinated by trains *O *
and loved the history of how they were *L *O
so instrumental in the industrializa- 0 *0 (
tion of America," says Hendrick, of A 4,6o- es 7.' s -.
Nashville. "Dad was a construction 1**1 O o *.*** **0 *0 ,." I
exec, and the carpentry shop was a 1' -1* .00 '
weekend diversion. He was always sal- .. ..W
vaging some interesting artifact from a
building that was being torn down.
When I saw some of the scrap rails, I
realized there might be some beautiful
things we could make with them."
The two launched Rail Yard Studios
in 2010. Using century-old railroad
steel and hardwood timber, they make
one-of-a-kind chairs, desks, tables,
beds. Some of the rails date back as
far as 1898. Each piece is numbered
using a salvaged date nail that's been
scavenged from the tracks themselves.
Many wood furniture artisans are
interested, as the Hendricks are, in
honoring the provenance of their ma-
terial, whether it's repurposed, recy-
cled or just reimagined as something
that can be used in the home.
That creative respect makes for
some beautiful and intriguing pieces.
Naomi Neilson Howard, founder of
the company Native Trails in San Luis
Obispo, Calif., uses staves and barrels
from nearby wineries to make bath-
room vanities for her Vintner's Collec-
tion. Her Cabernet model has a deep,
warm patina, the result of the oak
soaking in red wine for several years.
The pieces have an Old World, weath-
ered quality. --.


See WOOD/Page E9
A Native Trails Bordeaux Wall Mount
Vanity crafted from a reclaimed oak
wine barrel.
Native Trails/Associated Press







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WOOD
Continued from Page E8

This spring, Howard added the Re-
newal series to her line, a departure
from the more rustic pieces. She
molds tightly grained, compressed
bamboo into contemporary vanities
such as the Halcyon, a curvy, wall-
mounted piece fashioned from two
proprietary varietals, Caramel Bam-
boo and the darker Woven Strand
Bamboo.
Fred Strawser and David Smith
have an eponymous Brooklyn shop
selling refurbished and repurposed
furnishings whose components
started life back in Rust Belt facto-
ries. With its mix of heartland crafts-
manship and modern high style, the
shop has attracted the attention of
design enthusiasts as far away as
Japan.
For examples, a medical cart from
late 19th-century Toledo, Ohio, gets a
walnut top that used to be a leather


worker's work surface, and is ready
for action as a hip new desk or con-
sole. Industrial-chic side tables are
made of thick, lustrously finished
slabs of reclaimed wood with
wrought-iron, hanging machinist's
baskets instead of shelves.
Sarah Reiss is a Dallas-based
artist, furniture designer and writer,
who found her inner craftsman when
buying a fixer-upper She invested in
a jigsaw and some other equipment
and built a wall out of interesting re-
claimed lengths of wood. The striking
result a colorful, textural geomet-
ric piece of art caught the atten-
tion of design bloggers, and her
business took off.
"Piecing a wall together is like a
long-form improvisation with a per-
manent outcome. I think that's pretty
cool," she says.
Reiss will custom design a wall for
you using locally sourced woods such
as flooring from old bowling alleys or
gymnasiums; shiplap; and barn sid-
ing. If you want something smaller,
she makes chevron-patterned tables.


charming character and handsome appointed upgrades these Berra
you'll find a uniquely O
I .I I,,, pte enclave call ed
Z c- -I te Vista This
....... ,esslve collection of
i highlighted by striking firing etend
design and refined architectural detailing Each with its own 4Bd/2.SBath/2+Car/Hillside South
charming character and handsomely appointed upgrades these Beautiful home in Terra Vista with a picturesque view of the
Skyview Golf Course Popular Cordova model with 4 bedrooms
plus a den/office Nice upgraded features such as hardwood
I ............ a flooring, Corlan, extended lanal, gas fireplace and a two-car
private club amenities and active lifestyle garage with golf cart bay
MLS#353652 $415,000 MLS#354012 $395,000





FEATURING AN EXCELLENT VIEW O:,F THE STH HOLE
Skylvew Golf Course this 3/2/2 maintenance free villa is a fantastic buy at this price The villa has
oversized 2 car garage, loaded with
system and pool with waterfalls is a
course community
MLS'.JSi.D$ 22.1..00 MLS#355408 $324,000










VERY NICE UNFURNISHED HOME IN TERRA
VISTA. I SPACIOUS LIVING, GREAT LOCATION
unfurnished end unit in Brentwood Townhomes Enjoy the amenities of Terra
#1275 I I i $1400 S11 li.h |
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the c
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


..... ....... ... --- 1- .. ....... LUI T-:
$249,900. MLS #355564
Call 352-726-5263. The sellers mind.
FOUND:
A great deal for you.
m 2/2 remodeled home w/brand new deck on
back office in garage could be possible 3rd
bedroom. Nice quiet street. MLS #355222
COME A RUNNING TO THIS GREAT BUY! ..... Crazy low price of $66,900!
,, I .. I . II I, 325 Red Rose Lane, Inverness
..,, .,. .'". ,,, ,,,,,,, ,,, ,. Call Kathy Chapman 352-476-4988.


