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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02756
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 05-01-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02756

Full Text


Back home: Hot off wins in Texas, Rays host struggling


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny, becoming
88 partly cloudy. East winds
LOW around 10 mph.
68 PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Y






SNI www.chronicleonline.com


MAY 1, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 117 ISSUE 268


TRADE CENTER RISES:
n 1,250'
One World
Trade Center
now NYC's
tallest tower.
/Page A14




Crystal River
in running for
fishing contest
CRYSTAL RIVER
So, do you have a
story about the "big
one" you caught in
Crystal River?
If so, you know
first hand what a
great fishing town
Crystal River is. You
can help the city win
a $25,000 donation
by voting online dur-
ing the month of May.
Starting today at
noon, WFNFishing
Town.com is opening
the voting lines to
find its Ultimate Fish-
ing Town. In one day
(24 hours) each per-
son is eligible to vote
four times, once
every six hours dur-
ing the month of May.
Participants can
earn up to nine
bonus votes by refer-
ring a friend, sharing
on Facebook or
Twitter, or listing a
business.
Voting will run until
6 p.m. on May 31.
For more details and
voting times, visit
http://www.world
fishingnetwork.com/
uft/promote/crystal
river-fl.
France honors
World War II
veterans
JACKSONVILLE
The French Con-
sulate honored U.S.
veterans who fought
alongside France
during World War II
in a ceremony in
Jacksonville.
The ceremony took
place Monday during
the celebration of the
450th anniversary of
the French landing
in Florida by Jean
Ribault.
The veterans re-
ceived the insignia of
"Knight in the Na-
tional Order of the
Legion of Honor,"
which was founded
in 1802 by Napoleon
Bonaparte. The Con-
sulate said the honor
rewards eminent mili-
tary and civil merits
in the service of
France and is the
highest distinction
that can be granted
in France on a
French citizen as well
as on a foreigner.
Notable Americans
who have received the
award include Thomas
Edison, Alexander
Graham Bell, as-
tronomer Simon
Newcomb, sculptor
Augustus Saint Gau-
dens and painter
John Singer Sargent.
-From staff and wire reports


Comics . . . . .C9
Community . . . .C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial . . ... ...A12
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C9
Obituaries . . . .A8
Classifieds . . . .C10
TV Listings . . . .C8


6Illlllll 8478 2002


Woman claims discrimination at WTI


Lawsuit: School officials said black women's scores were 'too high'


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS An Or-
ange County woman filed a
federal lawsuit against the
Citrus County School Dis-
trict claiming officials ac-
cused her of cheating on a
test because she is black.
Lelia Jackson-Burch is
seeking at least $75,000 and
punitive damages against
school district officials for
an incident that occurred in
2010 at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.
School board attorney
Wes Bradshaw said the dis-


trict would have no comment
The Florida Civil Rights
Association, a nonprofit
statewide organization, filed
the lawsuit on Jackson-
Burch's behalf. The lawsuit
accuses WTI officials of
maintaining "policies and
practices that prevent
African-American students
from competing on equal
footing" concerning the
scoring of the Test for Adult
Basic Education, or TABE.
According to the lawsuit,
this is what happened:
On April 20, 2010, Jack-
son-Burch and another
woman, Aretha Thomas,


took the TABE test at WTI
in Inverness. The women,
both black, had purchased
books on refresher materi-
als for math, English and
nursing school courses to
prepare for the test
After the test, WTI direc-
tor Denise Willis, assistant
director Judy Johnson and
test administrator Helena
Delgado accused Thomas
and Jackson-Burch of cheat-
ing because they scored
"too high" on the 12th-grade
section of the exam.
The administrators asked
Jackson-Burch and Thomas
to retake the test, which


they refused. Jackson-
Burch tried to leave, but ad-
ministrators blocked her
vehicle and called the sher-
iff's office, the lawsuit said.
Deputies checked Jack-
son-Burch's iPhone and
found no evidence of cheat-
ing, the lawsuit states.
The WTI officials then
contacted the state Depart-
ment of Education, Orange
County School District and
Jackson-Burch's college with
the cheating allegations.
Jackson-Burch was barred
from entering a nursing pro-
gram because of unfounded
allegations, the lawsuit states.


The lawsuit seeks past
and future wages and puni-
tive damages.
A similar claim by Thomas
was settled by the Citrus
County School District, risk
manager Dave Stephens said.
The district's insurer paid
Thomas $2,500, he said.
Jackson-Burch refused
the district's settlement
proposal because it didn't
include an apology and the
financial offer "did not jus-
tify the loss she experi-
enced," according to a
Florida Civil Rights Associ-
ation news release.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.



Elderly

couple hit

by shotgun

blast while

driving

Woman, 69,

hospitalized
SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
BEVERLY HILLS -
What started as a ride home
with a friend early Monday
morning ended with a shat-
tered windshield and a
woman in the vehicle being
taken to the hospital with
gunshot wounds to her face
and neck.
Just after 2 a.m. Monday,
a shotgun blast shattered
the windshield of a bur-
gundy 2003 GMC SUV
driven by a Pine Ridge cou-
ple eastbound along West
Norvell Bryant Highway,
about a quarter-mile west of
the intersection of County
Road 486 and West Pine
Ridge Boulevard.
Police are not releasing
the name of the victim or
the driver of the car be-
cause of an ongoing investi-
gation.
"There are a lot of con-
cerns out there for her
safety because there are a
See Page A4



District

maps get

judge's OK

Critics consider

next move
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida can hold congres-
sional elections under the
Legislature's new redis-
tricting map this year, a
judge ruled Monday shortly
after the Justice Depart-
ment approved that plan as
well as state House and
Senate maps.
Circuit Judge Terry
Lewis wrote that the con-
gressional plan can be used
until he can receive addi-
tional evidence and testi-
mony he needs to make a
ruling on its constitutional-
ity That decision, though,
would not come in time to
change the map for the Aug.
14 primary and Nov 6 gen-
eral election.
The Tallahassee-based
judge agreed with the Re-
publican-led Legislature
that there are many dis-
puted facts that must be re-
solved before he can
See Page A4


A


after a diving board
accident left him to
live the rest of his
life confined to a


wheelchair, doctors told Bill
Clark's wife to picture him
as Christopher Reeve. Un-
like Reeve, however, Clark
can breathe on his own.

But like Reeve, Clark had injured his
spinal cord, leaving him a quadriplegic.
He was 36.
Just three years before the accident,
Clark and a neighbor had their picture
in the Chronicle for capturing an alliga-
tor that was wandering the neighbor-
hood. He worked at Citrus Memorial


I U':


hospital as a maintenance mechanic and
took care of his grandparents, who had
been the first people to live on his street.
In 2001, Clark's wife left. Two years
ago, he was diagnosed with an inopera-
ble brain tumor.
His life is challenging at best. And yet,
every morning Bill Clark, who will turn 52
on May 5, is thankful he has one more day
0 E
"I can't cry over it," Clark said. "There's
nothing I can do about it At first I got
mad at everybody, but it's no one's fault.
It's just something that happened the
accident and the brain tumor. I'm just
glad to wake up every day"
May is National Brain Tumor Aware-
ness Month. This year, an estimated
22,910 Americans will be diagnosed
with a brain tumor. Symptoms depend
on the tumor's size and location, and
each tumor is as individual as each per-
son who has one.
See Page A5


%:






. -s


Editor's note
May is Brain
Tumor Awareness
Month. According
to the National
Cancer Institute,
an estimated
22,910 new
cases will be di-
agnosed in 2012.
Hernando resi-
dent Bill Clark,
diagnosed two
years ago, is just
one example of
people living with
this condition.
On top of it,
Clark is a quadri-
plegic as a result
of a swimming
pool accident in
1996.


Each day, a new day


1~


j-v


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Hernando resident Bill Clark was diagnosed with a brain tumor two years ago, on top of living as a quadriplegic since
a diving accident in 1996. May is Brain Tumor Awareness Month.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
-HERNANDO





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
From left, Ryan Edward Dougherty, 21, Dylan Stanley-Dougherty, 26, and Lee Grace
Dougherty, 29, are pictured in mugshots taken by the Pueblo County Sheriff's Office. The
Florida siblings, accused of shooting at a police officer and staging a daring bank robbery
in a multistate crime spree, were given sentences ranging from 18 to 32 years in prison.


Siblings accused of crime


spree sentenced in Colorado


Associated Press
DENVER Three Florida siblings ac-
cused in a multistate crime spree that in-
volved a daring bank robbery in Georgia
were given prison time Monday on charges
in Colorado, where they were captured
after a nationwide manhunt.
Ryan Dougherty was given 18 years; Lee
Grace Dougherty received 24 years; and
Dylan Stanley-Dougherty got 32 years -the
maximum he faced- at separate hearings.
Prosecutors said Stanley-Dougherty was
the one who fired at officers pursuing the
siblings before their Aug. 10 capture.
The hearings effectively end the siblings'
stay in Colorado as Georgia authorities
await their extradition.
The three were the focus of a cross-country
search last year after authorities said they
fired at a police officer in Florida and robbed
a Georgia bank. The search ended with a
police chase in Colorado, where shots were
fired at officers before the siblings' car
rolled and crashed into a guard rail.
Lee Grace Dougherty, 29, faced up to 28
years in prison after pleading guilty to first-
degree assault and two counts of menacing
in the Colorado case. In court, the judge
told her that as the eldest of the three, she
should have shown better judgment.
"I'd like to say itwas a lapse in judgment, but
10 days is not a lapse in judgment," Lee Grace
Dougherty said. "It was bad, poor judgment."
All three are expected to soon be trans-
ported to Albany, Ga., where they face a
May 15 court hearing.
In the robbery case, witnesses said two
men and a woman, dressed in black and
wearing masks, entered a Valdosta, Ga.
bank Aug. 2 and fired shots into the ceiling.
One carried an assault rifle and an auto-
matic pistol, similar to weapons recovered
after the siblings' capture.


Lee Grace Dougherty is pictured in district
court Monday, where she was sentenced to
24 years in prison.
The three also are charged with firing
shots at a police officer in Zephyrhills, Fla.,
during a high-speed chase earlier on Aug. 2.
In Florida, the siblings are charged with
fleeing or eluding and attempted second-
degree murder of a law enforcement officer
Ryan Dougherty also is charged with grand
theft auto.
Authorities said the three had been liv-
ing together in Lacoochee, Fla., and each
had a criminal record.
Before the alleged crime spree, Ryan
Dougherty was sentenced to register as a
sex offender for sending sexually explicit
text messages to an 11-year-old girl. His
mother, Barbara Bell of East Palatka, Fla.,
said her son feared the conviction would
prohibit him from seeing his newborn son.
Lee Grace Dougherty said in court that
her actions were prompted by her desire to
protect Ryan.


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A2 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


nIS A1


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Page A3 -TUESDAY, MAY 1,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


AroundTE Scott sends vets to head of the line
THE STATE snst fln


Citrus County

Citizens' Academy
alumni meet May 8
The Citizens' Academy
Alumni Association (CAAA)
will hold its spring meeting at
6 p.m., Tuesday, May 8, at
the Citrus County Auditorium.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.
with a silent auction.
Featured speakers at the
meeting will be the K-9 Unit
officers from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. They
will speak about the role of
their dogs in law enforcement
and demonstrate some of the
techniques used to subdue
suspected criminals.
All graduates of the Citi-
zens' Academy are invited to
the meeting. For information,
call Jonna Wing at 352-726-
7721.
Disability speakers at
next alliance meeting
Dennis J. Michon, state
support coordinator of the
Agency for Persons with Dis-
abilities, Vidya R. Hogan, di-
rector of Consumer Services
of Elder Options out of
Gainesville, and a staff mem-
ber of the Senior Care Serv-
ices of Citrus County
Community Services will
speak Thursday, May 3, at
the Citrus County Community
Alliance meeting.
The Citrus County Com-
munity Alliance meetings are
open to the public and are on
the first Thursday of each
month. Coffee and network-
ing begins at 8:15 a.m., and
the meeting starts at 8:30
a.m. at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto, Florida,
in Conference Room 280.
For information, call Bar-
bara Wheeler at 352-860-
2308 or email at mfhc01
@gmail.com, or Cara Meeks
at 352-527-0090 or by email
at cmeeks@devereux.org.
Wykes write-in
candidate for sheriff
A Citrus Springs man filed
paperwork Monday to run for
Citrus County sheriff as a
write-in candidate.
Douglas Wykes won't have
his name on the ballot. In-
stead, the ballot will include a
space to write Wykes' name if
voters choose him over the
other candidates.
By being a write-in candi-
date, Wykes is not required
to pay a filing fee or submit
petition signatures.

Tallahassee

Askew joins merit
retention push
The Florida Bar is planning
a $300,000 campaign to edu-
cate voters about merit reten-
tion elections of state
Supreme Court justices and
appellate judges.
Former Gov. Reubin
Askew, the father of merit re-
tention in Florida, was on
hand as the bar announced
its initiative Monday.
The effort comes amid
conservative opposition to
the retention of three
justices.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

Because of a reporter's
error, a story and photo cap-
tion on Page A1 of Sunday's
Chronicle, "High school
diploma not enough for
CRHS senior," misidentified
Regan Ramsey.
Because of a reporter's
error, the wrong person was
identified in a photo in Satur-
day's Chronicle accompany-
ing the story on Page A1 "To
the land of Legos." Kaleigh
McCarrick was shown with
Gioia Cali learning about en-
ergy and how it works on
Lego cars.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by


mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


Billprovides

priority course




Staff writer

Beginning July 1, veterans
and their dependents who
want to attend a Florida col-
lege or university will get to
go to the head of the line
when it comes to registering


for classes.
On Friday, April
27, Gov Rick Scott

ingto Postsecondary
Course Registration
for Veterans into
law.
The bill offers pri- Gov.
ority course regis- Sc
tration for veterans signe
and their depend- vete
ents who use the GI
Bill at Florida colleges and
universities that offer prior-
ity course registration for
other students such as ath-


U

4.
r


I

co
!

dr


letes or honor stu-
dents.
"Realizing that
those veterans and
their dependents
who receive the GI
Bill only have 36
months to use the
Rick benefits they have
ott earned, this bill en-
bill for sures these individ-
rans. uals have access to
the courses they
need to graduate in a timely
manner at Florida's col-
leges and universities,"
Rep. Jimmie T Smith said.


Tour operators

hear from officials

about changes
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Boats
moored in the newly designated
sport zone in King's Bay have until
June 1 to move or face sanctions.
Beginning today, additional en-
forcement will be on hand in the
bay during peak periods.
These were among a mountain
of information officials of the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
shared with tour operators and
guides Friday during a meeting.
Dozens showed up to hear
about the new rules of water-
borne conduct announced March
15; permitting issues and the var-
ious permutations of enforce-
ment authority in the bay
Stephanie Barrett, from the
USFWS office in Jacksonville,
explained the difference be-
tween a national wildlife refuge
and a manatee refuge.
National wildlife refuges, Bar-
rett said, are lands and waters
owned, leased or otherwise man-
aged by her office, as is the case
with Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge, which was es-
tablished in 1983.
She said the recent designation
of King's Bay as a manatee refuge
means certain activities are re-
stricted for the safety of the mam-
mals and USFWS has no
mandate beyond that.
Barrett also explained the list
of restricted activities USFWS
considers harmful to the
seacows.
Michael Lusk, the refuge man-
ager, piggy-backed on Barrett's
explanation about USFWS' man-
date in the wildlife refuge and
manatee refuge areas of the bay
"Our area is dealing issues
with harassment of the manatee
and speed, but if you have con-
cerns about noise in the canals or
someone is blocking your path,
you can call FWC or the sheriff's
office," Lusk said.
Also on hand to explain their


"While we don't know
how many students this will
affect, we have over 300 vet-
erans attending classes at
(both campuses) of the Col-
lege of Central Florida,"
said Dr Ruth Hall, campus
director of student affairs.
Prior to this bill, priority
registration went only to
honors students and those
with the highest number of
credit hours.
Now veterans will get the
same priority, regardless of
how many credit hours they
have.


zone will have to be moved by
June 1 or they will be cited, and
other "appropriate" actions will
follow if they remain.
Lusk also said tour operators
should leave tagged manatees
alone.
"They are there for rehabilita-
tion, and if you follow them or
have your passengers try to play
with them, they may get scared
and may not adjust to their new
environment," he said.
Ivan Vicente, of USFWS, said
there "is a higher focus on edu-


"Following the end of
World War II, veterans pro-
vided an untold economic
benefit to our country as
they returned from war,"
Smith said. "I am excited
this bill will attract these
same type of individuals to
Florida after they return
from active service and I am
honored to be able to serve
them as they have served
our country"
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


King's Bay rules spelled out


roles in enforcement of the rules
were the two USFWS officers -
Ryan Maier and Craig Cabanna.
Chief Chris Hinote, of the U.S.
Coast Guard, and Florida Fish
and Wildlife Commission (FWC)
officer John Jones also talked
about their roles in rules
enforcement.
Lusk said he will dip into his
wildlife refuge budget to hire
more officers to help with
enforcement.
He said boats moored in the
area now designated as the sport


national materials" to help peo-
ple who use the bay for business
and recreation to better under-
stand the rules of conduct.
Vicente said floating kiosks
will also be used to help get the
message out.
He also reminded tour opera-
tors one of the in-house rules for-
mulated is a three-strike system.
"First strike, you are gone for a
week; two strikes, you are gone
for a month; and three strikes,
you are out for the year," Vicente
said.
One operator wondered
whether the process of deter-
mining a strike will be arbitrary
and without due process.
Lusk said he gets to determine
whether a strike is assessed based
on information he gathers from
his enforcement officers. If an op-
erator harasses or directs pas-
sengers to commit what amounts
to harassment, or chases a mana-
tee, it will be a strike and there is
no appeals process.
For the 2011 season, 93,099
people visited the bay through
tour operators and guides, ac-
cording Vicente. There were
68,000 people the previous year
Operators are required to report
passenger numbers to USFWS
through their permitting process.
Capt. Mike Dunn, a tour opera-
tor in the bay, said he was slightly
disappointed about how lax some
of the rules were.
Dunn would like to see the one-
hand, open-palm rule when
touching a manatee enforced.
"A lot of people like to scratch
the manatees, and they do it a lot.
That is something I would like to
see them stop doing. I will like to
have a meeting with them later to
see if we can do something about
it," Dunn said.
The manatee is the pyramid of
Crystal River, Dunn added.
'"As many visitors as we get
around here, if everybody tries to
scratch the manatees, that would
be terrible," he said. "It's all about
respect If you just want to see how
they feel, touch them gently and
let it go. Don't sit there and keep
scratching them just because it's
not illegal to touch them."
To report issues in the bay, call
FWC at 888-404-3922.


Dairy farmer never soured on hope


McClellan talks about coming

back from failure, alcoholism


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Milk, alcohol and a mira-
cle are all part of a Lecanto
dairy farmer's life story
"The miracle I have you
can only keep by giving
away," said Dale McClellan,
as keynote speaker this
month at the annual meet-
ing of Farm Credit of Cen-
tral Florida in Lakeland.
"The miracle I have is: My
name is Dale and I'm an
alcoholic."
By some miracle, McClel-
lan said he came back to so-
briety and dairy farming.
McClellan said he
stopped drinking in March
1983 while a patient at
Lakeland Regional Medical
Center Now he was back in
Lakeland speaking before
one of the organizations that
put him on his feet again.
Farm Credit is a financial
cooperative owned by its
member-borrowers since


1917 to provide agricultural
loans.
McClellan knew he sur-
prised people by admitting
his alcoholism.
"I've heard if you don't
share it, you're cheating
God," McClellan said. '"And
you should let people know
there is a way out."
As a young man, McClel-
lan said he was on a down-
ward spiral when his
family's Tampa-based busi-
ness, Sunny Brook Dairy,
"crashed and burned" in
1979.
"I couldn't get that out of
my system," McClellan said.
"I felt like a failure. The
feeling wouldn't go away"
Trying to reopen the old
family business wasn't easy
In 1987, the building had
junk cars inside it, but no
tanks or packaging ma-
chines. Part of the roof had
collapsed on the floor and
weeds were growing out of
the drains.


-... The dairy
.. business in
the '80s was
w-, changing.
S.- McClellan
named five
or six small
S-- dairies in
Dale Lakeland
McClellan that have
disap -
peared. They were run out
of business by the big plants,
such as Borden's, Sealtest
and Pet.
"Back in those days, milk
was very competitive be-
cause the big plants were
gobbling each other up,"
McClellan said.
In addition, supermar-
kets, such as Winn-Dixie
and Publix, started packag-
ing their own brands, and
there was not enough busi-
ness for the big plants.
"I had to come up with a
way to do packaging and be
able to afford to do it," Mc-
Clellan said.
The idea that has worked
for him is the niche market
of dairy and fruit juice
products for schools, hospi-
tals, nursing homes and
prisons.


"All the big companies
seem to treat schools as a
stepchild," McClellan said.
"I was pretty sure that even
if I didn't make much money
I would still get paid, so that
was my plan."
Then McClellan spoke
about opening M&B Dairy
Farm in Lecanto about 10
years ago and the opposi-
tion he faced from
residents.
"Neighbors put fliers with
skull and crossbones in
mailboxes that we were
going to poison the water
and drive down property
values," McClellan said. "I
didn't know what to do."
Stage fright hit him when
he was called to Tallahassee
to speak before the Florida
Senate. But McClellan said
he got over his fear of speak-
ing in front of people by
speaking in front of people.
"Courage is not the ab-
sence of fear," McClellan
said. "Courage is looking
fear in the eye and doing the
right thing."
Now a fixture of Citrus
County, McClellan has be-
come a spokesman for
county agriculture and was


ON THE NET
tinyurl.com/8yxrkht

one of the founders of the
Agricultural Alliance of Cit-
rus County, which started as
a subcommittee of the Cit-
rus County Economic De-
velopment Council. The
alliance is now facilitated
by the Citrus County Exten-
sion Services Division.
McClellan thanked mem-
bers of the EDC, extension
services and Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce who
traveled to Lakeland to hear
him speak. They were John
Siefert, executive director
of the EDC; Theressa Foster,
executive director of Sun-
flower Springs Assisted Liv-
ing Facility, Homosassa; Dr
Joan Bradshaw, director, ex-
tension services; and Matt
Lenhardt, horticulture
agent, extension services.
Farmers and ranchers
were urged to get involved
in the business community
"Every agricultural man-
ufacturer should be a mem-
ber of EDC and the
chamber," McClellan said.


RIC BUSH/Special
Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge volunteer John Martin places
temporary signs over existing ones Monday in King's Bay to inform
boaters they are passing through the slow-speed zone.


*






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHOOTING
Continued from Page Al

lot of unknowns at this
point," Gail Tierney, spokes-
woman for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, said
Monday afternoon.
The driver's 69-year-old
wife was struck near her
right eye, plus in her neck,
upper chest and left arm.
Nature Coast EMS attended



MAPS
Continued from Page Al

determine whether the map
violates new anti-gerryman-
dering standards.
"I do not have the author-
ity to replace it with another
map while the case is pend-
ing," Lewis wrote. "And de-
spite plaintiffs' protests to
the contrary, the new map
appears on its face to be an
improvement on the one it
replaces."
The existing map also is
drawn for only 25 districts.
Florida is gaining two more
seats this year due to popu-
lation growth over the last
decade for a total of 27.
The map is being chal-
lenged by the Florida Dem-
ocratic Party and a coalition
of three groups the
League of Women Voters of
Florida, National Council of
La Raza and Florida Com-
mon Cause that backed
the Fair Districts standards
voters adopted in 2010. Vot-
ers passed a pair of state
constitutional amendments,
one each for congressional
and legislative redistricting.
"We remain concerned
about elements of the map,
and we will continue to
evaluate our legal options
moving forward," Florida
Democratic Party executive


to the victim at the scene be-
fore transporting her to
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center. She re-
mains hospitalized.
Crime-scene technicians
were sent to search the
scene for any physical evi-
dence, while the sheriff's
helicopter combed the area
looking for the shooter.
If anyone has information
about this crime, the sher-
iff's office asks that they
call 911 or contact Crime


director Scott Arceneaux
said in a statement.
While Lewis' ruling could
be appealed, time is running
short. Qualifying for state
and federal offices begins
June 4 and ends June 8.
The Justice Department
or a court must give what's
known as preclearance to
election-law changes includ-
ing the redistricting maps to
make sure they comply with
the federal Voting Rights
Act. The requirement is be-
cause of past racial discrim-
ination in five of Florida's
67 counties.
Preclearance came three
days after the Florida
Supreme Court affirmed a
revised Senate map. The
justices earlier approved
the 120-district state House
map but sent the 40-seat
state Senate plan back to
lawmakers for a do-over be-
cause it violated the Fair
Districts standards in part
by favoring incumbents and
the GOP
"One of our foremost
goals during this redistrict-
ing cycle was to conduct the
process in a manner that
would give both the voters
and candidates time to be-
come familiar with the new
districts," said Senate Pres-
ident Mike Haridopolos, R-
Merritt Island, in a statement
"I am proud to say that we
accomplished that goal."


Stoppers of Citrus County,
Inc., by texting CITRUS
plus the tip to 274637
(CRIMES), clicking on
www.crimestopperscitrus.
com or calling 888-ANY-
TIPS toll-free.
Tipsters may be eligible
to receive a cash reward of
up to $1,000.
Chronicle Managing Edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can be
reached at sfrederick@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2930.


The fact that Attorney
General Eric Holder did not
object to the maps is not a
bar to subsequent litigation.
The challengers contend
the congressional map also
violates various Fair Districts
provisions including its ban
on intentionally favoring in-
cumbents and political par-
ties and a requirement that
districts be compact.
Three of Florida's four
black members of Congress
and all three of the state's
Hispanic representatives
last week signed a letter to
Perez urging that the de-
partment give preclearance
to the congressional map.
They also noted that the
map includes a new central
Florida district that would
create an opportunity for
the election of another His-
panic representative. It has a
41.4 percent Hispanic voting-
age population.
The Hispanic voters in that
district, though, are mostly
Democratic-leaning Puerto
Ricans while Florida's current
Hispanic representatives are
Cuban-American Republi-
cans: Ileana Ros-Lehtinen,
Mario Diaz-Balart and
David Rivera, all of Miami.
The black representatives
who signed the letter are all
Democrats: Alcee Hastings
of Miramar, Corrine Brown
ofJacksonville and Frederica
Wilson of Miami Gardens.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office

Burglaries
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 10:31 a.m. April
27 in the 700 block of S. Mul-
berry Point, Inverness.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 12:20 p.m. April
27 in the 5300 block of S. Suf-
folk Terrace, Homosassa.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 4:37 p.m. April
27 in the 3100 block of E. John
Lane, Inverness.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 5:56 p.m. April
27 in the 5000 block of W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
EAvehicle burglary occurred
at about 7:03 a.m. April 28 in the
3400 block of W. Century Boule-
vard, Dunnellon.
EAvehide burglary occurred at
about 7:20 a.m. April 28 in the 500
block of Franklin Court, Inverness.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 9:51 a.m. April 28 in the
3100 block ofW. Shares Drive,
Dunnellon.
EAvehicle burglary occurred
at about 11:04 a.m. April 28 in
the 9500 block of N. Old Mill
Way, Dunnellon.


ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made by
the sheriff's office, go
to www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
For the Record reports
are archived at www.
chronicleonline.com.

A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 4:32 p.m. April
28 in the 8100 block of S. Sun-
coast Boulevard, Homosassa.
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 5:39 a.m. April 29
in the 4000 block of S. Grand-
march Avenue, Homosassa.
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 9:21 a.m. April
29 in the 1100 block of W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Thefts
A petit theft occurred at
about 5:03 a.m. April 27 in the
7900 block of S. Heather Point,
Floral City
A petit theft occurred at
about 6:50 a.m. April 27 in the
60 block of S. Smith Avenue,
Inverness.


A petit theft occurred at
about 12:49 p.m. April 27 in the
3700 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred at
about 2:02 p.m. April 27 in the
5000 block of W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Crystal River.
A grand theft occurred at
about 5:47 p.m. April 27 in the 180
block of Pine Street, Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 10:49 a.m. April 28 in the
6300 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred at
about 1:06 p.m. April 28 in the
5400 block of N. Suncoast
Boulevard, Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred at
about 12:19 p.m. April 29 in the
1300 block of N. Florida Avenue,
Hernando.
A petit theft occurred at
about 6:13 p.m. April 29 in the
4700 block of W. Alamo Drive,
Beverly Hills.
Vandalisms
A vandalism occurred at
about 10 p.m.April 28 in the 3800
block of E. Byrd Street, Inverness.
A vandalism occurred at
about 9:24 a.m. April 29 in the
400 block of Hiawatha Avenue,
Inverness.


|egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





SMeeting Notices..................C12





Notice to Creditors/



Administration.....,..,,........C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
PC
sh
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR III LU PH
90 66 0.00 90 64 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOKExclusive daly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 88 Low: 68
"" Partly to mostly cloudy .

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 64
Partly sunny with a slight chance of showers
and thunderstorms.
THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 64
-. Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers
..- /and thunderstorms.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11


91/64
93/44
86/57
78
+7

0.00 in.
2.61 in.
6.47 in.
12.56 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m.


East winds around 15 knots. Seas
around 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
,..ill have a light to moderate chop.
Partly cloudy and breezy at times
today.


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
ts


Gulf water
temperature

74

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.79 26.78 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.72 32.69 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.94 34.92 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.45 36.41 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


""f 50s 6Os 60s 50s
_* -- 80.ng .

40ss



_0.


59

38% _


POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, hickory, grasses
Today's count: 5.1/12
Wednesday's count: 5.1
Thursday's count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/1 TUESDAY 1:59 8:12 2:24 8:36
5/2 WEDNESDAY 2:43 8:56 3:08 9:21
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0SUNSET TONIGHT............................8:06 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:48 AM
MY1 : R 0 C MOONRISE TODAY ...........................3:30 PM
MAY 5 MAYT12 MAY 20 MA 28 MOONSET TODAY............................3:21 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
TIDES
"From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay ***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:47 a/10:13 a 2:51 p/10:53 p 3:10 a/11:14 a 3:35 p/11:53 p
Crystal River* 12:08 a/7:35 a 1:12 p/8:15 p 1:31 a/8:36 a 1:56 p/9:15 p
Withlacoochee* 10:59 a/5:23 a 11:18 p/6:03 p 11:43 a/6:24 a -- /7:03 p
Homosassa*** 12:57 a/9:12 a 2:01 p/9:52 p 2:20 a/10:13 a 2:45 p/10:52 p


90s Ea Paso


90s


_Us--- -
Ios
o A n:r l 100...,s ,
2os "406 .1 505


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Monday Tuesday
H LPcp. Fcst H L
60 29 sh 59 47
80 52 s 83 53
83 56 ts 81 56
87 65 pc 86 63
na na ts 66 54
86 73 pc 89 72
63 47 ts 77 58
66 40 c 66 38
89 60 pc 88 66
64 50 .07 sh 59 39
54 41 sh 50 45
56 34 .14 pc 60 46
58 27 sh 58 45
83 64 pc 84 65
85 50 ts 80 63
85 65 c 86 63
63 50 ts 73 57
83 50 ts 77 63
80 46 12 pc 67 56
88 66 pc 89 65
84 55 ts 76 62
63 30 sh 53 42
85 72 pc 86 70
76 40 pc 76 48
65 48 pc 78 65
57 46 .57 pc 68 56
90 56 s 92 67
84 63 .34 ts 83 64
62 35 ts 75 56
63 34 sh 58 48
85 74 pc 85 71
79 55 43 ts 77 63
87 68 pc 89 65
92 63 pc 88 67
80 67 .09 pc 88 65
64 60 pc 63 55
84 62 .46 ts 82 66
86 67 pc 88 69
58 44 pc 62 54
63 44 ts 78 62
91 60 pc 82 69
92 60 pc 89 65
86 60 ts 85 64


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


pFW AIanta
Merop .
L "0 90s
Houston 41 am



FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 68 pc 85 70
New York City 62 43 sh 64 54
Norfolk 73 49 ts 82 65
Oklahoma City 83 61 .43 pc 82 67
Omaha 69 48 pc 83 66
Palm Springs 93 66 s 86 60
Philadelphia 63 43 ts 74 55
Phoenix 95 70 s 95 68
Pittsburgh 83 46 sh 75 58
Portland, ME 55 30 sh 49 41
Portland, Ore 59 50 .12 sh 55 44
Providence, R.I. 59 35 sh 54 47
Raleigh 80 61 c 86 65
Rapid City 73 33 pc 73 47
Reno 78 51 s 72 45
Rochester, NY 58 30 pc 64 46
Sacramento 83 56 s 77 50
St. Louis 73 64 .05 ts 82 67
St. Ste. Marie 46 40 pc 65 48
Salt Lake City 75 44 sh 68 49
San Antonio 90 73 .01 pc 90 71
San Diego 64 61 c 63 55
San Francisco 65 50 s 63 48
Savannah 91 64 pc 84 66
Seattle 55 46 .18 sh 54 42
Spokane 62 46 .20 sh 55 37
Syracuse 60 31 pc 66 45
Topeka 70 55 pc 82 66
Washington 67 50 ts 79 63
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 Needles, Calif.
LOW 17 Big Piney, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/74/s
Amsterdam 65/50/sh
Athens 84/60/s
Beijing 72/51/sh
Berlin 81/61/s
Bermuda 70/61/pc
Cairo 84/61/s
Calgary 53/36/sh
Havana 86/69/ts
Hong Kong 87/76/c
Jerusalem 78/57/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


61/55/sh
64/42/r
63/48/pc
81/55/ts
55/42/sh
61/36/pc
65/47/pc
73/61/sh
71/56/c
68/54/pc
68/59/sh
65/44/pc
84/59/pc


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY


CHRONICLE
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a 106 W. Main
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A. 34450


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I-


A4 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


LOCAI/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FDLE: Florida's crime rate dipped slightly in 2011


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE
Florida's crime rate dipped
slightly in 2011, with a drop
in the number of violent
crimes offsetting increases
in burglaries and larcenies,
according to the annual
crime statistics report re-
leased Monday by the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement.


The total number of crimes
tracked by the state agency
dropped 0.1 percent, but the
increase in population meant
that the crime rate dropped
0.8 percent. Overall, violent
crimes dropped by 3.7 per-
cent to 98,183. That's 3,724
fewer violent crimes than
the year before and nearly
33,000 fewer than 2007. Non-
violent crimes increased by
2,686 to 671,297, or 0.4 percent


But the number of crimes
compared to the state's pop-
ulation was the lowest it's
been since the agency began
tracking crime statistics 41
years ago. The agency tracks
murders, forcible sex offenses,
robberies, aggravated as-
saults, burglaries, larcenies
and motor vehicle thefts.
"We began tracking those
crimes in 1971 and Floridi-
ans are safer today than at


any other time since that
date," said agency Commis-
sioner Gerald Bailey
Florida had 985 murders
in 2011, a drop of two from
the year before. Of those,
691 were committed with a
firearm. Similarly, forcible
sex offenses were nearly the
same as the year before,
with 9,886 reported in 2011,
or six fewer than the year
before. Aggravated assaults


dropped by 5 percent.
At a time when there are
arguments about whether
Florida should repeal it's
"stand your ground" self-de-
fense law, Bailey said justi-
fiable homicides committed
by private citizens increase
from 40 to 48 in 2011.
Bailey also noted that the
number of domestic violence
crimes have dropped 1.5
percent at a time when it's


increasing elsewhere in the
country And that's despite a
65 percent increase in simple
stalking in domestic cases,
up to 647 from 392 in 2010.
"One thing that's happened
is that our citizens, our public,
are more aware of the stalk-
ing laws. They're more sen-
sitive to stalkers whether they
be cyber stalkers or physical
stalkers. So that definitely
plays a role in it," Bailey said.


Homeownership
hits 15-year low
WASHINGTON -The
American dream of homeown-
ership is at its lowest point in
15 years, the latest evidence
of a housing market still far
from recovering five years
after the housing crash.
New figures released Mon-
day by the Census Bureau
show the rate of U.S. home-
ownership fell in the first three
months of this year to 65.4
percent. That's down from
66.4 percent in the first quarter
last year.
Recent housing and eco-
nomic data have been encour-
aging, prompting some
economists to predict a pickup
in housing this year. But few
believe the U.S. will ever re-
turn to its 2004 peak.


MGIC settles in
discrimination case
WASHINGTON -The Justice
Department has settled a first-
of-its-kind discrimination case
against the nation's largest
mortgage insurer for requiring
women on maternity leave to
return to work before the company
would insure their mortgages.
The lawsuit filed last July
against the Mortgage Guaranty
Insurance Corp. alleged a vio-
lation of the Fair Housing Act.
The lawsuit arose from a
complaint to the Housing and
Urban Development Depart-
ment by a Wexford, Pa., loan
applicant.
Seventy people will be
compensated from a $511,250
fund. A federal court approved
the settlement.
-From wire reports


Task force wants changes to 'stand
Associated Press Neighborhood watch volunteer
George Zimmerman said he acted in
TALLAHASSEE-An independent self-defense when he killed Martin
task force wants major changes, but not earlier this year in Sanford. A special
an outright repeal, of Florida's "stand prosecutor, however, charged Zim-
your ground" law after the shooting merman with second-degree murder
death of teenager Trayvon Martin. following weeks of outcry and
State Sen. Chris Smith, the organ- protests. Zimmerman has posted bail
izer of the group, delivered the rec- and is currently in hiding as he awaits
ommendations to Gov Rick Scott and trial on the charges.
legislative leaders on Monday Smith, a critic of the existing law,
Smith said the group which in- put together his own task force to look
cluded prosecutors, defense attorneys, at the law after complaining that Scott
police chiefs and law professors was waiting too long to respond to the
could not reach a consensus on Martin killing. A separate task force
whether to get rid of the seven-year- assembled by the governor is sched-
old law that allows a person to meet uled to hold its first meeting in Talla-
force with force if they reasonably be- hassee on Tuesday
lieve they are in danger of being killed Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale, said he
or seriously harmed. The law removed would a sponsor in the bill in the
a duty to retreat that previously was in Florida Legislature that includes the
the state's self-defense law. changes recommended by his group,
"We took an adult look at'stand your including one that requires that a
ground,"' Smith said. "We had adult grand jury and not a prosecutor de-
discussions, not political, but adult termine whether "stand your ground"
discussions on 'stand your ground."' can be used to avoid arrest.


your ground' law
Smith's group also called for creat-
ing a system to track self-defense
claims in Florida and to make it clear
the police can detain and question
someone even if the person contends
they were acting in self-defense.
The 21-page report by Smith's group
includes recommendations that either
had unanimous support, or a super-
majority Smith noted that only a sim-
ple majority supported a repeal of the
stand your ground law and that he
would not "waste" the time of the
GOP-controlled Legislature or public
by sponsoring a bill to repeal the law.
One recommendation that received
a supermajority- but not unanimous
agreement was that police should
be allowed to charge someone if the
person killed was unarmed or was in
the process of running away
Smith on Monday repeated his push
to have the Florida Legislature deal
with the state's self-defense laws in a
special session instead of waiting until
next year's legislative session.


II
Clark had surgery last De-
cember, which gave him
some feeling and strength
back, but he's lost some of it
Still, he doesn't give up.
Allen said the hardest thing
is to not do things for him -
that it's better to let him
struggle and do things
himself.
He washes his own face
and feeds himself it just
takes him 10 times longer
than it does most people. He
can brush some of his hair,
put on his hat and sun-
glasses.
He keeps up with the
world through his computer
He sends email and reads
the news. He likes watching
science and nature pro-
grams on TV to keep himself
learning and informed.
"Psychiatrists have asked
me if I ever think of suicide,
but that never enters my
mind." he said.


His home is on property
he bought from his grand-
parents. His grandfather,
Algie Lee Fisher, used to
take him deer hunting in the
nearby woods. Clark moved
to Hernando from Ohio in
1987 to help his grandpar-
ents and he never left.
He barely gets by on Social
Security Disability Insurance,
Medicare and $61 in food
stamps. He said he's doing
OK, but he needs help with
his roof. After the last big
rainstorm, he noticed a bunch
of shingles on the ground.
Allen said someone reno-
vated his bathroom years ago,
but things aren't quite suited
for his specific needs. The
toilet is set on a platform,
and there's only one grip bar
next to it and he needs two.
The shower is narrow and
it's difficult for an aide to
give him a shower without
also getting soaked. Now the
water is ruining the floor.


CLARK
Continued from Page Al

Clark's tumor is located in
the back of his head, going
into his brain stem. Currently,
it is 10 centimeters, about 4
inches big. Since he was di-
agnosed, the tumor has dou-
bled in size, but right now
it's stable, Clark said.
It causes him to have a
constant pain in his head,
which is controlled with Val-
ium and morphine. He also
has trouble with his short-
term memory
"My pain level is about a
7," Clark said. "I asked the
doctor what's going to happen
to me. One doctor said, 'You're
going to be eating mashed
potatoes and you'll fall face
first into them and you won't
wake up.' I said, 'Oh. OK."'
For Clark, it's difficult to
separate his tumor from his
paralysis, although the
paralysis came first. Plus,
that's what people see.
One time he visited a local
elementary school classroom
and let the students ask him
questions. He told them, "Being
a quadriplegic doesn't make
me any less of a person."
However, he has been spit
on by a group of boys and
humiliated in a restaurant
when someone who saw his
urine bag said loudly, "Can't
people like that cover things
up?"
"I used to go to church
every Sunday, but I stopped
when two pit bulls tried to
drag me out of my chair," he
said. "If it wasn't for a
parishioner coming by with
a ball bat in his trunk, I
would've been dog food."
Clark survives with the
help of a friend, Tracy Allen,
who comes in twice a day to
help him in and out of bed.
She fixes meals for him, gets
him set up for the day
A visiting nurse comes
once a week and CNAs
come twice a week, plus
friends stop by to see him.
"He's fiercely independ-
ent," Allen said. "But this
has been a rough year, a lot
of ups and downs. He has a
lot more going on than just
being quadriplegic and hav-
ing a brain tumor.
"His attitude he has
good days and bad days, but
more good than bad," she said.
"I admire his get-up-and-go.
I'm not sure I could handle
it as well as he does."


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Little things like that add
up, Allen said.
"I wish I had a million
dollars to help him, but all I
have is my friendship," she
said.
On nice days when it's not
too hot, Clark wheels himself
outside on his porch to sit
under his big umbrella that
he calls his "taco stand."
"I cleared these lots my-
self," he said of days gone
by. "It's nice and quiet out
here. I can sit with my feet
up and watch cars go by and
the kids get off the bus from
school and remember how it
was when I used to take my
dune buggy to get my
youngest son from the bus."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


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TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


NEWS IN BRIEF
STAFF REPORT
Ed Johnson, heavy equip-
ment operator, was surprised
when he pulled the giant scoop
of earth from the basement he
was digging. "What is that?" he
thought. "An old whiskey bar-
rel or a wooden box of some
kind?" He jumped off his back-
hoe to investigate. As he ap-
proached, his mind was racing.
He could see that the wooden
box was badly decayed and full
of something. As he got closer,
he could make out a sword, an
old canteen and remnants of an
old military uniform. While sift-
ing through the box, he found a
bugle, tattered papers and some
military badges. It appeared to
be the belongings of a soldier of
some kind. He spent the rest of
the day collecting and examin-
ing the items he had found. He
needed to find out more.
The next morning he
stopped by the local coffee shop
to ask questions about the lot he
was digging on. He stopped at
the right place. Three elderly
gentlemen were swapping sto-
ries as they did every morning.
Ed approached the group and
asked if they were from the
area. They all laughed and said
"Who's asking?" Ed explained
that he was building a new
house on a lot he recently pur-
chased and told them where it
was. One gentlemen said, "Oh,
you mean the old Norris place?
That place was demolished over
50 years ago. Been an empty lot
ever since." Ed was intrigued-
he hadn't realized there had
been a house there. "Place
caught fire in the 1940's. I was
just a school boy at the time-
no one was home, but the place
was a total loss. The charred
remains sat there for 4 or 5
years before it was cleaned up.
I walked past that place twice a
day, five days a week, back and
forth from school. Went all the
way to the 8th grade," the fel-
low said with a smile. "After
that, no one ever rebuilt on the
lot. I'm glad to see somebody's
doing something with it. Go
down and talk to Larry at the
court house. He can pull the plat
book and tell you all about it."
The old guy was right, Larry
was a wealth of information.
The original farm house was
built by Elsie and Thomas Lit-
tle back in 1845. They moved
out and sold to Elijah Miller in
1883. Then in 1916, the place
was sold to Henry Norris who
tore down the existing two-
room farm house and built a
new house. That house burned
down in 1943.
All of this was great info,
now what about the military
items? Ed needed to find out
exactly what they were. When
Ed learned that the Treasure
Hunters were coming to town,
he thought this would be his
chance to learn more about
the items he had found. The
advertisement had said that
the experts would offer advice
on any antique and collectible
items and they would do it for
free. It also said that they would
make offers to purchase items.
He wasn't interested in selling,
but you never know. Hey, if the
price is right, who knows?
Ed walked into the hotel
where the show was and fol-
lowed the signs to the meeting
room with great anticipation.
"My heart was actually beat-
ing at twice the normal rate," he
said. "As soon as I walked in I
was welcomed to the show and
given a number. They said it
would be about 10 minutes un-
til they would call my number.
While I waited, I looked at all
the unusual antiques on display.
There were old toys, coins, sil-
ver tea sets and old metal signs.
There was even a sword simi-
lar to mine. My number was
called and it was the moment
I'd been waiting for. I would
finally learn about the items I
had found."
Ed continued, "almost im-
mediately after I sat down,
Greg the antique guru was as-
signed to assist me said, 'hey
nice Civil War sword and bu-
gle. Where did you get them?'
I told him my story and he said
the family most likely buried
the items in honor of the sol-
dier who owned them, and who
most likely fought in the Civil
War." The soldier's uniform, or
what was left of it, the sword
and other items would have
been distributed by the Union
Army. The items were that of
an infantry soldier and dated at
around 1863. Because a bugle
was found, this soldier was
most likely the company bugle
boy. Most buglers were young
boys. Also, the hat in the col-
lection would have fit a very
small head-that of a 12 to 14
year old boy.
Greg also explained that
since the uniform, sword and
other items were together, the
soldier most surely survived the
war and returned home. Ed re-
flected that "learning about the
items was very interesting and
definitely worth the trip. The


entire collection was valued at
$2,200. Most of the value was
the sword and the bugle. I de-
cided to take pictures and sell
the collection. I had a great time
learning about it and thought it
should be in a Civil War enthu-
siast's collection. I'm actually
having a small monument made
in honor of the find and putting
it at the exact location where it
was found."


Treasure Hunters are coming to Lecanto


BY DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

Got Booty? If you
have a coffee can full of
old coins, an old guitar
or maybe the costume
jewelry your aunt gave
you, it's time to bring it
out of hiding. This week,
Treasure Hunters will be
in town and want to see
what you have. These
Treasure Hunters aren't
armed with a shovel and
metal detector, rather
their weapon of choice
is their expertise and
the collectors they buy
for. You see, these guys
know all about diamonds,
coins, antiques and col-
lectibles, musical instru-
ments and anything that's
old. They are asking you
to bring your booty and


make your best deal.
These guys pay cash for
just about anything that's
old. The items they buy
go straight to collectors
all over the world. How
much is a 1960 Gibson
Les Paul worth? Well, to
some, it might be worth
a couple hundred dol-
lars but to a serious col-
lector it could be worth
thousands, even ten's of
thousands. These guys
are buying for these col-
lectors. They pay more
for the things their col-
lectors want.
The event is free to at-
tend and there is no ob-
ligation to sell anything.
If it's information you
want, that won't cost you
a thing. But be prepared,
as an offer to purchase
your treasures is high-


ly likely. About eighty
percent of the stuff that
comes into the show is
purchased by these hun-
gry treasure hunters.
According to the Trea-
sure Hunters I talked to,
the wait time to get your
items looked at is usually
a half hour or less. Once
there, your items will be
examined, identified and
an offer will quickly fol-
low. Then it's up to you...
do I sell, do I hold out for
more or do I walk? The
whole thing sounds like a
lot of fun and might put
some jingle in your pock-
et. So dig up that booty
and head down to the
show. You might have the
treasure they have been
looking for!


DO'
- 4GETH


ABOVE A customer brought in his father's coin collection that he


had


inherited. He was pleasantly surprised with his offer and decided to
sell the collection. He said that the money would go towards a down
payment on a house for his family.


WE WANT TO
BUY ANY TYPE
OF GOLD
YOU HAVE
GOLD IS ALMOST AT
$1,700 PER OZ.
IT'S TIME TO SELL!

Hi, I'm
Archie.
I've been
a Trea-
sure Hunt-
er since
1996. Back then, gold
was around $225 per
oz.-now it's six times
that. Gold has never been
this high and may never
be again in my lifetime.
Back in the 1980's,
gold and silver soared in
price, but soon fell back
to rock bottom. Well, it's
a seller's market right
now. The poor world
economy and weak dol-
lar have increased prices
to all-time highs. My ad-
vice to people is to sell
now at the high side.
Many people have
gold in their jewelry box
and don't realize how
valuable it really is. If
you've got old rings,
necklaces, mismatched
earrings or even gold
teeth just sitting in a
dresser drawer, dig it out
and bring it in. You will
be surprised just how
much we can pay you.



,,ar.. -^


Old Coins and

Paper Currency
Did you know that the United States started mint-
ing coins in 1793? All coins are worth something:
old silver dollars, half dollars, quarters and dimes
made before 1965 are mostly silver and worth many
times their face value. A $20 gold coin from the ear-
ly 1900's could be worth $2,000 or more to collec-
tors. If you have any older coins or paper currency,
please come see us. We will buy one coin or million
dollar collections.


JEFFERSON "WAR"
NICKEL


ROOSEVELT DIME


WASHINGTON QUARTER






KENNEDY HALF






MORGAN DOLLAR


PEACE DOLLAR


,,--1c

$20 LIBERTY HEAD $20 ST. G
DOUBLE EAGLE DOUBLE


GAUDENS
E EAGLE


BUYING PRE-1934 PAPER CURRENCY


...


j]


Hi, my name is David. I've been
collecting coins since I was a child. I
can't wait to visit with you and exam-
ine your old coins and paper currency.
I will be honest and fair with you and
pay you as much as I can for your old


coins. I have purchased millions of dollars worth of
coins from people all over the world.


5 DAY BUYING EVENT



TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-6PM SATURDAY 9AM-4PM
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS & SUITES
903 E. GULF TO LAKE HWY. LECANTO, FL 34461

DIRECTIONS 352.341.3515
INFORMATION 217.787.7767


SWhat kind of things are
they looking for?

I'm Tony, and I get asked this
question a lot. I usually say, "if
it's gold or old, they will prob-
ably be interested in it." I know that's a vague
answer, so here's a list that might get you
thinking:

Gold Jewelry, Costume Jewelry, Dia-
monds, Silver Coins, Silver Dollars,
Gold Coins, Old Paper Currency, Old
Wheat Pennies, Old Pocket Watches,
Toys made before 1 970, Wrist Watch-
es, Foreign Coins, Silver Bullion, Ster-
ling Silver, Barbie Dolls, Tonka Trucks,
Coin Collections, Advertising Signs,
Old Guitars, Saxophones, All Musical
Instruments, Comic Books, Historical
Documents, Oil Paintings


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WANTED
We pay for any instrument, including guitars,
saxophones, clarinets, flutes, drums, cymbals,
french horns, tubas and bass guitars.


-SILVER

Hi, I'm Dennis and I am a Treasure
Hunter. Silver is almost $35 per oz. Five
years ago, it was $2.50 per oz. If you
have old silver jewelry, tea sets, sterling
and old silver coins, I want to see it. I
buy hundreds of pounds of silver every
week. If it's silver, please come and see me!


BUYING ALL POCKET WATCHES
AND WRISTWATCHES
We are one of the largest pocket watch and
wristwatch buyers in the world. We deal in
all makes and models, including:

MARTIN BRAUN, BREITLING, CARTIER,
LECOULTRE, OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
ROLEX, TIFFANY & CO., VACHERON &
CONSTANTIN, HAMILTON, ILLINOIS


OOOB9X1


I ,p j 00
u KIL,
F s
f-I u N T E :1


A6 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


7. F-7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


PAYING CASH FOR ALL COINS


PRE-1970 & CURRENCY


WEALSOPURCHAS
PRE- 1970 GU[FARS
POCKET WATCHES
SPORTS MEMORABI
COMIC BOOKS


INDIAN CENT
UP TO $500*


3 CENT PIECE
UP TO $2,500*


SHIELD NICKEL
UP TO $4,000*

**J


SEATED LIBERTY DIME
UP TO $6,500*


KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR
UP TO 8X FACE VALUE*


1797 $1
UP TO $200,000*


$2.5 LIBERTY HEAD
GOLD COIN
I I- - I . . -


ARMS OF CALIFORNIA
GOLD HALF DOLLAR
I I- T I .I .. .


WHEAT BACK CENT
UP TO $1,500*






BUFFALO NICKEL
UP TO $1,800*


CAPPED BUST HALF DIME
UP TO $10,000*






STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER
UP TO $4,400*


BARBER HALF DOLLAR
UP TO $6,750*


1798 $5
UP TO $125,000*


$5 LIBERTY HEAD
GOLD COIN
III- T . 1 . I


GOLD DOLLAR TYPE II
U Ip T, 4 iI -*


BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT
UP TO $3,800*


JEFFERSON "WAR" NICKEL
UP TO $2,000*


BARBER DIME
UP TO $2,800*


BARBER QUARTER
UP TO $3,200*


PEACE DOLLAR
UP TO $3,000*


DRAPED BUST HALF CENT
UP TO $5,000*


$10 INDIAN
GOLD COIN
III- T. I ..


$5 DRAPED BUST
RIGHT LE
II- T. 4':" ""'"-


2 CENT PIECE
UP TO $2,000*


LIBERTY "V" NICKEL
UP TO $2,800*


MERCURY DIME
UP TO $3,600*


WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR
UP TO $4,700*


MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR
UP TO $100,000*


1832 CLASSIC HALF CENT
UP TO $80,000*


$20 ST. GAUDENS
GOLD COIN
II- T I , ,- -


FLOWING HAIR STELLA
GOLD COIN
I II- T , I 'i -


the COIN DEALER
nowlttter


WE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME OF
THE RAREST NOTES IN UNITED
STATES HISTORY!

BRING IN YOUR OLD BANK
NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU
HAVE A HIDDEN GEM!


WHO TREASURE HUNTERS

WHAT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO
SELL THEIR COINS AND
CURRENCY

WHERE HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
& SUITES
903 E. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
LECANTO, FL 34461

WHEN MAY 1ST-5TH
TUES-FRI 9AM-6PM
SATURDAY 9AM-4PM

DIRECTIONS 352.341.3515

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TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Jose A.
Rosado Sr., 84
CITRUS SPRINGS
Jose A. Rosado Sr, 84, of
Citrus Springs, FL, passed
away on Saturday, April 28,
2012.
M r
Rosado was
born on May
8, 1927, in
Villalb a,
Puerto
Rico, to
C a r m eR 0o
and Ra- Jose
monita (Tor- Rosado
res) Rosado.
In 1952,
he enlisted in the United
States Marine Corps, where
he faithfully served his
country in active duty until
1971, then in inactive duty
until 1982. Mr Rosado was
also employed by General
Electric Corporation in
Plainville, CT, where he re-
tired in 1989. He then
shortly moved to Citrus
Springs, FL, that same year.
In the beginning of his ca-
reer as a young United
States Marine, he fought in
the Korean War in the early
1950s; later Mr. Rosado went
on to earn two Purple
Hearts for his courage and
valor during the Vietnam
War in the 1960s.
On September 3, 1955, Mr.
Rosado married his lovely
bride, Mrs. Ramonita (San-
tiago) Rosado, in Ponce,
Puerto Rico. The couple
went on to have four chil-
dren together and to travel
the world.
He enjoyed HIS Boston
Red Socks, golfing, bowling
and many other sports, and
serving in the VFW of Citrus
Springs, FL.
He is survived by his al-
ways loving and faithful
wife of almost 57 years, Ra-
monita Rosado; oldest son,
Jose A. Rosado Jr. of New-
ington, CT; daughter, Ruth
(Rosado) Alicea of Newing-
ton, CT; and youngest son,
John D. Rosado of Kensing-
ton, CT; six grandchildren
and ten great-grandchil-
dren, and countless loving
friends and neighbors both
in Florida and Connecticut.
He was preceded in death
by his brother, Leon
Rosado; and two sisters,
Gloria and Carmen Rosado.
And lastly, his loving son,
Robert D. Rosado, whom he
loved and cared for dearly
Visitation is Wednesday at
5 to 7 p.m. at Roberts Fu-
neral Home 19939 E. Penn-
sylvania Ave., Dunnellon,
FL. Mass of Christian burial
is Thursday at 10 a.m. at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Church, Citrus Springs, FL,
with interment following at
Florida National Cemetery
with full military honors.
Condolences may be left at
www.RobertsofDunnellon.
com.



Funeral Home With Crematory
DOUGLAS HUMMER
Graveside: Mon. 2:30 PM
Fero Memorial Gardens
NELSON HOWE
Graveside: May 7 2:30 PM
Florida National Cemetery
RUSSELL AAGEBERG
Service: Thurs. 10:00 AM Chapel
ALBINA SPITTLEHOUSE
Mass: Wed., May 9,2012
Our Lady of Fatima
726-8323 oooBlVN


Robert
Lietz, 26
HOMOSASSA
Robert Lietz, 26, of Ho-
mosassa, died Thursday,
April 19, 2012.
Survived by parents
Orville, Della; sister Karrie;
two brothers, Brian,
Richard; and grandmother
Wanda.
Coastal Cremations of
New Port Richey is in
charge of arrangements.




Russell
Aageberg, 97
INVERNESS
Russell Edward Aage-
berg, age 97, Inverness, died
Saturday, April 28, 2012,
under the loving care of his
family, Hospice of Citrus
County and the wonderful
caregivers at Arbor Trail
Rehab and Nursing Center.
Russell was born on
March 30, 1915, in Ham-
mond, IN, to the late Adler
and Alice (Sexton) Aage-
berg. He served our country
in the United States Army
during WWII, achieving the
rank of 1st Lieutenant. He
was employed by Union
Carbide in East Chicago, IN,
as a supervisor for over 38
years. An avid golfer, Rus-
sell enjoyed his member-
ship at the Inverness Golf
and Country Club and also
enjoyed dining at the club-
house.
He was a dedicated fam-
ily man, who leaves behind
survivors as nephews,
Ronald Adley, Dennis
Porter, Tom Porter and
Michael Adley; nieces, Sally
Turner and Jackie Adley;
his sister-in-law, Loraine
Porter; and special care-
giver Pam Sewell. He was
preceded in death by his
wife, Marie, on 11/26/2000;
and his sister, Ruth Adley, in
2002.
A Celebration of Life Me-
morial Service will be held
on Thursday, May 3, 2012, at
10 a.m. at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Fr.
Charles Leke of Our Lady of
Fatima Parish officiating.
Military honors will follow
under the direction of VFW
Post 4337. Burial at a later
date in Florida National
Cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.





"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"




Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY.19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Nelson
Howe, 86
Nelson Taylor Howe, 86,
died April 26,2012, in Largo,
FL. He was born in Coving-
ton, Kentucky, on June 8th,
1925.
Mr. Howe was a decorated
veteran of World War II, see-
ing action in Europe, in-
cluding the Battle of the
Bulge. Following the war, he
began a career in education
in Hillsborough County,
which over the next 35 years
took him to Turkey Creek,
Plant and Robinson High
Schools. He retired from
Robinson after more than 2
decades as head of the Sci-
ence Department.
Truly a gentleman and a
scholar, he will be forever
missed by his family and all
who knew him.
He is survived by his son,
Allie Howe and daughter-in-
law, Melanie Howe; daugh-
ter Janice (Howe) Lydon
and son-in-law, Michael
Lydon; grandchildren
Christopher Lydon and
Sarah (Lydon) Crooks; and
great-grand-daughter Lil-
lian Grace Crooks.
Funeral Services will be
held at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, on
Monday, May 7th, 2012, at
2:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests contributions in
Mr. Howe's name be made
to the Veterans of Foreign
Wars or Suncoast Hospice.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home With Crematory,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARY RATES
Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be in-
cluded for an additional
charge.
Larger photos, span-
ning the entire column,
can also be accommo-
dated, and will incur a
size-based fee.




