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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02760
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 05-06-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02760

Full Text



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TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny with a
89 10 percent chance of
LOW showers.
64 PAGE A4
MAY 6, 2012


CITRUS


COUNTY


ONICi M

W Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 273


Official explains King's Bay rule


What's great
about your
mom?
Whether she's
Mommy, Mom or
Mother, everyone ei-
ther has or has had
one.
Tell us in 100
words or fewer what
makes your mom
special. We want to
hear from kids of all
ages preschoolers
to senior citizens -
for a tribute to moms
to run in the Chroni-
cle on Mother's Day,
May 13.
Submit your en-
tries by Tuesday to
Nancy Kennedy at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. Include
your name and
phone number. We
will choose the top
five submissions.
Also, we will ask for
a photo if we choose
your submission.
-From staff reports



HOMEFRONT:
Annie 0.? No
Expert John Sikorski
advises a readers about
this portrait of a Wild
West cowgirl, not Annie
Oakley./Page E4

COMMENTARY:
Shuttled
Columnist Mary Jo
Melone writes a farewell
to Space Shuttle
Enterprise./Page Cl
OPINION:
The
current
mistrust of
government
has been a
long time in
the making.


BUSINESS:


Pensions
More states look to
reduce costs by cutting
or changing pension
plans./Page Dl


TOMORROW:
iBudget
The Agency for Persons
with Disabilities will begin
phase two of the new
statewide benefits plan,
including Citrus County,
called iBudget./Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword .............A14
Editorial ................ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ............. B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .........A14
Obituaries .............. A6
Together .................. A16


. !171121 !II


in the bay
Hankla said that was the
thinking behind designat-
ing the sport zone in a for-
mer mooring field where
studies indicate manatees
are drawn to anchors.
People with boats an-
chored in the new zone have
until June 1 to move their
vessels or face sanctions.
"We have contacted
everyone who has a boat
there and all but maybe
two have yet to respond to
our notice, but after June 1
,we will tow boats away.
They will go to impound,"
Hankla said.
The new sport zone, a 70-
acre area north of Buzzard
Island, will become a 25
mph zone from the previ-
ous 35 mph zone between
June 1 and Aug. 15.


USFWS officials hope
the slower speed in the
sport zone will have some
continuity with the 25 mph
zone in the river channel.
Everything south of that
area is slow speed year
round, including the shore-
line buffers around the
sport zone.
USFWS data shows dur-
ing the old May through Au-
gust water-sport zone, May
tended to have the most
manatee use and early Au-
gust had the least, thus the
decision to fall in the mid-
dle with the new dates.
Hankla reiterated that
his office will not overstep
its mandate of providing
protection for manatees in
the bay
See Page A2


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- The
supervisor whose office
authored and is now trying
to implement the contro-
versial rules about water-
borne activities in King's
Bay tried to clear the air
Wednesday
Dave Hankla, field su-
pervisor of the North
Florida ecological services
office of U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, also laid
out what he calls a deliber-
ative and well-researched
process used by his office


to reach the rules they an-
nounced March 15.
A process, Hankla in-
sists, which also included
several compromises to the
original proposal they un-
veiled in June 2011.
"At the end of the day, we
would never trade people
for manatees," Hankla told
the Chronicle Editorial
Board.
He said while his office
is charged with protecting
manatees, they understand
the safety needs of humans
and manatees and "take
those folks seriously"
when they talk about safety


Working toward a more

accessible world

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Gary Marienthal and Roy Johnson
travel on their motorized scooter chairs together.
Both residents of Crown Court Assisted Living Facil-
ity in Inverness, they like their independence and being
able to get around town on their own.
Back in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act made
it law that people like Marienthal and Johnson could have
access to any public facility, any public transportation, any
store or building that's open to the public, drink at a water
fountain, use a public bathroom, cross at intersections on
public highways, travel public sidewalks.
For the most part, Citrus County is a disabled-friendly
place when it comes to everyday life.
But it's not 100 percent.
Not yet.
On Thursday, Marienthal and Johnson took a trip on
their scooter chairs to Walgreens at the corner of U.S.
41 and South Apopka Avenue, crossing U.S. 41 at Semi-
nole Avenue.
To press the crosswalk button, Marienthal had to
drive onto a patch of grass, which made the three-
See Page A5


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
If you're elderly or dis-
abled, where do you go if
you need help?
At a recent meeting of
the Citrus County Al-
liance, a group of local so-
cial service agencies that
provide assistance to
county residents, Vidya
Hogan, Elder Options di-
rector of consumer serv-
ices from Gainesville,


spoke about her agency
and what it does.
Basically, she said,
it is an aging and disabil-
ity resource center, offer-
ing information and
referrals.
"We get about 20,000
calls a year, ranging from
'Who do I call to get a pos-
sum out from under my
porch?' to 'I'm about to go
into the hospital; I'm car-
ing for my mother with
dementia what can I


The history of the ADA

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
It's the basis for our national existence "all
men are created equal" as our founding fathers
wrote in the Declaration of Independence.
However, as our national history has proven,
not every person has been treated equally
According to the 2010 U.S. Census, nearly 34
million Americans live with disabilities in the
United States, almost 28,000 in Citrus County at
the time of the census.
Prior to the 20th century, people with disabili-
ties were commonly put in institutions. They
were, and often still are, called handicapped,
which is derived from the idea of a person with
"cap in hand," begging.
After the two world wars in the 1900s when
thousands of men and women returned from mil-
itary duty with various forms of physical disabil-
ities, the nation started to take notice.
Then came the 1960s, and along with the racial
civil rights movement came the disability rights
movement.
Congress passed a Rehabilitation Act in 1972,
which was vetoed by President Richard Nixon.
However, after a group of people with disabilities
See Page A5


do?"' Hogan said.
She said Elder Options
provides a helpline, 800-
96ELDER (800-963-5337).
Some of the services
Elder Options provides
include helping people
connect with: Medicaid
and Medicare, legal assis-
tance, disability programs,
caregiver support, con-
sumer protection issues,
home-delivered meals
and congregate dining,
Emergency Alert Systems,


ramp construction and
home modifications or re-
pairs to accommodate
disabilities.
"We also have a Living
Healthy unit, a program
for people with chronic
conditions that gives a
lifestyle approach to
managing their condi-
tion," Hogan said.
She also noted a
Medicare change that


Page A5


USFWSfield supervisor says

plan was well researched


Per


capital,


Citrus


second-


safest


county in


state
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Based on population, Cit-
rus County is the second
safest in Florida, surpassed
only by Santa Rosa County
in the Panhandle, according
to the recently released
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement crime
numbers.
This county has the
second-lowest crime rate
per 100,000 citizens, accord-
ing to the report.
And, according to sher-
iff's office officials, it took a
combination of things to get
those results.
"Wherever he goes, the
sheriff (Jeff Dawsy) is always
telling people to lock their
cars and to lock their doors
and windows at home," said
Gail Tierney, spokeswoman
of the sheriff's office.
She said the combination
of Dawsy's constant mes-
sage to residents and other
crime-fighting initiatives
like the agency's free-of-
charge residential and com-
mercial security survey
services and campaigns
such as Lock Out Crime are
paying dividends.
And so is the agency's
proactive stance with his in-
telligence-led policing (ILP)
protocol, which all of his of-
ficers are trained in, said
Tierney
Using ILP, the agency's
operational strategy seeks
to reduce crime through the
combined use of crime
analysis and criminal intel-
ligence in order to deter-
mine crime reduction
tactics that concentrate on
the enforcement and pre-
vention of criminal activity,
with a specific focus on ac-
tive and repeat offenders.
Citrus County has similar
populations with Martin, In-
dian River and Santa Rosa
counties. Citrus County has
a population of 140,956,
down from the figure of
142,202 cited in 2010
Monday, FDLE released
its 2011 annual Uniform
Crime Report, which
showed Florida's crime
rate at a 41-year low, declin-
ing by 0.8 percent.
Violent crime decreased
by 3.7 percent for the year,
while non-violent crime in-
creased slightly by .4 percent
The 2011 annual UCR in-
cludes data submitted by
411 of Florida's 414 munici-
pal, county and state law
enforcement agencies for
crimes reported from Jan. 1
through Dec. 31. These sub-
mitting agencies represent
99.3 percent of the state's
total population.
Crime rate statistics focus
on FDLE's seven index of-
fense categories: murder,
forcible rape, robbery, ag-
gravated assault, burglary,
larceny and motor vehicle
theft.
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office statistics for 2011
showed a 10.6 percent
decrease in reported index
crimes within its own
jurisdiction, that is, the un-
incorporated areas of the
county, plus the city limits
of Inverness.
At the request of the Crys-
tal River City Council,
index crimes reported
within the city limits are
submitted separately and
indicated a 20.8 percent
See Page A2


Living with limitations

I NO67


-, -

~'. .L
'- ~..


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Gary Marienthal and Roy Johnson, residents of Crown Court, travel on the sidewalk along U.S. 41 in Inverness to
buy some cigarettes. Florida Department of Transportation has scheduled work to improve crosswalks, which will
make traveling more scooter-friendly. Marienthal felt he needed to use his foot to brace the motorized device where
the sidewalk meets the road.


Services available to elderly and disabled


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Week IN REVIEW


Editor's note: The "good-newsnicks" of
the world came in a distant second to those
readers who based on hits to stories
posted on Chronicleonline.com found
sex, drugs and litigation to be of greatest
interest this past week Let's rock 'n'roll:
Education litigation
The county school district has been
slapped with a lawsuit seeking a minimum
of $75,000.
The federal suit filed by the Florida
Civil Rights Association on behalf of an Or-
ange County woman accuses Withla-
coochee Technical Institute officials of
maintaining "policies and practices that
prevent African-American students from
competing on equal footing."
After the now-plaintiff completed the
Test for Adult Basic Education at WTI, a
trio of staffers accused her of cheating be-
cause of her stellar performance on a por-
tion of the exam.
After refusing an offer to re-take the
exam, the woman sought to exit the Inver-
ness campus but the educators went on the
defense and blocked her way then called
the cops, the lawsuit says.
The WTI folks lodged the accusations
with a couple other education institutions
with which the woman was affiliated.
The woman then lodged a complaint of
her own and now it'll be up to the courts to
sort things out.
Attack on C.R. 486
A shotgun blast to a vehicle traveling on
County Road 486 early Monday morning
left a 69-year-old Pine Ridge woman with
gunshot wounds to her right eye, neck,
chest and arm.
The victim, her spouse and their friend
were reportedly traveling home at around 2
a.m. when the as-yet-unknown shooter com-
mitted the crime.
Those with information that could help
authorities solve the case are encouraged
to call the sheriff's office.



RULE MacV
Continued from Page Al um

"We don't have flexibility reg
with the new rules to begin
adding new prohibitions in
King's Bay The only flexi- categorizing r
ability we have is with the 25 endangered tf
mph zone," Hankla said. "The manat
He said in another depar- is definitely
ture from the proposed four percent
rules, USFWS scrubbed a we expect the
so-called safe line provision double in 20 y
"because it was confusing said.
and unenforceable and the He said the
public did not really under- mum of 5,000
stand it." Florida curre
He said with regard to the even if they ar
hours at Three Sisters that would ha
Springs and after much de- on the protect
liberation, USFWS officials already in pla
settled on shutting it from Mac Willia
sunset to sunrise to avoid Crystal River
harassment of manatees opposed to th
when you can't see them. Bay rules,
Hankla also talked about creased num
the possibility of re- that further


After initially being transported to Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center, the victim
was taken to Shands Hospital in
Gainesville, where she was listed in stable
condition by mid-week.
Court date set
Killing his dad. Strong-arm robbery Bur-
glary Theft. Dealing in stolen property
Those are the charges 38-year-old John
Campbell faces -just in Citrus County
It was in August 2010 when the report-
edly crazed suspect is said to have smashed
his vehicle into a Hernando County squad
car when being hotly pursued, then plowed
into another vehicle for good measure.
This past week, Judge Ric Howard set a
well-restrained Campbell's trial for the
week of Sept. 24.
More from court
Also before Judge Howard this past week
was Yvonne Nicole Andrews, a 40-year-old
HIV-infected woman who is accused of
sleeping around in unprotected fashion
while knowingly having the potentially
deadly virus,
Her arrest in January came on the heels
of an arrest in 2011 for committing the same
crime with a couple of other unsuspecting
men.
She was out on bond from the first go-
around when she was accused of re-
committing the crime with multiple men
around Christmastime.
Andrews, who was also well restrained in
court, is now slated to stand trial the week
of Aug. 27.
Busted x 12
Twelve count 'em 12 suspects were
busted after a two and one-half year investi-
gation into a reported "drug house" in Inglis.
Inglis police were joined by Levy and Cit-
rus sheriff's officials in the operation,
which Inglis Police Chief Steve Dixon said
"... is just the tip of the iceberg" which
likely has other recent visitors to 21 Cypress
Lane looking over their shoulders.


/illiams said the increased
bers is proof that further
5ulation is unnecessary.


manatees from
o threatened.
;ee population
increasing. At
growth a year,
population to
years," Hankla

ere is a mini-
0 manatees in
ently, but said
re reclassified,
ave zero effect
tion provisions
ice.
ams, of Save
Inc., a group
he new King's
said the in-
bers is proof
r regulation


is unnecessary
"In Northwest Florida,
we have the highest growth
rate for manatees. So why
are they fedss) here and try-
ing to seize our waters? We
have been good stewards of
manatees," Williams added.
"Hankla is just out there,
going around the state and
acting like a demi-god.
None of their rules are
backed by facts."
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


NASA's first Hispanic astronaut,

two others join Hall of Fame


Inductee joins John Glenn,

Neil Armstrong Sally Ride
Associated Press tion and the International
Space Station. He left
CAPE CANAVERAL NASA in 2005 to found Ad
NASAs first Hispanic astro- Astra Rocket Co., where he
naut was among three astro- is working on propulsion
nauts Saturday who joined systems for travel to Mars.
John Glenn, Neil Armstrong Chilton piloted the shut-
and Sally Ride in the U.S. tle Endeavour on its inau-
Astronaut Hall of Fame. gural mission, in 1992. He
Franklin Chang-Diaz, served as a deputy program
who was born in Costa Rica, manager for operations in
was inducted into the hall the International Space
of fame in a ceremony at Station office at Johnson
the Kennedy Space Center. Space Center before he left
Two other former space NASA in 1998.
shuttle astronauts, Charlie Chilton went on to be-
Precourt and Kevin come the commander of Air
Chilton, also were inducted. Force Space Command and
Chang-Diaz flew seven Air Force Strategic Comn-
shuttle missions, a record mand. He retired in 2011 as
he shares with former as- a four-star general, the
tronaut Jerry Ross. highest military rank ever
A plasma physicist with a held by a U.S. astronaut
doctorate from the Massa- Precourt and six crew-
chusetts Institute of Tech- mates were aboard the
nology, Chang-Diaz helped shuttle Columbia on March
deploy the Galileo space- 22, 1993, when its three
craft on its mission to main engines ignited six
Jupiter and worked on both seconds before their sched-
the Russian Mir space sta- uled liftoff. As steam en-


SAFEST
Continued from Page Al

rise, up from 260 in 2010 to
314 in 2011, according to
the sheriff's office.
Larcenies in Crystal
River saw the largest in-
crease, rising from 191 in
2010, to 239 in 2011. Aggra-
vated assaults and rob-
beries also rose marginally,
up by 6 and 4 respectively.
Burglaries, on the other
hand, dropped from 32 in
2010, to 26 in 2011.
The total number of
index crimes reported to
FDLE by the sheriff's of-
fice in its own jurisdiction
decreased by 389, down
from 3,655 in 2010, to 3,266
in 2011. Specifically, these
crimes fell under the prop-
erty index offense cate-
gories of burglaries, which
decreased from 884 to 806,
and larcenies, which
dropped from 2,191 to
1,934.
For Citrus County as a
whole, including Crystal


SO YOU KNOW
The percentage of re-
ported crimes cleared
by arrest (or else excep-
tionally cleared) by the
sheriff's office in its own
jurisdiction increased
marginally from 30.8
percent in 2010, to
31.3 percent in 2011.
In Crystal River, how-
ever, the clearance rate
rose dramatically from
40.0 percent in 2010,
to 48.7 percent in
2011. All of these num-

River and Inverness, the
overall number of reported
index crimes dropped by a
total of 8.6 percent.
Since April 2004, the
sheriff's office has handled
all law enforcement re-
sponsibilities within Inver-
ness. The agency took over
policing in Crystal River in
February 2008.
In 2007, the last full year
CRPD was in command, the
total number of index
crimes reported was 369, or


The ceremony
brought the
number of former
astronauts in the
hall of fame in
Titusville to 82.

veloped the shuttle, a liquid
oxygen valve sprung a leak,
triggering an automatic en-
gine shutdown seconds be-
fore the twin solid rocket
boosters were to ignite.
Precourt, now an execu-
tive at ATK Aerospace
Group's Space Launch Divi-
sion, flew on Columbia in
April 1993 after its engines
were replaced on the
launch pad.
Florida Today reported
Saturday's ceremony
brought the number of for-
mer astronauts in the hall
of fame in Titusville to 82.
Chang-Diaz, Chilton and
Precourt were selected by a
panel of current hall of
fame astronauts, former
NASA officials, historians
and journalists.


bers rank far above
Florida's statewide
clearance rate of 24.2
percent.
* The sheriff's office re-
ported 4,988 arrests in
2011, fewer than the
5,695 reported in
2010. Within the city
limits of Crystal River,
however, there were
621 arrests in 2011, up
from the 587 reported
in 2010.
-Source: Citrus County
Sheriff's Office

55 more crimes than were
reported in 2011. Included
in those crimes were 246
larcenies, 12 robberies, 16
vehicle thefts and 62 bur-
glaries. Comparatively, in
2011, there were 239 larce-
nies, 9 robberies, 5 vehicle
thefts and only 26 burgla-
ries reported, according to
the sheriff's office.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


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A2 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


STATE/LOCAL


1,







Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




AroundTE Group seeks to form cultural alliance


Citrus County
Chance to make
a difference
Learn where volunteers
can make a difference and
discover their niche in com-
munity service at a forum
hosted by the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and Retired
and Senior Volunteer Pro-
gram to link people with vol-
unteer openings.
The forum is an opportu-
nity to meet with
NCVC/RSVP staff and volun-
teer managers throughout the
county and learn about their
programs.
Opportunity Links will be
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 9, at the Citrus
County Resource Center
Cafe, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto.
Persons with disabilities
requiring reasonable accom-
modations call ahead.
For information, call 352-
527-5955 or email
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Sugarmill Woods
road closures ahead
A two-week road closure is
planned in the Sugarmill
Woods subdivision.
West Cypress Boulevard
will be closed in the vicinity of
Pine Drive.
The road closure will start
during the morning of Mon-
day, May 7 ,continuing
through Friday, May 18.
A detour from West Cy-
press Boulevard onto
Golfview Drive, Biscayne
Street and Douglas Street will
be clearly identified. Proper
detour signs will be posted so
motorists are aware of alter-
nate roads. For more infor-
mation, call the Citrus County
Water Resources Depart-
ment at 352-527-7650.


Campaign TRAIL


The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium; and 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, at the College of
Central Florida. Information:
Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
Phil Mulrain, Democrat
for clerk of courts, will speak
at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, at
the B&W Rexall in Inverness
for the Downtown Democratic
Club meeting.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club and Citrus Re-
publican Women's Club is
sponsoring the following fo-
rums at 9 a.m. at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River:
Saturday, May 12, Sandy
Balfour and Robert Cum-
mins, candidates for superin-
tendent of schools; Saturday,
June 9, Shannon Heath-
cock and Joe Meek, candi-
dates for county commission
District 3; Saturday, July 14,
forum for all Republican pri-
mary candidates. Information:
Fred or Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
The Citrus County Tea
Party Activists have sched-
uled the following forums at 1
p.m. at the Inverness
Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Drive, Inverness: Saturday,
May 19, state representative
candidates Nancy Argen-
ziano, Lynn Dostal and in-
cumbent Jimmie T. Smith;
Saturday, June 16, candi-
dates for sheriff with details to


be announced.
The Beverly
Association can(
forum is at 7 p.m
Sept. 27, at 77 C
Beverly Hills. Inf
Rosella Hale, 35
The Citrus I
sociation is host
dates' forum at 7
Thursday, Oct. 4
rus Hills Golf anc
Club.
The Campaig.
listing of political
for the 2012 elect
Send events or c
fundraisers to M
mwright@chroni
com.


y Hills Civic
didates'
n. Thursday,
3ivic Circle,
ormation:
52-746-2545.
Hills Civic As-
ing a candi-
7 p.m.
1, at the Cit-
d Country

n Trail is a
I happenings
action season.
campaign
like Wright at
icleonline.

-From staff reports


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

LECANTO A new
group is looking to unite
government, business, art
and interested individuals
to form a cultural alliance.
In April, the Citrus Cul-
tural Alliance (CCA) marked
its one-year anniversary
since the group's formation.
Nearly a dozen community
leaders with connections to
the local arts and culture
scene sit on the coalition's
board.
Michele Wirt, president of


CCA and an associate pro-
fessor of art and humanities
at the College of Central
Florida, said the idea to de-
velop a cultural alliance
came from the arts and cul-
ture committee at the col-
lege. Already working
closely with the Marion Cul-
tural Alliance, Wirt said
committee members
wanted to gain a sense of
what the cultural landscape
was like in Citrus County
Therefore, for the past
year, the CCA board has
been working to define Cit-
rus County's artistic envi-


ronment in preparation for
making the next big step:
becoming incorporated and
collaborating with other
groups
In a short PowerPoint
presentation, Wirt ex-
plained the alliance seeks to
"add to our economic base,
strengthen our county's
image, support arts initia-
tives, increase tourism in
the area and keep cultural
dollars in Citrus."
According to the Florida
Cultural Alliance, using
data from Americans for the
Arts, a national nonprofit


PetAdoptathon

connects lovable

animals with

forever families

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Kneeling
gently on her knees, Rose Eish-
tadt couldn't resist getting slob-
bery kisses from
Remus, a sweet
terrier-mix dog.
Ii "If I could take
... in them all, I
would," Eishtadt
To see video, said.
click on this A variety of
story at area pet rescue
www.chronicle groups joined up
online.com. with Precious
Paws Rescue on Saturday for the
2012 North Shore Animal League
America's 17th annual Interna-
tional Pet Adoptathon at the
Crystal River Mall.
Tails and tongues wagged and
friendly kittens put on their
cutest faces as each animal tried
their best to appeal to passers-by
in hopes of snagging a "forever
home."
Jo Budny, a volunteer with the
Friends of Citrus County Animal
Services, showed off a lovely 9-
year-old Lab-mix named Tanner
He may be up in age, but Budny
said he still has a lot of life in him.
Budny said she loves volun-
teering at Citrus County Animal
Services in Inverness because
she gets satisfaction from trying
to help the shelter animals find
homes. She also believes events
such as these help people in the
community realize just how many
animals in the county are in need
of good homes.
"This gets them out there. They


organization that promotes
the arts and arts education,
Florida cultural visitors
spend on average of 137 per-
cent more than resident at-
tendees ($57.49 vs. $24.25).
In addition, for every dollar
invested in the arts, there is
a $5 return to local and state
treasuries.
Through membership,
community events promot-
ing the arts and donations,
the CCA would raise funds
to make grants available to
arts organizations and indi-
viduals. In turn, the grants
would advance cultural ac-


4-month-old ebony kitten with vi-
sion problems. In need of correc-
tive eye surgery, Frisbie said she's
hoping she will be able to find a
way to get the much-needed pro-
cedure done for Leah and then
find her a nice family
Pat O'Brien, a volunteer with
Precious Paws, said they did the
adoption event last year, which
yielded great results. Therefore,
they felt it would be great to do it
again this year
"It's the perfect opportunity to


tivities and add fuel to the
county's economy
While scrolling through a
list of cultural alliance
groups listed on the Florida
Cultural Alliance's website,
Wirt noted how Citrus has
no listing.
"We want to be on that
list," she said.
For more information
about the Citrus Cultural Al-
liance, email Wirt at
wirtm@cf.edu.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


Gone to the dogs (and cats)


get to socialize," she said. "Peo-
ple actually see there are so
many dogs out there."
Representing Adopt A Res-
cued Pet Inc., Mindy Barone, a
volunteer, agreed adoption
events are essential to finding
pets a good home.
"A lot more dogs are adopted
this way," added fellow volunteer
Sharon Warburton.
Kathy Frisbie with Home At Last
Adoptions, a cat rescue group, was
spreading the word about Leah, a


FDOT restarts turnpike plans


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer


The state has not given up
on the idea of extending
Florida's Turnpike from its
Wildwood terminus to
Lebanon Station in Levy
County
'As Florida continues to
grow, we need to identify fu-
ture corridors," said Ananth
Prasad, secretary of the
Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT),
speaking to the Chronicle
editorial board recently
"This area's going to grow;
Florida's going to grow.
We'll be the third most pop-
ulous state in the next three
to four years."
Looking ahead to more
growth, Prasad talked about
Interstate 75 being choked
with trucks 40 percent of
its traffic and identifying
future corridors, running
both north to south and east
to west.
"Just look at it from Jack-
sonville down to Tampa,"
Prasad said. "We've got a di-
rect route on U.S. 301 to
Waldo and Starke, and it's
loaded up with trucks.
That's the more direct
route, and now you come
down 1-95 to take 1-4. 1-4 is
already gridlocked in parts
of Tampa and also in Or-
lando, so it's important that
we invest in north-south-
east-west corridors."


The FDOT has
been studying and
planning to relieve
that traffic.
"We're going
through that
process," Prasad
said. "The first two
we're looking at is to An
expand the turnpike. Pra
It was talked about FD
when I first came secr
into the FDOT in the
1990s to expand it from
Wildwood to Lebanon Sta-
tion to get people off 1-75."
In 1988, a 45-mile exten-
sion of Florida's Turnpike
from Wildwood to U.S. 19 at
Lebanon Station in Levy
County had been planned
by the FDOT as part of a
long-range plan to transfer
traffic away from 1-75.
Motorists would be able to
drive up U.S. 19 to Tallahas-
see from Florida's Turnpike
terminus at Lebanon Sta-
tion rather than take 1-75 to
its 1-10 intersection to travel
to the Panhandle.
1-75 has become con-
gested and, therefore, more
dangerous. But excess traf-
fic does not flow over to U.S.
19 because it is not easy to
reach from the east side and
center of the state. Roads
leading to U.S. 19 pass
through such cities as Inver-
ness, Bronson and Williston,
areas that necessarily cause
slower speeds and take
more time.


But the turnpike
extension to
Lebanon Station
was never started.
One reason was con-
cern for environ-
mental impact. In
1989, Dunnellon res-
nth idents urged the
sad state's project con-
OT sultants to slow
tary. down the then-$200-
million plan. Al-
though the consultants had
not recommended a partic-
ular route or alignment, 12
were identified encompass-
ing different 8- to 10-mile
stretches at that time.
No path was chosen and,
ultimately, the state could
not fund the project. It has
been shelved because of
cost factors. Prasad said the
FDOT would restart the
project and address envi-
ronmental issues.
"Every construction proj-
ect we do, we're going to
have that," Prasad said.
"Just because we run into a
problem doesn't mean we're
going to avoid it. Maybe
there's a different align-
ment. If we had stayed on
the course (previously),
maybe we would have
reached a solution. We've
got to come somewhere to a
happy medium."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.


show how many pets need
homes," she said,
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@chronicle
online.com.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

FLORAL CITY The
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice is looking for a man ac-
cused of kidnapping his
ex-girlfriend and her
daughter
According to officials,
dispatchers received a call
shortly after 10 p.m. Thurs-
day about a possible kid-
napping of a 29-year-old
woman and her 2-year-old
daughter on East Gobbler
Drive in Floral City
Neighbors reportedly
heard a gunshot and
screams for help before a
vehicle sped away from the
residence.
Authorities found the
woman and her daughter
later at the home of an ac-
quaintance near where the
suspect, David Duncan Jr,
52, allegedly dropped them
off in Marion County.
Deputies said the woman,
who had been beaten, was
transported to Munroe Re-
gional Medical Center in
Ocala. She was treated and
released.
The toddler was
unharmed.
Duncan, who is an ex-
boyfriend of the woman,
remains at large, according
to officials.
Duncan is described as 5
feet 10 inches tall, weigh-
ing 200 pounds, with brown
hair and brown eyes.


Local
detectives
inter -
Svie wed
'W neighbors
and exam-
/, ined the
Floral City
David residence
Duncan Jr. where the
kidnapping abduction
suspect. occurred.
After
meeting with the state at-
torney's office, investiga-
tors secured a warrant for
Duncan's arrest
Charges include two
counts of kidnapping, one
count of aggravated battery
with a firearm and one
count of armed burglary.
Other charges may be
pending.
Anyone who has infor-
mation about this crime or
the whereabouts of David
Duncan Jr is asked not to
approach him, but to call
911 immediately or contact
Crime Stoppers of Citrus
County Inc., by texting CIT-
RUS plus the tip to 274637
(CRIMES), clicking on
w w w. crimestoppers
citrus.com or calling 1-888-
ANY-TIPS toll-free.
Tipsters may be eligible
to receive a cash reward of
up to $1,000.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


AMANDA MIMS/Chronicle
Joe Joe the pit bull mix, a Citrus County Animal Services shel-
ter dog, extends a paw to new friend Melissa Schirmer, 12, on Satur-
day during a pet adoption event at Crystal River Mall. The Precious
Paws Adoptathon continues Sunday, May 6. Precious Paws partnered
with rescue organizations throughout the county, including Home at
Last, Adopt a Rescued Pet and Friends of Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices for the Adoptathon, which runs from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday.
: Volunteer Dianne Tiano brought Dylan the Labrador retriever
mix, a Citrus County Animal Services shelter dog, to the event in hopes
of finding a home for him. Tiano is a member of Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services.


Kidnapping suspect sought


a

*e





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Polo mogul




requests new trial


Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH -A
Florida polo mogul's attor-
neys have asked a judge to
throw out his conviction in a
fatal drunk-driving crash
after a juror revealed that
he conducted a drinking ex-
periment during trial.
In a motion filed late Fri-
day, defense attorney Roy
Black asked Circuit Judge
Jeffrey Colbath to grant
John Goodman a new trial.
A jury in March convicted
Goodman, 48, the owner and
founder of the International
Polo Club in Palm Beach, of
manslaughter and vehicular
homicide in the 2010 death
of Scott Wilson.
In a 32-page book pub-
lished this week, juror Den-
nis DeMartin said he drank
three vodkas in half-hour in-
crements the night before
the jury reached a verdict in
an experiment to determine
how impaired Goodman
would have been if he had
consumed three drinks, as
witnesses said he did, on the
night of the crash.
Black told The Palm
Beach Post that DeMartin
ignored the judge's orders
not to conduct any inde-
pendent research or investi-
gation into the case.
"Dennis DeMartin is a
nice fellow. I don't want to
demonize him. It's not who I
am as a person," Black said.
"But Dennis did not follow
any of the rules in the case."
DeMartin, a 68-year-old
former accountant, told the
newspaper he decided to
self-publish his book "Be-


living in the Truth" so oth-
ers would know what to do
on a jury, and to make some
extra money to buy a car.
DeMartin said he fol-
lowed Colbath's instruc-
tions to not read or listen to
any news reports about the
trial. He even skipped visits
to his condo pool during the
trial to avoid talking about
the case.
He doesn't remember Col-
bath's instructions about re-
lying only on the evidence
or not conducting any inde-
pendent research.
"I don't remember him
saying anything about that,"
DeMartin said. "I'm human
and that's my mistake."
DeMartin said that after
his drinking test left him
"confused," he decided that
Goodman would have been
too impaired to drive, but it
didn't convince him that
Goodman was guilty.
"It wasn't a big factor," he
said of his test results. "I
just wanted to know for me
what it would feel like. It's
got nothing to do with the
case."
In the book, DeMartin
wrote that he was still not
ready to convict Goodman
when he arrived at the court-
house the day after his test.
"Something was bother-
ing me of the 911 tapes, so
we all decided to hear the
911 tapes again," he wrote.
"What I wanted to hear was
John Goodman's statement
of if he stopped for the stop
sign."
On the 911 tape, Goodman
said he stopped and then hit
something. During trial,


Goodman testified that the
brakes of his Bentley didn't
work and it surged
uncontrollably
DeMartin said the contra-
diction, along with testi-
mony about the drinks
Goodman drank before the
crash and his blood alcohol
level, convinced him Good-
man was guilty.
DeMartin said he would
feel badly if his book sets
Goodman free.
"I'm going to be very, very
hurt especially that it's my
fault," he said.
Police say Goodman was
drunk when he ran a stop
sign and rammed his Bent-
ley into Wilson's car, sending
it into a canal where the 23-
year-old man died. Authori-
ties say Goodman left the
scene and waited nearly an
hour to call for help. Good-
man's blood alcohol level
was measured at 0.177 per-
cent, more than twice the
legal driving limit.
Prosecutor Ellen Roberts
said she had not read De-
Martin's book and didn't
know what impact it would
have on the case.
Another juror, Michael St
John, has claimed he was
unsure of Goodman's guilt
but felt pressured to return
a guilty verdict.
Black and Roberts have
made separate requests to
Colbath based on St. John's
statements. Black asked for
a new trial, or at least more
jury questioning, while
Roberts called St. John's
claims "juror's remorse" and
asked for Goodman's sen-
tencing to move forward.


Salmonella in dog food


sickens 14 people in US


Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. Four-
teen people in at least nine
states have been sickened
by salmonella after han-
dling tainted dog food from
a South Carolina plant that
a few years ago produced
food contaminated by toxic
mold that killed dozens of
dogs, federal officials said
Friday
At least five people were
hospitalized because of
the dog food, which was
made by Diamond Pet
Foods at its plant in Gas-
ton, S.C., the federal Cen-
ters for Disease Control
and Prevention said. No
pets were sickened, ac-
cording to the Meta, Mo.-
based company
"People who became ill,
the thing that was common
among them was that they
had fed their pets Diamond
Pet Foods," said CDC
spokeswoman Lola Russell.
Three people each were
infected in Missouri and
North Carolina; two people
in Ohio; and one person
each in Alabama, Connecti-


cut, Michigan, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania and Virginia,
the CDC said.
"Our folks are really
wanting people to be aware
of it. They want to be aware
that this is causing people
to get sick because they
may have product in their
homes. For every one that
is reported, there may be 29
others," Russell said.
People can get salmo-
nella by handling infected
dog food, then not washing
their hands before eating
or handling their own food,
health officials said.
The South Carolina plant
temporarily was shut down
April 8. Diamond Pet Foods
has issued four rounds of
recalls for food made at the
plant, located outside of
Columbia, S.C., between
Dec. 9 and April 7. The lat-
est recalls were announced
Friday
"We took corrective ac-
tions at the plant, and today
the plant is up and running.
Our mission is to produce
safe pet foods for our cus-
tomers and their pets in all
Diamond facilities," the


company said in a written
statement Friday
In 2005, a toxic mold
called aflatoxin ended up
in food made at the same
Diamond Pet Foods plant
in South Carolina and
dozens of dogs died. The
company offered a $3.1 mil-
lion settlement. The Food
and Drug Administration
determined the deadly fun-
gus likely got into the plant
when it failed to test 12
shipments of corn.
Agriculture officials in
Michigan found the strain
of salmonella during rou-
tine testing of dog food on
April 2 and health investi-
gators noticed there was a
possible link to the food
made by Diamond Pet
Foods.
The recall covers a num-
ber of pet food brands
made at the Gaston plant,
including Canidae, Natural
Balance, Apex, Kirkland,
Chicken Soup for the Pet
Lover's Soul, Country
Value, Diamond, Diamond
Naturals, Premium Edge,
Professional, 4Health and
Taste of the Wild.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Bid Notices....... ...................... D7


Meeting Notices..................... D7


Miscellaneous Notices................D7


S^ :' Self Storage Notices...................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
NA PN NH LO PR
NA NA i --NA NA NA L 193 K


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


Daytona Bch
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gaminesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Feast
PC
pc
pc


is
pc

PC
PC
pc


city
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


pc
ts
pc

ts

pc
PC
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
smooth increasing to a light chop.
Slight chance of showers and thun-
derstorms today.


90 68 0.00 1 a -uU
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exuswedady
... .. TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 4
Mostly sunny. 10% chance of a
shower t5
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
4High: 8 Low: 66
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of scattered t-storms

. ....... TUESDAY WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 65
Partly cloudy: 40% chance of scattered t-storms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 91/63
Record 95/48
Normal 87/58
Mean temp. 77
Departure from mean +4
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 In
Total for Ihe month 0 00 in.
Total for the yeai 6.47 in.
Normal for the year 12.84 in.
*As of 6p mn attiverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 48%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, grasses, hickory
Today's count: 4.7/12
Monday's count: 5.4
Tuesday's count: 4.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNINGi (AFTERNOON)
5,6 SUNDAY 6:09 12:01 6:40 12:25
5/7 MONDAY 7:14 12:59 7:46 1:30
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
OST TONWIT____- 889 PM.
SUNRISETOMORROW 644AM
4 0 O o MfOMISEhTODAY .907PM
MIX l M i l 4 IMOMET TTU ........................6__ AM

BURN CONDITIONS
Trodfay Fire Danger Rating is HIGH. There is no bum ban.
For rncre inlormablon call Florida DaiviSOn ol ForesIrV al 1352 754-6777 For more
infarmatlun on drougrfl coddiOflons plbase visi In O Diviion oI Foreslrv s Web sile
rtlp 'llame II-lol comrnlre weallie',kkbt
WATERING RULES
One-aay-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday. 2 or 3- Tuesday, 4 or 5- Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
alter 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plannings
Questions, concerns or reporting violations. please call Citrus County al
352-527-7669. or email waterconservabon@bocC citrus II us

"From mouths of rivers "At King s Bay ""At Mason's Creek
Sunday Monday
City HighlLow High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chasshowizka 7:04 a2:22 a 612?p??020 7:54 a/3 9a 653p 3002 p
Crystal Rivew" 5:25 ari/:42a 4:33p-- 6:15 a/1231 a 5:14 p/12:24 p
Withacoochee 312a/9:30 a 2 20 ti. i0 9 402 a/10 12 a 3:01 pi!1'06 p
Homosassa"" 614 a/1:21 a 522 Pi 119c 704 a/208 a 6:03 p/2:01 p


Gulf water
temperature


80
TA"n at Aripe*m


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.71 26 70 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.57 32.55 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 34.94 34.92 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.28 3627 42.40
.efLa tuYed ,n feel JDJ.e sea F._- el Rood stage for laes aie based on 2 33-.y Ilood, t mean-
jnndi flri whuh nia a3 er.,e i' ct anre ul beimg equamd o.r ire, o ,-r. antr in iu s This data is
OOiinel hroini me S u't5we. i Floila WaTer M nagem ini Diw.rn.-r a1 s i u|l it o re re.I.n in no even
mi me Otlr.lil s u n Un le SLates Geol rgill Sur. Li~e ranE fo i a i, oam gei ,jnsrig c ul [hi e ,e a f
IIs a u i nru im r uI.nso. r Crr riinui r.uri tirie 1hIdii.L.ULI Dala seoni l 5?i .'% :% n


THE NATION


- .. -
Mal1
But '1


Albany
Albuuerque
Ashville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Bimrningram
BRase
Boslon
Builalo
Budrgton. VT
Charleston. SC
Charleston. WV
chaiago
Ch~rlote

Clevela~d
Columbia. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. N H
Dallas
Denver
Des Mones
Detroit
Eb Paso
Evanswile, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las vegas
Litle Rock
Los Angeles
Lowisvdle
Memphis
MilwauLkee
Milneapolis
Mobile
Monlgomery
Nashville


Saturdav Sunday
H LPIp. FctH L
64 52 pc 68 37
84 54 pc 8354
79 57 01 ts 81 S58
85 68 42 ts 88 66
65 55 pc 63 46
95 71 pc 93 73
80 60 02 pc 71 53
56 43 02 pc 58 34
88 65 ts 89 66
55 36 s 65 40
58 48 09 s 62 49
63 50 pc 64 50
58 45 s 66 35
93 68 .01 ts 84 66
74 63 1.36 pc 85 60
B7 61 ts 81 59
60 54 ts 75 59
80 65 34 pc 83 64
65 55 pc 69 50
94 66 c 83 64
81 64 pc 80 60
68 48 01 s 69 35
92 67 pc 91 70
B4 49 C 60 44
87 69 ts 79 56
72 57 pc 66 51
89 66 pc 89 64
87 64128 pc 88 68
77 59 01 pc 72 48
66 57 pc 69 47
91 70 pc 88 73
81 62 pc 84 65
91 70 pc 90 68
82 63 s 86 66
69 71 pc 91 70
69 54 s 69 57
83 64 1,48 pc 88 68
90 73 pc 92 72
53 47 12 ts 61 49
60 54 91 ts 67 50
89 67 pc 88 70
87 70 ts 90 67
88 64 24 ts 88 69


KEY TO CONDITIONS: -c.ludyi drdriutIe;
Itair. b.hamyr pcIpar*U cloudy; r.rain;
r=-rainswow min Isunnyr Ish-shower;
2n-snomw t -umulmrstms; w...ind.
CO012 Weathr Central, MadisoMn. WI.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saitday Sunday
City H LPop. FCeH L
New Orleans 90 73 oc 86 70
\.e, Y.i :1,v G63 56 pc 99 53
Norfolk 80 66 09 pc 67 56
Oklahoma City 89 63 Is 88 64
Omaha 90 73 is 77 53
PailmSprings 94 60 s 89 65
Phladephia 67 62 pc 70 52
Phoein 94 68 s 96 66
Pinsburgl 80 62 pc 77 55
Portland.ME 61 45 s 64 38
Portland. Ore 57 44 pc 59 45
Providence.R.I 59 51 .01 pc 66 48
Raleigh 84 64 .7? pc 77 58
Rapid City 64 52 .53 pc 62 38
Reno 63 36 s 69 43
Rochester. NY 59 48 pc 64 45
Sacramento 79 51 s 86 50
St Louis 92 71 t 90 70
St Ste Maie 63 43 sh 58 41
Sail Lake City 58 45 S 60 43
San Amonia 95 73 pc 93 73
San Diego 67 60 s 66 56
San Francisco 68 47 s 73 55
Savannmfl 90 70 Is 87 67
Seattle 56 41 pc 66 46
Spokane 55 34 pc 62 37
Syraciuse 67 52 pc 67 42
Topeka 89 66 s 8257
Washington 83 64 pc 72 53
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NON 107 Vernon, Texas LOW 19 Truckee
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Bermuda 741%6/st Rio
Cairo 92/62Zs Rome
Calg~rv 531/3/s Sydlney
Havalida 85/68/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 88/78/c Toronto
Jerusalem 84/57/s Warsaw


61/55/c
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A4 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sheriffs office watches for handicap parking abuses SERVICES
Continued from Page Al


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office uses a three-
pronged approach to
enforce handicap parking
abuses. First, all CCSO
Crime Watch volunteers uti-
lize a form to alert potential
violators of handicap park-
ing violations. Although they
are not authorized to write



HISTORY
Continued from Page Al
marched on Washington, a
revised act was passed in
1973, giving people with dis-
abilities civil rights pro-
tected by law for the first
time in history
At the same time, schools
were mandated to accom-
modate children with dis-
abilities, giving them an
equal opportunity



ACCESSIBLE
Continued from Page Al

wheeled scooter "tippy"
Then, to get into the street
he had to maneuver down a
sloped area of the sidewalk
that was only about 14 or 16
inches wide, which wasn't
big enough he went over
the curb and nearly fell
sideways into the heavily
trafficked street.
Once the men arrived,
they were pleasantly sur-
prised to discover another
problem they had previ-
ously encountered had been
rectified the sidewalk on
S. Apopka where it meets
the Walgreens driveway en-
trance had just dropped off
and not sloped, making it
difficult for them to enter
the driveway
Instead, they would ride
around the block to use the
back driveway entrance on
Pine Street.
"That's been our only
problem getting around,"
Johnson said. "We go to-
gether and help each other
out."
"Sometimes we go up to
CVS and stop at Wendy's for
a Frosty," Marienthal said.
"We go through the drive-
through."
mmE
The problem with ADA


tickets, they are encouraged
to use the forms and to pa-
trol parking lots to make
sure violators are notified.
Second, all CCSO Public
Service Officers can and
do write citations to those
who park illegally in fire
lanes, loading zones and
handicapped parking
spaces. This duty is in-
cluded in the PSO job de-


for education.
So, people with disabili-
ties were considered equal
under the law, but that
didn't mean they could ma-
neuver their wheelchairs
easily on public streets, in
public buildings or on pub-
lic transportation.
They still couldn't reach
drinking fountains. They
still couldn't go through
some doors or get to the
third floor of an office
building that didn't have


regulations is often they
aren't quite enough.
For 42-year-old Michael
Haskell who has been in a
wheelchair for five years, he
drives his van into a store or
shopping center parking lot,
and if he can find a Handi-
capped parking space, he
still might not be able to get
in and out of his van be-
cause he needs room to op-
erate a lift.
"Sometimes I end up hav-
ing to illegally park my van
crooked so I can keep some-
one from parking beside it
and roll myself across the
parking lot to get to the
store," he said. "I can't just
open my door and step out"
Haskell said the places he
goes are generally accessi-
ble for him, although one
day last week he went to the
Lecanto Government Build-
ing to attend a meeting about
services available to people
with disabilities, only to dis-
cover the meeting was on the
second floor and the eleva-
tor was out of order.
"That's frustrating," he
said. "I try to get to places
early because it takes so
long to do stuff."
The meeting was moved
to the first floor to accom-
modate him.
A woman in Inverness,
who asked that her name
not be used, also struggles


scription and is routinely
enforced in different areas
of the county
Finally, deputies write
traffic citations to those who
violate handicap parking
privileges. According to
Deputy Roy West, who
serves on the CCSO's traffic
unit, violations occur fre-
quently and he addresses
them immediately


an elevator.
In July 1990, the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) was signed into law,
the landmark legislation
that requires any business
or entity that serves the
public must comply with
specific guidelines, from
handicapped parking
spaces and wheelchair-ac-
cessible bathroom facilities
to lifts and ramps on public
buses and access to tables in
restaurants.


with life in a wheelchair.
She recently wrote a letter
to the Chronicle imploring
that something be done
about crosswalks and side-
walks on U.S. 41.
One in particular U.S.
41 and Line Avenue.
"This is a serious matter
for a handicapped person,"
she wrote. "There are new
curbs and corners all over
Inverness, and I have seen
several people trip and
curse! on the raised cir-
cular things on the curbs,
which are also terrible on
the tires on wheelchairs.
The new curbs are so high
and so far away from the
(crosswalk signal) poles that
they make it impossible for
anyone in a wheelchair to
reach the buttons to change
the lights. Also, some of the
buttons are too high up on
the poles for many people to
reach."
The signal poles the letter
writer described are up on a
raised grassy area, partially
surrounded by a concrete
curb. A person in a wheel-
chair either needs incredi-
bly long arms to reach the
button or would need to
wait until someone comes
by to press it for him or her
"The Americans with Dis-
abilities Act is supposed to
prevent such things from
happening to stop the hand-


Violators who park in des-
ignated handicap spaces
without a placard or proper
decal on the license tag can
receive a ticket for $183.
Those who illegally use a
handicapped parking plac-
ard or license plate can re-
ceive a citation for $183 and
up to a $500 fine and up to
60 days in jail as this is a
criminal offense.


It regulates signs and tele-
phones, benches, handrails,
bathtubs, dressing rooms -
and many, many other ac-
commodations. ADA
reaches into restaurants
and libraries, medical care
facilities, theaters, hotels,
courtrooms and recreation
facilities even jails and
prisons.
The ADA also prohibits
hiring discrimination based
solely on a job applicant's
disability.


icapped from living 'normal'
lives," the woman wrote.
"It's going to cost all of us
taxpayers a fortune to rem-
edy this situation. Who is re-
sponsible? Will anyone be
accountable for this?"
In the case of the inter-
sections at U.S. 41 and Line,
Seminole and Apopka av-
enues in Inverness, the re-
sponsibility falls to the
Florida Department of
Transportation.
They are currently in the
process of remedying the
situation, according to Kris-
ten Carson, FDOT
spokeswoman.
At an estimated cost of
$175,000 per intersection,
the plan is to:
Rebuild the existing
box span wire signals and
replace the existing span
wires that hold the signals
at U.S. 41 and North Apopka
Avenue with a new box span
wire signal.
Replace pedestrian sig-
nals with new countdown
pedestrian signals.
Install new traffic
controllers.
Re-stripe existing


will take effect in 2014 -
If a person goes into the
hospital and is re-admit-
ted under the same diag-
nosis within 30 days,
Medicare will not pay the
hospital.
"We have a Care Transi-
tions Program, a coaching
program, that follows up
with a person's follow-up
from the hospital," she
said. Elder Options can
help coordinate meals or
homemaking needs or
transportation any-
thing that helps a person
with their after care to
help them not re-enter
the hospital for the same
thing.
"A big thing that we do is
help people identify elder
abuse, neglect or exploita-
tion," she said. When in
doubt, call.
Also at the alliance meet-
ing, Sherrie Holton from
the Department of Chil-


crosswalk markings.
Reconstruct sidewalks
and curb ramps to meet
ADA requirements.
Estimated construction
time one month for each
location, to be completed by
October 2012.