GOOD______GRAVY___ _LOOKY LOOKY doh, I I ... I '
k 10, iii,i I l 'n'. lI.T. I. ONLY S69 900! Tio.....
M1 I VIEW' i. Ul. U ,,d ull p iuuiii l cui, 4 cidupiilluud plu, l l d ud
i Fqlti '. inh...llnl ASKINC S29 000li I nq rnnm Infi ru l, .i. 'l H ..i i, lIn l- l ,l I- ,
'l .. O lY A'KIN, S29 000 ,u ,,,i, 'll...... .. iI...... ... 1-2!q ,h 1. 4. d I d",ll


rooms, gourmet kitchen with breakfast bar, custom D U .' I .1m......u .. BANK OWNED HOME IN FORESI RIDGE' i
she ing decorator lights, interior laundry, tfile roof and a ***... .. .. .
view of the 8th hole! Must see home for I i i i I I ""I I I i i1 i
ONLY $263,700! MLS #355303. CallTomika ,,,,. .. "I H.,h,,,-:,l S.q.900 .... 6.. I2 Diam.. d LpS k:a Toma Sp es-
Spires-Hanssen 586-6598 or Kim Fuller 212-5752. i..1 i I.. i.. .. .... .. I,,I,,1. I . iH I-. '.. I ;.


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 E9









E10 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012


To place an ad, call 563-5966


S- -- lassifleds

In Print

and

Online

All
The Time


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
FLORAL CITY
3/2, Fenced, Pool
$600 + dep, 726-7417
FLORAL CITY
Small 2/1, 3 acres, ideal
for single or couple
$450m.352-560-7837
INVERNESS
2/1 Scrn. Prch. Fenc'd
yrd, No pets First. &
Security negotiable
$425.mo (352) 726-4842
LECANTO
3/2, Ist Mo. Rent FREE
$600 mo+sec. wtr/garb.
incl.d (352) 628-5990


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
WWWaacresfl.com
auroraacresfl.com


BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182


For Sale By Owner
'97, MH, 16 x 80, excel.
cond., located on cor-
ner lot, /2 acre +, lots of
trees, corner of
Rosedale and Corona
Way, Homosassa Must
See to appreciate.
Priced to sell $37,500
(352) 364-3242
(478) 569-9685

INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
carport, screen rm.
shed $3995
(352) 586-7962


NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183





Homossassa 2/2
carport nicely furn. MH
on Homosassa
Riverdock shed, f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077


Lake Rousseau
1/1, enclosedFlorida
porch, tiled inside & out
furnished $9500. very
nice (352) 362-7681




2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
on Approx 1/2 Acre
$29,900 owner finan.
with $3,000 down and
payment of $475. or
cash price of $25,000
(352) 687-3030
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, $5000
Down, $435
(352) 302-9217
Inglis Bargain
5BR/2BA, Fully Furn. DW.
large eat-in Kit, opens
to den w/ FP separate
Liv./Din. on 1 Acre Lot,
Near Goethe Forest.
UrgentSale$22,500obo
(407) 398-9759







SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55+, Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705



SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55+, Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
SUMMER SPECIAL
2BR 2Bath $15,000.
(352) 795-7161

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period 55+ Park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing & enjoyment,
clubhouse, onsite shuf-
fleboard, and much
more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2,900. 352-476-4964


Inverness Sr. Park,
1984 Fleetwood 2/2
14 x 60, fully furnished
with everything, scrnd
Fl. Rm., Shed w/elec.,
rf over, Cen Air., gas
heat & range, cent. isl.
kitchen, Wash/Dry
Used Very Little
Needs Nothing,
very good condition
$18,000 obo Call Doris
Inverness Park Resales
352-344-1002


Stonebrook 2/2,
1,150 sf on corner lot,
partially furn., incl'ds Irg
attached storage rm.
New Roof, $14,000
(352) 563-5931


Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352)637-1400


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com


OWN TODAY!






NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool, Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES, a
MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks, picnic
tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
houses remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
mo.