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and Compassion Matter
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ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL 352419 l791ll




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Connie
Saffelder, 66
ELBERTA, ALA.
Connie (Harrington) Saf-
felder, 66, of Elberta, AL,
went home to the Lord on
Saturday, April 28, 2012.
Born Oct. 28, 1945, in St.
Clair, MI, she was the
daughter of the late Clyde
Baird Harrington and Ruth
(Fosbender) Harrington.
She attended Washington
Elem. in Marysville, MI, and
graduated from Leesburg
High, Leesburg, FL. She
was formerly employed by
1st National Bank of Lees-
burg and Dixie National
Bank in Miami, FL.
She is survived by hus-
band, Ernie Saffelder; sister
Mary Lou (Tom)
Szmytkowski; brothers Paul
(Irene) Harrington of Inver-
ness, FL, and Ed Harrington
ofBelfair, WA; niece Brenda
(Mike) Hermanson, Inver-
ness, FL.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options.
Obituaries must be veri-
fied with the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Associated Press
Blind Chinese legal activist Chen Guangcheng is seen re-
cently at an undisclosed location in Beijing during a meet-
ing with human rights activists.



Running blind:


China activist's


dramatic escape


Associated Press

BEIJING Chen
Guangcheng's blindness
was a help and a hindrance
as he made his way past
the security cordon ringing
his farmhouse.
He knew the terrain he
had explored his village in
rural China as a blind child
and moved as easily in
darkness as in daylight He
was alert for the sounds of
people, cars and the river
he would have to cross.
But he stumbled scores
of times, arriving bloody at
a meeting point with a fel-
low dissident the first of
an underground railroad
of supporters who eventu-
ally escorted him to safety
with U.S. diplomats.
A self-taught lawyer who
angered authorities by ex-
posing forced abortions,
Chen is now presumed to
be under U.S. protection,
most likely in the fortress-
like American Embassy in
Beijing. Details of his im-
probable escape making
his way last week through
fields and forest, then being
chased by security agents in
Beijing are emerging in
accounts from the activists
who helped him.
Chen and his family had
been harassed and kept
under house arrest since
the summer of 2005, except
for a four-year period when
Chen was jailed on charges
of disrupting traffic.
The 41-year-old activist
hatched his escape plan
months ago with a simple
idea he would just lie


still, said Bob Fu, founder
of the Texas-based rights
group ChinaAid and one of
a handful of people to
speak to Chen since he fled
his village.
For weeks on end, Chen
stayed in bed, saying he was
too feeble to rise.
In fact, Chen wasn't well;
his stomach was bothering
him as it had for years. But
he exaggerated his condi-
tion to lull the guards into a
sense of complacency
The ruse worked. The
guards didn't look in on him
constantly, assuming he was
still bedridden, and when
he escaped under cover of
darkness, it took three days
for them to notice.
He walked for hours, try-
ing to put as much distance
between himself and his
heavily guarded home as
possible before daring to
slip a battery into his mo-
bile phone and call He
Peirong, a Nanjing-based
English teacher-turned-
activist who had promised
to help. She was waiting
with a car
When she finally found
him, Chen was wet, covered
in mud and blood, and had
numerous cuts and bruises.
He herself was detained
Friday by police. Hours be-
fore, she told The Associ-
ated Press she had been in
contact with Chen's rela-
tives, who told her that
when the local village chief
discovered Chen was gone,
"he was furious."
They beat Chen's wife,
his brother and his adult
nephew, she said.


Deux Oh!


Thursday, May 17

Limited seating.
Reservations Necessary.
Call: 352-341-6427


Edward Jones
Financial Services
Wann and Mary Robinson -
Edward Jones
Canadian Meds
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Smith Optical Services
Deco Cafe
Ted & Judy Stauffer
Ice Cream Doctor
Anonymous
Frank DiGiovanni
Sweetbay Supermarkets
TO BENEFIT THE CITRUS
COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY


p
r 1




e :


I Now through May 31
,Buy one syringe of

Radiesse or juvaderm
and receive one box of

Latisse FREE

m Also receive a 50% discount
on second syringe





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AnD SKin SURGERY CEnTER
Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461


www.dermatologyonline.com


352-746-2200


Citrus County Fallen Heroes Monument

Benefactors Ceremony
....-- 1


You are cordially invited to help us Thank Our Supporters

Saturday May 5, 2012 at 9a.m.
Citrus County Fallen Heroes Monument
Bicentenial Park, Crystal River Florida


Light Refreshments immediately following
www.citruscountyfallenheroes.org


A8 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obama and Romney: Where they stand


A concise look at the platforms of the Democratic president and the Republican presidential hopeful


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- -
A look at where
Democratic Presi-
dent Barack Obama
and Republican
presidential hopeful
Mitt Romney stand Ba
on a selection of Ob
issues:
Obama:
Abortion and birth con-
trol: Supports abortion
rights. Health care law re-
quires contraceptives to be
available for free for women
enrolled in workplace
health plans.
Economy: Term marked
by high unemployment, a
deep recession that began
in previous administration
and gradual recovery Re-
sponded to recession with a
roughly $800 billion stimu-
lus plan. Continued imple-
mentation of Wall Street
and auto industry bailouts
begun under George W
Bush. Proposes tax breaks


for U.S. manufactur-
ers producing do-
mestically or
repatriating jobs
from abroad, and
tax penalties for
U.S. companies out-
sourcing jobs.
rck Education: Has
ama approved waivers
freeing states from
the most onerous require-
ments of the Bush-era No
Child Left Behind law.
"Race to the Top" competi-
tion has rewarded winning
states with billions of dol-
lars for pursuing education
policies Obama supports.
Gay rights: Once op-
posed federal recognition
of same-sex marriage,
later said his views were
"evolving" and has not
taken a position since. Op-
poses constitutional
amendment to ban it. Sup-
ports civil unions and let-
ting states decide about
marriage.
Health care: Achieved


landmark overhaul putting
U.S. on path to universal
coverage if the Supreme
Court upholds the heath
care law and its mandate for
almost everyone to obtain
insurance.
Social Security: Has not
proposed a comprehensive
plan to address Social Secu-
rity's long-term financial
problems.
Taxes: Wants to raise
taxes on the wealthy and en-
sure they pay 30 percent of
their income at minimum.
Supports extending Bush-
era tax cuts for everyone
making under $200,000, or
$250,000 for couples.
Terrorism: Approved
the raid that found and
killed Osama bin Laden.
War: Ended the Iraq
war he had opposed and in-
herited, increased the U.S.
troop presence in
Afghanistan then began
drawing down the force
with a plan to have all out by
the end of 2014.


Romney:
Abortion and
birth control: Op-
poses abortion
rights. Previously
supported them.
Says state law
should guide abor-
tion rights, and Roe M
v Wade should be Ron
reversed by a future
Supreme Court. Said he
would end federal aid to
Planned Parenthood.
Economy: Lower taxes,
less regulation, balanced
budget, more trade deals to
spur growth. Replace job-
less benefits with unem-
ployment savings accounts.
Education: Supported
the federal accountability
standards of No Child Left
Behind law. Has said the
student testing, charter-
school incentives and
teacher evaluation stan-
dards of Obama's "Race to
the Top" competition "make
sense" although the federal
government should have


less control of
education.
Gay rights: Fa-
vors constitutional
1P amendment to ban
Sf gay marriage, says
l policy should be set
federally, not by
itt states. But said he
iney would not seek to re-
store a ban on openly
gay service members.
Health care: Promises
to work for the repeal of the
federal health care law
modeled largely after his
universal health care
achievement in Massachu-
setts because he says states,
not Washington, should
drive policy on the
uninsured.
Social Security: Protect
the status quo for people 55
and over but, for the next
generations of retirees,
raise the retirement age for
full benefits by one or two
years and reduce inflation
increases in benefits for
wealthier recipients.


Taxes: Drop all tax rates
by 20 percent, bringing the
top rate, for example, down
to 28 percent from 35 per-
cent and the lowest rate to 8
percent instead of 10 per-
cent. Curtail deductions,
credits and exemptions for
the wealthiest End Alterna-
tive Minimum Tax for indi-
viduals, eliminate capital
gains tax for families mak-
ing below $200,000 and cut
corporate tax to 25 percent
from 35 percent
Terrorism: No constitu-
tional rights for foreign ter-
rorism suspects. In 2007,
refused to rule out use of
waterboarding to interro-
gate terrorist suspects. In
2011, his campaign said he
does not consider water-
boarding to be torture.
War: Has not specified
the troop numbers behind
his pledge to ensure the
"force level necessary to se-
cure our gains and complete
our mission successfully" in
Afghanistan.


Number of US newborns


with drug withdrawal triples


Associated Press
CHICAGO -Less than a
month old, Savannah Dan-
nelley scrunches her tiny
face into a scowl as a nurse
gently squirts a dose of
methadone into her mouth.
The infant is going
through drug withdrawal
and is being treated with the
same narcotic prescribed
for her mother to fight ad-
diction to powerful pre-
scription painkillers.
Disturbing new research
says the number of U.S. ba-
bies born with signs of opi-
ate drug withdrawal has
tripled in a decade because
of a surge in pregnant
women's use of legal and il-
legal narcotics, including
Vicodin, OxyContin and
heroin, researchers said. It
is the first national study of
the problem.


your playground
has never
been bigger


The number of newborns
with withdrawal symptoms
increased from a little more
than 1 per 1,000 babies sent
home from the hospital in
2000 to more than 3 per
1,000 in 2009, the study
found. More than 13,000 U.S.
infants were affected in
2009, the researchers
estimated.
The newborns include ba-
bies such as Savannah,
whose mother stopped
abusing painkillers and
switched to prescription
methadone early in preg-
nancy, and those whose
mothers are still abusing
legal or illegal drugs.
Weaning infants from
these drugs can take weeks
or months and often re-
quires a lengthy stay in in-
tensive care units. Hospital
charges for treating these
newborns soared from $190


million to $720 million be-
tween 2000 and 2009, the
study found.
The study was released
online Monday in the Jour-
nal of the American Medical
Association.
Savannah is hooked up to
heart and oxygen monitors
in an Oak Lawn, Ill., new-
born intensive care unit In
a pink crib, she sleeps fit-
fully, sometimes cries all
night, and has had diarrhea
and trouble feeding typi-
cal signs of withdrawal.
Some affected babies also
have breathing problems,
low birth weights and
seizures.
It nearly breaks her young
mother's heart
"It's really hard, every day,
emotionally and physically,"
said Aileen Dannelley, 25.
"It's really hard when your
daughter is born addicted."


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AIO~TH MARA, A ,202SOKSEiusCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowToS E'THEMRTINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
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GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg % Ch Name Last Chg % Ch Name Last Chg %Ch9 Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
BarnesNob 20.75 +7.07 +51.7 Aerosonic 3.45 +.67 +24.1 ExceedCo 3.65 +1.56 +74.9 ing qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
ImperHIdg 3.83 +.88 +29.8 MGTCap rs 3.07 +.37 +13.7 BookMill 3.19 +.64 +25.1 ures date only from the beginning oftrading. pf- Preferred stock issue.pr- Preferences.pp-
Sunoco 49.29 +8.38 +20.5 OrionEngy 2.10 +.17 +8.8 Concepts 18.77 +3.59 +23.6 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security ata specified price. s-
Edenor 2.75 +.38 +16.0 Vringo 3.51 +.27 +8.3 Homeow wt 2.74 +.50 +22.1 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
DemndMda 8.31 +1.06 +14.6 RennGEnt 2.21 +.14 +6.8 GenProbe 81.55 +12.84 +18.7 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock.u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Tenneco 30.83 -5.26 -14.6 HstnAEn 2.31 -.31 -11.8 ZionsBcwt 4.15 -.77 -15.7
CSVInvNG 82.09 -13.39 -14.0 PacBkrMg 11.44 -1.41 -11.0 KeatingCn 6.15 -.85 -12.1
VeriFone 47.64 -6.80 -12.5 NwGoldg 9.10 -.92 -9.2 Grouponn 10.71 -1.27 -10.6
NamTai 4.98 -.65 -11.5 ASpecRity 4.99 -.36 -6.7 MerusLb g 2.06 -.24 -10.4 52-Week Net % YT[
ArabAmDv 8.73 -1.00 -10.3 GreenHntr 2.20 -.14 -6.0 Hologic 19.12 -2.11 -9.9 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


1,190 Advanced
1,854 Declined
124 Unchanged
3,168 Total issues
92 New Highs
14 New Lows
3,390,580,333 Volume


DIARY


222 Advanced
228 Declined
39 Unchanged
489 Total issues
8 New Highs
2 New Lows
68,892,669 Volume


836
1,671
120
2,627
101
29
1,585,115,528


13,297.11 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
470.05 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P 500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


13,213.63
5,230.24
470.53
8,119.07
2,426.28
3,046.36
1,397.91
14,689.85
816.88


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-14.68 -.11 +8.15 +3.17
-37.15 -.71 +4.19 -5.04
+1.07 +.23 +1.26 +9.80
-32.84 -.40 +8.59 -6.13
-8.59 -.35 +6.49 -1.17
-22.84 -.74+16.94 +6.36
-5.45 -.39+11.16 +2.70
-66.11 -.45+11.37 +1.66
-8.59 -1.04+10.25 -4.43


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BeoBradpf 16.03 +.02
BoSantSA 6.33 -.14
BoSBrasil 8.08 -.16
BkofAm 8.11 -.14
ABBLtd 18.87 +.06 BkMontg 59.37 -.21
ACELtd 75.97 -.39 BkNYMel 23.65 -.19
AES Corp 12.52 +.07 Barday 14.24 -.29
AFLAC 45.04 -.13 BariPVix 16.55 +.36
AGCO 46.57 -.65 BarnesNob 20.75 +7.07
AGL Res 39.43 +.18 BarrickG 40.43 -.23
AKSteel 7.42 +.15 Baxter 55.41 +.32
ASA Gold 24.56 +.16 Beam Inc 56.78 -.18
AT&TInc 32.91 +.24 BeazerHm 3.10 -.11
AbtLab 62.06 +.07 BectDck 78.45 +.48
AberFitc 50.17 -.71 BerkHaA120800.00-125.00
Accenture 64.95 -.07 BerkH B 80.45 -.11
AccoBrds 10.55 -.42 BerryPet 45.55 +.64
AccoBdwi 10.50 -.41 BestBuy 22.07 -.26
AccretivH 10.06 +.73 BigLots 36.64 -.70
AdamsEx 11.07 -.04 BBarrett 23.98 +.29
AMD 7.36 +.03 BioMedR 19.82 -.14
Aeroposfi 22.18 -.87 BIkHilsCp 33.01 -.09
Aetna 44.04 +.52 BIkDebtStr 4.16 +.02
Agilent 42.18 -.38 BlkEnhC&l 13.40 -.04
Agnieog 39.92 +.56 BIkGlbOp 15.27 +.01
AirProd 85.49 -.07 Blackstone 13.56 +.22
AlcatelLuc 1.51 -.05 BlockHR 14.70 -.26
Alcoa 9.73 -.02 Boeing 76.80 -.47
Alere 23.89 -1.78 BorgWarn 79.04 -.68
AllegTch 42.94 +.64 BostBeer 103.32 +3.36
Allete 41.21 -.09 BostProp 108.25 +.45
AlliBGIbHi 15.24 +.06 BostnSci 6.26 -.01
AlliBInco 8.21 +.04 BoydGm 7.69 -.20
AlliBern 14.09 -.04 BrMySq 33.37 +.05
Allstate 33.33 -.22 Brunswick 26.29 -.75
AlphaNRs 16.13 +.26 Bukeye 56.45
AIpAlerMLP 16.81 +.10 CBREGrp 18.81 -.32
Altria 32.21 +.08 CBS B 33.38 -.95
AmBev 41.98 -1.41 CFInds 193.06 -4.91
Ameren 32.79 +.03 CH Engy 65.62 -.36
Amerigrp 61.76 -1.43 CMS Eng 22.99 +.16
AMovilLs 26.65 +.50 CNO Find 7.27 -.25
AmAxle 9.69 -.49 CSS Inds 19.15 -.44
AEagleOut 18.01 -.42 CSXs 22.29 -.10
AEP 38.84 +.14 CVSCare 44.62 -.26
AmExp 60.21 +.04 CblvsNYs 14.82 +.26
AGreet 16.00 +.45 CabotOGs 35.14 +1.35
AmlntGrp 34.03 -.43 CallGolf 6.13 +.15
AmSIP3 7.01 +.04 Calpine 18.75 +.45
AmTower 65.58 +.48 Camecog 22.10 -.18
Amerigas 40.52 -.09 Cameron 51.25 -.03
AmeriBrgn 37.21 +.31 CampSp 33.83 -.02
Anadarko 73.21 -.58 CdnNRsgs 34.75 +.77
ABInBev 72.62 -.02 CapOne 55.48 -.58
Annaly 16.32 +.04 CapifSrce 6.45 -.07
Aonplc 51.80 +.18 CapMpB 14.81 +.19
Apache 95.94 +1.03 CardnlHIth 42.27 -.04
ApolloRM n 18.15 -.11 CareFusion 25.91 -.04
AquaAm 22.71 +.15 CarMax 30.87 -.42
ArcelorMit 17.33 -.28 Carnival 32.49 -.35
ArdchCoal 9.76 +.30 Carters 54.30 -.60
ArdchDan 30.83 -.25 Caterpillar 102.77 -1.79
AreosDor 17.87 +.02 Celanese 48.46 -1.19
ArmourRsd 6.98 +.03 Cemex 7.23
Ashland 65.87 -.36 Cemig pf 24.67 -.28
AsdEstat 16.93 -.20 CenovusE 36.25 +.39
AstraZen 43.90 +.35 CenterPnt 20.21 +.16
ATMOS 32.58 +.17 CntyLink 38.56 -.04
AuRicog 9.17 +.16 Checkpnt 10.96 -.20
Avon 21.60 +.03 ChesEng 18.44 +.72
AXIS Cap 34.02 +.67 ChesUfi 42.02 -.44
BB&TCp 32.04 -.59 Chevron 106.56 +.36
BHP BilILt 74.30 +.05 Chieos 15.36 -.52
BP PLC 43.41 -.12 Chimera 2.89
BPZRes 4.05 -.19 ChinaUni 17.38 -.37
BRFBrasil 18.43 -.69 Cigna 46.23 -.64
BRT 8.49 ... CindBell 3.80 +.14
BakrHu 44.11 +1.20 Cifgrprs 33.04 -.46
BallCorp 41.76 -.02 CleanH s 68.24 -.25


CliffsNRs 62.26 +.11
Clorox 70.10 +.32
CloudPeak 15.39 +.26
Coach 73.16 -.75
CCFemsa 105.95 -.31
CocaCola 76.32 -.31
CocaCE 30.12 +.38
CohStlnfra 17.40 -.07
ColgPal 98.94 +.56
CollctvBrd 20.77 -.43
Comerica 32.02 -.49
CmwREIT 18.75 +.03
CmtyHIt 24.34 -.25
CompSci 28.06 -.42
ComstkRs 17.57 +.07
Con-Way 32.50 -.38
ConAgra 25.82 -.10
ConocPhil 71.63 -.35
ConsolEngy 33.24 +.56
ConEd 59.45 +.14
ConstellA 21.60 -.17
Cnvrgys 13.37 -.09
Corning 14.35 -.10
CorrecdnCp 28.89 -.16
CottCp 6.55
CoventyH 29.99 -.09
Covidien 55.23 -.11
Crane 44.13 -.71
CSVS2xVxS 6.68 +.10
CSVellVSts 11.93 -.27
CredSuiss 23.31 -.51
CrwnCsfie 56.61
CrownHold 36.98 -.19
Cummins 115.83 -2.46

DCTIndl 5.93 +.03
DDRCorp 14.80 -.02
DNPSelct 10.80 +.08
DR Horton 16.35 -.16
DSW Inc 56.26 -1.22
DTE 56.38 -.02
DanaHIdg 14.62 -.06
Danaher 54.22 -.47
Darden 50.08 -.36
DeanFds 12.28 +.12
Deere 82.36 -.53
DelphiAu n 30.69 -.42
DeltaAir 10.96 +.14
DemndMda 8.31 +1.06
DenburyR 19.04 +.35
DeutschBk 43.39 -1.10
DevonE 69.85 +.19
DiamRk 10.63 -.11
DxFnBuIrs 103.36 -1.91
DirSCBear 18.17 +.58
DirFnBear 21.18 +.36
DirDGIdBII 13.12 -.36
DirxSCBull 58.72 -1.98
Discover 33.90 -.19
Disney 43.11 -.24
DollarGen 47.46 -.32
DomRescs 52.19 +.12
Dominos 37.81 +.66
DEmmett 23.24 -.14
DowChm 33.88 -.85
DrPepSnap 40.58 +.87
DuPont 53.46 -.26
DukeErgy 21.43
DukeRlty 14.82 +.09
E-CDarg 7.99 -.18
EMCCp 28.21 -.11
EOG Res 109.81 +.79
EQTCorp 49.82 +1.99
EastChm s 53.97 -.08
Eaton 48.18 -.89
EVEnEq 10.98 -.02
Ecolab 63.69 -.12
Edisonlnt 44.01 +.20


BPasoCp 29.67 +.15
Ban 13.79 -.11
BdorGldg 14.18 -.16
EmersonEl 52.54 -.13
EmpDist 20.52 -.05
Emulex 8.68 -.23
EnbrdgEPt 30.90 +.03
EnCanag 20.94 +.39
EndvSilvg 9.27 +.46
EngyTEq 41.96 +1.88
EngyTsfr 49.63 +1.71
Enerplsg 18.49 +.21
EnPro 41.41 -.47


ENSCO 54.65
Entergy 65.56
EntPrPt 51.54
EqtyRsd 61.44
EsteeLdr s 65.35
ExcelM 1.87
ExaoRes 7.34
Exelon 39.01
ExterranH 13.51
ExtraSpce 30.35
ExxonMbl 86.34
FMC Tech 47.00
FairchldS 14.17
FedExCp 88.24
FedSignl 5.16
Ferrellgs 14.87
Ferro 5.19
FibriaCelu 7.94
FidNatlnfo 33.67
FstHorizon 9.18
FTActDiv 8.37
FtTrEnEq 12.02
RFirstEngy 46.82
Rotek 13.64
Huor 57.75
FootLockr 30.59
FbrdM 11.28
FbrdMwt 2.44
ForestLab 34.83
ForestOil s 13.32
FBHmScn 22.74
FranceTel 13.86
FMCG 38.30


Fusion-io n 25.65 -1.90

GATX 42.87 -.81
GNC 39.06 -1.93
GabelliET 5.54 -.01
GabHIthW 8.50 +.04
GabUlI 8.04 +.11
GafisaSA 3.68 -.14
GameStop 22.76 +.08
Gannett 13.82 -.21
Gap 28.50 -.03
GenDynam 67.50 -.08


GenElec 19.58 -.20
GenGrPrp 17.80 -.25
GenMills 38.89 -.04
GenMotbrs 23.00 -.53
GenOn En 2.13 +.02
Genworth 6.01 +.02
Gerdau 9.39 -.07
GlaxoSKIn 46.23 -.28
GoldFLtd 12.87 -.14
Goldcrpg 38.26 -.86
GoldmanS 115.15 +.74
Goodridch 125.46 +.18
GoodrPet 16.77 +.47
Goodyear 10.98 -.34
GtPlainEn 20.42 -.02
Griffon 9.91 -.31
GpTelevisa 21.97 +.23
GuangRy 18.78 -.17
GugSPEW 51.48 -.15
HCA Hldg 26.92 -.31
HCP Inc 41.45 +12
HSBC 45.17 -.41
HSBC Cap 26.34 -.03
Hallibrtn 34.22 +.98
HanJS 16.04 +.33
HanPrmDv 13.61 +.05
Hanesbrds 28.22 -.67
Hanoverlns 40.36 -.29
HarleyD 52.33 -.56
Harman 49.58 +2.32
HartfdFn 20.55 -.22
HatterasF 29.13 +.03


HawaiiEl 26.54 -.02
HItCrREIT 56.70 -.03
HItMgmt 7.20 -.14
HIthcrRlty 21.48 -.05
HealthNet 35.61 -.52
Heckmann 3.80 -.29
HeclaM 4.28 +.01
Heinz 53.31 +.15
HelixEn 20.41 +.12
HedmPayne 51.39 +.40
Herbalifes 70.32 -.15
Hershey 67.01 +.26
Hertz 15.41 -.40


Hess 52.14
HewlettP 24.76
HighwdPrp 34.73
HollyFrts 30.82
HomeDp 51.79
HonwIllnfi 60.66
Hospira 35.12
HospPT 27.58
HostHofis 16.64
HovnanE 2.00
Humana 80.68
Huntsmn 14.16
IAMGIdg 12.40
ICICIlBk 33.89
ING 7.06
iShGold 16.23
iSAsfia 23.84
iShBraz 60.26
iSCan 28.36
iShGer 22.54
iSh HK 17.55
iShJapn 9.74
iShMex 61.84
iShSing 13.00
iSTaiwn 12.81
iShSilver 30.11
iShChina25 37.93
iSSP500 140.28
iShEMkts 42.22
iShiBxB 116.48
iShSPLatA 45.74
iShB20T 117.32
iShB7-10T 105.69


iS Eafe 53.75
iShiBxHYB 91.20
iSR1KV 69.39
iSR1KG 66.00
iSR2KG 93.70
iShR2K 81.47
iShUSPfd 38.94
iShDJTed 21.91
iShREst 63.91
iShDJHm 15.46
iShSPSm 75.27
iStar 6.92
ITTCps 22.46


Idacorp 40.74 -.12
ITW 57.38 -.73
Imafon 5.80 -.01
ImperHIdg 3.83 +.88
Inergy 19.49 +.41
IngerRd 42.52 -.09
IntegrysE 54.64 +.22
IntcnmfiEx 133.04 +.37
IBM 207.08 +.27
InfiGame 15.58 -.21
IntPap 33.31 -.54
InterOilg 60.44 +2.09
Interpublic 11.81 +.08
InvenSenn 16.08

Invesco 24.84 -.26
IronMtn 30.37 -.32
ItauUnibH 15.69 -.07


JPMorgCh 42.98 -.36
Jabil 23.45 -.13
Jaguar g 2.71 -.18
JanusCap 7.58 -.12
Jefferies 15.93 -.16
JohnJn 65.10 +.26
JohnsnCfi 31.97 -.36
JonesGrp 11.22 -.47
JoyGIbl 70.77 -.83
JnprNtwk 21.43 +.17
KBHome 8.68 -.19
KBR Inc 33.86 -.49


KCSouthn 77.02 -1.34 MetroPCS 7.30 +.29 PennVaRs 25.49 -.31 RegionsFn 6.74 -.14
Kaydons 24.53 -.50 MetroHIth 7.48 -.56 PennWstg 17.14 -.23 Renrenn 6.10 -.11
KA EngTR 27.97 +.68 MKors n 45.67 -.23 Penney 36.06 -.66 RepubSvc 27.37 +.36
Kellogg 50.57 +.22 MidAApt 68.07 -.30 Pentair 43.34 -.30 ResMed 34.01 -.10
KeyEngy 12.66 +.08 Midas 11.50 +.01 PepBoy 14.93 -.01 Revlon 17.08 -.01
Keycorp 8.04 -.07 MobileTele 19.56 +.48 PepcoHold 18.92 +.11 ReynAmer 40.83 +.25
KimbClk 78.47 -.21 MolinaH s 25.65 -.85 PepsiCo 66.00 -.10 RioTnto 56.07 -.89
Kimco 19.41 +.06 MolsCoorB 41.58 +.09 Prmian 20.91 -.03 RiteAid 1.45 -.03
KindME 82.44 -.73 Molycorp 27.06 -.71 PetrbrsA 22.16 -.03 RobtHalf 29.80 -.81
KindMorg 35.90 +.06 MoneyG rs 16.84 -.08 Petrobras 23.55 -.13 RockwAut 77.34 -.85
Kinrossg 8.95 -.09 Monsanto 76.18 -1.66 Pfizer 22.90 -.18 RockColl 55.89 -.38
KodiakOg 8.85 -.13 MonstrVW 8.63 -.44 PhilipMor 89.51 -.30 Rowan 34.53 -.15
Kohls 50.13 -.67 Moodys 40.95 -.62 Phill66wi 34.05 -.06 RylCarb 27.37 -.62
Kraft 39.87 +.47 MorgStan 17.28 +.33 PiedNG 30.48 +.20 RoyDShllA 71.54 +.23
KrispKrm 7.33 -.11 MSEmMkt 14.60 +.02 Pier1 17.18 -.71 Royce 13.74 -.02
Kroger 23.27 -.08 Mosaic 52.82 -.18 PimoStrat 11.36 +.09 RoycepfB 25.66 +.06
LDK Solar 3.18 +.22 MotrlaSolu 51.03 +.28 PinWst 48.35 +.14 Rand 22.51 -.19
LSICorp 8.04 +.15 MotrlaMob 38.82 +.11 PioNtrl 115.82 +.18
LTCPrp 33.28 -.13 NCR Corp 23.50 -.02 PitnyBw 17.13 -.05
LaZBoy 15.07 -.27 NRG Egy 17.00 +.37 PlainsEx 40.85 +.76 SAIC 12.16 +.05
Ladede 39.38 -.16 NVEnergy 16.65 -.01 PlumCrk 42.04 +.15 SCANA 46.12
LVSands 55.49 -.38 NYSEEur 25.75 -1.32 Polariss 79.44 -.56 SKTIcm 13.52 +.02
LearCorp 41.50 -1.32 Nabors 16.65 +35 PostPrp 48.70 -.38 SpdrDJIA 131.80 -.20
LeggMason 26.07 -.16 NatFuGas 47.32 +.78 Potash 42.48 -.20 SpdrGold 161.88 +50
LeggPlat 21.77 -.22 NatGrid 54.09 +.20 PwshDB 28.41 +.11 SPMid 180.20 -1.55
LennarA 27.74 -.67 NOilVarco 75.76 +.17 PwSWtr 18.76 -.23 S&P500ETF139.87 -.52
Level3rs 23.06 +.24 Navistar 33.95 -.41 Praxair 115.70 -.77 SpdrHome 21.52 -.39
LbtyASG 4.35 -.03 NewAmHi 10.34 +.01 PrecDrill 9.24 -.03 SpdrS&PBk 23.25 -.33
LillyEli 41.39 +.09 NJRscs 43.24 +.21 PrinFnd 27.67 -.02 SpdrLehHY 39.73 +.12
Limited 49.70 -1.26 NYCmyB 13.49 -.13 ProLogis 35.76 +.36 SpdrS&P RB 28.07 -.47
LincNat 2477 +10 Newcasfie 7.07 +03 ProShtS&P 35.91 +.16 SpdrRefi 61.74 .70
Lindsay 66.79 -1.91 NewellRub 18.20 -.37 PrUShS&P 15.20 +.14 SpdrOGEx 56.37 +.49
Linkedlnn 108.45 -1.27 NewfidExp 35.90 -.05 ProUltQQQ 115.89 -1.65 SpdrMetM 48.45 +.17
LizClaib 13.40 -.35 NewmtM 47.65 -.21 PrUShQQQ 30.71 +.43 STMicro 5.78 -.18
LloydBkg 1.96 -.03 NewpkRes 6.36 -.20 ProUISP 57.42 -.53 Safeway 20.33 -.45
LodhdM 90.54 -.76 Nexeng 19.35 -.05 ProUShL20 18.51 +.01 Stoe 17.83 -.10
LaPac 9.05 -.06 NextEraEn 64.35 -.19 PrUPShR2K 9.04 +.27 SJude 38.72 +.09
Lowes 31.47 -.14 NiSource 24.65 +.16 ProUSSP500 9.15 +.13 Saks 10.96 -.36
NikeB 111.87 +1.23 PrUltSP500 82.77 -1.03 SJuanB 16.94 +.49
7 5 Nobleorp 11 +1.2 PrUVxSTrs 13.44 +.60 SandRdge 7.99 +.45
NokiaCp 3.65 -.02 ProUSSilv 11.26 +.18 Sanofi 38.18 -.42
M&TBk 86.27 -1.11 Nordstrm 55.86 -.19 ProctGam 63.64 -.80 SaraLee 22.04 +.01
MBIA 10.08 -.05 NorfikSo 72.93 -.44 ProgrssEn 53.22 +.07 Schlmbrg 74.14 +.19
MDU Res 22.94 +03 NoestUt 36.77 .05 ProgsvCp 21.30 -.21 Swab 14.28 -.03
MEMO 3.59 -.03 NorthropG 63.28 -.47 ProUSR2K 30.22 +.64 SeadrillLtd 39.13 +.72
MFA Fnd 7.38 -.07 NuSHn 53.30 +1.09 Prudent 60.54 -.83 SealAir 19.18 -.06
MCR 9.53 Nucor 39.21 .12 PSEG 31.15 -.04 Sensient 37.15 -.62
MGIC 3.46 -10 NustarEn 54.99 +84 PubSg 143.26 -.65 SiderurNac 8.92 -.08
MGMRsts 13.42 -.36 upp 486 +05 PulteGrp 9.84 -.23 SilvWhg 30.53 +.29
Macquarie 3454 +20 NuvMuOpp 14.86 +05 PPrIT 5.59 -.04 SilvrcpMg 6.93 +.18
Macrys 41.02 &16 NPf 8.7 +.30 QEP Res 30.81 +.19 SimonProp 155.60 +.27
Macys 41.02 -.16 NuvQP5 2 8.73 -.04 QuanexBld 18.43 -.22 Skecers 18.67 +.70
MageiMPr 70.82 +.15 OGEEngy 53.96 +28 QuantaSvc 22.12 +.06 SmithAO 47.60 -1.11
Magnalgs 43.83 -1.05 O asisPet 33.07 -.56 Questar 19.75 +.16 SmithfF 20.96 .26
MagHRes 6.21 -.02 OcciPet 91.22 -.52 QksilvRes 4.70 +27 Smuer 79.63 +26
Maniwoc 13.805 -.80 OfficeDpt 3.04 -.16 RPCs 10.34 +.12 SoJernd 49.25 +.23
Manulifeg 13.67 -.21 COiSA 17.93 -.37 RPM 26.57 .36 SouthnCo 45.94 .05
MarathnOs 29.34 -.37 OldRepub 9.95 -.18 RSCHdgs 23.72 .07 SthnCopper 32.88 +.42
MarathPn 41.61 +.32 Olin 20.96 -.64 RadianGrp 3.12 -.13 SwstAirl 8.28 +.03
MkVGold 46.39 -.41 OmegaHIt 21.41 -.03 RadioShk 5.18 -.18 SwstEy 31.58 +1.07
MVOilSvs 40.82 +32 Omnicom 51.31 -.23 Ralcorp 72.81 -.17 SpectraEn 30.74 +.20
MktVRus 29.95 +.06 ONEOK 85.89 +.40 RangeRs 66.66 +2.75 SprintNex 2.48 +.12
MktVJrGId 23.30 +.07 OneokPts 55.76 +.24 RJamesFn 36.62 -.37 SPMats 36.67 -.26
MarlntA 39.09 .44 OshkoshCp 22.83 .91 Rayoniers 45.35 -.16 SPHIthC 37.51 -.02
MashM 33.45 +.25 OwensCorn 3435 -1.40 Raytheon 54.14 +.23 SPCnSt 34.18 -.09
MStewrt 357 -.12 Owenslll 23.25 -.20 Rltylneo 39.34 +.09 SPConsum 45.61 -.26
Msmn 13.18 -.26 ".10 ] RedHat 59.61 -1.30 SPEngy 71.24 +.44
McDnlds 97.45 +.07 PG&ECp 44.18 +.30 RegalEnt 13.61 +.11 SPDRFncl 15.43 -.09
McGrwH 49.17 -.05 PNC 66.32 -.41
McMoRn 8.80 +.18 PPG 105.24 -.42 S S
McEwenM 3.79 +.21 PPL Corp 27.35 +.04
MeadJohn 85.56 -.41 PallCorp 59.61 -.80 The remainder of the
MeadWvco 31.82 ... Pandoran 8.60 -.28 e rem ain er o e
Mechel 8.69 -.03 ParkerHan 87.69 -1.30 Y listings ben
Medtnic 38.20 +.51 Patriotcoal 5.83 -.07 NYSE listings can be
Merck 39.24 +.78 PeabdyE 31.11 +.91 found on the next page
Meritor 6.51 -.38 Pearson 18.94 -.05 found o p
MetLife 36.03 -.28 Pengrthg 8.97 +.06


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.56 -.06
AbdnEMTel 19.47
Acquityn 5.77 +.02
AdmRsc 60.73 +.23
Advenlx .59 +.01
AlexeoRg 6.39 +.03
AlldNevG 29.29 +.13
AlmadnMg 2.36 +.10
AmAppared .99
Anooraqg .26 -.04
AntaresP 3.15 -.06
Aurizong 5.41 -.08


AvalnRare 2.51
Bacterin 2.05
Ballanty 6.32
Banrog 4.27
BarcUBS36 42.12
BarcGSOil 26.17
BrclndiaTR 53.41
BrigusGg .84
BritATob 102.92
CAMAC En .78
CardiumTh .24
CelSd .52
CFCdag 21.23
CheniereEn 18.31
CheniereE 26.30


-.04 ChinaShen 1.25 -.04
+.03 ClaudeRg .90 -.01
+.40 ClghGlbOp 11.47 -.01
-.03 CrSuislneo 3.86 +.05
+27 CrSuiHiY 3.11 +.01
+.01
+.08 DejourEg .31 +.01
-.02 DenisnM g 1.83 -.04
-.56 Dreams 3.42
-.03 EVLtdDur 16.30 +.12
+.00 EVMuniBd 13.26 +.10
+.04 EVMuni2 14.45 +.07
-.04 ElephTalk 2.03 -.07
-.43 EllswthFd 7.13 -.02
-.80 EntGaming 1.03 +.20


ExeterRgs 2.40 -.06


GSESy 2.88 +.01
GamGldNR 16.21 +.01
GascoEngy .25 +.01
Gastargrs 2.81 -.05
GenMoly 3.24 -.03
GeoPeto .16 -.04
GoldResrc 27.12 +.03
GoldenMin 7.47 +.40
GoldStrg 1.53 -.07
GranTrrag 6.45 -.02
GrtBasGg .71 +.02
GtPanSilvg 2.18 +.08


GreenHntr 2.20 -.14
GugFront 21.09 -.04
Hemisphrx .32 -.02
HstnAEn 2.31 -.31
iBb 1.50 -.18
ImpOilgs 46.59 +.25
InovioPhm .54
IntellgSys 1.71 +.03


KeeganRg 3.24 +.11
LadThalFn 1.65 -.05
LkShrGldg .99 -.01
Libbey 14.27 +.42
LucasEngy 1.86 +.03


Rub-on 306 +05

ParaG&S 2.44 -.01
MAGSlvg 10.03 +.35 PhrmAth 1.62 +.04 SamsO&G 1.95 -.07
Metalido 3.24 -.15 PbnDrill 7.88 +03 Senesco .22 -.01
MdwGoldg 1.44 PolyMetg 1.01 07 SilverBull .54 -.01
NaideaBio 3.12 -.02 Protalix 6.95 -.04 TanzRyg 4.47 -.04
NeoStem .36 PyramidOil 4.85 Taseko 3.50 +14
NBRESec 440 Quaterra g .44 .0 TimberlnR .43 -.01
N eQuaerrag .44 -.0 TrnsafiPet 1.16
Nevsung 3.64 +.11 Quepasa 3.80 -.21 TravelCs 6.30 -.08
NwGoldg 9.10 -.92 QuestRMg 2.00 TriVealey .14 -.00
NA Pallg 3.00 +.02 RareEleg 5.27 -.17 TriargPet 6.51 -.35
NDynMng 5.64 +19 Rentech 2.31 -.01 Tueowsg 1.44 +.17
NthnO&G 19.47 RexahnPh .43 -.01 Univlnsur 4.14 -.05
NovaGldg 7.17 +.16 Richmntg 6.98 -.03 Ur-Energy 1.09 +.01


Uranerz 1.75 -.06
UraniumEn 2.95 +.07


VangTotW 47.70 -.20
VantageDrl 1.58 +.02
Versar 2.31 -.10
VirnetX 24.84 -.41
VistaGold 3.02 +.03
VoyagerOG 2.54 -.04
Vringo 3.51 +.27
WFAdvlnco 10.29 -.02
YMBiog 1.74 +.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACI Wwde 39.86 -.14
ASML HId 50.99 +.48
ATP O&G 7.56 +.10
AVIBio .83
Abiomed 24.33 -.29
Abraxas 2.98
AcadaTc 41.00 -.34
AcadiaPh 1.50 -.01
Accuray 7.70 -.14
Achillion 6.65 -.25
AcmePkt 28.07 -.80
AornEngy 12.49 +.40
AcfvePw h .89 +.01
AcfvsBliz 12.88 +.05
AdobeSy 33.55 -.03
Adtan 30.52 -.10
AdvEnld 11.94 -.29
Aegion 18.25 +.54
AEternag .63 +.01
Affymax 13.11 -.25
Affymetix 4.42 -.06
Agenusrs 6.25 +.15
AkamaiT 32.59 -.59
Akorn 12.13 -.13
AlaskCom 2.56
Alexion s 90.32 -.24
Alexzah .62 +.02
AlignTech 31.71 -.25
Alkermes 17.30 -.58
AllosThera 1.82
AllotComm 24.54 -.16
AllscriptH 11.10 +.80
AlteraCp If 35.57 +.01
AlterraCap 23.92 -.10
Amarin 12.21 +.20
Amazon 231.90 +5.05
ACapAgy 31.24 +.23
AmCapLd 9.95 +.31
ARItyCTn 10.97 +.09
Amrign 14.30 -.27
AmCasino 17.98 -.32
Amgen 71.11 -.53
AmkorTIf 5.17 -.36
Amylin 25.91 +.49
Amyris 3.13 -.10
Anadigc 2.21 -.04
AnalogDev 38.98 +.01
Anlogic 68.21 -.77
Analystlnt 4.89 -.08
Ancestry 26.70 -.35
Ansys 67.07 -.26
AntheraPh 1.56 +.09
A123Sys 1.02 -.10
ApolloGrp 35.22 -.56
Apollolnv 7.25 -.10
Apple Inc 583.98 -19.02
ApldMafi 11.99 -.04
AMCC 5.58 -.35
Approach 35.88 -.24
ArQule 7.09 -.18
ArchCap s 39.28 +.04
ArdeaBio 31.87 +.02
ArenaPhm 2.44 -.19
AresCap 16.04 -.02
AriadP 16.30 -.50
Ariba Inc 38.20 -1.15
ArkBest 15.34 -.92
ArmHId 25.33 -.70
ArrayBio 3.49 -.13
Arris 12.93 -.13
ArubaNet 21.12 -.51
AscenaRts 20.48 -.26
AsialnfoL 12.60 +.71
AspenTech 19.78 -.30
AssodBanc 13.33 -.37
athenahlth 72.45 -1.04
Atmel 8.87 +.09
Autodesk 39.37 -.26
AutoData 55.62 -.20
Auxilium 17.92 -.38
AvagoTch 34.48 -.12
AvanirPhm 3.05
AVEO Ph 11.50 +.25
AvisBudg 13.16 +.02


Aware 6.20 +.05 ColSprtw 47.10 -1.51
Axcelis 1.36 -.04 Comcast 30.34 +.07
BBCNBcp 11.00 -.26 Comcspd 29.83 +.01
BEAero 47.03 -1.09 CmcBMO 40.09 -.42
BGCPtrs 6.97 -.01 CommSys 13.01 -.15
BJsRest 43.19 -1.84 CmplGnom 2.70 -.01
BMCSft 41.26 +.20 Compuwre 8.72 -.10
Baidu 132.70 -1.74 Comverse 6.45 +.05
BeasleyB 5.10 +.43 Concepts 18.77 +3.59
BebeStrs 8.20 -.31 ConcurTch 56.56 -.53
BedBath 70.39 -.79 Conmed 28.59 -.54
Biocryst 3.62 -.21 ConstantC 24.17 -.81
Biodelh .72 -.06 Coparts 26.41 -.22
BioFuelEh .46 +.00 CorinthC 3.84 -.06
Biogenldc 134.01 +.85 Costeo 88.18 -.51
BioMarin 34.70 -.36 Craylnc 11.15 -.23
BioSanteh .55 -.01 Creelnc 30.90 -.07
BobEvans 38.24 -.43 Crocs 20.20 +.27
BonTon 6.20 -.52 Ctrip.eom 21.67 +.01
BookMill 3.19 +.64 CubistPh 42.28 -.51
BostPrv 9.32 -.18 Curis 4.79 -.19
BreitBurn 19.03 +.40 Cymer 51.84 +1.12
Brightpnt 6.12 -.06 CypSemi 15.51 +.54
Broadcom 36.60 +.13 CtRxh .33 +.01
BroadSoft 42.81 -.79
Broadwd h .34 -.02
BrcdeCm 5.54 +.01 DFCGIbl 17.48 -.43
BrukerCp 15.03 +.10 DeckrlsOut 51.01 -.82
BuffabWW 83.85 -1.34 Dell Inc 16.37 -.07
CA Inc 26.42 -.12 Dndreon 11.65 +.29
CD InfiEnt .29 -.39 Dentsply 41.06 -.27
CH Robins 59.74 +.72 Depomed 6.07 -.18
CMEGrp 265.82 -2.56 DexCom 9.78 -.19
CTC Media 10.83 -.03 DiamndFlf 20.90 -.30
CVBFnd 11.57 -.30 DigRiver 18.81 -.10
CadencePh 3.69 +.01 DirecTVA 49.28 +.26
Cadence 11.67 -.19 DiscCmA 54.43 -.46
Caesars n 14.64 +.47 DiscCmC 49.69 -.70
Cal-Maine 36.03 -.37 DiscovLab 3.08 +.04
CalAmp 5.98 +.28 DishNetwk 31.97 -.18
CalumetSp 27.16 +.15 DollarTree 101.66 -.29
CdnSolar 3.45 +.09 DonlleyRR 12.51 -.34
CapCtyBk 8.35 -.14 DrmWksA 18.01 +.14
CapProd 8.74 +.12 DryShips 3.16 -.06
CapFedFn 11.81 +.06 Dunkinn 32.37 -.16
CpstnTrb h 1.08 -.03 Dynavax 4.99 +.20
CareerEd 7.13 -.23 E-Trade 10.63 -.10
Carrizo 28.04 +.42 eBay 41.02 -.21
CarverB rs 4.85 ... eResrch 7.90 -.02
CatalystH 86.37 -.70 EagleBulk 1.64 -.09
CathayGen 17.22 -.51 EaglRkEn 9.81 +.39
Cavium 29.26 +.46 ErthLink 8.12 -.03
Celgene 72.93 -.46 EstWstBcp 22.77 -.31
CellTherrsh 1.11 -.03 EasyLkSInt 5.90 +.20
CelldexTh 4.56 +.18 EchoThera 2.02 +.07
Celsion 1.99 -.05 EchoStar 29.05 +.41
CentEuro 4.88 -.03 EducDev 4.61 -.18
CenGrdA If 10.69 -.29 ElectSd 14.26 -.28
CentAI 9.20 +.10 ElectArts 15.38 +.06
Cepheid 38.41 -.09 EmmisCh 1.23 +.19
Cerners 81.11 +3.60 EndoPhrm 35.14 -.69
CerusCp 3.94 -.10 Endocyte 7.12 -.07
Changyou 24.22 +.07 Endobgix 14.98 +.01
ChrmSh 5.89 -.25 EnerNOC 6.01 -.04
Chartlnds 76.43 -1.05 EnrgyRec 2.10 +.03
ChkPoint 58.13 -.87 EngyXXI 37.68 +.57
Cheesecake 31.50 -.35 Entegris 8.85 -.12
ChelseaTh 2.12 +.08 EntropCom 4.23 +.01
ChildPlace 45.98 -.60 Equinix 164.20 -4.98
ChrchllD 59.36 -.64 Ericsson 10.00 +.04
CienaCorp 14.82 -.27 Euronet 21.63 +.12
CinnFin 35.65 -.15 ExactScih 10.77 -.26
Cintas 39.17 -.25 ExceedCo 3.65 +1.56
Cirrus 27.38 -.49 Exelids 4.80
Cisco 20.16 +.18 E)deTc 2.88 -.01
CitzRpBrs 16.87 -.30 Expedias 42.65 +2.34
CitrixSys 85.61 -.17 Expdlni 40.00 +.10
CleanEngy 19.24 -.12 ExpScripts 55.79 -.21
Cleantch rs 5.31 +.77 ExtrmNet 3.83 -.07
Clearwire 1.46 +.04 Ezcorp 26.79 -.32
ClevBioLh 1.94 +.19 F5Netwks 133.93 -2.18
CoffeeH 9.47 +.13 FLIRSys 22.46 -.41
Cognex 40.25 +.61 FSI Inf 5.07 -.04
CognizTech 73.33 -.65 Fastenal s 46.82 -.70
Cogo Grp 2.46 -.08 FedMogul 12.95 -.36
Coinstar 62.79 -.81 FifthStFin 9.82 +.03
ColdwtrCrk .99 -.03 FifthThird 14.23 -.17
ColumLbh .73 +.04 Fncllnst 16.92 -.58


Finisar 16.52 +.08 Illumina 44.53 +.05
FinLine 22.26 -.24 ImunoGn 12.75 -.14
FstCashFn 40.96 -.47 ImpaxLabs 24.63 -.68
FstMerch 12.33 -.09 Incyte 22.66 -.28
FMidBc 10.65 -.30 IndBkMI 3.83 +.20
FstNiagara 8.94 -.19 Infinera 7.16 -.24
FstSolar 18.40 +.05 Informat 46.02 -.62
FstMerit 16.80 -.32 Infosys 47.30 +.24
Fiserv 70.29 -.38 IntegLfSci 37.23 -.95
Flextrn 6.68 -.05 IntgDv 6.78 +.11
FocusMda 23.90 -1.43 Intel 28.40 +.01
Fonar 5.72 +.17 InteractBrk 15.17 -.22
ForcePro 5.55 ... InterDig 27.72 +.39
FormFac 5.60 +.06 Intrface 14.16 -.26
Forfnets 26.12 -.10 InterMune 10.44 +.12
Fossil Inc 130.67 -1.33 InterNAP 7.04 +.04
FosterWhl 23.00 -.19 InfiSpdw 26.69 +.08
Francescn 31.35 +1.60 Intersil 10.27 -.01
FreshMkt 51.17 -3.00 Intuit 57.97 -.01
FriendFdn 1.09 +.01 InvRIEst 7.22 -.04
FronterCm 4.03 -.04 IridiumCm 8.79 +.06
FuelSysSol 23.45 -.67 Isis 8.00 -.21
FuelCell 1.24 -.03 IstaPh 9.05 -.03
FultonFncl 10.49 -.08 Itron 40.80 -.88
SFuhiCo 682 05
j2Global 25.83 +.39
GSVCap 17.12 -.20 JA Solar 1.30 -.07
GTAdvTc 6.50 -.25 JDASoft 28.88 -.34
GalenaBio 1.21 ... JDS Uniph 12.17 -.34
Garmin 47.13 +.32 Jamba 1.87 +.03
GenProbe 81.55 +12.84 JamesRiv 4.98 +.11
Gentex 21.98 -.43 JazzPhrm 51.03 -.69
Genfivah 8.28 -.36 JetBlue 4.75 -.05
Geores 37.71 +.65 JonesSdah .40 +.03
GeronCp 1.68 -.06 JosABank 47.55 -.76
GileadSd 52.02 -.14 KITDigit 6.78 -.11
GladerBc 14.90 -.44 KLATnc 52.14 -.16
Gleacher 1.04 -.06 KaiserAlu 52.57 +.42
Globalstrh .53 -.03 KeryxBio 1.59 +.04
GIbSpcMet 13.34 -.13 KnightT 12.66 +.15
GluMobile 4.55 +.03 Knology 19.45 -.05
GolLNGLtd 36.98 -.10 Kulicke 13.10 -.14
Google 604.85 -10.13 LKQCorp 33.45 -.49
GrCanyEd 17.39 -.08 LPL Inv 35.89 -1.09
GrWfRes 7.84 -.01 LSI Ind If 6.85 -.33
GreenMtC 48.73 +.83 LTX-Cred 6.90 -.21
GreenPlns 7.99 -.24 LamResrch 41.67 -.40
GrifolsSA n 9.46 -.03 LamarAdv 31.82 +.41
Grouponn 10.71 -1.27 Landstar 53.54 -.65
GulfportE 26.19 -.13 Lattce 5.46 -.03
HMN Fn 2.85 -.05 LeapWirlss 5.61 -.23
HMS Hd s 24.06 -.25 LedPhrm 1.62 -.03
HSN Inc 38.71 -.40 LibGlobA 49.81 -.19
HackettGp 5.71 -.02 LibCapA 87.44 +.46
HainCel 47.30 -.46 LibtylntA 18.83 -.04
Halozyme 8.08 -.13 LifeTech 46.36 +.05
HancHId 32.17 -1.02 LifePtH 39.02 -.92
HansenMed 3.16 -.03 LimelghtN 2.74 -.13
HanwhaSol 1.12 -.08 Lincare 24.40 -.45
Harmonic 4.72 +.02 LinearTch 32.71 -.15
Hasbro 36.74 +.06 LinnEngy 40.25 +.39
HawHold 5.66 -.18 Liquidity 53.33 -2.22
HrfindEx 13.83 -.21 LodgeNet 2.30 -.17
HSchein 76.74 -.55 Logitech 10.15 +.01
HercOffsh 5.08 +.01 LogMeln 36.01 -.63
Hibbett 59.72 -.07 LookSmart .92 -.07
HimaxTch 2.10 +.04 LoopNet 19.17 -.01
Hittte 53.54 +.70 Lulkin 76.84 -.02
Hologic 19.12 -2.11 lululemngs 74.14 -.57
Home Inns 23.76 +.21 Luminex 25.04 +.13
HomeAwn 26.05 +.02
HomeownC 14.04 +.40
HorsehdH 11.23 +.12 MCG Cap 4.19 -.02
HotTopic 9.80 -.21 MGE 45.74 -.08
HudsCity 7.06 -.10 MIPSTech 6.54 -.25
HumGen 14.71 +.14 MTS 47.97 -.49
HuntJB 55.31 -.35 MSG 35.97 +.04
HuntBnk 6.69 -.04 MagelnHI 44.28 -1.87
IAC Inter 48.15 -.91 MagicJcks 24.95 +.63
iGateCorp 19.46 -.02 MAKOSrg 41.31 -1.11
IPG Photon 48.40 -.62 ManTech 31.42 -.95
iShAsiaexJ 56.20 -.01 MannKd 2.23 -.01
iShACWI 46.66 -.17 MarvellT 15.01 +.12
iShs SOX 56.11 -.24 Masimo 22.15 -.32
Icon PLC 22.18 -.12 Mattel 33.60 +.08
IconixBr 15.35 -.01 MattrssFn 40.04
IdenixPh 8.77 +.22 Mattson 2.34 +.11


Maximlnt 29.58
MaxwlIT 9.51
MedAssets 12.61
MedicAcIn 5.52
MediCo 22.09
Medivafton 80.88
MeleoCrwn 15.52
Mellanox 58.59
MentorGr 14.45
MercadoL 96.74
Mercerlnfi 6.86
MergeHIth 4.29
MeridBio 20.55
MeritMeds 13.22
Methanx 35.16
Micrel 10.89
Microchp 35.37
MicronT 6.59
MicrosSys 56.83
MicroSemi 21.52
Microsoft 32.02
MillerHer 19.53
Misonix 1.93
MitekSys 5.66
Molex 27.59
MonPwSys 20.72
MonstrBvs 65.00
MoSys 3.60
Motricity 1.03
Mylan 21.69
MyriadG 26.01
NABI Bio 1.67
NETgear 38.50
NICInc 11.29
NIl HIdg 14.00
NPSPhm 7.16
NXP Semi 25.85
Nanomtr 15.51
NasdOMX 24.57
Natlnstrm 27.20
NatPenn 9.22
NatusMed 12.24
NektarTh 7.63
NetApp 38.83
NetEase 60.32
Netflix 80.14
Netlist 2.50
NtScout 20.69
NetSolTh .49
NetwkEng .90
Neurcrine 7.43
Newport 17.07
NewsCpA 19.61
NewsCpB 19.84
NobltyH If 7.22
Nordson 53.90
NorTrst 47.56
NwstBcsh 12.32
Novavax 1.36
Novlus 46.80
NuVasive 16.57
NuanceCm 24.43
NutriSyst 11.58
Nvidia 13.00
NxStageMd 17.00
OCZTech 5.90
OReillyAu 105.50
OceanRign 17.43
Oclaro 2.87
OdysMar 3.04
OldDomFrt 44.47
OmniVisn 18.42
OnAssign 18.71
OnSmcnd 8.26
Oneothyr 4.29
OnyxPh 45.51
OpenTxt 55.99
OpenTable 44.72
OpnwvSy 2.59
OptfmerPh 14.80
Oracle 29.40
Orexigen 3.50
Orthfx 41.22
OtterTail 21.96
Overstk 6.03
Oxignersh 1.14


PDLBio 6.29 +.06
PFChng 39.69 -1.10
PMCSra 7.07 -.07
PSS Wrld 23.93 -.01
PacWstBc 23.82 -.30
Paccar 42.95 -.78
Pacerlnfi 6.01 -.13
PacEth rs .94 +.03
PaciraPhm 11.21 +.04
PanASIv 19.51 +.15
ParamTch 21.58 -.69
Parexel 26.94 -.48
Patterson 34.09 +.10
PattUTI 16.18 -.14
Paychex 30.98 -.16
Pendrell 1.35 -.03
PnnNGm 44.98 -.22
PennantPk 10.45 -.06
PeopUtdF 12.33 -.04
PeregrinP h .47 -.01
PerfectWd 12.21 -.85
Perrigo 104.90 -1.28
PetSmart 58.26 -.76
PetMed 13.47 +.01
PetroDev 34.39 +.26
Polyomms 13.27 -.05
Popular 1.77 -.04
Power-One 4.26 +.01
PwShs QQQ 66.76 -.48
Powrwvrs 1.13 +.15
Pozen 6.66 +.42
Presstekh .80 +.06
PriceTR 63.12 -.12
PrSmrt 82.54 -.58
priceline 760.82 -1.31
PrivateB 15.73 -.27
PrUPShQQQ 10.97 +.21
PrUItPQQQ 114.49 -2.43
ProceraN 20.76 -.19
PrognicsPh 10.99 -.19
ProgrsSoft 23.14 -.58
ProspctCap 10.92 -.19
PureCycle 2.52 -.23
QIAGEN 16.73 +.15
QlikTech 28.81 -.83
Qlogic 17.25 -.07
Qualcom 63.83 -.35
QualitySs 37.40 -.13
QuantFuel .70 +.03
QuestSft 23.27 -.08
Questeor 44.90 +.20
Quidel 16.52 -.27
QuinStreet 10.51 -.31
RFMicD 4.33 -.04
Rambus 5.09 +.32
Randgold 89.15 -2.25
RealPage 18.15 +.16
ReconTech 2.52 +.20
Regenrn 135.26 -4.75
RentACt 34.21 -1.00
Replgn 4.41 -.09
RschMotn 14.30 +.27
RexEnergy 10.51 +.37
RigelPh 7.73 -.22
RiverbedT 19.73 -.93
RosettaR 50.27 +.06
RossStrss 61.50 -.72
Rovi Corp 28.64 -.62
RoyGId 61.96 -.05
RoyaleEn 4.74 +.39
Rudola h 10.80 -12