Cathy Jackson, Center for
Independent Living pro-
gram coordinator, said
when it comes to ADA com-
pliance, she would give Cit-
rus County a letter grade
of C.
Not with government
buildings, but in the pri-
vate sector debit card
pin machines in retail
stores are often too high to
reach for people in wheel-
chairs. In smaller bou-
tique-type stores and
consignment or thrift
stores, the merchandise is
often crowded, racks too
close together, she said.
A store may have a handi-
capped-accessible dressing
room, but clothing racks or
display tables may make
maneuvering a wheelchair
or scooter difficult
"We get a lot of calls about


dren and Families Adult
Protective Services unit
said people can anony-
mously report elder abuse,
neglect, self-neglect and
exploitation.
"The highest number of
calls we get is about self-
neglect," Holton said.
The number for report-
ing suspected elder abuse
is 800-96ABUSE (800-962-
2873).
Holton said other serv-
ices they offer include
helping caregivers of dis-
abled adults, including a
stipend of $120 a month,
and helping with getting
hospital beds, bed rails,
bathroom handicap
accessories and other
help to keep elderly and
disabled in their homes
safely for as long as
possible.
Sherrie Holton can be
reached at 352-860-5008.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


doors," Jackson said. "A lot
of the older doctors' offices,
the doors aren't accessible
for wheelchairs."
At many of the chain
restaurants with heavy
doors staff open the door
and greet
customers.
"According to ADA re-
quirements, automatic
doors aren't required,"
Jackson said. "Doors just
have to be accessible. Hav-
ing a staff person open a
heavy door makes it accessi-
ble. Smaller stores can do
the same thing. If you see a
person in a wheelchair at
your door, go open it. That
doesn't cost anything.
"It's education; it's aware-
ness," Jackson said. "People
don't know about these
things unless they live it.
But I have to say that when
we become aware of a prob-
lem and bring it to their at-
tention, they've been
agreeable to fixing the
problem."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


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SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Robert
Fox Sr., 85
NORTH
HUNTINGDON, PA.
Robert Howard Fox Sr,
85, of North Huntingdon,
Pa., formerly of Inverness,
died Thurs-
day, May 3,
2012.
He was
an Army
veteran of
World War
II, a retired
tool and die
Robert maker for
Fox Sr. General
Motors,
Fisher Body Plant, West Mif-
flin, Pa., where he worked
for 32 years and was a mem-
ber of United Auto Workers,
Local 544. He and his wife
enjoyed being active with
their motor home club, trav-
eling across the country and
30 years of retirement in
Florida, where they spent a
lot of time golfing together.
Surviving are children,
Karen Freise and husband,
Bill, Robert Fox Jr, Thomas
Fox and wife, Sue, Daryl
Fox and wife, Dana, Kevin
Fox and wife, Denise, and
Earl Fox and wife, Anke; 12
grandchildren; 21 great-
grandchildren; siblings,
Eileen Thompson, Yvonne
Collins, Mary Kay Thomp-
son and Patty Jones.
Friends will be received
Sunday at the William Sny-
der Funeral Home, 521
Main Street, Irwin, PA, 724-
863-1200, where a funeral
service will follow at 8 p.m.
Interment with military
honors will be at a later date
in the National Cemetery of
the Alleghenies, Bridgeville,
Pa. In lieu of flowers, a con-
tribution may be made to
Norwin Alliance Church,
10585 Farview Drive, North
Huntingdon, PA 15642.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Elfriede
Giangulano, 82
BEVERLY HILLS
Elfriede Lina Giangulano,
82, of Beverly Hills, passed
away on May 4,2012.
A native of Duisburg, Ger-
many, and a nurse practi-
tioner by profession, she
moved here from Long Is-
land, New York, and is sur-
vived by her husband of
more than 50 years, Peter
Giangulano; daughters, Ma-
rina and Marion; and a
granddaughter, Sarah.
Fero Funeral Home, Bev-
erly Hills. wwwferofuneral
home.com.

August
Males Jr., 65
DUNNELLON
August Males Jr., 65, of
Dunnellon, died Thursday,
May 3, 2012, at Seven River
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory, Crys-
tal River

Walter
Marsh, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Walter Russell Marsh, 86,
of Crystal River, died Friday
May 4,2012, at Cypress Cove
Care Center in Crystal
River.
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River.


Ronald
Aungst Sr., 60
HOMOSASSA
Ronald S. Aungst Sr, age
60, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday,
May 2, 2012, at his home in
Homosassa under the care
of his family and Hospice of
Citrus County.
He was born January 12,
1952, in Pottsville, Pa., to
Richard and Carmella
(Spinelli) Aungst. He came
here 50 years ago from
Pottsville. He was a master
mechanic for F&H contrac-
tors of Crystal River. He was
a member of St. Benedict's
Catholic Church in Crystal
River, Fla.
He was preceded in death
by his father, Richard, and a
brother, Roger Aungst.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 40 years, Fawn, of
Homosassa, Fla.; two sons,
Ronald Aungst Jr, and Gre-
gory Aungst, both of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; his mother,
Carmella Aungst, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; three broth-
ers, Richard Aungst
(Brenda) and Robert Aungst
(Regina), all of Homosassa,
Fla., and Randall Aungst
(Debra) of Citrus Hills, Fla.;
a sister, Carmella
Psaledakis (Greg); and a sis-
ter-in-law, Lauraleen
Aungst, all of Homosassa,
Fla.; two grandchildren,
Kody and Kristina; his
father-in-law, Richard Buck
Sr. (Helen) of Homosassa,
Fla.; brother-in-law Richard
Buck Jr. (Susan) of Orlando,
Fla.; sisters-in-law Wilma
Benefield and Violet Mc-
Daniel, both of Chiefland,
Fla., and Cecelia Merritt
(Carl) of Homosassa, Fla.;
and many nieces and
nephews.
A funeral Mass will be cel-
ebrated at 5 p.m. Monday,
May 7, 2012, at St. Benedict
Catholic Church in Crystal
River, Fla., with the Rev.
Ryszard Stradomski as cele-
brant. In lieu of flowers, the
family is accepting dona-
tions to assist with medical
and funeral expenses.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Leonora
Touby, 90
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Leonora Touby,
90, of Inverness, will be at
12:30 p.m. Monday, May 7,
2012, at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes.
She died Thursday, May 3,
2012, in Inverness. Inter-
ment will follow at Florida
National Cemetery,
Bushnell.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Additionally, all
obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline.
com.


Lucille Furry, 89
FLORAL CITY
Lucille Marie Furry, 89,
Floral City, died May 3,2012,
at the HPH Hospice Care
Center in
Inverness.
Mrs.
Furry was
born in Ko-
Ssuth County,
Iowa, on
Aug. 15,
11 1922, to
Lucille the late
Furry Roy and
Capitol
(Burgess) Sutton and came
to this area in 1986 from St
Petersburg, where she was
employed at the Pinellas
Lumber Company She was
a member of the First Pres-
byterian Church of Inver-
ness, Humanitarians and
TOPS. She was preceded in
death by two husbands, Ray-
mond E. Thurston and
Homer R. Furry
She is survived by two
children, Gerald Thurston
and wife, Cheryl, of Lilburn,
GA, and Donna Schmid and
her husband, Robert, of Flo-
ral City; three grandchil-
dren; and six
great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Furry's life will be
celebrated at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 10, from the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
the Rev. Craig Davies, pas-
tor of the First Presbyterian
Church officiating. Inter-
ment will be at a later date
in Memorial Park Cemetery,
St. Petersburg. Friends are
invited to visit with the fam-
ily from 3 p.m. until the hour
of service. In lieu of flowers,
contributions requested to:
Humanitarians of Florida,
PO. Box 924, Inverness, FL
34451.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE


Jean
Magaddino, 80
HOMOSASSA
Jean Magaddino, age 80,
of Homosassa, FL, passed
away Friday, May 4, 2012, at
her home in Homosassa
under the care of her family
and Hospice of Citrus
County.
She was born June 28,
1931, in Brooklyn, NY, to
Joseph and Angelina (Sug-
ameli) Ruisi. She came here
18 years ago from Dix Hills,
Long Island, NY, where she
retired from real estate. She
was a member of the King-
dom Hall Jehovah's Witness
of Homosassa, FL, and a
volunteer for Foster Grand-
parents of the Mentally Dis-
abled Children for over 20
years. She was a member of
the Homosassa Friends and
Homosassa Book Club.
She was preceded in
death by a son, Salvatore
Magaddino, who died Oct.
23, 1976. Surviving are her
husband of 55 years, Simon,
of Homosassa, FL; and her
daughter, Josette Walker
(Michael) of Garrison, NY;
two brothers, her twin,
Nicholas Ruisi (Rose) of
Commack, Long Island, NY,
and Gene Ruisi (Frances) of
Burlington, NJ; several
brothers- and sisters-in-law;
and many nieces and
nephews.
A memorial service will
be conducted at noon Satur-
day, May 12, 2012, at the
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's
Witness in Homosassa. In
lieu of flowers, the family
suggests a memorial contri-
bution to Hospice of Citrus
County. Strickland Funeral
Home assisted the family
with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE


Dick Beam, 75
Ben Silver, 85 LOS ANGELES


PHOENIX,
ARIZONA
Former CBS news corre-
spondent and Arizona State
University journalism pro-
fessor Ben Silver has died.
He was 85.
The university said he
died Wednesday from com-
plications of Parkinson's
disease at his home in St.
Louis Park, Minn.
Silver was a CBS national
correspondent in the 1960s
and covered race riots,
school integration and Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy's acci-
dent at Chappaquiddick.
Silver worked at WCKT-
TV in Miami from 1957 to
1966, reporting from the So-
viet Union and Latin Amer-
ica. He won a Peabody
Award in 1960 for his cover-
age of Latin America.
He began teaching atASU
in 1972 and continued to file
CBS reports for several
years. He retired in 1990.
He is survived by his wife,
six children and 11 grand-
children. Services will be
Sunday in Minneapolis.
-From wire reports


CALI F.
Dick Beam, an assistant
on two of Southern Califor-
nia's national champi-
onship football teams and
later an executive with the
Los Angeles Rams and
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, has
died. He was 75.
Beam died of cancer
Thursday in the Orange
County city of Corona, Calif.,
the university said.
Beam worked under
coach John McKay at USC
from 1972-75, spending the
first two seasons as a part-
time assistant and scout
while teaching physical ed-
ucation at a high school. He
was a full-time assistant in
his final two seasons. Beam
followed McKay to the NFL,
working from 1976-80 with
the Buccaneers as an assis-
tant and director of admin-
istration. He spent 1981-90
as director of operations for
the Rams. He was general
manager of the Orlando
Thunder in the World
League of American Foot-
ball from 1991-92.
-From wire reports

To Place Your

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sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com
r-Cosn tmfopacn a-
Lis dyspiotorndte. A


Barbara
Turner, 85
INVERNESS
Barbara Ellen Turner, 85,
Inverness, died at home on
April 11, 2012, under the lov-
ing care of her family and
HPH Hospice.
Mrs. Turner was born
April 8,1927, in Center Hill,
FL, to the late Leonard
Ralph and Mabel (Carver)
Watkins. She was employed
at the Lakeland Plant of
Kraft Foods for over 20
years before moving here
from there five years ago.
She enjoyed shopping,
working in her garden,
reading, and indulging in
her computer.
She is survived by her
four children, Robert H.
Turner III, and Lisa of
Bowling Green, KY, Michael
L. Turner and wife, Monica,
of Vasteras, Sweden; Terri
Turner and husband, Bill, of
San Clemente, CA; Marie
Blume and husband, Bob, of
Dunnellon, FL; two sisters,
June Green and husband,
Arlan, of Navarra, FL, Joyce
Koutnik and husband, Ward,
of Jacksonville, FL; five
grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.
Mrs Turner's life will be
celebrated at 2 p.m. Friday,
May 11, from the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Pastor Carl Hemphill of
HPH Hospice Staff officiat-
ing. Committal services of
the urn will be at a later
date.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials requested to HPH Hos-
pice, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, FL
34465.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos will incur
a size-based fee.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


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Deaths ELSEWHERE

Harold
Colburn, 86
MOORESTOWN,
N.J.
Colburn, a longtime New
Jersey lawmaker and public
official, has died. He was 86.
Family members said Col-
burn died Tuesday at a sen-
ior living facility in
Moorestown. A Republican
who lived in Mount Laurel
for many years, Colburn
served as a Burlington
County freeholder for 13
years before being elected to
the Assembly, where he rep-
resented the 8th Legislative
District. He held that seat
for 11 years before resigning
in 1995 to become director of
the state Board of Medical
Examiners. A dermatologist
who practiced in southern
New Jersey for many years,
Colburn was a graduate of
Princeton University. He re-
ceived his medical degree
from Albany Medical Col-
lege in Albany, N.J.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Dennis Stone of Independence, Mo., holds his 4-month-old Chihuahua, Cherry, on Saturday
in Kansas City, Mo. Hundreds of tiny dogs dressed up like tacos, ballerinas and a variety of
other things fell short of setting a world record, but organizers say they're encouraged by
the turnout for the inaugural Cinco de Mayo Chihuahua parade.


Chihuahua invasion


Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Hundreds of tiny tacos, bal-
lerinas and other costumed
dogs fell short of a world
record Saturday morning in
Kansas City, but organizers
said they were encouraged
by the turnout for the inau-
gural Cinco de Mayo Chi-
huahua parade.
Mark Valentine, the presi-
dent of the group that organ-
ized the parade, said 500
dogs showed up in costume
- about 200 fewer than
what was needed to break
the Guinness Book world
record. The event, organized
by United Entertainment to
benefit a local animal shel-


ter, was open to any breed.
Valentine estimated that
80 percent of the costumed
canines were Chihuahuas,
more than the 50 percent he
anticipated.
"We are going to keep
doing this until we run out
of dogs in Kansas City and
have to start shipping them
in," Valentine said. "For a
first try, we did OK."
Valentine said he was told
Chihuahuas were among
the most common breeds in
animal shelters. Saturday's
event raised about $2,500
for The Pet Connection, a
local no-kill shelter.
"Chihuahuas get killed in
animal shelters almost as
much as pitbulls," he said.


Anne Fisher, a food stylist
from Stilwell, Kan., about a
half-hour south of Kansas
City, said her male Chi-
huahua, Willie, seemed re-
lieved when she slipped off
his ballerina outfit after the
parade.
"We figured he was going
to be the smallest Chi-
huahua here, but he's not,"
she said of the 3-pound dog.
"We're having more fun
than he is. It's hysterical."
Just after 11 a.m., everyone
in the crowd with a Chi-
huahua raised their pets over
their heads. The result was a
sea of tiny heads adorned
with sombreros, cowboy hats,
bows and even a Green Bay
Packers football helmet


Making whiskey in Umatilla


BILL THOMPSON
Ocala Star-Banner
UMATILLA It seems
out of place.
A lonesome palm tree
shooting up in the forefront
of a southeast Marion
County farm whose pasture
is dotted with impressive
live oaks.
But further up the
ranch's dirt driveway, in a
converted horse barn nes-
tled among a clump of
those oaks, that singular
palm takes on a new
significance.
It serves to distinguish
the name and logo of Palm
Ridge Reserve a hand-
made, homemade whiskey
that Dick and Marti Waters
distill in their barn.
The Waterses are part of
a burgeoning trend in the
alcohol-producing industry
They are micro-distillers -
sometimes referred to as
craft distillers a gradu-
ally swelling cousin to the
small, niche beer and wine
producers that boast of
deep regional roots.
As with any challenge to
the accepted business
norm, making headway, not
to mention profits, depends
on deflating a stereotype.
In the Waterses' case, that
means convincing liquor
drinkers that smooth, fla-
vorful whiskeys can be
made in places like Marion
County and not just Ken-
tucky, Tennessee, Canada
or Ireland.
SE
It all begins with a sip.
On a sunny but chilly
morning recently, Dick Wa-
ters siphons off into a small
measuring cup a couple of
ounces of the clear liquid
- which bears a remark-
able resemblance to moon-
shine but is known to
distillers as "white dog" -
flowing from a tube pro-
truding from his 8-foot-tall
copper still.
He sips the brew, waits a
moment, sips again, waits
and then finishes the cup.
Close but not quite, he
surmises.
In addition to being co-
founder, president and co-


Associated Press
Dick Waters talks about the process of distilling at Florida
Farm Distillers on Tuesday in Umatilla. The micro-distillery,
owned by Marti and Dick Waters, is on a small 80-acre cat-
tle farm where they distill and barrel their own Florida
whiskey every other Tuesday and Thursday. The name of
their whiskey is Palm Ridge Reserve and is finished in
small, charred 5-gallon white oak barrels for less than a
year. They produce about 6,000 bottles a year.


marketing director of his
company, Florida Farm
Distillers, Waters is most
responsible for engineer-
ing Palm Ridge Reserve's
"flavor profile."
Before becoming a
whiskey maker, Waters was
a long-time whiskey
drinker. He preferred to
wash his palate with the
iconic Canadian-produced
blend Crown Royal.
He also is a former
plumber and construction
worker. Marti mostly
worked for him during that
career.
The Waterses also kept
horses and cattle on their
80-acre farm near Umatilla,
which they bought in the
1980s. They moved there
from Casselberry 20 years
ago.
Their last horse was put
down last year, Marti Wa-
ters said, although a dozen
cattle still roam the site.
Their entry into the spir-
its industry came as the
construction industry was
headed south.
Marti Waters said she
read a newspaper article in
2007 that related how farm-
ers in the Midwest turned
to distilling to supplement
their falling incomes.
"I called him and said,
'Honey, you like to drink
whiskey Have I got a job for


you,"' she recalled.
Dick Waters embraced
the idea but admits now he
wasn't prepared for the reg-
ulatory obstacles and the
fickle ways of Florida's al-
cohol industry
The couple spent two
years, and upward of
$100,000, securing the nec-
essary federal, state and
local permits and obtaining
the equipment for their
operation.
Palm Ridge Reserve fi-
nally hit the market in 2010.
And the ongoing costs
can be considerable.
They pay $4,000 a year
for a state license.
The specially charred, 5-
gallon white oak barrels,
imported from Arkansas,
that add so much of the
whiskey's flavor run about
$130 apiece.
And each gallon of Palm
Ridge Reserve is slapped
with a total of $20 in taxes
from the federal and state
governments.
That's about triple the
combined levy for beer and
roughly double that of wine
- not to mention a big hit
for a small company that
manages to produce about
1,200 gallons a year.


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Breast Augmentation


A Q&A with
Dr. James Rogers, D.M.D., M.D.


If I have implants, will I have
to get them replaced every 10 years?
No. Breast implants do not have a fixed lifespan; although, like all
medical devices, they should not be expected to last forever. Generally speaking,
if there is no implant failure (i.e. leakage) and a woman's
breasts don't change, they can be left in indefinitely.

Does it matter how large an implant I
choose, and are there limits as to how large
they should be?
A number of factors determine how large an implant a
patient should have. As a general rule, the more breast
tissue and body fat covering an implant, the better. Many of
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visibility, rippling or wrinkling, tend to increase with the


size of the implants.


Dr. James Rogers
Y%.MILK M.AXDY


Do breast implants increase the risk of Bou d Certified
Board Certified
getting breast cancer? Plastic Surgeon
There is no evidence that suggests breast implants increase
the risk of breast cancer or delay the detection of early breast cancer. All women 35
years or older should have a mammogram prior to having breast augmentation and
practice routine self-examination as well as have annual exams by their physician.

Do I have to go to the hospital to have my surgery?
No. Most of our outpatient procedures are done in our own ambulatory surgery center,
Paddock Park Surgery Center. The center is certified by the Agency for Health Care
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Both silicone and saline filled implants are safe. Which implant is better for a particular
patient depends on a number of factors. Generally speaking, if a patient has very little
breast tissue and body fat, silicone implants may be softer and less likely to "ripple" or
"wrinkle."This advantage diminishes with increased breast tissue.
Silicone implants are generally more expensive, and leakage may be more difficult to
detect. In addition, silicone implants are not available to women under 21 years of age.

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


NEWS IN BRIEF
STAFF REPORT

Ed Johnson, heavy equip-
ment operator, was surprised
when he pulled the giant scoop
of earth from the basement he
was digging. "What is that?" he
thought. "An old whiskey bar-
rel or a wooden box of some
kind?" He jumped off his back-
hoe to investigate. As he ap-
proached, his mind was racing.
He could see that the wooden
box was badly decayed and full
of something. As he got closer,
he could make out a sword, an
old canteen and remnants of an
old military uniform. While sift-
ing through the box, he found a
bugle, tattered papers and some
military badges. It appeared to
be the belongings of a soldier of
some kind. He spent the rest of
the day collecting and examin-
ing the items he had found. He
needed to find out more.
The next morning he
stopped by the local coffee shop
to ask questions about the lot he
was digging on. He stopped at
the right place. Three elderly
gentlemen were swapping sto-
ries as they did every morning.
Ed approached the group and
asked if they were from the
area. They all laughed and said
"Who's asking?" Ed explained
that he was building a new
house on a lot he recently pur-
chased and told them where it
was. One gentlemen said, "Oh,
you mean the old Norris place?
That place was demolished over
50 years ago. Been an empty lot
ever since." Ed was intrigued-
he hadn't realized there had
been a house there. "Place
caught fire in the 1940's. I was
just a school boy at the time-
no one was home, but the place
was a total loss. The charred
remains sat there for 4 or 5
years before it was cleaned up.
I walked past that place twice a
day, five days a week, back and
forth from school. Went all the
way to the 8th grade," the fel-
low said with a smile. "After
that, no one ever rebuilt on the
lot. I'm glad to see somebody's
doing something with it. Go
down and talk to Larry at the
court house. He can pull the plat
book and tell you all about it."
The old guy was right, Larry
was a wealth of information.
The original farm house was
built by Elsie and Thomas Lit-
tle back in 1845. They moved
out and sold to Elijah Miller in
1883. Then in 1916, the place
was sold to Henry Norris who
tore down the existing two-
room farm house and built a
new house. That house burned
down in 1943.
All of this was great info,
now what about the military
items? Ed needed to find out
exactly what they were. When
Ed learned that the Treasure
Hunters were coming to town,
he thought this would be his
chance to learn more about
the items he had found. The
advertisement had said that
the experts would offer advice
on any antique and collectible
items and they would do it for
free. It also said that they would
make offers to purchase items.
He wasn't interested in selling,
but you never know. Hey, if the
price is right, who knows?
Ed walked into the hotel
where the show was and fol-
lowed the signs to the meeting
room with great anticipation.
"My heart was actually beat-
ing at twice the normal rate," he
said. "As soon as I walked in I
was welcomed to the show and
given a number. They said it
would be about 10 minutes un-
til they would call my number.
While I waited, I looked at all
the unusual antiques on display.
There were old toys, coins, sil-
ver tea sets and old metal signs.
There was even a sword simi-
lar to mine. My number was
called and it was the moment
I'd been waiting for. I would
finally learn about the items I
had found."
Ed continued, "almost im-
mediately after I sat down,
Greg the antique guru was as-
signed to assist me said, 'hey
nice Civil War sword and bu-
gle. Where did you get them?'
I told him my story and he said
the family most likely buried
the items in honor of the sol-
dier who owned them, and who
most likely fought in the Civil
War." The soldier's uniform, or
what was left of it, the sword
and other items would have
been distributed by the Union
Army. The items were that of
an infantry soldier and dated at
around 1863. Because a bugle
was found, this soldier was
most likely the company bugle
boy. Most buglers were young
boys. Also, the hat in the col-
lection would have fit a very
small head-that of a 12 to 14
year old boy.
Greg also explained that
since the uniform, sword and
other items were together, the
soldier most surely survived the
war and returned home. Ed re-
flected that "learning about the
items was very interesting and
definitely worth the trip. The


entire collection was valued at
$2,200. Most of the value was
the sword and the bugle. I de-
cided to take pictures and sell
the collection. I had a great time
learning about it and thought it
should be in a Civil War enthu-
siast's collection. I'm actually
having a small monument made
in honor of the find and putting
it at the exact location where it
was found."


Treasure Hunters are coming to Lecanto


BY DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

Got Booty? If you
have a coffee can full of
old coins, an old guitar
or maybe the costume
jewelry your aunt gave
you, it's time to bring it
out of hiding. This week,
Treasure Hunters will be
in town and want to see
what you have. These
Treasure Hunters aren't
armed with a shovel and
metal detector, rather
their weapon of choice
is their expertise and
the collectors they buy
for. You see, these guys
know all about diamonds,
coins, antiques and col-
lectibles, musical instru-
ments and anything that's
old. They are asking you
to brine your booty and


make your best deal.
These guys pay cash for
just about anything that's
old. The items they buy
go straight to collectors
all over the world. How
much is a 1960 Gibson
Les Paul worth? Well, to
some, it might be worth
a couple hundred dol-
lars but to a serious col-
lector it could be worth
thousands, even ten's of
thousands. These guys
are buying for these col-
lectors. They pay more
for the things their col-
lectors want.
The event is free to at-
tend and there is no ob-
ligation to sell anything.
If it's information you
want, that won't cost you
a thing. But be prepared,
as an offer to purchase
your treasures is high-


ly likely. About eighty
percent of the stuff that
comes into the show is
purchased by these hun-
gry treasure hunters.
According to the Trea-
sure Hunters I talked to,
the wait time to get your
items looked at is usually
a half hour or less. Once
there, your items will be
examined, identified and
an offer will quickly fol-
low. Then it's up to you...
do I sell, do I hold out for
more or do I walk? The
whole thing sounds like a
lot of fun and might put
some jingle in your pock-
et. So dig up that booty
and head down to the
show. You might have the
treasure they have been
looking for!


ABOVE A customer brought in his father's coin collection that he had
inherited. He was pleasantly surprised with his offer and decided to
sell the collection. He said that the money would go towards a down
payment on a house for his family.


WE WANT TO
BUY ANY TYPE
OF GOLD
YOU HAVE
GOLD IS ALMOST AT
$1,700 PER OZ.
IT'S TIME TO SELL!

Hi, I'm
Archie.
I've been
a Trea-
sure Hunt-
er since
1996. Back then, gold
was around $225 per
oz.-now it's six times
that. Gold has never been
this high and may never
be again in my lifetime.
Back in the 1980's,
gold and silver soared in
price, but soon fell back
to rock bottom. Well, it's
a seller's market right
now. The poor world
economy and weak dol-
lar have increased prices
to all-time highs. My ad-
vice to people is to sell
now at the high side.
Many people have
gold in their jewelry box
and don't realize how
valuable it really is. If
you've got old rings,
necklaces, mismatched
earrings or even gold
teeth just sitting in a
dresser drawer, dig it out
and bring it in. You will
be surprised just how
much we can pay you.


Old Coins and

Paper Currency
Did you know that the United States started mint-
ing coins in 1793? All coins are worth something:
old silver dollars, half dollars, quarters and dimes
made before 1965 are mostly silver and worth many
times their face value. A $20 gold coin from the ear-
ly 1 900's could be worth $2,000 or more to collec-
tors. If you have any older coins or paper currency,
please come see us. We will buy one coin or million
dollar collections.


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thinking:

Gold Jewelry, Costume Jewelry, Dia-
monds, Silver Coins, Silver Dollars,
Gold Coins, Old Paper Currency, Old
Wheat Pennies, Old Pocket Watches,
Toys made before 1 970, Wrist Watch-
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Hi, I'm Dennis and I am a Treasure
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S


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


- 4.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Berber spring?


North Africa

culture gets

boostfrom

Arab Spring

Associated Press

AZDINE, Morocco One
of Said Lakenizaa's two re-
maining cows fell sick and
died last year as he led it
down the steep dirt track
from his village in Mo-
rocco's Atlas mountains to
the rest of the world.
It was the second time
he'd lost a cow because the
lack of paved roads ham-
pered access to health care
for animals and humans.
But now, after enduring
their lot for years, the 40
Berber families in Azdine
have started protesting for
better services. They
demonstrated in front of
local government offices
four times in the past year.
The Arab Spring has gal-
vanized the Berbers, North
Africa's original inhabi-
tants, to push for their own
political and cultural rights,
with some success they
have secured official recog-
nition for their language in
Morocco. But the new polit-
ical openness has also
brought to power their im-
placable enemies, the Is-
lamists, possibly setting the
stage for a new conflict in an
already volatile region.
Lakenizaa said they are
just struggling to improve
their lot, and neglected
by an Arab-dominated
government.
"We are demonstrating
because we are tired of
their lies. The government
said it was going to build a
road, but it is still not here,"
he said, sitting inside his
stone hut, which lacks both
electricity and running
water. "As soon as the peo-
ple in the government real-


Associated Press
An activist carries the Berber flag April 22 during a march calling for greater rights and au-
tonomy in the Moroccan city of Casablanca. The growing Berber movement, inspired by the
Arab Spring, has galvanized North Africa's original inhabitants to push for their political and
cultural rights and helped them secure official recognition for their language in Morocco.


ize you are a Berber peas-
ant, they don't care about
you."
Berber dreams go beyond
the basics.
They long for northwest-
ern Africa to be a unique re-
gion with its own Berber
heritage and culture not
just a lesser-populated ex-
tension of the Arab heart-
land of Egypt, Syria and the
Gulf. And they say it would
be a good deal more liberal
and tolerant than the rest of
the Arab Middle East.
"We are a society apart;
we are different different
by language, different by
culture," said Rachid Ti-
jani, an activist from the
town of Khenifra, near Lak-
enizaa's village.
In Berber societies, he
said, there is no rigid segre-
gation of the sexes as in tra-
ditional Arab tribes, and
there is more of a separa-
tion between religion and
state. While most Berbers
are Muslim, they pride
themselves on secular tradi-
tions at odds with some of
the Islamist movements


gaining ground in the
region.
As the Arab Spring swept
through the Middle East last
year, Berbers in every coun-
try in North Africa took ad-
vantage of the new climate
of freedom to push forward
their own long-simmering
demands.
There are no official fig-
ures for the number of
Berbers in North Africa, but
estimates for those who
speak one of the many
Berber languages are
around 25 million to 30 mil-
lion, mainly concentrated in
Morocco and Algeria.
In Morocco, where they
make up 50 percent of the
population, they became an
integral part of the pro-
democracy movement. And
when King Mohammed VI
presented a raft of reforms
to defuse the protests shak-
ing the country last year, he
included a constitutional
amendment to make the
Berber language,
Tamazight, an official lan-
guage alongside Arabic.
In Tunisia, the small


Berber community has
formed its first cultural as-
sociations and is once again
speaking its forbidden lan-
guage. In Libya, the Berbers
were a key part of the rebel
force that overthrew Moam-
mar Gadhafi. In Mali, the
Tuareg, another Berber
people, have armed them-
selves and are declaring a
homeland in large swatches
of the north.
Yet the same Arab Spring
has also brought to power
Islamist parties that tradi-
tionally have seen the
Amazigh, as the Berbers call
themselves, as a threat
"Overall, increased de-
mocratization ... provides
greater space for the
Amazigh to promote their
cause, but it also does so for
the Islamists, who generally
view the Amazigh move-
ment with disdain, or
worse," noted Bruce Maddy-
Weitzman, a leading expert
on the Berbers. "As the Is-
lamists have the momentum
on their side, it appears that
the Amazigh movement has
its work cut out for it."


UK publisher to release Taliban poetry anthology


Associated Press
In this photo taken Saturday, April 28, Violet D'Mello of
Aberdeen, Scotland, poses with a cheetah while being
photographed by her husband, Archibald, during a visit to
Kragga Kamma game reserve near Port Elizabeth, South
Africa, during a visit to the country.


SAfrica: Man


photographs cheetahs


attacking wife


Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG -
The photos taken by a
tourist from Scotland show
his wife on the ground,
hair flying, blood on her
neck, with two cheetahs
nearby
The Port Elizabeth Her-
ald reported Friday that
Violet D'Mello of Ab-
erdeen, Scotland, was at-
tacked by cheetahs April
28 while in a petting pen
with the animals at a game
reserve near Port Eliza-
beth in southeastern South
Africa.
It said she was attacked
while trying to protect
young children from an-
other group in the enclo-
sure at the same time.
Her husband took photos
of the attack, which were
published by the local
newspaper and others.
One of the photos taken
by Archie D'Mello shows


Violet D'Mello smiling and
posing with a cheetah
raised by humans in the
enclosure, before, as she
told the Herald, "it became
serious very quickly"
One of two cheetahs in
the enclosure first grabbed
a young girl, leaving her
with scratches and cuts
that needed stitches, the
Herald reported.
D'Mello tried to calm the
child and her brother, and
ended up also being
attacked.
She told the BBC she
had many bite and punc-
ture marks, and that her
scalp was "sliced open."
The cheetahs "weren't
being vicious. You could
tell they were just excited,"
Violet D'Mello told the
Herald.
The Herald said park
staff and other visitors
pulled the cats off. The
D'Mellos continued their
holiday in South Africa.


RAPHAEL SATTER
Associated Press

LONDON -Agroup of re-
searchers are preparing to
release an anthology of Tal-
iban poetry, something they
hope will help English-
speakers better un-
derstand the men ON1
who've waged more NI
than a decade of
war against NATO- U Poetr
led forces in the T
Afghanistan. www.
Many of the ofthe
works in "Poetry of com/
the Taliban" center
on the movement's campaign
to expel foreign forces from
their territory, with angry bat-
tle anthems or mournful
dirges devoted to civilian ca-
sualties. But others touch on
themes of religious devotion,
nostalgia, or even love.
Alex Strick van Lin-
schoten, one of the anthol-
ogy's coeditors, said he had
collected the 240-odd poems
off the Internet and in the
field not for novelty's sake,
"but as a way of understand-
ing who the Taliban are."
"This is one of the big
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problems of the conflict,
which is one of making deci-
sions without properly un-
derstanding the circum-
stances of the people around
which these decisions are
being made."
Although the Tal-
iban's Web pres-
THE ence is closely
ET monitored, few
people showed
y of much interest in
aliban: the group's poetry
poetry Strick van Lin-
taliban.
[ schoten suggested
that was a mistake.
"The only way
you're going to understand
who the Taliban are is read-
ing and understanding what
they have to say," he said.
The poems cited in the
book's forward run the
gamut There's an ode to the
guerrilla fighter:
"I know the black ditches/I
always carry a rocket
launcher on my shoulder;
"I know the hot trenches/I
always ambush the enemy;
"I know war, conflict, and
disputes/I will tell the truth
even if I am hung on the
gallows..."


But there's also a cry for
peace:
"End cruelty so that,
'An ant won't die by some-
one's hand..."


And moments of intro-
spection and self-doubt:
"It's a pity that we are
wandering as vagrants,/We
did this all to ourselves."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


April30 to May 4 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, grits, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on warm flatbread, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, oatmeal with
fruit, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits,
cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Baked chicken
nuggets, sausage pizza, PB
dippers, garden salad, sweet
peas, seasoned rice, mixed
fruit, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
tenders, ham super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, warm apple slices,
crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Pasta with
mozzarella and meat sauce,
mozzarella MaxStix, PB dip-
pers, garden salad, green
beans, chilled applesauce, milk,
juice.
Thursday: Hamburger on
bun, uncrusted PBJs, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, ranch pasta
salad, peaches, crackers, milk,
juice.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, turkey wrap, PB dip-
pers, garden salad, steamed
broccoli, dried fruit mix, milk,
juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, chicken al-
fredo, yogurt parfait, fresh baby
carrots, peas and carrots, sea-
soned mashed potatoes, corn-
bread, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, ham super salad,


PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, warm apple crisp,
chilled pears, crackers, milk,
juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, ranch
pasta salad, colossal crisp
french fries, dried fruit mix, milk,
juice.
Thursday: Stuffed crust
cheese pizza, cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chef super
salad, PB dippers, garden
salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, Jell-O, crackers, milk,
juice.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, fajita chicken and
rice, turkey super salad, fresh
baby carrots, green beans,
sweet potato souffle, peaches,
crackers, milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fa-
jita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, green
beans, chilled peaches, french
fries, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy
over rice, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh garden salad,
peas and carrots, baked french
fries, dried fruit mix, crackers,
milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, ham super salad,
PB dippers, baby carrots,
baked beans, corn, mixed fruit,
cornbread, french fries, crack-
ers, milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, chicken sandwich, pizza,
turkey super salad, yogurt par-
fait, garden salad, glazed car-
rots, Spanish rice, french fries,
applesauce, crackers, juice bar,
milk.
Friday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, hamburger pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, corn, peas,
sweet potato souffle, french
fries, peaches, crackers, juice


bar, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese, macaroni and cheese,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken super salad,
pizza, yogurt parfait, baby car-
rots, green beans, baked
beans, dried fruit mix, french
fries, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yo-
gurt parfait, pizza, garden
salad, glazed carrots, french
fries, peas, peaches, baked
chips, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries, ranch
pasta salad, broccoli, tater tots,
mixed fruit, baked chips, crack-
ers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, green beans, sweet
corn, french fries, applesauce,
baked chips, crackers, milk.
Friday: Chicken tenders,
pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, spaghetti with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, fajita
chicken salad, parfait, baby car-
rots, seasoned rice, peas,
sweet potato souffle, peaches,
french fries, baked chips, crack-
ers, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Macaroni and
cheese, green peas, parslied
carrots, pears, slice white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sloppy Joe, mixed
vegetables, potatoes O'Brien,
seeded hamburger bun with
margarine, peaches, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Blended juice,
chicken thigh with tomato pep-
per sauce, hot German potato
salad, Tuscan vegetables, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Meatballs with
sweet and sour sauce, coconut
rice, green beans, fruit salad,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad and pea
cheese salad and marinated
broccoli salad, special Mother's
Day dessert, two slices whole-
grain bread with mayonnaise,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


News NOTE

Children invited to make it for Mom at Citrus libraries


This May, make it for your mom: Head to the
library for a special Mother's Day craft workshop
on Saturday, May 12, where you can spend the
morning making your very own Mother's Day
craft.
The craft workshop will be offered at the Cen-
tral Ridge branch from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., the Flo-


ral City branch from 1:30 to 3 p.m., and the Ho-
mosassa and Lakes Region branches from
10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Crafts help little ones improve dexterity and
motor skills, not to mention exercise their creativ-
ity. The workshops are free and open to the pub-
lic. For information, visit www.citruslibraries.org.


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Fo a RE i -hoeetmae alstdy


Got a bad case of


wedding bill blues


I just got my third bill in the mail for an
out-of-town wedding this summer.
(Many people like to call them "invita-
tions.") While the brides' fathers are pay-
ing for the receptions, the dresses, the
ministers and the honeymoons, I will be
paying for plane tickets, rental cars, air-
port parking, hotel rooms and expensive
presents for brides I barely
know and the complete
strangers they'll be marrying.
Why do phone companies and
electric companies still send
out old-fashioned "bills" when
they could mail fancy invita-
tions on expensive card stock
each month that read, "Humon-
gous Utility invites you to cele-
brate the wedding of Your
Money and Our Monopoly on Jl
the fifth of the month. Please MUI
save the date. RSVP with a gift
check in the amount of $115.76.
Enclosed is a map with directions to our
office if you'd like to drop off your gift in
person."
"If it bothers you so much, why don't you
just send a big present and save yourself
the grief of attending?" you might ask. Be-
cause we're not going for the bride and
groom; we're going for their parents the
same parents who forgot to mention the
money-saving benefits of elopement to
their progeny Have a big wedding, or buy
your first house? Have a big wedding, or
retire at 40?
Or maybe the parents tried it and it did-
n't work. Weddings have become a com-
petitive sport. The point of a wedding now
is not to celebrate a loving commitment to
your life partner, but to make all your
friends jealous.
I know one father of the bride who of-
fered his daughter $50,000 to elope. She
wanted a big, fat wedding instead. One
could probably make a good case that any-
one who wants a big wedding probably
isn't mature enough to get married.
As friends of the parents, we can't play
favorites. Once we make the mistake of at-
tending one out-of-town wedding, we have


to go to all of them or we'll hear, "So you
like Daphne's daughter better than
mine?" for the rest of our lives. Maybe in
the afterlife, too. Some people can really
hold a grudge. Better to shell out the cash
than listen to that for the rest of your
years.
Even if the wedding is not in some ex-
otic, faraway land '"Join us on
our wedding cruise to New
Zealand," "Share our love of
vertical ice climbing and of
each other in Banff," "Help
Chad and Merlot forage all the
food for their wedding feast in
the Copper Canyon" it can
still run up a tab. You have to
buy new clothes; you have to
buy a present
M Buying a present is pretty
LEN easy for us, because we give
cash. Our feeling is, let the kids
do something smart with it -
pay off some of their college loan, save up
for their first home, start a 401(k), start a
college fund for their children. There are
hundreds of ways to invest that money in
their future. Or they could spend it on
breast enhancements and expensive hub-
caps for the groom's car, as Chad and Mer-
lot did.
We are still waiting for the thank-you
notes from last summer's weddings, even
though we don't expect them anymore.
Both marriages ended in acrimonious, ex-
pensive divorces. Chad wanted to split up
the breast enhancements; she wanted her
half of the hubcaps. I hear from her par-
ents that Merlot is busy planning her next
wedding. That's one way to get over the
heartbreak, I guess.
I hope she doesn't wait too long to send
out her next batch of wedding bills, be-
cause we can't attend two weddings at
once.

Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to Lose
Money in Your Spare Time-At Home,"
is available at amazon. com. You can
reach him atjimmullenbooks.com.


News NOTE

Floral City Merchant's Association slates next Market Day


Floral City Merchant's Asso-
ciation invites all to Market Day
from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 12, adjacent to
The Frugal Frog, 7698 S.


Florida Ave. (U.S. 41).
Artistic and handmade
items, honey, plants and pro-
duce are featured, as well as
food.


Free parking is within walk-
ing distance.
For information or to partici-
pate as a vendor, call Louise
at 352-344-1000.


Mother's






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A10 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


i
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rI I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cub Scouts
cross over

On April 26, Cub Scout Pack 449 hon-
ored four members with the Arrow of
Light, the Cub Scouts' highest honor.
They were, from left: Hunter Reiner,
Eric McGeorge, Mark Lindsey and
Charles Butt. The four boys, as well as
Paul Micali, were also recognized for
completing the five-year Cub Scout
program from Tiger to Webelo II with
Pack 449. They have now crossed
over to Boy Scouts, being introduced
into a brand new Troop 2693, which
the Elks Lodge of Homosassa
sponsors.
Special to the Chronicle


News NOTE


The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park will host a
Wildlife Jeopardy program in
the Children's Education Center
from noon to 12:30 p.m. Satur-
day, May 12. The subject of the
program will be armadillos.
The Wildlife Jeopardy pro-
gram is an educational program
for all ages. Volunteer Barbara
Cairns will use a Jeopardy-style
format to present information
on different Florida species
monthly. There will be educa-
tional handouts.
The program is included at
no additional charge with regu-
lar park admission. It is a 10-


minute walk from the park's
west entrance on Fishbowl
Drive to the Education Center.
The programs are usually the
second Saturday monthly from
December through May.
Cairns works as a docent in
the Children's Education Center
and is a retired school principal
from the Department of De-
fense schools in Labrador, Ger-
many and Panama. She is also
a published author with articles
and stories in books, maga-
zines and newspapers. Her lat-
est books are "Cracker Cow: a
Narrative of Florida History"
and "Gatsby's Adventures."
For more information, visit
www.floridastateparks.org.


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Overweight, Anxiety* Depression
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Send your resume in confidence to:
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Attn: nancy@citrushills.com
Fax: 352-746-7707


PETER YUNG KIM, M.D.
Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery


HERE

WHEN YOU

NEED

CITR
When it comes to outstanding cardiovascular care, trust
your heart to Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center.
With nearly a decade of experience, our expert team of
surgeons, physicians and nurses offer the most advanced
expertise when you need it most, right here at home.
From advanced heart surgery such as coronary artery
bypass (CABG) and heart valve repairs to the implantation
of pacemakers and automatic defibrillators, Citrus
Memorial is at the heart of it. Our minimally invasive
abdominal aneurysm surgery, carotid artery procedures
and lung surgery techniques help in reducing the risks and
complications associated with more traditional methods
and promote improved healing that helps speed you back to
normal daily living.
So when it comes to matters of the heart, coupled with
our proven record for compassionate care and excellent
outcomes, you can depend on Citrus County's most
comprehensive heart and vascular center. Learn more about
us by visiting on-line at www.heartofcitrus.com.
For a free Citrus Memorial Heart & Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.



CITRUS MEMORIAL

AHeart
& VASCULAR CENTER


502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


Play 'Jeopardy' at wildlife park


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 All







N /12. O6,-



ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Carnival 9/11 defendants ignore judge


Associated Press
Cole Dryden, 8, enjoys cot-
ton candy Friday during the
annual Spring Fling carnival
at Horizon Community
Learning Center in
Phoenix, Ariz.


Ski area rallies on
climate change
ASPEN, Colo.-Aspen
Ski Area hosted a ski race
without snow Saturday to
highlight the effect climate
change has on the outdoor
recreation industry.
Auden Schendler, Aspen
Skiing Company's vice presi-
dent of sustainability, said
"climate change is already
pounding businesses and
communities, whether you're
a ski resort, an insurance
agency or a raft business."
AT&T to pay $5M
to Muslim woman
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -A
former Kansas City woman
who converted to Islam in
2005 said she was harassed
for years at AT&T, and the
abuse boiled over in 2008
when her boss snatched her
head scarf and exposed her
hair.
A Jackson County jury on
Thursday awarded Susann
Bashir $5 million in punitive
damages in her discrimina-
tion lawsuit, along with
$120,000 in lost wages and
other actual damages.
The Kansas City Star re-
ported Saturday the award
appears to be the largest jury
verdict for a workplace dis-
crimination case in Missouri
history.
Bashir said in court docu-
ments her work environment
became hostile im- mediately
after she converted, with her
co-workers making harassing
comments.


Feeling OK


Associated Press
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL
BASE, Cuba They knelt in prayer,
ignored the judge and wouldn't listen
to Arabic translations as they con-
fronted nearly 3,000 counts of mur-
der The self-proclaimed
mastermind of the Sept 11 attacks
and four co-defendants defiantly dis-
rupted an arraignment that dragged
into Saturday night in the opening
act of the long-stalled effort to prose-
cute them in a military court
More than seven hours into the
hearing, the judge at the U.S. mili-
tary base in Cuba hadn't yet read the
charges against the men, including


2,976 counts of murder and terrorism
in the 2001 attacks that sent hijacked
jetliners into New York's World
Trade Center and the Pentagon.
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the
admitted 9/11 architect, and the four
men accused of aiding the 9/11 con-
spiracy put off their pleas until a
later date. Lawyers were still dis-
cussing trial dates Saturday night;
another hearing was set for June 12.
Earlier, Mohammed cast off his
earphones providingArabic transla-
tions of the proceeding and refused
to answer Army Col. James Pohl's
questions or acknowledge he under-
stood them. All five men refused to
participate in the hearing; two


passed around a copy of The Econo-
mist magazine and leafed through
the articles.
The detainees' lawyers spent
hours questioning the judge about
his qualifications to hear the case
and suggested their clients were
being mistreated at the hearing, in a
strategy that could pave the way for
future appeals. Mohammed was sub-
jected to a strip search and "inflam-
matory and unnecessary" treatment
before court, said his attorney, David
Nevin.
It was the defendants' first ap-
pearance in more than three years
after stalled efforts to try them for
the terror attacks, in which hijackers


steered four commercial jets into
the World Trade Center, the Penta-
gon and a western Pennsylvania
field. Nearly 3,000 people were
killed.
The defendants' behavior out-
raged 9/11 family members watching
on closed-circuit video feeds around
the United States at East Coast mili-
tary bases. One viewer shouted,
"C'mon, are you kidding me?" at the
Fort Hamilton base in Brooklyn.
"They're engaging in jihad in a
courtroom," said Debra Burlingame,
whose brother, Charles, was the pilot
of the plane that flew into the Penta-
gon. She watched the proceeding
from Brooklyn.


2012 MCAS Cherry Point Airshow


Associated Press
A member of the Trojan Horsemen, a six-man team of T-28 Trojan airplanes, performs Saturday at the 2012 MCAS Cherry Point Airshow in
Havelock, N.C.