AURORA

ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com

















835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.(itrusCountyHonieRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS
2430 W. Tall Oaks Dr... $1300
3/3/2 Pool Home
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N. Crede......... $450
2/1 mobile, furnished
8560 W. Basilico St..... $850
3/2/2 Roomy kit. open floor plan
HOMOSASSA /
CHASSAH OWITZKA
6437 W. Akzian (H)...... $500
2/1 Mobile
2021 S. Comforter Pt. (H). $650
3/1/1 Cute and Comfortable
8355 W. Periwinkle (H). $1100
4/2/2 Newer Home
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
3441 E. Chappel Ct......$650
2/1/Carport, Close To Lake
944 E. Winnetka St......$675
2/1-1/2, SW on 1 acre!


Onltu y21

J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?



3/2/2 Pest control included
................................$850
3/2/1 Available June.......$750
2/Bonus Room/2/2.........$650
2/2/1.......................... $650

2/1.5/1 New Kitchen Flooring
......................... $625

2/2/1 Waterfront............ $750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

CASTROEAT
and Property^^^


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., Near Town
352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inglis
comply. furn. direct TV,
country setting, off hwy
19 N. of Inglis, no smoke
$675/m (352) 586-9598


M
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 incl water sewer,
Washer/Dry $425
(352)212-9205
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 near hosp
352-422-2393

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.
Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694





Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
with or without
children
1Bds $396;
2 Bds $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."










CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Available
(352) 422-6579


FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391



HOMOSASSA
Sugarmill Woods Villa
on Golf course, 2/2
oversize den/office, Sr.
Section, absolutely
Immaculate Beauty
$1,000mo 352-382-7920
Call betwn. 9am-5pm
INVERNESS
WHISPERING PINES
VILLAS 1 bdrm. 1-1/2
bath. xtra room, clean,
quiet, 1 Car Garage,
community pool,screened
lanai, 55+adult only,
sec.dep./ref. $640/mo.
call 727 862 3264 aft.
5PM or Iv.msg.



CRYSTAL RIVER, 2/1
water, incl'd $500mo.
+ dep 352-464-2716
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D
Hk.-up,water & gar-
bage incl. No pets,
$550mo. (352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
2/2 Spacious, Tiled,
Lg. patio, Quiet, W/D
Hkup. No Pets.$575/mo
352-344-0238




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




AVAIL.. HOMOSASSA
Meadows $725/up
Sugarmill 3/2/2
upgrades $825.
SMW 2/2 furn Villa $700
Riverlinks RIty
(352) 628-1616



INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964


IF 35)5 -5W I olFre (83 822301E1il' 1 ..*edZhrnclolneiom Iw lne -worn enieo


Home 0 Finder -










e cr




FiMdL Your Vre*Mo Howe-,
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/2/1 ,
$2,000 Down, $475. mo.
(352) 726-9369
C ITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, appls $795/mo
Ist/Ist sec no smoke
352-812-1414
CITRUS COUNTY
Lake front, spacious
3/2/2, $800. Rent or
Sale (908) 322-6529
CITRUS SPRINGS
RENTRENT ENT TO OWN
$699 Move-in Special
3Bed 2Bath, Garage
Lovely Home, spotless
tiled, fenced, Pets ok
352-527-0493

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Plantation Golf. Spac.
Clean $800/mo+dep.
352-795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
Newly Remodeled, h/2
AC, $750. 352-220-3005
HERNANDO
2/1 Mobile Home
total remodel, clean,
great water $400
(352) 344-2201
HOMOSASSA
3/2 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1 /1, very
clean, ceramic tile car-
pet, dbl lot. $650.rent.
1st Ist sec. 813 908-5550
INVERNESS
2 bedrm.1 1/2 bath,
garage, lanai ,near town
$650. 813-973-7237
INVERNESS 2/2/1
New paint & flooring
$675 mo. Inclds. trash,
352- 637-0765,
352-267-9941
INVERNESS
2/2/2, Gospel Is., Dock,
carpet, appl's, $750 1st,
last sec. (352) 464-0316
INVERNESS
3/2/2,Highlands
Starting @ $750.
3/2/2 w/pool. 352-
601-2615/201-9427

INVERNESS Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723


RetHoss


SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $800
(352) 400-0230



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Home WF $550 mo
352-228-0257/795-9633
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
Just Rennovated 1/1
scrn. por., deck, boat
slip, dock, no smoke or
pets, incis water, gar-
bage & lawn $525
+sec. (941) 730-2359
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964



C ITRUS HILLS
2 master suites. $600/m
incls ALL (352) 419-5481



CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2/1, CHA, new wall to
wall carpet, new roof,
near Manatee Lanes.
$750 to rent
$850 lease/opt to buy
call Paul 352- 746-9585



CRYSTAL RIVER
Furnished,Clean
House, cable, w/d,
$115wkly/430mo. No
hidden cost. 563-6428



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



Get


Results in


the


homefront


classifieds!