SBACom 53.79 +.17
SEI Inv 20.20 -.08
SLM Cp 14.83 -.03
STEC 8.29 -.06
SXC HIth 90.58 -1.13
Saialnc 18.78 +.81
SalixPhm 49.40 -1.15
SanderFm 51.61 -1.19
SanDisk 37.00 -.58
Sanmina 8.90 -.30
Santarus 6.37 +.09
Sapient 11.97 -.19
Satconh .42 -.03


SaientPh 2.37 -.02 Thoratec 34.81 -.42
Scholastc 30.55 -.42 ThrshdPhm 7.28 +.03
SciClone 5.99 -.08 TibeoSft 32.90 -.28
SciGames 10.16 -.86 nVo Inc 10.79 -.19
SeagateT 30.76 +1.43 Towerstm 4.59 +.17
SearsHIdgs 53.78 -.55 TractSupp 98.41 -1.07
SeattGen 19.77 -.09 Transcept 8.99 134
SelCmfrt 28.88 -1.06 TransceptP 8.99 -.34
Selectlns 17.49 +.05 TrimbleN 54.14 -1.20
Semtech 27.26 -.03 TripAdvn 37.51 +.64
Sequenom 5.12 -.03 TriQuint 4.87 +.12
SvcSource 16.58 -.12 TrueRelig 27.16
SvArtsrsh .12 +.01 TrstNY 5.47 -.10
Shenglnn rs 1.30 -.01 Trustmk 25.45 -.61
Shire 97.56 +.18 TuesMrn 4.04 -.07
ShoreTel 4.79 -.05 UTiWrldwd 16.67 -.12
ShuffiMstr 17.67 -.20 Ubiquitf n 33.02 -.73
Shutterfly 31.16 -.50 UltaSalon 88.18 -1.44
SigaTech h 3.30 -.07 Ultratech 31.94 +.11
SigmaAld 70.90 -.48 U a 4 +2
SignatBk 65.69 -.87 Umpqua 13.24 -.26
SilicGrln 9.45 -.31 UtdOnln 4.74 +.19
Silicnlmg 6.01 +.06 US Enr 2.62 -.17
SilcnLab 35.49 +.32 UtdTherap 43.75 -1.21
SilicnMotn 17.02 -.35 UnivDisp 44.98 -.18
Slcnware 5.83 -.02 UnivFor 37.40 -1.03
SilvStdg 14.42 +.47 UranmRsh .88 +.03
Sina 58.51 -.71 UrbanOut 28.96 -.25
Sindair 10.28 -.12
SinoClnEn 1.76 -.12
SiriusXM 2.26 +.05 VCA Ant 23.66 -.30
SironaDent 50.51 -.42 VO)( Infl 12.69 -.46
Skullcdyn 16.12 +.45 ValenceT h .73 .02
SkyWest 8.99 +.07 Valencelh 73 -.
SkywksSol 27.14 -.67 ValueClick 21.18 -.31
SmartTcg 2.53 -.15 VanSTCpB 79.22 +.08
SmithWes 8.25 -.03 VaseoDta 7.79 +.01
SodaStrm 34.35 -.33 Veeeolnst 30.19 -.16
Sohu.cm 51.57 -4.19 Velt 11.95 +.45
Solazymen 11.00 -.29 VBradley 25.98 -.43
Somaxonh .35 -.02 Verisign 41.11 -.59
SonicCorp 7.22 +.11 Verisk 48.95 -.48
Sonus 2.83 +.11 VertxPh 38.48 -.14
SouMoBc 24.55 -.05 MVacomB 46.39 -.98
Sourcefire 50.99 -.58 Vcal 3.12 +.07
SpectPh 10.63 -.16
SpiritAirn 24.02 +.16 VirgnMdah 24.61 +.16
Splunkn 33.95 -1.11 ViroPhrm 21.75 -.28
Spreadtrm 13.80 -.71 VistaPrt 37.29 -1.71
Stamps.cm 29.03 -1.21 Vivus 24.22 -.93
Staples 15.40 -.36 Vocus 12.93 -.23
StarBulk .00 +.01 Vodafbne 27.82 -.11
StarSdent 3.56 -.04 Volcano 27.15 -.08
Starbucks 57.37 -.06 WarnerCh 21.81 +3.02
SfDynam 12.78 -.24 WaveSys 1.42 -.07
StemCeilrs .95 +.01 Web.com 12.95 -.76
Stericyde 86.60 -1.04 WebMD 22.75
SMaddens 43.21 +.02
SunHIth 7.23 -.02 Wendys Co 4.87 +.03
SunPower 5.61 -.03 WernerEnt 23.62 -.11
SusqBnc 10.38 -.21 Westmrld 10.09 -.16
SwisherHIf 2.25 -.10 Wstptlnng 31.32 -.06
Symantec 16.54 +.06 WetSeal 3.30 -.16
Symetricm 5.56 -.03 WholeFd 83.07 -.42
Synaeorn 8.29 +.29 WillsLpfA 11.05 -.23
Synaptfcs 30.71 -.22 WilshBcp 5.36 -.03
SynrgyP rs 5.93 +.16 Windstrm 11.24 -.02
Synopsys 30.01 -.31 WisdomTr 8.55 +.02
TGClnds 11.41 +1.40 Wynn 133.40 -1.64
THQh .68 +.011 XOMA 2.89 1.
TTMTdi 10.33 -.57 XOMA 289 +11
tw teleom 21.80 -.20 X-Rite 5.54
TakeTwo 14.11 -.20 Xlinx 36.38 -.12
Tangoen 20.48 -.70 YRCrs 7.28 +.77
Targacept 4.74 -.07 Yahoo 15.54 -.03
TASER 4.60 +.15 Yandexn 23.72 -.97
TechData 53.79 -.90 Yongye 3.21 +.11
TICmSys 1.93 -.18 Zagg 13.03 +.74
Tellabs 3.77 -.06 Zalicus 1.05 -.01
TescoCp 16.33 +1.01 ZebraT 38.79 +1.14
TeslaMot 33.13 -.21 ongpin 9.44 -.30
TesseraTch 15.64 -.32 Zowngp -.
TetraTc 26.70 -.74 llown 34.87 .26
TevaPhrm 45.77 +.14 ZonBcp 20.39 -.26
TxCapBsh 37.71 -.54 Zopharm 4.76 -.11
Texlnst 31.94 -.23 Zpcar 12.05 -.15
TexRdhse 17.25 -.02 Zumiez 36.66 -1.57
Theravnce 21.64 -.09 Zyngan 8.34 -.19


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.4130 4.4170
Australia .9596 .9552
Bahrain .3770 .3771
Brazil 1.9037 1.8850
Britain 1.6232 1.6269
Canada .9873 .9809
Chile 485.25 483.48
China 6.2805 6.2885
Colombia 1763.90 1759.00
Czech Rep 18.84 18.74
Denmark 5.6183 5.6101
Dominican Rep 39.05 39.05
Egypt 6.0407 6.0458
Euro .7551 .7542
Hong Kong 7.7582 7.7594
Hungary 216.67 216.45
India 52.655 52.455
Indnsia 9193.00 9189.00
Israel 3.7615 3.7432
Japan 79.81 80.39
Jordan .7105 .7085
Lebanon 1503.50 1504.00
Malaysia 3.0260 3.0430
Mexico 13.0352 12.9669
N. Zealand 1.2226 1.2149
Norway 5.7196 5.7254
Peru 2.641 2.639
Poland 3.15 3.14
Russia 29.3815 29.3045
Singapore 1.2370 1.2374
So. Africa 7.7775 7.7420
So. Korea 1130.20 1131.80
Sweden 6.7186 6.7190
Switzerlnd .9073 .9062
Taiwan 29.17 29.19
Thailand 30.73 30.75
Turkey 1.7572 1.7606
U.A.E. 3.6733 3.6731
Uruguay 19.7499 19.7499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2950


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.095 0.08
6-month 0.145 0.13
5-year 0.81 0.82
10-year 1.92 1.94
30-year 3.11 3.09



S FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jun 12 104.87 -.06
Corn CBOT Jul12 63414 +83/4
Wheat CBOT Jul 12 6541/2 +412
Soybeans CBOT Jul 12 15051/2 +12
Cattle CME Jun 12 114.15 +1.30
Sugar(world) ICE Jul12 21.12 -.09
Orange Juice ICE Jul 12 141.85 -6.15


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1663.40 $1631.90
Silver (troy oz., spot) $30.969 $30.b2b
Copper (pound) $3.8255 $3.6230
Platinum (troy oz., spot)lb/1.90 $155bb2.b
NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.7 ... 7.42 +.15 -10.2 Microsoft .80 2.5 12 32.02 +.04 +23.3
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.3 48 32.91 +.24 +8.8 MotrlaSolu .88 1.7 21 51.03 +.28 +10.2
Ametek .24 .5 20 50.33 -.29 +19.5 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 38.82 +.11 +.1
ABInBev 1.57 2.2 ... 72.62 -.02 +19.1 NextEraEn 2.40 3.7 13 64.35 -.19 +5.7
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 8.11 -.14 +45.9 Penney .80 2.2 22 36.06 -.66 +2.6
CapCtyBk ... ... 29 8.35 -.14 -12.6 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 14 17.74 +.04 +4.1
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 23 38.56 -.04 +3.7 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.7 27 53.22 +.07 -5.0
Citigrp rs .04 .1 9 33.04 -.46 +25.6 RegionsFn .04 .6 25 6.74 -.14 +56.7
CmwREIT 2.00 10.7 16 18.75 +.03 +12.7 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 53.78 -.55 +69.2
Disney .60 1.4 16 43.11 -.24 +15.0 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 79.63 +.26 +1.9
EnterPT 3.00 6.3 27 47.99 -.10 +9.8 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.48 +.12 +6.0
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.6 10 86.34 +.26 +1.9 Texlnst .68 2.1 21 31.94 -.23 +9.7
FordM .20 1.8 7 11.28 -.27 +4.8 TimeWarn 1.04 2.8 14 37.48 -.60 +3.7
GenElec .68 3.5 16 19.58 -.20 +9.3 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.76 -.99 +7.1
HomeDp 1.16 2.2 21 51.79 -.16 +23.2 VerizonCm 2.00 5.0 43 40.38 +.15 +.6
Intel .84 3.0 12 28.40 +.01 +17.1 Vodafone 2.10 7.5 ... 27.82 -.11 -.7
IBM 3.40 1.6 15207.08 +.27 +12.6 WalMart 1.59 2.7 13 58.91 -.12 -1.4
Lowes .56 1.8 22 31.47 -.14 +24.0 Walgrn .90 2.6 12 35.06 -.61 +6.0
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 18 97.45 +.07 -2.9 YRC rs ......... 7.28 +.77 -27.0


A10 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I MUTUALFUN S I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: TechGroA 35.59 -.28
Balancp 16.91 -.05 DreihsAcInc 10.51
Retlnc 8.87 +.01 Driehaus Funds:
Alger Funds B: EMktGr 28.96 +.08
SmCapGr 7.10 -.09 EVPTxMEmI46.85 +.02
AllianceBern A: Eaton Vance A:
BalanAp 16.89 ... ChinaAp 17.15 +.02
GIbThGrAp 66.60 ... AMTFMuInc 10.11
SmCpGrA 39.60 -.41 MulICGrA 8.85 -.06
AllianceBern Adv: InBosA 5.84 +.01
LgCpGrAd 29.74 -.17 LgCpVal 18.80 -.09
AllianceBern B: NatlMunInc 9.91 -.01
GIbThGrBt 57.28 ... SpEqtA 16.56 -.16
GrowthBt 27.84 -.19 TradGvA 7.45
SCpGrBt 31.66 -.33 Eaton Vance B:
AllianceBern C: HIthSBt 10.18
SCpGrC t 31.82 -.34 NatlMuInc 9.91 -.01
Allianz Fds Instl: Eaton Vance C:
NFJDvVI 12.28 -.03 GovtC p 7.44
SmCpV 31.32 -.13 NatMunInc 9.91 -.01
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance I:
AGICGrthC 26.58 -.24 FltgRt 9.03
TargetCt 15.99 -.13 GblMacAbR 9.94
Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapVal 18.86 -.09
LgCaplnst 21.00 -.08 FBR Funds:
Amer Beacon Inv: Focuslnvtn 50.93 -.14
LgCaplnv 19.93 -.07 FMI Funds:
AmeriCentury 1st: LgCappn 16.89 -.09
Growth 28.64 -.16 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Adv: NwInc 10.64 +.01
EqGroAp 23.98 -.13 FPACres 28.44 -.02
EqlncAp 7.65 -.01 Fairholme 30.06 -.19
Amer Century Inv: Federated A:
AIICapGr 31.51 -25 MidGrStA 36.50 -.29
Balanced 17.20 -.06 MuSecA 10.52
DivBnd 11.10 +01 TfRtBdp 11.46 +.01
Eqlnc 7.65 -.01 Federated Instl:
Growth 28.39 -.15 KaufmnR 5.42 -.05
Heritagel 23.40 -.22 TotRetBd 11.46 +.01
IncGro 27.08 -.15 StrValDvlS 4.91
InfAdjBd 13.09 -.01 Fidelity Adv FocT:
IntDisc 9.86 -.03 EnergyT 36.22 +.06
InfiGrol 10.71 -.04 HItCarT 23.40 -.14
New Opp 8.38 -.09 Fidelity Advisor A:
OneChAg 12.99 -.05 Nwlnsghp 22.59 -.16
OneChMd 12.47 -.03 StrlnA 12.45 +.01
RealEstl 22.99 -.04 Fidelity Advisor C:
Ultra 26.27 -.19 Nwlnsghtn21.37 -.15
Valuelnv 6.15 -.01 Fidelity Advisor I:
American Funds A: EqGrIn 66.72 -.61
AmcpAp 21.24 -.09 EqInin 25.33 -.07
AMufiA p 27.76 -.04 IntBdl n 11.56
BalAp 19.73 -.04 Nwlnsgtln 22.88 -.17
BondAp 12.73 ... Fidelity AdvisorT:
CaplBAp 51.66 -.02 BalancT 16.28 -.07
CapWGAp 35.30 -.04 DivGrTp 13.04 -.09
CapWAp 21.13 +.03 EqGrTp 62.38 -.57
EupacA p 39.30 +.06 EqInT 24.94 -.06
FdlnvAp 39.21 -.17 GrOppT 41.69 -.44
GIblBalA 25.95 -.04 HilnAdTp 9.97
GovtAp 14.45 +.01 IntBdT 11.54
GwthAp 32.86 -.08 MulncTp 13.53 +.01
HITrAp 11.04 +.01 OvrseaT 17.28 -.07
IncoAp 17.53 -.02 STFiT 9.30
IntBdAp 13.70 ... SSelAIICp 19.88 -.11
InfiGrIncA p 29.38 -.05 Fidelity Freedom:
ICAAp 29.90 -.08 FF2010n 14.00 -.02
LtTEBAp 16.26 FF2010K 12.94 -.02
NEcoAp 27.63 -.07 FF2015n 11.70 -.02
NPerAp 29.71 -.05 FF2015K 12.99 -.03
NwWrldA 51.84 +.15 FF2020n 14.16 -.02
STBFAp 10.09 ... FF2020K 13.41 -.03
SmCpAp 38.83 -.08 FF2025n 11.78 -.03
TxExAp 12.84 ... FF2025K 13.56 -.04
WshAp 30.61 -.06 FF2030n 14.03 -.04
Ariel Investments: FF2030K 13.71 -.04
Apprec 43.58 -.23 FF2035n 11.63 -.03
Ariel 47.68 -.49 FF2035K 13.81 -.05
Artio Global Funds: FF2040n 8.11 -.03
GIHilnclr 9.67 +.02 FF2040K 13.86 -.05
IntfEqIr 25.38 +.03 FF2045n 9.60 -.03
Artisan Funds: Incomen 11.63
Inf 22.86 -.06 Fidelity Invest:
Infilnsfi 22.99 -.06 AIISectEq 12.68 -.08
InfiVair 27.39 -.14 AMgr50n 16.06 -.04
MidCap 39.93 -.40 AMgr70rn 16.91 -.06
MidCapVal 21.29 -.10 AMgr20rn 13.17 -.01
SCapVal 16.28 -.13 Balancn 19.73 -.08
Baron Funds: BalancedK 19.72 -.09
Asset 52.27 -.26 BlueChGr n 49.85 -.42
Growth 55.94 -.27 CAMunn 12.70 +.01
SmallCap 26.26 -.11 Canada n 53.64 -.22
Bernstein Fds: CapAp n 28.97 -.23
IntDur 13.95 ... CapDevOn 11.58 -.07
DivMu 14.85 ... Cplncrn 9.23 -.01
TxMgdlnI 13.69 ... ChinaRgr 28.31 +.28
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 19.59 -.06 CTMunrn 12.00
GIAIAr 19.39 -.04 Contra n 77.45 -.56
HiYlnvA 7.76 +.01 ContraK 77.43 -.56
InfiOpAp 30.74 -.10 CnvScn 24.88 -.15
BlackRock B&C: DisEqn 24.00 -.19
GIAICt 18.02 -.04 DiscEqF 23.98 -.19
BlackRock Instl: Divlntiln 28.41 -.07
EquityDv 19.64 -.05 DivrslntKr 28.38 -.07
GIbAllocr 19.49 -.04 DivSOn 16.66 -.09
HiYldBd 7.76 +01 DivGthn 29.66 -.21
Brinson Funds Y: EmergAs r n28.42 +.21
HiYddlY 6.19 EmrMkn 22.95 +.06
BruceFund 403.22 +.18 Eqlncn 45.11 -.12
Buffalo Funds: EQIIn 18.97 -.07
SmCapn 28.67 -.21 ECapAp 17.37 -.13
CGM Funds: Europe 28.52 -.17
Focusn 29.16 -.20 Exch 323.88
Mutin 27.93 -.08 Exportn 23.32 -.16
Realtyn 30.45 -.14 Fideln 35.36 -.24
Calamos Funds: Fiftyrn 19.96 -.20
GrwthAp 53.10 -.57 FItRateHirn 9.84
Calvert Invest: FrInOnen 28.47 -.11
Incop 16.00 +.02 GNMAn 11.88 +01
InfiEqAp 13.46 -.03 Govtlnc 10.78
SocialAp 30.51 -.08 GroCon 97.09 -.85
SocBdp 16.01 +.02 Grolncn 20.45 -.11
SocEqAp 38.19 -.10 GrowoF 97.04 -.85
TxF Lg p 16.18 GrowthCoK 97.04 -.85
CohenLp .1Steers: GrStratrn 20.71 -.19
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 68.87 -.10 Highlncrn 9.05 +.01
ColumbiaClass A: indepnn 25.42 -.27
Acorn t 30.32 -.23 nroBdn 3109
DivEqnc 10.39 -.04 ntGoBdn 10.99
DivrBd 5.12 ntGovn 10.99
DivOpptyA 8.61 -.03 Intmun 10.58 +.01
LgCapGrAt26.43 .19 cn 30.83 -.10
LgCaprQA126.43 -.03 InfiSCprn 20.19 +.01
dLgCorQAp .4 -.0 InvGrBdn 11.81 +01
MdCpGrOp 10.46 .07 lnvGBn 7.81
MidCVOpp 8.12 -.04 InvGBn 7.81
PBModAp 11.11 -.03 Japanrn 9.93 .01
TxEAp 14.01 JpnSm n 8.96 +01
SelCommA47.91 -.3 LgCapVal 11.14 -.04
FrontierA 11.02 -.13 LevCoSatAm 52.98 -.2240
GlobTech 22.66 -.14 LevCoStkn 2906 -40
Columbia Cl l,T&G: LowPriKr 40.30 -.19
EmMktOp In 8.38 .02 Magelln n 72.41 -.53
Columbia Class Z: MagellanK 72.36 -.53
AcornZ 31.40 .24 MMuagellanK 72.36 53
m 4 MDMrn 115 4
AcornlntZ 39.56 -.08 MAMunn 12.56
DivlncoZ 14.73 .03 MegaCpStknl .48 -.05
IntBdZ 9.39 +.01 MIMunn 12.42 +.01
IntTEBd 10.91 305
LgCapGr 14.34 -.03 MidCapnn 30.15 -.22
MNMunn 11.96
MdCpldxZ 12.07 -.10 MtgSecn 11.27
ValRestr 49.20 -.27 Munilncn 1332
Credit Suisse Comm: NJ Munrn 12.17
ComRett 8.18 +.04 NwMktrn 16.73 +.05
DFA Funds: NwMilln 32.44 -.17
InfiCorEqn 10.20 -.04 NYMunn 13.50
USCorEql n12.00 -.07 OTn 61.49 -.17
USCorEq2nll.80 -.07 OhMunn 12.20
DWS Invest A: 100Index 9.88 -.04
CommAp 18.02 +.01 Ovrsean 30.31 -.17
DWS Invest&S: PcBasn 24.24 +.09
CoreEqtyS 17.84 -.14 PAMunrn 11.32
CorPlsInc 10.90 +.01 Purin 19.40 -.08
EmMkGrr 16.42 +.09 PuritanK 19.40 -.08
EnhEmMk 10.51 +.01 RealEn 31.64 -.03
EnhGlbBdr 10.11 +03 SAIISecEqF12.68 -.09
GIbSmCGr 38.97 -.33 SCmdtyStrtn8.98 +.04
GIblihem 22.13 -.03 SCmdtyStrFn9.00 +.04
Gold&Prc 14.06 -.09 SrEmrgMkt 16.48 +.04
HiYldTx 12.70 ... SrslntGrw 11.41 -.04
IntTxAMT 12.01 ... SerlnDlGrF 11.44 -.04
Infl FdS 41.06 -.13 SrslntVal 8.63 -.04
LgCpFoGr 33.25 -.29 SerlnfiValF 8.65 -.03
LatAmrEq 40.95 -.21 SrInvGrdF 11.81
MgdMuniS 9.36 ... StlntMun 10.86
MATFS 14.99 ... STBFn 8.54
SP500S 18.60 -.08 SmCapDiscn22.37 -.22
WorldDiv 23.65 -.08 SmllCpSrn 18.49 -.22
Davis Funds A: SCpValur 15.56 -.12
NYVenA 35.99 -.12 StkSelLCVrnll.27 -.04
Davis Funds B: S- SlcACapn27.54 -.16
NYVenB 34.35 -.12 SllSelSmCp 19.91 -.17
Davis Funds C: Stratlncn 11.15 +.02
NYVenC 34.66 -.12 StrReRtr 9.51 +.01
Davis FundsY: TotalBdn 11.07
NYVenY 36.39 -.12 Trendn 77.47 -.58
Delaware Invest A: USBI n 11.84
Diverlncp 9.28 ... Utilityn 17.86 +.08
SMIDCapG 25.53 -.28 ValStratn 28.79 .33
TxUSAp 11.97 +.01 Valuen 71.80 -.42
Delaware Invest B: Wrldwn 19.58 -.13
SelGrBt 35.55 -.26 Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: Aim 38.58 -.15
EmMCrEqnl9.40 -.02 Bankingn 18.92 -.23
EmMktV 29.03 -.05 Biotchn 97.30 -.68
IntSmVan 15.41 -.06 Brokrn 45.81 -.19
LargeCo 11.04 -.04 Chemn 112.16 -1.46
TAUSCorE2n9.60 -.06 ComEquipn23.71 -.05
USLgVan 21.12 -.10 Compn 66.16 -.63
USMicron 14.63 -.18 ConDisn 27.43 -.16
USTgdVal 16.89 -.16 ConsuFnn 13.28 -.10
US Small n 22.79 -.24 ConStapn 77.08 -.43
USSmVa 25.84 -.26 CstHon 43.03 -.35
IntSmCon 15.64 -.04 DfAern 85.78 -.59


EmgMktn 26.52 -.02 Electrn 51.33 -.16
Fixdn 10.34 ... Enrgyn 51.71 +.10
IntGFxInn 13.00 +.01 EngSvn 68.50 +.43
IntVan 15.79 -.10 EnvAItEnrnl6.07 -.07
Glb5Fxlncnll. 11 ... FinSvn 58.03 -.41
TM USTgtV 22.26 -.23 Gold r n 38.20 -.24
2YGIFxdn 10.13 ... Healthn 133.94 -.77
DFARIEn 26.27 -.04 Insurn 49.35 -.14
Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 111.72 -.82
Balanced 73.66 -.19 Materialn 68.11 -.86
Income 13.66 +.01 MedDIn 61.71 -.85
IniSt 32.18 -.14 MdEqSysn 28.17 -.06
Stock 113.24 -.43 Multdn 49.50 -.23
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 31.32 +.17
TRBdI 11.25 Pharmn 14.57
TRBdNp 11.24 Retail n 63.79 -.32
Dreyfus: Softwr n 87.32 -.53
Aprec 44.07 -.17 Techn 103.50 -1.01
CTA 12.23 ... Telcmn 46.26 +.19
CorVA 22.47 Transn 52.46 -.35
Dreyf 9.60 -.06 UtilGrn 55.54 +.50
DryMid r 29.29 -.24 Wireless n 7.65 -.01
Dr5001nt 38.39 -.15 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 16.10 +.02 5001dxlnvn 49.59 -.19
GrChinaA r 32.91 +.25 5001dxl I 49.59 -.20
HiYldAp 6.45 +.01 InfilnxlInvn 32.40 -.13
StratValA 29.15 -.20 TotMktlnvn 40.40 -.18


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 11.84
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn 39.82 -.33
5001dxAdv n49.59 -.20
IntAdrn 32.41 -.12
TotMktAd r n40.40 -.19
USBondl 11.84
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.28 -.06
OverseasA 21.77 +.03
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblA p 6.73 -.03
GovtAp 11.56
GrolnAp 16.42 -.10
IncoAp 2.55
MATFAp 12.34 -.01
MITFAp 12.67 -.01
NJTFAp 13.59
NYTFAp 15.07 -.01
OppAp 29.93 -.17
PATFAp 13.57 -.01
SpSitAp 25.16 -.08
TxExAp 10.15
TotRtAp 16.62-.06
ValueBp 7.58 -.02
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.07 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS px 8.89
ALTFAp 11.73
AZTFAp 11.31
CallnsAp 12.65
CAIntAp 12.03
CalTFAp 7.37
COTFAp 12.26
CTTFAp 11.34
CvtScAp 14.94 -.08
DblTFA 12.24
DynTchA 34.02 -.22
EqlncAp 17.88 -.05
Fedlntp 12.40
FedTFAp 12.48
FLTFAp 11.89
FoundAlp 10.63 -.02
GATFAp 12.51
GoldPrMA 33.36 -.14
GrwthAp 49.90 -.27
HYTFAp 10.66 +.01
HilncA 2.02
IncomAp 2.17
InsTFAp 12.38
NYITFp 11.79
LATFAp 11.85
LMGvScAx 10.38
MDTFAp 11.88
MATFAp 11.99
MITFAp 12.22 +.01
MNInsA 12.78
MOTFA p 12.59
NJTFAp 12.53
NYTFAp 12.01
NCTFA p 12.77
OhiolAp 12.92
ORTFA p 12.42
PATFAp 10.78 +.01
ReEScAp 16.78 -.03
RisDvAp 37.10 -.10
SMCpGrA 38.50 -.30
Stratlncpx 10.48 -.04
TtlRtnApx 10.28 +.01
USGovAp 6.91 +.01
UflsA p 13.59 +.02
VATFAp 12.08
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.06 -.01
IncmeAd 2.15
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.19
USGvCt 6.86
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.45 -.06
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 23.35 +.09
ForgnAp 6.37 -.03
GIBdAp 13.10 -.01
GrwthAp 17.78 -.06
WorldAp 15.08 -.03
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 17.78 -.06
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.76 +.09
ForgnC p 6.23 -.04
GIBdCp 13.13
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.25 -.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.85 +.01
US Eqty 44.03 -.21
GMOTrust IIll:
Quality 23.92 -.07
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 23.07 -.06
InTflntrV 19.68 -.11
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.39
Quality 23.93 -.07
StrFxInc 16.62
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.94 -.24
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.29 -.06
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.66 -.18
HiYield 7.17 +.01
HYMuni n 9.03 +.01
MidCapV 37.58 -.07
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.61 +.01
CapAplnst 43.73 -.23
Intlnv t 58.75 -.32
Intf r 59.34 -.32
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.88 -.25
DivGthAp 20.49 -.05
IntOpAp 14.38 -.07
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 32.91 -.25
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.36 -.29
Div&Gr 21.13 -.06
Advisers 21.03 -.06
TotRetBd 11.92
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.35 -.01
StrGrowth 11.50 +.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.67 +.07
HlthcareS 16.07 -.04
ISI Funds:
NoAm px 7.96 -.03
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 16.06 -.02
WldwideIr 16.07 -.02
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.99 -.06
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.86 +.13
Utlifies 17.07 +.06
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.55 -.02
CmstkA 16.93 -.06
Constp 24.45 -.18
EqIncA 8.96 -.02
GrlncAp 20.35 -.07
HilncMu p
HiYld p 4.23
HYMuA 9.77
InfiGrow 27.75 -.04
MunilnA 13.67
PATFA 16.69
US MortgA 13.03
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.62 -.18
MunilnB 13.65
US Mortg 12.96 .
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.89 +.10
AssetStAp 25.68 +11
AssetSklr 25.91 +.11
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.97
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.02
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal 26.75
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond 11.97
ShtDurBd 11.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquity 11.27
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBd 11.96 ..
HighYId 7.95
IntmTFBd 11.35
LgCpGr 25.39
ShtDurBd 11.00
USLCCrPIs 22.49
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.60 -.09
ContrarnT 14.13 -.04
EnterprT 65.45 -.07
FIxBndT 10.77 +.01
GlUfeSciTr 28.92 -.11
GIbSel T 10.70 -.04
GITechTr 18.73 -.09
Grw&lncT 33.78 -.21
JanusT 31.48 -.20
OvrseasTr 35.34 -.12
PrkMCVal T21.89 -.09
ResearchT 32.00 -.17
ShTmBdT 3.09
Twenty T 60.75 -.53
VentureT 60.12 -.04


WrldWTr 44.79 -.10
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJ n29.01 -.03
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.88 +.01
RgBkA 14.29 -.19
SWrnAp 6.59
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.59
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.65
LSBalanc 13.27
LSConsrv 13.18


Name NAV Chg
LSGrwth 13.24
LSModer 13.06
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.22 +.04
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.66 +.05
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 125.15 -.62
CBApprp 15.28 -.06
CBLCGrp 23.23 -.06
GCIAIICOp 8.37 -.01
WAHilncAt 6.00
WAMgMup 16.83 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.16 -.06
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.27 -.11
CMValTrp 41.58 -.27
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.57 +.07
SmCap 27.48 -.08
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.71 -.01
StrlncC 15.24 -.03
LSBondR 14.65 -.01
StrIncA 15.16 -.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.46
InvGrBdY 12.47
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.66 -.04
FundlEq 13.35 -.06
BdDebAp 7.94
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.42 -.09
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.63
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.16 -.10
MIGA 17.37 -.10
EmGA 47.70 -.35
HilnA 3.48
MFLA
TotRAx 14.95 -.06
UtilAx 17.75 +.01
ValueA 24.98 -.08
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.60 -.10
GvScBn 10.54 +.01
HilnBn 3.49
MulnBn 8.79
TotRBxn 14.96 -.04
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.01 -.07
Valuel 25.09 -.09
MFS Funds Instl:
InfiEqn 17.91 -.13
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBAx 5.95 -.02
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.12 -.07
GovtBtx 8.93 -.01
HYIdBBtx 5.92 -.02
IncmBldr 17.02 -.05
InfiEqB 10.69 +.01
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.21 -.24
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 80.51 -.39
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.46 -.04
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.88 +.01
Indialnvr 16.10 +.06
PacTgrlnv 22.50 +.08
MergerFdn 15.81 +.01
Meridian Funds:
Growth 46.92 -.48
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.61
TotRtBdl 10.61
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.05 -.02
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.21 -.14
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.55 -.02
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 13.63 -.05
MCapGrl 37.63 -.32
Muhlenkn 56.49 -.31
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.20 -.26
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn32.56 -.22
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.72 -.02
GblDiscA 28.98 -.08
GIbDiscZ 29.35 -.08
QuestZ 17.40 -.03
SharesZ 21.63 -.06
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.14 -.05
Geneslnst 49.50 -.21
Int r 16.62 -.04
LgCapV Inv 26.33 -.09
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.34 -.22
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.65
Nichn 48.28 -.38
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.95
HiYFxlnc 7.31
SmCpldx 9.12
Stkldx 17.41
Technly 16.75
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.20
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.27
HYMunBd 16.17 +.02
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.51 -.03
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 42.98 -.18
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.07 -.10
Globall 22.41 -.09
Intl r 18.42 -.13
Oakmark 47.58 -.21
Select 32.48 -.14
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.27
GIbSMdCap 15.10 -.07
LgCapStrat 9.79 -.04
RealRet 9.45 +.01
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.90 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.95 -.01
CAMuniAp 8.46
CapApAp 48.66 -.28
CaplncAp 8.91 -.02
ChmplncApx 1.82
DvMktAp 33.42 +.05
Disc p 63.65 -.63
EquityA 9.45 -.06
GlobAp 59.78 -.30
GIbOppA 30.40 -.24
GblStfrlncA 4.22
Gold p 32.21 -.27
IntBdA px 6.38 +.01
LtdTmMu 14.92
MnStFdA 36.53 -.22
PAMuniAp 11.26
SenFltRtAx 8.25
USGv px 9.70 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.86 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.96
CplncB t 8.73 -.02
ChmplncBtx 1.82
EquityB 8.71 -.05
GblStrlncB 4.23
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.37
RoMuAp 16.72
RcNtMuA 7.29 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.06 +.05
InfiBdYx 6.38 +.01
IntGrowY 28.80 -.17
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.81
TotRtAd 11.22
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.74 +01
AIIAsset 12.23
ComodRR 6.73 +.03
Divlnc 11.74 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.50 -.02
EmMkBd 11.77 +.02
Fltlncr 8.65
ForBdUnr 11.11 +.04
FrgnBd 10.82 +.01
HiYId 9.33 +.01
InvGrCp 10.75 ...
LowDu 10.47 +.01
ModDur 10.84
RealRet 11.86 -.03
RealRtil 12.18 -.01
ShortT 9.81
TotRt 11.22
TRII 10.81
TRIll 9.87 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.67 +01
LwDurA 10.47 +.01
RealRtAp 12.18 -.01
TotRtA 11.22
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.55
RealRtCp 12.18 -.01
TotRtCt 11.22


PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.22
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.73 +.01
TotRtnP 11.22
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 28.53 +.01
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.61 -.09
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.72
InfiValA 18.32 -.10
PionFdAp 41.90 -.14


Name NAV Chg
ValueAp 11.82 -.06
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.16 -.04
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.26 -.04
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 18.60 -.04
StratlncYp 10.94
Price Funds:
Balance 20.61 -.05
BIChip 46.00 -.31
CABondx 11.31
CapApp 22.44 -.05
DivGro 25.64 -.07
EmMktBx 13.47 +.03
EmEurop 18.86 +.06
EmMktS 31.91 +.16
Eqlnc 25.30 -.08
Eqlndex 37.72 -.14
Europe 14.96 -.11
GNMAx 10.12
Growth 37.92 -.28
Gr&ln 22.25 -.06
HlthSci 39.06 -.14
HiYieldx 6.76
InsiCpG 19.09 -.13
InstHiYldx 9.53 +.02
MCEqGr 30.46 -.18
InflBondx 9.98 +.02
IntDis 44.19 +.10
Intl G&I 12.57 -.06
InfStk 13.78 -.03
Japan 7.90
LatAm 41.24 -.26
MDShrtx 5.24
MDBondx 10.92
MidCap 59.61 -.33
MCapVal 23.70 -.05
NAmer 35.24 -.22
NAsia 15.96 +.17
NewEra 44.20 +.12
N Horiz 35.92 -.25
Nlncx 9.77
NYBondx 11.66
OverS SF 8.08 -.02
PSInc 16.91 -.03
RealAssetr 11.17 -.02
RealEst 21.11 -.04
R2010 16.20 -.03
R2015 12.63 -.02
R2020 17.51 -.05
R2025 12.85 -.04
R2030 18.48 -.07
R2035 13.09 -.05
R2040 18.63 -.08
R2045 12.41 -.05
SciTec 29.28 -.19
ShtBdx 4.85
SmCpStk 35.32 -.37
SmCapVal 38.09 -.41
SpecGr 19.13 -.09
Speclnx 12.72
TFIncx 10.36
TxFrHx 11.45 +.01
TxFrSI x 5.70
USTIntx 6.25
USTLgx 13.36
VABondx 12.11
Value 25.04 -.11
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 10.43 -.07
LT20201n 12.36 -.03
LT20301n 12.23 -.04
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.33 -.12
HiYIdAp 5.55 +.01
MuHilncA 10.02 +.01
UtlityA 11.62 +.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.86 -.10
HiYIdBt 5.54
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.17
AZTE 9.39
ConvSec 19.66 -.10
DvrlnAp 7.58 +.01
EqlnAp 16.48 -.10
EuEq 18.72
GeoBalA 12.89 -.02
GIbEqtyp 9.23
GrlnAp 14.25
GIblHIthA 42.85 -.02
HiYdAp 7.65
HiYld In 5.95
IncmAp 6.91 +.01
IntGrln p 9.07
InvAp 14.25 -.07
NJTxAp 9.74
MuliCpGr 56.42
PATE 9.41
TxExAp 8.91
TFInAp 15.47
TFHYA 12.37 +.01
USGvAp 13.64
GIblUtilA 10.44 +.01
VoyAp 22.96 -.23
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.49 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.52 +.01
EqInct 16.34 -.09
EuEq 17.95
GeoBalB 12.75 -.01
GIbEqt 8.33
GINtRst 18.20
GrInBt 13.99
GIbIHIthB 34.21 -.02
HiYldBt 7.64
HYAdBt 5.84
IncmBt 6.85 +.01
IntGrInt 9.00
InfiNopt 13.88 -.07
InvBt 12.82 -.07
NJTxB t 9.73 +.01
MultCpGr 48.31
TxExBt 8.91
TFHYBt 12.39 +.01
USGvBt 13.58
GlblUtilB 10.41 +.01
VoyBt 19.32 -.20
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.30 -.07
LgCAIphaA 42.62 +.23
Value 25.41 +.27
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.87 -.08
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.69 -.06
MicroCapl 15.91 -.10
PennMulr 11.84 -.11
Premierlr 20.42 -.12
TotRetl r 13.65 -.08
ValSvct 11.91 -.07
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.17 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.49 -.11
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.16 +.08
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 19.26 -.03
lOOOInvr 39.62 -.17
S&PSel 21.89 -.08
SmCpSI 21.04 -.23
TSMSelr 25.35 -.12
Scout Funds:
Infl 31.47 -.07
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.64 -.11
AmShSp 43.63 -.11
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.51
Sequoia 161.86 -1.07
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.67 -.27
SoSunSClnvt22.15 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 55.68 -.15
Stratton Funds:
Mulfi-Cap 36.49 -.14
RealEstate 30.53 -.06
SmCap 54.00 -.45
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.18 +.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktInx 8.83 .02
TotRetBdl 9.91
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.86
Eqldxlnst 10.65 -.05
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.22 -.06
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 15.56 -.05
REVallnstr 24.46 -.01
Valuelnst 45.69 +.16
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.59 +05
IncBuildAt 18.52 -.01
IncBuildCp 18.51 -.02
IntValuel 27.18 +.04
LtTMul 14.61
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.88
Incom 9.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.32 +.02
Flexlncp 9.09
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.06 -.41
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.69 -.06
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.49 -.06
ChinaReg 7.43 +.06
GIbRs 9.90 -.04
Gld&Mtls 11.79 -.12
WIdPrcMn 12.49 -.05


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 14.63 -.09
ShtTBnd 9.20
SmCpStk 14.65 -.17
TxElt 13.53
TxELT 13.61
TxESh 10.82
VABd 11.48
WldGr 20.10 -.09
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.12 -.17
Stkldx 26.08 -.10
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.53 -.07
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.37 -.06
CAITAdmn 11.57
CpOpAdln 74.24 -.17
EMAdmr r n 35.46 -.03
Energyn 113.91 +.63
EqlnAdmn n49.50 -.11
EuroAdml n 56.17 -.40
ExplAdmI n 75.15 -.67
ExtdAdm n 44.64 -.40
500Adml n 128.96 -.50
GNMA Adn 11.05 +.01
GrwAdm n 36.43 -.20
HlthCrn 58.28 -.15
HiYldCp n 5.87 +.01
InfProAdn 28.40 -.01
ITBdAdmln 11.89 +.01
ITsryAdmln 11.67
IntGrAdm n 58.75 -.19
ITAdmIln 14.21
ITGrAdmn 10.17 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.17
LTGrAdmlIn 10.41 +.01
LTAdmln 11.57
MCpAdmInl00.48 -.43
MorgAdm n 63.00 -.43
MuHYAdmnl1.01
NYLTAdn 11.58
PrmCap r n 69.79 -.12
PALTAdm n 11.57
ReitAdmrn 92.84 -.13
STsyAdmln 10.78
STBdAdmlnlO.64
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.85
STIGrAdn 10.76
SmCAdm n 37.37 -.35
TxMCap r n 70.03 -.28
TDBAdmI n 11.04 +.01
TStkAdmn 34.97 -.16
ValAdmIn 22.30 -.06
WellslAdm n57.66 -.02
WelltnAdm n57.77 -.09
Windsor n 48.66 -.08
WdsrllAdn 50.86 -.18
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.74 +.01
CapOppn 32.14 -.07
Convrtn 12.77 -.05
DivdGron 16.60 -.02
Energy n 60.67 +.34
Eqlnc n 23.61 -.06
Explr n 80.74 -.72
FLLTn 11.99 -.01
GNMAn 11.05 +.01
GlobEqn 17.89 -.08
Grolncn 29.80 -.14
GrthEqn 12.57 -.08
HYCorpn 5.87 +.01
HlthCren 138.13 -.35
InflaPron 14.46
InfiExplrn 14.69 -.02
IntlGrn 18.47 -.06
InfiValn 29.17 -.10
ITIGraden 10.17 +.01
ITTsry n 11.67
LifeConn 17.01 -.02
LifeGron 23.10 -.07
Lifelnc n 14.53
LifeModn 20.58 -.04
LTIGraden 10.41 +.01
LTTsryn 12.84 +.01
Morg n 20.31 -.15
MuHYn 11.01
Mulntn 14.21
MuLtdn 11.17
MuLong n 11.57
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.17
NYLTn 11.58
OHLTTE n 12.50
PALTn 11.57
PrecMtlsrn 18.62 -.09
PrmcpCorn 14.51 -.04
Prmcprn 67.25 -.12
SelValurn 20.17 -.11
STARn 20.33 -.04
STIGraden 10.76
STFedn 10.85
STTsryn 10.78
StratEqn 20.83 -.13
TgtRetlncn 12.01 -.01
TgRe2010n23.79 -.04
TgtRe2015nln3.17 -.03
TgRe2020 n23.40 -.06
TgtRe2025 nl3.33 -.04
TgRe2030 n22.89 -.07
TgtRe2035 nl3.78 -.05
TgtRe2040 n22.65 -.08
TgtRe2050 n22.54 -.09
TgtRe2045 nl4.22 -.05
USGron 21.24 -.15
USValuen 11.33 -.06
Wellslyn 23.80 -.01
Welltn n 33.45 -.05
Wndsrn 14.42 -.02
Wndslln 28.65 -.10
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n95.69 -.51
ExtMktln 110.17 -.98
MidCplstPl n109.48 -.46
TotlntAdm rn24.01 -.09
Totlntllnstr n96.04 -.35
TotlntllP r n 96.06 -.36
TotlntSig r n28.81 -.10
500 n 128.95 -.50
Balancedn 23.36 -.06
EMktn 26.99 -.02
Europen 24.11 -.17
Extend n 44.62 -.39
Growth n 36.43 -.19
LgCaplxn 25.87 -.11
LTBndn 13.82
MidCapn 22.14 -.09
Pacific n 9.91 -.02
REITr n 21.76 -.03
SmCap n 37.33 -.35
SmlCpGth n24.22 -.24
STBndn 10.64
TotBndn 11.04 +.01
Totllntl n 14.36 -.05
TotStkn 34.96 -.16
Value n 22.30 -.06
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.37 -.06
DevMklnstn 9.18 -.05
Extln n 44.64 -.39
FTAIIWIdl r n85.33 -.35
Grwthlstn 36.43 -.19
InfProlnstn 11.57
Instldxn 128.13 -.49
InsPIn 128.13 -.50
nstTStldxn 31.65 -.15
lnsTStPlusn3l.65 -.15
MidCplstn 22.20 -.09
REITInstrn 14.37 -.02
SCInstn 37.36 -.36
TBIstn 11.04 +.01
TSInstn 34.98 -.16
Valuelstn 22.30 -.06




STBdldx n 10.64
SmCpSig n 33.67 -.31
TotBdSgl n 11.04 +.01
TotStkSgln 33.75 -.16
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.80 -.02
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.86
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.73 +.04
CorelnvA 6.49 .05
DivOppAp 15.40 .06
DivOppC t 15.24 -.06
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.84 -.32
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAlIAp 12.55
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.09
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 20.90 -.20
Grwthlnv 40.66 -.38
Opptylnv 40.53 -.13
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.73 -.40
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlus I 11.34
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.25 -.06
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.63 -.05
Focused 19.85 -.05


USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.21 -.28
CA Bd 10.82
CrnstStr 22.45 -.01
GovSec 10.40 +.01
GrTxStr 14.32 -.02
Growth 16.25 -.05
Gr&lnc 16.16 -.07
IncStk 13.42 -.05
Inco 13.27 +.02
Infi 24.26 -.16
NYBd 12.29 -.01
PrecMM 28.77 -.18


Markets end first losing month




as Spain enters recession


Associated Press


NEW YORK News that
Spain's economy entered
another recession renewed
worries about the fragility of
Europe's finances Monday
and nudged stocks lower
The market ended its first
losing month this year
The Standard & Poor's
500 index slipped 5.45
points to close at 1,397.91.
For April, it was down 0.8
percent, its first month in
the red since November
The Spanish government
said that the country's
economy shrank in the first
three months of the year, the
second straight quarter of
contraction.
The worry is that Spain's
heft could make it difficult
to rescue. Its economy is
roughly twice the size of the
three other countries that
have tapped the European
Union for bailout loans
added together Greece,
Portugal and Ireland.
In the U.S., a drop in an


Market watch
April 30, 2012

Dow Jones -14.68
industrials 13,213.63

Nasdaq -22.84
composite 3,046.36


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-5.45
1,397.91

-8.59
816.88


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,190

Declined: 1,854

Unchanged: 124

Volume: 3.3 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 836

Declined: 1,671

Unchanged: 120

Volume: 1.6 b
AP

index of Midwestern manu-
facturing and a slowdown in
consumer spending last


T-bills up on


Associated Press


NEW YORK Investors are buying U.S.
government bonds after fresh worries
emerged about Spain's economy
Spain said Monday it was back in reces-
sion for the second time in three years. In-
vestors worried that Spain might need a
rescue as Greece and Ireland did. But res-
cuing fourth-largest economy in the 17-
country euro zone could prove to be too


month added to worries that
the economy is losing steam.
Weaker earnings reports
from health insurer Hu-
mana and the owner of the
New York Stock Exchange,
NYSE Euronext, also
weighed on stock indexes.
Among stocks making big
moves:
Barnes & Noble
jumped 52 percent on news
that it will team up with Mi-
crosoft to house the digital
and college businesses of
the bookseller and create a
Nook application for Win-
dows 8. Microsoft's stock
was flat
Health insurer Humana
fell 8 percent to after re-
porting a large drop in first-
quarter profit as the company
paid out more in claims.
Sunoco jumped 20 per-
cent, the most of any stock in
the S&P 500. The fuel-refin-
ing company agreed to be
bought by Energy Transfer
Partners, an operator of nat-
ural gas pipelines, for $5.3
billion.


Spain's woes


expensive for Europe's bailout funds.
U.S. Treasurys are viewed as one of the
safest investments in the world and usually
rise in value when investors are anxious.
The price of the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rose 15.6 cents for every $100
invested. The yield on the note fell to 1.92
percent from 1.93 percent late Friday
The 30-year Treasury bond rose 9 cents
for every $100 invested. Its yield remained
flat at 3.11 percent.


Name Last Chg
SP Inds 37.01 -.35
SPTedch 29.82 -.21
SP Uil 35.66 +.05
StdPac 5.06 -.11
StRegis .87 -.02
Standex 44.06 -1.16
StanBlkDk 73.16 -1.28
StarwdHfi 59.20 -.99
StarwdPT 20.87 +.01
StateStr 46.22 -.10
Statoil ASA 26.91 +.22
Steris 31.41 -.11
SillwtrM 10.73 +.09
StratHotels 6.81 -.12
Stryker 54.57 +.01
SturmRug 57.07 +1.93
SubPpne 42.53 -.07
SunCmts 43.75 -.03
SunCoken 15.22 +.25
Suncorgs 33.04 +.77
Sunoco 49.29 +8.38
Suntedch 2.52 -.17
SunTrst 24.28 -.52
SupEnrgy 26.92 +.62
Supvalu 5.94 -.20
SwiftTrans 10.49 -.29
Synovus 2.10 -.07
Sysco 28.90 -.16
TCF Fncl 11.47 -.23
TDAmeritr 18.79 +.01


TECO 18.02
TJXs 41.71
TRWAuto 45.71
TaiwSemi 15.58
TalismEg 13.06
Target 57.94
TeckResg 37.33
TeekayTnk 5.16
TelcmNZs 10.78
TeleBrasil 28.47
TelefEsp 14.63
TempurP 58.84
TenetHIth 5.19
Tenneco 30.83
Teradyn 17.21
Terex 22.64
TerraNitro 268.00
Tesoro 23.25
TetraTech 8.71
Textron 26.64
Theragen 1.72
ThermoFis 55.65
ThmBet 71.91
ThomCrkg 5.93
3M o 89.36
Tiffany 68.46
TimeWarn 37.48
Timken 56.51
Titan Infi 28.89
TollBros 25.40
TorchEngy 1.94
Trdimrks 48.71


y Hills iv:


CENTER'

ges




actions i X RAYS& *


CLEANING

HProphy 01110
InitialOral Exams 00150

Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S.P.A. Value 1215 I


Senior Citizens $15 00

Discount AskFor1
Details) Time sit


WellsFargo 33.42
WestarEn 28.69
WAstEMkt 14.54
WstAMgdHi 6.38
WAstlnfOpp 12.85
WDigital 38.81
WstnRefin 19.05
WstnUnion 18.38
Weyerhsr 20.36
Whrlpl 64.02
WhifngPet 57.20
WmsCos 34.03
WmsPtrs 57.44
WillisGp 36.46
Winnbgo 9.75
WiscEngy 36.84
WT India 18.33
WolvWW 41.95
Worthgtn 17.84
Wyndham 50.34
XL Grp 21.51
XcelEngy 27.06
Xerox 7.78
Yamanag 14.70
YingliGrn 3.64
Youku 24.04
YumBmrnds 72.73
Zimmer 62.93
ZweigTI 3.15


ValeSA 22.20 -.29
ValeSApf 21.63 -.18
ValeroE 24.70 -.42
VangREIT 65.47 -.17
VangEmg 42.56 -.13
VangEur 44.94 -.28
VangEAFE 33.22 -.19
VarianMed 63.42 +.02
Vecsen 29.45 +.07
Ventas 58.79 -.41
VeoliaEnv 14.55 -.15
VeriFone 47.64 -6.80
VerizonCm 40.38 +.15
Visa 122.98 -.54
Vishaylnt 11.22 +.07
VMware 111.72 -.69
Vornado 85.84 -.16
WGL Hold 40.11 +.49
WPX En n 17.57 +.37
Wabash 8.37 -.49
WalMart 58.91 -.12
Walgrn 35.06 -.61
WalterEn 66.31 -.68
WsteMInc 34.20 -.05
WatsnPh 75.36 -.80
WeathflnD 14.27 -.26
WeinRlt 26.56 -.15
Wellcare 61.18 -.17
WellPoint 67.82 -.81


TorDBkg 84.45
Total SA 48.11
TotalSys 23.52
Transom 50.39
Travelers 64.32
Tredgar 17.35
TriConfi 15.80
TrinaSolar 7.26
Trinity 29.60
TwoHrblnv 10.46
TycolntI 56.13
Tyson 18.25
UBSAG 12.37
UDR 26.33
UIL Hold 34.37
USAirwy 10.26
USG 18.05
UltraPtg 19.76
UniSrcEn 36.40
UniFirst 60.76
UnionPac 112.44
UtdCont 21.92
UtdMicro 2.68
UPSB 78.14
UtdRentals 46.68
USBancrp 32.17
USNGsrs 16.41
US OilFd 39.68
USSteel 28.33
UtdTedi 81.64
UtdhlthGp 56.15
UnumGrp 23.74


HIGHLIGHT Whee Quality and alu


IDS Tgte uciw TM
Natural gas prices up

on production report

NEW YORK The price of
natural gas jumped by nearly 5 Mric-SatI1:O AM- 6PM
percent Monday after govern- --
ment data showed producers ,...... Un j. .
are making good on promises
to cut supplies.
Chesapeake Energy Corp., f l Sti
ConocoPhillips and Encana -. .
Corp. have said they would take t
some natural gas operations of-
fline this year. They were forced P .
to, in part, because of their own
success. U.S. supplies have
ballooned to nearly 60 percent jLWA
above the five-year average.
On Monday natural gas fu-
tures rose 9.9 cents to end the i..s,
day at $2.285 per 1,000 cubic
feet, the highest since March 21.
Meanwhile, oil prices
dropped slightly on Monday
with concerns of growing eco-
nomic troubles in Europe.
Benchmark U.S. crude lost 6
cents to end at $104.87 per barrel i o
in New York. Brent crude, which
is used to price oil imported into tC StaRive r l
the U.S., lost 36 cents to end at 3S0 S.S. US 19
$119.47 per barrel in London. 092-799-7223

-From wire reports


Beverl



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BUSINESS


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 All







Page A12 TUESDAY, MAY 1,2012



PINION


"There never was a good war or a bad peace."
Benjamin Franklin, letter to Josiah Quincy, Sept. 11, 1773


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z..Ifl Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


EXERCISE CAUTION





Conditions





prime for





wildfires


We all know how dry it
is across the county.
One glance at Lake
Rousseau, the Tsala Apopka
lakes chain or the Withla-
coochee River says it all.
Stumps popping up in the
water, dry land beyond the
ends of docks and boat ramps
too treacherous
for many boaters
are proof that THE Il
water levels are Fire dang
down signifi-
cantly
While the water OUR O0
levels are an in- Each of
convenience, the make a c
risks caused dur-
ing this routinely
dry time of year should be
heeded. Conditions are opti-
mum for brushfires.
With the fire danger rating at
"high," we need to remember
that each of us can help make
the county a safer place to live.
Almost daily firefighters are
called out to illegal burns and
accidental fires, where home-
owners armed with little
knowledge of the danger
they're posing decide to burn
yard trash or a variety of other
things without taking proper
precautions.
While, as yet, there is no
burn ban in place, it's impera-
tive the residents take precau-
tions because it take little for a
fire to grow out of control.
It's not only insufficiently
covered burn barrels or resi-
dents failing to supervise burn-
ing with a hose close at hand
that creates the high risk.
All it takes is a cigarette butt
carelessly tossed out of a car
window or a lightening strike
to recreate the wildfires of the


Lakes should be full
Don't blame Mother Nature for
our low lake levels. The lakes
were being drained way before
the drought. As long as there are
millions of gallons of Withla-
coochee River water flowing into
the Gulf each day, let's not
blame Mother Nature. And there
is no excuse for not hav-
ing the lakes full. We
have a system of locks 1,
and dams in place to di-
vert some of the river's
water into our lakes,
then back to the river
onto the Gulf. A totally
full lake system is a
tremendous financial
benefit for our local CAL
small businesses who 563-
depend on the boating Uu
and fishermen who used
to use our lakes, spending
money on restaurants, hotels,
bait shops, gas stations and for
boat engine repairs. So who is to
blame? It is the Army Corps of
Engineers, Southwest Florida
Water Management (District) and
our current local elected officials.
If our county commissioners
were interested in helping the
small-business community, they
would be screaming for higher
lake levels. As a 25-year-plus res-
ident of Citrus County, I can


S
De

P

i


I

(


past decades, burning thou-
sands of acres and hundreds of
homes. Don't think it can't hap-
pen here in Citrus County? It
can.
Our county is semi-rural
and many homes are sur-
rounded by thick underbrush
and palmettos, causing a real
concern if a fire
gets started. The
;SUE: other problem is
r is high. many areas do
not have fire hy-
INION: drants so fighting
a blaze can be
us can very difficult.
fference. Lack of rain, dry
conditions and
dry wind is a
recipe for disaster Add a spark
to the scenario and it becomes
a fiery situation.
Citrus County is currently
under a high fire danger rating
according to
The Florida Forest Service,
which has the Citrus County
fire danger categorized as
"high," uses the Wildland Fire
Danger Index (FDI) for esti-
mating the potential for a fire
to start on any given day
Another tool used to monitor
fire threats is the Keetch
Byram Drought Index. The
county is currently under a
high risk rating, meaning it is
between 450 to 499 points on
the chart. A one means no dan-
ger and 750-points or above
means drought and an ex-
tremely high risk of fire.
For more information or to
track potential wildfire prob-
lems, visit www.floridaforest
service.com/fire_weather.
Please remember, each of us
has to do our part. Be aware
and think smart.

swear to you that all of the above
agencies and commissioners ...
use the excuse like lack of rain,
threats of hurricanes, etc. They
will tell you the locks are closed
while you're standing there right
at the lock, seeing that they are
open, while talking to them your
cell phone. Stay focused and
blame the ones who are really to
blame for the low lake
JND levels. They should be to-
tally full 365 days of the
r year.
Read the legals
This is info for all those
who call storage facilities
asking if there will be any
'60 auctions coming up.
Check the legal section
)579 of the local newspaper.
All storage facilities that
hold auctions or public
sales must advertise in the legal
section two times within two weeks
before the sale of any goods.
Computer access
This is to the editor who reads
and answers the Sound Off calls:
What do you say to those people
who want to read the Buffett rule
but don't have a computer?
Editor's note: Public libraries
offer computer access, and have
staff or volunteers available to
help you.