Race, religion collide in presidential campaign


Associated Press
How unthinkable it was, not so
P. long ago, that a presidential election
would pit a candidate fathered by an
African against another condemned
as un-Christian.
F !Yet here it is: Barack Obama ver-
Associated Press sus Mitt Romney, an African-Ameri-
Warren Buffett enjoys a can and a white Mormon,
frozen treat Saturday while representatives of two groups and
touring the vendor floor at that have endured oppression to
the Berkshire Hathaway carve out a place in the United
shareholders meeting at States.
the CenturyLink Center How much progress has America
Omaha, in Omaha, Neb. made against bigotry? By November,
we should have some idea.
Berkshire holders Perhaps mindful of the lingering
trust Buffett power of prejudice, both men soft-
pedal their status as racial or reli-
OMAHA, Neb. Warren gious pioneers. But these things
Buffett worked to reassure "will be factors whether they're ex-
shareholders he's feeling plicitly stated or not, because both
good after his recent prostate Obama and Romney are minorities,"
cancer diagnosis, and Berk- said Nancy Wadsworth, co-editor of
shire Hathaway is ready to the anthology "Faith and Race in
replace the revered 81 -year- American Political Life."
old investor when the need Mormons are 1.7 percent of the
arises. U.S. population, according to the
Based on the questions Pew Research Center. Blacks are
Buffett got from the crowd of 12.6 percent
more than 30,000 at the com- "Americans like to obsess about
pany's annual meeting in ways that people are different," said
Omaha on Saturday, Berk- Wadsworth, a political science pro-
shire shareholders are taking fessor at the University of Denver.
him at his word. Voters of all types say a candidate's
Many of the questions at race or religious beliefs should not
Many of the questions at be cause for bias, "but Americans
the meeting either focused in are really conflicted about this, and
on technical aspects of Berk- they talk out of both sides of their
shire's many businesses or mouth."
dealt with general economic In an October 2011 Associated
or political topics. The con- Press-GfK poll, 21 percent of re-
glomerate includes an eclec- spondents said they would be less
tic mix of companies such as likely to cast a presidential vote for a
Geico insurance, MidAmeri- Mormon. Four percent said they
can Energy, the Burlington would be less likely to vote for a
Northern Santa Fe railroad, black person. An AP poll during the
Shaw carpet, Helzberg Dia- 2008 campaign found that nearly 40
monds, the Nebraska Furni- percent of white Americans had at
ture Mart and Pampered least a partly negative view of black
Chef. people.
-From wire reports The gap between America's high-


r .".
i Il



Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks Saturday during a campaign rally at
the Value City Arena in Columbus, Ohio. Republican presidential can-
didate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks Friday at a cam-
paign stop in Pittsburgh, Pa.


minded ideals and narrow-minded
practice is not new.
In 1620, the Puritans landed on
Plymouth Rock searching for reli-
gious freedom. The Constitution for-
bade a religious test for president.
Still, the religion of presidential can-
didates historically has been a major
issue, though nearly all have been
Protestant.
Thomas Jefferson, who coined the
phrase "separation between church
and state," was decried as godless.
Nearly 160 years later, John E
Kennedy was tarred as a Roman
Catholic who would answer to the
pope instead of the American people.
In 1787, the same colonists who
had demanded equal rights in their
dealings with England wrote a Con-
stitution that reduced blacks to
three-fifths of a person. Nearly 80
years would pass before that
changed and another century before
blacks would be assured the vote.
Obama remains the sole member
of the most exclusive club in the


world: racial minorities who were
nominated for president by a major
party.
In 2012, it's unlikely more than a
smattering of die-hard bigots will be
repelled by both presidential
choices. But even well-intentioned
people can be influenced by the pow-
erful emotional pull of these issues.
Obama has been assailed by
racially charged accusations since
he became the first black president:
Obama isn't a citizen; he refused to
punish New Black Panthers who in-
timidated white voters; he's seeking
payback for past white racism by re-
distributing tax money to poor mi-
norities; he's using the Trayvon
Martin killing for political gain.
Wadsworth said that even after
three-plus years of a black presi-
dent, racial bias remains "super-
loaded and super-coded."
"It's coded into political 'other-
ness' he's a Socialist, he's dan-
gerous, maybe a Muslim," she said.
"I think down underneath, there's a


lot of race bias; it's just that they've
figured out ways to channel that into
seemingly race-neutral codes."
Romney has tried to push past
anti-Mormonism, with mixed suc-
cess. His membership in the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
has been an issue his entire politi-
cal career
The Mormon church was founded
in 1830 by Joseph Smith, who said
God directed him to restore the true
Christian church by revising parts
of the Bible and adding the Book of
Mormon as a sacred text.
Smith said an angel directed him
to a buried holy book in upstate
New York, written on golden plates,
which he translated from "re-
formed Egyptian" into the Book of
Mormon. Theological differences
have led many Christians to con-
clude Mormons are not part of his-
toric Christianity.
There's the issue of polygamy,
though the Mormon church re-
nounced the practice in 1890.
Montana Gov Brian Schweitzer, a
Democrat, recently took the oppor-
tunity of a Daily Beast interview to
say Romney's father, George, was
"born into (a) polygamy commune in
Mexico." (Mitt Romney's grandfa-
ther, Gaskell, had one wife, but his
great-grandfather, Miles Park Rom-
ney, had four and fled to Mexico in
1885 to escape U.S. anti-polygamy
laws.)
One of the toughest questions
probably will focus on the Mormons'
former ban on men of African de-
scent in the priesthood. When the
church lifted the prohibition in
1978, leaders didn't explain the the-
ology behind it. That left questions
about church doctrine on race, even
though Mormon leaders repeatedly
denounce racism.
It's an issue Mormons discuss
among themselves. But when it's
brought up in a campaign setting,
many Mormons say it's just an at-
tempt to embarrass Romney











EXCURSIONq


C I r


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A15 of
today's
Chronicle.


p.-- --"
oo ,' qje 'E % 0o v e t 9 a d e s
Aead, _o- -


yWhere does this map say we are'
My Everglades


kayak

by Barry Schwartz, S


journal

special to the Chronicle
"..;. -- -- --.


S te e COL'rni oelr a nd II riN\ e 300
miles I dowl n the w est co:',ast ot
Floricda from C r i stal Rn er t
Everalades Cit. to, ka.ak the
E\ erIlacles E\ erglacles (it. is the
northern gatelwa. of the
E\ ergladles Nati':nal Park
\Ve sta, at the h eI House
Inn and arrange a shuttle
so that the car \ll I )e\11ait-
ing tfor us in Flamintgo. the
stl h ent ra nce of the
E\eraclades in a week
\Ve resent e ouroI" ca irp-
sites at the Ranger Station.
a nd in Chi okolos kee \e
tour the historic Small- BOAD
w\0ood General Store. which ROAI
is no\\ operated as a Imu- TA
seni \Ve also \ visit the
Rod and Gun Club). an Old
Florida'" historic Inn. lots of vood. a
bi) fireplace in the lobb1. andi pictures
of the imaon celebrities \11ho ha\ e
stayed and fished. Includin-g
presidents
After dinner I in\ entor, i.\ Ipacki n-g
list once i'iore to: be sure that I ha\ e
not forgotten anyhiAng that I will need.
as there is nio cha nce :of resuppl\ in-
an.\1hingdiuring the ne\t \week and
80-plus miles in the \water


OFF WE GO
Our first day's route is a Ion'_N the wa-
terwta's inside passage. taking us
through several ba, s and fi nally into a
cttot'tf to the Chathain River to( ca m p at
Ed W\atson's old honimestead.


P
fr


- -.


Alon the 18 miles. we rarelI
see a bo)'at and there are tew
sins of tthe ,:,ld holimestead be-
1nci a concrete fountciation. a
tellw deca. i ng ta ri. t,:":,ls a nd an
Ild s. |ru )I)p oi ler The
large land area as rii-
nall% a shell moI11unld cre-
ated )b, the (olusa people
Sel' i11ai1,n cent lr'ies
In the Ini,' rninl'. 'Ale 'if
the first things I see is a
I)bibcat nI iI',ire than 21)
feet alla\ The biibecat is'
probably there liiiookingo tor,
the fresh water tound in
D C LEthe old cistern
M LESS Day 2 starts \\with the
KEN tide and \\i ind wxo rkingo
wxith us. so the touir miles
to the (GulfdoIw n the
Clahaam i oes fast. \Ve finally thread
ouAr \'a1 through h se' eral small keys
and break out into the Gulf.
We are still in the reg ion considered
toi be part oft the 10.000 islands. so find-
in_ an Island ti stop on and take a
break is easy \We turn south and head
to, the tip 'ot Flocida. still several cla's

Our trip is timed ti, cincicde w1ith the
full Iimoon anti high afternoon tides'
that make it easier t, land on beaches
after a (la. o t pacicddlmi When we make
it tio Hio,, Ke.. we notice lots ot ldamaige
froin the most recent hurricanes. The
hish tide. w which Ioccurs about mid-
night. gets \er\ close to w\'here our
tents are In tact. for several hours it
sou nds as if t he waves will come crash-
ins into the tents at any minute
We take precautions to always bring-
the ka\ aks out ofthe water and secure
them abole the high-water mark. The
other thing we do each day is protect
our water and food from scavenging
raccoons. rats and birds. The excite-
ment on Hog Island is awakening sud-
clenly. about 1 a.m.. as I hear
something actively and loudly gnawing
its \\ay through my tent. I slap hard at


-b-



the tent andi iita,,ne the attacking rat
1 in tl I i'ir-ih the air and scu rr in


IN THE WILD
0\er the next several
cla s we head
south.


t start as ear
as the tide will allow
while the xvind is still at our backs.
pass the mouth of the Shark River ant
finally arrive at the bottom tip of
Florida. Cape Sable, and must now
turn east towards Flamingo.
By about 1 p.m.. the wind is gusting
to 25 mph from the east. As we turn di-
rectly into the wind and try to move
through the crashing waves. it is like a
roller coaster. riding the swells up and
down. The tricky part comes in picking
a place to safely surf the waves in
order to crash onto the beach. Long
ribbons of lonely and very spectacular
beaches stretch along this part of
wild Florida.


See KAYAK/Page A15


Steve prepares breakfast at camp.


Ice trekking

Geoff Mather of Beverly Hills and his son Mark recently went on a two-week
South American trip. The highlight of the trip was a guided two-hour ice-trekking
tour of the Perito Moreno Glacier near the town of El Calafate in the Patagonia
region of Argentina.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
CATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I
k


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's time divorcee


gets on with life


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 6, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B:Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:003 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
1 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (N) Harry's Law (N) 14' The Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' cc News Access
Masterpiece Mystery! Underground Masterpiece Mystery! Confusing Masterpiece Mystery! Blackmail Great As Time As Time
0 WEU PBS 3 3 14 6 crime gang. 'PG' and dangerous puzzles. 'PG' case involves a dominatrix. 14' Romances Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up As Time... NOVA (In Stereo)'G' Finding Your Roots Masterpiece Mystery! '14' America-Prime MI-5'14'
News Nightly Dateline NBC Harry's Law "Class The Celebrity Apprentice "Blown Away" News Paid
0 NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News "Discrimination" (N) War" (N) '14' Celebrities create a print ad campaign. 'PG' Program
o WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives GCB The ladies run News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG' c(N) 'PG' c into danger in Juarez. Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (Season Finale) The teams NYC 22 "Lost and 10 News, Paid
0 ] WT)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) a race to the finish line. (N) 'PG' c Found" (N) '14' 11pm (N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) The Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:0News (N) The Closer"Blindsided"
0 [WTTFOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Simp Simpsons Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad 14 (In Stereo) N '14'm
E DWCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Desp.-Wives GCB "Revelation" News Brothers
WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
E WCIF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
SWFTSABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives GCB The ladies run News Grey's
I ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'mcc(N) PG' cc into danger in Juarez. Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Law & Order Deaf girl ** "Proof of Life" (2000, Suspense) Meg
B [Wo IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory "Manhood" PG strangled.'PG' Ryan, Russell Crowe, David Morse. R'
S[WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "Catch That Kid"(2)04) 'PG' c Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Paid
f [WACX) TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Variety King Journey Creflo D. Connec JimRaley Dayna Variety
S WTo CW 4 4 4 12 12 King of 'Til Death Twoand Twoand Criminal Minds (In 'ii Trace' True/ NUMB3RS"Under The Unit"Inquisition"
IM CWu4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' 1 Half Men Half Men Stereo)'14'B i- .- ii Pressure"'PG' '14'c
The Comedy The Comedy Spy Crime Your Citrus County Court Music Mix Music Mix The Cisco Black
i WYi FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
Ei CWOX FOX 13 7 7 Law & Order 'PG' Simpsons Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers I|Fam. Guy |American FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
[CWVEAW UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. |Noticiero Rosa de Guadalupe Nuestra Belleza Latina'PG'(SS) Sal y Pimienta'14 Comed. Noticiero
M XWPX) ION 17 **** "L.A. Confidential" (1997) Kevin Spacey Guy Pearce. 'R *** "The Pelican Brief"(1993) Julia Roberts. 'PG-13'
Parking Parking Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage- Storage- Duck Duck Duck Duck
54 48 54 25 27 Wars'PG' Wars PG Wars PG Wars PG WarsPG WarsPG Texas Texas Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
55 64 55 **I* "A League of Their Own" (1992) Tom Hanks, Madonna. A wom- The Killing "Keylela" (N) Mad Men Peggy is The Killing "Keylela" (In
55 64 55 men's professional baseball league debuts in 1943. PG' '14' keeping a secret. 14 Stereo) '14'
Tanked: Unfiltered Feng Frozen Planet"Winter" River Monsters: Killer Swamp Wars"Flesh- River Monsters Swamp Wars"Flesh-
52 35 52 19 21 shui tank.'PG' 'PG' c Sharks Eating Lizards"'PG' "Russian Killer"'PG' Eating Lizards"'PG'
96 19 96 Church Girl '14' "The Marriage Chronicles" (2012) Jazsmin Lewis. Married The Game Let's Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 couples go to a retreat to spice up their marriages. 14 Together Together Together
[BIAV0) 254 51 254 OC |Don't Be Don't Be Don't Be Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
Jeff Dunham: Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Between The Comedy Awards Celebrating the world of The Comedy Awards
27 61 27 33 Controlled Chaos'14' 14'N '14'm '14' c Two comedy. (N) (In Stereo) c (In Stereo) cc
** "Road House" (1989) Patrick Swayze. A legendary *** "Urban Cowboy" (1980, Drama) John Travolta, Debra Winger. A Texas oil
98 45 98 28 37 bouncer agrees to tame a notorious gin mill. 'R' worker looks for love at a popular honky-tonk. (In Stereo) PG'
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid |Insanity! Diabetes |Wall St. Fat & Fatter Cocaine Cowboys '14, D,L,S,V' Apocalypse 2012
IMNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Jessie Shake It Jessie Jessie Good- Good- A.N.T Jessie Austin & Shake It A.N.T Good-
niSifG 46 40 46 6 5 G' Up! G G G' Charlie Charlie FarmG' G' Ally G Up! G' Farm'G' Charlie
(ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies atWashington Nationals. (Live) SportsCenter (N)
[ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Drag Racing NHRA Drag Racing Summit Racing Equipment Southern Nationals. World, Poker World, Poker
(EWTNJ 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing Sunday Night Prime |Catholic. |Savoring G.K. |Rosary Franciscan Univ. God Bookmark
S*** "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do ***t "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do
1)29 52 29 20 28 white couple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13' white couple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13'
S 118* "Equilibrium" (2002, Science Fiction) *** "Brassed Off" (1996) Pete ** "Rogue Trader" (1999, Drama) Ewan "Long-
118 170 Christian Bale. (In Stereo)'R'c Postlethwaite.'R'c McGregor. Premiere. (In Stereo)'R'c Friday
FNC 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Chopped All-Stars Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped All-Stars Iron Chef America Chopped'G'
(FSNEL) 35 39 35 MLB Baseball Marlins |Boysin World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) Barfly |Game 365 World PokerTour
*** "The Incredible Hulk" (2008, Action) *** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A billionaire dons an *** "Iron Man"
FX 30 60 30 51 Edward Norton, LivTyler, Tim Roth. PG-13' armored suit to fight criminals. PG-13' (2008)'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf IPGA Tour Golf
"A Taste of Romance" (2011, Romance) Teri "The Magic of Ordinary Days" (2005, Drama) Frasier'PG Frasier'PG Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
L 39 68 39 45 54 Polo, Bailee Madison. 'NR' c Keri Russell, Skeet Ulrich.'NR'
"Red t** "Robin Hood"(2010) Russell Crowe. Robin and his Game of Thrones (N) Veep (N) Girls (N) Game of Thrones (In
RdiB 302 201 302 2 2 Riding" men battle the Sheriff of Nottingham. PG-13' 'MA'c 'MA" MA Stereo) 'MA' c
"Harry Potter and Real Time With Bill **t "Water for Elephants" (2011) Reese ***t "Gladiator"(2000, Historical Drama)
S 303 202 303 Deathly Hallows" Maher 'MA' c Witherspoon. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc Russell Crowe. (In Stereo) 'R' c
(HGTVl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt ntl Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Best of Holmes Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
Swamp People "Under Ax Men "Up in Flames" Ax Men "Family Rivalry" Ax Men "Swamp Gold" Swamp People "Secret MonsterQuest 'PG' N
51 25 51 32 42 Siege'PG' '14'm '14'B (N)'14' Weapons"'PG'
i 1 "I Know Who Killed ** "Chloe" (2009, Drama) Julianne Moore, ArmyWives "Fallout" The Client List Riley ** "Chloe" (2009)
24 38 24 31 Me" (2007)'R Liam Neeson. Premiere. R'c (N)'PG' considers dating. (N) Julianne Moore. 'R
(N 50 119 "A Friend of the Family" (2005, Suspense) "The Pregnancy Project" (2012, Docudrama) "Lies He Told" (1997) Gary Cole. Bored mili-
50 119 Kim Coates, Laura Harris. c Alexa Vega, Judy Reyes. c tary man fakes death, starts new life. c
St "X-Men 2" (2003) Patrick Stewart. A right- *2 "Your Highness" (2011) Danny McBride. ***t "Speed" (1994, Action) Keanu Reeves,
320 221 320 3 3 wing militarist pursues the mutants. Premiere. (In Stereo)R' R Dennis Hopper. In Stereo) R c
(MSNBJ 42 41 42 1 1 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera The Mind of Manson |Dahmer
SWicked Tuna'14 Finding Atlantis 'PG' The 400 Million Dollar Area 51 Declassified Wicked Tuna "Man v. Wicked Tuna "Weekend
(W 109 65 109 44 53 Emerald 'PG, V PG' Storm" (N) 14' Warriors"'14'
tNiCIJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. '70s '70s MyWife |MyWife George |George Friends |Friends
(MWN) 103 62 103 Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class Master Class
(IXYJ 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) PG' Best Ink 'PG' Law Order: Cl
S i*** 340 241 340 4 "Mr. Holland's The Borgias "Stray Thhe Big C Nurse Nurse The Big C The Borgias'The Nurse The Big C
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[SPEED] 732 112 732 (Live) Despain (N) Academy (N) G Infineon.
37 43 37 27 36 e "The Day After Tomorrow" (2004) Dennis Quaid. Global warming *** "Cloverfield" (2008) Michael Stahl-David. *** "Cloverfield"
rSP11LI 37 43 37 27 36 leads to worldwide natural disasters. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' (2008)'PG-13'
T**3 "Cars *** "Salt"(2010) Angelina Jolie. Magic City "Suicide ***t "Moneyball" (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt. (In ***t "The Social
370 271 370 2" (In Stereo) PG-13 'c Blonde" 'MA' N Stereo) PG-13' Network" (2010)
Captain's Sortfishing Flats Class Ship Sportsman Florida Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Insidethe
SNJ 36 31 36 Tales T Shape TV Sport. Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals G' Rays
"Freddy's Dead: The "Thirteen Ghosts" (2001, Horror) Tony "One Missed Call" (2008, Horror) Shannyn ** "The Cave" (2005)
31 59 31 26 29 Final Nightmare"R' Shalhoub, Embeth Davidtz. R' Sossamon. Premiere.'PG-13' Cole Hauser.
(IBS) 49 23 49 16 19 "Rush Hour3"(2007) Jackie Chan. *** "Ocean's Thirteen"(2007) George Clooney *** "Oceans Thirteen"B
35 **** "Mart)"al(C,1 Drama) Ernest Borgnine, *** "Harryand Tonto" (1974, Drama) Art ** "Bell, Bookand Candle" (1958, Comedy)
( 169 53 169 30 35 Betsy Blair. IHA Carney Ellen Burstyn. R' James Stewart. NR'
MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters "Swinging MythBusters "Driving in MythBusters "Fixing a MythBusters "Driving in
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(TIE 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Medium |Medium GypsyWedding Medium |Medium
*** "Hotel Rwanda" ** "Raw Deal" (1986, Action) Arnold ** "Drive Angry" (2011, Action) Nicolas Cage. *2 "As Good as
(_iEJ 350 261 350 (2004) cc Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) R'B, Premiere. (In Stereo) R' cc Dead" (2010)'R'
S"48 33 48 31 34 WeAre NBA NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Boston Celtics. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets. (N)
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(IT N) 38 58 38 33 *** "Monster House" (2006) 'PG' Adven |Adven King/Hill King/Hill Chicken IFam. Guy Fam. Guy Loiter
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(WE 117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
WGNW 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: ClI 30Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay The Unit'PG'


Dear Annie: My ex-
husband and I have
been officially di-
vorced for only four months,
and last week he married
the girl he dated all through
high school. They began dat-
ing immediately after we
separated.
My ex and I have a 5-year-
old son together. At first,
when he began dating, I was
very upset, but I assumed
his feelings for
the other woman
would eventually
wear off and he'd
come back to me.
I've never kept
our son from
him, but I admit,
I initially tried to
make it hard for
him to see our
boy I wanted him
to understand
that if we got ANN
back together, he
would be able to MAL
spend as much
time as he liked with his
son. Unfortunately, that did-
n't stop him from marrying
his girlfriend.
I feel that my ex is choos-
ing his new wife over our
son and that he should be
here for our family. Hon-
estly, isn't he obligated to try
to work things out with us
for our son's sake? I'm sure
everything would be differ-
ent for us this time. I'm tired
of waiting for him to figure
it out. Should I just tell him
that I want him back? -
Heartbroken Single Mother
Dear Heartbroken:
Honey, wake up and smell
the coffee. Your ex is mar-
ried to someone else, and he
isn't going to "figure it out."
He's moved on. It's over.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
In real 3D. 4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
Digital. 1 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Safe" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R)
ID required. 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
In real 3D. 4:30 p.m. No passes.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:40 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
No passes.


"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
Digital. 1:30 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Marvel's The Avengers" (PG-13)
In real 3D. 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Safe" (R) ID required. 12:50 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
4 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
In real 3D. 12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R)
ID required. 12:40 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"The Raven" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Think Like a Man" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Wood used
for furniture
6 Poet Ogden -
10 Land measures
15 A letter
18 Greek nymph
19 Instruments
21 Feel
22 "Mars Needs -"
24 Tantalize
25 Laudatory speech
26 Teacher
27 Use a blue pencil
28 Common abbr.
29 Kind of escape
31 Attain
33 Printing mistakes
35 Onion relative
37 Warmth
38 Nothing
39 Epic by Homer
40 Perfect
42 Capital of Belarus
43 MTV staple
44 Book of instructions
46 Gamut
47 Make angry
48 Grandma
52 Adhered
53 Peter's -
54 De Niro or
Redford
56 Cyst
57 Coral island
58 New Year's Eve word
59 Dwelled
60 Seedlike body
62 Bog
63 Forcible restraint
65 Work in verse
66 Waxy substance
67 Snake
68 Canal
69 Obstruct
71 Disagreeable task
73 Dark
75 Experienced one, for short
76 Stage
77 Tier
78 French cleric
82 Burning
84 Nerve network
85 Except
86 Roman household god
87 Place for horses


90 Something sticky
91 Long carpet
93 Kind of
processing
94 Emissary
95 Lane or Keaton
97 Equal
98 Fellows
99 Dead Scrolls
100 Money in coin
102 Wished
104 Gridiron player
105 Flavoring plant
107 Inflexible
108 Sword
109 Concoct
110 Of a grain
112 Howled
113 Unchanging
114 Early Soviet
satellite
117 Waste time
118 River in Russia
119 Repeat
123 Item for sketching
124 As said before
125 Gift
127 Chapeau
128 Chief
129 Occurrence
131 Intensity of
emotion
133 Grown-up
135 Roofing piece
136 Burn a little
137 Absent schoolboy
138 Bend
139 Directed
140 Creature of myth
141 Wriggling
142 Printer ink


DOWN
1 Inn relative
2 Mountain ridge
3 Kind of officer
4 Vegas
5 Paradise
6 Of nerve cells
7 Apportion
8 Retard
9 Farm animal
10 Assault
11 Upholstered item
12 OT book


13 Environment
(prefix)
14 Office machine
15 Ralph Waldo-
16 Beverages
17 Strike
19 Breakfast fare
20 Medical
instrument
23 Remain
30 To the future
32 If not
34 Gypsy gentleman
36 Catch fire
38 Metallic element
39 Lubricated
41 Affaire d'honneur
42 Animals' hair
43 General feeling
44 Gesture
45 Hooded coat
46 Fleming or
Zellweger
47 Wander
49 Missing GI
50 Notorious
emperor
51 Freshly
52 Disney deer
53 Fool's gold
54 Crest
55 Old Russian ruler
58 More secure
59 Less snug
61 Entreaty
63 -may-care
64 Tricky plan
66 Skyscraper
70 Dead lang.
71 Stretched
72 Hang in the air
74 Story
76 Wrinkled fruit
79 Empty gun
cartridges
80 Fight
81 Rub out
83 Concern of dieters
85 Contemptuous look
87 Money
88 Pointed arch
89 admiral
90 Profit
92 Raised
93 Make a choice
95 Yankees star


Jeter
Holy picture
Donated
Cruel
Barn area
Mind
Lone Star State native
Bungled
- of the earth
Amuse


111 Black cuckoo
112 Baseball player
113 Serious crime
114 Quarrel
115 Danger
116 Member
of the family
117 Dirty
118 Of warships
120 Old butter-maker


121 Reduce by
50 percent
122 Aquatic mammal
124 Impression
125 Loyal
126 Diplomat's forte
130 By way of
132 Before
134 Twosome


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


And it does not speak well of
you to withhold your son to
punish or manipulate him.
This only hurts your child,
and we know you don't in-
tend to do that.
You must find a new way
to work things out, and it
will involve custody, visita-
tion and child support. We
urge you to put your son first
and make this as easy and as
positive for him as you can.
DearAnnie: On
the subject of
post-menopausal
women and their
4 desire for sex:
Please consider
the woman who
has given up sex
out of sympathy
for her husband,
who has lost in-
terest due to
health issues or
IE'S erectile dysfunc-
BOX tion.
There are ways
he could respond,
but he seems to expect that
she should simply accept
that sex is over. These are
the women who will keep
their marriage vows and
deny their active libidos. I
wish those husbands would
give more thought to the
women who still love them,
no matter what, but would
like to feel loved by them, as
well. E.I.M. in Florida


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar Email
questions to anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A14 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

Business owners, contrac-
tors and vendors are invited by
the Inverness Wal-Mart to par-
ticipate in a Memorial Day
event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, May 26, at the super-
center. Space is limited. For
more information, call JoAnne
at 352-637-2300 or 352-
586-2901.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136, Air Force Association,
will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday,
May 17, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala.
Representatives from the
Marion County Sheriff's Office,
Division of emergency Manage-
ment, will brief the group about
what to do in the event of a hur-
ricane. All are welcome.
For more information, call
Mike Emig at 352-854-8328.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9, 2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorials services. Is-
lands to be visited include
Oahu, Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email him at dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
The Old Homosassa Vet-
erans' Memorial opened with
great fanfare Oct. 21, 2011, and
is gearing up for Phase III. Pur-
ple Heart recipients are sought
to be honored with center-
pieces with their names on
them. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092. Phase III is open to
all veterans and consists of a
marker that has 64 spaces for
$100, plus $2 for additional let-
ters. Many families are putting
multiple family members on a



KAYAK
Continued from Page A13

Finally, we make our way
through Lake Ingraham, to
get a break from the con-
stant pounding from the
winds. As we get closer to
the Flamingo Ranger Sta-
tion we notice more boat
traffic, as we are now close
to "civilization" again.
We reach the Flamingo
boat ramp about 11 p.m. and
quickly get everything out of
the kayak and loaded in the
car for the long drive back to
Crystal River

HOMEWARD BOUND
The drive back takes us
through Homestead and
eventually back west on the
Tamiami Trail. This part of
Florida has many canals
that were built over a span
of years from the 1930s to
the '60s to drain water from
the Everglades for develop-
ment. Of course, few then
thought about the ecological
disaster this would cause.
The canals are now slowly
starving the Everglades as
they interfere with the fresh
water flow that is essential
for the Everglades to sur-
vive. There are groups try-


marker.
Volunteers are needed to en-
sure the memorial grounds look
presentable at all times. To
help, call Shona at 352-422-
8092 or scook94@
tampabay.rr.com.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety pa-
trols, search and rescue,
maritime security and environ-
mental protection. Wear the
Auxiliary uniform with pride and
your military ribbons. Criminal
background check and mem-
bership are required. Email
Vince Maida at vsm440@
aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call


352-476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Mother's Day dinner will be
served 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, May
13. Music with Russ and Drew
at 3 p.m.
Menu will include prime rib,
twice-baked potatoes, vegeta-
bles, salad and dessert. Cost is
$10. Tickets in advance only.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
For information about the
post and its activities, call


Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
All are welcome at the meat-
loaf dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, May 11, at the post.
Cost is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-


ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100
wheelchair and walker bags to
area nursing homes. Members


collect good, clean cotton mate-
rial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair
and walker and ditty bags for
veterans in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded
to include many more who are
eligible to join. For more infor-
mation or to donate items, call
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
Dunnellon Young Marines
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
A pancake breakfast and out-
door flea market will be from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 19. Cost is $5 for all you
can eat.
The Memorial Day Service
will be at 11 a.m. Monday, May
28. A picnic will follow.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at
352-201-1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong

See VETERANS/Page A16


Special to the Chronicle
This Everglades map shows the route and campsites used.


ing to restore this flow of
water and there are the
usual competing forces try-
ing to prevent this as "bad"
for business and develop-
ment.
Along the Tamiami Trail
we stop at Clyde Butcher's
photo studio. He is an amaz-
ing Florida photographer,
much in the style of Ansel
Adams, using black and
white with great detail to
catch the light just right.
Eventually we head north


5th Jnnuial

t9fhlete of th e ear

,Sports J,.wards banquet

Thursday May 17th
Reception 5:00pm 6:00pm
Awards Ceremony 6:00pm 8:00 PM
College of Central Florida Citrus Campus
COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA E .-. .


Citrus County
Health Department ..... -


Tickets are $20 and are available at
The Citrus County Chronicle offices
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
J... or more information call: 352-563-6363


again on 1-75 back to Crystal
River
The link http://bschwartz.
net/ek/ has more informa-
tion, photos and a video of
the trip. Bette and I are off
to Colorado soon for more
"Road Less Taken" adven-
tures. See you in the fall!


Barry and Steve relax at the campsite at the Watson Homestead.

Rowdy. They are retired been hiking, climbing,
teachers who now split scuba diving, sailing or
Barry Schwartz and his their time between Ozello driving through at least 50
wife, Bette, live at the end and the Colorado countries around the
of Ozello Trail with their Mountains. During the past world. Email him at
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TRAVEL & VETERANS


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 A15








Patriot Star


Special to the Chronicle
Candace West taught the April workshop for Creative Quilters, the Patriot Star, a quilt that
West designed. The focus of the quilt is an eight-point star that she simplified by using the
paper-piecing method to achieve perfect points and seams that match exactly. Using a
"pin board" West made, students first found the pattern repeat and cut rectangles of the
repeat eight copies of the repeat were cut and laid on the pin board, the pins were placed
through all eight layers in the same spot. After pinning eight to 10 matching spots, the
students could trace and cut out eight identical star points to use for kaleidoscope stars.
These were then put on a paper foundation to create a block. Pictured in front of West's
completed quilt are Lee Lawson and Maryann Zutaut with their first completed blocks.


First BIRTHDAYS


Penderjadon Brisson

Pender Jadon Brisson celebrated her
first birthday April 20, 2012.
She is the daughter of Benjamin and
Michelle Brisson of Raritan, N.J.
Maternal grandparents are Emil and Pat
Brisson of Phillipsburg, N.J. Paternal
grandparents are Donald and Janet Luff of
Lake Tranquility, N.J.
Mary Pearl Green Luff of Inverness is
her paternal great-grandmother


New ARRIVAL

Jaydin Janie Cousins
I d*/ T 0 *


Rocky and Tara Cousins of Inverness
announce the birth of their daughter, Jay-
din Janie Cousins, at 4:14 p.m. Friday,
April 27, 2012.
The new baby was welcomed by grand-
parents Kathryn Golds of Hernando, Ken-


neth Karsten of Leesburg and Doug and
Janie Cousins of Williston.
She was welcomed also by great-
grandparents Edward and Mary
Sinkewicz of Lecanto and Charles and
Helen Karsten of New Paltz, N.Y


For the RECORD


Divorces 4/23/12 to 4/29/12
Andrew S. Retter, Beverly Hills vs. Randi Ret-
ter, Beverly Hills
Marriages 4/23/12 to 4/29/12
Randal Dale Knepp, Homosassa Springs/An-
gela Michele Middleton, Homosassa Springs
Tyler Paul Montgomery, Crystal River/Linda


Lea Froce, New Castle, Pa.
Nestor Quiles, New Haven, Conn./Betsy Ivette
Ortiz, Citrus Springs
Adam Slade Ridgeway, Hernando/Sarah Jean
Natal, Crystal River
Michael Brian Torres, Ocala/Montana Lynn
Dominey, Inglis


In SERVICE


Zachary M. Durham
Air Force Airman Zachary M. Durham gradu-
ated from basic military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-week
program that included training in military discipline
and studies, Air Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Humane Society
& uil,*m idM 0%0 %


OF CITRUS CO*


Shelly


Airmen who complete basic training earn four
credits toward an associate in applied science de-
gree through the Community College of the Air
Force.
Durham earned distinction as an honor gradu-
ate.
He is the son of Sandra Durham of Ho-
mosassa. The airman is a 2011 graduate of
Lecanto High School.

FOR THE RECORD


* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in
another county, contact the clerk in that area.



Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, ac-
tive and reserves) and associ-
ate members are eligible for
MCLA membership. Call Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 or Secretary/Treasurer
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to
the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is avail-
able for funerals, flag raising
and nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and
its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or
three-piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all
eligible veterans and their fam-
ilies to visit our post and con-
sider joining our Legion family:
American Legion, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237, by
approval of its Executive
Board on Jan. 22, and by
those members present at the
Jan. 26 general membership
meeting, has changed its reg-
ular meeting time to 7 p.m. on
the fourth Tuesday monthly.
Contact the post at 352-746-
5018 for more information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed.
Visit the post for printed
schedule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at
352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of the
U.S. is eligible for membership


if said service was within
Korea, including territorial wa-
ters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the
present or if said service was
outside of Korea from June 25,
1950, to Jan. 31, 1955. For in-
formation, call Hank Butler at
352-563-2496, Neville Ander-
son at 352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thurs-
day monthly at the Inverness
Highlands Civic Center at
4375 Little Al Point Road, In-
verness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for informa-
tion about the post and
auxiliary.
Post 77 will host an Armed
Forces Day barbecue and a
flag retirement and disposal
ceremony Saturday, May 19,
at the Highlands Civic Center,
4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness.
The flag disposal ceremony
will be from noon to about 1
p.m. Bring old and worn flags
to be disposed of with honor
and dignity.
The barbecue will be grilled
black Angus beef patties, hot
dogs, homemade potato
salad, pasta salad, baked
beans, corn on the cob,
desserts, ice tea, lemonade,
soda and coffee, with serving
from 1 to 5 p.m. Cost is $6 for
adults and $4 for children
younger than 8.
Weather permitting, there
will be horseshoes, bad-
minton, bocce ball and shuffle-
board courts available. For
more information, call John at
352-697-1281, or the day of
the event call 352-726-0444.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189
Ladies Auxiliary facility on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across
from Harley-Davidson. We
meet in the small building to
the left of the main building. All
former and current post mem-
bers, as well as all interested
veterans, are cordially invited
to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at
352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way). For more information
about the 40/8, call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane, call
La President Carol Kaiserian


A16 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


Special to the Chronicle
Shelly is a very friendly Bea-
gle mix. She is 7 years old,
housebroken and fully vet-
ted. Shelly weighs about 40
pounds. She was an only pet
from an adult home. She was
always well cared for, but
due to health problems of her
previous owners she is now
in need of a new loving
home. If you feel Shelly is
just the right girl to complete
your home she would be ever
so grateful. Call Karron at
352-560-0051. Adoptions re-
quire an approved applica-
tion. For an application or to
see additional pets that are
available for adoption, visit
www.rooforonemore.net.


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5-6 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

at 352-746-1959; or visit us on
the Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially
invited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at
352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Superior Bank.
Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Meet new
friends and discuss past glo-
ries. Call Morgan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
at the post.
Call the post at 352-
447-3495 for information about
the post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are wel-
come to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: May 12, Sept.
8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at
the Embassy Suites Hotel,
1445 Lake Cook Road, Deer-
field, Ill. Group reservation
code is CGN. Call 847-945-
4500 for reservations. Ask for
the USS Long Beach reunion
rate of $99.68, which includes
all taxes on rooms. Cutoff date
is Aug. 13.
For more information, con-
tact Don Shade, 299 Kiantone
Road Lot 92, Jamestown, NY
14701-9370, or email
lbcgn9@aol.com or visit
www.usslongbeach-assoc.org.


2012


MO Y &ME

myfata', CVtest











SPORTS


Minutes
to watch the
race, hours
to watch the
hats at the
Kentucky .
Derby./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Adult recreation/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Magic can't complete home comeback


Hill's free throws in overtime give

Pacers 101-99 win and 3-1 series lead


Associated Press
ORLANDO The Indiana
Pacers have looked like a team
with enough talent to win in the
playoffs.
After wasting a big lead in
Game 4 against the Magic, the
Pacers showed they have the late-
game toughness to win as well.
George Hill hit a pair of free
throws with 2.2 seconds left in
overtime to help Indiana survive
squandering a 19-point fourth
quarter lead and beat the


Orlando Magic 101-99 on Satur-
day to take a 3-1 lead in the first-
round series.
David West scored 26 points, in-
cluding 12 in the third quarter
and four in overtime for Indiana.
Danny Granger added 21 points.
The Pacers won their third
straight game and will try to close
out the Eastern Conference se-
ries Tuesday in Indianapolis and
get out of the opening round for
the first time since 2005.
"They did a great job of coming
back," said Granger, who re-


turned to the game in the fourth
quarter after spraining his right
knee in the third. "That was a mo-
mentum win. They had a lot of
momentum going. We're lucky to
get out of here."
Indiana coach Frank Vogel
echoed that fortunate feeling, but
said he also likes being in the
spot his team is in now.
"Yeah, it's a good place to be,"
See Page B4
Orlando Magic guard Chris Duhon
and Indiana Pacers guard Darren
Collison scramble for a loose ball
during the first half of Game 4 of
a first-round NBA playoff series
Saturday in Orlando.
Associated Press


Don't mind if I do...


Associated Press
Jockey Mario Gutierrez rides I'll Have Another to victory in the 138th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs on Saturday in
Louisville, Ky. I'll Have Another made a hard charge down the final stretch to pass Bodemeister, who led from the start.

I'll Have Another sprints from behind to claim 138th Kentucky Derby


c
N s*N .-- aUi -M -.


Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. I'll Have
Another looked like just another
horse at the Kentucky Derby
Until the final furlong, that is.
That's when the chestnut colt
- sold for a paltry $11,000, rid-
den by a rookie jockey hardly
anyone knew and stuck in an
outside post blazed past
highly regarded Bodemeister
to win by 1 1/2 lengths on Sat-
urday, beating one of the deep-
est fields in years.
I'll Have Another stormed
out of post No. 19 the first
winner from there in 138 run-
nings of the Derby and bided
his time back in mid-pack while
Bodemeister set a blistering
I'll Have Another, left, passes
Bodemeister near the end of the
Kentucky Derby.


pace on a muggy, 85-degree af-
ternoon at Churchill Downs.
"He's an amazing horse. I
kept telling everybody, from
the first time I met him, I knew
he was the one. I knew he was
good," jockey Mario Gutierrez
said. "I said in an interview,
even if they allowed me to pick
from the whole rest of the field,
I would have stayed with him,
100 percent, no doubt about it"
Making his Derby debut at
25, Gutierrez got his chance to
ride I'll Have Another after
trainer Doug O'Neill and
owner J. Paul Reddam hap-
pened to see him at Santa
Anita in Southern California.
"I don't know if he won or
not, but he really looked good
in the irons to me," said Red-
dam, who owns CashCall, a
See Page B4


Simpson


emerges


on top

Golfer holds

lead heading

into final day

Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. For
someone playing so close to
his house, Webb Simpson has
been on edge all week.
The home crowd. Two
rounds with Tiger Woods. His
name atop the leaderboard at
Quail Hollow
alongside
Rory McIlroy
and so many
others late
Saturday af-
ternoon. It
has caused
him to try Webb
extra hard to Simpson
block every- on top at Wells
thing out ex- Fargo event.
cept the shot
in front of him.
So far, it has worked better
than he imagined.
Simpson broke out of a five-
way tie for the lead with a 12-
foot birdie putt on the 17th
hole, and a 3-under 69 gave
him a one-shot lead over Ryan
Moore and D.A. Points going
into the final round of the
Wells Fargo Championship.
"It seems like when guys on
this level do get nervous, it
seems like every time they
focus a little better, they just
tighten up their thoughts a lot
better," Simpson said. "Seems
See Page B4


Union

files

grievance

NFL players

union appeals

Saints' bans

Associated Press
NEW YORK The NFL
players union has challenged
Commissioner Roger Goodell's
authority to suspend players
who participated in the New
Orleans Saints' pay-for-pain
scandal and wants him re-
moved from hearing appeals.
The union filed a grievance
late Thursday, one day after
Goodell suspended four play-
ers who participated in boun-
ties from 2009-11. The
complaint says Goodell is pro-
hibited from punishing players
for any aspect of the case oc-
curring before the new collec-
tive bargaining agreement was
signed last August. It argues
that a CBA system arbitrator,
and not Goodell, has the right
to decide player punishment
under such circumstances, as
well as rule on any appeals.
In a document obtained by
See Page B4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Like the good old days


Palmer, Nicklaus,

and Player play

round together

Associated Press

THE WOODLANDS, Texas -
Arnold Palmer curled in the 25-foot
putt on the 18th hole, raised his right
hand and acknowledged the massive,
cheering gallery with a thumbs-up
sign and his trademark smile.
Jack Nicklaus gave Palmer a hard
handshake. Gary Player offered a pat
on the back, a fitting end to a memo-
rable day for the golf greats.
Nicklaus, Palmer, Player made up a
threesome in a nostalgic, 18-hole exhi-
bition round Saturday in conjunction
with the second round of the Champi-
ons Tour's Insperity Championship.
Thousands lined the fairways at the
Woodlands Country Club and several
Champions Tour players joined the
gallery to catch a rare glimpse of
golf's "Big 3" playing together.
"We enjoyed it," Nicklaus said. "We
didn't make any bogeys, we made a
few birdies and we hit a few nice
shots and had a great time. And that's
what this was all about."
Lee Trevino played in the three-
some ahead in the nine-man scram-
ble. Miller Barber, Don January,
David Graham, Gene Littler and Dave
Stockton also participated.
But most of the estimated crowd of
40,000 came to see the Big 3, who hit
the ceremonial opening tee shots to-
gether at the Masters for the first time
this year
This day was different, and even
competitive. Naturally, Nicklaus,
Palmer and Player took home the
biggest trophy, shooting 11-under par.
"We didn't make it too serious,"
Palmer said, "but we didn't want to
come in second, either."
Before the round, Trevino
lamented that he wasn't sure when
the group would get to play together
again. But Nicklaus, who said he had-
n't played in public for six or seven
years, said afterward that he was
open to the idea.
"I'd do it again," Nicklaus said. "I
just don't play golf. I actually hit the
ball pretty decently today I putted
very well, and I wouldn't have ex-
pected that."
The event seemed to be a huge suc-
cess, with young and old fans eagerly
snapping photos and lining up for au-
tographs between every hole. They
were treated not only to entertaining,
up-close banter with the players, but
also some solid golf.
The 76-year-old Player, who says he


Associated Press
Jack Nicklaus watches his tee shot on the third hole during the Greats of Golf
event Saturday in The Woodlands, Texas.


routinely shoots six or seven shots
below his age, dropped his approach
to the par-4 11th hole within two feet,
setting up one of the group's 11
birdies.
"We birdied the living daylights out
of this golf course," Player said. "The
quality of golf was like when we were
young."
Palmer tapped in the short putt be-
fore Player and Nicklaus reached the
green, and Palmer bent down and
rolled the ball down a hill to Player's
feet, drawing laughter from the
crowd.
"We've got to hit it closer, guys!"
Palmer said, as the players boarded
carts and headed for the next tee.
Just as they arrived, Trevino ripped
a drive down the middle of the 12th
fairway, drawing applause. The chatty
Trevino turned to the crowd, raised
his driver and cracked, "I may auc-


tion this off when we're finished!"
There were also reminders of the
days when the men ruled the game.
Driver in hand, Nicklaus walked up
to the tee box on the par-5 13th hole
and turned to the gallery
"How long is this hole?" Nicklaus
asked.
"Five hundred yards," someone an-
swered.
"Driver, wedge, Jack!" someone
else said.
"Ah, those were the good ol' days,"
Nicklaus said, before hitting a drive
down the right side of the fairway
Palmer, who retired from competi-
tive golf during the Champions Tour
event here in 2006, had his share of
good shots and capped the day with
the long birdie putt
"I was so happy to see him do that,"
Player said. "He got a little taste of
what he did when he was young."


Phatlum, Icher tied for lead in Brazil Cup


Funk, Lehman lead Champions

Tour event in Houston


Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO -
Thailand's Pornanong
Phatlum and France's
Karine Icher each 7-under
66 on Saturday to share the
first-round lead in the
LPGA Tour's 36-hole
Brazil Cup exhibition
event.
American Katie Futcher
was a shot behind at Itan-
hanga Golf Club, and Nor-
way's Suzann Pettersen


matched Brittany Lang and
Candie Kung at 68. Paula
Creamer and Christina
Kim shot 69.
Phatlum and Icher each
had eight birdies and a bogey
"My approach shots and
putting were very good
today," Phatlum said. "I
think I just have to play and
focus on my game," Por-
nanong said. "I just need to
have fun tomorrow."
Icher was third last week
in the Mobile Bay LPGA


Classic.
"My putting was good,"
Icher said. "At the begin-
ning, the greens were hard
to read and slow, too. I had
many opportunities at the
beginning and I just made
one birdie on No. 2 and
then par, par, par, par. I
was close to the hole, but
then I made birdies on
eight and nine. It was a
good round, a good sensa-
tion. I love that course. It's
just flat and enjoyable, so
it was cool."
Lehman, Funk share
lead in Houston
THE WOODLANDS. Texas


- Fred Funk shot a 3-under
69 on Saturday in sweltering
heat for a share of the second-
round lead with Tom Lehman
in the Champions Tour's
Insperity Championship.
Lehman followed his open-
ing 65 with a 70 to match
Funk at 9-under 135 on The
Tournament Course.
Mike Goodes and Brad
Bryant were one shot back.
Goodes had a 67, and Brad
Bryant shot a 68.
Michael Allen, going for his
third straight victory, had a 68
to join Bobby Clampett at 7
under.
Clampett shot a 67.


What it takes to


stay in the game


he Olympics are less
than three months
away Many athletes,
since they were very young,
dream of participating on
the Olympic team or win-
ning a medal. The Olympics
are the ultimate.
You must have luck, tim-
ing, lots of training and ded-
ication to obtain this
ultra-elite and now very lu-
crative goal. But avoidance
of injury and the subsequent
pain and loss of training time
is but one practice away
from injury
Because of the
necessity and
dedication to
training, almost
to the extreme,
injury and the
use of medica-
tion can follow.
Athletes try to in
obtain any edge Dr. Ron
possible for the DOCT
dream of partici- DO* i
pating and ORD
medaling in the
Olympics.
The extreme physical
wear and tear that Olympic-
caliber athletes endure can
cause a myriad of injuries
and chronic pain that can
often lead to the use of
painkillers.
Managing pain is one of
the biggest issues doctors
face when treating injured
athletes in general, but it's a
bigger issue with Olympic
athletes because these
events only occur every four
years. If an athlete is unable
to train or perform at his or
her best, the Olympic cycle is
missed. An athlete may be
too old or unable to finan-
cially dedicate another four
years to this elite training
program.
For some athletes, pain
pills are an essential part of
getting through training and
competition. For others, the
use of performance-enhanc-
ing drugs or blood doping
may be their answer to gain
the edge.
There are many legal ways
to improve your perform-
ance without the use of
drugs. One is high-altitude
training. We have just wit-
nessed a tragedy to an
Olympic athlete dying at age
26 trying to gain the edge
legally
Norway's most popular
and world renowned athlete
in swimming died in
Flagstaff, Ariz., last week,
presumably cardiac related.
He was training in Flagstaff
at over 7,000 feet, a well-
known pre-Olympic training
spot for endurance athletes
such as distance runners,
swimmers and triathletes,
due to the fact the altitude is
like "blood doping" legally
Blood doping is the act of
artificially and dramatically
increasing the amount of an
athlete's circulating red
blood cells. This is done by
the transfusion of someone
else's blood or your own
stored blood through an in-
travenous. There are drugs
like EPO (erythropoietin
factor) that stimulates your


bone marrow to make new
red cells.
Or a legal way to do this is
train at altitude where the
lower oxygen concentration
in the atmosphere will stim-
ulate red blood cell produc-
tion. The job of red blood
cells is to transport oxygen
to the athlete's muscles to
increase endurance and
heal damaged and injured
muscles and tendons. The
more red cells to carry oxy-
gen, the more oxygen car-
ried to muscles that
increase energy
production.
Two problems
exist with going
to elevations
over 5,000 feet-
altitude-related
sickness and ad-
ditional cardiac
stress. I have
Joseph spent many sum-
7R'S mers in Aspen,
OR'S Colo., at 10,000
ERS feet watching
Lance Arm-
strong and many other elite
athletes train at high alti-
tude. The problem is that
when it is too high, fatigue
and excess cardiac stress
occurs. Also, the risk of
high-altitude pulmonary
edema (water in the lungs)
is significantly increased.
Therefore, altitudes be-
tween 5,000 and 7,000 feet
are preferred. There is less
risk of altitude-related ill-
ness, but there is still the
lower oxygen content in the
atmosphere needed to stim-
ulate the production of red
blood cells.
Now, if you are a weekend
warrior athlete and not
training for the Olympics,
there are a few easier, albeit
less effective, ways.
One of which is you can
sleep in an oxygen tent. The
concept is to train low and
sleep high.
Try laying on your back
and putting your feet up on
a coffee table or bench. This
allows the pooled blood to
flow more effectively
Also, diet can help with the
number and quality of red
blood cells. Menstruating
women are frequently iron
deficient secondary to blood
loss. Iron deficiency inhibits
red cell production and less
efficiency to carry oxygen.
Make sure your iron count is
at the right level.
Believe it or not, running
too many miles will destroy
red blood cells due to direct
trauma to red cells being
pounded in the heel of the
foot
These are just a few of the
basics of how to get to the
Olympics. It all starts with
having enough red blood
cells to heal the injuries oc-
curring in training and pro-
vide sufficient oxygen to do
the massive training neces-
sary to get there.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute can be
reached at
rbjhand@cox.net
or 352-212-5359.