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 12-4pm
4/3/3 Pool Home
1276 Tacoma St.
HERNANDO










For Sale By

AUCTION
1,250 SF Bldg.
on .7 acres
Zoning: CH High
Intensity Commercial
Permitted uses
include restaurant,
retail, hotel, motel,
office, gas station,
c-store, plus
much more!
Auction held on site
16 NE HWY 19,
Crystal River FL
JUNE 12 @ 12 PM
OPEN from 11 AM
sale day
Call 352-519-3130
for more info
For Details Visit our
Website
AmericanHeritaae
Auctioneers.com











By Owner
New 3/2 Custom Built,
'07 Lease Option Owner
Financing w/dn pinmt
407-739-2646/442-3597



Beverly Hills
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
25 E. Golden St.
$19,900 or best offer
Call 746-1017



Timberlane Estates
Pool Home w/ 3/2/2
1 Acre, Fenced,
Needs some TLC,
possible owner finance
125,000 (352)795-6024




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream Home
In Active Senior
Community $175,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA Pool
Home. Split floor, plan
w/ separate family rm.,
master suite & guest
wing open to lanai/
pool. New wood floor-
ing in Liv/Din. area
dbl. garage, beautifully
landscapped yard.
Call (352) 726-6564


Country Club Road 3
bedroom. 1 bath. Home
for Sale: $105,000 Coun-
try Club Road, Crystal
River Florida. Location,
Location, Location!!!!!!!!!!
Across the street from the
famous Plantation Golf
and Resort. 3 bedroom,
Privacy, this is private
large lot but close to all
that Crystal River has to
offer!
Fenced in yard with stor-
age shed in the back
yard. Also plenty of room
for boat/trailer
storage.Updated with
newer ac/furnace, roof,
interior totally profession-
ally updated, tile and car-
pet thru out. Rental his-
tory is great with tenant in
place. Check it out! Seller
says Sell! REaltors, I will
pay a generous bonus if
you bring me a buyer!


H
OPEN HOUSE
2/2 + Den or 3 BR
Lowest Priced Home
in Arbor Lakes
Sat & Sun. 10Oa-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




2/2/1 Villa
Whispering Pines new
carpet, paint & tile, will
sell turn or unf. $69,900
(352) 726-8712
For Sale By Owner
$105,000, 4/3/2, Pool
Home, 3400 sf total
OPEN HOUSE
Sat. May 19th 12-3P
(352) 726-3798
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598



Inver/Highlands.
Large 1 Family 2.8 acs
fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A
4 BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool,
costly updates asking
$220K make offer if
you can offer a quick
closing.352-419-7017
OPEN HOUSE
Sat. 12 & Sun. 13, 12-5
6094 E. Loring Lane
2/1/1 Move In Ready,
w/ 2 Additional Lots,
$58,500. (352)697-2884




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and fore-
closures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.

HOLDER
3/2/2 blk/stucco home
w/enclosed lanai.
1350 sf. near club-
house w/pool & recre-
ation, beautiful oaks &
mature Citrus trees
$84K, 352-603-2202


3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $243,900
Call 352-628-9647
or 727-647-2372




3/2/3 pool home
move in ready $165K
Largo FI condo. wheel
chair access. 2/1.5
remodeled, new appl
walking distance ALL
conv. 1 mi to Ind. Rocks
Bch 55+ comm.$80K
(727) 266-7356


fc%^ A


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.


AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com







SEmployment
source IS...





lwww chronicleonline cor


SOWN TODAY
MIO0aWNA TODAY


DEB INFANTINE
4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

OWN TODAY!


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



Get

Results in

the

homefront

class ifieds!


NO CREDIT CHECK!
OFFER INCLUDES:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, Wi-Fi, Club-
house & Pool Relax
on your large spa-
cious lot with your
family and friends.
AURORA ACRES,
a MUST SEE
COMMUNITY is
located on 28 acres
of beautiful mature
oak trees, scattered
hammocks,
picnic tables and
gazebos. Your NEW
house is remodeled
and waiting for YOU
to call it HOME!
Just $595 a
Mo.