The war is over? Could've fooled me


S rn he war on terror is
Overr" or so claims an
.. unnamed senior State
Department official, as reported
by National Journal's Michael
Hirsh in his recent article "The
Post al-Qaida Era."
Really? Well, if the war is over,
I must have missed the peace
treaty signing ceremony. I also
haven't noticed a de-
cline in incendiary
rhetoric, or the disar-
mament or at least
laying down of arms
- that usually accom-
panies the end of war
Does this mean we
can do away with full-
body scanners and
TSA pat-downs? Cal T
Those who believe OTI
the war against radical
Islamists is over never VOI
really believed we
were fighting one. They have been
in denial from the start Each time
they have been proven wrong -
the land for peace formula be-
tween Israel and her enemies is
just one example among many -
they have simply moved on to the
next level of denial. Now they
have reached rock bottom with
nowhere else to go and are telling
us we can live with Islamism.
Hirsh references Reuel Marc
Gerecht, senior fellow at the Foun-
dation for Defense of Democra-
cies, a nonpartisan institution
focusing on national security and
foreign policy, whom he calls one
of the "smarter hardliners on the
Right." Hirsh says Gerecht is
among an emerging group of pol-
icymakers and analysts coming to
realize that "the Arab world may
find another route to democracy
- through Islamism."
This is preposterous. It is like
saying the route to women's rights


h
H


is through patriarchy War is
peace. George Orwell lives! Rad-
ical Islamists have made it per-
fectly clear they have no interest
in joining the democratic process.
They are at war They are at war
with the West. No amount of
"make-nice" will stop them from
trying to destroy Western infidels,
which they consider all proponents
of democracy to be.
Gerecht's kind of
thinking is beyond
self-delusional. It is
suicidal. Any hope
that the Arab Spring
and the Middle East
elections that result
will make any differ-
ence in the way radi-
iomas cal Islamists deal with
IER or perceive the West is
misplaced. Elections
CES are meaningless with-
out a framework guar-
anteeing individual rights. History
is full of examples where elections
brought to power dictators who
either gamed the system so their
re-election was guaranteed or made
sure there were no more elections.
Closer to reality is a report in
the April 15 London Sunday
Times. Reporter Hala Jaber
writes from Cairo about the forth-
coming Egyptian elections: "Vot-
ers fear the imposition of the veil
and a harsh penal code if radicals
win the election."
Ask the radical Islamic cleric
Abu Qatada if he thinks the war
against the West, which is the
proper way of framing this con-
flict, is over British Home Secre-
tary Theresa May has possibly
blown an opportunity to deport
Qatada because of a bureaucratic
snafu over a deadline for his ap-
peal to the European Court of
Human Rights. Now there is a
good chance that Qataba, de-


scribed by a judge in Spain as
Osama bin Laden's right-hand
man in Europe, could be released
from prison instead of being de-
ported to Jordan as planned.
Just because the leadership of
al-Qaida has been killed, impris-
oned or forced to run, does not
mean that the fighting stops. In
fact, though the "war on terror"
may be over as a concept, White
House spokesman Tommy Vietor
assured Michael Hirsh, the war
against al-Qaida rages on. But the
war is much broader than al-
Qaida. Terrorism flows from a be-
lief system and worldview that
will not be crushed because a few
al-Qaida leaders are gone.
The secular left refuses to un-
derstand this. Terrorism is not
the only tool in the arsenal of rad-
ical Islamists. Infiltration, Islamic
schools, the building of mosques
in the midst of the "Great Satan,"
the running of Muslim candidates
for public office, the demands for
more "rights" and civil liberties,
while Islamists deny such things
to the nations they dominate all
of this and more proves the war by
whatever name one wishes to call it
is not over It is just beginning.
Radical Islamists are attempt-
ing to unify the Muslim world
under Sharia law and other dic-
tates of the extremist wing of the
religion. If they succeed, they will
most assuredly redouble their ef-
forts to eliminate Israel and come
after America.
The war on terror continues.
We need to fight it to win it.
--*--a
Direct all mail for Cal Thomas
to: Tribune Media Services,
2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX
75038. Readers may also email
Cal Thomas at tmseditors@
tribune.com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Gas prices
This letter is in response to
the letter by Harry Cooper,
"Facts are correct," of April 16.
The letter was responding to a
Sound Off caller about the price
of gasoline at different times.
Cooper responded with three
receipts dated Aug 25, 2008, for
the amount of $49.64, another
dated July 22, 2009, for $46.47 and
another for March 23,2010, amount-
ing to $44.60. None of these re-
ceipts contains any fact. For
example, none of these receipts
tells what a gallon of gas costs.
Now, here are the facts: On
Aug. 18, 2008, the average gas
price was $3.74 per gallon. In
July 6,2009, the average gas price
was $2.61 per gallon, and on March
22, 2010, gas was $2.82 per gallon.
I do agree with the letter-
writer about giving one's name.
The letter-writer again does
not give facts when it comes to
President Obama. He states that
President Obama is looked upon
as a joke in Europe. That state-
ment is false. President Obama's
ratings are high in Europe, with
75 percent and 12 European
Union nations approving of his
handling of global affairs.
Obama's success in eliminating
al-Qaida leader Osama bin
Laden appeared to be a factor in
his popularity in the EU.
I hope the next time the letter-
writer goes to Europe, he comes
home and tells us the gas prices.
I am sure the letter-writer knows
what he is talking about, but I am
also sure when he was in upper


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

management he could not do in-
ventory control the way he tried to
sell his gas receipts to the readers.
Also, if the letter-writer is
blaming the president for the
gas prices, he knows better:
OPEC determines the price per
barrel after it determines the
amount of crude oil produced. I
am sure as a member of upper
management, the letter-writer
already knows this.
Chuck Weiler
Crystal River


Formal opposition
Concerning an article pub-
lished April 13 ("Bargaining
points"), relative to George
Decker's proposed develop-
ment of Pirate's Cove in Ozello:
It is understandable that Mr
Decker and associates came
away from the Feb. 13 commu-
nity meeting with the impres-
sion that there was little or no
opposition to their plan. Ozello
residents voiced virtually no
objections at that meeting, as
the residents were advised Mr
Decker and his associates were
simply making a presentation
for informational purposes
only The meeting was clearly
not a forum for debate, and res-
idents reacted accordingly. The
lack of negative response un-
fortunately gave Mr Decker the
erroneous impression that
Ozello residents either ac-
cepted his plan or were neutral
toward it.
In point of fact, there is
widespread opposition in the
Ozello community to the ambi-
tious but impractical plan pre-
sented by Mr Decker The
Ozello residents have organ-
ized The Committee to Save
Ozello in formal opposition to
the unrealistic development
plan presented by Mr. Decker
and his associates.
Linda Green
Robert H. Schaefer
Co-chairs, The Committee
to Save Ozello


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Very 'Sunny Saturday'
The United Methodist Women of Inverness
hosted its sixth annual "Sunny Saturday"
Charity Golf Tournament in memory of Ruby
Moore, at Inverness Golf and Country Club,
on March 31. It was a great day for golf, and
everyone seemed to enjoy the day.
There were numerous door prizes do-
nated by local businesses and individuals.
Again, the businesses and people of Citrus
County came through. There were beautiful
gift baskets made by the UMW circles. These
baskets were worth upwards of $60.
There was an auction with great items, from
hand-crocheted afghans, flower arrangements
and wall decorations to gift certificates worth
$25 or more. Each golfer received a door prize.
The morning started at 7:30 a.m. with a
welcoming from the UMW president, Rose-
marie Hutterer, followed by the blessing and
then a great continental breakfast. After a
shotgun start at 8:30 a.m., the golfers and
guests enjoyed a nicely presented hot lunch
of pork or chicken breast, wild rice, mashed
potatoes, green beans, salad, tea, coffee or
soda, followed by ice cream for dessert.
We would like to thank Inverness Golf and
Country Club for allowing us to have the
tournament at that great establishment, and
the hot lunch it provided. As always, staff
there did a great job.
We would also like to thank the following
for their participation in helping make this a
great tournament.
Sponsors were: Brice Insurance Agency,
Inverness; Wann Robinson Edward Jones,
Inverness; Jeanne Pickrel Century 21; Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home Inc., Inverness; J.W
Morton-Century 21 (in memory of Veronica
Morton), Inverness; United Methodist Men
of Inverness; Rosemarie Hutterer and fam-
ily (in memory of Joe Hutterer), Inverness;
Marion Morgan (in memory of Peggy Smith),
Inverness; Susan Hillard, Jim, Bea and Mark
Jones (in memory of Dot Tokach), Inverness;
Conchita Riparip (in memory of Ambrosio,
Conchita, Ambrosio Jr. and Ofelia Riparip),
Inverness; Oscar and Ellen Chiang (in honor


of grandchildren), Inverness; Mrs. Denise M.
Kingsley, Martin, Diane Hogue and family (in
memory of David M. Kingsley), Inverness;
Rob't J. Eldredge, accountant (in memory of
Patricia Eldredge), Inverness; Dennis J. and
Gloria Kreiss (in honor of God), Inverness.
Golf passes from: Prestige Golf Club, Dun-
nellon; Sherman Hills, Brooksville; Citrus
Springs Golf& County Club, Citrus Springs;
Twisted Oaks Golf Club, Beverly Hills; Citrus
Hills Golf& Country Club, Hernando; Inver-
ness Golf& Country Club, Inverness.
Donations: Chefs of Napoli, Inverness;
Sweetbay Supermarkets, Inverness; New
England Pastry & Cafe, Beverly Hills; Sub-
way, Inverness (Downtown); The Flower
Basket, Inverness; Joe's Family Restaurant,
Inverness; Publix Super Market, Inverness;
West Coast Insurers, Inverness; Winn-Dixie,
Inverness (Downtown); Rainbow's End Golf
Club, Dunnellon; Beef'O' Brady's, Inverness;
McDonald's, Inverness (downtown); Short and
Sassy Beauty Salon, Inverness; Bon Worth of
Inverness; Joni's Hair Salon, Inverness; The
Crafty Lady, Inverness; Walmart Supercenter,
Inverness; Manatee Lanes, Crystal River; Joe's
Deli, Inverness; Connor's Gifts & Christmas
Village, Inverness; VanAllen Insurance
Agency, Inverness; Sherman Hills Golf Club,
Brooksville; The Scroll Bookstore, FUMC of
Inverness; City Tire of Inverness; Tally Ho
Vacations, Inverness; Array of Flowers, In-
verness; Reflections Hair Salon, Inverness;
Lakeview Salon, Hernando; SECO, Inver-
ness; Center State Bank, Inverness; Harbor
Lights Lounge and Restaurant, Lake Pana-
soffkee; and Santa's Hair Salon, Inverness.
Individual donations: Olivia Johnston,
Bea Jones, Gloria and Dennis J. Kreiss, Eve-
lyn Ross, Shirley Braveman, Bobbi Marek,
Kenneth and Mary Ann Borger, Kathy and
Butch Shampine, Corky and Diane Hogue,
Denise Kingsley, Carol Banks.
Also a thank-you to anyone who had a part
in making this tournament a success by vol-
unteering time, talents or efforts.
Rosemarie Hutterer
United Methodist Women


Vicious cycle
This is in regard to the April 19 Sound
Off titled "Wasteful spending," where he
proposes salary cuts for all county em-
ployees. Does he realize the county em-
ployees have not had a raise in four to
six years depending on where you
worked? Keep on cutting our salaries,
you'll have no county employees, which
means you'll have no services, which
means then you'll have another topic to
write in about to Sound Off
about the fact that the lack of
services with the county. ... In- I
stead of creating more hostility,
how about figuring out some-
thing that's a little bit more con-
ducive to helping the fellow
workers of the county? The
county workers perform a great
service for this county.
War dehumanizes CAL
The multiple deployments that 563-(
we are putting our young men
and women through in Iraq and
Afghanistan are proving one thing: War de-
humanizes everyone. The proof is the pho-
tographs coming out of our troops acting
like animals. I don't blame them. We just
need to stop the war.
Obamacare good
To the person with no health insurance
and "Wasteful spending" (April 19): Yes,
we taxpayers would have to pay for you if
you are unable, as we do for indigents,
etc. Check Obamacare has a lot of
good in it.


Dent and run
To the person who backed into my car
on Wednesday, April 18, in the parking lot
of Citrus Memorial hospital: All's I can say
is, I hope your conscience is bothering you
for fleeing the scene and leaving no note
on my windshield. All's I can say is, any-
body who can't turn the steering wheel the
correct way to make an "L" turn in reverse
to avoid hitting other cars should not be
allowed to drive. It's no different from
making and "L" turn when going
LkN forward except everything is in
IND reverse.
d)FF Dredging issue
Mr. Martin of Martin Associates
said Port Citrus was a diamond in
the rough. You enhance a dia-
mond in the rough by cutting it,
a making the many small pieces
more valuable than the whole.
0579 Cutting Port Citrus means to
)595 dredge. Several of the bidders
raised this issue. Dredging, and
the environmental debate concerning
dredging, will be the ultimate issue for the
future of Port Citrus. The question is: Will
Port Citrus become a profitable small con-
tainership feeder port or an existing niche
barge port?
Registry number
I'm calling about the "do not call" num-
ber. I would like to have it listed in the
paper. I'm tired of people calling me all
hours of the day and night for political
B.S. Put it in the paper.
Editor's note: 888-382-1222.


B.K. Patel, M.D., Internal Medicine
H. Khan, M.D., Family Practice (Board Certified)
Awilda Pena, M.D., Internal Medicine



*Intern l M cine



Walk-Ins Welcome
Now Accepting New Patients
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Active Staff at both Seven Rivers &
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Beverly Hills Inverness Homosassa
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. 308 S. Line Ave. 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Beverly Hills Inverness Homosassa Springs
(352) 746-0600 (352) 344-5511 (352) 503-2011


WeAccept Hu ana reom ntd


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an^


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- I 1I1P


Thank-you LETTER


- : I I I:


OPINION


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 A13


- I I-











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS Attacks target symbols of Syrian state power


Suicide bombers

kill 9, wound 100

Associated Press


BEIRUT In fresh attacks on
symbols of state power, twin suicide
bombs exploded Monday near a
government security compound in
northern Syria and rockets struck
the central bank in Damascus,
killing nine people and wounding
Associated Press 100.


An alleged gunman surren-
ders on the 4000 block of
Liberty near Waco under
gunpoint from Houston Po-
lice and SWAT officers out-
side the home where he
reportedly admitted to
shooting his common-law
wife to death, Monday after
a police standoff in Hous-
ton, Texas.


Witness: Edwards
knew about money
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
The wife of a key former aide
to John Edwards said the
presidential candidate told
her it was legal to deposit
money from a wealthy donor
in order to take care of Ed-
wards' mistress.
Cheri Young testified in Ed-
wards' trial on federal cam-
paign finance charges. She
said she deposited money
from the donor into a bank
account she held jointly with
her husband, Andrew Young.
Cheri Young said she had
doubts about the money and
insisted Edwards himself tell
her it was legal under cam-
paign finance laws. She said
Edwards told her in a phone
call that campaign lawyers
said depositing the money
was legal.
Prosecutors said Edwards
deliberately used donations
to hide his pregnant mistress
as he sought the White
House in 2008. Edwards de-
nied the charges.

World BRIEFS

Mourning


Ls'


The regime and the opposition
traded blame, accusing each other
of dooming a United Nations plan
to calm violence that has largely


failed so far The head of the U.N.
observer mission acknowledged his
force cannot solve the country's cri-
sis alone and urged both sides to
stop fighting.
The attacks are the latest in a se-
ries of suicide bombings that
started in December and have
mostly targeted Syrian military and
intelligence positions.
The regime routinely blames the
opposition, which denies having a
role or the capability to carry out
such attacks. After other similar
bombings, U.S. officials suggested
al-Qaida militants may be joining
the fray, and an al-Qaida-inspired
Islamist group has claimed respon-
sibility for previous attacks in Syria.
The powerful blasts, which blew


two craters in the ground and
ripped the facade off a multistory
building, came a day after Maj. Gen.
Robert Mood, the head of the ob-
server mission, took up his post in
Damascus.
"Ten, 30, 300 or 1,000 observers
will not solve all problems," he told
reporters Monday. "So everyone
has to help us achieve this mission."
More than 9,000 people have
been killed in the 13-month crisis,
according to the U.N.
An April 12 cease-fire agreement
has helped reduce violence, but
fighting persists, and U.N. officials
have singled out the Syrian regime
as the main aggressor
An advance team of 16 U.N. ob-
servers is on the ground to try to sal-


vage the truce, which is part of a
broader plan by special envoy Kofi
Annan to launch talks between
President BasharAssad and his op-
ponents. By mid-May, the team is to
grow to 100, but U.N. officials have
not said when a full 300-member
contingent is to be deployed.
Monday's bombs went off in the
northern city of Idlib, an opposi-
tion stronghold that government
troops recaptured in a military of-
fensive earlier this year TV footage
of the aftermath from the blasts
showed torn flesh, burned-out cars,
twisted debris and pavement
stained with blood. The force of the
explosions shattered windows and
sent debris flying for hundreds of
meters.


Trade center back on top


Associated Press
Light from the setting sun reflects on buildings, including One World Trade Center, top left, in New York, Monday as seen from Jersey City, N.J.
Workers erected beams on the top of the structure earlier in the day allowing it to claim the title of New York City's tallest skyscraper.


Twin towers replacement claims title of tallest building in New York City


Associated Press
NEW YORK One
World Trade Center, the
monolith being built to re-
place the twin towers de-
stroyed in the Sept. 11
attacks, claimed the title
of New York City's tallest
skyscraper on Monday, as
workers erected steel
columns that made its un-
finished skeleton a little
more than 1,250 feet high,
just enough to peek over


the roof of the observation
deck on the Empire State
Building.
City officials and iron
workers applauded as the
first 12-ton column was
hoisted onto the tower's
top deck.
"This project is much
more than steel and con-
crete. It is a symbol of suc-
cess for the nation," said
David Samson, chairman
of the Port Authority, the
agency that owns the


World Trade Center
Clear skies afforded an
immaculate 360-degree
view from the top, al-
though it wasn't easy get-
ting up there. After riding
an elevator to the 90th
floor, a small group of offi-
cials and journalists had
to climb three steep lad-
ders to reach the top plat-
form, which was encircled
by blue netting along the
perimeter
The milestone is a pre-


liminary one. Workers are
still adding floors to the
building once called the
Freedom Tower It isn't ex-
pected to reach its full
height for at least another
year, at which point it is
likely to be declared the
tallest building in the U.S.,
and third tallest in the
world.
Those bragging rights,
though, will carry an
asterisk.
Crowning the world's


tallest buildings is a little
like picking the heavy-
weight champion in box-
ing. There is often
disagreement about who
deserves the belt.
In this case, the issue
involves the 408-foot-tall
needle that will sit on the
tower's roof.
Count it, and the World
Trade Center is back on
top. Otherwise, it will have
to settle for No. 2, after the
Willis Tower in Chicago.


Associated Press
Hernan Rodriguez, second
from left, and Maria Sues-
cun, parents of police offi-
cer Andres Rodriguez,
attend his funeral service
Monday in Guarne, Colom-
bia. Colombia's Defense
Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon
said his government has
not launched any special
rescue mission for Romeo
Langlois. a French iournal-


ist who was ac
a counterdru
when it was
leftist rebels
killing Rodrigu


Officials:
in copte
BOGOTA, Col
cials in Colombia
bian air force heli
crashed near the
coast and all 13 p
have been killed.
Atlantico state
director Jorge F
said the aircraft
field in a rural ar
town of Sabanac
Two officials w
condition they not
identified put the
Both say they we
ized to disclose th
They said the
caught fire as it
ground and poli
force personnel
Colombia's air
its website that thE
copter crashed at


Ocean race accidents stun


sailors as probe deepens


Associated Press


.companying SAN DIEGO For 65
ug mission years, sailors have raced 125
attacked by nautical miles from Newport
Saturday, Beach, Calif., to Ensenada,
ez. Mexico, with expectations of
a safe overnight voyage fol-
lowed by beers at a popular
13 dead cantina.
Likewise, sailors in the
r crash century-old Full Crew Far-
ombia Offi- allones Race off San Fran-
said a Colom- cisco would return to the
copter has docks jubilant at having
Caribbean mastered winds averaging
people aboard 10 to 20 knots and churning
Pacific Ocean swells that
a civil defense can reach 14 feet.
d Death was an after-
ernandez thought. At least until this
crashed in a spring.
rea of the spring.
ea of the Two weeks after five
grande. sailors were killed in the
ho spoke on waters off Northern Califor-
t be further nia when their 38-foot yacht
death toll at 13. was hit by powerful waves
re not author- and capsized, the sailing
ie number. community was stunned
aircraft again this weekend.
fell to the Three sailors were killed
ce and air and one went missing, their
were aboard. yacht found in pieces near
force said on the Mexican border, perhaps
e Bell 212 heli- in a collision with a large ship
t4:30 p.m. in the middle of the night
The Coast Guard was
-From wire reports seeking records of any large


Associated Press/ newportbeach.patch.com, Susan Hoffman
The Aegean begins the 125-mile yacht race from Newport
Beach, Calif., to Ensenada, Mexico, on Friday. The 37-foot
boat, carrying a crew of four, was reported missing Satur-
day, the U.S. Coast Guard said.


ships in the area when the
37-foot Aegean was believed
to have been destroyed
early Saturday, Lt. Bill Bur-
well, an agency spokesman,
said Monday
Investigators are also ex-
amining the yacht's debris
and GPS coordinates and try-
ing to find other race partici-
pants who were in the area.
Burwell, a Coast Guard
pilot who helped locate the
three bodies, said he isn't


ruling out the yacht collided
with rocks on Mexico's
Coronado Islands. Race or-
ganizers say they see no
other explanation other
than a collision with a
larger ship.
"I think equal opportunity
should be given to the idea
that there wasn't another
vessel involved. The evi-
dence doesn't point to that
yet, but the evidence doesn't
point anywhere," he said.


US not reporting


all Afghan attacks


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
military is under-reporting
the number of times
Afghan soldiers and police
open fire on American and
other foreign troops.
The U.S.-led coalition
routinely reports each time
an American or other for-
eign soldier is killed by an
Afghan in uniform. But
The Associated Press has
learned it does not report
insider attacks in which
the Afghan wounds or
misses his U.S. or allied
target It also doesn't report
the wounding of troops
who were attacked along-
side those who were killed.
Such attacks reveal a
level of mistrust and ill will
between the U.S.-led coali-
tion and its Afghan coun-
terparts in an increasingly
unpopular war The U.S.
and its military partners
are working more closely
with Afghan troops in
preparation for handing off
security responsibility to
them by the end of 2014.
In recent weeks an
Afghan soldier opened fire
on a group ofAmerican sol-
diers but missed the group


entirely The Americans
quickly shot him to death.
Not a word about this was
reported by the Interna-
tional Security Assistance
Force, or ISAF, as the coali-
tion is formally known. It
was disclosed to the AP by
a U.S. official who was
granted anonymity in
order to give a fuller pic-
ture of the "insider"
problem.
ISAF also said nothing
about last week's attack in
which two Afghan police-
men in Kandahar province
fired on U.S. soldiers,
wounding two. Reporters
learned of it from Afghan
officials and from U.S. offi-
cials in Washington. The
two Afghan policemen
were shot to death by the
Americans present.
Just last Wednesday, an
attack that killed a U.S.
Army special forces sol-
dier, Staff Sgt. Andrew T
Brittonmihalo, 25, of Simi
Valley, Calif, also wounded
three other American sol-
diers. The death was re-
ported by ISAF as an
insider attack, but it made
no mention of the wounded
- or that an Afghan civil-
ian also was killed.


Standoff











SPORTS


* TJ Duke zip
by for second
consecutive win
in Super Late
Models./B2


0 Citrus County Speedway/B2
0 Horse racing/B2
0 Baseball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, Lottery/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tampa ties Seattle twice, breaks it for win


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG El-
liot Johnson hit an RBI sin-
gle with one out in the 12th
inning, giving the Tampa
Bay Rays a 3-2, comeback
victory over the Seattle
Mariners on Monday night.
The Rays twice rallied
from one-run deficits before
winning it against Brandon
League (0-2), who failed to
hold a 2-1 lead the Mariners
took on Jesus Montero's
homer in the 11th.
J.P Howell (1-0) pitched


one scoreless inning for the
win. Ben Zobrist drew a
one-out walk in 12th, moved
to second on Carlos Pena's
single and scored when
Johnson lined a 1-0 pitch to
left field.
B.J. Upton's RBI single in
the 11th wiped out the short-
lived lead the Mariners took
on Montero's homer off
Wade Davis, the fourth of
five Tampa Bay pitchers.
Miguel Olivo homered off
Rays starter Jeremy Hel-
lickson for Seattle's first
run. Mariners starter Felix


Hernandez struck out nine
and walked four in eight in-
nings while limiting Tampa
Bay to Sean Rodriguez's
second-inning RBI and five
hits overall.
Tampa Bay's Evan Longo-
ria left the game with what
the Rays described as left
knee soreness after sliding
into second base on an at-
tempted steal that ended the
third inning. The three-time
All-Star remained on the
ground before climbing to
his feet and walking to the
dugout without assistance.
The Mariners lost Olivo
with a right groin strain in
the ninth, when the catcher
picked up Upton's dribbler
in front on the plate and


threw awkwardly to first
base before falling to the
ground.
Hellickson, bidding to
join James Shields and
David Price in matching
Tampa Bay's record for vic-
tories in April, scattered six
hits over seven innings,
walked none and struck out
seven. Shields and Price
won four times during the
opening month, tying the
franchise mark set by Andy
Sonnanstine (2008) and Matt
Garza (2010).
Olivo hit his third homer
of the year to give Seattle a
1-0 lead in the second. The
Rays countered with Ro-
driguez's RBI single off Her-
nandez in the bottom half.


Associated Press
The Seattle Mariners' Ichiro Suzuki hits a first-inning single
off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson on
Monday in St. Petersburg. Catching for the Rays is Jose
Molina.


Powell, Reed and
Parks receive NFL
free-agent deals
TALLAHASSEE -
Three Florida State players
have reached agreements
with NFL teams following
last week's draft of college
players.
Punter Shaun Powell,
receiver Bert Reed and
safety Terrance Parks each
signed free agent con-
tracts. Powell will join
teammates Nigel Bradham
and Zebrie Sanders with
the Buffalo Bills, while
Reed signed with Cleve-
land and Parks inked with
the Kansas City Chiefs.
Florida State had four
players taken in last week's
draft. Bradham went early
in the fourth round as the
105th pick in the draft, fol-
lowed by Sanders in the
fifth round, defensive back
Mike Harris in the sixth and
offensive tackle Andrew
Datko in the seventh and
final round. It was the first
time since 1987 that
Florida State failed to have
a player drafted in one of
the first three rounds.
Tiger trades news
conference for
Facebook
JACKSONVILLE The
only questions Tiger
Woods
fielded
before
his next
tourna-
ment
came
from his
Tiger fans.
Woods In-
stead of
a news conference before
this week's Wells Fargo
Championship, Woods an-
swered 19 questions Mon-
day in a 15-minute video
posted on his website. The
questions were submitted
through Facebook and
Twitter.
The timing of the deci-
sion was peculiar. Woods
is coming off his worst
performance ever at the
Masters, a tie for 40th in
which he finished 15
shots behind and was
roundly criticized for kick-
ing his 9-iron in disgust
after a poor tee shot on
the par-3 16th hole in the
second round.
NY judge won't nix
lawsuit against
Jets, Favre
NEW YORK Brett
Favre will have to testify in
court about sexually sug-
gestive text messages.
A Manhattan Supreme
Court judge in early April
refused to dismiss a law-
suit filed against the New
York Jets and Favre by two
massage therapists.
Christina Scavo and
Shannon O'Toole contend
they were subjected to sex-
ual harassment and job
discrimination. They are
seeking unspecified dam-
ages from Favre, the Jets
and a team massage
coordinator.
From wire reports


Pace quickens


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers guard George Hill defends Orlando Magic guard Jameer Nelson in the first half of a first-
round playoff game Monday in Indianapolis. The Pacers won 93-78.


Indiana defeats

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS The chal-
lenge before the Indiana Pacers
wasn't about game plans, execu-
tion or matchups.
It was simply about toughness.
An Orlando team without its
top rebounder, injured All-Star
center Dwight Howard, domi-
nated the boards in the first half
to take a two-point lead. The
heavily favored Pacers stewed in
their locker room as they faced
the possibility of taking a two-
game deficit to Orlando for
Game 3 on Wednesday
"No one liked the way we
were playing," Indiana forward
Tyler Hansbrough said. "I didn't
think we were playing with en-
ergy or aggressive enough."
The Pacers responded, assert-
ing complete control inside dur-
ing the second half of a 93-78 win
in Game 2 of the Eastern Confer-
ence first-round playoff series.
Indiana grabbed 12 of the first 13
rebounds in the third quarter
and outrebounded Orlando 26-


Orlando 93-78, evens series at 1-1


The Indiana Pacers' George Hill (3) receives congratulations from
Paul George after Hill hit a 3-point shot in the second half.

13 in the second half. most resolve, the team just play-
"That's what it's exactly ing with the most attitude to try
about," Indiana forward Danny to get the win. It was just some-
Granger said. "This time of year, thing everybody knew."
games are a lot harder. Every- The Magic had no choice but
body's playing twice as hard. You
have to be the team with the See Page B5


LHS senior to play at Webber


Greenlee signs

up for football

with Warriors
C.J. RISK
Correspondent
LECANTO Shortly be-
fore noon Monday, things
started coming together for
Tra'Vaun Greenlee.
The Lecanto High School
senior's immediate future


began to take shape when
he signed to play football at
Webber International Uni-
versity in Babson Park,
southwest of Orlando and
east of Tampa.
While the opportunity to
play for the Warriors is at-
tractive enough, it's only the
means to an end for the 6-
foot, 196-pound running back
"I liked this school aca-
demics-wise," Greenlee
said when asked why he
chose Webber.
"I wanted to play football


also. I get to take it to the next
level," he said during Mon-
day's official signing process
in Lecanto's main offices.
"I'll continue playing football
and I'll go to college."


Webb
college
Greenle
"Thei
said, "b
and its
1 teacher
can stay


Goodbye


to 2011-12


season
Closing out the season with a
bang is what the Citrus Area
Doubles League did last
Thursday
The CADL had its most compet-
itive season in a long time. After 21
matches each, only seven points
separated
the teams
from first
and fifth
place in the
standings. At "-
the end of
season.
luncheon
Thursday,1
the CADL
will crown Eric
the Bicen- van den Hoogen
t e n n i a l ON COURT
Babes as the
champions
of the 2011-12 season. It is their
second consecutive title.
The Bicentennial Babes won
the league with 112 points. The
runner-up Pine Ridge Fillies had
110; Skyview Advantage, 109; Sug-
armill Woods Oakies, 106; Skyview,
105; Pine Ridge Mavericks, 86;
Skyview Aces, 72; and the Tennis
Bratz, 70.
The winning team was cap-
tained by Sherri Stitzel with co-
captain Susan Garrick. Players
included Candace Charles, Diane
Elmhirst, Valerie Elvin, Kim
Knudsen, Anna Paoli, Gerlinda
Valente, Sally deMontfort, Beth
Ensing, Robyn Hollins, Sharon
McKethan, Heidi Miller The team
was helped by substitutes Jamie
Elmhirst, Micki Brown, Lynn Fin-
man, Dixie Long, Cherryll Mesker,
Carol Buzzo, Vicki Lavoie, Lana
Shale and Noreen Vicente.
Now the 2011-12 local league
season is over Hope you all have a
great summer.
Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
Final standings:
Brooksville Kick Butt, 62;
Pine Ridge, 58;
Brooksville Aces, 49;
Bicentennial Babes, 32.
This league is geared toward the 3.5
and 4.0 female players who cannot
play during the day and don't mind
traveling for tennis matches.
For more information, contact Vivien
Amabile at tonykgbird@aol.com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Team Tennis
Final standings:
Riverhaven Reds, 50;
Pine Ridge Palominos, 41;
Bicentennial Breakers, 37;
Crystal River Chip and Charge, 27.
See Page B4


9


er wasn't the only
interested in
eo. ALAINA MOODY/Special to the Chronicle
re were others," he Lecanto High School senior Tra'Vaun Greenlee, seated, signs
)ut I liked Webber his letter of intent to play football at Webber International
small campus (32-to- University on Monday. On hand for the signing is his aunt,
er-to-student ratio). I Patricia Gray-Jackson, left; mother, Teel Greenlee; standing
y focused." from left, Lecanto High School Activities Director Ron Allan,
Lecanto High School football coach McKinley Rolle and
See Page B4 Lecanto High School Principal Kelly Tyler.


Johnson's RBI single in 12th

gives Rays comeback victory






B2 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012

CITRUS COUNTY
SPEEDWAY

April 28 race results
Super Late Models
No. Driver's name Hometown
28 TJ Duke S.W. Ranches
4 Randy Anderson Wildwood
98 Herb Neumann Jr. Inverness
09 Scott Grossenbacher San Antonio
22 David King Alturas
1 Dale Sanders Lecanto
23 Todd Brown Lake Panasoffkee
123 Mike Smith Auburndale
82 Drew Brannon Tampa
47 Keith Zavrel Brooksville
177 Ray Hester Lakeland
88 Kenny Kuhn Dunnellon
122 Herb Hoefler Floral City
27 Cody Lane Port Richey
77 Brannen Hester Lakeland
9 Kurt Jet Orange Park
44 Tony Altiere Inverness
94 William Fuller Lecanto
5 Don Paul Crystal River
Pure Stocks
No. Driver's name Hometown
123 Eugene Malverty Spring Hill
65 Happy Florian Lecanto
83 William Stansbury Inverness
9 Tyler Stickler Pinellas Park
17 Nicholas Malverty Spring Hill
76 Michael Martin Citrus Springs
183 Megan Spicer New Port Richey
20 Chris Ickes Brooksville
10 Kenny May Spring Hill
44 Glen Colyer Homosassa
39 Carl Peters Winter Garden
46 Duane Baker Homosassa
6 Eddie Hudak Lecanto
7 Arden Franklin Hernando
45 James Johnston Brooksville
60 Jerry Hoover Floral City
Street Stocks
No. Driver's name Hometown
3 Curtis Flanagan Inverness
98 Bubba Martone Floral City
61 John Chance Inverness
63 Tim Alexander Inverness
5 James Peters Winter Garden
48 Dora Thorne Floral City
10 Kenny May Spring Hill
73 David Kingsbury Brooksville
121 Joey Bifaro Inverness
52 Tommy Stokes Floral City
25 Ray Lyon Brooksville
92 Robert Kuhn Jr. Dunnellon
88 Craig Cuzzone Lakeland
68 Austin Hughes Hernando
Modified Mini Stocks
No. Driver's name Hometown
98 James Ellis Brooksville
7 Clint Foley Dunnellon
06 Ray Miller Tampa
69 Shaun Cater Hernando
09 Jessica Robbins Plant City
24 Phil Edwards Crystal River
29 Chris Snow Inverness
47 Richard Kuhn Ocala
Figure 8s
No. Driver's name Hometown
82 Jimmy Kruse Ocala
58 Eric Sharrone Floral City
85 Thomas Peet Floral City
83 William Stansbury Inverness
5 Pnut Higginbotham Brooksville
6 Ronnie Schrefiels Inverness
1 Larry Triana New Port Richey
81 Gator Jones Inverness
13 Neil Herne Homosassa
09 Benny Harris Spring Hill
44 Glen Colyer Homosassa
03 Charles Herne Homosassa
Hornet Division
No. Driver's name Hometown
55 DarylVeltman Crystal River
9 Scott Bumgarner North Carolina
32 Chris Hennessy Beverly Hills
60 No Name


RACING


Two wins in a row


Special to the Chronicle
LEFT: TJ Duke (28) races hard on the outside with leader and former track champion Herb Hoefler (2) early in
the Super Late Model feature. Duke took the victory. RIGHT: Curtis Flanagan (3) and Bubba Martone (98)
moved by John Chance (61) on their way to the front in the street stock feature. Flanagan won.

Duke claims victory in Super Late Models once again


Special to the Chronicle

Nineteen Super Late Models in-
vaded Citrus County Speedway on
Saturday, with some of the state's
best young guns eyeing the checkers.
TJ Duke (28) returned to try to
prove his first victory two weeks
ago was no fluke, but veteran com-
petitors had other ideas.
Duke benefited from the six-row
inversion, which put him at the
pole next to former Super Late
Model track champion Herb Hoe-
fler (122).
At the drop of the green, Hoefler
powered to the lead and Duke set-
tled into second followed by David
King (22) in third. Hoefler
stretched his lead, but a Lap 4 cau-
tion bunched the field.
Hoefler again led the field to the
restart, but his machine didn't
have the speed of the early laps.
Duke passed for the lead at Lap
12. Hoefler drifted to the rear with
what was determined to be a loose
right front wheel after the event
Following Duke were King,
Randy Anderson (4), Herb Neu-
mann Jr (98), and Scott Grossen-
bacher (09). King pressured Duke,
but on Lap 28 King lost his spot to
Anderson, who brought Neumann
Jr and Grossenbacher by with
him.
A Lap 30 caution gave the front
of the field one last shot at Duke.
Duke ran away on the restart and
took his second victory in a row.
Anderson finished second.
Neumann survived a late-race
battle with a hard-charging Scott
Grossenbacher to take third at the
stripe.
Drew Brannon (82) and Kurt Jett
(9) were heat-race winners.
Street Stocks
Fourteen Street Stocks looked
to knock Curtis Flanagan (3) off
the mountain in the 20-lap feature.
Flanagan has won every feature
this season except one and he


suffered a mechanical failure in
that event
David Kingsbury (73) and
Robert Kuhn Jr (92) occupied the
front row for the green flag. Kings-
bury jumped out the early lead
with fifth-place starter John
Chance (61) settling into second.
Flanagan caught the leaders by
Lap 6 from his ninth-starting posi-
tion and moved by Chance for sec-
ond, bringing Bubba Martone (98)
with him. Flanagan then passed
Kingsbury on the inside for the
lead on Lap 8. Martone and
Chance followed for second and
third, respectively Flanagan won
his fifth feature win. Martone fin-
ished second and Chance third.
Chance and Tim Alexander (63)
were heat-race winners.
Pure Stocks
Sixteen Pure Stocks spent the
night chasing Eugene Malverty
(123), with little success.
Malverty moved to the lead
early in the event from his third-
place starting position. He re-
turned to lead three times after
three separate restarts.
After the third and final restart,
Malverty scooted away, leaving the
rest of the field to fight for second
and third. At the stripe, Malverty
took the victory, followed by
Happy Florian (65) in second, and
a William Stansbury (83) in third.
Peters and Arden Franklin (7)
were your heat race winners.
Modified Mini Stocks
Eight Modified Mini Stocks
came to the green led by Shaun
Cater (69) and Chris Snow (29).
Cater jumped out to the early lead,
but fifth-starter James Ellis (98)
moved to the top of the running
order
Cater connected with Clint
Foley (7) to bring out the caution.
Foley took the blame and went to
the rear Cater was back to second.
Ellis drove away from the field


during the final 16 laps to take his
first feature win. Foley rallied for
second followed by Ray Miller (06)
in third. Foley was the heat-race
winner
Figure 8s
Twelve Street Stock Figure 8
drivers all tested Lady Luck with
40 trips through the dreaded in-
tersection of the track.
Gator Jones (81) jumped out the
early lead from the front-row start-
ing position. On Lap 4, he slowed
for congestion in the intersection,
allowing second-place runner
Jimmy Kruse (82) to move by for
the top spot.
Deep in the field, Thomas Peet
(85) weaved his way to the bumper
of the leader with only two laps
left. Peet attempted to pass on the
outside on the last lap, but Kruse
held the line. Kruse won and Eric
Sharrone (58) edged out Peet on
the inside at the line for second.
Peet was third.
Hornets
The Hornet Division saw a first-
time winner in the 15-lap feature.
Young Daryl Veltman (55) faced
fierce competition for the entire
15-lap race from Scott Bumgarner
(9). Bumgarner tried every possi-
ble line around Veltman, but the
young man proved he was up to
the challenge. Bumgarner settled
for second ahead of third-place
Chris Hennessey (32).
Upcoming races
This Saturday night will be
"Open Wheel Madness" at Citrus
County Speedway Saturday night
will be the first visit in nearly two
years from the TBARA winged
outlaw sprint cars! Winged sprint
cars can lap the speedway in less
than 12 seconds, compared to 13.5
seconds in a Super Late Model.
Joining the Sprints will be the
Open Wheel Modifieds, Sports-
man, Pure Stocks, Mini Stocks,
Hornets and the Dwarf cars.


I N I


Who has Kentucky Derby favorite?


Union Rags or

Bodemeister

poised to win

Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Michael Matz is back at the
Kentucky Derby with a
strong contender for the
first time since he won in
2006 with Barbaro, whose
bronze likeness now greets
all visitors to Churchill
Downs.
Bob Baffert is a regular at
the Derby, a three-time win-
ner who's been looking for
No. 4 since 2002. Only this
year, he returns a changed
man. A heart attack has a
way of doing that.
Either trainer could have
the favorite for Saturday's
big race.
Matz trains Union Rags,
who has never finished
worse than third, while Baf-
fert's top horse among his
two runners is Bodemeister,
named after his 7-year-old
son Bode.
Wrenching as it may be to
recall Barbaro's tragic end
- he broke down in the
Preakness and, despite a
valiant fight, was eutha-
nized nine months later -
Matz doesn't try to temper
his delight to be back in the
Run for the Roses.
"It's a great feeling to be
here after six years, espe-
cially with a horse that has a
good chance," Matz said.
"This doesn't happen too
many times and I was lucky
enough once. It's hard to be-
lieve you can get luckytwice."
Baffert knows you can.
His lifestyle of eating fried
food and lots of meat, com-
bined with already high cho-


Associated Press
Trainer Bob Baffert gives Kentucky Derby hopeful Liaison a pat on the head after a bath
Sunday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. The Kentucky Derby is scheduled for Saturday.


lesterol, caught up with him
last month in Dubai, where
he had gone to watch his
horse, Game On Dude, run
in the $10 million Dubai
World Cup. He fell ill and
was rushed to a hospital,
where surgeons inserted
three stents in two arteries.
"It was a pretty big scare
for him," said Bernie Schi-
appa, who co-owns Game
On Dude. "He thought he
was going to check out"
"I wouldn't listen," Baffert
said, understating he's "a
little hard-headed."
When his family isn't
around, Baffert has Schiappa
to keep him on the straight
and narrow. In Louisville, the
duo has been hitting the hotel
gym at 5:30 a.m. to exercise.
Baffert does 30 minutes on


the elliptical trainer followed
by light weights.
"I'm training him, he's
training the horses," Schi-
appa said.
Bodemeister's owner,
Ahmed Zayat, greeted Baf-
fert with a big hug outside
his barn Monday The biggest
change Zayat sees in Baffert
is a new contentment
"He doesn't have to get
everything done perfect,"
Zayat said. "His demeanor is
telling me that 'I'm happy to
have a second chance and
now I'm going to try to enjoy it
and try not to stress myself."'
That includes watching
his horses during races. In-
stead of getting fired up,
waving his arms and shout-
ing, Baffert sticks to a more
subdued, "Come on, boy"


NTRA 3-year-old
thoroughbred poll
NEWYORK -The 2012 Three Year-Old
Thoroughred Poll, conducted by the Na-
tional Thoroughbred Racing Association
NTRA, covering racing performances
through April 29. Rankings based on the
votes of sports and thoroughbred racing
media representatives on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-
3-2-1 basis with first place votes in paren-
theses, record, total points and previous
rank Sex: C-colt, G-gelding, H-horse, F-filly,
M-mare):
SSt 1 2 3 PtsPvs
1. Union Rags (16) C 2 1 0 1 361 1
2. Bodemeister (15) C 4 2 2 0337 2
3. Gemologist (6) C 2 2 0 0 311 3
4. Creative Cause (1) C 3 1 1 1 262 5
5. I'll Have Another (4)C 2 2 0 0249 4
6. Dullahan C 2 1 1 0200 6
7. Hansen C 3 1 2 0143 7
8. Alpha C 3 2 1 0124 9
9. Take Charge Indy C 2 1 1 0123 8
10. Daddy Nose Best C 2 2 0 0 61 10
Other horses receiving votes:Went The Day
Well (53), El Padrino (33), Daddy Long Legs
(13), Secret Circle (11), On Fire Baby (10).


Mark Valeski still


on fence about race


Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky -
Trainer Larry Jones is still
debating whether to run
Mark Valeski in the Ken-
tucky Derby on Saturday
Even a solid workout by
the colt on Monday didn't
settle things. Named for a
longtime friend of owner-
breeder and former Ken-
tucky governor Brereton
C. Jones, Mark Valeski
went five furlongs in
1:00.20, equaling the
fastest of 28 drills at that
distance at Churchill
Downs.
Jones is playing it cau-
tiously, waiting to see how
the colt responds over the
next two mornings.
"I'm not going to guaran-
tee that we're in or out,"
he said. "Tomorrow will
tell me more, and we'll
know really on Wednesday
morning when I get on
him. Especially if he tries
to buck me off, then he's in
the (starting) gate."
Mark Valeski was run-
ner-up in his last two
races; missing by a nose in
the Risen Star Stakes, and
by a half-length in the
Louisiana Derby
Trainer D. Wayne Lukas,
a four-time Derby winner,
is closely monitoring the
Mark Valeski develop-
ments. He trains Opti-
mizer, who remains on the
Derby bubble.
The top 20 entrants
based on graded stakes
earnings are guaranteed
spots in the race. Opti-
mizer is 21st on the list. A
defection would put Opti-
mizer, a modest 1 for 9 in
his career, and Lukas in


the Derby.
"I'd really like to see
him get a chance to run,"
said Lukas, a four-time
Derby winner. "One thing
about him, he's a true
mile-and-a-quarter horse."
Two for Asmussen
Sabercat and Daddy Nose
Best, the two Derby con-
tenders for trainer Steve As-
mussen, hit the track Monday
for their final workouts.
Sabercat, third in the
Arkansas Derby in his last
race, went a half-mile in 48.40
seconds. Daddy Nose Best,
the Sunland Park Derby win-
ner, was clocked in 49.40 for
the same distance.
Asmussen said Sabercat
would have to step up his
game.
"He needs to be a little
faster," he said. "I like his ex-
perience, but I think he's a
horse that's going to have to
run faster than he has to this
point."
As for Daddy Nose Best,
Asmussen hopes to maintain
the colt right where he is.
"He's put in some good
works over the racetrack and
we just want to keep that
rhythm with him and keep him
happy," he said.
Asmussen is winless with
10 previous Derby starters.
Nehro (second last year) and
Curlin (third in 2007) were his
only runners to finish in the
money.
Asmussen, who won his
6,000th race in November,
trained three consecutive
Horse of the Year champions
in Curlin, a two-time honoree,
and the filly Rachel
Alexandra.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

TOP TEN POINTS
Super Late Models
No. Driver's name YTD points
4 Randy Anderson 405
1 Dale Sanders 396
23 Todd Brown 396
09 Scott Grossenbacher 394
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 388
82 Drew Brannon 377
47 Keith Zavrel 372
177 Ray Hester 318
28 TJ Duke 304
94 William Fuller 279
Open Wheeled Modifieds
No. Driver's name YTD points
19 Tommy Schnader 401
0 Troy Robinson 392
53 Doug Miller 389
4 Jarrett Snowden 361
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 306
25 L. J. Grimm 303
198 Wayne Morris 281
6 Billy Bechtelheimer 275
98 Robbie Cooper 273
20 Scott Millar 257
Modified Mini Stocks
No. Driver's name YTD points
7 Clint Foley 548
47 Richard Kuhn 482
69 Mark Powers 414
24 Phil Edwards 407
09 Jessica Robbins 386
29 Chris Snow 281
06 Ray Miller 203
07 Jody Robbins 198
98 James Ellis 109
33 Chris Allen 107
Sportsman
No. Driver's name YTD points
66 Andy Nicholls 397
51 Christopher Harvey 379
4 Jay Witfoth 370
90 Cody Johnson 356
83 Dennis Neighbor Sr. 339
56 Brandon Morris 316
99 Cody Stickler 295
55 Ernie Reed 293
17 Mike Bell 283
121 Devin McLeod 265
Street Stocks
No. Driver's name YTD points
3 Curtis Flanagan 632
98 Bubba Martone 610
5 James Peters 588
48 Dora Thorne 582
73 David Kingsbury 560
68 Austin Hughes 533
10 Kenny May 506
88 Craig Cuzzone 485
121 Joey Bifaro 400
61 John Chance 291
Pure Stocks
No. Driver's name YTD points
17 Nicholas Malverty 623
65 Happy Florian 607
123 Eugene Malverty 605
20 Chris Ickes 542
9 Tyler Stickler 469
96 Dustin Dinkins 459
46 Duane Baker 451
39 Carl Peters 402
83 William Stansbury 375
45 James Johnston 363
Mini Stocks
No. Driver's name YTD points
32 Jeremy Sharrone 759
46 Shannon Kennedy 705
11 Jerry Daniels 646
50 Jessey Mallory 604
24 Tim Scalise 585
71 Wayne Heater 548
43 Shawn Jenkins 520
29 Chris Snow 493
60 Carson Taylor 428
98 Kevin Stone 407
Pro Figure-8s
No. Driver's name YTD points
28 Benny Harris 100
3 Cliff Rousseau 98
01 Mason Love 96
6 Joey Catarelli 94
83 Charles Herne 92
4 Wayne Whitehead 90
86 Justin Meyer 88
7 Neil Herne 86
88 William Stansbury 84
14 Wayne Calkins 82






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Yankees 2, Orioles 1


Baltimore


NewYork


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Reimld If 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0
Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Grndrscf 3 0 0 0
EnChvz pr 0 0 0 0 ARdrgz dh 3 0 0 0
Markksrf 4 01 0 Cano2b 3 0 1 0
AdJonscf 2 1 1 0 Teixeir lb 3 1 2 0
Wieters c 2 0 1 0 Ibanez rf 3 0 0 0
C.Davislb 2 00 1 AnJonsrf 0 0 0 0
Betemt 3b 3 0 1 0 ErChvz 3b 3 1 1 2
MrRynldh 3 0 0 0 Martin c 3 0 0 0
Andino 2b 3 00 0 ENunez If 3 0 0 0
Totals 27 15 1 Totals 282 5 2
Baltimore 010 000 000 1
NewYork 020 000 00x 2
DP-Baltimore 1, New York 2. LOB-Baltimore
2, New York 4. HR-Er.Chavez (3). CS-
Ad.Jones (3). SF-C.Davis.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
HammelL,3-1 6 5 2 2 2 5
Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 0
New York
KurodaW,2-3 7 4 1 1 1 3
Robertson H,4 1 0 0 0 0 3
M.Rivera S,5-6 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Kuroda (Wieters). WP-Kuroda.
T-2:22. A-36,890 (50,291).

Red Sox 11, Athletics 6


Oakland Boston
ab r h bi
JWeeks 2b 3 1 0 0 Aviles ss
Crisp If 5 1 2 2 Pedroia 2b
Reddckrf 4 1 2 3 AdGnzlib
Cespds cf 5 0 1 0 C.Ross rf
S.Smith dh 4 0 0 0 LAndrs If
KSuzukc 2 1 1 0 Sweeny rf
Reckerph-c3 1 2 0 Ortizdh
Barton lb 3 0 0 0 Shppchc
Inge3b 3 0 1 0 DMcDn If-rf
Pnngtnss 3 1 2 0 Byrdcf
Punto 3b
Totals 35 6115 Totals


ab r h bi
5 22 4
5 02 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
3 32 2
3 00 0
-If 4 3 3 2
4 22 2
3 1 0 0
361111


Oakland 010 000 500 6
Boston 042 050 00x 11
E-J.Weeks 2 (4), Punto (1). DP-Oakland 1,
Boston 3. LOB-Oakland 10, Boston 5. 2B-
Recker (1), Pedroia (6), D.McDonald (4), Byrd
(1). HR-Reddick (4), Aviles (5), Ortiz 2 (6),
D.McDonald (2). SB-Pedroia (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Milone L,3-2 42-38 8 7 1 5
Norberto 1-3 2 3 3 1 0
Fuentes 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.Miller 2 1 0 0 2 1
Boston
BuchholzW,3-1 62-37 6 6 5 5
Tazawa 0 1 0 0 0 0
PadillaH,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Atchison 1-3 2 0 0 1 1
FMoralesH,6 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Aceves 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tazawa pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Buchholz (Pennington), by Tazawa
(S.Smith).
T-3:23. A-37,359 (37,495).

Rangers 4, Blue Jays 1
Texas Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler 2b 3 1 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0
Andrus ss 5 02 1 KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0
MYong 3b 4 0 1 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0
Beltredh 5 1 3 0 Lindlb 3 0 0 0
BSnydr pr-dh0 0 0 0 Encrncdh 3 1 2 1
DvMrp If 4 0 0 0 Thams If 4 0 1 0
N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 1 Lawrie 3b 2 0 0 0
Napolic 4 0 0 0 Rasms cf 3 0 1 0
Morlndlb 3 1 1 1 Arenciic 3 0 0 0
Gentry cf 4 1 1 1
Totals 36 4104 Totals 30 1 4 1
Texas 011 000 200 4
Toronto 000 100 000 1
E-K.Johnson (3). DP-Texas 1, Toronto 1.
LOB-Texas 10, Toronto 5. 2B-Andrus (4),
Beltre 2 (6), N.Cruz (6). HR-Moreland (3),
Gentry (1), Encarnacion (8). CS-Kinsler (3).
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
Darvish W,4-0
Adams H,6
Nathan S,6-7
Toronto
Drabek L,2-2
E.Crawford
Frasor
L.Perez


7 4 1 1 2 9
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1


E.Crawford pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Darvish (Encarnacion), by L.Perez
(Moreland).
T-2:59. A-21,945 (49,260).


Rays 3, Mariners 2,
12 innings,
Seattle Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Figgins If 6 0 0 0 Zobrist2b 3 1 0 0
Ackley2b 5 01 0 C.Penalb 5 0 3 0
ISuzuki rf 6 0 3 0 Longori 3b 2 0 1 0
Smoaklb 5 02 0 EJhnsn3b 3 0 1 1
JMontr dh-c 5 1 1 1 Scottdh 5 01 0
Seager3b 4 0 1 0 Kppngrpr-dh 0 1 0 0
Kawskpr-ss1 00 0 Joyce rf 5 0 0 0
Olivoc 4 1 2 1 Allen If 3 1 0 0
Wlhlmsp 0 00 0 Gimenzc 1 00 0
C.Wells ph 1 0 0 0 BUpton cf 5 0 3 1
League p 0 00 0 SRdrgz ss 5 0 1 1
MSndrs cf 5 0 1 0 JMolin c 3 0 0 0
Ryan ss 3 0 0 0 DJnngs If 2 0 0 0
Jaso ph 1 00 0
Liddi 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 47 2112 Totals 42310 3
Seattle 010 000 000 010 2
TampaBay010 000 000 011 3
One out when winning run scored.
DP-Seattle 2. LOB-Seattle 10, Tampa Bay
11.2B-C.Pena (5), Scott (6), B.Upton (2).
HR-J.Montero (4), Olivo (3). SB-S.Ro-
driguez (2). CS-Longoria (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHernandez 8 5 1 1 4 9
Wilhelmsen 2 1 0 0 1 1
League L,0-2 BS,2-9 11-34 2 2 1 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson 7 6 1 1 0 7
McGee 1 1 0 0 0 1
Rodney 1 2 0 0 0 1
W.Davis 2 2 1 1 0 3
HowellWl-0 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP-Wilhelmsen.
T-3:41. A-9,458 (34,078).


TODAY'S LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Ortiz, Boston, .405; Hamilton,
Texas, .395; Jeter, New York, .389; Konerko,
Chicago, .383; Sweeney Boston, .373; Willing-
ham, Minnesota, .353; Span, Minnesota, .337.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 24; Hamilton, Texas,
20; Aviles, Boston, 18; Granderson, New York,
18; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 18; AdJones, Balti-
more, 18; De Aza, Chicago, 17; Ortiz, Boston, 17.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 25; Swisher, New
York, 23; Encarnacion, Toronto, 21; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 20; Ortiz, Boston, 20; Cespedes, Oak-
land, 19; Longoria, Tampa Bay 19.
HITS-Jeter, New York, 37; Hamilton, Texas,
34; Ortiz, Boston, 34; Konerko, Chicago, 31; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 30; ISuzuki, Seattle, 30; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 29; Span, Minnesota, 29;
MYoung, Texas, 29.
DOUBLES-Sweeney Boston, 11; Konerko,
Chicago, 9; Ortiz, Boston, 9; Swisher, NewYork,
9; Cano, New York, 8; Encarnacion, Toronto, 8.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Tampa Bay 15
Baltimore 14
NewYork 13
Toronto 12
Boston 11




W
Washington 14
Atlanta 14
New York 13
Philly 11
Miami 8


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .652 8-2
9 .609 1 6-4
9 .591 1Y2 Y2 7-3
11 .522 3 2 5-5
11 .500 3Y2 2Y2 7-3



East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .636 5-5
9 .609 Y2 6-4
10 .565 1Y2 1 6-4
12 .478 3Y2 3 5-5
14 .364 6 5Y2 2-8


Str Home
W-2 9-1
L-1 8-4
W-2 7-4
L-1 6-7
W-1 4-5


Away
6-7 Cleveland
6-5 Chicago
6-5 Detroit
6-4 Kan. City
7-6 Minnesota


Str Home
W-1 4-7
W-1 4-7
L-1 6-7
L-1 0-10
W-1 3-8


Texas
Oakland
Seattle
L. Angeles


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
L-4 8-2 6-6
L-1 7-3 7-6
L-1 8-5 5-5
W-1 5-5 6-7
L-2 6-5 2-9


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Houston
Chicago


Str Home Away
L-1 6-3 8-5
W-2 7-5 4-6
W-1 6-6 4-6
W-1 5-4 5-8
W-1 5-5 4-9
L-1 5-8 3-7


L. Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .550 6-4
11 .500 1 2Y2 5-5
11 .500 1 2Y2 2-8
15 .286 5Y2 7 3-7
15 .286 5Y2 7 3-7


Str Home
W-1 8-5
L-3 6-7
L-3 3-6
L-1 4-6


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
6 .739 6-4
13 .458 6Y2 3Y2 4-6
13 .458 6Y2 3Y2 4-6
15 .318 9Y2 6Y2 3-7




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
6 .727 7-3
10 .545 4 112 6-4
11 .522 4Y2 2 5-5
11 .476 5Y2 3 5-5
16 .304 9Y2 7 4-6


Swinging for the cheap seats


Associated Press
The Philadelphia Phillies' Placido Polanco follows through on a two-run double off Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Rafael
Dolis in the eighth inning Monday in Philadelphia. The Phillies won 6-4.




Polanco's double equals win


Phillies beat Cubs;


Yankees victorious


over Orioles

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Placido
Polanco hit a tiebreaking, two-run
double in the eighth inning to lift the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 6-4 victory
over the Chicago Cubs on Monday
night.
Bryan LaHair hit a tying, two-run
homer off Chad Qualls (1-0) in the
eighth after Vance Worley threw
seven impressive innings for
Philadelphia.
But the Phillies answered in the
bottom half. Scott Maine (0-1) hit
pinch-hitter Juan Pierre with a one-
out pitch and Jimmy Rollins singled
off Rafael Dolis with two outs.
Polanco, who had just two RBIs in
his first 71 at-bats, drove in two with
a hard liner to the wall in left.
Jonathan Papelbon pitched the
ninth for his eighth save in as many
tries.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Diamondbacks 9, Marlins 5
MIAMI Left-hander Patrick Corbin
pitched 5 2/3 innings to win his major-
league debut, and the Arizona Diamond-
backs beat the slumping Miami Marlins.
The 22-year-old Corbin, who was
called up from Double-A Mobile, struck
out six and allowed three runs.
One day after jumping ahead 8-0, the
Diamondbacks were up 7-0 by the fifth in-
ning. Cody Ransom and Justin Upton hit
two-run homers, and Willie Bloomquist
had a two-run double.
The home team drew boos for the sec-
ond straight day and lost for the eighth time
in nine games. Miami tapped into a 1-2-3
bases-loaded double play and committed
three errors, including one on a misplayed
bunt that led to a five-run inning.