Recreation BRIEFS


Shuffleboarders to
meet May 10
Beverly Hills Shuffleboard
Club will meet at 3 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 10, at the Civic Center
Community Building. This will be
the last meeting for the summer;
the next meeting will be Sept. 13.
Val Pierce and Sharon
Pineda will provide the cakes.
There will be a MOM and
POP Shuffle Saturday, May 19.
The club will first meet at
Skeet's Restaurant at 9:30 a.m.
before they go shuffle. Anyone
interested in joining us for
breakfast (Dutch treat) is wel-
come, and then go shuffle to
see if they would like to join the
club.
For more information, call
352-746-0657 or 352-527-8488
'Grub, Grog & Plunder'
for Pirates
The CRHS Pirates Football
Booster Club will present a
"Grub, Grog & Plunder" benefit
dinner with seat auction and
raffle from 6 to 9 p.m. Satur-
day, May 12, at the Ho-
mosassa Riverside Resort.
This event is an evening for
adults featuring complimentary
grog, fine grub and an auction
for a plunder of treasure.
Advance tickets are $25 per
person. All proceeds will benefit
Pirates football. For tickets, call


John LaFleur at 352-302-1528.
Men's, co-ed leagues
forming now
The City of Inverness De-
partment of Parks & Recre-
ation's Men's and Co-ed Adult
Recreational Softball Leagues
are forming now for all ability
levels of players. Men play on
Tuesday and the co-ed
leagues play on Fridays.
Games are played at Whis-
pering Pines Park in Inverness;
all are welcome.
For more information, call
Shaun Miracle at 352-726-
2611, ext. 1311 or email
smiracle@inverness-fl.gov.
For more information about
other programs and classes,
call Whispering Pines Park ad-
ministration office at 352-726-
3913 or email parks@
inverness-fl.gov.
Skeet shoot, fish fry
benefits home
A skeet shoot and fish fry to
benefit the Covenant Children's
Home is planned for Saturday,
May 19, at Robinson Ranch,
19730 S.E. 127 Terrace, six
miles west of Dunnellon on
County Road 40.
Skeet shooting is from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. and lunch begins at 11
a.m. with food provided by Char-
lie's Fish House of Crystal River.
The charge for skeet shooting
is $20 for 25 shots, using per-


sonal firearms or those pro-
vided. The fish fry is $10. Veter-
ans may "skeet and eat" for $25.
All proceeds go to the home.
Tickets are available at
www.cchfl.org or call 352-489-
2565.
Rays' game trip
helps seniors
Tickets are available now for a
trip to the Tampa Bay Rays vs.
Red Sox ballgame May 16 at
Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg.
Cost is $45 and includes one
game ticket and round-trip
transportation from the Citrus
County Resource Center to
Tropicana Field.
Proceeds go to the Senior
Foundation of Citrus County
and the Home Delivered Meals
Program.
For tickets, call 352-527-5975.
Sharks to host
golf challenge
The Crystal River Sharks will
host a golf challenge Saturday,
May 19, at Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club.
Tee off will be at 8:30 a.m.
There are several choices for
sponsorship including Platinum,
Gold, Silver and Hole sponsor-
ship. Proceeds benefit Pop
Warner youth football and cheer-
leading. The event will also in-
clude raffles and prizes for first-,
second- and third-place golfers.
For more information, call


352-238-6482 or email
gina@citrusports.com.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA now
offers its Group Exercise pro-
gram at First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa, the Y's
westside venue for health and
wellness classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability and
strength classes offered at
these locations. For more infor-
mation about the YMCA Group
Exercise program, call the of-
fice at 352-637-0132. Financial
assistance is available to all
those who qualify. The YMCA
office is in Beverly Hills at 3909
N. Lecanto Highway, and is
open noon to 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for


information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This on-going
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can
improve health and fitness with-
out harming weight-bearing
joints. Research suggests that
moderate-intensity, low-impact
activity is just as effective as
high-impact activity in lowering
the risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Jazzercise at
community center
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Jazzercise at
West Citrus Community Center.


The 60-minute class includes a
warm-up, high-energy aerobic
routines, muscle toning and
cool-down stretch segment.
One-hour classes are offered
at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tues-
days and Thursdays. Unlimited
monthly ticket is $25.
Call 352-465-7007 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired
dance-fitness class, is offered
at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dunnel-
Ion Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St.


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


SPORTS


a
T,
34






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL


Athletics 4, Rays 3,
12 innings,
Oakland Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
JWeeks 2b 6 0 0 0 DJnngs If 6 0 2 0
Pnngtnss 5 1 0 0 BUptoncf 6 0 1 0
Reddckrf 6 1 2 2 C.Penalb 5 1 2 1
Cespds cf 5 00 0 Joyce rf 5 00 0
S.Smith If 2 0 0 0 Scott dh 5 0 0 0
JGomsph-lf 1 1 1 1 Zobrist2b 4 1 1 1
Kaaihu dh 6 0 1 1 Rhyms 3b 3 0 1 0
KSuzuk c 5 0 1 0 SRdrgz 3b 2 0 1 0
Barton 1b 5 1 3 0 JMolinc 3 0 0 0
Inge3b 6 0 1 0 Kppngrph 1 0 1 0
Gimenz c 0 00 0
EJhnsnss 4 1 2 1
Totals 47 49 4 Totals 44311 3
Oakland 101 100 000 001 4
T. Bay 001 110 000 000 3
E-Zobrist (3), Rhymes (1). DP-Oakland 1.
LOB-Oakland 14, Tampa Bay 10. 2B-S.Ro-
driguez (2). HR-Reddick (5), J.Gomes (5),
C.Pena (5), Zobrist (4), E.Johnson (1). S-
Gimenez, E.Johnson.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Colon 5 8 3 3 2 2
Norberto 2 0 0 0 0 2
R.Cook 2 1 0 0 0 1
FuentesW,2-0 2 1 0 0 0 1
BalfourS,7-9 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson 32-35 3 2 3 2
Howell 21-31 0 0 0 1
McGee 1 0 0 0 1 1
Badenhop 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Rodney 11-30 0 0 0 0
B.Gomes 2 0 0 0 2 1
Jo.PeraltaL,0-1 1 2 1 1 0 3
HBP-by Fuentes (Joyce), by B.Gomes
(K.Suzuki).

Orioles 8, Red Sox 2
Baltimore Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EnChvzlf 5 0 1 0 Punto3b 4 0 0 0
Hardy ss 4 1 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0
Markks rf 4 1 1 1 Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0
AdJonscf 4 1 1 2 AdGnzllb 4 1 3 0
Wieters c 4 1 1 0 Aviles ss 4 0 0 0
C.Davislb 4 2 2 0 Sweeny rf 4 1 1 1
Betemtdh 3 1 2 1 C.RossIf 4 0 1 1
MrRynl3b 4 1 2 3 Sltlmch c 4 0 1 0
Andino 2b 4 00 0 Byrd cf 3 0 0 0
Totals 36 8107 Totals 34 2 8 2
Baltimore 017 000 000 8
Boston 000 000 200 2
E-En.Chavez (1). DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-
Baltimore 3, Boston 6. 2B-Wieters (4),
Mar.Reynolds (6), Pedroia (9), Ad.Gonzalez (6),
Sweeney (13), Saltalamacchia (4). HR-
Ad.Jones (7), Mar.Reynolds (2). CS-
En.Chavez (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
HammelW4-1 62-34 2 2 1 8
O'Day 2-3 3 0 0 0 1
Patton 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Lindstrom 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 0
Boston
A.CookL,0-1 22-38 7 6 1 0
Mortensen 31-32 1 1 0 5
Atchison 3 0 0 0 1 1
WP-A.Cook. PB-Saltalamacchia.

White Sox 3, Tigers 2
Chicago Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeAzacf 4 1 2 0 AJcksn cf 5 0 2 1
AIRmrzss 3 00 0 Boeschrf 4 0 0 0
A.Dunndh 4 1 2 2 RSantg2b 0 0 0 0
Konerklb 4 1 1 1 MiCarr3b 4 0 0 0
Przynsc 4 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 40 0
Riosrf 3 00 0 DYongdh 4 0 0 0
Viciedol If 2 00 0 Avilac 4 1 1 0
FukdmIf 1 0 0 0 JhPert ss 3 1 1 0
Morel 3b 2 00 0 Worth pr 0 0 0 0
EEscor 3b 1 0 0 0 Dirks If 4 0 2 1
Bckhm 2b 3 00 0 Raburn 2b-rf 4 01 0
Totals 31 36 3 Totals 362 9 2
Chicago 000 000 102 3
Detroit 020 000 000 2
E-AI.Ramirez (2), Scherzer (1). DP-Chicago
1. LOB-Chicago 2, Detroit 8. 2B-Dirks (3),
Raburn (3). HR-A.Dunn (8), Konerko (6). SB-
De Aza (4). S-AI.Ramirez.
IP H RERBBBSO
Chicago
Floyd 7 7 2 2 0 6
N.JonesW,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0
H.Santiago H,1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
ReedS,1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Detroit
Scherzer 7 4 1 1 0 9
BenoitH,7 1 0 0 0 0 2
Valverde L,2-1 1 2 2 2 0 1

Royals 5, Yankees 1
New York Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jeterss 4 0 0 0 Dyson cf 4 1 0 1
Grndrs cf 4 0 2 0 AGordn If 5 2 4 1
ARdrgz dh 3 0 0 0 Butler dh 4 0 2 3
Cano2b 4 01 0 Hosmerlb 3 0 0 0
Teixeirib 4 0 0 0 Francrrf 3 0 1 0
Ibanez If 4 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0
Martin c 4 1 3 1 Quinter c 4 0 0 0
Wise rf 3 00 0 Getz 2b 2 1 0 0
AnJons ph 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0
ENunez3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 34 18 1 Totals 32 5 8 5
NewYork 000 000 100 1
Kansas City 200 012 00x 5
E-Jeter (2). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-New
York 8, Kansas City 10.2B-Granderson 2 (4),
Martin (2), E.Nunez (2), A.Gordon (7), Butler 2
(8). HR-Martin (3). SB-Getz (5), A.Escobar
(7). SF-Dyson.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
KurodaL,2-4 41-36 3 2 3 2
Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Eppley 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
Logan 1 1 0 0 1 0
F.Garcia 2 0 0 0 1 1
Kansas City
FPaulinoW,1l-0 6 4 0 0 2 6
Mijares 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
K.Herrera 11-31 0 0 0 1
Collins 1 1 0 0 0 1
Eppley pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP-Kuroda.

Rangers 5, Indians 2,
11 innings
Texas Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 6 0 2 1 Brantly cf 5 1 2 0
Andrusss 4 02 0 Kipnis2b 5 1 1 0
Hamltncf-lf 4 01 0 ACarerss 5 04 1
MYongIb 5 00 0 CSantnlb 4 00 0
DvMrplf 2 00 0 Hafnerdh 4 0 0 0
Gentryph-cfl 00 0 Choorf 5 01 0
N.Cruzrf 5 21 0 Duncan If 3 0 0 0
Napolic 5 1 2 0 Damonph-lf 1 00 0
Morlnddh 4 1 3 1 Hannhn3b 3 0 0 0
AIGnzlz3b 4 00 0 Marsonc 4 00 0
Beltreph 1 1 1 3
BSnydr3b 0 000


Totals 41 5125 Totals 39 2 8 1
Texas 010 100 000 03 5
Cleveland 000 000 020 00 2
DP-Texas 2, Cleveland 3. LOB-Texas 8,
Cleveland 7. 2B-Moreland (4), Brantley (7),
A.Cabrera (8). HR-Beltre (5). CS-Kinsler (4).


Texas
D.Holland
Adams BS, 1-2
OgandoW,1-0
Nathan S,7-8
Cleveland
D.Lowe
Hagadone
Pestano
J.Smith L,1-1
PB-Napoli.


IP H RERBBSO


71-35 2
2-3 1 0
2 1 0
1 1 0


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Tampa Bay 19
Baltimore 18
Toronto 16
New York 14
Boston 11



W
Washington 18
Atlanta 16
New York 14
Miami 13
Philadelp. 13


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .679 8-2
9 .667 Y2 8-2
11 .593 2Y2 6-4
13 .519 4Y2 2 4-6
15 .423 7 4Y2 5-5


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .667 5-5
11 .593 2 6-4
13 .519 4 5-5
14 .481 5 1 6-4
15 .464 5Y2 1Y2 5-5


Home Away
13-2 6-7 Cleveland
8-4 10-5 Detroit
8-7 8-4 Chicago
7-6 7-7 Kan.City
4-9 7-6 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
11 .560 - 5-5
13 .500 112 212 3-7
14 .481 2 3 3-7
17 .346 512 612 6-4
18 .280 7 8 2-8


Home Away
5-8 9-3
8-9 5-4
5-9 8-5
2-11 7-6
3-8 4-10


Texas
Oakland
Seattle
L. Angeles


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-4 12-3 6-6
W-1 8-5 8-6
W-1 9-6 5-7
W-5 6-5 7-9
L-2 5-5 8-10


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
11 .593 - 5-5
13 .500 2Y2 Y2 6-4
14 .481 3 1 7-3
15 .444 4 2 4-6
15 .444 4 2 5-5
17 .370 6 4 5-5


Home Away
8-4 8-7
8-6 5-7
9-5 4-9
6-6 6-9
6-5 6-10
6-9 4-8


L. Angeles
Arizona
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .667 5-5
14 .500 412 212 6-4
17 .393 712 512 3-7
17 .370 8 6 4-6



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .667 5-5
14 .500 412 12 5-5
14 .481 5 1 4-6
13 .480 5 1 4-6
19 .321 912 512 4-6


Home Away
8-5 10-4
6-7 8-7
3-7 8-10
7-8 3-9


Home Away
10-2 8-7
6-7 8-7
7-7 6-7
8-8 4-5
7-12 2-7


Orioles continue home woes for Red Sox


Associated Press
Baltimore Orioles third baseman Mark Reynolds can't catch a foul ball in the stands during the fifth inning Saturday
against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park in Boston.




Baltimore belts Boston 8-2


Rays fall to A's 4-3

in 12 innings

Associated Press

BOSTON Mark Reynolds hit a
three-run homer, Jason Hammel con-
tinued his strong start this season
and the Baltimore Orioles extended
Boston's recent home struggles with
an 8-2 win over the Red Sox on Sat-
urday afternoon
Adam Jones added a two-run
homer for Baltimore, which won its
fourth straight and 10th in the last 12
games.
Hammel (4-1) limited the Red Sox
to a pair of first-inning hits and held
them scoreless until he gave up two
runs in the seventh.
Adrian Gonzalez had three hits for
Boston, which lost its fourth straight
and has dropped nine of its last 10
games at Fenway Park.
A's 4, Rays 3, 12 innings
ST. PETERSBURG Oakland out-
fielder Jonny Gomes hit a go-ahead solo
home run in the top of the 12th inning to
propel the A's to a win at Tampa Bay.
Elliot Johnson, Carlos Pena and Ben
Zobrist all hit solo home runs for the Rays
in the loss.
Gomes hit his eventual game-winner
off Tampa Bay reliever Joel Peralta.

White Sox 3, Tigers 2
DETROIT-Adam Dunn hit a two-run
homer deep into the right-field seats off
Jose Valverde in the ninth inning and the
Chicago White Sox turned the tables on
Detroit, beating the Tigers.
Detroit defeated Chicago 5-4 on Friday
night when Jhonny Peralta hit a two-run
shot with one out in the ninth. There was
also one out when Dunn hit his 422-foot
drive off Valverde (2-1).
Nate Jones (1-0) got the win and Addi-
son Reed came on to strike out Austin
Jackson with runners on second and
third for the final out.

Royals 5, Yankees 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Felipe Paulino
came off the disabled list to toss six
shutout innings, Billy Butler drove in three
runs and the Kansas City Royals beat the
New York Yankees.
Paulino (1-0) retired 11 straight to start
the game and did not allow a ball out of
the infield until Raul Ibanez singled with
one out in the fifth. Paulino gave up only
four hits and walked two while striking out
six in his first start of the season.
Butler doubled in the first and again in
the fifth, each time driving in Alex Gordon,
who matched a career high with four hits.
Gordon also drove in a run with a double
in the sixth.

Rangers 5, Indians 2, 11 inns.
CLEVELAND Pinch-hitter Adrian
Beltre hit a three-run homer in the 11th in-
ning to help lift the Texas Rangers to a
win over the Cleveland Indians.
Beltre didn't start for the fourth straight
game due to a tender hamstring, but hit a
1-0 pitch from Joe Smith (1-1) over the
center-field wall for his fifth homer, snap-
ping Texas' three-game losing streak.
Alexi Ogando (1-0) pitched two score-
less innings and Joe Nathan worked the
11th for his seventh save in eight tries.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Baltimore 8, Boston 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Detroit 2
Texas 5, Cleveland 2, 11 innings
Kansas City 5, N.Y. Yankees 1
Oakland 4, Tampa Bay 3,12 innings
Toronto at L.A. Angels, late
Minnesota at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-0) at Detroit (Porcello 2-2),
1:05 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 4-0) at Cleveland (Jimenez 2-2), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tom.Hunter2-1) at Boston (Buchholz 3-1), 1:35 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 3-2) atTampa Bay (M.Moore 1-1), 1:40 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (PHughes 1-4) at Kansas City (Hochevar 2-2),
2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Williams 2-1), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 0-3) at Seattle (Noesi 1-3), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs 1
Washington 7, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 3
San Francisco 5, Milwaukee 2
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 2
Houston 8, St. Louis 2
Miami 4, San Diego 1
Atlanta at Colorado, late
Sunday's Games
Arizona (Cahill 2-2) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 1-2) at Pittsburgh (Morton 1-2), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 1-3) at Houston (Happ 2-1), 2:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 0-0),
2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 2-1) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-0), 3:10 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 3-0) at San Diego (Wieland 0-4), 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 1-1) at San Francisco (M.Cain 1-2),
4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 3-1) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-
2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnatiati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.



NATIONAL LEAGUE

Dodgers 5, Cubs 1
CHICAGO Chris Capuano threw
seven shutout innings and drove in two
runs to lead the Los Angeles Dodgers to
awin over the Chicago Cubs.
Capuano (4-0) held Chicago to three
hits and struck out seven, extending his
scoreless innings streak to 18 2-3. His
two-run double in the second gave him
his first RBIs since Aug. 24, 2007.
Cubs starter Chris Volstad (0-4) fell to
0-9 over 17 starts dating to July 10. He al-
lowed four hits and five runs over five in-
nings, walking three and striking out one.
Nationals 7, Phillies 1
WASHINGTON Gio Gonzalez al-
lowed one run over seven innings and
the Washington Nationals hit a season-
high three home runs in a victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Jayson Werth hit a three-run drive,
Chad Tracy connected with a man on and
lan Desmond had a solo shot for the Na-
tionals, who have won seven straight
over the Phillies dating to last year. By
taking the first two games of the three-
game set, first-place Washington im-
proved to 8-1 in series play this season.
Rick Ankiel had three hits in a second
consecutive game, and Tracy and Steve
Lombardozzi also had three hits apiece
for Washington.


Giants 5, Brewers 2
SAN FRANCISCO Madison Bum-
garner shut down Milwaukee for seven in-
nings and added an RBI double to win his
eighth straight home start, helping the San
Francisco Giants snap a four-game losing
streak with a victory over the Brewers.
Buster Posey and Brett Pill added RBI
hits in a three-run sixth inning against
Randy Wolf to give Bumgarner (5-1) all
the support he needed as the Giants
ended a season-worst losing streak.
The Brewers got NL MVP Ryan Braun
back in the lineup after he missed Friday's
series opener with a sore right Achilles and
he hit a solo homer in the eighth inning.
Mets 4, Diamondbacks 3
NEW YORK Johan Santana won for
the first time in 20 months, finally getting
some run support from his teammates,
and the New York Mets beat the Arizona
Diamondbacks to snap a four-game los-
ing streak.
Mike Nickeas and Andres Torres each
hit a two-run single to back Johan San-
tana, who toughed out seven innings for
his first victory since he had shoulder sur-
gery in September 2010. Daniel Murphy
went 4 for 4 for the second four-hit game
of his career.
Santana's last win came against At-
lanta on Sept. 2, 2010, before his injury
wiped out last season.
Astros 8, Cardinals 2
HOUSTON Chris Johnson hit his
first career grand slam, Bud Norris contin-
ued his dominance of the Cardinals and
the Houston Astros beat St. Louis to win
a fifth consecutive game for the first time
since late 2010.
The victory earned the Astros their sec-
ond consecutive home series win with a
game to spare. The last time the Astros
won five straight was Aug. 22-26, 2010.
Norris (2-1) limited the Cardinals to one
unearned run on three hits over six in-
nings to improve to 7-2 in 11 career starts
against them.
Pirates 3, Reds 2
PITTSBURGH Neil Walker ended a
long home run drought, James McDonald
put together another strong start and the
Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Cindnnati Reds.
Alex Presley also homered for Pitts-
burgh and Joel Hanrahan worked a per-
fect ninth for his fifth save in relief of
McDonald (2-1), who gave up one run on
six hits in 6 1-3 innings, walking two and
striking out seven.
Cincinnati's Mike Leake (0-4) remained
winless but showed improvement after a
rough opening month, allowing three runs
on four hits in seven innings. He walked
four and struck out four.
Marlins 4, Padres 1
SAN DIEGO Mark Buehrle threw a
complete-game five-hitter and pinch hitter
Greg Dobbs drove in the go-ahead run to
lift the Miami Marlins to their season-high
fifth straight victory with a win over the
San Diego Padres.
With a bullpen depleted due to overuse
recently and closer Heath Bell getting de-
moted, Miami manager Ozzie Guillen
was counting on Buehrle to pitch deep in
the game, and he delivered.
Buehrle (2-4) allowed one run and five
hits with two walks and three strikeouts in
a game that lasted 2 hours, 18 minutes
one day after the teams played a 12-in-
ning game that lasted 4:45.


NL


Dodgers 5, Cubs 1
Los Angeles Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DGordn ss 5 1 2 1 DeJess rf 4 00 0
M.Ellis2b 4 0 1 0 Mathercf 4 0 0 0
Kemp cf 3 0 0 1 SCastro ss 4 1 3 0
Ethierrf 2 1 0 0 LaHairlb 2 0 0 0
Abreu If 4 1 1 0 ASorin If 4 0 0 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 IStewrt 3b 4 0 2 1
JWrght p 0 00 0 Barney 2b 4 00 0
HrstnJr3b 4 0 0 0 Sotoc 3 00 0
Loneylb 3 1 0 0 Volstadp 1 0 0 0
Treanr c 3 1 1 1 Campn ph 1 00 0
Capuan p 2 0 1 2 LCastill p 0 0 0 0
GwynJ If 1 0 0 0 Marml p 0 00 0
DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0
Bowden p 0 00 0
Totals 31 56 5 Totals 321 5 1
Los Angeles 030 020 000 5
Chicago 000 000 001 1
E-D.Gordon (7), Volstad (1), S.Castro (8).
DP-Los Angeles 1. LOB-Los Angeles 6,
Chicago 6. 2B-D.Gordon (5), Abreu (1), Ca-
puano (1). SB-D.Gordon (12). S-Capuano.
SF-Kemp, Treanor.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
CapuanoW,4-0 7 3 0 0 2 7
Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.Wright 1 2 1 1 0 1
Chicago
Volstad L,0-4 5 4 5 5 3 1
L.Castillo 2 1 0 0 0 1
Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1
Bowden 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Marmol.

Nationals 7, Phillies 1
Philadelphia Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollinsss 4 0 1 0 Dsmndss 5 1 1 1
Polanc 3b 4 0 Lmrdzz3b 4 1 3 0
Victorncf 4 1 1 0 Harper If 4 00 0
Pence rf 4 0 2 0 Werth rf 4 22 3
Ruizc 3 0 0 1 Tracylb 4 2 3 2
Wggntnlb 3 0 0 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Mayrry If 3 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0
Galvis 2b 3 0 1 0 Ankiel cf 4 0 3 1
Worleyp 2 0 0 0 Ramosc 4 00 0
Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 3 1 1 0
Savery p 0 0 0 0 TMoore 1 b 1 0 1 0
Contrrs p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 15 1 Totals 37715 7
Philadelphia 000 100 000 1
Washington 000 041 20x 7
E-Lombardozzi (2). DP-Philadelphia 1,
Washington 1. LOB-Philadelphia 5, Washing-
ton 8.2B-Rollins (4), Victorino (3), Pence (6),
Galvis (6), Lombardozzi (3), Tracy (2), Ankiel
(6), G.Gonzalez (1). HR-Desmond (4), Werth
(3), Tracy (2). SF-Ruiz.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Worley L,2-2 6 11 5 5 2 4
Savery 1 2 2 2 0 0
Contreras 1 2 0 0 0 2
Washington
G.GonzalezW,3-1 7 4 1 1 1 7
Mattheus 2 1 0 0 0 0

Giants 5, Brewers 2
Milwaukee San Francisco
ab r h bi ab rh bi
Aokicf 5 0 0 0 Pagancf 4 01 0
RWeks 2b 4 0 1 0 Theriot 2b 4 00 0
Braun If 4 1 1 1 MeCarrrf-lf 4 1 2 0
ArRmr3b 4 1 1 0 Poseylb 4 1 2 1
Hartrf 3 0 0 0 Beltlb 0 0 0 0
AIGnzlzss 1 0 1 1 Pill If 3 1 1 1
Clzturs ss 2 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 1 0 0 0
Conrad 1b 3 0 0 0 Ariasss 4 1 1 0
MParrp 0 0 0 0 HSnchzc 4 1 2 1
Ishikawph 1 0 0 0 Gillaspi3b 4 0 0 1
Dillard p 0 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 3 0 1 1
Loe p 0 00 0 Mota p 0 00 0
Kottarsc-1b4 0 1 0 JaLopzp 0 0 0 0
Wolf p 1 0 1 0 SCasill p 0 0 0 0
Lucroyc 2 0 20
Totals 34 28 2 Totals 35510 5
Milwaukee 010 000 010 2
San Francisco 000 013 01x 5
E-Ar.Ramirez (2), Pagan (2). LOB-Milwau-
kee 9, San Francisco 6.2B-Ar.Ramirez (8), Pill
(3), H.Sanchez 2 (2), Bumgarner (1). 3B-
Me.Cabrera (3). HR-Braun (8). SB-Ale.Gon-
zalez (1). S-Hart, Wolf.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Wolf L,2-3 6 9 4 4 0 3
M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 0
Dillard 2-3 1 1 0 0 1
Loe 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,5-1 7 6 1 1 1 5
Mota H,2 2-3 1 1 1 1 1
Ja.LopezH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
S.Casilla S,5-5 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-Wolf, Bumgarner

Mets 4, D-backs 3


Arizona

Pollock cf
Overay ph
Blmqst pr
A.Hill 2b
J.Upton rf
Kubel If
Gldsch 1ib
RRorts 3b
JMcDnI ss
HBlanc c
MMntr ph-c
Corbin p
Cllmntr p
Breslw p
GParra ph
Totals
Arizona
NewYork


New York
ab r h bi


4 1 1 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
5 00 0
5 1 2 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 2

4030
3 00 0
C 1 0 0 0

0 00 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0
36 3103
010
000


ATorrs cf
Tejada ss
DWrght 3b
Hairstn If
Baxter ph-lf
DnMrp 2b
Turner lb
I.Davis lb
Niwnhs rf
Nickes c
JSantn p
Parnell p
Rottino ph
Frncsc p

Totals
020 000
400 00x


ab rh bi


LOB-Arizona 9, NewYork8.2B-Goldschmidt
(6), Jo.McDonald (4). HR-R.Roberts (2).SB-
Bloomquist (3), A.Torres (1). S-Collmenter,
J.Santana 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CorbinL,l-1 31-35 4 4 2 2
Collmenter 3 3 0 0 1 3
Breslow 12-31 0 0 0 1
NewYork
J.Santana W,1-2 7 9 3 3 1 5
Parnell H,5 1 1 0 0 0 1
F.FranciscoS,6-7 1 0 0 0 1 1


Pirates 3, Reds 2
Cincinnati Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab
Cozart ss 4 0 1 1 Tabata If-rf 3
Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 Walker 2b 4
Vottolb 3 0 2 0 McCtchcf 3
Phillips 2b 3 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 2
Bruce rf 4 1 1 0 McGehlb 3
Rolen3b 3 0 1 1 GJonesrf 3
Ludwck If 4 0 0 0 J.Cruz p 0
Mesorcc 3 1 1 0 Grillip 0
Leakep 2 0 1 0 McLothph 0
Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0
Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4
Barajs c 3
JMcDnlIp 2
Presley If 1
Totals 31 28 2 Totals 28
Cincinnati 000 000 110
Pittsburah 002 000 10x


r h bi
1 1 0
1 2 2

0 1 0
0 1 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
S0 0
S0 0
J 00





1 1
3 6 3
- 2
- 3


DP-Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 4. LOB-Cincin-
nati 5, Pittsburgh 7. 2B-Cozart (8), Votto (12),
Tabata (5). 3B-Bruce (1). HR-Walker (1),
Presley (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
LeakeL,0-4 7 4 3 3 4 4
Arredondo 1 2 0 0 2 2
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonaldW,2-1 61-36 1 1 2 7
J.CruzH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Grilli H,6 1 2 1 1 1 2
Hanrahan S,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 0


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


PGA Wells Fargo
Saturday
At Quail Hollow Club Course,
Charlotte, N.C.
Purse: $6.5 million
Yardage: 7,469, Par: 72
Third Round
Webb Simpson 65-68-69-202 -14
Ryan Moore 65-70-68 -203 -13
D.A. Points 66-68-69 203 -13
Rory Mcllroy 70-68-66 -204 -12
NickWatney 68-64-72 -204 -12
Rickie Fowler 66-72-67-- 205 -11
Stewart Cink 65-69-71 -205 -11
Geoff Ogilvy 71-70-65 -206 -10
George McNeill 70-68-68-206 -10
JohnSenden 66-68-72 -206 -10
Ben Crane 70-64-73 -207 -9
Jonas Blixt 68-73-67-208 -8
Richard H. Lee 70-69-69 -208 -8
Seung-Yul Noh 68-70-70 -208 -8
Robert Garrigus 69-72-68 -209 -7
Patrick Reed 66-74-69 -209 -7
Brian Davis 66-74-69 -209 -7
Tommy Gainey 68-72-69 -209 -7
Jason Day 70-70-69 209 -7
Jeff Overton 68-71-70 -209 -7
David Toms 74-65-70 209 -7
Martin Flores 68-70-71 -209 -7
Tom Gillis 73-68-69 -210 -6
Sean O'Hair 72-69-69 -210 -6
CamiloVillegas 71-70-69 -210 -6
James Driscoll 71-70-69-210 -6
Spencer Levin 72-68-70-210 -6
Ben Curtis 69-70-71 -210 -6
Jonathan Byrd 69-69-72-210 -6
Phil Mickelson 71-72-68-211 -5
Lee Westwood 71-72-68 211 -5
Kyle Reifers 70-72-69 -211 -5
Martin Laird 72-70-69-211 -5
J.B. Holmes 71-71-69 -211 -5
Carl Pettersson 69-72-70 211 -5
Sung Kang 71-70-70- 211 -5
Billy Mayfair 67-71-73-211 -5
Robert Karlsson 71-67-73-211 -5
Johnson Wagner 71-66-74-211 -5
Heath Slocum 69-67-75 -211 -5
Hunter Haas 68-68-75-211 -5
Kevin Stadler 68-74-70 -212 -4
Brendon de Jonge 67-73-72-212 -4
Roberto Castro 68-72-72-212 -4
John Merrick 70-68-74 -212 -4
Rocco Mediate 68-69-75-212 -4
ArjunAtwal 68-69-75 -212 -4
Will Claxton 71-72-70 -213 -3
Troy Matteson 74-69-70 -213 -3
Cameron Tringale 69-74-70-213 -3
Josh Teater 69-73-71 -213 -3
Jim Furyk 71-71-71 -213 -3
J.J. Henry 73-69-71 -213 -3
Brian Harman 67-74-72-213 -3
Ryujilmada 69-72-72-213 -3
Kevin Chappell 72-71-71 -214 -2
Brendan Steele 71-72-71 -214 -2
Dicky Pride 69-72-73-214 -2
Andres Romero 70-71-73-214 -2
Chad Campbell 72-71-72-215 -1
Ken Duke 72-71-72-215 -1
Jimmy Walker 69-73-73-215 -1
Chris Kirk 75-67-73-215 -1
BrandtJobe 72-70-73-215 -1
Sang-Moon Bae 69-69-77-215 -1
Alexandre Rocha 68-75-73-216 E
Marc Leishman 75-67-74 -216 E
Hunter Mahan 73-68-75-216 E
Gary Christian 73-70-74 -217 +1
Aaron Baddeley 69-73-75-217 +1
Gavin Coles 72-71-75-218 +2
David Hearn 70-72-76 -218 +2
Zach Johnson 70-71-77-218 +2
Harris English 70-72-77-219 +3



NHL playoff glance
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 2, Washington 2
Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washing-
ton 1
Monday April 30: Washington 3, NY Rangers
2
Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers 2, Wash-
ington 1, 30T
Saturday, May 5: Washington 3, NY Rangers
2
Monday, May 7: Washington at NY Rangers,
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 9: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Washington at NY
Rangers, TBD
New Jersey 2, Philadelphia 1
Sunday, April 29: Philadelphia 4, New Jersey
3, OT
Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia
1
Thursday, May 3: New Jersey 4, Philadelphia
3, OT
Sunday, May 6: Philadelphia at New Jersey,
7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey at Philadelphia,
7:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia at New Jer-
sey TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Phoenix 3, Nashville 1
Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT
Sunday, April 29: Phoenix 5, Nashville 3
Wednesday May 2: Nashville 2, Phoenix 0
Friday, May 4: Phoenix 1, Nashville 0
Monday, May 7: Nashville at Phoenix, 10p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: Phoenix at Nashville,
TBD
x-Friday May 11: Nashville at Phoenix, TBD
Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 0
Saturday, April 28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1
Monday, April 30: Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2
Thursday, May 3: Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2
Sunday May 6: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 3
p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9
p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: St. Louis at Los Ange-
les, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD



Kentucky Derby Finish
Saturday
1. I'll Have Another
2. Bodemeister
3. Dullahan
4. Went the Day Well
5. Creative Cause
6. Liaison
7. Union Rags
8. Rousing Sermon
9. Hansen
10. Daddy Nose Best
11. Optimizer


12. Alpha
13. El Padrino
14. Done Talking
15. Sabercat
16. Gemologist
17. Trinniberg
18. Prospective
19. Take Charge Indy
20. Daddy Long Legs
Kentucky Derby Winners
2012 I'll Have Another
2011 -Animal Kingdom
2010 Super Saver
2009 Mine That Bird
2008 Big Brown
2007 Street Sense
2006 Barbaro
2005-Giacomo
2004 Smarty Jones


SCOREBOARD


FOT 1the remco-rd


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
... CASH 3 (early)
3-3-2
CASH 3 (late)
;,/ S^ Si 4-3-3

PLAY 4 (early)
S7-4-4-3
PLAY 4 (late)
7-7-6-3

FANTASY 5
Florida Lotty 7-14-16-21-36

POWERBALL LOTTERY
9-12-20-44-59 2-13-20-26-45-53
POWER BALL XTRA
23 5



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
6 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Aaron's 312 (Taped)
12 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Aaron's 499
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Summit Racing Equipment
Southern Nationals (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
9 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Kentucky (Taped)
MLB
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Oakland Athletics at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Kansas City Royals
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres
8 p.m. (ESPN) Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Philadelphia Phillies at Washington
Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers. Eastern
Conference First-Round, game 4
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at New York Knicks. Eastern
Conference First-Round, game 4
7 p.m. (TNT) Atlanta Hawks at Boston Celtics. Eastern
Conference First-Round, game 4
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets.
Western Conference First-Round, game 4
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers.
Eastern Conference First-Round, game 4 (Same-day Tape)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Miami Heat at New York Knicks. Eastern
Conference First-Round, game 4. (Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
2 p.m. (NBC) Giro d'Italia. (Taped)
11:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of Turkey (Taped)
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Open de Espana
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Wells Fargo Championship
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Wells Fargo Championship
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Insperity Championship
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NBC) St. Louis Blues at Los Angeles Kings.
Western Conference Semifinal, game 4
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Philadelphia Flyers at New Jersey
Devils. Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 4
RUGBY
12:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Scotland
(Taped)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Oklahoma

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


- Funny Cide
-War Emblem
- Monarchos
- Fusaichi Pegasus
-Charismatic
-Real Quiet
-Silver Charm
- Grindstone
-Thunder Gulch
-Go for Gin
-Sea Hero
- Lil E.Tee
-Strike the Gold
-Unbridled
-Sunday Silence
-Winning Colors
-Alysheba
- Ferdinand
-Spend A Buck
-Swale
-Sunny's Halo
- Gato Del Sol
- Pleasant Colony
-Genuine Risk
-Spectacular Bid
- Affirmed
- Seattle Slew
- Bold Forbes
- Foolish Pleasure
-Cannonade
- Secretariat
- Riva Ridge
-Canonero II
-Dust Commander
- Majestic Prince
- Forward Pass
- Proud Clarion
- Kauai King
- Lucky Debonair
- Northern Dancer
- Chateaugay
- Decidedly
- Carry Back
-Venetian Way
-Tomy Lee
-Tim Tam
-Iron Liege
- Needles
- Swaps
- Determine
- Dark Star
- Hill Gail
-Count Turf
-Middleground
- Ponder
- Citation
-Jet Pilot
-Assault
- Hoop, Jr.
- Pensive
-Count Fleet
- Shut Out
-Whirlaway
-Gallahadion
-Johnstown
- Lawrin
-War Admiral
- Bold Venture
-Omaha
- Cavalcade
-Brokers Tip
- Burgoo King
-Twenty Grand
-Gallant Fox


-Clyde Van Dusen
- Reigh Count
-Whiskery
- Bubbling Over
- Flying Ebony
- Black Gold
- Zev
-Morvich
- Behave Yourself
- Paul Jones
- Sir Barton
- Exterminator
-Omar Khayyam
-George Smith
- Regret
- Old Rosebud
- Donerail
-Worth
- Meridan
- Donau
-Wintergreen
- Stone Street
- Pink Star
- Sir Huon
-Agile
- Elwood
-Judge Himes
-Alan-a-Dale
-His Eminence
- Lieut. Gibson
- Manuel
- Plaudit
-Typhoon II
- Ben Brush
- Halma
- Chant
- Lookout
-Azra
- Kingman
- Riley
-Spokane
- MacBeth II
- Montrose
- Ben Ali
- Joe Cotton
- Buchanan
- Leonatus
-Apollo
- Hindoo
- Fonso
- Lord Murphy
- Day Star
- Baden Baden
-Vagrant
- Aristides


NBA Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Philadelphia 2, Chicago 1
Saturday, April28: Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91
Tuesday, May 1: Philadelphia 109, Chicago 92
Friday, May 4: Philadelphia 79, Chicago 74
Sunday, May 6: Chicago at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8: Philadelphia at Chicago,
9:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: Chicago at Philadelphia,
TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Philadelphia at Chicago,


TBD
Miami 3, NewYork 0
Saturday, April 28: Miami 100, New York 67
Monday, April 30: Miami 104, New York 94
Thursday, May 3: Miami 87, New York 70
Sunday May 6: Miami at New York, 3:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: NewYorkat Miami, 7p.m.
x-Friday, May 11: Miami at New York, TBD
x-Sunday May 13: New York at Miami, TBD
Indiana 3, Orlando 1
Saturday, April 28: Orlando 81, Indiana 77
Monday April 30: Indiana 93, Orlando 78
Wednesday, May 2: Indiana 97, Orlando 74
Saturday, May 5: Indiana 101, Orlando 99, OT
Tuesday, May 8: Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m.
x-Friday, May11: Indiana at Orlando, TBD
x-Sunday May 13: Orlando at Indiana, TBD
Boston 2, Atlanta 1
Sunday April 29: Atlanta 83, Boston 74
Tuesday, May 1: Boston 87, Atlanta 80
Friday, May 4: Boston 90, Atlanta 84, OT
Sunday May 6: Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8: Boston at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: Atlanta at Boston, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Boston at Atlanta, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio 2, Utah 0
Sunday April 29: San Antonio 106, Utah 91
Wednesday May 2: San Antonio 114, Utah 83
Saturday May 5: San Antonio at Utah, 10 p.m.
Monday, May 7: SanAntonio at Utah, 8 or 9 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: Utah at San Antonio, 7
or 8:30 p.m.
x-Friday, May 11: San Antonio at Utah, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Utah at San Antonio, TBD
Oklahoma City 4, Dallas 0
Saturday, April 28: Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 98
Monday, April 30: Oklahoma City 102, Dallas 99
Thursday, May 3: Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 79
Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City 103, Dallas 97
L.A. Lakers 2, Denver 1
Sunday April 29: L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 88
Tuesday May 1: L.A. Lakers 104, Denver 100
Friday, May 4: Denver 99, L.A. Lakers 84
Sunday, May 6: L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8: Denver at L.A. Lakers,
10:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: L.A. Lakers at Denver, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Denver at L.A. Lakers, TBD
L.A. Clippers 2, Memphis 1
Sunday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 98
Wednesday, May 2: Memphis 105, L.A. Clip-
pers 98
Saturday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 87, Memphis 86
Monday, May 7: Memphis at L.A. Clippers,
10:03 p.m.
Wednesday, May 9: L.A. Clippers at Mem-
phis, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
x-Friday, May 11: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Memphis,
TBD



Astros 8, Cardinals 2


St. Louis Houston
ab r h bi
Furcal ss 3 1 1 0 Altuve 2b
Jay cf 4 1 1 0 Bogsvc rf
Hollidy If 3 0 1 1 JDMrtn If
Beltran rf 4 0 1 1 Ca.Lee lb
Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 Lowrie ss
YMolin c 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b
Descals 2b 2 0 1 0 Maxwll cf
Greene ph 1 0 0 0 JCastro c
MCrpntlb 4 0 1 0 Norrisp
JGarcip 2 0 0 0 Wrght p
Roinsn ph 1 00 0 WLopez p
JRomrp 0 0 0 0 MGnzlzph
Boggs p 0 00 0 DvCrpn p
T.Cruzph 1 00 0 Abadp
Totals 32 26 2 Totals
St. Louis 100 000 010
Houston 400 200 02x


ab r h bi
4 00 0
3 1 0 0
4 0(0 0
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 2
4 22 4
3 1 2 1
3 00 0
1 0 0 1
0 00 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0

298 6 8
2
8


E-C.Johnson (4). DP-Houston 2. LOB-St.
Louis 7, Houston 2.2B-Ca.Lee (4), Maxwell 2
(2). HR-Lowrie (4), C.Johnson (3). SB-Fur-
cal (5), Holliday (2), Bogusevic (4). CS-
Descalso (1). SF-Norris.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
J.Garcia L,2-2 6 4 6 6 4 2
J.Romero 11-32 2 2 0 1
Boggs 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
NorrisW,2-1 6 3 1 0 4 4
W.Wright 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
W.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Davi.Carpenter 1 2 1 0 0 1
Abad 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP-J.Garcia. PB-J.Castro.
Marlins 4, Padres 1


Miami San Diego
ab r h bi
Reyes ss 4 1 0 0 Denorfi rf-lf
Bonifac cf 4 0 1 0 Guzmn If
HRmrz3b 4 1 3 0 Mikolasp
Kearns If 3 1 1 0 Headly 3b
Dobbs ph-lf 1 0 1 1 Hundly c
Infante 2b 3 0 1 2 Alonso lb
Stanton rf 4 1 1 1 OHudsn 2b
GSnchz lb 3 0 2 0 Maybin cf
J.Buckec 4 0 1 0 Bartlettss
Buehrle p 3 0 0 0 Richrd p
Thayer p
Venale ph-rf
Totals 33 4114 Totals
Miami 000 100 021
San Diego 000 001 000


ab r h bi
4 00 0
0000
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 00 0
23 000
2 0000
1000
1 0 0 0
31 1 5 1
4
1


DP-Miami 1. LOB-Miami 6, San Diego 5.
2B-H.Ramirez (4), Infante (8), G.Sanchez (8),
J.Buck (4), Guzman (7), Alonso (10). HR-
Stanton (5). CS-Dobbs (1). S-Buehrle. SF-
Infante.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
BuehrleW,2-4 9 5 1 1 2 3
San Diego
RichardL,1-4 7 9 3 3 1 7
Thayer 1 1 0 0 0 0
Mikolas 1 1 1 1 1 2
Richard pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
JeterNYY 27 118 20 46 .390
Hamilton Tex 24 94 20 36 .383
OrtizBos 26 100 17 36 .360
Sweeney Bos 23 79 8 28 .354
Konerko CWS 26 97 14 34 .351
ACabrera Cle 19 81 12 27 .333
LongoriaTB 23 82 15 27 .329
CDavisBal 25 89 15 29 .326
Andino Bal 25 87 10 28 .322
BeltreTex 23 84 14 27 .321
Home Runs
Encarnacion, Toronto, 9; Granderson, New
York, 9; Hamilton, Texas, 9; ADunn, Chicago, 8;
MiCabrera, Detroit, 7; AdJones, Baltimore, 7;
Napoli, Texas, 7; Wieters, Baltimore, 7.
Runs Batted In
Hamilton, Texas, 25; Encarnacion, Toronto,
24; Swisher, New York, 23; MiCabrera, Detroit,
22; ADunn, Chicago, 22; Ortiz, Boston, 22;
Scott, Tampa Bay 21.
Pitching
Shields, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Price, Tampa Bay,
5-1; Sabathia, NewYork, 4-0; RRoss, Texas, 4-
0; Weaver, Los Angeles, 4-0; RRomero, Toronto,
4-0; Darvish, Texas, 4-0.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
Jay StL 20 74 13 30 .405
Kemp LAD 27 97 28 38 .392
DWright NYM 24 85 17 32 .376
LaHairChC 24 73 13 27 .370
SCastroChC 27 108 15 38 .352
Altuve Hou 26 104 18 36 .346
Lowrie Hou 20 77 13 26 .338
Furcal StL 27 108 21 36 .333
Bourn Atl 27 115 16 38 .330
PoseySF 24 85 13 28 .329
Home Runs
Kemp, Los Angeles, 12; Braun, Milwaukee, 8;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 8; PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 7;
Beltran, St. Louis, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 7;
LaHair, Chicago, 7.
Runs Batted In
Ethier, Los Angeles, 28; Kemp, Los Angeles,
27; Freese, St. Louis, 24; CGonzalez, Colorado,
23; Freeman, Atlanta, 21; Helton, Colorado, 20;
JDMartinez, Houston, 20.
Pitching
Lynn, St. Louis, 5-0; Bumgarner, San Fran-
cisco, 5-1; Capuano, Los Angeles, 4-0; Cishek,
Miami, 4-0; Cueto, Cincinnati, 4-0; Lohse, St.
Louis, 4-1; Lilly, Los Angeles, 3-0.