AURORA
ACRES
Mobile Home &
RV Community
11240 N Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2759
auroraacresfl.com






"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


(352) 563-5966

CI I1l)\l(:l

www.chronicleonline.com 4


Hme


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012 Ell


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre nice lot on
dead end.Have survey
and clear title.listed 10k
below county land
value.Zoned rural
residential.See at 8678 s
greenhouse
ter.$16500.o.b.o.
813-792-1355



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Dr has
Wetlands, River
access, $6,000.
352-621-1664



M















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY
HUGE PRICE REDUCTION OF S29,000

I a1a1 I1I ll .: Li Alll . N iill ll. m i *vi:. l|
11-111 i |i N ,I I .il. .l II ll l .l l$
i,,I, l .... 1 1 ,.:,,* $110,000
David Kui I., Cell 954 383 8786
Office 352 726 6668


INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY HOME
0 _. l: IJl .(' ,:..J I i,: 1 ...I m i I I yI
sG ,lll _" ll.II.I .j 1 lv.l i l -.l ,.l : N4 Im,

Mi 5 = 5 v.ii PRICED TO SELL S143,000
Call Ouade 352 302 7699


"BE YOUR OWN BOSS"
Th..; I' ". l.': 1. lly1 6 j I.. ;y I l p .l1.
I, 1 ll 1 .I ll I,,,l ,11i1 ,I PI 1 ,, l I h l

Ml. t = 32.97
Isaac S. Baylon 352 697 2493


* rijiji lijivit pill.
* Il Jl l I..ill. J .: ii

* I 6l11,ll I. I pilil.lif wI.l l
MI = $114,500
Willaid Pickiel 201 9871
I',I',I. CitrusCounit'Sold. corn


ENTIRELY MANAGEABLE!

A ... III . .l l. .i l .l l ...l l .I 11 I)
.m l .h hl i..l' l ...1 .... l.. ll." l .l 1 1. 1.
.).I .II ..1 |lhe 3 I .. 1 f. d.l. ll
MvL = 3 .3 .i3 $89.000
Ask lom Mald n Booth 637 4904


FLORAL CITY

ii,. 1 6.L,: ih.: 1. 11, i I-I':l l I P l f. I ,I i i: I
Mi 5 = :. :"11 $49,000
Call Donis Mine 352 422 4627


INVERNESS 3/2/2 HOME
rj. ,, i I_ I i ..I : ; I: K 1 %, I, .
Mi-;_= .? 1.:1..1,, $79,900
Call Challes Kel// 352 422 2381


WOW!
h- 1 ..... ..

I. f- f. I l I i.jl II'- I ... I ,, l . 1 hl iH rI' II
b u I ..I.u I u.i' .....' .. . m I-- 1 1 ,fi -I I

$67,900
C.all Ila.l Parsons 3S2 634 12/3


WARM & INVITING
IS THIS WELL KEPT HOME



l. li.al I nl i.: v .3,
Mi_ =.'i. $59,900
lotaine 0 Reqan 352 5860075











CUL-DE-SAC LOT 3.5 AC PINE RIDGE
MII I I 111 I..'1 h i .1' II ''.ll' illll
MC l i =l cel 35i 2 77lII
Call Nilda, cell 352 270 0202


TUU'LL LUVe I H kUUM Ilhtb HHhK
N..a:. irl .l .a :' _" llh i ..v i': ii .. 1
.illi ': II ,I. F ill Ia l all1s. I ia ili a
B ,i nh l jl I.,j I 1.1 -I.. I NI. ll'ji ..:I .ll<

Ml 5 =. .'i ASKING $114,900
Pat Davis 352212 7280
l'l c mplete hsti n ,i:fi f. l ?I.i ,tt.hi ., m !Lim


* liv i L .1111: II I .aiv .i
N N l: ,....I I .n i ,1 ,ill
Mi. = id, ONLY $149,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!

* .il Ill, .lP .l II I I.H 1 ].6I 6


Mi 5 = 3 ]l ONLY $63,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


A ppi ....:.. ;q, 11111 .1. ... 1l.I j .l .:.
Ul. 1 1.. .l .l.6 .l I l. I i
.ll .a j.ll lllli l i.l. i 1 1 I ...

.,, $239,500
Call Martha Sny'det toda' 352 476 8727
ask lot ile =349332


HERNANDO LAKE CHAIN

I, v11 , iiII: l h i ll.p h66p l.j, Ii li l

ASKING $67,900
Call Ruth Fiedeick 1 352 563 6866


MOBILES IN PARKS
FROM $8,300
TO $49,900
55+ Parks.
Inverness, Crystal River,
Homosassa.
Some doublewides, singles,
waterfront. Newer. Older.
Call Doris Miner
0 352-422-4627


4 BED/2.5 BATH/4 CAR GARAGE
pII. lll...ll. M I _! = 'v.l i.1 'l

CAN'T BE BEAT FOR $224,9001
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


E12 SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012