Pirates 9, Braves 3
ATLANTA- Pedro Alvarez and Ya-
maico Navarro each hit two-run homers,
and the Pittsburgh Pirates enjoyed a
long-awaited offensive breakthrough as
they beat the Atlanta Braves.
The Pirates, last in the major leagues
with 58 runs in 22 games, almost doubled
their previous season high of five runs. Neil
Walker had three hits and drove in a run.
It took the Pirates 22 games this sea-
son to score more than five runs. That
was the longest streak since the 1972
Milwaukee Brewers went a major league-
record 31 games into the season without
surpassing five runs, according STATS
LLC. The last National League team with
a longer streak was the 1919 Boston
Braves, who went an NL-record 23
games into the season without topping
five runs.
Astros 4, Mets 3
HOUSTON Matt Downs hit a two-
run homer and Jed Lowrie had the go-
ahead single in the eighth inning to propel
the Houston Astros to a win over the New
York Mets.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
N.Y Yankees 6, Detroit 2
Cleveland 4, L.A. Angels 0
Toronto 7, Seattle 2
Baltimore 5, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 4, Boston 1
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 4
Tampa Bay 5, Texas 2
Monday's Games
N.Y Yankees 2, Baltimore 1
Kansas City at Detroit, ppd., rain
Texas 4, Toronto 1
Boston 11, Oakland 6
Tampa Bay 3, Seattle 2, 12 innings
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, late
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore (Matusz 0-3) at N.Y. Yankees (PHughes 1-3),
7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 2-1) at Detroit (Porcello 1-2), 7:05
p.m.
Texas (Feliz 1-1) at Toronto (Hutchison 1-0), 7:07 p.m.
Oakland (Parker 0-0) at Boston (Doubront 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Noesi 1 -2) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 2-1),
8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 0-3) at L.A. Angels (Williams 1-1), 10:05
p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Texas at Toronto, 12:37 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Arizona 8, Miami 4
Cincinnati 6, Houston 5
Chicago Cubs 5, Philadelphia 1
Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 3, St. Louis 2
N.Y Mets 6, Colorado 5, 11 innings
San Francisco 4, San Diego 1
L.A. Dodgers 2, Washington 0
Monday's Games
Arizona 9, Miami 5
Philadelphia 6, Chicago Cubs 4
Pittsburgh 9, Atlanta 3
Houston 4, N.Y. Mets 3
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late
Milwaukee at San Diego, late
Tuesday's Games
Arizona (Cahill 1-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-1),
7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-1) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 1-0),
7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 3-1) at Atlanta (Beachy 2-1), 7:10
p.m.
N.Y Mets (Niese 2-0) at Houston (Happ 1-1), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 1-1) at St. Louis (Wainwright 0-3), 8:15
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 2-0) at Colorado (Chacin 0-2), 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 1-1) at San Diego (Volquez 0-2),
10:05 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 2-0) at San Francisco (M.Cain 1-1), 10:15
p.m.
Wednesday's Games
N.Y Mets at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Diego, 6:35 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

The game was tied 3-all when Jordan
Schafer reached on an infield single to
start the eighth. He stole second with one
out and scored on the hit by Lowrie,
which reliever MannyAcosta (0-2) de-
flected into the outfield.
Schafer finished with two hits and
scored two runs. Downs' homer came in
Houston's three-run sixth.
The Mets tied it by scoring three times
in the seventh, including a two-run single
by rookie Kirk Nieuwenhuis.
Fernando Rodriguez (1-3) got the last
out of the eighth and Brett Myers pitched
a perfect ninth for his fifth save.


AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 2, Orioles 1
NEW YORK Hiroki Kuroda pitched
seven neat innings and teamed with
catcher Russell Martin to nab Nick
Markakis at the plate in the key play of
the game, lifting the New York Yankees
over the Baltimore Orioles.
Eric Chavez hit an early two-run
homer as the Yankees beat Baltimore
once again. They are 4-0 against the
Orioles this year, 43-15 over the O's
since 2009 and have not lost any of the
last 14 season series to them.
The loss denied Buck Showalter his
1,000th win as a big-league manager -
his first victory came in 1992 next door
at the old Yankee Stadium. Baltimore
lost for the second time in eight games.

Red Sox 11, Athletics 6
BOSTON David Ortiz finished the
best April of his career with a pair of
solo homers, Mike Aviles hit a three-run
shot and the Boston Red Sox beat the
Oakland Athletics.
Darnell McDonald had a two-run
homer and Marion Byrd drove in a pair
of runs to support a decent start by Clay
Buchholz, who held Oakland to one run
until he gave up five in his last inning.
Ortiz hit .405 in April with six homers
and 20 RBIs. He hit .543 in Fenway
Park (19 for 35).
It was Boston's seventh win in eight
games, coming off a 6-1 road trip.
Former Red Sox outfielder Josh Red-
dick hit a three-run homer for Oakland,
which dropped its third straight.

Rangers 4, Blue Jays 1
TORONTO Yu Darvish won his
third straight start, Mitch Moreland and
Craig Gentry homered and the Texas
Rangers beat the Toronto Blue Jays.
Darvish (4-0) allowed his first home
run but remained unbeaten in five
major-league starts. He gave up one run
and four hits in seven innings, walked
two and struck out nine.
In winning his past three starts,
Darvish has allowed just two earned
runs over 21 2-3 innings against Detroit,
the New York Yankees and Toronto. His
season ERA is 2.18.
Mike Adams worked the eighth and
Joe Nathan finished for his sixth save in
seven chances.
AL West-leading Texas won for the
17th time in April, matching the 1989
team for the second-most victories in
the season's opening month. The
Rangers won a record 18 April games in
1998.

Royals-Tigers game postponed
DETROIT The scheduled game be-
tween the Kansas City Royals and Detroit
Tigers was postponed because of rain.
It will be made up Sept. 24 at 7:05
p.m., which had been a mutual off day for
both teams just before facing each other
the following day in Detroit.
Play never started Monday night and
the game was called after a delay of
about 40 minutes.


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 B3



NL

Phillies 6, Cubs 4


Chicago


ab r h bi


Philadelphia
a


ab rh bi


Str Home Away
W-310-2 6-4
W-2 6-3 6-7
W-2 6-7 6-4
L-2 6-6 4-5
L-2 5-9 2-7


Tabata rf
JHrrsn ss
McCtch cf
McGeh lb
Walker 2b
Navarr If
PAIvrz 3b
Barajs c
JMcDnI p
Resop p


4 2 1 0
4 0 1 1
4 1 1 0
5 1 3 1
4 22 3
4 1 1 2

3 00 0
0 00 0


Totals 35 9118
Pittsburgh 002
Atlanta 200


Bourn cf
Prado If
Fremn lb
McCnn c
Uggla 2b
C.Jones 3b
Hinske rf
Pstrnck ss
Minor p
Durbin p
JFrncs ph
LHrndz p
Diaz ph
Totals
202 300
100 000


E-Resop (1). DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Pittsburgh
5, Atlanta 7. 2B-Tabata (3), McGehee (3),
Uggla (4), Hinske (1), Pastornicky (3). HR-
Navarro (1), PAlvarez (5), Freeman (4). SB-
Walker (1). CS-Bourn (4). S-J.Harrison.
SF-McCutchen.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonaldW,1-1 72-37 3 3 2 10
Resop 11-31 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
MinorL,2-2 61-38 7 7 3 9
Durbin 2-3 2 2 2 1 0
L.Hernandez 2 1 0 0 0 3
PB-McCann.
T-2:49. A-17,181 (49,586).


Astros 4, Mets 3


NewYork
ab r h bi
Niwnhslf 4 0 2 2
Tejada ss 3 0 0 0
DnMrp 2b 4 0 0 0
DWrght3b 4 1 1 0
I.Davislb 4 1 2 0
Baxterrf 3 0 1 0
Hairstnph-rfi 0 0 0


Torres cf
Thole c
Dickey p
Duda ph
Acosta p
Byrdak p
Parnell p
Vldspn ph


4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
2 0000
0 00 0
0 00 0
1000
1 0 0 0


Totals 34 38 3
NewYork 000
Houston 000


Houston

Schafer cf
Altuve 2b
Lowrie ss
T.Buck If
JDMrtn ph-I1
MDwns lb
Bogsvc rf
CJhnsn 3b
JCastro c
Norris p
WLopez p
Maxwll ph
Wrght p
Lyon p
Abad p
FRdrgz p
Myers p
Totals
000 300
003 01x


ab rh bi
4220
3 00 0
4 0 2 1
2 1 0 1


3 00 0


E-Thole (4), Dan.Murphy (5). LOB-NewYork
6, Houston 4. HR-M.Downs (2). SB-Schafer
(8). CS-Bogusevic (2). S-Altuve.
IP H RERBBSO


NewYork
Dickey
Acosta L,0-2
Byrdak
Parnell
Houston
Norris
W.Lopez
W.Wright
Lyon
Abad


11-32 1 1 0 2
1-3 0 0 0 0 1
1-3 0 0 0 0 0


Fe.RodriguezW, 1-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MyersS,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 0
Abad pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Norris (Tejada).WP-Norris.

TODAY'S LEADERS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Kemp, Los Angeles, .425;
DWright, NewYork, .397; Altuve, Houston, .373;
Posey, San Francisco, .353; Bourn, Atlanta,
.337; SCastro, Chicago, .333; Freese, St. Louis,
.333; Kubel, Arizona, .333.
RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 23; Beltran, St.
Louis, 17; MElis, Los Angeles, 16; Freeman, At-
lanta, 16; CGonzalez, Colorado, 16; Hart, Mil-
waukee, 16; Headley, San Diego, 16; Uggla,
Atlanta, 16; JUpton, Arizona, 16.


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .636 5-5
11 .500 3 2Y2 7-3
12 .455 4 3Y2 4-6
12 .455 4 3Y2 5-5
14 .391 5Y2 5 4-6
15 .348 6Y2 6 5-5


DeJess rf 5 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 2 2 0
Campn cf 4 1 0 0 Polanc 3b 5 02 2
SCastross 4 1 2 1 Victorncf 5 1 1 0
LaHairlb 4 1 2 2 Pencerf 4 1 1 1
ASorinlf 4 1 1 0 Wggntnib 4 0 2 0
IStewrt3b 2 0 1 0 Nix If 2 1 0 0
DeWitt 2b 4 0 1 0 Mayrry ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Dolis p 0 0 0 0 Ruizc 3 0 1 2
Sotoc 3 0 0 0 Orr2b 3 0 2 1
Volstad p 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 00 0
Camp p 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph 0 1 0 0
Maine p 0 0 0 0 Papelnp 0 0 0 0
Barney2b 1 0 0 0 Worleyp 2 00 0
Galvis2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 48 3 Totals 34611 6
Chicago 000 000 130 4
Philadelphia 400 000 02x 6
E-Soto (4), Wigginton (3). DP-Philadelphia
1. LOB-Chicago 7, Philadelphia 9.2B-LaHair
(8), A.Soriano (2), Polanco (3). HR-LaHair (5).
SB-Campana (7). S-Volstad, Worley.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Volstad 6 8 4 4 3 4
Camp 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Maine L,0-1 1 0 1 1 0 1
Dolis 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Philadelphia
Worley 7 5 1 1 2 5
BastardoH,2 1-3 0 1 1 1 0
Qualls W,1-0 BS,1-1 2-3 3 2 2 0 0
Papelbon S,8-8 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Maine (Pierre). Balk-Volstad.
T-2:49. A-45,397 (43,651).

D-backs 9, Marlins 5
Arizona Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Blmqst ss 4 1 1 2 Reyes ss 4 02 0
RRorts 2b 3 0 0 1 Bonifac cf 5 0 1 0
J.Uptonrf 5 2 2 2 HRmrz3b 4 1 1 0
Gldschib 3 2 1 0 Kearnslf 4 1 1 2
Ransm3b 4 1 1 2 Infante 2b 4 1 1 0
GParral If 5 1 1 1 Stantonrf 4 01 0
Pollockcf 4 1 2 1 GSnchzlb 2 00 1
HBlancc 5 0 1 0 J.Buckc 4 1 1 0
Corbinp 1 1 0 0 Buehrlep 1 0 0 0
Breslwp 0 0 0 0 DMrphph 1 1 1 2
Overay ph 1 0 1 0 DJnngs p 0 00 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Morrsn ph 1 0 1 0
Putz p 0 00 0 Webb p 0 00 0
Dobbs ph 1 00 0
Bell p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 9109 Totals 35510 5
Arizona 020 500 002 9
Miami 000 021 200 5
E-Ransom (2), Kearns (1), J.Buck (1), Webb
(1). DP-Arizona 2, Miami 1. LOB-Arizona 8,
Miami 8. 2B-Bloomquist (6), Reyes (6),
H.Ramirez (3). HR-J.Upton (2), Ransom (2),
Kearns (2), Do.Murphy (2). SB-J.Upton (3),
Goldschmidt (2). S-Corbin 2. SF-R.Roberts,
Pollock, G.Sanchez.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CorbinW,1-0 52-38 3 3 3 6
BreslowH,2 11-31 2 1 0 2
D.Hernandez H,5 1 0 0 0 0 0
Putz 1 1 0 0 0 1
Miami
BuehrleL,1-4 5 8 7 4 1 3
Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0 1 0
Webb 2 1 0 0 1 3
Bell 1 1 2 2 1 0
HBP-by Corbin (Kearns), by Bell (Ransom).
T-3:19. A-31,006 (37,442).

Pirates 9, Braves 3
Pittsburgh Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi


'I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATP World Tour
rankings
Through April 29
Singles
1. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 13020
2. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 10170
3. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 8880
4. Andy Murray, Britain, 7860
5. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 4830
6. David Ferrer, Spain, 4280
7. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 4080
8. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 2820
9. Mardy Fish, United States, 2725
10. John Isner, United States, 2620
11. Gilles Simon, France, 2525
12. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 2495
13. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 2175
14. Gael Monfils, France, 2075
15. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 2015
16. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 1795
17. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 1735
18. Richard Gasquet, France, 1595
19. Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 1595
20. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 1565
21. Florian Mayer, Germany 1435
22. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, 1425
23. Milos Raonic, Canada, 1425
24. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 1400
25. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 1340
26. Julien Benneteau, France, 1250
27. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 1250
28. Andy Roddick, United States, 1245
29. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 1185
30. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, 1175
31. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 1170
32. Robin Soderling, Sweden, 1165
33. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 1165
34. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 1155
35. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, 1147
36. Mikhail Youzhny Russia, 1140
37. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 1076
38. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 1070
39. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 1025
40. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 1020
41. Alex Bogomolov Jr., Russia, 1011
42. Albert Ramos, Spain, 1003
43. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 1001
44. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 993
45. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 982
46. Andreas Seppi, Italy 980
47. Michael Llodra, France, 965
48. Fabio Fognini, Italy 930
49. David Nalbandian, Argentina, 905
50. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 901
Doubles
1. Bob Bryan, United States, 9,430
1. Mike Bryan, United States, 9,430
3. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, 9,090
3. Daniel Nestor, Canada, 9,090
5. Michael Llodra, France, 7,720
6. Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 7,700
7. Leander Paes, India, 6,195
8. Mariusz Fyrstenberg, Poland, 4,905.
8. Marcin Matkowski, Poland, 4,905.
10. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, 4,690
Teams
1. Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek,
Czech Republic, 3,405
2. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Daniel Nestor,
Canada, 3,255
3. Bob and Mike Bryan, United States, 3,175
4. Michael Llodra, France, and Nenad Zi-
monjic, Serbia, 1,540
5. Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matkowski, Poland, 1,520
6. Michael Llodra, France, and Nenad Zi-
monjic, Serbia, 1,310
7. Mahesh Bhupathi and Rohan Bopanna,
India, 1,220
8. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez, Spain,
1,190
9. David Marrero and Fernando Verdasco,
Spain, 1,065
10. Marc Lopez and Rafael Nadal, Spain,
1,000
ATP schedule
H-hard, C-clay, G-grass
April 30-May 6 BMW Open, Munich, Ger-
many, CO
April 30-May 6 Serbia Open, Belgrade,
Serbia, CO
April 30-May 6 Estoril Open, Estoril, Por-
tugal, CO
May 6-13 Mutua Madrid Open, Madrid,
Spain, CO
May 13-20 Internazionali BNL d'lItalia,
Rome, CO
May 20-26 Power Horse World Team Cup,
Duesseldorf, Germany CO
May 20-26 Open de Nice Cote d'Azur,
Nice, France, CO
May 27-June 10 Roland Garros, Paris, CO
June 11-17 Gerry Weber Open, Halle,
Germany, GO
June 11-17-AEGON Championships, Lon-
don, GO
June 17-23 UNICEF Open, Den Bosch,
Netherlands, GO
June 17-23 AEGON International, East-
bourne, England, GO
June 25-July 8 -The Championships, Wim-
bledon, England, GO
July 9-15 MercedesCup, Stuttgart, Ger-
many, CO
July 9-15- Campbell's Hall of Fame Cham-
pionships, Newport, R.I., GO
July 9-15 SkiStar Swedish Open, Bastad,
Sweden
July 9-15 Studena Croatia Open, Umag,
Croatia, GO
July 16-22 bet-at-home Open, Hamburg,
Germany, CO
July 16-22- Atlanta Championships, Nor-
cross, Ga., HO
July 16-22 Credit Agricole Suisse Open
Gstaad, Gstaad, Switzerland, CO
July 22-28 bet-at-home Cup Kitzbuehel,
Kitzbuehel, Austria, CO
July 23-29- Farmers Classic, Los Angeles,
HO
July 28-Aug. 5 Olympic Games, London,
GO
July 30-Aug. 5 -Legg Mason Classic, Wash-
ington, HO
Aug. 6-12- Rogers Cup, Toronto, HO
Aug. 13-19 Western & Southern Open,
Mason, Ohio, HO
Aug. 19-25 Winston-Salem Open, Win-
ston-Salem, N.C., HO
Aug.27-Sept. 9 -U.S. Open, New York, HO
Sept. 14-16 Davis Cup semifinals
Sept. 17-23- Moselle Open, Metz, France,
HI
Sept. 17-23 St. Petersburg Open, St. Pe-
tersburg, Russia, HI
Sept.24-30 -PTTThailand Open, Bangkok,
HO
Sept. 24-30 Malaysian Open, Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia, HI
Oct. 1-7 -China Open, Beijing, HO
Oct. 1-7 Rakuten Japan Open Champi-
onships, Tokyo, HO
Oct. 7-14 Shanghai Rolex Masters,
Shanghai, HO
Oct.15-21 -Erste Bank Open, Vienna, HI
Oct.15-21 -If Stockholm Open, Stockholm,
HI


Oct. 15-21 Kremlin Cup, Moscow, HI
Oct. 22-28 Valencia Open, Valencia,
Spain, HI
Oct. 22-28 Swiss Indoors Basel, Basel,
Switzerland, HI
Oct. 29-Nov. 4 BNP Paribas Masters,
Paris, HI
Nov. 5-12- Barclays ATP World Tour Finals,
London, HI
Nov. 16-18 Davis Cup final
WTA rankings
Through April 29
Singles
1. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 9020
2. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 8280
3. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 7170
4. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland, 6710
5. Samantha Stosur, Australia, 5825
6. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 5330


FOr the record


==Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)
7-2-9

". PLAY 4 (early)
3-5-2-0
PLAY 4 (late)
6-0-2-1

ora Lo y FANTASY 5
13 19 24 28 36



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB
7 p.m. (SUN) Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Francisco Giants
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) Eastern Conference first round, Game 2:
Philadelphia 76ers at Chicago Bulls
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Western Conference first round, Game 2:
Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers
NHL
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Eastern Conference Semifinal,
Game 2: New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Liverpool vs.
Fulham

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


WEBBER
Continued from Page B1

Greenlee's focus in the
past year has been worth
noting, Lecanto football
coach McKinley Rolle said.
"This is huge for us," the
coach said, adding Greenlee
is the first Lecanto player to
sign with a college during
his tenure, which -granted
- is only entering its second
season. The Panthers were
3-7 in 2011.
"His grade point went
from a 2.2 to a 2.6," Rolle
said. "That's what I'm most
proud of with Tra'Vaun.
He's developed as a man."
Greenlee also developed
as an offensive force for the
Panthers. He was Lecanto's
most valuable player and
was named to the All-Citrus
County Chronicle football
team, rushing for 440 yards
and five touchdowns.
"Webber is a great fit for
him, academically and ath-
letically," Rolle said. "It's a
business school primarily, a
good school with small class
sizes. He'll be able to grow
and develop even more as a
person."
The adjustment, going



7. Marion Bartoli, France, 5020
8. Li Na, China, 4940
9. Serena Williams, United States, 4300
10.Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 3775
11. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 3380
12. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 3350
13. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 3201
14. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 3125
15. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 2785
16. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 2715
17. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, 2500
18. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 2450
19. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 2410
20. Julia Goerges, Germany, 2335
21. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 2255
22. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 2246
23. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 2230
24. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, 2155
25. Peng Shuai, China, 2050
26. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 1931
27. Sara Errani, Italy, 1840
28. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, 1820
29.YaninaWickmayer, Belgium, 1745
30. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 1740
31. Mona Barthel, Germany 1732
32. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 1730
33. Zheng Jie, China, 1720
34. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 1720
35. Nadia Petrova, Russia, 1706
36. Christina McHale, United States, 1621
37. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 1547
38. Ksenia Pervak, Kazakhstan, 1430
39. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 1387
40. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 1351
41. Kim Clijsters, Belgium, 1311
42. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 1310
43.Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 1282
44. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 1265
45. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, 1243
46. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 1240
47. Simona Halep, Romania, 1230
48. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain,
1229
49. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 1228
50.Tamira Paszek, Austria, 1173
Doubles
1. Liezel Huber, United States, 10,040
2. Lisa Raymond, United States, 10,040
3. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, 7,950
4. Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, 7,950
5.Vania King, United States, 7,225
6. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 7,095
7. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 5,815
8. Sania Mirza, India, 5,560
9. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic,
5,465
10. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 5,455
WTA schedule
H-hard, RC-red clay, GC-green clay, G-
grass
April 30-May 5 Estoril Open, Estoril, Por-
tugal, RCO
April 30-May 5 Budapest Grand Prix, Bu-
dapest, Hungary, RCO
May 5-13 Mutua Madrilena Madrid Open,
Madrid, RCO
May 14-20 Internazionali BNL d'lItalia,
Rome, RCO
May 21-26 Brussels Open, Brussels, Bel-


from high school to college
sports, is never an easy one.
Webber plays in the Sun
Conference and in the
NAIA. The school's football
program started in 2002 and
has had one winning sea-
son, according to its website.
The Warriors were 7-4 in
2010 before slipping to 4-6
last year Still, they re-
bounded from a slow start in
2011, winning four of their
last five games. Kelly Davis
is the head football coach.
Also, Webber is not a team
limited to in-state oppo-
nents. Last season, it trav-
eled to play Southern
Oregon University in Ash-
land, Ore., and Azusa Pacific
University in Azusa, Calif.
"They like that he's a big
back," Rolle said of the War-
riors. "They like the way he
runs, he's a downhill
runner
"He's going to have the
opportunity to compete. He
knows nothing is given to
him, he's going to have to
compete for it."
Greenlee is undecided
what his major will be; he
plans to make that decision
his sophomore year at Web-
ber But he does know he'll
be playing football for the
next four years.



gium, RCO
May 21-26 Internationaux de Strasbourg,
Strasbourg, France, RCO
May 27-June 10 Roland Garros, Paris,
RCO
June 11-17- AEGON Classic, Birmingham,
England, GO
June 11-17- Nuernberger Gastein Ladies,
Gastein, Austria, RCO
June 17-23 UNICEF Open, Den Bosch,
Netherlands, GO
June 18-23 AEGON International, East-
bourne, England, GO
June 25-July 8 -The Championships, Wim-
bledon, England, GO
July 9-15 Bank of the West Classic, Stan-
ford, Calif., HO
July 9-15-SNAI Open, Palermo, Italy, RCO
July 16-22 Mercury Insurance Open,
Carlsbad, Calif., HO
July 16-22 Sony Ericsson Swedish Open,
Bastad, Sweden, RCO
July 23-28 Baku Cup, Baku, Azerbaijan,
HO
July 28-Aug. 5 Olympics, London, HO
July 30-Aug. 5 Citi Open, Washington, HO
Aug. 7-13 Rogers Cup, Montreal, HO
Aug. 13-19 --Western & Southern Open,
Mason, Ohio, HO
Aug. 19-24 -Texas Open, Dallas, HO
Aug. 19-25 New Haven Open at Yale, New
Haven, Conn., HO
Aug. 27-Sept. 9 U.S. Open, New York, HO
Sept. 10-15 Tashkent Open, Tashkent,
Uzbekistan, HO
Sept. 10-16 Bell Challenge, Quebec City,
HI
Sept. 17-22 Guangzhou International
Women's Open, Guangzhou, China, HO
Sept. 17-23 Hansol Korea Open, Seoul,
South Korea, HO
Sept. 23-29 Toray Pan Pacific Open,
Tokyo, HO
Sept. 29-Oct.7-China Open, Beijing, HO
Oct. 8-14 Generali Ladies Linz, Linz, Aus-
tria, HI
Oct. 8-14 HP Japan Women's Open,
Osaka, Japan, HO
Oct. 15-21 Kremlin Cup, Moscow, HI
Oct. 15-21 BGL BNP Paribas Luxembourg
Open, HI
Oct. 23-28 -TEB-BNP Paribas WTA Cham-
pionships, Istanbul, Turkey, HI
Oct. 30-Nov. 4-Commonwealth BankTour-
nament of Champions, Sofia, Bulgaria, HI
Nov. 3-4 -Fed Cup final

BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Agreed to terms
with 3B Brandon Inge on a one-year contract.
Designated INF Luke Hughes for assignment.
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Agreed to terms with
OF Hideki Matsui on a minor-league contract.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Reinstated
RHP Todd Coffey from the 15-day DL.
PHOENIX COYOTES-Signed D Mark Louis
to a one-year contract.


Associated Press
Former MLB pitcher Roger Clemens, right, autographs a baseball for Juan Albarracin, left,
as he leaves the federal court Monday in Washington as a perjury retrial of the
seven-time Cy Young Award winning pitcher entered its third week.



Clemens lawyer attacks



'08 congressional hearings


Retrial enters

third week in

federal court

Associated Press

WASHINGTON A fed-
eral court jury saw snippets
of Roger Clemens denying
steroid use at a now-famous
2008 congressional hearing,
then listened Monday as
Clemens' lawyer tried in fits
and starts to declare pro-
ceeding to be "nothing more
than a show trial" that
shouldn't have taken place.
As the perjury retrial of
the seven-time Cy Young
Award winning pitcher en-
tered its third week, yet an-
other day was bogged down
by constant objections. And
the behind-the-scenes snip-
ing was again nastier than
anything the jurors have yet
to hear in court. Clemens'
lawyers used a written re-
sponse Monday, to a govern-
ment motion filed with the
court, to aim their latest
broadside at the govern-
ment's key witness. They
claimed that Clemens' for-
mer strength coach Brian
McNamee has a past that
"contains more dirt than a
pitcher's mound."
If nothing else, prosecu-
tors cleared a psychological
hurdle when they managed


to get through the day with-
out getting into trouble with
U.S. District Judge Reggie
Walton. It was during the
first trial last July that they
played an excerpt from the
2008 hearing that had been
ruled inadmissible -
prompting Walton to declare
an embarrassing mistrial in
an already costly case.
The retrial, resuming
after a five-day break and
expected to last several
more weeks, still seems
light years away from ad-
dressing the principle ques-
tion that could matter most
to the jurors when they de-
cide whether Clemens lied
to Congress: Did he use
steroids and human growth
hormone during his re-
markable 24-year career?
As it was, the court spent
Monday hearing a second
day of testimony from the
trial's first witness, Phil
Barnett, who was majority
staff director for the House
Oversight and Government
Reform Committee when
that committee held the
2008 hearing.
Prosecutors used Barnett
to try to establish that Con-
gress was within its bounds
when it called the hearing,
which took place two
months after Clemens was
named in the Mitchell Re-
port on the use of perform-
ance-enhancing drugs in
baseball. The government
has maintained that the va-


lidity of the Mitchell Report
was important, in part be-
cause of overall concerns
over steroids and HGH as a
public health issue.
With Barnett on the stand,
the government played por-
tions of Clemens' televised
testimony at the February
2008 hearing as well as an
audio tape of the deposition
that preceded it.
"Let me be clear: I have
never used steroids or
HGH," Clemens said confi-
dently in the videotape of
the hearing.
Taking his turn to ques-
tion Barnett, Clemens'
lawyer Rusty Hardin tried
in several ways to raise
doubts about the validity of
the hearing, but many of his
questions were met with ob-
jections by the government
or by an attorney from the
House of Representatives,
leading to several private
conferences at the judge's
bench and one debate that
took place with the jury out
of the room.
"How is that relevant?"
Walton said at one point,
clearly puzzled by Hardin's
line of questioning.
Hardin told the judge he
wanted to show that the
hearing "was nothing more
than a show trial of Roger
Clemens on that day" and
"nothing more than to pun-
ish the man who had the
temerity to say he did not
commit a crime."


Sports BRIEFS


Adult baseball Steve at 697-0909 or Corey at
league holds tryouts 556-4290.
Y Vnfth fA*tbh ll


There are open baseball
practices for adults at noon
every Sunday at Dazzy Vance
Field in Homosassa. Depend-
ing on interest levels, the sea-
son will start either May 6 or 13.
For more details, contact


IVUl IIVVMUI I
signups in progress
The Crystal River Sharks
youth football program signups
are now through June.
Signup times, dates and
places are:


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

This ladies-only league is geared toward play-
ers rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in playing or
being a team captain, call chairwoman Candace
Charles at 352-563-5859 or email
Candacecharles@tampabay.rr.com.
Citrus Area Senior Ladies 3.0-3.5
Tuesday League
The winning team for the 2011-12 season is
Citrus Hills, followed by Sugarmill Woods, Crys-
tal River, Riverhaven Ospreys, Pine Ridge Mus-
tangs, Meadowcrest Aces and Meadowcrest
Racquettes.
For information, email chairwoman Lucy Mur-
phy at wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
Results for April 26 are:
Sugarmill Woods def. Bicentennial Bratz, 6-3;
Bicentennial Babes def. SkyviewAdvan-
tage, 6-5;
Pine Ridge Fillies def. Sky Aces, 6-2;
Skyview vs. Pine Ridge Mavericks, 5-5.
For information, contact chairwoman Carol
Keatts at 352-382-5280 or ckeatts@aol.com.
Ladies on the Court
Results for April 26 are: Jo and Shirley, Marta,
Maria and Sally.
Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m. Thurs-
days at Le Grone Park courts in Crystal River.
Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents and sign
up to play two out of three tie-break sets.
For more information, contact Barbara Shook
at dshook@tampabay.rr.com or 352- 795-0872.


May 5 and 12 -10a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the Crystal River
Mall food court.
May 18- at Crystal River
High School during the Spring
football game.
June 2, 9, 16 and 23 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Crystal
River Mall food court.
From staff reports


The Friday Senior Ladies Doubles
3.0 3.5 League
The 2011-12 season champion is the team
from Riverhaven with 65 points, followed by Pine
Ridge, 52; Bicentennial, 46; Citrus Hills, 46; Sug-
armill Woods, 33 and Meadowcrest, 18.
For information, contact chairwoman Joyce
Shiver at 352-795-1086 or Jshiver@tampabay.rr.
com.
USTA Leagues
The winter USTA leagues have ended and the
winning teams are set to go to Daytona. The 3.5
and 4.5 levels are the first ones to play on May
4-6, followed by the 3.0 and 4.0 level on
May 18-20.
For information in our District 4 (south) call or
email Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or vaco-
cala@comcast.net or ustaflorida.com.
For information about the Hernando leagues,
contact Lou Giglio at 727-207-4760 or
Lou@topseedtennispro.com.
Tournaments
May 5 and 6: Cinco De Mayo tennis Tourna-
ment (mixed doubles) at Deltona Woods Park in
Spring Hill, NCTF@tampabay.rr.com. Entry fee
is $20 per player.
June 9 and 10: The Tournament of Champi-
ons Event will be at Sugarmill Woods/Oak Vil-
lage Tennis Complex. Players who would like to
enter, email jjeanette3saj@aol.com.
Oct. 27 and 28: eighth annual Fall Fest
Compass Tournament at Crystal River High
School.
U

Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle tennis
columnist, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


B4 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NBA playoff glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Chicago 1, Philadelphia 0
Saturday, April 28: Chicago 103, Philadel-
phia 91
Tuesday, May 1: Philadelphia at Chicago,
8p.m.
Friday, May 4: Chicago at Philadelphia, 8
p.m.
Sunday, May 6: Chicago at Philadelphia, 1
p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Philadelphia at
Chicago, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Chicago at Philadel-
phia, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Philadelphia at
Chicago, TBD
Miami 2, NewYork 0
Saturday, April 28: Miami 100, New York
67
Monday, April 30: Miami 104, NewYork 94
Thursday, May 3: Miami at New York, 7
p.m.
Sunday, May 6: Miami at New York, 3:30
p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: New York at Miami,
TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Miami at New York, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: New York at Miami,
TBD
Orlando 1, Indiana 1
Saturday, April 28: Orlando 81, Indiana 77
Monday, April 30: Indiana 93, Orlando 78
Wednesday, May 2: Indiana at Orlando,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: Indiana at Orlando, 2
p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Orlando at Indiana,
TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Indiana at Orlando, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Orlando at Indiana,
TBD
Atlanta 1, Boston 0
Sunday, April 29: Atlanta 83, Boston 74
Tuesday, May 1: Boston at Atlanta, 7:30
p.m.
Friday, May 4: Atlanta at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6: Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Boston at Atlanta, TBD
x-Thursday May 10: Atlanta at Boston,
TBD
x-Saturday May 12: Boston at Atlanta,
TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio 1, Utah 0
Sunday, April 29: San Antonio 106, Utah
91
Wednesday, May 2: Utah at San Antonio,
7p.m.
Saturday, May 5: San Antonio at Utah, 10
p.m.
Monday, May 7: San Antonio at Utah, 8 or
9p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: Utah at San Anto-
nio, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: San Antonio at Utah,
TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Utah at San Antonio,
TBD
Oklahoma City 1, Dallas 0
Saturday, April 28: Oklahoma City 99, Dal-
las 98
Monday, April 30: Dallas at Oklahoma
City, late
Thursday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Dal-
las, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City at Dallas,
7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Dallas at Oklahoma
City, 8p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: Oklahoma City at
Dallas, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Dallas at Oklahoma
City, TBD
L.A. Lakers 1, Denver 0
Sunday, April 29: L.A. Lakers 103, Denver
88
Tuesday, May 1: Denver at L.A. Lakers,
10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 4: L.A. Lakers at Denver,
10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6: L.A. Lakers at Denver,
9:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Denver at L.A. Lakers,
TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: L.A. Lakers at Den-
ver, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Denver at L.A. Lak-
ers, TBD
L.A. Clippers 1, Memphis 0
Sunday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 99, Mem-
phis 98
Wednesday, May 2: L.A. Clippers at Mem-
phis, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: Memphis at L.A. Clip-
pers, 4:30 p.m.
Monday May 7: Memphis at L.A. Clippers,
10:03 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: L.A. Clippers at
Memphis, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Memphis at L.A. Clip-
pers, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Mem-
phis, TBD


PACERS

Continued from Page B1

to concede they were
outhustled.
"In the third quarter, they
just kicked our butts," Or-
lando center Glen Davis said.
"They got every loose ball."
Indiana lost Game 1 81-77


SPORTS


Winning with a late goal


Ovechkin late

score gives Caps

3-2 victory

Associated Press

NEW YORK Alex
Ovechkin's power-play goal
with 7:27 remaining
snapped a tie and gave the
Washington Capitals a 3-2
victory over the New York
Rangers that squared the
Eastern Conference semifi-
nal series 1-1 on Monday
night.
Just under 6 minutes
after Ryan Callahan got the
Rangers even with a power-
play goal, Ovechkin put the
Capitals ahead for good
after they squandered a 2-0
lead.
Mike Knuble and Jason
Chimera scored first-
period goals for the Capi-
tals, who will host the next
two games of the series.
Washington is trying to re-
peat its first-round feat
when it lost the series
opener but rallied to beat
Boston in seven games. The
Capitals have earned four
of their five wins in this
postseason on the road.
Brad Richards had a goal
and assist, and defenseman
Michael Del Zotto had two
assists for the top-seeded
Rangers, who got forward


dl


Associated Press
The New York Rangers' Michael del Zotto (4) reacts as Washington Capitals right wing
Mike Knuble celebrates after scoring the Capitals' first goal in the first period of Game 2
of the Eastern Conference semifinals Monday at Madison Square Garden in New York.


Brian Boyle back from a
three-game injury absence
but couldn't turn it into a
commanding lead in the
series.
New York rebounded
from a 14-shot performance
in its series-opening win
and fired 28 shots on goalie
Braden Holtby. But the in-
crease in numbers pro-
duced fewer results.
Henrik Lundqvist, who


allowed two goals or fewer
in six of the previous eight
games and four straight,
made 22 saves for the
Rangers. New York had
won three straight games,
dating to the first round
against Ottawa when Boyle
sustained a concussion.
New York killed a
penalty against Boyle mo-
ments after Callahan's tying
goal at 6:58, but Ovechkin


struck off a clean faceoff
win by Nicklas Backstrom
during another power play.
With Richards in the
penalty box for holding,
Ovechkin fired a shot from
inside the blue line past
Lundqvist to make it 3-2.
The Rangers' much-ma-
ligned power play got New
York into a 2-2 tie 56 sec-
onds after Knuble was sent
off for high-sticking.


Wade's 25 carries Heat past New York


Associated Press

MIAMI As the Miami
Heat expected, the New
York Knicks were much im-
proved in Game 2.
Better, yes but not good
enough.
Dwyane Wade scored 25
points, Chris Bosh added 21
and the Heat beat New York
104-94 on Monday night,
sending the Knicks to an
NBA-record-tying 12th
straight postseason loss.
LeBron James finished
with 19 points, nine assists
and seven rebounds for the
Heat, who lead the Eastern
Conference first-round se-
ries 2-0.
Carmelo Anthony scored
30 points on 12-for-26 shoot-
ing for New York, which got
18 points from Amare
Stoudemire and 13 apiece
from Tyson Chandler and
J.R. Smith. The only other
team to lose 12 straight play-
off games is the Memphis
Grizzlies, who dropped
their first dozen postseason
contests from 2004 through
2006.
New York's last postsea-
son win came April 29,2001.
The Knicks get another
chance to snap the drought
Thursday when they host
Game 3.
Mario Chalmers scored 13
points and Mike Miller and
Shane Battier each shot 3


on Saturday and felt its sea-
son slipping away in Game 2
before rallying.
"We just came out with a
different type of energy,"
Granger said. "We knew how
important this game was. We
couldn't lose two games in a
seven-game series on our
home court. With that in
hindsight, we went after it"
David West had 18 points


Associated Press
The Miami Heat's LeBron James, left, and Carmelo Anthony
stand on the court in the first half of Monday's game in the
first round of the Eastern Conference playoffs in Miami.


for 5 from 3-point range on
their way to 11-point games
for the defending East
champion Heat, who shot 52
percent
Baron Davis, who sat most
of the first half and has been
battling back issues, fin-
ished with 12 points for the
Knicks.
Along with the Grizzlies,
the Knicks were one of four
teams in NBA history with
11-game postseason losing
streaks, according to STATS
LLC, joining Denver (1988-
94) and the Baltimore Bul-
lets (1965-70).
The Heat came into the
game saying they expected
Anthony to be much more
aggressive. They were right


and 11 rebounds and has
emerged as a stabilizing
force for the Pacers.
"He's leading our team
right now in competitive
spirit and will and desire
and all that stuff that does-
n't show up on the box score,
providing our team with the
necessary swagger to get a
good playoff win," Pacers
coach Frank Vogel said.


Anthony opened with an
11-shot quarter the last
time someone took more in
the first 12 minutes of a
playoff game was May 15,
2006, when Richard Hamil-
ton got 12 shots off for De-
troit against Cleveland.
Anthony missed all seven of
the jumpers he took in
Game 1 when guarded by
James, then got his first one
to fall on the game's first
possession Monday
By halftime, Anthony was
up to 21 points on 9-for-18
shooting, the Knicks need-
ing all that and more. Wade,
James and Bosh combined
for 41 points in the first two
quarters, helping Miami
take a 53-47 lead.


"He's just dialed in. A play-
off tested veteran. Hopefully
he's going to lead us very far
in the playoffs."
Granger and George Hill
each added 18 points and
Paul George had 17 points
and eight rebounds for Indi-
ana. The Pacers won de-
spite making just 2 of 20
3-point attempts and
Granger, the team's leading


Unlike Game 1, it wasn't
over by halftime. And play
was heated, just not over-
heated.
Chandler, who set a back
pick that sent James tum-
bling late in Saturday's first
half, picked up a technical
for taunting early in the sec-
ond quarter when he went
over Miller for a putback
dunk and then glared at him
for a few moments. A few
minutes later, James did a
fist-pump toward the seats
after a layup late in the half.
But whenever Miami was
on the cusp of pulling away,
New York had answers.
Consecutive baskets by
James midway through the
third quarter, the second of
those good enough for him to
merit it worthy of a chest-
bump and long look at the
Knicks bench, put Miami up
67-56 then its biggest lead.
Fbur minutes later, the Knicks
were within four, a dunk by
Chandler making it 72-68 with
1:37 left in the period.
Miami's margin was back
to nine after a flurry ended
the quarter. James drove
right and got just about
every Knick to shift with
him, leaving Battier all
alone for a 3-pointer, and
James' three-point play as
the shot clock was running
down had him laughing and
the Heat up 78-69 going into
the fourth.


scorer this season, shooting
just 7 for 21 from the field.
Indiana held the Magic to
36 percent shooting overall.
Indiana has held the Magic
below 40 percent shooting
in both games.
"We're going to have to be
better offensively," Orlando
coach Stan Van Gundy said.
"I'm going to have to find
something that works."


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 B5

NHL playoff glance
AIITimes EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 3
Thursday, April 12: NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2
Saturday, April 14: Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 2,
OT
Monday, April 16: NY Rangers 1, Ottawa 0
Wednesday, April 18: Ottawa 3, NY Rangers
2, OT
Saturday, April 21: Ottawa 2, NY Rangers 0
Monday, April 23: NY Rangers 3, Ottawa 2
Thursday, April 26: N.Y Rangers 2, Ottawa 1
Washington 4, Boston 3
Thursday, April 12: Boston 1, Washington 0,
OT
Saturday, April 14: Washington 2, Boston 1,
20T
Monday, April 16: Boston 4, Washington 3
Thursday, April 19: Washington 2, Boston 1
Saturday, April 21: Washington 4, Boston 3
Sunday, April 22: Boston 4, Washington 3,
OT
Wednesday, April 25: Washington 2, Boston
1, OT
New Jersey 4, Florida 3
Friday, April 13: New Jersey 3, Florida 2
Sunday, April 15: Florida 4, New Jersey 2
Tuesday, April 17: Florida 4, New Jersey 3
Thursday, April 19: New Jersey 4, Florida 0
Saturday, April 21: Florida 3, New Jersey 0
Tuesday, April 24: New Jersey 3, Florida 2,
OT
Thursday, April 26: New Jersey 3, Florida 2,
20T
Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 2
Wednesday, April 11: Philadelphia 4, Pitts-
burgh 3, OT
Friday, April 13: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 5
Sunday, April 15: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh
4
Wednesday, April 18: Pittsburgh 10, Philadel-
phia 3
Friday, April 20: Pittsburgh 3, Pphladelphia 2
Sunday, April 22: Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh
1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Los Angeles 4,Vancouver 1
Wednesday, April 11: Los Angeles 4, Van-
couver 2
Friday, April 13: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2
Sunday, April 15: Los Angeles 1, Vancouver
0
Wednesday, April 18: Vancouver 3, Los An-
geles 1
Sunday, April 22: Los Angeles 2, Vancouver
1, OT
St. Louis 4, San Jose 1
Thursday, April 12: San Jose 3, St. Louis 2,
20T
Saturday, April 14: St. Louis 3, San Jose 0
Monday, April16: St. Louis 4, San Jose 3
Thursday, April 19: St. Louis 2, San Jose 1
Saturday, April 21: St. Louis 3, San Jose 1
Phoenix 4, Chicago 2
Thursday, April 12: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT
Saturday, April 14: Chicago 4, Phoenix 3, OT
Tuesday, April 17: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT
Thursday, April19: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT
Saturday, April 21: Chicago 2, Phoenix 1, OT
Monday, April 23: Phoenix 4, Chicago 0
Nashville 4, Detroit 1
Wednesday, April 11: Nashville 3, Detroit 2
Friday, April 13: Detroit 3, Nashville 2
Sunday, April 15: Nashville 3, Detroit 2
Tuesday, April 17: Nashville 3, Detroit 1
Friday, April 20: Nashville 2, Detroit 1
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 1,Washington 1
Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washing-
ton 1
Monday, April 30: Washington 3, NY Rangers 2
Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: NY Rangers at Washing-
ton, 12:30 p.m.
Monday, May 7:Washington at NY Rangers,
7:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: NY Rangers atWash-
ington, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Washington at NY
Rangers, TBD
Philadelphia 1, New Jersey 0
Sunday, April 29: Philadelphia 4, NewJersey
3, OT
Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey at Philadelphia,
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 3: Philadelphia at New Jer-
sey, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6: Philadelphia at New Jersey
7:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia at NewJer-
sey, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Phoenix 2, Nashville 0
Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT
Sunday, April 29: Phoenix 5, Nashville 3
Wednesday, May 2: Phoenix at Nashville, 9
p.m.
Friday, May 4: Phoenix at Nashville, 7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Nashville at Phoenix, 10
p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: PhoenK at Nashville,
TBD
x-Friday May 11: Nashville at PhoenK, TBD
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Saturday, April28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1
Monday April 30: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
late
Thursday, May 3: St. Louis at Los Angeles,
10p.m.
Sunday May 6: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 3
p.m.
x-Tuesday May 8: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD
x-Thursday May10: St. Louis at LosAngeles,
TBD
x-Saturday May 12: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD


Citrus County Support Services

CitrUS I SN IOR A nonprofit organization dedicated to
generate funds to support the unmet
County FOUNDATION needs of Citrus County seniors.

Tampa Bay Rays Baseball Trips
Wednesday, May 16th Rays vs. Red Sox 3:30 pm
Upcoming Games
Thursday, June 1 3th Rays vs. Mets 3:30pm
Tuesday, July 3rd Rays vs. Yankees 3:30pm

All tickets $45 per person
(make checks payable to The Senior Foundation of Citrus County).
Price includes admission & round-trip transportation via chartered bus.
Pick up and drop off location for the bus will be:
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct., Lecanto, FL
All ticket sales are final. Note:
Per the Tampa Bay Rays, game times are subject to change.
',,.-..- o-.,- For more information call 527-5975
2jH O CLL All proceeds from the Rays Baseball Trips go
000822L V l,<....nem ~towards Helping Seniors in Citrus County.


5th J.nual

S72ihlete of thee ear

Sports Jvwards iaanquet

Thursday May 17th

Reception 5:00pm 6:00pm
Awards Ceremony 6:00pm 8:00 PM

College of Central Florida Citrus Campus

----i COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA U ca- "








Citrus County
Health Department ,_ ..



Tickets are $20 and are available at
The Citrus County Chronicle offices
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
... Jor more information call: 352-563-6363


BROOKSVILLE BEAUTIES
AND BEASTS CAR SHOW
Presented by Citrus Mopars Car Club
and Crystal Automotive I


All Makes, Models, and Years of cars and
trucks are welcome to attend and participate
Saturday, May 1 9th
Registration 8am to 10 Oam
Awards at 3pm
Crystal Chrysler Dodoge
Jeep of Brooksville
14358 Cortex Blvd. Brooksville
Pre-Registration $15 Day of show $20
Vendors must pre-register (no fee)
Call Ken McNally at 352-341-1165 or
4 Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019
Food Vendors call Justin352-860-2453
Bring Your Valve (
Cover Racers to C ^
Drag Race for Prizes
OVER qS AWARDS TO
BE PRESENTED!
JOIN US FOR
A FUN SHOW
AND SOME
00MGREAT CARS!












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Gyllenhaal has a
second baby girl
NEW YORK- Maggie
Gyllenhaal and Peter
Sarsgaard have wel-
comed a
second
daughter
Gyllen-
haal's
publicist
said in an
email
Monday
Maggie the ac-
Gyllenhaal tress gave
birth to
Gloria
Ray on
April 19
a in New
York. No
f more de-
tails were
provided.
Peter The
Sarsgaard couple
had their
first daughter, Ramona,
in 2006. They got married
in 2009.
The 34-year-old Gyllen-
haal has appeared in
films including "The Dark
Knight" and "Secretary"
She earned an Academy
Award nomination for
best supporting actress
for 2009's "Crazy Heart."
Sarsgaard, 41, has been
seen in movies such has
'Jarhead" and "Green
Lantern."

'Amarillo Slim'
dies at age 83
AMARILLO, Texas -
Thomas Austin 'Amarillo
Slim"
Preston
Jr., an ac-
claimed
profes-
sional
poker
player
who fan-
Thomas cied him-
Preston Jr. self the
"World's
Greatest Gambler," has
died in Texas.
Bunky Preston said
Monday his father died of
colon cancer Sunday in
hospice care in Amarillo.
He was 83.
Preston won the 1972
World Series of Poker in
Las Vegas and was in-
ducted into the Poker
Hall of Fame in 1992. He
also wrote or co-wrote
several books about the
game and himself.
Bunky Preston says his
father got his nickname
playing pool.

Hudson's sister's
911 call released
CHICAGO Moments
after finding her mother's
body, the sister of Oscar-
winning actress Jennifer
Hudson sobs as she
pleads for help in a dis-
turbing 911 recording re-
leased to media Monday
"Oh my God.... Some-
body's killed my mother,"
Julia Hudson said, while a
dispatcher tries to get her
to calm down and repeat
her address. "She's on the
floor and I see blood com-
ing from her head."
A judge in Chicago re-
leased the tape after a re-
quest by the Chicago
Tribune, Sun-Times
Media and The Associ-
ated Press. The tape was
played in open court last
week during the trial of
William Balfour, who is
accused of killing the ac-
tress' mother, brother
and 7-year-old nephew.
-From wire reports


CORE OF THE BEACH BOYS


'GET


AROUND'


Associated Press
The Beach Boys, from left, Bruce Johnston, Al Jardine, Mike Love, Brian Wilson and David Marks pose for a portrait
April 18 in Burbank, Calif. After decades of prolonged separations, legal spats and near reunions, the core Beach
Boys are back together, both on stage and for an upcoming new album.

California band puts past differences aside for 50th reunion


DERRIK J. LANG
AP Entertainment Writer

BURBANK, Calif. -A "miracle."
That's the word Al Jardine not-so-
jokingly uses to describe the latest
Beach Boys reunion -this one con-
sisting of himself and fellow found-
ing Beach Boys Brian Wilson and
Mike Love, as well as longtime play-
ers Bruce Johnston and David
Marks.
After decades of prolonged sepa-
rations, legal spats and near re-
unions, the core Beach Boys are
back together, both on stage and for
an upcoming new album. Their re-
birth, which became a reality earlier
this year when the group performed
"Good Vibrations" with Maroon 5
and Foster the People at the Gram-
mys, has reawakened musical mem-
ories for 69-year-old Jardine.
"When I'm rehearsing over there,
I'm hearing stuff I haven't per-
formed for many years," Jardine
said during a recent break from re-
hearsals for the iconic band's 50th
anniversary tour, which kicked off
last week in Tucson, Ariz.
"It's wonderful to rediscover the
music that way When you're
recording three albums a year, as
we did in the early days, it's yester-
day's news," he said. "You're on to
the next thing. Boom. That stuff gets
parked somewhere though, and
now it's becoming unveiled again."
When the Beach Boys formed in
1961, it was mostly a family affair:
school pal Jardine established the
group with Wilson and his late
brothers, Carl and Dennis, and
their cousin, Love. Their breezy
harmonic tunes and embodiment of
freewheeling West Coast sensibili-
ties captured the nation's attention
just before the Beatles invaded the
United States, and continued for
much of the 1960s with timeless
songs like "I Get Around" "Surfin'
USA" and many more.
Following the 1998 death of Carl
Wilson, the group fractured and
began moving in different direc-
tions. Over the past 20 years, the
Beach Boys' legacy has been mired
in messy conflicts the group's mem-
bers agreed to squash in honor of
their fans and the band's 50th an-
niversary, a hallmark occasion even
in this jaded age of reboots and
comebacks.
"They sense that we love each
other and that we really want to
share that love with them (the
fans)," said 69-year-old Wilson, the
visionary songwriter of such clas-
sics as "Help Me Rhonda," "Surfin'
USA" and "California Girls."
Wilson, who has released solo al-
bums in recent years and now
speaks with a slight slur, had a tur-


Birthday The year ahead looks like it will be far more
active socially than usual. Numerous friendships will link to-
gether in a remarkable manner, which will produce a fun,
intimate group of loyal allies.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you decide to get involved
in a new endeavor with several other people, make sure
you have a voice in the project, as well as a leadership role.
Reconsider if you don't.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There is nothing wrong with
expressing your friendship or love for another with some
kind of tangible token. But unless you're extremely close,
don't make it anything expensive -just thoughtful.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -As you charm everyone
around you, including your adversaries, it will become evi-
dent communication comes quite easily to you. Use this at-
tribute liberally for best results.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you have something to sell, it's


BEACH BOYS TOUR
DATES, PLACES
May 2: St. Augustine, FL,
St. Augustine Amphitheater.
May 4: Hollywood, FL, Seminole
Hard Rock Hotel & Casino.
May 5: Tampa, FL, Stratz
Center for the Performing Arts.
May 8: New York, NY, Beacon
Theatre.
May 9: New York, NY, Beacon
Theatre.
May 11: Pittsburgh, PA,
Benedum Hall.
May 12: Uncasville, CT,
Mohegan Sun Arena.
May 13: Uncasville, CT,
Mohegan Sun Arena.
May 15: White Plains, NY,
Westchester County Center.
May 17: Bethlehem, PA, Sands
Bethlehem Events Center.
May 19: Atlantic City, NJ, The
Borgata Hotel Casino.
May 21: Chicago, IL, Chicago
Theatre.
May 22: Chicago, IL, Chicago
Theatre.
May 25: Chula Vista, CA,
Cricket Wireless Amphitheater.
May 26: Indio, CA, Fantasy
Springs Special Events Center.
June 23: Saratoga Springs,NY,
Saratoga Performing Arts Center.
June 24: Wantagh, NY, Nikon
at Jones Beach Theater.
June 26: Boston, MA, Bank of
America Pavilion

bulent tenure with the Beach
Boys, notoriously leaving then re-
turning to the band at one point as
he battled mental illness and drug
abuse.
"When it comes to the music, all
the pretensions are aside," said 71-
year-old Love, who reached a set-
tlement with Jardine in 2008 after
launching a lawsuit against him in
2003 over his usage of the Beach
Boys name (he also has sued Wilson
on more than one occasion, most re-
cently in 2005).
'All the egos are aside. It's just all
about those group harmonies," he
added. "The effect that it has on
ourselves and other people is just
fantastic."
Love said the Beach Boys, who
will be supported by a backing band
composed of members from the
group's various touring entities,
have rehearsed more than 50 songs
spanning all their albums, includ-
ing "Pet Sounds" and "Smile." The
band noted the biggest challenge


Today's HOROSCOPE
an excellent time to go after the big account you've been
eyeing but have been afraid to approach. If you assert
yourself, your fears will diminish of their own accord.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Your expansive mood is likely
to trigger some of your nobler qualities. With little thought of
gain, you're likely to do things that will mean a lot for others.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When you show people you re-
ally care, they, in turn, will automatically be as concerned
for your welfare as you are for theirs. Visible demonstra-
tions are likely to come from several sources.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Make extra efforts to show
people how much you really care about their welfare. It will
help inspire a reluctant person to feel special and offer you
valuable help.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) More opportunities than
usual are likely to present themselves, making it possible
for you to achieve two ambitious objectives that may or


has been figuring out who is singing
lead on which songs, not recaptur-
ing their chemistry
"The chemistry is there," said 63-
year-old Marks, who recorded four
Beach Boys albums and has moved
between the band's camps. "We
pick up right where we left off, es-
pecially the five of us together. The
magic bubble comes around us. It's
the chemistry that's behind all suc-
cessful bands, like the Beatles and
the Stones. It has to be there. It's
special for us."
The 40-city tour will take the
band's members to bigger venues
than in recent years, including
headlining performances at the
Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival.
To honor Carl and Dennis Wilson's
contributions (Dennis died in 1983),
the band will play alongside videos
of the late founding Beach Boys
during a tribute in the show.
"We haven't gotten the holograms
together yet," joked Marks, refer-
encing the hologram of late rapper
Tupac Shakur that appeared at the
Coachella Valley Music and Arts
Festival earlier in April.
For a group who could hardly be
considered boys anymore, they're
surprisingly unfazed by the
prospect of a sweeping tour that
will take them across North Amer-
ica, Europe and Japan. Johnston
noted "hotels are great" nowadays,
while Marks was reminded they no
longer have to unload or haul their
own equipment in a "U-Haul trailer
and station wagon."
"The heavy lifting is the writing,
arranging and recording," said 69-
year-old Johnston, who joined the
group in 1965. "This is not the heavy
lifting. This is the chocolate cake
for me because we get to pull all of
these magnificently arranged parts
out and sing them live. We don't
have to write them now. We just
have to pull them out of the trunk."
The Beach Boys will stuff more
tunes into that trunk with the re-
lease of an as-yet-untitled album of
new material this summer. Love
said the new songs will recall their
classic harmony-stacked style. The
group plans to perform their new
single, "That's Why God Made the
Radio," while on tour and may add
new tracks to the set list when the
album is released.
"We're slaves to the Beach Boys
legacy," Marks said. "We're just out
there trying to keep that legacy
alive. I can't count how many times
people have come up to me after
shows and told me that they sing
their children to sleep with 'Surfer
Girl.' I look in the audience and lit-
tle children know the words to
'Help Me Rhonda,' and 80-year-olds
are dancing in the aisles."


may not be connected.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --You have the ability to
merge two dissenting voices into one positive, unified force.
Without your intervention, the concerned parties are likely
to continue bickering between themselves.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --Two quality changes are
stirring that could help you better yourself career-wise
and/or financially. They are apt to be triggered by a couple
of unrelated circumstances.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Your judgment is much
keener than usual, enabling you to correctly evaluate both
sides of opposing issues. It will give you an edge over your
competition.
Aries (March 21-April 19) The possibility for gains in
your material affairs are stronger than usual at this time, so
don't waste the opportunity. In fact, there are likely to be
two sources making some good things possible.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, APRIL 29
Fantasy 5:14 17 20 23 31
5-of-5 1 winner $190,770.90
4-of-5 239 $128.50
3-of-5 7,518 $11
SATURDAY, APRIL 28
Powerball: 31 39 40 57 58
Powerball: 33
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 4 11 13 17 20 28
6-of-6 1 winner $21 million
5-of-6 87 $2,475.50
4-of-6 3,878 $44
3-of-6 65,689 $5
Fantasy 5:1 12 13 20 34
5-of-5 1 winner $292,087.58
4-of-5 396 $118.50
3-of-5 11,738 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, May 1,
the 122nd day of 2012. There
are 244 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 1, 1982, the
World's Fair in Knoxville,
Tenn., was opened by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan. The
fair's theme: "Energy Turns the
World." (The six-month exposi-
tion's last day was Oct. 31.)
On this date:
In 1707, the Kingdom of
Great Britain was created as
a treaty merging England and
Scotland took effect.
In 1898, Commodore
George Dewey gave the com-
mand, "You may fire when
you are ready, Gridley," as an
American naval force de-
stroyed a Spanish squadron
in Manila Bay during the
Spanish-American War.
In 1931, New York's 102-
story Empire State Building
was dedicated.
In 1941, the Orson Welles
motion picture "Citizen Kane"
premiered in New York.
In 1962, the first Target dis-
count store opened in Ro-
seville, Minn.
In 1971, the intercity pas-
senger rail service Amtrak
went into operation.
In 1987, during a visit to
West Germany, Pope John
Paul II beatified Edith Stein, a
Jewish-born Carmelite nun
who was gassed in the Nazi
death camp at Auschwitz.
In 1992, on the third day of
the Los Angeles riots, a visi-
bly shaken Rodney King ap-
peared in public to appeal for
calm, pleading, "Can we all
get along?"
Ten years ago: Israeli ar-
mored vehicles began leav-
ing Yasser Arafat's battered
West Bank compound, end-
ing his five months of con-
finement.
Five years ago: In only his
second veto, President
George W. Bush rejected leg-
islation to pull U.S. troops out
of Iraq in a showdown with
Congress over whether the
war should end or escalate.
One year ago: Pope
Benedict XVI beatified Pope
John Paul II, moving his
predecessor a step closer to
sainthood in a Vatican Mass
attended by some 1.5 million
pilgrims.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer astronaut Scott Carpen-
ter is 87. Country singer
Sonny James is 83. Singer
Judy Collins is 73. Singer
Rita Coolidge is 67. Actor-di-
rector Douglas Barr is 63.
Actor Dann Florek is 61.
Singer-songwriter Ray Parker
Jr. is 58. Hall of Fame jockey


Steve Cauthen is 52. Country
singer Tim McGraw is 45.
Actor Darius McCrary is 36.
Thought for Today: "Any-
one who is satisfied to stand
still should not complain
when others pass him." -
Italian proverb.