MAGIC
Continued from Page B1

he said. "We feel like we can
get a win on our home court.
It's tough to get a road win
anywhere against anyone in
the playoffs. To come in here
in a tough environment and
get two, it just speaks vol-
umes of our guys' resiliency"
Orlando had a final
chance to tie the game in the
closing seconds, but Glen
Davis' fade away jumper
bounced off the side of the
rim.
Jason Richardson led the
Magic with 25 points and
Davis added 24 points and 11
rebounds.
The Magic now head to In-
diana staring at the possibil-
ity of their second
consecutive first-round post-
season exit as they continue



NFL
Continued from Page B1

The Associated Press, the
union told the league Goodell
"released all players from
conduct engaged in prior to
execution of the CBA."
"Thus, even assuming for
the sake of argument that the
commissioner had the au-
thority to punish players for
conduct detrimental under
the alleged facts and circum-
stances of this particular sit-
uation he does not he
nevertheless would be pro-
hibited from punishing NFL
players for any aspect of the
alleged 'pay-for-
performance/bounty' con-
duct occurring before Aug. 4,
2011," the union said.
Last August, the league
agreed not to file lawsuits
against players regarding
detrimental conduct that oc-




PGA
Continued from Page B1

like when I'm more nerv-
ous, for the most part, I play
better. It's not a good thing
when we get comfortable
out there because you start
getting lazy and losing focus
on your target."
This is no time to relax.
Ten players were sepa-
rated by four shots going
into Sunday on a course
where anything can happen.
Two years ago, McIlroy
made the cut on the number,
closed with a course-record
62 and won.
This time, McIlroy goes
into the final round only two
shots behind and playing
better each day He can go
back to No. 1 in the world by
finishing seventh, although
what matters more is that



DERBY
Continued from Page B1

lending company in Ana-
heim, Calif. "I said, 'We need
to try some new blood."'
It was another chapter in
Gutierrez's unusual route to
the Derby winner's circle. He
followed in his father's foot-
steps as a jockey, getting on
quarterhorses in Veracruz,
Mexico, at 14. After a stint in
Canada, he eventually
started getting noticed on the
West Coast, especially after
winning the Santa Anita
Derby last month.
"Top trainers, top owners, of
course, they're not going to
know anything about me," he
said.
Still, Gutierrez was largely
a mystery to the record
crowd of 165,307, who didn't
know 15-1 shot I'll Have An-
other or the jockey had the
right stuff until the 20-horse
field turned for home. That's
when Gutierrez, who moved
up between horses around
the final turn, positioned his
colt not far from the rail and
set him down to run.
"I know my horse was
reaching every single step of
the way but I wasn't going to
stop riding until I was pass-


ing the wire," he said. "That
is when the horse race is
finished."
I'll Have Another over-
hauled a tiring Bodemeister
to win by 1 1/2 lengths. He
paid $32.60, $13.80 and $9. He
ran 11/4 miles in 2:01.83.
Bodemeister, trained by
three-time Derby winner Bob
Baffert, was second and re-
turned $6.20 and $5.60 as the 4-
1 favorite. Dullahan was a
neck back in third and paid
$7.20 to show.
O'Neill didn't waste any
time vowing that I'll Have
Another will go on to the
Preakness in two weeks.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

their tumble since Dwight
Howard's season-ending
back surgery late in the reg-
ular-season. Including the
regular-season, Orlando is 5-
11 without the all-star center
Only eight teams have
been able to wipe out 3-1
deficits in NBA history, the
last being Phoenix against
the Los Angeles Lakers in
2006.
"You wish just one of those
shots could've dropped be-
cause I thought our guys
worked really, really hard,"
Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
said. "We had some really,
really bad stretches in that
game, but we kept coming ...
We're down 3-1 and it's a
matter of mindset and
whether you think you're
still in the series or not"
The Pacers started the
extra period with six straight
points, including four by
West.

curred prior to signing the
new CBA. But the clause the
union cites doesn't deal with
conduct detrimental to the
league that endangered
player safety over three
seasons.
Earlier this week, Goodell
suspended linebacker
Jonathan Vilma for the 2012
season; defensive lineman
Anthony Hargrove, now with
Green Bay, for eight games;
defensive end Will Smith, for
four games; and linebacker
Scott Flujita, now with the
Cleveland Browns, for three
games.
The union said the suspen-
sions violate the league's
"duty of fairness to players,"
and that the process "vio-
lated various procedural re-
quirements of the collective
bargaining agreement, in-
cluding limits of Goodell's au-
thority over the matter and
failure to disclose sufficient
evidence of the violations."


trophy He was among seven
players who had a share of
the lead at some point dur-
ing the warm afternoon be-
fore he fell back with a
three-putt bogey on the 16th
and had to settle for a 66.
"I definitely feel like I've
left a couple out there,"
McIlroy said. "A 66 is a good
score out there, and I feel
like I've got another one of
those scores in me, and
looking forward to doing
that tomorrow."
Simpson was at 14-under
202.
Moore, penalized one
shot Friday when his ball
moved right before tapping
in a 10-inch putt, had his
first bogey-free round in 14
months and shot 68. Points,
whose lone win came with
Bill Murray as his partner
at the Pebble Beach Na-
tional Pro-Am last year, shot
a 69.


"Maryland, here we come,
baby!" he said.
They'll go to Pimlico as
one of the favorites as a re-
sult of I'll Have Another's
Derby win and his catchy
name. It has nothing to do
with alcohol; it's Reddam's
response to his wife's nightly
query of "Do you want any
more cookies?" as he
lounges on the couch.
It's an offer the portly Red-
dam rarely refuses.
I'll Have Another made
his way to the starting gate
accompanied by his stable
pony, Lava Man, another
cheap purchase turned into
a career winner of more
than $5 million by O'Neill.
The trainer has made his
name predominantly in
Southern California, al-
though he's won three
Breeders' Cup races.
One of his best horses, Ste-
viewonderboy, was the win-
ter favorite for the 2006
Derby before being sidelined
by injuries early that year
"When you tell people
you're in the horse racing
game, they ask you, 'Have
you won the Kentucky
Derby?'" O'Neill said. "Now
I can say, 'Yes, I have, 2012.'"
A hot pace was anticipated
from speedster Trinniberg,


although, surprisingly, it was
Bodemeister under jockey
Mike Smith who bolted to the
front and forced Trinniberg
to take a backseat In the late
afternoon heat, Bodemeister
set impossibly fast fractions.
He ran the opening quarter-
mile in 22.32 seconds and the
half-mile in 45.39.
"I told Mike, 'Look, if he
breaks great and feels like
running, we can win it," said
Baffert, who was hospital-
ized just five weeks ago fol-
lowing a heart attack in
Dubai. "That's the only time
I've run second where I've
been happy because he ran
his race."





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Logano takes Aaron's 312


Driver beats Kyle

Busch at finish of

Nationwide race

Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. Joey
Logano nipped Kyle Busch at the
finish line Saturday to win the Na-
tionwide Series race at Talladega
Superspeedway to give Toyota its
200th win in NASCAR.
The race was marred by a late ac-
cident that sent Eric McClure to an
Alabama hospital by helicopter, but
NASCAR officials said he was
awake and speaking to medical
personnel.
And, after the finish, Danica
Patrick intentionally wrecked Sam
Hornish Jr. on the cool down lap. It
was apparent retaliation for Hor-
nish squeezing Patrick on the last
lap; he said he had a flat tire, but
she wasn't buying the excuse from
her former IndyCar colleague.
Meanwhile, Logano was cele-
brating his sneaky victory over
Busch, his teammate in the Sprint
Cup Series.
"I haven't seen one yet that's pre-
dictable at Talladega," Logano said.
"I just got him right at the line. I
was super pumped."
The multi-car accident that col-
lected McClure brought out a 19-
minute red flag, and Busch
restarted as the leader with two
laps to go in the race. Logano went
off in third, and immediately
pulled onto the back of Busch's


Associated Press
Joey Logano poses with the trophy in victory lane after winning the
Nationwide Series' Aaron's 312 on Saturday at Talladega Superspeedway
in Talladega, Ala.


bumper.
He stayed in line and pushed
Busch around the track as the two
teamed to hold off the tandem of
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and Cole Whitt.
Stenhouse and Whitt never pulled
alongside of Busch and Logano in
an attempt to pull them apart, and
it gave Logano the chance to make
his move.
"Was hoping (Whitt and Sten-
house) would get up alongside of us
and we'd have to drag race it and
Joey would have to push me to the
checkered," Busch said. "They
couldn't quite get up alongside and
it gave the opportunity for Joey to
win."
Logano pulled out as they exited
the final turn, and nipped Busch by
.034 seconds at the finish line.


Logano said after he was nervous
he hadn't timed the move correctly
"I thought, 'Oh my God, I went too
soon,'" said Logano, who gave Toy-
ota its milestone win. The au-
tomaker has 42 wins in the Sprint
Cup Series, 67 in Nationwide and
91 in the Trucks Series.
"We were in the right position.
You have to position yourself for
the end of these things. I thought
we were in the right position there
for a while. Kyle knew it was com-
ing. I know he knew it was coming."
Because NASCAR during the off-
season banned driver-to-driver
radio communication, Stenhouse
wasn't able to make a plan with
rookie Whitt for the final restart.
"I knew I was going to push
Cole," Stenhouse said. "If I could


have talked to Cole, I could have
told him what I thought to do but it
is his first situation there."
The race was stopped after a 10-
car accident on the previous
restart. It wasn't clear how it
started, but Michael Annett ap-
peared to be turned into Brad Ke-
selowski, and cars began spinning
all over the track. McClure's darted
head-first into the inside wall of
Turn 3. The car's roof had to be cut
and peeled back for McClure to be
removed.
"Everyone is doing what they
have to do at these races," Annett
said. "Unfortunately we tore up a
bunch of race cars. Everybody is
trying to get everything they can on
those last two laps. It is just the way
this racing is."
Busch wound up second, and
said it validated what he already
knew about the last lap of a restric-
tor-plate race.
"If you're leading, being pushed,
plan on finishing second," Busch
said. "That's all there is to it."
Stenhouse, who took over the
points lead from Elliott Sadler, fin-
ished third and was followed by
Whitt.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. was fifth and
was followed by Kurt Busch, James
Buescher, Justin Allgaier, Kenny
Wallace and Sadler.
Neither Patrick or Hornish was
called before NASCAR following
their post-race skirmish.
Patrick was apparently upset
that Hornish squeezed her into the
wall on the last lap, and retaliated
after the race by intentionally run-
ning into the back of him, which
turned his car into the wall.


Clippers edge Grizzlies in NBA playoffs


Thunder finish off
sweep of defending

champ Mavericks

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Chris Paul had
24 points and 11 assists and high-fly-
ing Blake Griffin added 17 points for
the Los Angeles Clippers, who beat
the Memphis Grizzles 87-86 Saturday
only after Rudy Gay missed a jumper
just before the buzzer
The Clippers won their first home
playoff game in six seasons to take a
2-1 series lead in the Western Confer-
ence playoffs.
Paul hit a fadeaway jumper with
2:02 left for an 82-80 lead. On the next
possession he had a no-look bounce
pass to Griffin coming in off the base-
line for a monster slam.
Trailing 86-80 after two free throws
by Paul, Gay hit a 3-pointer with 12.9
seconds left, Memphis' first field goal
since 7:10. After Los Angeles missed
three of four free throws, Gay hit an-
other 3-pointer with 8.9 seconds.
Eric Bledsoe missed two more free
throws, Gay got a good look but
missed. Gay finished with 24 points.
Memphis had seemingly taken the
red-clad home crowd out of the game
in the third quarter, when it outscored
the Clippers 25-14 to take a 71-64 lead.
The Clippers' lull extended into the
fourth quarter. Marc Gasol made a
field goal with 7:10 left for a 77-71


lead, but that was Memphis' last bas-
ket until the first of Gay's two 3-point-
ers in the closing seconds.
The Clippers, who rallied from 27
down to win the opener on Sunday night
at Memphis, started this comeback with
just more than four minutes to go.
Reggie Evans made a strong inside
move against Marreese Speights to re-
bound Bledsoe's missed free throw
and score to pull L.A. to 79-77 with
4:08 left.
Thunder 103, Mavericks 97
DALLAS James Harden scored 15 of
his 29 points in the fourth quarter as Okla-
homa City rallied for a victory to sweep the
defending NBA champion Dallas Maver-
icks out of the playoffs.
The Thunder trailed by 13 points with
9:44 left before Harden scored seven in a
row, and nine in a 12-0 run over the next
3 minutes.
Oklahoma City finally took the lead, and
kept it, after Russell Westbrook stole the
ball from Dirk Nowitzki and passed to
Serge Ibaka for a two-handed slam that
made it 92-91 with 5:17 left.
Dallas is the second defending cham-
pion in five years to be swept in the first
round. After beating the Mavericks in the
2006 NBA Finals, Miami lost in four games
to Chicago the next year.
Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake
Griffin shoots as Memphis Grizzlies
forward Zach Randolph, left, and guard
Tony Allen defend during the first half
of Game 3 in their first-round NBA
playoff series Saturday in Los Angeles.
Associated Press


Gordon


snags


pole

Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. Jeff
Gordon understands winning
a pole doesn't mean very
much for the big picture.
But after opening this
season with a serious
slump, the four-time
NASCAR champion is em-
bracing all the small victo-
ries he can get.
Gordon grabbed the top
starting spot
for Sunday's
race at Tal-
ladega Su-
perspeedway
with a lap at t
191.623 mph
in his Hen-
drick Motor-
s p o r t s Jeff Gordon
Chevrolet. It was Gordon's
first pole since this race
last year, and the 71st of his
career third on the all-
time list.
And it comes at a time
when Gordon is trying to
jumpstart his season. He's
got just two top finishes
through the first nine races,
and is ranked 17th in the
Sprint Cup Series standings.
AJ Allmendinger held
down the top spot for most
of Saturday's qualifying ses-
sion in his Penske Racing
Dodge.
Sprint Cup
Aaron's 499 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 191.623.
2. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 191.111.
3. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.039.
4. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 190.981.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 190.772.
6. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.586.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 190.586.
8. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 190.476.
9. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 190.245.
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.2.
11. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.17.
12. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 190.14.
13. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 190.072.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 190.064.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 189.959.
16. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 189.959.
17. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 189.906.
18. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 189.864.
19. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 189.797.
20. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 189.785.
21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 189.691.
22. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 189.68.
23. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 189.601.
24. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 189.556.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 189.477.
26. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 189.354.
27. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 189.331.
28. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 189.182.
29. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.1.
30. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.073.
31. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 189.051.
32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 189.021.
33. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 188.984.
34. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 188.902.
35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 188.63.
36. (97) Bill Elliott, Toyota, 188.171.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 188.012.
38. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 187.625.
39. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Toyota, 186.71.
40. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 186.293.
41. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, Owner Points.
43. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 186.528.
Failed to Qualify
44. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 186.296.


Capitals even series at 2
Rangers, tying their Eastern It allowed the No. 7-
W ashingto n Conference semifinal series seeded Capitals to make 2
at two games apiece. much-needed recovery
nips NT Y 3-2 On the go-ahead goal, from what could have beer
Rangers captain Ryan Calla- a demoralizing setback:


Go to www.chronicleonline.com/subscribercontest,
or fill out the form below and mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
, to enter for your chance to win!


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Jazz Fest


marks


Cinco de


Mayo

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS The
New Orleans Jazz and
Heritage Festival served
up margaritas and other
Latin fare Saturday as it
celebrated Cinco de Mayo
with a lineup peppered
with acts such as Mexican
singer Paulina Rubio.
"There are a lot of Latin
American singers, but not
many of this caliber are
from Mexico," said Nancy
Alonzo, a Mexican-born
fan who moved to New Or-
leans five years ago. "It
means a lot to us that she's
here."
A mariachi band per-
formed in an area of the
festival grounds where
Latin American arts and
crafts such as handmade
Brazilian drums, paint-
ings and sculptures were
on display As Honduran-
born New Orleans artist
Scarlett Alamiz demon-
strated how to make a
pifiata, she talked about
how excited she was that
Rubio was at Jazz Fest.
"She's our Britney
Spears," Alamiz said.
"We're so happy she's
here."
In honor of Cinco de
Mayo, which celebrates
Mexican heritage and
pride, the festival sought
Rubio and others, includ-
ing Rumba Buena and
The Pedrito Martinez
Group. Fans also got a
taste of traditional music
by Allen Toussaint, Irma
Thomas, Roland Guerin
and John Boutte. The
day's headliners included
the Eagles, My Morning
Jacket and Ne-Yo.
A steady flow of people
filled the Fair Grounds
Race Course for the festi-
val, which runs through
Sunday An overcast sky
and cool breezes provided
reprieve from the heat
and sun.
Toussaint, wearing a col-
orful red, yellow, green and
black jacket, had the
crowds camped in front of
the Acura stage -the festi-
val's largest on their feet
Singer Theresa Andersson
joined him for a funky duet
of "Now You Know" and
Cyril Neville made an ap-
pearance with him as well
on "Old Treme."
Irma Thomas and the
Eagles would follow his
performance later in the
day
The festival also contin-
ued to give fans a taste of
the new with debut per-
formances by artists such
as New Orleans' own Tar-
riona "Tank" Ball and the
BlackStar Bangas. Earlier
Saturday, she had a sparse
group in the field fronting
Congo Square on their
feet, waving their arms,
cheering and dancing as
she performed an eclectic
show that included rap,
poetry and singing.
New Orleans residents
Susan Ranheim and her
husband, Steve Salm,
planned to spend the
weekend moving around
the festival grounds.
"Roaming is the best
way to experience Jazz
Fest," Ranheim said. "We
just stop when we find
something we like listen-
ing to."


Fascinators


Associated Press
Race goers watch Saturday as jockey Colm O'Donoghue rides Revolving through the paddock before the third
race at the 138th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. The Run for the Roses draws
them to Churchill Downs. But what race goers wear is as much a spectacle in itself.

Minutes to watch the race, hours to inspect the Derby's bhats


Associated Press

They drink bourbon for break-
fast. Mint juleps for lunch. And all
day long, spectators wear colorful,
larger-than-life hats at the Ken-
tucky Derby


The Run for the Roses draws
them to Churchill Downs. But
what race-goers wear is as much a
spectacle in itself.
Hats with flowers and feathers
and brims so wide faces are hidden.
Men get into the spirit, too, one


notable this year for his red
bowler hat, another for his check-
ered suit with a matching hat, of
course.
Here's a look at the colorful cou-
ture of the 138th Kentucky Derby
Saturday in Louisville, Ky.


Jim Leuenberger, from Shawano, Wis., wears a red
bowler hat white while walking through the paddock.


Sandy Cousins, of Fond du Lac, Wis., wears horseshoe
glasses.


Ruby, S.C., watches horses in the Tamara Sorrell, from Austin, Texas, wears a fancy hat in
the paddocks.


Today's HOROSCOPE
something you have yet to accomplish, because it could
backfire on you. Don't let your pride put you in a situation
that would cause embarrassment.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You usually operate very effi-
ciently, as long as you can handle developments as they
occur. Today, however, if you don't have your moves
planned in advance, you won't like the results.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Keep an eye open on some-
thing you share with a partner that requires some astute
handling, and which your partner is managing alone. If it's
botched, it could cost both of you money.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) When handling an important
matter, take nothing for granted, even if the other party in-
volved is a friend. If either of you gets careless, the profits
could dwindle away.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Things will not automati-
cally take care of themselves, even in arrangements where


you have a strong momentum going. If you take your foot
off the accelerator, the project will come to a halt.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Guard against inclinations
to overindulge in activities that could cause your budget to
blow a gasket. Do all you can to keep extravagant urges
under control.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Because you're easily
tempted to take gambles in order to achieve an ambitious
objective, your impatience may cause you to think unwisely.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Refrain from embellishing
information passed on to you just to make the story juicier.
If what you say turns out to be hurtful, your credibility and
reputation will suffer.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's never a good time to
count your chickens before they're hatched, so don't bank
too heavily on making a huge financial gain that may or
may not become a reality.


Amanda Lear, from
paddock area.


Birthday In the year ahead, you'll not be deprived of a
substantial amount of opportunities, some of which could
be of the long-shot variety. If you're smart, you'll restrict
your risk-taking to sure things.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Someone who is aware you
can easily be manipulated through flattery might lay it on
pretty thick in order to get something from you that he or
she knows you're apt to reject.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Usually, you're the type of
person whose word can be relied upon. Today, however,
you might tell another something is done when it isn't, just
to get him or her off your back.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Everything should work out
fine for you in situations where you rely solely on yourself.
However, the same might not be true in matters where
you're dependent on another.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be careful about taking bows for


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MAY 4
Mega Money: 4 27 29 37
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $1,841.50
3-of-4 MB 53 $304.50
3-of-4 902 $53
2-of-4 MB 1,533 $21.50
1-of-4 MB 12,942 $2.50
2-of-4 29,127 $2
Fantasy 5:2 4 7 13 30
5-of-5 4 winners $64,694.21
4-of-5 447 $93
3-of-5 12,323 $9
THURSDAY, MAY 3
Fantasy 5: 8 16 22 29 34
5-of-5 3 winners $79,833.06
4-of-5 319 $121
3-of-5 10,211 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 6,
the 127th day of 2012. There
are 239 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 6, 1937, the hy-
drogen-filled German airship
Hindenburg burned and
crashed in Lakehurst, N.J.,
killing 35 of the 97 people on
board and a Navy crewman
on the ground.
On this date:
In 1861, Confederate
President Jefferson Davis ap-
proved an act passed by the
Confederate Congress rec-
ognizing that a state of war
existed with the United
States of America.
In 1910, Britain's Edwar-
dian era came to an end
upon the death of King Ed-
ward VII; he was succeeded
by George V.
In 1954, medical student
Roger Bannister broke the
four-minute mile during a track
meet in Oxford, England, in 3
minutes, 59.4 seconds.
In 1962, in the first test of
its kind, the submerged sub-
marine USS Ethan Allen fired
a Polaris missile armed with
a nuclear warhead that deto-
nated above the Pacific
Ocean.
In 2006, Lillian Gertrud As-
plund, the last American sur-
vivor of the sinking of the
Titanic, as well as the last sur-
vivor with actual memories of
the disaster (she was 5 years
old at the time), died in
Shrewsbury, Mass., at age 99.
Ten years ago: Myan-
mar's opposition leader Aung
San Suu Kyi was freed after
19 months of house arrest.
Five years ago: Conser-
vative Nicolas Sarkozy won
the French presidency by a
comfortable margin over so-
cialist Segolene Royal.
One year ago: Brimming
with pride, President Barack
Obama met with the U.S.
commandos he'd sent after
terror mastermind Osama bin
Laden during a visit to Fort
Campbell, Ky.
Today's Birthdays: Base-
ball Hall-of-Famer Willie
Mays is 81. Rock singer Bob
Seger is 67. Singer Jimmie
Dale Gilmore is 67. Actor
Alan Dale is 65. Actor Ben
Masters is 65. Actor Gregg
Henry is 60. Former British
Prime Minister Tony Blair is
59. TV personality Tom Berg-
eron is 57. Actress Roma
Downey is 52. Rock singer
John Flansburgh (They Might
Be Giants) is 52. Actor
George Clooney is 51. Actor
Clay O'Brien is 51. Actress
Leslie Hope is 47. Actress
Adrianne Palicki is 29. Ac-


tress Gabourey Sidibe is 29.
Thought for Today: "Do
not worry if you have built
your castles in the air. They
are where they should be.
Now put the foundations
under them." Henry David
Thoreau (1817-1862).


Jackie Resillez, from Cincinnati, waits for the race.


Kimberly Scott, left, from Albany, Ga., chats with a friend
in the paddocks.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Dr. Jim

Harvey,


a man of

impact

It is sometimes the
quiet, behind-the-
scenes guys who re-
ally make things happen.
Dr James Harvey of the
College of Central Florida
is one of those guys.
After a lifetime in edu-
cation at the community
college level, Dr. Harvey
retires later this month.
Because he is quiet and
unassuming, many people
don't know him. But he
has made a lot of good
things happen in his life,
and the students of the
College of Central Florida
in Lecanto have been the
biggest beneficiaries.
So has our community.
The Citrus Hills resi-
dent transplanted to Cit-
rus County after more
than a decade in Miami
working at the community
college there. He came to
Citrus County as the
provost of the then-Cen-
tral Florida Community
College. It was during Dr.
Harvey's leadership that
the funds were secured to
expand the community
college and build the
modern campus we have
today
Dr. Harvey was later
pulled up to the main
campus in Ocala, where
he served as the vice pres-
ident of administration
and finance. For the last
six months of 2011, Dr.
Harvey served as the in-
terim president of the col-
lege while the search was
completed for the new
leader of the organization.
Once the new leader, Dr.
James Henningsen, was
selected, Dr. Harvey
began his plans to retire.
On May 22, there will be
a reception to honor Dr.
Harvey back at the
Lecanto campus, where
friends and coworkers
will get together to wish
him luck.
But before he goes off
into retirement, the resi-
dents of Citrus County
should step back and re-
flect on the good things this
professional educator has
done for our community.
He was not a controver-
sial guy He never got into
the headlines for anything
other than expanding pro-
grams and increasing stu-
dent opportunities.
People liked to work for
him. People liked to work
with him.
He doesn't have a big
ego. He always gives the
credit to members of his
staff or to the college
president
I got to know him really
well because we have
both been members of the
Chamber of Commerce
board over the past
decade or two. When Dr.
Harvey got promoted to
be second-in-command at
the main campus in Ocala,
all of his fellow chamber
directors complained
Ocala was stealing one of
our best guys. But Dr. Har-
vey said at the time he
would not abandon Citrus
County and would still be
deeply involved in county
events.
And you know what? He
did just that.
Every time Citrus
County has had a manatee
festival or a Christmas pa-
rade or some other chamber
event, you'd find Dr. Har-
vey out directing traffic or
See PageC3


Associated Press
Space shuttle Enterprise, riding on the back of the NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, flies over New York City on April 27.





We long, we linger


The space shuttle Enterprise took one last
fly over Washington late last month. New York-
ers also got a glimpse, not of puffy white trails,
but the real thing, as the shuttle headed to a
museum aboard the U.S.S. Intrepid.
But not us. We didn't get a chance to see the
shuttle's sharp outline against the blue sky
and give one last salute.
It was hard not to be annoyed, even a little
resentful. For the shuttle is ours. In a state known
for the ridiculous and the tacky, the shuttle
was a monument to our
possibilities and dreams
the serious ones.
We didn't always feel
so attached to Columbia,
Challenger, Atlantis, En-
deavour and Discovery,
as well as the prototype
Enterprise. Sometime
after the shuttle first
Mary Jo Melone flew on April 12, 1981,
FLORIDA too many of us became
blas6 about its flaming
VOICES ascents and flawless
landings.
If wonder were a switch, we fell asleep at it.
That all changed on Jan. 28,1986, when the
single fat plume of the Challenger split in two
against a cloudless sky, and seven people, even a
schoolteacher, disappeared forever The phrase
"Roger, go at throttle up," became haunted, iconic.
The shuttles flew 135 missions. They orbited
Earth 21,000 times and ventured across 542
million miles. Among the 365 astronauts was
the improbably named Sally Ride. While Chal-
lenger broke up soon after lift-off, the Columbia
disintegrated over Texas during re-entry in
February 2003.
It has always seemed to me that spaceflight
transforms astronauts not just into heroes but
almost certainly also philosophers; they are stu-
dents not just of science but also infinity. What
goes through the mind of someone who walks
in space? Perhaps the deeply religious become
atheists. Perhaps the atheists find a God. In that
blackness, a middle way would seem impossible.
Now it's over. The shuttles are confined to
the ground, at what could hardly be a worse
time. The death of the shuttle coincides with
this terrible fear we have as Americans that
we are slipping into the second rate, that we
must downsize our ambitions. That's why the
end of the shuttle program left so many
shocked, even angry It ended? That's it?
Sure, we'll be on Mars one day, but we need
a cheer now, need to see people travel in
space as easily as they might fly to Chicago.
One last glimpse, one last time over Florida,
even of the Enterprise, that never flew in
space was that really asking too much?

Mary Jo Melone, former columnist with the
Tampa Bay Times, is a writer in Tampa.


The NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft moves into place for mating underneath
the space shuttle Enterprise April 20 for transport to New York at Washington Dulles In-
ternational Airport in Sterling, Va. Space shuttle Discovery, atop a 747 carrier
jet, departs the Kennedy Space Center on April 17 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Discovery was
transported to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.


Packing up a decade of memories


When the legislative
session ended in
early March, sena-
tors were asked to pack their
Tallahassee offices and ship
personal effects back to their
district offices. This happens
every two years as senators
are moved from office to office
depending on their seniority
or standing with leadership.
This also allows for the ar-
rival of new members, as half
of the Senate is up for elec-


tion every two years.
A few senators keep a staff
member in Tallahassee year-
round. This is the case with
me and my small office on the
second floor of the Senate Of-
fice Building. As one of the
most senior members, I
should have had an office on
the fourth floor, with other
senior Republican members
who were term-limited this year
But such is the price for not
blindly following the Senate


president's wishes. A small
office among my Democrat
colleagues is a small price to
pay for my independence.
When I left the Florida
House in 2002 after six years,
I moved out all my personal
belongings. But after 10 years
in the Senate, I have accumu-
lated a voluminous collection
of items.
Where to begin?
I psyched myself up to be a
discarder, not a hoarder, so


we brought in the industrial-
size trash can. I could have
filled a few dozen recycling
bins, but having seen them
emptied into the trash bins,
we cut out the middleman.
We put together four boxes of
stuff I just couldn't part with,
and my legislative assistant
offered to host an office
"garage sale" with some of
the rest. On seeing the


Page C3


F


loridians have a right
to feel cheated at the
moment.


Paula Dockery
FLORIDA
VOICES







Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 6,2012



PINION


"Our costliest expenditure is time."
Theophrastus, quoted in Diogenes
Laertius' "Lives and Opinions of
Eminent Philosophers," 3rd century A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick............................. managing editor
J Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen m em ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CONTENTIOUSNESS & COMMUNICATION





FWS rule





now law on





King's Bay


Fish and
Wildlife Service
.ee* brass were in
town this past week to discuss
what the future looks like on
King's Bay and how implemen-
tation of the new "rule" looks.
The new rules have been im-
plemented in an effort to pro-
tect the Florida manatees. The
federal govern-
ment's regulations THE I
have stirred up
some vehement Implem
opposition from of FW
Crystal River wa-
terfront property OUR 01
owners who feel
their rights are Communi
being trampled in
the effort to protect the mana-
tees. They feel the federal gov-
ernment has overreached its
authority.
It now appears that lawsuits
will be coming from the Save
Crystal River group and possi-
bly from the city of Crystal
River, so many of the details
will be in the headlines for a
time to come.
In the meantime, the Fish
and Wildlife Service (FWS) has
begun to implement the rules.
New signs are being posted. A
10-week sports zone is being
marked in the bay And tour op-
erators are being informed of
new rules that will impact how
they do business.
In a visit with the Chronicle
editorial board, Dave Hankla
- the field supervisor from
FWS's Jacksonville office -
laid out the agency's priorities
and discussed some lessons
learned from the Crystal River
experience.
Hankla explained that pro-
tecting the endangered mana-
tee population is a chief
concern; but protecting human
safety is a higher priority.
That's why, the field supervisor
said, the agency agreed to cre-
ate the 10-week sports zone
near Buzzard Island so that
water skiing does not become
concentrated in the more nar-
row sections of the Crystal
River.
FWS has already notified the
boat owners who have an-
chored in the sports zone that
they must remove their craft or
they will be impounded. The
local FWS office has also
pledged to employ additional
enforcement officers to give
out tickets to those who are
breaking the new rules.
Tickets have already been
issued.


563-0579


S
e



c


This would be a good time for
the city of Crystal River to cre-
ate an improved mooring zone
that includes rental fees for use.
Reacting to fears of local res-
idents, Hankla said that more
rigorous rules would not sud-
denly be implemented in Crys-
tal River without following the
government's rule-making
process which
;SUE: includes public
iSUE: meetings with local
ntation citizens and gov-
S rule. ernment officials.
FWS officials
INION: did sit down with
manatee tour op-
:ation key. erators late last
month and estab-
lished some strict guidelines
about following the govern-
ment's regulations concerning
manatee interaction. King's
Bay/Crystal River is the only
place in Florida where man and
manatee are allowed to interact.
Tourist education must im-
prove and breaking the rules
will result in stiff penalties
against tour operators. Those
operators who violate the rules
three times would face a one-
year suspension from doing
business in King's Bay.
FWS is pleased that rules
and regulations put in place
over the last 20 years have had
a positive impact on the mana-
tee population. Some experts
say the manatee population
has doubled in the last two
decades and projections look
good for further improvements.
Citrus County is home to the
largest concentration of mana-
tees in America and the
human-interaction rules have
created a boom to the local
tourism economy.
The ongoing conflict with
local government and water-
front property owners is re-
grettable, but not
unpredictable. The FWS field
supervisor said that whenever
a new rule is adopted, the serv-
ice either ends up getting sued
by local residents who think
they went too far, or by envi-
ronmentalists who think they
did not go far enough.
Going forward, FWS needs to
make every effort to communi-
cate with local citizens and in-
volve them in the decision-
making process. The current
mistrust of government has
been a long time in the making.
That mistrust can be dimin-
ished through thoughtful com-
munication and decision-
making that values local opinion.


Golf course exemption
I was just reading about the water shortage in
Florida and how they're blaming the farms for using
so much water. It's funny, not one word about the
millions and millions of gallons of water being shot
up in the air in the middle of the day to develop and
keep golf courses green so an elite few can play
around in a green pasture. Have you ever driven
through The Villages, Black Diamond, Citrus Hills or
any other country club community and seen the
water being used? Which is more important -
farming or playing golf? You can't eat golf balls.


Taking a scythe to the Bill of Rights


WASHINGTON
Controversies can be won-
derfully clarified when
people follow the logic of
illogical premises to perverse
conclusions.
For example, two academics
recently wrote in the British
Journal of Medical Ethics that
"after-birth abortions" killing
newborn babies are matters of
moral indifference because new-
borns, like fetuses,
"do not have the same
moral status as actual
persons" and "the fact
that both are potential
persons is morally ir- '
relevant." So killing /
them "should be per- rl
missile in all the
cases where abortion
is, including cases Georg
where the newborn is OTH
not disabled."
This helpfully vali- VO1
dates the right-to-life
contention that the pro-abortion
argument, which already defends
third-trimester abortions, con-
tains no standard for why the
killing should be stopped by arbi-
trarily assigning moral signifi-
cance to the moment of birth.
Now comes Rep. Jim McGov-
ern, D-Mass., with a comparable
contribution to another debate,
the one concerning government
regulation of political speech.
Joined by Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi, 26 other Democrats and
one Republican, he proposes a
constitutional amendment to rad-
ically contract First Amendment
protections. His purpose is to
vastly expand government's
power i.e., the power of incum-
bent legislators to write laws
regulating, rationing or even pro-
scribing speech in elections that
determine the composition of the
legislature and the rest of the gov-
ernment. McGovern's proposal
vindicates those who say most
campaign-finance "reforms" are
incompatible with the First
Amendment.
His "People's Rights Amend-
ment" declares that the Constitu-
tion protects only the rights of


"natural persons," not such per-
sons organized in corporations,
and that Congress can impose on
corporations whatever restric-
tions Congress deems "reason-
able." His amendment says it
shall not be construed "to limit
the people's rights of freedom of
speech, freedom of the press, free
exercise of religion, freedom of
association and all such other
rights of the people, which rights
are inalienable." But
the amendment is ex-
plicitly designed to
deny such rights to
natural persons who,
exercising their First
Amendment right to
freedom of associa-
tion, come together in
corporate entities to
e Will speak in concert.
IER McGovern stresses
that his amendment
DES decrees that "all cor-
porate entities for-
profit and nonprofit alike" have
no constitutional rights. So Con-
gress and state legislatures
and local governments could
regulate to the point of proscrip-
tion political speech, or any other
speech, by the Sierra Club, the
National Rifle Association,
NARAL Pro-Choice America, or
any of the other tens of thousands
of nonprofit corporate advocacy
groups, including political par-
ties and campaign committees.
Newspapers, magazines,
broadcasting entities, online
journalism operations and
most religious institutions are
corporate entities. McGovern's
amendment would strip them of
all constitutional rights. By doing
so, the amendment would em-
power the government to do
much more than proscribe
speech. Ilya Somin of George
Mason University Law School,
writing for the Volokh Conspiracy
blog, notes that government, un-
leashed by McGovern's amend-
ment, could regulate religious
practices at most houses of wor-
ship, conduct whatever searches
it wants, reasonable or not, of cor-
porate entities, and seize corpo-


rate-owned property for what-
ever it deems public uses with-
out paying compensation. Yes,
McGovern's scythe would mow
down the Fourth and Fifth
Amendments, as well as the First.
The proposed amendment is
intended to reverse the Supreme
Court's Citizens United decision,
which affirmed the right of per-
sons to associate in corporate en-
tities for the purpose of
unrestricted collective speech in-
dependent of candidates' cam-
paigns. The court's decision was
foreshadowed when, in oral ar-
gument, the government's lawyer
insisted the government could
ban a 500-page book that con-
tained one sentence that said
"vote for" a particular candidate.
McGovern's amendment would
confer upon Congress the power
to ban publishing corporations
from producing books containing
political advocacy, when Con-
gress considers a ban reasonable
- never mind the amendment's
rhetoric about the "inalienable"
rights people enjoy until they
band together to act in corporate
entities.
A decade ago, then-Rep. Dick
Gephardt said of George Soros'
spending in support of liberal
causes: "It is not consistent with
campaign reform, but it is consis-
tent with what the Constitution
says about freedom of speech."
As the editors of National Review
note, liberals control unions and
most of academia and the media.
Yet such is their evident lack of
confidence in their powers of
persuasion they are desperate to
control the speech of others.
By proposing his amendment,
McGovern helpfully illuminates
the lengths to which some liber-
als want to go. So when next you
hear histrionic warnings about
tea party or other conservative
"extremism," try to think of any-
thing on the right comparable to
McGovern's proposed vandalism
of the Bill of Rights.
--In--
George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Dogs not rescues
I enjoyed the front-page article
on the National Greyhound
Foundation in (the April 23)
Chronicle, and I applaud the
work that Beverly Sebastian and
her group are doing. However, I
am somewhat disturbed by the
casual and repeated use of the
word "rescue" when referring to
the greyhounds that are used in
the program.
As a long-time (almost 19
years) owner of racing grey-
hounds, I wouldn't disagree that
"rescue" had some validity back
when I first became involved,
but as greyhound tracks have
closed and adoption groups have
proliferated, the supply-demand
ratio has changed dramatically,
and the vast majority of retired
greyhounds now go into adoption
programs. On a personal level, I
am involved with four groups
(three in the Tampa Bay area and
one in North Carolina), and every
one of my retired greyhounds gets
placed into its "forever home."
I note that nowhere on the
group's website is the word "res-
cue" used; as a matter of fact,
they state that candidates are
"selected from retired racing
greyhounds of high intelli-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

gence," etc. This does not sound
like a "rescue" operation to me,
and I would be interested in
finding out the sources) for the
greyhounds they use.
Dick Adler
Lecanto


Follow conscience
Diogenes can retire his
lantern; an honest man has
been found. But wait, the hon-
est man turns out to be a
woman. It was with great
amusement and delight that I
read Nancy Argenziano's reply
to Bob Hagaman's shrill scold-
ing of her for abandoning the
Republican Party.
I feel much the same as Nancy
She did not abandon the party;
the party abandoned her. I per-
sonally am no longer comfort-
able with either party, nor am I
welcomed by the current leader-
ship of either major party. I am
very comfortable with her ap-
proach to public service: Just
follow your conscience and then
do the right thing.
I am looking forward to a
lively political season. To those
who prefer to blindly follow
what currently passes for party
dogma rather than applying crit-
ical thinking to issues, I say:
Keep your blinders on, continue
to ignore the obvious, but do not
be surprised if at last you find
yourself on the losing end.
Jim Bitter
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


(
-E
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Melbourne: A taste of what was to come


After leaving Dunedin
and rounding the
southern tip of the
southern island of New
Zealand, a course was set
north-northwest toward the
world's smallest continent
-Australia the only con-
tinent that is, within itself, a
country.
In comparison to our own
country, Australia is just
slightly larger in area than
the United States, that is, the
contiguous states, absent
Alaska and Hawaii, but its
population is much smaller
than ours, with only some 22
million people as compared


to our 300 million plus. Over the ensuing years,
By virtue of discovery, by Australia gained status as a
claiming it and British domin-
taking it away ion, which
from the local meant it had its
inhabitants own govern-
the Aborigines- 1 ment, but it was
the British gained still answerable
control of Aus- to Britain.
tralia during the Finally, as re-
late 18th century. cently as March
It subse- 3,1986, Australia
quently became Fred Brannen became a fully
a penal colony, A SLICE independent na-
with the British tion, one that has
shipping folks OF LIFE thus far chosen
there for com- to remain a
mitting various felonies and member of the British com-
misdemeanors. monwealth of nations.


Their history and an
exciting one it is has
proven that these undesir-
ables have done very well
during the past two and one-
half centuries.
From New Zealand, it
would take two days at sea
to reach Australia's south-
ernmost major city, Mel-
bourne and, for the
record, Melbourne is also
the world's southernmost
city with a population of 1
million or more.
A city of such size cannot
be called "quaint," but with
its past and its architecture,
it can indeed be thought of


as charming and, to Cheryl
and me, it was.
We enjoyed touring Mel-
bourne, studying the British
influence as well as observ-
ing the obvious changes in
materials and styles used
for buildings as they have
evolved over the years.
The same as in New
Zealand, Melbourne's peo-
ple have stayed relatively
close to the coastline, but we
were able to venture out
into the countryside and to
take a journey through a
heavily wooded forest
aboard an old steam loco-
motive.


Somewhat disappointing,
on our excursion, unless you
count the "mate's" drinking
local beer, we saw very little
of the famous Australian
wildlife but, this would
come later once we reached
Sydney and headed out
back a bit further into the
outback.
Even so, Melbourne was
the appetizer.
It gave us a taste of what
was to come.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident a
Chronicle columnist


Romney represents opportunity
itt Romney will be the Republican growing the private economy creating
candidate for president Conserva- jobs in the private sector. Unlike the shel-
tives would have preferred a can- tered academics in the Obama administra-
didate drawn from their own ranks. tion, Romney knows that government
Romney was born into wealth and edu- cannot borrow more money to buy its way
cated at Ivy League schools. His health care to a better economy
plan when governor of Massachusetts is As to his health care plan: He is not the
said to come right out of the progressive first "doctor" to treat an illness and ignore
playbook and to be the forerunner of"Oba- the patient. Before Romney, the conserva-
macare." In the past Romney believed gov- tive Heritage Foundation proposed forcing
ernment had a much larger role to play in citizens to buy health insurance. So did
the lives of citizens than do conservatives. Newt Gingrich. All were focused on the
He has a talented wife and a great fam- problem of freeloaders burdening those
ily There will be no embarrass- who paid their own way Only
ing accusations of hidden later did they stop to think
affairs, messy divorces or spots about what a mandate might
on a blue dress. He has not been mean regarding expansion of
associated with terrorists, con- government powers and consti-
victed felons, racist ministers or tutional rights of citizens.
shady real estate deals. The Our president is not an evil
worst that can be said is that he man. He is just ignorant of eco-
has shifted his opinions on nomics and believes in the pro-
some issues in a fashion that gressive theory that basic
looks to be political. Dr. William Dixon human behavior can be
He is not John McCain, some OTHER changed by laws. That this has
squeaky "maverick" who boasts never been the case seems to
incessantly of being able to VOICES elude him and his administra-
"cross the aisle" and work with tion.


the opposition. Unlike McCain,who backed
away from direct attacks on Obama, Rom-
ney has shown a willingness to take on all of
Obama's programs and Obama himself. His
campaign will be well organized and hard
fought. When Democrats hit "below the
belt" as they will Romney will respond
in kind. His "super PACs" have already
demonstrated that.
The concern that a President Romney
would respond to political necessities
rather than keep his conservative cam-
paign promises are off the mark. Moderate
Republicans in Congress are under pres-
sure from voters tired of politics as usual.
Longtime Republican U.S. Sens. Orrin
Hatch of Utah and Richard Lugar of Indi-
ana are facing dedicated opposition in
their primary elections for the first time.
Voters have had enough of big government,
oppressive regulations and the welfare
state. The pressure on a President Romney
would be to become even more conservative.
Romney is the only candidate with real-
world economic experience. He knows that
our growing national debt is unsustainable
no matter how much some in both parties
might wish to continue the government
programs adding to it. He knows that the
only solution to the problems we face is


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

loading people on a boat or
doing some volunteer thing.
And just like his work at
the college, he did it in a
quiet, professional and com-
petent manner
Dr. Harvey spent a career
fighting for students. He


Obama's health care law costs trillions
and forces citizens, for the first time, to buy
a commercial product. His Environmental
Protection Agency publishes regulations at
enormous cost to the economy His finan-
cial regulators are causing businesses to
move to foreign capitals. He supports green
energy projects with federal grants that
every experienced businessman knows will
fail. His and those of his appointees is the
vision of European socialists.
There are five Supreme Court justices in
their late seventies or older. The next pres-
ident will appoint at least two new justices
to a lifetime on the court.
That thought alone should remove any
hesitation conservatives might have in fully
backing Mitt Romney for president.


William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University, New York Medical College and
the USF College ofBusiness Administra-
tion. He served in the Army as a surgeon
and as a Special Forces Officer, achieving
the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was an
assistant professor of surgery at the Uni-
versity of Georgia before entering private
practice. Dr Dixon can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


worked long hours building
our schools and helping young
people find opportunity.
And then he came home
and volunteered to make his
community a better place.
Dr James Harvey is the type
of guy who builds stronger
communities. He is the type
who has made Citrus County
a better place. If we had more
Jim Harveys, our country
wouldn't be having such a


Pinch running
I don't know much about baseball. I was
concerned what I saw at Bicentennial Park.
A young boy hit the ball and got on first
base. The coach came over to him and I
guess he thought he was going to give him
a high (five) sign. Instead he took him off
the base and put a runner in for him. I just
wondered if other coaches did that.
Keep dogs at home
To the new residents and renters in
Beverly Hills: We do have restrictions
in this area. The people ... who
leave the black and tan dogs loose;
we are tired of these animals peeing ,
and doing their business on our
yards. Keep them on your own lawns. .
We have dead grass and bushes CAL
being ruined by them peeing on
them. Please tie them up and let 563-
them do their business on your
own lawn instead of ruining other people's.
Germany was first
This is in response to the person who
asked what country first established Social
Security, in today's paper (April 25). First,
according to World Book Encyclopedia, was
Germany in the 1800s; health insurance
(in) 1833, Workers Comp (in) 1884, old-
age insurance (in) 1889. In the United
States, Wisconsin was the first state and
that was 1911.
Take down signs
I'm tired of people leaving up their yard
sale signs in town and I think that people
should be fined if they don't remove them
within two days of their yard sales. It
makes the town look messy and then they
end up blowing away.


I

(


hard time climbing out of the
rough spot we're in right now.
I didn't want him to roll
off into retirement without
knowing how much all of us
in this community really ap-
preciate him. If you want to
drop Dr. Harvey a line, you
can do so at harveyj@cf.edu.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.


No government like no government
I think we would be better in this country
with no government whatsoever than the
government we have.
Summer spikes
Gasoline prices always go up in March
because that's when they shut down the re-
fineries for maintenance and repair. They
stay up during the summer be-
JND cause people are driving more and
because the additives in the sum-
olo mer gasoline blend are more ex-
pensive than the additives in the
winter blend. They come back
down in September every year be-
cause people are driving less and
the winter blend is coming back on
ft the market in the Northern states.
When that happens this year, igno-
0579 ramuses that don't know any bet-
ter are going to give the president
credit for it and they're going to reelect him
because of it. People need to learn.
Thanks from Mr. Joe
Rick Ginsmore and Reese McDaniel: Mr. Joe
would like to say thank you very much for
helping push his car out of the intersection of
Eden (Drive) and (U.S.) 41 when it lost power.
Thank you very much. You're a credit to Cit-
rus County. Thank you, thank you, thank you.
Believe in Mulligan
April 22, Gerry Mulligan, I believe you
wrote a great article, as always. Thank you.
Voter's vow
The government has no business being in
the job of providing social services. County
commission, you raise my taxes, I vote
against all of you.


Obamacare or bust


I ust published a three-part YouTube
video series specifically directed to
the U.S. Supreme Court justices
which outlines the three-ring circus of
horrors we call the U.S. health care sys-
tem. With Big Pharma functioning as the
ring master for the past 50 years, the sys-
tem is out of control, even though the ma-
jority of U.S. health care professionals
are fine, decent people.
We all need to pray that the judges will


allow Obamacare to remain
the law of the land.
We now have a baby born
every hour addicted to
painkillers. According to the
journal of the American Med-
ical Association, these babies
suffer from respiratory prob-
lems, low birth weight and
seizures.
Baby seizures? Good grief.
And our pharmaceutically-fo-
cused physicians tell us this is
happening because they are
just more aware of mother's


Don
OTH
VOI(


pains. Is anyone advocating proper diet
and a little exercise?
Drugging pregnant women is working
out so well, damaged babies be damned,
Big Pharma may have to pull its birth
control pills off the shelves ... decisions,
decisions.
When do we start calling ourselves the
United States of pharmaceuticals?
I've mentioned in previous columns
that I am an experienced pro-se litigator,
meaning I represented myself. I've suc-
cessfully filed dozens of briefs and mo-
tions and conducted oral arguments in
circuit courts, district courts of appeals
and the Florida Supreme Court
The reason for mentioning this is the
fact that my YouTube series is styled as a
type of an online Amicus Curiae, or
Friend of the Court motion and oral ar-
gument for the Affordable Care Act. (To
view the videos, go to my website listed
below for the link to my YouTube channel.)
The nine judges who now hold the fate
of the U.S. economy in their hands must
make the constitutionally correct, honor-
able and decent decision regarding Oba-
macare. If they don't, our economy may
never fully recover.
That is not hyperbole. Read on, some of
the facts in my videos are enough to make
you weep there are tens of millions of
Americans with poor chances for proper
health care:
600,000 war veterans returning home
with PTSD and/or TBI.
Our veterans constitute 25 percent of
our homeless.
11 percent of them are women.
There are 50 million uninsuredAmericans.
There are 50 million underinsured
Americans.
Half of all Florida counties have no
dentists that accept Medicaid. So 6-, 7-
and 8-year-old children right here in Cit-
rus County go to school every day with



DOCKERY
Continued from Page C1

rummage-sale posting, a friend said he
didn't "know whether to laugh or cry,"
sorry to see me leave because of term
limits, but happy to get some good stuff at
term-limited prices.
What does one find after 10 years of
hoarding? The usual: business cards, let-
ters, notes, speeches, committee packets,
research materials, calendars, bill infor-
mation, vote sheets, delegation informa-
tion, pens and paper clips lots and lots
of paper clips. Where did all these darn
paper clips come from?
If you're a lady senator, you might also
find some personal items: lipstick, curl-
ing iron, hairbrush, toothbrush, nail pol-
ish, a guitar and, of course, pantyhose.
It was a little surprising to find auto-
graphed hats (Billy Donovan) and foot-
balls (Tim Tebow) and a baseball glove
from good friend and now Congressman
Dennis Ross that I'd forgotten I had. I
found shot glasses, an ice bucket, bottle
openers, coozies, Everglades Seasoning
and Slap Yo Momma seasoning, a
checkerboard, DVDs, CDs, VCR tapes and
several gavels.
And files, so many files. Of course, I
had to read what was in the files to make
an informed decision on their worthi-
ness. Since I'm not planning to open the
Paula Dockery Library, we decided to
throw out prior-year issues. Rachel, my
legislative assistant, claimed the public
records and ethics information. I packed
the files on high speed rail, SunRail,
USF Polytechnic, prison privatization
and water. But redistricting maps,


toothaches little kids, toothaches, what
in heaven's name are we becoming?
Health care costs will soon consume 25
percent of the entire U.S. economy
70 percent of U.S. adults and 30 percent
of our children are overweight or obese.
As a result, 50 percent of American
adults, and ever increasing numbers of
our children, are diabetic or pre-diabetic
we are now labeled by our largest
health insurance company as "The United

As soon as the boomers are
covered by Medicare, over 200
million of us will be covered
by universal health care. 38
trillion of 68 trillion of our un-
funded liabilities result from
,) that situation. And we don't
need health care reform?
.A family of four now pays
Hess $19,000 a year for health care.
MER There are 45 million low in-
come working families, with
CES 22 million kids involved.
700,000 American children
suffer the consequences of medical cost
bankruptcy every year.
Every night 30,000 of these people wind
up on the street.
Twenty-five percent of U.S. prisoners
suffer mental problems.
The World Health Organization rates
U.S. health the worst of all industrialized
nations, and the most expensive while al-
lowing $1.5 trillion a year to be stolen
from the system.
And still the proponents of bumper-
sticker health care fixes say proper
health care reform is a socialist plot. I
call them the QEDS (pronounced kids) -
the Quick, Easy, Dumb, Short-Term gang.
Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, Eisen-
hower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford,
Carter, Clinton and Obama all pleaded
with Congress for health care reform.
What say you?
HHS, CMS and the GAO tell us Oba-
macare has done a great job in just the first
two years, recovering some of the $1.5 tril-
lion stolen from the system each year. If
Obamacare is defeated, that will probably
be our last hope for health care reform for
another 10 to 15 years. Remember Hillary
Care? Our economy can't handle that.
Tell you what, in addition to praying for
Obamacare, if you know a way, try to get
my video URLs to the Supreme Court jus-
tices because those are the nine individ-
uals who need to see them.
History rarely provides the opportunity
for so few to help so many


Don Hess, a Crystal River resident
with 48 years experience in health
insurance, is a civic activist, National
Guard veteran, pilot, farmer, investor
and ex-professional pool player His
website, ThinkWeCan.com, provides
links to exhibits, citations and research
supporting his columns and videos.


budget spreadsheets and gambling prop-
aganda were disposed of with great
flourish.
Up until now, there was nothing emo-
tional about the task. Then we found the
bowling scores that reminded me of the
camaraderie I enjoyed with my fellow
senators, representatives, aides and lob-
byists. After taking a picture of this me-
mento and posting it to my Facebook
page, it was back to work.
Next we found thank-you notes, letters,
newspaper clippings, awards, plaques
and photos. We found the poster of my
dearly departed golden retriever,
Charley, in his successful campaign for
Caucus Canine. Now it was getting nos-
talgic. We packed these without further
examination, to be sorted in private,
where the memories could soak in.
All that remained were items for the of-
fice garage sale: TV refrigerator, mi-
crowave, vases, books, clocks, lamps, floor
plants and, of course, the artwork, which
will be the last of the personal items to
leave 224 SOB.
On the way to the parking garage, a
Senate staffer looked at our box-filled
trolley, then at me, and said, "This must
be bittersweet for you."
While driving home to Lakeland, I
thought, in November when my 16 years
in the Legislature come to an official
end, I get to do this again on a much
larger scale. That truly will be bitter-
sweet.


Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland who
is chronicling her final year in the
Florida Senate. She can be reached
at pdockery@florida voices, com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Endorsement
LETTER

Kitchen has a plan
On Saturday, April 21, I
spent a very informative
20 minutes with Ron
Kitchen at his booth in
Howard's Flea Market
regarding his candidacy
for county commissioner.
Among the number of
subjects we discussed
was his disclosure that
the county was consider-
ing a raise in property
taxes. We also discussed
his personal plan to re-
duce the county deficit
without raising taxes or
cutting services, and just
for laughs, to give me his
opinion regarding the
prattle printed on the
Chronicle blog site
where he is belittled for
even being at Howard's
Flea Market. We got a
good laugh on that sub-
ject and it was at that
point I looked around
and inquired, "By the
way, where are the
booths of the other peo-
ple in the race?"
Ron Kitchen has a
plan, a plan that in-
cludes all of the voters
in Citrus County, and if
you want to get a good
one-on-one perspective
of his plan, call him or
visit him at Howard's
Flea Market.


Larry Coughenour
Homosassa


Tired of misinformation
I get so tired of reading the same
misinformation in "letters." The latest
is Mr. Cooper, who, in spite of all we
read, insists that the president controls
gas prices. The reserves that he wants
us to use are not the Federal Reserves,
they are the Strategic Reserves and
there is nothing other than his objec-
tion to higher prices that warrant the
depletion of those reserves.
How many times do people have to
be reminded that the oil companies
are either foreign owned or multina-
tional? They control oil and gas
prices and they've been making the
highest profit in their history in re-
cent years. He doesn't comment on
the bill submitted by Democrats, in
the House, requiring the Keystone
Pipeline to be built with American
steel, American labor, and that all of
the oil piped through be sold here. It
was defeated by the Republican ma-
jority The pipeline, if built, is not
only going to refineries in the Gulf,
it's going to ports. He apparently
doesn't remember the $4 a gallon gas
in Bush's term. Unemployment is
high, but going down. The economy is
improving, though the rate is slower
than everyone would like.
Then we have Mr. Hagaman, who
blames the president for the Wall
Street bailout which began under
Bush. He complains that stocks and
bond holders lost money because of
the auto bailout, when tens of thou-
sands of jobs were saved and the
auto industry recovery saved an
American icon. His comments about
the president's reading from
teleprompters are too petty to com-
ment on, especially when the previ-
ous president couldn't string two
sentences together without grammat-


SCoun t
2012 VopW- ca ntes a

Bah, howep
00OZ May 14th
S'at the Citrus County Auditorium "
'.\ Expecting a baby?
Come to our
.. Baby Shower! '
Learn about taking care of \
yourself and your baby.
Parents of infants under
C) 6 months old are also invited.
There will be exhibits, games,
) a scavenger hunt, gifts for moms,
ads, babies and lots of door prizes!
<^ a Chrho(no n4So Cn.


Call 228-9047 for information

5th J.,nnual

athletete of the Tear

Sports -Swards 'Banquel

Thursday May 17th
Reception 5:00pm 6:00pm
Awards Ceremony 6:00pm 8:00 PM
College of Central Florida Citrus Campus
COLLEGE E o/ ,
CENTRAL
FLORIDA Su_ JM cwm






Citrus County
Health Department


Tickets are $20 and are available at
The Citrus County Chronicle offices
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call: 352-563-6363


Letters to THE EDITOR
ical errors. As far as "forcing" the De-
mocrats to pass the Affordable
Health Care Act, when is the last
time the Republicans didn't vote as a
bloc? Follow Mr. Nugent's and Sen.
Rubio's voting records in "How Your
Lawmakers Voted."
Everything we read from these
gentlemen is opinion, not fact.
Tom Geronimo
Crystal River

Enjoyed serving
The Homosassa Special water Dis-
trict (HSWD) is a special district created
by the Florida Legislature in 1959 at the
request of the citizens in Homosassa.
The HSWD was formed to provide a
public potable water supply, distribu-
tion system and fire protection to the
residents of the area, essentially the
Homosassa Springs, Riverhaven and
Old Homosassa area.
The HSWD has made many changes
since its inception. Over the past 19
years our customer base has increased
by 27 percent We were the first water
provider in Citrus County to use con-
servation rates. As a result, we have
increased water sold by only 6 per-
cent over the same period of time.
We have an excellent well field on
Grover Cleveland Boulevard and have
increased our water storage capacity
from 100,000 gallons to 1,250,000. We
have added service to new areas within
our district boundaries and have up-
graded our infrastructure. We have a
wellhead protection program to ensure
a continuing safe water supply The
HSWD has added emergency backup
power and valves to allow our million-
gallon storage tank to fill from all four
of our wells and to gravity feed the
entire system, during any emergency

T 0,, .J Sunday Mc
7"NiV"


Adoptathon

Crystal River Mall, Crystal River
May 5th 10am to 2pm
May 6th 12pm to 3pm
Sponsored by Precious Paws Rescue
In conjunction with North Shore Animal
League's World-Wide Adoptathon.
",i shelters around the world will join It ,-ilit-i
for the Pet Adoption Month of May!
Rescue groups with cats and dogs for adoption will
be there along with educational materials and
people to answer questions on training,
grooming and pet care.
Can't adopt but love pets? Stop by and see
how you might help any one of the groups.


For more information call
V Precious Paws Rescue at:
352-726-4700
WMOCn-ca



419


Sound OFF


We consolidated our buildings into
one major location on Grover Cleve-
land Boulevard (purchasing and re-
habbing the old Mosquito Control
facility) to ensure we can function
during an emergency We have a leak
detection program and have purchased
equipment to identify and repair
leaks. All of these changes have been
done with the same 10 employees.
In 1993, I was elected as a commis-
sioner for the Homosassa Special
Water District. It has been a privilege
to serve on the board. I will not be
running for election this year. I have
thoroughly enjoyed the experience
and have enjoyed working with our
great staff and fellow commissioners.
The HSWD was formed at the re-
quest of the people of Homosassa
and I believe the district has served
the citizens well. The district has five
commissioners; three of those will be
up for election this year.
It has been my privilege to serve on
the board. I loved the job. Thank you!
Diann Griffin Schultz
Homosassa

Stand up for retirees
The government's near-zero inter-
est rate policy has punished savers
and retires, without producing a
strong recovery
Retired people are suffering when
their life savings cannot produce the
interest income they expected. It is
time we stand up and make our prob-
lems and concerns addressed. It is
not fair to reward the no-savers at
the expense of those who saved for
their future.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


tI

/*1
4







e


4


Obama not at fault
In response to "Angry
with taxes," in Sound Off
of April 26, the person
referenced, "We have
been retired living here
and our taxes were
$11,369 this year." Ac-
cording to the IRS tax
table, this tax pertains to
taxable income between
$76,450 to $76,550
when filing a joint return.
In 2008 their taxes
would have been
$11,806 for the same
taxable income range. So
that would have been a
tax reduction of $437.
They seem to blame
President Obama for
everything that goes
wrong in the country. I'm
not envious of them,
only concerned about
their implications.
Ban the ads
All political ads should
be banned.
Thanks for help
I want to thank the
person who turned in my
bag to Publix Supermar-
ket's office on Wednes-
day, April 18. You'll never
know how much I appre-
ciate it. God bless.
Call for cribbage
For those of you look-
ing for a cribbage group:
Please call 352-249-
7033 and ask for Bob.


Sunday May 6th
Precious Paws Rescue Pet Adoptathon
Citrus Jazz Society Open Jazz Session

Wednesday May 9th
Card & Game Party

Thursday May 10th
United Way Kick Off

Friday May 11th
Spring Fling Dinner Dance
ACT: Moon over Buffalo 5/11 5/27

Saturday May 12th
Wine Festival in Crystal River
Appraisal Fair
Stamp Out Hunger

Monday May 14th
World's Greatest Baby Shower
Golden Citrus Scholar Awards

Wednesday May 16th
Senior Foundation Rays vs Red Sox

Thursday May 17th
Sports Awards Banquet
Concert Spring Finale at Old Courthouse
Historical Society Deux Oh

Friday May 18th
Beverly Hills Farmers Market

Sunday May 19th
Sheriff's All Hazard Expo
Beauties & Beast Car Show

Saturday & Sunday May 19th-20th
Halleujah Girl Drama Production
A Garden Tour with Historical Overtones

Friday June 1st
Beverly Hills Farmers Market

Saturday June 2nd
Movies in The Park: Happy Feet 2
Boat Drawing


NII I/
Saturday, May 12, 2012 2:00 6:00 PM
Citrus Avenue Crystal River, Florida
For More Information Call: 352-794-3834 or 727-588-9463
$35.... 00. In Advanc 40.00 t Gat
SPQNt OR S ti


178
SPONSORED



The ch e is committedio supporting iocal businesses
aiad boanizations tiafpniovide' all types 'ofiservs
'fuiraisers. and ertertainimentfthr0ou OutoUr crmu-.
niy TheCoitd e is coiifedto help u grmae Citrus
WOuWnty .,be..ace.,iiv a.^ wor. D.'.rhesiti.e t o
contact The .Chroeitce for.Fl :of >g.ur pOnoshipiiie'ds!


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Expensive pensions


States scaling

back worker

retirement

plans to save

money
MELINDA DESLATTE
Associated Press

BATON ROUGE, La. -
Neil Carpenter took a pay
cut when he accepted a job
as a Louisiana state ac-
countant more than 12
years ago, but he figured he
would make up for the loss
with a retirement check
that would guarantee long-
term financial security for
him and his family
Now the 41-year-old
finds his life plan teetering
as Republican Gov. Bobby
Jindal seeks to restructure
the pension system for
rank-and-file workers, po-
tentially requiring higher
employee contributions
and delaying the retire-
ment plans of employees
like Carpenter
"Do you really want to
breach a contract with the
employees who have com-
mitted a long part of their
lives to the state of
Louisiana?" Carpenter
asked state lawmakers
recently
For years, state govern-
ments lured workers with
the promise of lucrative
pensions that provide
nearly the pay that employ-
ees earned on the job. But
after years of budget
crunches, nearly every
state has revamped public
retirement benefits in an
effort to shrink the long-
term obligations that are
billions of dollars short of
what is needed to cover
benefits.
The moves have trig-
gered a legal and political
battle over whether states
are reneging on their
promises to millions of
public-sector workers.
The National Conference
of State Legislatures re-
ports that since 2009, 43
states have boosted the slice
of money workers must pay
toward their own retire-
ment, changed the age
when a retiree can get ben-
efits or modified their pen-
sion plans in other ways.
"In most cases, the
changes affect only people
hired after the legislation
was passed. In a few plans,
the changes apply to non-
vested members as well,"
said Ron Snell, a public
employee pension expert
with the National Confer-
ence of State Legislatures.
Governors as ideologi-
cally apart as the conserva-
tive Jindal and California
Democrat Jerry Brown are
facing intense opposition
from labor groups, workers
and even members of their
own parties as they try to
change pension rules. And


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana addresses activists from America's political right Feb. 11 at the Conserva-
tive Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Governors from the conservative Jindal to California Democrat
Jerry Brown face intense opposition from labor groups, workers and even traditional political allies as they try to change
pension rules.


California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks with reporters Feb. 26
during the National Governors Association winter meeting
in Washington.


some battles have shifted
to the courts, because most
states have some sort of
legal protection for public
pensions.
Florida lawmakers last
year passed a law requiring
state workers to start pay-
ing 3 percent of their salary
toward their pensions.
Unions representing state
workers challenged the law
and won in a lower court.
The lawsuit awaits a state
Supreme Court decision.
Arizona legislators also
backed a 3-percentage-
point increase in retire-
ment contributions for
public employees, but
they're working on revers-
ing that increase after it
was successfully chal-
lenged in court.
A New Hampshire judge
ruled that recent pension
changes in that state ille-
gally raised contribution
rates for workers vested in
the state retirement
system.
Few states have moved to
raise the retirement age or


change existing service re-
quirements for current
workers, as Jindal pro-
posed. But most are grap-
pling with the issue in
some way:
In New York, lawmak-
ers voted to require new
public-sector employees to
pay more toward their re-
tirement and to wait longer
to get benefits. Public em-
ployee unions had strongly
opposed Democratic Gov.
Andrew Cuomo's efforts to
cut benefits for future
workers.
In Illinois, Democratic
Gov. Pat Quinn proposed
raising the retirement age
for public employees, re-
quiring them to pay more
toward their pensions and
making school districts and
colleges share in the costs.
He said employees should
not be allowed to retire
with full benefits until age
67. Unions rejected the
proposal as irresponsible
and unconstitutional.
Washington lawmakers
reduced benefits for future


state workers who take early
retirement Those who re-
tire before age 62 are al-
ready penalized with lower
pension benefits. Now,
workers hired in May 2013
will face a 50 percent reduc-
tion if they retire at age 55 -
a move expected to save $1.3
billion over 25 years.
One of the biggest battles
is being waged in
Louisiana, where pension
programs are more than $18
billion short of the funding
they'll need to pay for prom-
ised benefits. The governor
says the shortfall threatens
funding for critical state
services as well as the
state's overall ability to pro-
vide pensions to workers.
"What we're doing today
is not sustainable. Part of
the reason we're in this
hole is for too many years,
politicians made promises
without paying for those
promises," Jindal said.
Jindal wants to raise the
contribution rate for cur-
rent state workers and pub-
lic college employees from
8 percent to 11 percent of
their pay He also wants to
push the retirement age
from as early as 55 for cur-
rent workers to as late as
age 67, depending on how
many years they've been in
the system and their age.
He's seeking to create a
cheaper 401(k)-style of pen-
sion plan for new hires.
The proposals would af-
fect the retirement plans of
50,000 current state em-
ployees, including workers
at public colleges.
The ideas have faced re-
sistance so far from law-
makers, and constitutional
questions about diminish-
ing benefits already prom-
ised to employees.
Opponents, including lead-


ers of the state employee
retirement system, call the
proposals illegal, saying
they break agreements
made with employees
when they were hired.
"People entered into
state government with a
state contract provided for
specifically in the Constitu-
tion," said Roy Mongrue,
general counsel for the
Teachers' Retirement Sys-
tem of Louisiana and a for-
mer assistant attorney
general.
Secretary of State Tom
Schedler said the gover-
nor's retirement proposals
threaten to drive off some
of his most qualified elec-
tion workers.
"I'd leave too, quite
frankly, but it's a very scary
position for me," said
Schedler, a Republican.
Jindal is opposing at-
tempts to make the bills
apply only to future hires.
In California, Jerry
Brown faces an even larger
unfunded liability for the
state's two retirement sys-
tems $150 billion.
Brown wants to increase
the retirement age for fu-
ture workers, require cur-
rent and new local and
state government employ-
ees to pay more, increase
the years a new employee
must work to qualify for re-
tiree health benefits, and
place new workers into a
hybrid plan that includes
401(k)-style accounts.
Republicans say Brown's
plan doesn't go far enough
but have generally em-
braced his proposal. "We
believe it's a good start,"
said Senate Minority
Leader Bob Huff, a Repub-
lican. "It's certainly rare
that you see us agreeing
See Page D4


What's your real name, part two


he April 1 Ask
SCORE column
discussed the legal
necessity of providing
the state of Florida with
the real names of owners
or officer/shareholders
of firms doing business
in Florida. Probably the
most significant driver of
this legislation is the
state's responsibility to
protect its' citizens from
harm that may be caused
by a Florida business.


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
ASK SCORE


Registration and renewal: Reg-
istration under the Fictitious Name
Act is valid for a five-year period
and must be renewed prior to Dec.
31 of the last year of the five-year
period.
Registration renewals must take
place between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31 of
that fifth year
The Florida Department of Cor-


portions mails a re-
newal form to existing
businesses under the act.
Failure to receive the
renewal document does
not relieve owners of
complying nor does it
provide an extension or
exemption.
If the renewal docu-
ment is not received by
Dec. 31 of the last year of
current registration, the
fictitious name registra-
tion expires.


That event can trigger serious
legal ramifications.
Failure to register or renew: If
an individual/corporation does
business in Florida and does not
register or fails to renew the ficti-
tious name, unwelcome conse-
quences may occur
Non-compliance is serious in that
certain criminal misdemeanor


penalties can apply An owner may
be prevented from maintaining a
law suit and held liable for attorney
fees and court costs if the owner
cannot be located under the ficti-
tious name.
Exemptions: There are basi-
cally four exemptions to registra-
tion under the act. They are as
follows:
1. Licensed attorneys forming a
business to practice law in Florida.
2. Applicants registered with the
Department of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation or the Depart-
ment of Health and their respective
licensing boards have not imposed
registration under the act
3. The applicant is a corporation,
limited liability company or part-
nership filed and in good standing
with the Division of Corporations
and is not transacting business
under any other name.
4. The applicant is a federally


chartered corporation and is not
transacting business under any
other name.
More information: Call: 850-
245-6058 or write to the Florida De-
partment of State, Division of
Corporations, PO. Box 1300, Talla-
hassee, FL 32302 or go to www.sun-
biz.org
Starting a new business? At-
tempting to improve or expand an
existing business? SCORE stands
for "The Life Of Your Business" Let
our business mentors help you suc-
ceed. Call 352-249-1236.
Office hours are: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday to Thursday If you call
during non-business hours, provide
information so we can call you back.

Dr. FrederickJ. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County SCORE.
He can be reached via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


If it



ain't



broke

EAR BRUCE:
When we retired
12 years ago in
Florida, we went to the
local bank to deposit some
cash we had at that time.
While there, we were
introduced to a senior
vice president who of-
fered to be our financial
adviser and to manage our
401(k). We relocated all
amounts from previous
jobs to that bank and live
comfortably Once a year,
the bank sends the re-
quired minimum distribu-
tion to our checking
account. We use part of
this to travel abroad, re-
pair cars, maintain the
home and buy gifts for
grandchildren. Life has
been good to us, consider-
ing we were born in the
former Soviet Union.
We understand we are
supposed to pay for the
service to manage our
money in mutual funds
our financial adviser se-
lects at our twice-yearly
meetings. We have never
discussed that amount,
and we were taking for
granted a necessity to pay
All went smoothly until
our younger nephew
came to visit. He discov-
ered we are paying an un-
reasonable amount, in his
opinion, to the service
and suggested relocating
all our money into an
index fund where charges
are almost nonexistent
(again, according to him).
We are at a loss. We
can't manage our money
without help from an ad-
viser, and we understand
that asking him to put our
401(k) into an index fund
is actually firing him. Is it
worthwhile to jeopardize
our good relations with
him to gain some possible
money? We are both 75
and can live as well as we
do now with our money in-
vested in the mutual
funds. VB., Florida
DEAR VB.: It seems to
me you're happy, living
well and satisfied with the
advice given to you over
12 years by the bank offi-
cer However, here comes
your nephew, who sud-
denly says you're paying
an unreasonable amount
and the products are not
appropriate.
For a couple of reasons,
I think you should stay
where you are. You've
been happy with your re-
turn, and you have a good
relationship with your cur-
rent adviser I don't believe
it is usually wise to take
advice from relatives, par-
ticularly a young relative.
Whether I would agree
with your nephew in
terms of having all of your
eggs in one basket i.e.,
mutual funds is another
question.
I might consider diver-
sifying from all mutual
funds into some other in-
vestments, and I think
most financial people
would agree with that as-
sessment. You might wish
to get a second opinion,
either asking advisers for
recommendations in an-
ticipation of switching
your accounts to them or
going to a "fee-based"
adviser
But on balance, if you're
happy and it ain't broke, I
would leave it alone.


Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Nottage attends
surgical seminar
Joye Nottage, P.T. and center
manager for Select Physical
Therapy, recently attended a
seminar, "Orthopedic Surgical
Update: Shoulder and Knee."
Andreas Mueller, P.T., certi-
fied functional manual therapist,
was the instructor for this
hands-on course. Mueller re-
viewed biomechanical consid-
erations for rehabilitation for
orthopedic surgical procedures.
Mueller described current surgi-
cal techniques for shoulders
and knees, and discussed post-
surgical outcomes. He also dis-
cussed when to progress and
when to maintain rehabilitation.
Mueller reviewed post-opera-
tive complications, how to man-
age them and when to be
concerned.
Nottage learned several soft-
tissue mobilization techniques
for the shoulder and knee. Exer-
cise prescription activities began
with acute-immediate post-op
phase and progressed through
functional performances to skill
enhancement activities for
shoulder and knee pain.
Select Physical Therapy pro-
vides physical therapy in an
outpatient setting. Most insur-
ance is accepted. Contact Not-
tage at the Beverly Hills clinic,
3400 N. Lecanto Highway, or
call 352-527-8489.
Lori Thompson wins
Star of Life Award
LECANTO Every year,
Nature Coast EMS nominates
one of its best and brightest
caregivers to
the American
Ambulance
Association's
Stars of Life
award cere-
mony in
Washington,
D.C. The Lori
Stars of Life Thompson
award recog- Nature Coast
nizes and cel- EMS.
ebrates the
achievements of individuals
working in the ambulance in-
dustry. It is the highest award
an EMS caregiver can receive.
Lori Thompson, a Nature
Coast EMS critical care para-
medic, was awarded the Star of
Life Award from the associa-
tion. Thompson began her ca-
reer in 1999 as a volunteer
EMT in Lone Rock, Wis. She
has also worked in Madison,
followed by La Crosse, Wis. In
2006, she became a paramedic
and earned the National Reg-
istry status she has maintained
ever since.
In 2010, Thompson joined
Nature Coast EMS and is now
certified as a critical care para-
medic. Thompson teaches in
the EMT program and has
learned other areas such "act-
ing" education supervisor, "act-
ing" operations supervisor and
logistics.
Citrus inventors
to meet May 11
The next meeting of the Cit-
rus County Inventors will be at
10 a.m. Friday, May 11, at the
Lakes Region Library on Druid
Road in Inverness.
Discussion will be about au-
thor and inventor Stephen Key
and his tips in the process of
getting your ideas or products
to market.
This will be the last meeting
for the season. Meetings will re-
sume in the fall. Meetings are
open to the public and there is
no cost associated with this
group. Call Mary at 352-527-
2827 for information.
Creager on staff at
Sunshine Gardens
Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River has named Dawn Crea-

business of-
fice manager.
Creager
was born in
New York and
spent several
years there
before mov-
ing to New creager
Mexico and Sunshine


later, Arizona. Gardens
In 2002, Crystal River.
Creager
moved to Inverness. She has
worked in management most of
her life, most recently as a
manager with EDS/HP and the
accounting manager with hos-
pice before coming to Sunshine
Gardens Crystal River.
Creager has an extensive
education background, includ-
ing an impressive five degrees:
AAS Business Management,
AS Accounting, AA Business,
BAAccounting and MBA Busi-


'Discover Japan' agent


Special to the Chronicle
The Japanese Tourism Agency (JTA) and the Japan National
Tourism Organization (JNTO) selected Debbie Muir from Tally
Ho Vacations to attend the "Discover Japan" campaign. Deb-
bie was one of 50 agents chosen to travel to Japan and bring
back information to share with U.S. travelers. Travel agents
are encouraged to create personalized travel itineraries, then
return home to talk about their discoveries of the culture, tra-
ditions and the spiritual experiences while in Japan. For in-
formation about Japan travel, contact Debbie Muir at Tally Ho
Vacations, 352-860-2805 or dmuir@tallyhovacations.com.


FPRA adds new member


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Public Relations Association Nature Coast
Chapter recently inducted Renea Teaster, marketing coor-
dinator for the Citrus County YMCA where she handles pro-
gram development, media coordination and marketing plans
for programs and special events. From left are: Amy Kingery,
FPRA past president; Renea Teaster, new member; and
Lanse K. Fero, FPRA president. Teaster joins Anne Black, of
HPH Hospice, as one of the newest members of the chapter.
FPRA is the oldest public relations organization in the United
States. Members represent a variety of different organiza-
tions including private and public corporations, government
entities, not-for-profits, counseling firms and independent
practitioners. The Nature Coast Chapter hosts a monthly pro-
fessional development meeting at Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club. For information on joining the group for a meeting
or becoming a member, contact Katie Mehl at (352) 344-
6501 or kmehl@citrusmh.org.


ness. Creager grew up caring
for the elderly, and states, "I am
excited to work for Sunshine
Gardens. I have a caring nature
and love using that side of me
to help the elderly."
Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River will provide specialized
care to those with all types of
dementia. For information, call
the facility at 352-563-0235.
Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River is at 311 N.E. Fourth
Ave., Crystal River.
Visit www.sgwseniors.com.
Workforce group
sets May workshops
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties has scheduled
a full calendar of workshops
and clinics for the month May
for those interested in sharpen-
ing employability skills.
The programs are open to
job seekers in the three-county
region at no charge. Partici-
pants must be fully registered
with Workforce through the Em-
ploy Florida Marketplace (EFM)
at www.EmployFlorida.com.
Workshop registration is also
required unless otherwise indi-


cated. Programs take place at
the Workforce Connection Mar-
ion County Center, 2703 NE
14th St., in Ocala. Citrus
County workshops are held at
the Workforce Connection Cen-
ter at 1103 E. Inverness Blvd.,
Inverness and Levy County
workshops take place at the
Levy County Center at 109 NW
Third Ave., Chiefland. Commu-
nity workshops also continue to
be held at area library branches
in Citrus and Marion counties.
Additional information about
the following programs is avail-
able at Workforce Connection's
Calendar of Events at
www.clmworkforce.com.
Open Resume Labs are
held in Ocala each Monday at 9
a.m. and 2 p.m. as well as
every Friday at 9 a.m. The labs
also take place May 15 and
May 29 at 1:15 p.m. in Inver-
ness and on May 15 May 29 in
at 8:15 a.m. in Chiefland. The
staff-assisted lab helps job
seekers learn how to market
themselves more effectively to
the employer, identify strengths
and transferable skills, and


See DIGEST/Page D4


*This special available for new subscribers or as an
additional subscription for current subscribers. Ask for Code MD


Call 352-563-5655

SCTw.hronileonline.omTY



Ik www.chronicleonline.com


D2 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


BUSINESS





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
MAY 6, 2012


Workshop for entrepreneurs


Are you ready to grow from

self-employed to small business owners?


The Citrus County Business Re-
source Alliance Partners will
present the workshop "Hire Your
First Employee" from 5:30 to 8
p.m. Tuesday, May 15, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida Learning
Center at 3800 S. Lecanto High-
way in Lecanto.
The cost is $15 per person for
members of: Chamber, EDC,
SBDC and SCORE; $20 per person


for general public; includes book
to be used in the workshop.
This workshop is designed for
self-employed entrepreneurs who
are ready to hire their first em-
ployee. Attendees will receive
step-by-step guidance on finding
employees, how much to pay, nav-
igating red tape like payroll taxes
and benefits, and becoming the
boss.


The registration fee includes a
book to be used in the workshop.
To ensure delivery by the work-
shop date, pre-registration is
highly recommended as soon as
possible.
The featured presenter is Mike
Orlito, Certified Business Analyst
for the Small Business Develop-
ment Center at UNF in Citrus
County.
Content for this workshop is
pulled from "Hire Your First Em-
ployee," a book by small business
expert Rhonda Abrams. Abrams
has advised, mentored and con-


sulted entrepreneurs and small
business owners since 1986.
An experienced entrepreneur
herself, Abrams has started three
successful companies, including a
small business consulting firm.
Her experience gives her a
strong real-life understanding of
the challenges facing
entrepreneurs.
Currently, she is the founder
and CEO of The Planning Shop, a
company focused on providing en-
trepreneurs with high quality in-
formation and tools for developing
successful business plans.


We'd like to thank our sponsors,
Quickbooks Assist and HR Solu-
tions in Tandem for supporting
our training efforts and Economic
Development in Citrus County.
To register online, please visit
"events" page online at www.
citrusedc.com. To register by
phone or email, contact Matthew
at 352.795.2000 or i.itthewv,-
citruscountychamber.com.
Veterans: You may be able to at-
tend this workshop free of charge.
Go to http://vetsfastlaunch.org/
coupon-signup/ to request a
coupon to bring to the seminar.


Cyber Theft Workshop


Ambassador Spotlight

Janet Mayo is the Cater-
ing Manager at the Planta-
tion Spa and Golf Resort in
Crystal River. Originally
from Illinois, she has lived
in Citrus County since 1993.
Mayo is an enthusiastic
fisherwoman, as well as an
avid golfer, and loves to
read. Another thing she
loves? Bling on her flip
flops! Mayo has been a
Chamber Ambassador since
2007 and is always ready to
lend a helping hand to
Chamber members and par-
ticipate in Chamber events. Janet Mayo


Chamber After Hours

Networking Mixer May 10


Please join us Tuesday,
May 10, at High Octane Sa-
loon at 1590 S. Suncoast
Blvd. in Homosaassa. This
unique saloon is a must-see
place. Bring your business
cards and mingle with other


business professionals like
yourself.
For more information
about High Octane, call 352-
795-3149. For information
about this event, call the
Chamber at 352-795-3149.


Deadline is May 9 to

vote for Bikes in Bloom


As part of the ongoing series of workshops produced by the Citrus Business Alliance of the Chamber, EDC,
SCORE, SBDC and the College of Central Florida; Jim Green, managing partner of Business Risk Solutions, pro-
vided insight into the threats of cyber theft and how businesses and individuals can protect the security of pri-
vate and sensitive information when working online.




King's Bay Blessing of the Fleet


All boat owners are cordially in-
vited to join in the Blessing of the
Fleet on King's Bay This auspicious
event will be at 1400 (2 p.m.) Saturday,
May 19.
Conducted by the Crystal River Sail
and Power Squadron, the local affili-
ate of the United States Power
Squadrons, your vessel will be
blessed by Fr. Kevin Holsapple, Rec-
tor of Saint Anne's Anglican Church.
The Blessing of the Fleet origi-


Insight Credit Union


nated centuries ago in Mediterranean
fishing communities. The Blessing
was meant to ensure a safe and boun-
tiful season for the fishermen. Today,
it is practiced by all boaters, includ-
ing fishermen, to ensure a safe pas-
sage for the season.
This event will be on the north side
of Buzzard's Island in King's Bay
Blessings will begin at 1400 (2 p.m.).
Please arrive shortly before then and
form a line to pass by the committee


boat which is a 22-foot pontoon boat
with a Crystal River Power Squadron
banner and a green bimini top.
All local boating clubs and groups
are invited, including the Homosassa
and Crystal River Coast Guard Auxil-
iary, and the sheriff's Marine Unit
This is expected to be an annual
event, and all are welcome to join in.
For questions, please call Jack Flynn
at 352-527-8038 or send email to
jdflynn@tampabayrr.com.


Health experts from
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center encourage
women of all ages to take
small, manageable steps to
lead longer, healthier and
happier lives.
From 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 17, "Girls Night
Out" is a free, educational
and social event just for
women.
Learn the latest about
pelvic pain, breast health,
osteoporosis and heart dis-
ease.
Free product samples,
service demos and gourmet
refreshments will be
offered.
The first 50 guests receive


Time is running out to vote
on your favorite Bikes in
Bloom entry Bikes in Bloom
have popped up throughout
the downtown Crystal River
area, and we encourage you
to enjoy the bikes and vote
for your favorite.
The Chamber will present
an award to the business
that receives the most votes
for its display during the
Chamber's luncheon Friday,
May 11.
Ballots will be accepted
through May 9, so there is
still time pick up a ballot
and enjoy "Bikes in Bloom."


Ballots and maps are avail-
able in Heritage Village at
Pickers & Peddlers and at
the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce.


* WHAT: "Girls Night
Out" educational and
social event.
WHEN: 5:30 to 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 17.
WHERE: Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
Center, Main Lobby and
Cafeteria, 6201 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19) north of Crystal
River.
COST: Free.
WEAR: Purple or
orange for a surprise!

a Women'sWorks charm;
wear purple or orange for
an extra surprise!


Insight Credit Union celebrated their new Citrus County location and their membership in the Chamber of Commerce with
a recent ribbon cutting. At 211 E. Highland Blvd. in Inverness, membership in Insight Credit Union is open to anyone who
lives in Citrus County, as well as 14 other counties in Central Florida. For more information, stop by their office or call
888-843-8328. We welcome them to Citrus County.


Chamber Luncheon: Working and Playing Well with Others'


Join us at the May Cham-
ber luncheon, Friday, May
11, at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club. Our speaker,
Beth Ramsay, presents:
"Working and Playing Well
with Others," providing fun,
fast-paced insights to suc-


cessfully navigating people's
perplexing personalities!
It's very real and con-
crete why these things hap-
pen, and you can change
your interactions to win
every time close more
sales, become a better


leader and be the catalyst
for less stress among your
team. You are sure to ap-
preciate Ms. Ramsay's in-
corporation of humor into
her discussions of leader-
ship and team dynamics.
We thank our generous


sponsor for this luncheon,
Superior Residences.
Log into the MEMBERS
ONLY section at www
citruscountychamber.com
and make your reservation,
or call 352-795-3149 prior to
May 10 at noon.


Chamber After Hours

Networking Mixer May 24


Please join us from 5 to 7
p.m. Thursday, May 24, at
Verizon Wireless-Cellular
Sales for a Chamber After
Hours Networking Mixer. At
3085 U.S. 41 in Inverness
(next to McDonalds), the
knowledgeable staff at Veri-
zon Wireless are ready to
showcase their products
and services. Bring your


business cards and mingle
with business professionals
like yourself.
For more information
about Verizon products, visit
their website at www.
cellularsales.com or call
352-341-0801. For informa-
tion about this event, please
call the Chamber at 352-
795-3149.


Women'sWorks:


Girls Night Out





D4 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


PENSIONS
Continued from Page Dl

with the Democrat governor"
But Democratic lawmak-
ers who control the Legisla-
ture in California have not
acted on the ideas in the
more than six months since
Brown offered them.
Concerns have been
raised that existing case law
makes it difficult to change
contribution rates for cur-
rent employees and retirees
outside of collective bar-
gaining. Union leaders have
said the proposals cut too
deeply into pension bene-
fits, despite a nonpartisan
legislative analysis that



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band recently passed, and I
was shocked to find that in
error he named our trust as
the beneficiary I know he
never intended that, as we
had always heard you
should make a person your
beneficiary and not the
trust for tax purposes. The
rollover is sizable more
than $600,000. In either case
the funds are mine, but one
is with tax consequences
and the other is not.
We have not been with
this financial firm very long.
To my dismay, no one ques-
tioned the beneficiary
designation.
Do you know of any way
we can reverse this error?
- Reader in California
DEAR READER: I can
appreciate how shocked
you were when you learned
after your husband's death
that your new financial ad-
viser may have made a sub-
stantial error If that is true



DIGEST
Continued from Page D2

develop additional strategies.
Walk-ins are welcome no
additional registration is re-
quired but space is limited.
"Navigating the New World
of Work" two-day workshop
takes place every Tuesday and
Wednesday in Marion County,
except May 8-9. The workshop
is also offered on May 8-9 and
May 22-23 in Chiefland and on
May 10-11 and May 24-25 in In-
verness. The workshops cover
how to identify abilities and
transferable skills, job search
strategies/targeted resume de-
velopment, and interviewing
skills/follow up.
Community Workshops:
"Navigating the New World of
Work" offers many of the high-
lights of the two-day sessions
but in a two-hour format. These
take place in Marion County on
May 8 at 2 p.m. at the Forest
Library in Ocklawaha, May 10
at 2 p.m. at the Belleview Li-
brary and May24 at 10 a.m. at
the Dunnellon Library; and in
Citrus County on May 14 at
3:30 p.m. at the Coastal Region
Library in Crystal River, May 16
at 1 p.m. at the Central Ridge
Library in Beverly Hills, and
May 17 at 2 p.m. the Ho-
mosassa Library.
"Nail that Interview," "Em-
ploy Florida Marketplace Es-
sentials" and "Optimal Resume"
workshops May 3, May 17 and
May 31 beginning at 8:15 a.m.
in Ocala. Nail that Interview is


found California public
workers receive some of the
most generous pension ben-
efits in the U.S.
Carroll Wills, a spokesman
for the California Profes-
sional Firefighters, said the
union supports some meas-
ures, like ending pension
abuses, but feels public em-
ployees have been maligned
in stories about public exec-
utives who game the system.
Wills said "the notion that
pension funds are an unmit-
igated drain on tax dollars"
is misleading.
Changes to state-backed
retirement plans for public
employees were rare before
2005, said Snell, of the Na-
tional Conference of State
Legislatures. But then the


and if it can be documented,
it's possible the errors-and-
omissions insurance he
hopefully carries would
cover your tax loss.
If the error is not his but
rather your late husband's, I
seriously doubt there is any-
thing you can do, since the
"only" damage here was the
additional tax. The fact you
remember retrospectively
that the designation should
have been handled differ-
ently is not an excuse for your
contribution to the error
The first thing to deter-
mine, with a proper tax at-
torney or CPA, is whether
this error can be over-
turned. The next thing is to
determine who made the
mistake. Often, things of this
nature work out.
DEAR BRUCE: I am con-
cerned that the amount of
money in my bank account,
$325,000, is over the maxi-
mum amount the govern-
ment will protect you for in
the event the bank goes
under. After thinking about
this for some time, I went to
the bank to discuss it. Their
suggestion was to put my


also offered May 18 in Inver-
ness and May 30 in Chiefland.
Registration is required.
"Beyond Barriers: Path-
ways to Employment" is de-
signed for those whose
background issues create a bar-
rier to finding a job. The work-
shops take place May 11 and
May 25 at 1:30 p.m. in Ocala.
"Computer Basics" work-
shop is for those new to tech-
nology or with entry-level skills.
Sessions are set for 3:30 p.m.
May 8 and May 22 in Chiefland
and at 1:30 p.m. May 18 in
Ocala.
To register for any of the
workshops, call 352-291-9552
or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410 or
sign up online at www.time
center.com/wcworkshops.
May events at
Crystal River Mall
During the month of May,
visit the Crystal River Mall for
many fun events, such as Pre-
cious Paws Adopt-a-Thon con-
tinuing Sunday, May 6.
Precious Paws is partnering
with rescue organizations
throughout the county, such as
Home at Last, Adopt a Rescue
Pet and Friends of Citrus
County Animal Services. The
Adopt-a-Thon will run from
noon to 3 p.m. Sunday.
The Mall will host an antique
appraisal fair with Dudley's Auc-
tion in Inverness. Appraisal
times are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, May 12. Call Crystal
River Mall for information or
visit www.dudleysauction.com.
On Saturday, May 19, the
Citrus County Drummers will


BUSINESS


children's names on the ac-
count, which would divvy
that amount among the
three of us.
I have not done anything
yet, but I am concerned. If
my kids' names are on the
account, can they have ac-
cess to that money? What
happens if one of them gets
into financial trouble and
that money gets confiscated
for something else?
My husband and I are di-
vorced, so he is not in this
picture. I don't want to do
anything that might jeopard-
ize my hard-earned savings,
yet I don't feel comfortable
with losing $75,000, either.
What would you suggest? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: If you
put your kids' names on the
account, it does give them
some degree of control. And,
yes, if they were to get into
financial trouble, that
money could potentially be
in jeopardy


tap out their rhythm from 2:30
to 4 p.m.
Doug Nicholson returns with
the oldies at 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 26.
For information about these
events or Crystal River Mall,
call the mall office at 352-795-
2585 or find us Facebook.
Crystal River Mall is on U.S.
19 north of the city of Crystal
River. Anchor stores include
Belk, JCPenney, Kmart and
Regal Cinema. The mall also
includes a variety of specialty
shops and eateries.
Thompson president
at Capital City Bank
CRYSTAL RIVER Ray
Thompson will succeed Kay
Wilkes as president of the Cit-
rus/Inglis market of Capital City
Bank, effective immediately.
Thompson comes to
Citrus/Inglis from Port St. Joe,
where he served as Gulf County


A CRYSTAL RIVER MALL


Appraisal Fair
Saturday May 12, 2012 flam-4pm at Center Court
Appraisal fees are $5.00 per item and $12.00 for 3 items
On hand to assist you identify and place value on your treasures will be
8 knowledgeable collectors, dealers, auctloneen & appraisers to include
but not limited to areas listed below
CoinsiMilitary
Jewelry
Tools I
Postcards
Signature & other paper
String Musical Instruments
Many different items can be identified & valued.
Feed drive deV of appraisal fair to bemeffit


FmIlb easUoec Center


We Care Fooeed Pa .


Help till rhe panlr af rhe.ei nJ rJr ragr anil.aTIons
bring a dounilrun ufra.lmned ur boued food

DUDLEY'S AUCTION RNi CRYS t-RL RER m


economic slump and the
stock market downturn bat-
tered investments and fund-
ing levels of retirement
systems.
The average funding ra-
tion for 126 statewide re-
tirement plans had fallen to
about 77 percent by 2010, ac-
cording to the Center for
Retirement Research at
Boston College. To pay for
benefits, more and more tax
dollars will have to be
shifted to pension pay-
ments, threatening to crowd
out spending on health care,
education and road repairs.
The underfunding isn't the
workers' fault. Retirees are
living longer, the systems as-
sumed optimistic investment
returns but faced losses in-


stead and politicians raised
benefits or added workers to
systems over the decades
without adding new money
to cover the costs.
"We made a bunch of
promises we couldn't keep.
We're where we are because
all of us like to make people
feel good and promise them
things like a 28-year retire-
ment, which sounded great
at the time, but we didn't
pay for it," said South Car-
olina Rep. Gilda Cobb-
Hunter, a Democrat who
served on a panel that stud-
ied that state's retirement
benefits.
But public employees, in
many instances, don't have
the Social Security safety
net. They don't pay into that


government system and so
they can't get Social Secu-
rity benefits when they get
older. That's why they think
it's unfair for states to
shrink their pensions.
"The state made a com-
mitment," Jerry Pecora, a
25-year Louisiana state em-
ployee, recently urged law-
makers. "Don't penalize and
punish the people that are
working hard to try to pro-
vide, to stay off all the wel-
fare, to stay off all the social
stuff."
For his part, Carpenter is
trying to sort out what the
changes may mean for his fi-
nancial future. The
Louisiana Workforce Com-
mission accountant had
planned to put his three


ployer. My kids are equal
beneficiaries on everything
I own. I have one credit card
bill that is around $4,000,
which I am chipping away at
finally I am in good health
and have good health insur-
ance. I don't foresee any life
changes like owning a house
or anything like that... so do
I need a will?
I was married twice and
divorced around the nine-
year anniversary mark, so
neither of them would be
entitled to my Social Secu-
rity if something were to
happen to me. My kids
would get the death benefit,
I assume, and is that all?
Please let me know if I am
overlooking anything, as I
consider you to be the ex-
pert and I want to make
sure I am not making any
mistakes. -J.S., via email
DEAR J.S.: You say you
know it's important to have
a will but you don't know if
you need one. I understand
you think you have most of
the "i's dotted and t's
crossed," but there is no way
you can be absolutely cer-
tain this is the case.