Section C TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012



H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Dr Frank
Vascimini I
/Page C2
0 Dr. David
B. Raynor
/Page C5


Secondhand organs


Add kidneys

to list of things

that can be

recycled
LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO It turns out
you can recycle just about
anything these days even
kidneys and other organs
donated for transplants.
Recently in Chicago, in
what is believed to be the
first documented case of its
kind in the U.S., a trans-
planted kidney that was
failing was removed from a
patient while he was still
alive and given to some-
body else.
There have been other
cases since the 1980s of
transplant organs being
used more than once, but
they were rare and in-
volved instances in which
the first recipient died.
Typically when trans-
planted organs fail in living
patients, doctors throw
them away But with more
than 73,000 people await-
ing transplants nationwide,
some specialists say doc-
tors should consider trying
to reuse more organs to
ease the severe shortage.
"The need for kidney
transplantation doesn't
match our capacity," said
Dr Lorenzo Gallon, a
Northwestern University
transplant specialist who
oversaw the kidney recy-
cling operation in Chicago.
"People die on dialysis"
while awaiting kidneys.
That was the possible
fate awaiting two strangers.
A research letter describ-
ing the unusual case was
published in Thursday's
New England Journal of
Medicine.
The donated kidney
lasted just two weeks in the
first patient, a 27-year-old
Illinois man. The same dis-
ease that ruined his kid-
neys started to damage the
new kidney, given to him by
his sister He was getting


Associated Press
Cera Fearing, right, her brother, Ray Fearing, center, of Arlington Heights, III., and Erwin Gomez, three patients involved
in an unusual kidney retransplant case, are pictured April 25 after they met for the first time at Northwestern Memo-
rial Hospital in Chicago. Cera Fearing donated a kidney to her brother. After only two weeks, his kidney disease attacked
the donated organ, so doctors removed it last summer and transplanted it into Erwin Gomez, a Valparaiso, Ind., sur-
geon with kidney disease. It's believed to be the first time a living patient has donated a transplanted organ.


ON THE NET
* New England Journal of Medicine: www.nejm.org
* Organ donation: www.unos.org


sicker, and doctors needed
to act fast if they were going
to save the organ. With per-
mission from the man and
his sister, they removed it
last July and retrans-
planted it into a 67-year-old
Indiana man.
The Illinois man is back
on dialysis and will proba-
bly get another transplant
eventually
Still, reusing a trans-
planted organ can be tricky
- and riskier because
surgeons have to deal with
scar tissue that typically
forms around an organ as
the body heals from the op-
eration.
Also, Wayne Shelton, a
bioethicist at Albany Med-
ical College in New York,
said the practice may raise
ethical questions. He said
doctors need to make sure


patients who are offered
reused parts understand
all the risks and are not
made to feel coerced into
accepting such organs. And
because these cases are so
rare, there is little data on
how patients with recycled
parts fare, Shelton noted.
Dr. Jonathan Bromberg,
director of transplantation
at the University of Mary-
land Medical Center,
praised the Northwestern
doctors but said organ re-
cycling is unlikely to be-
come commonplace
because it would be rare
for an already transplanted
organ to be healthy enough
to be reused.
In Boston in 2009, a man
died shortly after a getting
a new heart, and the organ
was in good enough shape
to be transplanted into


someone else. A 2005 med-
ical journal report detailed
three U.S. cases involving
donor livers reused after
the initial recipients died,
and said they were among
11 similar cases between
1987 and 2005. Medical lit-
erature also includes re-
ports from the 1990s about
a kidney retransplant in
Spain and a heart retrans-
plant in Switzerland.
In the Chicago case, Ray
Fearing of Arlington
Heights, Ill., received a new
kidney that was later
reused by Erwin Gomez of
Valparaiso, Ind., a surgeon
familiar with the medical
complexities involved.
Joel Newman, a
spokesman for the United
Network for Organ Shar-
ing, said previous retrans-
plants in the U.S. "have
occurred when the original
recipient has died soon
after a transplant but the
organ is still able to func-
tion. To our knowledge, this
is the first publicly re-


ported instance where a
kidney has been removed
from a living person due to
the risk of organ failure
and retransplanted."
Fearing had a disease
that caused scarring that
prevented the kidneys from
filtering waste from blood.
He had to quit his indus-
trial machinery job and
went on dialysis a year ago.
His sister donated a kidney
last June in what was
"probably the happiest mo-
ment of my life," Fearing
said. The worst, he said,
was a few days later, when
doctors told him the kidney
was damaged and had to be
removed.
Gallon, medical director
of Northwestern's kidney
transplant program,
thought the kidney could
be reused in somebody else
if it was removed quickly,
before it became irre-
versibly damaged.
Gallon needed Fearing's


.Page C6


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Healthy

living

guidelines

n my work as an on-
cologist, and as a vol-
unteer for the
American Cancer Society,
when I talk with people
who've been diagnosed
with cancer, they all seem
to ask me three questions
in common, and they are:
What can I do to re-
duce the chances that my
cancer will come back?
What can I do to help
me not develop some
other kind of cancer?
How can I help my
family members reduce
their own risk for devel-
oping cancer?
We've known for years
that for people who don't
smoke, the most impor-
tant ways to reduce their
risk of cancer is to stay at
a healthy weight; live a
physically active lifestyle;
See Page C6


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Dental

X-rays


Common ear, nose and throat

problems fact or fiction


E ach and every
day, I am asked
many questions
by patients and, as we all
know, there is quite a bit .
of information available
via word of mouth and
the Internet. However,
not all of it is true and
some of it is unsound
and even not safe. Dr. Den
For instance, Q-tips EAR,
are a common product & TH
in our homes: I am often
asked if it is a safe and
easy way to clean wax in the ears.
The bottom line is that Q-tips are
great for the outside of the ear, but
when you try to enter the canal, the
cotton tip is about the same size as
the diameter of the canal and sim-
ply pushes wax further in.


li,
IE
IF


Irrigation or direct re-
moval of the wax by a
physician is a much bet-
ter choice, particularly if
it is a significant prob-
lem for the patient.
0 Allergies: We com-
monly call some of them
"hay fever." Is there a
fever component associ-
s Grillo ated with seasonal aller-
NOSE gic rhinitis?
AT Typically, we see
symptoms such as runny
nose, itchy eyes, itchy
throat, and sneezing jags. But sel-
dom, if ever, do you see a fever as-
sociated with these symptoms.
What actually occurs is exposure to
an allergen irritant, which creates
an excessive reaction and causes
See Page C6


National EMS Week coming up can spur
u brain


Good morning! The
month of May is
an extremely busy
one, with excitement fill-
ing the air for everyone
with high school and col-
lege graduations, parties
to attend and summer
plans being made.
Tragic accidents also
happen this time of year;
some of them preventa-
ble. All of us at Nature
Coast EMS encourage
you to be safe, take


I &
Katie I
NATI
COAST


plenty of time to reach your desti-
nation and designate a driver if the
occasion warrants. "Every minute
counts," so be smart while plan-
ning your fun.
The week of May 20 through May
26 is National EMS Week with the
theme, "More than a job. A Calling."
National Emergency Medical Serv-


ices Week honors the
dedication of emergency
medical professionals
around the country who
provide lifesaving serv-
ices every day.
Nature Coast EMS
would like to recognize
our team members and
all emergency medical
Lucas personnel at Seven
U RE Rivers Regional Medical
" EMS Center, Citrus Memorial
T EMS tHealth System, Oak Hill
Hospital, Bayflite,
Aeromed, Regional Medical Center
at Bayonet Point, Shands at the
University of Florida and the many
other wonderful facilities with
which we serve.
In celebration of National EMS
Week, Nature Coast EMS will offer
two Hands-Only CPR classes at
See Page C6


tumors
We all go to the
dentist regularly,
have our teeth
cleaned and get X-rays for
our teeth whenever our
dentist recommends it.
The American Dental As-
sociation has standard
recommendations for
dental X-rays. Do you
know this regular dental
X-ray is not as benign as it
sounds?
Early or repeated expo-
sure to dental X-rays ap-
pears to increase the risk
for meningioma, the most
commonly reported pri-
mary brain tumor in the
See Page C4


Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in
the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to:


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James J. Ronzo, D.O.
Frank S. Bono, D.O.
board Cerihe.;: F.llov..ship Tr.;]inr .;: l


UI


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oral cancer screening

day helps those who went
As most of you know, I hosted a free people enjoy what I write. He also asked if
oral cancer screening event this past I accept new patients and if all I did was the
Thursday in order to acknowledge "fancy dentistry"


Oral Cancer Awareness Mont
The event was from 8 a.m.
noon. We saw approximately;
people. Far fewer than I expect
Of those 15 people, three h1
suspicious lesions that requil
follow up. Another four were ]
at ease because, what th
thought was oral cancer, in ft
was a variant of normal anatoi
The remainder of the peo]
had no suspicious lesions.
My staff and I enjoyed the d
We felt as though we had mad
difference in people's lives.
were all happy the day was
steady, but not hectic, and we
plan to host the event again
next year
On another note, it has
come to my attention that
some readers of this column
are unaware I am a general
dentist who sees patients
every day at the office.
Apparently, some readers
are under the impression


Dr. F
Vasci
SOUND


Like
general d
have a fei
especially
do in ad(
general d


that, because I write this column, I am just
a dentist who gives "expert" advice, and I
only do specialty work.
The reason I am bringing this up is that a
few weeks ago, while at Mass, I met a gen-
tleman who thanked me for writing my
column.
Of course, I thanked him for the thank-
you and told him how nice it is to hear that


Since this is not the first time I
have been approached like this,
I thought I would mention that,
in fact, new patients are always
welcome.
In addition, though I do re-
store a lot of complicated cases, I
am, first and foremost, a general
dentist.
Like most general dentists, I
have a few areas I especially like
rank to do in addition to general den-
mini tistry One of those areas is root
BITES canal therapy and, as some of
you already know, I also enjoy
making dentures.
most Thank you to all of the
I readers who have gone out of
entists, I their way in public places to
w areas I thank me for the column. It is
truly my pleasure. I actually
ly like to enjoy it.
A thank-you also goes out
edition to to those of you who ques-
l tioned if all I do is the fancy
entistry. stuff. In knowing how you
viewed me, it allowed me to
make everyone aware of what I really do
each day

Dr Frank Vascimini is a Homosassa
dentist. Send your questions to 4805 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email them to him at info@
MasterpieceDentalStudio. com.


www.gulfcoastspine.net'






Family Medicine
Meet Dr. Ghassan Hasan


We proudly welcome a physician who is prepared
to care for your whole family. Dr. Hasan provides
comprehensive management of geriatric medical
conditions and high-risk patients, as well as integral
care for heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's,
osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Dr. Hasan is board
certified in family medicine. He keeps an open door
policy and is fluent in English, Spanish and Arabic.
No matter the language, Dr. Hasan communicates
through his compassionate care.


Primary Care & Geriatric Clinic
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 6
Crystal River
352.794.6151


He is now accepting new patients.
Call to schedule an appointment today.


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C2 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


HEALTH & LIFE


OOB8R9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Moisturizer deals with vaginal dryness


with vaginal dryness
due to menopause?
A: Nearly all women will
experience vaginal dryness
at some time in their life.
This dryness can be caused
by childbirth, breastfeeding,
menopause, intense exercise,
stress, and even some med-
ications. Vaginal dryness can
also occur when douching,
using tampons or at the end
of the menstrual cycle.


Vaginal dryness during
menopause is a result of es-
trogen deficiency, which
leads to a reduction in the
elasticity and thickness of the
vaginal wall along with a re-
duced blood flow and secre-
tions in the vagina.
These changes can pro-
duce itching, dryness, burn-
ing and painful sexual
intercourse.
Replens is a polycarbophil-
based, non-prescription,


long-lasting vaginal moistur-
izer with bioadhesiveness.
Bioadhesiveness is a prop-
erty that allows a compound
to adhere to the surface of the
body's mucous membranes,
like the vagina.
This product does not con-
tain estrogen or spermacides,
and can be inserted into the
vagina using the supplied ap-
plicator anytime during the
day or night.
For best results, most


women should use the mois-
turizer every three days. As
the cells of the vaginal wall
are regenerated, dry cells are
cleared and the moisturizing
ingredients in Replens are
eliminated naturally
Clinical study has shown
that using Replens can im-
prove the quality of life for
many menopausal women
and help to relieve vaginal
burning, itching and painful
intercourse.


Replens is available in
most pharmacies and comes
in a 14-application package
with a reusable vaginal appli-
cator or an eight-count pack-
age of pre-filled applicators.


Richard P Hoffmann,
Pharm.D., has been a
pharmacist for more than 40
years. Send questions to him
at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando. FL 34442.


Health NOTES


LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: To find a donor
center or a blood drive near
you, call 352-527-3061. Donors
must be at least 17, or 16 with
parental permission, weigh a
minimum of 110 pounds and be
in good health to be eligible to
donate. A photo ID is required.
LifeSouth remains in emer-
gency need for all blood types.
According to LifeSouth, fewer
than one in 10 Citrus County
residents regularly give blood,
so this small group is challenged
to keep up with the need.
Hospitals are not fully
stocked, and LifeSouth does
not have the ability to stock
them. In this status, the hospi-
tals may have to look to other
communities to import blood.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday
and closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
0 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday,
May 1, Citrus County Schools
Bus Transportation, 710 N.E.
Sixth Ave., Crystal River.
Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 1, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 2, Wal-Mart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
0 2 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 4,
Hernando Elementary School,
2353 N. Croft Ave., Hernando.
3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, May
5, St. Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, 7040 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 5, Bizco Shredding Event,
204 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6, St. Thomas the
Apostle Catholic Church, 7040
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Springs.
1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 6,
Wal-Mart Supercenter, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
9 to 11 a.m. Monday, May
7, Nature Coast EMS, 3876 W.
Country Hill Drive, Lecanto.
Noon to 3 p.m. Monday,


May 7, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
0 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday,
May 8, Citrus County Schools
Bus Transportation, 710 N.E.
Sixth Ave., Crystal River.
Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 8, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Blood drive 1 to 4 p.m.
May 9 at Arbor Trail Rehab, 611
Turner Camp Road, Inverness,
in cooperation with LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers.
Bring a photo ID. All donors will
receive a free T-shirt. Call 352-
637-1130.
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center offers the following
health education programs pre-
sented by board-certified physi-
cians and licensed medical
professionals. Website: Seven-
RiversRegional.com. Call 352-
795-1234 to register for the
programs.
Women'sWorks: "Girls
Night Out" 5:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 17, designed to em-
power women to take small,
manageable steps to lead
longer, healthier and happier
lives. Guests will have access
to expert presentations on
pelvic pain, breast health, os-
teoporosis and heart disease.
Free product samples and
service demos available. Gour-
met refreshments served. The
first 50 guests receive a Wom-
en'sWorks charm. Wear purple
or orange for an extra surprise.
Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp
- Patients scheduled for knee
or hip replacement surgery
learn pre- and post-surgery ex-
ercises, how to use a walker,
knee and hip precautions and
adaptive equipment that may
be needed for activities of daily
living. Offered the first and third
Tuesday of each month at 1
p.m. at SRRMC.
Free Balance Screenings
- Seven Rivers Rehab &
Wound Center offers free bal-
ance screenings at 1675 S.E.
U.S. 19 in the Crystal River
Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). Call 352-795-0534
to schedule an appointment.
Join the free LifeSharers
program to donate your or-
gans. Everyone is welcome to
join LifeSharers. There is nei-
ther age requirement nor limit
and parents can enroll their


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minor children as well. Pre-ex-
isting medical conditions do not
exclude you from becoming a
member. Even if you are al-
ready a registered organ donor,
you can improve your chances
of getting an organ if you ever
need one by joining.
Visit the website to join online
at www.lifesharers.org.
From 5 to 8 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly, Applebee's at
1901 Main St. in Inverness has
"Dining to Donate" 10 per-
cent of the guests' bill will be
sent to the corporate office of
LifeSharers. A flier must be pre-
sented: email Anna DiPleco at
floridiananna@aol.com (with
the subject Re: LifeSharers) for
a copy of the flier for presenta-
tion. Call DiPleco at 352-726-
8489 to answer any questions.
The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at 3 p.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, 3700 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first floor
conference room.
Bereaved Parents of the
USA 2012 National Gathering,
June 29 to July 1 at Wyndham
Tampa Westshore Hotel. The
Bereaved Parents of the USA
provides support groups, self-
help, resources and education
to families who are going
through the grief process after
losing a child of any age. The
National Gathering is like a con-
vention, where there are speak-
ers and workshops that pertain
to grieving the loss of a child
and how to survive the grief.
We are currently looking for
workshop presenters to partici-
pate in this year's National
Gathering, here in Tampa.


Complete an online workshop
application to submit your work-
shop information if interested in
facilitating one this year. We are
still in need of monetary dona-
tions, as well as donated items
for table favors, goodie bags,
butterfly boutique, silent auction
and raffles.
A seven- meal plan is $145.
Visit the National BP/USA
website at www.bereavedpar-
entsusa.org or call 813-661-
0680 or 813-495-7539.
"End-Of- Life Ethics" free
teleconference, 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday, May 3, at the Hos-
pice of Citrus County Wings
Community Education Center,
8471 W Periwinkle Lane, Suite
A, Homosassa. Coffee and
doughnuts will be provided at
8:30 am.
To make a reservation, call
Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020.
Visit www.hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
INVERNESS "Meet the
Experts" panel from 8:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Friday, May 4:
second of an ongoing mini-con-
ference series hosted by Hos-
pice of Citrus County at the
Lakeside Bar & Grill (formerly
VanderValk Lakeside), 4543 E.
Windmill Drive, Inverness.
A panel of local profession-
als, expert in financial planning,
tax law, elder law, estate plan-
ning, insurance, real estate and
charitable giving will include
Sally Long, Edward Serra,
Shawn Fitzpatrick, Eddie
Leven, Debbie Rector and An-
thony Palumbo with moderator
John J. Ceparano, CFP, PFS,
CPA, M, principal of Joseph
Capital Management.
Complimentary continental
breakfast included. Space is


limited. Reserve a seat by call-
ing Linda Baker at 352-527-
2020.
Free seminar conducted
by Craig O'Dell, AAMS, finan-
cial adviser in Crystal River,
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 8,
at Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River, 311 NE Fourth Ave., be-
hind the Walgreens on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and U.S.
19. O'Dell will talk about long-
term health care planning and
what long-term care insurance
is and isn't. Sunshine Gardens
Crystal River will provide spe-
cialized care to those with all
types of dementia. For more in-
formation on SGCR or for help
regarding Alzheimer's, call the
facility at 352-563-0235 or visit
www.sgwseniors.com.
The Citrus Alliance
Against Adult Abuse (C4A)
monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m.
the second Wednesday
monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills.
For information, call Judy
Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your
help is needed to protect our
vulnerable against abuse, neg-
lect and exploitation.
Partners for a Sub-
stance-Free Citrus Inc. will
meet the second Thursday
monthly in the basement of the
Citrus County School Board of-
fice in Inverness, 1007 W. Main
St. Use the elevator to go to the
basement.
0 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting.
0 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee,
doughnuts, networking.
0 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. mem-
bership meeting.
Call the office at 352-389-
0472 or email substancefree.
citrus@yahoo.com.


Mother's Day Eve bal-
loon release 7 p.m. Saturday,
May 12, at Fort Island Trail
beach in Crystal River to honor
and remember deceased
children.
Email heapingparentsheal@
yahoo.com.
LECANTO EMT and
Paramedic Program classes
at Nature Coast EMS, 3876 W.
Country Hill Drive in Lecanto.
Contact student services to
complete an application.
The office is open from 8:30
a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday; however, ap-
pointments can be scheduled
after business hours if needed.
For admission requirements,
visit www.naturecoastems.org
or call 352-249-4700.
0 The 16-week EMT (Emer-
gency Medical Technician)
classes begin Monday, May 14,
designed to prepare students to
provide basic life support meas-
ures as a member of an ambu-
lance crew, at the scene of an
accident, during transport to a
hospital or medical facility, and
in the medical facility.
It will prepare students to sit
for the Florida Bureau of EMS
EMT Certification Exam.
0 The 10-month paramedic
program classes begin July 23.
EMT students who have re-
cently graduated may register
for the paramedic course; how-
ever, are required to have their
EMT state of Florida certifica-
tion by the end of phase one
(midterm).
The paramedic program is
designed to prepare students to
provide advanced life support
measures.
See GROUPS/Page C4


11 --I -, I tI
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HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 C3


I





C4 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

United States, according to
a study published online
April 10 in Cancer. The key
word here is "early" We
must realize that it takes
many years or usually
decades before this X-ray
exposure causes any signifi-
cant effect. So, if you are a
senior citizen, the benefit
may outweigh the risk.
The study reveals a statis-
tically significant increased
risk for meningioma in peo-



NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Autism support group
sponsored by Isaiah Founda-
tion Inc., for adults taking care
of autistic children at home or at
work. "What is Pivotal Re-
sponse Therapy (PRT) and
how can it be used?" discus-
sion will be led by Brenda Bren-
nan, PRT clinician, from 6:30 to
8 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, at Cit-
rus Family Center, 719 S. Otis
Ave., Lecanto.
To sign up, contact Barbara
Washburn at isaiahfoundation
@ymail.com or 352-447-1775.
Visit isaiahfoundation.org. No
sitter is available adults only.
Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter sup-
port group: Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Anne
Black at 352-527-4600.
BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
first Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo at 352-592-8128.
HUDSON Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point
Alzheimer's support group
meetings 10 a.m. to noon the
first Tuesday monthly in the
second-floor conference room.
Call Maria Curley at 727-992-
1358 or Kathy Montero at the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion at 727-848-8888. Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point
is at 14000 Fivay Road in Hud-
son. Visit www.rmchealth.com
or www.heartoftampa.com.
SPRING HILL-- Care-
giver Support Group, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly, at the Florida Cancer
Institute-New Hope's Spring Hill
Center, 10441 Quality Drive,
Suite 203 in the Medical Arts
Building next to Spring Hill Hos-
pital. Call Pamela McGee, facil-
itator, at 352-688-7744.
NEW PORT RICHEY -
Community Chatterboxes
support group to assist individu-
als suffering from communica-
tion deficits as a result of a
cerebral vascular accident or
other neurological disorders, 3
to 4 p.m. every other Thursday
at Community Hospital, 5637
Marine Parkway, New Port
Richey, FL 34652. Caregivers
and spouses are encouraged to
attend. Call 727-845-0757.
Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 11
a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at Sandy Oaks RV Resort,
6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills, for families, friends


ple who underwent bitew-
ing or panoramic X-rays.
The population-based
case-control study com-
pared 1,433 patients with in-
tracranial meningioma with
a control group of 1,350 peo-
ple with similar traits who
had not been diagnosed
with a meningioma.
Over a lifetime, patients
with meningioma were
more than twice as likely as
control subjects to report
having had a bitewing exam,
which uses an X-ray film
held in place by a tab be-
tween the teeth.
Regardless of age, more


and anyone affected by MS.
Call 352-422-5868.
BROOKSVILLE "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope's
Brooksville Center, 7154 Med-
ical Center Drive. Call Mary
Capo at 352-596-1926.
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support
Group, 10 a.m. to noon the first
Monday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids
Central Inc. will facilitate the
meeting. Call 352-387-3540.
OCALA-- The
Alzheimer's and Memory Dis-
orders support group of Ocala,
3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Medical Office
Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W.
46th Court, Community Room.
Call 352-401-1453.

Weekly meetings
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group, 6:45
p.m. Wednesday at Dunnellon
Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St., Room 204 in of-
fice building, use right-side en-
trance across from the
Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is
for family and friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group: call 888-947-8885 or go
to www.NARANONFL.org.
"Recovery from Food Ad-
diction," 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Thursday at St. Anne's Church,
9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River, in the parish hall library.
Call Peg at 410-903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a free
12-step recovery program for
anyone suffering from food ob-


HEALTH & LIFE


frequent bitewing films
were associated with in-
creased risk. People with
meningioma were 1.4 to 1.9
times more likely than con-
trol subjects to have re-
ceived bitewing exams
yearly or more often.
Bitewing X-rays are rela-
tively common. More than
92 percent of the population
studied had undergone one.
This study is the largest of
its kind to explore the ef-
fects of relatively common
dental X-rays, according to
the researchers. Most previ-
ous data came from studies
that looked at the effects of


session, overeating, undereat-
ing or bulimia. For a list of
meetings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit: www.foodaddicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday at
Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in the
back hall, St. Thomas Church,
off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal
Street. Group is composed of
men and women who are expe-
riencing grief and are con-
vinced "Life can be good
again." Open to all. Come or
call Anne at 352-212-0632.
AI-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic, 550 S. U.S. 41.
Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
*Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Serenity:


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high-dose single exposures
such as atomic bombs, or a
small number of high-dose
exposures like radiation
therapy, the researchers
note.
Meningioma is a tumor
arising from the meninges,
which are membranes that
surround the brain and
spinal cord. Although tech-
nically not brain tumors,
they occur inside the skull
and can push inward on the
brain from the outside. Most
of them (90 percent) are
pathologically benign. Ap-
proximately 170,000 people
in the United States have


10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 352-
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living Wa-
ters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne
St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at
352-527-2443. Free and open
to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
S It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 352-382-0851.
Overeaters Anonymous:


been diagnosed with these
tumors.
What does this mean to
me? Should I never have any
dental X-rays? No, but you
should have it only when it is
absolutely necessary This is
particularly true for chil-
dren, teenagers and young
adults. Do not get annual
routine dental X-rays. It is
absolutely not indicated.
Also, we should not ex-
trapolate these findings for
all sorts of X-rays. If you
need an occasional CT scan
or bone scan as per your
doctor, you should not worry
about risk of cancer from


0 5 p.m. Wednesday at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church. Call
Rita at 352-382-8503.
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at 352-746-5019.
Solution, 3 to 4 p.m. Tues-
days at the Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. Call Marilyn at 352-
726-9112.
10:30 a.m. Wednesday at
St. Anne's Church, 9870 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River,
in the parish hall library. Call
Peg at 410-903-7740.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
352-341-0777.
The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
more. Weekly meeting. Call
352-637-3196.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at 352-422-3234.
Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy at 352-527-8399.
Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

them. Many of my cancer
patients ask me about risk
of cancer from a PET scan
or CT scan. Remember, in
these situations, benefits of
the study far outweigh the
risk.


Dr Sunil Gandhi is a hema-
tologist and oncologist He
is the volunteer medical
adviser of the Citrus Unit
of the American Cancer So-
ciety Write to 521 N
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461, email
sgandhi@tampabayrrcom
or call 352-746-0707.


two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days. Child care available. Call
CASA at 352-344-8111.
Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 352-503-3262. The
National DBSAAssociation's
number is 800-826-3632.
Celebrate Recovery:
0 7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Recov-
ery Fellowship Church, 2242
W. State Road 44. Call 352-
726-2800.
7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Call 352-746-6200.
Gulf to Lake Church Min-
istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Dinner at 6 p.m. Friday. Call
352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We
offer referrals to Celebrate Re-
covery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 352-628-2874.
Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and codepen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at 352-465-1644
or Nancy at 352-794-0017.
See GROUPS/Page C5


H 0 P E Our Reason to Relay

This is Relay For Life, a community event where people come
together to remember loved ones, inspire others and
celebrate life. It's your chance to make a difference in the fight
against cancer. The money you raise will fund lifesaving
research, education, advocacy and service programs. Call us
to register your team for this unforgettable event. This is the
American Cancer Society.


"You feel so helpless when cancer hits. The American Cancer Society
Relay For Life allows you to fight back, gives you hope that we are
going to make a difference, find a cure, save lives."
Joanne from Massachusetts
American Cancer Society Relay For Life Volunteer


Lecanto May 4
Lecanto High School


4A



RELAY
FOR LIFE
Ameic


For more information call 637-5577
CI TRUS --COUNT


www.chronicleonline.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Myth vs. fact: Diagnosing fungal nails not so simple


I get many questions regarding
fungal toenails frequently in
my office as one might expect
because I am a podiatrist. Most
people with a discol-
ored nails assume or
are visually "diag-
nosed" by lay persons
and professionals as
having nail fungus if "I
their nails are lifting,
discolored, thick or b'
have debris beneath
them.
I find it very difficult
to educate patients and Dr. Davi
dispel many myths BEST
about fungal nails, but I FORI
still try
Contrary to what


most people think, a majority of
nails that are lifting, discolored,
thick or have debris beneath them
are not due to fungus.
Nail fungus infection, called
onychomycosis ("onycho-" means
nail, "-mycosis" means fungus in-
fection), can only truly be diag-
nosed by nail plate testing. A
painless clipping of a suspicious
nail must be sent to a pathology
department for testing to know if


fungus is present in the sample. A
clipping of the nail or nails in
question is placed in a plastic bag-
gie and sent to an outside lab.


i-i-

d Raynor
FOOT
WARD


The three most com-
mon pathologic tests
performed on the nail
clipping are KOH, PAS
stain, and fungal
culture.
Exposing a portion of
the sample to potas-
sium hydroxide and ex-
amining the sample
microscopically per-
forms the KOH test.
This is an older test
where a noticeable
change in color when
KOH is applied to the


sample indicates the presence of
fungal elements.
The periodic acid Schiff test
(PAS) is a test that seems to have a
much greater sensitivity for dis-
tinguishing the presence of fungi
in tissue according to many der-
matopathology sources. Standard
staining techniques helpful in
identifying the presence of bacte-
ria are of little help in identifying
the presence of fungal elements.


The PAS and KOH tests are per-
formed quickly, and if positive, the
sample is sent for the final test, a
culture, which takes much longer
The fungal culture deposits the
nail sample in question in a media
to incubate fungi to identify the
exact species of infection to prop-
erly target medication options to
treat the confirmed infection. The
culture will be negative or positive
and identify the exact pathogen to
target medical treatment
A negative culture is a diagnosis
for nail dystrophy or onychodys-
trophy The nail is in the condition
it is in for reasons other than fun-
gus, and no treatment for fungus is
thus indicated.
Thick, discolored and lifting
nails that fail to demonstrate a di-
agnosis of onychomycosis frus-
trate many patients, some of
whom even disbelieve the lab re-
sults. However, these three tests
are very reliable and accurate.
Nail dystrophy is a term used to
describe toe and finger nails that
have a disfigured appearance due
to reasons other than infection. In-
herited characteristics, trauma to
the nail root or matrix, nail plate


manifestations of dermatological
conditions, such as eczema and
psoriasis, peripheral artery dis-
ease, lymphedema, diabetes and
diseases like systemic sclerosis or
scleroderma are just a few exam-
ples of possible causes of nail plate
changes in the absence of infection.
Multiple studies in the medical
literature estimate that fungal nail
infections worldwide affect an es-
timated 20 percent or less of the
population. These numbers have
been investigated many times in-
dependently with very similar re-
sults and conclusions each time.
I feel if a patient has a question
about a nail they should be edu-
cated and given the option to send
for testing or not. I do not believe
in prescribing oral antifungal
medication without a positive cul-
ture. Treatment options for sam-
ples that are positive for fungus
include living with the nails as
they are and not treating them, ap-
plying prescription Ciclopirox 8
percent nail lacquer daily for a
year, debridement, the use of an
oral antifungal, laser treatments
that are not covered by insurance,
or permanent nail removal.


Treatment options for samples
that are negative or nails that are
simply dystrophic include living
with the problem or neglecting the
nails, debridement or trimming
them down and back, or a perma-
nent nail removal of the nail.
Removal of a nail with the
hopes of it growing back in a bet-
ter cosmetic appearance is
painful and futile.
A laser treatment for onychomy-
cosis is available in Inverness. I do
know that the treatment still does
not have a proven track record in
the medical literature, costs from
$600 to $1,200 depending on how
many toes are involved, how badly
they are affected, and how many
treatments they will need. Insur-
ance will not pay for this treatment
and there are no guarantees of
success.


David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness and can
be reached at 352-726-3668 or
visit his website www.
AdvancedAnkleandFoot
Centers. corn to send questions or
suggestions for future columns.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C5

SPRING HILL Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at 352-346-8864.
Organizations
Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affil-
iated support groups are for
family members, caregivers
and others interested in learn-
ing more about Alzheimer's dis-
ease. Meetings are open to
everyone and free of charge. To
arrange free respite care so
you can attend a group, call the
Hernando office at 352-688-
4537 or 800-772-8672.
Website: www.alzsupport.
com Live chat every Wed-
nesday at noon. Message
boards open at all times to post
questions and leave replies.
Join the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion online community at www.
alz.org/livingwith_alzheimers_
message_boards_lwa.asp.
Brooksville: Lykes Memo-
rial County Library, 238 Howell
Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday
monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at
352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill Hos-
pital Senior Partners, 11361
Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first
Thursday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Residence
at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest
Road; 2 p.m. third Monday
monthly. Call Diane Koenig at
352-683-9009.
First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that run
on a monthly basis. All groups
are open to the public and free
of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in
Room 203 in the Administration
Building:
First Monday: diabetic
support group.
Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
0 Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Anyone
bringing a loved one for the first
time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information
forms. Call 352-628-4083 for
meeting dates.
Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. Sup-
port group meetings are in the
CMHS Administration Building
unless indicated.
ACS Man to Man Prostate
Support and Education Pro-
gram, 11:30 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly. Meetings
are in the conference room at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute at 522 N. Lecanto
Highway in the Allen Ridge Med-
ical Mall. Call 352-527-0106.
AHEC Quit Smoking
Group: 3 p.m. Tuesday at
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Allen Ridge Medical
Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support
Group: 11:30 a.m. the second
Friday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Call Judy
Bonard at 352-527-4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:


4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.
Cancer Support: at Cancer
Treatment Center. Call Jean-
nette at 352-746-1100.


000b8y7


ASSISTED LIVING


NATURE COAST ASSISTED LIVING
279 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto.........527-9720

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Crystal River................................. 563-0235
CARDIOLOGY
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Govindarajan, Balachander MD FACC
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Pasupuleti, Suman MD
Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Miguel A. MD FACC
Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI
Savage, Kenneth L. MD
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness...726-8353
760 SE 5th Terace, Crystal River....795-4165
211 S Osceola Ave., Inverness.......726-8353
601 E Dixie Ave. Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg.... .......... ............. 352-315-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210
Lake Sumter Professional Plaza,
The Villages............................. 352-751-3356
CHIROPRACTIC

CHANEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Chaney, William DC DIBCN
3470 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills.................................. 270-8869
4056 Commercial Way,
Spring Hill.................................352-686-6385

DENTAL

CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS
Holland, Edwin L. DDS
Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
2231 Highway 44 W.- Unit 101,
Inverness...................................... 726-5854

CITRUS HILLS DENTAL
Davila, Alexa DMD
Davila, Jose DDS
2460 N. EssexAvenue,
Hernando........... ................... 527-1614

COMPLETE FAMILY, COSMETIC & IMPLANT
DENTISTRY
Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA
1815 SE US 19,
Crystal River.... ........... ............. 795-1223

LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, JeremyA. DMD PA
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa................................ 628-3443

TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace,
Leca nto............................................746-9 111
DERMATOLOGY

BAY DERMATOLOGY & COSMETIC
SURGERY PA
Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Cert.
Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Cert.
Broughton, Brandi PA-C
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.................................. 503-2002

SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
Collins, Margaret MD
Massullo, Ralph MD FAAD
Wartels, Michael MD FAAD
Bonomo, Brian PA-C
Chatham, Kristy PA-C
Watkins, Erin PA-C
Estes, Elizabeth ARNP
525 N. Dacie Point,
Lecanto......................... 746-2200 873-1500


Diabetes Support Group:
Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at
352-341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer
Support: Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Call Wendy
Hall at 352-527-0106.


Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office
Building. Call 352-560-6266 or
352-344-6538 to register.
Look Good Feel Better


Group: monthly at Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Call the American Cancer Soci-
ety at 800-395-5665.
Ostomy Support: 2 p.m.


third Sunday, Cypress Room at
CMHS Historic Building. Call
Steve Spielman at 352-229-
4202, Sue Penner at 352-560-
7918, Sharon Brummer at
352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel
Shipley at 352-341-0005.


PAID ADVERTISING -



a r nuIJ


ELDER LAW ATTORNEY

Sean W. Scott, PA
3233 East Bay Drive, Largo.....727-539-0181

FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE

BEVERLY HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
Alugubelli, Venkat R. MD FAAFP
3737 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills......................... ........ 746-1515

HEALTH & WELLCARE SERVICES OF FL
DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
McCollough, Barney PA
Tzivanis, James PA
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy,
Crystal River................................ 794-3872

SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Co, Alistair W. MD
Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N.ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC

3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Inverness..................................... 341-5520

7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.... ........................ 382-8282

10489 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs.............................. 489-2486

FITNESS

DYNABODY FITNESS CLUB
2232 Hwy. 44 W., Inverness............344-3553

INVERNESS YOGAAND WELLNESS
CENTER
118 N. Pine Ave,
Downtown Inverness.................... 726-7060

HEALTH EDUCATION

COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto....... ........................... 746-6721

3001 S.W. College Road,
Ocala.................................... 352-873-5800

Nature Coast EMS...................... 249-4700

HEALTH RELATED PRODUCTS

FURNITURE PALACE & MATTRESS
WAREHOUSE
3106 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness.................................... 726-2999

WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER
1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
Hernando.................................... 344-8882

HEARING

GENESIS HEARING CARE
20336 E Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon................................352-489-9479

HOME HEALTH SERVICES

SENIOR HOME CARE
494 S Pleasant Grove Rd.,
Inverness.................................... 344-0150


HOSPICE

HPH HOSPICE
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills................................ 527-4600
HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
502 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.................................... 726-1551

MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
................................................ 3 52 -86 7-8 18 1

REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Bayonet Point
14000 Fivay Road,
H udson...................................727-819-2929
INDEPENDENT LIVING

INVERNESS CLUB APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave.,
Inverness .......................................344-8477

INTERNAL MEDICINE
Gira S. Shah, MD
203 S. Seminole Ave.,
Inverness.................................... 726-7800

TRI-COUNTY INFECTIOUS DISEASE
CONSULTANTS, LLC
Gillikin, Sheila MD
Jaimangal, Shantie DO
212 S.Pine Ave.,
Inverness.................................... 633-0215
MASSAGE THERAPY

SERENITY DAY SPA
1031 N. Commerce Terrace,
Lecanto....................... ............ 746-1156

MENTAL HEALTH

Albright, Dianne PHD, LMHC, ACS, NCC
111 W. Main St. Ste 301,
Inverness, FL ... ......... ............. 637-1200

Ford, Cyndie Ford, LMHC NCC
470 Pleasant Grove Rd.,
Inverness........................................ 341-0435

NURSING HOMES

CYPRESS COVE CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.,
Crystal River................................. 795-8832

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH & REHAB
2730 W. Marc Knighton Ct.,
Lecanto........................................ 746-9500

LIFE CARE CENTER
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.,
Lecanto...........................................746-4434

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY

COMPREHENSIVE WOMEN'S
HEALTHCARE OF CITRUS COUNTY
Miller, Joseph DO FACOG
11521 W. Emerald Oaks Dr.,
Crystal River................................. 794-6060

ONCOLOGY/HEMATOLOGY
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT ONCOLOGY
INSTITUTE
Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto........................................ 527-0106
605 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness...................................... 726-3400


OPHTHALMOLOGY


SUNCOAST EYE CENTER
EYE SURGERY INSTITUTE
Freedman, Alan M. MD
Seigel, Lawrence A. MD
221 NE Hwy 19,
Crystal River...... ...................... 795-2526

ORTHOPEDIC/SPORTS MEDICINE

GULFCOAST SPINE INSTITUTE
Ronzo, James Joseph, DO
Bono, Frank S. DO,
Inverness.............................. 855-485-3262

KIDDER ORTHOPEDIC LABORATORIES
5676 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River................................. 795-5556

NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDIC &
SPORTS MEDICINE
Choung, Walter I, MD
Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO
2155 W. Mustang Blvd.,
Beverly Hills................................. 746-5707
2236 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness ... ............................... 344-2663
520 SE 8th Ave.,
Crystal River................................. 564-2663
PET/CT SERVICES

PET/CT SERVICES OF FLORIDA
3404 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills.................................. 746-6888
1541 SW 1stAve., Suite 101,
O cala .......................................352-622-1133
PHARMACIES
BRASHEAR'S PHARMACY
206 W. Dampier St.,
Inverness...................................... 637-2079
471 N. Dacie Point,
Lecanto........ .............. ............. 746-3420
PODIATRY

ADVANCED ANKLE & FOOT CENTERS OF FL
Raynor, David B. DPM
490 Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness...................................... 726-3668

CITRUS PODIATRY CENTER
Daly, Edward J. DPM
Pritchyk, Kenneth P. DPM
4930 S. Suncoast Blvd. Suite A,
Homosassa................................... 621-9200

2385 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto......................................... 746-0077
SURGERY

BON IMAGE
Sastry, Narendra MD
5466 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa...... ........................ 503-2019

Mohammadbhoy, Adnan DO PA
11535 W. Emerald Oaks Dr.,
Crystal River................................. 794-6056

PREMIER VEIN CENTER
Sharma, Ravi MD
7767 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa................................... 621-0777

UROLOGY
UROLOGY INSTITUTE OF CENTRAL
FLORIDA
Son, Kenneth A. MD
605 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.......................................... 341-6338


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 C5





C6 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


ORGANS
Continued from Page C1

permission, and also asked
the young man's sister, Cera
Fearing.
Fearing said he was
heartbroken and reluctant
to abandon an organ that



BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

eat a diet made up mostly of
fruits, vegetables and whole
grains; and watch how
much alcohol is consumed.
As a matter of fact, a re-
cent study published by ACS
researchers showed that
non-smokers who most
closely followed these rec-
ommendations had a signif-
icantly lower risk of
premature death from can-
cer, cardiovascular disease,
and all causes when com-
pared to people who fol-
lowed the guidelines least
closely
Answers about how to re-
duce the risk of recurrence
were not as clear But
they've recently gotten
clearer
During the past several
years, evidence has accu-
mulated for a number of
cancers that achieving and
maintaining a healthy



GRILLO
Continued from Page Cl

inflammation and the in-
flammation is the allergy,
but fevers are seldom noted.
Snoring: Can a patient
be trained or conditioned
not to snore, and what about
the spray for the throat that
eliminates snoring?
Snoring and sleep apnea
affect millions of people in
many ways from minor cos-
metic snoring issues to health
issues related to sleep apnea
and poor oxygenation. Unfor-
tunately, we have no con-
scious control over snoring.



LUCAS
Continued from Page C1

10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Thursday,
May 24, with our compli-
ments. No reservations are
required, but I would suggest
you arrive early prior to the
class you choose to attend.
Our administration office is
on Homosassa Trail in
Lecanto.
In other exciting news,
after months of hard work
and preparation, Nature
Coast EMS has been selected
to compete at the annual
Florida Sterling Conference
Team Showcase in Orlando
for the state championship
the week of May 29 through
June 1 to vie for the Gover-
nor's Sterling Award.
The team showcase helps
to facilitate the regional ap-
plication of performance im-
provement principles and
recognition across the six
state regions. As one of six
teams chosen across the
state, this is an honor for Na-
ture Coast EMS and the citi-
zens of Citrus County. Citrus
County is part of Region 4
and includes Hernando,
Pasco, Pinellas and Hillsbor-
ough counties.
Established in 1992, the
Florida Sterling Council is a
public/private not-for-profit
corporation supported by
the Executive Office of the
Governor Since 1992, 66 or-
ganizations have received
the Governor's Sterling
Award (GSA) for significant


had been his only hope for a
normal life. But he decided
it was the only option that
made sense. His sister, too,
was crushed but said she
didn't hesitate when told
her kidney might help
someone else.
"I just assumed it's dam-
aged, it's garbage," she said.
"The fact that they were


weight, getting enough phys-
ical activity and eating a
healthy diet can reduce the
chance of recurrence, and
increase the likelihood of
disease-free survival after a
diagnosis of cancer
Extra weight is linked to
increased risk of the cancer
coming back and decreased
survival rates among breast,
prostate, and colorectal can-
cer survivors, and possibly
others. Being overweight is
a risk factor for these three
cancers and others, and
many people with cancer
are overweight at the time
of diagnosis.
For these survivors, set-
ting lifelong goals to achieve
and maintain a healthy
weight are among the most
important health-related
goals that can be set
Healthy ways to control
weight include limiting
high-calorie foods, drinking
fewer beverages high in fat
and/or added sugar, eating
more low-calorie foods like
vegetables and fruits, and


There are hundreds of de-
vices registered as cures for
snoring. These devices are
effective only in the fact that
they sometimes make it im-
possible for the patient to
sleep, so therefore he does-
n't snore. But realistically,
they have little impact on
snoring.
Snoring and sleep apnea,
however, can be helped
through lifestyle changes
such as weight loss, diet and
exercise, medical treatment
including approved devices
for sleep apnea, and surgery
to un-obstruct the ob-
structed airway
Loud noises: Can you
become accustomed to loud


improvement and achieve-
ment of performance excel-
lence. The GSA is derived
from the internationally ac-
claimed Baldrige Criteria
for Performance Excellence
and is based on the applica-
tion of the Sterling Criteria.
The Governor's Sterling
Award is recognized as the
pre-eminent state award
process in the nation. Ster-


able to give it to someone
that somehow was able to
benefit from it was great."
Gomez was selected be-
cause he was a good match.
But Gallon said doctors also
thought Gomez's medical
background would help him
understand the complexi-
ties. Gomez said he had
never heard of reusing


adding more physical activ-
ity throughout the day
Sounds just like what I
mentioned above, doesn't
it?
Many studies have shown
that being physically active
has a tremendous impact on
the quality of life of cancer
survivors.
Now, studies have demon-
strated that physical activity
after cancer diagnosis is
also associated with a lower
risk of the cancer coming
back, and improved overall
survival among multiple
cancer survivor groups, in-
cluding breast, colon,
prostate, and ovarian
cancer
Among breast cancer sur-
vivors, a recent analysis
showed that exercising after
a diagnosis of cancer was
associated with a 34 percent
lower risk of breast cancer
deaths, a 41 percent lower
risk of dying from all causes,
and a 24 percent lower risk
of breast cancer recurrence.
Among colon cancer sur-


noises if exposed on a regu-
lar basis? The bottom line
with loud noises is you can-
not condition your ears.
If the noise is too loud, it
begins to destroy sensitive
nerve endings in your inner
ear and they are gone for-
ever Therefore, the damage
is permanent
If a person is working on
a regular basis and exposed
to excessive noise, ear pro-
tection is suggested. If there
is any question, you should
see your doctor and have
your ears tested. Discuss
with him or her the environ-
ment in which you are ex-
posed to noise to see if it is a
risk factor


ling promotes organiza-
tional performance excel-
lence through the offering of
three assessment tools. The
Governor's Sterling Award,
Sterling Challenge and Ster-
ling Navigator provide or-
ganizations at all levels
explicit feedback on system-
atically improving their
management approaches.
Nature Coast EMS team


transplant organs, and he
worried about taking what
seemed like damaged
goods. But he agreed after
the Northwestern team ex-
plained the risks and possi-
ble benefits.
The removal and retrans-
plant operations took place
July 1. Within two days, the
transplanted kidney had re-


vivors, studies suggest exer-
cise cuts deaths from colon
cancer and all causes, and
cuts the risk of the cancer
coming back by up to 50
percent.
The recommendations of
the ACS encourage sur-
vivors to aim to exercise for
at least 150 minutes per
week, and to include
strength training exercises
at least two days per week.
For survivors who have not
been previously active,
gradually working up to
these recommendations is
the way to go.
Recent reviews suggest
that food choices may affect
the risk for recurrence and
overall survival among sur-
vivors as well. The majority
of these studies have fo-
cused on breast cancer, but
more evidence has also
emerged for colon and
prostate cancer survivors.
Similar to what we've
seen for cancer prevention,
it looks like it's the overall
dietary pattern that is im-


Does avoiding speaking
or singing and whispering
when your voice is hoarse
help you? Think of your
voice and vocal cords like
any other structure in your
body
For example, if you sprain
your ankle, you are going to
avoid walking on that
sprained ankle for a while
as it heals. The same thing is
with the vocal cords.
Voice rest does help.
Whispering is worse, be-
cause is strains the voice
box to produce the whisper
sound and doesn't help or
aid in healing.
Prolonged hoarseness
over three weeks may be a


members are active with
area festivals, and informa-
tion & health fairs around
Citrus County. See us at the
Information Fiesta at Citrus
Hills Country Club on
Thursday, May 3; the All
Hazards Expo on Saturday,
May 19, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River; the Stroke Awareness
Event at the Lutheran


Go to www.chronicleonline.com/subscribercontest,
or fill out the form below and mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
, : to enter for your chance to win!


gained function. Gallon said
he is convinced the damage
is reversed.
Gomez is taking anti-re-
jection drugs and is off dial-
ysis. "I finally feel normal,"
he said. Fearing is back on
dialysis and said he is doing
OK.
Gallon said it is not un-
common for patients with


portant for cancer survivor-
ship, not one food, or even
one food group, that makes
the difference.
It's likely the combination
of many different nutrients
coming from many different
foods, working together, that
offers the best protection.
Studies suggest the best
protection comes from a
diet that is high in fruits,
vegetables and, whole
grains, includes more fish
and poultry instead of red
and processed meats, in-
cludes low-fat instead of
full-fat dairy products, and
includes nuts and olive oil
instead of less healthy
sources of fat, such as butter
or trans fats found in many
processed snack foods.
Do we have all the an-
swers related to nutrition,
physical activity, and cancer
survivorship?
No, there is so much more
we need to learn.
But do we have enough
information and evidence to
recommend that anyone


sign of a serious health
problem, especially in pa-
tients who smoke or drink
alcohol regularly, and
should be evaluated by a
physician.
"Hey, doc, I didn't go
swimming. How come I
have swimmer's ear?"
The fact is that when any
type of water gets into the
ear from either swimming,
showering, or hair washing,
it is a vehicle for bacteria or
fungus to get inside the ear
canal. Usually, the water
runs back out, but some-
times the bacteria gets
trapped from some wax ac-
cumulation and an infection
will start up.


Church on State Road 44 in
Inverness on Tuesday, May
22; and the Cobia Tourna-
ment in Homosassa the
weekend of June 2 and 3.


Katie Lucas is the public
information officer at
Nature Coast EMS. She can
be reached at 352-249-4730
or katie.lucas@nature


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Fearing's disease to go
through more than one
transplanted kidney, and he
expects Fearing will eventu-
ally get another one.
Despite his own misfor-
tune, Fearing said he is "ex-
tremely happy about being a
part of this medical break-
through" that might end up
helping others.


who's been diagnosed with
cancer should strive to be at
a healthy weight, live a
physically active lifestyle
and add more fruits, vegeta-
bles and whole grains to
their meals and snacks?
Absolutely yes, we do. It's
an important message for
everyone I know who has
been diagnosed with any
kind of cancer


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, member of the
Citrus County Unit and
Florida Division Board of
Directors of the American
Cancer Society Watch
"Navigating Cancer,"
hosted by Dr Bennett, on
WYKE TV,at 7:30p.m.
Tuesday and 10 a.m.
Thursday. Ifyou have any
suggestions for topics, or
have any questions, contact
him at 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, or email at
cjbennett@rboi. com.


This is a very common, yet
readily treatable problem.
If your ear feels blocked
or it itches or has some dis-
comfort and it goes beyond
a few days, it should be
checked out.
Other signs include
swelling of the ear and dis-
charge from the ear These
types of symptoms suggest
that you should be seen by
your doctor


Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 352-795-0011 or
visit CrystalCommunity
ENTcom.


coastems. org. Nature Coast
EMS is an accredited,
nonprofit 501(c)3
established in 2000 to
provide emergency
medical services to Citrus
County Watch "Every
Minute Counts" hosted by
Mike Hall, CEO, Nature
Coast EMS on WYKE TVat
8p.m. Tuesday and 10 a.m.
Wednesday.


The #1 Provider of News and

Advertising Information in

Citrus County


Call to see how you can receive

2 Weeks Free

352.563.5655


CHR NICEE
Sww .chronicleoir. o e.corr.


Citrus Count's May 14 2012

2012 World's Greatest 5abj Shower at the Citrus County Auditorium

Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby Shower! Learn about taking care
of yourself and your baby. Parents of infants under 6 months old are
also invited. There will be exhibits, games, door prizes, a scavenger CHOOSE ONE
hunt and gifts for moms, dads and babies! First Session: 3:00pm 5:00pm OR
Second Session: 6:00pm 8:00pmr
NO COST!!! Call 228-9047 for information. Cli lI)N6I:p


Seven Days A Wee


I Rain or S ^hin


769452







Page C7 TUESDAY, MAY 1,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Oakwood Village
HOA to meet
The Oakwood Village
Homeowners Association
quarterly meeting is at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2, at the
Central Ridge Library.
The speaker will be from
Hospice. Light refreshments
provided.
For more information, call
Dee at 352-249-7651.
Sale to raise funds
for Lighthouse
A fundraiser sale will begin
at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at
The Lighthouse, 3185 E.
Thomas St., Inverness (near
Croft Avenue). The event is
to raise money for The Light-
house, which is part of The
Centers.
For sale will be ceramics,
clothing, kitchen utensils,
toys, games, electronics and
many other items.
All proceeds are used to
benefit social skills of people
with mental illnesses through
The Centers' social program.
For more information, call
352-344-2158.
Transit retirees
convene May 4
New York City Transit Re-
tirees of Florida Chapter No.
9, Citrus County, will meet at
1 p.m. Friday, May 4, in the
Beverly Hills Community
Building, 1 Civic Circle.
All retired from the New
York City Transit System re-
siding in Citrus County are
welcome, as are any retirees
from the NYC Transit System
visiting locally.
Refreshments will be
served. For more information,
call President Clarence Redd
at 352-527-8418 or Secretary
Clarisse D'Adamo at 352-
527-2508.
Novelists to meet
in Beverly Hills
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society
meets at 1 p.m. on the first
Saturday of each month in
the Community Room at the
Central Ridge Library, 425 W.
Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills.
On May 5, Valerie Weston,
treasurer of FCHNS, will
present "Historical Research
in your Pajamas!" The pro-
gram will feature many
sources of information readily
accessible online from
around the world.
Everyone interested in
reading, writing and historical
research is welcome to at-
tend. Call Marian Fox at 352-
726-0162 or go to
www.fchns.org.
Citrus Hills to host
info 'fiesta'
A free, 90-minute 2012 Cit-
rus Hills Informational Fiesta,
sponsored by the Citrus Hills
Civic Association, will begin
at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May
3, in the Hampton Room of
Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club.
The venue allows resi-
dents to meet and ask ques-
tions of local government
officials about how the county
functions. Many other non-
government organizations
throughout the county are
also represented. Some are:
Nature Coast EMS; Citrus
Memorial Health System;
Seven Rivers Regional Hos-
pital; Hospice of Citrus
County; Hernando-Pasco
Hospice; The Art League;
Comfort Keepers; Mended
Hearts of Citrus County;
Guardian Ad Litem; Kings
Bay Rotary; National Active
and Retired Federal Employ-
ees Association; Citrus Hills
Development; Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County;
SCORE and Junior Achieve-
ment; the Chronicle; The Vil-
lage Crier, King's Bay Home
Association; and United Way.
For more information, call
Cathi Smith at 352-746-7532
or Colleen Welch at 352-


560-7504.


Special to the Chronicle

Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
will sponsor the organization's first car
show, Cruisin' for Kidz, on May 5 at the
Love Honda/Motorsports property on
U.S. 19 in Homosassa. Car entry fee is
$15, which includes tickets for two
adults. Groups must pre-register and
prepay to reserve parking spots to-
gether Cost at the gate is $5, with chil-
dren younger than 12 admitted for free.


Any kind of car classic, old, new,
antique, or otherwise or truck or mo-
torcycle may be entered as long as the
owner is proud of the vehicle and
wants to show it Classes to be judged
are 1976 and Older, 1977 and Newer,
Off-Road Vehicles, Motorcycles, and
the Craziest Ride. Vehicles will be
judged by the public and trophies
awarded.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with
the show open to the public at 10 a.m.


All spots must be claimed by 9:30 am.
Food, beer, soda, and water will be on
sale all day. Live bands, including the
popular local band Moccasin Slough,
will play from 10:30 until 4 p.m.
Included in the day's happenings
will be a "Blow up the Car" event, with
people predicting how long a car will
operate with no oil in it. There will also
be 50/50 drawings and door prizes.
Trophy sponsors, a competition
sponsor and individual banner spon-
sors are being sought Call 352-621-9225
for more information about registra-
tion or sponsorships.


Scouts help fill backpacks


Special to the Chronicle
Girl Scouts from Daisy Troop No. 34 and Cadette Troop No. 274 got together recently to help fill backpacks for the Bless-
ings in a Backpack program, which helps feed Citrus County schoolchildren on weekends. The Cadettes, from right, are:
are Tamara Chiles, Morgan Lozzi, Alexis Maguire, Devon Newton, Dana O'Shall, Amber Ferdinand, Selia Reeves, Joy Moses
and Laurel Summa. The Daisies are Olivia Spriggs, Rachel Miles, Molly Maguire and Kalissa Hensley.



SAltruistic
Abbey

Animal lover and future artist Abbey
Pafford sold her handmade craft
items recently and donated the
proceeds to Precious Paws Rescue.
Abbey, a fifth-grade student at Seven
Rivers Christian School, plans to
.offer her craft creations at the
Precious Paws Rescue Adoptathon
beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, May
5, at Crystal River Mall. A variety of
pet-related organizations and rescue
S- groups will also be in attendance.
The Crystal River Mall PPR adoption
center is open noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday. Cats and
kittens are available at the
PetSupermarket on State Road 44,
Inverness, during regular store hours.
For more information, visit
Swww.preciouspawsflorida.com or call
352-726-4700.
Special to the Chronicle




Still plenty to do as season winds down


he month of May will still be busy Saturday, May 5, at Cornerstone Baptist
in Citrus County, even as snow- Church in Inverness, and at 2:30 p.m.
birds begin to go back North and Sunday, May 6, at Homosassa First
the season winds down. United Methodist Church. Call 352-746-
Here is a partial list of what's going 7567.
on: 0 Pitfull of the Blues band will per-
American Cancer Society Relay form "For the Love of Eve Shaw"
For Life begins at 6 p.m. fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. Sun-
Friday, May 4, at Lecanto day, May 6, in the backyard
High School. garden of the Museum Caf6
Habitat for Humanity's on West Yulee Drive in Ho-
Women Build is Saturday, mosassa. Call Susan at 352-
May 5, at 8569 N. Buscetta 503-3498.
Loop, Crystal River Call Crystal River King's Bay
352-563-2744. Lions Club will meet at 6 p.m.
Cruisin' for Kids car Monday, May 7, at Oysters
show to benefit the Boys & Restaurant in Crystal River
Girls Club is Saturday, May Ruth L Guest speaker is local the-
5. Call 352-621-9225. Ruth evs atrical producer and Chroni-
Citrus County Gator AROUND THE cle columnist Jeri Augustine.
Club's annual Scholarship COMMUNITY For dinner reservations, call
Scramble begins at 9 a.m. Janice Griffin at 352-795-
Saturday, May 5, at World Woods Golf 5816.
Club's Pine Barrens Course. Call 352- 0 Crystal River Christian Women's
697-1499. luncheon is Saturday, May 8, at the
Citrus County Builders Association Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center at
and FDS Disposal will present the an- the Key Training Center campus. Call
nual Family Fishing Tournament Sat- 352-746-7616.
urday and Sunday, May 5 and 6, at 0 Nature Coast Volunteer Center's
Homosassa Riverside Resort. Call 352- Community Links Volunteer Forum be-
746-9028. gins at 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 9, at the
Nature Coast Community Band center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court,
will perform showbiz tunes at 2:30 p.m. Lecanto. Call 352-527-5955.