The company's bank sub-
sidiary, Capital City Bank, was
founded in 1895 and now has
70 banking offices and 74
ATMs in Florida, Georgia and
Alabama. For more information
about Capital City Bank Group
Inc., visit www.ccbg.com.
Regulatory council
sets teleconference
The Regulatory Council of
Community Association Man-
agers will conduct a public
meeting at 9 a.m. Friday, May
11, via conference call.
The conference call number
is 888-808-6959; the confer-
ence code is 4879597#.
The Regulatory Council of
Community Association Man-
agers is housed within the De-
partment of Business and
Professional Regulation's Divi-
sion of Professions.
The Department of Business
and Professional Regulation's


But I don't see any reason
to do this. Why not make it
simple? Just take the
amount in your account that
is over the $250,000 maxi-
mum the FDIC covers and
open an account at the bank
across the street? That
would solve all of your prob-
lems and prevent future
complications. You will
have complete control of
your money, as well as
peace of mind.
DEAR BRUCE: Many
years ago, you helped me
with a problem I had with a
debt-reduction company
and a bank that was trying
to make my son pay a bill of
mine. Your advice was spot-
on, and I thank you.
I now would like to ask
you about wills. I know you
say it's important to have
one, but I'm not sure I need
one. I do not own any prop-
erty. I own my car, have a
401(k), IPERS and a life in-
surance policy from my em-


president since joining Capital
City Bank in 2008. As commu-
nity president, Thompson will
oversee the operations of the
five offices in Citrus County and
nearby Inglis, and will focus on
further strengthening the com-
pany's position in the market.
"Ray brings with him years of
experience serving Capital City
markets and an impressive
record of success," said Tom
Barron, president of Capital
City Bank. "He's a knowledge-
able banker and a capable
leader, and I know he will serve
our clients and community in
Citrus/Inglis well."
Kay Wilkes concludes a 40-
year banking career, retiring
later this summer from Capital
City Bank after serving four
years as president of the Cit-
rus/Inglis market.
Capital City Bank Group Inc.
(NASDAQ: CCBG) provides a
full range of banking services.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

children through college be-
fore retiring at around age
59 with full benefits, about
three-fourths of his salary.
Now he faces the possibility
of having to wait until he
turns 64 to reach that level
of pension benefits.
"You're paying more to
wait longer for less bene-
fits," he said. "One thing is
bad enough, but when you
combine it with insurance
going up, pay staying the
same, I'm considering look-
ing at going back to the pri-
vate sector."
Associated Press reporters
Judy Lin in Sacramento,
Calif; Paul Davenport in
Phoenix and Seanna Adcox
in Columbia, S.C.; con-
tributed to this report


Every adult should have,
at the very least, a simple
will that clearly states who
should receive whatever is
left behind, exactly what is
to be done and who is to be
responsible for carrying out
the deceased's wishes. That
will does not have to be filed
for probate.
If you find there is no
need for the will, fold it up
and put it away If it turns
out there are things that
should be addressed, such
as offspring who are dis-
agreeing, a will is an ab-
solute requisite.
Understand, you can't
come out of the grave and
write the will if there are
problems. It is a simple, in-
expensive document that
can save a lot of grief for
your family after you have
passed away

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns.


mission is to license efficiently
and regulate fairly. DBPR li-
censes more than 1 million
businesses and professionals
ranging from real estate agents,
veterinarians and accountants
to contractors and cosmetolo-
gists. For information, visit
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.
Business offers but-
terfly festival
BELLEVIEW Timberline
Farms wraps up its 2012
Spring Butterfly Festival today,
Sunday, May 6. Activities in-
clude: live butterfly exhibit, but-
ter making, candle making,
blacksmith exhibit and petting
zoo. A portion of the proceeds
go to benefit St. Theresa's
Soup Kitchen, Marion County
Juvenile Detention Center and
Good Shepherd's Lighthouse.
The farm is at 3200 S.E.
115th St., Belleview. Call 352-
454-4113 for information.


SMemorable



~ Moms


Show your Moum just how special she is by honoring her

or her memory with a photo message in the

Citrus County Chronicle.


Publishing Mother's Day

Sunday, May 13th in the Classifieds

Deadline:

Friday, May 11 before (12) NOON

Call 352-563-5966


CRONICLEO
www.chronicleonline corn
Call Classifieds
L at 352-563-5966


Liz Jones


We love
you and
miss you.




Love,
Sharon
& Dave


Choose your artwork
from below:




9%w12


Every adult should have,
at the very least, a simple will.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C CITRUS COUNTY





H ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


Classifieds



Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday

Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday

South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


SWF seeking a mature
financially secure,social
drinker, laid back, fun
loving 40 + let's talk
352-400-6845
SWM, Desires SWF 74 +
Yrs. That lives in Crystal
River/Homosassa Area
for Steak night out
and/or Burger on the
dock. Quiet times,
I am a Member of
Elks & VFW, Respond
to Blind Box 1775P
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal Riv. 34429



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Apartment $400
3/2/2 waterfront
villa $1200
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Riverhaven
house $850
3/2/Huge DW on 1
acre $750
More Available
Call Nancy
352-422-4137
WAYBRIGHT
REAL ESTATE INC.
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
INVERNESS
2/2/1 comm. pool
comm. boat docks,
$650 pr month
(352) 201-8401
PURPLE LEATHER
RECLINER SOFA $115.
Love Seat
sofabedgreenstnpe 250.
White bar height
table/41eather like chairs
200. phone
352-344-2833
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3/2/1 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Yamaha Organ
3 keyboards, good
cond. w/ bench
(352) 201-8796



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



(4) Kittens
liter box trained
(352) 628-1783
2 Hound mix
glossy, loving 11 yr old
need loving homes
352-220-1480
3 FREE HORSES
to good homes
Nice Horses, just too
many (352) 628-1472
4 FREE BANTAM
CHICKENS 9 weeks old
352-563-2288
12YR OLD "MIN PIN"
Families Combined
She is stressing, spayed,
needs loving home
(352) 419-6298
CANNING JARS
W/LIDS & CANNING
BOOK
(352) 628-9851
Free Puppies
10 weeks old
(352) 564-0270
Free Roosters
(352) 795-8634













Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Your World







CHRONICLE


Free to good
home,Beautiful white
Paso Fino horse,No
RIDE, companionship
only.352-513-4473
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
PHOTOGRAPHY WALL
4' X 8' w/picture holes
cut-out, great for
church or party photos
call (352) 212-4849
Small, reddish female
greyhound, look alike,
goes by Hope, 1-1/2
yrs. Energetic &
Affectionate, free to
loving home. She
would like a yard to run
in (352) 233-3837
Megan or Alex
TAKING DONATIONS
CLOTHING,KIDS
STUFF,BABY
STUFF,SHOES,PURSES,FUR-
NITURE INDOOR
AND OUT DOOR,ECT
PLEASE CALL JAMIE @
352-586-9754
TWO FREE 4 FT
CABINETS
AND A GAS RANGE
(352) 422-2927
WILD HOGS
destroying your
property?
Maybe I can help
(352) 503-6588
WILL PICK UP donations
of quality items: desks
dressers chairs etc. patio
tools kitchen clothing cos-
tume jewelry small appli
etc Proceeds for rescue
puppy surgery Thank You
352-270-3909



40LB AFRICAN
TORTOISE
in S. Lake Rousseau
area. This is a pet
he is tame. pls call
(352)212-4849
Blonde Brussel Griffon
251bs, long coat male,
last seen 5/3 Inverness
Golf & Country Club
(352) 341-4313
Chihuahua
male, black w/some
white & tan, last seen
Sun 4/29, Inverness
Hwy 44(352) 603-9634
Man's Wedding Ring
date & initials W.T.S.
date 6/23/56. ..
Crystal River area
(352) 795-5942
MINI DACHSHUND
Black, one blue, one
brown eye. Silver Daple
in vicinity Beverly Hills
352-228-1720
or 352-212-7394







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519
SET OF FORD TRUCK
KEYS W/DOOR OPENER
ON IT
lost in vicinity of Coast
Dental or Walmart
Parking lot, Inverness
352-464-4151



Pomeranian?
Must call to Identify
Independence Hwy
Inverness
(352) 637-4179
White and grey male cat.
Found in Hampton Hills.
352-746-6587



HIGH SCHOOL DI-
PLOMA FROM HOME
6-8 weeks. Accredited.
Get a Diploma. Get a
Job! FREE Brochure.
800-264-8330 Benjamin
Franklin High School.
www.dipolmafrom
home.com
Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 com-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373
LOOKING FOR
LOCAL MUSICIANS
352-465-0462



Do you study with
Shepherd's Chapel out
of Arkansas? Do you
want to meet other
people who do? Call
(352) 419-6964
Lonely, Bored, Need
Answers, Call
Someone Who Cares
(352) 464-2390




2 Tickets to the Players
Championship, TPC,
Sawgrass, Friday, 5/11
Includes parking

(352) 527-4910


Front Desk
Receptionist
The Chronicle is
seeking candidates
who display a
positive and profes-
sional manner to
work full time as its
front desk
receptionist. The
ideal candidate will
have a high school
diploma or equiva-
lent; be familiar with
using a computer,
Microsoft Word,
Microsoft Excel,
calculator, fax
machine and email;
have customer
service experience
and be required to
sit for up to 8 hours
each day. The
position is routinely
exposed to com-
puter screen glare.
EOE

Send resumes to
marnold@
chronicleonline.com.





EXP. STYLISTS

Needed for Busy
Salon (352) 795-5859


Hair Technician
Experienced. F/T, No
clientele neccesary.
302-8847 or Private
Email: hotheadshair@
hotmail.com












Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






Avante
At Inverness
is currently looking for

INTERNAL ADMISSION
COORDINATOR
Qualified Candidates
must have
Knowledge of
Medicare, Medicaid
and other Insurances
Must have a
Associate Degree
and a minimum of
3 years experience
in long term care.
Knowledge of health-
care regulatory
standards is preferred
Please apply online:
Avantecenters.com
or e-mail Resume to:
mdaniels@
avantecenters.com

Avante
Of Inverness
is looking for

PRN Dietary Aid
& PRN Cook
Hours and shifts will
vary. Please Apply
online at
avantecenters.com


F/T CNA's

Shifts: 7a-3p & 3p-I Ip
For Assistant Living
Facility. Paid by
experience, benefits
avail, aft 60 days.
Vac. accrued after
90 days. Apply in
person @ Brentwood
Retirement Comm.
1900 W.Alpha Ct
Lecanto Fl.
DFWP/EOE


FRONT OFFICE
& Medical
Assistant
Experience preferred
Attn Candi
Fax resume
(352) 489-9400

HOME HEALTH
CARE
PROFESSIONALS
Rapidly expanding home
health company, Village
Home Care is seeking
additional staffing Citrus
County, The Villages and
Ocala. These individuals
must have experience in
Medicare Home Health.
Full time and part time
positions are available for
RNs, LPNs, Physical
Therapists, Physical
Therapist Assistants.

Please respond by email:
plarkin@villagehomecare.org
or fax:
352-390-6559


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Hospital RN's
Needed

MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.comrn
352-344-9828
Lic.Mental Health
Professional

wanted to share
downtown Inverness
office on open days.
Send resume by fax to :
316-223-8824.
For details, Iv msg @
352-220-8824.
MARKETER

Health Care Co. is
seeking a Marketer
interested in profes-
sional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing
Experience, Positive
Attitude Good
Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit
resume to PO Box
2498 Inverness Fl
34451 or fax
352-726-2864
MASSAGE
THERAPIST
WANTED-ASAP
I am a Chiropractor seek-
ing a massage therapist
for a chiropractic office in
Homosassa. Hours are
flexible and I provide the
room and supplies. Must
have a valid Massage
therapy license. Fax
resume to: 352-205-8603
or Call: 352-266-3841
MEDICAL ASSIST.

Full time position for
front/back office for
FP Office by CMH.
Fax Resume:
(352) 726-2808

MEDICAL BILLING
ASSOCIATE

STRONG WORK
ETHICS AND ENER-
GETIC INDIVIDUAL
WITH RECENT, AND
MINIMUM OF TWO
YEARS WORK
EXPERIENCE BILLING
INSURANCES AND
WORKING AR.
COMPETITIVE SALARY
AND BENEFITS.
M-F 8:30-5PM.

SEND RESUMES TO:
CITRUS PODIATRY
CENTER, PA,
P.O. BOX 1120,
LECANTO, FL
34460-1120.
NO PHONE CALLS OR
FAXES ACCEPTED.

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

RN & LPN
field staff

Needed for a busy
Home Health
Agency.
SIGN ON BONUS
Higher pay per visit
than most agencies.
Excellent benefit
package.
Home Health experi-
ence preferred but
willing to train.

Fax or e-mail resume
to Patricia Goya.
Hr@homeadvantage
hc.com
Fax: 352-245-3509.
lic#HHA299991526.
EEO/Drug-Free
work place

RNs-Hospice
Full-Time & PRN

HPH Hospice is a
not-for-profit
community-based
healthcare organiza-
tion providing innova-
tive, skilled medical
care to patients with
life-limiting illness and
compassionate
support to their family
members.

We are currently
searching for
qualified candidates
to fill Full-Time and
PRN RN Case
Manager positions in
our Citrus Office
located at
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Beverly Hills, FL.

To learn more about
becoming a part of
our team, please visit
our website at
www.hph-hospice.org
(under Careers) or
contact our recruiter:
Phone: 352-796-2611
Fax: 352-796-7703


HP~hospice
EOE


Medical Office

F/T position, must be
pleasant, good
phone etiquette &
customer service
skills, exp a plus,
Fax: Resume
352-746-5605






POLICE
EVIDENCE CLERK

The City of Dunnellon
Police Department
is accepting applica-
tions for an Evidence
Clerk. High school
graduation or
possession of an
acceptable equiva-
lency diploma and
valid Florida driver's
license essential.
At least 3 years
experience in law
enforcement along
with completion of
Police Academy or
Patrol Duties, and
Managing Property
and Evidence in
Law Enforcement
curriculum required.
Additional requisite of
at least two (2) years
of general office
experience. Must
obtain a job descrip-
tion and application
package at the
Dunnellon Police
Department,
12014 S. Williams St.,
Dunnellon FL 34432
or by calling
352-465-8510 and
return to same no
later than 05/23/2012.
Electronic
applications/resumes
not accepted.
Salary Range 24,357 -
36,546. Position will
remain open until
filled. E.O.E., DFWP.


The Citrus County
Mosquito
Control District
Is accepting
applications for:
Mosquito Control
Technician I

Public Health Pest
Control Certification
is necessary within
six months of
employment.
A detailed job
description and
application can be
obtained at the
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Headquarter's
Office or our website
www.citrus
mosauito.ora
968 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
(352) 527-7478
Between 7:30 a.m. -
4:30 p.m. weekdays.
Deadline to receive
applications will be
4:30 p.m. on Friday,
May 11,2012

The Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District is an equal
opportunity employer
and does not
discriminate on the
basis of race, color,
national origin, sex,
religion, age or
disability in employ-
ment or the provisions
of services.

Preference will be
given to veterans. (A
copy of the DD-214
must be provided).


Youth Care
Worker

Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for

Youth Care Workers
* Must be over 21
years of age, have
High School Diploma
and be able to pass
a Level 1 back
ground screening
* Must be able to
com plete self- de-
fense and physical
intervention training.
* Ability to tolerate
verbal and mental
abuse while main-
taining a professional
demeanor
* Ability to perform
appropriate crisis in-
tervention, including
physically breaking
up fights.

APPLICATION AT
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
Drug Free Workplace







SERVERS

For upscale restaurant
Must be experienced,
neat, professional
and have great
customer service skills
Apply in Person at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd. Hernando. or
Phone (352) 746-6727
To make an appt.


LINE COOK &
PIZZA MAKER

Apply in Person 2492 N.
Essex Ave., Hernando




Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SALES
Good Benefits, 401K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exx.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relationship.
Apply in person Mon.-
Sat. 9-5. 2440 US. 19
Crystal River, Fl. Just
North Of The Mall.
Drug Free Workplace

SALES POSITION
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927

Telemarketing

Regional Builder has
opportunities for F/T &
P/T telemarketers to
cultivate large pros-
pect database. No
cold calling. Late
afternoon, evening
and weekend hours
with flexible sched-
ules. Must be person-
able and computer
literate. E-mail
resume to
aschweinberg@cit-
rushills.com




25 Driver Trainee's
Needed Now!
Become a driver for
Schneider National!
Earn $800 per week! No
experience needed!
CDL & Job Ready in just
3 weeks!! 888-374-7644
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed Top 5% Pay
2Mos. CDL Class A Driv-
ing Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

AUTO
COLLISION TECH

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

CARPENTER
Experience in all phases
of carpentry, remodeling,
framing necessary.
HS Diploma/GED
Valid DL&Reliable Trans.
Call 637-4629
Fax resume 637-3258
DRIVERS
New Freight for
Refrigerated & Dry Van
lanes. Annual salary
$45K to $60k. Flexible
hometime. CDL-A, 3
months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
Drivers Wanted
Class a CDL
w/hazmat. Company
& 0/0's. OTR/ Regional
Runs. LOts of Freight to
move! Call
877-893-9645
Exp. Roofers
Transp &Tools a must.
also hard-working
laborers for roof tearoff
JOHN GORDON
ROOFING
(352) 302-9269
Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most weekends
Vets welcome
843-266-3731

MASONS and
TENDERS Needed

at new Wal-mart on
Lecanto Rd (CR. 491)
in BeverlyHills.
Applications will be
taken at jobsite this
Monday from
10am till noon.
Photo ID and Social
required."

MECHANIC I

DEPARTMENT:
City of Crystal River
Public Works

GENERAL
DESCRIPTION:
Skilled work in the
maintenance and
servicing of cars,
trucks and other City
Public Works/Fire De-
partment equipment
(large and small
equipment). Work
performed under the
general direction of
the Public Works
Superintendent of
Operations.

A COPY OF THE JOB
DESCRIPTION
SHOWING THE
DETAILS OF THE
POSITION IS
AVAILABLE FROM THE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DIRECTOR OR ON THE
CITY'S WEB SITE.
DEADLINE:
FRIDAY, MAY 18,
2012
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com


B
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Lisa
352-436-4460

Local Lawn
Service Hiring

Dependable Only
need apply 628-9848

Office Assistant
Seeking
a qualified individual
who posses excellent
organizational, inter-
personal & communi-
cation skills. Knowl-
edge of QuickBooks
& Accounting help-
ful. Apply at Oak Run
or call for more
information
352-854-6557 X13
EEO/DFWP
Potential to Generate
$4000. to $20,000. or
more a month with this
activity No selling.
Experience financial
& time freedom. Call
352-445-1385 Financial
FreedomWav.info.

SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.comr
352-341-PREP (7737)




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Attend College
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline
cornn




TAYLORCOLLEGE






2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


Can You Dig It?
We will train, certify
and provide lifetime
assistant landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator
866-362-6497



ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
*'BARBER
*COSMETOLOGY
SiWFACIAL
I FULI SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR

*MANICURE/Nail Ext
w-MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
i mmmmmill




2 DOOR METAL STOR-
AGE CABINET 60"x36" 3
Shelves Lock and Key
$45 727-463-4411
4 DRAWER LATERAL
METAL CABINET Great
For Storage In Garage
52"x36"x18" $45
727-463-4411
STORAGE CABINET
WITH LOCK AND KEY 4
Roll Out Shelves
54"x36"x18" $75
727-463-4411




Antique wood frame
window 12-11 1/2"x15
1/2"glass panes great
craft project $99
352-489-3914 after 11am
TIFFANY TULIP STYLE
HANGING LAMP pretty
pink antique style. $75.00
352-513-4473
Wood Frame Window 22
3/4"x75 3/4", top 11 1/2
rounded, 18 5 1/2x9 1/2"
glass panes plus 4 at top
$99 352-489-3914




ILLINOIS POCKET
WATCH, 15 jewels, 20%
gold case w/chain,
made in 1913.... $130.
(352) 344-5283
SCHOOL DESK
w/attached chair. Unique
steel/wood construction
for child. $100 obo.
352/628-0698













Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Working Hot tub for
Sale, good cond.
5 ft x 7 ft
$675. obo
(352) 503-3787


COOKTOP JenAir elec-
tric cooktop 48" x 22"
in good condition. $85
352-628-2150
ELECTRIC RANGE
Whirlpool Glass top,
almond,self cleaning like
new condition. Location
Beverly Hills
$225.00 (352)746-0842
GE Electric Stove
$175
Frigidaire Refrig
dbl/door, ice/water
25.7 cu ft $350
(352) 341-5211
Kenmore Washer &
Whirlpool Dryer
Works great
$200.
(352) 637-0397
SMALL REFRIGERA-
TOR and Newer Window
A/C $100 for Both or
OBO 352-563-1509
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER AND REFRIG-
ERATOR Whirlpool
Heavy Duty Washer, 5
years old, $100.00, Re-
frigeratorAmana, 1 11/2
year old, Cream Color,
$150.00 352-419-5830,
call after 12:00 pm.
WASHER OR DRYER
$150.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
white large capacity looks
good works great 100.00
90 day warranty dennis
352-503-7365
Whirlpool Washer
white, looks good,
works great $100
(352) 503-7365



COMPUTER DESK
Formica Top 36"x24" with
2 Drawer File Cabinet
Attached. $25
727-436-4411
COMPUTER PRINTER
STAND OR T.V. STAND
28 High. 20 wide. 15deep
in good condition
$15.00 352-726-0686
DESK CHAIRS Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 each 727-463-4411
LATERAL 2 DRAWER
FILE CABINET Commer-
cial Metal New in Box with
Keys Graphite Color $75
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"18" $85
727-463-4411
PREOWNED COMMER-
CIAL DESK CHAIRS (4)
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727-463-4411
PREOWNED FILE CABI-
NET 2 Drawer Commer-
cial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 727-463-4411



2 AUCTIONS
THURS. MAY 3 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-? Row, groups,
piles w/furniture., appli-
ances, tools. Follow the
auctioneer. So much to
choose from 3,000+
adv & bar glass

SUN. MAY 6 Antiaue &
Collectible Auction
Prey. 10 Auction 1pm
1937 operational 40FT
tugboat. Quality high
end turn., from Victorian
to Country Oak, coins,
jewelry, 500+ lots of
great value & variety
SEE WEBSITE.
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.


SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

RN-Charge ICU and ED Physical Therapy Assistant
MRITech Experienced MonitorTech
Occupational Therapist Core Measures Coordinator
Occupational Therapy Assistant Network Administrator
Physical Therapist PCA
RN-Cath Lab, ICU, ED,Med-Surg/Tele, Comprehensive Rehab
and Women's and Family Center

Our highly skilled nurses and physicians, state-of-the-art technology, flexible scheduling,
competitive wages and benefits package are just a few of the reasons why you will want to call
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER your home.

For these and other opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
Career Center at www.srrmc.com
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464 Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email: stephanie.arduser@hma.com 352-795-8462

EOE/DRUG/TOBACCO FREE WORKPLACE 000BDBS


l [S15ff 81S88ll: B135^^', B
T O *A RTIS E CALL:







352m563m5966
ORPLACY
wwwchonclenlneco


(ONETIG HERIH


BUER*WTHYOR ESAG


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, MVAY 6, 2012 D5









D6 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


Delta Band Saw 14"
w/stand $200. DeWalt
Comp. matter saw 10"
w/stand $150. Crafts-
man 10" band saw
w/stand $85.
many handtools (352)
419-7368/601-5119
Large assortment of
various tools
(352) 527-2029
MILLER GENERATOR
Welder #185, with
Accessories $2,450
(517)431-2170




19' PANASONIC COLOR
TV Cable ready with
remote $25.00
352-746-0401
19" PANASONIC
TV Cable ready color TV
with remote, 25.00
352-746-0401
20" TOSHIBA Color TV
Works Like New Digital
Cable Ready $50
727-463-4411
27" CURTIS MATHIS TV
27"color TV $50.00
Call:628-4271
27" SHARP TV
Cable ready with remote,
very good condition
$45.00 352-746-0401
SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Older Model Digital Cable
Ready Works Like New
$65 727-463-4411
SONY 13 INCH T.V.
WITH REMOTE Very
good condition $20.00
o.b.o. 352-726-0686
XM SIRIUS SATELLITE
RADIO KIT For any car
with radio, car power
adapter, antenna, cradle,
booklet. $20. 201-6764




ALUMINUM SCREEN
PORCH PANELS Excel-
lent condition, five panels,
height 84 1/2", widths 108
1/2", 112 3/4", 122 1/2",
134", 136 1/4" and one
36" screen door Price
$575.00 phone
352 408 9506
352 503 7114
ENTRY DOOR
15 panel hardwood w/all
hardware. Good condi-
tion.$100 obo.
352/628-0698.




COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $75 /352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


13 PC PATIO POOL SET
2 lounge chrs, table w/
lazy susan, umbrella, 6
chrs, 2 foot rests, 1 end
table $550 small storage
shed $75 352-419-4513
OUTDOOR DINING
TABLE,4 CHAIRS AND
CHAISE LOUNGE table
54"x36"oval putty pvc
pipe, 4 matching chairs
sling beige with green
palm trees and matching
chaise lounge. 5yrs old
always beeinn enclo-
sure. $175.00
352-489-9683




(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabnric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metal Frames with Arms
2 for $35 727-463-4411
2 Twin beds
Headboards
w/cottage grey shell
pattren w/metal
frames, matt & bx
springs $700 Wooden
Computer desk
w/hutch top $200.
(352) 527-7885
2 White wood rocking
chairs, $50 ea. obo
New Pop Canaopy Tent
$50.obo
(352) 746-0853
5 PC COFFEE TABLE
SET glass coffee and end
tables w/2 lamps..50.00
352-533-8230
6 PC STANLEY BD SET
king sz headbd, triple
dresser, mirror, chest, 2
NS $625 Rattan dinette
$250 cherry sofa table
$65 (352)4194513
36" SQUARE TABLE
PreOwned Rugged Gray
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Frame $65 727-463-4411
60"X40" 3/8" GLASS
TABLE TOP Bevel
edges, etched ribbon on
perimeter, very minor
scraches. $35. 201-6764
Adjusta Magic 2 Twins
Adjustable/massaging
head/foot, like new
$200 ea.(352) 637-6993
BEDROOM SET
FIQ Bed, Dresser
w/mirror,Chest,
Nightstand. $650.00
obo.(352)563-1692 or
ewaldu51@embarqmail.c
om
CHERRYWOOD FRAME
CHAIRS (2) Fabric Up-
holstery with Arms
PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411
Child's Chest of
Drawers, $35 end
tables $10 ea.butcher
block utility table $30.
no calls before noon
(352) 628-4766


USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.comr 795-0121
COUCH & CHAIR blue
floral queen size couch
and chair, excellent con-
dition. $85 352-628-2150
CURIO GLASS DISPLAY
CABINET 4 shelf medi-
cine vintage style, white.
$45.00 352-513-4473
Dark Pine Queen Bed,
Suite, and Mattress,
hutch, dresser, chest,
night stand, like new
$600.
(352) 341-4313
Entertainment Center
Lighted 10' wide 79' tall
inc TV stand area
46" W 45" T $1500
(352) 527-7885
EXERCISE
REBOUNDER CD'S +
BOOK 25.00
912-509-5566
(beverly hills)
Flex Steel Sofa 80"
burgundy/grn leaf like
new $1500 2 matching
chairs available
(352) 527-7885
FOLDING BANQUET TA-
BLE Wood Grain Top 6
Foot Long. PreOwned
$35 727-463-4411
FREE STANDING
CHERRYWOOD BOOK-
CASE 3 shelves
48"x36"x12" PreOwned
$65 727463-4411
GLIDER CHAIR WITH
OTTOMAN-GREEN
Glider chair w/ ottoman
$50.00 Call:628-4271
LARGE COFFEE TABLE
Unique Indoor/outdoor
use. New over $500.
$100 OBO.
352/628-0698
Lazy Boy Couch Brown,
Like new, 87"L $300 obo
Oak Electric Fire Place
52" L. 41" H, $200 obo
(352) 746-0853
LAZY BOY Dble sofa
bed, hunter's green
$250. 60"x42" Wooden
Oval pedestal table
w/4 chrs. $500
(352) 527-7885
LEATHER LAZYBOY
RECLINER'S Pair
Leather Lazyboy Recliner
Rockers. Light Brown.
Will sell separately.
Pictures available.
$125.00 each
352 746-6406
Loveseat
sage.$200 brown
recliner $100. Lovely Kit
set 4 chairs on coasters
$200. wood baby
dressing table $75.
wooden end tables $35
ea. All show rm cond
(352) 795-0363
OLDER WOODEN DESK
$25.00 915-509-5566
(beverly hills)
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808


CLASSIFIED


PURPLE LEATHER
RECLINER SOFA $115.
Love Seat
sofabedgreenstripe 250.
White bar height
table/41eather like chairs
200. phone
352-344-2833
RECLINER, BLUE
TWEED nice condition
$45.00 352 513 4473
ROUND TABLE 36"
Like New Rugged Yellow
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $65
727-463-4411
SOFA, LOVESEAT
Light pattern, Striped
$300 set, Glass coffee
table, light wood, $250
obo. (352) 613-7941
STACKABLE CHAIRS
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Choice of Fabrinc
Color $10 each
727-463-4411
STORAGE CABINET
WITH LOCK AND KEY 4
Roll Out Shelves
54"x36"x18"
727-463-4411
TABLE, 2 CHAIRS +
BENCH 50.00
912-509-5566
(beverly hills)
TWIN WICKER
HEADBOARD $25.00
Call:628-4271
TWO END TABLES
$125, WALL UNITS,
Call for $$$$$$$$$
(352) 613-7941
USED KING MATT AND
BOXES Very clean!!!!
$100.00 352-257-5722
for details




DixonRiding
Mower
0 turn, 51" deck, $1500
(352) 746-7357
Garden Tractor
Murry 20hp V-twin B&S
eng.48" mulching deck
$400 firm.
(352) 302-6069
New Steel Garden
Wagon
$100.
(352) 341-4313
STORAGE/GARDEN
SHED rubber maid
7'X1O' shed with double
front door, side
doors,floor,back win-
dow and 2 sky lights!
$600 352-563-1519



Rose of Sharon For Sale
In Bloom Right Now
At 1733 N. Croft Ave.
Inverness 352-341-7780




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. 5 & Sun. 6, 9a-2p.
97 S. Davis Street


Citrus Springs
8534 N Mernmac Way
Sat 7-1 Sun 8-12
Delta Band Saw 14"
w/stand $200. DeWalt
Comp. matter saw 10"
w/stand $150. Crafts-
man 10" band saw
w/stand $85.
many handtools (352)
419-7368/601-5119

GUN SHOW
CMstal River Armorv
May 12 & 13,
Sat 9-5 Sun 9-4
GunTraders
is now buying GOLD
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Brina your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134




LADIES JUSTIN GYPSY
BOOTS Pinklbrown, 7
1/2. Like New, No marks
or stains. Paid 100, ask-
ing $60. 352-726-1526
PROM DRESS $30.00
Size 10 classic A-line
satin periwinkle prom
dress with matching
shoes (7-1/2). 860-1636



IPHONE/IPOD BAT-
TERY BACKUP-NEW
Never run out of power!
Retails $40. Sell $25 Call
228-7372




12 x24 ft.
Top of the Line
Above Ground Pool,
Excellent Condition
$800 obo
(352) 465-3175
24 GAL RUBBERMAID,
Action Packer Storage
Box New $15
(352) 382-1154
48 Qt. RUBBERMAID, Ice
Chest, NEW $18
(352) 382-1154
60 PEICE KIDS WOOD
BUILDING BLOCKS.
$25.00 Call:628-4271
1918 JENNY STAMP
GREAT COND $100.00
OR B.O. lNDA
352-341-4449


TANDEM KAYAK. 10-1
pedal drive, rudder, high
comfort frame seats, 2
paddles, original cart, zip-
per cover. Excellent con-
dition. All for $1,400(new
$2,700).352-201-6764


(beverly hills)
912-509-5566
6V/2 ft. Fiberglass
Swimming Pool Slide
$500 obo
(352) 628-7633
ARTIST'S
Studio supplies A-Z 100's
of Items, some new,
some used, a bargain
bundle $500 (oil
paints)(352) 527-8528
Boat, RV, Car
Storage indoor $75.
month (352) 637-1739
Car Maintenance
Ramp set $20.
H.P. Office Jet-
All in one #7210
Printer/fax/scanner
$55.(352) 382-1154
CHENILLE new white
king size bedspread
$25.00 (beverly hills)
912-509-5566
DOGGIE ride stroller
also hooks on bike
$40.00 beverly
hills(912-509-5566)
DOONEY
black shoulder purse
$30.00 912-509-5566
(beverly hills)
FRAMED CORK BOARD
Used approximately 4 x 4
framed cork board.
352-566-6646
GARAGE DOOR
OPENER Screw drive,
works, includes remote.
$45. Call to see in action.
382-3847
General lonics H20
Conditioner 99.99%
pure H20 bio static filter
used 6 mos $1,500. obo
(352) 270-8743
HEAVY DUTY ROLLING
LADDER 6 Steps Hand
& Guard Rails Excellent
Use for RV and Boat Re-
pair $95 727-463-4411
HOOVER
SELF-PROPELLED
VACUUM CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO $45 CALL IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
LOTS OF BEDS $100ea
LOTS OF TV'S $25 $75
AND MORE
(352) 634-0129
MISCELLANEOUS
YARD SALE STUFF Mis-
cellaneous yard sell stuff
$10 a box. 352-566-6646
MUUMUU DRESS $20
NEW NEVER WORN
EMBROIDERED SIZE
LARGE CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
OVERSTUFFED CHAIR
Beautiful green leaf
designed overstuffed
chair.Good condition.
$65.00 352-527-3177
PICK UP TRUCK
RUNNING BOARDS
6 Foot Long Platinum
Color Universal Mounting
$65 727-463-4411
PUSH MOWER & LEAF
BLOWER
Yardman 22" mower $50
Toro Gas Blower $30
716/860-6715


ROOF VENTS Two used
roof vents good condition
asking $15 each.
352-566-6646
ROTISSERIE SUNBEAM
CAROUSEL $45 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
SHELVING UNIT 6 foot
heavy duty shelving
unit.$15.00
352-566-6646
STAG HORN PLANT
40 yrs old, 8 diam. 7'
top to bottom $1500
obo(352) 382-0741
Swing set, $100
or best offer
Call Andy
(352) 476-1735
TOWER air purifier
$25.00 912-509-5566
(beverly hills)
WALL SCONES
$20.00 912-509-5566
(beverly hills)
White round plastic
table, 4 chairs, new
umbrella $30.
IAIWA Stereo system
cass/turn table/CD,
remote, stand $100.
SMW's (352) 382-3015
WOOD-PINE SLABS
(1 1)25"x6' x 1 7/8"
thick, $10 each. Good for
workbench tops
(352)637-6619



Handycap Scooter
Like New,
New battery
w/ hoist,
$550.
(352) 726-8336
Red Pride 4 Wheel
Electric Scooter,
with charger, New
batteries good cond.
Paid $1,900 Asking
$850. Can Deliver
(352) 527-2639












STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP ON SERVICE FOR 8.
KEN 352-601-7074
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




AMERICAN STANDARD
SINK White Oval 19"
Outside Measurement is
21" $20 727-463-4411


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I General


FLOOR TILES 12 x 12/
NEW light colors/25.00
Linda 341-4449
GARAGE DOOR
OPENER Screw drive,
works, includes remote.
$45. Call to see in
action. 382-3847
GARBAGE CANS (2)
Very clean. One with
wheels, other regular.
Both $20. Call 382-3847.
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE NEW/12 x 9
Was 59.95/selling for
20.00 IINDA 341-4449
TROPICAL OIL PAINT-
ING 54" x 43 1/2 "wood
frame painting .Mauve.
and blues with palm
trees. Beautiful. Good
deal. $50.00
352-489-9683
VANITY TABLE...
wooden with mirror top,
pink skirt with small chair.
Not a child's toy. $45 Call
352-228-7372




BODYSMITH WEIGHT
EQUIPMENT Bodysmith
weight bench and ac-
cessories more than
500 pounds in free
weights,bench,butterfly, lifting
bars and more.
$300.00.Pickup or deliv-
ery for a fee.
352-560-7869
Bowflex, Ultimate 2
like new,
$800 obo
(352) 621-0522
GAZELLE EDGE
GLIDER Classic Gazelle
low impact exercise
glider, digital readout,
exc cond $50. 201-6764
Stamina Precision Rower.
Classic slide rower.Heavy
duty resistance cylinders.
Practically new $99.
352-201-6764




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
COBRA 2 SHOT
.38 Spec. Derringer,
w/pocket holster &
ammo new in box
never fired $200.
(352) 344-5283
ConcealedWeapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GO-DEVIL MOTOR For
Sale used 1998 Honda
Go-Devil motor with 20
horsepower electnc
start- low usage hours-
$1500. Call Craig at
341-0476 or
352-446-5679.


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

NEW 16X8.5 V nose
encl. car hauler
$3995
USED 7X18 Goose
neck, 6 ton Equip.
hauler w/mesh sides
& ramp gate $2895

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299


vanesDiwiseer'y


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020






SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179






Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR 491. 746-1998






LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872






Awn ngs "Carports
Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic. Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557





AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

Computer Problems?
Sr. Discount-in home
service. John Warken
(352)503-4137


I REm


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

_ CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584






AAA ROOFING
Call t e "t4ak6uster"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 ~ 00BA QM


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000B6SU


WINDOVPQ

We dlean Windows and o Whole Lot More,
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366

CREATION ELECTRIC:
Full service contractor.
Residential & commer-
cial specialist. Service
changes, large or small
repairs, Spa hookups &
more. Lic/Ins.
352-4274216.

DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *





ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977





Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ABC Painting &
Handyman Services.
Low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V*FAST
V AFFORDABLE
se RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
& RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100%Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC V THIS OUT!
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST AC & HEAT PUMPS
Build your new pool now and Opinion, 10 yr warr
be ready for next summer! on ALL Parts, Great
Refinish your pool during the cooler months. prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
352-400-3188 Lic #CAC027361


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator 'tttit'ttyj

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

I enerac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377






* New Landscapes


* One Time Cuts


* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
S & Landscape
^s.t (352)464-3566


&* Decorative Mulch
NEW & Stones
C10 U Top Soil
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!


NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
"j 'Y Residential &
"I^ J.. Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


Citrus Cleaning
Team
Reasonabe
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Team
Reasonctle
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Team Reasonable
Rates. Stacy 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L i-
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566
SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421


Lawn Care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALLi!!
OCALL 352-228-7320
All 'n'1 Lawncare
property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
Richard's LawnCare
Low rates, dependable
FREE Estimate, leave
message 352- 287-1198



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
Roesch Construction
House Moving Founda-
tion Work,Level Floors
Repair/Demolition
Mcduff:352-586-4171




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman Services,
Low rates, Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/IEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handy an Services,
low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
S H Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
= ,Screening
Clean Dryer
h l. Vents

L CONSTRUCTION Affordable & Dependable
r352-628-2291 xperencelifelong
PreventDryerFiresNow.com K cel l:400-1722


1994 club car, gas
engine, very good
condition $1450 obo
(352) 795-5421
Golf cart parts, battery
charger, 36 or 48 volt,
$185 with exchange.
8" wheel & tire, $15
(315) 466-2268
GOLF CLUBS,
LOTS of sets & singles,
equipment, technical
manuals to make
golf clubs $800 obo
(352) 621-3133

GUN SHOW

May 12 & 13,
Sat, 9-5 Sun, 9-4
GunTraders
is now buying GOLD
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Brina your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134

Gun Winchester
12 Gage, Pump, model
1200 excel cond.
$350. (352) 637-0987
GUNS
45 auto stainless, AMT,
hardballer, mint $550.
Kimber 45/22 cony
new in bx $250
(352) 563-5628
Savage 30/30 pump
22" barrl, mts. exc. $350
Marlin 22 mag. stain-
less, new in box, hvy brl
scope $300
(352) 563-5628
SCHWINN STINGRAY
BICYCLE Collectable,
great condition, only
$100. 352/628-0698
TENT
Outdoor Spirit 18' x
10.5', dome, sleeps 10,
brand new, $100
(352) 563-0106
WE BUY GUNS |
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


I 1;









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto

Utility Trailer
4x 9.......... $500.
(352) 746-7357






SOak-




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966













TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369


tOt


ALPINE COACH 2001,
37', 2 slides, 330 cum-
mins turbo, loaded with
options and includes 18'
add a room. Warranty for
5 years or 80K miles!
$55,000 or BRO, no
trades. 207-852-5926




BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219

BOARDING & TRAINING
Air Condition Kennel,
Critters and Canines
Homosassa 634-5039
Dachshund long hair
mini.all shots, 9 mos,
blk/creme,lovable
lap dog. spayed,
crate,pen& doghouse
$320. (352) 726-0094
Dachshunds, Mini Long
Hair ,8 wks, H/C CH
Bid. Lines,Choc. Black/
cream shadded Eng.
Cream $300-$500 (352)
795-6870/220-4792

DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718

Designer Puppies
Father 31b Chihuahua
mother 61bs Shih-Tuz
will be 8 wks old, 4
males white $275 ea.
(352) 795-7513
ENGLISH BULLDOG
Beatuifl 4 months old
male, white, all shots,
health certs., $700
(352) 341-7732
Cell 352-613-3778

Jack Russell Puppies
12 weeks old
parents on premises
$150.
(352) 897-4490
KITTENS & CATS
MANY BREEDS
All neutered, micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832

Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783


LABRADOODLE PUP-
PIES ready may 4th. 10
larbadoodle puppies fe-
male and males 575.00
and 625.00. ckc,vet
check,h/c ect.
4theluvofdoodles@gmail.c
om
LABRADORS (2) Free to
good home older labs in
need of loving care. I am
no longer able to care for
them. One black lab is 8
years old, one chocolate
lab is 13 years old. They
both have had all their
shots, and have been
spayed and neutered.
Please help. contact
home phone at
352-628-5402 or Cell
phone 352-601-7520
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




English & American Bull
dog mixed puppies,
10 wks old. $125.
(352) 621-0157




BARN MASTERS
We Build..Horse Stalls
Barns,,Fences..Decks..
Pastures.(352) 257-5677


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers calF
352-563-5592.


New Type 1 vest, Std
Hoz.hand held radio
13Lb anchors, 3 strand
rope, 3/8,1/2. 5/8, 6 gal
fuel tank 352) 382-3298




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. MAY 3 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-? Row, groups,
piles w/furniture., appli-
ances, tools. Follow the
auctioneer. So much to
choose from 3,000+
adv & bar glass

SUN. MAY 6 Antiaue &
Collectible Auction
Prev. 10 Auction 1pm
1937 operational 40FT
tugboat. Quality high
end turn., from Victorian
to Country Oak, coins,
jewelry, 500+ lots of
great value & variety
SEE WEBSITE.
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.
'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini,
newrtrlr much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
Flat Bottom Aluminum
Boat,18' & trailer as is
$900.
(352) 489-4761
Palm Beach 02
16' 50hp yamaha, alum
tril, extra's, exc cond.
$5500(352) 563-5628
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8495
(352) 563-5628
SEYLOR
15ft Center Console,
w/48HP Evin. mtr. trail,
Asking $2,100 obo
(352) 476-1113
TROLLER 85
14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke
electric start,trolling
motor, hummingbird
fish finder w/trailer
$1800 bo 352-344-5993


GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
JAYCO '04
40', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator, slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285




GULF STREAM
'98, Seahawk 5th
Wheel, 30 ft. full slide,
new tires, clean $7,500
obo 440-813-5334
412-629-3231


CITUS COUNTY



Twww.chroncleonline.comrn
Floria andW aIoa l d Coll se non Comm- l on;
htaptlnud.cormi -myi sthp-com-app


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 D7


2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
HUNTING CAMPER
15' good cond..$450. &
30' org.wood cabs lots
of storage$1050.(352)
344-4670/220-1262
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,200. 352-795-2975
SKAMPER
2005 Travel Trailer 26ft
queen bed,toilet,shower,
fng,A/C,heat,Hot water,
slideout,awning,couch,
sleeps 6. $6900. ph
352-746-2172
leave
message
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bedlike
new,heated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$29k obo 352-382-3298



1999 Dodge pickup,
V-6 automatic,
parts, $200
(315) 466-2268
Bull Bar, Westin, like
new, fits F Series Ford
Truck w/ spare,
$250 obo
(352) 621-0522
DODGE TRUCK TOPPER
for 3/4 Ton Pick-Up
Excellent
Condition $90
352-628-2150
GMC TRUCK TOPPER
for Half Ton Pick-Up
Excellent
Condition $85
352-628-2150



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909 |








JUNK CARS PAY-
ING $300 AND UP
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS. $300 AND UP
FOR ANY FULL SIZE
VEHICLE. NO TITLE RE-
QUIRED* SAME DAY
PICK UP. FREE TOW-
ING. OPEN 7 DAYS A
WEEK. 352-301-8888







KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298
WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
consianmentusa.ora
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440


1970 CHEVROLET
CHEVELLE
SS 454/360HP, red, auto-
matic, Price $5800 e-mail
for pictures
gauthy6@msn.com /
813-377-4590.
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 63 -I 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BUICK
'03, Regal, 4 Door,
82k miles, Like New
ASKING $4,200.
352-461-4518
BUICK
'05, Le Sabre Custom,
Leather, Canvas Top,
Chrome pkg. New Tires,
Loaded, Like New, 70K
$8,600 (352) 634-3806
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
MERCEDES
'78, 450SL, org. mi. 82K
2 tops, Florida Car, ga-
raged, very clean 8cyl,
auto/gas, beautiful
$13,000 (352) 344-4352


S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto

PONTIAC
'06, Solstice, Red Conv.,
5spd, excel. cond.
low miles, Lots of Extras
$13,600 (352) 344-0678

SAND RAIL
project $500.
(352) 228-1897

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org





AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
MAY 6. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Notices


CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
CHRYSLER SEBRING 98
RED CONVERTIBLE
beautiful condition in
and out, runs fine
$5000
(352) 628-1723




CHEVROLET '03
Silverado, 47K miV8
auto, air, pwr. Win & DR
8ft bd, new tires $12,500
obo (352) 447-1244
CHEVY COLORADO
2006, EXTRA CAB
59K miles, 4 cyl, 5spd
Tilt, Cruise $7800
(352) 637-5001

Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166K mis. $6k obo
352-302-7204

FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576

POLAR '01
60HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
motor. 17' L, 8'W Bimini
top, ladder $6K obo
must sell 352-494-0009

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org





2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533




342-0513 SUCRN


TOYOTA
2008 FJ Cruiser Trail
Teams edition, 14800 mi-
les, white, 4X4, naviga-
tion, excellent condition,
$9800,
bacb@netscape.com




CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger,body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded insidevelour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.
Asking $3,200.OBO,
call 637-4011




CAN-AM
'09, Low miles, less than
1,700 mi, red & black,
lots of accessories
$13,000 firm (352)
564-0130 or 634-0883
Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
HARLEY 98
1200 Sportster custom
8k miles, lots of extras &
new parts first...$4K
call pm (352) 382-0403
Harley Davidson
03, Super Road King,
fuel inj. $48K up grades
too much to list/ Cry Riv
$8800 (727) 207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
Harley Davidson
2011 street glide,
Xtras, ext. warranty,
2200. miles
$19,500 (352) 465-3668
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$5995 352-601-7460


5/23 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Personal Property of the following Tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and
83-807: PERSONAL MINI STORAGE- DUNNELLON
UNIT #00237 CINDAS. SEIBERT #00009 CHERYLYN MORGAN #00141 RITAWILKINS
#00163 MARINDA GARRISON #00005 ASHLEY HIBBERT
Contents may include kitchen, household items, bedding, luggage, toys, games,
packed cartons, furniture, tools, clothing, trucks, cars, etc. There's no Title for vehicles
sold at Lien Sale. Owners reserve the right to Bid on Units. Line Sale to be held on the
premises May 23, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. Viewing will be at the time of the sale only.
Personal Mini Storage Dunnellon, 11955 N. Florida Ave., (Hwy. 41) Dunnellon, FL 34434
(352) 489-6878
May6 and 13, 2012.


343-0506 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Lueder, Rowe, Carithers
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Jeremy A. Lueder Denise N. Rowe Ancil E. Carithers
2021 NW 15th St 660 S Otis Ave 1935 N Rock Cress Path
Crystal River, FL 34428 Lecanto, FL 34461 Crystal River, FL 34429
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
May 6,2012.


339-0506 SUCRN
5/10 Meeting Citrus County Aviaton Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 10, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
May 6,2012.


340-0506 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 022-12
Traffic Control Materials-Permanent Preformed Thermoplastic
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide permanent preformed thermoplastic lines, markings, legends, letters &
numbers, and adhesives for placement throughout Citrus County on roadways and
parking lots (herein after referred to as "Commodity"). See the Specifications Section
of this Invitation to Bid for more information.
Minimum Requirement to Submit a Bid- Bidders must provide documentation showing
full unconditional approval by FDOT with their bid submittal.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before May 18, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for May 18, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Then click on "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
May 6,2012.

341-0506 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 021-12
Articulated Water Truck
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide an articulated water truck with a 2600 gallon tank or equivalent
(herein after referred to as "Commodity"). See the Specifications Section of this Invi-
tation to Bid for more information.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before May 18, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for May 18, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Then click on "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
May 6,2012.