United Way of Citrus County's an-
nual community awards luncheon is at
11:30 a.m. Thursday, May 10, at Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club. Call 352-
795-5483.
Encore Swing Band's Spring Fling
Dance and Dinner is from 5 to 9 p.m.
Friday, May 11. Call David at 352-302-
3742.
Beverly Hills Card Club's card and
games party is from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 12, at Central Ridge
Community Center in Beverly Hills.
Call 352-746-4882.
Citrus County Retired Educators
annual luncheon begins at 11:30 a.m.
Monday, May 14, in Room 115 of With-
lacoochee Technical Institute in Inver-
ness. Call Gayle Balint at 352-795-6734.
Our Lady of Grace/Knights of
Columbus Blood Drive is from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at the Parish
Life Center in Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-2144.
Floral City Garden Club's garden
tour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
May 19. Call Marcia at 352-726-7740.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety
of projects around the community.
Write to her at PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


Cruisin' for Kidz


Jones at 352-503 6199.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Clubs get ready for car show fundraiser


News NOTES

Get tickets now
for 'Sock Hop'
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will present its
first "Sock Hop" from 6 to 9
p.m. Friday, June 1, at the
Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills. Doors
open at 5:30 p.m.
Tickets are $10 for mem-
bers of the Community Cen-
ter and $15 for
non-members. The price in-
cludes a burger plate, fries
and a milkshake.
Food will be provided by
Paige's Root Beer. Deejay
Richard Reyes will provide
the sounds for rocking
around the clock.
Seating is limited; get tick-
ets by Friday, May 4, at the
Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills. For
more information, call 352-
746-4882 or 352-465-7007.
Snippits keep
all in stitches
The Snippits, a neighbor-
hood group of the Nature
Coast Chapter of the Ameri-
can Sewing Guild, will meet
at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 3,
at A-White Sew & Vac in the
Airport Plaza, Crystal River.
The project of the month
will be a press and sew roll-
up. It's a great item for sew-
ins and when you need to
have a small pressing mat
and notions on hand. If you
wish to sew after lunch, you
may bring your machines.
For more information, call
Marcia at 352-563-2879 or
Anne at 352-382-7872.
Learn landscapes
with masters
It is possible to have a
beautiful, Florida-friendly
landscape with minimal im-
pact on the environment, full
of color, attractive to wildlife
such as butterflies and hum-
mingbirds, and entailing mini-
mal costs.
Attend one of the free
County Extension Master
Gardener Plant Clinics. The
schedule for May is:
Wednesday, May 2 -
2 p.m. at Floral City Library.
Tuesday, May 8 -
1 p.m. at Lakes Region
Library, Inverness.
Wednesday, May 9 -
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Friday, May 11 -
1:30 p.m. at Coastal Region
Library, Crystal River.
Wednesday, May 16 -
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library, Citrus Springs.
Tuesday, May 22 -
2 p.m. at Homosassa Library.
Bring any questions, sam-
ples, or experiences from
your garden to share with
other attendees. For more in-
formation, call the Extension
Service at 352-527-5700.
'Kidney for Karen
Picnic' on May 5
Mellodie Farfaglia will host
a "Kidney for Karen Picnic"
from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
May 5, at Mellodie's Body
Image Gym, 1101 Middle
School Drive, Inverness.
Karen Dixon-Pulcini has
Type 1 diabetes. She needs
a kidney and a pancreas. The
gym is raising money to help
make her whole again. There
will be raffles, auctions and
50/50 drawings. Win a life-
time membership to the gym.
Adult tickets are $20 ($5
for children 10 and younger).
Make checks payable to the
Karen Dixon-Pulcini
Beneficial Trust.
Coast Guard
auxiliary to meet
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Crystal River Flotilla 15-01
will meet at 6:30 p.m. Mon-
day, May 7, at 148 N.E. Fifth
St. in Crystal River.
Guests are welcome to at-
tend. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com or call
917-597-6961. For public ed-
ucation classes, call Linda





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


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o WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Last Man Cougar Dancing With the Stars Private Practice "True Eyewit. Nightline
SABC20 20 20 News (N)'G' Fortune Standing Town (N) (N)'PG' ccColors"'14' News (NJ)c
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(LET} 96 19 96 Countdown" (N)'PG'E Together Together 14' 14' 14' Together 14' Together
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fl 40 29 40 41 46 John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
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51 25 51 32 42 Tech It to the Max Modern History Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Swamp People "Under Top Shot "The Ultimate Top Shot "Season 4
51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' Siege' PG' Prize" ca Behind the Bullet"
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47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Investigation '14'
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South
14
2
34


North 05-01-12
4 10 9
KQ65
* AKQ104
SJ 7 4
East
442
V K 8 4 3
9 8 6 2
Q 10 3
South
4 AKQ63
V A 10 7 2
4 J 5


8 5

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
West North East
Pass 2* Pass
Pass 34 Pass
Pass 4 4 All pass


Opening lead: 4 A


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Friedrich Nietzsche said, "It is my ambition to
say in 10 sentences what others say in a whole
book." I wonder if he ever succeeded.
South's ambition in today's deal is the same as in
yesterday's: to take 10 tricks in four spades. But his
winning plan, which I shall explain in 10 sen-
tences, is very different. What should he do after
the defenders begin with three rounds of clubs?
North's three-club rebid was fourth-suit game-
forcing. This was a slight overbid, but nothing else
was better Then South had an unenviable contin-
uation. Some would have selected three dia-
monds, but three spades with a powerful five-card
suit was sensible. North, with no club stopper,
raised.
South has 10 tricks: four spades, one heart and
five diamonds. But to cash those diamonds neces-
sitates first drawing trumps.
If declarer ruffs the third club and cashes his top
three spades, he cannot recover. If he plays a
fourth spade, West cashes two clubs. If declarer
shifts to diamonds, West trumps the fourth and
leads another club. South ruffs but is forced to lose
a heart trick to East.
Instead, declarer must ruff the third club and
lead his last low trump at trick four
In real life, West might play low, but let's assume
he takes his jack. Now if he leads a heart or a dia-
mond, South wins in his hand, draws trumps and
runs the diamonds. Alternatively, if West leads an-
other club, declarer ruffs in the dummy with his
carefully preserved high trump, returns to his
hand with a heart or a diamond, draws trumps and


cashes the diamonds.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SKACTR /

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
HRPOM



UNSEFI



INVITED

:] | |T


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek







-07
t -









TH W M--- N ---

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SNUCK BEACH ACROSS DOUBLE
I Answer: After their defeat the night before, the coach
wanted his team to do this BOUNCE BACK


ACROSS
1 Rank
above maj.
4 Camper,
maybe
7 Hay storage
unit
11 Byron work
12 In a dither
14 Europe-Asia
range
15 Painting of a
famous smile
(2 wds.)
17 Aloha tokens
18 Type of nut
19 Envoy
21 it or lose it!
22 Not sm.
or med.
23 Look
daggers at
26 Grassy
expanse
29 Icicle site
30 Like plow
horses
31 Go on the -


WSW Answer to Previous Puzzle
opposite
Hired muscle ER G P |
Pouches ERG PAP KW
Has a cookout IONS UN I T WOO
Clear the R Y A N RACE A R S
windshield
Nourished ESTATE HIDE
Dent FOE BYE
Morning J AMUP GAITER
eye-opener
She played A B ES I N L E E
Jessica U G DOLE EL A N
Jai- SHIRT SCADS
Nolonger USN PAH D
worried U P mmm
Solar plexus PANT ADOBES
Bygone
Concorde LEASH LAW ER AT
fleet URN APIN DIRE
Zsa Zsa's GOO ISMS C S T
sister
Go-getter 2 Limburger 7 Swelled
Long sigh feature outward
Tire support 3 Singer 8 Circle size
U-_IvIRAM, LuTV-.


Horne
4 Carry-on bag
5 Limber
6 CPA forte


9 MIVIIIk, to Tves
10 End of a
threat
13 Shipwreck,
maybe
16 Sky-colored
20 Mild oath
23 Right,
to a mule
24 Sp. or Ger.
25 Declare
positively
26 Electrical
units
27 Viking name
28 Texas town
30 Joins metals
32 Chow mein
additive
34 Merriment
35 Suit fabric
37 More doubtful
38 Sweet roll
40 Island near
Sicily
41 Part of a deck
42 Muffin spread
43 Destiny
45 Even once
46 Name in blue
jeans
47 Economist
Smith
50 NASA
counterpart


Dear Annie: My wife and I
have been married for 45
years. We both grew up in
this small Midwestern
town. Until 10 years
back, I thought it was a
good marriage.
The problem began
when I found out some
things that happened
during our high school
years. Through discus-
sions with other class-
mates and conversa-
tions with friends, it
became evident
there's a lot I didn't ANIN
know about my wife. MAII
However, from our
very first discussion
about these incidents, she said
this was none of my business, it's
in the past, and she shouldn't
have to answer any of my ques-
tions. But Annie, some of what
was revealed is hard to forget
I have sought counseling for
this, and it has helped to some
degree. My question now is: Am I
in the wrong to want some kind of
explanation or discussion of this
information? Is a spouse in such
circumstances required to clear
the air? I don't need every detail,
but shouldn't I have enough to
settle my anxiety? Surprised
Husband
Dear Surprised: To your wife,
these incidents are ancient his-
tory, and she'd like to forget about
them. But you insist on picking
the scabs off her teenage scars
because to you these incidents
are fairly recent and you are still
absorbing their impact. As far as
she's concerned, the explanation
is simple: She was young and
made mistakes. She grew up and


changed her life.
We understand you'd like more
of an explanation, but she ab-
solutely does not want
to rehash her life be-
fore she married you.
Unless something she
did then has conse-
quences that require
action now, please ac-
cept that she is not
that person any longer,
and apparently, all for
S the good. You've been
obsessing over this for
10 years, and we are
IE'S certain it hasn't
BOX helped your marriage.
Whatever it was she
did, please find a way
to forgive her and let it go.
DearAnnie: My wife and I have
a small group of friends with
whom we do something fun as a
group every week or so. The prob-
lem is, we are the only ones who
initiate this time together. If my
wife and I don't plan or host it, we
sometimes won't hear from these
people for a month or more.
To make it worse, we often
hear about the fun things they did
without us during this time. We
are tired of feeling left out and
unimportant. Aside from finding
new friends, we are at a loss. -
Frustrated with Friends in South
Dakota
Dear South Dakota: Are those
"fun things" planned by others?
Your friends could be the type of
people who need to be organized
by those willing to put forth the
effort. And if they are arranging
and hosting events and not in-
cluding you, they are users who
are happy to eat your food and
share your plans, but have no in-


tention of reciprocating. Most
people fall somewhere in be-
tween. They aren't trying to be
rude. They simply aren't paying
attention. Your situation is in the
category of "nothing to lose."
Take one of these so-called
friends aside and ask what's
going on.
Dear Annie: This is for
"Texas," who was fed up that her
mother ate food from her fridge
without asking permission. So
she let her mom eat a dog biscuit
to teach her a lesson. She sounds
like a stingy, thankless child.
When I was a girl, my mother
cooked and fed four children on a
tight budget She often ate less so
we could have more. As adults,
we never had to ask her permis-
sion to take a cookie from her
cookie jar or a drink from her re-
frigerator. In fact, we were urged
to help ourselves.
My mom was always welcome
to any food or beverage I had in
my home, and I would gladly
have served her a second plate.
I'm offended that "Texas" would
deliberately fool her mother and
brag about it. Louisiana
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


West
4 J 8 7 5
J 9
. 73
* AK 9 62


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


BECAUSE WE WHAT PLOT? WHAT ARE YOU
ARE NOT DOING TALKING ABOUT?
ONE OF THOSE SOMETIMES I LIKE
LAME "MIDDLE-AGED TO IMAGINE MY LIFE AS
COUPLE GETS A SERIES OF WEEK-LONG
OVERWHELMED BY Il STORY ARCS AND I WANT
SOCIAL MEDIA" EACH ONE TO BE GOLD.
pfts


Dilbert

THOSE MUST BE THE
GOOGLE GLASSES THAT
GIVE YOU INFORMATION
ABOUT YOUR ENVI-
RONMENT.







The Born Loser


rk, SU Tus! ~ES, 'sV E- r f O-Roo, gUTus!
1AC YOU ON TEKoITCREN RNVEU 5EEN

MC?? A \G~i.LE-! 12 ^ 3K


I'LL SWEEP YOUR
DUMB TWEETS OFF
TO THE SIDE.
THIS IS
UNSETTLING.


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


SDistributed by Universal Uclick for UFS "Seriously, people, must we always
flock together?"
Doonesbury

HONEY, I HAVE SUCH AN WE'LL NEEP TO CUT UP 1,000 VO
AMAZING VISION FOR YOUR YAR0S OF MYLAR, PIT YOU IT' NOT
#EPWIN6, BUT IT'S 601N6 FOR SCUBA 65AR, RENT A -W, NHAT? 7 '4 1TO
TO TAKE A LOTOF PREP... CAWLOPE, ORDER A VAT OF THAT
g / -'-AM-5-E CARP .. KIN OF


i -MOM!





Big Nate


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I think May is my favorite. It's the
quickest month to write!"


"BUT 'YOU SEEMe UPSET WITH ALLTI-OSE
BILLS G0 I THREW 1 'EL AWAN."
Betty


Frank & Ernest


GUYS, ALL WE HAVE
TO pO 15 WRITE A
ROMANCE NOVEL-,
AND WE'LL BE RICoH!








Arlo and Janis


WE KIOW
NOTHING HEY, HOW
ABOUT HARD CAN
WRITING IT BE?
R OIANCE
NOVELS'


-f I' ^^^~^


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Safe" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) In real 3D. 1:45
p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) 4:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Safe" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,


ALL WE NEED IS A PAIR.
OF STAR-CROSSED LOVERS,
SOME DRAMATIC
HISTORICAL EVENT, AND
A CHEESY PEN NAME!

I jil lIq


"I LOST b ..Y
MY HEART VANE5SA
IN THE VAVOOM!
WAR OF r------
1z"! ///SEE?
\1 // THIS
WILL
WRITE
ITSELF!


7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) In real 3D. 4:15
p.m. No passes.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Raven" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Think Like a Man" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"Cabin in the Woods" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


S" z> TTE, iLUf rTA ,
E / P STATE, gLUE fTAT"---
SOMETIME$ GfI T
CI O TE FI LING6
THAT TV' NvdS J
:r rC) iS CONTgol.1L4 |






WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M Sjlenbe N


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COMICS


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 C9









CIO TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY 0





cHRONICLE Classifieds

www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT
.. .


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday............. 11 AM, Tuesday

Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday

South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


SWM, Desires SWF 74 +
Yrs. That lives in Crystal
River/Homosassa Area
for Steak night out
and/or Burger on the
dock. Quiet times,
I am a Member of
Elks & VFW, Respond
to Blind Box 1775P
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal Riv. 34429

The Right Lady
I'm beginning to think
she doesn't exist. I'm
ready to throw in the
towel after searching
a long time for the
right gal. I'm an ac-
tive widower in de-
cent shape, who
seeks to meet a
happy attractive, af-
fectionate, extro-
verted Christian lady
between 65-75 with a
warm personality, in
aood health slim
build Lfor meaningful
conversation and
other social activities
and perhaps a per-
sonal, loving relation-
ship. Is this asking too
much? If you some-
how fit the bill, give
me a call at
527-0591. I'd love to
hear from you!





Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
(352) 464-3748

GO-DEVIL MOTOR For
Sale used 1998 Honda
Go-Devil motor with 20
horsepower electric
start- low usage hours-
$1500. Call Craig at
341-0476 or
352-446-5679.

HARLEY 98
1200 Sportster custom
8k miles, lots of extras &
new parts, first...$4K,
call pm (352) 382-0403

LABRADORS (2) Free to
good home older labs in
need of loving care. I am
no longer able to care for
them. One black lab is 8
years old, one chocolate
lab is 13 years old. They
both have had all their
shots, and have been
spayed and neutered.
Please help. contact
home phone at
352-628-5402 or Cell
phone 352-601-7520

Lazy Boy Couch Brown,
Like new, 87"L $300 obo
Oak Electric Fire Place
52" L.41" H,
$200 obo
(352) 746-0853

WOOD-PINE SLABS
(1)23",(1)25"x6'x 1 7/8"
thick, $10 each. Good for
workbench tops
(352)637-6619





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645


CASH PAID
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



Free Kittens
Just in Time
Mothers Day
(352) 344-1401
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
TAKING ALL
DONATIONS
CLOTHING, PURSES,
SHOES,BABYSTUFF,
FURNITURE ETC
CONTACT JAMIE @
586-9754 THANK YOU




Lost Dog
4 year sheltie
gray, black & white
Leisure Acres
/Glenn St. Area
REWARD
(352) 586-0493
(352) 628-7198
Lost
Female Chihuahua
Fawn & White
16 yrs. old, bet. Green
Acres and W. Holi-
day(352) 476-8340
Lost Ipod Touch
w/ pink case
Near Citrus High School
Has Very Important
Information on it
Call (352) 341-5553
Man's Wedding Ring
date & initials W.T.S.
date 6/23/56...
Crystal River area
(352) 795-5942







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr offi Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546 400-1519



Blue Bike
Hernando
(352) 341-5553
Female Dog beautiful
white & brindle, black
collar found in the vic
of Turkey Oak
(352) 436-4149
KITTEN
approx 2 to 3 months old
gray w/yellow shadows
wearing pink collar
w/ rhinestones
(352) 621-0341



HIGH SCHOOL DI-
PLOMA FROM HOME
6-8 weeks. Accredited.
Get a Diploma. Get a
Job! FREE Brochure.
800-264-8330 Benjamin
Franklin High School.
www.dipolmafrom
home.com


I

kvAV^ll I k'd o JJ :B
TOADVERTISECALL:

352P563Bni66

OR PA CE YOUR A 1 1NLINE AT



www^hronclenlin^co


(ONE(IN TH RGH



BUYERS^^ WITH^^^ YOUR^^ MESAG


BLLY UAI'L.b IKUBIL..
$7/Class, WED. 6P-7P
1925 S. E. US 19, Crystal
River (352) 503-7591
Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 com-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373

PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother
of the Son of God,
ImmaculateVirgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my mother 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. 0 Mary con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary, I
place this causein
your hands (3 times).
Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you. JR




Do you study with
Shepherd's Chapel out
of Arkansas? Do you
want to meet other
people who do? Call
(352) 419-6964



2 Tickets to the Players
Championship, TPC,
Sawgrass, Friday, 5/11
Includes parking
Asking $125.









working dependable
employees FT & PT
CertifiedOnly
Apply Within
307 Zephyr Street
Inverness










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** *****I


Sudoku **-. 4puz.com


618 7


3 2 8


4 265


2 68


912 4813


___ 13 __7


78 3 J 1


1 6 4


6 382

Fill in Ihe squares so ihal each row colut"mnI c1i(1
3-by-3 box coilain th i numbers 1 I through 9




TRACTOR WORK


$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800 |


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aelvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Avante
At Inverness
is currently looking for

INTERNAL ADMISSION
COORDINATOR
Qualified Canidates
must have
Knowledge of
Medicare, Medicaid
and other Insurances
Must have a
Bachelors Degree
and a minimum of
5 years experience in
long term care.
Knowledge of health-
care regulatory
standards is preferred
Please aply online at
Avantecenters.com
or email Resume to:
mdaniels@
avantecenters.com

DIETARY COOK/
DIETARY AIDE
Cook for 125 Bed
Facility, experience
preferred. Inquire at:
700 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE
Exp. Medical Asst
FT For Busy Medical
Office, 3 yrs Exp. req.
Fax resume to Fax
(352) 564-4222
Call (352) 564-0444
F/T CNA's

Shifts: 7a-3p & 3p-I Ip
For Assistant Living
Facility. Paid by
experience, benefits
avail. aft 60 days.
Vac. accrued after
90 days. Apply in
person @ Brentwood
Retirement Comm.
1900 W.Alpha Ct
Lecanto Fl.
DFWP/EOE

Hospital RN's
Needed

MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

MARKETER
Health Care Co. is
seeking a Marketer
interested in profes-
sional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing
Experience, Positive
Attitude Good
Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit
resume to PO Box
2498 Inverness Fl
34451 or fax
352-726-2864

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Office

Needs People
With Experience in
Insurances, Nursing,
and Computers.
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1769M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida, 34429

P.T. Tech

Part-time position
open for a physical
therapy clinic.
Experience preferred.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 726-7582.

RN'S

Immediate Need
for non medicare
Home Visits,
Wound Care/IV

INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111


Staff Accountant

Experienced.
Bookkeeping, payroll
Please Send Resume:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1772P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429




SERVERS

For upscale restaurant
Must be experienced,
neat, professional
and have great
customer service skills
Apply in Person at
2100N Terra Vista
Blvd. Hernando. or
Phone (352) 746-6727
To make an appt.


I


Animal/Rancn


Advertising Sales

$1,500 a wk. Comm.
Caliber, a very exciting
program. 352-428-9664

RETAIL SALES

Citrus Co. For $$
Motivated person.
Positive attitude,
strong customer
service. Some
weekend shifts
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1771 P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd Crystal River
Florida, 34429

SALES POSITION
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927





25 Driver Trainee's
Needed Now!
Become a driver for
Schneider National!
Earn $800 per week! No
experience needed!
CDL & Job Ready in just
3 weeks!! 888-374-7644

ALUMINUM
WELDER/
FABRICATOR
Experienced Aluminum
Welder with fabrication
skills. Press brake
experience a plus.
352-637-0645
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed Top 5% Pay
2Mos. CDL Class A Driv-
ing Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

AUTO
COLLISION TECH

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

CARPENTER
Experience in all phases
of carpentry, remodeling,
framing necessary.
HS Diploma/GED
Valid DL&Reliable Trans.
Call 637-4629
Fax resume 637-3258
DRIVERS
New Freight for
Refrigerated & Dry Van
lanes. Annual salary
$45K to $60k. Flexible
sometime. CDL-A, 3
months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569

Drivers Wanted
Class a CDL
w/hazmat. Company
& 0/0's. OTR/ Regional
Runs. LOts of Freight to
move! Call
877-893-9645
Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most weekends
Vets welcome
843-266-3731











NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! t0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com



A-Able Septic is now ac
cepting applications for a
septic truck driver. Re-
quirements: Class A CDL
with Tanker End., current
DOT Phy, clean driving
record, ability to lift 150
Ibs. Full time, some
weekends, some OT,
DFWP EOE Pick up an
application at 2190 N
Crede Ave, C.R. Tues-
day through Thursday
9am to 2pm.





CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
All Shifts No Exp.
Neccessary Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Front Desk
Receptionist
& Locker Room
Attendant/
Housekeeper

For Upscale
Spa & Fitness Center
APPLY IN PERSON

2125W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.

Potential to Generate
$4000. to $20,000. or
more a month with this
activity. No selling.
Experience financial
& time freedom. Call
352-445-1385 Financial
FreedomWav.info.


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59
86
78
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9 3
75
12
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217
7 1
1 2
8,4
48
9 5
69

36
53


Caretaker.
Live on property 1
person, Rm & board +
352-220-1926
SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Attend College
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline

Can You Dig It?
We will train, certify
and provide lifetime
assistant landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator
866-362-6497



TAYLORTOLLEGE






2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube




Pizza/Sub Biz
inside Cony. Store all
equip NEW. Ready to
go only $22K
(352) 637-1488




FOR SALE
BLIND CLEANING
and RETAIL SALES
20 Years Reputation
$2,995 Dr. Mini Blinds
Call (352) 637-1900




AVON VINTAGE
SPRING GARDEN
TEALIGHT HOUSE can
em pix $18. obo
352-560-7857
CUSTOM HAND MADE
DOLL HOUSE many
pieces of furniture and
more.$50.00 513-4473


STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS.
KEN 352-601-7074













Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





APPLIANCE REMOVAL
SERVICE
A FREE SERVICE CALL
TODAY: 352 209 5853
DRYER whirlpool white
looks good works great
100.00 352 503 7365


Aenmorep ec incsoves
dishwasher and small
apartment size
refrigerator all in good
working order $125.
(352) 382-1830
Kenmore Washer &
Whirlpool Dryer
Works great
$200.
(352) 637-0397
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$150.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398



HEAVY STEEL DESK
22x42has 5 drawers
needs paint $40
352-586-8657



2 AUCTIONS
THURS. MAY 3 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-? Row, groups,
piles w/furniture., appli-
ances, tools. Follow the
auctioneer. So much to
choose from 3,000+
adv & bar glass
SUN. MAY 6 Antique &
Collectible Auction
Prey. 10 Auction 1pm
1937 operational 40FT
tugboat. Quality high
end turn., from Victorian
to Country Oak, coins,
jewelry, 500+ lots of
great value & variety
SEE WEBSITE.
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP 2% ca.disc.



BOSCH JIGSAW heavy
duty, good condition, with
case. $25.00
352 302 7451
Delta Band Saw 14"
w/stand $200. DeWalt
Comp. mittersaw 10"
w/stand $150. Crafts-
man 10" band saw
w/stand $85.
many handtools (352)
419-7368/601-5119
TABLE ROUTER
ryobi like new. 50.00
352 302 7451



1970'S SEARS
STEREO/AM/FM/8TRACK all
work, no speakers
$40. OBO 560-7857




2 COMPUTERS
Towers from $70up.
complete systems
$110 (352) 586-6891
2 yrs. old Dell
Laptop Computer,
used very little. Inspiron
Windows 7, 4Gig, 13"
screen & camera asking
$350
Memorex DVD Player
w/ remote like new $25.
Call 352-419-5362
AUTO DC TO AC
CONVERTER FOR
COMPUTER, ETC.
12VDCto 120VAC 140
Watts. $20 352 726 9983
COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $75 /352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



MUST SELL
2 sm pick ups
2 forklifts
27' cabin cruiser
Many other items
Make offers
352-563-1033
352-601-0819



CONCRETE LAWN OR-
NAMENT Japanese lan-
tern $45 352-860-0444



2 Twin beds
Headboards



Computer desk
w/hutch top $200.
(352) 527-7885
2 White wood rocking
chairs, $50 ea. obo
New Pop Canaopy Tent
$50.obo
(352) 746-0853
BEDROOM SET
FIQ Bed, Dresser
w/mirrorChest,
Nightstand. $650.00
obo.(352)563-1692 or
ewaldu51@embarqmail.c
om
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE WWW.
comfortsofhomeused
furiitnitu.om. 795-0121
Couch & loveseat
set $350.
(352) 613-5594


COUCH
Traditional, Hunter
Green Brocade,approx
90"long, Exc Cond. $100
(352) 382-4559
Entertainment Center
Lighted 10'wide 79' tall
incl TV stand area
46" W 45" T $1500
(352) 527-7885
Flex Steel Sofa 80"
burgundy/grn leaf like
new $1500 2 matching
chairs available
(352) 527-7885
Lazy Boy Couch Brown,
Like new, 87" L $300 obo
Oak Electric Fire Place
52" L. 41" H, $200 obo
(352) 746-0853
LAZY BOY Dble sofa
bed, hunter's green
$250 60"x42" Wooden
Oval pedestal table
w/4 chrs. $500
(352) 527-7885
Loveseat
sage.$200 brown
recliner $100. Lovely Kit
set 4 chairs on coasters
$200. wood baby
dressing table $75.
wooden end tables $35
ea. All show rm cond
(352) 795-0363
Matching Sofa &
Loveseat, brown tweed,
good condition,
New coffee & end
tables $325. obo
352-302-8265
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER CHAIR Used
blue tweed good cond.
$45.00 513-4473
SOFA, LOVESEAT
Light pattern, Striped
$300 set, Glass coffee
table, light wood, $250
obo. (352) 613-7941
THOMASVILLE TABLES
Beautiful Tables. Solid
med.dark oak.
Deal!!!99.00each
352-726-9132
TV 27 "
good condition
$50 (352) 613-7941
TWO END TABLES
$125, WALL UNITS,
Call for $$$$$$$$$
(352) 613-7941
Two extra long
twin Mattress's
Like New $100. obo
(352) 794-3672



Craftsman Heavy Duty
Electric Landscape
Edger $50
Craftsman 22" large
rear wheels, self
propelled lawn mower
$125. (352) 615-4037
(352) 341-3991
Garden Tractor
Murry 20hp V-twin B&S
eng.48" mulching deck
$400 firm.
(352) 302-6069
Weed Eater One
Riding mower, new last
season, tuned up &
ready mow asking $450
obo (765) 318-1156




LT 35x12.50 R20 Nice
tread!! Only asking $100
for the pair!
(352)551-1810

225/60 R16 High tread!!
Like new! Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
2 BARSTOOLS BAM-
BOO LOOKING PLUSH
RUST COLORED
SEATS 30"to top of seat
50.00 pr. 464 0316
12 x24 ft.
Top of the Line
Above Ground Pool,
Excellent Condition
$800 obo
(352) 465-3175
2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 mi E. of Stokes FLea
ANTIQUE TREADLE
SEWING MACHINE
Makes an unusual table.
$50.00 Call 3527265753
Bevel Glass Mirror
20x32in oak frame
25x45 $8.
13" Sylvania color TV
w/remote $25.
(352) 746-9399
BIRDCAGE large metal
birdcage. great condition.
85.00 352 302 7451
Boat, RV, Car
Storage indoor $75.
month (352) 637-1739

0000000
CEMETERY PLOTS
2 cemetery plots and
vaults for sale in The
Fountains Memorial Park
Valor Section,
Homosassa, FL $5,000
or best offer.
352-368-2358


4800 Sewing Machine
Koala Cub, bleached
oak cabinet $425.
Kenmore Model 1913
Zigzag Sewing Machine
& Cabinet $75
(352) 615-4037
(352) 341-3991
MANS BROWN SUIT
New w/tags size 46 pants
can be hemmed to any
length pants $15.00
352-382-7329
MULCH FOR YOUR
GARDEN OR BUSHES
ONLY 20.00 U LOAD
YOUR PICK UP
4640316
ORIGINAL SCRUBBING
BUBBLES BANK
Collectors.bank in original
box and new condition.
$50.00 352-382-7329
QUICK SHADE ROLLER
BAG Fits 10'by10" quick
shade popup canopy
Never used.$40.00.
Call Ray @ 464-0573
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID
Good Condition
Includes batteries
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
SWIVEL DESK CHAIR
With adjustable
armsback and height.
Good condition.
$20.00 352-382-7329
TOW DOLLY AND
SMALL REFRIGERA-
TOR Like new tow dolly
$700
Like new small
refrigerator $50 Call
352-207-3512
WOOD FLOORING
Med. Oak-Tongue &
Groove Planks 3" x 3/8"
New in box 25 sq ft $55
352-382-3650



EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH. Like New
$75 352 726 9983
Jazzy Select Elite
Power chair, new never
used cost $3500 new
sell $1500 352 613-6173
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS AND
LEG EXTENSIONS
ONLY 100.00 464 0316











STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS,
KEN 352-601-7074



"NEW" BLACK SG
STYLE ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR W/GIGBAG & AC-
CESSORIES $50
352-601-6625
"NEW" BLACK
TAKIMINE JASMINE
ES31C ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC($150 OFF!)
$100 601-6625
"NEW" MITCHELL
MOI00S "00O"SIZE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PAK W/ EVERYTHING
$100 601-6625
"NEW" NICE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACKAGE
W/GIGBAGTUNERDVD-
STRINGS&STRAP $50
601-6625
#24 JEFF GORDON
ELECTRIC GUITARLES
PAUL STYLE PLAYS
GREAT! $75
352-601-6625
SOLID MAHOGANY LAP
STEEL P90 PICKUP
W/GIGBAG AND EX-
TRAS $100
352-601-6625



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE doesn't
fold up works fine only
100.00 464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE upright
type stationary compact
only 75.00 464 0316



1997 Litespeed Ulti-
mate 58CM Polished Ti-
tanium, Road Bicycle
$900. (352) 726-2645
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
GO-DEVIL MOTOR For
Sale used 1998 Honda
Go-Devil motor with 20
horsepower electric
start- low usage hours-
$1500. Call Craig at
341-0476 or
352-446-5679.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART
Yamaha,
$800 obo
(352) 795-1902
GOLF CLUBS,
LOTS of sets & singles,
equipment, technical
manuals -to make
golf clubs $800 obo * "
(352) 621-3133 Telltl


Gun Winchester
12 Gage, Pump, model
1200 excel cond.
$350. (352) 637-0987
New belt holster for
1911-A1 and Beretta M9,
top quality $40 Hernando
864-283-5797
TENT
Outdoor Spirit 18' x
10.5', dome, sleeps 10,
brand new, $100
(352) 563-0106

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




4X8 UTILITY TRAILER
like new,wire mesh
floor,wood sides,ramp
gate,bought 2011 $575.
352-344-2321

EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
2010 7x18 enclosed
$2595.
2010 8.5 x 20
encl.w/xtra's
$4295

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


at* special
that special


person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966














STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP ON SERVICE FOR 8.
KEN 352-601-7074

TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




ALPINE COACH 2001,
37', 2 slides, 330 cum-
mins turbo, loaded with
options and includes 18'
add a room. Warranty for
5 years or 80K miles!
$55,000 or BRO, no
trades. 207-852-5926





BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219

Dachshunds, Mini Long
Hair ,8 wks, H/C CH
Bid. Lines,Choc. Black/
cream shaded Eng.
Cream $300-$500 (352)
795-6870/220-4792


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAAAAAA ^^


Dashound long hair
mini.all shots, 9 mos,
blk/creme,lovable lap
dog. spray crate,pen
doghse... $320.
(352) 726-0094
DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718
KITTENS & CATS
MANY BREEDS
All neutered, micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832

Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
LABRADOODLE PUP-
PIES ready may 4th. 10
larbadoodle puppies fe-
male and males 575.00
and 625.00. ckc,vet
check,h/c ect.
4theluvofdoodles@gmail.c
om
LABRADORS (2) Free to
good home older labs in
need of loving care. I am
no longer able to care for
them. One black lab is 8
years old, one chocolate
lab is 13 years old. They
both have had all their
shots, and have been
spayed and neutered.
Please help. contact
home phone at
352-628-5402 or Cell
phone 352-601-7520
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




BARN MASTERS
We Build..Horse Stalls
Barns Fences..Decks..
Pastures.(352) 257-5677


Born 2/27,
$50. ea.
954-295-3055



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. ncl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $450. mo. + sec.
(352) 344-5457
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period. 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and enjoy-
ment, clubhouse, onsite
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $595.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $550.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
UNDER NEW MANAGE-
MENT Cedars Lake MH
and RV park with 1 and 2
bedroom mobile homes
and RV sites available
call:628-4441
cedarslakepark@aol.com




1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
turn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077

BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2,
extremely reasonable,
owner finance $27,000
(352) 564-8057
HERNANDO Las Brisas
Mobile Home Park, 55+,
2/2, Furnished, clean,
own your own lot, Car-
port, attached shed,
club house, heated
pool, Priced to sell.
765-212-0348
NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 CI1


CLASSIFIED




ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 from $499 mo
Loaded. 3/2 from
$399 mo Loaded.
Homes on your lot
0 down.
800-622-2832 X 210

Palm Harbor Village
New Homes Start @
$39,900. $5K for your
used mobile home.
Any condition
800-622-2832 x 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183




Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term 1st/Ist/sec $850
352-220-2077




Lake Rousseau
1/1, enclosedFlorida
porch, tiled inside & out
furnished $9500. very
nice (352) 362-7681




CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, $5000
Down, $435
(352) 302-9217




61 S. Atkins Terr.
Lecanto Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Mobile
Home in clean 55+ Park,
This is in very good con-
dition. Central Air And
Heat. New refrigerator,
Mostly Furnished. $230
park rent. $7500 Neg.
Please call 352-302-6586


1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/I scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room im-
maculate $39,900
(352)419-6926

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Security
deposit, pro-rated over
3 mo. period 55+ Park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing & enjoyment,
clubhouse, onsite shuf-
fleboard, and much
more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.900. 352-476-4964

Inverness Sr. Park,
1984 Fleetwood 2/2
14 x 60, fully furnished
with everything, scrnd
Fl. Rm., Shed w/elec.,
rt over, Cen Air. gas
heat & range, cent. isl.
kitchen, Wash/Dry
Used Very Little
Needs Nothing,
very good condition
$18,000 obo Call Doris
Inverness Park Resales
352-344-1002

PARK MODEL
nice 1 BR, CHA Irg encl
sun rm.cov porch on
Lake Rousseau, boat
parking $12K obo
(386) 451-9266

SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 +, Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705

STONEBROOK 55+
2/2, totally remodeled,
furnished, w/Washer
& Dryer.... $5K
(352) 634-1171

Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


SReroofs Any Repairs .

\ Complete Home Inspections iy


I e. I *

*e, a *


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com





CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
2/2 DW $500
Agent (352) 382-1000


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

INVERNESS
2 bedroom- 1-1/2 bath
VILLA- lanai, quiet, adj.
to State Park, commu-
nity pool, lawn svc.,
55+Adult, financially
secure, ref./dep. rq. Will
consider lease w/option
to buy. $650/mo.
727 862 3264 aft.5p, or
leave, msg.
forrkoen@hotmail.com





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large.2/1 incl water
sewer, W/D hook up
$475 (352)212-9205

INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847





CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Avail.
(352) 422-6579


bnhies Dfrees


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020






SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179






Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR 491. 746-1998







YOU'LL U THIS!
Assisted
Living,Secured
unitMemory care for
Alzheimer/Dementia
Crystal Gem Manor
10845 W. Gem St.
Crystal River, Fl 34428
352-794-7601




LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451


Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
no prob 352-503-7052


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC 1326872




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

Computer Problems?
Sr. Discount-In home
service. John Warken
(352) 503-4137

COMPUTER TUTOR!!
Do you have a computer
and wish you knew how
to use it more? Need to
know how to do navigate
the web better or manage
a social network profile?
Private lessons in my
home office (Homosassa)
or yours (Citrus County)
727-614-2685
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.








Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC:
Full service contractor.
Residential & commer-
cial specialist. Service
changes, large or small
repairs, Spa hookups &
more. Lic/Ins.
352-427-4216.
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907




SA 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977

GUTTER CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
352-362-5187




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
F AFFORDABLE
VHRELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


ABC Painting &
Handyman Services.
Low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129

Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
(352) 464-3748
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





' THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Reasoncble
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Recsoncble
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Team Reasonable
Rates. Stacy 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
k House Cleaning *k
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel


mB

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L H i,:. ,.. ,, .
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE Est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
CALL 352-201-7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566

SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
wCALL 352-228-7320


property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070
ATTENTION! Snow Birds
Need your Lawn Maint.
Call Mowing & More...
352-419-6287, Lic/Ins.
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
MEAGHERS LAWN CARE
AND PINK MINI DUMP
Tree Service, Stump
Grinding, Free Est.
(352) 341-3478



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Painting &
Handyman Services,
Low rates, Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handy an Services,
low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleanin & Painting
352-341-3300




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!








#I Employment
source is...


^7erarv
?aintin

Sccilit ""


Inlenor .L E~renor












GEN




Pressure Washing
* Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenle.com/spnngh l


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

- CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
S" Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
,J 'y Residential &
-- ,, Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


GENERAL 1 A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377







BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
L_ 00_______________QB6SUj


IgI


AAA ROOFING

Call theeak6usty5"
- -Free Written Estimate

$10 0OFF,
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed a

WILLCONSTRUCTION LncoOJ
, 352-628-2291 S
EPreventDryerFiresNow.com U]


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
All Home
RepHairs
Si Small Carpentry
Fencing

Clean Dryer

A Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
,.' 352-344-0905
cell. 400-1.722


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Y Rivenbark Lawn
", l & Landscape
, (352) 464-3566


5-1 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2012

"How's it going? I'd heard you quit
your job at the bank."









C12 TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012


WORDy GU It B TRICKY RICKY KANE00BIVE


1. Actress West's higher bet in poker (1) Every answer is a rhyming

ll |_and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Chaz Bono's mom's two kings, two tens (1) they will fit in the letter
-_-_-_-_ ---- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Deep-voiced singers' high cards (2) syllables in each word.


IIII I 0 IIII
4. Hotel room cleaner's card suit (1)


5. Actor Charlie's female face cards (1)


S2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclck for UFS


6. Radio Limbaugh's good poker hands (2)


7. Singer Bonnie's good poker hands (1)

--I-I---I-1-0---I-I


5-1-12


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857




Cashiers NC, 2 BR, IBA,
Cabin on 2 Acres
Updated, private rd.
private well, approx.
4K elevation. $170.000,
352-341-0336
Cell, 352-586-8946





"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


SIHDIVHIS SIUIVH L SHHSl'ISf SHSflH '9 SNRalbl SNa3HS *'
a(ivdS S(IIV w SHOV Sassva SHIivd SCIaH 's aSIVH Savw 'i
SuaASKV


SResidential Roto-Cean
* Commercial e
Cleaning Service
* VCT Stripping
Wax

LIc./Ins. Carpet & Tie

I SUPER SPECIAL I,
I3-Rooms $6 00
I (Upto250Osqft.each) I *
I Deep Cleaned Not validw/anyther offer.
& Deodorized Expires 5/19/12. Coupon Required. 4 aSO
First Room Of ScotchgardTM is Free! '


FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, No smoking
$550mo. (352)220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370

INVERNESS
3/1, $400 mo., 1st Ist
Sec. $1,200 Move In
4308 E. McCartney Lp
(352) 212-3385


INVERNESS
3/1, $400. mo. 1st., Ist.
sec. $1,200 Move In
4308 E. McCartnev Lp
1/1 Block Home $350
mo. 1st, Ist. sec. W/D
hkup. $1,150 move In
4095B Illiana Terrace
3/1, $350 most. Ist.
sec. $1,150 move In






INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed,$600
352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 2/2/1, + Fm. Rm
$635. mo. 352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/2/1 ,
$1,000 Down, $360. mo.
(352) 726-9369

CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO OWN
This is a real cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1 /2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493


YOU'LLo THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7pm
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
Rent to Own, Rent or
Buy Fabulous Home
Across City Beach
2 Fire Plces, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$575. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, $650/mo. Pets ok
fst/Ist/sec 352-434-1235
Homosassa
3/1.5..$675 + sec.
(352) 746-3073



Inver/Highlands.
Large 1 Family 2.8 acs
fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A
4 BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool,
costly updates Under
contract for $250K, tak-
ing too long to close,
will consider offers.
Owner 452-419-7017


Rent to Own 3/1/1, very
clean, ceramic tile car-
pet, dbl lot. $650.rent.
1st Ist sec. 813 908-5550
PINE RIDGE 4/2/2
pool/g.course avail
5/15, $1250/m 746-7716




CRYSTAL RIVER
FURNISHED, water-
front 1 BR or 2BR,
Laundry ,Boatslip,
Lanai Pets? $850
352-220-6593
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
Very Private, NICE 1/1
incls garbage, water,
laundry, $550 +Sec. No
Pets Cell (941)730-2359
Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term 1st/Ist/sec $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed,$600
352-476-4964




INVERNESS
Phone, pool incl. $110
wk. (352) 419-2480




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office/home 4/2,
zoned commercial
perfect for someone
who needs office &
home $895 rent /sell
$99,50 Owner financing
w/$10K dn. call Paul
(352) 746-9585




INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932
INVERNESS
Room for Rent, util. inc.
share dbl wide w/two
tenants $325
(352) 726-0652




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ile-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





Oakwood Village
820 Sunset Strip
3/2/1, 1747 sf. New kit./
baths, flooring, paint,
in/out. Pix/Info
gcjcinc.com $79,900
(352) 527-1239





2/2 villa
The Landings, new
Trane a/c & new lanai
screen porch,$58K
cell (352) 400-8130

HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598



-= 1I -


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.














Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv()
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre nice lot on
dead end.Have survey
and clear title.listed 10k
below county land
value.Zoned rural
residential.See at 8678 s
greenhouse
ter.$16500.o.b.o.
813-792-1355











LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT, chainlink
fence, Make Offer
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
I in W. Highlands,
I N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000
By owner 617-471-7417




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. MAY 3 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-? Row, groups,
piles w/furniture., appli-
ances, tools. Follow the
auctioneer. So much to
choose from 3,000+
adv & bar glass

SUN. MAY 6 Antiaue &
Collectible Auction
Prev. 10 Auction 1pm
1937 operational 40FT
tugboat. Quality high
end turn., from Victorian
to Country Oak, coins,
jewelry, 500+ lots of
great value & variety
SEE WEBSITE.
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12%BP- 2% ca.disc.

'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Mere. 4str. dbl. bimini,
new trIr. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949

Carolina Skiff 16'
2004, DLX, C/C, 2005
Yamaha 50hp. $3000.
(352) 746-2140

CENTURY
'99, 1901 Bay Boat, 115
HP, Yamaha w/ alum.
trailer, excel. cond. Lots
of extras, stored inside,
$8,500 (352) 465-9395

Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628

PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298

SEYLOR
15ft Center Console,
w/48HP Evin. mtr., trail,
Asking $2,100 obo


14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke

motor, hummingbird
$1800 bo 352-344-5993

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
98 ,38 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
JAYCO '04
40' 5th whl toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SOUTHWIND
1992 FOR PARTS ONLY
2 arconditioners, 1 yr. old
refrigerator, hot water
heater, commode, re-built
Jasper transmission. Cell
423-292-4275




CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
Coachman Pop-up
08, 17 furnace,.a/c,
elect, water & propane
sys. 12 awning $4550
obo(352) 726-1303
GULF STREAM
'98, Seahawk 5th
Wheel, 30 ft. full slide,
new tires, clean $7,500
obo 440-813-5334
412-629-3231
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ Toyhauler,07
32 like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,200. 352-795-2975
Prowler 02
26 T/T, electric or gas
all essentials incl $3500
obo cell (727) 678-1250
352-795-3729
PROWLER CAMPER
1 bd. 1 bath New hot
wateraterter, furnace,
tub and surroundings
$900 obo See Rose at
Sandy Oaks
RV Cruiser Fun '07
TV Body. microwave
tv bath w/shower out
pull out awning/Bar b q
$6k(352) 628-0554
SKAMPER
2005 Travel Trailer 26ft
queen bed,toilet,shower,
fnrig,A/C,heat,Hot water,
slideout,awning,couch,
sleeps 6. $6900. ph
352-746-2172
leave
message
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bedlike
newheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298




$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $300 &UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
C ASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free


parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298
WE FINANCE *'
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.


BUICK
1992 Skylark, runs
good, good tires, $850.
(352) 419-6901
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier, 4 DR,
4 Cyl., runs great
looks good $2,275.
352-637-2588
or 845-701-6253
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093
Chrysler Sebring
06 Cony. 34K miles V6,
full pwr. new vinyl top,
tires, & battery, exc
cond. $8930
(352) 726-3427
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217

KIA
'02, Sportage,
Asking $2,500.,
352-461-4518

KIA '07
Sportage, 42K ,mis.
4 cyc. auto. full pwr,
like new $8900
(352) 726-3427

KIA SEDONA
06 MINI VAN
Exc Cond, only
39,300 miles, comp.
to dealer prices for
same model w/high
mileage. Original
Owner,new tires,
battery, fuel
cannister,bk-up tv, up
to date maint. full
history $12,000
(352) 637-1527

MERCEDES
'78, 450SL, org. mi. 82K
2 tops, Florida Car, ga-
raged, very clean 8cyl,
auto/gas, beautiful
$13,000 (352) 344-4352
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org





AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
MAY 6. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
FORD MUSTANG
'65, fastback 2+2 289
eng. a/c, power steer-
ing, disc brks. great
shape, runs great.
65,100K mi. recently
appraised for $25,378
sell $22,700 Owner fi-
nancing w/$10 OK dn
call Paul(352) 746-9585
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab
fair cond, runs good
166Kmis. $6kobo
352-302-7204

FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
GMC
2005 Yukon GPS, Enter-
tainment Center, Memory
seats, Towing package
with leveler, backup cam-
era. Excellent condition.
160,000 miles. $7,500.
Call 726-4943.

POLAR '01
60HP 2 Stroke Yamaha
motor. 17 Long, 8 Wide
Bimini top ladder
$7,000, 352-494-0009


* WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org





2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533


CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger,body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded insidevelour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.
Asking $3,200.OBO,
call 637-4011


99, Villager
7 pass, low mi.,
hitch, excel
$3,500 (607) 59




Harley
Roadking Cla
gear 17Kmile
obo.(352) 48

HARLEY
1200 Sportster
8k miles, lots of
new parts, firs
call pm (352) 3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Pav^ Harieynavisson
Estate 03, Super Road King,
loaded, fuel inj. $48K up grades
cond. too much to list/ Cry Riv
92-5543 $8800 (727) 207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
00 (407) 712-0803
ssic, all KAWASAKI
I-0873 2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
98 miles. Newer tires and
custom battery. Bike jack,
extras & Cycleshell, lots of ac-
st...$4K, cessories. Pix available.
382-0403 $5995 352-601-7460


501-0501 TUCRN
Laplante, Helene 2072-CP-273 Notice to Creditors (Summ Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-213
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELENE LAPLANTE, A/K/A HELENE MURIEL LAPLANTE,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Helene Laplante, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-213, by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was August 29, 2011: that the total value of the estate is SNONE and that the
names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Murielle Heath, 3805 N. Indanhead Road, Hernando, FL 34442
Claire Provencher, 4360 N. Indianhead Road, hernando, FL 34442
Bernard Laplante, 31099 County Rt. 179, Chaumont, NY 13622
Claude Laplante, V Speystradt 9, Kloosterzande (ZVL), Netherlands 4587EE
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 24, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Murielle Heath
3805 N. Indianhead Road, Hernando, FL 34442
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
April 24 and May 1, 2012.


502-0501 TUCRN
Carter, Betty A, 2072 CP257 Notice to Creditors (Summ, Admin,)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012 CP 251
IN RE: ESTATE OF BETTY A. CARTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the estate of BETTY A. CARTER, deceased, File Number 2012 CP 251, by
the Circuit Court for CITRUS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was
Dec. 26, 2011; and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been as-
signed by such order are:
Name Address
STEPHEN D. CARTER 4 Bumelia Ct., Homosassa, FL 34447
NEALE J. CARTER 2761 Darlington Cove, Memphis, TN 38118
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom a provision for full
payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 24, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ STEPHEN D. CARTER
4 Bumelia Ct., Homosassa, FL 34446
Attorney for the estate:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0075272 Attorney for the estate
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447 Phone: (352) 382-7934 Fax: (352) 382-7936
April 24 and May 1,2012.

503-0501 TUCRN
Kossomedes, Christine A. 2011-CP-000718 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2011-CP-000718
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CHRISTINE A. KOSSOMEDES,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Christine A. Kossomedes, deceased, whose
date of death was May 23, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2011-CP-000718; the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 24, 2012.
Personal Representative:
Timothy Kossomedes
14 Homestead Lane, New City, NY 10956
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNessJr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 1-352-795-1444
VanNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 N. Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
April 24 and May 1, 2012.


506-0501 TUCRN
Merlino, Helen T. 2012-CP-236 Notice of Administration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO: 2012-CP-236
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN T. MERLINO,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of HELEN T. MERLINO, deceased, File Number
2012-CP-236, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the
validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after
the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 24, 2012.
Personal Representative:
Lawrence K. Mierisch
342 Morgan Circle North, Lehigh Acres, Florida 33936
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Kenneth K. Thompson, Esquire FLA. BAR NO. 344044 (239) 369-5664 phone
1150 Lee Boulevard, Suite 1, Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 369-8763 fax
April 24 and May 1, 2012.


508-0501 TUCRN
Evola, Ora May 2012-CP-141 Notice to Creditors
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
IN PROBATE FILE NO.: 2012-CP-141
IN RE: ESTATE OF ORA MAY EVOLA, a/k/a ORA M. EVOLA, a/k/a ORA EVOLA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of ORA MAY EVOLA, a/k/a ORA M. EVOLA, a/k/a
ORA EVOLA, deceased, whose date of death was February 11, 2012, and whose
Social Security Number was 264-58-8566, File Number 2012-CP-141, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 24, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ SUSAN E. DEAN
Attorney for Personal Representative:
DEAN AND DEAN, L.L.P. BY: /s/ Jonathan S. Dean, Esquire Florida Bar No.: 699100
230 Northeast 25th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34470 352) 368-2800
April 24 and May 1, 2012.


510-0501 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF MEETING
The regular meeting of the Water & Wastewater Authority originally advertised for
Monday, May 7, 2012 has been cancelled. The next regularly scheduled Water &
Wastewater Authority meeting will be held on Monday, June 4, 2012at 1:00 P.M. or
as soon thereafter as possible, in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Room #166, Lecanto, Florida.
BY: ROBERT K. HNAT CHAIRMAN
CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY
May 1,2012.


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Citrus County's

Profiles


I


Heath


Medical Nutrition Wellness


16
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Advertising Supplement


C I T R U S CCO U N T Y '
CHR ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ADVERTISEMENT



M2 Clients Successfully Keep the Weight Off


M2 Metabolic Method has opened its newest Weight Loss
Center in the Citrus Center shopping Center located at
2609 E Gulf to Lake Highway in Inverness. Based out of
Volusia County, M2 is privately owned by its CEO Mitch-
ell Menaker, and has two other office locations in Deland
and New Smyrna Beach Florida. The Company has 5 full
time weight loss coaches and 2 support staffmembers.
All coaches have successfully lost their weight on the M2
Program and were previously coached by Mr. Menaker.
M2 Metabolic Method was founded in 2010 after the
owner lost 100 pounds in 3.5 months on the weight loss
program. Having struggled with weight and health issues
for almost 30 years, Mr. Menaker saw the ability to help
others who suffer from similar issues, and to work to
make a difference in the health and quality of people's
lives. The M2 program consists of an all natural propri-
etary weight loss supplement, that, when combined with
a low calorie diet eating regular foods, will cause average
weight loss of anywhere from 1V2-1 pound per day. The
supplement will naturally suppress your hunger, remove
physical cravings and release the abnormal fat deposits
stored by the body (what is more commonly known as
"brown fat"). Many other diets and exercise programs
cause the body to lose muscle and normal fat deposits
known as "white fat" while the abnormal fat deposits
remain intact.

What makes M2 unique in the market place is its one
on one private weight loss coaching and support. M2's
private coaching and support has helped over 2000
people in the last 2 years achieve not only their initial
target goal, but in many cases fantasy weight goals that
have not been seen since Jr. High or High School. In
addition, many of the clients whom have worked with
M2 have seen improved health in Diabetes, Blood Pres-
sure and Cholesterol. Mr. Menaker himself was dia-
betic, had high blood pressure and cholesterol medical
issues that were so dangerous to his health that in 2009
his Physician gave him back his medical chart and said
she was not going to attend his funeral. Within 90 days
of starting the program, Mr. Menaker was totally off all
medications and his physician was in shock when she
saw him 90 days after his last visit. In addition, due to
the natural changes that often occurs with the body as
a result of this program, (and especially when com-
bined with the M2 Private coaching), M2 clients have
successfully kept their weight off in almost all cases and
have not experienced the "yo-yo" effect so often found
with other weight loss scenarios.


Many people who suffer from being overweight or worse
from obesity can look to the root of their problem in the
fact that they are addicted to food, no different than any
other addiction such as drugs or alcohol. M2 offers group
support meetings Monday nights in their Inverness office
where clients whom are being coached and their guests
come together to support each other and to begin to un-
derstand where the addiction originated from so they can
change their daily behavior and thus their addictive rela-
tionship with food. The combination of the accountability
of the coaching relationship combined with the group
support has allowed M2 to be able to boast a 97% success
rate for their clients achieving their goals or beyond.
M2 has a division of the company known as M2 Medi-
cal Method. Many times Dr's and or Chiropractors are
looking to help their patients by suggesting and offering a
weight loss program. M2 has been in-
vited to be the weight loss program for
several Dr's and Chiropractors around
the state by offering private labeling
of its Proprietary Platinum Formula
under the Dr's own branded name. Mr.
Menaker will then go into the medical
office to train and support the appointed
staff members) so that they can coach
and support their own patients. It is esti-
mated that 70% of the US population will
be overweight or obese by the year 2030.
Through the Medical Method Program, our
success stories are now being expanded directly between
Dr and Patient.

Mr. Menaker and his team of consultants have collaborated
to offer several new and exciting additional products in
2012 to enhance weight loss, maintenance and skin
care. These proprietary products help to improve
metabolism, tighten and enhance the skin and
naturally curb hunger and cravings with no
drug involved.

Perhaps the most frequent question asked of
Mr. Menaker is whether the weight will come
back once the client go off of the diet? The
response given is that in over 6000 people he has
put on this program, his experience is that unless the
person goes back to serious bad eating habits, the weight
stays off due to the resetting of the body which occurs on
this program. This is truly what distinguishes NM2 Meta-
bolic Method from all other weight loss programs.


A recent M2 client commented, "In most all cases
when something sounds too good to be true it usually is.
However, in this case, too good to be true is the fact that I
am down 12.2 pounds in 13 days."

Mr. Menaker is a National Public Speaker and Motiva-
tional Wellness and Diet Coach and is happy to speak to
civic, social or business groups. Please call the corporate
office at 386-423-0067 to book speaking engagements.
Mr. Menaker resides here in Lecanto, Florida as well as
in Deland, Florida. He is a father of two girls ages 20 and
29 and a 110 pound Newfoundland puppy. Mr. Menaker
graduated from The University of Florida in 1978 with a
Bachelors Degree in Business. His hobbies include travel,
music, Antiques, Golf, and is an avid movie enthusiast.

M2 Metabolic Method offers No Cost Private
Consultations in order to discuss your
personal situation and to explain their
weight loss program and senices.
To schedule your Private Consultation
please call 352-341-4242 today.
Now offering No-Credit-Needed
Financing!!!


\AA


G2 Tuesday, May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


15A. t





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ear what all 6,000
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Tuesday, May 1, 2012 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





G4 Tuesday, May 1, 2012 ADVERTISII"
Citrus County's



Profiles


4G SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Health


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Trina Murphy
Advertising/Operations Director

Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager


Advertsng Supplement


Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


Welcome to the second edition of
Profiles in Health. We are excited to
present this special advertising section
providing you with a better knowledge
about a variety of local health related
businesses. In these advertisements,
readers will learn about the rich history
of these businesses and about the
products and services they offer. These
businesses provide an excellent choice
for customers to meet their health
needs. They make our community a
better place to live with their choices of
products and services and serve as an
integral part of the community through
participation in community events and
fundraisers.
The feature articles contained in this
publication were written by Advertising
Features Correspondent Rita Johnson,


who has been a freelance writer with
the Chronicle for seven years. She has
written hundreds of advertising feature
articles about Citrus County businesses
and the Nature Coast. Her background
includes more than 20 years of writing
while working in nutrition, alternative
medicine and quantum physics. After
receiving her doctorate in Alternative
Medicine, Rita completed her PhD in
Integrative Medicine so that she can
now publish articles in medical
journals and teach college level
courses.
We are confident you will find this
publication useful and interesting and
we encourage your support of these
local businesses as they help our
community grow and prosper.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County's
Profiles Health
Medical Nutrition Weliness

a W
^- -


Advertiser Index -
M 2 M etabolic M ethod.......................................................................................... pages 2, 3
The D erm atology C enter............................................................................................page 5
Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute..............................................................pages 6,7
G ardner A udiology.................................................................................................page 8
Superior Residences of Lecanto................................................................................page 9
Suncoast Prim ary C are........................................................................................... page 10
Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery Center..................................................page 11
Citrus Diabetes Treatment Center & Physicians Weight Loss......................pages 12,13
D ental Sleep Solutions............................................................................................ page 14
The Snyder Center of Pain Pharmacology.............................................................page 15
Suncoast Eye Center........................................................................................ pages 16,17
Inverness Fam ily Practice...................................................................................... page 18
C om fort K eepers..................................................................................................page 19
H om e Instead Senior Care.......................................................................................page 21
Professional Hearing Centers..........................................................................pages 22,23
Citrus Memorial Heart & Vascular Center............................................................page 24


CilioRIENKL






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JbFLT~wzato/io09y dFntAFT,


p


7_. v H/71nia
Board Certified Dermatologist







Specializing in the Comprehensive Treatment
for Sun Damaged Aging Skin
Surgical Removal of Skin Cancers
Medical, Surgical & Aesthetic Dermatology


Detection and Removal of Skin Cancer
Photodynamic Therapy
Acne/Acne Surgery
Contact Allergies and Rashes
Moles
Warts
Adults and Children
Botox/JuvedermTM/Radiesse/Restylane
Pelleve Cosmetic Dermatology
Chemical Peels
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Hydra Facial
LatisseTM
Glytone products
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Hours: Monday Friday 8:30 4:30
Medicare, Blue Cross & Most Insurances


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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Florida Sunshine!
That's why we live here, but are you concerned with the effects on your skin? Are you
ready to look your absolute best? The professional team at The Dermatology Center in
Inverness is there for you.
This staff of highly trained professionals are led by Dr. Charles Dewberry, who has over
10 years of dermatology experience. Whether you want to get rid of a rash, be assured that
mole is not cancerous, or check out the newest therapies in cosmetic procedures, you don't
have to travel to Orlando to get the finest care.
The Dermatology Center in Inverness should be your first stop if you suspect a skin
cancer; but, were you aware that they also treat all of the following:
* Acne and Complexion Problems
* Rosacea
* Moles, Cysts, Warts and Growths
* Skin Cancer and Melanoma
* Mohs Surgery
* Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis/Psoriasis
* Melasma
* Freckles, Age Spots and Brown Spots
* Botox for Excessive Sweating
* Scalp and Nail Problems
* Pediatric Skin Conditions
* Skin Rashes/Shingles
If you have been considering a cosmetic procedure, now is the perfect time to see the
newest advancements at a discounted price. For a limited time, The Dermatology Center is
offering 20% off any cosmetic procedure! Call today to speak with a licensed Aesthetician.
Here are some of the therapies provided:
Juvederm Ultra and Ultra Plus is the smooth gel filler that the doctor uses to instantly
smooth away wrinkles around your mouth and nose with results that last up to a year.
Restylane These products can be used individually to add volume and fullness to the
skin to correct moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as the lines from your
nose to the corners of your mouth.
Sculptra is a new type of facial injectable made from poly-L-lactic acid, which helps to
replace lost collagen. It helps correct shallow to deep facial wrinkles, and folds.
Radiesse immediately provides the volume and lift needed to diminish the signs of
aging because of the calcium-based microspheres and gel that comprise the product.
Botox is a prescription medicine that is injected into muscles and used to improve the
look of moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows in people 18 to 65 years of
age for a short period of time.
Pelleve is a revolutionary non-surgical procedure to safely and effectively treat facial
wrinkles with virtually no pain and little downtime.
Hydrafacials is the newest advance in non-laser skin resurfacing, and is the only
hydradermabrasion procedure that combines cleansing, exfoliation, extraction, hydration
and antioxidant protection simultaneously, resulting in clearer, more beautiful skin with no
discomfort or downtime.
VI Chemical Peel will improve the tone, texture and clarity of your skin, reduce or
eliminate age spots, freckles, and hyper-pigmentation, including melasma, soften lines and
wrinkles, clear acne skin conditions, reduce or eliminate acne scars, stimulate the
production of collagen, for firmer, more youthful skin.
Alpha-Beta Hydroxy Treatment AHA glycolic acid, and BHA salicylic acid, are used
by physicians to induce light skin peels, which removes a very thin layer of skin, which in
turn promotes the growth of new, smoother skin and helps treat fine lines and wrinkles,
acne and uneven texture and coloration.
The Dermatology Center also offers a full line of products at their Online Skin Care
Store! Website: FloridaDermCenter.com. Browse through the store and shop with
confidence. Unlike other skin care websites, they have a Board Certified Dermatologist and
Licensed Aesthetician on staff to answer any questions you may have. They offer free
Priority Mail shipping with quick delivery.
The Inverness office of The Dermatology Center is located at 931 US Hwy. 41 in
Inverness, FL 34450. Ph: (352)637-1310 Fax: (352)637-0788


Inverness 3 Floral City
Highway 41

SDr. Schekorra
Lu


Tuesday, May 1, 2012 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







G6 Tuesday, May 1, 2012


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement000810


The premier radiation oncology


provider in the tri-county area


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute
- The ONLY Fully Accredited Radiation
Oncology provider in Marion, Citrus,
and Lake-Sumter County, Florida.

The Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute is the premier radiation
oncology provider in the tri-county area,
and the only one accredited by the
American College of Radiology (ACR).
The Institute utilizes the most advanced
and trusted technologies and techniques
to deliver the best radiation oncology
treatment possible. Their expert staff
and latest equipment eliminate the need
to travel to larger cities or out of Citrus
County for the newest advancements in
cancer treatment. With their experienced
team of radiation oncologists, medical
physicists, dosimetrists, oncology nurses,
therapists and social workers, you will be
provided with a relaxed atmosphere, and
the best care possible right here in
Citrus County.

The newest methods of treating cancer
are available at the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute:

IMRT Intensity Modulated Radio
Therapy

SRS Stereotactic Radiosurgery for
Brain and Body tumors

IGRT- Image Guided Radiotherapy

3D Conformal Radiotherapy

Electron Beam Therapy

Prostate Seed Implants using
Palladium, Iodine, and Cesium

Brachytherapy implants utilizing
High Dose Rate Remote After
Loading system (HDR) for Lung,
Breast, Gynecologic, and Skin
Malignancies, including our use of
the Leipzig Applicator that treats
skin cancers in just 10 days without
any surgery


H -r "uk.


Systemic radiotherapy with
Samarium-153 and Strontium-89
for cancer that has spread to the
bones and is causing pain

On-site simulation with in house
CT scanner, 3-D treatment
planning, and inverse
computerized treatment planning


The Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute works with all types of
malignancies, including:

* Breast Cancer
* Lung Cancer
* Skin Cancer treatment without
surgery.
Genito- Urinary Cancer, including
Prostate and Bladder Cancer
Gastro- Intestinal Cancer, including
Esophagus, Stomach, Pancreas,
Colon, Rectum, and Anal Cancer
Gynecologic Cancer, including
Ovary, Uterus, Cervix, Vaginal
Cancer
Brain and Central Nervous System
Lymphomas
Head and Neck Cancer
Cancer of the Bone, treating both the
cancer and the pain associated with it.


Cancer is a family disease, and can
affect far more than the individual
patient. In fact, many spouses and
family members experience more
emotional distress than the actual
patient. In order to effectively care for
the entire family system, and manage
the multifaceted problems of cancer, the
R o b e r t
Boissoneault \ --
Oncology ,;y
Institute r
developed a -
social services -. .
division in
their practice -
with trained
professionals
to deal with .
the emotional
and social
support
needed for the
entire family, with the aim of helping
the patient and all family members
adjust to the diagnosis, treatment, and
ultimately surviving cancer.

The mission of the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute is to be recognized
for providing their patients and
communities with the highest quality
medical services using the most


advanced technology, delivered in a
timely manner whenever necessary.

On April 30, 1990, the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute opened
its doors to patients from all over North
Central Florida. The Institute was
named after "Rusty" Boissoneault who
died of Hodgkin's Disease (lymphatic
cancer) at the age of 21. He was a high
school friend of the founder, Dr.
Norman Anderson, who credits Rusty
with helping him dedicate his life's
work to the best cancer care possible, in
memory of his childhood friend. The
Institute is now operating five clinics,
with two in Citrus County. In 1998, the
Institute was awarded accreditation by
the American College of Radiology
(ACR), the highest honor that can be
awarded a radiation oncology practice in
the United States of America, and the
Institute has maintained this
accreditation ever since.

The Lecanto and Inverness clinics are
served by two Radiation Oncologists -
Dr. Timothy A. Brant and Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett, Jr. in
addition to a
M. staff of
medical
ph y sicists,
-radiation
Therapists and
dosimetrists
( a Dr. Brant and
-Dr. Bennett are
S the only ACR
Board Certified
S Radiation
Oncologists
residing in
Citrus County.

Clinics are located at: 522 North
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
(352)-527-0106, and 605 West Highland
Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 726-3400

For more information, please visit the
website at: www.rboi.com







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Tuesday, May 1, 2012 G7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement



Hear what you've been missing


If you think you can hear fine but have
difficulty understanding conversation,
then you want help from someone who
understands your problem. Dan Gardner
is that person. Dan knows firsthand about
hearing loss. While serving in the U.S.
Navy in the 1960's, Dan's Oceanography
studies were abruptly halted when he
sustained a head injury with ear damage.
Since that injury, he has been passionate
about helping people hear better. Upon
discharge from the military, Dan returned
to the University of South Florida and
earned his graduate degree in audiology,
the science of hearing. The primary
mission of Gardner Audiology, Dan's
36-year-old Citrus-based company, is to
help people solve their hearing problems.
Dan addressed his hearing problem
early in life when he began wearing
hearing aids. Many Americans miss out
on a full life because they will wait up to
seven years or more before they do
something about their hearing loss. Ten
percent of the U.S. population
suffers from hearing loss.
Approximately 30 percent
of the people over the
age of 60 have hearing
problems. Almost all of
these people could hear
better with hearing aids.


Most all adults
with hearing
losses suffer ee
from
irreversible
damage to
sensory cells of
inner ear from
such causes as


noise exposure, aging,
hereditary factors, and toxic medications.
Hearing aids are the most common solution.
Over 2000 patients have participated in
Gardner Audiology Research Studies.
View videos of their experiences on
www.GardnerAudiology.com


The majority of hearing loss in adults
is a result of irreversible deterioration of
the sensory cells of the inner ear caused
by phenomenon such as noise exposure,
aging, medications, trauma, and various
hereditary factors.
Hearing loss seriously impacts
your personal and professional life
with symptoms of irritability, anger,
fatigue, stress and depression, that
slowly leads to isolation and
withdrawal. Recent research has linked
hearing loss with the progression of
Alzheimer's and dementia.
Hearing aids are the best and
sometimes the only solution for most
people
suffering
from hearing
loss.
Gardner
Audiology is
unique
because it
partners with
large
international
companies to


research consumer satisfaction with
hearing aids. Through research with
over 2000 patients, Gardner learned that
although the latest hearing aid
technology helped most of the
participants to hear better, about 35
percent did not perceive enough value
to embrace hearing aids as part of their
everyday life.
How can you decide if hearing aids
are a good value for you? You could
participate in one of Gardner's hearing
aid field studies and earn a free trial
fitting by simply sharing your
experience on a pre-and post- fit
questionnaire. You could also buy a set
of hearing aids
with a return
clause in the
purchase
agreement. The
State of Florida
protects the
consumer from
fraudulent
hearing aid
sales, but Dan
recommends


that you thoroughly read contracts and
purchase agreements.
When Dan was asked what he felt
was the most valuable advice he could
give to people considering a hearing
aid, he replied, "Consult with an
audiologist instead of a salesman,
because who you see is much more
important than the products you buy."
You can watch field study videos
and gather a wealth of information by
visiting www.gardneraudiology.com.
If you have questions about or would
like to participate in a hearing aid field
study, call Gardner Audiology at one
of these Citrus county locations.

Gardner Audiology offices
are located at:
700 SE Fifth Terrace, Suite 11
Crystal River, FL 34429
352/795-5700
and in the office of
Rama Nathan, M.D.
820 S. Bea Avenue
Inverness, FL 34452
352/419-6565


Interesting hearing loss facts:
* About 30% of Americans over the age of 60 have hearing loss.
* The Americans for Disability act protects hearing impaired from discrimination.
* There is a 65% chance that you will embrace new hearing aid technology
to solve your hearing problems.
* Both Audiologists and Hearing Aid Specialists licensed to sell hearing aids
in Florida. Audiologists are required to earn a masters or doctorate degree.
In comparison Hearing Aid Specialists need only a high school
degree or its equivalent. -


J Gardner


D Audiology

7 Locations in Tampa Bay

1-800-277-1182


G8 Tuesday, May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



Caregiver Stress You Are Not Alone


"I'm living with a stranger, who looks like my
husband."
"Before my mom died I made a promise to take care
of my dad. We never had a great relationship, but I
promised her. It's my job; no one else."
"I miss the person who raised me. Now I take care
of someone who doesn't even know my name."
All of these statements can and have been
expressed by caregivers as caring for an ill loved one
is not an easy task. Many times when someone has
an illness or disease, a family member, often a
spouse or child, steps into the role of primary
caregiver taking on the responsibilities of making
decisions and handling the everyday tasks associated
with daily living. As this is done in addition to
balancing a life of one's own, caregiver stress can
develop. The responsibility of caring for another
person is stressful in and of itself. Ensuring
medications are taken properly at the right time
and in the right amount scheduling doctor's
appointments, providing emotional support, not to


mention taking care of the everyday stresses and
issues that we all face, like paying bills and doing
housework, add up and can become too much for
one individual to handle.

Often, we encounter children and spouses that
have had to change their role as daughter, son,
husband or wife to primary caregiver. This is a very
difficult transition and can lead to tension in all
involved relationships. Countless times we speak
with families who are at their breaking point when it
comes to the care of their loved one. We want you to
know, it does not have to be this way. There are
many resources and services available to assist you
throughout this process. Some of the services that
are available include day stay programs, respite
programs, and support groups. Day stay programs
provide caregivers time during the day to take care
of tasks that may be difficult to accomplish if they
are caring for their loved one. Respite care is for
more extended periods of time, anywhere from two
days to a month. Each provides the caregiver with


some downtime and, in essence, makes the task of
providing care much less overwhelming. Support
groups are also available and can be essential for the
caregiver, as well; these groups allow the caregiver
the opportunity to talk and discuss what they are
experiencing with others who understand and can
help them develop resolutions.

Sunflower Springs and Superior Residences of
Lecanto are available to help families in need with
support services and can direct you to other support
organizations. You can reach Sunflower Springs at
352-621-8017 or Superior Residences of Lecanto at
352-746-5483. Most importantly, if you are a
caregiver we want you to know that you are not
alone and there are services available to help you in
this journey.

Theressa Foster
Senior Executive Director
Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Community
Superior Residences of Lecanto


Theressa Foster, Senior Executive Director says, "Live the Moment...Love the Moment."


Tuesday, May 1, 2012 G9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


"YOU'RE NOT JUST A PATIENT, YOU'RE A PERSON."
Suncoast Primary Care is a full service primary care facility with three locations throughout Citrus County.


One reason they are different is that at Suncoast
Primary Care, your primary care is their primary
motivation. They specialize in personalized service where
even new patients feel welcome and comfortable.
As Medical Director, Dr. Alex Villacastin explains, "We
pride ourselves in taking care of our patients (from 14 years
of age and up) like they are part of the family. We practice
modern medicine the old fashioned way. We take care of
the patient in the office, at the hospital, and through follow
up at the nursing facility for rehabilitation. This
commitment to care and follow up goes beyond the scope
of normal primary care.
Their team of physicians have hospital privileges with
both Citrus Memorial Hospital and Seven Rivers Hospital,
and include:
Alex T Villacastin, MD Board Certified in Internal
Medicine. After receiving his Doctorate at the top of his
class in the Philippines, Dr. Villacastin completed his
residency in New Jersey and relocated to Florida. He
opened Suncoast Primary Care Specialists, which is an
affiliation of West Florida Medical Associates in January
2003. Among his many notable achievements, Dr.
Villacastin was Chief of Department of Medicine at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center and has a leadership
position at Citrus Memorial Hospital, and President of the
West Florida Medical Associates.


Catherine P Sembrano-Navarro, MD Board Certified
in Family Practice. After receiving her Doctorate in the
Philippines, Dr. Sembrano-Navarro completed her
residency in Pennsylvania. She has been practicing in
Florida since 2008, and joined Suncoast Primary Care in
2009.
Carlos F Gonzalez, MD Dr. Gonzalez has been
practicing medicine for over 50 years, and was the past
Medical Director at the Crystal River Geriatric Center in
Crystal River. He was Past President of the Citrus-
Hernando County Medical Society, as well as Chief of Staff
of Seven Rivers Community Hospital for 6 years. His
practice has been at Sugarmill Medical Center since 1971.
Alistair Cyril W Co, MD Board Certified in Family
Practice Graduated at the top of his class to receive his
Doctorate in the Philippines, and then post graduate work
in Michigan as a resident physician with pediatric
rotations. Dr. Co relocated here last September to join
Suncoast Primary Care.
The team includes three highly trained and dedicated
Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners who are an asset
to the clinic and who maintain their own patient log: Maria
Villacastin, ARNP; Alexander Villacastin, ARNP; and Sheila
Villacastin, ARNP.
Suncoast Primary Care continues to develop and add
new services to better serve its patients. They are primary


care specialists, and provide pulmonary functions, EKG,
minor surgeries, x-rays, bone density testing, and chelation
therapy. They also cover women's health issues,
hypertension control, diabetes management, cholesterol
management, infection care, cardio vascular disease,
neurological disease, arthritis care and adult physical.
Most insurance providers are accepted, including:
Medicare & Medicaid, Blue Cross & Blue Shield, Freedom,
Optimum, Humana, Avmed, United, and many more.
Suncoast Primary Care is accepting new patients at this
time and offers three locations in Citrus County: Citrus
Springs, Inverness (across from Enterprise Rental Car) and
Homosassa (just north of Sugarmill subdivision). They are
aware that a first visit to a new office can often be filled with
uncertainty and many questions, and they go out of their
way to make sure your experience will be as comfortable as
possible and that your questions are answered. As a new
patient, you may want to pick up the new patient forms to
help reduce your wait time for your first appointment.
You can trust the professionals at Suncoast Primary Care
and feel confident that they will always be here for you. As
Dr. Villicastin says, "Citrus County has a close knit
community feel where people still say 'Hi' to each other, and
it is a wonderful place to raise a family". They are here in
Citrus County, and will continue to grow and provide the
best of primary care that Citrus County deserves.


Primary Care Specialists


* Lab
* EKG
* X-Ray
* Pulmonary Function


* Bone Density
* Women's Health
* Minor Procedures
* Chelation


352-382-8282


. ,- 1 ,r.., .,..rl..i- .rr r. ,


1.1D
,Ihai_ r ,':: a. ID
I .rnd Fra.i.li-


r. i ,


-. I, i i, i il:


Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy
341-5520


Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd
382-8282


Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave.
489-2486


iLc
-I ,1 l :1,7 _:1 : r.!',
r.1,


, Fr,. 1r l, h


G10 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


our Not Just a


Patetfu a Pew



-MDAAPONMNSAALBE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Renew yourself at Suncoast Dermatology


Dermatology is a medical specialty that
deals specifically with skin diseases and
conditions. Dermatologists are medical
doctors who have extensive training and
experience, as well as a passion for keeping
skin, hair, and nails healthy and vibrant,
throughout all phases of life. A
dermatologist's medical education includes
training to treat medical/health and cosmetic
concerns. At Suncoast Dermatology, our four
board certified physicians not only treat a long
list of skin conditions, including the surgical
removal of potentially deadly skin cancers;
but also use many techniques to reverse the
signs of aging and improve the skin's
appearance.
Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery
Center offers the latest treatment modalities in
the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer.
Since 1989, the physicians of Suncoast
Dermatology have continued to evolve their
practice to ensure their patients receive the
best options available to diagnose and treat
your skin. Skin cancers effect 2 million people
annually. They are the one type of cancer that
will increase in frequency as people age and
they receive more exposure to the
environment.
The most frequent types of skin cancer are
basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell
carcinomas, and melanomas. Any skin cancer
needs to be taken seriously and treated


promptly; but of these three types, melanomas
can be deadly if not treated early.
Anyone can get melanoma. It's important
to establish a regular routine for self
examination that encompasses a head to toe
assessment. This exam starts with your scalp
and goes to the bottom of your feet. Use a
hand held mirror where necessary, and take
notes. A detailed list of the existing moles and
skin lesions will help you decide if there is a
change in size or shape that needs to be seen
by the doctors at Suncoast Dermatology. This
is a good habit to develop to find melanoma
early, when it is nearly 100% curable.
When checking your skin, you should look
for the ABCDEs of melanoma:
Asymmetry. Do both halves look the
same?
Border. Is there an irregular, scalloped, or
poorly defined border?
Color. Is the color varied from one area to
another, from tan to brown to black, or
even shades of white, red or blue?
Diameter. Melanomas are usually larger
than a pencil eraser (6mm) when
diagnosed, but can be smaller.
Evolving. A mole or skin lesion that looks
different from the rest or is changing size,
shape or color.
If you see a mole or new spot on your skin
that has any of the ABCDEs, immediately
make an appointment to see the doctors at


Suncoast Dermatology. In the early stages,
melanoma may not cause any symptoms, but
sometimes melanomas will itch, bleed, or be
painful. Many melanomas have these signs
and symptoms, but not all melanomas will
display them. A common misconception
people have is that their mole or skin lesion is
normal and nothing to worry about. Be
proactive with your health and watch out for
the warning signs.
In addition to the diagnosis and treatment of
medical skin conditions, Suncoast
Dermatology offers an extensive array of Skin
Renewal and Age Management options. At
Suncoast Dermatology, it really is possible to
turn back and slow the clock, help you defy
age, gravity, and increase your confidence.
The Age Management Department at Suncoast
Dermatology specializes in normalizing
hormones, creating a healthier lifestyle through


dietary choices and routine exercise.
Additionally, they use the latest advances to
successfully treat wrinkles, sagging skin,
frown lines, age spots, spider veins, hair loss
or hair removal, and much more. Suncoast
Dermatology has licensed estheticians who can
provide facials, peels, and cosmetic
counseling. Many blemishes that occur on the
skin, such as age or brown spots, birthmarks,
wrinkles, and scars, can be eliminated or
improved by an appropriate dermatological
procedure. The Laser Center at Suncoast
Dermatology can help reduce the effects aging
has on your skin as well as promote a healthier
overall look.
For any additional information you may
have regarding skin conditions or how to
achieve a healthier, more youthful
appearance and lifestyle, contact Suncoast
Dermatology or visit our website at
www.dermatologyonline .com
There are two locations to serve you:
Allen Ridge Professional Village at 525 N.
Dacie Point (CR 491), Lecanto, FI 34461
Phone: (352) 746-2200
Timber Ridge Medical Park at 9401 S .W.
Highway 200, Ocala, FL 34481-7700
Phone: (352) 873-1500
Offices are open Monday through Friday
8:00 am. to 4:30 p.m.
Closed from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. for lunch.


Incorporating science with skin care




A Medical Approach


to cosmetic procedures


* Skin Cancer Diagnosis &
Treatment
* MOHS Micrographic Surgery
* Cosmetic/Plastic Surgery Skin
Repairs


* Growth Removal
* Chemical Peeling
* Esthetics
* Laser Surgery
* Laser Hair Removal


Age Management Medicine
Botox Therapy
Photofacial Rejuvenation
Juvederm
Obagi


"Skin Cancer is diagnosed in more than 2 million people annually"
Routine screening and early detection of skin cancer is key to treatment


Participating with
Medicare,
Blue Cross-Blue Shield PPC,
United Healthcare, Aetna,
Cigna & Humane
Board Certified American Board of Dermatology; American Socie
Surgery Member American Association of Facial Plastic and Reco
Fellow American Society for MOHS Surgery


www.dermatologyonline.com MEg

iunCORIT DERMATOLOGY

AnD /Kin SURGERY CENTER
ty for Dermatology Allen Ridge Professional Village 352-74(
nstructive Surgery 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 352-87


6-2200
3-1500


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G1il


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


Citrus Diabetes Treatment Center


& Physicians Weight Loss


"Physician, Heal Thyself..." Luke 4:23


And so he did. Eihab H. Tawfik, MD, is a
board-certified internist and trained primary
care physician, qualified to treat all areas of
health as a family physician. Dr. Tawfik has
also become a weight loss expert. His decision
to name his offices the Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center and the Citrus Physicians
Weight Loss is the result of his own health
challenges and victories. At the age of 12,
Eihab Tawfik contracted the mumps virus. As
a result, he developed Type 1 insulin-dependent
diabetes. He was told he needed five or six
insulin injections a day to control his blood
glucose levels. "There's no other way to treat
Type 1 diabetes except with insulin," Tawfik
explains. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where
the body's immune system destroys the


AFTER
August 30,2011
160 Lbs.


pancreatic cells that make insulin, the hormone
needed to regulate blood glucose. Today, Dr.
Tawfik wears an insulin pump, about the size
of a beeper, that holds three days' worth of
insulin and delivers it via a catheter placed
under the skin.
Dr. Tawfik's personal desire to find a way to
control his disease led him to studies on the
correlation between weight and insulin/blood
glucose. He was also well aware that insulin
causes weight gain, and struggled with his own
weight for most of his life. "During medical
school and my residency, it was very difficult
to lose weight," recalls Dr. Tawfik. "Once I
started practicing, I realized the importance of
controlling my weight. A patient should not
come to a weight loss center only to see a
doctor who is overweight himself."
Dr. Tawfik once weighed 220 pounds and is
now a healthy 160 pounds. He lost over 60
pounds in just the past three months following
his own protocol. As a direct result of this
weight loss, Dr. Tawfik has cut his insulin
requirements down to only one-third of what
he required previously. His work with weight
loss and diabetes has helped hundreds of
people reduce or get off their medications
completely. At least 50 percent of all clients
coming to the Center for weight loss are found
to be diabetic, and for many it was a surprise.
According to American Diabetic Association
findings, a 5-10% reduction in body weight
produced a 58% reduction in diabetes.
As a diabetic himself, Dr. Tawfik is aware
of the challenges involved with this disease and
that diabetes can affect your entire family.
Dianbete is the wventh lenadrlin cane of death


Diabetes affects 25.8 8 '
million people of all
ages 8.3 percent of -
the U S. population. 1
Among U S.
residents ages 65
years and older, 10 9
million, or 26.9
percent, had diabetes Dr. Eihab
in 2010. About
215,000 people younger than 20 years had
diabetes-type 1 or type 2-in the United
States in 2010. About 1.9 million people ages
20 years or older were newly diagnosed with
diabetes in 2010 in this country alone.
"Weight loss for diabetic patients can make
all the difference," Dr. Tawfik says. "Many of
our patients can eventually be freed for life
from insulin injections or other diabetic
medications."Dr. Tawfik's research shows that
maintaining a healthy weight and making good
food choices can keep a Type 2 pre-diabetic
condition from escalating into the disease. The
numbers for pre-diabetes are staggering: 35
percent of U.S. adults ages 20 years or older,
and 50 percent of adults ages 65 years or older.
Dr. Tawfik educates his patients on the health
benefits of maintaining a healthy weight.
Excess weight increases your risk of heart
disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and
much more. At his clinic, patients receive a
proven combination of diet, exercise, and
medication. This plan works for men and
women of all ages. Their physician-directed
weight loss programs offer strategies that are
not available to non-physician weight loss
nrcrams Thi medical weihit lons staff is


rawfik and wife Zoila Cruz


weight loss program. As Dr. Tawfik explains,
"When they come to the office for their diet
injection, we measure heart rate, blood
pressure, etc. If there is even a slight increase
in those areas compared to the last visit, a nurse
automatically puts the patient in an exam room
and it becomes a medical visit." Such
instances are rare, he stresses, but the ability to
respond to medical concerns immediately is an
important benefit of Citrus Diabetes Treatment
Center & Physicians Weight Loss.
Dr. Tawfik encourages patients to come in
for help with diabetes or weight loss, but
emphasizes that his staff is trained to provide a
full range of primary care services. The main
goal of his practice is to improve the patient's
quality of life, and to do so in a caring and
compassionate manner using the latest
advances in medical technology and
knowledge. As primary care physicians, Dr.
Tawfik's staff is trained to carefully assess a
patient's needs and determine the most
appropriate plan of care or
treatment Physician's Weight Loss and Citrus
Diabetes Treatment Center provides patients
with healthcare and testing for:
Flinhptpe/tih loodnnr Prpeiirp/Hiuh


in the United States. Diabetes is the leading committed to helping you lose weight quickly CholesterolHeart Attack/Stroke
cause of kidney failure, nontraumatic lower- and safely, but most importantly, to helping you PreventionCancer ScreeningAsthma/
limb amputations, and new cases of blindness keep the weight off long term. According to AllergiesPulmonary Function Testing
k. 1 S"" among adults in this country, as well as a major Dr. Tawfik, his patients typically lose up to ten (PFT), EKG's Holter
Cause of heart disease and stroke. Diabetes is a pounds the first week, with an average weight Monitoring Diagnostic Ultrasounds &
chronic illness with potentially serious loss in four weeks ranging between 20 and 30 Stress Testing on-siteMinor
complications including blindness, limb pounds. Dr. Tawfik is well aware of the ProceduresPhysical Exams, Routine
amputation and death. Today, many monitoring needed with diabetics as they lose Care & Screening & Much More...
complications of diabetes are preventable and weight, especially at this fast pace. A crucial Their professional staff will always be
trained physicians, like Dr. Tawfik, play a key component of his practice is monitoring prepared and available to answer your
role in preventing and controlling the disease. patients each week while they are on the questions and meet your needs.


G12 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Eihah H.Ta lu ik. MD Bnard (cerilied in Inlterna.l -ditinet- I)i.allt-ls E\pt-rl

Diabetes Care
Type I & Type II
ilni Pumpn Initlitn N~ll-mIilleiienl ,/ Tiej-llenIl ~i Si ieenilill
ellen it rleli,-l \\eight Lo,, Progrdm Of DiAbete, \JL,. llr Co'll i.l-ti'.iin,
lelleloinil & & Ner\e D-Im1-1.2e
ilesterio Trej-inent / \\Wnild C(ire i-nid MNlihi rMnre...


Urn-


GET YOUR CURVES BACK
Our medical \\ eight loss phls\ 1icians \\ill cIustom ililoi
a plan for \ou that \\ ill help \ou lose L eight quickly\
anld safel\ aInd keep the eightgt off loni term.
/Lose 15 to 25 pounds your first month
/ Lower y our risk of leatrt disease. diabetes.
high blood pressure and more
/A proven combination of diet. exercise .-Ind
medicationll
/ Receive a 1 month supply alnd a\\ welcomee kit
v\\hen \Ou sign up
,/Plans for NMen and \\omen of all ages


~JI


// /

"^.
sa


EIHAB H. TAWFIK, MD
BOARD CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE
WEIGHT LOSS EXPERT

352-564-0444 L AS


L739 W. Gulf to Lak Hwy Crsa ieF*42 08-1CotzBv.rosilF 41


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


%% % i.ailruidiallde real tminetcoilli






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT





SWEET



DREAMS


Finally, a solution to sleepless nights due to snoring


Do you snore or have any of the
following symptoms when you sleep? Are
you irritable or have memory loss? Do
you grind your teeth at night, or wake up
gasping or choking? When you go to sleep
do you frequently wake or are you restless?
Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a life
threatening disorder affecting over 18
million Americans.
OSA can affect anyone at any age. Risk
factors include male gender, being
overweight, being over the age of forty,


have a large neck size (17 inches or greater
in males, 16 inches or greater in women),
have GERD, allergies, sinus problems, a
deviated septum, and large tonsils, or a
large tongue.
There are serious risks of OSA that can
be life threatening including increased risk
of stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes,
poor memory and other cognitive
impairments, male impotence and
decreased sex drive, headaches, ADHD,
GERD, atrial fibrillation and even death.


If you have been diagnosed with OSA or
think you may have OSA, please contact
Dental Sleep Solutions in Inverness.
Dental Sleep Solutions offers dental
appliances to patients who have been
diagnosed with sleep apnea and/or cannot
tolerate wearing a CPAP machine, as well
as those who may not have sleep apnea but
snoring is affecting their everyday sleep.
DSS dentist's have been specially trained
and are part of a group that's sole purpose is
to provide an alternative to a CPAP machine


or sleep apnea.
and help improve people's health by making
it easier to breathe better during sleep.
They work in conjunction with
physicians like family, internists,
cardiologists, neurologists, and
pulmonologists to treat patients with sleep
apnea and reduce the risks of multiple
medical conditions that are life threatening.
Dental Sleep Solutions is located at 2333
Forest Drive, Inverness. Office hours are
Monday through Thursday 8:00 a m. to
5:00 p.m. Call (352) 726-2849.


Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is a life threatening disorder
affecting over 18 million Americans. 40% ofAmericans snore and 40%
of snorers have OSA with no signs or symptoms of the disease.

Serious repercussions /consequences of untreated OSA include:
* o
* Increased risk of stroke Headaches
* Increased high blood pressure Increased risk of motor vehicle accidents
* Increased incidence of atrial fibrillation Increase in Gastrointestinal Reflux
* Increased risk of diabetes Disease (GERD)
* Poor memory and other cognitive impairments Increase in ADHD in children


* Male impotence and decreased sex drive


* Death


21
Dental Sleep Solutions' offersfi-ee sleep screening and consultations.
Give us a call today! 877 95-SNORE ooxK

6* =Z1U111111 A11 piS' I


G14 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Local Compounding Pharmacy Meeting


The Individual Needs Of Each Patient


The Snyder Pharmacy, formerly known
as Custom Meds, is an independently
owned, highly specialized compounding
pharmacy that has been operating since
April 1985. For almost 30 years, they
have specialized in compounding
medications for various pharmaceutical
needs, including veterinary, pediatric,
bio-identical hormone replacement,
dermatology, erectile dysfunction and
many others with their niche lying in
topical pain relief. They can also add
flavors, colors and fragrances to most
prescriptions to further meet patients'
needs or desires. The Snyder Pharmacy
is known for "Creating Custom Meds" -
customizing medications to meet the
specific needs of individual patients.

Some unique services and products
that set them apart from other pharmacies
include unique delivery systems, patient
specific formulas, patient follow-ups and
recommendations. Topical pain relief


offers numerous advantages to traditional
oral medications. For example, because
a cream or gel
can deliver relief
directly to the
site of pain,
minimal
absorption into
the bloodstream
occurs producing
fewer side
effects, if any at
all, as well as
reducing the I
possibility of
adverse drug
interactions and
organ toxicity.
Furthermore,
topical formulations are non-addictive!
While The Snyder Pharmacy offers a few
proprietary formulas to treat pain, any
formula can be tailored to the specific
symptoms of each individual patient. One


of the most beneficial services The
Snyder Pharmacy provides is a clinical
evaluation of
The nt each patient by
o pain v esfrom their on-site
nurse to
an Snyder Pcal determine if the
condirtn. Bilcausl patient is
receiving the
fullest benefit
unqu, The Snyr from the topical
CenterfPin compound he or
Pharmacology c.an she was
I aid in cti prescribed. Once
and erftng ay the follow-up is
p.i., completed, the
trapy.regimen. nurse and
pharmacist will
make a
recommendation regarding treatment to
the patient's doctor.

The Snyder Pharmacy will make every
effort to bill the patient's insurance


carrier. They are also willing to work
with low income patients and Medicare
recipients.

As a staff, they make every effort to
make sure each patient is knowledgeable
in their own treatment plan in order to
obtain the optimal result, and above all is
treated with courtesy and care. By
building a relationship with their patients
and continually monitoring each patient's
progress, The Snyder Pharmacy ensures
that they will continue to provide a
valuable service to this area.

The Snyder Pharmacy is located at 102
E. Highland Blvd. in Inverness, FL
34452. Phone: 352-341-1212

Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. Monday through Friday


Creating Custom Medications


The Snyder Pharmacy specializes in compounding
topical pain relief gels and creams that offer numerous
advantages to traditional oral pain relievers.
Topical pain treatment bypasses the stomach and the
bloodstream, providing concentrated medication that
will not upset your stomach, react with other
medications or cause drowsiness. There are NO
known side effects or adverse reactions. Our
compounded topical pain relief formulas are used to
treat multiple ailments not limited to CRPS, post
herpetic neuralgia, neuropathies, sprains, strains,
arthritis, neck and back pain, stiffness, swelling,
repetitive use injuries and other various sports injuries.
Call our pharmacy today to see if we can help heal
your pain.


I


-w S^


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Vision changes



as you age


Are you experiencing blurry vision or

just can't see as well as you used to?


Changes in your vision can affect the
quality of life as you grow older. These
changes could be could be caused by a cata-
ract or an eye condition called presbyopia.
CATARACTS are a normal part of the
aging process, but can also be from an
injury or from long-term use of steroid
medications. Diabetes, smoking and
long-term exposure to sunlight can also
cause cataracts.
A cataract is when the natural lens of
the eye becomes cloudy, when things
begin to look yellowish or even foggy.
Seeing through a
cloudy lens is like
SIGNS OF looking through a
CATARACTS: fogged-up window.
R The lens in the eye
Blurry vision works similar to a
Difficulty camera lens; the
driving or crystalline lens
driving or focuses the light
seeing at that enters the eye
night as it travels to the
Difficulty retina. Vision
becomes blurry or
viewing a dark and colors
computer become dull.
screen Cataracts usually
o Colors appear affect people over
dimandfaded the age of 60, and
are the leading
Frequent cause of treatable
change vision loss in adults.
in glasses The good news is
cataract surgery is
prescription one of the safest,
o Glare or halOS easiest and most
around lights commonly per-
Difficulty formed surgical pro-
cedure with over 15
reading, million each year.
especially Innovative tech-
in low light nology has provided
patients with a


choice to choose a lens implant that
meets their specific vision needs and
can possibly reduce or eliminate the
need for glasses.
At the Suncoast Eye Center, cataracts
are treated with the most advanced sur-
gical procedure available: small inci-
sion, no-stitch surgery. Both Dr. Seigel
and Dr. Freedman remove the clouded
natural lens of the eye and replace it
with an advanced, premium artificial
lens implant of your choice.
Surgery is often timed so that one eye
has adequate vision while the surgical
eye heals.


There's a

Lensfor

Every

Lifestyle

vides excellent


STANDARD LENS this
lens gives you sharp
distance vision, but
glasses are needed
for closer objects.
TORIC LENS this lens is
best for patients with
a high degree of
astigmatism, it pro-
distant vision but will


often require the need for glasses for
near and mid range distance activities.
BLENDED VISION this will give you a greater
range of vision without the need for
glasses. This is also known as MONO VISION;
your dominant eye is for distance and the
non-dominant eye is for near vision.
MULTIFOCAL LENSES this unique lens is
proven to provide excellent vision at
near, intermediate and far distances
without the use of glasses; under all
lighting conditions day or night.
The multifocal lens procedure is per-
formed worldwide and is recognized for
its safety and predictability. The beauty
of using this type of lens is that it relies
on the eyes working together, as they
are designed to do. By having both
eyes processing all visual information in


t


*^r






condition II all

rb. Bo ,th


c s


the same way, the multifocal lens gives
people natural vision at all distances,
much like they had in their youth.
Medicare and most insurance plans
pay for the standard cataract procedure,
but there is an out-of-pocket expense to
cover the cost of the premium lenses and
customization involved.
Both Dr. Seigel and Dr.
Freedman will explain SIGNS OF
the advantages and dis- PRESBYOF
advantages of all lens
implant options avail- Loss of ab
able, and the particular up close
procedure which is most e Difficulty'v
suitable for your needs.
PRESBYOPIA is a computer
common age-related Need read
condition. Usually or bifocals
beginning around the Holding o
age of 40, the natural g
lens hardens and away to re
becomes less flexible so Decreasei
it becomes difficult to for near o
see objects in the dis- e Eyestrain
tance and up close
w Headache
without glasses.


Tests to determine presbyopia may
include the examination of the retina, a
muscle integrity test, refraction test, slit-
lamp test, or visual acuity.
According to the U.S National
Library of Medicine, there is no cure for
presbyopia, but it can be
corrected with glasses or
contact lenses.
Adding bifocals to an
'IA: existing lens, or changing
ilityto read an already existing bifocal
prescription can correct this
problem in many cases;
viewing a new surgical procedures
screen can also provide solutions
ing glasses in others.
IF CATARACTS or
PRESBYOPIA are affecting
objects further your quality of life, now is
ad the time to talk to your eye
d focusing ability doctor, at SUNCOAST EYE
objects CENTER, and find out your
best option. Call today to
schedule your evaluation.
1-800-282-6341.


)
i

q

:l
S
b
3
d


G16 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


When Experience Counts Most...
Board Certified Ophthalmologists
LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D. ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D.
Optometrist, DR. GEORGE KAPLAN
Established 1982
221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-2526 800-282-6341


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G17


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Caring is my Profession"

FAMILY PRACTICE
Diabetes !
High Blood Pressure :
High Cholesterol
Minor Emergencies
Dr. Pablo Figueroa
ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Dr e abla Fspae


INVERNESS

FAMILY PRACTICE
Serving Citrus County Since 1993
2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness
Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633
ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com


Are you one of the one-third of adults
in the United States that have high blood
pressure and high cholesterol? What
about the 25.8 million children and adults
in the U.S. who have diabetes?
There are a number of medical prob-
lems that can develop throughout your
life. Without proper medical attention
they can lead to more severe medical
problems.
Many health conditions
have no symptoms. Because FOCUS
of this, damage to your body
can occur over time includ- PREVI
ing damage to the heart,
blood vessels, kidneys, and A
other parts of your body.
That's why you need to PRII
see a physician who cares
and can work with you and
find the best ways to find and CAF
treat these medical con-
ditions before they do irre- PATI
versible damage.
"Caring is my profession," says Dr.
Pablo Figueroa of Inverness Family
Practice.
Dr. Figuero attended medical school at
the University of Illinois at Chicago


Are you


at risk?
College of Medicine and graduated in
1989.
He continued his training at Kaleida
Health System, Buffalo General Hospital.
Dr. Pablo Figueroa opened his
Inverness office October 13, 1993 and has
been located there ever since.
Figueroa's family practice provides sta-
bility and dependability in the services he


ING ON

MENTION

ND

M1ARY

E OF

IENTS


provides. His focus is for
the prevention and primary
health care of his patients.
Services include treatment
for diabetes, high blood
pressure, high cholesterol,
minor emergencies, as well
as many other types of gen-
eral medical care.
Inverness Family Practice
is "In Network" with Blue
Cross/Blue Shield and are
preferred providers. Other
private insurances are also
welcome. Please call the


office for more details and verification of
availability. Se Habla Espahol. Same day
appointments are available and walk-ins
are always welcome.
Inverness Family Practice is located at
2222 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FI 34453.
SiinC h i',L .i.i i iCil ".iX, iiiII ..,-i [n .d ,

S ',.ll 5 .',,11


G18 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WeA re Comfort Keep's


Our family
Sis here
to give comfort
to your family.
,,,, l,..,,,d \,,,,.,, I OfficeManager,
,, I ,,J,,,,1-d.... Idmn inistrator







1W4- I
k I
I?" 3


Gailen, Jennifer
& Lindsey
discussing
quality care.
Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner,
Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison,
Lindsey Arthur, Administrator-Owner
II


Marlene &
Deborah
I will help you
when you call.
1 .h,e,,,h s;.l., riffice Manager
/I. i i,, 1.. R ,R I/. Executive Sec.


Kooporq
Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888

In-Home Care Services that help people
maintain full and independent lives


* Companionship
* Meal Preparation
* Laundry
* Light Housekeeping
* Medication Reminders


* Escort for Shopping and
Doctor's Appointments
* Bathing and
Incontinence Care
* Alzheimer's/Dementia Care


4 Hy. 44 WIn s FL-4

.0F wwwenorericsivene sfloid.com


Paid Advertisement


In home care for


longer, healthier, and


more purposeful life


Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes
in-home care to a new level. Since the
business opened in 2004, their mission
has been to transform day-to-day
caregiving into opportunities for
meaningful conversation and activities
that engage and enrich the lives of
seniors physically, mentally, socially and
emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that
the practice of "Interactive Care-
giving'"' contributes to longer, healthier,
more purposeful lives for seniors.
Comfort Keepers caregivers are well
trained, professional caregivers who are
set apart by their natural gift of caring for
others. To work with Comfort Keepers,
caregivers must pass stringent screening
and interviewing processes and must
show a strong devotion to others.
Only a few special people who pass
this process go on to complete the
training necessary to deliver this special
brand of care and become Comfort
Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass
extensive background checks that exceed
both state and franchise requirements and
also must complete continuing education.
In-home care is a growing need for
seniors who desire to stay in their own
homes with familiar surroundings, but
can no longer take care of the necessary
requirements of the home. Sometimes,
all that is needed is a little assistance to
enable a senior to stay in their own home
and function safely for many more years.
Whether it is only a few hours a week,
or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at
Comfort Keepers make it possible for
seniors to continue to live in their own
home and enjoy a quality of life that they
thought was going to change forever.
This care reinforces seniors self value by
allowing them to continue their daily
activities with as much independence as
possible. The focus is providing solutions
for the normal transition of aging.


In order to achieve the most favorable
outcome for each client, Comfort
Keepers carefully matches caregivers and
clients by personalities, interests, skills
and needs. This extra consideration
forms the basis of strong, healthful
relationships. Comfort Keepers Care
Coordinators work as partners with our
client's family to provide their loved one
a complete in-homecare solution to
promote independent living.
Comfort Keepers provides
companionship and assistance through:
Meal Preparation
Laundry & Linen Washing
Light Housekeeping
Grooming & Dressing Support
Errand Services
Bathing & Hygiene Care
Grocery Shopping
Respite Care
Transportation
Alzheimer's/Dementia Care
All Comfort Keepers caregivers are
employees of the company and not
independent contractors. All of our
caregivers are bonded and covered with
Worker's Compensation and Liability
Insurance.
Comforts Keepers is locally-owned
and family operated by Deborah and
Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey
Arthur. Comfort Keepers is actively
involved in the community and
participates and sponsors local
organizations like, Chamber of
Commerce, Womens Business Alliance,
Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business
Masters and various health expos.
For in-depth information about
Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at
www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com
or stop by the local office at 2244
Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida.
Phone: 352-726-4547


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G19


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


We've got the prescription

If you're looking for great articles about health and
wellness, there's no better place to find them except in
our Tuesday Health Section. Each week you'll find a
: - variety of articles written by local doctors.


1 CITRUS COUNTY
CHwww.chroNICleonline.com
www.chronicleonline.com


G20 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Companionship Y

* Meal Preparation .,

* Med Reminder -W'

* Housekeeping

* Personal Care ,

* Shopping/ /

Errands



To you, it's about making

the right choice.

To us, it's personal.





Homei'nstead


u-fo Ztr PelflwlKM


Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

352-249-1257

4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto

www.homeinstead.com/671
HCS230036 HHA299993253


Paid Advertisement



There's No Place Like Home


According to a recent AARP study, 85% of
older Americans intend to remain in their homes
after retiring. In this community, 78% of adults
who do live in their own homes and are in need of
long-term care depend on family and friends as
their only source of help.
The local franchise of Home Instead Senior
Care in Lecanto, was opened five years ago by a
fourth generation Citrus County resident, Carolyn
Quintanilla, who saw the need for the services and
wanted to be involved with a company that makes
a difference to the seniors in this community.
Taking on the role as a family caregiver is an
important one, and Home Instead Senior Care
knows how difficult it can be to make the decision
to get outside help.
Loved ones and other
family members rely Hom e
on your help and the Home
demands can be great.
As the primary
caregiver, not only do
you deserve an
occasional break, but -0 ,,f, & _r
it's essential that you
have the opportunity to recharge your own
batteries and enjoy your own life. It's crucial to
take the time to care for yourself in order for you
to continue to handle the challenges of this
daunting responsibility.
Home Instead Senior Care was created to
help seniors remain safely in the comfort of their
own home and to provide support to the family
and friends who love them and care for them. All
of the CAREGivers"s are thoroughly screened,
extensively trained, insured and bonded, and
matched to the client's preferences.
Sometimes all that's needed for a senior to
remain in their home is a little companionship or
help with daily chores. Other situations might
require overnight care or an escort to doctor's
appointments. Whether it is just a few hours a
week or 24-hour home care, Home Instead Senior
Care provides professional CAREGivers"s who
take the time to get to know each client and tailor
care for their individual needs.
It is a difficult decision to turn over some of
the care for your loved one. Caregivers need to
ask themselves some probing questions. What is
your biggest concern regarding your aging loved
one? Are you worried about caring for them
while also keeping up with the needs of your own
life? Are you making compromises in your life
due to your responsibilities as a caregiver? What
do you need to help create balance in your life?
What do you need to feel confident that your
loved one can remain safely at home?
Home Instead Senior Care can be the
perfect match for your loved one a connection to
compassionate and reliable, non-medical
assistance. They provide everything for your
loved one that you would do and more, giving you
confidence that they are cared for and safe...


whether you live across the country or just across
town.
Home Instead Senior Care is available
around the clock, every day of the year and
includes everything from companionship, meal
preparation, light housekeeping, medication
reminders, shopping and errands to continual care
and also trained Alzheimer's care. The
CAREGiverssM of Home Instead Senior Care are
ready to step in with care and concern for your
loved one's needs so you can get away for any
reason. Whether you need to shop, attend an
event, go to church, get some exercise or just have
lunch with a friend, their respite care services
allow you to relax and enjoy, knowing your
family member is well
cared for in your
h stead absence. Their respite
wonderful solution
When you go on
vacation, travel for the
holidays, or attend an
e/vTU tiaz out-of-town event such
as a wedding or
reunion. While respite care can't change the
situation, it can help you maintain a sense of well
being and significantly improve your ability to
deal with the situation, while ensuring that your
loved one is receiving the best of care.
If you are dealing with a loved one with
Alzheimer's, studies have shown that the best
place for a person with memory loss is in familiar
surroundings. The American Society on Aging has
recognized Home Instead as the Small Business of
the Year for it's exclusive CAREGiver"s training
program designed by the world-renowned experts
of The George G. Glenner Alzheimer's Family
Center. This program and other professionally
developed and recognized Alzheimer's care
training programs provide CAREGivers" with the
latest in Alzheimer's education and dementia care
techniques, so you can be assured your loved one
is with a trusted professional.
Home Instead Senior Care works very hard
to keep rates as affordable as possible. Rates for
individuals for Companionship, Home Helper and
Personal Care Services are per hour, depending on
the services needed. Service can be arranged for
as little as 3 consecutive hours in a day or up to 24
hours per day, seven days a week, including
holidays and weekends. Some insurance policies
may cover certain in-home services. Please call
the office to see if your insurance benefits include
this type of coverage.

Home Instead Senior Care
is located at 4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-249-1257
www.homeinstead.com/671


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G21


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ip



r







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Why you should only buy hearing aids



from a hearing healthcare professional.

Thanks to modem medicine and many other contributing factors, people are a -
living longer than ever before. While this increased longevity is great news,
it does come with some side effects like a pronounced increase in people '
with hearing loss.I


Hearing loss is increasing.
Statistics show us that hearing loss already affects
nearly one out of every five American adults.
Statistics also tell us that the number increases along
with age. Thus, it only makes sense that as more
people live longer, more people with hearing loss
are seeking help.
Hearing aids are a proven solution.
Where there is increased demand, there usually is
increased supply. And sure enough, from the
Internet to retail stores to local insurance providers,
there are now more places than ever to purchase
hearing aids.
Where you get hearing aids is important
But buyer beware. There is no one-size-fits-all
solution to hearing loss. Just as every person is
unique, every hearing loss and hearing need is
unique, too. To ensure you get a hearing aid that's
custom-fit to your precise needs and lifestyle, it's
always recommended that you consult a hearing
healthcare professional. He or she may find other
health-related issues that could be causing your
hearing loss.
Always consult a hearing
healthcare professional
The Better Hearing Institute (BHI), a non-profit
center for hearing advocacy, recently published a
consumer warning about "do-it-yourself" hearing

If you or your loved one:
* Fi':EQuentl, .-s.k .::,tIeiS ti::,
repeo.:t thernmiel.es
Tiiin the T%'. up Ici t,::- he,-i it
H,.2:. .:r:1trilut, he Inn.

Schedule a FREE screening with a
hearing healthcare professional today


care, stating, "hearing devices that are purchased
over-the-counter or Internet without the consultation
of a hearing healthcare professional may result in the
devices not being accurately customized to the
specific hearing needs of the individual."
Hearing solutions should
be custom-fit to you.
Today's best hearing aids are precision instruments
utilizing advanced digital '.i .. i. ii _...i ,,,and
should be customized to fit your specific hearing
loss and your unique lifestyle needs. Which hearing
aids are right for you depend on a variety of
important and unique factors, including:
* The nature and severity of your hearing loss
* Your eyesight and dexterity
* The size and shape of your outer and inner ear
* The types of activities you enjoy
* Cosmetic concerns

Did you know?

1 o 1eogcje people \\oit
fil e to se\ en \ ecr's bet\i een
first expternencingc heoringc loss
on,. octuoll getting help fcu it

Hearing healthcare professionals
make a difference.
Only an experienced hearing healthcare professional
has the training and state-of-the-art equipment
needed to inspect your ear canal, accurately measure
your hearing loss, assess your unique needs, and fit
you with hearing aids that take all this important and
unique information into account.
One size does NOT fit all.
Sergei Kochkin, Executive Director of the BHI
reiterates this point, writing in his published
warning, "The process requires a complete in-


person hearing assessment in a sound booth, the
training and skills of a credentialed hearing
healthcare professional in order to prescriptively fit
the hearing aids using sophisticated computer
programs; and appropriate in-person follow-up and
counseling. This is not possible when consumers
purchase one-size-fits-all hearing aids over the
Internet or elsewhere."
Get the most out of your investment.
Hearing aids purchased without the consultation or
advice of a hearing healthcare professional risk
doing more damage than good to both your
confidence and your wallet. That's because hearing
aids purchased without help from an expert might


not sound good, might not work well, and probably
won't be hearing aids you'll want to wear.
Let P.H.C. help you hear better.
For over 29 years, the hearing healthcare
professionals at P.H.C. have helped Citrus County
residents improve their hearing and quality of life
- by providing the in-person, customized services
that the Better Hearing Institute recommends, all in
a warm and friendly environment.
Call today to schedule a free consultation with
one of our hearing healthcare professionals.
* FREE hearing screening
* FREE otoscopic ear examination
* FREE technology demonstration
* FREE 2-week risk-free trial
* 0% Financing


Call 352-726-4327

to schedule a FREE
personalized hearing
screening today


Ve L P. H. C.

Professional Hearing Centers
"Reconnecting Your Life"

211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34452 352-726-4327 DennyinglerHAS
Rivera, HAS www.nvernessHearin.comDenny Dioprothoogier, HAS
Valerie Rivera, HAS www.InvernessHearing.com Audioprosthologist


G22 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISING








Reconnect your /



life through V,



better hearing L


At Professional Hearing Centers,
we're helping you reconnect your life
through better hearing and celebrate
the sounds of life.
Owners Denny and Bonnie Dingler
work, live and play
right here in beautiful
Citrus County.
Audioprosthologist,
Denny Dingler, has
worn hearing devices
for over 40 years and
Denny Dingier understands the chal-
Audioprosthologist lenges his patients face.
Denny also teaches in the industry and
has served on numerous boards and com-
mittees including the State Licensing
Board of Hearing Aid Specialists. He has
also authored numerous articles and co-
authored a textbook.
At Professional Hearing Centers, the
staff believes an educated patient is a
satisfied patient and that your satisfac-
tion is 100% guaranteed or it won't
cost you a dime.
Their comprehensive testing ensures
they understand your unique level of
hearing loss.
The dispenser will ask you ques-
tions designed to uncover the specific
types of situations where you may be
having difficulty in hearing.
Additional diagnostic screenings such


000B75S


as the pure tone hearing test, speech
and noise tests allow us to recommend
the best solutions to help optimize
your ability to hear.


1. Do you have difficulty hearing in
noisy restaurants?
D yes E no D sometimes
2. Do people sound like they are
mumbling?
D yes E no D sometimes
3. Do you have difficulty
understanding speech on the
telephone?
D yes D no D sometimes
4. Can you understand men better
than women and children?
D yes D no D sometimes
5. Do you seem to hear better out
of one ear better than the other?
D yes D no D sometimes


Because they work with the best
manufacturers they are able to provide
you with state-of-the-art hearing aids.
In addition to Denny Dingler's


6. Do yo have difficulty hearing someone
who is speaking in a whisper?
D yes D no [ sometimes
7. Do you find yourself turning up the
volume on the TV?
D yes D no [ sometimes
8. Do your family members make
comments about your ability to
hear?
D yes D no D sometimes
9. Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?
D yes D no D sometimes
10. Have you been or are you frequently
exposed to loud noises?
D yes D no D sometimes


experience and focus, other members
of Professional Hearing Center's team
include Valerie Rivera, a licensed
Hearing Aid Specialist; Bonnie
Dingler, co-owner and office manager,
Bonnie Willette and Jenifer Epler,
Patient Coordinators. Together, their
experience gives you the confidence
to take the first steps toward better
hearing.
Patients often remark at the thor-
oughness of the testing done, the com-
prehensive use of equipment and
patient counseling to achieve great
hearing results.
The PHHA program includes
FREE BATTERIES for the LIFE of
your hearing devices, four-year war-
ranty, free reprogramming for the life
of the device, free cleaning and
adjustments, quarterly and annual
checks and hearing screenings, and live
demonstrations.
Exact fittings and programming is
guaranteed and exceptional follow-up
care gives you ongoing, personalized
customer service.
Professional Hearing Centers is
located at 211 South Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FI 34452. Office hours are
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to
12:00 p m., and from 1:00 p m. to 4:30
pm. Call 352-726-4327 for more
information.


HEARING QUIZ


If you answered "YES" or "SOMETIMES" to any of these questions,
you may be suffering from hearing loss. Call (352) 726-4327 today
to schedule an appointment for your hearing evaluation.


Tuesday May 1, 2012 G23


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


At Citrus Memorial,
our highly skilled
surgeons, physicians and
nurses provide superior heart
care that is high-tech and high touch.
For nearly a decade, our dedicated state-
of-the-art Heart and Vascular Center has
provided the most comprehensive cardiovascular
care in Citrus County with a proven record for
exceptional care and excellent outcomes. From our
Chest Pain Center and Cardiovascular Cath Labs
to the county's only Heart Surgery Program, all
right here and close to home when you need CitrUS
most!


HERE WHEN YOU




Intrrwuentional Cardilov Inrasive CardioloNg
Pictured first cohann (left to right)-
Srinivas Attanti, MD; Stephen Stark, MD; Hari Kannam, MID Suman Pasupuleti, MD; t
Stanley Williams, MD Ralph Abadier, MD; Gisela Trigo, MD; Javier Gonzalez, MD;
Mohammad Ansari, MD General Cardiology


Pictured second row (left to nrrghtl:
Bose Manyam, MD; Luis Delfin, MD; Dennis Walker, MD
Pictured third row
Peter Yung Kim, MD


502 West Highland Boulevard
Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com
heartofcitrus.com


NEED CITR
Register for a FREE
Heart Center tour today
by calling 352.344.6952.
You'll see for yourself why
HealthGrades, an independent
healthcare ratings organization,
awarded the Patient Care
Excellence Award to Citrus
Memorial last year and why the
area's top cardiologists choose
CitrUS for their patients.


CITRUS MEMORIAL

VHeart
& VASCULAR CENTER


OOOB7G1


G24 Tuesday May 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cardiovascular i&
Thomracic Surgery