CLASSIFIED


I Misc Noti


I Misc Noti


I Misc Noti


Metn


Metn


Metn


I Bi


I BN


I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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D8 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


dol--a, --








HOMEFRONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


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ON THE COVER:
D o-SCAPING,
E6
JANE'S GARDEN:
PRICKLY PEA
4 CACTUS, E
STHE ARBORIST:
WOOD DECA~,
'n" E9
FLORIDA-FRIENDLY LIVING:
RAINBOW
SPRINGs, E4
REAL ESTATE:
SEE
COMPLETE
LISTINGS
An English cream golden retriever and a
golden retriever that created a muddy
runway in their owner's back yard are
shown April 28 in Larchmont, N.Y.
Muddy lawns and ankle-twisting craters
are just two of the problems that frus-
trate pet owners each spring. But with
some simple design steps, you can re-
claim your back yard.
Associated Press










E2 SUNDA',~ MAY6, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


*Over 3,000 Sq. Ft.!! Pool/Lanai/Summer Kit.
* 3/3/3 Car Gar.!! Prestigious Entry
' Gorgeous Kitchen Circular Drive
* Golf/Equest. Comm. Relaxing Master Suite!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997

E-MAIL:elliesuIton@lremax.nel


UPDATED HOME GORGEOUS LOT!
*3/2.5/3 + Office/Den Stunning Salt Water Pool
'Many Built-Ins Master Suite/Soaking Tub
*Large Family Home Light and Bright Kitchen
*Family Friendly Home Gorgeous Lanai Area!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
I f .m II 1lrut i un L
www.FloridaLislinglnlo.com











PRIVATE ACREAGE!!
* Gorgeous Kitchen 2.80 Private Acres
* Fenced and Gated Great for Gardening
* Huge Great Room 2/2/2 Car Gar.
* Master Suite w/FP!!! Steel Frame Const.!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E MAIL kellg. i enai A nel


aU W. IP3Wlln LANI
HAMPTON HILLS
* Gorgeous 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Gourmet Kitchen w/Stainless Steel Appliances
* Granite Countertops Gas Fireplace
* Lg. Screened Tiled Lanai 1 Acre Landscaped Corner Lot

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


LESS THAN $43/SQ. FT. for 3/2 on an
acre+ in Kensington Estates! You can't build
for that cheap! 2,576 sq. ft. living area
includes big bedrooms, formal living/dining
rooms, Fm. Rm. w/wood-burning FP, huge
eat-in kitchen, Ig. laundry room, screened
patio. Plus a Bonus Room used as an office/
playroom.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


beautiful 3/34 brick c'olonal is situated on five peaceful
acres in Pine Ridge Farms Interior features include but not
limited to split floor plan, upgraded gourmet kitchen,
hardwood throughout fireplace, dual AC, security system,
built in buffet tasteful paint/carpet and window treatments
Master bedroom boast 18x24 size with huge dual walk-in
closets Master bath features dual sinks, walk-in shower and
two person jacuzzi tub Possible in-law setup
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


Nicely upgraded 3/2/3 in beautiful Sugarmill
Woodsl Before you purchase in the area do yourself
a favor and tour this lovely home Split plan, wood
shutters, solid surface counters, wood cabinets,
window treatments, ceramic tile and large patio are
some of the great features this property boasts Call
today for your private showingll
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
*Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 .
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


< 242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
835S Snos Bv. oro1s 62-70 ww.our Inielsfeco 50 NE Hwy 9Ias ivr7524


E2 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Geistfeld on top
in Citrus Hills
HERNANDO Karis Geistfeld
was recognized as the top sales
agent for March 2012 from The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills.
"For one to become a
sales leader now and in
the future, they must un-
derstand the differences
between today's buyer and
the buyer of yesterday.
They must be very cog-
nizant of their wants,
needs and fears," com- Ke
mented Mike Casey, vice Gehi
president of sales and of Citr
marketing. "For Karis to
achieve this top honor
three months in a row is a reflection
on her ability to grasp and under-
stand her customer's personal de-
sires. We congratulate Karis on her
continued success."
"I consider Citrus Hills the pre-
eminent builder in Florida and I
know our customers appreciate the


ir
u


quality that goes into every new
home, the after-sell support and the
sense of community felt throughout
all of our neighborhoods," Geistfeld
said. "I appreciate and value the
trust my customers have instilled in
me and will always work to
exceed their expectations."
Beyond new home
sales, Geistfeld and her
husband, Phil, enjoy cook-
ing, entertaining, kayaking
- J and spending time with
their two children. She
also exercises her love for
riseld music by playing the saxo-
lages phone and singing locally
s Hills in church.
Citrus Hills offers Florida
living in a variety of village styles in-
cluding both traditional single-family
homes and easy maintenance de-
tached villas. The neighborhoods
are highlighted by gated entrances
for added privacy.
All choices provide owners with
convenient access to the many
recreational and club facilities, in-


eluding four challenging golf
courses, three clubhouses, an ac-
tivity center, multiple dining venues,
both indoor and outdoor swimming
pools, the 45,000 BellaVita Spa &
Fitness Center and two tennis
centers.
The Welcome Center for The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills is at 2400 N.
Terra Vista Blvd. in Hernando. On-
line at www.CitrusHills.com.
RE/MAX honors
top producers
Several
RE/MAX Realty
One agents
passed the Mil- .
lion Dollar mark '
in sales volume 1
this week.
The brokers
and staff are Geila
proud to recog- English
nize Geila Eng- RE/MAX
lish, Len Realty One.
Palmer, Debra
Pilny and Kim DeVane for this ac-


DIGEST GUIDE
* News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity.


Len
Palmer
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Debra
Pilny
RE/MAX
Realty One.


complishment. Less than 10 percent of the
local agents in Citrus County have passed
this milestone. These four agents demon-
strate true professionalism by succeeding
not only in a challenging market but in a
short period of time.
English and Palmer are agents in the
Lecanto RE/MAX office. Pilny works out of
Inverness and DeVane is in the Crystal
River office.
The associates and staff of RE/MAX
Realty One are pleased to recognize Jody


iEa


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.


Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de-sac! Move-in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to the new shopping
center and Suncoast Parkway.
MLS 353832 $149,000


Kim
DeVane
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Jody
Broom
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Broom this week for passing the Multi-Mil-
lion mark in sales volume. Broom joins only
a handful of agents who have qualified for
this prestigious level this year.
A veteran of Citrus County real estate,
Broom is well known for her success in the
Homosassa area, especially in Riverhaven
Village. She recently celebrated her 15th
year with RE/MAX Realty One. The bro-
kers of RE/MAX extend their appreciation
and congratulations to Broom on her con-
tinued success.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
(352) 220-0466


gbarth@myflorida-house .com


GRAB THIS BARGAIN!
Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5 Country Estate on 10+ acre and
take a 3600 interactive virtual tour at www.mycountrydreamhome.com.
MLS# 350369. $565,000
1 I.


3560 N WOODCATE DR. -
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW
II INVERNESS
hyig m this 2 bed, 2 bath, 1 car garage villa Positioned to enjoy the stunning sunsets 3644 E. LAKE TODD DR.
located m The Glen, a 55+ community, and catch the breezes this 3/2 5/2 home in ARBOR LAKES
surrounded by nature, close to .,... 11. ....... gated community of Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+
dining, medical. The home is .1 ... .. 11.11 homes with upgrades like community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open
condition, ready for you to move in, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a
your front porch and watch the wildlife m the impressive porch for entertaining It can be spacious patio and the yard even has room
large greenbelts yours for a pool!
MLS #350097 $54,000 MLS#351012 $215,000 MLS #353089 $116,000


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
FLORAL CITY
S .. '..i citrus Hills!! LIVING ON THE WATER! Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
S... ner lot, this This classic contemporary pool home is Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
rr i- 1. ... .. .... 1 ...1 right setting for living the Florida yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
S .. .. 1 . style. Open and airy with the plantation your boat to go fishing -this 3/2/1 pool
want!! Everything is very well maintained, shutters diffusing the sunlight. 190 ft. of home on 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
New roof 5/2009. Just bring your suitcase seawall gives you plenty of room i you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! .11,1 .... 1 '
MLS#346203 $175,000 11 $489,000 MLS #351008 $239,000


COLDwe.LL
BANKeRO


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information......352-563-5592
................................................... advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information....................... 352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CifikN WiE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get out and explore Rainbow Springs


Register by May 8
Did you know the Rainbow
River is ranked fourth in the
state for the volume of water it
discharges each day?
The Rainbow River is
formed by a first-magnitude
spring (Rainbow Springs),
but there are numerous _
vents that issue 400 million
to 600 million gallons of /
crystalline water each day. -
Because of its nearly pris-
tine, natural condition, the
Rainbow River is one of the Joan B]
more scenic rivers in FLOE
Florida, earning the dis-
tinction of being one of the FRIE
state's Outstanding Florida LIV
Waters.
If you have wanted to explore and
learn more about one of the area's
finest natural areas, now is your
opportunity.
UF-IFAS Marion and Citrus County
Extension invite you to get out and ex-
plore one of the area's most unspoiled
hidden gems, the Rainbow River.
Program participants will have an
opportunity to hike nature trails, take
a canoe trip down the Rainbow River


and engage in workshops about pre-
serving and protecting one of the true
aquatic gems of our area.
Activities include:
Hiking tours led by Florida State
Park rangers.
Aquifer presentation
by Southwest Florida Water
Management District
geologist.
Water quality demon-
-- station by UF research
scientists.
\s Get Out and Explore Rain-
bow Springs Waters Day will
run from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
adshaw Wednesday, May 16, with op-
IIDA- tional canoe trip from 3 to 5
NDLY p.m., at Rainbow Springs
State Park, 19158 S.W 81st
ING Place Road, Dunnellon.
Pre-registration deadline
is Tuesday, May 8. Register online at
GetOutandExplore.Eventbrite.com or
call 352-671-8400.
There is a $7 fee for refreshments
and lunch.
Space is limited. Pre-registration is
required to participate in this event.
For additional information, please
call the UF/IFAS Marion County Ex-
tension Service at 352-671-8400.
Activity level will be moderate -


Register online at
GetOutandExplore.
Eventbrite.com or call
352-671-8400.
Get Out and Explore requires some
walking on nature trails and to the
boat launch.
Sponsors of this event include
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District, UF/IFAS Extension and
Florida State Parks and the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
Programs and activities offered by the
Extension Service are available to all
persons without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or national ori-
gin. "Citrus County Extension Pro-
viding Solutions for Your Life."

Dr Joan Bradshawis the natural
resource conservation faculty for
specialized programs in Citrus,
Hernando, Pasco and Sumter
counties with University of
Florida/IFAS Extension Service.


Rocker improved through paint removal; portrait needs ID


Special to the Chronicle
This washstand was made in America sometime during the late 19th to
early 20th century. Potential dollar value is $100 to $200.


D earJohn: Enclosed are two
pictures. I would like to
know your expertise on
both items. They were in my hus-
band's family generation after
generation so I know they are old.
I was dis-
mayed that
the rocker
was painted
black. I took -
it all down
and applied
an oak stain. w
I know that
this takes
away the John Sikorski
value, but it SIKORSKI'S
is a much
p r e t t i e r ATTIC
piece. I was
told that it is quite unusual to have
two carved back panels.
The dry sink was painted an
ugly green. When I removed the
paint to my surprise, the original
handles were beautiful. I also


This photograph shows a cowgirl,
but not the famous Annie Oakley.
Recognize her? Let John Sikorski
know!

added an oak stain. Thank you for
any information you may give me.
- PP, Crystal River
Dear PP: You did not take away


the dollar value by removing the
paint. Instead, you have enhanced
both salability and dollar value of
your rocker. A machine pressed
the design into the wood, produc-
ing the floral decorations on the
two backrest panels. The rocker is
called a pressed back. Rockers
like this were manufactured in
massive quantities and typically
sell in the $75 to $150 range.
The piece of furniture is a wash-
stand, not a dry sink. It was made
in America sometime during the
late 19th to early 20th century Po-
tential dollar value is $100 to $200.
Dear John: I am enclosing an
old photograph of a lady, which I
thought might be Annie Oakley.
However, it is not. I suspect she
was a late 1800 or early 1900 per-
former in a circus or Wild West
show.
I wonder if you can tell me who
she may be and if there may be
any collector value. I can find no
See ATTIC/Page E5


r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

markings either front or
back. K. W, Homosassa
Dear K.W: I do not recog-
nize the cowgirl in your
photo. She certainly has the
wardrobe of a Wild West
performer The fancy
beaded cuffs, bullwhip, and
wearing the six-shooter and
holster on her left hip for a
right-hand draw all make
her appear very authentic.
I am sure she is not Annie
Oakley, but perhaps a con-
temporary of the era. I won-
der if any of our readers
recognize her.
Dear John: Here is a
photo of a Zenith 1938 wal-
nut veneer cabinet, which
sits on my bench mostly be-
cause it was exposed to hu-
midity in a garage or storage
facility.
The humidity of Florida


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 E5


takes its toll on furniture not
properly stored though it
can be refurbished.
What is the value of this
unit if properly repaired
and refinished assuming
that the electronics, lighting
and dial are all functioning,
which they are? J.,
Internet
Dear J.: Zenith radios
were produced in huge
quantities during the 1920s
to '30s. They can be found in
marketplace generally sell-
ing in the $50 to $150 range.
It would likely be a losing
proposition to completely
restore in order to resell it
Dear John: We have a
hand painted Nippon vase
that has been in the family
for many years. It is in good
condition with no obvious
marks or defects. It is ap-
proximately 8 inches high
and 6 inches in diameter at
its widest point. What can
you tell me about it? -
L.H., Internet


Dear L.i: Use of the word Nippon
by the Japanese for their country of
origin export mark was dropped in
1921 and replaced with the word
Japan. All the beautiful hand painted
porcelain vases, chocolate sets, and
more marked Nippon are a category
of specific collector interest called
Nippon.


The category has been flooded with
reproductions for several decades and
new collectors should beware.
Since your Nippon vase was passed
down in the family, it is certainly not a
reproduction.
In order to help you with potential
dollar value, I need a couple of good,
clear photographs.


S Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor. A OUSE Realtor ,a
302.3179 SOLDoNa' 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700
4247 N. BRYNNER PASS T11R.
.11. BEVERLY HILLS

.. .. .. -. ..--..


I CX 518 S. HARRISON
S BEVERLY HILLS

h ,, I ,,,, h ,,, ,,, ," ,,, , h ,,, I
,, ,,- I ,, , , ,,


-
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques business
for 30 years. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
detached 2 story garage. $32,900 1300 sq. ft building. $71,900 MLS#354972


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybss@0ampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 30302-6714 "


WATERING FINES
* Effective Jan. 1, Citrus County has stopped issuing
warnings for first offenders of local watering rules.
Citations carry with them a fine of $100.


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
2 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
E RX bob@bjdavis.com I
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:bidaviscorn
FOR YOUR
FAIRY-TALE LIFE
5 S_ Bedrooms, 7 baths

Granite throughout
Hardwood floors
4-car garage
.. Pool with spa
r~c' S- Acres
.tt ., '_ _- $750 ,000 MLS 352090

FABULOUS ESTATE
3,300 SFLA w/pool
3 Bdrm, 3 BA, office
Fam. rm w/fireplace
%U.C-i'r, 3 Car garage
jAt t Detached 3-car garage
. --- withh guest suite
10 Fenced acres
$575,000 MLS 346814
WINDERMERE VILLAS
2 Bedrooms, 2 baths
2-Car driveway
--- Lanai
Maintenance-free
@ $155/mos
Clubhouse/Heated pool
$97K $101K


Amnda & Kirk John. Tom Baltour UlI Ars & H teiner Art Paty 7 4 6 -9 0 0 0
BROKER/ASSOC. I EALTO R ? REACTOR BROKER REACTOR
0A. . .
2o02sb st uy ca


-INNNNMA 1V R ;I-
BEVER$8 900LS


10

OWE FIACN


CITRUS SPRINGS


CIR US SPRINGS~f-l-
I.W. .Al







E6 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012




Dog-scaping



Garden or dog park: Can species share yard?


WENDY WILLIAMS
For The Associated Press

Is your yard going to the dogs?
Muddy lawns and ankle-twisting
craters are just two of the problems
that frustrate pet owners each spring.
But with some simple design steps,
you can reclaim your back yard.
Begin by thinking about your dog's
specific behavior and needs. Most dogs
will take the shortest route between
two points, creating a muddy trail in
the yard and along property lines.
Other dogs are canine police, pa-
trolling your yard for possible human
or animal intruders. Rushing to the
scene of the crime, they tear up grass
and anything else in their path.
Owners may try to eliminate the
mess by confining pets to a certain
area of the yard. If that doesn't seem
practical or attractive, "Try putting
down prefab pavers or creating a
flagstone path in high traffic areas,"
says Chris Lambton, star of HGTV's
"Going Yard."
'A well-designed path will make
your yard look more like a garden
than a dog park."
A cheaper fix is cedar wood chips
or mulch, which runs about $15 per
yard. "Wood chips can be delivered
and dumped, then easily spread with
a rake or shovel," says Lambton.
"You can use an inexpensive edging
material to keep them in place."
Over time, however, wood chips
can break down. They also can stick
in a dog's fur or cause splinters in its
paws. Worse, some wood chips, such
as cocoa mulch, can be toxic if eaten,
Lambton cautions.
A better option might be pea stone
gravel.
"Gravel is a good solution because
it will stay down and not get muddy,"
says Marty Rogers, a certified master
dog trainer from Yorktown, N.Y "It's
so small that most dogs find it unsat-
isfying to dig or eat. Best of all, it
soaks up urine and can be quickly
washed down with a hose."
Rogers also recommends certain
ground covers for lawn problems.
"Pachysandra works really well for
getting rid of water in muddy areas,"
he says. "It stands up to urination
and grows like a weed."
You can try putting down bales of
hay around the perimeter of your


property Then rake leaves up against
the edge of your yard to minimize
mud problems.
But what if dog owners still crave a
real lawn?
"Try Bermuda Grass, Rye Grass or
Kentucky Blue Grass," says Lambton.
"They are hardier varieties, but don't
count on having a decent lawn if your
dog is running or urinating on it."
Or there's synthetic turf.
"There's no mowing, seeding or
weeding," says Mike Lehrer, owner of
Home Green Advantage in Armonk,
N.Y "Dogs enjoy a clean, puddle-free
environment"
Lehrer has been installing the turf
in doggie day care centers and at res-
idential properties for over 15 years,
but it's a relatively pricey option, at
about $9 to $16 per square foot.
And Lehrer warns against cutting
corners by shopping for used turf on-
line or hiring inexperienced
contractors.
"You can't install on top of gua-
camole," he says. "You really need to
hire someone who knows what he's
doing."
Meanwhile, work with your dog to
improve his behavior, says Rogers.
Dogs who understand what you want
are less likely to tear up your grass or
ruin your heirloom roses.
Some of Rogers' suggestions for
common dog problems:
Digging: Buy an electronic out-
door containment system. When your
dog starts to wander into a "re-
stricted" area, he'll receive a mild
correction that will soon teach him to
stay away You might achieve the
same goal with a vibrating electronic
collar (www.Sitmeanssit.com).
Dog poop: If you want to desig-
nate a particular "bathroom spot" in
your yard, leash your dog and take
him to that same place every time.
Create a few words that he will soon
associate with that spot, like, "Go
potty" or "Do your business." Stay
with him until he goes, and then
praise him lavishly
Most important, "enjoy your dog,
but remember to mentally and physi-
cally exhaust him," says Rogers.
"Give him two or three short obedi-
ence training sessions every day A
tired dog isn't going to destroy your
lawn. All he'll want to do is nap."
You may feel the same way


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
An English cream golden retriever that created a muddy runway in his owner's back yard is shown
April 6 in Larchmont, N.Y.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 E7


Prickly-pear cactus has bright flowers, edible fruit


flowers occur in April and
June locally, depending on
exposure, microclimate and
rainfall.
The two Keys species sep-
arate easily at the stem
joints, but the prevalent hu-
mifusa stem pads are
harder to separate. When


handling these cacti, roll up
several sheets of newspaper
into a thick sheaf, loop it
around the cluster of joined
pads you want to relocate
and twist to snap them off.
Carry the plant in the
rolled paper to a new sunny
location and bury the bot-


tom pad half to two-thirds in it and water once a week for
the sand. Pile sand around See Page E8


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Opuntia humifusa, or prickly-pear cactus, grows throughout
Florida west to Louisiana and north to the Carolinas in dry,
well-drained, sandy landscapes. The bright yellow flowers re-
semble double-petaled roses in form. The succulent, tasty fruit
can be peeled and eaten raw or made into jams and jellies.


3645 E Arbor Lakes Dr.,
Hernando, FL 34442
Absolutely stunning home in Arbor
Lakes, a gated 55+ community on
Lake Tsala Apopka.
Directions: North on SR 200 to
Arbor Lakes Entrance. Inside
security gate continue straight and
home is on left.
MLS#353726 $110,000


~7"
3715 E Cove Park Trail
Hernando, FL 34442
Welcome to this spacious pool home and
the perfect Florida Lifestyle in this 55+ Lake
Community with boat ramp, fishing pier,
tennis courts, exercise room and more!
Directions: In Hernando, follow 200 N to
Arbor Lakes Entrance. Turn R, past gated
entrance, onto E Cove Park Trail. Home
around curve on left.
MLS#354287 $169,900


X eros is the Greek word for dry
The adjective xeric, used since
1926, means characterized by,
relating to, or requiring only a small
amount of moisture. Scape, used as a
noun since 1773, means a view like a
seascape. Hence
"xeriscape" in-
dicates a dry
landscape. 2011
was a dry year in
Florida. Rain-
fall this year is
below normal.
April and May
are historically
the driest
months in the Jane Weber
state. JANE'S
Cactii are
some of the most GARDEN
drought tolerant
or xeric plants. More than 200 species
grow in the Americas from Ontario to
the tip of South America. Florida has
three native species in the Opuntia
genus: two grow only in the Keys (0.
cubensis and 0. tricantha). Prickly-
pear cactus, O. humifusa, grows
throughout Florida west to Louisiana
and north to the Carolinas in dry, well-
drained, sandy enviroscapes, but not
in wetlands or swamps.
May is the month prickly-pear cac-
tus flowers most prolifically in Citrus,
Marion and Levy counties. Further
north, they bloom later into July and
August.
Each rose-shaped flower lasts but a
few days, but a clump of this ever-
green perennial can produce blooms
for three to four weeks. Occasional


REALTYGOUP T V
REAYntwood GROUPes


mJi.yrriist Ratyruco
^^^^HE '-d-'' f*- ^^^*^^^-W^7"^


_t Fa^^l- I LBTi^ e BH^B^^^^^^^^^B^H^


Pointe Vista 2Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2Car



M LS#353652 ......................... ............................................ $415,000


Hillside Villas 2Bd/2Bath/2Car
S 1.1 r patio furniture and fire pit Open
S i....I ,es including maple cabinets, solid
surface countertops and an expanded shower in the master bath
MLS#354017 ....... ..... $249,000


Hillside Villas 2Bd/2Bath/2Car
Luxurious Lantana detached villa This open floor plan has a

M LS#353866 ......................................... .... ... $199,000 M LS#352909 .......1.................. .1... ....................... $199,000


6 M o d


H10 i ]
Brentwood Townhome/2Bd/Garage/Den/2.5Bath
This home includes all the appliances, features hardwood and tile
floors and overlooks the community pool
# 2 99 6 7 7 ......................... .... .......................... ............... ........... .. $ 1 ,10 0


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Brentwood Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2Car
This Brentwood detached villa is fully furnished, professionally
decorated and includes all the appliances Will also consider
unfurnished with minimum 1 year lease
# 2 9 9 72 0 .............................................................................. ........ $ 1 ,3 0 0


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


000BE8P

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
IS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFCE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


AGENT ON] DUY SEVEN IDY-vAW


LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL?

I'LL TREAT YOU RIGHT!!

DAN HOFFMAN, Realtor
KELLER WILLIAMS OF CITRUS COUNTY
OFFICE (352) 746-7113
DIRECT CELL- (352) 601-3627

KELLER WILLIAMS
R E A L I '0001BCKV


Nancy Ayres
352-279-5058 ",, Bf ST
EXIT Realty Leaders < |
352-527-112


BEST

Realtor







E8 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012

Master gardeners
slate May clinics
It is possible to have a beau-
tiful, Florida-friendly landscape
with minimal impact on the en-
vironment, full of color, attrac-
tive to wildlife such as


butterflies and humming-
birds, and entailing minimal
costs.
If this sounds like something
you would like to implement in
your landscape, attend one of
the free Citrus County UF/IFAS
Extension Master Gardener


HoeF tBRIEF I____ p.m. at Coastal Region Library,
HomeFront F Crystal River.


Plant Clinics in May.
The remaining schedule for
May is:
Tuesday, May 8 1 p.m.
at Lakes Region Library,


Inverness.
Wednesday, May 9 -
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills.
Friday, May 11 1:30


Wednesday, May 16- 1
p.m. at Citrus Springs Library,
Citrus Springs.
Tuesday, May 22 2 p.m.
at Homosassa Library.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
Bring any questions, sam-
ples, or experiences from your
garden to share with other at-
tendees.
For additional information
about the clinics or Master Gar-
deners, call the Extension Serv-
ice at 352-527-5700.


GARDEN
Continued from Page E7

four to six weeks.
Spines and short glochids will be
stuck in the paper To avoid contact I
prefer to burn it rather than recycle.
Plant prickly-pears away from foot-
traffic. Pets naturally avoid these
cacti.
The bright yellow flowers resemble
double-petaled roses in form. Each
flower is typically two to three inches
in diameter Up to five often open at
the same time at the tip of a pad.
A large, mature colony may have
dozens of flowers open within a week
of a rainfall. Flowers are visited by
pollinators such as hummingbirds,
butterflies and bees.
Once fertilized, an oval, edible fruit
develops. This berry is somewhat
pear-shaped and turns purplish when
ripe. Wildlife depends on prickly-pear
as a staple food in season.
The succulent, tasty fruit can be
peeled and eaten raw or made into
jams and jellies. The fruit sold in the
ethnic section of the produce depart-
ment is usually imported.
Clumps can reach several feet in di-
ameter Individual stems are generally
flattened elliptic or oval pads about an
inch thick, three to five inches wide
and four to six inches high.
Some companion xeric plants that
thrive in similar conditions include


Once fertilized, an oval,
edible fruit develops.
This berry is somewhat
pear-shaped and turns
purplish when ripe.
Wildlife depends on
prickly-pear as a staple
food in season.
the cycad coontie, Zamia pumila;
evergreen perennial yuccas -Adam's
needle, Y filamentosa, and Spanish
bayonet, Y aloifolia; deep-rooted,
perennial green-eyes, Berlandiera
subacaulis; self-seeding, annual beach
or dune sunflower, Helianthus dibilis;
Solidago goldenrods; tickseed coreop-
sis and the self-propagating corm and
self-seeding blazing stars, Liatris.
With less rainfall and stringent
water restrictions, many gardeners
are planting succulent gardens in-
stead of thirstier plants.

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant
Semi-retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


311 W. Main St., Inverness
352-726-5263
www.Iandmarkinverness.com

L ML1 0S


B-tEST-
S -
ei.'


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES


BEAUTIFUL
WELL CARED FOR HOME
Vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, enclosed rear
porch with heat/air, city water. Backyard shed
has workbench & electric. Nice quiet setting
with community park across the street.
MLS #355157. $98,900
Call 352-726-5263


NO BETTER PLACE TO BE
THAN AT HOME IN THIS NEAT & CLEAN
3/2/2 split floor plan home
w/wood-burning fireplace & fenced backyard.
6122 E. Malverne St.
MLS #355089. PRICE: $83,500
Call Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983
or Tonva Koch 352-613-6427


WOW, THIS ONE IS GREAT
Not a short sale or foreclosure just a really
good deal. 2 bedroom, 2 bath home with
brand new deck, updated bathrooms,
lighting, and kitchen appliances.
UNBELIEVABLE PRICE OF $67,500
MLS #355222
325 Red Rose Lane, Inverness.
Kathy Chapman 352-476-4988.


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


I' -
MEL ..I.EL.
30 t n.,flinna QOW qi


6 900th
Bila1b1e


6ST.

HOMEBUILDER


Building
Custom Homes
throughout the
Nature Coast


S Of Citrus
I nc.
CBC049056


Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd. f f 'i MI
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL 1


m~uw


i F .. . .. .. . . .. . .. . . .


LANDMARK











Wood decay fungi can affect all parts of tree


W o o d B sive degenera-
decay is tion in cell walls
one of and wood
the most common r, strength and can
types of diseases disrupt sapwood
in the urban function when
trees. Because living cells are
decay weakens killed or react to
the wood and advancing decay
causes tree fail- Some wood
ures, it is one of Kerry Kreider decay fungi are
the most impor- THE known as decay
tant diseases. ARBORIST wood. Decay,
Decay is con- often together
sidered a disease with other tree
because it causes a progres- defects, is involved in most

KEY I"Always There For You"
RL-TY GAIL COOPER
K Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com
OIL. -u u'Q-


HOW'S THIS FOR VALUE?
* 3/2 pool home in South Oak village
* 20'4" x 30' oversized garage
* Corian kitchen with wood cabinetry
* Dual paned windows AND doors
* Oversized pool pump for efficiency
* Home warranty for buyers
#353972 $227,500


CALLING ALL GOURMET COOKS!
4/2/3 custom home on estate size lot
* Granite kitchen w/SS appliances
* 42" maple cabinetry
* Safe room with AC off the garage
* Gorgeous setting with circular driveway
* Well home warranty for the buyers
#353762 $219,900


tree failures. Decay can affect roots,
trunks and branches. Most wood
decay fungi initially enter trunks,
stems or roots of trees through wounds
that expose sapwood or heartwood.
Wounds in trees come in many dif-
ferent forms such as man, machinery,
lightning strikes, digging or improper
pruning. A few fungi can gain en-
trance into main stems through small
diameter branches.


Root decay or root rot develops from
the bottom up and may or may not pro-
duce visible crown symptoms. How-
ever, rot develops in the lower trunk
or base of the tree. Heart rot develops
in the center of the tree.
Branch rot decays small to medium
to large branches and sap rot decay oc-
curs when the bark or cambium have
been damaged. To preserve your trees
from this disease, have a knowledge-


able arborist inspect for signs or symp-
toms. A healthy tree is a happy tree.


Kerry Kreider is a practicing arborist
and a member of the International
Society ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and president of
Action Tree Service. You can reach
him at 352-726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com.


-S AIN qi ALL OF'CITRUS'COUNTY


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


61 Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


For a Virtual S STr So Mle hots
Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3



_i.'efl'-' 2218 N Bto .A "C. / 3100N Hu.iilucil. I D..
Fully furnished 3/2/2 villa w/a great view from Beautiful 2/2/2 w/bright kitchen in quiet
the lanai,. neighborhood.
Directions: Rte. 486 to Brentwood entrance, to Directions: Rte. 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd., to
straight on Brentwood Cir., to home on right, left on Honeylocust, to home on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


1671 N. Dinanamic Palh
.h L: *,',i S239.000
Beautiful Lantana villa model on the
2nd hole of Skyview Golf Course.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058

ONEM.M111111


W MLS# 354308 $199,000
Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course home.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


Py pill' 636 E. Gilchrisl CI. 23 4b
[.h_ : = '' '' 69.900
Lovely views from this 2/2.5 townhouse.
Matt Robinson 937-219-6949


Mwl MLS #352588 $170,000
3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac offers
spacious indoor living.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


NEW LISTING


-4,Uts MLS #352508 $78,500
2/2/2 home on large lot with private setting.
Directions: Forest Ridge Blvd., to west on
Sugar Maple which becomes Tamarisk.
Richard Silva 352-613-2239


K iffiw7.' ? -
,,if.,pnaS 9540 N. Davy Way
MLS #355233 $58,750
Newer pool, 3/2/1 needs some TLC.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913





4-0, ,. 1864 E. Monopoly Lp.
pfCgelDS MLS #353393 $149,900
Picture perfect 3/2.5/2 home w/new
roof & new appliances.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499
PENDING


dI. ,. 1437 W. Double Eagle Ct.
L iSM MLS #355269 $349,000
Elegant 3/2/3 home close to Bella Vita
Spa & Fitness Center.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


MLS #351319 $199,900
3/2/2 +den, bright kitchen & insulated
2 car garage.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


1ut MLS #354908 $119,000
Former model home, 3/2/2 in a quiet &
peaceful location.
Ron Egnot 352-287-9219
PENDING


l/3610 N. Lakeside Village Dr. ,5 552 E. Knighisbridge PI.
1510 N. Toro Dr. ,,ilwal MLS#349062 $29,900 f MLS #352377 $174,900 ,/l ito O 2338 N. Alachua Pt.
mCAnaL MLS#353649 $58,000 1/1.5/1 maintenance free villa, newly 3/2/2 open floor plan immaculately ML#354989 $99,900
3/2 2000 Skyline split floor plan home. painted in a 55+ community. maintained. Wow, 2/2/1 completely refurbished.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
@ 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Se irta ours vvvwreaaehmesucmI


TOSEVSAIOUSADVE L








E10 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


--


I -


11.


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$600.(352) 603-0024
HOMOSASSA
2/1'V2, 2 porches,No
pet/smoke W/D, $500m
Sst/sec 352-628-6643
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN, 3/2, DW
on 1/2 Acre MOL,
$2,500 down $575.
monthly. (352) 726-9369
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period. 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and enjoy-
ment, clubhouse, onslte
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
2BR home $450,
Includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $595.
1/1 turn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $550.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
YANKEETOWN
2/1 Furn., scrn porch
$450/mo 305-799-1177

1 i7'j r77TM-


1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/1scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
turn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077

BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2,
3133 N Holiday Dr.
Cry. River extremely
reasonable, owner fi-
nance $27K call 4 pm
to 8pm (352) 564-8057


For Sale By Owner
'97, MH, 16 x 80, excel.
cond., located on cor-
ner lot, 1/2 acre +, lots of
trees, corner of
Rosedale and Corona
Way, Homosassa Must
See to appreciate.
Priced to sell $37,500
(352) 364-3242
(478) 569-9685

NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private Interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587


ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Village
New Homes Start @
$39,900. $5K for your
used mobile home.
Any condition
800-622-2832 x 210


USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183





Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term Ist/Ist/sec $850
352-220-2077


Lake Rousseau
1/1, enclosedFlorida
porch, tiled inside & out
furnished $9500. very
nice (352) 362-7681



CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, $5000
Down, $435
(352) 302-9217
Inglis Bargain
5BR/2BA, Fully Furn. DW.
large eat-in Kit, opens
to den w/ FP, separate
Liv./Din. on 1 Acre Lot,
Near Goethe Forest.
Selling as Is $29,500 firm
(407) 398-9759



61 S. Atkins Terr.
Lecanto Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Mobile
Home in clean 55+ Park,
This is in very good con-
dition. Central Air And
Heat. New refrigerator,
Mostly Furnished. $230
park rent. $7500 Neg.
Please call 352-302-6586


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $39,900
(352)419-6926
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period 55+ Park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing & enjoyment,
clubhouse, onslte shuf-
fleboard, and much
more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
or $2.900. 352-476-4964
Inverness Sr. Park,
1984 Fleetwood 2/2
14 x 60 fully furnished
with everything, scrnd
Fl. Rm., Shed w/ elec.,
rf over Cen Air., gas
heat & range, cent. isl.
kitchen, Wash/Dry
Used Very Little
Needs Nothing,
very good condition
$18,000 obo Call Doris
Inverness Park Resales
352-344-1002
PARK MODEL
nice 1 BR, CHA, Irg encl
sun rm.cov porch on
Lake Rousseau, boat
parking $12K obo
(386) 451-9266
SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 + Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705
STONEBROOK 55+
2/2, totally remodeled,
furnished, w/Washer
& Dryer.... $5K
(352) 634-1171
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090





ACtion 352-195-RENT
Rental Management Realty I
www.itrscountyhomerentals.com
2021 Comforter Pt.
Homosassa
Comfortable & affordable3/1/1

650mo.


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com


Ondiur21

J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

Lakefront 2/1.5/1 ............ $625
2/2/1 .............................. $650
2/11l............................... $575
Roomy 2/2/2................. $650
2/2 Condo......................$550
1/1 Apt......................... $375
2/1 Apt........................ $450

2/1.5/1 ................... $625

Waterfront 2/2/1 ......... $750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010














CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
2/2 DW $500
Agent (352) 382-1000


-ACTION=
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368


1586 N. Edicott Pt.
$1300
2/2/2 villa, furnished, incl. util.
Meadowcrest

2271 N. Crede
$450
2/1 mobile, furnished

8560 W. Basilico St.
$850
3/2/2 roomy open floor plan

11435 W. Dixie Shores
$900
3/1 stilt home, NEW laminate
flooring, rooftop views


6139 S. Royal Dr.
$875
2/2/2 Canal side SPECIALi!i

2021 S. Comforter Pt.
$650
3/1/1 Cute home

6519 S. Mason Creek
$1100
2/1 fum. cottage, util. included


3441 E. Chappel Ct.
$650
2/1/carport. Adorable home
close to lake

VISIT OUR WEBSITE [FOR
ADDITIONAL LISTINGS!
ww.CitnrusountyllomeRentals.com

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scmrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, until. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large.2/1 incl water
sewer, W/D hook up
$475 (352)212-9205
INVERNESS
/1 $400 2/I..$500.
near hosp352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
with or without
children
IBds $396;
2 Bds $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."



112 t .,,


CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Avail.
(352) 422-6579
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391



INVERNESS
2/2/1 comm. pool
comm. boat docks,
$650 pr month
(352) 201-8401
INVERNESS
Regency Park 2/2
w/w&d, sml pet ok, no
smokers $650 f/I water,
sewer paid.
(352) 637-6993



Crystal River
2/1, furnished, until. incl
quiet country liv. CHA,
clean $150/wk $500.
Dep (352) 422-7000
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, No smoking
$550mo. (352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
INGLIS WATERFRONT
Charming eff./cottage
furn. No smokers
$645/mo. incl. utilities
352-422-2994




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 / 1 Apartment $400
3/2/2 waterfront
villa $1200
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Riverhaven
house $850
3/2/Huge DW on 1
acre $750
More Available
Call Nancy
352-422-4137
WAYBRIGHT
REAL ESTATE INC.
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area,pets,no smk
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
3/1, $400. mo. 1st., Ist.
sec. $1,200 Move In
4308 E. McCarlnev In
1/I Block Home $350
mo. 1st, 1st. sec. W/D
hkup. $1,150 move In
4095B Illiana Terrace
3/1, $350 most. Ist.
sec. $1,150 move In
4095C Illiana Terrace
(352) 212-3385




INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals.com
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784












Clean your coffee grinder; quicker drying; useful chicken bones


ou can clean
your coffee
grinder (or spice
grinder) by dropping a
few pinches of stale
bread into the grinder.
The bread will absorb
any oils, and it will pick
up any residual coffee
or spice grounds. After
the bread is processed,
simply wipe it out of
your grinder. The first
reader tip shares an-
other idea:


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


harder than the coffee,
so it will clean out the
old coffee from the
grinder and absorb the
oils that are trapped in-
side. Follow by grinding
a handful of coffee to
clean out the residual
rice. Repeat this every
couple of weeks. Brown
rice may be a bit softer,
but it should work just
as well. You should
probably avoid using
instant rice. It may do


Clean coffee grinder: Clean it an OK job, but for best results, use
by running about a cup of white the "old school" version. Niko,
rice through it. The rice is slightly Florida


Cut drying time: One of my fa-
vorite tips is how to cut drying
time in half when drying laundry
in the dryer. Put a clean, dry, lint-
free bath towel in with each load
of wet laundry It's amazing to me
the difference in drying time for
the clothes it literally cuts the
drying time in half. I hang laundry
outside in the summertime to save
money, but when that's not an op-
tion, this trick sure works. Lisa,
forums
Save chicken bones: If you
have the space, freeze your
chicken bones until you have a de-
cent amount, then make a richer
broth. Throwing in some chicken


necks or other very cheap pieces
helps as well. If you have a crock-
pot, it's wonderful to throw the
bones in with some chunks of car-
rot and onion, a bay leaf and cel-
ery to make broth. The low temp
keeps it from making a lot of scum,
which does need to be skimmed
off. I love using the crockpot to
make broth from turkey or roast
chicken carcasses. Even if you
have just a few bones and are
making a small amount, it is worth
it mix in a canned broth for a
lower sodium and better-flavored
broth. I do this myself to make a
cup or so for various recipes. -
Saule, Illinois


Quick pizza crust: Pita bread
makes a good crust.
We make pita pizzas for a quick
camping meal and bake them in a
portable gas grill. S.D.,
Minnesota


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut SL, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


Beverly Hills
2bed, Ibath, C/H/A
1st Mo FREE $550/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN, 2/1V2/1 ,
$2,000 Down, $475. mo.
(352) 726-9369
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 1430
NW 21st St. Very Clean,
fenced yard, screened
patio. No smoking/no
pets. $875.00/mo.
408-489-0849 local

YOU'LL THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7pm
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
Rent to Own, Rent or
Buy Fabulous Home
Across City Beach
2 Fire Pices, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$575. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
3/1/1 on 1/4 acre, $650.
1 st/Ist/dp.352 628-9220
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile car-
pet, dbl lot. $650.rent.
1 st st sec. 813 908-5550
HOMOSASSA
Very Private, NICE 1/1
WF garbage, water,
laundry, $550m+dp
(941) 730-2359
INVERNESS 21211
New paint & flooring
$695 mo. Inclds. trash,
352- 637-0765,
352-267-9941
INVERNESS
3/2/2,Highlands
Starting @ $750.
3/2/2 w/pool. 352-
601-2615/201-9427

LECANTO
Lovely 3/2 ,3 acres.,No
pets/smoke $650. + util
+ sec. 352-746-6345


EEB
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3/2/1 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Home $500 mo
352-795-9633/228-0257
CRYSTAL RIVER
FURNISHED, water-
front 1 BR or 2BR,
Laundry ,Boatslip,
Lanai Pets? $850
352-220-6593

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term I st/lst/sec $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $600
352-476-4964




CITRUS SPRINGS
Immediate Possession
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access, huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local

CRYSTAL RIVER
Office/home 4/2,
zoned commercial
perfect for someone
who needs office &
home $895 rent /sell
$99,50 Owner financing
w/$10K dn. call Paul
(352) 746-9585


R
INVERNESS
Must Love Animals,
$350. mo. References
(352) 322-1913

INVERNESS
Room for Rent, util. inc.
share dbl wide w/two
tenants $325
(352) 726-0652




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl ean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




ABSOLUTE AUCTION
Citrus Hills Golf Course
Lot Fri May 25 @10am
Ed Messer Auctions
Messer Auctions.comrn
352-212-6672

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE


-U
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









ABSOLUTE AUCTION
Citrus Hills Golf Course
Lot, Fri May25 @10am
Ed Messer Auctions
Messer Auctions.com
352-212-6672




RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3/2/1 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Oakwood Village
820 Sunset Strip
3/2/1, 1747 sf. New kit./
baths, flooring, paint,
in/out. Pix/Info
gcjcinc.com $79,900
(352) 527-1239



Timberlane Estates
Pool Home w/ 3/2/2
1 Acre, Fenced,
Needs some TLC,
possible owner finance
$125,000 (352)795-6024



2/2/1 Villa
Whispering Pines ,new
carpet, paint & tile, will
sell furn or unf. $69,900
(352) 726-8712
HIGHLANDS
2/1/1 Move In Ready,
w/ 2 Additional Lots,
Nice quiet Area
Hurry Wont Last!
$58,500. (352)697-2884
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598


Inver/Highlands.
Large 1 Family 2.8 acs
fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A
4BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool,
costly updates Under
contract for $250K, tak-
ing too long to close, i
except less for quick
closing 352-419-7017



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE


Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv )
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





Cashiers NC, 2 BR, IBA,
Cabin on 2 Acres
Updated, private rd.
private well, approx.
4K elevation. $170.000,
352-341-0336
Cell, 352-586-8946





"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre nice lot on
dead end.Have survey
and clear title.listed 10k
below county land
value.Zoned rural
residential.See at 8678 s
greenhouse
ter.$16500.o.b.o.
813-792-1355










LOTS FOR
SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT, chainlink
fence, Make Offer
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673

CITRUS SPRINGS
High & Dry Lot
$2500 obo
(352) 795-4363

GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
1 in W. Highlands,
1 N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000
By owner 617-471-7417


SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 E11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hmoas


Citrus Cou
Hoill ty
sn









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATERFRONT FLORAL CITY
b6 .v illi'il w l 11-*1111 pill, bn f.4 .i 'l
W .:.ll l l l: i .. l 'll l l il l. l I m',11
"i ll, n l if I ,il lI l .h is, ll 1.lfi 1 hi I

Mi 3-= ,',Ill Pi,:.I .,i $159,900
Ask lon Cheril 0o Jennie 352 726 9010


PRICE REDUCED H.,Ji ii.. niill


Anu LL ii..Ip ,,.. i. ,,:i,,; I .1 $129,900
Call Maitha Snydei 352 476 8727
to iien, this almost new home
Ask /ot file = 352412


SPACIOUS 3/2/2



I .'-...j L.I.I ', mii .h.T. HIII_; -1 h In- T fihlf_
Ii I = l I 1
Pat Dai is ,352/212 7280
Viewn sting a tiww c2lpaldat is comn











* I-h I lh I ~h ,]h .11 1 .1.i ,l ,i l i....).l


* I A.'. *''Ii i
Mi I = ,l "' $174,900
Call Chatles Kelly 352 422 2387


* PIIJ1I HIJMI 3L...llii
* i ,h e.,ii,. I I .1 l,
* P ll l hi .: VV.il I :
Mit = -'.' $114,500
i'illaid Pickiel 352 201.9871
wwwnni CiltusCounty'Sold como


CRYSTAL RIVER

I-.. _. ... h. i l- f .l .i .. 11 I. .
* I b J I'"" b.,i..,...,, w, i.


Mi. = 3 ONLY $99,900
izii,' sellihncitinscounti Ilhomes corn
Call Nancj Jenks 352 400 8072










GREAT WINTER OR
YEAR ROUND BARGAINS!
M..Il 11..I i. iI...... $8,900 TO
$49,000 i.:..i ...i iir.... 1 i) ..:. *I .

Call Dons Minet
/oI mo1e info 352 422 4628


INVEflNED UUL ar UUNINT numc
SIII:11: I:n ,I n l 1-i6, 1i 66, : li., h.,i .,i,,ln

MI.3 = ',4i 7 PI:', I. :,i.. iill $143,000
Call Ouade 352 302 7699


BRENTWOOD BEAUTY POOL HOME!
i, l.il I, ll . I I.I h H l. il i i.l ll l

I.. .l I ient :n.'H i: i. illllw.l

Mi = '"_) $123,900
Call lonaame 0 Regan 352 586 0075


A pp.I.,: II Iq 1:11:11 1 ; h l .. .l1l.l. A l ..i

.i i fl n;0 a P, ll.1 16 ; Il l. in _
,)IhI i l ll.ll I ....'I i I1uwI jI I ....I

,i,,,i $239,500
Call Maitha Sn'dei today' 352 476 8727
ask lo file = 349332


'I


INVERNESS
WATERFRONT "S
HOME!

l i,,il II., Ih -i h l l( h) all yl nl I

Mi 5 = 1:"'. $74,000
Call Ouade Feese, 352 302 7699


MOBILE HOME IN CASTLE
LAKE PARK! NO LOT RENT!
I)VVNf hNAN(IN'I.' I. n ypi il .,i n 1,..
il, A, I (. I :.) I

'ii 1I1111.l.,n, $30,000
Call Don, Miner lo more mnlo 352 422 4628








INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH

.,, .li.] p.... I .. h I l I_ ..
.i ili l l' hJ T l .lJ.ii n ] \. i H .I

]I:1:11. h. ..) ..I hI h..l. lh .lj ..ul

$77,000
Dn lid Hurrtz Cell 954 383 8/86
Otlihee 352 726 6668


* "F U ,ii. l l"
* ; h Z ll, l,,p ;lpa
* On I I) lh. .I ls, h y 1 iI1 i Hill
* MI = :; .
PRICED TO SELL QUICK $49,000
Call Willaid Pickiel 220 9871
I'1i'r. CiliusCountlrSold. corn


VIEW A SPECIAL VILLA
A iI : lll l i l I Il l 1 1"I ,l. l 1
l l ,,I lh l ; 1 .I l. j j l,


Mi =:" 1:I $87,900
/ll.iill n Booth 637 4904


INVEKNE55: HKUYL UOAI
T.l.l inm .n .i..l,.l i I l. m ..l w. I l Il,. .
I i, ipFn Ih661 p 1,1 ;: i :;; 11. ii I



ONLY $79,900 Mi1. -3 .1IIII
Deb Thompson 634 2656


rKHblEuiUUb ILBMKVIBW V hbEIM2Eb

f,.,,,,,] I I , I If I h If II I ,


Mi = .l1 ASKING $238,900
Pat D. is ,35212/2 1280
I'e hslisting 111111 c2p.id.id is cornm


M 1i . .IMIII.I WII.I
Mi _. = )Ii $49,000
w ''iw. Cili usCounlrSold. coin
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


HORSE LOVERS ALERT


Ih.: _lll. lt . a h ],;1 q.11 l ,y i w",lll i .:.IhI

$220,000
Call Ruth fiedetick I 352 563 6866


TAKE A LOOK!

; , } l iH, :I,, r .ill.
h l I fI_ 1 1I h i.. Hl I i,,I : N i,, :-I
. i ll I 4 l1 1 1 1 .1 I I i ill i 1. 1 1 I .
Mi_5= 3-=1_ $69,500
Call Chet'l ot Jennie 352 726 9010


INVERNESS 3/2/2 HOME
rJ....I rJ. .. K....I nL1:: ; I.... h-, R. ,*.,
M.i = '. i..i..,l, $79,900
C.ll Ch.iles Riel 352 422 2387


I


" I


E12 SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012